The East Carolinian, February 18, 1988






COMING TUESDAY:
Tipper Gore visits Greenville in campaign swing
for husband. Clay Deanhardt has story Tuesday,
MM�0.nMMMI
HHHMMHKBNT
mmmimmammmmmmm
Carol gets off on Action Jackson. See review on
page 9.
SPORTS
ECU swim coach, Rick Kobe, is voted Coach of
the Year by CAA. See page 13
She �a0i (Carolinian
Vol. 62 No. 38
Serving the East Carolina camvus communitu since 1925.
Thursday, February 18,1988 Greenville, NC 16 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Student Union needs new committee heads
Bv STEPHANIE FOLSOM
�Uti writer
Karen Pasch, the newly elected
1988-89 Student Union president,
is calling tor more student in-
volvement in her group as the due
date tor committee head applica-
The five -year plan
tions nears.
Pasch said the Student Union
receives more money from each
individual student than does the
Student Government Association
and is responsible for the majority
of activities on this campush.
The Student Union is allotted a
certain amount of each student's
activity fees. Pasch said students
who would like to have more
input in how their money is used
should get involved with the
union.
Applications for committee
head positions will be accepted
only through Friday, Pasch said.
They can be picked up at the Stu-
dent Union Office in Mendenhall
234. Applications to be a commit-
tee member can be picked up
Why school takes so long
By TIM HAMPTON
Assistant News Editor
Tor various reasons, many col-
lege students find that it is diffi-
cult to graduate in four vears. On
the ECU campus and other cam-
puses, students often decide to
graduate in five years or as it is
popularly termed 'the five year
plan
As oi the spring semester of
1988 ECU has a total of 2,910
seniors, according to William
Melton, the director of Institu-
tional Research for ECU. Of the
almost 3,000 seniors, 1,195 have
tentatively applied for dradu-
n. Helton said.
The disparity in these figures
means that 1,715 seniors are not
graduating in four years or that
they have not applied for gradu-
ation.
There are many reasons why
students decide not graduate in
four years. The reasons range
from a changing of major to tak-
ing a lesser course load.
Some students say that gradu-
ating in four years would mean
taking too many hours, too
quickly. In order to spread out
their course load so they will be
able to concentrate on their sched-
ule, they prolong their college
carrcer to five years or more.
"My relatives ask what I'm
taking at ECU and my reply is Tm
taking my time Dwayne Kemp
Gilbert, a senior Industrial Tech-
nology major, said.
Other students choose to
have part-time jobs to bear the
finanicial burdens of college. Jeff
Gibson, who has a part-time job in
Greenville, takes an optimistic
view of graduating in five years.
"School is a learning experience,
so why not learn as much as you
can for as long as you
canGibson, a senior Communi-
cations major, said.
According to Helton, 41 per-
cent of students enrolled as fresh-
SRA discusses intramural service
men at ECU in 1982 graduated
within the five years between
1982 and 1987. Also 37.8 percent
of the 1982 freshmen either trans-
ferred toother schools or dropped
out of school.
In the five year follow-up by
the Institutional Research, Helton
found that 12.5 percent of the stu-
dents from the same class were
academically suspended. The
study also found that 8.7 percent
of the 1982 freshmen were still
enrolled.
Jimmy Patterson is in the 8.7
percent of the that class which still
enrolled at ECU. "I changed my
major a couple of times, and I took
a lot courses I didn't really need
Patterson, a senior Industrial
Technology major, said. Patter-
son said that he has 175 credit
hours.
throughout the year.
The Student Union has a pro-
gram board made up of 11
committees serving various stu-
dent interests. These committees
are: Special Events, which spon-
sors events like Barefoot on the
Mall and the upcoming Marcel
Marceau performance; Major
Concerts, which handled the An-
ita Baker and Jimmy Buffet con-
certs; Minority Arts, which hosts
International Week and the Stu-
dent Star Search Competition;
Publicity, which takes care of
public relations; Special Concerts,
which books acts like the Flesh-
tones; Forum, which handled the
pornography debate; Films,
which takes care of the weekly
movies in Hendrix Theatre;
Travel, which is handling the trips
to New York, Hawaii, and the
Bahamas; Visual Arts, which
sponsors the Illumina Competi-
tion; Coffeehouse, which spon-
sors student bands; and Produc-
tions, which sponsors the tree-
trimming party, open house, and
Mocktail Casino Nights.
Pasch said those interested es-
pecially in the communications
and entertainment field should
consider filling out an applica-
tion. The GPA requirement for
chairpersons is 2.25, and 2.0 for
committee members.
The amount of time you need to
be a chairperson depends on the
committee and how involved vou
get, according to Pasch. Laura
Salazar, current productions
chairperson, said she spends "at
least 4-6 hours a week calling
people, meeting with advisors,
and thinking about it (the pro-
grams)
Pasch said the training session
for chairpersons, which will be
scheduled for late March or early
April, will cover stress and time
management, recruitment, lead-
ership skills, information on how
to run meetings, and how to
communicate effectively. During
this training session the new
chairpersons will be swom in.
Pasch said that chairpersons do
not receive a salary, but "there is
enough compensation and
enough benefits All chairper-
sons get tickets for activities that
the Student Union organizes.
Memberson thecommittee which
organized the event also get tick-
ets.
Pasch also said that the Student
Union gives a person the chance
to "deal with professional people
in the working world. It relates to
every major, every interest
Salazar said that the Student
Union is "well-organized and
runs smooth but carries "a lot of
responsibility
By KIMLEY EDER
stiff writer
Nancy Mize from the depart-
ment oi intramural-recreational
services was the guest speaker at
the meeting of the SRA council
this Tuesday.
The key issue discussion was
whether or not to eliminate the
residence hall structure from in-
tramurals or not. Mize also ad-
dressed the issue of lack of com-
munication with the residence
halls with regards to intramurals.
She noted that participation in
intramurals has not decreased,
but more and more people are
signing up as independents
rather than through residence
halls.
The decrease in representaion
was especially noticable in
women'r residence halls. 'There
has been a big decline in men's
and co-rec but it is more signifi-
cant in women's She said IRS is
proposing that they abolish the
residence hall structure and put
the residence halls in with the
independents.
A proposal was brought forth to
make the IRS representative for
each dorm a member of the execu-
tive house council. Mize said the
IRS department would welcome
any ideas that the students have to
offer.
A representative from West
Campus announced that Chan-
cellor Richard R. Eakin will speak
in Green Hall lobby Wednesday,
from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. The chancel-
lor is scheduled to speak about the
athletic facilities and lighting on
West Campus. All West Campus
residents are welcome to come.
Tickets for the Spring Dance are
now available from any SRA
member. The dance will be held
on March 18 at the Holiday Inn,
and the theme for the dance is
"One Night in Bangkok Trans-
portation for the dance will be
provided by the SGA buses, and
cost is $3person and $5couple
for SRA cardholders and $4per-
son and $7couple for non-card-
holders.
Historic film to be shown on public television
ECU News Bureau
" Boogie-Woogie in Black and
White an hour-long documen-
tary program about an all-black
musical featurette filmed in
Greenville in 1947, will be broad-
cast by the UNC Center for Public
Television network Friday at 10
p.m.
Alex Albright of the East Caro-
lina University English faculty is
the program's writer and co-pro-
ducer. "Boogie in Black and
White" is part of special Black
History Month programming
scheduled by UNC-TV and is di-
rected and co-produced bv Susan
Massengale of the Center for
Public TV staff.
A surviving copy of the all-but-
forgotten film was discovered at
the Roxy Theatre in Greenville
several years ago. Albright ar-
ranged to have the rare film re-
stored by the American Film Insti-
tute and re-premiered on the ECU
campus in 1986.
The 26-minute-long film, made
by two local white men, John
Warner and William Lord, in-
cludes "big band rhythm and
blues, and burlesque music and
dance routines, mostly per-
formed by traveling entertainers.
Several Greenville people ap-
peared in the cast. The main char-
acter is portrayed by the late Tom
Foreman, a prominent member of
Greenville's black community.
Because of distribution prob-
lems, the film was shown only a
few times in the Carolinas, then
laid aside and forgotten. Some of
the performers themselves never
saw it until its re-premiere four
decades later.
Since its rediscovery, "Pitch a
Boogie-Woogie" has attracted
considerable attention as a signifi-
See DOCUMENTARY, page 2
Sunny weather
The weather in Greenville has been abnormally warm for February the last few days, as these
volleyballers will attest to. Students across campus have taken advantage of the warm weather to
get fresh air, exercise and maybe even a tan before Spring Break trips to the sandy beaches further
south. (Photo by Hardy Alligood � Photolab)
Morgan Distinguished Alumni lecturer
Robert Morgan
ECU News Bureau
Robert B. Morgan, director of
the State Brueau of Investigation,
and former U.S. senator, will
serve as ECU's 1988 Distin-
guished Alumni Lecturer March
20-21. While on campus Morgan
will also participate in Scholars
Weekend activities.
Morgan will deliver a public
lecture entitled "On Politics, Civil
Liberties and Ethics March 21 at
8 p.m. in Ampitheatre 1010 of
ECU's new general classroom
building.
Donald Y. Leggett, assistant to
the vice chancellor for Institu-
tional Advancement said, "We
are honored that one of North
Carolina's most respected and
dedicated public servants will be
on campus to address our stu-
dents, potential ECU students
and the local citizenry.
"Robert Morgan is an experi-
enced leader who has a wealth of
information to share. I hope that
the University and Greenville
community will seize the oppor-
tunity to meet and learn from this
year's Distinguished Alumni Lec-
turer
Chancellor's home, meetings As a state senator Morgan
with student and faculty leaders, worked for university status for
class visitations, and the banquet, his alma mater and was a strong
Morgan will participate in in- advocate for the establishment of
formal meetings with campus the ECU Medical School and
leaders, honor students and ECU School of Nursing.
said.
He has served as chairman of
the ECU board of trustees and
president of the alumni associa-
tion. He received one of the
university's first honorary doc-
Ambassadors. He will specifi- Morgan graduated from East torate of letters degrees in 1975
Alumni
cally visit students and faculty in Carolina in 1947 with a bachelor's
the Departments of Criminal Jus- degree in math and chemistry,
tice and Political Science.
"My undergraduate training in
A native of Harnett County, math and chemistry was the most
Morgan will address Scholars Morgan became director of the significant factor in whatever
Weekend guests at a banquet SBI in 1985. During a lifetime of success I've had in law. I can't
Sunday, March 20. The weekend political and legal work, Morgan recommend a better major for
is arranged for top-ranking high has served four years as a clerk of pre-law students. The logic, rea-
school juniors who visit the ECU court, 10 as a state senator, six as sorting and methodology of these ars Weekend or the public lecture
campus to preview opportunities state attorney general, and six as curriculums provide excellent with Robert Morgan, contact the
for honor students. The weekend a U. S. senator. He has also prac- preparation for the kind of think- ECU Office of Alumni Affairs at
will include a reception at the ticed law in Lillington. ing required in law Morgan 757-6072.
and the Outstanding
Award in 1965.
Morgan served in the U.S. Na vy
in both World War II and the
Korean Conflict. He has served in
the U. S. Naval Reserves and the
U. S. Air Force Reserves.
For more information on Schol-

- � . �
4- � - "
-
- -1 ii �jjtt iijui. in- r �'���-





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 18,1988
Preparing students for fire with new policy
How prepared are you in case of
a fire? Don't let your education go
up in smoke. A fire on Campus
not only interrupts your educa-
tion, it destroys property and can
injure or kill people.
How prepared are we on Cam-
pus in residence halls? Not as well
as we should be. Take for instance
the new policy on tampering with
fire alarms and equipment. The
penalties may seem harsh, but are
they really that harsh, when you
really consider what is at risk?
From Aug. 22 through Dec. 10,
1987, there were 198 fire alarms
responded to by Public Safety,
only 18 were the result of acciden-
tal fires or smoke. During this
same period there were approxi-
mately 25 fire extinguishers sto-
len, and 52 maliciously dis-
charged by vandals. There were
83 glasses to fire extinguisher
cabinets broken and 15 cabinets
damaged by acts of vandalism.
Are you really prepared in case
of an actual fire? Maybe or maybe
not. When the fire alarm goes off
Pirate Police
Line
by
Capt. Keith Knox
in your building, do you evacuate
or investigate? Most do not, even
during fire drills, because the
alarms go off so frequently they
don't see the danger, since there
simply has not been a major fire
on campus.
Have you become complacent
in your response? It has gotten to
the place it should remind us of
the story about the little boy who
cried wolf so often, that finally
when there actually was a wolf,
nobody responded to his call. Of
course, when a fire alarm goes off
Public Safety and Residence Life
Staff are going to respond. How-
ever, human nature takes over
and after frequent false alarms
they too, may become lax and do
not respond as quickly as they
should.
If there was a fire in your room,
do you know where to find the
alarm stations andor fire
extinguishers? If so, hopefully no
one has stolen or discharged the
fire extinguishers, thus making it
impossible for yov. to extinguish a
small fire before it becomes a
major one.
Always follow Campus fire
rules, if you don't, your education
could go up in smoke. Report
those who tamper with fire
alarms, fire detection devices, and
fire fighting equipment immedi-
ately to Public Safety at 757-6150
or call Pirate Crimebusters at 757-
6266. Remember: Fire prevention
is everybody's business.
Nedim dismissed, dog misuse
(CPS) � University of Califor- moved from it in January for giv-
nia at Davis officials have dis-
missed veterinary Prof. Nedim
At about the same time, two "I don't like it when someone
ing his students the option of re- University of North Florida stu- says you must kill to get a good
fusing to perform any surgeries dents asked UN F'sDept. of Natu- grade Terry Powers told The
they considered "unethical or ral Science to stop using live ani- Spinnaker, UNF's campus paper,
immoral mals in an upper-level physiol- "Because of my beliefs, I'm being
ogy class they are taking, and penalized.
The teacher, a Dept. of Opthal- asserted they should not get bad
mology spokesman said, hadn't grades solely because they re-
Buyukmihci, who had taught gotten official permission to give fused to participate in the experi-
the course since 1987 , was re- his students such a choice. ments.
Buvukmihci as a "course leader
J
of a surgery class in which stu-
dents operated on live, healthy
animals as part of their course-
work.
Davis' Buyukmihci was repri-
manded for trying to avoid penal-
izing students for such feelings.
SMje Cost Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo
Adam Blankenshlp
i
Shari Clemens
Edwards, King plead no contest to charges
Theodore "Blue" Edwards 1986. ing stolen goods,
and Tracy Clayton King, two for- Both Brown and Williams ' A no contest plea is not an
mer ECU basketball players, pleaded guilty to two charges admission of guilt, but still carries
pleaded no contest to charges of each of breaking and entering in the weight and penalty of a con-
receiving stolen property in Pitt November. viction. The maxium sentence for
County Superior Court Tuesday. Edwards pleaded no contest both Edwards and King is ten
Edwards and Clayton along io one count of receiving stolen years. Both men were allowed to
with two other former basketball goods in a plea bargin which dis- remain free on bond Tuesday.
players, Howard Elliot Brown missed three counts of breaking The dorm thefts allegedly
and John Aaron Williams, will be and entering. King, who was occurred during the Christmas
sentenced March 28 in connection charged with four counts of
with several Scott Dormitory breaking and entering, pleaded
;reak-ins during Christmas of nocontestto two counts of receiv-
Documentary features an
all-black musical
Continued from page 1
break of 1986. Police officials esti-
mate that $6,000 in property was
stolen from several of the dorm
rooms. The four were charged in
early September in connection
with the thefts.
Ed wards is the only one of the
four who is still enrolled at ECU.
Buyukmihci repeatedly had
asked Dept. of Ophthalmology
officials to let him use cadavers of
animals that had died of natural
causes, terminally ill animals or,
"as a last resort abandoned
pound animals instead of live,
healthy ones.
The department refused his
requests.
George Cardinct, a member of
the department's curriculum
committee, said Buyukmihci's
proposals were "contradictory"
to what other faculty members
wanted students to accomplish in
the courses, and that once
Buyukmihci decided to press his
case anyway he'd begun, in the
department's view, to use the
class for his own "political pur-
poses
cant document of jazz history and
black history. A copy of the film
has been deposited in Library of
Congress film archives, and Al-
Fillmore Bell ana E. A. Eaton. Also
interviewed are Greenville attor-
ney Sam Underwood Jr local
theatre manager Pervis Cohens,
and two members of the ECU
faculty: historian Donald Lennon
and film scholar William
Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY KATKS
0 49 Column inches$4.25
50-994.15
100-149405
150-199 3.95
200-249 3 85
250 and above3 75
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
(Charge in Addition to Regular Space Rale)
One color and black$90 00
Two colors and black 155 00
Inserts
5.000 or less( each
5.001 - 10,0005.5each
10.001-12.000 5�each
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
Phones757-6366757-6557
757-6558757-6309
J
bright has arranged screenings at Stephenson. Local musician Bill
several film festivals. Shepherd, who found the surviv-
The TV documentary about the ing reel upstairs at the Roxy, ap-
making and rediscovery of "Pitch pears in the program,
a Boogie-Woogie" features brief Although the forgotten film's
interviews witn some ot the origi- sound track was in poor condi-
nal cast members: Beatrice Atkin- don, the film was in generally
son of Greenville, former good shape when Shepherd un-
Greenville residents Herman earthed it and first screened it on
Forbes and the Rev. Dr. Joe Little, the Roxy's old carbon arc projec-
and musicians from the sound tor. Like most films of the period,
track band, the "Rhythm Vets it was shot on silver nitrate-based
"The TV program gives a brief film stock and with age and de-
cultural history of the film's set- compostion this material is likely
ting � the night club scene along to ignite under the heat of projec-
what was known as The Block' on tion lights, Albright said. "This
Albemarle Avenue during the
30's and 40's Albright said.
"During tobacco season both
blacks and whites from miles
around frequented the clubs and
restaurants on The Block. Some of
:he nation's leading jazz perform-
ers appeared there, people like
Lucky' Millinder, Earl Tatha'
Hines and Billy Eckstine, along
with traveling minstrel shows,
such as Silas Green's minstrels
The Block � actuallv
v.
.�-
phenomenon resulted in many
movie theatre fires during the 30's
and 40's he explained.
"Warner and Lord shot the
ilm's dramatic sequences in a
zonverted sound stage in a to-
bacco warehouse on Albemarle
Avenue. These scenes were
spliced with footage of traveling
music acts Albright said.
All-black cast revue films like
"Pitch" were made specifically
for distribution to movie theaters
blocksof Albemarle rightoff West in black neighborhoods, he noted.
Fifth � is recalled in the show by These featurettes were scheduled
proprieters of businesses in the along with standard Hollywood
area: Charles and Lillie Shiver, arure films.
February
� A MONTH TO �
Celebrate
two
CAROLINA PRIDE
ALL MEAT OR
All Beef
Bologna
PUNCH, ORANGE, LEMONLIME,
DIET OR REGULAR COLA
Big K
Soft Drinks
ITR-jLtr.
NRB
BLACK
HISTORY
12
Oz.
Pkg
KROGER
All Meat
Wieners
99
KROGER REGULAR OR
WITH MARSHMALLOWS
Dutch
Cocoa
12
Ct.
Box
88
WASHINGTON STATE
Granny Smith
Apples
Lb.
77�
COST CUTTER FROZEN
Breaded
Fish Sticks . .
8
Oz
Pkg
990
KROGER
CHILEAN
Plums or
Nectarines
89
Lb.
KROGER SINGLE
TOPPING
Fresh
Pizza
Multigrain
Bread
0
2
12
Inch
Pies
$
"NEW" EAGLE
SNACKS
Crispy Thin
Potato Chips
6 5
Oz.
Bag
79
LIMIT 2 WITH $10
ADO L PURCHASE
ASSORTED
VARIETIES
Yubi
Yogurt
$
Oz.
Cups
DOUGHTIES
Roast
Beef
$
459
Items and Pricas Effective
Sun. Feb. 14, 19SS thru
Sat. Feb. 20, 1SS8
Donald Lennon, director of the ECU Manuscript Collection, exam-
ines documents relating to the 1947 Greenville-made film, "Pitch a
Boogie Woogie" with Susan Massengale and Alex Albright
tan �.
000 ��iee
tat�a���aa,t�awaaaCar.�a5l.
Jf?" 7a M0URS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
� �Minew�ii)at�aM�jMa���i i1
. ?� -

Carol Creech, left, community
information about I aiboio S
Rumple News Bureau)
Pres. ca
says he'
( ONCORD H
George Bush and Mid
Dukakis pointed their campaigj
southward after decisive J
Hampshire victories, and
Dole promised to counterattaj
unless the vice president stoJ
distorting the Dole re I
Richard Gephardt said he vvai
the race to stay.
But Sen. Paul Simon ol lllinol
third among Democrats in J
1 iampshire after finishing seco
in Iowa, said he will ha c to dfl
out unless hecan v in next w eokl
either South Dakota or Mini
sota. Jesse Jackson said he had nl
with former Arizona Gov. Bni
Babbitt, who he said was an
timg with" the question
yhcthcr to continue
Dole, the big Republican wl
nor in Iowa last week, said I
comeback victory in New i lard
shire meant "he s the front ri
ner.
Asked on CBS what made tl
difference in New Hampsha
Dole renewed his accusatia
against Bush, saying, 1 think tl
negative advertising in ettef
distorting the Pole record on ral
mc taxes
And he said in remarks tap
tor ABC-TV, "Unless they vani
get back on the straight and nl
row and withdraw some c4 tl
attacks, we're going to have
counterattack
Tuesday night Dole had
cused Bush or "lying about
record
Bush, asked about that in
interview taped for CBS IV si
f I'm sorry he tools tH.it way
Were you lying? Bush vi
Isked.
j "No ho answered quietly
I Bush won 38 percent of
Republican vote and 11 d
fates to the GOP convention
(early complete returns I Viet
t percent, of the vote and seJ
delegates. They were followed!
kep. lack Kemp ot New "i oj
firmer Pcleware Gov. Pete
Oflt and former tele ision ev
ielist Pat Robertson.
; Dukakis lived up to expotj
Ictnsby carrying his neighborii
kale by lb percentage poirj
�vet Rep. Gephardt ot MissouT
last week's winner in Iowa
I In other comments toda
� -Dukakis, who won by a
inargin in a state bordering
lachusetts where he is the govJ
lor, said on ABC-TV that he Q
jlso do well in the South, whsj
Jominatcs the Super TuoN.il
primaries on March 8. 'Too pi of
c South aren't voting for a A
ode; they're voting for the prtj
ent of the United States,
aid.
CoMedT
7XJNE
WED
IC
� m J
CoMedf
WFD
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
752-7303
I w�





