The East Carolinian, January 28, 1988






COMING TUESDAY:
New regulations about fire alarm boxes could affect
residence halls across campus. Toni Page has the
story Tuesday.

ENTERTAINMENT
Robin Williams makes Vietnam fun for all. See
page 9.
SPORTS
Pirates lose their third CAA game in another dole
contest. See page 13.
She 4�wst Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. tO No. 33
Thursday, January 28,1988
Greenville, NC
16 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Jackson calls for new south, common ground
By TIM HAMPTON Jackson said. state of public education. � 5
By TIM HAMPTON
Statt Writer
Democratic presidential candi-
date Jessie lackson said he has
visions of a new south overcom-
ing the pains of "the common
grounds' in a speech before a
crowd of 1.500 in a Greenville
church Wednesday night.
Speaking of the" common
grounds Jackson said it is time
to stop the plant gates from clos-
ing, to stop the family farms from
becoming bankrupt and to stop
the lack of finanicial aid in col-
fackson said. state of public education.
One of Jackson's themes in his Jackson reflected back on the
speech was that the nation must 1960s battle over civil rights and
help to improve the lives of 41 his close association with Dr.
million poor Americans. In using Martin Luther King Jr. He spoke
a parable to the Biblical Mary and of the first protest sit-in at a
Joseph who were without a home Woolworth's lunch counter in
at the time of Jesus'birth, Jackson downtown Greensboro in the
said 'let's become like the wise early '60s. Jackson, who attended
men and help the homeless North Carolina A & T University
In critizing big business, and in Greensboro, was one of the
in particular General Electric, protesters in the historic sit-in.
Jackson said the trade deficit is the
fault oi American investment in On racial and religious unrest,
countries such as Korea which Jackson said, "When we turn out
leges and universities. Jackson's have caused the closing of plants the lights, it's amazing that we
plees to improve the south in America. look the same in the dark to
brought vibrant applause from On the death of the family farm, which the audience erruptcd into
the audience in the Corner Stone Jackson said federal farm subsi- applause.
Missionary Baptist Church. diesand the lack of farm loans will In another analogy, Jackson
Choose hope over dope and have to change. He said the back- said that his grandmother used to
choose the human race over the bone of America, the farmer, sow small patches of cloth in
nuclear race Jackson said. He should not be placed in jeopardy beautiful quilts. In a statement
said that weasa nation must work because of bad government pol- about unity, Jackson said "Let's
to lift the moral tone oi the coun- icy. pull thCse patches together
tr jackson also said it is ironic that Near the end of his hour
In an analogy that the country tax payers pay $120,000 per in- speech, Jackson said "It's good to
is full of lambs and lions. Jackson mate in federal prisons while see Eastern North Carolina rise
said that when there is a fire in the $6,000 per student in public insti- from being a sleeping giant He
torcst both the lambs and lions tutions. 'There are not enough expounded the importance of
come together to find the com- scholarship and student loans registering to vote and he told
mon grounds. "I see people com- and our teachers don't make those in the audience who weren't
ing together from the fire enough Jackson said about the registered to do so in the church.
:�B
Presidential smile
Jesse Jackson, a candidate for the Democratic nomination for president, smiles during a speech in
Greenville Wednesday. Jackson spoke at Corner Stone Missionary Baptist Church as part of his
campaign swing through southern states before Super Tuesday primaries. (Photo by Jon Jordan �
Photolab)
Legislature prepares for the spring
V
BEN ECKERT
By TIM HAMPTON
Staff Writer
When Bennett Eckert, the
speaker of the SGA legislative,
first told people his idea to install
condom dispensers in all student
residence halls, people snickered.
Now they are taking Eckert
seriously. Eckert said in an inter-
view Wednesday he is planning
to push the condom legislation
through the SGA.
"With the threat of AIDS it
seems imperative that we make
condoms more accessible Eckert
said.
He said that similar plans on
other North Carolina campuses
have worked. UNC-Wilmington
has condom dispensors in the
student health center, and NCSU
has students selling condoms in
caster eggs, Eckert said.
Eckert said that before intro-
ducing a condom proposal to the
SGA, he will first conduct a feasi-
bility study on the idea. Eckert
said if the study is positive, SGA
owned and operated condom
machines will be proposed.
Eckert said he expects opposi-
tion to the plan. Presently, the
Disease affects many women
By STEPHANIE FOLSOM
Stiff Writer
One out of every four women
experience the "Silent Crippler
a disease which costs Americans
$7-10 billion per year according to
speakers at the Lunchtime Learn-
ing Seminar Tuesday.
What is this "Silent Crippler"?
It is osteoporosis, a disease which
results in the decrease of bone
mass. ECU Nutritionists Mary
Kirkpatrick and Margie Gal-
lagher discussed the issue of cal-
cium supplements and offered
advice to women concerning os-
teoporosis at the seminar.
Gallagher said calcium,
whether taken in through food or
through supplements, is known
to help prevent the disease. 1000
milligrams of calcium per day is
recommended, although most
women fall far short of that in
their diet.
She said many women worry
about weight gain when includ-
ing high intakes of calcium in
their diet, but that lowfat milk and
lowfat yogurt acturally have a
higher percentage of calcium than
their fattening counterparts.
Other recommendation from
Gallagher and Kirkpatrick in-
cluded:
� Participation in weight bear-
ing exercises, such as walking or
jogging, four times weekly. Exces-
sive amounts of exercise actually
deplete calcium, they warned, so
it was suggested not to overdo it.
� Avoid too much protein. Too
much protein from foods, such as
See DOCTOR, page 3
Health issues
The Lunchtime Learning Seminar Tuesday featured a discussion on the disease Osteoporosis, a health
problem mainly affecting women. (Photo by Jon Jordan � Photolab)
student health center is the only
location on campus for students
to purchase condoms.
Eckert said other plans for the
spring semester include refining
the election process, completing
annual appropriations and mak-
ing the SGA legislature respresen-
tative of the student population.
Concerning elections, Eckert
said he would like to see the proc-
ess go smoothly. He said he
doesn't expect runnintg into the
problems of bias and unattended
polling locations which
beleagued elections last year.
The annual appropriations, in
which 85 percent of the SGA
budget is appropriated to student
groups, is one project Eckert said
he will be working on in the up-
coming weeks.
Eckert said the Appropriation
Committee has worked over a 100
hours on annual appropriations
Jr oast years to assure that student
groups recieve just funding.
Eckert said he disagrees with
possible manditory funding roles
for the arts. Manditory appropria-
tion bylines are rumored accord-
ing to Eckert.
"Anytime you set the amount of
money we have to give a group,
you are restricting the SGA's
power Eckert said.
IMPORTANT
The rain and flooding of the
past few weeks has forced the
closing of the lower parking lot at
Minges Coliseum and the lots
adjacent to Harrington Field, ac-
cording to Laureen Kirsch, Stu-
dent Union president.
Therefore, Kirsch said, the Stu-
dent Union will provide a shuttle
bus service for the Jimmy Buffett
concert Thursday from the park-
ing lots surrounding the Allied
Health building to the coliseum.
Kirsch said two buses will run
from 6:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Parking will be available in the
paved lots around the coliseum,
but Kirsch said she expected those
lots to fill up early.
"I think they'll fill up by 6:30
p.m she said. "We're going to
try selling tickets as soon as pos-
sible, so people will be standing in
line to buy tickets. That will
probably fill up the lots
"I'll have a watchful eye on the
annual appropriations Eckert
said.
Eckert said he wants to see
proper representation in the SGA
legislature. "We want a more
rounded SGA with minority
voices as well as voices from
groups such as Students for Eco-
nomic Democracy Eckert said.
There are nine openings in the
legislature, room for five dorm
representatives and four day rep-
resentatives, according to Eckert.
Eckert said he will try to organ-
ize a forum committee in efforts to
bring gubernatorial candidates
Jim Martin and Bob Jordan to
speak on campus.
On the parking plan which
passed in December's Trustees
meeting, Eckert said he approves.
"Everyone wants a simple solu-
tion to the parking problem. Al-
though there will be a $25 increase
in parking fees they are still low
compared to other schools Eck-
ert said.
SRA makes plans for
retreats, conferences
By KIMLEY EDER
Staff Writer
Discussion about the vacant
council secretary position topped
the agenda at Tuesday's meeting
of the Student Resident Associa-
tion.
SRA President Thomas Denton
said applicants for the position
should have at least one year's
experience on executive house
council. Anyone interested in the
position should contact Denton
by Thursday or Friday.
Discussions continued about
plans for a spring dance to be held
March 18 at the Holiday Inn on
U.S. 264. Tickets are scheduled to
go on sale Feb. 16 and are ex-
pected to cost $3 per person and
$5 per couple. SGA buses will
provide transportation to and
from campus.
An announcement was made
that the Central Campus ARC
will sponsor a Mardi Gras cele-
bration Feb. 16 in Slay dorm.
Admission is free to residents of
central campus halls, 50 cents to
everybody else.
In further business, two upcom-
ing conferences were discussed.
A leadership conference will be
held Friday through Sunday at
Camp Con ten tea. All house coun-
cil members are welcome, and
there will be round-table discus-
sions for all area members.
Guest speakers will include
Dean Caroline Fulghum and
Linda Barkley. Denton said inter-
ested members should have their
applications in by Thursday, and
transportation will be provided.
Also, the SRA state conference
willbeheld Feb. 12-14 in Winston-
Salem. The deadline for appli-
cants is Tuesday.
New rules
govern aid
packages
By KRISTTNA MURDEN
Staff Writer
The structural changes finan-
cial aid will undergo in the 1988-
89 school year will drastically
impact the eligibility of many
types of students, according to
ECU Director of Financial Aid,
Ray Edwards.
Edwards said Congress has
adopted a new methodology for
everyone. Dependent students,
especially those who work, will
see less eligibility. Also, criteria
used to evaluate this year's need
will come from the previous year.
Current jobs will not be taken into
consideration. Parents have al-
ways been evaluated this way; on
the basis of prior information.
Students with families will also
see a drop. Aid will be entirely
based on direct cost of student
expenses for nine months instead
of family size. Edwards said a
maimed student with a child re-
ceived $10,510 last year, but
would only receive $3990 under
See AID, page 2
l
� N �ifww� �
� - -mr r �r
�x. -

MMHRMPti�C4 .





i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 23, 1988
Bell to start ECU student campaign group
By M. BURBELLA
Aut New tJitot
ECU graduate Dan Bell, a
Democratic candidate for the of-
fice of North Carolina's Secretary
of State, returned to his alma
matter Wednesday to help organ-
ize a student support group for
his campaign.
Bell, who recently resigned
from his position as the state's
securities administrator, was the
youngest ever to hold that job in
America at the time of his ap-
pointment. He is originally from
Mount Olive.
Bell, in cooperation with the
ECU Young Democrats, is hoping
set up a "Students for Bell cam-
paign "as soon as possible Bell
hopes to set up such groups on
campuses statewide. He sees this
not onlv as an opportunity for
recognition, but also as a way to
Aid offered
Continued from page 1
the new rules. In addition,
spouses will no longer be relevant
in the evaluation process.
Edwards said he can't stress
enough how important it is to be
aware of the new changes and to
get applications in quickly. Since
these new policies will affect so
many people in a negative way,
the system will be "sensitive al-
lowing for human intervention
says Edwards.
He also mentioned students
need to get applications in as soon
as possible in order to know
"What we're dealing with this
year A temporary full-time staff
member will be instrumental in a
faster, more efficient evaluation
process.
get students involved with politi-
cal campaigns and voting on a
"smaller scale
Bell taught Business law, Intro-
duction to Business and Income
Tax courses at ECU while attend-
ing graduate school at night. Bell
says he learned a lot at ECU. He
also met his wife, who has an
undergraduate degree from ECU, secretary of state because he be-
here, lieves he is the only one qualified.
Although Bell has always kept For the last six years, Bell has
up with politics and current served as a top administrator of
events, he says he never aspired to the secretary of state's office. He
being a politician. admires present secretary of state,
"1 didn't plot from the time 1 Thad Eure, and plans to keep in
was in high school that 1 was step with his campaign slogan by
going to be a politician Bell said, "continuing the tradition
"But, 1 am the type of person that's The "tradition Bell said, is the
always proud the be involved in tradition of a secretary of state
some way or another who wants to be secretary of state
"On one hand it's not surpris- � not just use the post as a stcp-
ing at all that I'm running for sec- ping stone to a higher office. (Eure
retarv of state Bell said. "But if I has remained in his position for
were running for commissioner over 50 years.)
or lieutenent governor, or what- Another tradition Bell believes
ever, 1 think 1 would be more in is using credentials to deter-
shocked than anyone else mine a person qualified for a posi-
would tion in a public office. He was
Bell has never before run for a chosen purely on his credentials
public office and doesn't believe it after seeing an advertisement for
will happen again in the future, an opening as attorney for the
He is running for the office of secretary of state.
Bell said Eure hired staff on the
basis of experience and creden-
of securities and stocks and bonds
and issuing approvals to salese-
curities which raise capitol Bell
also screens for abusive practices
and for fradulent offers.
During his time with the secre-
tary of state office, Bell has
handled North Carolina's secun-
North Carolina, record levels of
inverstment activity, and record
number of enforcement cases
according to information given in
his media folder.
Bell's literature also said he has
been a major force in the return to
the public of millions of dollars of
tials, unlike some politicians who
hire on the basis of favors or
friendship. "He certainly didn't
owe me any favors � 1 had never
met the man until I was inter-
viewed and was hired
What Bell has accomplished for
Eure is twofold. He has headed
"subsidive programs at the office,
which includes the business and
financial service oversight pro-
grams This means a screening
functions of "proposed offerings
tics regulation programs through investment losses due to .llogal �
she 3rs of "unprecedented abus,ve pract.ee.
grow Including a five-fold ,n- And, he says, he pla
crease in the number of stockbro-
kers registered to do business in
ns to con-
this level of accumphsh-
nent if elected to office.
Qttf 3&0t ttar0litrtaa
Servbig die East Carolina canyus community sine. 1925
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representative
nne Leigh Mallory James Russo
Shari Clemens Adam Blankensl ,p
Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY KATES
0-49 Column inchesS4.25
50-99 4 15
100 149 4 �
150 199 3 95
200 249 3 85
250 and above3 75
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
(Charge in Addition to Regular Space Rale)
One color and black $90 00
Two colors and black 155.00
Dan Bell (left), former ECU graduate student, talked with (from the left) Hugh Carroll, Melissa Schulte
We need to know of changes and Micky Burbella after a meeting Wednesday to organize a student campaign group at ECU. (Photo by
from last year so adjustments can
be made for unusual circum-
stances" said Edwards.
Edwards said independent stu-
dents will see improvements in
the system if they see any change
at all. A positive change is that the
Pel Grant has increased to $2,200,
up $100 from last year.
Application forms are now
available from the financial aid
office. Priority due date for the
1988-89 academic year is April 15
and April 1 for summer school.
Thomas Walters
r
rr
Photolab)
( ZARfiJf WP-fLASH ALkVt$
SETS LIKE THIS UHEU HE
REAPS THE.
&STCM0UUIAN;
Inserts
5.000 or less
5.001 - 10,000
10,001-12.000
6c e�ch
5 5� eich
5c each
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
Phones757-6366757-6-57
757-6558757 6309
S0METHW
��J
T
-&,
FROM SI BUAY
ALL VARIETIES
SERVE & SAVE SLICED
Luncheon
Meat
$&
CAFFEINE FREE DIET.
DIET OR
Coke
Classic
KROGER
All Meat
Weiners
12
Oz
Pkg
REGULAR OR LIGHT.
MIRACLE WHIP OR
Kraft
Mayonnaise . . ja
LIMIT 1 WITH $10 ADD I PURCHASE
990
DRY ROASTED
Planters
Peanuts .
$279
INDIVIDUALLY
WRAPPED KROGER
American
Singles . . . .
BUY ONE GET
QNE99e
Subway always has "Somethin Hot Enjoy the fresh
alternative at Subway! Delicious steak and cheese,
meatball, hot ham & cheese or roast beef and
cheese. All with the fresh fixin's of your choice.
Sandwiches & Salads
FROM THE FLORIDA SUN
SHINE TREE SWEET
Juice
Oranges
ASSORTED VARIETIES
Fox
Pizza
KROGER
Multigrain
Bread
24
Oz.
Lvs.
ASSORTED
MOORE S
Potato
Chips
ASSORTED VARIETIES
SANDY MAC
ROYALIST
Boiled
Ham
rl-
MV
Lb
STORE A
Pitt Plaza
756-2110
�Buy any sandwich or salad and get one of equal or lesser price for
99 with purchase of 22 ok. soa drink. Not valid with other coupons
or offers. At participating stores only. Offer expires Feb. 29, 1988.
Items and Prices Effective
Sun. Jan. 24,1988 thru
Sal. Jan. 30, 1988
Copyrijhl IMS
Krofar Saw-On
Quantity Pti(hti Ratarvrd
Nona Sold To Daalart
taw ML ��� l�4.
0'�O t�m �nt� � AC 'I'lintMMfft'V'
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd - Greenville
Rand v
By KAREN SALTI R
Staff Writer
State Senator Tony K
v-umberland Count) a andi
late for Lieutenant Governor,
iaid Wednesday that cdu
must tx a top priority for the I
tureof North Carolina
He made the remark
addressing several member
! ' Student
Association.
Rand, who
dorsedasacandidal
ml Governor by the Nortl
lina Assih iation ol � �
' � ivembcr, indicated that or i
rth arolina's greatest u
iw is education.
Rand, whos
Personal sd
to prevent
f
Your personal sal l
ity- is t!ie I Jepartment
Safety's number on
t yours? In mosl
not, unless you i -
o you has been a vi I i
Most people do n I
personal safety and s
because they are exp
me else to do it f -
PublicSafel
a known fact that t! � s
can not be in all pi
Although not all crinru
prevented, the fa
majority can. That is
important that
rime Prevention.
What is Crime Pre
the anticipation and n
�fa crime risk and them
some type of action to decrc
eliminate that particluar ri �
An example of this is th(
rrespass Warning signs that
now appearing in residence I
on campus. Fnesered, bla -
white highly visible signs hav
been placed in areas lead
living quarters for resid i I
visitors protection.
These signs read: "V
� All Non-Residents
building are forbidden I
yond this point, unles
by a resident of this buil I .
Violators are subject I i
T TRESPASSNG , on :
property and will b&pfcen
1 accordance with (N �
159.12,14-159.13). This
manor punishable by a maxii
imprisonment ol six "�
and or maximum fin. I :
rhis is a new rrespa
which became effecth �
Some residents an
them. The are concern d i
their safety and sevurit
them have been victims r �
I others who have t
also know that a majoi I
vandalism, larcenies, and a
Crimebust
The Campus
help.
On Saturday at appi
ll:40pm,fivebla -
White Hall through tl
doors leading totl
unescorted. They
elevator with one m
female students �
get her.
One ol the black n
washarrassing i
while in th
got off on the rd I
student followed b
rnale �.
five black male
lowed As tl
reached the 1 r i
males struck
unconcious
males attempted t
female's room, but wci �
Phe five black n
thereat ter
Doctor says
� Continued from pagt 1
rid meat, removes cak un
t4e body
e Avoid soft drinks,
, ftocolatc. and foods high in
since they interfere with
absorption ol calcium
; � Also, tn to sleep
each night and avoid execs
stress
How do vou know it
even at nsUor developing o
porosis? According to Kir
trick and Gallagher, boside-
nutritional habits, vou shoui
concerned it
r vou arc a Caucasian ten
a?





