The East Carolinian, December 3, 1987






INSIDE
Editorials a
Entertainment� $
Sports :�" -�
Classifieds� V
ENTERTAINMENT
Writer tells about experience of visiting a hospital
see ENTERTAINMENT, page 13.
SPORTS
Lady Pirate Classic to be held this weekend. For
a preview � see SPORTS, page .19.
�l?i iEaat (Earnltrtiati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 No. 27
Thursday, December 3,1987
Greenville, NC
26 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Faculty Senate votes down tenure committee
Bv TIM HAMPTON
Suit Writer
The ECU Faculty Senate, in a
Tuesday meeting, voted down a
proposal to create an ad hoc
committee to evaluate instruc-
tors' tenure.
Before voting on the proposal.
Or. William A. Bloodworth, vice
chancellor of Academic Affairs,
announced that ECU will observe
Martin Luther King Jrs birthday
Jan. 18, 1988. In observing Dr.
King's birthday, Bloodworth potential tenure of faculty Ten-
said, classes will not be held, ure-promotion committees are
In debating the proposed implemented in some universi-
committee,senators wcredivided ties, but ECU has never used the
on the role that faculty members committee format, according to
should play in evaluating the Dr. LawerenceE. Hough an asso-
ciate delegate on the senate.
The ad hoc committee proposal,
initiated by Bloodworth, would
have put a faculty voice into the
process of faculty promotion and
tenure.
The committee would "advise
me of the university's expecta-
tions of the tenure due process
Blood worth said.
One professor moved to create a
slate of names for the tenure
committee, stating the fact that
the committee would be tempo-
rary.
In opposing the move, Sen.
William F. Grossnickel said the
committee, no matter how tempo-
rary, would set prescedents for
future committees of a similar
nature.
Also opposing the plan, Sen.
Judy D. Sadler said the senate
should not allow the tenure
committee to set precedents
Some faculty senators were
opposed to faculty members
evaluating members of other
departments. Sen. Robert M.
Woodside asked the senate,
"How can a member of the art
department evaluate a member of
the math department?"
Tenure-promotion criteria dif-
fer from one department to the
next in settingguidelines for what
an instructor has to accomplish to
receive tenure. Some depart-
ments have rigid requirements
while others do not, Hough said.
Hough said university admin-
istrators have traditionally
handled the tenure process. "The
responsibility of the tenure
mechanism belongs to the ad-
ministration Hough said.
The final 25-17 hand vote on the
issue denied the motion to create a
"slate" of faculty members for the
tenure committee.
After the vote, in other busi-
ness, Student Union Forum
Committee Chairwoman Tonya
Batizy said there was "a lack of
faculty support for the Shirley
Chisholm lecture She asked that
the faculty encourage students to
attend future guest lecturers.
Batizy said all faculty members
should have known of the Chish-
olm lecture because the Forum
Committee had advertised it in
The Daily Reflector and The East
Carolinian.
Mendenhall changes begin
New building still needs work
The new general classroom
building stands at last � without
a name and without definite plans
to have classes there at the begin-
ning oi next semester.
Contractors should have the
building ready for the beginning
of the spring semester, but furni-
ture and equipment won't have
been moved in,said lames Lowry,
director of the Physical Plant.
Lowry said he had been hoping
that the building would be ready
for spring semester classes.
The registrar's office has al-
ready designated the building as
GO (General classroom build-
ing), but no classes arc scheduled
to be held "at the present mo-
ment according to Registrar Gil
Moore.
Moore said the delay in comple-
tion of the building has meant that
tewer classes can be scheduled
during the most popular class
hours, 10a.m2 p.m. Moreclasses
had to be scheduled during other
times, he said.
However, some classes could
be moved to the new building
during the semester, Moore said.
Meanwhile, contractors arc
cleaning up and making adjust-
ments to the building.
The building had originally
been scheduled to open for classes
in August, but the 160,000 sq. ft.
building needed changes.
"There were a lot of good rea-
sons (for the delay) Lowry said
in August. "It's a very compli-
cated building all the way
through and there were a number
of changes that had to be made
The $1.5 million structure is the
largest on campus and is to house
65 classrooms and laboratories
and 180 faculty offices.
The departments of Business,
Foreign Language, English, Inter-
national Affairs and Honors are
among those that are supposed to
relocate to the building.
