The East Carolinian, March 1, 1988






COMING THURSDAY:
How to stay safe over the Spring Break.
i ���
STYLE
HAPPY BIRTHDAY SUPERMAN! The Man of Steel
celebrates his 50th. See page 9.
SPORTS
Winding down � Pirate cagers lose their last regular
season game in preparation for this weekend's CAA
tournament in Hampton,
ttfoe lEaat (Earoltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 No. 41
Tuesday, March 1,1988
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Gephardt brings campaign to Greenville
By CLAY DFANHARDT
Managing Vditor
Presidential candidate Richard
Gephardt campaigned in
Greenville Monday bringing his
tough talk on trade protectionism
to the forefront ot his campaign as
he spoke to a group ot approxi-
mately l?0supporters gathered at
the American Legion building.
Gephardt, a Missouri congress-
man trying to capture the Demo-
cratic party's nomination for
president, was campaigning in
North Carolina Monday to drum
up support before next weeks
Super Tuesday primaries. He
came to Greenville from Winston-
Salem. where he visited an AT&T
plant in the process of laying off
employees.
"We have to decide in 1988 if we
are going to stay on the road
we've been on or if we're going to
move in a new direction he said.
"We are going to change this
country in fundamental ways
Gephardt said America is cur-
rently in a state of decline, trading
good jobs for bad jobs at the ex-
pense of a shrinking middle class
and growing lower class. "The
people that have been stuck on the
bottom see no opportunity to get
out of the bottom, to get up the
ladder, to have an opportunity, to
have promise and hope and ex-
pectation he said.
It is important that the United
States seize control of its eco-
nomic destiny, he said, in order to
provide opportunity for all itsciti-
zens. Gephardt cited his own
story � neither of his parents fin-
ished had the opportunity to fin-
ish high school and now he is
running for president � as an
example of the opportunities he
said all people must have.
"1 run for the presidency not so
that 1 can have the title � not so
that I can be in the White House,
but so that we, together, can
change this country so that every
voung person has the kind of
opportunity that Dick Gephardt
had he said. "So this is a cause,
and not a candidacy. I am
unimportant in this. What's im-
portant is that we together change
this country. It's your fight too
As part of his plan for making
fundamental changes, Gephardt
said we must first have a trading
policy that, "asks our trading
partners to treat us as we treat
them
Gephardt said that foreign
competition in the market place
was welcome in America, but that
in return Americans should be
able to have the same economic
freedom to compete in other
countries. le cited as an example
a Chrysler K car, which he said
costs $10,000 in America and
competes with the South Korean
Hyundai, priced at $7,000. But,
Gephardt pointed out, the K Car,
after taxing by the South Korean
government, costs $48,000 in that
country and cannot compete with
Hyundai.
"When I'm president I want to
have a meeting with the South
Koreans and I'm going to say two
things. First we'll keep our mili-
tary commitment to South Korea
because that's the kind of people
we are. We give our word � we
keep it.
"But I'm also going to ask them
to take off their tariff's that we
don't put on their products com-
ing here. And if they refuse we're
going to walk away from that
negotiating table wondering how
See CANDIDATE, page 8
Presidential candidate Richard Gephardt, a Missouri congressman, gestures to a gioup of supporters at
the American legion building in Greenville Monday. Gephardt campaigned in North Carolina Monday
preparing for next week's Super Tuesday primaries. (Photo by Jon Jordan � Photolab)
Board approves two dorm improvements
By ED W1LKERSON
Staff Writer
Meeting last week, the ECU
:Board of Trustees approved plans
to improve Umstead and Slay
dormitories and to install a new
sound system in Ficklen Stadium.
The University has allotted
$157,500 for improvement spend-
ing for the two co-educational
dormitories and an estimated
$82,000 will be appropriated for
the stadium's sound system.
According to university offi-
cials, the financing for the two
projects will come directly from
excess revenues within the
university's bond and interest
sinking fund. ECU Trustee
Clifton G. Moore explained that
the improvement to be made of
the two residence halls is primar-
ily the replacement of present
bedroom and bath area windows
with thermal panes which will
increase energy efficiency by
minimizing heat loss from the
buildings.
At the meeting, ECU Chancel-
lor Richard R. Eakin addressed
the matters of remedial educa-
tion, minority presence, and the
preparation of teachers at ECU.
Eakin mentioned that of the 3.2
million dollars spent by the UNC
system in 1986-87 for remedial
education only $77,000, 2.4 per-
cent of the total, was spent bv
ECU.
"I think we have good reason to
be proud of the statistics which
show that ECU students do not
take many remedial courses
Eakin said. Currently only three
remedial courses, in math, chem-
istry, and reading, are offered at
the University.
In his discussion of low minor-
ity enrollment at ECU the chan-
cellor said the "We are not meet-
ing our own expectations in mi-
nority applications or in gradu-
ation rates As an example he
citied that "Black students com-
prise only ten percent of this
year's freshmen class and con-
tinued by saying "I believe that it
is vital for us to attract qualified
minority students because it is of
obvious importance to the univer-
sity and to Eastern North Caro-
lina
Recognizing the complexity of
resolving the current problem,
Eakin said "1 realize that eco-
nomic trends and historical pat-
terns of college attendance in
North Carolina arc obstacles to
progress in this area In accor-
dance with this realization of in-
herently regional problems which
possibly contribute to low minor-
ity enrollment, Thomas A. Ben-
nett, chairman of the board, said
that "If this university wants na-
tional recognition it can find it
best by addressing regional prob-
lems
Addressing the matter of
teacher preparation, Eakin men-
tioned the 38 recommendations
adopted in 1986 by the UNC
Board of Governors and the Gen-
eral Assembly which directly af-
fect prospective education ma-
jors. "The most dramatic of these
recommendations is the require
ment of all education majors to
earn an additional major in one
basic academic discipline within a
See EAKIN, page 7
SGA elections nearing:
Election procedures defined
Bv TIM HAMPTON .
By TIM HAMPTON
A�siunt Ncwi Kditor candidate must have a minimum
With the 1988 campus elec- of 48 credit hours. Academically,
tions approaching, it will soon be the candidate must meet a 2.0
time for ECU students to decide grade point average requirement
who will represent them in next and must be in good standing
year's student government. But with the university, which means
first, there must be candidates. that the candidate can't be on
Students wishing to run for a academic probation.
SGA office must file with the SGA After reviewing the candi-
dates' qualifications, Porcelli will 18. Porcelli said candidates arc
hold a compulsory meeting for all allowed to spend $200 on ther
candidates on March 15 in which campaigns,
those vying for SGA positions Elections will be held Mart i
will be told if they are eligible 23.
If a candidate is said to be eli- If the tallied results from the 11
gible for election, he or she must polling centers show that there is
submit a campaign expense ac-
count to the SGA Office bv March See ELECTION, page 8
office by Friday in order to be able ct-f
ITscS ctfons'S SGA Passes Wright resolution after modifications
Tony Porcelli.
What are the qualifications of
running for a SGA office?
To run for a executive position
on the SGA, such as president,
vice-president and treasurer, the
candidate must be a full time stu-
dent who has been enrolled at
ECU for two consecutive semes-
ters or more before elections. The
By TIM HAMPTON
Assistant News Editor
The controversial resolution
supporting the university's ef-
forts in renovating the Ledonia S.
Wright Afro-American Cultural
Center passed through the SGA
Legislature Monday after being
re-worded in committee. The
SGA also passed a $3 increase in
student fees, the first increase in
SGA fees in 4 years.
After rendering the bill on the
list of unfavorable legislature,
and then placing the bill on the list
of favorable legislation, the reso-
lution concerning the Ledonia S.
Wright center was passed in its
third week of consideration.
The bill was originally placed
on the unfavorable calendar, ac-
cording to Student Welfare
Committee Chairperson Kelly
Jones, because of problems in its
wording. When the bill returned
to the floor Monday, the wording
had been changed to show sup-
port for a "minority" cultural
See WRIGHT page 3
Dansey seeks state Senate seat
Bill Dansey, a member of the ECU Board of Trustees, has an-
nounced his candidacy for this district's state Senate seat. (Photo by
Ellen Murphy � Photolab)
ByJEANWHEBY
Staff Writer
Speaking about education, ille-
gal drugs and the welfare system,
Bill Dansey, a member of the ECU
Board of Trustees, addressed a
small group Monday in the
Brewster building about his deci-
sion to run for a seat on the state
senate.
"I know that this is shocking to
you academic people, but I am a
Republican Dansey said. He
went on to say that his decision to
be a Republican was not necessar-
ily because he believed in the
Republican philosophy, but be-
cause there seems to be more
opportunity in that party.
Dansey began by discussing
some of the problems he has had
to face not only with the Board of
Trustees, but also with the cam-
pus beautificafion committee.
Dansey believes parking on cam-
pus is a major problem here, and
said he pushed for a two story
parking garage to be built on
campus.
Dansey moved in to discuss his
strong beliefs. "Education seems
to be the solution to a lot of prol-
ems in our society today" he said.
"As a candidate, I feel that every-
thing revolves around education
and ultimately jobs
Dansey said that by the year
2000, 30 percent of the country
will be minorities. "If we don't do
a better job to break the cycle in
educating minorities, we're going
to have a very difficult time with
the political and moral fibers of
the country
Dansey moved on to the prob-
lem of welfare and illegitimate
children. "The programs that we
already have aren't solving the
problem Dansey said a lot of
women having these children are
illegitimate themselves.
He has come up with a program
that he calls BAD: Babies, Auto-
mobiles, and Drugs, to solve these
and other problems.
Dansey discussed the drug is-
sue first, saying that in order to
help stop the wide distribution
and use of drugs, more money
needs to go into enforcement and
tougher sentences need to be is-
sued. He also said the jurisdiction
for sentencing drug pushers
hould be taken out of the judges
hands and put in the hands of the
legislature. "We need to catch
them and not let them out on
bail he said. "We need to make
sure they understand how harsh
the punishment will be
Dansey said the teenage life-
styles may be one cause of the
high hih-school dropout rate. He
noted that because so many
young adults, particulary males,
buy automobiles, and then have
to pay for insurance and gas that
they feel they need to drop out of
See DANSEY, page 8

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fccAM CAROLINIAN
x- -
The five year aftermath
Effects of blast still being felt
B PATRICK O VEILL
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Parents and Students
Let us show vou
RINGGOLD TOWERS

inipiis � East Carolina I niversity
�Towers located at 7th & Cotanehe
Streets surrounded on three sides by
campus.
�Towers closer to both downtown and
classrooms than many ECU
dormitories.
�Designed for student appeal and
afford ability.
�Each unit is completely furnished
except linens.
�On site management.
�Excellent financing.
Call for details
7TO'U4.pO YOUR HOMEWORK"
Ln; . �� �. . u �� : tl
Green expl si n .�� as thv ��� rst
11 , �. � u
v. � -v : -� . . . S S L 1
. �- . inscveti n
or- � � it flexibl
lineslvused gasdrxers
rte -J cb mgt . be! eves : i.
rd t is leaks
d and nis Martin said his
a ons we nevs r rn rted thata ni
ic e.
I the
hi
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
Vv and frozen yogurt
321 East 10th Street. Greenville
758 4896
IT'S GIRL SCOinr COOKIE TIME
stop nv
Buy Anv Girl Scovit Cookie Item
Get the 2nd Half Price
Sales Position
Available
The East Carolinian
is now accepting applications
for advertising sales
representatives.
Requirements:
Previous Sales Experience
Excellent Communication Skill
Good Organizational Skills
Must Have Own Transportatioi
Basic Computer Knowledge
Apply in Person atThe East Carolinian
Please Include Resume
Publications Building
(In Front of Joyner Library)
Must be ready to start training April 1st.
No Phone Calls Please!
Pickn
Wrieht r s
is �� t needi d
ersit alread
:�
a true
h.w e to junp all o ei
when the unn ersit) a
pbmmng to rfumge th�-�rn(j
Viartv ns askevi
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yet?
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felt that :
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universitx
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Apr- :
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stl!
creased
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54:
to respet I v.
the fall semestei
In apj
ECl (ksptM v
$2 iHV1 foi travi
concert toui Dm
$20 iXX1 from varioi
promotions to pa
a cording to Ste
ing president oi the
muI the choir needed
funding to met! trave
ot the hundred memb� i
the tour
In other business
�SGA Presidenl S
mas annourw cA that the ft
Trustees approved .1 park
plan proposed b hai
Eakin by .� vote
�Vice hancellof of!
Life, Elmer Meyer ai
thai the proposed student � !
tion center vili result in i
crease ol $88 $117 ii tudenl .J
? Tflfang on! Spring
: Break's a' comin