THE EAST CAROLINIAN!
JANUARY 28, 1988 3
oup
North Carolina, record levels of
investment activity, and record
number of enforcement cases,
according to information given in
his media folder.
Bell's literature also said he has
been a major force in the return to
the public of millions of dollars of
investment losses due to illegal or
abusive practices.
And, he says, he plans to con-
tnue this level of accumplish-
ment it elected to office.
te0lfcriaa
is nmunity sine 2925.
director of Advertising
epresentatives
James Russo
Adam Blankensl .p
DVERTISING
$4.25
4.15
4.05
3 95
3.85
3 75
RUSING RATES
. i� Rate)
$90 00
155 00
6c each
5 5c each
5c tich
SS HOI RS:
iy-Frida)
! p.m.
I7-6366757-f 57
!7-6558757 6309
.LY
KROGER
;an
12
Oz
Pkg
990
ITED
IE S
ato
ps
9
v
Moore's!
'�Willy
SANDY MAC
ROYALIST
Boiled
Ham
$
�99
�- �-�� 'T W �� ������
i HOURS EVERYDAY
vine Blvd Greenviii�
)
Rand visits campus
By KAREN SALTER
Suff Writer
State Senator Tony Rand (D-
-umbcrland County), a candi-
date for Lieutenant Governor,
aid Wednesday that education
must be a top priority for the fu-
ture of North Carolina.
He made the remarks while
addressing several members of
the ECU Student Government
Association.
Rand, who was officially en-
dorsed as a candidate for Lieuten-
ant Governor by the North Caro-
lina Association of Educators in
grade teacher in the Cumberland
County School System, empha-
sized North Carolina's need to
both get good teachers and keep
and challenge the good teachers
currently employed.
Rand said he has already made
efforts to improve the quality of
education in North Carolina. As
kinds of teachers we have in our
schools He said North Carolina
needs to do things to "create more
enthusiasm about teaching as a
career primarily by raising the
salary of school teachers.
Another way to attract quality
students to the teaching profes-
sion, Rand said, is by providing
November, indicated that one of
North Carolina's greatest areas of need WairndmOTmi.
need is education. �But more importnt
Sand, whose wife is a first- buildings said Rand, "an
chairman of the Appropriations fellowships for students inter-
Committee, Rand said, he helped csted in teaching careers. In the
pass the School Facility Act Senate, Rand worked on the Basic
which, over the next ten years, Education Plan and on Project
will provide three billion dollars Teacher, a fellowship program
for the building and remodeling designed to encourage minorties
of North Carolina schools, some to enter the teaching profession,
of which are antiquated and in According to Rand, 400 North
Carolina students are currently
participating in this program.
1 i11
TONY RAND
EAT IN
OR
TAKEOUT
than
the
Personal safety helps
to prevent some crime
Your personal safety and secu- have been committed by non-rcsi-
-ity is the Department of Public dents. Others think the signs and
Safety's number one concern � is what they stand for is ridiculous
t yours? In most cases usually or is a violation of their freedom,
not, unless you or someone close Some feel that it is too much
to you has been a victim. trouble to go to the lobby and
Most people do not put their escort their guests to their rooms,
personal safety and security first, Any time there is a change in the
because they arc expecting some- rules we live by there are going to
one else to do it for them, such as be some for and some against.
Public SafetyPolice Officers. It is
a known fact that these officers Unescorted persons, some stu-
can not be in all places at one time, dents and some not, have been
Although not all crimes can be known to rip off rooms and even
prevented, the facts reveal that a assualt students or guests of that
majority can. That is why it is resident hall. In the past, persons
important that you practice caught unescorted or wandering
Crime Prevention. around a residence hall could
What is Crime Prevention? It is only be banned by Campus Po-
the anticipation and recognition lice. If they then returned to that
of a crime risk and the initiation of building or campus, they could be
some type of action to decrease or arrested for trespassing,
eliminate that particluar risk. However, now the Trespass
An example of this is the new Warning signs serve as that ban in
Trespass Warning signs that are residence halls. Now the Campus
now appearing in residence halls Police may arrest that individual,
on campus. These red, black, and if heorsheisinviolation. Whether
white highly visible signs have or not these signs are enforced is
been placed in areas leading into up to you and other residents of
living quarters for residents and your building. You must report
visitors protection. all violators for is to be an effective
These signs read: "WARNING deterant against those who will
� All Non-Residents of this steal from, or harm you and your
building are forbidden to go be- guests.
yond this point, unless escorted Women should be especially
by a resident of this building, careful. Please do not let in or
Violators are subject to arrest for escort anyone that you do hot
-r TRESPASSiNG �m on state know or think you know into the
property and will bi�p1fce!rtcd ving areas of youffcuiMingsf
in accordance with (N.C.G.S. 14- because you think you are doing
159.12,14-159.13). This is a misde- he or she a favor. You may very
manor punishable by a maximum well be assisting him or her into
imprisonment of six (6) months the position to steal from or assu-
alt you or others who live or visit
there. The same holds true when
you do not report violations. This
holds true in coed, male, and
female residence halls. Please
report all violations immediately
to your RA and Campus Police -
757-6150.
Remember you and your safety
"As the Federal Government is
getting out of the business of help-
ing college students attend col-
lege, increasing pressure is being
placed on states (to offer alterna-
tive financial assistance) he said.
One way to help students, he
noted, is by making scholarship
assistance information available.
As chair of the Appropriations
Committee, Rand said he also
worked to keep down tuition
costs of the state's universities
which, he said, are "reasonable
Rand encouraged the students
at the meeting to get involved in
political campaigns and to keep
track of issues and candidates.
"We need to do what we can to
increase student interest in the
North Carolina Legislature
Rand said, because legislators
"have the power to affect your
lives
hkihmh Clip-N-Save ����!
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
and frozen yogurt
321 East 10th Street. Greenville
(Next to Wendy's)
758-4896
This coupon good for
$1.00 OFF
Your Valentine's Ice Cream Cake.
We'll Write Your Greetings FREE.
Order Today!
Good Thru 2 14 88
What Sweeter Way To Say I Love You!
MJM� Clip-N-Save �����)
FAMOUS
"COMPARE
OUR
PRICES"
BUSINESS HOURS:
MONDAY - SUNDAY
11 tn � 11 jmi
100 E. 10th Strati
and Evan SWmI
Gr��nvlll�, M.C.
SUPERBOWL SPECIALS
26" Color TV To Watch The
GAME
60 oz. pitcher of beer - $1.50
EAT IN ONLY
2 Large Pizzas, 2 Toppings $12.95
2 Small Pizzas, 2 Toppings $9.95
For Fast Free Delivery
Call 757-0731 or 757-1278
DELIVERY ONLY
2 Large Pizzas, 2 Toppings $13.95
2 Small Pizzas, 2 Toppings $10.50
2 Spaghetti Dinners wmeat balls
(Includes salad & garlic bread.) 10.95
2 Lasagna Dinners
(Includes salad A garlic bread.)1 1 .25
This offer not good with any other promotion. This oifer may be withdrawn at any time.
ATiTIC
The,
CoMedY
WED
The,
CoMedY
WED
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
752-7303
THURSDAY
ICC WATER
MANSION
ICC WATER
MANSION
12 Price Admission
with Buffet Stub
FRIDAY
ICE WATER
MANSION
ICE WATER
MANSION
88 c Bar Specials
SATURDAY
The
Usuals
Never Stop
Party Rock
SUNDAY
Super
Bowl
7TK0
Giant 15 foot T.V.
andor maximum fine of $1000
This is a new trespassing law
which became effective October.
Some residents are glad to see
them. The are concerned about
their safety and sevurity. A lot of
them have been victims or know
of others who have beeii. They
also know that a majority of the
vandalism, larcenies, and assaults begin with you!
Crimebusters seek info
The Campus Police needs your Campus Police were then noti-
help. fied, and arrived on the scene
On Saturday at approximately within a couple of minutes. They
11:40 pm, five black males entered were unable to locate any of the
White Hall through the curfew black male subjects. The studer
doors leading to the elevator area that was rendered unconciou'
�at
unescorted. They got on the
elevator with one male and two
female students, who were to-
gether.
One of the black male subjects
required medical attention for a
cut lip and facial fractures.
All five black males were de
scribed as being large and weli
built. The only description wc
have is that one of the black males
was harrassing one of the females was approximately 6 ft. to 6 ft. 3
while in the elevator. Everyone
got off on the 3rd floor, the male
student followed behind the fe-
males to one of their rooms. The
five black male subjects also fol-
lowed. As the male student
reached the door, one of the black
inches tall, 250-280 lbs round
face, close cut hair, brown rim
glasses and wearing blue jeans.
These subjects were reported ear-
lier in Fletcher Hall for being
unescorted.
If you have any information
males struck him, rendering him concerning this or any other crime
unconcious. Two of the black on the ECU Campus, please call
males attempted to enter the Campus Police � 757-6150 or
female's room, but were kept out. Pirate Crime Busters � 757-6266.
The five black males left shortly Remember, we want your infor-
thcreafter. mation, not your name.
Doctor says avoid soft drinks
Continued from page 1
r$d meat, removes calcium from
ie body.
� Avoid son armies, caat&sm
ci�ocolatc, and foods high in fat,
since they interfere with the
absorption of calcium.
� Also, try to sleep 7-8 hours
each night and avoid excessive
stress.
How do you know if you are
even at risk for developing ostco
� your family has a history of
osteoporosis
� you have a low body weight
� you were born prematurely
� vou h�v� fivolonevl nrri-
, - t
dontal disease
Gallagher, of the School of
Home Economics, sees osteropor-
sis as a "significant health prob-
lem It was stressed in the semi-
nar that all women realize the
importance of developing strong
bones before their post-meno-
when the risk is
porosisr According to Kirkpa- pausal years
trick and Gallagher, besides bad greater. According to Kirkpatnck,
nutritional habits, you should be of the School of Nursing, sooner
concerned if � " womcn evP �
� � you are a Caucasian female degree of osteoporosis.
BUFFET CONCERT
VAKTY
AbEAWAYS
Kavpa Sigma house
3:00 until Concert
Tickets!?2 AdwMd
$3
. .�. dl:
- . wt � A �.wm���A'
4 - - ���





OJfie lEaat (Earoliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, GnnmM�ir
Clay Deanhardt, .1 uo.
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, Director of Advertising
Tim G iandler, si &�
Jot in Carter, -�� Editor
Mia ielle England, &�� m-
Debbie Stevens, s
Jeff Parker. �!���
TOM FtJRR, Circulation Manager
Mike Upchurch, production Manage,
JOHN W. MEDLIN, Art Director
Mac Clark, Business Manage
January 28, 1988
OPINION
Page 4
Buccaneer
Book needs student support
People at Monday's meeting of the to have their portraits made begin-
Media Board heard the first good ning Feb. 8, and the rest of the stu-l
news to come from the office of the dent body can have their pictures!
Buccaneer in some time: the 1988-89 made Feb. 15-19. Faculty and staff
Buc is on schedule, the first deadline pictures will also be made during
has been met and production is that time.
moving smoothly. In addition, the Buc is in the proc-
The announcement serves as a ess of organizing group photo-
reminder to us that the problems graphs for their pages. A major criti-
that plagued the 1986 and 1987 Buc- cism of the 1986 Buccaneer has been
caneer staffs cannot be blamed on its lack of ECU group oriented mate-
the present staff. They must be given rial. The 1988 Buc can remedy that
a fair chance to produce the book only if student groups get organized
and they deserve the support of and get their photos made.
students, faculty and campus or-
ganizations.
This reminder could not have
come at a better time, since the Buc-
A yearbook cannot be compiled
without the help of the student
body. If we want a quality yearbook,
caneer offices are now scheduling then the responsibility lies with us to
portraits and group shots for this have our individual and group
yearbook. Seniors can sign up now photographs taken.
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and clas-
sification, address, phone number and
signature of the authoris). Letters are
limited to two typewritten pages, double
spaced or neatly printed. All letters are
subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are reminded
that they are limited to one every two
weeks. The deadline for editorial material
is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday's edition and
5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday's edition.
Forum
rules
Campus
Spectrum
rules
In addition to the "Campus Forum"
section of the editorial page, The East
Carolinian features the "Campus
Spectrum This is an opinion column
by guest writers from the student
body and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum'
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation
The columns are restricted in con
tent only with regard to rules of gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
Students and alumni say Bern went too far
To the editor:
Bern McCrady's Jan. 21 letter
("Former writer attcks the right with
biting comments") was one of the
most immature, hypocritical, and
extreme displays of liberal hysteria I
have ever seen. I'm a conservative
Republican and proud of it. But even
though I disagree strongly with the
liberals on this campus about virtu-
ally everything, I haven't and will
never resort to the puerile, hackneyed
second-grade name-calling that
McCrady engages in.
Evan Lightner and Rick Brown,
both ECU liberals, are two of the nic-
est guys I've ever met or talked to I
may disagree with them on the issues,
but I sure as heck respect them as
human beings, and I honestly want to
hear their point-of-view. As far as I
know them, I don't think they would
ever resort to the ravings of a Bern
McCrady.
Some of the liberals on this campus
(but not Evan or Rick) have resorted
(to an extent) to calling conservatives
names and using diversionary tactics
to get around addressing the issues
directly. But none of the liberals on
this campus have in any way even
come close to the paranoid, Mc-
Carthyish tirades of Bern McCrady.
McCrady calls conservatives
"mindless fools "Nazi supporters
"low-life excuses of political drivel
etc etc etc. What a bunch of
unadulterated nonsense I think that
it's really kind of sad and pitiful that
McCrady has to resort to this kind of
mud-slinging to try and support his
views: all it does is make more sen-
sible liberals look bad.
It is particularly ironic that
McCrady calls conservatives "Nazi
supporters" when it is the liberals
which classify the innocent unborn as
'less than human" and claim that it is
thus permissible to kill them to cure
"social ills Liberals openly advocate
abortion, euthanasia, even infanti-
cide: practices that are a mirror image
of the atrocities Adolph Hitler
committed in Nazi Germany.
How can conservatives be "Nazi
supporters" when they are totally
against everything Hitler stood for?
How can McCrady accuse them of
being "Nazi supporters" when he
himself supports many of the things
Hitler advocated, like branding a
whole class of human beings "sub-
human"? Incredible!
McCrady blasts Contra-supporters
as "mindless fools I have something
every liberal, especially McCrady,
should read. It's entitled "Nicaragua:
A Speech to My Former Comrades on
the Left" It's a speech made by David
Horowitz, former radical liberal ac-
tivist, founder of the Vietnam Solidar-
ity Campaign, and one of the found-
ers of the New Left a quarter-century
ago
Today, he's an anti-communist and
a committed opponent of Communist
rule in Nicaragua. This man knows
more about the goals, ideologies, and
failures of the liberal left than
McCrady and all the other liberals on
this campus put together. Horowitz
was involved in the same activities
and believed the same lies liberals
believe in now before McCrady was
even born. I suggest you listen to
what he says, McCrady.
"The issue about Nicaragua isn't
whether it's morally right for the U.S.
to arm the Contras, or whether there
are unpleasant men among them. The
issue is how to oppose a Soviet impe-
rialism so vicious and so vast as to
dwarf any previously known In
every case, without exception, time
has proved the Left wrong about
communism. Wrong about its views
of the revolutionaries' intentions, and
wrong about the facts of their revolu-
tionary rule. And just as consistently,
the anti-communists proved right-
Without Castro's intervention, the
anti-Somoza and pro-democratic
Contras would be the government of
Nicaragua today
Finally, McCrady viciously at-
tacked Pat Robertson. Bern, take the
advice of one of your fellow liberals:
"I'd like to think that Americans will
look past any trivial finger pointing
and look at the ideas the candidates
have to offer" (Steve Sommers, Nov.
11,1987 Campus Spectrum).
Justin Sturz
Junior
English
Bern is slanderous
To the editor:
The "Campus Spectrum Rules" on
the editorial page of The East Carolin-
ian clearly states all letters are
subject to editing for obscenity and
libel My question as Chairman of
the ECU College Rupublicans is this:
Why wasn't former student Bern
McCrady's letter edited as such? Why
were such horrendous personal at-
tacks permitted by McCrady?
I was of the opinion that The East
Carolinian was a reputable, func-
tional, intergral part of the Univer-
sity. I feel unduly resentful now. Be-
sides the horrific personal assaults,
McCrady called College Republicans
"Nazis Sir, we are the College Re-
publicans, not the College Nazis!
Incorrect facts abounded in
McCrady's letter. Caiiing M.G. "Fat"
Robertson a hypocrite! Gracious
McCrady, perhaps you need a lesson
in some of that good old time religion
yourself. 1 think McCrady lowered
himself in inexorable levels this time.
McCrady also made the statement
that the "CR's are continuing unpar-
alleled ignorance and intolerance
What an ignorant and intolerant
statement. Sir! The Republican party
is the party of compassion.
Why should we as College Republi-
cans support the drafting of women
into the armed services i.e. ERA, fed-
erally funded abortions, the spread-
ing of Communism, and high taxes if
the senior Republican party abhor-
rently disagrees with these issues?
When I first read McCrady's letter I
was a little fumed. Later that senti-
ment turned into a sense of pity.
McCrady resorted to the old fash-
ioned liberal trick of personally at-
tacking the writers instead of logi-
cally debating the issues at hand. I
strongly urge The East Carolinian to
discontinue the practice of printing
suchbiased and uninformative letters
in the future.
Conservatively,
Matthew L.J. Clarke
Senior
Communications
Liberal responds
To the editor:
I was so pleased to read the College
Republicans' last letter to the editor.
I'm excited that a new semester has
begun, and the CRs are willing to stop
intolerance, name-calling and issue
clouding. Both sides agree that we'll
discuss the issues.
I assume that means we won't see
the banner hung in Brewster last year
reading, 'Tired of ECU'S flower chil-
dren? Join the College Republicans
Great! Tolerance is the cornerstone of
any free society. Tolerance is broken
down by prejudice and hate. Hate is
founded in fear and ignorance.
We liberals feel the conservative
agenda is "illogical, anti-Amercan
and destructive as well as being
inhumane. Cons priorities, many
military-oriented, are wasteful and
unnecessary. The military-industrial
complex, the Defense Dept, and
National Security Council are proof;
USAmericans are kept ignorant of
government actions. The Reagan
Administration, through the Iran-
contra scam and other means, has
proven to be not a government of and
for the people, but in spite of them.
On the issue of capital punishment,
most cons follow the emotional re-
sponse of revenge �an eye for an
eye. Initially this policy seems sen-
sible. Logic forces us to realize the cost
the government bears in legal at-
tempts to appeal the decision is far
greater than that of incarceration. The
loss of freedom and its deterrence
factor is far stronger than that of the
loss of life. The death penalty is not a
sufficient threat to a criminal with no
belief in God or an afterlife. Two is-
sues remain: the penal system's goal
in the status quo is rehabilitation, not
punishment, and, one can never be
sure a verdict was accurate.
Liberals are pro-choice, not pro-
abortion. A woman's choice must be
upheld by the government A woman
should not be expected to carry a
rapist's child. Before Roe V. Wade,
women were dying from unsafe, ille-
gal abortions. If Roe v. Wade is re-
versed, that situation will be rees-
tablished. Since cons want to cut birth
control funding and education, what
are the alternatives?
Contras. Those raping, murdering
men Reagan calls "Our Founding
Fathers"? Well, the International
Court of Justice ordered the US to
"cease and refrain" from interfering
in Nicaragua's internal affairs. Con-
tra leader Calero admitted in a recent
NACLA publication that the contras
lack a broad base of popular (of the
people) support in Nicaragua. USA-
merican do not wish to fund the con-
tras by a 2 to 1 margin. Logically, we
shouldn't fund them.
We, too, would like a response to a
few issues:
1. Why do cons support govern-
ments guilty of severe human rights
violations� El Salvador, Guatemala,
and Honduras � in Central America
but then highlight Nicaragua for
change? Does anyone remember FDR
saying about Somoza, "He's a son-of-
a-bitch, but he's our son-of-a-bitch"?
Why was Costa Rica's government, a
remarkable example of true democ-
racy, singled out for revenge by the
US government after the Arias Peace
Plan? Costa Rica's aid was delayed
along with an appointment of a new
USAmerican Ambassador to Costa
Rica. Why is Reagan so enamored of
the idea of a series of US dependent
banana republics in Central America,
puppet states of the USA?
2. How can the cons declare the war
on poverty to be over, and why do
they insist on blaming the victims?
The easy way out, "It's their fault, and
I won't deal with it is the cons re-
sponse. Half of this nation's poor are
children. Welfare mothers who begin
to work have all their medical help cut
off. The WIC program, which pro-
vides pregnant women, infants, and
children with extra help, was cut; it
had proven to be one of the most cost-
efficient, preventative programs es-
tablished. Over Three million USA-
mericans are homeless. What are the
cons proposing to do? You cons can
say "Equal under law" until dooms-
day, but until each citizen has some
economic security, they will never be
politically equal. "That government
is best which does the most for its
people
Another Bleeding Heart Liberal
Democrat
Mary Elizabeth Davis
Sophomore
Political Science
Hardy defense
To the editor
In response to Bern McCrady's er-
roneous assertion that 1 am a Nazi
supporter (The East Carolinian, Jan.
21, 1988), I may confidently respond
that I am not.
It amazes me how someone can
condemn the tactics of former IS
Sen. Joseph McCarthy and use those
very same tactics in the same breath. It
is the height of hypocrisy. Most ra-
tional thinking liberals encourage
free expression and the marketptoc
of ideas because they can intelligently
debate their views with cognent argu-
ments and let the listener decide for
himself. However, McCrady feels he
must use allegations and innuendos
to discredit my conservative beliefs
He should try to attack the beliefs
with his own arguments.
It is radical to believe that someone
is a "Nazi supporter" because they
believe in the sanctity of unborn life,
support for those fighting Commu-
nists in their own nation, the reduc-
tion of taxes and government spend-
ing, a strong national defense, that
children forced to attend public
schools should not be indoctrinated
in secular humanism or situational
ethics or the "Mommy I don't want to
die" attitude to achieve "world
peace" and in tax vouchers so poor
parents may choose which school
their children attend.
In fact it is Nazis and communists
who don't believe people should
have the freedom of belief, expression
and ideas. I don't believe McCrady is
a Nazi or a communist. Therefore, I
challenge him to put up or shut up.
He should attempt intelligent argu-
ments to gain supporters to his beliefs
and refrain from personal attacks. I'll
trust the people of this nation to sup-
port my beliefs over the liberals if they
hear both sides of the issues.
Edwin M.
"Sandy" Hardy
Alumnus
Winston-Salem
C
A
M
P
U
$
F
O
R
U
M
' f fft uiMMlM ��
AIDS t
Jrt-T Panks � a divii
within the Catholic Church stul
dents at most Catholic campu
ln the U.S. can learn about
'harsh
quired
ises
. tht
realities" of AIDS (at
ju'rea immune deficiency svn-
drome), but can't buy condomc
on campus.
In fact, the American branch ofl
the church officially said onl v last
month that Catholic students can
evnJarn about condoms.
While traditional Catholic doc
nne calls the use of any contra-
ceptive devices sinful, the U S
branch of the church in December i
approved telling parishoners
about prophylactics as part of a
of Am to contro1 the spread
"Condoms are not available (on
campus), and are not likelv to be
unless the church changes its
stance said Dr. Harold Dobb.
who heads the health service at
Marquette L'niversitv in Milwau-
kee.
But most Catholic campus
healthofficialshaveembraccdthe
December statement bv the Na-
tional Conference of'Catholic
Bishops, which disagreed with
official Vatican dogma and said
congregants should know con-
doms may help them avoid the
disease.
AIDS, of course, can be spread
Student's h
LAKELAND, na.(CPS)- One
male student at Florida Southern
College preferred hair to there
but 11 others yielded to an ad-
ministration demand to trim their
hair before returning to campus.
The ultimatum brought inter-
national notoriety to the conser-
vative campus and, for some stu-
dents at least, waked the ghosts of
the sixties, when students at
schools across the country fre-
quently protested to overturn
dress codes.
The uproar began in December
when Assistant Dean of Students
Frank Szabo pulled the 12 stu-
dents out of pre-registration lines.
Hfe ordered them to cut their hair
during Christmas break to con-
form to the Methodist college's
dress code, or to transfer to an-
Faculty Senate
The ECU Faculty Senate pro-
posed an academic calendar
change for the 1988-89 school year
and passed a resolution calling for
the reinstatement of the computer
services department at the Stu-
dent Stores in its regular meeting
Tuesday.
The proposed 1988-89 aca-
demic calendar recomends:
�Faculty returns to work Aug.
20, with regular class beginning
Aug. 22.
RACK
BRANDED
Greenville Buyer's Mi
Memorial Drive
Open Mon
Sunday 1
Me3
nui
Guess the
an
Your Name.
Telephone.