By CAMILLE COX
Stiff Writer
The fence closing off much of
Mendenhall Student Center went
up a about two weeks ago, and the
plans for the expansion of the
building became reality.
"We hope to have the fence
down by the end of 1988. The
project is scheduled to last 380
days. The project includes exca-
vating what was formerly the
patio and area beyond accord-
ing to Rudolph Alexander, assis-
tant vice chancellor of Student
Life and director of University
Unions.
Mendenhall will remain a three
story building, with one under-
ground and two floors above
The cafeteria, which is used by
students on the meal plan, will
remain open and operate through
the Spring, 1988, semester.
"The Student Union needed
more space, a bigger place to eat,
additional meeting rooms and a
new home for WZMB, thecampus
radio station � also in additional
offices for SGA, Student Union,
IFC, Panhellenie, Minority Affairs
and SRA Alexander said.
"The construction will be an
aggravation to both students and
faculty. You have to goaround the
barn to get in. It's an annoyance,
but a delightful annoyance be-
cause within one year or so we
will have the facilities we so des-
perately need
ground, he said
MADD to hold vigil Dec. 8
AW medium prnpnwl
Holland calls for ECUTV station
Bv JOHN TUCKER
Staff Writer
The newly elected chairman of
the media board said ECU needsa
television station to contribute to
the university's growing commu-
nications school.
"WiththegTowthinthcnumbcr
of students enrolled as communi-
cations majors at ECU, there's a
need for television production
said Chris Holland, the new chair-
man.
Holland said the television sta-
tion would be run by students,
such as other media programs at
ECU.
'The school radio station and
newspaper are run by students
and this covers some aspects in
the communication field, but we
need a video form of the media
Holland said.
Holland said the TV station
could possibly be on cable televi-
sion on a public service access
channel.
According to Holland, the sta-
tion probably would air three
times weekly at 6:30 p.m. and
10:30 p.m. and would be mostly
an ECU news-oriented program.
The media board determines
the budgets for all student run
media and would have to decide
where the money for operation of
the TV station would come from.
"We need a lot of student sup-
port to create and run this new
medium Holland said.
The media board is comprised
of members from various organi-
zations on campus such as the
SGA, SRA, Inter-Fraternity Coun-
cil, Minority Student Organiza-
tion, Panhellenie Council and
others. There are also two ECU
faculty members on the board.
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Managing Editor
Mothers Against Drunk Driv-
ing ADD)and theSigma Sigma
Sigma sorority will hold a candle-
light vigil on Dec. 8 to remember
those killed by drunk drivers,
according to Jessica Perry, a
member of both organizations
Perry said there is a high rate of
DWI (Driving While Impaired)
arrests among ECU students ac-
cording to ECU Public Safety and
the Greenville Police Depart-
ment.
"Pitt County has one of the
highest rates of drunk driving in
North Carolina she said. "I think
the reason is because the students
are more concerned about getting
caught and are not concerned
about hurting themselves or oth-
ers
Perry said that while this is the
first Pitt County vigil ever, the
program is used across the coun-
try during the holiday season
each year.
Kathy Prescott, president of the
Pitt County MADD organization,
will speak at the event. Her son,
Jay Bright, was killed in June,
1981, by a drunk driver as he tried
to push a car to the side of the
road.
The Rev. Molloy Owens, pastor
of the church, and Greenville
Mayor-elect Ed Carter will also
speak at the ceremony.
However, Perry said, the focus
of the event will not be on
speeches. Instead, relatives of
those who have been killed by
drunk drivers will light a candle
in their memory. They can say a
few words if they want to, but it
will not be mandatory, she said.
Perry said those unable to at-
tend but would like to have some-
one remembered can call Prescott
at 355-6248. Those names will be
read off in a roll call during the
ceremony.
The vigil will take place at 7
p.m. at Jarvis Memorial United
Methodist Church. Perry said
other area dignitaries have been
invited to attend the event.

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INSIDE
Editorials 4
Entertainmentj "13
SportsL.�3T.19
Classifieds "6
ENTERTAINMENT
Writer tells about experience of visiting a hospital
see ENTERTAINMENT, page 13.
SPORTS
Lady Pirate Classic to be held this weekend For
a preview � see SPORTS, page 19.
Qttlt �aat (EutBlMun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 No. 27
Thursday, December 3,1987
Greenville, NC
26 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Faculty Senate votes down tenure committee
By TIM HAMPTON
Suit Writrr
The ECU Faculty Senate, in a
Tuesday meeting, voted down a
proposal to create an ad hoc
committee to evaluate instruc-
tors' tenure.
