The East Carolinian, January 14, 1988







���"
JIMMY BUFFETT'S COMING
and we have tickets! See page 8 for inf orrriatiori on
how you can win one of two pairs of tickets from
The East Carolinian to see Buffett live on Jan. 28
in Minges Coliseum.
ENTERTAINMENT
�����
Student Union President Laureen Kirsch talks about
what it takes to arrange a major concert at ECU �
see page 15.
SPORTS
nil'I

The Gamecocks roiled over the Pirates 7851 in
Minges Coliseum Wednesday � see page 21,
Bht lEaat (Earolmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 No. 2r
Thursday, January 14,1988
Greenville, NC
26 Pages
Circulation 12,000
After eight years as vice-chancellor
'It's time to retireMeyer says Wednesday
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Managing Editor
After eight years of service to
ECU as the vice-chancellor for
student life, Dr. Elmer Meyer, 60,
announced Wednesday he would
retire Aug. 31 to be with his wife in
Washington, D.C.
Meyer let his plans be known in
a letter to the chancellor in which
he said he has enjoyed working at
the university and is proud of his
accomplishments here.
A former professor in the
School of Home Economics at
ECU, his wife Mary has been in
Washington for the past four
years working as a kitchen and
interior designer. Meyer has said
he will join his wife's business
after his retirement.
Meyer came to the school in
1979 after holding the position of
vice president for campus affairs
and dean of students at Cornell
University in Ithica, N.Y. As vice-
chancellor for student life, he
worked closely with students as
advisor to the Student Govern-
ment Association, the Media
Board and other campus organi-
zations.
"It's time to retire Meyer said
Wednesday afternoon. "We've
had a lot of accomplishments, and
my staff has certainly contributed
a lot to the improvement of stu-
dent life
He said his best work at ECU
came when he helped students in
gearing programs that meet their
needs. Specifically he mentioned
the on-going renovations to the
dining facility at Mendenhall and
the improvement in services at
the Student Health Center.
Meyer said the last few months
of his work here will be busy tying
up matters to make the transition
for his successor easier and pre-
paring the fee budget for next
year.
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin
said Meyer will be missed at the
university. "I have enjoyed very
much the opportunity to work
with Dr. Meyer he said. "He has
been very helpful to me in helping
me to understand the university
and in acquainting me with the
various student services that we
have. I certainly shall miss him
because he has been a very able
vice chancellor for student life
Eakin said Meyer had talked for
some time about retiring to move
closer to his wife, "it was just a
matter of his deciding a time
when he would like to do that he
said.
The search for a replacement for
Meyer will begin in the next two
or three weeks with the appoint-
ment of a search committee, Eakin
said. A search is already under-
way to find a new vice-chancellor
for academic affairs, a position
which has been open since Dr.
Angelo Volpe left in June. The
application deadline for that posi-
tion is Jan. 31, Eakin said.
"I believe Dr. Meyer's decision
to let us know at this early date
will be most helpful in our search
(for a replacement) he said.
"This is a good time of the year for
us to make the position known
"As advisor to the student gov-
ernment he has been very good to
deal with and has been instru-
mental in nv own involvement in
SGA student body President
Scott Thomas said Wednesday.
"Dr. Meyer was certainly a great
friend to the students and he
didn't mind sticking up for what
was best for the students
Thomas said Meyer is a good
"idea man" who the SGA could go
to for help and advice.
Meyer graduated from Carroll
College in 1950, where he majored
in business administration and
history and government. He
earned his doctorate from the
University of Wisconsinin 1965 in
counseling and behavioral stud-
ies at higher education.
His accomplishments while at
ECU include the institution of a
full-time coordinator for Handi-
capped Student Services, the es-
tablishment of phones in resi-
dence hall rooms as part of the
rent and the complete renovation
of the Student Health Center.
Meyer has seen the university
through three chancellors,
changes in the drinking age and
unprecedented growth in student
enrollment. During his tenure as
vice-chancellor the computeriza-
tion of the unversify was com-
pleted, as the last departments
received their terminals during
the 1984-85 school year.
He and his wife have been
married since 1954. They have
three children.
Thomas looks
to spring, 1988
By TIM HAMPTON
Stiff Writer
When SGA President Scott
Thomas came into office in Au-
gust he bought a new red ink pad
for his official veto stamp on SGA
legislation. So far he hasn't had to
use it.
Thomas' office and the SGA
legislature had few disagree-
ments in the fall of 1987, and
Thomas doesn't forsee any prob-
lems in spring '88.
For 1988, Thomas said he has a
list of items that include working
closely with the new transit direc-
tor, Joanne Pitts, and the new
athletic director, David Hart.
Thomas said he will help Pitts
develop an efficient method for
acquiring the use of the transit
sytem's charter service, which is
used by campus organizations for
transportation. Other plans in the
transit department include the
addition of shelters for riders
waiting for the bus at some bus
stops, Thomas said.
Thomas also plans to help Hart
encourage students to participate
in ECU athletics.
Thomas said he is planning a
leadership seminar that would
have leaders from government,
business and academics come on
campus to speak about leadership
to the 200 campus student organi-
zations. Thomas said he would
work with the Student Union in
order to get the seminar slated for
this semester.
The chancellor's Beautification
Committee is one of Thomas'
concerns. Thomas said he has
appointed two members of his
cabinet to the committee in an
effort to devise a long term plan to
improve ECU'S appearance.
Other plans for 1988 include
making a safer crosswalk at the
intersection of 10th Street and
College Hill Drive. Thomas said
an elevated walk-way may be one
of the solutions in avoiding the
dangers of crossing the busy in-
tersection. One student was hit by
a car in spring, 1987, while trying
to cross 10th Street.
Two students charged
with drug felonies
SGA President Scott Thomas
Concerning the parking issue, be resolved by the Chairman
Thomas said he voted for the Thomas Bennett, Thomas said.
Chancellor's plan at the Dec. 4 Bennett cast the dciding vote in
ECU Board of Trustees meeting, favor of Eakin's pla a to construct
Thomas said he was opposed to parking lots,
the parking deck plan because the The plan includes the creation
expenses of a parking lot would of 851 freshman spaces and 100
push parking sticker prices commuter spaces at an extra cost
higher than $100. of $25 to each person purchasing a
The final vote of the parking parking sticker, beginning in fall,
plan ended in a tie, which had to 1988.
By TIM HAMPTON
Staff Wtitar
Two ECU students were ar-
rested on drug charges Wednes-
day following a six-month inves-
tigation conducted by narcotic
officers from the Greenville Police
artment and the Pitt County
riff Department, according to
an official with the Sheriffs De-
partment.
Hobert Ferguson and Robert
Wiight were arrested on felony
drug charges following a drug
raid. Two Greenville men, Lee
Hamilton Moore and Randy
Moye, were arrested on similar
charges.
Ferguson was charged with
possession of cocaine with the
intent to sell and selling and traf-
ficking cocaine. Wright was
charged with two counts of pos-
session with the intent to sell
marijuana and two counts of
selling marijuana.
Both students were still in jail at
press time under bail bonds be-
tween $10,000 and $80,000 ac-
cording to the official, who would
comment only on the condition of
annonymity.
Moore was charged with two
counts of possession with the in-
tent to sell hallucinogenic mush-
rooms and two counts of selling
mushrooms.
Narcotic officials estimated
they seized 300 mushroom plants
while arresting Moore. The offi-
cials said the plants would yield
approximately 50 grams of the
hallucinogenic drug.
The other Greenville man,
Moye, was charged with three
counts of conspiring to possess
marijuana, three counts of posses-
sion with the intent to sell and de-
liver marijuana and one count of
possession of marijuana. Bonds
for both Moore and Moye were
set at a range from $10,000 to
$80,000, the official said.
The official said he anticipates
that six other people will be ar-
rested and charged on related
drug possession charges before
the investigation is completed.
Crack, a substance derived
from cocaine, was also found in
Wednesday's raid. Officials
would not comment on the
amount of marijuana and cocaine
seized in the drug raid.
Jordan offers ideas for rural development in N.C.
By KAREN MANN
Staff Writer
Over 200 supporters gathered
at the Greenville American Le-
gion Hall Wednesday night to
hear Lieutenant Governor Bob
Jordan announce that he is a
Democratic Candidate for North
Carolina Governor.
Joined onstage by his family,
Jordan addressed a number of
topics vital to his campaign in-
cluding education, the the recent
phosphate detergent ban and the
need for economic development
in North Carolina's rural areas.
"The fight to secure a future of
opportunity and hope for our
people is being waged in class-
rooms and factories and offices
and homes all across North Caro-
lina. But more importantly, the
fight for that future must be led
from the office of Governor
cyfor
Jordan stressed the need for
growth from within and freedom
from economic dependence or
foreign investors. Jordan then
explained his recent proposal to
abolish the State Department of
Commerce and replace it with an
entreprenurial public-private
partnership known as the North
Carolina Economic Development
Corporation. If the proposal is
accepted, the governor will serve
as chairman of the board and chief
executive officer of the corpora-
tion.
'The corporation will help
North Carolina's small towns and
rural areas grow and prosper he
said.
It will push for the develop-
ment of four lane highways in
those areas that need a new road
to the future. Most important of
all, this new corporation will
bring into state government the
entrepreneurial and market
driven genius and thinking for
tomorrow that exists in the pri-
vate sector
Following the speech, Jordan
discussed his Basic Education
Plan which has provided scholar-
ship loans to over 16,000 educa-
tion students in the last two years.
Since its inception, $6 million
have been appropriated to the
program. However, Jordan be-
lieves that government suport for
the program will continue to
grow.
"It won't be hard to get support
once they see the caliber of stu-
dents participating
Jordan also pointed out what he
feels are some differences be-
tween Governor Jim Martin, a
Republican, and himself.
"Governor Martin is attacking
my plan to make far reaching
changes in the way North Caro-
lina builds its economic future.
But he doesn't understand.
Things are changing and it is
important for North Carolina to
change as well
"The difference between Gov-
ernor Martin and me is that he
believes the Hodges-Sanford-
Hunt record is a record to sit on
and I believe it is a record to build
on.
Jordan cited the accomplish-
ments of several Democratic gov-
ernors including Terry Sanford
and Jim Hunt and added that they
"built a North Carolina that is
recognized as a innovator and a
leader among the states
Service helps with job search
ByCAMILLECOX
As graduation approaches,
finding a job becomes the concern
of many seniors. The ECU Career
Planning and Placement Service
can help students move from the
university into the "real world
According to Jim Westmore-
land, assistant dirctor, "Now is
the time for seniors to come by the
center to pick up a packet that
contains forms and instructions
on how to register and establish
your credential files
"Recruiters from various busi-
nesses, schools, and major corpo-
rations begin interviewing next
month, so it is important to regis-
ter now so that seniors will be
eligible
fou have to be registered to be
able to interview
Those students who have
resgistered will receive a bulletin,
the Job Guide, which lists jobs
reported to the center. Further-
more, "After you register we keep
you on our files tor ten years he
said.
"The Career Planning and
Placement Service help all ma-
jors. Some recruiters do call for
particular majors, such m bank-
ing, advertising, and marketing.
See REGISTRATION, page 2
"ifrni"i"
�- y a trw y �n&ift-witi&ji wm � -� tt yyg





IMM BUFFETT'S COMING
ami we have tickets! See pan1 s toi information on
vs you can win one ol two .iiM'l tickets from
I he I ast Carolinian to see Buffett live on Jan. 28
" l rices Coliseum.
I II KIAINMI NT
Student Union President I aureen Kirsch talks about
what i! tal to arrange a major concert at ECU �
sec page 1
SPORTS
The (.amecocks rolled over the Pirates 78-51 in
Minges Coliseum Wednesday � see page 21.
�he lEast (ftaroltman

immunity situ i I
nu.r
( ,i on 11 le, (.
26 IiH
( irculation 1 2,D0(J
jit r (ight cars as u -clu "
'It's time to retireMeyer says Wednesday
� mie abnt retiring h i me
us to make the position known '
' it . t ,i "As ad i i r ti) the stud i I
ittei deeidii time ernment he has been verv good
ild like tod � t1 teal with and has be
1 mental n m i iw n involv ei
earehfora replacement for SGA' student bodv President
Mover will begin in the next two Scott Ihomas said W ln la
r . � - . th the appoint- "I )r. Meyer was cerl
' i seal tteej ikin friend to the students and
aid i an h is already und I In t mind sti t i ip fi r hat
' ' � i ' tindam � � neelloi was best for the students
- n i h mas said Meyer is a I
h has been open since Dr. eaman" whotheSGAo
' for help at d adv ice.
M yer graduated fr �m
' "� : ikin said, i ill, in ' � v here he ma i : I
in business administration ai :
Mevei 1 tor and . - ernmei I
I us know at this earh date e lrned his doctorate from th
thelpfu ir search niversitvof Wisconsin in 1 n
� i i replacement he said, counseling and ber i ral
� � � 1 timeof the vcar tor ies at n.
Thomas looks
to spring, 1988
Two students charged
with drug felonies
nt Scott Ihomas
ri . � i bv
n is Bennett,
By TIM H VMPTON
,vo ECU stvi tents wen

dav follow ing a si
nducted by nai
. I ohct
Department and the Pitt County
Sheriff Department, according to
,n official with the Shcrifl s De
partment
Robert Ferguson and R bert
Wright were arrested on feloi
drug charges following a di
rani. I wo Greenville men, .
Hamilton Moore and Rai
ve. were arrested on similar
chargers
Ferguson was charged with
possession ot cocaine with the
intent to sell and selling and tral
H. . tic king cocaine. Wright was
Ihomas I : trged with two counts of pos
.
:
ippi umat �
man
L


r t1
� the deciding voh in session with the intent I
kin's plan I . t marijuana and two counts
jelling marijuana.
lion Both students were still in jail at
press time under bail b
tan extra cost teen j and -
ach person purchasing a cording to the. uld
,g sticker, beginning in fall comment onlv on t!
loss
that
I I
, �
irk:
� � plan im lud
� S3! freshman spaces
annonvmitv-
was a I
� �
Jordan offers ideas for rural development in N.C.



� ' � I in i lass-
oftices
North Caro
lina. But i rtantlj the
fiiihl
led
ieutenanl C�o
�overnor in 88
ernor Bob Jordan came to Greenville Wednesday to spread the wordoi
Jordan spoke about ways to develop rural North Carolina (Phototab)
Us i
indidacv fo
Jordan stressed the need tor
growth from within and freedom
from economic dependence or
foreign investors. Jordan then
explained his recent proposal to
abolish the State Department ot
c Commerce and replace it with an
entreprenurial public-private
partnership known as the North
( arolina Economic Development
( orporation. If the proposal is
a i eptcd, the governor will serve
as chairman of the board and chut
executive officer oi the corpora
lion.
"The corporation will help
North Carolina's small towns and
rural areas grow and prosper he
said.
"It will push tor the develop-
ment ot tour lane highways in
those areas that need a new road
to the future. Most important ot
all. this new corporation will
lung into state government the
entrepreneurial and market
driven genius and thinking tor
tomorrow that exists in the pri-
vate sector
Following the speech, Jordan
discussed his basic Education
Plan which has provided scholar-
ship loans to over 1h,(XX) educa-
tion students in the last t wo years.
�since its inception, $6 million
r have been appropriated to the
program. However, ordan be-
lieves that government suport I i
the program will continue I
grow
"It won't be hard to get supp I
once th( v see the caliber ot stu
dents participating.
Ionian also pointed, out w hat he
feels are some differences be-
tween (overnor lim Martin a
Republican, and himself.
"Governor Martin is attacking
my plan to make tar reaching
changes in the way North Cam
lina builds its economic future
But he doesn't understand.
h.�l

. . .
r N
oen
1 tin � rd is a i d 1
and
on.
Ionian cited thi
ments ot several I Vine
ernors including ITerr)
and jim 1 hint and added t:
built a Not th Carolii i I
ret ognized as a inno atoi ai
Ii a i among the states
Service helps with job search
ByCAMILLECOX
Stall Vnlcr
As graduation approaches,
finding a job becomes the con. em
of many seniors. The ECl t arcer
Planning and Placement Service
can help students move from the
university into the "real world
According to Jim Westmore-
land, assistant dirctor, "Now is
the time tor seniors to come b the
center to pick up a packet that
contains terms and instructions
on how to register and establish
your credential files
"Recruiters from various busi
nesses, schools, and major corpo-
rations begin interviewing next
month, so it is important h
tcr now so that seniors will be
eligible
i ou have to be registei ed t
able to interview
Those students who have
resgistered will receh ea bulletin.
the ob Guide, which lists �
reported to the center Further-
more tter you register we keep
you on our tiles tor ten wars he
said
1 he areer Planning and
Placement Service helps all ma-
jors Some recruiters o call for
particular majors, such as bank
mg, advertising, and marketing
See REGISTRATION, page 2
N





T IE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14, lQ&S
How not to slip up traveling over icy roads
Welcome back! Hope you had a
nice a sate holiday Speaking
about safety, let's make this
semester the safest and nicest vet.
lhmk safety and crime preven-
tion, it can make a difference in
your college life.
Being involved in an accident,
becoming a victim oi theft or as-
sault i no fun and makes things
unpleasant for you and those
around you.
Pirate Police
Line
By Capt J. KEITH KNOX
lake tot instance, when there is
snow and or ice on our streets,
highways, sidewalks, steps, etc
extreme caution should be used
while walking or dining. When
conditions were as they were this
past week you should drive only
when it is absolutely necessary.
Even it you think you know
how to drive on ice or snow, the
drivei ot the vehicle coming to-
ward you or behind you may not,
as main have found out this past
w eek sonic even losing their lives
becauseofit. Even the best of driv-
ers can lose control on ice or
ompacted snow.
It you must drive, drive very
slow lv, do not use brakes as not
mal, only use them when
absolutely necessary with a grad-
ual pumping action. You should
start slowing down way before
sou actually need to stop. It may
be necessary to manually down
shift gears to slow you down. This
is bettor than using your brakes.
You should allow three to tour
times or more distance between
you and the vehicle ahead. Since
you never know what the vehicle
in front of you will do. On Ice if
you do apply brakes and start
sliding, the vehicle will usually
speed up slightly at first instead of
slowing down, taking much
longer to stop than expected.
Remember cm ice you can not
use your brakes as normal! And
that is hard to remember, since it
is instinctive to do so. IV patient
and drive carefully, getting in a
hurry on ice or snow will cause
serious injury or death.
It your vehicle is stuck, please
wait for help. l not attempt to
push your vehicle yourself, with
no driver and the vehicle in gear.
We've had one person on campus
who the vehicle got away from
pinning them between two ve-
hicles. She was fortunate to es-
cape serious injury, but was se-
verely bruised. It pays to think
safety!
Also please remember parking
regulations on campus are still in
effect even in bad weather. So
please do not park where you are
not permitted to.
How about walking in snow
andor ice? Snow alone is not so
bad unless it has been packed or
begun to melt. But ice is another
matter altogether. How do you
walk on it? Very carefully is how 1
do it.
Man)' people have slipped and
fell on ice, including me. It is best
not to wear smooth sole shoes if
you can help it, especially tennis
shoes. Walk with very carefully
placed steps not far apart, will
help when it's real slick. Some-
times no matter how careful you
are, you will slip down.
If you feel your feet slipping,
sometimes it may lv best to just sit
down. Oi course you'll have to
give that quick little glance
around to see who's looking, lor-
get the embarassment; broken
bones are what you're trying to
avoid. Unfortunately wedid have
some people on campus this past
week who were hurt when they
fell. Please be careful, because this
year is supposed to be a severe
weather year according to all indi-
cations, and this may not lv the
last ice or snow we get.
Overall everyone has been
fairly safe on campus during this
hazardous weather and we at
Public Safety would like to com-
mend you on that.
Enough about safety. Let's talV
Crime Prevention. It's already
started, students are being ripped
off by thieves. You know, these
persons who have sticky fingers.
Believe it or not there are those
who want what you've got worse
than you do.
You have to deny them the
opportunity to steal from you.
Some victims make it very easy.
Leaving your room door open or
unlocked is actually helping
thieves to continue to operate on
this campus. 1 know some think
it's silly and inconveiont to carry
keys and lock the door if they are
only going to the bathroom or
across the hall.
But the fact is if you don't, the
chances are one day you are going
to get ripped off. Some even make
it easy tor them even though they
lock the door by leaving a key
outside somewhere. You say
nobody knows about where it's
at, but me and my roommate.
Right!
You would lv surprised at who
knows that key is there, it's just
that some of them who know do
not have sticky fingers but others
do. We have to face the fact that
we live in a time when theft is
prevalent on every college and
university campus, as well as
everywhere we may live, work, or
play.
Each of us has to do his part in
preventing crime by denying the
thief the opportunity to rip us off.
Also to make this campus and
where you live a safer and more
enjoyable place: if you seea crime,
report it and become involved.
Crime in our society has he
come dn everyday occurance
rather than a rarity because we
have the attitude, "it can't happen
to me" and we don't want to git
involved if it's happened to some
body else.
The cuddling ot criminals and
the complexity oi our Judicial
System have made our society
easy prey. Remember, help
MeGruff take a bite out ot crime
See it, hear it, report it. Call Pi
rate Crime Busters
I
Mrs. King challenges Reagan to help the poor
WASHINGTON (AP) The
widow ot Martin Luther king Jr.
s.is that if President Reagan is
serious about honoring her
husband's legacy, he should do
something tor the nation's poor
Coretta Scott King's comments
:ame ruesday after a White
t louse ceremony during which
Reagan signed a proclamation
honoring the 59th anniversary of
the ci il rights leader's birth.
Reagan declared that "the fight
tor genuine equality of opportu-
nity goeson. It still continues for
mam Americans today. Yet let us
not ignore the strides that have
been made and the great strides
that are being made toward end-
ing discrimination and bigotry in
our towns and communities, in
our government, and most im-
portantlv. in our own hearts
Mrs king attended the cere-
mony and, afterward, she dis-
puted Reagan's claim ot great
strides
Asked what the president could
do in his last year as a tribute to
her husband, she replied: "The
least thing that he could do is call
tor the Congress and the private
sector to provide some reM.uin.vs
for the poor people of this country
We have too many poor people
in this country, too many pople
who go to bod hungry at night, too
many with no food and no place to
sleep. This is really a disgrace
Reagan, in his statement, had
said that black employment "has
risen 2b percent during our (eco-
nomic) expansion. That's more
than twice the rate of the job gain
of whites. The unemployment
rates of black youths has declined
dramatically
The ceremony was one ot sev-
eral events leading to Monday's Pennsylvania Avenue plaza two
observanceofa federal holiday in blocks east of the White House. By
King's honor. 1 lis birthday is 1 ri- law, the capsule will be opened a
day. century later.
Earlier, Mrs. king, 1 lousing Among the items in the capsule
Secretary Samuel Tierce and other are king's Bible, a robe, other
officials attended a ceremony in personal items, taped tributes
which a 500-pound tune capsule from world leaders, various
containing memorabilia relating loks and speeches written by
to King's work was entombed in a king, and a miniature Liberty Hell.
3tl Cafit Carolinian
SewUxg ttw East Carolina campus community suk 1925.
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Anne Ieigh Mallory James Kuno
Shari Clemens Adam Blankenshlp
Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY RATES
0-49 Column inches '
50 99 - 15
100-149 -� 05
150 1995
200 249 5
250 and aboveI 75
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
(Charge in Addition to Kegular Sp.c Rale)
One color and black
Two colors and tUv k
Inserts
5,IKK) or less
5,001 10,000
10.001-12.000
VM) 00
US 00
6 eah
N $4 c-avh
5 c.uh
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
Phones
757-6366757-6557
757-655S757 6309
Registration begins next week
Continued from page 1
We like to educate the students to
job opportunities that are avail-
able. We distribute a flyer of the
upcoming campus interviews, of
the dates and who is interview-
ing
The service also conducts res-
ume and interview workshops
throughout the semester in order
to help students get the jobs they
want.
The office Career Planning and
Placement is in Bloxton 1 louse,
between Greene Porm and Men-
denhall Student Center.
Interview signups begin Ian.
20. General information meetings
will be held at 3 and 4 p.m. an. 19
in Mendenhall, room 221. Stu-
dents can call the service's office
for more information.
SGA TRANSIT
$
ications Now Being Accepted
For Spring & Summer School
Semester Bus Drivers.
Applications may be Piked up in
Room 225, Mendenhall Monday
thru Friday, 10-4.
Professional eye exams. The latest eycwcar
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last. And more. It all adds up to personalized
eye t .ire and quality eyewear. And now we've
I even added special savings on eyeglasses, coi
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I
I Ihta toujion valid until 2lfH8 only at IVarlr Vision CentwW
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luichasr No other titst ounts apj'ly
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lualas Drawion
Adam Baits
licensed Opticians
Mon Sat.
10 a.m. - 9 p.m.
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Spend Yours in Styl
DESIGNERS DIFF
�Round trip transportation to beautiful Daytona Beach
via modern highway motorcoaches.
�Seven nights accommodations at one ol Daytona's tmest
hotels. The majority of hotels that we u are i hain
operated and are newly remodeled to meet strict chain
requirements. They are all located directly on the beach
and are the best possible accommodations to make .1
luxurious vacation.
�Optional one-day exeersions to Disney World, Epcot
Center, Deep Sea Fishing, Sea World. Wet N Wild, Part)
Ship, Hawaiian Luau, and many more attractions.
�Free pool deck parties with music and refreshments at
the hotels that we use. our pool decks are much targCl
and more popular. Consumer companies like this and
have agreed to run contests and giveaway promotional
items on all of our pool decks.
�A professional staff is always present to make your
travels worry free.
�Special car rental prices for all students 18 years and
older. At most of our hotels, the cars will be delivered.
�All taxes and tips are included.
�Our company, along with the hotels, local businesses
and the Chamber of Commerce have arranged special
events and activities for underaged students.
JowmonJ
� For More Information
Call Dave
at
757-3516
Between 8-10 p.m.
Cross
(ON) Organized pra;
were allowed at the l nivers
Mar) land w hile a large ro
banned from tin- UniversihJ
Idaho during the just passed
day season.
At Idaho conservative stud(
lost an effort to preserve a .1 i
tradition of forming a n
lea ing on certain rooms ligh
.t residence Kail
Meanwhile .i� toss the 1
a I Iniversit) of Mar) land atl
student lost Ins tuit to
prayers from his w intei gr�
ation ceremony
Members ol Student Values
Idaho conservative
tioned President Rn hai
Rare
I PS) In a prelude I
iolent , lashes between I
.iicts and Palestinian no
thai tued 1
pro Pale tinian e I
ti eh rare demonsti
roe 'v,v-
ust 1 in-m-s ei .
ida s
��
ti by P

Vt the v
ned to sp ik
lions .1.
re
e believe in I
Reserve Offil
postponed d
v PS) Faced vs
abundance ot 0 the
Force and Na Reset ve I
ask
aduating from co
spring to lea e the pi
postpone thou commissioi
Students enrolled in the
RO I v howe ei
tetfed
Air Force and Navy ROTC
(i! aren't Mire how man)
dents will dela) oi forego t
militar) careers 1.1 .
the 23 390studentsenn I
Force ROTC voluntarih I
am said v. apt I
son an Au orce R( T(
man.
In 1986 Congress concerj
there were too man) officer!
the militai
nation s militar) branches to
their officei tanks Stephe
said Cadets w ho usual yj
required to serve in the 1 1
Do
Le
I
S
B
li you're headin
call 1TG Trawl (
nothing left. IT
and package
Spring Break I h
limited so don't
355-507!
Mon. - Fril
m fci� a





ads
me an everyday occurance
ther than a rarity because we
,ve tin attitude, "it can't happen
me and we don't want to get
v olved n it's happened to some-
rhe cuddling of criminals and
lexity of our Judicial
have made our societv
Remember, help
ike a bite out of crime.
car it. report it. Call Pi-
listers
araltatao
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cepted
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up in
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tytona's finest
ire i h.un
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:is to make a
World, Epeot
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re attractions.
isic and refreshments, at
i decks are much larger
ompanies like this and
i giveaway promotional
present to make your
for all students 18 years and
'Is, the cars will be delivered.
Icluded.
h the hotels, local businesses
merce have arranged special
inderaged students.
re Information
U Dave

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
ANUARY14,1988 3
Cross not lit at Idaho campus
(CPS) � Organized prayers
were allowed at the University of
Maryland while a large cross was
banned from the University of
Idaho during the just-passed holi-
day season.
At Idaho, conservative students
lost an effort to preserve a campus
tradition of forming a cross by
leaving on certain rooms lights in
a residence hall.
Meanwhile, across the country
a University of Maryland atheist
student lost his effort to ban
prayers from his winter gradu-
ation ceremony.
Members of Student Values, an
Idaho conservative group, peti-
tioned President Richard Bibb not
to "pull the plug" on the Theophi-
lus Tower cross.
But they were too late. Ul
Spokeswoman Marythea
Grebner said Gibb was respond-
ing to local organizations that had
argued lighting the cross was us-
ing state property to display a
religious symbol.
A local off-camous paper last
year editorialized against the
cross, she said, on the grounds the
state � fighting an image of being
a refuge for white suprcmicist and
anti-Semitic groups like the Ar-
yan Nations � couldn't afford to
align itself with any one religious
group.
Grebner predicted the tower
Jean Hopper, Owner
will be dark during holiday sea-
sons to come. "It seems clear the
university is not going to continue
the practice (of having the cross)
The University of Maryland,
meanwhile, plans to continue
including prayers at its gradu-
ation ceremonies.
U.S. District Court Judge Nor-
man Ramsey in December re-
fused to stop officials from lead-
ing a prayer at its December 22
commencement exercises.
Student Matthew Barry, who
said he was an atheist, had asked
the courts to halt the practice. "I
view those prayers as a violation
of my right to be free from govern-
mental endorsement of religion.
The school assumes Barry, now
graduated, won't continue the
case. The issue he raised "is moot
with respect to him UM lawyer
Terence Roach asserted.
Both Roach and James Mingle,
an assistant attorney general han-
dling the case, say another plain-
tiff must be found before argu-
ments in the case could go for-
ward.
The Ameican Civil Liberties
Union, which represented Barry,
will probably seek someone, a
senior who will graduate in May,
who shares Barry's sentiments
and has the standing to chal-
lenge Mingle said.
355-5866
I
w
M:v .S �
Rare pro-Palestinian riots held
(CPS) � In a prelude to the raelis until we force them out been denied basic civil rights,
violent clashes between Israeli Nabil Husni, a Palestinian study- Hanna Siniora, the editor of an
soldiers and Palestinian rioters ing at Arizona, told a crowd of Arabic newspaper, told approxi-
that continued in Israel last week, about 50 students at the Nov. 29 mately 120 people at Yale. "Over
pro-Palestinian groups held rela- rally. "They took my land and my the past three years the Palestini-
tively rare demonstrations on at house. They kicked my people out ans have faced the harshest mili-
least three American campuses and they terrorized my people.
just before classes ended for the We want our homeland back
holidays. Relations between Israelis and
The rallies were part of a Nov. Palestinians have been marked by
29 Day oi International Solidarity conflict and violence since the
1940s, when Israel was created
from the section of the Middle
East historically known as Pales-
tine. Both groups claim they have
religious and historical ties and
rights to the area.
sponsored by Palestinian groups
around the world.
At the universities of Arizona
and Iowa and at Yale, students
listened to speakers denounce
Israel and Israeli civil rights viola-
tions against Palestinians living
there.
tary occupation in the 20-year
history of that occupation he
said.
Both the United States and the
United Nationscondemned Israel
Jan. 4 for using live ammunition
to halt riots in the Gaza Strip and
on the West Bank of the Jordan
River.
to vote, Siniora said. He called for
peace talks based on a mutual
recognition of Israeli and Pales-
tinian rights to a homeland.
At Iowa, a Palestinian speaker
identified only as "Saed" com-
pared Israel's treatment of Pales-
tinians to South African apart-
heid. He told the 50 students who
attended a rally that Israeli mili-
tary personnel routinely abuse
Palestinians. "You never know
who is going to die there
MS$$MMMMMMM.
On January 6, Israeli troops did
Palestinians living in Israel and switch to using rubber bullets.
Israeli-occupied territories taken Palestinians are often detained
o�TfiLinkSnowJ �
Parents and Students
Let us show you
RINGGOLD TOWERS
At The Campus � East Carolina University
�Towers located at 7th & Cotanche
Streets surrounded on three sides by
campus.
�Towers closer to both downtown and
classrooms than many ECU
dormitories.
�Designed for student appeal and
affordability.
�Each unit is completely furnished
except linens.
�On site management.
�Excellent financing.
"We believe in fighting the Is- during the 1967 Six-Day War have without trial and denied the right
Reserve Officer Training grads' commissions
postponed due to oversupply of officers
Call for details
"WE'LLDQ YOU HOMEWORK'
(CPS) � Faced with an over-
abundance of officers, the Air
Force and Naw Reserve Officer
Training Corps may ask seniors
graduating from college this
for several years after graduation Durcn said.
� were allowed to leave the Air
Force program without future The 63,000 students enrolled in
commitment. the Army ROTC, however, will
The students who left the pro- not facc anY problems, according
spring to leave the programs or gram, Stephcnson said, did so to spokesman Paul Kotakis.
postpone their commissions. voluntarily. "We're not forcing
Students enrolled in the Army anybody out Students who had
ROTC, however, will not be af- received Air Force ROTC scholar-
tected. ships, however, will be required
Air Force and Navy ROTC offi- to repay the Air Force
cials aren't sure how; many stu- Tne Air Force win aUow
dents wi 1 delay or forego their dents to leave the program volun-
tarily again this year, Stephcnson
said, although he said it is un-
likely any students will be re-
program said CaPt Bill Stephen-
son, an Air Force ROTC spokes- n
man. The Navy ROTC delayed
In 1986, Congress �concerned commissioning about 100 stu-
there were too many officers in dents who graduated last spring,
the military � ordered the spokesman Rod Duren said,
nation's military branches to cut Those students were "non-schol-
their officer ranks, Stephcnson arship" cadets who were asked to
said. Cadets � who usually are postpone their military careers
squired to serve in the military following "a selection process
ATiTIC
The,
CoMertf
WED
The
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wed'
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
752-7303
THURSDAY
illllft
ECU $1.00
Beach Concert
military careers. Last year, 138 of
the 23,390 students enrolled in Air
Force ROTC voluntarily left the
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I





(Bile Safit (Earoltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, cmmiA���j�r
CLA DEANHARDT, M�.s,nS rjHo,
.Wpv Lewis, vcn em James F I. McKee, okmtm uvenmnn
Tim Chandler. ��� lmo, Tom Furr, ommh m� h�h
John Carter. ;�� M 1 ke Upa i u rci i, (��. m-�
M.CHELLE ENGLAND, ca v��r JOHN VV. MEPLIN, 4 dm
Debbie Stevens, r�ii7y Mac Clark, u.nos vun-r
anuarvU, 1988
Opinion
Page 4
Plan needs work
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin's If so, the athletic department or the
revised parking plan, which this Firate Club should be required to
newspaper earlier called "a drop in pay tor at least part of the lot to
the bucket was approved by the defray student costs. It would not be
ECU Boa of Trustees Pec. 4 in a fair to ask students to pay more
narrow vote. money, then tell them their cars
Thomas Bennett chairman of the must be moved to provide athletic
board cast the deciding vote in the parking for non-students.
7-6 decision in favor of the plan. Many people, including experts in
SGA President Scott Thomas also the area, have said publicly and pri-
ted for approval. vately that, given the growth rate of
It was a mistake. the university and the growth of the
As a result of the board's actions, parking problem, the university
parkin g rocs will be raised by 525 for eventually will have to build a park-
everybody next vear. This hardly ingdeck.
seems fair As was passed the plan We have to wonder why the chart-
provides for Sol new spaces' for cellor feels the time is not right now.
freshman parking in the Minges We have a new general classroom
Coliseum irea and the addition of building right in the middle oi the
100 spaces for commuters to the campus with almost no additional
existing lot at the bottom of College parking spaces at all. Admittedly,
Hill this brilliance in planning is not the
But everyone must pav the price, fault oi Eakin or the current admini-
Residents who get no new spaces, stration, but why not use our park-
also pav the $23. It is also question- ing needs as a springboard to solve
able whether most commuters both problems?
would be willing to pay that money More thought needed to be given
for only a handful of new spaces, to the long range future of the uni-
The only direct beneficiaries of the versity parking problem before ao
increase will be the freshmen, who tion was taken A board member's
are lucky to be able to bring cars to proposal to defer action until a
school at all. No other major univer- comprehensive study could be
sitv in North Carolina gives their completed was voted down before
freshmen that privelege. Eakin's plan was accepted. That
To be fair to the plan, the spaces proposal should have been listened
currently available to freshmen just to more carefully,
off of 14th Street beside Rose High Thomas also should pay more at-
School are being reclaimed by the ten tion to the legacy his SGA will
school. Those freshmen living on the leave behind for the university,
hill needed new places to park. White the SGA did endorse Eakin's
However, we question the necessity revised plan, it seems that organiza-
of adding851 spaces to solve such a tion needs to ask harder questions
small part of the overall problem, about our university and its future.
Another question arises as to the Eakin has said he will work closely
use of the lots. As we have said ear- with the SGA this semester to find a
lier, freshmen are now asked to solution to the parking problem,
remove their cars from the Minges Whether that plan includes a park-
area on weekends with home foot- ing deck, shuttle buses from outly-
ball games. Wrill this still be the case ing lots, or the addition of more level
in the new lot? Eakin said Wednes- lots in the immediate area, we hope
day he didn't know the answer to the next proposal is more than a
that question. drop in the bucket.
LOOKS LIKE A PERFECT FIT TO MEl
Refund rule is unfair
To the editor:
I am writing this letter in response
to a stupid rule designated by the
Aycock Hall gameroom staff. This
rule states that no refunds referring to
the vending maehines and washer-
dryer facilities can be given over the
weekend. Now, folks, let's get seri-
ous, not ridiculous. Let me give you
an example oi my experience dealing
with this rule.
A few weekends ago, my last three
dollars was to be spent on laundry in
the Aycock basement. No problem.
After putting the money in the
washer an hour later, I noticed that
the washer did not go through the full
cycle, leaving my clothes completely
saturated. So there I was left with a
wet pile ot clothes. Keeping my cool 1
went to the gameroom and asked for
my refund. Did 1 get my refund?
Noooooo! The attendant told me that
no refunds can be given on weekends.
Now, something is wrong here And
it's definitly not me.
This dumb rule, who started it 1
have no idea, affects all of the resi-
dents living on College Hill Drive
Aycock Hall, lanes, Scott, Belk, and
Tyler. Peopleire getting sick and
tired of being ripped off and not get-
ting their refunds just because "it's
the weekend Who knows, maybe
something can be done to change this
rule.
Oh by the way, next time you go to
Aycock to do your laundry on a week-
end, do yourself a favor � Bring lots
of money because you won't get your
refund!
Frank Reyes
Sophomore
Journalism
Swimming-free book
io meeuuor:
Like many of you, I was quite ex-
cited to get my free edition of the 1986
edition of the BUCCANNEER. As 1
opened it, I realized why it was free.
After turning the pages briskly to find
the sports section, and eventually the
couple pages on my swim team which
was a particularly fine year for us (21-
4 combined M W record, a confer-
ence championship for the men, and a
top ten finish at Independent Nation-
als), I came to a very sad conclusion.
There was nothing, not a page, pic-
ture or word on the East Carolina
Swim Teams, or on any other of the
several fine athletic teams. How can a
college yearbook be put together so
poorly and incomplete, especially
when they had three years to com-
plete it. 1 hope this situation never
occurs again. I am optimistically
waiting the 1987 edition.
Kick Kobe
Head Swim Coach
Drinking law
10 the editor:
Raising the drinking age was ad
dressing the very real problem of
drinking and driving Along with the
hike in the drinking age the states
were forced to pass tougher drinking
and driving laws. North Carolina has
some of the toughest Localities were
given large amounts ot money to
enforce these new laws. Greenville
was given a million dollars in 1987.
I'd like to raise some questions. It
road safety was the concern, and the
government was willing to spend
some money to improve things wh)
raise the drinking age. Do you know
anybody who is under twenty-one
and does not drink because they are
underage? Why were alternate es not
considered? Imagine the public tran
sit system QreenviUe could have tor
those who go downtOAyu with,a nuV,
lion dollars a year. Vhere are other
obvious questionable aspects of the
law, like how many established bars
were brutalized economically and
directly by not being able to keep their
underage patrons from not dunking
Well 1 think the answers are clear.
It is a stupid law. It is an oppressive
law. It is an abused law and the drink-
ing age should not be twenty-one.
It was brought about by what has
been called sleazy legislative black-
mail. Ronald Reagan wants to reduce
the size of the national government
by creating a new state heavy federal-
ism. Yet, he bribes the states with
highway funds. Everyone knows it
was a sere wed-up procedure to main-
tain the votes of uptight conserva-
tives. (Not all conservatives are up-
tight.) Well, the times have changed.
Reagan has never been so power-
less. Things look good for the demo-
crats in the '88 presidential election. It
is time to make the drinking age an
issue. Remember, if you can vote and
if you pay taxes (which includes sales
tax) the government works for you.
These people are your Congressmen
and Senators. The laws ire your laws.
Write your senator and your con-
gressman. Talk to friends and parents
about it. Have them write letters. The
address is United States Senate or
United States House of Representa-
tives, Washin
tf
Marxists attacked
fo the editor.
tnnon Morrow s I
democracy letter was
credibl) ignorant Mai
nent l'veev id
L iberals were v rong vhen
believed v. astro s prete �
rac while Cuba went
wrong when the) swa
Fonda's traitorous anti � . ca
pro-Communist propaga i ibout
the iet � - i; v .� ��
the) applied harsh sancti tst
South Africa which haw done
�, to end Apaj theid but have
made multitudes or peaceful bl :k
lose their jobs and suffer and
easier for c ommunism to take v
frica over one da) wrong ia .
the) opposed the I S. move to defeat
Communism in Grenada wi
when thev oppose I S. pollC) i
Persian Cult, wrong when tjte)
muiv.e U.tv support lei men ai
women who bitterly oppose
want to overthrow the brutal (
munist Sandinista government in
Nicaragua David Horowitz formei
leftist radi al and founder oi the iet
nam Solidarity Campaign: 'In even
case without exception tune has
proved the t eft w rong about c om
munism). Wrong in its views of the
revolutionaries' intentions aiwt
wrong about the facts ol their revolu
tionary rule. And itist as consistent!)
the anti-Communists proved right
And yet, here is Morrow , parroting
the same liberal baloney, claiming
that liberals "seethebig pictureabout
Nicaragua" and anti t. ommunist con-
servatives DON' r?! Incredible
Morrow laments that conservatives
"just don't realize that there are lotsof
hungry people" in Nicaragua Ms
Morrow, you must have read Bobb
Hall's pro Contra, pro-democracy
letter with one eye and one mind
closed, he noted that the Washington
Post Ad the New York Times have
both run front-page articles pointing
out that the "hungry people" ofNica
ragua blame the Sandinistas, NOl the
Contras, lor the economic problems
that plague the country.
Morrow claims that the Sandinistas
have "made reforms tor the people"
See SANDINISTAS, page 5
A wise student advocate will be missed
It is with mixed emotions that we
view the retirement announcement
made yesterday by Dr. Elmer
Meyer, vice-chancellor for student
affairs.
We are happy for him, especially
since he will be able to live with his
wife Nancy in Washington, D.C.
After almost five years of having a
"commuting" marriage, we know
he will enjoy the benefits of a stable
homelife.
But at the same time we are sad to
see him go. The university is losing a
good administrator; but more im-
portantly, the students are losing a
good friend.
Meyer has been admired through
the years for fairness in his treat-
ment of and dealings with students.
It was just last year that he stood up
for John Shannon, former managing
editor of The East Carolinian, as
campus conservatives called for his
dismissal when he openly endorsed
a candidate on the editorial page.
Meyer calmly and wisely pointed
out that Shannon was protected by
the first amendment to the U.S.
Constitution, thus averting what
could have been a major injustice.
It is going to be hard to imagine the
SGA without the guidance of
Meyer, who has long been an idea
man for the organization.
Meyer has also been here during a
long period of growth for the uni-
versity, and has kept the interests of
the students in mind through it all.
Through the storm Df the Thomas
Brewer administration, the aca-
demic growth of the John Howell
tenure and now the growing pains
of the Richard Eakin first year,
Meyer has quietly worked to bring
high-quality services to the stu-
dents. The additions to Mendenhall
Student Center and the renovations
of the Student Health Center will
stand as testimony to his dedication
A grim
It is a hot Saturday in e
gust. The tell-tale signs
whisper the coming . i
reason, a few leaves drifting �
ound, j vain mistiness, i
change of tempo, somethi
the blood But the 100 d e�
temperature isn
It is hot, but the launc
needs donig
His. v, laundry la� seen
vomc n's ork nd m ;�
I OOI � �� v
historically the Laundroma
�een a neighberh w j ,
lace, a
pul � ill with son
es oi the rivei i td e � -v
when � '� �- . �
� i :lol tes vcre tea
granite surfaces,
rungsh i d ' he
:� �� - kinds 1 a w. omats
�on es
. . � � iesi � is � i
some j ppei e -�. I
populated by i -
and dormib
rarv perchers, i ers
ne's laundry eak
one ind e f& ee e sa
�v rson .
wj oma isua . �
frequen - kecx
� i bubble f sik
v ' - a k
Sandinistas
Continued from page t
:onditkns i Nica .
ig � �� d e
tru' S -�'�
h . . arsuppoil
i; - the res j
d �h � '�-�� a e i ed
1 00 pereen n
una �
mdthec viscoi
red o is . i ' iei � i Mo i �
the land A u i f � -
export ra to - � I
M � g
� : . -genei i �� e s
ive party of Nicaragua c � a
pposi ion ��� � v � Kza i
oday is wel ,says "v a
e gime is more repre is
and corrupt th e 5omo
dynasty it replaced lou -��
mpare � e v. s
worse now We didn't have hv
et elections in the time
moza, but at leat the peoj
ood
Publicly, and for tr� tene
Wes like Miss Mori �
. is la ne e I
�cr econom c �� - - �
must spend 40 to 5( er�
eir budget on the wai .
Nicaragua gets i - �
tree, and the Sov et tloc i I
nates rice and corn
ista military. In adc I
Nicaragua s milit iry b
tvgan the moment the Sandm
tas took power, be retheC
. en existed.
Morrow praises the 5a .
ter signing the Ana Peace
The undeserved Nobel i
stowed on itno � standing
Teace" plan is a jok maj
provisions toe JSak
the Contras, but says
about slopping the hug
ot Soviet aid to the 5a .
pro ides no timetabte tor inte
reforms and no means et saiv,
should the reforms go untultil
In shoit it is worth - �- s
TRUE peace and hreedom
concerned
OW ou ha e some ot the
picture about Nicaragi
Morrow not the nduul
lions ot Marxist sympat
liberals who oi course i
not right'
Justin
lui
A
LEADING
Model
S & R Com
S30I
Downtown Grel
� �. ������ mm iii��o �:�� � !� � � '��
m � m. ii�iiii� m �mi





lfair
10.
� o Sommcrs
lunior
itical Science
A
id
ists attacked
; anti-
mosl in-
propa-
� read.
a hen they
of democ-
mmunist;
�wed lane
American
da a Knit
�ng when
ns against
done noth-
kve only
ful blacks
nd made it
�ike South
ng when
defeat
wrong
in the
p �� t n they d
� . - ; � ind
jC and
Com-
ment in
former
leViet-
' In every
time has
it Com-
- of the
, and
ir revolu-
sistently
.1 right
parroting
claiming
ture about
mmunistcon-
- dible
nservatives
ere are lots of
aragua. Ms.
� read Bobby
democracy
ind one mind
: that the Washington
- Times have
:les pointing
ple"of Nica-
ts,NOTthe
mic problems
the Sandinistas
' r the people"
VNDIMSTAS,page5
be missed
litorial page.
ca wisely pointed
Sh was protected by
nt to the U.S.
us averting what
ve I ijor injustice.
to imagine the
out the guidance of
vho has long been an idea
the organization,
has a No been here during a
ir d oi growth for the uni-
I has kept the interests of
?nts in mind through it all.
the storm of the Thomas
administration, the aca-
;rowth of the John Hovvell
md now the growing pains
Richard Eakin first year,
as quietly worked to bring
ality services to the stu-
fhe additions to Mendenhall
Center and the renovations
Itudent Health Center will
testimony to his dedication.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14, 1988 5
A grim trip to Glamourama
It is a hot Saturday in late Au-
gust. The tell-tale signs of fall
whisper the coming of a cooler
season, a few leavesdrifting to the
ground, a certain mistiness, a
change of tempo, something in
the blood. But the 100 degree
temperature isn't reading the
signs. It is hot, but the laundry
needs doing.
Historically, laundry has been
women's work. And in poor
towns and poor neighborhoods,
historically the laundromat has
been a neighborhood meeting
place, a community center, a
pulse, still with some of the attrib-
utes of the river and the rocks
where the hard dirt from working
men's clothes were beat out on
their granite surfaces
Things have changed. There are
as many kinds of laundromats as
there are lifestyles, incomes and
even desires for anonymity. In
some upper level neighborhoods
populated by apartment dwellers
and dormitory residents, tempo-
rary perchers, a person can do
one's laundry, never speak to
anyone and never see the same
person twice. Such a place is the
laundromat I usually go to. I too
frequently need to do my clothes
in a bubble of silence catching up
on the thoughts that occupy me,
Sandinistas
Continued from page 4
and "are changing poor
conditions" in Nicaragua. Noth-
ing could be further from the
truth Much of the decline in
popular support for the Sandinis-
tas is the result of the economic
hardships they have caused. In-
flation is 1,000 percent per vear!
Basic consumer goods are
unavailable to most Nicaraguans,
and the country is commonly re-
ferred to as La Tierra No Hay �
the land of no goods. The import-
export ratio is now 4-to-l.
Myriam Arguello Morales, sec-
retary-general of the Conserva-
tive party of Nicaragua, the main
opposition party to Somoza and
today as well, says the Sandinista
regime is more repressive, brutal
and corrupt than the Somoza
dynasty it replaced. "You can't
compare it she says. "It is much
worse now. We didn't have hon-
est elections in the time of So-
moza, but at least the people had
food
Publicly, and for the benefit of
gullibles like Miss Morrow, the
Sandinistas blame the Contras for
their economic woes, saying they
must spend 40 to 50 percent of
their budget on the war effort. But
Nicaragua gets all of its weaponry
free, and the Soviet bloc also do-
nates rice and corn to the Sandin-
ista military. In addition,
Nicaragua's military buildup
began the moment the Sandinis-
tas took power, before the Contras
even existed.
Morrow praises the Sandinistas
for signing the Arias Peace Plan.
The undeserved Nobel prize be-
stowed on it notwithstanding, the
"Peace" plan is a joke. It makes
provisions to cut off US aid from
the Contras, but says nothing
about stopping the huge amounts
of Soviet aid to the Sandinistas,
provides no timetable for internal
reforms, and no means of sanction
should the reforms go unfulfilled.
In short, it is worthless as far as
TRUE peace and freedom are
concerned.
NOW you have some of the "big
picture" about Nicaragua, Ms.
Morrow, not the ridiculous no-
tions ot Marxist sympathizing
liberals who, of course, are left,
not right! .
Justin Sturz
Junior
English
thinking work thoughts
prompted by this facility's prox-
imity to the university where I
teach.
Black, almost all are overweight.
One young mother there with her
mother, braids the hair of her
small daughter who sits on her
I,tau?1C!SaPlaCu!hefXtCrior laP' and then hoPs off' run�ng
around the crowded building
of freshly-painted white stucco in
a Spanish-style architecture,
white pebbles an pink oleander
bushes framing the sidewalk and
hourly-swept parking lot. A so-
larium across the front overlook-
ing the street provides a resting
place with hanging plants, attrac-
tive wicker furniture and maga-
zines like Southern Living and
Connoisseur for wishful thinking.
It's a spacious place, clean and
white with plenty of wide aisles
and folding tables. It's a spacious
place, clean and white with
plenty of wide aisles and folding
tables. It's air-conditioned, and a
color TV strategically poised near
the change machine entertains
peole who don't want to read. My
last visit there I tuned in and out to
the Oprah Winfrey Show and lis-
tened to a man in a blue striped
suit and Hush Puppies argue that
women don't do the best they can
with what they have, a contention
he nc-v-er managed to support.
But today the itinerary for my
errands doesn't include this cool
cave away from the heat and
hassle of the workaday world,
this sacred temple to the god
cleanliness where everything
works effortlessly.
Today I stop at Glamourama.
With its faded sign out front and
the dirt road across a vacant field
littered with soft drink bottles and
styrofoam fast food containers, it
is an easy eyesore to miss. The
front door is propped open, sig-
naling the presence of un-condi-
tioned air, and the pay telephone
just outside the door is being used
by a girl of 12 or 13 who tries to
watch three younger children
while she talks on the phone.
Glamourama is located in what
started to be a small shopping
center across from Roses, Hills
and Revco, but with the addition
of a Family Dollar Store next door,
the developer either ran out of
ideas or money and quit.
Glamourama shares a run down
vellow brick building with a
cleaning establishment. The heat
from the machines is wilting, and
the three large women who work
behind the counter to take clean-
ing, make change and dispense
soap powder look frazzled. Their
faces are oily and they are tired.
It's only 11 a.m.
J
This laundromat serves an area
which could be called marginal,
although what determines the
margins is a matter of debate. The
houses range from proudly poor
but to on-our-way-up-and-out to
downright dilapidated rental
duplexes, aging boxy dwellings
with balding yards. It costs to
water. It costs to mow.
The occupants today are all
female except for one slightly
hung-over looking fellow in
shorts. Most of the women are
upending her bottle of chocolate
with the expectation of finishing
and leaving and that is that, pre-
dominates. This is a place less
appealing than home, a place to
come to and do your laundry.
That is all it is. The family waits,
the family needs the neatly folded
UMlcMI�tfatki
IW� w tv cam tam mm
RICHARD EMILIO
DREYFDSS ESIEVEZ
Playdate: Jan. 14-17
Hcndrix Theatre
It's a tmtfi job but somrbodys got to do H!
WmWt. . WMMWKI I'ftl'JtlMUtU
11. MTV-P. 'II "�� "XT
�1MMi -JI�.W�tt? -M9 TflHM
LEADING EDGE
Model D
Complete System
with Printer
$1295
v
Includes:
Leading Edge Model D
� IBM PC XT compatible
� 2 - 360k floppy drives
� 512k RAM
� Monochrome monitor
� 20 month warranty
Leading Edge Wordprocessor
� 80.000 word spelling corrector
Citizen I80D printer
� 180 characters per second
� Graphics 4 Near Letter Quality
System Starter Kit
� I box diskettes
� all software installed
� printer cable
� 500 sheets clean tear paper
S & R Computer Associates, Inc.
530 Cotanche Street
Downtown Greenville (Next to Bicycle Post)
757-3279
milk, in a spotless but thread-bare piles and piles of workclothes,
pair of ruffled nylon dotted-swiss uniforms from factories, mill, and
underpants. A son, a few years car washes, fast food restaurants,
older, says, "Me big boy, Mama
Me big boy insistently, over and
over like a chant. There are few
places to sit, mostly makeshift,
corners of tables. A few sit on the
tops of unused machines. The
equipment is dilapidated and
needing paint. I find at last a
machine that is usable. To the left,
a sign reads "Machine out of or-
der A sign on the one to my right
says "Cold water only
I go to the front of the large
room to try to find a drink ma-
chine. I perch on the window
ledge sipping a diet Coke and
read a copy of the Ad-Pak which
was part of the litter on the floor
beside the drink machine. A
woman in a hot-looking beltless
black and red dress with the
sleeves torn out, leans against the
wall and stares into the circular
window of the washer, watching
her mechanical helper, a silent
and uncomplaining worker.
It's a workplace, don't forget
that. A mood of resigned and
exhausted acceptance coupled
and the women know that they
will be back here again next week,
washing the same clothes if the
paycheck holds out.
This is no place to linger.
(Editor's note: This is part of the
continuing series on poverty in
North Carolina. Agnes McDonald is
a native North Carolinian.)
Ladies' rtwf
Lock-In )MM
Saturday,
Jan. 16
Best Legs &
Buns
Contest
Gentleman Allowed
in After 10 p.m.
Interested contestants call:
355-2666 after 3:00 p.m.
s
Sheraton Greenville � 203 Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
DAPPER
DAN'S
VINTAGE CLOTHING,
JEWELRY, AND
COLLECTABLES
116 E. 5th Street
919-752-1750
SPRING BREAK '88
THIS ONE'S ON US
Spring Break Capital. DAYTONA
BEACH. FLORIDA.
wants your business!
SPRING BREAg PACftAQE
to help your budget! The Package
includes over $400.00 worth of
FREE DRINK PASSES and VIP
CARDS from all the HOTTEST
Night Clubs!
THIS YEAR, most Clubs are
allowing 18 yrs and up entrance!
This Package is UNCONDITION-
ALLY GUARANTEED! LIMITED
OFFER.
One time only. Send $10.00 check
or money order for handling to:
SPRING BREAK V.I.P.
THE TAUSSIG CORP. OF
DAYTONA BFACH
P.O. BOX 5727
DAYTONA BEACH. FL
32018
V�
Aerobic
Membership
35 A Day!
What a way to begin the New
Year!
For only $100, get a great start on
your fitness plan for 1988! One low
yearly price entitles you to our spe-
cial aerobic membership, that's
about 35 a day, so you can get
yourself into the shape you want to
be in for the New Year! Come join us!
36 aerobic workouts a week.
If you have a hectic schedule, don't
worry, because at The Spa, there are
aerobif daisies going on all the time.
With 36 aerobic workouts a week,
you can go to aerobics when it's
convenient for you, so you won't have
to plan your day around someone
else's schedule. That's just one of the
reasons The Spa is such a popular
health club.
And there's much more than
aerobics at The Spa.
The Spa offers you state-of-the-art
Dynacam exercise equipment, ex-
ercise bicycles, free weights and
qualified instructors on hand at all
times to help you with your fitness
plan. Plus, there are Greenville's
largest sauna and steam rooms, a
hot whirlpool mineral bath, our
tanning bed, a massage therapist.
and even a registered dietician to
offer you nutritional guidance.
Just drop by The Spa in South
Park Shopping Center, next to
Food Lion, for a touiof the,faqji-
ties. and see why we're Greenville s
best health club value.
Beat the January 31st price
increase.
All other memberships are dis-
counted. Some up to 50.
i Green
fr
Green vtile's
best health club value.
SOUTH PARK SIIOIMMNOCKNTHR
GREKNVILLE 7567991
BB&T
u
Plus
q System
n
IIIIMREUW
Your Bank at ECU Mendenhall
BB&T offers ECU Convenience PLUS
o
a
n
O

o
P?
(0
tr
o
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��
o
3
FREE 24 HOUR BANKING
We never charge you for using our
BB&T 24 machine. You'll receive a
24 hour card with a checking or
savings account.
Other BB&T Greenville
Offices:
Main Office � Stantonsburg Road
BB&T 24
Downtown Office � Corner 3rd & Greene
iOl Arlington Boulevard
BB&T 24
FREE CHECKS
Just for ECU - Your FIRST 50
CHECKS ARE FREE with your new
BB&T checking account.
I0�
�ii:v
It'sMoreThanABank.
Its An Attitude
Federal Deporit In
CHECKING PLUS
For $4.00 per month, you can have
� Free checks all the time
� Free money orders
� Discounts at Greenville Theaters
� Travel and Amusement Park Discounts
� $10,000 Accidental Death Insurance
. . . AND MORE
For Service or
Information Call
752-6889
m
mmm'
ii 0m
�� �i i m, . pi ma,





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
1ANUAKY 14. 1988
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
TUTOR km Chemistry 2620 needed Call
S33 -Jcoo
HELP WANTED Clean parking lots
Need driver's license Schedule Sun 4
am. - 11 am. Tues 5 am-9 am, Wed
10 p.m. - 2 a m. S4 iX1 hr 830-1882.
OVERSEAS JOB Abo Cnnscships.
SI5,000 - S95 400 r Now hiring' 320
openings! (1) 805 687 6000 Ext. OJ-1166
RED HOT bare, ug dealers' cars,
boats, planes repo'd Surplus. Your area
Buver's Guide (I) 805-687-6000 Ext S

BE ON T.V. Many needed tor
mercials Casting info. (1) S 687-
6000 Ext. TV-1166.
PART-TIME HELP needed to work in
LAB Some light machinery work
involved Vor in person to manager at
envillc Optician, Doctor Park, Bldg
�1 Will work around students hours No
evperience necessary
HFLP WANTED Tart time interior
design student - send resume to:
Designer, 3010 East 10th St Greenville,
N.C
INTERESTED IN PAYING OFF those
Christmas bills or beginning to plan for a
new Spring wardrobe1 Brod) s has part-
time positions Sale Associate positions
available tor individuals who can work
flexible hours. Applv at Brodv's, Carolina
Ea-t Mall, M-VV, 2-4 p.m.
PROFESSOR O'COOLS I lelp Wanted
shwashcrs and cooks - part time and
tull time Applv in person on Saturday
between 9 11 am
FOR RENT
R1NCCOLD TOWERS Apts for rent
Furnished. Contact 1 lolhe Simonowich at
752-2865.
NON-DRINKER male or female student
to share a two bedroom split level apt
Plus 1 '2 utilities Call 758 6872
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed Non
smoker' Expected to pay 12 expenses
$120 rent Call 758-5923 or 756-4580
(leave message for Crissy)
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New �
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. Sih Stn I
� !� � ; N� .1: ECU
� Y.i: Majoi Shoppu �; n lers
�Across Krom lltghwa) Patn� Si .
1 United Olfci $275 .i month
. � ini .i r it ronii jfW -
756-7815 or 830- 1937
Ofn � ojx r p B 12-5:30 p m
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean .ir.d (t one heUroa I n cvi
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer. oioti.u n.i-Vrs dryers, cable, TV.
Couples or singles only $195 .� month. 6
month lease. MOUIl E HOME RENTALS �
couples or singles. Apartment and mobile
homes tn Azalea Gardens v.r.ir Brook Valley
County C
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756 7815 '
HOUSEMATE WANTED: Prefei
graduate student, non-smoker, $150
month. 12 utilities. $150 damage
Deadlines for Classifieds
and Announcements
For Tuesdays Paper: Friday at 4:00 p.m.
For Thursdays Paper: Monday at 4:00 p.m.
No Exceptions Please.
deposit, 3 bedroom house, 13 minutes
from campus. 758 68 - ask for Jay.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
immediately. Eastbrook Apts. Own room
120 a mo.13 utilities. Call now 758-
424.
WANTED - 1 male roommate to share 2
bdrm. apt. 2 blocks from campus. $150 a
month plus utilities and deposit. Call 758-
0395 after 5 p.m.
SO ROOMMATES need to share room
in Wildwood Villas townhouse. $125.00
each plus utilities Call Julie 752 4781.
ROOM FOR RENT: Tor female,
everything included. Call after 6:00 p.m.
758-5422.
ROOM AVAILABLE: For female, non
smoker. Call 757-1798.
ROOMMATE WAN LED to share brand
new 2 br apartment. 830-5193.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2
bedroom apt. at Carriage I louse Apts. SI 35
per month plus 1 2 utilities. Call 756-9248.
MALI OR FEMALE roommate needed to
-hare large 3 brm. house on corner of Oak
3rd St. Must see it to believe space. Call
Chen or 1 isa at 758-0312.
WANTED: Male roommate for only 1
semester. Non smoker. Non drinker. S115
a month plus 13 utilities. Call 758-9065.
Tar River lists.
NEED FEMALE roommate to share three
bedroom Eastbrook Apartment. 13 rent
$120 plus 13 utilities. On bus line. Call
752-3678. Keep trying!
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Scaly Mattress & Springs and
frame $75, chest of drawers S25. Call 738-
7090after 5:00 p.m.
OAK DINETTE SET, twin bed, oak
dresser tor sale Neg Call 756-9652 after 6
p.m.
SPECKLED KING SNAKE for sale Call
752-0453.
FOR SALE: Couch i. chair, good
condition. $150 Neg. 1973 Toyota Corolla,
4 speed $600 Neg Call after 400 p.m. 752-
4196.
FOR SALE: New Kenmore 16 cubic ft
refrigerator, matching love seat ft rocker.
Call 736-4930.
CAROLINA GRILL CAFE' Good home
cooked food. Welcome Back To School
Special. A complete breakfast SI.49 tax.
A complete lunch $2.60 tax. 907
Dickinson Avc. 3 blocks from ECU. 752
1188 for quick call-in.
D.J. - Are you having a partv and need a
D I? For the best in Top 40, Beach and
Dance, call Morgan at 758-7967.
Reasonable rates. References on
request.
PARTY ANIMALS Great for birthday
or any occasion Gorilla Crams, C.ator-
Grams, Penguin for I lire. Balloons
Delivered in Costume Deliveries on or
off campus Chip Py 830 1823.
IT IS TRUE You Can Buy Jeeps for 5-14
through the U.S. government1 Get the
facts today! Call 1-312-742 1142 Fxt.
5271 A.
THE TROPICAL ZONE G-Ville
hottest new concept in tanning.
Featuring state of the art silver solarium.
Special rates for students. Call for an
appointment. 355-5120.
FOR SALE: Breakfast set, table 2
chairs. Call after 6:00 p.m. 758-5422.
PERSONALS
IS SPRING FEVER hitting you early. If
so, visit "Off the Cuff" Lounge for a little
Vitamin-C. Screwdrivers, Greyhounds,
Fuzv Navels $1.75 special. We hope to
C-ya soon. Every Monday from 5-i.
TO ALL GREEKS: Thanks for your
SPRINGBREAK SAILING BAHAMAS
45 ft Captained Yachts For Groups Of Eight 7 Days in
Bahamas $435.00 pp All Inclusive
SPRINGBREAK HOTLINE 1-800-999-7245.
Anytime Campus Reps, needed. Ask for David.
awesome support ol the East v .uo.m.
Tea Party Come on out and I � lea
with us all night LONG Lct'smakeM
great Absolutely every Long Island W
Tea $2.00.
SEE PAGE 5 FOR BB&T free check
coupon. Open your HB&T checking
account today.
ATTENTION ALL ECU MALES Vim.
Beta Theta Pi at 1110-H Cotanchc St for
Rush, Monday night thru Wednesday
night from 7-11
RIPE NEEPEP: To Annapolis, Md . or
surrounding area. Will help "th all
expenses. For weekend of an 30 v. an
leave anytime that Thursday or Friday
Please call Pat 830-0601.
PI KAPPA ALPHA Welcome back
fellas and a hearty hello to all our hi
sisters. Hope Santa duin t ack
anybody?! Put your thmkin caps on and
your drinkin boots on cause it's gonna
be a helluva semester Go Pikes Paul
O'Brien was here.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new
officers of Sigma Nu Commander
Patrick Letts, Lt. Commander Andy
Sugg, Treasurer: Ray Whitbv, Reorder
I ee Snuggs.
KA BROTHERS: Welcome Hack' Wo arc
looking forward to a super semester!
Love, KA Little Sisters.
MEMBERSHIP has its advantages oin
NCSL Monday, fan. I8at7 p m room 241
MSC. Help plan an I.C travel, receive
college credit, ind more.
TRACY, BRIAN, . . oh yeamd Ed!
New Years Eve was a Blast! Can
Pennsylvania women Party or what7 Be
Bop was a total Blur, except tor the ever
popular question of "Where's Ed ?" 1 ove,
Ann and Karen
YES, THERE IS A DIFFERENC1 ' Rush
Sigma Nu Monday 7 p.m. Mendenhall
room 248: Tuesday and Wednesday
Mendenhall Multipurpose Room al
p.m. Real men don't Rush elsewhere
JR. PANHELLENIC Execs and
Delegates: Welcome Back' Lasl semester
was a great success and a lot of tun too!
There's not much time left and we stul
have a couple protects to do. Next
meeting will beat AOPi Thursday at 4 00,
so get psyched to work even harder than
before. I ove, Karen.
SH PI N I M you tiki
and wanl to get involved will
Union 'hen come to thi
Committee Meeting on W� I
0th at i p W n Mendenhj
info call 75 ' y,l 1
PHI SIGMA PI and the Amern
Soctct is �ponsorinj5 �� ai
lanuan 28 Horn 9 M the ECU!
Store Have your best friend profess
worst enemy thrown in jail and H . ,
mono) i �,n ci rcsean h
UII KAPFA SICMAS m
welcome all the I Ireeka h i �
them �� successful scmeMei .
forward to kts of throw d
sororities Ms' good
fraternities in Rush Kapp
Simon t
ofinterr
t V v N C-M� � f . t �
rTL
.
i " �
- �-
iw n
i I 111 S HOOl PAR I .
I ei s find out tonight al the I
I louse 1 ei s pt late nights ! I
Buy some beei before dowi �
and come get pre faced till trv
K I I I 1 I � SISTERS Wei.
1 here will be a meeting l'
l i n m 1 his is in.in.i.ii.M
lot to talk about! '� , yousoi
SiCMANI BROTHI RS I
full semest� Rush an 18
Weekend SSugai Mountain
Beach Weekend in Man h !
al the beach April 9 A
WI DN1 sPA Nil I Back �
p.irt at Rafters adies frei '
$ 25 dr.itt all night
PI II A SIGMA IHI I A
will be sponsoring �'
Unlimited rouch, rhui d i �
Admission is SI with i
Freshman are wek omc
HI , Ml M 1 miss you VN Ml
PHI KAPPA I M I ittl.
Sunday night at VJ i1 p m Mai
SIGMA PHI I PSI1 o 1 II
I XP1 Rll N I
WI 1 c OMI BAt K'
continues to jam in the new
Pressure Boys on 11us . in Dei
Fri . and Rythm Metl ixJ on Sal
� r:
��
V-rth
"

" s
Announcements
Summer positions with camps, parks
and resorts are available for students in a
variety of majors. Over fifty recreational
empl ers will interview students on
Recreation Da jn. 28, in Memorial
signup! r interviews and more
ntact Cooperative Education in
I Rawl.
DANCE PERFORMANCE
A! DANCE THEATRE pres-
ents "PPINTES OF PASSION-BODIES
IN BEAT an evening of dance Ian. 23,
8:1 5 p.m New Bern Senior I hh School
Auditorium, and Ian. 24, 8:15 p.m Dll.
Conley Hij;h in Greenville. Breathtaking
Ballet, 1 lot la, and Titillating Tap, new
works recently choreographed for the
semi-professional dance company and
numbers too hot to put down are guaran-
teed to heat up your winter. Tickets are S7
in advance; S8 at the door. For further
nfo contact Atlantic Dance Theatre at
919)637-3941.
AWARDS CEREMONY
The Eta Nu Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha
Fraternity, Inc. announces their 4th An-
nual Martin Luther King, Jr. Leadership
Awards Ceremony and Reception Mon-
day evening, Jan. 18, 1988 at 8:00 p.m. In
Mendenhall.
EPISCOPAL FELLOWSHIP
The Episcopal Student Fellowship
wants YOU! 1 iolv Communion 5:30 p.m.
Wednesdays, 4th St 1 block north of
C.arrett Dorm. For more info, call Allen
Manning 738-1440.
JUNIOR PANHELLENIC
Atrn. Jr. Panhellenic Execs and Dele
gates: The first Jr. Panhellenic meeting for
- will be this Thurs. at 4.00at the AOPi
house. Please make sure your sorority
pledge class is well represented with one
exec and one delegate. If there is a prob-
lem with attendance, please remember to
call Janie and let her know.
NCSL
� The second meeting of the N.C. Student
Legislature will be Mon , Jan. 18 in MS
room 241 at 7 p.m. We will be discussing
the an. I.C. on Ian 22 24 Make plans to
attend Also, ECU will be hosting the Feb
I.C on Feb 26-28 tome ami become par1
et NCSL Membership does have its ad
vantages.
ACCOl NTING SOCIETY
The Accounting Society willl hold its
Jan. meeting on Wed (an 20th at 5 p.m. ir
Brewstcr B-102. Our speaker will be CJ
Skender from NCSU. 1 le will be discuss
ing CPA review courses with us Pleas
attend!
FRESHMENSOPHOM OR IS
The Dept. of Military Science still has
openings in MLSC 1001 (Intro, to ROTC
and the Army). This one-hour elective
introduces students to scholarship, finan-
cial and career opportunities (civilian and
military). Available through the Dept. of
the Armv. There are no committment,
uniform, haircut or lab requirements for
thiscourse. Simply add MLSC 1001 as you
would any other elective. Sections still
open are: Sect. 001 - Mon. 1300-1400; Sect.
002 - Wed. 0900-1 (XX); Sect. 003 - Thurs.
0900 1000. For additional info call Capt.
Alvin Mitchell at 757-69676974 or visit
Erwin 1 Jail, room 319.
BLOOPMOBILE
The Biology Club will be sponsoring a
Bloodmobile Jan. 20 and 21 in room 244
Mendenhall between 12 p.m. - 6 p.m. The
Red Cross is on special appeal for blood.
Please give the gift of life.
PHI SIGMA Pi
Phi Sigma Pi and the American Cancer
Society is sponsoring a Jail A-Thon on Jan
28 from 9-4 at the ECU Student Store
I lave your best friend, professor, or worst
enemy thrown in jail and help raise
money for cancer research.
RUGBY CLUB
ECU Rugby Club and anyone inter-
ested in plavine in the sDrinv: therp will bp
a mandatory meeting to discuss Spring
Break Tour and Spring Schedule Thurs. 14
at Q:Hi at 408 Biltmore behind the Sigma
Sigma Sigma house.
DIVE CLUB
Dive Club meeting Thurs Jan. 21 7:00
p.m. in Mendenhall rm. 221. We will dis-
cuss future dives, fund raisers, and elect a
new secretary. Everyone is invited.
HONORS SEMINARS
All faculty members and honors stu-
dents are reminded of their opportunity
to design or request an honors seminar of
their choice. The 1 lonors Committee
makes the final selection. Please submit
proposal (at least by phone) to David
Sanders (737-6373) at the Honors Office
by Wed Jan. 20. Faculty interested in co-
teaching a seminar on JewArab rela-
tions. Closing of the American Mind,
Vietnam, The Nuclear Age, or health is-
sues are especially urged to reply.
LIBRARY SCHEDULE
Regular hours for Joyner Library are as
follows: MonThurs 8 a.m. - Midnight;
Fri 8 a.m. - 9 p.m Sat 9 a.m. - 8 p.m
Sun : 12 Noon - Midnight. The following
schedule will be followed for the Martin
Luther King, Jr. Holiday: Sat Jan. 16: 9
a.m. - 6 p.m Sun Jan. 17: 12 Noon - 10
p.m and Mon Jan. 18: CLOSED.
MODELS NEEDED
Positions are open for modeling in the
School of Art figure drawing classes. The
salary is S5 per hour. See Tran Cordley or
Connie Pointer in Jenkins 2000 or call 757-
6563 for info, and application forms. T.
Cordley may be reached at 757-6259 or
Jenkins 1307.
SELF-HELP POSITION
Part-time Clerk Typist and Reception-
ist: The Office of International Studies and
Scholarships needs a reliable, conscien-
tious, and efficient student with strong
skills and some experience to assist in a
�minn rrrr-
ing, and clerical skills are desired. Please
contact Dr. Maurice D. Simon at 757-6504
or apply at his office, Brewster A 1 IS. We
will be hiring as sxn as possible.
CLASS CLOWN
Win prizes and gain exposure by enter
ing the U.S. College Comedy Competi-
tion, Wed Jan. 20,8:00 p.m in the Coffee-
house, groundfloor, Mendenhall Prepare
a 3-minute comedy routine (no vulgar or
obscene material please) and have it
judged by professional comedians. Free t-
shirts to all participants. Call 757 6611,
ext. 271 for more info.
COMEDY COMPETITION
Come cheer on your favorite ECU
comedian as they compete for prizes in
the U.S. College Comedy Competition.
Free Doritos and sticklets gum to be given
away. Wed Jan. 20 at 8 p.m. in the Coffee-
house, groundfloor, Mendenahll.
SELF-HELP POSITION
I'art-time Clerk Typist and Reception-
ist: The Department of Political Science
seeks a reliable, conscientious, and effi-
cient student with strong skills and some
experience to assist staff and faculty in a
variety of activities. Good typing, copying
and clerical skills are desired. Please con-
tact Mrs. Cynthia Smith, Brewster A-124
personally or by telephone, 757-6030,8:30
a.m. to 5 p.m Mon. - Fri. We will be hiring
as soon as possible.
SRS7GRAD STUDENTS
Now is the time to be registered with
the Career Planning and Placement Serv-
ice in the Bloxton I louse. Located between
Mendenhall and Greene Residence I Iall,
this is a place where graduating students
may put resumes and establish a creden-
tials file. Interview sign-ups begin Jan. 20
and you must be registered to sign up.
General Information meetings will be
held Jan. 19 at 3 & 4 p.m. in Mendenhall
221.
INTERVIEW WORKSHOPS
fhe Career PtarttltrTfc and-PIWPmt�n�"
Service In the Bloxton 1 louse is ottering
these one hour sessions to aid ou in
developing better interviewing skills A
film ami discussion of how to interview
on and off campus will be shared These
sessions are held in the Career Planning
RtKim on Jan. 20, 25, & 2h at 3 p m and at
7 p.m. on Jan. 26.
BIOLOGYCH EM I ST R Y
Those who graduate this year will want
to register at the Career Planning and
Placement Service. The Research Triangle
Institute will be Interviewing on campus it
enough majors sign up You may want to
clip this and post so no others will mi
Glaxo will also be here and we have vide
otapes on career with the Southern Re
search Institute and the National Cancer
Institute.
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton I louse is offering
these one hour programs on beginning a
resume for your job search. I landouts and
samples will be given out to the first 20
people to come to each session. No sign up
required. These sessions arc held in the
Career Planning Room on Jan. 22 & 28 at 3
p.m. and on Jan. 26 at 7 p.m.
ALPHA EPSILON DELTA
Alpha Epsilon Delta members and in-
terested premed students: The Biology
Club is sponsoring its annual Blood
Mobile on Wed 20th and Thur 21. Your
help from 11:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on these
days will be greatly appreciated. It will be
held in Mendenhall 224.
ALL STUDENTS
The Travel Committee is having their
first meeting for the semester. All are
welcome. It will be Wed Jan. 20th at 5
p.m. in Mendenhall. Please try to attend.
For further info call 757-6611.
SEP
The first meeting for Students for Eco-
nomic Etemoaracv will meet in Menden-
' nM&f1Wfir(Op rrrrrft !
wek i me
AI
Amncst) International meets e i I
Wed at 8 p m at St Paul's 1 pi;
Church 401 1 4th St . in the upper l �
from the Jth M entrance Nexl i
Ian 27th
MUSICA1
lhe long running hit Broadv
cal, I'urhe, will be performed in '�'
Auditorium on Wed , an 27 1 i -
p.m Thisenerg) packed blockbuster
of sweet ballads and powerful pi
numbers, will be here tr one perl
ance only Tickets tor this delightl
are available al the Central
Mendenhall, ECU, 757 661 1 exl
Central I i ket Office hours are ! I
until hOOpm This event is spor
the Dept ol University Unions
SYMPHONY
The E I' S) mphony and tl
Symphony will present a concert
si.ecial guest cellist, Lynn Ham
Sun an. 17, 1988, at 3 15 p m in �
Auditorium The 130-piece
orchestras will perform works b �'
ner,Schubert,and Dvorak ricketsl
powerful event are available at the I �
tral Ticket Office, Mendenhall
ext 2(i6. Central Ticket Office ho irs .m
11:00 am until MX) p m I his i v
sponsored by the Dcpl ol Unh
Unions
VOCAL ARTS ENSEMBLE
The Dept. of University Unions � '�
The School of Musk present the
Angeles Vocal Arts Ensemble, .�
talented group of singers and aco
rusts, in Hendrix Ihe.itre on Thurs
21, 1988, at Six) p m. Tickets for this
wonderful concert are available al the
Central Ticket Office, Mend i
6611, ext. 266 Central Ik ket Mice
are 11:(X) a m until 6:00 p m
Poland and i
I
The East Carolinian
is now taking applications for the following positions
Staff writers
Earn while
Layout artists
Editorial columnists
learn and gain valuable experience
Mtm1
�������� �nnm��w�1�-1"






1
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 14,1988 7
STUDENTS it you like travel
: involved with Studcm
rte to the Travel
' W�E. Ianuarv
MendcnhaU. For m
MAPI VmcrkanCnfc
a lail A Thori on
I at the ECU Student
�esl tnend, professor o
rr in jail and help rajg,
search
V1VS ld like to
� back and wish
semester We look
v downs with the
'� ,u lo the
v �ppa Sigma
� PART past H)rp
KPpaSnw
?srockin again
vnlown doses
the wee hours
ne Back'
' londay, fan Is
" ��� n we have
� s'n Kathryn
I RS Cctrcad) fort
" " 20, Ski
� Fob 12 & 13;
Spring Formaj
�ck-t School
- ti! I(h30 pjn
� V S rority, Inc
rt at the
�hi 14 th.
lege ID.
meeting
Mandatory.
V HIT TIME
�v Ddi
� with the
sion on
Simon takes coordinator
of international studies post
fcClJ News Bureau
ECU announced in December
the appointment of Dr. Maurice
I). Simon, professor and chair-
man of political science, to the
newly-created post of Coordina-
tor of International Studies and
Scholarships effective Jan. 1.
Simon, 47, will resign as chair of
the political science department
but will retain his academic rank
as faculty member while assum-
ing the new university-wide
administrative appointment.
Dr. William A. Bloodworth,
acting vice chancellor for aca-
demic affairs, said the new posi-
tion combines duties carried out
in the past by persons serving as
coordinator of international pro-
grams and coordinator of na-
tional and international fellow-
ships and scholarships.
"International studies is one of
the truo interdisciDlinarv subject
matters Simon said. "The con-
temporary world cannot be
understood without a basic
understanding of languages, lit-
erature, anthropology, sociology,
business, economics, communi-
which Simon said "enhances the
possibilities" for prominence in
the field.
In announcing the appoint-
ment, Bloodworth expressed
appreciation to others on the ECU
faculty who have worked on be-
half of international studies and
cations, history, ethics and phi- programs. He said the work of Dr.
Iosophy, art, technology, educa- Ennis Chestang, coordinator of
tional systems, scientific trends, international programs for the
military affairs, and of course, past three years, "has been espc-
pohtics dally important
Simon said that former Univer- Simon is a native of Los Ange-
sity of North Carolina president lcs. He received the bachelor's
William Friday emphasized that degree with distinction in politi-
international studies is one of the cal science at the University of
primary missions of a fine univer- California at Berkcly and the
sity. "We must all be conscious of master's degree in public law and
this tact he said. government from Columbia Uni-
"Nationally and internation- versity.
ally, we can gain more promi- "We live in a highly interde-
"Dr. Simon will have responsi- nence through continued and pendent world of diverse nation-
greater participation in overseas states, socio-economic systems
programs, faculty exchanges, and cultures
professional association and con- "This is a complex and volatile
terence activities as well as coop- global environment which we
erative research he said. and our students must attempt to
ECU is to establish an endowed analyze and understand he said,
chair in international studies and "As citizens of a superpower, we
bilities in the planning, develop-
ment and administration of inter-
national studies at East Carolina
University Bloodworth said. In
his new post, he will report di-
rectly to the vice chancellor for
Academic Affairs.
Simon served as director of
graduate studies in the Depart-
ment of Political Science, Univer-
sity of North Carolina - Greens-
boro, prior to his appointment as
professor and chair of political
science at ECU in 1984. He holds
the PhD in political science from
Stanford University.
Bloodworth said Simon was
chosen in an internal search "in-
volving applications from a num-
ber oi highly qualified faculty
"He brings to the position
extraordinary credentials in
scholarship and administration
Bloodworth said. "With Dr.
Simon's assistance, the university
can look forward to an increased
visibility of and commitment to
international concerns in curric-
ula and programs
Simon is a specialist in studies
oi Poland and eastern Europe
including the Soviet Union and
the Soviet bloc.
will propose a master's level pro-
gram in international studies
have an obligation to educate our
students about the dilemma and
issues surrounding the world
order
Dr. Maurice D. Simon
GET
CAUGHT
5l)c iEaotiOarnliniuti
TAKE OUT
�- FAMOUS
OR
'COMPARE
OUR
PRICES"
�USINESS HOURS:
MONDAY - SUNDAY
11 ant 11 pm
100 E. 10th StrMt
and Evans Strtat
Grtanvllla.
Pizzas
Hot Oven Subs
Sandwiches
Daily Specials:
Meal Deal $2.49
(not for delivery)
Spaghetti with Meatballs,
Salad & Garlic Bread
$3.95
(not for delivery)
Lasagna, Garlic Bread & Salad $3.95
(not for delivery)
Spaghetti
Lasagna Salads
Delivery Specials:
Buy any Sub,
Get A Free Drink
Buy Any Large Pizza,
Get 2 Liter Pepsi Free
Buy Any Small Pizza.
Get 2 Free Drinks
For Fast Free Delivery
Call 757-0731 or 757-1278
60 oz. Pitcher Beer $1.50 every night
This offer not good with any other promotion. This oiTcr may be withdrawn at any lime.
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking applications for
Day-Student Representative
for the 1988-89 Term
Responsibilities:
Qualifications:
Selecting the Student Union President
Approving Committee Chairpersons
Approving the Student Union Budget
Setting Policy for the Student Union
Full-Time Student
Reside Off Campus
Independent
Deadline To Apply: Friday, January 22, 1988
r V; v
M
ts ever)
piscopal
r floa
� ting
mik i
� v. n
: n Wright
?88 at -
� uster, full
I reduction
pcrform-
tful overt
" ket a
ext. 266.
0 a.m.
- rtsored by
SYMPHONY
ai ! the N.C
vert will
rtn llarroll, on
15 p.m. in Wright
e combined
�ks bv Wag-
� rickets for this
� at the Ccn
757-6611.
�� . hours are
��� This event is
� ot University
M ARTS r-NSKMBLE
�. ums and
sent the Los
mbk .i uniquely
rs and acoompa
tre on Thurs , Jan
p m. Tickets fr this
ivaibble at the
" i.nhall, 757-
- � Office hours
p m.
sitions:
FIFTH ST.

RUSH
PHI KAPPA TAU
e.
I Want You
To Be A Phi Tau!
Tues. 7:00-11:00 - Sorority Night, come meet the sorority girls of E.C.U.
Wed. 7:00-11:00 - Sub Night
Thurs. 7:00-11:00 - Meet the Brothers and little Sisters of Phi Kappa Tau
Late Night Party Saturday, Jan. 16th - 10:00-2:00 a.m.
with live Music by "Noble Savages"
-For more information or a ride call 757-1319
-f- � � ��"��-� m. o
�wm��0m
jhjmjmj&m � " i itiB nwm fiimi'
�mmimjtt0i0w000tBimi





THE EAS1 v AKOI Ii.W
ANUAR 14. 1988
Laws over oceans are sought by some states
CHARI ESTON S.C (AD
rhe nation s coastal states would
like to see Congress create a fed-
eral commission tin year to re
v iew lavs s concerning coastal and
ocean matters according to the
director of the Coastal States
v h mi uition.
What the commission will do
is take a fresh look at existing
federal law we have, the local re-
lationships between the tederal
government and the states land
whether we're doing enough
with respect to ocean and coastal
resources Gary Magnuson said.
1 le said the group would then
prepare recommendations tor the
Congress and the president on
what ought to be done.
A bill tocreatea National Ocean
Policy Commission that would
look at such matters over a two-
year period has been passed by
the IS. 1 louse and is pending in
the Senate, he said.
"It's an ettort to cut across the
obstacles of trving to develop a
comprehensive (coastal and
ocean) police said Magnuson,
who was in Charleston tor the
annual meeting of the Coastal
States Organization.
Such a review is needed, he
said, because "when you try to
deal with coastal issues and ocean
issues it cuts across many tederal
laws and many congressional
committees so it's hard toget final
action on a bill"
"The commission will give us
an opportunity to examine the
whole relationship between the
government and the states. For a
long time tederal ocean law just
governed federal activities. But
the states are impacted by what
goes (mi in the ocean. It's all one
framework he said.
The Coastal States Organiza
tion is made up oi gubernatorial
appointees from 3(1 coastal states
and five territories. The group's
annual meeting was to conclude
tod a v.
Meanwhile, the group is also
hopeful Congress will tins year
approve comprehensive oil spill
legislation that's "been around
tor five or six congresses Mag
nuson said.
The measure would form a sys-
tem of liability and compensat
"a way in whi h to addre
oil spill as last as possible
hold those who have spilled
accountable and to compel
those who were damaged u
spill he said
There is now no lear . ut poll
on oil spills, simply a "mish i
of bits and mom's of federal
state laws Magnuson
While 24 states have oil spill
grams "it's a very 1� " ,s �'�
After a hunger strike, Dutch tourist may have found his dog
OS v- i I i S (AD A
rist who staged a hun-
ger sti k� after his dog disap-
peared during an airline flight
I i St I ouis to identify
a doc killed in traffic that officials
missing pet.
pc tor my
must go there to be
I eo Kocwe - �id I uesday
as he prepared to leave for
sis ven important
i
Airlines officials
o 4 year-old female ter-
- � je mix. named Loekie,
escaped during a plane change
and was killed on a street near
Lambcrt-St. Louis International
Airport.
Don Morrison, a TWA spokes
man. said the dog was found
Monday.
We believe that based on the
identity we have that it does
match the identification as far as
this gentleman's do$ Morrison
said.
Koewe, whose hunger strike at
1 os Angeles International Air-
port drew national attention to a
search tor his lost dog, said the
dead dog's description matched
Loekie's.
Koewe, a singer-composer and
hotel owner from The 1 lague, had
placed Loekie in an airplane bag-
gage section during a trip from
Pallas to Los Angeles on Thurs-
day.
In Pallas, Loekie had made
quite a hit with magician erry
Guyer, who performed a show
that Koewe had attended.
Guyer, who called Los Angeles
from Pallas Tuesday to inquire
about the dog, said, "It was just
such a cute little dog that you
couldn't torget it
1 le added, 'The dog was well
trained. It would dance, and
when he talked to it in Dutch it
would answer him
Morrison had said earlier that it
Loekie could not be located TWA
would compensate Koewe tor the
loss.
But Koewe, who canceled ins
trip home Monday and vowed
not to eat until I oekie was found,
wasn't willing to discuss that
fuesdav.
Mendenhall Spring
Movie Schedule
on page 16
Ticket Giveawa
� The East Carolinian is giving away two (2) pair or tickets for the Jimmy Buffett
Conceit to be held on January 28th at Minges Coliseum. A11 you need to do to
enter is fill out the form below and bring it by The East Carolinian office or mail
it to: The East Carolinian. Old South Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858.
I
I
I
I
I
I
tmmmm
� Name
I

I lnone fl
I
I
I
I
I
Addl-
es s
I
I
I
I
� i cnt i
�ALL ENTRIES MVST BE RECEIVED BY THE EAST CAROLEVIAN NO
LATER THAN 5 P.M. ON MONDAY. JANUARY 25TH.
�Union is located In the Publications Building in front ol
arj I
�Ri - "c facsimiles will be accepted as an entry for the drawing.
DRAWING TO BE HELD AT 6 P.M. ON
TUESDAY, JANUARY 26TH.
WINNERS WILL BE NOTIFIED
The Jimmy Buffett concert is sponsored by the
Student Union Major Concert Committee.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
SINGERS DANCERS INSTRUMENTALISTS
TECHNICIANS VARIETY PERFORMERS
Kings Productions the world's
e '� � �' ' � ' �
the spectacular 1988 � KINGS
DOMINION, Richmond irgii
. lD,
provide one rour I tnj � e hired
work at a park over 250 mill h �
v � e your auditioi i I ��� ����

GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
Friday ir
�. �'� Fletcher M
Sin ;� � 2 PM; Dancers & Insl entolisl
�� � � �.�
RICHMOND VIRGINIA
Kings I lominton '�' � '�'
:� 2-4 PM ' � '�' � ' '� '
tv Act " � � �'
. A
RUSH
Tau Kappa Epsilon
'Have
UONCX � iTicj
ment has hi 1
teach lity to 1,10
servants, an urtusu il .1 I
tion fam-
Rest assured, h
Karen Dunn won't fcn I
government en .
"Have a nil 1 la
"It's one oi th
British find �
� and anm
Monti 1.
Kansas (
investiga
.

WASHH
ers of a K 1
station possil
tederal act �i I 1
legedly inde
prime-timi
station
lines w
"Privati
Mort �
board � v'
Chattai
ner oi i "
ever, that tl
laws.
"Tin
allowc
choice on
dance
dards K
"How(
guide es,
movie
"We did r
nor arc we
adding
Report urges
KALI
of North
ernors y
sider a rep
strongly er
universil
search pai 1
vate s
academic freedom.
The report also calls f
tem to aggressivi
funds from priva-
tions and
The rep. 11
two-part stal
tions betv
North Cai
tern and .
It disc
agricultural �
small bus tess
gram- spt
nessev
conch ;d -
tween the
vate sector is m il
pal and should he -
Couraged "provided I
academic freedom and era
Student rights are not
according to th N 'S
server ot Ral
If appr ed '
be considered 1
its Februan
guarantees
are included
governing the
search relati
industr
The first
unanimou
by the 32 n
Tuesday Jan. 19
Wednesday Jan. 20
Thursday Jan. 21
Rush Times 7:00 - 11:00
951 E. 10th Street
The House at the bottom of the hill.
For more information call 757-3042
Imogtne it you Hod to ask tor
to save me We of someone yd.
Next time the Anertcon R
asks, g've blood.
OIVIB IOOD, WJAM
�.� Mm r - � .






T IE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 14,1988 9
ates
tyandcompensal
,h u addre
� a possible ami
have spilled
I I compensate
� imaged in the
Icar-eul
,i misr �
- ol federal and
i said.

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16
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PERFORMERS
silon
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'Have a nice day' phrase annoys the British
LONDON (AT') � The govern-
ment has hired an American to
teach civility to 1,1(X) of its civil
servants, an unusual act in a na-
tion famed for good manners.
Rest assured, however, because
Karen Dunn won't be teaching
government employees to say,
Have a nice day
weeded out Americanisms to tai-
lor her customer-relations course
for British consumption.
Her firm, Sterling Consulting
Group of Sausalito, Calif has
been hired to bring the
government's Export Credit
Guarantee Department up to
speed on the latest techniques in
"It's one of those phrases the customer relations. The depart-
British find extremely American ment is a branch of the Treasury
and annoying Dunn said which underwrites overseas busi-
Mondav, explaining how she
explaining
ness transactions. It's funded by
premiums from private compa-
nies in the export business.
A few eyebrows were raised
over morning tea Monday when a
Daily Telegraph headline re-
ported that Dunn and her busi-
ness partner, Keith Bailey, had
been hired "to make Britons more
civil
The Telegraph expressed no
opinions on the topic, but the
Daily Mail did.
In an editorial today, the news-
s aon in manners from resi-
dents of the New World.
paper opened: "Surely, it is the spokesman,
depth of bureaucratic rudeness to Britons view their nation as a
imply that there is not a single poIHe one with little need for in-
native of these shores capable of
inculcating patience and good
manners
"No discourtesy intended, but
Americans, especially Califor-
nians, are not widely regarded as
the epitome of politeness and ci-
vility it said.
"I winced when I saw that said
Kansas City television station under
investigation for showing explicit film
John Atkinson, a department their tradition of courtesy and
pledged to restore that "funda-
mental" value, particularly
among the young.
"If that were all there was, we
probably wouldn't be here Her
job entails teaching clients better
communication skills. Customers
around the world desire three
"We are a polite society and things �respect, recognition and
don't like to be told" that British responsiveness, she said,
manners need polishing, Atkin-
son said. Dunn said that while she
Prime Minister Margaret doesn't believe in the old adage
Thatcher recently said she was that the customer is always right,
concerned that Britons had lost she stresses the need for sales
WAS11INGTON (AP) Own- were chosen on something that is
ers of a Kansas City television almost a year old
station possiblv facing the first The Federal Communications
federal action for showing an al- Commission on Tuesday began
legedly indecent movie during an enforcement action of its inde-
rnan Dennis Patrick said, promis- sexual context
ing "full enforcement of the la w in The version allegedly broadcast
accordance with the guidelines by the TV station, however, may
In light or hw remarks, Atkin-
son said: "It is comforting to think
what we are doing falls into the
overall plan
Dunn said good manners are
only a small part of customer rela- government will disclose Sterling
tions. Consulting's fee, Dunn said the
"The British, by and large, have typical session in the United
people to keep their temper re-
gardless of how difficult a cus-
tomer is behaving.
"Most sales staff find that ex-
tremely difficult she lamented.
Dunn and Bailey will be train-
ing groups of 25 people in four-
hour sessions in nine British cities.
though neither she nor the
prime-time viewing hours say the
station violated companv guide-
lines when it aired the sex comedy
"Private Lessons
Morton Kent, chairman of the
board of Media Central Inc. in
Chattanooga,Tenn general part-
ner of KZKC-TV, added, how-
ever, that the station violated no
laws.
The people at the station are
allowed some basic freedoms of
choice on programming in accor-
dance with community stan-
dards Kent said Tuesday.
"However, we have company
guidelines, and the particular
movie violated our standards
"We did not violate any laws,
nor are we censors he said,
adding, "We don't know why we
cency standards against KZKC-
TV for airing the movie, a sex-
provided by the Supreme Court
"Private Lessons" was broad-
cast by the independent UHF sta-
tiononMay26bcginningat8p.m.
oriented comedy featuring according to a complaint investi-
"Emmanuelle" star Sylvia Kristel, gated by the FCC.
during the 8-11 p.m. time period The movie, a comedy, concerns
known as prime time. a wealthy 15-year-old boy, played
The agency said the broadcast by Eric Brown, who is left for a
may have violated the law be- summer in the care of a chauffeur,
cause it contained explicit sex and Howard Hcsseman, and who is
was aired at a time when children
may have been in the audience.
The action was the first the
commission has taken to enforce
tough new indecency standards it
adopted last April, and the first
seduced by a maid pla ved by Miss
Kristel.
The film, made in 1980 by Barry
& Enright Productions, carried an
R rating, which rrcans thai in
not have been the same version
that was shown in theaters. Mov-
ies often arc edited for television
broadcast.
The FCC detailed the complaint
against KZKC in a letter to the
station. Kent said neither the sta-
tion nor Media Central had re-
ceived the letter.
The FCC has refused to identify
the complainant or release the
letter that prompted the investi-
gation.
If a variation is found, the
agency could impose sanctions
ranging hum a letter of repri-
mand to a fine of up to $10,000,
very good manners she said.
States costs $4,000.
movie theaters no one under 17
time the agency has targeted the was admitted without a parent or Kamp said
programming of a TV station. guardian, according to the Mo- The FCC also could start a li-
'The law prohibits the broad- tion Picture Association of Amcr- cense-revocation hearing, but
cast of certain sexually explicit ica. Kamp said that that would be
programming to children on ra- FCC spokesman John Kamp "highly unlikely" in sue1- a case,
dio and television FCC Chair- said the movie has "nudity in a
Report urges universities to seek funds from private firms
RALEIGH (AP) �A University
of North Carolina Board of Gov-
ernors panel is expected to con-
sider a report Thursdav which
strongly encourages the state's
university svstem to cultivate re-
search partnerships with the pri-
vate sector within the bounds of
academic freedom.
The report also calls for the sys-
tem to aggressively seek research
funds from private firms, founda-
tions and government agencies.
The report is the second of a
two-part statement on the rela-
tions between the University of
North Carolina's 16-campus sys-
tem and private industry.
It discusses faculty consulting,
agricultural extension programs,
small business centers, and pro-
grams specially tailored for busi-
ness executives and employees. It
concludes that collaboration be-
tween the university and the pri-
vate sector is "mutually benefi-
cial" and should be strongly en-
couraged "provided that faculty
academic freedom and graduate
student rights are not violated
according to the News and Ob-
server of Raleigh.
If approved, the report would
be considered by the full board at
its February meeting. Similar
guarantees of academic freedom
are included in the board's poluj
governing the university's re-
search relationship with private
industry.
The first part of the report was
unanimously approved in May
by the ?2-membcr panel. It states
that research contracts with in-
dustry should support the
university's educational mission,
should not restrict the faculty's
right to publish and should not
hamper graduate students from
publishing or defending their
dissertations.
Tliat policy gives chancellors
the authority to approve proprie-
tary, or secret, research in jointly
funded projects and to approve
restrictions on the right of faculty
or students to publish their find-
ings. Chancellors must report to
UNC system President CD.
Spangler each time they approve
research projects that carry such
limitations.
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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14,1988
reme
� �ffi555TSH�
10 p.m. - la.m.
Featuring:
O
responsible for Nevada deaths
WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) � The suit charged that the gov- atomic testing program's public
The Supreme Court today refused ernment negligently failed to information plans could not be
to hold the government finan
daily responsible for deaths and
diseases allegedly caused by
years of open-air atomic weapon
tests in Nevada.
The court, without comment,
turned away an appeal by some
1.200 people who themselves
lived downwind from the test site
or had relatives who lived in
Nevada, Arizona and Utah.
The federal government, under
the aegis oi the Atomic Energv
Commission, conducted over 100
atomic weapon tests between
1951 and 12.
A 1979 lawsuit filed in Utah
contended that the radioactive
fallout from those tests caused
numerous deaths and diseases,
such as cancer and leukemia.
amends the discretionary func-
tion exception to the ITCA or
passes a specific relief bill for
individual victims, we have no
choice but to leave them uncom-
monitor test results "and to warn held liable under the FTCA be-
about the fallout hazards. cause it amounted to a "discre-
A federal trial judge, after re- tionary function
viewing the claims of 24 of the "These plans clearly fall within pensated
plaintiffs, ruled that 10 of them the discretionary function exeep- Lawyers for those who sued
could recover monetary dam- tion" to government liability, the then asked the Supreme Court to
ages. U.S. District Judge Bruce appeals court said. rule that the discretionary func-
Jenkins said the government was In a concurring opinion, Judge tion exception does not apply to
liable for a negligent failure to Monroe McKay said, "While we "non-regulatory conduct
follow the commission's public- have great sympathy for the indi-
safety guidelines. vidual cancer victims who have
The judge said the claims of the borne alone the costs of the AEC's
other plaintiffs could proceed choices, their plight is a matter for
under the Federal Tort Claims Congress
Act a law that allows people to "Only Congress has the consti- government was granted immu
sue'the otherwise legally immune tutional power he added, "to nity for allegedly failing to warn
federal government. decide whether all costs of gov- federal project workers about the
But the 10th U.S. Circuit Court ernment activity will be borne by dangers involved in handling a
all the beneficiaries or will con- fertilizer.
tinue to be unfairly apportioned, The case is Allen vs. U.S 87-
as in this case. Until Congress 316.
But government lawyers urged
the justices to reject the appeal.
They relied heavily on a 1953
high court ruling in which the
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of Appeals reversed Jenkins' rul-
ing last April 20.
The appeals court said that the
Defense spending
World spends $930 bil
WASHINGTON (AP) �The and Reagan's search for a "a per- technology, bases, training for-
narions of the world spent $1.8 sonal and popular triumph" in eign forces, aid to foreign coun-
million a minute last vear on the his last year in the White House, tries, naval fleet, combat aircraft,
military or about $930 billion But in the meantime, the United nuclear reactors, nuclear war-
overall with the United States in States and the Soviet Union both heads and bombs, nuclear tests
first place, according to an annual increased their military spending and arms exports.
in 1987, she reported. U.S. spend- She said the United States also
ing went from $280 billion to $293 ranked first among 142 countries
billion, while the Soviet's rose in the percentage of people with
from $245 billion to $260 billion. safe water, fifth in literacy, eighth
Overall, the developed coun- in life expectancy, 18th in popula-
tries spent $790 billion on the tion per physician and 20th in
military in 1987, with the two school-age population per
superpowers accounting for 59 teacher,
percent. The developing coun-
tries spent $140 billion, a drop of
$5 billion from 1986.
Sivard is a former chief of the
U.S. Arms Control and Disarma-
and the policies of Soviet leader ment Agency's economics divi- such statistics, Sivard said. The
Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Fresi- sion. She received financial help United States ranked fourth in the
dent Reagan. for her study from the Rockefeller overall comparison, behind No. 1
The summit produced a treaty Foundation, the Arms Control Iceland, No. 2 Norway and No. 3
to abolish all U .S. and Soviet inter- Association, which is a Washing-
mediate-range nuclear missiles, ton-based arms control group, the
�k ard said national priorities British Council of Churches and
could shift as a result of attempts other private groups,
bv Gorbachev to ease the military She ranked the United States
burden on the Soviet economy first in military expenditures,
And, We also buy Stero's, T.Vs,
V.C.Rs, Furniture, Bikes, etc.
Ring
0:0O 5:00 (M-F)
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752-3866
study.
Global military spending in-
creased $50 billion over 1986.
There were more wars last year�
22 - than ever before. The death
toll from those conflicts so far is
2.2 million, with civilians ac-
counting for 84 percent, Ruth
Leger Sivard reported Monday.
But the former U.S. Arms Con-
trol Agency official also found
some hopeful signs, especially
last month's Washington summit
The Soviet Union, which has
spent an estimated $4.6 trillion for
military purposes since 1960, was
23rd in economic-social standing
based on a composite ranking of
Canada.
In 1987, she reported, 26.6 mil-
lion men and women, were in
armed forces around the world,
an increase over 25.8 million in
1986. The Middle Eastern coun-
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tries reached a peak of 3 million,
while there were decreases in
China and Africa.
The United States trimmed its
forces to 2.16 million from 2.4
million, while the Soviet military
increased to 3.8 million from 3.66
million.
"A military joyride on credit
has left mountains of debt for fu-
ture generations Sivard wrote.
"Rising poverty and the lengthen-
ing lines of the unemployed con-
trast with the affluence with
which military programs
operate
ECU
Interested In
Studying Abroad?
Information on academic exchange oppor-
tunities throughout the world through the
International Student Exchange Program
(ISEP), at ECU. Information available from:
Dr. R. Hursey, Jr.
ISEP Coordinator
Austin 222
Phone 757-6418 (work)
756-0682 (home)
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NOW ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS FOR T
1988
JUDICIAL BOARDS
MM
These positions offer an excellent
opportunity to gain experience and
leadership abilities that will bene-
fit you throughout your life. At the
same time, these positions will
enable you to make valuable con-
tributions to East Carolina Univer -
sity. For additional information
and applications, contact the As-
sociate Dean of Student's Office in
209 Whichard or the Attorney
General's Office in 222 Menden-
hall.
ALL APPLICATIONS MUST
BE TURNED IN BY
TUESDAY, JANUARY 19TH.
Society
an expe
THOMASVILLE, N.C (Al
With the space shuttle progl
stalled, members of the Plane!
Society say the United Stj
space program should conl
trate on a new giant leap!
mankind � setting foot on
Based in Pasadena, Calif
seven-year-old society, wi
calls itself the largest space 11
cst organization in the w
claims over 100,000 mem!
some 1,500 of which live in NJ
Carolina.
The founders were peoph
volved in the Viking land
who had become discour.
a space program that had bee
"missionless, goalless" in th
1970s, spokesman Tim j
said.
"In the 1960s, President
ncdy was the political force
the country united behind to
man on the moon Lynch
"We would like to see a new
cration make a fairly signifj
commitment to the space
gram.
"We don't want to see
cians be too conservativ I
space program because thej
there's no public interest
The Viking landings, ml
. able as they were scientifil
; hardly fired the public's imaj
; tion after the initial disapj
, ment of finding little evidei
life.
FBI all
NEW YORK (AP) � Tht
has information that some asl
atcs of Judge Dougla:
Ginsburg lied when they d
knowledge of his past manj
use, according to a publij
report.
The New York Times,
anonymous law-enforcemei
ficials, reported in Wednej
editions that the FBI wouk
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1
TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 14,1988 11
HERING TIME AT
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Daiquiri Night. $2
as All Night,
lav $2 95 Long Island Ice I
n $2 for your favorite
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is and Margaritas tor $2.
Irties and Entertainment
Ireenville. NT 752-5855
ney $
iq Gold or Silver
Braclets
Coins, ect.
ero s, i b,
Hikes, etc.
Man
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ed In
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ic exchange oppor-
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R THE
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Univer-
irmation
the As-
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MUST
19TH
Society urges NASA to send
an expedition to Mars
THOMASVILLE, N.C. (AP) �
With the space shuttle program
stalled, members of the Planetary
Society say the United States
space program should concen-
trate on a new giant leap for
mankind � setting foot on Mars.
Based in Pasadena, Calif the
seven-year-old society, which
calls itself the largest space inter-
est organization in the world,
claims over 100,000 members,
some 1,500 of which live in North
Carolina.
The founders were people in-
volved in the Viking landings
who had become discouraged by
a space program that had become
"missionless, goalless" in the late
1970s, spokesman Tim Lynch
said.
"In the 1960s, President Ken-
nedy was the political force that
the country united behind to put a
man on the moon Lynch said.
"We would like to see a new gen-
eration make a fairly significant
commitment to the space pro-
gram.
"We don't want to see politi-
cians be too conservative on the
space program because they feel
there's no public interest
The Viking landings, invalu-
able as they were scientifically,
hardly fired the public's imagina-
tion after the initial disappoint-
ment of finding little evidence of
life.
The only possible signs of life,
scientists said, were chemical re-
actions in the soil tests that might
be attributed to microorganisms.
But the reactions also might be
due to soil chemistry that is differ-
ent from Earth's, they said.
The space program has not
launched a planetary probe since
1978. Instead, the space shuttle
became NASA's darling.
But with delays plaguing the
program and the Challenger trag-
edy in January 1986, the American
space program has been in a vir-
tual standstill, especially when
compared to the industrious So-
viet program.
A July "Case for Mars" confer-
ence at the University of Colorado
saw NASA administrator James
Fletcher tell the many scientists
there that "I believe we should go,
and I'm confident we will go
But he said "the question is
when will we be ready?"
The society wants to change the
course of the American program
by promoting the Mars Declara-
tion, already signed by what
Lynch calls an impressive cross-
section of people who influence
public opinion.
The declaration describes Mars'
mysteries and how they may help
Earth.
"How did a once earthlike
world become so parched, frigid
and comparatively airless it
asks.
The declaration tries to ignite
man's frontier spirit by describing
the beauties of a great canyon that
would cross most of the United
States and extinct volcanoes that
dwarf anything on Earth.
Signess have included both
Republicans and Democrats,
high-ranking military offficcrs
and leaders of peace groups,
Nobel Laureates, university
presidents, football coaches, en-
tertainers and authors, the Plane-
tary Society says.
Among the North Carolina
signers is Bruce Poulton, Chancel-
lor of North Carolina State Uni-
versity.
Other well-known signees are
Carl Sagan, Johnny Carson,
Jimmy Carter, Walter Cronkite,
Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and
former NASA admisistator Tho-
mas Paine.
The Society hopes to revive the
stagnant U.S. planetary program
in an almost spiritual way, the
declaration says.
Also, Lynch said that because
1988 is an election year, the soci-
ety wants to show political candi-
dates that there is strong public
interest in the space program.
One North Carolina member of
the society says he sees strong
This dorm resident takes out her first-week
she's only got a water gun (Photolab).
local support for manned space
flight.
Jamestown's Jim Olson who
gives a presentation to Triad as-
tronomy clubs on the possibilities
of Mars, said that he's enthusias-
tic about the possibility of an in-
ternational mission.
"We can accomplish a lot more
through cooperation he said.
A round-trip to Mars would
take about three years, it is esti-
mated, and mav cost $50 billion.
The Soviet Union has made a
strong commitment to reaching
Mars. They will launch two space-
craft, one to the planet and the
other to its moon, Phobos, in 1988.
of-school agressions out on poor old Fred. Thank goodness
FBI alleges sources lied about Ginsburg
NEW YORK (AP) � The FBI
has information that some associ-
ates of Judge Douglas H.
Ginsburg lied when they denied
knowledge of his past marijuana
use, according to a published
report.
The New York Times, citing
anonymous law-enforcement of-
ficials, reported in Wednesday
editions that the FBI would for-
ward the information to the Jus-
tice Department.
The newspaper said it was un-
likely that criminal charges
would be brought against the
associates because the back-
ground interviews were not con-
ducted under oath. But the Times
said the FBI was considering
changing procedures for back-
ground checks.
Ginsburg withdrew his nomi-
nation to the Supreme Court in
November after disclosing that he
used marijuana before becoming
a judge.
The FBI routinely asks charac-
ter witnesses during background
checks whether a candidate has
abused alcohol or illicit drugs.
"There were people inter-
viewed who obviously knew
about Ginsburg's use of mari-
juana and did not reveal it to us
Floyd I. Clarke, and assistant di-
rector of the bureau, told the
Times. He declined to discuss
details of the case.
The FBI ha said it interviewed
more than 100 people about
Ginsburg in five separate investi-
gations and that none of them
disclosed his drug use.
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And learn to manage, inspire and lead. Even
before you graduate.
When vou do graduate, you'll have a college-
degree in nursing and an officers commission
in the Army Nurse Corps. With the
responsibility most other graduates will hae
to wait years for.
For more information about Army ROTC and
the qualifications for Army ROTC Nursing
Scholarships, talk to vour Professor of Military
Science, todav.
For Further Infor:
Captain Steve L. Jones
(Erwin Hall) 757-6967
RUSH
KAPPA PHI
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Sure A Fraternity is Surrouned by Alot of Fun!
There are Great Benefits besides The
Social Aspects of Being A Pi Kappa Phi.
PI KAPPA PHI FRATERNITY FACT SHEET
Pi Kappa Phi Facts
106 Chapters
15 colonies
50,240 initiated members
Fastest growing fraternity in the country
83 years old - founded December 10, 1904 at the College of Charleston
The only National Fraternity who has created and supports its own national service project -PUSH
Has a $500,000 headquarters building located in Charlotte. NC
Convention - Supreme Chapter - every odd year
Leadership School - Pi Kappa College - every even year
A mid-year leadership conference (AVATW)
Nine area conclaves
Solicitation of alumni support totalling $200,000 last year
Has over 45 regional alumni associations
A quarterly magazine - The Star and Lamp
Has a National Council made up of 7 of Pi Kappa Phi's distinguished alumni
Examples of Some Famous Pi Kappa Phi's
Howard Baker - Chief of Staff to President Ronald Reagan
Gaylord Nelson - Former United States Senator
Jim Edwards - Secretary of Energy under President Reagan, former Governor of South Carolina
Thomas Wolfe - Author
Joe Sewell - Baseball Hall of Fame
Randy Owen - Country music award winner, "Alabama" band
Alan C. Sundberg - Chief Justice, Florida Supreme Court
Phillip M. Crane - Congressman, United States House of Representatives (R. IL.)
Pi Kappa Phi sends you this invitation to
become a distinguished member of the
Beta Phi Chapter of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity!
CALL FOR A FREE RIDE - 752-9650
Tuesday
Female Stripper - at Rotary Club
Wednesday
Sub Night - with Sorority at Rotary Club
Thursday
Bid Night - meet the Brothers at the Rotary Club with Sorority
All nights are from 7:00 'til 11:00 p.m.
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12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14,1988
Highlights of tax laws listed
WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) �
This is the year that Americans
relearn the art of filling out a fed-
eral income-tax return.
If you filed last year, you will
have to do some things differently
this year. If you have never filed,
this may be your year to start. And
if your income is low enough, you
may no longer be required to file
at all.
Thanks to the 1986 tax overhaul,
there are some new forms and
some old forms that look differ-
ent. The old standard deduction,
replaced for a few years by the
"zero bracket amount is back
and bigger. Some favorite deduc-
tions have been repealed and
others have been reduced. There
is an entirely new set of provi-
sions affecting children.
The personal exemption has
been almost doubled. Tax rates
have been cut significantly for
most people, although that will
make little difference in how a
return is completed.
Some things never change. The
main individual tax form, 1040, is
still blue, the short form 1040A is
still pink and the simple 1O40EZ is
still green. The filing deadline is
still April 15. And if you wait too
long to file, your refund will be
delayed.
Because of changes in deduc-
tions, you may be among several
million people who will no longer
find it profitable to itemize. Un-
fortunately, the only way to find
out for sure is to total up your
deductions and see whether they
are larger than the standard de-
duction.
Here are some highlights of the
new law, the most thorough over-
haul since the income tax law was
enacted in 1913:
� Rates: The old law had 15 rates
for single people and 14 for joint
returns; they ranged from 11 per-
cent to 50 percent. For income
earned in 1987 there were five,
ranging from 11 percent to 38.5
percent.
� Exemptions: You'll be able to
exempt from taxation $1,900 of
your income, plus an equal
amount for your spouse and each
dependent. That is up from $1,080
for 1986.
� Standard Deduction: If you
don't itemize, reduce your in-
come subject to taxation by $2,540
if single or head of household,
$3,760 if filing a joint return, or
$1,880 if married filing separately.
If you are at least 65 or blind,
you are allowed $3,000 if single,
$4,400 if head of household,
$5,000 if married filing jointly or
$2,500 if married and filing sepa-
rately. An elderly or blind person
gets another $750 if single or head
of household and $600 if married;
those figures are doubled if a
person is both blind and elderly.
But the elderly and blind no
longer have additional exemp-
tions.
� Two-Earner Deduction: This
special benefit for couples has
been repealed.
� IRA: The days of deductible
Individual Retirement Accounts
for everybody are over. Now,
your deduction will be reduced or
eliminated altogether if you are
covered by a company pension
plan and your income exceeds a
certain level. This will require
some new calculations on your
return.
� Capital Gains: These profits
from the sale of assets are now
fully taxable, at a maximum rate
of 28 percent.
� Income Averaging: This tax-
saving device for people whose
incomes fluctuate sharply from
year to year has been repealed.
� Contributions: Unless you
itemize, you are no longer al-
lowed to deduct gifts to charity.
� State, Local Taxes: Sales taxes
are no longer deductible.
� Interest: Only 65 percent of
your 1986 personal interest ex-
penses - including consumer and
automobile loans - is deductible.
In addition, you may fully deduct
home mortgage interest on a loan
that does not exceed the cost of the
home plus any improvements
you have made, you may exceed
cost of you borrow against your
home to pay medical or educa-
tional expenses. No new restric-
tions for pre-Aug. 16,1986, mort-
gages.
� Medical Expense: You may
deduct only unreimbursed ex-
penses that exceed 7.5 percent of
your adjusted gross income.
� Miscellaneous Expenses: In
most cases, only the portion of
these expenses, such as union
dues, job-search expenses and
work tools, that exceeds 2 percent
of adjusted gross income is de-
ductible.
� Children: Any dependent at
least 5-ycars old must have a So-
cial Security number. One with
any interest or other unearned
income and total income over
$500 must file a return. A person
who may be claimed as a depend-
ent by someone else is no longer
allowed a personal exemption. A
child under 14 who had more that
$1,000 of investment income dur-
ing the year will have to fill out a
special new form and that income
may be taxed at the parent's
higher rate.
L
PARADISE
Step mo paraaise
Stea Cut m Style
329 Arlington
Blvd.
756-1579
ALL HAIR SERVICES
MAKEUP-MANICURES
TANNING BEDS
Yd�7o"Discount"6ff "
i Any Service.
! Good Through 1-31-88.
PETEY HATHAWAY, Owner
1
I
I
I
I
J
fraternity
V
� � � ��.� �. �
;�
TIMEg?S
IT FURNITURE DEPOT
Used Furniture
BuySelITrade
752-3223
Beside the
Railroad Depot
Student Discount
102 Oakmont Drive
756-8545
PICTURE
YOURSELF
15 TO 20
POUNDS
THINNER
ON
VALENTINES
DAY
DIET
CENTER
'56-8545
SELF-SERVICE
COPIES
5
At Kmkos we offer the highest qualm copies jt a ven inu
price. Our other services include binding, collating and a
self-serve workspace stocked with all the things you need
to put together that project or proposal Tr Kinkos For
great copies. And great deals
kinkes
Open early. Open late.
Open weekends.
321 E. 10th Street (919) 752-0875
Monday - Friday 7:00am � 10:00pm Saturday 9:00am 6:00pm
$4,400
WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP)
you must tile a 1987 federal I
letum if you had income of $4 �
or more - unless you were marl
ried, widowed, self-emj
over 65 or somebo rx
ent.
Filing requirements are ba
on age, amount and typ I
come, marital status and whet
you are blind The new I
generally raised the md�;mur
income a person may earn v j
out tiling, removing at
eral hundred t!
tax rolls. Hut oUht : �
that law could require as n
1 million children undi - j
14 to tile for the first time.
Similar factors d
which tax form
a decision that . �
enced by v, I
deductions
You must �
Tax law chan
WASH1N
The numb- rol
by several n
thanks ma
writeoff f I
taxes and n � r
deducti
and miscellari
The new tax la
the treatment of tl I I
home mortga
way that will haw M
most Americans
mortgage inten st -
deductible une
obtained a second
took out a home
some purpose oth� r
tion, medical er.x- r
improvement.
So, should you itei
tions? There's only one v
know for sure: total your d
ible expenses and compar
with the newly increased sti
dard deductions. It will be �
while to itemize if your ded
tions are higher than $2
(single or head oi househol
$3,760 (married filing i
National Geo
I
m
WASHIN ' N
Sational Get eraphic Societyeei
brated its ;
announcing Its centennial
the nation: $20 n n to hel
teach kids I
"Our kids
�.hey are. And
where vou an
said Gilbert M. Grosvenor tJ
society's pres
The monev
foundation a: 1 I
ised to kick in 51 n
it can raise an equ
outside contnbut ns for its
of combatmc gcograj
acy.
Grosvenor. inten
NBC-TV "Toda sr
foundation will direct -
resources toward br
ers. "We believe that tht
geography in the scr
through the teachers V e w ant
TF!SiJg
A
-S
"WaJU"3
WILL BE HELD AT "THE HUB 618 PITT
Tuesday, Jan. 19th - Subs Night
Wednesday, Jan. 20th - Sorority Night
Thursday, Jan. 21st - Hot Tub Night (Invitation Only)
Bring Bathing Suit
FOOD, FUN
For Further Info Call
752-7559 or 752-0232
ENTERTAINMENT
��!�� i "�'

mim
,0i ��� m tm
m ni��i�inwiin r





T
I
TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
f
JANUARY14,1988 13
mi's
3EP0T
niture
Trade
Beside the
Railroad Depot
PICTURE
YOURSELF
15 TO 20
POUNDS
THINNER
ON
VALENTINE'S
DAY
DIET
CENTER
RVICE
1ES
i
n low
King and a
- �ui need
�'� kinko's. For
�pen late,
ikends.
(919) 752-0875
� " am � 6:00pm
$4,400 over must file '87 federal tax returns
WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) �
you must file a 1987 federal tax
return if you had income of $4,400
or more � unless you were mar-
nod, widowed, self-employed,
over 65 or somebody's depend-
ent.
Filing requirements are leased
on age. amount and type of in-
come, marital status and whether
veu are blind. The new tax law
generally raised the maximum
income a person may earn with-
out filing, removing at least scv-
hundred thousand from the
tax rolls. But other provisions of
I law could require as many as
illion children under theageof
14 to le tor the first time.
Similar factors determine
ich tax form you should file �
lecision that also will be influ-
d by whether you itemize
ctions.
. must tile if you are
� Single, under 65 and income is
$4,400 or more; under 65 and le-
gally blind, $4,900; 65 or older,
$5,650.
� Married, Joint Return, if you
and your spouse are under 65 and
income is at least $7,560; both are
under 65 and at least one is blind,
$8,800; one spouse is 65 or older,
$9,400; or, both are 65 or older,
$10,000. You do not qualify for
joint-return treatment if you and
your spouse were not living to-
gether at year-end or if either
could be claimed as a dependent
by another person.
� Married, Seperate Returns,
regardless of age or sight, if in-
come is at least $1,900.
� Head of Household, under 65
and income of at least $4,440;
under 65 and blind, $6,300; or, 65
or older, $7,050. As a general rule,
for this status and its lower tax
rate you must have been consid-
ered unmarried on Dec. 31 and
paid more than half the cost of
maintaining a home for more than
half the year for yourself and an
unmarried child or a dependent.
� A Widow or Widower, meet
certain qualifications, are under
65 and income is at least $5,660;
under 65 and blind. $6,900. or 65
or older $7,500. This filing status
with lower tax rates is generally
available for one whose spouse
died in 1985 or later, who dJd not
remarry before 1988, who has a
dependent child and who paid
more than half the cost of main-
taining a home for that child for
the full year.
� Self Employed and had net
earnings of $400 or more.
A dependent child must file a
separate return if he or she had
total income over $500 last year
and even $1 of that was interest or
other investment income. Even if
there is no investment income, the
dependent must file if total in-
come exceeds $2540.
But that's not all.
A return also is required from a
dependent child who can be
claimed as a dependent by an-
other person and has only earned
income � wages, fees and tips �
of over $2,540, or only investment
income over $500, or total income
of any kind over $500.
If you received advance pay-
ments from the earned-income
credit for working-poor families
last year, you must file a return
regardless of income. And a re-
turn also is required to obtain a
refund if you have no tax liability
but taxes were withheld from
your wages.
Having determined that you
must file a return, your next deci-
sion is which form to use. That is
considerably easier:
� Use the one-page Form
1040EZ if you are single, claim no
other dependents, have no deduc-
tions, claim no tax credits and
have taxable income under
$50,000 which must have been
entirely from wages and tips,
except for up to $400 in interest.
� Use Form 1040A if your tax-
able income is under $50,000 and
is entirely from wages, tips, inter-
est, dividends and unemploy-
ment compensation; you do not
itemize deductions and the only
credit you claim is for job-related
child-care expenses. You may use
this shorter form even if you qual-
ify for an Individual Retirement
� Use Form 1040 if neither of the
other forms fits. You may file this
long form even if you do not
itemize deductions.
i must im n uu aie. rate you must nave oeen consid- other investment income, tven ir considerably easier:
Tax law changes the way people may itemize deductions
�ilNCTON, D.C. (AP) � turn). Or $1 SSn (m.irrioH filing nMUI��u� - w:�nt-

wm
NORTHSIDE SEAFOOD
All Types of Fresh Seafood!
Fresh Large Shrimp $5.99lb
(Headless, no extra charge for shelltnft)
Scallops
Softshell Crabs
Crab Legs
All Sizes of Shrimp
10 discount on any seafood item with
ECU-I.D. and this coupon
iHINGTON, D.C. (AP)
berofitemizers will drop
eral million this year,
- s mainly to repeal of the
for state and local sales
1 new restrictions on
; for consumer interest
ineous expenses.
tax law also changes
nent of the deduction for
age interest but in a
�. ill have little impact on
ricans. In general,
est remains fully
ss you refinanced,
ond mortgage or
ne equity loan for
other than educa-
. expenses or home
n ent
: you itemize deduc-
erc s only one way to
-ure: total your deduct-
xpenses and compare them
the newly increased stan-
j deductions. It will be worth-
k to itemize if your deduc-
ris are higher than $2,340
or head of household),
33,760 (married filing a joint re-
turn), or $1,880 (married filing
separately). Those figures arc
higher if you or your spouse is
over 65 or blind.
Here is how the new law affects
itemized deductions on your 1987
return:
� Medical Expenses: You may
deduct the portion of unreim-
burscd medical and dental ex-
penses that exceeds 7.5 percent of
your adjusted gross income, or
AGI. Last year it was 5 percent of
AG1. Eligible expenses include
fees for doctors, dentists and
nurses; prescription drugs, insu-
lin, medical-insurance premiums,
eyeglasses, hearing aids and
transportation to obtain medical
care (oil and gas or 9 cents a mile,
plus parking and tolls).
� Sales Taxes: No longer de-
ductible.
� Interest: Only 65 percent of
consumer interest paid last year,
including automobile loans,
credit cards and borrowing for
education, is deductible. Con-
sumer interest includes any por-
tion of home mortgage interest
that is not fully deductible. You
may need to file the new Form
8598 to calculate the mortgage
deduction.
There also is a new restriction
on deducting interest on money
borrowed to make investments.
You may deduct investment
interest up to the total of net in-
vestment income (which is invest-
ment income minus all invest-
ments expenses except interest)
plus 65 percent � but no more
than $6,500 � of interest that ex-
ceeds net income. Investment
interest that is not deductible this
year may be carried over to next
year's return.
� Moving Expenses are deduct-
ible under the new law only if you
itemize. If you changed jobs last
year and added at least 35 miles
each way to your commute, you
may be able to deduct some or all
the costs of moving your posses-
sions, looking for a house before
you moved, and selling your old
home. Publication 521, free from
the IRS, has all the details.
Miscellaneous Expenses gen-
erally are deductible only to the
extent they exceed 2 percent of
AGI. These include union dues,
job-search expenses, fees for tax
advice and return preparation,
work clothes and uniforms, rental
of safe-deposit box in connection
with your investments, and cer-
tain unreimbursed employee
business expenses, such as travel
and transportation.
A few miscellaneous expenses
are fully deductible, without the 2
percent limitation. These include
gambling losses to the extent of
winnings; certain job-related ex-
penses required of a handicapped
person, and, for one year only,
certain expenses related to mu-
tual funds.
� Contibutions: Travel, meals
and lodging expenses incurred
while away from home serving a
charity may be deducted only if,
in the words of the IRS, "there is
no significant element of personal
pleasure, recreation or vacation"
involved.
1108 East Gum Road
(Turn right off North
Green Street, 1 mile past
� bridge by East Coast Roofing.)
Phone:
758-0107
College courses for career success.
Course Title Name Njl ��� Begin End Pays
MLSC 1001 - Introduction to ROTC and the Army
Section 01-1400-1500-M
Section 02 - 0900 -1000 - W
Section 03 - 0900 -1000 - TH
MLSC 1002 - Map Use and Terrain Analysis
Section 01 -1000-1100 -M
Section 02-0900-1000-T
Section 03 -1000-1100 -W
For Further Information, contact your Department
of Military Science at 757-69676974.
ARMY RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
Contact Captain Steven Jones
(Erwin Hall) 757-6967
National Geographic celebrates birthday 100
T rON (AP) � The
eographk Society cele-
3 i 00th birthday today by
ing its centennial gift to
on: $20 million to help
Is about the planet Earth.
ur kids don't know where
are. And if you don't know
you are, you're nowhere
ilbert M. Grosvcnor, the
ty's president.
he money will go into a new
darion, and the society prom-
kick in $20 million more if
in raise an equal amount in
si le contributions for its cause
ombating geographic illiter-
ivenor, interviewed on the
BC-TV "Today" show, said the
idarion will direct most of its
urces toward training tcach-
A'e believe that the future of
graphy in the schools is
through the teachers. We want to
train these teachers to teach geog-
raphy he said.
"This foundation will form a
basis for all of America to partici-
pate. We've not only put $20 mil-
lion into this foundation, but
we've also challenged the private
sector and foundations to contrib-
ute another $20 million, which we
will match
The society is best known for its
yellow-bordered monthly maga-
zine, National Geographic, with
richly illustrated articles about
explorations, adventures and
exotic ports of call, as well as its
widely watched television spe-
cials about nature and the envi-
ronment.
Its dues-paying membership
has boomed in recent decades,
even while the study of geogra-
phy has gone into eclipse in
America's schools.
LOW COST
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional coat. Pregnancy
Test, Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy Counseling, For
further information, call 832-0535 (toll free number 1-800-
532-5384) between 9 a jn. and 5 p.m. weekdays. General anes-
thesia available.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
SEMI-ANNUAL
CLEARANCE
RUSH
Jan. 19th and 20th 7-11
ALPHA
SIGMA
PHI
422 W. 5th St.
ST.
25 - 50off
757-3516
"The Phoenix TAKES FLIGHT"
Be A Part Of It
On Monday, January 11, Coffman's Men's Wear will of-
fer substantial savings of 25 to 50 on fashionable se-
lections of fall and winter merchandise for men, women
and boys. An excellent opportunity to save on fine
clothing, furnishings, sportswear and outerwearall
from our regular stock of traditional fashions.
�r
NMENT
oPPmans
4LPKA
MENS WEAR
Downtown Greenville
Carolina East Mall
Tarrytown Mall. Rocky Mount





I
14 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
.
T
JANUARY 14,1988
THE E.C.U
INTERFRATERNITY
COUNCIL INVITES
YOU TO RUSH 88!
ji liappa IIi
nKO
803 Hooker Road
758 1700
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 120
Date and Place ot Founding: December 10. 1904
College ot Charleston, SC
National Headquarters Location:
Charlotte. North Carolina
Fraternity Colors: Gold. White, Blue
Pr ilanthropic Organization PUSH
(Play Units tor the Severely Handicapped)
What makes this Fraternity Unique
Strongest Alumni Association
piji j&appa Hhxa
OKT
409 Elizabeth St. 757 131V
Number ot Chapters Nationally Over 100
Date and Place ot Founding March 17, 1906
Miami University
National Headquarters Location:
Oxlord, Ohio
Fraternity Colors Havard Red and Old Gold
Philanthropic Organization Children's Heort Foundation
What makes this Fraternity Unique
Encourage Brothers to be involved in campus
lunations
luifiLw Alplu:
riKA
210 Whichard
Number ot Chapters Nationally: Over 150 752 3874
Date and Place ot Founding March 1. 1868
University of Virginia
National Headquarters Location
Memphis. Tennessee
Fraternity Colors Garnet and Gold
Philanthropic Organization
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Group ellort in reaching goals
Sigma Jan (�attrma
508 W 5th St
ITT
7574)127
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 100
Date and Place of Founding June 28. 1920
Central Missouri State
Teachers College
National Headquarters Location:
Warrensburg. Missouri
Fraternity Colors. Blue and White
Philanthropic Organization:
Greenville Boys Club
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Academics Individuality
Utappa Sigma Ki
700 E 10th St 752 5543
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 200
Date and Place of Founding December 10. 1869
University of Virginia
National Headquarters Location:
Charlottesville, Virginia
Fraternity Colors. Scarlet, White, Green
Philanthropic Organization Muscular Dystrophy
What makes this Fraternity Unique
Leadership
Tues Jan. 19th,
7:00-11:00 p.m.
Wed Jan. 20th,
7:00-11:00 p.m.
Thurs Jan. 21st,
7:00-11:00 p.m.
3fratenuti Life
Surial Jlh . .
To be in a fraternity is not merely to be in a social
club Fraternities are a way of lite We sharQ ex-
penses as well as experiences, and we are responsi-
ble lo each other for our own actions. We live off
campus, for the most part, yet we are very active on
campus We enjoy a good relationship with our
university's administration and, in the past few
decades, have become a maior part of the univer-
sity's student life.
Biill fraternities rturt my grabes?
� No, there's every evidence that joining a fraternity
improves your chances of graduating.
� 33 of men on campus without fraternities v 'I
graduate, and
� 47"o of non-members on campuses with frater-
nities graduate, but
� 65 of all fraternity members graduate.
� Scholarship programs of fraternities produce
greater academic success, and better achievement
for you.
It never can be said that fraternity people don't en
oy a good social life Getting to know many different
people is only natural among such a close knit
group One seems to fall into a wealth of oppor-
tunities for things to do with his spare time Events
such as Greek Week is ust an example of some of
Ihe activities that fraternities plan during the year.
pieties . . .
Fraternity men enjoy an active athletic existence
Whether it be track meets, field events or in-
tramurals, we enjoy competing against one another
In one sport or another
AXA
ICamboa Chi Alpha
500 E Elizabeth St
Number of Chapters Nationally Over 200
Date and Place of Founding November 2, 1909
Boston University
National Headquarters Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana
Fraternity Colors Purple, Green, Gold
Philanthropic Organization March of Dimes
What makes this Fraternity Unique
Diversity
General Fraternity Facts
� All but two U.S. Presidents since 1825 have been fraternity men. Sixteen Vice-Presidents have been fraternity men.
63 of the U.S. President's Cabinet members since 1900 have been fraternity men.
71 of the Who's Who in America listees are fraternity members.
76 of the U.S. Senators &. Representatives are fraternity members.
85 (40 of 47) of the U.S. Supreme Court Justices since 1910 have been fraternity men.
85 of the Fortune 500 executives are fraternity members.
Of the nation's 50 largest corporations, 43 are headed by fraternity members.
2mi Iflajjpa tpatlim
TKE
951 E 10th St
757 3042
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 200
Date and Place of Founding. January 10, 1899
Illinois Wesleyan University
National Headquarters Location:
Indianapolis. Indiana
Fraternity Colors: Cherry, Gray
Philanthropic Organization:
St Judes Children's Hospital
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Diversity and Teamwork
ticta (Djfta V
2l0Whichard
Number of Chapters Nationally. Over 100
Date and Place of Founding: August 8, 1839
Miami. Ohio
National Headquarters Location:
Miami, Ohio
Fraternity Colors: Pink and Blue
Philanthropic Organization:
What makes this Fraternity Unique
Brothers helping Brothers
Ben
757 1840
CW.4)

M(hTm
Phi
423 W Ilk
Mphm AtUc
ITT

Tn 401 44k. � J arri.

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700 11 Oik.
UmaUtM.
Aritft� m
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7570313
Helta �igma n
510 E 13th St
Number of Chapters Nationally Over 100
Dale and Place ol Founding December 10. 1899
College ot the City ot New York
National Headquarters Location
Indianapolis, Indiana
Fraternity Colors Nile Green. White
Philanthropic Organization March of Dimes
What makes this Fraternity Unique
The Fraternity ol Engineered Leadership
Sigma $hi tpsiLm
505 E 5th St.
757 0487
Number of Chapters Nationally: Almost 300
Date and Place of Founding: November 1, 1901
University of Richmond. Virginia
National Headquarters location:
Richmond, Virginia
Fraternity Colors: Purple, Red
Philanthropic Organization:
Heart Fund
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Diversity
Heta Seta (Dot
83f0524
ZBT
Number of Chaples Nationally: Over 150
Date and Place of Founding 1898
Clark College, Ne.v York City
National Headquarters Location:
New York City
Fraternity Colors: Blue, White
Philanthropic Organization:
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Stress Scholastics, Close knit members
Isappa JMpla
500E 11th St
Number ot Chapters Nationally Over 150
Date and Place of Founding December 21, iob5
Washington and Lee
National Headquarters Location:
Lexington. VA
Fraternity Colors: Crimson ana wiu oold
Philanthropic Organization Muscular Dystrophy
What makes this Fraternity Unique
1st fraternity on Campus
KA
757 0128
ftrjeta Crjt
210 Whlchard
ex
752 0232
Number of Chapters Nationally: 155
Date and Place of Founding: 1856
Nomvich University, Norwich, Vermont
National Headquarters Location:
Trenton, New Jersey
Fraternity Colors: Red and White
Philanthropic Organizations: Ronald McDonald House
What makes this Fraternity unique
Personal development and service to Alma Mater
Alpra �igma JHji
AIt
7573516
422 W 5th St
Number of Chapters Nationally. Over 100
Date and Place of Founding: December 6,1845, Yale
University
National Headquarters Location: Delaware. Ohio
Fraternity Colors: Cardinal and Stone
Philanthropic Organization:
American Lung Association
What makes mis fraternity unique
Thot eoch brother is on individual and that Ihe fraternity
unites to become the best.
jStfftiatfu
210 Whichard
757 6824
Number of Chapters Nationally: over 200
Date and Place of Founding: January 1, 1864
Virginia Military Institute,
Lexington, Virginia
National Headquarters Location:
Lexington, Virginia
Fraternity Colors: Black, Gold, White
Philanthropic Organization:
Kidney Foundation
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Founded against hazing
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I

Entertainment
Student I'nion hosts KulTett concert;
plans lor future musical perfurimint
i
?wf


ratings
I
t
nuicll
several spins
Heide I asna
"Simultaneous
and Sam
w ()(i.
pui e is on display in ira
()thei artist's display in
Picking the hones
Casket University sounds gros
KvCHHTY BOXEHEAD
Mat( llr.Tr
11 . illerv .is
-
mains get bui
- opposed to sa.
i s orn or used as shoehorns,
rthosecorpsi s(corpi? rpu-
larum?) to bo buried there are
am procedures to be followed.
ne er really I ight about these
iti! 1 learned that
. friends was planning to
urte a m irtic ian
�! i( . � ss But what i an you
sav ' i Live fun scrap-
not out oi dead peoples s
decaying nostrils Cause they
v. to do that.
Really. They have to scrape it
lout so they can plug up the body.
They have to get all the bodily
fluidsout v1 the body won't build
up gaseous residue and explode
� � coffin. Really
1 guess that means embalm-
eis have to squeeze all the stuff
out ol the bladders and intestines
ol the bodies too. Is there a ma-
chine or a ' Pre Too per Scooper"
tool for this kind oi work'1 Or ts it
alldoneb hand,anagcold tradi-
tion.
Personally, 1 wouldn't want to
be the one to have to make up the
Iaci- or style the hair either. What
if the deceased had hall his face
sheared ofi in a Volvoeighteen-
�elei � � Hisj m? I )on't t 11 me
Revlon ran fix that
Or even sicker, what if the head
had rolled off too, and it had h
sewed back on. fmaj thread-
ing the needle through the gi
ing, leathery neck, trying to
the Adam's apple back in place.
Maybe they just usedu t tape to
get missing parts back on I
would tend to look a little forced,
but hey, the thing's going in
ground soon anywav. ou might
need Krazy Clue tor the skelc
parts though, so the thing is at
least cohesive.
I know the blood has to be
drained too, it it hasn't alread
been, m some gruesome 1 i
knife iccident What do they do
with all l blood? They can t
leave it ying around. Perhaps
they store it in special Tupper-
ware containers, or throw it on the
azalea bed to fertilize the flowers.
It can't go to blood banks Dead
blood isn't very useful, though I
suppose for some AIDS victims it
can't hurt. Maybe it goes to sci-
ence, but there can't be too much
you can study off of d�.d blood.
And if the blood is gone, the
veins and stuff are gonna be
empty. That would cause a
sizable decrease in the or
cumfrvnee of the corpse1 (.a new
weight loss program?), so you got
to pump something in there or the
clothes the surviving family picks
oet won't fit

c p�
l do (
-lu
thai d
-
in ope
run to I an
'Mean
rail sti k .j round
mouth and it looks liki a e
two toi If I evei
conve! tion 1 could tell them I
I m sure morticians have con
ventions. Even other profession
JiHvs ! can see it now a couple of
them from Ka . sitting on the
beach o: tsid i in
North M � v ingabout
the problems ol dull needles
when sew ing ui tl
Meanwhile, their ,
SeeMORTTC 1 X'S nag 1






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
JANUARY 14,1988 Page 15
Student Union hosts Buffett concert;
plans for future musical performances
By GRETCHEN JOURNIGAN
Staff Writer
Laureen Kirsch, Student Union
president, says that there is a lot
more to hosting a compus concert
than what most people may think.
Kirsch says that group's agents
call the school to ask if they can
play on a particular date instead
of the school calling them.
Before a concert contract can be
signed, the athletic and health
education departments must be
consulted first. The departments
have to reschedule classes and
sports activities held in Minges in
order for the concert to take place.
Kirsch says that the beginning
of the school year is probably the
best time to schedule a show be-
cause there's not an indoor sports
schedule to compete with. Some-
times, it may take a month or
longer before the arrangements
are finalized.
There's not a big profit made
from ticket sales. At the most
there may be $200 ma.de, said
Kirsch.
The upcoming Jimmy Buffet
concert, Cheap Vacation, costs
$65,000. This money comes from
students activity fees which is
$22.50 per person.
Arrangements for the Buffet
concert has taken about 2 months,
she said.
Kirsch says that campus con-
certs are not sponsored Ty us but
through us The school adver-
tises alone with the radio stations
and the school provides the use of
the coliseum.
At the concerts, the ECU concert
committee is sometimes asked to
work backstage, but this is deter-
mined m thecontract.
Also, the committee is respon-
sible for making hotel rcser
vations for the band.
Kirsch said that the past Anita
Baker concert went over great and
expects that Buffett will too.
January 28 at 8 p.m. will be his
first appearance at ECU in 7 years.
After the performance, Buffett
will continue his tour to Fairfax,
Virginia & Washington, D.C.
He will be featuring his most
recent album "Holidays Tickets
are $13 for ECU students and $16
for general public. The cost is $16
at the door.
Tickets can be purchased at East
Coast Music & Video, Z103 and at
the Central Ticket Office at Men-
denhall.
Kirsch says that there arc still
tickets left.
As an extra promotion effort
there will be a casino night Jan. 25
in the multi-purpose room in
Mendenhall where 2 tickets will
be given away.
Also WZMB, will give away a
Buffett CD package to a lucky
winner. Entry forms can be found
at Joyner Library and at WZMB.
Kirsch says that Alabama may
come next but won't be discussed
until after the Jimmy Buffett con-
cert.
She says that the committee is
open for concerts they would
want to see in the near future.
Tew Connells record takes
veral spins to get adjusted to
Laureen Kirsch, president of the Student Union, and her c
worked very hard to get Jimmy Buffett to play here oft January 28. Go
see him.
'Beauty' survives ratings
By MICAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
If ever a series seemed destined
for an early death, it was certainly
CBS's "Beauty and the Beast" In
me first place, the ptwmJBurttrf
synopsis (female reporter fights
social injustice with aid of hulking
sewer monster) sounded like a re-
hash of DC Comics' "Angel and
the Ape secondly, network TV's
misun ierstanding of fantasy has
had Hans Christian Anderson
and the Brothers Grimm whirling
in their graves for decades
thirdly, the title is a cliche.
So, why is "Beauty and the
Beast" far from being on ice at
mid-season? Why did it initially
maintain good ratings and shows
signs of being a cult series? Be-
cause it has admirably sur-
mounted the odds, thaf s why.
What it lacks in plot originality
(and who has an original plot
these days?) it makes up for in the
richer areas of characterization
and style. What other current
program makes literary refer-
ences (Shakespeare, Dickens, and
Dickinson, for example) on a
regular basis?
In the former area, Linda Ha-
milton and Ron Perlman hi
depth to characters who coi
easily have becoroji
sional. Although"
"Beautv" trieifca
rive and projects
intelligence bej
tional fairy tale
Perlman's Beast is 2, mat of
the Cocteau film but mow Iterate
and generally more ttrtapfjRad In
his passions, only flarjogup when
Hamilton is in dangeeshais a
rather convenient psychic Ink �
read "plot device" - with her).
Herein is the series' main struc-
tural fault: every week, Hamilton
must get in some sort of trouble.
Sometimes, it's the Beast who gets
in trouble and Hamilton must
rescue him, but that is hardly a
successful plot variation. Also,
the pay-off of the "beast" trans-
forming into a prince can never
happen as long as the series runs.
But this last "flaw" has been
transcended because the charac-
ter of Vincent, the Beast, is al-
ready, a prince. Although this is
his inner self, even Perlman's leo-
nine make-up and Medieval dress
By STEVE SOMMERS
Staff Writer
m I first heard the new
?ils record Boylan Heights.
illy did not like it. The whole
;med artificial. It was like
lo wn to earth North Carolina
was a victim of an over zeal-
woducer.
back-up vocals on the first
sounded like Gregorian
its. So, I checked to see who
iced the record and it was
other than Mitch Easter of
's Active and R.E.M. fame. It
:emed me how the
Richard Oreyfus, movie star, stars with Emilo Estevez in "Stake Our
a movie showing this weekend in Hendrix theater.
emphasize this. grappling and heavy breathing of
This doesn't make their rela- TV love stories and this factor,
tionship easier, however, for it is even more than the strong female
not clear if Vincent is even re- lead, probably accounts for the
motely human. But in- series'popularity with women,
surrmountable odds are the stuff
of romance.
A cerebral relationship that is
nonetheless passionate is a nice
change of pace from the normal
and Murmur could
i good sound like the one the
Is have and make it sound
about six weeks later I see
Heights sitting at num-
n Rolling Stone's college
hart. I became curious
w a small North Carolina
a small time record label
tbfbr poorly mixed record to
niimber five? I gave the record
another listen.
This time I already knew I did
not like the mix on "Scotty's
Lament and I knew it was a
mainstream pop album. I put
those prejudices aside. Now, I
love the record. It is a fantastic
mood maker and simply makes
ou feel good when
it. The lyrics do not say anything
concrete, they just revolve around
topics that seem personal. This is
from "Choose a Side my favorite
song on the record.
"When they said 'Who won the
war?'
You were in the war.
When they said to choose a side,
It made you want to hide.
When you fell in with the rest
We were not impressed.
When they said 'Who won the
war?
It made you smile
is richOn
actually use a
real trumpet that keeps the fed
honest. Etoug McMillan has an
impressive voice although, it docs
not sing through the songs or play
the part of just another instru-
ment.
Peele Wimberly is one of the
finest drummers you will find in
North Carolina. He is not a power
drummer but a smooth drummer.
Mitch Easter did do a good job
mixing the drams.
Mike Connell's lead riffs try to
give the record a Scottish flavor
and it works. However, with
"Choose a Side" being the excep-
tion, the guitars were mixed much
too low during the choruses and
the keyboards were mixed much
t0See&)NNliLL,S, page 18
8 jjttidlivogfAyiiCi
whldt open Friday. Otter artyfe
MMMMH
it Galfcty m past of '�
4HC Safly H�fctuW
"�v.





16
Campus Comics
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14,1988
By BARBOUR
cmrmsT msw
MMEPCMTOOHISTSl
Apply now for postion as a cartoonist!
v- m � Being your own boss!
You'll enjov: Zl ��� i t
J Meeting exciting people!
Fun hours and flexible friends!
Becoming a celebrity!
Apply in person at The East Carolinian.
SO-HOW WAS
yOOR MOUTAV?
(T WAS NICE TO 1 BurTH�N6 JOST l
"feE HOttE , AN"D
SEt TH FAMILY
ANP MY0LPHI6�
SCHOOL. FRIEKDS.
WEREN'TTHESAflf.
rKN0W?J WAS
6LAP TO core
-fcACKTDScHCXXl
SHOO0X FEB-60IU7
ABOOT THAT ?
MO-JTU PASS
AFTE A FEW
tfEALS FRO
AENTENHrM-L
1988 SPRING SEMESTER FILM SCHEDULE
DATE
JAN.13
JAN.14-17
TAN.20
TAN.22-24
TAN27
TAN29-31
FEB.3
FEB.4-7
FEB 10
FEB.11-14
FEB.17
FEB.18-21
FEB.21
FEB. 24
TITLE
BLISS
STAKEOUT
ANGEL HEART
INNERSPACE
Hitchcock Double
Feature
39 STEPS
STRANGERS ON A TRAIN
THE UNTOUCHABLES
THE HIT
WITCHES OF EASTWICK
GINGER & FRED
THE SICILIAN
Greek Tragedies
Double Feature:
OEDIPUS REX
MEDEA
BEVERLY FULLS COP II
Dead Stars Film Festival:
CASABLANCA
MISFITS
TO CATCH A TFIIEF
SID & NANCY
RATING
DATE
FEB. 25-28
FEB. 26-27
MARCH 2
MARCH 16
MARCH 17-20
MARCH 25-27
MAR. 25-26
MAR. 30
TITLE RATING
R
APRIL 27
APRIL 28-MAY 1
LIVING DAYLIGHTS PG
Late Show:
URGH! THE MUSIC WAR R
MAN WHO FELL TO EARTII R
MAURICE N
LESS THAN ZERO R
TBA
Late Show:
WHATEVER HAPPENED TO
BABY JANE? PC
Woody Allen Double Feature:
EVERYTHING .SEX PG
SLEEPER PG
TIN MEN R
FATAL ATTRACTION R
RIVER'S EDGE R
TBA
MY LIFE AS A DOG
THE BIG EASY R
The Late Show:
LETHAL WEAPOxN R
THE GLASS MENAGERIE PG
NO WAY OUT R
u'j,i;i)Vi �T'X3Jl
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Candi
WILSON, N.C (AD �
Adams wipes his hands
apron and loans acres!
counter, an intense express
his beefy, red face. MornirJ
light streams through the!
front window oi the Dow
Soda Simp.
"I don't know too much
these Democrats' Ada mi
"Don't make any differenc
whether they come or nt-tl
come through here, a few
get to sec 'em, then they're
Down the street, the rl
crowd at the Rib Room
over morning coiicc ant
rettos. College football, no
tics, is on the minds ol nir.
nessmen seated around a
table.
Are they aware that
Democratic presidential ho
visited their town in
that the wife of another
through?
"I heard something about
real estate developer kj
Smith says with a grin. H
gone to see any ol their '
don't think they've gotten
oi a turnout
Welcome to Wilson, i
37,000, the typical town m
Carolina's 40-county
plain" separating Raleig'rl
the Atlantic. The area is km1
Hat terrain, pine forests,
summers and pork barj
And for conservative politi
Democrats have been as
nant in Eastern North a
most oi the 20th Century
tobacco, the region's eco
Mortician's
interest for
Continued from page 1!
shopping at the Cay Delphi
good car air freshener to
formaldehyde smell in the
tiac. They end up buying
ahzed bicycle license plal
the kids.
Still, like all jobs, it w oulj
tokavc its percs. 1 mean, evj
wants a mannequin to ph
S$ the ones Daddv bringj
don't smell so good, but
they would be great for nei
hood haunted houses.
I don't see how anyone
hack it being a handler o
bodies. Where are your
opportunities? "I'm
Mouth Stuffer at Wistful
lawn Funeral Home Thj
charming statement for whj
go on "The Dating Game.
So I told my friend to
cremation instead. It mighj
a little worse, but at all you
have to do is dump the
YOU I
and thj
But ft
music
So
anddi
knock
The
studenl
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Normal
$796lstpncecy!i
(Mufcpte sets cc
bonus ptoami
I y I
�? �





By BARBOUR
hcx LH I FEEL. OMi-jy
N0-JTHTA9S
t "n - V
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 14,1988 17
RATING
PG
R
R
NR
R
PG
PG
PG
R
R
R
R
R
PG
R
ive
ction of
East
I
aset,
I-Noor
Board,
Papers
Framing
Candidate stops fails to impress Wilson voters
WILSON, N.C. (AP) - Doug
Adams wipes his hands on his
apron and leans across the
counter, an intense expression on
his beefy, red face. Morning sun-
light streams through the large
front window of the Downtown
Soda Shop.
"I don't know too much about
these Democrats Adams says.
Don't make any difference to me
whether they come or not. They
come through here, a few elites
get to see 'em, then they're gone
Down the street, the regular
crowd at the Rib Room lingers
over morning coffee and ciga-
rettes. College football, not poli-
tics, is on the minds of nine busi-
nessmen seated around a corner
table.
Are they aware that three
Democratic presidential hopefuls
visited their town in 1987, and
that the wife of another passed
through?
"1 heard something about that
real estate developer Richard
Smith savs with a grin. Has he
gone to see any of them? "Nah. I
don't think they've gotten much
of a turnout
Welcome to Wilson, population
37,000, the typical town in North
Carolina's 40-county "coastal
plain" separating Raleigh from
the Atlantic. The area is known for
flat terrain, pine forests, humid
summers and pork barbecue.
And for conservative politics.
Democrats have been as domi-
nant in Eastern North Carolina
most of the 20th Century as has
tobacco, the region's economic
lifeblood. But the GOP has made
inroads. Even former Gov. Jim
Hunt, the pride of nearby Rock
Ridge, barely held his own in
Eastern counties in 1984 when he
failed to unseat Sen. Jesse Helms.
Former Sen. Gary Hart, Massa-
chusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis
and Sen. Albert Gore have made
campaign stops in Wilson. Last
month, Jane Gephardt, wife of
Rep. Richard Gephardt, D-Mo
made the pilgrimage. Jesse
Jackson was scheduled to visit but
changed his plans.
North Carolina is the third-
laigcst of the 14 Southern and
border states holding primaries
on "Super Tuesday" - March 8,
1988.
Most observers believe a desire
to curry favor with the still-influ-
ential Hunt, who recently en-
dorsed Sen. Albert Gore, is behind
Wildon's popularity with the
Democratic hopefuls
But common folk seem
unimpressed.
"I think most people are so
damn disgusted with the deficit
and everything, they're disgusted
with politicians Smith says in
the Rib Room.
Who would he like to see in the
White House?
"A Christian businessman, not
a politician Then, after a pause:
"But if a Christian businessman
becomes a politician, then he
probably wouldn't be a Christian
businessman any more
At a downtown barber shop,
John Whitley snips a customer's
hair, David Lewis, 56, who retired
early because of arthritis in his
hands, looks on.
"I haven't decided who I'm
voting for says Lewis, a Demo-
crat who often crosses party lines.
"Some people say '1 was born a
Democrat and I'll die a Demo-
crat You ain't born nothing
Whitley is a Democrat but
hasn't voted that way in two dec-
ades. He gestures toward a
framed photograph on the wall.
The faces are of Lyndon Johnson,
wife Lady Bird, and former Vice
president Hubert Humphrey. But
the picture has been doctored: all
three have the bodies of gangsters
clad in pinstriped suits, clutching
tommy guns.
"They ran me off" from the
Democratic Party, Whitley says.
James Boswell, 53, a retired
Army sergeant, voted for Ronald
Reagan in 1984 but says he'll re-
turn to the Democratic fold in
1988 "if I vote. They (Democrats)
haven't got anybody worth vot-
ing for yet
Bill's Barbecue is a Wilson land-
mark. The walls are lined with
trophy cases, plaques and pic-
tures of hogs and stock car driver
Richard Petty. Menu favorites are
pork barbecue, fried chicken,
Brunswick stew and corn sticks.
Many visiting politicians eat
here. Mrs. Gephardt and her en-
tourage were the latest. But owner
Bill Ellis doesn't take sides: "I feed
everybody
Ellis, 54, has the look of an out-
doorsman: sandy hair, ruddy
complexion, sports shirt opened
at the neck, windbrcakcr jacket.
"I haven't talked to anybody
who's excited about the presiden-
tial race he says. "Nobody's
made up their minds yet Has he
attended the candidates' appear-
ances? "If he doesn't come to see
me, I don't go to see him"
Parkwood Mall is Wilson's link
with Everytown, USA: fast-food
restaurants, department stores,
Radio Shack, Baskin-Robbins. It's
early afternoon on a weekday,but
stores are crowded with Christ-
mas shoppers.
Ruth Liner, a retired school-
teacher, cuddles her 2-year-old
granddaughter. She's a Republi-
can, but hasn't decided whom to
vote for. She's dimly aware that
Democratic candidates have vis-
ited.
Trip McKinnon, 19, dips frozen
yogurt at a sidewalk stand. He's
an ardent Democrat, a family
friend of Hunt's, and met Dukakis
during his Wilson stopover.
"He's a caring man, and we
have too many politicians who
don't care any more McKinnon
says.
Gladys Tucker, a black woman
who operates a small "outreach
ministry" with her husband, says
she's no political junkie but
probably will vote for Jackson.
"Everybody in our church likes
him Mrs. Tucker says.
Her husband, Nathaniel, leans
toward Jackson but is so con-
cerned about a breakdown of
morals that he might back Pat
Robertson.
He hasn't seen any of the visit-
ing Democrats. Nor, he says, have
most of his barber shop patrons.
"Most people who come in like
Jesse Jackson because he's a black
candidate Tucker says. "They're
not all that upon politics but they
rally bching the black candidate
PHI
SIGMA
PHI
SIGMA
1JAIL-A-THON PI
FOR THE
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY
Mortician's job entombs no
interest for the Bonehead
Continued from page 15
shopping at the Gay Dolphin for a
good car air freshener to kill the
formaldehyde smell in the Pon-
tiac. They end up buying person-
alized bicycle license plates for
the kids.
Still, like all jobs, it would have
tokd ve its percs. I mean, every kid
wants a mannequin to play with.
S07 the ones Daddy brings home
don't smell so good, but hey
they would be great for neighbor-
hood haunted nouses.
I don't see how anyone could
hack it being a handler of dead
bodies. Where are your career
opportunities? "I'm Senior
Mouth Stuffer at Wistful Wood-
lawn Funeral Home There's a
charming statement for when you
go on "The Dating Game
So I told my friend to go into
cremation instead. It might smell
a little worse, but at all you would
have to do is dump the bodies

I
down a chute or something, not
recoil the intestines after they fell
on the workbench.
Of course, sorting out all the
ashes in the bottom of the oven at
the end of the day would be kind
of creepy. But then, picking the
bones always is.
SPEND
SPRING BREAK ON A CRUISE!
The Travel Committee Presents:
a 6-day cruise on the Funship Carnivale.
Deadline Friday, January 15, 1988
Depart: 6 p.m. March 6
Return: 4 a.m. March 12.
Via: Round trip to Miami on Seashore Trailways Bus.
Cruise aboard the Funship Carnivale.
Price: $475 (ECU Students) $520 (Non-students).
Call: Mendenhall's Central Ticket Office
for more details 757-6611.
J
Jan. 28th - 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
ECU Student Store
For a $20 donation anyone may procure a "warrant" for the arrest of
anyone. Upon payment of $20, a "police officer" will proceed to the sus-
pects place of business or home and deliver him to the "magistrate" at
the ECU Student Store.
The "Magistrate" will set "bond" and the subject will be placed in a mock
I jail. He will be allowed to use the telephone to entreat his friends to post
his "bend so he can be freed. The amount of bond will also go to the
American Cancer Society.
Call the American Cancer Society at 752-2574 or come by the ECU
Student Store on Jan. 28.
ALL PROCEEDS GO TO THE AMERICAN
CANCER SOCIETY, PITT COUNTY UNIT
'1
F777VESS
y
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FOUR FOR FREE
.1
ii
��Sfv
jazzereise
Bring this coupon in by 13188
and receive four fun Jazzercise
classes. Good for first visit only.
Call 756-8302 or 1-800-422-TRIM
CLASS SCHEDULE
�MWF 9:00 AM Greenville Dance Co.
MW 6:30 PM Elmhurst Elementary
TuTh 5:45 PM Elmhurst Elementary
'Child care available
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'�CV 5IK SW
' ECU.
STUDENT UNION
MAJOR CONCERTS COMMITTEE
PRESENTS
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You live in rooms the size of sneakers, eat pizza for breakfast
and throw jello at the ones you love.
But if s OK with us. We love students. Because students love
music and movies.
So we think students are entitled to more than bad food
and dull textbooks. Show us the coupon below, and we'll
knock 1WO BUCKS Off your next music or video purchase.
The Record Bar Student Discount. Just for being
students. And for being strange.
STUDENT DISCOUNT COUPON
WHY BE NORMAL?
Return this coupon and get
$2.00 OFF
Normal Price of any LPCassetteCDPre-recorded Video
$7 98 Ist price or higher PreHecorded Video $19 95 or higher Sale items excluded One item per coupon
(Muipte sets count as one item) May not be used in ccinjundkxi wim any other ccmxxi. discount or
bonus program Expires Jan 31 1988
THE P1AZACAROUNA EAST MAU.
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IN CONCERT
THURSDAY,
JANUARY 28,1988
MINGES COLISEUM
8:00 P.M.
TICKETS
ECU STUDENTS $13.00
GENERAL PUBLIC AND
AT THE DOOR $16.00
AVAILABLE
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE -
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
AND
EAST COAST MUSIC AND VIDEO -
CHARLES BLVD,
'�' 'MiAirt���iHltal
- � n,i�, fr �� jii "��'� ' iilut tm m ��
m wSwit�ini aVu1! � � � ��� ���� �i't�'�V�'i-�





IS
THE EAST CA3CCNTAN
rANUAir u, :�
Mobile
DALLAS " C A? - As
i" - r -i;r" 2-irr 2rce
Swaynr Crane slides 1 4-foot-ta
fruit lidrn tomato rine :r: its
grc �� ing place.
Crane inspects the vine s thriv-
- root system grow ing is i
peat-t 2d svlindcr mesh
system
i -�i �"�" af�f V )nM
: p
gree n h se .?pora:
ind ri:cr:ci r.
irops the plant ?a:
inch-iong section
Dnceagiuon it is part of a vege-
table-growing matching Crane
;i s the system
Zrane'scotnpanj HanesHone-
y-acre Farm Enc is me : rst n the
Care nas to use the system a
� desig
& Tcennessce
lawyer turned farmer Crane
opened "o greenhouse in une
with his brother-in-law a ne
c : oe Hanes and another in-
�'� itri the process Ljane and tus
partners want to prove that local
grc �� ers car make mone) supply-
local passion for
neyacre greenhouse already
u proved it can produce the
�� ?gctable&
v: : u can see the rlAn:s Crane
said pointing to a row of 7-foot
ornate vines each grosing from
ts plastic pipe. "1 ou can see the
crrarccs
The H: rtcyacre process stresses
mobility. When a plant has crown
. into its mesh root cylinder -
system ready" in Crane s jargon
- it can be moved wrUfcoul tra rs-
pbnt sKodt to ir: proving sta-
tion :n the greenhouse
The mobtlifA means that when
an old plant wears oat or dues
Crane s start can ping n a hi
sized ard sometimes trait-laden
replacement from the
greenhouse's nursery tanks
When Honeyacre coerce in
"one tt imported tomato vines
fro m a Honda gr ce n he n se using
the same process. A week later
Honeyacre harvested ripening
Most rarmers have to set 00:
r'ants cure rcouse 0: trans-
planting shock sa:ci Crane a
termer teacher and conventiona
tarmc- not in me system you
can ptck up something full-growr
and m: � c it anyw here across the
street or across the country
In the Honeyacre process each
plant crows from a mesh root
cvlinder packed with neat moss
drated lime and
per.
a v
canic c'ass The cylinders stand in
vertical plastic pipes which in
mm stand tn fertilizer solution.
Water and nutrients soak up-
ward through the root cylinder.
Each plant s roots grow down-
ward to its best level of water and
mk-
fertilizer supph
"We call n cafeteria-style feed-
ing, Crane said.
. The greenhouse recently was
filled with closely spaced rows of
plastic pipes holding treUised
snow peas, cucumbers, water-
tndons, snap peas and tomatoes.
Spinach, herbs and house plants
ed any gaps.
Crane said the greenhouse pro-
duces vegetables as good as those
from any garden. He paused at a
e bearing plump, halt-moon
rods. He picked a snow pea
sweet and tender enough to eat
' I �
Most of the produce goes to
retail customers who drive to the
greenhouse on Puctt s Chapel
Road northwest of Dallas- The
greenhouse also supplies vege-
tables and herhs to area res:au-
rants
Crane said he routine!) scllsout
0: tomatoes at $139 a pound,
cucumbers at 50 cents a pound
and small peppers at 20 cents
each. Supermarkets stock pro-
duce at similar o:t-season prices.
ConnelVs new Lp
is very inoffensive
Continued tTom page 15
. his record does not ' rock' me.
In fact is a very inoffensive
album.N ou could cue this record
to your mother on Mother's Day.
there are unoffensive bands
but do not pla v good enough to do
anything for you. The Connells
are certainly not one of these
bands.
! give The Connells an "A" for
Povlan Heights. Much Easter, I
have to give you a C
When the outdoor growing same day other people are plant- d exped -e ���j.ke �
season begins, he hopes to sell ing Crane said. dent m the ye g tor rretfc
home gardeners miniature ver- And it the first greenhouse strand S lomat�et
sions ot the Honeyacre process proves profitable, Hanes surd, he Crane S3 0.
complete with ready-to-bear and his partners could open nine
plants. more greenhouses at their Dallas
Thev can rick tomatoes the sue
PARTY
with Campus Marketing
YOUR BEST DEAL TO DAYTONA
YOU DfttVf (10 'e p?-
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W DGfvl tnm wum swais ?�)
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This Special Expires i-31-88
756-6200
OPEN 830 AM TO 9 00 PM
INCLUDES:
�v r � �.x" gf-� c�
?�KX� iX' � -VI ho�l (� a t�ov � ' A1 �� �� .�� � � �
� ii s�t� oi ct? :vxn n ,iv
gooa
. At tw�� and 'c1
SPEND A WEEK - NOT A FORTUNE
Sigma Phi Epsilon
a lifetime experience
NEED A RIDE!
757-0487
757-0305
830-9646
830-9647
ECU's Largest Fraternity
Chancellor Cup Champs 3 Years
Running
2nd Highest G.P.A.
240 Chapters Nationally
2 Houses and a Party Room
$90,000 in Scholarships Awarded
Annually
Located at the corner of 5th and Summit.
Jan. 19th - Meet the Sorority Girls of III
Jan. 20th - Meet the Sorority Girls AA7C
Jan. 21st - Meet the Brothers of I0E
"The House With The Heart
fS
Cigar
fOKYO V
. VJt vV.
V.tVv X:
pand . � . �
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Thecfcx v �
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dcndtiondiuod �. '� s � I -
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lotti't written by North v .r. .
Sen esse I lelrru to Wn
t.aitot Vasuhiro v .
July 198� denviindtrtg .�
Abie jhare ti the Jt.i�.� n
World's aides
WILMINGTON NX
vio.tth oi a Pennsylvania u
recognized .� the worUi ��
jhvm b tht Guinness is-
World Records h.is rekudUt
British publishing v.np.tm
torost in 4 WilmingKn w
beliewd to be 7 j r.u �. vivi
Rorence Knapp ateaohei m
miurched in support v't v�ni
suffrage in llJ diedKioiuiav
nursing home in lhilavtelp
She was i i-i ears vKi
Guinness vlvu wi reoi
ll iti old Susie Bruis.n .��
world's oldest woman he
there Is now rittendo unu�ntaj
of her birth Min BrunsonmoJ
In uly with hei dlaughtei W
McDaniel to Wilnungton (i
I ong Island N
" iuh-vI something in i
mg David lHt-lun Gutnnd
American hui nd pubhsj
viui in a u-U'plu'ns- interview tf
New ink People t.Iw and
but lhat doesn i mean 11��
right
"li nIu in right then she if
oldest living person in iiu- w
work not um iiu-1 Inited 't.ii
Bothm told tl��- WUmind
Morning st.u We're send
London a tekt right now t
them going on ii
Mrs Hi union vn-s �� vn �11
ChristmM Dty, 1870( to ft
slaves iu.li Bamberg S
South.uolm.J did not n
birth otrtificaiet until 1913
Mr Brunton't birth wa-
corded tn htr bwnily'i BiN
BibU'wdi MoU-nii iv� when
moved to New York,
McDaniel said.
Authenticated or not
McDaniel is ju?.i pleased o
her mother around
"We know how old IT if
we're proud !�he� with us
long she said
Miss Knapp was born (k -
1873. She lived (or 110 years m
stone farmhouse in Montgon
Square where she was born
moved to the nursing home
I
' I0qkimamamt ' im i i
KBO-111 " "





eason
K
THE HAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14, 19K8 19
ivc 11 make a
irning tor fresh
I tomatoes

CHA"VBfR
ON
Cigarettes popular in Asia
TOKYO (AP) - While health ket
U.S. and Korean officials in Seoul scal�- media blitzes in their cam-
J� Spring Break 88
BAHAMA BOUND
experts counsel smokers to quit,
American tobacco firms are ex-
panding their sales in the lucra-
tive Asian market.
"The decline in sales in Ameri-
can cigarettes has forced compa-
nies in the U.S. to look for new
markets said Dr. Gregory Con-
nolly, a member of the World
Health Organization Expert Ad-
visory Tanel on Smoking and
Health.
According to statistics from the
WHO, the smoking rate in the
West is declining at a rapid annual
rate of 2.1 percent, prompting
many tobacco firms to channel
their products to Asia, where
smoking is increasing in some
countries.
"1 sense a growing determina-
tion among my colleagues to act
boldly to show their constituents
that they do not intend to remain
silent, and very damaging deci-
sions are often made in such an
environment Helms wrote in
the two-page letter.
"May 1 suggest a goal of 20
percent (share of the market)
within the next 18 months the
senator added.
In October 1986, japan sus-
pended its entire import tariff on
ended in deadlock after South
Korea said it would open the
market but without hurting its
tobacco growers and cigarette
producers. Still, U.S. imports
have risen 8 percent this year,
worth $2.5 million.
Lawyers in the Philippines are
suing American giants Philip
Morris and R.J. Reynolds to force
them to put warning labels on
cigarette packs sold through local
licensees.
"The companies have no right
to sell something they know-or at
foreign cigarettes and tobacco
products, ending the year-long the very least they ought to know-
unfair trade practices suit, and is dangerous to health without
U.S. cigarettes now account for 10 warnings said Francis Jarde-
pereent of sales in Japan. leza, who filed the suit in Fcbru-
Dr. Judith Mackay, a Hong ary with four other attorneys.
"What happened by 1983 was Kong-based member of the WHO "If the home country is the
that the high U.S. trade deficits smoking panel, said the British United States and you have cer-
merged the interests of the U.S. colony also faced strong pressure tain labelings there, then you
government with those of the
multinationals Connolly said
on a visit to Tokyo. "The multina-
tionals then manipulated U.S.
trade interests to put tobacco high
on the list of trade priorities)
A recent estimate by the U.S.
Agriculture Department showed
that American tobacco exports to
Asia soared 76 percent to SI .2 bil-
lion in the first nine months of
1987.
paign to corner the Asian market,
where smoking is much more
common than in the West. Of
adult makes, 78 percent smoke in
the Philippines, 70 percent in
China and 63 percent in Japan. A
recent survey in the United States
found that about 30 percent of
American men smoke.
Dr. Shaw Watanabe, chief of
epidemiology at the National
Cancer Center Research Institute
in Tokyo, estimated total cigarette
advertising on Japanese televi-
sion alone rose from 1,220 min-
utes of air time in 1985 to 3,383
minutes in 1986. Total advertising
expenditures nearly doubled
from 3.5 billion yen ($28 million)
to 6.6 billion yen ($53 million)
because of aggressive promotion,
he said.
"That's more than two com-
8DMS7NIGHTS
s299.��
Price includes:
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from the United States when should treat the Third World
Hong Kong decided in January country at par he said, adding, pletedaysof only cigarette adver
198b to prohibit sales of smokeless "Thcycannot provethat the lungs tising VVatanabesaid inan inter
Fly tQ f IdLJLJrjil
Cruise to Freeport;
CALLTOLLFREE1-800-6-BAHAMA
tobacco.
"Letters were written by Sena-
tor Bob Dole and others to our
chief secretaries that such a ban
would constitute an unfair and
discriminatory trade restriction
she aid in an interview.
Ms. Mackay added that the U.S.
consulate and American Cham-
oi an Asian are any different from
the lungs oi an American
view.
Often depicting healthy, attrac-
tive young Caucasians, the ads
Ms. Mackay said many of the areaimed at enticing the youthsof
tobacco firms have utilized full- Asia to smoke, Watanabe said.
It attributed the rise to aggrcs- ber of Commerce in Hong Kong
sive American negotiations and also joined the crusade against the
threats oi trade retaliation. ban, but the colony nevertheless
However, a spokesman for the passed a law against smokeless
R.J. Reynolds tobacco firm in tobacco imports in January 1987.
Tokyo, denied that U.S. produc- The U.S Agriculture Depart-
ers were reiving on political pres- ment said in a report that Ameri-
sure to increase their Asian mar- can market shares in Taiwan and
ket. South Korea also increased
'We're not using any political through trade pressure, and in
pressure said the spokesman, Taiwan sales of U.S. cigarettes
Akio Tabata. We're just selling
our products like other cigarette
makers
Connolly, also director oi the
Office for Nonsmoking and
Health in the Massachuetts De-
multiplied by 34 times in the first
nine months of this year to 4.2
billion cigarettes worth 94.5 mil-
lion dollars.
"Only last year, the mere pos-
session of imported cigarettes had
partment oi Public Health, said been illegal for citizens" in South
an Tobacco and Salt, a govern- Korea, the U.S. Foreign Agricul-
ment monopoly corporation, was
denationalized in 1985 because of
foreign pressure.
But the government retained all
the shares oi the new Japan To-
tural Service reported earlier this
month. Fearing trade retaliation,
the South Korean government
agreed in September "1986 to allow
1-percent market access for U.S.
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
.Adutts$2so5
CHILDREN
5:30 I ANYTIME
KINGSTON
PLACE
WE HAVE SEVERAL
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR SPRING
SEMESTER.
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393.
AFFORDABLE, LUXURIOUS
FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
BUILT SPECIFICALLY FOR
ECU STUDENTS.
Her official successor is Maren
Torp, 111, of Norway, according
to Guinness record keepers.
Vitamin
0
bacco Inc and also kept a 20 per- cigarettes, the report said.
cent jmport tax on foreign cia- 71ie state-run Korea Monopoly
rettes, prompting the U.S. to file Corp. remains the only licensed
an unfair trade practices suit. cigarette importer and the sole
Connollv showed a copv oi a domestic manufacturer. Ameri-
letter written by North Carolina can officials are seeking permis-
Sen. Jesse Helms to former Prime sion to set up joint ventures and
Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone in aneasingofrestrictionsoftobacco
uly 1986, demanding " a reason- advertising.
able share of the Japanese mar- Three rounds of recent talks by
World's oldest woman dies
WILMINGTON, N.C - The years ago after she broke a hip.
death of a Pennsylvania woman
recognized as the world's oldest
person bv the Guinness Book of
World Records has rekindled the
British publishing company's in-
terest in a Wilmington woman
believed to be 117 years old.
Florence Knapp, a teacher who
marched in support of women's
suffrage in 1919, died Monday at a
nursing home in Philadelphia.
She was 114 years old.
Guinness does not recognize
117-year-old Susie Brunson as the
world's oldest woman because
there is no written documentation
of her birth. Mrs. Brunson moved
in July with her daughter, Mary
McDaniel, to Wilmington from
Long Island, N.Y.
"We need something in writ-
ing David Boehm, Guinness's
American editor and publisher,
said in a telephone interview from
New York. "People talk and talk,
but that doesn't mean they're
right
"If she is right then she is the
oldest living person in the whole
world, not just the United States
Boehm told the Wilmington
Morning Star. "We're sending
London a telex right now to get
them going on it
Mrs. Brunson says she was bom
Christmas Day, 1870, to freed
slaves near Bamberg, S.C.
South Carolina did not issue
birth certificates until 1915, but
Mrs. Brunson's birth was re-
corded in her family's Bible. That
Bible was stolen in 1932 when she
moved to New York, Mrs.
McDaniel said.
Authenticated or not, Mrs.
McDaniel is just pleased to have
her mother around.
"We know how old she is and
we're proud she's with us this
long she said.
Miss Knapp was bom Oct. 10,
1873. She lived for 110 years in the
stone farmhouse in Montgomery
Square where she was bom and
moved to the nursing home four
Play.u Cinrma
Starting Friday
Raw- R
Three Men & A Baby
PG
The Couch Trip - R
When you make piixa ttra good, om just isn't enough
Starts Friday
Dirty Dancing - PG
l$1.50 All Times 13
fin
Party
Every Monday
Greenville's Best Cure
For The Weekend Hangover
Screwdrivers
Jp Fuzzy Navels
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Sheraton Greenville
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0
At little Tartars? whrn ynu pay for nn riVlinmis pi7a,
the second nnp is U You always tako homo t wic M many as
n,i pay for But don t export to have a lot left over When you make
pizza thus Rood, one just isn't enough "
! TWO PIZZAS ! FREE
$8.90'

I
! Medium Size Pizzas
GRAND
OPENING
Greenville Blvd. & E.
10th Street
(N'ext to Food Lion)
757-1212
and we're still at
323 Arlington Blvd.
(across from farm frh)
I
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with Cheese & 2
Item(s)
NO LIMIT
Extra item and extra cheese available at
addition! cost. Valid with coupon at
participating Uttk Caesars One coupon
per customer Carry Out Only
Expires 1-31-88
BUY ONE
PIZZA
GET ONE
FREE!
Buy any size pizza at
regular price, get identical
pizza FREE!
NO LIMIT
I Price varies depending or. size and assa b�f �,
toppings ordered Vabd with coupon at
participating Uttle Caesara!Carry O. r .
Expires 1 31 88
NJj 756-7256757 1212 EC �U 756- 72T.6 A 7V7 1212 EC
AM 12 MIO "n Thm.
11 AM 1 AM Fii SH
:
� SiuL�Marfi.iia s.i tis ns�is� s�- nwwgas�swan
�?fcNli �si ssii in �� itm mnam�alM
I





20
TH E EAST C A ROLINIA N
IANUAR 14 1988
Pirate Comics
WalkirT The Plank
Bv A. GUY Orpheus: Nightwalker
By HARRIS and GURGANUS
X1 up?� Am S4��e rs
n

��. jjw r ����. s j�� '
I'M 50 $WW
'wj ir-tv v ?a ety
�f
�1MAT5 ik foi eieM-TtftPoe
Undercover Cats
By PARKER Hellion
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KAPPA ALPHA
Dear Rushee . . .
As a fraternity rushee this fall at East Carolina University, you
will have an important decision to make. You must choose the
organization which you wish to join. A fraternity of men with whom
you will live for the next four years, and whom you will call your
brothers for the rest of your life. We at Kappa Alpha are sure that you
will make a careful evaluation of the various aspects of fraternity life.
And further more, we believe that you will agree that KA is the most
unique and traditional of any college fraternity. We are looking for-
ward to meeting you during rush, and wish you the best of luck in
deciding on a fraternity and in your college career.
The Brothers of Gamma Rho
Chapter of Kappa Alpha Order
THE HOME OF SOUTHERN GENTLEMEN
RUSH
7:00-11:00
Each Night
TUESDAY, JAN.19TH
until
THURSDAY, JAN. 21ST.
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By KRIST1 MAI Bl
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While the holiday
been a relaxing . a
ECU students the Easl
Men's and V
Dive team was
trying to improve I
records.
December was k -
fifth of the month with v.
against Duke in Pur!
the men And the woi
nately came out on I
with both teams
January's picks
Earl
By I AKl VIS H VMPTO
With college ;
and the NFL
swing, this is the
sportsman's t.ioiite time ol
year.
The indoor sportsman � i
cast forthemonthol januan
take theNorthC arolina farh
lake the Chicago Bull sar
summer ran( h home in
on the Washington Rcdskir
the Ml playoffs
First, colh .� hiops
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enee. c Georgia Rh h has , rci
N.C state has Shack and
pepperoni guards But lv
HeelswithJ.R Reid'sbigl
Ranzino Smith s sweet "i
devastate their AC rivals
Give the points and taku
HeeK. Even though Mar I
Terps have (Irimesland n
Keith Catlin back in the hn
the Terps will be stomped
in Cole hold I louse1-
Notice there is no notk
Duke in the Earl vis AtFow
Reason: Durham and Dukt
are living in a tar
"Ferry'land. Just about any
John Smith uiild play f(r C
K'sBlue Devils.Seriously the
Billy King, Duke's power for
extraordinaire, will have to
down t lot of boards and tick!
net a lot of times for the blue r
to have a successful confer

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MEN
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JANUARY 14,1988 Page 21
South Carolina's balanced attack dooms
Pirates' hopes of victory in Minges
Point guard Jeff
the Pirates' 78-51
Started � ECU
Kelly drives to the goal against South Carolina during
loss to the Gamecocks Wednesday night. (Photo by Mar
Photo Lab)
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
After a dazzling beginning,
East Carolina's hopes for an upset
got shot down by South Carolina
Wednesday night in Minges Coli-
seum.
Behind a balanced scoring at-
tack, the Gamecocks rolled to a 78-
51 victory. With the win, South
Carolina improved to 8-3 for the
season, while the Pirates dropped
to 5-8.
"They shot the ball better to-
night than I thought they would
ECU head coach Mike Stecle said.
"If they continue to shoot like
that, they are going to win a lot of
games
Tony Shaw and Brent Price led
the scoring attack for the Game-
cocks with 14 points each, while
Terry Dozicr added 12 and Terry
Gould 10.
Reed Lose paced the Pirates
with 15 points, 11 of which came
in the first half, while Gus Hill
chipped in 11.
The Pirates blitzed to a 8-2 lead
early as Lose hit bottom on his
first three field goals.
Stanley Love put the Pirates up
11-8 at the 14:30 mark of the first
half before South Carolina began
a run to overtake the lead.
The Gamecocks took the lead
for good in the contest on a layup
by Terry Dozicr with 13:27 to play
in the half. Moments later, Dozier
stole a errant pass from walk-on
guard David Simmons and
rammed it through for a 14-11
lead.
"Their defense took us right out
of what we wanted to do said
St�le. "They were just so big and
they pressured the ball very well.
We've gotten some quality min-
utes from David (Simmons) this
year, but their defense was really
tough on him
The final 10 minutes of the first
half proved to beallGamccocksas
they outscorcd the Pirates 19-7
down the stretch to head to the
lockcrroom with a 36-21 lead.
"I just think our kids were real
tired out there Stcele explained.
"We had to go without Jimmy
Hinton (who was attending his
grandfather's funeral) and I just
didn't see much zip in them to-
night. Not making excuses but we
did have two walk-ons (Simmons
and Kenny Murphy) out there a
lot tonight and they were having
to go against some real good ath-
letes
The Pirates seemed poised to
begin a comeback in the second
half as they quickly closed the gap
to 11,38-27, behind a pair of jump-
ers from I Jill and a score from
Love with 18:27 to play.
After watching the lead fluxtu-
ate between 11 and 13 for the first
five minutes of the half, the Pi-
rates saw their upset hopes go up
in smoke as the Gamecocks reeled
off 10 straight points in a three
minute span.
When Price drilled a shot at th
11:15 mark, the Gamecocks led 54-
33. From there, the closest the
Pirates could get the remainder of
the way was 18 points.
The goal for the Gamecocks
coming in was just simply to be
ready for anything.
"1 don't assume anything head-
ing into a game South Carolina
head coach George Felton said.
"East Carolina is a Division I bas-
ketball team and in Division I you
have to respect every team you
play- On any given night anybody
can beat someone else.
.vould like to complement
P ike Steele for how his team
played continued Felton. "They
played real hard, but I also feel
that our players played real hard.
I thought they got out there and
played two complete 20 minute
halves of basketball
For the game, the Gamecocks
shot a sizzling 53 percent from the
floor, connecting on 33 of 62 shots,
while the Pirates managed only a
46 percent shooting mark (22 of
48).
The game was played before a
crowd of 4,260, which Stcele said
could never quite get into the
game.
"I thought it was a great crowd
in number Steele said. "But by
the time they all got settled in,
South Carolina had the lead and
we were never really able to get
them into the game fully
The Pirates will be looking for
another large crowd Saturday
when they return to CAA action
against Navy in a 7:30 p.m. game
in Minges Coliseum. The game
will be the second half of a double-
header at Minges with the Lady
Pirate basketball team battling
Fairleigh Dickinson in a non-con-
ference women's contest at 5 p.m.
Student gets lucky, wins '88 Prelude
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Writer
The East Carolina men's basket-
ball team may have come out a
loser Wednesday night in Minges
Coliseum, but John Simpson cer-
tainly had no tears in his eves
when he left the game.
Simpson, a 19-year old FCU
sophomore from Madison, N.C
left Minges as the proud owner of
a 1988 fully loaded Honda Prel-
ude SI.
ECU-South Carolina game. The Simpson said that he had heard value of the Prelude at about
shootout, sponsored by Bob Bar- of the contest earlier, but never $20,000. "We put the car up in the
hour Honda of Greenville, re- envisioned himself winning it. contest for just that purpose,
quires a participant, drawn prior "1 heard about it on the news, When he sank that last shot, I felt
to halftime, to make a layup, free but I didn't think about it like picking him up and carrying
throw, three-pointer and a half- Simpson said. "There are always him around on my shoulders
court shot within a 25-second thingsout thereto win,but I never As the halfcourt shot went
span. am the one to win. I have never through the net, Simpson's facial
Well, Simpson made all four won anything worth over more expression went nearly blank as if
shots in a 15-sccond period. than $10 he was in a state of shock.
"I'm surprised I was even able Well, John, Robert Ellis, a reprc- "I knew I had won the car, but 1
to get it to the rim from halfcourt scntative of Bob Barbour Honda, didn't know what to do. It's just
said Simpson. "When I went out will guarantee you that the car is
Simpson won the car as part of there 1 was just messing around� definitely worth more than $10.
fee . londa Prelude Sportscar I never thought 1 had a chance to "I was delighted that he won
it at the halftime of the win said Ellis, who estimated the
cv.
Swimmers have good holidays
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sport Writer
While the holidays mav have
been a relaxing vacation for most
"We gave Duke a great meet
and swam very well but they were
just too fast reflected Coach Rick
Kobe.
The Pirates were back on the
ECU students, the East Carolina upswing on Dec. 6 when both the
Men's and Women's Swim and
o team was hard at work
tr ing to improve their winning
records.
December was kicked off on the
fifth oi the month with the meet
against Duke in Durham where
the men and the women unfortu-
nately came out on the short end
with both teams losing.
men and women easily beat
American University here at
Minges Coliseum.
"We were just a far superior
team said Coach Kobe.
Finally, the Pirates traveled to
North Palm Beach, Florida to take
winning their first meet of the
new year.
The wins over the holidays put
the men's record at 5-4 for the
season. The women are doing
even better with their record cur-
rently at a strong 8-2.
UNC-Wilmington is next on
East Carolina's schedule. The Pi-
rates will host the Seahawks this
Saturday, Jan. 16 at the Minges
Natatorium. ECU students are
too much
-For Suapftuq, Avioning the car
couldn't have come at a better
time. It seems that when he
moved back to school following
Christmas vacation he lost his car
keys. By Wednesday evening,
Simpson had still not found his
keys.
"I guess I needed a new car Ronnev Gibbs goes to the hoop for a rebound against South Carolina as
since 1 lost my keys quipped Stanley Love (32) looks on. (Photo by Mar Startari � ECU Photo Lab)
Simpson.
Lady Pirates still have hope
By MARK SCHECHTOR
Spurts Writer
2.5 boards.
"We really depend on our in-
The Lady Pirates basketball side game and are getting good
team has faced an up and down play from all of our girls said
season thus far under first-year Picrson.
coach Pat Picrson, however,
on Johns Hopkins University on urged to come out and support hopes are still high with the team
Jan. 3. Again, both the men and
the women emerged victorious
the Pirates in this Colonial Ath-
letic Association meet.
January's picks
Earl gives picking a swirl
By LARLVIS HAMPTON
Stiff rrognosticator
Look for the under in this defen-
sive struggle guys. The final will
look something like Denver 27,
Cleveland 14.
It will be deja-vu in Washington
year. the division leaders by season's
Outside the ACC, look for end.
With college hoops, the NBA Northwestern to upset three more Take the Jazz at home in the Salt
and the NFL playoffs all in full top 20 teams enroute to an aston- Palace, but forego the Jazz when
swing, this is the indoor ishing Final Four appearance, they leave the friendly confines
sportsman's favorite time of the When Northwestern fans in- and head to the road.
vear vaded the court Monday night Now to the real games at hand,
The indoor sportsman's fore- after the 66-64 upset win over pre- the NFL playoffs,
cast for the month of January says viously 16th-ranked Indiana, In the AFC, go the right way
take the North Carolina Tarheels, viewers could hear ESPN's Dick with Elway as the Orange Crush
takctheChicagoBullsandputthe Vitale saying "Bye, Bye Bobby. Go will make Kosar and Company
summer ranch home in Colorado home want mate an utapt U-turn
on the Washington Redskins in Watch for number three Okla- from Mile High Stadium back to
thcNFI playoffs homa to run, shoot and run, shoot. Cleveland
First, college hoops. Take the over with the Sooners.
In the Atlantic Coast Confer- In pro round ball, watch for
ence Georgia Tech has Crcmins, rookies Scott Pippen and
N C State has Shack and two Clemson alumni Horace Grant to
pepperoni guards. But Dean's reinforce the Chicago Bulls attack.
Heels with I R Rcid's big butt and Air Jordan will escalate in the on Sunday as the Redskins for the
Ranzino Smith's sweet T will playoffs and break 40 points per second straight strike season will
devastate their ACC rivals. game as the Bulls will capture the bring home the Super Bowl rings.
Give the points and take the ?rown from the L.A. Lakers in six Remember 1982 the laststr ke
Heels Even though Maryland's games. Jf f�; The Redskins flipped the
Terps have Grirnesland native S . . . Dolphins that year to claim the
KeTh Gatlin back in the lineup, Take the Bulls when they are the title and this year the Redskins
the Terps will be stomped tonight underdog and when they are less will once again come home victo-
in Cole Field House 90-76. than a five point favorite at home
Notice there is no notice of in the windy city. In Central Dm-
Duke in the Earl vis ACC Forecast, sions games espea ally agams
Reason: Durham and Duke fans the Atlanta Hawks and Detroit
are living in a fantasy Pistons, go low Chicago and take
"Ferry"land. Just about any other the under.
John Smith could play for C u
K's Blue Devils. Seriously though, Although the Utah Jazz are
Billy King, Duke's power forward rreriUy !n the M h position m
extraordinaire, wiU have to pull the NBA Midwest Division,
downalotofboardsanddcklethe JYa'�' Eighty Mailman
netalotoftimesforthebluehorns � "H? St�5
to have a successful conference Mark Eaton to pull the Jazz withir
nous.
Hail to the Redskins
Back to the NFC title game. The
Redskins will send the Vikings
out to sea with a 35-21 thrashing
before a thrilled fullhouse in RFK
Stadium Sunday.
That's the best bets for January.
Remember when the monies be-
gin rolling in that you got the tips
right here � from good
Earlvis.
ol'
for a successful finish to the sea-
son.
A brutally tough schedule fea-
turing such nationally-ranked
teams as Vanderbilt, Duke,
Southern California, along with
Colonial Athletic Association
powerhouse James Madison have
made the going tough. To make
matters worse, the Lady Pirates
have been hampered all year with
nagging injuries to key personnel.
All things considered together
have made the going tough for the
Pirates.
Leading the Pirates this year are
senior forwards Monique Pom-
pili and Alma Bethea. Pompili is
averaging 14.2 points per game
and 7.3 rebounds, while Bethea is
scoring 12.2 points a contest,
while pulling down 8.5 rebounds.
"We're really depending on our
seniors (Pompili and Bethea) for
leadership and scoring head
coach Pat Picrson said.
Contributing from the
backcourt for the Pirates this sea-
son are junior guards Chris
O'Connor and Pam Williams,
sophomore Irish Hamilton and
freshman Wendy Morton.
O'Connor is tossing in 6.5
points per game, Williams 4.8,
Hamilton 3.6 and Morton 1.8
"Our team has been effected by
injuries to Pam (Williams) and
Irish (Hamilton), but they're get-
ting back into it said assistant
coach Rosie Thompson.
Accompanying Pompili and
Bethea on the Pirates frontline are
junior center-forward Gretta
O'Neal Savage and junior center
Rose Miller.
Savage, who has been slowed
somewhat by nagging injuries, is
averaging 12.5 points per contest
and 5.8 rebounds. Miller is tossing
in 4.1 points a game and grabbing
A&T for a non-conference con-
test. The ladies will return back
home Saturday to play Fairleigh
Dickinson in another non-confer-
ence game. That game is set to
Currently, the Pirates own a 5-8 tipoff at 5 p.m. in Minges Coli-
rccord overall and a 0-2 mark in scum.
CAA action.
"We've had some tough times, The ECU-Fairleigh Dickinson
but by doing a lot of talking in contest will be the first part of a
team meetings, things seem to be doubleheader in Minges. At 7:30
working out said Picrson. p.m the men's basketball team
The Lady Pirates return to ac- will battle Navy in a CAA confer-
tion tonight as they travel to N.C. ence matchup.
Pam Williams jumper could do a great deal for the Lady Pirates as they
try to rebound from a sluggish start
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22 TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14, 1988
1. Arizona � Even after losing on the road against in-state rival Runnin' Rebels rolled to a 103-68 rently 11-0 after blowing past San
in the ever-unpopular "Pit" to Michigan State. Pacific Coast Athletic Association Diego State 92-65 over the week-
New Mexico a couple of weeks 6. Kentucky � The Wildcats victory over California-Irvine end, the BYU fans arc itching for a
ago, the Wildcats hold down first probably played their worst game Saturday behind 21 points from spot in the top ten in the nation,
place in this week's poll based ever Saturday in dropping a 53-52 Gerald Paddio and 17 from Staccy One big hurdle stands in the way
upon their other performances, heartbreaker to Auburn. For the Augmon. The win lifted UNLV to already however, a Friday date to
Everybody is allowed a loss in the game, Kentucky connected on 14-1 for the season. Coach Tar-
Pit 1 don't even think the Dis- only 21 of 61 shots from the field kanian describes this year's team
ciples could pull out a win there, for a pathetic 34 percent. Even as a weak one compared to the

'
This week's top 20 poll
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Sean Elliott got the 14-1 Wildcats with the poor shooting, the 10-1 others in the past. I'll hate it when
back on the winning track last Sat-
lay by pouring in Q points in a
90-65 rout over Stanford. Lute
Olscn's troops return to the court
Wildcats had a chance to win the
game at the buzzer but a 20-footer
by Rex Chapman rimmed out.
The Wildcats could steadilv climb
tonight to battle Oregon State on back up in the poll, that is if they
the road. got past Alabama last night.
2. North Carolina � The Tar 7. Oklahoma � 1 don't know
the Rebels ever have a power-
house in Tarkanian's book. The
Rebels were back in action last
night against Cal State Fullerton.
12. Kansas � The jayhawks
picked up their 54th straight
home court win over the weekend
i Is better hold on to this posi- how it happened, but Oklahoma by toppling a capable Missouri
meet the Wyoming Cowboys on
the road. A win there would go a
long way to convincing pollsters
that BYU is for real.
17. New Mexico � Home sweet
home is definitely the words to
live by if you are a New mexico
fan. Wins over top five teams
Arizona and Wyoming in the past
two weeks have helped boost
New Mexico to 14-3 for the season
and keep a 10-game winning
streak alive and well. Charlie
Thomas paced the way for New
Mexico in its 85-72 win over
Wyoming with 27 points and 13
rebounds. New Mexico will ven-
ture outside of the "Pit's" friendly
walls tonight to play San Diego
State on the road.
18. Auburn � Even with a
lost to LSU. The Sooncrs seemed team, 78-74, in the Big Eight depleted starting lineup and
like a indestructible force des- opener for both teams. Danny bench, Sonny Smith seems to
tined to literally roll past oppo- manning paved the way for the somehow continue winning at
nents all year. Billy Tubb's gang victory by scoring 28 points, while Auburn. The Tigers really gained
headed into the LSU game with a Milt Newton tossed in a career some attention Saturday by
14-0 record after beating Okla- high 21. Lam'Brown's 11-3 squad knocking off then top-ranked
ho ma State 108-80 over the week- was back at it again Wednesday Kentucky in Rupp Arena. John
end. In that game, Dave Sieger night on the road at Iowa State. Caylor provided the winning
ictorv by tossing in 20 of his team tied a Big Eight conference record 13. Syracuse � The Orange- points in the game by nailing a
30 points in the second half of with eight three-pointers. Look men have slipped again. Playing three-pointer with 10 seconds left
for the Sooners to shake off the underdog Villanova Monday to make the score 53-52. The 9-2
loss and start putting big numbers night at the Spectrum in Philly Tigers were paced in the win by 18
on the board again soon. proved to be too much for points from Chris Morris. Sonny's
8. Duke � The Blue Devils got Boeheim's gang as they faltered in
an all-world performance from the Big East conference battle.
tier ir.ncjv because with Mary-
id waiting at Cole Field House
tonight, the Heels could slip a
ten or two. Dean's bovs, now
1 tor the year, rolled to a t-82
victory oxer LaSalle Saturday
spite ; points bv Lionel Sim-
J.R. Reid paved the way to
We Buy
Standing
Pine
and
Hardwood
Timber
A
Weyerhaeuser
919-633-7455
game, which was a true battle
pening 20 minutes.
3. Purdue � Gene Keady
p his 200th coaching vic-
ardue Saturday thanks to
pair of tree throws by Todd
ell. Mitchell's two free
iws came in the waning sec-
Is faBigTenmatchupagainst
a and lifted the Boilermakers
to a S 79 victory. The next action
for the 13-1 Boilers will come to-
;ht when they play host to
.estern in a conference
Earlier in the weekend, the Or-
angemen barely slipped pasl
Seton Hall, 84-82. In that contest,
the 12-3 Orangemen were paced
by 17 points and 16 rebounds
from Derrick Coleman. Sherman
Douglas also scored 15 points in
the game, 11 in the closing half.
14. Iowa State �The Cvclones
Dannv Ferry over the weekend in
topping Virginia, 77-59, and im-
proving to 9-1 for the season.
Ferry powered in 29 points,
ripped off nine rebounds and
dished out five assists to pace the
Devils. In fact. Ferry was the
game-high leader in all of the cate-
gories. Duke will be back in action
tie. 1 still think Purdue is going tonight when they play host to St. improved to 13-2 over the week-
50 all the way this season. The Louis in Cameron Indoor Sta- end by disposing of a quality
I c �nsecutive wins since an early dium. Dayton club 84-80. Norm Grevey
n upset loss to Iowa State 9. Georgetown � The Hoyas provided the decisive points
hasize that also. had a big week last week in im- when he fired in a three-pointer
Temple � Philly is still proving to 11-1 for the season, with 37 seconds to play. The Cy-
and Temple is still rollin First was the mild upset of Pitts- clones were paced in the victory
. Is are currently 10-0 after burgh in the Capital Centre. Then v Lafester Rhodes with a game
king f lowly George Wash- a 74-64 victory over DePaul Sun-
79-66 over the weekend, day in Chicago. Pern-McDonald
ired in 24 points and paced the way in the victory over
irk Macon 22 as the Owls Depaul by scoring 16 points,
while Charles Smith came off the
bench to chip in 15. If the Hoyas
beat Providence Wednesday, as
was expected, they might con-
tinue to head up the poll.
10. Pittsburgh � After rolling
� k. f r m a 36-32 half time
th( W Temple
�- 1 ic its winning
ght when they play
at home.
5. Michigan � Boy, are the
high 30 points. Look for the Cy-
clones to make the top 10 in the
future, especially if they managed
to beat Kansas at home Wednes-
day.
15. Wyoming � The Cowboys,
like Arizona, fell victim to New
Mexico in the "Pit" over the week-
end. New Mexico topped Wyo-
ming 85-72 marking their second
bunch was back in action last
night on the road at Georgia.
19. Georgia Tech�The Yellow
Jackets improved to 12-2 by tak-
ing a pair of victories since the
weekend. Georgia Tech beat in-
state rival Georgia State handily
Tuesday after rolling to a ACC
win over Wake Forest Saturday.
In the Wake Forest game, a 78-66
victory, forward Tom Ham-
monds powered in 19 points
while Duane Ferrell added 16.
Bobby Cremins is trying to mold
his squad into one that can con-
tend with Duke and North Caro-
lina for the ACC title.
20. Iowa � The Hawkeycs lost
their fourth game of the season
over the weekend when Purdue
pulled out a 80-79 win.
HUNGRY PIRATE
St 1 Cotanche St. 757-1666
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11 - 5.
Weekends
Holiday
Due to the Martin Luther k.
Holiday weekend, there hash
a change in the recreational tu
ity schedules as follows:
�All recreational facilities
Points st
for the
Women's Independent
The Enforcers
Campus Crusade
Alpha Sigma Phi lil sis
Fraternity Division
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Tau Kappa Hpsilon
Pi Kappa Alpha
Equipm
sponsore
The Intramural Recreatioi
Services is sponsoring a
ment Giveaway.
To enter, simply fill
provided below and return it
Memorial Gym. If 3 j
drawn, you will win 01 i
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EAST CARd
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nes ever explosive. After past Duquesne Monday night the straight loss. Earlier last week,
tied with Minnesota 44-44
ir game over the weekend,
gaii blew away to take a 103-
71 victon The Wolverines were
ed by Glen "The Ice" Rice who
i in 40 points, including 25
Panthers picked up their second Wyoming, now 11-2, was beaten
straight win after the loss to Geor- by Texas-El Paso on the road. Eric
getown last week and improved Leckner led the way for the Cow-
to 11-1 for the season. Saturday boys in the loss to New Mexico by
the Panthers collected a key Big scoring 19 points, while Fennis
East win over St. John's as Jerome Dembo chipped in 18. Wyoming
permission. Freider might Lane pumped in 19 points and was back in action last night
: me much of a coach, but with garnered 15 boards in the 81-70 against Air Force.
play like that it isn't necessary, contest. Charles Smith also added 16. Brigham Young � Oh what
Wolverines, 13-1 this season, 20 points in the victory. a season Brigham Young is hav-
return to the hardwood tonight 11. Nevada-Las Vegas � The ing out in Utah to this point. Cur-
WAcUWoWJifofi
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i Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
I
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Sunday 1-6
TAKE AN j
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OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(EXCEPT AIGNER, NIKE AND REEBOK)
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East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking applications for
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
Deadline: January 22. 1988
STUDENT UNION
COMMITTEE CHARIPERSONS
Deadline: February 12, 1988
for the 1988-89 Term
Any full-time student can apply
Applications available at Mendenhall Student
Center's Information Desk and Room 234 -
Student Union.
What Does
Kappa Sigma
Offer Its
Members?
�Introduction to new
people
�Job References From
Alumni
�Bahama Mama
�Best Location on
Campus
�Intramurals
�Leadership In School
�Social Involvement
�Lifetime Friendships
Dates:
January 19th, 20thf and 21st.
Time:
7:00-11:00 each night
Place:
Kappa Sigma House-700 E. 10th St
Invents to be announced in Tuesday's Paper
R
Beat the Price
Increase!
Now through
31.TheSpaisofYen
Special Membershi
centive to beat the p
increase in Januan
memberships will
discounted, some i
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develop a total
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1988.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 14,1988 23
Holiday changes IRS times
Due to the Martin Luther King close at 5 P.M. on Friday, January Jan. 16, Sunday, Jan. 17 and
Holiday weekend, there has been 15. Monday, Jan. 18.
a change in the recreational facil- 'Memorial Gymnasium rec- Minges recreational facilities
ity schedules as follows: reational facilities will be open will be closed on all of the above
�All recreational facilities will from 1 P.M. to 5 P.M. Saturday, dates.
Points standings in the race
for the Chancellor's Trophy
Women's Independent
The Enforcers 335
campus Crusade 177
Alpha Sigma Thi lil sis 144
Fraternity Division
Sigma Fhi Epsilon 747
lau Kappa Epsilon 703
Pi Kappa Alpha 676
Co-Ed Residence Hall
Belk 349
Jones 328
Slay 119
Men's Residence Hall Division
Scott 429
Aycock 270
Garrctt 166
Men's Independent Division
Alcoholics 268
Sigma Phi Epsilon 212
ArmyROTC 196
Women's Residence Hall
Clement "
White 51
Cottcn 48
Equipment giveaway
sponsored by IRS
Sorority Division
Delta Zeta 322
Alpha Phi 250
Alpha Omicron Pi 192
The Intramural Recreational
Services is sponsoring a Equip-
ment Giveaway.
To enter, simplv fill out the form
provided below and return it 204
Memorial Gvm. If vour name is
drawn, you will win one of manv
prizes to be given away.
Also, winners will appear in the
next Intramural Roundup in The
East Carolinian on January 28.
For more details on the Equip-
ment Giveaway, call 757-6387 or
stop by the Intramurals Office in
room 204 Memorial Gym.
Pirates'
Landing
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Intramural
giveaway
NAME
STATUS: Fr So Jr Sr Grad
SOCIAL SECURITY 8
200 W. 8th St. -
Greenville, NC 27834
758-6061
� Private Rooms
� Cooking Facilities
� Cable T.V. Available
� Central HeatAir
� Utilities Included In
Rent
� Furnished
� Sun Deck with
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� 2 Blocks From
Campus and
Downtown
�Laundry Facilities
�Free Maid Service.
�Now oflering semester
leases.
Professionally
managed by:
REMCO East, Inc.
Healthy
Resolution
$69
Join individuals and organizations
who arc helping nearly one
million people with their tax
returns. The people being helped
are low-income, elderly,
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with English. The IRS will train
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Volunteer Income Tax Assistance.
For details, call the nearest IRS
office listed in your local telephone
directory.
Beat the Price
Increase!
Now through January
31, The Spa is offering a
Special Membership In-
centive to beat the price
increase in January. All
memberships will be
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We can help you
develop a total ex-
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There's more to The Spa
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All at a special member-
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January 31st.
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the whole story on
Greenville's best health
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(Next to Wendy's)
758-4896
Buy 1 Frozen Yogurt or Ice
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12 Price
Good Thru Jan. 23, 1988
I
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THE ECU STUDENT UNION
SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE
STICKLER
AND
Doritos
cool ranch: flnor
TORTILLA CHIPS
PRESENT
mil
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Wednesday, January 20
8:00 p.m.
Coffeehouse, Ground Floor, Mendenhall
TWO FUN WAYS TO WIN!
WIN A SHOT AT
COMEDY FAME AND FORTUNE!
U.S. College Comedy talent stouts ore coming to jour compos in seorrh of the funniest cortege student m
9 e country!
� VKta o tnp to Dqrtmo Beoch to perform before Huongs of vocotioning students during Spring
Brook
� Perform live at the famous Comic Strip in New tor,1
� Dean en Official US COLLEGE COMEDY t shirt'
� Stop by the US COLLEGE COMEDY COMPETITION site ot yout school I hour eorty to enter
Even if you're not seeking comedy fome and fortune, STICKLETS� ond DORITOS brond Cool
Ranch brand flavor Tortilla Chips invite you to come by to wotch the emiement ond enioy two
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A FREE COMEDY
Save those empty STKtCLETS Natural Flavor Gum pocks ond DORITOS orond femllo Chip bogs
� Nbio FREE Comedy Concert at your school starring Lorry Bud' Mehnon ond Gilbert
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brand Cool Roach brand flavor fort.Ha Chip bags ond deposit them at the Official U S
COLLEGE COMEDY Entry Drspfoys
� The school colfottmg the most wrappers wins1
Official Drop-off bins for empty
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Call 757-6611
for more information.
DON'T MISS IT!
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24 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14,1988
Football playoff proposal killed
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) � A
major-college football playoff is
dead and buried - for now. Bowl
games arc alive and well- for now.
The money-hungry NCAA
Division 1-A members threw
away between $100,000 -$200,000
per school Tuesday when they
overwhelmingly rejected a play-
off - for now.
"The vote (98-13, with one
abstention) was even more over-
whelming than 1 thought it would
be Dick Schultz, executive direc-
tor of the NCAA, said. "I think it's
done for the time being
There is widespread agree-
ment, however, that some sort of
playoff is inevitable.
"It's not a matter of 'if it's
matter oi 'when said DeLoss
Dodds, athletic director at the
University oi Texas and chairman
of the Postseason Football Sub-
committee which proposed a
two-team post-bowl playoff on a
one-year trial basis.
"This vote was not reflective of
anything. The athletic directors
knew coming in it wasn't going to
pass.
"The environment right now is
not conducive to a playoff. People
want to allow the bowls to operate
and, hopefully, conduct their
business properly.
"We'll probably be talking
about this again in three or four
years when (bowl) TV contracts
run out and if ratings continue to
go down. There was less pressure
for a playoff this year because the
Orange Bowl, and last year the
Fiesta Bowl took care of that prob-
lem for us
"We'll have to wait two, three,
four more years for it to happen,
and it will be a groat thing four
college football said Vince
Dooley, head coach and athletic
director at the University of Geor-
gia and a supporter of a one-game
playoff.
The nation's 18 bowl games
were delighted with the resound-
ing anti-playoff vote.
"Whether a playoff is a matter
of time will probably be decided
in the next two or three years
when we see what impact the new
TV contracts might have on the
major bowls said Sam Jenkins,
executive director of the Sun Bowl
and chairman of the bowls'
committee.
Dodds put all the bowls on
notice that they had best shape up.
"The bowls have to stop violat-
ing the selection date and the New
Year's Day bowls have to stop
playing at the same time and
killing each other's TV ratings
he said. "They've got to start
working that around for the bene-
fit of college football
Dodds said he "could make a
heck of a case for a playoff from
the financial side
He estimated that a one-game
playoff could generate between
$25 million-$30million to be split
among all Division I-A institu-
tions.
But he said a playoff tied into
one TV package and including
regular-season games would
bring an "amazing" amount of
money, although he declined to
name a figure. "I don't think any-
one knows how much it would
be he said.
There have been several college
football TV packages since the
courts ruled that the NCAA'S
single-network TV plan violated
antitrust laws.
Elimination of the official bowl
invitation date - currently the
Saturday after the third Tuesday
in November - was to be voted
today. The legislation is spon-
sored by the policy-making
NCAA Council but opposed by
the bowls themselves.
"Six of the 13 votes opposing
the anti-playoff resolution came
from the nine-member Western
Athletic Conference - the W AC it-
self, plus Hawaii, New Mexico,
San Diego State, Texas-El Paso
and Utah.
"This is not a vote to support the
playoff concept at this time
Commissioner Joe Kearney said.
"But we didn't want to foreclose
further discussion, study and
dialogue
The other votes opposing the
resolution were cast by Georgia,
Georgia Tech, Long Beach State,
Louisville, Nevada-Las Vegas,
Southwestern Louisiana and
Tulsa. The Pacific Coast Athletic
Association abstained.
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THE RESUME PEOPLE
Next to Chicos in the Georgetown Shops
Willie Stargell inducted into Hall of Fame
NEW YORK (AP) � After
spending 21 seasons hitting tow-
ering drives into the summer sky,
Willie Stargell just wants to keep
both feet on the ground.
Stargell, who guided the Pitts-
burgh Pirates to two World Series
titles with his bat and leadership,
on Tuesday became the 17th
player to be elected to the Baseball
1 fall of Fame in the first year of eli-
gibility.
Stargell was named on 332 of
427 ballots (82.4 percent) returned
to the Baseball Writers' Associa-
tion oi America. In order to be
elected, a player must be named
on 73 percent of the ballots, which
this year was 321.
When he learned of his induc-
tion, Stargell's eyes filled with
tears.
"1 don't know where I'm at, I've
lost that big ol' composure he
said. "To be in the same room as
Bane, Hank and Ernie what a
feeling. What an honor
Stargell hit 473 homers with
1,540 runs batted in and a .282
batting average, all with the Pi-
rates. He was equally regarded
for his qualitites as a leader on the
field and in the ciubhouse.
"I still try to keep both feet on
the ground because my mama
once told me to the 47-year-old
Stargell said.
For the other favorite on this
year's ballot, Congressman Jim
Bunning of Kentucky, the returns
were not as favorable.
Bunning won 224 games,
pitched a perfect game in 1964
and had 40 shutouts. In 17 seasons
with Detroit, Philadelphia, Pitts-
burgh and Los Angeles, he struck
out 2,855 batters. He was the sec-
ond pi tcher ever to win 100 games
in both leagues and have a no-
hitter in each. Cy Young was the
only other man to achieve both.
After missing by 21 votes last
vear, Bunning fell four votes short
with 317 (74.2 percent) in his 12th
year of eligibility.
"I thought I had a shot said
Bunning, who was in Hawaii on
Tuesday. He is still eligible for
three more years. After that, he
must wait three years before he
can be considered by the veterans
committee.
"I think I was right the first
time Bunning said, "If you don't
make it right away, you should
take your name off the ballot so
you won't have to go through this
every year.
"But I'll live. I'll get up in the
morning and the sun will shine.
It's great for Willie
Bunning's near miss wasn't the
closest in voting history. Former
Chicago White Sox second base-
man Nellie Fox missed by one
vote in 1985, his last season of
eligibility.
After Bunning, Tony Oliva was
third in the voting with 202, fol-
lowed by Orlando Cepeda 199
and the late Roger Maris with 184.
It was Maris' 15th and last year of
eligibility.
Induction ceremonies are
scheduled for July 31 in Cooper-
stown, N.Y.
Reflecting the weak field, nine
writers returned signed ballots
without votes. Fourteen of the 45
players listed failed to receive a
vote.
If those nine writers had not
sent in their ballots, the total
would have been 418, meaning 75
percent would have been 314 and
Bunning would have made it.
Stargell totaled 2,232 hits and
won the National League home
run titles in 1971 when he hit 48,
and 1973 when he finished with
44. He had 30 or more home runs
six times and drove in 100 or more
runs five times.
"All that hard work and sacri-
fice, I never thought it would feel
like this Stargell said. "I never
thought I would have a day like
this. I'm overwhelmed
Stargell is the only batter to hit a
ball out of Dodger Stadium - and
he did it twice. He cleared the
right-field roof at old Forbes Field
seven times and hit four balls into
the upper deck in right field at
Pittsburgh's Three Rivers Sta-
dium.
"I thought winning was one oi
the greatest thrills, but (this) is
really overwhelming Stargell
said. "My family, my friends all
the people there in Pittsburgh,
thank you
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SINGERS � DANCERS � INSTRUMENTALISTS
TECHNICIANS � VARIETY PERFORMERS
Kings Productions, the world s 1 producer of
live entertainment is holding auditions for the
spectacular 1988 season at CAROWINDS,
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Pay is good and obs are plenty (we'll even
provide one round trip airfare if you re hired to
work at a park over 250 miles from your home)
Make your audition a show we can't do without1
GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA
Friday, January 22
University of North Carolina � Greensboro
Elliott University Center � Cone Ballroom
Singers 12-2 PM Dancers & Instrumentalists 3 4 PM
Specialty Acts 12-4 PM
WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA
Saturday. January 23
North Carolina School of the Arts, Workplace Studios� �614
Singers 1-3 PM, Dancers & Instrumentalists 4 5 PM
Specialty Acts Technicians 1-5 PM
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ONLY $40.00
Indoor Swimming Pool Weight Room
Gymnasium Air-Dyne Exercise Bikes
Suntanning System Weight Loss Programs
Aerobics, Low Impact Aerobics
Toning, and Aquaerobics Classes
Burroughs
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Aquatics and
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ECU-Greenville
758-6892
Operated by the 10th St.
Greenville Recreation and Parks Department
Time: 7:00 p.m. - 10:30 p.m.
Event: RUSH - Spring 1988
Place: Mendenhall Student Center (Multi-Purpose Room)
Date: Jan. 19th, 20th, and 21st.
To Attend: All College Men
Call 7S8-6765 or 752-7284
Hayne
DENVER (AP) - A year a
Denver cornerback Mark Hayn
expecting to make a signifu
contribution in the AFC chan
onship game at Cleveland, nej
got his uniform dirty, faihnd
leave the bench tor a single pli
He intends to have a good d
more input on Sunday when
Broncos and Browns meet aj
to the conference title.
Last year's experience waj
humiliating one for a player v
had been All-Pro three times
who, at 28, presumable was stij
the prime of his career
Hayncs, who didn't break
the starting lineup all year
who rarely played even
Denver's nickel package in p
ing situations, derisively refer
to himself as the "penny ba
1 le was as much of a nonentit)
the Broncos had on their rosu
Hayncs - and the Broncos' fi
Redskin
HERNDON, Va. (AP) -M
no mistake, the homefield ad
tage is no myth for the Washj
ton Redskins at RFK Stadiui
Since 1982, no NFL team
compiled a better rccor
home.C So, Washington C
joe Gibbs was elated when
nesota upset San Francisco tc
the Redskins in a position to
the NFC title game if they a
beat Chicago the next day
"When we saw Minnesota
the game, the thrill oi gettn
chance to come home rc: I
cited our players Gibbs sau
didn't have to say much to tl
that night (to get them re I
Chicago)
Washington beat the Bears
17 Sunday to gain the ho met
edge.
"Being in familiar surroi
ings, with our fans that s
biggest thing Gibbs said W
thev get cranked up, it carries i
to our players
The stadium, seating 5:
larger than only two others ii
28-team NFL vthe Astrodome
Busch Stadium), but whenj
Redskins start rolling, the
starts rocking - literally
Because the stadium was
to also house the since-de
Washington Senators ba�
team, many moveable sU
were installed to meet the
demand for football tickets V
the fans in the temporary
start jumping and hollenngl
tire sections actually rock up
down.
Gibbs hopes Redskins fai
at their raucous best when thj
kings, who have scored a
bined SO points in playoff j
rics (44-10 over New Orleans
36-24 over San Francisco) coi
town.
"Minnesota is playing the
football in the NFL nght novJ
said. "It's going to take evcrf
we've got, and everything
every one of our fans has goj
us to win
The East Carolim
Pick it up
ECU ST1
-Prel
Monday, Ji
and af i
�Craps Tabh
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Multi
rm-smm.jm.jm.urri-





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14,1988 25
UMES
A
NICE
:h job market by
'py
etwei photo-
ginais.
ei and
4h
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JESUME PEOPLE
400
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� ety performers
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ARO. NA
:arolina
NU

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Iti-Purposc Room)
2-7284
Haynes readying for title game
DENVER (AP) � A year ago,
Denver cornerback Mark Haynes,
expecting to make a significant
contribution in the AFC champi-
onship game at Cleveland, never
got his uniform dirty, failing to
leave the bench for a single play.
He intends to have a good deal
more input on Sunday when the
Broncos and Browns meet again
to the conference title.
Last year's experience was a
humiliating one for a player who
ud been All-Pro three times and
who, at 28, presumable was still in
the prime of his career.
1 laynes, who didn't break into
the starting lineup all year and
who rarely played even in
Vnver's nickel package in pass-
ing situations, derisively referred
to himself as the "penny back
i c was as much of a nonentity as
the Broncos had on their roster.
lavnes - and the Broncos' front
office- both may have had second
thoughts about the April 1986
trade that brought the former
New York Giants star to Denver.
The price was high - two second-
round draft picks and a sixth-
rounder- and the return on the
investment had been slight.
There was speculation that
Denver sought to take Haynes,
and his lucrative contract, during
the off-season. Coach Dan Reeves
said publicly that if Haynes did
not win a starting job in 1987, he
would be gone.
The starting job came, but only
because of the surprise retirement
of Louis Wright.
Now, the Broncos are wonder-
ing what all the disgruntlcment
was about. Haynes has been a
steady defender all season, and he
had his best game as a Bronco in
Sunday's 34-10 playoff victory
over Houston.
He had six tackles without a
miss and two pass deflections. In
the third quarter, he robbed
Houston of a scoring opportunity.
The Oilers had driven to the
Bronco 7-yard line, but Haynes
intercepted Warren Moon's pass
in the end zone and returned it 57
yards.
He was named the Broncos'
most valuable player in the game.
Haynes still has one deficiency:
He tends to get buried by blockers
on running plays to his side of the
the field.
"Forcing the run is the only area
where he's been a disappoint-
ment Reeves said, "but he has
worked hard to improve on it. It's
something he never had to do
before he came here. He always
got support from the safety
At 5-foot-ll and 195 pounds,
Haynes isn' t the biggest of corner-
backs. His technique against a big
lineman coming out on a sweep
usually was a low, rolling block
aimed at taking the lineman out of
the play. But is also removed
Haynes from the play and fre-
quently led to a big gain for the
opposition.
"He's been staying on his feet
better, and he doesn't get taken
out of the play as much defen-
sive coordinator Joe Collier said.
Haynes' feud with the media
continues, however. He has de-
clined interviews ever since some
training camp criticism, and he
had a "no comment" for reporters
after Sunday's game. But he did
provide the Broncos' public rela-
tions department with a comment
on his interception.
"He (Moon) threw it behind the
receiver a little bit he said. "I was
in the right place at the right
time
Redskins enjoy home field advantage
HERNDON, Va. (AP) � Make
nistake, the homefield advan-
tage is no myth for the Washing-
ton Redskins at RFK Stadium.
Since 1982, no NFL team has
compiled a better record at
:ne.C So, Washington Coach
loe Gibbs was elated when Min-
nesota upset San Francisco to put
I o Redskins in a position to host
the NFC title game if they could
eat Chicago the next day.
When we saw Minnesota win
the game, the thrill of getting a
.hanee to come home really ex-
ited our players Gibbs said. "I
didn't have to say much to them
that night (to get them ready for
Chicago)
Washington beat the Bears 21-
17 Sunday to gain the homefield
edge.
"Being in familiar surround-
ings, with our fans that's the
I biggest thing Gibbs said. "When
they get cranked up, it carries over
to our players
The stadium, seating 55,750, is
larger than only two others in the
28-team NFL (the Astrodome and
Busch Stadium), but when the
Redskins start rolling, the place
starts rocking - literally.
Because the stadium was built
to also house the since-departed
Washington Senators baseball
team, many moveable stands
were installed to meet the huge
demand for football tickets. When
the fans in the temporary seats
start jumping and hollering, en-
tire sections actually rock up and
down.
Gibbs hopes Redskins fans are
at their raucous best when the Vi-
kings, who have scored a com-
bined 80 points in playoff victo-
ries (44-10 over New Orleans and
36-24 over San Francisco) come to
town.
"Minnesota is playing the best
football in the NFL right now he
said. "It's going to take everthing
we've got, and everything that
every one of our fans has got, for
us to win
The homefield advantage did
not help New Orleans or San
Francisco against the Vikings, but
it is the main reason Washington
is a four-point favorite even
though the last two games be-
tween the clubs went into over-
time.
The Redskins won 27-24 last
month in Minnesota, and 44-38 at
RFK in 1986. Washington has won
four straight and holds a 6-5 edge
in the series, last losing in 1980.
For the Redskins, there is cer-
tainly no place like home. Wash-
ington is 46-12 at home under
Gibbs, 41-9 since 1982.
In the playoffs, the Redskins are
8-1 at RFK, 6-1 under Gibbs. And,
the last time Washington lost a
championship game at home was
in 1940, against the Chicago Bears
in the famous 73-0 debacle.
Quarterback Doug Williams
has played in dozens of stadiums
in his career, but he says no fans
compare to those in Washinton
for generating enthusiasm.
"Since I've been here the last
couple years, I know one thing:
the greatest stadium to play foot-
ball in front of your home crowd is
RFK Williams said.
Despite the advantage of play-
ing at home, Gibbs says he. is
hoping the next game is an
"awa' contest - in San Diego at
Super Bowl XXII.
The most exciting
fewhours
you'll spend all week.
Run. Climb. Rappel. Navigate. Lead.
And develop the confidence and
skills von won't et from a textbook.
Knroll in Army ROTC
as one of vour electives. Get the tacts
todav. BK ALL YOU CAN BL.
For Further Information Contact:
Captain Steve L. Jones
(Erwin Hall) 757-6967
ARMY RESERVE ONCERS'TRAINING C
MARATHON RESTAURANTS
'DtUvery Menu
The East Carolinian
Pick it up
SUBS
Steak and Cheese3.95
Steak and Mushrooms3.95
Reuben with French Fries4.45
Ham and Cheese3.95
Roast Beef and French Fries 4.45
Cold Sub3.95
Chicken Salad Sub3.95
Pastrami Sub3.95
Turkey and Cheese3.96
Super Sub4.45
B.L.T. 3.95
GREEK DISHES
GYRO Sandwich3.95
Souvlald Sandwich3.95
Aegean Grilled Cheese2.95
GYRO Platter4.45
Marathon Special4.45
Athenian-Style Chicken4.45
SANDWICHES
Hamburger1.75
Cheeseburger1.95
Hot Dog1.35
Chicken Salad Sandwich2.95
Chicken Breast2.35
Shrmp Eggroll1.25
SALADS
Greek Salad3.95
Chefs Salad3.95
Chicken Salad Plate3.95
Tossed Salad1.95
Potato Salad1.70
GREEK PASTRIES
Baklava1.25
PIZZA MENU
9" 14"
Cheese Pizza3.505.50
Any 1 item4.006.50
Any 2 items4.507.50
Any 3 items5.008.50
Any 4 items5.509.50
Add! items501.00
Mushrooms
Ground Beef
Green Peppers
Hot Peppers Olives
Anchovies Ham
Canadian Bacon
Marathon Deluxe: Pepperoni, Onions,
Ground Beef, Mushrooms, Green
Peppers
9"
$7.00
14"
$10.50
SOFT DRINKS
Small .70 Large .80
FRENCH FRIES
Small .65 Large .75
ssssssssssssssssss
MonJri. 4-11
Sat. &Sun. 11-11
Welcome Back Students
20 off 20
422 Arlington Blvd. 1 756-7202 Expires 2188
� 4 9 � a � � t
752-0326
or
752-3753
ECU STUDENT UNION - PRODUCTIONS
COMMITTEE
GtINO
-NIGHT
onday, January 25 -7:00 p.m. til 9:30 p.m.
and afterwards. Auction & Donations
�Craps Table �Poker �Blackjack �Bingo-and-more
�Mocktails �Special Entertainment all night
�Play money and prises auctioned
�Open to Faculty. Staff and Students
F ADMISSION PRICE:
$1.00 for $1,000 play money
Multi-purpose Room, ltondonhall Student Center
Bring This Ad For A Free Moctall
Call for ride 757-0127
Sigma Tau Gamma
Encourages Individuality with a
strong Brotherhood bond. So if you
think you have what it takes to be a
Sig Tau well see you at
"THE BIG BLUE HOUSE"
For a wild time
"OFTEN IMMITATED, BUT NEVER DUPLICATED"
1 �l�. IW
�� wmwunntHM � �





26 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14, 1W
JS&5JrtiJ
LAMBDA-CHI ALPHA
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jan.19-21
7:00-11:00
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 14, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 14, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.580
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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