The East Carolinian, March 24, 1988







COMING TUESDAY
SRA elections are next week. Look for candidate
profiles Tuesday
ENTERTAINMENT
Just who is this Pantana Bobs guy? See page 8.
SPORTS
Campbell hands the Pirates another loss. See page 15.
She
(Earoltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 o. 4(
Thursday, March 24,1988
Greenville, N(
14 Pages
Circulation 1? �
Murphy, Jones get most votes on first tally
Run-off scheduled for two weeks from now
Bj TIM HAMPTON
Assistant .rw ditot
id one of the SGA execu-
tive elections are complete but
run off elections between presi
dential candidates Larrv Murphy
and Greg Thompson and
presidential candidates Kelly
Jonesand SteveSommers must be
: to decide the winner of the
respective positions.
ie run off elections will be
held on Wednesday April 6.
Murphy received 47.3 percent
of the vote while Thompson held
25 percent of the electorate. The
bottom two candidates, Amar
Singh finished with 16 percent ot
the vote and Michael Bartlctt with
11 percent will not be eligible
the run off elections.
Ot the vice president) . idi-
dat - received 49.75
per nmers
k 32 percent of the b
aid after the results
re tallied that he would basi-
with the same cam-
paign. Thompson said that in the
run off election he will clear up
tnce at
several campus committees was
lax.
In answering critism that he has
missed many meetings in the past
to the Media Board and Student
Union Board of Directors, Th-
ompson said while he was the
president ot the Minority Student
Organization last year the organi-
w as not r� zed by the
- ;a
Thompson said that during his
adminstration as president oi the
MSO, the SGA did not pass the
MSO constitution nor appropri-
ated funds to the minority group.
He said that when campaigning
for the run off elections he would
clear up these items he feels are
misconceptions.
Murphy said he w ill emphasize
his strongest qualities which in-
clude his leadership ability. "If 1
got 4 percent, i think that people
hear what 1 have to say. 1 don't
think 1 will change any of my plat-
form Murphv said.
Before the run off elections in
two weeks, Murphy said he
would like to address students
living in the dormitories and stu-
dents of the arts. Murphy feels
that he did not campaign hard
enough with the art students or
dorm students
Onto the vice presidential race,
candidate Steve Sommers feels
that he will have to change his
campaign tactics to emphasis his
stand on student rights and his
track record. 1 Ie said as president
' Students for Economic Democ-
racy, he has seen the group grow
from a small organization into
c with 40 members.
lie said his campaign for
Wednesday's election centered
on theissues while his opposition,
mainly Kelly (ones, campaigned
on her past experience and "her
love for people he said.
Sommers said he still feels that
dorm residence rights are being
violated by Residence Advisers
and Campus Security, who Som
mers said may enter any dorm
room without a search warrant.
Sommers also feels that the stu-
dent store did a great disservice to
students when it ended the com
puter section oi the store. Som
mers said that Kelly lones was on
the Student Store Advisory
Committee when the store pulled
out the computer section which
allowed students to purchase
computers and pay for them after
they graduate.
Sommers said he thought his
student-teacher evaluation plan
would pull a lot oi voters in his
favor. "1 thought it would be lit
big prize which the voters w
receive if they voted for me
Sommers said about the eva
ation plan which enlists a n
i omprehensive test than the (
i ng evaluations and propi
the SGA publish the results.
Sommers said as Vice Presi
: recruit students
in true campus beauti-
iti u - rather than resume
who claimed 49
nt ol the ballots (just .6 per-
being elected), said
thinks the election rules
inged so that the
� ceivesthepolar-
would then be des-
n you should win.
� lections are set up,
ke it hard on the
' ' th students
ir about it again
' - ��� v become apa-
election process
� ' hoed Joi - senti-
the elections rules.
uld win. If elected
uld push for a
A group of students crowded around the polling booth outside of the Student Store Wednesday
preparing to vote for SGA offices. A runoff election will be held April 6. (Hardy Allegood - Photolab)
: would set a certain
win by. The runoffs
� . u id more time
Murj v said
said that she has cam-
paigned on her record because
she feels her record is indicative of
what she would achieve as vice
sident. Of her opponent Som-
mers, she said his ideas arc so
: � that, lie should run
-s instead of the SGA
irphy said the added election
away from school
I is the real reason we
r
Dropout rate first priority for Bob Jordan
By TIM HAMPTON
sfl ant News Edit
In a speech in Greenville
. - lay, North Carolina guber-
rial candidate Bob iordan
the dropout rate ol North
hna high school students
re a disease it would be an
lemic. As governor, ordan
said he would institute the euro
� r the drop-out epidemic.
In front of Greenville's Wahl-
ites school, Lt. Gov. Jordan
said that presently one out of four
students dropout from high
olsin North Carolina. "With-
i ut a high school diploma people
i ant succeed in today's world
Jordan said about theissue, which
he feels should be the first priority
oi the next governor.
"We can't be content with
education, this is not a time to sit
still and stick with the status quo
iordan said concerning what he
terms a crisis in North Carolina
schools.
Jordan's plans of attack on
the dropout issue include raising
the number oi guidance counsel-
ors in the high schools, improving
the technical aspects of the high
schools, and enacting a require-
ment which would make obtain-
ing a driver's license an incentive
to staying in school.
By increasing the number of
high school counselors to one to
every 40 students in jeopardy of
dropping out, Jordan said these
students would have one on one
tutoring necessary to keep them
in school. Oi the projected cost of
$7.6 million for increasing the
counseling, Jordan said it would
be a good investment in North
Carolina's future.
As governor, he would insti-
tute a 'tech prep' program to
strengthen the link between high
schools and community colleges.
Jordan said by blending academ-
ics with technical skills, students
interested in techinal careers
would be encouraged to stay in
school.
On the driver's license incen-
tive requirement, Jordan pro-
poses to allow no student under
the age of 18 to be able to take the
license exam if they are not in
good academic standing with
their high school.
Also, Jordan said that drivers
education training should only be
offered to students who are good
standing and are still enrolled in
school. He said the requirement
would be phased in over a two
year period.
Iordan said that he and Gov.
Jim Martin have had many battles
concerni ng education. He said the
democrat-supported Basic Edu-
cation Program passed in 1985
despite Martin's opposition to the
legislation. As lt. governor, Jor-
dan said he has kept his
committment to increasing edu-
cation spending while Martin has
proposed tax cuts which would
have decreased spending on edu
cation.
On higher education, Jon
said, "One of the major goals is t i
keep tuitions low, recognize the
salaries of professors. As individ-
institutions, I believe we
e strength to what is
needed by the institution
Addressing questions about
a s rtt made last week in
See JORDAN, page 3
Greenville's Mayor Ed Carter
works to be best ever in the job
By DEN A BOYETTE
Staff Writer
Since taking office in December,
Mayor Ed Carter claims he has
been trying to be "the best mayor
that Greenville has had
In a recent interview, Carter
said he sees growth and many
upcoming developments not only
in the future for Greenville, but
for the university as well.
There have been two retreats,
one in Greenville and one in
Emerald Isle, in which the mayor,
the city council members, the city
manager and the city attorney
attended to help establish objec-
tives for their positions. Carter
said the retreats were beneficial,
and that he is impressed with the
present city council. "This council
has a greater chance of addressing
problems then the councils in the
past they are ready to go against
the grain for the best of the city
he said.
Carter said the council had a
fear at first of breaking some of the
old waysand ideas that past coun-
cils had made tradition, but now
they have talked out their opin-
ions and are not afraid to make
new changes and decisions.
Carter is excited to see the
growth Greenville has under-
taken, 'The medical school has
attracted people to the commu-
nity, but it is still a challenge to
sometimes find a job in this area
Greenville now has a tourism
bureau and Carter said steps were
- 0 uu.�v .w.utu n� Duiiaing
ot a civic center, "Greenville re-
ally has a prominsing future he
added.
Talking of the university, Car
ter emphasized it was essential to
keep up the good rapport the
university and the community
holds, "One third of the city's
population is made up of univer-
sity students and faculty, ECU is
an important part of the commu-
nity Carter meets with Chancel-
lor Eakin once a month to keep an
"on-going dialogue" and men-
tions his staff is always here for
the university staff. The mayor
also agrees with the majority that
something should be done about
campus parking.
After being asked if he thought
the university would lose it's
friendliness with growth, he
commented that the depersonal-
iztion that happens with growth
anywhere (city or univeristy) is
hard to control.
One thing Mayor Carter would
like to see improvement in is the
graduation of athletes. He said he
read that students enlisted in the
ECU sports program had the
lowest graduation rate in the state
and he wanted to see the numbers
turn around.
The mayor said he has seen
great change take place in
Greenville, from the killing of
blacks by policemen in the 60s and
early 70s, to finally the peaceful
integration by the policemen and
now Greenville has it's first black
mayor, "I'd like to instill hope,
pride and dignity in those that
believe they can't accomplish
Lt. Gov. Bob Jordan campaigned in Greenville Wednesday, calling
for reforms in education while trying to shake the effects of his now
infamous "redneck" comment. (Thomas Walters � Photolab)






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 24,1988
Low calorie foods can help you lose weight I pgj
I use foods that are labeled diet,
reduced, and low calorie, but I
still haven't lost weight. What is
the problem?
It is difficult to answer that
question without knowing your
total calories consumed. If so-
called "diet" foods have been
added to an already high calorie
diet, for example a diet soda or-
dered with a Big Mac and fries,
then weight loss would probably
not be expected.
cated or altered to lower the ca-
loric content. These foods must be
at least 25 calories less per serving
than the unaltered form. A good
example of an altered form is low
calorie cheese. The second cate-
gory contains foods that are natu-
rally low in calorie such as celery.
Food labeled "reduced calo-
ries" are 33 13 percent less in
calories than the standard form of
the foods. However, foods la-
beled "diet" were originally de-
It's also important to recognize signed for diabetics because they
that the terms diet, reduced, and are produced with no sugar,
low calorie are not interchange- Nevertheless, it is important to
able; moreover, these foods may read labels to determine the
contain a wide range of calories, number of calories for each indi-
There are two types of low calorie vidual product,
foods; first, foods that are fabn- Diet, reduced, and low caloric
SBI chief Morgan
speaks on civil liberties
The Hon. Robert B. Morgan, todbe serving in the public do-
director of the SBI and former main. A public servant who is
United States Senator, was the subject to constant survclliance
distinguished alumni speaker at may be afraid to voice his dissent
this year's Distinguished Alumni on a political issue.
foods can be used in a weight
reduction program, but overall
calorie consumption must be
Health Column
By
Student Health Service
evaluated. Increased physical ac-
tivity and moderation in food
consumption play a vital role in
eight loss and maintenance.
I drink a lot of diet soda. Is this
a safe practice?
In July, 1983, the artificial
sweetener, aspartame was ap-
proved by the Food and Drugs
ylketonuria (PKU).
The safe amount of aspartame
that can be consumed is 40 milli-
grams per kilogram of body
weight. An example of this is that
a woman who weight 56 kilo-
Administration (FDA) to be used grams could safely consume ap-
in carbonated beverages. How-
ever, any foods or beverages con-
taining aspartame are required by
the FDA to display a warning to
individuals suffering from a rare
genetic disease called phen-
proximately 2250 milligrams of
aspartame per day. One 12-ounce
can of diet drink contains 150
milligrams of aspartame.
A number ot complaints from
consumers have included prob-
lems with headaches, dizziness,
and a wide variety of other symp-
toms, that they attributed to the
consumption of aspartame con-
taining products. Therefore, the
Center for Disease Control has
investigated these complaints
and their data did not provide any
evidence for the existence of seri-
ous, widespread, and adverse
health consequences attendant to
use of aspartame.
LectureSeminar Series. Morgan
spoke Monday evening in a lec-
ture in the new classroom build-
ing about "Politics, Civil Liberties
and Ethics
Morgan said the issues of civil
liberties is one that is "a topic that
is very dear to me He said he is a
firm believer in the right of indi-
vidual privacy. He said in his
years on the Senate Select
Committee on Hostilities (from
1975-1981) the committee uncov-
ered several acts of surveillance
"Fear represses dissent Mor-
gan said. "I think we can all say
that this is a truism Morgan said
that "when officials in govern-
ment act this way the foundations
of democracy crumble He said
that constant surveillance of indi-
viduals, especially in govern-
ment, results in overzealousness
on part of the watcher.
Morgan said of such invasion of
personal privacy "no good can
come of it for a democratic soci-
ety He gave a few reasons tor the
�.
by the FBI, the CIA, and the Army failed attempts to curb such sur-
security agency, including the vclliance, such as the constant
opening of over 14 million pri- need to review our Constitution,
vate letters and forwarding of increased paranoia with intcrna-
private telegrams to the FBI.
He noted that oftentimes, an
individual in the government
who showed political views con-
trary to those in power would be
put under constant electronic
surveillance, and even subject to a
"sudden audit" by the IRS. He
noted also several other breaches
of privacy by the government in
the name of "national security
including break-ins of homes,
tional conflict, technical ad-
vances, and human nature. Mor-
gan said that one way to combat
such survclliance is to allow no
electronic survclliance without a
court order.
Such an order would be obtain-
able only with probable cause,
and would limit time and place of
use. It would also require the
executing officers exercise re-
straint in carrying out the order.
These students are doing like some 2,000 others did Wednesday and
exercising their right to vote. You'll get the chance again in two weeks
when a run-off election is held. (Hardy Allegood � Photolab)
Qttrt �at (Earnlinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo
Shari Clemens Adam Blankenship
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threats, and provocation of hos- Morgan said the same restraints
tilities between opposing hostile should be imposed upon obtain-
groups. Morgan quoted Supreme ing survclliance data on a person.
Court Justice Douglas in stating Survelliance, said Morgan, is an
that we have "a system of investi- obvious means of social control
gation similar to the Commu- over a person,
nists Morgan said that the real re-
Morgan said he is very opposed forms, however, must come from
to this type of survelliance and the people � that people must
investigation of private individu- recognize the sanctity of the
als. He said that an individual human right to be left alone. He
who is under constant survelli- believes that the most effective
ance will develop traits of para- step in this direction is education,
noia, nervousness, and will even- He said that education must be
tually begin to engage in "avoid- taken on by all society � that we
ance behavior Such individuals must teach not only by word but
will also begin to engage in evalu-
ation apprehension, and will
also by deed. In closing Morgan
asked, "Will we fight for our pri-
modify their behavior to act ac- vacy as we have for our freedom,
cording to how they believe their or will we relinquish both?"
surveyors think they should act.
The result is very damaging to After Morgan's speech, he was
the person, and can be especially presented with a plaque of appre-
damaging to a person supposed ciation by Chancellor Eakin.
CLEP tests give credit
for university courses
Are you one of those students
who feel that you should be able
to place out of some of your more
basic classes, but have never
tried? If so, then the CLEP Test
may be for you. CLEP is short for
College-Level Examination Pro-
gram, a national testing program
for credit by examination. The
CLEP Test is a service of the Col-
lege Board, the same people who
make up the SAT.
According to Wanda Wiseman
of the ECU Testing Center in the
Spilman building, the CLEP Test
can be taken by anyone for any
course that they have not already
attempted on a post-secondary
level. An acceptable score on the
test will result in the student re-
ceiving credit for that course. The
credit is treated as a transfer class,
and will not affect the student's
GP A in any way. ECU is one of the
few testing centers on the eastern
side of the state, and the test is
open to anyone �not just stu-
HT
m?
dents. Wiseman said that there
are a lot of people who come from
community colleges in the area
(Pitt, Onslow, Wayne) to take the
CLEP.
The CLEP will not count against
you if you do not make a passing
score, she said. It will not go on
your record unless you pass. She
also said if you do not make a
passing score the first time you
take the CLEP, it is possible to
retake the same test again in six
months.
The score needed to obtain
credit for a course by CLEP is
determined by the admissions
office, not the testing center, so
Wiseman suggested checking
with admissions to see what score
one would need to receive credit
for a course. Credit can be ob-
tained by CLEP for many differ-
ent 1000 and 2000 level classes in
many subjects. Each test lasts
about 90 minutes (timed) and cost
if pproximately $35 per test.
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600 Creenvilie Blvd Greenville
(CPS) � Stanford Univei
student Susan Poff returned
a 1984 trip to Nicaragua upset j
wanting to tell the world at
what she saw.
Across the country in Virgil
Michael Boos read a news sf
about Poff s feelings.
So Poffs name ended i
Boos's list of people who op
the Reagan administration's
cies in Central America, and
of his lists end up in the Fed)
Bureau of Investigation filef
dissenters who might bear wa
ing.
Poff found the process of
made into some sort of potei
traitor "unnerving
Boos, who heads a national
dent group called Yo
America's Foundation, called
"naive
She is, in any case, an un witl
player in the widespread spj
on campus activists that cam
light in a late-January relea?
FBI documents.
The papers reveal the
"monitored" students at Floi
State, Wichita State, Tennc
State, the universities of
homa, Kansas, Minnesota
Pennsylvania, and other stud
who worked with anv of
campus chapters around
country of United Campi
Against Nucluear War.
Most of the students
watched, however, were
bers of the Committee in Soli
ity with the People of El Salv,
(CISPES), a group opposed to
policy in Central America.
"We weren't doing anvti
illegal said Poff. "I shoul
have to be accountable to anvi
This makes me angry
In the four years it follol
CISPES members, the FBI n
did uncover any wrongdoing
documents suggest.
The documents also su
"the right to dissent, a basic k
of a democratic society, is incr
inly encumbered said Mar$
Ratner of the Center for Consl
tional Rights (CCR), the
York group which obtait
FBI papers through the Fra
of Information Act.
While the FBI's syping on
pus dissenters recalled
extensive Nixon-era sabotal
of student groups it didn't hi
a policy that provoked the
sage of the Freedom of Infoi
tion Act as a way to control fi
administrations � the d(
ments indicated a well-organ
unofficial network of people
watched campuses for the
ernment.
"The constitution chai
Chip Berlet, a Cambridge, M
journalist and investigator
monitors right-wing groups
being short-circuited by a pr
spy network
Berlet names Boos's grouj
along with the Council for ij
American Securitv and the
tal Research Center, amend
ers � as part of the network!
The groups clip newspaj
scan cables, compile lists. �2
memos from campus friend;
then forward them to the FB
other federal agencies, the
ments reveal.
The FBI accepts such info
tion � which may or may n4
Jordan talk:
about being
"redneck"
Continued from page 1
Greensboro that voters in the)
ern part of the state are 'redn
Jordan said he didn't intern
statement to be interpertc
derogatory comment. "A redl
is a hard working North Car
farmer with mud on his
Jordan said. He said he d
think an apology to the vote
eastern North Carolina w,
order.
Jordan said that the
should stand that as Lt. Gov
he has fought more for the
ing class of the state thanl
other lieutenant governor
He said that he can relate to
ing people because he once
fork lifts and loaded trucks
Mount Gilead lumber busii
On Monday, Jordan rec
the American School Com
Legislator of the Year A
during the association's ai
convention in Chicago. The
ciation recognized Jordan
true champion of educatic
for his willingness to cha
course for education