Before voting on the proposal.
Dr. William A. Bloodworth, vice
chancellor of Academic Affairs,
announced that ECU will observe
Martin Luther King Jrs birthday
Jan. 18, 1988. In observing Dr.
King's birthday, Bloodworth
said, classes will not be held.
In debating the proposed
committee, senators wcredivided
on the role that faculty members
should play in evaluating the
potential tenure of faculty. Ten-
ure-promotion committees are
implemented in some universi-
ties, but ECU has never used the
committee format, according to
Dr. Lawerence E. Hough, an asso-
ciate delegate on the senate.
The ad hoc committee proposal,
initiated by Bloodworth, would
have put a faculty voice into the
process of faculty promotion and
tenure.
The committee would "advise
me of the university's expecta-
tions of the tenure due process
Bloodworth said.
One pro fessor moved to crea te a
slate of names for the tenure
committee, stating the fact that
the committee would be tempo-
rary.
In opposing the move, Sen.
William F. Grossnickel said the
committee, no matter how tempo-
rary, would set prescedents for
future committees of a similar
nature.
Also opposing the plan, Sen.
Judy D. Sadler said the senate
should not allow the tenure
committee to set precedents
Some faculty senators were
opposed to faculty members
evaluating members of other
departments. Sen. Robert M.
Woodside asked the senate,
"How can a member of the art
department evaluate a member of
the math department?"
Tenure-promotion criteria dif-
fer from one department to the
next in setting guidelines for what
an instructor has to accomplish to
receive tenure. Some depart-
ments have rigid requirements
while others do not. Hough said.
Hough said university admin-
istrators have traditionally
handled the tenure process. "The
responsibility of the tenure
mechanism belongs to the ad-
ministration Hough said.
The final 25-17 hand vote on the
issue denied the motion to crea te a
"slate" of faculty members for the
tenure committee.
After the vote, in other busi-
ness. Student Union Forum
Committee Chairwoman Tonya
Batizy said there was "a lack of
faculty support for the Shirley
Chisholm lecture She asked that
the faculty encourage students to
attend future guest lecturers.
Batizy said all faculty members
should have known of the Chish-
olm lecture because the Forum
Committee had advertised it in
The Daily Reflector and The East
Carolinian.
Mendenhall changes begin
The new classroom building stands nearly finished. Although no
classes are scheduled to be held there yet, some classes could be
moved to the building during the spring semester (Thomas Walters,
I notolab).
New building still needs work
The new general classroom
building stands at last � without
a name and without definite plans
to have classes there at the begin-
ning oi next semester.
Contractors should have the
building ready for the beginning
of the spring semester, but furni-
ture and equipment won't have
been moved in, said James Lowry,
director oi the Physical Plant.
Lowry said he had been hoping
that the building would be read)'
for spring semester classes.
The registrar's office has al-
ready designated the building as
'GC (General classroom build-
ing), but no classes are scheduled
to be held "at the present mo-
ment according to Registrar Gil
Moore.
Moore said the delay in comple-
tion of the building has meant that
fewer classes can be scheduled
during the most popular class
hours, 10a.m2p.m. More classes
had to be scheduled during other
times, he said.
However, some classes could
be moved to the new building
during the semester, Moore said.
Meanwhile, contractors are
cleaning up and making adjust-
ments to the building.
The building had originally
been schedu led to open for classes
in August, but the 160,000 sq. ft.
building needed changes.
"There were a lot of good rea-
sons (for the delay) Lowry said
in August. "It's a very compli-
cated building all the way
through and there were a number
of changes that had to be made
The $1.5 million structure is the
largest on campus and is to house
65 classrooms and laboratories
and 180 faculty offices.
The departments of Business,
Foreign Language, English, Inter-
national Affairs and Honors arc
among those that are supposed to
relocate to the building.
New medium prnpnpH
Holland calls for ECUTV station
Bv JOHN TUCKER
Staff Writer
The newly elected chairman of
the media board said ECU needs a
television station to contribute to
the university's growing commu-
nications school.
"With the growth in the number
of students enrolled as communi-
cations majors at ECU, there's a
need for television production
said Chris Holland, the new chair-
man.
Holland said the television sta-
tion would be run by students,
such as other media programs at
ECU.