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on
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Skills
kills
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Pickney speaks on stress
Hv STEPHANIE FOLSOM
SUM tuei
1 earning how to deal with
friends v ho are in crisis situations
is a problem many college stu
dents encounter and struggle
with Wednesday night at the
Student Methodist Center, im
Pinkney of the ECU Counseling
C enter led a discussion on how to
help someone who is going
through a difficult time in their
life
Pinkney said you can tell it a
person is approaching a crisis
point in their life by their chang-
ing behavioral patterns. It a per-
son begins complaining of in-
somnia displays a difficulty in
dealing with things and is de-
pressed then that person might
be crying out for help i line,
to Pinkney
Often, because they do not
know how to hand let he sit nation.
a friend may push a person awa
when they need them. Pinkney
d persons sometimes protect
themselves in the role ol helper
by:
Playing detective and onh lis-
tening to the tacts;
Playing the magician and com
ing up w ith quick and easy solu- ation is serious
tions; Pinkney said that, as a friend,
Being a foreman and always you can be there as an emotional
urging the person to stav busy; contact. " on can instill some hope
ludging the situation and find- nd be a reminder that there are
ing a rational" explanation; people to turn to. Me said you
1 abeling the problem, instead have to care and be there to help,
ol dealing with it. or but "Pont ever feel responsible
Competing b) reminding the Scholastic Aptitude Test prepa-
person that you once had a w orso ration courses have been shown
problem to raise SAT scores by 20 to 120
rhese coping strategies on the points, according to a study con-
part of the helper actually avoid ducted by Robert M. Brown, an
what Pinkney said should be the ECU education professor, and
real focus a friend who is going
through a painful crisis and needs
support
Pinkney said, "Most suicide
attemptors want to live, they just
see no cither solution. They want
to end the pain They hurt and see
no way out rhese are the people
who are in a crisis situation and
reach the point where they are
hopeless, feel helpless. and have
no control.
So what can a friend do to help
someone who is feeling this wa
Pinkney said that it is h lportant
you involve someone else,
that
such as a counselor, the REA1
risis enter, or someone in cam
pus ministries if you feel the situ
Wright resolution passes
continued from page 1
center
After the meeting. Lvnwood
Carlton, the author of the resolu- nee
tion, said that he is pleased with
the resolution's outcome.
In trying to create student
support for the his resolution,
Carlton argued several weeks ago
that the Wright center did not
facilitate anv culture. "It's just a
room with plastic chairs
Carlton said. Echoing Carlton's
sentiments. Kenneth K Ham-
mond, a member of the Cultural
Center Advisory Committee, said
"There wasn't anything cultural
about the center
In opposition to the bill, a
legislator argued that the resolu-
tion is not needed because the
ersiry already has a commit-
ment to converting the center into
a 'rue cultual center. "Why do we
have to jump all over this (issue)
when the university is already
planning to change the center?
Marty Helms asked the legisla-
ture.
Another legislator in oppo-
e resolution had a dif-
ferent stand, "Are we gome
support a committee (The Cul-
tural Center Advisory Commit-
tee) which hasn't make a decision
yet" Alan Manning asked.
Helms also disagreed with
changing the name of thebuilding
i minority center, he said the
name of the building should re-
main its original name. "I'm
strongly against changing the
name of the building Helms
said.
The changing of the
building's name in the resolution
evolved from a concession
Carlton made to the Student Wei
fare Committee so the resolution,
would be passed. The committee
felt that the center should be ac-
cessible to all minorities, not just
blacks, if it were to be a cultural
center, Jones said.
The SGA also approved an
university fee hike of $3 per stu
dent for SGA appropriations. In
reading the bill, Glen Perry, the
Appropriation Committee chair
man, said that while SGA funds to
student organizations have in
� ased by 20 9! since 19K4, the
s(,A coffcrs have not increased
The approved student fee in-
crease will create approximately
$42,000 for the SGA to distribute
to respective student groups for
the fall semester of 1988.
In appropriation news, the
ECU Gospel Choir was funded
$2,000 for travel on a multi-city
concert tour. The choir has raised
$20,000 from various fund raising
promotions to pay for the tour,
according to Steve Pierce, the act-
ing president of the choir. Tierce
said the choir needed the SGA
funding to meet travel expenses
for the hundred member choir on
the tour.
In other business:
�SGA President Scott Tho-
mas announced that the Board of
Trustees approved a parking lot
plan proposed by Chancellor
Fakin by a 7-6 vote.
�Vice-Chancellor of Student
Life, Elmer Meyer announced
that the proposed student recrea-
tion center will result in an in-
crease of $88-9117 ir -indent ac-
?Tfifahg on! Spring ?
: Break's af comin1 j
;iiti tors depending on the
� hich final plan for thebuildingis
KM
Pen
Robert P. Peele, a graduate stu-
dent.
The study, done with a groupof
1� high school students from re-
gional N.C relied on the stu
dents' scores both before and after
they had taken an eight-week
review course. Brown said the
course placed an emphasis on
practical skills, such as those
tested on the SAT. The students'
scores were raised by n average
ol 71 points.
The review course, provided by
Horizon tor Learning Ltd cost
$80 per person. The cost was
shared by each individual student
and the county Board o Educa-
tion.
rhese types ol courses and
training aids have become very
popular and are big business for
the companies that sell them, ac-
cording to Brown, but he warns
that: "Parents should be cautious
"IN THE DARK
PRESENTED BY THE ECU STUDENT HEALTH
SERVICE NURSING STAFF
Where: Student Health Service, Room 116
When: March 15th, 22nd, 29th - 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Register by calling 757-6841 (ask for Barbara Pennell) 8-5 p.m.
THESE CHEAPO
AIRFARES CAN
GET YOU THERE
WITH MONEY TO
SPARE
5 Angeles $238
Miami$140
Orlando$180
Dallas$228
New Orleans$198
Houston $208
Chicago$163
Boston$161
New York$138
Washington$128
Philadelphia$158
St. Louis$178
Denver $228
Kansas City$208
Baltimore $128
Seattle$238
Phoenix$238
Newark$108
Nashville $148
Minneapolis$198
Las Vegas$296
Tucson$268
San Francisco$238
Salt Lake City$268
Atlanta $148
READ THE FINE PRINT
ftiese f.m s are th� !iw�-st round trip r.itrs from Greenvtlle, NC urrrntly In effect. Sparc Is limited and
travel reatrtcUona apply ()ricr purchased, your Hi krt cannot be hanged nor refunded Advance
pun hase required Hates based on midweek travel Kares on other days at slightly higher rates r arcs
su!)e t u hange at anytime and are e(Te tlve for travel through May '20 Holiday Surcharges apply
Spring Break Travel to warm weather fli ski destinations all but sold out Check with fTXl
THE PLAZA GREENVILLE
MON. THRU FRI. 9 A.M5 P.M.
355-5075
about courses costing hundreds
of dollars and promising high
gains on SAT scores. Company
originated statistices used to en-
courage customers to purchase
theur products should be viewed
with some caution particularly
when the product is relatively
expensive to the customer
ECU's study contradicts a
study done at Harvard Univer-
sity, but Brown said "That is not
unusual. Different results are
common in investigations of this
type He said the coaching was
effective in helping this group of
students.
Brown said "Coaching at least
helped the students to become
'test wise' and score to their maxi-
mum ability
UNC
w
I
L
M
I
N
G
T
O
N
Experience Summer
at
UNC
Wilmington
For a 1988 Summer
School Catalog,
write or call:
Summer School Director
109 Alderman Hall
UNC Wilmington
601 South College Road
Wilmington, NC
28403 3297
(919) 395 3540
Swimsuit Fashion Show by
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.
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Catch the wave of Fashion at Rids Spring Swimsuit Specta .
Tuesday, March 1st Ladies admitted at 7 p.m.
Guys admitted after 8 p.m.
rjhe Club
Classic MR
Dance Hits
Every Tuesday!
$1.25
Well Cocktails'
Jeans Allowed
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FACULTY & STAFF OF E.C.U WE
CHALLENGE YOU AT
1&&
The E.C.U. Department with
the most full facility
memberships purchased
by March 31, 1988 will
win a dinner for all
members of that
department at
KING & QUEEN
RESTAURANT,
Greenville, NC.
With this contest you will be
eligible for up to 25 off on
full facility memberships as
a faculty or staff member.
This offer expires March 31,
1988.
Facilities & Programs
Offered Include:
Co-ed Aerobics, hot mineral
whirpool, Dynacam weight
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.
�Jj� Eaat (Earnltmatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, c�n ��
Clay Deanhardt, hi mnm
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, ntrtctor of AjMrtimng
Tim Ci iandler, s-�, mm
John Carter, ;��-� u��
Michelle England,otM�rr
Debbie Stevens, w�y
JEEF rARKER.StafrtllustTtior
TOM Y)RR, CircuUUumManMgtr
Mike Upci jurci i, product� !����
JO! IN W. MEDLIN, Art nrtdor
Mac Clark, KnaiMjrr
March 1, 1988
OPINION
Page 4
C ommunication
Students have learned to work together
The Ledonia S. Wright resolution
finally passed through the Student
Government Association without
major incident yesterday, sending a
signal that students are ready to
compromise and listen in the best
interest oi the university as a whole.
Kudos go the the SGA legislators
who voted to bring the resolution
back onto the favorable calendar
and then voted again in favor of the
resolution on the floor of the legisla-
tors. Kudos also belong to the
resolution's sponsors and support-
ers for amending the bill to insure its
passage through the legislature.
This whole incidence has brought
to light a very serious problem on
our campus: communication. It
appears this whole controversy
could have been avoided had the
principle players simply communi-
cated with one another freely.
Communication is important to
the well being of any group, espe-
cially one as diverse as a university's
student bodv.
The SGA must communicate more
with the students and work more
closely with them in solving the
problems of the university. As the
time for annual appropriations
draws near, the drama of the past
few weeks serves as a strong re-
minder to students to get their facts
straight and know what the SGA
wants from student groups. To the
SGA, the experience sends a mes-
sage that all actions must be con-
ducted openly and that information
should be distributed as easily as
possible.
Cham �pi on n. t m
1. a valiant fighter 2. a person who fights for
another or for a cause; defender; protector;
supporter, no matter the outcome �
SYN. see Pan Jensen
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and clas-
sification, address, phone number and
signature of the authoris). Letters are
limited to two typewritten pages, double
spaced or neatly printed. All letters are
subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
ami libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are reminded
that they are limited to one every two
weeks. The deadline for editorial material
is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday's edition and
5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday's edition.
Forum
rules
Campus
Spectrum
rules
In addition to the "Campus forum"
section of the editorial page, The East
Carolinian features the "Campus
Spectrum This is an opinion column
by guest writers from the student
body and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
Students slam Bonehead for bad writing
To the editor:
So, Mr. Bonehead, someone was
perturbed by your reference to semen
semen semen, or was it vaginal dis-
charge discharge discharge? And
now you think you're 1 lunter S. Th-
ompson, Jr. Get over it, honey. Your
column is so boring it makes my teeth
hurt. 1 dare you to write something
offensive. Or thought provoking. Or
runny.
Maria Smith
Freshman
Art
Bonehead bad
To the editor:
The bill of Rights guards our free-
dom of speech and now the Supreme
Court attempts to protect it even more
through its judgment in the Falwell v.
Hustler case. This judgement pro-
tects our freedom of speech no matter
how tasteless. This permits Mr. Bone-
head to say what he wants. But I will
not stand by and watch my Father's
name be dragged through the mud
and mercilessly slandered after all he
has done for mankind.
God has given mankind so much.
And although we take what he gives
us and abuse it and forget about him,
h- still loves us all. No matter what
we do he loves us. This unconditional
love may be hard to conceive but it's
here and "forgiveness" is part of that
love. The love of God causes him to
forgive everyone; yes even Jimmy
Swaggart. His love, Mr. Bonehead,
knows that none of us are perfect and
that's why it's here.
If anybody on this earth is perfect
and sinless then I'll call him lord but
there is no other Lord, only one, Jesus,
and he was and is the only perfect,
sinless person. Jimmy Swaggart is not
perfect so we don't follow him. We
follow our god as he works through
his willing servants. We work to-
wards perfection through him be-
cause we have been in sin since birth.
It is like struggling out of thick, sticky,
tar to a clean, cool stream, so we often
cannot totally rid ourselves of the tar.
This is why we have the opportu-
nity for God's forgiveness. He knows
how sticky and tough tar is, and sin,
especially to our fleshy bodies, so he
helps us when we fall. When we sin-
cerely repent, ask him to forgive us,
and ask him to help us to continue on
in him, he is faithful and just to do so.
This is what brother Swaggart had
done and if he is sincere and God
knows, then he is forgiven. Believe it
or not, if s still true.
It hurts God and me that you, Mr.
Bonehead and others feel the way you
do, but if you'd read Matthew 24:9-14,
vou'd o that lesm had already spo-
ken of these events.
Terrell Worthem
Freshman
Art
Underground
To the editor:
Brad Bannister's article on Justin
Time in the February 23 issue of The
East Carolinian raised a point which
1 feel should be clarified. In the article,
he stated that the band's February 19
show at The Underground was
poorly attended because of poor
scheduling on the part of the Coffee-
house Committee. The Coffeehouse
Committee schedules all Under-
ground shows at 8 p.m. on Friday
evenings.
I and the other members of the
Coffeehouse Committee feel that this
is an unfair assumption on the part of
Mr. Bannister. This past Friday an-
other band, Mass Confusion, played
at 8 p.m. at The Underground. We
had over 80 people in attendance. The
Bob and The Rocking Horses show on
January 29 and the February 5 audi-
tions both drew over 50 people. In fact
the Justin Time show is one of only
two this whole year which weren't
successful.
In fairness to the band, they did put
on a good show and it's unfortunate
that so few people saw them. How-
ever, allowing them to play at 9 or 10
p.m. would have put them in direct
competition with Downtown and
that is neither the purpose nor the
intention of the Committee.
We try to provide a diverse selec-
tion of entertainment for people who
want an alternative to Downtown or
who would like to see a show before
going there. We know that we make
mistakes and can't please everyone. If
anyone would like to see changes
made on the Committee all they have
to do is join. We welcome all prospec-
tive members and their opinions.
Karen A. Mann
Junior
English
Swaggart deserves
respect
To the editor:
Take a close look at yourself.
What's the difference between you
and Jimmy Swaggart? God created
Swaggart and God created us. So
what authority do we have to con-
demn Swaggart for falling short of the
glory of God? Matthew chapter
seven, verseone states, "Do not judge
lest you be judged yourselves"
(American Standard), therefore, as
children of God we shouldn't be so
quick to criticize him. God is a forgiv-
ing God. Thus, we must be a forgiving
group of people.
Overall, society is harming Swag-
gart more than the sin that he commit-
ted. We tend to associate sexual sin as
the worst sin in the world. Sin has no
landmark and no brand name. All sin
is the same. No matter how big or
small, God treats sin all in the same
respect. Jesus told the Pharisees when
they desired to stone to death the
woman taken in adultery, "He that is
without sin among you, let him cast
the first stone" (John 8:7). I'm quite
sure that in a corrupt society in which
we live there is not a man who lives a
perfect life. True Christians must
renew themselves everyday. If we for
one second decide to become the
throne of grace and cast the first stone
we are exceeding our limits by being
disobedient to God's command.
Personally, I have all the respect in
the world for Swaggart. For it takes a
true child of God to stand up before
thousands of people and confess his
sin. It was evident that Swaggart did
not worry about himself; he just
humbled himself to let Christ use
him. Today, will you humble to let
Christ use you?
David Williams
Sophomore
English
Bonehead racist?
To the editor:
I was not amused by Bonehead's
remark: "And I want to see the Arab
that can finish anything in seven days
besides a was" (Feb. 25, 1985). His
racist comment is simply an attempt
to extract a cheap laugh at the expense
of another ethnic group.
Bonehead would benefit from
watching the national news. There, he
can see Palestinian Arabs, younger
than he is, armed with stones and
slingshots, destroying the myth of the
invincibility of the Israeli army, the
fourth most powerful army in the
world. The struggle shows no signs of
ending. Seven days indeed!
Orayb
Najjar
Greek sub-culture
To the editor:
In response to all the conflict squan-
dered recently about the greek sys-
tem, I would like to engage in a few
points of interest.
A sub-cluture is a group of people
living within an overall realm of
people or culture, with different indi-
vidual ideals or norms. Even though
their main concerns are the same as
others in the culture, some of their
intra-personal views are different
and sometimes conflicting with those
of others within the culture.
The greek system is a series of 14
male and 9 female sub-cultures
within the realm of the campus. The
only difference between the greek
system and the GDI sub-cultures is
Lm4 wc are organized and have
names for our groups. I'm not trying
to say we arc better or worse than the
GDI's, just different.
For anyone who was involved in
high school they were probably a
member of a clique. Although they
probably don't like to admit they
were, it's a fact of life. It's how society
functions. An individual grouped
with friends that has the same ideals
and norms, and possibly were of the
same socio-economic status (living in
the same neighborhood). Even
though they were different, they were
the same in that they were all mem-
bers of their high school culture, they
all had school spirit and came to-
gether in times of unity for their alma
mater.
In essence, the same is happening
here at ECU. We cling together on
matters of universal concerns, like the
NCSU incident or the attack of the
young woman in Scott dorm. But we
also break off into sub-cultures, like
the football, baseball or other varsity
teams, cheerleaders, SGA members,
campus ministry members, or
Greeks.
So, in response to Missy White's
bad experiences with the Greeks,
maybe it just wasn't for you. Greeks in
general are open people, and we do
have friends outside of the greek sys-
tem. As in the case of every "clique"
there arc people who make others feel
unwelcome or outcast because they
are different from them. Unfortu-
nately, this is a fact of life. If we could
change it, to make everybody get
along the same with everyone else,
we would definitely be living in a
Utopian society.
Sean Mc Bryde
Sophomore
BcstComm.
ROTC vandalism
To the editor:
Along with the College Republi-
cans, I am concerned about the recent
vandalism of the Air force ROTC sign.
And I am not surprised to see the
CR's, who are so very nationalistic in
ideology, support financially the in-
vestigation that will hopefully lead to
the arrest of the culprits who painted
a Swasticka (the sign of another very
nationalistic ideology) on the sign of
the AFROTC. I also agree with Robert
Landry that ROTC and nazism are
not the same thing. For sure, the mili-
tary elitism of the ROTC and the mili-
tary elitism of nazism are not similar.
And I would think that any connec-
tions drawn between the rumored
association between the White Su-
premacist Party here in North Caro-
lina and the military folks in Fayettev-
ille would be false. And this false
correlation should not draw anyone
to the conclusion that ROTC (another
American military institution) would
support nazism.
Also, I picked up a flier for the Air
Force ROTC in the library today. It
was trying to recruit those select few
who could possibly be "man enough
to become missile specialist. This, 1
think, would also make that graffiti
artist absolutely off-base with the
mushroom cloud he or she painted.
These White Supremacists inciden-
tally are responsible for the murder of
several non-violent peace activists in
Greensboro. Keeping this in light, I
certainly would never understand
why someone would foe tney would
have to show their opposition in a
faceless and nameless fashion. I
agree, the graffiti artist should stand
up for what he or she has done and
catch the stones that should be tossed
at them.
Furthermore, I really and truly feel
sorrv for those in the AFROTC who
will have to transfer schools in order
to graduate. Some of these unfortu-
ates are friends of mine. 1 feel it'sa real
shame that just because somebody
wants to serve their country in this
most honorable way, he or she has to
be jerked around by their country like
this. The amount of sorrow 1 feel for
these people now really doesn't com-
pare to the amount of sorrow I will
feel for them later when this same
country will make them kill someone
they have never even met before just
because their commanding officer
told them to. And these people who
will have to kill have families who
love them, too. Even more than that,
my sorrow is greater for those who
actually die when they are fighting
that communist horde, like the ones
in Graneda, Beruit (one of which was
a friend of mine), Central America
(oh, excuse me, I forgot the official
word is that no Americans are fight-
ing in Central America), and lastly, all
the covert operations our boys in blue
are engaged in throughout the world
that we only find out about when
those like Oliver North get caught.
In the SGA I've done my best to
argue against supporting organiza-
tions like the AFROTC. These groups
so-called "peace keeping" methods
arc murderous by definition. As a
Pirate, a proud Pirate, I would like to
offer a personal reward of fifty bucks
(to match the CR's) to anyone who
can come up with an effective enough
argument that would rid our campus
of these types of political groups who
see maintaining a high level of fear
throughout the world is maintaining
free societies. This sacrifice of fifty
dollars doesn't quite match the sacri-
fice those who are willing to give their
most precious possession - their life,
to maintain this insane system And
finally, in response to the CR's, last
line: "Thank God for the United States
Armed Forces, you keep us free I
would like to say I do not thank God
for the United States Armed Forces,
they keep the rest of the world in fear
and some Americans so frightened of
the system that they feel they have to
resort to vandalism to express their
opposing ideas.
Steve Sommers
Junior
Pol. Science
Dems
To the editor:
Deficit reduction is a poj
topic with congressional l
crats these days Even tlu
President Reagan has n
d fora rein on federal s
ing, it took the October
market crisis to get
Democrat's attention And
their reaction was predict
they blamed Reagan
budget detKit and its effe
ill Street
But the Democrats an
for the lingering federal hi
deficit, not Reagan!
Since Re sumed
. the I k mocrats tune I
insisted on tax increa:
striking d on
theyhadnointentioi
The IX
in 1982 and 1984 was pi
cut spend :h tim.
increases were imph
the Democrat � � their p
tses and increased
spending.
Reagan has tried t. -
deficit despite c
willingness to
cooperate Instead, th
led C engross has
viewing the solut n to 1 i
lem from one persp
that oi higher taxes -
lower spei I
President Reagan ha
significant progress in
ening the American
despite these obsta
tion will soon becnU i
third consecutive
nomic growth, the longest p
time expansion in lu- i
still being created, and the u
ployment rate is still falliri
November, the overall u
ployment rate dropped
tying the 10-year low oi uly,
and 313,000 new jobs wen
a ted.
During the last year of Re;
can control oi the Senate,
gress endorsed Reagan's
nomic policies that were re
sible for reducing the fedcra
cit for fiscal year
lion - to 1.7' 'r of our gross na1

Tom Tog,
Next Wai
Nothing ii
Winter wear closeou!
AMU
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Im j ' - '�
Hwv. 64 East B
Bethel and Tan
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Import Car or Tru
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additional
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Receive Up to:
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Today At
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I
fights for
protector;
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 1,1988
- orum

Campus
pinion column
n the student
imns
ctrum"
onccrn
� or nation.
ted in con-
fgram-
mittinc
cptby-
5 no en-
bc pub-