THE FAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 28, I9KH 5
Y,
V
ie Campus Forum"
il pace The Hast
the Campus
s an opinion column
m the student
The columns
npus Spectrum"
pics of concern
nunity or nation.
istrictcd in con-
to rulesofgram-
rs nssubmilting
ng to accept by-
rts, as no en-
rs n ill be pub-
far
F
O
R
U
M
n
J
j
d
s
ist Carolinian, Jan.
dently respond
someone can
s of former U.S.
. and use those
ie )me breath. It
�crisy. Most ra-
encourage
i i the marketplace
ie they can intelligently
vith cognentargu-
the listener decide for
ver NicCrady feels he
ns and innuendos
nservative beliefs.
i try to attack the beliefs
ments.
i t believe that someone
pporter" because they
i e sanctity of unborn life,
� ' those fighting Commu-
- .vn nation, the reduc-
- and government spend-
itrong national defense, that
i : rced to attend public
�uld not be indoctrinated
lar humanism or situational
: Mommy I don't want to
ttitude to achieve "world
and in tax vouchers so poor
mav choose which school
kildren attend.
t it is Nazis and communists
on't believe people should
e freedom of belief, expression
ms. I don't believe McCrady is
or a communist. Therefore, I
ge him to put up or shut up.
uld attempt intelligent argu-
o gain supporters to his beliefs
rain from personal attacks. I'll
e people of this nation to sup-
y belief s over the liberals if they
th sides of the issues.
Edwin M. "Sandy" Hardy
Alumnus
Winston-Salem
AIDS topic of catholic decision
(CPS) � Thanks to a division
within the Catholic Church, stu-
dents at most Catholic campuses
m the U.S. can learn about the
harsh realities" of AIDS Uc
quired immune deficiency syn
drome), but can't buy condoms
on campus.
m ;act, the Aunf nan branch ot
the church officially said only last
month that Catholic students can
even learn about condoms.
While traditional Catholic doc-
trine calls the use of any contra-
ceptive devices sinful, the U.S.
branch of the church in December
approved telling parishoncrs
about prophylactics as part of a
larger effort to control the spread
of AIDS.
"Condoms are not available (on
campus), and are not likely to be
unless the church changes its
stance said Dr. Harold Dobbs,
who heads the health service at
Marquette University in Milwau-
kee.
But most Catholic campus
health officials have embraced the
December statement by the Na-
tional Conference of Catholic
Bishops, which disagreed with
official Vatican dogma and said
congregants should know con-
doms may help them avoid the
disease.
AIDS, of course, can be spread
by using contaminated blood
products or intravenous needles,
or through sexual intercourse
with an AIDS carrier.
Telling Catholic students that
using condoms could help them
avoid AIDS, however, presented
educators with the prospect of
contradicting Vatican policy.
Most, however, have chosen to
accept that policy while proceed-
ing with AIDS programs anyway.
For example at Marquette, "safe
sex is not extramarital sex. That is
the position of the school and the
church Dobbs asserted.
But with the Bishops
Conference's blessing, Dobbs and
health officials at many other
Catholic campuses are stretching
dogma far enough to include
mentions of condoms in AIDS
brochures it gives to students.
"AIDS is the polio of the 1980s
Dr. James Moriarity of Notre
Dame University said in explain-
ing why Notre Dame now gives
students brochures that talk
about condoms. "It has kids
scared to go out, scared to develop
relationships. And more people
will die from AIDS next year than
died in the Viet Nam war
Catholic campuses as diverse as
St. Mary's College of California,
the University of San Francisco
(USF) and Georgetown Univer-
sity are doing the same thing.
They're handing out AIDS pre-
vention brochures produced ei-
ther by the American College
Health Association or, as at USF,
through the campus ministry of-
fice. Many of the campuses have
sponsored conforrnr1 nr discus
Mons that include mention of
condoms.
Yet, unlike scores of other col-
leges, the Catholic campuses are
not dispensing condom.
"Condoms are not part of the
approach we've chosen to take
explained USF spokesman Mike
Brown.
It can make for tricky rhetoric.
At Notre Dame, Dr. Moriarity and
his colleagues "discuss AIDS in
the context of sexually transmit-
ted diseases. We don't educate for
promiscuity or encourage preg-
nancy, but we deal with the facts,
with the harsh reality
Similarly, Georgetown pro-
vides information � including a
condom-mentioning U.S. Sur-
geon General's report on AIDS �
without "encouraging or advo-
cating" sexual activity.
Georgetown student health
service Director Dr. William
Dodson, like physicians at other
Catholic schools, noted that while
the AIDS programs might pro-
voke discussions, there has been
no raging theological debate
about them.
Many had programs that men-
tioned condoms well before the
December Bishops' statement,
which has caused a whirlwind of
controversy in many Catholic
F1ZZAOC newest gathering place in town.
Sat. January 30th
10 p.m. 1 am
Klee Liles
acoustic rock featuring
James Taylor
& Jimmy Buffett
Open MonSat 1 10 K Fourth St
752-5855 All ABC Permits
C; i. r.
Student's hair offends dress code
LAKELAND, Fla. (CPS) - One
male student at Florida Southern
College preferred hair to there,
but 11 others yielded to an ad-
ministration demand to trim their
hair before returning to campus.
The ultimatum brought inter-
national notoriety to the conser-
vative campus and, for some stu-
dents at least, waked the ghosts of
the sixties, when students at
schools across the country fre-
quently protested to overturn
dress codes.
The uproar began in December
when Assistant Dean of Students
Frank Szabo pulled the 12 stu-
dents out of pre-registration lines.
He ordered them to cut their hair
during Christmas break to con-
form to the Methodist college's
dress code, or to transfer to an-
other school.
Although upset, 11 of the 12
students did have their hair cut
and registered at FSC last week.
One transferred to Purdue.
Szabo refused to comment on
the situation, but did explain to
College Press Service that FSC's
dress code had been in force for
"manv moons
James D'Loughy, FSC student
body president, termed the dress
code "archaic and puritancial
The incident should have been
handled differently, said
D'Loughy, who thought most
students at FSC were "outraged"
by the incident.
"They let the girls have really
short hair and far-out hairdos.
The policy doesn't specifically say
what an extreme (hairstyle) is
said freshman Mike De Rosimo,
one of the 12 students given the
ultimatum.
The FSC dress code, in fact,
makes no reference to hair,
D'Loughy contended. "It's sub-
jective. It talks about anything
'extreme in appearance Does
that mean overweight? Does it
mean musclebound? It's hard to
know what they look for
FSC students are scheduled to
voice their concerns about the
incident at a student government
meeting this week.
"We hope to re-write the policy
and make it more specific, but I'm
not optimistic about making the
changes said D'Loughy. "The
administrators are very puritani-
cal on personal appearance is-
sues
"Keeping people ignorant will
not encourage appropriate be-
havior said Father James
Schexncider of the Diocese of
Oakland's AIDS task force, which
reviews materials distributed to
students at St. Mary's, among
other colleges.
"We don't encourage the use of
condoms, bu t we include mention
of them as a preventive measure.
If people choose to be sexually
active or to be I. V. drug users, this
information will keep them
alive
Georgetown's Dodson saw no
conflict between Vatican dogma
and what Georgetown is doing.
"Catholic doctrine and good pub-
lic health go hand in hand
Georgetown's AIDS education
program does not use the term
"safe sex Dodson said, "but we
point out the truth of the Surgeon
General's report: the only way to
be absolutely safe is abstinence,
but there are safer ways than oth-
ers. Then we discuss the other
alternatives
Dodson added, "We are medi-
cal personnel first. Our job is to
give information to students or
patients so they can make in-
formed decisions
But Dodson contended good
AIDS education programs had to
include issues larger than physi-
ology.
'Talking about 'plumbing' is
not enough. We want to talk about
the responsibility of one person to
another, and about non-exploita-
tive relationships Dodson said.
Notre Dame, Moriarity added,
aimed "to protect the innocent
and not to create panic
liii
at
Anything Paper
Bells Fork Square
ECU
Get Prepared for Life
RUSH
A0Q
Alpha Phi Omega is a National
Coeducational Service Fraternity
If you really enjoy doing things
to benefit others then come
Mendenhall Student Center
Tuesday, Feb. 2 from 7 to 9 p.m.
in room 221, or Wednesday, Feb.
3 from 8 to 10 p.m. in room 244
to meet the brothers.
e
Faculty Senate votes to change '88-89 calendar
The ECU Faculty Senate pro-
posed an academic calendar
change for the 1988-89 school year
and passed a resolution calling for
the reinstatement of the computer
services department at the Stu-
dent Stores in its regular meeting
Tuesday.
The proposed 1988-89 aca-
demic calendar recomends:
�Faculty returns to work Aug.
20, with regular class beginning
Aug. 22.
� A labor day holiday.
�Students taking a full week for
Thanksgiving vacation.
� Ending classes Dec.7, with
exams beginning Dec. 10 � al-
lowing a weekend to substitute
for "reading day
Although the calendar re-
sembles last year's approved cal-
endar, the new ammendments
met with questions and opposi-
tion.
Some members of the senate
questioned the loss of a Monday
in the new calendar. However,
after a make-up Wednesday was
determined, the proposal passed
with some reluctance.
A proposal from Robert C.
Morrison, of the department of
Chemistry, concerning the dis-
continuence of the personal com-
puter department at the Student
Stores received attention on the
floor.
RACH ROOM SHOES,
WHY WAIT
f&SSfcgl for your
Vf�l2 TAX REFUND
WHEN YOU CAN
GET YOUR MONEY FAST!

BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
I
I
I
I Open MonS
B Sunday 1-6
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
10 OFF
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(EXCEPT AIGNER, NIKE AND REEBOK)
MexicanRestaurant
27
Play Chico's Name Game
Guess the name of the Senorita
and win a $50.00
Gift Certificate
Your Name.
Address
Telephone.
USE H&R BLOCK'S
RAPID REFUND PROGRAM
It's available whether
H&R Block
prepares your tax return or not.
IT'S FAST!
For more details or to see if you qualify call
H&R Block now.
H&R BLOCK
" �One Entry per
person
�Contest ends Feb
14th, 1988
Greenville Square 756-9365
West End Buyers Market 756-1209
Hours: 9-9 M-F
9-5 Sat. & Sun.
� -� �? ttit. m
mmrm





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 28,1988
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
JOB OPENING on the Buccaneer staff. If
interested please fill out an applicaion at
the Buccaneer Office. Publications bldg.
Apply soon.
ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT: Gain
experience in small business accounting
operations. Must have basic accounting
and tvping skills. 15-20 hours. Schedule
neg. Send resume to 3010 E. 10th Street,
Greenville, N.G
HELP WANTED: Part time interior de-
sign student - send resume to: Designer,
3010 East 10th Street, Greenville, N.C.
PERSONAL CARE attendant in ex-
change for free room and board in a nice
2 bedroom, 2 bath house. Will need 312-
4 hours work per da, 7 davs a week.
Located 12 miles outside of town. Call Jov
Foster at 746-2588, 746-3513, or 758-2399.
NOW ACCEPTING applications for
counselors, a waterfront director, and
.distant swim instructors. Friendly Day
Camp is a summer camp for mentally and
physically handicapped children and
adults Please write or call: The Special
Populations Program, P.O. Box 590,
Raleigh, N.C 27602 - (919) 755-6832.
TUTOR NEEDED for CHEM 2620
ASAP' Please call 758-454.
BAR MAIDS WANTED: Part-time. No
experience necessary. Will train. Must be
21 years old. Excellent tips. Call 75S-0058.
Ask for Jack or Ray.
SERVICES OFFERED
ECU - For the best tan - The best service -
The best deal - Start Spring Break early.
Call California Tanning today -355-7858!
PARTY ANIMALS Great for birthdays
or any occasion Gorilla-grams, Gator-
grams, Penguin-for-hire, balloons deliv-
ered in costume Deliveries on or off
campus Call Chip Py at 830-1823.
SOUND MIXTURES D.J. Service is back
m Greenville! Back with more equip-
ment, more experience, and even better
ound quality, for more information,
don't hesitate to call 752-4916, Bob.
ECU - Don't be white during Spring
Break - tan now! Great Specials! Call
California Tanning Salon today at 355-
7358.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and phoytocop ymeservices We also sell
software and computer diskefte�r24n6urs
in and out. Guaranteed typing on paper up
to20hand written pages. SDFProfessional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(Beside Cubbies) Greenville, N.C, 752-
3694
THE MOODY DUDES wish everyone a
Happv New Year. Call for a great party
band anytime. 830-1780 or 758-0819.
MID WINTER BOP: The original is still
here. Old wax. New wax. The TRASH-
MAN D service. Approved by thousands.
Discover it. Bashes, formals, mixers, so-
cials, etc . . . Dial 752-3587 anytime. Many
thanx.
MASSAGE CLINIC: Got any aching
muscles or joints? Come get a massage
from the physical therapy students on
February 2 between 5:30-9.30 p.m. We are
located in the Physical Therapy Lab in the
Allied Health Building. Advanced tickets
are SI 00 and S1.25 at the door.
THE TROPICAL ZONE: G-ville's hottest
new concept in tanning. Featuring state of
the art silver solarium. Special rates for
students. Call for an appointment. 355-
5120.
FOR SALE
IS IT TRUE you can buy Jeeps for $44
through the U.S. government? Get the facts
today! Call 1-312-742-U42 Ext. 5271-A.
FOR SALE: 26" ladies 10 speed bike with
child carrier and 20" girls bike (excellent
condition). Call Debbie at 756-6333.
CAROLINA GRILL CAFE: Good home
cooked food. Welcome Back-to-School
Special: A complete breakfast $1.49 tax; A
complete lunch $2.60 tax. 907 dickinson
Avenue. Three blocks from ECU. Call 752-
1188 for quick call-ins.
FOR SALE-1979 Sunbird-runs-only
$300.00. Call 752-7481, leave message.
SPRING BREAK 1988: South Padre or
Daytona Deluxe Condos or I lotel accom-
modations starting at low $149.00 per per-
son for 7 nights. Call 1-800-222-4139. Trans-
portation available.
1982 HONDA CIVIC: excellent condition,
5-speed, AC, AMFM. One owner. $2500.
Call 756-6675 after 6 or 559-5158 from 8-5.
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2 bed
room apartment at Kings Row Apart-
ments. 12 rent plus utilities. No deposit
required. Contact Danny at 758-7356 if
interested.
FEMALE, NON-SMOKER needed to
share 2 bedroom townhouse. 89.00
month and 14 utilities. Close to cam-
pus. Call 758-7879.
BEVERLY MANOR APARTMENTS
now leasing spacious 2 bedroom units
with large living room and dining area.
New carpet; new wallpaper in kitchen
and bath. Range and refrigerator pro-
vided. Central heatair, coldhot water
and basic cable TV. included in rent as
low as $335.00 per month. Call 756-515
days, 746-2098 evenings for appoint-
ment.
ROOM FOR RENT: $125.00 per month
No deposit. On campus bus route. 1.2
miles from campus. Call 1-800-682-1331
or 758-2948. Ask for William.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female,
non-smoker. Must be neat and respon-
sible. $150.00 per month plus 12 utili-
ties. Located 3 blocks from campus. Call
758-7245.
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apartments
for rent. Furnished. Contact 1 lollie Si-
monowich at 752-2865.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 2 Wildwood
Villas will have own room $112.50 per
month plus 14 utilities. Call 758-5513.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
immediately - roomy, 2 bedroom
.townhouse. $167.50 per month plus 12
utilities. No deposit required - call752-
7662.
ROOM FOR RENT: Male, female, non-
smoker would like to share large house
1 12 blocks from campus. Washer
dryer. Fully furnished. Single room
double room. If you would like to see the
house, please call Ronnie at 757-0202,
leave message.
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New �
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
�Located Near ECU
�Near Major Shopping Centers
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
Limited Offer - $275 a month
Contact J. T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt 8. 12 - 5.30 p.m.
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $195 a month. 6
month lease. MOBILE HOME RENTALS
couples or singles. Apartment and mobile
homes In Azalea Gardens near Brook Valley
County Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
PERSONALS
HEYTHETA CHI GUYS! On Sunday the
Jlst, the Redskins and Broncos will meet.
But who will go home with the defeat?
Let's cause some comotion while watch-
jig the Superbowl game. And after get-
ting together with you guys. Grogs will
lever be the same! Love, the AOPi's.
THE MOODY DUDES! Catch em at
Susie's Treehouse. Tuesday, February 2.
$2.50 pitchers. Party Attitude Required.
COME SEE the star of the X-rated film
classic "Misty Beethoven Gloria Le-
onard, defend pornography, while the
founder of Women Against Pornogra-
phy, Dolores Alexander, condemns it.
This hot debate will take place in Hendrix
Theatre, Feb. 9 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $3.00
for students, $4.00 for facultystaff, $5.00
for the general public. Available at Cen-
tral Ticket Office, Mendenhall. Spon-
sored by: Student Union Forum Commit-
tee.
TO OUR K A MEN: Mike and Ken, things
looked pretty bleak until we found out it
was National Pizza Week. Our dinner
was a wreck, don't forget your rain check.
Sorry we weren't ready by eight but
Roseball turned out great. From the bro-
ken roses, rolling mixers, zippers and
safety pins and seeing double, memories
of an awesome Roseball! Thanx, Lisa and
DcLynda.
MELINDA, things sometimes seem
rough and tempers may run thin, but I'm
always your sister and a best friend. Ter-
esa.
LYNNE- We thought living on Elm Street
would be scary. Remember the beach and
your pal Larry? Latenight guests some
short some slim. Who could forget your
favorite, Jim? R. and R. means rest and
relaxation, but last year for you meant
regurgitation. Halloween Eliura and a cat
on a peg. Oh my God, it was an egg.
I lawiian Inn, last years spring break. Too
bad Toby was such a fake. The Hungry
Pelican kept us fed, but Pizza Hut turned
your stomach to lead. Our gorging forks
in the air are raised. Golden Corral bar
should be praised. Parties and down-
town are always fun, they'd even be bet-
ter if we were 21! These memories here
are but a few, we still can' t believe you are
almost 22! The kegs on Friday will be
tapped and ready. Close the door-here
comes Freddie Happy Birthday! We
love you, Kate and Kris.
PHI SIGMA PI and the American Cancer
Society is sponsoring a Jail-a-Thon on
January 28 from 9-4 at the ECU Student
Store. Have your best friend, professor,
or worst enemy thrown in jail and help
raise money for cancer research.
LPHA KAPPA ALPHA Sorority, Inc.
atU have lForaSripoRuh Jan u-
iry 31,198? al7!flTp.m.lnTnTMultipur-
rjoserdotn Gf MSC. Alf ffitercsted tern ales
ire invited to come out and join us in the
fun as you learn more about our sorority.
STUDENTS intersted in travel: The Stu-
dent Union Travel Comm. is having a
meeting to decide on trips for next year.
Come and give us your input. The meet-
ing is Feb. 2 at 5 p.m. in Mendenhall. Call
757-6611 ext. 210 for more info.
LOST: 14 karat gold nugget bracelet.
Special gift from parents. Reward will be
given. Please call if foun at 752-1922.
SENIORS SENIORS SENIORS-Don't
forget to call the Buccaneer office at 757-
6501 to sign up for senior portraits. Call
January 25 to 29. Make your appoint-
ment.
LOST AND FOUND: Necklace found
near Garrett and Fletcher dorms. Please
call 756-2082 and ask for Randy.
AMIR-Thanks for the great surprise on
my birthday Love, Anne.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
NEW associate members of Tau Kappa
Epsilon: Joe Moe 111, Dana Dubel, Greg
Atkins, Joe Holmes, Chad Dobrei, Darel
Crumpler, Steve Raper, Warren Powell,
Jeff Davis, Glen Schow, Parrish Nichols,
Tom Davis, John Parks, Bryan Carrigan,
Mark McGee, Trey Snellings, Scott
Mackey, Todd Howell, Mark Brinkley.
Remember TKE is for life.
WZMB is celebrating our 6th anniversary
and we would like to invite you to come
and party with us at the Attic on Tuesday,
February 2. There will be door prizes as
well as music from The Bond, The Veldt,
and The Amateurs. Admission is only
$2.91, so mark your calendar and plan to
party Z style.
THE NEW DELI wants you to jam with
the best live music around. Catch See
You! on Thursday, the deep down blues
of The Blues Defenders on Friday, don't
you miss Not Shakespeare on Saturday.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA: Thanks for
making Friday such a surprise. The sis-
ters and pledges love you guys! We'd
love the party again real soon. Love, the
Chi Omegas.
DELTA PLEDGES: Get psyched for Fri-
day night. Don't be scared, just be pre-
pared. Learn that creed or you won't
succeed. After that, a sister you will be,
you've worked hard, but it's worth it,
you'll see! We love you and are proud
The Sisters of ZTA.
THANKS TO DEBBIE HURD for all her
hard work, dedication and success with
the pledge class. We couldn't of done it
without you The Sisters and pledges of
ZTA.
YO FREE GROCERIES Are you fed
up with Oodles of Noodles, macaroni and
cheese, and tuna fish? If so, then take a
shot at winning 20, 40, 60 or 100 bucks
worth of free grub from the Food Lion.
Just ask any Pika for details. Let Tom E.
Smith and Pika do you proud.
THE ECU COMPUTER CLUB wishes to
thank S&R Computer Associates of
Greenville for sponsoring the second
annual programming contest held on
January 22,1988 and for providing prizes
to the winning team.
PI KAPPS: Thanks for having us over
Friday night - we had a blast! Love, the
Alpha Phis.
DEAR S.A.M Congratulations on mak-
ing Lambda Chi Alpha. I'm so happy for
you. Also, I'm looking forward to dining
and dancing with you on Saturday. Love,
Cathy.
BETA RHOS: Thanks for the great gift -
we love it Get Ready Love, The Sisters
of Alpha Phi.
TO RACHEL: It took a "fantasy" to get us
together. Let's make it last. Steve.
DELTA SIG: Kitty's place was rocking.
The dice were truly brutal. I lomeboy and
WORD - try rehab? Pete - 747 to Ger-
many? Yeagle-Kitty; length or depth?
This year is off to a good start. Let's keep
it going James Yeagle - Why can't you
J make it to BROTHERI lOOD?
DELTA ZETA: With a caffine buzz, we
waited for eleven just to chug that little
cup of heaven! The new guys joined us for
their first official brew! VVhat we must say
now is many thanx to you! Delta Sig.
TO THE HOLIDOME we went, for a
once in a life time event. The men were
looking fine and the women were quite
divine. The pledges had their roast, and
none were too proud to boast. We danced
on the wall, until some of us couldn't
stand up at all. At 1:00 the party was still
alive and others were in the Hot Tub and
pool until 5! To all the AOPi's and their
dates, nothing could surpasss Roseball
'88
HEY YOU Next Wednesday 7-10 p.m. a
second chance to see the Delta Sigma Phi
Fraternity! Call 757-0313 or 752-7658 for
details We can help make your college
years the best
KAREN, you were the best thing that
ever happened to me, so here's to the 30th
and what could have been, and what still
can be. If you ever want to come back to
me, I'll be waiting. Love, ED.
DELTA SIGMA PHI - THE FRATER-
NITY
JEFF DAVIS: Thanks for making Rose-
ball an awesome one. I might call you
next time I have a formal. Love, Stef.
FRANK, I lost your number so I'm using
the paper. Talk about made in heaven.
Cindy's favorite band. Ice Water Man-
sion is at the Attic on Friday and Ann's
favorite band, The Usuals is at the Attic
on Saturday and they're both celebrating
birthdays - I'll meet you at the Attic for the
Super Bowl on Sunday and tell you how
things went.
KAPPA SIGS: The night started out early
with chicken prepared so fine, and the
girls won all the contests by the fame it
was nine. Brother Buffet played the
whole night through, all the more reason
to come back for late night too. Thanks for
having us over to welcome your future
brothers, your the- greatest guys, we're
looking forward to another. Love, AZD.
TO ALL GREEK FRATERNITIES:
Happy's Pool Parlor presents: The 1st
annual Greek 8 Ball Pool Tournament.
$10.00 per 2 man team, $.75 beer, fraterni-
ties can be reppresented by as many
teams as they like. 1st placc-$l 00.00, 2nd
pi ace-pony keg.
GREENVILLE'S new gay and lesbian
organization next meeting is January
28th at 7:30 p.m. For more information,
call 752-2816 or 752-2675.
SHARON LEWIS-You are a Goddess!
Where were you at 3:00 a.m.? Your Secret
Admirer.
LESLIE L. Congratulations on the most
sought after award in Alpha Omicron Pi-
Thc Big "O" Award. Thanks for Saturday
night, I had a ball- a "Roseball JR.
SUPERBOWL PARTV Don't miss out
on Pi Kappa Phi's annual Superbowl
party at the Attic this Sunday. Door
pncs and a free pass to the Attic for those
who pick the winning team. Come out for
a good time with good friends this week-
end.
DELTA PLEDGES OF ZTA: Get ready t0
have a fantastic week. Happy Zeta
Week Love, the Sisters
AOPI'S: Thank you for all of your sup
port during our spring rush. We had a
great time, let's do it all again with a blow-
out social soon. 11EY Donna, you were a
great "Pi Kappa Phi Girl" choice Al wj s,
The Brothers of Pi Kappa Phi
WHY DRIVE all the way to the Sheraton
for Ice Teas in little tiny glasses when vou
can WALK to the El bo for $2 00 Ice Teas in
HUGE CLASSES7 Come to the DZ SAC
HAPPY IIOUR every Triday from 4 7'
TJ Thanks for telling me abut The
Tropical Zone. It was a good deal and the
tan looks great! BJ.
CONGRATULATIONS TO our new
Sisters of Chi Omega: Kikki Dye, Nisan
Home, Susan Durham, Nancy Si
Bitsy Squires, Terrell Waldr.n, � Jura
Ward, Krista Kamcnski, Laura Briggs
Kristen Hogg, Libby Mozingo, kathv
Faires, Wendy CNeil, Angela Mcinders
Shannon Copeland, Kendra Curtis, Lynn
Fennichia, Kelly Brown, Tina Thorna.
Kris White, Catherine Holland, an
Personskv. We Love YOU'
THE SISTERS and pledges of Alpha
Omicron Pi would like to w-ih Delynda
Carter the best of luck in the Miss Whttev-
ille Pageant this weekend We love youi
ALPHA PHI, Thank vou tor all vourhelp
with rush Delta Sig.
CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL THE
PEOPLE who received awards at Rose
ball. And especially to Lydia Jolly Mor
gan for all of her help and support The
AOPi's appreciate everything vou have
done.
TKE: Friday was a late blast Thanks for
letting us make it last' Lets party a
real soon. Love, the Chi OS
KA's: We're glad we could V-1 a part of
your induction partv Get p-vchud tor
that social-we sure are' Love the Chi
Omegas.
ALPHA PHI'S: We had a blast at last
week's social and can't wait untij weal
get together again. Love a The Brothers
and pledges of Pi Kappa Phi
Pre-Super
Bowl Party
Friday, January 29th
No Cover Before 8:30 p.m.
Drink Specials Available

-mo
The Club
207 S. W. Greenville Blvd.
355-5000
Announcements
PIANIST
The ECU Performing Arts Series pres-
ents internationally acclaimed pianist
Eugene Istomin on Thurs, Feb. 11, at 8pm
in Wright Auditorium. A trio formed with
Isaac Stern, Leonard Rose, And Mr. Is-
tomin collected a Grammy Award in 1971
for Best Chamber Music Performance.
Ticketscan be purchased at the Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter, or by calling 757-6611 ext. 266.
PORNQGRAPY DEBATE
Porn star Gloria Leonard will be debat-
ing the founder of Women Against Por-
nography on Feb. 9 at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre. Some of the issues to be dis-
cussed will be sexual oppression vs. artis-
tic freedom. Tickets infor available at the
Central Ticket office in Mendenhall. 757-
6611 ext. 266. Sponsored by the Student
Union Forum Committee
CARFCIVFR GROUP
Support group for people who are car-
ing for a parent, spouse, or other loved one
at home. Redding, R-N.The group will
meet at St. James United Methodist
Church at 200 E. 6th Street, on Tuesday,
?eb. 2, from 7 pjn. until 830 p.m. Respite
services available. To make reservations
for respite care, call the Creative Living
Center at 757-0303 from 8 a.m. to 5p.m. 24
hours in advance.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
The ECU College Republicans will
meet every Tuesday night in room 221
Mendenhall at 7 p.m. Call 758-5775 or 752-
3587.
SOCWCI ADMISSIONS
Applicants for Spring admissions to the
SOCWCJ Program must have picked up
their application by Ian. 30. All first inter-
views with a faculty member must be
complete by Feb. 26. The second inter-
view meeting with Mr. Garrman will be
on March 2 & 3,1988 at 5 p.m. Applicants
must have an overall GPA of 2.5 and
completed at least one SOCWCJ course
to apply.
TEACHER EXAM
The National Teacher Examinations-
Core Battery Exams- will be offered at
East Carolina University on Saturday,
March 5, 1988. Applications are to be
completed and mailed to the Educational
Testing Service, box 911-R, Princeton, NJ
08541. Applications must be postmarked
no later than Feb. 1, 1988. Applications
may be obtained from the ECU Testing
Center, Room 105, Speight Building, ECU.
AHZAI
Allied Health Professions Admission
Test will be offered at ECU on Saturday,
March 12,1988. Application blanks are to
be completed and mailed to the Psycho-
logical Corp 555 Academic Court, San
Antonio, Tx 78204-0952 to arrive by Feb.
12,1988.
GMAT
The Graduate Management Admission
Test (GMAT) will be offered at ECU on
Saturday, March 19, 1988. Application
blanks are to be completed and mailed to
GMAT, Educational Testing Service, Box
966-R, Princeton, NJ 08540. Applications
must be postmarked no later than Feb. 16,
1988. Applications may be obtained from
the ECU Testing Center, Room 105
Speight Bidding, ECU.
EDUCATION MAJORS
This year the ECU School of Education
and the Career Planning and Placement
Service will be offering a Career Day for
ECU students in addition to regular on-
campus interviewing. Some students wil
explore future full-time employment op-
tions and many underclassmen may ex-
plore possible careers in various geo-
graphical areas. Over 50 school systems
will be set up at tables in Rooms 244 and
221 of Mendenhall on that day. All stu-
dents in the education held are invited to
participate in the Education Careers Day.
Mark your calendars for February 16,1988.
ERQS
EROS, The female spiritual or psycho-
logical principle of love, unity, and peace,
manifests itself in the Equal Rights Or-
ganization of Students here at ECU. Meet-
ings will be held on Wednesdays at 5 p.m
in Austin 308. All interested persons are
invited to attend. For more info, call 758-
3645 or 752-7998.
GAMMA BETA PHJ
The National Gamma Beta Phi Honor
Society will hold a meeting Feb. 2 at 7pm
in Jenkins Auditorium. Attendance is
mandatory!
TR AVFL COMMITTEE
There will be a meeting on Feb. 2 at 5
pjn in Mendenhall to decide on the trips
scheduled for the '8889 school year.
Everyone is welcome. Call 757-6611 ext.
210 for more info.
PHYSICAL ED. TEST
The Physical Education Motor and
Physical Fitness Competency Test is
scheduled for Friday Feb. 5, 1 p.m. at
Minges Coliseum. A passing score on this
test is required of all students prior to
declaring physical education as a major.
Maintaining an average T-score of 45 on
the six item test battery and having a T-
score of 45 on the aerobics run is
required.Of anyone has any medical con-
dition that would contraindicate partici-
pation in the testing should contact Mike
McCammon or Mitch Craib at 757-6497.
ASSERTIVENESS
A three part workshop offered to stu-
dents at no cost by the University Coun-
seling Center will be held Jan. 28 and Feb.
4 Ac 11. All three sessions will be con-
ducted from 3-4 PM. in 312 Wright
Building Learn how to express your-
selves directly and openly and sharper
your interpersonal skills. Please call the
Counseling Center at 757-6661 for Regis-
tration.
MALE SUBJECTS NFFPFD
Men ages 18-34 are needed for a study
at the ECU human performance labora-
tory. Subjects will be paid $25, receive a
copy of their resting ECG, have their per-
cent bady fat assessed, and have their
oxygen uptake measured. In return, sub-
SCAM-CAM
What? Get A Snapshot
of your latest ECU Lust.
Sponsored by
AZD PLEDGES
For more information stop
by ECU Student Store
Feb. lst-5th

m
Wanted:
Boxers Register
Now for TKE
boxing
tournament.
March 29, 30,31.
Call
752-6032
758-7144
jects will have to complete two moder-
ately paced downhill runs. Runners and
serious weight lifters should not apply
Call Mitch Craib at 757-6497 or 752-5867
or come by the Human Performance
Laboratory at 113 Minges Coliseum and
speak to Mitch Craib.
KBS
Dept. of Athletics needs more tutors
immediatley in the following areas: sci-
ences, business, for. lang math, english,
geology, geography, philosophy. Look-
ing for upperclassmen grad. students;
good P8' great experience. Call 757-6053
for more info.
DIVE CLUB
There will be a meeting on Thurs. Feb.
4 at 7 p.m. in Mendenhall rooms 8D, E, and
F. We are Key West Bound. Those inter-
ested should join us at the meeting. Every-
one is invited.
CATHOLIC NEWMANT
All new students - Welcome. Sunday
Masses are at 11:30 am. Bio. Bldg Rm 103
and 9 pm at the Newman Center. Wed.
night Mass 5:30 pm, followed by a fellow-
ship dinner. Tues. 730 pm there will be a
series of talks. Thurs. 830 pm Bible study.
We are located near the bottom of College
Hill and 10th street. (953 E. Tenth st.) 757-
3760. For more info. Contact Teresa Lee at
752-9910.
KERYGMA
A Bible study for those who are serious
about studying the Bible. Weekly meet-
ings (tentatively Tues. afternoon) will be
scheduled to accomodate those who are
interested. Kerygma is an interdenomina-
tional program sponsored by Presbyte-
rian Campus Ministry. For more infor
Call Mike at 752-7240.
COFFEEHOUSE
The Coffeehouse is holding auditions
for interested bands and musicians to
perform in the Coffeehouse . Jerground
- Mendenhall. Registration forms may be
obtained in Rm. 234 Mendenhall Audi
tions will by Friday, Feb. 5 at 8 pm Free
admission - open to the public.
� PHI STC.MA PI
Phi Sigma Pi and the American Cancer
Society is sponsoring a jail-A-Thoi. fn Jan
28 from 9-4 pm at the ECU Student Store
Have your best friend, professor or worst
enemy thrown in jail and help raise
money for cancer research.
CAMERECREATION pAJC
nuner positions with camps, parks,
and resorts are available for students in a
variety of majors. Over fifty recreational
employers will interview students on
Kecrearion D.y, Jan. 28 in Memorial Gym
to �ig� up for interviews and more info
���� Cooperative Education 304 Rawl.
MSQ
faaaZTJS S � ��"� Thursday,
cSSLM " � culture center at 5:00
2?B Hj�ory Month. All fr
��� �nd sororities encouraged to at-
Compl
(CPS) � An October complair
by the director of Mankato Stul
University's Women's Cente
about "sexist" advertising la�
week cost an award-winninl
Minneapolis ad agency about $l
million worth of business.
U.S. West, the huge telecoi
munications company that rui
telephone companies in 11 wesl
em states, on Jan. 14 told Falloj
McElligot, the agency that create
U.S. West's ads for the past
years, it no longer wanted it
handle its $10 million account.
The phone company was "e:
tremely uncomfortable" with FaJ
Ion McElligot's response to
complaint by Mankato State
Neala Schleuning, explained L(
west Vice President Judi Servos)
"Our feeling she added, "w;
that we're a company th
strongly espouses pluralism ai
equal opportunity
Schleuning, for her part, sai
"My original objective wasto tal
about sexism in advertising, nc,
bringing a major corporation to ll
knees. They didn't lose that"bu;
ness because of what I did
Still, Schleuning, who said
an uphill battle convincing "col
An
BIOLOGY CLUB
Biology club meeting will be held
Monday, Feb. 1, in room BN-109 at 5
p.m. Featured guest lecturer, Dr. Wen da
E. Allen will be speaking on Genetic
New members are welcomed.
JAZZ
The Performing Arts Series at ECU
proud to present Richard Stoltzman
Woody Herman's Thudering Herd in, "
Tribute to Woody on Thurs. Feb. 11
8:00pm in Wright Auditorium. Under
direction of Frank Tiberim, the Thundc
ing Herd will perform many of the worj
with which it is associated. From
donia to "Ebony Concerto Tickets i
be purchased at the Central Ticket Of fid
Mendenhall Student Center. 757-6611 ej
266.
BALLET
the Atlanta Ballet wilt perform
Wright Auditorium on Tues, Feb. 16,
8pm. Included in the evening's progra
are two new works: "Reflections For.
Artistic director Robert Bamett and
untitled work by Lisa De Ribere. Tick
available at Central Ticket Office in M
denhall Student Center.
CAYS AND LESBIANS
ECU Gay and Lesbians association!
having their next meeting Jan 28 at
?
0N1
Sne,
� - . ��. imvmmmmmrtk
Mill mUf
'�miomiiiw' i"
���iii��ft:Hiiiuin





i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 28,1988 7
MM 1 DCESOl ZTA: Get ready to
ihc week Happy Zeta
tor
k you tor all oi your sup.
our spring rush We hjd a
: - do it all again with a blow-
ma, you were a
- ippaPhiGirl choice.Always,
t Pi Kappa Phi
PKI t all thewa) to the Sheraton
n glasses whon you
52 lOIeeTeasin
S1 Come to the D2 S r
i from 4 7!
me abut The
� I- a good deal and the
IiO JO
our now
) Kikki Dye, Susan
' Nancy Snecd,
Caldron, Laura
Laura Briggs
M "go Kathy
Vngela Meinders
- ira Curtis, Lynn
na rhomas,
Hand and lili
v ot Alpha
� ' kvish Delynda
MissWhitev-
d o love you!
i for all your help
VTIONS TO ALL THE
� d awards at Rose
� -��a folly Mor-
ind support. The
- rything you have
blast Thanks for
�t! I et - party again
be a part ol
psyched for
c the Chi
: ' ' i-t at last
' ��-� until w.
� i rhe Brothers
Phi.
SCAM-CAM
A apshot
St ECU Lust.
Sp tis red by
AZD PLEDGES
rmation stop
yE Student Store
st-5lh
Wanted:
Boxers Register
Now for TKE
boxing
tournament.
March 29, 30,31.
Call
752-6032
758-7144
I to accotnodate those who are
ted Kervgmaisan mterdenomina-
a: program sponsored by Prebyte-
jbn Campus Ministry For more in for
like at 72 724(Jl
The Coffeehouse is holding auditions
r interested bands and musicians to
erform in the Coffeehouse Underground
I Mendenhall Registrahon forms may be
Warned in Rm 234 Mendenhall Audi-
ts will by Friday, Feb. 5 at 8 Pm Free
kdmission - open to the public.
PHLS1GMAP1
I hi Sigma Pi and the American Cancer
jciety is sponsoring a lail- A-Thon on Jan.
f� from 9-4pm at the ECU Student Store.
Jve your best friend, professor or worst
nemy thrown in jail and help raise
�oney for cancer research.
CAMPRECRFATir PAY
Summer positions with camps, parks,
fnd resorts are available for students in a
variety of majors. Over fifty recreational
�mployers will interview students on
Recreation Day, Jan. 28 in Memorial Gym.
Jo sign up for interviews and more info.
intact Cooperative Education 304 Rawl.
MSQ
There will be a meeting Thursday,
January 28 in the culture center at 5.00
ncenung Black History Month. AH fra-
smities and sororities encouraged to at-
Complaint costs agency money
(CPS) � An October complaint
by the director of Mankato State
University's Women's Center
about "sexist" advertising last
week cost an award-winning
Minneapolis ad agency about $10
million worth of business.
U.S. West, the huge telecom-
munications company that runs
telephone companies in 11 west-
ern states, on Jan. 14 told Fallon
McElligot, the agency that created
U.S. West's ads for the past 4
years, it no longer wanted it to
handle its $10 million account.
The phone company was "ex-
tremely uncomfortable" with Fal-
lon McElligot's response to a
complaint by Mankato State's
Neala Schleuning, explained U.S.
west Vice President Judi Servoss.
"Our feeling she added, "was
that we're a company that
strongly espouses pluralism and
equal opportunity
Schleuning, for her part, said,
"My original objective was to talk
about sexism in advertising, not
bringing a major corporation to its
knees. They didn't lose that busi-
ness because of what I did
Still, Schleuning, who said it's
an uphill battle convincing "cor-
porate America to do anything
hailed U.S. West for considering
women's concerns and predicted
the decision will force the adver-
tising industry to become more
sensitive in how it portrays
women and minorities.
The furor was ignited in Octo-
ber, when Schleuning wrote a let-
ter to Fallon McElligot complain-
ing about the "negative stere-
otypes" in its ads.
One ad that particularly infuri-
ated Schleuninng touted the tele-
vision show "Dynasty Over
photos of three female stars was
the headline "Bitch, Bitch, Bitch
Schleuning said the ad repre-
sented a "male gonad style of
doing business
In response, Schcuning ex-
pected a polite form letter thank-
ing her for her concern and ignor-
ing the issues she raised.
But the Fallon McElligot re-
sponse was anything but polite.
"When I got a real live letter in a
hand-addressed envelope, 1 was
impressed. But when I opened it
up and was abused and de-
graded, it just blew me away
Fallon McElligot's Charles
Anderson had sent Schleuning a
photo of an African boy pressing
his mouth against a cow's anus. In
an accompanying letter, Ander-
son suggested Schleuning visit
the Dinka tribe to investigate the
"barbaric ritual
Angered, Schleuning informed
Minnesota women's groups of the
exchange, and those organiza-
tions fired off letters asking if the
Fallon McElligot response repre-
sented the company's true feel-
ings.
The agency's founders, Patrick
Fallon and Thomas McElligot,
then offered Schleuning a one-
way ticket to Africa to investigate
Dinka cow- kissing.
"Their message came through
real clearly said Schleuning.
Although Fallon McElligot's
other major clients � including
Lee Jeans, Porsche USA, the Wall
Street Journal and First Tennessee
Corp. � say they will continue to
work with the ad agency, Sch-
leuning hailed U.S. West's action.
"Other companies would have
written an apology and left it at
that, but they thought it was a big
joke Schleuning said of the ad
agency. "The image they gave
themselves astounds me. They
shocked a lot of people. People are
often outraged by advertising but
don't do anything about it. Maybe
this will give them the idea that
people want advertising based on
a ground of mutual respect
Seminar held
The Eighteenth Annual Speech-
Language and Hearing Sympo-
sium will be held in the Blue
Audiroruim at the Brody Medical
Sciences Building on February 4th
and 5th. Guest speakers will be
Barbara W. Bremer, M.S CCC
from noon to 5 p.m. Feb. 4 and
Paula S. Cochran, PhD from 8:30
a.m. to 4:15 p.m. Feb. 5. Barbara
Bremer will present "Diagnosis
and Treatment of the Language
disordered Child: A Step Be-
yond" and Dr. Cochran will pres-
ent "Clinical Applications of
Computers: For A Clinician, By A
Clinician
Mrs. Bremer is currently a clini-
cal instructor and language spe-
cialist with the Depart-
ment of Speech-Language and
Auditory Pathology at East Caro-
lina University.
WHAT
HIGH-TECH
ADDS TO
PERSONAL-
TOUCH
NURSING.
High-tech will never replace the care
and kindness of personal-touch nursing
What it can do is offer more sciennh.
accurate treatment, freeing you up tor
your personal care.
Army hospitals and medical centers
�ire among rhe leaders in rhe use of
high-tech instrumentation and meth-
ods. Vs a nurse you'll he encouraged to
continue your education, to continue
growing. As an Army Officer you'll K-
a respected member ot a topflight health care team. And never lose
your personal touch.
For more intormarion on Army Nursing, call:
Sgt. 1st. Class Crocker or Captain Bevs
(919) 467-2828 (collect) or 1-800-662-7473
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
Announcements
BIOLOGY CLUB
Biology club meeting will be held on
Monday, Feb. 1, in room BN-109 at 5:00
p.m. Featured guest lecturer, Dr. Wendall
E. Allen will be speaking on Genetics.
New members are welcomed.
JAZZ
The Performing Arts Series at ECU is
proud to present Richard Stoltzman and
Woody Herman's Thudering Herd in, "A
Tribute to Woody on Thurs. Feb. 11 at
8:00pm in Wright Auditorium. Under the
direction of Frank Tiberim, the Thunder-
ing Herd will perform many of the works
with which it is associated. From "Cal-
donia to "Ebony Concerto Tickets can
be purchased at the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center. 757-6611 ext.
266.
��(" - fe
BALXET
The Atlanta Ballet will perform in�
Wright Auditorium on Tues, Feb. 16, at
8pm. Included in the evening's program
are two new works: "Reflections For by
Artistic director Robert Barnett and an
untitled work by Lisa De Ribere. Tickets
available at Central Ticket Office in Men-
denhall Student Center.
GAYS AND LESBIANS
ECU Gay and Lesbians association is
having their next meeting Jan 28 at 7:30.
All new faces welcomed. For more info.
Please call 752-2816 or 752-2675.
RACOUETBALL
Registration for intramural racquetball
will be held February 10at 6 p.m in MG102.
For more information call 757-6387.
TUBE POLO
Registration for intramural Tube Polo
will be held on Feb. 3 at 6 p.m. in MG 102.
For more information call 757-6387.
FREE THROW CONTEST
Registration for the free throw compe-
tition will be held on February 2 from 3
p.m. - 5 p.m. and 7 p.m 9 p.m. in MG. For
more information call 757-6387.
CHALLENGE DAY
Registration for Intramural Challenge
Day wil be held on March 2 from 11 p.m6
p.m. in MG 104-A. For more information
call 757-6387.
CANOE CLINIC
Registration for the Intramural Out-
door Recreation Canoe Clinic will be held
from February 1-February 15. Activity
dates will be on Feb. 16 and Feb. 18. For
more information call 757-6387.
BACKPACKING CLINIC
Registration for the Intramural Out-
door Recreation Backpacking Clinic will
be from Feb. 8-Feb. 22. The Activity date
will be on Feb. 24 at 6 p.m. For more
information call 757-6387.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
There will be meetings every Thursday
at 6:00 in the culture center. Everybody
welcome.
SAVE THOSE WR APPhRS
Deposit all empty Sticklets Natural
Flavor Gum packs and Doritos Brand
Cool Ranch flavor tortilla chip bags in the
U. S. College Comedy Competition dis-
plays located in the Student Book Store
lobby and Mendenhall. ECU could win a
free comedy concert if we collect the most
wrappers.
F�A
Fellowship of Christian Athletes will
meet Tuesday nights at 9:30 p.m. at the
Pirates Club.
EDUCATION MAJORS
Deborah Cooper, Visual Arts Specialist
for Charlotte-Mecklenburg City Schools
will hold an informal question and an-
swer session on Thursday, January 28,
room 1325 Jenkins Art Building.
SOPHOMORFSmiNTORS
Earn approximately $800.00 this sum-
mer while attending the Army ROTC
basic camp at Fort Knox, Ky. Participation
in the basic camp opens the door to finan-
cial aid, scholarship and career opportu-
nities. Plus, when you return to school in
the fall, you will receive $1000.00 tax-free
per year for your last two years. When you
graduate, you'll not only have a degree,
but a commission as an officer in the US
Army, Army Reserves or National Guard
along with the leadership experience that
will enhance any career endeavor. For
more information, attend a basic camp
information session on Thursday, Janu-
ary 28 in Joyner Library, room 305 at 6:30
p.m or contact Captain Alvin Mitchell at
757-69676974, or visit Erwin Hall, room
311.
REAL CRISIS
We need your experience. Your
achievements in everyday situations can
be useful to others. Earn that feeling of
accomplishment. Real Crisis Center is
recruiting volunteer crisis counselors. We
wil be offering training classes in this
enriching field beginning February 8. call
758-HELP or come by 312 East 10th Street.
PAT ROBERTSON
Students who would like to help with
getting MG. "Par Robertson elected
President, contact Justin Sturz at 758-2047.
Organizational meeting will be held soon.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
For someone sweet
A portrait of
you.
Portraits are a gift of love
so special only you can give them.
Call for Appointment
Special Valentine's Packages Available
Portraits by
INSTANT REPLAY
The Plaza, Greenville � 355-5050
. Man. Woman. Life. Death. Infinity.
�JF Tuna casserole. t29
ONE SPECIAL SNEAK PREVIEW
Dares To Tell It AH.

Healthy
Resolution
$69
A IOHN HUGHES FILM
KEVIN BACON ELIZABETH McGOVERN
SHE'S HAVING A BABY
� J 9 . f DO
A New Comedy About The Labor Of Life
r�PMCUST nCTMfifS rPESf NTS IOHVHUGHfS.fllV) SHE SH!N&BASY KFV1N MCON ElSZABETHMcCOVtHN'
hfu!i.� PreferRONHKOIBY Vi if- Produffd and DittCfd b� I0HS HUCHES
PC 1 1 K�rtlST�0�Kl�CMITI0�H! �B J- .
Sneak Preview Saturday January
at a theatre near you
Beat the Price
Increase!
Now through January
31. The Spa is offering a
Special Membership In-
centive to beat the price
increase in January. All
memberships will be
discounted, some up to
50! What a great way
to start the New Year!
We can help you
develop a total ex-
ercise program for
1988.
There's more to The Spa
than just aerobics
classes and exercise
equipment. Our quali-
fied instructors are on
hand at all times to
help you work out with
our Dynacam Equip-
ment and free weights.
Aerobics instructors
conduct classes 36
times a week. Plus,
you get a tan in our
tanning bed, enjoy a
real whirlpool mineral
bath, or bask in
Greenville's largest
sauna and steam room.
All at a special member-
ship price, only through
January 31st.
Drop by The Spa in
South Park Shopping
Center, next to Food
Lion, and let us give you
the whole story on
Greenville's best health
club value. But you'd
better hurry! The clock
is ticking!
-�Sr
Greenville's
best health club value.
SOUTH PARK SHOPPING CENTER
GREENVILLE 756-7991
- -� � ��
iumn �mt
y-jw �nn�ii i��"��� ifni " ����





