The East Carolinian, january 21, 1988






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ENTERTAINMENT
The latest music videos reviewed � see page 9.
SPORTS
Pirates look to recover from Monday's loss to
American; they face the Richmond Spiders
Saturday � see page 13.
�he liaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.62 o. 31
Thursday, January 21,1988
Greenville, NC
16 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Students travel abroad in summer programs
By ANDREW ROSE
Staff Writer
What would you sav to a four
day excursion from class to the
Caribbean Coast visiting with
Jamaican descendents in small
fishing villages? How about a
lunch date on the cathedral steps
outside the Notre-Dame between
classes? Or just relaxing to a Sun-
day morning brunch oi bagels
and lox in a London restaurant?
Wherever your taste for adven-
ture or thirst for learning take vou,
the International Programs office
has a challenge for vou in the form
of study abroad programs.
The university offers minor
programs, each 24 credit hours, in
four global areas � Africa, Asia,
Europe and Latin America. The
course study is designed to give
students an intimate working
knowledge of the social, political,
cultural and economic conditions
oi the area. Students are also ex-
pensed to advanced language
studies which can be applied to
real life problems in a national or
international arena.
If the challenge of cultural
immersion seems too great, the
office also hasa variety of summer
programs lined up.
Ors. Holly Mathews and Vin-
cent Bellis will lead a group of 20
students to the National Univer-
sity of Costa Rica in Hcredia.
Heredia is the mountain suburb
of the San Jose, the Costa Rican
capitale. Temperatures there
never dip below 65 or peak above
85. No Spanish background is
required to make the trip, but
Mathews said the opportunity to
develop or sharpen existing skills
is available.
Students are housed with fami-
lies picked by the student to
match their desires. The families
provide meals and laundry serv-
ices and serve as an intermediary
while the student becomes accus-
tomed to the new surroundings.
The student spends six weeks
earning college credits while liv-
ing in an independent nation with
no national armv. Mathews said
the economy is agreeable tc a
student's budget, and public
transportation to nearly every
part of the country is safe and
inexpensive.
If cultural heritage sparks your
interest, then the course offering
of ANTH 2020 could be well
suited for you. If tropical rain for-
ests and beaches are more to your
liking, then the obvious choice
would be BIOL 340001. Inde-
pendent studies can also be ar-
ranged.
Visits to an active volcano and a
tropical agricultural research sta-
tion top the list of day trips in-
cluded in the program. Also in-
cluded are three days at the Man-
uel Antonio National Park on the
Pacific coast and four days on the
Caribbean coast doing barrier reef
studies and meeting with the local
fisherman. The application dead-
line for this trip was Jan. 15, but
last minute applications are still
being accepted. For additional
information, contact Mathews at
Brewstcr A406 or Bellis at Biology
S-305a.
Dr. Paul Dowell will lead a
group of students to London this
summer for classes at Richmond
College located in the west end's
fashionable Kensington. The
classes run for the month of July
and are open to all students. Par-
ticipants can choose from a wide
range of courses including Inter-
national Markets, Russia: 1917-
87, Modem Dance workshop,
Victorian Architecture and Bnt-
ishU.S. Criminal Justice.
Day trips will be run to historic
Bath, Stonehenge, York (a medie-
val city), and to Stratford on
Avon, Shakespeare's birthplace,
where student's will take in a
play.
A one week excursion to Paris,
Brussels and Amsterdam is on the
See TRAVEL, page 2
Lichter says media biased
By TIM HAMPTON
Staff Writer
An expert the media told a
crowd of 300 in the Jenkins Fine
Arts Auditorium Tuesday night
that television and print journal-
ists often let their own prospective
of the world influence their news
gathering.
S. Robert Lichter, director of the
Center for Media and Public Af-
fairs, said that television news
anchors have a "trusted pre-
sense" inside the homes of mil-
lions of viewers who tune in for
the evening news casts. Lichter
used the example of former CBS
anchor Walter Cronkite as being a
trusted uncle to the mass audi-
ence in the 1960s and 1970s.
But Lichter said that just be-
cause you hear it on the evening
news doesn't mean it is unbiased
news. Lichter said viewers and
readers of journalism should
never take the objectivity of the
reporting for granted.
Journalists have become the
"pipeline of ideas" between
people with knowledge and the
public, Lichter said. The public
trusts journalists to give them the
news accurately. However, jour-
nalists do have their own prospec-
tive of the world, Lichter said.
Lichter said most journalists
are liberals. He and another col-
league from George Washington
University conducted a poll in
1980 which found that 75 percent
of journalists consider themselves
to be liberal in political matters, he
said.
The poll found that 80 percent
of the journalists approved of
increased welfare programs for
minorities and that 47 percent
believed that adultery was
wrong. The poll also found that a
half of the journalists surveyed
did not attend church and that 25
percent believed homosexuality
was not morally wrong, Lichter
said.
Lichter said about half of all
news anchors come from three
states; New York, New Jersey and
Pennsylvania. He said most jour-
nalists are children of profession-
als that had stressed education.
For the most part, journalists
come from completely different
cultures from that of their audi-
ence, according to Lichter.
Lichter said that journalists'
personal stands on issues often
unintentionally and intentionally
bias of the newsgathering.
In a study on the media and the
issue of nuclear power, Lichter
found that journalists reported
anti-nuclear stands, or bad press,
more often than reporting Dro-
nuclear stands, or good press. In a
poll after the Three Mile Island
disaster, Lichter found that sci-
ence journalists were anti-nuclear
by a two to one margin.
In the same study, Lichter
polled 1000 scientists in the field
of nuclear power and found that
over half of true experts on the
subject were pro-nuclear.
See CHOICE, page 2
Sexual assault support group begun
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Staff Writer
ECU students who have been
the victim of sexual assault will
get the benefit of help in the form
of a support group beginning
Monday, according to Dr. Josie
Campinha-Bacote.
The ECU Counseling Center
will offer a Sexual Assault Sup-
port Group designed provide a
safe, confidential therapeutic
environment for students, she
said.
According to Campinha-Ba-
cote, of the School of Nursing,
who began the group along with
Dr. Bur errante of the ECU
Counse i g Center, this type of
support group can be beneficial
because it deals with victims re-
gaining control over physical,
psychological, social and sexual
life-style disruptions.
REAL volunteers offer counsel
By KAREN SALTER
Staff Writer
The REAL Crisis Intervention
Center at 312 East 10th Street is a
non-profit organization which
has, since November 1971, pro-
vided phone-in and walk-in crisis
counseling services for local resi-
dents. Trained volunteers staff
the center, which is open 24-hours
a day.
The majority of REAL'S volun-
teers come from human service
backgrounds such as social work
or psychology according to
S. Robert Lichter prepares to give his lecture about bias in news
reporting. Lichter, who recently appeared on ABC's "Nightline told
the audience that we should not always trust a journalist to be
objective in his news gathering (Jon Jordan, Photolab).
On the scene:
Panama in state of turmoil
REAL'S Executive Director Mary
Smith, but she said this is not a
requirement. Smith trains inter-
ested people from all back-
grounds, provided they have the
ability to communicate well with
others and are aware of other
people's needs.
Volunteers undergo a rigorous
training program involving both
36 hours of in-class training and a
24-hour internship of supervised
on-the-job training. 'The training
must be specialized Smith said,
"because we are working with
people in great depth
"The training is intimidating
said Marlene Cheitlin, the pro-
gram coordinator and a counselor
at REAL Crisis. In fact, a few vol-
unteers enter the training and
discover they are not mentally
prepared to take on the responsi-
bility of counseling people with
serious problems. "Some quit the
ti aining program early Cheitlin
said.
Bruce Miller, a potential volun-
teer crisis counselor at REAL who
See VOLUNTEERS, page 2
A 1986 survey of 349 female
ECU students found that 33.5
percent reported being a victim of
unwanted sexual activity. Ninety
percent of those women knew
their assailant
Acquaintance rape or "date
rape" is a confusing and major
social problem at most universi-
ties, Campinha-Bacote said. One
goal of the group session is to
remove the myths surrounding
date rape, she continued.
"If you've been raped or think
you've been raped, come to the
groupshe said.
The survey, conducted by Dr.
Susan McCammen and Marianna
Bier, found that 48.8 percent of
those polled reported the assaults
occurred while in college.
Campinha-Bacote said college
students who have been raped
prior to attending ECU may be
experiencing "Post-traumatic
Stress Syndrome" or "Rape
Trauma Syndrome
"Even if you've been raped two
years ago, a year ago or last
month, victims still have flash-
backs said Campinha-Bacote.
See SUPPORT, page 2
By TONI PAGE
Staff Writer
(Editor's note: Toni Page spent her
Christmas break this year in Panama
with her family. The following is the
story of her experiences there.)
Despite the appearance of se-
renity in the palm-laced country
of Panama, the ocean breeze
brings with it the shrouded feel-
ings of tension and oppression
which is present in Panama today.
In contrast to the preceeding
summer months, the last few
months in Panama have been
calm. Eye of the storm? The stead-
fast pulseof hope still beats for the
people of the "republic" of Pan-
ama as they struggle for democ-
racy under the militant rule of
their self-promoted leader, Gen.
Manuel Antonio Noreiga.
Since his reign began in 1981,
corruption has been unbridled
and unrest within the country has
been mounting. Suspicions
reached their height in 1985 when
a major critic of Noreiga, Hugo
Spandafora, was murdered and
beheaded. Allegations of election
fraud and drug trafficking were
also alive and kicking. It was not
until July of 1987 that these allega-
tions could be confirmed.
Col. Roberto Diaz Herrera,
chief-of-staff of the defense forces
under Noreiga retired and spilled
his guts to the press pertaining to
General Norciga'scriminal activi-
ties.
This gave the Panamanian op-
position, The National Civiliani-
zation Crusade (Civilistas) the
opportunity and evidence they
needed to publicly write and
demand democratic elections
through civil demonstrations.
Over 100,000 united Panamani-
ans took to the streets unarmed,
dressed in white (the symbol of
opposition) and waving white
flags and hankerchiefs. They
were met by Noreiga's riot-con-
trol police, commonly known as
the "Dobermans who tried to
disperse the crowd.
In an underground videotape
which contained footage shot in
July, I witnessed the "Dober-
men Equipped as if they were
going to war, they hosed down
and beat unarmed protesters.
Innocent bystanders were beaten
and taken away and many people
were shot with bird shot. Even
people in their homes were as-
saulted with tear gas and smoke
bombs thrown by the police. To
combat this, the people had only
their white shirts and undying
spirits for justice which kept them
in the streets despite the fear of
tear gas, birdshot, guns and im-
prisonment.
During these protests Noreiga
took away all of the people's civil
rights. He made it a crime to
See PANAMA, page 3
Protesters rally against Noreiga during an evening when he was reportedly not in the country. The
protesters were dispersed by police with tear gas and bird shot (Toni Page).
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2 THE EAST CAROUN1 AN
V
JANUARY 21,1988
Foreign trips offer adventure and educations
Continued from page 1 stU(jy at tne Sorbonne program,
agenda for the end of the month. Students spend five weeks
Included in the cost of the trip overseas studying French civili-
are tickets to plays, many of which zation, art, language, and phonet-
will travel to Broadway, and sub- ics while earning six credit hours
way passes for travel throughout and a certificate de la langue
London and the outlying sub- francaise for passing their
urbs. courses.
Student's can earn six credit They have the choice of either Elysees, Lournc,
hours, three for participation in staying with a family or at a stu- Triomphe, and
two years of high school French or
one year of college French. A
slight discount is offered to stu-
dents who wish to audit the
courses.
On daily outings in the after-
noon or evening, students can
ingest such sights as the Champs-
the Arc de
the Musee
Dr. Stephen Dock and Karine
Sparrow-Ginter. Sparrow-Ginter
has beeen accompanying stu-
dents in both travel and study in
France since 1964. All inquiricss
should be directed to Sparrow-
Ginter at Brewster 421A or Dock
in Brewster 441 A.
The Italian city-state of Ferrara
near the Adriatic Sea houses the
Literary Landmarks of England dent dorm near the Luxembourg d'Orsay. For a nominal additional Universita degl: Studi di Ferrara
and three from any course at Gardens. Dorm accomodations
Richmond College excluding the include only breakfast, but every
natural sciences. room has a refrigerator and every
The students live in a campus floor a kitchen. Dorm space is
iorm room and are provided limited and students living in a
.vith 18 meals a week. For more dorm will receive a refund to
nformation contact Dowell atl24 cover the cost of evening dining.
ustin. Students living with the French II landing beaches. They will also
If being in Paris, the capital and families will be fed twice a day. spend one night in Caen, and then
cultural center of France, in- The program is open to all stu- view Monet's home and gardens
trigues vou, then maybe you dents, but it is recommended that in Giverny.
should investigate the summer applicants have a minimum of The program is coordinated by
fee, eight students will take a
three day weekend tour of
Chartres and le Mont-Saint-
Michel, centers of medieval
church life. The students will see
the American Cemetary in Nor-
mandy along with the World War
where students earn six credit
hours studying Italian art, archi-
tecture, landscape and the impact
of the Renaissance in one of the
centers for its development. This
is the fourth year this program is
offered and it is open to all ECU
students.
The students are housed in a
two star hotel, The Albergo
Carlton, in the town's historic
center a short walk from the uni-
versity. In keeping with the eco-
nomical nature of the program,
meals aren't included but are not
expensive either.
Day excursions include visits to
Mantova, Ravenna, Florence and
Padova, as well as other historic
and cultural spots.
For additional information on
the Ferrara 1988 program, contact
Eugene Ryan in Brewster A102.
If you're worried about the
costs of the programs both the
Rivers and Fulbright scholarships
are available to students. For
more information on trips not
mentioned, international studies
or scholarships, students should
consult the Office of International
Studies in Brewster Al 17.
prograi
Support group focuses on trauma of rape
Continued from page 1
raped prior to coming to ECU �
he or she may still be a member of
our group
The group will discuss victims'
feelings and constructive ways to
resolve the feelings. Its goal is to
return students to their previous
Volunteers benefit from
counseling at REAL
Continued from page 1 tjon from seeing positive results
So even if a student has been come from what they have accom-
had previous counseling experi- plished, Smith said.
once, said that helping people in "Volunteers at REAL gain valu-
crisis situations can be a positive able experience which can be util-
experience, but dangerous, too. ized as a reference for future
There is always the possibility of employment she said. Employ-
failure, so vou, as a beginning ers are impressed that a person
counselor, are taking an emo-
tional risk he said.
Despite the costs, Smith said
volunteers receive a variety of
benefits from the human service
work they do at REAL. Smith said
workers get the personal satisfac-
tion of knowing that, although
thev receive no monetary com-
pensation for their work, they can
help other human beings. Volun- begins Feb. 8, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
teers especially derive satisfac- Monday and Wednesday nights.
Choice of sources affects slant of story
Continued from page 1 In recent study by the Center for
"The journalist and the scien- Media and Public Affairs involv-
tists were not on the same wave ing the coverage of the Iran-Con-
length Lichter said. While most tra affair, Lichter said that 70 per-
scientists were pro-nuclear, more cent of the sources used bv the
anti-nuclear experts were inter- media were unidentified. Lichter
viewed by the press than pro- said the media now relies on
nuclear by a three to one margin, many sources who refuse to have
which lead to an unbalanced re- their names quoted.
lifestyle as quickly as possible. sion and support from other
Campinha-Bacote said that al- members who have been through
though they want to resolve prob- the same thing she said,
lems quickly, it doesn't mean the She added that as members
sessions will end. progress, they can help each other
because rape trauma usually
"After the sessions have begun, tends to be in stages that everyone
victims will find a sense of cohe- goes through and can identify.
"It will be a cohesive group
said Campinha-Bacote. "This
type group is generally successful
and fall off is low
Role playing, films and group
exercises will be used to initiate
the group sessions, but the major-
ity of the sessions will be devoted
to members discussion of feel-
ings, she said.
She said the group, which is
issue-oriented, will focus on the
rape incident and not previous
problems, unless they are
relcvent to the incident.
The group is the first of its kind
to be made available to ECU stu-
dents. Campinha-Bacote and Fer-
rantc, who will work with the
had the initiative to take a job not
required of them and the then
stick with it, Smith said.
The center is in need of volun-
teers to help with their programs,
Smith said. People interested in
volunteer crisis counseling
should contact Cheitlin at 758-
HELP. A new training program
group, have worked closely with
the Sexual Assault Awareness
Committee and its chairperson,
Janet Johnson, to provide such a
group for students to deal with
post-rape feelings.
Referrals to the group are being
made by ECU faculty, the Student
Health Center, The Counseling
Center and the Campus Police as
well as the Pitt County emergency
department, Sheriff's Dept,
Greenville Police and the REAL
CRISIS hotline.
The sessions will be held each
Monday from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m.
at the ECU Counseling Center,
located on the second floor of the
Wright Building, next door to the
Student Store.
Sessions are open-group so that
new members can enter at any
time.
Anyone wanting more infor-
mation may contactjosic Camp-
inha-Bacote, 757-6061, or Fer-
rante, 757-6661.
attj Cajrt (Earolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community sine 1925
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Since journalists choose their
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Lichter asked the audience
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issue of unidentified sources.
T.V. news is more subjective
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Lichter also said T.V. news is
more interpretative and is where
most people learn about the news.
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Pana
Continued from page 1
demonstrate against the govei
ment and engage in protest o( a
form.
One activist told me that vl
could be pulled over and heal
up or inprisoned for just wean
white or having a white hankj
chief in your car Noreiga do
down the press, La Prensa .
select broadcasting stations
law, anyone in the country can
jailed without a hearing for th
days if thev are accused of di!
Sped by a Panamanian Dcf
Force (PDF) member I his tei
to make for a tense demo
Over the summer, the siruat
in Panama made national nc
and opened the eyes of the
Senate. Although relation- j
Panama had been gradually d
norating due to the suspe
corruption within the govd
ment. the demo-
prompted the I S.top
on Noreiga.
Using their economi
the IS pressun
the extensive militan
o( the government
democratic elci
Sees. The I
knowledged Noreij
effect on Panama
politically and st Noi -
not the type, hov
knowledge his
gize, and step down i
type to even slither
Noreiga did not taV �
the pressure and he J
Ann- A me near,
Panama to get back
He played on Panai
ism and portrayed
having too much p i
manian affairs and as ti
take over Panama .
other bad consp
mans During this time ! j
drew closer to Cub.
and also became
the Nicaraguan S
gime To �
mapped the
Embassy in P
It was then that
all economic
amounting
intil restituf.
tors was paid m daavyje-
American Embass)
footage ! saw
rials th: 'v brick
can car- trashed the pr pert
defaced the Emass) wil
paint. The si me red .
remains splattered on its '
today.
The "civilistas the Panai
evening of Jan. g (Toni Paj
Male first a
CHARLOTTE (A
weeks ago, Queens C ollege
man Phillip 1 lorne mo ed ii
dorm and made hist
attended his tir-t class and
17 women mad
When Home and fellow
man Joseph Graham mo evil
Queens dorm two week!
they became the first mal
dential students at the l v
old women's college in Cha
which decided in August
coed. A third male student"
in later this month
Home made a memorab
appearance in his career
ning class when he propoj
his 17 female classmate
women might be more
than men to staying homj
children.
"That was the last word
I
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ions
rs .ind Fulbnght scholarships
available to students. For
information on trips not
ned, international studies
larships, students should
tho Office of International
in Brewster A117.
ECU
arultafan
sine 1925
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THE EAST CAROLnsiIAN
Panama filled with unrest
JANUARY 21.1988
Continued from page 1
demonstrate against the govern-
ment and engage in protest of any
form.
One activist told me that you
could be pulled over and beaten
up or inprisoned for just wearing
white or having a white hanker-
chief in your car. Noreiga closed
down the press, La Prensa and
select broadcasting stations. By
law, anyone in the country can be
jailed without a hearing tor thirty
days if they are accused of disre-
spect by a Panamanian Defense
Force (PDF) member. This tends
to make for a tense democracy.
Over the summer, the situation
in Panama made national news
and opened the eyes oi the U.S.
Senate. Although relations with
Panama had been gradually dete-
riorating due to the suspected
corruption within the govern-
ment, the demonstrations
prompted the U.S. to put pressure
on Noreiga.
Using their economic leverage,
the U.S. pressured Noreiga to pull
the extensive military power out
ot the government and restore
democratic elections and prac-
tices. The U.S. repeatedly ac-
knowledged Noreiga s negative
effect on Panama economically,
politically and socially. Noreiga is
not the type, however, to ac-
knowledge his weakness, apolo-
gize, and step down. Nor is he the
type to even slither into exile.
Noreiga did not take kindly to
the pressure and he instigated an
"Anti-American" campaign in
Panama to "get back" at the U.S.
He played on Panama's national-
ism and portrayed America as
having too much power in Pana-
manian affairs and as trving to
take over Panama along with
other "bad" conspiring Panama-
nians. During this time Noreiga
drew closer to Cuba's Fidel Castro
and also became chummv with
the Nicaraguan Sandinista re-
gime. To fan the tire, Noreiga
napped the attack on the U.S.
Embassy m Panama in early July.
It was then that the U.S. cut off
all economic aid to Panama,
unting to $26 million dollars.
inril restitution or$10&000 dol-
lars was paid in damages ta-fche-
American Embassy. In the Juv 13
footage 1 saw, government offi-
cials throw bricks through Ameri-
can cars, trashed the property and
defaced the Emassv with red
paint. The same red paint still
remains splattered on its walls
todav.
1
SINGERS DANCERS � INSTRUMENTALISTS
TECHNICIANS � VARIETY PERFORMERS
Kings Productions, the world's 1 producer of
live entertainment, is holding auditions for
the spectacular 1988 season at KINGS
DOMINION, Richmond, Virginia.
Pay is good and jobs are plenty (we'll even
provide one round trip airfare if you're hired to
work at a park over 250 miles from your home).
Make your audition a show we can't do without!
VI
Protesters at the demonstration waved white flags and cried "Justicia" and "Libertad" (Toni Page).
During a Jan. 9 demonstration try that weekend was strategic
in Panama City, 1 witnessed the and readily taken in "with hungry
unity ot the Panamanian people eyes" by the Panamanian opposi
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Friday, January 29
East Carolina University, A. J Fletcher Music Building�Recital Hall
Singers: 1-2 PM, Dancers & Instrumentalists: 3-4 PM
Specialty Acts, Technicians: 1-4 PM
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA
Saturday, January 30
Kings Dominion, Mason-Dixon Music Hall
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Specialty Acts, Technicians 2-6 PM
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under different circumstances.
The white flags were waving and
the streets were packed, this time
in celebration. Noreiga had left
town and rumors born out of
hope had spread that he might not
return.
tion. It looked like a cause for cele-
bration.
Their glimpse of freedom
ended abruptly that night with
the Dobermen releasing tear gas
among the demonstrators and
breaking up the crowd with bird-
The lines of tension on people's shot. They towed and destroyed
faces, present in the previous cars anywhere near Fredrico
demonstrations, had disap- Boulevard � especially those
peared. I saw hopeful eyes full of drafted in white tissue,
anticipation, some full of tears. Noreiga returned to work
People of all ages were present. Monday morning; business as
Children on the shoulders of par- usual. The streets along via Ar-
cnts symbolized the importance gentina and Calle 50 were quiet,
of democracy for the future of Trash, confetti and white stream-
Panama. An ocean of white flags ers blew freely along the streets
went up with the cries "Justicia" and gathered at the curbs. The
and "Libertad" and people weekend events left more than
waved a common symbol of pro- this however; it left a presence,
test; the picture of a pineapple The presence of freedom that will
with a slash through it. Noreiga is not leave the Panamanian people
known as cara dc pina (pineapple easily
face), a reference
scarred face.
to his acne-
Cable News Network reported
that night that the U.S. had sent
Defense Secretary Richard Armi-
tage to meet secretly with Noreiga
and discuss the prospects of Nor-
eiga stepping do'n and.allowing
Despite Noreiga's smirk of con-
tent on his face, in the back of his
mind he entertains the fears that
any despot would; the taste of
freedom still lingers on the lips of
the Panamanian people, and like
all oppressed people they will
hunger for more.
One of my ci vilista friends put it
Winners All Day
MARGARITAVILLE
MONDAY
democratic reforms to take-place Tnatfer-of-factly when he said,
nPanama.Te tiCrri1 gP �JSTntirkrmi?A 1SaJs � wil1 not
sure and even seta tirrietab for Wfcranother country which is our
choice, when he leaves it will be to
heaven or to hell, which is his
choice
his departure. Engaging in his
tvpical disinformation campaign,
Noreiga told fellow officers that
friendly toasts were exchanged
and that the Reagan Administra-
tion backed him.
Noreiga's trip out of the coun-
Until then, Panama remains a
pressure cooker, and the distant
tolls of familiar bells get louder
and louder for the U.S.
The "civilistas the Panamanian opposition, were among those protesting against Noreiga on the
evening of Jan. 9 (Toni Page).
JANUARY 25. 1988
Register to win Jimmy
Buffett concert, tickets
by tomorrow at 6 p.m. at
East Coast Music &
Video or at the studios
Z91the unique difference, we make winning easy
Male first at girls' college
CHARLOTTE (AP) � Two
weeks ago, Queens College fresh-
man Phillip Home moved into his
dorm and made history. Then he
attended his first class and made
17 women mad.
When Home and fellow fresh-
man Joseph Graham moved into a
Queens dorm two weeks ago,
they became the first male resi-
dential students at the 130-year-
old women's college in Charlotte,
which decided in August to go
coed. A third male student moves
in later this month.
Home made a memorable first
appearance in his career-plan-
ning class when he proposed to
his 17 female classmates that
women might be more suited
than men to staying home with
children.
"That was the last word I got in
for a while he said. "I kind of got
ganged up on One classmate
even grabbed his arm as she made
her point.
But Home, a 21-year-old politi-
cal science major who wants to
attend law school, says his female
classmates haven't held it against
him.
Queens hadn't planned to ac-
cept its first resident men until fall
1988, but its first three male stu-
dents "just surfaced Queens
President Billy Wireman said.
Home chose Queens, he says,
because he wanted to attend col-
lege in Charlotte, where his fam-
ily lives, and he wanted a good,
small school.
"The girls in the class have re-
ceived me very well he says. "If
it continues this way, it'll be
great

�The East Carolinian is giving away two (2) pair or tickets for the Jimmy Buffett
Concert to be held on January 28th at Minges Coliseum. �All you need to do to
enter is fill out the form below and bring it by The East Carolinian office or mail
it to: The East Carolinian, Old South Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858.
I
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Name
Address
Phone .
�Only One Entry Per Person
�Employees of The East Carolinian are not eligible to enter.
�ALL ENTRIES MUST BE RECEIVED BT THE EAST CAROUNIA1Y NO
LATER THAN 5 P.M. ON MONDAY, JANUARY 25TH.
�The East Carolinian is located in the Publications Building in front of
Joyner Libraryl
�Reasonable facsimiles will be accepted as an entry for the drawing.
DRAWING TO BE HELD AT 6 P.M. ON
TUESDAY, JANUARY 26TH.
WINNERS WILL BE NOTIFIED
The Jimmy Buffett concert Is sponsored by the
Student Union Major Concert Committee.
I
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V
�ije lEant QJarfliiman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, ceM,
Clay Deanhardt, mmp, u
James F.J. McKee, d�u ofAjrtmnt
1 THE1 HAVE ONE THING IN COMMON11
THEY NEVER CW�E ABOUND UNLESS
IT'S PAYPAY!
Andy Lewis, n� &
TIM O IANDLER, Sp u�or
o im Carter, r���s &�
MlQ 1CLLE ENGLAND, CAtM-uirr
Debbie Stevens, si
Jeff Parker,? mom
TOM FURR,Cimiiii0n M�w$r
MIKE UPC! IURCT I, Product� M-rugrr
John W. Medlin, m otm
MAC CLARK, Business MnitT
lanuarv 21. 1988
OPINION
Page 4
The horror of rape
There is a violent part of human
nature that makes life difficult for
evervone. At ECU and other univer-
sities, where we supposedly live in
an "ivory tower" of learning and
idealism, we must confront, among
other evils, the tragic phenomenon
known as date rape. And the ivory
lower image is soiled.
When students go to school to get
a diploma, they learn more than
what is taught in the classroom.
They learn about how to be and
adult and live with other adults; and
manv learn about what love be-
tween two mutually caring people
means.
When a woman goes out on a date
with a man, the idea in her mind
may be simply having a good time,
or perhaps she might be romanti-
cally involved. But because of the
ugly side of some people's person-
alities, she must also consider her
own safety.
It is never pleasant to consider the
possiblity that someone we like
cannot be trusted.
Many people find help from
groups such as the Sexual Assault
Support Group, which begins Mon-
day (see the story on the front page).
This group offers ECU students who
have been sexually assaulted free
help in dealing with the violence
that has been done to them.
The people wrho sponsor and
operate groups such as this offer
another type of learning. They teach
people how to heal.
This type of knowledge may be the
most important thing learned by
people who have been sexually as-
saulted.
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and clas-
sification, address, phone number and
sigtuiture of the authoris). Letters are
limited to two typewritten pages, double
spaced or neatly printed. All letters are
subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are reminded
that they are limited to one every two
weeks. The deadline for editorial material
is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday's edition and
5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday's edition.
Forum
rules
Campus
Spectrum
ruies
In addition to the "Campus Forum"
section of the editorial page, The Fast
Carolinian features the "Campus
Spectrum This is an opi nion coin mn
by guest writers from the student
body and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
Former writer attacks the right with biting comments
To the editor:
Upon a recent visit to Greenville, I
noticed that several things had
changed, and that was to be expected.
But to mv horror and dismay, one
thing remains the same: the College
Republicans.
Throughout my college career, I
was treated to many outbursts and
performances from ECU's Nazi sup-
yx�rters. People such as Dennis
jrnv-nc" 3ancrv Hardy, Gorden
pock, Gorden Walker, Lance
I harden, Trashman and the Coalition
all contributed to the mutual making
of fools of themselves. Several recent
letters in the East Carolinian have
proven that this low-life excuse of
political drivel continues to find ref-
uge within the ECU student body.
There are still those mindless fools
who believe that theContrasstand for
democracy. One individual even
claimed that since the U.S. stands for
freedom and backs the Contras, then
the Contras stand for freedom. Why
would anyone uphold such simplistic
nonsense?
The Contras have repeatedly been
proven to be power hungry merce-
naries who will do anything to put
pressure on their opponents. The
murderof doctors, farmers and teach-
ers who "work" for the Sandinistas is
a common tactic used by the Contras.
Groups visiting Nicaragua's coun-
tryside have been attacked and kid-
napped. It would seem the Contras
do not want these people to return to
the states for fear they will reveal the
truth. Supporting terrorists does
nothing to curb communism and only
strengthens the Sandinistas' grip.
A very humorous letter dealt with
the candidacy of the so-called Rev.
Pat Robertson, the TV minister who
claims to have God's will in his elec-
tion bid. The same individual who
believes Joe McCarthy to be "the great
patriot who cleansed many commu-
nists from America" also believes that
Robertson would offer leadership,
integrity and compassion.
Leadership does not include fatten-
ing one's wallet the same way all of
the TV Jesus freaks have. Integrity
does not include hypocrisy, which
Pat well demonstrated with the reve-
lation of his sexual habits. Compas-
sion does not include the attack of
Jews and other people who are not of
"Christian" heritage.
Besides, Pat does not have the
memory to be president. When he
said, "I do" on his wedding day, he
forgot he already had! Yes, there he
was, his naughty parts all engorged
and tingling, leaving a perfect chance
to go down below the Bible belt. Well
isn't that special?
Robertson's campaign is even
lower than that of two-timer Gary
Hart. If we must have a Pat for presi-
dent, how about the East Carolinian's
own Pat "am I still a virgin" Malloy?
So you're proud to be a supporter of
Pat Robertson, Mr. Clark? That's your
problem!
Yes, the names have changed, but
the members of the College Republi-
cans are continuing the tradition of
demonstrating UNPARALLED igno-
rance and intolerance. Some things at
ECU have not changed. Then again,
they probably never will. God help us
all.
Bern McCrady
Class of '87
Letter wrong
To the editor:
The Dec. 3 anti-Contra letter by
ShanndYi1 M6'rrovifasso full otsmm sf
and displayed sutih an incredible t
ignorance of history and present
world conditions I was, quite frankly,
appalled.
flie Sandinistas are the cause of
Nicaragua's economic woes, NOT the
Contras. Morrow claims that people
are "hungry" in Nicaragua because of
the Contras, but that is totally false.
It's precisely because the Sandinistas
have ruined the economy that so
many people, including many former
Sandinistas, have joined the Contra
cause! Inflation is incredibly high (as
much as 1,000). Many basic goods,
such as beans, sugar, rice and gaso-
line, are unavailable, or at least are
strictly rationed by neighborhood
committees on the basis of political
loyalty. Productivity and work incen-
tives among the people have plum-
meted: the government has confis-
cated many private farms and facto-
ries and turned them into state-run
enterprises or peasant cooperatives,
discouraging output.
The Sandinistas wail and moan in
public that they have to spend so
much money on the war effort. That's
an outrageous lie coming from Com-
munists, who have the world's long-
est record of lies. The Soviet Union
provides the Sandinistas with much
of their food and all of their weaponry
for free! Besides, the military buildup
in Nicaragua began before the Con-
tras even were formed!
The Arias "Peace" Plan that Mor-
row praises is worthless. I still can't
figure out why such a flawed treaty
received a Nobel Peace Prize! It says
;ncrwgafcflut stopitheimasive ,
Soviet military and economic aid to
the Nicaraguan Communist, but it
sure says a lot about stopping the little
bii. of aid the U.S. is sending the Con-
tras. If implemented, the Arias plan
virtually insures that a Communist
client state would be established on
the mainland of our hemisphere.
What good is it, then?
Morrow believes the Sandinistas
are going to grant "free, pluralistic
and honest elections" once they con-
solidate their power. She's wrong.
The Arias plan is identical to pledges
made by the Sandinistas to the Or-
ganization of American States in an
agreement signed July 9,1979, to form
a "new Nicaragua, a democratic
state" and ensure "the right of all
Nicaraguans to political participation
without ideological discrimination
The Sandinistas have not complied in
any meaningful, legitimate way to
either the Arias plan or the 1979
agreement.
Alberto Saboria, president of the
Nicaraguan Bar Association, was
jailed recently for undertaking hu-
man rights cases and released after a
15-day hunger strike. He savs. "all the
government is trying to do is main-
tain itself in power. They've been in
power for eight years, and they
haven't kept a promise yet. They will
make a few concessions on civil liber-
ties, but nothing they can't take back
when the time is right Lino Hernan-
dez Triueros, head of the independ-
ent Permanent Humans Rights
Commission, received a letter from
Lenin Cerria, the Chief of state se-
cruity, threatening that if Hernandez
continued his human rights-workhe
could expect to be jailed again. So
much for Sandinista compliance to
the 1979 and Arias "Peace" Plans!
Morrow says "the Soviets haven't
even asked to put military bases in
Nicaragua (they know the U.S.
wouldn't stand for it) Ms. Morrow,
do you honestly think the Commu-
nists would go up to Reagan and say,
"May we build a military state in
Nicaragua, pretty please?" Come on!
The Soviets HAVE been sending
hundreds of tanks, helicopters, mis-
siles and guns to Nicaragua and have
built an airstrip there larger than
Andrews Airforce Base! Of COURSE
they didn't ask us if they could: they
did it anyway.
Finally, Ms. Morrow, the size of
Nicaragua has nothing to do with
anything. YOU fail to see the big pic-
ture and you are ignorant of history:
consider Vietnam and Communist
expansion and learn something.
David Youmans
Senior
Communications
New Agers are prohibiting real advances
By RICHARD BLOW
The New Republic
Shirlev MacLaine must be in seventh heaven.
Since 1983 she has shepherded into the American
mainstream a host of ideas and practices known as
the New Age movement. Gallup Polls show that
from 20 to 35 percent of Americans believe they have
had a past-life experience. According to one study,
some 5 percent to 10 percent of the population has
adopted other New Age beliefs.
One is "channeling in which human mediums
call forth the voices of long-dead spirits. Another
involves crystals. Thousands of people believe crys-
tals can cure diseases and transmit human thoughts.
Perhaps the best-known New Age performance was
last summer's "harmonic convergence during
which thousands gathered at "pressure points"
around the world, hugged, held hands and chanted,
united in the conviction that this would usher in a
new era of world harmony.
The New Age movement began in California in
the 1960s with the spread of Eastern philosophy
among a small number of mostly white, mostly
young Americans. But then came the '70s, a time of
disillusionment, and the practitioners of New Age
capitalized on it. they added a modem twist: the idea
that Hevoting oneself to self improvement was per-
sonally valuable and socially beneficial.
In 1980 Marilyn Ferguson's The Aquarian Con-
spiracy" was published, and it became the New Age
bibie. Ferguson argued that the world was entering
a new era of harmony ana peace. Ordinary people
could bring this about through their awareness of its
inevitability. The more people were aware of the
trend, the more quickly iy would become reality.
The bedrock of New Age thought now is the
fulfillment of individual potential, with the implicit
consequence of bringing the New Age closer. How
fulfillment is achieved doesn't matter. What counts
is the awareness that one has such potential and can
exploit it.
If all of this makes New Age sound like a religion,
that's because for many adherents it is. It attempts to
address believers' spiritual concerns with the prom-
ise of an afterlife (or rather, another life). And it
demands that its believers have faith in things that
cannot be scientifically proven.
But there is no God in the New Age church. Rather,
god is within everyone. Reaching the godforce
within you is easy if you know how to do it. If you
don't know how , plenty of New Age teachers will
show you � for a price.
The belief certainly lends weight to the idea that
the individual is capable of doing anything. By re-
congizing thaf'you are God as MacLaine says,
"you can create your own reality
Why do so many people find this retreat into
individualism so attractive? For young people, born
in the '60s and '70s New Age is a concession to
Ronald Reagan's success. They believe in progres-
sive social change, but see its 20th-century vehicles
� the Democratic Party, labor unions, college cam-
puses � as monound or apathetic. They don't like
Reagan, but don't know how to beat him, so they
adopt a philosophy that never mentions him.
New Age language sounds suspiciously like Re-
publican social policy. Economic growth leads to
personal growth, and that is always worthwhile.
Even better, the pursuit of profit will also take care of
social concerns like poverty, hunger and war. In the
New Age lexicon, there is no mention of sacrifice,
duty or responsibility. Those concepts are regres-
sive, unprofitable in any sense.
There is no tension in the New Age between reap-
ing the rewards of capitalism and the desire to help
others. Profit, after all, is simply the fulfillment of
potential, the byproduct of spiritual harmony.
Not surprisingly, New Age condones big business
because New Age is big business. In 1986 New Agers
spent $100 million on crystals and $300 million on
audio and videotapes. There are hundreds of books
and dozens of periodicals devoted to New Age,
seminars held by channelers and hypnostists and
self-help groups and, perhaps most lucrative of all,
New Age music.
New Agers are anti-war, pro environment, anti-
nuke, pro-feminist. What makes them different from
other liberals is their approach to the resolution of
these isssues.
One example is a New Age group called Beyond
War, which is not just against war, but claims the
"concept" is obsolete. Beyond War suggests a three-
step process: "KNOWLEDGE, DECISION, AC-
TION
To complete the first phase, one must "gain
knowledge about our environment In part two,
"we must then make a decision to choose the path
which leads to global life In the final stage, individ-
ual decisions will be transformed into societal
change through "ACTION What kind of action?
Building "understanding that the world is beyond
war through a process that does not impose the
specific steps of the solution
Thanks to "research Beyond War has a theory
about its inevitable success. Once 5 percent of any
group believes an idea, that idea is "embedded
When the number reaches 20 percent, the idea is
"unstoppable
The New Age on world hunger is handled by
something called the Hunger Project. The project's
mission is to "generate a new context in which
ending hunger could show up a a real possibilty"
Like Beyond War, the Hunger Project doesn't get
too specific. It tries to encourage individuals to "take
a stand for the end of hunger" by realizing that the
"end of hunger is an idea whose time has come
Lester Brown of the WorldWatch Institute told
Mother Jones magazine that the Hunger Project has
"probably collected more money in the name of
hunger and done the least about hunger than any
group I can think of m
Groups like Beyond War and the Hunger Project
embody all that is bad about the New Age They talk
SL(�S�S� 21W �" for � worfd, but never
�2�yii,ll� �� Maybeone
these people can help it
Soviet
(CPS) � Soviet agents a
prowling American campus
braries and using American si
dents to gather sensitive
though unclassified � techni
information for them, the Fed el
Bureau of Investigation says.
The FBI, moreover, has ask
librarians to help it catch them
reporting the names of foreH
students who use certain book
databases.
But college librarians general
don't want to help, saying it coi
scare students away from librj
ies, violate their constitutioi
rights and scuttle the libanai
own professional ethics.
"It's an unwarranted intrusi
by the government said Patrl
McDermott of the Chicago-bae
American Library Association
'To be told to look for foreij
agents is frightening said Ji
Barrett of the Association of
search Libraries. "How do you
if someone is a foreign agent
they have an accent?"
"They've got no busini
screwing with libraries
Quinn Shea of the National Set
rity Archive, a Washington, D
group that pursues freedom
information issues.
The FBI, in turn, says its "
brary Awareness Program"
legal and necessary to keep f
eign agents from piecing togetl
technical information from uj
versify libraries that could
used to harm U.S. national so
rity.
"We've known for years tl
the Soviets target university
braries said James Fox, headj
the FBI's New York office, "esi
Studies say g
(CPS) � American stude(
don't know very much geogl
phy, studies released during
cent weeks show.
Separate surveys of studei
geography knowledge at the
versity of Wisconsin � Oshk
and California State and Man!
State universities found some
legians were unable to tind
Soviet Union on a mapr then
Nicaragua was an Asian islanj
didn't know who the U.Ss k
ing trade partner was.
ATTIC
The ,
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his human rights, work he
xpect to be jailed again. So
r Sandinista compliance to
and Anas "Peace Plans!
says the Soviets haven't
d to put military bases in
i they know the U.S.
itand tor it) Ms. Morrow,
mestly think the Commu-
uld go up to Reagan and say,
e build a military state in
jua, pretty please?" Come on!
viets HAVE been sending
is of tanks, helicopters, mis-
1 guns to Nicaragua and have
airstrip there larger than
s Airforce Base! Of COURSE
in't ask us if they could: they
lyway.
y, Ms Morrow, the size of
la has nothing to do with
g YOU fail to see the big pic-
' you are ignorant of history:
r Vietnam and Communist
Ion and learn something.
David Youmans
Senior
Communications
es
e a decision to choose the path
1 life " In the final stage, individ-
be transformed into societal
kCTIOV" What kind of action?
finding that the world is beyond
xess that does not impose the
solution
rch Beyond War has a theory
p success. Once 5 percent of any
idea, that idea is "embedded
reaches 20 percent, the idea is
n world hunger is handled by
te Hunger Project. The project's
erate a new context in which
kid show up a a real possibilty
It, the Hunger Project doesn't get
tto encourage individuals to "take
of hunger" by realizing that the
in idea whose time has come
the WorldWatch Institute told
cine that the Hunger Project has
I more money in the name of
the least about hunger than any
nd War and the Hunger Project
i about the New Age. They talk
I new era for the world, but never
from words to deeds. Maybe one
New Age on earth � but not if
elpit
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 21,1988 5
Soviets get info, via students
(CPS) � Soviet agents are
prowling American campus li-
braries and using American stu-
dents to gather sensitive �
daily big technical libraries like students and faculty members
you'd find at MIT or Stanford, for they suspected were communists,
information During the 1960s and '70s, the
Soviet agents, Fox said, often bureau monitored campus anti-
'It smacks of the intimidation of
the left during the '60s said
though unclassified � technical hire students or professors as re- war and civil rights activists,
information for them, the Federal
Bureau of Investigation says.
The FBI, moreover, has asked
librarians to help it catch them by
reporting the names of foreign
students who use certain books or
databases.
to monitor library users
Gubman's experience � and
response � is typical. "I had the
FBI come into my office one day
said Charles Osburn, Maryland's
former dean of libraries now at
the University of Alabama. "They
searchers to gather information
about lasers, artificial intelligence
and other technology with mili- McDermott. "Foreigners are an wanted us to report the names of
tary applications. easy target, especially with the people who asked for certain
Gennadi F. Zakharov, the So- anti-Libyan and anti-Middle engineering journals. They were
viet spy arrested in 1986 who was Eastern sentiments prevalent to- real stony-faced � I couldn't
later traded for Nicholas Daniloff, day. It's easy to erode rights by make them laugh � and I told
But college librarians generally an American reporter seized in going after groups to whom soci- them we couldn't comply with
don't want to help, saying it could Moscow, recruited students to ety is especially unsympathetic their request
scare students away from librar- gather information for him, Fox first SUNY-Buffalo was the only
ies, violate their constitutional said. Those students "smelled Shea argued that, "just because school to comply. In the fall of
rights and scuttle the libarians' something bad" and tipped off something is not against the law 1986, explained spokesman Dave
own professional ethics. the FBI. Other students, lured by doesn't mean it's a good idea, and
'It's an unwarranted intrusion large amounts of money, are less recruiting librarians as surrogate
patriotic, he said. spies is a stupid idea. It's the dif-
The agency, he said, is not ask- ference between what this coun-
ing librarians to join the espio- try is supposed to stand for and
those countries the FBI is sup-
Clip-N-Save
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream �y
and frozen yogurt Jr
321 East 10th Street. Greenville
(Next to Wendy's)
758-4896
Buy 1 Frozen Yogurt or Ice
Cream Mini Sundae, Get 1
3
12 Price
Good Thru Jan. 31, 1988
CliD-N-Save �
FIZZ The newest gathering place in town
by the government said Patrice
McDermott of the Chicago-based
American Library Association.
'To be told to look for foreign nage business. "All we want to
agents is frightening said Jaia know is if there are Soviets corn-
Barrett of the Association of Re- ing around regularly and posting
search Libraries. "How do you tell cards looking for research assis-
lf someone is a foreign agent? If tants
they have an accent?" Librarians, however, say the
"They've got no business program isn't that innocent,
screwing with libraries said "What's the next step? asked
posed to protect us from
So far, the FBI has asked at least
5 schools � New York Univer-
Webb, "the FBI came to the library
and asked to see research refer-
ence requests made by a specific
foreign student reportedly an
Iraqi citizen. "They wanted to see
library records, databases he'd
searched. The university re-
fused
Soon after, though, the agency
Tonight - Thur. Jan. 21st
O 10 p.ml a.m.
� . Featuring
0 ' Klee Liles
sity, the State University of New returned with a subpoena for the
York-Buffalo, Columbia, and the information. "The FBI is conduct-
universities of Cincinnati and ing fishing expeditions con-
Maryland � to monitor who's eluded McDermott. 'They're not
Quinn Shea of the National Secu- Barrett. "Classifying road maps using their libraries. coming in for specific information
rity Archive, a Washington, D.C because they show where bridges "In the spring of 1986, an FBI with subpoenas. If s unconscion-
group that pursues freedom of are for terrorists to blow up?" man came in and told me they able
information issues. "The whole basis of our govern- were looking at the technical li- Thirty-six states � including
The FBI, in turn, says its "Li- ment and the First Amendment braries in New York recalled New York, the focus of the Li-
brary Awareness Program" is added New York University's NYU library official Nancy Gub- brary Awareness Program �
legal and necessary to keep for- Nancy Kranich, "is the free flow of man. "He said one of every three have library confidentiality laws
eign agents from piecing together information The attempt to con- U.N. delegates from the Soviet that forbid librarians to share in-
trol "sensitive but unclassified Union are spies, and wanted to formation about library use.
information is so broad, it could know if any Soviets have come in "One of the things librarians
take in anything asking for sensitive information, believe in is not attaching motives
The Library Awareness Pro- database searches or unusual to requests for information. That's
gram is the latest of the FBI's copying requests what intellectual freedom is all
campus activities that date back at "I was stunned Gubman re- about said Kranich. "Yet the FBI
Sat. Jan. 23rd.
10 p.ml a.m.
Featuring
Mark Johnson
Acoustic Rock Bands playing the best of
James Taylor and Jimmv B�fff n
Come in for music and
dinner & enjoy the best
charbroiled food in town.
PRIVATE PARTIES AND ENTERTAINMENT
110 EAST 4TH ST. 919-752-5855
technical information from uni-
versity libraries that could be
used to harm U.S. national secu-
rity.
"We've known for vears that
the Soviets target university li-
braries said James Fox, head of
the FBI's New York office, "espe-
least to the early 1950s, when
agents compiled information on
membered. T said I can't and
won't help them. We're not going
Studies say geography weak for U.S. students
(CPS) � American students Students who took a 21-ques- "More people knew where Burt
don't know very much geogra- tion, multiple-choice geography Reynolds went to school than
phy, studies released during re- quiz at Cal State Fullerton, for what the third most populous
cent weeks show. example, averaged just 12 correct country in the world was la-
Separate surveys of students' answers. Only 14 percent could mented Fullerton geography
geography knowledge at the Uni- locate the eastern Caribbean Sea Prof. William Puzo.
versify of Wisconsin � Oshkosh where Columbus first arrived in At the University of Wisconsin-
and California State and Mankato
State universities found some col- one-fourth of those tested could
legians were unable to find the locate and identify Canada as the
Soviet Union on a map thought � United States' leading trade part-
Nicaragua was an Asian island or ner or the Soviet Union as the
didn't know who the U.Ss lead- world's third most populous na-
ing trade partner was. tion.
the Western Hemisphere; only Oshkosh, only 22 percent of stu- keep,
dents recently surveyed could
is encouraging us to attribute
motives
"We feel strongly about the
principles of confidentiality and
the right of an individual to seek
information added Danuta
Nitecki of the University of Mary-
land library system.
Some librarians believe the FBI
program already has had a "chill-
ing effect" on students' using
their libraries, and on the kinds of
records libraries themselves will
RPP. Inc
IScJhAi
ATiTIC
The.
CoMcdY
2PNE
WED
�The,
CoMedY
2PNE
WED
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
752-7303
THURSDAY
rm
ANGEL
Top 40 Rock N Foil
$1.00 All ECU
Students
find the Soviet Union on a world
map. In Dallas, another survey
revealed that one quarter of the
high school seniors tested knew
that Mexico is the United States'
southern neighbor.
I
Cards and Gifts
from
Recycled Paper Products, Inc.
Available at
CENTRAL BOOK
Ok NBww9
GrMiwttto Square Shopping C�tw � 7S-7177
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Winterfest '88
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ft
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PARTY
with Campus Marketing
YOUR BEST DEAL TO DAYTONA
A
LOOKING FOR A
SUMMER JOB?
YOU DRIVE (TO THE PARTY)
$124.00
WE DRIVE (THE PARTY STARTS HERE)
$185.00
INCLUDES:
� Round trip motor COOCh transportation to rwiuMul
Dav'ona Beoch (W DUIVt Packages Only) Wp use
nothing but modem highway coaches
� Eiont rior'da daysseven endless nights at one of our
ecting oceanlront hotels located right on the Doytona
beach strip Your hole' has a beautiful pool, sun deck air
conditioned rooms color IV and a nice long stretch of
beach
� a fuH schedule of WEE pool deck parties every day
� A full hst of pre arranged discounts to save you money m
Davtona Beoch
� Travel representatives to insure o smooth trip and a
good time
� optional side excursions to Disney World Epcot deep
sea flsNng. party cruises etc
CONSIDER
RECREATION DAY
� AN towes ond tips
SPEND A WEEK - NOT A FORTUNE
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
AND SIGNUP
Call Jim
752-7923
or stop by
203-B Belt Dorm
NTERVIEW WITH RECREATIONAL EMPLOYERS
January 28, 1988
Memorial Gym
For More Information
Contact Cooperative Education
313Rawl
li i if in i ii in iHMKgUm pW�n�"i
�- �i ,? tmmammmtim0 j�
- i m. �' '� mpm tmm
m





O THE EAST CARPI INT AM
JANUARY 21,1988
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
INTERESTED IN paying off those
Christmas bills or beginning to plan for a
new Spring wardrobe? Brody's has part-
time sales associate positions available
for individuals who can work flexible
hours. Apply at Brody's, Carolina East
Mall M-W, 2-4 p.m.
SUPER SUMMER JOBS- Sixty five 4-H
camp summer jobs now open. Five loca-
tions in the state with many interesting
program areas. Excellent training pro-
vided. Mr. Flory will be recruiting at
Memorial Gym on January 28. Come by
and see what a great experience you can
have.
HELP WANTED. Part-time employee to
distribute materials and do odd jobs.
Must have a vehicle. Call 752-5717.
ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT Gain
experience in small business accounting
operations. Must have basic accounting
and typing skills. 15-20 hours. Schedule
neg. Send resume to 3010 E. 10th Street,
Greenville, N.C.
HELP WANTED: Part-time interior de-
sign student - send resume to: Designer,
3010 East 10th Street, Greenville, N.C
FOR SALE
SOUND MIXTURES D.J Service is back
in Greenville! Back with more equip-
ment, more experience, and even better
sound quality. For more info don't hesi-
tate to call Bob, 752-4916.
FOR SALE: Loft for two twin beds com-
plete with ladder, $80.00; two pieces of 11
bv 14 carpet for $20.00 each. Call Tracy at
758-1325.
FOR SALE: "Sting" tickets, Chapel Hill,
N.C S35.00pair. Call between 8:00-5:00
at 551-2524 or after 5:00 p.m. at 758-7024.
CAROLINA GRILL CAFE: Good, home
cooked food. Welcome Back-To-School
speical: A complete breakfast, $1.49 tax;
a complete lunch, $2.60 tax. 907 Dickin-
son Avenue, three blocks from ECU. Call
752-1188 for quick call-ins.
ARE YOU having a party and need a D.J.?
For the best in Top 40, Beach and Dance
call Morgan at 758-7967. Reasonable
rates. References on request.
PARTY ANIMALS Great for birthday
or any occasion Gorilla-grams, Gator-
grams, Penguin-for-hire, balloons deliv-
ered in costume Deliveries on or off
campus Chip Py, 830-1823.
IS IT TRUE you can buy Jeeps for $44.00
through the U.S. government? Get the facts
today! Call 1-312-742-1142 Ext. 5272-A.
FOR SALE: Breakfast set, table and two
chairs. Call after 6.00 p.m. 758-5422.
FOR SALE: Fully equipped supersingle
waterbcd, $120.00. Call 830-0598.
SPRING BREAK: Get in shape at Golds
Gym and East Carolina Tanning Center!
Get your coupon for a free workout in this
paper.
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed No de-
posits required. $100 per month plus 13
utilities. Phone 752-2421.
ROOM near campus. $125.00 includes
utilities. Deposit required. 757-3543.
IF YOU NEED a room a fully furnished
apartment in Kingston Place is available
for two individuals. Rent is $150.00
month. No utilities. Call collect 703-560-
8779.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share a two
bedroom duplex with woodstove.
$125.00month 12 utilities. Three blocks
from campus. 752-1743. Keep trying!
THREE BEDROOM house located near
ECU, $300.00 per month, lease and deposit
required. Call 758-1274 after 5:00 p.m.
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apartments for
rent. Furnished. Contact Hollie Si
monowich at 752-2865.
ROOM FOR RENT Male, female, non
smoker would like to share large house 11
2 blocks from campus. Washerdryer.
Fully furnished, single roomdouble
room. If you would like to see the house,
please call Ronnie at 757-0202. Leave a
message.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share brand
new two bedroom apartment. Call 830-
5193.
TWO ROOMMATES needed to share a
room in Wildwood Villas townhouse.
$125.00 each plus utilities. Call Julie at 752-
4781.
HOUSEMATE WANTED: prefer grad
student or responsible senior. $150.00
per month and 12 utilities, $150.00
damage deposit, 15 minutes from cam
pus. Call 758-6998.
ROOM FOR RENT: For female, every
thing included. Call after 600 p.m. 758
5422.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 2 Wildwood
Villas. Will have own room. $112.50 per
month plus 14 utilities. Call 758-5513.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed immedi-
ately - roomy, two bedroom townhouse.
$167.50 per month plus 12 utilities. No
deposit required. Call 752-7662.
PERSONALS
DELTA ETA: We would like to con
gratulate the new sistors of Delta Zeta:
Suzanne Brown, Maggie Carnwath,
Michelle Dark, Kirstm Lakes, Kathie
Mcllale, Marne McKee, Julie Met,
Charlotte M of fat, Robin Morrison,
Karen Prcvost, Missy Richardson, Lau-
rie Sodano, Lori Stevenson, and Kathy
Ulrich. We love ya Gel ready for a
PHI SIGMA PI and the American Can
cer Society is sponsoring a Jail A Thon
on January 28 from 9 4 at the ECU Stu
dent Store. 1 lave your bestfriend, pro-
fessor, or worst enemy thrown in jail
and help raise money for cancer re-
search.
FREE BUFFET TICKETS, Buffet CD,
Buffet party packs Listen to WZMB 91 3
FM for more details .
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
EXPERIENCE.
A LIFETIME
RAFTERS: Tuesday night is rock n roi
night, free admission, .25 cent draft
WELCOME BACK Lambda Chi Alph,
little sisters 1 lope to see you tonight at
rush around 7.00 p.m. Also, we have j
meeting monday the 25th at 9 00 pm
Love, the Lambda Chi Alpha Brothers
DELTA SIGMA THETA ority,
invites you to an evening ot fun at th?
Cultural Center on Friday, January 22nd
from 9 til 2. Admission is $1 00
SCHNAPPS NIGHT Thursday
night
�Captained Yachts For Groups Of Eight. 7 Days
�in Bahamas $435.00 pp All Inclusive
�SPRINGBREAK HOTLINE 1-800-999-7245
Anytime Campus Reps, needed. Ask for David.
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New �
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
�Located Near ECU
� Near M.ijor Shopping Center
�Aitoss From Highway ("atroi Station
Limited Oder - $275 a month
Contact J. T. or Tommy Williams
756 7815 or 830 1937
OfTu e ojen - Apt 8. 12 - 5:30 p m
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartments, energf efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $195 a month. 6
month lease. MOiillJC HOME RENTALS
couples or singles Apartment and mobile
homes In Azalea Gardens near Urook Valley
County Club
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
jammin year!
DELTA ZETA: Congratulations to all
new officers of Delta Zeta - we know
you'll do a great job! Lx)king for ward to
a fantastic year. Love, The Sisters and
Pledges.
MARCAR1TAVII.LE MONDAY is
coming to WZMB on Monday, January
2th Listen to 91.3 FM for more details
CONGRATULATIONS to the 1988
Alpha Omicron Pi officers! Delynda
Carter - President; Lisa Grosshandler
VP; Teresa Morse - Recording Secretary;
Leslie Liedel Corresponding Secretary;
Patty dander and Pam Harbour - Treas
urers; 1 Ieidi Schafer Pledge T , Stepha-
nie Patton - I louse Manager; Laura
Wood - Scholarship Ch ; Debbie Schroe-
der - Membership Ed Eileen 1 lealy -
Social Ch Rachel Barger Chapter Rela-
tions; Lauri Evans - Philanthropy;
Amanda Brewer Rush Chairman;
Melinda 1 luffman - Panhellenic Exec;
Beth Beaney - Panhellenic Del Tracy
Parrish - Historian; Chris Brackman
Sting leader; Stacey (.cmxIo Intramural
Rep; Pam Pugh K of R and Diana
Dit.ler - PR. Let's have an AWESOME
YEAR!
BETA KAPPAS of Alpha Omicron Pi,
let it be known that we're going to rock
at the 1 lolidome. White will be right for
Saturday night. We won't be done by
quarter to one and get ready to tell the
sisters how to have fun!
NEW DELI JAMS! Catch the down home
style pickin' blues of Lightnin Wells on
Thursday, Snatches of Pink on Friday and
don't miss Flipside on Saturday.
PARTY Come check out the all new
Elbo. Clean cut crowd; mixed drinks;
good dance, and lots of fun. We love ya
See you Friday and Saturday night. The
all new Elbo: your 1988 place for dance
and romance
L.B: Thanks for the tip on the Tropical
Zone. It was a good deal and the tan looks
great. J.T.
TUESDAY NIGHT - Rafters brings to
you only the finest rock 'n roll with free
admission and .25 draft.
TKE - It was short on notice but long on
fun - great social guys, lets do it again
soon - The girl's of Delta Zeta
HAWAIIAN TEA PARTY $2.00 ice teas
and free admission. 4-7 Friday afternoon
The Elbo invites you to get your member-
ship for SI.00: look for coupon in todays
paper.
KA'S: The actions of a few are not the
thoughts of us all! Sincerely, The Phi Tau
Brothers.
PATSY: The time we spent together was
great, 1 wish it could continue, maybe
someday it can. Please keep in touch.
Chris.
ELBO memberships: If you have already
bought a membership from Elbo, come
pick it up today. If you don't have one yet,
get it now for just $1.00.
- -j ��'m
the Dbo has 75 cent schnapps member?
free till 12 Get your $1 00 members' lpthis
week Dance all night'
HEY MON - The Attic will be ,dmrr,r
with the reggae of AAE on Friday S�
you there early, mon, to catch the Peter
Tosh video
THE AOTT'S would like to congratu-
late Dana 1 rout, for, well. we can't sav
what for, but CONGRATULATIONS
anyways The candie lighting was well
deserved.
Rio - Clash Bash
Party this Friday. No
cover before 8:30 p.m.
Wear your clashing clothes.
THE OMEGEA PS1 PHI Fraternity, !nc
will have a dance on Thursday, January
21 at the Unlimited Touch Also, or, Sarm
day, January 23 at the Culture (enter the
Fraternity will be sponsoring a dance We
ask that everyone interested in partyir.
come out.
JOIN US THIS FRIDAY at Rio for the
Clash Bash Party Wear your dashing
clothes. Drink specials' No cover bel �
8:30 pm
TO MY AOP1 L1L' SIS � Susan L no
van � just wanted to say vou'vo been the
best little sis' Get ready lor Rosebafl
because it's your time to shine' Will
switch dates and find Dana P 1 guess
we'll see Sat. night" I love you T:j .
TKE-thanks for our traditional New
Years - we had a blast' looking forward I
'89 already Love, ADTT.
SIGMAS � get ready to partv hard an;
match your card for a schnapps shot Sur.
night. PS. bring your pens and dress fc
glow, 'cause we might as well have nu
clear waste also See ya there, Sig Eps
GET LEID Everyone gets a lav at the
door at the Hawuan Tea Partv Fnda
afternoon, 4-7 at Dbo $2 0016 oz ice tea
and free admission Come caiv a
avoid the lines Grab your coupon in t
paper for $1.00 membership
FRATS: Good luck with rush this week
We hope it turns out to be a success
ADTT.
SIG EP ROSEBALL DATES
ready for Sat. night. You'll have the tat
of your lives.
Announcements
SAVE THOSE WRAPPERS
Deposit all empty sticklers, natural fla-
vor gum packs and Doritos brand cool
ranch flavor tortilla chip bags in the U.S.
College Comedy Competition displays
located in the Student Book Store lobby
and Mendcnhall. ECU could win a free
comedy concert if we collect the most
wrappers.
SELF-HELP POSITION
Part-time ClerkTypist and Reception-
ist: The Department of Political Science
seeks a reliable, conscientious, and effi-
cient student with strong skills and some
experience to assist staff and faculty in a
variety of activities. Good typing, copying
and clerical skills are desired. Please con-
tact Mrs. Cynthia Smith, Brewster A-124
personally or by telephone, 757-6030,8:30
a.m. to 5 p.m Mon. - Fri. We will be hiring
as soon as possible.
INTERVIEW WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton House is offering
these one hour sessions to aid you in
developing better interviewing skills. A
film and discussion of how to interview
on and off campus will be shared. These
sessions are held in the Career Planning
Room on Jan. 20, 25, & 26 at 3 p.m. and at
7 p.m. on Jan. 26.
BIOLOGYCHEMISTRY
Those who graduate this year will want
to register at the Career Planning and
Placement Service. The Research Triangle
Institute will be interviewing on campus if
enough majors sign up. You may want to
dip this and post so no others will see.
Glaxo will also be here and we have vide-
otapes on career with the Southern Re-
search Institute and the National Cancer
Institute.
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton House is offering
these one hour programs on beginning a
resume for your job search. Handouts and
samples will be given out to the first 20
people to come to each session. No sign up
required. These sessions are held in the
Career Planning Room on Jan. 22 & 28 at 3
p.m. and on Jan. 26 at 7 p.m.
MUSICAL
The long-running hit Broadway musi-
cal, Pur lie, will be performed in Wright
Auditorium on Wed Jan. 27,1988, at 8:00
p.m. This energy packed blockbuster, full
of sweet ballads and powerful production
numbers, will be here for one perform-
ance only. Tickets for this delightful event
are available at the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall, ECU, 757-6611, ext. 266.
Central Ticket Office hours are 11 00 am.
until 600 p.m. This event is sponsored by
the Dept of University Unions.
BUSINESS STUDENTS
The American Marketing Association
to running ill spring semester member-
ship drive on January 19 thru the 22nd.
Tuesday and Wednesday at the Student
State, and Thursday and Friday on the
second floor of RawL The organization is
not only limited to business students;
anyone who has an interest in marketing
i� encouraged to come talk with us.
VOCAL ARTS ENSEMBLE
The Dept. of University Unions and
The School of Music present the Los
Angeles Vocal Arts Ensemble, a uniquely
talented group of singers and accompa-
nists, in Hendrix Theatre on Thurs Jan.
21, 1988, at 8:00 p.m. Tickets for this
wonderful concert are available at the
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall, 757-
6611, ext. 266. Central Ticket OfFice hours
are 11:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m.
BLQQPMQBILE
The Biology Club will be sponsoring a
Bloodmobile Jan. 20 and 21 in room 244
Mendenhall between 12 p.m. - 6 p.m. The
Red Cross is on special appeal for blood.
Please give the gift of life.
PANCE PERFORMANCE
ATLANTIC DANCE THEATRE pres-
ents 'TOINTES OF PASSION-BODIES
IN BEAT an evening of dance Jan. 23,
8:15 p.m New Bern Senior High School
Auditorium, and Jan. 24, 8:15 p.m D.H.
Conley High in Greenville. Breathtaking
Ballet, Hot Jazz, and Titillating Tap, new
works recently choreographed for the
semi-professional dance company and
numbers too hot to put down are guaran-
teed to heat up your winter. Tickets are $7
in advance; $8 at the door. For further
info contact Atlantic Dance Theatre at
(919) 637-3941.
M
Amnesty International meets every 4th
Wed. at 8 p.m. at St. Paul's Episcopal
Church, 401 E. 4th St in the upper floor
from the 4th St. entrance. Next meeting
Jan. 27th.
PHI SIGMA PI
Phi Sigma Pi and the American Cancer
Society is sponsoring a Jail-A-Thon on Jan.
28 from 9-4 at the ECU Student Store.
Have your best friend, professor, or worst
enemy thrown in jail and help raise
money for cancer research.
DIVE CLUB
Dive Club meeting Thurs Jan. 21 7:00
p.m. in Mendenhall rm. 221. We will dis-
cuss future dives, fund raisers, and elect a
new secretary. Everyone is invited.
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
Join the ECU Gospel Choir - Rehearsal
is on Wednesday at 5:00 p.m. in the Cul-
ture Center. The cut off date will be Janu-
ary 27,1988.
SOCCER
There will be a mandatory ECU
Women's soccer club meeting Thursday,
January 21st in Memorial Gym room 102.
All new players welcome. Please bring
insurance forms. Any questions call Re-
nee at 355-4644.
BTOinr.YCHEMISTRY
Those who graduate this year will want
to register at the Career Planning and
Placement Service The Research Triangle
Institute will be interviewing on campus if
enough majors sign up. You may want to
dip this and post so others will see. Glaxo
will also be here and we have videotapes
on careers with with the Southern Re-
search institute and the National Cancer
Institute.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will hold its next
meeting on January 21, Thursday evening
in room 238 Mendenhall. Guest Speaker
will be Sara Chrome with the Public De-
fenders office. All members are asked to
attend. Any interested non-members are
invited.
ECU COMPUTER CLUB
The ECU Computer dub will have its
annual programming contest Friday,
January 22 from 12 noon until 6:00 p.m.
Pizza will be served afterwards. Team
members must bring their spring
semester dues of $5.00 to be eligible to
participate. Teams will meet in Austin 223
at 12 noon to be given the contest prob-
lems.
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
The ECU Gospel Choir will hold reher-
sals every Wednesday at 5:00. We wel-
come new members for Spring 1988. The
cut off date for new membership is Janu-
ary 27.
STUDENT TEACHING
Spring semester student teachers 1st
Student Teaching Teachers meeting will
be held on January 26th at 4:00 p.m. in
Hendrix Theater, Mendenhall.
OVERSEAS NETWORK
The Overseas Development Network
will hold its first meeting of the semester
on Sunday, January 24, at 7 p.m. in Men-
denhall room 248. This is an organiza-
tional meeting with a special guest. Any-
one interested is invited to attend.
EDUCATION MATORS
The Department of Speech-Language
and Auditory Pathology (SLAP) will be
providing the speech and hearing screen-
ing for all students eligible for admission
to the Upper Division of Teacher Educa-
tion on Monday, January 25, Tuesday,
January 26 and Wednesday, January 27.
The Department will be testing form 5:00
to 6:30 on Monday and 5:00 to 7:00 on
Tuesday and Wednesday. No appoint-
ment is needed (first come basis). The
SLAP Department is located in Belk An-
nex on Charles Street.
WORKSTUDY STUDENTS
The Office of International Studies and
Scholarships needs several workstudy
students (already approved by the Office
of Financial aid) to fill derk positions.
Duties include answering telephones,
running errands, light clerical work, and
other duties as needed. Must possess a
good attitude. Contact Mr. Sven VanBaars
or Ms. Kristi Pascarella at 757-6504 or
apply at Brewster, A-117.
CASINQttlCHT
The Student Union Productions
Committee is sponsoring Casino Night,
Tuesday, January 25, from 7-9:30 p.m. in
the multi purpose room of Mendenhall.
One dollar adm ssion buys $3000 worth of
play money and all the mocktails you can
drink. Many prizes will be auctioned off
including tickets to the upcoming Jimmy
Buffet concert.
NAACP
There is going to be the first meeting of
the ECU chapter of the NAACP on Thurs-
day January 21 at 5:00 at the Ledonia B.
Wright Cultural Center. Be there and
bring ideas for this semester.
CO-REC BOWLING
Registration for Intramural Co-rec
bowling will be held January 27 at 6 p.m.
in MG 102. For more information call 757
6387.
SCEC
The Student Council for Exceptional
Children will hold its first meeting of the
semester on January 21,1988 at 5:00 p m. in
Speight 211. All Special Education Majors
please attend.
WOODY HERMAN
The Performing Arts Series at ECU will
present Richard Stoltzman and Woody
I lerman's Thundering I lerd in, "A Trib-
ute to Woody on Thurday, February 11,
1988, at 8:00 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Under the direction of Frank Tiberi, The
Thundering I lord will perform many of
the works with which it is associated.
From "Caldonia to ibony Concerto" tc
"West Side Story you can count on
Stoltzman and The Thundering I lerd to
follow Woody's mot toWhatever you
play, its gotta swing Tickets for this stel-
lar evening of jazz can be purchased at the
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, East Carolina University,
757-6611, ext. 266. Office hours are 11:00
a.m. through 6:00 p.m.
PIANIST
The ECU Performing Arts Series pres-
ents internationally acclaimed pianist
Eugene Istomin on Thursday, February 11,
1988, at 8:00 p.m. in Wright' Auditorium.
Mr. Istomin has given more than 3000
concerts in his distinguished career. A trio
formed with Isaac Stern, Leonard Rose,
and Mr. Istomin collected a Grammy
Award in 1971 for Best Chamber Music
Performance. Mr. Istomin's program will
include works by Bach, Schubert,
Beethoven, DeBussy, and Rachmaninoff.
Tickets can be purchased at the Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall, or by calling
757-6611, ext. 266. Office hours are 11:00
a.m. through 6:00 p.m.
ATLANTA BALLET
The Atlanta Ballet, long recognized as
one of the Great Regional Ballot Compa
nies of America, will perform in Wnj
Auditorium, on Tuesday, Februar) K
1988, at 8:00 p.m. Included in the evening s
program are two new works: "Reflections
For by Artistic Director Robert Bar-
nett and a yet untitled work bv Lisa d
Ribere. Tickets can be purchased at the
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Stu
dent Center, 757-6611, ext 266. Office
hours are 11:00 a.m. through 6:00 p m
ECU
ECU
TAXPAYERS
with dependents
HERE'S A TAX TIP:
Beginning with your 1987 income
tax return that you will file in
1988, you generally must list social
security numbers tor dependents
who arc at least five years old by
the end of 1987. It any of your
dependents do not have this
number, get an application form
today from the Social Security
office in your area.
YOU
DONT
HAVE TO
GIVE
BLOOD
TODAY
BUT SOMEDAY,
YOU'LL BE GLAD YOU DID.
NEXT BLOODMOBILE VISIT
January 20 & 21
American Red Cross
Sponsored by:
Triangle East Advertising & Marketing Association
Love t
(AP) �Love and harmon
were the recurrent themes of ti.
first paid state holiday marking
Martin LutherKingjr'bbirthdasl
but controversy simmered al
thousands paid homage to th
slain civil rights leader.
At Hamlet in Richmon.
County, about 600 people sanj
spirituals and marched in protei
of the local school board's de
sion to hold classes on the ho!
day.
"Dr. King worked so hard
us up in the world, we shou;
something for his birthdc
Anthony Allred, a Richmon
Junior High School student
don't think they sould have I
celed the birthday of somebod
important
"I'm here because black
dren need heroes and role m.
just like everybody else -
Edna Robinson, a drama an
North Carolina history t
didn't feel right telling my I
dents this is what they need I f
and I not be here. I'm an ad
for children
Dr. Fred McQueen, Ri
County NAACP presid
he was pleased with the n
which began and ended :
fully. But he said, "I'm ver) . -
pointed that the whites di I i
come out to protest. It's n I
holiday for blacks. It's a
for everybody. What Martin Li
ther King jr. did was for thee- j
countrv
Several school systems arourw
the state held classes V
make up for a snowstorm
King's d
true, say
BOULDER, Colo. (CPS
Martin Luther King rs dream
racial equalitv hasn't come tr
his daughter Yolanda Kii g I I
350 people at the Univer
Colorado a week before s
around the country prepared
celebrate Martin Luther Kii
Day.
She blamed the "widenir
between the haves and ha
nots" in the United Stales
But campus resistance u
her father's birthdav as a fede
holidav seems to be disa ppea I
When President Reagan a
thorized Kind's birthdav as a t
eral holiday in 1983, some cai
puses didn't want to add a hcj
day to their tight schedules, w
the debate peaking in 3
first vear King's birthda
celebrated as a holiday.
Most of the calendar issue
rounding the slam civil
leader's birthday have bej
settled, although at North Caj
hna State, for example admit
rrators provoked reactions
replacing an Easter Monday h
dav with King's birthday
Some students remain
about the decision fames
president of the N.C. State
Read The
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have the time
VNTA BALLET
ng recognized as
al Ballet Compa-
rm in Wright
February 16
d in the evening's
works: "Reflections
Director Robert Bar-
d work by Lisa de
re purchased at the
Mendenhall Sha-
7-6611 ext. 266. Office
' i it tl r ugh 6.00 p.m.
U
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ETO
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�ME DAY,
-AD YOU DID.
IOBILE VISIT:
20&21
Red Cross
(red by:
Marketing Association
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 21,1988 7
Love theme for King's birthday
(AP) �Love and harmony
were the recurrent themes or the
first paid state holiday marking
Martin LutherKingjrsbirthdav,
but controversy simmered as
thousands paid homage to the
slain civil rights leader.
At Hamlet in Richmond
County, about 600 people sang
spirituals and marched in protest
of the local school board's deci-
sion to hold classes on the holi-
day.
"Dr. King worked so hard to get
us up in the world, we should do
something tor his birthdav said
Anthony Allred, a Richmond
Junior High School student. " 1
don't think they sould have can-
celed the birthday of somebody so
important"
"I'm here because black chil-
dren need heroes and role models
just like everybody else said
Edna Robinson, a drama and
North Carolina history teacher. "I
didn't feel right telling my stu-
dents this is what they need to do
and I not be here. I'm an advocate
for children
Dr. Fred McQueen, Richmond
County NAACP president, said
he was pleased with the march,
which began and ended peace-
fully. But he said, "I'm very disap-
pointed that the whites did not
come out to protest. It's not just a
holiday for blacks. It's a holiday
for everybody. What Martin Lu-
ther King Jr. did was for the entire
country
Several school systems around
the state held classes Monday to
make up tor a snowstorm that
kept students out of school for
more than a week.
Schools and government offices
were closed in Raleigh, where up
to 4,000 people paraded from the
Capitol to the Raleigh civic Center
for a memorial service.
Rupublican Gov. Jim Martin,
who last year opposed the
Legislature's enactment of a paid
state King holiday, drew polite
applause for his speech paying
tribute to King.
"His dream now becomes
ours Martin said. "It is for us to
continue to fulfill that dream
through serving others � not in
an abstract sense, but through
action
Martin was followed to the ros-
trum by Democratic Lt. Gov. Bob
Jordan, who supported the holi-
day and is running for governor
against Martin. Jordan's brief
remarks drew a thunderous ova-
tion.
"Just as we made this holiday a
reality, we can build a better to-
morrow, we can build better op-
potunities for every man, woman
and child in North Carolina and
America Jordan said.
Martin, who drew fire from
black leaders for his stand on the
holiday, first declined an invita-
tion to take part in the celebration
but changed his mind after Jordan
agreed to participate.
Wilma Burgess, 35, of Raleigh,
said she was angry at Martin for
opposing the holiday bill. "I think
he's probably lost the governor-
ship for another year because of
it
The crowd clapped and swayed
as choirs led the singing of gospel
hymns. The keynote speaker was
the Rev. John 11. Adams, presid-
ing bishop of the Washington,
D.C AME Church Conference,
who attended Boston University
with King.
Adams said King was a "con-
temporary man" who seized
opportunities as they arose, rec-
ognizing that such commonplace
incidents as Rose Parks' refusal to
relinquish a bus seat to a white
man could be used to symbolize
widespread discrimination.
"Because Martin was contem-
porary, we must be sontempo-
rary Adams said. "Because
Martin was prepared, we must be
prepared. And if we are going to
be conteporary, we have got to
deal with the new isssue of slav-
ery to drugs in our youth
He urged blacks to register to
vote and to "vote intelligently"
and said the view of many that
Jesse Jackson cannot be elected
president was "a cynical example
of racism
The snow that kept students
home across the state also caused
them to miss the usual history-
class preparation for King's birth-
day.
But Angela Sanders, 11, one of
many pupils in attendance at the
Raleigh celebration, said she did
not need prompting to appreciate
the holiday.
"The thing we hear about in
history books arc like stories
Miss Sanders said. "But Dr. Mar-
tin Luther King was a real person
� today is for real
Carol Bebman, 39, of Raleigh,
said she brought her 10-year-old
daughter, Koyah Alston, to the
ceremony because "I think she
takes it for granted we sit in the
front of buses now and go where
we want to the bathroom and to
eat
"I tell her all the time, but she
takes it for granted Ms. Debman
said. "This is a great day
Many businesses stayed open
Monday, drawing criticism from
Adams, who pointedly noted that
few if any of the state's well-
known business leaders were in
attendance at the Civic Center.
"The custodians of America's
wealth are not here he said.
Banking officials have dis-
cussed closing for the King holi-
day but there is little support for
doing so, said Ed Aycock, general
counsel to the North Carolina
Bankers Association.
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King's dream has yet to come
true, says daughterYolanda
BOULDER, Colo. (CPS) �
Martin Luther King Jrs dream oi
racial equality hasn't come true,
his daughter Yolanda King told
350 people at the University of
Colorado a week before schools
around the country prepared to
celebrate Martin Luther King
Day.
She blamed the "widening gulf
between the haves and have
nets" in the United States.
But campus resistance to mark
her father's birthday as a federal
holidav seems to be disappearing.
When President Reagan au-
thorized King's birthday as a fed-
eral holidav in 1983, some cam-
J
puses didn't want to add a holi-
day to their tight schedules, with
the debate peaking in 1986, the
first year King's birthday was
celebrated as a holiday.
Most of the calendar issues sur-
rounding the slain civil rights
leader's birthday have been
settled, although at North Caro-
lina State, for example, adminis-
trators provoked reactions by
replacing an Easter Monday holi-
day with King's birthday.
Some students remain angry
about the decision. James Jones,
president of the N.C. State Inter-
fraternity Council, said the school
should celebrate both days. "King
helped whites as well as blacks.
Martin Luther King is important
and his civil rights helped all
minorities: women, handi-
capped, gays. His insight helped
us all out
"We should have both days
lones continued. "I'm in favor of
the holiday, but do not like giving
up taster Monday
In general, however, the contro-
versy about adding the holiday �
from bureaucrats complaining
the holiday would be too costly
and from opponents claiming
King was not worthy of a national
celebration � appears to have
faded from the national scene.
Indeed, recently indicted
Arizona Gov. Evan Mccham's
refusal to let state agencies ob-
serve King's birthday � King
would have been 58 this year had
he not been assassinated by a
sniper named James Earl Ray in
1968 � in part led to petitions that
will force him to face a recall elec-
tion later in 1988.
But if the holiday has gained
acceptance, his daughter noted in
her Boulder speech Jan. 10, King's
vision still hasn't become the
norm.
"Wc as human beings have not
reached the Promised Land said
the younger King, an artist who
heads the Martin Luther King
Center for Nonviolent Change in
Atlanta. "The magnificent dream
pursued by my father is still a
dream
Before he was murdered in
1968, King planned to shutdown
the federal government through
massive civil disobedience ac-
tions until ending poverty be-
came a governmental priority.
"That was his last dream. And if
you understand how threatening
it was for some groups, you un-
derstand why the bullet came and
where it came from Yolanda
Kine said.
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t
?
8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 21. 1988
Prof, says anti-drinking laws not heeded
(CPS While anti-drinking To get liability insurance, col-
rules cost Marquette University leges had to demonstrate to insur-
cheerleaders their jobs during the ance companies they were keep-
holiday break and could land two
North Carolina State students in
jail a California State University
CSlat I minquez Hills profes-
sor concluded campus attitudes
Still encourage students to drink.
Students added CSU's Dr.
David Nasatir in reporting the
results of the University of Cali-
fornia at Berkeley study he helped
direct seem to be drinking as
much as they always have, de-
spiteintense campus efforts to the
contran
Most schools around the U.S.
have cranked up "alcohol aware-
ness policies since 198f, when
federal law s forced states to raise
their legal drinking ages from 18
to 21
ing their underaged students
from drinking liquor.
But the Berkeley study sug-
gested there has been no pro-
found increase or decrease in stu-
dent drinking since the new poli-
cies began.
The reason is that many schools,
Nasatir said, "are lax in observing
violations of the drinking mini-
mum age Alcohol, moreover, is
drinking rates high. "Young men
living in fraternities seem to drink
more often and larger quantities
than any other group of similar
young men in dormitories, or
with roommates
"It's not clear whether that's
because fraternities recruit drink-
ers or manufacture drinkers
Nasatir continued. "But that
seems to be a phenomenon that
holds true on all campuses with
fraternities
A solution, he suggested, might
often an integral part of social and be to crack down on people and
athletic events, and the "aware- groups who serve liquor to stu-
ness" programs, by not recogniz- dents. "This has a chilling effect
ing alcohol's role, are rendered onindividual willingness to serve
ineffective. alcohol
Nasatir's research, part of an At Marquette,
ongoing studv of campus alcohol
use, noted fraternities have
helped keep general student
however, a
group of cheerleaders quit in
December instead of tolerating a
crackdown.
Eleven cheerleaders quit the
Milwaukee college's squad after
school officials suspended two
cheerleaders for swiping some
leftover bottles of champagne
from a private party.
'They said they could no longer
cheer" with two members sus-
pended for something they all
took part in or knew about, said
Mark McCarthy, Marquette's as-
sociate dean of students.
Former cheerleader Kim Heller,
one of those suspended, said
cheerleaders often took leftover
champagne from parties they had
worked at as hostesses to save for
a celebration after the first basket-
ball game of the season. However,
the boat company that sponsored
the party complained to the
school.
At the same time Raleigh police
charged two North Carolina State
students with counterfeiting
drivers' licenses and selling them
to classmates to use them to buy
alcohol.
The two students built a large
cardboard replica of a license.
They would t take photos of
customers standing in front of the
replica, and process the resultant
artwork as a fake license.
The students, each charged
with two counts of counterfeiting
and selling drivers' licenses,
could serve 3 years in prison it
found guilty.
The University of Washington,
however, may have been
overzealous in attempts to control
drinking. The school, facing a
lawsuit from the American Civil
Liberties Union and several l'
law students, agreed not to search
fans attending football games for
alcohol. At the beginning of the
1987season, university police had
stepped up efforts to combat alco-
hol use during football games
But administrators, heeding
protests, agreed to halt the
searches, at least for the last game
of the season. UVV officials say
they will develop a revised search
policy for next season.
Presidential candidates visit N.C.
P National and state poli-
tic ins competed for attention
North Carolina, as presi-
i andidates came to two
s i nd Democratic guberanto-
lid ate Bob Jordan won an
end lent
ford, state Rep. Billy Wat-
t iorsed ordan for gpver-
; a breakfast sponsored
v the Gra e ounty school
�, � .n �� n r fp. �
� : - mmit
i sidered a run tor
go ein. �i himself
Later, Watkins and Jordan at-
��� ' P. Webl
Oxford cm the
state � . f the bicenten-
- v nstitution.
stal politicians made
u ements two presidential
rs p �� ned to campaign
CORE chair
savs the Greek
spoke truth
EW YORK IAP)Fired CBS
Spt �rts commentator Jininiv "The
Greel Snyder 'spoke the truth"
; was repeating statements
li bv blacl leaders when he
made controversial racial re-
marks last week, the chairman of
the Congress of Racial Equality
says.
CORE? national chairman, Roy
Inms, is one oi the few black lead-
ers to defend Snyder, who has
r" vvidelv criticized tor making
on air racial remarks considered
derogatory toward blacks.
Among the remarks Snyder
made during a televised inter-
view Friday was a comment that
blacks are better athletes than
whites because of breeding tech-
niques that originated during the
Civil War
'During the slave period, the
slave owner would breed his big
black with hi1- big woman so that
he could have a big black kid �
that's where it all started Snyder
said during the interview.
Innis defended those state-
ments as accurate during an
awards dinner Monday honoring
the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr
and said black leaders, including
Malcolm X, had made similar
statements in the past.
jimmy must have been read-
ing Malcolm he said.
Speaking oi the days of slavery,
Innis said: "We were bred like
chattel. It's wrong that they did
that to us � but it's not wrong to
talk about history
Innissaid the meaningof equal-
ity between blacks and whites
incorporates the idea that mem-
bers of the two races should be
able to exchange ideas "even
when they're unpleasant
"Jimmy the Greek spoke the
truth said Innis, who referred to
Snyder's firing as a tragedy.
gathered at a breakfast meeting
that Dole "can understand Wash-
ington. He's been in the Congress
for 27 years. Will he work effec-
m North Carolina. Vice President hole in the law � he removed his
George Bush was bringing his name from the voting registration
campaign for the Republican rolls, then re-registered and was
presidential nomination to Win- eligible to file for office.
ston-Salem. Democratic presi- Kathie Chastain Cooper, For- tively with the Congress of the
dential contender Gary Hart of syth County elections supervisor, United States? His colleagues se-
Colorado planned to campaign in said the law allows a newly regis- lected him to be their majority
Fayetteville. tered voter to file for office imme- leader of the United States Senate.
Elsewhere in state polictics, diately. At a news conference at
Attorney General Lacy Thorn- Other presidential campaigns Raleigh-Durham Airport, Gore
burg traveled from Sylva to � all aiming at capturing the said he strongly supported the
Raleigh to Charlotte to announce March 5 Super Tuesday votes in federal tobacco program and saw
his Democratic re-election cam- southern states � were active in no inconsistency between that
paign. Republican Parks Helms of North Carolina on Monday. stand and encouraging young
Charlotte also scheduled a news Former Transportation Secre- people not to smoke,
conference to announce for lieu- tary Elizabeth Dole campaigned Faced with criticism from some
tenant governor. Monday for her husband, GOP Southern politicians for his recent
In local politics, R.J. Reynolds presidential hopeful Sen. Robert comments about tobacco, Gore
Tobacco USA Chairman Gerald Dole of Kansas, while Democratic
Sen. Albert Gore Jr. of Tennessee
defended his stance on tobacco.
"What we're talking about is
running on a record, not a res-
ume Mrs. Dole said, adding that
the GOP presidential contest is
between Dole and Vice President
George Bush.
A
TmeMf
s
329 Arlington
Blvd.
756-1579
IT. Long filed as a Democratic
candidate for Forsyth County
Board o Commissioners. The 59-
year-old Long is also a member of
the R)R Nabisco board of direc-
tors.
Long had changed his partv
registration last December from
Republican to Democrat, but clec- Mrs. Dole started her tour of the
tion officials told him he hadn't state in Hcndersonvillc and went
been registered the required 90 to Hickory before stops in Fay-
days with the party when he tried etteville and Winston-Salem.
to file Jan. 4. Longjfound. a loop- She told about 200 Republicans
said he had consistently backed
the program in Congress and
would continue doing so as presi-
dent.
He said he would oppose direct
federal subsidies of tobacco but
that the program was grower fi-
nanced. The current allotment
system, he said, is necessary to
ensure that the leaf will continue
to be grown on small farms.
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THF FAST AROi SU
Music
By MICAH HARRIS
Stiff Writer
;
There are two things I'm i fte
asked in public:pl rhefirsti
"How much longer ai
be in that stall7' Thi -
"What sorta video wl
watch it you wen
to review 'cm?" 1 can ai
second question (tl
the tirst vanes) by I
list of what Iconsidei
examples:
"The Greatest
Whitney Housti ;
autobiographical ;
lzed dreams as the v
back and rth
Secret Set
to protect
during car
Tennessee Sei
was philosophic i
small knot of suj
courtroom bei:
squeezed by sten I i
who talked into I
"It helps to pay I i
plane Gore chuck
questioned about tl
tion to his camp ligi
the Secret Service.
Secret Service pr I
good points for a
Gore's reference to
airplanes is a case ir
When Gore - or arc.
with protection - rents �
for a campaign sv ing I
pay tor seats on th :
might otherwise be en :
ing to defray tht
But some are:
protection, beca .
harder to get c! �se to 1
Senate Republican
Dole made a point of tc
porters he didn t wa
Service following him
saying he didn't wa
taxpayers with the exti
Dole's main car
Iowa is that's he's a S
who is "one of us
Cubbie's is t
downtown'
By STAN ARNOLD
Staff Wri�w
Cubbie's Restaurant
501 S. Evans Street, is
operated by Dean
Cubbie's is open fi
to 10:00 p.m. Mon
Saturday and is d
days. Cubbies, the
downtown" establishrr
kind and winner
Cheeseburger in
Award, serves
drive-in tvpe food Oi
freshest ingredients ire us
Cubbies says Ban
is one thing that mak
so popular
Barrow, who �"
Cartaret High S
Chowan College says
Fasnac
School ot n Prr�� v"
East Carolina Un
School of Art Visiting
gram will sponsor a p
lecture by New York a
Heide Fasnacht on M
7:30 p.m. in Jenkins Audit!
Fasnacht's visit and I
been scheduled to coincid
Gray Art Gallery's cum
hibit, "Simuntaneous
Her painted wood iculptui
charcoal drawings will be
as part of the exhibit tl
February 6, 1988.
Fasnacht graduated
Rhode Island School of
with a BFA and New Yori
versity with an MIA Sl
exhibited in many solo and
shows across the nation ilM
"In Three Dimensions,
Sculpture by Women
Institute Gallery and "Nod
Comtemporary Surreal
Vanderwoude Tananbaui
tery in New York
Her work appears in

����





eded
ma) have been
(tempts to control
school, facing a
the American Civil
m and several UVV
reed not to search
tball games for
n Arming of the
diversity police had
�rts to combat alco-
�tball games.
rs heeding
to halt the
he last game
� officials say
�a revised search
�on
eMf-M
29 Arlington
Blvd.
Sh-1579
SERVICES
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ount Off i
irvice.
Jh 1-31-88. !
wner
A
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3042
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t
r
THEEASTIAHOIINIAN
Entertainment
JANUARY 21, 1988 Page 9
MusicvideosWe got the top ten list hangin'
By MICAH HARRIS
SUN Writer
I here are two things I'm often
asked in public places. The first is:
low much longer are you gonna
be in that stall?" The second is :
iVhat sorta video whould you
tch if you weren't getting paid
to review 'em?" I can answer the
second question (the answer to
first vanes) by the following
t what I consider outstanding
nples:
; he Greatest Love of All" -
Whitney Houston. An effective
biographical piece oi real-
I dreams as the video moves
hack and forth between
1 louston's concert preparation
and childhood memory of being
backstage before one of her
mom's concerts.
"Gypsy" - Fleetwood Mac. Pop
music is riddled with cliches,
especially in the area of love
songs. The power of a good Stevie
Nicks song is that she relies on
fresh imagery to strike an emo-
tional resonance rather that re-
hashed lyrics. It is frequently ob-
scure imagery that can engage
you at a deeper level, cutting
through all the sappy crap.
The video of "Gypsy evi-
dently some stream of conscious
tour, moves through the depres-
sion era, the '40s, and ends in a
storybook forest. 1 have no idea
exactly what this song i-s about,
but it leaves me with an uplifted
feeling.
"Experiment IV" - Kate Bush. A
mini-science fiction film remenis-
cent of Poe's "Masque of the Red
Death A government project to
control the populace by sound
backfires in the creation of a senti-
nent entity which, initially ethe-
real and angelic, quickly trans-
forms into something corporal
and demonic.
"The Lady In My Life" - Stanley
Jordan. Jordan relives his days as
a street musician with darker re-
sults this time. A psychopath who
only kills musicians drops off her
last victim's instrument, a guitar
named 'The Lady" at a pawn
shop. Jordan buys it and becomes
the focal point of her next homi-
cide. A disturbing but hauntingly
lyrical piece.
"Night Moves" - Marilyn Mar-
tin. Back-up vocalist, Marilyn
Martin, failed to secure a hit with
her first single, but her video was
a hit with me-horror fan that I am.
Martin portrayed a modern vam-
pire preying on the singles scene.
"Thriller" - Michael Jackson.
Another horror video? Sort of
actually more of a loving parody
with feature-film quality effects.
Still unique, but rarely seen these
days. Is Jackson still embarrassed
by it or what?
"Rosanna" - Toto. Great cine-
matography, great sets, and great
gams on "Dirty Dancing's" Cyn-
thia Rhodes, doing the high-step
in this remenscience of a spiteful
first love.
"Beat It" - Michael Jackson. A
modern pop classic in terms of
music, setting, and dance. Jackson
got it so right the first time, the
"Bad" video could only look like a
case of second rate self-plagan-
ism.
Secret Service gears up
to protect candidates
during campaign trail
"Uptown Girl" - Billy Joel. Joel
evokes more '50s nostalgia in
under five minutes than Travolta
and Newton-John did in two
hours. Wife Cnsty Brinkley in a
short shirt doesn't hurt things ei-
ther.
"Babooshka" - Kate Bush. An
example of less is more. Begin-
ning with the title which is a triple
pun on "grandmother "veil'
and "disguise Bush proceeds to
do more with a stage bare but for
herself and a bass violin (and
herself occasionally bare), than
most performers could do with a
MGM musical budget.
Tennessee Sen. Albert Gore Jr.
is philosophical when he saw a
ill knot of supporters in a tiny
irtroom being increasingly
eczed by stern-looking men
talked into their sleeves.
It helps to pay for the air-
rte Gore chuckled as he was
uestioned about the latest addi-
tion to his campaign entourage -
the Secret Service.
Secret Service protection has
good points for a candidate.
Gore's reference to paying for
lirplanes is a case in point.
When Gore - or any candidate
h protection - rents an airplane
r a campaign swing, the agents
� tor seats on the plane that
ht otherwise be empty, help-
to defray the cost.
I some are reluctant to accept
ction, because it makes it
: r to get close to the voters,
nate Republican Leader Bob
made a point of telling re-
rters he didn't want the Secret
ice following him around,
ng he didn't want to burden
ivers with the extra cost,
.e's main campaign theme in
i is that's he's a Midwesterner
i is "one of us His down-
home campaign style wouldn't
square with an entourage of
armed guards.
Butthere'sadvantages-forone,
the attention a motorcade draws
as it races through town. At one
Mason city stop, several hundred
oi the curious showed up at the
airport the night before Vice
President George Bush arrived.
Their reason! To watch the un-
loading of his armor-plated li-
mousine.
Bush gets the protection by vir-
tue oi his office, and not his status
as a candidate. Former television
evangelist Pat Robertson and
lesse fackson sought protection
because oi threats, and were
among the first oi the candidates
to receive it.
Gore picked up protection Jan. 4
and Illinois Sen. Paul Simon's
Secret Service entourage signed
on a week later. Simon initially
resisted the idea of protection, but
aides say family pressure pre-
vailed.
Gary Hart was given protection
this week, and Missouri Rep.
Richard Gephardt is scheduled to
start traveling with agents later
this week.
Cher still rockin' with
new movies and Lp
KK�RXX
NEW YORK (AP) � Cher says
her fortunes haven't gone to her
head despite her success as a
singer, actress, fitness guru and
mother.
"I tear myself to pieces before
the critics can get tome she said
in an interview in this week's
People magazine.
Her latest movie hits include
"The Witches of Eastwick "Sus-
pect and "Moonstruck She
also has a new record out, her first
in five years.
Even so, the 41-year-old actress
says she still has moments when
she feels unsure of herself.
One of those times, she said,
occurred while she was shooting
"Witches" with Jack Nicholson.
"I could hardly move. I was
terrified she said. "I went to
Cubbie's is the'one and only
downtown' place of its kind
By STAN ARNOLD
Stiff Writer
ibbie's Restaurant, located on
S Evans Street, is owned and
rated by Dean Barrow.
bbie's is open from 10:30 a.m. !900's and was a drug store for
1:00 p.m. Monday through many years. "It was something I
the idea for Gubbie's from a small
drive-in in his eastern N.C. home-
town. Three years ago Barrow
and his father renovated the pres-
ent location of Cubbies and began
operating the establishment.
The building was built in the
irday and is closed on Sun-
5. Cubbies, the "one and only
. ntown" establishment of its
- i and winner of the Best
seburger in Pitt County
vard, serves old fashioned,
-in type food. "Only the best,
thought would work and it was
something I'd always wanted to
do. The building had been gutted
by fire but, after renovating, I
knew the place would be an excel-
lent location for my restaurant
Though some things had to be
Larry Putam cooks up a meal at Cubbie's, located on the corner of Fifth street and Evans. (Photo Bv
Hardy Alligood)
Jack's trailer and I knocked and
told him something was wrong
"And he put hisarm around me
and said, 'Look it's free-floating
anxiety, nerves. You're all right
I'll just take care of you until it's
over. We don't have to go out
there and work Nobody's gonna
do this scene until we're ready
And the minute he said that 1
started to feel really good Cher
recalled.
Sea beast found
Experts at the county Museum
of Natural History are ecstatic
over a find that has been under
foot for 20 years: an extinct v
million-year-old sea serpent
stashed in the museum's base-
ment.
Officials said recently the fossil-
ized beast, a mosasaur, is so well
preserved it still has its scales
skin and probably the contents oi
its last meal - a 3-foot-Iong fish - in
its stomach.
The sharp-toothed mosasaur
was a reptile that lived at the time
of the dinosaurs and captured fish
at great depths.
This one was collected from a
chalk bed in a fossil-rich section of
Logan County, Dan and shipped
to the museum in 1967 by profes-
sional collector Marion Bonner.
"Did they tell you that sucker
staved down in the basement 20
years?" the 77-year-old Bonner
asked. "Now they're telling me
it's the best in the world
J.D. Stewart, the museum's as-
sistant curator of vertebrate pale-
ontology, said the creature was
shipped in three sections that got
mixed in with a large purchase of
fossils. The packages got sepa-
rated and their identifying labels
were lost.
-host ingredients are used at replaced, much of the interior of
: bies savs Barrow, and "this Cubbies is original. The paneled
ne thing that makes Cubbie's ceiling, ceiling fans and tiled
popular floors along with artwork of
Barrow, who attended West Greenville in the 1900's give
artaret High School and Cubbie's that classic, old-fash-
an College,feays that he got ioned appearance.
Barrow also plays beach music
exclusively at Cubbie's. Although
the clientele is mostly college stu-
dents and businessmen, Barrow
says Cubbie's is becoming more
of a family establishment.
While all of Cubbie's food has a
reputation for being good, this
writer feels a special affinty for the
shrimpburgers. The fries are sure
bet too.
Fasnacht to give slide show
Pickin9 the bones
Weather is annoying to
the Bonehead this week
School of Art Pre�� Release
East Carolina University's
School of Art Visiting Artists Pro-
gram will sponsor a public slide-
lecture by New York sculptor
Heide Fasnacht on Monday at
'30 p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium.
public commissions and collec-
tions and has been reviewed in
such prominent publications as
Arts Magazine, Art News, and
The New York Times. She has
served as adjunct professor of
FasnaduVvfcit and"lecture has sculpture and drawing at SUNY's
been scheduled to coincide with
Gray Art Gallery's current ex-
hibit, "Simuntaneous Views
I ier painted wood sculptures and
charcoal drawings will be on view
is part of the exhibit through
February 6, 1988.
Fasnacht graduated from
Purchase campus and as visiting
artist and lecturer at Princeton
University, College of Art, Ben-
nington College and Cleveland
Institute of Art.
Fasnacht's sculptures have
been described by Nancy Princen-
thal in Arts in America as "a new
animism" evoking the move-
ttode Island School of Design ment, the rhythms - the actual
with a BFA and New York Uni- development of forms in nature.
vcrsity with an MFA. She has
exhibited in many solo and group
shows across the nation including
"In Three Dimensions, Recent
Sculpture by Women" at Pratt
Institute Gallery and "Notions of
Comtemporary Surrealism" at
Vanderwoude Tananbaum Gal-
lery in New York.
Her work appears in several
The pieces are made of rings or
slabs of wood chipped, sliced and
laminated together until they
emerge as objects in the tradition
of Nam Gabo, Russian Con-
structivism 1890-1977. They so
reveal the process by which they
were constructed that they be-
come clear and direct statements
on the relationship between form
and content.
In the same way, Fasnacht's
large charcoal drawings build up
an image, gestural line upon ges-
tural line. Though intended as
working sketches which 'think
through' a proposed sculpture,
the drawings are forceful works
themselves, both rational and
agrcssively expressive.
As a participant in the Visiting
Artist Program, Fasnacht will be
on campus Jan. 25 and 26 to speak
to classes and individual students
in the School of Art. Her visit has
been sponsored in part by a grant
from the National Endowment
for the Arts. There will be a recep-
tion for Fasnacht and the opening
of the "Simultaneous Views"
exhibit following her lecture
Monday in the Gray Art Gallery.
The public is most cordially
invited to attend all these lectures;
there is no admission fee. For
more information, call (919) 757-
6336.
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Strif Writer
I'm sorry, but I grew up in a city What can you do? You can't sue
where it got hot in the summer the atmosphere for reckless en
I give up. I just hacking give up. and cold in the winter. Spring and dangerment. The City of
I want it to rain some more. I fall had some leeway, but they Greenville has yet to take respon-
want it to snow about six more were usually pretty casual about siblity for natural disasters. The
inches, causing 60 more aggra- the way they ran things. next of kin is just screwed in a case
vation than I already deal with. I Meanwhile, just an hour and 42 like this.
have had it with this insane minutes away, the weather dei- The sad thing is, I'd bet a good
Greenville weather. ties have run rampant. Snow, majority of my comic collection
I've always maintained thatthis rain, sunshine and even little pel- that manhole had been intended
city was out to get me. First park- lets of hail, the size and consis- for me. Only an amazing string of
ing tickets for facing the wrong tency of hamster shit, fall wher- coincidences propelled that old
way on the correct side of the ever they feel it will be the most lady into the trap the dements
street IN FRONT OF MY OWN annoying. laid out for me.
HOUSE. You may mink I'm kidding. But I must sound paranoid. But on a
Then the utter and complete for unknown reasons, a sexually day where my clothes have been
absew�ofanyDrivin'andCryin' abused childhood, mutageneuc splattered repeatedly by muddy
records anywhere. The prolifera- radiation or whatever, the air water flying off my bike tires, the
tion of pool halls that play nothing currents swirling around Pitt stair m Austin got painted, caus-
but Def Leppard retrospectives. County take no orders and no ing me to be late to two classes and
Now, weather that can't seem to prisoners. even as i try to be funny, workmen
read a calendar. In fact, last week, although it are drilling holes through the
When I took GEOG1000: Earth wasn't heavily publicized, an eld- walls of the hallowed halls of The
and Man, I learned that weather erly lady sank right through die East Carolinian offices well,
supposedly follows certain geo- snow into an open manhole off of you just can't blame me.
graphical and seasonal patterns. Dickenson Avenue and broke her Any more than I should blame
Ha. Not in the Emerald City. forearm and two vertabrae. the weather. But that old classic
This place studied a long time to She didn't die thanks to a rock song comes to mind. And
learn the techniques of surrealist friendly bum that kept dropping perhaps humming it will put me
weather. And this semester it bottles of Boone's Farm to her. But in a better mood, here goes:
seems determined to show every- then, when the rains came, she "Rainy days and Mondays al-
one, but me in particular, just how drowned when the sewage level ways get meeeee down
adept it is. reached above her head.Thank you, and have a nice life.
" " '





f
f

10
TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 21,1988
Whitehurst sees sad students
Schixils have put a heavy em-
phasis on drug counseling, but
Mash County Schools staff psy-
tlogist Beverly Whitehurst
says she sees more students who
are simply unhappy.
One in five students report
symptoms characteristic of mild
depression every day, according
to statistics. As Whitehurst sees it,
the phenomenon stems from a
deterioration of the traditional
family and its support svstems.
i see more students who are
unhappy and mavbe experiment-
ing with drugs as a larger pattern
of self-destruction here
Whitehurst said. 1 really don't
see discipline as a problem - the
ses I go into 1 could hear a pin
p.
Besides the stress caused by the
breakdown ot family norms, she
says main depressed students
feel disillusioned with the institu-
ns that govern them and social
expectations hooked - as some
n agers see it - like a noose
around their necks.
Whether depression or drug
experimentation, the problems
usually translate into disorders
that can severely impede an
adolescent's ability to learn. And
that's where Ms. Whitehurst
comes in.
As a young teacher in Brun-
swick, Ga in the late 1960s, fresh
out of East Carolina University
with an English degree in hand,
Whitehurst quickly became dis-
turbed with students' inability to
master their curriculum.
"I was just out of school and
idealistic the Scotland Neck
native said with a smile. "I dealt
with many slow learners and kids
who just couldn't read. The text-
books, therefore, were inappro-
priate. Students were unprepared
tor what 1 wanted to teach them
It was, as she described it,a rude
awakening to the real world of
education.
"I became so enthralled with
the problems of kids that the
school's counselor asked me if I
had ever thought about school
psychology she said. "I wasn't
even sure what one did
At the time, the number of
school psychologists in Southern
states could be counted on one
hand. But the slim numbers of
affect students' performances.
When appropriate, Ms.
Whitehurst refers students to
special classes for the academiclly
gifted, mentally handicapped,
learning disabled or bchavior-
ally-emotionally handicapped.
It isn't an easy job, she says. It
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RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
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school psychologists didn' t daunt takes more than three hours just to
her.
Intrigued by the concept - a
marriage of psychology and edu-
cation - she resigned her job to
enroll in Georgia Southern
College's master's of education
program and later earned a six-
year education specialist degree
in school psychology.
By the time she got her degree,
schools had become more inter-
ested in psychology and she took
a job at the Dougherty County
Schools in Albany, Ga.
Last year, she moved to Nash
County to be closer to her family.
As a school psychologist, she
assesses the learning styles, emo-
tional and social factors that could
write a comprehensive evalu-
ation after students are tested.
Ms. Whitehurst also keeps an
eye on the students' progress,
sometimes suggesting pertinent
educational planning to teachers
and parents.
"The greatest challenge with
consultation is communicating a
diagnosis to parents she said,
"so (they) can understand with
perspective
With 11,000 students in the sys-
tem, Ms. Whitehurst has little
time for individual counseling.
"Probably 5 percent of my time
is spent in individual counsel-
ing she said.
Hmssts
�Lr FURNITURE DEPOT T�
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BuySellTrade
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m EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY S
m
AND THE
m
A� DEPARTMENT OF UNIVERSITY UNIONS 9�9a
QT �) PRESENT THE 3
"Knot's Landing" wins best
prime-time show says Digest readers
' . fc fa. � � fc� f� w �
Alpha-Omega Players
o5 c�
M
S swept the eight nighttime
opera awards selected by
� - ith "Knot's i.andme '
g th besl prime-time
ootOur Lives" won as
� st popular soap on daytime
. ision.
Hie winners in 2! categories
were selected by the readers oi
p Opera Digest, and awarded
ollvwood on Saturday in a
ui sh w broadcast Mon-
. on NBC. The winners re-
� � ipl es shaped like glass
irts.
in the network race. NBC-TV
got nine of the 13 daytime awards
with ABC and CBS getting two
apiece.
"DaysofOur Lives" was picked
Ronstadt tour
album based
r Linda Ronstadt, rchears-
for a U.S. concert tour based
on her new album of Mexican
. - says she learned to love the
traditional music as a child.
" My father taught mea lot of the
songs Ms. Ronstadt said at a
vs conference Monday night.
1 he album is titled "Canciones de
mi Padre Spanish for "Songs of
my Father.
"in Arizona, we think we're
Mexicans' said Ms. Ronstadt, a
native of Tucson.
Ms. Ronstadt, 41, is spending
two w eeks here rehearsing for the
. r, which opens in San Antonio,
Texas, on Feb. 5, and will last two
months.
the best daytime program with its
star Stephen Nichols taking the
top acting honor and Kim Zim-
mer of "Guiding Light" winning
best actress.
Trime-time winners included
CBS' "Knot's Landing" for favor-
ite show with top acting trophies
won by its stars, Michele Lee and
Kevin Dobson.
Day time winners were:
Show - "Days of Our Lives
NBC
Actress - Kim Zimmer. "Guid-
ing Light CBS
Actor - Stephen Nichols, "Days
of Our Lives NBC
Villainess - Brenda Dickson,
"The Young and the Restless
CBS
Villain - lustin Deas, "Santa
Barbara NBC
Supporting actn s nna Lee,
"General Hospital' ABC
Supporting actor- Nicolas Cos-
ter, "Santa Barbara NBC
Heroine - Robin Wright, "Santa
Barbara NBC
Hero - A Martinez, "Santa Bar-
bara NBC
Humorous actress - Arlene
Sorkin, "Days oiOur Lives NBC
Humorous actor - Michael T.
Weiss "Days of Our Lives NBC
Outstanding newcomer - Ian
Buchanan. "General Hospital'
ABC
Super couple - Patsy Pease and
Charles Shauehnessv, "Days of
Our Lives NBC
Prime-time winners:
Show Knot's Landing CBS
Actress - Michele Lee, "Knot's
Landing CBS
Actor - Kevin Dobson, "Knot's
Landing CBS
Supporting actress - Tonva
Crowe, "Knot's Landing CBS
Supporting actor - Steve Ka-
naly, "Dallas CBS
Villainess - Donna Mills,
"Knot's Landing CBS
Villain - Larrv Hagman, "Dal-
las CBS
Super couple - Michele Lee and
Kevin Dobson, "Knot's Landing
CBS
m
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� 1,532 Broadway Performances!
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A DINNER THEATRE PRESENTATION
FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 19
AND
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
AUDITORIUM 244
Dinner: 6:30 p.m. Curtain: 8:00 p.m.
Advance Sales Only, No Tickets At The Door
E.C.U. STUDENTS $10.00
ALL OTHERS $16.00
FOR TICKETS CALL: THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
757-6611, EXT 266
��������� � & ���

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�)ure smart eno
to calculate
the size of a Hydrogen atom.
Playing Thurs.
Jan. 21st - Sun. 24th
8:00 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
$ Need Money $
We pay Cash For Anything Gold or Silver
"it . �:� " . ,
Classrings
Necklaces
Braclets
Coins, ect.
And, Wc also buy Stero's, T.Vs,
V.C.R.s, Furniture, Bikes, etc.
Coin & Ring Man
10:00-5.00 (M-F)
10:003:00 Sat.
400 S. Evans
�jii�iiwnniTOinr.liiViVTr�i-i�vi-�jafc��
752-3866.
Interested In
Studying Abroad?
Information on academic exchange oppor-
tunities throughout the world through the
International Student Exchange Program
(ISEP), at ECU. Information available from:
Dr. R. Hursey, Jr.
ISEP Coordinator
Austin 222
Phone 757-6418 (work)
756-0682 (home)
And you're still smoking?
li'pattnM-nl Mjllh A. Hum m
. immwmm
ppMI awMMMH H
� �� " � �� 'niUKWHUiKIW
Lonel
Maggie Smith ha: � j ,
amaing gallery of indelible fill
haracers. the pitiable I
mona to Laurance Olivier
Othcll the spirited . man
jjlThe Prime of lean Bi j
twitchy film star in "
Suite' the st If effa ing .
one in "A Room With a View
Now comes "The Lon :
sion ot Judith Hearne with a
Other rare performance.
It's hard to find much to admi
about Judith Hearn SI
Wil Shr,
resmble
The makers
Shriner" shi
low ke
time telev lsion
into the world
ment, a la Mil
Da idson.
In recent ye - - I
market has
issue-oriented
"The Oprah VVinfri
"Donahue" - I
shows like "1 four M
Shriner's d iil
showmade
ting a big pu
Productions. Shrin� r
in more than
prime time in sorrx
eluding Los Ang
rock- start in the ratings I
numbers improved ai i
revamped to make it moi
Madonna to
like she hasn'
Pop diva Madonna v. is
the money" when
fcned tor the part I
ipworV � � 'two! 1
xiucers in a new play bv Dav
imet, her new director say:
"Tl-ie audition pi � -I
tht Gregory Mosher, head
icoln Center Theater and din
oi "Speed-The-Plow
am wants to
sam Posterna will be givei
rout in baseball spring
lodetermme if she should beco
tiV first woman umpire in the k
leagues.
"It's our intention t
Is long and serious a lo �
able on her merit V. I
Bart Giamatti told The !
Herald on Tuesday. I
give her a chance
rostema, 34, has been in
minors for 11 seas
been at the eiass AAA lc
five vearsand spent last s j
Lit award given
The Whithread Bck -
prize, one oi Britain - I
Konors, was awarded to 22 yd
Old Christopher pal
fyzed Insh writer who criti j
compared to lames
Dvlan Thomas.
Nolan, a cerebral pals) vi
Who types with a t -
his forehead,onTuesda)
equivalent of $35 400 I
:ltie Eye of the Clock
disguised autobiography
'Tonight is the happiest ni
Of mv life olan said in an
Keptance speech read b
�pother, Bernadette
4

The Student!
YOU wouli
Please brii
234
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LOW COST
PORTIONS UP
TO 12lhb'EEK0F
PREGNANCY
3 to 18 weeks at additional eo Pregnancy
�at, and Problem Pregnancy Counseling, For
rmation. call 832-0535 (toll free number 1-800-
r9 a m. and 5 p m week-day. Oneril iw�-
SIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
THE EASTCAROLfNlAN
JANUARY? ;��� j,
EKZS
IRE DEPOT
jrniture
lTrade
Beside the
Railroad Depot
tRSiTY J
iE '
RSfTY UNIONS 9�
if
lego. Players
SUi
?A
ncesi
RE PRESENTATION
JARY 19
3RUARY 20
TENT CENTER
M 244
n: 8:00 p.m.
- ets At The Door
NTS SlO.OO
IERS $16.00
AL TICKET OFFICE
EXT 266
� fc � ft- ft � ���

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m,nH. HhA Hum, S
���
Lonely Passion' stars hot actress in cold role
Maggie Smith has created an
kmazing gallery of indelible film
piaracers. the pitiable Desde-
Inona to Laurance Olivier's
bthello, the spirited schoolmarm
In "The Prime of Jean Brodie the
Iwitchy film star in "California
Hiite the self-effacing chaper-
ne in "A Room With a View
Now comes "The Lonely Pas-
sion of Judith Heame with an-
other rare performance.
It's hard to find much to admire
�about Judith Hearn. She's pleas-
ant looking, but the years of car-
ing for her irascible, invalid aunt
(Wendy Hiller) have given her a
pinched, old-maid appearance.
She keeps losing piano students
by showing up for lessons late
and hung-over.
Yes, Miss Hearne drinks, and
sometimes not just a little. Out of
frustration and loneliness, she
holes up in her Dublin boarding
house room and sings loudly to
phonograph records.
Her landlady is a smarmy
widow (Marie Kean) with a no-
good, obese son (Ian McNeice)
and a brother (Bob Hoskins) re-
cently repatriated after a luckless
life in New York. The brother
starts courting Miss Hearne, be-
lieving she could finance his
dream of a Dublin hamburger
joint. She leads him on, and when
he discovers she is as broke as he
is, he drops her into an alcoholic
breakdown.
Ever since Brian Moore's "The
Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne"
Wil Shriner wants talk show to
resmble Merv 's and Mike's
was published in 1955, such direc-
tors as John Huston and Jack
Clayton have tried to film it. Stu-
dios and producers were under-
standably loathe to provide fi-
nancing. It's not the kind of story
that will make box offices jingle.
Jack Clayton ("Room at the
Top") finally found a backer in
George Harrison's Handmade
Films. With Peter Nelson's faith-
ful translation of the novel, Clay-
ton has created a film that will be
cherished by discriminating audi-
ences, particularly for the power-
ful performances.
Maggie Smith is a marvel to
watch, ever exploring the con-
fused emotions of Judith Hearne,
never allowing her to become piti-
ful. Exasperating, yes, never piti-
ful. The audience can share her
tiny triumph when after all her
travails she decides to stand on
her own, rather than accept
Hoskin's backhanded propsal.
lajLmaHer, less defined role.
The makers of "The Wil
IShriner" show are hoping the
jlow-key comedian can draw day-
time television audiences back
into the world of light entertain-
ment, a la Mike Douglas or John
Davidson.
In recent years, the syndicated
market has been taken over by
issue-oriented shows such as
The Oprah Winfrey Show" and
Donahue" or by magazine
shows like "Hour Magazine
Shriner's daily, one-hour talk
show made its debut last fall, get-
ting a big push from Group W
Productions. Shriner's show, seen
in more than 100 cities - airing in
prime time in some markets, in-
cluding Los Angeles - got off to a
rocky start in the ratings, but the
numbers improved after it was
revamped to make it more theme-
oriented.
"I think Oprah changed the way
people expect syndicated shows
to perform Shriner said. "She
came out and started getting rat-
ings numbers like 5 and 6. The big
problem is that the networks and
syndicators won't stick with any-
thing new. The most a network
will give a show to make it is six
weeks. It's a little longer in jyndi-
cation
The verdict on Shriner's show is
still out. He is scheduled to tape
shows until at least June 17 for
airing later in the summer.
"In the beginning, we went for
the name value of stars to attract
an audience he said. "Now
we're going for elements that
make for an entertaining show.
The feeling is that people don't
watch these shows to see stars. We
find people come back because
it's a pleasant hour. A blend of
information and humor.
"Merv Griffin and Mike
Douglas proved that these shows
are host-driven. I don't think
people watch Carson because
Orson Bean is the guest. Or David
Letterman to see the Stupid Pet
Tricks. It's the host that's the main
attraction. Merv was a great lis-
tener. Mike got more involved in
the entertainment
Shriner, 31, grew up in show
business, the son of the late
"Hoosier humorist" Herb
Shriner. His twin brother, Kin,
and his sister, Indy, are actors.
Shriner has done some acting
himself with roles in the movie
'Teggy Sue Got Married on
ABC's "General HoLpital" and
Steven Spielberg's "Amazing Sto-
ries But he is probably most
widely known for "T.Vs Bloop-
ers and Practical Jokes where he
was host of the "Video Vault
He has been making funny
films since his father gave him a
movie camera as a child. A buddy
of fellow Hoosier David Letter-
man, he was a regular on
Letterman's morning show.
Shriner's interest in filmmaking
led him into standup comedy. "I
started doing voiceovers for my
films at the Improv, and all of a
sudden I was a performer he
said. He would like to direct mo-
tion pictures.
He was born in New York City
but grew up in Fort Lauderdale,
Ha and Los Angeles. Vacations
were usually spent at his father's
boyhood home in Indiana.
Madonna to star in 'Speed the Plow a play;
like she hasn't been in every other media, too
Pop diva Madonna was "right
on the monev" when she audi-
tioned for the part of an office
temp working for two Hollywood
I producers in a new play by David
Mamet, her new director says.
The audition process worked
right, Gregory Mosher, head of
Lincoln Center Theater and direc-
tor of "Speed-The-Plow said
Tuesday.
Madonna's reading for Mamet
and Mosher "came out of the
blue said L:incoln Center Thea-
ter company spokesman Merle
Debuskey. "She asked to try out
for the role
"She was great, right on the
money said Mosher, director of
more than a dozen plays by
Mamet, whose Broadway play
"Glengarry Glenn Ross" won a
Pulitzer Prize.
The play, which begins preview
performances March 29 at Lincoln
Center's Mitzi Newhouse Thea-
ter, also will star Joe Mantegna
and Ron Silver as the Hollywood
producers. No formal opening
date has been announced.
Pam wants to be first female major league ump
Pam Postema will be given a
trvout in baseball spring training
to determine if she should become
the first woman umpire in the big
leagues.
"It's our intention to give her
as long and serious a look as pos-
sible on her merits NL President
Bart Giamatti told The Miami
Herald on Tuesday. "I want to
give her a chance
Postema, 34, has been in the
minors for 11 seasons. She has
been at the Class AAA level for
five years and spent last season in
Lit award given
The Whitbread Book of the Year
prize, one of Britain's top literary
honors, was awarded to 22-year-
old Christopher Nolan, a para-
lyzed Irish writer who critics have
compared to James Joyce and
Dylan Thomas.
Nolan, a cerebral palsy victim
who types with a stick strapped to
his forehead, on Tuesday won the
equivalent of $35,400 for "Under
the Eye of the Clock a thinly
disguised autobiography.
'Tonight is the happiest night
of mv life Nolan said in an ac-
ceptance speech read by is
mother, Bernadette.
the American Association.
"It's always good to know
they're interested Postema told
the Herald from Phoenix, where
she works off-season as a driver
tor United Parcel Service. "But I
can't give you any indication of
what they're thinking.
"You're always an inch away
from being moved up to the big
leagues and an inch from being
released. But you never know
We Buy Standing Pine and Hardwood Timber A Weyerhaeuser 919-633-7455
fA
BAREFOOT ON THE MALL
9 The Student Union would like too know what bands
fete YOU would like to see at Barefoot on the Mall
A Please bring or send your recommendations to:
234 Mendenhall Student Center
ROCK.
REGGAE.
BEACH
OTHER
BAREFOOT ON THE MALL
deadline: February 5, 1988
Hoskin registers with customa
strength. All of the suppor ,
players are excellent, expi
Wendy Hiller, seen it sti
flashbbacks, and Mane k. � �
the ever smiling, venomous �
lady.
Peter Nelson and Richa
Johnson produced the Island I
tures release, which is rated R f i
language, bed scenes and adult
subject matter. Running time IV
minutes.
BIG LUINT6R Sflie
50 OFF
fill foil and winter merchandise
Sale begins January 25. 1988
Store Hours
Monday - Sorurdog
1000 600
558 B�astflrftngi m8l
G�eeMile N 2 -
(910) 555 m ��
The East Carolinian
Pick it up
SPEND
SPRING BREAK ON A CRUISE!
The Travel Committee Presents:
a 6-day cruise on the Funship Carnivale
Depart: 6 p.m. March 6
Return: 4 a.m. March 12.
Via: Round trip to Miami on Seashore Trailways Bus
Cruise aboard the Funship Carnivale.
Price: $475 (ECU Students) $520 (Non-students).
Call: Mendenhall's Central Ticket Office
for more details 757-6611.
�.?�?
JAJ KJ J J v ,��
SPRING BREAK?
TIME TO GET IN SHAPE
CTOLDS GYM
5!
vS)
409 Evans Mall
Greenville, North Carolina 27834
(919)758-4359
and
EAST CAROLINA TANNING CENTER
Welcomes Students Back With Supper Specials
Special 1 - $70 per semester gets you:
over 10,000 pounds of free weight &
Nautilus & Daily Aerobics Classes.
Special 2 - $35 per semester gets you:
AEROBICS CLASSES EVERY DAY
Special 3 - Golds Now Has 4 Tanning Beds
$39.99 gets you 15 visits
$29.99 gets you 10 visits
$19.99 gets you 5 visits
LOOK GOOD FOR SPRING BREAK
409 Evans Mall
across the street
from Elbo
BRING THIS COUPON j
IN TODAY FOR A I 758-4359
FREE WORKOUT J
GOOD THRU 2-15-88
�Golds Gym Has Payment Plans For Students Also
� :� m





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it gji�y bus migjhl got fondled if you're not careful. Stay away from the YMCA today.
�- �esgH Is really ke to go, eh? Know what I mean? Nudge nudge, say no more!
imid be a magic weekend for you. All signs are go for a passionate yet tasteful romance.
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s rombustion i always a danger. If you've got gas, just let it out. Heck, you're only human,
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we isn't a nu way tui-de-sac. Read the ECU comics with 'em. Go to the Buffet concert.
everything? Get a life!
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like to seeYOUR "Fun-N-Games" on this page, send your puzzles to
the East Carolinian. We will print them if we like them or you are
willing to show us your naughty parts. We gone.
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1HE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JANUARY 21, 1988 Page 13
URGANUS and HARRIS
irates look to regroup for Richmond
fter overtime loss to American Monday

f

&
RK Bonehead
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport rditor
fThe East Carolina men's basket-
team must put Monday's
fcrtime 75-69 loss to American
hind them and get to the busi-
fss at hand as a matchup against
Inference leading Richmond is
Laiting Saturday night on the
lad
HThe rirates, who have put to-
other a g overall record and 2-
bnark in the CAA, will face their
l t CAA challenge oi the year
j; the Spiders. The Spiders cur-
pntlv stand at 12-2 overall and 3-
in conference battles. The only
ses thus far this season for
nond have been to nation-
al; ranked North Carolina, 87-76
VCU, 72-53. Richmond also
i victory over Virginia
Commonwealth this year.
ng the teams the Spiders
have beaten this season are Gcor-
( h 73-67, Arizona State, 76-
i i : rulsa 64-60. Also, along
! this season, the Spiders
have picked up holiday tourna-
ment titles in both the Kactus
Klassic in Tempe, Ariz, and the
Richmond Times-Dispatch tour-
nament.
The Spiders, the preseason pick
to take the honors in the CAA
race, present several problems for
ECU head coach Mike Stcclc's
team.
"Richmond isccrtainly the class
o( our conference and it will be a
tough assignment to play them on
the road Steclc said. "I'm not too
concerned about our players'
frame of mind (following the loss
to American) because I think
they'll bounce back. We've got a
few days to get over the American
game.
"1 don't see why everyone is
making such a big deal over the
loss (to American) Steele contin-
ued. "We've came back before
and played well after a loss and I
think we will again. Right now all
we can do is improve on the
things that caused us to lose to
American � things we can con-
trol. We had 21 turnovers in that
game
Richmond sports a starting
lineup which is loaded with tal-
ent. On the inside, the Spiders
send 6-5 senior Peter Woolfolk
and 6-8 senior Steve Kratzcr at
their opponents. While the pe-
rimeter is held down by senior
guard Rodney Rice, who is well
known for his efficiency from 3-
point range. Also starting for the
Spiders are sophomores Ken At-
kinson and Scott Stapleton.
"My main concern this week is
Richmond because they have so
many ways to beat you Steele
said. "Woolfolk will give us
trouble inside with our lack of
size, as well as Steve Kratzer, and
their guards are quick and very
good
American coach Ed Tappscott
said that for the Pirates to be suc-
cessful at Richmond they will
have to play a controlled game on
offense and defense.
"They've (ECU) got to stop Rice
outside and one of those guys
(Kratzer or Woolfolk) inside
Tappscott said. "If you don't shut
down one of them inside, they'll
score on you all night
The meeting between the Spi-
dersand Pirates will mark the 51st
in the long-running series.
Richmond holds a 29-21 lead,
with both squads gaining victo-
ries last season. The Pirates won at
home in Minges Coliseum 78-70
and the Spiders claimed victory in
the Robins Center 62-60.
Following the game in
Richmond, the Pirates will return
home to Minges for a CAA
matchup against William & Mary
next Wednesday, Jan. 27. That
contest will carry a 7:30 p.m. tip-
off. The Indians are currently 5-9
overall and 2-1 in the CAA with
two games remaining they square
off with the Pirates.
ady Pirates fall to American in CAA

??
�� f
"he ECU women's basketball
has now lost five straight
4m - and have yet to win in
ial Athletic Association
wax
ady Pirates fell again,
lay night to American Uni-
"0-51, in Washington,
D.C
Monique Pompili had 18 points
and eight rebounds for ECU but
the effort was not good enough
after only one other Pirate, Alma
Bethea, scored in double figures
with 10 points.
After a close half, the Ladv Pi-
rates were down 30-28. But Pirate
foul trouble in the second half
enabled American to pull away
for the win.
American forward Beth Shearer
scored 26 points and teammates
Kia Cooper and Janine Lorimcr
scored 16 points each. Cooper also
pulled down 15 rebounds.
ECU, now 0-4 in the CAA and 5-
11 overall, will look to break their
five game losing streak and earn
a conference win Saturday in
front of a home crowd as they host
Richmond. Tipoff for the contest
in Minges Coliseum is set for 7:30
p.m.
� Carolyn Justice
Gus Hill, shown in earlier action against Longwood College, will try to
rebound for the Pirates' next game against Richmond. (File Photo)
Shuttle service offered
The ECU athletic department
will provide a continuous shuttle
bus service from the Allied Health
Building, on Charles Boulevard,
to Minges Coliseum for the re-
maining men's basketball games
this season.
Shuttle bus service will begin
each game night at 6:30 p.m. and
run up until tip-off time. The
shuttle buses will return at the
end of each game and run con-
tinuously to return spectators
back to the parking lot.
Lady hoopsters looking for answers to season
By MIKE SMALL
Sports Writer
After three straight winning
seasons, the Lady Pirate basket-
bjy(5amfrni1s-ttjlf In the middle
or a 5-11 season, and a scary 0-3
conference mark.
This is essentially the same
team the Pirates fielded last year,
with the exception of lightning-
quick point guard Delphine
Mabry.
So, what is wrong?
The Lady Pirates have a new
head coach this season in Pat Pier-
son, who came to ECU after post-
ing successful marks at North-
western State University in Lou-
isiana. But anyone can tell you the
Pirates problem is not the coach.
A new coach can be a tough ad-
justment for players, but the rea-
son for the demise of the Pirate
hoopsters seems to be simply a
run of bad luck.
"You start losing a few close
games and you begin to lose your
confidence ECU head coach Pat
Piersonsafd: �
Pierson inherited the same
players as former head coach
Emily Manwaring left behind.
But according to Pierson,
Manwaring did not experience
the problems with the players that
she has.
"They didn't have knee prob-
lems, ankle problems and shoul-
der problems last year Pierson
said. "All of our perimeter players
have serious injuries and it can't
help but weaken our play
The outlook remains good for
the Pirates future as two excellent
prospects have already been
signed for next season. Pierson
also said that several other top
prospects are still hopeful signees
of the Pirates. So, no doubt look
for big things from the ladies in
years to come. But what is wrong
with this year?
"Trtjurigg; tneemsistency and:
lack of continuity on the offensive
end of the court, and lack of inten-
sity of the defensive end Pierson
said.
With all the problems and hard-
ships faced thus far this season by
the team, Pierson still holds her
head high and waits for some-
thing good to happen.
"I'm an eternal optimist Pier-
son said. "I try to be
positivesomething good will
come out of this
The Pirates will try once again
to find the good this Saturday
when they host the Lady Spiders
of Richmond in a CAA conference
game at 7:30 p.m. in Minges Coli-
seum.
as
B FRII-DRICH
Alma Bethea (30) goes for a score in the Lady Pirates' loss to Fairleigh Dickinson. Bethea -md all the Pirates have
teen hampered all season by nagging injuries. The Pirates will try to get back on the winning track Saturday
4 home against Richmond in a CAA game at 7:30 p.m. (File Photo)
The life of a college gambler
-
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
College Gambler
It's 6:31 Tuesday night, an hour
before the tip-off of the ECU-
Amencan basketball game in
Minges Coliseum and a straggled
college student reaches for the
phone.
I le had told everybody he was
going to quit it. He made a New
Year's resolution. Then he made
daily resolutions. But then the
emotion overtook his rational
mind and once again he awoke in
the gutter. Ultimatium number
f 567 came on Monday afternoon as
' he told a friend "I'm quitting for
good
But by Tuesday evening the
withdrawal stages set in and the
pain became too emense. With a
twitching forefinger he dialed the
familiar number. As the phone
receiver buzzed with a busy sig-
nal, the lunatic ran his nicotine
fingers through his unkempt hair
and muttered something about an
imaginary illegimate son.
What is this young man's prob-
lem? Drugs? Drinking? Or is there
some woman to blame?
After receiving another busy
signal, the crazed college student
begins to pace the living room
saying, "What am I going to do if
it's busy for ever
In an attempt to avert his atten-
tion, he picks up the USA Today
and turns to the sports section.
But the sports section is hard to
read because there are numbers
and notes written everywhere.
With glazed eyes he looks at the
sports the way a little fat kid looks
at candy in the Fast Fare.
Finally, the line on the other end
begins to ring, it rings again, it
rings again, "Answer the phone
the college boy pleads. Someone
answers. Several moments later
the derelic college students says
"Give me a half on ECU minus
three Quido, the guy on the
other end of the line, asks "Are
you sure you want the Pirates in
a foreshadowing tone. With abod-
ing confidence the LOSER an-
swers Quido with a prolonged
yes.
Becoming a constant heckler in
the balcony stands, the college
student screams at the top of his
lungs, sending praise to the Pi-
rates and sending damnation to
the players from American. Fans
behind him yell "Sit down" to no
avail because the lunatic is so
involved with the game.
The college student believes
that he has some mysterious con-
trol over the outcome of the game.
He believes that by his presense in
the arena the Pirates will win by
more than three. This is a common
trait of all LOSERS.
With a little over a minute left in
regulation, ECU leads by three
and the college student thinks
about a new pair of shoes. Maybe
he will eat tommorrow if ECU
pulls this one out. Maybe if ECU
beats the spread he will purchase
a razor and shave his ragged face.
Maybe if ECU wins by more than
three he will go to class instead of
studying the sports section.
All this contemplation is
quickly rendered futile as ECU is
called for a 10-second violation
and the game goes into overtime a
minute later after a simple free
throw is missed by the Pirates
with one second left to play.
And in overtime, the college
student becomes the dreaded
LOSER.
After finding a semi-comfort-
able gutter to sleep in Tuesday
night, the lowly college student
wonders why he ever bet on a
team with a starter named Lose.
Tar Heel swimmers beat ECU;
seniors end careers in Minges
The East Carolina senior swim-
mers closed out their careers at the
Minges Natitorium Wednesday,
unfortunately the successful
swimmers' had to bid farewell on
a losing note.
Both the men's and women's
swimming and diving teams fell
in defeat in the final home meet of
the year for the teams to the Uni-
versity of North Carolina in a dual
inter-state meet. The Tar Heel
men topped the Pirates 118-96,
while the UNC women defeated
the Lady Pirates 134-76.
"For the men, it was one of their
finer meets the guys swam this
year even though they lost head
coach Rick Kobe said following
the losses. "Our women also
swam well, but they just came out
on the short end of the stick to-
day
The men managed to capture
four first place finishes in the 13
swimming and diving events,
while the women garnered five
first place spots in the 13 events
they competed in.
Complete results of the Pirates
match against the Tar Heels will
be in Tuesday's edition of The East
Carolinian. Also upcoming will be
a profile on the senior Pirate
swimmers that closed out their
careers at Minges.
The next action for the Pirate
swimmers will be this Saturday
when they take to the road for a
non-conference battle against Old Senior diver Becky Kerber receives a farewell hug during Senior Day at
Dominion. Minges Natatorium Wednesday. (Photo by Hardy Alligood)
� i ����� tm m tm �-� -�m-






T
i
f
14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 21, 1�88
Crum tabbed as head coach at KSU Tuesday
KENT, Ohio (AD Kent State
University officials say they
wanted former North Carolina
coach Dick Crum as head coach
because of his concern for his
players' academics, and Crum
n s he doesn't intend to let them
dov n
1 believe that these young
people who are involved in ath-
letics are student athletes, and 1
(lunk the student has to come first
. Crum said Iucsday atter
being named the new Kent State
coach. "1 think it's absolutely es-
sential that if that youngster
comes to Kent State University,
first thing he has on his mind
is he wants to graduate
Kent State President Michael
Schwartz said the school had
ee reasons tor wanting to hire
( rum. w ho had been criticized by
I ar 1 leel tans in recent years
for his conservative brand ol foot-
ball and his team's failure to beat
�hlv ranked opponents. Crum
ad .i 72-41-2 record at North
Carolina.
ic s a proven winner
Schwartz told a news conference.
"Secondly, he's been associated
with fine programs noted for their
integrity, and third, he has very
serious academic concerns with
regard to student-athletes. He
wants them to graduate. In fact,
his athletes do graduate
The northeast Ohio school de-
clined to release the terms and
length oi Crum's contract in a
news release issued Tuesday, but
the (Akron) Beacon Journal re-
ported in Tuesday's editions that
Crum had agreed to a three-year
contract with a salary of $60,000 a
ear. Crum had a $90,000 annual
salarv in North Carolina, the
newspaper reported.
Athletic Director Paul Amodio
said cKl.OOO "is in the ballgame"
and that Crum would be paid at
least that much.
A native of the Youngstown
suburb oi Boardman, Crum, 53,
graduated from Mount Union
College in Alliance. Crum said he
was looking forward to returning
to his home state.
Tracksters fare well
The Fast Carolina indoor track
md field team picked up a trio of
) three finishes in the recent loe
Hilton Indoor Invitational held
an. 15-16 in Chapel Hill.
In the 440-yard dash eompeti-
the Pirates' Ken Daughtry
placed first with a time oi 50.6.
Eugene McNeill garnered a
third-place finish in the 55-meter
dash, while the Pirates' mile relav
team battled to a second-place
finish by clocking in with a team
time of 3:25.0.
The next action for the men's
and women's indoor track and
field teams will be Friday at the
Eastman Kodak Invitational in
Johnson Citv, Tenn.
UNC-W tics on sale
udent tickets tor the East
Carolina UN'C-Wilmington bas-
game set for an. 30 in
ungton are available for ECU
stud nts
tickets an be purchased for
number at the ticket office is (919)
395-3233.
A block oi 100 tickets have been
s�.n aside for ECU students on a
first-come, first-serve basis.
The game between the Pirates
S5b contacting the ticket office at and the Seahawks will tip-off at
N. Wilmington. The phone 7:50p.m.
Maturity is aid for
ACC underclassmen
Three of the Atlantic Coast
Conference s best big underclass-
have reached Ail-American
status this season because oi in-
rcased maturity, coaches say.
North Carolina State's 6-foot-10
Charles Shackleford, Duke's 6-10
Danny Ferry and North
ar lina's6-9J.R.Rcid are having
I seasonsof their careers so
QQ coaches said Tuesday
a teleconference hookup
th media representatives.
"He's really hungry Georgia
R ch Coach Bobbv Cremins said
it Shackleford. a junior, who
red 20 points and grabbed 19
rebounds last Saturday against
Yellow Jackets. "He's looking
�. n the road at a NBA career.
- really grown up.
' At times he hasn't put it all
ther. He has put it all together
v Cremins added.
ackleford, who is leading the
U C in rebounding at 11.1 per
me, has taken three seasons to
get adjusted to being the "big
man Coach Jim Yalcaono said.
"1 toldShack that thecurseof
being a 6-10 center is that people
think you should get 25 points
and 25 rebounds a game Val-
vano said. "Eve asked Carles to
live up to the standards that we've
set between ourselves. Shack is
playing very hard right now
So are Ferry and Reid, both for-
mer national high school players
the year who came into the
onferenee with a lot expected of
them.
"Dannv Ferry has had a great
year to date North Carolina
Coach Dean Smith said. "The
scoring load has been placed on
his shoulders and he seems to
thrive on it.
"He's certainly one of the best
players in America Smith said.
Ferry is fourth in the league in
scoring at 18.b points per game,
while also pulling down 7.5 re-
bounds and handing off 4.2 as-
sists. Coupled with those staistics,
the junior is shoooting 82.1 per-
cent from the free throw line.
Meanwhile, Reid is leading the
league is scoring at 19.7 and field
goal percentage at 67.1, and has
coaches scratching their heads,
wondering how to stop the 240-
pound sophomore.
"I think J. R. presents problems
for the second team in practice
said Duke Coach Mike
Krzyzewski, whose ninth-ranked
Blue Devils face Reid and No. 2
North Carolina on Thursday
night.
"I've been really impressed
with the way he's competed
Krzyzewski said. "You really
can't stop him. Players like that
you're just not going to shut out.
He's reached a real high level in
his game. He's risen to All Ameri-
can status
"He has great hands and he
catches the ball in traffic Val-
vano said about Reid. "He's got
the ideal body for a person who
plays close to the basket. He cer-
tainly doesn't play like a sopho-
more
Is Holmes in trouble?
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP)-
Eddie Futch and Ray Arccl, mas-
ters at teaching boxing, wish
Larry Holmes wouldn't get in the
ring with Mike Tyson Friday
night.
"I don't feel good about his
fight the 75-year-old Futch, who
trained Holmes for 12 title bouts,
said in a telephone interview from
Las Vegas. 'Tyson has the style
and strength that could make it
hard for Larry to avoid getting
badly beaten and possibly hurt
"At this point in his career, I
hate to see him in there, that's all
said the 88-year-old Arcel, who
helped Futch train Holmes for a
1982 knockout of Gerry Cooney.
"You don't belong in the ring,
"Football is very important in
Ohio, and it produces year-in and
vcar-out many good players
Crum said. "I think the respect
that is in the state for the quality of
high school football is in evidence
by the number of colleges that are
in there recruiting
Crum said recruiting and or
ganizing a staff are his first priori-
ties in his new job. I le said he has
no plans to hire any oi his staff
members from North Carolina.
Before he went to North Caro-
lina, Crum coached Kent State ri-
val Miami of Ohio to a 34-10-1
record between 1974 and 1977. In
1974, Miami, was ranked 10th
nationally, the highest finish ever
by a Mid-American Conference
team.
"I like the Mid-American Con-
ference. It is as competitive a
league as there is in the country-
maybe not the most-publicized,
but when it comes to competition,
everyone in the league is so
close Crum said. "There are no
teams that are head and shoul-
ders above anyone else, and 1
think that makes for a good con
ference
In November, Crum accepted
tn $800,(XX) buyout of the remain-
ing four years of his contract at
North Carolina. At Kent State he
replaces Glen Mason, who ac-
cepted the head coaching job at
the University of Kansas on Dec.
29.
With only three weeks remain
ing before high school athletes
start commiting themselves to
colleges,rum said he has plenty
of work to do
"I want to see who Kent has
right now, who they're rtn ruiting
and get to those youngsters as
quk kly as 1 can' he said
next week will be kind ol an
evaluation, seeing what's avail
able who's interested in knit
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TUrkey
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not with a 21 -year-old gut who
can punch Arcel said by tele-
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he (Holmes) wins, he has to
absorb punishment
Tyson, the unbeaten premier
heavyweight for over seven
years, turned 38 on Nov. 3 and
hasn't fought since losing a 15-
round split decision to Michael
Spinks while trying to regain the
International Boxing Federation
title on April 19, 1986.
"Larry started showing signs of
deterioration about three years
ago Futch said. 'Tyson is get-
ting better
"The big question is, has Father
Time taken too much away from
Larrv?" said Arcel, who is retired.
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7. NEVADA-LAS �
TheRunr i
the seasoi I
State 87-8
PCAA acnoi
Up th� . �
Basnight sidehi
pang a! picked
Saturday on r
Provident ftei I
the half, the Rf
72 win Stav s �'��
wavinthat win th21
rebounds and 10 ass
8. MICHIGAN -Th
ines fell on hard luck in
Ten Monday night vn hen they!
into an inspired Ohio State tel
The Buckeyes shocked the
Verities by taking a 7 68 vie
to send Frieder s club I
from a top five perch V
talent there is Ann Arbor
Michigan, now 14 2 on theyeaj
pick up the paves and h.
UP the polls quick!)
9. IOWA STATE The
clones rolled over patsv
ternahonal 123-92 over the wi
end to improve to 15-2 tori
year. Iowa State phci. tour pj
ers in double figures led bv
Gravers' 32 points and 2-i
bounds. Gary Thompkins
scored 21, while Lafcster Vr
chipped in 15 and Terry W
13. The Cyclones were bac
action last night against
kraska.





!
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 21.1988 15
sday
ith onlv three weeks remain-
before high school athletes
rt commihng themselves to
- Crum said ho has plenty
work to do
want to see who Kent has
lit now who the) rerecruiting
a to those youngsters as
Id) a i can he said This
week will be kind of an
ition seeing what s avail-
le who s interested in Kent
S
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TAILS
This week's top 20 poll
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
1. PURDUE - I'm gonna
back to my instincts this week at
put the Boilermakers back at the
top of the heap. Behind a season-
high 30 points from Todd Mitch-
ell Turdue rolled past Minnesota
82 "4 over the weekend in Big Ten
action The win boosted the Boil-
ermakers to 15-1 on the year and
also marked their 14th staight
victory- Now all 1 have to do is sit
back and hope the Boilers didn't
ose last night at home to Michi-
gan State.
10. DUKE � The Blue Devils
slipped to 10-2 for the season after
Maryland shocked them 72-69
Saturday in Cameron Indoor Sta-
dium. Danny Ferry led the way
for the Blue Devils with 23 points
even though he suffered from
atrocious shooting. The Blue dev-
ils will have a chance to make
amends for the loss tonight when
they travel to Chapel Hill to take
on North Carolina.
2. ARIZONA � The forwards
of Arizona helped push the team
past Oregon, 70-54, in Pac 10 ac-
tion Saturday. Sean Elliott and
Anthony Cook each scored 18
points in the victory, which
pushed the Wildcats to 16-1 for
the ear. Lute Olsen will have hit:
dub back on the hardwood to-
hight in another conference game
against Southern Cal.
3. NORTH CAROUNA �The
Tar Heels continue to look im-
pressive arter rolling to a 87-62
rout of the pesky Virginia Cava-
liers leff Lebo led the way with 23
points, while JR. Reid added 19
after only having five at the inter-
mission. The win lifted the Heels
to 13-1 overall and 2-0 in the ACC.
But beware Carolina, Duke will
be trying to put a damper on the
winning streak tonight in the
Dean Dome.
11. BRIGHAM YOUNG �
Brigham Young was promoted
up the top 20 ladder after dis-
patching of Wyoming last Friday
and moving to 12-0 for the year.
The victory over Wyoming on the
road answers the questions about
how good Brigham Young really
is. Pesky Texas-El Paso is next in
1 for Brigham Young tonight. A
wii wouldmarkluckyl3inarow
for the gang from Salt Lake City.
12. OKLAHOMA � The run-
ning gunnin' Sooners seem to be
running out of ammunition as
they fell to Kansas State 69-62
Saturday marking their second
straight loss. The Sooners shot a
miserable 32 percent from the
floor in the loss. Oklahoma, 14-2,
was trying to get back on the
winning track Wednesday at
Colorado.
Illini moved to 13-3 over the
weekend by picking up back-to-
back wins. On Saturday, the Illini
rolled to a 80-65 win over Wiscon-
sin in Big Ten action before re-
turning to the hardwood Sunday
to rout Tennessee 103-79. Illinois
will be back to playing tonight as
they travel to Iowa for a tough
conference matchup against the
Hawkeyes.
15. KANSAS � The Jayhawks
improved to 12-4 for the year and
picked up their 55th straight vic-
tory in Allen Field House by top-
pling Hampton 95-69 Saturday.
Danny Manning led the way,
amid chants of "Rock, Chalk, Jay-
hawk by pumping in 22 points.
The Jayhawks will need another
big performance from Manning
Saturday as they travel to South
Bend to take on Notre Dame.
began their climb back up the top
20 poll Saturday by bombarding
Northwestern 92-68. The win
boosted Iowa to 11-5 for the sea-
son with a key game upcoming
tonight at home against Illinois. A
win by the Hawkeyes means
more climbing in the polls, a loss
means forget the polls.
19. NORTH CAROLINA
STATE �The Wolfpack's dra-
matic win over Georgia Tech be-
fore a record crowd in Atlanta
boosts them into the top 20 in
place of the Yellow Jackets. Char-
les Shackleford pulled down an
amazing 19 rebounds in the 76-74
victory that lifted the Pack to 10-2,
but Brian Howard still had to pull
out the win with a tip-in at the
buzzer. State tried to continue its
winning ways last night against
Wake Forest.
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4. TEMrLE � The Owls rocked
the house once again Monday
night to improve to 13-0 for the
season. The victim this time was
Tenn State. Behind 19 points from
Mark Maconand 13 points and six
Mocked shots from Tim Cherry,
the Owls disposed of the Nittany
Lions 59-54. The Owls also rolled
to a 73-63 win over St. Bonaven-
ture over the weekend. Macon led
the way in that contest also by
pouring in 21 points, 14 in the
second half.
� � � � �
5. KENTUCKY�The Wildcats
plated four players in double fig-
ures Hi by Rex Chapman's 21
points in a 83-65 victory over
Tennessee over the weekend. Ed
Da ender added 18 points, while
Walter Lock had 12 and Winston
Bennett 10 for the Wildcats, who
improved to 12-1 for the season.
Wednesday night's game against
F.enda could hurt the Wildcats
ranking next week if they fell vic-
tim to upset, which is doubtful
since the game was played in
Rupp Arena.
6. PITTSBURGH � The Pan-
thers chalked up win number 13
against onlv one loss this season
Saturday when they toppled Vil-
lanova 85-73 in Big East action.
:ne Lane powered the Pan-
thers by scoring 17 points and
npping down 13 boards. The true
test tor the Panthers will come Sat-
urday in Norman when they face
Billy Tubb's Sooners of Oklahoma
on national TV.
� � � � �
7. NEVADA-LAS VEGAS �
The Runnin' Rebels ran to 15-1 for
the season by dispatching Utah
State 87-83 Tuesday night in
PC A A action. The Rebels picked
tip the victory even with Jarvis
Basnight sidelined. Tarkanian's
gang also picked up a key win
Saturday on national TV against
Providence. After trailing 49-43 at
the half, the Rebels rallied for a 92-
2 win Stacey Augmon led the
way in that win with 21 points, 10
rebounds and 10 assists.
� � � � �
8. MICHIGAN � The Wolver-
ines fell on hard luck in the Big
Ten Monday night when they ran
into an inspired Ohio State team.
The Buckeyes shocked the Wol-
verines by taking a 70-68 victory
to send Frieder's club toppling
from a top five perch. With the
talent there is Ann Arbor, look for
Michigan, now 14-2 on the year, to
pick up the pieces and head back
up the polls quickly.
9. IOWA STATE � The Cy-
clones rolled over patsy US In-
ternational 123-92 over the week-
end to improve to 15-2 for the
I year. Iowa State placed four play-
ers in double figures led by Jeff
Grayers' 32 points and 24 re-
bounds. Gary Thompkins also
scored 21, while Lafester Woods
chipped in 15 and Terry Woods
13. The Cyclones were back in
action last night against Ne-
braska.
13. GEORGETOWN � The
Hoyas lost a heartbreakcr Satur-
day to Boston College when Dana
Barros bottomed a jumper at the
buzzer to lift the Eagles to a 68-66
victory and send the Hoyas reel-
ing to 11-3. Barros, for the game,
scored 30 points to lead Boston
College, while Charles Smith
paced the Hoyas with 21. The
Hoyas were home last night to
conference foe St. John's.
16. SYRACUSE �The Orange-
men continue to slip in the polls as
they fell to 13-4 after splitting a
p iir of games over the weekend.
On Saturday, the Orangemen
were stunned by Connecticut 51-
50. Derrick Colcman gave all he
could in the loss for Syracuse as he
poured in 16 points, garnered 14
rebounds and blocked seven
shots. Boeheim's gang got back on
the winning track Monday by
routing Boston College 90-60
behind 21 points from Stephen
Thompson.
17. AUBURN � The Tigers
rolled to 10-3 by knocking off
Southeastern Conference foe Mis-
sissippi State 65-57 Saturday.
John Caylor led the way for Au-
burn by pumping in 18 points.
The Tigers were back in confer-
ence action last night against Ten-
nessee.
20. FLORIDA �The Gators,
who just last week were booed by
their homecrowd, move back into
the top 20 following a 77-72 win
over Mississippi. Vernon
Maxwell paced the 12-4 Gators
with 18 points, while Livingston
Chatman added 15. The Gators
likely suffered their fifth loss
Wednesday when they traveled
to Rupp Arena to battle confer-
ence foe Kentu( ky.
14. ILLINOIS � The Fightin' 18. IOWA � The Hawkeves
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T
16 THEEAqrrAPniiKMAM
JANUARY 21,1988
Skins to use different approach
HERNDON, VA. (AP)-After
watching the Redskins lose by 29
points in their last Super Bowl
appearance, Washington Coach
Joe Gibbs is planning to do things
a bit differently this time around.
It is with unfond memories that
Gibbs looks back on the 38-9 game
thrashing the Los Angeles Raid-
ers inflicted upon the Redskins in
the 1984 Super Bowl. It was, at
that time, the biggest rout in the
history of the event and tarnished
what had been a spectacular 14-2
regular-season.
Gibbs said he will wait a bit
before getting his players primed
for the Denver Broncos and re-
strict them from becoming en-
gulfed by the media hoopla that
precedes the title contest.
"Last time, we started a little
early in getting ready Gibbs
said. "We took our rest early
(before this year's NFC semifinal
game against the Chicago Bears),
then picked up the pace, and
that's what we're going to do this
time.
"When we get there, it's impor-
tant for the players to enjoy it and
have a good time, but they have to
be careful at night with the activi-
ties they get caught up in Gibbs
said. "I'd prefer they spend a
normal evening, with friends or
relatives. Last time there was no
curfew, but this time it will be
around 12 o'clock
Will all this help save the Re-
dskins against the Broncos?
"Who knows?" Gibbs said.
"We'd have probably lost (the last
Super Bowl) 52-0 if we had a cur-
few. But it makes it sound better,
as a coach, to change things
around this time around
The squad Gibbs is taking to
San Diego boasts a mixture of
youth and experience.
"Really, the advantage we have
here is that we have 16 guys who
have been to the Super Bowl and
knew what it took to get there
Gibbs said. "And yet we had a ma-
gority of young guys who had
never been there, were hungry,
and decided they were going to
do whatever it takes. And they fed
off the older players' experience
Players such as rookie running
back Timmy Smith, who rushed
for a combined 138 yards in the
Redskins' two playoff fames, and
Kurt Gouveia played major roles
in Washington's 17-10 victory
over the Minnesota Vikings in the
NFC title game.
We've got a lot of youthful
guys who have really contributed
to this team, and we have a good
blend of veterans center Jeff
Bostic said. "When you've got
that combination, you're going to
go places
Linebackers Caldwell and Gou-
veia spent last year on injured
reserve but against the Vikings
Caldwell had a sack and stopped
Anthony Cartr from breaking
away on a punt return. Gouveia
registered a sack of Vikings quar-
terback Wade Wilson and
Vaughn had four tackles and a
sack.
Caldwell, Gouveia and Vaughn
made their mark on special teams
for most of the year, but had an
increased role against Minnesota.
Gibbs sent the players home
until Thursday, when they will
begin practice for the Broncos at
Redskin Park. The team will fly to
San Diego on Monday.
Jackson well aware of Greens quickness
. DENVER (AP)-Broncos wide
receiver Mark Jackson has a vivid
memory of an incident during the
most recent Washington-Denver
game, late in the 1986 season.
Jackson, not exactly a slouch in
the speed department, recalls
dashing after a long John Elway
pass, straining to get to the
slightly overthrown ball-and see-
ing Redskins cornerback Darrell
Green overtake him.
"I peeked over my right shoul-
der, and Green ran right by me
Jackson said. "I thought, 'Holy
smokes, he's not human' It was
pretty awesome.
"We have a lot of respect for
their defensive backs. They're all
very- fast
To listen to Broncos Coach Dan
Reeves, you'd have to think there
is an abundance of avvesomeness
on the Redskins' roster.
At midweek, Reeves and his
staff still were preparing their
game plan against the Redskins in
Super Bowl XXII, but Reeves was
able to make som observations
about Washington based on that
1986 game-won by Denver 31-30-
some recent film.
"The one thing that stands out
about the Redskins is they're very
well coach Reeves said. "If I
could vote year in and year out for
a guy doing a great job, it would
be (Washington Coach) Joe Gibbs.
He's won over 70 percent of his
games playing in a tough divi-
sion. Richie Petitbon does a great
job with their defense, too.
"They're pretty much the same
team we faced last year. The main
difference is they've gone with
Doug Williams at quarterback
instead (Jay) Schroeder. Williams
doesn't move around as much. He
stays in the pocket and waits until
the last minute to throw.
Although Denver has been in-
stalled as a three-point favorite,
Reeves sees the game as a tossup.
Intramural preseason best bets
Anyone who takes time out to
read the campus scripture, The
East Carolinian, knows all about
the Fearless Forecast. Intramural-
Recreational Services' own IMA
RECK would like to introduce the
Poor Prophecy- a prediction poll
like no other, mostly because of its
accuracy or lack thereof.
As the pre-season basketball
registration lines roll to a close six
campus squads have forged their
way into the ranks of victim and
must now fall prey to the first of
manv Poor Prophecy Polls.
1 SCIENTIFIC METHOD-
Chosen number one by a unani-
mous decision based on the
belief that their squad has experi-
mented and found the perfect
formula for success.
2. MANTRONIX- Ranked sec-
ond due to their own blend of man
and machine. Like a well oiled
bulldozer, these guys will roll
over their opponents.
3. 7DWARF- Give the little
guys a break.
4.ECU CHRISTIAN FELLOW-
SHIP - They have an extra player
on their side.
5. RAIDERS-Although ranked
number five, they do win the most
original name award.
6. KING of the HILL- King of
the Hill and King of the Hoop are
two entirely different things.
Though a tad cold and o the
point, these predicitons will no
doubt prove that Poor Prophecy is
indeed that. These squads will be
battling it out on the courts of
Memorial Gym Thursday, Friday
and Sunday of this week so be
sure to drop by and catch IMA
RECK in all her glory. Sugges-
tions and comments are welcome
and should be sent to:
IMA RECK
204 Memorial Gym
East Carolina University
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Title
The East Carolinian, january 21, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 21, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.582
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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