'The school radio station and
newspaper are run by students
and this covers some aspects in
the communication field, but we
need a video form of the media
Holland said.
Holland said the TV station
could possibly be on cable televi-
sion on a public service access
channel.
According to Holland, the sta-
tion probably would air three
times weekly at 6:30 p.m. and
10:30 p.m. and would be mostly
an ECU news-oriented program.
The media board determines
the budgets for all student run
media and would have to decide
where the money for operation of
the TV station would come from.
"We need a lot of student sup-
port to create and run this new
medium Holland said.
The media board is comprised
of members from various organi-
zations on campus such as the
SG A, SRA, Inter-Fraternity Coun-
cil, Minority Student Organiza-
tion, Panhellenic Council and
others. There are also two ECU
faculty members on the board.
By CAMILLE COX
Staff Writer
The fence closing off much of
Mendenhall Student Center went
up a about two weeks ago, and the
plans for the expansion of the
building became reality.
"We hope to have the fence
down by the end of 1988. The
project is scheduled to last 380
days. The project includes exca-
vating what was formerly the
patio and area beyond accord-
ing to Rudolph Alexander, assis-
tant vice chancellor of Student
Life and director of University
Unions.
Mendenhall will remain a three
story building, with one under-
ground and two floors above
ground, he said.
MADD to hold
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Managing Editor
Mothers Against Drunk Driv-
ing(MADD)and the Sigma Sigma
Sigma sorority will hold a candle-
light vigil on Dec. 8 to remember
those killed by drunk drivers,
according to Jessica Perry, a
member of both organizations.
Perry said there is a high rate of
DWI (Driving While Impaired)
arrests among ECU students ac-
cording to ECU Public Safety and
the Greenville Police Depart-
ment.
"Pitt County has or the
highest rates of drunk ig in
North Carolina she saiu nink
the reason is because the students
are more concerned about getting
caught and are not concerned
about hurting themselves or oth-
ers
Perry said that while this is the
first Pitt County vigil ever, the
program is used across the coun-
try during the holiday season
each year.
Kathy Prescott, president of the
The cafeteria, which is used by
students on the meal plan, will
remain open and operate through
the Spring, 1988, semester.
"The Student Union needed
more space, a bigger place to eat,
additional meeting rooms and a
new home for WZMB, thecampus
radio station � also in additional
offices for SGA, Student Union,
IFC, Panhellenic, Minority Affairs
and SRA Alexander said.
"The construction will be an
aggravation to both students and
faculty. You have togoaround the
barn to get in. It's an annoyance,
but a delightful annoyance be-
cause within one year or so we
will have the facilities we so des-
perately need
vigil Dec. 8
Pitt County MADD organization,
will speak at the event. Her son,
Jay Bright, was killed in June,
1981, by a drunk driver as he tried
to push a car to the side of the
road.
The Rev. Molloy Owens, pastor
of the church, and Greenville
Mayor-elect Ed Carter will also
speak at the ceremony.
However, Perry said, the focus
of the event will not be on
speeches. Instead, relatives of
those who have been killed by
drunk drivers will light a candle
in their memory. They can say a
few words if they want to, but it
will not be mandatory, she said.
Perry said those unable to at-
tend but would like to have some-
one remembered can call Prescott
at 355-6248. Those names will be
read off in a roll call during the
ceremony.
The vigil will take place at 7
p.m. at Jarvis Memorial United
Methodist Church. Perry said
other area dignitaries have been
invited to attend the event.
MM
MMMMMap
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A
THE EAST CAROUNIAN
DECEMBER 3,1987
Professor searches for places without names
By G. A. THREEWrrrs
By G. A. THREEWITTS
ECU N�n turmm
Names of little known places in
North Carolina, not found on
today's maps, are being sought by
a geographer at ECU in a research
project for the U.S. Geological
Survey.
Dr. Richard A. Stcphenson, a
geography and planning profes-
sor at ECU, is doing the study in
which he hopes to pinpoint the
exact location of thousands of old
and forgotten places � towns,
crossroads, streams, hills or is-
lands. It doesn't matter as long as
the place had a name at some time
in history.
"kendrick's Mount and Pain
Fort are a couple of examples
said Stephenson, who also directs
the newly-established Office of
Geographic Names in the Depart-
ment of Geography and Planning.
Both of these places were on the
North Carolina coast and were
well know at one time. Today they
don't exist.
Kendrick's Mount or Cape
Kendrick was a point off the
North Carolina coast 16 miles out
to sea. It has eroded away since
the middle of the 18thcentury and
today is covered by ocean. Pain
Fort was noted on 18th century
maps as well. This fort was on the
north end of Roanoke Island but
today it doesn't exist either.
"We're going to get the latitude
and longitude of these places and
make a complete file. It will be a
computer listing of the Gazetteer
of the U.S. Geological Survey
Stephenson said.
He said that as many as 40,000
of these places exist in North
Carolina. Their exact longitude
and latitude positions were never
recorded.
A $105,000 grant from the U.S.
Geological Survey is supporting
the project.
"It is important that a single,
unbiased, standardized system
for geographic names beavailable
for research and for general use
Stephenson said.
Stcphenson said that work has
Advice given about PMS
already begun in findingnamesof
places in Dare County. He said he
chose to study Dare County first
because this is where North Caro-
lina history began. Also it may be
the most difficult to study because
many places that were known and
recorded on maps 400 years ago
are now covered by water.
Much of the research done by
Stephenson in the past involved
the study of changes in shape and
position of North Carolina's bar-
rier islands.
Serving as consultants for the
names study will be historian
William S. Powell, professor
emeritus at the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Powell's book "The North Caro-
lina Gazetter" is a dictionary of
place names in the state.
Anotherconsultant is Professor
Neil Linebach, chairman of the
Department of Geography at
Appalachian State University.
Assisting with the project in-
clude Dr. Owen J. Furseth, a pro-
fessor in the Department of Earth
Sciences and Geography at UNC-
Charlotte; Hardee R. Cox of
r
Washington, director of Global
Map Services of Greenville; and
ECU students Lynn Marie Muter
of New Bern, Kyle Schick of Falls
Church, Va. and David Jones of
Centreville, Va.
Stphenson said that anyone
wishing to submit a place name
should drop him a line in the
Department of Geography and
Planning, East Carolina Univer-
sity, Greenville, NC 27858-4353
Each month, one out of everv
three women suffer from a vary-
ing group of symptoms related to
their menstrual period known as
Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS).
These symptoms include but
are not limited to: mood swings,
irritability, depression, fluid re-
tention, breast tenderness, head-
aches, food cravings and fatigue
Women may experience these
symptoms one to two days before
their period or for as long as two
weeks from mid cycle until the
day their period starts.
Causes of PMS are unknown
but are related to the hormones
that cause menstruation and may
appear as early as puberty or as
late as menopause. PMS seems to
begin following a shock to the
Health Column
By MARY ELESHA-ADAMS
ECU Student Health Center
endoc.me system, such as men-
struation, childbirth, going on or
off birth control pills or other
major life stress.
Most cases of PMS can be
treated by simple measures you
may implement yourself before
seeking medical assistance. Daily
vigorous exercise such as aero-
bics, running, swimming or brisk
walking helps to increase circula-
tion and decreases stress.
Be sure to get seven to eight
hours of sleep each night. Eat six
small meals a day instead of three
regular meals to help maintain an
even blood sugar level. It is im-
portant to attain or maintain your
ideal body weight. Your diet
should include 45 grams of pro-
tein daily as well as foods high in
Vitamin B6(corn, wheat, unsalted
sunflower seeds, peanuts, yeast
Doctor from Afghanistan joins Med. school
ECU Man Bureau
Dr. Hamid Hadi, an obstetri-
cian-gynecologist, has joined the
ECU School of Medicine faculty
as associate professor in the De-
partment of Obstetrics and Gyne-
cology. He will direct the mater-
nal and fetal medicine section in
the department.
Before assuming his post at
ECU, Hadi was assistant profes-
sor of obstetrics and gvnccology
in the division of maternal and
fetal medicine at the Medical Col-
lege of Geogia in Augusta.
Formerly of Kabul, Afghani-
stan, he received his medical de-
gree from the Kabul University
School of Medicine and his under-
graduatc education at Habibia
College, also in Afghanistan.
After completion of medical
school, Hadi finished a one vear
pediatrics residency at the Uni-
versity of Florida's University
Hospital in Jacksonville, concen-
trating on neonatology. He later
completed a four year residency
in obstetrics and gyneeology at
the College of Physicians and
Surgeons of Columbia Univer-
sity, Harlem Hospital Center in
New York City.
He then pursued a one-year
fellowship in obstetrics and gyne-
eology and perinatal pathology at
the University of Pittsburgh and a
two-year subspecialty fellowship
in maternal and fetal medicine at
the Medical College of Georgia in
Augusta.
While at the Medical College of
Georgia, he was the recipient of
the Teacher of the Year Award in
the school's Department of Ob-
stetrics and Gvnccology. He was
also the recipient of the first scien-
tific paper award in the District IV
meeting of the American College
of Obstetricians and Gynecolo-
gists.
His professional affiliations
SPEND
SPRING BREAK ON A CRUISE!
The Travel Committee Presents:
a 6-day cruise on the Funship Carnivale.
Depart: 6 p.m. March 6
Return: 4 a.m. March 12.
Via: Round trip to Miami on Seashore Trallways Bus.
Cruise aboard the Funship Carnivale.
Price: $475 (ECU Students) $520 (Non-students).
Call: Mendenhall's Central Ticket Office
for more details 757-6611.
OUR RESUMES
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having a clean professional-looking resume by AccuCopy.
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include membership in the
American College of Obstetri-
cians and Gynecologists, the
American Medical Association,
the National Perinatal Associa-
tion, the Southern Medical Asso-
ciation.
and liver) and magnesium (whole
grains, dried beans and seafood).
Fluid retention (swelling) can
be reduced by using a natural
diuretic (1 lemon in a glass of
water daily) as well as avoiding
salty foods, especially fast foods
and canned foods. Carbonated
beverages contain sodium and
should be restricted to 1 per day.
Sugar, caffeine and alcohol can
increase irritability.
Fruits are good for snacking,
especially bananasand oranges. It
is equally as important to allow
some time for yourself to relax
and do things that are fun for you.
None of these things are easy
for a college student to fit into her
lifestyle, but it can be done and it
can make a difference in the way
you feel each month.
If you have any questions or
need additional information
about PMS, talk with a health care
provider at the ECU Student
Health Center.
�fte Caat (Earoiitttan
Serving the Exist Carolina campus community since J925
James F. J. McKee. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representative
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo
Sharl Clemens
Maria Bell
Pete Ferna'd
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Vandalis
Campus vandalism. What is it?
And who does it cost?
First let's define vandalism
According to Webster's New
World Dictionary of the Ameri-
can Language, vandalism is de-
fined as the actions or attitud
the vandals or of a vandal; n
cious or ignorant destruction of
public or private property espe
dally of that which is beautiful or
artistic.
This malicious destruction ot
public or pm
much more
and other
Piratl
By C Al' r
1
would like t.
ample last
there were 2ltf
Trustees to me
K I Sei Bureau
The ECU Board of Trustees will
meet on campus at 2 p.m. F i
on the eve of ECL's 7v-th com-
mencement.
Thecommencement, begim
at9a.m.Saturdavin Minges
scum, will be the first fail
mencement in the uiversity's
tory. Approximate I
and summer graduates ar
pected to participate.
Degrees will be conferred ui
as many as 1,500 fall and
graduates but officials sa
many as a third of these ma'
and 5U1
txx'n unab
tiona spnnj
Dr. Ric
and in
, .
Mate-
ATTIC 1
THURSL
The
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The
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ZONE
WED
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
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THE
USUALS
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NCECUStu
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WEDNESC
One time only rel
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��






out names
Northaro Washington director of Global
Map Services ol Greenville; and
-tate ECl students 1 vnn Mane Muter
n is Professor New 'rn Kyle Schick of Falls
in ol1 the Churh ,i and Pavid !ones of
( entrex ille .
Stphenson said that anyone
ihing to submit a place name
shoi p him a line in the
f .tvgraphy and
( Planning East Carolina Univer-
s h Greenville NC 2-858-4353.
�aat (Earolinian
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Advertising
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Fames Russo
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A
�H IE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 3. 1987
Vandalism costs students
Campus vandalism. What is it?
And who does it cost?
First let's define vandalism.
According to Webster's New
World Dictionary of the Ameri-
can language, vandalism is de-
fined as the actions or attitudes ot
the vandals or of a vandal; mali-
cious or ignorant destruction of
public or private property espe-
cially of that which is beautiful or
artistic.
This malicious destruction ol
public or private property occurs
much more frequently at ECU
and other campuses than we
Pirate Police
Line
ByCAl'T. KIITHKNOX
H.L Public Safety
would like to think. Take for ex-
ample last school year, '8687;
there were 208 cases of vandalism
reported to the ECU Department
of Public Safety.