.
olicy
mall fire before it becomes a
.nor one.
Always follow Campus fire
es it you don't, your education
uld go up in smoke. Report
w ho tamper with fire
arms tiro detectiondevices,and
ghting equipment immedi-
to Public Safety at 757-6150
Pirate Cnmebusters at 757-
nember: Fire prevention
dv s business.
aroltnian
itysi MX 1925.
Advertising
esentatives
s Russo
n Blankenship
ERTISING
$4.25
4.15
4 05
SING RATES

bt each
S -1 each
each
HOI RS:
i richly
0 p.m.
6757-6557
6558757-6309
FROZEN
8
IKS . . Pkg
99
;le
Is
iThin
hips
POTATO
. rHT5
1
LIMIT 2 WITH $10
ADD L PURCHASE
DOUGHTIES
Roast
Beef
459
OURS everyday
le Blvd - Greenville
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 18,1988 3
Students protest presence
of CIA recruits on campus
Carol Creech, left, community schools coordinator for the Tarboro City Schools, gives Dawn Robertson
information about Tarboro Schools during the Education Careers Day held on campus. (Photo by Tony
Rumple � News Bureau)
Pres. candidate Gephardt
says he's in race to stay
CONCORD, N.H. (AD �
George Bush and Michael
Dukakis pointed their campaigns
southward after decisive New
Hampshire victories, and Bob
Dole promised to counterattack
unless the vice president stops
"distorting the Dole record
Richard Gephardt said he was in
the race to stay.
But Sen. Taul Simon oi Illinois,
third among Democrats in New
1 lampshire after finishing second
in Iowa, said he will have to drop
out unless he can win next week in
either South Dakota or Minne-
sota, fesse Jackson said he had met
with former Arizona Gov. Bruce
Aibbitt, who he said was "wres-
tling with" the question of
�-hether to continue.
Dole, the big Republican win-
ner in Iowa last week, said Bush's
comeback victory in New Hamp-
shire meant "he's the front-run-
ner
Asked on CBS what made the
difference in New Hampshire,
Dole renewed his accusations
against Bush, saying, "I think the
negative advertising, in effect,
distorting the Dole record on rais-
ing taxes
And he said in remarks taped
for ABC-TV, "Unless they want to
get back on the straight and nar-
row and withdraw some of their
attacks, we're going to have to
counterattack
Tuesday night, Dole had ac-
cused Bush of "lying about my
record
Bush, asked about that in an
interview taped for CBS-TV, said,
fl'm sorry he feels that way
; Were vou lying? Bush was
$sked.
; "No he answered quietly.
I Bush won 38 percent of the
Republican vote � and 11 dele-
gates to the GOP convention � in
nearly complete returns. Dole had
J9 percent of the vote and seven
delegates. They were followed by
feep. jack Kemp of New York,
former Dcleware Gov. Pete du
font and former television evan-
gelist Pat Robertson.
: Dukakis lived up to expecta-
fions by carrying his neighboring
jtate by 16 percentage points
4ver Rep. Gephardt of Missouri,
last week's winner in Iowa.
I In other comments today:
I -Dukakis, who won by a big
margin in a state bordering Mas-
sachusetts where he is the gover-
nor, said on ABC-TV that he can
jlso do well in the South, which
jominates the Super Tuesday
primaries on March 8. "People in
fie South aren't voting for a ZIP
fode; they're voting for the presi-
dent of the United States he
aid.
-Simon said on NBC-TV he
would have to win next week,
otherwise, I'm going to have to
withdraw You just can't con-
tinue to run second and third
-Gephardt said on ABC that
whoever remains in the race, he
himself will "do well because
we're connecting with the voters
on my ideas
-Rep. Jack Kemp of New York,
who beat our former television
evangelist Pat Robertson and
former Dcleware Gov. Pete du
Pont for third place among the
Republicans, said his showing
proved his standing among the
conservatives who form the base
for himself, du Opnt and
Robertson.
-Robertson, on the other hand,
said, "This was a small spread
between Jack and me He
added, "New England is not my
natural constituency. . . . Going
into the South, it's a different ball
game
"On to the South, where we're
going to rise again exclaimed a
euphoric Bush late Tuesday
night. He won a solid victory
after seeing his earlier 20-point
lead in the polls melt in New
Hampshire after his embarrass-
ing third-place finish in Iowa
behind Dole and Robertson.
Read
The
East
Carolinian
ALBANY, N.Y. (CPS) � Eight
State University of New York
(SUNY) at Albany students were
charged with trespass for staging
a sit-in to protest a Central Intelli-
gence Agency recruiter's pres-
ence on campus.
The 8 were part of a larger
group of about 75 students from
SUNY-Albany, Rensselaer Poly-
technic Institute, Union College,
Hobart College, SUNY-Buffalo,
SUNY-Purchase and the Univer-
sity of Rhode Island who turned
out to block the CIA recruitment
Feb. 8.
A weekend national meeting at
Rutgers University in New Jersey,
an Albany lecture by former CIA
agent John Stockwell the day be-
fore, and an allegedly broken
promise fueled student anger at
the CIA's recruiting, sources said.
Demonstrators demanded the
release of "The Albany 3 stu-
dents arrested during an October,
1987 CIA visit to the campus, and
asserted administrators had
promised them they would stall
CIA recruiting until SUNY-Al-
bany reviewed its policy.
Vice President Mitchell Living-
ston, demonstrator Danella
Korotzer said, had promised in
October that "the CIA will not be
allowed to be on this campus until
the issue is cleared up
Livingston replied, "no morato-
rium was ever declared
"The issue was put before a
committee, and they came out
with a view that it would be inap-
propriate to change our policy
said President Vincent O'Leary.
Some of the students, fresh
from the Rutgers meeting where
about 700 students from around
the country gathered to try to
coordinate nationwide campus
leftist activities and where anti-
CIA sentiments ran high, held a
rally denouncing CIA "crimes
marched outside Livingston's
office, and then occupied
O'Leary's office.
"We have a duty under the
Nuremberg Principle (which held
people are legally obliged not to
follow 'immoral' orders) to try to
prevent crimes against humanity
being carried out by the CIA
explained student Kathy Manley.
"We want the CIA off our cam-
pus" because SUNY is "com-
plicit" in CIA activities subver-
sion in other parts of the world,
added student Nick Schneir.
University police arrested the
protesters when they refused to
leave O'Leary's office after clos-
ing hours.
Students who had job inter-
views did get to talk with the CIA
official, who was somewhat hid-
den away at the remote Alumni
House. The prospective CIA
employees, however, had had to
be escorted to their interviews by
police.
No injuries were reported, but
several demonstrators com-
plained of being picked up by
police and thrown into the snow.
VALUABLE COUPON
EC"
15
I Are You Hungry?
J Two All Meat
Small Pizzas
Pepperoni, Ground Beef,
Ham, Italian Sausage
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
$8
756-7256 757-1212
Extra items and extra cheese available at
additional cost. Valid with coupon at par-
ticipating Uttle Caesars. One coupon per
customer. Cany Out Only.
Expires: 2-29-88
tl.
5EK3
mm m VALUABLE COUPON � �
FREE
EC
j� BUY ONE
VJxy pizza
GET ONE FREE!
Buy any size pizza at
regular price, get identical
pizza FREE!
756-7256 757-1212
Price varies depending on stee and number
of toppings ordered. Valid with coupon at
participating Uttle Caesars
Carry Out Only
Expires: 2-29-88

x
VALUABLE COUPON
VALUABLE COUPON
I
FREE PIZZA!
BUY ONE PIZZA, GET ONE FREE!
Cheese
One Item
Two Nems
Three hems
SM
8 pc
5.35
6.05
6.75
7.45
Little Caesars Special 8.51
10pc
7.10
8.00
8.90
9.80
10.90
12pc
9.50
10.60
11.70
12.80
14.10
Extra hems over 3" .70 .90 1.10
�Extra Cheese 1.50 2.00 2.50
CHOOSE FROM THESE TOPPINGS
PEPPtROM. UUStnCCUS. OMONS. HAM. BACON. OBOUND KEf.
IIMJAN SAUSAGE. GHEE N PEPPERS. ANCHOVES. HOI PEPPER WMOS.
SACK CHIVES. ORE EM OLIVES
PEVERAC
SM
CocCota Dwt &.& 55
Sprite� Uelo Vrtow
Chwry Coke�
66
LITER
95
CAESARS SANDWICHES�
Tuna Melt2.76
Italian Sub2.36
Ham and Chee�2.36
Vegetarian 2.36
SALADS SM MD LG
Tossed 1.19 2.39 3.69
Greek 139 2.89 4.69
Amipasto 139 2.89 4.69
CHOOSE FROM THESE TOPPINGS
Ffwctv nmar. �� MM. Omk I w
SPECIALTIES
Freshly Baked Crazy Bread 1.19
A M ��� mm M am �ti M Buiw � ftrmmr Ml
Crazy Sauce
p�om Mpct � envm (Proi m�, mtm m�i
86
GRAND OPENING OF OUR NEW STORE
University Square Shopping Center
(East Tenth Street at Greenville Blvd.)
757-1212
AND WE'RE STILL AT
323 Arlington Blvd.
(AeroM from Farm Fresh)
756-7256
WHpii vou moke pixzn this uood, one just isn't enough!
Hours: 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 midnight SUN. - THU.
11:00 a.m. - l:OOa.m. FR1.
SAT.
ATTIC
CoMcdY
WED
CoMedf
7m?
WED
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
752-7303
THURSDAY
Justin
Time
EC $1 with
this ad
FRIDAY
Band
of Oz
Beach Concert
SATURDAY
�lEUINIEir
Show Rock
EARLY FRIDAY FUN
IS BACK AT PANTANA BOBS
This Friday February 19, 1988
Wear Your Letters!
Bob will award grand
prize to the best
Greek group in attendance
Also, $1-00 shot of Schnapps
Buy one $3.00 pitcher and
receive 2 Hotdogs FREE!
?Private club for members & Guest
Has Anyone Seen Bob?
32 aerobic workouts a week.
If you have a hectice schedule, don't
worry, because at The Spa, there
are aerobic classes going on all the
time. With 32 aerobic workouts a
week, you can go to aerobics when
it's convenient for you, so you won't
have to plan your day around some-
one else's schedule. We have also
implimented low impact aerobics.
These are just some of the reasons
The Spa is such a popular health
club.
And there's much more than aero-
bics at The Spa.
The Spa offers you state-of-the-art
Dynacam exercise equipment, exer-
cise bicycles, free weights and quali-
fied instructors on hand at all times
to help you with your fitness plan.
Plus, there are Greenville's largest
sauna and steam rooms, a hot
whirlpool mineral bath and our
tanning bed.
Just drop by The Spa in South
Park Shopping Center, next to
Food Lion, for a tour of the facili-
ties, and see why we're Greenville's
best health club value.
Get an early start on your
Spring Break Tan with a
Wolff
Suntanning
System
- the world's 1 Tanning Beds.
A Package Deal For Only
$34.95
I Greenville's
Greenville's
best health club value.
SOUTH PARK SHOPPING CKNTKK
GKKKNVILLE 7567991
�?-��-�
- 4f '
?��
Mi 111 � ii mmmmmWm






�tje �aHi (Karnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, cmiah
Clay Deanhardt, h�i z�
JAMES F.j. MCKEE, PinctorofAdotrUmng
TIM Cl IANDLER, Sp. EAtor
Jot in Carter, r &��
Michelle England,obhm
Debbie Stevens, 5,
Jeff PARKER,si�riu.irfr�tor
Tom FURR,circHktioRM�uf�
Mike Upchurch, �, mmmXb
JOHN W. MEDLIN, Art Director
Mac Clark, Bs.�M��jer
February 18,1988
OPINION
Page 4
0?ew fe door
Committees need accountability
There is an unwritten policy
within ,he Student Government
Association that committee votes
and discussions on important bills
and resolutions are taken behind
closed doors. It is a policy that is both
illegal and dangerous.
As it stands now, when a bill or
resolution comes before a commit-
tee, the sponsors of the measure are
allowed to state their case before the
committee. They then leave the
room while the committee discusses
and votes on the measure. The same
process is followed in appropria-
tions, where student groups present
their funding requests and then
leave while their requests are being
discussed.
In a free society such as ours, it is
important that legislative action on
all levels be open to inspection by
the public. It is so important that
North Carolina and other states
have open meetings laws which
require that all such decisions be
made publicly, and that records be
kept of all such decisions.
According to the North Carolina
Open Meetings Law, "each official
meeting of a public body shall be
open to the public, and any person is
entitled to attend such a meeting
The law goes further to say that
public bodies include a number of
councils and commissions as well as
school administrative boards
and any body which "exercises or is
authorized to exercise a legislative,
policy-making, quasi-judicial, ad-
ministrative, or advisory function
While the SGA Constitution does
not violate this law, it seems that
through tradition, SGA practice
does. It is a tradition that must be
stopped.
But the SGA is not fully to blame
for this. The student body, through
complacency, has allowed this prac-
tice for several years. Students need
to be more aware of their rights and
exercise them to hold the SGA ac-
countable for its actions.
This has become an important is-
sue now especially in light of
Monday's meeting of the Student
Welfare Committee. While the
committee holds that the sponsors
of the Cultural Center resolution
understood what language prob-
lems they had with the measure, the
sponsors claim they were never told
specifically what the problems
were.
Had the sponsors been allowed to
be present during the debate and
vote, they would fully understand
the problems with the resolution
and may have been able to reword it
and re-submit it for approval. As it
stands, the actions of the committee
have the appearance of being more
narrow-minded than they might
have been.
Records should be kept of commit-
tee votes, and student legislators
should be held accountable for their
speech and actions. In order for that
to happen, students need to recog-
nize and exercise their rights as citi-
zens and members of the university
community.
The open meetings policy needs to
be implemented, made a part of the
SGA Constitution, and followed to
the letter in the future.
Committee chair responds to editorial
Reviva
The ECU Christian Fellowship,
Singleton, is a well-established,
God-fearing group of young pe
love the l.ord with all their heai
soul, but who also live sacrificial
God's glory.
Their purpose is to preach Jesul
dedication, and responsiveness t
; often leads them to iacc hard rxj
L will proudly say - with teary eyi
endure for a night, but joy come
Joy is given to us by God. It lias I
ontinual giving, and that dema
ness, and ultimately a death to se
Jhan that new life which we find �
of sin. It is in Christ and thn
mystery of joy is made equivale
tery of the resurrection
J Cont
To the editor:
In light of last issue's article, edito-
rial, and cartoon concerning the reso-
lution on the rebuilding of the Le-
donia S. Wright Afro-American Cul-
tural Center, I feel that I must clarify a
few issues:
First, the resolution in its modified
form read a bit differently than re-
ported: "Whereas: The present Afro-
American Cultural Center is inade-
quate; and Whereas: The present
Afro-American Cultural Center is not
representativp of what its name indi-
cates; and Whereas: The East Carolina
University is in the process of campus
beautification; Be it therefore re-
solved: That the Student Government
Association of East Carolina Univer-
sity supports the university's efforts
in transforming the Ledonia S.
Wright Afro-American Cultural Cen-
ter
Second, yes, there were indeed
problems with the wording of the
resolution itself � even in its modi-
fied form. The resolution called for no
renovation of the present "Afro-
American Cultural Center" into "a
true cultural center It instead called
vaguely for "transformations for
"rebuilding As presented to the
committee, the author and colleagues
hoped for support in transforming
today's center into a place to display
ECU students' diverse minority heri-
tage. The resolution itself, however,
called for no such conversions: It
mentioned solely the "Afro-Ameri-
can students not all minority stu-
dents which include Hispanics, Ar-
abics, Orientals (to name a few) as
well as the Afro-Americans.
Third, the matter at hand seemed to
be a priority type thing � not top-
priority, however. The majority of the
committee members, indeed "repre-
senting all of the students on cam-
pus felt that their support was
needed elsewhere first on an issue
where money is involved (university
funds, not SGA funds). Funding for
this center might take money needed
for campus-wide renovations that
would affect all students, not just
minorities. Such a project, among
others, is the renovation of campus
parking. The committee as a whole
never totally opposed the resolution.
Fourth, the presenters � author
and colleague �of the resolution
were present at the committee meet-
ing and were made aware of the dis-
crepancies in the resolution. When
asked what amendments they
wanted to make, they made but one: a
choice. When asked if they wished to
postpone voting on the resolution for
a week, they again made a choice �
not to wait.
Fifth, the rapport maintained in the
committee meeting was one of a very
friendly nature. Yes, heated discus-
sion permeated the room, but no
negative signs of debate ever tran-
scended: I refer, as last issue's cartoon
did, to prejudice. By no meansdidany
commi t tee member or presenter seem
out-to-get his so-called opponent.
The issue was never made and still is
not considered a true racial issue. It
was simply a matter of intent. A fair
and open-minded debate took place.
The outcome simply happened to be
"unfavorable" � as suggested by the
resolution's being placed on the unfa-
vorable calendar.
In conclusion, I might suggest that
next time anyone � reporter, legisla-
tor, or other interested party-desires
to create such a spread on an issue
that he make himself available at the
committee meeting as well as at the
SGA meeting in order that he will be
aware of and then tell the full story.
Kelly Jones
Chairman
Student Welfare Committee
Editor's note: In order to present a fair
and balanced editorial page, the editons
board makes every attempt to contactd
the people involved in a given issue. As
students, it would be impossible tor us
attend every organizational meeting on
campus. The East Carolinian does havei
representative at the SGA meetings, ant
he is responsible for relaying to the stofl
what goes on there.
Jones was contacted Monday by Tht
East Carolinian, as was Linwoo
Carlton, the sponsor of the resolution in
question, in order to get both sides of the
issue. A copy of the bill, which was
printed verbatim in the editorial in ques-
tion, was read to Jones who agreed that if
was what the committee voted on. Carlton
gave us that copy of the resolution.
In addition, Carlton and other support-
ers of the resolution have told The Ex
Carolinian that no one on the Stuirt
Welfare committee told them the ad
proolem with the resolution's langnx
until after it was reported by The Ed
Carolinian.
Student feels cartoon incites racist emotions
To the editor:
I would personally like to tell all
people that are directly involved with
the publication of The East Carolinian
that you have reached a verv low
point in printing Barbour's editorial
cartoon Tuesday. To depict the Stu-
dent Welfare Committee as members
of the KKK and the Cultural Center
Rebuilding Bill as a hung black, is a
direct "spit in the face" to all the stu-
dents of ECU.
The Student Welfare Committee
has taken a bold and intelligent step to
promote the rich heritage of all mi-
norities at ECU. This low point in
decision making by training journal-
ist professionals shows their igno-
rance and immature views of racism.
Each day there are steps made to
improve race relations in this country,
but it is racist overtones that make
those important steps of progress�
meaningless. As editors, don't join
that group that promotes meaning-
less progress.
So editors and illustrator Barbour,
what's next? A Lynching!
Michael Ward
Freshman
Political Science
Bonehead bad
To the editor:
An an English major, I loathe to
bastardize a fellow writer, but I admit
that I have had quite enough. In the
past, I have quietly put up with
Chippy Bonehead's article. Usually,
after reading Chippy's article of the
day, I calmly put the paper down and
think to myself, "O.K the next time I
read this paper, Chippy is going to
come up with something both tasteful
and humourous More issues are
printed. I give him some slack and
again, I think, "Maybe next time
This routine went on, and on, and on.
Until finally, today, I read a word that
was so utterly tasteless, I felt com-
pelled to voice my opinion. May I
refresh your memory on that particu-
lar word? Cream.
Chipper, Chipper, Chipper - please
acquire some tact, my friend.
Granted, most people enjoy your ar-
ticle and I do too, sometimes. Your
word choice is extremely unbecom-
ing of the profession from which you
hail. I know your persona is supposed
to come off as "radical and cool but
your word choice is oh, so "uncool It
seems the more "cool" you feel you
are, the more "uncool" you actually
become.
By no means am I asking for the
abolition of your article. I just want
you to realize that if you desire to
establish a name for yourself, you
can't employ these repulsive little
words.
Paige Hales
Senior
English
Black history
To the editor:
February is designated as Black
History Month. This is a time set aside
to celebrate and give tribute to black
history.
I encourage everyone, especially
black students, to start this month and
continue throughout learning more
about African-Americans.
For the black students, in studying
your history you will be able to un-
derstand yourself and your true self.
Your true self being your African self
and your American self. In better
understanding yourself, you will be
able to understand the society in
which you live. This will allow you to
reach your full potential as an Afri-
can, an American and a human being.
To those students who feel they are
not of African descent in studying
African-American history you will
have made a step toward harmony
between you and the entire commu-
nity. You will be developing as a full
individual.
I challenge students to not just
study Martin Luther King, � though
a great man. Learn about some of
those African American sisters and
brothers not often mentioned �
Emmitt Till, Mose Wright, W.E.B.
Dubois, Charles Drew, Marcus
Garuey, Madame C.J. Walker.
Not only look at those in the past
but educate yourselves and others
about those of today � Dr. Benjamin
Chavis, Dr. Mae C. Jemison, John H.
Johnson, Nelson Mandela and Win-
nie Mandela.
Students, as you enter Joyner Li-
brary remember, a "man without his
history is like a tree without roots
Valeria Lassiter
Student
Sommers responds
To the editor:
In response to Stephen Cooper, I
would like to first say that I'm glad
that students are taking notice of the
important issues we are debating in
the SGA.
Stephen, your point about the
poppy seeds, if true, is a great point.
In fact, it is the kind of point that needs
to be raised. What I'm saying is if you
want to take a position, fine. If you can
change my opinion by having a better
and more thought out opposing posi-
tion, great! I'm ready to be convinced.
However, do not label my current
convictions by stigmatizing them lib-
eral orconservative or whatever. This
type of debate is by definition name
calling and thus shallow.
Take this pointer Stephen and con-
tinue to take positions. But this name
calling only makes you look foolish.
Steve Sommers
SGA Day Rep
Contra vote right
To the editor:
In letter to the editor last week,
Justin Sturz boldly proclaimed that
the House of Representatives' deci-
sion to cut off contra aid was "Proba-
bly the most incredibly ignorant and
tragic decision of this decade
I found this statement not only to be
impulsive and inappropriate but
completely inaccurate as well.
I won't pretend to believe that our
Congress hasn't made any bad deci-
sions over the years. Even our Con-
gress, one of the greatest and most
distinctive institutions in the world, is
prone to bad decisions. However, I
wasn't aware that any of their deci-
sions, even the bad ones, were "in-
credibly ignorant They do represent
we the people, so what does that
make us?
The more I think about Sturz's
comment on our "ignorant" congress,
the more I think of how incredible
oblivious to the whole situation Sturz
must be.
I must admit that in the past I have
supported giving aid to the Contras.
Evidently I was in the majority be-
cause Congress has voted in favor of
sending money to the Contras. What
I was opposed to was the manner in
which it was done.
Sometimes other impulsive Ameri-
cans have thought the best way to get
money to the Contras was by dealing
arms to terrorists? or was that the
Iranians? or are those two actually
one in the same? By the way, who did
get that money? Its taken more than
Sherlock Holmes and Watson to fig-
ure that one out.
Needless to say, the aid essentially
did serve its original purpose because
it forced the Sandanistas to the bar-
gaining table, which was, as I under-
stand, our original goal. Our job is
done, at least temporarily, so lets back
out before we box ourselves in.
Finally, I would like to address
Sturz's comment about the many
"useful idiots" on this campus. Once
again another unfortunate and erro-
neous comment has been made.
Sounds to me as though he's from the
same mold as the well-known narrow
minded Pat Robertson. I thought all
of those prople went to Oral Roberts
University or something. In the fu-
ture, Sturz, try not to overindulge
yourself in criticism of this fine uni-
versity which I have grown to admire
and appreciate.
C
A
M
P
U
S
Clay Walker
Senior
English
F
O
R
U
M
To the editor
Tmu' will prove that Congress
decision to cut off military a
.the Contras was a tragic mis!
Roger Miranda, the Sandii I
leader who defected not long
; has made some startling n
; -lions that are really a metaphor
! -cal slap-in-the-face to liberal j
others who are anti-Contra, pr
Sandinista.
Miranda has revealed and th
Sandinistas have confirmed th�
! they � Surprise � have n
j intention of complying with th
Anas Peace Plan Soviet an
Cuban advisers have told th
Sandinistas that they can b
j deceive the U.S. (that Is, liberal!
and certain others in the U.Sthc
never fooled conservatives) b
j cooling the rhetoric about build
i ing a Marxist state and talking
j instead, of "democracy "plura
! ism and "reform And i
course, the liberals have swal
lowed their lies hook, line, anc
sinker.
Miranda and conservative
how can the Sandinistas, rev:
thinking oi peace when at th
j same time in the back of then
� minds they're thinking about crej
I a ting the most powerful arrnv i
I Latin America (600,GQG) �rtvrmj
!ltfvatijr�uEnert t ha tontvnn
Mbsr armies irr Latm ATMi-icl
S have?
We're npt talking about caj
1 guns and water pistols. We
; talking about self-propelled a:
i.ierv, MiG-21 high-performand
! aircraft, new 400-ton ships for thj
I navy, additional Mi-25 Hind-
helicopterss, Mi-17 Hip heli j
ters, armored personnel carrier
� self-propelled howitzers, AK-4"
anti-tank weapons, and surface
; to air missiles. Tine Sandin
don't plan to export bananas: thel
t plan to export communist revoh
! tion! This is what they have a
mitted and this is reality, my hi
S oral friends, When will you wak
! up?
Either we support the Contra
now before it's too late, or we
have to send our own troop
down to Central America. Whj
j will it be1
Michael David Madid
FreshmaJ
Political Sciend
Yxfre
C4!
Ill
philosophical
ramifications of
Victor FrankTs
"Existential
Vacuum?
� And you re
still smoking:
s l)pjrtm-nl �" Hralth A. Human S�vk
RACK
BRANDE1
Greenville Buyer's
Memorial Drive
Open Mi
Sunday
�� mmmmaMiiup
�m
tm � i n i �
4ff W:Jjrf�'�"
Mi�)���� �n� imtr��-