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 24.1988
eight
iuts have included prob-
r with headaches, dizziness,
I a wide v ariet) of other symp-
ns thai thev attributed to the
nption of aspartame con-
ning products. Therefore, the
for Disease Control has
ted these complaints
d their data did not provide any
idence for the existence of sen-
read, and adverse
alth - uencesattendantlo
tair.e
aroltafatt
� jr.
ertising
t entatives
�ship
RTiSIXG
MM RATES
I R
p.m.
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269
�-�- t. t tc -�
- -� ttm � '��� �
. �. t �
OURS EVERYDAY
e Blvd Greenville
FBI investigates students
(CPS) � Stanford University true � because the laws passed Conyers of Michigan have
student Susan Poff returned from after the Nixon administration's worked with the KGB, the Soviet
a 1984 trip to Nicaragua upset and domestic spying scandal restrict it Union's spy agency
wanting to tell the world about from doing much campus moni
what she saw. toring on its own, Ratner specu-
Across the country in Virginia, lated.
Michael Boos read a news story She noted the documents in-
about Poff's feelings. elude a memo telling FBI agents
So Poff's name ended up on "specifically not to question how
Boos's list of people who oppose 'individuals acting on their own
the Reagan administration's poli- initiative' obtain information
cies in Central America, and some "Just because articles are kept in
Berlet said CIAS and the other
groups often issue reports "call-
Pat Buchanan are on the council
for Inter-American Security's
advisory board.
Yet Alicia Fernandez of the
Center for Constitutional Rights
ing everyone to the left of Teddy said the FBI documents provide
Kennedy a commie who should only tenuous evidence of links to
be shot which then end up at the the government. The extent of
FBI and even the White House. those ties, she said, is "something
For instance, one of Boos's we have not yet determined
CISPES reports � gleaned from There are no links, said Chris
newspaper reports like the one Long, head of the Young Ameri-
of his lists end up in the Federal a file doesn't mean we're working reporting Poff's return from Nica- cans for Freedom, which helped
Bureau of Investigation files of with outside sources said FBI ragua�was classified as "secret" promote Reagan as a presidential
dissenters who might bear watch- spokeswoman Sue Schnitzer. by the FBI and distributed to FBI candidate 20 years ago.
ing.
Our mandate is to follow up on bureaus around the country.
Poff found the process of being allegations we receive, but it
made into some sort of potential doesn't mean a full-blown inves-
traitor "unnerving tigation is taking place
Boos, who heads a national stu- The private groups, in fact,
dent group called Young boast that they monitor campus
America's Foundation, called her dissenters,
"naive
She is, in any case, an unwitting are the most extensive in the na
player in the widespread spying tion Lynn Bouchey, president of
on campus activists that came to the Council for Inter-American
light in a late-January release of Security (CIAS), said in a recent
Boos's article accused CISPES
of supporting terrorism, and was
later published in Young
America's Foundation's 'The
American Sentinel" magazine.
Although the groups try to prod
the government into investigat-
ing leftists, Long says they've
failed. "The administration won't
listen to conservative groups,
even with good evidence appar-
ently for fear of being accused of
FBI documents.
The papers reveal the FBI
"monitored" students at Florida
State, Wichita State, Tennessee
State, the universities of Okla-
homa, Kansas, Minnesota and
Pennsylvania, and other students
who worked with any of the
campus chapters around the
country of United Campuses
Against Nucluear War.
Most of the students being
watched, however, were mem-
bers of the Committee in Solidar-
ity with the People of El Salvador
(CISPES), a group opposed to U.S.
policy in Central America.
"We weren't doing anything
illegal said Poff. "I shouldn't
have to be accountable to anyone.
This makes me angry
In the four years it followed
CISPES members, the FBI never
did uncover any wrongdoing, the
documents suggest.
The documents also suggest
"the right to dissent, a basic tenet
of a democratic society, is increas-
inly encumbered said Margaret
Ratner of the Center for Constitu-
tional Rights (CCR), the New
York group which obtained the
FBI papers through the Freedom
of Information Act.
While the FBI's syping on cam-
pus dissenters recalled the
extensive Nixon-era sabotaging
of student groups it didn't like �
a policy that provoked the pas-
sage of the Freedom of Informa-
tion Act as a way to control future
administrations � the docu-
ments indicated a well-organized
unofficial network of people who
watched campuses for the gov-
ernment.
"The constitution charged
Chip Berlet, a Cambridge, Mass
journalist and investigator who
monitors right-wing groups, "is
being short-circuited by a private
spy network
Berlet names Boos's group �
along with the Council for Inter-
American Security and theCapi-
tal Research Center, among oth-
ers � as part of the network.
The groups clip newspapers,
scan cables, compile lists, gather
memos from campus friends and
then forward them to the FBI and
other federal agencies, the docu-
ments reveal.
The FBI accepts such informa-
tion � which may or may not be
Jordan talks
about being
"redneck"
Continued from page 1
Greensboro that voters in the east-
ern part of the state are 'rednecks
Jordan said he didn't intend the
statement to be interperted as
derogatory comment. "A redneck
is a hard working North Carolina
farmer with mud on his boots
Jordan said. He said he didn't
think an apology to the voters of
eastern North Carolina was in
order.
Jordan said that the record
should stand that as Lt. Governor
he has fought more for the work-
ing class of the state than any
other lieutenant governor ever.
He said that he can relate to work-
ing people because he once drove
fork lifts and loaded trucks in his
Mount Gilead lumber business.
On Monday, Jordan received
the American School Counselors
Legislator of the Year Award
during the association's annual
convention in Chicago. The asso-
ciation recognized Jordan as, "a
true champion of education and
for his willingness to chart the
course for education
Some critics fear even unsub-
"Our files on the organized left stantiated reports like Boos's en- fostering a Red Scare.
joy special clout in agencies that Even if there were links, Berlet
should know better because the conceded the private network's
private groups have impressive efforts probably are legal,
ties to the nation's leaders. "It's not a question of illegal-
Young America's Foundation, ity said Berlet, who himself col-
according to financial records lects information on conservative
fundraising letter
Boos, in turn, claims to have the
biggest "campus information net- obtained by San Francisco televi- groups. "It's a question of corn-
work in the nation
Whatever it is, CIAS's Michael
Waller says, "it's not spying. All
our information comes from their
literature or from defectors. We
don't have secret agents infiltrat-
ing their organizations
His group watches the left, he
adds, because "the FBI doesn't
watch these groups" and because
someone should.
CISPES, for example, raises
"money for communist terrorists
trying to overthrow a govern-
ment the U.S. Congress sup-
ports said Waller, whose allega-
tion was not supported by the
material released in the
doucments.
Waller also claimed congress-
men Ted Weiss of New York, Ron
Dellums of California and John
If
sion station KRON, has received mon sense and good taste
more than100,000 in recent years
from the federal United States
Information Agency.
White House aides Frank
Donatelli and Ken Cribb serve on
Young America's Foundation's
board of directors. Retired U.S.
Berlet (who was an editor of
College Press Service from 1970
through 1973) claims his "moni-
toring" of lightest groups is dif-
ferent from the conservatives'
because he doesn't give unveri-
Army Gen. John Singlaub, a major fied impressions to the govern-
figure in the Iran-contra scandal, ment, which could then use the
and former White House staffer information against citizens.
Sorority to help raise money
Scott Paper Company and the
ECU Alpha Delta Pi Sorority will
be teaming up with the local gro-
cery retailers in a national effort to
raise one million dollars nation-
ally to support the Ronald
McDonald Houses throughout
the country, and Ronald
McDonald Childrens Charities.
Ronald McDonald Houses are
where families can stay while
children are receiving treatment
for serious illness at nearby hospi-
tals.
Members of several campus fraternities got together Sunday to help the chancellor with his beautif ica-
tion efforts, cleaning up the garbage across campus. (Thomas Walters � Photolab)
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SilE 3�a0t (Eartfltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel M aurer, g� m�
Clay Deanhardt, M�-gu.f &�
I AMES F I. MCKEE, Doctor Jf AJixmnt
m Chandler, s�� � mn
John Carter, f��� �
Michelle England, cm m
Debbie Stevens, s�t�t
jeff parker�
Tom Furr, cmmh mm
Mike Upchurch, fVAow. M��g�r
JOHNVV. MEDLIN, MOiNrtw
Mac Clark. bu3� Mger
Via.
OPINION
Page 4
Kudos
Committee pulls it off
Tony Porcelli and the entire SGA
Elections Committee deserved to be
amended tor Wednesday7s elec-
ns Why? Because nothing hap-
pened.
And it was music to our ears. The
silence was golden. For many years
SGA elections have led to bitter in-
rtg and accusations.
years ago the race between
Chris Thomasic and Steve Cunanan
became a mud-slinger, mostly on
the part of Tomasic Charges of un-
lir electioneering were levied
both candidates, but, ulti-
mately, the man who ran the clean-
est campaign (Cunanan) won and
went on to be a good SGA president.
Last year it was a race between
Scott Thomas and Steve Pierce. It
was possibly the worst SGA election
of the decade. Neither candidate
could be blamed, but allegations of
ible corruption within the elec-
n committee rose, and the cam-
through over a month of
turmoil including a highly-charged
rally in support of the Pierce cause.
This year there has been nothing.
We have not even heard any charges
of campaigning too near the voting
boxes, a cry that is heard nearly
every year.
The silence and the smoothly run
elections are the direct result of the
hard work and dedication of
Porcelli and his committee. Know-
ing that the pressure would be in-
tense, Porcelli took a defective
committee and turned it into a
strong force for election change.
More control was kept over ballot
boxes and polling attendants, and
the caution paid off.
Porcelli and his committee de-
serve to be recognized for their out-
standing work. Anyone who can
bring a clean election to a campus
that hasn't seen one in many years
with only one year to create the
change is almost a miracle worker.
Student slams on East Carolinian
To the editor:
It has come to most every student's
attention that thequality of our school
newpaper has declined over the past
year. Granted that it is hard to keep a
journalistic consistency when your
staff changes every semester or so,
there are a few things that can be done
to preserve an amount of respectabil-
ity.
First of all, the fact that the paper
has become a personal bulletin board
and opinion page for its staff is utterly
ridiculous. The East Carolinian is not
the Washington Post or New York
Times but it still has a responsibility
to the community that it serves. Fur-
thermore, the belittling attitude that
the paper projects towards the stu-
dents (who pay the collective "rent")
is wrong. 1 refer specifically to the
photo captions by the "incredibly
boss" so-and-so. Cut the shit, please.
Also, more recently, the caption be-
neath the photo of the band Drivin'
and Cryin' in last Tuesday's paper
was completely ridiculous. I refuse to
be told that I am not worthy of speak-
ing anyone's name. And I further-
more refuse to be told to "wake up
I think you people ought to change
a few things around there and start to
show a bit of professionalism. I real-
ize that this is a college newspaper
and that it must relate to the people
that are reading it. However, you
people seem to think that the popula-
tion of ECU is idiots. Get your act
together people, I' ve seen more news-
papers in the trash can than in
people's hands.
Tonv Smith
Junior
English
P.S. John Rusk, a close personal
friend of mine and the former general
manager of your paper, saw a copy of
the East Carolinian last weekend and
was appalled. I think that you should
take a hint from that
PICK THE WEAPON
WOSTFEfREDBY
THE ISRAELI'S
David needs postcards
IHSTRUCTTOMS TO EHTER:
RASPTWEPOORTOWm900RRl6HT
HARMLESS YOU ARE LEFT-HANPED, (N
WHICH CASE EITHER HANPfSALLOWEP,
MraCLOCK�VmTJ
Have you ever wanted to get a taste of heaven without ever
leaving earth? Well, it is possible and I would like to - at least
in part - offer you the chance to do just that. No, I'm not talking
about a mysterious out-of-the-body experience, nor a trip to
"cloud 9 but simply a journey we can take not only on this
occasion, but whenever we do something loving and unsel-
fish for someone else.
The journey isn't a long one, but one that can be activated
anytime a person shares with someone else those things -
large or small - that mean so much: from time-to-time I may
need a smile, someone else to hug, but it's not necessarily
those tangible things that make the difference. It is The love,
the nature, the concern, that turns what could be a bad
situation into something beautiful.
Have you ever noticed the joy and gratitude on the faces of
people you've helped. Well, to me, this defines life in a nut
shell. It's not getting to the finish line first or being successful
at all cost, it's taking the time to help someone in need - yes,
loving one another in the purest sense.
Today I'm going to ask you to do something that requires
just a small amount of your time. It's not incredibly demand-
ing, nor will it require you to exercise anything much more
than your heart. You see, life is kind of funny at times and then
it changes; sometimes for the better, other times for the worst,
yet these changes will occur. All of our lives we have been
conditioned by society to change and, even knowing that,
many times the changes come hard.
I speak of changes, because I want you to have a change of
heart about life and its value. Too many times so many of us
live life carelessly and then it takes something tragic to remind
us that life is precious and it should be treated accordingly.
There is a need for priorities, yes even within our personal
lives, and the time has come to begin listing them one by one.
Even this article was changed. Originally, it was to be about
democracy: its meaning, influence, and part here at ECU, but
all of that meant very little when I received a letter from
Joseph Singleton (chairperson, ECU Christian Fellowship
and president of the MSO).
It was a letter that he received concerning a little boy dying
of leukemia. I don't know the little boy's age or expected ltfc
span, but I do know that he is a fighter. His name is David and
he lives in England. While others dream of fame and fortune,
he can only hope to leave a little something behind - some
mark, some idea, some sign - to let others know that nothing
should be taken for granted, especially life.
The Bible describes life as a "vapor It appears for a little
time and then it "vanishes" away (James 4:14). When we were
younger and looked ahead, life seemed so long. It was hard to
imagine that what older folks often said about life and its
brevity was true, but then it is. As we grow older, even the
years of our present existence witness this fact and we should
learn to make what time we have left count for the greater
cause.
FOCUS
By
Steven Pierce
David's dream is to be in the Guiness Book of World Rec-
ords. He wants to do this by receiving the most post cards
before he dies. To some this may seem silly, childish or even
selfish, but for someone whose life has a set time table, it
means the world. You see, David can't become a fireman or
teacher, neither a doctor or astronaut, but he can with your
assistance have his dream come true. Would you help to save
a life?
Please send your post cards to: David, co Miss McWil-
liams, St. Martin de Porres Infant School, Luton, Bedfordshire
England, U.K. Your attention to detail in this matter will be
appreciated.
Individuals as well as organizations are encouraged to send
as many post cards as you can. If you have any questions or
simply want more information, contact me at 752-9431.
College Republicans need help in rhetoric
�y �� i �MA�Ko�iM ;ni nrotprt us from nuclear boml
Once again the ECU College Republicans have
shown that they need an elementary course in rheto-
ric. Their letter last Thursday in support of SDI (Star
Wars) is full of logical fallacies - ad populum. hasty
generalization, false choice, false dilemma, the usual
ad hominem tirade against liberals, and worst of all,
rTument from ignorance. The truth is that Star
Wars will not protect us from nuclear attack. The
president's plan is an expensive and dangerous
piece of science fiction.
The College Republicans say that one successful
test - one missile, fired at one target - proves Star
Wars is feasible. This claim is ignorant and naive. In
practice, the success of SDI would depend on inter-
ception of thousands of incoming Soviet warheads,
with only minutes of warning. Former Defense Sec-
retary Casper Weinberger, in the September, 1983
Omni said, "The goal would be to try it against
Iwsands of missiles, including missiles that carry
n independent warheads, and missiles whose
warheads can change direction The system would
have to "reliably identify, track, and destroy several
Thousand targets in a very, very short space of time"
between two to three minutes. Whether we use
Hareed particle beams, neutral particle beams,
Ckted missiles, or lasers, the hardware problems
unprecedented and immense. But the real reason
Star Wars won't work is the software.
The SDI computer programs would be far more
complex than anything ever designed, required
millions of lines of instructions; and even if it uses
"fifth generation" artificial intelligence (yet to be
developed), there is little chance that the system will
work. "All large programs contain undiscovered errors
and omissions that come to light only after prolonged
experience in actual use says computer science pro-
fessor Jonathan Jacky his italics in "The Star Wars
Defense Won't Compute" (The Atlantic, June
Campus Spectrum
By
Luke Whisnant
1985). "This is the single most important fact for
users of complex computer systems to understand.
No matter how many megabytes of memory or
millions of lines of code the fundamental fact
about computer programs will not change: it is
impossible to find all the bugs by analysis and test-
ing alone - the program must be used under actual
conditions The actual conditions for SDI will be
nuclear war - too late to de-bug the program. Since
no one has ever fought an all-out nuclear war, pro-
grammers necessarily will be ignorant of dozens,
perhaps hundreds, ot contingencies; any conceiv-
able program will be inadequate. Star Wars, the most
expensive and sophisticated weapon in history, will
fail. �
I agree with one point the College Republicans
raise-SDI will not force the Soviets to build addi-
tional missiles to "overwhelm" the system. They
won't need to. They have more than enough missiles
right now.Evenits supporters admitthatSDI cannot
be 100 percent effective in protecting the United
States from an all-out nuclear attack. The College
Republicans argue that a 90 percent effective system
is worth the risk of destabilization and the stagger-
ing cost of development (already around four billion
dollars peryear).ln their scenario, "only" 1300one-
megaton warheads - ten percent of the Soviets
10,000 missiles - would make it through the im-
penetrable shield
One thousand megatons . . . Jonathan Schell, in
Tfrf Fatf nf the Earth, analyzes at leneth, in horri-
fying detail, the effects of various attacks, and con-
cludes that just one megaton - equivalent to eighty
Hiroshimas - would be "an unimaginable catastro-
phe and ten megatons, eight hundred Hiroshimas,
"would leave any nation on earth devastated be-
yond anything in our historical experience A 1,00C
megaton attack would, quite simply, completely
destroy the United States as we know it.
How should SDI protect us from nuclear bombs
delivered by Soviet aircraft? How would it destroy
missiles launched from Soviet submarines, missiles
so close they'd arrive in six to ten minutes? Ho
would SDI react to thousands of cheaply made d e�
coys mixed in with warheads in an all-out attack?
How would it intercept low-flying cruise missiles?
The Union of Concerned Scientists (which includes
57 Nobel Laureates and the majority of the National
Academy of Sciences) says that "unless it can be
stopped, SDI will probably end up as nothing more
than a costly weapons system designed to protect
U.S. missiles from a Soviet attack It will foster a
new escalation of the arms race as both sides seek to
outdo each other
The people who support Star Wars are the Air
Force, m whose domain space weapons reside; the
high-tech and weapons industries, who would reap
hundreds of billions of dollars from Star Wars con-
tracts; and physicists receiving easy government
money for SDI research. The rest of us, in our igno-
rance, fear, and complacency, take the lazy way out,
blindly putting our faith in Reagan's pernicious pipe
dream - another easy American technological quick-
fix - instead of educating ourselves, understanding
the dangers, working for change.
The only true defense against nuclear weapons is
to negotiate them out of existence. Period.
Study i
(CPS) � Students who tenc
default on their Guaranteed Si
dent Loans aren't dishonors1
they're just poor, a General
counting Office (CAO) report
sued last week claimed
The GAO � which audits r
eral spending programs �
trying to draw a "profik
tvpical GSL. defaulter aencv
ficial William Gainer told
House Postsecondarv Educat
Subcommittee, and is hndind
tar that dropouts, students w
support themselves and stud
who are stuck in lower-pav
r,s make up the bulk
nation's defaulter,
ire than halt 56 pel
of the former students in det
did not graduate, Gainer
Me added the CAPS "prel
nary results" agreed with the
timony at a January kkin der
Summit of student aid offk
trom around the country
Take A
11

" t
March ct
requld
is the
of y
ing
price.
in the
that.
pare,
the prl
tionshl
tion
OUtSt(
� i ui bas
weight B
. col rs
� Our basic pic.
cotton Khaki :
� Oui . lassS4
Knit Shirts
� Oui basic ;
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� Our basic Univers
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,�. I, i i�i� n,m.tfomr
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1 ?





vY THAT'S,
�HS.TOPSi
J
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 24, 1988
olinian
hink that thepopula-
idiots. Get your act
I ve seen more news-
the ttash can than in
Tony Smith
Junior
English
Rusk, a close personal
ie ana the termer general
�our paper, saw a copy oi
simian last weekend and
led 1 think that vou should
rrom tha
ds
roncerning a little boy dying
It tie boy's age or expected life
Ichter. His name is David and
iream of fame and fortune,
lie something behind - some
� others know that nothing
recially life.
ipor It appears for a little
fames4:14). When we were
eemed so long. It was hard to
(ten said about life and its
As we grow older, even the
itness this fact and we should
ive left count for the greater
US
n Pierce
e
s
s
Y
e
3
Guiness Book of World Rec-
eceiving the most post cards
iv seem silly, childish or even
life has a set time table, it
id can't become a fireman or
tronaut, but he can with your
true. Would you help to save
to: David, co Miss McWil-
Int School, Luton, Bedfordshire
to detail in this matter will be
itionsare encouraged to send
If you have any questions or
�, contact me at 752-9431.
etoric
Irotect us from nuclear bombs
lircraft? How would it destrov
m Soviet submarines, missiles
e in six tc ten minutes? Ho y
tousands of cheaply made d
warheads in an all-out attack?
?pt low-flying cruise missiles7
led Scientists (which includes
nd the majority of the National
�) says that "unless it can be
bably end up as nothing more
ns system designed to protect
viet attack It will foster a
arms race as both sides seek to
rapport Star Wars are the Air
tin space weapons reside; the
ms industries, who would reap
of dollars from Star Wars con-
receiving easy government
:h. The rest of us, in our igno-
lacency, take the lazy way out,
tith in Reagan's pernicious pipe
American technological quick-
lung ourselves, understanding
ig for change.
vse against nuclear weapons is
it of existence. Period.
Study says loan defaulters are poor, not cheap
(CPS) � Students who tend to
default on their Guaranteed Stu-
dent Loans aren't dishonorable,
they're just poor, a General Ac-
counting Office (GAO) report is-
sued last week claimed.
The GAO - which audits fed-
eral spending programs � is
trving to draw a "profile" of a
typical GSI. defaulter, agency of-
ficial William Gainer told the
House Postsecondary Education
Subcommittee, and is finding so
tar that dropouts, students who
support themselves and students
who are stuck in lower-paying
jobs make up the bulk of the
nation's defaulters.
More than half - 56 percent �
oi the former students in default
did not graduate, Gainer said.
ie added the GAO's "prelimi-
nary results" agreed with the tes-
timony at a January loan default
summit" of student aid officials
from around the country, organ-
ized by Rep. Pat Williams (D-
Mont).
Many campus aid directors
aserted defaulters were not dead-
beats, but people who were sim-
ply unable to afford to repay their
loans.
The GAO's emerging profile of
the typical defaulter "raises seri-
ous concerns about forcing needy
students to take out loans, rather
than (get) grants" that don't have
to be repaid, American Council on
Education official Charles Saun
ders said.
In its new budget proposal, re-
leased last week, the Reagan
administration suggested raising
the amount of money the govern-
ments gives out in grants.
In its prior 7 proposals, the
adminstration had sought to re-
duce students' reliance on grants
� which are much more expen-
sive for the government � in fa-
vor of loans.
It was announced at this week's
SRA meeting that the filing dead-
line for SRA elections will be to-
day. There will also be a manda
tory candidates meeting tonight
in room 221 Mendenhall at 6 p.m.
Elections will be held Tuesday.
The winners of the residence
hall energy contest were an-
nounced at the meeting. They are
as follows: Tyler Hall-lst place;
Scott Hall-2nd place; and Green
Hall-3rd place. SRA President
Thomas Denton said that the
contest was so close that it was
decided to give all the winners
cash prizes. Thus, 1st place prize
is $200, 2nd place $100 and 3rd
place prize is $50. Denton stated
that the money should be used for
something for the good of the
residence hall and must be spent
by May 7, 1988.
The SRA Banquet will be held
on April 13 at the Riverside Steak
Bar. The banquet is an apprecia-
tion-type dinner for SRA officers,
and will also announce the out-
standing residence hall u the
time.
In other business, the SRA
elected not to amend their
constitution to make an executive
office for Intramurals representa-
tives. They instead agreed to add
a description in the bylaws or at
tach a description of such posi-
tions as IRS rep. and social rep to
the end of the constitution.
In further business, it was an-
nounced that April 8 is the last
registration day for a booth in
Barefoot on the Mall. Barefoot on
the Mall is scheduled to be held on
Thursday, April 21 from noon to 6
p.m. It was also announced that
the Hill Jam will be held on April
9, and that among other things
Jones Hall will have a Wesson oil
tug-of-war.
Take A Look At Our
10-Day
March 23rd - April 2nd
- o eoitYaii Ms a
regular price sale! This
is the best assortment
of young men's cloth-
ing, at the very best
price, that we can find
in the market. We know
that, if you will com-
pare, you will agree that
the price � value rela-
tionship on this selec-
tion of clothing is
outstanding.
� Out basic year-round
weight Blazer (in several 1 C C rr
solid colors) IOC) . UU
� Our basic pleated 100�o $Q1 r7Cl
cotton Khaki Pants OH 3
� Our classic solid color SO Cf
Knit Shirts O I . OU
� Our basic pleated.
all-cotton, washed $07 ZC
Twill Shorts O I . C)U
� Our basic University SIO CA
Shoe. The White Buck 4 . OU
WEBUIIT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
US O A GRADE A �SELF BASTING
10 LBS AND UP
Young
Turkeys
AP
SAVACENT
The frmtmmt way to Sv�
J �
703 Greenville Blvd.
US DA (.HOICE BEEF�THIN TRI
Shoulder
London Broil
lb
IM
99

STOPi
U.S.D.A. CHOICE
BEEF-BONELESS
FAMIl Y PACK
Fresh Fryer CQC
Drumsticks J
Boneless Bottom
Round Roast
STOP
CUSTOM CUT FREE
Whole Boneless
New York Strip
Rump
Roast
J2.49 lb.
U.S.D.A. CHOICE BONELESS
Sirloin
Steak
lb
349
12-14 lb.
avg.
STOP
STOP
DOLE
JUICY LUSCIOUS
Florida
Strawberries
PLANTATION. RIPI
pint
basket
Fresh Pineapple
���
Brussel Sprouts
fl: I R P
Cut Watermelon
8 INCH Pt ��� i-t PALM SUNDAY
Areca Palms
REGULAR OR LOW SALT�KEEBLER
lb mJJ
7.99
California
Navel Orang
88 Size
ALL VARIETIES
Clothing
At All Our Fine Stores
oPPmani
REGULAR OR DIET
STOP� , -
m Pepsi Cola
2 Liter Bottle
Town House 4 89 Doritos
Crackers I Tortilla Chips
1
89
TsT
Oodles of Noodles
Wild Rice Mixes
Spaghetti Sauce
� ARIETIES'IN NATURAL JIWCE
Dole Pineapple
MtDHJM 48 CT OR LARGE'HEG ABSORBENCY
LIMIT 2 WITH
10.00 OR MORE PURCHASE
MENS WEAR
315 EVANS MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
CAROLINA EAST MALL
TARRYTOWN MALL. ROCKY MOUNT
ALL FLAVORS
Flav-O-Rich
Ice Cream -ar
1
Pampers
QUARTERS
1.29
1.69
.79
7.99
5 02
pkg
32 OZ
I
STOP
A&P CHILLED
20 oz
Orange
Juice
32 ct
pkg
qq Parkay
Margarine
2
16 02
pkg
89
Limit One
With
'10 Purchase
64 oz.
ctn.
FOR THE LAUNDRYM0 OFF LABEL
Surf
Detergent
IN OIL OR WATER�CHUNK LIGHT
Chicken of the Sea
Tuna
ABSORBENT
Scot
Towels
LIMIT ONE WITH
�10 PURCHASE
LIMIT TWO WITH
MO PURCHASE
6Vi OZ.
cans
LIMIT TWO WITH
�10 PURCHASE
Single
rolls
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open Sunday 7 a.m. - 11 p.m. Mon. - Sat. 7 a.m. - 12 midnight
PRICES EFFECTIVE SUN MAR. 20 THRU SAT MAR. 26, 1988. QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED.
1





THE EAST CAROUN1 AN
MARCH 24,1988
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
BRODVS - Entry level office position for
light secretarial and data entry. Must be
proficient with personal computer.
Flexible scheduling, approximately 15
hours per week. Apply in person,
Brody's, Carolina East Mall, M-W, 2-4
p.m.
BENETTON Part time, self-help
wanted. Apply in person between hours
of 10-12 or 3-6 p.m. 638-B E. Arlington
Blvd Greenville, NC. 27858. 355-7473.
WORK AT THE BEACH; Have A Ball!
Coastal restaurant needs summer cooks,
bartenders and waits. Above average pay
and excellent benefits. Full time
schedules available in April, weekend
schedules available now. Contact
Papagayo in Atlantic Beach, 919-247-
7876, between 2 p.m. - 8 p.m WedSun.
Ask for Mary or Kevin.
DIRECTOR OF MUSIC:
Responsibilities include directing adult
and children choirs, hand bell choir, and
organist for worship services. Send
resume to Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church, 811 E. Mulberry St Goldsboro,
NC 27530. Phone 1-735-0128.
WANTED: Coach for a summer swim
team, late May until Aug. 7. Must have
experience or have been a member of a
swim team. Applicant could attend
summer school from 11-3 p.m if desired.
For more info contact Bill Howerin 823-
5111 -W.
HELP WANTED: Part-time interior
design student - send resume to:
Designer, 3010 East 10th St Greenville,
N.C.
� Th
Need a summer job at the beach?
Looking for excellent pay, benefits,
and flexible hours?
Then apply at the Food Lion store
located in Market Place (Southern
Shored, or U.S. 158 By Pass (Nags
Head), or at your placement office.
Work for the most progressive and
stable grocery chain in the United
States, Food Lion, Inc.
Positions available in all
departments with various shifts.
Apply at your convenience and
secure your summer job NOW!
Remember if you are going to be
where the action is in Nags Head,
North Carolina, then you will also
want to be working for the best -
FOOD LION.
Equal Opportunity
Employer
SERVICES OFFERED
TOP QUALITY TYPING: SI.50 per
page. Resume SI 5.00 - call Joy at 758-7423,
call from 6-9 p.m.
PARTY ANIMALS Balloons
Delivered in Costume Gorilla-Grams,
Gator-Grams, Penguin too Male
Stripper Birthdays etc. 830-1823.
CARS WAXED: Student washes,
polishes, & waxes cars. Good Job, Good
Price -$25.00. Call 752-2839.
SOUND MIXTURES D.J. SERVICE has
the music to move the crowd, (onto the
dancefloor, not out the door!) The right
songs, the right timing, the right mix.
For a good time, call 752-4916, Bob.
TYPING & WORD PROCESSING:
Letter QualityLaser Printing. Rush Jobs
Accepted. Designer Type 752-1933.
AIRBRUSH ARTWORKS Got a rad
idea and want it on a T-shirt? Hot colors
and artwork reproduced w Airbrush
Artwork! T-Shirt, Sweatshirts, Banners.
Handpainted one of a kind art work
(won't wash out). Professionally
airbrush in g 1980-1988 recently came up
from Daytona, FLA. Paul Hill 752-0607.
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICES: We
offer typing and photocopying services.
We also sell software and computer
diskettes. 24 hours in and out.
Guaranteed typing on paper up to 20
hand written pages. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbie's) Greenville, N.C. 752-
3694.
FOR SALE
SURFBOARDS for sale: A 6'0" Rip Curl
thruster with Trac-top for $130.00 and a
5'11" Kim Hickman thruster for $70.00
Great buys. Call 758-5300 and ask for
Tim.
WHY WAIT until Friday when there's
everyday at Famous Pizza. Stop by for
pitchers. $1.99 and $2.99.
BIKE FOR SALE: Brand new Schwinn 10
speed, tan-bronze. Perfect condition,
only used once. $120.00 For more
information, call Barbara at 758-7114.
FOR SALE: 1987 Honda Scooter, brand
new, never ridden. Elite 50. 1984 Chev.
Corvette, 40,000 miles, excellent
condition. Peavey mace amp with 4 x 12"
speaker cabinet.
AMSTRAD WORD PROCESSOR need
to sell! $400 brand new. Plus two lofts or
single! Matching! Comes with 2 shelves
plus desk top. Call 758-9285.
FOR SALE: 1981 Datsun 210, 5-speed,
AM-FM cassette, steel-belted radial tires,
dependable and good on gas. $1,000.00.
Call 551-2469, 8:00-5:00, and 756-8720
evenings.
BUY ONE GET ONE FREE! Buy a 10 inch,
1 topping for $8.00, get one free. Buy a 16
inch, 1 topping for $10.50, get one free. Call
for fast, free, delivery. 757-0731 or 757-
1278. Famous Pizza.
IS IT TRUE you can buy Jeeps for $44.00
through the U.S. government? Get the
facts today! 1-312-742-1142 Ext. 5271-A.
COUCH FOR SALE at $25.00 and a
recliner for sale at $15.00. Call 752-0661
and ask for Lisa.
FREE-FREE-FREE. Subs delivered free.
Order an 8 or 12 inch sub and receive a 16
oz. drink free. Call Famous Pizza at 757-
0731 or 757-1278. Delivery only.
FOR SALE: Easter Mini-Lop rabbit, great
pet, litter box trained, $30.00 includes
cage, food and bedding. Call Mac at 758-
8371.
ON A TIGHT BUDGET? Come join your
friends at Famous Pizza for a Meal Deal.
Hamburgers and sandwiches served
with fries and a drink only $2.49. Not
valid on delivery.
RINGGOLD TOWERS condo for sale-B-
unit, 2nd flor, fully furnished. Tax
market-value, $43,730.00. Make me an
offer. 919-787-1378.
LARGE, DORM-SIZED Sears
refrigerator with freezer; excellent
condition, $100.00. Call 752-2474 after 5:30
p.m.
TROLLS TUX AND TEES-Don't pay
high prices for your formal wear, try
Trolls Tux and Tees for your formal
needs. Traditional and designer models.
Special fraternity rates. 757-1007 or 830-
1447.
FOR SALE: Entertainment centerwall
unit for $60.00. No assclmbly required
Also, aqua blue carpet with padding 12' x
14 $50.00 call Travis or Dianna at 757-
3543.
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed $114.00
per month. 830 4910 Tar River Estates.
EASTBROOK APARTMENT for sub
lease, available May 15-August 15, 1988.
Dishwasher, ac, swimming pool and
bus service. Please call Deborah at 758-
1075 for any questions.
ROOMMATE FOR ROCKY MOUNT
NEEDED: Female May graduate needs a
female Mav or summer graduate to share
a 2 bedroom apartment in Rocky Mount.
Please call Elizabeth at 758 4265 or 758-
1880 if interested.
ROOM FOR RENT: $125.00 per month
plus deposit Available April 1st. Phone
Art at 757-3543 alter 5:00 p.m Near
campus.
ROOM AND BOARD available, near
campus for non-smoking female in
exchange for assisting with household
chores. 757-1798.
SPRING SPECIAL -Fairlanc Farms
Apartments-2 bedroom2 bath
apartment, 894 Sq. ft, 1 month free rent
with 12 month lease, $95.00 security
deposit, 355-2198.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom apartment, sub
lease for May, June and July with an
option to rent. $320.00 a month For more
information, call 830-0256.
TOWNHOUSE APARTMENT to
sublet. $300.00 per month Central heat
and air, pool, fullv carpeted. 7576423
days, 919-975-2481 evenings (call collect).
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Available May 8 to share 3 bedroom
apartment at Wilson Acres. Private
bedroom, 13 rent and utilities, furnished
except for bedroom. Non-smoker. Call
Dawn or Corey at 758 7368 or leave
message.
ROOMMATE WANTED for summer. V
3 rent, 13 utilities. Close to campus,
furnished bedroom. Please call 752-
5630, before 10:00 p.m.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed ASAP
to share two bedroom townhouse in quiet
area. Will have own room. Rent $125.00
13 utilities. Call 355-4647.
NEED A NEW HOME? Share 2 bed2
bath, $145.00 pllis1 utilities, ft) minute
commute, call Michael, 756-2491.
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apartments for
rent. Furnished. Contact Hollie
Simonowich at 752-2865.
PERSONALS
TO THE MASTURBATOR: preppily
clad in green sweater and beige pants,
who I caught jacking off outside my
bedroom window midnight Sunday the
20th just a quick thank you for showing
me a disgusting new side to your already
perverted gender.
FAST . . .FUN . . .FOOD. Pizzas,
sandwiches, subs, salads, lasagne,
spaghetti, and . . .beer. Fast free delivery.
Call Famous Pizza. 757-1278 or 757-0731.
ALL INTERESTED GIRLS: Its your
chance to find out about THE GREEK
LIFE. 1988 Sorority Fall Rush Interest
meeting-Thursday, March 24 at 7:00 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium. For more
information, call 757-6823.
ONCE AGAIN a reminder of who rules
Friday Happy Hour downtown, it's Pi
Kappa Phi as usual and we will continue
to rage until the police break it up.
HAYES? Yes, Mike Hayes. All of you
students who are in the "Mike 1 layes Fan
Club there will be a cocktail party in
honor of this great leader on Saturday
evening at 9:00 at the home of Morris,
Russo, and McDowell Refreshments will
be served.
HEY BOTH OF YOU: Sorry about all the
secrets, we just think exactly alike! Don't
take it personally, but there are just some
things ya'll don't need to know! 1 lope the
lines of communication stay open; but
who knows when there is the pinky and
MUMS THE WORD?! Get psyched for
this weekend, we are! One last reminder:
If ya'll pass out, you'll get locked in the
car See ya at 2:00! Love ya, us.
AMANDA: Sunday night? You messed
up again. Frosty's and crackers: are we
eating again? Your friends are goofballs
and one is a hosebag. Are you blind?
Where's Otis? I don't think your parents
exist. What a liar. Appreciated the picnic.
Where's my card? My shirt? Your
earring? Late again? My directions were
perfect. Where's the pool? Tip not
included, enjoy the atmoshpeere. Spring
cocktail? I'll be on the wall Spend, spend,
spend. Anytime.
WE ARRIVED in green with G.G.Ds
and Alpha Sigs on the scene. We danced,
drank, and played pool all night, until a
few of us began to lose sight. So, let's
party again another night! Love, the
Zeta's.
BEST BODS. Bikinis, beer, bodacious1!
Check out all of the above at The New
Deli on Monday, mercy.
PEEJY AND ROSOCE: Thanks to you
two dudes Pika Racquetball rules this
campus. Congrats on the All Campus
Win 2 vcars straight.
SAE: The social at the Rotary was one of
lots of fun, competing in all the contests,
that we wished we would have won
Getting to know one another, for the first
time, made us all realize that y'all are
really fine! We also enjoyed the party at
your house on Saturdav night, for the
celebration of your initiation that made it
just right. We really wish y'all the best of
luck and hope that we can do something
together real soon love, the AZD's.
PROUD OWNER oi a fabulous bod?
Then enter the best contest at ECU and
reap the rewards that aerobics, jogging or
just the big man above has given you. Call
758-5012 for more information.
TO ALL ECU GREEKS: We want to wish
everyone a safe and happy Easter break
Love, The Alpha Phi's.
CONGRATULATIONS to the 1990 Ol
class: Come down to Grog's tonight for a
I lappy I four to celebrate! I tope to see
you there class of '89.
DONNY PEACOCK-congrats on your
engagement and good luck at Corrigan's
tonight. Elena.
MICHELLE S. Your birthday was a blast'
Can't wait to party again during Easter in
Myrtle Beach. I'm glad I finally got to
meet your Western Lambda Chi guy-you
were right! Sarah.
PIKA PLEDGES: Its been hell as we can
tell. When the week is done let's have
some fun. With parties and the formal,
Monday morning won't be normal!
We're thinking about you. Love, the little
sisters.
ATTENTION A! L HAPPY CAMPERS:
The night will soon be here, full of karma,
fun, and yes, six kegs of beer. The Red
I louse is ready for some rockin and Babs
has to itch to throw another Bash, so I
hope you'll be there, to help us get
trashed. Friday.
Announcements
PI KAPPA ALPHA-The Founders Day
weekend is finally upon us, To a Pike this
means serious business; On Friday with
the Caravan's quest for Myrtle, It's
enough to make a young girl's blood
curdle; The guys in their tuxes and the
ladies in their gowns, This will surely be
the most wanted ticket in town; With
I lodges at the Pika I lelm, This is our
celebration of a tremendous realm; To
our Seniors this is the highpoint of their
glorious task, so help them out if they
should lose their flask; When the dust has
finally settled and the cheers vanished
from our ears, To a Pike this moment will
be cherished for many years! 1 lappy
Founder's Day, Pikas
CHIPS, DIPS, CHAINS, WHIPS. Pump
up the volume. Crazy Mar was there,
were you? Thanks Easter Bunny, Bok-
Bok. Great gift idea! Wilma! Tea for two.
Get a grip, get a clue, I have fun when I'm
with you. Naked twister, anyone?
YO CRAIG! I lope all is cool, don't stress
out. Thanks for your help Sunday I hope
you arc happy, a personal for no specific
reason. Mary.
ALL ECU GREEKS: Greek Week is right
around the corner. Get psyched for the
second annual Alpha Sigma Phi and
Alpha Phi Tequila" kill off. Andale,
Andale, Arriba
MAGS I'm here for you, always Kathie
NEED YOUR CAR WASHED? Come to
Famous Pizza on Sunday, March 27th
from 1.00-until. Help Zeta Tau Alpha
support the Association for Retarded
Citizens
PAM-This is your long distance personal
from Chapel I Iill The last few weekends
have been great. I hope they are a hint of
more to come. Can't wait for our trip to
D.C. Thinking of you from the hill
feffrey.
GET READY-Apnl 8 at Lambda Chi
Alpha. All campus party with Locals
Only and The Usuals. BYOB. tickcN on
sale in front of Student Store week of
April 4.
CAR WASH � Sat. March 26th at the
10th St. Fuel Doc. 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Sponsored by the fine pledges of Sigma
Phi Epsilon.
NOW AT FIZZ
Tonight, March 24 th and Saturday,
March 26th - 10 p.m. until.
MARK JOHNSON
FIZZ Presents 88 Spring Bash
Mar. 27, 4 p.m. til Free BBQ Pi?.
Drink it Beer Specials, Good Music,
Outside Deck Open for Spring '88.
$2 Cover Charge
LOST Blck and white male cat with red
collar and greensboro rabies tages-Holly
St. and 4th St. area. 758-6998.
CONGRATULATIONS to the Delta
Zeta Basketball team for a fantastic
season! Beth Hopkins, Melissa Lord,
Sharon Jackson, Holly Condrey, Robin
Morrison, Nora Stevens, Nancy Schuster
We love you! The Sisters and pledges of
Delta Zeta.
THOMAS JOWANZA IN 820: Happy
21st birthday! We can finally go to The
Rio and drink marguritas legally! 1 lave a
great one-you deserve it! Love, Fu Fu
ATTENTION ECU STUDENTS: Watch
out, it's coming, only 2 weeks away
before you see ECU's Dreamgir!
Calendar. It's full of color and 14 months-
Watch for it, Pika.
TWO MORE DAYS, we can hardly wait,
what will happen is only fate; so grab
your date and hit the road; DZ is Va
Beach bound in the partyin' mode,
lkxgying and partying all thru the night,
Sunday morning will be a fright, Ladio
in Limos and hot men in tux-it'11 all be
worth those hard earned bucks, All
equipped with trunks, shades and stash,
on the beach the DZ bash; Driving home
will bring a tear but you'll know wh
only happens once a year!
SAE HAPPY HOUR at the Llbo, Fri
from 4-7. S2.00 Teas, why drive anywhere
else.
SIG EP � Yes "D" team won a game
Who believes it7 Next game is Tues
Check the board for hitting pra �
Regular "D" team practice will resume at
Cubbies this week
ZETA TAU ALPHA car wash Come
drink a few at Famous Pia while you
wait to have your car washed" March
27th, 100-until.
PIKAS BEST BOD CONTEST: Ir you've
got what it takes and you want to flaunt it
tor big daddy bucks or other pnes then
call 758-5012 to enter for Mondays contest
H The New Peh
A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E 5th Street
�Looted Near
�Acrws From ! bgbtva) PfcroJ Sutior.
Limited Offer - $275 a month
Mad I or Tommv VViiiurrs
756-7815 or �M�97
.�open-Apt 1,12 530pja
�AZALEA GARDENS
.rj Bad quiet one bedroom furnished
tpinmrnti, merry efficient free water and
STHer, optional wishers, dryrrs, able TV.
Cjjup� oi smje aruy.Vl-&��wrt.k. tertw.
Vise MOBUXDOMf.HEMMSwplns.
� Aputmenl �nd mobile homes in KzAiet
Gardens neat Brook Valcy Country Club
Contact' T or Tommy Williams
56-7S1S '
SALES POSITION
AVAILABLE
APPLY IN PERSON AT
THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
APPLICANTS MUST HAVE:
�EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION SKILLS
�COMPUTER EXPERIENCE AND TYPING
�BE WILLING TO START TRAINING IN APRIL
PLEASE INCLUDE RESUME
NO PHONE CALLS
KERYGMA
A Bible study for those who are serious
about studying the Bible. Weekly meet-
ings (tentatively Tues. afternoon) will be
scheduled to accomodate those who are
interested. Kerygma is an interdenomina-
tional program sponsored by Presbyte-
rian Campus Ministry. For more infor.
Call Mike at 752-7240.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
There will be meetings every Thursday
at 6:00 in the culture center. Everybody
welcome.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
The ECU College Republicans will
meet every Tuesday night in room 221
Mendenhall at 7 p.m. Call 758-5775 or 752-
3587.
Students for Economic Democracy will
meet every Sunday from 7:00 p.m. in
Mendenhall 8-D. For more information,
call 758-9760 or 746-6049.
FCU FRISBEE CLUB
There will be practice every Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday at 2:30 on In-
tramural Fields 5 and 6 behind Minges
Colliseum and on Sunday at 2.00. New
players welcome
PRIME TIME
Prime Time, sponsored by Campus
Crusade for Christ, meets every Thursday
at 750 p.m. in Brewster C-103. Everyone is
welcome.
fHRTSTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Friday nights are ALIVE more than
ever before! Join us at Jenkins Auditorium
(Art Building) at 8:00 pjn. Every FRIDAY
NIGHT for Christiani FeUowraWp and
, teaching where JESUS IS LORD!
CAMPUS MINISTRIES
Worship God and celebrate Commun-
ion this Wednesday night at 5:00 p.m. at
the Methodist Student Center. Also avail-
able: all-you-can-eat meal which is $2.00
at the door, $1.50 in advance. Call 758-2030
for reservations. Sponsored by Presbyte-
rian and Methodist Campus Ministries.
CHAMBER MUSIC
The 1988-1989 Chamber music Series
attractions include: Buswell-Parnas-Lu-
visi Trio, National Gallery of Art Vocal
Ensemble, Tokyo String Quartet, and
OREGON. For a brochure detailing the
events, contact the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center, 757-6611, ext.
266. Office hours are 11:00 a.m6:00 pjn
Monday-Friday. This series is co-spon-
sored by the Department of University
Unions and the School of Music.
PERFORMING ARTS
The 1988-1989 Performing Arts Series is
sponsoring the following events: The
Ohio Ballet, Wynton Marsalis, The Acting
Company, The Atlanta Symphony, PHI-
LADANCO, The N.Y. Gilbert and Sulli-
van Players in Pirates of Penzance, The
Polish National Radio Orchestra, CABA-
RET, The ECUNC Symphonies in con-
cert with SPECIAL GUEST PIANIST
KAREN SHAW, and Nadja Salerno-Son-
nenberg. For a brochure detailing the
events contact the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall, 757-6611, ext. 266. Office
hours are 11:00 a.m6:00 p.m Monday-
Friday.
STUDENT REGISTRATION
General College students should con-
tact their advisers the week of March 21-25
to make arrangements for academic ad-
vising for first and second summer ses-
sions and fall semester, 1988. Early regis-
tration will begin March 28 and end April
4.
NASWCORSO
Wanted: Social Work Criminal Justice
majors and intended majors, to attend
meetings. Held the 2nd and 4th Monday
each month, at 4:00 p.m in Allied Health
bldg room 110.
SLAP
All General College students who have
indicated a desire to major in Speech-
Language and Auditory Pathology and
have R. Muzzarelli as their advisor are to
meet on Wednesday, March 23 at 5:00
p.m. in Brewster D101. Advising for early
registration will take place at that time.
Others interested in SLAP should contact
the department-757-6961.
OUTDOOR THERAPY
Worshop sponsored by the LSS-S and
LSS4700, March 19,9:00-4:00 at River Park
North. Lunch included. Open to students
($12.50) and professionals ($25.00). Pre-
register and pre-pay by March 9th at the
LSS Building. Limited to 30 participants.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
Volunteers are needed to help with the
1988 Greenville-Pitt County Special
Olympics Games which will be held on
Friday April 15, 1988, at E.B. Aycock Jun-
ior High School in Greenville. Volunteers
must be able to work from 9:00 a.m. to
2:00p.m. If you are interested, you need to
attend a volunteer training session in
Biology 103 on Tuesday, April 12 at 5:00
p.m. For more information, call Leslie
Wooles at 830-4551.
CQQP-EP
Students holding North Carolina Real
Estate Sales license are neede for positions
with major resort developer located in NC
mountains, for more information contact
Cooperative Education, 2nd floor, New
Classroom Building.
COUNSELING rFNITFtt
Making a Major Decision Group: This
program is designed to aid students in
choosing an academic major in a small
group format. Each participant will also
receive individual aid from the group
leader if desired. Group participants will
increase self knowledge of their interests,
values and abilities; learn how these relate
to majors and career areas at ECU; and
narrow their options through a systematic
career decision making process. The Ma-
jor Decision Group will meet: March 21,
23, 25 in 329 Wright Building, from 4-5
p.m.(attend all three meetings). Although
advance registration is not required, we
would appreciate advance notification of
interest to insure that we have adequate
materials on hand. Please contact the
Counseling Center in 316 Wright Building
(757-6661) for further information or to let
us know you plan to attend.
CONTINUING EP,
The following Personal Development
Courses will be held: Money Matters
(starts March 15); Guitar (starts March 15);
Scuba (starts March 15); Drawing with
Colored Pencils (starts March 17); Begin-
ning Calligraphy (starts May 19). Contact
Continuing Education, Erwin Hall for
more information.
WOMEN'S FRISBEE CLUB
Practice will be held Tuesday, Wednes-
day and Thursday from 3:30 until, at the
bottom of College Hill. All interested
players should attend. Those who have
received forms need to have them com-
pleted and ready to turn in.
MARSHAUS
Applications are not being accepted in
room 214 Whichard Building. You must
have a 3.0 and be a junior at the end of the
1988 spring sememster. Last day to apply
is March 23.
OVERSEASJjFV,
Student internships interested in
spending a summer (or longer) in remote
parts of the world? The Overseas Devel-
opment Network is seeking several con-
cerned, committed students and recent
graduates who are interested in develop-
ment. Internships are available in India,
Bangladesh, Latin America, the Philippi-
nes, and the Appalachian Mountains.
Financial assistance is available. Contact
Marianne Exum for more information at
home 752-2389 or work 757-6271. Appli-
cation deadline is March 15, 1988.
SLAP
All General College students who have
indicated a desire to major in Speech-
Language and Auditory Pathology and
have R. Muzzarelli as their advisor are to
meet on Wednesday, March 23 at 5:00
p.m. in Brewster D101. Advising for early
registration will take place at that time.
Others interested in SLAP should contact
the department-757-6961.
ECA
Fellowship of Christian Athletes will
meet every Tuesday at 9.30 at the Pirate
Club. Coaches, athletes, and others are
welcome to attend.
GAY COMMLINTTY
Greenville Gay Community is a group
formed last fall to meet the needs of the
gay and lesibian Community in
Greenville. The group meets every othber
week at different locations in Greenville.
For more information please call and ask
for Charley at 752-2675.
AI
Amnesty International meets every
fourth Wednesday, St Pauls Epicopal
Church, 3rd St. Greenville. Next meeting
March 23.
CAMPUS GIRL SCQUS
Tuesday meeting at 1:30 p.m in Men
denhall. Your girl scout cookies are in For
further information call Nancv Ludwig at
738-6701 after 5 p.m.
BRASS QUINTET
The Department of University Unions
presents The Empire Brass, America l
finest brass quintet, on Friday, Apnl 8,
1988, at 8:00 p.m. in Wright Auditorium
This group's repertoire of ovor 300 work?
is unparalleled in diversity and qualitv
SPECIAL NOTE: There will be an oppor-
tunity for you to meet The Empire Brass
following their performance at East Caro-
lina University. For further information
on the reception contact: WTEB Radio,
Craven Community College, P.O. Box
885, New Bern, N.C. 28560, or call (919)
638-3434. For further ticket information
contact: The Central Ticket Office, men
denhall Student Center, phone 757-6611,
ext. 266. Office hours are Monday-Fridav,
1100 a.m6:00 p.m.
SRA
Attention Residence Hall Students:
Today's the last day to file for a position in
the Residence Hall System. If vou are
interested, see your Residence Hall
Director for filing slips or any additional
information. The candidate's meeting will
be at 6:00 in Mendenhall Student Center.
Check at the front desk for the room
number.
SUBJECTS NEFPFP
ine Human Performance Lab is
looking for responsible males to
Palpate in a musde function study
Potential subjects should be 18 to 30 years
old and presently not involved in a weight
trauung program. Compensation will
In�Ki0r con,Pletin8 ���� study,
terestedpersons should contact T
Evans at 757-6497 or 756-7160.
Pell
WASHINGTON, D.C.
Pell Grant checks for rmi,
students during the l
school year may get sma
vanish entirely, the U.S.
Education warned c
around the country.
As many as 53,000 low
students could lose the)
Grants while 1.2 millions
could get smaller grants n
because the government i
$99 million short in n
budget, the adminis
warned.
In a Feb. 1 "Dear Coll
letter to campuses, Fd
Dept. officials blamed
for the shortfall, sayii .
the maximum Pell Grant tn
for 1988 without ap i i
enough money to givt
that much more.
To solve the problem,
partment said it Will eitht
$31 off every Pell
Anno
DELIA51 CM TH
Delta Sigma Theta �
all interested ladies to
Tea" Sur.dav, March 2 1988 7
the Cultural Center
nniRFLTFACHL
The Foreign and Domes
Organization needs tea
all fields fh m Kind, rg
College to fill �
vacancies both at h m
18, our organ;at
vacancies and locating tea
foreign countries and
Out information is free
opportune time when there .�
teachers than teaching pos
you wish adds: -
our organization, j
National Teach - -
Universal Teachers Bo
Oregon 97208.
UMYrLRSlTYjCH O R
The University Choral,
direction of Dr. Kh
cordially invites student
staff to their Spring C
March27.lQSS.8prr '
Hall.
Meeting "today" in rm !
p.p. S� sure fo bring 3'our F
receipts for the fundraiser
must attend; ejections for m
officers will be held. Thursday :
be a speaker, Ed Adams CM
Channel 9 to talk about TV a
1032 of the New Buildir g
HANG GLIDINC,
Registration for Intramural
Recreation Hang Gliding
from March 21-April 5
meeting will be held on April e?.
The activity date will be on Api
more info call 757-6387
WHITE WATER RA1
Registration for Inb
Recreation White Water Rai
held from March 21-April 5
meeting will be held on Apr
Activity dates are from Apr
more info , call 7? 6387
WINDSURFING
Registration for Intram
Recreation Windsurfing will
March 14-March 28 Activit)
be announced For more ml
6387
HILLEL
There will be a bagd and
Sunday. March 2th fri tn I
Temple Bavt Shal or g
will show a comedy movie
dunng the brunch If you need
outside the front entrance ol
between 1230-12:45 O.
430 if vou need more infom
FRISBEE CLUB
ECU'S IRATE Fnsbee Qub
practicing at 3:00 Tues Thur- I
at the bottom of College Hill C
and play Ultimate with
Championship contenders tn th�
to be the best
POLISH LIBRARIAJ
On Friday 25 March at 3
room 1031, General Classroom E
Dr. Aniela Kolbuszewska Univ.
Wroclaw, will present a lei I
university libraries in Poland
Hill follow the lecture AH are .
attend.
ALPHA RHQ Ml F
Alpha Rho Mu Psi is having a
Sat. march 26 at the Hardee's on C
che Street.
CANOE TRIP
Registration for the Intra
Outdoor Recreation Canoe Trip
held from April 5-Apnl 18 The 1
meeting will be on April 20 at
Activity dates will be from Apr
For more info call 757-6387.
ATiTIC
COMedY
WED
The
COMedY
ZCNE
WED
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
752-7903
� l � II,
- , � . ��





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 24,1988
- and white male cat with red
sboro rabies tapes I lolly
area ; f0US
RATULATIONS to the Delta
team tor a fantastic
kins Melissa Lord,
ksor Hoih Condrey Kobin
Stevens an Vhuster.
he Sisters and pledges of
- . m W IN $20 Happy
kVe can tinalh vv to The
� i- legall) ' 1 lave a
�' : ove Fu Fu.
M STUDENTS: Watch
. ; weeks away
- team girl
d 14 months
DAYS �rdl) wait;
so gTab
-it the � Z is a
,iP mode;
I thru the night
he a tnght Ladies
in ru it U all be
earned bucks; All
- uides and stash,
riving home
- w whv this
� . � . I ridays
. c an where
a game.
game is Tues.
tting practice
wiU resume at
l LPHA car wash Come
a while you
� ai washed" March
C ONTEST: If you've
want to flaunt it
a then
- for Mondavs contest
ul Place to Live
New 2 Bedroom
leady To Rent
MVERSITi APARTMENTS
- W E 5th Street
� - : Near ECU
ghwa) Patrol Station
CTSaanoatk
-
' - ! 10 p.m.
� AZALEA GARDENS'
la Iraooi tumished
. j tgfatm. free water and
-a. washers, dryers, cable TV.
� v .w .v S39G a fr-nt. to month
�LS coup�es or
���� �- Azalea
. . � . ry i MMtry Club.
rrum a .jra
SITION
BLE
RSON AT
AST
NIAN
. �.�
1ST HAVE:
fN I CATION SKILLS
:nce and typing
TRAINING IN APRIL
DE RESUME
CALLS
� AMPUS GIRL SCOUTS
iy meeting at 130 p m in Men-
irgiiis ut cookies are in. For
mation call Nancy Ludwig at
BRASS QUINTET
rtment of University Unions
Empire Brass, America's
iss quintet, on Fndav, April 8,
it 8:0 p m in Wright Auditorium.
perti tire of owr 300 works
ed in diversity and quality.
NOTE. There will be an oppor-
u to meet The Empire Brass
wing their performance at East Caro-
ruv.TMty For further information
w reception contact: WTEB Radio,
n Community College, P.O. Box
New Bern. NC 28560, or call (919)
44 For further ticket information
intact: The Central Ticket Office, men-
lenhall Student Center, phone 757-6611,
Office hours are Monday-Friday,
� i m I 00 p.m.
SRA
Residence Hall Students:
Ml day to file for a position in
he Residence Hall System. If you are
nterested, see your Residence Hall
Vector for filing slips or any additional
n formation The candidate's meeting will
:x? at 6:00 in Mendenhall Student Center.
heck at the front desk for the room
number.
SUBJECTS NEEDED
The Human Performance Lab is
looking for responsible males to
participate in a muscle function study.
Potential subjects should be 18 to 30 years
old and presently not involved in a weight
training progTam. Compensation will be
S25.00 for completing the study.
Interested persons should contact Todd
Evans at 757-6497 or 756-7160.
Pell grants may lose money
Clip-N-Save
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS) �
Pell Grant checks for millions of
students during the 1988-89
school year may get smaller, or
vanish entirely, the U.S. Dept. of
Education warned colleges
around the country.
As many as 53,000 low-income
students could lose their Pell
Grants while 1.2 million students
could get smaller grants next year
because the government is about
$99 million short in its grant
budget, the administration
warned.
In a Feb. 1 "Dear Colleague"
letter to campuses, Education
Dept officials blamed Congress
tor the shortfall, saving it raised
the maximum Pell Grant to $2,200
tor 1988 without appropriating
enough money to give students
that much more.
To solve the problem, the de-
partment said it will either shave
$31 off everv Pell Grant
recipient's check next year, or cut
as much as $400 from "least
needy" students so the "most
needy" students could get the full
$2,200.
The letter warned the depart-
ment was giving Congress until
April 30 to come up with more
money, or it would start cutting
"least needy" students off the Pell
Grant roles for next year.
"They're telling us that if we
don't do something, they'll do
something harmful complained
Gray Garwood, chief aide of the
House Postsecondary Education
Subcommittee.
Garwood doubts Congress
could meet the deadline � which
the Education Dept. says is neces-
sary because it must establish fi-
nal Pell Grant payment schedules
by April 30 � and questions the
department's numbers.
Congress, depending on a Con-
gressional Budget Office (CBO)
estimate, budgeted $4.42 billion have to give out $4 c ' Mlion Pell
to give out in Pell Grants for the Grants.
1988-89 school year, Garwood CBO estimates, said Charles
said. Saunders of the American Coun-
But the Education Dept using cil on Education, have proven
different estimates, thinks it'll more accurate in the past.
(Q)
VgD
s&
&)
s

Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
and frozen yogurt
321 East 10th St Greenville
758-0000
(WERE NEXT TO WENDYS)
Hank's Newest Treat
The Sunkist Swish
A Refreshing Blend of Orange Sunkish
and Vanilla Ice Cream
Save 50wthis Coupon
,ti
Good Thru 3-31-88
� Clip-N-Save
Announcements
DELTA SIGMA THFTA
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. invites
all interested ladies to attend the "Delta
Tea" Sunday, March 28, 1968, 7:30 p m at
the Cultural Center.
FUTURE TFACHFR-
The Foreign and Domestic Teachers
Organization needs teacher applicants in
all fields from Kindergarten through
College to fill over six hundred teaching
vacancies both at home and abroad Since
1968, our organization has been finding
vacancies and locating teachers both in
foreign countries and in all fifty states.
Our information is free and comes at an
opportune time when there are more
teachers than teaching positions. Should
you wish additional information about
our organization, you may write The
National Teacher's Placement Agency,
Universal Teachers, Box 5231, Portland,
Oregon 97208.
UNIVERSITY CHORALF
The University Chorale, under the
direction of Dr. Rhonda Fleming,
cordially invites students, faculty, and
staff" to their Spring Concert Sunday,
March 27,1988,8 p.m A Fletcher Recital
Hall.
AM A MEMBFRS
Meeting tcsJav " in mi 130 Rawl at 3:30
p.m. He sure to bring your Food Lion
receipts for the fundraiser. All members
must attend; elections for next years
officers will be held. Thursday, there will
be a speaker, Ed Adams CM oi WNCT
Channel 9 to talk about TV advertising in
1032 of the Mew Building.
HANG GLIDING
Registration for Intramural Outdoor
Recreation Hang Gliding will be held
from March 21-April 5. The pre-trip
meeting yvill be held on April 6 at 4 p.m.
The activity date will be on April 9. For
more infocall 757-6387.
WHITE WATER RAFTING
Registration for Intramural Outdoor
Recreation White Water Rafting will be
held from March 21-April 5. The pre-tnp
meeting will be held on April 13 at 4 p.m.
Activity dates are from April 15-17. For
more info call 757-6387.
WINDSURFING
Registration for Intramural Outdoor
Recreation Windsurfing will b u d from
March 14-March 28. Activity uatt are to
be announced. For more info ca.1 757-
6387.
HILLEL
There will be a bagel and lox brunch,
S'mday, March 27th from 1:00-3:45 p.m. at
Temple Bayt Shalon (1420 E. 14th St.). We
will show a comedy movie (T.B.A.)
during the brunch. If you need a ride, meet
outside the front entrance of Mendenhall
between 12:30-12:45. Call Mike at 756-
4930 if vou need more information.
FRISBEE CLUB
ECU'S IRATE Frisbee Club will be
practicing at 3:00 Tues Thurs and Sun.
at the bottom of College Hill. Come out
and play Ultimate with National
Championship contenders in their guest
to be the best.
POLISH LIBRARIAN
On Friday, 25 March, at 3:00 p.m. in
room 1031, General Classroom Building,
Dr. Aniela Kolbuszewska, University of
Wroclaw, will present a lecture on
university libraries in Poland. A reception
will follow the lecture. All are invited to
attend.
ALPHA RHO MU PSI
Alpha Rho Mu Psi is having a car wash
Sat. march 26 at the Hardee's on Contan-
che Street.
CANOE TRIP
Registration for the Intramural
Outdoor Recreation Canoe Trip will be
held from April 5-April 18. The pre-trip
meeting will be on April 20 at 4 p.m.
Activity dates will be from April 22-24.
For more info call 757-6387.
SCEC
Exceptional Children's Week-March
21-25. Meeting on Thursday March 24 at 5
p.m. Sp. 103. kids on the Block presenta-
tion. All Welcome to attend!
SU VISUAL ARTS
All Illumina entrants please pick up
your art at Mendenhall as soon as pos-
sible.
PROD. COMMITTEE
The Student Union Productions
Committee will have a meeting on Tues-
day March 29th at 4:15 All members are to
attend.
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center Is Open
Mon Tues, & Wed. Fri. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
9 a.m. - 2 p.m. & by appointmenl
For an appointment or more infor-
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline,
757-0003
11 1 East Third Street - The Lee Building
Greenville. N. C.
Free Pregnancy Test-
Confidential Counseling
CANiXVCT
ATTENTION COLLEGE SENIORS
The Coast Guard needs officers and you may qualify. Do you want the opportunity to put
that hard earned degree to work for you, job satisfaction and security? $20K starting
salary, quick promotion, free medical and dental benefits, travel and adventure?
If you are age 21-26. hold a BS, BA or higher degree, are in good
health and a U.S. citizen YOU MAY QUALIFY!
Put your degree to work to help others while helping yourself in the Coast Guard! A Coast
Guard Officer recruiting representative will be available to answer any questions you may
have about a career in The Service with a Peace-Time Mission on
Thursday. March 24th, at the Student Supply Store, ECU CAMPUS.
For a free information package or further details call toll free
1-800-345-8230.
THE COAST GUARDAN ARMED SERVICE AND MORE
RACK ROOM SHOES.
i
) BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
I
I
Open MonSat. 10-9
Sunday 1-6
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
10 OFF
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(EXCEPT AIGNER, NIKE AND REEBOK)
AT THE UNDERGROUND
RIK ELLIOT
COMEDIAN
AND
PATRICK BOYD
MAGIC AND GUITAR
�FRIDAY, pj
MARCH 25TH 8:00 P.M. '
'FREE ADMISSION AND
MUNCHIES
rj-x-gdtherins place
ATTIC
The
CoMcdY
2PNE
WED
�The
CdMedi"
2PNE
WED
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
752-7303
THURSDAY
The
Make
Greek Social
FRIDAY
Rolling Stones
Tribute
SATURDAY
w Boogie Monsters
ECU$1
SUNDAY
EUINMRT
Ail AgesNo Alcohol
Served 6-10 p.m.
Rock Against Drugs
GREAT COPIES
GREAT LOCATION
GREAT PRICES
Great hours, too. Kinko s is open early open late and open
weekends For quality copies at a price vou can afford
kinko's
Great copies. Great people.
321 E. 10th Street (919) 752-0875
Monday - Friday 7:OOam - 10:00pm Saturday 9:00am - 6 OOpm
FOUR SHUT,
PIZZA
Fast FREE
Delivery
WITHIH SO MINUTES
758-3300
114 East Tenth Street
GREENVILLE, N.C.
STORE HOURS
SUNTHU 11 AM-1 AM
FRI -SAT11 Am-2AM
WE ACCEPT CHECKS
m. FROM NOW ON WHEN YOU ORDER
PIZZA FROM FOUR STAR PIZZA YOU
WILL RECEIVE TWO PIZZAS FOR
ONE SPECIAL LOW PRICE'
TWO HOT DELICIOUS PIZZAS WITH
FULL PORTIONS OF ThE FRESHEST
POSSIBLE INGREDIENTS AND
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YOU CAN ORDER TWO IDENTICAL
PIZZAS ORTWO DIFFERENT
TOPPING PIZZAS ITS UP TO YOU'
AE SEStBvE Tm� niG"�T TO uMiT
OU� DELIVER B��
PRICES DO NOT INCLUDE TAX
14 TASTY ITEMS
TO CHOOSE FROM
PEPPERON1, SAUSAGE, HAM, GROUND CHUCK, BACON, PINEAPPLE,
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10"10"14"14"
DOUBLEZZSINGLEDOUBLEZZSINGLE
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5 ITEMS FOR THE PRICE OF 4
PEPPERONI, SAUSAGE, MUSHROOMS, ONIONS
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no suBSTmrnoNS
Big 12" Subs. $4.50
HOT OR COLD
ITALIAN, HAM & CHEESE, ROAST BEEF & CHEESE, MEATBALL
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9 ITEMS FOR THE PRICE OF 5
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Diet Pizza (10" Only)
SLICED TOMATOES, MUSHROOMS, GREEN PEPPERS, ONIONS, BLACK
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OPTIONAL TOPPINGS: PINEAPPLE fc HOT PEPPERS
�i coupon
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Green ville"
m m n�-i�
���ni�iiiJ�u,��MWH.
��Wt





v.
THE EAST CAROUNIAN
Entertainment
MARCH 24, 1988 Page 8
Has anyone everseen the real Pantana Bob?
By BILL UPCHURCH
Staff Writer
Has anyone seen Pantana Bob?
This well known character seems
to be verv eUusive. So is his origin.
The caricature of Pantana Bob
was created by Amy Erving. a
ECU alumna, based on the
concept of a hardy English
gentleman, wearing a derby,
drinking a draft from a mug.
When asked about the name.
"Pantana Bob's" owner Bill Spital
slyly smiled and said the origin
was unknown. Doubtful, but that
just adds to the atmosphere of the
club. First a little history.
The Library, Tamberlane, and
Tiki, names not many of us are
familiar with, were dance clubs
that catered to a college crowd
and were open before 1977. In
1977, the building located at 519
Cotanche St. became Pantana
Bobs. Founded by Spital,
Pantana's quickly became a
popular downtown night club.
The crowds have never stopped
coming.
One reason Pantana's has
remained popular: many changes
have since been made to increase
the appeal of the bar and to keep
pace with the ever changing
attitudes of college students.
The bar was origionally located
near the entrance where the foos-
ball tables are now, but was
moved to the middle, because the
back of the club "looked like a
cave according to Spital. This
move also made your favorite
beverage easier to obtain due to a
larger bar area.
The wood and old logs on the
walls are partially covered by
fireplace mantles, various mirrors
and old advertising signs. This
idea was borrowed by Spital from
bars he frequented in Atlanta,
GA.
The back of the bar originally
had bean-bag chairs and one of
the first projection screen TV's in
Greenville. Also, there was a
stainless steel dance floor, left
over from the previous clubs.
In the past Pantana's opened
every day at 4 p.m. to serve
afternoon partiers. Hard rock
music could be heard contantlv.
In 1983 Spital and partner Bo
LaPrade, along with the entire
staff of PB's, extensively
remodelled the bar.
A gazebo was installed where
the dance floor was previously
located. This gave patrons
somewhere to escape the crowds
and also added the atmosphere.
Pool tables, bar stools and a long
bar replaced the bean-bag chairs.
The original projection TV is still
on the wall.
Pantana's now opens at 9p.m.
Monday through Thursday and
Saturday. They open Fridays at 4
p.m. The music is upbeat rock and
roll by popular artist such as
Sting, The Cult, Led Zepplin,
Simple Minds, The Cure and
Jimmy Buffet.
Pantana Bob's became a private
club in the fall of 1983 to attract a
select crowd. Mixed drinks also
became available when Pitt
County passed liquior by the
drink.
Annual Day of Dance
scheduled for Sunday
This is a picture of the outside of Pantana Bob's. It is a nightclub where boss people go, or so our crack reporter
Bill I pchurch sayeth. Anyway, they added this keen awning so the people outside won't get wet. That was night.
(Photo by Hardy Alligood.)
This week's
bossWZMB-
top 13 list
1. Drivinn-Cryin' "Whisper
Tames the Lion" Island Records
2. Robyn Hitchcock "Globe of
Frogs" Relatively' Records
3. The ChurchStarfish"
Ansta Records
4. Snatches of Pink "Send in
the Clowns" Dog Gone It
Records
5. Arms AKimbo "This is Not
the Late Show" 688 Records
6. Coolies "Doug-A Rock
Opera and Comic Book" DB
Records
7. Morrisscy "Viva Hate" Sire
Records
8. Jazz Butcher "Fishcoteque"
Relatively Records
9. Woodentops "Wooden Foot
Cops On the Highway" CBS
Records
10. Godfathers "Birth, School,
Work, Death" Epic Records
11. Close Lobsters "Foxheads
Stalk This Island" Enigma
12. Slammin' Warusis
"Slammin' Watusis" Epic
Records
Theater Arta Prest Release
Sunday, the 1 heater Arts
Department of ECU will sponsor
the Eleventh Annual Day of
Dance in the studios of the
Messick Theatre Arts Center The
Day of Dance is a series of
workshops for dancers at all
levels of training and will include
master classes in ballet, jazz,
modern and tap. Two guest
artists, Joseph Carow and Liza
Gennaro-Evans, will be featured
this year in ballet and jazz,
respectively.
Carow, a memeber of American
Ballet Theatre for ten years, rose to
the rank of soloist with the
company and danced leading
roles in numerous ballets. He was
assistant to Dimitri Romanoff,
regisseur of the company, and has
toured extensively in thiscountrv
as well as South and Central
America, Russia and Europe.
His varied background also
includes a season with the
Chicago Opera Ballet and acting
roles in the Broadway
productions of Dark of the Moon
and City Center revivals of
Carousel. Finian's Rainbow, and
Music Man. As Associate Director
for New Jersey Ballet Company
for the past twenty years, Carow
has played a vital part in the
development of a small regional
dance group into a nationally
recognized classical
contemporary ballet company
with potential for major impact.
He has been nominated for an
Emmy Award in choreography
for a major network children's
program. His adaption
choreography of Peter and the
Wolf and his choreography for
the first act of The Nutcracker
have become standards in New
Jersev Ballet's repertory.
Gennaro-Evans was a
founding member of The
American Dance Machine,
performing with the Company at
the Ford Theatre in Washington,
D.C. and as soloist in their highly
acclaimed Broadway premier at
the Century Theatre.
She went on to perform in other
Broadway productions and on
television, including galas for
both President Carter and
President Reagan. She a so danced
with Pat Benatar on the MTV.
video choreographed by Michael
Peters.
Gennaro-Evans worked as co-
choreographer for the Guthrie
Theatre's production of
Anything Goes and was assistant
choreographer on Marvin
Hamlisch's Broadway musical
produciton of Smile. She has also
worked as assistant to her father,
Peter Gennaro, on several
producitons including Singing in
the Rain and Lucky Guy.
Gennaro-Evans has taught
JazzTheatre Dance in the U.S.A.
an Canada in various universities
See DAY, page 9
The idea of going private was to
give students, who had attended
college at least one year and who
liked sports, a place to meet
people with similar interest and
education.
Pantana's also began to sponsor
local and college athletic club
teams. If you go to the end of the
bar and look to your right, you
will find a trophy case stocked full
by these teams. Some of the teams
included ECU'S surfing and
rugby teams, and the Greenville
city league baseball teams.
P.Bs also supports Pirate
athletics. Until recently,
Pantana's sold T-shirts with "Beat
State" on the pockets and the
classic Pantana's logo on the back
This tradition will probably
continue with another one of our
rivals, since NC State so unwis ly
decided to end the contest.
Memberships are $15 for a one
year , $25 for a lifetime and $100
for a gold card membership.
The regular one vcar
membership en titles you to useall
of the clubs facilities and to enter
without paying a guest fee. At the
end on one year you will have to
pay a $5 membership renewal fee.
The lifetime membership
includes the above benefits, but
you pay no renewal fee and vou
get one guest in free.
The gold card is the ultimate.
You get all thebencfitsof a regular
member, but you can get two of
your guest in free and vou never
have to wait in line.
Speaking of waiting, a new
front bar was added recentlv to
alleviate congestion at the middle
bar and lighting was added to
brighten up the bar. In addition,
an awning was put on the front of
the building to cover customers
waiting in line during bad
weather.
Something else is new at P.Bs,
or rather is being reinstated:
opening eartv Friday afternoon's.
Once again the ECU student has
become an early afternoon
par tier. vVith great prices and an
outstanding staff, Pantana's is
well suited to accommodate your
partying needs.
Pantana Bob's has become an
institution for ECU students.
Manv people return long after
they have graduated. In fact,
during homecoming weekend, it
seems Pantana's is hosting the
ECU reunion. Almost everybody
who comes back to ECU goes
down to Pantana's to have a dnnk
and remember how things wore,
and how some things never
change.
This is a picture of Liza Gennaro-Evans. She danced in a Pat Benatar
video. My guess is it was the one for "Love is a Battlefield I don't
remember any others that had a lot of dancing. Anyway, Liza will be here
Sunday, so you can ask her what video it was.
"Terra Nova based on true story,
opens Monday in McGinnis
Pickin'the Bones
The evil last laugh of the lama
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
ECU Playhouse Pr�� Eclcwc
In the winter of i911-12, five
Englishmen and five Norwegians
raced to the Antarctic. Only the
five Norwegians returned. "Terra
Nova" is the story of the
Englishmen. Ted Tally's stirring
drama of Robert Falcon Scotf s ill-
fated expedition to the South Pole
is the fourth offering of the East
Carolina Playhouse's 1987-88
season.
Opening night in Monday at
8:15 p.m.inthe McGinnis Theatre.
The play runs through Thursday.
Ironically, Scott's last entry into
his diary which was found on his
frozen body is dated March 29,
1912.
The director, Donald Biehn, a
fine cast and an imaginative
design team have joined forces to
transport the audience to the
distant and frozen universe
known as Antarctica.
In Terra Nova Tally has
alternated scenes of Scott and his
jnen at various stages of their
ordeal with others in which Scott
conducts remembered or
imaginary dialogues. The
dialogues are with his wife,
Kathleen, an independent
woman and companion of
Isadora Duncan and Rodin, and
with Norweigian Roald
Amundsen, who beats Scott to the
South Pole by one month.
Throughout the play, Amundsen
functions as a combination goad,
tempter, and alter ego for Scott.
Scott was a typically
Edwardian, proper English
gentleman convinced of English
superiority. His conquest of the
South Pole will be a human one,
and open rooted in the British
tradition of "playing the game
fairly He plans to have his men
haul their provision-laden sled
over the tricky crevasses through
the frozen Antarctic and back
without the use of huskies.
Amundsen, on the other hand,
will use huskies to pull his sled,
and then will use them as food on
the return trip. This plan, to Scott,
is "not cricket and is not playing
fairly. Amundsen skeptically says
that Scott is a 'man who would
treat dogs like gentleman and
gentlemen like dogs
Scott does reach the South Pole,
only to find that Amundsen's
group had been there, planted the
Norwegian flag and left them a
note. Nonetheless they hoist the
Union Jack and take the famed
photo found with their bodies.
That photo and others are
projected on stage during the
show.
The return journey is savage
and Scott's men falter and fall,
from legs gone lame, from snow
blindness, from madness. The
clash of ideals � common sense
on the one hand, sportsmanship
on the other� is present
throughout the agony of the
journey.
As Scott makes his final entries
in his diary, he is overtaken by the
exhilaration of "rightness of
belonging. "Some men are only
intensely alive for one moment
he writes for the world to read,
See PLAY, page 9
When the lama came and sat on
the couch in the East Carolinain
offices, I don't think He realized
just what He was getting into.
For a week or so it was cool. He
just sat cross-legged on the black
vinyl couch, giving off soothing
karmic vibrations to anyone
sitting about 10 feet from him.
Then Jeff 'Xook-look-iookin' at
my Gucci�" Parker asked if we
too might become enlightened
and not have to talk to anyone
who wasn't boss.
He said yes, because He really
wanted to discuss comics with us.
One of His major concerns was
the fact Kevin Maguire hasn't
drawn the last three issues of
"Justice League International
We too were concerned. So, His
Baldness made a suggestion. He
felt we should journey forth and
find Maguire and return him to
the comic he made great.
If we did this, His Robed Self
said, He could make us full-
fledged lamas and we wouldn't
even have to hang around Tibet
for a long period of time. We
could even hire a couple of
lackeys to do our work.
He sat us down and summoned
forth our astral bodies. This kind
of hurt, as we were not used to this
discipline and due to the fact He
yanked them out of our left
nostrils.
Apparently mis is where the
ethereal sou! resides in the body,
and could explain why all those
bored people pick their noses in
I rl�i ThFv'r rrving tn flv down
to Myrtle Beach on a booger.
Anyway. We floated around a
bit getting used to the fact we
were about as substantial as farts
now. Jeff decided to exploit this
odd condition before we began
our quest, so we wafted over to
Cotten Dorm to see some girls
with no clothes on.
This part of the adventure was
very fun for a white. We found it
very simple to slip in between
girls' clothes and their naughty
bits. But we were in for a
terrifying twist of fate.
The dreaded ECU Association
of Fat Girls Who Write Bad Poetry
decided to hold their first meeting
in that dorm. Jeff got too dose,
and their negative auras almost
sucked him into the cellulite folds
of their nasal cavaries.
I managed to rescue him by
telepathically inducing thoughts
of Chicken McNuggets� into
their brains. This caused them to
sneeze Jeff out, and he floated out
of the dorm onto the street,
obviously shaken.
Suddenly, we heard the lama's
voice in our heads. He said we
were dawdling and that we must
hurry. So we drifted upwards and
headed for New York.
We slipped out of reality into
the astral plane to take a shortcut.
Even here, danger lurkedXosmk
manifestations of all our
adversaries gathered. The
Human Megaphone, Itchy Crotch
tad, Arm Fall Off Boy, and even
one we thought long dead.
Screaming Into the Nigt Boy
head, stunning him. The Human
Megaphone said "HeUo" and the
vibrations shook astral blood out
of my astral ears.
Undaunted, Jeff managed to
grab one of Arm Fall-Off Boy's
loose limbs and knock out the
Human Megaphone. I recovered
then and pushed Itchy Crotch Lad
into Screaming Into the Night
Boy.
We fled the astral plane as they
tried to avoid touching Itchy, lest
his strange power affect them all.
We re-emerged in reality just
outside the disco they film Cub
MTVfcat.
We were shocked to find
Maguire dancing jerkily to the
beat ofTerrence Trent EXarby. We
managed to make ourselves
visible, but Maguire was dancing
so hard he failed to notice us.
We had to get his attention to
ask him if and when he was ever
coming back to draw the justice
League By teiekineticaliv
concentratingon Downtown Julie
Brown's taffeta mini skirt, we
managed to yank it off her.
This had no shocking effect on
the dancing crowd, as she was
wearing leather underwear and
V�� taed the skirt was
meant to come off
We heard die lama faintly
r out to us. Apparently, the
time we had left in our astral
fcnrawa lifted. We daadidte
fc? beaming ottr mtetiton
Into Maguire'iWn,
from him was
fysim We
� hi
J
4
Four actors stuggk to righl tr
a Latin phrast meaning
out.
a
War
star be
Polly Be
recent roles, as
and Remembrance
in the ARC mo
His Lo repi
extremes of her
She reprise her t
ABC's 30-hour m i -
and Remembi
"The Winds I
broadcast next -
"Addicted I
movie in which agi
swindled by a romanl
seek revenge, will app
next Monday.
"I loved pl.t.
Bergen said. "1 lov
weaknesses and sha
understood her and n
her.
"That's why i �
much. She - strong
the scam to take carr
w,frp ripped. Jhem oj Ihl
thing is that "Vivian an Rh
the two extremes oi
see me as having all I
of Vivian, hut I'm
frightened as Rhod
I'm closer to Viviai
When Bergen signed
move it was called
At one time it was ca
Vengeance She
choice, but unprinta
about the new title
"It was a good part
moderate senpt when I �
she said. 'The da
begin work the script haj
drasticallv improved ' I
along there was rr
and it got better and b
Dav of Dar
happens oi
Sunday
Continued from pae.e
and studios including V
Universitv, Radcliff
Universit The America-
Machine Training
North Carolina s owr
Colony.
In addition to the mastei
in ballet and jazz to he tai
Carow and Gennaro
classes will also be tauj
modern and ballet by tl
Dance Facultv Patricia P�
MarvisRav, David VVansl
Patnaa Weeks
All classes for the Da) oj
will be filled on a tirst j
serve basis; therefor
registration isencoura, I
$17, this covering ten
classes that will run from
4:45 pm. Registrant I
27 will begin at 9:30 am
Messick Theatre Arts t erf
Additional details ar
registration torms t
workshop are available t
Department oi Theatn
E.C.U, which has offices)
in the Messick TheatiJ
Center, corner ol I �f
Eastern Streets Foi
information call 7S7 I '
Read
The
East
Carolini'
i
P1
.m !���� ii m
nfii tmmmmm �-





a Bob?
idea or going private was to
students, who had attended
0 at least one vear and who
sports a place to meet
with similar interest and
.tion.
ana salso began to sponsor
md college athletic club
i.Uy ou go to the end of the
if and look to your right, you
ill find a troph case stocked full
ims Some of the teams
led ECU'S surfing and
igby teams and the Greenville
ague baseball teams.
supports Pirate
thletics Until recently,
antana'ssold T-shirts with "Beat
on the pockets and the
issic Pa n ta na s logo on the back.
- tradition will probably
�ntinue with another one of our
v NC State so unwisely
led to end the contest.
ips are $15 for a one
1 - a lifetime and $100
a gold card membership.
regular one vear
entitles you touseall
- facilities and to enter
r�g a guest fee. At the
ne vear you will have to
. a $5 membership renewal fee.
rhe lifetime membership
s the above benefits, but
: pay no renewal fee and you
I one guest in free.
"he gold card is the ultimate,
u get all thebenefitsof a regular
il v u can get two of
free and you never
wait in line.
aking of waiting, a new
nt bar was added recently to
te congestion at the middle
d lighting was added to
n up the bar. In addition,
a wrung was put on the front of
Hiilding to cover customers
aiting in line during bad
feather.
�something else is new at P.Bs,
rather is being, reinstated;
ming early Fridav afternoons.
rice again the ECU student has
an early afternoon
Aith gTeat prices and an
ding staff, Pantana's is
lited to accommodate your
irtying needs.
"antana Bob's has become an
i-titution for ECU students.
lany people return long after
?y have graduated. In fact,
unng homecoming weekend, it
ems Pantana's is hosting the
ICU reunion. Almost everybody
no comes back to ECU goes
town to Pantana's to have a drink
jnd remember how things were,
nd how some things never
ange.
the lama
. stunning him. The Human
Megaphone said "HeUo" and the
nbrations shook astral blood out
f my astral ears.
Undaunted, Jeff managed to
ib one of Arm FaB-OK Boy's!
se limbs and knock out the!
luman Megaphone. I recovered
hhen and pushed Itchy Crotch Lad
into Screaming Into the Night
Boy.
We fled the astral plane as they
Itried to avoid touching Itchy, lest
his strange power affect them a$L
W� re-emerged in reality Jail
outside the disco they film Oub
lMTV8at.
We were shocked to find
iMaguire dancing jerkily to the
VjeatofTeiTenoelVentD'arby.We
I managed to make ourselves
visible, but Maguire was dancing
I so hard he failed to notice us.
We had to get his attention to
ask him if and when he was ever
coming back to draw me justice
League By telekineticaiiy
concentrating on Downtown JuBe
Brown's taffeta mini skirt, ��
managed to yank it off her.
This had no shocking effect on
the dancing crowd, as she wa
wearing leather underwear and
people figured the sldrt w�
meant to come off.
We heard the lama faintly
time we had left in our astral
Iforrmwiahmitod. We decided
try beaming our questions
fcediy into Maguire tinto.
Theor0yceienttt8po9ae
Bdeved from Mwtk
THE EAST CAROLfNIAN
MARCH 24. 1988
Play tells it
like it was
in Antarctica
Continued from page 8
"And this is it Was Scott a hero
or a fool? Tally never makes this
decision for the audience; it is left
up to individual decision.
Single tickets are priced at $5 for
the general public and $4 for ECU
students and groups of 10 or
more.
For further information call
757-6390.
Astral trip is
adventure
Four actors stuggle to right their sled in the based on a true story play, "Terra Nova which is most probably
a Latin phrase meaning something. I have no idea what though. Go see the play, and perhaps you will figure it
out.
Li
War and Remembrance"
star became part of movie
Tolly Bergen says her two most
recent roles, as Rhoda in "War
and Remembrance" and as Vivian
m the ABC movie "Addicted to
His Love" represents the
extremes of her personality.
She reprises her role as Rhoda in
ABC's 30-hour miniseries "War
and Remembrance the sequel to
The Winds of War It will be
broadcast next season on ABC.
Addicted to His Love a
movie in which a group of women
swindled by a romantic con artist
seek revenge, will appear on ABC
next Monday.
"1 loved playin Rhoda
Bergen said. "1 loved .er in all her
weaknesses and shallowness. I
understood her and cared about
her.
"That's why I like Vivian so
much. She's so strong. She sets up
the scam to take care of the jerk
vybp, rpem QrTh,(wr�jcvy
thing is that Vivian an Rhoda are
the two extremes oi me. Teople
see me as having all the strength
of Vivian, but I'm really as
frightened as Rhoda. But I guess
I'm closer to Vivian
When Bergen signed for the
move it was called "Sisterhood
At one time it was called "Sweet
Vengeance She had a few
choice, but unprintable words
about the new title.
"It was a good part but only a
moderate script when I signed
she said. 'The day I arnved to
begin work the script had been
drastically improved. As we went
along there was more rewriting
and it got better and bette r. That's
Day of Dance
happens on
why I think we got such good
people
The movie also stars Barry
Bostwick as the con artist, Erin
Gray, Linda Turl and Dee Wallace
Stone as his other victims and
Colleen Camp as a woman who
helps them in their plot. Arthur
Allan Seidelman directed from a
screenplay by Ronni Simon and
Richard Alfieri.
"It's not a comedy, but there's a
lot of comedy in it said Bergen.
"My biggest scene is very moving,
heartbreaking, but the rest of mv
appearance arc fun. It becomes a
game to get him.
"I'm the oldest and wealthiest
of the women. I play a widow
who's lonely and vulnerable, and
she fell for this very slick man.
When it's over it very nearly
destroys my belief in myself as a
woman. So I have an enormous
axtget and have to make a
decision. I have to expose myself
and my pride to get this done
In "War and Remembrance
she returned to her role as the wife
of Tug Henry (Robert Mitchum),
the naval officer who observes
much of the war effort in the
books by Herman Wouk. Rhoda
has an affair with the scientist
played by Teter Graves.
"I had total sympathy for her
Bergen said. "She had built her
life around her husband. All she
ever wanted was a little
appreciation and affection. When
she no longer got it from him,
when turned elsewhere. She was
shallow, but she had always been
there for her family
After four years with the role,
playing it, rehearsing it, learning
lines and preparing for it, she was
very sad to finally take her leave
of Rhoda.
"The last day was very
traumatic she said. "It was like
walking away from a part of
myself. I had grown very close to
her
Sunday
Continued from page 8
and studios including New York
University, Radcliffe, Boston
University, The American Dance
Machine Training Facility and
North Carolina's own The Lost
Colony.
In addition to the master classes
I in ballet and jazz to be taught by
iCarow and Gennaro-Evans,
j classes will also be taught in tap,
j modern and ballet by the ECU
Dance Faculty: Patricia Pertalion,
MarvisRay, David Wanstreet and
Patricia Weeks.
All classes for the Day o f Dance
will be filled on a first-come, first-
serve basis; therefore, pre-
registration is encouraged. Cost is
$17, this covering four dance
classes that will run from 10 am to
4:45 pm. Registration on March
27 will begin at 9:30 am, in the
Messick Theatre Arts Center.
Additional details and pre-
registration forms for the
workshop are available from the
Department of Theatre Arts,
ECU, which has offices located
in the Messick Theatre Arts
Center, corner of Fifth and
Eastern Streets. For further
information call 757-6390.
Read
The
East
Carolinian
COLLATION
IS NOT A DIRTY WORD . . .
(Ka la shan. ka-) 1. the act. process, or
result of gathering (the sections of a book)
together in proper order for binding.
IT'S OUR BUSINESS
We specialize in duplicating and binding
multiple page documents
-$�
FAST COPIES FOR FAST TIMES
We are open early & late
Next to Chico's in Georgetown Shops
758-2400
Kdu
THE PLAZA
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NAUTILUS
"The Last Chance To Shape
Up Before Summer"
Remaining Spring
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fAimabdlc'sl
I " " RESTAURANT & PUB I
Buy 1 get 1 for
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RIB EYE DINNER
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RIB EYE DINNER PURCHASE & RECEIVE YOUR SECOND
RIB EYE DINNER FOR HALF PRICE. EACH DINNER
INCLUDES POTATO AND TRIP TO OUR SALAD BAR.
Valid thru April 2,1988
One per customer per visit please
Also New Bulbs
In Tanning Studio.
10 Visits $30
758-9584
$25
1002 Evans St.
(corner of 10th & Evans)
Continued from page 8
everyone else, had sold out.
Dejected, we slipped back to the
astral plane.
We were unhampered by our
foes. Itches power had left them
scratching and moaning. We
swam through the purple mists of
the plane, hurring to return to
Greenville before our bodies
melted into flesh Jell-O�, or
something suitably dramatic.
Wafting in the window of the
office, we swooped back up our
respective noses. The lama smiled
at us as we rose to our feet and
stretched out our legs.
" guess we'll never be lamas
now, Jeff. We screwed up 1 said
dejectedly.
"Word was all the
heartbroken illustrator could say.
The lama stood up. He said
something to us, but since His
translator had long since
continued on the lama's speaking
tour, and was currently doing
quite well impersonating His
Tibetr.ess, we couldn't
understand what he said.
He faded away like the memory
of a particularly loud cough in a
9:30 class. We watched as he
vanished. The only sound he
made was a very un-Zen -like evil
laugh.
The whole thing was really not
understandable, and we still
didn't get any lackeys. Bogus.
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Blvd.
756-1579
ALL HAIR SERVICES
MAKEUP-MANICURES
TANNING BEDS
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i
i
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Are You A Fabulous Babe?
Then Come Compete For The Big
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Wanna See Fabulous Babes?
Then Come Suck Some Down And
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Monday the 28th, 9:00 at the New Deli
Call 758-5012 For Info & Sign Up, Entries Still Available
Linda
(Dove
In Concert
Sunday, March 27th 6:00 p.m.
A Former Lead Vocalist With "Truth"
A Nationally Known Contemporary Gospel Group.
St. Paul Pentecostal Holiness Church
10th St. Extension Beyond Hastings Ford & Rivergate Shopping Center
Free Admission
i
mm

iwm�





10 rHEEASTC
VROLINIAN
MARCH 24, 1988
Spike Lee makes another boss movie
I'Uiy.u Ciiumu
Director Spike Lee's
. film a low budget se farce
called She's Gotta Have It �
made him famous. But when the
now successful Lee returned to
rehouse College the Atlanta
school from which he graduated
to shoot his second movie,
he � very well-received. In
i he was asked to leave.
I ee savs it was because the film
a being released across the
ibout class and color
�ns amoung students at a
v liege.
rehouse administrators say
vas because I ee wouldn't tell
m what the movie called
w as about.
I him what the film
it recalls Or. Hugh
it then Morehouse s presi-
�. asn'l inclined to
After the film was being
shot, we began to receive reports
ncerning what it was about
studenl
hat he heard:
it turns out, is
set at a fictitious black southern
college called Mission, where the
students divide themselves into
cliques oi lighter-skinned "wan-
nabees" � as m "want to be
whites � and darker skinned,
lower-income students called
"jig
It all sounded "downgrading
to Gloster, who then told Lee to
get off the school grounds,and the
ban on filming the movie was
extended bv the 5 other presi-
dents whose schools share the
Atlanta University Center (AUC)
campus.
He wouldn't show it AUC
Chancellor Dr. Charles Merideth
said of Lee and the script, "we
couldn't see it, so we said it
couldn't be shot
Lee figured, "I had nothing to
gain by letting them read the
script adding he thought its
subject would be enough to pro-
voke the presidents into exiling
him.
Lee insists "School Daze" is
accurate, that Morehouse was
socially divided along skin tone
and class lines when he attended.
"We exaggerated it (in the film),
but there were cliques
Gloster disagrees. "It (happens)
in black society, yes, but not
among our college students
Merideth also concedes that "a
long time ago there were fraterni-
ties and sororities for light-
skinned people only, but nothing
would suggest that's operative
today"
"It's a lie asserts Dr. Calvert
Smith, president of Morris
Brown, another AUC college.
"You're not going to find that
kind of differentiation on these
college campuses
Campus residents themselves
are not sure.
"There are cliques ovserves
lanet ones, a senior resident at
Spelman, Morehouse's sister
school, "but 1 don't think it's a
matter of skin tone as much as
socioeconomic background
man freshman Tracy Wil-
liams doesn't see divisions of any
kind, noting her circle of friends
are a diverse group.
Classmate Stephanie Brown
thinks "there are (cliques), but it's
not really obvious. Most of the
light-skinned girls hang with
light-skinned girls, and the dark-
skinned girls hang with dark-
skinned girls. But it's not as if they
don't like each other. They just
don't hang together
Morehouse senior John Atkin-
son disagrees. "It doesn't matter
how light your skin is. Everone is
of one race. We stick together.
That's how I see is
"Spike's main aim is to make
films and make money Gloster
says. "Our concern is to protect
our schools while he's doing
that
"His portrayal was sensational
in an effort to make money
Smith adds. "I hope he gets rich,
but not at the expense of black
institutions
Tickets only $2 for
first hour daily.
�D.O.AR
?Police Academy,
Part 5-PG
Masquerade-R
jOari Ikectre
?Action
Jackson-pg
SI.50 All Times
Walkin' The Plank
More movies about switching bodies
w do you figure it - three
- in a row with the same
ic plot?Last year it was Dudley
re and kirk Cameron
in I ike Father.
ion Now we have fudge
;h with his
I Savage, in "Vice
come: George
ientities with his
son Charlie
- Again
lence is
. three movies
. to entertain.
in fact, is a nifty
supernatural
it be from a clever
ment and Ian
ils produced),
n b Brian Gilbert
spired teaming oi
gSavageasthe
- and son.
role reversal is caused bv a
ien skull stolen from a Thai
Like Father, Like Son
tboratory potion; in "IS
in auto crash.
parent. His 11 year-old son lives
most of the time with his mother
who is now remarried. During a
brief visit, father and son touch the
skull and become transformed.
The fun begins, though both
a Chicago
executive who is
� than adequate part-time
Students
art show
on Friday
" eaac
- - : i ol of Art is planning
approach to the Annual
iduate Art Exhibition
pen March 25th.
rst time, the exhibition
prize money
The judges are three prominent
North Carolina Arts
rtmunit) : left Fleming, curator
istern Center for
rary Art in Winston-
em; Lida Lowrey, Head
- r Exhibitions at the
nma Museum of Art in
Ral ind Tom Spleth, noted
ic artist and
iftsman working out of
Prize money will include $400
provided by the Art Enthusiasts
of ECL, a community based
support organization with
membership throughout the
tte. In addition, ECU
Chancellor Richard R. Easkin is
spons ring a Chancellor's
Purchase Award.
According to Perry Nesbitt,
illery Director at Gray Art
Gallery, the changes in format for
the exhibition have been made to
give students an opportunity for
their work to be seen by artworld
persons other than their
professors
"Jurying will keep the show to a
manageable size and most
importantly will give the students
a taste of what it is like to
participate in the beginning levels
oi competition which will reflect
the realities of the art world
Nesbitt explained.
All events are free and open to
the public. Parking is available in
the lots adjoining the Jenkins
Center. A reception will be held
Saturday, at 7:30 p.m. in Gray Art
Gallerv. For more information,
call 757-6336.
victims are distressed by thcirnew
identities. Reinhold is more
interested in rock music and his
pet frog. bu t he reports to the office
and tries to take his way through
matters that are as foreign to him
as trigonometry.
EDDIE MURPHY
RAW
1HE CONCERT M0VI1
C ON SO LI DATE D
THEATRES
Adults $250't"
5:30
CHILDREN
ANYTIME S
BUCCANNER MOVIES
v 756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
Playing Thursday
March 25th-
Sunday March 27th
8:00 p.m. 1 lendrix Theatre
Starts Friday
DEADLY ILLUSION
rated R 1:15-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15
RATED PG EndsTuesA starts Wed. March 30
VICE VERSAV BEETLEJUICE
l: 15-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15 PG

RATED PG-13 Starts Friday
JOHNNY BE GOOD
1:00-3:05 5:10-7:1 5-9:20

44 Mom says the
house just isn't the
same without me,
even though its
a lot cleaner.55
Just because your Mom is tar
away, doesn't mean you can't lv
close. You can still share the love
and laughter on AT&T Long
Distance Service.
It costs less than you think to
hear that she likes the peace and
quiet, but she misses you. So go
ahead, give w air U m a call. You
can clean your room later. Reach
out and touch someone"
AT&T
The right choice.
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Tickets only $2 for
first hour daily.
�D.OA-R
Police Academy,
Part 5-PG
Masquerade-R
� JPkti rkectt
Action
fackson-PG
0 All Times
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 24,1988
sctil
5:30
CHILDREN
ANYTIME $250
MOVIES
us Shopping Center
I SION
i
A

EETLEJUICE
PG

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What it is. Having recieved enlightenment, we
have returned from mountains deep within the
city limits of downtown Tibet to bring you, the
reader, wisdom, fun and games. Right, Boner?
Word, Jeffrey. I'm so enlightened now, I can
command Jennifer Pearson to give me boss
backrubs. Also, we now have a new cartoon
to debut� theUncannv Adventures of
109.
'
Arm Fall-Off
Boy By RACER X
n Comic Book Con af comin'
y l By MIC AH HARRIS
IJ "Heros Are Here" of Goldsboro will hold theirthird annual comic book and basebaU card convention on Sunday,
March 27 at the Wayne Center, 200 West Chestnut Street in downtown Goldsboro.
The convention will feature 25 dealers and special guest Matt Feazell godfather of the stkk figure and creator
of "Cynicalman Feazell recently released a paperback compilation of his comics.
The Con will run from 10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. A dollar admission will be charged. Word.
WANTED: Reader's letters to the Comix Page. Tell as what yon like, dislike, or ask as any questions about
the strips you read. Letters Will Be Printed! We promise! Drop 'em by the East Carolinian in person or by
Intra-Campus Mail.
WANTED: More readers like JenniferPearson, Karl Weathers, and





THFHASTC AROl INIAN
Sports
MARCH 24, 1988 Page �2
Camels ninth inning runs knock off Pirates
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport Kditar
Fast Carolina took a tough 7-4
loss to Campbell University on
the chin Mondav night at
Harrington Field.
The Pirates entered the ninth
inning against the Camels with
the game knotted at 4-4.
Campbell, however exploded for
three runson four hits and a Firate
error in the inning to seize the lead
dnd the victory.
fimmy Creech led off the inning
with a single to centerfield. Tim
Frexler then nailed a double to left
to plaee runners at second and
third with no outs in the inning.
With still no outs recorded.
Randy Hood delivered a two-run
single to center to give the Camels
a t-4 advantage. Campbell gained
an insurance run later in the
inning when Hood scored from
third after an ECU error.
The Pirates, who are in the
midst of preparing tor a trio oi
games this weekend against
fames Madison, the preseason
pick to win the Colonial Athletic
Association, platooned its
pitchers throughout the game.
The process might have cost the
Pirates a win.
Scott Stevens started the game
on the mound for the Pirates and
hurled three scoreless innings.
Stevens struck out seven batters
in the three innings, while
walking none and giving up only
one hit.
We did it (platooned the
pitchers) strictly to get ready for
this weekend Pirate head coach
Gary Overton said. "Each of those
pitchers needed to grow a little
and this was our way of getting it
done. Stevens certainly did a fine
job for us, we couldn't have asked
for more in three innings
Tim Langdon took over the
pitching duties in the game for the
Pirates in the top of the fourth and
gave up a solo homerun to Randv
Wood to put theCamelsoutontop
1-0.
ECU bounced nght back in the
bottom oi the inning with a three-
run burst to grab a 3-1 lead.
Steve McGraw walked to open
up the Pirates part of the inning.
Calvin Brown then powered a
round tripper over the ccnterficld
fence next to boost ECU on top 2-
1. With two outs in the innings, for the season, will try to bounce contest. The Pirates will then host beginningat 1 p m. A single ganm
John Adams singled and put back today when Cleveland State the Dukes of James Madison against jMU will be play
himself into scoring position by invades Harrington for an 8 p.m. Saturday in a doubleheader Sunday at 1 p.m.
stealing second. Whit Whitley did
the rest of the work from there as
he delivered a run-scoring double
for the Bucs' final run of the
inning.
Campbell managed to get even
in the fifth frame as the Pirates
brought in their third hurler of the
night (Johnathon Jenkins). After
Ricky Barrier had reached the first
sack courtesy of a walk, Corey
Satterfield belted a two-run
homer to knot the score at 3-3.
The Camels, now 15-6 for the
year, pushed back on top in the
sixth inning when Chris Mitta
opened the inning with a double.
Mitta then moved to third on an
infield grounder and scored
following a passed ball by Chris
Cauble.
Whitley pulled the Pirates even
in the bottom half of the seventh
when he opened the inning up
with a solo blast.
"I thought both teams played a
fine game until the ninth inning
Overton said. "They just
managed to get the hits at the right
time
East Carolina, who falls to 14-7
��i"1 �'���.
. ' 7 -�
Pirate baseball player Calvin Brown gives a pitch his best swing during an earlier Pirate home "ntest
Harrington Field.The Pirates will be back in action tonight against Cleveland State, i Photo bj Thomas V all
Softballers sweep pair Tuesday; gain 13 wins
East Carolina used a strong
defensive performance to sweep a
pair of Softball games from
Louisburg College Tuesday at
Varsity Field.
The Lady Pirates won the first
game 2-0, while they took an easy
10-2 decision in the nightcap.
The doubleheader sweep by the
Pirates upped their record to 13-3-
1 for the season.
In the opening game, the Pirates
broke on top for a 1-0 lead earlv
when Leslie Cramer scored.
Cramer reached base on a walk.
She later moved to second on a
sacrifice fly by Mona Jackson and
stole third base. Cramer managed
to score when Louisburg walked
three straight ECU batters.
The Pirates added the final run
of the opening game in the fifth
inning.
In the nightcap rout, EC U broke
on top with a 1-0 lead in the firs!
inning.
Jeannie Murray walked and
later moved to second in the
inning on a sacrifice by Cramer.
Murray then scored after Mona
i,i Kson r ipi
an K
cBl
sii
The Pirates Uok i
contn -1 i I the game
inning wl
for a three-run roundti
keyed E( m earl)
ramerled thePira
i n 11 "i (�

1 he Piral
come this Saturday v
travel to Chapel Hill
North Carolina.
� TfM CHAVIHI-R
TKE boxing tournament is set
2
fe
i
Softballer Mona Jackson heads to first after cracking a basehit this past weekend for the Lady Pirates. The
Pirates trael to North Carolina Saturday for their next contest. (Photo by Hardy Alligood)
Pigskin Pig-Out not far away
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
pnng football training drills
have begun and that means that
the 5th Annual Great Pirate
PurpleGold Pigskin Pig-Out
Party is just around the corner.
This year's event, scheduled for
p.m. Area radio stations will also
join in the fun as WRQR, WDLX
and WRNS will all broadcast live
from the stadium area.
The Entertainers will be on
hand Friday from 9 p.m12 a.m.
under the stands at the stadium to
allow all shaggers to enjoy the
The 13th Annual Tau Kappa
Epsilon Boxing Tournament
returns to Minges Coliseum
March 29 through March 31,1988.
The event is sanctioned by the
American Boxing Federation, and
will begin nightly at 7:30 p.m.
"Attendance should be well
over 10,000 for the three nights
said Micheal Criscitiello,
Tournament Chairman.
Proceeds from the event will go
to St. Jude's Research Hospital.
The tournament is open to
anyone who has never received
prize money for any kind of
boxing event. Boxers will occupy
Followingthebikini contest, the one of ten weight divisions and
Admission for the tournament
will be $2 on the 29th and 30th,
and $3 on the 31st (finals night)
Anyone producing
student ID will be adm
off the regular adm
Pirate football players and the
Miller Lite All-Stars will be
available for autographs and
pictures until 3 p.m.
Then it will be time for the
feature attraction of the entire
weekend. The PurpleGold
April 21-23, promises to be one of events. Also at 9 p.m fireworks, Game will kickoff at 3:30 p.m. in
the best vet.
J
The action-filled weekend will
be issued in on Thursday
afternoon when the Pirate
baseball team plays host to the
University oi North Carolina at
Harrington Field. That game is
scheduled to begin at 4 p.m.
later that evening at the Hilton
Inn, the Pig-Out Golf classic
Social and Auction will begin at 7
p.m.
The festivities continue on
Friday with the golf tournament
and luncheon featuring Miller
Lite All-Star Lee Meredith getting
the day underway. The golf clasic
will be held at Brook Valley
Country Club. The Intramural
Department will also throw its
hand into the events with the
beginning of the Pirate Pig-Out
Softball Tournament.
The around-the-clock softball
tournament begins at 3:30 p.m. on
Friday.
Friday evening the action heats
to a boil as Ficklen Stadium will
turn into a carnival arena. At 6
p.m. hot air balloon rides
will fight three two-minute
rounds. Winners will be awarded
trophies on the night of the finals,
along with a most valuable boxer
award.
The major sponsors of the
tournament are The Miller
Brewing Company and C. O.
sponsored by Frito-Lay, will light the stadium to cap off the eventful Tankard Company. This marks
the skies as the pigs are placed on
the grill for the all night cook-off.
If the outdoor scene is not your
cup of tea for Friday evening then
the Evening With the Stars
Banquet at the Hilton Inn might
be. The banquet, which costs $50
per person, will feature Miller Lite
All-Stars L.C. Greenwood, Ben
Davidson, Boog Powell, Jack
"Hacksaw" Reynolds, Larry
Csonka, Conrad Dobler and
Meredith.
Don't enjoy Friday night too
much though because the action
weekend.
their ninth year of sponsorship.
The punches will be flying once again this year at the 13th Annual Tau
Kappa F.psilon Boxing Tournament at Minges Coliseum. (File Photo)
Lacrosse team holds hopes of improving
Mark "Duke Whelan has College came to Greenville for but they don't know about the
visions of lacrosse becoming a scrimmages and left very team he explains. "As far as
varsity sport at East Carolina one impressed with ECU's program, lacrosse itself, most people just
day. But for now, he will continue
to serve as advisor for the
university's successful club
lacrosse team.
"The club is real successful
Whelan says. "And, that is
And Hobart College should don't know the rules of the
know, for the last nine years in a game Whelan says lacrosse is a
row, they have been NCAA fast-moving, contact sport. The
Division III National Champions, basic principle of the game is
Whelan feels the club team will simple-put the lacrosse ball in the
grow even stronger. "A lot of lacrosse goal. He promises that
continues at 7 a.m. Saturday with good leaders Good leaders
because of good organization and people on campus play lacrosse attending a game will do the trick.
Admission is tree and all home
games are played behind Allied
Health.
For those interested in
becoming involved witl the
campus lacrossse club, just stop
by one oi three week practices or
Stop by the Department of
I n t r a m u r a 1 - Rec r ea t i o n a 1
Services.
the judging of the pigs. The
carnival and boat show will be
opened up once again for the
public at 10 a.m. and the long-
awaited barbecue plates will be
ready to hit the tables for the
public's judging at 10:30 a.m.
Plates will be available until 3
p.m.
The remainder of the morning
consists of the opening of the
Dunken Booth (dunkee's will be
announced at a later date), Miller
Lite All-Star Competition and a
sponsored by Frito Lay will be yet-to-be-announced band
offered to guests. Also the annual playing in the tailgate area,
mini-carnival will also begin at 6 The championship game of the
� m Intramural softball tourney will
The rest of the evening at the begin at 12 p.m. followed by the
stadium consists of a boat show ever-popular Suntan Bikini
around the field beginning at 6:30 Contest sponsored by Frito Lay.
Namely, Mark Seaschultz, Chris
Gouland, Mark Henderson and
Whelan.
Whelan is in his third year of
association with the campus
lacrosse club team, but his ties to
the sport go back much further.
Upon graduation from high
school in his hometown of
Syracuse, New York, Whelan
headed south to North Carolina
State University on a lacrosse
scholarship. During his tenure at
N.C. State, the Wolfpack went
from pretenders to contenders to
the tune of a ninth-place ranking
in national lacrosse polls.
And, success breeds success.
ECU's club team is competitive
with all club teams in North
Carolina and with other college
teams. Over spring break, Hobart
1988 ECU Lacrosse Schedule
Friday, March 25
Saturdav, March 26
Saturday, April 9
Sunday, April 10
Old Dominion
Vir. Commonwealth
Washington
James Madison
Wednesday, April 13 N.C. State
Saturday, April 16
Friday, April 22
Saturday, April 23
Maryland
Wake Forest
Fayetteville
Away
Away
Away
Away
Home
Awa y
Home
Home
p .n
2 : OOi
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p.m,
7:00o
�p.m
TBA
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Irates
ECU's 1RAT1
hit 1-95 and h
Florida sui
Spring Bn 1
held in �
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game wini
to be th.
represent i
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I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 24, 1988 13
12
rates
iningat 1 p m single game
gainst MU will be played on
I at 1 p.m.

rarlier Pirate home contest at
(Photob Ihomas'W alters)
3 wins
in RBI single.
- complete
me in the second
lurray connected
-run roundtripper that
o an early 5-0 lead,
ramerled the Pirates in hitting
rtd came as she
doubles in a
itting performance.
- next action will
this Saturday when they
avel to Chapel Hill to battle
orth Carolina.
TIM CHANDLER
ent is set
g a valid ECU
ill be admitted for$l
egular admission price.
this tjr at the 13th Annual Tau
Minges Coliseum. (Kile Photo)
iproving
I
I
sion is tree and all home
are played behind Allied
For those interested in
ming involved with the
ampus lacrossse club, just stop
one of three week practices or
I P by the Department of
Ijntramural-Recreational
'ices.
Schedule
8:
3p.m.
2:n0p.TK
2:00p.a.
7:00p.m.
2:00P.n.
TBA
2:00p.n.
Irates spend break in Florida
EFiiS TE Ultimate squad The final game is scheduled to upcoming Easter Eggstravaganza 1, and finally Nationals in Santa
hit 1-95 and headed south for the appear on ESPN. in Wilmington on April 2 and 3. Barbara, Ca. Memorial Day
Honda sun (?) to participate in in Gainesville, the IRATES The following weekend, April 9 weekend May 28 and 29.
spring Break tournaments to be opened Saturday pool play with a and 10, ECU will host ULTIMAX The IRATES plan a good
held in West Palm Beach, win over Hollywood, Flas Stars. XI, kicking off the affair with an showing in Nationals to avenge
Paytona Beach, and Gainesville. Tampa's Sunflight and G. W. Us April 7 benefit concert featuring last year's disappointing 1-5
I he 14-man team, sporting an 11- Centrifugal Force were the next the Amateurs and Flipside at the performance. In fact, this year's
game winning streak, promised IRATE victims. ECU's second Attic. strong veteran core and
be the strongest ever to Florida loss came courtesy of Other spring tournaments will outstanding bunch of rookies
represent ECU in Spring Break Chain Lightning from Atlanta. In include the Athens, Ga. Ultimate have set their sights on a National
competition. their quarter-final game on Bowl April 16 and 17, Collegiate Championship. Look for team
After having their campsite Sunday, the IRATES bowed to Sectionals in Raleigh April 23 and discs to be available in a few
washed out by heavy rains, the Miami's Refugees. 24, Regionals at Lehigh U. in weeks and help the IRATES in
IRATES began Saturday's pool The IRATES now focus on the Bethlehem, Pa. April 30 and May their quest to be the best,
play in West Palm Beach by
defeating host team Bunch-A-
Pudes. ECU next faced Orlando's
Pogs of War (last year's
Gainesville champ) and finally
won a hard-fought battle 13-12.
Unable to field a full team, U.
Conns Slipped Disc forfeited to
the IRATES.
Sunday's single elimination
play saw the IRATES take their
quarterfinal game against U.
Tenn. By a 17-11 score. The IRATE
15-game win streak ended when
Gainesville's Vicious Cycle took
the semi-final match.
The IRATES moved on to
Daytona Beach and the National
Collegiate Sports Festival to find
only one other team, Void, there
to compete. After two days of
postponing their rematch with
the Irates, Void finally agreed to
play on Thursday. Despite the
tierce winds, the IRATES
promptly resumed their winning
ways with back-to-back 15-11
victories. For the wins, the
IRATES were awarded plane
tickets and motel
accommodations for a return trip
in November. ECU will then face
the winners from each of the
Festival's remaining three weeks
in the championship tournament.
Netters have successful week on courts
Sports Writers
Needed
Call The East Carolinian, 757-6366
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sports Writer
ECU's men's tennis team rolled
to three victories last week with
wins over Mount Olive, High
Point and Pfeiffer.
The Pirates, now 14-6 overall
emd 7-5 tor the spring, swept past
The Pirates were extended only
once in the match, going three sets
in the number four singles.
Mike Amick defeated Steve
Tanner in the three sets, 7-6,4-6,6-
4.
Jon Melhorn and David Shell
playing in the number one
Pirates recorded their fourth
consecutive win of the spring.
ECU won 4 singles matches and
swept the doubles, with the
number one doubles match going
into split sets.
The Lady Pirates dropped their
third match of the season
the Trojans of Mount Olive in last doubles position of the Pirates Wednesday to UNC-Greensboro
recorded their first win of the playing in a home match.
season as they defeated Duane The Lady Pirates split the
Can, Tony Reed and ShaunKnist, singles matches with the
8-1. Spartans, but only won one of the
The Pirates traveled to High deciding doubles matches.
Point, where they earned their Susan Mattocks and Holly
next victory, before returning Murray went to split sets against
home to take on Pfeiffer. UNC-G's Mary Suman and Tracy
ECU was once again victorious Baker, winning 6-3, 2-6, 6-3, for
ECU's only doubles win.
ECU's men will host two
matches this week as UNC-
Wilmington comes to town on
Thursday and Gilford plays in
Greenville on Friday.
Thursdays match will be held at
Minges and Fridays can be see at
Riverbirch.
The Lady Pirates, now 10-5
overall and 5-3 for the spring were
looking to rebound from its losses
wM� a
VVggnesdlyat'WIeai'm
Thursday, March 24,
Wright Auditorium
7:00 p.m.
Wednesday's match, 9-0.
Foreman
is back
LAS VEGAS, Nev. (AP)-
Former heavyweight champion as they defeated Pfeiffer 7-2
George Foreman says his
comeback effort should be an
inspiration for everyone over the
age of 40.
"It proves the age of 40 is not a
death sentence at all Foreman
said after stopping Dwight
luhamad Qawi in the seventh
round of a scheduled 10-round
tight Saturday night.
Foreman looked his age,
however, appearing slow and
plodding as he went after a flobby
Qawi for six rounds before finally
catching him with some solid
shots.
"He's not as sharp as he could
be promoter Bob Arum said of
the 40-year-old Foreman. "He
needs some intensive spaning to
sharpen himself up
Qawi, carrying 222 pounds on
his 5 foot 7 frame, landed several
clean shots early but faded late in
the fight and finally quit while
still on his feet after a Foreman
left-right combination to the head
in the seventh round.
"I was surprised at how strong
he (Foreman) was Qaei said.
"He really wore me down
Foreman won for theeigth time
since beginning a comeback a
year ago after a decade outside the
ring. But the unimpressive
showing brought boos from the
crowd at Caesars Palace which
looked for an early Foreman
knockout.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
� 422 Arlingtonvd.
It was once again victorious as
they defeated Pfeiffer 7-2.
"It was a tight match with
several matches going split sets
said Coach Pat Sherman whose
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i
14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 24, 1988
Spider again in tourney field
Every year in the NCAA
Tournament, there's spider
waiting in the corner, ready to
ensnare a defending champion in
its web. Or a bad-tempered ram
ready to butt a finalist from the
previous season.
The Indiana Hoosiers, who
were shocked in the first round by
unheralded Cleveland State in
1986 only to win the national title
in a last-gasp shot by Keith Smart
a year ago, were stung by the
upset bug again over the
weekend.
The culprits were the
Richmond Spiders, who also
defeated Georgia Tech Sunday to
advance to the East Regional
semifinals against top-raneo
Temple.
The East also is the home to this
year's other upstarts, the Rhode
Island Rams, who followed their
first-round victory over Missouri
with an upset win Saturday over
Big East champ Syracuse, which
lost last season's title game to
Indiana.
Rhode Island faces Duke in the
Thursday's other East Regional
semifinal.
Richmond is coached by Dick
Tarrant, a crafty veteran who
Indiana's Bobby Knight said "was
a good coach before I even started
coaching
Knight gave Tarrant full credit
for Richmond's basketball
success when he said, "There isn't
any reason why Richmond
should be any good
Tarrant played the underdog
role to the hilt against Indiana and
Georgia Tech.
"Indiana has better people at
every position and we're
undersized at every spot
Tarrant said.
After the game, he admitted, "I
was blowing smoke all right. I
thought we could beat them
Tech's Bobby Cremins was
impressed with the Spiders.
"They look like they're on some
kind of mission he said.
"They're hungry, they're not
scared of anybody and they're
incredible well coached
It's not really surprising that
one or two teams from
conferences with little exposure
come into the NCAA Tourna ent
every year with everythii g to
prove and nothing to lose. They
manage to beat the guys who are
on television so often they have
their own makeup powder in the
locker room.
Rhode Island guard Carl ton
Owens said he was happy not
only to knock Syracuse out ot the
tournament, but to silence to
Orangemen.
"They were talking (during the
game) about playing some weak
Atlantic 10 team Pwens said, "I
just returned and said, 'That was
an Atlantic 10 dunk
"We had to prove that we were
a great ballclub and that we're
from a great conference, and I
think we did that
North Carolina Charlotte, a first
round loser in overtime to
Brigham Young this year, was one
of the first unheralded teams to
shock the experts since the NCAA
tournament was expanded.
Led by Cedric Maxwell, who
later excelled for the Boston
Celtics, North Carolina-Charlotte
beat Syracuse and top-ranked
Michigan en route to the Final
Four in 1977.
Two years later, Ivy League
champion Penn shocked North
Carolina in the first round when
the Tar Heels had counted on
playing host to the East Regiona.
!n front of sparse crowds, Penn
went on to upset Syracuse and St.
John's to advance to the final four.
Penn did it again in 1980,
beating Wahington State, and in
1983 Princeton gave the Ivy
League its last NCAA victory,
against Oklahoma State.
Tyson wins in a (egg)roll
TOKYO (AP)-Which came first,
the turkey or the egg? in this case,
it was the Big Egg, the nickname
for the recently built Tokyo
Dome. Then they put the Mike
Tyson-Tony Tubbs heavyweight
title fight in it.
They should have held this one
on Thanksgiving. Tubbs looked
stuffed, and it took Tyson less
than six minutes to baste him.
Fat Tony weighed 238 14
pounds and looked like a beached
whale. If he bought his own food
in this most expensive city in the
world, there can't be much left of
his $500,000 cut.
Actually, Tubbs got $550,000,
including a $50,000 bonus for
being in condition. Obviously,
Tony got the bonus just for
showing up in Japan. There had
been some doubt he would.
Jose Ribalta had been lined up
as a backup for Tubbs to ensure
the fight would go on. Ribalta,
however, does not have a
passport and so could not get a
visa to enter Japan.
Tuyson earned about $10
million and picked up another
$615,000 for advertising a
Japanese beer. Tyson sold beer,
Tubbs looked like he drank it. If
Tony does a commercial it should
be for an antacid remedy.
'Tyson's more popular in Japan
than he is in the United States
Bill Cayton, who co-managed the
champion, said before the fight.
And that was what was being
sold in the Big Egg on Monday-
Tyson's celebrity, his reputation
as a destroyer. And it will be
contined to be sold abroad at little
risk as long as second bananas like
Tony Tubbs can be lined up.
A Tyson-Tubbs fight would
have had hardly any live gate
appeal in the United States. Down
the road for Tyson, if he beats
Michael Spinks on June 27 at
Atlantic City, are a Sept. 3 meeting
against Frank Bruno of Britain in
London and a possible bout
against Francesco Damiani of
Italy in Milan.
Maybe the Bruno fight should
be held in Asia. After all, big
Frank has a chin of china.
Damiani, on the other hand,
packs pasta power in his punches.
Tyson can't be blamed for the
lack of quality opposition, and his
managers can't be blamed for
cashing in on his name in foreign
markets.
Fans around the world
understand, however, that they
are paying to see Mike Tyson
more than they are paying to se a
competitive fight.
Muhammad Ali peddled
cheese cloth for silk in several
places around the world. He just
got more than he bargained for
when he fought the Thrilla in
Manila against Joe Frazier in 1975.
Ali and Frazier fed off each
other in what ws a very strong era
for the heavyweight division in
terms of depth of quality
competition.
The division is sadly lacking in
quality fighters now, and it is to
Tyson's credit that he didicates
himself to his trade, he looked jet-
age sleek at 21614 pounds for the
Tubbs fight.
Mike Tyson might find himself
in several fights that lay eggs in
terms of competition, but when
they do, you can bet he will be the
one who does the scrambling.
Lamar, of the Southland
Conference, made a habit of
upsetting highly ranked teams in
the 1980s. In 1980, the Cardinals
beat Oregon State and Steve
Johnsn in the second round, in
1981 they defeated Missouri in the
first round and in 1983, Alabama
was the victim.
Other big shockers in 1981 was
St. Joseph's defeat of No. 1 DePaul
and James Madison's upset of
Georgetown.
1982 was the year that
unhearlded Tennessee schools
made headlines as Middle
Tennessee beat kenucky, spoiling
an eagerly awaited Kentucky-
Louisville showdown, and
Tennessee-Chattanoogo ousted
North Carolina State, which went
on to win the national title the
following year.
Richmond pulled its first big
upset in 1984, when it defeated
Auburn, led by Charles Barkley
and Chuck Person.
Karl Malone carried Louisiana
Tech, another Southland team, to
two easy victories in 1985 before
losing to Oklahoma in overtime in
the regional semifinals. Before
that, Louisiana Tech crushed
Pittsburgh 78-54 and defeated
Ohio State 79-67.
Often, however, the biggest
upsets are followed by
devastating defeats.
In 1979, when Penn reached the
Final Four, the Quakers lost 101-
67 to eventual champion
Michigan State. St. Joseph's after
its last-second defeat of DePaul in
1980, fell 7816 to Indiana in the
regional finals.
LOW COST
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12lhWEEKOF
PREGNANCY
Abortion from 13 to 18 weeka at additional coat Pregnancy
Teat, Birth Control and Problem Pregnancy Counseling, For
further information, call 832-OS35 (toll free number 1 -800-
532-5384) between 9 a jn. and 5 p.m. weekday. General anes-
thesia available.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
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$100 for 1 and 2 Bedrooms. Sign up now for
summer school and fall semester while
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Three Month Leases Available For Summer School
10ih Street Ext. to RiverbluiTRd. 700"4U A 5
Have You Ever Sung In A Choir?
Are You A Non-Music Major?
Register For The:
University Chorale
No audition required.
Enroll in Muse 1635, 2635, 3635 or 4645 M-T 12:00
105 Music Building
Questions? Contact Dr. Rhonda Fleming
School of Music 757-6331
t
1988 SUMMER SESSION
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA
AT
CHAPEL HILL
Academic Calender
Term I: May 16 - June 21
Term II: June 23 - July 29
Cost: NC Resident � Undergraduate 1-5 hours $152; 6-8 hours $215
UNC-CH often, Airing two 5-12 week terms, one of the largest summer programs in the United States. Over 800 courses arc
, vheduted in 40 disciplines. A typical course load per term is two classes of three semester hours each.
For summer visiting students, our "Open Admissions Policy" makes possible the opportunity for students from other colleges
and universities to attend UNC-CH.
�This
does not obligate the University to admit these students for die academic year,
please request a catalog
cny
State.
Zip.
CB 3340, Peabody Hall, Chapel Hill. NC 27599
19-962-1009
(AAEBO Institution)
07
DRIVE THE NEW DODGE DAYTONA SHELBY ZAND WIN!
Drive to win' Take the wheel of a Daytona Shelby 2 and put this
Dodge performance machine through a competition ratly
course set up on campus Your lap will be electronically timed
and the student with the best' official score wins a trip to
Daytona Beach to compete in the National Grand Finals Plus
prizes to the 2nd and 3rd place finishers. All absolutely free to
students.
Entry is easy Just fill out the entry form at the competition and
then drive to win Open to any student 18 years or older
who's a licensed driver
Win a trip to Daytona Beach. Rondo during Spring Break,
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National Grand Finals Awards. 1st Place-$5,000 cash
scholarship and use of a Dodge Daytona Shelby 2
tori year
2nd Pkx-$3.0COcx3sh scholarship and use of a Dodge
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COMING TO: ECU
WHEN: MARCH 30-31
WHERE: ALLIED HEALTH PARKING LOT
TIME: 10 A.M5 P.M.
HOSTING CAMPUS GROUP: STUDENT
UNION SPEC3 AL EVENTS COMMITTEE
mjnnwai. umi m





Title
The East Carolinian, March 24, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 24, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.598
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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