mg
specialist. Tins, I
make that graffiti
: base with the
id he or she painted.
ipremacists incie'en-
ble for the murder of
on-violent peace activists in
iro. Keeping this in light, I
would never understand
nc would feel thev would
?ir opposition in a
nameless fashion. 1
artist should stand
t he or she has done and
� � at should be tossed
1 really and truly feel
in the AFROTCwho
Ulster schools in order
e of these unfortu-
of mine. I feel it'sa real
t just because somebodv
their countrv in this
av, he or she has to
d by their country like
unt of sorrow 1 feel for
I really doesn't com-
� amount of sorrow I will
them later when this same
ill make them kill someone
r even met before just
commanding officer
� J these people who
have families who
Even more than that,
' a tor tor those who
ie when they are fighting
uinibt horde, like the ones
emit (one of which was
t mine), Central America
e me, 1 forgot the official
Americans are fight-
America), and lastly, all
ratu ms our boys in blue
xi in throughout the world
nlv find out about when
Oliver North get caught.
V I've done my best to
gainst supporting organiza-
e the AFROTC These groups
peace keeping" methods
rderous by definition. As a
proud Pirate, I would like to
personal reward of fifty bucks
:h the CR's) to anyone who
cupwithaneffectiveenough
it that would rid our campus
types of political groups who
itaining a high level of fear
out the world is maintaining
ieties. This sacrifice of fifty
loesn't quite match the sacri-
' who are willing to give their
?cious possession - their life,
bin this insane system. And
In response to the CR's, last
(ank God for the United States
rces, you keep us free I
ce to say I do not thank God
Jnited States Armed Forces,
the rest of the world in fear
? Americans so frightened of
ti that they feel they have to
vandalism to express their
ideas.
Steve Sommers
Junior
Pol. Science
I
Dems. to blame for deficit
To the editor:
Deficit reduction is a popular
topic with congressional Demo-
crats these days. Even though
President Reagan has repeatedly
called for a rein on federal spend-
ing, it took the October stock
market crisis to get the
Democrat's attention. And then
their reaction was predictable:
they blamed Reagan for the
budget deficit and its effect on
Wall Street.
But the Democrats are to blame
tor the lingering federal budget
deficit, not Reagan!
Since Reagan assumed office in
1981, the Democrats have twice
insisted on tax increases when
striking deficit-reduction deals
they had no intention of honoring.
The Democrat side of the bargain
in 1982 and 1984 was promises to
cut spending. Both times the tax
increases were implemented, but
the Democrats broke their prom-
ises and increased congressional
spending.
Reagan has tried to reduce the
deficit despite Congress' lack of
willingness to compromise and
cooperate. Instead, the Democrat-
led Congress has insisted on
viewing the solution to the prob-
lem from one perspective only -
that of higher taxes rather than
lower spending.
President Reagan has made
significant progress in strength-
ening the American economy
despite these obstacles. The na-
tion will soon be entering its sixty-
third consecutive month of eco-
nomic growth, the longest peace-
timeexpansion in history, obsare
still being created, and the unem-
ployment rate is still falling. In
November, the overall unem-
ployment rate dropped to 5.8,
tying the 10-year low of July, 1987,
and 313,000 new jobs were cre-
ated.
During the last year of Republi-
can control oi the Senate, Con-
gress endorsed Reagan's eco-
nomic policies that were respon-
sible for reducing the federal defi-
cit for fiscal year 1987 by $73 bil-
lion - to 1.7 of our gross national
product (GNP), the lowest pro-
portion of GNP since 1982.
Since then, the Democrats have
snubbed the Republicans' earnest
action on deficit reduction and
have considered all Republican
budget plans "dead on arrival" on
Capitol Hill. In their world of
delusions, Democrats champion
the idea that tax increases will
reduce the budget deficit. As
usual, the facts prove that Demo-
crats are dead wrong.
It is a documented fact that tax
increases will increase, rather
than decrease, the budget deficit.
Every one-dollar tax increase
adds 58 cents to the federal deficit.
Why? Because Congressional
1 )emocrats simply cannot control
themselves - they spend $1.58 for
every $1 in taxes.
Congressional Democrats
have: 1-failed to pass even one of
their 13 appropriations bills. In-
stead they passed a $593 billion
"catch-all" bill in a package that
included three bills that had never
even been scrutinized in debates
on the House floor; 2-failed to
agree on budget targets; 3-failed
to enact Reagan's recommenda-
tions to reduce the size of the defi-
cit by cutting spending; 4-faiIed to
act on the president's request for a
line-item veto; 5-failcd to put a
trade bill on the president's desk;
and 6-failed to hold hearings on a
constitutional amendment to re-
strain federal spending.
Instead, they have: 1-proposed
a budget that will raise spending
from 12 to 6 - a five-fold
spending increase from 1987 to
1988; 2-ovcrridden Reagan's veto
oi the budget-busting Water and
Highway Bill, costing taxpayers
$106 billion; 3-passed, in both
houses, protectionist trade bills;
and 4-attempted to give them-
selves a pay raise, bringing their
salary increases for the vcar to a
total of $17,085. This occurred less
than two weeks after the financial
markets' plunge!
No matter how much Demo-
crats blame Reagan for the deficit,
the fact is that during the Reagan
administration, Congress has
appropriated $89 billion more
than Reagan has requested.
Clearly, the blame for the vast
majority of the country's deficit
woes falls on Democrats, not
President Reagan.
The 1988 elections arc a prime
opportunity for Republicans to
retain the White 1 louse and both
1 louses of Congress so that ra-
tional budget decisions can be
made in the best interest of the
American people.
Kimberly Babb
Junior
Communications
Walker wrong
To the editor:
Clay Walker's Feb. 18 letter
("Contra vote right") was much
more reasonable than Bern
McGrady's earlier error-filled
anti-Contra tirade. However,
there was much error in Walker's
letter as well.
Walker, responding to Justin
Sturz's claims that the decision to
cut off Contra aid was "incredibly
ignorant" and "tragic called
these claims "completely inaccu-
rate Furthermore, Walker says
that Sturz "must be "incredibly
oblivious" to the Nicaraguan situ-
ation. But Walker is wrong. The
decision was ignorant and tragic,
and it is Walker, not Sturz, who is
oblivious to the situation.
1- The decision follows the de-
fection of key Sandinista Roger
Miranda, who revealed that the
Sandinistas are liars, peace-plan
ignorers, and revolution-minded
terrorists. Miranda's revelations,
openly confirmed by Nicaraguan
Defense Minister Humberto Ore-
tega two days later, prove that the
Sandinistas cannot be trusted and
cannot be dealt with in a non-
mil itarv manner.
2- The decision is anti-peace
and anti-democracy. There can
never be true peace with freedom
and democracy where commu-
nism exists. True peace and com-
munism arc mutually exclusive,
diametrically opposing entities.
Thus, peace with freedom and
democracy will only come to
Central America when the
Sandinistas are destroyed or re-
moved. The Contras were a
means to that desirable end; the
Arias "Peace" Plan is not.
3- The decision allows the
unimpeded consolidation of a
revolutionary communist dicta-
torship on our hemisphere. Thus,
the decision was a foreign policy
disaster and a serious threat to
future U.S. national security.
4- The decision ignores the
overwhelming public support for
Contra aid both in Nicaragua and
in all of the other Central Ameri-
can countries.
5-Thc decision ignores the $490
million per year that the Soviets
pump into Nicaragua, both in
economic and military aid. The
decision instead cuts off the rela-
tively tiny amount of aid ($36
million) to the Contras.
Sturz used the term "useful idi-
ots" in his pro-freedom letter, a
term which really got to Walker.
Walker called it "unfortunate"
and "erroneous Well, it might
interest Walker to know that
Sturz did not invent the term.
Guess who did? Lenin, leader of
the Bolshevik Revolution and co-
founder of communism! He used
the term to describe those of us in
the West who are gullible enough
to believe that Communists are
reasonable, trustworthy people
who can be dealt with in ways
other than militarily.
No, Walker, Sturz borrowed the
term from Lenin and used it ap-
propriately, using it in the way it
was originally intended to be
used. By using it, he was not
"overindulging in criticism of this
fine university Rather, he was
using it to accurately describe
many of the people on this cam-
pus. That is not called "narrow-
mindedness friends, that's
called accuracy and truth.
Mary Fordham
Junior
Pol. Science
Do you have
DOUBTS? QUESTIONS? CONCERNS?
About your faith?
WE WELCOME YOU!
Are you looking for a
FUN & FRIENDLY FELLOWSHIP
in which to express your faith?
WE WELCOME YOU AT
to fat
A CARING CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY
Fellowship supper. Program tk Community Prayer
EVERY WEDNESDAY at 5 p.m. at the
METHODIST STUDENT CENTER
501 E. Fifth St. (across from Garretl Dorm
THIS WEEK: "Building Self-Esteem" w�d. u-��. � cim�ci.n
For more information: Bill Stanley. President 758-7637; Rev. Michelle
"Mike" Burcher 752-7240; Rev. Dan Earnhardt 788 2030
Sponsored by Presbyterian & Methodist Campus Ministries
A PICTURE IS WORTH
A THOUSAND WORDS
SO BRING YOUR
PICTURES TO:
�One Hour Photos
INSTANT REPLAY
For Quality, Convenience, and Personal Service
The Plaza
(next to Annabelle's)
j� couponj
i FREE r
355-5050
FREE
I
coupon -
2nd SET OF PRIX'TSl
REPRINTS
FREE
ENLARGEMENl
"I
AT TIME I O11� Free Reprint , With Purchase of
urit. r i -r Color Enlargement
With Each Two to 11x14-
PROCESSING
Limit 2 Rolls � One
Coupon Per Visit
Expires 3-8-88
I
Purchased
Tom Togs Factory Outlet
1900 Dickinson Avenue
Next Warehouse Sale Feb. 29th - March 6th
Nothing in Warehouse over $10.00
9:30-6:00 p.m.
Winter wear closeout. New Spring Collection Arrived
IACKy
TKOCADKKO
& famous Names That We Cannot Mention
M
are a newcomer to town, we invite -ou to visit our store at 1900 Dickinson Avenue. If you are going to
beach at Morehcad City, visit our new location on Hwy. 70 (just across frorr. Bojangles.)
Hwy. 64 East Between Hwy. 70 West
Bethel and Tarboro Morehead City, N.C.
Conetoe, N.C. WoH - Q-S
Wed. - Sat. 9-5 vvcq- bat y -
Mastercard & Visa Accepted
U'e Also Wholesale
One Coupon Per Visit '
Expires 3 v 88
Receive 2nd Enlai.
FREE limit Two
Expires 3-8-88
'I
�V
Juniors, Seniors & Grad
Receive Up To
$1600.00
Cash Back From
General Motors
With Any Purchase Of A
1988 Chevrolet Nova.
With any 1988 Nova
Purchase receive
Import Car or Truck
owners receive an
additional
(vehicle not required as trade in)
$600.�� Cash Back
$600.00 Cash Back
If you qualify for the
College Graduate Program $400.00 Cash Back
Receive Up to: $1600.��
CallUs
Today At
paul fceWi
CHEVROLET
1800 S. Tarboro St Wilson
(Hwy. 42 East of Raleigh)
291 2111 orToD Free 1-800 247-8318
23 12 Hr. Wrecker Service
Hour:
Sale Dept Mon - Thura. 7:30 a.m - 8 p.m.
Fit 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m Sat 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Service-Parta Wreck Dept
MonFrt. 7:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
�$600 Cash Back incentives end: Feb. 29. 1988
College Graduate Program ends: April 30. 1988
GIVE YOURSELF
SOME CREDIT!
APPLY NOW FOR YOUR VERY OWN
9 Bring a photocopy of
your School I.D.
� No cosigner required
APPLY NOW ON CAMPUS!
Date: March 1st, 2nd. 3rd
time: 9:00am-2:00pm
Place: In front of Student Store
and
the Croaton CITIBAN0
� Citicorp, 1986
Reservations Still
Open But Hurry!
'124!184j
� O'li MCUSE
nu ncua
ex
Onbar (South Dakota) N A Mambx fd�C
? ?
FOR DETAILS AND RESERVATIONS
Call and leave message
752-8870 - David
Final sign up Night is
Tues March 1st
5-7p.m.
300 Ringgold Towers
MtfllDHrWMi nii�
f. �jawd�fc ��
I m





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 1.1988
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
ARE YOU A COLLEGE STUDENT
bored with your classes and in need of
spending money? Are you enthusiastic,
dependable and excited about working in
a fashion environment? Brody's and
Brady's for Men have part-time openings
for individuals able to work flexible
hours. Apply at Brody's, Carolina East
Mall, M-W, 2 until 4 p.ni.
NOW HIRING: Hank's Homemade Ice
Cream is currently hiring enthusiastic,
motivated, outgoing persons to scoop
the Nation's number 1 Ice Cream. Apply
in person at 321 E. 10th Street between
1:00 and 5:00 p.m. daily!
HELP WANTED: Watiters and
waitresses needed for restaurant near
Atlantic Beach. Apply at 218 Front Street,
Beaufort N.C
WESTERN SIZZL1N is now accepting
applications for part-time waitresses.
Must be available to work weekends.
Apply in person at Western Sizzlin on
10th Street.
FEMALE BARTENDER needed at
BEAUS Nightclub. Training available,
come by Thursday between 7-11 and
speak with Jimmy Arnold for more
information.
BOOKBUYER earn while you learn'
Make your own hours. Be your own boss!
Buy books for local book company.
Respond to Carolina Book Services, Box
2151, Greenville, N.C, 27836.
HELP WANTED:
design student �
Designer, 3010 East
Greenville, N.C.
'art-time interior
send resume to:
10th Street,
RESIDENT COUNSELOR: Interested in
those with 1 luman Service background
wishing to gain valuable experience in
the field. No monetary compensation,
however room, utilities and phone
provided Call Mary Smith, The REAL
Crisis Center, 758-HELP.
SERVICES OFFERED
TOP QUALITY TYPING-Papers, S1.50
page, resumes written and tvped for
$15.00. Call Joy after 6:00 p.m. at 758-7423.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICES.
Call 758-8241758-5488.
BARTENDER FOR HIRE for private
parties, social functions, etc. Rates
negotiable. Call Mike at 757-3811 anytime
around the dinner hour.
NEED MONEY for college? Free
information on loans and scholarships
available for undergraduate and
graduate students. Write Scholastic
Financial Services, 202 Arlington Blvd
Suite D Greenville. State year in school.
AIRBRUSH ARTWORKS � Got a rad
idea and want it on a T-shirt? I lot colors
and artwork reproduced with Airbrush
Artwork! T-shirt, sweatshirts, banners.
Mandpainted one of a kind artwork
(won't wash out). Professionally
airbrushing 19804988, recently came up
from Day tona, Florida. Paul Mill, 752-
0607.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: 18 yrs
experience. Work is done on a computer
with a letter quality printer. Low, low
J rates! Will correct spoiling. Call 756-89.4
between 5 pm. and 9 p.m. Ask for Ginger.
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICES: We
offer typing and photocopying services.
We also sell software and computer
diskettes. 24 hours in and out.
Guaranteed typing on paper up to 20
hand written pages. SDF Professional
"In the Dark a series at (rank discussions onl
sexually transmitted diseases will be presented bvl
the ECU SltS Nursing Staff at the Student Health I
Center Room 116, March 15th, 22nd. and 2Hh at 3
lp.rn4 p.m Register by calling 757-841 between!
� the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. and ask (or Barbara!
ll'enneU.
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
fteside Cubbies) Greenville, N.C, 752-
3694.
FOR SALE
RED HOT BARGAINS! Drug dealers'
cars, boats, planes repo'd. Surplus. Your
area. Buyers Guide. (1) 805-687-6000 ext.
S-U66.
FOR SALE: Coupon for one way ticket to
anywhere Continental Airlines flys.
$89.95. Must be used by 52588. Call
355-2580.
FOR SALE: Springbreak round-trip
ticket from Greenville to Boston. $100.00.
Call 758-9580 during the late afternoon or
evenings.
1981 WT. CHEVETTE, blue vinyl
interior, bucket seats, floor console.
Looks and runs like new, perfect for
student, must sell. $2,495.00 B.J. Mills,
746-24446 or 753-2878.
IS IT TRUE you can buy jeeps for $44
through the U.S. government? Get the
facts today! Call 1-312-742-1142 ext. 5271-A.
FOR SALE: brand new 26" 10 speed
bicycle. $75.00. Call 752-3569.
FOR SALE: 1979 Subaru Station Wagon, 4
wheel drive. $1450.00. Call 752-2284.
TROLL'S TUX AND TEES-Don't pay
high prices for your formal wear, try
Troll's Tux and Tees for your formal
needs. Traditional and designer models.
Special fraternity rates. Call 757-1007 or
830-1447.
SPRING BREAK TSHIRTS If you
thought the I lalloween shirts were hot,
wait until you see the Springbreak 1988
t's. Get them while they last. Call Phil or
Troll at 830-1447 or 757-1007.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 2
bedroom, 112 bath townhouse. $170.00
month plus 12 utilities. Completely
furnished except bedroom, central air
and heat, dishwasher, pool. Call 752-5614
and ask for Bob.
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apartments for
rent. Furnished. Contact Hollie
Simonowich at 752-2865.
PERSONALS
THETA CHI: Here's some more
highlights from George Mason. The road
trip was great thanks to Pj's half gallon
and the "port a potty 1 ley Bill, how old
is this gum? Gary, thanks for the ride
home from dinner. Never buy beer in
Virginia, right Jeff? Pat, get out from
under the bed! Hey, wherc's Greg and
Steve? We won the man-mice award!
They only have 10 kegs? Why are we the
only chapter always in the beer line? Who
set off the Fire alarm? We gotta get outta
here! Thanks to Mrs. Pfautz for that spicy
dinner. Whata weekend!

TICIA-Thanks so much for putting up
with four tired, complaining people all
the way to S.C and back. South of the
Border will NEVER be the same! We had
a lot of fun, despite all of the complaining
we did! We love you!
TALL, DARK AND HANDSOME man
would like to hear from girls interested in
developing a meaningful relationship.
(Call 830-5467, between 9-10 p.m, M-Th
ask for Bill. Serious inquiries only).
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 2
bedroom apartment in Eastbrook. Have
your own room and bathroom for just
$155,000 per month plus 12 utilities. Call
758-4749.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMED-
IATELY: Your best bet! Only $150.00
monthly, no utilities. Very, very close to
campus. Call 830-199. Hurry!
FREE Food
FREE Food
FREE Food
Mexican Imports
$1.50
every Wednesday 5-7
Off The Cuff
Sheraton (ireenville
A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS �
2899 E. 5t. Street
�Ixwated Near ECV
�Near MJor Shopping C ntrrs
�Across From highway Patrnl Station
IjmHed Offer - $275 a month
Contact J T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 o. 830-1937
Office open - Apt 8. 12 - 5.30 p.m
�AZALEA GATDENS
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washerj, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $195 a month. 6
month kase. MOBILE HOME RENTALS -
couples or singles. Apartment and mobile
homes tn Azalea Gardens near Brook Valley
County Club
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
RANDALL: Just a note to let you know
just a few more hours til we're in the
snow. Ellen.
THE BIG DAY is on its way, the dream
girls of ECU are coming to town, the final
pictures were done the other day 15
gorgeous girls from bathing suits to
evening gowns. They'll be out the 1st
week in April you'll soon see, a full-color
14-month calendar of ECU's finest, I'm
sure you'll agree. Pi Kappa Alpha.
EXPERIENCE "the kick from down
under for .75 at The East Carolina Tea
party. It's Wild! Off The Cuff, Sheraton-
Greenville.
$2.00 UNDER 21, $1.00 21 AND UP �
The Gong Show at the Attic First act goes
on at 9:30 p.m. Don't miss it.
OFF THE CUFF would like to thank all
our patrons and wish everyone a great
spring break.
THANK YOU-Larry, formerly of "The
Cut Above" has moved to CALIFORNIA
CONCEPTS. 1 Ic would like to thank all of
you for your patronage the last eight
months. Come see him or call at 757-3222,
located at 1100 Charles Blvd.
SAE HAPPY HOUR at the Clbo every
Friday from 4-until. $2.00 Teas-why drive
anywhere else?
RAFTERS: Tuesday night is rock 'n roll
night, free admission, .25 draft.
LOST: Connecticut Driver's License.
Need desperately. Cannot get home
before Spring Break to get a new one. Call
Ann-758-9168 lr 758 0625. Reward
offered!
WEDNESDAY Ladies night at Rafters
Ladies admUted in free from 8:30-10:30.
SI.00 wine coolers, .25 draft.
MR. ECU � Attention all studs: Get
ready to show off your bodies at the Mr.
ECU contest on March 15 at the Elbo
Girls: be prepared to see the hottest
bodies on campus. For information call
752-8090.
SGA ELECTIONS-Candidatesfor SGA
Executive Offices must file for election in
228 Mendenhall bv Friday, March 4,1988.
THE GONG SHOW IS HERE, tonight s
the night, if you want a gxxi seat you'll
have to put up a tight. The judges are
ready, all acts can't wait to be seen, not
only that, we have the unkown comic and
Gene Gene the dancin' machine. So get to
the Attic early, and bring some cash, the
all greek Gong Show will be a bash.
SINGLE? Separated? Divorced? Does
anyone say it better than Alexander
Graham Bell? "When one door closes,
another opens; but we often look so long
and so regretfully upon the closed dour
that we do not see the one which has
opened for us A new door is opening in
this community to provide you the
opportunity to meet new people. Por
information, write REACHING OUT,
Suite 150, 2462 Stantonsburg Road
Greenville, N.C, 27834.
RANDALL: Thanks for being the best
date at theSig Ep formal It's the BEST I've
ever been to! But 1 hope that vou have
caught your breath because your going to
need it on the slopes! 1 can't wait Just a
few more days Catch me on the downhill
baby! Ellen.
DELTA SIGS: Casino Night was such a
blast the chips flew and the kegs went too
fast. A good time was had by everyone,
even though all bets weren't won! At
times we think we might regret it vou
know, that film would you please edit?!
Love, the Alpha Phi's.
GONG SHOW TONIGHT All act be at
the Attic by 7:30 p.m
CRAIG INCRAIIAM: Congratulations
on reaching the ripeoleageof 21 Hang m
there. Only one more year til vou
graduate. You mav get out before I do
1 lappy Birthday P.S. No more Kit Bits
for you, young man
CHI O We had a ball last night Ya'll sure
do know how to party. Let's do it again
real von because vou know where the
real golfers are. Love, the Brothers of
Alpha Sigma Phi.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY, KELLY, my most
uncritical friend. Ha! 1 still won't forgive
you far dropping THE bomb Anyway,
happy birthday and . . remember the
Aycock! 'chelle.
NEW DELI IS THE PLACE to eat, drink,
and make merriment Come jam to the
tunes of Brioe Street Thursdav, and hear
your Favorite Beatles, Steely Dan, Little
Feat and Doobie Brothers. We'll be
closing at 9.00 during Spring Break, but
come check out our delicious daily lunch
specials. 1 lave a good one!
PI KAPPA ALPHA One more week 'til
breaks gonna smack us in the face. Try to
hit a hxk or two you'll thank me for it.
FizzThe newest
gathering place. Drink
Specials for Every
Night of the wpek!
Mon: $1.00 Imports
Tues: $2.00 Kamikazees
Wed: $1.50 Highballs
Thurs: $2.00
Fri: $2.00 Margaritas & Tequila
Sunrises
Sat: $2.00 Fireballs
Old Fashioned
Soda Fountain
416 Evans St Mall
Across from Gold's Gym
9pa Alpha 0iw
V Presents
"Spring Break Blast"
Raffle Party
Featuring
"The Moody Dudes"
$2.00 Advance $3.00 Door
March 2, 4:00 p.m. at KA House
Tickets sold in Front of Student Store
Announcements
ROBERTSON
Students who would like to help with
getting M.G. "Pat" Robertson elected
President, contact Justin Sturz at 758-2047.
Organizational meeting will be held soon.
KERYGMA
A Bible study for those who are serious
about studying the Bible. Weekly meet-
ings (tentatively Tues. afternoon) will be
scheduled to accomodate those who are
interested. Kerygma is an interdenomina-
tional program sponsored by Presbyte-
rian Campus Ministry. For more infor.
1al Mike at 752-7210
CHALLENGE DAY
Registration for Intramural Challenge
Day wil be held on March 2 from 11 p.m6
p.m. in MG 104-A. For more information
call 757-6387.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
There will be meetings every Thursday
at 6:00 in the culture center. Everybody
welcome.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
The ECU College Republicans will
meet every Tuesday night in room 221
Mendenhall at 7 p.m. Call 758-5775 or 752-
3587.
SRA
SRA Semiformal Dance: Tickets art on
sale now! The dance will be from 9 pm to
lam on March 18,1988 in the Holiday Inn
Holidome with the theme bevn? "One
Night in Bangkok See Residence Hall
Vice-President for tickets ($3.1XJ single,
S5.00 couple with SRA card and $4.00
single, $7.00 couple without SRA card).
PHI ALPHA THETA
There will be an important Phi Alpha
Theta meeting on Wednesday, March 1 at
3.00pm.in theTodd Room (First floor, D
wing of Brewster Bldg.). All members
strongly urged to attend.
pCH FRISBEE CLUB
There will be practice every Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday at 2:30 on In-
tramural Fields 5 and 6 behind Minges
Colltseum and on Sunday at 2:00. New
players welcome.
f HJ BFTA LAMBDA
To honor free enterprise week, we will
have Margret BarnhiU as our guest
�Lker Open to all business-related
!�� New members are welcome.
SSL -till be held in Rawl 302 on
IJ March 2.1300p.m.
CHAMBER MUSIC
The 1988-1989 Chamber music Series
attractions indude: Buswell-Parnas-Lu-
visi Trio, National Gallery of Art Vocal
Ensemble, Tokyo String Quartet, and
OREGON. For a brochure detailing the
events, contact the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center, 757-6611, ext.
266. Office hours are 11:00 a.m6:00 p.m
Monday-Friday. This series is co-spon-
sored by the Department of University
Unions and the School of Music.
N.C. SYMPHONY
"Roberta Peters, soprano, will be the
featured soloist with the N.C. Symphony
on Wednesday, March 16 at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. This final concert of
the 1987-88 N.C. Symphony Series is
made possible by the Pitt Co. N.C Sym-
phony chapter and Burroughs-Wellcome
Co. Tickets are currently available at
Mendenhall Ticket Office (757-6611)
CHRISTIAN FELI.QWSHTP
Friday nights are ALIVE more than
ever before! Join us at Jenkins Auditorium
(Art Building) at 8:00 p.m. Every FRIDAY
NIGHT for Christian Fellowship and
Bible teaching where JESUS IS LORD!
SCHOLARSHIP
Students who wish to obtain financial
aid for overseas education may apply for
a Rivers Scholarship. The application
deadline is March 15,1988. For more info,
contact the Office of International Studies
and Scholarship in Brewster A-117.
AEP
If you want to hear the true crime story
come hear Lawrence Harris, M.D. on
March 1 at 7:00 p.m. in F-307, the topic for
the meeting will be Forensic Pathology.
Final plan for Memphis will be discussed
after the meeting.
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
All Travel Committee members: There
will be a meeting on Wednesday, March 2
at 5 o.m. in Mendenhall.
OUTDOOR THFRAPY
Worshop sponsored by the LSS-S and
LSS 4700, March 19,9:00-4:00 at River Park
North. Lunch included. Open to students
l$12.50) and professionals ($25.00). Pre-
register and. pre-pay by March 9th at the
LSS Building. Limited to 30 participants.
FRIME TIME
Prime Time, sponsored by Campus
Crusade for Christ, meets every Thursday
at 730 p.m. in Brewster C-103. Everyone is
welcome.
OVERSEAS DEV.
Student internships interested in
spending a summer (or longer) in remote
parts of the world? The Overseas Devel-
opment Network is seeking several con-
cerned, committed students and recent
graduates who are interested in develop-
ment. Internships are available in India,
Bangladesh, Latin America, the Phillippi-
nes, and the Appalachian Mountains.
Financial assistance is available. Contact
Marianne Exum for more information at
home 752-2389 or work 757-6271. Appli-
cation deadline is March 15,1988.
FCA
Fellowship of Christian Athletes will
meet every Tuesday at 930 at the Pirate
Club. Coaches, athletes, and others are
welcome to attend.
MIME
The Student union Special Events
Committee presents the world's greates
mime-Marcel Marceau-on Wednesday,
March 2nd, at 8:00 p.m. in Wright Audito-
rium. For tickets, contact the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall, 757-6611, ext.
266. Office hours are 11:00 ajn6:00 p.m
Monday-Friday.
FOREIGN FILM FANS
The European Studies program inviias
you to a unique view of European sodety
through the art of film. On Tuesday,
March 1 at 6:30 pm, Istvan Szabos film
MEPHISTO (1981) will be shown in
Joyner Library, room B-04. Mikhail
Kalatazov's CRANES ARE FLY!NG
(1957) will be shown on March 15. These
films focus on the rise of Nazism and its
devastating effects on Europe. All are
welcome to attend.
SlAP
All General College students who have
indicated a desire to major in Speech-
Language and Auditory Pathology and
have R. Muzzarelli as their advisor are to
meet on Wednesday, March 23 at 5:00
p.m. in Brewster EM01. Advising for early
registration will take place at that time.
Others interested in SLAP should contact
the department-757-6961.
INTRAMURAI.S
The Department of Intramural-Recrea-
tion Services and the Outdoor Recreation
Center is sponsoring a Canoe Clinic on
Feb. 16 and 18. Registration for mis trip
will be taken in 204 Memorial Gym from
8:00 am to 500 pm through Feb. 15.
CONTINUING ED.
The following Personal Development
Courses will be held: Money Matters
(starts March 15); Guitar (starts March 15);
Scuba (starts March 15); Drawing with
Colored Pencils (starts March 17);
Beginning Calligraphy (starts May 19).
Contact Continuing Education, Ervvin
Hall for more information.
ECU AMBASSADORS
There will be a meeting on Wednesday,
March 2 at 5:15 p.m. in the Mendenhall
Multi-purpose Room. We will be having
our group pich re made for the yearbook.
EROS
The Equal Rights Organization for
students will meet today at 5:00 in
Brewster B-101 to ratify the constitutuion
and plan a fund raiser. All interested
persons invited to attend. For more
information, call 758-35645 or 746-6049.
WOMEN'S STUDIES
Women's role in politics is the topic of
discussion for the second Brown Bag
Lunch of 1988, sponsored by Women's
Studies. Dr. Dorothy Clayton of the
Political Science Department will speak
briefly and be available to answer
questions from 1:00 p.m. The luncheon
will be held in Mendenhall Room 221
from 12-130 on Wednesday, March 2.
PRODUCTION COMM.
The Productioi. Committee will meet
on March 1 at 530 p.m. for pictures in the
yearbook. A!l members need to meet at
Mendenh?'i Student Confer at the
information desk.
EARLY CHILDHOOD CLUB
All education and child development
majors are invited to a special meeting
about storytelling and puppetry on
March 2 at 4:00 in Speight 308. Don't miss
this wonderful opportunity to see a
storyteller. Information on how to read a
story and make a flannel board will be
given out for professional files.
WOMEN'S FRISBFF cum
Practice will be held Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday from 330
until, at the bottom of College Hill. All
interested players should attend. Those
who have received forms need to have
them completed and ready to turn in.
sasc
There will be an important meeting on
Thursday, March 3 at 5:00 p.m. in Speight
103. We will be electing officers for next
year. Everyone is asked to attend.
BIKE HIKE
Registration for the Intramural Out-
door Recreation Bike Hike will be held
from Feb. 22 - March 14. The Pre-Trip
meeting will beheld on March 16at 4 p.m.
The Activity Date will be on Feb. 24 at 6
p.m. For more information call 757-6387
"Where fun is 1
PURIM
Purim Pizza Party Wed. March 2nd
from 5:30 - 7 p.m. in rooms 8 DEF (down-
stairs) in Mendenhall. The food and
drinks are free. Come for dinner and meet
other Jewish students.
NASWCORSO
Wanted: Social Work Criminal Justice
majors and intended majors, to attend
meetings. Held the 2nd and 4th Monday
each month, at 4:00 p.m in Allied Health
bldg room 110.
PERFORMING ARTS
The 1988-1989 Performing Arts Series is
sponsoring the following events: The
Ohio Ballet, Wynton Marsalis, The Acting
Company, The Atlanta Symphony, PHI-
LADANCO, The N.Y. Gilbert and Sulli-
van Players in Pirates of Penzance, The
Polish National Radio Orchestra, CABA-
RET, The ECUNC Symphonies in con-
cert with SPECIAL GUEST PIANIST
KAREN SHAW, and Nadja Salerno-Son-
nenberg. For a brochure detailing the
evenls contact the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall, 757-6611, ext. 266. Office
hours are 11:00 a.m6:00 p.m Monday-
Friday.
SPRING SEM. CRAPS.
Caps and gowns should be picked up in
the Student Stores, Wright Building,
March 22,23, 24,1988. These are yours to
keep providing the graduation fee has
been paid. For those receiving the Masters
Degree the fee pays for your cap and
gown, but there is an extra fee of $12.50 for
your hood. Announcements are available
in the Student Stores, Wright Building.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The National Gamma Beta Phi Honor
society will be holding a meeting March 1
at 7 p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium. Raffle
tickets are available in Mr. Dunlop's office
Brewster A 217. Attendance is
mandatory.
CULTUKAL CENTER
A meeting will be held on Tuesday,
March 1, 1988, 4:00 p.m in the Cutural
Center. Interested faculty, staff, and stu-
dents are invited to attend.
WORKSHOP
Ms. Melissa Haid, a viting artist. ill
conduct a multi-rncJu worksrtop with
day, paper, and slumpe i glass on March
14-18 in Jenkins Art Building. Ms. I laid will
present a slide lecture on .JUarA lc at 7:30
in J-1327 of reccn' work A work by Ms.
Haid v.ili be completed dunr, the
workshop and will be Jonated .j the
permanent collection in Mendenhall
Student Center or Kate Lewis Gallery The
workshop is sponged by il.e Ccomics
Guild, The Visual Art Fonom, and The
SGA. The public is invited to attend.
Workhop hours will be fm. 8.0Ck:0U
noon the 14-18 in J-143.
SIGMA GAMMA FPSILON
Sigma Gamma Epsilon, the Honor
Society of Earth Sciences, and the ECU
Dept. of Geology welcome Dr. Keros
Cartwright, the 1987-1988 Birdsall
Distinguished Lecturer of the
I lydrogeology Division of the Geological
Society of America who will present two
lectures. "Safe Landfills-Can we
succeed?" will be presented Tuesday,
March 1, at 730 p.m. in General Classroom
Building Rm. 1019. "Large Scale
Experiments in Hydrogeology" will be
presented Wednesday, March 2, at 4:00
p.m. in Graham Building Room 301. All
are welcome to these talks. For more
information, call ECU Geoloev Dept. at
757-6360.
BUILDING SfiLE FSTFFM
Wanda Lancaster, a nurse clinidan in
psychology will be speaking on behalf of
Presbyterian and Methodist Campus
Ministries on Wednesday, March 2. The
Methodist Student Center (501 E. 5th St
across from Garrett dorm) will host an all-
you-can-eat dinner on Wednesdays; cost
is $2.00 at the door and $1.50 in advance.
m CAMPUS MINIffTHIES
Worship God and celebrate Commun-
ion this Wednesday night at 5:00 p.m. at
the Methodist Student Center. Also avail-
able: aU-you-can-eat meal which is $2.00
at the door, $150 in advance. Call 758-2030
for reservations. Sponsored by Presbyte-
rian and Methodist Campus Ministries.
SE&
Students for Economic Democracy will
EEi"TS f from �� Pm
Sun
Its thai time of year agaj
dents are making plans to
to warmer climates for a i
relaxation, fun, and most (
start developing a "healti
s there really any such th
"healthy tan"? Many rese
have come to the conclusi
there is no such thing. Eve
you get a tan, you are dai
your skin. A "tan" is your
way of repairing dama.
ofskin due to ultraviolet ra
exposure. The safest way
to protect your skin is to i
Of the sun, use sun -
Cover your skin if vou go
sun.
Being in the sun is not hj
More than half of the sun
tion is invisible, includ
violet ravs which caus j
and burning There ar
types ot ultraviolet (U
including UVA, UVB, ar
UVC ravs have minor J
the skin, but UVA and U
are extremely dam i
these ravs arv jusl
light. UVA ma) redden I
quickly but disappears �.
hours, because thea
deeper layers n. IP
show no reaction on the
first,but three to eight hoi
the burr, will appear
ri � FJ L T H � Q l
1
Sheri Wilson
V ht n the sun's ravs in
ing cells, electrochemical c
take place. This causes tc
products that irritah
rounding tissue and 1
heat, swelling, and inOami
of sunburn. Once the skin
tacked by the UV rays, it h�
and thickens to block otre
from entering the skin ccllj
speeds up the peelir. I
which causes the natural J
tion of our skin to be she
with the dead skin cells.
The sub-surface skin
nelanocytes, arc We in
Akxks aiftmuns. They pi
mnd store melanin which d
the skin to lessen ultraviole
(ration. When the deepest
nocytes are exposed to I'M
the cells increase the prodi
of melanin. This exposure
ocur two to five days aftl
exposure to UV ravs.
Frequent exposure to th
may cause the developmi
different skin cancers are
increase the aging pr
through wrinkles and sa
skm. By age 50, most people
to see the damage they hav.
bv sunbathing when they
younger, although sigr
exposure to the sun could
early as age iV Most skin c
are preventable and there
Eakin spea,
to trustees
continued from page!
four-year degree program
said.
Eakin also said the reconl
dations "represent a sp
opportunity for us to take th
in developing new and
ways of educating our nal
teachers
Focusing on future de
ment, Eakin remarked upo
recent proposal bv the Sti
Recreation Center Comi
which represents the interej
ECU students in the need
student recreation facility
President Scott Thomas all
ECU trustee, stated the col
that "The level oi intramual
reation facilities at East Cai
is not what it should be.
proposal promotes the coni
tion of a 100,000 to 110,000 sJ
toot building that would pos
offer students swimming
ties along with basketball, tc
racketball, and handball cot
Thomas estimated that
ing the facility would consj
an annual increase in studei
of $88 at the very least. A
proposal has yet to be subnj
for approval pending loo
design, and financing of the
ity.
In other business, univd
officials announced posl
searches for two key officcrstj
Business Affairs Division
university will seek both a I
director of Computing and l
mation Systems and a dir
Physical Plant and Archil
Planning.
mmmmmm
4 ���





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 1,1988
ie khe dancin' machine So got to
earl) and bring some cash, the
will be a bash
�ivorced? rvs
�vu il than Alexander
en one doot doses,
pens � we often look so long
upon the closed door
I �v the one which has
new door i opening in
provide ou the
meet new people. For
v NG OUT,
burg Road,
-4
ks for being the best
rma t's the BEST I've
pe that you have
earn because our going to
s pes! I can t wait lust a
the downhill
N c �� as such a
� v and the kegs went too
n � id : everyone,
i ;s r weren t won! At
- we might regret it you
ase edit
v rONIGHT All act be at
'� v it ons
i 2 angin
n ore vear til you
(- I do
N e Ritz Bits
(Sl night a 11 sure
: aga:n
where the
the Brothers oi
rHDAY, Kill i. m) most
won t forgive
: THE bomb An) way,
member the
- mi PI -UT toeat drink,
to the
md hear
Little
- be
pring Break, but
is da:l lunch
week 'til
I sinth face Try to
. 11 thank me for it.
a �rfe
k Blast"
ty
Dudes"
3.00 Door
.it KA House
f Student Store
WORKSHOP
i, a vting artist, ill
' a rr wi rksnop with
�lass on March
Vsi laid w,l!
rch it at 7:S0
� rk work by Ms.
I dunng the
be Jonareu .o the
� n Mendenhall
vis Gallery The
.ed b e Ce. .imic
rt Fonun, and The
- invited to attend.
rs v - � 'a M
� " in ' 143
SIGMA GAMMA EPSILON
E psilon, the Honor
ences, and the ECU
welcome Dr. Keros
right, the 1987-1988 Birdsall
-ed Lecturer of the
-ion of the Geological
�ho will present two
Fe Landfills-Can we
�d7" will be presented Tuesday,
r at 730 pm in General Classroom
g Rm. 1019 "Large Scale
sriments in Hydrogeoogy" will be
Wednesday, March 2, at 4:00
in Graham Building Room 301. All
welcome to these talks. For more
on, call ECU Geology Dept. at
BUILDING SELF ESTEEM
. anda Lancaster, a nurse clinician in
choiogy will be speaking on behalf of
sbyterian and Methodist Campus
- striea on Wednesday, March 2. The
Ithodist Student Center (501 E. 5th St
jss from Garrett dorm) will host an all-
can-eat dinner on Wednesdays; cost
p OC at the door and $1.50 in advance.
CAMPUS MINISTRIES
Vorship God and celebrate Commun-
this Wednesday night at 5:00 p.m. at
Methodist Student Center. Also avail-
e: all-youan-eat meal which is $2.00
he door, $1.50 in advance. Call 758-2030
reservations. Sponsored by Prosbyte-
and Methodist Campus Ministries.
Itudents for Economic Democracy will
St every Sunday from 7.00 p.m. in
ndenhall 8-D For more information,
758-9760 or 746049.
Sun basking damages skin
8-15
Burns quickly, tans minimally
6-8
Burns moderately, gradually
tans 4-6
Minimal burns, always tans
2-4
It s that time of year again. Stu- reason to increase the aging proc-
dents are making plans to migrate ess.
to warmer climates for a week of There are predisposing factors
relaxation, fun, and most of all, to for developing skin cancer. They
start developing a "healthy tan arc people with fair skin, with red
Is there really any such thing as a or blonde hair, who sunburn eas-
"healthy tan"? Many researchers ily. People with dark brown or
have come to the conclusion that black skin rarely develop skin
mere is no such thing. Every time cancer, yet there arc some forms
you get a tan, you are damaging of skin cancer that may develop if
your skin. A "tan" is your body's they overexpose themselves to
way of repairing damaged layers the sun's rays. The more a person
ot skin due to ultraviolet radiation stays in the sun, the greater the
exposure. The safest way for you risk for skin cancer.
to protect your skin is to stay out If you insist on being in the sun,
ol the sun, use sunscreen, and protection from UV rays is a ne- ers on low risk tanning:
cover your skin it you go into the cessity, even for skin types that
sun- tan easily. To increase the body's
Being in the sun is not harmless, own defenses, you need to use
More than half of the sun's radia- sunblocks or sunscreens. Sun-
blocks, like white zinc oxide,
block UV radiation by reflecting
the sun's rays. Sunscreens do the thirty minutes before going into
types of ultraviolet (UV) light opposite of sunblocks by absorb- the sun.
including UVA, UVB, and UVC. ingharmfulrayssothatonlyafew -Be generous when applying
UVC rays have minor effects on tanning rays penetrate the skin sunscreen to allow for maximum
the skin, but UVA and UVB rays cells. absorption.
are extremely damaging because Skin types are classified accord- � Tanning should be gradual;
these rays are just beyond visible ing to natural melanin production don't spend the whole day in the
light. UVA may redden the skin ability. Depending on your skin sun your first day at the beach.
quickly but disappears within 24 type, you would use a product "Limit your first few tanning
hours, because these rays affect with a specific SPF (Sun Protec- sessions to 15-20 minutes a day
deeper layers of skin. UVB rays tion Factor). The fairer your skin, and increase exposure gradually.
show no reaction on the skin at the higher the SPF you need. If UV rays reflect off of smooth j
you use a SPF of 4, it will allow or shiny surfaces, which means
you to stay in the sun four timesas that sitting in the shade is not a
long as you normally would with- form of protection,
out burning. To determine the UV rays penetrate water and
SPF you should use, look at the will reach you under water.
�Wet skin burns easier than
tion is invisible, including ultra-
violet rays which cause tanning
and burning. There are three
Rarely burns
Here are some helpful remind-
� Products that contain ingredi-
ents like cocoa butter, aloe juice,
or baby oil are great moisturizers,
but they do not act as sunscreens.
�Sunscreen needs to be applied
while tanning; a prolonged pe-
riod of time tanning one area will
cause sunburn.
�The sun's rays are most in-
tense between 10:00 AM and 2:00
PM. Try tanning before 10:00 AM
and after 3:00 PM.
While many of you head to the
beaches, some of us have to stay
behind because of jobs or lack of
funds. We may look into tanning
beds so we won't be pale in com-
parison when you return home
from Spring Break.
Tanning beds can be just as
dangerous as the sun's rays. In
fact, sun lamps produce either
UVA rays or UVB rays which are
the same rays produced by the
sun.
Hope you have a wonderful
Spring Break! I also hope that you
remember the facts about suntan-
ning and follow the low risk tan-
ning tips if you still plan on tan-
ning. Have a safe and healthy
vacation.
If you need any more informa-
tion on this subject, please feel free
to contact the Health Promotion
Office at the Student Health Cen-
ter: 757-6841.
For the latest in ECU News,
Features and Sports,
Pick up your copy of
The East Carolinian
VILLAGE
Donna
Edwards
owner
Bring in this ad for a 15 discount
on a purchase of $10 or more
with valid E.C.U. I.D.
55 Gallon Aquarium Sale!
P J J (This month only)
Weekly Fish Specials
Our Marine Room has all the fish and marine
life you'll need for a perfect Saltwater tank.
511 Evans Street
Greenville, NC 27834 Phone: 756-9222
tirt, but throe to eight hours later
the burn will appear.
rJ
a
Sheri Wilson
S'u.l1 Health Center
When the sun's ravs invade liv-
ing cells, electrochemical changes
take place. This causes toxic by-
products that irritate the sur-
rounding tissue and leads to the
heat, swelling, and inflammation
of sunburn. Once the skin is at-
tacked by the UV rays, it hardens
and thickens to block other rays
from entering the skin cells. This
speeds up the peeling process
which causes the natural protec-
tion of our skin to be shed along
with the dead skin cells.
The sub-surface skin cells,
rnelanocytes, arc fhe building
tlocks oriemtans. They produce
nd store melanin which darkens
the skin to lessen ultraviolet pene-
tration. When the deepest mcla-
nocytes are exposed to UV rays,
the cells increase the production
of melanin. This exposure will
occur two to five days after the
exposure to UV rays.
Frequent exposure to the sun
may cause the development of
different skin cancers and will
increase the aging process
through wrinkles and sagging
skin. By age 50, most people begin
to see the damage they have done
by sunbathing when they were
younger, although signs of over-
exposure to the sun could start as
early as age 20. Most skin cancers
are preventable and there is no
Eakin speaks
to trustees
following chart:
SKIN TYPE
SPF
Always burns, never tans
continued from page 1
degree program
he
dry.
�On a cloudy day only 25 per-
cent of UV rays are blocked � you
can burn!
� Equally expose skin surfaces
WE VE OPT
We've got a summer you won't be able
to resist at Tar River Estates�stroll
along the river trail, picnic by the pool
and enjoy our quiet wooded area. Our
exceptional 1 bedrooms offer private
patios, clubhouse and 24-hour
maintenance; all just minutes from
ECU and Medical Center.
Hours: 9-5:30 Weekdays. 1-5 Saturday and Sunday.
752-4225
1400 Willow St.
Professionally managed by Shelter
Management Group
�Now taking deposits for summer and fall only on 1
and 2 bedrooms.
TarRiver
ars iYs
SURF
SHOP
THE PLAZA
MALL
tour-year
vi id.
Eakin also said the recommen-
dations "represent a splendid
opportunity- for us to take the lead
in developing new and better
ways of educating our nation's
teachers
Focusing on future develop-
ment, Eakin remarked upon the
recent proposal by the Student
Recreation Center Committee
which represents the interests of
ECU students in the need for a
student recreation facility. SGA
President Scott Thomas, also an
ECU trustee, stated the concern
that "The level of intramual-rec-
reation facilities at East Carolina
is not what it should be The
proposal promotes the construc-
tion of a 100,000 to 110,000 square
foot building that would possibly
offer students swimming facili-
ties along with basketball, tennis,
racketball, and handball courts.
Thomas estimated that build-
ing the facility would constitute
an annual increase in student fees
of $88 at the very least. A final
proposal has yet to be submitted
for approval pending location,
design, and financing of the facil-
ity.
In other business, university
officials announced position
searches for two key officers in the
Business Affairs Division. The
university will seek both a new
director of Computing and Infor-
mation Systems and a director of
Physical Plant and Architectural
Planning.
s
p
R
I
N
G
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
'88
20
NEXT PURCHASE
GREENVILLE STORE ONLY
EXPIRES 31588
�MUST PRESENT VALID E.C.U. I.D.
�NOT VALID ON SALE ITEMS
(MUST HAVE THIS COUPON)


SPECIAL 30 OFF
VUARNET, BUCCI, COSTA
DEL MAR GLASSES!
RACK ROOM SH0BS,
BRANDED SH
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
TAKE AN
EXTRA
10
Open MonSat. 10-9
Sunday 1-6
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(EXCEPT AIGNER. NIKE AND REEBOK)

SGA Elections
� rv. 1 MMii i ii'
' � . , at' ��-
t i i. � LnJ
SGA President
SGA Vice-President
SGA Treasurer
SGA Secretary
Candidates for these positions must file for
Election in 228 Mendenhall Student Center
by 5 p.m. Friday, March 4, 1988.
SGA Election Committee
�3L2?S
(
fe


P
TO
TAKE
OFF FOR
SPRING
BREAK
IN STYLE?
PRESENT YOUR ECU STUDENT ID AND RECEIVE 10
DISCOUNT ON ANY BRODY'S MEN'S OR JUNIOR S
SWIMSUIT. JUST IN TIME FOR A TROPICAL
SPRING BREAK!
Brocks tropical sun rises and sets on our sizzling hot swlmwear for
1988. Ran your getaway pray for scorchers! But first be dazzled
by our great selection of scintillating swlmwear. All in blazing high
impact colors and textures. BrooYs has the
best selection of styles for
both men and women by
McaJ . Instinct. Gotcha.
OP. Raisins and Cruz
Dteourt for ECU Stuctont ndi Salmdoy. Mach SMv
Carolina East MaH � The Plaza
"fflHPr
' � - - -wnmmmmm "iffrnt u
r3�- .





8
THEEAS1 CAROLINIAN
M
SRA elections coming soon
BvKIMin EDER
Stilt Vtltff
Elections for next yeai s s!v
officers will be held March 29
according to SRA Vice President
Mark Carroll Positions will he
tilled in the SRA executive conn
cil the Area Residence Councils
l ARO and each HouseCouncil
In order to be eligible tor the
SKA executive council one must
have one year s experience with
the SR executive council or one
vcar with an Area Residence
Tragedy brings
o . O
many together
continued from page 2
or gas dryer connection at the
aj - plex
Manv law suits were tiled in the
aftermath of the explosion The
Martin Seabolt familit s
1 � : sr cases out of court
According to Kenneth i iaigler an
attornev with the Greenville firm
- Tart raft and Haigler, which
-riited 13 residents ol Vil-
lage Green who suffered injui
?m the blast, there are still cases
pending for all his clients.
Haigler would not reveal the
aramountsol tin law suitsbut
did sav that lawsuits were filed
against a half dozen different cor
poratedefendents Headded that
he expects all the cases to be
wrapped up very soon
ECl sst Psychology Profes
sorSu san McCammon was also a
principle figure in the network of
pport which was set up for the
ms fthe Village Green dis-
aster.
McCammon ith the h Ip i I
u?r Meyer crcatedaposl trau-
) help vic-
�: iosion cope w
ial sea

the - indations laid b her
committee were helpful a year
later when Pitt County was struck
byanotherdisaster,a tornado that
' limed 13 lives
Election
solved for '88
continued from page 1
not a clear majority winner in
individual races, then a run off
election will be held.Only the I
top ote getters for the individual
position in the first election are
eligible for the run-offs
Porcelli said he has planned
for the upcoming elections so that
the problems which plagued the
37 elections will not re-occur
One of the problems in last year's
elections invoked the failur-
check candidate's grade point
average before the election day,
Porcelli said. Also some candi-
dates in the 1987 elections vio-
lated an election rule which for
bids soliciting inside 25 feet
boundaries surrounding polling
centers. The 25 feet boundary lint
stipulation is set to allow fairnes;
in petitioning potential voters.
Porcelli said that he think
there is not enough minority rep
rescntation in the S A and that
the 1988 elections are a time to
correct the disparity in minority
numbers in the SGA "1 would
encourage, and personally like to
see, more minorities to run tor
position in the SGA Porcelli
said.
Candidate
talks tough
Continued from page 1
t .re going to sell Hyundais in
America for $48,000 he said.
Answering the charge that his
protectionist policies are too
tough and could lead to a trade
war, Gephardt said history has
proven that a get tough policy
works in opening up foreign
markets. He said it was time the
U.S. stopped being timid and
faced with courage the task of
making the trade balance more
fair.
"And then when we get those
markets open � and we will
then we really have to be good
because the' competition is
tough he said. "This is the
toughest challenge we've ever
faced .
Gephardt said another impor-
tant part of Americas future lies in
education. "We have to set a goal.
We have to pull this country up in
terms of education he said.
( oun i! AI! vhsiti�ns art
decided i n in hiding preside
vice pi esi�
lent si 11i.t! treas
urer and publit it i hail m
AR po nI ions to he ele ted in
�'hide lent vice , lent
�ecretar an� KC
neinK i -
eai s
on all
�reas v, th !w 'sari I
mi, 'Us West
v enti al
r�resi
ems ana vice-presidents also
� in he ek ted I o run for one ol
these offices, a student must be a
Sophomore or above in class
standing.
In addition to these require
ments anyone who wishes to run
foi i :ii. i must 1) he a full time
studt nt ' be a resident ol the
student dormatories, ") have a
i leai judi ial re. ord,and 4) havea
V A ol 2 0 oi above 1 he filing
.1 ties are March ?1 -24, and appli-
ations i an be obtained from the
1 louse Council vice president.
There will be a candidates meel
ingon March 28th, and elections
are to be held on the 29th.
The SKA hopes to have a better
voter turnout thisyear than List It
is estimated that approximately
1 4 or lessol the students who are
eligible to vote on the SKA ele
lions actually do vote,arroll
said Also, it is important to re
member to look at the candidates
you are voting tor, and Study their
motn es, he said.
Dansey calls for clay care help
continued from page 1 that invo! sadaycai program
school to work and support the for mothers that receive aid tor
car Dansey believes that "We dependent children This pro
need to have a way to keep kids in gram m ludes $UH i month to a
school, we need to give them in mother with two children
entive " 1 le went on to say that
businesses should not hire teen
agers unless they are enrolled in
S hool, or have received a (I'D or
a diploma
I ansey dis ussed babies as the
final issue in Ins solution I )ansey
said that there is a program in
Kentucky (where the federal gov
eminent funds 7S percent of the
money and the state- legislature
provides the other 2 percent)
program is voluntary and in �
to take part in it, the mother t
Ixh ome a tull time student eithei
in high school or ollege "When I
g t to State Si nate, one oi tin tirst
thing I'll do i bring this program
in .it It asl on a v oluntai if
not a in.nidati �ry basis !
Dansey is runnii
senate i il currently hi
( ,i 0 n ille attorn) v 11 m I aft
EXTRA LOW
FOOD LION
PRICES!
USDA Choice Beef Unfrimmed Whole
12-14 Lbs. Average Prices in this ad good thru
Sliced FREE! Sunday, March 6, 1988.
Sirloin Tip
Roast
We Reserve The Right To Limit
Quantities On All Items.
) Oi Mouse Of Raeford
TURKEY BREASTS
W

White
Cauliflower
�99o f
Fresh Greert
BROCCOLI
U.S. No. 1 White
POTATOES
Crisp Iceber
LETTUCE
Bunch
��
Heads
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2 Litei � Caffeine Free Coke. Cherry
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Free Diet Coke
Milwaukee's
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$369
Pkg. of 12 12 Oz Cans Reg & Lt
Gallo
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$519
3 liter Chabtis Blanc Rhine Pink Chabhs
Red Rose Vm Rose. Burgundy
EXTRA LOW PRICES
. Everyday
Heinz
Ketchup
Del Monte
Vegetables
3�1
� Pea
Pillsbury fQzark Valley
Biscuits -LI
Pot Pies
79� 11399
, Ri I 16 0 Phillip ;
Blue Bonnet
Margarine
99
3 lb Tub
lllsbury
aster Strucfe
99�
11 5 Oz Asv 'ted
Surf
Detergent
$159
Palmolive
Dish Detergent
99�
?H 0 Automatic
9-Lives
Cat Food
l489
6 0z Hearty BeefHearty Meat
Salmon SupperSea Shore
� '�� HMI I .��"
Hunter's Choice
Doa Food
$399
25 Lb RationChunk
Man (
H ()M U
1. �
Super
' om
con I I

cars I 1 �
Green
Y

Kr j
at sorrv
. . : .
fordan, (IvC.EFV LAVTER1
GL
VVOl
Ai .
answer
thems
U n i
Hal als
recharj
orit'd 1 �
was 1 "
found
pov ' '
color
Dan
H HI R BO VRPM W
Dangcrou
a DJ on VVZM
Music Pin � � s
' islcar '
changes
s the rcas
The Mus v
what cot- played
� cas) to pla "
like that
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THE EAST C AROLINIAN
Style
MARCH 1,1988 Page 9
Man of Steel celebrates 50th anniversary
� � w . . II J�L 'cV f
By JOHN CARTER
Featum Editor
Superman debuted in "Action
Comics 1 in 1938. At first he
could onlv jump over buildings
and all that stuff. Well, it's 50
years later.
Things have changed.
But not that much. As the
thirties segued into the forties, the
Man of Steel gained more powers.
The famous X-ray vision, the heat
vision, the telescopic vision, the
mcTOSCOpic vision
It seems like all he did was look
Metropolis Marvel marrying Lois would kill Supey. Yeah it was
Lane or dying. silly, but it was the fifties.
This just supports the theory Red K always had weird effects
that today's society constantly on Superman. It made him fat or
straddles the line between sex and stupid or evil. One time it made
death. him cat tons of Big Macs. If a
Anyway. The imaginary stories Superman comic had Red
were a lot of fun. A lot of them Kryptonite on the cover, it was
were better than the regular worth buying,
adventures of the Big Red "S Superman wasn't the only one
Because after his powers who had to deal with strange
increased so much, he could beat transformations. Lois and Jimmy
anything so what was the point in Olsen between them got changed
even having villains get up in the into everything from babies to
morning? amorphous blobs.
Kryptonite. After the first At first, the Kryptonian
radioactive chunk of Supie's Crimefighter was the only
at things funny and funkv stuff
would happen. But he also got home planet showed up, the stuff survivor of his exploded home
real flight, super-breath and was everywhere. And then the planet. Slowly at first, and then
different varieties started with mind numbing speed, other
appearing. survivors of Krypton showed up.
Red K. Gold K. White K. Jewel Like Krypto.
K. Special K (which rendered the Not that Krypton was this super
Church Lady sterile.) But my scientific planet that had robots or
favorite was Blue Kryptonite.
This onlv affected Bizarros.
Bizzaros? They were imperfect
super hearing. Not the most boss
powers in the world, but hey. Vou
don't have em.
The forties went bv without
ever explaining why the Big Blue
Cheese never glanced Adolf's
way and just fried his head off his
shoulders. It also gave the world
the first Superman movies and duplicates of Superman and his
cartoons.
The fifties and sixties brought
anything. No, Jor-El had to send a
defenseless puppy into orbit. But
if he hadn't, we never would have
been able to read those great
stories in "Superman
friends. They did everything Krypto
backwards. That was their Family
gimmick. Backwards. Beppo the supermonkey had
Well, it's funny in context. Like, about the same secret origin,
the Bizarro World. It was square. Supergirl, the cousin of steel, had
It also thought because, as it been stranded on an asteroid city
The imaginary stories allowed reasonedMe am Bizarro World, for 16 years.
the writers to do anything they rianet earth not think, therefore Space pirate, android and all
damn well wanted to with the me do around bogus dude Brainiac,
character, and then totally ignore Blue K, as vou can probablv shrunk a whole city before
it in the next issue. Most of the infer, was an imperfect duplicate Krypton bit the big one. Thus the
imaginary stories centered on the of Green K, which, o( course, bottlecityof Kandor and its teeny
about the TV show and
introduced two crucial things to
the comic book series - The
imaginary stories and spin-offs
Pictured here is Superman�, the Man of Steel. His birthday was yesterday and boy, did we celebrate it.
Also pictured are his dog Krypto, who doesn't exist anymore in any reality and the boss rocket that
brought Clark to Earth. (I1' 'ration by Jeff'Why has HE got three comics " Parker)
tiny inhabitants became a p of Kryptonian criminals and every Supes got him to say his name
once in a while they'd bust out backwards. Not that Kltpzyxm
and raise hell. makes any more sense, but it
No doubt, the Big Guy had always seemed to work.
some boss enemies. Like Terra Man was a guy from the
Mxyzptlk, the fifth dimensional
imp who would only go home if See SUPERMAN, page 10
the Superman legend
Superman's dad also created
the Phantom Zone. Sort of a
purple, mist- filled two-
dimensional album cover in
space. This Zone was filled with
Green Lantern Corps lights go out, finally
BY JEFF"i love im"PARKER
Staff Illustrator
Well, with all the fuss being
made about that big lug from
Krypton being 50, I'd like to talk
about someone who's 29 and just
got Jus romu- rangcRed-Hal
lor dan, the GTWEJ��WI��
GL has always been kind of
special to me for some reason.
He's always been one of the
hippest superheroes DC ever had.
When DC began revamping their
colden age heroes to fit into the
silver age of comics, GL was one
of the first, along with the Flash.
In Showcase 22 the story of his
origin debuted. Abin Sur, an alien
GL crashed his spaceship on
Earth and ordered his power ring
to seek out a man without fear,
worthy to take his place.
And the ring picked good ol'
Hal, a test-pilot for Ferris Aircraft.
Later, when Hal got his own
comic he found out he had to
answer to the Oans, a bunch of
little blue guvs who proclaimed
themselves the Guardians of the
Universe.
Hal also found out he had to
recharge his ring every 24 hours
orit'd run out of green energy. He
was probablv pretty mad when he
found out that this incredibly
powerful ring was useless on the
color yellow. This came from
DC's annoying tendency to give
every nero a weakness, m icast
his ring affected wood, unlike
Alan Scott's, the golden age GL.
Over the years Hal saved the
Earth countless times in stories by
the late Gardner Fox, and was
often drawn bv Gil Kane, who
gave us lots of shots of Hal's
nostrils but is still considered
THE Green Lantern artist.
Being one of the more powerful
heroes, it was just natural that Hal
joined the Justice League in the
sixties. Unfortunately he was
mostly used to turn the JLA'ers
back to normal whenever they
were transformed into babies,
trees, cavemen, crystaLetc.
Meanwhile, in ms own comic,
Hal was letting his Eskimo pal
Pieface tag alone with him until
Pictured here is Hal Jordan, Earth's first Green Lantern. He is illin' because his comic got cancelled. Guy
Gardener, on the left, is ill 'cause he got beat up by Batman. John Stewart, on the right, is ill 'cause he
doesn't have a ring anymore, and he married an alien. (Illustration by Jeff" and Hal only has one?"
Parker)
he had to share his comic with
Green Arrow (Who HAS his own
comic now! What injustice.)
But he was still hip enough that
Donovan mentioned him in his
songSunshine Superman For
a while GL and G A got into some
socially relevant storylines
courtesy of artist Neal Adamsand
writer Denny O'Neil. These
stories are still popular today for
their high quality.
Unfortunately, Hal's book was
cancelled after this and he had to
find work in the back of The
Flash.(Who has HIS own book
again, too.) He finally returned to
greatness with his own book
again in GL90, though he still
had Arrow hanging around with
him. Hal finally booted G A out of
his book and had some solo
adventures until The Crisis.
As referred to in the article on
that Krypton Guy, the DC
universe went through a massive
upheaval, clearing out all those
useless worlds they didn't need
anymore.
And during all this time, where
was Hal? Why, he was powerless
on Earth while John Stewart, the
first black GL took his place. Even
Guy Gardner, Hal's substitute
was brought out of a coma and
given a ring again.
Steve Englehart's new "Guy"
was a good character, though, and
finally (as the Crisis ended) Hal
got his ring back just in time to see
his comic become a "team" book.
This version, "The Green Lantern
Corps" brought in a few other
members of the Corp from
around the galaxy. This
incredible concept of a whole hero
team, all with the same power,
lasted 24 issues until - the evil
yellow cancellation monster
attacked.
According to what I've heard,
the book still had good sales and
was canned because of some
company policy. Now I ask you-is
this fair? The concept of Green
Lanterns and the Guardians were
eventually worked into being the
backbone of the DC universe.
And where is Hal to be now? In
the new Action Comics Weekly.
Guy Gardner appears in the
Justice League now, where he's
been reduced from one of the
toughest superheroes to Pat
Boone with a power ring. And
John Stewart's power ring was
taken back from him the Main
Power Battery on Oa.
Obviously, it just doesn't pay to
be a GL. But I know that someday,
in brightest day or blackest night,
Hal will be back, restored to
greatness in his own comic once
again. So until then I guess you'll
have to read about that Super-
what's-his -name. He has THREE
comic books.
Dangerous Dave helps reprogram WZMB
By HENRY BOARDMAN
Stiff Wnter
Dangerous Dave Elliot has been
a DJ on WZMB since 1985 and
Music Director since January of
last year. If you've noticed some
changes in the music they play,
he's the reason.
The Music Director decides
what gets played and how often.
It's easy to play favorites in a job
like that, something Dave tries
hard to a void. "There's some stuff
in heavy rotation that I don't like
very much he admits. If it'sgood
music it will probably be heard
He wants to avoid ruts
predictability. He tried to pull the
station out of the "jangle rock"
groove they were in. Diversity.
From the funky white rap of Pop
Will Eat Itself and Voice Farm to
the reggae rap of Pato Banton,
the metal-edged Zodiac Mind
Warp, Dangerous Dave makes
sure WZMB will play it all.
Dae got involved in radio in
1985 when he heard "a really bad"
DJ on WZMB. He then told
Program Director, Spike
Harward, he could at least do a
better job than that guy. "They
hired me and fired him Dave
laughs. Ever since, he's been one
of the most recognized voices in
Greenville.
He worked as an intern at 688
Records in Atlanta last summer,
doing a little bit of everything.
After graduation in May he's not
sure what he'll do - there are a lot
of options. Maybe 688, there's
talk of a new-music station in
Virginia Beach - but nothing's
decided.
"I used to, but not anymore. I
can just present it. If they want to
listen, they know where it is
What does Dangerous Dave
listen to if not WZMB?
"The only preset on my radio is
classical He can't listen to Top 40
anymore, it's too boring.
What are Dave's current faves?
"Snatches of Pink, Sisters of
Mercy, They Might Be Giants, the
Space Negroes, and Game
Theory
He thinks WZMB serves a good
function, especially in extern
North Carolina, to expose reople
to something different. They
might not like it but at least they
know about it and hat has to be
good.
So the next time you're looking
for a way out of the Top 40 rut,
remember that 91.3 Dangerous
Dave has picked a few thingds
you just might like.
Just turn on the radio and he'll
tell you WZMB an idea
whose time has come
He'd rather be involved in
music production than radio,
though. A commercial DJ? "I'm
not negative enough. Like
Howard Stern, he's at the top of
his profession I couldn't be like
thar
Who does he miss at WZMB?
Radical Rick and Captain Max
were good, he says, but on-air
personalities are a tricky thing.
He says a lot of people really hate
some jocks, "but that's good in a
way, too. At least we're getting
their attention. You push some
people away, and you also bring
people in, It's a trade-off but it's
worth it
Does Dave, like some others, Shown here is Dangerous Dave Elliot, Music Director of WZMB. He is a boss guy and he i the one
want to push new music on each rcsponsible for turning me on to DrivuY and Cryin So blame him. (Photo bv Ton Jordan.)
people? wm '
rfMriMi
!fe '





10
THE CAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 1,1988
Negative land is brainy music
By STEVE SOMMERS
Stilt VSntrr
You want brain food? You've
got it. It s Negative Land and it
will make you think.
In the today's music world, few
bands seem concerned with
producing cerebral stimulation.
Granted, alot of bands make you
gp "yahoo alright" and "rock-
n-roll baby" and I definitely like
that, but the ones that make you
go "hmmm, what's this about?"
are few and far between.
The Butthole Surfers are
coming up with some real shock
alue stuff, but Negative land on
the SST record label has really
thrown the world into a new
perspective. It sa perspective that
- resulted from n entire
American generation being
exposed to. and some would say
inflicted with religious morality
pressure.and the power ot the big
corporations and military
nuclear build-up.
The actual song lay-outs are
innovative, like no other songs
I've heard. They don't follow any
basic patterns like verse, chorus,
verse, guitar solo, chorus and end.
Their songs are imitation radio
commercials, consultation of a
psychiatrist and his patient and
there is even a song with Rob Weir
. nd lerrv Garcia on it.
O; .e song is a dialogue between
an American reporter and a Soviet
person on a ham radio. The Soviet
says "And about power, man,
nobody is perfect American
response - "so, what is your
point? Soviet response -
"Nobody is perfect, that's not
even funny, we have so much
power" As you can tell their is a
strong message here. The idea oi
humans, who are imperfect
animals. ha ing so much power.
It's hard for me to choose a
favorite song on this record. "The
Nesbitt's Lime Soda Song" which
features the guitar playing of The
Grateful Dead's two lead men is
great.
Basically, it's a story of a
peaceful guy who sold what
things he had and bought a
mobile home so he and his wi.e
and child could go and live
without the hassles of
civilizatic ns. But, he really got
upset one day when he had to
throw out his last bottle of
Nesbitt's Lime Soda because a fly
flew in it.
The moral oi the story is
something like "You can take the
boy from commercial society but
you can't take the commercial
society out of the boy And I
really like this song. It just has an
acoustic guitar and what sounds
like a bongo drum. But it's not my
favorite.
My favorite would have to be
Superman has kind of bumming 50th birthday
Continued from page 9
� west who got kidnapped and
- : by an alien. When he came
ck to Earth (EarthTerra. Get
he had tons oi neat gadgets
kc tobacco that induced
nal ns and sixguns that
t ra v b tsts
: course, Lex Luthor, the
;ave him the most
trouble. I ex s motive was that
- iperboy caused him to lose his
� Great, but you'd think that
nan could have found a
? for baldness somewhere in
- uter -pace travels
'�
le seventies came, and much
of the silliness got scrapped in
the socially oriented
. that Denny O'Neill's
reen Lantern" stories had
ted.
Foster pla s
All the kryptonite on Earth
turned into iron in some freak
chemical thing which set alchemy
back about 200 years. Supergirl's
costumes got more revealing and
krypto conveniently went off to
romp in space.
The stories didn't get any more
relevant. They just got sillier, and
not even the fun kind of silly. Just
Michael fackson silly. The art was
flat and saleson the greatest super
hero of all.
Then in the eighties. Superman
sold out. DC hired John Bvrne to
"revamp" the legend. To
streamline it after the continuity
consolidating changes the "Crisis
on Infinite Earths" brought about.
Supergirl died, Krypto
retroactively ceased to exist and
Kandor was put in the shrunken
city shredder.
Mr. Kent was once again the
sole survivor oi Krypton. He was
also a yuppie. So was Lois. The
comic sells but it sucks. The plots
repeat every other issue and the
characters are indistuinguishable
mannequins.
The newest movie sucked too.
And yet another one is still being
planned.
It's Superman's 50th
anniversary. He's come pretty
much full circle but the only real
thrill a Man of Steel fan can look
for is the theme music from the
movies.
No wonder Greenville didn't
celebrate this festive occasion. Oh
well. Maybe by the time the 75th
birthday comes around, some red
kryptonite will fall on Byrne and
have him make Supcs a fun guy
again.
Happy Birthday Superman. I
hope Captain Marvel has a better
time on his 50th.
new age piano
H MICAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
Chances are you've heard
ster even if you've never
rd of him. His 'Winter
. as the official theme oi
recent Winter Olympics held
tnada. it seems appropriate
then, that the jazznew age
s recent album, 'David
er:
phony Sessions was
d live in British Columbia
with the Vancouver Symphony
hestra. The irony is that the
s ssi �� - ere held in the summer;
David Foster using pure talent to
en-till the feel of winter.
Put on the album and close your
eyes No matter what the time of
year, the season will turn to
ntcr. Listen. You hear "Time
iing as seconds drift like
over an opaque night of no
St
Now the snowflakes flutter in
dance against an azure dawn to
Tiano Concerto In G As though
ashamed oi being discovered by
morning, they slow down into a
mn. meditative descent only
to tumble into their great dance
again after you have moved
on.For now you are passing not
only through time but space into
the Canadian country-side.
"tou are conscious of the
loneliness of the piper in the
distance who calls for an
unknown love to join him in "The
Ballet "Conscience" then comes
in whispers oi Winter's breath to
stir thoughts like autumn leaves
in forgotten garden corners, give
them eloquent speech, then draw
their voice into nothingness:
winter is still and sharp and
painful, and memory is a ghost.
Bu t there is life among the dead.
Frozen fountains begin to trickle,
then cold and glorious, blaze into
silver flame and the "Firedance
Notes like blackbirds
frightened from fields of husks
take wing and are drawn into
orchestrated form; now the notes
dart like skiers, appearing then
disappearing, and appearing
again over the blue and white
stanzas of land and sky. The skiers
and the birds: each in their own
"Winter Games
Foster has transposed winter
into plastic because he
understands diat a season is more
than weather: it is memory and
association.
He is so effective a conpurer
that as you slip the album back
into'its sleeve, your lungs will still
be scalding from the winter
breaths you've drawn.
SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION FOR
STUDENTS WHO NEED
MONEY FOR COLLEGE
Every Student is Eligible for Some Type of
Financial Aid Regardless of Grades or Parental Income.
� We have a data bank of over 200.000 listings of scholarships,
fellowships, grants, and loans, representing over $10 billion in private
sector funding.
� Many scholarships are given to students based on their academic
interests, career plans, family heritage and place of residence.
� There's money available tor students who have been newspaper car-
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Don't Forget
Tuesday is college Night at
4th St. 264 Bypass and now at the
Wash Pub
2510 E. 10th St.
752-5222
(This offer expires February 29,1988)
"Communism Is Good" where
they use a hypnotically rhythmic
combination of drum and guitar
with sounds of missies shooting
off in the background; while, they
repeat over and over again "And
the loud speaker spokc-up and
said, 'Christianity is stupid.
Communism is good. Give up
What are we to think about this?
Well, I don't think Negative Land
is ii band full of Communists but
they ccrtainl reject the
traditional Ar :e.ican frame of
mind. "In this country we have
four time zones. Do you know
how many time zones there are in
the Soviet Union? Eleven. That's
half the whole world.
We're just a little, one little tenth
of the globe. That's ridiculous.
That's not even funny. There's
two things you don't talk about;
one's politics and the other one's
religion. The reason you don't
talk about them is because they
combine in each other
Something to think about, huh?
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND PARKS
DEPARTMENT
LIFEGUARDS AND INSTRUCTORS
The Greenville Recreation and Parks Department is
now acceptin0 applications for Lifeguards and In-
structors at its City Outdoor Pool. Applicant should
have current WSI or Advance Lifesavin Certificate.
Applications may be picked up at the City Personnel
Office, located on the corner of 5th and Washington
Streets. For more information, contact
Charles Williams. 830-4555.
SKIERS
SPRING INTO SPRING
But first come in to see us for a look
at what makes spring skiing the
best of the year! sgg0
CLEANERS
ii it
SHIRT COUPON
40 $036
for in
This coupon must be presented
with shirt order
SHIRT COUPON
GREAT SALES!
All Ski Apparel for Men's & Ladies7T7720-75 off
(includes: jackets, coats, sweaters, pants, & bibs)
All Sky R Turtlenecks $15.95
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AllWoolrich Coats & Jackets50 off
Selected Ski AccessoriesUp to 50 off
(gloves, mittens, tobaggans)
All Boots20-40 off
(Salomon, Nordica)
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Selected Men's & Ladies Underwear50 off
Great Savings on Ski Packages
(Skis, boots, poles & bindings)
Our Complete Ski & Repair Service
Doesn't Stop With Spring
Gordon's Golf & Ski Shop
200 �. Greenville Blvd. (next to McDonald's)
Greenville, NC
756-1003
MMJUMMM jJtt Jf ,
t t nasw'lr � n iinr. ambi
ATTRACTIONS
I I
I I I
Wednesday, March 2
8:00 p.m. Hendrix
Movie:
MAN WHO FELL
TO EARTH
Wednesday, March 2
8:00 p.m. Wright Auditorium
MARCEL MARCEAU
Ticket Prices:
E.C.U. Studentsyouth $7.00
E.C.U. Facultystaff $12.00
Public $14.00
Thursday, March 3
8:00 p.m Hendrix Theatre
SNEAK PREVIEW
VICE VERSA
For more information, contact the
Student Union at 757-6611, ext. 210.
KWMG OU1 tO UVf W
Taylo
BY BILL UPCHURCH
Staff Writer
If you're in a James Tavj
mood, and tired of playing
greatest hits album over and 01
again, check out "Never
Young Taylor's newest albui
From "Never Die Young
"First of May every song on t
album should appeal
established Tavlor fans;
create manv new ones.
musicainship is what you woj
expect from any well done albi
precise, professional, and nonj
it overburdens Taylor's r
vocals.
Lcland Sklar plays bass; Cai
Vega gives a solid well pla
performance on drums
percussion; Bob Mann and jail
Taylor are the guitarist; u
Dugmorc fills in on pedal
guitar and banjo; Don Groh
plays excellent keyboard pi
without overdoing it (he
tastefully produced the albi
and James Taylor provides
vocals for this consistai
professional album.
Most of the songb of the al
fall into the Top-40, ad
contemporary format, but
quality of the songs and
uniqueness of Tavlor's phi j
should extend his appeal
larger audience including
students.
"Never Die Young the
track of the album and the
song on side one, is d
radio bound. The music is ty
top-40 material, but the lyrics
better than the usual crap ton 1
top-40 radio-land.
"T Bone" is a song abni
friend, who spends all of his
trying to forget something
needs to confront, and who f 11
realizes he must confr I
"Although he may not knoj
yetunless I miss my K
trying to forgetwhat his I
remembers
In "Babv Boom Baby'
sings about missing an old 1
and wanting her back, bu
afraid the outcome of his ettj
"1 worked on a letter but it
made it out of my headso m
mading your name it wasnj
sameas leaving the tl
unsaid and "My feet an j
and my heart's on fire What
do if my dream comes true
some of the lyrics from the
which seems filled with confl
"I've been all the places tf
ever want to beI've sen?n all
people that I ever want to seel
sick and tired of being lonelvl
free These lyrics
"Runaway Bov" rei
J
disillusion with being on tr
constantly; and wanting to
down.
Bowie stars
I "Man who
Fell to Earii
"The Man Who Fell to EaJ
Nicolas Roeg's film ell
starring David Bowie as an
who comes to earth. He
water as the precious liqu
running out on his own planj
is desperate to save hi;
family in the world tar awaj
In this world he come
contact with life and a
passions and obscurities
Wednesday night movie is:
at the Hendrix theater at
The movie is free.
There is also a sneak pre
"Vice Versa" on Thursday
p.m.
-Susanne
Poetry Fon
meets Toni:
in Menden
The EC 'oetry Form
meet ton ht at 8 p
Mendenhall 248. The for
open to the general pubi
listeners are welcome.
writers wishing critical fel
should bring 8-10 copies!
poems to be read. It will bd
time for all involved, a
Makuck is a boss guy in
right.
gathering place
EC
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IT i





I
t
1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 1,1988 11
ION AND PARKS
:nt
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ersonnel
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�3
IONS
i i
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ithering place
Taylor records newLP
BY BILL UPCHURCH
Staff Writer
If you're in a James Taylor
mood, and tired of playing his
greatest hits album over and over singing style used for the song.
The last song on side one is
"Valentines Day The music is
mostly soft pianosynthesiser
which accompianies Taylor's
voice and blends well with the
explanation is to long for a review,
but the song is a winner.
Also on side two is "Letter In
The Mail a song about a small
town that mostly lives in
childhood memories. "And little
WOU) CHAfcUG &ROVH
FlUrUY MAt� IT WTH THriJ
.LITTLE ReDHEAp GIRL )
'AUO JU5T B�CAUSe HE 60T)
HiPFROM REAPHJ& THE
BOSS 6astcar.oliminJ
FTATuRes (6ej
COPIES
.
"Q-
"Sun on the Moon" opens side by little, light after lightThat's
two and begins with a gospel how it diedThey say your never
sounding chours and is followed go home againThat's no lie
by music that sounds like "First of May" is the last song on
something from Paul Simon's the album. The harmonizing and
Graceland by blending a horn arrangement of the song bring
section with African rythmes. back memories of some Earth,
Also used in the song are call- Wind, and Fire song from the
and-rcsponse techniques used in seventies (the name is literally
lse. professional, and none of early jazzblues recordings. The hanging from the tip of my
verburdens Tavlor's fine lyrics seem to reflect Taylor's tongue. AUUGGGHHHH I hate
need to not to change because he that) Anyway, the lyrics seem to
isn't sure what to change into. "In equate feelings of love with
line, in line, it's all in lineMy feelings felt on a beautiful first
again, check out "Never Die
oung Taylor's newest album.
From "Never Die Young to
First of May every song on this
album should appeal to
established Taylor fans; and
create many new ones. The
musicainship is what vou would
expect from any well done album;
prec
it o
ocals.
Leland Sklar plays bass; Carlos
Vega gives a solid well played
rV
(Self Service 8 12x11 White Bond)
758-2400
FAST COPIES FOR FAST TIMES
(NEXT TO CHICOS IN THE GEROGETOWN SHOPS)
performance on drums and ducks are all in a rowThey do not day of May.
percussion; Bob Mann and James change, they do not moveThey "Never Die Young" is a solid
Taylor are the guitarist; Dan
Dugmore fills in on pedal steel
guitar and banjo; Don Grolnick
plays excellent keyboard parts
without overdoing it (he also
tastefully produced the album);
and lames Taylor provides the possible.
vocals for this consistantly "Home By Another Way" is a
professional album. song with a religious message
Most of the songb of the album from the past applied to todays
have nowhere to go consistent album that should
Borrowing rhythms from have broad appeal. If you're
"Birdland a popular Weather felling mellow and need a break,
Report song from a few years ago, give this album a listen. "Never
"Sweat Potato Pie" is a silly love give up, never slow downNever
song with in-depth lyrics; if that's grown old, never die young
�?
&
VA
&

I
fall into the Top-40, adult
contemporary format, but the
quality of the songs and the
uniqueness of Taylor's phrasings
should extend his appeal to a
larger audience including college
students.
"Never Die Young the title
track of the album and the first
song on side one, is definetly
radio bound. The music is typical
top-40 material, but the lyrics are
better than the usual crap found in
top-40 radio-land.
"T Bone" is a song about a
friend, who spends all of his time
trying to forget something he
needs to confront, and who finally
realizes he must confront it.
"Although he may not know it
vetunless I miss my bethe's just
trying to forgetwhat his heart
remembers
In "Baby Boom Baby Taylor
sings about missing an old lover
and wanting her back, but is
afraid the outcome of his efforts.
1 worked on a letter but it never
made it out of my headsomehow
�admg vout name it wasn't the
sameas leaving the thing
unsaid and "My feet are frozen
and my heart's on fireWhat do I
do if my dream comes true are
some of the lyrics from the song
which seems filled with conflict.
"I've been all the places that I
ever want to beI've seen all the
people that I ever want to seeI'm
sick and tired of being lonely and
free These lyrics from
"Runaway Bov" reflect
disillusion with being on the go
constantly; and wanting to settle
down.
Bowie stars in
"Man who
Fell to Earth"
"The Man Who Fell to Earth" is
Nicolas Roeg's film classic
starring David Bowie as an alien
who comes to earth. He seeks
water as the precious liquid is
running out on his own planet. He
is desperate to save his own
family in the world far .vay.
In this world he comes into
contact with life and all its
passions and obscurities. The
Wednesday night movie is shown
at the Hendrix theater at 8:00 p.m.
The movie is free.
There is also a sneak preview of
"Vice Versa" on Thursday at 8:00
p.m.
-Susanne Nielsen
Poetry Forum
meets Tonight
in Mendenhall
The EC1 oetry Forum will
meet ton fcht at 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall 248. The forum is
open to the general public and
listeners are welcome. Those
writers wishing critical feedback
should bring 8-10 copies of the
poems to be read. It will be a boss
time for all involved, and Dr.
Makuck is a boss guy in his own
right.
world. The lyrics are complex and
James Taylor seems to be a man
who listens to his lyrics.
"Never Die Young" is on CBS
records and is available at East
Coast Music and Video.
mil
tri
-A
10.
River Bluff Apartments
2 Bd. Townhouses Temporarily Reduced to
$295month and Security Deposit of only
$100 for 1 and 2 Bedrooms. Sign up now for
summer school and fall semester while
rates still in effect.
�Fully Carpeted
�Large Pool
�Free Cable
�ECU Bus Service1.5 miles from Campus
it
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s

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
MARCH 1,1988 Page 12
Seahawks slip past Hill-less Pirates
in season-ending finale Saturday
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport t ditof
Undermanned East Carolina
lost another Colonial Athletic
Association heartbreakcr
Saturday night in Minges
Coliseum as UNC-Wilmington
outlasted the Pirates 65-60 in the
final regular season game for both
teams.
The Pirates, playing without
the services of their leading scorer
and rebounder Gus Hill, got key
performances from several
players before falling in defeat.
Walk-on Kenny Murphy led
the scoring in the contest for the
Pirates with 19 points, including
three-of-five shooting from the 3-
point line. Reed Lose added 13
points, all oi which came in the
opening half and freshman
Stanley Love added 10. Hill
injured his foot in the Pirates' 88-
62 loss at William & Mary last
season and will not play the
remainder of the season.
The loss dropped the Pirates to
8-19 overall for the vear and to 3-
11 in the CAA. The heartbreak
comes in when it is considered
that ECU has had the ball with a
chance to tie or win in the final
minute oi plav in nine of its 11
conference losses. Saturday night
was no different.
"I've got to give our kids a lot of
credit head coach Mike Steelc
said. They played hard like I
thought they would without Gus
(Hill) in there. They've played
hard all vear long
The Seahawks broke out of the
blocks early in the game and built
a quick 5-01ead by the 18:04 mark
of the first half. Lose got the
Pirates untracked when he drilled
a 3-pointer with 16:51 to play in
the half. That's when the fans took
over.
When Lose's shot went through
the net, toilet paper came flying
from the stands bringing about a
two-shot technical foul from the
game's officials. A fan was also
tossed out of the contest by the
officials after he argued the call to
one of the officials. The end result
of the icident left the Seahawks
ahead 7-3 and Steele angry.
"You've got to use a little
common sense on that Steele
said. "If they are going to call it
(the technical) then they need to
be consistent.
"What happens if when we go
to Wilmington next year I tell 20
guys to throw toilet paper from
the stands � we'd be shooting
free throws all night
The Pirates shook of the effects
of the technical and managed to
tie the game at 13-13 with 10:19
left in the half when Lose drilled
his third 3-pointer.
The Seahawks responded by
running off six straight points,
four of which game from center
Larry Houzcr, who led all scorers
in the game with 25 points.
Murphy then popped in a 16-
footer followed by a 8-foot left-
handed shot by Lose, which
pulled the Pirates within two, 19-
17, with 6:44 showing on the first
half clock.
The Seahawks, who improved
their record to 14-13 overall and 8-
6 in the CAA, pushed the lead
back to six twice and led 25-19
with 3:44 remaining before
intermission when the Pirates
organized a seven-point run to
grasp their first lead of the game,
26-25, with 2:14 to play.
Lose sparked the run with a
ayup, while freshman guard
i
Jimmy Hinton knocked in a pair
of free throws. Murphy closed out
the run with his first 3-pointer.
After Houzer nailed a pair of
free throws to give the Seahawks a
27-26 lead, Murphy calmly drilled
his second 3-pointer for a 29-27
Pirate lead with 1:35 left in the
half.
Houzer rounded out the
scoring for the half and knotted
the score at 29-29 when he slamed
home the second of his four dunks
for the night.
In the second half, Wilmington
once again forged out a six-point
lead when Houzer scored and
was fouled for a 3-point play at the
15:15 mark.
Once again, the Pirates
answered. This time in the form of
a nine-point burst, which gave
them a 44-41 lead with 12:49 to
play.
Kelly started the run with a pair
of free throws. Murphy then
chipped in with a 17-footer and a
3-pointer, while reserve
Dominique Martin closed out the
run with a 16-footer from the free
throw area.
The Seahawks answer was a
eight-point run and a 4944 lead
by the 8:42 mark. Forward Greg
Bender, who finished with 14
points, capped the run with a 3-
po inter.
The Pirates battled back and
closed to within one with 7:45 to
play after scores from Love and
guard Jeff Kelly.
ECU then managed to go on top
once again with 5:17 to play when
Murphy fired in a 16-footer,
which made the score 54-53.
The lead then exchanged hands
until Love gave the Pirates their
final lead of the night at 58-57 with
3:25 to play thanks to a pair of
tosses from the charity stripe.
After the Seahawks built a
three-point lead, Martin was true
on a pair of free throws to close the
gap to 61 -60 with 1:02 showing on
the clock.
The Seahawks Antonio
Howard, who scored 10 points,
knocked in a pair of free throws
with 24 seconds remaining to
boost the lead to 63-60.
The dissappointment then set
in for the Pirates as they were
trying to set up a shot at the other
end. Kelly was whistled for
double dribbling giving the
Seahawks possession.
Bender then put aside any
hopes of a Pirate victory when he
knocked in two more shots from
the charity stripe with only seven
seconds remaining.
"It (the late turnover) was
unfair because Jeff Kelly had
played a good game for us Steele
said. "And no one feels worse
about it than Jeff does
Once again, the Pirates, in
losing, drew praise from the
opposition at game's end.
"You've got to give East
Carolina's players and Mike
Steele a lot of credit Seahawk
head coach Robert McPherson
said. "They really played their
hearts out. It was a great college
ballgame with a good collegiate
atmosphere
The Pirates will now take the
remainder of the week to prepare
for the CAA tournament, which
begins Saturday in Hampton, Va.
ECU will be paired against
regular-seasjpn champion
Richmond in the opening round.
That game will carry a 7 p.m.
tipoff.
Basebatters win two out of four
If baseball teams can educate
themselves by playing in close
games, then East Carolina's
youthful club should be a little
better prepared for final exams
after its season-opening weekend
at Harrington Field.
The Pirates, defending
champions of the Colonial
Athletic Association, picked up a
pair of wins and a matching pair
of losses�all four games decided
by just one run�as the 1988
campaign got underway.
ECU split a pair with Virginia
to open the season Saturday, then
lost to the Cavaliers Sundav. The
Pirates managed to survive the
weekend with a .500 record after
edging George Washington 5-4
late Sunday afternoon.
The hectic, cold weekend at
Harrington Field produced a
couple of interesting items:
�ECU'S 11-10 victory Saturday
was the Pirates 17th consecutive
season-opening victory dating
back to 1971.
�The 5-4 win over George
Washington gave Pirate head
coach Gary Overton his 100th
career victory. The fourth-year
coach is 100-42 since taking over
the reigns in 1985.
�Jay McGraw, in his first at bat
of the season, smashed his 24 th
career home run. The Charlotte,
N.C senior is tied for third on
ECU's all-time career home run
list.
� In one not-so-positive note,
junior pitcher Jake Jacobs lost his
first game ever in the collegiate
ranks. The right-hander set a
school record the previous day by
winning his 11th consecutive
game as a Pirate hurler, breaking
the record he shared with Bab
Patterson (currently with the
Pittsburgh Pirates).
Pirate stagger Jay McGraw belted a homerun in his appearance at bat
in the 1988 season. (Photo courtesy of ECU Sports Information)
East Carolina 11 Virginia 10
Mike Andrews ripped a two-
out double in the bottom of the
seventh inning to push Tommy
Yarborough across the plate for
the winning run as the Pirates had
to come from behind twice to
down the visiting Cavaliers 11-10.
McGraw's first swing of the
season sent a David Sammons
fastball flving over the left-field
wall, scoring John Thomas (who
led off with a single) to tie the
score 2-2 in the first inning.
Virginia, out of the Atlantic
Coast Conference, managed to
score two runs in each of the first
four innings and led 8-2 at one
point. The Pirates rallied in the
fourth inning when freshman
Steve Godin lined a two-run
double to left to pull ECU within
8-4 after four innings, and Calvin
Brown's two-run homer
highlighted a five-run fifth frame
that put ECU up 9-8.
UVa, however, scored a pair of
runs when Mike Basara hit a two-
run, pinch-hit homer off of Pirate
reliever Jake Jacobs and led 10-9,
setting the stage for Andrews'
late-game heroics in the seventh.
Virginia 4 East Carolina 3
Virginia earned its revenge in
the nightcap in what appeared to
be a pitcher's dual in comparison
to the first game.
Wahoo pitcher Doug Johns
scattered seven hits and struck
out five to lead Virginia to the 4-3
victory. Pirate freshman Scott
Stevens went the distance on the
mound for ECU, and was equally
impressive giving up seven hits,
striking out three and walking
none.
David Ritchie, McGraw and
Chris Cauble each hit safely as the
Pirates knotted the score at 3-3 in
the fifth inning. Virginia's Bobby
Rivell reached third on a three-
base ECU error in the top half of
the seventh. Rivell scored the
game-winning run on a sacrifice
fly-
Virginia 6 East Carolina 5
Virginia scored five runs in a
big second inning and added the
eventual game-winner in the fifth
as the Cavaliers took full
advantage of seven hits and five
Pirate errors for the 6-5 win.
The Cavaliers' five singles,
coupled with two Mike Andrews
errors helped UVa score five in
the second frame. ECU battled
back as Calvin Brown hit his
second home run in as many days
to pull the Pirates to within 5-4.
UVa added a single run in the
fifth off of two more ECU errors,
and pitcher Mark McMillan shut
down the host Pirates the last two
innings.
East Carolina 5 George
Washington 4
Sophomore pitcher Brian
Berckman scattered five hits and
East Carolina scored four times in
the sixth inning capped by the
game-winning, pinch-hit single
by Chris Cauble for a 5-4 win.
ECU trailed 4-1 going into the
sixth but McGraw led off with a
single and two Virginia pitchers
walked three straight batters in
the big inning as the two teams
battled it out in near-freezing
weather at Harrington Field.
"We were pleased with our
effort over the weekend ECU
head coach Gary Overton said,
"but I think we showed our
inexperience and that we still
need to work on a lot of things
Walk-on Kenny Murphy, filling in for the injured Gus Hill, at-
tempts a dunk in Saturday's game against UNC-Wilmington.
(Photo by Hardy Alligood � Photolab)
Linksters take 14th
scores of 75-77-73. Freshman
Frances Vaughan was next in line
for the Pirate linksters with a 230
mark after posting rounds of 85-
75-70.
Senior team captain Chris Riley
placed third in the Pirate
standings with a 231 total. Riley
toured the course with rounds of
77-79-75. Walk-on Greg Powell
was next with a 236 score after
shooting rounds of 76-85-75,
while junior Mark Hidlay rode
scores of 79-80-80 to a 239 total.
Although displeased with the
beginning of the tournament,
Morrison saw promise in the
Pirates' performance, in the
closing days.
"Our freshmen just kinda
pushed the panic button the first
day Morrison said. "We played
very respectable the last day
though, but when you get that far
behind against good teams you
just can't make it up
Morrison went on to say that the
Pirates came very close to
shooting the low team score of the
day for the final round of the
event. However, five shots lost on
the last two holes put an end to
that possibility.
The Pirates will head back to the
links this weekend when they
travel to Fripp Island, S.C to
compete in the Fripp Island
Invitational.
Morrison said the scores at this
three-day tournament, which is
played at Ocean Pointe Links,
should run higher than those at
the Palmetto.
"It is a tough course located by
the ocean so that makes it windy
always Morrison said.
By TIM CHANDLER
Spurts 1 diior
East Carolina's golf team
regrouped from a slow start over
the weekend to claim a 14th-place
finish in the Palmetto
Intercollegiate, which was held in
Santee, S.C.
The Pirates, who were next to
last in the 18-team field after the
first round, rallied in the closing
two days of competition to
advance to the 14th spot.
"We embarrassed ourselves out
there the first day head coach
Hal Morrison said. "We played
real good the last day though and
that was when the conditions
were at their worst. It was cold
and windy the whole round
Clemson won the overall event
with a three-day team total of 869.
North Carolina State took second
after winning a playoff against
Tennessee, which finished third.
Both teams had scores of 870 after
the 54-hole event.
Virginia took fifth place with a
stroke total of 873, while South
Carolina was sixth with a 882
score.
Also finishing ahead of ECU's
918 mark were Duke, which
finished in eighth place with a 888
score and North Carolina, which
garnered the ninth spot with a 892
total.
Virginia's Jeff Putman grabbed
individual honors in the
tournament by posting a three-
day total of 208. Chris Patton of
Clemson finished one stroke
behind Putman's score at 209.
Leading the way for the Pirates
was freshman Jeff Craig. The
Pinehurst native totaled 225 with
Baseball cards still part of life
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
College Rover
The first indication was a
surge in his hand, a pain between
thumb and forefinger. The
restlessness and the unability to
sleep followed, his appearance
became wrinkled and tired, it
seem to be recking him. While
watching the last flickers of
ESPN's late addition of Sports
Center, he felt a relapse of the
addiction and he did not know if
he could hold back the urge any
longer.
"I spend about fifty dollars a
week on it and I can't help it said
the addict about his addiction. "I
try to go to sleep, but I just can't
stop thinking about it the addict
said as he starts his car and drives
to the nearest convenience store.
Walking through the aisles
of the store, he passes the candy,
beer, wine, cigarettes, and stacks
of chips in search of a quick fix. In
a battered state of delirium, the
man swaggered (no pun
intended) to the counter, leaned
over it's slick edge and asked "Do
you have any baseball cards?"
Can grown people actually
be addicted to a hobby most think
is kid's stuff? And what is all this
controversy surrounding Chris
Washburn? The college rover
visited with baseball card addict
David Breece in search of some
answers.
In Breece's Greenville
apartment, one can find stacks of
glossy pictured sports cards
everywhere. Frankly people, it is
bewildering, the rover could not
concieve seeing that many .
baseball cards in one location,
anywhere.
Breece has so many shoe
boxes full of cards, one would
believe him to be a shoe salesman.
Stacks of cards lay on coffee
tables, on end tables, atop the TV,
and there are even stacks of
Breece's baseball card collection
on top of the toilet tank in his
bathroom.
"Sometimes the bathroom is
the quitest place where I can do
somsorting Breece said of his
throne-card shifting.
Breece started collecting as an
emotional outlet from a severe
gastral infamation disorder when
he was six. "I'd find four or five
coke bottles and return them at
the 7-11 for a pack or two of
cards he said.
Now 16 years later, the 22-
year old ECU student majoring in
Urban Planning says he still
makes a daily visit to convenience
stores for cards,
He says his baseball card
fantasy is to stop in a small
general store in the country and
find a full ventor's box of 1955
Topps. Topps is the major
producer of sports cards. The
rover asked Breece what he
would do with such a box.
� "I'd throw away the cards
and chew the gum Breece said
jokingly.
Wearing a wool Atlanta
Braves cap, which friends say he
wears to bed, Breece says he
receives a lot of satisfaction from
his addictionhobby of card
collecting.
"I just get such a high rush
when I get a good player like Don
Mattingly Breece said.
Although some collectors
are collecting for investment
purposes now a days, Breece
baseball card philosophy, in a
BroU rend,erinS Emission,
Breece explains, "Cards are
documentation of our hertitage as
Americans, � feel it is my patrStic
duty to buy baseball card?"
c Thcolle8� rover is looking
oufyouhaveaninterestinl
?? at " Rover, Earlvis,
Publications Building.

Netter,
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Spurts Writer
East Carolina had a b :
weekend of tennis, with the me
team playing three matches ai
the women playing one match
ECU's men's tennis U,
opened up their season with thi
teams that they had never wj
against before.
The men came away with thi
straight loses to NLC Staj
Atlantic Christian and C
Dominion.
In Wednesday's match agau
N.C. State, the Wolfpack d :
the Pirates 0-9.
Jon Melhorn, the Piratj
number one seeded player
defeated by state's Kris
Larzou, 2-6. 0-6.
The Pirates number
doubles combination
Lady Pi
to Seah
In the first half oi -
night's game between
Carolina's women -
team and UNC-Wiln
looked as if the Lady Pirjj
would defeat the team that
defeated them earlier in
season 75-3b before their 1
crowd.
But that wasn't the case
Wilmington rallied in the
half, after trailing 31-27at I i
to defeat ECU 74-64.
The Lady Pirates were shoo
47 percent in the first
compared to the Lady Seahaw
28 percent.
In the end, it was again
throws that would keep El
from the win.
UNC-Wilmington made 13
18 free throws as Lade P
Sandra Grace fouled out oi
game and four other ECU plai
carried four fouls a piece.
ECU finished up it's regi
season with it's
consecutive lose.
The Lady Pirates, now
overall and 2-10 in the conferej
finished tied .for last place n
. QjJonial A&lutio Gwier nectj
will plavin thcCAATournai
March 10-12 at Hampton, A
Senior Alma Bethea, pLv
her last regular seas
Fitness
is the
IRS gan
Need to get
shape? Call the IRS
Need to get
better shape? Ca
Need to bettei -
body? Call the IK-
That's right
Department ol
Recreational Sen
fitness
Another sess
classes gets under
Sundav, March 14 '�
classes are availab
According to 10
assistant director o(
recreation and ph si
traditional aerobics k�v
aerobics, aquarobies
are just a few of the class -
this spring. Registration
remain open through lb -
March 4 and will re opei
March 14 and 15 flu
consists of 12 classes anj
set at $10 for students ai
facultystaff Ml classes
available on a drop in :
the purchase of a ticket
Hill says that titne� w I
I.R.S. is more than juj
traditional aerobics class
impact aerobics is t
example. This class IS not t
half-hearted, and it is r
easier version ot ti
aerobics, low impact i
means less jarring ot tlu
(from knee to ankle), feet
and lower back all aocomp
with one foot on the g'
Movement includes
walking and cross floor 4
with power walking and Stj
movements. Exagerated!
movements push the heart I
0-80 percent of the nu
icart rate, making low
erobics as challengs
See FITNESS pag 14
���- i VMm nn� .Hpjulw
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-4�W�
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 1,1988 13
:�v.
m
injured Gus Hill, at-
;ainst L NT-Wilmington.
ake 14th
75- Freshman
is next in line
i a 230
rounds of 85-
r team car hris Riley
rd in the Firate
total. Rilcy
ith rounds oi
Walk-on Greg Powell
i 2 $6 score after
g rounds of 76-85-75,
. . r Mark Hidlay rode
s H 3 30 to a 239'total.
displeased with the
jinning of the tournament,
lorrison saw promise in the
rates' performance in iho
� days
ir freshmen just kinda
i i the panic button the first
M rrison said. "We plaved
r spectable the last day
t when you get that far
iinst good teams you
� make it up
rrison went on to say mat the
ame very close to
he low team score of the
r the final round of the
sit However, five shots lost on
e last two holes put an end to
iat p
he Pirates will head back to the
weekend when they
el to Fripp Island, S.C to
te in the Fripp Island
al.
' rrison said the scores at this
. tournament, which is
fayed at Ocean Pointe Links,
lould run higher than those at
Palmetto.
tisa tough course located by
- that makes it windy
ivs ' ' -ison said.
prt of life
He says his baseball card
v is to stop in a small
?neral store in the countrv and
id a full ventor's box of 1955
ropps is the major
;er of sports cards. The
� i Brecce what he
Jo with such a box.
"Id throw away the cards
id chew the gum Breece said
Wearing a wool Atlanta
Iraves cap, which friends say he
ears to bed, Breece says he
reives a lot of satisfaction from
lis addictionhobby of card
liecting.
"I just get such a high rush
men 1 get a good player like Don
Hattmgly' Breece said.
Although some collectors
f collecting for investment
fc:rposes now a days, Breece
ikes a different approach to his
ascball card philosophy, in a
eart rendering admission,
reece explains, "Cards are
mentation of our hertitage as
kmencans, I feel it is my patroitic
uty to buy baseball cards
college rover is looking
ryou.I you rave an interesting
sorts related story, drop me I
e at College Rover, Earivis,
;blications Building.
Netters com
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sports Writer
Fast Carolina had a busy
weekend of tennis, with the men's
team playing three matches and
the women playing one match.
ECU's men's tennis team
opened up their season with three
teams that they had never won
against before.
The men came away with three
straight loses to N.C. State,
Atlantic Christian and Old
Po minion.
In Wednesday's match against
C. State, the VVolfpack defeated
the Pirates 0-9.
Ion Melhorn, the Tirate's
number one seeded player was
defeated by state's Krister
I arzou, 2-6. 0-6.
The Pirates number one
doubles combination of Tat
Companaro and Wayne Barber
were also defeated by the
VVolfpack's Alfonso Ochoa and
Michcal Gilbert, 1-6,2-6.
The Pirates travel to Atlantic
Christian for Friday's match with
the Bulldogs.
ACC handed the Pirates a 1-8
loss as they swept six straight
singles matches and two doubles
matches.
East Carolina's only win came
in the doubles when David Shell
and Andre' Moreau won 5-7, 7-5,
6-4.
Facing Old Dominion on
Sunday wasn't any better for the
Pirates as the Monarchs swept all
matches, even with the Pirates
home court advantage.
Melhorn was defeated by
ODU's Chris Brown, 6-7, 2-6. At
the number two position, ODU's
Rex Tcrwilliger was the winner of
David Shell, 4-6, 6-7.
The Pirates did not fair well in
the doubles matches either as the
Monarchs won all three of the
matches.
Barber and Campanaro lost to
ODU's Shannon Sealey and
Drake Schunch in three sets. The
Monarchs won the first set 2-6, the
Pirates rallied back to take the
second 6-4, before ODU took the
third set 3-6.
The Lady Pirates recorded their
first win of the spring season,
Thursday as they took on Atlantic
Christian.
The Lady Pirates earned a 5-4
victory over the Lady Bulldogs
with wins by Holly Murray, Joey
Millard, and Jill Hobson.
Murray defeated ACC's Kim
Parker, 6-4,6-0 in ECU's first win
of the day. Number one seeded
Lady Pirate Susan Mattocks was
beaten by the Lady Bulldog's Kim
Murkurjee, 6-1,6-2.
Karla Hoyle also was victorious
for ECU with a 6-2, 6-3 win over
Lisa Tew.
Millard took a 6-2,6-3 win over
ACC's Debbie Leete and Hobson
won 6-2, 6-2, over Kerry
Humpheries.
In doubles action ECU's
Mattocks and Millard recorded
the Lady Pirates only doubles
victory of the day by defeating
Leete and Humpheries, 6-1,6-0.
The Lady Pirates will play one
more match before their spring
trip to Hilton Head, when they
take on Christopher Newport in a
home match (to be held at
Rivcrbirch tennis courts) on
Wednesday.
CLIFF'S
'Seafood House and Oyster Ba'r
Washington Highway (N.C. 33 Ext.) Greenville. North Carolina
Phone 752-3172
Mon. thru Thurs. Night
Popcorn
Shrimp $3.65
Lady Pirates fall
to Seahawks, 74-64
In the first half oi Saturday
night's game between East
Carolina's women's basketball
team and I C-Wilmington, it
looked as if the Lady Pirates
would defeat the team that had
defeated them earlier in the
season 75-56 before their home
crowd.
Put that wasn't the case, as
Wilmington rallied in the second
half, after trailing 31 -27 at the half,
to defeat ECU 74-64.
The 1 ady Pirates were shooting
47 percent in the first half
compared to the Lady Seahawks'
2 percent.
In the end. it was again free
throws that would keep ECU
from the win.
UNC-Wilmington made 13-of-
18 tree throws as l.adv Pirate
Sandra Grace fouled out of the
game and tour other ECU players
carried four fouls a piece.
ECU finished up it's regular
season with it's eighth
consecutive lose.
The Lady Pirates, now 8-19
t erall and 2-10 in the conference,
fmished tied.for last place in the
vor.ial AAblei�'�IoiU$ieie�and �
will play in theC A A Tournament,
March 10-12 at Hampton, VA.
Senior Alma Bethea, playing
her last regular season game for
Fitness
is the
IRS game
Need to get your body into
shape? Call the I.RS.
Need to get your body into
better shape? Call the LRS.
Need to better shape vour
body? Call the I.R.S.
That's right - call the
Department of lntramural-
Recreational Services and ask for
fitness
Another session of fitness
lasses gets under way on
Sunday, March 14. And these
classes are available for everyone.
According to Kathleen Hill,
assistant director of informal
recreation and physical fitness,
traditional aerobics, low-impact
aerobics, aquarobics and toning
are just a few oi the classes offered
this spring. Registration will
remain open through this Friday,
March 4 and will re-open on
March 14 and 15. The session
consists of 12 classes and fees are
set at $10 for students and $20 for
facultystaff. All classes are
available on a drop-in basis with
the purchase of a ticket.
Hill says that fitness with the
l.R.S. is more than just a
traditional aerobics class. Low-
impact aerobics is the perfect
example. This class is not for the
half-hearted, and it is not an
"easier version" of traditional
aerobics. Low-impact simply
means less jarring of the legs
(from knee to ankle), feet, hips,
and lower back - all accomplished
with one foot on the ground.
Movement includes brisk
walking and cross-floor patterns
with power walking and striding
movements. Exagcrated arm
movements push the heart rate to
60-80 percent of the maximum
heart rate, making low-impact
aerobics as challenging as
See FITNESS page 14
ECU, scored 17 points and pulled
down her season high in
rebounds with 16.
Chris O'Connor added 13
points for the Lady Pirates and
Pam Williams had 10.
The Lady Seahawks were led by
Sharon McDowell, who scored
the game high 20 points and
pulled down the game high
rebounds which was also 20.
UNC-W's Tressa Reese also
added 15 points.
� CAROLYN JUSTICE
Unreal Hammonds
ATLANTA (AP)-Coach Bobby offensive load throughout the
Cremins called Tom Hammonds game and Brian Oliver hit three
"unbelievable" after he scored 29 crucial free throws in the final 45
points, grabbed six rebounds and seconds to preserve Tech's lead,
held Duke star Danny Ferry to six Hammonds attributed the
points in the second half as victory to the defense on Ferry,
Georgia Tech downed Duke 91-
87.
Fifth-ranked Duke dropped its
second game in a row to No. 20
Georgia Tech in an Atlantic Coast
Conference game on Sunday.
"He put on a show Cremins
said of Hammonds. "He was
unbelievable. What a
performance that kid put on. He
never quits. He's something
special
Hammonds carried most of the
�-���.��
mtmmmMmmm
mvwmmmmwmmmmw:vn
SPRINGTIME IN LONDON
10 Days & Nights in England
who led the Blue Devils with 24
points. , . . ,
r it was the seventh victory in a
row for the Jackets, 21-6 overall
and 8-4 in the conference. The
Blue Devils dropped to 20-5 and
8-4 in the conference
Today is the
Deadline
Today is the
Deadline
Depart: 6:25 p.m. Mon May 9
from Raleigh Durham airport
Return: 7:35 p.m. Fri May 20
to RaleighDurham airport
Transportation; Delta Airlines
Hotel: Ladbroke Hotel, Hyde Park, London
Price ner person: $1200 for Dbl. occupancy
Deadline: March 1, 1988
For more info:
Call Mendenhall Student Center (757-6611)
BEAU'S
presents
Ladies Zoo
and
180 Proof
Wednesday Feb. 24th
Ladies 9-10:30 p.m. $1.00.
Guys After 10:30 pitii.
Every one $2.00. Special
$.50 Memberships
LIVE
Rock & Roll
with
180 Proof
Drink Specials;
$3.00 Pitchers
$1.50 Harry Navels
$2.00 Kami Kazes
$1.00 Schnapps
$.25 Draft
ALL NIGHT LONG
513 Cotanchc St. 758-0080
Buy One Specialty Sandwich
: -JGet One 12 Priee
Good 3 p.m. - 9 p.m.
Expires March 31, 1988
Open for Lunch & Dinner 11 a.m. - til closing
-�� ��
K�. �� ��.
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1

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East Carolina University
Department of Intramural-Recreational Services
FITNESS CLASS SCHEDULE
SPRING 1988
Registration Dates
March 1-4 & 14-15
Session Dates
March 14 - April 22
Cost Per Session 12 classes) Cost Per Drop-In Class
SlO.OOStudents 1 .OOStudents
$20.00Faculty-Staff $2.00Faculty-Staff
All classes available on a drop-in basis with purchase of a ticket. Tickets are
available in 204 Memorial Gymnasium, Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. and
Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Aerobics
Times Locations
4:00-5:00 p.m. MG 108
4:30-5:30 p.m. Clement
5:15-6:15 p.m. MG 108
6:30-7:30 p.m. (Low Impact) MG 108
5:15-6:15 p.m. (Low Impact) MG 108
6:30-7:30 p.m. MG 108
4:00-5:00 p.m. MG 108
5:15-6:15 p.m.
Days
Mon. & Wed.
Mon. & Wed.
Mon. & Wed.
Mon. & Wed.
Tues. & Th.
Tues. & Th.
Fri.
Fri.
9. Sat.
10. Sun.
MG108
1:00-2:00 p.m. (Drop-in Only) MG 108
3:00-4:00 p.m. (Drop-in Only) MG 108
11. Mon. & Wed.
12. Tues. &Th.
13.Tues. &Th.
14.Sat.
Toning
3:00-4:00 p.m.
4:00-5:00 p.m.
5:30-6:30 p.m
MG108
Fletcher
MG112
15. Tues. &Th.
12:00-1:00 p.m. (Drop-in Only) MG 108
Aquarobics
5:30-6:30 p.m. MG Pool
SUPRCLASS
An innovative 90 minute workout incorporating weights as light
resistance for muscular strength and endurance, in addition to a 30
minute aerobic component. Registration is required and sessions are
the same as all other fitness classes. Cost per session (12 classes) is
$15.00Students and $25.00Faculty-Staff.
16. Tues. &Th.
17.Sat
3:30-5:00 p.m.
10:30-12 noon
MG108
MG108
Drop-in basis available
A104
Physical Education
Mv first time tutoring was a night
to remember. Mv student was some-
thing called Bone Crusher Reed, a.k.a.
Billv Jo, defensive tackle for the foot-
ball team.
I had the shock of my life when
he answered his dorm room door.
He was about si x foot seven in J
diameter. And when he shook my
hand, I thought Ici never get it back.
So there I was, face-to-knee with
the big man on campus, wondering
how I was going to relate American
Literature to The Hulk.
But then he pulled out a can of
Orange Cappuccino. I was shocked!
Could it be that this tough jock
liked its delicate taste? And when
Bone Crusher brought out the bone
china, I was beyond belief
Reading trie expression on my
face, he saidWhat can I say? I like it.
The Cafe Francais is pretty good,
too" Well, who's going to argue, I
thought. As we sipped our Orange
Cappuccino, I discovered that Billy Jo
loves reading novels; his only problem
was poetry. �o I gave him tips on
reading Emily Dickinson, and he
gave me a copy of Ann Beattie's
"Falling in Race"
All I could think was, Dad's never
going to believe this!
?.�5$
General Foods International Coffees.
Share the feeling.
0IMHH tK-nrral Fonda Carp
. -









14 TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 1,1988
Fitness time at the IRS
Continued from page 13
traditional.
Another alternative to
traditional aerobics is aquarobics.
Held in Memorial Gvm pool,
aquarobics is especially beneficial
for the overweight and the injury-
prone. And, swimming skills are
not necessary. Hill savs
aquarobics offer a different
dimension of aerobics and a
different type of resistance. With
water involved, the sweating here
isn't as bad.
Toning classes are the exact
opposite of aerobics, with all
concentration on muscular and
strength work. Toning classes
offer a variety of exercises in
reaching muscle overload, as well
as stretching before the cool down
period. Hill points out that
although the muscles are
overloaded, they are not
overused here. Toning is safe and
gaining in popularity on campus.
And for those already in shape
and seeking to reach a bit higher,
there is SUPRACLASS - an
innovative 90-minutc workout
incorporating weights as light
resistance for muscular strength
and endurance, and aerobics. Hill
says this class is oriented for the
individual who has been
involved in cardiovascular
activity regularly for at least two
years. The Fee for SUPRACLASS
is set at $15 for students and $25
for facultystaff.
For more information on these
classes and other fitness classes
offered, stop by Memorial Gym,
Room 204 or call 757-6387.
How to stand out
in a crowd
Fitness class schedule
0NA1 ER01 :S
i SM E SL0CATI0 MG 10 3N
. � : - ;00pro
MW1: 5 : 3 0pmClementDorm
MW -� o �pmMG108
I6: ?030pmMG108
F: 0-5;00pmMG108
h: -6:15ptnMG108
1:00-2:00pmMG108(Drop-in Only)
S u nt:00- 1 :00pmMG108( D r o p - i n 0 r 1 y )
- ' AC1 AEROBICS
v6: :030 tilMG108
5 : 1 5 - :MG108
MING
MW3:00- 1 :MG108
. Fh.00-5:c.iFletcher Dorm
h: $0-6: ?0r�rcMG1 1 2
Sat12:00-1 mMG108
C ' H C S
: :h5:30-6:pmMGpool
S RC1 V-
�000pmMG108
sI: 0-NOONMG108
�� i usUfH'tng welcome
i h ither jacket
n bound t'r
iiinnv, i'ilt�-
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� rvtl nig � i! aj:i
Iu tii gei tlu-( ard now
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MJRCH ' : ' 3 : APR1 I
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1)6X1
FOUR STAR

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Delivery
WITHIN 30 MINUTES
758-3300
114 E. 10th St.
Greenville, N.C.
Hours:
Sun. - Thurs. 11 a.m. - 1 a.m.
Fri. - Sat. 11 a.m. - 2 a.m.
?FROM NOW ON WHEN YOUR ORDER PIZZA FROM FOUR
STAR PIZZA. YOU WILL RECEIVE TWO PIZZAS FOR ONE
SPECIAL LOW PRICE!
TWO HOT DELICIOUS PIZZAS WITH FULL PORTIONS OF
THE FRESHEST POSSIBLE INGREDIENTS AND TOPPINGS!
YOU CAN ORDER TWO IDENTICAL PIZZAS OR TWO
DIFFERENT TOPPING PIZZASITS UP TO YOU!
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT OUR DELIVERY AREA
WE DO ACCEPT PERSOXAL CHECKS
ft
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10" & 14" Doublezz (2 pizzas )
-v �, At rwrmv . ONE low PRICE
14 TASTY ITEMS TO CHOOSE FROM
PEPPERONI, SAUSAGE, HAM, GROUND CHUCK, BACON, PINEAPPLE, THICK CRUST, ONIONS. GREEN
PEPPERS, HOT PEPPERS, ANCHOVIES, MUSHROOMS, OLIVES, EXTRA CHEESE
$10
o
10ffCheese$72O 14ffCheese
Pizzas w Pizzas
16 SLICES f per additional item 24 SLICES $150
�frl.UU COVERING BOTH PIZZAS �PA.UV
Four Star Pizza Deluxe Four star Pizza
25
PER ADDITIONAL ITEM
COVERING BOTH PIZZAS
5 ITEMS FOR THE PRICE OF 4
PEPPERONI, SAUSAGE, MUSHROOMS, ONIONS AND
GREEN PEPPERS
NO SUBSTITUTIONS
Big 12" Subs$4.50
HOT OR COLD
ITALIAN, HAM & CHEESE
ROAST BEEF & CHEESE, MEATBALL
Super Deluxe
9 ITEMS FOR THE PRICE OF 5
PEPPKRONI. SAUSAGE, MUSHROOMS, GROUND CHUCK. ONIONS,
GREEN PEPPERS, BLACK OUVES, HOT PEPPERS, AND EXTRA
CHEESE
NO SUBSTITUTIONS
Diet Pizza (10" Only)
SLICED TOMATOES. MUSHROOMS, GREEN PEPPERS, ONIONS.
BLACK OLIVES ft PARMESAN CHEESE
OPTIONAL ITEMS: PINEAPPLE HOT PEPPERS.

I
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COUPON � ����
758-3300
Greenville
2-10"
Cheese Pizzas
16 Slices !
only
$720
W 2 FREE
12 oz. Cokes
�COUPON NOT REQUIRED
�WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT
OUR DELIVERY AREA
COUPON EXPIRES 4-1-88
COUPON � 1

� COUPON
�g$ 758-3300 �
3 Greenville �
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2-14"
Cheese Pizzas
24 Slices
only
$10251
M W 4 FREE
� "2 oz. Cokes
�COUPON NOT REQUTRED
�WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT
OUR DEIJVERY AREA
COUPON EXPmES 4-1-88
� ��� COUPON IIH
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 1, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 01, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.593
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57948
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