editorial
n. I might suggest that
inyone reporter, legisla-
cr interested party-desires
h a spread on an issue
nake himself available at the
meeting as well as at the
neeting in order that he will be
and then tell the full story.
Kelly Jones
Chairman
dent Welfare Committee
� :cr to present a fair
rial ige the editorial
: mai s � mpt to contact all
fiven issue. As
� ssible tor us to
� nal meeting on
he East :un does have a
the SGA meetings, and
ng to the staff
here
i Monday by The
.t Carolinian, as was Linwood
sp nsor of the resolution in
n in order to get both sides of the
A : r of the bill, which was
nted verbatim in the editorial in ques
05 read is fonts sho agreed that it
tedon.Carlton
t us thai c tpy the resolution.
aril mand other support-
ion have told The East
man that no one on the Student
them the exact
the resolution's language
it was reported by The East
tions
I would like to address
comment about tne many
il idiots" on this campus. Once
another unfortunate and erro-
comment has been made.
Is to me as though he's from the
jmold as the well-known narrow
ed Pat Robertson. I thought all
se prople went to Oral Roberts
arsiry or something. In the fu-
Sturz, try not to overindulge
Slf in criticism of this fine uni-
y which I have grown to admire
?preaate.
Clav Walker
J
Senior
English
F
O
R
U
M
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 18,1988 5
Revival service features charismatic speakers
WlofnnUic h,riSl11in F?u,W!hT' by J0SCPh J�y is a rcality oi spirit. It shares in the spirits' of Jesus: there is teaching, preaching, singing, praise, The guest evaneelist for Saturdav niahi will h�
rJSV.lteWished, forward-moving, immortality and yet it provides a source of strength laughter, celebration. When they come together it's J - "
od-tcanng group of young people who not only to the mortal. Because it is able to transcend even the
love the Lord with all their heart, mind, body and most tryings of suffering (problems, trials, tribula-
soul, but who also live sacrificial lives � daily � for tions, death) they cannot extinguish its' illuminating
God'sglory. flamc. &
Their purpose is to preach Jesus. Their committal,
Elder Norbert Simmons from Goldsboro. The guest
like new-found love: They exalt one another, they evangelist for Sunday morning will be Minister
share each others burdens, they love each other with Maugn Roundtree of Wilson. This one nieht revival
the love of' has been sir-named Joy Night and what a joyous
However, the fellowship is only one of several
Christian organizations on campus, yet all of these
ieve
occasion it will be: singing, praying, preaching,
praises
3 Joy is given to us by God. It has to be awakened by
. continual giving, and that demands self-forgetful-
riess, and ultimately a death to self. It is nothing less
Jhan that new life which we find in losing the old life
7 of sin. It is in Christ and through him that the
mystery of joy is made equivalent even to the mys-
tery of the resurrection.
enjoying the very presence of Christ upon hisher
individual life. He (Christ) seems to have given each
of them �in a very unique way � a sense of control,
a sense of purpose, a sense of direction and they are
like candles that sit upon hills. They cannot be hid-
den.
Every Thursday night at 6:00 p.m. at the Ledonia
Wright Cultural Center they meet to lift up the name
FOCUS
By
Steven Pierce
Contra decision wrong
We are walking by faith � and because of that
faith � we arc believing that God will do nothing
less than He has already promised to do through His ��
word. Acting upon that faith, we have put together All are invited to come and be a part as we share
one night campus revival (Saturday, 7 p.m. Jenkins together in this Holy Ghost-filled service. It is sure to
Auditorium) followed up by a Sunday morning be a blessing and a night to remember,
campus service (10:30 a.m.). If you don't have joy, you can leap for it, but
remember that the measure of your intimacy with
Christ is exactly the measure of your joy. A life of
serving God is pure joy because God is joy and in
giving yourself to God, you are giving yourself to
joy. Come and be ye filled
To the editor
per year 1977-1981), homcless-
w!mC UiU1 pr.�VCiK Con�ross' Conservative attack dramatiafiy during the
decision to cut ott military aid to vvll,a'1 ?�"? v auaa

(the Contras was a tragic mistake.
Roger Miranda, the Sandinista
.leader who defected not long ago,
�has made some startling revela-
tions that arc really a metaphori-
cal slap-in-the-face to liberals and
others who are anti-Contra, pro-
Sandinista.
Miranda has revealed and the
-Sandinistas have confirmed that
Surprise � have no
same period. More important, the
To the editor: Reagan housing cuts had
Mary Elizabeth Davis' Jan. 28 absolutely no effect on the basic
otter, "liberal responds was full trend in public housing construc-
of misconceptions and un-
founded allegations concerning
the conservative agenda.
I would like to respond to one
particular statement she made.
She assserts that there are "over
three million homeless people in
the United States She goes on to
j intention ot complying with the imply that conservatives are not
Anas Peace Plan. Soviet and willing to do anything about the
C uban advisers have told the
Sandinistas that they can better
deceive the U.S. (that is, liberals
and eertai n others in the U.S they
never fooled conservatives) by-
cooling the rhetoric about build-
ing a Marxist state and talking,
instead, of "democracy "plural-
ism and "reform And, of
course, the liberals have swal-
lowed their lies hook, line, and
sinker.
Miranda and conservatives ask,
how can the Sandinistas really be
thinking of peace when at the
same time in the back of their
minds they're thinking about cre-
ating the most powerful army in
illing to do anything
situation.
Now Davis calls herself "An-
other Bleeding Heart Liberal
tion as far as new units being
completed until 1985.
Indeed, in the first four years of
the Reagan Administration (1981-
4), the government completed
111,195 new housing units � a
stunning 170 increase over the
first four years of the Carter
Administration (1977-1980) when
3nly 41,198 were completed.
While this sudden 1980s explo-
sion in new units was enacted
under Carter, no one can say "a
helping that tiny number. But we
wish that liberals would quit dra-
matically exaggerating the situ-
ation in a pitiful attempt to make
us look like we don't care, when
we do.
Stephen Cooper
Sophomore
Political Science
Democrat 1 don't question her shortage of public housing
sincere desire to help the home-
less and poverty stricken of this
country. However, it is important
to note that the liberal Democrat
"war on poverty" has been a total,
glaring failure. The welfare sys-
tem, as set up by liberal Demo-
crats, has not only not alleviated
poverty in this country: it has in
fact created even more poverty
However, the purpose of this
letter is not to the examine the
'auses of the failures of the liberal
'war on poverty it is to show
Latin America (bcXXOOtj ah-armviowBa"ws' assertion fcat there
arev�three million . homeVess
j withimarreument thata&raxjauhe
j iHher am-ries irt Latwr-Ajfiferlca ��
have?
We're npt talking about cap
I guns and water pistols. We're
s talking about self-propelled ail-
l.fery, MiG-21 high-performance
i aircraft, new 400-ton ships for the
I navy, additional Mi-25 Hind-D
helicopterss, Mi-17 Hip helicop-
ters, armored personnel carriers,
self-propelled howitzers, AK-47s,
anti-tank weapons, and surface-
to air missiles. The Sandinistas
don't plan to export bananas: thev
plan to export communist revolu-
; tion! This is what they have ad-
mittcd and this is reality, my lib-
oral friends, When will you wake
I UP?
Either we support the Contras
I now before it's too late, or we'll
I have to send our own troops
! down to Central America. What
J will it be?
Michael David Hadley
Freshman
Political Science
Y)ifre
astute end
Amerfcsns is mcoffecr �"
First of all, I've never heard the
figure "three million" before. The
general claim made by liberals is
that there are two million.
Furthermore, a new Depart-
ment of Agriculture study con-
firms that there are only 300,000
homeless Americans in the U.S
caused the sudden rise in "home-
lessness Particularly when, in
the four years that the liberal
hyped this problem the hardest
(1982-5), we were completing
new housing units at an annual
rate of 24,450, nearly 2.4 times the
10,300-a-year rate during the Car-
ter years. And even though future
new construction has been re-
duced by Reagan, the total num-
ber of people receiving direct rent
subsidies has risen from less than
4 million in 1981 to over 6 million
now. Even though the rate of
growth of housing spending has
slowed, total housing assistance
has still risen 46 in constant
dollars since 1981, an average of
6.4 per year � far faster than the
economy as a whole.
So blaming Regan (i.e. conser-
vatives) for the sudden rise in
homelessness is not merely base-
less, it's a mean-spirited attempt
TAXPAYERS
with dependents
HERE'S A TAX TIP:
Beginning with your 1987 income
tax return that you will file in
1988, you generally must list social
security numbers tor dependents
who are at least five years old by
the end of 1987. If any of your
dependents do not have this
number, get an application form
today from the Social Security
office in vour area.
iMi4ii�
ONLY 60 SEMESTER
CREDIT HOURS
NEEDED FOR OCS.
If you have 60 accredited semester hours, and can achieve a
high score in a special aptitude test, you could be just 22 weeks
from earning the gold bars of a second lieutenant in the Army
Reserve. And ready to take on your first Reserve leadership assign-
ment.
Quality, and you'll attend an 8-week Basic Training Course,
then goon to a 14-week Officer Candidate School (OCS) which
will challenge you both mentally and physically. When you gradu-
ate, you'll receive your commission as an officer in the Army
Reserve, and continue training in a branch Officer Basic Course.
Then you'll return home to serve in a nearby Reserve unit�usually
one weekend a month and two weeks annual training.
It's a great opportunity to gain the skills and begin the practice
ot the kind ot leadership and management prized so highly by civil-
ian employers.
You need nor have completed vour degree, just have bC semes-
ter hours and a lot of ability and confidence, to quality.
It you're interested in OCS, call:
SFC Munroe or SSG Hamilton
756-9695
ARMY RESERVE.
BEALLYOUCANBE.
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
-� CLIP THIS COUPON
georges
hair designers
Pale isn't your color.
Klafsun Suntanning Beds
less than t wo-tcn ths"of' fpcrcen t exploit reaTpain anTsuf ferirTg J'�l" Tamrdnys -1LH? 2J:2PJ TOJJrOOPM
Get An Early Start On
Your Spring Break Tan.
10 Visits Regularly $40
NOW ONLY $35.00
This Special Expires 2-29-88
of the nation
Of all the liberal attacks on
Reagan, none has been more ri-
diculous than the claim that Re-
agan suddenly drove tens of thou-
sands out of their homes into the
streets and the backs of cars for
shelter becase of a "massive cut-
back" in the housing budget.
You see, what liberals won't
admit is that, despite the spiral of
public housing construction dur-
ing Carter's term (average of 18
for political purposes.
Finally, surveys show that only
a small fracton of the homeless
today are in that condition for
economic reasons. The vast ma-
jority (90t) are homeless either
because of the tragic devastation
of drug and alcohol addiction, or
because they have been driven
out of mental institutions.
Less than two-tenths of 1 per-
cent of Americans are homeless.
Sure, we conservatives are for
SKI INTO SPRING WITH GREAT
SAVINGS
�o
iBwnsii
philosophical
ramilications of
Victor Frankls
"Existential
Vacuum?
� And youre
still smoking?
I s Dt-piilme nl �t Helllh & Humjn Siiv n i
wrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr'wiw
:��:��:�:���:��:�:�:���:�.���������
SPRINGTIME IN LONDON
10 Days & Nights in England
Depart: 6:25 p.m. Mon May 9
from RaleighDurham airport
Return: 7:35 p.m. Fri May 20
to RaleighDurham airport
Transportation: Delta Airlines
Hotel: Ladbroke Hotel, Hyde Park, London
Price per person: $1200 for Dbl. occupancy
EgaiUiiifi; March 1. 1988
for more info;
Call Mendenhall Student Center (757-6611)
mmmm
RACK ROOM SHOES,
j BRANDED SHOES
I Greenville Buyer's Market
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
�All Nordica & Salomon Boots 20 Off
�All Skis & Poles At Great Savings!
�Ski Packages As Low As v299�95
(Skis, Boots. Bindings & Poles)
�All Men's & Ladies' Ski Wear 20-50 Off
(includes coats, jackets, pants, bibs, & sweaters)
�Sky R Turtlenecks V 1 � 95 (wMe quantities last)
�Wool Rich Men's & Ladies 40 Off
�Men's After-Ski Boots As Low As s29.95
�Ladies' After-Ski Boots 20-50 Off
We Are A Complete Certified Ski Repair Shop
Gordon's Golf
Memorial Drive
I
I
I
Open MonS
Sunday 1-6
10 off
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(EXCEPT AIGNER. NIKE AND REEBOK)
& Ski Shop
200 E. Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, NC
I Hours: 10-6 Mon, - Thurs
10-7 Fri 9-6 Sat Also by Appt 756-1003
� at ���i iiN i�i � m �
a,� ia �,�ni �fcn�Mi�.p� -ii m





