The East Carolinian, February 11, 1988






COMING TUESDAY:
The East Carolinian will begin covering Greenville
decisions that affect the students. Tuesday we feature
this month's city council meeting.
ENTERTAINMENT
'The Lark' opens Wednesday at McGinnis Theater.
For a review, see page 13.
SPORTS
The Pirates look to continue their winning ways this
weekend in key conference matchups. See page 16.
She iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 No. 3b
Thursday, February 11,1988
Greenville, NC
18 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Debators focus on enlightening students
By STEPHANIE FOLSOM
Matt VNnter
ui may have been enlight-
ened, amused or maybe oven of-
fended, but it you learned any-
thing from the pornography de-
bate Tuesday, then Gloria Le-
onard and Pelores Alexander
accomplished what they wanted
to
When asked alter the forum
why they debate on college cam-
puses both women agreed they
want to reach young people. Al-
exander said that she wants her
views to reach young men and
- is where she can do that.
Hie question of whether por-
nography is art or smut is one
I eonard and Alexander said had
to be answered individually.
According to Alexander, "Por-
nography is not sexual liberation.
It is a form of sexual oppression
As a founding member of the
National Organization of Women
and the co-founder of Women
Against Pornography, Alexander
wants more people to be aware of
the ill-effects of an industry that
"Spews out the worst kind oi
exploitation of women
Leonard, on the other hand,
said pornography is a form of free
expression. She did not deny that
pornography portrays women as
sex-objects. Instead, she said
"There is a time and a place, and
when that time and place presents
itself, then it's okay to be viewed
as sex-objects
Leonard, the publisher of High
Society magazine and star of the
adult film "Mistv Beethoven is
concerned with groups like
Alexander's infringing upon
rights graranteed under the First
Amendment. She told students
not to be "steam-rollered by thugs
in suits or women in dresses tell-
ing you what to do
Leonard also said that it was
unfair for Alexander to link por-
nography to violent crimes. Alex-
ander had said that pornography
is commonly found in the homes
oi men who commit violent
crimes. Leonard challenged that
by saying "If the police went into
any other man's apartments they
would find the same magazines
as any mass murderer had. You
would also find milk in the refrig-
erator and toothpaste in the bath-
room
Alexander used slides to make
her point about how erotica has
turned into pornography over the
past 15 years. Leonard said that a
person needs to go and see for
themselves what is out there.
A concern of Alexander's is that
'Tomography leads to males' at-
titudes becoming more callous
towards women and that that
influences rape and wife-beating.
Another theme Alexander
stressed was that "Pornography
has become a terrible condition-
ing agent in our society She said
that if men would stop buying it
and women would stop partici-
pating in it, then wecould be rid of
it.
Leonard said she was "amazed,
amused, and appalled" that the
groups attacking pornography
are not concerned with slasher
movies which depict women
alone being subject to harm. She
said that these movies promote
more violence than pornography.
When asked if a compromise
could be reached Alexander said
"Yes, if they could rid porn of
sexism, and turn it into erotica
Leonard and Alexander said
they do agree on some issues,
such as the right to abortion and
the need of better resources for
birth control.
Allen Manning, mediator for
the debate, said "Everyone who
came out left with an opinion
about what both sides were ad vo-
cating
That was what both women
said they hoped to achieve. "I
think that if we made them (the
audience) think, then we have
done our jobs Alexander said.
Appropriations begin
ByTlMHAMl'IUN
Maff Writer
Money. The green stuff. The
SGA funds student groups with
valid SGA approved constitu-
tions, but it groe.ps don't apply,
they will receive no money.
The SGA appropriation
committee is preparing for their
busiest time of the year in the
weeks to follow, as they draw the
agenda for annual appropria-
tions. The committee will con-
sider the budgets oi 35 to 40 stu-
dent groups after the groups sub-
mit budgets tor the upcoming
year.
Besides having a SGA
constitution, groups need to have
raised 15 percent of their budgets
before applying for annual appro-
priations, according to Glen
Perry, the chairman of the appro-
priation committee. Perry saidthe
deadline for submitting receipts
or statements proving that groups
have raised 15 percent of their
budgets is Feb. 28.
A subcommittee of the appro-
l lations group will review the
receipts before reporting to the
committee favorably or infavora-
bly, Perry said. The 15 percent
stipulation, or the matching reve-
nue plan, was passed by the SGA Gloria Leonard, left makes a point Tuesday as Delore Alexander looks on. The two women had ju,t
in the spring of 1987. completed a debate on pornography sponsored by the Student Union Forum Committee. (Photo hv Jon
See SGA, page 2 Jordan ph�tolab)
SRA elects secretary for spring
By KIMLEY EDER
Staff Writer
Dcnise Young was elected sec-
retary of he Student Residence
Association following a secret
vote at Tuesday's meeting.
Young, who will replace Dcena
While the weekend was cold, it wasn't snow but toilet paper that covered the Chi Omega sorority
and its yard on Fifth Street. (Photo by Thomas Walters � Photolab)
Niewiadomski, will perform du-
ties including taking minutes for
the meetings and distributing
them, typing any memos or
committee reports needed and
recording attendance.
"One Night in Bangkok" was
chosen as the theme for this year's
spring dance. The dance will be
held at the Holiday Inn. The menu
will feature oriental cuisine, in-
cluding egg-rolls and fortune
cookies, and many other items.
Tickets will be on sale from Tues-
day until the day of the dance.
Cost will be $3 per person, $5 per
couple for SRA cardholders and
$4 per person, $7 per couple for
non-SRA cardholders. Bus trans-
portation will be available to and
from campus for anyone who
needs transportation.
It was announced that Pirate
Walk will close today for the rest
of the semester. SRA President
Thomas Denton said that the SRA
and SGA need input from the
residence halls about the program
on whetcre it should be continued
next year and how effective it is.
Serious consideration is being
given to turning the program over
to the public safety reserves, but
the major obstacle here is the cost
of the radios. If radios are fur-
nished they could cost anywhere
from $299 to $800 apiece, and
Denton said it is estimated that
five to seven radios will need to be
purchased. The major benefit oi
public safety running the pro-
gram, however, will be that it can
run the entire year, and maybe in
the summer also.
Nacy Mize will be at Tuesday's
meeting to discuss the intramural
programs with respect to
women's residence halls. It has
been proposed that the intramu-
ral activities in all-women resi-
dence halls be stopped com-
pletely. All IRS representatives,
and anyone with an opinion on
the subject is encouraged to at-
tend the meeting. It was men-
tioned that the meeting may be
held in one of the rooms in Jovner
east wing if more space is needed.
National fellowships offered through society
The ECU chapter of the Phi
Kappa Phi National Honor Soci-
ety has announced it is accepting
applications for graduate fellow-
ships awarded nationally by the
society.
Fifty fellowships worth up to
$6,000 each will be awarded by
the organization. An additional
30 students will recei ve honorable
mention awards worth $500 each.
The awards are for first year
graduate or professional study in
any discipline.
Recipients are chosen on the
basis of scholastic achievement,
high standardized test scores
(when applicable), transcript rec-
ord, honors and enrichment pro-
grams, promis of success in
graduate or professional study,
leadership, participation in uni-
versity and community activities,
experience, evaluation by instruc-
tors, and expression of study
plans and career goals.
Students who feel they are
qualified may apply to Fred
Broadhurst, chairman of the local
selection committee, in 131
Flanagan or Douglas McMillan in
124B Austin. Broadhurst said
competition at the university
level is difficult, as it is all through
the selection process.
To receive the award, a student
must be an active member oi Phi
Kappa Phi on the date the a wards
are made. Applications will be
accepted from those selected from
membership that have not vet
been initiated.
Applicants must have initiated
plans to enroll as a candidate for
an advanced degree in a recog-
nized graduate or professional
See NATIONAL, page 2
S
i
��-
- �"�





I

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 11,1988
from
ECU News Bureau
The North Carolina Scottish
Rite Masonic Foundation, Inc
has presented a gift of $60,000 to
East Carolina University for the
1987-88 operation of the Scottish
Rite Clinic for Childhood Lan-
guage Disorders. The clinic is in
the Department of Speech-Lan-
guage and Auditorv Tathology
(SLAP) in the School of allied
Health Sciences, and since the
foundation's initial gift in 1972
establishing the clinic. North
Carolina members of the Scottish
Rite have supported it with gifts
totaling more than a half-minion
dollars.
"The 30,000 members of the
Scottish Rite Masonic Fraternity
in North Carolina are delighted to
be teamed with East Carolina
University H. Lloyd Wilderson
said, "in making it possible for
children with language disorders
to be evaluated and assisted
Willerson, of Jacksonville, N.C is
the Sovereign Grand Inspector
General in North Carolina.
The clinic is free and offers spe-
cialized, in-depth diagnostic
evaluations for children with any
combination of language, learn-
ing and dyslexia disabilities. In
some cases, therapy services are
also available. Language learning
disability is a difficulty in under-
standing the expression of speech
and language, in the absence of
mental deficiency or sensory
impairment.
Although the program is di-
rected toward children in eastern
North Carolina, evaluations have
been performed for children from
Iowa, Tennessee, Virginia and
Texas. About 320 diagnostic
evaluations are performed each
year. A similar program at Appa-
lachian State University is spon-
sored by the Masonic Foundation
for children in western North
Carolina.
In addition to clinicai services,
the program provides unique
training experiences for SLAP
graduate students.
"The Master of Science decree
in Speech-Language Pathology
requires that students obtain
clinical practicum experiences
during their graduate program
says Dr. Robert A. Mussarelli,
chairman of SLAP.
"Because of the existence of this
specialized clinic supported by
the Scottish Rite Masonic Founda-
tion, the students are provided
with a unique type of clinical
esperience for a very specific lan-
guage disordered population
Each year, about 18 students
receive master of science degrees
in speech-language pathology
and audiology According to
MuzzareMi, more than 90 percent
of the graduates are employed in
North Carolina in a variety of set-
tings.
"Without the foundation's sup-
port, it would be difficult to pro-
vide training experiences for our
students in these highly special
ized disorders Muzzarelli said
Gore masquerading, says Jack Hawke
RALEIGH (AD � Democratic
presidential hopeful Albert Gore
jr. is masquerading as a conserva-
tive but is one of the most liberal
members oi Congress, state Re-
publican chairman Jack Hawke
said today.
At a news conference, Hawke
said the endorsement of Gore by
Democratic senator Terrv San-
ford and former governor Jim
Hunt showed that all three were
supporters of a national liberal
agenda.
"To say that Albert Gore is as
liberal as (Sen.) Teddv Kennedy is
unfair to Kennev Hawk said.
The fact is that Albert Gore's
voting record is even more liberal
than Kennedy's
Hunt and Sanford have said
Gore, a Tennessee Senator, has a
philosophy and record compat-
ible with those of mainstream
North Carolinians.
Tom Hendrickson, North Caro-
lina director of Gore's campaign,
said Hawke's attack demon-
strated Gore's strength in the state
and throughout his native south.
"The republicans know that
senator Gore is electable. That is
why they are targeting him now
Hendrickson said. "Al Gore will
attract votes from millworkers,
farmers, housewives, and profes-
sionals. He understands North
Carolina and the people of North
Carolina and can win this state in
the Presidency in the fall
Hawke said two conservative
groups � The National Taxpay-
ers Union and the American Con-
servative Union � had given
Gore lower rating than Kennedy.
The latest ratings issued by Con-
gressional Quarterly showed that
Kennedy voted with President
Reagan twenty-nine percent of
the time in 1987 compared with
Gore's ten percent.
"The idea that Albert Gore is the
candidate who can represent the
southern conservative is perpetu-
ating a fraud upon the unsuspect-
ing voters of this state Hawke
said.
"He was born and raised in a
posh hotel in Washington, D.C
schooled in an clitest prep school
and attended Harvard Univer-
sity. He hasn't lived in the south
long enough to know what grits
are, much less to learn to appreci-
ate them
Hawke said North Carolinians
who wanted to vote for Conserva-
tives should register Republican
SGA seeks answer for referred funding
Continued from page 1
Money for travel, hotel rooms,
or food are usually not considered
when the appropriations commit-
tee reviews groups' budgets,
Pern said.
In last years' annual appropria-
tions, a total oi $15,000 of funds
appropriated were not used by
groups according to SGA treas-
urer Chris Holland. The unused
funding, called referred funding,
is an issue which disturbs Hol-
land.
To alleviate the problem of re-
ferred funding, Holland and
Perry advise groups to cut out all
unneccessary expenses before
submitting budgets. On unused
money, Perry said. "In the past the
appropritations committee has
taken a harsh view on groups
which 'pad' their budgets
Annual appropriations is no
easy task for the committee. The
ten member committee will
spend 50-60 hours together in in
the next weeks to decide on the
funding.
Holland and Perry expect this
year's total budget to equal last
year's budget of $96,545. Last
year's largest appropriation went
to the executive council, while the
second, fine arts, which includes
music, art, the Playhouse and the
Marching Pirates, was appropri-
ated $37,000 according to Perry.
Included in the executive coun-
cil appropriations arc salaries of
SGA executives. Monthly salaries
are as lollows: president $200,
treasurer $150, vice president
$125, speaker and secretary $100.
Perry said for those with ques-
tions concerning appropriations
to contact him
2ty Cart Carolbrtati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
James F. J. McKee. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo
Shari Clemens Adam Blankenshlp
Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY RATES
0-49 Column Inches$4.25
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One color and black$90.00
Two colors and black 155.00
Inserts
5.000 or less6� each
5.001 - 10.0005.5each
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BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
Phones
757-6366757-6557
757-6558757-6309
National honor society
offers grad. fellowships
Continued from page 1
school. Preference will be given to
candidates planning to proceed to
the doctorate level of study,
though this is not a requirement.
According to the society, Phi
Kappa Phi is the only major na-
tional honor society which recog-
nizes academic excellence in all
disciplines. The society was
founded in 1897 and today there
are 245 chapters throughout the
nation.
The fellowship program was
extablished in 1932 and since then
has honored over 875 scholars
with fellowships and 353 with
honorable mention awards.
The awards are intended for the
support of students undertaking
first-year graduate study within
12 months of receiving their bac-
calaureate degree. However,
those who have delayed graduate
study for a year or more will be
considered.
Correction
There will be a meeting for stu-
dent legislators who want to bet-
ter understand the UNC Board of
Governor's new drug policy
Monday at 3 p.m. in Mendenhall
room 212.
briB
Cut
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Daator
Studen
iCPS) � In Philadelphia -
00 angry urban reside
to protest inadequate police prd
techon
In Buffalo, people meet
their landlord to demand he :
prove seeuntv.
In Kalamazoo ' I
ers petition for police rea -
their area would be sail
rapists.
The people demanding
protection were of a . -�
dent:? reacting to campus or neai
campus crimes since Si pto mix rl
Their emergence a a I
seems to indicate thai lavs ai
order once an issue i
among middle class . i
owners, has become a
political priority in recei
months.
"In recent years, there's been
greater awareness of enme issu
than in the past said Dan Kellej
the director of public safety at tl
University oi Louisville wh
helps train campus police depar
ments around the country. "Sti
dents are more conservative an
they want more anti-crime pr
grams'
"Students � and the campu
community in general � are mo
attuned tothingsgoingonarounj
them than in the past, said L nj
versify oi Geogia director of purl
lie safety Asa Boynton. who ah
serves as president oi the Interne
tional Association oi Campul
Enfocemcnt Administrate
They're a more informed pubi
that wants things addressed.
Some are so upset that the
want to make colleges tell pn.
spective students how bad enm
is on their campuses.
Largely at the urging oi th
parents oi a student murdered
Lehigh University, the Pennsyi
vania legislature, for one is cor
sidering a bill that would force al
schools in the state to make pubii
their enme rates.
The issue's emergence vs
prompted bv a new realit1
Boynton noted: that crime
moving onto campuses
Bovnton theorized that. a p
lice become more effective m tri
ditionally high-crime area
criminals move to new territory
.� including suburbs "viral an
land college � �
"The situation has gotti
worse said Wayne Glasker
grad student at the University
Pennsvlvania, where scores
students have been robbed m
attacked in surrounding Philad
phia neighborhoods in recenj
years and where the fall. 198
stabbings of three athletes pro
voked the protest for more p
protection.
'Times are hard Glasker r
ures, "and people are desperatj
College students are easy pre)
"People are afraid to wai
around at night, even if they ha
a companion said Tenn studei
Sander Gerber. "It's just not safej
In Kalamazoo, the violent ra;
and murder of a Western Mien
gan University student in
vember "shook everybody u
WMU student Don Sopor said
At the University ot Washirt
ton, three attempted sexual
saults on campus during a twj
week period in January have a
ated widespread concern
It's a significant change frc
the recent past, said State Univi
sity of New York at Buffalo publ
safety Director Lee Griffin, wh
campuses were viewed as "I al
tasy Islands" that were lmmul
to crime.
Thanks to that heritage, rrn
over, campuses are hard to
cure.
"A university is not meant
have a fence around it argu
Sylvia Canada of Tenn's Dep
ment of Safety "We're an o
campus
"We haven't closed the camp
We won't throw
barricadessaid Western Mic
gan spokesman Michael J Ml
mews.
Boynton added that stud
insistence that residents be f i
come and go complicates secui
efforts.
A Michigan State student
example, was attacked in
dorm room Jan. 9 by a man v,
was signed into the build
other residents. A subsequ
investigation conducted bv
State News - - the MSU stud
newspaper
� revealed thai
dents and housing empk
often ignore secunty pxech
And when students
other students � the
most propertv crimes. Boy:
said, although "most of the ml
crimes are committed by pe-
fr
Mwnitonmtmmm0imm f�� "�1I
� � -Mfc I
�g�w�. ii.�- � �-�r OTftn





THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 11.1988 3
ite
language pathology
ology According to
h. more than 90 percent
.mates are employed in
Irohna in a variety of set-
it the foundation's sup-
uld be difficult to pro-
ting experiences for our
jin these highly special-
Irders Muzzarelli said.
Ifntatt
tirwe 1925
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ition
�� � �� �e � -
'ERYDAY
Greenville
Students want more protection
(CPS) � In Philadelphia, some
200 angry urban residents march
to protest inadequate police pro-
tection.
In Buffalo, people meet with
their landlord to demand he im-
prove security.
In Kalamazoo, Michigan, oth-
ers petition for police reassurance
their area would be safe from
rapists.
The people demanding better
protection were, of all things, stu-
dents reacting to campus or near-
campus crimes since September.
Their emergence as a force
seems to indicate that "law and
order once an issue largely
among middle class property
owners, has become a student
political priority in recent
months.
"In recent years, there's been a
greater awareness of crime issues
than in the past said Dan Keller,
the director of public safety at the
University of Louisville who
helps train campus police depart-
ments around the country. "Stu-
dents are more conservative, and
they want more anti-crime pro-
grams
"Students � and the campus
community in general � are more
attuned to things going on around
them than in the past said Uni-
versity of Geogia director of pub-
lic safety Asa Boynton, who also
serves as president of the Interna-
tional Association of Campus
Enfocement Administrators.
"They're a more informed public
that wants things addressed
Some are so upset that they
want to make colleges tell pro-
spective students how bad crime
is on their campuses.
Largely at the urging of the
parents of a student murdered at
Lehigh University, the Pennsyl-
vania legislature, for one, is con-
sidering a bill that would force all
schools in the state to make public
their crime rates.
The issue's emergence was
prompted by a new reality,
Boynton noted: that crime is
moving onto campuses.
Boynton theorized that, as po-
lice become more effective in tra-
ditionally high-crime areas,
criminals move to new territories
� incfuctyng suburbs, rural arqas"
land college. � �
"The situation has gotten
worse said Wayne Glasker, a
grad student at the University of
Pennsylvania, where scores of
students have been robbed and
attacked in surrounding Philadel-
phia neighborhoods in recents
years and where the fall, 1987,
stabbings of three athletes pro-
voked the protest for more police
protection.
'Times are hard Glasker fig-
ures, "and people are desperate.
College students are easy prey
"People are afraid to walk
around at night, even if they have
a companion said Penn student
Sander Gerber. "It's just not safe
In Kalamazoo, the violent rape
and murder of a Western Michi-
gan University student in No-
vember "shook everybody up
WMU student Don Soper said.
At the University of Washing-
ton, three attempted sexual as-
saults on campus during a two-
week period in January have cre-
ated widespread concern.
It's a significant change from
the recent past, said State Univer-
sity of New York at Buffalo public
safety Director Lee Griffin, when
campuses were viewed as "Fan-
tasy Islands" that were immune
to crime.
Thanks to that heritage, more-
over, campuses are hard to se-
cure.
"A university is not meant to
have a fence around it argued
Sylvia Canada of Penn's Depart-
ment of Safety. "We're an open
campus
"We haven't closed the campus.
We won't throw up
barricades'said Western Michi-
gan spokesman Michael J. Mat-
thews.
Boynton added that student
insistence that residents be free to
come and go complicates security
efforts.
A Michigan State student, for
example, was attacked in her
dorm room Jan. 9 by a man who
was signed into the building by
other residents. A subsequent
investigation conducted by The
State News � the MSU student
newspaper � revealed that stu-
dents and housing employees
often ignore security procedures.
And when students victimize
other students � the source of
most property crimes, Boynton
said, although "most of the major
crimes are committed by people
not part of the campus" � schools
sometimes are reluctant to treat it
as a criminal, as opposed to a dis-
ciplinary, problem.
Attitudes frustrate campus
crime prevention, too.
"Many males Boynton said,
"Don't consider date rape as
rape
Students, particularly middle
class kids from suburbs, also have
a sense of immortality that clouds
their judgement and makes them
easy marks for criminals, added
Canada.
Nevertheless, students are
trying to make campus officials be
more aggressive in insuring law
and order.
Glasker, for one, charges Penn
hasn't done enough to educate
students to minimize their
chances of becoming victims.
"The immediate streets sur-
rounding Penn aren't patrolled
by university police, and Phila-
delphia cops offer just the barest
security in those neighborhoods
he added.
Students at WMU are happier
with their administration's ef-
forts, said Soper. The school be-
gan addressing the issue of cam-
pus security well before the tragic
murder, installing additional
lights around campus and spon-
soring escort services and on-
campus student safety patrols.
Some are doing more than us-
ing their own common sense: In
Atlanta, students from Georgia
State University, Morris Brown,
Clarrk, Spelman, and Morchouse
colleges are patrrolling city
streets on the alert for crime and
lost tourists. Indiana University
fraternity members provide
funds and volunteers to drive
women home from campus at
night.
Johns Ttozvers
503 "East 3rd Street
Qreenville, 9.C-
752-3311
10 Off
MjtoraC
Arrangements
ivith ECU I'D,
,& "This fAd.
Order must be made by 5 p.m. Thursday
Gloria Leonard, star of the adult film "Misty Blue" and publisher of High Society, signs au tographs after
Tuesday's debate on pornography. (Photo by Jon Jordan � Photolab)
Two-day "Basic Training for Estimators"
seminar offered by ECU School of Technology
ECU News Bureau
"BasicTraininor Estimators'
an Intensive two-day seminar for
general construClicm estimators,
will be offered by the East Caro-
lina University School of Technol-
ogy Feb. 25-26.
The program is sponsored by
the EC U Department of Construc-
tion Management and the Caroli-
nas Branch of Associated General
Contractors for relatively inexpe-
rienced building estimators. The
course will stress the basic aspects
of construction cost estimates,
including site preparation, con-
crete forming, masonry and car-
pentry.
All participants will work with
architectural drawings in "take
off" exercises and are requested to
bring scale rules and hand-held
calculators. Computer based esti-
mation will not be covered.
Sessions will be held at the
I loliday Inn, Greenville. Further
information adn registration
forms arc available from the ECU
Department of Construction
Management, Flanagan Building;
ECU, or from the Carolinas
Sin up for Army R()T( 1 Basic
(!amp.You11 get six weeks of
challenges that can build up your
leadership skills as well as your
body. Youll also get almost $700.
But hurry This summer may be
your last chance to graduate from
college with a degree and an officers
commission.
See your Professor of Military
Science for details.
For Further Information Contact:
Captain Steve L. Jones
(Erwin Hall) 757-6967
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I
�te SaHi (Earnlinfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, cmmimm
Clay Deanhardt, �� e
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, Director of Advertising
TIM Q IANDLER, v u�r
John Carter, ��t�m
Mici ielle England, o. m�w
Debbie Stevens, s
Jeff Parker m
TOM FURR,OcMUrimMM(cr
Mike Upchurch, production m,
John W. Medlin, a �.�.
Mac Clark, 8�u)M�r
February 11,1988
OPINION
Page 4
Culture
SGA must pass resolution
There is a motion before the Stu-
dent Government Association to
resolve that renovations and im-
provements need to be made to the
Ledonia Wright Cultural Center.
While the bill has been sent to
committee, it seems to be a motion
whose time has come.
The cultural center is run down. A
campus eye-sore, it is barely
adequate as a meeting place and less
than adequate as a cultural center.
The title of cultural center conjures
images of a building with displays
so students can learn about an ethnic
group's history and tradition. It
should be a place where students of
that ethnic group can congregate. It
should be a place that these same
students are proud of.
The Ledonia Wright building is
supposed to be a cultural center for
the black students on campus. It
meets none of the aforementioned
qualifications. Built as an alternate
to creating a Black Student Union,
the building has almost become a
run down shack that simply houses
meetings for minority student
groups and others.
February is Black History month,
and there is no better time than now
for the university to meet its obliga-
tion to the minority student popula-
tion and upgrade the existing facili-
ties. What form these upgrades
should come in, be they renovations,
remodeling, rebuilding or moving,
is a decision best left to a joint
committee of students, administra-
tors and architects.
However, it is important to make a
start. The SGA should waste no time
in passing the resolution proposed
Monday.
NEW 3KH
IrltPH
STREET P5RS0A1
To the editor,
There has been a lot of talk lately on
campus and in The East Carolinian
about different candidates for presi-
dent and how they are all out to beat
the front runner, George Bush.
In America, a competitive society,
you usually only get to be the front
runner by being the best. And in this
case it certainly is true. Most people
who are for the vice president are for
him because they know that he stands
behind & supports Ronald Reagan's
policies 100 percent. Not just because
they lowered inflation, interest rates
and brought strength and pride back
to America, but because they were his
policies too! That's part of the reason
why 52 percent of southern Republi-
cans and 27 percent of the Democrats
support him.
Now let me tell some other reason
why I like and support George Bush
for president. First of all Bush is a
family man. Married since 1945 to
wife Barbara and has four sons and
one daughter. He has ten grandchil-
dren, ages one to 12. So you can see
why he want's to protect America and
improve education in our schools.
He knows the horrors of war.
George Bush enlisted in the U.S. Navy
on his 18th birthday and became the
youngest World War II Navy pilot
ever. He flew 58 combat missions.
Once shot down over enemy terri-
tory, he completed his bombing mis-
sion before his damaged plane had to
go down. He was rescued by a U.S.
submarine. For his bravery he was
awarded the Distinguished Flying
Cross. He will work to build and
preserve a lasting peace and he
knowns that he must work from
strength.
Bush knows our government well
he has been a two term mmber of
Congress and not to mention vice
president of United States for eight
years. He knowns foreign affairs,
being an ambassador to the United
Nations and Chief of the U.S. Liaison
Office in Peking. Bush was also once
Director of the CIA, so he knows in-
tentions and threats of those who
wish America did not exist. At all of
these positions Bush was a success,
because he has the ability and leader-
ship required to overcome tough
challenges.
Here is a quick look at what he
stands for.
Education: "I want to be remem-
bered as the education president.
Hopes for our children will mean
little with out outstanding educa-
tion
Trade: "Certainly there are unfair
trading practices out there and we
must do all in our power to guarantee
free and fair trade
Deficit: "We should work to bal-
ance the budget, not by raising taxes
but by cutting spending. I will fight a
tax increase every step of the way
Abortion: "I support a constitu-
tional amendment against abortion,
except in the case of Rape, incest and
where the life of the mother is at risk
Central America: "I support the
Contras and a free democracy. I don't
want to see a Communist beach head
in Central America
Reagan said "George Bush is the
best vice president this country has
ever known He also picked Bush to
be the president if something happen
to him. George Bush has the vision
and strength to keep America strong.
Let's stay on the right track.
From a John Wayne Fan.
Bobby R. Hall Jr.
Management
House votes wrong
To the editor
The House of Representatives' de-
cision to cut off Contra aid was proba-
bly the most incredibly ignorant and
tragic decision of this decade.
The liberals in Congress have
proven once again that they have no
hind-sight, no tore-sight, and no pres-
ent-sight.
They have learned no lessons from
Vietman, Cuba, or China. The same
blind trust in liars, the same "peace
nik foolishness, the same liberal fan-
tasies and delusions that House liber-
als believe in now are the same blind
trust, foolishness and dangerous de-
lusions that led to the consolidation of
a Communist government 90 miles
off the coast of Florida.
The whole time Castro was consoli-
dating his Communist stranglehold
on Cuba, he looked the gullible, lib-
eral American press right in the eye
and told us that he was an "agrarian
reformer a "democrat etc ad
nauseum. And of course, liberals,
"peaceniks, and "useful idiots"
swallowed his outrageous lies hook,
line and sinker.
Twenty-five years ago liberals ap-
plauded Castro's denouncement of
Cuba's one-crop economy and
claimed that U.S. imperialism was the
cause of Cuba's economic plight.
Whenever liberals were confronted
by the political costs Castro's revolu-
tions might entail, they were confi-
dent that this gain alone � Cuba's
freedom to grow food for Cubans �
would make any sacrifice worth-
while.
The same illusion � that the revo-
lution will mean better lives for
Nicaragua's poor � underlies every
Bush good choice for pres.
defense of the Sandinistas today.
Well, it has been nearly 30 years
since Cuba's "liberation and Cuba
is still a one-crop economy. Cuba's
external debt is now 200 times what it
was when Fidel took power. Before
the revolution, Cubans enjoyed the
highest per-capita income in Latin
America. Now they are economic
prisoners of permanent rationing and
chronic shortages in even the most
basic necessities. For example, the
allotted rations of rice, a basic staple
of Cuba's poor is half the yearly con-
sumption of Batista's regime.
Former radical liberal activist
David Horowitz puts it this wav:
"Theidea that Marxist revolution will
mean economic 'x'nefit for the poor
has proved to be the most deadly
illusion of all. i' is because Marxist
economies cannot satisfy economic
needs � not even at the levels of the
miserably corrupt capitalisms of Ba-
tista and Somoza � that Marxist
states require pcm.cnent repression
to stifle unrest and permanent ene-
mies to saddle with the blame
And what happened in Cuba while
liberals twiddled their thumbs
trusfed IhTiars isTfifper
again- in Iviicarvia.
�nnol. see the two situations are iden-
tical is either truly ignorant of history
or his completely blinded himself to
the truth in an unbelievable display of
close-mindedness and dangerous
self-deception.
Liberals keep whining, "but just
give peace a chance What they ref-
use to admit or acknowledge is that
we know from experience � it is
simply historical fact � that there can
never be true peace under a Commu-
nist dictatorship. The "peace" of lib-
erals, "peaceniks, and "useful idi-
ots of which there are manv on this
J
campus, is merely absence of war.
But the mere absence of war is not
true peace. Peace is liberty and justice
for all. Peace is democracy, free elec-
tions, and freedom.
The Sandinistas have stated that
they will never compromise their
power. In other words, true peace will
never come to Nicaragua unless they
arc destroyed. The Contras were a
means to that end; the Arias "Peace"
Plan is not.
Two things anyone that has not
blinded himself to the truth can see:
1- Liberals never learn from history:
they make the same mistakes and
believe the same lies over and over
and over and over and over again
2- There are Americans who believe
in true peace and democracy, and
then there are liberals.
Justin Sturz
junior
English
I� hneiisn
What will happen if the Russians pull their troops out of Afghanistan?
�e N7 Rep"bUc utv' Anatoly Adamishin, was telling Tass that "na- have five years' worth of supplies stored up.) crossed the line senaraHn ?��.�� it - � ��u.l
The New Republic
Hey, wait a minute. What if the Russians really do
get out of Afghanistan?
Over the last few weeks there has been a lot of
signaling that it will, beginning soon. On Jan. 6, in
Kabul, Eduard Shevardnadze, the Soviet foreign
minister, gave an important interview to an
unimportant organization, the official Afghan press
agency, Bakhtar. (What a sad collection of doomed
hacks that must be.)
In the interview Shevardnadze said, "We would
like the year 1988 to be the last year of the presence
of Soviet troops in your country An unexception-
able sentiment, only Shevardnadze seems to have
meant it as more than a bland wish.
It was more in the nature of a New Year's resolu-
tion, one that must have chilled his hosts. For he
went on to say that while the Russians would like to
see "a coali tion government on the broadest possible
basis" in Afghanistan, that is something for the
Afgans to worry about.
Meanwhile, in New Delhi, Shevardnadze's dep-
uty, Anatoly Adamishin, was telling Tass that "na-
tional reconciliation" of Afgan factions "is not con-
nected" to the Soviet Union's plans for withdrawal.
The resistance groups have shown no interest in
"national reconciliation and now the Soviets are
growing impatient with it too, and with its promot-
ers. Shevardnadze told the Bakhtar scribblers that
anybody who puts "some transient, circumstantial,
personal considerations and aspirations above the
interests of the nation" had better watch out.
This was taken to be a jab at Najibullah, 'he
uninominal general secretary of the People's Demo-
cratic Party of Afghanistan, who has also tec-
known at various times as Dr. Najibullah, Dr. Na jib,
Mohammad Najib, or just plain Najib. This fellow
has more names than Gary Hart, though his political
future is not as bright.
In a negotiating session scheduled for February in
Geneva, a deal will probably be struck whereby the
Soviet troops will start to withdraw and the United
States, at the same time, will end its military aid to
the guerrillas. (Not to worry, though; they are said to
have five years' worth of supplies stored up.)
A variety of stratagems would be employed to
give the Soviets and their clients a decent interval of
the sort considered desirable on these occasions. But
the bottom line, perhaps a year from now, would be
a total Soviet military retreat, followed in short order
by the overthrow of whatever Afghan government
the Russians have left behind.
That, at any rate, is what the Soviet leaders seem to
be preparing themselves and their people for. Judg-
ing from that, and from what the Reagan administra-
tion, the Pakistanis and the resistance fighters them-
selves have been saying, the chances of such an
outcome have to be rated as considerably better than
even. If the Russians do get out, and the remnants of
Afghan communism are extirpated, then an awful
lot of geopolitical computers are going to have to be
reprogrammed.
One obvious casualty of the de-Sovietization of
Afghanistan will be the so-called Brezhnev Doc-
trine, according to which, writes Richard Pipes in
"Survival Is Not Enough "any country that has
crossed the line separating 'feudalism' or capital-
ism from communism must under no conditions
revert to its previous status, whereas all non-com-
munist social and political systems are subject to
change of ownership at all times Reagan tweaked
the doctrine's nose in Grenada, but it has been left to
the mujahideen of Afganistan to finish it off
As a side effect, the Brezhnev Doctrine's collapse
wih probably damage the corresponding doctrine
on our siae. The decline-of-the-West school of con-
servatism has long maintained that the democracies
are too divided, too irresolute, too guilt-ridden, and
too squeamish about violence to resist Soviet expan-
sionism with any steadiness.
Yet the American response to Russia's invasion of
ttSZl T, 9S P�� of covert military
dA nd relentless diplomatic pressure - has been a
J�. carried out by two admini-
JSEf 1� rent i"?5 and Geologies over a
�L i?� E? Wlththe virtually unanimous
support of Congress and the people. The dogma of
democratic fccklessness is duffor reappraisal
Reaga
ICPS) � Seizing what has bt-
come a trendy idea, the Reaga i
administration is expected td
propose giving federal tax breaks
to parents who buy savings bond
for their children's college tui-
tions.
Administration officials hop
the tax breaks will encourat,
parents to save money for college
lessening their needs for federal
loans and grants.
The president is expected to
Fuji offers
scholarship
ROCHESTER, N.Y. (CPS)
The Battle of Rochester wage
between Eastman Kodak and th.
Fuji Photo Film Co. has moved t
the Rochester Institute of T.
nology, where the Japam
based Fuji recently announced
scholarship for photography stu
dents.
The scholoarship will be th
first of its kind at the school.
The two photography compaj
nies have bashed heads ovej
higher education in Rochester ii
recent months, but a Fuji spokesi
woman insists thecompany cha
RTT as the recipeint of its scholari
ship "because of its reputation!
not because it was in Rochester. 1
The Rochester-based Kodak is
major donor to RIT � the com
pany has given the school $4.
million during the last 10 years
as well as the Universitv of Roch
ester. The two companies clashes
indirectly last fall when the Uni
versity of Rochester "discnrolj
led" a Fuji employee.
Kodak, which donated $600,00
to Rochester last year, expressd
concern that the Fuji employe
would have learned corpora t
secrets while sharing classes wit
some 90 Kodak employees.
After much criticism, Rochestc
eventually asked the Fuji eni
ployee to return, but he declind
their offer, enrolling instead at thj
Massacheussetts Institute
Technology.
RACK
BRANDED
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Memorial Drive
Open Mon
Sunday 1
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$124.
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SPEND A WEEK
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or stop by
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nnwiiWMiiiii'dpii'
� - 111 L .
. Jff - - - � - -�- � -hUh ����ii.fr





THE FAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 11, 1988 5
)N6tL
use (
-
r pres.
l
fore
.ed the
a tin
and
poor
mic
the
i
cribs and
JfpWJ
ivof

ref-
that
it is

mu
hb-
. � ful idi-
m this
not
tice
r v elec-
1 that
their
will
hey
ere a
ace"
not
in see:
tory:
�nd
r ind over
igain
believe
" . and
n Sturz
junior
Engjidj.
anistan?
r 'capital-
must under no conditions
� is all non-com-
litical systems are subject to
,f d" hr igan tweaked
but it has been left to
;anistan to finish it off
he Bre7hn( Tine's collapse
the corresponding doctrine
xrline-of-the-West school of con-
maintained that the democracies
h irresolute, too guilt-ridden, and
it violence to resist Soviet expan-
f cad mess.
in resp nse to Russia's invasion of
Igantic program of covert military
diplomatic pressure � has been a
ive, earned out by two admini-
tnt parties and ideologies over a
(a-s with the virtually unanimous
ss and the people. The dogma of
sness is due for reappraisal.
Reagan may propose tax-free college bonds
ICPS) � Seizing what has be-
come a trendy idea, the Reagan
administration is expected to
propose giving federal tax breaks
to parents who buy savings bonds
for their children's college tin
tions.
Administration officials hope
the tax breaks will encourage
parents to save money for college,
lessening their needs for federal
loans and grants.
The president is expected to
Fuji offers
scholarship
ROCHESTER. N.Y. (CPS)
The Battle of Rochester waged
between Eastman Kodak and the
Fuji Thoto Film Co. has moved to
the Rochester Institute of Tech-
nology, where the Japanese-
based Fuji recently announced a
scholarship for photography stu
dents.
The scholarship will be the
first of its kind at the school.
The two photographv compa-
nies have bashed heads over
higher education in Rochester in
recent months, but a Fuji spokes-
woman insists the company chose
RIT as the recipeint of its scholar-
ship "because of its reputation,
not because it was in Rochester
The Rochester-based Kodak is a
major donor to RIT the com-
pany has given the school $4.8
million during the last 10years
as well as the University of Roch-
ester. The two companies clashed
indirectly last fall when the Uni-
versity of Rochester "disenab-
led" a Fuji employee.
Kodak, which donated $600,000
to Rochester last year, expressed
concern that the Fuji employee
would have learned corporate
secrets while sharing classes with
some 90 Kodak employees.
After much criticism, Rochester
eventually asked the Fuji em-
ployee to return, but he declined
their offer, enrolling instead at the
Massacheussetts Institute of
Technology
announce details of the plan when
he makes his formal federal
budget proposal soon, and col-
lege officials while expressing
reservations � seem to approve.
"The higher education commu
nity supports the idea, but it it
competes with funding of need
based, we can't support it said
Charles Saundcrs of the Amen
can Council on Education (ACE).
"If it's designed to complement
need-based aid, we support it
"lt'sa modest proposal, and it it
encourages savings, that's good
said Art 1 lauptman, an ACE con
sultant. "But 1 wouldn't fund o er
basic student aid
The Reagan plan also pro
posed by Vice President George
Bush in his presidential cam
paign will be included in the
fiscal 1989 budget theadministra
tion will soon send to Congress.
The government now taxes the
interest people earn on savings
bonds, and people have to pay the
taxes when they cash in the bonds.
Under the president's proposal,
the government would not tax the
interest if it's used to pay for
education.
The idea "has political appeal
said 1 lauptman.
The idea, in fact, isn't new.
Ulinolis and North Carolina
have state "education bond" pro-
grams designed to encourage
parents to start college tuition
nest eggs. Last week, Kentucky
ami Nebraska legislators were
debating starting similar plans in
their states.
More than half the nation's state
legislatures considered them in
1987.
Six states now have "pre-paid"
tuition plans in which parents pay
a Oat fee to cover future - and
presumably higher � tuition
costs at the school of their choice.
Several private companies, in-
cluding Boston's Fidelity Invest-
ments and New Jersey's College
Savings Bank, now offer college
savings plans.
In early January, Illinois fami-
lies snatched up $93 million
worth of COllege Savings Bonds
in just days.
The concept's popularity
doesn't mean it's foolproof, Jen-
nifer Afton of the Education
Commission for the States
warned. Illinois and other states
that have adopted similar plans
may have been "hasty she said,
"There are risks to parents and
the state Afton said.
"There's a danger that people
will assume if they take one action
at one time, they think they're
fixed said Kathleen Brouder, a
spokeswoman for the College
Scholarship Service o� the College
Board. "Like any investment, this
is the kind of thing you have to
watch closely
Pre-paid tuition plans are par-
ticularly risky, Afton noted, be-
cause they require parents to se-
lect a school for their child long
before the student is ready to go to
school. A school's quality also can
deteriorate, leaving parents buy-
ing less than they thought.
The Illinois bonds, Afton said,
address those issues, and the
Reagan administration should
work along the same lines. "If the
federal government does get in-
volved, a bond is the way to go.
Futures are not where it's at
Still, said Saunders, the Reagan
proposal is really a "side show
compared to the real problems"
because while it addresses the
need of the middle-class, it
doesn't do anything for parents
without the resources to purchase
bonds.
"We have some serious prob-
lems with the scope of the plan.
The administration should really
provide for those without re-
sources, not provide another
break for people who can afford to
save ahead for their children's
tuition
"Theadministrationisshowing
its priorities by assisting the
middle class" and ignoring the
poor, said Hauptman.
"The focus developing na-
tional solutions for rising tuition
costs is a useful one. It's fo-
cused a lot of attention on the need
for college savings said
Brouder. "But I don't know that
one single plan will work for all
families.
CLARIFICATION
The ECU administration has
taken no formal action on recom
mendations from the SG A cabinet
to initiate a passfail system tor
some course studies
$�)3$
?
Delores Alexander,a founding member of the National Organization for Women, answers the questions
of a student Tuesday following the pornography debate. (Photo by Jon Jordan � Photolab)
Hewers c?
Remember Us For All IJour
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2 PIECES OF CHICKEN (Original Recipe or Extra Crispy)
1 MASHED POTATO AND GRAVY
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for only1.75 with this coupon .Limit one package per coupon, four coupons
per customer. Good on combination orders only. Customer pays all applicable
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Kentucky Fried Chicken
2 PIECES OF CHICKEN (Original Recipe or Extra Crispy)
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Coupons Good at: Greenville, Tarboro, Wilson, Goldsboro,
Williamston, Jacksonville, and Kinston.
I M





I

6 iE EAST CAROL INI AN
FEBRUARY 11,1988
V)
Crr

EMMY �re Red, Violets
blue, here is "almost" a year in
d&M, Prom, Gradu-
ation, tequilla, the beer bath for
nger, cruising, Shell Island,
Bow of Boat, I 10 anniver-
Running, Fishing
Tournami Halloween,
Teddie, Drag-
rebuilding the
Christmas, New Years,
Surprise" Be My Valentine
OVE YOU, Donna.
STEPHEN C. - Don't be jealous
n't be sad When 1 get done
th TinoYou will v id.
TO MY DEAREST ITNO-
WEENO: Roses arc Red Violets
arc blue! want you in bed So I can
have fun with you!
JOANNE beautil . in
�d. A beautiful
you be
i have
valen-
u. I have always
1 in a neighborhood
-tot
might
ild
ntine.
lid
ave
u will!
id !
lid
alentin ove
v the best of luck on
Monday!
TO G R L c
r. I
T. HARD
arc
D.BRQNSO
iside to show your sweetheart
how in ate them. I
hope I show vday just
how much I care. C.T.
LISA, MARJ, AND SCOTT:
Roses are Red Violets are Blue.
I'm schizophrenic And so am I.
Kathy: You'n .1 kid. I raised
'i right. Sit up straight! Kevin:
You sexy thang you. Crai
Happy V.D. Don't catch one.
From: Murph, Mar, Dightmar
and Mary.
JEFF, Happy Valentine's Day.
Thanks for making these last few
months so great. Love Your
Guppie, Beth.
BIG MAMA, Now these 3 weeks
have really been a lot of fun, So I
decided to write this little pun.
Your roommate (G.L.) has done it
again, but for this little set up I
want to thank him to no end.
Now without Cheav products
this storv would never be com-
your face under the boiling heat.
I am now going to end this in a
very nice way, So please have a
Happy Valentine's Day. Beatnik.
MISS "FULL-FIGURE This
past year has been so fun, so I
scribbled down this ultimate
pun. It started with a lump in the
door, and has turned into so
much more. I guess it was "des-
tiny" and now you mean the
world to me. So with nothing else
to say except have a happy
Valentine's Day! Harry Home-
maker.
MICHELLE E We finally have
the chance to become what we
want to so let's try harder than
ever. Happy Valentines Day to
the onlv one I love ; Phillip
W.
J.M.P.K. - I know your "eyes"
throb for many and that you
would even pay a pretty pennv
(or write a check for just one
night)! But my love tor you is true
and I am the only "Dumb B for
you! Happy Valentines Day!
Greenie.
TBS - The last tv
been great. Pumkin sh . .
Jits at Chico's. . . ir's
� in Phi la. . . Roseball.
uiri's in the backyard. . . and
drunk death rides ii
and all the othei
tim ve had together. 1
fay! U
D O U G
thing special! Happy Valenlin
Day. Love, Kim.
DARK
and n
r hand
ALPHA PHI-Hapj ,
Da ips
' -now. From: . - a
Hint-2 1 serve
dinner Tuesdays. Hint I; Bob.
BOSS, You be special just becuz
of all the wonderful things you
duz. You make me laugh, you
make me sing. You make mv little
squirrel heart ping. March 1st is
so far away! I want you back for
Valentine's Day! 1 love you!
Squirrel.
KAREN HFJM, Nov. 21, Feb. 21,
Aug. 21. It must be magic. The last
three months have been great.
Together lets make your last
three months of school your best
ever! Get psyched for formal.
Love, Brian.
SWEETHEART: My life was
empty before you. Now it's full of
surprises and love. My heart and
my future are safe in your hands.
Loving You Always, Bambi.
A certain Sigma can kiss my
shiney hiney!
ANNE: this is my happiest valen-
tine day ever. I owe it all to you.
Because you are the greatest.
Thanks for being my sweetheart.
Love, Honey Bunny.
POOKER, It isn't easy being me.
I've got a head I can't think with.
An eye I can't see out of. I have to
hang around with two nuts all the
time. My closest neighbor is a
butthole My best friend is Jeza-
bel. An everytime I get excited I
throw up! No ones perfect, but be
my Valentine anyway. Love,
Billy Bob.
JRW - To my cute little red h
with the blush to match. 1 hope
your Valentines Day is trul)
smash - Love, Allen.
ESH - This past year has not all
been a bed of roses, although
have definitely had our moments
(example - tues. night). I love
you with all mv heart and sin-
cerely hope the future holds hap-
piness for both We damn
sure desei it. Happy
Valentine's Day and every dav I
LOVE YOU. Sweet
TO KRIS, Hay
hope that our n
great as the I i
be your Valentin
Allen.
TO THE LADIES OF SUITE 410,
Have a Happy Valentine;
I'm sure you'll all be doi
Right
Mai
the
dream

SCHMO
I don't km
vourfunr
the morning. ILOV EYOl M
TOTI n IN
the beginnii
on tine
tdean.
DEAREST G.R
eyou, I want you
on Valentine's Da

BUBBA: Last year about I
time, I was writing our fii
rhyme. You're not my type she
was heard to tell, ��. blown
that theory all to hell. The thir
we've seen the things we
done, have added up to total tun.
The best of times are when vou
get hot, and I know I've found
that magic spot. Love ya, Me and
Mr. Dog.
PAUL - Roses are Red and V
are blue; Guess What? The dollar
I borrowed was to put this in
you! Happy Anniversary and
Happy Valentine's Day! Love,
Carolyn.
CMD, Roses are Red, Violets are
blue, It has been almost two And
I still love you! LjS.
D - The time has slowly arrived.
A celebration is well deserved.
For this birthday girl has sur-
vived. So get ready on Monday
for some fun. Because the famous
hooker is finally 21! L.
LORI -1 know you'll be my wife,
but will you be my Valentine? I'll
love you always - Dan.
SHARI, A Valentine from a Jew-
ish Cowboy? No way. Oh, I get it!
Our times have been really fun.
Hope to have many special ones
in the future. Spring of 88 should
be one to remember. Happy
Heart Day. Love, Bucky.
STEVE (SPM), You're the Great-
est! Happy Valentine's Day. I
LOVE YOU! Always and For-
ever. Cindy (CLO).
DEAR MOM, DAD, TED &
flfifc
W?
MAURK
It
BRA!
XI
J �
MICH
A
ATTENTION
ROBERTSON
friend - Lustmuffi
BOYFRIEND,
Valentines Da)
Bookie, Ltippi, Fruppi
Dupj-
trie.
SALLY AND )l
Valentine's Day to t wo of my 1
friends. 1 ove, Stace.
KRISTA B. AND MARC
uldn'task for a family as .
as you. Hugs and k
WHEN I GET BACK on Sure
let's see if vou can prove fa
that you're not called Act
Jackson for nothin
Kitty
JACK, It may have taken m
couple of years to realize this
I really, really do love you rm
friend. Always, Stacey.
DEAR JILL, Our first six and a
halt months together have been
absolute wonderfulness. Becau
of your warm caring love, I have
begun to understand what beine
joined together as one is all about
m yours forever, and I can't wait
to continue enjoying life with
you. All my iOVC Ke�n
NOODLE, Thanks for a great
ending to last semester and tere
1?F�!JrrlSS&The
Formal ' scene has been jam-
�n - how about Luau? Love ya
suckman "teriza P. S ne7er
Played tuba in High School
PA1
MORRIS, I
.
i
ther nv
POOR
and I
CRAK
wan
on
Christine.
TOM M
dan
trul
CHRIS
to me and
kno
gether
will be
Happv
Chi
JILL
important I
luckiest mai
met you.
HEY COON
life without
Valentine "euz
with me a
j. Forev. �
DRIFTER
Day. 1 wish I
Hope the ti
always on rm n
J.
BEAN: We v
times and a few bad
I'm glad your
andGator is to
STEPHANTr
past several months
together and look forwa
many more. I lov
SEHOYA- Holding
it's like that ol' summer sun. S
"you say "me" - But sa
TOGETHER Bodacious on
come live with me and we'll ki
invisible black children forev
t,mm"� m m,�lim nwaninnmin),
MM





i

iav,
to me
Action
ut
ny
and a
een
;ause
I have
t being
ic is all about.
and 1 can't wait
ith
mks for a great
t semester and here
skeleton in 1988! The
"e has been jam-
! Luau? Love ya
,ck: iza P. S.I never
lyed tuba in High School.
But . .nir dicti
more than all m
man I " com ike
md get you sonic
gurt. i nir bone-
ur the 1
S
ith Lamb-
Hi lid
N CHURCH,
Mu
- me-
Fhat's
ten tine
pother. 1 promise a romantic eve-
ning not soon forgotten and
be later I'll get lucky. As ever,
1 love you, jay.
TROOPER JOHN, You are the
only one I could ever love. These
ears have been wonder-
ful. Valentine's Day is just a sweet
reminder of the love we share. You
the best. Happy Heart's Day!
Ann.
uthern Bear, 1 hope
this Valentine's Day can beat the
Can it? It's up to you! Be
mine! I love you, Your Northern
R.
RHUDY & GIN
3 not th
tra special Valentin
Day! Get ready for an evening of
provocative fun Because it's not
going to end until way past on
Our rendt starts saturd
night with Champaign and da i
ingas we see the sights. I'm look
forward to the weekend in
Happy Valentin
Day. 1 love you! Pam.
TANYA RHUDY, I'll alwayscher-
thc many wonderful times we
had together. Right now I can only
v that the future holds many
more in store for us. Thinks for the
warmth, honesty, and under-
standing you gave me but above
all else, thanks for being you! 11
alwa ith
STEPHEN I Valentine's
Day and may you always rest in
ice. Ha, Ha, Ha What a
thin y, huh? Love alwa;
ludy JEN F.I My mom and dad both
KRISTI PATTERSON, I hope say I must be crazy to be this
i have a great Valentine's Day. fatuated. So call me crazy, for in
u roal dcs . safe and secure.
ohnns friend.
KA�






s
vi
i j
the wi '
JORDAN,
After I
t
CRIT
ry much
rla.
MCPHERSON, Ca:
nb up your mountain
lei I s I
hat's n
e Sat. Just remember, I'm a
ul. G.
t wanted to let you
I h tirr pend fc
special. This weekend
�last. See you later and
Valentine's Day. Lo
I love you. You are the most
mt thinginmy life. I'm the
-1 man in the world to ha
you.
t COON, "I just can't live my
without you Be my forever
�ntine 'cuz who else will ho wl
h me at 3:00 a.m. I really Love
i Forever, Georgia.
�IFTER, Happy Valentine's
i wish I could be with you.
pe the time will help. You're
v ays on my mind. I Love You!
BEAN: We've had alot of good
times and a few bad ones too, but
I m glad your my valentine
andGator is too. Love, Jere.
STEPHANIE, I've enjoyed the
past several months we've spent
together and look forward to
many more. I love you.
ur
� it make it

)ay, Buttrash.
, L. H. iforopen-
For this 1
ki.
OF THE WED-
NITE LASAGNA
PopSH
to be
?Id.
icchini, learn your
md all you fellows will
never again famish. Love ya,
DOLL, All t) in the world
ild never amount to the love
ether. Th-
ries will V ver in my
will always be
. ou if someday you de-
d nt it. David.
IIUS, The past four and a half
ive shared together
XH?n the best of my life.
Thanks for always being there. I
forward to our future to-
Happv Valentine's Day.
With love, Joyce.
TODD MCLAWHORN, I love
much and 1 am very
; Thanks for being
nv tine. Love ya bunches,
Kr
AS W: You really mean a lot to me
Your as sweet as can be Your
a v joy to see and the love
from heart keeps growing bigger
than the biggest tree. Happy Val-
entines and I LOVE YOU. TBF.
rv 1 v r t �
lountains crumbled to th -
hi and m
a lot in the
iher, but
you a �� as
ir
I
� � the
nderful Valenf
�r know who Cupid
arrow might hit.Good ith
orite Frat Rat! l.i
always, the Bear Lover.
JOHN, Love is a many splender
thing and I'm very glad that we
share such a splender thing. I'm
vei u came into my life.
I tr. i, Bridget!
BUBBA, I'm glad we'll be I
her ft.
n't imagine being withou
again. Happy Valentine's Day. I
love you, Lips.
MICHAEL J. MCK1ERNAN.
Through the laughter and the
tears, it's been almost three
years. I love you more each day
than words could ever say.
Without you I couldn't be, to-
gether we'll stay for eternity.
Happy Valentine's Day Darling.
You are the best. Yours total
Kim.
LAMBCHOP, Hey, Smooth
Operator, Magic Hands, etc.
Happy Valentine's and all that
jazz. If I may borrow one of your
corny lines- you know my heart
is all yours. Hope your day is
filled with LUV. Hugs and
kisses, L.
MY SPIRIT PONDERS PERPET-
UAL MEMORIES OF: ferris
wheel rides, and gospel sings,
pizza burgers and onion rings,
tears of joy and sharing hurt, half-
priced movies and Cragmont
shirts, one dozen hotdogs from
Norris' Kiwk Mart, icy road travel
and an interest in art. The sum of it
all in your eyes I still see. Anne,
you're a gift from God to me. I love
you, Tad.
LYNN, It's difficult to believe this
will be our 4th Valentines to-
MATT, Happy Valentine's Day,
Happy Anniversary, and all that
stuff. I can honestly say its been
a year I'll never forget. I love
you, Caroyln.
BRYAN H. As the day of hearts
draws near, 1 wonder how it
would be to have you as my val-
entine. The feelings of content
and happiness would over-
whelm me! So tell me, would you
be my Valentine! Shelley.
JEFF AND PUFF: What a bitch!
CHUCK - What can I sav this will
ryday is such a perfect day to
-ith you. S.
EMILY there is a will
and th
found the way. Thanks
being a friend ai x?
�'�
BRIAN J leant
what the past year has mt
the
ial. Don't
w much 11
Am
B.D
sensitive, lo �ring, under-
standing, romantic, invigorating,
j
walk God's green earth, and I
consider myself very fortunate to
have you. Love, John.
CHIP, Wishing you a "wh
lotta love" on Valentir
W( Charlei
TO MY "DON RAM IRQ ch
laufev
ing a special part of my life.
Your Sunshi
TINA, Th
the md pi cirl in
the I. Hap:
LOVE YOU! Jeff
DANIELLE: The past 4
have been the greatest years of
my life. You're the best friend I've
ever had and I love you very
much. HAPPY VALENTINE'S
DAY! Best buddies forever - Jill.
BONITA: Between you and
Charlemayne, my days are filled
with love. I'll be your hawk-eyed
moose if you will be my loving
chottcr. Happv Valentine's Day.
THEOLONIUS and Harry, the
Crimson King.
LEISA, I knew from the first time
I saw you I hoped you would be
my Valentine. One step at a time.
Happy Valentine's Day Sweet-
heart! Love, Jon.
DEAR JAMES FJ. MCK - All of
us at the paper hope you & Paula
have a great V-Day! Love, Bell,
James, Adamer, Proof & Dingle.
(aco
SEHOYA-Holding you
it's like that ol' summer s
. well,
sun. Say
"you say "me" But say "IT
TOGETHER Bodacious one,
come live with me and we'll kiss
invisible black children forever.
V
fl4Al�Xc-fl
X
oie
� ��,y;� ��.�� i)H)ll �l �v
- ,��. m- -&





t
8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 11,1988
Universities may lose research collections
(CPS) � Boston University and
the University of Texas may lose
major collections of research pa-
pers if they can't resolve legal
questions about gifts from the late
Martin Luther King and former
Gox. John Connally. On Jam. 28,
BU asked a court to dismiss a suit
filed by King's widow demand-
ing the university turn over to
King's estate a collection of his
papers and correspondence.
Coretta Scott King wants to
transfer the collection to the
Martin Luther King Center for
Nonviolent Social Change in At-
lanta.
The University of Texas, mean-
while, could lose a collection of
papers from Connallv's years as
governor and secretary of the U.S.
departments of Treasury and the
Navy.
Connally filed for bankruptcy
soon after donating the papers to
UT, but under bankruptcy laws, a
court could sell most of
Connally's possessions to raise
money that, in turn, would be
paid to th" people Connally now
owes.
Connally, a reported $42 mil-
lion in debt, held a much-publi-
cized auction of his personal ef-
fects in Houston Jan. 22-23, and
raised about $2.5 million.
Connally's creditors have asked
the National Archives to decide if
his personal papers should be
sold, too.
The question in Boston is where
King really wanted his papers to
reside.
"Dr. King wanted the South to
be the repository of the bulk of his
papers Coretta Scott King ar-
gued in her lawsuit.
"We hold the papers at BU in
1964 along with a letter that said,
"In the event of my death, all such
materials deposited with the uni-
versity shall become from that
date the absolute property of
Boston University
King was assassinated in 1968.
A theology student at BU during
the 1950s, he never asked the uni-
versity to return the papers, but
did not give the school title to the
documents.
Mrs. King's attorney, Rudolph
Pierce, says King would have had
to formally transferred title of the
documents to the university or
left them to the school in his will
before BU could actually own
them.
Miller, in reply, cited King's
letter and called claims BU was
not caring for the King collection
properly "bogus
"Scholars and researchers can
continue to see the papers. We
will maintain them in acid free
boxes and a climate-controlled
vault
While BU waits for the court
ruling, Texas awaits action from
the National Archives, which
must decide whether to sign the
deed to Connally's collection.
Connally drafted the still-un-
signed deed assigning ownership
of the papers to the National Ar-
chives, of which the UT's LBJ
Library is a part, before the bank-
ruptcy filing.
Once the deed is signed, there
should be no problems with the
donation, said Jill Brett, Archives
public affairs officer.
Don Wilson, the new head of
the National Archives of the
United STates, began work the
last week of January, and has not
yet had time to complete his re-
view of the Connally donation.
"He will probably sign (the
deed) Brett said, but the Ar-
chives is prepared to abide by the
ruling of the bankruptcy court if
any question about the donation
is raised.
Pres. candidates move to N.H.
CONORD, N.H. (AD � Re-
publican Pat Robertson declared
in New Hampshire today that "I
am on the winning edge" after
finishing second in Iowa, while
Paul Simon, the Iowa runner up
among Democrats, stepped up
his cntisism of Richard Gephardt
but admitted his own campaign
had monev problems.
The comments came a dav after
George Bush borrowed a neigh-
borly slogan from rival Bob Dole,
and Dole took a leaf from Rep.
fack Kemp's plavbook as the re-
publicans presidencial conten-
dors jostled for support in New
r lampshire after their race turned
topsy-turvy in Iowa.
Among Democrats, Massachu-
setts Gov. Micheal Dukakis
settled in for a fight on his home
turf, declaring that he would lead
the pack after the Feb. 16 primary
here. Iowa winner Gepharbt at
least partly agreed, describing
himself as "clearly the underdog"
here.
Today, in Dixville Notch,
Robertson said, "I have a wonder-
ful bit of momentum coming into
New Hampshire
"I believe that I am on the win-
ning edge he said at the Bal-
sams, a posh hotel where the first
votes in New Hampshire elec-
tions traditionally are cast.
Former Gov. Meldrim Thom-
son, Robertson's state campaign
chairman, said "it's going to be
real touch" to do well in the New
Hampshire primary next Tues-
day.
Simon said at a news conference
in Hampton, with the Seabrook
nuclear plant as a backdrop, that
Gephardt was guilty of a "flip-
flop" in his opposition to the
completed but unlicensed, plant.
Regarding reports that his cam-
paign is running out of money,
Simon said, "We have an indebt-
edness problem. I can't tell you
what it is
Dr. Alyne Ricker, a pediatric
endocrinologist, has joined the
East Carolina University School
of Medicine faculty as assistant
professor in the Department of
Pediatrics.
She will direct the department's
section of pediatric endocrinol-
ogy and assist in coordinating
hospital-sponsored programs
such as Camp Needles in the
Pines, an annual summer camp
for diabetic children.
Preceding her faculty appoint-
ment at ECU, Ricker was a faculty
member in the endocrinology
division at The Children's Hospi-
tal in Boston as well as an instruc-
tor in pediatrics at Harvard Medi-
cal School.
The Boston native completed
her undergraduate education at
St. Mary's College in Notre Dame,
Ind and received her medical
degree from the Univeristy of
Geneva in Switzerland.
She finished a pediatrics intern-
ship and residency at Strong
Memorial Hospital in Rochester,
N.Y and completed clinical and
research fellowships in pediatric
endocrinology at the University
of Calgary in Alberta, Canada and
The Children's Hospital in Bos-
ton. Additionally, she completed
a one-year diabetes research fel-
lowship at the Joslin Diabetes
Center in Boston. Later, she joined
the center as a research investiga-
tor.
She is also a recipient of the
Juvenile Diabetes Foundation's
Schreyer Family Research Grant
for studies in pancreatic islet
transplantation.
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Contra leades postpone peace talks,
ask Americans for donations
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the
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Ml AMI (AP) � Contra leaders
have postponed peace talks with
the leftest Nicaraguan govern-
ment and arcasking Americans to
donate money to help fund their
civil war because Congress re-
acted military aid.
' We are now faced with the
challenge of conserving the integ-
rity and morale of our forces
Azucena Ferrey, a director of the
Nicaraguan Resistance, said
Monday. "In order to surmount
this challenge, we need your fi-
nancial support and appeal to the
generosity which has always
characterized the American
people
"This support is essential to
overcome the present situation,
even though it cannot substitute
the aid of the American govern-
ment nor match the aid received
by the Sandinistas from the Soviet
Union she said.
Contributions already have
been received from presidential
candidated Sen. Bob Dole, R-
Kan and from Sen. John McCain,
R-Ariz. Dole gave $500 and
McCain $400.
The Contra leaders said they
have set up two foundations in
Washington, the Nicaraguan Re-
sistance USA Office and the Nica-
raguan Resistance Educational
Foundation. Donations solicited
by the groups will be used only for
non-lethal aid, they said.
"We will go to third countries
and people living outside the
United States" for funds to buy
weapons, said director Adolfo
Calero, adding that no other
countries have yet been ap-
proached.
It was the search for funds after
the first U.S. aid cutoff that led
then-CIA director William Casey
and National Security Council
aide Oliver North into selling
arms to Iran with the profits going
to the Contras.
One idea currently under con-
sideration by the Contras is offer-
ing bonds similar to the Israel
Bonds sold in the United States to
support that nation.
Rejection of a $36.2 million
appropriation by the House of
Representatives last week re-
moved pressure on the Sandinis-
tas, Calero said.
The lack of a 'yes' vote in
Congress did undermine the
peace effort and the democratiza-
tion of Nicaragua' he said. "It
served a self-defeating purpose
The Contras said neither they
nor the Roman Catholic Church
mediators will attend
Wednesday's scheduled peace
talks with the Sandinistas in Gua-
temala.
Contra director Alfredo Cesar
said the leaders have received
word of a Sandinista offensive to
be launched in the next few days.
Nicaraguan Foreign Ministry
spokeswoman Mercedes Borge
said the government wants a
cease-fire "as soon as possible
"It is fundamental to avoid
more bloodshed, to save lives
she said in the Nicaraguan capital
Managua.
The delay in the talks will be for
only "a few days or a couple of
weeks Cesar said. The sched-
uled date had been tentative, he
added, blaming part of the delay
on the travels of the chief media-
�:�
Managua's Cardinal Miguel
Obandy Brave, who is not
scheduled � return to Central
America until Feb. 18.
White House spokesman Mar-
lin Fitzwater said the administra-
tion wants the talks to resume.
"We've been assured it's just a
temporary delay Fitzwater said.
"The Contras wanted more
time to assess the fallout from the
House vote. 1 think it's just for a
few days. It's just to reassess their
position, It shouldn't have any
effect
The Sandinistas had long re-
fused direct talks with the Con-
tras.
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'
Israeli
JERUSALEM (AP) � Isr,
authorities today lifted curtc
affecting 212,000 Arabs, and L
envoy Richard Murphy met w
Israeli leaders in an effort to
fuse tensions in the occupied
ritories.
Murphy outlined a U.S. pj
that Israeli sources said calls
Palestinian self-rule and electu
this year in the occupied wl
Bank and Gaza Strip.
The plan also calls for talksi
December on the perman
status of the occupied lanj
sources said on condition of ai
nymity.
The sources said Murphv
ported that Jordan's Kil
Hussein had insisted on an inti
national conference, which Pnj
Minister Yitzhak Shamir oppos
But they said Hussein showc
lew willingness to negouat
temporary self-rule arranger�
for Palestinians after an intei
tional opening for talks.
Murphy discussed the
proposals today with forei
Minister Shimon Peres and
Med. sc,
one ofh
ST. LOUIS, Mo. (CPS) � Wl
campus regents and truste
around the country are meetinj
set � and normally raise �
tion for the 1988-89'school yeai
February, one school has saic
will lower tuition next year.
Washington University (of
Louis) School of Medicine tr
tees announced Jan. 27 they wi
lowering tuition by 5 percent,
about $700, for next year.
The trustees said they
lowering the rates to try to relic
students of the need to enter oi
the highest-paying areas of me
cine in order to repay their sj
dent loans. The American M
cal Association found in 1987 tl
the average new doctor left
school $32,000 in debt.
fc"That debt may be forcil
young physicians to select
V8hL"1�yiBB sP�jalties in orj
tp rjri$& thf�ajcial vnctehr
rjeaS ISid- Assotflte Dean Jc
Herweg in announcing
Federal court!
exempts Univ
BOSTON, Mass. (CPS) �
leges don't have to follow
criminal court procedures wl
they consider suspending
dents, a federal court has rul
University of Rhode Island
dent Raymond J. Gorman III
sued the university, claiming I
had violated his right to due p
ess by denying him a lawyer
not allowing him to videotJ
student conduct board heanj
held to decide whether to
pend him.
The board ultimately did
pend Gorman for allegedly
assing and verbally abusing
URI staffers in an argument at
using a student van.
But the three-judge U.S. G
; of Appeals for the First Circuit!
week ruled the "courts should)
require that a fair hearing be
that necessarily must follow I
traditional common-law ad
; sarial method
It held that hearings are fal
"the individual has had an op(
tunity to answer, explain
defend" him or herself.
Last September, a federal j
peals court ruled that New Yi
Hamilton College must offer j
rial hearings to 12 students
pended for participating n
anti-racism sit-in.
The court ruled that Hamil
a private college, violated thel
dents' constitutional rights'
cause the school's disciplii
process is defined to comply
a New York law. Links wit!
state, no matter how tenuou
quire schools offer judicial
ings to guarantee constituti
rights are not violated, the c
ruled.
Observers said the case w
limit colleges' power to disci i
disruptive students.
r
m
! ft P C
� i�i��ini Mwwpimni.il
i uni'�' ' Tin in i m m&m
I MI III- � �
i�i �� � �" ��' mi q�i nmiMMJWWMWHl







THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 11,1988 9
ons
affairs officer
. Wilson, the new head of
Jatkmal Archives of the
ti STates. began work the
lock of January, and has not
d time to complete his re-
. r the Connally donation.
u ill probably' sign (the
Brett said, but the Ar-
s prepared to abide by the
of the bankruptcy court if
E -non about the donation
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more details
Israeli authorities lift curfews
JERUSALEM (AP) � Israeli fense Minister Yitzhak Rabin, and
authorities today lifted curfews planned to meet with a Palestin-
arfecting 212,000 Arabs, and U.S.
envoy Richard Murphy met with
Israeli leaders in an effort to de-
fuse tensions in the occupied ter-
ritories.
Murphy outlined a U.S. plan
that Israeli sources said calls for
ian leader whose name was not
disclosed, officials said.
After meeting Shamir on Tues-
day night, Murphy said he had
received "great encouragement"
in his talks with Israeli leaders as
sist, and possibly debate and bar-
gain he said.
Peres supporters saw Shamir's
comments as a rollback on previ-
ous flexibility on the issue of tim-
ing.
Meanwhile, Israeli leaders said
Israel would back a Palestine Lib-
Palestinians live.
The daily Hadashot reported
today that a group of soldiers and
one settler from Elon Moreh beat
four Palestinians from the village
of Salem north of Jerusalem and
then used a tractor to dump dirt
on them.
They ordered us to lie with our
faces to the ground and two sol-
well as with the leaders of Jordan, cration Organization ship carry-
ralestinian self-rule and elections Syria, Saudi Arabia and Egypt. ingmore than 130 deported Pales-
this year in the occupied West "I had the sense of eagerness tinians from reaching Israel. The diers stepped on our backs so we
Bank and Gaza Strip. and enthusiasm in each place that ship planned to set sail from wouldn't move the newspaper
The plan also calls for talks by 1 visited, including here in Jerusa- Athens today.
lem, to find a way to move ahead 'This ship will not be allowed to
and to look at some new ideas come close to the shore said Avi
December on the permanent
status of the occupied lands,
sources said on condition of ano-
nvmirv.
The sources said Murphy re-
ported that Jordan's King
Hussein had insisted on an inter-
national conference, which Prime
M inister Yi tzhak Shamir opposes.
But they said Hussein showed a
new willingness to negotiate a
Murphy said.
In his session with Murphy,
Shamir reiterated that negotia-
tions should be based on the 1�78
Camp David accord which pro-
poses five years of limited auton-
omy before the start of talks on a
final agreement.
Shamir told
a party meeting the largest city in the occupied
temporary- self-rule arrangement Tuesday he opposed an acceler- West Bank where 125,000 Arabs
for Palestinians after an interna- ated time frame for self-rule. "We have been confined to their homes
tional opening for talks. see serious problems if anyone since severe riots on Jan. 31.
Murphy discussed the U.S. thinks we have to cancel or Curfews remained in force in a
proposals today with foreign shorten (the timetable). This is a half-dozen West Bank villages
Minister Shimon Peres and De- problem and we will have to in- and refugee camps where 65,000
officer, I think his name was Char-
lie, told the tractor driver: Let's
go, move on them
"I felt the tractor throw a big pile
of wet sand and rocks on us. He
did it two or three times
Hamdan was quoted as saying. "I
couldn't breathe. I just remember
that people came from the village,
pulled us out of the pile and
eight locations including Nablus, poured water on us
An Israeli army spokesman
Pazncr, spokesman for Shamir.
"The question is whether we will
allow this ship to stand at a
distance and the exploit the situ-
ation to blacken our image in the
world
The army lifted curfews on
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army
said he had no immediate com-
ment on the report, which he said
was still under investigation.
Arab demonstrators clashed
year.
Med. school lowers 1988-89,
one of few schools to do so
ST. LOUIS, Mo. (CPS) � While unusual rate reduction.
campus regents and trustees He hopes the tuition cut from
around the country are meeting to $14,100 this year to $13,400 next
set � and normally raise � tui- school year will push students to
tion for the 1988-89 school year in specialize in less-lucrative feilds
February, one school has said it like "academic medicine, family
will lower tuition next year. practice, pediatrics and some of
Washington University (of St. the other primary care areas
Louis) School of Medicine trus- Herweg added he wished other
tees announced Jan. 27 they were schools would follow
lowering tuition by 5 percent, or Washington's example, but the
about $700, for next year. wish may not come true.
The trustees said they were The University of Illinois on
lowering the rates to try to relieve Jan. 18 imposed a special, mid-
students of the need to enter only academic year tuition hike of $150
the highest-paying areas of medi- for all undergrads, to help it it
cine in order to repay their stu- compensate for severe cuts in
dent loans. The American Medi- state funding.
cal Association found in 1987 that Similarly, Michigan Tech stu-
the average new doctor left med dents discovered they, too, will
school $32,000 in debt. pay $46 more in tuition to attend
"That debt may be forcing classes this term,
voung physicians to select tne While mid-year tuition in-
higher-paying specialties in order creases � a practice first popular-
v :cjfith,&fu&ial Hxtehjtedi. .izedjduring this decade ta help
neSsrsciid AssodBle Dean John defray sudden losses in public
Herweg in announcing the funding � are less widespread
Tuesday with Israeli security
forces in scattered protests in the
West Bank, Gaza and Jerusalem.
An army officer opened fire to
disperse protesters in the Gaza
Strip City of Fafah, wounding a 16
year old youth in the leg, military
officials said.
The army also said it was inves-
itgating Arab reports that a 17
year old Gaza City resident, Fuad
Tarazi, died Tuesday after being
this year, trustees and regents beaten while in army custody.
normally meet during January According to U.N. figures, 51
and February to set tuition for the Arabs have been killed at the
next school years. Observers ex- hands of Israelis since anti-Israeli
pect them to raise tuition an protests began Dec. 8. Most of the
average of 5 to 7 percent for next casualties were caused by army
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Federal court
exempts Univ.
BOSTON, Mass. (CPS) � Col-
leges don't have to follow all
criminal court procedures when
they consider suspending stu-
dents, a federal court has ruled.
University of Rhode Island stu-
dent Raymond J. Gorman III had
sued the university, claiming URI
had violated his right to due proc-
ess by denying him a lawyer and
not allowing him to videotape
student conduct board hearings
held to decide whether to sus-
pend him.
The board ultimately did sus-
pend Gorman for allegedly har-
assing and verbally abusing two
URI staffers in an argument about
using a student van.
But the three-judge U.S. Court
of Appeals for the First Circuit last
week ruled the "courts should not
require that a fair hearing be one
that necessarily must follow the
traditional common-law adver-
sarial method
It held that hearings are fair if
"the individual has had an oppor-
tunity to answer, explain and
defend" him or herself.
Last September, a federal ap-
peals court ruled that New York's
Hamilton College must offer judi-
cial hearings to 12 students sus-
pended for participating in an
anti-racism sit-in.
The court ruled that Hamilton,
a private college, violated the stu-
dents' constitutional rights be-
cause the school's disciplinary
process is defined to comply with
a New York law. Links with the
state, no matter how tenuous re-
quire schools offer judicial hear-
ings to guarantee constitutional
rights are not violated, the court
ruled.
Observers said the case would
limit colleges' power to discipline
disruptive students.
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10
fHE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 11,1988
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
BRODVS, The Plaza and Carolina East
Wall need individuals to perform infor-
mal modeling of prom dresses. Must be
inendlv, self-assured, and available Sat-
urdays, beginning March thru mid-may.
Applv at Brodv's. Carolina East Mall M-
W, 2-4 p m.
CAPE HATTER AS. N.C. . . Summer
help needed at EMILY'S Soundside Res-
taurant. Available positions for busers,
waiters, waitresses and kitchen help. Will
train! To start Mav 15th thru August 20th.
Housing available! Call 919-987-2383.
CABIN COUNSELORS AND
INSTRUCTORS (male and female) for
western North Carolina 8 week
children's summer camp. Over 30 activi-
ties including Water Ski, Tennis, Heated
swimming pool. GO-Karts, Hiking, Art
Room, meals, salary- and travel. Experi-
ence not necessary. Non-smoking stu-
dents write for application brochure:
Camp Pine wood, 20205 N.E. 3 Court,
miami, Flonda.33179.
THIS IS IT! The Spring Break trip. Dav-
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tels Register before its too late. 300
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ASSISTANT MANAGER We are look-
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ARE YOU a college student in need of
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Camp is a summer camp for mentally and
physically handicapped children and
adults. Please write or call: The Special
Populations Program, P.O. Box 590,
Raleigh, N.C. 27602, (919) 755-6832.
PART-TIME drivers needed for late af-
ternoon and night. Apply at Dependable
Cab Company, 1001 South Evans Street.
NO PHONE CALLS.
FOUR STAR
PIZZA

DELIVERY
PERSONNEL
NEEDED
REQUIREMENTS:
Must be at least 18.
Must have own car, a valid
I driver's license &
j insurance.
j Must have clean, neat appear-
ance.
WAGEWS:
Our drivers average S6 to $10
per hour with salary, tips &
cash commission (paid dairy.)
BENEFITS:
Paid vacation.
I Promotion from within.
I APPLY IN PERSON
FOUR STAR PIZZA
114 E. 10th Greenville. NC
PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANT in
exchange for free room and board in a
nice two bedroom, two bath house. Will
need 312-4 hours work per day, 7 days a
week. Located 12 miles outside of town.
Call Joy Foster at 746-2588, 746-3513 or
758-2399.
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION and
Parks Department is recruiting for indoor
soccer coaches. The program will begin in
March and the hours of work will vary,
3:30-9:00 p.m Monday through Friday
and 1O00 a.m4:00 p.m. on Saturdays,
working approximately 20 hours per
week. The program will last about eleven
weeks. Some soccer background is re-
quired. You will need to teach soccer
fundamentals, team play, and strategies
to youngsters ages 5 through 15. Rate of
pay will be $3.55 to S3.85 per hour. Mini-
mum age is 16. Contact Ben James at 830-
4543 for more information.
BRODVS FOR MEN is searching for
part-time sales associates. Enthusiastic
individuals who en jo v fashion and have a
flexible school schedule should apply in
person, Brodv's, Carolina East Mall, M-
W, 2-4 p.m.
COLLEGE REP WANTED to distribute
"Student Rate" subscription cards at this
campus. Good income. For information
and application write to: COLLEGIATE
MARKETING SERVICES, 251 Gleen-
wood Dr. Mooresville, N.C, 28115. (705)
664-4063.
DISABLED GRADUATE student needs
part-time physical assistant. Contact
Marty at 752-2994.
HELP WANTED: Part-time interior de-
sign student - send resume to: Designer,
3010 East 10th Street, Greenville, N.C
Wanted:
Boxers Register
Now for TKE
boxing
tournament.
March 29, 30,31.
Call
752-6032
758-7144
SERVICES OFFERED
CLASS ACT Limousines: Make
Valentine's Day Special - Let us drive you
in style. Call 757-3240.
CANT BEAT IT! Cheap typing and last-
minute jobs: $1.00page! Call 830-5340,
please leave a message.
ROMANTIC VIOLIN Serenade Feb. 10-
17. Delivered to work, home, dorm or
restaurant! Call now for reservation.
830-0641 or 758-9103.
ACCOMPLISHED MAGICIAN for
hire. Unique entertainment for informal
or formal occasions. Reasonable rates.
For information, call 830-0636. If no an-
swer, leave message!
ATTENTION D.J. NEEDERS: Want to
feel the music, instead of just hearing it?
Want to dance fast, slow, hard, dirty?
Want reliable, punctual, and professional
service? Call Sound Mixtures, 752-4916.
Ask for Bob.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and phoyocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
N.C 752-3694.
HAVING A PARTY and need a deejay?
I charge $100.00 per party with no time
limit on the music. Call 752-4251.
VALENTINES DAY Party Animals
Balloons delivered in costume Fun! Fun!
Fun! Ask about student specials. 830-
1823.
CLASS ACT LIMOUSINES: Don't
drink and drive Party in style! Call 757-
3240.
TOP QUALITY TYPING: papers, $1.50
per page. Resumes written and typed
$15.00. Call Joy at 758-7423 after 5 p.m.
MID WINTER BOP: The original is still
here. Old wax. New wax. The
THRASHMAN DJ service. Approved by
thousands. Discover it. Bashes, formats,
mixers, socials, etc . . . .Dial 752-3587
anytime. Many thanx.
GENTLEMEN, send your sweetheart a
serenade. For only $3.00 on and $5.00 off
campus, Phi Mu Alpha Professional
Musk Fraternity will sing to your girl-
friend, mom, etc. Our quartets are
availbale for Thursday, Feb. 11 through
Saturday, Feb. 13. Inquire in the Music
Building M-F, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
FOR SALE
ECU'S ORIGINAL. We've been SPRING
BREAKING PIRATES for years! Don't be
fooled by a bus company offering a
spring break trip. Campus Marketing
exists soley for spring break trips. Day-
tona Beach will rock this year and we will
be right there Call Jim at 752-7923.
NEED TO GET RID of 8 cubic foot refrig-
erator! Excellent condition. Price nego-
tiable. Call 830-5340 and leave a message.
FOR SALE: Sony stereo stand, Schwinn
10-speed bicycle. Super Fox Radar Detec-
tor, call 758-5471.
COMMODORE 64 System, disk drive,
NLQ printer, Modem, color monitor,
well over $2,000 in software. Need cash
for spring break! $500.00 firm. 758-9936.
PARTY STARTS HERE This will be a
SPRING BREAK you'll never forget.
Campus Marketing hotels put you right
on the hot spot, not 4 miles down the
beach. Hell, if I wanted to run 4-8 miles a
day, I'd join the Marines!
WAKE UP! Don't forget a day you will
regret the rest of the year, but a day shell
remember forever. Valentine's Day!
Jenni K. Handcrafted Jewelry. 608 Ar-
lington Blvd Suite E 355-6714.
SPRING BREAK 1988. South Padre or
Daytona Deluxe Condos or Hotel accom-
modaiton starting as low as $149.00 per
person for 7 nights. Call l-SOO-2224139.
Transportation available.
DONT FORGETto pick up some-
thing special for the one who is special to
you, at Jenni K. Handcrafted Jewelry. 608
Arlington Blvd. Suite E. 355-6714.
CAN YOU BUY Jeeps, cars, 4 x 4's seized
in drug raids for under $100.00? Call for
facts today. 692-837-3401 EXt 711.
SPRING BREAK T SHIRTS: If you
thought the Halloween shirts were hot,
wait until you see the Spring Break 88 t's.
Get them while they last. Call Phil or Troll
at 830-1447 or 757-1007.
TROLLS TUX AND TEES: Don't pay
high prices for your formal wear, try
Trolls Tux and Tee's for your formal
needs. Traditional and designer models.
Special fraternity rates. 757-1007 or 830-
1447.
BUY 14K gold bracelets and necklaces at
wholesale prices, buy from a direct dealer
at 752-4589-David Dupree, and skip the
jewelers high prices.
FREE Sterling silver hearts with every
purchase at Jenni K. Handcrafted Jew-
elry. 608 Arlington Blvd. Suite E. 355-
6714.
SUN, FUN AND HARDBODIES! Don't
stay blocks off the beach or miles down
away form the action. Campus Market-
ing Hotels are right on the water and
where the action is pumping! CM has
been providing ECU with unforgettable
Spring Break trips to Daytona Beach for
years. Our experience makes us the hot-
test trip going! Call Jim now for info, at
752-7923.
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP to share apartment in Tar River
Estates. 13 rent, 13 utilities. Call 752-
2124.
BEVERLY MANOR APARTMENTS
now leasing spacious 2 bedroom units
with large living room and dining area.
New carpet; new wallpaper in kitchen
and bath. Range and refrigerator pro-
vided. Central heatair water and basic
cable tv included in rent. As low as
$335.00 per month. Call 756-5155 days,
746-2098 evenings for appointment.
1 OR 2 ROOMMATES needed to share
Wildwood Villas Townhouse. Call Julie
at 752-4781.
FOR RENT: apartment, $225.00 per
month. 1 bedroom available, call 752-
4199, great location Across from cam-
pus.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: 2 bed-
room apartment. Split rent and utilities 1
3. Tar River Apartment. Call 758-1253 or
come by 105 Oak, 4.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 2
bedroom apartment. Private room. Close
to campus. $155.00 per month plus 12
utilities, call 752-5668.
TOWNHOUSE APARTMENT for rent.
No security deposit. Fully carpeted.
Central heat and air. Call 757-6423 days,
919 975-2481 evenings (call collect).
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
$147.50 per month, fully furnished apart-
ment, within driving distance from cam-
pus. Call 355-6730, leave message.
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apartments for
rent. Furnished. Contact Hollie Si-
monowich at 752-2865. Whole semester
free
A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
�Located Near ECU
�Near Major Shopping Centers
�Across From highway Patrol Station
Umtted OfTer - $275 a month
Contact J T. or Tommy Williams
756- 7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt 8. 12 - 5:30 pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $195 a month. 6
month lease. MOBILE HOME RENTALS -
couples or singles. Apartment and mobile
I homes In Azalea Gardens near Brook Valley I
County Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
PERSONALS
JEN ANDI: CONGRATULATIONS
You've finally made it! I am so happy for
you both, you've shown me what sister-
hood really means I love you both! Kath.
ALPHA PHI: Wendy Artz, Maria Fiano,
Jill Liles, Cheryl Robinson, Marisa
Sepesy, Julie Tharrington, and Lisa Wil-
liams - HANG IN THERE! Keep working
hard and it won't be long! We love y'all!
Love, the Sisters of Alpha Phi.
GOTTA CRUSH ON SOMEONE? Let
them know with a can of crush Delta
Zeta Crush Sale, February 8-12 in front of
the Student Store.
AMANDA HODGES: Congratulations
for winning Panhellenic Outstanding
Greek Woman! We're all very proud of
you! Love, The Sisters of Alpha Phi.
DELTA SIG'S: Thanks for inviting us to
help celebrate your pledges inductions.
We had a great time! Love, the AOPi's.
DELTA SIG: Chris K. and John P. Chapel
Hill was a blast! The Chi Phi's have it so
we have to get it back. Hope everyone
had a rockin time Friday! No eating in the
front room. Hot Damn!
TO THE ADPI pledges: Good luck this
week! We are thinking about you. All our
love, the Sisters.
TO AZD PLEDGES: Congratulations on
getting the best pledge class award!
You're doing a great job. Keep up the
good work. Love, the Sisters of AZD.
HARD ROCK fans unite! Come see
Roulette, a band in the Van HalenBon
JoviDokken vein live at Susie's Tree-
house, Tuesday, February 23 at 930.
Come hoist a few and rock with party
band, Roulette.
TO ALL AZD dates: Since it's the time of
year for cupid to reappear, get psyched
for the Valentine's Dance, because it is
almost here. Love the AZD's.
THANKS TO EVERYONE who came
out for the DZ-SAE Happy Hour! Let's
party again this Friday from 4-UNTIL -
You know the place
THE NEW DELI JAMS on! If you know
what's good for you, then come welcome
back the ACCELERATORS Thursday,
jam to the upbeat sounds of ANTIC IIAY
Friday, and don't dare miss FLAT
STANLEY Saturday.
QUOTE OF THE WEEK: "You should be
GRATEFUL you're not DEAD" because
New Potato Caboose is playing at the
Attic on Friday.
TO ALL the sororities who received
awards at the scholarship banquet -
Congratulations. Have a great semester.
Love, the ADPi's.
SENIORS SENIORS SENIORS: Senior
portraits are now being taken. February
8-12 and 1-5. Don't delay, stop by the
Buccaneer office.
DELTA SIG Ray and Mark, 21 A Birth-
day never looked so good
ATTENTION SENIORS, faculty and
undergrads: Yearbook portraits are being
made Feb. 15-19 everyday from 9-12 and 1-
5. Please stop by and support your year-
book.
SHARON LEWIS: Hey BABE, Guess
who? Yes, it's your secret admirer again,
wishing you a spectacular Valentine's
weekend. Hope Cupid doesn't shoot you
'cause I've already been shot. Can't wait
until next weekend. Things will get ugly
at Topsail Beach! Your Valentine, J.P.R.
TO SIGMAS: Now my roommate Tara
has been talking some, claiming
that the Sigmas are it; She says you girls
can party us under the table, for her sake
let's hope this is no fable; To a Pike this
year it's been a long wait, thank goodness
you girls have caught our bait; Now it's
time for you girls to break those old Con-
federate ties, and start to party with some
real fun guys; We've heard you been
scoping our new pledges. Hopefully
Thursday night there won't be too many
social wedges; Sigmas don't be late to
catch that bus, With the Pikas you've got
the best on this campus; So you girls
better live up to your fame. For this
Valentine's you might find a new pika
flame. Happy Valentine's Day, Sigmas!
Brothers and pledges of Pi Kappa Alpha.
CONGRATULATIONS TO Susanna
Hudson for receiving the Lisa Turner,
Most Outstanding Pledge award and
Stacy Stone who received one of the Dr.
Elmer Meyer Scholarship Awards. We're
proud of ya'U. Love, the Sigmas.
PIKA'S: Valentine superlatives will be
on. our minds all week! We're looking
forward to Thursday night! Love, the
Sigmas.
AOPI: Congratulations on winning the
Laura Sweet Award. You all worked hard
and truly deserved it! Love, the Sigmas.
GARY HART for president! Let the
PEOPLE decide! You can participate in
his grass roots campaign for the N.C
Presidential primary on March 8th. For
any question or further information call
Bob at 758-2570.
PI KAPPA PHI: Are you ready to dance?
A little dirty? Well, rest up because this is
the night! Can't wait and we'll see ya
around nine Love, the Zetas.
DELTA SIG: We would like to extend a
Delta welcome to our new pledges: Glen
Atwell, Chris Key, John Paige, David
Mizelle, Walter Holt, Buddy Sell, Bill
Conley, and Andy Lipscomb! Good Luck
Guys The Brothers of Delta Sigma Phi.
AZD SISTERS: Thanks so much for your
support. We never could have done it
without you. Beta Mu's, you were a tough
act to follow. We love you. The Beta Nu's.
Best Pledge Class. 1987-1988.
AOPI: Friday night was excellent! Hope
you all had a great time! Let's do it again
soon! Delta Sig.
PIKA: Thanks for the invite and party
this past Saturday. Missed the Sig Eps.
Between the two of us, Minges rocked.
Your sign blew us away. Thanks for
showing us what brotherhood is all
about. ECU's Christian and newest fra-
ternity - Chi Alpha Omega.
TKE: Saturday night was a Mast. The
music was great and we danced all night
Thanks so much. Let's do it again soon.
We love you. The AZD pledges.
DEAR ELIZABETH: Hope you enjoyed
yourself this weekend. It was a memo-
rable one. Can't wait to do it again. Hope
you liked the roaes I sent you. Love, Scott.
RAFTERS: Tuesday night is rock 'n roll
night, free admission, .25 cent draft.
DELTA SIGMA THETA SORORITY,
INC. invites you to an evening of fun at
the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center, Fri-
day, Feb. 12 10-2 a.m. Admission SI.00
with student id.
AOPI: Congratulations on 28 years of an
outstanding sorority at ECU. Keep up the
great work and it will last a lifetime.
ALL ADPI pledges: Just wanted to say
"thanks" for the nice message I found in
the foyer! You're all the best! I luv ya,
Meredythe.
ALPHA PHI: The sisters of Alpha Phi
congratulate the newly initiated sisters
and welcome them to our sisterhood
We're proud of y'all! Lisa Adcock, Ami
Bannerman, Misaie Beason, Shannon
Bowen, Petrina Bowie, Cyndi Calloway,
Andrea Chase, Lou Dalrymple, Megan
Farn, Karen Hartmen, Cyndi Healey,
Alice Jarman, Stacey Lippincott, Sheri
Neal, Angela Paige, Heather Schofield,
Carolyn Steed, Rcnee Story, Karen Stuck-
enschmidt, Julie Trepal, Gina Tripodi,
Sarah Williams, Denise Zech.
LOST: Man's large silver signet crest
ring, engraved 10-4-81, extreme sentimen-
tal value. Reward if found. Call 756-4468
and ask for Ed.
SAE HAPPY HOUR at the Elbo Friday
from 4-7. S2.00 teas-why drive anywhere
else!
LOST AND FOUND: Necklace found
near Garrett and Fletcher dorms. Please
call Randy at 756-2082.
WEDNESDAY-Ladies night at Rafters
Ladies admitted in free from 830-10-30.
$1 00 wine coolers, $.25 draft.
KAPPA SIG'S: It started out cold but
warmed up fast. Let's just say Saturday
was a blast! Thanks Guys - Let's do it
again soon! Love, Delta Zeta.
THE NEWS HAS SPREAD. The Attic is
the place. Many acts, many laughs, and all
the while, getting faced. Fraternities and
sororities, we know you'll be there,
because, hey, whether you know it or not,
we really do care. Sign t �rw this Monday in
front of the student sto give us your
John Hancock, and we'll give you a
Snickers Bar.
Spring Break
1988
Dive PcnncKamp
in Key Largo, Fla.j
$425.00
For information &
Registration call the
Rum Runner
Dive Shop
758-1444
TKE
Ringgirl
Competition
March 4
at the Attic.
For More
Information
Call 758-7144
Prizes awarded for
1st, 2nd 3rd place.
Announcements
�f.vw,r.i .).�:�
The National Gamma Beta Phi Honor
Society will hold a meeting Tuesday, Feb.
16 at 7p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium. Tickets
are available in Dr. Dunlop's office 217-A
Brewster.
PHT AT.PHA THETA
Phi Alpha Theta History Honor Society
presents: Viet Nam - The Personal Reality.
Dr. Donald Parkerson, Dept. of History,
introduces a video presentation and
round-table discussion presented by Al-
lan Hoffman (WNCT-TV) and other
members of the Viet Nam Veterans of
America. What are the differences be-
tween reality and Rambo? What were the
feelings of the front-line combat soldiers
(many of whom had been college students
only weeks before being sent into com-
bat)? Come see and discuss - Wed Feb.
17th at 100 pjn. in the Nursing Bldg.
Auditorium (next to the Croatan Bldg.)
COMPUTER CLUB
The ECU Computer Qub will meet in
Austin 223 Thursday, Feb. 11 at 330 p.m.
Group photographs for the Buccaneer
will be taken around 400 p.m. Refresh-
ments will be served.
SEE
Students for Economic Democracy will
meat every Sunday from 7:00 p.m. in
Mendenhall 8-D. For more information,
oil 758-9760 or 746049.
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
The Accounting Society's February
meeting will be held on the 15th at 4 pjn.
in the Multi-purpose room in Menden-
hall. Ralph Hester, a vice-president from
BB&T in Wilson will speak on Internal
Auditing and EDP Auditing. Refresh-
malts will be served!
GARY HART
Gary Hart for President-let the people
decide. You can participate in his grass
roots campaign for the NC Presidential
Primary on March 8th. For any questions
or further information, please call Bob at
758-2570.
ECU NAVIGATORS
Flight 730 takes off this Thursday at
730 in the Biology Auditorium B-102.
Come out to learn how God can cure the
loneliness blues. Good times and teach-
ing. See you at Flight 730 tonight.
BACKPACKING CUNTf-
Registration for the Intramural Out-
door Recreation Backpacking Clinic will
be from Feb. 8-Feb. 22. The Activity date
will be on Feb. 24 at 6 pjn. For more
information call 757-6387.
SCHOLARSHIP
Students who wish to obtain financial
aid for overseas education may apply for
a Rivers Scholarship. The application
deadline is March 15,1988. For more info,
contact the Office of International Studies
and Scholarship in Brewster A-117.
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
Bible study tonight at 8:30 pm. There
will be a "simi-simi-formal Valentine
Party at the center Saturday, Feb. 13th at
9.00 pm. For more information call Steve
Crawley at 752-1869 or the Newman
Center at 757-3760. Refreshments will be
served Also come join us in the Holy Eu-
charist, Sundays at 1130 am in Biology
Building room 103. A special reminder
Ash Wednesday mass will meet in Biol-
ogy Building room 103. For more informa-
tion call Teresa Lee at 752-9910.
ASSERTIVENESS
A three part workshop offered to stu-
dents at no coat by the University Coun-
seling Center will be held Jan. 28 and Feb.
4 a 11. All three sessions will be con-
ducted from 3-4 P.M. in 312 Wright
Building.Leam how to express your-
selves directly and openly and sharpen
your interpersonal skills. Please call the
Counseling Center at 757-6661 for Regis-
tration.
CAMPUS MINISTRIES
Worship God and celebrate Commun-
ion this Wednesday night at 5:00 pjn. at
the Methodist Student Center. Also avail-
able: ali-you-can-eat meal which is $2.00
at the door, $1.50 in advance. Call 758-2030
for reservations. Sponsored by Presbyte-
rian and Methodist Campus Ministries.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Prime Time: sponsored by Campus
Crusade for Christ meets Thursday at 730
pm, Brewster C-103. Please come and join
us for Biblical teaching, fun, and fellow-
ship. Bring friends! Don't forget the SCs
Social Friday, Feb. 12 at Jarvis Church
Fellowship Hall at 8:00 pm. If you have
any questions call Robin at 752-1487.
ECU CHRISTIAN
There will be meetings every Thursday
at 6:00 in the culture center. Everybody
welcome.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
The ECU College Republicans will
meet every Tuesday night in room 221
Mendenhall at 7 p.m. Call 758-5775 or 752-
3587.
ROBERTSON
Students who would like to help with
getting M.G. Tat" Robertson elected
President, contact Justin Sturz at 758-2047.
Organizational meeting will be held soon.
aasSsSstssfi
EROS, the female principle of love,
unity, peace, manifests itself in the Equal
Rights Organization of Students at ECU.
The purpose of EROS is to educate, organ-
ize and act in accordance with the female
experience and women's issues. Meetings
are Tuesdays, 5:00 Austin 308. For info,
call 758-3645 or 752-7998.
PiflSLEP. MAJORS
All Physical Education Majors and in-
tended majors are welcome to join the
Physical Education Majors Qub snd fac-
ulty at 7 p.m. on Wed Feb. 10, 1988. A
reception will be held in the Pirate Qub.
Dr. David Watkins, chairman HPERS,
will speak on Physical Education as the
Consumate Profession and refreshments
will be served.
CHALLENGE DAY
Registration for Intramural Challenge
Day wil be held on March 2 from 11 p.m6
p.m. in MG 104-A. For more information
caU 757-6387.
COOPERATIVE ED.
Would you like to spend the summer of
fall in Florida? Walt Disney World win be
on campus to recruit students for summer
or fall semesters. Students from all majors
are encouraged to participate. Merchan-
dise, food, and attractions, among other
positions, are available. Representatives
will be at ECU on February 22 and 23.
Contact the office of Cooperative Educa-
tion in Raw! Building for further details.
BALLET.
The Atlanta Ballet will perform in
Wright Auditorium on Tues, Feb. 16, at
8pm. Included in the evening's program
are two new works: "Reflections For by
Artistic director Robert Barnett and an
untided work by Lisa De Ribere. Tickets
available at Central Ticket Office in Men-
denhall Student Center.
SAVE THOSE WW APPFUS
Deposit all empty Sticklets Natural
Flavor Gum packs and Doritos Brand
Cool Ranch flavor tortilla chip bags in the
U. S. College Comedy Competition dis-
plays located in the Student Book Store
lobby and Mendenhall. ECU could win a
free comedy concert if we collect the most
wrappers.
IA77;
The Performing Arts Series at ECU is
proud to present Richard Stoltzman and
Woody Herman's Thudering Herd in, "A
Tribute to Woody on Thurs. Feb. 11 at
8:00pm in Wright Auditorium. Under the
direction of Frank Tiberim, the Thunder
ing Herd will perform many of the works
with which it is associated. From "Cal-
doniato "Ebonv Concerto Tickets can
be purchased at the Central Ticket Office.
Mendenhall Student Center. 757-6611 ext
266.
CfflSTIAN FBI i jwshtp
NIGHT for Christian FeUowJD �
Bible teaching w�re JERJSiTuD!
Soviet
MOSCOW (AP) - Mikhai
Gorbachev announced tha
Soviet withdrawal from Afgl
stan will begin May 15 if I
sponsored peace talks reach a
tlement within five weeks
said the pullout could be ccj
pleted within 10 months
The Soviet leader also stres
Monday that the Kremlin w,
no say in who governs Aighj
Stan after the departure of its
mated 115,000 troops, wh I
been battling anti-commui
Afghan guerrillas lor more
eight years.
The White House called
speech a positive developrrJ
but said it would wait to
whether any conditions I
tached to the proposed wj
drawal.
It was the clearest indical I
that Gorbachev is moving rap
to extricate his country from
conflict he has termed a "blocs
wound
The mediator of the UN -
sored peace talks, Di
Late co
of Tryo
ECU News Bureau
The influence oi late i
and federal era Phila
upon the nation's decor
is the topic of the 20th aru
Trvon Palace Symposium M
2f22.
Featured speakers will incij
specialists from Winterthur
seum and Colonial WilliamsH
The symposium, co-sponsore
the Tryon Palace Comma ss
and the East Carolina Univei
Division of Continuing Edil
tion, is designed for persons vj
a personal or professional into
in antiques, colonial-federal
decorative arts, and architect!
This year's symposium to
and speakers are:
"Philadelphia Silver. Ele$
-$sfi?, 175ft 1812, PonaId Fe
more, associate curator at
Henry Francis Dupont Wii
thur Museum, Delaware; "PI
Professor trl
off computer
SEATTLE, Wash. (CPS)
professor is trying to start a
paign to push off-color pke
messages off the Universit
Washingon's campuswide
puter bulletin board.
"Jokes of sexual, personal
racial violence have no place!
universiy, and I intend to stoj
associate Prof. David
warned.
While campus officials refj
to zap the messages immedi;
UW Vice Provost for Compv
Annou
IfflRAMLKAib
The Department of Intramural PI
tion Services and the Outdoor Recrf
Center is sponsoring a Canoe C
Feb. 16 and 18 Registration for th
will be taken in 204 Memorial I
8:00 am to 5:00 pm through Fob 1 Sj
The Career Planning and Plaj
Service in the Bloxton louse i. �
these one hour sessions to aid
developing better interviewing si
film and discussion of how 1
on and off campus will he shared
sessions are held in the C ar V
Room on Feb 1 at 3pm and
Feb. 4, 10, 18, and 23 at 3pm
Valenti
13
$1.50
$i n
Memberships
ON
Private Club for
Just
'�� ,ii�rr�wsisMjspasiss�siwiwsis�ii
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pVlkfWl-
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r
r
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 11,1988 11
Saturday night was a blast. The
sic was great and we danced all night.
iks so much Let's do it again soon,
hove vou. The AZD pledge.
kR ELIZABETH: Hope you enjoyed
It this weekend It was a memo-
Uc one Can t wait to do it again. Hope
liked the roses! sent vou. Love, Scott.
IfTERS: Tuesday night is rock n roll
IK �ree admission, 25 cent draft
LTA SIGMA THETA SORORITY,
invites vou to an evening of fun at
edonia Wright Cultural Center, Fri-
- 12 10-2 am Admission $1.00
I -tent l d
. � ml Nations on 28 years of an
sorority at ECU Keep up the
will last a lifetime.
BL ADPI pledges 'ust wanted to say
a iks foi the nice message I found in
ver You re all the best1 I luv va,
red) the
r K PHI The sisters of Alpha Phi
)c'3'v;iafe the newlv initiated sisters
come them to our sisterhood.
oud ol v ail' Lisa Adcock, Ami
ian Missie Beason, Shannon
na Bowie, Cvndi Calloway,
jdrea Chase Lou Dairvmple, Megan
Karen iartmen. Cyndi Healey,
'jrmar Nacev Lippincott, Sheri
Angela Paige, Heather Schofield,
teed ReneeStorv, Karen Stuck -
alie Trepal. Cina Tripodi,
:ams Denise Zech
r Mart s large silver signetcrest
a ed 10-4-81, extreme senrimen-
Seward if found Call 756-4468
� x Ed
HAPPY HOUR at the Elbo Friday
4-7 S2 30 teas-why drive anywhere
�WD FOUND: Necklace found
Garrett and Fletcher dorms. Please
�artdv at "56-2082,
�NESDAY Ladies night at Rafters
Ks admitted in free from 830-1030.
-ine coolers $.25 draft.
�PA SIG'S It started out cold but
Jmed up fast Let's ?ust sav Saturday
a blast' Thanks Guvs - Let's do it
r soon' Love. Delta Zeta.
NEWS HAS SPREAD. The Attic is
r see Many acts, many laughs, and all
� getting faced Fraternities and
nries, we know you'll be there,
use, hev. whether you know it or not,
all v do care. Sign ups this Monday in
�he student store, give us your
Hancock, and we'll give you a
� ers Bar
pring Break I
1988 I
Dive PenneKamp
In Key Largo, Fla.
$425.00
For information &
Registration call the
Rum Runner
Dive Shop
758-1444
TKE
Ringgirl
Competition
March 4
at the Attic.
For More
Information
Call 758-7144
Prizes awarded for
1st, 2nd Ac 3rd place.
suable at Central Ticket Office in Men-
hall Student Center.
. SAVE THOSf. WRAPPERS
Deposit all empty Stkklets Natural
�vor Cum packs and Doritos Brand
i Ranch flavor tortilla chip bags in the
IS. College Comedy Competition dis-
bys located in the Student Book Store
by and Mendenhall. ECU could win a
i comedy concert if we coUect the most
ippers
TA77
� Performing Arts Series at ECU is
Jd to present Richard Stoltzman and
ady Herman's Thudering Herd in, "A
Ibute to Woody on Thurs. Feb. 11 at
�pm w Wright Auditorium. Under the
rtion of Frank Tiberim, the Thunder-
' Herd will perform many of the works
fh which it is associated. From "Cal-
Iniato Tbony Concerto Tickets can
purchased at the Central Ticket Office.
�"denhall Student Center. 757-ttl 1 �ct
CHRISTIAN fet Ugmmm
Wg nights are AUVE mew than
t BuildrngJt MO p.�. Evwy FWDAY
t�"T for Christian Fellowship and
U h�ching where JESUS IS LORD
Soviet with drawal announced
MOSCOW (AP) - Mikhail S.
Gorbachev announced that a
Soviet withdrawal from Afghani-
stan will begin May 15 if U.N
sponsored peace talks reach a set-
tlement within five weeks. He
said the pullout could be com-
pleted within 10 months.
The Soviet leader also stressed
Monday that the Kremlin wants
no say in who governs Afghani-
stan after the departure of its esti-
mated 115,000 troops, who have
been battling anti-communist
Afghan guerrillas for more than
eight years.
The White House called the
speech a positive development,
but said it would wait to see
whether any conditions were at-
tached to the proposed with-
drawal.
It was the clearest indication yet
that Gorbachev is moving rapidly
to extricate his country from the
conflict he has termed a "bleeding
wound
The mediator of the U.Nspon-
sorcd peace talks, Diego Cor-
doves, said today in Pakistan that
the next, and possibly final, round
of talks will begin March 2 in
Geneva. He said the time frame of
a Soviet pullout which would be
overseen by the United Nations
military observers, has virtually
been agreed upon.
Cordovez told reporters in Is-
lamabad that only logistical de-
tails of the Soviet army's depar-
ture remain to be solved. He has
spent the past 20 days shuttling
between Islamabad and Kabul,
the Aftghan capital.
"The Afghans themselves will
decide the final status of their
country among nations Gor-
bachev said in a statement read on
national television by an an-
nouncer Afghanistan's future "is
none of our business he said.
The remarks left the future of
Afchanistan's Marxist president,
Najib, in serious doubt. Foreign
observers believe Najib, 41, won't
be able to retain his grip on power
if he is deprived of Soviet military
might.
Najib also went on radio and
television in Afghanistan on
Monday to announce the time-
table for Soviet withdrawal.
According to Gorbachev, the
Soviets won't demand that Af-
ghanistan be neutral and non-
aligned, phrasing that was once
standard when Kremlin officials
spoke of their neighbor's future.
The Kremlin sent troops, tanks
and military hardware into Af-
ghanistan in December 1979, and
presided over the replacement of
one Marxist ruler by another. The
intervention has been a major irri-
tant in U.SSoviet relations and
has soured Kremlin ties with
many Moslem and Third World
countries.
It also has been opposed at
home as Soviet casualties have
mounted. Western diplomats es-
timate as many as 10,000 Soviet
soldiers have been killed and tens
of thousands maimed.
Monday's statement was
Gorbachev's first mention of a
specific date for the withdrawal.
Late colonial influence topic
of Tryon Place Symposium
Previously, the Soviets had said
only that they wanted to pull out
by the end of the year, and that it
would take about 12 months.
Gorbachev said the date of May
15 was fixed based on the assump-
tion that the Geneva negotiations
will reach an agreement no later
than March 15.
In the event a settlement is
signed before then, "the with-
drawal of troops will, accord-
ingly, begin earlier he said.
Soviet TV interrupted a serial
film to broadcast Gorbachev's
statement, assuring that his re-
marks would have the widest
distribution. It was carried on the
official Tass news agency and was
the lead item on the evening TV
news.
At the White House, President
Reagan, said: "We'll wait to see
what the conditions are when
asked by reporters about
Gorbachev's statement.
White House spokesman Mar-
lin Fitzwater said Gorbachev's
statement "sounds like a positive
step and we hope it is, but we need
to see the fine print (to see if there
are any conditions). We've got to
know what it means
x-�?���
Support
Pirate
Athletics
�MMMMWMHIHMi
1 iiiiyrrrrrxTr!
� ����� ���;������;�:���:�;�,�������;�;����� ����� .�:�.�:�:��:���:��:� ����j-fiYfrr
mmmM&mm
SPRINGTIME IN LONDON
10 Days & Nights in England
PvPart; 6:25 p.m. Mon May 9
from RaleighDurham airport
fi�iJimi 7:35 p.m. Fri May 20
to RaleighDurham airport
Transportation: Delta Airlines
Hotel: Ladbroke Hotel, Hyde Park, London
Price per person: $1200 for Dbl. occupancy
Deadline: March 1, 1988
For more info:
Call Mendenhall Student Center (757-6611)
ECU News Bureau
The influence of late colonial
and federal era Philadelphia
upon the nation's decorative arts
is the topic of the 20th annual
Trvon Palace Symposium March
222.
Featured speakers will include
specialists from Winterthur Mu-
seum and Colonial Williamsburg.
The symposium, co-sponsored by
the Tryon Palace Commission
and the East Carolina University
Division of Continuing Educa-
tion, is designed for persons with
a personal or professional interest
in antiques, colonial-federal era
decorative arts, and architecture.
This year's symposium topics
and speakers are:
"Philadelphia Silver: Elegant
�mZQHS&EBar PonaldJFennl
more, associate curator at the
Henry Francis Dupont Winter-
thur Museum, Delaware; "Phila-
delphia Transplanted: William
Corbit's House in Odessa, Dela-
ware John A. H. Sweeney, assis-
tant to the Winterthur Museum
director;
Charles Willson Peale:
Painter and Patriot Carolyn J.
Weekley, director of the Abby
Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Cen-
ter and acting director of muse-
ums. Colonial Williamsburg;
"The Philadelphia Windsor: De-
velopment and Exportation
Nancy Goyne Evans, research fel-
low at Winterthur;
"Tradesmen and Technology:
Producting Quality in the 18th
Century Jay M. Gaynor, curator
of mechanical arts, colonial Wil-
liamsburg; and "Glass for the
Philadelphia Market, 1765-1800
Arjen? . Palmer Sen wind, Yar-
mouth, '� Maine, ' hist6rian and
museum consultant who is cur-
rently working on a catalog of the
Winterthur glass collection.
Professor tries to push jokes,
off computer bulletin board
SEATTLE, Wash. (CPS) � A
professor is trying to start a cam-
paign to push off-color jokes and
messages off the University of
Washingon's campuswide com-
puter bulletin board.
"Jokes of sexual, personal and
racial violence have no place in a
universiy, and I intend to stop it
associate Prof. David Hodge
warned.
While campus officials refused
to zap the messages immediately,
UW Vice Provost for Computing
Helmut Golde said, "I'm plan-
ning to follow up on it. I don't
condone that kind of thing
The offending messages are in
computer file called CAN, which
was designed for "uninhibited"
messages and jokes and "ex-
changes of software ideas Aca-
demic Computing Services Act-
ing Director Steve Hallstrom ex-
plained. But Hallstrom added the
bulletin board wasn't intended as
a "vehicle for free expression
Other symposium events in-
clude dinners at the Sheraton
Hotel and the Tryon Palace
Commission House, breakfasts at
the Commission House, a lunch-
eon at nearby Christ Episcopal
Church, tours of the Tryon Palace
complex and an evening concert
by a soprano and harpsichordist
from Williamsburg.
A special feature will be an
exhibit, "Manifestations of Phila-
delphia Craftsmanship on view
at the Tryon Palace Reception
Center.
Tryon Palace (built 1767-1770)
was a colonial capitol and the
restored residence of royal Gover-
nor William Tryon. The restora-
tion complex includes the house,
authentically furnished with pe-
riod antiques and its gardens and
outbuildings, along with several
adjoining smaller residences,
among them the 1783 Stanly
House and the 1830 Stevenson
House.
Further information about the
symposium and lodging facili-
ties, along with registration forms
can be requested by mail from
'Tryon Palace Symposium Di-
vision of Continuing Education,
East Carolina University,
Greenville, N.C. 27858-4353.
Early registration is advised,
since enrollment is limited.
- � CLIP THIS COUPON
georges
hair designers
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Your Spring Break Tan.
10 Visits Regularly $40
Pale isn't your color. N�W ONLY $35.00
Klafsun Suntanning Beds This Special Expires 2-29-88
World's 1 Tanning System 756-6200 - OPEN 8:30 AM TO 9:00 PM
I
I
I
I
I
-J
THE MOODY DUDES
CLASSIC ROCK & ROLL
FRI. FEB. 12 8:00 P.M.
FREE ADMISSION
�flM1H� I' � A-i wTT��i
i IA -(�
Sdthering place
QROUNOFLOOR .MENDENHALL
FREE T-SHIRT RAFFLE!
Announcements
iCll&MUHK
The Department of Intramural-Recrea-
tion Services and the Outdoor Recreation
Center is sponsoring a Canoe Clinic on
Feb. 16 and 18. Registration for this trip
will be taken in 204 Memorial Gym from
8:00 am to 5:00 pm through Feb. 15.
INTERVIEW WORKSHOP
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton House is offering
these one hour sessions to aid you in
developing better interviewing skills. A
film and discussion of how to interview
on and off campus will be shared. These
sessions are held in the Career Planning
Room on Feb. 1 at 3pm and 7pm and on
Feb. 4, 10,18, and 23 at 3pm.
ECU SAILING CLUB
There will be a meeting of the ECU
Sailing Club on Feb. 17th. All interested
persons are welcome to attend the meet-
ing at 5:00 pm in Menges Gym, room 145.
COUNSELING CENTER
Coping with stress? A free mini class
offered by the East Carolina University
Counseling Center for Students. Feb. 9,11,
16, and 18. 329 Wright Building from 3-4
pm. Call or stop by the Counseling Center
for more information (757-6661).
ATiTIC
The. �
COMedY
ZONE
WED
"llie
CcMedf
WED
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
752-7303
THURSDAY
mm j tut
nuiua
1 Time Only reunion
$2.00 wthls ad
FRIDAY
Greatful Dead Little
Feat classics
originals & more
SATURDAY
Final Greenville
Appearance
SUNDAY
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?.
Amature Laff
Oft Drawing
For $100
Night On Town
Pantana
Bobfs
the late night place
to be invites you & yours
to a
Valentines Day Party
$2.50 Pitchers
$1.50 Hi Ball Special
$1.00 Beer Special
Memberships Available for only $5.00
ON THIS DAY ONLY
Private Club for members & invited guest only.
Just Who Is Bob?
"� ii)H��pJ��y






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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
FEBRUARY 11,1988 Page 13
Uneven 'Lark' opens Wednesday to full house
By JOHN CARTER
Features tditor
The East Carolina Playhouse
production of Lillian Hcllman's
adaptation of 'The Lark" opened
Wednesday night to an almost
completely full house. Although
the play's set and lighting
indicated a serious tone at the
beginning, the play itself was
irreverent vet moody.
The actors often spoke directly
to the audience. Not in a
Shakespearean monologue, but
in an informal address.
oan(Debbie Shirley) frequently
relived her past, and by the use of
this narrative device, ended the
performance on a happy note.
Both acts took place in during
her heresy trial before a church
court. Through flashbacks the
scope of the show widenend from
her hometown to the court of the
Dauphin of France.
The problem with such an
informal form is the delivery.
Either the script or the actors are
to blame when a speech or
reenactment aimed at the
audience fails. The confusing
segues in this play make it hard to
tell which is to blame.
Not that all or even most of
these devices failed. Warwick's
dialogue with the audience
seemed the most stable. It could
have been actor Brendan Medlin,
or it could have been that he got
the best lines.
Joan's solos suffered the most.
The childhood scenes were
awkward. The beating she took
from her father looked almost like
WWF wrestling from certain
angles - no contact and no realism.
The set, a simple looking stair
and bridge affair, served well. The
stage was almost Shakespearian
in design, having three levels. The
backdrop was lit with varying
colors depending on what twists
the plot was taking.
Several characters stood out.
The Dauphin's playful mistress,
Agnes SoreKCandance
McKcnzie) and his queen (Carla
Snow) were delightful. Their
yuppieness amidst France's
decline was amusing.
But the Holy Inquisitor (Scot
Slusarick) stole the show. After
not speaking during the entire
first act, it was almost inevitable.
But his "sinister" presence
throughout the second act was
powerful.
The play was not without its
humor. When Joan asks Robert de
Beaudricourt (Vandy Befir) for a
horse an armed escort to the
Dauphin and tells him she's never
ridden before, the dirty minded
Robert responds, "Well, maybe
we'll talk about a small horse
When the meek Dauphin,
played by Christopher Brown, is
encouraged by Joan, he finally
starts to order his subjects about.
When they surprise him and
obey, he remarks, "It's the first
time they ever obeyed me
Brown has cultivated an insane
cackle for the part. Even at the
solemn ending, he cracks into
giggles. It's a high pitched thing,
which fits in with this
performance's portrayal of
Charles the Dauphin,
He's cast as almost a laughable
idiot. Yet as Joan feeds him
courage, he strats to become a true
king. Even after he disavows
Joan's divine intervention, he
keeps her lessons and stays in
power.
Since this is a historical play, the
ending is no secret. But the
suspense is kept, and the ending
almost seems a departure from
historical fact. Eventually, Joan is
put to death. But even this does
not keep her out of the play.
It seems for a while that she will
cave in and sign a document of
confession. Her resistance is
admirable, but she is after all, only
human.
Using the audience narrative
device, she floats down the stairs
to relive her finest hour. Even in
death she symbolizes her struggle
to make man sacred.
The theme of the performance
was undoubtably individuality.
Joan fought incredible odds, and
helped others to do the same. As
Warwick points out, she was a
lark in battle, flying forward and
inspiring her soldiers.
Her true conflict was not with
the English, but with her church's
denial of her brand of faith. No
matter how she tried to resolve
the split, the righteousness of the
church branded her a heretic.
"The Lark" is sympathetic to
Joan's plight, where other works
have prtrayed her as a
madwoman or deluded child.
The "voices" she hears are never
heard by the audience, but are
suggested to be real by her one-
sided conversations with them.
Even with Warwick in the cell
with her as she communes with
the spirits one last time, he docs
not immediately deem her crazy.
Indeed, he tries to keep her from
revealing her change of heart.
Overall, the play was satisfying.
Certain things, like Joan's stagey
monologues, were distracting.
The cast was obviously well
rehearsed, and no opening night
nervouness was noticed.
One scene that stood out as
particularly effective was the
burning at the stake. Thankfully
(and tastefully) done off stage, the
other characters reactions to
Joan's final moments were
perhaps more revealing than her
own last, strangely ca 1 m momen ts
before the audience.
The positioning of key
characters, backs to the crowd, on
the stage when they did nothing
more than stand and wait for their
next line, was intriguing too.
This is a light yet serious play.
The central message is never
preached, but it is all important to
the story. Joan says that the
greatest sin is to swear agianst
oneself. By the end of this
production, you have to believe it.
'The Lark" will run through
Saturday. Tickets are $4 for ECU
Pictured here are Aaron Nay and Debbie Shirley in the East Carolina Playhouse production of "The students and $5 for the general
Lark The play will run through Saturday. This is a touching love scene, which fits right in with our public. It's an entertaining and
All Love Issue. (Photo by Esther Norton, ECU Photolab) controversial look at a legendary
heroine.
Daffy Duck's character defamed by Micah
Bv MICAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
exactly what his label implies
� "I'm just a darn fool duck he
Daitv Duck is fifty years old, chirps in rabid tones and then
and as I look back over his career, - � - � �
hand of Bob Clampett, Daffy was Duck in Holly wood he not only Around this time, Daffy also The sudden flourish of mSuple
demolished the mental health of
Wonder Pictures director Von
Daffy attempts to aid a
haunted, female duck client (no
doubt due to her voluptousness,
I must conclude his name te more
than a cutesy monicker. I hate to
shatter your childhood illusions,
but friends, Daffy Duck is schizo.
He be real gone, man.
From his debut, "Porky7 s Duck
Hunt directed by the great Tex
Avery through his early cartoons
guided by the equally brilliant
proceeds to drive the unfortunate
straightman of the particular car-
toon to an emotional breakdown.
As said straightman was liable to
quip before being reduced to
mental jello: "You know that
duck's screwy
In this incarnation, the duck
began hearing voices which he personalities left Daffy drained,
accredited to an invisible pal, and he slid into his current more
Hamburger, but before a startled "Harry And then multiple per- sinister, plotting persona. I'm not he doesn't notice she's'devil pos
frlm crew, molested a ducky inge- sonalities began to sprout full- saying this should be held against sessed). �
nue with a young Betty Davis grown from nis forehead on a the now middle-aged duck. We The new cartoon is the dream-
drawl, regular basis. are all, after all, a mixture of he- child of Greg Ford, a commercial
By the time of "Daffy Doodles Insane people are known to redity and environment. and public service announcement
almost ten years later, his anti- adopt the identies of people like It should be noted that much of writer for Warner's, who has been
social behavior had calmed to Napoleon or John the Baptist. For the duck's malicious aggression soliciting cartoon scripts for 10
mere mischievousness as he de- Daffy, it was pop culture icons was directed at one individual: years. His patience was rewarded
faced property by scribbling like Duck Dodgers, Duck Tracey, Bugs Bunny, the single Warner when Warner's animation direc-
was a violent, danger to society. In moustaches on posters and the Robin Hood, or the stereotypical
the space of a single short, "Daffy like.
Private Dick, er, Duck.
Goodbyes are said to Skip
Special to The East Carolinian
By LEWIS HOFFMANN
The place is jumping. The
rhythm section's pumping, bass
and drums laying down a groove
a mile wide, pure rock and roll.
You're tapping your toes, the pi-
ano player's playing - with his
elbows, with his heels, with his
head.
Now you're dancing, feeling
good. You look up: the guitar
player is gone, but you still hear
the guitar. You look around; he's
right next to you, ax in hand, snak-
ing through the crowd, jamming.
Now you're jumping, you're
shouting, you're rocking with the
Skip Castro Band.
I come not to praise Skip Castro,
but to bury him. Last Friday night,
400 people turned out to say
me, "Hi. What's your name
again?" I tell him and we go on
from there. The inevitable ques-
good-bye as Skip Castro played tion: Why the breakup?
the Attic for the last time. After ten
years, three albums, and count-
less one-nighters, the Charlot-
tesville, Va. quartet is calling it
quits.
Skip and I go way back. I was on
'It's like playing minor league
baseball and knowing you're
never going to get called up to the
majors He points at the For-
eigner video on a nearby TV set,
'Look at the production, the sup-
Bros. cartoon character he never tor and fellow duckophile Terry
could rise above. Continually Lennon became aware of his simi-
being paired with the Oscar Win- lar interest. Seventy-nine year old
ning Rabbit in his declining years Mel Blanc will again do Daffy's
must have been intensely frustrat- overdubs for him.
ing to Daff. Ralph Bakshi and his "Mighty
But now, 20 years after his last Mouse" crew proved that quality
theatrical short, Daffy Disk, as cartoon shorts can be produced
"People Magazine" would say, " under today's limitations. Will
is back and high on life " as Lennon and Ford's effort return
well as a big screen solo vehicle, the theatrical short to the past
something, they better be ready to Evidently in full possession of his glory days? I hope so. I don't think
faculties, Daffy will feature in Daffy's mental health could stand
See SKIP, page 14. "The Duxorcist another blow.
about it. My act will have lots of
humor, lots of audience involve-
ment. If they want me to sing
the crew during production for port, that's the major leagues
the video of Skip Castro's 1983
single "Boogie at Midnight The
video, made in Greenville, using
dancers and extras from ECU,
was featured on MTV's "Base-
ment Tapes Between then and
now, I've seen them many times.
I'm still tight with the guys.
Guitar player Bo Randall greets
Piano player Danny Beirne
adds, "I felt sort of imprisoned. I
never said, 'Oh, what a bummer,
I'm playing in a band but we all
started to evolve in different di-
rections, so now it's time to move
� �
on.
And move on they are. Beime's
going solo. "I'm very excited
Pickin'the Bones
'Bonehead inspires love, magic
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff RostaMik
An hour later,dejected and only
slightly buzzed, he was asked to
leave the bar. Even die hippesi
bars have to close at 2 a.m. in
North Carolina. He walked to his
These are the former members of the Skip Castro BartcL The band dissolved after ten years and
several albums, and played the Attic Friday for a good bye show.
they wouldn't care. barstooi and began to search for
One drizzly night He hocked this tender beauty. He went so far
histest amp in order to eat and go as to open the door to the girl's
In keeping wijn this All-Love totherarmestbarmtovmalew bathroom and shoutHey! Little
ssueofthe&stCarolinian,Ihave drinks. He got a 20 piece Bed Headed Girl! Where are
deddedtorelateaUttleparaWeto McNuggetCwith two thing of war
you. If s about love, which any honey), composed a song using The girls snorting coke in the
English teacher worm their die- the words oh his tray Uner and first stall screamed and giggled,
tionary will tell you is a rough th walked to the hip bar. He dosed the door and sat down
subject to wnteabomobjectivefy, msevmiCowslJbe beside the wall with the foos bail
WelLSince lam the most boss asked a veiy bodacious young table,
professional purnahst on this lady dance to his current favor-
paper, it shouldn't be any prob- ite S(m$f whic! the deejay bad
lern for me. So without further veiy nicety deckied to play,
mess, A Love Story by Me. Inegirl was full of beauty. Her
Once upon a time, mere was j g ymetallic
this boss, handsorne young tes partofaBudLigntcan.Herta-U$ terra green Volkswagen�, pried
guitarist. He looked just like Pat- wm, txnaKW and behaving, open the door and drove home,
rick Swaze, only without a 4is- They belong in a Pert cornmer- only stalling twice at stoplights.
ceimblechinlputadassae4 dal, he mougnt to limself. Her tie next morning came. Noon
announcement In a respectable freckles were painted on with came. Three 'o dock came and
music journal for a drurntner Perrierfc colors. kicked the young bassist's eyes
This journal was so ultra coot. As they slammed into each open as me doorbell worked on
only the verybossest people read other to the beat of the drum 3sears.HestamWedmroughthe
it. People like lead singers for machine rhythms of "YovfU mounds of unwashed t-shirts and
Drivin' and Cryin and redusive rncToAiiytJrtmgto
album cover painters who had Milkmen, they began to notice
churches made of bicydes in his their naughty parts were engorg-
back yard. It was mat cool. mg ng tingling.
Jtcostthisbassisttotsofrnonev After daiKii she vm� into �ie
to put an advertisement m this m restroom to tend to her
joumri.rthefigureditwoaldbe inmorctiteandabnMansehe
woitlftheGreaUiiknown �ft a cold fixsty one saws
Drummer In North America an- the gash in his forehead "Gostl
svredlad,theycottWforma. fgThat wooden post
band and become so unnessecar. ��11 think this giri is boss.
uyfoiwHisitwassiny. I woiider how mudi change l�ot
They would be able to make back from this beer
videos; starring hordes oskater- Ten minutes later, he left his
atsand thev would beso lamous.
me empty space his amp used to
occupy.
He opened me door. There, on
the grey, rotting wood steps,
stood a redhaired girl. Her white
skin reflected the three 'o clock
sunlight like Xerox� paper. She
rested her tenor drum and mallets
on the steps.
"So. You're the one who wants
tre drummer.
Theyoung man replied quickly.
Sc BOSS, page 15
� �� 1 W �'� -
� "i mi 11 mliwxi idi ti
m ��in ii mmmmm





14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 11,1988
Skip Castro ends performance with a laugh
JL M . were smiles all arouna tne stag
Continue from page 13.
sing along.
Drummer Robbv Rico An-
tonelli won't be idle. "I've got a
gig with a band called Tough
Luck. I got a call from (lead singer)
Lips Lackowitz and we worked
things out. I'll be around
Bass player Charlie Patortield is
starting his ow n band. "We'll play
mostlv original music, a lot oi my
songs Tastorfield. author of
Castro standards 'Tallin' Domi-
nos Christine and "I Don't
Want to Work adds, somewhat
unecessarily, It 11 be straight
ahead rock and roll
Guitarist Randall is getting out.
I'll probably get a job. I'm mar-
nod, with a babv, and I just girls would be there. I told him 1
bought a new house. I've got a would get him in free. So we went.
B. A. in Economics, so I'll probably The band was already playing
put that to work, mavbe in a stock when we got there, a guitar break.
brokerage We rounded the corner into the
ill miss them, thev always room, toward the bar. And there
seemed to care about the audi- was Randall, playing a mean
ence savs longtime follower lead, duck-walking on top of the
Doug Bade. "I've seen all the solos bar, straight at us.
1 nudged Tim to get his reaction.
His eves were wide, and he
a hundred times and they always
manage all the energy and fun
vou could possiblv squeeze out ot
it. It's good time rhythm and
blues
1 once took mv buddy Tim to see
Skip Castro at the Attic. 1 had to
convince him to go. 1 told him they
played good rock and roll. 1 told
him how much fun they were to
dance to. 1 told him how manv
grinned like a fool. All he could
say was, "These guys are alright!
Which one is Skip Castro?"
So which one is Skip Castro,
any wayWell, no one. "When our
old drummer, Corky, was in
Berkeley School of Music, he
played with a couple of country
bands that really weren't very
good recalls Pastorfield, "so he
used this stage name, Skip Castro.
When we started this band, we
couldn't think of anything any
better, so we've been Skip Castro
ever since
That was ten years ago, and
"ever since" ended last Friday
night at the Attic. It was in many
ways a typical Skip Castro per-
formance. The band Kited out
high-energy renditions of origi-
nals "Lucille 'Tallin' Dominos
were smiles all arouna tne stage
and "Christine as tne crowd slowed, and
There was no let up through st0pped. There were no dancers
cover versions of John Fogerty s noW only listeners
Rockin' All Over the World
Mitch Ryder's "jenny Take a
Ride and Joe Turner's "Shake,
Rattle, and Roll The crowd sang
along and danced in a drawn-out
farewell to the band that had
rocked them so well.
The last encore was Led
The band moved easily through
the Zeppelin cbssic, but it seemed
less like a rock anthem that an
inside joke. The audience, how
ever, played along, supplying the
punchline, "Woman-you need
it and everyone laughed And
that's the way Skip said good bye,
Zeppelin's "Whole Lotta Love wim a laugh.
not exactly standard fare. There So long, Skip. We'll miss you
Vincent Price credits success to
versatlity and cultured toughness
Vincent
legend who
LOS ANGELES (AD
Trice is a screen U
manages to survive by being ver-
satile.
He is willing to spread his
unique talent in all med;a. He was
the ghostly voice on Michael
lackson shit Thriller" album. He
toured for years in his one-man
show about Oscar Wilde. He
appears on "Hollywood
Squares talk shows and com-
mercials. He sang and devised
villaninous plots as the voice of
Professoi Ratigan in Disney's
animated feature, "The Great
Mouse Detective
Trice recently has been in the
theaters in two widely divergent
films "The Offspring a low-
budget thriller, and "The Whales
of ' Lindsay Anderson's
arrine Bette Davis,
Lillian Gish and Ann Sothern.
At his home in the Hollywood
Hills, filled with great works of
art Trice reflected on his acquain-
tance with the great women of the
screen.
"1 worked with Bette years ago
39) in a thing called 'The Pri-
vate Lives of Elizabeth and Essex
with Errol Flvnn. It was great
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fun he said. "She was wonderful
and imperious, but oi course she
had a right to be: She was playing
Queen Elizabeth 1
He met Miss Gish when he was
in "Victoria Regina" (1936) with
Helen Haves, who was a close
friend oi hers.
At 76, Trice was the youngest of
the quartet: Miss Gish is reported
to be 91, although she denies it.
Miss Davis is 79, Miss Sothern 78.
How did he feel about working
with such grande dames?
"I found that the grande dames
aren't so grande when you get
them on a set, particularly on a
small island in Maine. Some oi
their grandeness disappears he
said.
In The Whales of August
Trice plays a Russian nobleman
and friend of the two quarreling
sisters tGish and Davis). It's a
small role, he admitted, the kind
he likes: "You don't have to carry
the picture. You walk in. play
your little scene and walk out
with people remembering you
Born in St. Louis, Vincent True
left Yale University to study art in
Plaza Cinema
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Price's chill-master image be-
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Wax" in 1953, and has stuck with
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Off-screen, he presents the im-
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which he is. But he admits to a
certain toughness.
"Once 1 was a guest on a talk
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'fas, -
Sheila
NEW YORK (AP) Don't lump
Sheila E. in with Prince's lingerie-
clad protegees of the past, those
lovely ladies in lace such as Van
ity or Apollonia.
Sheila E. turns heads, but she'd
rather do it with her timbales than
a teddy.
"I want to show the public that
I do know how to play drums - a
lot of people don't know that And
for the press, 1 want to prove to
them that I'm a musician she
Boss Valentin
from Bonehea
Continued from page 13,
"Well, yeah. But you have to livi
here. So we can practice night
I'hey hauled her worldly
gOods(twoClash alburns a p
black leotards, the coolest rer
ing of Michael Stipe ever ;
duced by human hand and
headlight of a Toyota�an
inside the spacious seven r
apartment.
They became even mo?
"Cinderell
open Febr
FCL Scot Bureau
Rossini's opera "Cinderella'
will be presented by the ; l
Carolina University Opera The
atre Feb. 11 � 14 in four perform
ancesin the Fletcher Music Cenh
Recital Hall. Evening perform
ances arc scheduled for Feb 11
12,and 13at8p.m,a 2 p m maM
nee performance will be give
Sunday, Feb. 14.
Cast members are students ll
the ECU School of Music Tr
production will be conduct�
Dr. Clyde Hiss, Opera Theart
director. Accompanists will
Mark Gansor and Alisa Wethe
ington. Costumes arc bv Tatnc
Hiss and Diane Foley
In order to give the maxirmi
number, oi student .suagcrs
opportunity to perform, le
roles are double cast, with soi
soloists appearing Thursday ai
Saturday; others on Friday ai
Sunday.
Featured as Cinderella will
Jennifer Grum of Raleigh ai
Carol Hawkins of Wilson Doi
bling as her stepsisters are Mfc
cle Crotry of Fayetteville. Kai
Scott of Greensboro, Bndgcj
Cooper of Washington, D.C. a
Mary Jay of Wilmington.
Prince Ramiro will be sun
Charles Maxwell of Raleigh a
Mark Caughron oi Nahunta
idoro, a philosopher, will be p
trayed by Dean Laves oi Che
eake, Va and Chn-
Bridges of Raleigh
Don Magnsfico, a snob, will
sung by Dale Smith ot Raid
and Robert Cox of Wilson
athon Jolley of Greenville
Gregorv Honcvcutt of Be
will sing the part of Dandini.
vant tothopnnce
Carol Hawkins, Mark
play out the roles of the Ci
theater tonight through "





laugh
- all arouna ine stage
v rowd slowed, and
ere were no dancers
-toners
icband moved easily through
ssic but it seemed
i a rock anthem that an
I he audience, how-
supplying the
Woman you need
o laughed. And
- . Sk p said good-bye,
o o 11 miss you.
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9
TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 11,1988 15
Sheila E. more than just a sex symbol
NEW YORK (AP) - Don't lump
Sheila E. in with Trince's lingerie-
clad protegees of the past, those
lovely ladies in lace such as Van-
ity or Apollonia.
Sheila E. turns heads, but she'd
rather do it with her timbalcs than
a teddy.
"I want to show the public that
1 do know how to play drums - a
lotofpeoplcdon'tknow that. And
for the press, I want to prove to
them that I'm a musician she
said in a recent interview.
"I'm a drummer first, not a
singer, not a sex symbol. I'm not
trying to sell sex
To prove it, Sheila says, she's
put her solo career on hold to play
the drums in Prince's last band
(and hit movie "Sign 0' The
Times") and re-establish her
reputation as a musician - a repu-
tation she asserts was well earned.
"I worked very, very hard, and
Prince didn't have anything to do
Boss Valentine's Day story
from Bonehead to squeeze
Continued from page 13.
"Well, yeah. But you have to live
here. So we can practice night.
They hauled her worldly
goods(two Clash albums, a pair of
black leotards, the coolest render-
ing of Michael Stipe ever pro-
duced by human hands and the
headlight of a Toyota� Camray)
inside the spacious seven room
apartment.
They became even more fa-
mous than they hoped and filmed
videos of skaterats in shopping
malls all over Raleigh. They got to
be guest Veejays twice on MTV,
and eventually met Cher and
joined her health club.
The end. This story is about 60
true. The rest will come true if the
bodacious and incredibly boss
Sehoya E. Harris wises up and
comes to live with me. Ain't love
grand, as X says. Have a
BossValentine's Day. I hope ev-
eryone ends up as famous as me.
"Cinderella" opera to
open February 11th
ECU Newt Bureau
Rossini's opera "Cinderella"
will be presented by the East
Carolina University Opera The-
atre Feb. 11 � 14 in four perform-
ances in the Fletcher Music Center
Recital Hall. Evening perform-
ances arc scheduled for Feb. 11,
12, and 13 at 8 p.m a 2 p.m. mati-
nee performance will be given
Sundav, Feb. 14.
Cast members are students in
the ECU School of Music. The
production will be conducted by
Dr. Clyde Hiss, Opera Theatre
director. Accompanists will be
Mark Gansor and Alisa Wether-
ington. Costumes are by Patricia
Hiss and Diane Foley.
In order to give the maximum
number oi student lingers an
opportunity to perform, lead
roles are double cast, with some
soloists appearing Thursday and
Saturday; others on Friday and
Sunday.
Featured as Cinderella will be
Jennifer Grum of Raleigh and
Carol Hawkins of Wilson. Dou-
bling as her stepsisters are Mich-
ele Crotty of Fayetteville, Karla
Scott of Greensboro, Bridgette
Cooper of Washington, D.C. and
Mary Jay of Wilmington.
Prince Ramiro will be sung by
Charles Maxwell of Raleigh and
Mark Caughron of Nahunta. Al-
idoro, a philosopher, wiil be por-
trayed by Dean Layes of Chesap-
eake, Va and Christopher
Bridges of Raleigh.
Don Magnifico, a snob, will be
sung by Dale Smith of Raleigh
and Robert Cox of Wilson. Jon-
athon Jolley of Greenville and
Gregory' Honeycutt of Benson
will sing the part of Dandini, ser-
vant to the prince.
A chorus of 14 singers will also
appear onstage. The opera will be
sung entirely in English.
Rossini's music is best de-
scribed as "effervescent or bub-
bly noted Dr. Hiss. The story
line of his "Cinderella" (or "La
Ccncrentola" in the original Ital-
ian) is a bit different from the well-
known fairv tale.
For one thing, his version has
the prince and his servant ex-
changing places, complete with
disguises, in order that the prince
can find a girl who will be at-
tracted to him for himself alone,
not for his position.
Also, since the composer dis-
liked "magic" in plots, he insisted
that his text have no reference to
the transformation of pumpkin,
rats and mice into coach, horses
and coachmen.
The glass slipper in his operatic
"Cinderella" became a pair of
matching bracelets. The fairy
godmother becomes a philoso-
phertutor to the prince, and the
stepmother becomes a stepfather,
the snobbish Don Magnifico.
However, the ECU production
offers a compromise, with some
of the traditional fairy tale compo-
nents restored.
"We felt that using all of these
changes might make an audience
wonder if it really had seen 'Cin-
derella Hiss commented.
"Therefore we have reinstated
those elements we perceived as
not doing too much damage to
Rossini's original
Advance tickets to "Cinderella"
are available from the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center at $5 each for the
general public, and $2.50 for stu-
dents. Any unsold tickets will be
available at the door.
with it says the Sheila, sho is also
annoyed by the perception that
the Minneapolis rocker was re-
sponsible for her solo successes -
the hit singles "The Glamorous
Life "Sister Fate" and "Hold
Me
"The only thing that Prince did
(for me) was 'Love Bizarre says
Sheila. "And to say that he wrote
it all, produced it and all that - it
makes me mad, because people
don't know how hard I worked
Work - and playing the drums,
congas and timbales - began at age
14 for Sheila Escovedo, who was
weaned on percussion in
California's Bay Area by her
musician father, the former San-
tana member Pete Escovedo.
"I was around music every day.
No one ever taught me how to
play drums, and I've never sat
down and practiced - never in my
whole life she said. "I just one
day started playing, and two
months later I was in a band. Six
months after that, I was on tour
with my father. So it happened
reallv fast
Almost as quickly, she became a
percussionist in demand: touring
Europe with George Duke, play-
ing behind Marvin Gaye, backing
up Lionel Richie. But it wasn't
until she got together with Prince
in 1983 that Sheila decided to step
out on her own.
The result was her debut LP
'The Glamorous Life with its
top 10 single and video of the
same title. Butalong with stardom
came an assortment of miscon-
ceptions, many of which still
bother her.
"The public thought I was one
of Prince's protegees and I just
wanted to sell sex. You know,
The Glamorous Life' came out,
and the lace - that's how I wanted
to look, but I wasn't trying to sell
sex she said.
Carol Hawkins, Mark Caughron, Karla Scott and Bridgette Cooper
play out the roles of the Cinderella opera, playing at the ECU Opera
theater tonight through Sunday.

LOVE BLOOMS
AT THE A�?P!
On Valentine's Day. let your love flower with out lusc khis
Long Stem roses beautiful, sensuous roses that we jet in
from around the world, filled with tin- language of love
Or perhaps your Valentine would prefer Sweetheart
Roses. . smaller, delicate flowers that express your feelings
perfectly. Our roses are available in Ked Yellow Pink or
White and well pack them in a see-through box lined
with Baby's Breath for added beauty, and even i) �
matching bow, if you wish. We have all kinds of colorfully
fragrant flowers to choose from and potted plants, txY
So shop The AP for Valentine's Day. and watch love
bloom before your very eyes!
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
FEBRUARY 11,1988 Page 16
Pirates look to extend winning streak
this weekend with a pair of CAA games
The East Carolina basketball
team will travel to Navy and
American University this
weekend in hopes of moving up
in the Colonial Athletic
Association standings and
adding to a one-game winning
streak.
The Pirates snapped a six-game
losing skid on Monday with a 70-
66 homccourt win over James
Madison. It was ECU's second
win of the season over the Dukes
and it brought the Pirates out of
the conference cellar and into the
fight for position heading into the
March 5-7 tournament in
Hampton, VA.
ECU is now 7-14 and 3-6 in the
CAA as coach Mike Stcele's
troops face Navy on Saturday
night at 7:30 in Annapolis, MD.
Navy, which lost to ECU by a 61-
49 margin last month in
Greenville, has won three straight
league games to improve its mark
to 3-5 prior to a Wednesday road
game at William & Mary.
Saturday's meeting with the
Midshipmen will mark the 14th
time the two schools have met on
the hardwood, with Navy
holding a 11-2 lead in the series.
The Middies had won nine
straight over the Pirates before the
victorv by the Pirates earlier this
season.
In that game, Reed Lose led the
scoring for the Pirates with 17
points, while Gus Hill chipped in
14 and Jeff Kelly tallied a career-
high 11. Kelly, who missed last
week's action against Gcogre
Mason and James Madison
because of a shoulder injury, is
listed as questionable for
Saturday's contest.
Probable starters for the
Midshipmen are EddieReddick, a
6-6 forward, Matt Nordmann, a 6-
5 forward, Byron Hopkins, a 6-9
center, Cliff Rees, a 6-4 guard and
6-2 guard Mel Davis.
American owned a 9-12 and 4-4
CAA mark, but the Eagles have a
road date at Richmond on Feb. 10
and a home contest with UNC-
Wilmington on Feb. 13 before
hosting the Pirates.
When the Pirates battle the
Eagles Monday, it will be the
ninth time the two teams have
played, with American leading
the scries 5-3.
The Eagles won an earlier
contest over the Pirates this year,
75-69, in overtime in Minges
Coliseum. The Pirates had a
chance to win the game in
regulation when Gus Hill
attempted the front end of a one-
and-one with only one second
remaining and the score tied at 69-
69.
Hill, who finished with a game-
high 25 points, had connected on
13-of-15 free throws in the game,
but he missed in his final attempt
and the Eagles went on to
outscore the Pirates 10-4 in the
overtime period.
Starters for the Eagles include 6-
6 forward Daryl Holmes, 6-1
forward Brock Wortman, 6-9
center Tom Scherer, 6-4 guard
Mike Siimner and Mike Sampson,
a 6-0 guard.
Monday's game will be played
in the new Bender Arena on the
American campus. It will be only
the third game played in the
newly-dedicated arena.
"Even though it felt like we
hadn't won in a year, our win over
James Madison threw us right
back into the hunt to start moving
up the ladder Steele said. "Navy
has shown a great deal of
character by bouncing back from
a rough start, and they feel like
they can keep winning. We've
definitely got our hands full on
Saturday
"American beat us in overtime
(75-69 in Greenville) after we had
a chance to win in regulation from
the free throw line with only one
second left. They have some very
talented players in Mike
Sampson, Daryl Homes and Dale
Spears off the bench. That will be
a tough place to try a get a win
The Pirates will be playing in
the new Bender Arena on the AU
campu, for the first time. It will
only be the third game played in
the new on-campus facility.
ECU is led in the scoring
column by sophomores Gus Hill
and Reed Lose. Hill, a 6-3 native of
Fairfax, VA, is averaging 18.6
points and 5.1 rebounds, while
Lose is scoring 15 points per
game.
The Pirates are shooting a very
respectable 73 percent from the
free throw line as a team (280-of-
386).
TV time
Two members of the East
Carolina men's track team will
participate in the Mobile 1
Racing Invitational, to be held in
Fairfax, Va this weekend, Feb.
14.
Lee and Eugene McNeill will
represent the Pirate tracksters in
the event.
The meet will be televised live
nationally by cable network
ESPN from 8-10 p.m.
Swimmers hope to garner CAA title
East Carolina, champions of the
Colonial in 1986 and runners-up
last year, hope to wrestle the
men's swimming and diving title
awav from powerful James
Madison and Navy in the will swim against the six other
conference championships at league teams Wednesday
Annapolis, Md. this week. through Saturday at the U.S.
The Pirates, 6-6 in dual meets Naval Academy. The ECU
and 3-2 against Colonial teams, women, 10-3 and unbeaten in six
Soccer Invitational scheduled
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Minges Coliseum will be the
site for the fourth-annual East
Carolina University Indoor
Soccer Invitational sponsored by
Budweiscr this Saturday, Feb. 13.
This one-day tournament will
get underway at 10:30 a.m. The 16
competing teams will be divided
into four seperate divisions, with
each team competing in a round
robin event with the teams of their
division. The top two teams from
each division will then advance
from that round robin portion to a
single elimination tournament to
determine the overall tournament
champion.
Each soccer match will consist
of 20 minutes of competition. A
specially designed soccer ball for
indoor play only will be used for
this tournament and all four walls
of the Minges gymnasium will be
in play.
Among the teams scheduled to
compete are: the Pirates, Averett
College, Campbell University,
High Point College, North
Carolina Wesleyan teams I and II,
Frances Marion College, Guilford
College and Atlantic Christian
College.
Admission to the Invitational
tournament is free with action
taking place all day Saturday
until 8 p.m.
Pirate head soccer coach
Charlie Harvey feels that the
tournament should be a
competitive one.
"I think that it should be a pretty
even tournament in ability across
the board Harvey said. "The
favorites to win would probably
be us (ECU), UNC-Charlotte,
North Carolina Wesleyan and
Guilford
The Pirate soccer team,
according to Harvey should fare
well in the indoor event.
"We've been practicing on it
(the indoor soccer formatVin the
gym since -the Jcids gotJiack to
school after Christmas break in
January Harvey said. "At this
point we are as ready as we are
ever going to be
The Pirates will be the first team
to compete in the tournament
with their opening match
sceduled at 10:30 a.m. The Pirate
booters will also be in action
during the round robin portion at
11:30 a.m 12:50 p.m 3 p.m 4:30
p.m. and 5:50 p.m.
Following the preliminary
round robin rounds, the single
elimination will get underway
immediately.
6ET A
CAA dual meets, will also
compete this week for their first
conference crown under coach
Rick Kobe.
ECU, outpointed only in the
diving competition, finished
third in the Colonial meet last
season at Minges Natatorium.
Much like last year's meet, the
1988 Colonial championships
appear to be a close battle
between defending champion
Navy, James Madison and ECU.
The Lady Pirates will challenge
Ny, lamgs Madison and
William and Mary for the league
crown.
"The meet should be a good
meet all the way around with
some excellent times Kobe said.
"With a strong effort by our men I
think they have a chance to win.
We have 14 swimmers we think
can reach the finals
"We are only carrying 11
women on the trip, so we'll be
very limited there. It will be
difficult for them to finish in the
top three
Individually, Ronald Fleming,
Andy Jeter and Andy Johns all
won CAA championships last
year for the Pirates. The Lady
Pirates return no defending
champions, but Patti Walsh and
freshman Meredith Bridgers have
been swimming like potential
winners.
"If there is a favorite to win the
men's competition it would have
to be Navy Kobe said. "They're
swimming in their own pool and
that can be a big advantage
Driving for two
Pirate point guard Jimmy Hinton drives in for a Iayup during ECU's
victory over James Madison Monday. Hinton scored on the play and was
fouled for a three-point play.
Lady Pirates drop
to JMU once again
For the second time this season,
the Lady Dukes of James Madison
have defeated ECU's women's
basketball team.
ECU fell Monday night to JMU
at Harrisonburg, VA 79-54.
JMU defeaJplthjB.Udy PJrate
earlier in the season at Minges, 88-
51.
The Lady Pirates shot just 35
percent as their record fell to 8-15
overall and 2-6 in the Colonial
Athletic Conference. JMU is now
8-0 in the CAA and holds first
place in the league.
Only one ECU player scored in
double figures for the night. Alma
Bethea led the Lady Pirates with
12 points and 5 rebounds.
Freshman Wendy Morton also
tossed in nine points.
For the Lady Dukes, Alisa
Harris led the JMU win with 25
points and three others tossed in
10 points or better. JUM's Sandy
Broughton had 14 points and was
jhe games, leading rebounder
wilh 10 rebounds.
Poor shooting plagued the
Lady Pirates as they shoot 17-of-
48 for the game. They shot 40
percent in the first half as they
trailed 42-30 in the first half.
East Carolina will take a few
days off from play and will try to
rebound from their fourth
consecutive loss as they host
American Monday at Minges.
� CAROLYN JUSTICE
Smith tabbed by CAA
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) � Steve
Smith, who scored 33 points on
12-for-19 shooting from the floor
to lead George Mason to a pair of
victories last week, was named
Tuesday as the Colonial Athletic
Association's player of the week.
Smith, a sophomore forward
from Silver Spring, Md had only
six points in the Patriots' 67-64
victory at East Carolina, but offset
that with five rebounds, three
assists and two blocks.
In an 84-70 victory at North
Carolina-Wilmington, Smith had
a career-high 27 points as well as
four assists, two rebounds, two
blocks and on steal.
Smith leads George Mason with
20 steals and 33 blocked shots.
OUT OF INDOOR SOCCEK I
Earlvis says go with Tar Heels
- XT'S THE HTH WML
ECO WOCfr INVITATIONAL SOCCE.R
T0ORNAMH.NT - THI5 SATORDW-
vN6ES COUSEUA-IO:30to8.OO
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Tarheel fan
As thoughts of placid waves,
powdered white sand, scorsing
skin, skimpy bikinis, steamy
shades and tongue-tingling chilly
buttweisers enter the minds of
college students, Earlvis is
constantly halted on his way to
class and asked, "Hey Earlvis, I
need spring break money, can
you give me a winner?"
Forget that spring break trip to
the Econo Lodge in Pine Tops,
baby, because paradise in the land
of the orange trees can be yours.
Reserve that first-class ticket to
Miami on TWA. Call up the
Hilton in Key West and reserve
the penthouse sweet, man,
because this is your lucky day.
No more trips to Daytona on a
crowded bus. No more sleeping
in the lounge chairs by the pool.
No more having to eat beanie-
weenies. No more hot Black
Label, buddy, because you are
going first class.
How? Take the Tarheels in the
Dean dome tonight because they
will do you right. The Pack is
crying wolf, they aren't for real,
the Shack won't go to the rack and
Jimmy V. will have to give up his
coaching job and concentrate on
how to become a better Athletic
Director.
Realistically, this classic rivalry
between Carolina and State will
be a hard fought, see-saw, pound-
it-inside, game with all the
superlatives and adjectives that
commentator Dick Vitale uses
during sex.
At press time, a spread line on
the Carolina-State game was
unavailable, but the line is
antisipated to be below 5 points
with the Wolfpack of course being
the underdog.
If the line is four or below, take
the Tarheels and put your spring
break funds on them. On the other
hand, if the spread ranges from
four and one-half to six points,
drink a quart of two-day-old-flat
Colt 45 before deciding to take the
Heels. Hold you breath in the last
minutes if the spread is this high
because it might take a last minute
free throw by Carolina guard Jeff
Lebo to ice the bet.
By no means will this game be a
blow out, and with this logic take
the Wolfpack and the points if the
spread is higher than six and one-
half. Remember that State was a
10 and one-half underdog going
into Cameron against Duke last
Saturday and State won by two.
There are few blow outs in the
ACC.
The last time Carolina and State
played in mid-January in Raleigh,
the lieels pulled out the big W by
four points. In that game, the
Tarheels were favored by three
and one-half points. Needless to
say it was a stressful, nail-biting
win for gamblers whom took
Carolina.
To recap that game, Carolina hit
all but two free throws while the
Pack, with rim-rattler
Shackleford, were horrid from the
foul line.
Shackleford had a good game
despite his shooting from the
charity stripe and two missed
slam dunks. But hell be in the
Dean dome, baby, where the
living god Dean is known to
invent multiple defenses to shut
down the opposition.
To be perfectly honest, Earlvis is
prejudice against N.C. State. After
Carolina wins tonight, Earlvis
will have much satisfaction in
knowing that State freak Jack
Manning is in Raleigh crying.
Purdu
Th
B
LPURDUE�My choice to
it all this season has climbed bi
to the top thanks to
misfortunes of others ever
weekend The Boilermalq
made their fortune though as -J
went into Ann Ar
defeated Michigan
improve to 19-2 for the -
The win boosted the Boiler i
top of the Big Ten Cor
with a 8-1 mark Todd M
led the way for the Boil i
points, while Troy U j
20. I wonder it Trov - -
Scott, who is an assistant
hereat ECU, can persuade �
transfer to the Pirate pr
Purdue was back in act
hardwood last night
Michigan State
� � � � �
2. TEMPLE � The
to 18-1 for the season c
rolling past Rutgers M
of Owls had dandy peri n -J
in the victory Mil J
had 21 points to lead a J
while freshman sensab - (
Macon had 1Q p-
rebounds Howard E
13 points and dishe
to keep a bi smik
Chaney's face The Ov
falter in the polls il
upset last night in a game ag,
Villanova.
3. OKLAHOMA �
Sooners improved l 21-21
year Tuesday nig - ngj
Nebraska 92- Th
Sooners a one-ha If g im
Kansas State in the E
Conference race
were led by a qu rttet f d
figure scorers . d by IS
from Dave Seiger. I I
and Stacey King ea
while Harvey Gran tadd
Mookie Blaylock 12
also scored an impressive 12
:ctory over a quality Mi
dub Saturday K r g
that victor) witf acareeY-higj
nts.
� � � � �
4. PITTSBURGH -
Panthers roll i
four spot, thanks g?
tact that they
weekend. Currei 6-2 i
season, the Panthers -
short-lived as Big
Syracuse came
Wednesdav with
victory in its eyes
"Backboard Pain" Law I
a good job oi keepi ng the Panl
m the top 10 for the n
season.
� � � � �
5. ARIZONA �
rebounded from j
the week to Star- rd
California 74-62
Anthonv Cook led the wa t
win with 19 points
rebounds, while Sea
added 15 and Crai: 4
The 21-2 Wildcats will be baj
action tonight when they
Oregon in a Pac-10 cor
� � � � �
6.NORTHCAROLIN K
Tar Heels advance up the pa
much the same reason Pittsb
did � they didn't play
weekend. The 16-3 Tar Heels
get a big test tonight in the to
North Carolina State in the
Dome. Don't look pas.
Wolfpack, Dean. They
knocked off Duke in Can
and are on a roll
� � � � �
7. DUKE � Duke expenei
rollercoaster weekend Satuj
the Blue Devils fell to
Carolina State 77-74 after le�
by 14 points with just ov
minutes left in the game
Sunday, however, the Blue tm
bounced back with a 70-f 1
over Notre Dame. Danny
paced the way for the Devi
their win over the Insh wil
points. Kevin Strickland a
14, Robert Bnckey 13 and
King 11. King also guarded
Dame whiz kid David Ri
held him to just nine points t j
game. The 16-3 Blue Devils
back in action in the ACC
when they host Wake Fore
� ����
8. BRIGHAM YOUNG
Cougars' bubble burst in
way Saturday night as the
for the first time this seasor
83, to Alabama-Birminghai
HBP in ic.i m�wm
�m,m�im-r





two
�r a layup during ECU'S
s ored on the play and was
drop
again
nine points.
e Lady Dukes, AHsa
led the JMU win with 25
� three others tossed in
1 r better. JUM's Sandy
(ton had 14 points and was
-ics leading rebounder
rebounds,
ting plagued the
rat�. as thev shoot 17-of-
the game. Thev shot 40
in the first halt as they
in the first half.
arolina will take a few
If �rorr plav and will try to
I from their fourth
ive loss as they host
n Mondav at Minges.
� CAROLYN JUSTICE
byCAA
I at East Carolina, but offset
fith five rebounds, three
ind two clocks.
B4-70 victorv at North
a-Vilmington, Smith had
r-high 27 points as well as
iists, two rebounds, two
land on steal.
p leads George Mason with
Us and 33 blocked shots.
r Heels
member that State was a
one-half underdog going
imeron against Duke last
ly and State won by two.
ire few blow outs in the
ast time Carolina and State
in mid-January in Raleigh,
sis pulled out the big W by
oints. In that game, the
lls were favored by three
e-half points. Needless to
as a stressful, nail-biting
r gamblers whom took
la.
:ap that game, Carolina hit
I two free throws while the
with rim-rattler
jford, were horrid from the
jc.
kleford had a good game
his shooting from the
stripe and two missed
lunks. But he'll be in the
i do ie, baby, where the
god Dean is known to
multiple defenses to shut
the opposition.
! perfectly honest, Earlvis is
ice against N.C. State. After
wins tonight, Earlvis
ive much satisfaction in
ig that State freak Jack
g is in Raleigh crying.
THE EAST CAROLIN' M
FEBRUARY 11,1988 17
Purdue back on top of heap
62 behind 22 points from Sherman
Douglas. Rony Seikaly added 16
and Steve Thompson chipped in
15 points points and grabbed 12
rebounds for 17-5 Syracuse. The
Orangemen tried to continue
their winning ways last night on
the road at Pittsburgh.
�����
12. NORTH CAROLINA
STATE � The Wolfpack rolled to
nation in field goal percentage, 15-4 with a pair of wins over the
connected on only 42 percent of weekend. Saturday, the Wolpack
their shots in the loss. Mike Smith upset Duke on the road 77-74.
scored 21 points and Brian Taylor Rodney Monroe led the way for
19 for BYU in the loss. The the Pack with 17 points, while
Cougars rebounded from the loss Charles "The Shack" Shackleford
on Tuesday by topping Miami added 16. Guard Vinny Del
improve to 19-2 for the season. (Fl.) 99-86 and improving to 18-1 Negro chipped in 12 points for the
rhe win boosted the Boilers to the for the season. Smith once again Pack including the team's last six
top of the Big Ten Conference led the way for the Cougars with points. Jimmy V's team was back
with a 8-1 mark. Todd Mitchell 24 points. in action Monday night against
led the way for the Boilers with 22 Ba tist. The Pack;lcd gy 23 Soints
points, while Troy Lewis added 9. NEVADA-LAS VEGAS � from Del Negro, easily sailed to a
wonder if Troy's brother The Runnin'Rebels ran out of gas win in that contest, 116-68. The
Scott' T,s an ass,stant coach Saturday in the second half as Wolfpack has a tough assignment
lure at ECU, can persuade Troy to they blew an 11-point lead in waiting in Chapel Hill tonight
losing to Cal-Santa Barbara 71-66. against North Carolina.
The loss dropped Jerry �����
Tarkanian's team to 20-2. The 13. MICHIGAN � The
Rebels are finding the going in the Wolverines suffered a tough 91-
PC AA a little tougher this year as 87 loss Sunday at home to Big Ten
the conference is finally leading Purdue. The loss dropped
The best in hoops
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
1. PURDUE � My choice to win Cougars, who had been leading tc
it all this season has climbed back
to the top thanks to the
misfortunes of others over the
weekend. The Boilermakers
made their fortune though as they
went into Ann Arbor and
defeated Michigan 91-87 to
15. IOWA � The Hawkeyes
pushed their record to 16-6 over
the weekend by dropping a bomb
on Michigan State's parade. Jeff
Moe pumped in 19 points for the
Hawkeyes in only his second start
of the year to lead the 101-72 rout.
The Hawkeyes entertained Ohio
State last night in Big Ten action. If
Iowa managed to win last night,
its hopes are still alive in the
conference race.
program
Purdue was back in action on the
hardwood last night
Michigan State.
against
2. TEMPLE � The Owls rolled
8-1 for the season Saturday by beginning to catch up with the
Rcbs. UNLV will be back on the
hardwood tonight against Cal
State Fullcrton.
10. KENTUCKY � The
Wildcats pushed their record to
16-3 for the season by rolling past
SEC foe Mississippi State 83-59
over the weekend. Ed Da vender
tol
rolling past Rutgers 84-53. A trio
of Owls had dandy performances
in the victory. Mike Vreeswyck
had 21 points to lead all scorers,
while freshman sensation Mark
Macon had 19 points and 10
rebounds. Howard Evans added
13 points and dished out 11 assists
to Weep a big smile on John
Chaney's face. The Owls could
falter in the polls if they were
upset last night in a game against
Villanova.
� � � � �
3. OKLAHOMA � The
Sooners improved to 21-2 for the
year Tuesday night by rolling past
ebraska 92-77. The win gave the
Sooners a one-half game lead over
Kansas State in the Big Eight
Conference race. The Sooners
were led by a quintet of double- reckoned with not only in the Big
figure scorers paced by 19 points East but in the entire country. The
from Dave Sciger. Ricky Grace Orangemen went on the road
and Stacey King each added 18, Saturday and routed St. John's 79-
ile Harvey Grant added 16 and
Mookie Blayiock 12. The Sooners
scored an impressive 120-101
victory over a quality Missouri
club Saturday. King led the way in
thai victory with a career-high 40
the Wolverines to 18-4 overall and
into second place in the
in
conference race. Bill Frieder
certainly can't blame the loss on
Gary Grant. Grant pumped in 32
points in the loss, while Glen Rice
added 23 and Terry Mills pulled
down 14 rebounds. The games
don't get any easier for the
Wolverines as Saturday Bobby
led the way with 21 points, while Kni ht is bri m his su'
Winston Bennett poured in 15 Hoosiers team to Ann Arbor
points and garnered 11 caroms in � � � � �
lhe . vnhiC. PAS�d 14' BRADLEY - The Braves
KenmckysSEC record to8-3. The improved to 15.3 with two
victories this weekend. Hersey
Wildcats had another SEC foe to
battle last night on the road at
Auburn.
11. SYRACUSE � The
Orangemen seem to be
developing into a force to be
hawkins scored 32 points
Saturday to pace the Braves past
Drake 85-67. Bradley took back to
the court Monday night and
disposed of St. Louis 83-67. As
long as Hawkins stays healthy
and at the top of his game, the
Braves are going to prove mighty
tough to beat.
points.
� � � � �
4. PITTSBURGH � The
Panthers rolled into the number
tour spot, thanks greatly to the
tact that they did not play over the
weekend. Currently 16-2 for the
y?ason, the Panthers stay could be
short-lived as Big East foe
vracuse came to town
Wednesday with hopes of a
victory in its eyes. Jerome
Backboard Pain" Lane should do
a good job of keeping the Panthers
in the top 10 for the rest of the
season.
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5. ARIZONA � The Wildcats
rebounded from a loss earlier in
the week to Stanford to topple
California 74-62 Sunday.
Anthony Cook led the way to the
win with 19 points and 10
rebounds, while Sean Elliott
added 15 and Craig McMillan 10.
The 21-2 Wildcats will be back in
action tonight when they host
Oregon in a Pac-10 contest.
� � � � �
6. NORTH CAROLINA � The
Tar Heels advance up the poll for
much the same reason Pittsburgh
did � they didn't play last
weekend. The 16-3 Tar Heels will
get a big test tonight in the form of
North Carolina State in the Dean
Dome. Don't look past the
Wolfpack, Dean. They just
knocked off Duke in Cameron
and are on a roll.
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7. DUKE�Duke experienced a
rollercoaster weekend. Saturday,
the Blue Devils fell to North
Carolina State 77-74 after leading
by 14 points with just over 10
minutes left in the game. On
Sunday, however, the Blue Devils
bounced back with a 70-61 win
over Notre Dame. Danny Ferry
paced the way for the Devils in
their win over the Irish with 16
points. Kevin Strickland added
14, Robert Brickey 13 and Billy
King 11. King also guarded Notre
Dame whiz kid David Rivers and
held him to just nine points for the
game. The 16-3 Blue Devils will be
back in action in the ACC tonight
when they host Wake Forest
� ����
8. BRIGHAM YOUNG � The
Cougars' bubble burst in a bad
way Saturday night as they lost
for the first time this season, 102-
83, to Alabama-Birmingham. The
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16. FLORIDA � The Gators
were unsuccessful in giving coach
Norman Sloan his 600th career
coaching victory Saturday as they
fell to Auburn, 58-57, in SEC
action. The loss dropped the
Gators to 16-6 for the season and
7-3 in the SEC. Vemon Maxwell
led the way in defeat for Florida
with 21 points. Florida was back
in action last night in the SEC on
the road against Georgia.
17. INDIANA � Bobby
Knight's Hoosiers are finally back
on the winning track and back in
the top 20 where they belong.
Saturday the victim for the
Hoosiers was the hard-luck lllini
of Illinois. Indiana was victorious
thanks to 27 points from freshman
sensation Jay Edwards. Edwards
iced the win with a pair of free
throws with 30 seconds to play.
Dean Garrett added 18 points for
the Hoosiers. Bobby will put his
13-6 club back on the court tonight
against Wisconsin.
18. KANSAS STATE � The
Wildcats lost their lock on first
See TOP page 18
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18
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 11,1968
Intramural congrats bowlers
Congratulations are in order for
four members of the IM-REC Co-
Rec Bowling League.
Lorrie Knighton and Walter
Wilson take home the week's
High Series honors. Lorrie rolled
an impressive 368, while Walter
was just a few pins behind at 368.
In the High Game category,
Marisa Shifflett bowled a
whooping 204, and Ricky Reid
had a 194. Congrats again to those
high rollers
Three big inner-tube water polo
games are on tap for tonight in
Memorial Gym. Sigma Phi
Epsilon "A" takes on Phi Kappa
Tau at 9 p.m. to start out the
action. Other games slated
include Kappa Sigma "A" versus
Pi Kappa Alpha "A while
defending champ Tau Kappa
Epsilon "A" meets Theta Chi.
ACC players make
mugs on gum cards
RALEIGH (AP) � Some
Atlantic Coast Conference
basketball players aren't waiting
until they turn professional to
have their own bubblegum cards.
The cards, being handed out by
policemen, feature players from
Duke, North Carolina and N.C.
State with anti-drug messages on
the back.
"We certainly are role models
whether we want to be or not
North Carolina Coach Dean
Smith said Tuesday during the
wceklv telephone news
conference of ACC coaches. "We
are the largest schools in the state,
and with no professional team
vet, our players are known from
television.
"These cards are like Mickey
Mantle baseball cards at some
schools Smith said.
It's not cool to smoke now in
high school or college Smith
aid. "When I was growing up
everybody watched old movies
and smoked. This is a step
forward
"I think the ACC has really
stepped to the forefront in the
tight against drugs said Duke
Coach Mike Krzyzewski, who
along with his team, met
resident Reagan on Monday
during his visit to Duke
University for a drug abuse
conference. "1 know one thing,
Duke will give it its full support
The color cards were first
started last year by the Oklahoma
football team m conjunction .with
CA A, according to Jay Deutsch,
president of Sports Market Inc
Sheridan
extended
RALEIGH (AP) � North
Carolina State football coach Dick
Sheridan has been given a three-
year extension to his original five-
vear contract, and an option for
five more years that could keep
him with the Wolf pack through
1998.
NCSU athletic director Jim
Valvano announced the new
contract Tuesday, saying
Sheridan is "the right coach in the
nght job at the right place
Sheridan had three years
remaining on his original
contract, but the new terms throw
nut that agreement. The new
contract will stand for six years,
wi than option for five more years
that could be picked up in 1992 if
both parties agree.
"We feel very fortunate to have
Dick Sheridan, and his staff, at
N.C State Valvano said. "We're
pretty close on the type of image
we want to bring to N.C. State.
The two words that come to mind
are class and dignity, and Coach
Sheridan has certainly brought
that to this university.
Sheridan also was pleased with
the agreement.
"I speak for the entire staff
when I say it's a very good day for
us he said. "We, as a staff, are
very satisfied with N.C. State, and
I think this contract shows that
N.C State feels the same way
toward us.
"After two years, we know that
this is the place we want to be. It
takes a special place, and a special
harmony for you to want to make
a long-term agreement, and this is
it for us.
"We've enjoyed a great family
atmosphere for the last two years.
Jim, and his staff, are responsible
for that. At State, we're all trying
to be successful together. We're
not going to be satisfied until we
can compete in the conference,
and on the national level. Plus, we
want to achieve that with true
student athletes who will
represent the university with
class and dignity
the Seattle company whicn
produces the cards.
The North Carolina basketball
team joined Oklahoma last year
with an order of 10,000 sets, while
Duke and N.C State ordered the
cards this year, according to
Deutsch.
"The kids go nuts over these
cards he said. "This is the first
way for a school to be involved in
a drug awareness promotion. It
makes the athletes into clean role
models to follow. It's going over
real well
Deutsch said corporate
sponsors like IBM, Glaxo Inc
Blue Cross Blue Shield and
Adolescent Care Unit pay for the
cost of the cards, which are
distributed to police officers by
schools.
Duke, N.C State and North
Carolina are among only six
schools in the country to
participate in the card project,
Deutsch said. Besides Oklahoma,
Arizona State and Kansas State
also distribute the cards.
"All the kids need to do is go up
to the policeman and ask for a
couple of cards Deutsch said. "It
opens up the line of one-to-one
basis and he's your friend
Duke also has ordered 10,000
sets, while the Wolfpack ordered
20,000 sets, he said.
"Looking into the future, we
may decide to go statewide with
100,000 sets Deutsch said.
North Carolina's cards feature
mug shots of 12 players, while
Duke's and N.C. State's cards are
action shots.
Watch the East Carolinian
Tuesday for an update of the first
week of action.
Hoops are still the biggest story
on campus. Of course, the Men's
Independent and Fraternity
games are probably the most
heated games but for just one
moment Monday night, the best
basketball player on campus was
a Sigma Sigma Sigma. Debra
Watkins launched a 40-foot shot
against Zeta Tau Alpha and made
it 40-feet Congrats Debra! The
Tri-Sigs didn't fare so well after
that, dropping the game 24-12.
Winners from across the
leagues Monday and Tuesday
include Too Fresh Crew, Phi
Kappa Tau "B Runnin' Rebels,
Sliced Bread, Lilley Pads, Coolers,
Motley Crew, and Do Wrongs.
Facultystaff action got under
way Sunday afternoon. Pre-
season favorite "Count 'Em" took
on the Steclcrs. John Althoff and
Billy Best combined for 42 points
to lead Count 'Em to a 62-52
victory. And you didn't think
those games could be so high
scoring?!
We're about halfway through
the basketball season for some
leagues and the post-season
picture is beginning to take a little
shape. Coming up in Tuesday's
East Carolinian, we'll have a look
at the league standings. And
Thursday, IMA RECK takes a
second stab at basketball
pronostication.
Registration for the Slam Dunk
competition and Wrestling is
coming up soon. Slam Dunk
registration opens on Feb. 22 at 6
p.m. while Wrestling registration
opens on Feb. 24 at 6 p.m. For
those interested in officiating the
wrestling competition, a clinic
will be held on February 24 at 8
p.m. Call the intramural office for
more information.
Finally, some reminders about
upcoming activities. The Fitness
Olympics will be held on Feb. 28.
Registration for co-rec, men's and
women's teams will be held on
Feb. 22 in Memorial Gym, Room
204.
Registration for the Canoe
Clinic of Feb. 16 and 18 closes
Monday, Feb. 15, while
registration for the backpacking
clinic on Feb. 24 closes on
Monday, Feb. 22.
Contact the Outdoor
Recreation Center for more
information on those clinics and
activities planned for this
semester.
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Top 20 in review
Continued from page 17
place in the Big Eight by falling to
Missouri, 79-75, Tuesday night.
William Scott led the way for the
Wildcats, now 14-5 for the year, in
the loss with 20, while Mitch
Richmond added 18. Kansas State
was a little luckier Saturday when
it topped Nebraska, 65-63, thanks
to a pair of free throws from
Charles Bledsoe with two seconds
to play. 1 really wish these guys
would keep winning so I could
push them on up the poll. I have a
professor that is a K-State fan and
every win makes him a little
happier. And everybody wants
their teacher happy when the
grades are being dished out.
19. VANDERBO.T � Figure
out this team would you? First,
they beat North Carolina and then
later Florida and finally
Kentucky. Now, this past
Saturday they get crushed by an
average LSU team 94-79 to fall to
14-5 for the year. One person you
can't blame the loss on is Will
Perdue. Perdue banged in 29
points for the Commodores.
Vandcrbilt was back in the heat of
the SEC race last night with a key
game against in-state rival
Tennessee.
20. WYOMING � The
Cowboys slip back into the poll
this week following a weekend
victory over Jeckyl and Hyde
New Mexico. The 90-72 rout
administered by the Cowboys
boosted their record to 17-4 for the
season. Center Eric Leckner led
the way in the win with a career-
high 31 points. The Cowboys stay
in the top 20 could be cut short as
tonight they have to travel on the
road to meet Brigham Young.
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 11, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 11, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.588
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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