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 28,1988
Reynolds grant helps daycare
ECU New Burrau
The Z. Smith Revnolds Founda-
J
tion of YVinston-Salem has
awarded the School of Education
at ECU a $25,000 grant to upgrade
a child care center at Agnes Ful-
lilove Community School in
Greenville.
The grant will be administered
through Project PARENTING
Proactive Assessment and Regu-
lation oi Environmental Nurtur-
ing and Teaching Interventions
for Normal Growth), an educa-
tional program designed by ECU
and Caswell Center to teach par-
enting skills to selected
adolescent mothers enrolled in
Pitt Countv Schools.
Although the day care center is
open to all children in Pitt Countv,
the majority oi those enrolled are
the offspring of teen-aged moth-
ers who attend Fullilove, and al-
ternative secondary program oi
Pitt Countv Schools.
Reagan
� , . rhild Dav Care Section of the university students is that every-
"Ourgoahstolet themomsstay �h'ldrtt �h�1wi rI one will be enriched - the stu-
m school but at the same time N - LXpanmenio. numan ie- . . . �Kp rhildren in
hive an enriching stimulating sources for 15 infants and chil- dents themselves, the children in
have an tnnching, stimulating throuch ace four "We are the center and the teen mothers,
environment for their children arcn jnrougn age lour, wt re , universitv stu-
during the day said Becky Tay- completing the process which Taylor said,
lor, director of Project PARENT- will allow us to be licensed for 24,
Bleicher said.
INC
According to Taylor, the bulk of
the money will be used to pay the
salary of a full-time director,
something the day care center has
never had.
"For the past eight years, a vo-
cational education teacher has
dents will serve as positive role
models: they've finished high
school; they're attending college;
they're doing something positive
with their lives. This is something
these teen mothers don't get to see
very often
The Z. Smith Reynolds Founda-
tion was established in 1936 as a
memorial to the youngest son of
the founder of RJ. Reynolds To-
The grant will also be used to
transform the center into a train-
ing site for students from Ful-
lilove and ECU. "Most teen moth-
ers who attend Fullilove are en-
rolled in a child development
class Taylor said. 'These moth-
performed those services in addi- ers can practice some of the par-
tion to teaching several classes cnting skills they've been taught bacco"companyz. Smith Rey-
said Johann bleicher, Fullilove in the child care center on their
principal. "By hiring a full-time own children
director, we will be able to go ECU students majoring in child
beyond providing good, loving, development, social work and
adequate day care into a more special education will gain hands-
highly structural and individual- on experience in dealing with
ized approach ot our develop- children of low socio-economic
mental programming and infant families through practicums and
stimulation activities internships at Fullilove.
The center is licensed by the "A unique aspect of utilizing
Why Pay Hotel Prices & Just Get A Room??
For only $19.00 per PZS or
1-Bedroom or 2-Bedroom Apartmerit large Efnciency or
Studio unit with full Furnished Kitchens.
Pool - BBQ Cable TV Bike Rentals
Want to know more? Contact Debbie & Ed Gold at:
Venetian Court Apartments
59-71 Isle of Venice
Ft Lauderdale. Fl 33301
Or call 1-800-543-2006
h for finish
WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) �
President Reagan, in a State of the
Union address brimming with
optimism, proclaimed an Ameri-
can economic and military rea-
wakening and vowed to push "to
the finish line" for U.S. support oi
rebel movements in Nicaragua,
A tghanisun and elsewhere.
Seeking a fresh start with Con-
gress, Reagan invited both Demo-
cratic and Republican leaders to
the White House today to discuss
their legislative agendas.
The president called during the
nationally broadcast speech Mon-
day for new assistance to Contra
rebels battling the Sandinista re-
gime in Nicaragua and for U.S.
support oi democracies else-
where.
He talked oi an "economic and
social revolution of hope" in the
United States and "global demo-
cratic revolution" around the
world.
But Democrats immediately
dismissed much of the speech as
irrelevant.
"We've come to the end of an
era said Senate Majority Leader
Robert C. Byrd, D-W. Va. "The
feel-good' slogans have gone flat
with time
Reagan promised to go ahead
with plans to submit to Congress
on Wednesday a request for new
assistance for the Nicaraguan
Contra rebels, saying "the
struggle has extra meaning be-
cause that nation is so near our
own borders
He asked for quick Senate con-
firmation of Supreme Court
nominee Anthony M. Kennedy,
sought prompt ratification of the
U.SSoviet medium-range mis-
sile treaty and offered a mocking
critique of the congressional
budget-making process that even
brought laughs from some of the
lawmakers.
Holding aloft several last-min-
ute money bills that he said repre-
sented "43 pounds of paper and
ink Reagan said: "Congress
shouldn't send another one of
these, and if you do, I will not sign
it
but Democratic leaders de-
clared that Reagan will not be able
to set the national agenda in his
final year in office.
House Speaker Jim Wright, D-
Texas, said Reagan has failed to
do enough to protect Americans'
economic interests.
"As important as our commit-
ments abroad may be, our first
obligation is to the American
people and to their future
Wright said. "We can't build a
vibrant economy by just deliver-
ing pizzas to each other
Reagan dismissed suggestions
that he will be a lame-duck presi-
dent by promising "a full agenda"
in his remaining year in the White
House.
Reagan, who has used previous
State of the Union addresses to
honor people he considered na-
tional heroes, this time singled
out his wife, Nancy, for her "Just
Say No" anti-drug campaign.
He announced few new initia-
tives, except for a suggestion that
the executive and legislative
branches of government revise
the budget-making process with
"a joint agreement that sets out
spending priorities within avail-
able revenues
The address, otherwise, was
studded with references to long-
time Reagan goals � a balanced
budget amendment, a line-item
veto for presidents, a school
prayer amendment, welfare re-
form, and an anti-abortion
amendment.
In an accompanying written
message to Congress, Reagan said
he will seek $1.5 billion for the
fight against AIDS � a ten-fold
increase over 1985 funding levels.
He also broached the idea oi
reducing the tax on capital gains
"as part of any future tax reform
but he did not offer a specific plan.
He urged greater use of merit
systems to reward teachers in
public education and embraced a
program of tax-free savings
bonds to help parents pay for col-
lege.
He said he is determined to
reduce the danger of nuclear war.
The Intermediate-range Nuclear
Forces treaty, he said, marks "an
unprecedented achievement in
arms reduction I urge the Sen-
ate to give its advice and consent
to ratificaiton of this landmark
agreement
But some of Reagan's strongest
rhetoric was reserved for his dis-
cussion of other U.S. military is-
sues and commitments.
nolds' brother, RJ. Jr and sisters,
Mary Reynolds Babcock and
Nancy Reynolds Bagley, estab-
lished a trust for the people of
North Carolina with their inheri-
tance from his estate.
One of the initial trustees of the
Foundation was Z. Smith Rey-
nolds' uncle, William Neal Rey-
nolds, who at his death in 1951
created a trust which now pro-
vides 3 portion of the
Foundation's annual income.
The Foundation has made
grants totaling more than $135
million to recipients in all of
North Carolina's 100 counties.
$ Need Money $
We pay Cash For Anything Gold or Silver
Classrings
Necklaces
Braclets
Coins, ect.
And, We also buy Stero's, T.Vs,
V.C.Rs, Furniture, Bikes, etc.
Ring
10:00-5:00 (M-F)
OO 3:0O Sat.
400 S. Evans
752-3866
.10
O
FIZZ The newest gathering place in town.
SUPERBOWL SUNDAY PARTY
Come in and watch the
Superbowl on our Big
Screen Color TV at Fizz
Free admission
Free Nacho Bar
Kick-off time is 3:30
p.m. Sun Jan. 31,
1988.
Open MonSat.
110 E. Fourth St.
919-752-5855
All ABC Permits
Each year at this time. First Wachovia begins an
intensive effort to recruit and hire outstanding
graduates for our Management Development
Program. East Carolina University has long been
an important source of quality recruits for First
Wachovia. During 1987, First Wachovia hired
thirteen East Carolina graduates into various
management positions. Our needs for
distinguished graduates will be no less this year.
Recruiters for First Wachovia's Management
Development Program will be on campus
February 9. 1988. If you are considering a
banking career, contact the Career Planning
and Placement office for an interview.
Wachovia
i 'it 11
y
Ar Best Hotel On The Strip
&&' Staying at the luxerous Hawaiian Inn
u-lth I.nnu 7 nights a week. New Jazzul
We Buy
Standing
Pine
and
Hardwood
Timber
A
Weyerhaeuser
919-633-7455

0
.0
&


&
ft
Ck
'�
.
o.
4
S

A
�v
C
�!a
Js
A
LOOKING FOR A
SUMMER JOB?
"n�4
��
A
4
&

$
a
&
d
o


w
BEYOND 9 TO 5
CONSIDER
RECREATION DAY
The need for fast, quality copies doesn't stop at 5 o'clock.
And neither do we. Kinko's is open early, open late, and
open weekends to take care of all of your copying needs.
kinkes
321 E. 10th Street
752-0875
Mon. - Fri. 7 a.m10 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. - 6 p.m
Sun. 2 p.m. - 10 p.m
NTERVIEW WITH RECREATIONAL EMPLOYERS
January 28, 1988
Memorial Gym
For More Information
Contact Cooperative Education
313 Rawl
THE EAST CAROLINl
William
in6 Good
By JOHN CARTER
Feature Iditor
"Goooood Morning, Emeraj
City
Yeah, I know every other movj
critic in North America is goni
start their review with the sai
thing when they review "Go(
Morning,Vietnam So what. '
doing it toe.
It wasn't as funnv as I was led
believe by the commercials
fact, "Vietnam" suffers from tl
same problem that plagui
Jumpin' Jack Flash"� the funi
est bits are shown in the commt
cials.
But this doesn't reallv detral
J
from the movie overall. Tl
scenes of Saigon (real!
BangkokThailand) are cratt
into beautiful, detailed shots
life during wartime.
Robin Williams is a funnv gu
No doubt. Most of his energy
this film is channeled into tl
process of his character's a wakel
ing into the horror and stranf
Bill gives so
tequila recip
for the Jim
Buffett show
By BILL UPCHURCH
t Staff Writer
Ok Greenville. This is for th(
of you who need help preparij
for the Buffet concert tonight,
one of these drinks, or better
tryJalL
Warm up the afternoon wit
couple of Brave Bulls: Take 1
oz. of tequila, and 1 oz. of Kahll
pour over ice in a glass and adj
twist of lemon. Repeat throuf
out the day until brave; or
gustingly drunk.
For the main course of the al
noon, you must have the stand!
Margarita. Take 1 12 oz. of
quila, 12 oz. of triple sec, ai
oz. of lime juice; use part of I
lime to rub the rim of the glass,
the rim in salt.
Mix the liquid ingredients
cubes of ice in another glass
pour into the salted glass. I pi
my margaritas frozen. Use
same amounts of liquor froi
recipe above, and instead of
ing the ingredients in ice
use crushed ice.
Mix the ingredients in a biej
with a cup of crushed ice oi
for 5 min. Then on high until
(or put the cubes in the blc
with the mix and blend
mother on high until the
crushed or the blender is sj
ing). Adjust the recipe for thj
of your crowd.
If you feel like being a
conscious alcoholic, you can
a tequila sunrise. Use 2 oz.
quila, 4 oz. of o.j, and 34
Grenadine. Mix the tequii
o.j. in a glass and pour ovi
Top the mix with the Gren
and allow to settle. Stir ft
This Is the band, Bad B
t 8 p jn. The cott will
m0m. � - � I - �iii�i nn,ii i i ���
� i.i, ' "





s or
er
nff Man
52-3S66j



ivia
A
s
o
-s
Js
3. A
A

.
o.
'4r
AY
EMPLOYERS
on
tication
IMt FAST CAROI INIAN
Entertainment
11 IF. 1 AMAi'i �! I
Williams not funny enough
in'Good Morning,Vietnam'
B JOHN CARTER
l uturra I .i itot
HH
1 Morning, Emerald
know every other mo ie
North America is gonna
re iew with the same
they re iew (lood
ng ietnam s w hat. I'm
?o
I as funnv as 1 was led to
h the commercials. In
etnam' suffers from the
beauty of a country and its people frightening twists. When Garlick
underseige. and Cronauer ire tricked into
He reacts perfectly when he taking the wrong road through
finds out he's been betrayed by a enemy lines, 1 wasconvinced that
friendThis is gonna look really the picture was ncaring the end. A
bad on a resume Williams has good, intense surprise is rare
used this movie as a vehicle to any where today, and that one bit
.
problem that plagued
ack Flash thefunni-
ire shown in the commer-
doesn't really detract
movie overall. The
Saigon (really
- - are crafted
" � ill detailed shots of
ing u am me.
Williams is a funny guv.
ubt Most of his energy in
is channeled into the
� e? his character's a waken-
the horror and strange
Bill gives some
uila recipes
for the Jimmy
Buffett show
show the- public he can do more
than sit on his head.
So Williams is a serums actor
new That kind ol explains why
the movie is almost stolen from
him by the hopelessly unfunny Lt.
! lank, played by Bruno Kirby.
I iauk is so convinced ol his
c lie ability, it's almost funnier
to e him groping for jokes than it
is to hear spastic patter roll off
Williams's tongue.
Although not an ensemble
movie, the rest ol the supporting
cast is almost as well developed as
Williams. Forest Whitaker's Pvt.
( iarlick and Tung Thanh 'Iran's
1 uan are engaging characters.
The plot takes some often
almost makes the whole movie.
The underdogs oi the movie
though are the Vietnamese citi-
zens Cronauer teaches English.
Real English, the kind you hear on
Super Bowl Weekends. The
class's improvised baseball game
at the end is a rib tickler.
The crucial conflict in the movie
was censorship. Ominously, cen-
sorship seems to win at the climax
ol "Vietnam In real life, the cen-
sorship of the Armed Forces Ra-
dio was overturned.
But that was in the 60s. The 80s
is a much more conservative envi-
ronment. "Good Morning, Viet-
nam" is a sharp reminder that that
war still goes on.
Pictured here is Robin Williams, playing that zany Adrian Cronauer in the new hit. hi
funny dramedy'Good Morning, Vietnam Robin plays a new deejay on the Armed ! i
Station in Vietnam who is just a wild and crazy guy. The movie is pretty good, but not sol
fall on the floor and get stuck in all the used gum and not be able to get up again It
Hut it's pretty funny. It's the feel good movie of the year.
Dapper Dan sells vintage clothes, cards
Hv GRETCHEN JOURNIGAN
Staff Writer
teq
"1 tr to avoid being the average ent for all ages.
;tore located at 116 East 5th Street,
where he offers something diner-
little old lady anitque shop
sa) s businessman I )an Roberson.
oberson is the owner and
manager of "Dapper Dan's an
antique and vintage clothing
Han's sells clothes,
, jewelry, glassware,
i apper
hats, shoes
furniture and a wide variety of
specialty items including old
books, toes and postcards.
Most of his items are inexpen-
sive and very affordable for the
average college student says
Roberson. Trices range from SI
up.
i he majority ol his sales are old
clothes and jewelry, usually less
expensive compared to some oi
Robei
and � . . .
mother I
Alter .�� � '
in i
start his o a n
own antiqu
By BILL LTCHLRCH
Greenville. This is tor those
who need help preparing
concert tonight. Try
one ot these drinks, or better yet,
tr them a
Warm uy the afternoon with a
le of Brave Bulls: Take 112
and 1 oz. oi Kahlua;
in a glass and add a
n. Repeat through-
iv until brave; or dis-
ly drunk,
r the main course oi the after-
must have the standard
Margarita. Take 1 12 oz. of te-
. of triple sec, and 1
� lime juice; use- part oi the
rub the rim of the glass, dip
c nm in salt.
x the liquid ingredients and
t ice in another glass and
tr into the salted glass 1 prefer
margaritas frozen. Use the
same amounts oi liquor from the
pe above, and instead of mix-
ing the ingredients in ice cubes,
use crushed ice.
Mix the ingredients in abiendei
with a cup of crushed ice on low
5 mm. Then on high until firm
put the cubes in the blender
h the mix and blend that
ther on high until the ice is
hi d or the blender is smok-
Vdjust the recipe for the size
ir crowd.
you feel like being a health
scious alcoholic, you can have
lila sunrise. Use 2 oz. of te-
a, 4 oz. of o.j, and 34 oz. of
nadine. Mix the tequila and
in a glass and pour over ice.
the mix with the Grenadine
l allow to settle. Stir for the
� . ,
This is Dapper Dan's, an antique and vintage clothing, jewlery and furniture store on Fifth Street.
Dapper, as we like to call him, is open every day from 12-6 p.m. Weird hours, so remember them. (Photo
by ECU Photolab.)
sunrise affect. Drink many to ob-
tain your daily supply oi vitamin
C.
During the course of the after-
noon party festivities, you need to
occasionally do a few simple te-
quila shots. It you don't know-
how you must be a transfer stu-
dent. '
Lick your drinking hand in the
space between your thumb and
index finger. Put some salt in the
newly moistened area. Hold the
shot glass with your thumb and
index finger of the same hand.
Hold the lemon in your other
hand.
Lick the salt, dnnk the tequila,
and suck the lemon. Repeat until
nauseated. At that point, forget
about the formalities of the shot
and chug straight from the bottle
with no lemon or salt. The nausea
will pass and the night will con-
tinue merrily along.
Most of the measurments used
in these drinks are standard sizes
for normal drinkers. ECU stu-
dents may want to double all of
the quantities of the alcohol and
keep the amount oi mixer the
same.
See you at the Buffet show, in
the bathroom, driving the
porcelin school bus, and throwing
groceries.
the $275 furniture he displav s
Roberson mentioned a few
his current favorite pieces includ-
ing a 1920 oak drop leaf table with
matching chairs, a 1930 deco van-
ity priced $165, a Victorian purse
and a grey velvet opera cape.
Dan's antiques range from the goodkx
1900's to 1960's. He purchases difficult
most oi his items from other deal- di ��. i n
ers and auctions in the D. C. atvj
Maryland and New York. 1 Ie has
bought from Boone's in Wilson
and will sometimes buy
pieces from individuals here in
(irecnville.
Roberson says that lit gets a
new range of things every w
tor the store.
The new arrival oi antiques at-
tracts people oi all ages - "from
high schoolers to older ladies
says Roberson.
Employee, Melissa Terrell says
that she sold a antique suit to an
English professor.
She says that the clothes and
fashions from the past are the
same as Vogue styles are today.
Roberson estimated that B
percent oi his customers are col-
lege students and they're looking
for something different. Since his
business opened over a year ago
October 19S7 was the biggest
month for business vet. Old
clothes made great Halloween
outfits for many costume partiers.
"I was shocked at the crowd
savs Roberson.
increase
R bei
six months �
to open
.hose the nami
isoften lint
i ng i oi
Roberson plans to op n,�m Jut
store within the next fc
either Greenville -
crablc in a ma � .
In the near futui
add more ;
cards and hai
his store.
Roberson savs I
sionally ad
papers but tl �
tomers is du
and through trie;
fTie business
the past vear ai d
continue sa -
lie said that
selling and trade .
not part-time bul �
Dapper Dan s is
ness term 12-6 p.m. M
through Saturdav
Pickin' the Bones
Bonehead writes a nice column
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Offender
This week, we're going to try
and get through this column with-
out any cusswords. As amazing
as this seems, it has been done
before and I don't anticipate any
problems. This column is dedi-
cated to Tim Chandler's mommy
and Debbie Greenfeld's dead dog,
Whiskey.
This column was going to be
called'Last Shot O' Whiskey
but in the interest of cleanliness,
we'll call it "Last Shot O' Kool
Aid
Let's face it, this column doesn't
look too interesting so far. Feel
free to skip to the Pirate Comic's
"Fun N Games" section, co-au-
thored by my boney self and
Jeff "Where be that Bojangles?"
Parker.
Now, I'm at a loss. Just kidding
keg party starts for the Buffett strong hot chocolate and
concert. we are Greeks.
The reason we have two editors This is easy for us
is because the last three we had We observe the mane
ran screaming into the night. We Greek advertising sta
decided to split the job (and the then write it down
infinitives) up. So if we lose one to Classified style. sun
the night, we'll still have one left pis-urinates cverybod
to mop up. The ADVERTISEW
Therc'sa special page called the bottom of the pages ai vl
EDITORIAL PAGE. This tells us money. These arei
you, the reader, who works on the The AD STAF1
paper, some of the opinions these which is why
people have and some of the opin-
ions you, the readers, have.
Most of the readers that write in
to express their opinions talk
about liberalism and conserva-
tism, some pretty dirty words in
their own right. Nothing much
ever happens here either.
The person in charge of this
page is the MANAGING ED1-
funny as the rest of this pap i is
Certain AD STAFF1 -
tell us. the writers, what to write
about. To them. 1 would like to
give a hearty raspberry
Next comes the t I V
PAGE. I've never und
why on Tuesdays the page is
called STYLE, on Thursday s it's
ENTERTAINMENT when. jri
reality, it is never entertaining or
verv stvhsh
On "Thursdays, the !
COMICS appear. These comics
are usually not very comical 1 or
some reason, the majontv ot the
This is the band, Bad
at 8 p.m. The cost w
. Bob and the Rocking Horses. They wil play tomorrow night at the Underground
ill be $1 and there will be munchie. So come on out
TOR. Our MANAGING EDITOR
As long as we're referring you, the is Greenville's oldest Boy Scout
reader, to the other less offensive He is also a former Pinewood
things in this paper you can read, Derby champion. He can still re-
let's take a tour of that grand old cite all the Scout Laws, in order.
institution,THE EAST CARO- I'm not kidding.
LINIAN. He tries to keep some sense of strips are big rip offs of really
Let's start off with the front order on the page. It's not that funny comics like "Nancy" and
page. This, and the next seven hard. Basically, the Republicans "Garfield"
pages arc the province of the just write in and tell the Demo- The page facing the comics is
NEWS EDITOR. He and she (we crats they are stupid and the the SPORTS PAGE This page is
have both currently) work very Democrats point out how re- the most widely read page. This is
hard to bring you, the reader, the tarded the Republicans are. Prettv perhaps due to the editors mabl-
most recent and least boring sto- boring, huh? Well, lefs move on. ity to write words of more than
ries they possibly can. This is the CLASS1FIED PAGE. one syllable.
This task is even more awesome We have a lot of fun making these This makes it easy to read for
when you,the reader, consider things up. No one really puts your basic ECU graduate, but
that the only real news that goes these silly things in you know. We $ee TRIP, page 10
on around here is what time the sit around and drink whisk- uhh.






10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 28,1988
Jellybean still spinning out the 12 inch hits
John Benitez's professional
name is also a chilhood nick-
name. Jellybean, bestowed by his
sifter, inspired by his initials JB
and a saying current when he was
about 10, "Do you know what 1
mean, Jellybean?"
Jellybean, now 30, zoomed like
a rocket from playing records in a
Bronx disco to remixing dance
singles to producing records.
le did it with a lot of hustle. But
it wasn't the hustle of shortcuts
and palaver. It was a hustle to
learn how to do things, under-
stand what it all meant and then
hard work to do it himself.
Now he's known in the record-
ing business as a hit maker, and
his telephone rings with otters to
remix and produce records.
1 have to hear the song he
says. Hopefully 1 feel there's
something i could do to make it
better. !t I feel there's nothing
then 1 let it go. 1 don't want to just
put my name on something. I
want to make a difference
Jellybean says he gets about 10
offers a week but onlv does one or
two 1 don't solicit projects. 1
don't know of anyone that does.
E en the first couple of mixes just
came to me
Last year, his second album and
first for Chrysalis, "Just Visiting
This Planet was released. It
reached No. 111 on the pop charts
in October. Two singles from it,
"The Real Thing sung by Steven
Dante, and "Who Found Who?"
sung by Elisa Fiorillo, hit No. 1 on
the dance charts.
Jellybean doesn't sing on the
album. He considers himself the
conceptual artist. "On my next
album, I'll sing. Well, we'll see. As
soon as I sing then I'm really in
competition with all the other
artists I'm working with. I don't
know if I want to
The son of Puerto Rican par-
ents. Jellybean grew up in the
Bronx. "1 really loved music. 1
would spend any money 1 had on
buying records. When friends
had parties, I was asked to be the
disc jockey because I had the rec-
ords.
"One day a woman asked how
much I would charge to do her
daughter's 'Sweet Sixteen' I real-
ized somebody would actually
pay me to do somethig I'd been
doing free
Jellybean said he needed a job to
subsidize his record collection. So
he went to clubs to see what disc
jockeys did with a bid sound sys-
tem. He began auditioning. He
began to play at some clubs on a
regular basis.
"I met people who worked in
record companies. They invited
me to recording studios. I went
every day, hanging out, saying,
'Can I watch?' and 'How did you
do that?' I became the most re-
spected club D.J. in the country:
they didn't mind having me
around. They'd come to the club
and I would try their new records
out. It was a trade.
"I realized I could have influ-
ence if they listened to my ideas.
In 'Dance It Free Style' by Mantus
I said, 'Make the bass drum loud,
put repeating effects on the voice
and take the guitar out
Jellybean was asked to do all the
remix on "Flashdance" by Irene
Cara, his first big artist on a big
label, and he did Michael
Scmbello's "Maniac which went
No. 1 pop.
"It started snowballing, " he
says. "The last three or four years
I've been involved with 60 top 20
and 20 No. 1 records
What's most important in re-
mixing a recorded song for a 12-
inch dance single? Jellybean says,
"Keep the groove. Make sure the
song has a killer instinct in the
breaks so people let themselves
go and have a good time dancing
to it
The dance scene is healthy to-
day, Jellybean says. "Every track
on my album is danceablc. People
will always dance. When they
said disco was dead I was playing
for 1,500 people a night
In April 1984, Jellybean quit
working in discos, where he'd
always worn earplugs because, he
says, "I knew I'd be using my ears
in the future
His opportunity to become a
record producer came when he
met and began working with
Madonna.
"I produced Madonna's first
No. 1 dance hit and her first top 20
pop hit, 'Crazy For You a ballad.
It launched her career interna-
tionally and launched my career
as a record producer he said.
Jellybean immediately took
another big step in 1984. "I de-
cided I'd make a Jellybean con-
cept album, 'Watupski?' It's street
slang in the Bronx. It means
what's up, what's new
"Wotupski?" on EMI America,
is a five-cut, extended-play rec-
ord. The album has the song,
"Sidewalk Talk a top 20 hit,
written by Madonna and sung by
Kathryn Buchanan.
"There were four singers on
that record. They all have record
deals now. 'The Mexican' also
was a dance hit he says.
In planning for "Just Visiting
This Planet Jellybean says, '
wanted to have something that
would really have an impact
He said he had found three very
talented vocalist, Fiorillo, Dante
and Adele Bertei, and he wanted
to launch their careers from the
album.
"All three are working on
albums. I'm producing songs for
them. The greatest joy I'm going
to have is when these guys are
performing at Madison Square
Carden one day he said-
Jellybean commissioned c gnt
sonKS for the album, instructing
ThaUhey be about altered states of
consciousness - fusion, dreams.
le co-wrote one song, Hypno-
tized He took up keyboards a
year and a half ago and plays
synthesize on th album. He alos
has supervised music for a couple
of movies.
"It's all an adventure for me
What inspires me the most is
trying something new and learn-
ing how to do something. Fhe
worst that can happen is I would
fail. That wouldn't be so bad, he
says.
Jellybean refuses to drive him-
self around the clock. "I work
eight or nine hours in the studio.
Some people stay until it gets
done. I want to comeback fresh. 1
put limits on how much work 1 do
L.A. Vocal choir sings
Bv CAROL WETHHRINGTON
Staff VVrter
� ght the Los Angeles
rts Ensemble performed
at I lendrix Theatre to an audience
er 200. The four men and two
women from the ten member
up from Southern California
entertained theatre-goers with
pieces from Hadyn, Mozart,
ihms and Liebeslieder, just to
name a few.
Under director Armen
zclimian, listeners were en-
tranced bv beautiful chamber
musi played by Todd Camburn
and Guzelimian, accompanying
Cynthia-Westphal Johnson, so-
Rickie-Wiener Cole,
mezzo-soprano, Paul Johnson,
tenor, and James Koenig, bari-
tone.
The music was of the 19th Cen-
tury, and in a pre-show interview,
Guzelimian showed his enthusi-
asm about the music they chose.
He revealed the fact that the
music represented the overall,
unique character of the ensemble.
Guzelimian and group members
wanted to stress the fact that their
music is not choral music by gen-
eral standards.
The music is meant to be fun
and enlightening, showing us not
only the well-known master-
pieces, that we've all heard at one
time or another, but music that
19th century public listened to as
Man puts resume on a sign
EATON RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) -
Theo McNamara put out his res-
ume in a big way: on a billboard.
The 4-by-8-foot billboard, com-
plete with a photo of the 21-year-
old job seeker, looms above
Michigan route 99 near this town
about 10 miles south of Lansing
and is owned bv his brother,
Steve.
"In conversation it started as a
joke, but we thought about it and
thought it would be very crea-
tive Theo McNamara said.
Theo McNamara, who's look-
ing for a job as a cellular telephone
salesman, says he's had two job
offers since the billboard went up.
"They both have real potential
he said.
a part of everyday life. Guzelim-
ian was also anxious to explain
that their presentations do not
consist of "stuffy, old-fashioned
music that someone just pulled
off a museum shelf
The group will continue to tour
colleges and civic centers
throughout the United States,
with the individual members
appearing in solo performances
also.
Anyone interested in vocal
chamber music, remember the
names of these exceptional per-
formers, for it would be worth-
while to see them again, whether
solo or with the whole Los Ange-
les Vocal Arts Ensemble.
Correction
1 his page erroneously reported
poet Betty Adcock as coming to
read and give a workshop on last
Thursday.
She is, in fact, going to be here
TODAY. Everyone is invited to
attend the reading in Room 244 of
Mendenhall tonight at 8 p.m and
the workshop will be today at 2
p.m. in Austin 319.
Trip through
the EC paper
Continued from page 9
Pulitzer Prizes will never show up
on the SPORTS EDITOR'S desk.
So there vou have it. A trip
through the magical land of THE
EAST CAROLINIAN. As Whit-
ney Houston says, "I don't know
why I offend I just do
So if I missed anvbodv, like the
typesetters who can't spell, the
layout artists who keep cutting
out crucial paragraphs (which
end up on the Island of Misfit
Paragraphs) I'll get to you next
time.
A special thanks for help on this
column goes out to the STAFF
ILLUSTRATOR and o Al, the
great guy who has to clean up
after us newspaperin' fools.
And I didn't use a single cuss-
word. Whattanight
-1
:
��" A
���
m3 iSEj�5J
vxx
1

SAVE NOW ON YOUR NEW PC
Inductory Offer
$749
�IBM PC XTCompatibilty
�640 KBYTE MEMORY
� 2 360 KBYTE DSDO Floppy Drives
�8 Expansion Slots
�CRT Controller
� Monochrome Monitor (Green or Amber)
� Turbo Speed (4.7710 Megahertz)
�Parallel I'orts
� At Style Keyboard
� Word Processing & Desk Mate Software
Options available
�A 20 Megabyte I lard Disk Dnve For $295.00
� A I iigh Resolution Color Monitor For $295.00
�A Panasonic KXP10911 Printer For $279.00
To Try Out A VCS
2000 PC XT Turbo
Call or Come By
Financing Available
See The New VCS
Turbo 2000 PC XT
(Suitable for small business,
school, or home management)
One year full warranty

VAN CLEVE
SYSTEMS, INC.
222 South Lee Street
Ayden, N.C. 28513
919-746-2038
Bad Bob And The Rocking Horses
Prime Rock and Blues
Friday, January 29th - 8:00 p.m.
At The Underground
$1 Admission Free Munchies
gathering place
r,
ur
Dr. Manhattan
says:
Pay attention !
Assistant Features Editor
needed. You will be the
Feature Editor's slave. You
will do all the dumb things
he hates to do.
Apply in person at the
East Carolinian office.
REGGAE-ROCK with
THE AMATEURS
AT
OFF THE CUFF LOUNGE
at the Sheraton
a rocking-reggae super Sunday
Superbowl Party
Sunday. Jan. 31. 1988 - 10 p.m. - J a.m.
SPREAD THE WORD!
'7
Sheraton - 203 W. Greenville Blvd.
355-2666
SEE YOU THERE!
azz m
'NEW YORK (AT
lime Reeves began her mu;
raining at the age oi
ttle hint she wi'uld one day be
singing widi some o the jazz
world's most eminent perform-
ers.
e "I started out on pi ai ;h !
feave to suv 1 hated Reeves
jfl a recent int
pened, how e � r. her pe.
teacher was also a �. al �� a her
3She heard me sun; and si
'�hild, tins is w hat .
doing
I Reeves took the i
with the release t her I i
on an Important r
seems to havi becom
8ight success Shi
greeted w i ti
J
Televisi
LOSA
kinship
ationch Id M
ever got.
rith the tube
"We lived
4ore in Canand
ras one of tl
ectronic bahv- -
Winship has i
tscination int
ocumenta
ision whi
BS. He w r
He series.
Television
om the first i
median Mil ten ft
rmstrong walking 01
Garry Shane.
teomhome( ncabl
e comedie an
game show's a nd � -
the political procc -
Newman is the host
The series, which v i
Dramedies ar
well in rating
NEW YORK v AD - Despite (
"flTifefj i flPf" liable taJS, 5
catWrfUmcdies" have been
lackluster performers in the A C
Nielsen Co. ratings this season.
The half-hour shows veer awaj
from standard -teem tor-
depending more on char
development than pratfa
There is no laugh track -
sometimes no laughs
1 In one episode of VB
'Slap' Maxwell Story
Coleman delivered a dec p
sitive speech about the g
tween himself and his -
ABC's "Hoopcrman John Ritter
tried in vain to save a man
AIDS frin suicide.
The onlv "dramech tosc
the ratings has been I he '
and Nights of Molly Dodd
summer replacement on N
and that could have been d
its timeslot following the
rated "The Cosby Show
Thursdavnight.lt will get at.
J larch when it comes back on thj
chedule, most likely in a ditto
it time period.
i CBS' "Franks Tlace hasn
prospered in the ratings des
Us slot on Monday among thP
ach higher-rated Kate &
f "Newharf and Designini
fomen
jfcilast week's ratings 1 loopej
in" was the highest-ratej
ng the three shows, at 39th
rankings. Frank -
ked 33rd. "Slap was
Jm in 61st place.
PBC's "The Thorns a pncVj
iedy from Mike Nichols th"
. to turn the family sited
re on its ear, premiered at 5
the rankings.
THEATRES
BUCCANl
756-3307 � Gr��nvill
Rated R JJQ'
1:15-3
Rated R
DEATH RO
1:15-3:1
WAL1
2:00
�BEET"� " ' � "m m iip��wiM�ii
��0�r�ii�' '
� ��� ���iM'mw
mm j �





f
its
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 28,1988 11
have i- when these guvs are
rforming at Madison Square
rden one da) ho said.
ivan commissioned eight
tor the album, instructing
tn beaboutalteredslatesol
sness - illusion, dreams.
wrote one song, Hvpno-
He took up keyboards a
ii and a halt ace and plays
e on th album He alos
. sed musk for a couple
an adventure tor me
cs me the most is
thing new and learn-
to do something rhe
it can happen i 1 would
m'tbesobad" he
m refuses to drive him-
und � - uork
- in the studio.
. sta until it gets
neback tresh. 1
� how much workldo
CK with
EURS
LOUNGE
iraton
uper Sunday
Party
- 10 p.m. - 1 a.m.
WORD!
rreenville Blvd.
66
HERE!
y
4ABEACH
rommodations for 7 fun-filled nights,
coach transportation,
optional activities,
rvice discounts.
:harges Included.
184?
FULL PACKAGE
IIRVATIONS
rer
�� CAMPUS PROGRAMS
azz musician records album
IEW YORK (AD - When Di-
ie Reeves began her musical
lining at the age of 12, tnere was
he hint she would one day be
ting with some of the jazz
Irid's most eminent perform-
l started out on piano, which 1
ko to say I hated Reeves said
recent interview. As it hap-
lod, however, her piano
pher was also a vocal teacher,
le hoard me sing and she said,
ild. this is what you should be
hg '
leeves took the advice. Now,
h the release of her first album
in important record label, she
ns to have become an over-
nt success. She has been
ed with critical acclaim, and
her album is getting played on
jazz stations across the country.
Bruce Lund vail, the head of
Blue Note records, signed her to
do the recording at their first
meeting, before she had finished
making her pitch.
Lundvall later walked into a
club where Reeves was singing
DukeEllington'sclassicTveGot
It Bad and That Ain't Good That
song became part of her album.
VVhile the release of the record,
simply entitled "Dianne Reeves
might make the singer look like an
overnight success, it is, in fact, the
culmination of years of hard
work.
Reeves, a mature performer at
31, was discovered before, in
Denver, by the jazz trumpeter
Clark Terry when she was 17. She
was soon appearing with his band
and singing in a program with the
Denver Symphony.
She had studied classical sing-
ing and had begun to explore jazz
with the help of her uncle, Charles
Burrcll, a jazz musician who also
played with the Denver Sym-
phony. (He is not related to the
jazz guitarist Kenny Burrell.)
Reeves moved to Los Angeles
when she was 18, and began to
perform and record with several
groups, including a Latin jazz
group named Caldera, which in-
cluded keyboardist Eddie del
Barrio, who was to become an
important influence.
In 1981, she joined Sergio Mcn-
des, after being coached by his
Wevision show on TV
- ANGELES (AP) - Michael
hip grew up as a first-gen-
ion child of television and has
er gotten over his fascination
1 the tube.
�rVe lived over my father's rug
? in Canandaigua, N.Y and I
one of the first kids with the
tronic babysitter he said,
�inship has now turned that
pnation into an eight-part
mentary series called "Tele-
n which began Monday on
He wrote and co-produced
(eseru -�
�Television" looks at 60 years,
�flt the first fuzzy images to
HBedian Milton Berle to Neil
jmstrong walking on the moon
Garrv Shandling coping at his
stcorr home on cable. It examines
le comedies and dramas, the
shows and TV's impact on
political process. Edwin
man is the host and narrator.
The series, which will conclude
March 14, is a joint production of
WNET in New York and KCET in
Los Angeles in association with
Granada Television of England.
Granada earlier had produced a
series also called "Television
In college, Winship studied
political science. "Then I worked
on the McGovern (presidential)
campaign in 1972 he said. 'That
cured me of politics
He turned to writing as a
freelancer for the Washington
Star and eventually joined WNET
as a publicist. He soon moved into
production and in 1983 became
head writer for "Smithsonian
World
"It was an enormous task con-
densing 60 years of television into
eight hours he said of the "Tele-
vision" project. "The spine of the
series is looking at television
through different program forms.
It's not so much behind the scenes
as what we saw on the screen.
"It's really a retrospective. We
show comedy, drama, game
shows, the news, live events and
sports, plus the race to invent tele-
vision. I think we all have the
notion that TV was invented in
the United States and Great Brit-
ain. But parallel develops were
going on in the Soviet Union,
Japan and Germany. Gennany
had an operating system in the
1930s. Amazingly, Hitler never
understood its power
Winship, who has returned to
freelancing, said there is a possi-
bility of a sequel to "Television
The second series would get into
commercials, daytime drama and
explore TV news more thor-
oughly.
"I'd like to do something about
how television news is really
made he said. "Show how tele-
vision itself affects the news and
how politicians use television
wife to sing in Portuguese. Two
years later, she began touring
with Harry Belafonte, remaining
with him until 1985.
"My work with Belafonte, ex-
ploring various Latin rhythms
and chants, led me back full circle
to by black American roots she
said. "All those things brought me
right back to singing jazz again
Before connecting with Blue
Note, she recorded two albums on
the small Palo Alto label in Cali-
fornia; those recordings ulti-
mately brought her to Lundvall's
attention.
When the opportunity to record
for Blue Note arrived, she was
ready. She began by lining up her
cousin, the noted jazz pianist and
arranger George Duke, as the
record's producer.
The guest musicians on the
album include Hcrbie Hancock
on piano, Airto Moreira and
Paulinho da Costa on percussion,
Stanley Clarke on bass, Tony Wil-
liams on drums and Freddie
Hubbard on flugelhorn.
The result is not only a fine jazz
album but a catalog of the singer's
Latin and African influences.
m fin
LOW COST
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
Abortions from 13 to 18 week at additional cott Pregnancy
Test, Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy Counseling, For
further information, call 832-0535 (toll free number 1-800-
532-5384) between 9 a jtl and 5 p.m. weekdays. Genera! anes-
thesia available.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
NEW!
BLUEPRINTING
SERVICES
AT
BLUE PRINTS while you wait
COPIES from blueprints up to 36" wide
TRACINGS from blueprints or from copies
758-2400
Fast Copies for Fast Times
Located in Downtown Greenville
next to Chicos Restaurant in the Georgetown Shops
Dramedies are not doing as
well in ratings this season
ECU
V YORK (AP) - Despite fine
owLiiMHe sUrs, so-
�anamedies" tfflve been
Ester performers in the A.C.
?n Co. ratings this season.
H�e half-hour shows veer away
p standard sitcom format,
Ending more on character
Jelopmcnt than pratfalls,
re is no laugh track - and
jtimes no laughs,
one episode of ABC's "The
lp' Maxwell Story Dabney
jeman delivered a deeply sen-
ve speech about the gulf be-
?n himself and his son. On
's "Hooperman John Ritter
in vain to save a man with
IDS frin suicide.
The only "dramedy" to score in
ratings has been "The Days
I Nights of Molly Dodd a
immer replacement on NBC,
d that could have been due to
timeslot following the top-
ped "The Cosby Show" on
tursday night. It will get a test in
kiarch when it comes back on the
zhedule, most likely in a differ-
ent time period.
CBS' "Frank's Place" hasn't
prospered in the ratings, despite
its slot on Monday among the
much higher-rated "Kate & Al-
I lie "Newhart" and "Designing
Women
In last week's ratings, "Hooper-
man was the highest-rated
among the three shows, at 39th in
the rankings. "Frank's Place"
ranked 53rd. "Slap" was way
down in 61st place.
ABC's 'The Thorns a prickly
comedy from Mike Nichols that
aims to tum the family sitcom
genre on its ear, premiered at 55th
in the rankings.
NBC racked up its 12th weekly
win, in a row with an average,
primetime rating of 18.0 to CBS's
13.7 and ABC's 12.5. NBC has a
season-to-date rating of 16.5, fol-
lowed by CBS's 13.6, and ABC's
13.2.
The rating is a percentage of the
nations 88.6 million households
with televisions.
The NFL playoff game between
Cleveland and Denver on NBC
was the top-rated show of the
week with a rating of 32.0. Sports
events are included in the rank-
ings if they are broadcast in prime
time for 10 minutes or more.
'The Cosby Show" was second,
followed by the rest of NBC's
Thursday-night comedies,
"Cheers "A Different World"
and "Night Court The rest of the
top 10 included "Golden Girls"
NBC, "Growin Pains" ABC,
"Who's the Boss?" ABC, "L.A.
Law" NBC and "Family Ties"
NBC.
Pla.a Cinrma
f
ATTENTION
ECU
STUDENTS
Remco East, Inc.
announces that
LANGSTON PARK
APARTMENTS is now
under New Ownership.
The complex will undergo
renovations (interior and
exterior) with many
improvements planned for
1988!
Contact Remco East,
Inc. for rental
information
758-6061
Monday:
Tuesday:
Wednesday:
Thursday:
Friday
and
Saturday:
Sunday:
800 E. 10th St.
Greenville, N.C.
752-1907
Bloody Mary Blues Day
Bloody Marys and Screwdrivers $1.95
Toast Your Tuesday Off
House Brand Highballs for $1.95
RIBTACULAR 5-9 P.M.
All You Can Eat Beef Ribs $7.95
Includes Salad, Potatoe and Bread
Draft Beer For $1.09 Mug
$4.50 Pitcher
Hops and Schnapps
Bottle Beers $1.75
All Schnapps Shots $1.00
"Prime Time11
Prime Rib
Danyrs Cut $12.95. Regular $9.95
Super Bowl Special (Jan. 31st)
Big Screen T.V. - Draft Beer Special - Food Bar
Ht fld Mi' . 1M
Prince - Sign 'O' the
Times - PG 13
Three Men & A
Baby- PG
The Couch Trip
w Dan Ackroyd - R
Xcik ihactra
Dirty Dancing
-PG 13
$1.50 All Times
AND THEY VOTED
im
mm
v'v


CONSOLIDATED 4f WjJIWTSSlfcJf4JrYWr4J
THEATRES l
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756 3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center ,
Starts Friday
Rated r BORN TO RACE
1:15-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15
Rated R Starts Friday
DEATH ROW GAME SI
1:15-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15
Sixth Big Week
WALL STREET
Rated R
On January 6,1988, this
world-class panel of seafood
lovers voted North Carolina as
having the best, the tastiest,
and the most delicious seafood
in the world.
This renowned group of
world travellers includes
Olympic, NASCAR, NCAA,
and World Series champions,
and a host of civic leaders who
have enjoyed seafood from
London to Tokyo, and from New
York to Paris.
Like you, they're experts on
good seafood. They've found
that nobody fixes it better than
the chefs here at home. So enjoy!
NORTH CAROLINA, FIRST IN FISH
� 1988 N.C. Ihred & Tourism
n
"��" �l �"U��l�"1" '





Hi EAS1 CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 28,1988
ItU (v
�U.
I he Plank
-Ct -�rs�

you vt. 6ota eio eircl
YOU (JP io&etfA ttf )
pHtfMXmKtfft
B A(il Y Orpheus: Nightwajker
' )ty lAft fro
v. V � XV.
a
WiX,W WME&ffc
if
I
IkMIU PHI WM f SAW AIO
ft
;sty
lft"XJO� WOlft HfLP;


i D'AIEE A SPECIAL DUMBER
f A TRIGND "F "JR3 tjAVE US
IXi. MOLD
IZ
Whs - au DftAj)vi6)
-�
A " 83-c "�4 Wc &is
a:s ca� or C' O
Hi. I a�
M.
AN
x5
S
A
b?
1
.y.
h3
CO
s
Help Max Find 99
"Zs.
J
��
jnc
LTl
3 C
a
En
3.
D
The
"Kill Danny
Partridge"
Contest
For years, we've all despised
Danny Partridge with every fiber
of our collective beings. Now's
your chance to prove it! In two or
three sentences, tell us in what
horribly twisted way you'd like to
see Danny die. We'll print the best
ones. Drop all submissions by the
paper by Wednesday, holmes.
JoS" P V-e ;j, ,� i k�e� I
B GURGANUS and HARRIS
,Wjffl
By PARKER Hellion
By TIRRELL and bonehead

ry�VE '5 -r�gN
iui4y BV -4 rooD
OF BEER STWKT
rPt� ojf of
UtdffrMAfcSi
Inside Joke
B RIK
( ampus Comics
B BARBOl R
IS THAT IT?
I �P-THIS IS
I TH&ONEl

ALRI6HT1 JOST
WHAT WE'VE
TSEEIV WAITING
Y f0R1
HAJ THAT?
The. swiruT
ILLUSTRME ?
N0; EVEN l
IT'S .rcMSor'R
RENT'S AtimS
FOR con DOKs (
6l
Overkill
-Tot?A 04 (M $ViOVJ THr OPRAH
)LUCToMLSKl WWO WAMTS "To
WlM tVie HAND o vAPOfyjMA
MoWt)oVou hopet
To DO TrtlS?,
�2
pX GOkJMA STRt SAflDVoiJA
1
By FRIEDRICH
xxm Cjgnma 6TAftT d&r H?r-
1 l�98fgiCJ.fri
VtfU. .A -DU DAW?
o9iDod ioRrftATfoM
SAi 6H6 Wt 3a
m Back ToGlH.
thought
PHIV AIP
LAST
SHOW �00"T
to ecucvr cveh-
S5er
rMf T SHOULD V-W A
TuAiO TO YteM DftUG PCA(TtC
eoPie who
PftUGsf
V
IJW-1 THWkVT Ui 5H4KIV6
JH U5T J 5WCiTHATD vjakc-
AbOftrss ion oo rAWus
G
v
kV
Shown here are the creators of
"Fun N Games Chippy Bone-
marrow and Jeff "I don't Know
Why I Like it I Just Do Parker.
If you want to see your Fun N
Games printed, drop 'em by the
newspaper office. Or don't. We
don't give a log. Oye!
ftqsiw
SAY
i
irates an
ByTlMCHANDLlR
Sport I ilitor
W'illiam & Mary, behind a
point shouting whiz kid, hand
East Carolina its third straight
CAA loss, 70-63, Wednesd
night in Minges Coliseum.
The Tribe paced by 22 :
from reserve-guard C.reg Burzell,
including five of-six sh
from 3-point range, improve
6-11 overall and 3-3 in CAA ;
while the Pirates watched their
mark topple to 6-11 and 2-4 in
conference competition.
The Pirates were well a
Burzell s effective sh �
ity even before he started dnl
the points in. In tact, the I a
up a special defense I
him.
"We were running a trial
and-two defense with
guys guarding Burzell
man) head coach Mik
said following the gai
guess is as gwd as mil
he got open
Burzell was not
weapon the Tribe .
victorv. On the boa r .
Mary held a v
advantage by game's end.
The Tribe broke
Pirate
Summarizing the
the 1988 East Carolir.
team is a simple task � the F
will be strong offensi
young, untested pitchir g
Predicting ECU's t rl
1988 is another matter. The PiJ
rates, at times, can be full
prises.
Take last season, for e
The pirates started
enough, winning 13 of their I
15 games. The mid-season
ECU suffer a mild slump
lOof 16at one point and u
from atop me Colonial
Association standings to
league tournament's fittr s
It was at the C A A Tournament!
S
For the people that ha v
to an East Carolina basl
game at Minges Colis
winter,here's a chance k r the j
catch up on what they've missc
thus far:
They've missed EC I
tling, overachieving ba
team that has proven to be
conference's surprise K
year. They've missed the v
of a $20,000 car by virtue
half time shootout, filmed
later seen on cable stat
and ESPN from coast I
Manv fans will agr
that it may K worth the pi
ticket just to see the halftii
textainment - The Pure
Dancers. So while coach Mi
Steele's team has been filling
seats, it's the dozen purr
dancers that have kept them
their seats throughout the
mission.
ft hasn't always beer V
Minges. Half times, in past
have been reserved solely t
ting theconccssion stand mho
I
V
The Pure Cold Dancers are sj
basketball game. The Pure
�11 this season. (Phot" h? Th
m iwiwii. mmmmmmm a� mv







f

I RG l S.iik! HARRIS
-
Li
e.r iai���.
RRELL and bonehead
of beer n&r
i.swt&S
B RIK
. B RBOl R
; EN ir. " :
R9R CONDONS
By FRIEDRICH
ThAT CAMERA
A�n.
1 wm6 � ?
.AWiCCSS low o,j UrtOus
VWie,tiW ME r�,S;

THE EAST CAROl INIAN
Sports
JANUARY 28,1988 Page 13
irates ambushed by Tribe in own tepee
By TIM CHANDLER
Spoils Editor
William & Mary, behind a 3-
nnt shooting whiz kid, handed
List Carolina its third straight
A loss, 70-63, Wednesday
ight in Minges Coliseum.
The Tribe paced by 22 points
om reserve-guard Greg Burzell,
eluding five-of-six shooting
m 3-point range, improved to
l 1 overall and 3-3 in CAA play,
bile the Pirates watched their
lark topple to 6-11 and 2-4 in
inference competition.
(The Pirates were well aware of
irzell's effective shooting abil-
ev en before he started drilling
points in. In fact, they had set
a special defense to contain
m.
We were running a triangle-
d-two defense with one of our
lys guarding Burzell (man-to-
jn) head coach Mike Steele
id following the game. "Your
ss is as good as mine on how
;ot open
urzell was not the only
apon the Tribe utilized in the
torv. On the boards, William &
ry held a whopping 36-21
antage by game's end.
he Tribe broke out to a 34-30
halftime lead behind 11 points
from center Tim Trout. The Pi-
rates shot a sizzling 65 percent
from the floor in the opening half,
but once again the rebounds can
be pointed to as major factor for
the deficit. The Pirates were outre-
bounded 16-8 in the first half.
In the second half, Gus Hill took
over the offensive show for the Pi-
rates as he piled up 20 of his game-
high 25 points in the final 20 min-
utes.
A layup and free throw by Hill
along with a Reed Lose score from
the charity stripe evened the
game at 34-34 with 18:06 to play.
The Pirates then charged ahead
before the Tribe regrouped and
went back ahead, 43-40 at the
15:49 mark. The Pirates then
battled with the Tribe in a 14-9
spurt by the teams giving the Pi-
ratesa 54-52 lead with 9:23 to play.
Hill pumped in lOof ECU'spoints
during that run, including a pair
of 3-pointers.
After falling behind the Tribe
again by four, the Pirates rallied
for a 59-58 lead at the 4:29 mark.
The game see-sawed from that
point until William & Mary called
a timeout with 2:34 to play with
the game tied 63-63. From there it
was all Tribe as the Indians ran off
the final points of the game to ice
the victory.
"We made some bad decisions
on some key possessions to-
night Steele said. "We've got to
get over the idea that people keep
telling us that we are playing hard
and doing better than they ex-
pected. We've got to win some
games.
"We as coaches, fans and play-
ers can't be satisfied with the
thought that we are doing better
than we should
The only other double-figure
scoring Pirate, other then Hill,
was Lose with 18. Trout finished
with 19 for the Tribe.
The Pirates will be back into the
heart of the CAA schedule Satur-
day when they travel to Wilmin-
ton to battle arch-rival UNC-
Wilmington.
"We've got a lot of work to do
Steele said about Saturday's
game. "I know its an important
game. We've lost two conference
games at home now, we've got to
go beat somebody that we aren't
supposed to
Spirit challenged
ECU fraternity Pi Kappa Alpha
is sponsoring a Student Spirit
Contest to take place Saturday,
Feb. 6 when the Pirates' men's
basketball team hosts George
Mason in a 7:30 p.m. contest in
Minges Coliseum.
The contest is open to any or-
ganization or group at East Caro-
lina, such as a dorm, fraternity,
sorority or club.
The contestants will be judged
on their participation and spirit
during pre-game activities and
also during the game. The per-
centage of members in the organi-
zation taking part will also figure
into the judging. The winner of
the contest will receive a trophy.
An organizational meeting to
answer any questions about the
spirit contest will be held Tues-
day, Feb. 2 in the Pirate Club
Building.
For more information, contact
either Matt Hermes at the Pi �
Kappa Alpha house or the ECU Gus Hill (42) scores two of his game-high 25 points in the Pirates' 70-63
Athletic Marketing Office. oss Wednesday. (Photo by Hardy Alligood � ECU Photo Lab)
Pirate baseballers will have plenty of offi
Summarizing the potential of
the 1988 East Carolina baseball
team is a simple task � the Pirates
wfll Ix? strong offensively with a
young, untested pitching staff
played at The Diamond in (UNC Charlotte) was ECU's only
Richmond, Va that the Pirates representative on the all-confer-
regained their early-season form, ence team.
ECU came out of the loser's All three return this season for
bracket to win five games in three the Pirates, along with five other
�Predicting ECU's fortune for days, including a pair of 11th- starters, as ECU tries to improve
eligibility to enter the ECU School on to come in and just shut teams spring, and freshman Scott Ste-
of Medicine. Also gone from last down. Maybe someone will vens will join Smith as ECU's
year's club are senior pitchers Jim emerge from this group main trio of starters. Sophomores
Peterson, Craig Van Deventer While Smith may not have been Jonathan Jenkins (0-0, 6.43 ERA)
and Daniel Boone, who combined the "stopper" last season, he was and Tim Langdon will also see
for 51 ECU victories since 1984. certainly the staff ace. Smith (10-6, starting assignments. Alsoon the
is another matter. The Pi- &S4liS: hMfeW Catcher Jim Riley, who suffered a fig mound for the Pirates w,ll be Jay
at times can be full of sur- son on the tournament's final day and return to the NCAA Tourna- season-ending ankle injury in over half (24) of ECU s 43 games Blake cm
at times, can be lull of sur �3 ment for the fifth time since 1980. early March, is also gone from last last season, and earned MVP Langdon who impressed ECU
ke last season, for example. �ffiS5Sf2Sf ere are some key players S.club along with first base- tS
VlIT :SS5i L only senior MSS Sgm.
r-w PlgSS� 5S��S& P&d Phe join, by three SJSS
ECU suffer a mild slump, losing tions of head coach Gary Overton. Steve Sides was our leading nit very young, uverton saia, dik ' freshman in Whitten and lohn White.
MW16 at one point and L,W OuU.older John Thomas (from andweM!m .he sentors on we��. �� pttthmg m S� �?, one of oniy .hree
ftbm atop the Co on a Athletic Louisburg JO batted over the .300 our pitching statt. terms or numDers, so we iwve me , . � - 3 gl seniors on the roster, returns as
delation standings to the mark, left-handed pitcher Gary Sides, a junior last season who potential of having some depth. f�"
taSomament's fifth seed. Smith (Matawan,NJ.JC) won ten hit safely in 28 consecutive games �r����P; 3! venture las See PITCHING page 16
fwas at the CAA Tournament, games, and catcher Chris Cauble opted to by-pass his senior year of per. Someone that we can count against St. Bonaventure
ECU'S Pure Gold Dancers worth
Hfor the people that haven't been
10 an East Carolina basketball
game at Minges Coliseum this
kiter, here's a chance for them to
ditch up on what they've missed
tims tar:
they've missed ECU's hus-
tpng, overachieving basketball
jam that has proven to be the
conference's surprise team of the
year. They've missed the winning
Of a $20,000 car by virtue of a
ialttime shootout, filmed and
Inter seen on cable stations CNN
Ed ESPN from coast to coast,
any fans will agree, however,
at it may be worth the price of a
ket just to see the halftime en-
tainment - The Pure Gold
ncers. So while coach Mike
;eele's team has been filling the
sats, it's the dozen purple-clad
ncers that have kept them in
eir seats throughout the inter-
mission.
It hasn't always been like that at
inges. Halftimes, in past years,
lave been reserved solely for hit-
ng the concession stand in hopes
of revitilization. The Shootout is
in its third vcar, but no one has
come close until John Simpson hit
all net Jan. 13. The dancers are in
their fourth year, with this year's
team being the best yet.
"This is by far our best team
yet said Lynctte Johnson, direc-
tor and choreographer of the last
two groups. "These girls have a
lot of talent and don't mind work-
ing hard, cither
"The crowd seems to appreciate
what we're doing more this year,
too, and that always helps
The Pure Gold Dancers recently
took their act national, competing
in a contest entered by over 150
dance teams from universities
throughout the country. ECU fin-
ished an impressive 22nd.
The PGD's worked hard for that
honor. They practice at least three
nights a week, and dance at one,
sometimes two basketball games
a week. Practice is filled with rep-
etition until every routine is sec-
ond nature to all 12 girls.
The dancers attribute their suc-
cess to Johnson, who took over the
role as leader in the fall of 1986.
"She (Johnson) is really great to
dance for said Lyn Harris, who
is in her second year on the team
and second term under Johnson.
"She has the unique ability to
make us work hard, yet she makes
it fun at the same time
"She's always asking us for our
opinions on things. She's one of
us
For Harris, a junior from
Goldsboro, the practice and the
repititions are a labor of love.
In addition to being one of three
"veterans" on the Pure Gold
squad, Harris takes a full load (15
hours) of classes, works part-time
two nights a week, does aerobics,
and is a little sister for an ECU fra-
ternity.
"We try to make practice as fun
as possible said Harris, a busi-
ness major with a minor in dance.
"I think all the girls are really en-
joying being a Dancer this year.
"We love to perform, especially
in front of large crowds. It's hard
to describe the feeling before we
dance in front of a crowd. We're
nervous because we know we're
performing in front of basically a
college crowd, and there's a lot of
friends in the stands
Harris' teammates include:
Teresa Hollowell (So Newport-
News, Va.); Elizabeth Batson (Jr
Jacksonville); Bonnie Stucken-
schmidt (Fr Cary); Christy
Jackson (Fr Jacksonville); Bonnie
Armentrout (So Portsmouth,
Va.); Shannon Pugh (Fr
Clemmons); Tabitha Cardwell
(Fr Madison); Amy Walker (Fr.
Cary); Roxanne Roch (Jr
Greenville); Rhonda Stein (Fr
Rocky Mount); and Erin Glasgow
(Fr Cary).
"One important thing we did
this year was change the style and
music Harris continued, "last
year we were more of a broad-
way-jazz. We're more up-to-date
this year
"1 think this group has come a
long way Johnson said of her
second team of PGD's. "We'll
have to continue our hard work bo
that we can keep improving and
be even better next year
To reach that goal, Johnson
would like to take the 12 girls to
summer camp this year. To pay
for that, thePGD'sare selling 1988
calendars, filled with photos of
the Pure Gold Dancers�each girl
represents one of the 12 months
on the calendar. The calendars are
scheduled to go on sale today
(Thursday). The calendars can be
found all over campus, or at
ECU's athletic marketing office at
Scales Field House. For more in-
formation on how to purchase a
calendar, call John Althoff, assis-
tant director of marketing, at "57-
o49i.
In the meantime, it might be a
good idea to tell these people who
haven't been to Minges this win-
ter what's going on. If they only
knew what they were missing
Earlvis says take the 'Skins
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Redskin MeUter
wiP
n r �re shown entertaining the crowd at Minges Coliseum during halftime of a recent men's
The Pure Gold ����" " "Dancers ,�, r�,uIar .dded attraction at the men's home basketball games
basketball game. 1 ne rurc vv. photn I aM
�11 this season. (Photo by Thomas Walters - ECU Photo Lab)
With only a few days before the
Washington Redskins battle the
Denver Broncos in Super Bowl
XXII it is time for gamblers to for-
mulate their betting strategies for
Super Sunday.
Before we talk about the mar-
rage of bets to be waged on the
game of games, let's first discuss
the disturbing phenomena of the
band wagon fan.
It happens before every Super
Bowl with statements such as,
"I've always been a real Broncos
fan or "The Skins have always
been my team Bandwagon foot-
ball fans are an insecure group
who want to feel the glory of root-
ing for a champion. Fans who ride
the bandwagon are traditionally
either Minnesota Vikings or Buf-
falo Bulls fans who have been de-
prived of watching their teams
win the big one. This lot is the
scum of the earth.
In a chronological overview,
Earlvis will prove that he is a
REAL Redskins fan and not a fly-
by-night bandwagon rider.
In 1972, the seven-year old
Earlvis wearing his yellow vinyl-
sleeved Redskin jacket, number
22 Redskin jersey, Redskins socks
and a red pair of Sear's
toughskins, cried in front of the
old black and white as the Miami
Dolphins crushed his dreams in
Super Bowl VII.
In 1982, Earlvis the teenager
won his first bet of $2 as the 'Skins
won their first championship
against the same Dolphins in
Super Bowl XVII. True 'Skins fans
will always remember John Rig-
gins turning the "killer bees" into
bumble bees.
In 1984, Earlvis the freshmen
college student once again cried
in the basement of Aycock dorm
as the Raiders defeated the 'Skins
in Super Bowl XIX.
In 1988, Earlvis the fifth-year
(and still in General College) stu-
dent is anxiously awaiting Super
Sunday. Before the evening kick-
off, the keg will be tapped at
Jimmy's and the ranch will be bet
on the 'Skins.
Put February's rent on Wash-
ington plus three and a half. The
last time the 'Skins were the
underdog in the 1982 Super Bowl,
they won. Also, 1982 was a strike
season just like this year. That
victory over the Dolphins came in
the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Cali-
fornia. This year Jack Murphy
Stadium in San Diego, California
will errupt in "Hog Heaven" as
the 'Skins will win 28-21 over the
one-man Denver Broncos.
Put your meal ticket on the over
of 46 and one-half total points. ;
This will be a high-scoring aerial
battle which will be won by Doug
Williams to Gary Clark, Art Monk
and Kelvin Bryant.
Bet a 10 spot on Bryant to score
the first touchdown and win $70
as Las Vegas has him 7-1. Put a
social on Denver kicker Rick
Karlis to kick more field goals
than Washington's Hali "Shank"
Shriek. Shank has a bad tendency
to bounce his kicks off the up-
rights.
Take Denver to commit the first
penalty with a holding call on
Washington defensive end Dex-
ter Manley. Bet on Washington to
have more rushing yards as they
are favored in this category 2 to 1.
Running back Timmy Smith will
"slice" the Orange Crush.
Other bets include taking over
in the total points of the third
quarter and the under in the
fourth. Take Washington defense
back Darrell Green to snatch the
first interception. The payoff
should be 4 to 1 on these last two.
Earlvis will conceed one bet to
Bronco fans, Denver will win the
coin flip, a 2 to 1 payoff, which
they won last year before the N.Y.
Giants trashed them. If you do
choose to go against Earlvis and
take the Broncos, remember you
won't be the only LOSER.
' �� l ftmftnWt-
���.�i�"� "
�w
m m hm
mt





14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 28, 1988
Upsets rearrange Tim's top 20 poll this week
1. PURDUE � The Boilermak-
ers did me proud and continued
to help me look like not that bad of
a picker on national television
New Mexico 89-82, but the win
came in the "Pit The "Pit" has
claimed such victims as Arizona
and Wyoming this season, but not
on the court last night in a Big Fast
battle against Boston College.
� � � � �
17. SYRACUSE�The Orange-
Saturday bv dropping Loiusville Brigham Young. Tlie boys from men slipped to 13-5 for the year
in Freedom Hall 91-85. The Boil-
ers pvit four players in double fig-
Salt Lake City are proving tough
in the WAC. The next action for
ti

Tops in hoops
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
when Charles Smith canned a last
second shot and lifted Geor-
getown to a 69-68 win. Rony
Seikaly powered in 22 points for
Syracuse in the defeat. The im
Boeheim troops were back in ac-
tion last night as thev took on
Seton Hall in a Big Fast Confer-
ence contest.
18. BRADLEY - - The country
can breathe a sigh of relief. Jersey
1 lawkins and the Braves did not
play this past weekend. 1 iavvkins,
who has led the Braves to a 11-2
against YVVst Virginia
19. SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI
�The Golden Eagles, the defend-
ing NIT champions, ran their re
ord to 14-2 for the season by blow
ing past Tennesseehattanooga
record this year, is averaging over 98 M Saturday. Southern Missis
37 points a game and is Irving to sippi will have a tough assign
be the first player in many moons ment tonight to remain on the rise
to average 40 points a game for a in the polls .is Metre Conference
season. The Braves will take to the foe Louisville is coming to Hat-
hardwood tonight in a game tiesburg for a game with thoughts
ot victory showing in their eyes
� � � � �
20. VTLLANOVA -The Wild
, atscontinue to stun the teamsol
the Big East by leading the confer
ence with a 6 1 record Villan
is 14 4 overall. Saturday it .
seton Hall that fell victim to
Rollie's coa hing as the WiL;
s ored a 69 63 win behind
points from Kenny Wilson i
points and eight rebounds tr
Mark Plansky
ures in the contest making Pervis
look quite nervous. Troy Lewis
led the way for Purdue with 23
points while Fverette Stephens
added 19, Todd Mitchell 15 and
MelvinMcCants 10. The 17-1 Boil-
ermakers, winners oi t straight
games, w ill be back in action Sat-
urday on the road against Bob
Knight's slumping Hoosiers.
Brigham Young w ill be Saturday
when thev trv to ground the Air
Force attack.
� � � � �
10. MICHIGAN � The Wo er
ines beat Bobby Knight's Hoo-
siers Saturday on the road 72-60 to
improve to 16-2 for the year. Glen
"The Ice" Rice led the way with 21
points, while teammate Rumeal
Robinson fired in 17. The win
gives Bill Frieder's team a 5-1 Big
Ten mark with a tough battle
waiting on the horizon tonight
against the Fightin' Ulini.
� � � � �
11. PITTSBURGH � The Pan
thers rebounded from a 86-83 loss
to Oklahoma Saturday to shatter
Providence 90-56 Monday. When
1 sav shatter I mean shatter. Jer-
ome "Backboard Pain" Lane
scored 17 points and hauled in 17
points and destroyed a backboard
with a thundering dunk in the vic-
tory, which lifted the Panthers to
14-2 for the season.
� � � � �
12. FLORIDA �The Gators
last second shot Saturday giving continued to improve with a 76-56
UNLV a 59-58 victory. Jarvis "All win over Tennessee Saturday.
Night" Basnight scored 15 points The win lifted Florida to 14-4 for
in the win and Gerald "Big Dad- the season. Vernon Maxwell
dio" Paddio added 14. The 17-1 scored 18 points and became the
Rebels will be in action tonight all-time leading scorer at Florida,
acuinst Fresno State. Get the while Dwavne Schintzius
J
towel readyTark. chipped in 17. Norm Sloan was
����� fi�'n8 to try to keep the Gators
4. DUKE � The Blue Devils rolling on a winning streak last
have looked good of late in rolling night in a SEC battle against Lou-
a 13-2 mark. Last week thev isiana State.
2. ARIZONA � The Wildcats
rolled to 18-1 and continued to
dominate in the Pac-10 by rolling
past Walt Hazzard's pathetic
UCLA team 86-74 over the week-
end. Sean Elliott led the way with
27 points, while Tom folbert
scored 19 and Anthony Cook 18.
The Wildcats will be back on the
hardwood tonight against
Arizona State � another Pac-10
patsy
� � � � �
3. NEVADA-LAS VEGAS �
ihe Runnin' Rebels light show is
awesome at home games. So was
the way Anthony Todd ended
Temple s winning streak with a
beat the Tar Heels70-69 in Chapel
Hill marking only the second loss
for the Heels in the Dean Dome.
Then behind Danny Ferry's 29
points thev blasted Wake Forest
f
13. IOWA STATE � The Cy-
clones fell to 16-3 Saturday when
they ran into a fired up Missouri
team that rolled to a 119-93 vic-
)3-70 Saturday. And to top it all tory. In the loss, Jeff Grayer scored
the Devils survived a scare at
Stetson Monday night winning
62-59 The Devils must now rest
because the rest of the ACC is
gonna be aiming for them with
tire in their eves.
� � a � �
23 points and Lafester Rhodes
added 22. The loss sent the Cy-
clones falling to 2-1 in the Big
Eight Conference. The Cyclones
may fall more if thev could not
come up with an upset victory
over Oklahoma Wednesday.
� � � � �
14. IOWA � The Hawkeyes
picked up a pair of wins over the
time to spoil the Wolfpack's party weekend to improve to 14-5 for
in Raleigh Sundav with a 77-73 the year. Saturday, B.J. Arm-
victory. j.R. Reid led the Heels, strong scored 22 points and Bill
who shot a stunning 66 percent in Jones 21 in a 102-87 win over
the game, with 17 points even Dartmouth. And on Monday the
though he sat out half of the open- Haweycs continued to roll by
ing 20 minutes with three fouls, blitzing Wisconsin 104-89. Roy
5 travel to Greens- Marble paced the way in the win
5. NORTH CAROLINA �
Dean rebounded his team from its
loss to Duke earlier in the week in
boro tonight to battle Wake For-
est.
6. OKLAHOMA � The Soon-
ers arc beginning to recover from
their two-game losing skid. Satur- scored 17 points, Nick Anderson
over Wisconsin with 21 points,
while Bill Jones added 17 points
and 10 rebounds.
� � � � �
15. ILLINOIS � Larry Smith
dav, the Sooners ran past Pitts-
burgh 86-83 behind 28 points
from Harvev Grant. Even with
Grant's performance, it took a
pair of Mookie Blaylock free
throws in the waning seconds to
ice the victorv. The win boosted
Billy Tubb's runners to 16-2,
however, a key game last night
against Iowa State could have
changed everything around.
7. KENTUCKY �The Wildcats
looked impressive on the road in
16 and Glynn Black well 12 as the
Fightin' Illini rolled to a 14-4 rec-
ord with a 79-48 thrashing of
Northwestern Saturday. Illinois
carried a 14-point halftime lead in
before blowing past Northwest-
ern in the second half. The Illini
have a tough game waiting to-
night as they must travel to Ann
Arbor to battle Michigan.
� � � � �
16. GEORGETOWN � Char-
les "Last Second" Smith drove the
length of the court to fire in a
Bayou Country Saturday when TUm shot at thc buzzer to m
they topped LSU 76-61. Ed Dav- he Hqs (y a vi Qver
ender led the way to the win with s usc Sunday in thc c7arricr
21 points, while Rex Chapman D)mc Jhc 12Hovas erased a
and Winston Bennett each ni int lcad b he Qrange-
chipped in 18 to ruin Dale mcn � fhc fina, minuteg of
Brown s day. The 13-2 Cats will thc Jhc Hoyas wcr(? back
continue to move back up the
polls provided they beat Vander-
bilt on the road Wednesday night.
8. TEMPLE � The Owls blew it
Saturday. They had a big 12-point
lead and let UNLV sneak back in
and take away the game in a 59-58
loss. Mark Macon led the way for
theOwls,now 14-1 fortheyear,in
defeat with 19 points, but the
streets of Vegas proved to be just
a bit to much for John Chaney's
gang. The Owls will be back to the
patsies tonight when they square
off against the all-mighty team of
St. Bonaventure.
9. BRIGHAM YOUNG � I am
impressed with Brigham Young.
Not only did it run its record to 14-
0 for the year Saturday by topping
gfUlW
When you fill out your Form
W-4 or W-4A, "Employee's
Withholding Allowance
Certificate remember:
If you can he claimed on your
parent's or another person's tax
return, you generally cannot be
exempt from income tax
withholding. To get it right, read
the instructions that came with
vour Form W-4 or W-4 A.
Make your Super FSowl day
a celebration of good fcxxl
and good tastes with
scores of tempting treats.
Kick off your shopping with
a visit to our deli � where
the lineup includes a
winning touchdown of
delectable assorted cold
cuts an assortment of all-
pro domestic and
international cheeses .and
an incredible roster of
delicious salads � all sure
to please your team of
armchair quarterbacks.
Duke's
Mayonnaise
qi
68
Charmin
Tissue
Campbell's
Soup
68�
�; viNAOHCUDtw .I'ADE A
Turkey
Breast
99f
4- 7 It) avJ � li ')
i-tsn liNOc iOiNf -j
Assorted
Chops
ALir; 'NIA
Jumbo
Broccoli
'MiTfevEASf
61b �
mpvpg ib
88
� h CAN oHOWN
Fresh
Nectarines
79
SEAFOOD
THE WORLD OF FOOD
Apple Juice
WBjTXS
Grape Juice
UMTT 1 W�10 00 PURCH
Crisco
Shortening
Almond Delight
sue BEE
Strained Honey
v3
car
or
40 Ol
1
'5 oi
99c
1.67
78
1.79
1.39
OHM f Ht SH PON RA
Catfish Fillets
Flounder Fillets
3.99
3.99
MEAT
Sirlom Steaks
Grouna Chuck
2.99
1.79

X
i
v
SWEET FLORIDA
Bay
Scallops
CAMt"
� FRJ
3"
BAKERY
AP BRAND PEAS � COON OR
Green
15 16 07
cans
8 INCH
Lemon Meringue Pie
2.49
FRESH BAKED
French
Bread
'6 oz
oal
21
29
3
AAP
Peanut Butter
AAP
Grape Jelly
MILLER REGULAR OR LITE
V 99c
2: 89c
SALTED �UNSAlTEO
A&P Saltines
CASTLEBERRV S
Beef Stew
24 Porty PocV
'6 07
24 0
ca-
59
69
99
DELI flf CHEESE
deli & cheese 'tews ava.l able in somi �
JOES
old fashion
Hoop Cheese
HOT
Pepper Cheese
28 VARIETIES TO CHOOSE
Party
Trays
2
50
2.79
2.99
OFF
Fryer Leg
Quarters
FRfSH CUT USDA CHOKt Bft
Whole Sirloin Tip
Sliced Bacon
Cornish Hens
29�
.1.59-
DAIRY 8e FROZEN
Cottage Cheese '� 1.59
159
1.29
FRESH PRODUCE
CHILEAN ����
Fresh Peaches
Pineapples
.ARGE CAl FORNIA
Fresh
Cauliflower
Green Cabbage
ARGE � 95 v.
Tangy Lemons
99
1.29
Ice Cream Sandwiches
. . ;�
Ice
Cream
Fruit Pies
Orange Juice
ASSO
.1.1.19
2
-
� -
39
1.39
89c
Chef Boyardee
Pizza
89�

99
LIFESTYLES
99c
99
A&P Peroxide 3
4. .Am ET.ES
Crest Toothpaste '
3-Hour
Firelog 5,
4 02
1.00
1.59
119
Pepsi
Cola
RFG -NACHO CHEESE
COOL RANCH
Doritos
Chips
ASST .TSTASAlTtNFS V K-i IW
Keebler
Grahams
88
w�! S'O Pun hast-
14 16o
pkq
89
30HD � 10W30 � 10W40 � 20WbO
Havoline
Motor Oil
. 89
APP
SAV A CENTER
The freshest way to Save
SEE STORE
FOR DETAILS
WE SELL U.S. POSTAGE STAMPS AT POST OFFICE PRICES
AMERICAN EXPRESS MONEY ORDERS 25�
PRICES GOOD IN GREENVILLE, N.C. open sunday 700 am to 11.00 p.m
AT 703 GREENVILLE BLVD. M0NDAY THRU SATURDAY 7 00 .� midnight
PRICES EFFECTIVE JAN 24 THRU JAN 30. ISM QUANTITY RIGHTS REMRVRD
����
Man lex ci
s . �
Mank � has j

Desp '
be
- � -
Repon -
J . C . . . �
" Z
I
MatVh

rr :?rru
asm
'�
rvtthr
- �
Reeves:
Reeves like
absurd the : - r st
Onev �
tendency' oi thc mc
� k
v coaches I
game.
The Denvei
made light oi tht
of those terse
Mondav r -
press tor the first
team arrived
near San I
Sundav s S
Asked v
planned foi
retorted. Our
simple. We
team, so we just'
'o. 7 (quarterback
makes the curt
guys can do v
Reeves liked
he repeat�.i it
group of writers
Having been t six
Sujx?r Bowls Reeves k
ropes. He knows that -
ently false sUter
part of the Super
and that while the
allv rile him. the) ai
run good for the game n
takes good -naturedl)
In later answering tht
question, he said his play
no curfew Monda)
would havea 2 a m curfew
day night and a midnig
the remainder ot the week
The Bronco figure to
more today about the statu
their injured wide receix or
Johnson.
Johnson is recuperating tr,
groin mjur that required h
tali2ation He was injured br
and hasn't practiced since
Reeves said Johnson did
running betore the pla
boarded a plane in Denver at
day for a flight to San 1 H
"He just jogged, he did no;
hard Reeves said He ha
trouble. After we see hnr
(today), 1 think we'll have IU
idea about his availabilit;
have to list him as questioi
right now
The Broncos arrived ir





t
I
eek
in their eyes.
ILLANO The Wild-
in the teams of
ngtheconfer-
Villanova
Saturday it was
�.� fell victim to
.is the Wildcats
vhuui 21
son and 20
nds from
Bowl clay
N kx1
h
Ling treats,
hopping with
u here
iown of
it o all-
s and
of
all sure
m of
acks.
"4L!r; NIA
Will imw
Broccoli
88
ne can uhoan
79

X
JR fir FROZEN
eese ' 1 59
M9
nn
2
39
1.39
89c
(oyardee
89�
4
3 2 1.00
� '� 1 59
iur
log
j
1
19
�O-10W30- I0W40-20W50
Havoline
Motor Oil
� I �
TORE
TAILS
M.
MDNIGHT
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 28,1988 15
PARADISE
TeMft
Site "io Pvot�0
Site Out i Stfi0
329 Arlington
Blvd.
756-1579
ALL HAIR SERVICES
MAKEUP-MANICURES
TANNING BEDS
r
i
i
i
T
I
I
I
Manley chilling on game talk
SAN DIEGO (AP) - Dexter
Manloy has passed his first test of
Super Bowl week.
Despite a strong effort by the
media, the Washington Redskins
d( tensi veend on Monday refused
Montana, who said Mike Ditka
was a bum, said all the right
things during this press confer-
ence.
"I don't do that for attention.
Whatever say 1 say because
to be anything but congenial that'sthe way I feel Manley said
when talking about the Denver Monday. I don't care whether
Broncos.
Reporter: "Dexter, tell us about
Dave Studdard, who will be lin-
.ncupoppositeyouthisSunday
Manley: "He's a good player.
He's a great player
Reporter: "Can he handle you
one on one?
For years, Manley was better
known for his outlandish quotes
than for his prowess on the field.
But last year he excelled, getting
more sacks than any lineman.
This season, he finished second
on the team with 8 1-3 sacks and
had 176 hurries. And, yes, the
people like it or not. I can't help rollercoaster is moving upward,
tnat- because he had five tackles
Manley declared that he had against the Bears in the NFC semi-
final and 12 sacks against the
Minnesota Vikings in the NFC
championship game.
He expects a tougher time
against quarterback John Elway
and the Broncos.
"Elway is the best quarterback
in the NFL Manley said. "He
one objective this week, and get-
ting the Broncos riled up did not
fit in those plans.
"We're here for business, not
for pleasure he said. "We've
Manley: "Yes, he did before (in paid a lot of dues to get here, a lot
December 1986) of tears and sweat
Reporter: "Can he do it again?" Last year, Manley had the best
Manley: "I think so season of his seven-year career does just alx)Ut evertning rignt
And so it went. While dozens of and earned a spot in the Pro Bowl, runnj throwing and leading
members of the media tried to get He suffered a sprained knee in thcm.�
the usually outspoken veteran to training camp last summer, and Broncos Coach Dan Reeves
blurt out something controver- although his statistics were down, carefully chose his words in de-
sial. Manley stood his ground. He he still feels satisfied. scribing Manley, perhaps in an
went through a 30-minute session "I'm definitely pleased with the cffort t0 avoid giving the 6-foot-3,
without saying anything that the year I've had he said. "1 started 260-pounder an additional reason
Broncos could pin on their bulle- out with the knee injury, then to hunt down Eiway.
there was the (players') strike. It's �He's got &rcal speeci, tremen-
been kind of like a rollercoaster. dous strength and outstanding
But as long as the rollercoaster quickness Reeves said. "He can
keeps going up, that's what rush the passer as well as any-
counts one
tin board.
The same Dexter Manley who
once shaved his head and called
himself Dr. D, who said he would
utv vhe clock of an injured Joe
South Padre Island 128
North PaoriMustanc I sumo 156
Dattona Beach 99
Steamboat 8T
Calweston Island 124
Fo�t Walton Beach 126
Orlando Disney World 132
Miami Beach 13S
Hilton Head Island 131
DONT DELAY
NavMcabwwoawnoNMBnm
1-800-321-5911
Reeves: Game not so simple
LA JOLLA, Calif. (AP) - Dan Diego at 3 p.m. PST Monday and, ers usually stand on, so it will be
Reeves likes a good joke as much after being greeted by 200 sup- strange for us, too
as the next man, no matter how porters at the airport, boarded
absurd the premise. buses for their hotel.
One of Reeves'pet peeves is the Another round of interviews
tendency of the media and other was scheduled with both the
football'observers, including fel- Broncos and Redskins today.
low coaches, to oversimplify the Reeves, warmed by the sunny
game. weather that was a marked depar-
The Denver Broncos coach ture from Denver's frigid tem-
made light of the most prominent peratures, called San Diego "a
ot those terse pronouncements great place to play a Super Bowl.
Monday night when he met the We play out here once a year, and
press for the first time after his I don't think the weather has ever
team arrived in this seacoast town failed to be great. A game like this
near San Diego to prepare for should be decided under ideal
Sundav's Super Bowl. conditions
Asked what sort of curfew he Asked if the Broncos might
planned for his players, Reeves have a slight advantage because
retorted, "Our curfew is very of being more familiar with San
simple. We only have a one-man Diego Jack Murphy Stadium,
team, so we just have to make sure Reeves said, "We'll be in the home
No. 7 (quarterback John Elway) locker room and will be standing
makes the curfew. The other 44 on the side of the field the Charg-
guyscan do whatever they want
Reeves liked that line so much
he repeated it later to a different
group of writers.
Having been to six previous
Super Bowls, Reeves knows the
ropes. He knows that such pat-
ently false statements are merely
part of the Super Bowl buildup
and that while they may person-
ally rile him, they are in the long
run good for the game. So he par-
takes good-naturedly.
In later answering the curfew
question, he said his players had
no curfew Monday night, but
would have a 2 a.m. curfew Tues-
day night and a midnight curfew
the remainder of the week.
The Broncos figure to find out
more today about the status of
their injured wide receiver, Vance
Johnson.
Johnson is recuperating from a
groin injury that required hospi-
talization. He was injured Jan. 10
and hasn't practiced since.
Reeves said Johnson did some
running before the players
boarded a plane in Denver at mid-
day for a flight to San Diego.
"He just jogged he did nothing
hard Reeves said. "He had no
trouble. After we see him run
(today), I think we'll have a better
idea about his availability. I'd
have to list him as questionable I
"TCBV" �
Sweetheart Pus
A sweet gift idea your sweetheart or whole family
1 love. A delicious "TCBV" Sweetheart Pie
96 fat-free Golden Vanilla or strawberry frozen
yogurt with almost half the calories of
. premium ice cream, topped with fresh
strawberries. This delectable dessert
is pleasing to the waist as well as the
taste. So take home a "TCBV"
Sweetheart Pie or any of our
� delicious pies, and share it with your
sweetheart.
NOBODY TREaTS
YOU LIKE
tcbv;
Iff
325 Arlington Blvd.
Greenville (Beside Little Caesars)
� 1988 TCBY Syutms, be
���
right now.
The Broncos arrived
m
San Offcr expires: 2-4-88
$1.00 OFF LARGE
"TWTFIE.
"TCBV
PW(���� ���� W-t��n� Ow�t��cop�������!
Ofa ood oart � pwp� rjr.�u�wi.�i��
20 Discount Off
Any Service.
Good Through 1-31-88. J
PETEY HATHAWAY, Owner
NOW AVAILABLE ON OUR SHELVES
A MAN RffE� THROUGH - by Stephen R. Donaldson-
A memorable tale from a major American fantasy writer.
TRUMP;THE ART OF THE DEAL - by Donald Trump
Donald Trump is blunt, brash, surprisingly old-fashioned in spots - and always an
original.
IMAGES OF EXCELLENCE: CAROLINA BASKETBALL - by Sally Sather
two decades of excellence in collegiate basketball has been defined by the Tarheels.
LIGHTNING - by Dean r. Koontz
From a grand master of menace, here is an unforgettable haunting novel of inescapable
and imperiled destiny.
20 YEARS OF ROLLING STONE - edited by Jann s. Wenner
What a long, strange trip it'� een. For the past twenty years. Rolling Stone magazine has
mirrored American popula jlture. .
Central Book and News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 7 Days A Week
WE
ENCOURAGE
CUPPING ON
SUPER
SUN
i




4 Large Pizzas and
2-32 oz. soft drinks
$19.88
v


ONLY

V
him I'
(at-
. k mi ikv
KKKK �w
Vil v ,illl All
f �
it! Illlil . ill. I I
.ill .��� t �� ' I i
l -ii . , W tit) i (����� .ttiil ' ii' in-
i . u�ii ti Iutu iji.iiin; I.Mil'
� .(� h i i liM�MH1 � .111 V mit "Ii
15
4CABIE COUP
GRAND OPENING OF OUR NEW STORE
University Square Shopping Center
(East Tenth Street at Greenville Blvd.)
757-1212
o




AND WE'RE STILL AT
323 Arlington Blvd.
(Across from Farm Fresh)
756-7256
When you make pizza this good, one just isn't enough.1
HOURS: 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 midnight, SUN. - THU.
11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m FRI. - SAT.
"WW
� fmwm�l
NfWs4Mil
� � i m � wwiMi





16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 28,1988

Intramural hoops hit stride already
The Scott Celtics and Sigma
Alpha Epsilon were big winners
Monday on opening night for the
1988 intramural basketball sea-
son.
The Celtics, picked to finish
second in the Men's Residence
Hall "B" Nuggets League,
downed the Umstead Outlaws
51-22. Scott Taylor, Derek Smith
and Ken White led the Celtics
balanced scoring attack with 17,
12, and 10 points, respectively.
The Outlaws' John Hughes had 10
points and was the teams' only
player in double figures.
In other Nuggets League action,
The Umstead Convicts raced to a finished in double figures.
62-43 win over Jarvis West; the Other scores from opening
Aycock Fightin' Cocks downed night in the Fraternity "A" Trail-
Scott Lucid Eyes 47-30; and the blazers League were Tau Kappa
Belk Lakers edged the Belk Board Epsilon over Kappa Alpha Psi 50-
led with 11 points, while Koutsas for Pirate Prelude hopefuls). Also, held on Monday, Wednesday and
added 10. No Theta Chi player inner Tube Water Polo registra- Friday at noon in Memorial Gym.
tion is scheduled for Wednesday, Drop-ins are welcome.
February 3rd, with the officials A Fitness Olympics will be held
clinic set for Thursday, February on February 28. This is a one-day
4th. And finally, racquetball event in which teams compete for
doubles registration is slated for points in a variety of fitness-ori-
Busters 45-35. 31 and Sigma Nu beat Sigma Tau Wednesday, February 10th. De- ented activities. Registration is set
League action resumes Mon- Gamma 46-37. Delta Sigma Phi, fending champions are Pat Ricci for February 22. More info to
Plotkin (men) and Ann
Super objectives
SAN DIEGO (AP) - The Wash- remember what it was like in that
ington Redskins and Denver locker room
Broncos are heading for the same So the Broncos have developed
day night at Memorial Gym with seeded number one in the league,
the Celtics taking on the Belk received a first round bye and will
Lakers in a key matchup. take on Theta Chi Monday night
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, led by at 7 in Memorial Gym. Ima Reck,
Tim Dunn and James Koutsas, intramural expert prognosticator,
whipped Theta Chi 51-20. Dunn says the Sigma Alpha Eps are the
team to beat.
Kevin
EllenKim Adams (women).
For more information on these
events, contact the Department of
Intramural-Recreational Serv-
ices.
Most leagues will be in full
come on that event.
And of course, there's the Pepsi
Physical Fitness Club. Partici-
pants select from six self-directed
activities and work out on their,
record distances and receives
awards for successful completion
Several outdoor recreation ac
tivities are coming up. For Febru- of goals. For more information,
swing by the weekend, except the ary, a canoe clinic will be held on stop by Memorial Gym, Room
women's and stafffaculty the 16th and 18th. Registration be- 204.
league. Those two will begin a full gins on Monday, February 1st. A
slate of games next week. backpacking clinic is scheduled
Ima Reck, by the way, says the February 24 at 6 p.m. Registration
SPECIAL
VALENTINE
OFFER

That Students
WillLQY
PIRATES LANDING
is now offering
reduced rates
on short-term
and long-term leases
Contact:
Remco East, Inc.
758-6061
objective from different direc- a tunnel vision toward this year's All-Campus Champs will be The is scheduled to begin on February
tions. Losing a Super Bowl can do Super Bowl.
that. "We're all business this time
Last year's Super Bowl loss defensive end Rulon Jones said,
dominates the Broncos' thoughts, "We need a good focus on the way
words and approach. Just hours we play football and what we
after they arrived here, they were have to do on the field Sunday,
vowing this NFL championship Nothing else
game would have a more success-
ful ending. The Redskins, who lost in their
last Super Bowl appearance in
"The feeling of last year's loss 1984, aren't so single-minded,
stuck in all our craws quarter- "We're pretty relaxed and loose
back John Elway said. "That's the and excited to be here said of-
last thing we want to feel again, fensive tackle Joe Jacoby, one of 18
Nobody has to bring it up. We all Redskins to make it this far before.
All-Madden Team (men), The 8th.
Enforcers (women), and Count For more information on these
'Em (facultystaff). Just thought or any upcoming events, contact
we'd slide that by you. the Outdoor Recreation Center,
Co-Rec Bowling registrion was which opens Monday, February
held Wednesday afternoon. The 1st at 1:30 p.m.
Naturals are the defending And don't forget, bikini season
champs. See Tuesdays East Caro- is just around the corner. Worried
linian for a rundown on the Top about getting everything covered
Pins! up? Well, Physical Fitness pro-
Upcoming events and registra- grams are available for all types
tion to watch for include the Free and at all times.
Throw Competition. Registration Exercise W.I.S.Ely is for ECU
will be held on Tuesday, February faculty staff members. The class
2nd. (This could be good practice is a low impact areobics program
Don't Miss Wholesale Warehouse Sale
Tom Togs Factory Outlet
Warehouse Only!
January 28-30 3 Davs Only 9:30 - 6:00
After Inventory Sale - Nothing Over $8.00
Regular Retails to $40.00
Infants Sleepware - Adults Active & Sportswear
-fe-XICK
TOOCAUFJMl
& Famoui Namr� That W( Cnio Mention
m
Pitching could be suspect for baseballers
UyouirFanewconwrtotown, we tnvKr you to visit our storr at 1900 licklnon Avenue If you are going to
beach at Morehead City, visit our new location on I Iwy 70 (just across Irom Bojanglrs )
Hwy. 64 East Between
Bethel and Tarboro
Conctoe, N.C.
Wed. - Sat. 9-5
Hwy. 70 West
Morehead City, N.C.
Wed. - Sat. 9-5
VVc Also Wholesale
Mastercard & Via Accepted
Continued from page 13
ECU'S only three-year starter.
McGraw (.329,44 RBI, 8 HR) will
be a key to Pirate success this
spring.
After starting for two different
ECU teams that played in the
NCAA Tournament in right field,
McGraw may move in to play first
base this spring, replacing Mike
Sullivan.
The other first base candidate is
sophomore Calvin Brown (.281,7
HR) who may resume his every-
dav duty as designated hitter.
Senior Mike Andrews (.339) gives
ECU some solidity at shortstop,
while junior David Ritchie (.207)
will play third base if fully recov-
ered from a knee injury that
abruptly ended his sophomore
season in April. Highly-touted
freshman Kevin Riggs, junior
walk-on Tommy Boswell and
junior Ed Tant will battle for the
starting job at second base.
The outfield, led by Thomas
(.318,10 SB) in center, will be one
of the Pirate strengths in '88. Tho-
mas will be flanked by freshman
Steve Godin, drafted by the Balti-
more Orioles in June, and one of
two sophomores � John Adams
(.304, 42 RBI) or Tommy Yarbor-
ough (.212). McGraw, however,
will play right field if he is not
shifted to first base.
Cauble assumed the catching
duties after Riley went down in
March, and the all-conference
catcher batted .343 with 21 RBI.
Cauble's back-up is sophomore
Dominick Digiralamo (.250).
"Offensively, we will be similar
to last year's team Overton said.
"We'll have a few power hitters
like McGraw, Brown and Godin
in a lineup of good base hitters.
We'll have the potential to score
runs quickly
"We'll work hard to keep our
opponents from scoring so
quickly, too
The schedule is highlighted by
three-game series' with each CAA
team, home games with Virginia
and Duke, and road games with
North Carolina and Virginia
Commonwealth.
River Bluff Apartments
2 Bd. Townhouses Temporarily Reduced to
$295month
�Fully Carpeted
�Large Pool
�Free Cable
�ECU Bus Service
�1 Bd. Garden Apts. Available
10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd. (1.5 miles from Campus)
I 758-4015
PAID ADVERTISEMENT
THE DEPARTMENT OF INTRAMURAL - RECREATIONAL SERVICES
OFFICIAL STANDOUT
WHERE FUN IS 1
EXCLUSIVE
He's quick with the whistle. He's sharp as a tack. And,
he's the most respected of his kind on campus in a world of
Rodney Dangerfields. Meet Mike Yancey, ECU Intramural
Official of the Year. The senior leisure system studies major
from Ahoskie is now in his fourth year as an intramural
official.
Mike became a student official after his career as a high
school athlete was over. Officiating was the next best thing
to being there. But, after four years of thwarting chaos in
ECU intramural contests and three years as a high school
official, Mike's whistle has become the end result of a finely-
tuned skill.
Yes, Mike considers officiating a skill. "You don't get
any better without getting out there he says. "No matter
how many officiating books you read or how many VCR
tapes you listen to, nothing replaces the hands on experience
of running up and down the court
He says anyone can become an ECU official. It takes
only time and determination. For those who might be a bit
timid about wearing the zebra stripes, Mike invites you to
come out and watch a few games. "There's no way to get over
being timid he adds. "You have to get out and try For
those interested in officiating but have a lack of skills, the
intramural office offers several clinics.
And, finally, Mike does have a message for players and
fans. "You must remember - officials are human beings. If
you want perfection, you shouldn't be in intramurals. You
should be in Ficklen or Minges or at Harrington
Mike adds that officials are not blind as bats and that
your grandmother probably would have a tough time offici-
ating an intramural sport. "Let them be assured he says. "It
is not as easy as it looks
For information about officiating an intramural sport,
contact the Intramural offices.
CONGRATULATIONS
SCOTT ELLIS
Your name was drawn in the Intramural Equipment Giveaway.
Drop by 204 Memorial Gym and pick up your prize. The next
drawing will be held Monday, February 22. Entry forms are
available in 204 Memorial Gym.
o ooo oo oo o o
o COMING o
�ATTRACTIONS�
o ooooooo o o
Feb. 3
FIT BIT
Drop-in tickets may be purchased in 204
Memorial Gym Monday-Thursday for all
physical fitness classes.
Tube Polo registration
Racquetball registration Feb. 10
Free Throw Competition Feb. 2
Canoe Clinic registration Feb. 1-15
Backpacking Clinic Feb. 8-22
6 p.m. MG 102
6 p.m. MG 102
4-6 p.m. MG
7-9 p.m. Minges
WANTED
KM
rttob WATFR PQW OFFICIAL?
Clinic will be held Thursday, February 4, 1988
at 8:00 p.m. in Memorial Gym Pool.
NO EXPERIENCE IS NECESSARY
$$$$EASY MONEY$$$$
ima
top pic
1- THE ALL-M ADDEN -
2- THE DREAM TEAM -
3- CLUB VERTICLE -
4- PI KAPPA ALPHA-
S' THE FELLOWS-
6- THE WHEELS-
7- MANTRONIX-
8- SARCOIDOSIS-
9-KINGOFTHEHILL-
10- FIVE WAY TIE
-Motley Crew
-Stud Frogs
-Derelicts
-Wombat Posse
-Death From Above
Okay, so CBS might change their minds about me replacing
Jimmy the Greek. But just because I blew the pre-season
basketball picks? Just give me one more try. Here it goesfj
IMA RECK'S TOP TEN ALL-CAMPUS MEN'S TEAMS.
The only choice to take the title. Cuz' they start here .x .then zip .cut here
then swooshit's two. And these guys are tough.
1
Well, I mean, would you deny these guys another winning season. And, there's plenty of passing in this dream
offense.
Has to be near the top, because up is the only way they know.
This one's for the Greek. Somebody said this could be the year of PiKA or was that a typewriter salesman I
was speaking with the other day.
Just a bunch of fresh homeboys who love balling. It's hard to turn down true love basketball die hards.
Wheels .stay under me. Coach Carson says these guys are like lightening. That has to give them some advan-
tage.
Only one of two holdovers from (hose dismal pre-season tournament picks. I guess they should be a legit pick
since they won the tournament Rumor has it Gerald Keyes is the machine past of Mantromx.
Never leave out or pick against anything, team or whatever, that has a name you can't pronounce. Is this a team
from the School of Med or is this a joke. Mail your guesses to IMA RECK.
Okay, so you made me look bad. So you earned a little respect Don't let it go to your head. Just play basketball.
Runners-up in pre-season basketball.
These guys are all nominations for the All-Madden League. Because they're rough, their names are rough and
they send fear through intramural bodies of all types.
WOMEN'S FAVORITE
THE ENFORCERS I have no choice in this matter. I have been actually threatened in picking this team. They
said they would, in fact enforce the threat HELP!
FACULTYSTAFF FAVORITE - COUNT TiM .The obvious pick, because there are actually five profs who have the ability to play, .count
PAID ADVERTISEMENT
em.
I

mm
mmmmmm
w
mtmmmmmmim
�� � w"�"1 vi'tnmmmjmimwgKii
mm





Title
The East Carolinian, January 28, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 28, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.584
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy