The East Carolinian, February 2, 1988






COMING THURSDAY:
SGA reporter Tim Hampton continues to help you
understand the SGA better with a report on the SGA
cabinet and their activities.
STYLE
Jimmy Buffett brought Margaritaville to Greenville
Thursday. See page 9.
SPORTS
Pirates drop their fifth straight Monday as Campbell
rolls to a lop-sided victory. See page 12.
�he iEast (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 62
o. J3
Tuesday, February 2, 1988
Greenville, NC
14 Tages
Circulation 12,000
New budget forces cuts
Air Force to end ECU's ROTC detachment
By CLA PI ANHARDT
Ntaiuging V ditot
Atter 40 years of service to the
campus and the military the ECU
Air Force ROTC program will be
phased out ot existence over the
next 18 months the Air Force said
Wednesday.
The elimination of the program
is part ot a nation-wide effort at
trimming the military budg
552 9billion in 1989. In addition to
the ECU program units at UNC-
Chapel Hill, UNC-Charlotte and
I ayctteville State University have
bee n I Id to disband as members
ol a group ot 30 programs the Air
I -nee has decided to end. The Air
Forcesaid the four state programs
have a total ol 4; students.
Seven other ROTC detach-
ments will be consolidated to help
in the budget-trimming the Air
i i rce said.
The ir Force said the changes
will be gradually phased in over
an 18-month period to allow the
juniors and seniors in the 37 de-
tachments involved to finish their
studies. Underclassmen in those
programs will either have to
transfer, or will be allowed to
leave the program, the Air Force
said.
The Air Force will save approxi-
mately $14 million by restructur-
ing its ROTC program in this
manner. The military organiza-
tion spent $128 million in fiscal
1987 on the ROTC program.
Air Force officials have said
20,000 men must be eliminated
Margaritaville man
Farrott Heads across the campus rejoiced Thursday as Jimmy Buffett took the stage in Minges
Coliseum for the first time in six years. According to Ron Maxwell, a university union official, 4,959
tickets were sold for the show, allowing the Student Union to turn a slight profit which will be returned
to the coffers to help secure future major concerts. (Photo bv Thomas Walters � Fhotolab)
from Air Force personnel to meet
the 1989 budget. By eliminating
these ROTC detachments, the Air
Force will reduce the number of
young people being trained for
active duty as officers. The move
will leave the Air Force with 114
ROTC units nationwide.
"We are disappointed that the
program has been slated for dis-
continuance Chancellor Rich-
ard R. Eakin said Monday. "We
are proceeding to do whatever we
can to see if the program can be
retained
Eakin said the university sent a
telegram to the Air Force express-
ing its dismay over the decision
immediately after it became
known. The administration has
followed that up with a factual
letter, he said, and is looking for
other channels that mihgt be ot
help.
"We will now be in conversa-
tions with a variety of people who
might can help us he said. "We
will kind of play it by ear from
here
Eakin said the relationship be-
tween the university and the Air
Force has been a good one, and
that he does not want to see it end.
"We had one of the first AF-
ROTC programs in the countrv
starting back in 1948 he said. 1 le
noted that ECU has prepared
approximately 900 commis-
sioned officers for militarv duty
over the years.
Eakin said he thinks other uni-
versities besides ECU are also
disturbed by the Air Force's an-
nouncement.
"From some brief contacts I've
had it's clear to me many of the
universities are distressed he
said.
New Student Union chair
wants student opinion
SGA changes funding
Bv TIM HAMPTON
StaH H nter
The SGA appropriated ap-
proximately $1,500 to the senior
class council, cut funds to the Air
Force ROTC color guard and
spoke with Athletic Director
Dave Hart in Monday's meeting.
In one of the largest appropria-
tions made this year, the senior
class council was appropriated
$1512 for senior awards and
Force ROTC color guard which
passed in bt week's meeting was
cut to $100 atter the Air Force
announced last week that the Air
Force ROTC program will be can-
celed for the fall semester. The
color guard will use the $100 for
registration fees to competition at
the Azalea Festival in Wilmington
and at the University oi Mary-
land.
Legislator Marty Helms said
Legislator Michael Bartlctt
moved to strike the two line items
for rifles and Hags from the appro-
priation bill. After debate
whether to cut the appropriation
completely, the legislature passed
the $100 amendment.
see SGA, page 2
The newlv-chosen Student
Union chairperson says the or-
ganization should be responsive
to the wants and needs oi the stu-
dents it serves.
"I want the money to be util-
ized, I want to find out what the
students like Karen Pasch said
after being appointed to her new
post Thursday. As part of that, she
and the Student Union will con-
duct a survey outside the student
store in the upcoming weeks.
Students will be offered choices oi
films and are encouraged to voice
their own opinions.
"We'll be raffling t-shirts we
have printed up, giving out
samples of hair gel and movie
posters she said.
Involved with the Film
Committee since her freshman
year, Pasch evolved from a mem-
ber to committee secretary before
being elected to the chairperson
position on the twelve-member
board.
Every semester's films are ac-
ccnted by the sneak previews of
feature films before they open,
she said. The Film Committee is
on a network of 200 universities
across the country, she said, but
ECU is the only university in the
state subscribing to this network.
Once a new film comes up for
review, the film committee votes
on the movie idea. Karen stresses
student involvement, "The stu-
dents should be more aware that
it's their money and they should
have more say
As president, Karen's responsi- For more information on any oi
biliries will include overseeing all the student committees or organi-
committee functions and hiring zations, contact the Student
chair-people. The deadline for Union in Mendenhall at 757-6611.
chairseat applications is Feb. 22.
other plans. In introducing the that the original $300 appropria-
bill. legislator Lisa Carroll, the tion to the color guarddrill team
senior class president, said a por- included $200 for new rifles and
tion oi the funding will be used flags used in competition. Helms
towards starting a senior chal-
lenge program which will a-k
seniors to pledge money to the
school for four years after gradu-
ating.
A $300 appropriation to the Air
said that the rifles and flags would
only be used for one semester
because oi the cancellation of the
program by the Air Force and for
that reason the appropriation
should be cut.
Student Store sees controversy
According to John Bell, assistant
vice chancellor for business af-
fairs, the decision was in the best
interest oi the University.
"The store was losing a substan-
tial amount of moncv which was
not proportional to the cost of
employing a salesman. The store
receives no tax dollars and we
By KAREN MANN
Staff Wnter
Customers to the campus Stu-
dent Store may have noticed sev-
eral changes recently, most nota-
bly in the computer department.
As of Jan. 1 the Student Store has
not been employing a full time
computer salesman to aid stu
dents in the purchase and use oi have to support ourself he said,
computers. Bell said that 100 percent of the
Formed three years ago, the Student Store's revenue is given
computer department has been to a scholarship fund for ECU
managed by Ray Drake for the students. However, for the past
past 2-1 2 years. Drake declined three years the store has not been
to comment on the issue at this able to contribute to this fund
time. because of the computer
The decision was made bv the department's losses. The store
University Department oi Busi- will continue to sell computers,
ness Affairs in conjunction with though, and the campus Aca-
Student Store Manager Michael demic Computer Services will
Coston who said he "probablv
recommended" the revisions see STUDENT, page 2
Karen Pasch has been appointed chair of the Student Union for the
1988-89 school year. (Photo by Jon Jordan � Photolab)
Robertson stumps
at Greenville hotel
By TIM HAMPTON
Staff Writer
port to right wing armies in An-
gola, Mozambique and Nicara-
Pat Robertson, a candidate for gua. He said the Soviets are like
the Republican nomination for chess players wishing to check-
president, began a speech at a mate the king while Americans
Greenville hotel Friday by saying, are poker players who play each
"I am a conservative foreign policy card as it is drawn.
In his first campaign visit to In criticizing members oi Con-
eastern North Carolina, gress for not passing pro-Contra
Robertson said tobacco farming aid legislation, Robertson said,
should be phased out. He said he "In Congress we don't have many-
would propose a federal program people with intelligence.
to buy out tobacco allotments
for eight years so tobacco farmers
can raise other crops.
But the first initiative Robertson
said he would do as president
would be "to appoint conserva-
On education, Robertson said
'The crisis stems from illiteracy
and drugs and crime in American
public schools
To combat illiteracy, Robertson
said he would implement a pro-
tives to federal government jobs gram similar to one he started
instead of moderates to please with his Christian Broadcast Nct-
The Washington Post The work ministry which taught
crowd of about 1,000 in the 123,000 to read and write, accord-
Greenville Hilton applauded ing to Robertson. He said his liter-
Robertson's conservative stands, acy program is more effective and
"I want to restore the greatness more efficient than methods used
of America through moral presently in public schools,
strength Robertson said. Returning to his theme of
In foreign policy matters, strong morals, Robertson said he
Pat Robertson came to Greenville Friday and told a crowd of support- Robertson took a strong stand would "Bring God back into the
ers he is the conservative choice for president in 1988. (Photo by Jon against communists by saying the schools of America
Jordan � Photolab) U.S. must increase military sup- see ROBERTSON, vage 3







f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 2.1988
Student Stores lose dept
other changes made
continued from page 1
provide service to the customers.
They know the brands and Student Store have been as con
types we carry' Bell said. "Also, troversial as the change in the
students and faculty can still pur- computer department. Coston
chase computers at a substantial cited specific examples such as
discount changes in music piped into the
On Jan. 2t the ECU Faculty
icnate passed a resolution which
called for the reinstatement of the
computer services department at
store and the new check cashing
pclicy.
instead of waiting at the Infor-
mation booth to have a check
SGA cuts AFROTC fund
continued from page 1
Athletic Director Dave Hart
told the SGA that he appreciates
the student support for athletics.
Hart said he is working to up-
grade the total athletic program at
ECU.
Hart said that an expansion
project on the south end of Ficklen
stadium is a long-range plan of
the Athletic Department. In order
to start the project, 12 of the
expansions price tag would be
needed to secure construction on
the stadium. Hart said.
There is a possibility that the
Pirate football team may belong
i conference in the near future,
url said ECU football is cur-
rently an independent, meaning
that they don't belong to a confer-
ence. Hart said the football team
may become affiliated with other
southern independents to form a
new conference.
In other business, the SGA:
�Appropriated $300 to the la-
sse team for helmets.
�Appropriated $300 to the
Early Childhood Club, a club
� -thin the education department,
- an education journal.
�Tassed a resolution for a cam-
pus Students for Bob Jordan for
Governor group.
�Legislator Tripp Roakes an-
nounced that students wishing to
register for the March 8 primaries
may do so at Joyner Librarv. The
last day to register for the prima-
ries is Feb. 9, Koakes said.
�bA president Scott Thomas
oortcd that Usl weekend's Uni-
.ortn C
the Student Store. approved, customers can have
1 of the changes at the their checks approved by the
cashiers. In addition, Soda Shop
customers can now bring food
and drinks into the store. The
Student Store also decided to
continue to participate in the na-
tionwide Volkswagen contest
which is sponsored by Follett
Books.
Even more changes are planned
for the future, Coston said. He
said he hopes to expand the greet-
ing cards division and incorpo-
rate more school colors into the
store's design. There has also been
some discussion of a new store to
be built near the medical school.
"It's been in the planning stages
for some time he said. "But it's a
matter of available space in the
area. The store should have al-
ways been a student organiza-
tion. We can be more than fair and
still make a profit
meeting focused on a new drug
policy for schools within the UNC
university systems. Thomas said
he supported the new drug policy
in the meeting at the University of
North Carolina at Charlotte.
�Speaker Bennett Eckert said a
resolution concerning the
cancelling of the Air Force ROTC
will be bought before the legisla-
ture in next week's meeting.
Cl
atyf last ffiaroiintot
Serving the East Carolina campus community sind 1925.
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Changes in policy
By TONI PAGE
Staff Writer
A new campus-wide fire alarm
policy reflects the seriousness and
potential danger involved in the
increasing numbers of false
alarms and vandalism on campus
according to Dean Carolyn
Fulgham of the Department of
Residence Life.
Each time an alarm goes off
(and is reported) public safety has
to check out the complaint and the
building must be evacuated. Not
only does this take time of resi-
dents but may also cost money in
manpower in instances of vandal-
ism, Knox said.
According to statistics com-
piled by Capt. S.B. Kittrel of Pub-
"The new policy which has re- lie Safety, 180 false alarms went
cently been implemented carries off during the fall semester. Most
with it heavy penalties that will of these were reported in Aycock
and Umstead residence halls.
There were onlv 18 alarms that
went off due to accidental fire or
smoke.
"Our main concern is the safctv
J
of the students, and in order to
ensure this safety, we have to
hopefully deter people from both
pulling false alarms and vandal-
ism Fulgham said.
Signs have been posted both in
dorms and throughout campus
stating the new fire alarm policy
and the consequences of a student
intentionally setting off an alarm, propose a deterrent to those who
eTsitv Of "(
Carolina Asso-
discharging a fire extinguisher or
vandalizing a fire apparatus. Not
only can a student be fined up to
$250, under the new regulations
he can also be removed from a
residence hall and suspended
from the university. The student
ia.tion for Styjdirnt Governments may also be arrested in violation
of state law, whicK along with a
Gov't assault
WASHINGTON, D.C (CPS) �
The federal government has an-
nounced another "full-scale,
�oast-to-coast assault on dead-
beats who owe money to the
government, including those who
haven't repaid student loans.
Attorney General Edwin
Meese, in announcing "Operation
Deadbeat" Jan. 15, said the federal
government would withhold del-
lquent borrowers' federal tax re-
funds, seize their property and
hire pri vatela wyers to help prose-
cute them.
The program is aimed at collect-
ing the S80 billion in unpaid obli-
gations to the government. About
55.3 billion is held by former stu-
dents who haven't repaid student
loans.
At his press conference, Meese
reported a U.S. attorney in west-
ern Kentucky seized a BMW from
a teacher who had defaulted on a
student loan taken out in 1976.
The Reagan administration, of
course, has for years attempted to
recover unpaid student loans
from defaulters. In November,
Secretary of Education William J.
Bennett threatened to expel col-
leges and trade schools from all
federal student aid programs if
they allow future loan default
rates to exceed 20 percent. In Oc-
tober, President Reagan ap-
proved legislation that allows the
justice Department to hire private
attorneys to litigate defaulted
loans.
In recent years, the Education
Department has also worked with
the Internal Revenue Service to
withhold tax refunds from de-
faulters, reported defaulters to
credit bureaus, hired private col-
lection agencies and garnished
wages.
Four days after the debut of
"Operation Deadbeat a "default
summit" called by Rep. Pat Wil-
liams (D- Mont.) to forge a na-
tional plan to cut the number of
Guaranteed Student Loan (GSL)
defaults ended, with Williams
saying he had enough informa-
tion to write a bill.
College aid directors and edu-
cation associations were repre-
sented at the meeting, which dis-
cussed remedies ranging from
better screening of students want-
ing loans to cutting schools with
high default rates out of the GSL
program.
$500 fine, may result in imprison-
ment.
don't respect the law said Dean
Ron Speier.
"A lot of students don't realize
the penalty behind the simple act
of pulling a fire alarm. Serious
consequences could result noil
only for the vandal, but for every-
one in the building in the case of al
real fire that mav evcntuallv be
J J
ignored Speier said.
uine Leigh Mallory
Shari Clemens
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This is a sight you will not see any more, as the Student Stores has eliminated its computer section for
financial reasons. Other changes are also taking place at the campus bookstore. (Photo by Jon Jordan �
Photolab)
Panhellenic
officers named
The Panhellenic council elected
new officers for 1988 Thursday,
with each sorority on campus
receiving one executive officer
and one delegate.
The new executive officers are:
president, Camela Ward � Chi
Omega; vice president, Kris Kelly
� Sigma Sigma Sigma; secretary,
Meredith Smiley � Alpha Delta
Pi; treasurer Joann Jefferson �
Delta Zeta; rush chairman Eliza-
beth Walma � Alpha Phi; mem-
bers at large, Melinda Hauffman
� Alpha Omicron Pi; Jill Jones �
Alpha Xi Delta; Jody Turner �
Zeta Tau Gamma; Stephanie Sut-
ton � Delta Sigma Theta; Tammy
Daughtery � Alpha Kappa
Alpha; Sheila Speight � Zeta Phi
Beta, and Veronica McKinney �
Sigma Gamma Rho.
The new officers will be in-
stalled Thursday night at the
Panhellenic Banquet at the Shera-
ton by 1987 Panhellenic President
Amanda Hodges of Alpha Phi.
According to Laura Sweet,
Panhellenic advisor, the council
will attend a leadership confer-
ence at North Carolina State Uni-
versity Feb. 21st. Events for the
semester are still being planned.
"The student who pulls a false HayeS appointed
alarm does not realize the poten- r
rial danger involved in this type of R.Michael Hayes, a 1987 gradu-l
violation said Capt. Keith Knox ate of ECU and aformer president
of the Department of Public of the Gamma Eta Chapter of Phi
Safety. Kappa Tau social fraternity, has
"The case of 'crying wolf has become a chapter leadership con-
serious repercussions. Students sultant with the national head-
ignore fire alarms and stay in their quarters of his fraternity,
locked rooms because so many The former news editor foil
alarms go off, sometimes three WZMB, bus driver and national
and four times a day (or night). It Interfraternity Council represen
is obvious the dangers that imply tative will work with chapters in
in the case of an actual fire Indiana, Kentucky and Illinois.
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Call or stop in soon for jull details.
355-5075 The Plaza
Mon. - Fri. - 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Wednesday, February 3
8:00 P.M. Hendrix
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Thursday, February 4 -
Sunday, February 7
8:00 p.m. Hendrix
THE WITCHES OF
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Friday, February 5
8:00 p.m. Underground
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To apply, contact the
Student Union - 234 Mendenhall
Sunday, February 7
3:00 p.m. Wright Auditorium
PRESENTATION HALL
JAZZ BAND
Tickets: $4.00 E.C.U. StudentYouth
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Tuesday, February 9
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Tickets: $3.00 E.C.U. StudentYouth
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OLTI TO ��V YOU
Sdtherins place
Robertson
begins
Campaign
continued from page 1
During the speech, Roberts
took an unsympathetic stand
terrorists and drug pushers. I
message to terrorists, "If you
one finger on a U.S. citizen, th
will be no place to hide
For drug pushers, Robert!
said he would make a mandate.
life sentence for anyone con victl
twice of selling drugs to ju venil
In a campaign pitch similar
promises made by President 1
agan in 1980, Robertson said
would balance the budget by c
ting waste and mismanagemel
Without rising taxes, Roberts
said the federal governing
would have a balanced budget
1991. fo
In a press conference before t)
speech, Robertson said "This
the year the South will lead
nation on Super Tuesday
March 8, "Super Tuesday
southern states will hold bd
democratic and republican
maries.
In closing his speech, Robert:
urged his supporters to vote
March 8 and said, "Let me hal
the satisfaction of seeing D
Rather's face when he says 1
Robertson won the North'Cai
iina primarv
Princeton
SAT prep
(CPS) � A federal court
dered a companv to stop usi
questions from the Scholas
Aptitude Test (SAP and ot
standardized tests to help coa
students to score higher on
exams.
The order ended a two-1
court battle between the Edu
tional Testing Service (E"
which writes the tests, and PnnJ
ton Review, Inc a New York fi
that coaches test-takers.
The court permanently barrl
Princeton Review from obtainil
or distributing questions fn
ETS tests, and had the firm
$52,000 to ETS for using ETS quj
dons in the past.
The settlement also allows E
to inspect Princeton Revie
materials at any time during
next four years.
ETS sued Princeton Review
its president, John Katzman.j
)uly, 1985, for allegedly giv
students current standards
test questions on which to pi
rice.
"We wanted to prevent
Katzman from ever trying to g
his students the unfair benefij
seeing the actual test question
advance ETS President Greg
Anrig said.
"We have now done that
Katzman, who admits his i
provided students with "Se
teen questions way too similarj
those found on SATs, charjf
ETS instead was trying to pui
him for criticizing the tests!
which he argues are bia
ECU gradual
ECU Newt lunu
Three East Carolina Univei
graduates have joined the staj
the ECU Division of Student
as residence hall directors.
They are Pamela Riddle Rij
who has been assigned to '
Residence Hall; Tinger Simmj
assigned to Belk Residence
and Lavena Hembree Taylor
signed to White Residence Hi
Pamela Riggs was graduJ
from ECU in 1984 with a BA
gree in psychology and recen
master's degree in guidance
counseling from ECU two yl
later. She has worked for the'
two years as director of stuJ
activities and residence hall dj
tor at Chowan College.
She is the daughter of Fredl
Martha Riddle of Goldsboro
was recently married to
Tinger Simmons, recently
ried to Wade Purvis, is
daughter of Naomi Simmor
Raleigh. She received BA an
degrees in school and comrm
health from ECU and has 1
instructor in the Departme
School and Community
on campus.
Lavena Hembree TayloJ
ceived the Bachelor of Sci
Professional degree in
work from ECU in 1974
master's degree in guk
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1
ted its computer section for
Photo by Ion Jordan �
arnlinian
u 1925
Ivertising
cntatives
RTISING
NG RATES
N
�� . � � �
b309
TONS
n
E
biion)
Robertson
begins
Campaign
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 2.19fifi 3
continued from page 1
During the speech, Robertson
took an unsympathetic stand on
terrorists and drug pushers. His
message to terrorists, "If you lay
one finger on a U.S. citizen, there
will be no place to hide
For drug pushers, Robertson
said he would make a mandatory
life sentence for anyone convicted
twice of selling drugs to juveniles.
In a campaign pitch similar to
promises made by President Re-
agan in 1980, Robertson said he
would balance the budget by cut-
ting waste and mismanagement.
Without rising taxes, Robertson
said the federal government
would have a balanced budget bv
1991.
In a press conference before the
speech, Robertson said "This is
the year the South will lead the Pat Robertson, a candidate for the Republican nomination for president and a former evangelist, steps
nation on Super Tuesday On out of his limousine as he prepares to speak to a crowd of supporters at a Greenville hotel Friday. (Photo
March 8, "Super Tuesday all by Jon Jordan � Photolab)
southern states will hold both
democratic and republican pn thartes Cathedral expert speaks Feb. 10
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manes.
In closing his speech, Robertson
urged his supporters to vote on
March 8 and said, "Let me have
the satisfaction of seeing Dan
Rather's face when he says Pat
Robertson won the North Caro-
lina primary
ECU Newt Bureau
Author-lecturer Malcolm
Miller, internationally recog-
nized as an authority on Chartres
Cathedral in France, will visit East
Carolina University Feb. 10 to
present an illustrated lecture on
the art and architecture of the
medieval cathedral.
His program is scheduled for 8
p.m. in the Brody Building Audi-
torium and is free and open to the
public.
A native of England, Miller has
Princeton Review must stop using
SAT prep questions, says ETS
(CPS) � A federal court or-
dered a company to stop using
questions from the Scholastic
Aptitude Test (SAT) and other
standardized tests to help coach
students to score higher on the
exams.
The order ended a two-vear
J
court battle between the Educa-
tional Testing Service (ETS),
which writes the tests, and Prince-
ton Review, Inc a New York firm
that coaches test-takers.
against women and minorities �
and for helping students signifi-
cantly improve their scores.
"With this suit, they hoped to
put us out of business Katzman
said.
"We're out to get him? He flat- tions, Katzman said the company
ters himself countered ETS chief rewrites them to reflect concepts
legal counsel Stanford von that will appear on the tests.
Mayrhauser. ETS' real motives, said
Katzman's firm agreed in 1983 Katzman, stem from a 1985 Roll-
to stop using ETS material, but, ing Stone article that claimed stu
Consequently, ETS had to retire
324 questions from various tests,
according to von Mayrhauser.
While readily admitting he and
other Princeton employees have
taken the tests to gather ques-
von Mayrhauser claimed, vio- dents could raise SAT scores by
The court permanently barred lated that agreement. "In 1985, we 160 points after taking the 6-week
Princeton Review from obtaining felt compelled to sue Princeton Review coaching
or distributing questions from Stanley Kaplan, president of the course. ETS, which until just a few
ETS tests, and had the firm pay Stanley Kaplan Educational Cen- years ago had insisted coaching
$52,000 to ETS for using ETS ques-
tions in the past.
The settlement also allows ETS
to inspect Princeton Review's
materials at any time during the
next four years.
ETS sued Princeton Review and
ters, one of the best-known test
coaching companies, said the suit
will have little impact on the
coaching industry itself.
He added he disagreed with
Princeton Review's method of
presenting verbatim or similar
courses didn't help raise scores,
was embarrassed by Katzman's
success, and retaliated in court.
Katzman also believes ETS is
out to get him for his outspoken
criticism of the SAT, which he
says favors white males. "It's a
its president, John Katzman, in questions because it encourages lousy test that doesn't measure
students to memorize, not learn aptitude. It's a bullshit test writ-
and think. 'That's not the way to ten by a bunch of guys from New
do it said Kaplan. Jersey
SATs are taken by millions of Both sides claim victory in the
students every year and used by case. Katzman points out that ETS
schools to determine admissions, was awarded $52,000, an amount
By law, ETS is required to publish that Anrig admitted doesn't cover
the cost of replacing the retired
luly, 1985, for allegedly giving
students current standardized
test questions on which to prac-
tice.
"We wanted to prevent Mr.
Katzman from ever trying to give
his students the unfair benefit of
seeing the actual test questions in retired tests, and frequently sells
advance ETS President Gregory its old tests to coaching firms.
Anrig said
"We have now done that
Katzman, who admits his firm
provided students with "Seven-
teen questions way too similar" to
those found on SATs, charged
questions.
Katzman added the publicity
generated by the case quadrupled
the number of students enrolled
But Princeton Review, ETS said,
was giving students copies or
paraphrasals of questions that
would be used in upcoming SAT in Princeton courses, offered in 35
tests. Katzman, the lawsuit al- cities across the United States,
leged, obtained stolen test copies Lawyer von Mayrhauser
ETS instead was trying to punish or took the test himself to gather agreed the media portrayed
him for criticizing the tests � questions before they were re- Katzman as a David battling the
which he argues are biased tired. ETS Goliath, but added ETS
achieved its goal of stopping Prin-
ceton Review from using confi-
ECU graduates join staff 'Xl��
counseling the following year. whf he wf f do,inS was wrong
She is currently a candidate for a " von Mayrhauser
Certificate for Advanced Study in
guidance and counseling from the
ECU School of Education.
ECU Newt Bureau
thermg place
Three East Carolina University
graduates have joined the staff of
the ECU Division of Student Life
as residence hall directors.
They are Pamela Riddle Riggs,
who has been assigned to Scott
Residence Hall; Tinger Simmons,
assigned to Belk Residence Hall
and Lavena Hembree Taylor, as-
signed to White Residence Hall.
Pamela Riggs was graduated
from ECU in 1984 with a BA de-
gree in psychology and received a
master's degree in guidance and
counseling from ECU two years
later. She has worked for the past
two years as director of student
activities and residence hall direc-
tor at Chowan College.
She is the daughter of Fred and
Martha Riddle of Goldsboro and
was recently married to Jesse
Riggs.
Tinger Simmons, recently mar-
ried to Wade Purvis, is the
daughter of Naomi Simmons of
Raleigh. She received BA and MS
degrees in school and community
health from ECU and has been an
instructor in the Department of
School and Community Health
on campus.
Lavena Hembree Taylor re-
ceived the Bachelor of Science-
Professional degree in social
work from ECU in 1974 and a
master's degree in guidance and
said
what we set out to do.
'That's
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lectured at Chartres since 1958.
Each winter he visits various
campuses and museums in the
British Isles and North America,
speaking on medieval stained
glass, cathedral architecture and
other topics.
In addition, he has published
several books on the famed Ca-
thedral and has been featured on
Canadian and British television.
Miller's appearance, coordi-
nated by Karine Sparrow-Ginter
of the ECU Department of For-
eign Languages and Literatures,
is sponsored by the languages
and literatures department, the
ECU Medieval-Renaissance
Studies Committee, the European
Area Studies Committee, the
Department of Medical Humani-
ties
Read the sports
page in The East
Carolinian.
Simply the best.
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THANK YOU.
SINCERELY,
MIKE STEELE
HEAD BASKETBALL COACH
REMAINING HOME GAMES
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 6
- GEORGE MASON
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 8
- JAMES MADISON
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20
- RICHMOND
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 22
- ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27
- UNC- WILMINGTON
��"� �
A r
� � fl � . �!
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I





i,
3Hj� Saat (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, cu�r
Clay Deanhardt, M�r�, tt�
James F.J. McKee, ��� mmu�
Tim Chandler, s, ��
John Carter F���e �
Michelle England, &� m�-
Debbie Stevens, s�r�
Jeff Parker.?����
TOM FURR, CirculrtKm M�ug�r
Mike Upchurch, production su
JOHN W. MEDLIN, Art Director
Mac Clark, bsi�m ��$��
February 2. 1988
OPINION
Page 4
Program needs saving
The decision by the Air Force to
end their ROTC unit here within the
next few months is understandable,
but highly regrettable.
It is understandable because of the
government spending cuts which
are being made across the board.
Cuts must be made somewrhere in
lowing skills. A strong aspect of a
well-rounded education will be lost
when the ROTC pulls out.
Locally, the university and AF-
ROTC have long enjoyed good
working relations beneficial to both.
ECU has one of the first AFROTC
units ever chartered, and it is cele-
order to balance the budget and brating its 40th � and now seem-
somehow get the enormous deficit ingly last � birthday this year,
under control. The group also represented the
The Air Force has to meet a certain university well in competitions and
budget in 1989, and something has at athletic events. ROTC courses
to go so that can happen. Unfortu- teach young people leadership skills where one person can see only a drop of water, the scientist,
nately, North Carolina seems to and social skills while preparing for bymcansofhis microscope, can see a world of life in continual
have been picked on when it comes a guaranteed job. movement. Where another person sees only a thing, the artist,
to ending ROTC units. And let's not forget the financial through his talented eye, can see a sign pointing to a higher-
Three North Carolina schools be- benefits of the ROTC. Many stu- almost ineffable-reality. Simple facts prove the existence of
j rrtTL i i .a- � i. j � nrvr -u 1.1. two sides;however, if not examined carefully, one side can be
sides ECU have also lost their units, dents are in ROTC because they . , J? iTJI ' j�,
. , . , , -it misleading and even deceptive.
That can almost make one wonder need to money to stay in school. As an example, I call your attention to a very unique
what the Air Force has against North Some call this financial blackmail, building. Unique�because it is the only building on campus
Carolina. but at least it does give some people designated for the preservation of black history � and what
But the loss of the ROTC program what might be their only chance to a real sight! To me, it's just a piece of organized junk: wall-to-
is regrettable for two entirelv differ- attend school. T'Tl��?
� Ll . u thenwhatdoIknow?Totheuruversity,iKsapieceofart.They
Finally, there is a problem with the caJ t ,The hedoniA Wrieht Cultural Center" and for that, I
Cultural Center inadequate
the black experience and simultaneously educate the black, as
well as the white of social use and not for social status.
This so-called cultural center at ECU does none of the
above. Surely the university can do better. It's in times like
these when blacks are de-emphasized and overlooked that
someone must stand amid the crowd and take action.
This is Black History Month, and what an excellent time for
the student body, the chancellor and the Beautification
Committee to examine this problem and do something about
it.
ent reasons.
The first, on a national scale, is current underclassmen. To get their should be proud. After all, I can see all the hard work that
that, once again, education is paying commission they will be forced to went into its creative design, its lucrative decorations but
the price for weapons, waste and fat- transfer to different schools. Thev most importantly, its inviting location,
cat administrators. also have the option to just get out of Do forgivc me for ing sarcastic, but whenever I seriously
We here so much about budget the program. Neither option is ac- S
, . ? ,& . , e -f �� white university � seeing how it s being represented � two
mis-management and waste, and it ceptable. The end of the AFROTC things quickly come to mind: 1) Is it that the university really
seems the military could save lots of program is by no means going to wants us � as black students � to realize our black identity
money if it just cleans up its own cripple the school, and there will in terms of ourselves, our history and our culture? or 2) Is it
house. probably be some who are glad to that the university simply wants to appease us by offering �
Bv ending an educational pro- see it eo. However, the university, in disguise � what appears to be a cultural center, when m
gram such as the ROTC the armed through the administration and & 52;SS"�
services are denying the opportu- SGA, should make every effort to nous of a particular people � their history, their background
nity for students to learn valuable have the Air Force return our ROTC and their accomplishments. A place to focus, in this case, on
leadership skills and valuable fol- detachment.
f FOCUS
By
f -i Steven Pierce
I have long possessed a deep faith in the power of prayer
and education to bringabout change: change in status, change
in conditions, change in the way people think because
together we can bend the shackles that so easily beset us-as
long as we make strides forward and not backward.
Please build us a real cultural center! Demolish that offen-
sive piece of junk behind the infirmary and show some justice
for black America. If done properly you can succeed in
bringing the black students more pride, the white students a
greater appreciation and the university as a whole a better
understanding of black culture and black history.
Student wonders why Student Store disbands computer sales center
To the editor:
At times it seems the most illogical
things take place within an institution
dedicated to the development of
human learning and logic � such is
the case with the recent "shake-up" at
our campus bookstore. As of now, we
no longer have access to a computer
department with trained assistance.
That's right where other universi-
ties are pushing to make all their stu-
dents computer literate, our new
bookstore manager has axed three
experienced, full-time employees,
including the computer sales staff.
The computers are being cleared out.
Apparently this new manager is
one of those "efficiency experts" (self-
designated, I'm sure) who is deter-
mined to show his expertise by re-
placing full-time people with lower-
wage, part-time employees. Let's
look at this another way. The fast food
places also hire minimum wage, part-
time help. How many times have you
gotten an order screwed up by one of
the folks at the burger places? If it has
never happened to you, you probably
are a vegetarian. The fast-food places
only have about thirty items on the
menu. The bookstore has thousands
of different items. I rest my case.
In the business world there is a need
to keep an eye on the net profit the
so-called "bottom line It is, how-
ever, possible for a manager to have
his head stuck so far up his "bottom
line" that he can no longer see the
main objective service to the stu-
dents and faculty. Doing away with
the computer department and other
experienced staff positions seems to
be evidence of just such a problem.
I'm going to really miss some of
those people who have helped me
over the past years. Some of those let
go have been there for many years
and have helped thousands of us. I'm
sure their families will miss those jobs
as well.
William A. Robie Jr.
Graduate Student
History
Biased reporting
To the editor:
The actions of the media in recent
years have troubled me. And in the
past several months, the media have
attracted particular attention to them-
selves.
I am referring not to the pulp publi-
cations that shoulder up to us at gro-
cery checkout lines; I am talking
about those purveyors of public'
news, those guardians of our demo-
cratic right to know what is being
done to us by powers we cannot
touch. They are network news, the
weekly magazines, the daily tabloids:
CBS News, Time, The Washington
Post, and even The East Carolinian.
They are the media sources we count
on for honest, accurate, unbiased
reporting of the facts. If you laugh at
this remark, then welcome; you are as
si eptical (delete "cynical") as I. We
no longer expect the media to present
the bare, unadulterated facts. We
know the "facts" are very much de-
pendent on who's recording them.
We're not so naive as to believe every-
thing we read in the papers or see on
the news. We know better. But that
leaves some of us wondering what
exactly it is that we do know for a fact.
What do we really know about
Bush's involvement in the Iran arms-
for-hostages-and-money deal and
subsequent diversion of monies from
that deal to the Contras? Many of us
can hazard a guess about the former
CIA chief's role, but unless a criminal
investigation were to begin, we don't
really expect Bush to "reveal all" as
Jessica Hahn and others have done.
Student raises campus issues for consideration
There's no profit in it for him Why
blame the media? I haven't, on this
account.
I believe strongly in the freedom of
the press. I also think that this needs
much clarification. I believe the me-
dia have a responsibility to the public
to present the happenings oi the day
as accurately and completely as pos-
sible. I believe that actions by public
officials acting in official capacities
are the domain of such public
scrutiny. The networks and publish-
ers pay good money for thorough
investigative reporting; we ought to
receive it.
The problem is, it seems that these
reporters are being paid to do more
than investigative things which fall
into the public domain. The problem
is, these reporters are presenting syn-
opses of the "facts" and spending a
good deal of energy interpreting the
facts from the biases of the networks
See REPORTING, page 5
Nazi shmazi. McCrady, Mike Brady, Hardy,
hardly. C'mon guys, I've had just about enough
about who is a Nazi, what defines a communist,
what defines a liberal, what our U.S. Government
does on weekends, etc etc etc. Why do we have to
follow a party anyway?
I'm a proud Republican by party affiliation (but
not a college Republican), but I like to vote for the
best man when the time comes, and I'll reserve
judgment on just who that may be until the future.
Don't buy a Ford just because it is worth the money
and a good car. If Chevrolet is better, buy it. Get the
best car for your money, whichever that may be.
Many of us care, and it's not that I don't, but about all
this wasted ink in the Campus Forum, please see the
Campus Spectrum
by
Randy Mizelle
first line in Chippy Bonehead's weather article.
Change channels guys, if s time to move on. You
guys are like "Andy Griffith" junkies, refusing to
watch any other show (which is bound to be better)
which is on at the same time. I've got the remote
control, so 111 do the honors. Lets see what is on the
East Carolina University channel.
How about Coach Mike Steele (a.k.a. The Savi-
our)? Yes, I gave him the name and if s catching on.
The All Pete Rose Team plays in Minges, baby. The
coach has the dome rockin even though we could
stand improvement in the height department. The
guys give 110 every game, which is ail tnat counts,
though. Wait 'til next year.
How about the guy putting his resume on a bill-
board? Clever. Maybe I'll put the detailed account of
how I've lived off $80 a month for food for the last
two years on a billboard and pray someone feels
sorry for me, subsequently hiring yours truly. You
must admit, one must have motivation and drive to
look for the light past macaroni and cheese.
What about the parking problem? It was a prob-
lem five years ago, it is a problem today, and it will
be a problem five years from now. To be honest, I
ride a bike to college so it doesn't affect me in the
least. Now there's the solution, I park my less-than-
turbo-charged two-wheeler right in front of the
building I need to visit. Couldn't ask for a better
parking space. In any case, The East Carolinian
could write until is is blue in the print, but there is no
great solution for the parking problem except for a
deck, which never has gone over very well. Oh well,
grin and bear it.
Condoms in the dorms? Good idea, but as men-
tioned, they are available in the Student Health
Center if needed. Study distribution figures there,
then decide. It would be quite a convenience for the
illegal "sleep-overs" who can't leave until twelve
o'clock to be able to walk down the hall and purchase
AIDS control. Next, bartenders will be handing
them out at closing time. Hey, I might be on to
something here. Don't laugh, it may happen. Re-
member, you saw it here first.
Pirate Comix. Good idea, but you spelled it wrong.
Depression set in for me, however, when Man (J
Stick was sent out to pasture. The comic page iust
isn't the same without him, so 1 usually SKip it
The new classroom building? A beautiful piece of
work. Wait a minute. What is this? Fifteen parking
spaces? Oh, no! Not again! Oh, well, it happens �
adding insult to injury. However, please make class
moves after spring semester, I'll be gone and it won't
affect me. Thanks.
Jimmy Buffett. Finally someone other than Charlie
Daniels. Thank you � a great move. However, I
couldn't go. One week of food is a little too much to
ask. That's 45 boxes of Kroger macaroni and cheese.
I can chow for the price of admission. Anyhow,
when I hitchhike to Horida, I'll see him in some
nightclub. Besides, I go to the basketball games for
free and my disc collection is paid for. Thirdly, Carla
got married on "Cheers a feat in itself. I think Eddie
needs my glasses.
I think we have good movies this semester. I
always forget about them and am occupying myself
in other ways. I used to take advantage of the free
admission, but when I continued to get pelted by
paper airplanes I decided Tom and Jerry wasn't
worth it. Some advice: sit in the balcony so you can
do the flying.
Baseball is coming. I'll be there, ESPN hat and all.
A bright spot, annually, in our sports program. Too
bad pizza and coolers are a thing of the past. The
inconveniences of legislation and red tape.
Meal tickets. When I had one you could erase the
pencil marks and get an extra meal. You could also
pass it back in line to some poor slob who had no
meal ticket, no money, and really wanted to eat in
Jones Cafeteria. Those were the good 'ole days. Now
they are computerized so T have heard, and they
have your picture on them. Technology sucks.
Drop-add. When I was an undergraduate, 1 had to
get in line at 4 a.m. to even have a prayer of getting
the card I needed for the class I wanted. People bitch
about the computerized system � if only thev went
u -ESS uhe Card svstem where the line went from
the TKE house to Memorial Gym. Oh, the wonders
of technology. The computer system is the greatest
thing since the "Drunk Bus
The Drunk Bus (the slang term used to describe the
weekend night transit that carried students home
who had a few too many to drink). Gone but not
forgotten. Budget cuts can kill. Saved many people
much money. Oh, well, Dependable Cab is in the
�hm PY'For once l am Poising most things
��i- i�ne Ecu With 8� rea�n MXintra"
mural basketball team make the All Madden League
and is predicted 10th university-wide. All of This
,teaT " the "Derelicts ECU is
?pL thlnw!? thf otivation an drive to on our
inTdildietwehave
an advantage, which we'll need
,1 JmnlTl S y�U Na2is- conservatives, liber-
als, communists, left winooi-o -j w � � �
Helms next Mrea'wTH
lovingimcompeten"etL "SSLffS! �?
Whafs been dnnT 'w c?tc'e�c The issues, baby.
done.Tome,thebottomlineiswhatcountsIfswhat
you do, not say or look like wnaicoums ir s wnai
J�Z llnfor ��m Hlie of � te� at the
SAMS �l won,t lto ,ook at
Rep
publishers, or whomever. The
problem is, we can't possibly di-
gest the amount of information
we would need merely to stay
abreast of present situations. We
need a filter to screen out impor-
tant news and to put into contexts,
both historical and social. We are
hard pressed to make meaning
out of all the complexities. De
mocracy can't work if the repre-
sented are uninformed. It isn't a
democracy if we are misin-
formed. It becomes a mockery if
our leaders are spreading disin-
formation. That's why I believe
strongly in the freedom of the
press.
But how do we gain from a
media that seeks to sensational-
ize? How do we gain from that
misrepresents the facts? How do
we gain from a media that serves
its own ends and fosters profit
rivalry among its own? Who
gains from the disclosure of can-
didates' sexual escapades? The
media. Who gains from the repre-
sention of a covert operation as
the overactive zeal of a tew patri-
otic individuals? The media. Who
gains from a shouting match be-
tweeen the vice president and a
news anchor? The media. People
love drama. The media presents
drama. The people stay tuned.
What does The East Carolinian
have to do with this? We the
people cannot point the finger at a
media that dramatizes or at repre-
sentatives that disinform if we are
going to misrepresent the facts in
our own publications. I am refer-
ring specifically to the Jan. 28 is-
sue featuring a front page article
on Jesse Jackson's campaign
speech in Greenville last week.
The author did not paint a biased
picture; on that account, he did a
good job. He presented the mate-
rial objectively, as a reporter
should. However, the author
misquoted the candidate. He
quoted Jackson as saying, "When
we turn out the lights, it's amaz-
ing that we look the same in the
dark Jackson had actually-
said: "Because all of us look amaz-
ingly similar when the lights go
out
The author failed to put mate-
rial in its complete context. He
wrote of Jackson's "statement of
unity" in which the candidate
used the analogy of a quilt and all
the patches that make up the quilt
This was accurate. But the author
failed to mention that Jackson had
used "patch" as a metaphor for
the limited resources and powers
of the individual. Jackson re-
peated that our "patches ain't
big enough The quilt made or
individual patches sewn together
became a metaphor for unitv and
the "new majority
Let's start presenting accurate
information at the campus level
Don Rutledg
Graduate student
Engh-
Contra aid
To the editor:
It amazes me that liberals si
oppose aid to the Contras i
after the Sandinistas have admit-
ted they plan to shred the Arias
reace Plan and, with the aid of the
USSR and Cuba, to spread com-
munism throughout Central
America Why are liberals, par-
ticularly the Students tor Eco-
nomic Democracy, still putting
up their anti-Contra propagai
all over this campus (that is, when
thev are not tearing down the pro-
Contra posters)?!
Look, liberals, the cat is o
the bag: it's now publicized
that the conservatives have been
and are right and liberals have
been and are wrong about the
situation in Nicaragua all ak
Roger Miranda Benegoecr
34,a former keySandinista lead, rl
and aide to Nicaraguan Defense!
Minister Humberto Ortega
fected a couple of months ago andj
has effectively destroyed ei
liberal myth about Nicaraj
RACK R(
BRANDED
Greenville Buyer's Mai
Memorial Drive
Open Mon.
Sunday 1-6
mj �ilnrni BH�jB.dM
�� i'i IH0.I i jnwiiym mnp mmtmfP ,
"�i ��pp�Epwftf�
- � � -





QHjb iEaat (Earnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, cvm
Clay Deanhardt, M�jm, ���
James F.J. McKee, cw, ,��,
TIM CHANDLER, Span, EAtor
John Carter Ft fj
Michelle England,om��
Debbie Stevens, s�t
February 2. 1988
OPINION
JEFF PARKER,Si�fl'fli�jrr-tor
TOM FJRR,CmUtvm Mange,
Mike Upchurch, production Mmt
John w. Medlin, ah cwor
Mac Clark, &�� m
Page 4
Program needs saving
The decision by the Air Force to
end their ROTC unit here within the
next few months is understandable,
but highly regrettable.
It is understandable because of the
government spending cuts wThich
are being made across the board.
Cuts must be made somewThere in
lowing skills. A strong aspect of a
wrell-rounded education will be lost
when the ROTC pulls out.
Locally, the university and AF-
ROTC have long enjoyed good
working relations beneficial to both.
ECU has one of the first AFROTC
units ever chartered, and it is cele-
order to balance the budget and brating its 40th � and now seem
somehow get the enormous deficit ingly last � birthday this year. - m -m f -y a
under control. The group also represented the ff !� I Ptii
The Air Force has to meet a certain university well in competitions and y H ww IMs m Iw w V- m mw
budget in 1989, and something has at athletic events. ROTC courses
to go so that can happen. Unf or tu- teach young people leadership skills Whcrc one person can see only a. Imp of water, the scientist,
nately, North Carolina seems to and social skills while preparing for by means of his microscope, can se-i world of life in continual
have been picked on when it comes a guaranteed job. movement. Where another person sees only a thing, the artist,
to ending ROTC units. And let's not forget the financial through his talented eye, can see a sign pointing to a higher -
J: fT , , . i v. i- c c lu orYrr- Xk�� chl almost ineffable�reality. S mple facts prove the existence of
Three North Carolina schools be- benefits of the ROTC Many stu- ycbe
sides ECU have also lost their units, dents are in ROTC because they mislcading and even deceptive.
That can almost make one wonder need to money to stay in school. As an example, I call your attention to a very unique
what the Air Force has against North Some call this financial blackmail, building. Unique�because it is the only building on campus
Carolina but at least it does give some people designated for the preservation of black history � and what
But the loss of the ROTC program what might be their only chance to J
is regrettable for two entirely differ- attend school. then what do I know? To the university, it's a piece of art. They
ent reasons. Finally, there is a problem with the caH u ,The 03 Wright Cultural Center" and for that, I
The first, on a national scale, is current underclassmen. To get their should be proud. After all, I can see all the hard work that
that, once again, education is paying commission they will be forced to went into its creative design, its lucrative decorations but
the price for weapons, waste and fat- transfer to different schools. They most importantly, itsinvi ting loca Hon.
. j � -o,T�fVr;� twiner trrmrnf Do torgive me for being sarcastic, but whenever 1 seriously
cat administrators. also have the option to just get out ot considci?wh ltural exists here at a predominately
We here so much about budget the program. Neither option is ac- uaitc university �seeing how it's being represented � two
mis-management and waste, and it ceptable. The end of the AFROTC things quickly come to mind: 1) Is it that the university really
seems the military could save lots of program is by no means going to wants us � as black students � to realize our black identity
monev if it just cleans up its own cripple the school, and there will in terms of ourselves, our history and our culture? or 2) Is it
house probably be some who are glad to that the university simply wants.to appease us by offering -
nuustr. �iyjva.v y b diseuise � what appears to be a cultural center, when in
By ending an educational pro- see it go. However, the university, XitaagpUccforminorityorganizations.
gram such as the ROTC, the armed through the administration and the A rcal culturai center attempts to express what is indige-
services are denying the opportu- SGA, should make every effort to nous 0f a particular people � their history, their background
nity for students to learn valuable have the Air Force return our ROTC and their accomplishments. A place to focus, in this case, on
leadership skills and valuable fol- detum ent.
er inadequate
the black experience and simultaneously educate the black, as
well as the white of social use and not for social status
This so-called cultural center at ECU devs none ot the
above. Surely the university can do better. It's in times like
these when blacks are de-emphasized and overlooked that
someone must stand amid the crowd and take action.
This is Black History Month, and what an excellent time for
the student body, the chancellor and the Beauufication
Committee to examine this problem and do something about
it.
f FOCUS
By
i Steven Pierce
1 have long possessed a deep faith in the power ot praver
and education to bringabout change: change in status, change
in conditions, change in the way people think because
together we can bend the shackles that so easily beset us - as
long as we make strides forwa-d and not backward.
ricasc build us a rcal cultural center! Demolish that offen-
sive piece of junk behind the infirmary and show some justice
for black America. If done properly you can succeed in
bringing the black students more pride, the white students a
greater appreciation and the university as a whole a better
understanding of black culture and black history.
Student wonders why Student Store disbands computer sales center
A 1 � - i �. � L 1 . �-�. f �11 �� � r , - 4 -� r. r- ikr' fl . 1 � � � I "1 I � . � � . j
To the editor:
At times it seems the most illogical
things take place within an institution
dedicated to the development of
human learning and logic � such is
the case with the recent "shake-up" at
our campus bookstore. As of now, we
no longer have access to a computer
department with trained assistance.
That's right where other universi-
ties are pushing to make all their stu-
dents computer literate, our new
bookstore manager has axed three
experienced, full-time employees,
including the computer sales staff.
The computers are being cleared out.
Apparently this new manager is
one of those "efficiency experts" (self-
designated, I'm sure) who is deter-
mined to show his expertise by re-
placing full-time people with lower-
wage, part-time employees. Let's
look at this another way. The fast food
places also hire minimum wage, part-
time help. How many times have you
gotten an order screwed up by one of
the folks at the burger places? If it has
never happened to you, you probably
are a vegetarian. The fast-food places
only have about thirty items on the
menu. The bookstore has thousands
of different items. I rest my case.
In the business world there is a need
to keep an eye on the net profit the
so-called "bottom line It is, how-
ever, possible for a manager to have
his head stuck so far up his "bottom
line" that he can no longer see the
main objective service to the stu-
dents and faculty. Doing away with
the computer department and other
experienced staff positions seems to
be evidence of just such a problem.
I'm going to really miss some of
those people who have helped me
over the past years. Some of those let
go have been there for many years
and have helped thousands of us. I'm
sure their families will miss those jobs
as well.
William A. Robie Jr.
Graduate Student
History
Biased reporting
To the editor:
The actions of the media in recent
years have troubled me. And in the
past several months, the media have
attracted particular attention to them-
selves.
I am referring not to the pulp publi-
cations that shoulder up to us at gro-
cery checkout lines; I am talking
about those purveyors of public'
news, those guardians of our demo-
cratic right to know what is being
done to us by powers we cannot
touch. They are network news, the
weekly magazines, the daily tabloids:
CBS News, Time, The Washington
Post, and even The East Carolinian.
They are the media sources we count
on for honest, accurate, unbiased
reporting of the facts. If you laugh at
this remark, then welcome; you are as
skeptical (delete "cynical") as I. We
no longer expect the media to present
the bare, unadulterated facts. We
know the "facts" are very much de-
pendent on who's recording them.
We're not so naive as to believe every-
thing we read in the papers or see on
the news. We know better. But that
leaves some of us wondering what
exactly it is that we do know for a fact.
What do we really know about
Bush's involvement in the Iran arms-
for-hostages-and-money deal and
subsequent diversion of monies from
that deal to the Contras? Many of us
can hazard a guess about the former
CIA chief's role, but unless a criminal
investigation were to begin, we don't
really expect Bush to "reveal all" as
Jessica Hahn and others have done.
campus issues j
There's no profit in it for him Whv
blame the media? I haven t on this
account.
1 believe strongly in the freedom ot
the press. I also think that this needs
much clarification. I believe the me-
dia have a responsibility- to the public
to present the happenings ot the day
as accurately and completelv as pos-
sible. I believe that actions by public
officials acting in official capacities
are the domain of such public
scrutiny. The networks and publish-
ers pay good money for thorcugh
investigative reporting; we ought to
receive it.
The problem is, it seems that these
reporters are being paid to do more
than investigative things which tall
into the public domain. The problem
is, these reporters are presenting syn-
opses of the "facts" and spending a
good deal of energy interpreting the
facts from the biases of the networks.
See REPORTING, page 5
Nazi shmazi. McCrady, Mike Brady, Hardy,
hardly. C'mon guys, I've had just about enough
about who is a Nazi, what defines a communist,
what defines a liberal, what our U.S. Government
does on weekends, etc etc etc. Why do we have to
follow a party anyway?
I'm a proud Republican by party affiliation (but
not a college Republican), but I like to vote for the
best man when the time comes, and I'll reserve
judgment on just who that may be until the future.
Don't buy a Ford just because it is worth the money
and a good car. If Chevrolet is better, buy it. Get the
best car for your money, whichever that may be.
Many of us care, and it's not that I don't, but about all
this wasted ink in the Campus Forum, please see the
Campus Spectrum
by
Randy Mizelle
first line in Chippy Bonehead's weather article.
Change channels guys, ifs time to move on. You
guys are like "Andy Griffith" junkies, refusing to
watch any other show (which is bound to be better)
which is on at the same time. I've got the remote
control, so 111 do the honors. Let's see what is on the
East Carolina University channel.
How about Coach Mike Steele (a.ka. The Savi-
our)? Yes, I gave him the name and ifs catching on.
The All Pete Rose Team plays in Minges, baby. The
coach has the dome rockin even though we could
stand improvement in the height department. The
guys give 110 every game, which is all that counts,
though. Wait 'til next year.
How about the guy putting his resume on a bill-
board? Clever. Maybe I'll put the detailed account of
how I've lived off $80 a month for food for the last
two years on a billboard and pray someone feels
sorry for me, subsequently hiring yours truly. You
must admit, one must have motivation and drive to
look for the light past macaroni and cheese.
What about the parking problem? It was a prob-
lem five years ago, it is a problem today, and it will
be a problem five years from now. To be honest, I
ride a bike to college so it doesn't affect me in the
least. Now there's the solution, I park my less-than-
turbo-charged two-wheeler right in front of the
building I need to visit. Couldn't ask for a better
parking space. In any case, The East Carolinian
could write until is is blue in the print, but there is no
great solution for the parking problem except for a
deck, which never has gone over very well. Oh well,
grin and bear it.
Condoms in the dorms? Good idea, but as men-
tioned, they are available in the Student Health
Center if needed. Study distribution figures there,
then decide. It would be quite a convenience for the
illegal "sleep-overs" who can't leave until twelve
o'clock to be able to walk down the hall and purchase
AIDS control. Next, bartenders will be handing
them out at closing time. Hey, I might be on to
something here. Don't laugh, it may happen. Re-
member, you saw it here first.
Pirate Comix. Good idea, but you spelled it wrong.
Depression set in for me, however, when Man O
Stick was sent out to pasture. The comic page just
isn't the same without him, so 1 usually snip it.
The new classroom building? A beautiful piece ot
work. Wait a minute. What is this? Fifteen parking
spaces? Oh, no! Not again! Oh, well, it happens �
adding insult to injury. However, please make class
moves after spring semester, I'll be gone and it won't
affect me. Thanks.
Jimmy Buffett. Finally someone other than Charlie
Daniels. Thank you � a great move. However, I
couldn't go. One week of food is a little too much to
ask. That's 45 boxes of Kroger macaroni and cheese.
I can chow for the price of admission. Anyhow,
when I hitchhike to Florida, I'll see him in some
nightclub. Besides, I go to the basketball games for
free and my disc collection is paid for. Thirdly, Carla
got married on "Cheers a feat in itself. I think Eddie
needs my glasses.
I think we have good movies this semester. I
always forget about them and am occupying myself
in other ways. I used to take advantage of the free
admission, out when I continued to get pelted by
paper airplanes I decided Tom and Jerry wasn't
worth it. Some advice: sit in the balcony so you can
do the flying.
Baseball is coming. I'll be there, ESPN hat and all.
A bright spot, annually, in our sports program. Too
bad pizza and coolers are a thing of the past. The
inconveniences of legislation and red tape.
Meal tickets. When I had one you could erase the
pencil marks and get an extra meal. You could also
pass it back in line to some poor slob who had no
meal ticket, no money, and really wanted to eat in
Jones Cafeteria. Those were the good 'ole days. Now
they are computerized so T have heard, and they
have your picture on them. Technology sucks.
Drop-add. When I was an undergraduate, I had to
get in line at 4 a.m. to even have a prayer of getting
the card I needed for the class I wanted. People bitch
about the computerized system � if only they went
through the card system where the line went from
the TKE house to Memorial Gym. Oh, the wonders
of technology. The computer system is the greatest
thing since the "Drunk Bus
The Drunk Bus (the slang term used to describe the
weekend night transit that carried students home
who had a few too many to drink). Gone but not
forgotten. Budget cuts can kill. Saved many people
much money. Oh, well, Dependable Cab is in the
book.
Yes, I'm happy. For once I am praising most things
about ECU. I love ECU with good reason. My intra-
mural basketball team make the All Madden League
and is predicted 10th university-wide. All of this
promise from a team named the "Derelicts ECU is
great. We'll be lucky to win a game. Our center is
5'7 But we have that motivation and drive to on our
team, thanks to Kraft Dinners. With our diet we have
an advantage, which we'll need.
There you have it, you Nazis, conservatives, liber-
als, communists left wingers, right wingers, Jr. Jesse
Helms, next Mr. Reagans, wimpy George Bush
loving imcompetents, etc etc etc. The issues, baby.
Whats been done, what is needed, what will be
done. To me, the bottom line is what counts. If s what
you do, not say or look like.
I just hope the bottom line of this letter is at the
bottom line of page four so I won't have to look at
another page of garb.
Rep
1
publishers, or whomever. The
problem is, we can't possibly di-
gest the amount of information t�
we would need merely to stav b
abreast of present situations We
need a filter to screen out impor
tant newsand to put intocontexts,
both historical and social We are
hard pressed to make meaning
out of all the complexities De-
mocracy can't work if the repre
rented are uninformed It isn't a
democracy if we are misin-
formed. It becomes a mockery it
our leaders are spreading disin
formation. That's whv 1 believe
J
strongly in the freedom of the
press.
But how do we gain from a
media that seeks to sensational
lze? How do we gam from that
misrepresents the tacts- How do
we gain from a media that serves
its own ends and fosters pro!it
rivalry among its own? Who
gains from the disclosure of can
didates' sexual escapades? The
media. Who gains from the repre-
sention of a covert operation as
the overactive zeal of a tew patri-
otic individuals The media. Who
gains from a shouting match be
tvveeen the vice president and a
news anchor? The media. People
love drama. The media presents
drama. The people stav tuned.
What does The East Carolinian
have to do with this? We the
people cannot point the finger at a
media that dramatizes or at repre-
sentatives that disinform if we are
going to misrepresent the tacts in
our own publications. 1 am refer-
ring specifically to the Ian 28
sue featuring, a front page article
on Jesse Jackson's campaign
speech in Greenville last week.
The author did not paint a biased
picture; on that account, he did a
good job. He presented the mate-
rial objectively, as a reporter
should. However, the author
misquoted the candidate He
quoted Jackson as saying "When
we turn out the lights, it's amaz-
ing that we look the same in the
dark Jackson had actually
said: "Because all of us look ama ?
inglv similar when the lights gj
out'
The author failed to put mate
rial in its complete context He
wrote of Jackson's statement cfl
unity" in which the candidate
used the analogy of a quilt and al!
the patches that make up the quil!
This was accurate. But the author
failed to mention that Jackson had
used "patch" as a metaphor for
the limited resources and powers
of the individual. Jackson re-
peated that our "patchjesl ain't
big enough The quilt made ol
individual patches sewn togethei
became a metaphor for unity and
the "new majority'
Let's start presenting accurate
information at the campus level
Don Ru tied go
Graduate student
English
Contra aid
To the editor:
It amazes me that liberals stil
oppose aid to the Contras eve
after the Sandinistas have admit!
ted they plan to shred the Ana
Fcace Plan and, with the aid ot thj
USSR and Cuba, to spread
munism throughout Centra1
America Whv are liberals
ticularlv the Students for Ecd
nomic Democracy, still puttinl
up their anti-Contra propagandj
all over this campus (that is, who
they arc not tearing down the pr.
Contra posters)?!
Look, liberals, the cat is out d
the bag: it's now publicized ta
that the conservatives have Nxj
and are right and liberals ha
been and are wrong about ir
situation in Nicaragua all along
Roger Miranda Benegoechol
34, a former key Sandinista lead
and aide to Nicaraguan IVtenJ
Minister Humberto Ortega dl
fectcd a couple Of months ago atj
has effectively destroyed evej
liberal mvth about Nicaraguj
WacU
BRANDED
Greenville Buyers
Memorial Drive
X)pen Mon
Sunday �
TL .������'

�MNriMlNfl





equate
vato the black, as
� social status.
d �es none of the
ter. It's in times like
overlooked that
I take action.
in excellent time for
the Boautification
lo something about
cus
bn Pierce
power of prayer
. :n status,change
think because
- asily beset us-as
ackward.
demolish that offen-
iow some justice
u can succeed in
le, the white students a
; . hole a better
Sl rv.
enter
' for him. Why
1 haven't, on this
in the freedom of
- think that this needs
n I believe the me-
ihtv to the public
. penings of the day
ind completely as pos-
:t actions by public
g in official capacities
of such public
networks and publish-
money for thorough
rting; we ought to
" is, it seems that these
being paid to do more
native things which fall
lomain. The problem
"tors are presenting syn-
i the "facts" and spending a
al of energy interpreting the
m the biases of the networks,
REPORTING, page 5
ration
them. Technology sucks.
iwas an undergraduate, I had to
even have a prayer of getting
Ithe class I wanted. People bitch
fed system � if only they went
ptcm where the line went from
Jmonal Gym. Oh, the wonders
mputer system is the greatest
ik Bus
' slang term used to describe the
kit that carried students home
Imany to drink). Gone but not
ts can kill Saved many people
frell, Dependable Cab is in the
r once I am praising most things
-U with good reason. My intra-
n make the All Madden League
lh university-wide. All of this
named the "Derelicts ECU is
to win a game. Our center is
It motivation and drive to on our
' Dinners. With our diet we have
we'll need.
r ou Nazis, conservatives, liber-
wingers, right wingers, Jr. Jesse
leagans, wimpy George Bush
f, etc etc etc. The issues, baby,
pvhat is needed, what will be
)m line is what counts. If s what
?k like.
m line of this letter is at the
)ur so I won't have to look at
II

THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 2.1968 1
Reporting should be accurate and fair
publishers, or whomever. The
problem is, we can't possibly di-
gest the amount of information
we would need merely to stay
abreast of present situations. We
need a filter to screen out impor-
tant news and to put into contexts,
both historical and social. We are
hard pressed to make meaning
out of all the complexities. De-
mocracy can't work if the repre-
sented are uninformed. It isn't a
democracy if we are misin-
formed. It becomes a mockery if
our leaders are spreading disin-
formation. That's why I believe
strongly in the freedom of the
press.
But how do we gain from a
media that seeks to sensational-
ize? How do we gain from that
misrepresents the facts? How do
we gain from a media that serves
its own ends and fosters profit
rivalry among its own? Who
gains from the disclosure of can-
didates' sexual escapades? The
media. Who gains from the repre-
sention of a covert operation as
the overactive zeal of a few patri-
otic individuals? The media. Who
gains from a shouting match be-
tweeen the vice president and a
news anchor? The media. People
love drama. The media presents
drama. The people stay tuned.
What does The East Carolinian
have to do with this? We the
people cannot point the finger at a
media that dramatizes or at repre-
sentatives that disinform if we are
going to misrepresent the facts in
our own publications. I am refer-
ring specifically to the Jan. 28 is-
sue featuring a front page article
on Jesse Jackson's campaign
speech in Greenville last week.
The author did not paint a biased
picture; on that account, he did a
good job. He presented the mate-
rial objectively, as a reporter
should. However, the author
misquoted the candidate. He
quoted Jackson as saying, "When
we turn out the lights, it's amaz-
ing that we look the same in the
dark Jackson had actually
said: "Because all of us look amaz-
ingly similar when the lights go
out
The author failed to put mate-
rial in its complete context. He
wrote of Jackson's "statement of
unity" in which the candidate
' lsed the analogy of a quilt and all
the patches that make up the quilt.
This was accurate. But the author
failed to mention that Jackson had
used "patch" as a metaphor for
the limited resources and powers
of the individual. Jackson re-
peated that our "patchfesj ain't
big enough The quilt made of
individual patches sewn together
became a metaphor for unity and
the "new majority
Let's start presenting accurate
information at the campus level.
Don Rutledge
Graduate student
English
Contra aid
To the editor:
It amazes me that liberals still
oppose aid to the Contras even
after the Sandinistas have admit-
ted they plan to shred the Arias
Peace Plan and, with the aid of the
USSR and Cuba, to spread com-
munism throughout Central
America Why are liberals, par-
ticularly the Students for Eco-
nomic Democracy, still putting
up their anti-Contra propaganda
all over this campus (that is, when
they are not tearing down the pro-
Contra posters)?!
Look, liberals, the cat is out of
the bag: it's now publicized fact
that the conservatives have been
and are right and liberals have
been and are wrong about the
situation in Nicaragua all along
Roger Miranda Benegoechea,
34, a former key Sandinista leader
and aide to Nicaraguan Defense
Minister Humberto Ortega, de-
fected a couple of months ago and
has effectively destroyed every
liberal myth about Nicaragua.
Miranda revealed that the Sovi-
ets, the Cubans, and the Sandinis-
tas met in Managua in late Octo-
ber to:
1. defeat the Contras militarily;
2. funnel fresh military assis-
tance to the Marxist-Leninist
revolutionaries in El Salvador;
3. and help construct a 600,000
man Sandinista military.
And the amazing thingabout
these disclosures is that the
Sandinistas themselves have
openly admitted that they are
true The Sandinistas themselves
have proven that, once again,
conservatives are right and liber-
als are wrong (which is always the
case where communism is con-
cerned).
Now will you wake up to the
truth, liberals? Ifnot, when, when,
when? The truth is known: will
you accept it or continue to flatly
deny any reality that happens to
contradict your idealistic dreams
of Marxist paradise?
Scott Kirtland
Junior
Blades wrong
To the editor:
Walter Blades "No contras" let-
ter (Jan. 26), while thoughtfully
written and laudably pragmatic,
was nonetheless full of error.
Blades: "We don't have the
right to dominate the internal af-
fairs of another country I would
like to ask Blades if he supports
sanctions against South Africa?
Since he's a liberal, he surely
must. If he does, I would like to
know why he thinks that we have
no right to "dominate the internal
affairs" of Nicaragua, but at the
same time, that we have every
right to dominate the internal af-
fairs of South Africa? How can
liberals in general take such si-
multaneous, contradictory posi-
tions?
Shouldn't the U.S. be against
ALL forms of oppression,
whether the oppression in ques-
tion is Apartheid or Commu-
nism? Especially when the coun-
tries in question are vitally impor-
tant to future U.S. national secu-
rity? (Of course, the failures of the
liberals' sanctions against S. Af-
rica to dismantle Apartheid are
another matter.)
Blades: "During the Somoza
dictatorship, there was tremen-
dous poverty and inequality in
Nicaragua, thus the revolution
and thus the Soviet presence
What liberals like Blades refuse to
admit, however, is that the pov-
erty and inequality under the
Communist Sandinistas is far
worse than in the days of Somoza.
They refuse to listen to the warn-
ings of Nicaraguan citizens: "It's
much worse now. We didn't have
honest elections in the time of
Somoza, but at least the people
had food" (Myriam Arguello
Morales); "With all my heart, I tell
you it is worse now than it was in
the times of Somoza dictatorship"
(Violetta Chamorro).
It should be noted that both of
these women lead in the fight
against Somoza. You see, compar-
ing a right-wing dictatorship like
Somoza's with a Communist dic-
tatorship like Ortega's is like
comparing a hangnail with a
malignant brain-tumor
Blades: "What are the real in-
tentions of the Sandinistas?" As if
we already didn't know. As if
hearing what they plan to do
straight from the Sandinistas'
mouths is not enough! Look,
Blades and all other liberals,
Sandinista defector Roger Mi-
randa has already revealed and
the Sandinistas have already
admitted what their "real inten-
tions" are. They plan to shred the
Arias Peace Plan by building a
huge army, defeating the Contras
militarily, and exporting Com-
munist revolution to other Cen-
tral American countries. This is
what they have admitted to
doing, and this is what Contras
supporters have been trying to tell
the liberals all along.
And liberals still won't listen,
even when the Sandinistas them-
selves have revealed their inten-
tions! Unbelievable, intentional
ignorance
Blades: "But we've never ever
given the Sandinistas a chance
Wrong! We have been giving the
Sandinistas chances for years to
prove their honesty, and they
have proven to be liars, just as one
would expect revolution-minded
Commurists to be. In 1979, the
Sandinistas signed a pledge to the
Organ! i.ion of American States
to form a "New Nicaragua, a
democratic state" and insure "the
right of all Nicaraguans to politi-
cal participation without ideo-
logical discrimination They
have had almost ten years to fulfill
these promises.
And guess what, sports fans?
Now we know through their own
words that they have no inten-
tions of complying with either the
1979 or Arias Peace Plans, no
matter how many chances we
give them.
Blades: "The Nicaraguans
should decide the future of their
own country Exactly! That's
precisely why we should help the
Contras, native sons of Nicara-
gua, decide the future of their
own country, not the Soviet
Union!
None of the liberal anti-Contra
arguments are logical or realistic.
None.
Ray Alban
Senior
Marketing
Bern again
To the editor:
Bern McCrady's Jan. 21 letter
("Former writer attacks the right
with biting comments") was the
most hypocritical, error-filled lib-
eral tirade I've ever read.
All I've got to say about
McCrady's McCarthyish name-
calling and labeling is that it can
do nothing but make liberals on
this campus look bad. And if I was
one of the liberals still at this
campus, I would be angry and
upset by his lib-embarrasing tan-
trums.
McCrady viciously attacks 1fhe
Contras and Pat Robertson. Con-
cerning the former: it amazes me
that McCrady continues to blast
and lie about the Contras, hysteri-
cally proclaiming the same igno-
rant liberal baloney that the Con-
tras are the real villains in Nicara-
gua.
For crying out loud, liberals,
Sandinista defector Miranda has
revealed and the Sandinistas
themselves have admitted that
they have no intentions of com-
plying with Arias Peace Plan and
that they are trying to spread
Communism throughout Central
America. It seems pretty darn
stupid not to want to aid the
Contras in light of these facts.
Hard-line conservative anti-
Comminists have always been
right when it comes to the nature,
activities and goals of Communist
regimes; on i. other hand, Marx-
ist-sympath���.� liberals like
McCrady have always been
wrong.
Why in the world would any
thinking person listen to a liberal
making claims about the commu-
nist-fighting Contras giver their
always wrongnever right i vX: - rd
about communism?
Look, everybody, the Sandinis-
tas are Marxist-Leninist revolu-
tionaries whose goals are the con-
solidation of a Soviet client sta te in
our hemisphere and the exporting
of Communist revolution.
Miranda's revelations, quotes
from the Sandinista leaders, and
the massive Soviet militaryeco-
nomic 2xpenditures in our own
hemisphere all underscore these
two Communist goals.
McCrady demonstrated unpar-
alleled ignorance and intolerance
through his vicious and un-
founded attack on Pat Robertson.
McCrady claims that Robertson
has "fattened his wallet like other
TV Jesus freaks implying that he
is anefV��" Jim Bakker that grew
rich off the money sent in by
unknowing people. McCrady is
wrong. The financial records of
CBN Communications Network,
which Robertson founded, are
open to the public for anyone to
study. Robertson has never made
a dishonest cent off any of his
organizations or ministries.
Maybe McCrady is claiming to
know something the IRS doesn't?
McCrady claims that Roberston
has no integrity because he got his
girlfriend pregnant 30 years ago.
Well, maybe McCrady thinks he
himself is perfect, but all the rest
of us do make mistakes. What
McCrady doesn't seem to realize
is that Robertson married his girl-
friend and has remained faithful
to her for over 30 years. Yes, he did
make a mistake, but one for which
he is repentent and one for which
he took full responsibility.
I wonder if McCrady would
have acted as responsibly as
Robertson in the same situation. I
wonder if he, being pro-abortion,
would have persuaded his girl-
friend to kill their baby. Now
murder is real integrity, I must
say.
Finally, McCrady claims that
Robertson is not compassionate
and that he "attacks Jews What
incredible nonsense.
Would someone that "attacks
Jews" have received the National
Merit Award from the National
Council of Christians and Jews?
Robertson did. Would someone
that is not compassionate sell
everything he owned to live with
the poverty-stricken, downtrod-
den, urban ghetto blacks of the
Bedford-Stuyvesant area of New
York City? Roberston did. Would
someone that is not compassion-
ate have, in the last two years
alone, helped over 15 million
destitute, homeless, uneducated,
needy people from every color,
race and creed under the sun?
Robertson did.
Michael A. Alban
Sophomore
No Contras
To the editor:
"A number of us feel we have a
moral obligation not to hang the
Contras out to dry' Rep. Thomas
Carper is quoted as saying in
support of giving them $10 mil-
lion more next quarter.
Some of us feel that much wor-
thier people have been killed with
minimal attention from our gov-
ernment � Nicaraguan health
workers, teachers, community
leaders, families, for example.
(Why attack soldiers when if s so
much safer to attack civilians?)
And how about Guatemalan Indi-
ans, killed or driven out of their
homes by the thousands of Salva-
dorans bombed by their "demo-
cratic government and made refu-
gees from their own country?
The Nicaraguans got rid of
Somoza without any U.S. mil-
lions. If the Contras can't get by
for a measly three months of ne-
gotiation on the fat they've accu-
mulated, let them dry up!
Edith Webber
Emeritus
English
Jean Hopper, Owner
355-5866
Parents and Students
Let us show you
RINGGOLD TOWERS
At The Campus � East Carolina University
�Towers located at 7th & Cotanche
Streets surrounded on three sides by
campus.
�Towers closer to both downtown and
classrooms than many ECU
dormitories.
�Designed for student appeal and
affordability.
�Each unit is completely furnished
except linens.
�On site management.
�Excellent financing.
Call for details
"WE'LL DO YOU HOMEWORK"
- � �
RACK ROOM SHOES,
A103
Art and reason
When Mark and I decided to spend
the weekend at his mother's house,
I never imagined I would be walking
into a mouse's nightmare. There were
cats everywhere.
Cat plaques, cat statues, cat clocks,
even a cat mat. 1 couldn't begin to dupli-
cate her collection of kitty litter if 1 spent
a year at a garage sale. Conspicuously'
absent, however, was a real cat. Strange,
I thought, and began to fear that a
weekend with cat woman could be a
lot less than purr-feet
Hut then she came home, and
Mark introduced her. She was
dressed surprisingly well�no
leopard pants. In fact, you
could sav she was the cat s meow;
but Id rather not.
She offered me a cup of Dutch Choc-
olate Mint. Now that was something
I could relate to. Then she brought it
out in the most beautiful, distinctly
iintelinc china Id ever seen. As we
sipped, I found out that Mrs. Campbell
has my same weakness for chocolate,
loves the theater as much as I do, but,
incredibly never saw "Cats So Mark
and I are taking her next month.
t
BRANDED SHOES
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
10
OFF
MonSat. 10-9
Sunday 1-6
Open
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(EXCEPT AIGNER NIKE AND REEBOK)
natter"1
j
General Foods International Coffees.
Share the feeling.
It�wrr�l FtNxisf i
�Afc ifriaiu
mtm
im& " �?"��





li
.

Classifieds
HELP WANTED
NOW ACCEPTING applications for
counselors, a waterfront director, and
assistant swim instructors. Friendly Day
( amp is a summer camp for mentally and
physically handicapped children and
adults Please write or call: The Special
Populations Program, P.O. Box 590,
Raleigh, NC 27602 - (9l9)-755-6832.
BAR MAIDS WANTED: p-time no exp.
nee will train, must be 21 vrs. old ee
tips Call 578 0058 Ak for jack or Ray.
ItCCOl MING ASSISTANT: Gain
experience in small business accounting
operations Must have basic accounting
and typing skills. 15-20 hours Schedule
� g Send Resume' to 3010 C 10th Street.
enville NC
HUP WANTED: Part time Interior
Design Student Send Resume to . De-
signer, aOlOEast 10th St Greenville, NC.
PI RSONAL CARE ATTENDANT: in
exchange tor tree room and board in a
nice 2 bedroom. 2 bath house Will need 3
2 4 hvHirs work per Jav, 7davs a week.
I ocated 12 miles outside of town Call oy
ster at 7-k-v 2588, 746-3513 or 758-2399.
BUCCANEER: needs someone to assist
tographer during portraits. Feb. 8-12
Fob 15-19. Everday between 9-5.
mum Wage If interested call 757-
v OUNSELOR POSTITIONS ACT1V-
1T SPECIALISTS: CAMP STARLIGHT
N STARLIGHT PA Now has openings
f r qualified, outgoing upperclassmen
nen as CABIN COUNSELORS,
LEADERS INSTRUCTORS in most Ac-
tivity Areas I AND SPORTS, TENNIS,
GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, SAILING.
CANOEING WATER SKIING, NA-
1. MUSIC. DRAMA, STAGE, ARTS
CRAFTS; working with a mature staff
f 100 counselors from the U.S. and
and on a 385 acre campus with excel-
lent facilities 6 '23-8 23 Internships en-
couraged Write IS Clinton St Malverne,
N 11565 or call 516-599-5239 or cadi ECU
Co-op office 77-67
HE ON T.Y Main needed for commer-
- Details 0) 805-687-6000 Ext. TV-
1166
INTONE INTERESTED: In writing for
the Buccaneer Yearbook. Please call 757-
6501 or stap by the Buccaneer office. A
full time position mav be considered
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION
AND PARKS DEPARTMENT: Is recruit
for indoor soccer coaches. The pro-
gram will begin in March and the hours of
work will vary, 3.30-9:00 PM, Monday
through Friday and 10:00 AM to 4.00 PM
on Saturdays, working approximately 20
� lours per week. The program will last
about eleven weeks Some soccer back-
ground is required. ou will need to teach
�Hccer fundamentals, team play, and
strategies to youngsters ages 5 through 15.
Rate of pav will be S3.55 to S3.85 per hour.
Minimum age is 16. Contact Ben James at
B30-4543 for more information.
DISABLED GRADUATE STUDENT:
Needs Prime Physical Assistant. Contact
Mary at 752-2994.
MALE NEEDED FOR SALES AND
STOCK: Part-time. Neat and out going.
No phone calls. Apply at the Youth Shop
Carolina East Mall
SERVICES OFFERED
SOUND MIXTURES: D.J. Service Ls back
in Greenville! Back with more equipment,
more experience, and even better sound
quality. For more info don't hesitate to
call 752-4916, Bob.
ECU: Don't be white during Spring Break
- Tan now Great Speicals! Call California
Tanning Salon Today 355-7858!
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24 hours
in and out. Guaranteed typing on paper up
to 20 hand written pages. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville. Nc 752-3694.
ECU: For the Best Tan - The Best Service -
The Best Deal - Start Spring Break Early
Call California Tanning Today 355-7858.
MID WINTER BOP: The original is still
here. Old Wax. New Wax. The TRASH-
MAN DJ service. Approved by thousands.
Discover it. Bashes, Formals, Mixers, So-
cials, ectDial 752-3587 Anytime. Many
Thanx.
MASSAGE CLINIC: Got anv aching
muscles or joints? Come get a massage
from the physical therapv students on
February 2 between 5:30 - 9:30 pm. We are
located in the Physical Therapy Lab in the
Allied 1 lealth Building. Advanced rickets
are SI 00 and SI .25 at the door.
ECU: For the Best Tan - The Best Service -
The Best Deal - Start Spring Break Early.
Call California Tanning Today 355-7858.
FOR SALE
IS IT TRUE YOU CAN BUY JEEPS: for
S44 through the U.S. government? Get
the facts today! Oil 1-312-742-1142 Ext.
5271-A.
SPRING BREAK 1988: South Padre OR
Davtona Deluxe Condos or Hotel AC-
COMMODATION Starting at Low
SI49.00 Per Person for 7 Nights. CALL 1-
800-222-4139. Transportation Avail-
able.
SCHWTNN PRELUDE: 23" Columbus
Frame Diacompe Braking, Sugino
Crank, Sis Gearing and Weinman Rims.
8 Months Old. 325.00 Neg Call Chris
752-5157.
WORDSTAR
(Direct from Manufacturer)
Wordstar 3.31 - $55
Wordstar Professional
3.31 $70
Wordstar Professional
Release 4.0- $120
Release 4.0, Updates
from any version - $89
Wordstar 2000 Plus
Release 3.0- $149
Wordstar 2000 Plus
Rel. 3.0 Updates - $89
Phone - 312-490-0092
1982 HONDA CIVIC: Excellent condi
tion 5-speed AC AMFM One owner
$2500 756-6675 after 6 559-5158 8 to 5.
CAN YOU BUY JEEPS. Cars, 4 X 4's
Seized in drug raids for under $100.00?
Call for facts today. 602-837-3401. Ext.
711.
FOR SALE: Electric Typewriter, Excel-
lent condition. Great for student use.
$35.00. 757-3895 - evenings.
RED HOT BARGINS: Drug dealers
cars, boats, planes repo'd. Surplus. Your
Area. Buyers Guide. (1) 805 b87-6(XX)
Ext. S-1166.
ECU: For the Best Tan The Best Service
-The Best Deal - Start Spring Break
Early. Call California Tanning Today.
355-7858.
WATER BED: $100.00. Complete with
heater, liner & frame. Call Dan at 756-
9694 or 758-1626.
FOR SALE: 1970 Sunbird - runs - only
$300.00. Call 752-7481, Leave message.
TeleVideo XL
I
;loy
IBM Compatible
�Keyboard
�Monitor
�u� 'Graphics
PORTABLE &fjc;0
�Limited Quantity S � "
$850
IBM
Compa
PC
Compatible Ji �.
�Monitor TWO Drives
�Printer Port �Keyboard
Take die Multi and run.
Multispeed
�IdM Cbnpaltib
�8 M4 77 MHZ Clock
�MOKRAM
TWo 3 I IT 710 K Dnvca
�Printer. Semi. RGB Porto
�Super TVtot LCD Dwpkty
�M Cad Bolkrr Pftek
NEC $1399
NEW LOWER PRICING
ON THE
TOSHIBA LAPTOPS
$1598 (r-53i$3080
T-llOO
T-310O
SDF COMPUTERS
106 E. 5th. St. (Beside Cubbies)
Greenville 752-3694
ROOM FOR RENT: $125.00 per month
No deposit. On campus bus route. 1.2
miles from campus. Call 1-800-682-1331
or 758-2948. Ask for William.
2 ROOMMATES NEEDED: To share
room in Wildwood Villas. $125 each
plus utilities. Call Julie 752-4781.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male non-
smoker to share two bedroom apt. Rent -
$152.50, plus 12 utilities, phone and
cable. Call 830-0287. Ask for Jeff.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
share 2 bedroom apt. at Eastbrook. $155 a
month utilities. For more info. Call 758-
7967 and leave a message.
FOR RENT: Condo - 2 bedroom, 1 12
bath, fireplace. Washer & Dryer, Like
New Shuttle bus access. Only $355
month.
ROOMMATE (S) WANTED: 3 bedroom
house, Fenced-in yard, 15 minutes from
campus pets OK, rent and utilities reason
able lots of storage space 758-6998.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: 13
rent, 1 3 utilities, 3 bedroom apt. 1 bath &
1 2 bath. 1 3 deposit required. Tar River
Estates. Call Tommic at 752-1321.
R1NGGOLD TOWERS: Apts for rent.
Furnished. Contact I lollieSimonowich at
752-2865.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Immediately - Roomy, 2 bedroom.
Townhouse $167.50 per month plus 12
utilities. No deposit required Call 752-
7662.
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All Now �
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5ih Street
�Located Near ECU
�Neat Major Shopping Centers
�Aiross From Highway Patrol Station
Limited Offer � $275 a month
Contact J. T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office otx-n - Apt 8, 12 - 5.30 p.m.
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean anil quiet one rx-iiroom furnished
apartments, mcry efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $195 a month. 6
month lease. MOBILE HOME RENTALS -
couples or singles. Apartment and mobile
homes tn As.dlt-a Gardens near Brook Valley
County Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
PERSONALS
FOR RENT
ROOMATE NEEDED: To share 2 bed
room apt at Kings Row Apt. 1 2 Rent
Utilities. No deposit required. Contact
Danny 758-7356 if interested.
BEVERLY MANOR APARTMENTS:
Now leasing spacious 2 bedroom units
with large living room and dining area.
New Capet; new wallpaper in kitchen
and bath. Range and refrigerator pro-
vided Central heatair, coldhot water
and basic cable T.V. included in rent. As
low as $335.00 per month. 756-5155
days, 746-2058 evenings for appoint-
ment.
ROOMMATE WANTED: to share 3
bedroom apt. $98 a month, 13 utilities.
Call Gary or Steve 758-1573.
SHARON LEWIS: Yo, BABY! Look out
Thursday night girl because we are Hit-
tin' the Town. So Dress to impress be-
cause our First night out will be one to
remember Yours Truely, Y.S.A. J.P.R.
LESLEY HARRIS: We just wanted to
thank you for a great year as President.
We love you and think you did a terrific
job! Love, the Sisters and pledges of Delta
Zeta
IT'S THE ALL GREEK GONG SHOW:
To be held on March 1, only three days
before everyone heads for the sun. "A
night on the Town" for the Grand Prize
Winner, A Limo, A Keg, Free drinks, and
Dinner. All Frats and Sororities dig up an
act you thinks best and be ready to put our
judges, Tom 1 layes, Elmer Meyer and
Coach Mike Steele to the test. Stay Tuned
For More Info.
THE BROADCASTING HONOR
SOCIETY: will hold a meeting on Wed
"F eb 3 at 5:00 in Room 234 at the library. 2.5
g.p.a. to be eligable.
SHARI: What happend to the Broncos!
Or should we ask what happened to all
the beer! Anneleigh & Maria.
JEFF, SHAY, REEVES, TY, BRUCE:
Last minute plans were the best on hand.
The superbuzz could not have been more
fun. Expecially considering the best team
won! Thanks for a great, interesting eve-
ning. Anneleigh, Shari St. Maria.
ARE WOMEN EXPLOITED: through
pornography or is it an art form which
provides freedom of expression, pro-
tected under the constitution? Come see
the fiery debate bewteen pom star and
High Society publisher, Gloria Leonard,
vs. founding member of N.O.W. and
Women Against Pornography, Dolores
Alexander on Feb. 9th at 8 p.m. 1 lendrix
Theatre. Tickets $3 students, $4 Faculty
Staff. $5 public. Available at Central
Ticket Office. Mendenhall. Sponsored by:
Student Union Forum Committee.
RICH THURSTON: This is your per-
sonal Thanks for breakfast last week I'm
sorry if 1 messed up your diet. Elizabeth.
THE SISTERS AND PLEDGES OF
DELTA ZETA would like to congratulate
the following on their new offices: Liz
Wooten, President; Tracy Grimaldi, VP in
charge of Rush; Melissa Tucker, VP in
charge of Pledge Education; and Beth
Hopkins, Treasurer. We love you and
know you will all do great
THE LAST WORD: In Metal, First. Met-
alshop 122-0-4. 12-4 Friday and Saturday
Nights. 91.3 WZMB.
TO THE PIKA PLEDGES: Good luck
and we're behind you all the way! Love
the lil sis.
THE NEW DELI WANTS YOU: to jam
like you ain't jammed before! Catch the
infamous BAD CIIECKS with the FLAT
DUO JETS Thursday, don't dare miss
WIDESPREAD PANIC Friday, and come
hear ROLLY GRAY & SUNFIRE. Satur-
day, mon.
IF YOU LOVE MEXICAN FOOD: Don't
miss fiesta Frande at OFF THE CUFF
Wednesday with free taco-n-nacho Bar
and SI.50 Mexican imports with $2.00
marquritas.
GARY HART FOR PRESIDENT: Let the
People Decide! You can participate in his
grass roots campaign for the N.C. Presi-
dential Primary on March 8th. For any
questions or further information call Bob
at 758-2570.
WEDNESDAY: Make it happen at you
best hump-Day Happy Hour OFF THE
CUFF. (iiiti -
MARY FORDHAM: Roses are red, vio-
lets are blue, on Feb. 4th, you'll be 21 too!
I lappy Birthday - Love, a Fellow Repub-
lican. (Go Bob Dole, Yea!)
CONGRATULATIONS TO KRIS
KELLY New Vice President of
Panhellenic. We're proud of you and
know you'll do a great job! Love, the
Sigmas.
SIG EPS: Thanks so much for having us
over last Sunday to celebrate your new
pledges! Nuclear Waste III and card
search we're a blast! Glad we were aU
there to enjoy the fun. Let's do it again real
soon! Love, the Sigmas.
SEE ONLY THE FINEST: Looking sen-
ioritas at Feista Frande at OFF THE CUFF.
ROBERTO: Says come see me
PHI TAU LITTLE SISTERS: Mandatory
Meeting Wednesday night at 900 p.m.
All old and new little sisters need to be
there if you plan to be active this
semester, Amanda
CHI OMEGA: Terri, Christy, Dawn,
Beth, Samantha, & Celia; 1 lang in there,
We love you the sisters.
SIG EPS � The Super Bowl party wJS
awsome nice game Denver Ha Oh
well, see ya next year.
PHI TAU LITTLE SISTERS: Would like
to welcome the new brother and little
sister pledges to the family Enjoy the
Best!
CAM WARD: You did it for us a job well
done. We know you'll be great cause
your 1 Watch out Panhellenic Cams
Pres. now. We're SO proud of von You
wise old owl.
KA'S: 10 more days and counting 1 ove
the Chi-Crs.
YES HAPPY CAMPERS: It's time again
to rejoice. The Red 1 louse is inviting you
for another night of Karma and fun, and
the celebration will last 'till the dawn of
the sun. No birthdays this time, but we
now have a I lappy Camper Tree, and on
Sat. The 6th, Babs, Bev and Gina are hav-
ing another bush, so party with us and
you'll see! donations.
COME SEE THE STAR: of the X rated
film classic "Misty Beethoven Gloria
Leonard, defend pornagraphy, while the
founder of Women Against Pornagra
phy, Dolores Alexander, condemns it
This hot debate will take place in Hendrix
Theatre, Feb. 9th at 8 p.m. Tickets are S3
students, $4 FacultyStaff, S5 public
Available at Central Ticket Office Me
nedhall. Sponsored by Student Union
Forum committee.
STUDENTS INTERESTED IN
TRAVEL: The Student Union Travel
Comm. is having a meeting to deade on
trips for next year. Come & give us your
input. The meeting Ls Feb. 2 at 5 pm in
Mendenhall Call 757-6611 ext 210 for
more info.
FOUND: Necklace found near Garrett
and Fletcher dorms. Please call 756-2082
(Randy).
Designers of Travel
Ask around and you will ftnd out iha ECU
Hex ked the Hawaiian Inn last yrar Lets
do It again Spring Brrakk '88 Call Todd
758 931 1 or Daw 7S7-3SI6
Love Lines
unitreturn to
The "East Carolinian
for Valentine s (Day
"Watch for details.
Announcements
rORXOGRAPY DEBATE
Pom star Gloria Leonard will be debat-
he founder of Women Against Por-
aphy on Feb. 9 at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
atre Some of the issues to be dis-
ced will be sexual oppression vs. artis-
treedom. Tickets infor available at the
rttrai Ticket office in Mendenhall. 757-
ext. 266. Sponsored by the Student
ion Forum Committee
GAMMA BETA PHI
The National Gamma Beta Phi Honor
Society will hold a meeting Feb. 2 at 7pm
Jenkins Auditorium. Attendance is
�indatory!
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
There will be a meeting on Feb. 2 at 5
p m in Mendenhall to decide on the trips
scheduled for the '8889 school year.
Everyone is welcome. Call 757-6611 ext.
210 for more info.
PHYSICAL ED. TEST
.ae Physical Education Motor and
Physical Fitness Competency Test is
scheduled for Friday Feb. 5, 1 p.m. at
ges Coliseum. A passing score on this
test is required of all students prior to
declaring physical education as a major.
Maintaining an average T-score of 45 on
the six item test battery and having a T-
s re of 45 on the aerobics run is
required.Of anyone has any medical con-
dition that would con train dicate partici-
pation in the testing should contact Mike
McCammon or Mitch Craib at 757-6497.
ASSERTIVENESS
A three part workshop offered to stu-
dents at no cost by the University Coun-
seling Center will be held Jan. 28 and Feb.
1 & 11. All three sessions will be con-
ducted from 3-4 P.M. in 312 Wright
tn.ilding.Leam how to express your-
selves directly and openly and sharpen
your interpersonal skills. Please call the
Counseling Center at 757-6661 for Regis-
tration.
Registration for intramural Tube Polo
will be held on Feb. 3 at 6 p.m. in MG102.
For more informatkn call 757-6387.
MALE SUBTECTg NEEPEP
Men ages 18-34 are needed for a study
at the ECU human performance labera-
tory. Subjects will be paid $25, receive a
copy of their resting ECG, have their per-
cent bady fat assessed, and have their
oxygen uptake measured. In return, sub-
jects will have to complete two moder-
ately paced downhill runs. Runners and
serious weight lifters should not apply.
Call Mitch Craib at 757-6497 or 752-5867
or come by the Human Performance
Laboratory at 113 Minges Coliseum and
speak to Mitch Craib.
DIVE CLUB
There will be a meeting on Thurs. Feb.
4 at 7 p.m. in Mendenhall rooms 8D, E, and
F. We are Key West Bound. Those inter-
ested should join us at the meeting. Every-
one is invited.
COFFEEHOUSE
The Coffeehouse is holding auditions
for interested bands and musicians to
perform in the Coffeehouse Underground
- Mendenhall. Registration forms may be
obtained in Rm. 234 Mendenhall. Audi-
tions will by Friday, Feb. 5 at 8 pm. Free
admission - open to the public.
SAVE THOSE WRAPPERS
Deposit all empty Sticklets Natural
Flavor Gum packs and Doritos Brand
Cool Ranch flavor tortilla chip bags in the
U. S. College Comedy Competition dis-
plays located in the Student Book Store
lobby and Mendenhall. ECU could win a
free comedy concert if we collect the most
wrappers.
PIANIST
The ECU Performing Arts Series pres-
ents internationally acclaimed pianist
Eugene Istomin on Thurs, Feb. 11, at 8pm
in Wright Auditorium. A trio formed with
Isaac Stan, Leonard Rose, And Mr. Is-
tomin collected a Grammy Award in 1971
for Best Chamber Musk Performance.
Ticketscan be purchased at the Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter, or by calling 757-6611 ext. 266.
JAZZ
The Performing Arts Series at ECU is
proud to present Richard Stoltzman and
Woody Herman's Thudering Herd in, "A
Tribute to Woody on Thurs. Feb. 11 at
8:00pm in Wright Auditorium. Under the
direction of Frank Tiberim, the Thunder-
ing Herd will perform many of the works
with which it is associated. From "Cal-
donia to "Ebony Concerto Tickets can
be purchased at the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center. 757-6611 ext.
266.
BALLET
The Atlanta Ballet will perform in
Wright Auditorium on Tues, Feb. 16, at
8pm. Induded in the evening's program
are two new works: "Reflections For by
Artistic director Robert Barnett and an
untitled work by Lisa De Ribere. Tickets
available at Central Ticket Office in Men-
denhall Student Center.
RACOUETBALL
Registration for intramural racquetball
will be held February 10 at 6 p.m in MG 102.
For more information call 757-6387.
FREE THROW
Registration for the free throw compe-
tition will be held on February 2 from 3
p.m. - 5 p.m. and 7 p.m 9 p.m. in MG. For
more information call 757-6387.
CANOE CLINIC
Registration for the Intramural Out-
door Recreation Canoe Clinic will be held
from February 1-February 15. Activity
dates will be on Feb. 16 and Feb. 18. For
more information call 757-6387.
BACKPACKING CLINIC
Registration for the Intramural Out-
door Recreation Backpacking Clinic will
be from Feb. 8-Feb. 22. The Activity date
will be on Feb. 24 at 6 p.m. For more
information call 757-6387.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
There will be meetings every Thursday
at 6:00 in the culture center. Everybody
welcome.
TTX
Fellowship of Christian Athletes will
meet Tuesday nights at 9:30 p.m. at the
Pirate Club.
CRISIS INTERVENTION
We need your experience. Your
achievements in everyday situations can
be useful to others. Earn that feeling of
accomplishment. Real Crisis Center is
recruiting volunteer crisis counselors. We
wil be offering training classes in this
enriching field beginning February 8. call
758-HELP or come by 312 East 10th Street.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
The ECU College Republicans will
meet every Tuesday night in room 221
Mendenhall at 7 p.m. Call 758-5775 or 752-
3587.
PAT ROBERTSON
Students who would like to help with
getting M.G. "Pat" Robertson elected
President, contact Justin Sturz at 758-2047.
Organizational meeting will be held soon.
BROADCASTING SOCIETY
The Broadcasting Honor Society will
hold a meeting on Wednesday, February 3
at 5:00 in room 234 at the Library. You
must have a 2.5 gpa to be eligible.
RUNNING CLUB
There will be a meeting on Wednesday,
Jan. 3 at 5 p.m. in Memorial Gym, room
105-C. All runners beginnner to advanced
are invited to attend. Plans will be made
for the Shamrock Marathon in Virgina
Beach, V A in March. For more info contact
Hugh at 355-3759.
FQRENSICS
There will be a Forensics meeting on
Wednesday, February 3,1988 in room 211
of the Theatre Arts Building. Anyone in-
terested may attend.
WOMEN'S FRISBEE CLUB
There will be a meeting on Wednesday,
February 3 at 9:00 p.m. in Mendenhall
room 248 for anyone interested in joining
the Women's Frisbee dub. For more In-
formation call Gigi at 752-7578 or Hiedi at
758-6415.
COFFEEHOUSE
Applications are being accepted for
Coffeehouse Committee members. Any-
one is eligible to apply. Come by 234
Mendenhall for more details.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda will be showing a film
concerning Parliamentary Proceduren on
Wednesday, February 3 at 3:00 p.m. in
Rawl 302. Phi Beta Lambda is open to all
Business-related majors and new mem-
bers are welcome.
ART MATORS
The Student Union Special Events
Committee is looking for students to draw
characatures during Barefoot On The
Mall. We will pay $100.00 apiece to the two
best characature artists we find. Those
interested in auditioning please contact
Lynn Jobes at the Student Union Program
office at 757-6611, ext. 272.
ECU AMBASSADOR
There will be a meeting on Wednesday,
February 3, at 5:15 p.m. in the Multi-pur-
pose room in Mendenhall.
CAMPUS GIRL SCOT ITS
New meting schedule: Every Tuesday
at 6:00 p.m. in Mendenhall. We will wel-
come new members. Call Nancy at 551-
2583 from 8:00-5:00 p.m.
ECHO
ECHO will have its first business meet-
ing on Thursday, February 4 at 5:00 p.m.
in the Honors Lounge in Ragsdale. Elec-
tions will be held and activities for the
semester will be planned.
SJED.
Students for Economic Democracy will
meet every Sunday from 7:00 pjn. in
Mendenhall 8-D. For more information,
call 758-9760 or 746-6049.
CAMPUS MINISTRIES
Worship God and celebrate Commun-
ion mis Wednesday night at 5:00 p.m. at
the Methodist Student Center. Also avail
able: all-you-can-eat meal which is $2.00
at the door, $1.50 in advance. Call 758-2030
for reservations. Sponsored by Presbyte
rian and Methodist Campus Ministries.
ALPHA EPSILON DPI TA
Alpha Epsilon Delta, the premedical
Honor Society, will have a meeting on
Tuesday, February 2 at 7:00 in Flanagan
307. The guest speakers will be Veterinar
ian Dr. A.G. Thompson Members,
pledges, and guests are encouraged to
attend.
ECU FRISBEE CM IB
There will be practice every Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday at 2:30 on In-
tramural Fields 5 and 6 behind Minges
Colliseum and on Sunday at 2:00. New
players welcome.
COOPER ATTVF FD,
If you are work-study eligible, you may
be interested in a job off-campus this
semester or in the summer or fall of 1988.
Please contact the Cooperative Education
office, 312 Rawl Building for further in-
formation.
GARY HART
You can participate in Gary Hart's
grass roots campaign for the N.C Presi-
dential Primary on March 8. For any ques-
tions or further information, please call
Bob at 758-2570.
m NAACP
The ECU chapter of the NAACP will be
held on Thursday, February 4,1988 in the
Cultural Center at 5:00. All committee
chairpersons should be present in addi-
tion to all interested students.
RHO BESILQM
The Rho Epsilon chapter of ECU wel-
comes Craig Ralph to ECU. Mr. Ralph of
Ralph k Associates will be giving a pres-
oitetion on Corporate and Commerdal
Real Estate. All Rho Epsilon members and
"Oersted students and faculty are encour-
aged to attend on Monday, February 8 at
5:00 pjn in room 212 mendenhalL
ECU
ECU Ncwi lutua
East Carolina University
recognize and honor tour vetc
public school teachers in the
Tuesday with presentation o
"Outstanding Educator" aw
by the School of Education.
Those chosen to receive
awards are:
Dr. Mary Jo Martin of Hen)
son, assistant superintends
Vance County Schools.
Mrs. Frances B. Parmiil
Wilmington, Vocational if
Economics teacher in the
Hanover County school svst
Ms. Judith' O. Clarkl
Murfreesboro, mathem,
teacher in the Murfreesl
Middle School in the Her!
County school system.
Ms. Charlotte H. Hoyt of
both City, a 26-year veteraj
elementary education, teach
Pasquotank County school
tern.
The awards will be a hih
of the program for the sixtl
nual James W. Batten Dt
guished Lecture Series of the
School of Education, in He
Theatre at 7 p.m. Feati
speaker will be Dr. Phillip
Apartheid
university
(CPS) � About a vear
University of Missouri at Col
bia police were arresting
people who had invaded P
dent C. Peter Magrath's ot
demanding the university s�
investments in (inns that do
ness in segregationist Soutl
rica.
The arrests, it turned out,
but one of a sencs of upheav,
the campus, where proteSt
ties were repeatedly vandal
and administrators complaj
of harassment.
But the MU campus was
two weeks ago when, on Jai
its trustees voted to sell al
South African stocks in que
The change was indicab
the anti-apartheid moveme
U.S. campuses recently. It h
short, been very quiet.
"The movement is a victim
own success said V
Glaskcr, a grad student and
apartheid activist at the U
sity of Pennsylvania, which
divest in June, 1988.
It was three years ago, in
ary, 1985, that the anri-apari
movement � a fitfully acti1
fort on a handful of cam
since the 1960s � abruptl;
came a national phenomenc
dozens of campuses erupt
protests, rallies and sit-ins.
Since then, of course, the
dominated political life at
dreds of schools, and mai
those campuses have coi
with protestors' demand
they sell the offending stocl
By contrast, in January,
Eastern Michigan Universitj
dents forced South African
Gary Player � who, in fac
poses apartheid � to disass
himself from an EMU golf
project.
Otherwise, colleges have
quiet.
One reason, some obs
say, is that South African a
have cut the amount of
coming out of that country
bing students of the sense d
rage that motivated them
past.
Others blame a trendyl
media, which don't cover
sue much. "The problem wil
media complained Prof.
Wade, head of Penn's
American Studies prograi
that it measures success "
numbers that attend a rally
the issues raised
Still others see a natural
tion occuring.
"On our campus Mil
student Jacqueline Judiej
"you can trace the stages of
ment. It started as a polite
ment, and students went tl
the proper channels to ra
issue. Thcv were ignored,
organized protests that
headway
Judie says the rallies,
and protest shanties MU stj
were still building as of lasl
ber "embarrassed the univj
into taking action.
"Students show suppoi
there is something to
maintained, "and they're
terested in the issue
The trick to keeping presj
South Africa to dismantle
heid, others say, is in findi
to Vet students here do
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Oil 1758-2030
J by Presbyte-
I '�' is Ministries
HA tPSlLQN DELTA
premedical
have a meeting on
2 at 7:00 in Flanagan
I! be V'etonnar
Thompson Members,
are encouraged to
ECLFRISBE�XLVB
bee every Tuesday,
!� ana Thursday at 2 30 on In-
and 6 behind Mmges
and on Sunday at 2:00. New
me
C0QPERATTVEELL
r work-study eligible, vou may
" a job off-campus this
o summer or fall of 1988.
i t the Cooperative Education
I M2 Raw! Building, for furthci m-
n
GARYJIARI
can participate in Gary Hart's
ss roots campaign for the NC. Presi-
tial Pnmarv on March 8. For any ques-
! or further information, please call
a' 8-2570.
NAAIP
e ECU chapter of the NAACP will be
on Thursday, February 4,1988 in the
Irural Center at 5:00. All committee
irpTsons should be present in addi-
to all interested students.
RHO EPSILON
rhe Rho Epsilon chapter of ECU we
es Craig Ralph to ECU Mr Ralph of
h & Associates will be giving a pres-
ition on Corporate and Commercial
Estate All Rho Epsilon members and
ted students and faculty are encour-
to attend on Monday, February 8 at
p m in room 212 mendenhall
ECU honors veteran teachers
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 2,1988 7
ECU Ntwi Bureau
hast Carolina University will
recognize and honor tour veteran
public school teachers in the state
Tuesday with presentation of its
"Outstanding Educator" awards
by the School of Education.
Those chosen to receive the
awards are:
Or Miry )o Martin of Hender-
son assistant superintendent of
Vance County Schools.
Mrs. Frances B. Parnell of
Wilmington, Vocational Home
Economics teacher in the New
i lanover Countv school system.
Ms. Judith O. Clark of
Murfreesboro, mathematics
teacher in the Murfreesboro
Middle School in the Hertford
v ounty school system.
Ms. Charlotte E. Hoyt of Eliza-
beth City, a 26-year veteran in
elementary education, teacher at
Pasquotank County school sys-
tem.
Hie awards will be a highlight
of the program for the sixth an-
nual lames W. Batten Distin-
guished 1 ecture Series of the ECU
School of Education, in Hendrix
Theatre at 7 p.m. Featured
speaker will be Dr. Phillip Sch-
presents
lechty, executive director of
Ghcens Academy in Louisville,
Ky.
The "Outstanding Educator
Award" is presented annually to
educators who are graduates of
teacher education programs at
East Carolina University and who
were nominated by their col-
leagues.
Dr. Martin has been a teacher of
science and mathematics at Tar-
boro and Pinetops in Edgccombe
County, an assistant principal in
Rocky Mount and has been in the
Vance County system since 1981
when she became director of sec-
ondary education for the Vance
County schools.
In 1986, as the executive secre-
tary of the Citizens of Excellence
in Education, she led a successful
effort to pass an $18 million school
bond issue in Vance County.
Martin received her under-
graduate degree from Atlantic
Christian College, her master's
degree from ECU and the doctor-
ate in Education at Duke Univer-
sity.
Mrs. Parnell received both
undergraduate and graduate
degrees from ECU and began her
teaching career at Clayton High
School in 1961-1964. She taught at
Tileston Junior High and Roland-
Grise Junior High in Wilmington
and joined the faculty at John T.
Hoggard High School in 1969.
She has been a part-time con-
tributor to the Wilmington Morn-
ing Star's food and dietary sec-
tions, a dietary consultant to nurs-
ing homes and a consultant for
media review and evaluation for
the state department of public
instruction.
She has authored texts on
homemaking skills, a student ac-
tivity guide for homemaking
skills and an instructor's guide in
addition to numerous articles for
newspapers and national maga-
zines.
Dr. Vila Rosenfield, ECU coor-
dinator for secondary education,
said "Mrs. Parnell is an example
of teaching at its best. Students are
taught through example and
learning experiences to have a
positive attitude, to see the best in
everyone and to make the best of
what is. Students are taught to
think and to make decisions.
"She goes beyond the class-
room and into the community to
Apartheid protests quiet down when
university South Africa stocks sold
(CPS) � About a year ago,
University of Missouri at Colum-
bia police were arresting 41
people who had invaded Presi-
dent C. Peter Magrath's office,
demanding the university sell its
investments in linns that do busi-
ness in segregationist South Af-
r i C3.
The arrests, it turned out, were
but one et a series of upheavals on
the campus, where protest shan-
ties were repeatedly vandalized
and administrators complained
harassment.
But the MU campus was quiet
two weeks ago when, on Jan. 11,
its trustees voted to sell all the
Soutli African stocks in question.
Ihe change was indicative of
the anti-apartheid movement on
LS. campuses recently. It has, in
chort. been very quiet.
"The movement is a victim of its
own success said Wayne
Glasker, a grad student and anti-
apartheid activist at the Univer-
sity o Pennsylvania, which will
divest in iune, 1988.
It was three years ago, in Janu-
ary 1985, that the anti-apartheid
movement � a fitfully active ef-
fort on a handful of campuses
since the 1960s � abruptly be-
came a national phenomenon as
dozens of campuses erupted in
protests, rallies and sit-ins.
Since then, of course, the issue
dominated political life at hun-
dreds of schools, and many of
those campuses have complied
with protestors' demand that
they sell the offending stocks.
By contrast, in January, 1988,
Eastern Michigan University stu-
dents forced South African golfer
Gary PI aver - - who, in fact, op-
poses apartheid � to disassociate
himself from an EMU golf course
project.
Otherwise, colleges have been
quiet.
One reason, some observers
sav, is that South African censors
have cut the amount of news
coming out of that country, rob-
bing students of the sense of out-
rage that motivated them in the
past.
Others blame a trendy U.S.
media, which don't cover the is-
sue much. "The problem with the
media complained Prof. Jacqui
Wade, head of Pcnn's Afro-
American Studies program, "is
that it measures success by the
numbers that attend a rally, not by
the issues raised
Still others see a natural evolu-
tion occuring.
"On our campus Missouri
student Jacqueline Judie said,
"you can trace the stages of move-
ment. It started as a polite move-
ment, and students went through
the proper channels to raise the
issue. They were ignored, so they
organized protests that made
headway
Judie says the rallies, arrests
and protest shanties MU students
were still building as of last Octo-
ber "embarrassed the university7'
into taking action.
"Students show support when
there is something to do she
maintained, "and they're still in-
terested in the issue
The trick to keeping pressure on
South Africa to dismantle apart-
heid, others say, is in finding ways
to let students here do something
about it.
"Activists must work to find
ways to deal with people's daily
lives Kim Paulus of the National
Student Action Center said.
"Thev need to engage that moral
outrage
Josh Nessen of the American
Committee on Africa, which has
organized hundreds of campus
anti-apartheid efforts during the
years, contended the movement is
still building at some campuses
though he conceded that, at oth-
ers, "people have moved on to
other issues and broadened their
agendas
They have broadened, too, their
definition of which stocks cam-
puses should sell.
University of Washington stu-
dents, for instance, are challeng-
ing UW trustees' announcement
that they finished divesting on
Dec. 1, 1987. The students main-
tain the school still holds $2.5
million in stocks in firms with
indirect ties to South Africa.
At Penn, Glasker is monitoring
Penn's holding in Coca-Cola,
General Motors. IBM and Shell
Oil.
"The reasons for divesting from
GM and IBM are even more com-
pelling claimed Patrick
Hagopian, another Penn activist.
"Now these corporations have in
a formal sense sold out to local
managers who are not bound by
Suffering
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guidelines like the Sullivan Prin-
ciples a list of civil rights compa-
nies agreed to respect among their
South African workers.
Still other groups are shifting
their focus to racism in the U.S.
University of Utah Students
Against Apartheid, for example,
picketed a Salt Lake City tailor
shop after the owner posted a sign
on the front door warning, "Black
people may not enter
"If Salt Lake City is practicing
racism, then how can we expect
the rest of the world to solve their
racial prejudices?" Utah student
Tom Price asked.
At Missouri, "the anti-apart-
heid movement has sparked a lot
of awareness of racism on cam-
pus Judie reported.
But when George Washington
University students tried to refo-
cus their anti-apartheid group to
broader racism issues, "we got
bogged down, we had no concrete
goals GW organizer David
Hicks said.
Glasker agreed, noting "what
attracted people (to the apartheid
issue) was the moral clarity of the
issue
Now, however, "the issue is no
longer as clear. It's hard to mobi-
lize that sense of outrage. As a
result, we may have lost some
people. They may feel we've
achieved the objective (and won-
der) 'what more do you want?
help students to better under-
stand all ages, ethnic groups and
different work situations
Ms. Clark has taught at
Murfreesboro Middle School for
14 years. She "provides outstand-
ing leadership for other teachers
as chair of the mathematics de-
partment said principal Vir-
ginia S. Myers.
She is a trainer for in-service
workshops and as a resource per-
son for mathematicsscience cur-
riculum programs. She teaches
advanced mathematics courses,
sponsors the Mathcounts pro-
gram and a regional math contest.
She also teaches eighth grade sci-
encehealth.
Ms. Clark received her under-
graduate degree in secondary
education from Longwood Col-
lege in Virginia and a master's in
elementary education degree
from ECU. She taught previously
in Halifax and Wake Counties
and in Nottoway County, Va.
Mrs. Hoyt was selected as the
1987 Elizabeth City-Pasquotank
County "Teacher of the Year" last
fall. Superintendent William C.
Symons said Mrs. Hoyt is "among
the best at providing a strong
academic environment with high
expectations and an environment
that is warm, supportive and
positive
Mrs. Hoyt is a native of Raleigh
and grew up in Johnston County
and attended public schools in
Smithfield. A 1959 graduate of
East Carolina, she began teaching
at John Tyler Elementary School
in . Portsmouth, Va and also
taught at High Point before mov-
ing to Elizabeth City.
'Teaching school is a job I have
looked forward to every one of
my 26 years in education she
said. "It is just as exciting and
certainly more challenging than it
was when I first began in 1959.
There is no doubt in my mind that
I was meant to do anything but
teach. I shall continue to give
teaching my best in molding the
lives of future citizens, for this is
my contribution to society
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s
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
?UAR :
Students want involvement in drug decisioi
Univei
ot orth Carolina sysl
vernment leaders said
I n the are disappointed
� .id. of Governors did not
I them when d e a
V rs of I
N. � Ass
rver soi
' VS - pp rts
Lovelace
speaks Fri.
- . s Or.
i ps) i h
k, N vho will d
n a presentation
a at 7 5 p.m at
S lidltO
- - - rec-
Idren s
. I For almost
the show has us d
.5 host
- - help prepare
iters for 1
� � them.
ice
iployed in the
r producl �ns are
e in reading
y are a
. positive
graduateoi
: University and na-
� ' C is the
ker for the annual
n Readinc-Lan-
rts " � renee wh
on Frida Her
i pi on,
ikrhool and Vur
pen to the
began working with
the show in 1982. Before that she
the influences of
pre-
. � � - rat legi
rs � � ' Mi : ican. She

rked postdocl ral tel-
ntcr for Research on
nfluenccs ol Television on
Iren in Kansas
tr t si and her
ikits done bv the
. pet characters Big
Hrme and Bert, the Cookie
Oscar the Grouch as
is the numerous animated
ris. Her job is to make
that the message getting
to the -to-?-vear-old set
is both positive and instructive.
rresentatn ns tor the show are
child-tested bv Lovelace and her
taff at childcare centers in the
'ew York area.
She says that all the pieces that
into a one-hour show, about 35
segments of live action and ani-
are produced and as-
. peal to children -
senses ol and sound. Noth-
ng rei ains on screen long
me tiresome to the
most r s child, which she
is one of the reasons
behind the show s success.
Warren files
for re-election
Representative Ed N. Warren,
chair of the fhuise Appropria-
mmittee on Education
and a member of the 1 ligher Edu-
cation committee, recently filed
for re-election to the North Caro-
lina Houso ot Representatives
m the 9th District.
The 9th District is made up of
parts of Pitt and Greene counties.
Warren, who is seeking his fifth
term of office, is a Pitt County
native with roots in farming and
other enterprises Currently a
member of the board of directors
for Branch Banking and Trust Co
he was a school administrator for
2 vears.
Warren has been involved with
getting several major appropria-
tion bills for ECU through the
legislature since he has been in
office.
A Democrat, Warren must first
win the Democratic primary May
3 if he is to be re-elected to his post.
nors hasgix en to the d
we feel certain provisions pat
ticularly those which pertain to
immediate expulsion are too
stringent . UNCASG President
Brian Bailev said in a prepared.
statement.
iter Pa:ie sa ,i
rs couldn t understand, w
board ot coernors did not .
suit them. " rheboard did consult
a tew students when the were
ti ing to find out about di ug use
on campus, he said "We don i
know how those students were
cted. We don t know where
those students were from
Student leaders said the) plan
to talk with the board about the
polio .nd its implications for the
lb svstem campuses 1 iu also
want the board to answer ques
tions about the polic) s educa
tional, rehabilitative and punitix e
emphases.
ITie policy calls tor the state's 16
universities to offer drug-educa
tion programs and to encourage
rehabilitative efforts, but most
attention has focused on its man
datory, minimum punishments
The new system rules sue stu-
dents, faculty or staff members
caught selling hard drugs such as
heroin and cocaine must be ex-
pelled or tired and those selling
other dings such as marijuana
musl be suspended tor ,it 1 ast a
semester
Ihev II also N suspended tir .it
least a semester if they're caught
possessing hard drugs. I hev'll N1
put on probation for possession of
drugs, including marijuana and
1 SD
policy that m s someone is
going to be automatically kicked
out of school is not a good poli
bailev sai I
looking foi
v ampuses and
flexibility to de
will deal witl
blem
Koj
1
utonomv on
lOols t:
i ies t!
, t , u tu ul
i,
ill
rrv a
l use '
" There v i
si�nse from st
ii

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: � ' heS
EXTRA LOW
PRICES!
Holly
farms,
Holly Farms
Grade A
Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday, February 7, 1988.
We Reserve The Right To Limit
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EXPIRATION DATI FEBRUARY 29.19
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hould be publishr d
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'for- ther orv w,
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sion
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tor autonomy on tt
ses jnd giving schools tlv.
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mI with their partial!
or UNC Greet
government pre
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indie drucabust
- : onsiderable i
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I
Farms
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vary 7, 1988.
rhe Right To Limit
: On All Items.
49
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9
Reg & U
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9
Assorted
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ood
9
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
FEBRUARY 2,1988 Page 9
ECU show proves Buffett
is still mayor of "M-ville"
By ADAM BLANKENSHIP
Staff Writer
beach, slightly out of place.
After realizing Buffett was the
I remember I was in eighth UX "ft the br?c" ,eS (whL�
grade when I first saw Jimmy ?xcl'ed the ?�wd by doing noth-
Buffett. I didn't really know what !n8 ?! �m,T8 �n.StagC and ?'
he was all about. I heard a lot of
his music at the sailing clubs I
grew up around. Usually it was
the old cronies getting drunk and
singing along to his tapes.
It looked fun to me and my
friends. So off we went with
mom's money and weasled our
way to the sixth row. At the time,
ing "Hello) we knew instantly
this man was the definition of
"laid-back
Well, eight years later nothing
haschanged. Buffet hasa little less
hair, isn't as tan, and has both legs
intact. He looks as if he is still on
the same weight training pro-
gram, 12 ounces at a time, and
we felt like we were the only �ou,rd real,y care less about this
people there under 21, and defi-
nitely the only ones sober.
We were trying to act cool and
doing a pretty good job until one
of the roadies came up on stage
and one of my friends yelled,
"There he is and instantly we
felt like mountaineers at the
will be the classic tunes we will all
reminisce to when we're older.
The renditions of his usual all
time greats, his comedic flare and
wit gave me the impression
Buffett will be around a long time.
He has a lot of control over the
audience. At one point during the
concert, this almost horizontally
laid-back man had to reprimand a
few goons who were taking the
out-of-hand approach to having a
good time that ECU is famous for.
But life went on, as did the
show. The splendid finishing
of "Margaritaville
Students make cool hammocks
Bv CLAY DEANHARDT
Managing Fditor
it paid off. "The neat thing was going
When they talked to the pur- down there last August and see- circulation of more than 30,000.
chasing manager for the store, ing it hanging in the store he "I think it hasa lot of potential.
they found out he had just re- said. If he puts it in Coconut Telegraph,
Swinson said they have only it will take off he said.
turned from Australia and the
Jimmy Buffett and hammocks.
ultimate in laid-back and the
ultimate in laying-back. You
nld think they go together like �mefnca � C"P raccs; �herc hc sold a fcw hammocks through the
Margaritas and salt, but thcv hdt? 1fo1u1nd hamm�ck design he store so far, but that they hope to
reallv liked. Swinson and Wilder sell more soon.
r have.
Never, that is, until ECU stu-
dents hm Swinson and Alison
der brought them together
year on Spring Break in Key
West. The two operate a com-
any, Taradise Hammocks,
ivhich now weaves hammocks for
nittett's Kev West Margaritaville
(tore.
Swinson said the match is the
Result of a whim he and Wilder
lad last year. The two learned to
lake hammocks at a local manu-
facturer, hut decided thcv could
ake more money weaving them
ind selling them on their own.
So they started Paradise Ham-
nocks and began selling them to
friends and neighbors. Then,
(i. hen they went to the Keys for
break last year, they decided to
fake one with them. "We took it to
Margaritaville just as a tongshot
Jwinson said.
told him they were Parrot Heads
(the nickname for die-hard jimmy
Buffett fans) and that their ham-
mocks would be, of course,
American made. The man told
them to come back the next day,
but not to get their hopes up.
"We went back the next day
Swinson said. "They said 'We told
you not to get your hopes up �
and we didn't � but thev said he
(Buffett) liked it
Paradise Hammocks got the
contract, and they make the ham-
mocks for Margaritaville on de-
mand.
"We told him he could put his
name on it, and he did Swinson
said. "But wc can't sell them lo-
cally with his name on them
"We're expecting to be printed
in the Coconut Telegraph
Swinson and Wilder plan to join
the Peace Corps when they
graduate, but Swinson said they
can still make the hammocks
while they serve their tour of
encore
Frankly, I agree with him. Any- brought the crowd�to a fevered
way, I'm glad one can count on pitch and pumped everybody for
some things in this world, and a summertime. More immediate on
Jimmy Buffett show is of them. the audience's mind was what
and where to drink after the show.
Like last time, he was about 20 I had a good time. Everyone I
minutes late, just long enough to talked to (who could remember)
be casual without causing anxi- had a good time, and the ones
ety. As before, the crowd was who couldn't remember were
more or less a huge party which told they had a good time. I hope
could have gone on all night. Spir- he comes back or at least has
its were high, real high. What else "Carolina on his mind Buffett
would one expect from a Buffett was a jamming show and if you
show. missed it, Ha, too bad, your loss.
Listening to Buffett play his But you should definitely try to
new music, it sounds like these
New scary TV series
proving to be boring
which is his monthly newsletter duty,
(and souvenir magazine) he "The neat thing about this kind
said. That would mean people of business is you your own boss,
could order the ha�nmocks You can drink a beer on the job
through the mail, and Swinson and listen to jimmy Buffett and
said that would mean a booming get a tan he said.
By MICAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
The syndicated "Friday the
Thirteenth" series and the Fox
Network's Werewolf" represent
the new wave of TV horror as
loosened restrictions allow TV
Trips to Daytona planned
By CAROL WETHERINGTON
Staff Writer
Editor's Note: This is the first in
a series of stories on three vaca-
tion packages being offered this
Swinson �id the Margaritaville sPrin& vou can get away from
this insane asylum for a while.
store is expanding, and that they
are getting ready to put up a dis-
play featuring the jimmy Buffett
Hammocks in the new store.
ong journey into poetfs job
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Writer
Betty Adcock, drawing casually
n a much needed cigarette, ex-
plains how becoming a poet was
not a conscious choice. "It was not
a decision I really made
An only child in San Augustine,
eas, Adcock's mother died
� �hen she was five. Adcock dis-
covered years later that her
mother, an English and Latin
teacher, had also been a poet,
riting verses for children.
Adcock learned to read around
age six. Her small hometown had
� library, but at 10 she discov-
ered some "rat-eaten volumes" of
Keats and Shelley.
She pauses to stub out her ciga-
rette. Adcock just completed a
crueling Advanced Poetry work-
shop with Dr. Peter Makuck's
class.
Later in the evening, she will
read from her new book "Behold-
ings which the workshop class
has already tasted. The book, due
out in this spring, contains poems
that deal with her early years in
Texas.
During that time, she says, she
told her fifth grade teacher that
she wanted to be a poet when she
c;rew up. But the only outlet for
her poems then were various class
projects.
She kept writing. She says when
she realized there were actually
living poets, she was amazed. She
took a creative writing class with
southern novelist Guy Owen
when she was 26.
She gave him some of her po-
etry and he told herThese
should be published She sent
several poems to two poetry jour-
nals, "The Nation" and "Poetry
Northwestern
Both accepted poems. She con-
tinued to submit to other maga-
zines, but it wasanother two years
before another one was pub-
lished.
In the meantime, she worked as
an advertising executive.
See POET, page 10
She
Spring semester. To many, a
second chance at good grades. To
many others the semester before
graduation. But to most
SPRING BREAK
March 5-13 is THE WEEK!
Partying, fun in the sun, rest(???!)
and more partying.
Whether the beach is the all time
original Fort Lauderdale or the
rising Daytona - it can be a dream Intercampus Travel Company
of youth come true, for freshman, bussed over 100 students from
sophomore, junior or senior. ECU to Daytona. This year, be-
Throughout our young lives, in cause of increased benefits, Tam-
movies and by word of mouth, bling expects an attendence of
we've heard about Fort Lauder-
dale. But now Fort Lauderdale is
worn out. Too many tourists, too
many parties and too much con-
crete has made Daytona the new
Spring Break hotspot.
200.
Some of Intercampus Travel
benefits include great prices,
guaranteed confirmed rooms and
entrance discounts to amusement
parks in Daytona. If you drive to
Pianist Istomin to play Wright Thursday night
Mendenhall Press Release
Eugene Istomin will present his
rare combination of virtuosity,
poetic insight, and aristocratic
style in Wright Auditorium at 8
p.m. on Thursday. Istomin is a
recitalist, orchestra soloist, and
chamber music player.
During the four decades since Office located in Mendenhall Stu-
his debut, Istomin has given more dent Center, Monday-Friday, 11
than 3,000 concerts. He has per- am-6 pm. Ticket prices are $12 for
formed with virtually all of the general admission, $10 for ECU
world's leading orchestras under facultystaff, and $6 for ECU stu-
such noted conductors as Eugene dents, high school youth and
Ormandy and Leonard Bernstein, under.
For tickets and more informa-
Tickets for this performance can tion,call 757-661 l,ext 266, during
be purchased at the Central Ticket the above hours.
David Tambling, campus rep- Daytona, room cost is only $124
resentative for Intercampus for seven nights, and if you ride
Travel, cited Daytona Beach as the the chartered bus running di-
place to be this spring; 23 miles of rectly from ECU, the cost is only
white sand beaches without the $184!
Fort Lauderdale mess. Once in Daytona, a trip to
During Spring Break of 1987, Disney World, or the Epcot Cen-
ter is $36; Sea World is $31 and
Wet & Wild is only $23.50. This
includes the discount entrance
ticket and transportation.
Also, Intercampus Travel will
be supplying transportation to
the All New 1988 Party Boat - a
partying paddleboat. For only $1
you can drink (if your're 21) free
for two hours and after 11 p.m.
drink from the cash bar 12 price.
And to top all this off, your
room in Daytona on the beach will
be guaranteed! No guessing, no
worry of overcrowding or over-
loading. Travellers will be told
weeks in advance of their motel,
roommates, and exact room.
Intercampus Travel guarantees
that all ECU students will be in the
same motel. Whether it be the
Hawaiian Inn, Quality Inn
Surfside, Esquire Beach Motel, or
one of the other three motels In-
tercampus Travel uses, ECU will
be together to rock Daytona
Rental cars will be available to
Intercampus travellers, as well as
10-30 discount coupons to use
for food, gifts, nightclubs, etc.
This package feature is exclusive
producers to begin to compete
with big screen terror.
Before network restrictions
began to literally cast the devil
from programming, there existed
the possibility of real horror. This
was most notably realized in Boris
Karloff's "Thriller" episodes,
"Pigeons from Hell "The Cheat-
ers and the "The Grim Reaper
Then the network's typically
tasteless censors held sway for
over 25 years. As la teas,lg�5,�the
revived "Twilight Zone came
under the clippers. Only recently,
producers have taken advantage
of the lesser restrictions of syndi-
cation and Fox's new network.
Gore, violence, and atmosphere
can now be presented in heavy
doses.
In format, the new horror pro-
grams owe a debt to Darren
McGavin's "Kolchak! the Night
Stalker currently being rerun on
CBS. Unlike the former antholo-
gies, they feature recurring char-
acters in the spooky situation of
the week.
"Werewolf" started out weakly
in its two-hour premier as basi-
cally "The Fugitive" starring a
werewolf. Since then, the produc-
ers have succeeded admirably in
overcoming both the structural
limitations and the 30 minute time
slot.
Certain episodes focus on the
hero Eric's encounters with other
unlikely werewolves, such as a
monk and a seedy boarding house
operator. In a notable two-parter,
they killed the main character
who, understandably, was not
present in the concluding epi-
sode. And there have been stories
based on American Indian my-
thology.
"Werewolf" still has its prob-
lems. The men in werewolf suits
are as convincing as a gorilla in a
poverty-row movie serial. There's
some corny dialogue and campy
delivery that would make Ed-
ward Wood, Jr. cringe. Still, it is
surprisingly effective despite
these flaws.
More episodic, but featuring
character continuity, is "Friday
the Thirteenth" with happily no
to Intercampus Travel Company sign of an idiot in a hockey mask
as a bonus to you!
And, we can't forget the beer!
For those beer hounds out there,
Intercampus offers you rooms
with kitchenettes to store your
party paraphernalia This in-
cludes a refrigerator, stove and
cooking utensils.
Intercampus Travel works
under the Daytona Chamber of
Commerce Seal, which guaran-
The premise is that possessed
antiques have been sold by a dude
who's sold his soul to the devil.
When the devil claims his
voucher, it's up to the antique
dealer's niece and nephew to re-
claim various evil objects: a
mulcher that spits out money in
exchange for a life, a Cupid statue
that grants love which must be
followed by murder, the scapel of
tees quality, and is backed by lack the Ripper, or a comic book
Corona Beer' Domino's Pizza, whose monster springs off the
and Matilda Bay Wine Coolers. page-
Anyone interested in signing The make-up and effects are of
up can call David at 752-S870. If near feature film quality. This,
you get an answering machine, along with the actors' efforts to
. . . , . . ,� . j � tl PLEASE leave a message and flesh out characters and writers'
Eugene Istomin, who has played with some really boss people like Leonard BernstienCthe guy the dog David yfm t J attempts at clever plot twists,
talks about in that terrible video by the former greatest band in North America), will play here at 8 p.m. Hurry though! You don't want to make for the most effective bit of
in Wright Auditorium Thursday night The Bad Checks probably won't be there, but they are boss too. be left sitting at ECU- TV horror in 25 years.
-0 -vMta
�nOm ?? ?
mM
� a





t
I

10
THE EAST CAROL1NI AN
FEBRUARY 2,1988
Bad Checks sound like boss group
By STEVE SOMMERS
t Staff Writer
In my other record reviews I did
a lot of talking about producers,
mix quality, back-up vocals and
things of that nature. But, I think 1
was forgetting where I was com-
ing from. 1 didn't remember what
it means to be drenched in sweat
with my ears ringing and loving
every bit of it, and that's not re-
membering The Bad Checks are
all about.
Their latest record, "Inno-
cence has no bass or treble defi-
nition, cheap echo vocal effects
and is 100 sweat and blood rock-
n-roll. This record is the epitome
of what it means to get-off.
Anybody who likes the bullshit
that Led Zeppelin use to do and
realizes it was bullshit will like
this record. The bullshit I'm refer-
ring to is all that psuedo-psyche-
delic "Yeah, heavy man" stuff.
The Bad Checks are by no means a
psychedelic band but they arc full
of shit and they do a great cover of
Led Zepplin's "Rock and Roll
They've been called voo-
doobilly, graveyard rock, and an
assortment of other non-innocent
labels which are actually amaz-
ingly accurate. Most the time I
don't agree with labels people put
on bands but with The Bad
Checks I think it's deserving.
On the cover of the import copy
of "Innoncence" is a picture of this
girl lying on her bed with her
pants pulled down to her knees
and a record sticking out of her
butt. If you talk to the band they
will deny having anything to do
with the record in the butt bit and
they almost seem sincere. Just
when you start to believe them
you realize they are pulling off a
lot of this semi-credible stuff.
On the song "Crimes of Pas-
sion" Hunter Landen, their singer
moans through these lyrics.
'Those fingernails are digging
into my skin. I feel the chill that
goes with her being scared. Too
late to act, as if I really cared. I
know inside everything will be
alright.
Crimes of passion never go out
Guy writes book about fairies
NEW YORK (AD-Somewhere
out there, bevond the safe borders
of sanity and not too far from that
dark place at the back of closets
where scary things romp with
evil, is another world.
It's a place where fantasy col-
lides with reason, where night-
mares are made. It's also the locale
of one of the juiciest reads of the
season, Raymond E. Feist's "Fa-
erie Tale" (Doubleday, $17.95).
Much in the tradition of those
contemporary masters of fright,
such as Peter Straub, Cli ve Barber
and Whitley Streiber, Feist blends
scholarship with fantasy - in this
case, Celtic lore and superstition.
Fairies, he says, are an older,
dominant race, beings who have
existed perhaps longer than
humankind.
"What if there was another
world existing contiguously with
our own? Why don't we see it?
Because someone is driving a
wedge between us and that
world
And who might that be? Ah, an
anciet society of magi - a priest-
hood that exists only to maintain
the balance of things between us
and that world
"The genesis of the book is that
fairies were real and there was
this priesthood that keeps us
apart Feist said in a recent inter-
view. "My theory was that we've
been at war with fairies and one
side won and dictated the terms
and some of the fairies want to
break the treaty
Into this web of wicked play
steps the Hastings family, who
move from Southern Clifornia to a
farm in upstate New York that
happens to border the Fairy
Woods.
Almost immediately, some
members of the family sense a
presence, especially young Pat-
rick whose twin, Sean, poohs-
poohs his bedtime fears. But Pat-
rick knows The Bad Thing is
watching. Waiting.
One day, while the boys play by
the Troll Bridge that crosses the
stream in the woods on the path to
their home, Patrick meets his
worst nightmare face to face. He
falls in the icy water and the cur-
rent pulls him under the bridge.
"Claws seized him, and he felt
his T-shirt rip, while pain erupted
on his arm. He struck out with
small fists, which hit something
soft and fleshy. He felt himself
being lifted up, and his nose was
filled with the stink of rotting
meat.
"The Bad Thing hung by three
limbs beneath the bridge, upside
down like a giant spider. It
clutched the boy's arm in one
clawed hand, and above the
pounding sound of the water
Patrick could hear its inhuman
sounds
of fasion These lyrics in them-
selves aren't exactly innocent but
when you consider when Hunter
moans "I know inside" and
you're not real sure he's not say-
ing "I know her inside" it's defi-
nitely not innocent. But that's
rock-n-roll. You got to love it.
What I meant by the import
copy is that this record actually
came out in 1986 in France. The
Bad Checks worked out a deal
with an independent French la-
bel, Music Action Records, just to
get the pressing, although the
recording was done right here in
the ol' US of A, North Carolina
style.
This is actually a fairly common
practice for unsigned bands to
look to other countries for inde-
pendent labels to press their re-
cordings. All of this has to do with
different taxes and tariffs. The
Gun Club does something like
this. But now The Bad Checks are
on Black Park Records, the label
The Connells started to make
their own records.
But unlike the Connells, the Bad
Checks shows can get out of hand.
Last time they were in Greenville
some marine threw a bottle on
stage and there was a fight and
some marines got kicked out. But,
it wasn't too bad, my mother was
there and had a fine time. Al-
though she did stay in the pool
room most of the time.
Underground hosts Bad Bob
By CAROL WETHERINGTON
Staff Writer
There was no bubble gum rock
in the Underground Friday night.
Badjfcb ami the Rockinghorses
performed to a very receptive
audieifPe flrf"WpproximateIy 60.
Displaying great musical talent
and a wide range of'boogie blues'
were J.W. Raburn on bass, Bob
Aiken on drums and Bad Bob
Tunnell on lead guitar and vocals.
The Rockinghorses formed
during late summer of 1987 and
have since played in New Deli,
Wrong Way Corrigans and now
The Underground.
Specializing in blues and rock-
n-roll, (featuring Hound Dog
Taylor, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Dale
Hawkins and Elvis Presley), the
group has been well accepted and
is building a following.
The Rockinghorses are now
cutting a demo tape. It is being
produced right here in
Greenville, and should be avail-
able to local radio stations in a
couple of weeks.
So, whether you're a fan of Bad
Bob and the Rocking horses or you
prefer bubble-gum rock, let Un-
derground coordinator Ron
Maxwell know your interests for
future reference in scheduling
bands.
Adcock ends up a strong poet
Continued from page 9
at night, after her husband and
daughter were sleeping, to get the
necessary quiet to concentrate on
her writing.
She married Don Adcock, an
ECU alumnus while she was 18.
He is now retired after 22 years of
holding the position of Band Di-
rector at N.C. State.
Adcock, having realized her
initial ambition as a poet, found
that it was time to take the next
step - the publishing of a book.
And as before, she had the good
luck to get published on her first
submission.
The Louisiana State University
press, one of the the few bastions
for Southern writers in the late 60s
and early 70s, printed her first
book. They have printed all of her
other books as well.
As the discussion turns to her
major influences, Adcock smiles.
Having already told the work-
shop about the impact James
Dickey had on her, she relates the
story of how a six month study
and 200 page paper on Robinson
Jeffers taught her that "poetry IS
important
She has, as all serious writers
do, "dozens" of influences. But
Dickey and Jeffers taught her the
validity of using her own experi-
ences as a basis for her writing,
and the importance of imagery to
push a narrative along.
Adcock knows exactly how
important that kind of imagery is.
One poem, "Walking Out a
depiction of her father-in-law's
near drowning, took her 12 years
and hundreds of drafts to finish.
She doesn't see herself as a par-
ticular ambitious poet. She "just
wants to get the poem to where
it's going Nevertheless, 12 years
of revision on one poem speaks
highly of achievement.
Her poems are often concerned
with the everyday baptisms that
occur when an ordinary event
transforms the poet or reader. The
observer sees that the drab and
dull are really as miraculous as
the extraordinary.
As she says in her "South
Woods in October,With the Spi-
ders of Memory - "The world's
strung with embraces
You just have to know how to
look for them.
SB
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Bad Checks and Dexter shows
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The first six nights the bands
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and Skid Roper, Fetchin Bones, X,
and maybe The Talking Heads;
and on the final night, without
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Remco East, Inc.
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q
onty
EVV YORK (AP)-In the tain
le world created by Stephen
mdheim and James Lapine in
to the Woods Joanna Glea-
keepsher feet on the ground i
he plays the baker's wife, one
the few original - and pr i
racters in a musical fantasv
t goes beyond happily ever
;er. It tells the story of Cinder-
after the prince, Little Red
ing Hood after the wolf, Jack
ler he cuts down the beans!
the baker and his barren v.
;er they get what they wart
st - a child
The baker and his w
1 human beings in the -
?ason says. "Audiences
,ate to them. Their dilemma
man one
n a company that inc!
rling performer- i
Iters, Chip Zien. Rob- ii
gand Barbara Byrne, Gl is i
nages to shine brig I
onstadt
xs angel; - �
ir career has tra
i breadth oi Ami -
3m California rock t
iv, from bayou blu - I
ivn. Now Linda
rns home with an
?xican ranchero tur -
hCanciones de mi 1
��ngs of mv Father is a
m of Ronstadt's Tu-
ts, w'lth the singer -
ferrLv getting inl I
Dad Gilbert did the
on the back oi the Sp n
guage LP and offered fai
advice. Her two brol rs and
niece sang harmony
tcks. Cousins helped out
! English song hransl ttions
! inside cover
B"People have said 'this ssu
departure in your carec r
for me, singing rock n r
departure Ronstadt sa
recent interview.
"When we were kids
Mexican songs, and we
music, and my sister sang
ever classics were ar ind
standards, and mv fatl -
sing them, and we e
Spanish
Ronstadt's mib al si
journeyed through
("Different Drum
lads ("Long, Long Time"
fbmia rockDesperad(
orris writes
OS ANGELES A" -W
star Chuck Norris cal -
zentlv-published autob gr
iy "The Secret of h
rength
"People sometimes tell rr
:ky I have been in rm
writes. "When I hear that Isn j
I as never a natural athlel i
paid my dues in sweat ar
centration and took the time
fssarv to learn karate and be,
Bs-orld champion. I simp
for what 1 lacked physica
ith work and determma-
The theorv worked in kai
id it has paid otf in films I
Capitalizing on H
iscle-man vogue, Nor- - I
lilt a thriving career wn'r ad j
led, good guys against tru j
ivs movies. The latest is
Jck: Missing in Actioi
Based by Cannon Films
Jonth.
The new film continues-th. - .
Col. James Braddock th 1
hero of the 1984 "Miss
:tion" and 1985 s "Mis
:tion 2:The Beginning Fk
fere good moneymakers
mnon, hence the third in I
rcle.
Norris is talking about or
pile making another. The ne
le is "Hero and the Terror
fhich casts him as a Santa M
lice detective in search oi
sychopathic killer. On a blus-tel
inter night, he is racing over tf
f of the Wil tern Theater in mi
)s Angeles, pursuing the deadl
Terror" (Jack O'Halloran).
During a dinner break in tilt
ig, Norris relaxed in the art de
bby of the theater, newly
pred to its oldtime glamour ai
)w boasting rock concerts
liked about his book, his movj
d his life.
"The Secret of Inner Strengl
-Titter with Joe Hyams, det
he Norris saga. Born in Ol
toma, raised in Torrance, Cal
.ied to his high school swj
jart, discovering karate tn Kr
mile serving with the Air Fol
:oming karate champion
structor.
�Kl
������-
�Maflk ' - -
i ft awn m onwmipmi





t
ATTENTION
ECU
STUDENTS
Remco Fast. Inc.
ounces that
NGSTON PARK
�ARTMENTS is now
r New Ownership.
ex will undergo
is (interior and
with many
ovements planned for
tot Remco Hast.
Inc. for rental
information
758-6061
OR BUST'
1983

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& Ed Gold at:
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SCLUDES
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Pool Deck Parties
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Tto mta. aigqest partes in
cNap jmrtaflMP
lor� details
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 2,1988 11
onty Hall's daughter doing off- Broadway
NEV YORK tAD-In the fairy
le world created by Stephen
indheim and James Lapine in
jnto the Woods Joanna Glea-
Ln keeps her feet on the ground.
She plays the baker's wife, one
the few original - and practical
laracters in a musical fantasy
Lit goes beyond happily ever
Her. It tells the story oi Cinder-
la after the prince, Little Red
jding Hood after the wolf, Jack
Her he cuts down the beanstalk
vi the baker and his barren wife
her they get what they want the
lost - a child.
rhe baker and his wife are the
hi human beings in the show
Reason says. "Audiences can
late to them. Their dilemma is a
bman one
a company that includes such
I g performers as Bernadette
rters, Chip Zien, Robert Weste-
rn and Barbara Bvrne. Gleason
lanages to shine brightly.
Gleason has been involved with
Int the Woods" since May 198b
whei. she was called in to audition
for a workshop production to be
done at Playwrights Horizons, a
small off-Broadway theater com-
pany.
She went along to San Diego's
Old Globe Theater where the
musical tried out later in the year.
Before "Into the Woods" finally
opened in New York on Nov. 5,
the actress had devoted nearly 18
months to it.
She has seen the musical evolve
from a tiny workshop production
to a mammoth Broadway musical
costing nearly $4 million.
Gleason has been in the theater
for more than 20 years. The ac-
tress, who was born in Toronto,
has been near show business all
her life.
Her father is Monty Hall, best
known as host of the popular tele-
vision game show "Let's Make a
Deal Her mother was a teen-age
radio star in Canada, who after
she raised three children, went
back to school and became an
Emmy award-winning television
producer. Still, Gleason had what
she calls a normal childhood,
en after her family moved to
Southern California.
"My parents elected not to be
part of a Hollywood scene she
says. "Their roots were very
strong into family and a close
circle of friends
But their daughter always
wanted to be an actress and acted
in plays throughout high school
and college. New York audiences
first noticed Gleason in 1977 in the
Cy Coleman musical, "I Love My
Wife She left the show after a 14-
month run and returned to Cali-
fornia.
Gleason came back to New
York in 1981 after her marriage to
musical conductor Paul Gleason
collapsed. Theatergoers didn't
see her on stage until three years
later when she was hired as a
standby for Tom Stoppard's "The
Real Thing" and went on at sev-
eral performances.
The show began her profes-
sional relationship with director
Mike Nichols who put her in a
small role in the film "Heartburn"
and had her play a neurotic sister-
in-law in the Broadway comedy
"Social Security
"Mike creates an environment
in rehearsal that is so much fun
Gleason says. "He also has such
intelligence that he encourages
you to be smarter. That's part of
his genius. He lets everybody
flourish
Gleason's theater career has
continued to flourish in New
York. There were roles in Ter-
rence McNallv's acerbic theater
comedy, "It's Only a Play and a
juicy part in the British drama
"Joe Egg And there was a new
marriage, to Michael Bennahum,
president of Kaufman Asstoria
Studios, with whom she has
formed a production company.
But "Into the Woods" will be
her main occupation for the com-
ing months. A Sondheim musical
demands a lot from a performer.
"Sondheim songs are harder to
act than other songs I have sung
she says. "They are fuller. They
are more full of thought and you
have to convey those thoughts to
an audience
The prospect of a long run with
"Into the Woods" doesn't faze
her. in fact, she welcomes it.
"How can you be bored?" Glea-
son asks. "You're getting to do the
one thing you've prayed all your
life to do. It would be ungracious
to be bored
onstadt's cutting Mexican Lp now
LOS ANGELES (AP)-Her 20
?arcareer has traveled the length
id breadth of American music -
m California rock to Broad-
trom bayou blues to Mo-
Now Linda Ronstadt re-
rns home with an album of
exican ranchero tunes.
Canciones de mi Padre" or
n gs of my Father" is a celebra-
� Ronstadt's Tuscon, Ariz
ots with the singer's whole
getting into the act.
Dad Gilbert did the desert scene
the back of the Spanish-lan-
i:ace LP and ottered fatherly
i Her two brothers and a
ce sang harmonv on several
ks Cousins helped out with
: English song translations on
ie inside cover.
�pie have said this is such a
parture in your career Really,
r me singing rock n' roll was a
bparture Ronstadt said in a
kent interview.
When we were kids we sang
exican songs, and we sang folk
pisic, and my sister sang what-
rer classics were around, the
mdards, and mv rather would
hg them, and we all sang in
antsh
Ronstadt - musical styles have
lurneyed through folk tunes
Different Drum"), country bal-
kds 1 ong, Long Time"), Cali-
mia rock ("Desperado"), hard
orris writes
rock ("Back in the U.S.A),
Broadway ("Pirates oi Pen-
zance"), classic ballads ("What's
New")and Motown soul ("Tracks
of My Tears").
"Canciones de mi Padre how-
ever, seems to come closest to the
Ronstadt soul.
The singer traces her Hispanic
roots in the Americas back to Jose
Francisco do Ortega. A Spanish
Army sergeant in the 1769 Alta
California expedition of explorer
Gaspar de Portola. Ortega was the
first Spaniard to set eves on San
Francisco Bay.
Ronstadt also has in her lineage
Henry Dalton, an Englishman
who came to Mexican California
and acquired Rancho Azusa and
part oi the Rancho San Francis-
quito, both in Southern Califor-
nia.
"People say, 'Oh, you have a
German surname she said
"There was this very big settle-
ment oi Germans, and they inter-
married. People say, 'Oh, your
family moved from Mexico and I
say 'We didn't move, the border
moved
"We thought of ourselves as
Mexicans she said of her child-
hood. "1 didn't realize until I trav-
eled to Mexico that I was an
American
Ronstadt's first and biggest in-
fluence in song styles was the
Mexican singer Lola Beltran,
whom she saw as a child and has
performed with as an adult-an
experience she relates with fan-
like enthusiasm.
As a credit to the leverage she
has acquired as an artist, "Can-
ciones" was produced and dis-
tributed with no known demo-
graphic market in an era when
radio stations are defining their
play lists by age, race, income, and
attitude.
The record, despite its obscure
material, has climbed into the Top
100 oi the Billboard charts and
Ronstadt appeared on NBC's
"Saturday Night Live" to bring
some of the passionate ranchero
singing style to its hip audience.
Ronstadt said she began zero-
ing in on a long-held desire to
make a Spanish-language album
three years ago when she renego-
tiated her contract with Asylum
Records.
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ANGELES (AP)-Macho
tm
tar Chuck Norris calls his
�ntly-published autobiogra-
"The Secret of Inner
rength
People sometimes tell me how
:ky I have been in mv life he
rites. "When I hear that, I smile.
�� .is never a natural athlete, but I
Mid my dues in sweat and con-
Jentration and took the time nec-
ary to learn karate and become
rorld champion. I simply made
i for what I lacked physically
Mth work and determination
The theory worked in karate,
id it has paid off in films, too.
Capitalizing on Hollywood's
nuscle-man vogue, Norris has
hiilt a thriving career with action-
llled, good guys against the bad
rays movies. The latest is "Brad-
ock: Missing in Action III re-
ased by Cannon Films this
nonth.
The new film continues the sage
rf Col. James Braddock, the fear-
ess hero of the 1984 "Missing in
action" and 1985's "Missing in
vction 2:The Beginning Both
ere good moneymakers for
Jannon, hence the third in the
vcle.
Norris is talking about one film
vhile making another. The new
me is "Hero and the Terror'
hich casts him as a Santa Monica
xlice detective in search of a
Psychopathic killer. On a blustery
inter night, he is racing over the
roof of the Wil tern Theater in mid-
-os Angeles, pursuing the deadly
fTerror" (Jack CHalloran).
During a dinner break in film-
ing, Norris relaxed in the art deco
lobby of the theater, newly re-
stored to its oldtime glamour and
low boasting rock concerts. He
ilked about his book, his movies
md his life.
The Secret of Inner Strength"
Iwritter with Joe Hyams, details
'the Norris saga: Born in Okla-
homa, raised in Torrance, Calif
married to his high school sweet-
heart, discovering karate in Korea
while serving with the Air Force,
becoming karate champion and
instructor.
Get Prepared for Life
RUSH
A0Q
Alpha Phi Omega is a National
Coeducational Service Fraternity.
If you really enjoy doing things
to benefit others then come
Mendenhall Student Center
Tuesday, Feb. 2 from 7 to 9 p.m.
in room 221, or Wednesday, Feb.
3 from 8 to 10 p.m. in room 244
to meet the brothers.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY &
AND THE
M � DEPARTMENT OF UNIVERSITY UNIONS 9B
m PRESENT THE Q
Alpha-Omega Players

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�2
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A DINNER THEATRE PRESENTATION
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19
AND
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
AUDITORIUM 244
Dinner: 6:30 p.m. Curtain: 8:00 p.m.
Advance Sales Only, No Tickets At The Door
E.C.U. STUDENTS $10.00
ALL OTHERS $16.00
FOR TICKETS CALL: THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
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The Happiest Show
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Sunday. February 7, 1988
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Wright Auditorium
East Carolina University
Tickets available at: The Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
(919) 757-6611, Ext. 266
Sponsored by the Student Union Special Concerts Committee
rm ii��
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f
f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
FEBRUARY 2,1988 Page 12
r
Pirates blown out by Camels
in suffering fifth straight loss
�� Ut L,dn�inKinth
Fast Carolina
this season as
's Ronney Gibbs (22) goes to the hoop for two during the Pirates' overtime loss to American earlier
teammate Dominique Martin looks on. (Photo by Thomas Walters � ECU Photo Lab)
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Campbell University avenged
an early-season loss to East Caro-
lina Monday night by recording a
77-50 rout over the Pirates in Fay-
ctteville.
The hot-shooting Camels broke
open a 38-36 halftime game to
blow past the Pirates for the vic-
tory. For the game, Campbell shot
a sizzling 64 percent from the
field.
The loss dropped the Pirates to
6-13 for the year and increased
their losing streak to five games.
Campbell improved to 10-8 for
the year with the win.
Leading the way for Campbell
was Henry Wilson, who tossed in
a game-high 21 points. In leading
the Camels in scoring, Wilson
connected on eight of nine field
goal attempts. Other players in
double figures for the Camels
included Brad Childress, who
made nine of 10 field goals, with byas��P
18 points and Gary Elmore w�h ��� ��3
The Pirates were led in scoring Pirates' Kenny Murphy, who was
by Cus Hill, who scored 16 points, battling for a loose ball.
Sianley Love was the only other The P.rates led in the game69-
PirateYto score in double figures 67, with 47 seconds remanmg
for ECU with 12. after a 3-po.nter by �esnman
The Camels blitzed out to an Jimmy -linton. rhe bcanawKs
early 10-0 lead at the outset of the
I I
A
then got even in the contest with
game only to watch as the 11rates sfOTVs to pay when Larry
whittled the lead to two by -w��.�.
halftime.
In the second half, the Pirates hit
on only six field goal attempts in
recording only 14 points, their
losest point total for a half this
year.
The loss came on the heels of a
heartbreaking 71-69 CAA loss to
UNC-Wilmington Saturday on
the road.
Roy Walker canned a pair of
free throws with one second
showing to give the Seahawks the
victory over the Pirates, who led for 7:30 p.m.
Houzer followed up a Mark Gary
missed free throw.
The Pirates then held the ball
until Hinton missed on a 3-
pointcr with five seconds to play,
setting up Murphy's foul.
The loss dropped the Pirates to
2-5 in CAA action.
The next conference competi-
tion for the Pirates will come Sat-
urday when they host George
Mason in Minges Coliseum.
Gametime for that contest is set
v
r'

Wolfpack puts knife a little deeper in wound
T i
A look at sports
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
m
The wound keeps growing.
As much as the loss of the an-
nual battle on the football field
with the Wolfpack hurt the fans
and backers of Pirate sports,
jimmy "V" and the powers thatbe
in Raleigh have rammed the knife
into the Tiratcs' backs a little
deeper.
The athletic department at State
has cancelled this year's two base-
ball games with the Pirates. The
reason is reportedly because of a
concern about further altercations
between the fans.
Obviously, the cancellation of
the series spawned after the post-
game celebration by Pirate fans in
Carter-Finley Stadium. The cele-
bration broke out after the Pirates
had claimed a 32-14 victory over
the Wolfpack last September.
A one-year moratorium was
placed on the football game after
the incident. At the same time,
according to ECU head baseball
coach Gary Overton, State's ath-
letic council decided to include
the baseball series in the morato-
rium.
The football scries has since
been put on a permanent hold by
the Wolfpack. This came about
after officials at State refused to
comply with ECU's athletic direc-
tor Dave Hart's proposal that the
game be played on a home-and-
home basis when the series re-
sumed. All previous football
games between the two schools
have been played in Raleigh.
Overton, who was contacted by
the Wolfpack's baseball coach
Rav Tanner about the cancellation
J
of the games, said that he has
worked desperately to try to in-
sure that this is the only year the
baseball games will be canceled.
"We're extremely disappointed
that they canceled the games this
year Overton said. "It (the can-
cellation) first came to my atten-
tion back in September after the
Mantronix still rockin' in IRS
Intramural basketball is still
dominating the campus sport
scene. Nearly all the leagues have
now seen action. Mantronix, the
pre-scason tournament champs,
ITie Fellows and The Dream Team
were the runaway winners in last
week's contests. Mantronix
whipped league foe PMS 84-28 in
their opening game in the Men' s
Independent "A" Pistons League,
also cruised to wins. The Dream
Team drubbed the Sprints 89-29,
while The Fellows racked up
Wild wood 92-33. According to
reports, the keys to beating these
teams is to stop the fast break.
In other games from the Knicks
League, The Masters beat The
Aminals, 66-41; The Beaver Boys
downed The Navigators, 69-22;
and Essence cooled the Coolers,
54-38.
In other independent league
action, The Zoo beat Them, 55-30;
C-Ya defeated Alchoholics B, 46-
23; The Wheels rolled over Phi
Tappa Keg, 61-37; Phanton 7
slipped past PIKA C; Sig Ep D
beat the Lilley Pads; The Too
Fresh Crew stopped the Stoners,
68-53; The Do Wrongs did right
against Motley Crew, 70-57; and
Cremasters of the Universe con-
quered Lethal Weapon, 57-40.
King Of the Hill, led by this
week's Hot Shot Ron Wilson,
continued his climb to the top
witha 70-54 victory over Scientific
Method .Wilson canned 24 points,
while teammate Darryl Griffin
added 22. In other residence hall
action last week, Jones Slamatics
beats Jarvis A, 50-22; Scott 100
Proof stopped the Slay Syndicate,
50-42; Umstead Foul Trouble
slowed Aycock Express, 63-30;
White Shadow downed Aycock
Newton, 45-21; Garrett Bandits
tamed Aycock AC Wildcates, 45-
31; Scott Shay Lite stopped the
Belk Ball Slingers, 41-26; and the
Belk Sharpshooters beat the
Aycock 60-Niners, 51-31.
Finally, in Fraternity "A"
League action, Kappa Sigma
stoped Lambdi Chi Alpha, 46-39;
Pi Kappa Alpha tripped Phi Tau,
55-37; Phi Beta Sigma surprised
Alpha Sigma Phi, 48-13; and
Sigma Phi Epsilon won over Pi
Kappa Phi, 59-35.
Women's action begins Thurs-
day night with the league-favorite
Enforcers taking on S.Q.R.D.
Co-Rec Bowling Registration is
completed and action got under-
way Monday afternoon. Scrags,
Todd and the 3 disciples, and
Wild & Innocent (is that pos-
sible?) are the league's top three
picks. Campus Crusade I, II, and
III all receive honorable mention
(just for Luck.)
Leagues One and Two are in
action Monday and Wednesays
between 4 & 7 p.m while League
Four competes Tuesdays nd
Thursdays form 5:30 to 7 p.m.
And finally, don't forget about
today's Free Throw Competition
registration and Wednesday's
Water Tube Polo registration. For
more information, stop by the
Intramural offices at Memorial
Gym.
football incident. I was concerned
at that time that it would be per-
manent, but they (State) have
expressed an interest in continu-
ing the scries after this season. It
seems that the decision was made
by the athletic council when they
asked for the one-year morato-
rium
The inclusion of the baseball
contests in the moratorium by the
Wolfpack is going to be a difficult
decision for Pirate supporters to
accept.
According to Overton, there
have never been any fan "inci-
dents" at baseball games between
the Pirates and the Wolfpack.
"We have always had a great
relationship with N.C. State and
there have never been any prob-
lems at any of our games Over-
ton said. "None of us (baseball
coaches) know exactly why they
(State) dropped trs: They are say-
ing it is to avoid any possible
problems with fans at the games.
But I couldn't foresee any inci-
dents occurring
The picture from the
Wolfpack's point of view is start-
ing to clear somewhat. Let's put it
in a scenario.
N.C. State won the national
championship in basketball in
1983. Next came the resurgence of
the Wolpack football team last
season. And, almost every sea-
son, the Pack can be seen at or near
the top of the ACC and region in
baseball.
Now, consider this. You are
living on the west coast and you
wake up one morning in the fall
and open your newspaper and
read that East Carolina defeated
N.C. State, 32-14, in football. Or
maybe, the win was in baseball, or
even basketball.
A victory over the Wolfpack, if
you are East Carolina, means only
good things. It can help you in
recruiting, it helps you gain na-
tional attention and it gives you a.
big step toward major recogni-
tion.
A loss to the Pirates, if you are
N.C. State, brings only bad re-
sults. The Pirates can use the win
over the Wolfpack to possibly
steal some recruits, the national
recognition already obtained by
the Wolfpack could be hampered
some also.
The bottom line, if you are N.C
State, is you can't help but be
frightened to play the up-and-
coming Pirates in any athletic
competition.
The result, if you are N.C. State,
is push the knife a little deeper in
the Pirates' backs.
And make the wound continue
to grow. ��
Bell tabbed
Former Duke University defen-
sive coordinator and assistant
head coach Richard Bell was I
named as defensive coordinator
at East Carolina University Mon-
day, head coach Art Baker an
Tsounroth
Bell, 50, who resigned last
month after serving a five-year
stint with the Blue Devils, fills the
Please see FORMER page 14
Lady Pirates' streak is halted
Earlvis gets mohawk after win
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Mohawk Meister
Few things are so sweet and few
things are so rewarding. Maybe
that first organism or that first
roof dive could equal the emotion,
but it is doubtful. And some of us
gamblers have the privilege of
saying "I told you, dude
First let me sing "Hail to the
Redskins, Hail to the Redskins,
they kicked the Broncos' butt
If you didn't read last
Thursday's "Earlvis says take the
Skins lets' give you a short syn-
opsis. Earlvis said take the Skins
and the points, he said take the
over, he said Manley and Mann
would get off and he also said
Timmy Smith would "slice" the
Orange Crush.
Earlvis hopes you took his ad-
vice, because if you did you can
join him in a trip to Key West
where we can spend our won
booty. But if you went against
Earlvis, he will think about you as
he drinks a Tequila Sunrise on the
babed beaches near the equator
during Spring Break.
One 0f the most memorable
days in this Redskins fans' career
started about 2 p.m. Sunday when
Earlvis and fellow Redskin,
Chuck, took a couple of bingers.
Some of our friends are anti-Re-
dskins and we had to listen to
their constipated talk.
By 3:30 we were down at
Ralph's and the ruggers' pig
cooking. Some of the guys there
were trugid, a condition acquired
by drinking a yard-long glass of
cold draft, and the word trugid
was inked on their chests and
othere extremities to document
their accomplishment.
A notable act of athletism came
as rugger Greg Roach took the
first "roof dive" off of Ralph's roof
into the crossed arms of about 20
catchers. Another great athletic
manuever came an hour later af-
ter attempting to join the trugid
club.
By 5 p.m. we were buzzing and
whigging when we showed up at
Jimmy's. Jimmy was wearing a
Denver tee-shirt and Earlvis
started giving him hell.
Earlvis hadseen all the omens.
He was wearing his number 22
Redskins jersey and he had found
seven pennies on heads before the
game. Earlvis told Guido "Give
me a nickel on the Skins
As it approached 6 p.m Earlvis
was drunk and he was starting to
stress. In a crazed moment of
lapse of reason and rationale,
Earlvis told his buddy Paul Hoger
"I'm getting a mohawk if the Re-
dskins pull me through as they
stood beside the keg.
There is no reason to go into
great detail about Super Bowl
XX11. One reason for that is Earlvis
doesn't remember most of the
game. But in the end Doug Wil-
liams put all the white supremacy
freaks to shame as he won the
MVP. Timmy Smith, Coach Joe
Gibb's ace in the hole, racked up
the most yards for a running back
in the Super Bowl. And pretty boy
John Elway had to taste the turf
five times enroute to throwing
three interceptions.
Special thanks to Hoger, Mr. Gil
and A.T. who gave Earlvis a
Mohawk after the game and to
Rod Phelps who owes me a 12-
pack of Budweiser.
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sports Writer
East Carolina's women's bas-
ketball team saw a three-game
winning streak come to an end
Saturday night at Minges, as con-
ference rival UNC-Wilmington
handed the Lady Pirates a 75-56
loss.
On Thursday, the Lady Pirates
posted their third consecutive
win, 66-65 over Campbell Univer-
sity.
In their win over Campbell,
ECU improved their overall rec-
ord to 8-11. The Lady Pirates led at
the half, 29-28, as they shot 51
percent.
ECU was led by Alma Bethea,
who finished with 23 points and
six rebounds. Monique Pompili
added 16 points for the Lady Pi-
rates and pulled down six re-
bounds. Gretta O'Neal Savage
also added 10 points for ECU.
It was the fourth lose for
Campbell whose record fell to 11-
4. They were led by Julie Skinner
and Regina McKeithan who each
had 18 points.
As the Lady Pirates returned to
conference play Saturday, their
good fortune came to an end.
Shooting just 29 percent, ECU
could not contain the Lady
Seahawks. Wilmington jumped
out to a 4-0 lead in the first min-
utes of play.
ECU was able to take their only
lead of the game, 8-7, at 14:53
remaining in the first half, when
Irish Hamilton hit a 17-footer.
It was all downhill for the Lady
Pirates after that. They suffered a
four minute dry spell as the Lady
Seahawks led 22-11.
A layup by the Pirates' Alma
Bethea broke the streak, but did
not revive ECU.
Wilmington went on to lead 42-
26 at the half.
Thing weren't much better for
ECU in the second half. Wilming-
ton continued to dominate, and
with 9:30 remaining in the game,
led 64-38.
In the last two minutes, the
Lady Pirates outscored Wilming-
ton 8-3, but the effort came too
late, as the Lady Seahawks went
on to win, 75-56.
Only two ECU players scored in
double figures. Bethea scored 13
points and led the rebounding
with 13. Irish Hamilton added 11
points for the Pirates.
Wilmington was led by Char-
lene Page with 23 and Sharon
McDowell, who scored 16 points
and was .the leading rebounder
with 13.
ECU's record dropped to 8-12
overall and 2-4 in the Colonial
Athletic Conference.
Wilmington's conference record
is now 3-3
The Lady Pirates will travel to
Raleigh tonight to take on N. C.
State in non-conference action.
P
.1

c
Monique Pompili positions for a shot in the Lady Pirates' win over William & Mary last week i teammates
Wendy Morton (right), Gretta Savage (center) and Kate Kinney (left) look on.
)
illia
DIEGO (AP) - Another
Jcal stereotype passed.
into history at the Super
rucked safely away bvl
i Williams of the Washington
ins.
t now on, the MVP quarter-
;doesn't have to be the blond,
ed Ail-American with tht
!�rm. Sorry, John Elway.
rftom now on he can be a blacl
- with a fierce determinauoi
succeed and the inner strengtl
ore adversity,
jpefully, we're at the poin
'where most people are lookj
players and not colors anv
" Coach Joe Gibbs said.
Plliams raised America's con
I ily r
ME BE6I
BRONO
ack d
i Ifares wel
A pair of East Carolina tr
team members had impress
results over the weekend at
University of Florida Indj
Track Invitational held
Gainesville, Fla.
Lee McNeill finished in the
position in the 55-meter dash vj
a time of 6.29. McNeill's prihj
nary time clocking of 620 quj
fied him for the NCAA Indj
Track Championships.
Also picking up a first-pl
finish for the Pirate tracksters
Ken Daughtry. Daughtry loj
a time of 104.41 in the 500-i
run to capture the first positi
Daughtry's time qualified
for competition in the K
Championships.
travel
to foreign
land:
free.
Potr
wed. nites
film8pm
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1
f
r
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 2,1988 13
12
r
f
amels
Q
d
i
' j
1
�ht loss
s as 10 points in the first
Valuer's free throws were
a hen he was fouled by the
Kenny Murph who was
i loose ball.
- led in the game. 69-
- ' seconds remaining
inter by freshman
ton Hie Seahawks
even in the contest with :
play when Larry '
d ipa Mark Gary
en held the ball
ssed on a 3-
seconds to play,
- foul.
ped the Pirates to
CAA action.
conference competi-
ites will come Sat-
host George
Minges Coliseum.
r that contest is set
c
S
i
vound
ts, the national
ady obtained bv
�uld be hampered
n if you are .C.
an't help but be
play the up-artd-
- in any athletic
if you are .C. State,
a little deeper in
wound continue
3ell tabbed
ke University defen-
itor and assistant
tch Richard Bell was
defensive coordinator
it Carolina University Mon-
1 roach Art Baker an-
�vho resigned last
serving a five-year
Blue Devils, fills the
I
Please see KORMKR page 14
is halted
�itinued to dominate, and
remaining in the game,
two minutes, the
"irates outscored Wilming-
5-3, but the effort came too
e, as the Lady Seahawks went
'5-56.
two ECU players scored in
gures. Bethca scored 13
�ints and led the rebounding
th 13. Irish Hamilton added 11
r the Pirates.
nington was led by Char-
ge Pazi: with 23 and Sharon
I, who scored 16 points
3s the leading rebounder
ith 13.
J's record dropped to 8-12
and 2-4 in the Colonial
Conference.
conference record
Lady Pirates will travel to
igh tonight to take on N. C.
tate in non-conference action.
�.
!
I.
i & Mary last week
on.
Williams overcomes stereotype
SAN DIEGO (AP) - Another
sociological stereotype passed
quietly into history at the Super
Bowl, rucked safely away by
Doug Williamsof the Washington
I Redskins.
From now on, the MVP quarter-
back doesn't have to be the blond,
blue-eyed All-American with the
nflc arm. Sorry, John Elway.
sciousncss with a record-break- backs are a curiousity in the NFL.
ing performance in the Redskins' Williams stole Elway's thunder
42-10 romp over Denver and El- Sunday, passing for 340 yards and
way. He broke one Super Bowl four touchdowns, one of them an
recordand tied two others, and by 80-yarder. That broke Joe
the time he was through this Montana's record of 331 yards and
year's hero was just "the quarter- tied marks set by Terry Bradshaw
not "the black quarter-
back,
back
'All week long, the importance
From now on he can be a black of being a black quarterback was
passer with a fierce determination thrown around Williams said.
to succeed and the inner strength "but before I got here, I knew one
to ignore adversity. thing. I wasn't the quarterback of
Hopefully, we re at the point the Washington Redskins be-
now where most people are look- cause I was black. I didn't come
ing at players and not colors any- here with that in mind "
more, "Coach Joe Gibbs said. Still, people could not ignore
ilhams raised America's con- Williams' race. Black quarter-
and Jim Plunkett. In one magical
game, Williams made the Super
Bowl color blind.
For a long time, when black
passers came into the NFL, they
were converted to defensive
backs or wide receivers. It was
position discrimination that
changed ever so slowly with
people like James Harris and Joe
Gilliam.
Then along came Williams from
dusty Zachary, La a mapdot
town light years removed from
Los Angels, where Elway grew
up. Williams played at Gram-
bling, a small, traditionally black,
state school. Elway played at
Stanford, a prestigious private
institution.
Both were first-round draft
choices. Williams was installed
almost in desperation by woeful
Tampa Bay, while Elway was
warmly welcomed by more com-
petitive Denver.
Williams took the Bucs to the
NFC championship game one
year. Burdened by the long-
standing racial albatross, he was
largely dismissed by experts. The
Bucs eventually soured on him,
rejected his contract demands and
shrugged as he went off to the
USFL.
The new league failed and per-
Please see WILLIAMS page 14
Preview '88
Summer Student
Leadership
Opportunity
Available
East Carolina University
ORIENTATION STAFF
Pick up Application Packet
209 Whichard
Deadline for Completed Applications:
February 15, 1988 � 4:00 P.M.
Vie beginning to enjoy this
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Track duo
t Ifares well
A pair of East Carolina track
team members had impressive
results over the weekend at the
University of Florida Indoor
Track Invitational held in
Gainesville, Fla.
Lee McNeill finished in the first
position in the 55-meter dash with
a time of 6.29. McNeill's prilimi-
nary time clocking of 6.20 quali-
fied him for the NCAA Indoor
Track Championships.
Also picking up a first-place
finish for the Pirate tracksters was
Ken Daughtry. Daughtry logged
a time of 104.41 in the 500-meter
run to capture the first position.
Daughtry's time qualified him
for competition in the IC4A
Championships.
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1
14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 2, 1988
Broncos fall for the old sucker play in losing
SAN DIEGO (AP) � In football
terminology, it's called counter
gap. But from grade school to the
pros, it's often known as the
sucker play.
The object is simply to get the
defense moving one way while
the running back goes another.
It's in every team's playbook, but
because the Washington Re-
dskins run it so well, they own
another Super Bowl title.
The Redskins churned out a
over the Denver Broncos. Timmy most of his first NFL start. Smith led Washington in rushing about it. ter. It tied a Super Bowl record.
Smith had 204 of those yards, George Rogers was introduced during the preseason, but didn't "That's the one they run all the "We got off to such an awful
most of them on the play that has as the Redskins'starting running get into a game for an extended time said Denver Coach Dan start. I didn't know what was hap-
bcen a fixture in Washington's back. But Coach Joe Gibbs had period of time until November, Reeves. "We just couldn't stop it. pening Gibbs said. "We
game plan since Joe Gibbs put in decided to start Smith Saturay when he replaced an injured Ro- They have a great offensive line couldn't do anything. Then we
the one-back offense after taking night, though he didn't tell Smith gers. and Smith was superb running got that big play, and we were on
over as coach in 1981. about it until the opening kickoff. Smith's 58-yard TD gave Wash- theball our way '
"We made it (counter gap) Smith got outside and inside all ington a 21-10 second quarter Smith's success on the ground
famous said guard R.C. Thiele- day long in becoming the first lead, and his 4-yard run in the played a big part in the victory,
mann. "I guess everybody tries to player ever to run for more than final period enabled the Redskins but he wasn't the only reason
to notch a Super bowl record sixth Washington was able to blast the
touchdown. Broncos. Doug Williams, voted
The Broncos knew the Redskins the games most valuable player,
would try to run the counter gap.
They just couldn't do anything
run it, but nobody can do it as 200 yards in a Super Bowl.
good as the 'Skins Not bad for a fifth-round draft
"Our offensive line was giving pick who, because of injuries,
Super Bowl record 280 rushing me a chance to run all day long' played in only two game in his
yards Sundav in 42-10 victory said Smith, a rookie who made the final two years at Texas Tech.
Redskins aren't at top of Molloy's list
By PAT MOLLOY
�VmisiihI Sports I ililor
Author's note: Occasionally, there
are things that try our souls to the
point where we have to lash back. The
Redskins are one such thing for me.
Fortunately, 1 have an outlet. And the
bes t pa rt a bo utit is. f you' re a Was h -
ington fan, you'll feel compelled to
read this. The next best part is: you
can't say anything back.
I hate the Redskins. I hate them
with every fiber in mv body. I hate
them from head to toe, from ear to
are simple:
�Thev have no class.
staff told him to do was line up in Throughout the game, The
the middle and eat anything announcers were wondering why
Said Williams: "I think that 80-
yard play was the turning point of
the whole football game
Cornerback Barry Wilbum also
played a key role, intercepting
two John El way passes after Ricky
threw for 306 yards in the decisive Nattiel burned him for a 56-yard
first half, most of them in the 35- touchdown on the Broncos' first
offensive play.
"The woke me up early
Wilbum said. "I didn't want to
give up one more catch after that
Wilburn said the rest of the
�Charles Mann has the person- coming his way.
ality of Spam.
� Dave Butz Need I say more?.
�Dexter Manlev reallv is as
dumb as a grapefruit.
� 1 love the Dallas Cowboys.
Watching Washington play
Sunday was, admittedly, nause-
ating; but 1 did find comfort in the
fact that they won. That means
they won't win next year, when a
real football season commences.
Also, watching Manlev get
But Dan Dierdorf likes Butz, so
to speak. Says Dan:
"You know, Al, in the locker-
room, with his shirt off, Dave
doesn't look like a 14-year veteran
of the NFL. In fact, this could be
his finest season ever
Okay, Dan. Whatever you say. I
don't know how long you've been
checking out the vets in the lock-
errooms, but it's time to quit,
sweetie. Besides, it's entirely pos-
ear, from inside out, from finger roughed up by a second-string sible if you don't stop looking at
tip to tinger tip.
I don't like them narv a bit.
I could leave it at that. I wanted
to; but the powers that be de-
manded reasons.
Tim Chandler is the aforemen-
tioned "powers that be
Tim Chandler loves the Wash-
ington Redskins; and that's why
you're reading me on the back
pages.
Tim Chandler loves liver and
Edwin Meese.
So much for Tim Chandler.
rookie got me off.
Mv impression of Doug Wil-
liams took a step towards the
positive side when I saw him
complete spiral after beautiful
spiral to gliding wide receivers.
Dave Butz, he'll throw you down
and graze a while.
And of course it's his finest
season ever; he now weighs less
than a Buick.
But mv favorite Redskin rarelv
Alas, when the man opened his ever played. I think everyone
mouth to speak to the press, my knows of whom I speak. Jay "call-
suspicions returned. I'm con- me-anything-becausc-I-can't-
vinced Doug Williams is Leon sav-mv-name" Schrocder. 'Tis
Spinks in disguise. What choo be sad, 'tis true,
sayin baby? In fact, that in itself may be the
And for God's sake, tell Dave main reason I despise the Re-
Butz to drop a few pounds. He's dskins like I do. They're just plain
My reasons for hating the'Skins no ball player. All the coaching stupid.
Williams was super
Continued from page 13
sonal tragedy struck with the
death of his young wife. So when
the Redskins signed williams as a
backup and used him for exactly and a hyperflexcd left knee that
important thing was to come here
and play the game and do what
we needed to. And that was to
win
Root canal surgery Saturday
one pass all last season - a year
when Elway delivered Denver to
the Super Bowl - it hardly seemed
a hint of what would happen
Sunday.
But there was Williams, starting
at quarterback in the Super Bowl.
"I think Williams said, "the
took him out ot the game briefly at
the end of the first quarter Sunday
did not interfere.
When he returned, he produced
five touchdowns in 5 minutes, 47
seconds, and silenced the whis-
pers black quarterbacks have
heard for years.
South Ponor Uinnn 128
North PadreMustamc Island 156
Oaytona Beach 99
Former Duke coach
named by Art Baker
Calwcstom Island 124
Fort Walton Beach
Miami Beach 13S
Hilton Head Island 131
DONT DELAY
TOLL FEf SPWNC WHAK MFOMMTION AND RtSERVATIONS
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Continued from page 12
void left on the Pirates' coaching
staff by Les Herrin, who left the
Pirate program in December to
join Mac Brown's staff at North
Carolina.
Bell has been a defensive coor-
dinator for the past 16 years, ex-
cept for the 1982 season when he
was head coach at the University
of South Carolina. Bell was fired
controversially following the '82
season and later filed suit against
the university and won the case.
For Baker, the addition of Bell to
his staff also means the addition
of an old coaching pal. Bell and
Baker coached together from
1970-1972 as members of the
Texas Tech coaching staff.
Fela named
Jeff Fela, a graduate assistant
football coach on the East Caro-
lina staff, has been elevated to an
offensive assistant coaching posi-
tion, ECU head coach Art Baker
announced Friday.
Fela, who has been an assistant
at the University of Colorado,
Pittsburgh and Rutgers, joined
the Pirate coaching staff in the
summer of 1987. He had been the
tight end and receivers coach at
the Citadel during the 1985-86
seasons for Bulldog coach Tom
Moore.
The 36-year old North Plain-
field, Conn, native has coached
virtually every offensive position
as he was the line coach at Rutgers
in 1983 and the offensive back-
held and JV coach at Pittsburgh.
While at Pitt, the Panthers were
ranked second in the nation in
1980 and won the Gator Bowl.
Fela played collegiate football
at Southwestern (Kan.) College,
where he was team captain and
was a All-Kansas Athletic Confer-
ence choice.
Bell, who was in Greenville
Monday to accept the position,
credited ECU's football tradition
as well as his ties with Baker as the
main reasons for joining the Pirate
staff.
"I have followed ECU football
under coach (Clarence) Stasavich
(1962-1969), coach (Mike)
McGhee (1970) and coach (Pat)
Dye (1974-1979) Bell said Mon-
day. They were all winners.
They've (ECU) had a good foot-
ball tradition and I am glad to now
be a part of it.
"Coach Baker is one of the big
reasons I came here Bell contin-
ued. "Art and I have been friends
for a long time and our friendship
certainly played a part in my deci-
sion to come here
� TIM CHANDLER
Roses are red
Violets are blue
For someone sweet
A portrait of
you.
Portraits are a gift of love
so special only you can give them.
Call for Appointment
Special Valentine's Packages Available
Portraits by
INSTANT REPLAY
John Elway was smiling when he
ate the turf a few times. That one's
real easy. As he was getting up, he
asked Dexter Manley what his
SAT scores were.
The Washington Redskins:
Pseudobowl Champions for 1988.
Love those pigs.
point second quarter when the
Redskins built a 35-10 lead.
Williams' favorite target as
wide receiver Ricky Sanders, a
USFL castoff who caught nine
passes for a Super Bowl record Washington defense stiffened af-
193 yards. ter that play, surrendering only
Among those receptions was an three more points and limiting
80-yard bomb from Williams on Elway to only 13 completions the
the first play of the second quar- rest of the way.
4
The East Carolinian
Pick it up
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3g
A102
Intro, to The Short Story
When Caria told me that my date
was a little short, I thought she was
talking dollars and cents, not feet and
inches. So there I was at the door, in
my spiked heels, staring at the top of
my date's head.
All I could think was, how do I
get myself out of this? I could imagine
how my legs would ache if I had to walk
around with mv knees bent all evening.
So to stall for time, while figuring
out how to take malaria, I made us
some Double Dutch Chocolate.
When I brought it into the living
room, I discovered that Garv was
a chocolate lover too. Ahh, a man
after my own heart. Okav, I de-
J cided Id give him a chance. So we
sat down and saw each other face-
to-face for the first time. He had a
nice smile.
After some small talk�I mean
conversation�I discovered that we
both love Updike, hate the winter
weather, and both have minia-
ture sehnauzers. So, we made
a date to introduce Shadow
.nd Schatzi next week.
General Foods International Coffees
Share the feeling.
mmmmvm00tmm0mm m mummmvm m

1 �" ��
l�W�� "�
T





Title
The East Carolinian, February 2, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 02, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.585
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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