4
6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 18,1988
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
BRODrS FOR MEN is searching for
part-time sales associates. Enthusiastic
individuals who enjoy fashion and have a
flexible school sechedule should apply in
person, Brody's, Carolina East Mall, M-
W, 2-4 p.m.
ARE YOU A COLLEGE STUDENT in
need of spending money? Brody's is ac-
cepting applications for part-time sales
associates who can work flexible hours.
Positions available in the jewelryjuniors
department. Apply in persoi Brody's,
Carolina East Mall, M-YV. 2-4 p.m.
RESIDENT COUNSELOR, interested in
those with human service background
wishing to gain valuable experience in
the field. No monetary compensation,
however room, utilities and phone pro-
vided. Call Marv Smith, The REAL Crisis
Center, 758-HELP.
ASSISTANT MANAGER-We are look
ing for an outgoing, dependable person
for a full-time assistant manager's posi-
tion. Must be able to lift heavy furniture.
Apply in person, M-F, 10 a.m5 p.m. at
Galleria, The Plaza. Absolutely NO
phone calls.
SUMMER CAMP Counselors-men and
women; generalists and specialists: Two
overnight 8 week camps in New York's
Adirondack Mountains have openings
for tennis, waterfront (WS1, ALS, sailing,
skiing, small crafts), all team sports,
gymnastics, artscrafts, pioneering,
music, photography, drama, dance, and
nurses who love fun and children. Write
to: Professor Robert S. Gersten, Brant
Lake Camp, 84 Leamington Street, Lido
Beach, NY, 11561.
CAPE HATTER AS, N.C. . . Summer
help needed at Emily's Soundside Resta-
ruant. Available positions for busers,
waiters, waitresses and kitchen help. Will
train! To start May 15th thru August 20th.
Housing available! Call 919-987-2383
(collect).
PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANT in
exchange for free room and board in a
nice 2 bedroom, 2 bath house. Will need 3
12-4 hours work per day, 7days a week.
Located 12 miles outside of town. Call Jov
-Foster at 746-2588, 746-3513 or 758-2399.
FOUR STAR
PIZZA
� �
DELIVERY
PERSONNEL
NEEDED
REQUIREMENTS:
Must be at least 18.
Must have own car. a valid
driver's license &
insurance.
Must have clean, neat appear-
ance.
WAGEWS:
Our drivers average S6 to $10
per hour with salary, tips &
cash commission (paid daily.)
BENEFITS:
Paid vacation.
Promotion from within.
APPLY IN PERSON
FOUR STAR PIZZA
114 E. 10th Greenville, NC
CABIN COUNSELORS and instructors
(male and female) for Western North
Carolina 8 week children's camp. Over 30
activities including Water Ski, Tennis,
1 leated swimming pool, Go-karts, 1 lik-
ing. Art . . . Room, meals, salary and
travel. Experience not necessary. Non-
smoking students write for application
brochure: Camp Pinewood, 20205 N. E. 3
Court, Miami. Florida, 33179.
HELP WANTED: Part-time interior de-
sign student-send resume to: Designer,
3010 East 10th Street, Greenville, N.C
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING SERVICES: Experienced, Pro-
fessional Service includes proofreading,
spelling and grammatical corrections
and low rates . call after 5:30 p.m. 355-
2090.
HAVING A PARTY and need a deejay?
I charge $100.00 per party with no time
limit on the music. Call 752-4251.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
N.C, 753-3694.
MID WINTER BOP: The original is still
here. Old wax. New wax. The TRASH-
MAN DJ Service. Approved by thou-
sands. Discover it. Bashes, formals, mix-
ers, socials, etcdial 752-3587 anytime.
Many thanx.
CLASS ACT Limousines: Don't drink
and drive Party in style Call: 757-3240.
ATTENTION DJ NEEDERS: Want to
feel the music, instead of just hearing it?
Want to dance fast, slow, hard, dirty?
Want reliable, punctual, and professional
service? Call Sound Mixtures, 752-4916
and ask for Bob.
FOR SALE
SPRING BREAK T SHIRTS: If you
thought the Halloween shirts were hot,
wait until you see the Spring Break '88 t's.
Get them while thev last. Call Phil or Troll
at 830-1447 or 757-1007.
TROLLS TUX AND TEES: Don't pay
high prices for your formal wear, try
Troll's Tux and Tees for your formal
needs. Traditional and designer models.
Special fraternity rates. Call 757-1007 or
830-1447.
BUY 14k gold bracelets and necklaces at
wholesale prices; buy from a direct dealer
at 752-4589, David Dupree, and skip the
jewelers high prices.
AMINO ACIDS: Are you working out
hard? Then your body needs amino acid
supplements. Ultimate nutrition brand
amino acids, 1600 mgs. Cheapest price
ever, $18.00 per bottle, 2for S34.00. Call
Steve at 758-9644.
CAN YOU BUY jeeps, cars, 4 x 4's seized
in drug raids for under $100.00? Call for
facts today. 602-837-3401 ext. 711.
FOR SALE: Classical glass surfboard, 5 ft.
8 in. Custom made, extra light weight,
three colors, with leash and collar, good
condition. $150.00, Call 758-6998.
TRAILOR FOR SALE: Two bedroom,
one bath, $2,900.00. Call 758-3228.
1986 HONDA INTERCEPTOR VF500F:
Last year for this model, like new. Meticu-
lously maintained, original owner. Only
8300 miles. Oil changed every 2,000
miles. I lelmet and brand new 1 londa
cover included. $2995.00 Call Bruce at
752-2008.
Spring Break
1988
Dive PenneKamp
in Key Largo, Fla.
$425.00
For information &
Registration call the
Rum Runner
Dive Shop
758-1444
ONE OR TWO roommates needed to
share townhousc in Wildwood Villas.
Call Julie at 752-4781.
HOUSE FOR RENT: 3rd and Eastern
street, close to campus. $250.00 a month.
Available immediately. Please call 355-
6193 and ask for Melissa.
TOWNHOUSE APARTMENT for rent
No security deposit. Fully carpeted.
Central heat and air. Call 757 6423 days,
919-975-2481 evenings (call collect).
NEED A ROOMMATE to share a two
bedroom apartment very very close to
campus. $165.00month (utilities in-
cluded) Call 830-5131 after 9:00 p.m.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Large, 3 bed
room house located 2 blocks from cam-
pus. $150.00 per month plus 13 utilities.
Non-smoker. Call 758-7245, leave mes-
sage.
3101 E. 10th Street
Rivergate Shopping Center
757-0207
3 Month Sun Capsule
Membership $100.00
(limited to 20 people)
2 Month Solo Firm
Toning Bed Membership
$100.00
(limited to J 0 people)
20 Visits to Sun Capsule
$45.00
20 Visits to Toning Bed
$50.00
First come. First Served
so call Today!
FOR RENT
A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Strict
�Ux ated Near ECU
�Near Mjor Shopping Centers
�Across From highway Iitrol Station
Umtted Oder - $275 a month
Contact J T. or Tommy Williams
756-7S15 or h:0- 1937
Office oj.cn - Apt 8. 12 - 5:30 p m.
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartments, enerjy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers. r-vrrs. cable IV.
Couples or singles only SI95 a month. 6
month lease. MOBILE HOME RENTALS �
couples or singles. Apartment and mobile
homes In Azalea Gardens near Hrook Valley
County Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
PERSONALS
Permanent Wave Special
$28.95
Good Through Feb. 29 uMh coupon
Ask for Rhonda Dale
or Verna Shirley.
757-0207
R1NGGOLD TOWERS: Apartments for
rent. Furnished. Contact Hollie Si-
monowich at 752-2865. NOTICE:
"Whole semester free" mentioned in
previous ad did not apply to Ringgold
Towers!
INTERESTED IN living off campus
during the summer? Need responsible,
female roommate, 12 rent, 12 utilities,
free deposit! If interested, call 756-3690,
please call back if no answer.
ROOM FOR RENT: Male, female, non-
smoker would like to share large house 1
12 blocks from campus. Washerdryer.
Fully furnished. Single roomdouble
room. If you would like to see the house,
please call Ronnie at 757-0202leave mes-
sage.
SHARRONN, Hey you big Love God-
dess, that jacu.zi is looking better and
better every day. This weekend at Top
"Sail" Beach definitely will be our best
one, YET! Submitively Yours, James.
DR. BETSY HARPER: congratulations!
we never thought you could do it. Your
old office is empty and your i ?w office is
clean. Enjoy the rest of the semester �
your favorite students.
J.M.P.K Just a little note to let you know,
that my love for you will continue to
grow. The past two years have been really
great, and 1 must say-you make the per-
&& feet mate! Dinner at Chico's tonite!
Happy Anniversary! All my love
j Greenie.
WANDA, you are the joy of mv life. I lope
we can be together soon because 1 LOVE
YOU Lenny.
RAFTERS: Tuesday night is rock 'n roll
night, free admission, S.25 draft.
JOHN, 11APPY BELATED B1RT11DAY! I
LOVE YOU! LOOKING FORWARD TO
CRAVEN CO. ANN.
SAE HAPPY HOUR at the Dbo. Friday
from 4-7. $2.00 Teas-why drive anywhere
else?
MICHELLE DARK: Happy Birthday to
someone who deserves the absolute best!
You are a great sister and friend! Love in
DZ and me, Kathie. P.S Thanks for all
your scheming! really hope it pays off
SIG EPS AND THEIR COCKTAIL
DATES � take your vitamins, get some
sleep, eat your Wheaties, and drink some
milk.
K.B. Happy Anniversary! You are the
greatest S.C.
THE NEW DELI is the place to jam! Catch
the sounds of SOUL TRAIN with UV
PROM Friday, and flat out jam to
KNOCKED OUT LOADED Saturday.
Don't forget about open mike nights on
Tuesdays and "Dead" nights Wednes-
days.
"WHAT'S YOUR NAME"? If you had
your group photo made for the Bucca-
neer you need to send us a list of all
current members names and the group
name ASAP! Thanks!
HARD ROCK fans unite! Come sec
Roulette, a band in the Van HalenBon
JoviDokken vein, live at Susie's Tree-
house, Tuesday, February 23 at 9:30.
Come hoist a few and rock with party
band, Roulette.
LISA MARIE, even Gary I Iart got a sec-
ond chance! I don't want any "monkey
business I only want some time with
you! JPA.
PICA'S: Celebrating early made this
Valentines a special one, the superlatives
that were given added to the fun. Truth or
fieiton, lots of people were surprised,
guilt could be seen in everyone's eyes. We
had a great time and hope ya'll did too,
next semester should be even better-we
look forward to partying with you Love,
the Sigmas.
PI KAPPA ALPHA INTRAMURAL
FELLAS: Keep up the good work fellas,
your doin' us proud. . . . The Brothers of
the daddy frat, PIKA.
PIKA PLEDGES: Yo Etas The weekend
is coming hope ya'll packed some clean
drawers and tube socks. Big Brother is
watchin.
HEY BUTCH AND BUBBS: Thanks so
much for the yummy dinner. . . great
friends, great food, what more could we
ask for? We love ya'll! The Matails.
ADTT AND AZD: Thanks for the giggin
stranger mixers, we had a blast. Your Pika
dates.
SANDY-grab your pail and shovel, The
Band of Oz is finally returning to the Attic
this Friday.
TO THE Valentine Dates of the ADTTs,
Friday night was a blast, because of you
guvs we had fun with our strangers til the
end of the night, we must admit our
"Valentines" were out of sight! Love, the
ADTTs.
GUYS � thanks so much for the "con-
cern I'm feeling much better, but still
can't make it to the phone Dr. Jones,
your prescription really helped in my
speedy recovery! Love, Paige.
WEDNESDAY-Ladies Night at Rafters.
Ladies admitted in free from 830-10:30.
SI.00 wine coolers, $.25 draft.
TKE
Ringgirl
Competition
March 3
at the Attic.
For More
Information
Call 758-7144
Prizes awarded for
1st, 2nd & 3rd place.
Announcements
TO THE NEW SISTERS of Alpha Delta
Pi. . . Mary Kay Beck, Pam Berry, Kris
Boone, Gwyn Branch, Kim Cauthen,
Lorie Conger, Laura Connolly, Julie
Crawford, Nell Van Den Dungen, Connie
Glover, Liz Grant, Yohanne Hancock,
Dorothy Harris, Paige Houser, Andi
I luff, Adrienne Jackson, Megan Keane,
Beth Lamm, Cahterine Lee, Tara
McClure, Kelly Morton, Jenny Naujoks,
Amy Pope, Becki Powers, Jill Shallcross,
Sonia Turner, Cara Vallas Congratu-
lations. . we knew you could do it We
love you, your sisters.
SIG EPS HEADING TO MYRTLE
BEACH: Fact one: Willie has no date �
so don't let him near yours. Fact two: if
your date gets sick � she will be verbally
abused and left in Myrtle Beach Fact
three: if you snake my date � I'll borrow
I Jester's snake and beat you to death Fact
four: let's all GED off � and drive v)ber
Lally.
WITH CHAMPAGNE AND BUBBLE
BATH � strawberries and whipped
cream; the Sig Eps head to Myrtle Beach
� could this be obscene7 Rum, vodka,
bourbon aplenty; if you need protection
� Morgan has many Rumple Mmtc
and schnapps, b-hits abound; better
watch your date if Z's around 1 lave a safe
trip � don't drink and drive; your family
will be happy if you arrive alive
ALL GONG SHOW PARTICIPANTS
�you must have a description and the
number of people in your act bv Mon-
day. Practice, practice, practice.
KRISSYAND SHARI � be ready for an
awsome weekend James and Mike
MKG � measure what7?? Good luck
interviewing. "The fast man "
CATHERINE STOREY � What s haP
pening.
ROOM ASSIGNMENTS
Students enrolled Spring Semester
1988 who plan to return to East Carolina
University FaU Semester 1988 and who
wish to be guaranteed residence hall
housing will be required to reserve rooms
during the week of Feb. 22-26. Prior to
reserving a room, a student must make an
advance room payment of $60. These
payments, which must be accompanied
by housing applicationscontracts will
be accepted in the Cashier's Office begin-
ning Feb. 18th. Applications for students
living off campus may be picked up in
Room 201 beginning February 16. Room
reservations are to be made in the respec-
tive residenc hall offices according to the
following schedule. Students who wish
to return to the same rooms they pres-
ently occupy must reserve rooms on
Monday, Feb. 22 - 8:30 a.m. to 1230 p.m.
and 130 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Tuesday,
Feb. 23 - 830 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Students
who wish to return to the same buildings
in which they reside but different rooms
will be permitted to reserve rooms on
Tuesday, fob. 23 - 130 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
All other returning students will be per-
mitted to reserve rooms on a first-come
basis on Wednesday, Feb. 24, Thursday,
Feb. 25 and Friday, Feb. 26 - 830 a.m. to
1230 p.m. and 13p p.m. to 4:00 p.m. The
residence hall rental rate has not been set
for the 1988-89 School Year. However, we
do anticipate a small increase in the rental
rate for the 1988-89 School Year.
CATHOLIC CENTER
The Lenten season has begun. Make a
rcwolution to atten daily mass during
Lent Mon. 12:10 pjn Blessed Sacrament
Chapel Tues. 8:00 a.m. B.S. Chapel. Wed.
530 pjn. Newman Center. Thur. 7:00 a.m.
&BS ChapeL Fri. 12:10 pjn. B.S. Chapel.
Sat M0 am. B.S. Chapel. Sun. 11:30 am.
at the Bk. Bldg. Rm. 103,9:00 pjn. at the
Center Come and worship this Thurs.
ft30 pjn- ibr more information call New-
x at 757-3760 or Teresa Lee at 752-9910.
MIME
The Student union Special Events
Committee presents the world's greates
mime-Marcel Marceau-on Wednesday,
March 2nd, at 8:00 p.m. in Wright Audito-
rium. For tickets, contact the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall, 757-6611, ext.
266. Office hours are 11:00 a.m6:00 p.m
Monday-Friday.
ADVOCATE TRAINING
An Advocate Training Program will be
offered by the Pitt County Family Vio-
lence Program beginning Februray 18,
1988 for those interested in exploring vol-
unteer or career opportunities in crisis
counseling in a family violence shelter
program. The course will be conducted by
professionals in the fields of domestic vio-
lence, law enforcement, social work,
counseling, law and the judicial system.
All classes, except a courtroom session,
will be held at the ECU Allied Health
Building, Room 212. Sessions are sched-
uled for the evenings of February 18, 23,
and 25 from 7:00-9:00 p.m. and Saturday,
February 20 and 27 from 9:00 a.m3:00
p.m. Reservations are needed by Wednes-
day, February 17,1988 and may be made by
telephone to Volunteer Coordination
Mary a Hare, 757-3328. There is no
charge for the course.
EPISCOPAL FELLOWSHIP
Communion will be held at 5:30 at St.
Paul's Church one block towards the river
from Garrett Dorm on 4th Street. Service is
informal dress. Call Allen Manning for
more information at 758-1440.
AMA MEMBERS
The American Marketing Association
is having its spring semester wine and
cheese social in room 244, Mendenhall
Student Center, Thursday Feb. 18th at 4:00
p.m. The key-note speaker, William Free-
love (owner of 13 McDonald franchises)
will begin the social with a presentation.
Members and guest are invited.
NASWCORSQ
Wanted: Social Work Criminal Justice
majors and intended majors, to attend
meetings. He!d the 2nd and 4th Monday
each month, at 4:00 p.m in Allied Health
bldg room 110.
AI
Amnesty International meets every 4th
Wednesday at 8 p.m. at St. Paul's Epis-
copal Church, 401 E. 4th St on the upper
floor from the 4th St. entrance. Next meet-
ing, Feb. 24.
LIBRARY SCIENCE
Library Science classes start soon:
March 1 (for Tues. - Thurs. classes), and
March 2 (for Mon. - Wed. classes). Atten-
dance will taken the first day.
SAM
The next SAM meetin is scheduled for
Tuesday, Feb. 232rd. Grady Strickland
from Carolina Telephone will give a pres-
entation titled "Free Enterprise We'll
also discuss plans for the rest of the
semester.
SAVE THOSE WRAPPERS
Deposit all empty Sticklets Natural
Flavor Gum packs and Doritos Brand
Cool Ranch flavor tortilla chip bags in the
U. S. College Comedy Competition dis-
plays located in the Student Book Store
lobby and Mendenhall. ECU could win a
free comedy concert if we collect the most
wrappers.
CHALLENGE DAY
Registration for Intramural Challenge
Day wil be held on March 2 from 11 p.m6
p.m. in MG 104-A. For more information
call 757-6387.
BACKPACKING CLINIC
Registration for the Intramural Out-
door Recreation Backpacking Clinic will
be from Feb. 8-Feb. 22. The Activity date
will be on Feb. 24 at 6 pjn. For more
information call 757-6387.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
There will be meetings every Thursday
at 6:00 in the culture center. Everybody
welcome.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
The ECU College Republicans will
meet every Tuesday night in room 221
Mendenhall at 7 p.m. Call758-5775 or 752-
3587.
ROBERTSON
Students who would like to help with
getting M.G. "Pat" Robertson elected
President, contact Justin Sturz at 758-2047.
Organizational meeting will be held soon.
COOPERATIVE ED.
Would you like to spend the summer of
fall in Florida? Walt Disney World will be
on campus to recruit students for summer
or fall semesters. Students from all majors
are encouraged to participate. Merchan-
dise, food, and attractions, among other
positions, are available. Representatives
will be at ECU on February 22 and 23.
Contact the office of Cooperative Educa-
tion in Rawl Building for further details.
SEP
Students for Economic Democracy will
meet every Sunday from 7:00 p.m. in
Mendenhall 8-D. For more information,
call 758-9760 or 746-6049.
CAMPUS MINISTRIES
Worship God and celebrate Commun-
ion this Wednesday night at 5:00 p.m. at
the Methodist Student Center. Also avail-
able: all-you-can-eat meal which is $2.00
at the door, $1.50 in advance. Call 758-2030
for reservations. Sponsored by Presbyte-
rian and Methodist Campus Ministries.
PRIME TIME
Prime Time, sponsored by Campus
Crusade for Christ, meets every Thursday
at 7:30 pjn. in Brewster C-103. Everyone is
welcome.
ECU FRISBEE CLUB
There will be practice every Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday at 2:30 on In-
tramural Fields 5 and 6 behind Minges
Colliseum and on Sunday at 2:00. New
players welcome.
OFF CAMPUS JOBS
If you are work-study eligible, you may
be interested in a job off-campus this
semester or in the summer or fall of 1988.
Please contact the Cooperative Education
office, 312 Rawl Building, for further in-
formation.
INTERVIEW WORKSHOP
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton House is offering
these one hour sessions to aid you in
developing better interviewing skills. A
film and discussion of how to interview
on and off campus will be shared. These
sessions are held in the Career Planning
Room on Feb. 1 at 3pm and 7pm and on
Feb. 4,10, 18, and 23 at 3pm.
INTRAMURAL
The Department of Intramural-Recrea-
tion Services and the Outdoor Recreation
Center is sponsoring a Canoe Clinic on
Feb. 16 and 18. Registration for this trip
will be taken in 204 Memorial Gym from
8:00 am to 5:00 pm through Feb. 15.
FERRARA1988
There are still openings for participants
in ECU's Summer Program in Ferrara,
Italy. Cost is $1,725 and includes round
trip airfare, hotels, and travel in Italy. For
additional information contact the Office
of the Dean, Arts and Sciences, Brewster
A-102, 757-6249.
COUNSELING CENTER
Coping with stress? A free mini class
offered by the East Carolina University
Counseling Center for Students. Feb. 9,11,
16, and 18. 329 Wright Building from 3-4
pm. Call or stop by the Counseling Center
for more information (757-6661).
APrtcisJon.
Announces its
Grand Opening
on
March 1st
in Greenville
Greenville Blvd.
756-2800
For more information call:
751-1993
m
Wanted:
Boxers Register
Now for TKE
boxing
tournament.
March 29, 30 & 31
Call
752-6032
758-7144
N.C. SYMPHONY
"Roberta Peters, soprano, will be the
featured soloist with the N.C Symphony
on Wednesday, March 16 at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. This final concert of
the 1987-88 N.C. Symphony Series is
made possible by the Pitt Co' N.C. Sym-
phony chapter and Burroughs-Wellcome
Co. Tickets are currently available at
Mendenhall Ticket Office (757-6611)
EROS, the female principle of love,
unity, peace, manifests itself in the Equal
Rights Organization of Students at ECU
The purpose of EROS is to educate, organ-
ize and act in accordance with the female
experience and women's issues. Meetings
are Tuesdays, 5:00 Austin 308. For info.
call 758-3645 or 752-7998.
SCHOLARSHIP
Students who wish to obtain financial
aid for overseas education may apply f�r
a Rivers Scholarship. The application
deadline is March 15,1988. For more info
contact the Office of International Studies
and Scholarship in Brewster A-117.
PHI SIGMA P
yet your car washed by the pledges of
Phi Sigma Pi on February 20th, at the Fuel
Dox on 10th and 264. Thecost will be$2.00.
PERFORMING ARTS
The 1988-1989 Performing Arts Series is
sponsoring the following events: The
Ohio Ballet, Wynton Marsalis, The Acting
Company, The Atlanta Symphony, PH1-
LADANCO, The N.Y. Gilbert and Sulli
van Players in Pirates of Penzance, The
Polish National Radio Orchestra. CABA
RET, The ECUNC Symphonies in con
cert with SPECIAL GUEST PIANIST
KAREN SHAW, and Nadja Salerno-Son-
nenberg. For a brochure detailing the
events contact the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall 757-�lL ext. 266. Office
Frid7 �U:00 ��m-00 p1' Mondy"
Way.
College
(CPS)�College activists across
the country, who have long ral-
lied to keep Central Intelligence
Agency officials from recruiting
on their campuses, now seem to
be trying to make the agencv the
major focus of their political ener-
gies.
At a meeting of 600-some activ-
ists from around the country at
Rutgers University in New Jersey
Feb. 5-7, for example, students
pledged to organize national anti-
CIA rallies at campuses April 23.
A few days later, on Feb. 8, stu-
dents from five colleges around
Albany, N.Y protested against
CIA recruiters at the State Univer-
sity of New York at Albanv.
During January and fall term,
students at the universities of
North Carolina at Charlotte,
Washington, Vermont, New
Hampshire, Iowa, Minnesota,
California-Los Angeles and Santa
Barbara, as well as at Brown Uni-
versity, demonstrated against the
spy agency.
Activists say the success of the
anti-apartheid movement on U.S
campuses and increased publicitv
about the CIA's subversive role in
Central America have moved
some students to take on a new
course.
"The divestment movement
has slowed a bit because most
U.S. appn
(CPS) � Moving to enc 20
years of trying to force 10, mostlv
southern, states to desegrate their
state colleges, the U.S. Dept. of
Education approved to the "sub-
slantial progress" they'd made in
bringing minorities into their
campus systems.
U.S. Secretary of Education
William Bennett, at a Washing-
ton, D.C. news conference Feb. 10,
said four states � Arkansas,
North Carolina, South Carolina
and West Virginia � were finally
in "full compliance" with civil
rights laws the federal govern-
ment had been trying to force
them to follow since 1969, when it
sued 10 states that kept their
campuses racially segregated.
Bennett gave six other states
Heterosexuals
campus AIDS
(CPS) � Heterosexual collegei
students don't seem to be heecing
campus efforts to teach them how
to avoid getting AIDS (acquiredl
immune deficiency syndrome
some of the doctors at the Univer-
sity of Texas at Austin health
center say.
Nevertheless, on Feb. 1 the
Centers for Disease Control
(CDC) in Atlanta issued guide-
lines urging that schools start
those efforts as early as elemen-
tary school.
In college, however, IT Dx
Scott Spear, citing evidence that
students are still contracting ch-
lamydia � another sexually comi
municated disease � at the sam
rate thev were in 1986, concludes
J
students just aren't listening.
"So far as we can tell Speai
said, "behavior has not changed '
"I guess it's like other risk;
people take smoking, drinking
and driving Austin AIDS social
worker Traci Hiller told The DaihJ
Texan, the UT campus paper
"You know what the risks are, bu
you're in college, having fun an
not thinking about dying
Yet at a mid-January AIDS corJ
ference at Mankato State Univerl
sity in Minnesota, Rep. Allej
Quist accused colleges of actualh
encouraging the spread of AID'
by having an "Alternative Lif
styles Office" for gay students.
Quist said the office, by coui
5a
Still"1
When you fill out your Form
W-4 or W-4A. "Employee's
Withholding Allowance
Certificate remember:
If you can be claimed on vour
parent's or another person's tax
return, you generally cannot be
exempt from income tax
withholding. To get it right, reaj
the instructions that came with
your Form W-4 or W-4 A
��-Vr �-
�� -�in ��
�-e






n
I
t THE NEW SISTTRS of Alpha Delta
Man Jv Beck, Pam Berry, Kris
ine Cvwn Branch. Kim Cauthen,
wigef Laura Connolly, Julie
. .in UVn Dungen, Connie
117 tyrant Whanne Hancock
arris Paige Houser, Andi
� A : kson Megan Keane,
Cahterine Lee, Tara
v . Morton, lonnv Naujoks,
- vk; IVrs lill Shallcross,
ara alias Congraru-
m ou could do it We
- -vrs
, IPs HEADING TO MYRTLE
ehas no date �
wi:r- Fact two: if
she will bo verbally
in Myrtle Beach. Fact
dale � 111 borrow
ou to death. Fact
and drive sober.
kMPAGNI AND BUBBLE
- and whipped
Myrtle Beach
e? Rum, vodka,
need protection
Rumple Mintze
- iNnind. better
� : lave a safe
rive your family
ve ah e
-HOW PARTICIPANTS
� - � ption and the
- act bv Mon-
�ractke
� WD "� K1 vv rojdv tor an
i Mike
vxi luck
man
rORE What's hap-
APreciskM
mounces its
Grand Opening
on
March 1st
in Greenville
Greenville Blvd.
756-2800
re information call:
751-1993
4t '
Wanted:
Boxers Register
I Now for TKE
boxing
tournament.
March 29, 30 & 31
Call
752-6032
758-7144
VC. SYMPHONY
" eters, soprano, will be the
� the N C. Symphony
lay, March 16 at 8 p m. in
im This final concert of
W N.C Svmphonv Series is
ie possible by the Pitt Co N.C. Sym-
aptef and Burroughs-Wellcome
kets are currentlv available at
nhall Ticket Office (757-6611)
JS. the female principle of love,
peace, manifests itself in the Equal
ts Organization of Students at ECU.
be purpose of EROS is to educate, organ-
ic and act in accordance with the female
�penence and women's issues. Meetings
re Tuesdays, 5:00 Austin 308. For info.
"8-3645 or 752-7998
SCHOLARSHIP
Students who wish to obtain financial
r overseas education may apply for
Rivers Scholarship The application
leadline is March 15,1988. For more info.
kntact the Office of International Studies
Jnd Scholarship in Brewster A-117.
PHI SIGMA PI
-t your car washed by the pledges of
d Sigma Pi on February 20th, at the Fuel
x on 10th and 264. Thecost will be$2.00.
PERFORMING ARTS
The 1988-1989 Performing Arts Series is
Iponsoring the following events: The
hioBall t, Wynton Marsalis, The Acting
mpanv, The Atlanta Symphony, PHI-
ADANCO, The N.Y. Gilbert and Sulli-
ran Ravers in Pirates of Penzance, The
Polish National Radio Orchestra, CABA-
iET, The ECUNC Symphonies in con-
ert with SPECIAL GUEST PIANIST
JAREN SHAW, and Nadja Salerno-Son-
kenberg For a brochure detailing the
h ents contact the Central Ticket Office in
MendenhalL 757-66U, ext. 266. Office
hours are 11:00 ajn6.K30 pjn Monday-
pndav.
College activists focus on CIA
(CPS)�College activists across
the country, who have long ral-
lied to keep Central Intelligence
Agency officials from recruiting
on their campuses, now seem to
be trying to make the agency the
major focus of their political ener-
gies.
At a meeting of 600-some activ-
ists from around the country at
Rutgers University in New Jersey
Feb. 5-7, for example, students
pledged to organize national anti-
CIA rallies at campuses April 23.
A few days later, on Feb. 8, stu-
dents from five colleges around
Albany, N.Y protested against
CIA recruiters at the State Univer-
sity of New York at Albany.
During January and fall term,
students at the universities of
North Carolina at Charlotte,
Washington, Vermont, New
Hampshire, Iowa, Minnesota,
California-Los Angeles and Santa
Barbara, as well as at Brown Uni-
versity, demonstrated against the
spy agency.
Activists say the success of the
anti-apartheid movement on U.S.
campuses and increased publicity
about the CIA's subversive role in
Central America have moved
some students to take on a new
course.
'The divestment movement
has slowed a bit because most
major universities have di-
vested said Marc D. Kenen, a
University of Massachussetts
graduate student and opponent
of CIA recruiting at the Amherst
campus. "The issues are very
much related
"They both have to do with
university complicity with illegal
and immoral actions, whether it
be the CIA involvement in Cen-
tral America and Southern Africa
or U.S. government support of the
South African regime
"CIA links with apartheid are
alive and well Carol Thompson,
a University of Southern Califor-
nia associate professor told a
November Los Angeles anti-CIA
crowd of about 50 people, noting
the CIA swaps information with
South Africa's intelligence
agency.
Critics charge the CIA has
helped topple duly-elected gov-
ernments in nations such as Chile
and Guatemala, and promotes
terrorism through its support of
rebels in Central America and
Africa.
"The CIA should not exist at all
because they've proven they can't
stay within their legal limits
said Ohio State alumnus Rick
Theis during a November cam-
pus rally.
The agency's role in the Iran-
contra scandal also has fueled
anti-CIA activism, which first
appeared in the 1960s as a result of
U.S. military intervention in
Southeast Asia, Cuba and the
Dominican Republic. But it has
only been in recent years � and
particularly in recent months �
that the anti-CIA movement re-
ally has blossomed on campuses.
"Anybody who watched televi-
sion this summer knows the CIA
is behind the contra war. They are
the ones that are training the con-
tras in terrorist tactics Western
Michigan University minister
Donald Van Hoeven told pro-
testesters at a recent demonstra-
tion.
At Louisiana State, students
planted a mock graveyard out-
side the school's career placement
center, complete with crosses
bearing the names of people
killed by CIA-supported Nicara-
guan rebels. At Brown, 200-mem-
ber group called CIAO�CIA Off
Campus � checked out books
from the university library that
the agency helped finance or
write.
The CIA isn't retreating.
'The First Amendment grants
them the right to say what they
want, and the First Amendment
also grants us the right to recruit
on campus. We are a legitimate
U.S. approves college progress
(CPS) �Moving to enc. 20 Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Mis-
years of trying to force 10, mostly souri, Oklahoma and Virginia �
southern, states to desegrate their until the end of 1988 to tell how
state colleges, the U.S. Dept. of they'll complete specific projects
Education approved to the "sub- � mostly building improve-
stantial progress" they'd made in menb and funding of minority
bringing minorities into their
campus systems.
U.S. Secretary of Education
William Bennett, at a Washing-
ton, D.C. news conference Feb. 10,
said four states � Arkansas,
North Carolina, South Carolina
and West Virginia � were finally failed to integrate their campuses.
student recruiting efforts � to rid
themselves of "the remnants of
segregation
In its 1969 legal assault on states
Last week, Bennett readily con-
ceded none of the states had met
the goals a federal court set for the
states in 1978: to enroll more
minority students at traditionally
white campuses, hire more mi-
nority teachers and administra-
tors and improve facilities at his-
torically black campuses.
Yet "all of the 10 states have
that still segregated their colleges, made significant and substantial
the federal government won the progress in desegregating their
right to cut off funds to states that
in 'full compliance" with civil
rights laws the federal govern-
ment had been trying to force
them to follow since 1969, when it
sued 10 states that kept their
campuses racially segregated.
JBcnnett gave six other states �
M t 1
systems of public higher educa-
tion Bennett said in effectively
calling off federal pressure on the
states.
"Each has done all or most of
what it committed to do includ-
Various courts imposed dead
lines through the years for schools
to desegregate but, while occa-
sionally approving some state
efforts, kept giving other states ing spending an estimated $240
more time to meet the descgrega- million to renovate historically
tion goals. black colleges, Bennett said.
Not everyone, apparently, is
convinced.
Even the week before Bennett
made his announcement, Ameri-
CampilS AIDS edllCatlOn n Council on Education Presi
dent Robert Atwell complained
(CPS) � Heterosexual college seling gay students, effectively colleges have "hit the wall" in
students don't seem to be heeding condones homosexuality and their efforts to integrate.
campus efforts to teach them how sodomy, according to the MSU �ur ovvni fatigue,
to avoid getting AIDS (acquired Reporter
fleterbsexuals not heeding
immune deficiency syndrome),
some of the doctors at the Univer-
sitv of Texas at Austin health
J
center say.
Nevertheless, on Feb. 1 the
Centers for Disease Control
'You wouldn't have a center for
the Ku Klux Klan Quist report-
edly said.
In its guidelines to help schools
develop AIDS programs without
'encouraging" any kind of sexual
(CDC) in Atlanta issued guide- activity, the CDC suggested
lines urging that schools start schools stress abstinence outside
those efforts as early as elemen- marriage as the best way of avoid-
tary school.
In college, however, UT Dr.
Scott Spear, citing evidence that
students are still contracting ch-
lamydia � another sexually com-
municated disease � at the same
rate they were in 1986, concluded
students just aren't listening
Atwell said Feb. 2, "has been ac-
centuated by an administration
that has not seen equity issues as
important
He blasted the "steady down-
turn" in the number of black stu-
dents in colleges as evidence of
"backsliding not progress.
Black student enrollment na-
tionwide actually has declined in
recent years, the Dept. of
Education's own figures suggest,
and scores of public campuses �
the University of New Hamp-
shire, Farleigh Dickenson, Penn
goals this school year.
ing the disease, but that they urge
sexually active students to use
condoms.
There is evidence, of course,
that such AIDS education pro-
grams have changed students'sex State Mississippi State Tennes-
habits see, Nebraska and the California
A recent University of Wiscon- State University system, among
"So far as we can tell Spear sin survey, for example, reported �there - have launched new
said, "behavior has not changed that 56 percent of the students minority student recruiting
"I guess it's like other risks polled use condoms more than in dl
people take smoking, drinking the past. Two-lhirds of the stu-
and driving Austin AIDS social dents who said they had multiple
worker TraciHiller told The Daily sexual partners during the last
Texan, the UT campus paper, year said the fear of AIDS has
"You know what the risks are, but forced them to have relations with
you're in college, having fun and fewer partners
not thinking about dying
Yet at a mid-January AIDS con-
ference at Mankato State Univer-
sity in Minnesota, Rep. Allen
Quist accused colleges of actually
encouraging the spread of AIDS
by having an "Alternative Life-
styles Office" for gay students.
Quist said the office, by coun-
on the beach
3

When you fill out your Form
W-4 or W-4A, "Employee's
Withholding Allowance
Certificate remember:
If you can be claimed on your
parent's or another person's tax
return, you generally cannot be
exempt from income tax
withholding. To get it right, read
the instructions that came with
your Form W-4 or W-4 A.
FT. LAUDERDALE'5 PREMIERE
CONCERT AND DANCE CLUD
16 YEARS AND OLDER ADMITTED
CELEBRATE
in Ft. Louderdole
10 A.M. - 6 P.M. - POOISWE PARTIES
llv D J. fmceelng Poolsld Contett � Voter Vofl�yboi Tout�omn�
Ft Deer Chug rXeloyi � Free I Shift fteloys � The Belly Flop Contest
end cllmox the doy with . . .
The Wettew. Vet TShlrt Contest featured In Ployboy Mogotloe
Coih PrUe � Free T-Shlrtj � ond other gtveowayi
5ummtrj Gomes And Vet Voter Ts Videos How On Sol �
7 P.M. - 9 P.M. - COUE6E HAPPY HOUR
FTAFT CAROLINA UHlVrPflTY PARTY TOFJtPftY, �'APCI 8th
mil SPMNG 0MAK fi8 J SHIM WITH PAID ADMISSION TOP,
AOOVt COlllGl SWDINIS DtTWflH 7 OCIOCK AND 8 OCLOCK
wmt rnonn cot ugiio
All DAR DRINKS AND DRAFT DEER - S 75
COMPETE IN CONTESTS FOR PRIZES!
EVENINGS
SUMMERS on the beoch presents FUfXY
Ft. Louderdole i flneM Rock'n Rod band nightly
PLUS 6 Bon to Serve You
�IIIN� ftMMl ftt
HAST CAROM HA PMlVrPFTTY PAPTY � TUITHAV, MARCI! 8
out nwi u� onm on wun on ion mum - good nvon ���.����. teewit
KMnoKnocuuoMni
Vn�rt�� ftrorti �? �t�o.� 0MI -tt lawV-nV- tln� 'r.lPV �6? 8�?8
rtnrnr1 Woe noth rt ImfJw Bktf c� AIM
ADMmtOM POtK. �� Y��n Oi OM�t
. . . . ttrr amouvttiir AMPVAvr
employer of the U.S. govern-
ment said Sharon Foster, a
spokeswoman for the agency.
Most schools agree. "Students
want them here said Jerry
Houser of Southern Cal's Career
Development Center. "The CIA
has received a very good response
from USC students. They've been
here for years
At Colby College in Maine, stu-
dents objected to a November
Faculty Senate resolution to keep
the CIA off campus, claiming, as
campus College Republicans
Chairman John Whitacre put it,
"it's pedantic of the professors to
try and decide for us, to become
our conscience. It's our choice to
take (the CIA) up on it or not
"The CIA was here as a poten-
tial employer of our students and
alumni, and we normally provide
space and the opportunity for
interviews for those who have
positions for our graduates said
Henry Johnson, vice president for
student services at the University
of Michigan, the site of a recent
protest.
Activists, though, claim credit
for the CIA cancelling recruiting
visits to the University of Colo-
rado and Brown, where past
demonstrations have been par-
ticularly hostile.
The agency also suffered a set-
back at the University of Califor-
nia-Santa Barbara, after a Novem-
ber protest that resulted in the
arrests of 38 students who op-
posed the appointment of a CIA
officer to a temporary faculty
position.
The university rescinded the
appointment and instead named
George Chritton, the veteran CIA
agent, as a visiting fellow with no
teaching duties.
"We see all this as a kind of
turning of the tide said Joe
Iosbaker, a University of Illinois-
Chicago student and member of
the Progressive Student Network,
a national left-wing political
group. "Students are beginning to
win victories in this battle
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 18,1968 7
Dale Cards
(they're funnv!)
BALLOONS FOR ALL OCCASIONS
Local and Out of Town Newspapers
Central Book & News
Greenville Square
Shopping Center
756-7177

:
V-i
IF YOU'RE PAVING MORE
THAN THIS FOR COPIES
YOU'RE GETTING BUFFALOED
At Kinko s we offer the highest quality copies at a very low
price. Try Kinko s. For great copies. And great deals
kinkes
Great copies. Great people.
321 E. 10th Street (919) 752-0875
Monday - Friday 7.00am - lO.OOpm Saturday 9:00am - 6:00pm
East Carolina University1
Student Union
is taking applications for
Student Union Committee Chairperson
for the 1988-89 Term
Applications Available At The
Student Union Office - Room 234
GET INVOLVED ON ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COMMITTEES:
�Coffeehouse
�Films
�Forum
�Major Concerts
�Minority Arts
�Productions
�Public Relations
and Publicity
�Special Concerts
�Special Events
�Travel
�Visual Arts
Deadline to Apply: FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1988
A
o


East Carolina Tea
Party
EveryFridau
No Cover
No Cover
No Cover �"
Introducing
.75$ Kangaroo Kamlkazi .75$
"A Kick From Down Under"
All Domestic Bottled Beer
$1.00
Teas $2.00
� Sheraton Greenville
� la�lpwpBlW�r
I. ttl �. .1 M� 0l�frH���a






8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 18,1988
Student left activists gather
PISCATAVVAY, N.J. (CPS) �
Nearly 700 student activists from
85 campuses gathered at Rutgers
University Feb. 5�7 to form a
leftist political movement to hnng
about social change.
The students discussed, and
they decided to delay, establish-
ing a new national college net-
work to coordinate student activ-
ism on issues such as CIA recruit-
ing on campus, U.S. foreign pol-
k, secret military research.
South Africa, racism and sexism,
and the cost oi higher education.
Many of the delegates came to
the meeting hoping to form a new
student group reminiscent of Stu-
dents for a Democratic Society
(SDS). which helped oreanize the
anti�war movement of the
1960s.
While the students at the N.i
tional Student Convention '88
ultimately did urge the creation ot
a movement to realize our vision
of equality and substantive de-
mocracy and rail against "corpo-
rate and military dominance
they were unable to agree on a
constitution for a now group.
"We believe it's time to forgo a
more united student lett so that
we can be heard by those who do
lead this country said Rutgers
junior Stuart Eimer, a conference
organizer. "Historically students
have played a leading role in
bringing about change. We feel
the time is riht
'We're not looking for ways to
organize postcard writing cam-
paigns to congressmen in the
event we invade Nicaragua'
explained University of Califor-
nia Santa Barbara senior Sara
Nelson. "We're looking for direct
action. The system that we live in
is not suitable to our needs
Hut before risking alienating
some students with a constitution
that may not be suitable to their
needs, the delegates decided to
meet in regional meetings
through the spring to hammer
down a consensus platform, then
meet again next fall to write a
constitution and statement oi
purpose.
Activists say the fledgling or-
Students feel pinch of new loans
(CrS) � The first crop of stu-
dents to feel the pinch of the new,
tighter Guaranteed Student Loan
tGSL) rules is encountering con-
fusion and frustration, aid offi-
cials on manv campuses report.
The rules themselves went into
effect last fall, after most of the
loans for fall term had been made.
Some students who are just now
dent should receive a (SI .
By examining other forms oi
income, manv students and their
families are too weal flu to qualify
for the low-cost loans Some ob-
servers predicted as main as TO
percent of those students who
receivedGSLslast year would not
be eligible for the loans tins year.
To add to the confusion, the U.S.
add a step to the GSI process next
vear by requiring recipients to
undergo loan counseling. The
Education Department will work
getting loans for the current term Department of Education will
are feeling the pinch.
At the University oi Nebraska-
Omaha, for example, manv stu-
dents still don't understand the
new eligibility requirements, fi-
nancial aid Director ). Philip
Shreves said. "One thing I can say
about the changes is that it will be
difficult to explain to students
why they are or aren't eligible
Studentsat Southwest Missouri
State University were apparently
so confused by the new eligibility
rules that rumors of financial aid
cuts swept the campus in January.
To determine it a student was
eligible for a GSL in the past, fi-
nancial aid counselors examined
student and parents' income, the
number oi dependents in the
student's family, and the number
oi children in that familv attend-
ing college.
Now, under the federal Higher
Education Act of 1986, most of
which went into effect last fall,
counselors must look at other
forms of revenue and holdings �
such as real estate and invest-
ments � before deciding if a stu-
More control
due to law
(CPS) � The recent U.S. Su-
preme Court decision giving high
school principals more control
over student papers has embold-
ened at least one college adminis-
trator to threaten to try to put a
college newspaper under his con-
trol.
Edward A. Wagner, chairman
of the Board of Governors of Pima
Community College in Tucson,
Ariz called for Pima administra-
tors to put the college's newspa-
per "back on the right track
"In (view) of the recent Su-
preme Court decision, we as the
board have the right to edit or not
to edit Wagner asserted.
The court, however, specifically
excluded college papers from its
January ruling, which said school
officials could "regulate the con-
tent" of high school papers run as
for-credit courses just as they can
regulate the content of other
classes offered in the schools.
The decision already has led
officials at high schools in Iowa
City, IA and Cupertino, Cal to
try to censor stories out of their
student papers. At Pima, Wagner
seemed to regret trying to apply
the decision to his campus almost
as soon as he proposed it.
"What am I saying,?" he contin-
ued. "I don't want to get into the
censoring business
At least one other board mem-
ber agreed. Wagner, said Mark
Webb, is trying to "intimidate"
the paper. "The Aztec Press
should be published without in-
terference of any kind he said.
Wagner said the Aztec Press,
Pima's student newspaper, needs
greater guidance from school offi-
cials because of "shoddy report-
ing He proposed that profes-
sional journalists "help our stu-
dents by giving advice on writing
positive stories
"I don't want to hold it over
their heads. I'm in no way imply-
ing we should censor. I'm saying
that loud and clear. We should
look at the program Wagner
said.
vx ith colleges and lending institu-
tions "to make sure students
understand their obligations
said spokesman I eo Paszkicwicz.
Paszkiewicz hopes counseling
will decrease the numbers of stu-
dents who default on GSLs after
they graduate. GSL defaulters
now owe $1.6 billion, he said. "It's
a real problem. We're trying a lot
ot different things to get loans
repaid ,
ganization � which they have not
yet named � really can't ape the
student movement of the '60s.
"This is the '80s, and that's what
we have to stress said Eimer.
"Different issues and different
history
But the students � most of
whom were toddlers in the late
'60s � did receive support and
encouragement from veteran po-
litical activists, including poet
Allen Ginsburg, Abbie Hoffman,
and rock singer Steven Van
Zandt.
The '60s, said Van Zandt, a for-
mer member of Bruce
Springsteen's E Street Band and
producer of the anti-apartheid
album "Sun City "was the
awakening of what I think is a
revolution The Rutgers' con-
vention, he added, "is another
step in that revolution
Past student movements,
Hoffman told students, were
hampered by infighting, a mis-
take he hopes won't mar the
1980s' student movement. "Being
right isn't enough said
I loffman. "You have to work
hard with lots of cooperation "
page in The East
Carolinian.
Simply the best.
FIZZThe newest gathering place In town.
Sat. February 20th
10 p.m. - 1 a.m.
Klee Liles
acoustic rock featuring
James Taylor
& Jimmy Buffett
Open MonSat. 110 E. Fourth St
752-5855 All ABC Permits
Private Parties and Entertainment
ST. PAULS
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
401 E. 4th St.
LENTEN SCHEDULE
Sunday
7:30 a.m 9:00 a.m 11:00 a.m.
- Holy Eucharist
Monday � Tuesday � Thursday � Friday
5:30 Evening Prayer
Wednesday 5:30 p.m. - Holy Eucharist
6:30 p.m. -Student Fellowship Supper
7:00 p.m. -Program: "Ministers of the
Church" Lay Persons; Priests; Deacons
Bishops
One order will be discussed each week.
66 Mom says the
house just isn't the
same without me,
even though its
a lot cleaner.55
Just because your Mom is far
away, doesn't mean you can't be
cl )se. V( )u can still share the love
and laughter on AT&T Long
Distance Service.
It costs less than you think to
hear that she likes the peace and
quiet, but she misses you. So go
ahead, give your Mom a call. You
can clean your room later. Reach
out and touch someone�
AT&T
The right choice.
THF FASTARO N
Actio
Bv CAROL VVI I HI K1V
A��i�ln' Irj .
Action ack
rhere could be i
this movie
gushed with acti
go, AND Nl �
Flying glass, st alt!
and unbelievabli
grabbed the
strangled it and I
Jericho
News S
book co
The N
Greenville,
years old th
Carolina's fir
opened f r b
1978 in tl � �a
Avenue addr
operates.
To cell �
anni versa r.
a comic b
convention on
Greenville H
and 264. The
feature bas
records
The show start- a I
last until 4 p.m. Adn
There will be frei .
attend and d
given away in each
catagones.
Any one intot
any of the featured
other kind of pop; ilai
is invited to attend
number of dealers buving -
and trading thousands :n
bdoks, cards and re
Fhe show .viI als
cdbple of favorite r
comic book artists. R
Feazell, the king I I
comics and creat -
popular chara
Cynicalman. Antiso
Stupid boy and others
there.
Jimmv Lvle
That mini
Mime artist Marc
will perform a t
Auditorium March 2
The 64-vear old :
has thrilled audiences for rrn
than four decades
famous whi te face a nd g
hisonlv props. Marceau
howling wind, tame - 5,wa
a tightrope, gets
subway and climbs
interminable staircase
The artist's life was tur
with experiences trom v
This is Marcel Marceau, that
annoying things on this pM
tolerable. He'll be on this ve
"i�"





ring place In town.
bruary 20th
in. - 1 a.m.
e Liles
c rock featuring
nes Taylor
tuny Bnffctt
Sat 110 E Fourth St.
Ml ABC Permits
- ind Entertainment
T. PAUL'S
PISCOPAL
CHURCH
401 E 4th St.
EDULE
m. 11:00 a.m.
day � Friday
b Eucharist
nt Fellowship Supper
bam 'Ministers of the
frsorts; Priests; Deacons;
discussed each week.
ir Mom is far
lean you can't be
Mill share the love
n AT&T Long
plan you think to
ks the peace and
iissesyou.Sogo
�r Mom a call. You
room later. Reach
omeone?
it choice.
I
k

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
FEBRUARY 18,1988 Page 9
'Action' could teach Rambo
By CAROL WETHERINGTON
Assistant Features Editor
Action Jackson. Action Jackson.
rherc could be no better title for
this movie The movie literally
cushed with action form the word
go, AND NEVER STOPPED!
Hying glass, stealthy maneuvers
and unbelievable murder tactics
grabbed the viewers' attention,
strangled it and didn't let go!
Jericho "Action" Jackson, a
tough Detroit cop, was played by
Carl Weathers, whom we have
seen in "Rocky" (ALL of them!),
"Semi-Tough" and his most
recent, "Predator But this one
takes the cake.
The movie opened with a
sccrctary-and-boss-in-the-office
scene, only to be interrupted by
bodies busting through the
windows. Maybe that doesn't
sound too dramatic to you, but
then, to top it all off, you had to
find the intruders.
From there, fists never stopped
flying, blood flowed from
wounds inflicted in the weirdest
ways, cars were smashed, anger
raged and Vanity kept on
shooting up.
That's right, and you heard it
here first: Vanity portrayed a
JUNKIE. YES! And she was
damned good at it, too. Her
singing was in her style, of course,
while her wardobe was in no
News Stand hosting comic
book convention in G-ville
Nostalgic Press Release
The Nostalgia News Stand of
Greenville, North Carolina is ten
years old this month. Eastern
Carolina's first comic book store
opened for business in February
1978 in the same Dickinson
Avenue address where it now
operates.
To celebrate the shop's
anniversary, Lawrence is holding
a comic book collector's
convention on Saturday at the
Greenville Holidav Inn on US 13
and 264. The show will also
feature baseball cards and
records.
The show starts at 10 a.m. and
last until 4 p.m. Admission is free.
There will be free gifts to all who
attend and door prizes will be
given away in each of the three
catagories.
Any one interested in collecting
any of the featured items or any
other kind of popular culture item
is invited to attend. There will be a
number of dealers buying, selling
and trading thousands of comic
bdoks, cards and records.
(The show will also feature a
cdbple of favorite North Carolina
comic book artists. Raleigh's Matt
Feazell, the king of the mini-
comics and creator of such
popular characters as
Cynicalman, Antisocialman,
Stupid boy and others will be
there.
Jimmy Lyle of Waynesville,
artist on "Escape to the Stars" and
a recent updating of the Thunder
Agents called "T.H.U.N.D.E.R
will also be present, Both artists
will offer copies of their works,
original artwork and sketches for
sale. They will be happy to meet
with any aspiring artists and look
at their work.
After the show, there will be a
party at the Nostalgia News Stand
with free cake and drink and more
door prizes. It will start at 5:30
p.m. For more info call Charles
Lawrence at 758-6909.
style. It must be admitted that
even though I did expect some
poor acting from her, she did hold
her own. But then, how much
"own" could a person of her
caliber have?
Dellaplane, a murderous auto
tycoon, was played by Craig
Nelson. Remember him? He was
Sarnac in "Call to Glory" and the
alcoholic father from
"Poltergeist Yeah, that's the
one! Talk about one mean xxxxx!
The only thing I can really rag
on just happens to be one of the
most important things in the
movie. It was a little hard to
follow the conflict; not a lot, just
enough.
You were so caught up in the
action by the time the plot was
revealed that you had to
concentrate too hard to catch the
main ideas. It did help knowing
that the bad guy was an auto
corporation magnate out to gain
power any way he could, which is
revealed at the beginning of the
movie.
I won't tell you anymore life-
shattering details - you'll just
have to go see it! I can assre that it
will be worth your time.
This is Carl Weathers and Vanity, in James Bond Promo Picture Hell.
They star in the new action-thriller, "Action Jackson Not that this
was the name of a toy back in the 60s, or Jesse Jackson's new
nickname.
Wood was an eccentric director
By MICAH HARRIS
L Staff Writer
Edward Wood, Jr. - author,
director, transvestite, and lover of
women. Can there be any doubt
he was one of Hollywood's most
eccentric characters?
Unfortunately, Wood is as
obscure as he is colorful and it
seems fitting on the tenth
anniversary of his death that we
come not to bury him (no one
knows what happened to his
body any way) but to praise him. If
you arc unfamiliar with Wood, let
me warn you: this is a case of truth
stranger than fiction.
Wood can be considered one of
the first wave of movie fans who
became a pro out of a genuine love
of the medium. Unfortunately,
Hollywood did not esteem Wood
as a fair-haired child in the way
they did later fans who turned
pros like Lucas and Spielberg.
Perhaps the fact that his output
tended toward the kinky with
such titles as "The Sinster Urge"
and "The Bride and the Beast"
had something to do with this.
Tine epitome of this aspect of
Wood's career is the movie, "Glen
or Glenda" (1953), a thinly veiled
autobiographical piece.
Wood played (under a
pseudonym) the title character
and his wife of the time played his
fictional fiance, Barbara. The
story concerns an unhappy
transvestite's desire to come out
of the closet. He agonizes over
whether to tell his girl about his
habits before the wedding " or
hit her between the eyes with it
after (wards) when it might be
too late for either of them
In elegant tones worthy of
Thomas Hardy, Wood decries the
arbitrariness of social standards
of the time. "The title of this can
only be labeled 'Behind Locked
Doors Give this man satin
undies, a dress, a sweater, and a
skirt and he can be more of a
credit to his community and his
government because he is happy
In a touching moment, Barbara
takes off her angora sweater and
hands it to Glen after he has
confessed. In real life, Wood was
also fond of angora as well as
pants suits and lingerie.
According to one of his co-
workers, it was not unusual to
walk into Wood's home and find
him in lingerie, smoking a cigar,
and typing out his next project.
Unfortunately, Hollywood
politics make strange bedfellows
yes, stranger than Wood
himself. His executive producer
for "Bride of the Monster" was a
meat packing plant owner.
He insisted the film make a
statement against nuclear arms.
Wood wanted the climax to be a
life-death struggle between evil
scientist, Bela Lugosi and his
mutant octopus but was obliged
to insert stock footage of an
atomic blast totally out of story
context. Verily, there is no art by
committee.
When Wood received financial
backing from a Baptist Church for
"Graverobbers From Space they
had their own demands: all of the
cast had to be baptized (Wood's
friend and ex-wrestler, Tor
Johnson, was so large he had to be
baptized in a swimming pool. He
also had a habit of cracking
Wood's toilet seat. But I digress
).
The title, which was somehow
considered sacreligious, must be
changed. Thus, was born the
classic, "Plan Nine From Outer
Space the infamous worst
movie ever made.
You can't exactly say Wood's
carrer went downhill after "Plan
Nine A better metaphor would
be "the bottom fell out He spent
most of his latter years turning out
such fictions as "Scream Your
Bloody Head Off "The
Whorehouse Horror" (I'm not
making this up) and "The Fall of
the Balcony of Usher
In 1978, Wood and his second
wife were kicked out of their
home and subsequently had their
possessions stolen. A friend took
them in and Ed died there of heart
failure while watching a football
game on TV. Like the brain of
Kennedy and the bones of Moses,
the location of Wood's corpse is a
mystery.
As Wood's wife said: "Eddie
believed in what he was doing. He
was sincere A minor character
from "Plan Nine" sums up, then
Wood's epitaph in one word:
"Tragic
That mime guy is COming SOOn Saar will present slide lecture Monday night
ECU' News Bureau
Mime artist Marcel Marceau
will perform at Wright
Auditorium March 2, at 8 p.m.
The 64-year old pantomimist
has thrilled audiences for more
than four decades. With his
famous white face and gestures as
hisonly props, Marceau fights the
howling wind, tames lions, walks
a tightrope, gets lost in the
subway and climbs an
interminable staircase.
The artist's life was turbulent
with experiences from which his
stage interpretations are drawn.
Born into a Jewish family in
Strasbourg, France, Marceau
spent the war years fighting n
the side of the Free French. His
father disappeared at the hands of
the Gestapo.
After the war, Marceau began
studies in Charles Dullin's School
of Dramatic Art at the Sarah
Bernhardt Theatre in Paris. His
stage career was launched in 1947.
Since then, Marceau has
appeared throughout the world
in live and televised
performances. In the U.S. he has
appearances on the Max Liebman
"Show of shows as well as on
programs hosted by Johnny
Carson, Merv Griffin, Dinah
Shore and others.
Tickets to the Marcel Marceau's
performance are available from
the campus Central Ticket Office,
open weekdays from 11 a.m. until
6 p.m. Tickets are $14 each for the
general public, $7 for youth.
Ticket reservations (by major
credit card) and further
information are available from
the Ticket Office, telphone (919)
757-6611.
School of Art Press Release
New York based artist, Alison
Saar, will present a slide-lecture
on her work on Monday at 7:30
p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium. The
lecture is sponsored by Gray Art
Gallery at ECU'S School of Art in
connection with the current
exhibit "Enigmatic Inquiry"
which features the work of Saar,
Richard Reese and Italo Scanga.
Saar's work derives from what
she calls the "underground
mysticism and magic" of
ordinary people and objects and is
expressed in various forms
including beaded wall haneines.
HH I ��I1
'Justar
small frescoes, wood-carved
figures, sculptural constructions
and large scale drawings.
Her exhibition record includes
one-person shows with Jan Baum
Gallery in Los Angeles, the
Monica Knowlton Gallery in New
York, the Metropolitan Museum
of Art in New York, the
Washington Project for the Arts in
Washington, D.C. and is currently
represented by the Zeus-Trabia
Gallery in New York.
Saars work is represented in
several notable collections such as
the Metropolitan Museum of Art
Museum in Newark, New Jersey
and the Studio Museum in
Harlem, New York.
She has also served as Artist-In-
Residence at the Studio Museum
in Harlem, New York and at the
Roswell Museum and Art Center,
Roswell, New Mexico.
In addition to her lecture, Saar
will visit classrooms and
individual studios at the School of
Art thru Tuesday. The Gray Art
Gallery whose exhibit "Enigmatic
Inquiry" displays several pieces
of Saar's work, has been funded
by the North Carolina Arts
il to produce a cataloj
was
�tTiTmiT.i i i , Time for a little srnacteel of

Weil. I got some mail on the something. Let s
nial Page. Seems some of as thang
O0endedlmylastinisve. Boney agreed. $&s he
more of this Mr, Pansy
mast business. No more of
it tasteful mis weefc,
r?" Words are words.
I happen to place certain
ds in a certain order, and it
f sornething you'd rather not
about, men this is not the
to
a
back on page four.
mMM that mime guy. Mimes are probably the most
annoying things on this plane of existence, but Marcel is fairly
tolerable: He'll be on this very campus on March 2.
&aj
up a
wmmmm$m0
��- �� .���-� 1 1�l�H SjSVfSyj





10
rilEEASl CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 18,1988
t
Bandstand fan clubs are still in existence
LANCASTER, Pa. (AP) - In
1955, 8-year-old David Frees
discovered "American
Bandstand rtteshow was then 3
years old broadcast daily from
south Philadelphia bv a local
station and hosted by a local disc
key, Bob Horn.
By the time American
Handstand' hit the national
airwaves 13 months later, Dick
Clark and his cast of dancing
regulars were whipping Frees
and the rest of the 1 lowdy Doody
generation into a jitterbugging,
bunm. -hopping frenzy.
A mere wink or smile from one
oi the saddle-shoed, poddle-
skirted girls whirling around the
Bandstand" dance floor could
reduce him to a puddle of
adolescent longing.
Fed.n. at 40 Frees still thinks
the show has a good beat, he can
dance to it and he gives it a 98 on
a scale of 100.
1 ie is the president and founder
of the American Bandstand Fan
Club, which has 836 members in
L nited States, one member in
nee, one in England and one in
apan.
Tom Stepanchak, publicity
director for Dick Clark
ductions in Burband, Calif
said that as far as he or Clark
as. Frees' fan club is the only
"Bandstand" club
aining
Ym're
smart enough
to calculate
the size ofa
Ffydrogen
atom.
And you're
still smoking?
U.S. Department of Health & Human Service
Frees has become somewhat of
a national authority on
"American Bandstand He was
interviewed about his
longstanding infatuation with the
show for the book "The History of
American Bandstand by
Michael Shore with Dick Clark.
Frees' house is kind of a
"Bandstand" Hall of Fame,
packed with memorabilia from
the show's prc-California
heyday.
Two Dick Clark dolls - grinning
that familiar grin - rest on a chair
and a shelf in the living room of
Frees and his housemate, Richard
Burker. On the bar stools are
stacks of magazines from the '50s
and early '60s, including issues of
Teen magazine's "Bandstand
Blast" and "My Bandstand
Buddies
And on the room's paneled
walls are blown-up photos of old
"Bandstand" dancers, a 1973
photo of Pop Singer with
"Bandstand" kid Marlenc
Mizanin and a long-haired Frees,
autographed by Clark, and
framed issues of 16 Magazine's
"Your Secret Bandstand Album
Frees, the divorced father of a
17-year-old daughter who
watches "American Bandstand"
but prefers "Dancin' On Air is
an outgoing, chatty man who
seems to have discovered Clark's
formula for vouthful looks.
Plaza Cinema
Clad in a purple "Bandstand
Boogie" T-shirt and designer
jeans, he sat on a crushed velvet
couch in his living room and
explained his unflagging
affection for "American
Bandstand
"It was just a period of my life
that 1 liked and I want to keep it
alive. Some people collect rocks, I
collect 'Bandstand Frees said,
glancing around his
memorabilia-filled home.
Asa youngster, Frccsdidn't live
far from south Philly,but he never
attended a "Bandstand" show
because his parents were afraid to
let him take the train into the city
by himself. By the time he had
turned 16 and could drive, the
show had moved to California.
He joined his first "Bandstand"
fan club in 1960, a club devoted to
the Jiminez sisters. When the
president of the club went off to
college, she sold the club's
membership list and materials to
Frees for $10.
Eventually, Frees took on a
nuber of clubs, each one
promoting a different
"Bandstand" regular.
In 1967, Frees was drafted into
the Army. A month before his
tour of duty ended in Vietnam, he
broke a leg making an emergency
jump from a helicopter. He was
sent to recuperate in a
Philadelphia hospital. Many of
the old "Bandstand" regulars
were still in Philly and one of
them - Doris Olsen, who had
written to Frees wficn he was in
Vietnam - visited him in the
hospital.
When he was released, Frees
returned to his parents' home to
reclaim his memorabilia. To his
horror, much of it had been
ruined by water from a leaky attic
roof.
A lesser fan might have
surrendered, but Frees wrote to
fan club members and former
"Bandstand" kids, asking for any
memorabilia they could spare.
From his pen pals came
magazines, snapshots and
enough "Bandstand" kid glossies
to fill five scrapbooks.
In 1970, Frees consolidated his
individual fan clubs into one
national club, offering members -
for a lifetime fee of $10 - pen pal
lists, membership cands,
souvenir 45-rpm records,
"Bandstand" kid photographs
and an annual newsletter,
"Bandstand Boogie named for
the "Bandstand" theme song
lyrics by Barry Manilow.
As he'd done throughout the
'60s, Frees continued to
correspond with old
"Bandstand" regulars. In 172,
Marlene Mizanin invited him to
her Philadelphia home for a party
to celebrate Ivette jiminez'
birghday.
Through Mizanin, he went on
to meet other aging "Bandstand"
kids in the Philadelphia area.
"They all think it's pretty neat
that someone wants to keep the
whole thing alive said Frees. "I
think it's something that deserves
to be alive. It was an important
part of our history
LOW COST
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
Abortions from 13 to 18 wwks at addition! ccxt I'rrgrunry
lest. Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy Counseling, lor
further information, call 832-OS3S (toll free njmber 1-800-
532-S3&4) between 9 d m. and Sp m weekda)s General anes-
thesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
PlAa SMf IH
Tickets only $2 for
first hour daily.
Three Men and A
Baby - PG
For Keeps - PG 13
Wall Street - R
Perk Ihectre
AXEL FOLEY
IS BACK
BACK WHERE
HE OOESNT
BELONG
EDDIE MURPHY Wt
I3IEVIE12LYJ-UJ-I-S J-r
I
Fatal Beauty
R
$1.50 All Times
the HEAFS BACK ON
nim iPnui���wnn1'34fia m ���- -ru � dFr'i
-� � n ��-1 an- � c i xma av:mtm k a i �
Playing Thurs. Feb. 18th -
Sun. Feb. 21st
8:00 p.m. - Hendrix Theatre
60's Rock - Heavy Metal
Justin Time
At The UNDERGROUND
8:00 p.m. Friday, February 19th
Downstairs
at Mendenhall
gather ins place
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
Adults $25�,tn
5:30
CHILDREN
ANYTIME $250J
UCCANNER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
( ATED R Cher in
MOON STRUCK
1:00-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:20
C RATKD R


ACTION JACKSON
3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15
RATED R

hr-
SHOOT TO KILL
2:00-4:30-7:00
FED R Held over 3rd Big Week
THE SERPENT AND THE RAINBOW
Matinee 1:15 and evening 9:20
GREENVILLE, NC.
Wanted:
Margarita Villian
Last Seen at Chico's
MARG4RITA VMAIU

ie4
Wm
THURSDAY FEB 18 1988
10 AM-9 PM
EVERYTHING
IN THE
STORE
ALWAYS!
REG. STORE HOURS
M0NWEP.1QAM-7PM
THURSSAT.10AM-9PM
SUN. 1 PM-6 PM
GPKNVIUf.NC
Reward Offered:
Great Satisfaction From Wearing
this New T-Shirt on Sale Now at
Chico's
LADIES'
CLOTHING
VISIT OTHER HI-LITES IN YOUR TRAVELS IN NC & SC
: i
� LANCASTER, SC
� FLORENCE, SC
� BENNETTSVULE, SC
� ROCKINGHAM, NC
� lUMIIRTON, NC
� FAYETTEVILLE, NC
� SPRING LAKE, NC
� WALLACE, NC
� WHITEVILIE, NC
� WILMINGTON, NC
� MIDWAY PARK, NC
� ATLANTIC BEACH, NC
� NEW BERN, NC
� KINST0N, NC
� WINSTON SALEM, NC
� GREENSBORO, NC
� GRAND OPENING
DURHAM, NC
MARCH 3. ma
ldl
SEA LEVEL, N.C (AP) - H
been years since the u
Diamond City existed, but
town is still alive in the memo
pf 94-year-old Nellie Mora
"My grandfather was
whaler says Mrs Morse, no
resident at Sea Level Hospid
Extended Care Facility rj
name was John Stvron. In th(
days you had to have unsmka)
equipment, because if the
had a calf, it would fight I
Crazy. But it would tight
life, anyway
"My grandfather had a li
knoll he tailed a 'lookout . !
He would look for a little s
the water. He could recognize
way the water moved
whale. Then he would run -
camp, where his sons would be
the lookout for him "
"They'd get the cannon an
out and shoot the whale wit
small bomb, which
explode in the thing a
practically paralyze it
while, it didn't have the stn
to fight
They continued I
until it was dead 5
little calf would swim r
its mother's side. But the
have to be very old to be
sufficient, and eventually the
would swim oii
Mrs. Morse left Diamoi
whaling communitv
Shackleford Banks, at �
"I was the only child
"I left Diamond' City for a
school. But they had a terril
storm there. Houses were wasl
awav. Evcntuallv everyboj
left"
The incredibi
Top 13 alburi
WZMB'sTopl?
1. Firehose "If'n" SST
2.Gunclub "MotherJuno"
Rino Records
3. Sisters of Mercy "Floodlaij
Elektra Records
4. Jerry Harrison "Ca
Gods" Sire Records
JpMidnite Oil "Diesel & Dt
Columbia Records
6. The Triffids "Calenti
Island Records
7. Arms Akimbo "This Is
That Cher c
BEVERLY HILLS. Calif.
The contest for best actr
including such div
contenders as Lillian Gish
Cher, appeared the
competitive as the film
focused on today's 60th am
Academy Award nominatioi
Nominees in 2? categoj
ranging from best picture to
cartoon, were to be read!
Shirlev MacLaine, an O
winner for "Terms
Endearment and Acad
president Robert Wise a wii
for "West Side Story" and
Sound of Music
Three hundred mi
representatives and a small aj
of publicists were expecte
attend the pre-d
announcements at the Be1
Hills headquarters or
Academv of Motion Picti
and Sciences.
The nominations
scheduled at 3:30 a.m. rST so
could be earned live bv J
"today' "CBS Morning f
ABC's" "Good Morning Ame
Mid Cable News Network.
Bonehead h
Continued from page 9
�Bonehead, eyes strained
tearching out clues to the k
Of New Orleans,
hungrilv'Boss
� Inside the Brightly Lit Hard
die boys quiered the staff 01
prte biscuits would be
bailable. Upon hearing tha
kre indeed available that
loment, the Hungry Fi
ept for Joy.
Many food items
rocured and the guys sea
it a suitable Place to Coi
Mscuits. "What more ironic!
ien the very parking lot nj
place in which we work
teked.
Bonehead, being
isagreeable sort, just
Bogus They pulled int
llegal parking lot next to tr
uth Building and started
jyway.
By the time Bonehead
n the second Bacon am
�! finny �m � �
� 9'BmB9IBB0Bjt9mJ ����"��� I ������ �





t

Till: EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 18, 1988 11
fence lOld lady remembers stuff in her hometown
SEA LEVEL. N.C. (AP - It w � . . . . ,
WOMEN'S HEALTH
GANIZATIOHS
Metal
me
D
�-��� I
19th
airs
JL v �� �l. 1 .1X CX JL X
I f
8, 1988
9 PM
IC & sc
� NEW BERN, NC
� KiNSTON, NC
� W'NSTON SALEM NC
� GREENSBORO, NC
� GRAND OPENINO
DURHAM, NC
ARCH 3, 1983
LEVEL, N.C (AP) - It has
vn years since the town of
iamortd Citv existed, but the
iou n i still alive in the memories
t 94 year-old Nellie Morse.
H grandfather was a
laler says Mrs. Morse, now a
aient at Sea Level Hospital's
tended Care Facility. "His
ame was lohn Styron. In those
a s you had to have unsinkable
quipment, because it the whale
ad a calf, it would tight like
az) But it would tight for its
fe anyway
My grandfather had a little
ioll he called a 'lookout place.
c would look for a little swell in
c w ater. He could recognize the
a the water moved over the
hale. Then he would run back to
mp where his sons would boon
okout for him
rhey'd get the cannon and go
it and shoot the whale with a
Tall bomb, which would
ode in the thing and
pT ticall) paralyze it. After a
w it didn't have the strength
tc
) continued to shoot it
ui it was dead. Sometimes a
lit i. calt would swim right up to
it mother s side. But thev don't
ha e to be verv old to be self-
su ficient, and eventually the calf
Wid swim off
Mrs Morse left Diamond Citv, a
Whaling communitv on
ickletord Banks, at age 5.
I was the only child she says.
left Diamond Citv for a better
SChool. But thev had a terrible
Sfe rm there. Houses were washed
Stvav. Eventually everybody
lef
The people'who left Diamond
City settled all over, Camp Glenn,
Harker's Island, all around. The
Moreheaders didn't like the
people from Diamond City
coming in. I'll tell you why. It was
envy. They were of British
descent, and they had talent to
offer. They were boat builders,
bricklayers, lighthouse workers,
musicians
"That still exists on Harker's
Island. You ask a man there, 'Can
you build a boat?' He'll say, 'What
do want?' And he'll get his
pencil
Miss Nellie, who was born
Nellie Russell, left Diamond City
so she could attend a Methodist
school, a "church school the
same year her mother died. And
her father, she says, was never
around.
"My grandparents were the
only parents 1 ever had, but I
didn't have it easy, because thev
were old she says. "I've
supported myself since I was 9
In 1963, after her husband died,
Miss Nellie returned from
Norfolk, Va to Marshallberg.
After 15 years there, she moved
into Sea Level Hospital. But she
has lost barely a step.
"I'm the oldest one here, except
for one man she says. "They say
he's 100 and his mind isas good as
ever
Miss Nellie spends her time
crocheting bedspreads for her
triends and for the nurses, and she
likes to read.
"I like to read cowboy stories,
especially L'Amour. And I read
Reader's Digest, but always the
Bible first. I don't like these love
stories, and I hate the idiot box. TV
has ruined our. youngsters
Mrs. Morse says one of her
grandfathers was a Hancock, a
relative of John Hancock, the first
man to sign the Declaration of
Independence. She dismisses the
importance, saying "anyone can
sign a piece of paper
Miss Nellie's relatives were
actually uninvited guests of the
folks at the Diamond City. But
then again, everyone at Diamond
The incredibly boss WZMB
Top 13 album chart is here
jft'ZMB sTop 13
1. Firehose "If n" SST
2.Gunclub "MotherJuno" Red
Rino Records
3. Sisters of Mercy "Floodland"
Hektra Records
4. crry Harrison "Casual
Cods" Sire Records
5. Midnite Oil "Diesel & Dust"
Columbia Records
6. The Triffids "Calenture"
Island Records
1 Arms Akimbo "This Is Not
The Late Show" 688 Records
8. Accelerators "The
Accelerators" Profile Records
9. Cave Bvkers on Acid " Drill
Your Own Hole"
10. Robin Hitchcock "Globe of
Frogs" Realitivity Records
11. John Kroth "Midnite
Snack" Hope well Records
12. Voice Farm "F" Ralph
Records
13. Top Will Eat Itself "Box
Frenzv" Rough Trade
hat Cher chick wins more
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (AP) -
.e contest for best actress,
deluding such diverse
ntenders as Lillian Gish and
her, appeared the most
cc ipetitive as the film would
fc tsed on today's 60th annual
cademy Award nominations.
Nominees in 23 categories,
nging from best picture to best
noon, were to be read bv
hirley MacLaine, an Oscar
rinner for "Terms of
dearment and Academv
resident Robert Wise, a winner
- West Side Story" and "The
und of Music
Three hundred media
presentauves and a small army
M publicists were expected to
ittend the pre-dawn
nouncements at the Beverly
ills headquarters of the
cademy of Motion Picture Arts
nd Sciences.
The nominations were
heduled at 5:30 a.m. PST so they
ould be carried live by NBC's
odav "CBS MOiTiing Show
BC's "Good Morning America"
d Cable News Network.
In a year that most critics
considered less than scintillating,
the leaders for best picture
appeared to be "Broadcast
News "The Last Emperor
"Hope and Glory
"Moonstruck" and "Empireof the
Sun
Reversing a trend of recent
years, the actress contest seemed
to be the tightest. Among the
front-runners: Glenn close for
"Fatal Attraction Holly Hunter,
"Broadcast News Cher,
"Moonstruck Sally Kirkland,
"Anna Miss Gish, 'The Whales
of August Sarah Miles, "Hope
and Glory Maggie Smith, "The
Lonely Passion of Judith Hcarne
In the best actor category, two
stars seemed to be competing
with themselves. Jack Nicholson
has been praised for both "The
Witches of Eastwick" and
"Ironwced with "Eastwick"
likely to bring him a nomination.
Michael Douglas received
acclaim for his performances in
both "Fml Attraction" and "Wall
Street
onehead has
Continued from page 9
Bonehead, eyes strained from
searching out clues to the location
New Orleans, said
lungnlv'Boss
Inside the Brightly Lit Hardee's,
the boys quiered the staff on the
tune biscuits would be made
available. Upon hearing that they
were indeed available that Very
Nloment, the Hungry Friends
wept for Joy.
Many food items were
procured and the guys searched
out a suitable Place to Consume
Biscuits. "What more ironic place
! then the very parking lot next to
the place in which we work?" Jeff
asked.
Bonehead, being the
disagreeable sort, just said,
"Bogus They pulled into the
illegal parking'lot next to the Old
South Building and started eating
anvway.
By the time Bonehead started
on the second Bacon and Egg
City was uninvited, so they fit
right in.
"They were two young
Englishmen according to Miss
Nellie, "and they got tired of the
blue blook thing. So they saved
bread and water. Then they
sneaked on a boat that was to sail
for America, and they hid down
in the bilge.
"The deal was that if the boat
was 40 miles offshore (away from
the shores of England) and thev
were caught, the boat couldn"t
turn around. They ate all their
bread and water. Thev were
hungry, so they came up and
luckily, they were more than 40
miles away from England. Thev
were made cabin boys to wait
tables for captains and keep the
dining rooms clean
"The ship was loaded with
lumber. There was a storm and
they hit the Diamond City, Cape
Lookout I ighthouse. The ship
was wrecked. The Coast Guard
went to the ship and brought the
men ashore. The two bovs were
J
also saved
"And the deal was that the
company that owned the ship had
to pay the way back home for the
people who were shipwrecked
she said. "The Captain and the
crew went home, but the two boys
stayed and married there at
Diamond City. That was the
beginning of all of us
adventures Jp
Biscuit, a sound was heard. It was
a plinking sound. It sounded like
a ferret with a collar on being
placed into the blender.
Jeff, the Smart One, recognized
the sound. "It's hailing. It's
hailing golf balls out there
Bonehead swallowed the
mashed up hash brown in his
mouth quickly so as not to be rude
when he said, "Cliche Attack
The hail pelted down for nearly 15
minutes.
After the Business End of God's
Wrath had finished descending
on the two, they drove home to
get a good night's sleep before
their 9:15 classes.
The end. Okay, so it wasn't that
exciting, but the title itself told
you that.
Anyway. I'll be back next week
if I'm not lynched by the East
Carolinia Fat Girls Who Write
Really Bad Poetry Association.
And a big "Thanks to the boss
dudes at WZMB who play Drivin'
and Crvin' tunes for me.
A Mardi Gras of Savings!
It's Plardi Gras time
whale of a time .and a
whale of savings at
youi &Y Sav A Center!
SAV A CENTER
The freshest way to Save
in11 . . .
I
A oild
(ill ,it biq s,i
So (itoiis i ii i ' I'
I lit -f ' . Mil I (t
Cjras spie and (hi
.iislt s r
LIMIT ONE WITH ADD L $T0 00 PURCHASE
Eight O'Clock -j88
Coffee I
JMIT ONE WITH ADD L S'O 00 PURCHASE
Tide 438
Detergent I
-(O OP I ART.
Crisco �
Oil
DECORATOR
Waldorf
Tissue
HOMOGENIZED
89
Flav-O-Rich 459
V2 Milk I
6 119
Flav-O-Rich 499
Ice Cream 1"
419
- A. O-RIO
Ice Cream
Sandwiches
ASSORTED
MARK ��
Ground
Chuck
fHIN TRIM FRI A H
Shank Half
Fresh Ham
Ice Cream
PILLSBURV
Crescent
Rolls
Fryer
Drumsticks
YOUNG N TENDER MIXED
Fryer
Parts
179
119
89
39 $
� ANTAT �����-
Jumbo
Pineapples
D'Anjou
Pears
Ripe
Cantaloupes
� ��� � ABf
Hydroponic
Lettuce
1
I79
99
ASSORTED
Charmin
Tissue
68"
Limit One With Add I $10 Purchase
KEEBLER REG � LOW SALT
Club
Crackers
15-16 oz
P9
SWIFT � SLICED FREE
CHILEAN GROWN
Hostess � Red Seedless
Canned Ham Grapes
88
QUARTERS
Mrs. Filbert's
Margarine
pkgs
Limit Two With Add I $10 Purchase
Limit Two Please
JUMBO CALIFORNIA � 40 SIZE
Navel
Oranges
99
CHILEAN GROWN
Juicy Red
Plums
88
�EEBLER ASSORTED
Soft Batch
Cookies
KEEBLER
Town House 445
Cheddar, Jr. -
A&P ASST PEAS�CORN OR
Green j 400
Beans W
1
1
ASSORTED
Chef Boyardee
A&P
Orange
Juice
10 oz
pkg
12 oz
can
89
89
19
ANGElO
ALL VARIETIES
Frito Lay
Corn Chips
Crinkle Cut 449
Potatoes I
THIN TRIM USDA CHOICE BEEF
Boneless
Shoulder Roast
PREVIOUSLY FROZEN- �'�"
Dressed
Croaker
NORTH ATI ANTIC FRESH
Ocean Perch 99
Fillets
FARM FRESH POMP RAiF
Catfish
Fillets
1
3
399
A&P
Alcohol w
A . ARIETIf
Colgate
Toothpaste
RAVI � � ��'����
Hair
Spray
00
1
99
89
SLICED TO ORDER
Baked
Ham
SEE STORE FOR DETAd s
30HD � 10W30 � 10W40 � 20W-X
Havoline
Motor Oil
64
FINAL COST
AFTER REBATE
A&P CREAMY�CRUNCHV
Peanut
Butter
2b OFF LABEL
A&P
Grape
Jelly
2,
QAd "vory
ZJZt Liquid
89
7b; OFF LABEL
Liquid
22 oz
btl
64 oz
btl
CREAM
Havarti
Cheese
BAKED FRESH
60 � rs . iQO WATT
399 P&Q Light ,39
Bulbs
SELECTED FLAVORS
Pepsi
Cola
Limn JWO With Add J $W.
99
324 ourD.U9hg90 Coflee 9gc
Bush Beer
MR COFFEE
Coffee
SEE STORE FOR DETAILS
WE SELL U.S. POSTAGE STAMPS AT POST OFFICE PRICES
We Sell American Express Money Orders 25c Ea.
ff ' t .V, t l LU UTMRUFEB 20 1988 QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
$3.99
1212 oz. can ctn.
L
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open Sunday 7 a.m. - 11 p.m. Mon. - Sat. 7 a.m. - 12 midnight
taa -0 �
S-l �- -m, m






I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 18,1988
OM-rkill
Rv FKIEDRICH
The All-Dave Edition of
The Cutting Edge of Humor"
Boss Rebuses, man
The Upside-down answers:
aSeqqiQ aSe q3
qoog izbn sioog z ?0"M
Super hard Boss Rebus
saeus Xqooa sauus 3�a o�fl
mi h
Pirate he
large cro
ByTIMCHANDU R
Sportj liit or
East Carolina's chances I
upset victory over C oloni
Athletic Association lead in!
Richmond University Saturd
night in Minges Coliseum .
possiblv rest in the hand
fan'
"We will need a big i
a lot of enthusiasm head I
Mike Steele said
(Richmond) are though! j
best team in the confer
we could sure use all th i
enthusiasm we coul I j
fans.
"Our guys (play r u
to have to fight it oul I i
continued. "It would
upset for us if we coul I
Richmond b j
with a game to be p
James Madison I
Greenville. The
currently 7-3 in the
standings. The Pira- ire7-l
the year and 3-8 in the �
0SJ,
W$jF w
Senior forward Alma BetheaJ
Coliseum Monday night. The
Charlie
Charlie Can has beei
assoicate athletic dir
external relations at
Carolina, ECU athleti"
Dave Hart announced
Carr. 41, will be the
director of the ECU Ed
Foundation (FirateClu
oversee all external an
the athletic depart-
assumes the duties held b
for the past two years
Carr was the athlel
Mississippi State from
before he chose tor
Carolina and enter
Mark! Where the heck is "Hellion?" Has it been swallowed up by the bells? Or did 7$
Tiffany get ya? And don't tell us Anisa isn't your babe! We know the scoop. Are youfcj �
embarrassed yet? This will teach you to try and cross (melodramatic pause)
The PIRATE COMIX PAGE WORD!
Mini
By Jeff "We'll leave the light on
for ya" Parker
What it is. Hello everyone in
cartoonland, I am the master of
this page, Jeff "Who is this Drivin'
and Cryin' person anyway?"
Parker, the most dangerous man
on campus. Ha. I didn't get one
nicknames
at the New Deli meetings. 1 don't
know what the strip is about, but
neither does he so its okay.
The Law is one of our new strips
that is shocking the world. 1 hired
this guy because he's a genius and
he's married and needs the bucks.
Every week someone in his strip
commits a crime, and The Law
stomps them into a smudge.
Neat, huh?
funny strip, and i f you think it is, Inside Joke is another new strip
�TfflS youesi� The List is really thafsreally bos, 1 guess the artist
Cartoons would come help me cool, and so is the wnter,even
out. They're all almost always though he wears sweaters with
That way lies Madness
late because the artists and
writers wait until the last minute
to do them. Tragic, isn't it?
First there's Walkin' the Plank.
This is done by some greek who
just shows up at the cartoonist
that Chippy Spoonfed always meetings to get free beer. Then he
r(lr nn XZ expects me to just reprint one of
his old strips so he'll get paid for
Charlie Brown on them. Good
lookin' jerk, be careful.
Then there is strip with some
cats in it. Every story in it rips off
something, but its the coolest
is cool, we never see him actually
turn the strip in. Except when he
comes around trying to sell us
those Shirts From Hell. We
always just say'Nooo, my
brother
its next to the bosscst section ever,
Fun-N-Games! This strip is full of
humor,and shows that theartist is
heavily influenced by Love
Connection host Chuck Woolery.
Bitchin
Maybe this column shook up all
those smug artists. Yeah, they got
to all run wild under the reign of
the legendary Shclton, but now
I'm whipping them all into shape.
And what about me, anyway?
The position of Staff Illustrator is
far more important than it ever
has been this year.
I've got a really radical office of
my own with a couch in it, found
HMMM
CAST CAKOUAti
FSAWRBS Afe'
-R
1
Pictured here are the co-creators
of Fun-N-Games�, Jeff, "Dear
Mr. Jesus" Parker and the
Bonehead. They hope everyone
enjoys this edition of the
Fun-N-Games� with a biscuit
by myself and the world's coolest ar�d medium Mr. Pibb.
roommate, Dave. Can anyone else
boast that? I'd like to close with
sticks on me
?Boneheaded note: Yes you
did.
Since I've been deling
introspective today, and since
Alan Guy thought he was too
good to turn in a strip. I'm oing
relate to you some things that just
need to be said to fill up space.
Lets discuss these things called
this week. Bwah hah-ha-ha-ha! It
is a funny strip though, and
Johnny Hart, who does B.C. likes
it. Let's just all kiss Mr. Guy's lint-
encrusted toes, shall we?
Next to that is Orpheus, the
deepest strip ever written. Horror
fans like this a lot. It's not a very
Campus Comics is one of those
strip everTand only the hippest strips I'm often scared to print, personal comments that no
people read it. I wish there were because the artist is the most one else will get.
controversial man on campus.
Just the other day I saw some
good ol' boys chasing him in a
pickup, swinging ropes. I think
more strips like this. This guy
must be a babe magnet. (Editor's
note: Bwah-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!)
Hellion. "From the name you
would think it was a serious
horror strip. But its not, its a zany
madcap strip done by my
Boncmciscr, enjoyed Mardi
Gras, let's do that Boj thing.
Earl vis, that Mohawk is boss.
Carol gets off on Action Jackson.
Everyone, that is, except One
pickle juice scum that neglected
A to turn in their comic
J strips this week.
I'll offer this guy sanctuary, Gary, Tm still looking for a ride to
because I'm the most dangerous Honda,bigguy.Steph P stay this
man on campus. weekend and give my life
Ust is Overkilland dont think meaning. And Dave, "I think I
the artist likes being last, either.
unofficial assistant. Once in a �� meaning
while his pal helps him, even the artist likes being last, either done g�t blood all over myself
thoughthisartistdoesn'tshowup Butsomebodvhastobethere,and whatiHs.
You know who
you two are.
Bv EARLVIS HAMP1
The tonj� �����
Have you ever r
minaturc basket
downtown bars?
In this addition
rover, we will tell)
best minaturc ba-
in Greenville. His r
Hager.
Hager's dav
After attendmc his one
fifth-vear ECU nw
downtown. Loaded
quarters, he positions
front of the game be hasp
Shooting rapidly at the
he demonstrates w
him Greenville's besl -
In his first game
Hager had a hot scores-
Most plavers would he
with a 76, but Hap
discontent. With a
expression drawn on hi
explains his problem.
much back spin on the
The minaturc b
shoohng game allows
shoot as many balls ay
within a 40-second nY
Made baskets count twi
' "��i� am i mtpwp"�
st � m
nrwM
�im�"r - �





I
i
I

2�S
EVER I
�y
j
s
ORI! T
FEATURES Af�
-90J5 , PS��tV
ear
�he
� everyone
edition of the
with a bisci
d medium Mr. Pibb.
that is, except the
We juice scum that neglected
to turn in their comic
strips this week.
ou know who
you two are.
pooh,
I HI l-ASI CAKOI INIAN
Sports
i ; H - 1988 Page H
Pirate head man Steele hopes to see
large crowd when Pirates host Spiders
By TIM CHANDLER
s ports I ilitor
Fastarolina's chances tor an
upset victory over Colonial
thletic Association leading
mond University Saturday
hi in Minges Coliseum could
isibly rest inthchandsof Pirate
fan
We will need a big crowd with
: ol enthusiasm head coach
Steele said. 1 hev
hmond) are thought to be the
Ivsl team in the conference and
ould surcuseall the help and
i nthusiasm wc could get from the
l kir guys (players) are going
�a e to fight it out too Steele
tinned. "It would be a great
jet tor us it we could win "
Richmond boosts a 17-6 record
with a game to be played against
tes Madison before it comes to
enville. The Spiders are
rently 7-3 in the conference
standings. The Piratesare 7-16 tor
ear and 3-8 in the CAA.
The Pirates will have to control
a ti loot performers for the Spiders
it they hope to control the game
m the tempo.
Peter Woolfolk, who leads the
CAA infield goal percentage with
a 58 percent clip, is averaging 18.9
points inside for the Spiders,
while pulling down 8.�- rebounds
per game. Wool folk's scoring
mark is third in the conference
standings, while his rebounding
total is second in the league.
C aiards Rodney Rice nd Ken
Atkinson will also give the Pirate
defenders problems. Rice is
averaging 12.3 points per game
and connecting on 4� percent of
his 3-pointers, which is second
best in the conference.
Atkinson is in second place in
the league in assists by averaging
5.1 dish outs per contest.
The Pirates will be able to
counter with Gus Hill, who is
second in the lead in scoring
averaging 19.3 points per contest
and 10th in rebounding with 5.2,
and Reed 1 ose, who is sixth in the
lead in scoring with 14.7 points
per game and fourth in the CAA
with a 51.7 field goal percentage.
"1 want us to be in the game
heading into the last few
minutes Steele said. "If we are
there then we will have a
chance to win it
The Pirates game against the
Spiders is set to tipoff at 7:30 p.m.
in Minges.
The Pirates will also be in action
again on Monday, Feb. 22 when
they play host to non-conference
foe Atlantic Christian College in
Minges Coliseum. ECU will then
take to the road on Wednesday,
Feb. 24 to battle William & Mary
before returning home on
Saturday Feb. 27 to play UNC-
Wilmintonin the final game of the
regular season.
CAA tabs Kobe
East Carolina head swimming
coach Rick Kobe was voted the
men's swimming coach Coach of
the Year during the Colonial
Athletic Association Swimming
and Diving Championships at the
U.S. naval Academy last
weekend.
Kobe was voted to accept the
honor by his fellow coaching
counterparts in the CAA.
Kobe's squads have put
together impressive meets in each
of the three CAA championships
beginning with the 1986 meet in
Wilmington.
Kobe has compiled an overall
men's and women's dual meet
record of 97-46 since becoming
head coach at ECU in 1982. Kobe's
men's squads have won 43 of 68
dual meets. The freshmen class
fielded by Kobe this season
proved to be one of the most
talented in the history of the
school's swimming program
leaving optimism for even more
success in the future for Kobe and
ECU swimming.
Freshman
over Jame
center Stank- Love
s Madison last week
"���Mte'Sd
rips down a rebound in the Pirates' win
in Minges Coliseum.
Ladies hoping for good finish
Senior foi
( oliseum
ward Alma Be
Monda night
thea, shown he
. The Pirates w
East Carolina's women's
basketball team hopes to end a
four-game losing streak when it
takes to the road to battle
Richmond on Saturday and
William & Marv on Mondav in
Colonial Athletic Association
action.
The Lady Pirates, 8-16 overall
and 2-7 in the CAA, are hoping to
regroup before entering the
league tournament March 10-12
at American University.
ECU is currently in sixth place
in the seven-team league and
enters the final 10 days of the
regular season jockeying for
position for the tournament. The
top seed in the conference
tournament will receive an
opening-round bye, while seeds
four and five will face each other
in the opening round. Seeds two
and seven and seeds three and six
re in earlier action this season, participated in her last game in Minges will meet in the other first-round
ere defeated in that contest by American University. contests.
Richmond's Lady Spiders n
currently riding a six game
winning streak with a game
scheduled against league-leading
and nationally-ranked lames
Madison on tap tonight. The Lady
Spiders, 1" 6ovcrall and 4-3 in the
CAA, last loss came during its
two-game road . thro
North Carolina when they lost to
both East Carolina and UN
Wilmington.
Laurie Governor leads I
Spider's attack with 13.8 points
and ninen bx 1imds per game. m
Bryant is averaging 13.1, while
Dana Pappas is scoring 12u
points per contest.
The Lady Tribe of William v
Marv had lost six straight con tests
heading into Wednesday night's
game against George Mason. The
Tribe, 7-13 overall and 1-6 in
conference play, will also battle
UNC-Wilmington before the
Pirates come to town Monday.
Th� e lost 83 67 to ames
Madisn in it most recent outing
ireer-high 31 p intsb
ins. Evans currently
Is the Tribe in - ring with
7 points a game, v hile Debbie
le is adding 11 5 points and
- n : mds.
The Lad i tes 54-46 less to
American Monday in Minj
iseum marked the final home
game vi the year for the team. It
- marked the final home game
in the coliseum tor senior forward
Alma Bethea of Goldsboro.
Bethea will finish her career
among ECU'S all-time top
scorers, rebounders and in
blocked sh ts Bethea has
currently scored 1,120 career
points, pulled down 64 caroms
and blocked 62 shots.
The Pirates will wind up their
season after the two-game road
swing to Virginia with a visit to
Wilmington's Trask Coliseum on
Feb. 27
Charlie Carr named to spot in athletic dept. by Dave Hart
i�iu�:�iJUAUr.trmilic it I IMP lOirnine his Y.irl 1.�. ore.inization.
Charlie Carr has been named
assoicate athletic director for
external relations at Hast
Carolina, ECU athletic director
Dave 1 lart announced Tuesday.
Carr. 41, will be the executive
director oi the ECU Educational
Foundation (Pirate Club) and will
oversee all external areas within
the athletic department. He
assumes the duties held by 1 lart
for the past two years.
Carr was the athletic director at
Mississippi State from 1985-1987
before he chose to return to North
. arolina and enter private
business.
"I'm extremely happy to be
back home and to have this
opportunity at East Carolina
Carr said. "I had originally
planned to stay out of athletics for
a while, but the opportunity to
work with Dave Hart and the
chance to head the Pirate Club
was too enticing.
"There is tremendous potential
in the future of ECU'S program,
and under the new leadership of
Chancellor (Richard) Eakin, as
well as the new direction in the
athletic department, there is a
great future ahead
Prior to becoming athletic
director at MSU, Carr was an
associate athletic director at
North Carolina from 1978-1985.
During that enure, the Tar Heels
experienced great success in their
total athletic program.
Carr was an assistant football
coach at UNC from 1971-1975 and
later coached at Rice Univeristy
from 1975-1978.
"We're very happy to announce
th hiring of Charlie Hart said.
"He brings a wealth of experience
to the job and he has roots in this
market area of North Carolina
and Virginia
A native of Virginia Beach, VA,
Carr played football and baseball
at UNC, earning his
undergraduate degree in 1
and his master's degree in 19"
He played two
professional baseba
k Mets organization.
Carr is married to the former
� Harrington oi Lumberton,
Slam dunk time arrives in IRS
jte-3
- ,
Miniature basketball king
ere
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
1 he College Rover
1 lave you ever noticed those
in.nature basketball games in
downtown bars?
In this addition of the college
rover, we will tell you about the
it minature basketball shooter
in Greenville. His name is Paul
1 lager.
t lager's day starts at 11 a.m.
After attending his one class, the
fifth-year ECU senior walks
downtown. Loaded with
quarters, he positions himself in
front of the game he has perfected.
Shooting rapidly at the small rim,
he demonstrates why people call
him Greenville's best shooter.
In his first game of the day,
1 lager had a hot score of 76 points.
Most players would be satisfied
with a 76, but Hager seems
discontent. With a preturbed
expression drawn on his face, he
explains his problem, "I put too
much back spin on the ball
The minature basketball
shooting game allows players to
shoot as many balls at the hoop
within a 40-second time frame.
Made baskets count two points in
the first 20 seconds and three
points during the final 20 seconds.
It a player scores 30 or beyond in
the initial time frame, then an
additional 30 seconds is allotted.
A score of 92 last week is
1 lager's best accomplishment to
date. But the young man majoring
in business feels he can break his
own record.
In revealing his game secret,
Hager says "It's all in the quick
release as he motions a fast
breaking of the wrist. He says the
faster a player can shoot the ball
the more attempts he will have to
score.
I lager says he acquired a quick-
release style of shooting from
playing playground basketball
against taller opponents who
called him pee-wce. "1 was
always the shortest one on the
court, so 1 had to develop a form
that wouldn't get blocked he
said. Besides basketball, Hager
says the quick release comes in
handy in water sports.
Hager developed his shooting
accuracy in an unlikely place; the
den of his house. "Back before
someone invented ncrf basketball
me and my brothers used to shoot
a tennis ball into a tin can we
nailed in the den wall Hager
said. Ever since then Hager has
been nailing shots.
After spending a daily three
dollars on the game, Hager has
scored three times in the 80's and
six times in the 60's and 70's. 1
asked Hager if his basketball
shooting habit wasn't a little
expensive.
"Well, you know college rover,
1 win all the money back when
people bet against me. just ask my
friend Earl who I took twenty
bucks from last week Hager
said.
In evaluating the games
downtown, Hager said that the
game at the Sports Pad is
probably the kindest. "The one at
the Sports Pad will give you more
rolls as opposed to the one at
Pantana's he said.
If you see a guy shooting
baskets downtown who looks like
he isn't old enough to be in the
bar, remember that's Paul Hager,
the minature basketball shooting
king. And don't bet against him.
By IMA RECK
Intramural Recreational Service
It's showtime at the I.R.S
Men and women will be flying
through the air at Minges
Coliseum with the greatest of ease
in the Slam Dunk Competition.
Registration will be held on
Monday, Feb. 22, while
preliminary competition gets
under way on Tuesday, Feb. 23.
The grand slam finals are set for
Thrusday, Feb. 25 in Minges.
Men will showboat their dunks
on a regulation 10-foot goal;
however, the women will be
jammin' on an 8-foot basket. This
will be the first-ever slam dunk
competition involving the girls,
so come on out!
Each slam dunk competitor will
be allowed five attempts and will
receive points for each dunk
based on three criteria: (a)
difficulty, 1-10 range;
creativity, 1-10 range; and
success of dunk, 1 point
basket.
Once again, registration
men and women is Monday, Feb
22.
4 p. m. at Memorial Gym, Room
204. The actual event will take
place on Sunday, Feb. 28 from 6
p.m. until 10 p.m. in Minges.
Don't forget! Time is running
out for all you wrestlers.
Registration is Wednesday, Feb.
24. Officials are also needed for
Wrestling competition, the clinic
is set for Wednesday, Feb. 24 at v
p.m. in Memorial Gym.
IMA REC is wrecked It is true
that nasty rumor, that the Stcelers
of the Faculty, Staff League
scored 96 points The details
coming up m ruesday's edition ol
the East Carolinian. Don't miss
it
(b)
(c)
for
for
More action is coming up for
Minges Coliseum - the Fitness
Olympics on Sunday, Feb. 28. The
Fitness Olympics will be a team
event for coeds, men and women,
with each team consisting of four
to six members. Events include
the stationary bicycle race,
human wheel barrow relay,
balloon relay, and frisbec obstacle
course relay.
Registration will be held on
Monday, Feb. 22 from 9 a.m. untill
Man or machine? � Norwood Davis (10) of Mantronix goes up for two in
a recent IRS basketball game as teammate Shane Wells (5) awaits a
possible rebound.
I





�i

1
14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 18,1988
B oilermakers still riding on top of poll
m
't
The best in hoops
By TIM CHANDLER
�f Sports Editor
Maryland-Baltimore County conference-leading Pittsburgh.
Monday 99-77 behind 20 points �����
from center Charles Shackleford. 15. LOYOLA MARYMOUNT
Shackleford erupted for 16 of his (20-3) � I have overlooked the
points in the second half as the Lions long enough. A pair of wins
Wolfpack broke open a 10-point over the weekend gave me all the
halftime game with a quick 21-8 proof 1 needed to include them in Monay night 85-83 behind
1. PURDUE (21-2) � The
Boilermakers continued to roll in
the Big Ten alone at the top of the
heap Mondav night bv disposing
ot top 20 foe Iowa 73-66. Troy
Lewis led the way in the victory
for the Boilers with 20 points.
Turdue coach Gene Keady had
said earlier in the week that he felt
the Boilermakers would have to
keep the Hawkeyes from scoring
80 points in order to win the game.
Good call coach.
� � � � �
2. TEMPLE (21-1) � The Owls
got a victory Tuesday night over
Penn State by the skin of their
teeth. The Nittany Lions played
hard in Philly before finally
tailing to the Owls, 50-49, thanks
to a 3-point play by freshman-
sensation Mark Macon, who
finished the game with 2b points,
in the waning seconds. Macon
Saturday by bumping off
Alabama 82-68. The win gives
Kentucky a 10-3 SEC mark.
Winston Bennett paced the wav
with 25 points, many oi which
could be credited to guard Ed
Davender. Davendcr set a career-
high mark in the contest by
dishing out 10 assists. Kentucky
was back on the hardwood
Wednesday against Tennessee.
9. PITTSBURGH (18-3) � The
Panthers survived a scare from
Providence Tuesday night before
holding on for a 87-8b win.
Freshman fason Matthews drilled
a pair of 3-pointers in the last
minute o play to lift the Panthers
to victory. Charles Smith paced
the win with 33 points on 12-of-13
shooting from the field. The
Panthers were also victorious
Saturday when they knocked off
spurt at the outset of the second
half. The Wolfpack also pulled off
an impressive win Saturday
when they knocked off Louisville
101-89 on national television.
Vinny Del Negro led the way with
29 points, while Chucky Brown
added 23 and Shackleford 20.
� � � � �
12. MICHIGAN (20-4) � The
the poll. Friday, the victim for the
Lions was Santa Clara as they
cruised to a 108-89 victory. And
on Saturday, Hank Gathers
pumped in 18 points and pulled
down 11 boards to pace a 118-109
win over San Francisco. The duo
of wins pushed Loyola's mark to
10-0 in the West Coast Athletic
back in action last night on the
road against Alabama.
� � � � �
19. BRADLEY (17-4) � The
Braves slipped past Drake
38
points from Hersey "All-World"
Hawkins. Hawkins, in fact,
scored the winning points in the
contest by tipping in a missed free
throw by Luke Jackson with only
two seconds showing on the
clock. Hawkins also paced a 98-68
Saturday win over Creighton
with 25 points. Jackson set career-
highs in that win with 19 points
TeleVideo XL
IBM Compatible
�Keyboard
�Monitor
�Graphics
PORTABLE �650
�Ijmltrd Quantity
IBM
Compatible
PC
$850
�Monitor TWO Drives
�Printer Port �Keyboard
Take tw Multi atui run.
Multlspeed
� 3M �
-� 544 77 MHZ ' V-
��1G I HAM
T�i)l rv �'�
-Prtotcj 3rml RGB Prna
�Super Tw�i lOl �?,
NEC $1399
Association. The Lions were back
Wolverines remained only one on the court Wednesday against and 17 caroms. Anthony jackson
game out of first place in the Big Pepperdine. nelped the Braves with 10
Ten Saturday by topping Bobby �����
Knight's resurgent Hoosiers 92- 16. MISSOURI (16-5) � The
72. The Wolverines are currently Tigers showed a lot of poise over
l-2 in the conference. Michigan the weekend by knocking off
broke open a close 40-38 game in Nevada-Las Vegas 81-79 on the
the second half to mount the rout road. Derrick Chievous paced the
behind 24 points from Gary Grant victory for Missouri with 26
and 22 from Glen Rice. The points, while Byron Irvin added Norm Sloan's boys also ripped
Wolverines were back in action 17. The resurgent Tigers were Mississippi State 69-52 over the
back in action on the road last weekend. In the MSU game,
night against Big Eight foe Iowa which was Sloan's 600th career
State. A letdown in that game coaching win, Vernon Maxwell
could prove detrimental to the led the way with 23 points.
points and a dozen assists.
20. FLORIDA (18-7) � The
Gators rolled past Miami (FT.) 83-
73 Monday night in a non-
conference, in-state showdown.
last night against Minnesota.
also paced the way for Temple Villanova 87-75 behind 17 points
Saturday when it rolled past
George Washington in a rout 92-
hr. Macon pumped in 23 points,
while Howard Evans followed
with 17 points and a dozen assists.
The win Sa turday gave the Owls a
13-0 mark in "the Atlantic 10
Conference. Next stop for Temple
is on Tobacco Road Sunday when
they will put their prestigious
ranking on the line in the Dean
Dome against North Carolina.
� � � � �
3. OKLAHOMA (22-2) � The
Sooners got their revenge
Saturday of an earlier loss to
Kansas State bv pounding the
Wildcats 112-95. All five starters
for Oklahoma scored in double
figures led by 21 points from
Mookie Blaylock. Ricky Grace
had 20 and Stacey King 19.
Harvey Grant and Dave Seiger
chipped in 18 each in the Sooner
win. The win boosted the runnin'
Sooners to 8-1 in the Big Eight.
This team is literally unbeatable if
its opponents try to run with
them. The Sooners were back in
action last night on the road at in-
state rival Oklahoma State.
4. ARIZONA (23-2) � The
Wildcats knocked off another
patsy member of the Pac-10
Sunday when they leveled
Oregon State 77-62. Lute Olsen
should think about transfering his
team to another conference out
west like the WAC if he wants
some real competition for his
team. Arizona will take back to
the hardwood tonight when it
meets Southern Cal on the road.
5. NORTH CAROLINA (18-3)
� The Tar Heels remained tied
atop the standings in the ACC
Sunday after surviving a scare
from Virginia. The Heels, who
trailed by as many as 17 points in
the first half, rallied behind the
shooting touch of Jeff Lebo to win
64-58. Lebo led the team in scoring
with 18 points, while pulling
down eight caroms from his
guard position. The Tar Heels
were back in action last night in
the Dean Dome trying to gain
revenge for an earlier loss to Wake
Forest.
6. DUKE (18-3) � The Blue
Devils avenged their earlier loss
to Maryland Saturday by winning
in Cole Field House 90-83. The
win kept the Devils locked in a tie
for the top spot in the ACC with
North Carolina. Both teams are 7-
2 in conference action. Danny
Ferry scored a career-high 33
points to pace the win, while
Robert Brickey chipped in 21 and
Kevin Strickland 19. Duke was
back in ACC action last night in
Cameron Indoor Stadium against
Virginia.
7. BRIGHAM YOUNG (20-1)
� The Cougars picked up win
number 20 of the season Saturday
by slipping past Colorado State
86-80. The victory was paced by
Michael Smith's 20 points and
also 18 points from guard Jeff
Chatman. The Cougars will get
back into the heart of WAC play
tonight when they travel to
California to battle league foe San
Diego State.
� �� � �
8. KENTUCKY (18-3) � The
Wildcats chalked up their fifth
win in a row and took control of
the Southeastern Conference
from Smith and 16 from Sean
Miller. The Panthers are currently
8-2 in the Big East race.
� � � � �
10. NEVADA-LAS VEGAS
(21-3) � The Runnin' Rebels were
knocked oil at home for only the
fourth time in five years over the
weekend by Missouri, 81-79. The
Rebels, who rallied from a 44-32
halftime deficit, were paced in
their defeat by Gerald Paddio,
who scored 17 points. The Rebels
will return to PC A A action
tonight when they host Utah State
at home. Don't look for the Rebsto
lose two in a row at home,
especially considering who they
are playing.
13. SYRACUSE (18-6) � The
Orangemen lost to Georgetown
for the second time this year over Tigers.
the weekend 71-69. Syracuse blew
an 11-point lead in the game in
dropping to 7-4 in the Big East
Conference race. Stcvie
Thompson led the way for the
Orangemen in defeat with 20
points. Syracuse was trying to
rebound and get back on the
winning track last night at home
in the Carrier Dome against
conference ioc St. John's.
NEW LOWER PRICING
ON 77 IE
TOSHIBA LAPTOPS
$3080
T 3100
o
$1598
T-llOO
Come by and Register for a
FREE Hayes 1200 Baud Modem
To be gtDtm auny ori April .if). 1 tHH
No pureha.se necessary.
SDF
COMPUTERS
106 E. 5th. St. (Beside Cubbies)
Greenville 752-3694
� � � � �
14. GEORGETOWN (17-6) �
The Hoyas knocked off Villanova
Monday night 56-54 behind 22
points from Charles Smith and a
dozen from Perry McDonald.
Smith fired in 17 of his points in
the second half. The Hoyas also
defeated Syracuse for the seventh
straight time Saturday in the
Capitol Centre. Mark Tillmon
17. IOWA (17-7) � The
Hawkeyes rested over the
weekend in anticipation of their
meeting against top-ranked
Purdue. The rest did little good,
however, as the Boilermakers
won anyway 73-66. The
Hawkeyes needed a faster-paced
tempo in order to pull out an
upset and that just didn't
materialize. The Hawkeyes will,
however, make their presence
known when the Big Ten race
heads to crunch time.
� � � � �
18. VANDERBILT (16-5) �
The Commodores pushed their
SEC mark to 9-4 over the weekend
by routing Mississippi 93-68.
Vandy nailed nine-of-13 from the
3-point line in the game to aid the
win. Will Perdue paced the
scored 19 points in the 71-69 win,
11. NORTH CAROLINA while Smith added 17. The Hoyas Commodores in scoring with 17
The Wolfpack have a tough task awaiting them points, while Barry Goheen
Saturday on the road at Big East chipped in 15. Vanderbilt was
WE VE GOT
We've tfot a summer you won't be able
to resist at Tar River Estatesstroll
along the river trail, picnic by the pool
and enjoy our quiet wooded area Our
exceptional 1 bedrooms offer private
patios, clubhouse and 24-hour
maintenance: all just minutes from
ECU and Medical Center.
Hours 9-5:30 Weekdays. 1 -5 Saturday and Sunday
752-4225
1400 Willow St.
Professionally managed by Shelter
Management Gmup
�Na taking dt portta for summer and fail only on 1
and 2 bedrooms
blew past undermanned
TarKiver
OL
w,
�C-3 3-
GTYM
�ie E�ais Streei Ma
:acss ;ft� sfeer
Lets Get In Shape
Spring Fever
Specials
Nowthrouah the end
of the Semester
$55 for everything
$27 for Aerobics
$45 for one month
of unlimited Sun Tan
Bed visits
Coupon For One Free
Work Out
Weights or Aerobics
�I
I
I
I
l
I
Aerobic Schedule
Monday 3:15, 4:20, 5:30, 6:45
Tuesday 3:15, 4:20, 5:30
Wednesday 3:15, 4:20, 5:30, 6:45
Thursday 3:15, 4:20, 5:30, 6:45
Friday 3:15. 5:30
Preview
r
88
Summer Student
Leadership
Opportunity
Available
East Carolina University
ORIENTATION
STAFF
Pick up Application Packet
209 Whichard
Deadline Extended:
February 19, 1988 � 12:00 P.M.
Pirati
k
i �� to
PQDA trut i
basketba
V . rte
. .�-�� i

I
Pirate
r.

NC A
i's Ken -
?
NX
r d . �
Fenner i
-

-
1 r.
IT I-
3 ���
-
; �
krd
iker
zonnc
ir
ituden t ; �

lead" fa
ribed as
Crowds
warned
by NCAA
An tnen is
behavior at
games has led t!
penalties I r
can't control ur:
Under a ne
the rules, teams
two free thr
the ball it their
deliberaulv d
throwing debris
the past, onl)
awarded
The new in
from an inn dent
between ,
Mercer Universit)
Mercer got fourl
technical fouls all
Georgia State fans ai
won 80-78.
Georgia State pr
only two foul shots ST.
been awarded and that'
the new interpretat
In the past, referees
classifying siK h behavior a?
of the game, resulting in or.
foul shot
The new interpret!
force last Wednesday
Florida was awarded
throws and the ball after Go
fans threw toilet paper pp
other debris on the G
Coliseum court with five fo:
left and the Bulldogs up 7
Dwayne Schintzius hit a
shots, but the Gators missex
pointer as time ran out ats.
Bulldogs won 71-65.






1
I
I
eleVideo XL
�IBM Compatible
. 'Keyboard
a 'Monitor
�Graphics
�ORTABLE $650
BM n$8so
Itof �TWO Drives
v i Port 'Keyboard
. id run.
Multlspeed
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 18,1988 15
NEC $1399
�VG
TOSHIBA LAPTOPS
.598 C $3080
T 3100
� for a
M dem.
SDF
OMPUTERS
Cubbies).
. I 94
t
& GOT
yuA. jiAnrMAr
pool
i ana Our
is offer private
rid 24 hour
minutes from
a Center.
752-4225
1400 Willow St.
a :� I � Shelter
' Group
. on 1
�ma.
w
dent
P
ty
ersity
ON
Packet
P.M.
Pirate fans to help in voting for NCAA team
A nationwide balloting
program, conducted by USA
TODAY, that will allow college
basketball fans to select an NCAA
All-time Final Four Team will be
included as one of the highlights
of the 50th anniversary
commemoration of the Division 1
Basketball Championship.
Pirate basketball fans can
participate in the event by simply
tilling out a ballot form on
Saturday, Feb. 27 when the
Pirates battle UNC-Wilmington
at 7:30 p.m. in a CAA game in
Minges Coliseum.
1 "he announcement of the ballot
program was made jointly by the
NCAA and USA TODAY,
opening the anniversary
celebration that will culminate
with the Final Four in Kansas
City's Kemper Arena, April 2-4
1988.
"The Final Four is one of the
USA's most exciting and unifying
events said USA TODAY
president Tom Curley, "USA
TODAY believes its association
with the Final Four Foundation
will boost the recognition of the
enduring contributions of the
colleges, the athletes and the
NCAA
ISA TODAY will feature fan
Mloting each Tuesday in its
sports section for a six-week
period beginning February 9. In
addition to the USA TODAY
ballots, college basketball fans
will have the opportunity to vote
for their All-Time Team at
selected games played by
Division 1 institutions beginning
in February.
A blue ribbon panel of current
and former collegiate basketball
coaches and former chairmen of
the NCAA Division 1 Men's
Basketball Committee selected 50
players to be listed on the ballots
that will be distributed nationally
and printed in USA TODAY. The
50 players, 10 from each of the five
decades the Final Four spans,
were selected by the panel from
more than 250 players who
starred in the 49 NCAA
tournaments. Each ballot also will
include a write-in portion.
The selections were made by
four current head basketball
coaches � Denny Crum of
Louisville, Jud Heathcote of
Michigan State, Dean Smith of
North Carolina and John
Thompson fo Georgetown � and
four former collegiate coaches �
Joe B. Hall of Kentucky, Henry Iba
of Oklahoma State, Pete Newell of
California and John Wooden of
UCLA. Also included on the
panel were three former chairmen
of the Division 1 Basketball
Cammittee� Vic Bubas,
Fenner nailed again
Fo
ormer University of North
Carolina tailback Derrick Fenner
was involved in a fight during a
party at Duke University last
weekend and was asked to leave
the campus by public safety
cers authorities said Tuesday.
University police broke up a
fight between Fenner and an
identified UNC-Chapel Hill
student about 1 a.m. Sunday
during a fraternity party at the
Mary Lou Williams Center for
Black Culture, campus police Lt.
Leu Wardcll told the News and
Observer of Raleigh.
No charges were brought
ii� iii.n�h EeMM irVjCjonrwogtion with
the fight, which police said
apparently started with an
argument over a woman.
Wardcll said Fenner refused to
leave the campus when officers
first asked him to, but a friend
later convinced him to go. Fenner
could not be reached for
comment.
Wardcll said no action would
be taken against Fenner in
connection with the incident
unless the UNC-Chapel Hill
student objected.
Fenner, of Oxon Hills, Md was
charged in the June 2 shooting
death of a teen-ager in what police
described as a drug battle at a
Crowds
warned
by NCAA
An increase in unruly crowd
behavior at college basketball
games has led the NCAA to stiffen
penalties for home teams who
can't control unruly fans.
Under a new interpretation of
the rules, teams will be awarded
two free throws and possession of
the ball if their opponents' fans
deliberately delay a game by
throwing debris on the court. In
the past, only one foul shot was
awarded.
The new interpretation stems
from an incident in a game
between Georgia State and
Mercer University. In that game,
Mercer got four foul shots on two
technical fouls called against
Georgia State fans and eventually
won 80-78.
Georgia State protested that
only two foul shots should have
been awarded and that resulted in
the new interpretation.
In the past, referees had been
classifying such behavior as delay
of the game, resulting in only one
foul shot.
The new interpretation was in
force last Wednesday night as
Honda was awarded four free
throws and the ball after Georgia
fans threw toilet paper paper and
other debris on the Georgia
Coliseum court with five seconds
left and the Bulldogs up 71-41
Dwayrte Schintzius hit all four
shots, but the Gators missed a 3-
pointer as time ran out and the
Bulldogs won 71-65.
Maryland apartment complex.
The charge later was dropped
after prosecutors said they had
insufficient evidence.
Fenner pleaded guilty last
month to one count of cocaine
possession in a plea agreement in
Maryland. Under the agreement,
the Maryland state attorney
agreed to drop a weapons charge.
Fenner had been arrested on the
drug and weapons charges before
his arrest in the slaying.
Fenner, who lost his playing
eligibility in late 1986 because of
academic trouble, said last month
he had been readmitted to UNC-
Chapel Hill. But his attorneys say
the step is conditional on his
performance in correspondence
courses he is taking now and
classes he plans to take on the
Chapel Hill campus this summer.
commissioner of the Sun Belt
Conference; Wayne Duke,
commissioner of the Big Ten
Conference; and Dave Gavitt,
commissioner of the Big East
Conference.
The panel members all have
been associated with the NCAA
tournament and all eight coaches
have won at least one NCAA Final
Four championship.
Fans will vote for the five
players they consider to be the
best in Final Four history. The five
players receiving the most votes
will be recognized as All-Time
Final Four team members, and the
player receiving the most votes in
each of the five decade will earn
Player of the Decade honors.
"We are pleased to join with
USA TODAY in this fan-balloting
program for college basketball's
fiftieth anniversary season said
NCAA Executive Director Dick
Schultz. "All of those who follow
college basketball and the Final
Four will have an opportunity to
actively participate in our
celebration
More than three million ballots
will be produced for voting at
Division 1 games in February and
early March. Additional balloting
will take place during first-round
gamesofthe 1988 tournament. All
balloting will be tabulated by
USA TODAY and the NCAA's
Final Four Foundation. The
announcement of the All-Time
Team and Players of the Decade
will be made during the Fianl
Four weekend.
FINAL FOUR ALL-TIME
NOMINEES
(Years played in tournament are
listed in parenthesis)
1939-40's
Ralph Beard, Kentucky (1948-
49)
Howie Dallmar, Stanford
(1942)
Dwight Eddlcman, Illinois
(1949)
Arnie Ferrin, Utah (1944)
Alex Groza, Kentucky (1948-49)
George Kaftan, Holy Cross
(194748)
Bob Kurland, Oklahoma A&M
0945-46).�-
Jim Pollard, Stanford (1942)
Ken Sailors, Wyoming (1943)
Gerald Tucker, Oklahoma
(1947)
1950's
Grid time change
East Carolina's football game
with defending national
champion Miami has been moved
to Oct. 29, 1988 to accomodate a
televised scheduling change for
the Hurricanes.
The date change will allow the
Hurricanes to host Florida State,
the 1987 number-two ranked
team, in a nationally-televised
meeting in early September.
The ECU-Miami game, which
was orginally scheduled for Nov.
12, will be played at 1:30 p.m. on
Oct. 29 at the Pirates' Ficklen
Stadium on the ECU campus.
ECU'S 1988 home schedule
includes the defending champ
Hurricanes, the number four-
ranked Syracuse Orangemen
(Oct. 22) and 1987 Sun Bowl
participant West Virginia (Oct. 8).
Other home dates on the Pirate
schedule include Tennessee Tech,
Southern Mississippi and
Southwestern Louisiana.
Less than a Dime
and open til Nine
We're your one-stop copy shop with more
services available than you will find at any
copy shop anywhere.
Color Copies � Blueprinting � Laser Type
Copies up to 36" x 40" � Office Supplies
758-2400
L
open early
open late
open six days
ACCU
Located in Downtown Greenville
Next to Chicos Restaurant in the Georgetown Shops
Elgin Baylor, Seattle (1958)
Wilt Chamberlain, Kansas
(1957)
Tom Gola, LaSalle (1954-55)
K.C. Jones, San Francisco (1955)
Clyde Lovellctte, Kansas (1952)
Oscar Robertson, Cincinnati
(1959-60)
Guy Rodgers, Temple (1958)
Len Rosenbluth, North
Carolina (1957)
Bill Russell, San Francisco
(1955-56)
Jerry West, West Virginia (1959)
1960's
Bill Bradley, Princeton (1965)
Gail Goodrich, UCLA (1964-65)
John Havlicek, Ohio State
(1960-61-62)
Elvin Hayes, Houston (1967-68)
Walt Hazzard, UCLA (1962-64)
Kareem-Adbul Jabbar, UCLA
(1967-68-69)
Jerry Lucas, Ohio State (1960-
61-62)
Jeff Mullins, Duke (1963-64)
Cazzie Russell, Michigan (1964-
65)
Charlie Scott, North Carolina
(1968-69)
1970's
Kent Benson, Indiana (1976)
Larry Bird, Indiana State (1979)
Jack Givens, Kentucky (1975-
76)
Earvin Johnson, Michigan State
(1979)
Marques Johnson, UCLA (1974-
75-76)
Scott May, Indiana (1976)
David Thompson, North
Carolina State (1974)
Bill Walton, UCLA (1972-73-74)
Sidney Wicks, UCLA (1969-70-
71)
Jamaal Wilkes, UCLA (1972-73-
74)
1980's
Steve Alford, Indiana (1987)
Johnny Dawkins, Duke (1986)
Patrick Ewing, Georgetown
(1982-84-85)
Darrell Griffith, Louisville
(1980)
Michael Jordan, North Carolina
(1982)
Rodney McCray, Louisville
(1980)
Akecm Olajuwon, Houston
(1983-84)
Ed Pinckney, Villanova (1985)
Isiah Thomas, Indiana (1981)
James Worthy, North Carolina
(1982)
BLUE RIBBON PANEL:
Denny Crum, Louisville
Dean Smith, North Carolina
Joe B. Hall, Kentucky
Pete Newell, California
Vic Bubas, Sun Belt Conference
Dave Gavitt, Big East
Conference
Jud Heathcote, Michigan State
John Thompson, Georgetown
Henry Iba, Oklahoma A&M
John Wooden, UCLA
Wayne Duke, Big Ten
Conference
ihhhh Clip-N-Save ����n
Hank's Homemade let cream
and frozen yogurt
321 East 10th Street, Greenville
(Next to Wendy's)
758-4896
Buy 1 mini-or large sundae
Get one 12 Price
Your Choice of
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream or
9anf(s frozen yogurt
Good Thru 2-22-88
ft
Clip-N-Save
Presidents Day's Sale
FLOOR LAMPS
YOUR CHOICE
J Bnte Brass
Fan Pleat
Torchiers
jj $120 value
y 63 high
Soha Brass
J Shell & Tent
Aajustabie
Pharmacy Lamps
$100 valuer
Jack-N-Jill
White Melamme
Bookshelf Units
Jack $90 value I v
59.99
Jill $60 value
39.99
"N
ti�9�i2
" � 5�.
Plus Much, Much More .
An Stores Open Nightly & Sundays � Except Cameron Village
RALEi&H � Cameron Village & North Pidge DURHAM � Northgate Mali
GRIENVIUE � The Piaja
DRESS FOR SUCCESS.
� - r f 1 J ifTf '
As a Navy officer, pride and
professionalism come with the
territory. You also develop the
potential that you know you have
and gain leadership experience that
builds success.
In operations and management,
in scientific and technical fields,
you work with highly talented men
and women committed to being the
best.
You'll get a solid starting salary
and additional allowances that add
even more to your income Plus,
you'll get benefits like free medical
and dental care, thirty days' paid
vacation each vear, and
opportunities for postgraduate
education.
To qualify, you must be a U.S.
citizen no more than 28 years old.
have a BA or BS degree, and pass
an aptitude test and phvsical exam.
Get a leadership and management
opportunity that makes a big
difference in any career. Call Navy
Management
Programs: 1-800-662-72317419 or
outside N.C. 1-800-528-8713.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
CONTACT: NCI MITCH WELCH, Career Placement Office
FEBRUARY 23, 1988
OFFICER.
Presents SPRING BREAK '88
at the Luxurious
We GUARANTEE you will stay at
Daytonas BEST PARTY HOTEL!
The HAWAIIAN INN - HOME OF THE
HAWAIIAN LUAU ALSO
New Jacuzzis Kitchenettes
New Video Club Balcony wOcean View
Indoor Heated Pod Cable T.V
(only one in Daytona) Home of MTV
Large Pool Deck with Bar
NEW PRICES
Quad Capacity Now Only 199
5 Capacity Now Only $195
6 Capacity Now Only 189
U-Drive
$149.00 Quad
-DESIGNERS sponsors DAILY POOL PARTIES
this year in association with COORS BEER
-We leave ECU EARLY FRIDAY NIGHT, MARCH 4
-Air-Conditioned, Modern MotorCoaches
-Professional 24hr. staff" at the Hawaiian
-Special one-day excursions
-Car Rentals Available
DESIGNERS IS NOT A "FLY BY NIGHT
COMPANY' CALL US TODAY
SoMwi MjM-jrm Btmaif
to ttw SUM, SAMO and SUftF l
Deadline February 23 Call Todd 758-9311 or Dave 757-3516
wffcr �
m ��. f���
� �� �ii'OwHi







II
OUR PHILOSOPHY
IS TO SERVE YOU A
HAMBURGER THAT'S
BETTER THAN
THE OTHER GUY'S.
AND WE'RE PUTTING
OUR MONEY WHERE
YOUR MOUTH IS.
BUY 1 SINGLE
HAMBURGER
vjeLI vJINfc-
v�2� FREE
F:
k

BUY 1 SINGLE
HAMBURGER
W i i 1
FREE

i per G
� with any
BUY 1 SINGLE
HAMBURGER
GET 0
FREE
BUY 1 SINGLE
HAMBURGER
X GET ONE
FREE
I

I
i
I

I
i
-V.
� � ��� Ml II

- �
l
l

l
BIG CLASSIC
COMBO
-
R Medium Drink.
BIG CLASSIC
$1.99
Big Classic, Regular Fries, Medium Drink.
Valid only at Participating Wend vs. Please pre
upon when ordering. One coupon p i
Not valid with any other offer? Chi
tra. Tax extra where applicable.
EXPIRES MARC! I 31, '

I
BIG CLASSIC
COMBO
$1.99
, Regular dium Drink.
rt per Customer
other offers. Cheese
.
31, 1988
SAVE
.80
SAVE
.80
SAVE
.75
CHICKEN
SANDWICH
A, NOW ONLY
$1.49
i
1
CHICKEN
SANDWICH
JiX NOW ONLY
$1.49
75c OFF
One CO mer
�rti ipating Wendy's. Please present
coupon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit. Not valid with any other offers Ch�
extra. Tax extra where applicable
EXPIRES MARCH 31, 1988
THE PRICE OF A
GARDEN FRESH
SALAD
�'� nd sent
One coupon per Customer
with any other offers. Cheese
li .
988
BIG CLASSIC
COMBO
3 $1.99
Big Classic, Regular Fries, Medium Drink.
Valid only at Parti
coupon when g. One coupon p.
per visit. Not valid with anv
extra Tax extra where app
EXPIRES MARCH 31, I
I
c
m
i
i
i



SAVE
.75
75t OFF
THE PRICE OF A
GARDEN FRESH
SALAD
iraapahng
coupon when ordering. One coupon per Ci
per visit Not valid with anv other offers Ch�
extra. Tax extra where applicable.
EXPIRES MARCH 31, 1
SAVE
.75
752 OFF
THE 'RICE OF ANY
HOT STUFFED
BAKED POTATO
�paring Wendy's. Pfc -ent
;x-in when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit. Not uh any other offers. Cheese
ipplicable.
IRES MARCH 31,1988
SAVE
.75
75tf OFF
li
THE PRICE OF ANY
HOT STUFFED
BAKED POTATO
Valid only at Participating Wendy's. Please present
coupon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit. Not valid with any other offers. Cheese
extra Tax extra where applicable.
EXPIRES MARCH 31, 1988
SAVE
.30
REGULAR SIZE
CHILI
Valid only at Participating Wendy's. Please present
ipon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit Not valid with anv other offers. Cheese
extra Tax extra where applicable.
EXPIRES MARCH 31, 1988
SAVE
.30
REGULAR SIZE
CHILI
Valid only at Participating Wendy's Please pro-
coupon when ordering. One coupon per Customer
per visit. Not valid with any other offers Cheese
extra. Tax extra where applicable.
EXPIRES MARCH 31, 1988
The best burgers
in the business.
� CnUft)
T r T '111 !�,�� I
pj)tiiiiii� i � � -� it m mn
mmtimm
mmQmmmm





Title
The East Carolinian, February 18, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 18, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.590
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy