The East Carolinian, January 19, 1988






JIMMY BUFFETT'S COMING
And we have tickets! Sec page 2 tor information on
how you can win one of two pairs of tickets from
The East Carolinian to sec Buffett live on fan. 28
in Minges Coliseum.
STYLE
Fish Police is the hot new comic among collectors-
see page 13.
SPORTS
Pirates lose to the Eagles in overtime at Minges
Coliseum Monday night � see page 18.
(Hhc lEafit (Earamttan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
h2 No. 30
1 uesdav, January I1), 19S8
Greenville, NC
22 Pages
Circulation 12,000
King awards made Monday
In KRIS! I A Ml KIM
F.ta Chapter ol the
� pha ! ratemitv !
th annual Martin I uther
. eadership w ards
-
Max or I
i
i
:
: It
ler I
n to
the poor, king suffered theconse
quences ol his at tions, but never
ran aw I egged tor mercy
( - s that King was
dignity to the
i. He chose to com-
mei - life and legacy
i onight wecome together
to redidicate ourselves to
the tulfillment of King's
dream
Mayor Ed Carter
� Michael
Bad meaning
i said he "has
nd discrimina-
� which in-
vr Kii ,
Idress leader-
presented to
ivc made major
Forester elected to
Foundation directors
i
ctors oi the East C arolina
: l
I

I
3
pi
tht program of I
- i �
magement ot re-
nt er mem:
rk with the Oi
nent and Alumni
promote and assist
n Phelps,
Kinney and i orester Interiors,
: iign firm in
� husband,
� � exec utive
lent ol Si NX O, Inc
time supporters
� isilv. Mrs. Forester
is both the secretary
and treasurer of the Mecklenburg
tpter of the ECU
ition.
ster is al involved
ityBalletCo
and has an officer with the
Association. She
� her husband also support
. uliary, a center
for I ntown Char-
he : rs are members of
. nant Presbyterian Church
and have two children, Michele
1 Kenneth III.
contributions to the minority
community and the organiza-
tions they lead. Kimberly Mines.
Kiplan Clemmons, loeseph Sin-
gleton, Sheila Speight, Thomas
i logan, lottery Keenan, Nokomis
Gregory, Veronica McKinney,
Chen Mathows, Connie Foster,
Brenda Brad lev, and Cheri Tho-
mas were presented certificates of
recognition, loeseph Singleton
also received the Minority Stu-
dent Organization Award.
Phyllis Forte was awarded the
Alpha Phi Alpha Black Greek
Award for her outstanding
ac heivement, and Charles Smith
was presented the Student Lead-
ership Award. Smith, a non-tradi-
tional student and an industrial
tech major, holds a 3.5 GPA, is a
member of an honor fraternity,
and is on the dean's list.
Carter was also honored, re-
ceiving the Community Service
1 eadership Award. A native oi
North Harlow, Carter received
the award based on hisprosperity
as well as his providing a positive
outlook to continue aiming mi-
norities toward "Placing Our Fu-
ture On Solid (Jround
( arl Blair paid a tribute to King
with a poem exemplifying his life
spent in service. Other speakers
included Kenneth Hammond,
associate director oi University
Unions, with the invocation, and
a welcome by Alpha Phi Alpha
president Leslie Person.
The EC I gospel choir were fea-
tured in the program performing
"Praise Him and "You Don't
Know
In his closing remarks Carter
said that King's unfinished work
is our own and that, 'Tonight we
come together to rededicate our-
selves to the fullfillment of King's
dream.
Greenville Mayor Ed Carter speaks before ECU students
citizens who came to Mendenhall Student Center Monday
honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (Esther Not ton, Phol
ECU has record enrollment
CL News Bureau
Last Carolina University has a
record spring semester enroll-
ment of 14,075 students on cam-
pus, Registrar J. Gilbert Moore
announced Thursdav.
It marks the first time that
spring semester enrollment har-
exceeded 14,000 students, Moore
said. Last year's spring semester
enrollment, which had been a
record high, was 13,611. ECU'S
all-time record was for last fall
when semester enrollment
reached 14,882.
Moore released spring registra-
tion figu.es showing an under-
graduate enrollmi i I
and and undergrad late tot
eluding part-time
11,677. Graduate sch
were 2,398, Moore
There aro t,uv2 male ui der
graduate studnets and 7,983
women undergraduate -
graduate school, there a
men and 1,128 women.
ECU officials said th ;
spring semestc r em
significant because
time when college em
generally had beer. ;
decline.
UNC officials battle drugs
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AD -
University of North Carolina offi-
cials say a new systemwide policy
for faculty, staff and students
sends a clear message that drugs
will not be tolerated on UNC
campuses.
"The campuses oi the Univer-
sity of North Carolina will in no
sense be havens iov those who
wish to experiment with illegal
drugs Board oi Governors
member David Whichard II said
Friday. "On the contrary, drug
abuse simply will not be tolerated
within this academic community:
You will be punished if vou abuse
drugs
The policy calls for minimum
penalties ranging from probation
to discharge or expulsion for spe-
cific penalties.
"Transgressions involving the
more dangerous types of drugs
are dealt with more severely than
are involvements with the less
dangerous drugs said
Whichard, the board's vice chair-
man and head of a committee that
worked for 10 months on the pol-
ice.
Whichard stressed that the
punishments could be more se-
vere than the police prescribes.
"Depending on the circum-
stances in each case, the respon-
sible campus authorities may
conclude that a more severe sanc-
tion is warranted he said.
Federal legislation last year
required universities to have
drug-abuse prevention programs
for staff, faculty and students or
risk losing federal financial aid.
All UNC schools met federal
guidelines by the late spring, but
the Board of Governors decideni it
was in the system'sbest interest to
develop a consistent, systemwide
policy oi minimum punishments.
Those found to be illegally
selling, delivering or manufactur-
ing "hard" drugs, defined as
Schedule 1 and II drugs under
N.C. General Statutes, would be
expelled from enrollment or fircxi
from employment.
Schedule I and II drugs include
herion, opium and cocaine.
For a first offense involving the
illegal sale, manufacture or deliv-
ery of Schedule III through VI
drugs, students, staff and faculty-
would face suspension from en-
rollment or employment for at
least a semestei
A student would be expelled or
an employee fired for a second
offense involving Schedule III
through VI drugs.
Penalties for possession of ille-
gal drugs are more lenient,
Whichard said.
For a first offense of possession
involving Schedule I or II drugs,
members of the academic com-
munity would face a semester's
ECU physiologist gets grant
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin served as the honorary coach in ECU's
Saturday night basketball game with Navy (Thomas Walters, Photo-
lab).
Fee Nfwi Bureau
A physiologist at the ECU
School of Medicine has been
awarded a National Institutes oi
Health (NIH) grant to study the
roll of sensory mechanisms in the
heart's left ventricle, a research
project which is expected to yield
new information about circula-
tory-related ciisorders in hyper-
tension.
The $275,666 grant will support
a five-year investigation of the
sensory mechanisms known as
ventricular receptors, according
to Dr. Andrew J. Gorman III, as-
sistant professor of physiology
and principal investigator for the
study.
Gorman said the ventricular
receptors convey sensory infor-
mation about various physiologi-
cal processes oi the heart, though
scientists know little about their
precise role. To learn more, Gor-
man will determine how normal
ventricular receptor function is
altered during the developmental
Emergency shortage
stagers of hypertension.
Gorman's NIH award is one oi
several given annually by the
federal agency to new investiga-
tors setting up initial research
studies in various areas of science
and medicine.
Bloodmobile comes to ECU
The American Red Cross is
making an emergency appeal for
blood donations, anci the blood-
mobile will be on campus Wed-
nesday and Thursday.
Severe weather has caused the
cancellation of several bloodmo-
bile trips, and blood supplies are
low.
The ECU Biology Club is spon-
soring a blood drive at Menden-
hall Student Center 12-6 p.m.
Wednesday and Thursday.
People who donate or attempt to
donate will be given free movie
passes to the Buccaneer Theater.
suspension. For a first
involving Schedule lift: i
drugs, members would f ice pr
bation, with the length dete
mined on a case-by-case 1
For subsequent of fens
ing the possession oi m-w il
drugs, more severe pen
be imposed at thediscn I
individual schools.
Boards of trustees at I N(
schools will be instructed to ad
a drug policy consistent w ith
Board oi Governors polic
Chancellors will be charg d �
reporting annually to truste
to the UNC president on di
education activities, incidents
involving illegal drugs, the ettec
tiveness of the campus programs
and proposed changes to the .
icy.
Whichard said education a
rehabilitation remain the mcst
important defense in the war
against drugs The universit) for
the most part will rely on commu-
nity-based rehabilitation ;
grams, he said.
"We have wrestled with ques
tions about where the Board ot
Governors should prescribe and.
where we should delegate he
said. "We hope we have achieved
a balance
In nther business, the board
approved the appointment oi
Nathan F. Simms Ir as new sys
tern vice president oi student
services and special programs
Simms served as acting vice presi-
dent in the same position in ty�u.
He will assume the new post Feb.
1.
Since 1981, Simms, 55, has been
vice chancellor for academic af-
fairs at N.C. A&T State Univer-
sity. Previously, he was a profes-
sor and chairman of the mathe-
matics department at W7inston-
Salem State University.
1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 19 J 988
Preparing for the cold
Caring for hypothermia
What is hypothermia?
People often think that hypoth-
ermia affects only those who fall
into icy water or who are stranded
in siv feet of snow. However, it
can occur in the fall, early spring,
and winter and may strike hikers,
campers, surfers, and other out-
doorsmen.
Hypothermia is a condition
which lowers the body's tempera-
ture and cuts off blood circulation
to vital areas of the body such as
the heart and brain. The feet, toes,
tingers and hands are usually the
first to suffer the effects of hypoth-
ermia since they are the first to be
deprived of blood and warmth.
When the body is exposed to
wind or sun, perspiration from
the body evaporates quickly; this
causes the blood to thicken and
circulation slows. The oxygen
supply to the muscles is also
slowed, so fatigue sets in quickly.
How do I know if 1 am getting By MARY ELESHA-ADAMS
hypothermia?
and the body quits warming it-
self. When the body temperature
drops to 96-97 degrees, the body
begins to shake involuntarily; the
thinking process is dulled and
amnesia sets in a 95 degrees.
Health Column
ECU Student Health Center
When heat and oxygen don't At 90 degrees, the muscles stop
reach the outer parts of the bodv, moving altogether, respiration
it's temperature begins to drop andpulscratcsareslowedandthe
victim becomes sleepy; the victim
loses consciousness and the heart-
beat becomes erratic below 80
degrees; when the body's tem-
perature reaches 78 degrees, the
victim may die of cardiac andor
respiratory failure.
How can I keep from getting hy-
pothermia?
Hypothermia can be prevented
by drinking a quart of water or
fluids a day to replenish the sup-
ply of body fluids. Stay dry and
wear wind-proof clothing.
Argentina uprisings reported
RULNOS AIRES, Argentina
(AP) � Thousands of soldiers
surrounded an army compound
with orders to crush a revolt by a
rebel army officer who was holed
up inside with 100 supporters,
vowing never to surrender.
Other uprisings in support of
the rebels, led bv Lt. Col. Aldo
Rico also were reported Sunday
is the army, navy and air force
were ordered to overtake Rico,
who escaped from house arrest on
Thursday.
The insurrection was the most
serious in Argentina since April
when Rico led a military revolt
demanding an end to prosecution
rf senior military officers accused
of human rights abuses during
eight years oi military rule.
President Raul Alfonsin told
the military branches to combine
efforts to end the chase with Rico,
which hean near Buenos Aires
and moved Sunday to the town of
Monte Caseros, 325 miles north-
east of the capital.
Rico told an impromptu news
conference his troops were "well-
supplied and will not surrender"
to an estimated 2,000 loyalist
forces surrounding them.
Loyal units also were reported
to be moving to control incidents
by Rico sympathizers in San Luis,
520 miles west of the capital, and
in Tucuman, 800 miles northwest.
The army said it arrested 13 offi-
cers in an uprising in Las Lajas,
680 miles southeast of Buenos
Aires. No shots were fired.
Gen. Huntcrto Fernicci, fifth
army corps commander, prom-
ised loyalist troops would open
fire on Rico and his men if they did
not end their revolt.
Automobiles equipped with
loudspeakers drove through
Montre Caseros on Sunday night,
warning the 18,000 inhabitants to
stay away from the rebel garrison.
The private news agency Noticias
Argentinas said more than 1,000
residents evacuated a neighbor-
hood bordering the base.
Local civilians jeered and
shouted insults at the rebel offi-
cers, who replied with obscene
gestures and threatening move-
ments of their automatic weap-
ons.
Rico, whose mutinies have re-
quired military intervention
twice in nine months, told news-
men that he was demanding the
replacement of Gen. Jose Caridi,
army chief of staff, by an officer
"with sufficient prestige and stat-
ure to lead the armed forces
In April, the 43-year-old Rico
led a military revolt demanding a
halt in the prosecution of senior
military officrers who were ac-
cused of human rights abuses
during the military rule of 1976-
1983.
Alfonsin's government has said
that during those years of military
rule, at least 9,000 people disap-
peared in the "dirty war" waged
by security units against sus-
pected left-wing subversives.
Human rights groups claim some
30,000 people vanished after
being picked up by government
agents.
The revolt ended peacefully,
and a few weeks later the govern-
ment passed a law protecting
most officers from prosecution.
Rico, a decorated veteran of the
1983 Falkland Islands war, was
under house arrest at a counrty
club outside Buenos Aires await-
ing trial in the April revolt when
he fled Thursday.
Qttp ixiusi (ttswiftrtan
Serving the East Carolina campus communUy sc 1925
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo
Shad Clemens Adam BlankensMp
Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY RATES
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BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
Phones
757-6366757-6557
757-6558757 6309
AIDS pamphlets incorporated into
high school english curriculum
GREENSBORO (AP) �
Greensboro high school students
soon will find a new kind of litera-
ture in their English classes �
AIDS pamphlets.
In May, the Greensboro school
s stem will begin teaching AIDS
prevention to its 6,600 high school
students. Administrators say they
decided to teach the course dur-
ing English classes because Eng-
lish is the only subject that all
students must take every year.
The AIDS curriculum is written
just for seventh-graders, but
Greensboro will include grades 8-
12 this first year to teach all stu-
dents about AIDS prevention be-
fore they graduate
However, the English teacher
will not alwavs be the AIDS in-
structor. Principals will decide
which teachers to trau,fpj: the
curriculum. ��'
The system's 3,000 seventh- and
eighth-graders will be taught
AIDS prevention in their regular
health classes. Next year, only
seventh-graders will get AIDS
education.
The lessons, which will require
at least two hours of instruction,
will explain measures that will
lessen the risk of contracting
AinS, deluding use of condoms
duY6 sexual activity.
�:t, Associate Superintendent
Sancrde Campbell said, the cur-
riculum will give much greater
emphasis to not engaging in sex-
ual intercourse and not using
drugs as the only sure way to
avoid AIDS.
Campbell unveiled prelimi-
nary plans.ip� the curriculum to
the- Greensboro Board Of
Education's curriculum commit-
tee Wednesday.
AIDS, or acquired immune de-
ficiency syndrome, has struck 23
people in Guilford County and
423 in the state as of December.
In July, the General Assembly
passed a law requiring that AIDS
prevention be taught in school
starting this year. The legislature
instructed the N.C. Department
of Public Instruction to write the
curriculum. Parents will be noti-
fied before teachers start teaching
the curriculum, Campbell said. If
they object to the instruction, they
can remove their children from
the class.
We are BUYING for a limited time!
$ We Will Pay You Cash $
ro
USED OR NEW
NICE JEANS (Especially Acid Wash)
NICE LEISURE CLOTHES
JEAN JACKETS
NICE OVER-SIZE ITEMS
PERMIUMjvFOit LARGER SIZES
Twenty-six North Carolina
teachers awarded fellowships
FCl News Bureau
Twenty-six teachers of middle
grades mathematics and science
in eastern North Carolina have
been awarded $500 fellowships
for the spring semester
The awards � professional
development fellowships � are
intended for enrollment in sci-
ence and math classes at East
Carolina University.
The awards were made to sci-
ence and math teachers in grades
4-9 and are given by the ECU Sci-
ence and Mathematics Eduaca-
tion Center in cooperation with
the N.C. State Department of
Public Instruction and the UNC
Mathematics and Science Educa-
tion Network.
Recipient teachers include fac-
ulty of schools in Beaufort, Cra-
ven, Duplin, Edgecombe-Nash,
Greene, Hertford, Johnston, Le-
noir, Martin, Pitt, Tyrrell, Wayne
and Wilson Counties.
TAXPAYERS
with dependents
HERE'S A TAX TIP:
Beginning with your 1987 income
tax return that you will file in
1988, you generally must list social
security numbers for dependents
who are at least five years old by
the end of 1987. If any of your
dependents do not have this
number, get an application form
today from the Social Security
office in vour area.
We especially need nice casual clothes!
Shirts, Sweaters, Skirts, Coats,
Tops, Sweats, & Jeans.
7'T �� . " T .TTTTTTTT�JXTTTTTjPXTT'J.11 i'miiiji. i a
We Will Be Buying Only From
2:00 - 5:00 p.m. M-F
and 1:00 - 3:00 p.m. Sat.
No prices by telephone. Clothing
must be brought in.
Please keep in mind that prices are based on
a used clothing market.
CLOTHES
At
The Coin &
10:00-5:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 Sat.
Man
400 S. Evans St.
752-3866
Bias in national news coverage
discussed week at ECU
ECU Newi
The question of bias in national
news coverage and its effect upon
politics will be explored at a collo-
quium at ECU this week.
"The Media and Politics" is the
subject of the first annual collo-
quium sponsored by the ECU
department of political science
Jan. 19-20 on the campus.
S. Robert Lichter, director of the
Center for Media and Public Af-
fairs, Washington, will open the
program with a speech, "The
Media Elite and Bias in National
News Coverage" at 730 p.m.
Tuesday in the auditorium of the
Jenkins Fine Arts Center.
A "point-counterpoint" pres-
entation on "Bias among the
American Media Elite and the
impact of the media on politics" is
scheduled at 11 a.m. Wednesday
in the School of Nursing audito-
rium, 101 Nursing Building, and
will feature Lechter and David
Paletz of the department of politi-
cal science, Duke University.
The programs are free and open
to the interested public, faculty
and students.
�The East Carolinian is giving away two (2) pair or tickets for the Jimmy Buffett
Concert to be held on January 28th at Minges Coliseum. �Ml you need to do to
enter is fill out the form below and bring it by The Ekist Carolinian office or mail
it to: The East Carolinian, Old South Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858.
Name
Address
Phone .
�Only One Entiy Per Person
�Employees of The East Carolinian are not eligible to enter.
�ALL ENTRIES MUST BE RECEIVED BY THE EAST CAROLINIAN NO
LATER THAN 5 P.M. ON MONDAY, JANUARY 25TH.
�The East Carolinian is located in the Publications Building in front of
Joyner Libraryl
�Reasonable facsimiles will be accepted as an entry for the drawing.
DRAWING TO BE HELD AT 6 P.M. ON
TUESDAY, JANUARY 26TH.
WINNERS WILL BE NOTIFIED
The Jimmy Buffejtt concert is sponsored by the
Student-Union Major Concert Committee.
U.S. c
ATLANTA (AP) � The
Martin Luther King Jrs mess
of freedom rang out acros?
nation today, and Ebenezer
tist Church, site of his fai
triumph and tragedy, offen
20th annual ecumenical serj
since his assassination.
The national holiday to cj
memoratc King's 59th birtr
inspired people to march throl
a downpour in California,
hear ministers decry lingej
racism in the North and Soutl
Organizers in Little Rock,
planned a parade past hist
sites in the civil nghts struj
because, "You can't apprec
progress if you don't know wl
you've been coordinator Ai
Abrams said.
Bishop Leontine T.C. KellJ
the United Methodist Chi
1 alifornia-Nevada Conferej
was to deliver today's sermd
Ebenezer Baptist Church, w
King was co pastor.
Mrs.
ATLANTA (AP) � CoH
Scott King said on her
husband's birthday that if
Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
alive today he would be worl
to achieve peace in the worj
trouble spots and to get
blacks elected in the Ui
States.
Mrs. King, assessing the pi
ress of her slain husband's
violent civil rights movemenl
her annual "State of the Dret
address Friday, said Kn
dream is alive but much wj
remains.
We are far, far from the firl
line, but we must stay the courj
she told about 400 people gc
i red at the Marting Luther
( enter for Nonviolent So(
Change to observe what woj
have been the civil rights leadj
59th birthday.
Mrs. King's speech was on
many activities across the nat
marking King's birthdav.
third annual observance oi
national holiday in King's he
was Monday.
Had King not been assassmi
m 1�68, he likely would be w
ingfoday to improve black
cal representation, help bh
economically and bring peacl
places such as the Persian
Mrs. King said.
In the 25 years since King
his have a dream" speech, b
political representation
soared � but not nearly enoi
she said.
Though there are more tj
7,000blacks holding elected oi
in the United States, they accc
for only 1.5 percent of all ele

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Do
Le
I
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Mon. - Fn





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or of Advertising
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e based on
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ttt
c Jimmy Buffett
u need to do to
Ian office or mail
lie, NC 27858.
D AT 6 P.M. ON
TARY 26TH.
E NOTIFIED
is sponsored by the
ncert Committee.
U.S. celebrates King's birth
ATLANTA (AD � The Rev
Martin Luther King Jrs message
of freedom rang out across the
nation today, and Ebenezer Bap-
tist Church, site of his family's
triumph and tragedy, offered its
20th annual ecumenical service
since his assassination.
The national holiday to com-
memorate King's 59th birthday
inspired people to march through
.i downpour in California, and
hear ministers decry lingering
racism in the North and South.
Organizers in Little Rock, Ark
planned a parade past historic
sites in the civil rights struggle
because, "You can't appreciate
gross it vou don't know where
ve been coordinator Annie
Abrams said.
Bishop Leontine T.C. Kelly of
the I nited Methodist Church,
( alifornia-Nevada Conference,
was to deliver today's sermon at
I benezer Baptist Church, where
g was co pastor.
King's father and grandfather
were pastors there, and in 1974,
King's mother, Alberta, was as-
sassinated while playing the
church organ.
Mayor Andrew Young, one of
King's top lieutenants in the civil
nghts movement, and Sen. Low-
ell Weicker, R-Conn were
among the scheduled partici-
pants today.
Also planning to attend the
service and a wreath-laying at
King's tomb were Democratic
presidential candidates Paul Si-
mon and Jesse Jackson, a former
King aide.
Many Americans saw the third
observance of a national holiday
in King's honor as a challenge to
live up to his ideals.
Fontana, Calif police confis-
cated clubs and arrested two
people as 300 marched Sunday to
honor King's birthday despite a
downpour and threats of a distur-
bance by white supremacists.
The march east of Los Angeles
preceded a speech by Martin Lu-
ther King 111, the slain civil rights
leader's son.
"America is still, unfortunately,
a racist nation, not the masses ot
people, but a few individuals
King told an audience ol 1,000.
The Rev. Thomas Sweeney, a
Baptist minister who spoke Sun-
day in Nashville, Term cited a
rally by about 60 Klansmen in his
state the day before. "When you
see the KKK meeting in Pulaski,
you know it's not over yet
The Rev. Fred Jhuttlesworth,
who worked with King in the
1960s and is now pastor at
Cincinnati's Greater New Light
Baptist church, used the occasion
to criticize complancency by fel-
low blacks.
"The black community here
doesn't stay aroused and deter-
mined long enough to bring about
pronounced change he said in
Cincinnati.
Mrs. King speaks Fri
i
ATI ANTA (AP) � Coretta
tt King said on her late
' and's birthday that if the
Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. vcre
alive today he would be working
achieve peace in the world's
trouble spots and to get more
i ks elected in the United
tes.
Mrs. King, assessing the prog-
res- of her slain husband's non-
violent civil rights movement in
annual 'State oi the Dream"
addi ss Friday, said King's
tm is alive but much work
l c are far, far from the finish
it w e must stay the course
� Id about 400 people gath-
d at the Marting Luther King
enter for Nonviolent Social
( hange to observe what would
1 iave been the civil rights leader's
birthday.
Mrs. King's speech was one oi
many activities across the nation
marking King's birthdav. The
rd annual observance oi the
national holiday in King's honor
- Monday
I lad king not been assassinated
lfi�8, he likely would be work-
la) to improve black politi-
cal representation, help blacks
nomically and bring peace to
- such as the Persian Gulf,
Mrs. King said.
In the 23 years since King made
1 have a dream" speech, black
political representation has
soared � but not nearly enough,
she said.
Though there are more than
1 blanks holding elected office
in the United States, thev account
for only 1? percent of all elected
King was assassinated in Mem-
phis, Tenn on April 4, 1968. The
Nobel Peace Prize laureate's ac-
tual birthday was Friday.
In Philadelphia, Mayor W.
Wilson Goode and Rosa Parks,
the black woman whose refusal to
give up her seat on a buson Dec. 1,
1955, sparked King's leadership
of the 1955 bus boycott in
Montgomery, Ala planned to go
to Congress 1 lall for a bell-ringing
ceremony.
The most dramatic commemo-
ration today may be in Selma,
Ala where in 1965 state troopers
confronted civil rights protesters
on "Bloody Sunday A candle-
light march was to be held from
the First Baptist Church of Selma
to the Edmund Pettus Bridge,
where the confrontation oc-
curred.
"Some white people in Selma,
probably the majority, don't like
to see people going to the bridge.
They want it all to go away said
Mayor Joe Smitherman. "But I tell
them it's history, that people
come back to see how much thing
have changed. We've made racial
progress here
officials, she said. Blacks make up
II percent of the U.S. population.
Despite the presence of Demo-
cratic National Chairman Paul
Kirk in the first row of the audito-
rium, Mrs. King took a swipe at
both major political parties.
"In the political arena, he (King)
would remind us that in 1988
black Americans are treated as
non-entities, written off by the
republican party and taken for
granted by the Democratic
Party she said.
President Reagan taped a mes-
sage to be beamed by satellite
around the country for birthday
observances. King's son urged
economic pressure to end apart-
heid in South Africa, U.S. Educa-
tion Secretary William Bennett
led a "teach-in" and many
churches and schools held memo-
rials.
Reagan said King "reminded us
that the destinies of all Americans
were tied to one another, that the
freedom of all Americans was
inextricably bound together
King's son, Martin Luther King
111, told a Tallahassee, Fla audi-
ence that opponents of apartheid
could exert influence by boycott-
ing U.S. companies with
operations in South Africa.
'They will change apartheid
tomorrow if we shift our buying
power King, a 30-year-old Ful-
ton County, Ga commissioner,
said at Florida State University.
In memory of King, members of
Operation PUSH, a civil rights
group organized by Jesse Jackson,
protested apartheid outside that
country's consulate in Chicago.
Bennett taught an Uth-grade lit-
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school.
'The dream of equality and the
dream of equal opportunity, must
mean equal intellectual opportu-
nity in school the education sec-
retary told the students. "You are
making the dream a reality
High school students from Chi-
cago and Northwest Indiana met
at Chicago's Malcolm X College to
discuss the struggle for c' il rights
in the next decade. A decision to
hold classes Monday in the Dallas
suburb of Grand Prairi 1 -xas,to
make up an earlier -lay missed
because of an ice storm, was at-
tacked by local civil rights leaders.
'That is a blatant racist decision
on the part of the school board
Lee Alcorm, president of the local
chapter of the National Associa-
tion for the Advancement of Col-
ored People, told the board.
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�tf� Sa0t QIarnltman
Servmg the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, cniMmmt
Clay Deanhardt, M�pnSuno,
James F.J. McKee, .�� uhm-i
Andy Lewis, m. uh
Tim Ci iandler, spans ejot
)oi in Carter, r���� &��,
Michelle England, om
Debbie Stevens, seem�,
Jeff PARKER.supu�r-tor
TOM FURR,Ctrt�liiwiM�iujcr
Mike Upchurch, production m-
JOl IN W. MEDLIN, ah Dirtdof
Mac Clark, B�i��M�ugrr
January 19, 19S8
OPINION
Page 4
King
Issues of 60s are still issues today
AHDTHjfc
EMCTLV WHY
VttfvEGQ'KA HAVE A
mJtiSal Houwy for
THAT GUY
This past weekend was a time for
reflection and thought as the nation
both rejoiced and mourned in the
remembcrance oi Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr.
We rejoiced in the dream: King's
dream of a world of peace and to-
getherness, where a person is a per-
son and there is no prejudice. We
rejoiced in remembering King's
teachings of peaceful resistance. In
today's world, with its constant
threats of terrorism and war, King's
message that intellectual and spiri-
tual strength are mightier than
physical torce is one that we desper-
ately need to hear.
But we mourned the physical force
that took King from our midst. We
mourned the violence in Memphis,
Term on April 4, 1968, that ended
the dream for King. It wras sadly
ironic, but predictable, that the life
of a man who onlv wanted to love
was ended by the hate that he fought
all his life.
Martin Luther King Jr. the man
ied on that day, but the most im-
portant parts of King, his ideas and
his dreams, live on today.
Much progress has been made in
the arena of civil rights since King's
oath. Legal segragation is a think of
the past, and children of all races
play together peacefully in back-
yards, schoolyards and play-
grounds across the nation. In-
creased opportunities for education
and equal opportunities in the work
place have meant minorities have
more input, more power, than ever
before in deciding the events that
shape their lives.
Progress has been made, but there
i s still a long way to go. We cannot be
blind to the overt and subtle racism
that exist today among people of all
races.
Racism is evident on campus. It
would be impossible to count the
number of times "nigger" has been
scribbled on bathroom stalls, library
carols and desks across the univer-
sity. By the same token, profane
messages are also written about cau-
casions, and prejudice does not
draw racial lines: we see remarks
about religion, politics and national-
ity as well.
Some people even charge that ra-
cism played no small part in the
election controversy that raged last
spring. This is not the place for that
determination to be made, but evi-
dence has shown that students of all
races may have participated in some
form of racism during the election.
But the spectre of racism is not
always so open. We are becoming
more and more aware of subtle
forms of racism as they exist in
today's society. Attitudes, tones and
demeanors can be as damaging as
speech and overt action. Economic
racism, especially through govern-
ment cuts in educational funding,
will hurt the chances for poor people
of all races to get the education they
want and deserve.
Nationally, we rediscovered ra-
cism on a grand scale Saturday
when the remarks of Jimmy 'The
Greek" Snyder were made public
and he was fired from CBS. Snyder's
inflamatory remarks about blacks in
athletics were innapropriate, but
they highlighted more than ever the
ingrained prejudice that pervades
the world.
World wide we are faced with the
South African situation, perhaps the
most abhorrent case of racism left
today. As long as the white South
African minority government is al-
lowed to control the black majority
in such a domineering way, there
can be no justice in the world. It is
time for the U.S. and the rest of the
world to take a firm stand and force
Botha and his government to make
some true political reforms and give
freedomto the native africans.
More than a way of behaving,
prejudice is a way of thinking. The
only way to stop prejudice is to
change that way: to think of every-
one as being truly equal, and to ig-
nore such trivial factors as skin color
and national origin.
As students and the future leaders
of this country, we are charged with
changing the attitudes that pervade
today's society. We cannot allow
prejudice to stand in the way of
progress. We cannot allow our-
selves to be prejudiced or to single
out groups for discrimination.
Most of all, we cannot allow our-
selves to forget Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. or, more importantly, the
ideas and dreams for which he gave
up his life.
King's dream is still alive for us
The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.�a passionate believer one is almost immediately labeled as a trouble maker
of nonviolent methods, no matter what the provacation � Well, labels have never bothered me, so I II vemu
foucht the battle acainstbicotry with courage and eloquence what so many have refused to admit: ra 1 "
until his violent death. tion are real problems and they are very much alive not only
It was April 4,1968; a day of shock, of guilt, of sorrow-of in our nation as a whole, but here at b , n
white fear everyone, not even akt of people, but just enough to malife
It was the day that Black America almost lost hope, but we uncomfortable for someof our students - and this ught no
trusted in God as He renewed our strength. If they slew the be. .
apostle of nonviolence and love, what would the alternative It's apparent that some have false inclinations
be7 If they slew thedreamer, what would happen to the Black "color of their white skin has ordained them t i be super r
Man's Dream? (King) and that bothers me. Not because it makes me teel
It's been almost 20 years since that tragic day in Memphis, inferior - because it doesn't - but because at turns they allow
and yet, as we paused yesterday to honor King, it's more than their inner feelings to interfere with the outer freedoms of
evident: though the dreamer is gone, the dream is very much others and this is wrong.
FOCUS
By
Steven Pierce
alive.
The life of King and his ultimate sacrifice provide us with
the inspiration to not only deepen our dedication to the goals
for which he gave us so much, but also to set goals ourselves
and to strive toward reaching those goals inspite of obstacles.
It won't always be easy, but then as King once said, "there can
be no great social gain without individual pain
He went on to say that before the victory for brotherhood is
won, some would be misunderstood, some would be called There is no room at ECU or the world abroad I r this type
names, some would be thrown into jail, and some, just as ofbehavior and it must be stopped. Yes, it must ceasi because
King, would have to face a physical death. there is no division in humanity: whether the color of your
Sincehisdcath,wecanboast,butnottoohastily,thatwe've skin is light, dark or somewhere in between, we are all ot
come a long way. We still have a long way to go. During God's people and we were all created in H
King'sera,theissuesof racismand discrimination wereoutin Let us from this day forward press toward the markol the
the open and as a result, America's political leaders were higher calling as we tear down the walls of racism .
forced todeal with the real problems. Today these same issues discrimination forever and replace them with the bonds
are still around, yet if they are brought out or talked about, love and brotherhood.
Poverty gives a harsh lesson to teacher
�xi To
By KAREN ROSE
Special to The East Carolinian
My first year of teaching, I worked in
an inner-city school in Greensboro. The
student population was split into two
districts parts � one that inhabited the
"old money country club neighbor-
hood that had been taken over by the
goowing city and the other part made
up of students from poor families that
inhabited the noisy, overcrowded fed-
eral housing project adjacent to the
school grounds.
The "project kids as they had been
labeled by older, more experienced, and
certainly more calloused teachers, came
to school for the free lunches that state
and federal funding provided. These
kids sat willingly through four hours of
class each morning � not because they
were interested in learning about simi-
les, metaphors, or the symbolism in
Shakespeare's romances, but because
they were interested in eating. Filling
their stomachs seemed a much more
useful and practical reason for coming
to school than did filling their minds
with poetic language. I couldn't under-
stand their disinterest in the world I was
trying to open to them through my
teaching of great literature.
The housing project and the absolute
despair that provided a way of life for its
residents brought out a hositlity and
violicnce new to the novice teacher who
had grown up in comfortable suburbia.
Few Mondays passed without my stu-
dents telling me horror stories about the
beatings, knifings and break-ins that
had beset the project during the previ-
ous weekend. I listened with half an car
to the tales I knew were exaggerated
and impatiently assured the kids that,
while I didn't live in the project, I wasn't
so gullible that I'd believe every tall tale
they told.
Just before Christmas that year, I
called the mother of a student who had
been a constant, belligerent and uncon-
trollable behavior problem in class. I
had, I complained to the parent, tried
every disciplinary strategy I knew, but
none had succeeded. Judy's behavior, I
sanctimoniously told the girl's mother,
was making it impossible for me to
teach the rest of the class.
She listened in silence to my list of
specific complaints and then quietly
assured me, "Judy won't give you no
more problems
And she was right.
The day after my phone call, Judy
came to class-swollen, bruised, and
conquered. Gone was the child whose
animosity had kept me constantly on
my toes. The girl standi ig before me
was only a shell of the Judy I'd foughtso
hard to teach.
"Don't you be callin' my n igain,
MizRose she whispering almost inau-
diblv as she looked at the fli I'll do
whatever you want from nov
All my idealistic dreams for teaching,
inspiring, and changing the v. orld died
that day with Judy's spirit. This world
� the world of poverte and it- resulting
violence � was one for which I was
completely unprepared.
Six months later, I moved to teach
in a private school where, to my new
students, poverty and the daily trage-
dies that were a part of it were as alien as
they had been to me a few months ear-
lier. But I couldn't forget that I had run.
I knew that by leaving Greensboro 1 had
been defeated by the same S stem that
had conquered Judy.
(Editor's note: This is part oftheconiinu
ing series on poverty in North Carolina.
Karen Rose teaches at Apex High School,
near Raleigh. She has a master's degree from
North Carolina State University and his
worked with the Capital Area Writing Proj
ect and the Wiidacres Writing Retreat.)
Smokers should be aware of dangers they face
On "60 Minutes" recently, a segment was devoted
to the preponderance of heavyweight legal power
defending the tobacco companies, up against the
httle old lady left with only a fragment of her lung,
who was suing the tobacco companies for a few
million dollars. Mike Wallace was the host, and
with characteristic candor) he flashed back to the
old days when cigarette smoking was thought to be
entirely harmless. He gave the viewers a fragment of
a paid ad featuring Ronald Reagan, pushing some
cigarette or another, and a second quick flash of
Mike Wallace, in the bad old days, merchandising
rhilip Morris cigarettes.
The planted axiom of the "60 Minutes" segment
was very plain. What it said was: You can't beat the
cigarette companies' legal dreadnoughts with
small-time lawyers. Moreover, the heavy legal
people, earning $200 per hour, are harassing the
plaintiffs, asking them whether they had any record
of illegitimate children, venereal diseases, club feet
� anything to persuade the judge or jury that the
lung cancer was not necessarily the result of heavy
smoking.
Two reminiscences in point:
In the mid-SCs, Mike Wallace launched a net-
work interrogatory, and his very first guest was
Mississippi Sen. James Eastland. Wallace's reputa-
tion as a dragon-slayer was legendary, and much of
the world tuned in to see what, if anything, would be
left of Sen. Eastland at the end of the half-hour.
The viewing world was astonished. Wallace be-
haved like Dinah Shore, and Sen. Eastland wind-
bagged his way through the entire period without so
much as a whisker's opposition from the great inter-
rogator. It was a while later that I asked Wallace how
it was that he had lain down with the lion. He told
me: "Do you know what that s.o.b. said to me like 20
seconds before we went on the air? He said to me,
'Mike? If yo'all asks me any question I don' think
quite fair, I'm gonna � Wallace went through the
morion of reaching into his pocket as Eastland had
done, pulling out a package of cigarettes, offer you
one of these Philip Morris cigarettes, and I'm gonna
say, Mike: Here, hep yo'self to a nigger cigarette"
In those days, any identification of a brand name
as a product associated with blacks would have
meant, roughly speaking, the end of the commercial
affair. Ggarette smoking wasn't a question of
health, but of caste. Philip Morris wanted to be an
image cigarette. The social emphasis these days is on
the harm cigarettes do to the ingnorant classes.
A second reminiscence. Two months ago, a
scholar died in New Haven, Conn a gentleman of
cosmopolitan training and superior intelligence. He
read Sanskrit as readily as English, and he knew
exactly what it meant when, opening one of his
(three per day) cigarette packages he read the warn-
ing that tobacco is in the opinion of the surgeon
general dangerous to your health.
Mike Wallace tells us now on TV that more people
die every year from having smoked cigarettes than
from drunken driving, whooping cough, hiccups
and listening to Democratic orators. Those of us who
are not equipped to make independent scientific
judgments have only our senses to go by, and the
answer to the question, "Are cigarettes harmful and
in many cases deadly?" is plainly yes to the moder-
ately alert person, never mind the Renaissance
scholar.
Now, we can see from the way in which "60
Minutes" treated the cigarette question exactly what
the anti-nicotine strategy is. It is to persuade some-
one, somewhere along the line, that tobacco isn't
merely a pleasurable sensual distraction, like the
kind of thing Ronald Reagan and Mike Wallace used
to push. It is not to be confused with pickles, or
chilies jalapenos. It is, rather, in a class with mari-
juana and cocaine: a drug consumed with a high
incidence of mortal consequence.
This does not automatically alter the legal picture.
The lady on "60 Minutes so arrantlv indignant
with the tobacco companies, was not asked by Mike
Wallace the question: "How much pleasure did you
take from smoking during the 37 years you acknowl-
edge having smoked?"
On The Right
By
William F. Buckley Jr.
It isn't that such a question is too highbrow to ask
a humble ex-smoker. If it had been asked of the
Renaissance scholar, he'd have answered: "1 took
huge pleasure from smoking Whether he'd have
said, on his deathbed, that he was glad to have taken
up the habit in early life, one can't say. But that, after
all, is an unfair question. It is like asking Mata Hari
when she was against the wall before the firing
squad, whether she was glad to have adopted espio-
nage as a profession.
i
. i. .
mtun'm i � � �
Philip
Mond
MANILA, Philippines (A
Filipinos voted Monday n
gional elections precede)
weeks of violence that left atl
86 people dead, including
bernatorial candidate slain
before the polls opened
The military also report
least nine soldiers were kille
five other people were woul
in three separate clashes M
with communist rebels
armed forces blamed the rj
for most of the campaign
lence.
Officials reported gene
brisk turnouts nationwide
the pollsclosed at 4 p.m. Scat!
early returns from metropd
centers were expected bv
night (11 a.m. EST), but
Commission on Elections
firm trends would not be al
able before Tuesday.
U.S. officials ordered the 4(
American troops, Defense
partment civilians and milj
dependents living in the Phi
pines to avoid unnecessary ti
so they would not get hurt
election violence.
The 160,000-strong an
forces were on full alert,
troops guarded polling place
well as broadcast stations
intelligence reports that lefti:
rightist extremists might
assassinate officials visiting
stations for interviews.
Despite the security, a ras
violent incidents was repoi
Still, Election Commissiq
Ramon Felipe described the v
turnout in Manila as "very
pressive" and insisted "evf
thing is peaceful and normal
The governmen4 informa
agency said the turnout
heavy in other metropolitan a
as well.
But the militarv said noneei
600 voters in a town
Mindanao's island's North cj
bato province cast ballots beca
armed men believed to be
lem rebels entered the corn
nity late Sunday and ordeit
boycott.
Voters in 62 of the countr
provinces were casting bailed
about 16,000 candidates. Vol
was postponed in the othei
provinces because oi fears
lence. Elections in those provii
were rescheduled for van
dates. The voting was provi
for under a new constitution
fied Feb. 2.
President Corazon Aqui
who had promised the vol
would restore full democrac
the Thillippines. deplored
violence that left 39 candid;
dead, including a gubemato
hopeful slain hours before
Nursing scores
need raising
RALEIGH (AD � Adminisl
tors at N.C. Central Unive
and N.C. A&T State Unive
say they will do whatever it U
to boost their nursing gradud
passing rates on the state licj
ing exam this vear to avoi
admissions freeze
"We are at a point where
have no choice but to pull
every stop to assure that tlj
students do their very best oil
exam said Mickey Bun
NCCU's vice chancellor for
demic affairs.
"Anything that will help t
on their performance on thatj
amination, we'll have to do
Burnim said.
On Thursdav, a University
North Carolina Board of Go
nors panel voted to forbid the
predominantly black schci
from admitting any new stud(
to their nursing programs unl
at least 60 percent oi their gral
ates pass the exam this year.
The panel took the action,
posed by system President
Spangler Jr after reviewing
exam performances of LN
nursing graduates. Of the
UNC campuses offering nursl
degrees, NCCU and A&T fallej
meet the 60-percent minim
pass rate required by the
Board of Nursing.
At NCCU, 46 percent of nun
graduates taking the test for
first time in 1987 passed, whih
percent of A&T's gradu;
passed.
Beverly L. Malone, deanj
A&T's school of nursing, said
faculty members had tutored
dents weekly and had conduc
special review courses since (j
rials received the test results.





STAND
A
1)
THE FAST CAROLINIAN
IANUAL ' 19, 19SK
II V
v face
On The Right
By
K Bucklev Jr.
it 1 asked �t the
i have ans ei I tool
ether he'd have
t he v as glad to have taken
rtecan r say. But that,after
It is like asking Mata 1 lari,
wall before the Bring
lad u have adopted
Philippine elections held
Monday amid violence
MANILA, Philippines (AD �
Filipinos voted Monday in re-
gional elections preceded bv
weeks oi violence that left at least
86 people dead, including a gu-
bernatorial candidate slain hours
before the polls opened.
The military also reported at
least nine soldiers were killed and
five other people were wounded
in three separate clashes Monday
with communist rebels. The
armed forces blamed the rebels
for most oi the campaign vio-
lence.
Officials reported generally
brisk turnouts nationwide before
the polls closed at 4 p.m. Scattered
early returns from metropolitan
centers were expected bv mid-
night (11 a.m. EST), but the
Commission on Elections said
firm trends would not be avail-
able before Tuesday.
U.S. officials ordered the 40,000
American troops. Defense De-
partment civilians and military
dependents living in the Thillip-
pines to avoid unnecessary travel
so they would not get hurt in the
election violence.
The 160,000-strong armed
forces were on full alert, and
troops guarded polling places as
well as broadcast stations after
intelligence reports that leftist or
rightist extremists might trv to
assassinate officials visiting the
stations for interviews.
Despite the securitv, a rash of
violent incidents was reported.
Still, Election Commissioner
Ramon Felipe described the voter
turnout in Manila as "very im-
pressive" and insisted "even-
thing is peaceful and normal
The government information
agency said tho turnout was
heavy in other metropolitan areas
as well.
But the military said none of the
600 voters in a town in
Mindanao's island's orth Cata-
bato province cast ballots because
armed men believed to be Mos-
lem rebels entered the commu-
nity late Sunday and ordered a
boycott.
Voters in 62 of the country's 73
provinces were casting ballots for
about 16,000 candidates. Voting
was postponed in the other 11
provinces because of fears of vio-
lence. Elections in those provinces
were rescheduled for various
dates. The voting was provided
for under a new constitution rati-
fied Feb. 2.
President Corazon Aquino,
who had promised the voting
would restore full democracy to
the Thillippines, deplored the
violence that left 39 candidates
dead, including a gubernatorial
hopeful slain hours before the
Nursing scores
need raising
RALEIGH (AP) � Administra-
tors at C. Central University
and N.C. A&T State University
sav thev will do whatever it takes
to boost their nursing graduates'
passing rates on the state licens-
ing exam this year to avoid an
admissions freeze.
"We are at a point where we
have no choice but to pull out
every stop to assure that these
students do their verv best on the
exam said Mickey Burnim,
NCCU's vice chancellor for aca-
demic affairs.
"Anything that will help them
on their performance on that ex-
amination, we'll have to do it
Burnim said.
On Thursday, a University of
North Carolina Board of Gover-
nors panel voted to forbid the two
predominantly black schools
from admitting any new students
to their nursing programs unless
at least 60 percent of their gradu-
ates pass the exam this year.
The panel took the action, pro-
posed by system President CD.
Spangler Jr after reviewing the
exam performances of UNC's
nursing graduates. Of the nine
UNC campuses offering nursing
degrees, NCCU and A&T failed to
meet the 60-percent minimum
pass rate required by the N.C.
Board of Nursing.
At NCCU, 46 percent of nursing
graduates taking the test for the
first time in 1987 passed, while 50
percent of A&T's graduates
passed.
Beverly L. Malone, dean of
A&Ts school of nursing, said that
faculty members had tutored stu-
dents weekly and had conducted
special review courses since offi-
cials received the test results.
polls opened.
Late Sunday, tour assailants
shot and killed Roy Tadilla, ad-
ministration candidate for gover-
nor ot Luzon island's Camarines
Norte province, as he prepared to
address a final campaign rally.
The assailants escaped.
Earlier Sunday, another pro-
administration gubernatorial
candidate, Emmanuel Santos,
escaped injury when assailants
hurled a grenade into a rally in
Luzon's Nueva Ecija province.
One person was killed and about
20 were injured, officials said.
In Uocos Norte province oi
northern Luzon, officials said
gunmen kidnapped the acting
mayor oi Pagudpud and three
companions as thev inspected
voting stations early today. Gun-
men also wounded a policeman
guarding a polling station in
Cavite province near Manila.
The Philippine Constabulary,
the country's internal security
force, said 500 people were ar-
rested in Olongapo City near the
U.Srun Subic Bay naval base
after they tried to vote twice.
Candidates were running for
governor, mayors and local coun-
cil seats to replace officials ap-
pointed by Mrs. Aquino after she
tired those who served under
ousted President Ferdinand Mar-
cos. Mrs. Aquino was swept to
power in a civilian-military upris-
ing in February 1986 that sent
Marcos into exile.
The candidates included two
former officers linked to previous
This worker moves some furniture into the new building, which is supposed to hold
this semester (Hardy Alligood, Photolab).
classes some tim
SINGERS DANCERS � INSTRUMENTAl ISTS
TECHNICIANS VARIETY PERFORMERS
Kings Production' the ivorld'i '1 i
live entertainment, is holding auditi for 1
spectacular 1988 season a' CAROWINDS
Charlotte. North Carolina
Pay is good and obs are plenl
provide one round trip airt.jf �
work at a park over 250 mile' fi
Make your audition a show we cat do witl
The new classroom building contains more than just classrooms. This lounge is one of several in the
building (Hardv Alligood, Photolab).
GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA
Friday January 22
University of North Carolina� Greensboro
Elliott University Center�Cone Ba'lroom
Singers 12-2 PM, Dancers & Instrumentalists 3 1- � "
Specialty Acts 12 4 PM
WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA
Saturday January 23
North Carolina School of the Arts Workplace Sti I
Singers 1-3 PM, Dancers & Instrumentalists 4
Specialty Acts, Technicians 1 5 PM
itlOl
. �
NOES "
River Bluff Apartments
2 Bd. Townhouses Temporarily Reduced to
$295month
�Fully Carpeted
�Large Pool
�Free Cable
�ECU Bus Service
�1 Bd. Garden Apts. Available
10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd. (1.5 miles from Campus)
758-4015
College courses for career success.
Course Title Name Nfi $�� Begin End Days
MLSC 1001 - Introduction to ROTC and the Army
Section 01 -1400 - 1500 - M
Section 02 - 0900 - 1000 - W
Section 03 - 0900 - 1000 - TII
MLSC 1002 - Map Use and Terrain Analysis
Section 01 - 1000-1100-M
Section 02-0900-1000-T
Section 03 - 1000 -1100 - W
For Further Information, contact your Department
of Military Science at 757-69676974.
ARMY RESERM OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS
Contact Captain Steve L. Jones
(Erwin Hall) 757-6967
Annual 'Winter Sale
40 off
M'faff andWinter
Cfot hing, Se fee ted
Jewelry and Accessories
Some Spring and Summer
Merchandise
MonSat. 10-6
Thur. 10-8
919 A, Red Banks Road 756-1058
Arlington Village
it n'u
iitmi-H
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rir

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Wednesday, January 20.
8:00 P.M. Hendrix
ANGEL HEART
Wednesday, January 20
8:00 p.m. Coffeehouse
U.S. College
Comedy Competition
(Presented by Special Events Commettee)
Friday, January 22 -
Sunday, January 24
8:00 p.m. Hendrix
INNERSPACE
Monday, January 25
8:00 p.m. Multi-Purpose Room
CASINO NIGHT
Admission $1.00
(Presented by Productions Committee)
Upcoming Events:
Thursday, January 28 - In Concert
"Jimmy Buffett"
Sunday. February 7 - Preservation Hall
Jazz Band
Tuesday, February 9 - Pornography De
bate featuring Gloriz Leonard and Dolores
Alexander
For more information contact tfie
Student Union at 757 6611, ext. 210.
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THE EAST CAROUN1AN
JANUARY 19,1988
Classifieds
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HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Part-time interior de-
sign student - send resume to : Designer,
3010 East lo th St Greenville, N.C.
NEEDED: Part time babysitter Monday-
Fndav. 830-200 p.m. References re-
quired. Call 756-9822.
SUPER SUMMER JOBS Sixty five 4-H
camp summer jobs now open. Five loca-
tions in the state with many interesting
program areas. Excellent training pro-
vided. Mr Florv will be recruiting at
Memorial Gvm on ECU campus on Janu
ir y 28. Come bv and see what a great ex-
perience vou can have.
INTERESTED IN paying off those
Christmas bills or beginning to plan for a
new Spring wardrobe? Brodys' has part-
time sales associate positions available
individuals who can work flexible
hours Apply at Brodvs' Carolina East
Mall. M-W. 2 4 p.m.
rocker. Call 756-4930.
CAROLINA GRILL CAFE: Good home
cooked food. Welcome back-to-school spe-
cial: A complete breakfast for $1.49 tax. A
complete lunch for $2.60tax. 907 Dickin-
son Avenue. 3 blocks from ECU. 752-1188
for quick call ins.
ARE YOU having a party and need a D.J.?
For the best in Top 40, Beach and Dance,
call Morgan at 758-7967. Reasonable rates.
References on request.
PARTY ANIMALS Great for birthday or
any occasion Gorilla-grams, Gator-
grams, Penquin-for Hire, Balloons deliv-
ered in costume! Deliveries on or off cam-
pus Chip Py 830-1823.
IS IT TRUE you can buy jeeps for $44.00
through the U.S. government?Get the facts
today! Call 1-312-742-1142 Ext. 5271-A.
FOR SALE: Breakfast set, table and two
chairs. Call after 6:00 p.m. 758-5422.
FOR RENT
room in Wildwood Villas townhouse.
$125.00 each plus utilities. Call Julie at 752-
4781.
ROOM FOR RENT: Female, everything
included. Call after 6:00 p.m. 758-5422.
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apts for rent.
Furnished. Contact 1 lollieSimonowich at
752-2865.
NON-DRINKER male or female student
to share a two bedroom split level apart-
ment plus 12 utilities. Call 758-6872.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share brand
new two bedroom apartment. Call 830-
5193.
FOR SALE
NOT A BUFFET FAN? Go see Sting, in-
stead! Chapel 1 lilL January 28. 2 tickets -
s4 00. Croat seats1 Call 752-4996.
FOR SALE: 9' by 12 carpet, blue with floor
pad. Perfect tor dorm room. Call :8-8591
after &00 p.m.
SOUND M1VER D.J. service is back in
Greenville! Back with more equipment,
more experience, and even better sound
quality. For more into , don't hesitate to
call Bob. 752-4916.
FOR SALE: Loft tor 2 twin beds complete
with ladder, $80.00. Two peices of 11' by 14'
carpet. $20 00 each. Call Tracy at 758-1325.
FOR SALE: Sting tickets. Chapel Hill,
N C $35 00 a pair. Call between 8-5 at 351-
2524 or alter 5 p.m. 758-7024.
FOR SALE: Fullv equipped supersingle
waterbed $120.00. Call 830-0598.
FOR SALE: Now Kenmore 16 cubic foot
refrigerator, matching love seat and
FEMALE roommate needed. No deposits
required. $100 per month plus 13 utili-
ties. Phone 752-2421.
ROOM NEAR CAMPUS. $125 00 in-
cludes utilities. Deposit required. 757-
3343.
IF YOU NEED a room a fully fur-
nished apt. in Kingston place is available
for 2 individuals. Rent is $150.00month.
No utilities. Call collect 703-560-8779.
ROOM FOR RENT. Good location. One
block from campus. If interested call 757-
3088.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 2
bedroom duplex with woodstove.
$l25.00month and 12 utilities. 3 blocks
from campus. 752-1743. Keep trying!
THREE BEDROOM house located near
ECU, $300.00 per month, lease and de-
posit required. Call 758-1274 after 5:00
p.m.
TWO ROOMMATES needed to share
A Ik-auuful Place to Live
� All New �
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
� Ixwalcd Near ECU
�Near Major Shopping Centers
�Across Krom Highway Ialrol Station
Limited Oder - $275 a month
Contact J. T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830 1937
Office open � Apt 8. 12 - 5:30 pm.
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet one hedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cahle TV.
Couples or singles only. $195 a month. 6
month lease. MOBILE HOME RENTALS -
couples or singles. Apartment and mohlle
homes in Azalea Gardens near Brook Valley
County Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
PERSONALS
MARGAR1TAVILLE MONDAY is com-
ing to WZMB on Monday, January 25th.
Listed to 91.3 FM for more details.
TO ALL GREEKS: We hope you have a
gro.it semester! The sisters and pledges
of Chi Omega.
THE OMEGA PS1 PHI Fraternity Inc.
will have an interest meeting on Tues-
day the 19th at the Cultural Center for all
males interested in learning more about
the organization. The meeting will be at
8:00 p.m.
FREE BUFFET TICKETS, Buffet CD,
Buffet Party Packs Listed to WZMB
91.3 FM for more details
DELTA ZETA: The new sisters would
like to thank you all for everything! Ini-
tiation wasgTeat; January 13,1988 will be
remembered for a long time to come.
WE ARE SO GLAD TO BE SISTERS
NEW DELI JAMS! Catch the down
home style pickin' blues of Lightnin
Wells on Thursday, Snatches of Pink
Friday and don't you miss Flipside Sat-
urday.
SKI WEEKEND for Sigma Nu is set.
The condos at the top of Sugar are wait-
ing. Brothers and future pledges make
arangements to go Feb. 12 and 13. Just
bring money for gas and lift ticket, the
condos are provided by Brother Bailey.
ALL STUDENTS: Do you want to help
plan the trips available for you to take
during breaks? Would you like to de-
cide where these trips go to? Whether its
skiing or fun in the sun - the Travel
Comm. can offer it. Come attend the
committee's first meeting for the
semester and help us decide on the trips
for next year. It will be January 20 at 5:00
p.m. in Mendenhall. Call 757-6611 ext.
210 for more details.
KAPPA SIGMA PRESENTS "Wasted
away again in Greenville Pre-Buffet
concert party Before Jimmy takes the
stage, come on by and help us rage.
Two meascly buckes is cheap these
days for a kick ass band like the "Fade-
aways and when the band is in be-
tween making your bones shake. Buf-
fet discs will jam while they are on
break. Because ABC laws are such a
bone, we've got to ask that you bring
your own. If this isn't enough to make
you love it, there may be an appearance
by Brother Jimmy Buffet. Show starts
at 3:00 January 28, come party with the
Kappa Sigs cause its sure to be great.
GLAD TO SEE this school can still party
pastl:0( The late night last Thursday at
the Kappa Sig house was rippin so lets
make getting Butfaced at the Kappa Sig
house a Thursday night tradition.
REMAINING BETA PI'S: Hang in
there! We love you and are behind you
all the way DZ love, the new sisters.
GAMMA GAMMAS - Congratulations
on becoming Brothers of TI IE BES1 fra-
ternity at ECU. You guys worked hard tor
it, welcome to the best. The Brothers of
Phi Tau.
DEAR RUSHEE: While it may not be
apparent to you, the decision to join a
college fraternity may be among the most
important and rewarding decisions of
your life. Any fraternity can supplement
your college education, offering personal
development and enhancement of char-
actor. I lowever, its up to you, through
your individual effort, to make it a suc-
cess and got the fulfillment you desire.
The knowledge your gain, the brothers
with whom you associate and the experi
ernes you will have make it possible to
form a special closeness that you may
have left behind with high school. Unlike
joining other organizations during your
college days, membership in Pi Kapppa
Alpha Fraternity does not end upon
graduation. If you would like the chance
to become a part of this outstanding na-
tional fraternity, the opportunity is yours.
I lope to see you at Pi Kappa Alpha rush.
GO PIKE.
THANKS, THANKS, THANKS, for
making Off The Cuff your Friday after-
noon party! I lope Spring Semester is a
gcxxi one.
PANTANAS CELEBRATES the begin-
ning of rush: Tuesday night come on
down to Pantanas after rush and enjoy
some great specials: $2.00 pitchers and
buck-fifty drink specials What a groat
way to wind down "after the rush GO
GREEK.
OFF THE CUFF hopes rush week is a
huge success
KAPPA SIG'S: The snow had been fall-
ing since early Thursday, little did we
know that night we'd go out and play For
vou had invited us over for loads of fun,
but by the end of the night, we were wet
and on the run. 1 lowever, we have to
admit that the highlight of the n.ght, was
our great snowball fight. We re psyched
for this Friday night You guys are the
best. Love, the AZls
NEED CONTESTANTS for January
30th Dating Game. Males and 1 ��males,
caU Paul at Off The Cuff or seo Big Al at
the EC Tea Party for more info
P1KA LITrLE SISTERS. 1 ley gals W
come back, hope you had a groat h �1
There is a meeting this Wednesday al .
at Mendenhall, seo ya there
SORRY ABOUT the now cups not �
available don't despair weha
now and you're gonna have son H
additions to your kitchen (cal in � See
yaatOff The Cuff
AZD'S would like to welcome
back and wish them the best . .
the spring semester
AZD happy hour Wednesdaj i . : � at
Pantanas. Don't miss out oi I
of dinner for two!
ALL STUDENTS: If you like ��
and want to get involved witl
union, then come to the I raw .
tee meeting on Wednesday, fai
at 5 p.m. in Mendenhall For n -
call 757-6611.
PHI SIGMA PI and the Amei
Societv is sponsoring a ai
January 28 form 9 4 at the EC U stu
store. Have your best friend, pi I � -
worst enemy thrown in jail and
money for cancer research
PI KAPPA ALPHA: Welc mel kkl
and a hearty hollo to all our 1
Hope Santa didn't jack a:
your thinkin caps and your di �
on cause its pmnj be a helluva -
CD PIKES? Paul CYBriOT was
ATTENTION ALL ICL MAI ES
Beta Theta Pi at 1110 B Cotanc)
rush, Monday night thru Wednesdaj
night form 7-11.
Announcements
SAVE THOSE WRAPPERS
Deposit all empty sticklers, natural fla-
or gum packs and Doritos brand cool
ranch flavor tortilla chip bags in the U.S.
ege Comedy Competibon displays
located in the Student Book Store lobby
and Mendenhall. ECU could win a free
dy concert if we collect the most
wrappers.
SELF-HELP POSITION
Part time ClerkTypist and Reception-
ist; The Offke of International Studies and
Jarships needs a reliable, conscien-
tious, and efficient student with strong
- and some experience to assist in a
variety of activities. Good typing, copy-
and clerical skills are desired. Please
contact Dr. Maurice D. Simon at 757-6504-
r apply at his office, Brewster A-118. We
will be hiring as soon as possible.
CLASS CLOWNS
Win prizes and gain exposure by enter-
ing the U.S. College Comedy Competi-
tion. Wed Jan. 20,8:00 p.m in the Coffee-
house, groundfloor, Mendenhall. Prepare
a -minute comedy routine (no vulgar or
obscene material please) and have it
fudged bv professional comedians. Free t-
shirts to all participants. Call 757-6611,
ext 271 for more info.
COMEDY COMPETITION
Come cheer on your favorite ECU
comedian as they compete for prizes in
the U.S. College Comedy Competition.
Free Doritos and sticklets gum to be given
away, Wed Jan. 20 at 8 p.m. in the Coffee-
house, groundfloor, Mendenahll.
SELF-HELP POSITION
Part-time ClerkTypist and Reception-
ist: The Department of Political Science
seeks a reliable, conscientious, and effi-
cient student with strong skills and some
experience to assist staff and faculty in a
variety of activities. Good typing, copying
and clerical skills are desired. Please con-
tact Mrs. Cynthia Smith, Brewster A-124
personally or by telephone, 757-6030, 8:30
am. to 5 p.m Mon. - Fri. We will be hiring
as soon as possible.
SRS7GRAD STUDENTS
Now is the time to be registered with
the Career Planning and Placement Serv-
ice in the Bloxton 1 louse. Located between
Mendenhall and Greene Residence Hall,
this is a place where graduating students
may put resumes and establish a creden-
tials file. Interview sign-ups begin Jan. 20
and vou must be registered to sign up.
General Information meetings will be
held Jan 19 at 3 & 4 p.m. in Mendenhall
221.
INTERVIEW WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton House is offering
these one hour sessions to aid you in
developing better interviewing skills. A
film and discussion of how to interview
on and off campus will be shared. These
sessions are held in the Career Planning
Room on Jan. 20, 25, & 26 at 3 p.m. and at
7 p.m. on Jan. 26.
BIOLOGYCHEMISTRY
Those who graduate this year will want
to register at the Career Planning and
Placement Service. The Research Triangle
I nsti tute will be interviewing on campus if
enough majors �ign up. You may want to
clip this and post so no others will see.
Glaxo wili also be here and we have vide-
otapes on career with the Southern Re-
search Institute and the National Cancer
Institute.
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton House is offering
these one hour programs on beginning a
resume for your job search. 1 landouts and
samples will be given out to the first 20
people to come to each session. No sign up
required. These sessions are held in the
Career Planning Room on Jan. 22 & 28at 3
p.m. and on Jan. 26 at 7 p.m.
All STUDENTS
The Travel Committee is having their
first meeting for the semester. All are
welcome. It will be Wed Jan. 20th at 5
p.m. in Mendenhall. Please try to attend.
For further info call 757-6611.
MUSICAL
The long-running hit Broadway musi-
cal, Purlie, will be performed in Wright
Auditorium on Wed Jan. 27,1988, at 8:00
p.m. This energy packed blockbuster, full
of sweet ballads and powerful production
numbers, will be here for one perform-
ance only. Tickets for this delightful event
are available at the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall, ECU, 757-6611, ext. 266.
Central Ticket Office hours are 11:00 a.m.
until 6:00 p.m. This event is sponsored by
the Dept. of University Unions.
VOCAL ARTS ENSEMBLE
The Dept. of University Unions and
The School of Music present the Los
Angeles Vocal Arts Ensemble, a uniquely
talented group of singers and accompa-
nists, in Hendrix Theatre on Thurs Jan.
21, 1988, at 8:00 p.m. Tickets for this
wonderful concert are available at the
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall, 757-
6611, ext. 266. Central Ticket Office hours
are 11:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m.
MODELS NEEDED
Positions are open for modeling in the
School of Art figure drawing classes. The
salary is $5 per hour. See Tran Gordley or
Connie Fblmer in Jenkins 2000 or call 757-
6563 for info, and application forms. T.
Gordley may be reached at 757-6259 or
Jenkins 1307.
Al
Amnesty International meets every 4th
Wed. at 8 p.m. at St. Paul's Episcopal
Church, 401 E. 4th St in the upper floor
from the 4th St. entrance. Next meeting
Jan. 27th.
CAMPREC. DAY
Summer positions with camps, parks,
and resorts are available for students in a
variety of majors. Over fifty recreational
employers will interview students on
Recreation Day, Jan. 28, in Memorial
Gym. To sign up for interviews and more
info, contact Cooperative Education in
304Rawi.
DANCE PERFORMANCE
ATLANTIC DANCE THEATRE pres-
ents TOINTES OF PASSION-BODIES
IN BEAT an evening of dance Jan. 23,
8:15 p.m New Bern Senior High School
"ditorium, and Jan. 24, 8:15 p.m D.H.
Gonley High in Greenville. Breathtaking
Ballet, Hot Jazz, and Titillating Tap, new
works recently choreographed for the
semi-professional dance company and
numbers too hot to put down are guaran-
teed to heat up your winter. Tickets are $7
in advance; $8 at the door. For further
info contact Atlantic Dance Theatre at
(919)637-3941.
SPWINC NURSING GRADS.
In order to receive your Nursing Pin by
April, 1988, orders must be placed in the
Student Store, Wright Bldg no later than
Feb. 1, 1988. Orders should be placed at
the Jewelry Counter. Orders must be paid
in full when the order is placed.
EPISCOPAL FELLOWSHIP
The Episcopal Student Fellowship
wants YOU! I loly Communion 5:30 p.m.
Wednesdays, 4th St 1 block north of
Carrctt Dorm. For more info, call Allen
Manning 758-1440.
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
The Accounting Society willl hold its
Jan. meeting on Wed, Jan. 20th at 5 p.m. in
Brewster B-102. Our speaker will be C.J.
Skender from NCSU. I le will be discuss-
ing CPA review courses with us. Please
attend!
BLOODMOBILE
The Biologv Club will be sponsoring a
Bloodmobilo Jan. 20 and 21 in room 244
Mendenhall between 12 p.m. - 6 p.m. The
Red Cross is on special appeal for blood.
Please give the gift of life.
PHI SIGMA PI
Phi Sigma Pi and the American Cancer
Society is sponsoring a Jail-A-Thon on Jan.
28 from 9-4 at the"ECU Student Store.
I lave your best friend, professor, or worst
enemy thrown in jail and help raise
money for cancer research.
DIVE CLUB
Dive Club meeting Thurs Jan. 21 7:00
p.m. in Mendenhall rm. 221. We will dis-
cuss future dives, fund raisers, and elect a
new secretary. Everyone is invited.
HONORS SEMINARS
All faculty members and honors stu-
dents are reminded of their opportunity
to design or request an honors seminar of
their choice. The Honors Committee
makes the final selection. Please submit
proposal (at least by phone) to David
Sanders (757-6373) at the Honors Office
by Wed Jan. 20. Faculty interested in co-
teaching a seminar on JewArab rela-
tions, Closing of the American Mind,
Vietnam, The Nuclear Age, or health is-
sues are especially urged to reply.
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
Join the ECU Gospel Choir - Rehearsal
is on Wednesday at 5:00 p.m. in the Cul-
ture Center. The cut off date will be Janu-
ary 27,1988.
FELLOWSHIP
Worship God this Wednesday night at
5 p.m. at the Methodist Student Center
then enjoy a delicious, all-you-can-eat
home colked meal and good fellowship.
The meal is $2.00 at the door, $1.50 if you
sign up in advance. Call 758-2030 for res-
ervations. Sponsored by Presbyterian and
Methodist Campus Ministries.
SOCCER
There will be a mandatory ECU
Women's soccer club meeting Thursday,
January 21st in Memorial Gym room 102.
All new players welcome. Please bring
insurance forms. Any questions call Re-
nee at 355-4644.
BUSINESS STUDENTS
The American Marketing Association
is running its spring semester member-
ship drive on January 19 thru the 22nd.
Tuesday and Wednesday at the Student
Store, and Thursday and Friday on the
second floor of Rawl. The organization is
not only limited to business students;
anyone who has an interest in marketing
is encouraged to come talk with us.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will hold its next
meeting on January 21, Thursday evening
in room 238 Mendenhall. Guest Speaker
will be Sara Chrome with the Public De-
fenders office. All members are asked to
attend. Any interested non-members are
invited.
ECU COMPUTER CLUB
The ECU Computer Qub will have its
annual programming contest Friday,
January 22 from 12 noon until 6:00 p.m.
Pizza will be served afterwards. Team
members must bring their spring
semester dues of $5.00 to be eligible to
participate. Teams will meet in Austin 223
at 12 noon to be given the contest prob-
lems.
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
The ECU Gospel Choir will hold reher-
sals every Wednesday at 5:00. We wel-
come new members for Spring 1988. The
cut off date for new membership is Janu-
ary 27.
BIOLOGYCHEMISTRY
Those who graduate this year will want
to register at the Career Planning and
Placement Service. The Research Triangle
Institute will be interviewing on campus if
enough majors sign up. You may want to
dip this and post so others will see. Glaxo
will also be here and we have videotapes
on careers with with the Southern Re-
search institute and the National Cancer
Institute.
STUDENT TEACHING
Spring semester student teachers 1st
Student Teaching Teachers meeting will
be held on January 26th at 4:00 p.m. in
Hendrix Theater, Mendenhall.
NAACP
There is going to be the first meeting of
the ECU chapter of the NAACP on Thurs-
day January 21 at 5:00 at the Ledonia B.
Wright Cultural Center. Be there and
bring ideas for this semester.
TRAVEL COMM.
The Travel Comm. is having a meeting
to decide on the trips offered for next year.
If you want your opinion heard, please-
attend. It will be January 20th at 5 p.m. in
Mendenhall. CaU 757-6611 ext. 210 for
more details.
OVERSEAS NETWORK
The Overseas Development Network
will hold its first meeting of the semester
on Sunday, January 24, at 7 p.m. in Men-
denhall room 248. This is an organiza-
tional meeting with a special guest. Any-
one interested is invited to attend.
ALPHA FPSILON DELTA
Dorothy Ganick, MD, a hemologist
ancologist will speak at 7:00 pm. in
Flanagan 307 tonight. Information re-
garding our convention in Memphis will
be available.
WORKSTUDY STUDENTS
The Office of International Studies and
Scholarships needs several work study
students (alrcadv approved by the Office
of Financial aid) to fill clerk positions.
Duties include answering telephones,
running errands, light clerical work, and
other duties as needed Must possess a
good attitude.Gontact MrSven Vanftaars
or Ms. Kristi Pascarella at 757-6504 or
applv at Brewster, A-117.
ECU AMBASSADORS
Our first general meeting will be to-
morrow, Wednesday, January 20, at 5:15
p.m. in the Mendenhall Multi-purpose
room.
SEA
The first SRA meeting is Tuesday, Janu-
ary 19 at 4:00 p.m. is 212 MSC. Please make
sure your representative is there.
COMMBROADCASTINC,
There will be a meeting of the Commu-
nicationsBroadcasting 1 lonor Society on
Wednesday, January 20th at 5:00 p.m. in
room 234 in old Joyner Library. Your must
be a Junior with a 2.5 GPA overall to be a
member.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The Gamma Beta Phi Honor Society
will hold their first meeting of the spring
semester on January 19 at 6:30 p.m. in
Jenkins Auditorium. Attendance is man-
datory.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda will hold its first
meeting this semester on January 20 in
Rawl 302 at 3:00 p.m. Open to all Business
related majors.
PRODUCTIONS COMM.
The Student Union Productions
Committee meeting is on Tuesd
ary 1�, at 5:30. If you have any
please call 757-6611. All students an
come to attend.
CASINO NIGHT
The Student Union Pro
Committee is sponsoring Casin 3
Tuesday, January 25, from 7 w :
the multi purpose nxim of Mei
One dollar admission buys $300 w -� :
play money and all the mocktails j .
drink. Many pries will bo au
including tickets to the upcomii
Buffet concert.
INTRAMURAL SERVIC ES
Registration for Intramural b i
will bo hold January r9 from 11 a.m -r: no
in MG 104-A. All persons inti
oiCiating should attend the basketball
officials clinics held January 14,18and )i
8 p.m. in Memorial Gvm room KJ2 For ad-
ditional information call 757-6387
INTRAMURAL SERVICES
Preseason Basketball tournament reg-
istration for the Intramural pro season
basketball tournament will be hold ;anu-
ary 19 from 11 a.m -6 pm in MG I 4-A
There is a SI0 fee with this activity. Tor
more info. Call 757-6387.
CO-REC BOWLING
Registration for Intramural Co rec
bowling will be held January 2 at 6 p m
in MG 102. For more information c ill ;
6387.
S�E�
The Student Council for Except
Children will hold its first mooting of the
semester on January 21,1988 at 5:00 p m n
Speight 211. All Srxaal Education Majors
please attend.
FPITCATIONMATORS
The Department of Speech-Language
and Auditory Pathology (SLAP) will be
providing the speech and hearing screen-
ing for all students eligible for admission
to the Upper Division of Teacher Educa-
tion on Monday, January 25, Tuesday,
January 26 and Wednesday, January 27.
The Department will be testing form 5:00
to 630 on Monday and 5:00 to 7:00 on
Tuesday and Wednesday. No appoint-
ment is needed (first come basis). The
SLAP Department is located in Belk An-
nex on Charles Street
Critics
WASHINGTON (AP) p�
dent Reagan could kill the pea
process in Central America it
ignores Nicaragua's promise
hold cease-fire talks and conti
ues to push for new military aid
the Contra rebels, congression
critics say.
The White House says R
will ask Congress tor addition
Contra aid despite Nicarag
President Daniel Ortega's pr
ise during a regional summit (
Saturday to open direct cea -
talks with the rebels.
Congressional observers at t
summit said Sunday that s
move by the administrate
would be a grave mistal
"Literally, any contra aid
kill the peace process said Re
David E. Bonior, D-Mich one
five Democratic congressm
asked by House1 Speaker fi
Wright, D-Texas, to attend t
summit.
King b
N.C. General Assemt
Release
RALEIGH - In one of its fi
acts oi the 19S7 General A i
bly, the North Carolina Legisj
hire honored the memorv i f
rights activist Martin Luther Kij
Jr. by making the third Men-
January a paid holiday for sq
employees. January 19, 1
marks "the first such celebra I
the King holiday.
The 1983 General Assem
had put Reverend King's biH
day, January 15, on a list oi lej
public holidays. Legal public he
days are ones observed b I
state but not necessanlv given
time off with pay to state emplc
ces. The 1987 law brought Noi
Carolina into line with fedej
policy.
In 1981, the General Asseml
passed a resolution common
rating Reverend King, saving tl
"throughout his life (Dr. KirJ
PH
i
To
Tucs 7:00-11:00
Thurs. 7:00-11:0
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 19,1968 7
d od the iMght, we were wet
ho run However, we have to
itghitghtol the night, was
fight We re psvched
� t You guvs are the
CONTESTANTS tor January
Males and Females,
"he Cufl or v Big Al at
�, � nore into . .
Nx ITTLI SISTERS:lie) gals"Wei-
: i t;r�.it holiday!
s Wednesday at 9dOQ
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i ABOLT1 w cups not being
. iir we have em
- e some new
cabinets). See
me everyone
esl or luck fat
� night at
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kc traveling
d fcvith student
' ivel Commit-
uarj 20th
more into
in Cancer
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ssor.or
elp raise
ick fellas
sisters.
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kin boots
. a semester.
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ru Wednesday
sda) janu-
� . questions,
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� VSINO NIGHT
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p m. in
? 'endenhall.
- � worth of
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boned oft
� � - ming jimmy
INTRAMURA1 -1 K VICES
ral basketbal
a m �� pm.
- in terested in
I the basketball
: -and 19 at
mKQ. Forad-
: 757 6387
I IRA 1I RAL SERVICES
tounament reg-
pre-season
be held Janu-
m MG 104-A.
this activity. For
37
CO-REC HOWLING
tramural Co-rec
�. 27 at 6 p.m.
rmation call 757-
SCEC
for Exceptional
ts first meeting of the
-sat 3 00p.m. -n
5pt aal education Majors
E
ST
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Inals.
uroluuan
Critics say Contra aid would hurt peace aims
WASHINGTON (AP) � Presi-
dent Reagan could kill the peace
process in Central America if he
ignores Nicaragua's promise to
hold cease-fire talks and contin-
ues to push for new military aid to
the Contra rebels, congressional
critics say.
The White House says Reagan
will ask Congress for additional
Contra aid despite Nicaraguan
President Daniel Ortega's prom-
ise during a regional summit on
Saturday to open direct cease-fire
talks with the rebels.
Congressional observers at the
summit said Sunday that such a
move by the administration
would be a grave mistake.
" Li terally, any contra aid would
kill the peace process said Rep.
David E. Bonior, D-Mich one of
five Democratic congressmen
asked by House Speaker Jim
Wright, D-Tcxas, to attend the
summit.
The head of a similar Senate
delegation, Democrat Christo-
pher Dodd of Connecticut, said an
administration request for Contra
aid would not be in the interest of
peace efforts in central America.
"If, in fact, we see the kind of
commitment we've seen over the
last 24 hours, then I believe the
administration would be wise not
to even make the request and not
have to get to a vote and a fight in
Congress Dodd said on NBC's
"Meet the Press
However, Sen. John McCain, R-
Ariz who traveled to Central
America with Dodd, said he fears
tha t Nicaragua's leftist Sandinista
government will not act in good
faith.
"That is strictly cosmetic and
minimal adherence to the agree-
ments and thereby attaining the
goal which they seek, which is not
democratization of Nicaragua but
is a cutoff of aid to the Contras
he said on the NBC program.
Dodd suggested that if Ortega
fails to follow through on his
announced plans, "then he would
face not only the wrath of the
United States but more impor-
tantly, and this is most important,
the wrath of his Central American
neighbors
Ortega said Saturday that his
government will open talks with
the rebels, possibly this week. He
also lifted a 6-year-old state of
emergency in his country.
But a White House spokesman
said Sunday that the develop-
ments would not change
Reagan's plan to seek new Contra
aid.
'The president is committed to
suporting the resistance said
spokesman Roman Popaduik,
adding that "pressure by the
Nicaragua resistance is what
brought the Sandinistas to the
negotiating table
He said Reagan is expected to
make a formal request to Con-
gress for more aid on January 26,
the day after he delivers his State
of the Union address.
The administration had
planned to ask for a $270 million,
18-month aid package for the
Contra rebels last year, but never
proposed it formally because of
complaints that it would interfere
with the peace process.
Ortega's announcement came
at the close of a two-day Central
American summit meeting in the
Costa Rican capital of San Jose,
where the Nicaraguan president
had been under heavy pressure
from other reonal leaders to
comply with the regional peace
plan signed in Guatemala on Aug.
7.
Alejandro Bendana, secretary
general of the Nicaraguan For-
eign Ministry, on Sunday warned
the Reagan administration
against seeking more aid for the
rebels.
"One more dollar for the Con-
tras may just mean the end of the
Central American peace plan
Bendana said in an interview
from Managua on "Meet the
Press
King birthday observed
N.C General Assembly Press
Release
RALEIGH � In one of its first
acts of the 1987 General Assem-
bly, the North Carolina Legisla-
ture honored the memory of civil
rights activist Martin Luther King
Jr. by making the third Monday in
January a paid holiday for state
employees. January 19, 1988
marks the first such celebration of
the King holiday.
The 1983 General Assembly
had put Reverend King's birth-
day, January 15, on a list of legal
public holidays. Legal public holi-
days are ones observed by the
state but not necessarily given as
time off with pay to state employ-
ees. The 1987 law brought North
Carolina into line with federal
policy.
In 1981, the General Assembly
passed a resolution commemo-
rating Reverend King, saying that
"throughout his life (Dr. King)
advocated nonviolent action to
obtain equal rights for minorities
and counseled his followers to
show compassion, fairness, un-
derstanding, and even love to
those who opposed the civil rights
movement (King) lived and
died for the principles of equality,
humanity, and harmony among
the people of America
Dr. King was born in Atlanta on
Jan. 15, 1929 and was shot and
killed in Memphis, Tennessee on
April 4,1968. He was an ordained
Baptist minister and received the
degree of Doctor of Philosophy
from Boston University in 1955.
King first won national attention
in 1955 through his work to put an
end to racial segregation in
Montgomery, Alabama. In 1964,
Dr. King received the Nobel Peace
Prize and became, at 35, the
youngest man in history to win
the prestigious award.
State employees receive 11 paid
holidays per calendar year. The
State Personnel Commission de-
cides which paid holidays, in
addition to King's birthday and
Veterans Day, state employees
will be granted.
GET
CAUGHT
&v EaoUUanilimuu
RUSH
PHI KAPPA
TAU
THE ECU STUDENT UNION
SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE
STICKLETS

AND
cool ranch: flavor
TORTILLA CHIPS
PRESENT
w
fq&T,
Wednesday, January 20
8:00 p.m.
I Want You
To Be A Phi Tau!
Tues 7-00-11:00 - Sorority Night, come meet the sorority girls of E.C.U.
Wed. 7:00-11:00-Sub Night
Thurs. 7:00-11:00-Meet the Brothers and little Sisters of Phi Kappa Tau
-For more information or a ride call 757-1319
Coffeehouse, Ground Floor, Mendenhall
TWO FUN WAYS TO WIN!
WIN A SHOT AT
COMEDY FAME AND FORTUNE!
'�
e
U S College Comedy talent stouts ok coming to row campus in seordi of the funniest college student n
-� the country
V . v � " o "tP to Ooytono Beottt to perform before throngs of vocohoning students during Spring
VfVV? Break
yqtf � Perform live at the famous Com Strip In New fork!
X0, .R��weonOHioalUSCOLLEGtCOntfDYtsWti
� Slop by me U S COLLEGE COMEDY COMPETITION site at your school 1 hour early to entor
Even if youre not seeking comedy fame ond fortune, STICKLETS and DORITOS9 brand Cool
Ranch brand flavor fortifto Chips invite you to come by to watch the eiciiement and enioy two
dehaous products
WIN A FREE COMEDY
Save those empty STKKLETS Natural Flavor Gum packs ond W�ITOS� brand for Cfap bogs'
� Win o FREE Comedy Concert at your school starring Lorry Bud' Mthnoa (tad Gilbert
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� Get your entire campus to collect STICKLETS' Natural Flavor Gum pocks ond DORITOS
brand Cool Ranch brand flavor tortilla Chip bogs ond deposit them at the Offiaol US
COLLEGE COMEDY Entry Displays
� The school cotterhng Ike most wrappers mm!
Official Drop-off bins for empty
wrappers are located in
Mendenhall and the
Student Store Lobby.
Call 757-6611
for more information.
DOOTMISSm
us��ij�7Msr�tn NwvaeK.i�eMen m-n
J
4 f





? THE EAST CAROLINIAN
1ANUARY 19,1988

1
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No violence reported in new Haiti
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP)
Opposition leaders claimed
credit tor a "ridiculously low"
voter turnout in 1 laiti's presiden-
ts! election but the government
and major candidates proclaimed
the vote a success.
No violence was reported in the
junta-run election, but there were
reports ot bribery, people voting
more than once and ineligible
voters casting ballots. An earlier
attempt to hold the nation's first
presidential election in 30 years
was canceled Nov. 29 when thugs
killed at least 34 people.
Election officials today were
countingballots to see if any of the
11 candidates won an outright
majority. If not, a runoff will be
held Jan. 31 to determine the next
president of this impoverished
Caribbean nation.
The military led government
refused to release any results or
voter turnout figures after the
polls closed Sunday evening.
State-run television provided
no figures but showed voters
lined up at polling stations and
made references to an "electoral
avalanche" that represented "a
major turning point in Haitian
history
But Marc Bazin, who ran in the
aborted Nov. 29 presidential elec-
tion and who led the call for a
boycott of Sunday's vote, said no
more than 20 percent of the 3 mil-
lion eligible to vote turned out.
Gerard Bissainthe, political
coordinator for a coalition of
opposition groups, estimated the
turnout at less than 10 percent.
'The participation was ridicu-
lously low in most areas. The
general impression is, the boycott
was remarkable success he said.
Bazin and the three other lead-
ing candidates from the Novem-
ber election refused to take part in
Sunday's election, claiming it
Mexico provides illegal drugs
WASHINGTON (AP) De-
spite nearly a decade of aerial
spraying to destroy Mexican
marijuana and opium poppy
crop- Mexico is providing US.
addicts a creator share of illegal
drues than e er before, a govern-
V
ment report says
The anti-drug operation involv-
g - 3 aircraft has cost the United
States and Mexico $118 million
ce 1984,but persistent Mexican
farmers are finding ways to in-
crease production, says a report
released Friday by the General
cuinting Office The program
can in 1977.
- and Mexican officials dis-
the effectiveness of drug
eradication efforts in Mexico.
The Mexicans point to spec-
tacular success by 25,000 ground
ass gned to the anti-drug
effort and say it would take more
planes to destroy more crops.
The GAO report discounts the
Mexican claims, quoting U.S. offi-
cials as saying the Mexicans re-
ported in 1986 that they destroyed
more crops than were planted,
and that was in a year when
Mexico overtook Colombia as the
United States' major foreign sup-
plier oi marijuana with 37 percent
of the illegal market.
The GAO, which does investi-
gations for Congress, says the
planes are under-used, mainly
because pilots are underpaid and
maintenance is slow.
The State Department, in a let-
ter accompanying the report,
agreed not to ask for any more
aircraft until it can determine how
efficiently the present 55 helicop-
ters and 28 fixed-wing planes arc
being used.
The report says usage has
averaged 46 hours a month per
plane, although they reasonably
could be flown for 80 hours each.
U.S. officials last year estimated
that Mexican heroin made up
about 40 percent of the U.S. sup-
ply, more than double the amount
smuggled in five years ago.
"Mexico is a major source of the
heroin and marijuana which en-
ters the United States, and the
How is increasing despite years of
opium poppy and marijuana crop
eradication efforts said the re-
port which which was submitted
to Congress this week.
"Growing techniques have
evolved to make aerial eradica-
tion more difficult the report
said.
Mexican farmers reacted to ini-
Worshippers honor Martin Luther King Jr.
RAI EIGH (AP) � In a mass
ting i -cent oi the civil
ts era. blacks and whites from
two Raleigh churches worshiped
ther on the eve of the state
v honoring the Rev. Martin
� K n R.
Rev. fames Forbes ir. told
.crated congregation at
on Memorial Baptist Church
spiritual strength must be
; d to fulfill King's dream of
d justice because
political, social and economic
measures have not eliminated
racism.
Forbes, a North Carolina native,
is a professor from Union Theo-
logical Seminary in New York
who has led international confer-
ences for clergymen.
The service to honor King's
birthday was sponsored bv Tul-
len, a predominantly , hite
church, and Martin Street T iptist
Church, which is mostly black.
The service was the culmuniation
of a four-month, joint forum on
racism in the Triangle.
"I can't tell by looking at this
church if this is a black church or a
white church Forbes said, sur-
veying the packed sanctuary from
the pulpit. "This is a human
church
The Rev. Mahan Siler of Pullen
said the prospect of acting as a
catalyst for social change made
him feel fearful and excited.
There is a
r4fe
erence
RUSH
SIGMA NU
FRATERNITY
Tues. - Jan. 19
Wed. - Jan. 20
Thur. - Jan. 21
7:00 p.m. - 10:30 p.m.
MENDENHALL
MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM
CALL:
752-7284 OR 758-6765
tial success of the program by
planting smaller fields, moving
them to remote areas, planting on
steep ravines or under trees or
using camouflage techniques, the
report says.
In recent years, they have be-
come bolder with marijuana and
poppy crops spotted adjacent to
farmhouses and other crops. If
they are sprayed, the farmer
comes out and washes off the
herbicide, harvests his crop or
simply plants another one, the
report says.
The report partly blamed the
depresssed Mexican economy,
which has made illegal farming
more attractive financially, and
said peasants who work on illegal
crops can earn twice their regular
pay.
The report also mentioned
Mexican corruption as a possible
hindrance to the eradication pro-
grambut said it did not pursue the
issue.
The State Department, in a let-
ter from Ann B. Wrobleski, assis-
tant secretary for international
narcotics matters, said it agreed
with the report's conclusions and
has been negotiating with Mexico
over several issues related to the
aerial spraying program.
In the latest fiscal year budget,
the United States is contributing
about $14.5 million to the pro-
gram.
would be rife with fraud. Voting
was in no way secret. Ballots were
handed to election officials who
examined them before depositing
them in unsealed boxes.
"It was not like it was subtle.
Kids voted and laughed about it.
They told us Michael Hooper,
executive director of the New
York-based National Coalition
for Haitian Refugees, said after
touring voting stations.
Reporters at City Hall saw par-
tisans of one candidate handing
out ballots along with 5-gourde
bills worth $1 each.
"From the beginning, it has
been a farce said one Western
diplomat, speaking on condition
of anonymity.
The main candidates denied
that.
"The election is valid as long as
there are (any) voters university
professor Leslie Manigat said in
an intend
Attorney Gregoire Eugene
complained that Manigat had the
covert support of the army, but
went on to say, "My voters are so
many it would be impossible for
Mr. Manigat to win
The other leading candidates
were agronomist Gerard Phil-
ippe-Auguste and sociologist and
ex-government minister Hubert
DeRonceray.
Official results from Sunday's
election were not expected until
early next week. Preliminary tal-
lies could come early this week.
Balloting was to elect a presi-
dent and National Assembly to
replace the junta, which has ruled
since dicta tor Jean-Claude Duval-
icr fled to exile in February 1986.
The junta has promised to turn
over power to an elected govern-
ment next month.
BREU
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For further information Contact:
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INTRAMURAL RECREAfiylL SERVICES
FITNESS CLASS SCHEDUJE
SPRING 1988
Registration Dates
January 19-22
Cost Per Session f 12 classes)
$10.00Students
$20.00Faculty-Staff
Session Dates
January 25 - March 4
Cost Per Drop-in Class
$1.00Students
$2.00Faculty-Staff
All classes available on a drop-in basis with purchase of a ticket.
Tickets are available in 204 Memorial Gymnasium,
Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. and Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
A?r?t?ic?
DmTimesLocations
Mon. & Wed.4:00-5:00 p.m.MG 108
Mon. &Wed.4:30-5:30 p.m.Clement
Mon. & Wed.5:15-6:15 p.m.MG 108
Mon. & Wed.6:30-7:30 p.m.(Low Impact)MG 108
Tues. & Thurs.4:00-5:00 p.m.Cotton
Tues. & Thurs.4:30-5:30 p.m.(Low Impact)Fletcher
Tues. & Thurs.5:15-6:15 p.m.(Low Impact)MG 108
Tues. & Thurs.6:30-7:30 p.m.MG 108
Fri.4:00-5:00 p.m.MG 108
Fri.5:15-6:15 p.m.MG 108
Sat.1:00-2:00 p.m.(Drop-in Only)MG 108
Sun.3:00-4:00 p.m. Toning(Drop-in Only)MG 108
PaysTimesLocations
Mon. & Wed.3:00-4:00 p.m.MG 108
Tues. & Thurs.5:30-6:30 p.m.MG 112
Sat.12:00-1:00 p.m. Aquarobics(Drop-in Only)MG 108
Tues. & Thurs.5:30-6:30 p.m.MGPool
SUPR'CLASS
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An innovative 90 minute workout incorporating weights as light resistance for muscular
strength and endurance, in addition to a 30 minute aerobic component. Registration is
required and sessions are the same as all other fitness classes. Cost per session (12 classes)
is $l5.00students and $25.00faculty and staff.
Tues. & Thurs. 3:30-5:00 p.m.
Sat. 10:30-12 Noon
Drop-in if registered for Tues. & Thurs.
Mark Brunetz
Mark Brunetz
MG 108
MG 108
Visiting
closer ti
CHARLO'ITE (AP) Thn
Soviet educators who visited tl
University of Northarolina
Charlotte say their country is wi
ing to promote better relatio
ships with American Univen
ties.
"I think it's very important
step on this road Leonid
novich Kiselovski, president
Eyelo Russian State Universil
said Friday. "I hope it will be frui
fill for educators in the Sovl
Union and in the United States'
encourage a mutual understanj
ing between the two countries
Vladimir Pavilovich Shevi
enko, president of Donetsk StJ
University, noted the similar
between his school in the L krail
and UNC-Oharlotte.
"Both shcools have about HjC
students and are very similar
specialities and faculties
said. "I think by the beginning
next year this kind of relations
will be developed between m
universities
Drunk drivin
Lawm
RALEIGH (AP) Members
a legislative panel say it may
time to reduce the threshold
which a driver is considered
gaily intoxicated and create a m
offense for drivers w ho have be
drinking, but fall below th j
cut-off.
'The bottom line is I feel
are going to make some pn j
that is going to be effective ReJ
Dennis Wicker, D-Lee. said Fr
day. "It's not going to be j
coating or window dressing
Wicker, the chairman oi tl
Safe Roads Act Study Committd
instructed a staff attorney to di
proposed legislation under wh
drivers would be consider!
drunk with a blood-alcohol coj
tent of 0.08 instead of the currel
0.10.
ffcp. Joe Hackney, IM-Vji
suKested tfontfteCUfi Jta
corcTider creating a new offensej
driving with a BAC oi 0.04 to 0
Such drivers would not necessi
ily be charged with drunken dril
ing, but could be fined or haf
their licenses suspended temp)
rarilv on a lesser charge.
"We're concerned that the sil
nal we send is that it's all right
drink up to a point and you'
supposed to be intelligent enouj
to recognize that point he sail
Wicker said the state needed)
"fashion some sort of punishmel
that would get the message acrd
that 0.04 to 0.08 is getting into tj
impairment zone
The changes would be part
the first major crackdown
drunken driving in North Cai
lina since enactment of the V
Safe Roads Act, which some of
cials sav is losing its deterrent
feet.
Co. Jim xMartin pushed a pa
age of bills aimed at toughenij
the law in 1987, most of whj
Imogioe if you hod to ask for I
to save the life of someone you I
Next time the American Red Crc
asks, give Wood, ptea
HVI BIOOD, PUASI
I HIIM
� t th 'in mmmii
�j�mfc1 ���i iiXih1 ��'





action I isitin� soviet educators say they want
closer ties with American universities
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 19,1988 9
Read The East Carolinian
gpvernmen! minister Hubert
i Ronceray
Official results from Sunday's
n wore not expected until
nexl week. Preliminary tal-
1 come early this week.
?ting was to elect a presi-
H and National Assembly to
inta w hich hasruied
itor lean-Claude Duval-
oxile in February 1986.
has promised to turn
an elected govcm-
nonth.
year and
LTships won't
re easier.
o pay for.
-
:ion Contact:
L. Jones
57-6967
�ns
SERVICES
Jaics
4
'er Drop-in Class
lents
'v- Staff
ase of a ticket.
:n.
a.m. - 5 p.m.
MG 108
Clement
MG 108
MG 108
Cotton
Fletcher
MG 108
MG 108
MG 108
MG 108
MG 108
MG 108
i O
Locations
MG 108
MG 112
MG 108
MG Pool
Jht resistance for muscular
component. Registration is
ost per session (12 classes)
Brunetz
Brunetz
CHARLOTTE (AP) � Three
Soviet educators who visited the
University of North Carolina at
Charlotte say their country is will
ing to promote better relation-
ships with American Universi-
ties.
"1 think it's very important to
step on thib road Leonid lva-
novich Kiselovski, president of
Eyelo Russian State University,
said Friday. "1 hope it will be fruit-
ful for educators in the Soviet
Union and in the United States to
encourage a mutual understand-
ing between the two countries
Vladimir Pavilovich Shcvch-
enko, president of Donctski State
University, noted the similarity
between his school in the Ukraine
and UNC-Charlotte.
"Both shcools have about 11,000
students and are very similar in
specialities and faculties he
said. "1 think by the beginning of
next year this kind of relationship
will be developed between more
universities
Shevchenko and Kiselovski,
along with Edgar Vladimirovich
Linde, minister of higher educa-
tion in the Soviet Union, said they
hoped their tour of American
schools would pave the way for a
continuing exchange program
between mid-size universities in
the U.S. and the Soviet Union.
"My university has many con-
tacts with other universities in
other countries Kiselovski said.
"Unfortunately, our contacts with
schools in the United States are
not as well developed. This is not
a good thing
The Soviet delegation was es-
corted by UNC-Charlotte Chan-
cellor E.K. Fretwell Jr.
The Soviet educators arrived in
New York on Wednesday and
spent one day in Washington be-
fore embarking on a two-week
tour of seven American universi-
ties. The trip is being sponsored
by the American Association of
State Colleges and Universities.
Linde said through an inter-
preter that while it was too early
to draw any conclusions about
higher education in the U.S he
was impressed with what he hac
seen so far at the City University
of New York and UNC-Charlotte
"The auditoriums are so full,
some students were even sitting
on the floor he said. 'They're
obviously very interested. 1 also
like the high level of library serv-
ices
A delegation of American educa-
tors is expected to make a similar
journey to the Soviet Union in
April. Fretwell said he would
jump at the opportunity to go if he
were invited.
"My only regret is that they can-
not stay longer he said after
exchanging gifts with his Soviet
counterparts. Fretwell presented
the three with books on Charlotte
and school T-shirts.
After Linde presented Fretwell
with a book of photos on his na-
tive Latvia and Shevchenko
matched it with one depicting his
native Donctski as the "City of
Roses Fretwell asked Kiselovski
if he'd like to talk about Minsk.
"I have a few words about
Minsk, but I have no book
Kisclovki quipped.
Before they fly home on Jan. 26,
the Soviets will have visited Flor-
ida Central University in
Orlando, Louisiana State Univer-
sity at Shrcvcsport, Grambling,
Louisiana Tech and one of the
campuses of the State University
of New York.
Fretwell told his visitors that
UNC-Charlotte has 610 interna-
tional students from 60 foreign
countries. "This is a good time to
begin work on adding a 61st coun-
try � the Soviet Union he said.
Not to be outdone, Kiselovski
said 1,000 students from 84 foreign
countries are currently enrolled at
Byelo.
"We hope to make the United
States the 85th he said.
0V��
Drunk driving law
Lawmakers consider changes
time to reduce the threshold at
which a driver is considered le-
gally intoxicated and create a new
offense for drivers who have been
drinking, but fall below the legal
cut-off.
"The bottom line is I feel we
are going to make some progress
RALEIGH (AP) - - Members of stalled in a Senate committee. But drunken driving,
a legislative panel say it may be Hackney said he regarded those Becky Bowman, president of
measures as "tinkering" and that the Wake County chapter of
more comprehensive changes Mothers Against Drunken Driv-
wcre needed. ing, called for:
The Martin administration has
called for an 0.04 impairment
threshold for commercial
irdivers. Dexter Watts, and attor-
ney with the Institute of Govern-
J
that is going to be effective Rep. ment at the University of North
Dennis Wicker, D-Lee, said Fri- Carolina at Chapel Hill, said there death by vehicle.
day. "It's not going to be sugar was a "scientific consensus" that �Establishment of minimum
coating or window dressing 0.04 was the point at which the security prisons solely for DWI
Wicker, the chairman of the typical person began to be im- offenders.
Safe Roads Act Study Committee, paired. �Restrictions on limited driv-
instructed a staff attorney to draft Meanwhile, the study commit- ing privileges.
proposed legislation under which tee agreed to schedule several 'Stopping "frivolous" delays open beer and wine containers are
drivers would be considered plublic hearings this year to solicit in bringing DWI cases to trial. permitted unless in possession of
drunk with a blood-alcohol con- input on needed changes to curb � Requiring District Court the driver.
tent oi 0.08 instead of the current
0.10.
�Increasing the period for
which a driver's license is sus-
pended immediately after a DWI
arrest from 10 days to 30 days.
�Tougher sentencing for felony
judges to state in writing their
reasons for acquitting people
charged with DWI, especially
when their BAC was at the legal
limit or higher.
Wicker said he would be reluc-
tant for the committee to involve
itself with the court system, say-
ing its primary role should be
recommending laws to deter
impaired driving.
Joe Lennon, state president of
the Christian Action League, said
the committee should call for a
ban on open alcoholic beverage
containers in vehicles. Currently,
YOU
DONT
HAVE TO
GIVE
BLOOD
TODAY
BUT SOMEDAY,
YOU'LL BE GLAD YOU DID.
NEXT BLOODMOBILE VISIT:
January 20 & 21
American Red Cross
Sponsored by:
Triangle East Advertising & Marketing Association
P Joe yckrmv,
sider creating a new offense ofr"
driving with a BAC of 0.04 to 0.08.
Such drivers would not necessar-
ily be charged with drunken driv-
ing, but could be fined or have
their licenses suspended tempo-
rarily on a lesser charge.
"We're concerned that the sig-
nal we send is that it's all right to
drink up to a point and you're
supposed to be intelligent enough
to recognize that point he said.
Wicker said the state needed to
"fashion some sort of punishment
that would get the message across
that 0.04 to 0.08 is getting into the
impairment zone
The changes would be part of
the first major crackdown on
drunken driving in North Caro-
lina since enactment of the 1983
Safe Roads Act, which so Tie offi-
cials say is losing its deterrent ef-
fect.
Gov. Jim Martin pushed a pack-
age of bills aimed at toughening
the law in 1987, most of which
Before we
afgP6aC66dff
we'll give
you
a great fit.
See us for Nordica
and Salomon boots
(Salomon 20 Off).
Gordon's Golf and Ski Shop
264 By Pass (Next to McDonalds)
561003
- ��xT- a
L ABOVE AND BEYOND
r'
v-OS
Vtrffi
ft
z'
fT
i
CLIFF'S �-w
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N.C. 33 Ext.) Greenville. North Carolina
Phone 752-3172
. vt
a
m
M
H
t5w
Mon. thru Thurs. Night
rio,
v
ft

fl
Popcorn
Shrimp
$3.65
"Y
�vV
"Please,
my little
girl needs
"bio o d?
KINGSTON
PLACE
Imagine if you hod to ask for blood
to save the life of someone yootove.
Next time the American Red Cross
asks, give blood, please.
GIVE BIOOO, PUASI
WE HAVE SEVERAL
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR SPRING
SEMESTER,
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393.
AFFORDABLE, LUXURIOUS
FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
BUILT SPECIFICALLY FOR
ECU STUDENTS.
During the 19th, 20th and 21th of this month the Delta Sigma
Phi Fraternity will hold its Spring Rush from 7:00 to 11:00 each
evening. The Brothers of A�(J) Invite you to come and find out why
we were voted the most improved fraternity on the E.C.U.
Campus. To find out why we are not the stereotypical greek "Frat
To find out why our Atheletic Program is gaining in excellence
year after year. And to find out why we always have a hell of a good
time.
Please look around at other organizations. Then look into the
Deltas. You will find that we are a new breed of Greek that strives
to be both above and beyond.
Tuesday - Meet the Brothers of Delta Sigma Phi
Wednesday - Casino Night
Prizes from: Budweiser, Cubbies,
and East Coast Music
Thursday - Pizza and Sub Night
7:00 - 11:00 each Night
Call 757-0313 For More Info
Delta Sigma Phi
BROTHERHOOD OF THE SPHINX
510 East 10th St. �757-0313
-
p
z- $pmmm
I





Ction I Visitin� soviet educators say they want
closer ties with American universities
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 19,1988 9
Read The East Carolinian
eminent minister Hubert
�Roncera)
-nits from Sunday's
�n were not expected until
text week Preliminary tal-
come early this week.
: was to elect a presi-
National Assembly to
ita which has ruled
lean-Claude Duval-
e in February 1986.
- promised to turn
o an elected govern-
1 i
ionth.
OONT DELAY
-�W VtM. �� ����'�� AND OH
1-800-321-5911
rear and
rships won't
re easier.
t pay for.
ion Contact:
Jones
57-6967
SERVICES
Dates
4
er Drop-in Class
idents
tv-Staff
ase of a ticket.
ium,
t � m. - 5 p.m.
n
Locations
MG 108
Clement
MG 108
MG 108
Cotton
Fletcher
MG 108
MG 108
MG 108
MG 108
MG 108
MG 108
n Onlv)
Locations
MG 108
MG 112
MG 108
MGPool
ht resistance for muscular
component. Registration is
-ost per session (12 classes)
Brunetz
Brunetz
CHARLOTTE (AD � Three
Soviet educators who visited the
University of North Carolina at
Charlotte say their country is will-
ing to promote better relation-
ships with American Universi-
ties.
"1 think it's very important to
step on this road Leonid Iva-
novich Kiselovski, president of
Eyelo Russian State University,
said Friday. "1 hope it will be fruit-
ful for educators in the Soviet
Union and in the United States to
encourage a mutual understand-
ing between the two countries
Vladimir Pavilovich Shcvch-
enko, president of Donctski State
University, noted the similarity
between his school in the Ukraine
and UNC-Charlotte.
'Both shcools have about 11,000
students and are very similar in
specialities and faculties he
said. "1 think by the beginning of
next year this kind of relationship
will be developed between more
universities
Shevchenko and Kiselovski,
along with Edgar Vladimirovich
Linde, minister of higher educa-
tion in the Soviet Union, said they
hoped their tour of American
schools would pave the way for a
continuing exchange program
between mid-size universities in
the U.S. and the Soviet Union.
"My university has many con-
tacts with other universities in
other countries Kiselovski said.
"Unfortunately, our contacts with
schools in the United States are
not as well developed. This is not
a good thing
The Soviet delegation was es-
corted by UNC-Charlotte Chan-
cellor E.K. Fretwell Jr.
The Soviet educators arrived in
New York on Wednesday and
spent one day in Washington be-
fore embarking on a two-week
tour of seven American universi-
ties. The trip is being sponsored
by the American Association of
State Colleges and Universities.
Linde said through an inter-
preter that while it was too early
to draw any conclusions about
higher education in the U.S he
was impressed with what he hac
seen so far at the City University
of New York and UNC-Charlotte
"The auditoriums arc so full,
some students were even sitting
on the floor he said. 'They're
obviously very interested. I also
like the high level of library serv-
ices
A delegation of American educa-
tors is expected to make a similar
journey to the Soviet Union in
April. Fretwell said he would
jump at the opportunity to go if he
were invited.
"My only regret is that they can-
not stay longer he said after
exchanging gifts with his Soviet
counterparts. Fretwell presented
the three with books on Charlotte
and school T-shirts.
After Linde presented Fretwell
with a book of photos on his na-
tive Latvia and Shevchenko
matched it with one depicting his
native Donctski as the "City of
Roses Fretwell asked Kiselovski
if he'd like to talk about Minsk.
"I have a few words about
Minsk, but I have no book
Kiselovki quipped.
Before they fly home on Jan. 2b,
the Soviets will have visited Flor-
ida Central University in
Orlando, Louisiana State Univer-
sity at Shrcvcsport, Grambling,
Louisiana Tech and one of the
campuses of the State University
of New York.
Fretwell told his visitors that
UNC-Charlotte has 610 interna-
tional students from 60 foreign
countries. "This is a good time to
begin work on adding a 61st coun-
try � the Soviet Union he said.
Not to be outdone, Kiselovski
said 1,000 students from 84 foreign
countries arc currently enrolled at
Byelo.
"We hope to make the United
States the 85th he said.
@v��
Drunk driving law
Lawmakers consider changes
RALEIGH (AP) � Members of
a legislative panel say it may be
time to reduce the threshold at
which a driver is considered le-
gally intoxicated and create a new
offense for drivers who have been
drinking, but fall below the legal
cut-off.
'The bottom line is I feel we
are going to make some progress
stalled in a Senate committee. But drunken driving.
Hackney said he regarded those Becky Bowman, president of
me�ures as "tinkering" and that the Wake County chapter of
more comprehensive changes Mothers Against Drunken Driv-
were needed. ing, called for:
The Martin administration has
�Increasing the period for
which a driver's license is sus-
pended immediately after a DWI
arrest from 10 days to 30 days
called for an 0.04 impairment
threshold for commercial
irdivers. Dexter Watts, and attor-
nev with the Institute of Govern-
J
that is going to be effective Rep. ment at the University of North
Dennis Wicker, D-Lee, said Fri- Carolina at Chapel Hill, said there death by vehicle.
day. "It's not going to be sugar was a "scientific consensus" that �Establishment of minimum
coating or window dressing 0.04 was the point at which the security prisons solely for DWI
Wicker, the chairman of the typical person began to be im- offenders.
Safe Roads Act Study Committee, paired. �Restrictions on limited driv-
instructed a staff attorney to draft Meanwhile, the study commit- ing privileges,
proposed legislation under which tee agreed to schedule several �Stopping "frivolous" delays
drivers would be considered plublic hearings this year to solicit in bringing DWI cases to trial,
drunk with a blood-alcohol con- input on needed changes to curb �Requiring District Court
tent oi 0.08 instead of the current
judges to state in writing their
reasons for acquitting people
charged with DWI, especially
when their BAC was at the legal
limit or higher.
Wicker said he would be reluc-
tant for the committee to involve
itself with the court system, say-
ing its primary role should be
�Tougher sentencing for felony recommending laws to deter
impaired driving.
Joe Lennon, state president of
the Christian Action League, said
the committee should call for a
ban on open alcoholic beverage
containers in vehicles. Currently,
open beer and wine containers are
permitted unless in possession of
the driver.
YOU
DONT
HAVE TO
GIVE
BLOOD
TODAY.
BUT SOMEDAY,
YOU'LL BE GLAD YOU DID.
NEXT BLOODMOBILE VISIT:
January 20 & 21
American Red Cross
Sponsored by:
Triangle East Advertising & Marketing Association
o.io.
fi?p. joe ppy
colder creating a new offense of"
driving with a BAC of 0.04 to 0.08.
Such drivers would not necessar-
ily be charged with drunken driv-
ing, but could be fined or have
their licenses suspended tempo-
rarily on a lesser charge.
"We're concerned that the sig-
nal we send is that it's all right to
drink up to a point and you're
supposed to be intelligent enough
to recognize that point he said.
Wicker said the state needed to
"fashion some sort of punishment
that would get the message across
that 0.04 to 0.08 is getting into the
impairment zone
The changes would be part of
the first major crackdown on
drunken driving in North Caro-
lina since enactment of the 1983
Safe Roads Act, which some offi-
cials sav is losing its deterrent ef-
fect.
Gov. Jim Martin pushed a pack-
age of bills aimed at toughening
the law in 1987, most of which
Before we
5TgF6afB66fr "
we'll give
you
a great fit.
See us for Nordica
and Salomon boots
(Salomon 20 Off).
Gordon's Golf and Ski Shop
264 By-Pass (Next to McDonald's)
7R6-1003
;N

b ABOVE AND BEYOND
rS'
L
ia
f
w
m
tWi
CLIFF'S
'Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N.C. 33 Ext.) Greenville. North Carolina
Phone 752-3172
x
V

ii
d.
wfi
Mon. thru Thurs. Night
Popcorn
Shrimp $3.65

�v
"Please,
my little
girl needs
blood?
Imogine if you hod to ask for Wood
to save the We of someone you love.
Next time the Americon Red Cross
asks, give Wood, please.
(HVIBIOOO, PlEASi
KINGSTON
PLACE
WE HAVE SEVERAL
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR SPRING
SEMESTER,
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393.
AFFORDABLE, LUXURIOUS
FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
BUILT SPECIFICALLY FOR
ECU STUDENTS.
During the 19th, 20th and 21th of this month the Delta Sigma
Phi Fraternity will hold its Spring Rush from 7:00 to 11:00 each
evening. The Brothers of A�(J) Invite you to come and find out why
we were voted the most improved fraternity on the E.C.U.
Campus. To find out why we are not the stereotypical greek "Frat
To find out why our Atheletic Program is gaining in excellence
year after year. And to find out why we always have a hell of a good
time.
Please look around at other organizations. Then look into the
Deltas. You will find that we are a new breed of Greek that strives
to be both above and beyond.
Tuesday - Meet the Brothers of Delta Sigma Phi
Wednesday - Casino Night
Prizes from: Budweiser, Cubbies,
and East Coast Music
Thursday - Pizza and Sub Night
7:00 - 11:00 each Night
Call 757-0313 For More Info
Delta Sigma Phi
BROTHERHOOD OF THE SPHINX
510 East 10th St. �757-0313
� �� -
-
- -





10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 19,1988
r-
-�- i

I
b
r�
c.
g
s
ti
b

i
r
i
1
t
i
c
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Bloom accused of living another's life
RALEIGH, N.C. (AT) � David
P. Bloom was denied admission to
the fraternity of his choice be-
cause he tried to be someone he
was not, and it appears that he
made th? same mistake when he
set up shop in New York as a
money manager.
"He wanted to live this lifestyle
that wasn't really his said Bob
Levitan, a Durham businessman
who was president of Beta Theta
Ti when Bloom rushed the frater-
nity.
"You can't try to be something
you're not Levitan said. "I think
people can see through that
Last week, Bloom, 23, a 1985
Duke graduate, agreed to settle a
civil action filed against him by
the Securities and Exchange
Commission that accused him of
spending more than $8 million of
clients' money on fast cars, fine art
and expensive real estate.
Bloom also was charged in fed-
eral court Thursday with one
count of mail fraud in connection
with the case. If convicted, he
could be sentenced to serve five
years in prison and to pay a
$250,000 fine.
Bloom had attended an exclu-
sive Manhattan prep school and
apparently came from a well-to-
do family. During his first
semester at Duke, he and a friend,
Spencer M. Waxman, ran an in-
vestment fund out of their dormi-
tory rooms.
Waxman declined to be inter-
viewed, but released a prepared
statement.
"Although 1 knew David when and the paintings it had received,
we were both students at Duke
University, my relationship with
him ended before any of his ap-
parent misdoings began
Waxman said. "Recent events
concerning him and his business
were as surprising to me as they
appear to be to others who know-
lot of pain to Duke. We just want
it to be over
Before entering Duke in the fall
of 1982, Bloom had attended the
Trinity School, a primary and
secondary day school on
Manhattan's upper west side, for
nine years. The school's 1987-88
tuition of about $9,000 rivals the
price tag at manv colleges.
In September 1982, Waxman
and Bloom formed an investment
club, convincing some of their
dormitory mates to buy one or
more $100 shares of their invest-
ment fund. They promised prog-
ress reports and weekly strategy
meetings, several of the investors
said.
Richard T. Recce, who now sells
industrial equipment for his
family's firm in Dallas, said when
he got out of the fund after about
Daniel Bloom said. "It's brought a a year, he didn't get his money for
him cither personally or profes-
sionally
Bloom's purchases included
$4.7 million of art, an $830,000
three-bedroom condominium on
Manhattan's upper east side, a
$1.9 million Long Island beach
house, a $60,000 Mercedes-Benz
and a $139,000 Aston Martin con-
vertible, a $30,000 pearl necklace
and a $195,000 diamond and
platinum necklace. He also gave
two paintings and made a $1 mil-
ion pledge to Duke.
The school announced last
week it would return the money
several months and he lost half
what he had invested.
with a beer bar and dance floor.
They financed it with their money
and capital raised from family
"Eventually, I felt a little un- members and other investors. But
comfortable with the lack of infor- mc ciub did little business and
mation that had been promised to jater failed,
us Recce said in a telephone in-
terview. "I did speak with them
fairly often, but I couldn't get
anything in writing
During the fall of their sopho-
more year, Bloom and Waxman
opened Club Soda, a nightclub volved at that time.
Bloom, however, apparently
kept the investment club going,
and by 1984 he was skimming
some of the money for personal
use, the SEC has charged.
Waxman has said he was not in-
For
Bloom could not be reached for
comment. His father, Daniel, con-
tacted by phone at his Manhattan
apartment, declined to talk about
his son.
'It's brought a lot of pain to us
"Please, my little girl
needs blood
N.C. A&T and North Carolina Central must increase the x ranitai ovvutv For Residents
number of nursing graduates who pass state exam
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) � A
decline in nursing scores at North
Carolina Central University and
N.C. A&T State University must
be reversed if the schools want to
hold on to their nursing pro-
grams, a UNC Board of Gover-
nors panel has decided.
"Continuous sub-par perform-
ance is not allowable but for so
long Asa T. Spaulding Jr. of
Durham said.
The panel said the schools must
show 60 percent passing rates on
the state nursing exam by the end
or the vear or face a shutdown of
their nursing programs.
At NCCU, in Durham, 46 per-
cent of nursing graduates taking
the test for the first time in 1987
passed, members of the Univer-
sity of North Carolina Board of
Governors' Committee on Educa-
tional Planning, Policies and Pro-
grams were told in an annual
report on the state's nursing pro-
grams.
At N.C. A&T State, in Greens
boro, 50 percent of nursing gradu-
ates taking the exam in 1987
passed the exam. Both scores re-
flected significant declines from
the previous vear, when 87.5 per-
cent of NCCU's students passed,
and 80 percent of A&T's students
passed.
"I'm very displeased said
panel member Martha McNair of
Winston-Salem. "It's just inexcus-
able
The N.C. Board of Nursing,
which licenses the state's 53,000
registered nurses, requires
schools to post a 60 percent pass-
ing rate on the exam during any
given year and a 70 percent pass-
ing rate over any three-year pe-
riod.
Nationally, about 89 percent of
students taking the nursing exam
for the first time pass.
Among the nine UNC cam-
puses that oltcr nursing degrees,
79 percent passed the exam in
1987, campared with 88 percent in
1986.
Raymond Dawson, the UNC
system's senior vice president for
academic affairs, said he was
concerned about the 15 percent
drop since 1981 in the number of
students taking the nursing exam.
Declining pass rates, combined
with the apparent waning interest
in the profession, mean the na-
tionwide nursing shortage will
get worse before it gets better,
Dawson said.
Dawson said that unless pane!
members objected, UNC system
President CD. Spangler Jr. woulo
inform school officials that they
had until the end of �988 to post
the minimum 60-percent passing
rate.
Low passing latcs on the nurs
ing exam have plag;ed several
UNC campuses in i a past.
NCCU's program is m trouble
with the state licensing board,
having been cited last year for
imcomplete admission policies,
poorly kept records and curricu-
lum problems. The program vas
nearly shut down in the late 1970s
because ot low passing rates, in-
adequate faculty and library re-
sources. Since then, system offi-
cials havo revamped the curricu-
lum and upgraded faculty.
A&T'r, nursing program had
made considerable strides in re-
cent years, increasing its pass rate
to a high of 87.5 percent in 1984
from 15 percent in 1975.
It 1987 passing rates for other
nursing programs in the UNC
system were 75.6 percent at East
Carolina University, S7 percent at
UNC-Chapel Hill, 87 percent at
UNC-Charlotte, 73.6 percent at
UNC-Greensboro, 100 percent at
UNC-Wilmington, 88.2 percent at
Western Carolina, and 75 percent
at Winston-Salem State Univer-
sity.
The Army Reserve has a limited number
of scholarships available worth nearly
$8,000 per year.
Scholarships are available to residents in
the following specialties:
Anesthesiology
General Surgery
Orthopedic Surgery
For information regarding
application criteria,
compensation, and specific details
contact your Army Medical Department
Personnel Counselor:
KENNETH L. EICHHORN
2634 Chapel Hill Blvd.
Suite 205
Durham, NC 287707-2875
(91 9) 493-1364
ii��� 111 i��� �� tii i -iim inmimiimmammmmmmmmm
What Is Ki
Kappa Sigma
and largest a
Presently t
Undergraduati
Colonies at leal
universities throl
States and Can
What Is Th
Kappa
Kappa Sigm
college social fi
are many, but
promotion of fi
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Surrouned by
Alot of Fun!
There are Great Benefits besides
The Social Aspects of Being a
Pi Kappa Phi.
Pi Kappa Phi sends you this
invitation to become a
distinguished member of the Beta
Phi Chapter of
Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity!
s�&
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NOW ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS FOR THE
1988
JUDICIAL BOARDS
11
Problem:
Sol id!
Lead
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Intr
Answer:
For T
About
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Tuesday. Jan. 19th -Female Stripper -
Rotary Club
Wednesday, Jan. 20th -Sub night - With
sorority at the
Rotary Club.
Thursday, Jan. 21st -Bid Night - meet
the brothers at
the Rotary Club -
with Sorority.
CALL FOR A FREE RIDE - 752-9650
FRESHMEN WELCOME!
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f

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All nights are from 7:00 til 11:00 p.m.
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These positions offer an excellent
opportunity to gain experience and
leadership abilities that will bene-
fit you throughout your life. At the
same time, these positions will
enable you to make valuable con-
tributions to East Carolina Univer-
sity. For additional information
and applications, contact the As-
sociate Dean of Student's Office in
209 Whichard or the Attorney
General's Office in 222 Menden-
hall.
ALL APPLICATIONS MUST
BE TURNED IN BY
TUESDAY, JANUARY 19TH
SIGM
'� ��� .no I�mnmrilmulimt�t�i'ti&'t
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 19,1988 11
fe
ah a beet Kir ar�d fiance floor.
ho financed it with their money
apital raised from family
(embers and other investors. But
ie club did little business and
failed.
m however, apparently
ppl the investment club going,
lid b) l4 no was skimming
o( the money for personal
the SEC has charged.
jfaxman has said he was not in-
at thai time.
ils
tment
EH HHORN
�ic
RDS
excellent
lenceand
will bene-
lfe. At the
:ions will
able con-
laUniver-
fcrmation
:t the As-
s Office in
Attorney
Menden-
:ng
R THE
JMUST
BY
RY 19TH
Kappa Sigma Rush
For Those Exceptional Gentlemen Serious About A Lifetime Committment To Excellence
What Is Kappa Sigma?
Kappa Sigma is one of the oldest
and largest college fraternities.
Presently there are 201
Undergraduate Chapters and
Colonies at leading colleges and
universities throughout the United
States and Canada.
What Is The Purpose Of
Kappa Sigma?
Kappa Sigma is basically a
college social fraternity. Its goals
are many, but all center on the
promotion of friendship, loyalty,
and brotherly feeling.
3o
&j-
e
Famous Kappa Sigmas
Robert Redford Lanny Wadkins
Rick Barry William Hewlett
Jimmy Buffett Willard F. Rockwell
Sen. Robert Dole Gen. Samuel Phillips
Richard Crenna
When You Strive Fo
What Does Kappa Sigma
Offer Its Members?
1 Introduction to new people.
2. Development of a man's
organizational ability.
3. Job references from alumni
4. Assistance in or out of school
5. Leadership in school
6. Social involvement
7. Lifetime friendships
8. Sense of identity through
group experience
9. Added motivation to remain
in school
10. Sense of unity through
common ideals
Excellence . . .
Strive For Kappa Sigma
Problem: Where do you FIND
Social Rctiuity?
Leadership Development?
Academic Success?
mmmMK wrvn
Answer: Kappa
Sigma
Fraternity
For Those Exceptional Gentlemen Serious
About fl Lifetime Committment To Excellence
m
WHO: Fraternity Rush
WHAT:
-�,
KAPPA
SIGMA
THE MOST
wmm
MAN IN THE
COUNTRY
You and Your Friends
WHEN:
Tuesday - Exotic Dancer
Wednesday - Shrimp and
Oysters and meet ECU Sorority Girls
Thursday - Meet the Brothers
of Kappa Sigma 7-11 P.M.
WHERE:
KAPPA SIGMA HOUSE
700 E. 10th Street
(Beside Darryl's)
WHY:
GO GREEK . . . Your college years
are too short not to take advantage
of the fraternity experience.
HOW:
ECU TRANSIT BUSES will be
running or call us if you need a ride
752-5543
KAPPA
SIGMA
Pride in Excellence
��" �
1 '���
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-4-
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12
THE EAST CAROL1NIAN
JANUARY 19.1988

I
Ti
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d
�-(
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Li
V
a
t:
Ortega promises freedoms
MANAGUA, Nicaragua (AP)
� The government promised to
lift a 6-year-old state oi emer-
gency that strictly limits civil
rights, but it also rounded up six
opposition leaders and accused
some of them of them oi plotting
terrorist acts.
Sources in the presidential of-
fice, speaking condition oi ano-
nymitv, said Sunday that Presi-
dent Daniel Ortega would move
Monday to lift the state oi emer-
gency.
The emergency order sus-
pended the right to demonstrate,
strike, move about the country
freehand receive a speedy trial, it
also allowed police to make ar-
rests without a court order.
But Bavardo Arce, one of the
nine directors of the governing
Sandinista National Liberation
Front, warned that the freedoms
may not last long if the U.S. Con-
gress approves more aid for the
Contras.
Responding to pressure from
Nicaragua's neighbors and a pro-
posal for more U.S. aid for the
rebels, Ortega said at the end of a
five-nation Central American
summit on Saturday that he
would restore the suspended
freedoms and begin direct cease-
fire talks with the Contras, as
early as this week.
In a rancorous weekend meet-
ing in Costa Rica, Ortega and the
presidentsot El Salvador, Hondu-
ras, Guatemala and Costa Rica
did not extend last Friday's dead-
line for complying with a regional
peace agreement thev signed
Aug. 7.
The accord calls, among other
things, for cease-fires, greater
democratic freedoms and an end
to outside aid for the area's insur-
gencies.
At least three of the presidents
demanded that Ortega more fully
comply with the plan's call for
greater democracy and a cease-
fire with the contras.
Before agreeing to face-to-face
talks with the Contras, Ortega's
government held only indirect
talks with the rebels in which
Cardinal Miguel Obando y Bravo,
the Roman Catholic Archbishop
of Managua, acted as mediator.
The two meetings were held in
the Dominican Republican be-
cause Ortega refused to agree to a
meeting in Central America. But,
he also backed down on that point
Saturday, saying the direct talks
would be held in San jose, Costa
Rica.
Ortega also pledged at the
weekend meeting to grant am-
nesty to political prisoners ar-
rested after 1981 when a cease-fire
with the Contras is reached or
immediately, if a country outside
Central America is willing to re-
ceive them.
In Miami, rebel leader
Aristedcs Sanchez said Ortega's
moves were "a ploy to win time
and a favorable vote from Con-
gress
START
EXECUTIVE
TRAINING NOW
IM ' Don't wait until you
wljf.nis!) college to start a maii-
atsment training program. If you
haw at least two years remaining, consider
Air Force ROTC W? can give you a head
start on a fast-paced career.
(;l,i Kamlv Houslnii
it)4)75 '�s
Leader Enkn SUtts "
Presidential candidates fire shots
amid debates and tax form releases
(AP) � With a key campaign
test looming three weeks from
Monday in Iowa, Democratic and
Republican presidential contend-
ers are firing shots at one another
along battle lines drawn in a pair
oi weekend debates.
Two candidates also raised
concerns about race relations in
America, as the nation Monday
observed a holidav ded'eated to
-lain civil rights leader Martin
Luther King, jr.
Jesse Jackson met Sunday in
Washington with Jimmy "The
Greek" Snvder, fired from his job
aa CBS sports commentator for
his remarks about black athletes.
lackson, who had earlier criti-
cized Snvder's remarks, praised
him for apologizing and said
Snvder should not be the "scape-
goat" for institutionalized racism
in sports or television.
Sen. Paul Simon, D-lll mean-
while, said at a weekend forum in
Iowa he was worried about what
he called a widening rift between
the nation' hi cks and Jews.
Boih Simon and jackson were in
Atlanta today for the King holi-
day. Gary Hart, too, was cam-
paigning in Georgia today.
On the Republican side, former
Delaware Go. Pete du Pont re-
nounced his claim to any part oi
Super Tuesday's biggest prize �
Texas, with its 110 delegates.
Du Pont asked Saturday that his
name be taken off the state's
March 8 primary ballot becauseof
forged signatures that turned up
on his primarv petitions.
Texas officials said it was too
late to do that, but said any votes
du Pont received would be
counted as uncommitted. Several
other candidates' petitions are
being checked as well. The con-
tenders all have denied any
wrongdoing.
Sen. Bob Dole fired the latest
salvo in a paper war with chief
GOP rival George Bush, releasing
21 years of tax returns and details
about his wife's blind trust.
But the documents, released
Saturday, left some questions
unanswered about the Doles' ties
to David Owen, who served as a
financial adviser to the trust.
Owen stepped down as Dole's
campaign finance chief last week,
and Dole said Sunday he consid-
ered Owen's departure perma-
nent.
Bush had sparked the skirmish
by distributing 14 years' worth of
tax returns earlier this month and
saying all candidates should do
likewise.
Hart, meanwhile, visited his
tiny Kansas hometown of Ottawa
for the first time since rejoining
the race last month.
But Saturday's stopover was a
far less emotional event than a
tearful Hart homecoming in the
first phase of his campaign, before
he dropped out over revelations
about his relationship with Miami
model Donna Rice.
From
$190.
Best Hotels
On The Strip
Call
Dave
757-3576
or
$149 Todd
U Drive it 758-9311
Welcome Back Students
20 off 20
422 Arlington Blvd
756-7202
Expires 21c
im
v
Pictured here are the stars of tw
Shazam shirt is Kevin Mate! j
Fish Police Look, just trust me
or am I wasting mv time?
'Mage' re
Bv MICAH HARRIS
Stjff VNter
Mage: The Hero Discovi
Volumes One & Two, bv l 1
Wagner: The Donning Comrv j
Starblaze Graphics.
Joseph Campbell, in his classi
work, "The Hero With A Th.
sand Faces provides a schematil
of sorts of the archetypal a I
cultural hero: an individual gi f
about his routine receives a
den calling from an engimati
herald; soon afterward, the hero
separated from his homelanc
descends into the underwork
then returns as an exalted lead
Red Hot C
ew arou
homage to
By BILL LTCHURCH
Staff Writer.
The "Uplift Mofo Parry Plan
the latest and most cm- I
album bv L.As super-funl
rockers the Red Hot Chili Pe
pers.
Hillel Slovak does a good
guitar. He has his own style ai
doesn't rely on playing the sar
chords over and over.
Jack Irons is the drummer
hind the Chili Peppers, lack is
funkv dude who can rock haf
The drums on this album s
keep vour feet dancing and vc
head banging.
The bassist for the Chili P
simpl v goes bv the name Flea 1
bass lines range from a groo
laid back type to a fast poping J
plaving style that says this mJ
bodv is full of funk
Anthony Kiedis is the
singer who, on an interview
"120 Minutes "on MTV said
philosophy of life is "You a
down 'till your heart sU
beatin must have been
world's most hyper-activ
Anthony has a unique -
singing that must be hear.
appreciate.
Dave A
musica
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Writer
Dave Alvin used to be in
Blasters. He also played with
a while, but he didn't record
them. He never played with
Justice as far as I know, but
The guy has enough credentj
He has a new album out
solo Lp, but there are a lot c
friends playing on it too
album is called "Romeo'
cape That'salso the title of cj
the songs actually on the all
He re-records a couple t
Blasters tunes like "Bordcj
dk" and "Long White Cadi
He also does the song X mad
popular this summer, "Foul
July
To me, if s interesting tha'





I
START
EXECUTIVE
MNING NOW
wait until you
start a man-
?gram. It yixi
ling, consider
:ive voua head
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Hotels
Strip
Call
Dave
757-3576
or
Todd
758-9311
JANUARY 19, 1988 Page 13
'Fish Police' combines art
and sarcasm to amuse fans
Pictured here are the stars of two of the coolest comic books being published lately. The guy in the black
Shazam shirt is Kevin Matchstick from "Mage The little guy in the tobaggan is Inspector Gill of "The
Fish Police Look, just trust me. Read the review. It will be okay tomorrow. Is anybody still reading this
or am I wasting my time?
'Mage' recalls Arthurian myth
adents
o
0
HH
By MICAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
Mage: The Hero Discovered,
Volumes One & Two, by Matt
Wagner: The Donning Company,
Starblaze Graphics.
Joseph Campbell, in his classic
work, "The Hero With A Thou-
sand Faces provides a schematic
of sorts of the archetypal cross
cultural hero: an individual going
about his routine receives a sud-
den calling from an engimatic
herald; soon afterward, the hero is
separated from his homeland,
descends into the underworld,
then returns as an exalted leader
of his people.
Although Matt Wagner's
"Mage" triology is far from com-
plete (the two Starblaze books
reprint only two-thirds of the first
volume) it is interesting to gauge
the scries by Campbell's arche-
type: Wagner's hero, Kevin
Matchstick, is strolling down a
city street, minding his business,
when he suddenly encounters
Mirth, the World Mage.
Kevin becomes a key focal
point in the secret battle against
the Umbra Sprite and his Grack-
leflints who seek the blood of the
changeling but lame Fisher King
to throw the balance of the
struggle towards the shadows
and chaos for an unknown length
of time
Subsequently, Kevin is sepa-
rated from his destroyed apart-
ment and thereafter enters the
Styx Casino, the heart of the
Umbra Sprite's considerable
darkness. At the conclusion of the
second volume, Kevin's chances
for exaltation and return look
extremely slim
but, again, this is very obvi-
ously archetypal stuff. Wagner's
main source is Arthurian ro-
See WAGNER'S, page 14
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Writrr
"Ever since I arrived in this
dreamland of the incredibly obvi-
ous, I've seen nothing but cliches.
Of course Goldie's your niece, it
couldn't be any other way
And that quote, from the first
chapter of "Hairballs the Fish
Police graphic novel (and inci-
dentally issue number one) is how
Inspector Gill gets involved in the
schemes of S.Q.U.I.D. Of course,
the letters were all capitalized in
the comic, but you get the picture.
"The Fish Police" by Steve
Moncuse, listed as "Creatist" in
credits, is expected to run for
out 20 issues - following in the
laxi-series footsteps of Richard
nd Wendy Pini's successful
'Elfquest" comic.
Moncuse, aside from being a
talented Demolition Drinking
player, is a master storyteller. In
the present comic world, apoco-
lyptic themes and ragged render-
ing are hot now. Moncuse has
broken this trend with his clean,
animated style ("I've got four fin-
gers! Cartoon characters have
four fingers Gill complains) and
sarcastic theatrics.
How good a plotter he is is hard
to tell at this point. The series is
broken into separate stories like
"Hairballs" and "S.H.A.R.K.
Bait The storyline is convoluted
and hard to second guess. The
only hard information we have
about Gill is that one day he woke
up and realized he was a fish.
It is implied that Gill was once
human, as evidenced by his vague
memories of stars and cats. But it
may that he is imagining that
stuff. He may have always been a
catfish.
Nevertheless, he is coping.
When he starts noticing female
fish, he realizes, "It's amazing
how flexible male hormones can
be
The battle between S.Q.U.I.D.
and S.H.A.R.K. (still don't know
what the hell those acronyms
stand for) is apparently what
drew Gill into Fish City. Pawns
from other dimensions are in-
volved in the struggle for power,
and Gill may be one of those trans-
posed pawns.
Lot of questions. Lot of cliches
too. Supporting fish include the
beautiful but deadly Goldfish, the
droll butler Blophish, Hook's pets
Line and Sinker. Lots of cliches.
But handled in a completely
sarcastic manner. During the
scene where Gill Finds out
Goldfish's relationship with the
mysterious Dr. Calamari, an
unobtrusive waiter attempts to
serve them. "Sir, I hate to inter-
rupt the flow of melodrama, but
would you like to order now?"
All the characters are treated
with this kind of respect, even if
they appear only for a few panels.
Lord Tetra's pet Tadpole, dis-
plays his jealousy of Sinker's one
word vocabulary (Bah.), thinking
to himself that other fish are only
pretending to understand Sinker.
Hilarious stuff. Visual and
background jokes abound, add-
ing subtle touches of humor remi-
niscent of early issues of Phil
Foglio's "Myth Adventures
One in particular, Gill's visit to
A.T. Landis's Guns N Liquor
Store, stands out.
Moncuse totally disregards any
kind of physical laws. Beer flows
normally into a glass underwater.
Line, the hermaphroditic eel,
almost dehydrates in an under-
water desert. And cigars and ciga-
rettes light easily.
Gill somehow knows this is
weird but deals. When the Hair-
balls drug (Mammalus Becoma-
nol is the scientific name) is re-
vealed to him, he again senses
some weird mess is going on, but
he is unable to discern what is
happening.
Running gags are paced
throughout the series. Gill's
battles with his chief's stable of
temporary secretaries, and the
homophobia the supporting char-
acters exhibit is tastelessly funny.
"Fish Police" is at issue number
11 right now. The book's erratic,
bimonthly schedule make it
harder to read than a lot of other
comics. You know The Big Guy
and Lois haven't done anvthing
unusual in the labt month or so.
With Gill, a two month gap might
find him hours or miles away
from the end of last months clitt-
hangcr.
The main appeal of this comic is
its comicness. After absorbing
all the ramifications oi this
month's "Teenage Swamp Mu-
tants with Real, Socially Relavent
Problems the light seriousness
and hopeless complexity oi the
Police is what comics used to be -
sheer escapism.
f

a
Red Hot Chili Peppers'
ftew afl5jm 1S funk-rock
homage to Bo Diddley
�L i
. C4

s�di�
!?
yy
1
1L ii
V
.ill.
est
St
t
q
A
d
By BILL UPCHURCH
Staff Writer
The "Uplift Mofo Party Plan"is
the latest and most energetic
album by L.As super-funk
rockers the Red Hot Chili Pep-
pers.
Hillel Slovak does a good job on
guitar. He has his own style and
doesn't rely on playing the same
chords over and over.
Jack Irons is the drummer be-
hind the Chili Peppers. Jack is one
funky dude who can rock hard.
The drums on this album will
keep your feet dancing and your
head banging.
The bassist for the Chili Peppers
simply goes by the name Flea. The
bass lines range from a groovin'
laid back type to a fast poping and
playing style that says this mans
body is full of funk.
Anthony Kiedis is the lead
singer who, on an interview on
"120 Minutes "on MTV said his
philosophy of life is "You ain't
down 'till your heart stops
beatin must have been the
world's most hyper-active child.
Anthony has a unique style of
singing that must be heard to
appreciate.
This album, released on EMI
America, is filled with hard
rockin' funk. The songs on the
album deal with a wide variety ol
topics.
"Backwoods" is a kind of a trib-
ute song to Chuck Berry, Bo Did-
dley, and Little Richard. The lyr-
ics that refer to Bo Diddley must
be hard to sing: "Mr. Uplift Mofo
� my man Bo Diddley Hit sip-
pin' a bottle of nickle ripple Play
the lickity split finger lickin'
licks For all you wicked city slick
chics And all you nitty gritty
hicks We'll make you nipples
ripple Make you want to dip
your dipple Strange lyrics for a
strange song, but check it out
because this is a serious party
tune.
"Groovin' a rune straight out of
the womb Trust is a must to be a
true blue dude That's a matter of
fact don't be confused Every-
body knows true friends are few
Those lines come from "Walkin'
Down The Road a song that has
a funky backbeat and guitar
whk i plays around the beat and
not exactly on it.
"No Chump Love Sucker is a
See CHILIS page 14
Schoolly D's L
deffest rap of 1987
By STEVE SOMMERS
Staff Writer
When I talk about rap misic I
usually get two criticisms: 1) that
rapping does not take talent and
2) it's just not rock-n-roll. Well,
when you talk about LL Cool J's
"I'm Need Love" I can see that
point. That song is sappy.
But, if I were to say heavy metal
is not rock-n-roll for the same
reasons and used Bon Jovi's
"Wanted Dead or Alive" as my
example, would I be wrong? So,
Pressure Boys have feeling
By STEVE SOMMERS
Staff Writer
What makes great rock-n-roll is
feeling. After all, why spend so
much time and effort to play
music if you don't feel it? Money?
Well, that's what being sold-out is
all about. This is why I hate cover
bands. They don't have imagina-
tion, they don't have feeling and
in my opinion, they are just not
rock-n-roll.
So, the more feeling music has
the more real, the more authentic,
the more rock-n-roll it is. If you
mix this rock-n-roll feeling with
talent, innovation, imagination
and raw energy it equals a fabu-
lous band and great records. This
combination adds up to the Pres-
sure Boys and their new record
"Krandlebanum Monumentus
Now these boys know what
they're doing.
So, why does this record stand
TT
iL-
i
B

H J
Dave Alvin knows how to kick some
musical butt�and proves it onLp
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Writer
Dave Alvin used to be in the
Blasters. He also played with X for
a while, but he didn't record with
them. He never played with Lone
Justice as far as I know, but hey.
The guy has enough credentials.
He has a new album out. If s a
solo Lp, but there are a lot of his
friends playing on it too. The
album is called Romeo's Es-
cape That's also the title of one of
the songs actually on the album.
He re-records a couple of old
Blasters tunes like "Border Ra-
dio" and "Long White Cadillac
He also does the song X made real
popular this summer, "Fourth of
July
To me, if s interesting that he let
them do it before his own album
came out. But then, the way X has
been going lately, it was probably
a mercy gift. Anyway, Alvin's
version is less poppy. I miss
Exene's vocals, but now I don't
have to embarass myself by buy-
ing "See How We Are
Dave hits some high peaks
when he croons those slow songs.
"Brother on the Line" and "Every
Night About This Time" don't
have the lyric detail "Fourth of
July" has but they are no less en-
tertaining for their generaliza-
tion.
The title cut is awesome. Hot
guitars and kickin' words.
"Where-wherefore art thou Ro-
meo?Where did you go?You
got all these women moanin' low
For their little Romeo
John Mellencamp has a lot in
common with Dave. They both
write about topical problems in an
optimistic way. Dave uses more
harmonicas on his album though.
And it's more believable com-
ing from somebody who doesn't
have videos in heavy rotation on
MTV. Not that Mellencamp is any
less sincere, but video as a whole
destroys your crediblity.
Dave's "Brother on the Line" is
about strikes and scabs. NFL
players should have had the
chance to hear this a couple of
months ago. It's a sad tune but not
a buckling under song. The
speaker holds on to his integrity,
even though someone is walking
in on his job.
"New Tattoo "What are your
Ma and Pa gonna do?Everyone
wants a woman like youEspe-
cially now with that new tattoo
What else needs to be said about a
song like this?
As a whole, "Romeo's Escape"
works best when Alvin is concen-
trating on the kick-ass rockabilly
songs. The slow songs are pretty,
but situated as they are in the
dead center of the album, they
tend to bog it down some.
Move them to the end, and you
would have one waffle stompin
Saturday night fagbustine ibum
of tunes. So make a tape of the rest
of the songs and play it while
cruising in your 4x4. Save the
slow stuff for your woman.
That's how Romeo does it.
apart from so many others? As I
said before, feeling. The way I
think they feel and the way they
make me feel. When I first listened
to Krandlebanum Monumentus,
it was like the first time I listened
to an XTC record. They have seri-
ous concerns that they express
with the zanyiness that is their
signature. "Trombonehead" is a
song that addresses the socializa-
tion of children. Here are a few
lines.
"Let's saturate their hungry
minds
Show them quickly all the
proper lies
When they reach out for the
loving touch
Another thing that hits me
about this record is the tightness.
The Pressure Boys are one tight
band. This is not an easy task as six
people are in the band. They cer-
tainly don't make things easy on
themselves either. "Krandle-
banum Monumentus" has as
many rhythm and tempo changes
as any record by any band.
From the jumping vocals, the
slap bass, the soaring and some-
times delicately placed horns, to
the innovative guitar leads and
drum rythms comes a very com-
plete album. When The Connells
are making records you should
buy for your mother and The Bad
Checks are making records you
should hide from your mother,
The Pressure Boys have made a
record you should buy for your-
self. I give Krandlebanum Monu-
mentus an A. Excellent work.
I'm here to talk about a real rap-
per.
In 1987, while The Beastie Boys
were getting arrested for their
hydraulic penis and Run-DMC
joined the anti-crack movement
one rapper stood head and shoul-
ders above the rest. His name is
Schoollv D and his D.J. name is
Cold Money. And as Schoolly
would say "You've never seen a
nigger like this before
"Saturday NightThe Record"
is the quintessential party record.
It has kick-started all of my par-
ties. Throw on "Dis Groove is
Bad" and you start moving. No
questions asked. The beat is big,
strong and loud. It makes you
dance.
The cool thing about Schoolly is
he doesn't follow the typical rap-
pers' line. Schoolly just tells like it
is. If you go to Philadelphia don't
think about raising hell on
Parkside Avenue and getting
away with it. That's Schoolly's
territory and he's "guarding it
like it was Fort Knox And I be-
lieve him. That's the thing about
Schooly D, he's authentic.
When the Beastie Boys say I
better beware because they say, "I
got a .45 automatic on my person
And I got my hands in my pock-
ets and my finger's on the trig-
ger I want to say shut-up punk.
I just have that feeling they're full
of that ka-ka stuff. But, when
Schoolly says, "Little white kid
called me a 'nigger' and if I had a
gun then I'd pull that trigger I
say, "yes sir
1 don't want you to think
Schoolly is just hung-up on being
tough. He's concerned about so-
cial issues as well. Let's take AIDS
for example. From the title track,
Schoolly re-enacts a scenario from
one of "those wild Saturday
nights
"I said, 'Hey baby, it's you on
the bill
and tonight I want to be your
lover,
just one thing, I forgot to buy a
rubber
I must warn you. Schoolly D is
not for everbody. Certainly, he is
not for the easily offended or
weak-hearted. But the best things
in life you have to develop a taste
for. To coin a phrase, you don't go
to Mexico until you drink the wa-
ter.
fiHnrtiWMHM�iiy�ii ��
m iiii '�fc
mwwwwru
ummw�m�
Mr





I
14 rHEEASTO
ROUNlAN
IANUARY 19,1988
Vocal chamber
group to pla
I - A ngt -
Enseml le directed by
men imian, will
East Cai olina
S i It iuii i , Theatre
i t 8 p m
� 88
- co-
thc i Jepartment ol
lions and the School
tial funding
nen t
n in 19'v). the
rtly
I south
a 1 ut also in the
. i musu in
plored
n
b
in Ber-
idging the
Id of musical
ted .
- al acclaim
crformances,
982 New
ts on Na
.
Used Furniture
BuySellTrade
752-3223
Beside the
Railroad Depot
I he ten members of the I os Angeles Vocal Arts Ensemble will perform at Hendrix Theater Thursday at
8p m .So, basically, you'll have to decide whetheryou want to see them or poet Betty Adcock,unlessyou
can split in two and then you could see both.
.
i s Individually, the ensemble's
singers have appeared as soloists
- ith leading symphony orches-
tras and opera companies across
the nation.
rickets for the concert are on
Nile at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center each
Interested In
Studying Abroad?
Information on academic exchange oppor-
tunities throughout the world through the
International Student Exchange Program
(ISEP), at ECU. Information available from:
Dr. R. Hursey, Jr.
ISEP Coordinator
Austin 222
Phone 757-6418 (work)
756-0682 (home)
g ner's ' Mage' is legendary
, ti ss ITu re are no "mean
ile . captions to be found. In
parts in Malory: face, Wagner eschews all comic
Merlin book cliches such as thought bal-
I i ibei beari g l ons and blocks of exposition.
man (Interestingly, Wagner's other
� c lei an ssasian
undei vorld story-wasallexposi-
ei schai tion against collage pages in its
Arthurian oi iginal form). Also, I might add,
omcthingelseisnot that Wagner's coloring is gor-
nt (When a
ou re the
. th
Is battling
. t in an
or his
Sidhe(a
1 in a mid-
� ; �se, aw
ipk s
r'sski sual st(
cim
us.
The only areas where he tails
rt, for meat least, is in the area
ol charactei Kevin. Mirth. Sean (a
ndly ghost), and Edsel are lik-
and interesting but not com-
pelling. Tliis is especially odd
considering Kevin Matchstick is
based on Wagner himself. Of the
cast, Edsel is the most endearing,
but her name is the most out-
standing thing about her.
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v
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PHONE 754 222
Expiration Date:
February- 8. 1988
?
illl.) i OO
I Lj
Jean Hopper, Owner tiOO'OoOD
ige is
. and ha
and then regret
is shown best by
middle of the
I low
into this i I �
: that
got big
11. n a re
ts rig al out
vhichhas
tt reminscent of an
Diddl ng; and the
(t version
lubterranean
severbeen
I
im is a song
Secret Sung In-
in't play it and I
ou the lyrics, but let's
v ith partying on
i ia. h'sn great dance
i i to become a
.i little overpri i
due to Michael
n from Demolition Sound
aputure the power the
s release, but the
s and the feel
uys had a blast
5 this album, more than
tl i pr iiK tion.
i v a) to preview this
tnd see if on like thisband
MB and request some
ngs mentioned above.
til rock that grooves,
? hat's full of energy,
luld gi i ahead and buy this
w'
XV
�i
��;ir-
Parents and Students
Let us show you
RINGGOLD TOWERS
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OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(EXCEPT AIGNER, NIKE AND REEBOK)
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240 Chapters Nationally
2 Houses and a Party Room
$90,000 in Scholarships Awarded
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"The House With The Heart"
NEED A RIDE!
757-0487 830-9646
757-0305 830-9647
ollege
By LAURA SALAZAR
Staff V.nlrr
cl
Have you ever thought al
ecoming the nevt Eddi
Llurphy? If you have. her. is youi
:hance to appear al the famou
omic Strip, the club where lddi.
lyiurphy and mam top cornedi
arts got their start
� U.S. Concepts Incorporate
sponsoring the U.S. Coll
Comedv Competitiort Betv
January and March, popular
comedians and College Con
talent scouts will he on a na1
wide search tor the 1 �-�
Comedv Comedian Winr
At 100 college campuse
the nation, comic hop
perform a Vminute si
routine which will be videota
NCandECUsym
BY CHRIS BRINCl Ml IP
The North Carolina Symphon
and the East Carolina In
Symphonv performed in
concert Sundae afternoor
Wright Auditorium.
The concert was a presenl
of the East Carolina Univei
Artist series and the Departn
of University Unions.
The symphonies were
ducted by North Carolina S
phony Music Director and (
ductor Gerhardt Zimmermann
and ECU Symphony conductor
Robert Hause.
The symphonies opened the
concert with Hause directing the
much loved "Prelude" to "Piei
Meistersinger von Nuernberg
by Richard Wagner, which many!
feel is his greatest composition.
Schubert's "Symphony No. 8 in
B Minor known to the world a
'The Unfinished" symphony andl
his most frequently performed!
work, was second on the pro-
gram.
After a short intermission. Zinv
mermann conducted the symj
phonies in their performance oj
Dvorak's "Concerto for Cello
an "Orchestra in B Minor, o
104?" The Featured cellist wa
Lynn Harrell.
The Dvorak, the least well
known piece on the concert an
also the longest, is typi
Only On
Tuesday
and
Thursday
� ���
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20:





!
14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 19,1988
Vocal chamber
group to play
kiUuse
mbei Los Angeles
Enscml le, directed by
Annen Guzelimian, will
n in East Carolina
it; s Hendrix Theatre
i at 8 p.m
entis part of the 1987-88
hambei Musk Series, co-
red by the Department of
sit) Unionsand the School
usic with partial funding
�� rial Endowment
i its form itu n in 1979, the
tdimj act not only
the musical scene in south-
alifoi nia 1 ut also in the
. . ; hamber musk in
! rhe group has explored
little know n master
cal hamber music by
Haydn,Schumann, Ber-
n i Poulenc, bridging the
. the 'Aii Id of musical
and the oncert stage.
s mble lias attracted na-
il and international acclaim
. h its con erl pei formances,
ling a successful 1982 New
k debut, broadcasts on Na-
Used Furniture
BuySellTrade
752-3223
Beside the
Railroad Depot
The ten members of the Los Angeles Vocal Arts Ensemble will perform at Hendrix Theater Thursday at
8 p.m So, basically, you'll have to decide whether you want to see them or poet Betty Adcock, unless you
can split in two and then you could see both.
ings. Individually, the ensemble's
singers have appeared as soloists
with leading symphony orches-
tras and opera companies across
the nation.
Tickets for the concert are on
sale at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center each
Wagner s 'Mage" is legendary
rtued from pje 13
.i. e of the leads have
counterparts in Malory:
; Arthur (Kevin), Merlin
K and the Excaliberbearing
. the ! ake(a young woman
K i mow bea� s a
ii ad).
. . i � I Wagner'scha
s are exactly the Arthurian
at tors or something elseis not
t this point. (When a
I Kt in i. claims, "I'm
rthi Mirth replies,
let s just say you're the
. the Pen i")
ner draws from ancient
cycles as well, bringing
cti cly into the 20th
. Kevin's friends battling
gigantic, Marhault ogre in an
otball btadium, or his
iction Iw a Leanhaun Sidhe (a
re fairy) dressed in a mid-
visirl and fishnet hose, are
amples
nei s skills in visual story-
i l; are impressive. "Mage"
h the cinematic
iiiis cool Lp
ed'r , page 13
ing, and having sex
Si me nv and then regret-
Liter This is shown best by
rds in the middle of the
"Yes it's time to resist How
evei get into this How
1 have ever kissed that
So v. hat if she's got big
songs of mention are
� v e Trilogy a song about
r hind the Sun which has
in' heat reminscent of an
1 Hddley song; and the
I and smoothest version
b Dylan's "Subterranean
Blues' that's ever been
inyl.
on the album is a song
Special Secret Song In-
VZMB ,an't play it and I
II you the lyrics, but let's
it deals with partying on
genitalia. It's a great dance
ind destined to become a
lassie.
album is a little overpro-
probably due to Michael
n from Demolition Sound
to caputure the power the
'eppers release, but the
of the songs, and the feel-
I these guys had a blast
king this album, more than
the overproduction.
d way to preview this
i re and see if you like thisband
to call WZMB and request some
songs mentioned above.
But, if you like rock that grooves,
usic that's full of energy,
aild go ahead and buy this
smoothness. There are no "mean-
w liile captions to be found. In
face, Wagner eschews all comic
book cliches such as thought bal-
loons and blocks of exposition.
(Interestingly, Wagner's other
series "Grendel" an Assasian
underworld story-was all exposi-
tion against collage pages in its
original form). Also, I might add,
that Wagner's coloring is gor-
geous.
The only areas where he falls
1 urt for me at least, is in the area
oi character. Kevin, Mirth, Sean (a
friendly ghost), and Edsel are lik-
able and interesting but not com-
pelling. This is especially odd
considering Kevin Matchstick is
based on Wagner himself. Of the
cabt, Edsel is the most endearing,
but her name is the most out-
standing thing about her.
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� Graphics & Near Letter Quality
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� I box diskettes
� all software installed
� printer cable
� 500 sheets clean tear paper
S & R Computer Associates, Inc.
530 Cotanche Street
Downtown Greenville (Next to Bicycle Post)
757-3279
�"
V

Interested In
Studying Abroad?
Information on academic exchange oppor-
tunities throughout the world through the
International Student Exchange Program
(ISEP), at ECU. Information available from:
Dr. R. Hursey, Jr.
ISEP Coordinator
Austin 222
Phone 757-6418 (work)
756-0682 (home)
DONNA
ILUCE
Bring in this ad for a 15
discount on a purchase of
$10 or more!
With Valid ECU I.D.
Good Selection of Reptiles
and Saltwater and Freshwater Fish
We Carry A Complete Line
of Dog, Cat, and Fish Supplh
Master Card aa4 Visa arc
available.
511 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27�34
PHONE 754222
Expiration Date:
February 8. 1988
T
.qo ioniV fl
ETfeOffDlO"
RINGGOLD TOWERS
At The Campus � East Carolina University
�Towers located at 7th & Cotanche
Streets surrounded on three sides by
campus.
�Towers closer to both downtown and
classrooms than many ECU
dormitories.
�Designed for student appeal and
affordability.
�Each unit is completely furnished
except linens.
�On site management.
�Excellent financing.
Call for details
"WE'LL DO YOU HOMEWORK"
PSILON
ie experience
Greenville
Memorial
Market
i-nity
mps 3 Years
� Running
2nd Highest G.P.A.
240 Chapters Nationally
2 Houses and a Party Room
$90,000 in Scholarships Awarded
Annually
Located at the corner of 5th and Summit.
Jan. 19th - Sorority Girls of JXE
Jan. 20th - Sorority Girls AA71
Jan. 21st - Brothers of I0E ,
"The House With The Heart"
NEED A RIDE!
757-0487 830-9646
757-0305 8309647
jrifc
By LAURASALAZAR
Staff Writer
Have you ever thought atx)
becoming the next Ed
MwrphyIf you have, here is yc
chance to appear at the famo
ComicStrip, the club where Ed
Murphy and many top come
ans got their start.
U.S. Concepts Incorporated
sponsoring the U.S. Collej
Comedy Competition. Betwe
January and March, popul
comedians and College Come
talent scouts will be on a natioj
wide search for the 1988 Colle
Comedy Comedian Winner.
At 100 college campuses aero
the nation, comic hopefuls wa
perform a 3-minute stand-uj
routine which will be videotape
NC and ECU sy
BY CHRIS BRINCEFIELD
Stiff Writer
The North Carolina Symphony
ind the East Carolina University
Symphony performed in join
oncert Sunday afternoon a I
Vright Auditorium.
The concert was a presentatioi
f the East Carolina University
ulist series and the Department
f University Unions.
The symphonies were con-
ucted by North Carolina Sym-
hony Music Director and Con-
uctor Gerhardt Zimmermani
id ECU Symphony conductoi
obcrt Hause.
The symphonies opened their
mcert with Hause directing th
iuch loved "Prelude" to "Did
leistersinger von Nuernberg"
Richard Wagner, which many
el is his greatest composition.
Schubert's "Symphony No. 8 ii
Minor known to the world as
Tie Unfinished' symphony an
s most frequently perfoi
3rk, was second on the pre
am.
After a short intermission, ZimJ
rmann conducted the symj
ir performance o
mcerto for Cello
"Orchestra in B Minor, o
The Featured cellist waj
iHarrell.
The Dvorak, the least we
Tdwn piece on the concert an
so the longest, is typical
Only On
Tuesday
tnd
hursday
YO!
YOU DRIVE (io the pwm
$127.
DRIVE (im par� M
185.1
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- i-

Y 19, 1W 15
ms
�OT
ture
ade
Beside the
Railroad Depot
d In
broad?
exchange oppor-
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change Program
ivailable from:
v. Jr.
ator
ork)
inie)
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ILON
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3 Years
iinning
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Awarded
ummit.
U
ollege comics sought
By LAURA SALAZAR
Suft Writer
lave you ever thought about
?ecoming the next Eddie
kturphvIt you have, here is your
thance to appear at the famous
�mic Strip, the club where Eddie
Llurphy and many top comedi-
ans eot their start.
for review by National judges teed a performance at the famous
Larry "Bud" Melmana regular Comic Strip in New York City,
on Late Night with David Letter-
man) and Gilbert Gottfried (re-
cently seen in Beverly Hills Cop
II).
Melman and Gottfried will then
choose four finalists to compete
for the title of "The Funniest Col-
lege Comedian" at the U.S. Col-
U.S.oncepts Incorporated is legc Comedy Competition finals
S. College in Daytona Beach during Spring
medy Competition. Between
inuary and March, popular
medians and College Comedy
lent scouts will be on a nation-
wide search tor the 1988 College
Ipmedy Comedian Winner.
At 100 college campuses across
ie nation, comic hopefuls will
Ttorm a 3-minute stand-up
tutine which will be videotaped
Break next March.
Finalists will receive an all-ex-
The competition starts at Wash-
ington State University on Janu-
ary 18 and ends eight weeks and
99 schools later at Virginia Com-
monwealth University on March
11. The finals are scheduled on
March 21-25, in Daytona Beach,
Florida.
ECU's local competition will be
Wednesday at 8 p.m. in the Cof-
feehouse, Mendcnhall Student
Center. The Student Union Spe-
cial Events Committee is sponsor-
pense paid trip to Daytona and ing the competition. Lynn Jobes,
four days of VIP accommadation. Assistant Program Director and
According to the crowd's re-
sponse and Mclman's opinion, a
winner will be chosen by Melman
and representatives from Doritos
and Sticklets.
The winner will then be guaran-
advisor to the committee said
fC and ECU symphonies meet
V CHRIS BRINCEF1ELD
Sutf Writer
he North Carolina Svmphonv
d the East Carolina University
mphony performed in joint
inert Sunday afternoon at
Wr ght Auditorium.
�"he concert was a presentation
of the East Carolina University
entrants can pre-register by call-
ing either 757-6611 or by signing
up an hour before the competi-
tion.
All entrants will receive a free t-
shirt and there will also be prizes
for local winners.
Jobes said, "We've gotten a few
Dvorak's style. There are great calls about the competition. If we
similarities between this work have five students, I will feel that
and his more popular "Sym- it's a success She also said that
phony No. 9 The New World students should encourage their
This is the second joint concert friends to come out and compete,
given at ECU by the two sympho- Fifteen hundred bags of Doritos
nies and Zimmermann said that Cool Ranch Flavor and 5 cases of
he hoped it would become an Sticklets gum will be distributed
annual affair. The last time the free at the competition on Wed-
two symphonies performed to- ncsday night. Jobes encourages
Htbt series and the Department gether was for the gallery opening students to save their wrappers
Hof I nversitv Unions. of the remodeled Wright Audito- and deposit them in redemption
num.
Before theconcert began, ECU's
Zeta Psi chapter of Phi Mu Alpha
Symphonia music fraternity
awarded Maestro Zimmermann
their Orpheus award for signifi-
IL niversitv Unions,
�"he symphonies were con-
ducted by North Carolina Svm-
phonv Music Director and Con-
ductor Gerhardt Zimmermann
and F.CU Svmphonv conductor
Robert Hause.
The symphonies opened their
concert with lause directing the
much loved 'Prelude" to "Die
Meistersmger von Nuernberg"
by Richard Wagner, which many
feel is his greatest composition.
Schubert's "Svmphonv No. 8 in
B Minor known to the world as
The Unfinished" symphony and
his most frequently performed
work, was second on the pro-
gram.
After a short intermission, Zim-
mennarm conducted the sym-
phonies in their performance of
Dvlra's s Concerto tor Cello"
awl "Orchestra in B Minor, op.
lOIr ! tie featured cellist was
Lynn 1 larrell.
The Dvorak, the least well
kndwn piece on the concert and
also the longest, is typical of
boxes located in the Student
Stores and Mendenhall. The
school that collects the most
wrappers and bags in a two-week
period will win a free concert fea-
turing Melman and Gottfried.
A Great Combination
SiTzlin
and
Only On
Tuesday
and
Thursday
ECU
Come Dine At Western Sizzlin
Where Presentation of A Valid ECU ID
Will Entitle You To A 10
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E.C.U.
STUDENT UNION
MAJOR CONCERTS COMMITTEE
PRESENTS
JIMMY
BUFFETT
IN CONCERT
THURSDAY,
JANUARY 28,1988
MINGES COLISEUM
8:00 P.M.
TICKETS
ECU STUDENTS $13.00
GENERAL PUBLIC AND
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AVAILABLE
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CHARLES BLVD.
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�.





16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
IANUARY 19, 1988
History programs
stimulate
Artist slid
t
CH APEL HILL, N.C(AP)-The
headline from the Morning Ore-
gortian flashes across the com-
puter screen in time with a few
bars of ragtime music.
A student from the University
of North Carolina Chapel Hill is
hard at work waging a campaign
to place a woman's suffrage
amendment on the Oregon ballot.
1 le has overcome fire, the theft of
his petition signatures and a
dwindling campaign budget.
it's really nothing more than a
computer exercise. But tor the
moment, UNC-CH professor
ohn F. Semonche has taken his
student to the ear 1912.
About 90 minutes later, the
campaign is over. This time
around, the woman's suffrage
amendment has reached the Ore
gon ballot.
The lesson isn't restricted to
computer butts. It's a required
class assignment for all students -
mostly freshmen and sopho-
mores - in Scmonche's two-
semester U.S. history course.
Developed by Semonche and
funded by IBM, the computer
program is one example of an
intriguing new outlet for educa-
tors - the development of "course-
ware
Unlike most educational soft-
ware - which acts as a tutor by
reviewing facts - courseware re-
quires students to make decisions
and answer analytical questions
that relate directly to the ideas
being taught in a course, Semon-
che said.
He has more than 20 yearsexpe-
rience teaching the traditional
lecture history course, and he
looks the part with his pipe and
tweed jacket. But after watching
students work with his course-
ware project, he is convinced that
computer simulations can chal-
lenge students and draw them
into a subject in a way that reading
and lectures can't.
"Students have a notorious way
of putting a distance between
themselves and a subject" he said.
"The vast majority have to be
captured. The computer Simula
tions are the best way I've found
of doing that
William H. Graves, a UNC-CH
math professor, wrote the grant
proposal for IBM ir. 1983, when he
was an associate dean in charge of
the university's general educa-
tion requirements.
His intention, he said, was to
guarantee that computers and
resources were available for sub-
ject areas that hadn't explored the
computer's potential beyond us-
ing it as a word processor.
As a result, many of the 40 proj-
ects supported by the $2.5 million
in IBM money and equipment
were developed by humanities
professors such as Semonche,
Graves said.
"An interesting social phe-
nomenon was that people in
humanities really stepped for-
ward on this Graves said.
"There was really keen interest
because poeple in humanities had
been locked out of computing
In Semonche's case, the com-
puter programs were a natural
extension of a process he had used
for almost 20 years in the class-
room. Since the late 1960s, he had
been asking his classes to put
themselves in the place of people
who had to make historic deci-
sions. The approach helps stu-
dents understand the complexity
of historical events and enlivens
lectures, he said.
Since the IBM project began,
Semonche has developed 11 com-
puter simulations. Three have
already been incorporated into
his teachings: "1865 - "Should the
Southern States Be Readmitted to
the Union?"
"June-December 1894 - What
Action Should the President Take
Concerning the Pullman Strike of
1894 and its Aftermath?" and
"1912-Can You Get Your State To
Approve a Woman's Suffrage
amendment?"
After the students complete the
program, they answer a series of
analytical questions based on
their decisions. The student's
performance is recorded on a
printout and graded, Semonche
said.
The computer programs don't
replace basic course work but are
used in lieu of supplementary
reading.
"The intention is to make it a
very important part of the
course Semonche said.
He recently found a publishing
company that will sell his soft-
ware programs and hopes to put
others on the market. But one
criticism of courseware is that
much of it will never find a mar-
ket.
UNC-CH Associate Provost
John H. Harrison IV said course-
ware was used mainly by the
person who develops it. He thinks
the overall IBM project will pro-
duce little software that other
professors will find useful.
"A lot of time and effort is in-
vested in it, but it's far-reaching
impact may not be realized
Harrison said.
Instead, Harrison views the
project as a step toward making
software easier to create. When
that happens, more and more
professors will be willing to invest
the time it takes to create their
own personalized programs.
Semonche acknowledges that
some people - including students
who have dropped his course
because he used the program -
criticize the invasion of comput-
ers into courses that formerly
used lectures and readings.
But Graves said most of the
skepticism had disappeared. The
IBM project has sparked course-
ware development in various
subjects, including Latin, English,
calculus and psychology.
"I'd say we're in the midst of an
evolution in our own understand-
ing of how we can use the com-
puter with students he said.
"Interest is on the rise
One indication of growing in-
terest involves the work of
Educom in Princeton, N.J, a con-
sortium of 500 colleges and uni-
versities. Educom has developed
a "Software Initiative" project
that studies the increased use of
software. The group also holds an
annual awards program to en
courage the development of new
courseware programs, Vice Presi-
dent Candice K. Willut said.
Ms. Willut, Semonche and
Graves agree that courseware will
become more popular when col-
leges and universities provide
more computer terminals for stu-
dents.
"Using computers to teach is
not a new concept, but the micro-
computer certainly makes it more
accessible to more people Ms.
Willut said.
988 begi
'A,
Adcock will read poems and
give workshop on campus
tngli&h Department Press Release
Poet Betty Adcock will present
a reading from her works at East
Carolina University Thursday at
8 p.m. The reading, sponsored by
the ECU Poetry Forum, will take
place in Room 244 of Mcndenhall
Student Center.
Ms. Adcock, a native Texan
now residing in Raleigh, is author
of three books of poetry, "Walk-
ing OutNettlcs" and "Behold-
ings all published by Louisiana
State University Press. Her poems
are also included in several an-
thologies and more than a dozen
literary magazines.
At present, Ms. Adcock is Ke-
nan Writer-in-Rcsidence at
Meredith College. She has taught
pfehrtondJcrVorherV'sTurSynighhrTKoom p r�?adi at numcrous
244 of Mendenhall Student Center. She will also direct a poetry campUSes across the nation. In
workshop, scheduled for Thursday at 2 p.m. addition, she has been an cdtor
for "Southern Poetry Review"
and "Poets South
During her visit to ECU, Ms.
Adcock will direct a poetry work-
shop, tentatively scheduled for 2
p.m. Thursday.
The East Carolinian
Pick it up
SPEND
SPRING BREAK ON A CRUISE!
The Travel Committee Presents:
a 6-day cruise on the Funship Carnivale.
Depart: 6 p.m. March 6
Return: 4 a.m. March 12.
Via: Round trip to Miami on Seashore Trailways Bus.
Cruise aboard the Funship Carnivale.
Price: $475 (ECU Students) $520 (Non-students).
Call: Mendenhall's Central Ticket Office
for more details 757-6611.
. ; li )il' " ')lHk)ll i . Ml HI hltt
i 3&dia moJteivi'jfifiiQ�i6w�.d
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
OMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
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as a member of the Army Nurse
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career advancement are the rule.
, not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. If you re
earning a BSN, write. Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713,
Clifton, NJ 07015. Or call toll free l-800-USA-ARMY
XRMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN B
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On Monday. January 11. Coffman's Men's Wear will of-
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lections of fall and winter merchandise for men. women
and boys. An excellent opportunity to save on fine
clothing, furnishings, sportswear and outerwearall
from our regular stock of traditional fashions.
757-3516
"The Phoenix TAKES FLIGHT"
Be A Part Of It
i
hr
oPPman's
r MENS'WEAR
Downtown Greenville
Carolina East Mall
Tartytown Mall. Rocky Mount
gemgm
ALtMU-
School of Art Pros RcImm
6t Carolina University School
Jut's spring semester slide lee-
Igre series features nine artists
cs and faculty members
king January through March.
the lectures will be held in
ins Auditonrm at 7 30 p.m.
ibrielle Yablonsky will be lec-
tern her work Thursday. She
be teaching at the School ot
or the spring semester as a
cipant in the school's artist-
idence program.
r figurative work crosses the
urns of sculpture and paint-
jpnd includes photomontage
� performance and installation
�t In addition to sevei p
md solo exhibits across the na-
JOTV Yablonsky has completed
jOiSrfework for the doctorate
in Art History at UCLA
earning the M A at "i ale Uni-
versity and MFA at Boston Uni-
�nky
She is also trained in video and
Urn and has taught in several
alleges and universities irtclud-
ngthe University of California at
lerkeley, California State I'm ver-
ity at Long Beach and Havw a!
he University of Texas at Austin,
nd Wellesley College.
The following Mondav, Heid
asnacht will present a slide-lec-
ureon her work which will bx
lisplay in Gray Art Gallery !ar
ry 15 through February 6 in the
' . xhibit "Simultaneous Viev -
asnacht is a New York based
rtist exhibiting painted wood
rulpture and charcoal drawings
f Worst named
LOS ANGELES (AP - v
Blackwell, the self-appointed
fashion arbiter oi best and worst.
has declared actress Lisa Bonet to
be the worst-dressed woman of
the year.
At a news conference luesday,
he described Miss Bonet's ward-
robe as "Dracula's idea ci a good
rime
This year's 2Sth-annual list ot
,vorst-dressed women had 12
tallies because of two ties.
�t. 2 was Diane Keaten ("a bat
adpr) No. 3 actress Justine
Bateman ("stuffed sausage") and
tied at No. 4, ' Minsky's rejects
Cher and Cyndi Lauper.
Also listed were. 3. Monaco s
Princess Stephanie; 6, Shelley
Long; 7, Joan Collies. 8,Sally K
ermar; 9, Neg Ryr.n; 10 s
$rae and Susan Sul'ivan.
TEXA
-

N
I
V
To Sign Up
Or For More Info
Go by 214 or
iS 16 Slay Dorm
or
Call 768-8888
or 758-8887
flBQVi� � jr
mm
"i�i" inin.ijii jimriir i rm-rvmWT'm
i�n ii-inwi. nmmme0imm"
�iMfc II 111 ��'i ifi rinii,
�- M 1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 19,1988 17
nts
HM project has sparked course-
rare devctopmenl in various
ibjocts, including Latin, English,
tlculusand psychology.
I'dsaj we'reinthcnudstofan
solution in ourownunderstand-
� how we can use the com-
utcr with students he said.
I is on the rise
One indication or growing in-
involves the work of
in Princeton NJa con-
cilium ot 500 colleges -wd uni-
lucom has developed
vare Initiative" project
- the increased vise of
The croup also holds an
awards program to en-
the development of new
i arc programs, Vice Presi-
e K Willut said.
Willut, Semonche and
sagree that courseware will
me more popular when col-
and universities provide
nputer terminals tor stu-
- to teach is
ut the micro-
m ikes it more
n Ms.
v krtist slide-lecture series for
11988 begins with Yablonski
D
)N A CRUISE!
littee Presents:
p C ami vale.
in iys Bus.
: s lie.
n-students).
Office
School of Art Frti RcIuh
ast Carolina University School
rt's spring semester slide-lec-
series features nine artists,
ncs and faculty members
aking January through March,
the lectures will be held in
ans Auditorirm at 7:30 p.m.
tabnelle Yablonsky will be lec-
ng on her work Thursday. She
be teaching at the School of
for the spring semester as a
licipant in the school's artist-
isidence program.
cr figurative work crosses the
liums of sculpture and paint-
land includes photomontage
rformance and installation
In addition to several group
solo exhibits across the na-
Yablonsky has completed
so work for the doctorate
lee in Art History at UCLA
earning the MA at Yale Uni-
ity and MFA at Boston Uni-
It'y.
is also trained in video and
and has taught in several
:es and universities includ-
u? University of California at
ley, California State Univer-
it Long Beach and Hayward,
fmversity of Texas at Austin,
ellesley College,
following Monday, Heide
icht will present a slide-lec-
n her work which will be on
iv in Gray Art Gallery Janu-
K through February 6 in the
bit Simultaneous Views
�Icht is a New York based
fat exhibiting painted wood
(Culture and charcoal drawines.
Worst named
to
ui
1)
qa
tA

rw
ni
HI
! .1
'U
I
I l")

Graduating from Rhode Island
School of Design with a RFA and
New York State University with
an MFA, Fasnacht has taught and
shown widely including exhibits
at Pratt Institute Gallery, Vander-
woude Tananbaum Gallery and
Germans Van Eck Gallery in New
York.
Her credits include reviews in
such prominent publications as
Arts Magazine. Artnews. and
The New York Times. Fasnacht
will visit the ECU campus to talk
with classes and individual stu-
dents as a part opf the School of
rt's Visiting Artist Program
February 1 is the date of for
Ernst Habrichs' lecture "Future
Needs in Humanitarian Architec-
ture, Interior and Environmental
Design: A Critical View This
lecture is a sequel to a talk Hab-
richs presented last October en-
titled "Industrial Evolution in
Design of Furniture Related to
Architecture Born and educated
in Germany, Habrichs is a new
Assistant Professor of Interior
and Environmental Design in the
School of Art.
Sam Scott joins the ECU faculty
from Sante Fe, New Mexico as an
Artist-in-Residence teaching
painting and design for the spring
semester. Scott is a professional
painter and educator who has
served as visiting artist or faculty
member at major universities
throughout the United States.
His paintings and drawings are
featured in Gray Art Gallery's
exhibit "Simultaneous Views
from January 15 through Febru-
ary 13. His lecture presentation
takes place February 8.
Richard Spiller, also a visiting
faculty member for the spring
semester, will be teaching ceram-
ics and design. A mixed media
sculptor, Spiller will talk about his
work February 15. Spiller has
most currently been an adjunct
faculty member at the University
of Wisconsin at Madison in the
ceramics department and was
educated at Western Michigan
University with a BS in Art and
History and at the University of
WisconsinMadison with his
MFA in Ceramics and Glass.
February 22, Allison Saar's lec-
ture will begin a series of slide
presentations from the artists
showcased in Gray Art Gallery's
exhibit, 'Enigmatic Inquiry On
February 25, internationally ac-
claimed artist Italo Scanga will
discuss his work as a part of his
participation in the Visiting Artist
Program at the School of Art. The
exhibit's third artist is Richard
Reese who will be speaking
March 16.
On March 17, the School of Art's
Visiting Critics Program will
present a lecture by a New York
Art Critic Stephen Henry Madoff.
Madoff was educated at Colum-
bia College of Columbia Univer-
sity in English and American Lit-
erature and received his Master's
and Doctorate from Stanford
University.
He has also lectured and taught
at Stanford University, Ben-
nignton College, the Pratt Insti-
tute, the University of Texas at
Austin, New York University and
the National Art Academics in
Stockholm, Helsinki and Oslo.
The public is most cordially
invited to attend these lectures;
there is no admission fee. For
more information, call (919) 757-
6336.
fOS ANGELES (AP) - Mr.
Wickwell, the self-appointed
feKpUOii arbiter or" best and worst,
has declared actress Lisa Bonet to
teethe worst-dressed woman of
iheyear
Ata news conference Tuesday,
hedesenbed Miss Bonet's ward-
robe as "Dracula's idea of a good
time
rhisyear's2Sth-annuallistofl0
Ircssed women had 12
because oi two ties,
was Diane Keaton ("a bag
No. 3 actress Justine
in ("stuffed sausage") and
tied It No. 4. ' Mm sky's rejects'
Cher and Cyndi Lauper.
AJso listed were: 5, Monaco's
Process Stephanie; 6, Shelley
im& 7, Joan Collins, 8, Sally Kell-
f�r; �. N eg Ry;n; 10, Sonia
and Susan Siil'ivan.
The heat is on.
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!
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JANUARY 19,1988 Page 18
Pirates fall to American in CAA heartbreaker
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Fditur
So dose, but yet so far.
The old cliche could not fit any
better than after ECU'S 75-69
overtime loss to American Mon-
day night in Minges Coliseum
before a boisterous crowd of
2,820.
With the game tied 65-65 and
one second remaining on the
clock, the Pirates' hopes of win-
ning another key CAA game rest
solely in the hands of junior Gus
Hill.
Hill, who was fouled by the
Eagle's Mike Sampson was at the
free throw line with a chance to
score the game-winning points on
a one-and-one opportunity-
Hill, who was 13 of 16 at the
charity stripe for the night, how-
ever, fired the free throw long
sending the game into overtime.
In the overtime period, free
throws once again wouldn't fall
for the Pirates as the Eagles held
on for the win.
"Our guys played real hard and
really got after them (American)
ECU head coach Mike Steele said
following the loss. "But they just
didn't play smart and that is the
bottom line
The Pirates, for most of the
game, allowed the fast-paced
Eagles to dictate the pace of play
in the game, something Steele
wanted to keep away from. Steele
said that one of the keys he
pointed out to his players before
the game was to have patience on
offense.
"It (our patience on offense)
was as bad as I've seen it this
year Steele said. "They were
trying to score on one pass and we
don't have the team to do that
The Pirates fell behind by 10,25-
15, in the first half at the 9:31 mark
before thev mounted a rallv.
A pair of free throws each by
Hill and freshman Stanley Love
followed by a score from walk-on
Kenny Murphy pulled the Pirates
within four, 25-21 with 7:05 to
play in the opening half.
ECU managed to keep the
Eagles lead to four at the intermis-
sion when Terhern Harvey scored
with six seconds showing on the
first half clock making the score
34-30.
In the second half, the Pirates
opened by not going behind by
more than seven before rallying at
the 16:30 mark. Hill canned a pair
of free throws and then connected
on a 3-pointer to pull ECU to
within one, 44-43 with 15:50 re-
maining.
After falling back behind by six,
a nine-point surge by the Pirates
boosted them back into the lead
for the first time since leading 5-4.
Scores from Love, Murphy and
Jeff Kelly sandwiched around an-
other 3-pointer by Hill put the
Pirates in front 54-51 with 9:55 to
play.
The Eagles charged right back
and reeled off six points of their
own to grasp a 57-54 lead at the
eight minute mark.
"We were up by three and then
had two turnovers in a row that
really hurt us Steele explained.
From there, the Pirates man-
aged to get back in front by as
many as three, 61-58, before the
Eagles got back even at the end of
regulation setting up Hill's
chance for the victory.
"I told him (Hill) that missing
the free throw was not that impor-
tant Steele said. "The thing that
I'm concerned with about Gus is
the mental mistakes he made
during the game. He had about
four charging fouls
The free throw woes of the Pi-
rates continued in the overtime as
Kelly and Reed Lose each missed
the front end of one-and-one
opportunities and Love also mis-
sed a shot from the charity stripe.
With the loss, the Pirates fall to
2-2 in the CAA and 6-9 overall,
while the Eagles improve to 6-9
overall and 2-2 in conference ac-
tion.
Hill paced the Pirates in scoring
for the game with a game-high 25
points, while Lose scored 13.
American was led by Daryl
Holmes with 18. Sampson
chipped in 14, while Dale Spears
came off the bench to score 11.
"This is the first game that we
have lost that we should have
won Steele said. "We just need
to regroup now and get ready for
our next game
The Pirates next action will be
Saturday, Jan. 23 on the road
against the league-leading
Richmond Spiders.
ECU'S Stanley Love drives to the hoop against
Monday night. (Photo by Thomas Walters �
American's Mike Sumner
FXU Photo Lab)
Lady Pirate hoopsters drop two games;
marking fourth straight loss in a row
Gretta O'Neill Savage goes for a block
during action Saturday. (Photo by Thomas
against Fairleigh-Dickinson
Walters � ECU Photo Lab)
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sporti Writer
For the first time since the 1984-
85 season, ECU's Women's Bas-
ketball team has lost four con-
secutive games.
The Lady Pirates dropped two
nonconference games: Thursday
at North Carolina A&T, 58-51;
and Saturday at Minges Coliseum
against FairLeigh Dickinson, 76-
68.
At N.C. A&T, the Lady Pirates
fell short with the 58-51 loss in
Greensboro. The Lady Pirates
dropped to 5-9 overall and 1-3 on
the road.
Senior forwa d Monique Pom-
pili led the Lady Pirates with 16
points and eight rebounds. Senior
Alma Bethea'also had 16 points
for ECU who trailed the Aggiettes
30-24 at the half.
ECU shot only 38.7 from the
field for the game while NC A&T
shot 47.5.
The Aggiettes were led by
Paulette Dennis with 16 points.
The Lady Pirates came home to
Minges Coliseum on Jan. 16, to fall
to FairLeigh Dickinson, 76-68.
Both teams got off to a slow start
but two driving lay-ups by Gretta
O'Neill Savage at 15:35 put ECU
up 13-5 at 12:20, their biggest lead
�f the game. ����- tf
FairLeigh Dickinson tied the
game, 25-25, at 2:49 remaining in
the half, with an eight-foot jur. .per
by Delia Davis.
Diane Campbell, FairLeigh
Dickinson's leading scorer with
26 points, sank a free throw at the
half to give the Lady Knights the
lead 32-31.
Freshman Wendy Morton with
her career high 22 points, led the
Pirates with 12 at the half.
FairLeigh Dickinson continued
to hold the Lady Pirates through-
out the second half. With 7:00
remaining in the game, the Lady
Knights were up 60-44.
Exeeltent-free throw shootine
byCCHIuf irfb FlrlJigy j
Dickinson's lead 68-63, with 1:00
remaining in the game.
Bethea, who had 13 points for
the Pirates including 11 from the
line, sank eight of her free throws
in the last 7:00.
Bethea also led the Pirates with
14 rebounds.
In the end, it was Kerry Dressel,
FairLeigh Dickinson's second
leading scorer with 18 points,
who sank six free throws in the
last minute to seal the win.
Savage and Pompili each
scored in double figures with 13
points each.
The loss dropped the Lady Pl-
ata record to 5-10 overall ai
JhetuMrtta cor&rence pla
MOTWay night on the road at
American.
Pirates' Man of Steele is no doubt proving to be for real
A Look at Sports
Bv TIM CHANDLER
m
Sports Editor
ifr�
Nothing in the world can take the
place of persistence. Talent will not;
nothing is more common than unsuc-
cessful men of talent. Genius will not;
the world is full of educated derelicts.
Persistence and determination alone
are omnipotent. Theslogan 'press on'
has solved and always will solve the
problems of the human race.
� Calvin Coolidge
The above quotation, inscribed
in a cross-stitch portrait, is one of
the first things that greets a vistor
entering East Carolina basketball
coach Mike Steele's office.
The words expressed by the late
president Calvin Coolidge are so
related to the 1987-88 basketball
team at ECU that the words al-
most jump out at a visitor as those
spoken expressly for the team.
When Steele came to Greenville
Swimmers gain wins
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sports Writer
ECU's swim team came away
victorious in Saturday's dual
meet with conference foe UNC-
Wilmington at the Minges Coli-
seum Natatorium.
The men won eight of 13 events
for a total score of 106 over
Wilmington's 100, while the
women won 10 of 13 events for a
total of 108 over Wilmington's 75.
The men's and women's 400M
medley relay teams placed first
with times of 3:41.51 nad 4:11.51
respectively.
Ted Christcnscn, of the men's
relay team also took first place in
the 200 individual medley with a
time of 1:59.89. Teammates Ray
Kennedy and Patrick Brcnnen
were right behind as the Pirates
swept the event.
Leslie Wilson won the women's
200 IM finishing 2:15.97. Team-
mate Ryan Philyaw took third.
Freshman Sonya Hemingway
was one of two Pirate Swimmers
to take home two individual wins.
Hemmingway, a member of the
winning 400M medley relay, won
the 50M and 100M freestyle, 25.55
and 56.24. ECU also took second
place in both events with Angela
Winstead's26.53 finish in the50M
and Philyaw's 56.43 finish in the
T00M.
junior Pairicia Walsh also won
two events tor the Pirates. In the
200M freestyle, Walsh won with a
1:58.52 time. In the 500 freestyle,
Walsh and teammate Tracy Bau-
man took first and second, 5:14.15
and 5:24.02 respectively.
The men's D.J. Lewis finished
first in the 1000M freestyle with
9:46.59. Lewis also took second in
the 500M freestyle, 4:49.82.
In the 100M freestyle, Andy
Jeter and Andy Lewis took first
and second, 49.79 and 50.53.
Tom Holstcn and Tim Frick also
took the top two places in the
200M butterfly. Holstcn finished
1:58.20 and Frick, 2.02.76.
Ronald Fleming also had a first-
place finish with a 22.44 time in
the 50M freestyle.
For the women, Carolyn Green
and Ginger Carrick were the top
two finishers in the 1000M frees-
tyle, 10:56.00 and 11:08.13.
The women also took first in the
200M butterfly with Robin Wicks
finishing 2:13.58 and Ginger Car-
rick taking first in the 200M back-
stroke, 2:19.04.
Susan Augustus took third in
the 200M butterfly while Leslie
Wilson took third in the 200M
backstroke.
Other top finishers for the men
included Andy Jeter's second
place in the 200M freestyle and
See SWIMMERS page 21
early last Spring he was ready for
the long, hard struggle of trying to
rebuild the Pirate team, which in
the past 10 seasons, had com-
pleted only two winning cam-
paigns.
For Steele, who had risen to the
top of the Division III coaching
world at DePauw with an overall
record of 124-40, the task seemed
hard enough at the beginning
when Steele arrived; only nine
returning scholarship athletes off
of a team that posted a 12-16 rec-
ord.
The prognosis for this season
grew even worse by the start of
practice on Oct. 15. The nine re-
turning scholarship players had
been reduced to three. Four play-
ers, juniors John Williams and
Manuel Jones along with sopho-
more Tracy King had been dis-
missed by Steele for disciplinary
reasons and a fourth player,
Howard Brown had left the team.
Later, Blue Edwards, consid-
ered by many to be the Pirates'
only hope for success this season,
was removed from the team for a
violation of the ECU Student
Code. Edwards was arrested
along with Williams, King and
Brown on Aug. 26 and charged in
connection with a rash of break-
ins at Scott Dormitory.
That left Steele with only two
returning players from last year's
team, Reed Lose and Jeff Kelly.
Between the two of them, only
about four points per game and
two rebounds per contest were
salvaged. Joining Kelly and Lose
for the '8788 season would be
five freshmen, two walk-ons, a
junior college transfer and a
player who just two years ago had
undergone complete recon-
structive knee surgery. And to
make matters worse for Steele,
none of the players were taller
than 6-6.
By this time, it was time for the
annual preseason prognostica-
tions to hit the newsstands. The
Pirates were picked in all to finish
a dead last in the Colonial Athletic
Association race and one publica-
tion even went so far as to say the
Pirates would not win a single
game against a Division I oppo-
nent.
Wrong. The Pirates, behind the
motivating work of Steele, have
already posted three wins over
Division I teams. And as far as the
CAA race goes, the Pirates have
turned a few heads there also. By
winning for the first time ever at
James Madison last week and
then defeating Navy for only the
second time in 13 tries last Satur-
day, the Pirates find themselves in
the heat of the CAA race with a 2-
2 mark. In fact, thus far this season
ECU has accumulated six wins,
while dropping nine games. That
total for wins already exceeds
what any prognosticator guessed
for the Pirates at the outset of the
season.
The Pirates were just shy of
moving to 3-1 in the CAA Mon-
day before they fell in overtime to
American, 75-69. The loss was like
a knive stab in Steele's back be-
cause it was a game that the Pi-
rates should have and could have
won.
How has Steele achieved what
he has thus far this season many
ask.
That can be answered by look-
ing elsewhere on the coach's of-
fice wall. Tucked behind Steele's
neat and organized desk in-
scribed in a plaque, are the words:
Nothing great is ever accomplished
without enthusiasm.
That, according to Steele, is the
main thing he tries to sink into his
player's mind. Without enthusi-
asm in every game, Steele is aware
that the Pirates will have diffi-
culty winning.
"When you look at the person-
nel we had coming into this sea-
son, you have to admit that it was
not very promising Stcele says.
"I was afraid (at the beginning of
the season) to set a goal for wins. I
broke the season down into sev-
eral different areas. What I
wanted to do was improve as the
season went on and to play solid
by conference tournament time
The improving play displayed
by Steele's team has, no doubt,
won over the hearts of Pirates fans
even with a losing record thus far.
How?
Because of the effort that each
one of the Pirates puts out in every
game. Steele promised at the out-
set of the season that his team
would be one that would try its
hardest every game and would be
exciting to watch. Thus far, the
Pirates have lived up to their
promise.
"I think the people here have
been just great Steele said. "I
think they appreciate the efforts
the guys are putting out. If they
see them (the players) out there
giving all they've got then they
are usuallv satisfied
J
The road ahead for the Pirates
will continue to have obstructions
in it, but with a mentor such as
Steele leading the way, the Pirates
should find the gold at the end of
the rainbow someday.
"We're gonna have some diffi-
cult games Steele confesses.
"But we just have to use those
games as a learning experience
and not get down on ourselves
And, by doing that, one day
Steele and ihe Pirates may just
prove that Coolidge was right in
saying nothing in the world can
take the place of persistence.
m
1
Pirates r
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport Editor
East Carolina's men's baskel
jball team stunned its secoi.l
straight CAA opponent Saturda
night by rolling to a 61-49 victor
over Navy in Minges Coliscui
before an enthusiastic crowd
4,120.
The victory improved the
rates to 2-1 in the CAA and
overall. The Midshipmen fell to!
9 for the year and 0-3 in the conf(
encc.
"Our guys played real hart
head coach Mike Steele said fd
lowing the victory "It was a sol
win for us
The victory boosted the Pirdtl
collection of victories to mo
already this season than progm
ticators had predicted for tj
team before the season begd
Most said the Pirates would
hard-pressed to win four or fil
games and one publication evj
said the Pirates would notd
Division I team. Saturday's
tory marked the Pirates third t
season over a Division I team.
"After our victories over Jan
Madison and Miami of Ohio, a
guys knew that they wen
win more games than two
this year Steele said. "We n J
worried about what is su
to happen (as far as wins) now
just want to work hard every ti
out and try to win as many basi
ball games as we can
The Pirates were led by a tn
scorers in double figures in tl
win over Navy. Reed Lose oi
again paced the scoring with
points, 14 of which came in
first half. Gus Hill added 14
junior guard Jeff Kelly conned
on five of six free throws enro
to an 11-point performance.
The Pirates seized the lead
good in the game with 18:1?
play in the first half on a scl
from Gus Hill, which gave
Pirates a 3-2 lead. A 3-pointer
Lose and a jumper from K
boosted the Pirates on top
and forced Navy into a timej
situation with 14:34 to play in
opening half.
Navy closed to within three
12, with 11:53 to play in the
I
GR
DOROT
C
Hours: Mor
Hamburger
Double Hamburg
Breakfast Sandwi
Egg and Sausag
Egg and Bacon
Egg and Ham
Specialties:
Hot Dog
Shrimp Burger
Chicken Filet
Fish & Cheese
Smoked Sausagj
Side Orders:
Potatoe Salad
French Fries
Fried Okra
Slaw
Hush Puppies
Onion Rings
Hash Browns
D(
ECU head coach Mike Steele directs his team against �
night in Minges Coliseum. (Photo by Thomas Walters�ECU PhotoLaM
DOROT1
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 19,1988 19
reaker
American's Mikt u inner
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a row
points tor m the
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to have obstructions
:h a n tor su h a
the Pirates
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ses.
those
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ne day
rates may just
right in
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rteam "gainst American Monday
"hotnasWalters-ECU PhotoLab)
Pirates roll past Navy Saturday MALPASS MUFFLER
before the Pirates spurted to a 20-
12 lead following a score and free
throw by Hill and a score from
Lose.
The Midshipmen then rolled off
eight straight points to tie the
game at 20-20 with 7:41 left in the
an enthusiastic crowd of half. From there, it was ail ECU
until halftimc as the Pirates went
on a 14-4 run to grab a 34-24 lead
at the end of the half
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
East Carolina's men's basket-
ball team stunned its second
straight CAA opponent Saturday
night by rolling to a 61-49 victory
over Navy in Minges Coliseum
before
4 120.
Iho victory improved the Pi-
rates to 2-1 in the CAA and 6-8
o erall. The Midshipmen fell to3-
9 tor the year and 0-3 in the confer-
ence
Our guys played real hard
head coach Mike Steele said fol-
low ing the victory. "It was a solid
win tor us
he victory boosted the Pirates
collection of victories to more
already this season than prognos-
I Lators had predicted for the
team he tore the season began.
�st said the Pirates would be
pressed to win four or five
was a greac dunk and it got the
fans excited and into the game
Navy's last threat of the game
came with 6:33 to play. When
Harris scored on a jumper, the
Pirates lead was down to five, 48-
43. The Pirates answered the
threat by reeling off seven points
to Navy's two over the next three
minutes to forge a 55-45 lead with
3:31 to play.
I thought ECU came out strong From there all the Pirates had to
and played very well in the first do was make free throws down
half Navy head coach Pete the stretch to ice the game.
Herrmann said. "We cut into it
(ECU's lead) some, but we could
never get back after they had their
run
In the second half, Navy closed
to within six, 34-28, following a
tip-in from Byron Hopkins and a
score from Mel Harris. The Pi-
rates, however, answered back
with five points of their own to
push the lead back to 39-28.
After Hopkins scored and com-
pleted a free throw to pull the
Middies within eight, 39-31, with
just over 15 minutes to play,
Kenny Murphy bottomed a
Uter our victories over James jumper for the Pirates, which was
n and Miami of Ohio, our followed moments later by a
crowd-bolstering behind-the-
back dunk by Ronney Gibbs to
put the Piratesup43-31 with 14:11
remaining
an
s and one publication even
aid the Pirates would not defeata
Vivision 1 team. Saturday's vic-
. r marked the Pirates third this
n over a Division I team.
t
uvs knew that they were gonna
more games than two or three
ear, Steele said. "We're not
ried about what is supposed
vn (as tar as wins) now, we
ant to work hard every time
it and tr towinasmanybasket-
;ames as we can
irates were led bv a trio of
rs in double figures in their
er aw. Reed Lose once
paced the scoring with 17
14 of which came in the
alt. Gus Hill added 14 and
r cuard Jeff Kelly connected
o( i tree throws enroute
1-point performance.
irates seized the lead for
in the game with 18:18 to
in the first half on a score
i Gus Hill, which gave the
5 a ; 2 lead. A 3-pointer by
- and a jumper from Kelly
I the Pirates on top 11-4
r ed Navy into a timeout
with 14:34 to plav in the
. half.
a � closed to within three, 15-
11:53 to play in the half
The Pirates shot only 44 percent
from the floor in the victory mak-
ing 22 of 49 shots, while the Mid-
shipmen, who were led by
Hopkins' 14 points, shot only 37
percent.
"That (winning while shooting
only 44 percent) is a good indica-
tion of how hard our defense
played Steele said.
"We shot a very poor percent-
age tonight Herrmann said.
"Part of that is due to ECU's hustle
on defense
For the Pirates, the win was
another plus to a season that has
surprised many, while for Navy,
the loss means back to the draw-
ing board for the coaching staff.
"If we are going to develop into
a steady threat in this league
we're going to have to be able to
I'm just real happy he (Gibbs) score more than 49 points in a
made the dunk Steele said. "It game Herrmann concluded.

Pirate guard Jimmy Hinton battles for a loose ball in the Pirates' 75-69
loss to American. (Photo by Thomas Walters � ECU Photo Lab)
GRAND OPENING
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Hours: Monday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 10 p.m.
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;
Breakfast Sandwiches:
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Specialties:
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Shrimp Burger
Chicken Filet
Fish & Cheese
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French Fries
Fried Okra
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Chicken Filet
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January 28, 1988
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313Rawl
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mmmmmmmm





20 Tt IE EAST
CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 19, 1988
Washington advances thanks to good defense
WASHINGTON (AD � When
the inventors of football devised
this diversion tor large sized indi-
viduals, they included a little
twist called the goal line stand,
designed to keep the attention of
defensive players from wander-
ing.
You back up the defensive team
about as far as you can and then
challenge them to keep the ball
out oi the end zone. Because they
were so good at that particular
tak Sunday, the Washington
Redskins are on their way to the
Super Bowl today.
Twice, the Minnesota Vikings
came knocking on the Redskins'
door in the fourth quarter o the
NFC championship game. Twice,
the Redskins kept the door
slammed shut.
The first time, with a first and
goal from the 3-yard line, a touch-
down would have given Minne-
sota the lead. The Redskins made
the Vikings settle instead for a
tying field goal.
The second time, with first and
goal from the 12, and 72 seconds
to play, a touchdown would have
tied the game and almost eertainy
forced overtime. The Redskins
gave them nothing, perserving a
17-10 victory.
"Good defenses have got to
produce on �oal line stands and
we did said Redskins linebacker
Monte Coleman.
It was Coleman who stood up
Rick Fennev at the 1 -yard line on a
first-and-goal from the three in
the first stand. Charles Mann
Stopped Fennev again on second
down and on third down the
Vikings tried rookie D. J. Dozier
vaulting over the middle. Waiting
for him, though, was linebacker
Neal Olkewicz, who stopped the
plav for no gain.
"1 like those circumstances
Olkewicz said. "You say to your-
self, 'Come on, come at me 1 want
that. If you don't , you're in the
wrong business
Olkewicz is in the right busi-
ness.
Minnesota settled for three
points to tie the game at 10 and ,
having dodge that bullet, the
Redskins had the great good
sense to go dovvnfieid and score
the go-ahead touchdown.
Now, with 5:04 to play, the
Vikings came back one more time.
Wade Wilson took them to the
Washington 23 and then hit Steve
Jordan for 11 yards to the 12 and
Anthony Carter for six to the 6. It
was hold-your-breath time for the
Redskin defense again.
"Down there, it's a muscle
game tackle Darryl Grant said.
"It's me against you and I'd better
not make a mistake because
you're in so close every mistake is
crucial. There's SO little room for
error
Twice, Wilson threw for the
tying touchdown and twice the
ball fell incomplete. Now it was
fourth-and-four, one play for the
season and the Super Bowl.
In the huddle, cornerback Dar-
rell Green said, the Redskins were
not making a great deal of sense.
"A whole bunch of people were
talking loud, but they weren't
saying much he explained.
"What they were saying was from
the heart, though
Washington decided on a zone
defense. Minnesota decided on a
pass to Ddmn Nelson. Wilson
threw and for a split second it
seemed Nelson had the ball. Then,
with Green defending, it skipped
off the receiver's hands.
"My heart stopped tackle
Dave Butz said. "How close can
you be?"
For the answer to that, Butz
might want to talk today to Ear-
nest Byner and the Cleveland
Browns. They can tell him about
close.
nformal
Broncos slip by Browns to Super Bowl
DENVER (AD - Tlie Denver
Broncos had just enough. And
once again the Cleveland Browns
tell short.
Denver is headed for its second
straight Super Bowl - as a 3-point
favorite over NFC champion
Washington - because Cleveland
wasn't as successful on its last-
d itch drive Sunday as the Broncos
were on theirs last year.
last year, 1 felt elated Bron-
cos Coach Dan Reeves Mid after
his team held for a 38-33 AFC
Championship game victory over
the Browns. "This vear, I feel
numb.
the Broncos staged a 8-vard
drive for the tving touchdown in
the final minutes oi last year's
came at Cleveland, then won in
overtime. This time, the Browns
rallied trom an 18-point hole to a
31-31 tie, then tried to climb back
again after Sammy Winder's 20-
vard touchdown reception made
3-31.
Cleveland marched to the Den-
ver 8, wh .e Earnest Bvner, hav-
ing a sensational game, burst off
left guard. Bvner was headed into
the end zone when Jeremaih Cas-
tillo stripped the ball and fell on it.
The Browns were dead.
"I thought it was going to be a
score said Byner, who caught
seven passes for 120 yards,
rushed for 67 yards and scored
twice.
"Maybe if 1 had pulled the ball
in closer well, I don't know
Denver qualified for its third
Super Bowl with its ninth con-
secutive win over Cleveland.
None of Byner's teammates cast
the blame on him.
"This football team would not
have been in a position to win the
game if it wasn't for Earnest
Byner a teary-eyed Marty Schot-
tenhcimer, the Browns coach,
said.
Bernie Kosar, who threw for 356
vards and three touchdowns, also
praised Byner, calling him "one of
the classiest buvs in the NFL
ATTENTION BSN
CLASS OF 1988.
The A � "ce rias a special pro
gmrr, tor 1988 BSNs It selected.
iou porj enter active duty soon
Offer graduation without waifmg
� rh( res i c )f vour State Boards
qualify, you must avean
era E 3veraqe A"ercommis-
sionmg. . ittendal ve-mon-
nternsti p si a major a - -orce
: facility Its ar excellent
I . efoi fhe wtde range
' - �. � es you II nave serving
� 3S " Air Force nurse
�� ei -or more information call
MSgt Nick Nero (919)850-9549
Station to Station Collect
MARATHON RESTAURANTS
(Delivery Menu
SUBS
Steak and Cheese3.95
Steak and Mushrooms3.95
Reuben with French Fries 4.45
Ham and Cheese 3.95
Roast Beef and French Fries 4.45
Cold Sub 3.95
Chic ken Salad Sub3.95
Pastrami Sub3.95
Turkey and Cheese3.95
Super Sub4.45
B.L.T3.95
GRFEK DISHES
GYRO Sandwich3.95
Souvlaki Sandwich3.95
Aegean Grilled Cheese 2.95
GYRO Platter4.45
Marathon Special 4.45
Athenian Style Chicken4.45
SANDWICHES
Hamburger1.75
Cheeseburger 1.95
Hot Dog1.35
Chicken Salad Sandwich2.95
Chicken Breast2.35
Shrmp Eggroll 1.25
SALADS
Greek Salad3.95
Chefs Salad 3.95
Chicken Salad Plate3.95
Tossed Salad 1.95
Potato Salad 1.70
GREEK PASTRIES
Baklava.
1.25
PIZZA MENU
9" 14"
Cheese Pizza3.505.50
Any 1 item4.006.50
Any 2 items4.507.50
Any 3 items5.008.50
Any 4 items5.509.50
Addl items501.00
Mushrooms
Ground Beef
Green Peppers
Hot Peppers
Anchovies
Canadian Bacon
Pepperoni
Onions
Sausage
Olives
Ham
Marathon Deluxe: Pepperoni, Onions,
Ground Beef, Mushrooms, Green
Peppers
9"
$7.00
14"
$10.5O
SOFT DRINKS
Small .70 Large .80
FRENCH FRIES
Small .65 Large .75
MonJri. 4-11
Sat. & Sun. 11-11
752-0326
or
752-3753
"Obviously, it hurts a lot
Bvner said. "There's a lot ot weep-
ing going on in the locker room. I
felt I played an excellent game
But it wasn't enough, for the
second successive year.
The Broncos built a 21-3 lead in
the first halt, capitalizing on a
diving interception by Freddie
Gilbert and a tumble recoverv by
Steve Wilson.
John Elway found rookie Ricky
Nattiel tor the first of his three
touchdown passes, an 8-varder,
after Gilbert's pickoft. Steve Sew-
ell scored on a 1-yard reverse to
make it 14-0.
Matt Bahr kicked a 24-yard field
goal for the Browns, but 14-and
21 -yard passes to Nattiel keyed an
80-yard drive to Gene Lang's 1-
yard touchdown run and a 21-3
halftime lead.
Felix Wright's interception at
the start oi the second half set up
the Browns at Denver's 35. Kosar
lofted a pass into the end zone to
Reggie Langhorne for
Cleveland's first touchdown.
But Denver, with the AFC's top-
ranked offense, again victimized
the conference's No. 1 defense
with a big play. Elway scrambled
and sent a 5-yard pass to Mark
Jackson, who sped down the right
sideline for an 80-vard score.
J
Jackson caught four passes tor
134 vards, Nattiel had five for 95.
Vance Johnson was out with a
groin injury.
Cleveland trailed 28-10, when
its offense finally got untracked.
Kosar flipped a pass over Karl
Mecklenburg to Byner, who raced
untouched into the end zone for a
32-yard score.
On the next series, Byner scored
on a 4-yard run.
Elway then took the Boncos 59
yards to Rich Karlis' 38-yard field
goal and a 31-24 lead.
Kosar's pass to Bvner was good
for 53 yards on an 86-yard drive.
He hit Webster Slaughter for a 4-
vard touchdown to tie it.
We'll give you the
scholarship money to
become a nurse and
the leadership skills
to be a better one.
Start vour career with advantages other
nursing students won t have.
Anm Reserve Officers raining (iorps is
.i great wa to learn the se!f- onHden e and
leadership skills that are important to am
career, and indispensable in nursing.
Ybu deal with real people and real problems
Anil learn to manage, inspire ami lead Even
before ou graduate.
When you do graduate, you II have aollege
degree in nursing and an oflrw ersommissn n
in the rm Nurse Corps. With the
responsibility most other graduates w ill have
to wait years tor.
For more information about im k) I and
the qualifications foi mi K')( Nursing
Si In ilaislnps. talk to vour Professo? of tihtar
Si ience, todav.
For further information Contact:
Captain Steve L. Jones
(Erwin Hall) 757-6967
r-
u
u
z
z
r-
Ln
I I )
U
O
c

Southern Gentlemen's Quarterly
For The Traditional ManJanuary 1988
TUESDAY
- Happy Birthday
Kappa Alpha &
Robert E. Lee
WEDNESDAY
- Pizza Night
with the Little
Sisters
THURSDAY
- By Invitation
Only
1:00
500 East llth St.
For Rides Call
757-0128 or 830-1968
� i � i �- im m
ipon





1111 IAMAKOl.INIAN
JANUARY 19, 1988 21
tense
rian Bailey crowned champ
-on
1 it
.vd
-
� mt
1 proctor i ast tor the 198 ' football season.
lol,a Bailev, in fining the title,
fprognosti fH.skHla90-48overaUtotalforthc
the champion Wai to just nose out Dean The
'thallForc Dream Buchan Buchan ECU's
nformal recreation
1 : JO p.m.
-
p . m.
K
ne to
and
ills
p.m
� -
p.m.
p.m.
il
�i : �
H
assistant sports information di
rector,finished the season with an
impressive 88-50 mark.
In the third position in the final
standings, only one game behind
Buchan, was Rappin' Timmy C,
otherwise known as Tim (han-
dler. C handler, the sports editor
ol he East Carolinian compiled an
87 : record.
1 he fourth place spot went to
Pat "No Stress Mcister" Molloy.
Molloy, who finished with a
flurry, managed to correctly pick
Si) contests, while missing 58.
Molloy is the assistant sports edi-
tor of The East Carolinian.
And at the bottom of the totem
pole hi The Fearless Football Fore-
cast was The Boss" himself, Dr.
Richard 1 akin. Eakin, II 's
Chancellor, suffered through a
tough year, which saw him obtain
a record of 73 53. Word lias it that
Eakin may join Jimmy " (Tie
Greek" on the prognosticators
unemployment line but for
different reasons ol course.
As tar as the final puks of all the
bowls made by the panel of so-
called exports, Molloy proved to
be the most accurate picking 12 ot
ihe IS games correctly. Chandler
was next with 11 correct picks fol
lowed by Bailey with It), buchan
with nine and Eakin with seven.
Bailey, noticeably elated over
his victory, lists himself as the
leading candidate to till the void
kit at NFL lodav after the firing
ot "The (.reek but for now,
Bailey can only consider himsell
the king ol pickers in the East
Carolina area.
Manv thanks from I he East
Carolinian staff go out to every ne
that participated in The Fearless
I ootball Forecast tor 1987.
And, ot course, a big congratu-
lations to Bailey-
Swimmers
victorious
('ontinued from page IS
( ieorge Walters and Mark
(VBrien's second and third place
finishes in the 200M backstroke.
In the di mi; events, the men's
Scott Milligan placed firsl in the
1M due and second in the IM
dive Smith for the Pirates placed
first in the 3M.
1 or the women divers, Sherry
Campbell took first in the 1 M di e
and Becky Kerber took third
E I will - mj h !t again i m
Wednesday, anuary 20 at the
Minges Natatorium against the
University ot North Carolina-
Chapel Hill.
The most exciting
few hours
you'll spend all week
Kimlimb. Rappel. a ig-ate I eai I.
ml lie- el p the o mill ten e and
skilK mi i vn t l'1 tri Mil a textbook.
Iiin.ll in rn R()T
as one ol i ir clei 11 es. (iet the tai I
t ila.
For Further Information Contact:
Captain Steve L. Jones
(Erwin Hall) 757-6967

)!
iBienvenidos Amigos!
Open 7 Days for Lunch & Dinner
Mexican Restaurant
LUNCH SPECIALS $3 95
SERVED MON -FRI.
11 AM TILL 3 PM
DINNER SPECIALS $5 95
INCLUDES DESSERT
SERVED SUN THRU THURS
AFTER 5 PM
521 CoUnche St.
757-1666
Come for the food.
Stay for the fun.
i
� �
W � 9
11:00
ast 11th St.
ides Call
0128 or 830 1968
Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity
THERE MAY BE A BETTER WAY TO GO
THROUGH COLLEGE . . . BUT NO ONE
HAS FOUND IT YET!
Emphasis on Scholastics
'Scholarships Awarded
'Excellence in Athletics
?Varsity Soccer Players
'Varsity Tennis Players
?Varsity Swimmers
'Lacrosse Members
'Varsity Cheerleaders
'Outstanding Intramurals
'Leadership in All Aspects of Campus Life
'Best Social Life On Campus
'Large Dynamic Brotherhood
'Finest Little Sisters
SPRING RUSH 1988
ATTHE ATTIC January 19, 7:00-11:00; Jan. 20, 21, 7:00-9:00
Tuesday 19 MEET THE PIKES wLittle Sisters 7-11
Wednesday 20 STAY FOR COMEDY ZONE 7-9
Thursday 21 Beginning of'PIKEFETTI" 7-9
FOR MORE INFORMATION OR RIDES CALL 752-1048





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14,1988
THE E.C.U
INTERFRATERNITY
COUNCIL INVITES
YOU TO RUSH '88!
Ji liappa Jht
nKO
803 Hooker Road
758 1700
Number of Chapters Nationally Over 120
Date and Place of Founding: December 10, 1904
College of Charleston, SC
National Headquarters Location:
Charlotte. North Carolina
Fraternity Colors: Gold, White, Blue
Philanthropic Organization PUSH
(Play Units for the Severely Handicapped)
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Strongest Alumni Association
Ifcappa (Tau
DKT
757 1319
409 Elizabeth St.
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 100
Date and Place of Founding March 17, 1906
Miami University
National Headquarters Location:
Oxford, Ohio
Fraternity Colors Havard Red and Old Gold
Philanthropic Organization Children' Heart Foundation
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Encourage Brothers to be involved in campus
functions
li Happa Alplia
riKA
210 Whichard
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 150 752 3874
Date and Place of Founding March 1, 1868
University of Virginia
National Headquarters Location
Memphis, Tennessee
Fraternity Colors Garnet and Gold
Philanthropic Organization
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Group effort in reaching goals
Sigma (Tan CSartrma
508 W 5th St
ITT
757-0127
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 100
Date and Place of Founding: June 28, 1920
Central Missouri State
Teachers College
National Headquarters Location:
Warrensburg. Missouri
Fraternity Colors Blue and White
Philanthropic Organization:
Greenville Boys Club
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Academics Individuality
Itappa j&igma KZ
700 E 10th St 752-5643
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 200
Date and Place of Founding: December 10, 1869
University of Virginia
National Headquarters Location:
Charlottesville, Virginia
Fraternity Colors. Scarlet, White, Green
Philanthropic Organization. Muscular Dystrophy
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Leadership
Tues Jan. 19th,
7:00-11:00 p.m.
Wed Jan. 20th,
7:00-11:00 p.m.
Thurs Jaii. 21st,
7:00-11:00 p.m.
frattntrt 'JUife
jSarial life .
To be In a fraternity Is not merely to be in a social
club. Fraternities are a way of life. We share ex-
penses as well as experiences, and we are responsi-
ble to each other for our own actions. We live off
campus, for the most part, yet we are very active on
campus We enjoy a good relationship with our
university's administration and, in the past few
decades, have become a major part of the univer-
sity's student life.
JBItU fraternities rjuri nrrj grabe�?
� No, there's every evidence that joining a fraternity
improves your chances of graduating.
� 33 of men on campus without fraternities will
graduate, and
� 47 of non-members on campuses with frater-
nities graduate, but
� 65 of all fraternity members graduate.
� Scholarship programs of fraternities produce
greater academic success, and better achievement
for you.
It never can be said that fraternity people don't en-
joy a good social life. Getting to know many different
people is only natural among such a close-knit
group. One seems to fall into a wealth of oppor-
tunities for things to do with his spare lime. Events
such as Greek Week Is just an example of some of
the activities that fraternities plan during the year.
JVtitletics
Fraternity men enjoy an active athletic existence.
Whether it be track meets, field events or in-
tramurala. we enjoy competing against one another
in one sport or another.
AXA
lamb ha Clji Aiplja
500 E Elizabeth St.
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 200
Date and Place of Founding: November 2,1909
Boston University
National Headquarters Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana
Fraternity Colors: Purple, Green, Gold
Philanthropic Organization. March of Dimes
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Diversity
757 1367
General Fraternity Facts
� All but two U.S. Presidents since 1825 have been fraternity men. Sixteen Vice-Presidents have been fraternity men.
63 of the U.S. President's Cabinet members since 1900 have been fraternity men.
71 of the Who's Who in America listees are fraternity members.
76 of the U.S. Senators ft Representatives are fraternity members.
85 (40 of 47) of the U.S. Supreme Court Justices since 1910 have been fraternity man.
85 of the Fortune 500 executives are fraternity members.
Of the nauon's 50 largest corporations, 43 are headed by fraternity members.
Jaii Happa "Spailan
TKE
961 E 10th St.
757-3042
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 200
Date and Place of Founding, January 10, It
Illinois Wealeyan University
National Headquarters Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana
Fraternity Colors: Cherry, Gray
Philanthropic Organization:
St Judes Children's Hospital
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Diversity and Teamwork
tleta (Tljeta ))t
210 Whichard
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 100
Date and Place of Founding: August 6, 1839
Miami, Ohio
National Headquarters Location:
Miami, Ohio
Fraternity Colors: Pink and Blue
Philanthropic Organization:
What makes this Fraternity Unique.
Brothers helping Brothers
Ben
757 1840
CM
T.�

�aa w. iik
Alfha Attt

Taa �ei iu tJmli

rheta Cast)
The Hub
CAMPUS
�VamaNu
� � and
ZrtaBetaTau
TmkM.
iti i mtv
I I
ret a. lath.
sue
AZO
757-0313
Helta �ignta $JIi
510 E lOrhSt
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 100
Date and Place of Founding: December 10, 1899
College of the City of New York
National Headquarters Location:
Indianapolis. Inaiana
Fraternity Colors: Nile Green, White
Philanthropic Organization. March of Dimes
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
The Fraternity of Engineered Leadership
�tgma Up llpstlmt
IPE
505 E. 5th St.
757-0487
Number of Chapters Nationally: Almost 300
Date and Place of Founding: November 1, 1901
University of Richmond, Virginia
National Headquarters location:
Richmond, Virginia
Fraternity Colors. Purple, Red
Philanthropic Organization:
Heart Fund
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Diversity
Zeta $eta $m, -�
830-0524
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 150
Date and Place of Founding: 1898
Clark College, New York City
National Headquarters Location:
New York City
Fraternity Colors: Blue. White
Philanthropic Organization:
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Stress Scholastics. Close-knit members
IRappa Alplia
500 E 11th St
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 150
Date and Place of Founding: December 21, lbot
Washington and Lee
National Headquarters Location:
Lexington, VA
Fraternity Colors: Crimson ana uiu uold
Philanthropic Organization: Muscular Dystrophy
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
1st fraternity on Campus
KA
757 0128
ftrjeta Qlbi
210 Whichard
ex
752 0232
Number of Chapters Nationally: 155
Date and Place of Founding: 1856
Norwich University, Norwich, Vermont
National Headquarters Location:
Trenton, New Jersey
Fraternity Colors: Red and White
Philanthropic Organizations: Ronald McDonald House
What makes this Fraternity unique:
Personal development and service to AimeMater
Iplpi jStgma Jrjt
AZt
422 W. 5th St 757 3516
Number of Chapters Nationally Over 100
Date and Place of Founding: December 6, 1845, Yale
University
National Headquarters Location: Delaware Ohio
Fraternity Colors Cardinal and Stone
Philanthropic Organization:
American Lung Association
What makes this fraternity unique:
That each brother is on individual and that the fraternity
unites to become the best.
SifltTUt 11
210 Whichard
Number ol Chapters Nationally: over 200
Date and Place of Founding. January 1 i
Virginia Military Institute.
Lexington, Virginia
National Headquarters Location:
Lexington, Virginia
Fraternity Colors: Black, Gold, White
Philanthropic Organization:
Kidney Foundation
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Founded gainst hazing
Jjselayp��wai
�� ii. maewieai
m�nmav i �i tii y
'�� �"� -n iiiif i





Title
The East Carolinian, January 19, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 19, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.581
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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