The East Carolinian, March 17, 1988






COMING TUESDAY:
SGA candidates will present their platforms
Tuesday, as The East Carolinian also will make its
annual candidate endorsement.
�NTERTAINMENT:
Rocket Music takes off. See page 10.
��"
mmmmmm
SPORTS
Connecticut clobbers the Pirates. See page 15.
1
Jj m�.ABOtt
BA ST PATRICKS
She 2ast Caroltmatrl
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.62 No. 44
Thursday, March 17,1988
Greenville, NC
18 Pages
Circulation 12,000
SGA Candidate Profiles
President
Bartlett says faculty needs
better relations with students
By I-aMLEY EDER
Suit Writer
Senior psychology major Mi-
chael Bartlett, an SGA legislator
and the delegate chairman for the
NC Student Legislature, has filed
as a candidate for SGA president.
One oi his primary goals if
elected, he said, is to establish
better relationships between ECU
faculty and students. He would
like to open the lines of communi-
cation between the two groups,
by becoming a sort of mediator for
them. He proposed to do this by
establishing relationships with
the ECU facultv senate and the
SGA.
Bartlett said he would like to
build a better network of commu-
nication between the student
body and the SGA. He proposed
taking opinion polls of students
on certain topics that are of inter-
est, to question individuals
around campus and to get an
"ordinary" student's opinion
about a topic. He said that he
would like to give the students a
chance to voice their opinion on a
See BARTLETT, page 2
SGA should learn to stress
concrete decisions, Singh says
By DENA BOYETTE
Surf Writer
Amar Singh, who serves on the
�GA StwAeiU V4 etf are Committee,
is the junior class president run-
ning for SGA president.
Singh stressed he wanted the
SGA to become more service ori-
ented. He said sometimes in the
past, the SGA got too caught up in
abstract ideas and that now was
the time to deal in concrete deci-
sions. Singh said he also wanted
to see the SGA serve not onlv the
university, but the community as
well. He would like to become
more involved in charities such as
The March of Dimes, the Heart-
fund, etc. He stressed the impai-
tance of civic ideas, such as these.
"What you take from society, you
should give back he said.
In discussing the university's
parking problem, Singh said it is
not fair for students to pay an
increase in parking fees now
when it will only benefit future
students two and three vcars
down the road. Singh also said the
SGA should be involved in more
See SINGH, page 2
Murphy promotes diversity,
communication in next SGA
By TIM HAMPTON
Assistant Newt Editor
SGA Presidential candidate
Larry Murphy said he wants to
bridge the lines of communica-
tion between ECU students and
the SGA.
If elected Murphy said he
would distribute a brochure
which lists the services, such as
rentals, loans, and bus lines,
which the SGA provides for the
students out of student fees. "I
don't believe that the students re-
alize all the services the SGA has
to offer Murphy said.
To create a stronger minor-
ity voice within the SGA, Murphy
proposes expanding the respon-
siblities of the minority cabinet
position. He said the expanded
minority position would foster a
better line of communication
between minority groups and the
SGA.
As the chairman of the
Screening and Appointments
Committee for the '87�'88 school
year, Murphy said that he has
tried allow a diversity of legisla-
tors to enter the SGA. As presi-
dent, he said he would continue to
See MURPHY, page 8
Vice President
Jones calls for more safety
regulations at the university
Thompson wants students to
be excited about the SGA
By DENA BOYETTE
Staff Writer
Kelly Jones is a junior throwing
her hat into SGA vice presidential
race. Chairman of the SGA Stu-
dent Welfare Committee and a
member on other university
boards and committees, she was
freshman class president.
Jones said she really enjoys
working with students. She com-
mented that even back in high
school, she knew when she
started college she wanted to be-
come involved in student govern-
ment. "The vice president job has
a lot to do with public relations. I
just love working with students
and being on committees she
said.
Jones said there arc some
changes that she would like to see
come about on the campus. "I
would like a new lighting policy,
an update of the lighting system
She did not like it when Pirate
Walk came to a stand still this
year, "1 would like to see the Pi-
rate Walk get moving again She
believes that new safety condi-
tions on campus should be looked
into.
See JONES, page 2
By TIM HAMPTON
AssL News Editor
Greg Thompson says he is
excited.If elected SGA President,
Thompson said he would bring
fair representation to the SGA,
have more student input in the
legislature, and reinstitute the
Pirate Walk.
"Let's get excited about the
SGA Thompson said about
what he feels has been a lack of
enthusiasm by students outside
the student government. Th-
ompson feels the lack of enthusi-
asm about the SGA has stemmed
from both a campus sense that
students opinions are unheard in
the SGA and a p.oblemof student
apathy.
In order to achieve fair repre-
sentation in the SGA, Thompson
said the SGA must end the elitist
image it has held in recent years of
being controlled by three or four
people. Thompson said the SGA
is paid out of student funds so it
should serve the students, not just
the whims of a select few.
If elected, Thompson said he
See THOMPSON, page 7
Shore wants a broader role
for SGA vice president
By STEPHAINE FOLSOM
Stilt Writer
Carol Shore, SGA secretary and
candidate for vice president, said
she would like to broaden the vice
presidency and get Pirate Walk
started again.
Shore, a junior education major,
said she has been working with
current SGA vice president, Ross
Renfrow, and knows what is in-
volved with the job and how SGA
works. She said she would like the
vice president to be more of an
asset in working with the presi-
dent. She said. "The vice presi-
dent could take care of the little
things for the president. Be his
other hand
Last year Shore worked on the
Appropriations Committee and
said that through the experience
she knows more about where
SGA's money comes from. She is
also getting involved with the
North Carolina Legislature.
Shore said she would like to get
Pirate Walk started again. "I
See SHORE, page 2
Nigerian professor speaks on
constitutional development
By TON! PAGE
Stiff Writer
Professor Oyeleyc Oyediran, a
prominent Nigerian political sci-
entist addressed faculty members
and students Tuesday night on
"The Influence of the U.S.
Constitution on Constitutional
and polilical Development in Ni-
geria
Oyediran is credited with
many achievements including his
participation in the Nigerian
Constitution Drafting Commis-
sion of 1975-1976 and his member-
ship in the Political Bureau which
examined constitutional and po-
litical arrangements in Nigeria
during 1986-1987.
Oyediran, one of the "found-
ing fathers" of Nigerian democ-
racy compared the Nigerian
constitution with the U.S. Wash-
ington model noting the differ-
ences yet focusing mainly on the
parallels and the large amount of
U.S. influence involved in the
drafting of the Nigerian
constitution.
Oyelcye opened his talk in the
lecture hall of the new building
wi th the comment "That American
constitutional experiment has
made tremendous contribution to
political development around the
world is not an issue f( r debate.
Support for this view or fact is
shown by the influence of the
American experiment around the
world. The American constitu-
tional experiment is political engi-
neering at its best Oyediran also
placed the importance on funda-
mentals of the U.S. Constitution
and said, "Through a system of
checks and balances diversities in
religious, race, and social and eco-
nomic interests were wielded to-
gether, and the experiment has
lasted two hundred years
Some of the established princi-
pals Oyediran drew on were the
products of many debates similar
to that of our own founding fa-
thers. Similar concepts such as a
bicameral legislature, equal repre-
See PROFESSOR, page 7
Sommers calls for increased
student activity on campus
Nigerian prof essor Oyeleye Oyedian spoke Tuesday ab out the deve1
opment of the Nigerian Constitution. (Jon Jordan � Photolab)
By STEPHANIE FOLSOM
Stiff Writer
Steve Sommers, a candidate for
SGA vice president, said his cam-
paign will focus on the need for
students to have more interaction
with each other, power or expres-
sion, and decision making.
Sommers, a junior political sci-
ence major, said there needs to be
more involvement between
blacks and whites, and greeks and
non-greeks. He said, "I would like
to see more activities that blacks
and whites can both get involved
with. We need to break down the
race barrier.
"Also, there needs to be more
cooperation and interplay be-
tween greeks and people not in-
volved in sororities and fraterni-
ties He described himself as a
"pluralist saying he is not anti-
greek, but is not in a fraternity,
either. He said: "I believe in join-
ing groups. I've grown from my
activities outside of class
Another problem Sommers
said he would like to address as
vice president is parking. He said
the problem needs to be taken
care of now and he has a few
ideas, such as priority or carpool
parking on campus.
There also needs to be "more
avenues for freedom of expres-
sion said Sommers. He said he
supports the idea of a soap-box
forum, because: "It gives people
the chance to talk about things
they don't like about the univer-
sity. Students can make moves.
Indirectly they're making deci-
sions for themselves
Sommers said he would like
there to be a place for students to
go and not feel restricted, like the
tunnels at NC. State. He said if
there was a place for free expres-
sion then there would not be
problems, such as with the ROTC
sign.
A lot of the changes Sommers
said he has seen at ECU ha ve been
out of the hands of the university
and of the students. He said: "The
new drinking age controls a lot.
Within the SGA I would like to
have more pull to find loopholes
in the law
See SOMMERS, page 2





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 17, 1988
Health Service offers three STD seminars
By LAURA SALAZAR
Staff Writer
"We see STD's everyday, and
we treat a lot of STDs said Liz
Morgan, R.N B.S.N of the ECU
Student Health Service. Morgan
said that STDs are seen as a major
problem at every campus in the
nation.
The Student Health Service is
offering classes on Sexually
Transmitted Disease. The first
class on chlamydia, gonorrhea,
and syphilis was held Tuesday.
According to Morgan, only two
students attended. Morgan said
that marketing for the classes
began late and that most students
probably weren't thinking about
STD classes right after Spring
Break.
The next class will be March 22,
in Room 116of the Student I lealth
Service. To register, call 757-6841
and ask for Barbara Pennell. This
class will deal with herpes, vene-
real qarts, NGU, and pubic lice.
The final class will be March 29;
Institute helps preserve cultural heritage
ECU New Bureau
GREENVILLE�The mission of
the Institute for Historical and
Cultural Research at East Caro-
lina University is to help discover
and preserve the cultural heritage
of eastern North Carolina but its
director envisions a wider role.
Expanding our activities
throughout the Southeast United
States is a realistic expectation in a
few years savs Dr. Henry C.
Ferrell Jr ECU history professor
and director of the institute.
The institute is planned to serve
as a clearinghgpuse to bring social
sciences and humanities re-
sources and expertise together to
preserve the cultural heritage of
the region which comprises
roughly one-third of the state.
Ferret savs it plans to work with
Singh
Continued from page 1
social events, "I think we should
provide more services like Bare-
foot on the Mall he said.
"I believe that Greek organiza-
tions provide an invaluable serv-
ice with their charity work
Singh said. He wants to work
closely with the Greek system, "I
could better represent the Greek
system as a whole, I would not be
partial to one or the other of the
Greek houses
The last point that Amar
wanted to make was that there
were too many "ego boosters" in
theSGA'spast.
local historical associations,
county commissions and other
government and quasi-govern-
mental organizations and agen-
cies "to identify and develop proj-
ects to reaffirm and restore our
knowledge of the past
Established originally as the In-
stitute for Historical Research in
Tobacco in 1972, a component
which was renewed in 1978, it has
now been revamped as to title and
mission in the university's plan or
organization.
Under a new charter, the pur-
Shore calls for
more security
Continued from page 1
would hate for a rape or assault to
happen before it starts again She
said she hopes it will not take an
incident to make people aware of
the "things that go on for the pro-
tection of students
"I've noticed that securitv has
been checking the dorms more
and I think it should continue
said Shore. She said she thinks
there should be more campus
securitv.
Shore said, "Education and
politics go hand and hand She
said she feels she can get to more
people, because she has been in-
volved in many different areas on
campus.
Shore has worked on the legis-
lature for the last two years and
said she enjoys what she is doing.
pose is described as the coordinat-
ing of efforts that would "eventu-
ally result in grant acquistions,
publications, performances,
symposia and collections of his-
torical and cultural material it
would serve as agent between
those persons, agencies and gov-
ernment units "desiring the serv-
ices of scholars and students to
discover, record and review the
cultural and historical past
Ferrell said the institute will
also provide consultants for such
projects including media produc-
tions such as slide shows and live
performaces such as outdoor dra-
mas.
"We have a lot of skills and
know-how on our faculty Fer-
rell said. Consultants and project
teams may be drawn from such
Sommers
wants freedom
Continued from page 1
The drinking law and the mari-
juana resolution passed in SGA
make students more like crimi-
nals, instead of less like them, said
Sommers. The law "makes them
lie, cheat, and forge drivers li-
censes. Paternal laws have no
business on law books, especially
at the University level
Sommers said: "I joined SGA
because I was tired of seeing stu-
dents being stepped on. Now I see
students being stepped on more
and more, and I want to do some-
thing about that
disciplines as anthropology,
medicine, music, art, theatre art,
and others, he said museums and
archival preservation will be
important parts of the work.
In addition, he said, the insti-
tute plans to be involved in short
courses to provide instruction, in
technical services and research
activities.
Administratively, the institute
is a part of the program of the ECU
Department of History, College of
Arts and Sciences.
Jones calls for
cooperation
Continued from page 1
She would like to see the SGA
work with Public Safety in mak-
ing a booklet on crimes that hap-
pen on campus and the possible
punishment that can come about,
"The rules are in the student
handbook, but students do not
take the time to read through the
whole thing she said. Jones said
the book would deal mainly with
campus crimes.
Jones wants to also address the
current parking problem. She also
wants more student input than in
the past. Shr said if students have
a question, she doesn't want them
to hesitate to come and see her, "I
want students to know that the
vice presidents office is the place
to go with a problem she said.
AIDS and hepatitis will be dis-
cussed. Classes arc limited to 20
students.
Morgan said similar classes will
be offered to faculty and staff in
April. She added that after evalu-
ating the classes, a decision will be
made whether classes will be of-
fered for Fall.
Morgan said that the classes
consist of videos, slides of differ-
ent STDs and their symptoms. She
said, "The class is an hour long,
but the length really depends on
the questions the class asks. We
have marketed these classes as
discussion and not a lecture
Morgan could not estimate the
number of students the Student
Health Service treats for STDs but
she did say that chlamydia is the
most frequently treated disease
She added, "Chlamydia is a dis-
ease people aren't aware of
She said, "I hope we can get
across to the student how very
important this is it's just a real
concern that the nursing staff and
the whole staff has here. We want
people to be aware that these
classes are being offered
STD testing is available at the
Student Health Services. Testing
for all STDs is free, except for ch-
lamydia testing, which is $5
There is a fee for AIDS testing, but
Morgan said that the Greenville
Health Department does AIDS
testing free of charge.
Bartlett says students need defense for rights
"Continued from page 1
topic � and have a better chance
of being heard.
Bartlett said he would also like
to promote students' rights more.
He feels that there are certain is-
sues in which some students'
rights are being infringed upon or
?ven violated, and he feels pre-
pared to speak out on these topics.
In this area he is also prepared to
get the popular student opinion,
and take that opinion to the gov-
erning bodies with him. 'There
are a lot of things that people talk
about that they don't like, but it
never goes any farther than talk. I
would like to do something about
some of these thing he said.
He said he also would like to
upgrade the school's opinion in
the public eye � to downplay the
image of ECU being known as a
"party school" or a "second-rate
college He feels these labels are
misleading, and would like to
attempt to do something about
them.
Another one of Bartlctt's major
campaign issues is campus beau-
Tification � more specifically, the
building of a bell tower on cam-
pus. Bartlett said this campus
should have a bell tower as a dis-
tinguishing landmark, and that it
would give the campus and the
student body more of a sense of
dignity and pride. He says that a
bell tower is possible, and feasible
both location-wise and finan-
cially.
Bartlett feels he is the most
qualified candidate for the office
of SGA president. He said that
although he has not participated
in a multitude of student activi-
ties, he has put his all into those
activities in which he has taken
part. He feels his participation in
the NC Student Legislature, in
particular, has taught him some
very important skills in the ways
of debate, public speaking and
communication. He said experi-
ence in the NCSL has also taught
him how to get things done � he
has interviewed, and set up
committees for various projects.
He said the NCSL has brought out
a lot of leadership qualities in him.
Finally, Bartlett said that he sees
the presidency as a challenge, but
a very desirable challenge. He
said that he sees several areas in
this campus that need to be
worked on, and that he would like
the privilege of serving this uni-
versity as SGA president.
ECU
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Sorority 1988 Fall Rush Interest Meeting
Thursday, March 24, 1988
Wright Auditorium
7:00 p.m.
Dress: Casual
For More Information: 757-682
PLYMOUTH �
CAREER SEARCH WORKSHOP
lb
HOWTORND
THE RIGHT JOB
� NEW CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
INTERVIEW TECHNIQUES
DRESSING TIPS
nu si mi n n
CAREERS
i
General Workshop: Monday. March 21: 1:00 & 3:00 p.m.
Jenkins Art Building Auditorium
Co-sponsored by Career Planning and Placement Center, 8RA and CTA
Career
Have you thought about whal
you plan to do when you get oul
of college? Many students will
enter the job market in hopes of
finding that perfect job, the one
that will lead them to a long an
promising career in their chosei
Distingui
ECU New. ButTiL
GREENVILLE� A scries 0
seminars and workshops fc
teachers and school administn
tors will be presented at Ea
Carolina University in March anj
April by three scholars in the Di
tinguished Visiting Scholars Pn
gram.
Dr. Donald Cruickshank, a pre
fessor of education at Ohio Stal
University will open the series cJ
March 24. Cruickshank will
SRAs
The SRA spring dance "
Night in Bangogk" will be Fnc
night in the Holodome at
Holiday Inn. The dance will stl
at 9 p.m. and will last until 1 a(
There will be a live DJ, Ma
Callahan from WRAL ra
station in Raleigh, a cash bar.
food. The SGA buses will
providing transportation to
Tuitio
(CPS)�Tuition rates are goi
up again next fall, but not quite
steeply as they rose last yc
observers say.
Regents and trustees typia
set tuitions durning their Janui
and February board mectn
where initial reports suggest i
students will pay from 6 to
percent more to go to college
1988-89.
Last week, for example, Dj
University trustees approve
7.5 percent tuition hike at
Madison, N.J school, while "
versity of New Mexico Presu
Gerald May announced lr
would cost 10 percent in JulyJ
It's good news to some obs
ers.
The rate of increase has
moderating over the last
years said Meredith Ludwij
the American Association of Sj
Colleges and Universif
(AASCU), a Washington,
coalition of public campus 1
ers.
"For the 1988-89 academic
we're predicting tuition wil
up 6 percent at public schools
7 percent at private schoc
explained Pat Smith of the Ai
can Council of Education (Aj
"But we're currently revising
predictions, and if not!
changes dramatically the rat
increase for public college tu
might even be lower than 6
cent.
Tuition costs skyrocket
tween the 1976-77 and 19�
academic years, noted Norj
Brandt of the US. Departme
: Education. During that pel
� public school tuition increl
j 130 percent. Private college!
� tion rose 153 percent.
But Brandt added ruitioi
been rising more slowly the
� years.
Still, national averages are
; consolation to students at scl
: that will be increasing theii
3 tion by hefty percentages ne
Michigan State and New
� leans'Loyola University stu
face 10 percent hikes. Y(
stown State students will
percent more.
Thanks to an 85 percent
hike, it will cost most st
more than $20,000 to go
University of Southern Cal
next year, which puts it
same cost league as the
most selective schools.
While the general inflatij
for the year is under 4
Virginia's Mary B
E College's tuition will rise
cent, Missouri's Stp
5 College's 7 percent an
s Hampshire's Dart)
College's 6.4 percent.
Critics like U.S. Sec. of
tion William Bennett, of.
have been blasting cam
pushing tuition up faster
inflation rate, while ec
reply Bennett is ignorii
expensive it is to run a c
sCos are high, but





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 17,1988
nars
she did say that chlamydia is the
most frequently treated disease.
She added Chlamydia is a dis
ease people aren't aware of
said, I hope we can g
across to the student how very
important this is it's just a real
concern that the nursing staff and
w hole staff has here. We want
people to be aware that these
issc s are being ottered
STD testing is available at the
dent Health Sen ices. Testing
- Ds is free, except for ch-
ng, which is $5.
rhere i�� a fee tor AIDS testing, but
Morgan said that the Greenville
.partment does AIDS
free ot charge.
521 Cotanche St.
I 757-1666
,t i
atrick's Day
il7th
Johnson
f , JT
en Melon Margarita
on the rocks
$2L25reg.3.25
n Lime Margarita on
the rocks
$1.95 reg. 2.95
at
r�-A�$�r t
iinoviivo
I
&
X Meeting
�zt04l
988
'e li lation: 757-6823
ir
I0P
TO FIND
RIGHTJOB
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
IMES
riEW TECHNIQUES
SING TIPS
SESENTKD m
AREERS
& 3:00 p.m.
Center, SRA and CTA
Career planning workshop to be held Mon.
Have you thought about what
you plan to do when you get out
of college? Many students will
enter the job market in hopes of
finding that perfect job, the one
that will lead them to a long and
promising career in their chosen
field or profession. However,
have you thought about the
process involved in getting that
all-important first major job? Or
maybe what a potential
employer looks for in a potential
employee?
These topics and others will be
covered at the Chrysler-
Plymouth Career Search
Workshop, which will be held
Monday in Jenkins Auditorium.
The program is being presented
by Business Week Careers
magazine and co-sponsored by
Career Planning & Placement, the
SRA and CTA, and will hold
presentations at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.
Each presentation will cover the
following material:
1) Resume techniques, such as
what to include and not include in
a resume, and basic resume
techniques.
Distinguished scholars offer seminar
ECU New Bureau
GREENVILLE� A series of
seminars and workshops for
teachers and school administra-
tors will be presented at East
Carolina University in March and
April by three scholars in the Dis-
tinguished Visiting Scholars Pro-
gram.
Dr. Donald Cruickshank, a pro-
fessor of education at Ohio State
University will open the series on
March 24. Cruickshank will do
three presentations on "Reflective
Teaching a teaching concept for
which he is internationally
known.
His first presentation, a two-
hour workshop, wil begin at 9
p.m. in Room 129 of the Speight
(EducationPsychology) Build-
ing. At 1 p.m. he will discuss his
teacher education reform propos-
als and at 3 p.m. he will demon-
strate a method for helping teach-
ers improve the clarity of their
presentations.
Other speakers participating in
the series include Dr. Jonathan
Sher of the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill who will
visit on April 11. He will address
the issue of "Preparing for the
Real N.C. Schools
Dr. Cecil Mercer of the Univer-
sity of Florida, will conclude the
series on April 20. he wil discuss
"Teaching Students with Learn-
ing Problems
The Distinguished Visiting
Scholars Program is aprt of a
combined effort by ECU, Atlantic
Christian College, Elizabeth City
State University and N.C.
Wesleyan College to bring out-
standing visiting sacholars to
education faculties. The program
is funded by the University of
North Carolina Board of Fover-
nors.
2) Cover letters, which can
sometimes be a deciding factor in
whether or not you get an
interview.
3) Interviewing, developing
good interviewing skills,
stressing the importance of
proper appearance and eye
contact.
4) The importance of good
follow-up techniques.
The program will include
videos and workshops on how
not to get a job, how to do a self-
assement, and how to maintain a
positive attitude. Students
should remember, however, that
the workshop is not just for
graduating seniors � it is open to
all students, and can be just as
helpfel to the freshman or
sophomore looking that summer
job as to that senior seeking a full-
time position with a successful
firm. Career-seeking skills are
always useful, no matter what
type of job you are looking!
ECU
ECU
SRA semi-formal this weekend
The SRA spring dance "One
Night in Bangogk" will be Friday
night in the Holodome at the
Holidav Inn. The dance will start
at 9 p.m. and will last until 1 a.m.
There will be a live DJ, Marty
Callahan from WRAL radio
station in Raleigh, a cash bar, and
food. The SGA buses will be
providing transportation to and
from the dance from 9 p.m. to 1
a.m. The bus will depart on the
hour from West Campus, at the
Mendcnhall bus stop, at 10 past
the hour from the parking lot of
Umstead dorm, and from the hill
at 20 after the hour.
Tickets are still available from
house council vice presidents for
$3person and $5couple for
SRA cardholders. Also, radio
stations WZMB and WRQR will
be giving away tickets to three
callers. Be sure to get your tickets,
as the dance promises to be a lot of
fun!
There will be a mandatory
candidates meeting for everyone
running for SRA offices March 24
at 6 p.m. in room 221 Mendcnhall.
There will be a mystery prize
awarded to the Residence Hall
that has the highest percentage of
voter turnout in the SRA
elections.
In other announcements, the
West Area games will be held
April 5 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. West
Campus will also have a health
fair on April 12.
Tuition rises across the nation
(CPS)�Tuition rates are going
up again next fall, but not quite as
steeply as they rose last year,
observers say.
Regents and trustees typically
set tuitions durning their January
and February board meetings,
where initial reports suggest most
students will pay from 6 to 10
percent more to go to college in
1988-89.
Last week, for example, Drew
University trustees approved a
7.5 percent tuition hike at the
Madison, N.J school, while Uni-
versity of New Mexico President
Gerald May announced UNM
would cost 10 percent in July.
It's good news to some observ-
ers.
The rate of increase has been
moderating over the last few
years said Meredith Ludwig of
the American Association of State
Colleges and Universities
(AASCU), a Washington, D.C
coalition of public campus lead-
ers.
"For the 1988-89 academic year,
we're predicting tuition will go
up 6 percent at public schools and
7 percent at private schools
explained Pat Smith of the Ameri-
can Council of Education (ACE).
"But we're currently revising our
predictions, and if nothing
changes dramatically the rate of
increase for public college tuition
might even be lower than 6 per-
cent.
Tuition costs skyrocketed be-
tween the 1976-77 and 1986-87
academic years, noted Norman
Brandt of the U.S. Department of
Education. During that period,
public school tuition increased
130 percent. Private college tui-
tion rose 153 percent.
But Brandt added tuition has
been rising more slowly the last 2
years.
Still, national averages are little
consolation to students at schools
that will be increasing their tui-
tion by hefty percentages next fall.
Michigan State and New Or-
leans' Loyola University students
face 10 percent hikes. Young-
stown State students will pay 11
percent more.
Thanks to an 85 percent tuition
hike, it will cost most students
more than $20,000 to go to the
University of Southern California
next year, which puts it in the
same cost league as the nation's
most selective schools.
While the general inflation rate
for the year is under 4 percent,
Virginia's Mary Baldwin
College's tuition will rise 8 per-
cent, Missouri's Stephens
College's 7 percent and New
Hampshire's Dartmouth
College's 6.4 percent.
Critics like U.S. Sec. of Educa-
tion William Bennett, of course,
have been blasting campuses for
pushing tuition up faster than the
inflation rate, while educators
reply Bennett is ignoring how
expensive it is to run a college.
"Costs are high, but colleges
aren't ripping us off either sid
Brandt.
The costs of goods and services
colleges buy, said Julianne Still
Thrift of the National Association
of Independent Colleges and
Universities (NAICU), have in-
creased faster than consumer
goods the government monitors
when determining inflation rates.
Utility rates, maintenance and
construction costs have risen dra-
matically in recent years, she said,
and colleges have no other choice
but to pass those costs on to stu-
dents as state and federal govern-
ments chip in less money than in
the past.
"State legislatures were willing
to let tuition rise to improve or
protect the quality of their institu-
tions. But they don't want to raise
taxes (to raise more money to help
colleges pay for the improve-
ments) ACE's Smith observed.
But states facing economic
problems in recent years have
"been doing better said Ludwig,
and as state funding increases,
tuition hikes decrease.
Colleges also used the early '80s
� a period of low inflation �
increase faculty and staff salaries.
Between 1973 and 1981, faculty
members have lost 28 percent of
their actual spending power, said
Thrift, and even after the recent
increases, few have regained past
spending power.
Most schools, said Ludwig,
feel the salary increases and capi-
tal improvement projects of re-
cent years will be enough to tide
them over for a while, and, com-
bined with higher state funding,
tuition will stabilize.
Despite a shrinking pool of 18-
to -24 year olds, college enroll-
ment continues to increase as
more minorities, women and
older men attend college. But the
new students cost more to edu-
cate.
"The competition between
schools for students has increased
dramatically, and schools need to
improve their quality and equip-
ment to retain them said Thrift.
"Increased enrollment Brandt
agreed, "may not be a boon for all
schools
Campuses also need to raise
tuition to get money to provide
financial aid to their poorer stu-
dents, he said.
"Institutions now have to offer
aid from their own sources" be-
cause the federal government no
longer supplies enough money to
get students through college,
Brandt contended.
"They're taking from the rich to
ivc to the poor
Brandt reported federal student
aid supplied $15.9 billion to stu-
dents during the 1985-86 school
year, but, thanks to inflation, it
bought about $1 billion less edu
cation than a decade earlier.
5W? Slut ffiarnltaten
Serving the Exist Carolina campus community since 1925.
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo
Shari Clemens Adam Blankenship
Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTI ILY RATES
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One color and black$90.00
Two colors and black155.00
Inserts
5.000 or less6g each
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BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
Phones
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Kentucky fried Chicken �
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Kentucky Fried Chicken
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1 MASHED POTATO AND GRAVY
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per customer. Good on combination orders only. Customer pays all applicable
sales tax.Coupon Expires: March 31,1988
Kentucky ftied Chicken
$
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for only $1.75 with this coupon, limit one package per coupon, four coupons
per customer. Good on combination orders only. Customer pays all applicable
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Coupons Good at: Greenville. Tarboro, Wilson, Goldsboro,
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I fc�JH �Mli ��)�
"�"�- I� ����"J��l"l





Uftfz Saat QlutBlimun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, - ��- L
Clay Deanhardt, mm
James F.l. McKee, iwhuhtfAdmtm
Tim Chandler, �Wr� u.
Joi in Carter, mm ea
Mici ielle England, cm� m,
Debbie Stevens, s�.
JEFF PARKER,toaHt�i�
TOM FURR, QmfaliM .KUiuger
Mike Upci iurci t, p. u
JOHNW. MEDUN,vwd���
Mar ch 17 1988
OPINION
Page 4
Endorsements
How we decide
With SGA elections approaching will be based on a consensus, or it
next week, it is almost time for The none can be reached, by majority
East Carolinian to make its annual
candidate endorsements.
Last year there was great contro-
versy over the endorsement, and
many accused the newspaper of
being a "biased rag To the con-
vote. It is that endorsement which
you will see in Tuesday's paper.
Remember, the endorsement is the
opinion of the entire board, but it in
many ways reilects the opinions of a
large number of students. The mem
v
ALL X IMP WAS ATT A PASH OF 'GLASNOSVI
'
trarv, candidate endorsements are bers of the editorial board, because
an important part of a newspapers of their jobs, often know a great deal
function. In a situation such as ours, about what goes on within the uni-
where the campaign time is so short, versity and what issues are impor-
the candidate endorsement be- tant. This is an educated decision,
comes even more important as a not a popularity contest. Indeed, the
suggestion or recommendation for board is offering a service to the
our next campus leader. student body since it is one of the
However, it is important that the few groups of students that will sit
student body understands how this down with each candidate, indi
endorsement will be obtained. viduallv. for 30 minutes to Question
The Editorial Board of The East them on important campus issues.
Carolinian (the general manager,
managing editor, news editor, fea-
tures editor and sports editor) has
Bonehead reaps some ironic praise
The endorsements on Tuesda
will contain more than a simple
scheduled interviews with all the statement oi whom the board de
presidential and vice presidential cides to support It will also contain
candidates Each candidate will be the reasons for that endorsement
asked to make a short presentation, and try to present a fair picture oi th�
followed by questioning from tru
board.
When all the interviews are com-
plete, the board will meet again and
decide on which candidates to en-
dorse for each office. The decision
candidates endorsed
It is the hope oi the board that In
explaining these procedures in ad-
vance, the controversy that raged
across the campus last year can be
averted.
B&T IT, 6�0R6�
Ml I
NEW DESIGN FOR
MOUNT RUSHMOREW88S&?
GEPHARPT
mmfiSmmtimmS&i� iwmc f&rnjur-svAj -
i
SGA Legislator supports Jones forVP�' d� �����piy 'a
To the editor:
I cannot tell you how pleased I am
that the editors of this newspaper
include such witty, insightful, infor-
mative and stimulating articles as
those by the wonderful writer,
Chippy Bonehead.
These articles are not only enter-
taining, but newsworthy as well.
What informed, educated citizen
would miss this bi-weekly informa-
tion? 1 anxiously await, thumbs twid-
dling and heart skipping, by the
Publications Building each time The
Fast Carolinian is published. And
the humor! What can I say? It defi-
nitely gets three "ha's" on the ha
scale. (The "palsied tongues" of "old,
wierd, flabby" people, for example.)
In addition, Chippy is more insight-
ful and stimulating regarding social
matters than Abigail will ever be. I,
for one, will always follow his advice:
Laugh at fat girls' poetry, and avoid
helping people with Alzheimer's dis-
ease. And I will always, always con-
sider suicide when I have a problem.
I realize I am probably the only one
who adores this brilliant writer; so,
please don't ever remove this column
from The East Carolinian. If you did,
you would surely lose advertisers
and readers, as well as journalists
who are acquiring valuable experi-
ence by writing for such a prestigious,
honorable student newspaper
Angela Lingerfclt Bland
Graduate Student
English
ROTC Backlash
To the editor:
I would like to respond to Gary
Sanderson's letter, which fervently
defended ROTC and the Armed
Forces of the United States of America.
First of all, I feel that 1 must make it
known to all that I am not a Commu-
nist. My father, a LtC. in the U.S.
Army, lost his homeland, Hungary,
during their revolution in 1956.1 have
visited communist Hungary and at-
tended almost a semester of medical
school there in an American-backed
school and left due to security reasons
for my father. I witnessed commu-
nism and the problems it causes a
nation firsthand and would not want
to reside in a communist country.
However, the "minority" who at-
tack armed forces, which is not as
small as some may think does not do
so because we are ignorant to the
Communists' forceful methods of
obtaining power. We condemn armed
forces, of any nation, because of moral
reasons.
Morality is what makes us human
beings and allows us to share the earth
without killing each other. We learn
from early childhood to negotiate, or
as Sesame Street taught us, to compro-
To the editor:
I am writing this letter in support of
SGA vice-presidential candidate
Kelly Jones. I am qualified to write
such a letter because I serve on the
committee which she chairs - the Stu-
dent Welfare Committee. Kelly
worksdiligentlyasourchairanddoes
not sit idly when nothing is sent to our
committee for review; she, instead,
pounds the pavement looking for
matters of importance to the students
and brings these matters before our
group. Under her able leadership, our
committee has sponsored several
resolutions: a resolution supporting a
mandatory test before official drop
date policy, now before the faculty
senate; a resolution supporting the
repainting of the street in front of the
student store; a resolution supporting
not paving the marching band field,
which is used by many, many stu-
dents, and recently passed by ac-
anyone who defends ROTC or the
armed forces is a child; I am simply
making a point. Without a compro-
claimation, a resolution supporting mise, known in more adult terms as a
the updating of the campus lighting treaty, the earth would be a battle-
system. Kelly, in fact, authored two of ground and not the life sheltering
these resolutions - testing and light- resource that it was meant to be. Cer-
ing, so obviously she makes things for tainly the Communists have learned
us to do and, in so doing, works for the same moral lessons that we have
the students. or they would have killed each other
I cannot think of a better place for a off by now.
vice-president to start than as Student That brings me to another moral
Welfare chair. After serving as chair, issue, that of taking another's life.
Kelly surely has a feel for the needs When one learns useful skills in the
and concerns of the students; such an military, heshe is taught to target
idea is necessary in order to be a sue- threatening military installations with
cessful vice-president. as few civilian casualties as possible.
Join me in supporting the best can- Realize that these few hundred or
didatc - the most qualified candidate thousand civilian casualties are actu-
- for the job of SGA vice-president, ally human beings with families, jobs,
Vote Kelly Jones on Wednesday, dreams and aspirations much like
March 23. yours.
In Hungary I observed that the
John Howard majority of the population was not
Freshman communist, though they may be reg-
Business istered as such. They did not hold
communist ideals or care to uphold
them. If we bomb these "Commu-
nists how will they ever be able to
change their stifling governments?
Dead men and women and children
cannot make changes.
I feel sad for those who feel that the
only job opportunities they have in
our nation, the nation which you so
rightfully defend, would have to turn
to an employment which trains them
to take others' lives. If we do have
such an unemployment problem in
our country, then where is all the
money coming from to fund and
build our large armed forces and
missile supply. It seems to me that
killing people to some is just an in-
dustry, a job market.
I end by reiterating that I am not a
Communist. I also do not feel that I
should lead a life filled with fear and
intimidation because life to me is a
positive not a negative experience. I
merely do not see the point in killing,
when there are peaceful alternatives.
And for those of you who feel that I
am naive or too trusting of the Com-
munists, I have one thing to say: The
future of our planet can go in two
directions: destruction or reconcili-
ation. You decide.
One more thing I, too, hope the
vandalist is caught.
Tonya Batizv
English
US is Defenseless
To the editor:
The United States is completely
defenseless against any nuclear at-
tack, whether accidental or deliber-
ate. Did you know this? We are com-
pletely defenseless! Does this fact
scare you? Or do you just try to cope
with it by shutting it out of your
mind?
Imagine the following two scenar-
ios: 1. You're watching the six o'clock
news one evening and suddenly a
special bulletin interrupts the usual
show. The President is on TV. He
says, "I'm deeply saddened by and
regret that I have to tell you about
what has just occurred. The USSR
fired 100 ICBMs toward the U.S. fif-
teen minutes ago, and they will hit us
in fifteen minutes. Millions and mil-
lions of you will be annihilated, and
we can do nothing to stop this from
occurring. However, rest assured and
take heart at the fact that we retaliated
ten minutes ago and that in twenty
minutes, our missiles will incinerate
millions of Russian citizens. Good
night
Given our present "defensive" pol-
icy, Mutual Assured Destruction
(MAD), the scenario above could
very well become reality. The U.S. has
followed this policy since 1972. Con-
trast this scene of despair, doom,
destruction, and death with the fol-
lowing scenario which would occur if
the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI)
Space Shield were deployed and
ready:
2. You're watching the six o'clock
news one evening and suddenly a
special bulletin interrupts the usual
show. The President is on TV. He
says, "The USSR fired 100 ICBMs
toward the U.S. fifteen minutes ago.
However, we citizens of the U.S. can
take heart and rest assured at the fact
that virtually all of those missiles will
be destroyed in mid-air over the At-
lantic and Pacific oceans. No retali-
ation on our part will be necessary
and thus no Russian citizens will be
killed. Thank God for SDI. Millions of
people, Americans and Russians
alike, would be dead in twenty min-
utes if it were not for its defensive
protection. Good night
How could anyone be against pro-
tecting thiscountry and our lives with
bUI? Who could be against defending
oursckes against horrible death and
destruction I'll tell von who liberals
Some liberals say, "use SDI as a
bargaining chip Others sav, "SDI
needs at least ten more years of re-
search, so meanwhile let's extend the
MAI Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty of
197� TTiis will promote 'arms control'
and it won t hurt us because bDI isn't
ready to build anyway As usual,
liberals are wrong and dangerously
so.
Liberals attack SDI by making the
following six claims:
1. SDI will not work.
False. On lune 10,1984, our Defense
Department sent a missile up into
space at 10,000 miles per hour where
it scored a bull's-eye at a height of 100
miles against another missile travel-
ing at 10,000 miles per hour. This feat
proved that we can accomplish the
intercept, the most difficult part of the
SDI system, right now! Thus the rest
of SDI can be built and deployed in
the near future.
2. SDI won't be perfec
Nothing's perfect, oi eoas�, W.
SDI will certainly be more nearly
perfect than any treaty. Even if SDI
were only 90 perfect, that would
provide real deterrence and therefore
give us 100 protection. It the Soviets
knew that nine, eight, or even seven
out of every ten of their missile force
would be shot down, leaving our
missiles mostly undamaged, the So-
viets wouldn't shoot any oi their
missiles at us.
3. SDI is too expensive.
False. SDI will cost only about $30
billion over the next seven vears. This
figure compares favorably with the
$40 billion we now spend to continue
maintenance and modernization of
the offensive nuclear missiles re-
quired by our current MAD strategy.
4. SDI would be useless because the
Soviets would "overwhelm it with
more offensive missiles.
False. In order for the Soviets to
build enough additional missiles to
get through our SDI space shield, they
would have to beef up their missile
arsenal to ten times its present size.
This would involve the building of
5,000 additional ICBMs at a cost of $5
trillion. And that is impossibly costly:
the Soviets simply don't have the
money.
5. SDI would violate the MAD ABM
Treaty of 1972.
False. The 1972 ABM Treaty prohib-
its onlv ar.ti-Ticjjp defenses that
were "currcmiy' in use at the tune.
The Soviets absolutely refused to
limit future systems. In'fact, the Sovi-
ets have been working on their own
SDI since 1969 and have spent 15
times more money on it than we have!
6. SDI needs ten more years of re-
search. Let's extend the MAD ABM
Treaty during that time.
False. This is a deliberate delaying
tactic by liberals who are curiously
comfortable with the concept of keep-
ing the U S completely undefended.
Look, SDI shouldn't be a partisan
issue. We all need to be protected
from nuclear disaster, liberals and
conservative alike. I sincerely would
like to know why in the world liberals
are against a defensive system that
would save millions of lives? I
thought liberalsDemocrats were
supposed to represent the "compas-
sionate party
SDI is a non-nuclear defensive sys-
tem which destroys only weapons,
not people ut's deploy SDI before
llt?ntQ- Lct's�pbuilding bombs
ho i " ? ,ets � Protecting
the lives of millions with solid defen
sive deterrence. Let's deploy SDI
now! r '
The
ar
fo
if
I Hrd
�Me
the c
�The
quesq
�Ther
audie
College Republicans
This
date
the
uni
i
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 17,1988
NOT J
lie praise
be against defending
orriblc death and
II von who-liberals.
use SDI as a
Hhcrs say. "SDI
nore years of re-
le let's extend the
Missile Treatv of
to arms control'
:vcauseSDIisn t
d anyway As usual,
g and dangerously
- SDI by making the
rk.
m our Defense
: a missile up into
miles per hour where
ve at a height of 100
another missile travel-
- per hour. This feat
an accomplish the
difficult part of the
: now! Thus the rest
lilt and deployed in
be perfect
x:nci:t, A course, but
. be more nearly
treaty. Even if SDI
perfect, that would
renee and therefore
lection. If the Soviets
ght, or even seven
ry tei I their missile force
town, leaving our
ndamaged, the So-
In't shoot anv of their
J
expensive.
cost only about $30
next seven vears. This
-
favorably with the
. o now spend to continue
nance and modernization of
ive nuclear missiles re-
ur current MAD strategy.
aid be useless because the
d overwhelm" it with
- missiles.
rder for the Soviets to
additional missiles to
a r SDI space shield, they
e to beef up their missile
ton times its present size.
d involve the building of
b iditional ICBMs at a cost of $5
And that is impossibly costly:
nets simply don't have the
I would violate the MAD ABM
t-of 1972.
The 1972 ABM Treaty prohib-
rr ilc defenses that
rurrcnuy in use at the tune.
viets absolutely refused to
future systems. In fact, the Sovi-
e been working on their own
jince 1969 and have spent 15
Imore money on it than we have!
DI needs ten more years of rc-
Lct's extend the MAD ABM
during that time.
e. This is a deliberate delaying
by liberals who are curiously
)r table with the concept of keep-
r I completely undefended.
kk, SDI shouldn't be a partisan
We all need to be protected
nuclear disaster, liberals and
frvative alike. I sincerely would
i know why in the world liberals
gainst a defensive system that
save millions of lives? I
;ht liberalsDemocrats were
)sed to represent the "compas-
e party
is a non-nuclear defensive sys-
.hich destroys only weapons,
rople. Let's deploy SDI before
b late. Let's step building bombs
pll people; lef s start protecting
fes of millions with solid defen-
ietcrrence. Let's deploy SDI
College Republicans
HEAR THE
CANDIDATES SPEAK!
The Media Board and
The East Carolinia
are sponsoring a candidate
forum Monday from 2 p.m.
until 4:30 p.m. on the mail.
� Members of the campus media will ask
the candidates questions.
�The candidates will be allowed to ask
questions of each other.
�There will be a questioning period for the
audience, also.
This may be your only chance to meet the candi-
dates before Wednesday's elections, so don't miss
the opportunity! Take a part in the future of your
university. Attend the forum Monday and vote
Wednesday.





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 17,1988
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
SECRETARYOFFICE MANAGER.
Parthme positions, whol?sale firm needs
self-motivated, aggressive person with
pleasant professional voice to answer
phones, handle orders, filing, typing,
correspondence, and word processing.
Excellent working conditions. Send
resume to: CMS. P.O. Box 2987-0987,
Green ville, NC 27836.
ARE YOU A COLLEGE STUDENT
looking for summer employment and
available to begin working now? Are you
enthusiastic, dependable and excited
about working in a fashion environment?
Brody's and Brody's for Men have part-
time openings for individuals able to
work flexible hours. Apply at Brody's,
Carolina East Mall, M-W, 2 until 4pm.
WANTED - Lead singer for band. Must
have good range. We have some good
connections. Call 752-6867 after 10 p.m.
CHILD CARE NEEDED for 7 yr old girl
Car a must. Non-smoker. Call 752-1421
alter 6p.m.
HELP WANTED: Part time Director of
Music Responsibilities include directing
adult and children choirs, hand bell choir,
and organist for worship services. Send
resume to Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church, 811 E. Mulberry St Goldsboro,
NC 27530. Phone 1-735-0128.
OVERSEAS JOBS. Also cruiseships.
SI 5.000-95,400vr. Now Hiring! 320
openings! (1) 805-687-6000 Ext. OJ-1166.
WANTED: Ccach for a summer
swimteam, late May until Aug 7. Must
have experience or have been a member
of a swimteam. Applicant could attend
summer school from 1 l-3p.m if desired.
For more info: Contact BiU Flowerin-823-
5111-w- or mail resume to Tarboro Swim
Cub. P,0, Box 1301, Tarboro, N.C 27886.
HELP WANTED: Waiters and
waitresses for restaurant near Atlantic
beach Apply 218 Front St. Beaufort, NC.
BOOK BUYER-EARN WHILE YOU
LEARN! Make vou own hours. Be vour
own boss. Buy books for local book
company. Respond to Carolina Book
Services! Box 2151, Greenville, NC 27836.
HELP WANTED: Part-time interior
design student-send resume to:
Designer, 3010 East 10th Street,
Greenville. NC
PART TIME SALES assoc. needed
immidiately. Must be dependable,
outgoing, and able to move furniture. 20
hours weekly. Consisting of evenings
and week-ends. Apply in person at
Galleria, the Piazza. ABSOLUTELY NO
PHONE CALLS.
SERVICES OFFERED
ARE YOU READY FOR A COMPLETE
MAKEOVER? New York trained hair
stylist will design a hair cut and style to
compliment your facial features. Joanne's
Professional Image. 756-1945. Call
between 3:00-8:00pm. Students half
price
TYPING AND WORD PROCESSING.
Letter quality laser printing. Rush jobs
accepted. Designer Type 752-1933.
TOP QUALITY TYPING: Papers $1.50
page, Resumes written and typed $15.00.
Call Joy after 6:00 pm at 758-7423.
NEED MONEY FOR COLLEGE? Free
information on loans and scholarships
available for undergraduate and
graduate students. Write Scholastic
Financial Services, 202 Arlington Blvd
Suite D Greenville. State year in school.
AIRBRUSH ARTWORKS got a rad idea
and want it on a T-shirt? I lot colors and
artwork reproduced w Airbrush
Artwork! T-Shirt, Sweatshirts, Banners.
Handpainted one of a kind art work
(won't wash out). Professionally
airbrushing 1980-1988 recently came up
from Daytona, Fla. Paul Hill 752-0607.
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICES: We
offer typing and photocopying services.
We also sell software and computer
diskettes. 24 hours in and out.
Guaranteed typing on paper up to 20
hand written pages. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th
Street(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC
752-3694.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Stereo System, Marantz
Amp and speakers, Pioneer deck, dual
turntable. Techniques tuner, $400.00 or
best offer. Call 795-4014 after 7:30 pm.
TROLLS TUX AND TEES: Don't pay
high prices for your formal wear, try
Troll's Tux and Tees for your formal
needs. Traditional and Designer models.
Special fraternity rates. 757-1007 or 830-
1447.
WATERBED: For sale kingsize waterbed
comes complete temp control, semi
waveless matress and 2 sets of sheets!
Call John 752-3919 or 355-7473 $150.00.
SALT WATER AQUARIUM FOR
SALE: 30 gallons - Includes all necessary
equipment (filters, coral, hood, lights,
heater) $200.00 call 758-8010.
RINGGOLD TOWERS CONDO FOR
SALE: B-unit, 2nd floor, fully furnished.
Tax market value $43,730.00Make me an
offer. 919-787-1378.
LARGE, DORM-SIZED SEARS
refrigerator with freezer; excellent
condition $100.00. Call 752-2474 after 5:30
pm.
LOFT FOR SALE: Walnut stained, great
condition, easy to put together (8 pieces),
easy to store, only $50.00 Call Donna at
758-9827.
5BUCKS � just 5 bucks will get you the
hottest spring break tee shirt. Call Trolls
Tux & Tees at 757-1007.
FOR SALE: Daybed, white with brass
accents. $70.00. Call Pam at 830-1215.
FOR RENT
TWO BEDROOM TOWNHOUSE.
Available now. $300 per month. Central
heat and air. Fully carpeted. Pool. 757-
6423 days, 919-975-2481 evenings (call
collect).
ROOM FOR RENT $125.00 per month
plus deposit. Available April 1st Phone
Art at 757-3543 after 5:00 p.m. Near
campus.
OPEN MINDED ROOMMATE
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY: Your best
bet! Only $150 monthly, no utilities. Very,
very close to campus. Call 830-5199.
1lurrv!
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Aprs for rent.
Furnished. Contact I lollieSimonowich at
752-2865.
WANTED: Roomate to share large 3
bedroom home on Atlantic Beach with
young professional couple. Fullv
furnished except your bedroom. $200.00
plus half utilities. Call 247-3692 after 7:00
pm.
FEMALE ROOMATE NEEDED: ASAP
toshare two bedroom townhouse in quiet
area. Will have own room. Rent $125.00
plus 1 3 utilities. Call 355-4647.
GOING TO SUMMER SCHOOL? 2-3
female, non-smoker roomatcs needed by
May 1 to share apartment convenient to
campus. $147.50 for private room or
$73.75 for shared. AC, cable, pool,
laundry. Call Carla at 758-6837.
NEED A NEW HOME? Share 2 bed2
bath, $145.00 plus utilities, 10 minute
commute. Call Michael at 756-2491.
A Beautiful Place to Live.
�All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMEN S
2899 K. 5th Street
�Located War ECO
�Near Mjor Shopping C liters
�Across I'rom Highway Patrol Station
Limited Offer - $275 a month
Contact �) T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 o. 830-1937
Ome open - Apt 8. 12 - 5.30 p.m.
�AZALEA GATDENS
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $195 a month. 6
month lease. MOBII-E HOME RENTALS -
couples or singles. Apartment and mobile
homes tn Azalea Gardens near Brook Valley
County Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
PERSONALS
SAE HAPPY HOUR at the Clbo, Friday 4-
7; 2 dollar teas�why dance anywhere
else?
CAROL SHORE: SCA Vice-President,
vote Wednesday, March 23rd with
student I.D.
THE OMEGA PSI PHI FRATERNITY
INC. extends a warm welcome to
everyone to attend their annual "Royal
Omega Ball" March 19,1988 at the I lUton
Inn at 9:00 pm. Admission is $3.00 single'
and $5.00 couple in advance, $4.00 single
at the door and $6.00 couple at the door.
APPLICATIONS FOR MARSHALLS
are now being accepted in Room 214
Whichard Building. You must have a 3.0
GPA and be a junior at the end of the 1988
Spring Sememcster. Last day to apply is
March 23.
SIG EPS � Can't wait to " lop, Skip, and
Go Naked" on St. Patty's day. Love the
Alpha Phis.
ALPHA PHIS � Be ready to "Hop, Skip,
and Go Naked" Thursday night � Sig
Eps. P.S. don't forget to wear green
somewhere on your body.
THE LADIES OF DELTA SIGMA
T11ETA SOROITY INC. invites you to
party at the Unlimited Touch, Thursday
March 17th at I0pm-2am, $100 with
college I.D.
KEITH, SURPRISE! HAPPY
BIRTHDAY "OLD MAN The Big 22 is
finally here. But guess whatI still love
ya! From:me! (your secret admirer).
JUSTIN'TIME: Come down and drink a
few brews and let us knock your socks
off at the New Deli tonight at 10:00.
ROCK AND ROLL.
TO THE BAHAMIAN AZD'S, TKE'S
AND MIKE PATRICK: Churchill's was
"HOT, HOT, HOT the drinks were
'TINY-WINY but Hey Monwe be
jammin Love, Harriet and Elizabeth.
HOPE EVERYONE HAD A GREAT
SPRING BREAK Welcome back. Just
think only 26 more days of classes! Love,
the Sigmas.
TRP. JRN: I'm so happy you arc finally
close by. But always remember that I will
love you no matter where you are You
are the BEST I lighways 17 and 43 will
see a lot of me. I love you, Ann.
TAFFY: You are great! Cheer up, because
"Boo-Boo" and I love you very much!
Love, Bananer.
"IN THE DARK" A series of frank
discussions on sexually transmitted
diseases. Presented by the ECU Student
I lealth Services Nursing Staff. March
22nd and 29th from 3pm to 4pm at the
Student Health Service, room 116
Register by calling 757-6841 ask for
Barbara Pennell (8-5 pm).
CARNIVALE CRUISERS: We left at �
for Miami and got there in record time!
We finally boarded our ship, but notl
before going through the customs hnej
The bedrooms were nice, the bathrooms!
were, well, small, but oh those stewardj
were above them all. Mine were "Vo
man" and "Dag" and they really had the
Caribbean dance in the bag. The meals!
that we had ranged from a Mexican buffet!
to Italian night to surf and turf. The drinks!
we had began with bloody marys and!
daiquiris in the sun, then rum punch and!
tequilla at night for some drunken fun
The first and the last nights were the!
rockiest of all, enough to make you
stumble into a wall For those that got sick J
and used the white bags, Dramamine lsl
what you should have had I hop, ()1) aH
have great memories of the cruise and
that your pictures are great because this-
was the best Spring Break of 1988 KeepiT
touch. Love, Shanyour Chaperone)
NATALIE AND HELEN: Had a great
time partying with vou on the cruise
Hope to see you both at happy hour
Friday. Love, Shan
SIG EPS � As vi hi h'at the buzzer by oneJ
we found that "Nutsc Holts" werelotefj
fun. From thumpers to Little Ceaser
rings, we slammed shots and made the
Bud truck sing Some had to end the night
early due to test, others went to Mike's to
continue the party quest The night wjH,
definitely be one to remember AC iPis and
Sig Eps � 1; Tequila & Rumpiemintz -
Surrender Love the AOPis
VOTE LARRY MURPHY for SCA
President Wednesday March23rd Brine
a student I D. 5
The Fizz
present
KLEE LILES
on St. Patrick's Day - tonight
Irish Coffee $2.50
Saturday, March 19th
Mark Johnson
Drink Specials: Fireballs
& Mai Tais.
LARRY MURPHY
for SGA President
Vote Wednesday. March 23
Bring Student ID
Announcements
EKQS
The Equal Rights Organization for stu-
dents will meet today at 5:00 in Brewster
B-101 to ratify the conshtutuion and plan
a fund raiser. All interested persons in-
vited to attend. For more information, call
758-35645 or 746-6049.
SLAP
All General College students who have
indicated a desire to major in Speech-
Language and Auditory Pathology and
have R. Muzzarelli as their advisor are to
meet on Wednesday, March 23 at 5:00
p.m. in Brewster D101. Advising for early
registration will take place at that time.
Others interested in SLAP should contact
the department-757-6961.
WORKSHOP
Ms. Melissa Haid, a visiting artist, will
conduct a multi-media workshop with
clay, paper, and slumped glass on March
14-18 in Jenkins Art Building. Ms. Haid will
present a slide lecture on March 16 at 7:30
in J -1327 of recent work. A work by Ms.
Haid will be completed during the work-
shop and will be donated to the perma-
nent collection in Mendenhall Student
Center or Kate Lewis Gallery. The work-
shop is sponsored by the Ceramics Guild,
The Visual Art Forum, and The SGA. The
public is invited to attend. Workhop
hours will be from 8:00-12:00 noon the 14-
18 in J-143.
�CA
Fellowship of Christian Athletes will
meet every Tuesday at 9:30 at the Pirate
Club. Coaches, athletes, and others are
welcome to attend.
GAYCOMMITTNJTTY
Greenville Gay Community is a group
formed last fall to meet the needs of the
gay and lesibian Community in
Greenville. The group meets every othber
week at different locations in Greenville.
For more information please call and ask
for Charley at 752-2675.
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton House is offering
one hour programs on beginning a res-
ume for your job search. Handouts and
samples will be given out to the first 20
people to come to each session. No sign up
required. These sessions are held in the
Career Planning Room on March 3,16, and
22 at 3:00 p.m. For those who have already
written a resume and wish to have a res-
ume critiqued, separate programs are
listed at the office.
INTER VIEW WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton House is offering
one hour sessions to aid you in developing
better interviewing skills. A film and dis-
cussion of how to interview on and off
campus will be shared. These sessions are
held in the Career Planning Room on
March 2,15, and 24 at 300 p.m.
CQQfcEB
Students holding North Carolina Real
Estate Sales license are neede for positions
with major resort developer located in NC
mountains, for more information contact
Cooperative Education, 2nd floor, New
Building.
CHILDHOOD Q I IB
Do you know what makes a good
teacher? The answer to this question and
many more will be answered at our
version of the "Donahue" show on March
23 at 4:00 in Speight 129. Have you
questions ready for our distinguished
guests. The information they share with
us will be important for our future.
GAMMA BETA PHT
The National Gamma Beta Phi Honor
Society will hold a meeting Mach 22 at 7:00
p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium. Attendance
is required.
PHI ALPHA THFTA
There will be an informal discuaaion
with Professor Ronald Robinson of Balliol
College, Oxford Mon. march 21st at 1:00
p.m. in the Todd Room. Refreshments will
be served. Also, nominations for 1988-
1989 chapter officers will bve held Wed.
March 23rd at 3:00 p.m. in the Todd Room.
All members urged to attend this very
important meeting.
BIOLOGY CLUB
Biology club meeting 3-21-88 in BN-109
5-530 pizza break, 530 begin regular
meeting.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC;
The Department of University Unions
and The School of Music present The
American Chamber Players on
Wednesday, March 23rd, at 8:00 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre. This ensemble consists
entirely of srtists who have already
performed together with great distinction
as members of the library of Congress'
Summer Chamber Festival. For ticket
information contact: The Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall Student Center, phon
757-6611, ext. 266. Office hours are
Monday through Friday, 11:00 a.m6:00
p.m.
BRASS OUINTFT
The Department of University Unions
presents The Empire Brass, America's
finest brass quintet, on Friday, April 8,
1988, at 8:00 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
This group's repertoire of over 300 works
is unparalleled in diversity and quality.
SPECIAL NOTE: There will be an
opportunity for you to meet The Empire
Brass following their performance at East
Carolina University. For further
information on the reception contact:
WTEB Radio, Craven Community
College, P.O. Box 885, New Bern, N.C
28560, or call (919) 638-3434. For further
ticket information contact: The Central
Ticket Office, mendenhall Student
Center, phone 757-6611, ext. 266. Office
hours are Monday-Friday, 11:00 a.m6:00
p.m.
STRESS
Coping with stress: A free mini class
offered by the East Carolina University
Counseling Center for students: You can-
identify sources of stress, make positive
changes, manage your response to
stressful situations, learn to relax,
improve self confidence. March 22,24,29,
and 31 in 329 Wright Building from 4-5
p.m. No advance registration is required.
Call or stop by the Counseling Center for
further information. (316 Wright
Building; 757-6661).
CAMPUS GIRL SCOUTS
Tuesday meeting at 1:30 p.m. in
Mendenhall. Your girl scout cookies are
in. For further information call Nancy
Ludwig at 758-6701 after 5 p.m.
COUNSELING CENTER
Making a Major Decision Group: This
program is designed to aid students in
choosing an academic major in a small
group format. Each participant will also
receive individual aid from the group
leader if desired. Group participants will
increase self knowledge of their interests,
values and abilities; learn how these relate
to majors and career areas at ECU; and
narrow their options through a systematic
career decision making process. The
Major Decision Group will meet: March
21, 23, 25 in 329 Wright Building, from 4-
5 p.m.(attend all three meetings).
Although advance registration is not
required, we would appreciate advance
notification of interest to insure that we
have adequate materials on hand. Please
contact the Counseling Center in 316
Wright Building (757-6661) for further
information or to let us know you plan to
attend.
STUDENT RFGISTR ATTOM
General College students should
contact their advisers the week of March
21-25 to make arrangements for academic
advising for first and second summer
sessions and fall semester, 1988. Early
registration will begin March 28 and end
April 4.
MARSHALLS
Applications are not being accepted in
room 214 Whichard Building. You must
have a 3.0 and be a junior at the end of the
1988 spring sememster. Last day to apply
is March 23.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
Volunteers are needed to help with the
1988 Greenville-Pitt County Special
Olympics Games which will be held on
Friday April 15, 1988, at E.B. Aycock
Junior High School in Greenville.
Volunteers must be able to work from 9:00
a.m. to 2:00p.m. If you are interested, you
need to attend a volunteer training session
in Biology 103 on Tuesday, April 12 at 5:00
p.m. For more information, call Leslie
Wooles at 830-4551.
UP IN SMOKE
A program for students, faculty, and
staff will be offered on Monday, March 21,
1988 from 3 - 4 p.m. at the Student Health
Services, Room 116. The program will
teach techniques for stopping smoking
and is presented by the Student Health
Promotion Assistant, Kevin Hagen. For
registration or more information, contact
Barbara Pennell at 757-6841:
ACCOUNTING SOCT.FTY
The accouting society will hold its
monthly meetin on Monday, March 21 at
4 pjn. in the Mendenhall Multi-purpose
room. Donna Cannon from Weyerhauser
will speak on cost accounting.
Nominations for new officers will take
place. If you are interested in becoming an
officer, leave your name, phone number,
and office desired in the accoutin
department office.
SAM
A speaker from Businessweek
magazine is coming on March 21 at 3:30
p.m. to talk to all SAM members about
resumes and career planning. We'll meet
in room 1032 in the new classroom
building. Election of new officers will also
be discussed.
SUMMER INTERNSHIP
There will be interviews for summer
internships at 7:00 on Thursday March 17
in Mendenhall, Rm. 247. All majors
welcome.
KERYGMA
A Bible study for those who are serious
about studying tie Bible. Weekly meet-
ings (tentatively Tues. afternoon) will be
scheduled to accomodate those who are
interested. Kerygma is an interdenomina-
tional program sponsored by Presbyte-
rian Campus Ministry. For more infor.
Call Mike at 752-7240.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
There will be meetings every Thursday
at 6:00 in the culture center. Everybody
welcome.
ROBERTSON
Students who would like to help with
getting M.G. "Pat" Robertson elected
President, contact Justin Sturz at 758-2047.
Organizational meeting will be held soon.
SEJ2
Students for Economic Democracy will
meet every Sunday from 7:00 p.m. in
Mendenhall 8-D. For more information,
call 758-9760 or 746-6049.
CAMPUS MINISTRIES
Worship God and celebrate Commun-
ion this Wednesday night at 5:00 p.m. at
the Methodist Student Center. Also avail
able: all-you-can-eat meal which is $2.0C
at the door, $1.50 in advance. Call 758-2030
for reservations. Sponsored by Presbyte-
rian and Methodist Campus Ministries.
ECU FRISBEE CLUB
There will be practice every Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday at 2:30 on In-
tramural Fields 5 and 6 behind Minges
Colliseum and on Sunday at 2:00. New
players welcome.
PRIME TIME
Prime Time, sponsored by Campus
Crusade for Christ, meets every Thursday
at 7:30 p.m. in Brewster C-103. Everyone is
welcome.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Friday nights are ALIVE more than
ever before! Join us at Jenkins Auditorium
(Art Building) at 8:00 p.m. Every FRIDAY
NIGHT for Christian Fellowship and
Bible teaching where JESUS IS LORD!
SPRING SEM. GRAPS.
Caps and gowns should be picked up in
the Student Stores, Wright Building,
March 22,23,24,1988. These are yours to
keep providing the graduation fee has
been paid. For those receiving the Masters
Degree the fee pays for your cap and
gown, but there is an extra fee of $12.50 for
your hood. Announcements are available
in the Student Stores, Wright Building.
CHAMBER MUSIC
The 1988-1989 Chamber music Series
attractions include: Buswell-Parnas-Lu-
visi Trio, National Gallery of Art Vocal
Ensemble, Tokyo String Quartet, and
OREGON. For a brochure detailing the
events, contact the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center, 757-6611, ext.
266. Office hours are 11:00 a.m6:00 p.m
Monday-Friday. This series is co-spon-
sored by the Department of University
Unions and the School of Music.
PERFORMING ARTS
The 1988-1989 Performing Arts Series is
sponsoring the following events: The
Ohio Ballet, Wynton Marsalis, The Acting
Company, The Atlanta Symphony, PHI-
LADANCO, The N.Y. Gilbert and Sulli-
van Players in Pirates of Penzance, The
Polish National Radio Orchestra, CABA-
RET, The ECUNC Symphonies in con-
cert with SPECIAL GUEST PIANIST
KAREN SHAW, and Nadja Salerno-Son-
nenberg. For a brochure detailing the
events contact the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall, 757-6611, ext. 266. Office
hours are 11:00 a.m6.00 p.m Monday-
Friday.
CONTINUING ED
The following Personal Development
Courses will be held: Money Matters
(starts March 15); Guitar (starts March 15);
Scuba (starts March 15); Drawing with
Colored Pencils (starts March 17), Begin-
ning Calligraphy (starts May 19). Contact
Continuing Education, Erwin Hall for
more information.
CONTINUING ED.
The following Personal Development
Courses will be held: Money Matters
(starts March 15); Guitar (starts March 15);
Scuba (starts March 15); Drawing with
Colored Pencils (starts March 17); Begin-
ning Calligraphy (starts May 19). Contact
Continuing Education, Erwin Hall for
more information.
NASWCQRiQ
Wanted: Social Work ' Criminal justice
majors and intended majors, to attend
meetings. 1 leld the 2nd and 4th Monday
each month, at 4:00 p m in Allied Health
bldg, room 110.
COOPERATIVE ED,
The Co-op Education office is now lo-
cated on the second Boor of the new
General Classroom Buiidng, Room 2028.
Students interested in the program
should attend a co-op information semi-
nar. For specific seminar times, dates and
locations, please check the ECU Calendar
of Events or call the co-op office at 757-
6979. All students are ebgab'e to Co-op.
JOB HUNTING? Come to sec us at our
new locaticn
SLAP
All General College students who have
indicated a desire to maior in Speech-
Language and Auditory Pathology and
have R. Muzzarelli as their advisor are to
meet on Wednesday, March 23 at 5K3B
p.m. in Brewster DHL Advising for early
registration will take place at that time.
Others interested in SLAP should contact
the department-757-6961.
OUTDOOR THERAPY
Worshop sponsored bv the LSS-S and
LSS 4700, March 19, 9:00-4:00 at River Park
North. Lunch included. Open to student?
(S12.50) and professionals ($25.00) Pre-
register and pre-pay by March 9th at th�
LSS Building. Limited to 30 participants.
WOMEN'S FRISBEE CLUB'
Practice will be held Tuesday, YVednc
day and Thursday from 3:30 until, at trW
bottom of College Hill. All interested
players should attend. Those who havj
received forms need to have them con
pleted and ready to turn in.
COLLEGE RFPUBI JCANS
The ECU College Republicans wil
meet every Tuesday night in room 22
Mendenhall at 7 p.m. Call 758-5775 or 751
3587.
The
East Carolinian
Required read in
for the serious student.
Sex p
(rCPS) � One fraternity vw
banished from the University q
Rochester for allegedly holding I
group sex party, while the Un
versity of Pennsylvania sus
pended one of its houses for hn
ing strippers to perform at a part)
The incident at Penn, moreove
threatened to escalate into a cor.
flict between campus Jewish an
black groups
Rochester administrator)
banned the Theta Delta Chi housj
hrlOycarsm the wake of a Febnj
ury party in which 8 student
reportedly had sex with l,appai
ently consenting, woman
The 19-year-old woman, whosi
Reaga
(CPS) � President R(
vowed March 3 to veto a bill th�
would make it harder for college
to discriminate en the has
gender, race, age or ph)
abilities.
But Republican Senate V
nd presidential cand I
Robert Dole (R-Kan) warne
Congress probable would oveJ
ride the veto.
Profes
5

jentaion in the Senate, dire
fcion of the president along vm
Impeachment powers are four
JWithin the Nigerian constitutiol
The strong power oi the Sena
nd the judicial powers are ah
bbvious reflections of the Amei
can principal of checks and be
ances.
According to Oyediran, the
has been an outcry for a nei
constitution in Nigeria since 19"
and for civilian rule after the mij
Thompson to
Continued from page 1
would open the SCJA so that st
ient opinions would be heard
bills being considered on the le
islative floor. In the past. T
ompson said the SGA has not
lowed students to express the
view points.
As Minority Student Organ
zation president, Thompson sai
that during some SGA mcetind
he was not granted speakin
privileges to explain incomn
legislation concerning the MSC
Thompson said that as pre
dent he would be on the studen
side, unlike past SGA prcsider
who he said were on the suit
with the administration. AnothJ
idea Thompson said is to install
suggestion box near the SGA d
fice for students to register thc
remarks.
As a resident advisor
Fletcher Dormitory, Thomps
said he has seen the need for t
reactivation of the Pirate W'a
escort service which became J
funct earlier this school yej
Thompson said he is tor a studel
workstudy program for Pirai
Walk in which a six escort sta

Ad
jjpt �"�
-jjfr '� � i�' -��
miwy wnjM





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 17,1988
Ul CRUISERS Wo lett at
: Ihere in record time
d our ship, but not
the customs line!
� the bathrooms!
� oh thos stewards
Mine wore "v0
id the) really had the
the bjo. The meals!
a Mexican buffetl
md turf Thednnks
�od) marvs and!
rum punch and
si me drunken tun
its were thej
to make you
ee that got sickl
- Dramamine is I
�d I hope u all
nes : the cruse and
real because this
�" Keepii,
perone).
1 1
a v;roat
n tho cruise
P) hour
'� b) one-
Ceasa
d made tho
:ho night
Mike's to
he night will
VOPksand
nplemintz �
-
� Ml RPin for SGA
- rd Brine;
LARRY MURPHY
for SGA. President
Vote Wednesday. March 23
Bring Student ID
I
SASW CQRSQ
. Criminal justice
rs to attend
and 4th Monday
� ed Health
Sex parties ax fraternities
frS) � One fraternity was
banished from the University of
Rochester for allegedly holding a
group sex party, while the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania sus-
pended one of its houses for hir-
ing strippers to performata party.
The incident at Penn, moreover,
threatened to escalate into a con-
flict between campus Jewish and
black groups.
Rochester administrators
banned the Theta Delta Chi house
tor 10 years in the wake of a Febru-
ary party in which 8 students
reportedly had sex with 1, appar-
ent! v consenting, woman.
The 19-year-old woman, whose
name was not released, attends a
college in Ohio. Rochester admin-
istrators said they may contact the
woman's college about further
disciplinary action.
On March 4, Penn suspended
all-white, predominately Jewish
Zeta Beta Tau for 1 12 years for
holding a September party at
which 2 hired strippers, both
black, performed.
Some audience members
shouted racial epithets as they
danced and engaged in "sexually
explicit acts
ZBT's members issued a public
apologv and offered to make a
donation to the campus women's
center, but Penn President Shel-
don Hackney suspended the
house anyway, adding that "be-
havior that dehumanizes any
individual or group will not be
tolerated
At the same time, the Daily
Pennsylvanian, the campus pa-
per, received a death threat
against Conrad Tillard, head of
the Organization of Black Con-
sciousness at the school.
Tillard quickly blamed the an-
onymous threat on the radical
Jewish Defense League � which
denied it sent the note � and re-
lated it to a Feb. 29 rally at which
he called for ZBT's ouster.
Black and Jewish students
argued publicly in 1986 when
Tillard's previous group brought
Nation of Islam leader Louis Far-
rakhan. whose anti-Zionist
preachings often spill over into
criticisms of Jewish theology as
wrong and Jewish people as unsa-
vory, to speak at campus.
But Rabbi Howard Alperg of
Penn's Jewish Campus Activities
Board condemned Tillard for
promoting, without evidence, the
ZBT affair as an echo of the 1986
tensions.
"The Jewish community does
not support what happened at
ZBT added Daniel Gamulka
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
and frozen yogurt
321 East 10th Street. Greenville
758-4896
ITS GIRL SCOUT COOKIE TIME
STOP IN
Buy Any Girl Scout Cookie Item
Get the 2nd Half Price
Good Thru March 23, 1988
Miociinum
Value
$1.20
Maximum
Vuluc
$1.20
Reagan threatens to veto bill
(CPS) President Reagan
vowed March 3 to veto a bill that
would make it harder for colleges
to discriminate on the basis of
gender, race, age or physical dis-
abilities
But Republican Senate leader
and presidential candidate
Robert Dole (R-Kan) warned
Congress probably would over-
ride the veto.
The controversy surrounds
Congress's effort to overturn the
U.S. Supreme Court's 1984 Grove
City College decision, in which
the court said laws prohibiting
sex discrimination applied only to
the specific program that directly
got federal funds.
Previously, whole campuses
had to prove they didn't discrimi-
nate if just one of their programs
took federal funds.
In February, the U.S. Senate
passed a bill explicitly making
entire colleges subject to anti-bias
laws, and the House approved it
March 2.
But, as the bill was sent to the
White Flouse for the president's
signature, presidential aide Gary
Bauer warned President Reagan
would veto it.
Reagan, Bauer explained, be-
lieved the bill gave the federal
government too much power
over colleges and states, which
could lose their federal funding if
they were found to discriminate.
In reply, Dole, on the campaign
trail, said there were enough
votes in Congress to override a
veto. Vetoes can be overridden if
two-thirds of the senators dis-
agree with the president.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
DIVISION OF STUDENT LIFE
AND
COMMITTEE ON THE STATUS OF MINORITIES
PRESENTS
A NATIONAL VTOEOCONFERENCE
LIVE-VIA-SATELLITE
Professor draws constitution
i RACISM
CAMPUS
TOWARD AN AGENDA FOR ACTION
i RATTVEEP.
e is now lo-
- � the new
dng Room 2028
1 in the program
rotation semi-
aur times, dates and
ECU Calendar
ffiee at 757-
!e to Co-op
; �: us at our
SLAP
rs who have
in Speech-
Pathology and
- advisor are to
M r : 23 at 5:00
" vising for early
toe at that time.
d contact
OUTDOOR THERAPY
the LSS-S and
I � at River Parif
(pen to students
rofes SZ 00). Pre-
March 9th at the
I articipants.
WOMEN'S 1 RI SB IE CLUB j
sday.Wedn
.ntil, at th
��� Hill All interest
rhose who hav
. forms need to have them con
md readv to turn in
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS!
ECU College Republicans wif
rery Tuesday night in room 22"
tt7 pjn Call 758 775 or 75!
he
rolinian
equired readin
serious student.
sontaion in the Senate, direct elec-
feon of the president along with
impeachment powers are found
Within the Nigerian constitution.
The strong power of the Senate
and the judicial powers are also
pbvious reflections of the Ameri-
can principal of checks and bal-
ances.
According to Ovediran, there
has been an outcry tor a new
constitution in Nigeria since 1973
and for civilian rule after the mili-
tary came to power in 1966 as the
result of a decaying political sys-
tem. For the next 10 years Nigeria
was engulfed in a series of crises
� killing with strong ethnic bias,
inconclusive constitutional con-
ferences, counter-coup, and
worst oi all civil war. The recon-
struction of Nigeria resulted in
the geographical entity of Nigeria
but the cry for civil rule went
unheard and promises of the
armed forces of democracy went
Thompson to open the SGA
Continued from page 1
would open tVe SCA so tHat stu-
dent opinions would be heard on
bills being considered on the leg-
islative floor. In the past, Th-
ompson said the SGA has not al-
lowed students to express their
view points.
As Minority Student Org ini-
zation president, Thompson said
that during some SGA meetings
he was not granted speaking
privileges to explain incoming
jslation concerning the MSO.
Thompson said that as presi-
dent he would be on the students
side, unlike past SGA presidents
who he said were on the side
with the administration. Another
idea Thompson said is to install a
suggestion box near the SGA of-
fice for students to register their
remarks
As a resident advisor of
Fletcher Dormitory, Thompson
said he has seen the need for the
reactivation of the Pirate Walk
-scort service which became de-
funct earlier this school year
Thompson said he is for a student
workstudy program for Pirate
Walk in which a six escort staff
would be payed, unlike the failed
escort service which had unpaid
staff. He said 80 percent of the
Pirate Walk staff's pay would be
paid by the state.
Thompson said other
schools within the UNC system
have incorporated similar escort
services in which the staffs are
paid and he feels that ECU needs
to have such a plan to ensure the
safety of students walking home
late at night.
The workstudy early regis-
tration petitions should also be
reinstated, Thompson aid. A
few students abusing tne regis-
tration petitions is not a good
reason to stop the program, he
said. Ending the petition pro-
gram, Thompson said, was an-
other case of the adminstration
not listening to student view
points.
On the parking problem,
Thompson said he is for giving
commuters the choice of pur-
chasing a $50 parking sticker and
parking in the assigned areas, or
choosing not to bay a sticker and
parking in the lots at Minges and
Allied Health and having
shuttles to transport the com-
muters to campus.
unfulfilled. In 1979 however, the
new military administration of
General Murtala Mohammed
declared to return Nigeria to civil
rule. For Oyediran arid others the
next four year interval was full of
activities one of which was the
making of the Nigerian
constitution of 1979.
Even the selection of the draf-
ters was consistent with that of the
U.S. founding fathers. Oyediran
was one of fifty selected of differ-
ent ideological stands and back-
grounds. The men were selected
by representation of each state,
and were of learned disciplines
such as law, political science and
other social sciences.
While it is obvious that the
U.S. model was used as an outline
in the drafting of the Nigerian
constitution, the history and en vi-
ronment of Nigeria kept the coun-
try from producing a carbon copy
of the U.S. constitution. In a ques-
tion-answer period, Oyediran
addressed the issue of ethnic dif-
ferences which have alway pre-
vented a meeting of the minds in
Afrjca
S3
A�uA MAKES Aa� M0��
SOC'AU-Y- COKISCIO US
OULO LEAXH f0M-
INIAKJ 11
SiOAJ�i
TUESDAY, MARCH 22, 1988
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER, ROOM 244
11:30 A.M. - 12:45 P.M.
- HISTORICALCONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVE
12:45 P.M. - 1:45 P.M.
- DISCUSSION BREAK
1:45 P.M. - 3:00 P.M.
- ELEMENTS OF SUCCESSFUL MODELS BUILDING AN
AGENDA FOR ACTION
Sales Position
Available
The Eas t Caro linian
now accepting applications
for advertising sales
representatives.
Requirements:
Previous Sales Experience
excellent Communication Skills
Jood Organizational Skills
st Have Own Transportation
Jasic Computer Knowledge
Apply in Person atThe East Carolinian
Please Include Resume
Publications Building
(In Front of Joyner Library)
Must be ready to start training April 1st.
No Phone Calls Please!
mtmmmwmm0mmmmm





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 17,1988
U.S. students trail in education
(CPS) �U.S. students trail their
foreign counterparts in science
knowledge, placing almost last in
achievement tests given in 17 na-
tions, according to a major new
study.
Another report released last
week determined that most
young kids � regardless of coun-
try � believe the earth is flat.
The Second International Sci-
ence Study (ISS) found American
students in the fifth, ninth and
12th grades performed poorly
compared to students from other
countries. U.S. students, the ISS
found, finished last or almost last
in biology, physics, chemistry and
other sciences.
In fact, many U.S. students per-
formed no better than it they
would have guessed the answers.
"I'm not surprised said Dr.
Michael McCormick, the biology
department chairman at
Montclair State College (N.J.).
"The United States is ignorant in
many areas compared to other
nations
"The data paint a dismal picture
of science education in the United
States today said Bassam
Shakhashiri of the National Sci-
ence Foundation.
The study, conducted by the
International Association for the
Evaluation of Education Achieve-
ment, ranked U.S. fifth-graders
eighth among 15 countries in
overall science knowledge.
Ninth-graders finished 15th out
of 17 nations, while American
high school seniors enrolled in
advanced science classes finished
last in tests administered to more
than 200,000 students in 7,500
schools worldwide between 1983
and 1986.
Children from Japan, Korea,
Holland, Hungary, England and
Singapore generally recorded the
best scores.
Although American educators
agree U.S. students ai e not receiv-
ing the science education other
nations provide, they're wary of
the study itself.
"I'd like to see how it was con-
ducted said Vincent Sindt, the
director of the University of
Robert Morgan featured
speaker at scholars weekend
EC L Newt Bureau
GREENVILLE�More than 100
top-ranking high school juniors
will visit East Carolina University
March 19-21 for the university's
annual Scholars Weekend.
The students, from high schools
across North Carolina and Vir-
mformation about scholarships Building
available to academically gifted
students.
The Hon. Robert B. Morgan,
director of the State Bureau of
Investigation and former U.S
Wyoming Science and Math
Teaching Center. "If the test just
measured the quick recall of facts,
let 'em have it. If it was a measure
of how students think or reason,
then I'd be worried
"There are a lot of statistical
problems said McCormick.
Education in the United States, he
said, is mandatory, while other
nations don't require all children
to attend school.
Consequently, all U.S. testtak-
crs were competing against only
the most academically talented
students in foreign countries.
Still, there are those who say
American attitudes about educa-
tion have a lot to be desired. "In
some countries, education is a
special treat, a privilege that's
respected said McCormick.
Sindt cited low teacher salaries
and even selfish parents as rea-
sons.
"Some parents arc more willing
to spend money on a new color
television than help provide for
their children's education
U.S. students, particularly at
the college level, see education as
Scholars Weekend participants a means towards a high-paying
are recommended by high school carcer without value of its own,
principals and guidance counsel-
ors. Selected students must rank
in the top five percent of their
junior class and have at least a 3.5
senator, will address the students
at a banquet on Sunday evening, grade point average,
ginia, will be visiting the campus Morgan will deliver a public ad-
to preview opportunities at ECU dress as the 1988 Distinguished ECU offers scholarships for
tor honor students. While on Alumni Lecturer on Monday, $3,000 $1,500, and $1,000 a year to
campus thev will visit classes, March 21, at 8 p.m. in Room 1010 high school students who excel
attend social events and receive ot ECU's new General Classroom academically.
Bork charges students are
leftist than heft
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS)� America when university atti- Bork, who credits his convcr-
Stdl smarting from his 1987 rejec- tudos varied so much from the sion to conservatism to being
tion as a U.S. Supreme Court general public's attitude Bork, upset by student politics during
nominee, Robert Bork last week who now speaks regularly on the 1960s, added that law schools
charged American students were college campuses, said on a Cable � which supplied many of the
more left-wing than ever. News Network (CNN) rv show witnesses who testified against
- -�
Tibetan Lama speaks
Tuesday in Mendenhall
The Venerable KhenpoKarthar "A Christian coming to hear
Rinpoche, Tibetan Una and Bud- him would find much that issimi-
dhist will speak on The Path of lar to the teachings in Christian-
Wisdom and Compassion at 8 ity he said. "He owns no mate-
p.nv Tuesday. rial possessions. Anything that is
I he event will take place in given to him he gives away "
room 244 of Mendenhall Student
Center and is co-sponsored by the Tru C .recnviile visit is part of a
ECU Buddhist Meditation and tour of North and South America.
Study Group and the Greenville Khenpo Rinpoche is the official
Karma Thegsum Choling. American respresentative of H.H.
According to Byron Coulter, the Gyalwa Karmapa, head of the
Advisor of the ECU group and Karma Kagyu lineage of Tibetan
Co-ordinator of the Greenville K Buddhism. He is the abbot of the
& C, the lecture is designed to Karma Trivana Dharmachakra
generate compassion. Monastery in Woodstock, N.Y.
Murphy stresses relations
Continued from page 1 ball games. He also would like to
start a leadership seminar for the
support fair equality in the sru- SGA which he feels would be
dent government. invaluable.
On community relations, Murphy, who is presently
Murphy said that one of his pri- the president of Tau Kappa Epli-
orities as president would be to son fraternity, said he would like
ha ve more studen t organizations to recieve broad campus support
involved. Murphy said that ac- rather than individual organiza-
tivities such as the post Hallow- tional support. "I am hoping that
een street clean-up, preformed by the Greeks will support me, but I
several fraternities last year, is would like a good balance of
� also were far to'the
general public.
He told viewers of the
and Novak" CNN show he was
encouraged by the stirrings of
conservative law student groups
like the Federalist Society, and
hoped some of the society's
members would go into teaching
at law schools where "they will
rectify the balance (with liberal
professors) if they can get jobs
McCormick said. "The desire to
get an education is limited in this
country. People get educated to
get money, not knowledge, and so
they're not getting the broad
education other students dc
In a separate study, the Smith-
sonian Institution found most
children � at least until they're
about 10 years old �believe the
earth is flat.
Almost 50 percent of the U.S.
and Israeli 4th-grade children in
the Smithsonian study, which
appeared in the latest issue of
"Science and Children" maga-
zine, still believed in a flat earth.
The reason, study authors Alan
Lightman and Philip Sadler theo-
rized, had less to do with bad
schools than with the way chil-
dren develop.
Children, they wrote, often
can't reconcile "what they are told
about their world and what thev
see with their own eyes.
53�cr'r- 4th gtSdecfild .
- to haye much less trouble gmsp
'Evans ing thc conccP of a round earth
they added.
Mf
Read
the
Classifieds
ATTENTION STUDENTS!
For Your Summer Storage Needs
Call
Economy Mini-Storage
757-0373
300 Farmer's St.
Greenville, NC 27834
Discount To All Students
one example of successful com
munity involvement.
Looking towards the fall of
1988, Murphy said as President he
would try to create an atmosphere
of student involvement. "My ma-
jor goal is have total campus in-
volvement within the SGA, mean-
ing all sectors groups to be in-
volved in the student government
so that there will be more commu-
nications of issues Murphy said.
On student involvement,
Murphy said that students have
the ability to change the ECU
reputation. "I would like to see
ECU recognized as an academic
institution, not sucn a hick
school Murphy said.
Amoung Murphy's other
ideas are plans to create an ex-
ceptable student recreation cen-
ter proposal and to create better
student turn-out to Pirate basket-
Read the sports
Ipage in The East
Carolinian.
Simply the best.
student support
LOW COST
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at additional coat. Pregnancy
Tat, Birth Control �nd Problem Pregnancy Counseling, For
further information, call 832-0535 (toil free number 1-800-
532-5384) between 9 a jn. and 5 p.m. weekday. General anes-
thesia available.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
I MM III MINIM
SGA ELECTIONS
Mill
FOR
i i i i ii i i
SGA EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
Will be held on
1 ' � � � ' ' ' UU ' � ' � t i i i t i i i i
Wednesday. March 23
i i i i i r i i i i i m i
between
i i i i i i i i i i i i i i
9:00 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
' ' ' �����III I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I (
HAVE YOUR STJJDENT
iiiii i i i i i i i i ii i i -
ACTIVITY
LJJ
'III I I I I I I I I I I I I I I M I I I i I I I I M I I I I .til
SRA SEM-fWAL DAWCE
MARCH 18,
pro lam in-fa. Holiday Jnr
Ui-rh fln SRA Cord
fjt,4-hou a SKA Cord
islndk 4?. tout
cV4 avo.lblc
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
1988 FACULTYSTAFFSTUDENT
BILLIARDS TOURNAMENT
TUESDAY. MARCH 22,1988
6:30 P.M. MSC MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM
REGISTER IN MSC BILLIARDS CENTTR
BY MONDAY. MARCH 21 AT 5:00 PM
REGISTRATION: FREE
TROPHIES AWARDED FOR
FIRST, SECOND, AND THIRD PLACE
FOUR STAR
PIZZA
���� �MA V1
Fast FREE
DwffvwryzZ
tTthin Solmures
758-3300
1 14 East Tenth Street
GREENVILLE, N.C.
STORE HOURS
SUN -THU 11 AM-1AM
FRI -SAT 1 1 Am-2AM
WE ACCEPT CHICKS
� FROM NO DM '� �" . -3:
PIZZA FROM FOUR STAB PIZZA fCXJ
�'� LI OECE.ETWO p c-c
ONE SPEOAt PP
"WO HOT DEUC ' � �'� TM
cULl PORT ; "�-� PBESMEST
PCSS B.E NGREC � '�' �"
T0PP(NGS
OU CAN ORDER TWO � -
pizzas or two � ; � ����"
T0PP'NG PlZZAJ ' � ' �
�. � �
PRICES DO NOT INCLUDE TAX
10"10"14"14"
DOUBLCZZSINGLEDOUBLEZZSINGLE
16 SlicesS Slices24 Slices12 Slices
7.205.1010.257.25
8.205.6011.758.25
9.206.1013.259.25
10.206.6014.7510.25
11.207.1016.2511.25
12.207.6017.7512.25
$1.00 each add �w-� .it ion a! slice$1 SO each additional slice
14 TASTY ITEMS
TO CHOOSE FROM
tm,rImausace' ham ground chuck, bacon, pineapple.
T! UCk CRUST, ONIONS, GREEN PEPPERS, IIOT PEPPERS ANCIIOVIES
MUSI 1RCXMS, OLIVES, EXTRA CIIEESE '
Cheese
1 Item
2 Items
3 Items
4 Items
5 Items
' � �m auumonai slice
Four Star Pizza Deluxe
5 ITEMS FOR THE PRICE OF 4
PEPPERONI, SAUSAGE, MUSHROOMS, ONIONS
AND GREEN PEPPERS
NO SUBSTITLrnO.VIS
Big 12" Subs. $4.50
HOT OR COLD
ITALIAN, I JAM & CI IEESE, ROAST BEEF & CI IEESE, MEATBALL
Four Star Pizza Super Deluxe
9 ITEMS FOR THE PRICE OF 5
PEPPERONI, SAUSAGE, MUSHROOMS, GROUND CHUCK ONIONS
GREEN PEPPERS, BLACK OLIVES, HOT PEPPERS AND EXTTIA hKfW
NO SUBSTITUTIONS tXTRA CHEESE
Diet Pizza (10" Only)
0
SLICED TOMATOES, MUSHROOMS, GREEN PEPPERS ONIONS Rl Ar
OIJVI5 A PARMI3AN CHEESE ' JNlUN BLACK
OPTIONAL TOPPINGS. PINEAPPLE HOT PEPPERS
"���. 758-1
SIX PACK
OF COKE
ONLY
(with mtf Dmfe� pun rmae)
ONE COUPON PER ORDER
ICOUPON EXPIRES 5-1-S.
-aca&r
99
$4
Greenville I
I
I
I
I
25
coupon
I LUNCH
I OR DINNER
SPECIAL ANY
TWO ITEM
110" PIZZA
� PLUS 2 COKES ONLY
IONB COUPON PER ORDER
738-3300
Greenville
I Any Big 12"
I Sub Plus
V I 1 Coke
I only
13 Italian, Roast Beef 4 Ch
save 85 Ham at Cheeae, Meatball
We Keserve the right � �.�
758-33P� 7585301
Greenville gg Greenville!
� LUNCH -��Eaf
firij OR DINNER
VlUJ SPECIAL ANY
� TWO ITEM
114" PIZZA
IMi
$6I
save si mM PLUS 4 COKES ONLY
We Reserve the right" ONE COUPON PHI CHEWS We
$00!
I
nTODmBa toUnJou
?
Writi
ECU Newt Bureau
GREENVILLE - Public
teachers who participate n
I oastaJ PlainsWntingProjc.
summer are likelv to find tl
selves "teaching each often
to teach writing according
project's co-director.
A basic assumption of the
oel is "that teachers should
teachers how to t ich writiru
that the best teachers of w
are writers themselves sa
Patkrk Bizzaro of East Cai
I niversify.
"We' re going to ask the tea)
themselves to give presenta
and, also, they will do a cons
able amount of writing
selves Bizzaro said
Up to 25 teachers from gral
Racia
(CPS) � Tensions betil
v lute and minority student;
nued to worsen on a numb
( ampuses the first week I
At Rodgers Stateolle
Claremont, Okla white
school students injured abe
Middle Eastern college stucj
in a series of attacks and
March 3.
A hit-and-run accident,
gi! ns, rocks and eggs were u!
the rioting, which reportl
began with an argument bet1
1 of the collegians and a gro
For the finest
Coverage of
Pirote Athletic,
Read
The First
Carolinian
TH
F
M
Facilit
Co-ed Ai
Machine:
Dressingl
Showers
Sauna.
This
�hw��ri wiLnuaan m �'





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 17, 1988
.4 i�
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ok 4J a. couplt
RSIT
STUDENT
V AMENT
i 22,1988
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Writing project will teach teachers to write
ECU New Bureau
GREENVILLE - Public school
teachers who participate in the
( oastal riains Writing Project this
summer are likely to find them-
selves "teaching each others how
to teach writing according to the
project's co-director.
A basic assumption of the proj-
cct is "that teachers should teach
teachers how to U ch writing and
thai the best teachers of writing
are writers themselves says Dr.
Patick Bizzaro of East Carolina
University.
We re going to ask the teachers
themselves to give presentations
kd, also, they will do a consider-
able amount of writing them-
selves Bizzaro said.
L'p to 25 teachers from grades K
through 12 will be accepted for
the writing project program at
ECU which includes a four week
institute on campus July 5 - 29 and
a follow-up program during the
1988-89 school year.
Teachers who are accepted will
receive a $400 stipend, tuition and
fees for six hours in graduate
credit at ECU in English or educ-
tion, and materials on teaching
writing.
Teachers from schools in the
northeast North Carolina educa-
tion district are invited to apply
for the Coastal Plains Writing
Project fellowships. Applications
should be sent to Bizzaro in the
Department of English, ECU,
Greenville, N.C. 27858, and must
include a one-page description of
how writing is used in the class-
room and an explanation of spe-
cific successful activites. Signa-
ture or letter of support form the
applicant's local supervisor must
accompany the application. Ap-
plications are requested by April
15.
The Coastal Plains Writing
Project is part of the statewide
North Carolina Writing project
funded by the State Board of
Education.
Bizzaro, associate professor of
English and director of the Writ-
ing Center at ECU for the past five
years, also headed ECU's Writing
Across the Curriculum program.
He will co-direct the Coastal

Plains Writing Project with Dr.
Joanna Mink, assistant professor
of English and Director of Writing
Programs at Atalantic Christian
College in Wilson.
"There really is a lot of interest
in this program Bizzaro said. "It
is going to satisfy some real needs,
our teachers want to know how to
teach writing he said.
He added that he expects "the
best ideas will come from the
teachers themselves - teachers
giving ideas to each other by the
sharing of ideas
Participants will earn graduate
credit of three semester hours in
writing and three semester hours
in teaching of writing.
Activities will include writing
of all kinds, from journals to for-
mal postition papers; presenta-
tions by faculty and qualified
consultants; demonstrations of
effective teaching strategies, peer
group responsing and editing;
professional readirig and weekly
social activities. Participants will
be required to attend fall weekend
workshops.
Bizzaro said that the combined
effort will make it possible "to
reach as many teachers as pos-
sible in this large geographical
area, to continue the excellent
work begun by personnel at At-
lantic Christian College, and to
award graduate credit from
ECU
He said that over the past three
years, ECU faculty have con-
ducted workshops in Pitt County
for teachers K-12, focusing on
teaching writing as a process and
on using writing for purposes of
learning.
He added, "We believe that
prospective teachers are most apt
to learn how to teach writing not
only by writing themselves, but
also by observing and learning
form other teachers actively in-
volved in the promoting of read-
ing and writing skills
Racial tensions on the rise
(CPS) Tensions between
w hite and minority students con-
tinued to worsen on a number of
ampuses the first week of March.
At Rodgers State College in
Claremont, Okla white high
school students injured about 20
Middle Eastern college students
in a series of attacks and fights
March 3.
A hit-and-run accident, pellet
ns, rocks and eggs were used in
the rioting, which reportedly
began with an argument between
I of the collegians and roup of
the high schoolers. Police arrested
a 17-year-old for attacking a for-
eign student with a baseball bat.
At Ramapo College in
Mahwah, N.J housing chief
Ronald L. Bollhcimer reported on
the same day that as many as 20
dorm residents failed to sign a
card saying racism was unaccept-
able at Ramapo.
Bollheimer wasn't sure if the
"15 to 20" students who didn't
sign the cards, distributed as part
of a school-wide anti-racism pro-
gram in the wake of a December
fight between black and white
students, were actively resisting
the program.
Students who refused to sign
the card could be kicked out of
their dorms, he added.
For the finest
Coverage oj
Pirate Athletics
Read
The East
Carolinian
Help Wanted
The East Carolinian is now accepting applications
for the position of assistant credit manager
River Bluff Apartments
2 Bd. Townhouses Temporarily Reduced to
$295month and Security Deposit of only
$100 for 1 and 2 Bedrooms. Sign up now for
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�ECU Bus Service1.5 miles from Campus
Three Month Leases Available For Summer School
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Requirments:
Excellent Communications Skills
Good Organizational Skills
Must have Own Transportation
Basic Computer Knowledge
Apply in Person at The East Carolinian
Publications Building
No Phone Calls Please!
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center Is Open
Mon Tues, & Wed. Fit 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
9 a.m. - 2 p.m. & by appointment
For an appointment or more infor-
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757-0003
111 East Third Street - The Lee Building
Greenville, N. C.
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THE EASTCAROl INIAN
Entertainment
MARCH 17, 1988 Page 10
"iiiwHiiiiy'
Students open music store
ii�M.ii,iiiiiiiiiiiiii�'�.(fci���wiiiiiruiiM'iM
By DEENA NIEWIADOMSKI
Suff Writer
On February 16, 1983, two
former East Carolina University
students opened a music store.
Allan and Legare Hinds started
Rocket Music.
Legare, an art student, had been
in the business at another music
store. The idea came when that
music store was going out of
business and she teamed up with
Allan Hinds who had been a
history ma jor a t ECU and also had
attended Florida International
University.
In May of 1983, Allan and
Legare were married. During its
first year of being open, Rocket
Music had a third partner, Jim
"Boot Blanton and was located
two doors down the street from
Susie's. A year and a half later,
they moved to their present
location.
In the five years since Rocket
Music opened, it has seen
businesses move out of the
downtown area and into the
malls. The Hinds would like to see
commerce come back downtown.
They would like to see businesses
opening and Rocket Music
expanding.
Rocket Music's clientele are for
the most part repeat customers.
The Hinds see the main reason for
people not getting involved in
New Deli changes hands;
owners excited about future
BY HENRY BOARDMAN
Suff Writer
The New Deli changed hands
on Monday, Frcbruary 15.
Russell Ebelherr, Grady Smith
and Ron Everett bought the
downtown restaurantnighclub
This is a picture of Rocket Music downtown. It's a really boss place because they saw a lot of potential
to get instruments. In fact, I bought my harmonica there. (Photo by in . Grady and Ron, who also
Hardv Aligood) own Scott's Cleaners,and Russell,
PBS sponsors Festival f88
BY MICAH HARRIS
Stall Writer
PBS's annual pledge drive,
Festival '88, is currentlv in full
swine. I don't know about vou,
but I can't remember the last time
I saw such a carnival of TV
viewing. "MacNeil-Lehrer
Newshour. "Wallstreet
Week wow, sort of takes your
breath away, doesn't it? It's just a
regular three-ring circus on UHF
channel 25, and you can still get in
o the fun! Pop some corn, gather
rft and the RH aro-mHcl -Hie TV,
antf step under the" big fop
without leaving home.
During Festival '88, TBS will
rerun their acclaimed "Dukes of
lazzard for Literacy" special in
which Uncle Jesse comes to grips
with his inability to read: "I don't
need no book learnin he
protests. "One X on the jug means
fuel for the General Lee. Two X's
means com squeezins, and three
X's means my urine specimen for
the countv nurse or was that
two X's?"
Inhonorof the 10th anniversary
of the death of transvestite-
director Edward Wood, Jr PBS
has prepared a special edition of
"Hollvwood Legends" to give us
a poignant up-close look at the
man in high heels who gave the
world the Golden Turkey Award
winner for Worst Film Ever
Made: "Plan Nine From Outer
Space
To top off their tribute to
Wood,Jr "Masterpiece Theater"
will present a colorized version of
Wood's autobiography, "Glen or
Glenda Host Alistar Cooke
points out that "GlenorGlenda's"
screenplay rivals James Joyce's
"Portrait of the Artist as a Young
Man" for innovative narrative
technique.
"Compare says Cooke , "this
famous passage by Joyce: "Once
upon a time, and a very good time
it was, there was a moocow
coming down along the road
andmet a nicens little boy
named babv tuckoo to Wood's
"Glen or Glenda" stream of
consciousness narrative: "Beware
of the big green dragon that sits on
your doorstep! He eats little boys!
Puppy dog tails! Big fat snails!
Beware! Take care! Beware
"If Wood had written "Glen or
Glenda" as a novel as Joyce did
"Portrait of the Artist Cooke
concludes, "no one would read it,
either
On "The Victory Garden Mr.
Howard Keel shows how he
successfully transplanted the
tropical man-eating N'Gamba
plant to his New York climate.
"It's not the soil or weather that
makes the difference Keel
explains, "but a steady flow of
nameless transients
On "What's Cooking Julia
Child takes takes on celebrity
euest cook Wendy Richter in
chocolate mousse wrestling.
Afterwards, Child demostrates
that properly prepared flatulence
when expelled, can be for the
appetite what an aphrodisiac is
for lovemaking.
Mr. Rogers has a special with
guest star Emanuelle Lewis.
Lewis and Rogers take the trollev
to the neighborhood of make-
believe. There they join in a
retelling oi Hansel and Gretal
which ends with Lewis being
thrust into a microwave oven. As
the screaming Lewis bubbles
against the oven's window.
Mister Rogers,King Friday, and
all the neighborhood of make
believe puppets watch on: their
faces twitching masses of
See MICAH, page 13
who worked for seven years in his
parents' restaurant in New Jersey,
are three friends who wanted to
get into the food business. They
don't want to change things that
are making money, like
Wednesday's Dead Night, but
they do see room for
improvement.
They want to bring together the
two personalities of the Deli. By
day, it's a lunch spot for
downtown businessmen, while at
night it's Greenville's only haven
for those of us deadheads and
punks who really enjoy new
music that's not Top 40 pop.
A big change the guys have in
mind will be to introduce liquor to
the New Deli, maybe as soon as
March 17. As long as food sales
don't go below 51 of the total
income, state law won't require
the Deli to become a private club,
a status owners and customers
alike wish to avoid- - hence, the
new push in the dinner trade.
Most people don't know, that
the Deli is, and has been, open for
dinner as well as lunch. They're
thrilled with the steady lunch
crowd they get every day but
would like to see a lot more
people, especially ECU students,
at New Deli for dinner.
One reason for the slower
dinner business may be the fact
that bands often set up as early as
6:00 p.m. which tends to
discourage a leisurely dinner. So,
the guys will try to get the bands
to set up as late as 8:00,if
possible,in order to maintain a
dining ambiance.
See NEW, page 13
music is, as Legare puts it,
"getting over the fear of trying
Once that task is completed, the
interest grows.
Allan and Legare have a
daughter, Robbie, who is three,
and a son, John Allan, who is nine
months. Legare and Allan have
allowed their children to pursue
their interests in music.
Robbie has already begun
playing the drums and keyboard.
Legare plays the guitar and Allan
plays the guitar and harmonica.
Asa student at ECU, Allan sang in
the choir.
One hundred years ago the
building which is home to Rocket
Music was a carriage shop. Today
it is a family business.
With the aid of Bill
1 lollingsworth doing repairs and
service to the equipment, Rocket
Music is a "musician's store" that
sellsand services instruments and
rents PA systems.
Last Christmas, Rocket had an
advertisement aired on MTV. The
Hinds feel that MTV has been
good for sales because it makes
high school age kids especially
band conscious of instruments
seen in their favorite videos.
In five years, the music shop
whose music name came out of a
session of "throwing" names
around has turned into a
successful business that caters
mainly to people 14 to 30 years of
age. Their clientele ranges from
people who play because of
doctor recommended therapy to
those who plav for pure
enjoyment.
Earlvis has pretty good time in Fla.
BY EARLVIS HAMPTON
Pretty Good Writer
Key West, Florida� This is the
talc of seven college students who
in search oi the perfect buzz spent
they Spring Break in the southern
most point of the U.S. Like sailors,
they drank and smoked and sang.
Like the Atlanta Braves, they all
struck out.
The setting. Pink, pink, pink.
Key West is splashed with pink.
Piftk hotels, ii'inl o�sos Sun
pink people. Even the taxi cabsare
pink.
High and hungry for munch-
food, we entered a pink
restaurant with pink table clothes
and sat down. After ordering, we
became a little suspicous when
the waiter asked, "Did you want
extra mayo on that roast beef?"
Damn fag.
Yes, the rumors of Key West are
true, fags run rampant in gay
Old people ruin
Florida for natives
By HENRY BOARDMAN
Suff Writer
Some observations from the
East Carolinian's crack Florida
corrcspondant
People who live in Florida face
many invaders, including of
course, the yearly influx of
rowdy, obnoxious Spring
Breakers. This plague they can
deal with for several reasons.
First, Natives kind of envy them
who wouldn't want that much
sex. Also, Breakers bring ungodly
amounts of money with them and
tend to drink themselves into
blind stupors.
The pickings are easy for those
who know were to look. They also
come regular as clockwork, every
spring, then � and this is
important � they go away.
This brings us to the more
unwelcome intruder � Old
People. Like Samurai Fatman
commercials, they never go away.
They come from New York and
New Jersey never to return.
They are deviously obnoxious,
unlike the average Breaker who,
after puking in your yard, usually
leaves. Old eople won't puke, but
they'll stick around and tell you
how to clear up your crabgrass.
Now, I don't mean to knock
senior citizens in paricular, they
perform many valuable and
useful tasks in society like ahh
well, somebody has to get all that
money we put into Social
Security, right?
Anyway, they have lots of
values � really, I just don't feel
like writing them all down right
now. The thing is that they all end
up in Florida.
I've found that native
Floridians systematically fight
every offending characteristic of
their unwelcome invaders.
The sense of sight is the first to
go. Old people compensate for
this by wearing the brightest
colors possible, especially in the
area of green.
I believe that there exist in the
jungle of Retirement Villages
several heretofore undiscovered
shades of green just waiting for
some art geek to brave the wilds
and name.
To counteract these lethal color
schemes the Natives are never
without their shades. Protection
against the putrid pastel pinks,
greens, purples, yellows and
aquas (yes, aqua lives on in the
Sunshine State courtesy of the
Miami Dolphins) is absolutely
necessary if any quality of life is to
be maintained.
Many incumbants now opt for
those sunglasses that make
everything the same kind of
orangey-brown. This guards
against the violent nausea
incurred when a woman in lemon
yellow shoes, lime green pants,
red blouse, pink shawl, and blue
hair with a purple bow crosses
your path. This often happens.
Hearing follows quickly
behind, which is why old folks
TALK VERY VERY LOUD.
The modern solution to the
noise pollution problem is, of
course, the Walkman. This was a
welcome invention for those who
had tired of the old method of
protection � never removing
wax from the ears which, besides
being fairly unhealthy, smelled
pretty bad.
And smell is the last sense to
go. The solution? Hit that
perfume like there's no
tomorrow. Old people also tend
See OBSERVATIONS, page 12
herds of butt-hole surfers in this
resort island. Rail-thin AIDS fall-
out victims stand dying on every
street corner just waiting for
someone to, well use your
imagination.
Walking down the main street,
Du val, we witnessed a long line of
feminine-looking poop shooters
standing in front of the Pink
Palace Theather. Some of the
potential movie watchers were
dressed in leather tights, while
others were blatant homos in
drag. A by-stander in the rear end
of the line said, "It is packed in
there to which Jack added'Just
like fudge We were in tears.
Back when boys were boys
and men were men.
All fags and pink aside, we had
a good time in Key West, a
pretty good time.
The sun set. I think it was Key
West's own Ernest Hemingway
who said it best�"The Sun Also
Sets The whole town shuts
down and heads for Mallory
Docks to watch the great ball of
fire slowly drip its colors into the
crests of the horizon.
On the dock there arc Jugglers,
tight rope walkers, men in
straight jackets, men in chains and
men rolling around in broken
glass; all those kinds of sane
things to do for a living.
Sun set refreshments ranged
from jumbo shrimp to fresh
squeezed lemon aid. There was
the fudge lady who screamed
"Hot fudge, it'll burn your buns,
Good fudge
Or how about the man selling
Pretty Good pop corn. In addition
to a sign atop the cart saying
Pretty Good Pop Corn, he would
periodically say "It's pretty
good pop corn
Accomodations. For the first
night we got a room at the Red
Rooster Inn, a bombed fall-out
shelter that the building inspector
should have condemned had he
not been payed off. Our room
with the spectacular gravel
parking lot view was the size of an
Aycock dorm room.
Staggering home later that
night, we planned to torch
another bowl and guzzle a few
nVtrcOM'MWs, tnifc tnteh to tftit
dismayed chagrin the room was
locked. Little did we know that
the hotel room would be locked,
the hotel room would be locked.
"Whose got the key? Lumpy
asked Pugslcy.
"Jack and Buck do Pugsley
Adams, snap, snap, answered.
We kicked and pounded on
the Wells-Fargo hotel door until
our hands bled. We cussed every
curse word known to mankind.
Jack and Buck were passed out
and unconsiously deaf with the
shiny keys in their pockets.
The five locked out losers with
bloody fits found lounge chairs
where we slumbered by the pool.
We were pissed as shit.
On Sunday, day 2-for those of
you keeping a reader's diary, we
blew off the Red Cock Inn and
landed at the Spanish Gardens, or
was it Spanish Moss or Spanish
Fly? The Spanish hotel was across
from the Blue Marlin Hotel which
See EARLVIS, page 11
Pickin' the fat off the bones
I barely escaped with my life'
By CHIPPY CHAPSnCK
It was Friday night before
fceak. I had finished some term
papers on the computers lit me
ld East Carolinian offices, I
ocked the door and headed out
into the night,
I unlocked my bike and salon it
when I heard the noise, it was the
heavy, pounding scrape of a size
19 sneaker on the cement. I
whirled around nervously.
Suddenly, they were aB over
ne! Arms roughly the size of
oiph Lundrgren's, yet strangely
oose and flabby m the biceps,
threw me roughly to the
pavement
Harsh and high pitched
laughter mocked me as I
to sit up. A lam loot
pushed me down "You're
finished in this town, Bonepridkr
I looked at the circle �f my
The ECU Association
FatarisWhoWriteBed Poetry
been lying in wftit for me.
Dressed in pink, stretched out
WmmB
weapon, a Kmart brand bike
chain, was wrested from my
hand by the other two.
I managed to punch the red
haired one as she reached around
to tie my wrists, but the blow had
no effect against the cellulite
plating that armored her stomach.
They dragged me to the
diggings of the Mendenhall
Reflecting Pool. I was pushed
down into the mud and half
carried back to the metal fence. A
couple of mem started up a
bonfire they had built.
The others gagged me with the
latest issue at Panful Revelations,
their bimonthly poetry journal.
They secured me to the fence and
started taking off their clothes.
I shuddered as they bared their
bodies. Even in darkness, the
many obscene folds oi their pale
flesh shone in the streetlight. My
stomach yawned in terror.
Surely, they wouldn't
couldn't do what I dared not even
contemplate. I'd drunkenly
violated a few land whales in my
time, but mis this was
streaked each others bodies wit
ferocious warlike symbols, the
most common being a styiizec
broken bone.
The fire roared up and mey
began dancing around it, as if to
summon some forgotten goddess
of Unashamed Emotion
Expression.
Their obese breasts usua
drooped in gravity's painful
as they agonized through
boring, petty lives. Now
slapped and flopped against
ribcage, beating in time to the
avenging lyrics of Pat Benatar.
The music slowly faded away.
They began moving slowly
toward me, murmuring
something. The murmuring grew
louder and more distinct as they
crawled slowly towards me.
The words began to make sense.
They were chanting their po�
at me! The words are almost.
disgusting to print, but I have t&
overcome my own pain in order
to warn the public.
Thepoem went, The nights we
shared in a peertywhite tower
iovm the wo9$i
Teach
Public school teachers vj
participate in the Coastal PL
Writing Project this summer
likely to find thcmsel
"teaching each other how to to
writing according to
projects' co-director.
A basic assumption of
project is "that teachers
teach teachers how to
writing and that the best lead
of writing are writ
themselves says Dr Pati
Bizzaro of Hast Caro
University.
"We're going to ask the ti
themselves to give presentati
and, also, they will d
considerable amount of wril
themselves Bizzaro said.
Stars
MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) -
star-studded AIDS benefit
Elizabeth Taylor raised
for education and research,
organizers hope the gala
repeated elsewhere.
"We've had the most prr
funds raised (for AIDS) at this
function than anv other pla.
the country benefit spokesi
Charles Cinnamon said
Sunday's "An Extraordmj
Evening with Elizabeth Taj
and Friends
"We want it to be the protot
for the rest of the country
Earlvis h
West and
Continued from page 10
was of course was not pamj
blue but pink.
At the Blue Marlin a few nij
later we par tied with some ECI
Pi IappaJC-Mart girls. They vg
couTa.only ask questions to el
other, it was called the questi(
game, how original.
One of our crew, Pee
thought he had the hang
questions game so he ejaculal
"You have big giant titties h
of the girls.
Even though Pee Wee los
game because he mad
statement instead of posin
question, his words were
voted the statement of the wi
Bars. Sloppy Joe's was
Joe's had a singer who said
you believe all fags shoul
Bonehead
Attacked!
Continued from page 10
since you left
That's all I heard as I blaj
out. The construction woi
found me Monday, drooling
writhing in the mud. As I be
more coherent, 1 tried to ex
what happened.
There was no proof of it. 1
home and tried to recover
today, walking to class, I
mud stained bra size
F(lab)snagged on the tl
fluttering limply in the bree
Switching
The Ben Hecht-Ch
MacArthur plav "The
Page" has enjoyed a long cai
films. Adolphe Menjou anl
O'Brien starred in the 193l
directed by Lewis Milestoi
produced by Howard Hugfl
Howard Hawks had'
brilliant idea of changinj
reporter to a woman, anv
Girl Friday" was a hit in 194J
Cary Grant and Rosalind Rj
Billy Wilder went back
1920s era with Walter M,
and Jack Lemmon in 1973.
Now comes "Swil
Channels It is pattemc
"His Girl Friday with
Reynolds as the demonic
and Kathleen Turner as h
reporter and ex-wife
something new has been
television.
Changing frcm a Cl
newspaper to a satellite
network does surprising
damage to the timeless
Page" plot. If anythinj
deadline urgency is
pronounced, given
rornpetitive nature of TV
Oh well, 'The Front Paj
survive.
-�frMMnMtMamSHR
�fi? �' ' �� �i 'omBumghi





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 17,19M 11
Page 10
tore
a i egare puts it,
the tear of trying
- completed, the
d I ocare have a
Robbie who is three.
John Allan who is nine
ire and Allan have
children to pursue
�ests in music
ha already begun
ledrumsand keyboard
ivs the guitar and Allan
tar and harmonica
Mian sang in
years ago the
- home to Rocket
irriageshop Today
. ness
aid of Pill
repairs and
Liipment, Rockel
tore that
rumentsand
� docket had an
n MTV. The
M I" has Kvn
se it makes
especially
instruments
- � id(
music shop
came out of a
names
rned into a
caters
i rs �
rang - ��
� ius
led therap)
� r pure
Fla.
bow! and guzzle a few
d Wffs but murh ti air
m Araa
- now that
I - ked,
ked
umpv
� I Pugsley
�nap answered.
d and pounded on
hotel door until
I We cussed every
wn to mankind,
d Buck were passed out
ously deaf with the
n their pockets.
ked out losers with
ind lounge chairs
lmbered by the pool.
hit
� : �� � Jay 2-for those of
: a reader's diary, we
Red Cock Inn and
t the Spanish Gardens, or
Moss or Spanish
n i sh hotel was across
Blue Martin Hotel which
ee IARLVIS, page 11
d a
my life'
each others bodies with
us warlike symbols, the
common being a sryiizec
fnbone.
fire roared up and they
dancing around it, as if to
wn some forgotten goddess
Unashamed Emotional
BOfl.
obese breasts usually
in gravity's painful pull
agonized through their
petty lives. Now they
I and flopped against their
2;e, beating in time to the
;ing lyrics of Pat Benatar.
music slowly faded away.
began moving slowly
Ird me, murmuring
thing. The murmuring grew
and more distinct as they
1 slowly towards me.
I words began to make sense.
were chanting their poems
' The words are almost loo
sting to print, but I have to
me my own pain in order
i the public.
poem went, "The nights we
1iai peaiiywhite tower
?moHes form the words 1
BQNEHEAD, pay It
1
Teachers learn Writing through Project
Public school teachers who
participate in the Coastal Plains
Writing Project this summer are
likely to find themselves
teaching each other how to teach
writing according to the
projects' co-director.
A basic assumption of the
project is "that teachers should
teach teachers how to teach
writing and that the best teachers
of writing are writers
themselves says Dr. Patrick
Bizzaro of East Carolina
I niverstity.
We re going to ask the teachers
themselves to give presentations
and, also, they will do a
considerable amount of writing
themselves Bizzaro said.
Up to 25 teachers from grades K
through 12 will be accepted for
the writing project program at
ECU which includes a four week
institute on campus July 5-29 and
a follow-up program during the
1988-89 school year.
Teachers who arc accepted will
receive a $400 stipend, tuition and
fees for six hours in graduate
credit at ECU in English or
Education, and materials on
teaching writing.
Teachers from schools in the
northeast North Carolina
education district are invited to
apply for the Coastal Plains
Writing Project fellowships.
Applications should be sent to
Bizzaro in the Ecpartment of
English, ECU, and must include a
one-page description of how
writing is used in the classroom
and an explanation of specific
successful activities.
Signature of letter of support
from the applicant's local
supervisor must accompany the
application. Applications are
requested by April 15.
The Coastal Plains Writing
Project is part of the statewide
North Carolina Writing project
funded by the State Board of
Education.
Bizzaro, associate professor of
English and director of the
WritingCenter at ECU for the past
five years, also headed ECU's
Writing Across the Curriculum
program.
He will co-direct the Coastal
Plains Writing Project with Dr.
Joanna Mink, assistant professor
of English and Director of Writing
Programs at Atlantic Christian
College in Wilson.
"There really is a lot of interest
in this program Bizzaro said "It
is going to saitsfy some real needs.
Our teachers want to know how
to teach writing he said.
He added that he expects "the
best ideas will come from the
teachers themselves � teachers
giving ideas to each other by the
sharing of ideas
Participants will earn graduate
credit of three semester hours in
writing and three semester hours
in teaching of writing.
Activities will include writing
of all kinds, from journals to
formal position papers;
presentations by faculty and
qualified consultants;
demonstrations of effective
teaching strategies, peer group
responsing and editing:
professional reading and weekly
social activities. Participants will
be required to attend fall weekend
workshops.
Bizzaro said that the combined
effort will make it possible "to
reach as many teachers as
possible in this large geographical
area, to continue the excellent
work begun bv personnel at
Atlantic Christian College, and to
award graduate credit from
ECU
He said that over the past three
years, ECU faculty have
conducted workshops in Pitt
County for teachers K-12,
focusing on teaching writing as a
process and on using writing for
purposes of learning.
He added, "We believe that
prospective teachers are most apt
to learn how to teach writing not
only by writing themselves, but
also by observing and learning
from other teachers actively
involved in the promoting of
reading and writing skills
Stars host benefit for AIDS
MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) � A
star-studded AIDS benefit led by
Elizabeth Taylor raised $2 million
tor education and research, and
organizers hope the gala will be
repeated elsewhere.
We've had the most private
funds raised (for AIDS) at this one
function than any other place in
the country benefit spokesman
Charles Cinnamon said of
Sunday's "An Extraordinary
Evening with Elizabeth Taylor
and Friends
"We want it to be the prototype
for the rest of the country
The series of $2,500-a-platc
South Florida dinner parties fell
short of its $3 million goal,
although its "grand finale" of
champagne and dessert at the
Fountaincbleau Hilton Hotel was
sold out.
Ms. Taylor urged the crowd,
which included Brooke Shields,
Marlee Matlin, Margaux
Hemingway, Zsa Zsa Gabor, Ed
Asner and Lynn Redgrave, to do
more.
"Go out there and get your next-
door neighbor involved she
said. "Put your money where
your mouth is
"We're talking about the living
who and dying, and it's getting
closer to all of us Ms. Taylor
said, likening the fear of the
disease to the tenacles of an
x:topus.
"How do you cope with those
families who reject their beloveds
(AIDS victims) need
compassion and understanding.
People may say money can't by
compassion, but money can buy
health
The fund-raiser featured a
dozen black- tie parties from Palm
arlvis has a boss vacation in Key
West and even remembers the trip
Beach to Miami Beach, all given in
the homes of celebrities or
community leaders.
Ms. Taylor, who became
involved with AIDS issues in
1984, chairs the non-profit
American Foundation for AIDS
Research, a research and
education group that will share
the benefit's proceeds.
Read
The
East
Carolinian
LA5T CHAMCE!
TO GET TttOtS TZOtmrS
ne
-it I SudervH;
Continued from page 10
was of course was not painted
bhiebut pink.
At the Blue Marlin a few nights
later we partied with some ECU's
PI Kappa K-Mart girls. They were
f�itoui�. tf4Srg-u�c v�hef� you n
could only ask questions to each
Other, it was called the questions
game, how original.
One of our crew, Pee Wee,
thought he had the hang of the
questions game so he ejaculated,
ou have big giant titties to one
of the girls.
Even though Pee Wee lost the
game because he made a
statement instead of posing a
question, his words were still
voted the statement of the week.
Bars. Sloppy Joe's was cool.
Joe's had a singer who said "Do
you believe all fags should be
Bonehead
Attacked!
Continued from page 10
since you left
That's all I heard as I blacked
out. The construction workers
found me Monday, drooling and
writhing in the mud. As I became
more coherent, I tried to explain
what happened.
There was no proof of it. I went
home and tried to recover. But
today, walking to class, I saw a
mud stained bra size 38-
F(lab)snagged on the fence
fluttering limply in the breeze.
Switching
The Ben Hecht-Charlcs
MacArthur play "The Front
Page" has enjoyed a long career in
films. Adolphe Menjou and Pat
O'Brien starred in the 1931 talks
directed by Lewis Milestone and
produced by Howard Hughes.
Howard Hawks had the
brilliant idea of changing the
reporter to a woman, and "His
Girl Friday" was a hit in 1940 with
Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell.
Billy Wilder went back to the
1920s era with Walter Matthau
and Jack Lemmon in 1973.
Now comes "Switching
Channels It is patterned after
"His Girl Friday with Burt
Reynolds as the demonic editor
and Kathleen Turner as his star
reporter and ex-wife. But
something new has been added:
television.
Changing from a Chicago
newspaper to a satellite news
network does surprisingly little
damage to the timeless "Front
Page" plot. If anything, the
deadline urgency is more
pronounced, given the
competitive nature of TV news.
Oh well, 'The Front Page" will
survive.
lined up and shot point blank?"
The bar went crazy in applauding
approval. The singer then said
"Majority rules in my country
Captain Tony's�laid back
sweet breeze bar with billions of
"It was a three hour tour, a three
hour tour
Greyhound tracks�A bunch of
old men in Hawaiian shirts
yelling at animals running
around an oval. The dogs run like
Ultra Tanning
Booth
ScwtkMutk
103 Eastbrook DrS 758-7570
Tanning
Specials
business cards starpled to Jhe lighting and the old men have
small coronaries as they rip up
their losing tickets and say
"Geez After five races, our 30-1
long shot won. Sweet.
"Didn't need no welfare
state
The College Rover couldn't
leave Key West without a small
memento, so on the last day I went
to Sloppy Joe's to buy a tee-shirt. I
smirked when the lady told me
the only color they had was pink.
What the hell, I bought it anyway.
"Gee, our old LaSalle ran
walls � Hemingway- use to get
sloshed at Tony's, according to
Tony who use to serve him beers
way back when.
Rick's�a mall bar. Girls
climbed the walls, all nice and tan,
all hot and wanton. With oak bats
tarred and swinging, our seven
man line came up to bat.
Cup adjusted, our lead off
hitter, Pee Wee entered the batters
box. Fast ball. Curve ball. "Pee
Wee, can you call me a cab And
the youngest strikes out.
Later in the same inning, after great
the others on our team choose to T�i� a a t i j
walk, the determined Pee Wee �fJ3fT Award�Jack, a student
returned to the batters box. Swing of NSU, :for being a jackass, a
. jack of all trades, for using Ajax as
CheA swing fouled off. "Pee suntan lotionfor jacking up the
Wee close the door on your way car, for spending jack, for
out The youngest strikes out watching Billy Jack, and mostly
twice in the same inning. fjin8� f n � , n. ,
Foley's Square-another mall a Striking Out On Fat Girls
bar. Lefty Gil comes to the plate. Award-Pugsley Adams,snap
You know Vin, he usually hits snaP-
pretty good off this pitcher. Well Stealing Bikes Award-Co
Joe, Gil is batting .313 against this winners. Buck and Pee Wee.
screw ball thrower. kT AwardIt
After fouling off pitches for good Noodles
three hours in the dug-out of Struck Out In A Pick Up Truck
Puesley's pick up truck, Lefty Gil Award�Gil.
is out on strikes, Those werc the daVs-
Tanning Tanning Specialanning Special
Special
cissorsmitl
Scissorsmith
I with purchase of a perm
io visits for $20�� 4 FREE Visits
with coupon j
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1 Scissorsmith
i with any harfcut & style
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INTRAMURAL-RECREATIONAL SERVICES
OUTDOOR ADVENTURE TRIPS
OUTFITTED FOR FUN
SOCK MAT
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torto
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RAIN JACKET
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ORFALL
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ycrirliS
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At The Underground
Mark Johnson
Acoustic Guitarist
8:00 p.m.
Friday, March 18
gathering place
Swim Wir
- rvjr-ot-FS
SUrAMER
"HOTTEST TAN" CONTEST
at 'P'jrf
BACKPACKING
Registration held thru MARCH 21
WHITE WATER RAFTING
Registration held MARCH 21-APRIL 5
Memorial Gym room 113
For more information caH 757-6387
i .i i rims � immmmmmm
�Starts March 22nd
�Will Run 4 Weeks With The Finals On
Tuesday, April 19th
�Each weekly winner will:
-advance to the finals
-win $20 cash
Finals: Winner Will Receive Round-Trip
Airfare For 2 People To Sunny Pensacola,
Florida for a Weekend at the Gorgeous
Beach. Hotel accomodations provided.
Sign Up Early - Entrants Are Limited!
Plug at 4?j) Classic Rock & RoU Tuesdays s
$1.25 Highballs. Jeans Allowed.
wpnimm





12
THEFASr CAROLINIAN
MARCH 17, 1988
is
Old people live for 100 years
On the wall of the room where
lesse Fhtllips and Maude
Finnison spend much of their
time these days hangs a yellowing
photograph of their parents,
Shaw and Pansy Phillips
rhey the ones built this house
when we was children. Maude
saysot their farm home just inside
Moore County near the Chatham
County line. Wc vo Kvn here
100 years last 25th of February
Few people can claim to have
lived in the same h. . c for a
century but esse Fhillips can,
andhissister Maude mighthave
it she hadn't married Norman
Finnison in 1920. She moved over
near 1 ligh falls with her husband
and lived there until he died in
lu3 soon after the deaths of her
parents and then she moved back
to her family home with her
Maude who never had
children, will be 103 Wednesday.
se, s ho never married, turned
�st Sept. 1. They are the
� 5 aw and Pansy Phillips'
Idren.
"I had tour sisters Jesse savs.
I'm the onlv brother, but every
one of them had a brother
f le just trying to pull one on
you, Warns Maude. There was
� us children
"Well, that's what I told him,
Maude Jesse interjects.
Although they bicker with
some regularity, Maude and Jesse
get along fine together without
help.
Jesse doesn't like it, but he does
most of the cooking. "I can cook
steak all light, and you don't need
a knife to eat it with. Cut it with a
fork. Cook it right slow for an
hour and it'll be tender
Maude still bakes her famous
pound cakes (up until a couple of
years ago, she still churned her
own butter for them). She
crochets, too, sews some of her
own clothes and still quilts.
"Only I 1xut quit she says oi
her quilting. "I've make one or
two this winter. I've pieced two
here lately, but l hadn't quilted
em yet
Maude has been in a hospital
only once in her life. That was
three years ago when she had
some fainting spells, and the
doctor put her in a couple of days
for tests. Jesse hasn't had anv
serious health problems for more
than 30 years.
"Our health's been awfully
good, 'Maude says. "I get out and
piddle around and he docs.too.
He still drives
I drove to Carthage and back
'Black Lizard' about losers?
KE1 EY, Calif. (AP) - The
characters who inhabit Black
ird books are contemporary
rs struggling through scenes
�ling middle oi hell
n Earth
ugh that may not spur
- of readers to rush out to
buy one. Black Lizard co-
Barry Gifford and Don
s report their dark suspense
novels nevertheless have become
g hit, with sales approaching
nil lion this year.
m re not worried that tans of
traditional mysteries or gothic
romances shun the harsh titles
such as "A Ticket to Hell "The
Alcoholics "Swamp Sister" or
"A Moment to Prey
I don't read mysteries, I don't
know anything about mysteries
I can't read them said Gifford,
ntending most are poorly
ten and focus primarily on
advancing the plot. Black Lizard
books may contain a mystery, but
many don't include a corpse or
even a crime, he said.
As the editor who selects the
Black Lizard lineup, Gifford has
(car vision o what fits and what
doesn't, and he has no intention oi
trying to attract the fainthearted.
These thrillers are "not just
hard-bmled. They're books with a
certain psychological edge he
said.
According to Gifford and Ellis,
Black Lizard has become so
successful that major publishing
companies are trying to imitate
the innovations of the small
Creative Arts company that has
carried the Black Lizard imprint
Observations
Continued from page 10
to generate their own peculiar
odor if you know what I mean.
Most of them know too, so they
douse themselves daily in the
fumes to cover it up. The
fragrences usually mix however,
creating something totally new �
a Formaldahyde Flatulence No. 5
kind of thing.
The winning weapon for the
nasal front was found by a group
of far-seeing international
entrepreneurs with the audacity
to disregard the law.
After a few months of cocaine
therapy, the native's nose is
completely unresponsive to all
smells.
Like the Walkman, cocaine
offers fringe benefits. The natives
found that they could reduce that
unproductive sleep time by more
than half. Their lives suddenly
seemed so full, so alive. Besides,
Florida was getting too crowded
for those quiet, solitary moments
of thought.
I don't know yet if these defense
mechanisms are intentional or
not. They probably just evolved
out of necessity, but maybe
there's a secret Bureau of Old
People Protection in Tallahassee
to welcome new residents under
60 and inform them of the hard,
cold facts.
Either way, life is good in
Florida. The old people totter
around oblivious to the natives
who, wired for sound and speed,
pay them no heed.
since 1983.
That's when Gifford was
browsing in a Pans bookstore and
discovered a stack oi Jim
Thompson and Harry
VVhittington novels, many of
them the same dark 25-cent
paperbacks that he loved to read
as a kid hanging out in a Tampa,
Fla drugstore.
While the books' popularity
had plunged in the United States
since the '50's, they remained a
strong favorite with the French,
who have shown steady
appreciation oi the "serie noire"
storyline of such authors as
Thompson, Whittington and
David Goodis.
"It best represents the vision of
America that the French like to
retain Gifford said. "It's kind oi
like the Wild West
Filmmaker Francois Truffaut
claimed Goodis as one of his
favorites, filming the writer's
"Shoot the Piano Player Goodis
also wrote "Dark Passage and
did the screenplay as well for the
Humphrey Bogart-Lauren Bacall
film. Gifford's own "Port
Tropique" is in pre-production
for a movie.
He said his friend, best-selling
novelist Elmore Leonard,
routinely calls to suggest Black
Lizard nab a certain new author or
novel. "It's become a writers'
series as well Gifford said.
Black Lizard books are easy to
spot. In assition to the trademark
lizard logo taken from a Peruvian
stone rubbing and strategically
placed on each cover, most of the
novels also feature haunting,
lurid cover designs by San
Francisco artist Jim Kirwin.
The covers have become so
successful that contrary to the old
maxim, some people judge Black
Lizard books by their covers and
buy them for that reason alone.
this morning all by myself' Jesse
says. "Didn't have a bit oi trouble.
Went over there and got a haircut
and looked after some business
Jesse had to get his license
renewed just before he turned
100. He make the mistake oi
carrying along the glasses he uses
for reading.
"They're just magnifying
glasses from the dime store he
says. The examiner insisted he use
them to take the eye test.
"I said, '1 can't do anyting
with glasses on They said
'Buddy, you've missed five
questions and you're only
allowed three They said, 'Come
back in a week or two and trv
again So I went back without my
glasses. I passed all right. 1 lad no
trouble the last time. Just anytime
I want to go anywhere, I go
"He's been to Carthage today
Maude says.
"Yes, 1 told him that a while
ago Jesse loudly tells his sister
with a touch of impatience.
"Well, I didn't know "She
forgets things Jesse says. "Can't
hear. Mv hearing's bad, too
As a young man, Jesse took up
farming with his father. Later, he
switched to carpentry. When he
was nearly 40, he started making
wooden caskets in a shed on the
farm. At first he made them to
order for counties to use in pauper
burials but found business slow
and started selling to funeral
homes.
Jesse sold the casket business in
1955 and retired. After that he and
Maude started spending their
winters in Bradonton. Fla 2nd
they continued until a few years
ago.
"I got where I'd rather stay at
home Maude says. "I didn't
want to go, but I believe he'd a
went yet
"Yeah, 1 liked it down there in
the winter. I'd love to went this
past winter, but Maude couldn't
go. I'd've been a going every
winter if I could
When he was 85, Jesse decided
tha he wanted to see more of the
world. I le made three trips to
Europe and one to Hawaii. His
most recent trip was to the Virgin
Islands about eight years ago.
Maude never went with him. "I
don't go on plane she says.
Neither Jesse nor Maude ever
watched TV, but last month
Maude decided that she wanted
one and they bought their first set,
a 13-inch color model. It sits silent
most of the time.
"That picture changing keeps
messing my head and eyes up
lesse says.
"If it's preachin I like to watch
that Maude says. "But I've not
looked at it enough to learn what's
on it. He says it messes his head
up
"Well, Maudie, I told him that
Jesse says with a touch of
exasperation.
"I told you I don't hear and
understand good Maude says
with a smile.
PlaAi Cinema
Playing Thurs.
March 17th-Sun. 20th
8:00 p.m. Hendrix
PIAA Mil l IH
Tickets only $2 for
first hour daily.
OFF LIMITS
POLICE ACADEMY,
PART 5
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
Adults $250'tM
5:30
CHILDREN
ANYTIME $250
BUCCANNER MOVIES
. 756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center

THE LAST EMPORER
rated PG-13 2:00-5:00-8:00
RATED PC.

VICE VERSA
1:15-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15
Starts Friday - Jack Nicholson & Meryl Streep in
IRON WEED
RATED R 2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30

axsrouAsrfT
anrr�
XtSSL
ATTENTION COLLEGE SENIORS
The Coast Guard needs officers and you may qualify. Do you want the opportunity to put
that hard earned degree to work for you, job satisfaction and security? $20K starting
salary, quick promotion, free medical and dental benefits, travel and adventure?
If you are age 21-26, hold a BS, BA or higher degree, are in good
health and a U.S. citizen YOU MAY QUALIFY!
Put your degree to work to help others while helping yourself in the Coast Guard! A Coast
Guard Officer recruiting representative will be available to answer any questions you may
have about a career in The Service with a Peace-Time Mission on
Thursday, March 24th, at the Student Supply Store, ECU CAMPUS.
For a free information package or further details call toll free
1-800-345-8230.
THE COAST CUARD-AN ARMED SERVICE AND MORE
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I The original fitmil) hatrcutltrv J
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TIME I
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Jeans, Tops, Sweaters, Jackets and
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And We Are Always Buying:
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Regardless of Condition
We have a good selection of
faded, worn, distressed,
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2 I se black ink only
3 Leave at least '�inch margin on all skies
4 I se clean, transparent tape to attach "paste-ups
securely
5 Ise a fresh, dark ribbon in your typewriter or printer
6. "Screen black and white photos for best
reproduction
Come to ktnko s for fast service, outstanding qualm.
and low prices
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Limit One Coupon Per Visit
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MARCH 23
7:00PM MG 102
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RECEIVE FREE T-SHIRTS
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THE EVENTS WILL BE HELD
NIGHTLY MARCH 27, 28, 29
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 7S7-63S7
Lane
Lan �
pan
for .
sna

IT.
r

it


i
b
ot
be
in �
that
bloc
David Lee
LOS W
in Da
of toys
surfb
featur
a regi:
blue E
But this is �
vacatior I -
rock star
scream Ifsa
pla �
t audiences tor the r
months in ar
to New � � �
"Mus
sounds ri �
music it is
intervk a
music -
thunc t
floorb
the heave ns. S
rolling
what's a wa
to surl
Rol
his
"Sk Si i
includi -
Paradise
has
Th(
spoke ab
bee
Sitting in
rehears i
tied b a -
cameilace
shirt
loo

pati
ceilinj
w ai '
but ad
New Deli
Cont
The �
customers
expand the
ma pi
combinati
I or new
the bands I
Dch's stapli
the bigger
and Saturdays
the Usua
seemed I
owners-they
and othei
MicaluP.
Continued fi
impassioned
teeth dripping a h
PBS will also air "
Family I hi
his usual money n
Danny cons Rei
investing into a j
brothels Imagine
when Keith h
customer! I tsar
errors. Yes, Danny Par
Chippy "K OUld





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 17,1988
13
NG:
Jackets and
ar
ys Buying:
old or Silver
ndition
lection of
tressed,
leans.
MAN
GET
:opy
people
sit
'
pies
J
GEE7 & WINE
ES
' '
L BE HELD
23
102
MMTS
-SHIRTS
3 EVENTS
N PER TEAM
BE HELD
!7, 28, 29
IU 757-6387
Lance Co. makes changes in recipe
lance Inc the Charlotte
i ompany that clings fiercely to its
old-fashioned image, has made
one of its boldest moves in
decades - chaning the formulas
tor some of Us cookie and cracker
snacks.
some of these formulas have
been absolutely sacrosanct.
rhey've been untouched tor 50
years says 1 ance Vice President
True Gwynn.
lust the thought of changing
what our corporate fathers did
puts teeth on edge
But the company is confident
it s not repeating Coca-Cola's
New Coke blunder.
By removing contents that
increase levels of cholesterol -
animal tats, such as lard, beet fat
and tallow, and tree oils, such as
cocounut, palm and palm kernel
oil - I.ance hopes its products will
be more appealing to health-
minded consumers.
It's the largest single change
we've make to our products in the
history ot the company says
lance President A. F. "Pete"
Sloan.
"We think it will be very
significant, but you never know
"A large majority ot people that
buy our products don't grab them
and read the ingredients
Gwynn said. "But we wanted to
be responsive because we sell a lot
of our products to schools and
state institutions, and dieticians
were telling us, 'You fellas need to
be sensitive to what's happening
in the world We've tried to do
that
1 ligh levels of cholesterol in the
bloodstream clog arteries and
contribute to heart attacks.
Ingredients such as oils derived
from cottonseed sov, rapeseed
and canola replaced the animal
and tree oil. The company also
added nutritional information
about the contents to its packages.
The cracker-sandwich snacks
that have been changed account
for between 0 and 70 percent oi
the company's revenue which
were$380 million in the fiscal year
ended Dec. 31, Gwynn says.
Lince, one of the country's
leading snack makers, produces
150 lines oi cracker, potato chip,
candy and peanut products at a
231-acre, six building complex in
Charlotte that employs 1,700
people.
The change wasn't made
quickly. The company spent two
years working to alter the
formulas without changing the
products' taste. The first of the
new products were put in stores
in December, though some old-
formula products may be in
stores through midsummer.
"We did taste tests and taste
tests savs Gwynn. "From the
little bit of crude market research
we did with our customers, we
found their message was, 'If you
want to tinker with it, for gosh
sakes don't change the taste and
don't alter the price
And while the company is
proud oi the changes, don't
expect Lance to abandon it low-
key style to promote them.
Unlike most large consumer
product companies that spend
millions on advertising, the
closest thing Lance has to
advertisements are billboards on
its tractor trailers.
Instead, Lance plans to rely on
its 2,400 member, 3b state sales
force to spread the word. Lance
held the first sessions to instruct
sales personnel about the new
products last weekend. The
company does admit to sending
letters explaining the changes to
42,000 dieticians.
Hie new ingredients cost more,
but the company won't say how
much. Costs of oils and tats are a
small percentage of the
company's ingredients costs, say
Interstate Securities analyst Kay
Norwood.
The cost oi the change -
laboratory tests, taste testing an
minor equipment alterations -
was less that $1 million, Gwynn
says. No price increases are
planned.
The hang in ingredients is
Lance's second recent more to
attract health-minded
consumers. Following the
national trend toward healthy
foods, the company in 1985
purchased Nutrition Pak Corp a
granola snack maker in Mebane.
bill Oliver, an analyst with
Equitable Securities Corp. in
Nashville, says the change isn't
likely to boost sales or earnings a
great deal.
"I think this is a positive thing
for them Oliver savs. "I don't
think the whole population that
buys Lance products is
necessarily that health conscious,
but 1 do believe a certain segment
will appreciate it
Phillip 1 .ance, a Charlotte coffee
salesman, launched the company
in 1913 when he ordered 500
pounds of peanuts for a farmer
who decided he could not use
them. Lance roasted the peanuts
in his oven at home and sold them
in bags. In the 1920s, he began
making peanut butter and
spreading it on crackers.
GIVE BLOOD
(The
�ast Carolinian
ride,
lotivation,
xperience,
riends.
Apply today.
v
David Lee Roth goes on tour
LOS ANGELES IAP) - The child
in David Lee Roth is taking plenty
of toyson this trip: a 28-foot living
surfboard; a hugh banner
featuring bikini-clad women; and
a regulation-size, red, white and
blue Everlast boxing ring.
But this is no ordinary summer
�vacation for the shaggy-haired
rock star with the trademark
, scream. It's a concert tour, and the
I playthings are meant to wow
I audiences for the next nine
' months in arenas from Australia
to New York.
"Music should look like it
sounds, no matter what kind of
music it is Roth said in a recent
interview. "A lot of times this
music soulds like something
thundering up out of the
floorboards or raining down from
the heavens. Sometimes it's like
rolling waves of sound. And
what's a wave without somebody
to surf it?"
Roth, 32, it touring to promote
his third solo album,
"Skyscraper The record, which
includes the single, "Just Like
Paradise marks the first time he
has tried on the producer's hat.
The comic book-like showman
spoke about his tour before it
began March 4 in Lakeland, Fla.
Sitting in the second row of a
rehearsal hall, his long blond hair
tied back into a ponytail, wearing
camoflage pants and a torn T-
shirt, he was careful not to reveal
too many of the act's surprises.
"During the band's moment of
patriotism, I climb a ladder to the
ceiling of the arena - Jeez, I don't
want to give it all away he said,
but added, "It's death-defying
stuff
Roth's hometown is
Bloomington, Ind but he moved
to Pasadena, Calif when he was
about 12 and has lived there ever
since. He began his career after
meeting Eddie and Alex Van
Halen and Michael Anthony at
Pasadena City College. The four
formed Van Halen,a band that set
the standard for many heavy-
metal bands, with Eddie's
innovative guitar playing and �
Roth's wild-man antics.
The group split up in 19S3, and
Roth moved on to a solo career.
His new band includes lead
guitarist Steve Vai, bass guitarist
Billy Sheehan, drummer Gregg
Bissonette and keyboardist Brett
Tuggle.
Roth's international tour will
include some of the old Van Halen
standards, in addition to his solo
efforts, including a remake of the
Beach Boy's "California Girls"
and the bluesy "Just a Gigolo
In his spare time, Roth climbs
mountains, as seen on the "Just
Like Paradise" video in which he
scales a 3,000-foot-high vertical
wall oi granite. He said he got the
climbing bug as a boy scout.
Climbing is a kind of therapy
tor him: "You know, the most
scariest place you can put
yourself in has the most calming
effect
Roth is also in tercsted in marital
arts, receiving a black belt in
karate about nine years ago. At
one point he experimented with
kick boxing. These days, he
incorporates both disciplines in
his stage show.
New Deli has new owners
Continued from page 10
They want to keep their steady
customers but they also want to
expand the Deli's appeal-which
may prove to be a tricky
combination.
For now at least, they'll stick to
the bands that have been the
Deli's staple. They want to keep
the bigger circuit bands to Fridays
and Saturdays. The turnout for
the Usuals show last week
seemed to impress the new
owners-they want to have them
and other local bands play more
often on weeknights.
No radical changes are planned
on the menu, although they will
introduce more appetizers and
(gasp!) french fries soon. They'll
paint the "puke" green walls, they
say, and eventually expand the
upstairs. Maybe they'll change
the look of the front window too,
but that's all in the future.
For now though they're just
getting the feel of the business and
the general attitude seems to be if
it ain't broke, don't fix it.
Let's hope it ain't broke.
Micah, PBS and Festival '88
Continued from page TO M-MJf �$��
impassioned flesh; their pointed Parker will be answering phonos
teeth dripping a hot slaver during this seamen�.
PBS will also air "The Partridge All this, plus more specials you
Family: The Lost Episodes Up to paid to watch on Showtime last
his usual money making hi-jinks, year, more 70's British TV shows,
Danny cons Reuban into more fat, bald, but still bold'60's
investing into a chain of gay folk singers in concert; all
brothels Imagine their surprise interspersed with episodes of
when Keith shows up as a paying "The Jim and Tammy Show" and
customer! It's a regular comedy of "I ovc Connection Festival '88 is
errors. Yes, Danny Partridge fans, a virtual video carnival, and
Chippy "Could'vc Be-n !csidcs, it's free.
JN ft
THIS ST. PATRICK'S DAT,
DINE TO A DIFFERENT DRUMMER
AP
SAV A CENTER
Tht freshest way to Save
BEAUTIFULLY
HAND DECORATED
Cordelia
Stoneware
This Week's Feature: SAUCER
BLUET OR
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PATTERNS
with ever) 3 pun hase
69
MARKET FRESH � 3 LBS. OR MORE
Ground i
Beef
Corned
Green
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Chicken2
Noodle
alte i � � � �
A&P
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99
3 400
69
69
Tea
Evaporated j
Milk
Apple
Juice
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109
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Fryer
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Shoulder
London Broil
Boneless
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2
59
499
499
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99
429
5 990
A&P CHILLED
Orange
Juice
r980
Limit One With Add I $10 Purchase
HOLLY FARMS
Sunday Best
Roasters
69
JUICY BLACK � RED OR
White Grapes
77?
40 OFF LABEL
RICH � MELLOW
Tide
Detergent
42 oz
box
Limit One With Add I S'O Purchase
HOMOGENIZED
Flav-O-Rich 459
12 Milk 1
BETTy CROCKER Au GRATlN OR
Scalloped
Potatoes
HEINZ
Ke9 �' 990
Eight O'clock
Coffee
1 lb
Limn One With Add i $10 Purchase
USDA CHOICE � CENTER CUT
Corned Beef
Brisket
TENDER
California
Asparagus
ASSORTED
A&P
790
�. � Rf SH
Ocean Perch J99
Fillets
69"
Ketchup
3?
PACKERS LABEL
Crinkle Cut 449
Potatoes
A&P FROZEN
Orange
Juice
3
399
car
89"
FARMFRI HI N
Catfish
Fillets
SEALITE Ft . - � �
Crab Meat Q99
Blend
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A&P Charcoal f
Briquets �m
VOLT 1 PK OP �
Duracell
Batteries
� - -
Halsa J
Shampoo
1
3
69
OO
Ail VARIETIES
Lay's
Potato Chips
REG OR STRIPED CHIPS AHOY
COOKIES (2 OZ PKG 1 79)
Nabisco
Nilla Wafers
SAVE to s3.60
When you buy 12 Quarts of
Quaker State
041
'11.88
9 t i
-1.20
09 DUMDMM
QUAKER STATE WITH OSX
FIGHTS ENGINE WEAR AND TEAR
ASSORTED YOGURTS
Light N'
Lively
PILLSBURY
Crescent
Rolls
6 159
REG OR EXTRA THICK
Velveeta
8oz
can
1
09
A&P
Shredded
Mozzarella
12 oz
pkg
12 oz
pkg
1
1
79
IMPORTED 60
Brie
49
Pepsi
Products
2 Liter Bottle
990
FRESH BAKED
French
Bread
4
1.29
DISPOSABLE
Bic
Shavers
o 100
pkg
ROLL ON
Secret 2 JOO
Deodorant
pkgs
3
l i.oaves
SEE STORE FOR DETAILS
WE SELL U.S. POSTAGE STAMPS AT POST OFFICE PRICES
WE SELL AMERICAN EXPRESS MONEY ORDERS AT25EACH
PRICES GOOD IN GREENVILLE, N.C. open sunoay 700 Am to 11 00p.m.
AT 703 GREENVILLE BLVD. MON0AY �"u $ATUR0AY 7 �� A M ,2 mDHt0HT
PRICES EFFECTIVE MAR 13 THRU MAR 19. 1988 QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
Miller, Miller
Lite Beer
12 oz. 24 Party Pack Cans
$9.89
V. . , ,
, �" i v ? " �

�.mmff � ��HmwW





Ti IE LAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 17,1988 13
JYING:
Jackets and
ar
ys Buying:
old or Silver
� ndition

I cction of
;sed,
i heans.
5Mill
v:h
GET
:opy
'S

people.
pies
It
?E�ft & WINE
BE HELD
23
102
4NTS
-SHIRTS
iEVENTS
N PER TEAM
BE HELD
!7, 28, 29
Lance Co. makes changes in recipe
1 ance Inc the Charlotte
company that clings fiercely to its
old-fashioned image, has made
one of its boldest moves in
decades - chaning the formulas
tor some of its cookie and cracker
snacks.
Some of these formulas have
been absolutely sacrosai t.
They've been untouched for 50
years says Lance Vice President
Price Gwynn.
lust the thought of changing
what our corporate fathers did
puts teeth on edge
But the company is confident
il s not repeating Coca-Cola's
New Coke blunder.
By removing contents that
increase levels of cholesterol -
animal tats, such as lard, beef fat
and tallow, and tree oils, such as
cocounut, palm and palm kernel
oil - Lance hopes its products will
be more appealing to health-
minded consumers.
It's the largest single change
we've make to our products in the
history of the company says
1 ance President A. F. "Pete"
Sloan.
"We think it will be very
significant, but you never know
"A large majority of people that
buy our products don t grab them
and read the ingredients
Gwynn said. "But we wanted to
be responsive because we sell a lot
of our products to schools and
state institutions, and dieticians
were telling us, 'You fellas need to
be sensitive to what's happening
in the world We've tried to do
that
1 ligh levels of cholesterol in the
bloodstream clog arteries and
contribute to heart attacks.
Ingredients such as oils derived
from cottonseed, soy, rapeseed
and canola replaced the animal
and trek? oil. Hie company also
added nutritional information
about the contents to its packages.
The cracker-sandwich snacks
that have been changed account
for between 60 and 70 percent of
the company's revenues, which
were$380 million in the fiscal year
ended Dec. 31, Gwynn says.
Lance, one of the country's
leading snack makers, pr iduces
150 lines of cracker, potato chip,
candy and peanut products at a
231-acre, six building complex in
Charlotte that employs 1,700
people.
The change wasn't made
quickly. The company spent two
years working to alter the
formulas without changing the
products' taste. The first oi the
new products were put in stores
in December, though some old-
formula products may be in
stores through midsummer.
"We did taste tests and taste
tests says Gwynn. "From the
little bit oi crude market research
we did with our customers, we
found their message was, 'If you
want to tinker with it, for gosh
sakes don't change the taste and
don't alter the price
And while the company is
proud of the changes, don't
expect Lance to abandon it low-
key style to promote them.
L'nlike most large consumer
product companies that spend
millions on advertising, the
closest thing Lance has to
advertisements are billboards on
its tractor trailers.
Instead, Lance plans to rely on
its 2,400 member, 36-state sales
force to spread the word. Lance
held the first sessions to instruct
sales personnel about the new
products last weekend. The
company does admit to sending
letters explaining the changes to
42,000 dieticians.
The new ingredients cost more,
but the company won t say how
much. Costs of oils and tats are a
small percentage oi the
company's ingredients i osts, say
Interstate Securities analyst Kay
Norwood.
The cost of the change -
laboratory tests, taste testing an
minor equipment alterations -
was less that $1 million, Gwynn
says. No price increases are
planned.
The hang in ingredients is
Lance's second recent more to
attract health minded
consumers. Following the
national trend toward healthy
foods, the company in 1985
purchased Nutrition-PakCorpa
granola snack maker in Mebane.
bill Oliver, an analyst with
Equitable Securities Corp. in
Nashville, says the change isn't
likely to boost sales or earnings a
great deal.
"I think this is a positive thing
for them Oliver savs. "I don't
think the whole population that
buys Lance products is
necessarily that health conscious,
but I do believe a certain segment
will appreciate it
Phillip Lance, a Charlotte coffee
salesman, launched the company
in 1911 when he ordered H)
pounds oi peanuts for a farmer
who decided he could not use
them. Lance roasted the peanuts
in his oven at home and sold them
in bags. In the 1920s, he began
making peanut butter and
spreading it on crackers.
(JIVE BLOOD
(The
last Carolinian.
ride,
lotivation,
:xperience,
fiends.
Apply today.
N
David Lee Roth goes on tour
LOS ANGELES (AP) - The child
in David Lee Roth is taking plenty
of toyson this trip: a 2S-foot flving
surfboard; a hugh banner
featuring bikini-clad women; and
a regulation-size, red, white and
blue Everlast boxing ring.
But this is no ordinary summer
.vacation for the shaggy-haired
rock star with the trademark
scream. It's a concert tour, and the
I playthings are meant to wow
I audiences for the next nine
months in arenas from Australia
to New York.
"Music should look like it
sounds, no matter what kind of
music it is Roth said in a recent
interview. "A lot oi times this
music soulds like something
thundering up out of the
floorboards or raining down from
the heavens. Sometimes it's like
rolling waves of sound. And
what's a wave without somebody
to surf it?"
Roth, 32, it touring to promote
his third solo album,
"Skyscraper Hie record, which
includes the single, "Just Like
Paradise marks the first time he
has tried on the producer's hat.
The comic book-like showman
spoke about his tour before it
began March 4 in Lakeland, Fla.
Sitting in the second row of a
rehearsal hall, his long blond hair
tied back into a pony tail, wearing
camoflage pants and a torn T-
shirt, he was careful not to reveal
too many of the act's surprises.
"During the band's moment of
patriotism, I climb a ladder to the
ceiling of the arena - jeez, I don't
want to give it all away he said,
but added, "It's death-defying
stuff
Roth's hometown is
Bloomington, Ind but he moved
to Pasadena, Calif when he was
about 12 and has lived there ever
since. Me began his career after
meeting Eddie and Alex Can
Halen and Michael Anthony at
Pasadena City College. The four
formed Van Halen,a band that set
the standard for many heavy-
mctaJ bands, with Eddie's
innovative guitar playing and
Roth's wild-man antics.
The group split up in 19S3, and
Roth moved on to a solo career.
His new band includes lead
guitarist Steve Vai, bass guitarist
billy Shcehan, drummer Gregg
Bissonettc and keyboardist Brett
Tuggle.
Roth's international tour will
include some of the old Van Halen
standards, in addition to his solo
efforts, including a remake of the
Beach Bov's "California Girls"
and the bluesy "just a Gigolo
In his spare time, Roth climbs
mountains, as seen on the "Just
Like Paradise" video in which he
scales a 3,000-foot-high vertical
wall oi granite. He said he got the
climbing bug as a boy scout.
Climbing is a kind of therapy
for him: "You know, the most
scariest place you can put
yourself in has the most calming
effect
Roth isalso in tercsted in marital
arts, receiving a black belt in
karate about nine years ago. At
one point he experimented with
kick boxing. These days, he
incorporates both disciplines in
his stage show.
New Deli has new owners
Continued from page 10
They want to keep their steady
customers but they also want to
expand the Deli's appeal-which
may prove to be a tricky
combination.
For now at least, they'll stick to
the bands that have been the
Deli's staple. They want to keep
the bigger circuit bands to Fridays
and Saturdays. The turnout for
the Usuals show last week
seemed to impress the new
owners-they want to have them
and other local bands play more
often on wceknights.
No radical changes arc planned
on the menu, although they will
introduce more appetizers and
(gasp!) french fries soon. They'll
paint the "puke" green walls, they
say, and eventually expand the
upstairs. Maybe they'll change
the look of the front window too,
but that's all in the future.
For now though they're just
getting the feel of the business and
the general attitude seems to be if
it ain't broke, don't fix it.
Let's hope it ain't broke.
Micah, PBS and Festival '88
Continued ft- page 10 �d ,eff ngggJU
impassioned flesh; their pointed Parker will be answering phonos
teeth dripping a hot slaver during this seamen.
PBS will also air "The Partridge All this, plus more specials you
Family: The Lost Episodes Up to paid to watch on Showtime last
his usual money making hi-jinks, year, more 70's British TV shows,
Danny cons Reuban into
investing into a chain of gay
brothels. Imagine their surprise
when Keith shows up as a paying
customer! It'sa regular comedy of
errors. Yes, Danny Partridge fans,
Chippv "Could've Bern
more fat, bald, but still bold '60's
folk singers in concert; all
interspersed with episodes of
"The Jim and Tammy Show" and
"1 oveConnection Festival'88is
a virtual video carnival, and
lesidcs, it's free.
THIS ST. PATRICK'S DAT,
DINE TO A DIFFERENT DRUMMER
SAV A CENTER
Corned
Beef
Green
Beans
Chicken2
Noodle
A&P
Saltines
A&P CHILLED
Orange
Juice
Limit One With Add I $10 Purchase
ASSORTED
Scott
Towels
HOLLY FARMS
Sunday Best
Roasters
69
California 5 QQ0
Lemons 57
JUICY BLACK � RED OR
White Grapes
77?
40 OFF LABEL
Tide
Detergent
42 02
box
Limit One With Add I S'O Purchase
Limit Two With Add I $10 Purchase
RICH � MELLOW
Eight O'Clock
Coffee
USDA CHOICE � CENTER CUT
Corned Beef
Brisket
TENDER
California
Asparagus
Limit One With Add I $10 Purchase
HOMOGENIZED
Flav-O-Rich
12 Milk
BLTT - �� - : �� � iRATIN O
Scalloped
Potatoes
HEINZ
KegO'
Ketchup
32 oz
459
R
69
99"
ASSORTED
A&P
PACKERS LABEL
Crinkle Cut
Potatoes
A&P FROZEN
Orange
Juice
79
1
49
12 oz
can
89
NORTH -�" �����'
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Cats to you this week. I had to write short stories from Mickey Spillane hell and get this bitchin'
Florida Tan. Right, Bonehead? Word T"
THE LAW
The Law is the protector of the innocent, defender
of truth, justice and the
Campus Police way.
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hang by a single skin peel, and you won't be able to draw those cats anymore. Then I'll have the Fu,
F Games page all to myself. Bwah ha ha ha ha ha. At least I got laid over Break. Boss
THE BIGG
The Biee is a MARBLE� comics character, whose powers
include the mutant powers of bigness, strength and loves
to pose down in a studly fashion. Eats wimpy DZ� comics
characters for lunch.
1
Pirate Comix
Finger
Puppets
DIRECTIONS:
1) Cut along the dotted
lines. Don't snort 'em!
2) Use a sharp object
(Careful Kids! Get Mom
andDadtohelp)tomake
slits where the legs of thi
puppets are.
3) Stick index and bird
finger through. Have
hours of fun making
the characters fight
steal and pose in bikini
contests.
LETTERS!
We want your letters!
Yes, we at the Fun N
Games page really
want to read your
comments on the comics.
Well print ANYTHING!
Well, almost Word.
Connecticut pitcher Cr
Caudio cooled off East Caroliri
hot bats Tuesday as the vistd
Huskies handed the Pirates a ll
defeat on what was the.
afternoon oi the baseball si j
While Gaudio and reliever i
Allen were hat fling Pirate hittt
ECU starter Gary Smith v
touched with five hit and six n
in just over two innings. T1
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Lacross
By CAROL WETHERINGT
A�istint Kr,�uiT� Vii:Kr
ECU's athletic departm
has had quite an expene:
during the past week. Hoi
College's Champion Lacit
team out oi Geneva.New
has been ECU's guests, havi
been invited down bv our o
coach, Duke Whelan.
Hobart College, vi
usually travels to Universitj
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training between semesu
found themselves with a
problem this year. Florida - bi
fell later than I lobart s But n
worrv. Coach Whelan, who-
been associated with Ho
College for years, invited Hoi
down. Hobart flew dof
anticipating the warmer m ee
for some strong, serious prac
before the spring season.
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Finger
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Pupp
DIRECTIONS:
1) Cut along the dotted
lines. Don't snort'em!
2) Use a sharp object
(Careful Kids! Get Mom
andDadtohelphomake
slits where the legs of th
puppets are.
3) Stick index and bird
finger through. Have
hours of fun makirt.
the characters fight,
steal and pose in bikini
contests.
LETTERS!
We want your letters!
Yes, we at the Fun N
Games page really
wnt to read your
comments on the comics.
We'll print ANYTHING!
Well, almost Word.
f
THE EAST CAROl INIAN
Sports
MARCH 17,1988 Page 15
Connecticut rips ECU; gains revenge for loss
Connecticut pitcher Craig
Gaudio cooled off East Carolina's
hot bats Tuesday as the visiting
1 luskies handed the Pirates a 10-2
defeat on what was the coldest
afternoon of the baseball season.
While Gaudio and reliever Jim
Allen were baffling Pirate hitters,
ECU starter Gary Smith was
touched with five hitsand six runs
in just over two innings. Two
other ECU hurlers saw action in a
four-run Huskie third inning,
including sophomore Johnathon
Jenkins, who lasted five and one-
thirds inning.
Connecticut, 4-1 including wins
over George mason and Vermont,
got a game-opening triple by
Brian Specyalski. After Scott
Reimold walked, Marcelino
Sellas ripped a Smith slider over
the Harrington Field fence to give
the Huskies a 3-0 lead they would
nevr relinquish.
Things got worse for ECU, now
11-4 for the year.
Connecticut ripped four singles
in its first five at bats to start the
third frame off of Smith and
reliever Tim Langdon. Two more
walks were issued before Jenkins
was brought in to pitch perhaps
his finest outing of his young
career.
Jenkins, who walked none and
struck out three, did make one
mistake in the fourth � a solo
home run to Andy Walker to give
the Huskies out of the Big East
Conference an 8-0 lead.
The Pirates avoided being shut
out for the only time this season
when freshman Steve Godin
singled home David Ritchie and
Jay McGraw with two outs in the
sixth inning. No other Pirate base
runner got past the second sack
the remainder of the blistery
afternoon.
Jenkins gave up an unearned
run in the eighth, and freshman
pitcher John White issued a walk
and two hits for another run in the
top of the ninth to give the
Huskies a 10-2 advantage.
Allen came to the mound as a
relief pitcher in the ninth to sit the
Pirates down in order.
Godin, Calvin Brown, John
Adams and John Thomas each
went l-for-4 at the plate for ECU.
Sellas and Walker had two hits
each, including solo home runs,
for Connecticut. The Huskies will
battle Duke and Wisconsin in
Durham this week.
The Pirates will begin Colonial
Athletic Association this
weekend with a doubleheadcr on
Saturday at UNC-Wilmington's
Brooks Field. ECU will also
square off against the Seahawks
for a single game on Sunday.
Men netters topple Captains for 10th
ECU's men's tennis team third consecutive victory, Jon Cole defeated the Pirates number
improved its record to 10-6 for the McLamb, who moved up into the one doubles team of Campanaro
season Monday as they defeated third spot for the Pirates, also won and Wayne Barber, but ECU took
Christopher Newport, 8-1. over Sam Jackson, 6-1,6-0. the next two matches from the
The Pirates number one player, The Pirates' John Taylor, Mike Captains.
Jon Melhorn, defeated Newports' Amick and Pat Campanaro were Amick and Todd Sumncr
Doug Goulding in three sets, 7-6, also victorious in singles action teammed up to knock off Allen
3-6, 6-1, as the Pirates swept
through the singles matches.
Playing in the number two
position, David Shell beat the
Captains' Matt Allen 6-1, 6-1.
As the Pirates rolled to their
for ECU.
ECU took wins in two of the
three doubles matches with the
Captains also.
Newports' Goulding and Rush
and Brian Fleishman, 6-2, 7-6.
To round the Pirates eighth win
of the day, John Tilghman and
Tim Morris won 6-1,6-2, over the
Captains' Jackson and Matt
Hansen.
The Pirates will travel to Mount
Olive on Wednesday and
Thursday as they take on Mount
Olive and High Point College.
The Pirates will then take a
break on Friday, after a
cancellation with the University
of Wisconsin-Lacrosse, and
return home on Saturday in a 1
p.m. match with the Falcons of
Pfeiffcr.
� CAROLYN JUSTICE
Dream Team impresses Ima Reck
by garnering Intramural hoop title
Could IMA Reck be dreamin' or
did the football team really put
together a championship team?
Just kidding. A big
congratulations to the Dream
Team on winning the all campus
basketball title.
The Dream Team held off
Dream Team didn't have the
game in the bag until hotshot Ed
Fowler left the game with five
fouls. Fowler took game-high
scoring honors, tossing in 19
points. Teammate Karlus Artis
had 12.
Earlier Tuesday, the women's
V
�&�
ECU'S top seed, Jon Melhorn, shows his form during a recent practice
session. (Photo courtesy ECU imports Information) ��
Sarcoidosis Tuesday night to take all-campus title went to the No
the title, 46-42. The winners used a Names, who were 29-26 winners
balanced scoring attack against over Delta Zeta. Terry Lynch and
their opponents. Darren Bynum Jacqueline Ferrell both had six
led the way with 11 points, and points to lead the winners.
James Singletary tossed in 10.
Junior Robinson and Jarrod
The "Hard Hat" award of the
tournament goes to Jody Hite of
the No Names.
The 1988 pre-season softball
tournament is set for this
weekend. Fifteen teams have
signed up for action, which gets
under way this afternoon at 4
o'clock. The finals are set for
Sunday at 7 p.m.
Teams signed up for
competition include Sigma Phi
Moody had six each. However the- -lea Del
Melissa Lord and Holly Condrey Epsilon, Big Hanging Pieces, TKE
had 12 and 11, respectively, to "A Dirty Dozen, Sumthin
Aycock Newtons, TKE "B
Garrett Bandits, Renegades, Do
Wrongs, Fried City D & D, Misfits,
Exyerminators, The Talking Bats.
All games will be played behind
Ficklen Stadium.
Co-Rec super sports is here
again Registration for this two
man, two woman events opens
March 23 at 7 p.m. in Memorial
Gym, Room 102. All participants
will receive a free t-shirt. Four
events are scheduled for
competition nightly from March
27-29. Co-Rec super sports is
SpecilScott Beer Chuggers, being sponsored by Budweiser
Lacrosse team hosts Hobart
By CAROL W ETHER IN G TON
As�iatant Kcaturrt Editor
ECU's athletic department
has had quite an experience
during the past week. Hobart
College's Champion Lacrosse
team out of Gcneva,New York,
has been ECU's guests, having
been invited down by our own
coach, Duke Whelan.
Hobart College, who
usually travels to University of
Florida for their outdoor spring
training between semesters,
found themselves with a small
problem this year. Florida's break
fell later than Hobart's. But not to
worrv. Coach Whelan, who has
been associated with Hobart
College for years, invited Hobart
down. Hobart flew down,
anticipating the warmer weather
for some strong, serious practice
before the spring season.
And practice they got. For
the most part, the weather was
accomodating, the ground was
suitable and the fellas got outside
for their first real outdoor
practice. One trainer remarked
that the guys have been practicing
indoors for nearly two months,
and that it's been a real strain. (I
didn't see any strain.)
Watching Hobart practice,
then later watching the guys
scrimmage with our team, it was
easy to see how ECU could benefit
from such an experience. Many of
Hobart's players attend Hobart
on lacrosse scholarships, so you
know they're good. In watching
the two teams play, it was easy to
see why Hobart has been the
National Champions eight years
straight. Their strong skill, acute
awareness and an intense
devotion to the game was
constantly evident. The players
responded well to the firm
coaching of Dave Urick, who's
whole countenance was evidence
that Lacrosse is more than just a
game to him.
Standing on the sidelines
with ECU's finest, it was not hard
to recognize respect. The talk that
floated among the players ranged
from discussion about various
plays and maneuvers to
exclamations that displayed
individual admiration. Let's hope
our boys take this great tutorial
opportunity to make our lacrosse
season a winning one.
Coach Urick wishes to
thank ECU for their tremendous
hospitality and really appreciates
the use of the university's
facilities. From here, Hobart will
be going straight into a
tournament, and Coach Urick - ��
says he feels pretty good about it The East Carolina lacrosse team played host to Hobart College for a scrimmage game this week. Hobart College
thanks to their visit to ECU. is the defending national champion in lacrosse. (Photo by Hardy Alii good � ECU Photo Lab)
Duke hopes for success in Dean Dome
Billy King hopes to help Duke soar to the national title in the NCAA
Tournament. The Blue Devils open play in the tourney at the Dean Dome
in Chapel Hill. (FUe Photo)
DURHAM, N.C. (AP) - Kevin
Strickland and Billy King like the
idea of Duke opening the NCAA
tournament in a place where
they've never been welcome
before - at the University of North
Carolina's Dean E. Smith Center.
The Blue Devils, 24-6, and
seeded second in the East Region,
play Boston University in a first-
round game Thursday night.
"I'm really excited about it
Strickland said Monday at Duke's
Cameron Indoor Stadium. "It will
give more of our fans a chance to
come out and support us. And it
will cut down on travel
The Smith Center is in Chapel
Hill, N.C, some 10 miles from the
Duke campus.
"The fact we don't have to
travel is the biggest thing King
said.
"We've just played three tough
games and a lot of the guys are
mentally tired and physically
tired
The idea of calling the Dean
Dome home is a strange twist for
the fifth-ranked Duke Blue
Devils.
"If s never been an advantage
before for a Duke team to play at
Chapel Hill Duke Coach Mike
Krzyzewski said at a news
luncheon Monday. "We don't
have too great a record there
Coach mike Jarvis, in his third
season at Boston University, isn't
getting picky about North
Carolina geography when asked
about the location of the Terriers'
first NCAA post-season
appearance since 1983.
"We don't consider it a quasi-
home game for Duke. We
consider it a home game for
them Jarvis said by telephone
from his campus office Monday.
Of course if the game were at
Duke it could be worse. It being a
home game for them doesn't
make it any easier. The mountain
just gets higher
Krzyzewski said the game's
location "is an advantage for us.
Hopefully, it will outweigh the
disadvantage of playing three
tough games Friday, Saturday
and Sunday
"We need an advantage the
way we feel said the Blue Devil
coach. It's an advantage we
earned
Duke earned the privilege of
playing at Chapel Hill by
defeating North Carolina 65-61 in
the finals of the Atlantic Coast
Conference tournament Sunday.
Arnie Ferrin, chairman of the
NCAA selection committee, said
in a televised interview Sunday
that the winner of the ACC
tournament was going to be
seeded second in Chapel Hill and
that the loser would have been
sent to Salt Lake City regardless of
the game's outcome.
Boston University, 23-7, earned
its berth in the NCAA tournament
by winning the ECAC North
Atlantic tournament. The Terriers
use a three-guard offense that is
led by Drederick Irving, who
averaged 20.1 per game this
season.
"They play good defensive,
man-to-man Krzyzewski said.
"They've got some good New
York City players on the team.
They can improvise and they play
well together as a team
Krzyzewski said the key to
playing in the NCAA tournament
is reducing a team's vision to "a
four-team tournament
The winner of the Duke-Boston
University game will play the
winner of the Notre Dame-
Southern Methodist first-round
game.
When asked about playing in

5
the East region, Krzyzewski
couldn't overlook defending
national champion Indiana, 1987
runner-up Syracuse and top-
ranked Temple.
"Not only are there very
talented teams in there, but they
are talented veteran teams
Krzyzewski said. "They have
excellent tournament experience.
You've got the two teams that
played in the championship game
last year. You've got the No. 1
team in the country. . . . It's as
tough as a region could be
Krzyzewski, sounding a little
hoarse, said the Blue Devil victory
in the ACC tournament
championship was "as tough �
game as I've been involved in, as
player or coach, in terms of
intensity
"We did not allow ourselves to
get tired Krzyzewski said.
"With all the bumps and bruises
everybody had, that was the key
to the game
When something like that
happens, when people pull
together like that, it makes it that
much more special
Krzyzewski is trying to guard
See DUKE page 16
I
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16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 17,1988

The best in hoops
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
won the title by holding off a stub-
born UTEP team 79-75 in the fi-
nals. Eric Leckner led the way for
the Cowboys by pouring in 22
points. The Cowboys face a stiff
test this afternoon in the West
regional when they face a runnin
gunnin' Loyola Marymount team
in first round action.
� � � ��
1. PURDUE (27-3) � 1 know, I
know. The Boilermakers lost a
game while we were gone away
on Spring Break. But since this is
the final poll of the season I've got
to stick with my preseason in-
stincts and put the Boilermakers
back at the top of the heap head-
ing into the NCAA tourney. In its
final game of the season, Purdue
routed Minnesota 93-66 to finish
atop the Big Ten Conference
standings with a 16-2 mark. I
don't think Temple could have
wound up with that good of a
mark in a conference as tough as
Purdue's. Troy Lewis paced the
win with 17 points, while senior
teammates Melvin McCants and
Everette Stephens chipped in 15
each. The Boilermakers will open
action in the tournament today
against Fairleigh Dickinson in the
Midwest Regional. This is Gene
Kcady's best chance yet for a na-
tional title, if he blows it this year
he might not ever get as good of a
shot.
to help the Devils win their sec-
ond tourney title in three years.
The Blue Devils will open play
today in the East Regional against
the Terriers of Boston University.
� � � � �
2. TEMPLE (29-1) � The Owls
rolled through the Atlantic 10
Conference Tournament like they
owned it last week. But, for the
most part, they did own the con-
ference this season as no team in
the league was able to bump off
the Owls. I'm still not certain
about this team's chances in the
tournament. They only played
two tough road games (North
Carolina and UNLV) and they
lost one of those. But with John
Chancy handing out the orders I
guess anything is possible. The
Owls will open play on Friday in
the NCAA against the 64th seed
� poor, defenseless Lehigh.
3. ARIZONA (31-2) � The
Wildcats capped off a sweep of
the Pac-10 Conference honors this
season by pulling off a resound-
ing 93-67 victory over Oregon
State in the title contest. The ease
that the Wildcats swept through
the tourney emphasized just how
far they are ahead of the rest of the
league on the hardwood. Sean
Elliot led the way to the victory
with 20 points, while Anthony
Cook fired in 19. The Wildcats
open play on Friday against Cor-
nell in the very tough West Re-
gional.
4. OKLAHOMA (30-3) � The
Sooners rounded out a sweep of
the Big Eight Conference basket-
ball titles by slipping past an
improving Kansas State club 88-
83 in the finals of the conference
tournament. Stacey King led the
way with an impressive 34-point
performance. The Sooners have a
good chance to make the Final
Four in Kansas City, however, an
off shooting night will send the
runnin' and gunnin' Sooners back
to the hotel where they will be
packing their bags and heading
back to Norman. Oklahoma
opens as the top seed in the South-
east Regional today against Ten-
nessee-Chattanooga.
5. DUKE (24-6) � The Blue
Devils snatched the privilege of
playing in the Dean Dome in the
opening two rounds of the
NCAA's right out from under
North Carolina's nose Sunday
when they captured the ACC
tournament title with a 65-61 vic-
tory over the Heels. Danny Ferry,
who was awarded the
tournament's MVP award, scored
19 points and hauled in 10 boards
6. KENTUCKY (25-5) � The
Wildcats held off upset-minded
Georgia 62-57 in the finals of the
Soutcastern Conference Tourna-
ment to sweep the league's regu-
lar season and post-season titles
for the season. Rex Chapman
scored 23 points in the title game,
which was the Wildcats 16th
postseason title in the conference.
Don't count out these guys on
making a trip to the Final Four.
The Wildcats hit the hardwood
Friday with a first round Souteast
Region game slated against
Southern University.
7. NORTH CAROLINA (24-6)
�The Tar Heels just can't seem to
beat Duke this season. The Heels
lost their third contest of the year
to the Blue Devils, 65-61, in the
finals of the ACC tourney. And if
you are supersticious at all don't
plan on the Heels being in the
Final Four. Dean Smith has never
guided his team to the Final Four
in a year that his club did not win
the ACC Tournament. But all
things must come to an end, right?
The Heels have a tough road to
plow in the West Regional with a
first round game slated for later
today against North Texas State.
A win their sends Dean Smith's
boys against the winner of the
Wyoming-Loyola Marymount
contest.
� � � � �
8. SYRACUSE (25-8) � The
Orangemen have gotten hot at
just the right time of the year.
Over the weekend they survived
the Big East foes to claim the tour-
nament title with an easy 85-68
victory over Villanova in the
championship game. Stevie Th-
ompson led the way to the victory
with 25 points, while Sherman
Douglas chipped in 24. The Or-
angemen should not be over-
looked as a possibility of making
it to Kansas City to battle in the
Final Four. Syracuse opens play in
the East Regional today against
North Carolina A&T.
12. LOYOLA MARYMOUNT
(27-3) � How this team was ever
chosen to be the 10th seed in the
West Region will always remain a
mystery to me. Loyola rolled to its
tourney title by running past
Santa Clara 104-96 in the finals. A
true test will come later today
when Loyola opens play in the
West Region against Wyoming. A
victory there would probably
mean a game against North Caro-
lina and a headache for Dean
Smith.
13. NORTH CAROLINA
STATE (24-7) � Many people say
that the Wolfpack has the bast
chance of any ACC team to make
the Final Four this year. I simply
say that Charles Shackleford
needs to do some alterations on
his game "dress The Wolfpack
lost a hard-fought contest to Duke
73-71 in the ACC semifinals and
were shipped to the Midwest
Region where they will square off
against Murray State in first
round action on Friday. If
"Shack" can put together some 40
minute games in the tourney, the
Pack will no doubt be tough to
handle.
� � � � �
14. BRADLEY (26-4) � The
Braves swept honors in their con-
ference this year by knocking off
Illinois State in the tourney finals.
Hersey Hawkins and the rest of
the Braves will now try to prove to
the country that they are as good
as they have been claiming to be
all season. The first test in the
NCAA tourney will be against
Auburn today in the Midwest
Region.
ence mark reeling to 12-6. Iowa
will hit the hardwood Friday in
the opening round of the tourna-
ment against Metro Conference
foe Florida State in the West Re-
gional.
18. KANSAS STATE (22-8) �
Although the Wildcats lost to
Oklahoma 88-83 in the Big Eight
Conference Tournament finals,
they proved they could play with
the big boys and could make some
noise during the NCAA Tourna-
ment. In the Big Eight title game,
Steve Henson pumped in 20
points, while Mitch Richmond
fired in 19 and Will Scott 17. The
Wildcats will take to the court
today against a pesky LaSalle
team in the Midwest Regional.
19. XAVIER (OHIO) (26-3) �
Xa vier rolled past Dick Vitale-less
Detroit 122- in the Midwestern
Collegiate Conference Tourna-
ment championship game to head
to the NCAA's with a head of
steam. Byron Larkin, who copped
the tourney's MVP award, was
true for 38 points in the landslide
victory. Xavier will play the Jay-
hawks of Kansas Friday in the
Midwest Regional's first round.
20. INDIANA (19-9) � Bobby
Knight has got the Hoosiers hit-
ting on all cylinders at just the
right time. The Hoosiers rocked
Iowa in the season finale by an
impressive 116-89 margin. Keith
Smart was the main man on the
scoreboard with a career-high
point total of 32, 24 of which he
poured in during the first half.
Dean Garrett also added 26, while
freshman sensation jay Edwards
checked in with 24. The Hoosiers
will battle Colonial Athletic Asso-
ciation champion Richmond in a
first round East regional matchup
on Friday.
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15. NEVADA-LAS VEGAS
(27-5) � The Runnin' Rebels
slipped and fell on their faces in
the Pacific Coast Athletic Associa-
tion Tournament semifinals when
California-Irvine scored a 74-70
stunning upset. The Rebels must
now pick up the pieces, brush
themselves off and polish their
game up in time to meet South-
west Missouri Friday in the West
Region.
� � � �
9. PITTSBURGH (23-6) � The
Panthers are falling off of late and
preseason hopes of a national title
are looking slim. The Panthers
lost to Villanova in the Big east
tourney semifinals by a 72-69
count. Jerome "Backboard Pain"
Lane and Co. will get things
cranked up in the NCAA's on
Friday when they play Eastern
Michigan in a Midwest Regional
showdown.
10. MICHIGAN (24-7) � The
Wolverines closed out their sea-
son in impressive style over the
weekend by disposing of Ohio
State 95-76. Glen "The Ice" Rice
led all scorers in the game with 29
points, while teammates Loy
Vaught and Gary "General"
Grant fired in 16 and 15 points
respectively. The Wolverines
were shipped out west to battle in
the West Region with a first round
matchup scheduled against a
pesky Boise State club today.
11. WYOMING (26-5) � The
Cowboys regrouped in the West-
ern Athletic Conference Tourna-
ment to gain the title and meet
some of the preseason hopes and
dreams of their fans. Wyoming
16. ILLINOIS (22-9) � The
Illini closed out the season in fine
fashion over the weekend by top-
ping Northwestern 79-74. Ken
Battle led the way with a 21-point
performance, while Nick Ander-
son filled up the rim with 17. The
Illini was sent to the Southest
Region, where they will open play
up in the tourney on Friday
against Texas-San Antonio.
17. IOWA (22-9) � The
Hawkeyes slipped and fell in
their final game of the season to an
up-and-coming Indiana team by a
depressing score of 116-89. The
loss sent the Hawkeyes confer-
Duke wants luck
Continued from page 15
his team from letting up after
winning its second ACC
tournament in three years.
"A dropoff might be seen if
you're not careful when you win a
league championship and you're
playing anybody, not just playing
Boston University he said.
There's just a tendency for all of us
to savor a championship and not
go on to the next thing
Duke's tournament title came
after the Blue Devils lost three of
their final four regular-season
games.
1 really don't think this season
has been a roller coaster. I don't
think of this as that much of a
turnaround Krzyzewski said.
"This has been a really great
year for us, winning 24 games. We
have been a very consistent
basketball team
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Two
NEW YORK (AT)
Coach Lute Olson seesa It
basketball teams in his hi
player on both the fii
second All-America team)
Junior forward Sean Ell
named to the first tel
Monday and senior guarj
Kerr was on the seconc
Olson said having two plJ
such high caliber has not
problem.
"The biggest thing is th�
so completely unselfish
don't care who scores
said after learning the t wol
from his second-ranked VI
were chosen. "Individual!
are the least of their cone
it's interesting to see inc
honors go with teai
perform well and it's
lesson for teams to learn, j
joining Elliot on the firJ
which was selected by
member panel of sportj
from the AP and its
newspapers, were senior;
Manning of Kansas,
Hawkins of Brad lev an
Grant of Michigan
sophomore forward JR.
North Carolina.
Elliot averaged 19 pon
5.8 rebounds for the WildcJ
were ranked No. 1 for sv
this season.
"To me I can't imagine
who could have done moi
!
The road
Rrst round
PdOt. .
tFanaigrOlOirw .
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lOaa�0M
� 9 3' c �" vxs ai Ciap� I4JLNC WJ � � Bo�w Unrwraftv -Z0- f
Softball
at home
for four
East Carolina's Softball
will enter its longest hoi
of the season this week wil
games scheduled at Varisr
The Lady Pirates
doubleheaders schedule
North Carolina WeslevanJ
Chapel Hill, Ohio Univers
Louisburg College. All gai
scheduled for 2 p.m. start;
The Pirates are currentKl
the season after pulling o
victory over UNC-VVilminl
the road Tuesday.
Pirate slugger Micke;
paced the way for ECU I
victory with a triple
homerun against the Sea
Pirate hurler Jennifer Sagl
up the win on the
marking her third win
season.
The victory over the So
snapped a three-game
streak for the Pirates. ECUl
0 decision to Eastern Con?
Saturday. The loss to
came on the heels of two
a doubleheader against
Marion on Friday.
Frances Marion toppl
Pirates 5-1 in the opening
while taking a 3-1 decisk
nightcap.
The Pirates opened ti
with seven consecutive v
The first win of the year caj
a 2-1 victory over Lander
The Pirate sluggers w
record winsoverGeorgia j
5), Tennessee Tech (10-1),
Michigan(l-O), Temple (7j
0) and Coastal Carolina (4
� TIM
:��
mm mm'
mmm





N
MARCH 17,1988
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 17,1988 17
1 White Bond)
3PY
loo
�AST TIMES
:kogetown shops)
eak!
r
"T
EPLAY
Service
55-5050
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He,
Two stars no problem for 'Cats
NEW YORK (AP) - Arizona
Coach Lute Olson sees a lesson for
basketball teams in his having a
player on both the first and
second All-America teams.
Junior forward Sean Elliott was
named to the first team on
Monday and senior guard Steve
Kerr was on the second team.
Olson said having two players of
such high caliber has not been a
problem.
"The biggest thing is they're all
so completely unselfish. They
don't care who scores Olson
said after learning the two players
from his second-ranked Wildcats
were chosen. "Individual honors
are the least of their concern but
it's interesting to see individual
honors go with teams that
perform well and it's a great
lesson for teams to learn
Joining Elliot on the first team,
which was selected by a 20-
member panel of sportswriters
from the AP and its member
newspapers, were seniors Danny
Manning of Kansas, Hersey
Hawkins of Bradley and Gary
Grant of Michigan and
sophomore forward J.R. Reid of
North Carolina.
Elliot averaged 19 points and
5.8 rebounds for the Wildcats who
were ranked No. 1 for six weeks
this season.
"To me I can't imagine a player
who could have done more for his
team than what Sean has done for
us Olson said. "We're sort of a
team, with the exception of Sean,
of role players and you better
have one fantastic player to go
with them, one who can create
opportunities for himself and his
team. He's probably the closest
thing to Magic Johnson that's
been around for awhile
The 6-foot-10 Manning, named
to the first team for the second
straight year, managed a fine
senior season despite injury and
academic problems that plagued
the Jayhawks.
"I think he's had a phenomonal
year considering we've had so
many problems this year, and it's
added extra responsibility to
Danny, and he's done a
tremendous job Kansas Coach
Larry Brown said. "It's an honor
to be a repeat choice and that
doesn't happen too often
Brown said Manning would be
missed at Kansas for reasons
other than his basketball ability.
"I don't think it's possible to
replace a player like Danny
Brown said. "I'm thrilled that we
had a chance to coach him and be
with him. The next step will be to
look back, see him play where he
does in the future, and have
unbelievable pride that we were
part of it. You don't replace kids
like him, but you benefit from
having had him
Manning, named Big Eight
player of the year as a sophomore
and junior, averaged 22.3 points
and 8.9 rebounds this season.
Hawkins, a 6-3 guard, enters
tournament play with a 36.0
scoring average, the highest since
Freeman Williams of Portland
State averaged 38.8 in 1977. He's
also the first player to score 1,000
points in a season since Williams
11 years ago.
"He's the consumate collegiate
player because he has an absolute
great demeanor for the game and
has seen every type of defense
thrown at him and he's
unflappable, yet remarkably
consistent, inasmuch as he's
averaging 36 points Bradley
Coach Stan Albeck said of
Hawkins. "The honor is super
and well-deserved as far as we're
concerned because he not only
elevated himself but our
program
Grant averaged 22 points and
6.9 assists this year and led the Big
Ten in steals three consecutive
seasons.
"I think ifs a well-deserved
honor not only because he was
outstanding this year but he had a
tremendous career Michigan
Coach Bill Frieder said. "He's one
of the few players over the years
that was instrumental offensively
and defensively game after game.
He made the big plays
defensively to turn games
around. He shut down a lot of
great players
Reid enjoyed a solid sophomore
season. The 6-9 forward averaged
17.9 points and 8.7 rebounds
while shooting 61 percent from
the field.
"He had an excellent year and
has improved in all areas of his
game from last season North
Carolina Coach Dean Smith said.
"Defenses on him have changed a
great deal from last season and
he's handled that well in doing
what's best for the team
Pittsburgh's Jerome Lane, who
was voted to the third team as a
sophomore last season, joined
Kerr on the second team this year.
Others on the second team were
Temple freshman Mark Macon,
Duke junior Danny Ferry and
senior Jeff Grayer of Iowa State.
The third team was Sherman
Douglas of Syracuse, Fennis
Dembo of Wyoming, Byron
Larkin of Xavier, Ohio, Will
Perdue of Vanderbil t and Michael
Smith of Brigham Young.
CUT IT OUT NOW!
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Present coupon to cashier along with your I.D. at ��-
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March Special!
Hot Bar & Salad Bar Only 1.99 per lb.
Same Great Quality! New Low Price!
Coors, Coors Light, &
New Coors Extra Gold
6 pack - 12 oz. cans. � 0
e
OVERTON'A
Suptrnfte
The road to Kansas
Rrst round
Putou 27 3
Second Regionate Semifinals
round
Semifinals Regionais Second
round
First round
�' 3e-e
Fartaigri Dickinson i23
1939
NCAA
IKNAiL
Kansas City � 1988
(M inn EST)
km-

Pontiac,
Mich
March 25 S 27 I
� Emm Ucmsaa,22-7,
Tacnpla (2S-i
7 37 p m Fri a: -amord Conr
iUhighgui
City. Mo
April 2
? Gaorgrto�m (19-8)
9 3Tsi c' a' -larttore Cor-
slSU(i�-13)

Sunday
Gaorflia Tocn J21-8)
i 0" p m -� a' rlajStiffj
, towl SUW (20-11)
i Indiana; 19-8,
Sunday
2 37p-r Fn atHarfloro Corv
� 3 Mcrimond "3�-6
sMtoaourl (19-10)
2 07 p rr Thurs at Clape miC
� Bhoda ktloid (�)


-� East
Rutherford
N.J.
March 24 & 26 I
�M)
Saturday
12 j'ct Tlim Cnap Hi NC
iiMortn Carolina ��T(2t-2)
- Skl (27-6)
ropin Tnura at C.ap� Hal N.(
� c Mono Porno (20-O
9 3p Tijs at Cfiap H NC
� Boston Unhwraftv (23-7i
Saturday
NATIONAL
CHAMPIONSHIP
Kansas City, Mo.
April 4
NCAA
2 37 prn Fn a Los Angeles
Com�(17-g)
SotonHM (21-12)
507 p m Fn at Los Angeles
UTEPJ23-9)
jgjjj (22-8)
9 07 p m Fn a! Los Angeles
Pjgm Siasa (19-10)
UWLV (27-S)
1141pm Fn at Los Angeies
amgjgjgl Mbiaourl (22-6)
Florida (22-11)
1141pm Thurs at Sad Lake Dtv
3t John's (22-11)
�(3�-7)
9-07 pm Thurs at Salt Lake City
n�sa�.g4-s)
Wyoming pn)
4 37 p m Thurs at Salt Lake City
LnyaH taarymrmm (27-3)
207 pjn Thurs M Salt Lake C�y
rltaa� ��H7-H)
Lfi"L
l(1t-10)
1207 p m Thurs at Atlanta
P"0)
A? 37 p m Thurs at All
1 Or�on mm (20-10)
�VU(3S-o)
707pm Thurs at Atlanta
North Carolns-Charloni (22-4)
�fl")
1207 pm Fn a! Oncmnali
2
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m Fn atGncmriM
-San Antonto (21-s)
l('7-t3)
IS2L
i
9 37 p m Fn at GncmnaD
nn(24-6)
Softballers
at home
for four
East Carolina's Softball team
will enter its longest home series
of the season this week with four
games scheduled at Varisty Field.
The Lady Pirates have
doubleheaders scheduled with
North Carolina Wesleyan, UNC-
Chapel Hill, Ohio University and
Louisburg College. All games are
scheduled for 2 p.m. starts.
The Pirates are currently 8-3 for
the season after pulling out a 9-6
victory over UNC-Wilmington on
the road Tuesday.
Pirate slugger Mickey Ford
paced the way for ECU in the
victory with a triple and a
homerun against the Seahawks.
Pirate hurler Jennifer Sagl picked
up the win on the mound,
marking her third win of the
season.
The victory over the Seahawks
snapped a three-game losing
streak for the Pirates. ECU lost a 8-
0 decision to Eastern Connecticut
Saturday. The loss to Eastern
came on the heels of two losses in
a doubleheader against Frances
Marion on Friday.
Frances Marion toppled the
Pirates 5-1 in the opening contest,
while taking a 3-1 decision in the
nightcap.
The Pirates opened the year
with seven consecutive victories.
The first win of the year came with
a 2-1 victory over Lander.
The Pirate sluggers went on to
record winsoverGeorgia State(6-
5), Tennessee Tech (10-1), Eastern
Michigan (1-0), Temple (7-2 and 3-
0) and Coastal Carolina (4-2).
� TIM CHANDLER
m m VALUABLE COUPON � ��
1
INTRODUCING
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PIZZAS
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10 toppings only
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(HO SOSSTtlUttOB Of DOiTtONS)
VSM vr �"�� couron " curtifuhrl WW CaeMrs Mrs vstrj
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Expires 3-31-88
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EC
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PI77AMENUSM
8pc
Cheese5.35
One Item6.05
Two Hems6.75
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Little Caesars Special 8.51
eops One and Ham)
Extra Items over 3 .70 .90 1.10
�Extra Cheese 1.50 2.00 2.50
CHOOSE FROM THESE TOPPINGS
pep. tajsHnoous. omons, hms. bacon, oround met.
nmm sausage, oree h peivcts. amchowes. mot pepwp, wnos
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REVEHAGES SM MJ2 LITER
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(Cast Tsnth Strest at OrscnvtUs Bhr4.)
757-1212
CAESARS SANDWICHES
Tuna Mett2.76
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f-anr. W�ar Theuaer Mara. G�ee ft Barsr
SPECIALTIES
Freshly Baked Crazy aead 1.19
A la a) tat mm SjaJ SaaM �� Ssf4 Buaar s pawoaai Cnaaai.
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stuiK
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Hours: 11.00 a.m. -11:00 p.m. Sun. 4-Thurs.
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KINGSTON
PLACE
When you fill out your Form
W-4 or W-4A, "Employee's
Withholding Allowance
Certificate remember:
If you can be claimed on your
parent's or another person's tax
return, you generally cannot be
exempt from income tax
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Pub Ik amcr of the? im
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Kingston Place will guarantee Apartment
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Who Sign Up Now.
Call 758-5393
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MO CLASS!1.1.






18 Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 17,1988

TM
SAVINGS 0 THE GREEN!
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SAVE
40f

SINGLE
HAMBURGER
992
SAVE
94
Valid only at Participating Wendy's- Please present
coupon when ordering One coupon per Customer
visit. Not valid with any other offers Cheese
�tra Tax extra where applicable.
EXPIRES ArRIL 15,1988
BIG CLASSIC
COMBO
$1.99
Big Classic, Regular Fries, Medium Drink.
Valid only at Participating Wendy's. Please present
coupon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit. Not valid with any other often Cheese
extra. Tax extra where applicable.
EXFIRES AfRIL 15,19
SAVE
94 c
CHICKEN
SANDWICH
NOW ONLY
$1.49
Valid only at Participating Wendy's. Please present
coupon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit Not vaLd with any other offers. Cheese
extra. Tax extra where applicable.
EXPIRES AfRIL 15,1988
SAVE
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99�
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94
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75c
75� OFF
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75
wm $1-99
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Valid only at Participating Wendy's. Please present
coupon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit Not vabd with any other offers Cheese
extra Tax extra where applicable.
EXPIRES APRIL 15, 1988
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THE PRICE OF ANY
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coupon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit. Not valid with any other offers Cheese
extra. Tax extra where applicable
EXPIRES APRIL 15, 1988
75� OFF
THE PRICE OF ANY
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Valid only at Participating Wendy's. Please present
coupon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Cheese
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EXPIRES APRIL 15, 1988
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coupon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Cheese
extra Tax extra where applicable.
EXPIRES APRIL 15, 1988
SAVE
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REGULAR SIZE
CHILI
SAVE
20
REGULAR SIZE
CHILI
Valid only at Participating Wendy's. Please present
coupon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Cheese
extra. Tax extra where applicable.
EXPIRES APRIL 15, 1988
Valid only at Participating Wendy's. Please present
coupon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Cheese
extra. Tax extra where applicable.
EXPIRES APRIL 15, 1988
SAVE
40 c i
vm
SINGLE
HAMBURGER
99�
SAVE
94 c i
SAVE
50c
BIG CLASSIC
COMBO
752 OFF
I Valid only at Participating Wendy's. Please present
1 coupon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Cheese
' extra. Tax extra where applicable.
EXPIRES APRIL 15,1988
Big Classic, Regular Fries, Medium Drink.
Valid only at Participating Wendy's. Please present
coupon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Cheese
extra. Tax extra where applicable
EXPIRES APRIL 15,1988
SALAD
Valid only at Participating Wendy's. Please present
coupon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit. No' valid with any other offers. Cheese
extra. Tax extra where applicable.
EXPIRES APRIL 15,1988
Valid only at Participating Wendy's. Please present
coupon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit. Not valid with any other offers Cheese
extra Tax extra where applicable.
EXPIRES APRIL 15, 1988
SAVE
94c n
BIG CLASSIC
COMBO
$1.99
Big Classic, Regular Fries, Medium Drink.
Valid only at Participating Wendy's. Please present
coupon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit. Not valid with any other offers Cheese
extra. Tax extra where applicable.
EXPIRES APRIL 15, 1988
SAVE
751 OFF
!W
SALAD
Valid only at Participating Wendy's. Please present
coupon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit. Not valid with any other offers Cheese
extra. Tax extra where applicable.
EXPIRES APRIL 15, 1988
S A V E
Wenny
SINGLE
HAMBURGER
99�
Valid only at Participating Wendy's. Please present
coupon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Cheese
extra. Tax extra where applicable.
EXPIRES APRIL 15,1988
nnn
��m4p
mmmmmm
The best burgers
in the business.
���wmmmmmmmmm-





Title
The East Carolinian, March 17, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 17, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.596
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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