The East Carolinian, January 12, 1988






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mo ies rev iewed sec STYLE, page 17.
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SPORTS, page 24.
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mhiseveball. two years in prison term coupled Malason, a senior at NCSl at th
il





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 12. 1988
ECU history seen in library friends calendar
the calendar's cover and 12 pages
depict the two-acre lake formerly
located on the southeast part of
campus, "Old Austin" Building, a
195b Maypole dance, the 1917
girl's basketball team, clad in uni-
form berets and middy blouses.
ECU New Bureau
Scenes and dates from East
Carolina's history appear on the
"1988 ECU Historical Calendar
a recent publication oi the Friends
of the ECU Library.
Thotographs used to illustrate
Lanier selected
for Intellectual
Freedom award
Gene P. Lanier, professor in the
ECU Department oi Library &
Information Studies, has been
selected to receive the 1987 Robert
B. Downs Intellectual Freedom
Award. The award is sponsored
by the University oi Illinois
Graduate School oi Library and
Information Science and Green-
wood Press. It will be presented to
Dr. Lanier in ceremonies in Janu-
ary at the Midwinter conference
oi the American Librarv Associa-
tion meeting in San Antonio.
The Downs Award was estab-
lished in 198 in honor of Robert
B. Downs, dean oi libraries and
the library school at the Univer-
sity oi Illinois for 28 years, an
expert and author on intellectual
freedom, a president oi the
American Library Association,
and an international library con-
sultant. Former Dean Downs,
who is 84, called Lanier to offer his
congratulations on his selection.
Lanier, who has chaired the
Intellectual Freedom Committee
oi the N.C. Librarv Association
since 1980 and serves on similar
committees in the Southeastern
Library Association and the
American Librarv Association,
has been honored previously president of the American Coun-
withnationalandstateawardsfor cil on Education (ACE) said re-
an interior view oi the library December, for example, com-
vvhen it was housed in what is memorate such historical high-
now Wichard Building and other lights as the 1921 name change
scenes. from East Carolina Teachers
Each month lists significant Training School to East Carolina
events in the institution's history. Teachers College, First Lady
The pages for November and eleanor Roosevelt's 1941 visit to
East Carolina Teachers College,
the 1918 World War I victory cele-
bration on campus, a lecture by
Arctic explorer Sir 1 lubert Wilk-
insin 1930, and the 1965 football
team's Tangerine Bowl victory
over the University oi Maine.
"The calendars make .suitable
Christmas gifts for anyone associ-
ated with East Carolina said
Morgan Barclay, director of the
ECU Archives. "We hope the cal-
endar itself will become an ECU
tradition which will promt u n
terest in our history and pride in
our university
The calendars are available
purchase tor $5 each it bought in
personal the Archivesand M
scripts area, 113 oyner 1 ibi
Tiey arc also available by ma �
Set each from Friends ol thi I
Library, co Archives and M
scripts, Jovner librarv. h I
Greenville, N.C 27858
2ttt �&0t Carolinian
Sending tlw East Carolina campus community sine I �-
James F. J. McKee. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
"I
"Uld Austin" Building as it stood on the ECU campus in 1940. This structure, demolished in 1967 to make
way for he Jenkins Fine Arts Center, appears in the "19SS ECU Historical Calendar
Education council pans standardized tests
aptitudes in recent
vCPS) � Colleges should admit nd that they distort the way stu
students on the basis ot" good dents prepare tor college,
grades, teacher recommenda-
tions and student essays, not on
standardized test scores, the
Several schools - Bates, Bow-
doin, Midlebury, and Union col-
leges, Massachusetts Institute of
applicants
years.
A survey released this tall by
FairTest, an organization that has
called tor reform oi the tests, con-
his contributions and dedication
in the tight tor First Amendment
rights.
Lanier joined the faculty at ECU
in 1959 serving in various posts in
the universitv library' and as t'or-
cently.
ACE represents 1,450 American
colleges and universities.
ACE President Robert H.
Atwell told participants in a con-
ference on minorities and higher
Technology, Harvard' Busines eluded that seven colleges which
School and Johns Hopkins' mod stopped using the tests attracted
school � have stopped using better and more diverse appli-
standardized tests to measure cants than in previous years.
J.unes Russo
Adam Blankenship
Anne Leigh Mallory
Shari Clemens
Maria Bell
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BUSINESS HOURS:
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10:00-5:00 p.m.
Phones
757-6366757-6557
757-655S757 6309
mer chairman oi the Department education that "Society should
of Library and Information Stud-
ies. He holds degrees from East
Carolina University, and the Uni-
versity of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill. In addition to his
many speeches he has made con-
tributions to professional journals in deciding whom to admit,
and books in the area of intellec-
tual freedom. He recently served
as guest editor oi the fall issue of
North Carolina Libraries, the
value the people who work hard,
not just score well
Atwell termed the use of the
tests in admissions "totally inap-
propriate" and said they led col-
leges to be "overly quantitative"
official journal of the N.C. Library
Association, which was devoted
to intellectual freedom. He also
holds offices in the American
Library Association, the Ameri-
can Association of School Librari-
ans, and was recently elected
Although he was stating his
personal opinion, not ACE policy,
Atwell's remarks "shocked and
amazed" Donald M. Stewart,
president of the College Board,
which sponsors the Scholastic
Aptitude Test and several other
standarized exams.
Other critics in recent years
haveclaimed the tests really don't
predict who will do well in col-
chairman of the Executive Board
oi the N.C. office of People for the lege, that they're culturally biased
American Way. against women and minorities,
Let us pick up
part of the tab
Our pleasure.
Join us at the Hilton Inn in
Charley O's restaurant for a special
dining experience. You'll find
reading Charley O's menu an
experience in itself, but it's even
better when you pay half price.
Specialties created by our chef
like jack Daniels Ribeye, Grilled
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are receiving rave reviews. Some
say it's our tresh ingredients, we
say it's our tradition. You tell us.
So, join us. Enjoy a special offer
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Stude
By C.A.THKI 1 WII Is
11 l Newt HufWM
When a physical fitness iea
says it pays to exercise, K
especially it the tca her i
lohnson, an E( U graduate
dent in physical education irj
Rocky Mount
fohnson, whose specia I
aerobii s, skipped away fr
Servico National Aerobi
lenge in West Palm Bea
last week with a tirst j.
and $10,000 in prizes
1 le had already won n
I in October m a series i
gional preliminai .
that placed him in
1 loi ida
China an
MOM OV
c krbache calh I I i
meeting between (
Son iet Union in
tion the t
mo ing - �
than 25 ycai
In the first intt i
granted to Chim
a So ietG mmui
iorbai h� praised the si
Si no-Soviet relat i -
the were impr
Its comments i
is year ssect i
weeklv Chinese i
look. Soviet and
agencies on S
accounts of tht
Soviet �� - -
Vremya a No n .
iev Sunda
The Chinese V- i 1
:v quoted tht S
a- sj ing he takes a
in China s p
reforms and
nations f.
could arc their e :
v ' v lorbacht expi
satisfat tion v
v se coopei
So iet rass nt ��� - .
its commentary
A political
lished. We believe a
Rc
Beat the Price
Increase!
Now
v'i. I I It . . . - �
Spec. I - '
centivt
increase In .
menibei ships
discounted. - -I
50! What agre;
to start the New V i
We can help
develop a total
ercise prograi
1988.
There s nn

�-��
mm





lendar
n which will promote in-
-t in our history and pride in
www
idars are available tor
� $5 each if bought in
u rchivcsandManu-
115 loyncr Library
Available by mail fo
nds of the ECU
ivesand Manu-
1 ibrary, ECU
v 27858. '
Sarolitiiati
ty si r. 1925.
I Advertising
atlves
ISSO
nship
:VERTISING
s; 25
3 rr
1SIVJ R MIS
. rach
ach
HOI RS
in.
ao
3 -6S
'57 6309
Student rewarded
ByG.A.THREEWITTS
ECU New Hlimu
When a physical fitness teacher
says it pays to exercise, believe it,
especially if the teacher is Tony
Johnson, an ECU graduate stu-
dent in physical education from
Rocky Mount.
Johnson, whose speciality is
aerobics, skipped away from the
Servieo National Aerobic Chal-
lenge in West Palm Beach, Fla
last week with a first place finish
and $10,000 in prizes.
He had already won more than
$500 in October in a series of re-
gional preliminary competitions
that placed him in the finals in
Florida.
For the national competition
Johnson choreographed and per-
formed a musical routine using all
the high steps, kicks, sit-ups,
push-ups and jumping jacks asso-
ciated with aerobic exercises.
"We were judged on things like
enthusiasm, appearance, endur-
ance, agility, flexibility, transi-
tions, creativity and the ability to
follow an instructor Johnson
said.
Hisroutineand subsequent free
style performances were judged
the best among the five U.S. com-
petitors in the national competi-
tion.
Johnson, 24, is a graduate stu-
dent instructor for physical edu-
cation and intramural classes in
aerobics and tennis at ECU. He
also teaches aerobics at a Rocky
Mount physical fitness firm.
He started out as a tennis
player. By the time he was 13
years old he was playing tourna-
ment tennis and traveling around
the country competing in the Jun-
ior Circuit against other players in
his age group. But his interest in
tennis was overshadowed three
years ago when he was a student
at N.C. Weslcyan College.
"My girlfriend got me to go
with her to an aerobics class at the
Rocky Mount Nautilus said
Johnson. He liked the class and
continued going.
China and USSR patch relations
MOSCOW (AP) � Mikhail S.
Gorbachev called for a summit
meeting between China and the
Soviet Union in another indica-
tion the two communist giants are
moving closer together after more
than 25 years of tension.
In the first interview believed
granted to Chinese journalists by
a Soviet Communist Partv leader,
Gorbachev praised the state of
Sino-Soviet relations and said
they were improving.
His comments were published
in this year's second edition of the
weekly Chinese magazine Out-
look. Soviet and Chinese news
aeenrics on Sunday issued short
accounts oi the interview. The
Soviet television news show,
Vrcmya, also reported the inter-
view Sunday night.
The Chinese Xinhua News
Agency quoted the Soviet leader
as saying he takes a great interest
in China's political and economic
reforms and suggested the two
nations, facing similar problems,
could share their experiences.
"Mikhail Gorbachev expressed
satisfaction with the accelerating
Soviet-Chinese cooperation the
Soviet Tass news agency said in
its commentary on the interview.
"A political dialogue is estab-
lished. We believe a Soviet-Chi-
nese summit could be its logical
extension. Going by everything,
both sides feel an objective need
for it
The Chinese Foreign Ministry
declined today to comment on the
report. In the past, the Soviets
have been more optimistic about
improved ties than the Chinese.
Gorbachev was quoted in the
Chinese article as praising last
February's first round of Chi-
nese-Soviet talks to resolve bor-
der disputes that led to hostilities
in the 1960s. The two nations
contest ownership of some is-
lands in the Amur River, located
between northeastern China and
eastern Siberia.
Gorbachev said the agreement
signed at the U.SSoviet summit
in December to scrap all interme-
diate-range nuclear missiles has
improved prospects for drasti-
cally reducing strategic, or long-
range, nuclear amis, Xinhua said.
Gorbachev and President Re-
agan signed a treaty last month in
Washington. It still must be ap-
proved by the U.S. Congress.
Gorbachev's proposed summit
would mark the first meeting be-
tween Chinese and Soviet gov-
ernmental leaders since 1969
when Prime Minister Alexci N.
Kosvgin met with Chinese Pre-
mier Chou Enlai. It the meeting
includes communist party heads,
the meeting would be the first
since Mao Tse-tung held a cantan-
kerous meeting with Soviet party
boss Nikita S. Khrushchev in
1959.
The Soviet Union and China
were allies in the 1950s but split in
the 1960s for a variety of reasons,
including Chinese opposition to
the Soviet model of development
which stressed heavy industry
and mechanization.
Their relations reached a low
point during China's Cultural
Revolution when frequent
clashes occurred along their
3,000-mile border.
After the fall of the Gang of Four
in 1976, Chinese leader Deng Xi-
aoping adopted a series of re-
forms designed to decentralize
China's economy and allow a
measure of economic freedom.
Since that time, Soviet econo-
mists reportedly have looked to
China with great interest as they,
too, seek to reform Soviet society
under Gorbachev's policies of
"perestroika or restructuring.
Visits have been exchanged at
the level of deputy prime minister
and deputy Politburo member,
trade has picked up and student
groups have been exchanged.
"After six months the aerobics
coordinator asked me if I would
like to go through some training
sessions and teach he said. This
worked out well for Johnson, too,
and hegavcupcompetitive tennis
and began teaching and prepar-
ing for competition in aerobics
instead.
"Aerobics is like any sport he
said. "You enjoy it and you keep
practicing it and after a while
people urge you to enter in com-
petition and you like that too. I
realize that 1 had the potential to
do something with it he said.
Last August in Washington,
D.C he finished second in the
Crystal Lite National Aerobic
Championships, his first compe-
tition. His first place finish in the
Servieo Nationals in November
was only his second national
competition, he plans to compete
in these championships again
next year.
After winning the national
event he contracted with a body
building firm to do an aerobics
video. He said work on the video
will begin in January.
The son of Raylon sand Cheryl
Johnson of Rocky Mount, Johnson
graduated from N.C. Weslcyan in
1985 with a triple major in Eng-
lish, Psychology and Theater.
He was to complete his work for
a Master's degree in Physical
Education at ECU December.
VILLAGE
DONNA
Bring in this ad for a 15
discount on a purchase of
$10 or more!
With Valid ECU ID.
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Master Card md Visa arc
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PHONE 754 9222
Expiration Date:
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Resoluti
Beat the Price
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increase in January. All
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We can help you
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1988.
There's more to The Spa
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classes and exercise
equipment. Our quali-
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hand at all times to
help you work out with
our Dynacam Equip-
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Aerobics instructors
conduct classes 36
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you get a tan in our
tanning bed, enjoy a
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bath, or bask in
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All at a special member-
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January 31st.
Drop by The Spa in
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Follow the latest
in Pirate action.
Read the sports
page in The East
Carolinian.
Simply the best.
SINGERS � DANCERS � INSTRUMENTALISTS
TECHNICIANS � VARIETY PERFORMERS
Kings Productions, the worid's 1 producer of
live entertainment, is holding auditions for the
spectacular 1988 season at CAROWINDS,
Charlotte, North Carolina
Pay is good and obs are plenty (we'll even
provide one round trip airfare if you're hired to
work at a park over 250 miles from your home)
Make your audition a show we can't do without1
GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA
Friday, January 22
University of North Carolina�Greensboro
Elliott University Center�Cone Ballroom
Singers 12-2 PM, Dancers & Instrumentalists: 3-4 PM
Specialty Acts: 12-4 PM
WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA
Saturday, January 23
North Carolina School of the Arts, Workplace Studios�614
Singers: 1-3 PM, Dancers & Instrumentalists: 4-5 PM
Specialty Acts, Technicians: 1-5 PM
For additional information
Carowinds Entertainment Office
Kings Productions
704 588 2606
800 544 5464
KINGS DOMINION � CAROWINDS � CANADA S
WONDERLAND � KINGS ISLAND � GREAT AMERICA
AUSTRALIA S WONDERLAND -K , n g s P , o d u c t, o n s 1 9 8 8
RUSH
.� j � � �
PHI KAPPA
TAU
I Want You
To Be A Phi Tau!
Mon. 7:00-11:00 - Sorority Night, come meet the sorority girls of E.C.U.
Tues. 7:00-11:00 - Sub Night
Wed. 7:00-11:00 - Meet the Brothers and little Sisters of Phi Kappa Tau
-For more information or a ride call 757-1319

� i�i � m m it � .�"����.�?.
' -f � g -a
"�ii)idj�i





(Ml iEafit (Earnlinian
Serymg the Exist Carolina campus community since 192
DAMEL MAUKEt, nii in
CLA DEANHAROTMn�to
AN I �� - vis JAMES FJ. WKXEE,mmmnfMamm
Carter i -� e� Mike Lv. kci ; -v. ��.
MENCLAND.CMBMMVi JOHN W. MEPLNIaiOm�
E STEVENS v MaCCLSK �����r
' � � V
Opinion
aspe 4
wort
Series ends
"heathietic department and fresh- We will admit that it is a long two-
Athletic Director Pave Hart hour drive from Raleigh to
faced with a no-win situation Greenville, and the resultant travel-
in dealing with the continuation of lag could be detrimental to
the NC
ite
Lt
��-
e serie
University football NCSU football players. but nonethe-
solution" to the prob- less � Valvano's argument is full of
indefinite cancellation of holes.
has drawbacks,but seems The proposal would not take place
t move for the future of the until 1991, giving the Wolfpack
rogram. plenty of time to adjust to the fact
is major, though, they would have to play here. The
most by the students, economics of the game would no
We are now a school without a major longer differ greatly from playing in
college rival. The State-ECU series one stadium or the other, and a
he
Iw
v LC
�vn a landmark came, home-and-home series would cer-
Camous Forum
Writer urges resolve to get involved
filled with tradition and celebration tainlv intensify the already heated
Lxtn v
Now we wi
to loo
L
holds
both schools.
To the editor
The new year has arrived. It is at
this time of year that we set goals for
ourselves. It you have yet to nuke a
resolution for the new year allow me
to suggest one: get involved in your
University.
IV you remember that gummed
lable that you stuck to the back of your
ID card? Use it! Go to the debates,
movies, theater production, basket-
ball games and lectures on campus.
Remember, you paid tor them.
i et. there are other wavs of getting
involved at East Carolina other than
being entertained. Get involved in
5.G.A. or Student Union. It you are
interested, consider going Creek or
join a political organization. Here at
ECU we have a large campus minis-
tory in which you may wish to get
involved.
In short call the Student Union lot
line at 757-6004 for entertainment
suggestions and listen to WZMB and
read Hie East Carolinian. Let the
news media know how you feel on
such topics as N.C. State being
dropped from the football schedule.
Media Board Chairman Chris
lolland's idea to create an ECU V.Y.
station and other important campus
topics.
In conclusion, there should be no
reason other than school and oft
campus work, that you can't get in-
volved in improving vourselt
through extracurricular activities at
East Carolina University.
tor tenure. This is not SO. Each depart-
ment and school has a committee that
iocs lust that.
What the senate voted against was
the formal establishment ot what
some saw as a super committee
While not objecting to the right ot the
vice chancellor to appoint an advi-
sory committee to assist him in his
own evaluation, the senate did object
to participation by the faculty
through the senate in selecting the
members of such a committee.
A perusal by you of the ECU Fac-
ulty Manual with particular attention
to the ECU Code and Appendices C
and D would help clarity the entire
process tor you.
Conner Atkeson
Chair of the Faculty
and defeat. rivalry.
no longer have that No, Valvano and company don't
brward to. and, in- want to play here for two simple
deed, will have no North Carolina reasons. The first is they are afraid
schools on the football schedule. It is they will get beat more often. Al-
a major loss both for bragging rights though NCSU leads the series by a
and for school pride. wide margin, the last si games have
At the crux of the matter, however, been split evenly, 3-3. Should NCSU
is the issue of where the game have to play here, the tide could turn
should be played. For as long as the in our favor.
las existed, it has been played The other reason is the continued
er-Finlev stadium. step-sister image of ECU. Officials at
reasoning behind that has NCSU feel they can bully other uni-
ather simple. Carter-Finley versities in a variety of ways because
nore fans than Ficklen does, they are bigger and receive more
means increased revenue for alumni and state support.
The firm stand taken by Hart and
But that situation is soon to the athletic department shows those
change. Plans for the expansion of officials to be wrong. ECU will not
Ficklen Stadium mean the stadium be bullied by the Wolfpack, and
will hold 50000by 1991, when it was Valvano is showing once again how
proposed the first game be held at little class or foresight he reallv has.
BCU. After that the series would be Remember, the rivalry, along with
held on a home and home basis, the big bucks, are over for them, too.
alternating each year.
The powers that be at NCSU, Additionally, it must be obvious
namely Jim Valvano, however, ref- that ECU is no school's step-sister.
use to work on such a basis. Valvano With teams like Syracuse and the
says they count on that game being a National Champion Miami Hum-
home game, and that would mean canes scheduled to visit Ficklen next
his team might play up to six games year, it is more likely we will be
on the road some seasons. Cmue ella.
As '88 begins
Welcome back to ECU, the 1988 the parking problem on campus
version.
seemed too short once more, the posed, and it will be up to the admin-
student bodv has again converged istrators and students to find those
on the university to do their best to which best suit the needs of the en-
make good grades and keep that all tire university and implement them
important social life active and as quickly as possible.
happy This will be the year we name the
As the new year rolls around we new classroom building and hope-
are reminded that it is an election fully begin wrork on a new intramu-
year, and will be filled with the can- ral facility It will be a year without a a f to anJ gauge AmcriCAn pubUc
didates rhetoric and political ma- NCSU-ECU football game, but a 0p;njon strictly by relying on just the articles printed on the
neuvering that underlie such year in which the national champi- OpinionEditorial page of The East Carolinian, they would
events. Many candidates will be ons come to Ficklen for a fight. get a limited sense of understanding of the true vast spectrum
making stops here in Greenville or It will also be the year the first true oi opinion held by Americans
sending their spouses, as several assessments of Chancellor Richard J .l8
striiuiu a , , jtiu reactionary right rebutted by the reactionary left which are in
already have. Lt. Governor Bob Jor- R. Eakin can be made. He has now tum ,4 thc reactionary right ad infinitum. What
dan, a candidate for the Democratic had his period of adjustment, and thcy wouldn't notice is what I think would be the majority of
nomination for governor, for ex- 1988 will tell us whether or not he is people out there whose train of thought doesn't run so much
ample will be campaigning at the the person that can move ECU on its in the extreme.
American Legion Building in best path into the future. �don't propoundto speak for this "silent maprity'Huiao
mexican iuti uuuuuig r consider myself to be a level-headed, intelligent person who
Greenville Wednesday. All together, this will be a year for �� �J at things in a rational way inslad 0J falling into
'88 will also bring the first big many big events and big decisions. aknec.jcrk posture exhibited by most hard line conservatives
campus elections since the fiasco of Cool heads must prevail and careful anc liberals, Webstcr'sdictionary defines moderate as: avoid-
the 1987 vote. We can only hope that planning must be undertaken. 1988 ing excesses and extremes, keeping within reasonable
steps have been taken to insure that will be the springboard into the bound temperate. Asa 'raging moderate' I will try to set
7ii , � loone AnrmsininDicfififKo forth my views on 3ome major subjects in dear term some-
will never happen again. 1990s, and ourrnain hope is that it be J ishard findhcn rti th h thcnamc
Another big issue for 1988 will be better than 1987 in every way
Watch your meat
To the eviitor.
It you had to kill an animal to eat.
would youf dwoulvl Fortunately, we . .
do not haj-q to make that choice. , feed.hungry �gQ$JQ. Certainly,
Unfortunately, we Americans Still.
you, the second leading killer in thc
United States is hcartdiseasc Whatis
a main contributor to heart disease
Meat So if vou quit smoking because
you want to c longer quit cal
meat for the same reason
A typical argument against th s
health argument is thc notion that
without eating meat one does not get
enough protein However thereisa
long list or high protein foods that do
not requite the killing ol animals
More substantially there arc many
nutrients derived from animal prod-
ucts n hich can be found in non-flesh
foods.
As we pour money into chanties
hke 1 ive Aid and CARE,(1 think both
groupsevents are fantastic) we do
not sec a more oln ious step to solu-
tions. Today 800 million people will
go hungry, while 90 ot U 5 grain
w ill go to feed livestock. To produce a
one pound steak, a cow is ted 16
pounds ol grain and soybeans. It
everyone would simply reduce meat
consumption by 10, over 12 million
tons aC raiu wvaU be .available to
Allen Manning
Junior
Special Education
Article correction
To the editor:
After a winter break that Several solutions have been SS:
of The East Carolinian.
The article concerned tenure, and
the thrust ot the writing was that the
faculty does not now evaluate others
decide to kill animals to eat anyway.
This decision we make everyday.
In today's society, we can end this
thirst to kill to eat. When we eat meat
it is not to survive. Simply, we slaugh-
ter hundreds of thousands of lives
because we "enjoy the taste of meat.
The average American,depending on
their eating habits, is responsible for
the death of somewhere between fifty
to a hundred animals per year.
However, just telling you that you
are needlessly killing animals is
probably not enough to convince you
to stop or reduce your meat consump-
tion.
1 guess 1 could tell you that in a 70-
vear lifetime you will eat 1 calf, 3
sheep, 11 cows, 23 pigs, 45 turkeys, and
11)97 chickens; but again that's a little
repetitive. So let me try a self-interest
argument.
As every Health 1000 text will tell
1 would hot end nurnan hunger.Inn It
would increase the potential ot an end
to world hunger
Becoming a vegetarian is not an
easy accomplishment, but reducing
your amount of meat consumption is
easy, it we stop thinking of the meat
as the meal, but rather as a meal sup-
plement, it would pave the road to
reduced animal slayingsand a health-
ier America, both physically and cthi-
call v.
"From an early age, 1 have abjured
the use ot meat, and the time will
come when men will look upon the
murder of animals as they look upon
the murder of men.
-Leonardo Da Vinci.
Steve Sommcrs
Junior
Political Science

Moderate takes stand
tor later primaries.
The Budget Deficit: Okay, so we're facing the biggest na-
tional deficit in history, and the arguments fly back and forth
as to whether or not they have I direct effect on Wall Street, as
well as on the long term inflation and interest rates. A house-
wife can use thc same argument with her husband after she
just spent five times what he earned, using his credit card
That is, until thc bills come in.
Well folks, the bills are just now starting to come due, what
we saw on Wall St. on Black Monday could be just thc tip of
the iceberg if wc don't do something about thc huge deficits
wc are facing. Continually messing around with thc tax
system would just add to all the confusion, so budget cuts
would be most effective through such revenue techniques as
'user fees aimed at people who can afford them most such as
the people who use private boats and planes, and also
Campus Spectrum
By
Mike Highsmilh
thing which is hard to find when sorting through
calling and finger pointing of thc recent letters, articles, and
rebuttals.
1 will start off with the political process itself: 1 see a two through true spending reductions
party political system where both parties are so locked into Whcn wc ncar aYtou 'spending cuts' in Washington, what
concrete platforms that it usually comes down to choosing wc Mrcly hcar is lnat wc arc not spcniing icss on a program
between the lesser of two evils. Whatever happened to John than wc did last ycar wc arc pJy not spending as much of
Anderson? I thought at last there was a chance to open up the a percentage Df increase than last year that wc expected and
process to a third viewpoint, one that isn't hindered by all the piannccl 0n. Everybody knows it is time to get serious about
political restraints, and one that can possibly offer logical this, so one way to deal with it is to enact a spending freeze on
F0R6eTIT,PlCK�
II
alternatives instead of so much rhetoric and hyperbole
1 personally would prefer that we institite an election by
popular vote. The process as it exists today could conceivably
elect a president who did not get a majority of the vote. The
primaries should also be modified. What we see now is the
candidates posturing for position in the 'early primary' states,
making them tell thc people in those states what they want to
hear, even if it means 'creating positions' on locally favored
issues. One alternative would be to go to regional primaries,
preventing candidates from kissing up to certain few states to th the'presidentano"Coneress.
achieve a favorable response and a greater name recognition . s�e FOREIGN, page 5
most programs, except for Social Security which wc would
just hold to less of an increase than planned. One major way
which we could lop off billions from budget expenditures is
to do away with all foreign aid, and start fresh on a casc-by-
case basis and help only those countries that truly need it for
the welfare of their people. What were we doing sending
millions and millions to Haiti annually? And that is just one
example out of the dozens and dozens that could be used.
Lets get real, less talk and more action. And that goes for
Rea
JaekValcnti,gettinj
said to Gorbachev j(
by now Gorbachev
the jlls in Iowa
was going, he'd win
in Iowa it he had sta
couple ot works
maybe, given that K
quite cleat that it sht
live in the White H
chances would need)
lt was hard to belie
subject of human rig
Gorbachev showed
Khrushchev When
about human rights
akia Kick in 1
journalist to undei
Khrushchev had h
remove thejoum
anka to be taugl
(. lorbachev didn t pi
way. 1 tc said lie w ai
beinten iewed
thing to a gi
no other reason a
think ot why he
And then I
impron
Habiti
In MAR1 K
c a in a
an I didn : e
get out ol il
lusl kinda '
I ord , ati
good w ill Old as
first good hoi
lie Mae
va
When former Pre
Carter came to Charl
hammei and I
the poor I n m
church m
Associate rr
svM'mu.un an? si
era' zealots and
Park ��: j
that
teach
radical program U
Foreii
oursolvos hsg
WlthOUl a.
intematioi
sel es into a
conflict and
pcrcentap
alh would
o one and w J
that affects us
It has been e
have a presu
cooperation
shooting at
onevervoi j
to deal w ith Irj
are the ones
lanes the:
w v1 ; krtOM
who mined tH
The first H
is fired u
out e en si
stand that du
them And n
the same e
swapp
Cent n
a neui
way w e ha,
of the poop vi
ation o ei w
certainh
what the do
1 war : a: n
crossfire N
previous disd
boy do
assassi
dieted
a crossfire �
examining I
evew imess a
We sc n I
pohc net
communist
we'll suppoi
what
declared cot
bleeders
e.g the S
(and to a
perceive
hardline
it otht
It wotev. i
together W
Rica I
keep t.v
them vv
a powsbc
them u tho
There
thing to vV
all nvsatv V
rhetoric Wf4
gcther AKJ
quote me M
ScrwftfM
"W- �� �M�
Wi imW iMi.ir.rmm.mm





nvolved
' ausc
1 � iting
�� A th -
� n that
en it on(
gl. I
c is a
ds that do
ne inimals.
are many
� n-flcsh
' ties
I � ink botli
� istic) we do
is step to solu-
�" p pie will
;
grain
produce a
sr is fed 16
soybeans. If
. , reduce meat
. over 12 million
�aid be available to
'inly, this
C - i, but it
an end
not an
luring
imption is
� the meat
meal sup-
2 road to
lahealth-
.and ethi-
ave abjured
"he time will
k upon the
� :y look upon
Steve Sommcrp
Junior
'olitical Sciene
nd
- the biggest na-
ckand forth
ffect on Wall Street, as
it rates. A housc-
her husband after she
using his credit card.
i come due, what
could be just the tip of
ut the huge deficits
around with the tax
i fusion, so budget cuts
uch revenue techniques as
ford them most such as
and planes, and also
)
jm

: cuts' in Washington, what
pending less on a program
ely not spending as much of
t year that we expected and
time to get serious about
t enact a spending freeze on
li Security which we would
an planned. One major way
rom budget expenditures is
and start fresh on a casc-by-
untries that truly need it for
at were we doing sending
mually? And that is just one
iozens that could be used,
re action. And that goes for
I page 5
THE HAST CAROLINIAN
ANUAR 12 ll'S
Reagan comes to conclusions about Gorbachev
Jack Valenti, getting into the act,
said to Gorbachev jocularly that
by now Gorbachev was third in
the polls in Iowa. At the rate he
was going, he'd win the primary
in Iowa if he had stayed around a
couple oi weeks. Appropriate,
maybe, given that Raisa made it
quite clear that if she was going to
live in the White House, some
changes would need to be made.
It was hard to believe. When the
subject oi human rights came up,
Gorbachev showed a touch of
Khrushchev. When K. was asked
about human rights in Czechoslo-
vakia back in 1959, he gave the
journalist to understand that if
Khrushchev had his way, he'd
remove the journalist to the Luby-
anka to be taught good manners.
Gorbachev didn't put it quite that
way. 1 le said he was not there to
be interviewed, which was an odd
thing to say given that there was
no other reason anyone could
think of why he was there.
And then there was his famous
impromptu stop to say hello to the
people of Washington. People arc
Gorby's current infatuation. "I
feel he told some Americans at a
meeting in the Soviet Embassy,
"we should really ponder
whether we might not be lagging
behind the sentiments, the fccl-
ingsofour peoples Gorbachev's
"people" would like most of all to
be free, and Gorbachev is cer-
tainly lagging behind in giving
his people what they'd like.
An example of the new U.S.
sophistication is given by John
Williams, who happened to be on
the sidewalk where Gorbachev
stopped. He is identified as an
executive assistant with the
Council for Court Excellence. His
comment was that he wasn't en-
tirely appeased on the matter of
the Soviet Union. But "it docs
display some kind of amazing
trust in the American people he
said. Hard to know exactly what
he expected the American people
to do with Gorbachev when he,
stopped suddenly to shake '
hands. Lynch him?
But the great suprise was that of
Reagan when he called in the four
columnists and told them about
his epiphany. He said that he has
change his mind about the Soviet
Union, which he no longer be-
lieves wishes to stress Marxism-
Leninism throughout the world.
"Possibly the fundamental
change is that in the past, Soviet
leaders have openly expressed
their acceptance of the Marxist
theory of the one-world commu-
nist state; that theirobligation was
to expand in the whole world.
They no longer feel that way
The presidnet was asked how
became to that conclusion, and he
replied that Gorbachev was "the
first and only leader that has
never stood up before" a Commu-
nist Party gathering "and openly
stated that (global) goal, as all the
others have
On Nov. 2, five weeks before
Mr. Reagan made this statement,
Mikhail Gorbachev gave a speech
to 6,(X)0 members of Communist
parties from all over the world, at
the Kremlin's Palace nf Con-
gresses. The peroration of that
speech was: "In October 1917, we
parted with the Old World, re-
fecting it once and for all. We are
moving toward a new world, the
world of communism. We shall
never turn off that road
It is dismaying to see a presi-
dent with the acuity of Ronald
Reagan come to conclusions that
among other things would scan-
dalize Gorbachev himself. When
Roosevelt (FDR) warmed it up
with Molotov in 1944-45 and said
to him things on the oder of,
"You're too smart, Molotov old
boy, to believe all that see are aye
pec about communism all over
the world he thought he was
charming the pants off Molotov.
He was doing nothing of the sort.
Molotov's reaction, back home,
was not unlike that oi a papal
delegate who had been told in
convidence by a foreign lead r
that in his heart of hearts, he knew
all that stuff about Jesus was, well,
you know, for the birds.
Mr. Reagan has become famous
for his mastery or the Russian
phrase, "trust but verify I le is
doing better right now at verify-
ing holes in the ground for mis-
siles than he is in verifying what
the communists are saying r
instance, to 6,000 communist
On The Right
By
William F. Bucklev Jr.
delegates on Nov. ?. If Gorbachev
is not interested in world domin-
ion, why is he spending $10 mil
lion a day on the militarization o(
Cuba and Nicaragua?
Habitat for Humanity provides homes for the poor to live in
By MARY KRATT
Special to The Last Carolinian
"We was in a pitiful condition,
and didn't ever think we would
get out oi it. But now, I feel like I'm
just kinda flying - flying with the
Lord, catching the breeze of His
good willOld as I is, this is the
tirst good house I ever lived in -
Lillie Mae Brownes, Americus,
Ga.
When former President Jimmy
Carter came to Charlotte in July to
hammer and finish 14 houses for
the poor, I remembered a stormv
church meeting in 1982.
Associate ministers just out of
seminary arc supposed to be lib-
eral zealots, and ours at Myers
Park Baptist had just proposed
that church leaders endorse a
radical program to provide inter-
cst-frce loans to poor people so
they could own homes. Imagine
them, Dale Mullinix urged,
people who struggle all their lives
just to pay rent owning a modest
house, working on it themselves,
paying for it. The idea was called
Habitat for Humanity.
The concept came from Geor-
gia, he said. It was working, he
said. He had been there and seen
it. He told stories of changed lives,
gave facts and figures. The idea
was to gather donations, loans
and volunteer labor, to offer
housesnotasactsofcharity,butto
sell them to the poor for what they
cost, without interest or profit,
and to use payments for new
construction. The skeptical doc-
tors, lawyers, and businesspcr-
sons of the affluent church ques-
tioncd. "You've got to be kid-
Foreign policy mixed up
Continued from page 4
The Persian Gunow tnat we nave unilaterally appointed
ourselves big brother of the shipping lanes in that region
without achieving a consensus of all parties (or even seeking
international feedback beforehand), we have gotten our-
selves into a situation that potentially could lead to bloody
conflict, and there is no backing away. Since a very small
percentage of our oil imports come from that region, I person-
ally would have preferred that we go to each ally involved one
by one and work in cohesion with all of them on this problem
that affects us all.
It has been evident over the last 7 years that we don't exactly
have a president who thrives on consensus, consultation, and
cooperation. We do seem to be holding the Iranians back from
shooting at ships with the U.S. flag, but it is still open season
on everyone else. I'm not a violent person, but the only way
to deal with Iran is on their own terms. If t is known that they
are the ones who have been laying mines in the shipping
lanes, then their entire coastline should be mined as well. We
won't know who laid those mines any more than they know
who mined the shipping lanes.
The first American that is killed, or the first U.S. ship that
is fired upon by Iran should be retaliated against by taking
out every silkworm missile along their coast, and I under-
stand that due to our intelligence we know about most all of
them. And now our boys in the gulf are in danger of dying by
the same weapons which we gave them when we weren't
swapping them for hostages. Brilliant move, Ron.
Central America: I truly think that if a national poll taken by
a neutral agency using neutral quesions on the subject of the
way we have been handling the Nicaraguan situation, many
of the people polled would not know mrch about the situ-
ation over what Dan Rather or Tom Brokaw told them, an
certainly not enough to offer an informed opinion; but from
what they do know they would generally be against funding
a war that not only catches the civilian population in the
crossfire, but also comes straight out of our budget. (See
previous discussion). It wasn't too long ago that an American
boy down there working on a mission of peace was shot
assassination style by the contras. They never enven contra-
dicted that they killed him, but they did say he was caught in
a crossfire, which turned out to be totally untrue, proven by
examining the types of headwounds he suffered as well as
eyewitness accounts of what happened.
We seem to have a drastic double standard in our foreign
policy, where if a country has a government declared to be
communist, we can't do enough to change their situation; but
we'll support, even fund authoritarian dictatorships no mater
what atrocities they commit, as long as they say they aren't
declared communist. Some of our best friends and budget
bleeders have turned out to be proven murderous regimes;
e.g the Shah of Iran, Somoza, Marcos. 'Papa Doc' Duvalicr
(and to an extent 'Baby Doc his son), etc ad nauseam. I
perceive the long term communist threat as distinctly as any
hard line conservative, but I think there are ways to deal with
it other than U.S. funding of contrived wars.
If we feel that threatened by Nicaragua, then we should get
together with our friends in Honduras, El Salvador, and Costa
Rica and form a blockade of alliance around Nicaragua and
keep them from exporting their revolution, as well as watch
them closely to make sure they obey international laws, with
a possible naval blockade as an alternative looming over
them if they don't.
There is no way I can cover all the topics in one article, the
thing to do is keep the dialogue and discussion going; but by
all means let us offer alternatives and insights rather than
rhetoric and hyperbole. We work best when we work to-
gether. A house divided against itself cannot stand. You can
quote me on that.
(Editor's note: Mike Highsmith is a graduate student in the
School of Business and a former staff writer for The East Carolin-
ianA
ding some said. "Being Chris-
tian, tithing, investing in social
programs is one thing, but inter-
est-free loans are bad business.
Irresponsible
Still they voted for it. I watched
them. And four nearby churches'
leaders did too, Presbyterian,
Methodist, Episcopal, forming a
financial coalition that reached
into one of the worst neighbor-
hoods in Charlotte, Optimist
Park, a decaying, crime-ridden
relic of a mill village. Strong lead-
ers from within the Optimist Park
neighborhood met the churches
and madeithappen.ini 987 Opti-
mist Park has earnedd its name.
The neighborhood has radicallv
changed in spirit and sight, with
thirty Habitat houses built by
skilled volunteer labor and intri-
cate community planning.
In The Charlotte Observer,
Optimist Park leader Richard
Banks describes Habitat as "not
just a house-building program. It
is a community-building pro-
gram For people who have been
the "objects of mistrust all their
lives, suddenly people are saying,
'I trust you to pay the mortgage. I
trust you to be good neighbor
The new homeowners are proud.
They are paying monthly mort-
gage installments of about $150.
And prior to Jimmy Carter's
coming with a massive volunteer
labor force to raise fourteen new
houses from concrete slabs in one
week's time, Optimist residents
raised $2,500 door to door and by
a neighborhood festival toward
building more houses for the
poor. "The neighborhood says
Banks, "is no longer the same
Throughout North Carolina,
Habitat affiliates have raised an
additional thirtv basic houses in
Brevard, Durham, Roanoke Rap-
ids, Chapel Hill, Raleigh, Win-
ston-Salem, Marion and Trvon.
Local leaders with clout, such as
Presbyterian layman-builder
John Crosland, Jr. have made an
important difference.
Crosland, selected as "19S5
Builder of the Year" by Profes-
sional Builder magazine, became
a forceful chairman of the ledg-
ling Habitat Board in Charlotte
after visiting Habitat housing in
Americus.
The Charlotte affiliate of Habi-
tat employs a full-time builder,
Drew Cauthell, a skilled crafts-
man with deep religious convic-
tions. Executive director Julia
Maulden, a retired Charlotte
teacher and school board member
serves without pay.
I labitat's primary founder and
organizer, Miller Fuller, is a tall,
rangy traveling man, fervent in
speech and enormously success-
ful in his advocacy effort with
over 200 affiliates, which since
1976 have built over 2000 houses
in U.S. and Canada with pro
also in IS countries. Fuller be-
lieves, 'The emphasis today par-
ticularly with some television
evangelists, seems to be on what
can God do tor me? It seems to me
that's oii the path. The whole
purposeofl labitat is to offer good
news for the poor-hut also to give
affluent people an opportunity to
serve
For information oi donations,
contact Habitat for 1 lumanit) ,419
W. Church St Americus, Ga
31757.
(Editor's note: This article appt
as furt of the continuing scries on the
homeless and poor in North Carolina
begun last semester. Ma . Katt is a
Charlotte poet and the auth rt fsev
eral published works t f fiction and
non-fiction.)
�uVe astute enough to discuss the
EMixiij mm I hi rim mill i) ikIij
Victor FrankTs "Existential Vacuum5
T
m
m
And you're still smoking:
H " A
�' .�.
IM�w���i��
�aiMpfc� m I � i � � '��
�Aurfaafr.f.
� ��





7
TlIE EAS1 v AROI IMAN
JANUARY 12. 1988
Classifieds
HI.I P WANTED
I VRN up to S5,(XX) this school war
managing on campus marketing pro
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HELP WANTED v lean parking lots.
N- ed dri , ense Schedule Sun 4
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HI I P IVAN II D 'art time interior de

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dance; call Morgan at 738 7967 Reason
able rail's References on request.
OAK PINI ITI St 1 twin bod, oak
dresser for sale. Nog Call 756-9652 after
p.m
The Tropical Zone: G villc's
hottest new concept in Tanning.
Featuring State of the Art Silver
Solarium. Special rates lor
students, eull lor an
appointment 355 5120.
FOR SAIL Scaly mattress, springs and FEMALE ROOMMATE needed immedi-
frame: S75, chest of drawers: $23. Call 758- ately. Eastbrook Apts. Own room. $120
7090 after 5:00 p.m.
mo. and 13 utilities. Call Now. 758 4l24.
IS II 1 RtIE you can buy jeeps for S44 NEED FEMALE roomatc to share three
through the U.S. government? Get the facts bedroom. Eastbrook Apartment, 13 rent;
�llllTIT-7�Till-lI (-1 -M -I � - . I . , x i I -ii
today! Call 1-312-742-1142 Ext. 5271-A.
FOR SALE: 2 sofas with pillows, could be
used as daybeds. $40.00 for both. Call after
6:00 p.m 758-5422.
THE TROPICAL ZONE: G ville s hottest
new concept in tanning. Featuring state of
the Art Silver Solarium. Special rates for
students. Call tor an appointment. 355-
5120.
CHEAP! CHEAP! CHEAP! Grog's and
Attic memberships! Sec any Theta Chi to
get one for yourself!
FOR RENT
ROOM FOR RENT: For female, every-
thing included. Call after 6:00 p.m. 758-
5422
rW() ROOMATES needed to share room
in Wild wood Villas townhouse. $125.00
each plus utilities Call Julie 752-4781.
WANTED � Male roommate for only 1
semester. Non-smoker, non-drinker. SI 15
a month plus 15 utilities. Call 758-9065
Iar River Est.
S120, plus 13 utilities. On bus line. Call
752-3678. Keep trying!
ROOM AVAILABLE:
smoker. Call 757-1798.
For female, non-
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New �
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2H.X) K fith Street
�Ivocatcci Near ECU
�Near Major Shopping Centers
�Arross From Highway fatrol Station
Umltei Oder - $275 a month
Contact J. T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830 1937
Ofrie open - Apt 8, 12 - 5:30 p m.
�AZALEA GARDENS-
Clean anil quiet one twdroom furnished
apartments, energy efTu lent, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $195 a month. 6
month lease. MOBILE HOME RENTALS -
couples or singles. Apartment and mobile
homes in Azalea Gardens near llrook Valley
County Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756 7815
PERSONALS
WAN I"ED 1 male roommate to share 2 GINNY BALDREE - True friends are for
bdrm. apt. 2 blocks from campus, $150.00 ever friends, despite seven-and-a-half
month, plus utilities and deposit. Call 758- month jokes Clad to have you back,
0395 atter 5 p.m. groovy chic. Let's party' Love, Kathi.
ATTENTION ALL FRATERNITY
PRESIDENTS - There will be an I EC
meeting today at 5:00 p.m. at Mendenhall
This is an important meeting, so make sure
you show up or send a representative.
ALL STUDENTS: if you like traveling
and want to e,et involved with Student
Union, then come to the Travel Commit-
tee meeting on Wed. January 20th at 5
p.m. in Mendenhall. for more info, call
757 6611.
DELTA SIGMA THETA SORORITY,
Inc. will besponsoringa party at theUn-
limited Touch, Thursday, an. 14th. Ad-
mission is SI with college I.D freshman
are welcome.
WEDNESDAY NILE BACK-TO-
SCHOOL party at Rafters I adics free
'til 10:30. 25 cent draft all night.
COLLEGE NITE at Sportsworld every
Tuesday 7-11 p.m.$1.50 with college II)
WELCOME BACK! The New Deli con
tunics to jam in the new year with the
Pressure Hoys on Thursday, In Decision
on Friday, and Kythm Method on Satur-
day.
SIG EPS � welcome back and be ready
for a killer semester.
THETA CHI PLEDGES: Tins is it guys,
you can smell it in the air. Keep going
and do your best. Cood Luck Hill.
TO R, MY ONE AND ONLY
TROOPER! I love you with all ot my
heart. Sorry about this past weekend
Can't wait to see you on Friday' I miss
you bunches and bun- lies All my love
AI M
rO RN, howdy! ! typed the above
message tor AI M I lope . i like it
cause vve sure di i like v on' 1 o e AEM's
SIS.
NOCOVI RCH UCI at the Theta Chi
happy night at Crogs this Wednesday
There will be drink specials Start your
semester ofl right
OFF THE CUFF welcomes all ECU I
ulty and students ba k I
Rod, 1k y,In. 1 and Harry ai
hungry. Plea i see them i i
the Lastarohn Lea I'ai
DI LTAZETA-I .
1 loliday break" ire r
t rward to this semestei
you're the best and w
taPi's
Mil I AHI-Wt IOM1 BA K! I
get ready to ru
OFF T1IK CLFF It Hsppy to Announce
All New Moct�il Menu
Sheraton G-eev lie � 203 'A Gree
Announcements
I BRARi SCHEDULE
rsl ovner i ibrary are as
rhurs 8 a m Midnight,
S a tn " p m . Sat : g a m. - 8 p.m
tl : 12 f ' i�hl fol ���mg
� r Ihe Martin
Luther King, Jr. I lohdav Sal , Ian. 16 9
12 Nixm 10
: ' IS:CLOSl
C l F.XDAR REVISIONS
Please and announce to
.
s-S, will
I thei - s � obser ance
. .
� - - v ! be a
rstal
no classes - t on I
WM � .e reviBr� veil! mean
ii the -piine
d mo caicnd
SAVE THOSE WRAPPERS
fla-
ritos brand cool
gs in the U.S.
edy Competition display
tudent B - Sti re lobby
hall. ECU could win a free
concert if we collect the most
. . re
FRESHMEN SOPHOMORES
Tak this spring thai can open
the door I re. M . tarv Sci-
OTCandthe
Arn e hour course that counts as
live credit and entails no commit-
' ind no uniform or
Ehis course could
rststcj � ward a commission asan
r. For more info call Capt.
: Lieutenant Mike
at 757 6 67 or visa Erwin
111.
SYMPHONY
TIk . Symphony and the NC.
Svmphoi . � present a concert will
special gucs' el list, Lynn HarrclL on
Sun Ian 17, 1988, at 3:15 p m in Wright
Auditorium. The 130 piece combined
orchestras will perform works by Wag-
ner, Schubert, and Dvorak. Tickets tor this
. werful event are available at the Cen
tral Ticket Office, Mendenhall, 757-6611,
ext 266. Central Ticket Office hours are
am. until 6:00 p.m. This even! is
isored by the Dept of University
Its
Cl ASS CLOWNS
Win pi izes and ia:n exposure by enter
ing tl S Colk .e Comedy Competi
lion. Wed an. 20,8:00 p.m in the Coffee-
house, groundfloor, Mendenhall. Prepare
a 3-minutc comedy routine (no vulgar or
obscene material please) and have it
judged by professional comedians. Tree t
shirts to all participants Oil 757-6611,
ext. 27 for more info.
COMEDY COMPET1TIC)N
Come cheer on your favorite ECU
comedian as they compete for prizes in the
US. College Comedy Competition. Free
Doritos and sticklets gum to be given
awav, Wed Jan Mat 8 p.m. in the Coffee-
house, groundfloor, Mendcnahll.
SELF-HELP POSITIQN
Part-time ClerkTypist and Reception-
ist: The Department of Political Science
seeks a reliable, conscientious, and effi-
cient student with strong skills and some
experience to assist staff and faculty in a
variety of activities. Good typing, copying
and clerical skills are desired. Please con-
tact Mrs. Cynthia Smith, Brewster A-124
personally or by telephone, 757-6030, 8:30
a.m. to 5 p.m Mon. - Fri. We will be hiring
as soon as possible.
NURSING GRADUATES
In order to receive your Nursing Pin by
April, 1988, orders must be placed in the
Student Store, Wright Bldg no later than
F-b. 1, 1988. Orders should be placed at
pe Jewelry Counter. Orders must be paid
in full when the order is placed.
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Hloxton I louse is offering
these one hour programs on beginning a
resume for your job search. 1 Handouts and
pimples will be given out to the first 20
people to come to each session No sign up
required. These sessions are held in the
Career Planning Room on Jan. 22 & 28 at 3
p m and on an. 26 at 7 p.m.
ALPHA EPSILON DELTA
Alpha Epsiion Delta members and in-
terested premed students: The Biology
Club is sponsoring its annual Blood
Wobitenn Wed 2D and Trrur 21. Your
help from 11:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on these
days will beglfeatly appreciated! It will be
held in Mendenhall 224.
ALL STUDENTS
The Travel Committee is having their
tirst meeting for the semester. All arc wel-
come. It will be Wed Jan. 20th at 5 p.m. in
Mendenhall. Please try to attend. For fur-
ther info call 757-6611.
SJEAK PREVIEW
"Return of the Living Dead, Part II" will
be shown tonight at 8:00 p.m. in I Iendrix
1 heatre. Free movie posters to the first 500
people who attend.
MUSICAL
The long-running hit Broadway musi-
cal, Purhe, will be performed in Wright
Auditorium on Wed Jan. 27,1988, at 8:00
p.m. This energy packed blockbuster, full
of sweet ballads and powerful production
numbers, will be here for one perform-
ance only. Tickets for this delightful event
are available at the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall, ECU, 757-6611, ext. 266.
Central Ticket Office hours are 11:00 a.m.
until 6:00 p.m. This event is sponsored by
the Dept. of University Unions.
SRSVGRAD STUDENTS
Now is the time to be registered with
the Career Manning and Placement Serv-
ice in the Bloxton I louse. Located between
Mendenhall and Greene Residence I (all,
this is a place where graduating students
mav put resumes and establish a creden-
tials file. Interview sign ups begin Jan. 20
and you must be registered to sign up.
General Information meetings will be
held Jan. 19 at 3 & 4 p.m. in Mendenhall
221.
INTERVIEW WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton I louse is offering
these one hour sessions to aid you in
developing better interviewing skills. A
film and discussion of how to interview
on and off campus will be shared. These
sessions are held in the Career Planning
Room on Jan. 20, 25, & 26 at 3 p.m. and at
7 p.m. on Jan. 26.
BIOLOGYCHEMISTRY
Those who graduate this year will want
to register at the Career Planning and
Placement Service. The Research Triangle
Institute will be interviewing on campus it
enough majors sign up. You may want to
clip this and post so no others will see.
Glaxo will also be here and we have vide-
otapes on career with the Southern Re-
search Institute and the National Cancer
Institute.
DANCE PERFORMANCE
ATLANTIC DANCE TIIEATRE pres-
ents "POINTFS OF PASSION-BODIES
IN BEAT an evening of dance Jan. 23,
8:15 p.m New Bern Senior High School
Auditorium, and Jan. 24, 8:15 p.m D.I 1.
Conley High in Greenville. Breathtaking
Ballet, I lot Ja.z, and Titillating Tap, new
works recently choreographed for the
semi-professional dance company and
numbers tix) hot to put down arc guaran-
teed to heat up your winter. Tickets are s
in advance; S8 at the door. For further
info contact Atlantic Dance Theatre at
(919)637-3941.
VOCAL ARTS ENSEMBLE
The Dept. of University Unions and
The School of Music present the Los
Angeles Vocal Arts Ensemble, a uniquely
talented croup ol singers and accompa-
nists, m I Iendrix Theatre on Thurs Jan.
21, 1988, at 8:00 p.m. Tickets for this
wonderful concert are available at the
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall, 757-
6611, ext. 266. Central Ticket Office hours
are 11:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m.
CHOIR
The Greenville ChoraT Society will be
auditioning lor their Spring program on
Sun Jan. 10 at Memorial Baptist Church,
Greenville. If you were unable to audition
at the above date and time, please contact
the Musical Director, Dr. Rhonda Flem-
ing, at 756-3618.
SELF-HELP POSITION
Part-time ClerkTypist and Reception
ist: The Office of International Studies and
Scholarships needs a reliable, conscien-
tious, and efficient student with strong
skills and some experience to assist in a
variety of activities. Cood typing, copy-
ing, and clerical skills are desired. Please
contact Dr. Maurice D. Simon at 757-6504
or apply at his office, Brewster A-l 18. We
will bo hiring as soon as possible.
EPISCOPAL FELLOWSHIP
The Episcopal Student Fellowship
wants YOU! I lolv Communion 5:30 p.m.
Wednesdays, 4th St 1 block north of
Garrett Dorm. For more info, call Allen
Manning 758-1440.
AWARDS CEREMONY
The Eta Nu Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha
Fraternity, Inc. announces their 4th An-
� �
: ' : '
Awards my and Ue.
day evening j
Men
IS ' s e -
LASAGN1 :
Wes2fcl invites you to t Mel
Student Center (5 IE 5th St. across fi
Garrett dorm) this Wed. nighl at 5 .
and ever) Wed � t for a d
can cat home cooked 1
im. This week the mea
eludes homemade lasagne, bread, sa
and tea for only SI. Call 758-2030fon
vations. Sp insorcd by Presbyterian and
Methodist Campus Ministries
MODELS NEEDED
Positions are open for mod ling m
School of Art fig ire The
-salary ;sSecTrartGbt I
Connie Folmer in - s 2000 or call 757
6563 tor info, and application forms. T.
Gordley mav be reached at 757-625
Jenkins I 7
SEP
The first mccl ts f �: I
ocracy will meel in Menden-
hall Sun , 17th at 7 p m v members
welcome.
AI MEETING
Amnesty International meetsevi ry I
Wed. at B p.m. at St. Paul - Episx .
Church, 401 E. 4th Si, in the upper I
from the 4th St. entrance Next me
Jan. 27th.
CAMPREC. DAY
Summer positions with camps, parks,
and resorts are available for students m a
variety of majors. Over fifty recreational
employers will interview students , ��
Recreation Dav, Ian 28, in Men:
Gym. To sign up tor intcr iei s and more
into, contact Cooperative Education in
304 Rawl.
Th& East Carolinian
is now taking applications for the following positions:
Staff writers
t
Layout artists
Editorial columnists
arn while you learn and
jiublishing field. Writers
and will be trained
and editing. Come grow with
lications building.
Quitting s,
Trying
My New Yean r
quit snu ki n
HELP!
Congratulations I
have a healthier Nv-
many strategics for a
ing your goals. Let'
cessation first:
�list all the i
want to quil Ever
going to bed, r
reasons 10 times
�involve som
friend to quit v.
friend you can quit i
date t �
�switch
brand you find
lower in tar ai
your current
�cut
cigarettes)
half of each ci
postpone
rcttc one hour.
�stop bu
rcttesand
with
when
� :
Fund
A r i sti
I
nutritional n
sickle cell d
funded
Chi Id r
The i
supported a$
will be conductt
tianNai
gist Dr. C. Tatc H - -
the rru dical s :
Comprehc
gram.
RMCC. i
memory of M
Ra v A. l� �
Lanier
GeneD.Lanier
ECU Department ot I
Information E - v
Chairman of th
sors ot the North Caroij
of People tor the
meeting in exc
the Capitol Citj
'C on Decemb i -
Attorney k tl
serves as Executive
office. People :
Wav is a nonp
constitutional lil i
tion formed in 1 ;
nationally
ligious leadc rs ii '
producer Norman Leal
era tic Congr I
Jordan, nd foi
Congressman hn
With headquart rs n
ton, DC, there are
New York Cal
Carolina.
North Caroli
members and tl
serve First A:
doms. Or pro
the freedom to rca
honored I
group pr
cellenceai
to learn in An
i .





I

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 12,1988
v 1W
NO It
St a rl i
t.k
i

� Ml I ,
nounce
Come Home u ith J
Me! J
MfDU
i s c.i:
p.m. in

� �
MODI LS NE1 PEP

si n
I Ml l.7l(.
I y i
AMI' RJ C. D.

nal
more
:i in
� - �
ltions:
in the
latest
thus.
Quitting smoking, losing weight
Trying to keep those New Year resolutions
Aly New Years' resolution was to
quit smoking and loose weight
HELP!
Congratulations for wanting to
have a healthier 1988! There are
many strategies for accomplish-
ing your goals. Let's take smoking
cessation first:
�list all the reasons why you
want to quit. Every night before
going to bed, repeat one of" the
reasons 10 times.
�involve someone else. Ask a
friend to quit with you or bet a
friend you can quit on your target
date tor stopping.
�switch brands. Switch to a
brand you find distasteful and
lower in tar and nicotine than
your current brand.
�cut down on the number of
cigarettes you smoke. Smoke only
halt of each cigarette and each day
postpone lighting your first ciga-
rette one hour.
�Mop buying cartons of ciga-
rettes and stop carrying cigarettes
with von; leave them at home
when you're in class.
�don't empty your ashtrays.
This will not only remind you of
how many cigarettes you have
smoked each day, the sight and
smell of stale butts will be very
unpleasant
�change your eating habits to
aid incuttingdown. If you associ-
ate smoking with drinking coffee
or alcohol, drink something dif-
ferent such as juice or a soft drink.
Health Column
By MARY HLESHA-ADAMS
tCU Student Health Center
These are just a few ideas to get
you started on stopping smoking.
Some people try the "cold turkey"
approach and are quite success-
ful. Others benefit more from
taking a smoking cessation class.
Still others try both approaches
together. Check The East Carolin-
ian for ads about the smoking
cessation classes if you would like
to attend.
For many smoking cessation
and weight maintenance co hand
in hand. People often report that
they gain weight when they stop
smoking. That often is the cast1 be-
cause they substitute food for
cigarettes. One of the best ways to
maintain or loose weight is to
increase the amount of physical
activity you get. Specific sugges-
tions for achieving weight loss
andor maintenance include:
�learn about your present eat-
ing habits by keeping a record of
your daily food consumption.
�at home limit all food intake to
one specific room, preferably the
room with the kitchen table in it.
Sitting in front of the TV is dis-
tracting because it's easy to watch
the TV and eat compulsively.
�keep lower calorie foods more
available and more visible than
higher calorie foods.
�go to the grocery store when
you're not hungry.
�ask family and friends not to
use food for gifts or rewards.
�when eating meals eat the
foods you like best at the first of
the meal so mat you can avoid the
"eat everything on your plate"
syndrome.
�use the stairs instead of eleva-
tors whenever possible.
�set realistic goals for yourself.
Don't make your weight loss
goals too difficult; that'soneof the
main reasons for diet failure.
If you would like additional
information about smoking ces-
sation or weight lossmainte-
nance check the brochure racks at
the Student Health Center or
Mendenhall Student Center. You
may also want to visit our Health
Resources Room at the Student
Health Center for more informa-
tion.
If you have questions you
would like answered in the
"Health Column" I'd like to hear
from you! Send your questions
to Mary Elesha-Adams at the
Student health Center or call 757-
6814.
fitness Finesse
214 Arlington Blvd.
Suite A
Greenville, NC 27858
919-355-3181
Look Great Before
pring Break
Tan At
Fitness
Finesse
$5 Single Visit
$35 10 Visits
$60 20 Visits
Wolff System
355-3181
Funds granted to study sickle cell
FC'L Ncvs Hurciu
A new study at the ECU School
of Medicine will investigate the
nutritional needs of children with
sickle cell disease in a project
funded by Ronald McDonald
Children's Charities (RMCC).
The one-year study, wholly
supported a $60,593 RMCC grant,
will be conducted bv ECU dieti-
tian Nancy T. Gray and hematolo-
gist Dr. C. Tafe I lolbrook through
the medical school's Regional
Comprehensive Sickle Cell Pro-
gram.
RMCC, established in 1984 in
memory oi McDonald's founder
Ray A. Kroc, awards grants to not-
for-profit organizations helping 226 grants totaling nearly seven ing soon after birth, the disorder
children. More than 100 Ronald
McDonald Houses, including the
recently completed Ronald
McDonald House of Eastern
North Carolina located in
Greenville, represent the corner-
stone oi RMCC.
"With the support of the
McDonald's familv and our cus-
million dollars -an result in anemia, recurrent
Sickle cell disease, confined pain, retarded growth, and even-
largely to black populations, is the tual organ damage,
world's most common hereditary
blood disorder. In the United
States, one in every 500 black chil-
dren is afflicted with sickle cell
disease.
According to Holbrook, the
tomers, RMCC is pleased to assist disorder damages a child's red
this worthwhile children's pro- blood cells, limiting their ability
gram said RMCC representa-
tive Dr. John Falletta, chief of
pediatric hematologyoncology
at Duke Universitv Medical Ccn-
ter. "Since its inception in 1984
he added, "RMCC has awarded
to carry oxygen to body tissues
and distorting their normal disk-
like shape into sticky, malformed
sickles that can readily clog small
blood vessels.
With symptoms often develop-
Lanier receives advisor post
Gene D. Lanier, Professor in the
ECU Department of Library &
Information Studies, was elected
Chairman oi the Board of Advi-
sors of the North Carolina Office
maintains the separation of
church and state, safeguards the
independence of the judiciary,
and acts as a watchdog on the
growth of religious bigotry in
oi People for the American Way electoral politics,
meeting in executive session at Members serving on the board
the Capitol City Club in Raleigh, include author Mava Angclou;
NC on December 9, 1987.
Attorney Kathy Rosenthal
serves as Executive Director of the
office. People for the American
Way is a nonpartisan, citizens'
constitutional liberties organiza-
tion formed in 1980 bv a group of
nationally respected civic and re-
ligious leaders including writer-
producer Norman Lear, Demo-
cratic Congress woman Barbara
Jordan, and former Republican
Congressman John Buchanan.
With headquarters in Washing-
ton, DC, there are state offices in
New York, California, and North
Carolina.
North Carolina has over 3500
members and they work to pre-
serve First Amendment free-
doms. Dr. Lanier, a proponent of
the freedom to read, said he was
honored bv his election since "the
group promotes educational ex-
cellence and protects the freedom
to learn in America's schools,
the Reverends William W. Finla-
tor, Collins Kilburn and James
Ralph Scales; attorneys Emily
Prcyer Fountain, Cillv Clark, YVil-
liamG. Hancock, and the Honor-
able J. McNeill Smith along with
11 other civic and professional
leaders from across the state.
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS lv
HILLY I. CREECH
OPTICIAN ft. MANAGER
Doctors Park. Bldg I
Stantonsburg Road
Greenvlltt. NC. 27834
Telephone
(919) 752 4018
IAYHAN
FRAMES
20 PROFFESSIONAL COURTESY OFF
ON ALL GIASSES
TRANSPORTION PROVIDED BY
GREAT BUS
OPEN MONDAY AND WEDNESDAY vuarnet
NIGHTS UNTIL 7.30 P.M. frames
.cM0
W Tuesdays
Class"0
lPr3M
ft bOOO
The ECU study will document
the nutrutional status of children
with sickle cell disease. Gray said
the limited research available on
the subject suggests that such chil-
dren tend to be deficient in calo-
ries, protein and certain vitamins
and minerals, although it is un-
clear whether the deficiency re-
sults from the disease itself or
from a substandard diet.
Ultimately, Grav and Holbrook
hope that correcting the defi-
ciency may alleviate problems the
children have with growth and
development, and possibly make
them more resistant to other
sickle cell complications.
START OUT THE
NEW YEAR IN A
CREATIVE
'FRAME" OF MIND
20 OFF
i
i
i
All Complete
Frame Order &
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Frame Kits
ATTENTION
ART
MAJORS
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fram� �hop
520 S. Cotanchc St. � Greenville � 752-4620
Parkinu In Rear On Evans St.
s
&
o:
Aerobic
Membership
35A Day!
What a way to begin the New
Year!
For only $100, get a great start on
your fitness plan for 1988! One low
yearly price entitles you to our spe-
cial aerobic membership, that's
about 35c a day, so you can get
yourself into the shape you want to
be in for the New Year! Come join us!
36 aerobic workouts a week.
If you have a hectic schedule, don't
worry, because at The Spa, there are
aerobic classes going on all the time.
With 36 aerobic workouts a week,
you can go to aerobics when it's
convenient for you, so you won't have
to plan your day around someone
else's schedule. That's just one of the
reasons The Spa is such a popular
health club.
And there's much more than
aerobics at The Spa.
The Spa offers you state-of-the-art
Dynacam exercise equipment, ex-
ercise bicycles, free weights and
qualified instructors on hand at all
times to help you with your fitness
plan. Plus, there are Greenville's
largest sauna and steam rooms, a
hot whirlpool mineral bath, our
tanning bed. a massage therapist,
and even a registered dietician to
offer you nutritional guidance.
Just drop by The Spa in South
Park Shopping Center, next to
Food Lion, for a tour of the facili-
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8 THE FASTO
AROLINIAN
1ANUARY 12, 1988
Whale bones to be displayed at N.C. State
GREENSBORO (AP) - The
staff at the College of Veterinary
Medicine at North Carolina State
I niversity had been preparing
for nearly a year tor the day when
the call would come.
So I'd Small wood, professor of
anatomy at the veterinary school
was ready on Aug. 4, 1986, when
he got the word that the college
had a chance to get its long-
iwaitcd whale skeleton.
A 35-foot, 12-ton sperm whale
had beached on uninhabited
Portsmouth Island, part of the
Cape Lookout National Seashore
on the Outer Hanks.
"There are tew sperm whale
skeletons on display in this coun-
try Small wood Slid, "and none
that we know of at a veterinary
school
First, college officials needed
approval to participate in some-
thing called the Marine Mammal
Stranding Network operated by
the National Marine Fisheries
Service. That allowed them to use
a beached marine mammal tor
scientific or educational pur-
poses.
7 hen they worked out an agree-
ment with the N.C. National
Guard tor assistance in such a
mammoth salvage operation.
Even so, college officials faced
many obstacles when their whale
came in.
Portsmouth Island wasn't larce
Students illiterate?
PRINCETON, N.j. (CPS) �
American students are culturally
illiterate, or so they've been de-
scribed in a book which has been
a bestseller since August. And in
November some students at
Amherst College and Princeton
University set out to prove the
point.
In his book, "Cultural Literacy:
What Every American Needs To
Know Prof. E.D. Hirsch lists
terms and historical references
like the Battle oi the Bulge, Boss
Tweed and the Bard of Avon that,
he believes, well-educated people
ought to know.
So p seejiow well-educated
their readersvvere the editors of
tuJciM p.tpers-TJt Princeton and
then Amherst each conducted
telephone polls of 50 students,
asking them to identify some of
the references in Hirsch's book.
One student identified the
Battle of the Bulge, the last Nazi
counterattack of World War II, as
"an eternal diet
A Princeton student identified
Boss Tweed � the politician who
controlled New York politics for
two decades during the late 1800s
� as "what Bruce The Boss'
Springsteen wears onstage
"Deus ex machina the literary
device used to alter plot direction
in novels and myths, was defined
by an Amherst respondent as the
name of a new album by The Po-
lice, the rock group that released
an album called "Ghost in the
Machine
While respectable majorities of
student correctly identified
many of the terms listed in the
poll, Amherst Student managing
editor Maggie Bendicksen ex-
plained the effort "wasn't serious.
11 was sort of a poke a t Princeton
which did the survey first.
Princeton's poll was intended
to be less facetious than
Amhcrst's, Daily Princetonian
managing editor Anne Tarbutton
told the Associated Press.
enough to bury the tons of tissue skeleton, the crew used butcher-
that had to be cut from the whale, type knives for cutting,
and it could be reached only by It was a process akin to carving
private ferry. a turkey with a straight pin.
But the terry captain agreed to "The tissue was much harder
provide his boat and services, and than 1 had imagined Holladay
mainland residents helped locate recalls. "We had to sharpen our
a remote burial site. knives every five or 10 minutes
On Aug. 6, Smallwood along The process of cutting up the
with Steve Holladay, the college's whale, burying the tissue and
lab manager, and several others hauling the skeleton back to
Raleigh took 26 people about five
days.
"It was a major operation and a
oncc-in-a-lifetime experience for
our students Smallwood said.
After arriving in Raleigh on
Aug. 10, the skeleton was placed
arrived on the island.
They found what they believe
was a mature female sperm whale
that may have died as the result of
a collision with a ship. The whale
had several fractured vertebrae
and dage ,o its 9-fooMong ind winX
' Cui�i�R up .2 tons of whale ��? ' and J� "1L'
proved to be a breathtaking expe- Whales have large amounts of
fat in their bones that must be
Ex-
a lot of personality. compietT "
to keep from damaging the To speed things along, college
nence.
"ItheHworkonthedown- Amoved befd,
:itJr ithad � � the SkUn, �LLt.
1
C.K. Lee and his wife, Mary, presented a gift of $2,000 to ECU
scholarship fund in appreciation for ECU being "part of this fin
community.

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D1988 Pearle Health Services, Inc.
officials plan to call on the Na-
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"We're going to take it over and
steam clean it where they clean
their trailers and equipment
Smallwood said.
Once that is done, staffers will
pin the bones together and pre-
pare the skeleton for display,
probably in the college's main
reception area.
Assembling the skeleton will be
the easy part. Whales have only
�a�a��� J
about 120 bones, compared with
206 for humans.
"It's not much of a puzzle
Holladay said. "In a whale every-
thing is big, and that makes it a lot
easier
When theskeleton isondisplay,
everything will be authentic ex-
cept for one detail. The whale will
have false teeth.
"A whale's teeth arc made of
ivory Smallwood said. "They're
worth several hundred dollars
apiece, and we don't want some-
body to rip them off
One of the 20 or so teeth will be
sent to the Smithsonian Institu-
tion a s a mea ns of determ ining the
whale's age. The rest will be kept
in a safe place.
Smallwood hopes to have the
skeleton on display in March It
will join a noted collection that
includes domesticated animals,
animals native to North Carolina
and a 16-foot-tall giraffe
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(CPS)
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campus
Student s
Minnesota
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recent i
rofoam eu
other
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Schools
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 12, 1988 9
c don't want some-
m off
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man Institu-
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rest w ill bo kept
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in March. It
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styrofoam
(CPS) Spurred by recent re-
ports that the earth's ozone layer
s decaying, students at several
schools are trying to ban styro-
am which they say contrib-
utes to the problem from their
impuses.
Students at the universities of
Minnesota, California at
keley, California at Santa Bar-
ira and Colorado have mounted
cent campaigns to replace sty-
am cups and utensils with
: substances.
Cal-Santa Barbara's University
r Governance Board last
v scheduled a an. 14 meeting
consider whether to get rid of
St) rofoam cups, utensils and
- used in cafeterias, acting
od services director Bonnie
Krause said.
And while the University of
Colorado, under similar
presssure from environmental
groups, stopped using styrofoam
curlier this fall, the Minnesota
I ubhc Interest Research Croup
formally has asked Minnesota to
quit
Bcrkcly's City Council, more-
over, has tormailv resolved to ban
styrofoam throughout the city.
"Styrofoam doesn't decay, "
explained Paul Steinberg, a'stu-
dent trying to get Cal-Santa Bar-
bara to stop using the stuff, "so it's
evnironmentally unsound. And
when you pour hot liquids into it,
styrofoam releases toxic sub-
stances in the face of the drinker
Steinberg asserted chlo-
rofluorocarbons used to make
styrofoam "are responsible for
the depletion of ozone and the
creation of holes in earth's ozone
layer
Ozone protects the earth from
ultraviolet radiation, a cause of
skin cancer.
Others aren't sure chlorofluoro-
carbons are the culprit.
"There are actually quite a few
George DeMartino of the New
Haven Green Party contended.
Burning styrofoam releases
dioxins, and these, too, attack the
ozone layer, he said.
Earlier this term New Haven
residents and Yale students
joined in a "Mcprotest picketing
fast food restaurants that regu-
larly use styrofoam � which has
proven to be an effective, light-
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noted Yale chemistry Prof. Dr.
Robert Crabtree. But chlo-
rofluorocarbons able to reach the
upper atmosphere could react
with the ozone layer, Crabtree
said.
Nevertheless, even destroying
styrofoam creates a hazard.
to
boost awareness of the waste dis-
posal problem in general and sty-
rofoam in particular.
The action was part of a 16-state
effort coordinated by the Wash-
ington, D.C based Citizens'
Clearinghouse for Hazardous
Waste.

Charges against infant slayer dismissed
HICAGO (AP) - Veterinarian
McKay admits he killed
tvborn son, born with birth
ts �n the delivery room. Two
re wouldn't convict him of
Jer, and a judge ruled McKay
-land trial again.
Kay is 41, but the rigors of
past four years have him
ng like 110 he said after
fudge Will E. Gicrach dis-
'� the murder indictment
- a little like fimmy Stewart
cr�d ol 'It's A Wonderful
McKaysaid, comparing his
nces with the main charac-
the popular Christmas
' here's human kindness
: ission after a frighten-
ingordeal.Suddenlvvou'reoutof
trouble
After two juries deadlocked,
C ook County State's Attorney
Richard M. Daley sent his assis-
tant prosecutors to court asking
tor another trial.
"When we went to court, we
were looking for a miracle, that
we would not have to carry this
nightmare any further. It came to
pass McKay said.
McKay, of Beech or doesn't
deny the facts of the case.
On lune, 28, 1983, a son, John
! rancis, was burn to McKay and
his wife, Carol, at a 1 larvey hospi-
tal. The infant was born with a
cleft lip and palate, clenched
hands and a heart problems.
McKay responded by slam-
ming the infant against the deliv-
ery room floor, killing the baby
instantly.
Prosecutors called it murder;
McKay claims he was temporarily
insane.
Daley vowed to fight Gierach's
ruling.
"I believe the judge is wrong on
the facts, and wrong on the law.
This decision must be appealed to
meet our obligation to seek justice
for the dead baby he said.
McKay conceded he may wind
up in court again.
an
state's attorney does will be
attempt to do what's best for the
people. But I don't know if a
courtroom is the best place. The
judge said it isn't and 1 happily
accept that
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first trial ended in
1985 when jurors
couldn't reach a verdict after two
days of deliberations. A second
trial produced the same results
last year.
The judge's decision to dismiss
the indictment, McKaysaid, liftsa
"great burden" off his family. He
credits his wife, his 11
"I don't blame Richard Daley daughter'and otVerelXes
tor what he's doing he said, supporting him since he
Whatever the Cook Countv battle began.
legal
Pierce scholarship created
I Cl i-w Bureau
) of the late author
ims Pierce has an-
� ' at it will establish a
nd at ECU to provide
named for Pierce in
lepartment.
odied Wednesday at
7, taught creative vvrit-
r2( years prior to'Tkfs
T at in 195. He woksarvi
Aeldon, N.C, and had
U Southern Methodist
tyand Tulane University
�mingto ECU as a profes-

rrrsi ss
PROGRAM
ECU
ECU
sor of English and as wnteriv Mis best known novels include
rL PJ:IU� , , , . , The Planta��n On a Lonesome
Pierce was awarded the O.Max Torch, The Devil's Half The
Gardner award tor his contribu- Wedding Guest and Old Man's
tions to humanity through litera- Cold and Other Stories
ture in 1974 f le was also a recipi- Pierce's family requested that
entt tortlo Jg Qvj(i l�
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through the ECU Foundation Inc
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10
V
THE EAST CARQI inii am
JANUARY 12 ,1988
ECU education program gets award
I CU News Hi. iiiu
�n 1-CU program designed to
provide more qualified math and
science teachers for rural Eastern
North Carolina schools has been
selected by the Title II National
Steering Committc and the
United States Department of
Education as one of 23 Exemplary
Projects.
Dr. Catherine 1 lodgin, director
ot the E( I' ScienceMathematics
ication Center (SMEC), was
invited to Washington, D.C Dec.
8- 11 to present the program to
v! and regional Education
nil S vurityAct (EESA)
' representatives attending
Fourth National Conference
on the Implementation of the
EESA.
The Lateral Entry Program
trains college graduates who are
interested in becoming certified
teachers of science or math in the
fundamentals of instruction.
According to Hodgin, the pro-
gram originated when a chemical
engineer from Eastern North
Carolina approached the local
superintendent of schools about
becoming certified to teach high
school science.
"Through a series of discus-
sions with the School of Educa-
tion and the Science and Mathe-
matics Education Center at ECU,
the program was developed she
said.
To qualify, individuals must
have a college degree in a math or
sccincc field with a grade point
average of 2.5 or better. In addi-
tion, they must pass the National
Teachers Exam and be approved
by the interview panel.
Participants arc required to
complete six weeks of summer
school training on the ECU cam-
pus in "teaching survival skills
one academic year teaching in a
rural school under the supervi-
sion of a specially trained mentor
teacher, attend weekly seminars
at ECU in which special topics in
education will be discussed, and
complete a second six-week sum-
mer school session.
During that session, partici-
pants study educational founda-
tions, learning theory, curriculm
develpment, content methodol-
ogy and classroom management.
"A unique feature of the pro-
gram is that it recruits partici-
pants from rural areas and trains
them in area rural schools
Hodgin said
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East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking applications for
Day-Student Representative
for the 1988-89 Term
Responsibilities:
Qualifications:


Selecting the Student Union President
Approving Committee Chairpersons
Approving the Student Union Budget
Setting Policy for the Student Union
Full-Time Student
Reside Off Campus
Independent
Deadline To Apply: Friday, January 22, 1988
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arolinian
THE CAST CAROLINIAN
illiams family establishes ECU
ANUARY12.1988 11
�APER" 1
'ggquarters.
lo With Sugges
coration And
eds.

ations, cufs,
etc. I
�r a party!
NGSTON
PLACE
Michael Williams of Burline-
lm C and his wife, Linda,
have committed $20,000 to ECU
tablish a University Scholars
ird and tour Alumni I lonors
�larships.
I c I Michael and Linda 11.
iams University Scholars
Uvard is valued at $3,000 per
and will cover lull tuition
loos tor a student's tour year
graduate education. Uni-
. Si holai s arc chosen on the
- ol superior academic and
� ship capabilities through a
ipetitive selection princess.
currently has 22 University
-and lias commitments to
sor 13 more.
iamance Machine Com-
lumni I lonors Scholar-
p named tor Williams' Burl-
based company, will pro-
� �ur $2,000 scholarships to
tes of high schools in Ala-
. ounty. Recipients must
'rate academic merit, in-
volvement in extra-curricular ac-
uities, and leadership potential.
"I he Williams' sponsorship of
these awards signifies a strong
regard tor the university and its
goals. This type of concern and
support permits ECU to compete
on the national level for students
�f the highest caliber ECU
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin said.
"I have a strong sense oi loyalty
toward East Carolina said Wil-
liams, a 1980 ECU graduate. "1
consider myself an ECU fan eve-
ryday oi the week. Our interest in
awarding these scholarships is to
attract good, quality students to
EC U � the type of" student who
will have a genuine interest in
education .md who will one day
give something in return to the
university
After graduating with a BS
degree in biology education, Wil-
liams wasa factory representative
tor the southeastern United States
for Grady-Whitc Boats, Inc. oi
Greenville. In 1984 he became
Louis joins ECU
RAL
UDEXT
i
D
t RIO US
s
-LV FOR
rs.
Ill rvs Bureau
ouis I. Dolinar has joined
at the ECU School of
- assistant professor in
sychiatric
artmenl ot V
tssuming his post at
practiced psychiatry at
Mental Health Center
City.
his undergraduate education at
Duqucsne University in Pitts-
burgh.
hollowing medical school, he
completed an internship in inter-
nal medicine at the University of
Missouri-Kansas City Affiliated
Hospitals, after which he pursued
residencies in psychiatric medi-
cine at the University oi Cincin-
d his medical degree nati Medical Center and the Uni-
versity of Louisville versity oi Louisville Affiliated
lie, Ky and completed 1 lospitals
CLEP offered by
ECU testing center
D u ri'ju
(
'88
California
need
made
lable
kilus!
versity'sTest-
r the Collcge-
ition Program
thly, anuary
� xt year.
a national program of
.examination which en-
ts to acquire college
r material learned
ndependent reading or
e. Exams are offered in
iterature, mathematics,
I and social sciences, and
fields of business.
der to receive credit tor
examinations passed, adults
should be enrolled in a college,
university or technical institute
which grants academic credit for
CLPP examinations. Each cam-
pusdetermines the tests for which
a will award credit and the mini-
mum passing scores.
Test dates are Jan. 12 and 14,
Mar. 15 and 17, Apr. 12 and 14
May 17and 19,June Hand 16,and
July 12 and 14.
further information about the
CLEP examinations is available
from the ECU Testing Center, 105
Speight Building.
00
ts
Katu re created some ice sculptures as part of the storm that dumped
�bout four inches of snow on ECU late last week (Thomas Walters
�motolab). '
The
East Carolinia
equired reading
for the serious student
Zl
president of Alamancc Machine
Company, Inc currently a major
source for marine transmission
couplings in the United States.
Williams also owns several
small businesses, including sev-
eral car washes and an amuse-
ment park. He is a member of the
Alamancc County Chamber of
Commerce, the Alamancc Busi-
ness Club and the National Fed-
eration oi Independent Business.
An Atlanta, Ga native, Wil-
liams' hobbies include amateur
Formula Ford car racing, snow
skiing, and piloting single engine
aircraft.
As an ECU undergraduate,
Williams was president of Phi
Kappa Tan social fraternity, a
member of the Inter-Fraternity
Council and a cheerleader.
Mrs. Williams, a Chicopee,
Mass. native, graduated from
ECU with a nursing degree in
1977. She is on leave from Ala-
mancc County Hospital where
she is an educator in the intensive
care department. She is a member
of the American Nurses Associa-
tion, the American Association of
Critical Care Nurses, the Ala-
mancc County Suicide and Crisis
Service, and the Alamancc
County Service League.
"If I had not received financial
assistance, I would not have been
able to attend East Carolina said
Mrs. Williams. "St) if we are able
tt) help someone who would oth-
erwise not be able to attend col-
lege, I think this is a wonderful
way tt) pay back to the University
and the state what I received ten
years ago
The Williams have a 15-month-
old daughter, Megan Campbell.
They are members of the Church
of the 1 loly Comforter in Burling-
ton.
WINTER
WHITE
SALE
SAV A CENTER
The freshest way to Save.
HOMOGENIZED � VITAMIN D
Silverbrook
Milk
Lima Two With Ar AacM'ora S'O O Mo �
PURE CANE
CHILEAN GROWN
Red Seedless
Grapes
FAMILY PACK FRESH
Fryer Leg
Quarters
294
Limit One With An Additional $10 Or Wore purchase
VtH i i x vv
ABSORBENT
Bounty
Towels
JUMBO CAL. � 48 SIZE
THIN TRIM FRESH CUT
Navel Assorted
Oranges Pork Chops
0 4QQC
Limit Two With An Additional $10 Or More Purchase
ASST PRETZELS 8 5 0Z 69
I CHEEZ N CHIPS 7 5 0Z 99- OR
CHOC CHIP-OATMEAL RAISIN
Soft Batch
Cookies
STOP 1 LAY S ALL VARIETIES
F"? Potato
Chips
18 oz
pkg.
6 5 oz
bag

439
STOP .
jp Turkey
Hot Dogs
BUY 1 PKG GET 1
LIMIT ONE WITH $10 PURCH
uwnuNtwnH $10 PURCH o ,� ASSORTED CHOCOLATE MILK
Crisco Shortening 1.78 Look Fit Ice Milk T 99c Nestle Quik
BEAN COFFEE-LIMIT ONE WITH $10 pgRCH w 'AU
Eight O'clock 1.88 Margarine
A&P BRAND � LIMIT TWO WITH $10 PURCH a&P FROZEN
Chunk Light Tuna 2 6�SJ 88c Orange Juice
natural uran
Beer
STOP
4 RO SELECTED
4.by Lean Cuisine
SEALTEST
89Sour Cream
CHEESE FOOD
89e Kraft Slices
HUNGRY JACK � 10 CT
1.59 Pillsbury Biscuits
Or THIN TRIM BEEF-BONE. ESS
o9c Shoulder Roast 1.89
i00�c PURE BEEF CHOPPED
o9c Steak Patties ,1.79
?o;H Cft THIN TRIM BEEF TOP BONELESS
�� �.o9 Sirloin Steaks , 2.99
,0 FROZEN 4 7 lB AVG
l o9c Baking Hens t 69c
Coca Cola
) Classic
Diet Coke �
Caff. Free
Coke � Caff.
Free Diet Coke
Coca Cola
6 - 16 oz.
btl. ctn.
Ollfr '10W40�20W50
PHavoline
H Motor Oil
-A
m FINAL
WEEK
FUNK & WAGNALLS
Encyclopedia
COMPLETE YOUR
SET TODAY!
WE SELL U.S. POSTAGE STAMP!
I AT POST OFFICE PRICES
STOP FINAL
TWO WEEKS
GENUINE 24
FULL LEADCRVSTAl
Glassware
COMPLETE YOUR
SET TODAY!
See Store
For Details
AMERICAN EXPRESS MONEY ORDERS 49 EA
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open Sunday 7 a.m. - 11 p.m. Mon. - Sat. 7 a.m. - 12 midnight
PRICES EFFECTIVE JAN. 10 THRU JAN. 16,1966. QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED.
,L
iqmmm' � ��� � � iiw
m�mmmm
m�mmmfnmmm �'�� m
i�'� m
�ii am �' ���
ii� ill�ii il( �l m
"�.
�m





12
Tlli. h.vu ARot INIAN
'AM AR I 1988
ECU scholarship endowed
I C L cns Hurcju
Hie Ella Dean Broughton
Memorial Scholarship Fund has
been established at ECU by Vcra
Broughton Lentz and her hus-
band, John lentz of Greensboro.
1 he scholarship honors Mrs.
Lentz's mother, who was an ele-
mentary school teacher in eastern
North Carolina for 30 years.
"My mother loved education
said Mrs Lentz. "In tact, she loved
all ot her students. She never saw
a student that she didn't like
Born in 1SL)2, Mrs. Brouchton
received her teaching certificate
Mem ECTC and began teaching
elementary school in 1931. She
taught in Low land and Stonewall
in Pamlico County and Chocow-
inity in Beaufort County before
retiring in 1961. Mrs. Broughton
died in 1964.
"We arc both pleased and hon-
ored by Mr. and Mrs. Lentz's
decision to establish this scholar-
ship at Last Carolina University
said Dr. Richard R. Eakin, ECU
chancellor. "I can think of no finer
way to honor one who dedicated
her life to education than to pro-
vide the means for future genera-
tions to continue their studies.
This fund is indeed a fitting trib-
ute to 1:1 la Dean Broughton
because oi Mrs. Broughton's
devotion to Pamlico County stu-
dents, the 1 .cntzes have requested
that the scholarship assist deserv-
ing graduates of Pamlico County
high schools who attend East
Carolina University.
"We hope that this scholarship
w ill help someone from the area
who otherwise would be unable
to receive a college education
Mrs. Lentz said.
Mrs. lent: graduated from
ECTC in 1933 at age ISand taught
high school in Pamlico, 1 lyde,and
lee Counties. She received the
PhD in Counseling and Psvchol-
1964 and afterwards established
the Greensboro City Schools Psy-
chological Services Program,
serving as its first director. Mrs.
Lentz retired in 1976.
Lentz, who graduated from
Appalachian State University in
1933, began his career teaching
high school in VVatauga County
before taking a position at Stone-
wall High School. He then
worked as principal at Fairfield
High School in Lee County before
returning to Stonewall, where he
served in the same capacitv until
1942.
Lentz served in the United
States Navy in World War 11. He
returned from Europe and be-
came principal of Broadway High
School in Lee County. In 1949 he
was elected superintintendent of
Lee County schools and held this
position until 1966. That year he
and his wife moved to their pres-
ent home and, until his retirement
in 1976, Lentz was assistant
superintendent for Personnel
with the Greensboro City Schools.
The Lentz's have two children,
William "Jerry" Lentz of Mon-
terey, Calif and Mary Ella Trock
of Orlando, Fla.
KlMERY'S
P- ' FURNITURE DEPOT
Used Furniture
BuySeIlTrade
752-3223
Beside the
Railroad Depot
White House chef resigns unexpectedly
WASHINGTON (AP) � White
House executive chef Jon Hill
unexpcctly resigned his post just
four months after taking the job,
and will return to the hotel indus-
iR
v from UNC-Chapel Hill in
try, the White I louse says.
During his brief tenure, the 33-
M
f �
v
iTiA
Student Discount
102 Oakniont Drive
756-8545
PICTURE
YOURSELF
15 TO 20
POUNDS
THINNER
ON
VALENTINES
DAY
DIET
CENTER
J56-854!
�nr
- � W�
355-5866
s � I S "l
mlZ d?T fJ, classro�m buiMiS �� Paved with ice last week. The cold weather
WalterPhoto'ab) � 8rCC' 5'Ude"tS �n ,hc firSt day of cla5s Monday ,Thomas
Fraternities,
sororities
recognized
HI 'ews Burcjni
I CU Fraternities and sororities
received recognition last week for
their assistancce in a national
campaign to encourage respon-
sible decisions about the use oi
alcohol.
Laura Sweet, ECU staff advisor
to sororities, accepted the Certifi-
cate ot Recognition at the Associa-
tion of Fraternity Advisors meet-
ing in Pallas. The certificate rec-
ognizes the ECU Creek organiza-
tions tor their participation in
National Collegiate Alcohol
Awareness Week, Oct. 22-29.
The Alcohol Awareness Week
program was aimed at presenting
information about the problems
associated with alcohol abuse.
The program was chaired by stu-
dents David Brooke Stonesifer, of
(reenville, president of the Inter-
Lraternity Council and Barbara
Lamb of Virginia Beach, 'a a
representative to the ECU
Panhcllenic Council.
I )r. Ronald Speier, associate
d ea n a nd d i rector of Studen t Serv-
ices, is the staff advisor to frater- � -
nfficsai u. I Parents and Students
Let us show you
RINGGOLD TOWERS
At Te Campus � East Carolina University
�Towers located at 7th & Cotanche
Streets surrounded on three sides by
campus.
�Towers closer to both downtown and
classrooms than many ECU
dormitories.
�Designed for student appeal and
afibrdability.
�Each unit is completely furnished
except linens.
�On site management.
�Excellent financing.
Call for details
year-old chef prepared meals for
the visit of Soviet leader Mikhail
S. Gorbachev, and for the leaders
of El Salvador, Israel, Spain and
Sweden.
Spokeswoman Elaine Crispen
said Friday that Hill's departure
was "his personal choice" and
was not prompted by any dis-
agreements or dissatisfaction
with his work. Assistant chef
Hans Raffert will serve as acting
executive chef.
Reagan signs
WASHINGTON (AD - Presi-
dent Reagan has signed the Com-
puter Security Act of 1987, legisla-
tion aimed at creating uniform
standards for improving the secu-
rity of information in all federal
computers.
The bill "will enhance the abil-
ity of the federal government to
manage and protect its computer
resources and rcprcsentsa signifi-
cant step forward in the effective
use of these new technologies
Reagan said Friday in a statement
announcing his signature of the
bill.
"I sign this act with the under-
standing that it will neither ex-
pand nor restrict the federal
government's present or future
disclosure obligations under the
Freedom of Information Act he
said.
pviL
DONNA
LAGI
Bring in this ad for a 15
discount on a purchase of
$ 10 or more!
With Valid ECU ID.
Good Selection of Reptiles
New Shipment of Salt Water fish lias
Arrived!
"Check out our weekly fish specials"
We Carry A Complete Line
of Dog, Cat, and Fbh Supplies
Master Card sad Visa arc acceplW mm flaaaciag a
available.
S11 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27114 Expiration Date:
PHONE 75 mi February 8. 1988
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Tuesday, January 12
8:00 P.M. Hendrix
Sneak Preview Movie
RETURN OF THE LIVING
DEAD, II
Wednesday, January 13
8:00 p.m. Hendrix
BLISS
r
WORKING STUDENTS:
ii � i u till .ur oui Foi in
W-4oi W-4A. "Employee's
Withholding Allowance
1 rtificate, remember:
It you i an be claimed on vour
parent's oi anothei person's tax
return, you generallj cannot be
exempt from irw onw t.ix
w ithholding. To get it right, read
the instruc tions that came with
youi Form W-4 or W-4A.
fu �cwfcr of titm mm
TAXPAYERS
with dependents
Beginning with vour 1987 income
tax return that you will hie in
1 88, you general!) must list social
security numbers tor dependents who
are at least five ears old hv the end
ot 1987. If any o! your dependents
do not have this number, get an
application form today trom the
Social Security office in your area.
Thursday, January 14
Sunday, January 17
8:00 p.m. Hendrix
STAKEOUT
Upcoming Events:
Wednesday, January 20
8:00 p.m. Coffeehouse
U.S. COLLEGE COMEDY
COMPETITION
Thursday, January 28
8:00 p.m. Minges
In Concert
JIMMY BUFFET
Ticket Prices: $13.00 E.G.U. Student
$16.00 Public and at the door
Aplications are being accepted for Student Union Ptesidenl
and Day-Student Representative for ilu- Board ofDUtxtors
For more information, contact the Student Union. Room 234
MendenhalL
For more information contact the
Student Union at 757 6611, ext. 210.
WE'LL DO YOU HOMEWORK
no�o xn ?o �� mi'
ZJM gathering place
Sub
EC
Hv
For .in
corn.h
flashes u
The im�
quicklv nJ
it
In � iVfJ
ground
ruffled b
it a mess
A mag
door v
fu! Arcw
scape"1
Th
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sages arc
sour I �
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the in!
SC
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use sub!ii
their g
time
Dr Sid
Pr
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contr
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example
don't smc
may worl
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to help
messages
todiscoun
The use oi
in movie
arc also eri
SEX S
In the 1
covered si
A variety
biles, to c
clothing Vk
as their su
expcnmcp
embedded
have prodi
One
ma gar
tisements
rettes Bet1-
with sexua
the glass
on a rock �
rertead Pa
gave . g
but not to
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against c I
taining no si
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misintcrr-
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of evid
tort or
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be distor
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message to
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Ap;
G
� i m -��'� -�- rmmt - - - - jian.
I��W.





J
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 12,1988 13
le
Beside the
Railroad Depot
id for a 15
i a purchase of
more!
(ID
Ha
h specials"
Celine
Supplies
pi
nation Date:
' 8, 1988
oete System
ch Printer
SI 295
Model D
Wordprocessor
printer
er Kit
ates, Inc.
JOStl
)NS
i i
Subliminal advertising
ECU professor says effects limited
By G.A. THREEWITTS
KCX' Newt Bureau
For an instant a picture of pop-
corn, candy and a soft drink
flashes upon the movie screen.
The image comes and goes so
quickly no one remembers seeing
it.
In a department store the back-
ground music is just barely
ruffled by a different sound. Was
it a message?
A magazine photo of an out-
door scene looks bright and color-
ful. Arc words written in the land-
scape?
These arc examples of sublimi-
nal advertising. While the mes-
sages arc disguised in sight and
sound, to reach only the mysteri-
ous inner chambers cf the brain,
the intent is clear. It's to sell, sell'
sell.
Put a marketing professor at
ECU says that advertisers who
use subliminal suggestions to sell
their goods may be wasting their
tune and money.
Dr. Sid C. Dudley, associate
professor of marketing in the ECU
School of Business, says "The
possibility that subliminal stimu-
lation offers an effective means of
controlling consumer or political
behavior is highly unlikely
In an article published in the
Akron Business and Economic
Review a business journal,
Dudley said that claims support-
-g the use oi subliminal advertis-
ing are "based on enthusiasm
rather than on hard evidence
The available evidence sug-
gests that subliminal messages
have little or no persuasive
power he said.
Dudley believes subliminal
messages only encourage people
to do what they are alreadv will-
ing to do in the first place. For
example self help messages �
don't smoke, lose weight, relax �
may work by providing encour-
agement to people who are trying
to help themselves. Anti-theft
messages that department stores
to discourage theft may work too.
The use of subliminal commands
in movies to heighten suspense
arc a (so effective.
SEX SELLS, OR DOES IT?
fn the 1970s advertisers redis-
covered subliminal advertising.
A variety of ads from automo-
biles, to cigarettes, perfume and
clothing were produced using sex
as their subliminal message. But
experiments using sex images
embedded in advertisements
have produced mixed results.
One experiment, in a national
azine, involved two adver-
tisements for liquor and ciga-
rettes. Both ads were embedded
with sexual images reflected on
the glass of the liquor bottle and
on a rock formation in the ciga-
rette ad. Participants in the study
gave high scores to the liquor ad
but not to the advertisement for
cigarettes. The two were judged
against other advertisements con-
taining no subliminal images.
One of the problems, said Dud-
ley, is that subliminal ads can be
misinterpreted or misunder-
stood. He said there is a great deal
of evidence that consumers dis-
tort or ignore words and pictures
that arc not congruent with their
values and needs even if they are
presented in a normal fashion.
When words and pictures are
presented in a subliminal way it
becomes even easier for them to
be distorted.
"For example, the subliminal
message to "Buy Anacin" could
be perceived as "Buy Aspirin
"Buy Arsenic or "Buy Alcohol
he said.
While he questions the use of
subliminal advertisements, Dud-
Icy agrees that subliminal cues
can encourage certain behavior in
individuals.
In at least two movies, "The
Exorcist" and "The Texas Chain
Saw Massacre" subliminal
images were used to give the
audience an extra scare.
Department stores using sub-
liminal anti-theft messages say-
ing "You are honest "Don't
steal have reduced shoplifting
by 30 percent to 70 percent. In
some cases the messages have
stimulated adverse public reac-
tion among shoppers.
But the messages by advertisers
that may be hidden in magazine
ads and in commercials to influ-
ence people to buy a particular
product or vote for a certain politi-
cal candidate may not be as effec-
tive as regular, straight forward
advertisements. They aren't effec-
tive, the professor says, if the re-
search about them is accurate.
THE MIND'S EYE
The purpose behind subliminal
messages is to introduce informa-
tion into a person's mind through
the mind's "back door" entrance,
the subconscious. In most cases
the person neither sees nor hears
the message as it is presented but
it reaches the mind anyway.
There arc four distinct methods
of subliminal communication.
First there is the use of pictures
flashed across a screen so briefly
that the viewer is notawarcof it. A
second method uses speech pro-
jected rapidly in low volume. A
third method, used in magazines,
hides words and pictures within a
picture. And finally, the last
method uses pictures that suggest
mere than a quick glance would
indicate.
EXPERIMENTS
Dudley says that experimental
study oi subliminal commands
can be traced back to 1898 but
widespread interest in the subject
swelled during the 1950s and
again in the 1970s.
An advertising firm opened in
the mid-50s as the Subliminal
Projection Company. The
company's purpose was to proj-
ect "invisible commercials on TV
and movie screens
The company claimed that an
experiment at a New Jersey drive-
in theater, in which subliminal
messages to "Drink Coca-Cola"
and "Eat Popcorn" were flashed
across the screen, increased the
sale of these products. But the
experiment was critcized for its
lack of scientific controls and even
the company admitted that the
data collected was "too small to be
meaningful Many theaters
adopted the technique anyway.
Radio stations began running
high priced subliminal messages
for advertisers. A few stations ran
commercials for themselves se-
cretly telling their listeners "TV's
a bore and "Isn't TV Dull?"
Television was broadcasting
subliminal cues too. A station in
Los Angeles got a torrent of ad-
verse mail when it announced
plans to run subliminal public
service messages. A station in
Maine ran subliminal messages
urging listeners to write letters to
the station. The campaign failed.
The Canadian Broadcasting Cor-
poration conducted a "Telephone
Now" experiment but no one
called.
Congress almost passed a
couple of bills to outlaw sublimi-
nal advertising in 1958. The bills
died in subcommittee due in part
to actions by the National Asso-
ciation of Broadcasters (NAB) TV
Code to ban subliminal projection
on radio and television.
Several experiments were done
to see if subliminal commands
could affect a person's choice
behavior. In several guessing
game experiments "choose right"
or "choose left" were sublimi-
nally flashed on a screen. These
subliminal messages failed to in-
fluence the participants' re-
sponses.
In another experiment three
different types of commercials
were used over a period of weeks
to advertise grocery specials.
During another period of time
regular commercials were used
and in the third condition there
was a mixture of subliminal and
regular commercials.
The subliminal grocery ads in-
creased sales by only one percent,
the mixture of regular and sub-
liminal commercials increased
sales by 282 percent but the regu-
lar commercials, by themselves,
increased sales as high as 3,383
percent. � . . . x
By 1960 interest in subliminal
advertising ceased. Most experi-
ments had shown that subliminal
commands had been less effective
than regular commercials or print
advertisements.
Self-development programs
are also using subliminal mes-
sages with success. "Computer
programs have been developed
Interested In
Studying Abroad?
Information on academic exchange oppor-
tunities throughout the world through the
International Student Exchange Program
(ISEP), at ECU. Information available from:
Dr. R. Hursey, Jr.
ISEP Coordinator
Austin 222
Phone 757-6418 (work)
756-0682 (home)
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking applications for
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
Deadline: January 22, 1988
STUDENT UNION
COMMITTEE CHARIPERSONS
Deadline: February 12, 1988
for the 1988-89 Term
Any full-time student can apply
Applications available at Mendenhall Student
Center's Information Desk and Room 234 -
Student Union.
The new classroom building got its first taste of snow before the first course was taught there (1 homas
Walters, Photolab).
that enable viewers to embed
subliminal messages such as
"Exercise is fun "I will stop
smoking "I will stay on my
diet in cable TV programs.
Audio tapes using subliminal
suggestion for self improvement
are also available.
"There seems to be little doubt
that basic drives can be stimu-
lated (with subliminal mes-
sages) said Dudley.
"However, the use of sublimi-
nal cues to direct specific behavior
is questionable he said.
Most of the evidence from re-
search shows that up-front,
straightforward advertising is
more effective. But he added that
additional study, by independent
researchers, is rcqui red.
Otw (Deadlines for
Classifieds and
Announcements
For Tuesdays paper: Friday at
4:00 p.m.
For Thursdays paper: Monday
at 4:00 p.m.
9fo T.rceptipn Vfn
- Spring Break '88
BAHAMA BOUND
8DAYS7NK5HTS
$1A A 00
290.
Price includes:
� ROUND'RIP AIRROATFARFtROM MIAMI
OR FT IAUOERDAIF
� ROUND TRIP TRANSFERS TC vCUR � ' I
� BEACH OR NFAR BEACH ACCOMMODATIONS
�AlL TAXES TtPSiGRATUmES LODGING
� COMPLIMENTARY DRWKS4 DISCOUNTS Al
BAHAMAS FINEST RESTAURANTS
� EE COTTON T SHIRTS
?FREE COCKTAil PART:ESVG' -
? 'REE ADMISSION INTOE' NNGN iH7 �� ;
1 REE ADMISSION INTO GREAT CA ��
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Steak and Mushrooms3.95
Reuben with French Flies4.45
Ham and Cheese3.95
Roast Beef and French Fries 4.45
Cold Sub 3.95
Chicken Salad Sub3.95
Pastrami Sub3.95
Turkey and Cheese3.95
Super Sub4.45
GREEK DISHES
GYRO Sandwich3.95
Souvlaki Sandwich3.95
Aegean Grilled Cheese i2.95
GYRO Platter4.45
Marathon Special 4.45
Athenian-Style Chicken4.45
SANDWICHES
Hamburger1.75
Cheeseburger1.95
Hot Dog1.35
Chicken Salad Sandwich2.95
Chicken Breast2.35
Shrmp Eggroll1.25
SALADS
Greek Salad3.95
Chefs Salad 3.95
Chicken Salad Plate3.95
Tossed Salad1.95
Potato Salad1.70
GREEK PASTRIES
Baklava1.25
PIZZA MENU
9" 14"
Cheese Pizza3.505.50
Any 1 item4.006.50
Any 2 items4.507.50
Any 3 items5.08.50
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Add'l items501.00
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y

14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 12, 1988
Stock market
plan gets
little support
WASHINGTON (AP) � A
presidential task force on the
stock market collapse wants the
Federal Reserve or another single
agency to watch over financial
markets,but the proposal is draw-
ing little outright support.
President Reagan, Fcreral Re-
serve Chairman Alan Greenspan
and other government leaders
were noncommittal on Friday's
recommendations from the fix e-
mcmrxT commission headed by
former Sen. Nicholas F. Brady, R-
N.J.
And reaction from Wall Street
traders had been negative even
before the final report was re-
leased.
The commission was named bv
Reagan shortly after the record
508-point stock plunge on Oct. 19.
The commission concluded that
the collapse is unlikely to reoccur
and bore little resemblance to the
1929 stock market crash that ush-
ered in the Great Depression.
Still, lack of coordination
among regulators and failure to
recognize the various financial
markets as closely intertwined �
in effect, a single market �
helped to worsen the collapse.
The snowballing sell-off of
stocks was triggered by transac-
tions of "a surprisingly few insti-
tutions the report concluded.
The panel called for "one
agency (to) coordinate the few,
but critical, regulatory issues
which have an impact across the
related market segments and
throughout the financial system
The weight of the evidence
suggests the Federal Reserve is
well qualified to the fill the role of
the intermarkct agency the re-
port said.
The Presidential Task Force on
Market Mechanisms, as the panel
is formally named, stopped short
of recommending a merger of the
two current regulatory bodies:
the Securities and Exchange
Commission, which regulates
stock markets, and the Commod-
ity Futures Trading Comission,
which regulates the future mar-
kets.
In another key recommenda-
tion, the panel also called for for-
mulation of "circuit breaker
mechanisms such as price limits
and coordinated trading breaks"
to keep markets from overheating
in the future.
But Brady, in a news briefing on
the two-inch-thick report, said the
panel was not necessarily advo-
cating specific limits on stock
price swings.
The panel also called for new,
uniform rules on buying stocks
and other securities with bor-
rowed money.
In a statement, Reagan said he
would "carefully review this re-
port" along with the conclusions
of other study panels.
In a brief exchange with report-
ers as he left for the weekend in
Camp David, Reagan said he had
not yet read the report.
Brady himself said that he had
discussed the proposals with Fed
New faculty
-i . � �� "iit��
I
Campus was a welcome sight to many students, although perhaps a little
'iked (Thomas Walters, Photolab).
i airman Greenspan, but that the chairman of the House Energy
Commerce finance sub-
colder than some would have
Welcome Back
Students!
Have A Safe
And Happy 1988!
from
14TH & CHARLES ST.
GREENVILLE
central banker had not expressed
an opinion on them.
Senate Banking Chairman Wil-
liam Troxmire, D-Vis whose
panel plans to call Brady as its
leadoff witness in hearings next
month on the stock collapse, said
Congress "is rarely in the mood to
rush to anything, and certainly
not to rush to legislation in this
case
"What's been missed here is
that, since it's one global market,
it's going to be very hard to get
any kind of legislation that you
can coordinate with the other
sovereign countries Proxmire
said.
Rep. Edward Markey, D-Mass
and
committee, saidhe thought the
White House was trying to "dis-
tance itself" from the
commission's work.
"Neither a head in the sand nor
an invisible hand will solve the
problems uncovered by the re-
port Markey said.
Brady, however, told reporters
it was "perfectly understandable"
that Reagan wanted to take time
to read the report before making
any comment on it.
Richard Torrenzano, vice presi-
dent oi the New York Stock Ex-
change, also withheld judgment
on the report, pending "an oppor-
tunity to thoughtfully review the
commission's findings
ECU New Bu itau
Roy S. Sclby, former executive
directory of Eastern Carolina
Health Systems Agency, has,
joined the ECU School of Medi-
cine as an administrative consul-
tant to the medical school and Pitt
County Memorial- Hospital.
Selby was employed as the
agency's director for 11 years be-
fore assuming his post at the
medical school.
A Beaufort County native,
Selby will assist the medical cen-
ter in preparing certificate of need
applications.for a variety of health
care projects. Certificates of need
provide documentation which
specifically assesses and outlines
the health care facility needs of an
area based on the population and
other demographic data.
Additionally, he will be a lia-
sion between the medical center
and area community hospitals as
they seek to develop an efficient
and effective health care system in
the eastern section of the state.
The ECU graduate's 15 years of
experience in health planning
include his work with the Mid-
East Commission as director of
comprehensive health planning.
He helped to develop and super-
vise a family planning program
and an emergency medical serv-
ices plan for Beaufort, Bertie,
Hertford, Hyde artd Martin coun-
ties.
Hillcrest Lanes
Memorial Drive
756-2020
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U
Sheraton Greenville � 203 Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
BUD LIGHT
Welcome Back ECU
Students & Staff
Ask for Bud Light.
Everytni
is just a tig
Hond
shelte
TEGUCIGALPA,
(AP) � The governm.
international panel f
compliance with a (Yrv-
can peace plan that 1 I ndui
not be a sanctuary for r
ing the governmei � I
ing Nicaragua.
Refering to rebel camp
in Honduran tcrritor)
Minister Carlos Lopez
issued a statement sa
have pledged I
tvpe ft installati ns i i
and operational suj
of the irregular : i
tionist movenru nts 1
ing out civil wars in tl
ing countries, h
counterrevolution ol .
The 15-mcmbcr
commission was
Friday as part
through Centra!
progress on I
signed Aug
Nicaragua, I
dor, Guaten
The pane!
day for El Sal vad -
erarycall
eminent, chur
human rights
It will pn
13 to a sumn I I
American prcsi I
Costa Rica.
Be tore the
of hearings in .
dent Jose Azcona 11
members were
any place in th
advising befor
air bases and
tions.
Honduran oi
denied that the :
onlv saying thai
and went across
defined border be!
ras and Nicaragua
thev also haves
the rebels wou
their territory.
Lopez Centre
merit that Hi I
m m � �� i�i� k.i � ywpwMp�Mi�i�i �� iiiWt '�i





I
t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 12,1988 15
e
88!
v
T.
i!
I!
I!
i!
i!
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1!
a
Honduras refuses to
shelter the Contras
1 EGUCIGALPA, 1 londuras a sanctuary for Central American
P) rhe government told an insurgents and will abide by the
international panel checking peace agreement.
compliance with a Central Ameri- The U.Sbacked Contras, as the
i an peace plan that 1 londuras will rebels are known, have mounted
�t be a sanctuary for rebels fight- operations into Nicaragua from
calls for direct talks with the
United States because of its sup-
port tor the Contras.
In another development, Presi-
dent Vinicio Cerezo of Guatemala
said his government would re-
the government of neighbor- base camps in Honduras. They new talks with its leftist rebels if
they agreed to lay down their
arms and take part in legal politi-
cal activity.
Cerezo met with President
Reagan's national security ad-
American forces frequently viser, Lt. Gen. Colin Powell, dur-
conduct joint maneuvers with ing a two-day visit to the region,
Honduran troops, operating from according to the U.S. Embassy in
the Palmerola air base. Guatemala City.
On Friday, the verification
Nicaragua. claim that many of their 18,(XX)
Refering to rebel camps based fighters have now infiltrated into
i londuran territory, Foreign Nicaragua, where they are trying
nister Carlos Lopez Controras to oust the leftist Sandinista gov-
issued a statement saving: "We eminent.
pledged to dismantle any
of installations or logistical
operational support facilities
irregular forces or insurrec-
movements that are carrv-
out civil wars in theneighbor-
ountries, including the
panel met with Hondura's Na-
tional Reconciliation Commis-
interrevolution of Nicaragua sion, armed forces officials and
1 he 15 member verification leaders of labor, political, reli-
on was in Houduras gious, and human rights groups.
New faculty
as part ot week-long trip The commission includes rep- Dr. 1
ECU News Huri'du
.awrence I.ewkow
has
entral America to check rescntatives of the Organization joined the faculty at the ECU
School oi Medicine as assistant
professor in the Department of
Medicine's Section of Hematol-
ogy-Oncology.
A specialist in bone marrow
transplants, he will assist in di-
recting autologous bone marrow
transplantation with in the de-
partment.
Before coming to Greenville,
the New York Native was assis-
tant professor in the Department
of Internal Medicine-Division of
1 lematology at Wayne State Uni-
versity' School of Medicine in
Detroit.
1 le received his medical degree
at New York Medical College in
Valhalla, N.Y and finished his
undergraduate education at Cor-
nell University in Ithaca, N.Y.
After medical school, he com-
pleted an internal medicine resi-
dency and fellowship in hematol-
ov at Wayne State University
Affiliated 1 lospitals.
His professional associations
include membership in the
American Federation for Clinical
Research and the American Asso-
ciation for the Advancement of
Science.
on the peace plan, ot American States, the United
ug 7 by the presidents of Nations, the five Central Ameri-
tragua, Honduras, El Salva- can countries that signed the
Liatemala and Costa Rica. peace plan and members oi the
panel was to travel Satur- Contadora group and its support
Salvador, where itsitin- organization.
$ for meetings with gov- Cease-tires, amnesties for po-
:it, church, peasant and litical prisoners, greater democ-
m rights groups. racy and an end to outside aid for
It will present its findings Jan. insurgents are among the points
to a summit oi the Central included in the regional peace
Ami rican presidents in San Jose, plan.
. Rica. Meanwhile, leaders of the Nica-
fore the panel began a series raguan Resistance, the Contra
hearings in Honduras, Prcsi- umbrella organization, called
t Jose Azcona Hoya said panel "for a direct meeting" with the
members were free to "inspect Sandinistas mediated by Cardinal
anv place in the country without Miguel Obando y Bravo in San
advising beforehand including
air bases and military installa-
tioi
in officials often have
at the rebel camps exist,
Jose, either before or during the
presidential summit.
In a statement released in Mi-
ami, they said a meeting would
"give one more opportunity for
ig that guerrillas came compliance with the accord in its
final stage
Two rounds of indirect talks in
iragua. However, the Dominican Republic medi-
aid in the past that atcd by Obando y Bravo, leader of
Is would have to leave the Roman Catholic Church in
Nicaragua, failed to produce a
vz :Urcrassaid in a state- cease-fire. The Nicaraguan gov-
.duras would not be eminent repeatedly has rejected
went across that rugged, ill-
border between Hondu-
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I
1
16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 12, 1988
Bush gets attention in Iowa debate Friday
(AP) � Vice President George
Bush was on the spot when Re-
publican presidential candidates
gathered for their first debate of
the election year, while Demo-
cratic hopefuls scattered across
the nation in bids for regional
support.
Bush's prominence during Fri-
day night's debate in Des Moines
Iowa, was a mixed blessing for the
acknowledged GOP front-runner
� he was frequently at the center
of attention but he spent much of
the time defending himself.
The vice president's rivals,
spurred by a flurry of recent press
reports on the extent of his in-
volvement in the Iran-Contra af-
fair, honed in on the issue with
Bush waging a vigorous defense.
Bush said he hadn't known
about the diversion of funds to the
Nicaraguan Contras from the
Reagan administration's sale of
arms to Iran. He added that he
"probably erred" on the side oi
trying to free American hostages
held by terrorists, but said he was
not at all ashamed oi his concern
for the captives.
He added, "A deal that wasn't
supposed to be arms for hostages
turned out to be that But he
continued to refuse to disclose
what advice he gave the presi-
dent on the arms sales or hostage-
release efforts.
Rep. Jack Kemp of New York
took on Senate Republican Leader
Bob Dole at one point over the
Kansas senator's energy pro-
gram. Kemp said the oil import
fee backed by Dole is a "shell
game
Dole later bristled when Kemp
asserted that Dole had tried sev-
eral years ago to persuade a major
foreign oil producer to raise its
prices. "I didn't ask the Saudis to
raise the price of oil Dole
snapped.
But that exchange was rela-
tively unusual, and the candi-
dates for the most part stuck to
repeating familiar themes, with
Dole describing himself as a
leader who "made it the hard
way" and Kemp restating his
opposition to higher taxes.
Former .Secretary oi State Alex-
ander M. Haig promised not to
govern according to the whim of
public opinion, and former televi-
sion evangelist Pat Robertson said
he would want the people he
Space -aged
food served
JEFFERSON, N.C. (AP) �
When winter weather hits North
Carolina's mountains, some shut-
ins are treated to space-age food
instead of traditional Meals on
Wheels.
For the third year, the Council
on Aging in Ashc County is using
so-called Skvlab meals as a
backup system when the weather
is so rough that volunteers in its
Meals on Wheels program can't
makeitto the houses of the elderly
with hot food.
"It's the kind of thing the astro-
nauts use said Mannon Eldreth,
director of the council. Entrees are
in a freeze-dried bag that is
dropped into boiling water for
three minutes. You then have ham
and gravy and vegetables or even
hamburgers.
"I tried them myself, and
they're pretty good meals
Eldreth said.
A few days after Thanksgiving
each year, lOfcf the Skylab meals
are given to each client, she said.
Amanda Miller runs the pro-
gram for 70 people in Watauga
County.
"I've got clients back in the hills
and hollers she said. "Even
though U.S. 421 may be clear (of
snow), it takes a while for the sun
to get back to these places. We
instruct our volunteers never to
put themselves in danger by driv-
ing
The Skylab meals cost about $3
each and are supplied by a private
company in White Plains, N.Y.
The product has the endorsement
of the National Council on Aging.
Miller said that the Project of
Aging in Watauga abandoned the
Skylab meals because they be-
came too expensive, but the
agency has an alternative for
snowy days.
"You might call it our home-
made recipe in these days of fed-
eral budget cuts' she said.
Before bad weather hits, clients
in Watauga are supplied with
about a dozen meals in separate
bags. Each contains canned
foods, crackers, and hot cocoa
mix, Miller said.
brings into government to share
his "traditional moral values
Former Delaware Gov. Pete du
Pont said he would like "every
family in America to have the
same opportunity" that his
wealthy family has had.
While the Republicans were
concentrated in Iowa, the Demo-
and picked up the support of for-
mer state Democratic chairman
Alfredo Duran, a Cuoan-Amcri-
can lawyer in Miami.
In Wisconsin, Jesse Jackson
cratic field was spread far and strike against the Nicolet Paper
wide. Co.
Massachusetts Gov. Michael Former Colorado senator Gary
Dukakis campaigned in Florida Hart campaigned on a Chicago
commuter train and rallied about Sen. Paul Simon of Illinois
100 volunteers seeking to place picked up an endorsement in
his delegate candidates on llli- New Hampshire from Steven
nois' complicated ballot. Later he McAuliffe, whose wife, C rista,
went to Iowa, where he said the was the New Hampshire teacher
pledged his support for striking lack of organization of his reborn who died in the Challenger
papcrworkcrs and called for a campaign will not be fatal in that shuttle explosion.
state's first-in-thc-nation cau- Simon also defended his cco-
cuses Feb. 8. nomic proposal, maintaining that
"This is not a contest about who the budget can be balanced with-
has the best organization he
said. "This is a contest for the
nation's future
'workers' bill of rights Jackson
spoke to about 900 workers on
out new taxes.
"As a last resort, I am willing to
move to some tax increase, but
that is the last resort. It is not the
first resort and 1 genuinely believe
wccan do it without that Simon
said.
Sen. Albert Gore Jr. of Tennes-
see continued his effort to put the
spotlight on the Super Tuesday
primaries in the Sou th on March 8.
Campaigning in Louisiana,
Gore said, "Iowa has 52 delegate
votes. Super Tuesday has 1,300
delegate votes. The process has
been changed more than those
guys realize
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I
THt: EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 12, 1988 Page 17
The 'Throw Momma- Princess Bride' coincidences
BY CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Writer
I absolutely refused to see a
certain two movies over
Christmas Break. I told my
friendsI absolutely refuse to see
a certain two movies over
Christmas Break So of course, I
saw both of them.
The weird thir g is, they both
had so many connecting factors.
Synchronicity, if I can go so far.
Even weirder, for two commercial
successes, I liked them both.
"Throw Momma From the
Train" and "The Princess Bride"
were both funny, well produced
films. I stand corrected and
suspected. But what about that
Synchronicity?
Well, they both had Billy
Crystal in them, although "Bride"
used him only for a cameo and
that, to me, is all you need of Billy
Crystal. The guy can be funny in
sprints, but in the marathon
strctchs, he tends to wear out.
Ever see the "Saturday Night
Live" skit where he played an
aging baseball player? Eight
minutes long and went nowhere.
Same thing happened in a mime
piece he did on his HBO special;
too much art, not enough laughs.
But he carried his costarring
role well in "Momma Any
writer, professional, amatucr or
term paper variety, can
sympathize with his efforts to
cure his writer's block.
The real star of "Momma"
though was Danny DeVito. He
gave Owen Lift just the right
balance. Too much in cither the
nerd or psycho directions and the
character would have become flat
and unengaging.
The subtle use of trains
everywhere: Owen's toys, the
park ride and even the actual
getaway train,established an
undercurrent of foreshadowing.
Plot wise, the movie doesn't
disappoint, although for a few
moments toward the end a
contrived resolution seems
inevitable. The twist ending,
perhaps more than any other
single element in the film, is what
makes this movie for me.
Back to the synchronicity- Rob
Reiner makes a cameo as Crystal's
agent. Reiner is also the director of
"Princess Bride And instead of
being a saccharine infused fairy
tale, "Bride" turned out to be a
sharp and beautiful picture.
The country backgrounds were
stunning. The bigger names in the
cast, Mandy Patinkin, Andre the
giant and Christopher Guest,
played subordinate roles to the
newcomers portraying the hero
and heroine, the man in black and
Buttercup.
The film is full of pathos and
melodrama - but always tongue in
check. Nevertheless, it's
heartening to sec Patinkin slay
Guest, who killed his father so
many years ago.
Carol Kane, best known for her
role in "Taxi"(and who else
starred in "Taxi could it be
Danny DeVito? I told you, it's
synchronicity hell. And who was
on "Saturday Night Live" the
year Crystal was? That's right,
Chris Guest.) is hilarious as
UniversityChorus class
plans northern tour
By LARISSA TRIVETT
Staff Writer
Who would not like a class that
offers adventure, fame, and na-
tional travel opportunities? At
East Carolina, the students in the
University Choir experirnce all of
this in their annual tour in the
spring.
The University ChdtfiTa regu-
lar class that meets four days a
week Monday through Thursday.
The choir is composed of half
women and half men. At present
time there are still a few openings
for men to join the choir.
The tour that the class goes on is
usually in the spring after school
is over and consists of four days of
concerts in North Carolina and
Virginia to as many as 26 days of
travel on the west coast like they
did in 1982,1984, and 1987.
The choir usually stays in
homes of other people while on
tour, but if a home is not available,
they stay in hotels.
This past spring, the choir sang
their way across the country.
They started in Tennessee and
then went to Oklahoma, Texas
and New Mexico. lust for fun,
they stayed one night at the Grand
Canyon.
Most of the concerts were in
churches. Occasionally, however,
the choir sang at the restaurants
where they ate dinner just to show
off.
When it was time to go back to
work they gave a concert for the
East Carolina alumni in Holly-
wood California. The director, Dr.
Brett Watson said, "I was really
surprised and happy to see such a
great turnout. There were a lot of
East Carolina graduates there
who had done really well One
man that he mentioned was Barry
Scharf who is now a successful
designer of neon.
In California, the choir sang in
San Francisco, Napa, and Ureka.
From there they gave concerts in
Oregon, Idaho, Salt Lake City,
Utah and at the newly restored
Wheeler Opera house in Aspen
Colorado. Watson said that the
students enjoyed singing there.
On their way back to North
Carolina, they stopped in Cinc-
innati, Ohio, Bluefield, West Vir-
ginia, and Northern Virginia.
They ended their tour at the Old
Europe Restaurant for a luncheon
in Washington, D.C.
The plans for a tour this spring
are uncertain. Er. Watson is con-
sidering a week long tour in New
York and New England. He
stresses that new members, even
non-music majors, are welcome.
If anyone is interested in joining
the choir, they are to contact
Watson in the music building.
Many students Watson in-
structed now have successful
music careers. Two such students
are Ray Bunch and Bruce Frazier
Crystal's nagging wife.
Of course, Peter Falk played the
crochety grandfather, but I don't
know what he has to do with
anyone else. He was on television
though.
So I was wrong. Big names can
have good movies too. And they
can have fun with them. Still, as
long as Speilbcrg keeps cranking
out his winners, I'll stick to the
obscure stuff. But I'll keep an eye
on this most synchronos crew.
Trip home to
dentist office is
scary journey
By LAURA LEE S AL AZAR
Staff Writer
My Christmas vacation began
at 3:30 pm, Thursday, December
17. Fellow East Carolinian staff
writer, Pat Molloy, accompanied
me home on my journey to Vir-
ginia Beach. Little did he know
that the short, two-hour drive
would turn into a close call with a
Volkswagen bug and a Grey-
hound bus.
We suived the fiasco with mi-
nor heart palpitations and sweat
forming on Mr. Molloy's brow.
The next adventure involved
the dreaded nuni-ivory bowl
doctor. I'm not referring to the
gynecologist, but the dentist. It
was time for my yearly check-up.
When I was little, I enjoyed
going to the dentist because he
gave me wax teeth to play with.
But as I got older, the toys disap-
peared and the pain accrued. I
think they are inversely propor-
tionate!
I waited in the waiting room for
45 minutes. I guess that's why
they call it the waiting room. I
looked round for a decent maga-
zine, but ail they had were dentist
journals. I tried to read the ar-
ticles, especially the one entitled,
"Cocaine, the New Anesthetic
Finally, the receptionist in the
white uniform called my name
and escorted me to the "back
room where my pain emanated.
Waiting for the dentist in the
back room was worse than in the
waiting room. I could just imag-
ine what he was going to do to me.
Let's see, I brushed and flossed
for an hour before I came, and I
See DENTISTS, page 19
nine Ramsey stars as Danny Devito's scary, scary Momma in the smash hit movieThrow Momma From
the Train This picture shows Ramsey scowling nastily at DeVito, who is not pictured. You have to use
your imagination for that part
Greeting card shopping is not fun
By LAURA SALAZAR
Staff Writer
mark store to get a greeting card undergraduate degree at the Hall-
for a birthday, baptism, anniver- mark University for Greeting
sary or graduation. There are Card Writers. This university is
many colors, styles, shapes and equivalent to English 1100.
sizes to choose from. It takes at least 10 minutes to
Ever wonder how greeting card find the right section of cards.
University Choir is for you.
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
SUff Witter
It was a scary year. Mall rock got
popular and R.E.M. made a video
with a skate rat in it. Critics began
taking George Michael seriously.
And in perhaps the most serious
breach of good taste ever, Def
Leppard showcased their
maimed drummer in both their
videos.
Perhaps even more frightening,
MTV familiarized America with
bands that would never have
made it across the Atlantic on the
strength of their songs. Gene
Loves Jezebel, Crowded House
and New Order all showed what
can happen with some makeup
and an English or Aussie accent.
American bands fared only
slightly better. The really good
ones either never make videos or
the videos were never seen. But it
was business as usual for the
superstars; more Madonna, more
Springsteen and way loo much
Bon Jovi.
It was a scary year and it was a
Now that the holidays have
passed, a sigh of relief can be ex-
tc!led. No more fighting mad
who work with Dolly Parton on shoppers to get the last pair of creators come up with those witty Thank goodness for those section
her new television show. Reeboks only to find two left sayings? Do they sit down and markers: birthday for a special
So if you enjoy potential success sneakers. But there is one ritual think, "Now I'am going to write a person birthday for that not-so-
and would like to travel that lingers year rcund. greeting card I imagine that to special person, congratulations
extensively, maybe joining the Everyone, at one time or an- be successful at greeting card on your new babycongratula-
other, has had to go to the Hall- writing, one must receive an tionsonyour new litter of cats.
Could you imagine what a
nightmare it would be if you had
to dig through hundreds 0 greet-
ing cards to find one for a birth-
day?
You finally find the right sec-
tion of cards and reach for the
smallest one because spending
$1.50 seems too atrocious. The
card will probably end up in the
SIP
Year in video; mall rock ruled
year of musical drek. So lets pick capacity or another in 1987, you
the worst and look for the toler- weren't really trying. If there is a
able. God, Tiffany will get her head
1. The worst video of the year stuck in a blender in early Febru-
was "City of Crime by Tom ary.
Hanks and Dan Akroyd. Not only 4. 'T Want Your Sex Good. I
did it fail in its attempt to draw want your race, creed and na-
7. "Day in, Day out David.
David, David, David. What are
you thinking about? Roller
skates? Glass Spiders? Peter
Frampton?!?! The more I saw of
this tearjerking video, the more
disgusted I got. I wanted to hit
trash or in the fireplace anyway.
The next tribulation is finding
the right size envelope. At this
point,itdoesn'tmatter whetheror
not the card matches the color of
the envelope. The thought of fi-
nally leaving the store is on you
mind.
Arriving at the register, you
notice those freebie mini-calen-
dars. You take one and hope that
they are still free. Why does it
always seem like people that
work at Hallmark stores arc either
grandmother-like, or Christi Brin-
kley-like?
As the cashier puts your pur-
chase into a bag, you shove three
more calendars into your pocket.
Oh well, tis the season.
audiences for the flopped "Drag- tional origin, but I'm not writing Bowie upside the head with them
net" movie, it failed to have any songs about it. Perhaps the funni-
redecming qualities whatsoever, est thing George really said last
The video's defenders say it was year though, was when he told
meant asa rap spoof,but the thing SPIN magazine he never thought
wasn't funny. And to think that an he'd projected a homosexual
ex-Blues Brother could fall so far.
2. "Heaven is a Place on Earth
Maybe when you're saying "YES"
to certain psychoactive sub-
stances. But Belinda (married to a
Reaganitc remember) has forgone
her indulgences of yore. Now she
makes video with lots of children
skates til he remembered the
words to "Suffragette City "
8The-Video-by-the-Once-
Greatest-Band-in-North-Amer-
ica-Which-Shall-Remain-Name-
less I can't even think about this
video for long. But if Michael
image. Riiiiight
5. 'Shakedown Was it my
imagination, or did Bob look pal- Stipe's vision of the End of the
sied in this video? Just more proof World and feeling fine is a thir-
that AOR dinosaurs should be teen year old skatepunk in a old
heard and not seen. house, well, I hope I go in the first
6. "Alone Hogetta and Nancy earthquake.
Wilson apparently want us to 9. "True Faith New Order
and globes. I kept feeling this was believe they do nothing but ride suffers from the same art fag pre-
supposed to mean something, horses in abandoned warehouses tentions as Depeche Mode, Sting
Perhaps that art school is bad for all day long. Well, goody for and ubiquitous other Brit pop-
you. them. But did this video do any- pers-This video, featuringahand-
3. "I Think We're Alone Now thing to push forward the signing punching bag and about
And who cares? But this ditty boundaries of video, music, mu- fifteen trampolines, had nothing
invented a whole new genre of sic video or jusitify giving Adam to do with anyone or anything on
pop and convinced everyimc that Curry a paycheck? I didn't think this planet However, sources
if you didn't get on MTV in one so. See ROCKERS, page 19
MMrfAgMt
tLw-4t4e&m�. - rTTmFXWtu
feSUtt ���






18 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 12. 1988
' batteries' includes magic, love
By STAN ARNOLD
Staff Writer
"Batteries Not Included
Stephen Speilberg's latest science
fiction movie, is a heart warming
film about visitors from outer
space. The true mint of this film,
however, lies not in any skillful
acting nor the special effects but
rather in the portrayal of the inter-
action oi man and machine in a
unique and creative way.
The plot of the film centers
Nureyev scoffs
at criticism
Ballet star Rudolf Nureyev,
who will be 50 in March, scoffed at
London critics who panned his
performances with the Royal Bal-
let this week.
" 1 don't pay any attention to the
critics - not at all the Soviet-born
dancer told reporters Friday at
Heathrow Airport before catch-
ing a Hight for New York. "It
doesn't matter at all what they
say
Nureyev performed in
"Giselle" on Wednesday and
Thursday at the Royal Opera
House, his first appearance there
in five years.
His partner, French ballerina
Sylvie Guillem, 20, making her
Covent Garden debut in the title
role, won high praise.
"Unfortunately, her perform-
ance only served to accentuate the
limp, flabby, agonizingly labored
dancing by Nureyev said the
Evening Standard's critic, Robin
Stringer.
Asked if it mightbc time for him
to give up dancing, Nureyev, di-
rector of the Paris Opera Ballet,
said: "1 have no thoughts of retire-
ment "
ECU
around five tennants in an aged
building being harassed in an at-
tempt by an unscrupulous real
estate developer to force them to
leave so that he can tear down the
building to build offices.
Jessica Tandy and Hume Cro-
nyn play an eccentric but lovable
old couple named Faye and Frank
Rilcy. Frank McRae co-stars as
Henry Noble, an ex-prize tighter,
who constantly watches televsion
but rarely speaks.
Dennis Boutsikaris plays Ma-
son Baylcr, an artist, who paints
the decaying East side New York
City neighborhood an tries in vain
to have the building designated
for historic preservation. Eliza-
beth Pcna plays the pregnant
Marissa Esquival who is desper-
ately awaiting the return of her
fiance. Although none of the char-
acters are strong enough to carry
the film alone they work well
together to make an excllent film.
At first none of the characters
share anything in common aside
from losing their homes, yet upon
the arrival of the creature robots
from space they become close and
united. The little spacecraft fam-
ily bring fantasy and magic into
the lives of people whose lives
were in much the same condition
as the building itself.
This movie is not for very small
children nor hard core cynics,
neither of whom will truly under-
stand it (although the children
will still probably enjoy it).
CLIFF'S m?'
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N.C 33 E�l.) Graanvilla North Carolina
Phono 752-3172
Mon. thru Thurs. Night
Popcorn
Shrimp
$3.65
THE ECU STUDENT UNION
SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE
STICKLETS
AND
Doritos
cooLRrVcrnjyoR
tortilla oars
PRESENT
with every disc or roll of color print film
brought in for processing.
OFFER GOOD FROM 1-12-88 TO 1-25-88
STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
coupon must accompany order
WELCOME
BACK
STUDENTS
93 WDLX-FM
'Your Pirate Station"
100,000 watts of
Pirate Power
covering all of
Eastern
North Carolina.
1
m
lit
WDLX wishes
students a
happy 1988.
WDLX is the
official flagship
station for ECU
Athletics.

Wednesday, January 20
8:00 p.m.
Coffeehouse, Ground Floor, Mendenhall

Twmrm
m
v.
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TWO FUN WAYS TO WIN!
ee WIN A SHOT AT
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� Urn o trip to Doytono Beach to perform before throngs of voamonmg students during Spring
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bee if you re not staking comedy tome ond fortune STICKIETS' ond DORITOS brand Cool
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Call 757-6611
for more information.
DONTMISSin
'Return
II cooks
Editor's note: These red
came with the press packcj
"Return of the Living Dead,
II" which will be shown in a
cial screening tonight at 8 p.
Hendrix Theater. Supposed
is what you should eat be
hand and then trv to hold it
the zombies come out durin
film. Right.
Anyway, I wouldn't even kj
where to suggest you pun
the brains necessary for these
pes. However, there are alw
few cats running around Bilti
Street, and if one is quick-
might snag a kitten.
I understand that thefuris
to scrape off though, espei
around the cranial area. An
nate source of brain might tf
needed. You are collegi
Be creative.
Dentist's Oj
Continued from page 17
used Dad's Water l'ik. i r :
doesn't realize that I don'i
after every meal. It's air �
possible to do when
college.
1 hate flossing. Wraj
dental floss around my fi
cuts off the circulation. Fu
more, I find it totally d
use a sawing motion betweej
Rocker
Continued from page 1
reveal there is a nice planet
Rho Ophiuchi system wl
kind of stuff is consid i
mon sense.
10. In a million way tic J
place was: Evervth
Lewis did, ditto I r
Brvan Adams, Bruce
Whitesnake, Poison,
you get the idea. 1 lonorabl
tion goes to Starship foi
"Mannequin" soundtrack
In it, Grace Slick showed he
absence of talent and pre
embarassed poor China to
Or maybe not
Anyway, as you can gleal
the above, it was the year
Sell-Out. Some artists had
the process for a long timl
Lord knows, we shou
seen it coming. It was
to see young bands like L�
and R.E.M. do it so
though.
Now for the tolerable: 1.
f
!4�
NIW J1JT1
- �
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d Oyster Bar,
�eenviHe North Carolina
Night
3.65
itos
FLOR
)
!
20
ndenhall
WIN!
S
impty
in
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 12, 1988 19
'Return of the Living Dead'
II cooks up brains at Hendrix
Editor's note: These recipes
came with (he press packet for
"Return of the Living Dead, Part
II" which will be shown in a spe-
cial screening tonight at 8 p.m. in
Hendrix Theater. Supposedly this
is what you should cat before-
hand and then try to hold it in as
the zombies come out during the
film. Right.
Anyway, I wouldn't even know
where to suggest you purchase
the brains necessary for these reci-
pes. However, there are always a
few cats running around Biltmore
Street, and if one is quick, one
might snag a kitten.
1 understand that the fur is hard
to scrape off though, especially
around the cranial area. An alter-
nate source of brain might then be
needed. You are college students.
Be creative.
I wonder what brains sound
like as you drop them in the pan.
Or in the micro wave. I wonder if
you can use microwave -safe
dishes with brains, or would it kill
the taste. Oh well. Enjoy the
movie.
Fried "Noodle" Sans Pasta
1 boiled brain
olive oil
flour
clove of garlic
Heat garlic clove until golden
brown in two or three tablespoons
of olive oil. Remove clove. Slice
brain horizontally. Dip in flour,
then in beaten egg and fry on both
sides in olive oil. Serve with
wedges of lemon and parsley if
desired.
Seriously Syrian: Baked Brain
Delirium
1 boiled brain, cubed
butter
2 tbsp. flour
1 4 cup chopped green peppers
1 4 cup chopped onion
2 tomatoes, peeled and
chopped
34 cup broth or water
bay leaf
pinch of thyme
salt and pepper
Saute green peppers and onions
in butter, then add flour. Stir in
broth or water and tomatoes and
bring to a boil. Lower heat and
add bay leaf, thyme, salt and
pepper, cooking for 15-20 min-
utes. Add brain and bake at 350
degrees for 15 minutes.
A zombie rises from the grave in "Return of the Living Dead,PartTwo This creepy motion picture will
scare you. And if you eat the brain recipes printed here, that will scare everybody. The sneak preview
starts tonight at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theater.
Dentist's office is no place to spend Christmas break
Continued from page 17
used Dad's Water l'ik. i nope he
doesn't realize that I don't floss
after every meal. It's almost im-
possible to do when you are in
college.
I hate flossing. Wrapping the
dental floss around my fingers
cuts off the circulation. Further-
more, 1 find it totally disgusting to
molars to get guck out. My gums at the friendly dentist and hope
start bleeding and I clumsily fling that he doesn't have bad breath. I
the guck onto the mirror. I tried close my eyes for a second, and
flossing without a mirror, but I when I get brave enough to open
end up flossing between the same them, I am confronted with a pain
tooth more than onre. of eyebrows. The dentist donned
I'm convinced that dentists a mouth mask and a pair of rubber
need to invent a mirror especially gloves.
for flossing.
The dentist and his assistant
use a sawing motion between my arrive for the procedure; I look up
I felt like I had a disease or
something. I guess he's trying to
protect himself from AIDS. This
made me feel rather uneasy.
After the procedure, I felt like
someone flossed my teeth with a
machete. Once again he said that I
needed to floss my teeth more
frequently. I was tempted to ask
him to open his mouth so I could
examine his gums for evidence of
not flossing.
So the moral is: Make sure
you floss after every meal.
Rockers sell out to video gods in 1987
Continued from page 17
reveal there is a nice planet in the
Rho Ophiuchi system where this
kind of stuff is considered com-
mon sense.
10. In a million way tie for tenth
place was: Evervthing Huey
Lewis did, ditto for Bon Jovi,
Bryan Adams, Bruce Hornsby,
Whitesnake, Poison, and well,
you get the idea. Honorable men-
tion goes to Starship for their
"Mannequin" soundtrack video.
In it, Grace Slick showed her total
absence of talent and probably
embarassed poor China to death.
Or maybe not.
Anvway, as you can glean from
the above, it was the year of the
Sell-Out. Some artists had been in
the process for a long time, and
Lord knows, we should be have
seen it coming. It was surprising
to see young bands like Los Lobo
and R.E.M. do it so quickly
though.
Now for the tolerable: 1. Johnny
Mellencamp's "Paper in Fire"
was cool but it raised some seri-
ous social questions. Were they
really playing in front of that old
man's house or was it a set? If so,
did they have permission to play
there? If so, why did the guy look
so surprised to find a rock band
on his front steps?
2. "U got the Look Even
though Prince hasn't learned how
to spell "you" yet, and he sings
with Sheena Easton (but hell, Don
Johnson 'married' her) this was a
jammin, heck-a -slammin video.
Especially nice was the ever lchv
key Sheila E. "Erotic cityCome
alive t
3.TmBadMinustenpointsif
the plastic surgery queen came to
mind before LL Cool J. Bigger,
deffer and cooler than anybody
currently making soundtracks,
LL's one fault has been that slow
rap song. But one more like "I'm
Bad" and he's forgiven.
4. "Notorius" by Loverboy. Just
kidding.
4. "No Sleep til Brooklyn Even
censored, the Beastics are cool.
The heavy metal send up was
straight out of "Spinal Tap
5. "Notorious" by Duran
Duran. Just kidding, but didn't
anyone else think it was strange
Loverboy came out with the same
song in one year's time? Hell, I
would have sued for copyright
infringement.
5. "Seven Wonders Although
"Little Lies" is really a better
video, this one had more Stevie.
Slimmer, coke-free (supposedly,
the track on the "Special Christ-
mas Lp" might belie thfet) the
pseudo Egyptian backdrop and
the interplay between the Mac
faimily made this a really nice
video. And you can't really accuse
them of selling out, they did that
ten years ago.
MTV did do a few cool things
this year, such as showing Monty
Python episodes and the Pink
Floyd contest. Then again, they
sponsored a Sammy Hagar con-
test too.
But perhaps their most notable
acheivement was letting the
deejays from the busted Radio
New York international guest
veejay one Saturday. This was
eclipsed by MTV's branching out
into every other continent. Oh,
well. Just remember, Life's a
funny game, one you just don't
get out alive, and sex is best when
it's one on one.

A103
Art and reason
When Mark and I decided to spend
the weekend at his mother's house,
I never imagined I would be walking
into a mouse's nightmare.There were
cats everywhere.
Cat plaques, cat statues, cat clocks,
even a cat mat. I couldn't begin to dupli-
cate her collection of kitty litter if 1 spent
a year at a garage sale. Conspicuously
absent, however, was a real cat. Strange,
I thought, and began to fear that a
weekend with cat woman could be a
lot less than purr-feet.
But then she came home, and
Mark introduced her. She was
dressed surprisingly well�no
leopard pants. In fact, you
could say she was the cat s meow;
but IU rather not.
She offered me a cup of Dutch Choc-
olate Mint. Now that was something
I could relate to. Then she brought it
out in the most beautiful, distinctly
unfeline china IU ever seen. As we
sipped, I found out that Mrs. Campbell
has my same weakness for chocolate,
loves the theater as much as I do, but,
incredibly, never saw "Cats So Mark
and I are taking her next month.
.�
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nun�o?
,to�
J
General Foods' International Coffees.
Share the feeling.
room
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MAJOR CONCERTS COMMITTEE
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IN CONCERT
THURSDAY,
JANUARY 28,1988
MINGES COLISEUM
8:00 P.M.
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GENERAL PUBLIC $16.00
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ii -r�,Mmm





20 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 12, 1988
Animation techniques branching out in '80s
By MICAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
Animation found its earliest
medium as the 'theatrical short"
where it performed "short sub-
ject" duties along with serials and
newsreds. Appropriately, it was
revitalized with the latter two (as
soapoperas and the nightly news)
on television which granted a new
lease on life to the cartoon in the
form of made-for- TV animation.
In 1CS7, it was the video screen
that was again responsible for the
reyitalization of animation, a re-
birth notable for quality if not
quanitity. The popularity of
VCRs, and several companies
noticing that a lot of "Golden
Age" animation from thc30'sand
'40s was out of copyright, has
resulted in some classic work
being preserved where it only
languished before.
Granted, many of these tapes
feature obscure cartoons and the
reproductions are frequently
poor, but there can be no doubt
that the craftsmanship alone of
these animated features makes
them worthy of saving. And, oc-
casionally, something truly won-
derful is delivered from obscurity
to delight new audiences, such as
the Max Fleischer "Superman"
cartoons.
Beside, even the weakest of
these cartoons shines beside the
current Saturday morning drek
which only succeeded in getting
worse each season until a
diminitivebut nonthelcss mighty
mouse zoomed in to save the day
last fall. "Mighty Mouse, the New
Adventures" was a delight to all
who have discovered it following
Tee-Wee's Playhouse Pro-
'Cosby' airs
cancer episode
Industrialist Armand Hammer
may be a man of the world, but
when it comes to acting, he's as
stage-struck as the next guy.
Hammer, the 89-year-old chair-
man of Occidental Petroleum Co.
and of the President's Cancer
Panel, admitted flubbing his lines
this week as he taped a scene for
an upcemimy episode-of 'The
Cosby Show
"I had trouble remembering my
lines, and I kept calling (Cosby)
Bill, instead oi Cliff he said Fri-
day in a telephone interview from
Los Angeles. "Finally, they had to
make these big signs for me to
read off
Hammer plays a philanthropist
named Mr. Lindquist who badg-
ers Cliff Huxtable, the obstetri-
cian played by Bill Cosby, into
writing a letter to his congress-
man urging more government
funds for cancer research.
Cosby had said he would de-
vote a program to cancer if Ham-
mer agreed to appear.
GA native
recieves ticket,
holiday wishes
COVINCTON, Ky. (AP) � A
Georgia man may think twice
before calling Kentucky a "hill-
bill v commonwealth" again.
James B. Riggins, of Alpharetta,
Ga used that term in a letter to
Kenton District Judge Wil
Schroder that accompanied a $20
check to pay for a citation his
daughter received three days be-
fore Christmas on Interstate 75.
Riggins lamented the "enor-
mity of the stupidity" of stopping
an 18-year-old girl on her way
home from college because of an
expired license tag.
Fie closed the letter: "well,
Merry Christmas to you, you
Kentucky JERKS
Schroder returned the check
with a letter recently noting, "As
the presiding 'Kentucky JERK' of
the 'hillbilly commonwealth'
where yokel troopers' cited your
daughter for an expired license
tag, I have the distinct pleasure of
returning your check � but not
for the reasons cited in you letter
Schroder advised Riggins that
the fine, with added court costs,
totals $67.50.
He warned Riggins that the
state of Georgia would honor
Kentucky's outstanding penalty.
"I think our 'yokel troopers' refer
to this as the long arm of the
law Schroder explained.
He closed by wishing Riggins a
happy new year.
duccd by Ralph Bakshi of "Fritz
the Cat" and "Lord of the Rings"
fame, a typical episode of
"Mighty Mouse" is a cartoon-
comic book-pop culture fan's
dream with all the in-jokcs and
satire (some of which require a
VCR with a freeze frame to catch)
possible.
One episode in which the satire
was decidedly pointed was "The
Ice Goose Cometh" in which '40's
The deserved recognition must be
cartoon star Gandy Goose comes
out of suspended animation to
discover that he has no place in a
kid-vid land full of Transformers,
G.I. Joe, and even Pee-Wcc Her-
man (known here as 'Wee-Wee'
Herman).
Don Bluth and Steven
Spielberg's "American Tail a
box office success, was trans-
ferred to tape this year where it
has proven to be just as popular,
especially sweet to Bluth, a man
dedicated to craftsmanship and
magic in animation who has en-
dured unjust financial straits be-
cause of his integrity.
'Banjo the Woodpile Cat the
classics, "Lady and the Tramp
(on video) and "Cinderella" (at
the theater) in 1987. Both movies
arc unassuming, quiet films
which feature quality, if unspec-
short film Bluth and his friends tacular, animation with great sto-
animated in odd hours in Bluth's rics and charming characters,
garage while still keeping their But 1987's animation success
"day" job at Disney is now out on story must be Will Vinton, who,
video tape. It's a beautiful little ironically, doesn't produce
film made more remarkable when drawn animation but its much
you consider its humble origins. ignored "step-brother clay ant-
Walt Disney re-released two mation. Althouch his "Festival of
Claymation" didn't fare well at
the movies, his television work
featuring the California Raisons
has been ohcnominal.
Much of Vinton's work ls
also on video tape, but "The Little
Prince and Friends" is the most
outstanding with two stories
("The Little Prince" and "Martin
the Cobbler") striking on emo-
tional resonance even more re-
markable when you remember
the "actors" arc clay dolls.
I
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CONVENIENCE STORE
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With valid REGULAR PRICE WITHOUT
identification COUPON $4.89
Lynn Harrel will play cello
the North Carolina symphol
day at 3:15 p.m.
'Simultal
Schoo M r� CM BI I uc
Gray Art Galler ist
lina University opens
exhibition schedule with
taneous Views: Hcide Fasi
Sam Scott and -
on Friday, Ian. 15. The e j
will remain on view tl I
13.
"The exhibition juxtapos
monoprints of Scott, thedrail
and wood sculpture ol Fas
and I lutchison's sculpl
ingsand paintingson paper,
Perry Ncsbitt, gallon direct
Fasnacht is a Mew N. ork-
artist who primarily e
painted wood sculpture
holds a BFA from the Rho
land School of Design an
MFA from New York Univ
Among her many s
a Riversh
Try Ou:
Countr
All You
S3S33J
RAd
Greenvill
Memorii
Welc
Bac
Studl
Open M
Sunday
i�m ��i"��i-� '�� '� ��
�� '� i�uml
� � i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 12.1988 21
t
80s
lymation" didn't fare well at
e m his television work
tturing the California Raisons
is been Dhenominai.
i h oi Vinton's work js
ideo tape but "TheLittle
and Friends is the most
g with two stories
"he Little Prince" and "Martin
striking on cmo-
. nance even more re-
irkable hen you remember
c actors are i lay dolls.
OP
UDENTS
tEST
PACKS
fLY!
.59
'RICE WITHOUT
�N $4.89
I

I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I

I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
NC Symphony to play at ECU
Mcndcnh.il r�M Reict othcr orchcstras across the nation,
and he has returned several times
The North Carolina and East to the National Symphony in
Carolina University Symphony Washington, DC, including a
Orchestras will join forces for a special concert on the lawn of the
performance at East Carolina Capitol with composer Aaron
University in Wright Audito- Copcland narrating his own
rium, at 3:15 p.m. on Sunday. "Lincoln Portrait
Renowned cellist, Lynn Harrcll, The East Carolina University
will be featured with the 130- Symphony Orchestra is corn-
member combined orchestras for
an extraordinary musical event.
Founded by the Pulitzer Prize-
winning composer Lamar String-
prised of students from across the
state and around the country. In
addition to their regular classes,
the students work with the Sym-
ficld, the North Carolina Sym- phony in a rewarding schedule of
phony annually takes its musical rehearsals and concerts. As a re-
message from North Carolina's suit, the ensemble has earned the
mountains to its coast. For over distiniction as being one of the
fifty-five years, the Symphony best college orchestras in the
has been delighting audiences country.
with the finest in classical and The Symphony was selected as
popsrcpertoire.lt performs about one of the thirteen collegecon-
400 adult and educational con- servatory orchestras in the United
certs in more than 100 communi- States to be featured on the Na-
tics per year. tional Public Radio network.
Conducting the North Carolina Prior to this, recognition was
Symphony is Gcrhardt Zimmer- given to the orchestra through
man, artistic director since 1982. invitational performances at
Carolina, he received his profes- Artisits Award and the first
sional education at the University Avery Fischer Award. Mr. Harrcll
of Michigan and began his career regularly appears as soloist with
as assistant conductor of the the world's greatest orchestras
Michigan Symphony Orchestra, and conductors on five conti-
Lynn Harrcll is one of a handful ncnts, and in 1981 he received the
of cellists performing, whose Grammy Award for his recording
popularity and acclaim rival their of the Tchaikovsky Trio with
more widely accepted colleagues Ashkenazy and Pcrlman.
on violin and piano. Harrcll Tickets for this performance can
averages 100 appearances a year, be pruchascd at thcCcntral Ticket
and he has an exclusive recording Office located in Mcndcnhall Stu-
contract with DcccaLondon dent Center, Monday-Friday, 11
under which he is recording all of am - 6 pm. Ticket prices arc $12 for
the major repertoire composed general admission, $10 for ECU
for the cello. He is the recipient of facultystaff, and $6 for ECU stu-
numcrous prestigious awards dents and youth
including tc Mcrriwcathcr Post For tickets ana more informa-
Award, the Piatigorsky Award, tion, call 757-6611, extension 266,
the Ford Foundation Concert during the above hours.
Lynn Harrel will play cello in the upcoming concert featuring
the North Carolina symphony and the ECU symphony onSun-
day at 3:15 p.m.
Formerly associate director of the
St. Louis Symphony, Zimmerman
has also been musical director of
the Canton Symphony. He has
been guest conductor of many
music conventions in Atlanta and
Norfolk.
Robert Hause has been conduc-
tor at East Carolina University
since 1967. A native of North 1
'Simultaneous' art show opens in Gray
School of Art Press Release
Grav Art Gallery of East Caro-
lina University opens its spring
exhibition schedule with "Simul-
taneous Views: Hcidc Fasnacht,
Sam Scott and Sally Hutchison"
on Friday, Jan. 15. The exhibition
group exhibitions across the na-
tion arc "In Three Dimensions,
Recent Sculpture by Women" at
Pratt Institute Gallery and "No-
tions of Contemporary Surreal-
ism" at Vandcrwoude Tanan-
baum Gallery in New York City.
Her work appcrars in several
Art's Visiting Artist Program,
Fasnacht will talk with classes
and individual students.
"Sally Hutchison's modular,
architectural sculptures derive
the College of Santa Fe in New
Mexico, the University of
Arizona, Tucson; the University
of Texas at El Paso among others.
His work has been exhibited
will remain on view through Feb. public commissions and collcc-
13. tions and has been reviewed in
from repeated step forms which throughout the Southwest and
she modifies and textures Nes- West with critical attention in
bitt said. "Her investigations into Artspace and Arts News, and has
the clarity and order of the gco- earned him a place in "Who's
metric style have also been pub- Who in American Art
"The exhibition juxtaposes the such publications as Arts Maga- lished in "The Geometric Style in Fasnacht will present a slide
monoprints of Scott, thcdrawings zinc, Art News and The New York Art an article she authored for lecture on Monday, Jan. 25 at 7:30
Times. the Wisconsin Academy of Sci- p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium. A
She has served as an adjunct ences, Arts and Letters reception will follow at 8:30 p.m.
professor of sculpture and draw- Hutchison has exhibited, cu- in the gallery,
ing at State University of New rated and taught extensively in Jenkins Auditorium and Gray
York's Purchase campus and as the Madison, Wis area since re- Art Gallery are located on the
visiting artist and lecturer at the ceiving her MFA from the Univer- campus of East Carolina Univer-
Maryland Institute College of Art, sity of Wisconsin-Madison. sity in the Jenkins Fine Arts Cen-
Bcnnington College and Cleve- Scott will teach the entire ter. All events are free and open to
land Institute of Art. semester at ECU as an artist-in-
As a participant in the East residence. He has served as a vis-
Carolina Univcrsitv School of itine artist or facultv member at
and wood sculpture of Fasnacht
and Hutchison's sculpture, draw-
ingsand paintingson paper said
Perry Ncsbitt, gallery director.
Fasnacht is a New York-based
artist who primarily exhibits
painted wood sculpture. She
holds a BFA from the Rhode Is-
land School of Design and the
MFA from New York University.
Among her manv solo and
the public. For more information
call (919) 757-6336.
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12
S1 v roi INIAN
1 NUAR 12, 1988
Music school gets
new pipe organ
' �� mcnt ol the intervals between
A new pipe organ built as a tones used in the 18th centun
laeekel is widely recoj;niz� d as
one of the world's leading organ
builders, said Pr. E. Roboi t li w in,
professor of organ at E( I ,n
coordinator of F.( U's i Inn ch
music curriculum. aev kel isited
Ui earlier this earasa clinician
for the annual convention ol the
Not th t "arolina M usic I eacl
Association.
" 1 lie addition ol tins insti u
men! gi es the EC Si hool i i
Music an instrument that will
�u, faithfully perform the late 17th
ji. . � nt is and hstii centun literature he
. � i I List said.
Rescue squad celebrates
plica ot ,n earlv ISth centui
istrument, has boon acquired by
� c last Carolina University
chool of Music. Tie organ, in-
alled on the thud floor ol ECl l's
.j Music tei v. '11 be
vd as a pra sti nent
Fhe orga ill bv P miel
eckel ol 1 hiluth Minn, and U a
es a fullv s - ded mechani-
il act ' � par
lei ; . nade
AS1 IliVll.Ll ears
iey' e K i rom
angled cars th
vdies scoui ine i ods tvr lost
taking emerge
ih! fuelmedi:imdeliveries
rlv.
c been
ing il
The �tva Rescue

is the
Most
.i a r s. said.
on � iii i vecui
.
na Assovt S(:ue Squads
id eidie;il Services.
i 23 yeartis aPetty good
ngth of tu.Hnorsaid.
past21years,
-a rescLiead has
rding lo
0 d, v. 1t. nchiel since
�S' We'vetl res-
L vviii relsout
chii . bats out ol
uses �� also perform wa-
r rescues oi � cries,
elp ople, run
�d relays, perform ambulance
itandbvs, help with fuel and food
deli enes in the winter.
"We also transport dialysis pa-
tients, help the elderly such as
s mcone who has fallen out ol the
bod and can't get back in. Wc even
transport those patients who can'l
afford the count) ambulance. We
get most of our (undine, from the
I Inited Way and 1 kind ol feel like
that's what the United Way
.ie isall about And tl at's what
we'ie all about: helpinj
I also dt ponds
nn i s from the c
munit. I3o d said. It c ibout
: I DO a ear to ope rate th
squad.
"One eood thing is v e own our
n equipment - approximately
$250,000 worth of it Boyd said.
We own our own building and
pr rt too
As for tin. squad members,
Bo) d describes them as "a goo 1
mix of people. We also have a
good range of educational back-
grounds - bom the 10th grade to
doc U �; ate dej ,re
Every squad member holds an
advanced first-aid certificate
from the Red Cross: most are cer-
tified emergency medical techni-
cians or EMT-Intermediate, Co d
DRIVF. IIIRl
Dr. T. Robert li win practices on the new practice organ in the
School of Music. The organ is a replica of an earl) 18th . ntui
in.
"It's a big responsibility he
I 'They realize that, literally,
people's lives depend on them.
Mine's not a man in the squad
who doesn't know that. I work
with .i very dedicated bunch of
people. Thee don't have to be
doing this: the' want to. it's time
awav from their own families,
hey could be doing things like
leeping
The rescue squad has "come a
long way" since its birth, accord
ing to Boyd. "It certainly is quite
differenl from what it started out
as in 1962. Squad members first
mcl in the basement ofoneol tiu'ir
homes. We' e went from that tirst
meeting in the basement to own-
oar own property
$251 H woi th of i quipiru
David
of the rescue squad from I97�
1986, called the annivcrsar) "a
real milestone. I wenty-five s ears
ts K fore (cardiopulminary
resuscitation). Tw�
ago was bv fi �rc an stai : trds
ro iding care. I h an
11
f
and quipment
vcd. Twent) fiv
people were bein . I out of
ears withcrowbarsand a wrecker.
' . w we utilize thousands
lars oi equipment to si para
erson from a collide.
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New
By LALACARR STEEl
til ���
Salhe Southal j
the symbol ot the w ?man's
movement in the Soutl .
the earlv twentieth cent
most important achi .
involved service as a
gate to thi I of I ad
ers at the �� I
I x position
lair) in 1
North i arolina General 1
tion of Worm i
years 1911
ally a (aimed ;
and auth i
poem rhe
nd oi V'tr
Althougl t l
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extraordinan
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played
her ei
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Stephi �
ten: A

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plantation ir
named �
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owned a
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�,� i myim wimi� �





THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 12,1988 23
n
V
��

i

New book details Cotten's life
By LALA CARR STEELMAN
ECU New Bureau
Sallie Southall Cottcn became
the symbol of the woman's rights
movement in the South during
the early twentieth century. Her
most important achievements
i nvolved service as al ternate dele-
gate to the Board of Lady Manag-
ers at the World's Columbian
Exposition (Chicago World's
Fair) in 1893; president of the
North Carolina General Federa-
tion of Women's Clubs during the
vearsl911,1912,andl913;nation-
ally acclaimed public speaker;
and authorship of a book-length
poem "The White Doc or The
Legend of Virginia Dare
AHhought these accomplish-
ments may not appear
extraordinary enough to warrant
her claim to distinction, she dis-
played zeal and originality in all
her endeavors. This warranted
her a new biography by William
Stephenson, "Sallie Southall Cot-
ten: A Woman's Life in North
Carolina
Sallie Sims Southall (1846-1929)
was born in Petersburg, Virginia,
into a family of old stock that
faced economic uncertainty.
Opportunity came at the age of
thirteen when she went to live in
the home of a wealthy cousin,
John Wesley Soughall, of
Murfrcesboro, North Carolina.
During the Civil War she was
graduated from Greensboro Fe-
male College and became a tutor,
first in Concord and later in Edge-
combe County. In Edgccombc
County, she met a Civil War sol-
dier, Robert Randolph Cotten,
whom she married in March,
1866.
In 1868 the Cottens moved to a
plantation in Pitt County later
named Cottcndale. Although
they lived in Wilson where Robert
owned a store from 1872 until
1877, the Pitt County farm became
their permanent residence. Dur-
ing the early years of her marriage
Sallie was a typical plantation
mistress albeit one with an
unusual interest in intellectual
pursuits. A devoted mother, she
bore nine children; two died in
infancy, and her son, Robert, Jr
drowned at the age of fifteen.
Cotten's public life began when
her neighbor, Elias Carr (later
governor of North Carolina) as
alternate commissioner to the
World's Fair appointed her alter-
nate lady manager. Her stay in
Chicago and attempts to win fi-
nancial support for North Caor-
lina exhibition there sharpened
her interest in matters outside the
home.
After returning to Cottcndale,
she promoted the idea of a school
to train young women in domes-
tic science, to be named the Vir-
ginia Dare School. Hoping to es-
tablish the institution with pri-
vate funds,she gave public read-
ings of her poem The White Doe
in an effort to raise money.
Apparently she was unaware of
, the charter of the State Normal
and Industrial School for Women
at Greensboro in 1891. She aban-
doned her school-establishment
scheme in the la te 1890' s when the
success of Woman's College be-
came apparent.
Cotten's greatest success was as
a clubwoman. During the Pro-
gressive Era (1901 - 1917)
women's clubs were instruments
for reform. Sallie launched and
served for years as president of
the End of the Century Club, a
book club in nearby Greenville
that embarked on many civic
projects. During her presidency
the North Carolina Federation of
Women's Clubs persuaded the
state legislature to pass a law in
1913 clarifying the legal status of
women and authorizing them to
serve on school boards.
Cotten was an exponent of
"domestic feminism" which was
moderate in its nature. Husband
and children received top priority
in her scheme of values; she was
known by her contemporaries as
"Mother Cotten The reforms she
advocated were conservative;
foremost was better education for
North Carolina women. It was not
until the 1920s that she came to
favor woman's suffraee.
Nevertheless, she had rather
enlightened ideas on such matters
as race, sex, the "lost cause and
the plight of the poor. The meth-
ods she employed to achieve her
goals were always "ladylike
Diplomacy, not militancy, charac-
terized her efforts to win converts
to her causes.
Perhaps the greatest merit of
this excellent study by Stephen-
son is that it reveals the restricted
role assigned to women, their lack
of opportunities, and the hum-
drum existence that many were
forced to live, expccially unmar-
ried women. Cotten's life was rich
and productive, but she sympa-
thized with her less fortunate sis-
ters. Her greatest contribution
was to improve their conditions.
The author relied heavily upon
Cotten's letters, diaries, manu-
scripts, and published works for
information in addition to the
writings of her son Bruce and
several contemporaries who left
their impressions of the Cottens.
A bibliobraphy at the end of the
book supplementing the author's
"notes" would give the reader a
clearer picture of the sources that
were examined.
It is apparent, however, that he
used a variety of both primary
and secondary material. He might
have devised more imaginative
chapter headings rather than di-
vide Cotten's life story according
to dates. However, Stephenson
has written a smooth-flowing
narrative. It is the first biography
of a remarkable woman. Al-
though scholarly, this book is not
for specialists only. The story is so
engrossing and clearly written
that any person with an interest in
the past will not only enjoy it but
be inspired by Sallie Cotten's
example.
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w





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
2L
1
Gus Hill's 24 points pace Bucs to upset
victory over James Madison Monday
f . li. c: U� rrrxr X 7 10 n TTt. tl
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
The accomplishments of the
1987-88 East Carolina men's bas-
ketball team continued to mount
Monday as the Pirates defeated
James Madison 68-65 in Harri-
sonburg, Va in a C A A basketball
game.
With the victory, the young
Pirate squad raised its record to 5-
7, while evening its CAA mark at
1-1.
The Pirates, 15-point under-
dogs entering the contest, rushed
to an early lead in the contest and
never gave up in picking up the
victory. The win marked the first
for the Pirates in seven attempts
on the Dukes homccourt.
carry a 7:30 p.m. tipoif. The IV
rates will also be at home Satur-
Piratc in double figures as he
tossed in 15 points. Junior walk-
Ln Kenny Murphy chipped in day to take on Navy in a CAA
n?ne while Jeff Kelly added eight, game scheduled to begin at ,
The Dukes were led in scoring
by Kcnnard Winchester with 16
points and Ralph Glecn with 12.
The next action for the Pirates
will be Wednesday when they
made only 13 attempts in 17 trips
to the line.
The Pirates raced out to an early
24-12 lead in the game before
James Madison reeled off 11
unanswered points to close to
within 24-23. The two teams then
battled back and forth, with both
teams garnering leads, before
heading to the lockcrroom knot- entertain powerful South Caro-
ted at 34-34 at the half. lina in a non-conference game at
Reed Lose was the only other Minges Coliseum. The game will
JMU dumps Lady Pirates
p.m.
The Navy contest on Saturday
will be preceded by a women's
basketball contest pitting the
Lady Pirates against Fairlcign
Dickinson. That game has a
scheduled 5 p.m. tipoff.
Gus Hill
with a 41-18 halftimc lead behind fcrence battle. ECU will return
S3 percent shooting from the field home Saturday to entertain
in the first half. Fairlcigh Dickinson at Minges
- �rT1 team was nanany ocaicn vy na- The Lady Pirates shot only 30 Coliseum inji!5 p.mtipoff con-
ill paced the way for ECU tionallv.rankcd James Madison percent in the opening half. test. The game will precede the
24 points, including five Mnfw1V M Minws Coliseum. 88- In the second half, James Madi- men's 7:30 p.m. contcs
By MARK SCHECHTER
Sports Writer
The Lady Pirates basketball
team was handily beaten by na-
scoring 24 points, including nve Monday at Minges Coliseum, 88
points during a key stretch of the
second half, which enabled the
Pirates to break open a 50-50 tie
with a seven-point surge.
With the seven-point run, the
Pirates seized a 57-50 lead with
6:22 remaining in the contest.
The Dukes then reeled off six
51.
With the loss, ECU falls to 5-8
for the season and 0-2 in CAA
action.
The Lady Pirates were held
scoreless for the first six minutes
of the game by an aggressive man-
to-man defense, which forced
son continued to build onto its
lead, which reached 38 points, 76-
38, with five minutes remaining.
Rose Miller and Grctta O'Neill
Savage led ECU with 10 points
apiece
"The girls lack confidence
said ECU assistant coach Rosie
Naw.
Ticket office
hours forSC
shots, as James Madison, Thompson. �s hard on the g,rs TheJMtag- Cohscum Uc.
consecutive points of their own to
close within 57-56 with 4:36 left. �?�, jumped out to a 15-6 when tncy have to go out and play office will openat 6 pm. Wedra
From that point, the Pirates lcad and ncVcr loWd back. ranked teams all the time
banged in 11 of 12 shots from the AJisa Harris led jMU in XOTrQ For the game, James Madison
Reed Lose's Dlav for the Pirate basketball team has been a big part of the charity stripe to ice the game. .ft 24 ints while Sydnev wound up shooting a sizzling 52
r . irP,i �;�� arrl loff rpllv taSSPCl 111 . r. , , i jj.j � (,�m �V,n flnnr lA'hiln tVlP
reason for a 5-7 start to a rebuilding year at Ed I.
ECU-State cancelled
R -LEIGH - East Carolina ath- grew into one of college football's
six ot tne nnai 11 rree mwws uy
ECU.
For the game, ECU was true on
24 of 29 attempts from the free
throw line, while James Madison
14 and 12 points respectively. Lady Pirates could muster no
Chris O'Conner finally broke better than a dismal 36 percent,
the Lady Pirates cold spell with The next action for the Pirates
two free throws, but James Madi- will be Thursday when they
son went into the lockcrroom travel to N.C A&T for s non-con-
day before the East Carolina
men's basketball game against
South Carolina at 7:30 p.m.
Students wishing to obtain tick-
ets should bring a valid student
I.D. in order to receive their free
student ticket. Guest tickets will
also be available for students for
$3.50.
letic officials announced last
Monday that the school's 18-year
football series with North Caro-
lina State will not be renewed in
the immediate future.
C. State officials had called a
one-year moratorium on the se-
ries after last September's game in
most exciting rivalries, not to
mention the fact that it had be-
come the biggest football game in
the state of North Carolina East
Carolina Athletic Director Dave
Hart said in a prepared statement.
"It is with extreme regret that
we announce the continuation of
Raleigh which ended in a melee the scries has reached an impasse
when fans stormed the field, for the immediate future Hart
caused some property damage at said.
�-�tom. JjMlHir7r:TWfflBdrt?lf'tl Pitfflg
in red accuntv officer attempting Valvano said discussions on a
to keep students from tearing number of topics had been held in
down the goal posts. the last several months, but that
East Carolina won the game 32- an impasse had arisen over the
14 its sixth victory in rivalry. home-and home proposal.
The decision to end the series "The problem with home-and-
was made after N.C. State dc- borne is that schedules are done so
clined to accept a proposal by far in advance, we had always
ECU officials to play the game in counted (East Carolina) as a home
game Valvano said in a tele-
phone interview. "To go home-
and-homc would have put an im-
balance in that schedule. We will
continue to discuss it
Football won't be the same in the fall
A Look at Sports
By TIM CHANDLER
tory by the Pirates, a group of
Pirate fans stormed the field de-
stroying a endzone fence, damag-
ing goalposts and starting numer-
ous fights.
nual battle with a true rival. The
Pirates, who left the Southern
Conference over 10 years ago to
go independent, have a schedule
chocked full of perrenial national
Sports Editor
i&AMb ajMtttlati
Greenville beginning in 1991 on a
home-and-home basis.
East Carolina, which has a
35,000-seat stadium, has never
hosted N.C. State. Carter-Finley
Stadium seats 47,000, but with a
grassy bank can accomodate an
extra 10,000 fans.
The 1986 game between the two
teams drew 58,560, the largest
crowd ever to watch a football in
the state.
"The ECU-N.C. State series
ifiiion tofeW Ky pnutnrr rnnh -r M iawt tR. , IHt-
fWWAttietfteT Florida State and
was a one-year cancellation of the West Virginia and other less-
contest. The reason given for the known schools from out of state
decision was to give the fans of like Cincinnati, Southern Miss
both schools a "cooling off" pe- and Southwest Louisiana.
riod Hart said that he expects South
Last week, the one-year hiatus Carolina and Virginia Tech to
stretched to an unknown amount move in and take the place of State
of time when Pirate athletic direc- as the Pirates big annual rivals,
tor Dave Hart announced that the Certainly, the fans will be en-
series was cancelled indefinitely thused about both games eacr
The first Saturday in September For football followers in the
just won't be the same. area the game was probably the
For the past 18 years, generally closest resemblance possible to
on the the first Saturday in Sep- games like Auburn-Alabama,
tember, the East Carolina football USC-UCL A, Florida-Florida State
team has traveled 85 miles up U.S. and Oklahoma-Nebraska. Those
JCsSf �" W35fi � �V Wksed ,o yea, but J, is doub.fu. ,hc enjo
gridiron witn in state. " u nlav in Greenville beeinnine in t onal factor will ever resemble
Thoganwasbilledbymanyas ngh.s. �ZlS that of the battles with the
the Battle of Eastern North Caro- TT . � i- �ui-Ad� Wnlfnark
lina. The fans and players got ECU-N.C. State did just that Hart, in explaining his decision, A'olfpacl
Valvano did not rule out the
psyched to a fever pitch each year also. The game almost always
vmvd.iu .v w. .� as the game neared. For State fans, drew a record crowd to Carter-
possibility that the scries would victor� meant another year of Finley Stadium. And, at games
talking down the athletic pro- end, the bragging began by the
gram at ECU. And for Pirate fans, winners and did not subside unti
be renewed
"We felt we had to go get on
with the business in scheduling
he said. "We can continue discus-
sions in the future
said that he felt that the Pirates The simple fact of the matter is
deserved to have the game played Pirate fans need the State game.
in Greenville every other year. For it is right here in this state that
And until that issue can be hashed the sought after respect is lacking,
out by the two schools, Hart ex- The annual showdown in Raleigh
and respect.
T.V. ads ruin Molloy's sports
By PAT MOLLOY
Assistant Sports Editor
Warehouse Sales. They're the The federal government de-
folks who sing the "Truck Cover cided they wanted a piece of the
I've been watching too much Rap one of the most ingenious market, so they slid in their silly
television lately. I can tell when marketing schemes of all time, drug commercials. You ve seen
this happens because I take on a Now, here's a dumb-ass white them many times. This is drugs
confused void-like look that can guy, obviously lobotomized, who this is your bram on drugs
onW be cured by Specially de- wouldn't know rhythm if it That's the exact thing I want to
SnSSfSiSr detox smacked him in the face, and he sc as I'm crushing 17 of the colder
raffl tries to rap. He has some pretty beers in North America and Pay-
I'mnotusually this bad when it fancy footwork, too-if watching ton is cruising to his first 10,000-
comes to the tube; however, over a fat man have a seizure is your yard &�- �
Christmaslplantedmajorrootsin cup of tea. JwS�K&2� TtStTl
thp sofa soud hall of fame. I My dad tells me these commer- you kidding, jerkface? lhats a
couldn't hdplt. The temptation aJaccomplish their intended frying pan, and the other thing's
wa simply L much for Pa mere goal: "They force their product J�?
mortal to shoulder. into your mind, son my dad JJSJT
And the blame is not to be says. And so they do. But to tell smokin dope in Columbia?
placed upon Monday right foot- you the truth, dad, I don't think Get your act together and get a
KiSS - Sigh that is HI ever buy my Weaver from real job say smugghn, for start-
winners ana aia nui suusiuc unw � j ���. �
a win in the contest came the whistle blew sorting the game plained the game would be Put C�5
ecuippedwithabigdoseofpnde tSU w� lta astherest. ' J ?
Pirate fans that many have said it from the cancellation of the game. But for now, all the Pirates can
didn't matter if ECU only won One big loss for both will be finan- do is talk about having as good of
one football game all year � as daily. But at ECU the dormancy a team. And everyone knows that
long as it was the State game. of the series hurts even more than talk doesn't carry much weight if
No doubt the State-North from the financial standpoint. you can't back it up.
Carolina matchup is a big rivalry. State fans still have the annual When the first Saturday of Sep-
But the atmosphere of both the battle with North Carolina to get tember rolls around in 1988 Ten-
fans and players in that contest fired up for. Add to that the other nessee Tech will be lining up
can't hold a candle to the intense battles with Atlantic Coast Con- against the Pirates in Ficklen Sta-
mood surrounding the Pirate- ference teams, and it is easy to see dium and Western Carolina will
Wolfpack showdown. that the loss of the game to fans in be facing the Wolfpack in Raleigh
This past September the big Raleigh may not be felt for long, at Carter-Finley Stadium,
event came to a grinding halt. But for the Pi rates, the ercl of the Nope. Things just won't be the
Following a convincing 32-14 vie- series means the end to any an- same.
The next one is for the ladies. I
certainly wouldn't want to be
called a sexist. But I'm sure I will
be any way. The funny thing
about this commercial, and others
like it, is I've seen them now dur-
what got me on the couch in the a fat man having a seizure
first place. Another big winner is Eveready
Nope. The culprits are the batteries. These guys have adver-
commercials � those fifteen-sec- tising down cold,
ond slices of Americana that have Okay, they want me to buy
made us the great buying power Energizer batteries. I understand
we are today. I hold Bob Uecker that. What I don't understand is ThP��u
personallyre'sponsibleforweight why an Australian soccer player ffEKtt
gain across the nation. in leotards is screaming like he s 8r� conditioned more to
g Don't get me wrong; I don't getting an enema while he carries S
watch commercials because a 10-foot battery on his head. And ���dunnk
they're quality entertainment. I just what in hell is he trying to �?JJ"Sdavi?M thev
waTch them to see just how low 'say? Somebody give that idiot a J ' aS
the manufacturers will go to get valium and an English lesson, MXS thinea thousand
us to spend a buck. And, man, oh quick. I hate him worse than liver. 1 ve seen �� ��S � J-
mVn these people go down low. And no, I won't be lining up to S?5��
TnatfolCPare8justafewof buy his @!$ Energizer batteries. J1�
the very worst. I would include The trick to these commercials Ph�toWSL se
the rest, but this is only a 30-page is that they come on dunng foot- say
newspaper. ball games. So naturally, many
First up is that nauseating ad for are aimed at men. And boys.
CTSee COMMERCIALS page 29
1
to
up
irate
By TIM CHAND1 1 R
s ptirtt 1 Jit i�
I When exain time sel in
impusthestafi ot ! he i a
M took a iiuk h n
leak which sis foil
Itensive Christmas holid
report ot the men'shoopsl
on . ampus was after the second
ga: io of the season
.Mowing will be a bi I
sis ot each game the
pla . ed er the break
December B
ECU 61, Campbell 54
e Pirates boosted t;
llowing thi
t of the Can
put to ret -ome prt �
no itions that I
Stc
MC A A Division 1-A
SO!
I CiJ was pact i
sot homon
19 points an
man standout - i
Campbell, i:
k�s of the si
by horrid shoot:
For the game
oormnected on i i
tcr ' ' rnea
final u o minuU -
to erase a four
Campbell and t
27.
After �
theearh
the rirat
good in the game at I
mark when Love cai
footer.
The Pirates It id i
peak ith 11 sec r
when freshman j
Jimmy 1 linton bui
frex thi 5 to boost I
front 61-53
December 10
Maryland 75, ECU
The Pirates saw their l
to 2-2 on the road at tb mds
Mar. � d in this
House shootout.
ECU managed to stay cl -
THEDE
i n fen m
HOURS OI
urs a
MoriWed .
Fri.
e Mon.& Tue s.
t Wed.& Thurs.
' Fri.
Sat.
5 Sun.
MonThurs.
Fri .
Sat.
Sun.
Mon . Thurs.
Fri.
Sun .
MonFri.
MonFri .
Mon& Wed.
Tues& Thurs.
Fri.
Sat .
Sun.
MonWedFri
Sun.
MonThurs.
Fri
Sat
SunRacj
Icscrvations can be made m lourt reservations arc made �c made on Tridav tor Satiu Isrson from 1130 - 3 �pers ! one d dav S and 1
The M oreboard at Carter-Flniey Stadium wUl not have the Pirates name on it any longer. This photo was taken
this year as Pirates fans began preparing to celebrate a 32-14 victory over the Wolfpack.
INTRA-AC
IIOUr� OF FACILITY OPERA
WWMNtt�tf�0MMNMMH
m ma i �� i� mn
-�& .��-�-� �"� a� -���
t" ��� � �
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X 2i
upset
iday
a 7 "i Hpoff. rhe Pi-
vvill also be at Komc Satur-
tke on Navy in aA A
cdulcd to begin at 7:30
a v contest on Saturday
receded by a women s
ontcst pitting the
s against Fairleigh
rhat game has a
5 p m. tipoff.
ates
ce battle. E( L will return
� Saturday to entertain
- nson at Minges
in a 5 p.m. tipoff con-
game will precede I
p m. contest against
cket office
nirs forSC
scum ticket
n at 6 p m VVednes-
East Carolina
� tball game against
it 7 '�p.m.
�its wishing to obtain tick-
ing a valid student
rder to receive their tree
Guest tickets will
� r students for
e fall
: in auu icjk. int. prai-i. u
e Pirates big anl'uial
inly, the tans will
vd about both fcames
with a true rival. The
-vho left the Southern
ifcrence over 10 years ago to
independent, have a schedule
vked full of perrenial national
wmi i�uah ac Miat�MFi.), lilt-
Svracnse. Florida State and
,st Virginia and other less-
own schools from out of state
e Cincinnati, Southern Miss
uthwest Louisiana,
iart said that he expects South
rohna and Virginia Tech to
e in and take the plaice of State
the Pirates big annual rivals.
be en-
games each
ar, but it is doubtful the emo-
mal factor will cybr resemble
lat of the battles with the
folfpack.
The simple fact of the matter is
rate fans need the State game.
r it is right here in this state that
e sought after respect is lacking.
e annual showdown in Raleigh
ve Pirate followers a chance to
10w that they were just as good
the rest.
IBut for now, all the Pirates can
jo is talk about having as good of
'team. And everyone knows that
ilk doesn't carry much weight if
lou can't back it up.
When the first Saturday of Sep-
?mber rolls around in 1988 Ten-
lessee Tech will be lining up
(gainst the Pirates in Ficklen Sta-
ium and Western Carolina will
e facing the Wolfpack in Raleigh
t Carter-Finlev Stadium.
Nope. Things just won't be the
ime.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 12,1988 25
.
irate X-mas results
I
By TIM CHANDLER
SporU Editor
Vhcn exam time set in around
i pus the staff of The East Caro-
I m took a much-needed study
,ik which was followed by the
tensive Christmas holiday. The
report oi the men's hoopstcrs
campus was after the second
ne of the season.
llowing will be a brief analy-
st each game the Pirates
ed over the break.
December 8
ECU 61, Campbell 54
he Pirates boosted their record
2-1 following this home-court
et of the Camels. The loss also
to rest some pro-season prog-
tications that head coach Mike
.le s troops would not defeat a
A Division 1-A team all sca-
CU was paced in victory by
homore forward Reed Losc's
points and also 12 from fresh-
n standout Stanley Love.
ampbcll, in suffering its first
of the season, were hampered
horrid shooting from the field.
the game the Camels
nnected on only 21 of 63 at-
npts for a meager 33 percent.
. he Pirates battled back in the
il two minutes of the first half
erase a four point deficit by
npbell and tie the game at 27-
tter falling behind by one in
early going of the second half,
Pirates grasped the lead for
�d in the game at the 15:44
rk when Love canned a 6-
ter.
he Pirates lead reached its
ik with 11 seconds remaining
en freshman point guard
imv Hinton buried a pair of
�e throws to boost the Pirates in
ont 61-53.
December 10
Maryland 75, ECU 59
The Pirates saw their record fall
2-2 on the road at the hands of
Maryland in this Cole Field
House shootout.
ECU managed tostavclosefora
good part of the first half before
faltering near the end and falling
behind 32-22 at intermission.
The Pirates led on three occa-
sions early with the last lead com-
ing after Dominique Martin's 11-
footcr with just over 15 minutes to
play in the first half. Martin's
score put the Pirates on top 8-6.
The Tcrps, however, grabbed
the lead for good on a pair of
scores from center Brian Wil-
liams, who led all scorers in the
contest with 24 points.
Maryland put the game on ice
early in the second half with a 14-
point spurt that turned a nine
point lead into a 23-point cushion.
Reed Lose once again paced the
Pirates in scoring by pouring in 13
points. The only other double-fig-
ure scorer for ECU was Gus Hill,
who came off the bench to chip in
10.
The Pirates, for the game, could
muster only a 42 percent clip from
the field hitting on 23 of 55 shoot-
ing attempts.
December 12
Virginia Commonwealth 75,
ECU 70
Before an enthusiastic home
crowd in Minges Coliseum, the
Pirates came very close to pulling
off a big upset before faltering in
the late stages to the Rams.
It was a simple case of too much
Phil Stinnie in this game for ECU.
The VCU forward poured in a
team-high 30 points to ice the win
for the Rams.
Gus Hill came off the bench for
the Pirates to make things inter-
esting with a game-high total of 32
points, including four 3-point
shots.
Behind the play of Stinnie the
Rams bolted to a 32-23 halftime
lead. VCU later extended its lead
to 15, 44-29, at the 16:07 mark of
the second half before the Pirates
made their move.
Hill got the Pirates back within
10 points when he canned a 3-
pointer with 8:48 to play to trim
the lead to 52-43. Another 3-
pointcr, this one by Kenny
Murphy pulled the Pirates to
within 52-46 with just under eight
minutes to play.
The closest the Pirates got after
that was with 23 seconds to play
when Hill connected on a another
3-pointer to cut the margin to 71-
67.
VCU simply proved to be too
strong at the charity stripe for the
Pirates in the contest. The Rams
were true on 17 of 18 free tosses in
the second half in scaling the win.
December 28
Vanderbilt 99, ECU 63
After holding their own for the
first half, the Pirates fell victim to
the powerful Commodores in the
second half to fall to 2-5 for the
season.
ECU seemed poised to pull the
upset early own as it streaked out
to a quick 6-0 lead over the homes-
tanding Commodores.
The Pirates hung tough for the
entire opening half and only
trailed by six, 46-40 at the inter-
mission. The good half of play for
the Pirates was brought on by a 53
percent shooting clip from the
floor.
The second half was a com-
pletely different story for the Pi-
rates. Runs of nine, 17 and 12
points by the Commodores
brought about a rout by game's
end.
The knockout punch game
when Vanderbilt rolled off 17
straight points. Trailing 66-52
with 12:16 to play the Pirates then
watched as Vandy rolled to a 83-
52 lead in less than five minutes of
play.
"In the second half, our transi-
tion defense was terrible ECU
head coach Mike Steele said.
"They (Vanderbilt) turned it up a
notch and we just got tired
Reed Lose led the way for the
Pirates in scoring in the loss with
a 20-point effort. Gus Hill also
added nine.
December 29
ECU 86, Miami (Ohio) 63
The Pirates bounced back
See HOOPSTERS page 27
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Pool Prices: $1.50 per hour per person
12 Price for Ladies
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Look For Upcoming Tournaments and Specials
iM
THE DEPARTMENT OF INTRAMURAL - RECREATIONAL SERVICES
n ft&xr m a
i�n
HOURS OF OPERATION
(Hours may vary in accordance to program needs.)
WHERE FUN IS 1
FALL 1987 INTRAMURAL SPORT CHAMPIONS
Activity
�Flag Football
�Tennis Singles
Memorial Gymnasium
MonWed.
Fri.
Tues.
Thurs.
12:00 noon -
11:30 a.m. -
4:00 p.m. -
3:00 p.m. -
3:00 p.m. -
11:00 a.m. -
12:00 noon -
1:30p .m
1:30p .m
900p .m
9-00p .m
700p .m
500p .m
500p.m
�Racquetball Singles
�One-on One Basketball
�Swim Meet
�Volleyball
�Soccer
�Bowling
�Three-on-three basketball
�Turkey Trot
�Indoor Soccer
MenWomen
U.S. POUSATHE ENFORCERS
OPEN: DAVID TURNEROPEN: CATHERINE LAUD
INTERMEDIATE: KEVIN HYMANINTERMEDIATE: PAIGE
INTERMEDIATE: JIM PARKSDUSENBEI
OPEN: IVEY POWELLANN ELLEN
5' OVER: BRETT SCHECHTER
5' UNDER: PERCY EDWARDSANN ELLEN
LAMBDA CHI ALPHADELTA ZETA
LUCKY SEVENFORE
THE TOOLSLADY PIRATES
POWERHOUSEBETTAFAMMA
THE FELLOWSTHE ENFORCERS
YUK BUSTERSTOPT
PHI KAPPA TAU ALADY PIRATES A
EQUIPMENT GIVEAWAY
Register to win FREE rec-
reational equipment in 204
Memorial Gym. Your name
may be drawn and appear in
the next Intramural Round-
Up January 28. Read the
next edition and call 757-
6562 as the IRS will an-
nounce the first of many
lucky East Carolinians. For
more details, call 757-6387
or drop by 204 Memorial
Gym.
o ooo oo o o o o
o COMING o
ATTRACTIONS�
o ooo oooo o o
?Basketball
registration 119
11 am-6pm MG 104-A
Co-rec Bowling
registration 127
6pm MG 102
?Tube Polo
registration 23
6pm MG 102
I
Weight Rooms
Memorial
"�

MonThurs.
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
MenThurs.
Fri.
Sun.
MonFri.
MonFri.
Mon & Wed.
Tues & Thurs.
Minges
10:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
12:00 noon
3:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
12:00 noon
Swimming Pools
Memorial
Minges
MonWedFri.
Sun.
7:00 a.m. -
12:00 noon -
3:00 p.m. -
4:00 p.m. -
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3:00 p.m. -
11:00 a.m. -
12:00 noon -
8:00 p.m.
12:00 noon
9:00 p.m.
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5:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
9:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
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9:00 p.m.
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10:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
i ma
top
MonThurs.
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
Equipment Check-Out
Memorial Gym 115
10:00
10:00
11:00 a.m.
12:00 noon
9:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
Racquetball Courts
iReservations can be made in person at 115 Memorial Gym or by calling 757-6911
Court reservations are made one day in advance Monday-Thursday. Reservahons
are made on Friday for Saturday, Sunday and Monday. Courts may be reserved in
person from 1130 - 3:00 p.m. and 12 noon - 3:00 p.m. by phone.
FITNESS CLASSES
Registration Dates
Jan. 19-22
Mar. 1-4 & 14-15
Session Dates
Jan. 25 - Mar. 4
Mar. 14 - Apr. 22
Aerobics
it any longer. This photo was taken
the Wolfpack.
INTRA-ACTJON HOTLINE
757-6562
HOURS OF FACILTTir operation, schedule UPDATES, RA1N-OU1
I wanted to take this opportunity in my first column to introduce myself and
explain just how I got here and what I'll be doing. I realize that you don't care
one way or the other but this may be the only chance I have this semester to
set the record straight.
The Intramural Department needed some fool to be a major spectator and
get paid for it. So I figured, hey. I'm a fool and you can't beat it. I watch soap
operas from 12:00-4:00 every day, i can surely spectate for them.
But, as you know, with every simple task, there's bound to be a hitch. How
was I to know that during my hours of 'labor' I was to come up with the top
Intramural sport teams for 5 major sports this semester! I mean, those
Intramural players go for your throat If they're not In the top five.
Well, being the determined soul that I am, I know that I can relate my
�expertise in spectaUon' to my new job. Besides, my manager already gave m
job at Chicken City to his nephew.
So, I will set out to predict the top teams this spring in basketball, softball
eo-rec bowling and slam dunk. (What do you mean they don't have teams in
slam dunk? How does ONE person eat all those donuts?)
Well, anyway, since the intramural season hasn't started yet. let me throw
on you some of my predictions for 1988. If you have any comments, feel free
to write me at:
IMA RECK
204 MEMORIAL GYM
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
The 1 song on the charts: January 1988
YOU CAN TAKE THIS GAME AND SHOVE IT
(WE A1NT PLAYIN' HERE NO MORE)
by Johnny 'Dave Hart' Paycheck
The 1 box office smash: November 1988
THROW REAGAN DOWN THE DRAIN
starring - Robert Dole and Gary Hart
The SUPER BOWL Champions: 1988
Chicago Celtics
led by: Larry McMahon fit Jim Bird
By the way. these tdeaa are by no mean reflective of the idea and opinion of the Intramural Depart
ment So. we decided to print them anyway!
4:00-5:00 p.m.MG 108Mon.& Wed.
5:15-6:15 p.m.MG 108Mon.& Wed.
6:30-7:30 p.m.MG 108(LDMon.& Wed.
5:156:15 p.m.MG 108(LI)Tues.& Thurs
6:30- 7:30 p.m.MG 108Tues.& Thurs
1:00- 2:00 p.m.MG 108Sat.
3:00- 4:00 p.m.MG 108Sun.
3:00 - 4:00 p.m.
5:30 - 6:30 p.m.
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Toning
MG 108
MG 108
MG 108
Aquarobics
Mon. & Wed.
Tues. & Thurs.
Sat.
Paid Advertisement
5:30 - 6:30 p.m. MG Pool Tues. & Thurs.
Cost per session (12 classes)
$10students - $20faculty & staff
Cost per drop-in class
$1students - $2faculty & staff
All classes are available on a drop-in basis for a nominal fee with
presentation of a drop-in ticket and valid identification. Stop by 204
Memorial Gymnasium to purchase a drop-in ticket and pick up a complete
class schedule.
�Low Impact
f
,1
' t
�� a � �m a





26
i! IE E STCAROl INI N
I NUAIO 12, 1WS
Ladies struggle over break
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sport V riter
0 w ith a 68 49 ictorv over 1 -
o i to load 28 26 .it the halt.
the lino, sank five in theremaining
Tho I adv Pirates finished sec
Dec 12at MingcsColiseum Dayton led by 10 early in the 5:00. Savage led with !�) re-
rheLady Pirates, whose record second halt. ECU regained the bounds. Anettc Melvin led Day-
in the 1 ady Pirate Classic tell to 2 4, were led by Monique lead with 6:00 remaining in the ton with 11 points,
told Dec. 4-5 at Ming liseum, Pompili, who scored 1 points game alter back-to-back layups 1 he Pirates raised theii record
and pulled down live rebounds. bv Alma Bothea. to4 5
! I-
.u tor a 66 56 defeat in tho chain pi
onship game to V'anderbilt
ty.
The 1 adv Pirates ad anced to
tho finals with ,i 65 52 ictorv o or
o: th Carolin i ntral i ni or
hlue Devils domi Monique Pompili, who led the
nated the first half b leading Lady Pirates with IS points and
:( U ;1 23 at the half. l hris O'Connor, the second lead-
he Lady Pirates pulled within ing scorer with 4, together
fanuai v i
South Carolina 71, ECU 53
The Lady Pirates traveled to
vith 16:14 to coin the came but scored the Pirates last 13 of 14 Columbia, SC, to face the Lady
sit in the openii n und ol the Duke didn't let upas they contin- points
rnament.
Junior Gretta O'Neal Savage,
w ho w as named the rournament
M P, led the Pirates in both
nes ith 22 and 20 point
V; : nst NI the ! ad Pi-
rates mped 'arly load and
were up I s al the ha
O v
romainmo. in
the game I d Pirates fou
NX i tit the lead
- ; 6 left.
tit on to win and ad-
vanced to the championship two with 4:59 rema ; in l!
wed on to win bv 19.
Chris Moreland led Duke with
1 2 points and 1 5 iob� ninds
1 )ecember 15
ECU 56, I loward 55
ECU took a break for the holi-
davs with a 56 55 victorv ovei
1 low trd University on Dec. 15.
At Minges Coliseum, the 1 ady
Pirates, whose record was raised
to 3 4, led b I I at the hall Vl-20.
1 loward cut tho Pirate's lead to
l)onnor, oiojit for ton from
See LADIES page 27
o Vand w ho dcfi-atod
7-1 J
It w as .i close first hah m tho
gameand then to k I 53 4V�
24.
1 h.o 1 adv Pirate's recained the
championship with ECU loading lead on a three point plavbv Alma
most ol e. ECU led at the fVthea. Cretta O'Neal Savage,
hah 32-29 but wore only able to ECU's leading rebounder with 10,
igh the first five hold tho victory with a driving
second hall la up w ith :17 remaining.
Wendv S ' rbilt's Monique Pompili led the IV
rer with 17 points and rates with 19 points. Arlcr.e Hec-
13 rebounds sparked the victory tor led Howard with 16 points
S 'anderbill and Darlene Beale pulled down
seven as the 1 adv Pi- 22 rebounds.
almost , ,
Reebok Roundball C lassie,
December 29-30
I ad Pii att s resumed play
points as � i i � j i "
. . i alter Christmas witha third place
i to ui teat ana , , , . � ii it
tmish in the Reebok Koundhall
Classic, I )ec. 30, at Old 1 X'minion
ECU was defeated in the open-
ing game, s 61,b SouthernCali-
tornia.
ppod then , .
retta O eal ;e has . I
' wup i , ,
- � nts tor the Pirat and dma
, bethea pull 1 wn a I irate t a-
. � �, hounds ni tl
nd
our minute
Al thea led ECU with 12
A 2-2.
December 10
Georgia Southern 75, ECU 70
i s v
.
mo �-
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SPRING BREAK ON A CRUISE!
The Travel Committee Presents:
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Depart: 6 p m Man h 6
Return: 4 a.m Man h I
Via: Round trap to Miami n Seashore "railways Bus
Cruise aboard the 1 unship larnivale
Price: $475 (E( i udents) $520 (Non students).
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In tlii
I at , '
� rv 11vi ; . ton.
"I ledmost'ol thefirsthalf,bv
eht,but i a ton took season and dnve the team ,u a PossibleAA championship.
.in
begin i
tregair the
rgiaS ithcrn led by as
- 3 throughout the half.
II pulled within two with 14
nds r maining but fi
throws bv - horn's
� i lead
: the
ue
r i s O' i r
retta O'N Idition
. - � . �
rd di I to 2-3.
December 12
Puke 68, ECU 4C
of Duke
their perfect record ton-
Alma Bethea's improved pla could help to turn around the Lad Pirates'

J
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fr
�?
&
c

rf�
�V
x-c
r
Hoops
Continued from
quickly fi
Vanderbilt
own and impi .
season.
ECU
right fron I
ing to a -
Pirates s; I
in the frt
dskms -
percent of I
Tliesc
same way as
Reed Lose dri! : i
the 19:35mark! -
up 41-18 and sei 11
way
The lead gr �. I
48-21, when jui �
Kelly hit a : -
before th
tling back
Miami g I i
points ir tl
this game nod
be for th( ' ral
Lose led a
figure scorers
a game
in a r
points, ��� �'
kennv M irj
Kelly i:
far
ECL' 52, Wh
The
shoot
Ladies
have
tough
X-mas
Continued from
Gamec :ks r u -
5 ?.v i
son.

be t( much for I
hair. '
Trailing : -24 at :
Could � .
f9:32 remaining in I
South Cai
toy a 22
Monique " n
kxintsand sixr
iratos. Gr tt
iddedl2p nts
S
vv. �
-
b
ECL 78 -
The U
)rangburg
Carolina State 78 3
Senior A
hvith 21 p nts
junior V.
IQ poir -
The Pirates
md saw t" r besl
this sea -
from the '
unior .
icr best gan
12 points and
:rcshman VVer i
iw her best
season at EC L
md three rel
The Vk
record to 5 6
January
George Mas
ECL's Womcr s
Iropped tl
;ame an 9
against Geor$
The Lad) Pirat -
the Color
and 5-7 ovei
cent from the I
Mason Lad)
improved their overall
P�2, and 1-0 ir
Alma Bathca wil
land 13 rebounds
W'ho took an eai �
game
George Mason can
lead by as much as � �'
maining in the first half
pulled within three I ti
at the half.
The Lady Pirates reg
lead in the second halt by -
up 46-38.
George Mason guard I
iBaruch sparked the
comeback with 12straig
as the Pirates managed
points in a six minute pcrk
ECU never recovered �
Mason went on to win by e

H





SE!
its:
fill! I
llllli I
OML!

0
'
-
Hoopsters battle for wins during vacation
Continued from p;ie 25
kh from the rout against
anderbilt to record one of their
n and improve to 3-5 tor the
was on all-s) stems eo
from the beginning in roll-
.i 38 18 halftimc load. The
- shot a sizzling 53 percent
first half, while the Re-
struggled to be true on 30
ent of their attempts
lesecond halfbcgan much the
ia .u ,is the first half ended.
1 I osc drilled a 3 pointer at
' 35marktoboost the Pirates
s and send them on their
lead crew to as main as 27,
when junior guard lott
eai
and i.
t'rei
at �
� a
pair of tree throws
the Redskins began bat
.� back.
ami got no clser than I I
tsin their comeback et fortsas
game, no doubt was meant to
r the Pirates.
�se led a quartet of double-
irc scorers for the Pirates with
imc-high 31 points. Gus Hill,
i reserve effort, garnered 21
its while walk-on forward
nv Murphy added lb and
11.
January 2
ECU 52, Winthrop 45
The Pirates overcame pool
ting in this game to outlast
Ladies
have
tough
X-mas
Continued from page 2b
ks on Jan. A fell 71-
33 and dropped on the
son.
1 he Lady Gamcc
be too much for the
led b is i my as IS
r � -24 at tl
. . .
j c 32 remaining in the game.
n to V in
by a 22 point mai
led witl
pointsand six rebound -
. O'Neal Sa;
1 I rtts.
Carolina, vvl i five
- i
' arkcr wl I :
January h
ECU 78, South Carolina State
68
The Lady Pirates traveled
.burn SC, to defeat South
Carolina State " 68, on Jan. 6.
Senior Alma Bathca led I l
with 21 points and 10 reborn
� ior Monique Pompili tossed in
oints, her season high,
te Pirates led 39-31 at the I
and saw their best effort thus
i season by shootii . 58perccnt
m the field.
� r guard Pam Williams I
r best game of the season with
ints and eight rebounds.
Freshman Wendy Morton also
saw her best effort of her first
- n at ECU, with nine points
three rcboun
The wm improved the Pirat
rd to 5
January 9
George Mason 61, EC L' 53
CL"s Women's basketball
ped their first conference
came Jan. 9, in a home game
nst George Mason, 61 -53.
e Lady Pirates, now 0-1, in
e Colonial Athletic Conference,
and 5-7 overall, shot just 3b pcr-
� from the field as the George
on Ladv Patriots' victory
Bimproved their overall record to
and 1-0 in conference play.
Alma Bathca, with 17 points
and 13 rebounds, led the Pirates,
who took an early lead in the
game.
George Mason came back to
lead by as much as 11 with 5:00 re-
maining in the first half but ECU
j pulled within three to trail 30-27
i at the half.
The Ladv Pirates regained the
(.lead in the second half by going
up 46-38.
George Mason guard Cindy
Baruch sparked the Patriots
t comeback with 12 straight points
as the Pirates managed only two
points in a six minute period.
ECU never recovered as Gcorgo
Mason went on to win by eight.
mis headed to theii of - points. Reed lose and efl Hie Pirat
ori ioms with the score 2-4 16 Kelly each chipped in eight points 61 at tempi
In tin' second 1 i.iIt the Pirates apiece loi the Pirat) who shut field themselves,but 1H
nevei relinejui hed the lead, but onl) M percent from the field I
I they ni completely dis ime road
ot Winthrop eith January 4 I he Piral
id o .i hed il Maryland Baltimore mint)
: to plav v hen ins I lill si, I c I 7 Ishool
i .cored on a lavup t t the Maryland Baltimore oui
Piratesontop � shot an impressive 55 percent
Mill wound up being the only from the floor for thegame to sei
ite scorer in double tigu thi irates reeling to 4-6 for the much the sami
rati s as I M.B.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 12,1988 27
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Hoopsters battle for wins during vacation
Continued from page 25
quickly from the rout against
Vandcrbilt to record one of their
own and improve to 3-5 for the
season.
ECU was on all-systems-go
right from the beginning in roll
pour on the points with regular-
ity. The second-half lead grew to
as many as 19 points on two occa-
sions before the Pirates instituted
a comeback attempt, which
trimmed the U.M.B.C. lead to 12,
occasions with under a minute to
Winthrop and improve their rec- the two teams headed to their of 18 points. Reed lose and Jeff The Pirates connected on 30 of
ord to 4-5 before a vacation-depri- lockcrrooms with the score 24-16. Kelly each chipped in eight points 61 attempts for the game from the
ciated home crowd in Minges In the second half the Pirates apiece for the Pirates, who shot field themselves, but 18 turnovers
Coliseum. never relinquished the lead, but only 41 percent from the field for spelled doom for them on the
Winthrop had upset on its mind they never could completely dis- the game. road,
early as it opened up a six point pose of Winthrop either. January 4 The Pirates jumped out to a 6-0 ��wwm ��� w.ivi.u.v lcau io iz,
lead at the outset. 'Tic lead reached its peak with Maryland-Baltimore County lead early before U.M.B.C battled 73-61, with just over three min-
ngm iiii.i �.�; wguining in rou- The Pirates finally regrouped 10:34 to play when Gus Hill 84, ECU 73 back with good shooting to corner utes remaining,
ing to a 38-18 halftime lead. The and regained the lead, 11-10, on a scored on a layup to boost the Maryland-Baltimore County a 36-24 lead by the end of the first
Pirates shot a sizzling 53 percent free throw by Dominique Martin Pirates on top 38-25. shot an impressive 55 percent half. The closest the Pirates got after
in the first half, while the Re- at the 9:52 mark of the first half. Hill wound up being the only from the floor for the game to send The second half proved to be that was nine points on a coupleof
dskins struggled to be true on 30 The Pirates then slowly worked Pirate scorer in double figures in the Pirates reeling to 4-6 for the much the same story for the Pi- occa5Jrt�c �-5� ��- -
percent of their attempts. the lead up to eight by halftime as the game with his game-high total season. rates as U.M.B.C. continued to play
The second half began much the
same way as the first half ended.
Reed Lose drilled a 3-pointer at
the 19:35 mark to boost the Pirates
up 41-18 and send them on their
way.
The lead grew to as many as 27,
48-21, when junior guard Jeff
Kelly hit a pair of free throws
before the Redskins began bat-
tling back.
Miami got no clser than 14
points in their comeback efforts as
this game, no doubt, was meant to
be for the Pirates.
Lose led a quartet of double-
figure scorers for the Pirates with
a game-high 31 points. Gus Hill,
in a reserve effort, garnered 21
points, while walk-on forward
kenny Murphy added 16 and
Kelly 11.
January 2
ECU 52, Winthrop 45
The Pirates overcame poor
shooting in this game to outlast
Ladies
have
tough
X-mas
Continued from page 26
Gamecocks on Jan. 4. ECU fell 71-
53 and dropped to 5-6 on the sea-
son.
The Lady Gamecocks proved to
be too much for the Pirates as they
led by as many as 18 in the first
half.
Trailing 39-24 at the half, ECU
fould only pull within 13 with
V.32 remaining in thegame.
South Carolina went on to win
y a 22 point margin.
Monique Pompili led with 12
)ints and six rebounds for the Pi-
rates. Gretta O'Neal Savage also
idded 12 points.
South Carolina, who had five
layers in double figures, was led
y Marth Parker who tossed in 16
ints.
January 6
ECU 78, South Carolina State
68
The Lady Pirates traveled to
hangburg, SC, to defeat South
Carolina State 78-68, on Jan. 6.
Senior Alma Bathea led ECU
with 21 points and 10 rebounds,
junior Monique Pompili tossed in
I20points, her season high.
The Pirates led 39-31 at the half
ind saw their best effort thus far
tous season by shooting 58 percent
"rom the field.
Junior guard Pam Williams had
er best game of the season with
12 points and eight rebounds.
Freshman Wendy Morton also
iw her best effort of her first
eason at ECU, with nine points
ind three rebounds.
The win improved the Pirates
record to 5-6.
January 9
George Mason 61, ECU 53
ECU'S Women's basketball
lropped their first conference
ime Jan. 9, in a home game
igainst George Mason, 61-53.
The Lady Pirates, now 0-1, in
the Colonial Athletic Conference,
Und 5-7 overall, shot just 36 per-
cent from the field as the George
Mason Lady Patriots' victory
improved their overall record to
2, and 1-0 in conference play.
Alma Bathea, with 17 points
nd 13 rebounds, led the Pirates,
who took an early lead in the
a me.
George Mason came back to
dbyasmuchasll with 5:00 re-
ining in the first half but ECU
llled within three to trail 30-27
thehalf.
The Lady Pirates regained the
in the second hatf by going
r�46-38. v
George Mason guard Cindy
Barah spirted the Patriots
comeback with 12 straight points
�s the Pirates managed ofiy two
points in a si minutep��
ECU nevarrecoveiw mGm
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:
Maravich eulogized Saturday in La.
BATON ROUGE, La.
Hundreds of
mourners
(AP) - manship from 1968 until 1970, coach, Dale Brown, also was at the Officiating with Dobson were pains that were sometimes so in-
heard when he moved on to a 10-year funeral, along with football coach the Revs. Alfred Young of Christ tense he could barely move his
Tistol" Pete Maravich eulogized pro career that led to the Hall of
Saturday as a man whose evan- Fame,
gelical Christian zeal surpassed
his love for the sport that made
him a superstar.
"His last 45 minutes on this
earth were spent at a church, play-
ing basketball, which seems
rather fitting said Dr. James braved icy winds and tempera- vere winter weather over much of
Mike Archer and several mem
bers of the current basketball
He played with the Atlanta team. Also there were former LSU
Hawks , New Orleans Jazz and football stars Jimmy Taylor, Mike
Boston Celtics, riier, he at- Barber, Ben Jones and Mike An-
tended Broughton H ;h School in derson.
Raleigh, N.C. A larger crowd had been an-
About 600 to 700 people ticipated for the funeral, but se-
Tcmple Church and Rodney
Wood of Trinity Evangelical Free
Church, both of Covington.
Pallbearers included Darrell
Campbell, who co-authored the
book "Heir to a Dream" wm
arm.
He said he thought the pain
was the result of ncuritisis, a type
of inflammation, and had recently
told his doctor about it. But he was
never examined for the pain, be-
Frank Shroeder.
Burial was at Resthavcn Gar
Dobson, who was with Maravich
when the 40-year-old basketball
legend died of heart failure on
Tuesday.
to attend the service. Maravich's
widow Jackie, cried and put her
head on the shoulder of another
relative as Dobson delivered the
Maravich had just finished eulogy. Their sons, Jaeson, 8, and
playing a pickup basketball game Joshua, 6, were not brought to the
turcs just above the freezing mark the country may have hampered dens of Memory.
travel plans of man
Jay McCrear, an assistant
coach under Press Maravich in
the late 196Cs and early 70s, said
after the funeral that he had main-
tained contact with Pete Maravich
Maravich, and Maravich's agent, cause he told his physician it had
cleared up.
Dr. George Beller of the Uni-
versity of Virginia said the shoul-
der pain could have been an early
warning of a heart whose coro-
with Dobson and several other
men at a Pasadena, Calif church
when he collapsed. He had trav-
eled to California from his home
in Covington, La to tape a Chris-
tian radio show for the Focus on
the Family program, a ministry
directed by Dobson.
His funeral was held at First
Baptist Church of Baton Rouge,
not far from the Louisiana State
University basketball campus
where he wowed fans with his
unique brand of athletic show-
funeral.
"Basketball at one time was his
greatest love said Dobson. "But
his greatest passion was the love
of the Lord he served
Among Maravich's LSU team-
mates in attendance were Rusty was the fact that he never played
Bergman, Bill Whittle and Rich on a championship NBA team. "I
Hickman. Also there was Collis was sorry that he never got a
Temple, LSU's first black basket- complement of players around
ball player, who was recruited by him to really do something said
Pete's father Press Maravich. McCreary. "He really wanted an
LSU's current basketball NBA ring
The Maravich family has
asked that donations be sent to the
Pete Maravich Memorial Fund, nary arteries were diseased.
P.O. Box 1321, Covington, La Maravich, a vegetarian, had
70433. also told friends he had lost about
Medical experts said prclimi- 15 pounds in recent months,
over the years. He said the death nary autopsy findings could have dropping to around 180.
of Press Maravich last April hit had an undetected blockage of vr b
the younger Maravich hard, but arteries supplying blood to his
had strengthened the young heart. Also, he could have suf-
man's Christian faith. fered a sudden disturbance in his
McCreary also said that one of heart's electrical system.
GET
CAUGHT
SljeBUflanilimiM
Pete's career disappointment's
Payton bids farewell to sport
CHICAGO - He was the last
man to reach the losing Chicago
locker room, arriving well after
most of his teammates had
stripped out of their uniforms and
gone to the showers.
Walter Payton made his way to
the corner locker, the one without
the number over it. After 13 years,
after 16,726 yards, after a Hall of
Fame career, his locker needed no
number.
Payton slumped in the corner,
his helmet still on. He leaned back
against the wall and closed his
eyes for what seemed an eternity
after Washington eliminated the
Bears from the NFL playoffs, 21-
17.
Perhaps he was replaying the
last time he handled the football
for the Bears. Trying for a miracle
with no timeouts left and theclock
evaporating, Chicago faced a
fourth-down-and-8 at their own
36?Jim McMahon's swirig pass to
Payton picked up seven yards.
After rushing for more yards
than any man in NFL history and
gaining 85 yards Sunday to lead
all runners in the NFC semifinal
playoff against Washington, Pay-
ton had come up one yard short.
One yard.
There was the usual shuffle of
The
ast Carolinian,
�ride,
lotivation,
experience,
riends.
Apply today.
tape and pads, discarded at the
end of the game. For Payton,
however, this was the end of a
career, the greatest running back
career in NFL history. And he was
in no hurry.
Finally, he opened his eyes and
looked at his hands.
Again, he closed his eyes and
leaned his head back against the
wall, his helmet tapping softly.
He opened his eyes slowly, as if
the lids weighed tons. He leaned
forward, hands on chin, looking
like a living version of Rodin's
sculpture, The Thinker.
Calvin Thomas, dressing
nearby, noticed Payton still in full
gear. He walked over. "You OK?"
he said to the top ground-gainer
in NFL history.
"I'm fine Payton said. "I'm
just taking my time. It's my last
time taking it off
Thomas smiled and shook
Pay ton's hand. � �
Finally, the helmet came off and
Payton began going through the
ritual he had followed hundreds,
perhaps thousands of times. Me-
thodically, he stripped off the
tools of this tough business of
football.
When he came to the thigh
pads, he hesitated for a moment.
I've worn these for 20 years he
said, handing them gently to the
equipment man. "Three years in
high school, four years in college,
13 years here
It was as though he was saying
goodbye to two old friends.
Another pal, Chicago newsman
Bill Gleason, who has covered
Payton since the runner was a
rookie, slid over next to him.
"What I will remember about
you is how much fun you were
Gleason said.
Payton smiled softly. "That was
the main reason I was playing he
said.
Payton pulled the elastic ban-
dage off his left knee and headed
for the showers.
Matt Suhey, who blocked out of
the backfield for Payton for the
last several years, had his over-
coat on. He came looking for his
friend andfollowed him into
-ovmivoom fer epelast hug.
"NowTaytoVwas done shower?
ing and back at his locker. He
slipped into civilian clothes, an
outfit that seemed out of place for
him. Black pants, aqua shirt, black
sweater.
He looked at the media, picked
up a bottle of cologne and did one
last sweep, spraying it at them.
Sweetness, right to the end.
��ai �����mil iiiII
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Maravich had told friends he
had recently suffered shoulder
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Please look around at other organizations. Then
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edski
CHICAGO (AP) - The Wash-
on Redskins advanced to the
EC championship by defeating
Chicago Bears, ending the
r of Walter Payton, the
s all-time leading rusher in
. process.
Payton, who had announced
sS retirement, led all rushers
nday with 85 yards in 18 at-
pts.
Washington quarterback Doug
illiams, defensive end Charles
ann, receivers Gary Clark and
.cky Sanders and defensive back
arrcH Green led the Redskins
k to a 21-17 victory after the
ars had surged to an early 14-0
ad-
Clark made some key third-
vvn receptions to keep Wash-
i gton drives alive. Williams, so-
le ctcd by Coach Joe Gibbs to start
i stead of Jay Schrocder, brought
1 ie Redskins back 14-14 halftime
He completed key passes to
ndcrs and Clint Didicr before
rge Rogers ripped off a 3-yard
roncos cl
DENVER (AP) - The Denver
flroncos, veterans of the NFL
playoff wars, kept their heads
-hilc all about them the fledglingj
ouston Oilers seemed to be los-
i tg theirs.
Maturity helped the Broncos tol
a 34-10 rout of the Oilers in a divi-
s onal playoff game Sunday, pro-
p oiling Denver into the AFCI
c lampionship game for the scc-J
d straight year. Denver will
;ain play Cleveland at Mile High!
adium next Sunday. Thcf
wns beat Indianapolis 38-21
oh Saturday.
John Elvvay, the league's MVPJ
threw two touchdown passes tc
right end Clarence Kay and rai
for a third score as Denver, a play-
off team four of the past five yearsJ
took command early and never le
up.
Commercials
Continued frontpage 24
irst ofrTl have ho earthly idej
vhat the damn wings do.
o idly, I don't care one bit. Mj
ii nagination soars when I see tl
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vorse. Lastly � and most ci
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THE CAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 12. 1088 29
GET
CAUGHT
X IuMEu&I Iflariilmittii
YOND
this month the
told its Spring
ing. The Broth-
ind out why we
ternity on the
ve are not the
1 out why our
xcellence year
ays have a hell
lizations. Then
at we are a new
oth above and
k Phi
PHINX
13
I �
Wedskins
( HICAGO (AP) - The Wash-
ington Redskins advanced to the
Y C championship by defeating
j C hicago Bears, ending the
lavr of Walter Payton, the
V s all-time loading'rusher in
process.
tivton. who had announced
tircment, led all rushers
lav with 85 yards in 18 at-
r
11
t
touchdown run to cut Chicago's
lead in half.
With 51 seconds left in the half,
Williams hit Didier with an 18-
yard touchdown pass to tie the
game.
The clincher was a 52-yard punt
return for a touchdown by Green
early in the third quarter.
Quarterback Jim McMahon,
who had missed the last three
NFC finals
dskins the right to take on the "We ain't good enough right
Minnesota Vikings, who upset now Bears Coach Mike Ditka
the San Francisco 49ers 36-24 on said. "We just arc not good
Saturday, at Washington next enough with the people we have.
Sunday for the NFC title. The When it goes two years ending up
hmgton quarterback Doug games because of a hamstring in-
defensive end Charles
I receivers Gary Clark and
binders and defensive back
i
jury, threw a 14-yard touchdown
pass to Ron Morris to give the
Bears a 14-0 lead but he was
sacked five times, including three
by Mann, and was intercepted
three times.
"1 didn't throw the ball well. 1
didn't play very good football
McMahon said.
"Now we have a chance to play
in the championship game and go
I lay Schroeder, brought to the Super Bowl said Williams,
Iskins back 14-14 halftimc whocompletcd 14of 29passesfor
207 yards - including six for 92 to
completed key passes to Sanders. He was sacked only once
rs md Clint Didier before by the fearsome Bears defense.
Rogers ripped off a 3-yard The victory earned the Rc-
Green led the Redskins
, k to a 21-17 victory after the
y ad surged to an early 14-0
l irk made some key third-
receptions to keep Wash-
drives alive. Williams, se-
v Coach loe Gibbs to start
winner advances to the Super
Bowl.
"We're absolutely thrilled
Gibbs said. "This is the happiest
I've ever seen our locker room
Green's touchdown was his
first on a punt return in five years
in the NFL.
"I did that before in college
said Green, who cut down the
right sideline, hurdled Cap Boso
and cut back across the field for
the winning score.
The Redskins' Brian Davis had
intercepted McMahon and re-
turned 23 yards to the Chicago 6-
yard line. Williams threw an in-
completion and on the next play
Steve McMichael deflected a pass
and Mike Richardson intercepted
for the Bears.
But the Redskins held, forced a
punt and Green returned it for the
touchdown.
in the same position, it's not very
much fun
Two years, same situation. Last
year in the first piayoff game the
Redskins again rallied to defeat
the Bears 23-17 in the playoffs and
in Soldier Field.
Finishing strong for the Bears
was Payton, the NFL career rush-
ing leader with 16,726 yards.
"It hasn't sunk in yet the 33-
year-old Payton said of retire-
ment. "Next year it will sink in.
We had opportunities to put the
game away but, unfortunately,
wc didn't. We fell short.
"It's hard to leave the game
because it's still a lot of fun
Payton said.
The game was played in 4-de-
grec weather with a wind-chill
factor of minus-23. The crowd
included 58,153 of the sellout
66,030 ticket holders showed up.
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Broncos crush Oilers, head to title game
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Expires Feb. 12, 1988)
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WER (AP) - The Denver
- veterans of the NFL
: wars, kept their heads,
ibout them the fledgling
n Oilers seemed to be los-
. ty helped the Broncos to
ul of the Oilers in a divi-
plavoff game Sunday, pro-
I Vnvcr into the AFC
nship game for the sec-
� Might year. Denver will
Cleveland at Mile High
im next Sunday. The
- beat Indianapolis 38-21
irday.
Elway, the league's MVP,
��� two touchdown passes to
1 Clarence Kay and ran
tird score as Denver, a play-
on four of the past five years,
mmand early and never let
The young Oilers, who hadn't
been to the playoffs since 1980,
suffered two key interceptions
and a critical fumble on a lateral at
their own 1-yard line, along with a
slew of penalties.
"They (the Oilers) don't have
that much experience in the play-
offs, and it showed a little Den-
ver linebacker Karl Mecklenburg
said.
The Oilers came into Sunday's
game talking big. Even their
coach, Jerry Glanvillc, indicated
Denver was just a way station on
the road to the Super Bowl.
The outcome may have been
decided less than six minutes into
the game after Mike Horan's punt
went out of bounds at the Hous-
ton 5.
Alonzo Highsmith lost a yard
on a running play and the Oilers,
operating without a huddle,
quickly ran another play -a lateral
into the left flat to running back
Mike Rozicr. Rozier was behind
the line of scrimmage, and when
he dropped the ball, Denver's
Steve Wilson recovered at theonc.
Gene Lang scored for Denver two
plays later.
Houston then drove to the
Broncos' 20, but Mecklenburg
intercepted. Elway promptly
drove the Broncos to their second
score, hitting Kay, who had
beaten safety Keith Bostic, on a 27-
yardcr.
After an exchange of field goals,
Elway took Denver 80 yards in
nine plays, highlighted by a 55-
yard pass to a wide-open Vance
Johnson, for a 24-3 lead. On the
score, Elway rolled to his right
and threw back across the middle
to an open Kay.
The Oilers blew another scoring
opportunity in the third period.
VVarren Moon completed six
passes on a drive that reached
Denver's 7, but corncrback Mark
Hayncs picked off a pass in the
end zone and returned it 57 yards.
Houston got its lone touch-
down with 8:22 left after an inter-
ception by corncrback Patrick
Allen near midficld. Moon hit
Ernest Givins on a 19-yard pass
for the TD.
After Denver recovered the
ensuing on-side kick, Elway
passed 25 yards to Gene Lang and
then ran the final three yards for
an insurance score.
"They were coming at him all
thctime, but John still made some
great throws Denver Coach Dan
Reeves said. "And Clarence did
an excellent job. He had two great
catches
Commercials interrupt television sports
START
EXECUTIVE
TRAINING NOW
Don't wait until you
finish college to start a man-
agement training program. If you
have at least two years remaining, consider
Air Force ROTC We can give you a head
start on a fast-paced career.
Cap! K;iml Houston
leadership Excellence Starts Here
Mill
niied from pae 24
ave no earthly idea
tmn wings do. Scc-
t care one bit. My
s a rs when I see that
. and that has to be
� and most cru-
-t me 100 percent
No, 1 don't have to see
t you just keep that
in vour purse, underneath
tissu
the final prize-winner is
, for their ingenious
� ilet bowls.
- is the commercial where
QconvERSi)
Converse Canvas
All Stars
'Rainbow f Colors'
Retail 524
the toilets sit around and com-
piain -about hov ditfyi they are
because their owners don't clean
them with Sani-Flush. Here I am
thinking all these toilets need is a
couple drinks in them and they
can start cruising for babes.
Talking toilet bowls?
Jeez, Louise, even I and my
roommates clean the toilets be-
fore they start to talk. And exactly
what do they talk about when
they're not bitching?
Maybe they just chill out and
talk about football. Or maybe they
talk about people.
"God, Hank, did you see that
Alperna
Ski Bibs
Men's and Women's Sizes
Retail $64 95 to $79 95
butt thatcame in last night? That
thing weighed 700 maybe 800
pounds I'm sure they have
something like toilet bowl sup-
port groups.
Finally, a question: Just where
do these toilets use the bathroom?
Now THAT, I've just got to see.
Author's note: Writing these col-
umns is definitely a kick for me. Not
many people have as much fun at
work as I do, and I'm duely grateful.
But I don't always do it alone, such as
with this article. I want to thank
Micki Burbclla, Leigh Ann Cham-
bers, Suzanne Corcoran, and Carla
Roberson for all their help.
LUCKY SIZE REMNANT
CLEARANCE SALE
oo
Ski Boots
One Group Only
Up To 50 Off
Sale
Sale
Some As �,
Low As
95
Snow Ski Package
Rossignol 550 Skis
M 2 Marker Bindings
Koflach CE 200 Boots
Ntorts Series PoIps
Sale
291
Rossignol 4S Kevlar
Retail $375.00
Sale
299
95
Rossignol 3G Equipe
Retail $375 00
1
Sale
289
95
LET OVERTOILS TRAINED SKI TECHNICIANS
GET YOUR SKIS READY FOR THE SLOPES
-Certified Marker Binding Shop-
Flat File, Hand Buff And Hot Wax
Binding Adjustment
1
WINTERGREEN SKI TRIPS
Next Trip January 19 Sign Up Early
Call For Details $50" For Ski Rentals Add s 10
00
Overtoil's
7:00 J 1UI
Hours MonFri. 9:00
Saft. 8:00-6:00
Behind Comfort Inn
264 Bypass
Red Banks Road, Greenville
355-5783
H�rrctt
1009 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville
ROLLS. REMNANTS VINYL WALLPAPER & TILE
Ph
758-0057
Visa - MasterCard,
Cash Or Check
Now is the time to cover those COLD BARE FLOORS during the Lucky Size Remnant Clearance Sale. Lucky size remnants are the end pipces of carpet left over from large rolls of carpet and we sell them at a fraction of the regular price and have reduced over 200 in stock remnants to rock bottom prices many below wholesalejust to clear our inventory for new stockSale I Ends I Jan. 23rd
This Is A Small Listirig Of What Is Available
ColorSizeRegularSaleColorSizeRegularSale
Rust12x710"150.0029.95Brown12x157"345.00129.95
Tweed12x176"500.0089.0Rust12x127"357.00119.95
Beige12x12'6"449.0069.95Moss12x13349.0099.95
Tanir6"x8'6"139.9539.95Brown12x20 11"559.00159.95
Red12x14'6"479.0089.95Lt. Green12x17 8"479.00159.95
Gray12x15375.0089.95Orange12x99"135.0079.95
Silver8x16'6"250.0069.95Beige12x17240.00129.95
Rust9'6"x7155.0029.95Brown12x14179.99109.95
Beige12x14'6"329.008995Gray12x16'4"200.00119.95
Tweed10x11'6"238.0069.95Brown12x14'9"199.99119.95
Lavender12x9'6"309.0059.95Smoke12x16458.00169.95
Taupe12x10'6"329.5059.95Beige12x12240.00129.95
Tweed12x14359.0T89.95Tan12x13'5"357.00139.95
Tweed6x19'4240.0049.95Brown12x11'2"298.60129.95
Red12x26'6"699.00129.95Red12x9190.00109.95
Burgundy12x217"475.00169.95Brown12x11'1"299.00109.95
Lavender12x25'2"599.00169.95Cream12x123"289.00119.95
Rust12x1311�317.00129.95Peach12x9'9"200.00109.95
Pottery12x12299.00129.95Lavender12x10269.90109.95
Green12x10'2"204.45109.95Rust12x217"412.00239.95
Lavender12x22'5"597.80229.95Green12x7 1"142.0049.95
Gray12x9'2"244.9999.95Tweed12x127"335.60139.95
Rose12x133"265.00139.95Coral12x114"260.00129.95
Purple12x9'4"248.0099.95Tweed12x11'9"310.00139.95
Brown12x12'4"328.00129.95Brown12x167"440.00189.95
Rust12x11'8"235.99109.95Pink12x10'2"260.00109.95
Green12x13'6"325.00129.95Gray12x107"399.00109.95
Lavender12x15'ir424.40189.95Beige12x22 1"580.00239.95
Brown12x117"329.00109.95Forest Jreen12x24'2"484.00249.95
Aqua12x257"425.0029995Gray12x2210"499.52249.95
Beige12x17'6"255.00159.95Lavender12x127"258.00119.95
Brown12x13'2"220.0099.95Navy12x20480.00229.95
Mauve12x16243.00169.95Brown12x1210"260.00119.95
Blue12x16'5"410.00189.95Cream12x182"440.00179.95
Brown11x11'10"220.00109.95Brown12x127"250.00119.95
BeigeIf 11 "111225.00139.95
CARPET � VINYL � WALLPAPER - AT WHOLESAILE PRICES�
wU "
��' � ewawwtif





Our Spring Semester
Textbook Inventory Is
75 Used
The Average College Bookstore has only a 25
used textbook inventory but at the UBe 3 out of
4 textbooks are used. That's because our textbook
manager searches the entire nation for used text-
books, and our December Buyback was the big-
gest ever. So, if you want to save money on your
textbooks this spring, buy your textbooks Down-
town at the UBE.
Extended Hours For
Book Rush!
Open Tonite And
Wednesday 'til 9 p.m
Thursday 'til 6 p.m.
528 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.





Title
The East Carolinian, January 12, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 12, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.579
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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