The East Carolinian, March 3, 1988






���
The East Carolinian wishes you a
safe and happy spring break. See
you when we get back.
NTERTAINMENT
Earlvis heads out on a spring break vacation. See
page 7
SPORTS
Pirates get ready for the CAA tournament this
weekend. See page 11.
Mil
" "in
She
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 No. 42
Thursday, March 3,1988
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Speaker says avoid military
By LAURA SALAZAR
Suf � H r;ter
Bill Galvin, a field representa-
tive from the Central Committee
for Conscientious Objectors, ad-
dressed a group of approximately
15 people Tuesday about the
"militarization of students
CCCO provides numerous serv-
ices for members of the military as
well as people considering enlist-
ment or confronted with draft
registration
leave the military or ROTC.
Galvin said, "We also deal with
discrimination complaints, and
people who go AWOL (absent
without leave) that is a fairly
common thing that we deal with
these days
CCCO also focuses on educat-
ing the public about certain as-
they are getting into. Galvin said, was the militarization ot schools.
"Most enlist because they can't Galvin said, "Militarization is ot
find a job or are wondering how our whole society, not just
they're gonna get money for their schools, but it has specific effects
education on schools
As for the military's purpose, Galvin cited two effects of addi-
Galvin said, "The military's pur- tional defense spending on the
pose is not to train you for techni- military. They included federal
cal skills, but it is to prepare for and state funds to schools being
pects of the military. According to and to fight wars cut and stipulations such as regis-
Galvin, "Another aspect of our Galvin added that skills learned tering with the selective service in
work has to do with educating in the military are not always order to be eligible for federal aid.
people in general, and young transferable into the civilian Galvin said that women may
"CCCO was originally founded people in particular about what world. He said, "Even if you do have to sign-up for the draft if
to help people who were running the military is about and what it get a training in a technical skill � they are in a medical profession,
into conflict with the government means that's not really what the military According to Galvin, "Women
and state because of their objec- About enlistment, Galvin said is all about what it's really all going into the medical profession
tions with this (the draft) Galvin CCCO has learned from military about is being prepared for fight- may be facing the draft in the next
said. In addition, Galvin said the counselors that most people enlist ing wars two years He said a law has been
The main topic of discussion passed which would require per-
sons in the medical professions,
men and women, to be drafted in
time of war or emergency.
Concerning ROTC in high
schools, Galvin suggested imple-
menting an alternative program
which could be devised by profes-
sional educators. The program
would stress peace.
CCCO sponsored an "Inter-
view a Veteran Contest which
involved a student interviewing a
Vietnam veteran. The student
would then express him or herself
See GALVIN, page 2
CCCO helps those who want to in the military not knowing what
Staying safe on spring break
Ways to prevent rape
circumstances � hitchhike.
t a party, club, gathering etc
leave with strangers, be
doi.t
By REBECCA VALENTINE
Staff Writer
This coming week brings ECU'S
spring break, it also brings fear of
the unexpected rape. Accord-
ing to published statistics, in the
U.S. there is a rape every 60 sec-
onds and over 25 percent of col-
lege age women will or have been
raped or have been the victim of aware of your andor his alcohol
attempted rape. Another 45 per- and drug content, don't day
cent know someone that has been dream when walking out in the
raped. More than 50 percent of open and be aware of potentially
rapes are by friends or relatives.
Rape isn't a sexual assault, but
more a serious, violent crime
against women. Most rapists
aren't even interested in love or
lust, but instead want to dominate
and humiliate women. Eighty-
1 4 tank of gas in your car, never perfume un cue eyes, etc.
help male strangers, park in well If a rape does occur, police also
lit areas, always, when walking to encourage that you keep a de-
vour car, keep your car keys in scription of the rapist and scene in
hand, use horn in intense situ- mind. Don't wa �v dry clean
ations and never � under any
See RAPE, page 2
Bill Galvin spoke about the militarization of students Tuesday at the
Baptist Student Union. Here he looks over some of the literature he
brought for the students. (Photo by Jon Jordan � Photolab)
, . . � - � � ��- �
UNC Board policy stresses education
harmful surroundings. Always
go out in groups in new cities,
keep police and emergency num-
bers in mind, and know the loca-
tions of nearby phones.
Try to let people know where
you are going and when you will
five percent of rapes can be pre- return also. Police encourage self-
vented; by a little precaution, defense by screaming, threat of
preparation and awareness, your menstruation or venereal disease,
chances of attack can be reduced vomiting and urinating. Noise
by half, according to Janet may be your only weapon, there-
Johnson, chairperson of ECU'S tore tne earner you yen me ucuc
Sexual Assault Awareness
Committee. you in court.
With spring break coming up, Rapes don't occur always with
extra precautions are in order to young attractive women. Rape
lower the risk of rape, Johnson often has occurred to women be-
said. To begin with, on the drive tween the ages of 5-85. Officials
down: keep car windows 12 of urge women to take self-defense
the way up, keep money for emer- classes and try to carry non-con-
gencies, always check the back- ventional weapons such as
seat when entering your car, keep whistles, mace alarm devices,
By LYNN JOYNER
Staff Writer
from ECU's present penalties. But for the (education, counseling, well as campus policy on illegal
the university's education, coun- and rehabilitation) services. It use of the drug.
In order to help combat the seling and rehabilitation services also calls for more staffing
problem of illegal drug use on are expected to improve greatly. ECU Chancellor Richard R.
North Carolina university cam- The Educational Program Eakin says that the improved
puses, the UNC�Board of Gov- Dr. Ronald P. Speier, associate Committee is also working on a educational program "should
ernors has adopted a policy on dean and director of student serv- brochure that will help explain help all students whether they are
illegal drug use. jces says the Educational Pro- ECU's policy on illegal drugs. The illegal drug users or not. I hope
The policy will affect the 16 gram Committee is "currently brochure will list categories of that we can be so successful with
institutions of the University of writing a grant that will go to the drugs (including alcohol), give the prevention and education of
North Carolina system, and each U.S. Department of Education examples of each, state health illegal drug use that we can mini-
asking for $100,000. This money implications concerned with the mize the enforcement and penal-
will allow us to get more materials drug, and give the state law as ties aspect of the policy
institution must create their own
policy which meets the basic re-
quirements of the policy adopted
Noise also cannot be held against bythe Board of Governors. These
requirements include specific
areas of education, counseling
and rehabilitation and the area of
enforcement and penalties. Each
board of trustees is required to
adopt a policy for its particular
university by the 1988 Fall
semester.
The penalties for illegal drug
use in the new policy differ little
Sun can bring tan, but also cancer
By ANDREW ROSE
Staff Writer
Soaking up the sun will un-
doubtedly be the pastime of
choice next week, more so than
even drinking. A sun tan sets off
clothes and highlights hair, but
experts say it also increases the
chances of catching cancer
the introduction of vorofluoro- This is begining right now and
carbons (CFS), ice particle clouds general warming trends can be
containing chlorine and meteor- expected to continue as infra-red
oligical shifts classified now as light bounces off the gas shield in
phenomena. the troposphere in an increasingly
Most scientists agree that the large fashion,
amount of CFS in the air must be This gas shield is formed by
curtailed or abolished. One area burning fossil fuels and other
of major concern is in the atmos- natural or man made carbon diox-
According to Consumers Re- phere about 20 miles above Ant- ide causing agents,
search Magazine, one out of every arctica where the ozone is thin- In order to protect yourself in
seven Americans will develop ning rapidly. long periods of sun exposure,
skin cancer. Two types related According to Time magazine, a especially during the peak sun
most directly with ultraviolet study found that the amount of tanning hours, use a high level of
radiation exposure are basal cell ozone had dropped 50 percent by sun block, preferably above eight,
and squamous cell carcinoma. the end of last summer or polar
One cause of increased ultra- thaw. This is up 10 percent from a
violet radiation in the tropo- 1985 study,
sphere, the 10 mile air space be- With the depletion, certain
tween the earth and the ozone events can begin to occur in a
layer, is ozone depletion. There meteorological or climatic chain proaches the ozone thins out
are many factors quickening the reaction. One event being investi- world wide culminating in the
breakdown of ozone, including gated is the "green house effect fall with the measurable thinning.
NCSL teaches students how to govern better
The ozone hole may not appear
to be as bad as the studies show
during the spring and winter
months, but as �e S'lmnc 3p-
ByKIMLEYEDER
Staff Writer
The North Carolina Student
Legislature (NCSL) is a statewide
organization that allows students
to get a chance to see firsthand
how our government really
works. The NCSL is, in fact, a
"model legislature that gives
students a chance to participate
actively in debate. The NCSL is
also the official student voice to
the North Carolina State Legisla-
KOlling O D��tl� The prirrSy objectives of the
This isn't quite the way we rolled beetles as kids, but as times change so do our pranks. Someone "rolled" f�?1 � 2
this Beetle one night this week, leaving its owner with quite a mess to clean up the next morning. The P���1? ff?2 rT J?Z
inside was stuffed with more toilet paper and magazines. (Photo by Hardy Alligood - Photolab) �j�4hnd sfSta
debate, and 3) providing the offi-
cial college student voice to the
NC General Assembly. About 40
percent of the resolutions passed
in the NCSL in the past have been
voted on in the General Assem-
bly, and eventually became law.
The NCSL is comprised of ap-
proximately 27 schools statewide,
and ECU's delegation is one of the
most active with two elected offi-
cials in office and one appointed
official. The club participates ac-
tively in interim council meetings,
and in the annual session held
each year in Raleigh.
The interim council is a meeting
of delegations from two or more
schools, something like a confer-
ence that lasts over the period of
about one weekend. These are
held once a month in September,
October, November, January,
February and April to propose
and decide on bills to be taken to
the statewide annual session,
which is held for five days in
March.
This annual session is when all
the proposed bills are presented
to the entire NCSL, and are de-
bated on much in the same way
that Congress or the General As-
sembly would operate. Each pro-
posal must go through the same
commmi t tees and paths as a regu-
lar bill in the real legislature.
The NCSL mcetsevery Monday
night at 7 p.m. in Mcndcnhall, and
See NCSL, page!
' iimpMiMP�ini fTT
mamt-tt� irmti .m�r�'� ' �m ��' ���� � ' m3f:





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 3, 1988
Vistors to Davtona Beach beware
The Davtona Beach Area has
become one of the largest resort
centers in the nation. Each year we
are host to thousands of vacation-
ers, race fans and conventioners.
In order to maintain a Citv that
you will enjoy visiting again and
one that our citizens are proud oi.
certain laws and regulations must
be observed by everyone. In order
to make your stay as pleasant and
safe as possible, some oi the more
important ordinances and stat-
utes are provided herein for vour
review. Please obey them.
Over the past years, injury and
death has occurred to some visi-
tors who climb balconies at the
motels. This practice is illegal and
is considered disorderlv conduct.
an arrestable offense
State Statute 509.143.
PEACH SAFETY
Florida
1. The speed limit on the beach
is 10 mph at all times.
2. Driving in the water or soft
sand on the occanbeach is prohib-
ited.
3. A person can not sit or lie on
the beach in a driving or parking
area, except while in a vehicle
Sitting or lying between parked
vehicles is prohibited.
4. balls and frisbees can not be
thrown across traffic lanes.
5. Motorists shall at all times
yield the right-of-wav to pedestri-
ans on the beach.
h Motorists must take precau-
tions before parking or moving a
vehicle to avoid injury to any
person or property.
7. Animals are not permitted at
any time on the beach, except
seeingove dogs
S Tamping or sleeping over-
night on the Atlantic Beach Ocean
is prohibited.
9. Pricing on the beach at night
is prohibited.
HI Swimming within ISO feet of
the Ocean Tier is prohibited.
11 Changing tides place limita-
tions on ocean beach parking. In
order to avoid having your ve-
hicle towed for safety reasons,
al
ways remain in the vicinity.
MOTORCYCLE SA FETY
1. Motorcycle riders must olx�y
all general traffic rules and
reguzlations.
2. Motorcycles must bo
equipped with stock mufflers.
3. Motorcycle handle bars must
be no more than 15 inches above
the portion of the seat occupied by
the driver.
4. Approved motorcycle safety
nelmets must be worn at all times
5. Headlights must be in
operation at all times.
6. Mufflers required - must be in
good working order to prevent
excessive or unusual noise or
smoke. No muffler cut-out or
bypass.
7.1 leadlights required - to be on
at all times; positioned no higher
than 54 no less than 24" from the
ground.
8. Tail lamp - not less than 20"
from the ground, no higher than
72
9. 1 lorn and rear view mirror
required.
10. Footrcsts required - both
riders and passengers.
ORDINANC i s
1. The carrying or consuming ot
an open alcoholic beverage (in-
cluding beer) is prohibited on the
beach and City streets. This ap-
plies to pedestrians and occu-
pants of motor vehicles.
2. It is unlawful for any person
under the age of 21 years to pos-
sess alcoholic beverages or t()
misrepresent or misstate his or
her age to buy alcoholic bever-
ages.
3. Hitchhiking is prohibited
within the City limits ot I aytona
Beach.
4. Littering is prohibited
5. Trespassing on Motel Prop-
erty where you are not registered
as a guest may result in vour ar-
rest.
For further information
the Community Relations( i
Prevention Unit, Daytona &
Police Department at (904) :
1431
Carelessness can lead to thefts during spring break
Thank goodness spring break is
upon us. For some students it is
off to Florida to soak up some rays
and have a good time. Others will
go home tor a visit, some to work
or just plain relax and enjoy the
time away from it all. There is
nothing worse than having it all
spoiled by carelessness
v nether you live on campus or
not there is nothing more frustrat-
ing than to have had a great time
away only to return to find that
you have been ripped oii. That is
why it is important to take certain
steps before you leave to help
assure your return will not be a
disappointing one. The following
steps may help assure you have a
safe and enjoyable spring.
As you are preparing to leave:
close and secure all windows and
transoms above doorways; do not
hide your keys outside your resi-
dence or room; if possible, take
your valuables with you (money,
jewelry, stereo, etc.)if you can't
put them out oi sight; place your
bicycle in your room to help guar-
antee it's security or make sure it
is properly registered and se-
cured in a designated bike rack.
In addition, unplug and turn off
all unnecessary electrical appli-
ances etc. to help prevent a pos-
sible fire. Vehicles, including
freshmen, left on campus after
Friday should be parked in the
following areas to help assure
their security: College Mill �
parking lot in front of Tyler hall or
on College Hill Drive near the
dorms; West Campus�Menden-
hall parking lot or lot behind
Greene I tall. No vehicles should
be left on or off campus in any
otherarcas. Freshmen will need to
move their vehicles back to fresh-
men parking areas before 8 p.m.
March 13 to avoid being ticketed
or towed.
Use Rape Prevention
Galvin speaks on alternative
Continued from page 1
by creating something. Galvin
said that most of the creatings
were essays, but students were
free to create works oi art or even
videos. Deadline for contest en-
tries was in January, but judging
has not been completed.
Galvin was a conscientious ob-
jector during the Vietnam War.
The draft board turned down his
claim oi being a conscientious
objector. Galvin was not drafted,
but he said that he decided that he
il i rather go to jail rather than
going into the military. "Fortu-
said Galvin, "I didn't
have m do that
Galvin joined CCCOs staff in
1980. He is a graduate of Prince-
ton Theological Seminary. His
thesis at Princeton was on the
United Presbyterian Church's
response to the Vietnam War.
Galvin is currently on the Na-
tional Committee of the Presbvte-
rian Peace Fellowship.
Galvin said, "CCCO is commit-
ted to trying to make this job for
you ail easier. We arc a resource
group for groups like you all to
address these issues (on militari-
zation). We are willing todo what
we can
Continued from page 1
anything that could be used as
evidence either. Officials say not
prosecuting is one of the largest
encouragers oi rapists.
If vou are attacked, remember
J
there is nothing you can do to the
rapist whichisasbad aswhatheis
planning to oo to you.
Tilings to look for in a potential
rape:
Rapists
�Hostility towards women
�Sexists views
�Bossiness, abrubtness
�Alcohol, drug content
Surroundings
�Secluded, dark
�Potentially dangerous
�Look for open areas, public
phones
�vary routes to places
�keep on pathways
�use your own transportation
Yourself
�Hands free
�Protection
�Comfortable dress
�Looking alert
NCSL meeting
Continued from page 1
is open to anyone who is inter-
ested in politics, learning how our
government operates, or who just
wishes to participate. This week-
end, Feburary 26-28, the ECU
chapter hosted an interim council
meeting here, with meetings held
in the Brody Building. Guest
speakers included Greenville
Citv Mavor Ed Carter and Chan-
cellor Richard R. Fakin
(Mje �afit Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since l)2ri.
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Anne Leigh Mallory dames Rosso
Shari Clemens Adam Blankenship
Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTI 11.V RATES
0 49 Column Inches
50-99
lOO 149
ino 199
$4.25
4 15
4 05
Campus Notes
More players arrested
Two members oi the ECU
football team were arrested
Tuesday on assault charges in
connection with separate inci-
dents over the weekend accord-
ing to university officials.
The arrests brings to five the
number of ECU football plavers
arrested within the last two
weeks. Three members of the
team were arrested last Thurs-
d.w, two for assault on a female
and one for aiding and abetting,
t Mowing an incident Feb. 21 in
Scott Hail.
University spokesmen said
Michael Shane 1 lubble, IS, of St.
Petersburg, Fla was charged
with assault and damage to
personal propertv in connection
with an "altercation" Saturday
J
afternoon.
Another "altercation" Satur-
day night resulted in the arrest
oi Ernest Edward Logan II, 19,
of Spring Lake, on assault
charges, the spokesman said.
Logan is a starting defensive
end, while Hubble is a reserve
linebacker for the football team.
Officials said both incidents
occurred in parking lots on Col-
lege Hill, but that they were not
related. Both plavers are sched-
uled for trial in District Court on
March 14.
Sources say both men have
been suspended from the foot-
ball team pending the outcome
of the trial.
200 249 � hf
250 and above 75
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
(Charge tn Addition lo Regular Space Rate)
One color and black $90 00
I v.o colors and black 155.00
Inserts
5.CXX) or less 6c each
5,001 -10,000 cccach
10,001-12.000 5 eh
Phones
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
757-6366757-6557
757-6558757-6309
Program Board named
lonya batizy, a senior Hnghsh
major, was named assistant to
the president for the ECU Stu-
dent Union for 1988-89 accord-
ing to Karen Pasch, the 1988-89
president.
In addition, Pasch said her
selections for the Program
Board (Student Union commit-
tee heads) for next year have
been approved by the Student
1 nion Board oi Directors.
I he new chairpeoplc, and the
committees thev lead, arc:
Stephen Sommers, Major Con-
certs; Heidi Deudney, Visual
Arts; David Mayr, Films;
Carolyn Jones, Minority Arts;
Dcnise Pope, Travel; Craig In-
b.aham, Pu! !u Relations and
Publicity; Marianne Kunz, Spe-
cial Concerts; Allen Manning,
Forum; Shauna Kennedv, Cof-
feehouse, and Cindy Gray, Pro-
ductions.
There is still an opening for
the Special Events committee
chairperson, Pasch said, and
applications will be taken in the
Student Union offices in Men-
denhall.
Pasch said the program
board, which includes � in
addition to the committee chair-
people � herself, Batizy and
advisor Ken Hammond, is re-
sponsible for budgeting and
programming for the Student
Union.
Symposium to be held
Afro-American novelist
Paule Marshall will be the key-
note speaker of the African
Roots of Southern Culture svm-
J
posium to be held on campus
March 14.
Marshall will speak on the
role of women in passing on and
reclaiming their African heri-
tage.
The symposium will include
panel discussions on African
Cultural Traditions and African
Family Organization. At 6:30
p.m. there will be a soul food
dinner based on African foods
transplanted in the New World
in the Mendenhall dining room
sponsored by the Minority Arts
Committee. Tickets for the din-
ner are $4 and can be purchased
in advance at the Central Ticket
Office or at the door.
The free symposium is spon-
sored by a grant from the North
Carolina Humanities Commit-
tee, the African Studies
Committee, the Women's Stud-
ies Committee, the Minority
Arts Committee, the Honor
Program and the English De-
partment.
Sales
Available
The East Carolinian
is now accepting applications
for advertising sales
representatives.
Requirements:
Previous Sales Experience
Excellent Communication Skills I
Good Organizational Skills
Must Have Own Transportation
Basic Computer Knowledge
Apply in Person at The East Carolinian
Please Include Resume
Publications Building
(In Front of Joyner Library)
Must be ready to start training April 1st.
No Phone Calls Please!
Israel
(' PS) Israel's repressu
Palestinian protestors in re
weeks has convinced m
American student Zionists,
reluctant to criticize Israel
licly tor tear of encouraging
Semites, that Israel should
outol the Gaza Strip and
the Jordan River
I hey say Israel's
' . of Palestiniai
are "hard to ex �
lews make louse c
said (,il Margulis, a I
itv sophomore ai
ie Rutgers -V- .
m and Israel
Margulis
by Golda ' I i
minister � wael
traged) is not the) -
hut that tli.
theii
The situal
ens to drive j ivt �
rael and I
communil
And tl
what tiu '�
Mark I
Was
I ou
Prepping
Scholastic v
ration
to raise S '�
nts, ac( '
I by R
ECl educati - -
Robert P.
dci �
tud v
tudei - ��
nal N.C i
dents' scores
More money for 's
Students
erally art.
and hieher star:
last veer's grads
Placement Com
ported Feb. 12.
In its preliminary asso
bow student
grossed sine SojiiWri
the CFC found the stock
crash on October 19 has had v
ally no effect on corporate rec
ing of new grads c ei
masters or business
tion decrees
Petroleum engineei
are dome, best
starting salary offers f $
said CPC spokeswoman
Culick.
The CFC N
versity and Mi
versit) all publish
how mane companies .�
campuses to recruit ea
In their forecasts re
December, both Northwes
and Michigan State predu
crash would narrow si
prospects somewhat as
tions, worried that a rect
would follow, said the) v
ting their hiring In pei
I hoOV last week said pre
nary feedback from I
officeson 153campus
companies have not - J
their hiring after all.
In fact, many types ot m
say starting suiar - a;
ing
Accounting crads tor insUJ
are getting average salai
of $23,376, a 7.5 percent mcrj
over the average
the CPC reported
Pick Up A Pa
Eclipse bu Willio
pense by the bes
Brothers bu Will
thon Man.
Texasville bu bo
Picture Show
Outbreak - bu R
gling intrigue an
Fine Things bu
creating lovable





4
rules
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 3,1988
u tul tor any person
he aci ot 21 years to pos-
c beverages or to
or misstate his or
I alcoholic bever-
is prohibited
;v limits of Daytona
g - prohibited.
g on Motel Prop-
u are not registered
result in vour ar-
rmanon, contact
DelationsCrime
� Daytona Beach
tment at t04) 255-
arolinfan
?25.
rti sing
� entdtives
5SO
k ship
ERTISING
-
RATES
5 5�
l RS:
0 p.m.
1" �-6557
6309
-J
n
tions
nee
Skills
ills
tation
dge
t.
Israel takes criticism from student activists
(CPS) � Israel's repression of
Palestinian protestors in recent
weeks has convinced manv
American student Zionists, long
reluctant to criticize Israel pub-
licly for fear of encouraging anti-
Semites, that Israel should pull
out of the Gaza Strip and the West
Bank of the Jordan River.
They say Israel's beatings and
shootings of Palestinian protest-
ers are "hard to excuse
"Jews make lousy occupiers
said Gil Margulis, a Rutgers Uni-
versity sophomore and president
of the Rutgers Associaion for Zi-
onism and Israel.
Margulis cited a remark made
by Golda Meir, the late prime
minister of Israel. "The ultimate
tragedy is not they kill our boys,
but that they force our boys to kill
theirs
The situation, he said, "threat-
ens to drive a wedge between Is-
rael and the American Jewish
community
And this division, he thinks, is
what the Arabs want.
Mark Bromberg, a junior at
Washington University in St.
Louis, also branded some Israeli
policy decisions as "astrocious"
while still considering himself a its values again. "I believe in Israel as a modern they're handling the situation (on
Zionist and serving on the board Seeing the present unrest as "If I have a vision of what a democracy Hovis said, "based the West Bank). There must be a
of diretors of his campus Jewish "the manifestation of 20 years of Jewish state should be and could on the Jewish tradition of justice better way than beating people
Appeal. occupation" � as well as an in- be, I can't stay here and complain and decency; a modern democ- Like the other students inter-
Bromberg criticized the Israeli dictment of Jordan, which occu- about what it's not. I have to go mrv with a Jewish heart or Jewis1" viewed for this article, Cohen felt
government's decision to force pied the land before Israel and there soul" Americans were getting a slanted
open the shops during a general also refused to integrate the Pales- She also worried the "tragedy" Thc image of Israel as an op- view of the situation from the
inians into society or cede land to would persuade people around prcssor caused Sharon Cohen, a media.
the Palestinians � Adelsbcrg the world to think "all Israelis, all Washington University of St. Leery of speculating about so-
thought the time is right for a Jews are oppressors. The country Louis freshman, to lose "some lutions, Cohen felt strongly that
"territorial compromise. This was is torn apart respect for the state and its poli- strongly that "violence won't
"Israel shouldn't occupy other tics hclpnd that the situation would
territory or administer other "I've always supported Israel, only worsen unless the unrest
peoples Hovis emphasized. but Im not happy with the way was settlor!
strike on the West Bank. "They
should have been left closed and
protected
He called the government's
decision to abandon tear gas as a
weapon against demonstrators in
favor of beatings "a major mis-
take
But like Margulis, Bromberg
felt that "considering the situ-
ation and the age of the Israeli
soldiers, their methods are not
that severe. The number of deaths
is not as great as might have
been
Jonathon Adelsbcrg, a Brandeis
University junior, stressed he
remained a Zionist � someone
who supports a Jewish homeland
before conceding he's had
not true 5 years ago.
"Israel will have to acknowl-
edge Palestinian nationalism.
They need a moderate Palestinian
group to negotiate with. I blame
Israel for not seeking one out
"The hope for peace may ap-
pear as a dream said Adelsbcrg,
"but the potential for settlement is
there
Joanne Hovis, a University of
Wisconsin sophomore, described
herself as "disappointed and up-
set" by Israeli's handling of the
West Bank disturbances, an occu-
pation that was "wrong from the
UNC Student leaders support Bob Jordan
RALEIGH - Lieutenant Gover-
nor Bob Jordan will announce at a
news conference Thursday that
most of the Student Body Presi-
dents within the 16-campus UNC
system have endorsed him for
Governor.
"I am so glad to have this group
supporting me Jordan said, "be-
cause these people are the future
of our state. It's great to have more
young people, more young ideas,
and more young energy in my
campaign for Governor
Most of the Presidents who are
endorsing Jordan will attend
DeVane publishes
ECU News Bureau
Jay DeVane, a graduate student
it-week of dollars and promising high in anthropology at East Carolina
review course. Brown said the gains on SAT scores. Company University is the author of an
course placed an emphasis on originated statistices used to en- art scheduled for publication
practical skills, such as those courage customers to purchase in, The Journal of Man, a nation-
tested on the SAT. The students' theur products should be viewed ally-circulated anthropo ogical
scores were raised bv an average with some caution particularly Purnal Published at Wichita State
Robert P. Peele, a graduate stu- of 71 points. when the product is relatively Ucrsity'Kan,saS- c, 1T
dent. The review course, provided by expensive to the customer "
Thursday's news conference with
Jordan. It will begin at 11 a.m. and
will be held at the Bob Jordan For
Governor Headquarters on
Hillsborough St.
One of those who will attend is
the Student Body President at
East Carolina University in
Greenville, Scott Thomas.
"We as students are extremely
grateful to Bob Jordan. He has
shown dedicated and devoted
service to primary and secondary
education, as well as to the state's
University system, throughout
his public life Thomas said.
"Furthermore, he provides us
with a bright vision for the fu-
ture
"difficulty dealing with what's beginning,
going on now She has lived in Israel, visited
"A supporter of Israel must be there, and the country has "a cen-
willing to criticize Israel. Criti- tral place in my life In spite of the
asm oi the U.S. doesn't negate West Bank and Gaza uprisings,
support of the United States and she plans one day to live there
Prepping helps raise SAT scores
Scholastic Aptitude Test prepa-
ration courses have been shown
to raise SAT scores by 20 to 120
points, according to a study con-
ducted by Robert ML Brown, an
ECU education professor, and
The study, done with a group of Horizon for Learning Ltd cost
19 high school students from re-
gional .C, relied on the stu-
dents'scores both before and after
More money for '88 grads
BETHLEHEM, Pa. (CPS) �
Students of the Class of 1988 gen
ECU's study contradicts a
studv done at Harvard Univer-
J
sity, but Brown said "That is not
unusual. Different results are
common in investigations of this
$80 per person. The cost was
shared by each individual student
and the county Board of Educa-
tion.
These types of courses and
training aids have become very effective in helping this group of
popular and are big business for students.
the companies that sell them, ac- Brown said "Coaching at least
era lv are getting more job offers CQrdi Bro but h(? wams hd the studcnts to bQCome
and higher starting salaries than that; �farenls should cautious tcs wisc and XOK to their maxi-
last year s grads, the College
Monkey Business is DeVane's
sixth publication. It is based on an
interview with Dr. Laura Vick of
UNC-Greensboro; an instructor
at the primatology summer
Placement Council (CPC) re-
ported Feb. 12.
In its preliminary assessment of
how student jo� hyujnghOJ2l�
jessed sinoPSepHrtblyR?,
the CPC found the stock market
crash on October 19 has had virtu-
ally no effect on corporate recruit-
about courses costing hundreds mum ability
Senate commends athletics
� - tCUNews4)uieau commending the athletic depart-
The faculty senate of East Caro- ment and it was adopted unani-
lina University formally com- mously. Smith said he under-
mended the ECU athletic depart- stands that ECU is the only UNC
type He said the coaching was at MorSan Island'S �,
DeVane graduated from West-
ern Carolina University in 1983
with a degree in English and re-
ceived a degree in anthropology
from UNC-Greensboro two years
later. He is a member of Lambda
Alpha and Alpha Kappa Delta
honor societies.
��������������
WINNER TO RECEIVE CASH PRIZE AND COMPETE ON CBS
ANNOUNCING THE 1989
MISS NORTH CAROLINA USA and MISS NORTH CAROLINA
TEEN USA PAGEANTS
l'1')ep'm(fy ptrMj r-J fy T A MWfMI lot
NORTH CAROLINA S ONLY
PRELIMINARY TO THE
MISS TEEN USA
MISS USA
and MISS UNIVERSE PAGEANTS
NO PERFORMING TALENT REQUIRED
The search is or to fina Miss North Carolina
USA 1V89 and Miss Nor.h Carolina Teen USA
1�8� Entrants will be judged or beauty poise
and personality The Miss North Carolina USA
and Miss North Carolina Teer USA pageants
will be held or the weekend o Augus: Sth
To find out is you quality fill out the following
request form and return it to
THE 1989 MISS NORTH CAROLINA
USATEEN USA PAGEANTS
co TEL-AIR INTERESTS, INC
1755 N.E. 149 STREET
MIAMI, FL 33111-1099
or ca.
(305) 944-326
1
TAMMY TOLAR
MISS NORTH CAROLINA
USA-19SS

TEENUSA-19M
PLEASE SEND ME INFORMATION ON THE 1989 MISS NORTH CAROLINA USA
TEEN USA PAGEANTS
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ing oi new grads, even those with ment Tuesday for completing the system Division IA school to have
masters of business adminstra-
tion degrees.
Fetroleum engineering majors
are doing best, getting average
starting salary offers of $33,432,
said CPC spokeswoman Dawn
Gulick.
The CPC, Northwestern Uni-
versity and Michigan State Uni-
versity all publish forecasts of
how many companies will visit
campuses to recruit each year.
recent football recruiting period recruited an entire group that
without requesting any special meets normal academic require-
admissions. ments. Prospective athletes who
The 50-member faculty senate do not meet the requirements
applauded director of athletics academically may be admitted
Dave Hart Jr when Hart reported under special provisions, or
����������������������
111 ii���������
that of ECU's two dozen football
signces "none will be special
admits
Dr. James LeRoy Smith, profes-
sor of philosophy and former fac-
ulty chair, offered a resolution
Proposition 48.
Hart addressed the faculty sen-
ate on his goals for a "total sports
program" for ECU. "We will not
at any time, sacrifice integrity foi
success Hart said.
In their forecasts, released in
December, both Northwestern GerOIltolOgV COntereilCe tO DC hlCl
ECU News Bureau
A conference on issues relating
.to older people and their health
will be held March 16 at East
Carolina University.
The second annual Spring Ger
and Michigan State predicted the
crash would narrow students' job
prospects somewhat as corpora-
tions, worried that a recession
would follow, said they were cut-
ting their hiring by 5 percent.
The CPC last week said prelimi-
YOUR
PIRATE PRIDE
STAY ON TOP OF
WHAT'S HAPPENING
nan- feedback from placement ontology Conference will be held
offices on 153 campuses indicated at the Willis Building (Regional 3:30 p.m.
speakers including Dr. Elizabeth
Welch of Winston-Salem, Dr.
Harold Kallman of the ECU
School of Medicine and Dr. Eliza-
beth Knott of the ECU School of
Education.
The conference will adjourn at
companies have not scaled down Development Institute). The
their hiring after all. theme for the conference is
In fact, many types of majors "Building Bridges in Gerontology
say starting salary offers are ris- and Geriatrics
ing. Dr. Cary Kart of the University
Accounting grads, for instance, of Toledo, will open the confer-
are getting average salary offers ence at 9:45 a.m. with a presenta-
of $23376, a 7.5 percent increase tion, "Research and Practice in
over the average July, 1987 offer, Gerontology: Bridging the Gap
the CPC reported. He will be followed by other
Everyone with an interest in
issues related to the aged popula-
tion is invited to attend the confer-
ence. There is no charge for ad-
mission.
Those who would like to attend
are asked to contact the Office of
Continuing Education at East
Carolina University at 757-6321.
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SUf lEaat (Untalxmnxt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, gmm
Clay Deanhardt, M�,r�,�
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, Director of Advertising
Tim O iandler, s e�
John Carter, rmt, &��
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TOM FURR, CircuUium Mmager
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John W. Medlin, mom�
Mac Clark, b�s.�� M�na$rr
March 3.1988
OPINION
Page 4
Break
Be safe, have fun
It's time again for that wonderful next week, especially if your trav-
week of fun in the sun, hedonism elling a great distance by road.
and pure relaxation known as Remember that drinking and driv-
Spring Break. ing don't mix.
Like the all-star breaks in profes-
sional sports, Spring Break is a time This issue of The East Carolinian
to catch our collective breaths before contains some information on hav-
launching into the second half of the ing a safe and fun Spring Break, as
spring semester. well as a set of codes from the Day-
Unfortunately, Spring Break can tona area concerning beach safety.
ilso be a time of tragedy. Students They were sent to us by the local
are often injured and sometimes government at Daytona in hopes of
2ven killed when they throw care to preventing accidents and misunder-
the wind in a moment of madness, standings.
Don't become a statistic. Be careful Have a safe and relaxing break.
In defense of theBonehead
Campus
Forum
Good book says Swaggart bad
To the editor:
I arn writing in response to David
Williams' letter on March 1. I have a
certain respect for Jimmy Swaggart
and I do not judge him. As Williams
stated, Matthew 7:1 states, "Judge
not, that ye not be judged (KJV)
Personally, I do not judge Swaggart.
"I wish not to cast a stone and I know
thatall have sinned, and come
short of the glory of God (Romans
3:23) Williams made a good point, but
ho only used every quote that Jim
Bakkcr could bring up.
However, Williams never men-
tioned anything from the book of
Malachi. Malachi 2:2 states, "If ye not
hear, and if ye not lay it to heart, to
give glory unto my name, saith the
Lord of hosts. I will even send a curse
upon you, and I will curse your bless-
ings: yea, I have cursed them already,
because ye do not lay it to heart
(KJV) This can be roughly translated
as a message to priests whom were
not giving glory to God's name or
living as a good example. Many
people ignore the old testament be-
cause they have misunderstood
Paul's letter to Galatia. He mentions
love as an alternative to vigouous law
abiding, but Jesus mentions in Mat-
thew 5 how is not abolishing law.
I am not saying that David does not
know what he is saying. I am only
wanting to explain that a priest needs
to be an example for his people. He
only admitted to his actions because it
would be surfaced anyway. It was
still good of him and I have some
respect for him. He should not have
been so hypocritical toward Jim
Bakker. Sure Bakker is a crook, but
now that Swaggart is in the ring with
the adulterers, he does not want to be
stoned. Swaggart is a good man but
he needs to look over his own per-
formance. If David would have
looked at Matthew 7:3 he would ha e
read, "Why do you look at the spc ck
of sawdust in your brother's eye nd
fail to notice the plank in your own?
How can you say to your brother, 'Let
me get the speck out of your eye
when there is a plank in your own?
You hypocrite! Take the plank out of
your own eye first, and then you can
see clearly enough to remove your
brother's speck of dust (MEV) This
was Jesus' words to everyone, includ-
ing Swaggart.
James Riddle
Freshman
Business
To the editor:
In Tuesday's edition of the East
Carolinian, Chippy Bonehead took a
lot of abuse from people who read his
article dealing with Jimmy Swaggart,
a Jesus-shouting hypocrite who was
caught with his pants down at a very
inconvenient time. People, who
probably tripped on Jim and Tammy
Faye jokes for weeks, came galloping
to the rescue of Brother Jimmy, and in
doing so trampled the old calcium
cranium into the proverbial dust.
What gives?
In the first letter, Mr. Bonehead was
told by a freshman Art major that his
column is so boring that "it makes my
teeth hurt To which I reply "If it's so
boring, don't read it I am not posi-
tively certain, but I don't think the
Bonehead will lose much sleep over
your sore teeth. Maybe you need to
see a dentist.
The second letter, written by an-
other one of those freshman Art ma-
jors, was a page out of a religious text
- written by Joe Biden. After cutting
through the cliches, the descriptive
language, and Increase Mather's wig,
I managed to find the key sentence to
1 the whole letter. The last paragraph;
i.e "It hurts God and me wait just
a minute. I looked all over the page
and found not a single letter or com-
ment from Jehovah. Climb back into
the good ol paint closet, sniff a few
fumes, and make sure you didn't
misquote him. God and I thank you.
While I am on my Swaggart kick, let
me be the the one to attest to the honor
and respect we could have for a man
who ruined the lives of two equally
honorable and respected members of
our humble race (Aman, Aman,
Brother Jim and Sister Tammy),
screwed around behind his wife's
back with a whore, and managed to
"persuade" millions of people to foot
his little tab down at Miss Kitty's Cat
house. Nuts.
As far as being a racist, I dunno.
Let's just put it down to being another
comment from an excellent writer
who was trying to alleviate the stress
of writing humorous anecdotes about
a world that is going to pot faster than
Brother Jimmy could say "Pass dat
plate, I feel a resurrection comin' on
Thanx, Bonehead for waking us up
after economics class, and keep the
shi -1 mean the articles - goin
Peace- Blake Johnson
Freshman
EronBasket Weaving
Sommers satirical
To the editor:
I respect Steve Sommers' monetary
contributions to help in the arrest and
conviction of those involved, but I
doubt seriously that the degrading
and malicious act of defacing the
AFROTC sign was done by a person
or persons fearful of the U.S. Armed
Forces. The painting of the swastika
and mushroom cloud could very well
have been done, in revengeful spite,
by one or more of those students as-
signed to AFROTC that have to trans-
fer to another school or change their
major concentration. On the other
hand, it may not have been done by a
student of this educational institution
at all.
In light of all this, I don't believe
that any American citizen has any-
thing to fear with the presence of a
military defense system. And I be-
lieve that the majority of the Ameri-
can people, democratic or republican,
would agree with me on this. If the
U.S. government didn't support our
military defenses, it is highly prob-
able that this country would be under
the rule of fascist naziism or commu-
nism.
This country proved the necessity
of a defense 200 years ago when the
colonial U.S. defeated the British and
gained freedom. In the words of the
famed philosopher of the seventeenth
century Enlightenment, John Locke,
it's the "natural right of every person
to life, liberty, and property Well, I
don't know about everyone else, but I
want to keep this right; and if it means
supporting the military, I will do so.
I don't necessarily agree with nu-
clear defense, but as long as other
parts of the world contain them, I
wouldn't feel safe without them. I
wish all nuclear arms could be abol-
ished.
Our military system may not be
perfect, but at least they strive for
perfection. Sometimes you have to
fight fire with fire, for example, the
bombing of Libya after a wave of ter-
rorism supported by that country. I
then felt much better for Americans
and others traveling abroad.
The symbols painted on the AF-
ROTC were bad enough, and even
painting on a sectioned snake with
the words "Don't Tread On Me"
wouldn't have made it right. Being a
veteran, I believe it's written some
where in the UCMJ (Uniform Code ol
Military Justice) that the defacing of a
military establishment is prohibited.
Steve, you may not be a comrade-
in-arms, but I consider you a compa-
triot, and I, too, hope that the perpe-
trator or perpetrators are appre-
hended.
Brendan Kelsh
Junior,
Comminications
True democracy
To the editor:
The agenda has been set. We are to
think about how others see us as indi-
viduals. We are to think about our
money, our cars, our classes, our sex
lives. It is natural that we think about
what affects us now, this weekend, or
this semester. It is natural that we
think about what affects us here, in
our homes, in our town, at our school.
The agenda has been set; we all
helped put it in place, and it concerns
only what is right before us, what we
can touch and, whaV we can see.ev
there is another agenda that is to
many, hidden. It commands the at-
tention of only a relative few.
We do not, as members of the first
world society, invest much time
thinking about the atrocities of
power. To do so would increase
global awareness to the point where
such atrocities could not occur. The
good people of the overdeveloped
nations would not remain politically
inactive while starving to death. Yet,
indirectly, we cause the death and
starvation of millions. What does it
mean when roughly half of the reve-
nue collected through taxation in this
country is spent to increase levels of
militarism? Are we not already
armed to the gills?
The truth is that our good country,
as represented by our government
and its military system, is quite ca-
pable of destroying human life on
planet Earth. That this can be so,
while so many starve, is the real
crime.
I ask that you demand justice. True
democracy is peace. Do not let the sick
few infect us all. We are one people.
Brotherhood must prevail.
John Stamat
Senior
Gephardt looks like the viable Dem. candidate
i
The son of a Missouri milk man could very well
be the next president of the United States.
Of the four democratic presidential hopefuls,
Jessie Jackson, Albert Gore and Richard Gephardt,
who have campaigned in Greenville, Gephardt
stands as the most viable candidate for the nomina-
tion.
Gephardt's strong stand on the need for trade
policy reforms set him apart from all the other
Democratic candidates as well as the the Republican
candidates. At the heart of Gephardt's beef with the
existing Reagan trade policies is the growing trade
deficit which has caused the devaluation of the
dollar and has barred the growth in a competitive
world market.
Gephardt says that tariffs levied on American
goods abroad are not equal to the tariffs the US
imposes on incoming products from other countries.
In a speech Monday he used the price tags of two
cars, one American and the other Korean, to support
his argument.
In America, consumers can buy a Korean made
Hyundai for about $7,000 while a comparable
American car, the Chrysler K car, costs about
$10,000. But in Korea, a K car with upteen added
import tariffs costs $48,000. Something isn't right
here. Gephardt proposes increasing US import tar-
iffs so that American goods can be competitive in
both the domestic and world markets.
Gephardt is the most viable Democratic candi-
date because he has a stand, unlike the other Demo-
crats who base their campaigns around knocking
Gephardt. By the way, Gephardt is the son of a milk
man.
Al Gore, a rich good ole boy from Tennessee, on
the other hand, takes a much needed stand on agri-
cultural policy. Gore has said that the next president
of the US needs to support the small family farm, but
Gore hasn't actually said what programs he would
implement as president to reverse the tide of farm
disclosures and unstable commodity markets.
Gore expressed in a speech in Pitt County last
week that in the Senate he has always supported,
and will continue to back a major principle of North
Carolina agriculture; the tobacco farmer. But Gore
should support tobacco, he and his daddy grow it in
Tennessee.
Both Gore and Gephardt have one element
going in their favor; their age. It seems voters today,
just as voters in 1960, are a little tired of having an old
fogie in the White House. In 1960, John F. Kennedy,
the youngest elected president, succeeded Ike Eisen-
hower, one of the oldest men to hold the countrs
highest office. This phenonemon may reoccur in
1988 as the elder statesman Reagan gives the power
reigns to the likes of a Gore or a Gephardt.
Both Gore and Gephardt have something else in
common; they both acuse each other of reversing
stands which they once held as law makers in their
respective campaigns. Previously, both men voted
for anti-abortion legislation and now they both take
a pro-abortion stand. Gephardt, who once sup-
ported tax credits for private schools has recanted
that stand in his campaign. Gore, who once voted
against taxes on imported oil has been whistling
another tune as his campaign reached the barren oil
fields of Texas. Both men have flip-flopped their
stands, but so what.
Voters who can't decide between Gephardt and
Gore, are not alone. Senator Sam Nunn from Georgia
said it best, "I'm not ducking it, I just haven' decided
who I'm going to vote for yet
According to a Feburary 27 New York Times-
CBS News Poll, Gephardt held 12 of the Demo-
cratic vote while Gore placed 4th on the poll with 8.
Jessie Jackson has 13 of the voters polled.
Jackson stands in second place behind the present
front runner Micheal Dukakis who claims 21 of the
vote. After March 6, Super Tuesday, these percent-
ages should swing in favor of southerners Gore and
Jackson.
Reverend Jackson brought his campaign to
Greenville with a promise to improve the "common
grounds" of the south. Jackson's plees to help the
poor is bringing to the light the issue of the 41 million
poor Americans, most of whom live in the south.
Finally, a candidate is making the southern poor an
issue.
On farm issues, Jackson said the Reagan agri-
cultural policy has failed because there is a lack of
farm loans. What Jackson didn't say is that expendi-
tures on farm loans and federal farm subsidies has
more than tripled in the 8 years of the Reagan admin-
stration. Does Jackson think that we should increase
the $27 billion agricultural aid program?
POLITICAL ANALYSIS
By
TIM HAMPTON
While the other Democratic candidates have
said that the country needs a broad increase in
education, Jackson has specifically said that there is
a need for an increase of finanicial aid for college
students. For all the students who wait in the long
finanicial aid lines, Jessie Jackson hears you.
But Jackson has never held a political office. He
has no experience in dealing with Congress. While
he will receive a majority of the black vote, the;
delegates will not be enough to carry him in the
Democratic Convention in Atlanta. Jackson's fate
centers on his qualifications to govern, not the race
issue.
Studeni
(CPS)�The Palestinian "uprib
ing" � as it's called in the Arab
world � arrived on American!
campuses in recent weeks.
Students at the universities (
. Idaho, Arizona, Minnesota, UtahJ
V Oklahoma, Iowa, Colorado, .V
��A braska-Omaha and Missouri, a?
jVell as Michigan State, Western!
Michigan, Washington State uni-
versities, among others, have rai-
led for a Palestinian homeland in
the Mideast and against Ism-
violent repression of Palestini
protesters in the Gaza Strip a
along the West Bank of the ford ,
River.
But Palestinians on Amer I
campuses say U.S. student- a
whole still don't fully embr
their cause.
Citing anti-Arab prejudice,
vocal Jewish comminity syn
thetic to Israel the very complex
ity of Middle Hast issues and j
attraction of ether political iss
Abdulrahman Al-Hadlaj
president of the University
Idaho Muslim Students A-
tion, thought student involve-
ment in his cause might be I
ited.
Yet Al-Hadlag predicted tlv.
movement would "snowball. A�
people come to understand th(
issue, it will grow. But it will tak
a long time
Nevertheless, noted Westen
Michigan Prof. Sami Esn
"There arc thousands of stud.
from the West Bank and C
Strip in American colleges. I
communicate with their im.
there, they know what's going onl
and they're using this oyt
nity to speak out
Many are trying to cultivate
support among native born
dents.
Howell n
ECU News Bureau
Dr. John M. Howell, chancelk
emeritus of East Carolina Unive
sity, will serve as chairman of
statewide cpmmittee to make rd
oramendations on new doctor
defereV ryrSKams- tbr'JriuH
school administrators.
Howell was appointed by D
Raymond H. Dawson, senior vi
president for academic affairs f
� the UNC general administrate
Also appointed to the commits
i were representatives of the Sta
V)epartment of Public Instructioj
School administrators and urj
versitv educators.
Committee members includj
Frank Gadsden, an area superuj
tendent for the CharlotteMecl
lenburg Schools; Dr. G. Thorn
Houlihan, Granville Coum
Schools superintendent; D
Charles R. Jenkins, vice chana
lor for academic affairs at Pe
! ke State University; Robert
Phay, director of the UNC-Chapl
Hill Institute of Go vernment Prij
ripals' Executive Program: D
Foundation
calls for
engineers
(CPS) � More students need)
major in engineering, the
tional Science Foundation (N
warned last month.
If they don't, the U.S. will U
its competitive edge in scieij
and engineering, NSF Direc
Erich Bloch told a joint meetinej
the American Physical Sock
and American Association
Phvsics Teachers.
Bloch said a greater percent
of students need to be lured u
science because there are sim
fewer young people in the pod
lation. If they're not tempted a
the field, there will bo a short,
of scientists in the nation, regaj
less of how well funded scion tj
projects are.
"Fewer young people increal
the importance of attractil
women and minorities to scie
and engineering Bloch said.
NSF is the chief source of fed
funding for nonmedical al
nonmilitary research.
Ironically, as the number
Americans who enter science
engineering decline, more
i more foreign students earn td
nical degrees. Foreign stude5
Yearn one-fifth of the science C
ferates, one-third of the mat
krtarics doctorates and more tj
nf of the engineering doctor j
awarded in the United Statesr
year.
�ii�Km�mmmi mi mvmmmm'timmnnmmmim9wi1' ' '
, �: � � ��
�"�- ' � "i l"r"lIHj-
m �� -�






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 3,1988
ehead
the defacing of a
nt is prohibited.
t he a comrade-
ler you a compa-
v (hat the perpe-
rs are appre-
Brend an Kelsh
Junior,
Comminications
inocracv
isbi n set. We are to
m rssceusasindi-
1 think about our
ir lasses our sex
at we think about
this weekend, or
natural that we
iffects us here, in
�wn, at our school.
been set, we all
ice, and it concerns
before us, what we
U we can see. Yet
nda that is to
mmands the at-
. e few.
�mbers of the first
invent much time
jt the atrocities of
rvould increase
the point where
aid not occur. The
the overdeveloped
not remain politically
rving to death. Yet,
cause the death and
ons What does it
ly half of the reve-
r igh taxation in this
crease levels of
re we not already

Students protest against Israel
CCPS)�The Palestinian "upris-
ing" � as it's called in the Arab
world arrived on American
campuses in recent weeks.
Palestinian speakers at a na-
tional leftist student convention
held at Rutgers University Feb. 5-
7 were warmly received by the
700 students in attendance, who
Students at the universities of agreed to place the issue on their
Idaho, Arizona, Minnesota, Utah, agenda in upcoming months.
h h�ma' lowa' Grionuio, Ne- American students, some say,
s braska-Omaha and Missouri, as are attending the U.S. campus
i
� our good country,
ur government
ry system, is quite ca-
stroying human life on
That this can be so,
nany starve, is the real
u demand justice. True
peace. Do not let the sick
us all. We are one people.
d must prevail.
fohn Stamat
Senior
didate
n said the Reagan agri-
iled because there is a lack of
cson didn't say is that expendi-
md federal farm subsidies has
.ears of the Reagan admin-
n think that we should increase
iltural aid program?
AL ANALYSIS
By
HAMPTON
� Democratic candidates have
y needs a broad increase in
s specifically said that there is
se of finanicial aid for college
students who wait in the long
essie Jackson hears vou.
never held a political office. He
n dealing with Congress. While
najoriry of the black vote, the
be enough to carry him in uV
tion in Atlanta. Jackson's fate
ficatiens to govern, not the race
the Mideast and against Israel's
violent repression of Palestinian
protesters in the Ga7j Strip and
along the West Bank oi the Jordan
River.
But Palestinians on American
campuses sav U.S. students as a
whole still don't fully embrace
their cause.
Citing anti-Arab prejudice, a
vocal lewish comminity sympa-
thetic to Israel the very complex-
ity oi Middle Past issues and the
attraction of other political issues,
Abdulrahman Al-Hadlag, the
president oi the University oi
Idaho Muslim Students Associa-
tion, thought student involve-
ment in his cause might be lim-
ited.
Yet Al-Hadlag predicted the
movement would "snowball. As
people come to understand the
issue, it will grow. But it will take
-i long time
Nevertheless, noted Western
Michigan Prof. Sami Esmail,
"There are thousands of students
from the West Bank and G:
Strip in American colleges. They
communicate with their families
there, they know what'sgoingon,
and they're using this opportu-
nity to speak out
Many are trying to cultivate
support among native born stu-
dents.
tal and oppressive face Sanham
said.
The wider activity on U.S. cam-
puses, said University of Utah
student Salem Ajluni, a member
ion of Palestin-
JPS) "is directly
ing. Thisupris-
protest U.S. "foreign pol- ing is unprecedented in its intcn-
icy flaws sity and breadth. It's bound to
The United States continues to lead to support
stand bv Israel at a time when the Palestinians here are cultivat-
rest of the world is condemning ing support, too, from students
Israel Esmail concurred. "Many opposed to apartheid in South
students feel they have a moral Africa, with which Israel - - de-
duty to take offense at that
Esmail saw the demonstrations
n American campuses as "an
extension of what's happening on
he West Bank and Gaza Strip
.vhcre thousands oi Palestinians
temporarily" encamped when
he then-new nation oi Israel was
iHacked bv Arab armies in 1948,
ind which Israel itself took over
ind has occupied since 1967.
In December, 1987, Palestinians
n the terroritorics � frightened
v Israeli conservatives urging a
permanent takeover of the area
and frustrated by being left off the
agenda at an Arab summit meet-
ing � abruptly took to the streets
with rocks and protests.
Israel's army, in response,
switched from a policy of using
tear gas to break up the crowds to
one of using beatings and live
ammunition.
Israeli soldiers since have killed
and other governments have con- apartheid movement,
demned Israel for using excessive "It's not that organized said
force. Herman Ruther of the Palestine
"Israel is showing its very bru- Human Rights Campaign. "But
spite an international boycott �
continues to trade military goods.
Though in the past anti-apart-
heid activists have feared alienat-
ing the Jewish leaders and follow-
ersof their movement by support-
ing the Palestinians, their reluc-
tance seems to have melted away
in recent weeks.
In San Francisco, several anti-
apartheid activists were arrested
after blocking the entrance to the
Israeli consulate with a shanty in
December. Anti-apartheid activ-
ists have co-sponsored Palestin-
ian rallies at a number of colleges,
including Missoure, Pcnn State
and Idaho.
"There's a lineageon campuses,
to build coalitions from our previ-
ous work on South Africa said
the American Committee on
Africa's Josh Nessen, one of those
arrested. "The role Israel plays in
South Africa is a pressing issue,
at least 60 people and injured one that forces us to look at the
hundreds oi others � many of
them rock-throwing children �
while rooting out and exciling the
riot leaders they could find.
The United Nations, the U.S.
situation of the Middle East.
Palestinian activists, of course,
would like to see their cause
embraced with as much enthusi-
asm on campuses as the anti-
thcre's evidence it's moving in
that direction. Black Americans
appreciate the similarities be-
tween Isreal and South Africa,
and between themselves and
Arab-Americans
The evils of South Africa's
apartheid system, said Ajluni, "is
more clear cut, at least as it's per-
ceived by Americans
It's a complicated issue said
Ruther. "People are reluctant to
get hung up on it. Many fear
they'll be branded anti-Semitic if
they criticize Israel
A vocal, influential lobby stifles
criticism if Israel in this country,
Al-Hadlag contended, asserting
that extremists such as the Jewish
Defense League routinely
threaten Arab activists, hoping to
scare them into silence.
"The Israeli lobby is very pow-
erful he said. "It cuts politicians'
courage and intimidates the me-
dia
Moreover, many Americans
distrust Palestinians as bomb-
throwing terrorists.
"The myth of the Palestinian as
a terrorist is dying Ruther said.
"You can no longer dismiss the
Palestinians as terrorists when
you see kids throwing rocks and
bottles shot down by Israeli sol-
diers. Arabs are becoming more
and more a part of American soci-
ety. They're all around us now,
and they're not so different from
the rest of us. They're not a 20th
Century holdover of our enemies
from the Crusades
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
and frozen yogurt
?A
v
321 East 10th Street, Greenville
758-4896
IT'S GIRL SCOUT COOKIE TIME
STOP IN
Buy Any Girl Scout Cookie Item
Get the 2nd Half Price
Good Thru Monday (3-7-88)
Maximum
Value
$1.20
Maximum
VaJuc
$1.20
ONE-STOP
COPY SHOP
We copy, collate, and hind.
We make enlargements, reductions,
transparencies, and overlays.
We take passport and I.D. photos.
We sell paper, pens, tape, and other office
supplies.
We are open early, open late, and open
weekends.
We are your one-stop business copying
center.
kinko's
Great copies. Great people.
321 E. 10th Street (919) 752-0875
Monday - Friday 7:00am - 10.00pm Saturday 9:00am - 6:00pm
RACK ROOM SHOES
Howell named to committee
ECU News Bureau
Dr. John M. 1 lowell, chancellor
emeritus of East Carolina Univer-
sity, will serve as chairman of a
statewide committee to make rec-
ommendations on new doctoral
defcrfctf pVams WrRflfi
school administrators.
Howell was appointed by Dr.
Ravmond H. Dawson, senior vice
president for academic affairs for
v the UNC general administration. Preparation of Teachers which
i Also appointed to the committee reported to the 1987 General As-
i were representatives of the State sembly. Among its recommenda-
V3epartment of Public Instruction, tions was the implementation of a
school administrators and uni-
versitv educators.
Debra W. Stewart, vice provost chide more course work in such
and dean oi the graduate school at areas as personnel management,
N.C State University; Dr. Albert finance and practical statistics,
L. Walker, dean of the N.C. A & T with "less emphasis on research
University School of Education and theory
and Joseph B. Webb, assistant "There was agreement among
stale superintendent for instruc- Task Force members that the PhD
tional services, N.C. State Depart- and EdD degree now offered in
ment of Public Instruction. educational administration are
The committee is an outgrowth better suited to university faculty
of the state Task Force on the than to senior school administra-
J BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
� Memorial Drive
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
'i.
imi.i
l�" m
Open MonSat. 10-9
Sunday 1-6
10 OFF
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(EXCEPT AIGNER. NIKE AND REEBOK)
Committee members include:
Frank Gadsden, an area superin-
tendent for the CharlotteMeck-
lenburg Schools; Dr. G. Thomas
Houlihan, Granville Countv
Schools superintendent; Dr.
Charles R. Jenkins, vice chancel-
lor for academic affairs at Pem-
ke State University; Robert E.
Phay, director of the UNC-Chapel
Hill InstitutcofGovernment Prin-
ipals' Executive Program: Dr.
Foundation
calls for
engineers
(CPS) � More students need to
major in engineering, the Na-
tional Science Foundation (NSF)
warned last month.
If they don't, the U.S. will lose
its competitive edge in science
and engineering, NSF Director
Erich Bloch told a joint meeting of
the American Physical Society
and American Association of
Physics Teachers.
Bloch said a greater percentage
of students need to be lured into
science because there are simply
fewer young people in the popu-
lationlf they're not tempted into
the field, there will be a shortage
of scientists in the nation, regard-
less of how well funded scientific
projects are.
"Fewer young people increases
the importance of attracting
women and minorities to science
and engineering Bloch said. The
NSF is the chief source of federal
funding for nonmedical and
nonmilitary research.
Ironically, as the numbers of
Americans who enter science and
engineering decline, more and
more foreign students earn tech-
, nical degrees. Foreign students
Yearn one-fifth of the science doc-
foratcs, one-third of the mathe-
krlatics doctorates and more than
aV of the engineering doctorates
awarded in the United States each
year.
"rigorous" doctoral degree pro-
gram designed specifically for
senior school administrators.
Constituting three academic
years of graduate study, the pro-
tors he said.
The committee, which met for
the first time Feb. 24, will report its
recommendations to the UNC
General Administration this fall.
ECU is one of several campuses
being considered to offer the new
education doctorates.
Announcing his choice of
Howell to head the study commit-
poscd degree is to be designed as tee on the new degree program,
a first professional degree for UNC Vice President Dawson
school principals and superinten- commented on Howell's "long
dents, along the lines of the pro- standing interest in and commit-
fessional degrees JD and MD in ment to the improvement of the
the fields of law and medicine.
Dr. Howell, who served on the
Task Force, said the degree being
considered would probably in-
education of public school teach-
er- and administrators
"He is an ideal choice to lead
this study Dawson said.
FREE HOUSING
Spring Break and Summer Employment at
NAGSHEAD N.C.
2 blocks from restaurant and no transportation needed
s
�MB
LOW COST
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional coat. Pregnancy
Test, Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy Counseling, For
further information, call 832-0535 (toll free number 1-800-
532-5384) between 9 a m. and 5 p.m. weekdays. General anes-
thesia available.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Mc5onatrs
1
For more information
contact Polly Harris
P.O. Box 1572
Kill Devil Hills, NC
27948
(919) 441-4129
4
KINGSTON
PLACE
DONfT WAIT
Kingston Place will guarantee Apartment
Space For School Year 1988-89 For Those
Who Sign Up Now.
Call 758-5393
AFFORDABLE, LUXURIOUS
FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
BUILT SPECIFICALLY FOR
ECU STUDENTS.
mw
SUMMER TANNING
SPECIAL
10 Visits $30.00
318 S. Evans St. Mall 758-8553
Present this ad for additional 10 off.
m w �� fc
- � m V .
i�U�i






V
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 3,1988
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
DRIVER WANTED to pick up small
lcxl ol furniture in Phila for GreenviUe
delivery sometime in March. Your truck
or mine. Call 756 INS.
ARE YOU A college student bored with
your classes and in need of spending
money? Are you enthusiastic, depend
able and excited about working in a fash
ion environment1 Brady's and Brady s
tor Men have part time openings for
ir lividuals able to work flexible hours
.ppty at Brad) s Carolina Fast Mall M
W : 4 p m
HELP WANTED: Waiters and wail
resscs tor restaurant near Atlantic Beach.
Apply at 2IS Front St . Beaufort, N (
WESTERN S1711N now accept
tions tor part time waitresses
Must bo available to work weekends,
pry in person at Western Sizzlin on
10th Street.
ROOK BUYER earn while you learn'
Make your own hours Be your own boss
books for local book company. Kc
spond to Carolina Book Services Box
Greenville N C 27836
HELP WANTED: Fart time interior de
sign student-send resume to. Designer,
3010 Cast 10th Street. Greenville, N.C.
Rl SIDENT COUNSELOR: interested in
those with human service background
wishing to gain valuable experience in
the neld No monetary compensation,
however room utilities and phone pro
MarvSmith, The REA1 Crisis
Center, 758-HELP.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOIO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, KK East
Sth ST km (beside Cubbies) Greenville
N C 752-3694.
FOR SALE
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING AND WORD Processing Let
ter Qualtiv Laser Printing Rush
accepted Designer Type, 752-1933
DREADING EHOSE TAVES? Let IMEX
prepare your taxes. Satisfaction Guaran-
teed Short federal: $20.00, state. S10.00
4 federal: $45.00 state: $15.00. Fas!
service call 758 S395 today!
rOPQUALTn TYPING Papers -
sumes written and typed $15
Call Joy after t 00 p.m. at 758-7423
BARTENDER FOR HIRE for prv
i functions, etc. Rates iu
-e at 77 3811 anytime
md the dinner hour.
NEED MONEY FOR COLLEGE? Free
rmation on loans and scholarships
available for undergraduate and gradu-
ate students. Write Scholastic Financial
Services, 202 Arlington Blvd Suite D
Greenville. State year in school
AIRBRUSH ARTWORKS-Got a rad
idea and want it on a t-shirt? i lot colors
and artwork reproduced with Airbrush
Artwork' T-shirt, sweatshirts, banners
! landpainted one ot a kind art work
n't wash out). Professionally air-
Mi Recently came up from
n tona, Florida Paul Hill, 752-0607.
FREE SPREADSHEEET SOFTWARE
when ordering the PC. 100 MS DOS
Compatible, 640K, 20MD. Amber mom
tor AF style Keyboard. 5.25 one year
warranty only $1299. Call IMEX at 75A
B395.
1981 WT CHEVETTE. blue vynal inte-
rior, bucket seats, floor console Looks
aiA runs like new. Perfect for student
must sell $2,495.00 B I Mills 74t2446 or
753-2878.
FOR SALE: Brand new 26" 10 speed hi
cycle $75.00. Call 752 3569.
1 OR SAFE: 1979Subaru Station Wagon, 4
wheel drive $1450.00 Call 752-22S4.
FROLLS TUX AND FEES-Don't pay
high prices for your formal wear, try
Troll's Fux and Tee's for your formal
needs. Traditional and designer models.
Special fraternity rates 757-1007 or 830-
1447.
SPRING BREAK F-SHIRTS If you
thought the Halloween shirts were hot,
wail until you see the Spring Brak 1988 t's
Get them while they last Call Phil or
Troll 830 1447 or 757 1007.
FOR SAI E: Ringgold Towers efficiency
apartment-Brand new carpet great con
dition and totally furnished for more
information call 758-7114
CAN YOU BUY Jeeps cars, 4 u 4's seized
in drug raids for under $100.00? Call for
facts today. 602-837-3401. ext. 711.
V
A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E 5lfc Stn �.
�Located ar ECl'
�Near Mjor Si u; �� ;t c r.ti r�
�Across From highway Ii Station
1 � � Oflfer - $275 a m
U J I' of l rv Wtlttams
7To 7E15o. 830-1
Offl . open - A;J 8. 12 - 5 30 p m
�AZALEA GATDENS
C'( an � quiet out- be boom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, �� water an.i
s �.�� (a w.i-h� r , iry. rs, i able TV.
Couples or atag a only Si95 a month 6
month lease. MOHIIj; HOME RENTALS -
couples or sliigk-s Apartment and mobile
homes tn Azalea Gardens near Mrook Valley
County Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756 7815 "
l OR RENT
R1NCCOLD TOWERS: Apartments for
rent Furnished. Contact Hollie Si-
monowich at 752-2865.
FWO BEDROOM towrthousee, avail
able now. $100.00 per month. Central
heat and air. Fully carpeted. Pool. 757-
t423 days, 919 975 2481 evenings (call
collect).
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED to
share 2 bedroom apartment at Tar River
Estates. $120.00 a month plus 13 utilities.
7580700.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
immediatly 3-88-89. 12 utilitiesrent.
Furnished (bedroom included) Contact:
757-3227.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY: Your best bet! Only $13000
nonthly, no utilities. Vei very close to
ampus Call 830-5199. I lurry!
PERSONALS
RANDALL, Just a note to let you know
lust a few more hours til were in the snow.
Ellen.
ALPHA SIGS: We dimbed into our golf
arts to tee off at ten, there were birdies
and bogies and lots of men. We had to
make the par in order to win. We had so
much fun and want to do it again! Love,
the Chi Omega's.
KAPPA SIGS, SIGMA, AND SAE: We
wrote on our threads and banged our
heads-theCrafitti Social was a work of art
and we thank you all from the bottom of
our DZ heart! Let's do it again. Love, the
Delta Zeta's.
KEN CHURCH: Happy Birthday I
will miss you. Your buddy Chester.
UPCIIURCH - WHERE'S MY DOOR!
PATRICK ALLEN, Thanx for being my
knight in shining armor. The kitchen was
a perfect palace. The party was great-but
don't remain a stranger! L.G.
TKE TODD: Thanks for being my
stranger-but the encounter ended too
soon! Roses to you on our next encounter.
Robin.
REED-I can t wait until we "run-away"
to New Orleans! Good luck this weekend
Love, Nicole.
LOR1 AND AMY Hope your Spring
Break is Splendid for the two of you. I'm
glad I finally got the chance to really meet
you two lovely Little Sisters. James.
ADTT congrats to the new elected offi-
cers' PresJan Copley, V.PKaren Tar-
rant, Pledge trainer-Kirstin Peterson,
Recording Sec. Autumn Peters, Corre-
sponding Sec-Robin 1 lavekost, Treas-
urer-Laura Moody, Rush Chairman-
Angie Sough, House Chairman-Lisa
Johnson, Social Chairman-Emilv Procter,
guard-Krisfine Prygoda, Sr. Exec, at
Large Angie Smith, Panhellcnic dele-
gate Angie Sumrell. Good Luck!
SGA ELECTIONS: Candidates for SGA
Executive Offices must file for election in
22S Mendenhall by Friday March 4,19$v
NEW DELI IS THE PLACE to eat, drink,
and make merriment. Come jam to the
tunes of Brice Street Thursday, and hear
your Favorite Beatles, Steely Dan, Little
Feat and Doobie Brothers. We'll be clos-
ing at 9:00 during Spring Break, but aime
check out our delicious daily lunch spe-
cials. I lave a good one!
SIG EP � have a safe spring break. Be
sure to drink your face off your head, but
don't drive at the same time.
THANK YOU - Larry, formerly of 'The
Cut Above" has moved to California
Concepts. 1 le would like to thank all of
you for your patronage the last eight
months. Come see him or call at 757-3222,
located at 1100 Charles Blvd.
SAE HAPPY HOUR at the Elbo Fridays
from 4-until. $2.00 Teas - Why drive any-
where else.
RAFTERS: Tuesday night is rock and roll
night, free admission, .25 draft.
WEDNESDAY-Ladies night at Rafters.
Ladies admitted infree from 8:30-10.30.
$1.00 wine coolers25 draft.
D.CThursday night was scary, but, A. 10
slammers? B. Why was there cake on
your chest? C 15 Buttons? Maybe the
tunnel is in our basement-until Wednes-
day on My Turf! Your a Great Stranger-
CT.
ERIC AND TOMMY: We just wanted
ya'll to know that we are really looking
forward to tonight! See ya in a few hours,
o.k.?! Kathie and Sharon.
TALL, DARK AND HANDSOME man
would like to hear from girls interested in
developing a meaningful relationship
(call 830-5467, between 9-10 p.m M-Th
ask for Bill. Serious inquiries only.)
DZ BASKETBALL-GOOD LUCK in the
finals. We know your jammin-Luv, the
Sisters of Delta Zeta.
LEAVING FOR Spring Break on Satur
day? Well, have one last blow-out in
Greenville at the DZ-SAE 1 lappy 1 lour
on Friday at the Elbo. 4-until. Why drive
anywhere else?
SIG EP CHRIS - For the buttons we
kxiked and passages to findRubbing
gavels" was on your mind! We were look-
ii for ghosts behind every door-But all
wi found was popcorn on the fkxr! Be-
: ' e locking up the Rotary, the Sisters we
iuid to boot-How about that man-proof
suit? From screwdrivers to slammers,
which a few ere fake-Friday night was
definitely the "icing on the cake DKC.
JEN-Here's one for number 11! But what
happens now that it is 13?
H.S AND E.S. - Guess we'll try this
again, but it really doesn't matter if this is
printed because nothing has changed!
I lore is the deal: Get ready to drive, pack
as little as you can so that it will fit in the
FRONT seat with you, and most impor-
tant-GET READY'TO RAGE! PS. The
secret code word is 11.
1 HETA CHI: Don't forget about Famous
Piza this afternoon at 5:00 Be there or be
sohr!
CONGRATULATIONS to the new sis
ters of Alpha Omicron Pi: Pam Barbour,
Alexis Bobbins, Jodi Ciferni, Diana
Ditzlcr, Terry Edelen, Latin Evans, Jen-
nifer Flesca, Lisa Gate, Stacey Ckxxle,
Barbara Hill, Paige Jackson, Sharon Jull,
Sharon Lewis, April Peterson, Kim
Ruark, Tara Schulte, Amy Smith, Lisa
Speaks, and Amy Stinrt. Fellin' Kinda
Mellow
BRAD FREY: Happy B day, old man
From your Theta Chi Brothers.
KEN CHURCH, I just want to wish you
the best birthday because you are the
best. Happy birthday. . . Love always,
Michelle.
ALPHA XI DELTA is proud to congratu-
late the newly initiated sisters of AZD:
Frances Brown, Amy Antoniak, Andi
Armstrong, Shari Bxth, Kelly Boyle,
Karen Coart, 1 lolly Dorf, Allison Dowl
ing, Tonya 1 lildreth, Tracy I lolderfield,
Mary Leslie, Tracy Taylor, Kelly Branes,
Heather Meason, Lara Griffith, Amy
Bowers, I Ioney Martin, Gretchen Blaken-
ship, Janine Mertan, Maria Pantazis,
Diane Lambert, Krishna Murdcn, Kathy
Melrick, Kathy Moore, Missy Palmer,
Amy Row, Angela Storch, Julie Wcssler,
and Jennifer Vandenburg
KAPPA SIGS, DZ, AND SIGMA Just
wanted to say thanks for the great social-
we couldn't have had a better time! Let's
do it again real soon. SAE.
PI KAPPA PHI: We will see you at little
sister happy hour starting at 4:00 Thurs-
day. Tea party at the Elbo. 1 lappy hours
moved to Thursday because of Spring
break.
BOB SCHULTZ-We still love ya even
though your not a (free) friend. DK and
the Pi kapps.
GREEKS thank you for your campus
wide clean up program . . Otherwise
known as (GAG.) Greeks Against Gar-
bage. The campus allready kxiks deaner.
Campus Beautification Committee mem
bers.
SP � Prepare for the long ride in the
Beemer to the land of sun and fun 1 can't
wait to get out of here! Spring break
tomorrow! I'll see you at Elbo tonight and
buy you a tea! Love ya, DK.
SIG EP � I lope you guvs who arc leave
ing the Emerald Citv have an awesome
spring break Those of us who have to
stay here will be glad to lend you money
(with only a small finance charge) when
your return The Sig Eps with jobs.
FizzThe newt
gathering place, FiHnir
Specials for Rvery
Night Of the wyyfr;
Mon: SI.00 Imports
Tues: S2.00 Kamik.izecs
Wed: $1.50 Highballs
Thurs: $2.00
Fri: $2.00 Margaritas & Tequila
Sunrises
&it: $2.00 Fireballs
Private Parties and Uvr Entertainment
MAIHMOOD � I'VE GOT YOUR
DOOR HANGING.
AOTT'S AND THEIR DATES: On Fri-
day night we had to wait to see who was
our stranger date. We ended up dancing
all night, Delynda locked up the Rotary-
real tight. From Push It to Rosalita at the
end, our stranger mixer was great, let's do
it again
SCOTT U. Happy (9 month) Anniver
sary! So many good memories and many
more to come! 1 love you forever' Marian
U. PS. "You feel good A11111 overt"
TO: The whole Lambda Chi Alpha Fra
tcrnity: "People are all everything is-a lt
has ever been and all it will ever be
people you and me together in love"
Thanks! (Buseagha) Love, Betsy
MIKE, "Un, deux, trois, slammers vour
rootnatc getting dirty, maybe next time
we can make it to ")" nerd magnets
rolling sprite, it truely was l)n eventful
night 2 great nights of being crazed I
really was "shocked and amazed Rose
ball and stranger that makes 2 next
month is luau, will you come through'
You're the funnesf date' Debbie
WANT TO BUY: A Commodore M
Computer. 758-0244 or 355-3 ,
WANTED: Wild, undaunted rebellious
types with something to prove to Cod
and their country. That's right, the KAs
andPantana Bob's are looking for orazv
people to do crazy things and the craziest
act walks away with $501 r The 1st
annual "What 1 Wouldn't Do For
$501.06- contest for Muscular Dystrophy
is coming soon. Watch for details'
SIGLP. Congratulations Sig Epwes
tiers. Thanks for all vour hard work R S
PIZZA WAGON
Carolina Ea.sr Mall
�Serving Delicious, thin
New York Crust Pizza by
the slice or by the whole
�Eat in or Take Out
Free Delivery -
756-1984
�If you pick up -
$2.00 Off Small
$3.00 Off Large
Making your favorite pizza
is Jack, formerly of
Frank's Pizza
Read
The
East
Carolinian
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
Travel Committee members: There
will be a meeting on Wednesday, March 2
p m. in Mendenhall.
OUTDOOR THERAPY
Worshop sponsored bv the LSS-S and
LSS 4700, March 19,9:004 00at River Park
North. Lunch included. Open to students
(Si50) and professionals (S25.O0). Pre
roei-tor and pre-pay bv March 9th at the
I 56 Building. Limited to 30 participants.
WORKSHOP
Ms. Melissa Haid, a visiting artist, will
conduct a multi-media workshop with
cla v. paper, and slumped glass on March
n Jenkins Art Building. Ms 1 laid will
present a slide lecture on March 16 at 730
in 1 H27 of recent work. A work bv Ms
I laid will be completed during the work
shop and will be donated to the perma-
nent collection in Mendenhall Student
Center or Kate Lewis Gallery. The work-
shop is sponsored by the Ceramics Guild,
The Visual Art Forum, and The SGA The
c is invited to attend. Work hop
hours will be from S.00-12 00 noon the 14-
18 in J-143.
CONTINUING ED.
The following Personal F)evelopment
Courses will be held: Money Matters
(starts March 15); Guitar (starts March 15);
Scuba (starts March 15); Drawing with
Colored Pencils (starts March 17); Begin-
ning Calligraphy (starts May 19). Contact
Continuing Education, Erwin Hall for
more information.
WOMEN'S FRISBEE CLUB
Practice will beheld Tuesday, Wednes-
day and Thursday from 3:30 until, at the
bottom of College Hill. All interested
players should attend. Those who have
received forms need to have them com-
pleted and ready to turn in.
SLAP
AH General College students who have
indicated a desire to major in Speech-
Language and Auditory Pathologv and
have R. Muzzarelli as their advisor are to
meet on Wednesday, March 23 at 5 Oil
p.m. in Brewster D10L Advising for early
registration will take place at that time.
Others interested in SLAP should contact
the department-757-c�61.
pQRUCTIQN CQMM,
The Production Committee will meet
on March 1 at 530 p.m. for pictures in the
yearbook. All members need to meet at
Mendenhall Student Center at the infor
mationdesk.
Announcements
SCHOLARSHIP
Students who wish to obtain financial
aid for overseas education mav applv for
a Rivers Scholarship. The application
deadline is March 15,1988. For more info,
contact the Office of International Studies
and Scholarship in Brewster A-117.
CHAMBER MUSIC
The 1988-1989 Chamber music Series
attractions indude: Buswcll-Parnas-Lu-
visi Trio, National Gallery of Art Vocal
Ensemble, Tokyo String Quartet, and
OREGON. For a brochure detailing the
events, contact the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center, 757-6611, ext.
266. Office hours are 11:00 a.m6:00 p.m
Monday-Friday. This series is co-spon-
sored by the Department of University
Unions and the School of Music.
PERFORMING ARTS
The 1988-1989 Performing Arts Series is
sponsoring the following events: The
Ohio Ballet, Wynton Marsalis, The Acting
Company, The Atlanta Symphony, PHI-
LADANCO, The NY. Gilbert and Sulh
van Players in Pirates of Penance, The
Polish National Radio Orchestra, CABA-
RET, The ECUNC Symphonies in con-
cert with SPECIAL GUEST PIANIST
KAREN SI I AW, and Nadja Salerno-Son-
nenberg. For a brochure detailing the
events contact the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall, 757-6611, ext. 266. Office
hours are 11:00 a.m6:00 p.m Monday-
Friday.
NASWCQRSQ
Wanted: Social Work Criminal Justio
majors and intended majors, to attend
meetings. Held the 2nd and 4th Monday
each month, at 4:00 p.m in Allied 1 lealth
bldg room 110.
COOPERATIVE EP.
The Co-op Education office is now lo-
cated on the second floor of the new
General Classroom Buildng, Room 2028.
Students interested in the program
should attend a co-op information semi-
nar. For specific seminar times, dates and
locations, please check the ECU Calendar
of Events or call the co-op office at 757-
6979. All students are eligable to Co-op.
JOB HUNTING? Come to see us at our
new locatioNn
INTERVIEW WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton House is offering
one hour sessions to aid you in developing
better interviewing skills. A film and dis-
cussion of how to interview on and off
campus will be shared. These sessions are
held in the Career Planning Room on
March 2,15, and 24 at 3.00 p.m.
SLAP
All General College students who have
indicated a desire to major in Speech-
Language and Auditory Pathology and
have R. Muzzarelli as their advisor are to
meet on Wednesday, March 23 at 5:00
p.m. in Brewster D10L Advising for early
registration will take place at that time
Others interested in SLAP should contact
the department-757-6961.
FILMS COMMITTEE
The Student Union Films Committee
will be conducting a survey in front of the
Student Store on Thursday, March 3 from
8:30-3:00. The survey is designed to find
out about the movie viewing habits of
ECU. All those who fill out the survey will
have the chance of winning one of 15 t-
shirts being raffled off. Loreal hair gel,
sticklers gum and keychains will be given
away.
SPEAKER
Professor Oyeleye Oyediran of the
Department of Political Science at the
University of Lagos, Nigeria will be
speaking on The Influence of the U.S.
Constitutional Developments in Nigeria"
on Tuesday, March 15,1988 at 7:30 p.m. I le
will be speaking in the Lecture Room 1031
of the General Classroom Building. Ev-
eryone is welcome. For more information,
call Dr. Maurice Sunow, Coordinator of
International Studies at 757-6769.
WORKSHOP
Ms. Melissa Haid, a visiting artist, will
conduct a multi-media workshop with
day, paper, and slumped glass on March
14-18 in Jenkins Art Building. Ms. Haid will
present a slide lecture on March 16 at 730
in J-1327 of recent work. A work by Ms.
I laid will be completed during the work-
shop and will be donated to the perma-
nent collection in Mendenhall Student
Center or Kate Lewis Gallery. The work-
shop is sponsored by the Ceramics Guild,
The Visual Art Forum, and The SGA. The
public is invited to attend. Workhop
hours will be from 8:00-12:00 noon the 14-
18 in J-143.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
To honor free enterprise week, we will
have Margret Barnhill as our guest
speaker. Open to all business-related
majors. New members are welcome.
Meeting will be held in Rawl 302 on
Wednesday, March 2 at 3:00 p.m.
AEQ
If you want to hear the true crime story
come hear Lawrence Harris, M.D. on
March 1 at 7:00 p.m. in F-307, the topic for
the meeting will be Forensic Pathology.
Final plan for Memphis will be discussed
after the meeting.
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton I louse is offering
one hour programs on beginning a res-
ume for your job search. Handouts and
samples will be given out to the first 20
people to come to each session. No sign up
required. These sessions are held in the
Career Planning Room on March 3,16, and
22 at 3:00 p.m. For those who have already
written a resume and wish to have a res-
ume critiqued, separate programs are
li-ted at the office.
FCA
Fellowship of Christian Athletes will
meet every Tuesday at 9:30 at the Pirate
Club. Coaches, athletes, and others are
welcome to attend.
PHI ALPHA THFJA
There will be an important Phi Alpha
Theta meeting on Wednesday, March I at
3:00 p.m. in the Todd Room (First floor, D
wing of Brewster Bldg). All members
strongly urged to attend.
CONTINTJTNC: Fn,
The following Personal Development
Courses will be held: Money Matters
(starts March 15); Guitar (starts March 15);
Scuba (starts March 15); Drawing with
Colored Pencils (starts March 17); Begin-
ning Calligraphy (starts May 19). Contact
Continuing Education, Erwin Hall for
more information.
PRIME TIME
Prime Time, sponsored by Campus
Crusade for Christ, meets every Thursday
at 7:30 p.m. in Brewster C-103. Everyone is
welcome.
N.C. SYMPHONY
"Roberta Peters, soprano, will be the
featured soloist with the N.C. Symphony
on Wednesday, March 16 at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. This final concert of
the 1987-88 N.C. Symphony Series is
made possible by the Pitt Co. N.C. Sym-
phony chapter and Burroughs-Wellcome
Co. Tickets are currently available at
Mendenhall Ticket Office (757-6611)
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Friday nights are ALIVE more than
ever before! join us at Jenkins Auditorium
(Art Building) at 8:00 p.m. Every FRIDAY
NIGHT for Christian Fellowship and
Bible teaching where JESUS IS LORD!
TPMMUNTTY SHELTER
On Friday, March 11, there will be a
concert and dance to raise funds for the
Greenville Community Shelter. It will be
held at The Attic in downtown Greenville
starting at 9:00 p.m. Performing will be
Heaartwood and Liquid Sound.
ECU AMBASSADORS
There will be a meeting on Wednesday,
March 2 at 5:15 p.m. in the Mendenhall
Multi-purpose Room. We will be having
our group picture made for the yearbook.
SCEC
There will be an important meeting on
Thursday, March 3 at 5:00 p m. in Speight
103. We will be electing officers for next
year. Everyone is asked to attend.
EARLY CHIT DHnon ri im
All education and child development
majors are invited to a special meeting
about storytelling and puppetry on
March 2 at 4:00 in Speight 308. Don't miss
this wonderful opportunity to see a story-
teller. Information on how to read a story
and make a flannel board will be given out
for professional files.
BUILDING SFj f ESTEEM
Wanda Lancaster, a nurse clinician in
psychology will be speaking on behalf of
Presbyterian and Methodist Campus
Ministries on Wednesday, March 2. The
Methodist Student Center (501 E. 5th St
across from Garrett dorm) will host an all-
you-can-eat dinner on Wednesdays; cost
is $2.00 at the door and $1.50 in advance.
PROD. COMMITTEE
The Production Committee will meet
on March 1 at 5:30 pjn. for pictures in the
yearbook. All members need to meet at
Mendenhall Student Center at the infor-
mation desk.
WOMEN'S STUDIES
Women's role in politics is the topic of
discussion for the second Brown Bag
Lunch of 1988, sponsored by Women's
Studies. Dr. Dorothy Clayton of the Politi-
cal Science Department will speak briefly
and be available to answer questions from
1:00 p.m. The luncheon will be held in
Mendenhall Room 221 from 12-130 on
Wednesday, March 2.
CAY COMMUNITY
Greenville Gay Community is a group
formed last fall to meet the needs of the
gay and lesibian Community in
Greenville. The group meets every othber
week at different locations in Greenville.
For more information please call and ask
for Charley at 752-2675.
ERQS
The Equal Rights Organization for stu-
dents will meet today at 5.00 in Brewster
B-101 to ratify the constitutuion and plan
a fund raiser. All interested persons in-
vited to attend. For more information, call
758-35645 or 746-6049.
SPRING SEM. CRAPS,
Caps and gowns should be picked up in
the Student Stores, Wright Building,
March 22, 23, 24, 1988. These are yours to
keep providing the graduation fee ha
been paid. For those receiving the Masters
Degree the fee pays for your cap and
gown, but there is an extra fee of $12.50for
your hood. Announcements are available
in the Student Stores, Wright Building.
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
All Travel Committee members: There
will be a meeting on Wednesday, March 2
at 5 p.m. in Mendenhall.
SIGMA GAMMA EPSILON
Sigma Gamma Epsilon, the Honor
Society of Earth Sciences, and the ECU
Dept. of Geology welcome Dr. Keros
Cartwright, the 1987-1988 Birdsall Disfin
guished Lecturer of the Hydrogeologv
Division of the Geological Society of
America who will present two lectures
"Safe Landfills-Can we succeed?" will be
presented Tuesday, March 1, at 7:30 p.m.
in General Classroom Building Rm W
"Large Scale Experiments in Hydrogeo!
ogy" will be presented Wednesday,
March 2, at 4:00 p.m. in Graham Building
Room 301. All are welcome to these talks
For more information, call ECU Geoloev
Dept. at 757-6360.
w OUTDOOR THERAPY
t Sop sponsored by the LSS-S and
LSS 4700, March 19,9.004:00 at River Park
!rT5uLunch mduded OP" to students
(512.50) and professionals ($25.00) Pre
nioCT.and Pre-PaY bY March 9th at the
LSS Building. Limited to 30 participants
OVERSEAS DFV,
Student internships interested in
spending a summer (or longer) in remote
parts of the world? The Overseas Devel-
opment Network is seeking several con-
cerned, committed students and recent
graduates who are interested in develop-
ment. Internships are available in India,
Bangladesh, Latin America, the Phillippi-
nes, and the Appalachian Mountains.
Financial assistance is available. Contact
Marianne Exum for more information at
home 752-2389 or work 757-6271. Appli-
cation deadline is March 15, 1988.
SKA
SRA Semiformal Dance: Tickets are on
sale now! The dance will be from 9 pm to
1 am on March 18,1988 in the Holiday Inn
I olidome with the theme being "One
Night in Bangkok See Residence Hall
Vice-president for tickets ($3.00 single,
$5 00 couple with SRA card and $4.00
single, $7.00 couple without SRA card).

IHI t A
How t
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Stiff Wnlrr
Warning: This column
rated JO; Juniors or above On
Finally it is upon us, the breaj
of spring. By Saturday, the m
fortunate of us will be su
basking, checking out tl
commodities as they skimp
down the beach and throwin
back some cool ones 1 or the le
fortune who will spend the bre.
in the Emerald City, say hey
Dewanda at the Sports Pad fi
me.
Southward on -95, the fl(K
will cruise. Before gassing tl
tank and buying that 2-j nmd h
of road tripDoritos, think of the
Record store
offers more
than albums
By BRAD BANNISTER
Stiff Writer
Warning: This article is rat
EF; Even Freshmen can read itj
When my editor first asked
to check out East Coast Music ai
Video, I thought I was in U
another boring "Hew spotligl
that store" article. But, a(U
actually visiting the place, nj
only did I find that I was wrong!
also found a few albums I've be
looking for.
The music store, owned
Frank Ferrce, started off under i
corporate name "Rock and S
in a small building on Fifth Strei
In 1975, in order to make room f
more stock, the store was move
to a new location.
For four years businc
prospered until, in 1979, a til
caused it to be moved once moj
At this location thjoi a
dubbed "Apple RcxxTrdsfruT,
the first time, carried CD's.
Recently, "Apple Recordj
moved to 1109 Charies Boulevaj
where movie rentals have be
included and the name has be
changed again, this time to "F
Cosast Music and Video (Y
brothers and sisters, we h
during a time of history in t
making.)
"East Coast" is run by manai
and all around cool guy,
Dillon who was friends w
Fcrree in school.
"I used to drive a truck for
father until he shut his busim
down said Dillon. "Frank
me in the store one day and ask
me to come work for him
Dillon wasn't just an add-
though. Talk to him and v
find that he's pre tl
knowledgeable about music H
favorite section of the store
"new and developing artist
which he savs he likes b
because "a group's first albu
stands out more
But the whole store is full
surprises. Thcv even have a dnj
thru window for you musl
lovers who are to lazv to get outj
the car. It works pretty much hj
you conventional McDonal
drive-thru, except that you c
your order in. "Yes. I'll havesoi
JL
This it East Co�t Music arw
include video rentals. (Photol
"� � �? ir i�i .ip�i�i� mmmt���i
��w iMiMM wn
a�'��"� ��i �.�.�;
' wmXitMMiiiin ������� ' ��' W�!�M' '�.�





V
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 1988
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
DRIVER WANTED to pick up small
lojd of furniture in I'hita. for Greenville
delivery sometime in March. Your truck
or mine. Call 756-1198.
ARE YOU A college student bored with
your classes and in need of spending
money' Are you enthusiastic, depend
able and excited about working in a fash-
ion environment' Brody's and Brady's
tor Men have part time openings for
ip iividuals able to work flexible hours
.j'plv at Brod) s, Carolina East Mall, M
W, 2 4 p.m.
HEIP WAN TIP: Waiters and wait
resscs tor restaurant near Atlantic Beach.
Apply at 218 Front St, Beaufort, N I
WESTERN SIZZLIN now accepting
applications for part time waitres
Must be available to work weekends.
Apply in person at Western Si.lin on
10th Street.
BOOK BLMIR earn while you learn'
Make your own hours Be your own boss
Buy books for local book company. K.
spond to Carolina Book Services, Box
2151, Greenville N.C, 27836.
HELP WANTED: Part-time interior de-
sign student-send resume to: Designer,
3010 Cast 10th Street, Greenville, N.C.
Rl SIPENT COUNSELOR: interested in
those with human service background
wishing to gain valuable experience in
the field. No monetary compensation,
however room, utilities and phone pro
vided. Call Mary Smith, The REAL Crisis
Center, 758-HELP.
SERVICES OFFERED
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SHE
Professional Computer Services, 10b East
Mh STreet (beside Cubbies) Greenville
N.C. 752-3694.
FOR SALE
TAPING AND WORD Processing Let
tor Qualtiv Laser Printing. Rush .
accepted Designer Type, 752-1933.
DREADING THOSE TAXES? Let IMEX
prepare your taxes. Satisfaction Guaran-
teed Short: federal: $20.00, state: $10.00.
Long- federal $45.00, state: $15.00. Fw
service call 758 8395 today!
TOP QUALTIV TYPING-Papers Si
page resumes written and typed $15 I
oy after t 00 p.m. at 758-7423.
BARTENDER FOR HIRE for private
- social functions, etc. Rates neg
liable. Call Mike at 757-3811 anytime
around the dinner hour.
NEED MONEY FOR COLLEGE? Ft e
information on loans and scholarships
available for undergraduate and gradu-
ate students. Write Scholastic Financial
Services, 202 Arlington Blvd Suite D
Greenville. State year in school.
AIRBRUSH ARTWORKS-Got a rad
idea and want it on a t-shirt? I lot colors
and artwork reproduced with Airbrush
Artwork! T-shirt, sweatshirts, banners.
I landpainted one of a kind art work
n't wah out). Professionally air-
brushing 1980-88. Recently came up from
Davtona, Florida. Paul Hill, 752-0607.
EREE SPREADSHEEET SOFTWARE
when ordering the PC-t, lOO?; MSDOS
Compatible, 640K, 20MD, Amber moni-
tor AT style Keyboard, 5.25 one year
warranty only $1299. Call IMEX at 758
8395.
1981 WT CHEVEFIE. blue vvnal inte-
rior, bucket seats, floor console. Looks
and runs like new. Perfect for student,
must sell. S2,45.(X) B.J. Mills 74r 2446 or
753-2878
FOR SALE: Brand new 26 10 speed hi
cycle $75.00. Call 752-3569.
FOR SALE: 1979 Subaru Station Wagon, 4
wheel drive. $1450.00. Call 752-2284.
TROLLS TUX AND TEES-Don't pay
high prices for your formal wear, try
Troll's Tux and Tee's for your formal
needs. Traditional and designer models.
Special fraternity rates 757-1007 or 830-
1447.
SPRING BREAK F-SHIRTS If you
thought the I lalloween shirts were hot,
wait until you see the Spring Brak 188 t's.
Get them while they last Call Phil or
Troll. 830-1447or 757-1007.
FOR SAI E: Ringgold Towers efficiency
apartment-Brand new carpet great con-
dition and totally furnished for more
informaiton call 758 7114
CAN YOU BUY Jeeps, cars, 4 x 4's seized
:n drug raids for under $100.00? Call for
facts today. 602-837-3401, ext. 711.
A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New 2 Bedroom"
�And Ready To Rent"
UNrVERSITY APARTMENTS
2399 E 5th Stn -�
�Located Na: ECU
�Near M.yor Shopping C �.�� th
�A. toss From highway Kit: J S;jtn
Limited Oder - $275 a month
C nta t J T. or Tommy Wlthama
756-7615 o. 830-1937
Offt, �� open - Al 8, 12 � 5 ;io p
�AZALEA GAP DENS
CU-an and quiet one be trootn furnished
apartments, energy effk lent free water an.i
s w.r. optional washer . ity rs. cable IV.
Couples or strides only. $196 a month. 6
month Vase. MOBILE HOME RENTALS -
couples or singles. Apartment and mobile
homes tn Azalea Gardens near Hrook Valley
County Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756 7815 '
I OR RENT
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apartments for
rent Furnished. Contact Hollie Si-
monowich at 752-2865.
TWO BEDROOM townhousee, avail
able now. $300.00 per month. Central
heat and air. Fully carpeted. Pool. 757-
t423 days, 919 975 2481 evenings (call
collect).
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED to
share 2 bedroom apartment at Tar River
Estates. $120.00 a month plus 13 utilities.
758-0700.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
Immediatly 3-88-89. 12 utilitiesrent.
Furnished (bedroom included) Contact:
757-3227.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMEDI-
TELY: Your best bet! Only 930.00
nonthlv, no utilities. Verv very close to
ampus. Call 830-5199. I lurry!
PERSONALS
RANDALL, Just a note to let you know
lust a few more hours til were in the snow.
Ellen.
ALPHA SIGS: We climbed into our golf
arts to tee off at ten, there were birdies
and bogies and lots of men. We had to
make the par in order to win. We had so
much fun and want to do it again! Love,
the Chi Omega's.
KAPPA SIGS, SIGMA, AND SAE: We
wrote on our threads and banged our
heads the Grafitti Social was a work of art
and we thank you aU from the bottom of
our DZ heart! Let's do it again. Love, the
Delta Zeta's.
KEN CHURCH: I lappy Birthday I
will miss you. Your buddy Chester.
UPCHURCH - WHERE'S MY DOOR!
PATRICK ALLEN, Thanx for being my
knight in shining armor. The kitchen was
a perfect palace. The party was great-but
don't remain a stranger! L.G.
TKE TODD: Thanks for being my
stranger-but the encounter ended too
soon! Roses to you on our next encounter.
Kobin.
REED-I can't wait until we "run-away"
to New Orleans! Good luck this weekend.
Love, Nicole.
LORI AND AMY Hope your Spring
Break is Splendid for the two of you. I'm
glad I finally got the chance to really meet
you two lovely Little Sisters. James.
A DTI-congrats to the new elected offi-
cers! PresJan Copley, V.PKaren Tar-
rant, Pledge trainer-Kirstin Peterson,
Recording Sec. Autumn Peters, Corre-
sponding SecRobin I lavekost, Treas-
urer-Laura Moody, Rush Chairman-
Angie Sough, House Chairman-Lisa
Johnson, Social Chairman-Emilv Procter,
guard-Kristme Prygoda, Sr. Exec at
Large Angie Smith, Panhellcnic dele-
gate Angie Sumrell. Good Luck!
SGA ELECTIONS: Candidates for SGA
Executive Offices must file for election in
228 Mendenhall by Friday March 4,19S8
NEW DELI IS THE PLACE to eat, drink,
and make merriment. Come jam to the
tunes of Brice Street Thursday, and hear
your Favorite Beatles, Steely Dan, Little
Feat and Doobie Brothe . We'll be clos-
ing at 9:00 during Spring Break, but come
check out our delicious daily lunch spe-
cials. I lave a good one!
SIG EP � have a safe spring break. Be
sure to drink your face off your head, but
don't drive at the same time.
THANK YOU - Larry, formerly of "The
Cut Above" has moved to California
Concepts. I le would like to thank all of
you for your patronage the last eight
months. Come see him or call at 757-3222,
located at 1100 Charles Blvd.
SAE HAPPY HOUR at the Elbo Fridays
from 4-until. $2.00 Teas - Why drive any-
where else.
RAFTERS: Tuesday night is rock and roll
night, free admission, .25 draft.
WEDNESDAY-Ladies night at Rafters.
Ladies admitted infree from 8:30-10:30.
SI.00 wine coolers25 draft.
D.CThursday night was scary, but, A. 10
slammers? B. Why was there cake on
your chest? C. 15 Buttons? Maybe the
tunnel is in our basement-until Wednes-
day on My Turf! Your a Great Stranger-
C.T.
ERIC AND TOMMY: We just wanted
ya'll to know that we are really looking
forward to tonight! See ya in a few hours,
o.k.?! Kathie and Sharon.
TALL, DARK AND HANDSOME man
would like to hear from girls interested in
developing a meaningful relationship
(call 830-5467, between 9-10 p.m M-Th
ask for Bill. Serious inquiries only.)
DZ BASKETBALL-GOOD LUCK in the
finals. We know your jammin-Luv, the
Sisters of Delta Zeta.
LEAVING FOR Spring Break on Satur-
day? Well, have one last blow-out in
Greenville at the DZ-SAE 1 lappy 1 lour
on Friday at the Elbo. 4-until. Why drive
anywhere else?
SIG EP CHRIS - For the buttons we
looked and passages to findRubbing
gavels" was on your mind! We were look-
ii � for ghosts behind every door-But all
W found was popcorn on the floor! Be-
f � e locking up the Rotary, the Sisters we
itud to boot-How about that man proof
suit? From screwdrivers to slammers,
which a few ere fake-Friday night was
definitely the "icing on the cake DKC.
JFN-Here's one for number 11! But what
happens now that it is 13?
R.S AND E.S. - Guess we'll try this
again, but it really doesn't matter if this is
printed because nothing has changed
I lere is the deal: Get ready to drive, pack
as little as you can so that it will fit in the
FRONT seat with you, and most imnor-
tant-GET READY TO RACE! PS. The
secret code word is 11.
1 HETA CHI: Don't forget about Famous
Pizza this afternoon at 5:00 Be there or be
sobor!
CONGRATULATIONS to the new sis
ters of Alpha Omicron Pi: Pam Barbour,
Alexis Bobbins, Jodi Ciferni, Diana
Ditzler, Terry Edelen, Lauri Evans, Jen-
nifer Flesca, Lisa Gate, Staccy Goode,
Barbara Hill, Paige Jackson, Sharon Jull,
Sharon Lewis, April Peterson, Kim
Ruark, Tara Schulte, Amy Smith, Lisa
Speaks, and Amy Stuart. Fellin' Kinda
Mellow
BRAD FREY: Happy B day, old man
From your Theta Chi Brothers.
KEN CHURCH, I just want to wish you
the best birthday because you are the
best. Happy birthday. . . Love always,
Michelle.
ALPHA XI DELTA is proud to congratu-
late the newly initiated sisters of AZD:
Frances Brown, Amy Antoniak, Andi
Armstrong, Shari Booth, Kelly Boyle,
Karen Co.art, I lolly Dorf, Allison Dowl
ing, Tonya I hldreth, Tracy 1 loldcrfield,
Mary Leslie, Tracy Taylor, Kelly Branes,
Heather Meason, Lara Griffith, Amy
Bowers, I loney Martin, Grctchen Blaken-
ship, Janine Mcrtan, Maria Pantais,
Diane Lambert, Krishna Murdcn, Kathy
Melrick, Kathy Moore, Missy Palmer,
Amy Row, Angela Storch, Julie Wcssler,
and Jennifer Vandenburg
KAPPA SIGS, DZ, AND SIGMA Just
wanted to say thanks for the great social-
we couldn't have had a better time! Let's
do it again real soon. SAE.
PI KAPPA PHI: We will see you at little
sister happy hour starting at 400 Thurs-
day. Tea party at the Elbo. I lappy hours
moved to Thursday because of Spring
break.
BOB SCHULTZ-We still love va even
though your not a (free) friend DK and
the Pi kapps
GREEKS thank you for your campus
wide clean up program . . .Otherwise
known as (GAG.) Greeks Against Gar-
bage. The campus allreadv looks cleaner
Campus Beautification Committee mem
bers.
SP - Prepare for the long ride in the
Beemer to the land of sun and fun. I can't
wait to get out of here! Spring break
tomorrow! I'll see you at Elbo tonight and
buy you a tea' Love va, DK.
SIG EP � I lope you guvs who are leave
ing the Emerald City have an awesome
spring break. Those of us who have to
stav here will be glad to lend you money
(with only a small finance charge) when
your return The Sig Eps with jobs.
FJZZThe newest
gathering place. Drink
Specials for Every
Night of the weefr;
Mon: Sl.OO Imports
Tucs: $2.00 Kamikazecs
Wed: $1.50 Highballs
Thurs: $2.00
Fri: $2.00 Margaritas & Tequila
Sunrises
Sat: $2.00 Fireballs
Private Parties and Uvr Entertainment
MALHMOOD � I'VE GOT YOUR
DOOR HANGING.
AOTT'S AND THEIR DATES: On Fr,
day night we had to wait to see who was
our stranger date. We ended up dancing
all night, Delynda locked up the Kotjry
real tight. From Push It to Rosalita at the
end, our stranger mixer was great, let do
it again"
SCOTT U. Happy (9 month) Anniver
sary! So many good memories and many
more to come! I love you forever' Marian
U. PSYou feel good A1UI1 over
TO: The whole Lambda Chi Alpha Fra
tcrnity: "People are all everything is-all it
has ever been and all it will ever bo
people you and me together m love"
Thanks! (Buseaglia) Love, Betsy-
Mi KE, "Un, deux, trois, slammers " your
roomate getting dirtv, maybe next time
we can make it to "TO" nerd magnets
rolling sprite, it truely was an eventful
night 2 great nights of being crazed I
really wjs "shocked and amazed " Rose
ball and stranger that makes 2 next
month is luau, will you come throu ?
You're the funnest date' Debbie
WANT TO BUY A Commodore 64
C omputer 7:K (C44 or Yi ,
WANTED: Wild, undaunted rebellious
types with something to prove to Cod
and their country. That's right the KA's
and Pantana Bob's are looking for crazi
people to do crazy things and the craziest
act walks away with $sa ( Th �
annual "What I Wouldn't Do for
$501.06- contest for Muscular Dystrophy
IS coining soon. Watch for details!
SIG EP - Congratulations Sig Ep wres
'sprThanksf"r M vour hjrd w"rk Ks
PIZZA WAGON
Carolina East Mall
�Serving Delicious, thin
New York Crust Pizza by
the slice or by the whole
�Eat in or Take Out
Free Delivery -
756-1984
�If you pick up -
$2.00 Off Small
$3.00 Off Large
Making your favorite pizza
is Jack, formerly of
Frank's Pizza
Read
The
East
Carolinian
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
All Travel Committee members: There
will be a meeting on Wednesday, March 2
at 5 p.m. in Mendenhall.
OUTDOOR THERAPY
Worshop sponsored by the LSS-S and
LSS 4700, March 19,9:00-4:00 at River Park
North. Lunch included. Open to students
(Si50) and professionals (S25.00). Pre-
reister and pre-pay by March 9th at the
LSS Building. Limited to 30 participants.
WORKSHOP
Ms. Melissa I laid, a visiting artist, will
conduct a multi-media workshop with
clav, paper, and slumped glass on March
14 IS in Jenkins Art Building. Ms. I laid will
present a slide lecture on March 16 at 730
in I B27 of recent work. A work by Ms
laid will be completed during the work-
shop and will be donated to the perma-
nent collection in Mendenhall Student
Center or Kate Lewis Gallery. The work-
shop is sponsored by the Ceramics Guild,
The Visual Art Forum, and The SGA The
public is invited to attend. Workhop
hours will be from 8:00-12 00 noon the 14-
18 in J-143.
CONTINUING ED.
The following Personal Development
Courses will be held: Money Matters
(starts March 15); Guitar (starts March 15);
Scuba (starts March 15); Erawing with
Colored Pencils (starts March 17); Begin-
ning Calligraphy (starts May 19). Contact
Continuing Education, Erwin Hall for
more information.
WOMEN'S FRISBEE CLUB
Practice will beheld Tuesday, Wednes-
day and Thursday from 3:30 until, at the
bottom of College Hill. All interested
players should attend. Those who have
received forms need to have them com-
pleted and ready to turn in.
SLAP
All General College students who have
indicated a desire to major in Speech
Language and Auditory Pathology and
have R. Muzzarelli as their advisor are to
meet on Wednesday, March 23 at 5 00
p.m. in Brewster D101. Advising for early
registration will take place at that time.
Others interested in SLAP should contact
the department-757-6961.
PjQPJLJCTIQN CQMMt
The Production Committee will meet
on March 1 at 530 p.m. for pictures in the
book yyj members need to meet at
Mendenhall Student Center at the infor
mation desk.
Annonncempnts
SCHOLARSHIP
Students who wish to obtain financial
aid for overseas education mav applv for
a Rivers Scholarship. The application
deadline is March 15,1988. For more info.
contact the Office of International Studies
and Scholarship in Brewster A-117.
CHAMBER MUSIC
The 1988-1989 Chamber music Series
attractions include: Buswell-Parnas-Lu-
visi Trio, National Gallery of Art Vocal
Ensemble, Tokyo String Quartet, and
OREGON. For a brochure detailing the
events, contact the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center, 757-6611, ext.
266. Office hours are 11:00 a.m6:00 p.m
Monday-Friday. This series is co spon-
sored by the Department of University
Unions and the School of Music.
PERFORMING ARTS
The 1988-1989 Performing Arts Series is
sponsoring the following events: The
Ohio Ballet, Wynton Marsalis, The Acting
Company, The Atlanta Symphony, PH1-
LADANCO, The N.Y. Gilbert and Sulli
van Players in Pirates of Penzance, The
Polish National Radio Orchestra, CABA-
RET, The ECUNC Symphonies in con-
cert with SPECIAL GUEST PIANIST
KAREN SI IAW, and Nadja Salerno-Son-
nenberg. For a brochure detailing the
events contact the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall, 757-6611, ext. 266. Office
hours are 11:00 a.m6:00 p.m Monday-
Friday.
NASWCORSO
Wanted: Social Work Criminal Justice
majors and intended majors, to attend
meetings. I leld the 2nd and 4th Monday
each month, at 4:00 p.m in Allied Health
bldg room 110.
COOPERATIVE ED.
The Co-op Education office is now lo-
cated on the second floor of the new
General Classroom Buildng, Room 2028.
Students interested in the program
should attend a co-op information semi-
nar. For specific seminar times, dates and
locations, please check the ECU Calendar
of Events or call the co-op office at 757-
6979. All students are eligable to Co-op.
JOB HUNTING? Come to see us at our
new locatioNn
INTERVIEW WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton House is offering
one hour sessions to aid you in developing
better interviewing skills. A film and dis-
cussion of how to interview on and off
campus will be shared. These sessions are
held in the Career Planning Room on
March 2,15, and 24 at 3:00 p.m.
SLAP
All General College students who have
indicated a desire to major in Speech
Language and Auditory Pathology and
have R. Muzzarelli as their advisor are to
meet on Wednesday, March 23 at 5:00
p.m. in Brewster D10L Advising for early
registration will take place at that time.
Others interested in SLAP should contact
the department-757-6961.
FILMS COMMITTEE
The Student Union Films Committee
will be conducting a survey in front of the
Student Store on Thursday, March 3 from
8:30-3:00. The survey is designed to find
out about the movie viewing habits of
ECU. All those who fill out the survey will
have the chance of winning one of 15 t-
shirts being raffled off. Loreal hair gel,
sticklets gum and keychains will be given
away.
SPEAKER
Professor Oyeleye Oyediran of the
Department of Political Science at the
University of Lagos, Nigeria will be
speaking on "The Influence of the U.S.
Constitutional Developments in Nigeria"
on Tuesday, March 15,1988 at 7:30 p.m. 1 le
will be speaking in the Lecture Room 1031
of the General Classroom Building. Ev-
eryone is welcome. For more information,
call Dr. Maurice Sunow, Coordinator of
International Studies at 757-6769.
WORKSHOP
Ms. Melissa Haid, a visiting artist, will
conduct a multi-media workshop with
clay, paper, and slumped glass on March
14-18 in Jenkins Art Building. Ms. Haid will
present a slide lecture on March 16 at 7:30
in J-1327 of recent work. A work by Ms.
1 laid will be completed during the work-
shop and will be donated to the perma-
nent collection in Mendenhall Student
Center or Kate Lewis Gallery. The work-
shop is sponsored by the Ceramics Guild,
The Visual Art Forum, and The SGA. The
public is invited to attend. Workhop
hours will be from 8:00-12:00 noon the 14-
18 in J-143.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
To honor free enterprise week, we will
have Margret Barnhill as our guest
speaker. Open to all business-related
majors. New members are welcome.
Meeting will be held in Rawl 302 on
Wednesday, March 2 at 3:00 p.m.
A�D
If you want to hear the true crime story
come hear Lawrence Harris, M.D. on
March 1 at 7:00 pm. in F-307, the topic for
the meeting will be Forensic Pathology.
Final plan for Memphis will be discussed
after the meeting.
RESUME WORKSHOP;
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton I louse is offering
one hour programs on beginning a res-
ume for your job search. Handouts and
samples will be given out to the first 20
people to come to each session. No sign up
required. These sessions are held in the
Career Planning Room on March 3,16, and
22 at 3:00 p.m. For those who have already
written a resume and wish to have a res-
ume critiqued, separate programs are
li -ted at the office.
FCA
Fellowship of Christian Athletes will
meet every Tuesday at 9:30 at the Pirate
Club. Coaches, athletes, and others are
welcome to attend.
PHI ALPHA THFTA
There will be an important Phi Alpha
Theta meeting on Wednesday, March 1 at
3:00 p.m. in the Todd Room (First floor, D
wing of Brewster Bldg). All members
strongly urged to attend.
CONTINUING FD,
The following Personal Development
Courses will be held: Money Matters
(starts March 15); Guitar (starts March 15);
Scuba (starts March 15); Drawing with
Colored Pencils (starts March 17); Begin-
ning Calligraphy (starts May 19). Contact
Continuing Education, Erwin Hall for
more information.
PRIME TIME
Prime Time, sponsored by Campus
Crusade for Christ, meets every Thursday
at 7:30 p.m. in Brewster C-103. Everyone is
welcome.
N.C. SYMPHONY
"Roberta Peters, soprano, will be the
featured soloist with the N.C. Symphony
on Wednesday, March 16 at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. This final concert of
the 1987-88 N.C. Symphony Series is
made possible by the Pitt Co. N.C. Sym-
phony chapter and Burroughs-Wellcome
Co. Tickets are currently available at
Mendenhall Ticket Office (757-6611)
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Friday nights are ALIVE more than
ever before! Join us at Jenkins Auditorium
(Art Building) at 8:00 p.m. Every FRIDAY
NIGHT for Christian Fellowship and
Bible teaching where JESUS IS LORD!
COMMUNITY SHELTER
On Friday, March U, there will be a
concert and dance to raise funds for the
Greenville Community Shelter. It will be
held at The Attic in downtown Greenville
starting at 9:00 pm. Performing will be
Heaartwood and Liquid Sound.
ECU AMBASSADORS
There wiP '�" a meeting on Wednesday,
March 2 3 pm. in the Mendenhall
Multi-purt ose Room. We will be having
our group picture made for the yearbook.
SCEC
There will be an important meeting on
Thursday, March 3 at 5:00 p.m. in Speight
103. We will be electing officers for next
year. Everyone is asked to attend.
EARLY CHII DHppn r m
All education and child development
majors are invited to a special meeting
about storytelling and puppetry on
March 2 at 4:00 in Speight 308. Don't miss
this wonderful opportunity to see a story-
teller. Information on how to read a story
and make a flannel board will be given out
for professional files.
BUILDING SFf.F FSTEFM
Wanda Lancaster, a nurse clinician in
psychology will be speaking on behalf of
Presbyterian and Methodist Campus
Ministries on Wednesday, March 2. The
Methodist Student Center (501 E. 5th St
across from Garrett dorm) will host an all-
you-can-eat dinner on Wednesdays; cost
is $2.00 at the door and $1.50 in advance.
PROD. COMMITTFF,
The Production Committee will meet
on March 1 at 550 p.m. for pictures in the
yearbook. All members need to meet at
Mendenhall Student Center at the infor-
mation desk.
WOMEN STUDIES
Women's role in politics is the topic of
discussion for the second Brown Bag
Lunch of 1988, sponsored by Women's
Studies. Dr. Dorothy Clayton of the Politi-
cal Science Department will speak briefly
and be available to answer questions from
1:00 p.m. The luncheon will be held in
Mendenhall Room 221 from 12-1:30 on
Wednesday, March 2.
GAY COMMUNITY
Greenville Gay Community is a group
formed last fall to meet the needs of the
gay and lesibian Community in
Greenville. The group meets every othber
week at different locations in Greenville.
For more information please call and ask
for Charley at 752-2675.
EROS
The Equal Rights Organization for stu-
dents will meet today at 5:00 in Brewster
B-101 to ratify the consrJtutuion and plan
a fund raiser. All interested persons in-
vited to attend. For more information, call
758-35645 or 746-6049.
SPRING SEM. GRADS,
Caps and gowns should be picked up in
the Student Stores, Wright Building
March 22, 23, 24, 188. These are yours to
keep providing the graduation fee ha-
been paid. For those receiving the Masters
Degree the fee pays for vour cap and
gown, but there is an extra fee of $12.50 tor
your hood. Announcements are available
in the Student Stores, Wright Building
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
AU Travel Committee members: There
will be a meeting on Wednesday, March 2
at 5 p.m. in Mendenhall.
SIGMA GAMMA EPSILON
Sigma Gamma Epsilon, the Honor
Society of Earth Sciences, and the ECU
Dept. of Geology welcome Dr. Keros
Cartwright, the 1987-1988 Birdsall Distin
guished Lecturer of the Hvdrogeolop
Division of the Geological Sooetv ot
America who will present two lectures
"Safe Landfills-Can we succeed?" will be
presented Tuesday, March 1, at 7:30 p.m.
in General Classroom Building Rm lilQ
"Large Scale Experiments in Hydrogeo!
ogy" will be presented Wednesdav
March 2, at 4:00 p.m. in Graham Building
Room 301. All are welcome to these talks
For more information, call ECU Geolocv
Dept. at 757-6360.
, OUTDOOR THFFATY
Worshop sponsored by the LSS-S and
LSS 4700, March 19,9.00-4:00 at River Park
North. Lunch included. Open to students
($12.50) and professionals ($25.00). Pre-
register and pre-pay by March 9th at the
LSS Building. Limited to 30 participants
OVERSEAS prV,
Student internships interested in
spending a summer (or longer) in remote
parts of the world? The Overseas Devd
opment Network is seeking several con-
cerned, committed students and recent
graduates who are interested in develop-
ment. Internships are available in India,
Bangladesh, Latin America, the PhiUippi-
nes, and the Appalachian Mountains.
Financial assistance is available. Contact
Marianne Exum for more information at
home 752-2389 or work 757-6271. Appli-
cation deadline is March 15, 1988.
SKA
SRA Semiformal Dance- Tickets are on
sale now? The dance will be from 9 pm to
1 am on March 18,1988 in the Holiday Inn
Hohdome with the theme being "One
Night in Bangkok- See Residence Hall
�� esidenl for "d"5 tt3-00 �&e
$5.00 couple with SRA card and $4 00
single, $7.00 couple without SRA card).
1HL EAJ
How t
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Suit Hran
Warning: This column
rated JO; Juniors or above On!
Finally it is upon us, thebn,
of spring. By Saturday, the m
fortunate of us will be suj
basking, checking out tl
commodities as they skimp
down the beach and thrown
back some cool ones. For the le
fortune who will spK-nd the bre
in the Emerald City, say hey
Dewanda at the Sports Pad t
me.
Southward on 1-95, tht
will cruise. Before gassing I
tank and buying that 2 Hind b
of road tnp lntos. think of th
Record store
offers more
than albums
By BRAD BANNISTER
Stiff Wnler
Warning: This article is rah
EF; Even Freshmen can read
When my editor first ask
to check out East Coast Music ai
Video, I thought I was in fij
another boring "Hey, sp I
that store" article. But. afl
actually visiting the place, n
only did I find that I was wronj
also found a few albums I've be
looking for.
The music store, owned
Frank Ferree, started off under i
corporate name "Rock and
in a small building on Fifth Stre
In 1975, in order to make room 1
more stock, the store was movi
to a new location.
For four vears busine:
prospered until, in 1979, a til
caused it to be moved once mof
At this location lljEofti. �1
dubbed "Apple RecorasruT,
the first time, carried CD's.
Recently, "Apple Record
moved to 1109 Charles Bouleval
where movie rentals have hei
included and the name has bo
changed again, this time to "F
Cosast Music and Video O
brothers and sisters, we In
during a time of history in t
making.)
"East Coast" is run by manat
and all around cool guy, i
Dillon who was friends w
Ferree in school.
"I used to drive a truck for
father until he shut his busim
down said Dillon. "Frank
me in the store one day and ask
me to come work for him
Dillon wasn't just an add-
though. Talk to him and vod
find that he's prttj
knowledgeable about musk
favorite section oi the storej
"new and developing artist
which he says he likes b
because "a group's first all
stands out more
But the whole store is full
surprises. They even ha ve a d ri j
thru window for you musl
lovers who are to lazy to get outj
the car. It works pretty much hi
you conventional McDonaW
drive-thru, except that you c
your order in. "Yes. I'll have SOI
This is East Coast Music an
include video rentals. (Fhotol
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d the ECU
Di Keros
� - S Btrdsall ritm
� �. of
� � lectures,
eed?" will be
I, a- 730 p m.
rtg Km 101
Mont- in 1 lydrogeoJ
; Inesday,
raham Building
tme to these talks
eology
LDQQJR IHIRAPY
S-S and
' ' � I " it River Park
� i Open to students
ionals (v � 1're-
h th at the
' ; ' - parti, ipants
OVERSEAS DFV,
� rnships interested in
onger) in remote
�� r d rheOverseas Devel-
���'� �rk is seeking several con-
" students and recent
ire interested in develop-
ships are available in India,
I atin America, the Phillippi-
and the Appalachian Mountains.
ancia ince is available Contact
I v,im for more information at
9� work 757-6271. Appli-
ed ine is March 15, 1988.
SRA
formal Dance: Tickets are on
w' The dance will be from 9 pm to
n March 18, 1988 in the Holiday Inn
Mite with the theme being "One
in Bangkok See Residence Hall
'resident for tickets ($3.00 single,
couple with SRA card and $4 00
$7.00 couple without SRA card).
light
li e 1
10
Pjde
fHE 1ASI CAROt INIAN
Features
MARC in, 1988
How to prepare for Spring Break road
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Sfcifi V ritel
Warning: This column is
rated O; Juniors or above Only.
Finally it is upon us, the break
spring. Bv Saturday, the more
.mate of us will be sun
basking, cheeking out the
�modifies as they skimpcr
x n the beach and throwing
k k some axl ones, lor the less
inc who will spend the break
the Emerald City, sav hey to
anda al the Sports A tor
Southward on 1-95, the flocks
.Nil! rniise. Before gassing the
s and buying that 2 und bag
ad trip Doritos. think ot these
Record store
offers more
than albums
various necccssitics in vour pre
excursion preparation.
1 Transportation. I irst and
most importantly let's consider
passenger comfort. Call up
Grandpa or Uncle Leroy and ask
him it he can spare the 1 .incoln for
a week. Butter him upand tell a lii
like "My friends are really
responsible individuals before
asking him for the Exxon card.
It you can't hot-wire Uncle
Leroy's Contincntial, settle for
any mode of transportation
possible, lor instances the bed of
Pugslcy's pick-up truck will have
to suffice tor the college rover,but
1 won't mmd because I'll probably
pass out before we get to Georgia.
A fuzz buster is necessary to
Bv BRAD BANNISTER
Staff Writer
go 95 on I 95. It you see several
shaded windowed Mercedes
whizz by you at very high speeds,
follow them, they are in the mob
tnd the cops will never stop you.
2. Road Supplements. ECU
by-laws sav each individual
sojourning to Flordia must be
equipped with a case of that hops
and barley concoction and it must
be in hand's reach at all times.
Conservative spenders should
look into flu1 variety of swill beers
at $7 a c.ise whose brands names
are well known. Liberal spenders
always invest in Anheuser-Bush
products. Lite-weights should
seriously look into a cast- of LA
1 spending on how many
rulers are in your car, a dilemma
may arise in deciding the amount
of illccal substance to purchase
from that shady looking character
floating by raft on the Tar River.
The distance oi the trip should
also be taken into the amount
consideration.
Advanced matharrivesat this
formula. Multiply the number of
rolled illegal substance sticks by
the number of hours the trip's
destination will take and then
multiple th.it by one-half of the
number oi riders.
Using this formula, a 17-hour
trip to bort Lauderdale with four
people will take 34 such sticks, 17
times 2. This will mean that you
need to buy a half Jvig before the
trip. A quarter will do on shorter
Warning: This article is rated
EF; Even freshmen can read it.
When my editor first asked me
tcck out East Coast Music and
ideo, 1 thought 1 was in for
another boring "Hey, spotlight
that store article. But, alter
actually visiting the place, not
only did 1 find that 1 was wrong, I
also found a few albums I've been
king for.
1 he music store, owned by
frank Fcrrce, started off under its
corporate name "Rock and Soul"
ina small building on Fifth Street.
In 1975, in order to make room for
more stock, the store was moved
to a new location.
For tour years business
prospered until, in 1979, a fire
caused it to be moved once more.
At this location th tt.3� was
dubbed " Apple Recordsand, for
the first time, carried CD's.
Recently, "Apple Records"
moved to 1109 Charles Boulevard
where movie rentals have been
included and the name has been
changed again, this time to "Last
;ast Music and Video (Yes,
brothers and sisters, we live
during a time oi history in the
making.)
"Fast Coast" is run by manager
and all around cool guv, Jay
Dillon who was friends with
Ferree in school.
"1 used to drive a truck for my
father until he shut his business
down said Dillon. "Frank saw
me in the store one day and asked
me to come work for him
Dillon wasn't just an add-on
though. Talk to him and you'll
find that he's pretty
knowledgeable about music . 1 lis
favorite section of the store is
"new and developing artists"
which he says he likes best
because "a group's first album
stands out more
But the whole store is full of
surprises. They even have a drive-
thru wmdow for you music-
lovers who are to lazy to get out of
the car. It works pretty much like
you conventional McDonald's
drive-thru, except that you call
vour order in. "Yes. I'll have some
trips.
Muchies should include bags
of pig rinds, cajun chips, and
Crunch and Munch�. Remember
you already have beverage.
Riding with drivers who
don't like to stop for any thing may
be exceeding painful if they are
merciless. With this thought in
mind, think ahead and invest in
your very own bed pan.
3. Odds and Ends. Lor vour
friend who goes spastic (1 hate that
word)in the car and won't stop
harping on the most minute
happening in your sex-history
with rehash such as "Her thighs
were thisbig bring the morphine
injection just for him.
For fresh air in the car, bring a
sprayable air freshner for those of
your friends who enjoy other
people smelling their gastral
expulsions. If the problem
presists, lock the individual in a
gas station bathroom and leave
him there.
For AIDS sake, buy a box or
two or pink colored french tickler-
ribbed condoms, they make great
presents. They serve as beautiful
decorative items for your hotel
room after they have been used.
Make sure to bring your own
sheets, you just can never who
may have laying on that hotel
sheet, it could ot been blessed by
the presense of Jimmy Swaggart
or worst. Don't attempt to adjust
the air-conditioning, such
attempts will be rendered futile
and cause you to mix a stronger
drink, not to imply that you will be
drinking or anything.
Make sure to sober up one o
the mornings to write a note oi
one of those cheesy hotel pos
cards and send it to the person or
persons who made the trip
possible. Mom and Dad will
appreciate reading vour lies of
visiting the Marine Life Mueseum
and talking to biology experts. If
Mom and Lop are not fitting the
bill, send a post card to vour
bookie and thank him tor doling
out 500bucks.
Remember this is one week
out of the year when you have the
right to make a total dick head out
of yourself and have fun doing it.
Tell the girls you are a honor
student studying gynecologv.
Girls tell the guvs you are a virgin.
You will never see these
people again so why not elevalate
vour loser credential into a facade
oi little white lies. If you follow
Earlvis' directions, the decorum
of vour hotel room will be
abounded by sappy pink rubbers.
The Grammy Awards
that didn't get on TV
This is Judge Reinhold in the Columbia Motion picture, "Vice Versa
at Hendrix theater at 8 p.m. Also starring are Fred Savage and Swoos
which will sneak preview tonight
ie Kurtz.
By M1CAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
Warning: This article is rated
OM; Only Micah Harris fans
should read this story.
Every Grammy Awards
ceremony it happens: a list oi
awards that were passed out
before the telecast began are
rambled off by some has-been
celebrity and you pick that
moment to relieve your bladder.
Personally, we oi the East
Carolinian Features Page feel
these recipients are worthy of
your attention whether or not you
have to wee-wee. We are proud to
present the second annual
"Grammys That No One Saw
Best Frame on a Male Performer
Featured on a Movie Soundtrack:
Patrick Swayze.
Best Frame on a Female
Performer Featured on a Movie
Soundtrack:
Justine Bateman.
Merely Average Vocal
Performance on a Movie
Soundtrack by a Male:
Patrick Swayze.
Merely Average Vocal
Performance on a Movie
Soundtrack bv a Female:
Justine Bateman.
Best Duet: Suzanne Vega and
Power Source for "Dear Mr. Jesus,
Mv Name is Luka
Best Performance by an Artist
in Drag: Janet Jackson as her
"brother Michael. Okay, Janet,
you lost some weight and
rearranged your face but we
know why the "two of you" never
have songs out at the same time.
Nudge, nudge; wink, wink.
Biggest Stick-in-the-Mud Who
Wouldn't Come Back for the
Comeback: Lindsay Buckingham.
Defacement of Public Property
by a Musical Performer Award:
Tiffany for pasting her plastiscene
presence in malls around the
country.
On second thought, the Mall is
exactly where your plastic, pre-
packaged musical "presence
belongs.
The "Noooo, My Brother Get
vour Own Album" Award for
Best Album Not Available in Ary
Store: Tie: "The Sexy Sounds r'
Soul" and "The Chuck Wagon
Gang's Greatest 1 lits
Performer most resembling
warmed-over death: Rov
See GRAMMYS, page 8
Dead Kennedys, with a side order
of Hoodoo Gurus and a freshly
blended Tiffany, please
Plus, they've got all the killer
titles - Let's Active, Guadal canal
Diary, Drivin' n Cryin Dead
Milkmen, REM-cool Stuff that
other stores just ain't got.
"We trv to keep up with
WZMB's song list said Dillon.
"We have m stock 90 oi the
songs they play
They've even got records tor
you dudes who have no taste in
music.
They're also blessed with a
video selection to please the most
hardcore couch potato - From
music videos, horror and comedy
flicks to those tear-jerking,
family-type "Oh, how sweet"
movies.
And for you button wearing
folks, Last Coast Music and Video
has buttons with the newest snide
remarks this side of TTI
"a iHpo Once the downtown Apple Records, the shop has expanded to
This is East Coast Music andKV,dAlli�00d.)
include video rentals. (Photo by Hardy All.goo
Pirkin' the Bones
God puts Bonehead in Hell
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
A Koal Skjtepunk
Warning: This column is rated
SG; Sophomore Guidance
suggested for those who aren't
aid enough to buy beer.
In the first paragraphs of this
column, I'd like to publicly
apologize for the unintentional
racist remark I quoted God as
saying. He would like everyone to
know, that's not what He said,
and that I'm going to be locked in
a small room with Tiffany for all
eternity.
Anyway. Ever haveone of those
days? Things might be boss for a
while. Then you make the mistake
of listening to that last song on a
Stevie album (doesn't matter
which one, they all have really
depressing songs at the end).
Or a sadistic person has made
Xerox� copies of your poetry and
plastered them all over Brcwster.
Or some art fag bops you with his
art fag tool box. Something just
triggers it.
And you just want to kill
yourself. You think, Why am I on
this ridiculous planet? A world
full of sexually repressed English
teachers that pick on you in class.
A world full of stupid old
people with lots of encrusted wax
in their ears that want you to haul
their groceries in. A world with
only five copies of any Drivin' and
Cryin' albums in existence.
You might seriously think
about propping open the
microwave and frying your brain
from the inside out. Besides, you
don't want to end up old anyway,
do you?
Being old would suck. Think
about not having hair. Think
about drooling all the time. Think
about taking three minuter and 37
seconds to get from your car to the
front door.
Think about the 17 months of
wax in your ears that you
completely forgot to scrape out,
and everybody's too embarassed
to tell you. Stuff like that must
happen a lot.
Old people get weird too. You
might think the Bonehead isn't
iiving on this planet, but old
people mumble a lot and think
their belts are supposed to go
right up under their flabby little
chests.
Don't tell me old people have
sex. Don't even try to get up on
that one. That myth goes right out
the window when you try to get
that mental picture of grandma
and grandpa, dentures out,
colostomy bags passionately
intertwined, palsied tongues
searching around-
Gak. That's too much for even
me. Anyway, the point is, why not
go ahead and off yourself. That's
just one less car the rest of the
population has to deal with
during rush hour.
Hey, it's a good way to get all
that rotten poetry published. It
made Sylvia Plath. It
immortalized whatsisname, the
treasurer who ate a bullet on TV.
Iv'c just been warned by the
editor, I'd best not make this an
edorsement tor suicide. I could
get sued like that. Well, hang on, it
ain't over yet.
After all. Suicide is the only real
philosophical question, saycth
Camus, or one of those guys. I'm
just trying to present it as a
reasonable option.
However, Camus and the other
guys end up saying stuff like, you
shouldn't kill yourself 'cause then
you're just as ridiculous as the
world. Well, that's all well and
true.
But think about how much
more constructive it would be if
you killed somebody else instead
of yourself. Or if you were
especially cruel to someone. It
would be great.
There are so many people
whose heads should just explode.
The tellers at the bank who won't
accept your expired driving
permit. The fag at the record store
who keeps telling you ABBA was
a groundbreaking group. The
cops who give you tickets for
pissing behind the Fast Fare�.
I don't know exactly what the
NRA does, but if they can get me
See KILLING, page 8
r





1
8
J IE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 3.1088
University Unions presents shows
ECU Ne�� Bureau
More than a dozen of the
nation's leading concert and
theatre performers and
ensembles will appear at East
Carolina University during the
1988-89 academic year.
The will be featured on the East
Carolina University Unions
Performing Arts Series, a group of
programs formerly known as the
ECU Artists Series and the ECU
Theatre Arts Series, and on the
ECU Chamber Music Scries.
The combined music-dance-
theatre Performing Arts Series
will include these events during
the 1988 89 season:
The Ohio Ballet. Oct. 12;
Trumpeter Wynton Marsalis,
Nov. 1; The Acting Company's
Kabuki theatre production oi
Macbeth Nov. 9; the Atlanta
Symphony, Nov. 17; Philad,
ncerompanv. Ian. � � Vv.
rk Gilbert and Sullivan Players
in ' Tirates oi renzar.ee Ian 30;
c Tolish National Radio
Orchestra, Eeb. 22; a touring
production oi the hit Broadway
musical, 'Cabaret March 14; the
combined North Carolina and
ECU Symphony Orchestras with
guest pianist Karen Shaw, March
1 and violinist Nadja Salerno-
Sonnenberg, April 20.
All Performing Arts series
events will be held in Wright
Auditorium. Scheduled for
Hendrix Threatre in Mendenhall
Student Center are the four
concerts comprising the 1988-89
Chamber Music Series:
The Bu s well - Pa rnas-l.uvi si
Trio (piano, violin and cello), Oct.
3; the National Gallery of Art
Vocal Ensemble, Nov. 14; the
Tokyo String Quartet, March 16
and .ne jazz quartet "Oregon
A' ;il 5.
Season tickets for the
Performing Arts and Chamber
Music Series are already
available. Two types oi
Performing Arts series season
tickets are offered, one for all 10
events and one for the patron's
choice of seven oi the 10
scheduled events. Chamber
Music Series season tickets
comprise all four oi the chamber
concerts.
Season tickets for the general
public for all 10 Performing Art-
events are $100 each, and $50 for
uth. A set oi seven Performing
Arts concert tickets ire 580 each,
and $40 t t youth.
Batgirl sayeth:
Reading the
East Carolinian
Features page is totally rad.
I mean, boss
Sorry.
Please don't
make me
go back to
tne car shows
1
1 Tele Video XL
�IBM Compatible
'Keyboard
�Monitor
�Graphics
PORTABLE $595
J
I
These are the New York Gilbert and Sullivan Players in the musical, "The Pirates of Penance one of
the many attractions the University Unions will be presenting next year.
Grammys you didn't see
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
Adults $250,til
Continued from page 7
Orbison. l es, Roy, your pasty
countenance has us all "Crying
Now get back in the frezer and
please don't sit next to the milk.
The 'What Would Happen if
Every Chunky Girl in this Group
'imped Up and Came Down at
the Same Time" Award: those
buxom babes oi "Expose
Cookie Cutter Award for Most
-riginal Musical Perfomer:
Debbie Gibson. Debbie, your
music's bland, you can't dance
and your mother dresses you
funny.
May the FCA order your local
high school to put you in
detention hall for ten years or
until you develop some taste,
whichever comes first.
Artists with Delusions of
Grandeur Awtard: Run - D. M. C.
for their self-proclaimed new
Christmas Classic, "Christmas in
Hollis I'm sure firty years from
now, we'll all get misty-eyed as
we rap this one with our
grandchildren and look dreamily
at the vule log in the fireplace.
Tightest Jeans in a Music Video:
George "I've lost feeling in my
lower extremities" Michael.
George couldn't be here to accept
the award as he was having his
legs amputated.
The "Xo, I'm Not Exactly A
Singer but I Dance With Patrick
Swayze and Besides, Its My
Boyfriends Video" award for
Killing off the
stupid people
Continued from page 7
a gun, I'm all tor them, mere
wouldn't be 10 people left in this
town if I got hold of a pistol,
though.
'Course, some of us don't have
such extreme tendencies.
Simple cruelty is enough. But just
laughing at fat girls' poetry isn't
enough. Sure it hurts them, but fat
girls can't fight back anyway.
Thev just cry and write more
poetry.
If you are going to takeout your
aggressions, you have to go after
the people that arc really the
problem.
So, the next time some old
Alzheimer's sufferer asks you to
put their trash in the dumpster,
just sayLook, you old fart, my
mother and father didn't date
extensively in the early 60s,
fornicate and then pay lots of
money to put me through college
so I would end up 22 years later
taking your damn trash out
Or tell some bleached out art
fag, "Why don't you quit fooling
yourself and go work for a florist.
You only carry that damn toolbox
so you can pretend you're a real
man. Go home and hope a
construction worker doesn't beat
you up
Jell your English
teacher'Chippy Bonehead
writes better than you do, and he
gets laid more too. Besides, I only
Took this class to have some time
tosleep before Accounti ng class
Do these things. The world
wim't get any better, but everyone
will be as miserable as you for a
change. And I'll sit back and
laach.
appearance by a female in a video:
Cynthia Rhodes in "It Don't Mean
Nothing.
The "No, I'm Not Exactly A
Singer or A Dancer, but It's My
Boyfriend's Video" award for
Appearance bv a female in a
video: Tawny Kitaen in "Is This
Love
The "No I'm Not Exactly A
Singer, I Can't Dance, I Don't
Have A Boyfriend, And There's
No Real Purpose In My
Continued Existence" award for
Appearance bv a female in a
video: Debbie Givson in
eventhing she's done.
And there you have it: artistry
viulv worth wee-weeing over.
S.oO
CHILDREN
ANYTIME $250
BUCCANNER MOVIES
t: 756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
l Matinee Special Good For First Show Only
THE LAST EMPORER
RATED PG-13 2:00-5:00-8:00


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MOON STRUCK
1:00-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:20
Harrison Ford in
FRANTIC
RATED R 2:00-4:30-7:00-9:20

Plazci Cinema
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Tickets only $2 for
first hour daily.
Three Men and A
Baby - PG
Aetion Jaekson
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The Nest-R
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Batteries Not In
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$1.50 All Times
i
Come and Register for a FREE
Hayes 1200 Baud Modem.
To be given away on April 30. 1933.
No purchase necessary.
SDF
COMPUTERS
106 E. 5th. St. (Beside Cubbies.
Greenville 752-3694
Save 30e NOW on Diet Sun-drop with the attached coupon, and receive
$1.50 in coupons by mail when you purchase one 2-iiter or one multipack
of Diet Sun-drop.
HOT DEALS
ON COOL
SHADES FOR
SPRING BREAK
DIET Sun drop
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when you buy one 2-Liter
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Enclosed is the cash register recent for one any size Diet Sun-drop with the pnee circled, and
the UPC code number wnlten on the recept
Please send (check one): 3-50c coupons for next 3 purchases of Diet Sun drop or 50c cash to
NAME�
ADDRESS
CITY
(Please pnoi cieaiiy Proper delivery depends on a compiele and ecu reel address 1
STATE�
Offer expires March 31, 1988
Place in a stamped envelope and
mail to
Sun-drop Challenge Refund
P.O. Box 9042
Clinton, Iowa 52736
ZIP CODE
Please Note These Additional Terms:
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2 THtSCERTtflCATE MAY NOT BE MECHANICALLY
REPRODUCED AND MUST ACCOMPANY YOUR REQUEST
3 Your oltef rights may not be assigned or transferred
4 L unit 1 Retund(s) per name or address
5 Otter expires March 31 1988
6 Please allow 6 8 weeks tor delivery
ChaHenge Refund Certificate ICash Redemption Value 1 100 of 1c)
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The PUi Mail (across horn Bfmtysl
Brad'
by BRAD BANNISTTR
Nti V "W
It was by sheer luck thai
tourtdout.ddavsk case
in the right place at the -
kfime.
Let me g.plain:
I was standing at tl
in Kentucky Fried C'r i I
waiting to be served
real big on poultry n
anything, mind you,
that my budget a' I
allowed me a
$200 towards tl
dinner, which 1 I
rounded off to about a
Little� a night
they didn t
$.39 price
When I
asked me it
mayonnaise on
LittleS and 1 d l
remember sayr
Nevertheless
and guess what, my Cl
LittleS was plain, rn
wouldn't have said
but, with a diet of
Little� a night, I net
nourishment 1 could g
On returning to the co
found that the cashier vn -
and in her place w.
large gentleman, wean
sleeveless KFCS attire tl
exposed an elaborate tatt
his forearm th it read
Foghorn Lee n
The W
& �
WZM3 TO? 12
3-03-88
Warning: This list is rated
Not for Tiffany fans.
1. Dnvin' n Cryn "Whisj
Tames the Lion' Island.
2. Arms Akimbo, 'This is N
The Late Show 688.
3. Sisters of Mercy, "Fl
Land Elektra.
4. Robin Hitchcock, "Cob
Frogs, KearitfVfty.
3. The Accelerators, Vr
6. Firehose, "It n SST.
7. God Fathers. "Birth -
&t
Good Grief! Som
Become a column
BeFUNN for a
Apply now at t!
as
Units �M
FEELl
UN
ne:
Why not ctr.ne by the R
E. 10th St; or call 758
ing or Assistance.
Our Volunteers and Sti
around. In order to assisl
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preserve and enhance th
munity.
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f
TI IF. EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 3,1988
a
eth:
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BLE S595
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FOR
REAK
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rtx
is from Brndys
71
ungiasses.
;es on quality shades'j
I jtosses Eyeglass Frames.
Solutions And Eye Ancessoris
Eyeglass Frames from $9 95
i
3
Brad's mom kills the Kentucky Fried guy
by BRAD BANNISTER
Staff Wntcr
t w as by sheer luck that 1 ever
uind out, a classic case of being
n the right place at the right
el me explain:
w as standing at the counter
n Kentucky Fried Chicken�
waiting to be served. I'm not
real big on poultry man or
nvthing, mind vou, it's just
hat my budget at the time
ed me approximately
; 00 towards the weeks'
. Miner, which 1 figured
ided off to about a Chicken
I a night, considering
. didn't change that little
price.
When 1 ordered, the cashier
ked me it 1 wanted
navonnaise on my Chicken
t'tle� and 1 distinctly
nember saying yes!
Nevertheless, 1 got to my seat,
d guess what, my Chicken
was plain. Normally, I
couldn't have said anything,
but, with a diet of one Chicken
Little� a night, 1 needed all the
nourishment 1 could get.
On returning to the counter, 1
found that the cashier was gone
and in her place was a rather
irge gentleman, wearing
veless KFC� attire that
posed an elaborate tattoo on
rorearm that read. 1 love
.horn Leghorn 1 le wore a
scowl on his face that 1 would
swear was permanent.
"Excuse me, my good man I
spoke up. "With whom do 1
inquire about getting
mayonnaise on my Chicken
Little�?"
The man squinted his eyes;
his one long eyebrow crawled
like a catepillar to meet the
bridge of his nose.
"YOUR MAMA he
growled and spit a large green
secretion on my shoe.
1 went blank. 1 lisreply hit me
like a ton of bricks. Why would my
mother know anything about
Chicken Littles�? Weren't all the
Colonel's recipes secret? And if she
did know, how did she find out?
The questions lay on mv mind like
a chili dog on my stomach.
I pondered. After all, the Colonel
wasn't a man to give out his
secrets, was he? I mean, you'd
probably have to kill him to get a
glimpse of his eleven herbs and
spices. That's it! Maybe his death
hadn't been natural! Maybe my
mother
Horrified , I dropped my
Chicken Little� and darted out the
door towards my car, nearly
slipping in the green stuff that
oozed down mv shoe. Forty-five
minutes and a speeding ticket
later, 1 was pulling into the
driveway of my mother's house.
As 1 entered the doors things
looked grim, the truth was
obvious. In the air was the smell oi
fried chicken, and by the store
stood the suspect, my mother,
licking her fingers.
1 pointed an accusing linger at
her and said, "Why did vou do it,
Mom?"
A puzzled look came across her
face as she looked down at her
hands, "Wellwe didn't have any
napkins
"No. 1 mean about Colonel
Sanders. Whv did vou I wrung
my fingers across the front of my
neck.
She went pale. "So, you know
she sighed. "Sit down, son, and I'll
explain. It's sort of like this
Somewhere in the background,
the theme from the "Twilight
one" started playing.
"I was young and foolish, a girl
starved for affection. And Colonel
Sanders, well, was all 1 wanted in a
man-lovine warm, a good
cookI le was alos the only man I
had ever met with a pet chicken.
We met at Woodstock and I fell
as easy prey to his sweet talk. He
had said that I had such cute legs.
But he left me for some chick with
big breasts and nice thighs. And
that's the whole storv. That's
when lShe burst into tears.
"What, Mom?" I pleaded. "Is
that when you killed him?"
"No she sobbed. "I didn't kill
him, II
"What did you do?
I choked his chicken
Somewhere in the background,
the theme from "Laverne and
Shirley" started playing.
I drove back to Greenville with
a clear mind and an empty
stomach.
My moral: Don't ask for
mayonnaise on your Chicken
Uttles�.
The WZMB top 13
WZM3 TOT 13
3-03-88
Warning: This list is rated NT;
Not for Tiffany fans.
1. Dnvin' n Cryn "Whisper
Tames the Lion Island.
2. Arms Akimbo, 'This is No'
The Late Show 688.
3. Sisters oi Mercy, "Flood
Land Elektra.
4. Robin Hitchcock, "Globe of
rrogs, Reactivity.
5. The Accelerators, Profile.
6. Firehose, "If n SST.
7. God Fathers, "Birth, School,
Work, Death Epic.
8. Various Artist, "This Dogs
Live In the Garage Arf! Arf! Art!
Records.
9. Slamin' Watusis, Epic.
10. Snatches of rink, "Send in
the Clowns Dog Gone Reords!
11. Midnite Oil, "Deisel and
Dust CBS.
12. jerry HarrisonCasual
Gods Sire.
13. The Screaming Broccolli,
"Ruling Factor Records
'indicates new entries.
Good Grief! Somebody stop this Bonehead!
Become a columnist for the paper.
Be FUNNY for a change! Be female!
Apply now at the East Carolinian offices.
B
&i
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UNCERTAIN?
u�� NEED HELP?
Why not come by the REAL Crisis Intervention Center: 312
E. 10th St; or call 758-HELP, For Free Confidential Counsel-
ing or Assistance.
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you might have. Our longstanding goal has always been to
preserve and enhance the quality of life for you and our com-
munity.
Licensed And Accredited By The State of North Carolina
River Bluff Apartments
2 Bd. Townhouses Temporarily Reduced to
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rates still in effect,
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10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd.
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G3�
SAV A CENTER
The freshest way to Save
CHUNK LIGHT TUNA � IN OIL OR WATER
Chicken
of the Sea
USD INSPECTED 4-7 LB. AVG.
TUrkey
Breast
Limit Two With Add I $10 Purchase
Limit Three Please
Microwave 2 )00
Popcorn O

Green
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Spaghetti
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HOW '� ' �
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LARGE GARBAGE � 3 3A ASH
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Chee
1
99
ks; 3 i��
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Prices Good in Greenville. N.C. At 70o L eeiville BlvcJ
Open Sunday 7:00 AM to 11:00 P.M.
Monday Thru Saturday 7:00 A.M12 Midnight
PRICES EFFECTIVE FEB 28 THRU MARCH 5 i9M QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
Miller Light,
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Miller Draft
Beer
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12-1202





r
10 mEEASTCAROI 1N1AN
MARCH 3,188
B MJkiil I
"Nothing Superman can't handle -Hal Holbrook
AH:)V AH OrpheusrNightwalker
ByGURGANUSand HARRIS
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IT'S "BEAUTIFUL
OUTSIDE AE YOU
RErYDV JFOk OUTS 4
WALK?
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� The Spring Break Edition of
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you sck"J
THE BATTERtES:
IN W WAlWN
A?E 1.EAT.L
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BOSS!
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Readers, what it is! Yes, you'll find no games this week because everyone is enjoying themselves at
the beach, except for my partner Chip, who went to hell. Until you come back from break, occupy
yourself by trying to figure out which cartoonists on the page are the ones on the beach behind me.
Have a safe, fun, break, stay out of trouble, and keep your naughty bits to yourselves. We'll leave the
sun on for va.
The Law
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ChiP in Hell
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Pirates he
the Color
By TIMHANDLER
Sports f d
East C arolina I
ta-k this Ar
Saturday's
regular season �
to UNC-Wiln
sites toward th (
Association
tournament
The CAA toui
CAA
II ttichaori i : �
Saturday -� - '
. �.
IB taat: -��
H Ji t. �
S � � J � � -� � '
F �
-��c� Eollaaua
tS Mvv iS .1
2 Ajerina . 3 -i . , . .
Sat ur -iay . �� '
121 o e r �
Hamf ��.�
i: Miiiajt k harv
13 Qt-izt. Maac .�-1, �?
Saturday, March
IsOO p
Hsmptcn Collaa -
No 2reA
Bv CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sports VNrtter
While most studei
a break from a
members of the East j
men's and women's tT � j
will be busv on the track.
The men's team conclu 1 - I
indoor season with a trip I I
1C4A championships
.Cnmnian, M L
ECU Olvmprt hopeful
rernon McNeill will c
the 55-mct i �
Eugene McN d tear-
Ike Robinson.
Competing in th
will be Eugene
Robinson. Kelvin
Lee, and Chris Pur i
ECU Traek coach E
savs that ECU'S relay I
not be competii
championships -
runners will have a
compete in t:
events.
Ken Daughtery ai
Love will also be
ECU as the c
meters
On March
McNeill, will travi
Citv, to compete i
indoor champion ps
qualified for in Janu
McNeill ran a 6 19
preliminary heat at I
of Florida Invitational
season, a time good er
take him to the N'CA -
The rest of the n

Barry Scott proudly displays
as a professional btatheiete.

- � � maxai
�- �






f

I
I
.KI( M K
THE gATTES L
I? REiD
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
MARCH 3, 1988 Page 11
Pirates hope to regroup and head to
the Colonial Tournament with high hopes
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
East Carolina faces the tough
task this week of shaking off last
Saturday's dissappointing
regular season-ending 65-60 loss
to UNC-Wilmington and setting
sites toward the Colonial Athletic
Association basketball
tournament.
The CAA tournament, which
will be played in Hampton, Va second straight year. Home Team
begins with quarterfinal action on Sports, which is available on
Saturday, March 5 and continues
through Monday, March 7. The
tournament championship will
bo played at 7:30 p.m. on Monday.
The winner of Monday's title
game will receive an automatic
berth to the NCAA tournament.
Greenville Cable Television, will
broadcast all seven tournament
contests.
'Coming off of last Saturday's
will consist Saturday. He did
point out though that junior walk-
on Kenny Murphy has been
unable to practice much this week
because of a viral infection.
Murphy is expected to be ready
loss to Wilmington, everybody is by Saturday though
kinda down right now ECU
head coach Mike Steele said. "It
All games will be played in the was a very dissappointing loss for
Hampton Coliseum
us. We had worked hard to get
ready for the game without Gus
(Hill, who is out for the remainder
of the year with an injury) and
The Pirates contest against the
Spiders sports a 7 p.m. tipoff.
In losing Hill for the
tournament, the Pirates lost the
conference's second-leading
scorer. Hill finished the year
averaging 19.3 points. However,
now hopefully, with a full week of in league battles Hill was the tops
practice, we can regroup in scoring chipping in an average
The loss to the Seahawks of 22.4 points per contest. Hill also
Saturday left the Pirates in the ranked eighth in the league from
cellar of the CAA final regular the charity stripe during the year
No break for track
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sports Writer
While most students are taking
a break from school next week,
members of the East Carolina
men's and women's track teams
will be busy on the track.
The men's team concludes it's
indour season with a trip to the
IC4A championships on
,Prinontf�n.i V -
ECU Olympic hopeful, Lee
Yernon McNeill will compete in
the 55-mcters, along with brother
Eugene McNeill and teammate
Ike Robinson.
Competing in the 200-meter
will be Eugene McNeill,
Robinson, Kelvin Wrighton, Jon says one goal of this years team is
Lee, and Chris Durant. to qualify for the NCAA
ECU Track coach Bill Carson championships,
says that ECU's relay teams will No other women's relay team at
open up their outdoor season on
March 12 at the N.C. State
Invitational.
Carson says that the men will
probably start oi the season slow
as thev trv out new relav
J J j
combinations and work new team
members into the program.
Carson added that the team
should start to come on strong
close to the N.C. Collegiate
championships on April 9, and
reach their peak during the final
month of the season.
ECU's women's track team also
opens it's season at the N.C. State
Invitational.
Women's coach Wayne Miller
season standings with a 3-11
mark. Overall, the Pirates sport a
8-19 mark.
Finishing last in the regular
season standings delegates ECU
to the unwanted challenge of
battling league champion
Richmond, who finished the
regular season with an 11-3
conference mark and an overall
record of 21 -6, in the first round of
the tournament.
Heading into Saturday's first
round matchup against
Richmond will, no doubt, pose
several problems for Steele and
his players.
"Gus was very instrumental in
our staying close to them
(Richmond) in the games we
played this year (84-79 and 68-64
Richmond wins) Steele said.
"We've just got to work on
preparing for them without him.
"We're going in there
(Hampton) with the idea we can
win Steele continued. "But it is
like losing your book for a class
right before a big test � you
would feel much more
comfortable knowing you could
prepare for the test with the book
tossing in over 75 percent of his
free throws.
The Pirates will, however, have
the services of forward Reed Lose.
Lose wound up the regualr
season as the CAA's seventh
leading scorer with an average of
14.9 points per game. Lose also
ranks amoung the tops in the
league in field accuracy with a
51.1 percent clip
Freshmen Jimmy Hinton and
Stanley Love also find themselves
among conference leaders
heading into the tourney. Hinton
ranked fifth in steals for the year
with 1.7 per game and sixth in
assists with 3.9 dishouts per
contest. At only 6-5 Love is 10th in
the league in the rebounding with
an average of 5.7 caroms a game.
Other than the ECU-Richmond
contest, first round matchups pit
second-seeded American (9-5,14-
13) against seventh-seeded
William & Mary (5-9, 9-18) at 12
p.m. and third-seeded George
Mason (8-5, 17-9) versus sixth-
place James Madison (5-9,10-17)
at 2 p.m. The nightcap of the first
Stanley Love, the 10th leading rebounder in the CAA, is shown pulling
down a carom in the Pirates' 65-60 loss to UNC-Wilmington last Saturday
in Minges Coliseum. (Photo by Hardy Allegood � ECU Photo Lab)
Rosco run on tap
for Sat March 12
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sports Writer
instead of having to do it without round, which will carry a 9 p.m.
it� tipoff pits fourth-seeded UNC-
Steele said that at this point he is Wilmington (8-6, 14-13) against
not sure of who his starting lineup fifth-seeded Navy (6-7,12-14).
Pirate baseball to
air over WZMB
For those who might be caught follows the Pirates to Wilmington
the North Carolina runners club
and corporate teams.
A group of Greenville citizens The race will be the first of five
have combined the fun of racing races on the North Carolina
with caring and the lending of a corporate scries,
helping hand to benefit the The Rosco Run is sponsered by
Children's Hospital of Eastern several area merchants and
not be competing at the
championships so that the
runners will have a chance to
compete in their individual
events.
Ken Daughtery and Kelywin
East Carolina has ever done this
and Miller says that his relay team
has what it takes to do it.
They also are the defending
champions of the 400-meter relay
up in the books during the
afternoon and have to miss the
Pirate baseball games, have no
fcar.WZMB,91.3FM,hascometo
the rescue.
Sports director Mike Small,
who enters his third year of
to air a pair of games. The contest
on the 19th will begin at 3 p.m
while airtime will be at 1 p.m. on
the 20th.
Other broadcasts by WZMB
include Campbell, March 23, 7
at the N.C. Collegiate broadcasting at WZMB, along p.m James Madison, March 26,3
Love will also be representing championships and they are with assistants Danny West and p.m James Madison, March 27,1
ECU as they compete in the 500- looking forward to retaining their Don Conde will bring you play- p m Liberty University, April 6,
by-play and color commentary 3 p.m George Mason, April 9, 3
meters.
On March 11-12, Lee Vernon
McNeill, will travel to Oklahoma
City, to compete in the NCAA
indoor championships that he
qualified for in January.
McNeill ran a 6.19 in a
title this vear.
In other events, the Lady Pirates
are looking strong in the field as
well as track events.
"Our depth has improved" said
Miller. "We'll have someone
preliminary heat at the University competing in all field events and
of Florida Invitational earlier this we're looking forward to some
season, a time good enough to great results
take him to the NCAA's. So for ECU track, they're of f and
The rest of the men's team will running.
for 16 of the Pirates baseball
games this season. The trio will
also take to the road for several of
their broadcasts thanks to help in
the form of a grant from
Budweiser.
Following Spring Break,
WZMB will broadcast the Pirates
versus Connecticut on March 14
and 15. Both games carry a 3 p.m.
air time.
The broadcasts will continue
March 19 and 20 when WZMB
p.m George Mason, April 10, 1
p.m Mt. Olive, April 14, 7 p.m
Richmond, April 16, 6 p.m
Richmond, April 171 p.m North
Carolina, April 21, 7 p.m. and
North Carolina, April 22,6 p.m.
The George Mason contests and
the second game against North
Carolina will be road games for the
Pirates. However, Small & Co.
will be there live to bring you all
the action.
� TIM CHANDLER
North Carolina.
On March 12, the group will
hold the first annual Rosco Run, a
race featuring three separate
events.
The Rosco Run, named after the
children's hospital Rosco bear,
will include a 10,000 meter race, a
5,000 meter race and a one mile
Rosco runwalk.
According to one of the race's
organizers, Charles Justice, even
though the race will be held over
East Carolina's spring break,
there's still lots of students that
will be in Greenville and are
encouraged to come out and
compete.
"Some of the better runners in
North Carolina are expected to
participate in the race and we're
expecting 200-300 people said
Justice. "But that should not
discourage students from coming
out, because it will be a lot of fun
and experience competing
Among the runners will be
Team Tiger, whose members
include ECU senior Barry Scott,
ECU graduate and fourth place
finisher of the 1986 Richmond
Marathon, Rob Powell, and Phil
Rowen, who finished fourth in the
Richmond Marathon in 1987.
The race will also feature Team
Reebok and top masters teams for
businesses with it's grand patron
being the Greenville Daily
Reflector and Ross Labortories.
Awards will be given in all
events. The top three men and
women overall and the three
masters men and women will
receive awards and prizes.
The top three men and women
in each age group will also receive
awards.
In the Rosco RunWalk, Rosco
Bears will be given to the top three
boys and girls age 12 and under.
A wheelchair competition will
be featured in the 5,000 meter race
and the top two overall finishers
will receive awards.
Registration for the three races
will begin at 8 a.m. on March 12,
on the campus of the East
Carolina School of Medicine.
Entry fee on the day of the race
is $10 for the 5,000 and 10,000
meter races. Participants will also
receive a free t-shirt.
No fee will be charged for the
Rosco RunWalk.
Runners can Pre-register for the
Rosco Run up until March 6,
during which the entry fee is onlv
$8.
Anyone wanting additional
information on the race can
contact the Greenville Daily
Reflector.
Barry Scott claims first crown
Barry Scott proudly displays the trophy he won after his First career win
as a professional hiathelete.
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sports Writer
After years of running, ECU
senior Barry Scott reached one of
his highest goals when he won his
first professional biathalon.
Scott, who was selected to the
pro-elite catagory after last year's
running season, won his first
Triathalon Confederation
santioned event on Feb. 22, in
Sanford, Florida.
The race was the first
professional race that Scott had
participated in since he earned his
professional status.
"1 went down there as an
unknown and 1 think I surprised
some people said Scott, who
completed the race in one hour, 21
minutes and 24 seconds.
"I had set a personal record in a
5K race the week before and I was
training good and I felt really
good
Scott says the race, which
consisted of a three mile run, a 20-
mile bike race and another three
mile run, was a real test of
endurance because of the running
before and after the bike race.
During the first three miles,
Scott ran under five minute miles
and this is one thing that Scott
attributes to his win.
"I wanted to have a cushion in
the race so 1 ran hard in the first
run said Scott. "So when I got on
my bike, which is my strength, I
was able to get out of their sight
and I think this gave me an edge
on them
Scott rode the majority of the
bike race with a considerable lead
over the rest of the field. At one
time, he was clocked at 28 mph,
.with his average speed being
around 26 mph.
Competing in the race with
Scott were Ail-American athlete
Thomas Huggins, who finished
lth at the Triathalon National
Championships, and many other
top-ranked competitors.
As a pro, Scott is not eligiable to
compete for age group awards,
when competing in Triathalon
Santioned events (Triathalon
Conferderation is the governing
body of the triathalon competors).
Scott can only compete for the
overall awards which usually
means some money prizes for the
winners.
Scott says that turning
professional means a lot to him
but that there will some added
pressures that he hasn't yet seen
the effects of.
While continuing with his
competing, Scott says that
finishing his degree at East
Carolina is the biggest thing on
his mind.
"I've put a lot into competition
and now I want to concentrate on
school said Scott, a senior
Physical Education major. "I'll
probably be more serious about
competing after I finish school,
right now, I just enjoy doing it for
the recreation
What's in the future for Barry
Scott?
Well first, Scott will see another
goal become a reality.
Being in a national magazine is
one thing that Scott says he's
wanted to do and in an upcoming
issue of "Triathalon Today" Scott
will be featured.
This weekend, Scott will
compete in the National 10K
Roadrace Championships in
Greenville, S.C.
The race, in which several
world class runners will compete,
will include Scott along with
teammates of Team Tiger.
Scott will also be busy working
on the upcoming second Annual
Fiesta Biathalon to be held in
Greenville.
The biathalon, sponsored by the
Bicycle Post and Chico's will send
it's proceeds to the Special
Olympics.
Scott, who is sponsered by the
Bicycle Post and Trek Bikes, is a
coordinator of the race, which
drew a good group of runners last
year.
Despite all the training,
studying, and extra activities,
Scott says that enjoying college
life is still oneof his favorite things
to do.

� � ?�'






12
��: CAROl INI
MARCH 3, 1��SS
Xavier's play gains bid in top 20 for first time
nieht against (ieorgia.
� � � � �
The best in hoops
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
un ci-z)
1 ho
ntinue to roll
en Conference.
ist weekend was
nd 15 points
and 13 points
- from Everette
oilermakers
ictory and
ne load over
� � conference
takers will
i.wivi tonight
� � � � �
-�Owls
nd tune in
v and clinched
npionship
v onference.
i Mark Macon
s while
Ided II and
d in 13
? cat oms.
l the court
iseph s
Devils' woes continued to mount
this past weekend when Georgia
Tech upended them 91-87 in
Atlanta. The Blue Devils, now t w o
games behind North Carolina in
the ACC race, were led by I )anny
Fcrry's24 points and 15 each from
Robert Brickey and Kevin
Strickland. Puke was on the
hardwood last night trying to get
back on the winning track against
Clcmson.
� � � � �
9. KENTUCKY (20-5) - Rupp
Arena was good to the Rex
Chapman-less Wildcats this
weekend as thev knocked off
Syracuse 62 38. Freshman Eric
Manuel pumped in seven ol the
final eight points tor Kentucky in
the win and finished the game
with 11 points. Winston Bennett
led the Wildcats in scoring for the
game by totalling 15 Ed
Davcndcr chipped in with 14 ,n
Rob lock had 12. 'he Wildcats
were back in action in the
Southeasten Conference last
10. MICHIGAN (22-5) The
Wolverines, who trailed by 11
points at intermission, rallied for
,n eight point second halt lead
against Iowa Saturday only to
watch the! law keves regroup and
pull out a 95-87 victory. (iarv
"General" (rant paced the
Wolverines in defeat with 24
points, while Glen "The Ice" Rice
had 20. Michigan was back in
action Wednesday night against
Northwestern.
� � � � �
11. SYRACUSE (22-7) The
Orangemen were taken to the
w ire 1 uesday night before
managing a 71-69 win over
Villa nova in Big last action. The
Orangemen sfate was not quite as
good over the weekend as the)
fell to Kentucky 62-58 in Rupp
Anna. In the loss to Kentucky,
Ronv Seikaly fired in 21 points
and Derrick Coleman 12.
Boehcim's gang should still be
considered a major threat come
tournament time.
� � � � �
12.IOWA(20-7) rheup-and-
coming Hawkeycs knocked oft
Michigan95 -87 over the weekend
behind l9pointsfrom Roy Marble
,wA 16 from Ed I lot ton, B.J.
Armstrong and Bill oncs 1 lorton
also pulled down 11 caroms tor
the I lawkevesand also hit the go-
ahead jump shot late in the
contest. The I lawkeyes will In-
back to playing in the big Ten rate
tonight when they travel to
Michigan State.
� � � � �
13. Gl 3RGIA TECH (21-6)
The Yellow ackets picked up
their seventh straight victor) this
past weekend when thev nipped
Duke 91-87 in a key A( C
matchup. Tom Hammonds,
labeled .is unbelieveable by coach
BobbyCremins, paced the victory
with 2; points. The jackets could
really turn someheadsin the AC (
and the country if they managed
to knock off North Carolina
Wednesday in the ()mni.
� � � � �
14. BRIGHAM YOUNG (23-3)
� The( ougars fell on hard times
Saturday as the Utcs ol Utah
eeked out a 62-60 win o or them.
K'tt Chalman led the way with 19
points, while Michael 'smith
chipped in H points and nine
boards. I heougars fa e .mother
stilt challenge tonight when New
Mexico invades Salt 1 ake City for
a Western Athletic Conference
game.
� � � � �
15. NORTH CAROLINA
STATE (21-6) - Chucky Brown
received a nice birthday present
Mondav night when the
Wolfpack knocked off non-
conference foe UNC-Asheville
H7 76. Brown paced the Pack to
the win by firing in 25 points.
Vinny Del Negro added 23. The
Wolfpack was also victorious
Saturday when they slipped past
Virginia 64 63 after dominating
the first half of play. Rodney
Monroe and Charles Shackleford
led the way to that win with 18
pi �ints apiece.
� � � � �
16. LOYOLA MARYMOUNT
(24-3) 1 he lions roared once
ag.un last Saturday as they
toppled San Diego 141-126. Bo
Kimblc was the main man with 36
points, while Hank C.aithers was
not far behind with 34 points and
14 rebounds.(luardCorey Gaines
also was true for 14 points. The
Lions will not play again until
Saturday when they will take part
in the West Coast Athletic
Conference Tournament. First
round action for the Lions will be
against Portland.
� � � � �
17. BRADLEY (23-4) � The
Braves clinched the Missouri
Valley (onference regular-
season crown Monday night by
disposing of Southern Illinois
113 102 Mersey "All World"
I lawkins led the way, oi course,
for the Braves v ith 49 points. The
� ivcs � ere also victorious
Saturday when they knocked off
Indiana State 95-74 behind 36
points from Hawkins and IS
assists from Anthony Manuel
� � � � �
18. WYOMING (22-5) - The
Cowboys continue to be
impressive in the late stages of the
season after their midseason
slump. Saturday the Cowboys
dusted off lowly San Diego State
85-59. Fennis Dembo was the
workhorse for the Cowboys in the
contest with 24 points and 10
rebounds. The next action for
Wyoming will be Friday when
they entertain Boise State.
� � � � �
19. VANDLRBILT (18-7) � I
still sav that Vanderbilt is going to
be a team to watch in the NCAA
tourney. They sure looked good
Saturday in beating Notre Dame
75-66. Frank Kornet was the high
scorer for the Commodores with
17 points, while Barry Goheon
added 16. The Commodores were
back in action last night on the
road against SEC foe Florida.
� � � � �
20. XAVIER (23-3) � Xavier
picked up a pair of wins since the
weekend to enter the poll for the
first time this year. Saturday,
Xavier toppled a pesky Dayton
squad 86-73. And on Tuesday, the
victim was Niagara. Xavier rolled
to a 83-70 victory in that contest 1
have my doubts about ho w strong
this club really is. But the NCAA
tourncv is not far away and time
will toll.
IMA (26-2) � The
� , emeal out of
c in a 134 4
ng a 71 7
all dow n hill
s tor Billy
v king paced
hi ictory
h c larvev
ints md II
i?rs next
toueheras
� ' niehtin
ference
26-2) � Steve
me horrid
rks 1 fans at
S turday to pump
id n six-of-six
tl e 3 point stripe,
ton Anthony
let t eight-of-
- added 18
1 Sean
7 The
hed the
: , PAC-10
is! ington
�� ft rence
. Is VI GAS (25-
- ran their
Association
�. th a 71-
State.
Paddio
B points,
ick on the
Z beach
�.own to
tend
I AIUM 1A (21-4)
i a sv 52
: iy with 20
ne oi five
in double
r Day in the Dean
. g tve the 1 leels
inference
lay Before all
ns start getting your
igh, you better
�� m Wednesday
. . against Georgia
LTie I leels also
to Durham this
I Hike in
� dium.
� � � � �
. PI rSBl RGH '21-4) -The
past Big East
nColleg B7-
t behind 23 points
Smith and 20 points
re. Smith
I Mace on the
rcrs list with the
'anthers also picked
rda) when thev
ticut 74-69.
'Backboard Pain" Lane
ay with 22 points in that
� led 20.
s )i Kl (20-5) The blue
ECU
ECU
44 Mom says the
house just isn't the
same without me,
even thought
a lot cleaner.
��v
Just because y ur Mom is far
away, d esn't mean you can't be
close. Yi u can still share the love
and laughter on AT&T Long
Distance Service.
It costs less than you think to
hear that she likes the peace and
quiet, but she misses you. So go
ahead, give your Mom a call. You
can clean your rcx)m later. Reach
out and touch someone
AT&T
The right choice.
i
�i





Title
The East Carolinian, March 3, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 03, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.594
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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