This does not include those acts
of vandalism that occurred along
with another crime or those just
not reported. There has been an
increase each year for the past five
years according to the Depart-
ment of Public Safety records.
The destruction of personal or
public (school) property can in-
terrupt your learning ability and
social life, can cause a great deal of
Trustees to meet this Friday
t't l n�i Bunrau
The ECU Board of Trustees will
meet on campus at 2 p.m. Friday
on the eve of ECU'S 79th com-
mencement.
The commencement, beginning
at 4 am. Saturday in MingesColi-
seum, will be the first fall com-
mencement in the uiversitv's his
tory. Approximately 1,000 fall
and summer graduates arc ex-
pected to participate.
Degrees will be conferred upon
as many as 1,500 fall and summer
graduates but officials said as
many as a third of these may not
be able to attend. In the past, many-
tall and summer graduates have
been unable to attend the tradi-
tional spring commencement.
Dr. Richard R. Eakin, ECU
chancellor, approved plans for
two commencements each year
and united Dr. Tinsley E.
Yarhrough, professor and former
chairman of the Department ol
Political Science, to deliver the
79th commencement address.
Graduates will wear caps and
gowns and march in the tradi-
tional academic procession begin-
ning shortly before 10 a.m. Satur-
day.
Committees of the board of
trustees will meet on Friday prior
to the full board meeting. The 13-
member board will meet in Room
244, Mendenhall Student Center.
Trustees chairman Thomas
Bennett of Winston-Salem and
board members Sandra Babb of
Raleigh, William E. Danscy Jr.
and Max Ray Joyner of
Greenville, Craig Souza of
Raleigh and Student Government
Association President Scott Tho-
mas of Vanceboro will participate
in the commencement program.
ATTIC
The
CoMedY
ZONE
WED
1
The
CoMedY
ZONE
WED
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
MONDAY
THE
USUALS
Reading Day
Eve Special
THURSDAY
NCECU Students
FREE
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THURSDAY
TOAKRIQR
One time only reunion
wMaxx. WhiteHeat, &
Tipper Gor
FRIDAY
Exam Jam' w the
party Rixk of
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ECU with Ad
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$1.00
ECU
SATURDAY
Sidewinder
SATURDAY
13 Annual
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Christmas Party
wover $500 in
presents including
a trip to Winter-
green, Va.
FREE YOGURT
��
TCBV
�t
The Country's Best Yogurt
325 Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, NC
355-6968
CHRISTMAS TREAT TO GREENVILLE SATURDAY,
'�� 1�� DECEMBER 12th, 1987.
11 a.m. - 5 p.m.
TCBV
-A Free 5 oz. smoothie to everyone in the store
11 a.m. - 5 p.m.
-All shakes & hot sundaes purchased will be
served in 16 oz. plastic stadium cups
(while supply last).
-Drawing every hour beginning at 12:00 noon
until 5:00 p.m. for special gifts:
12:00- fl Shake of your choice.
1:00 - fl Waffle cone sundae.
2:00 - fl Christmas pie of your choice
3:00 - Delune Belgian Waffle - 1 a week for a year.
4:00 - Hot Sundae - I a meek for a year.
5:00 - 100 oz. yogurt.
Kids Hours
Everyday between
6 p.m. - 7 p.m. Free
kiddie cup free children
under 12.
Mom's Dav
Every Sunday all
day. Treat Mom
with a free 5 oz.
smoothie.
Discount Rates For Groups. We will deliver for groups.
inconvenience, and it costs
money.
Who does vandalism cost? If it
is your property that is destroyed,
it costs YOU. If it is school prop-
erty that is destroyed, it still costs
YOU. How can it still cost you if
the property belongs to the
school?
Simple. Some school property is
paid for by state taxes, which costs
everyone. However, students pay
for most of it through tuition and
fees. Damages to property caused
by vandalism raise educational
costs and students (you) are often
the ones who pay for these in-
creases.
This may hold especially true
for those students who live in
residence halls. Remember, de-
stroying property isn't very
smart, but it is illegal and costly.
If you see vandalism occur or
have any information concerning
a vandalism, please report it
immediately to the Campus Po-
lice Department of Public Safety
at 757-6150 or call Pirate Crimes
Busters at 757-6266.
Rcmember-kceping quiet
doesn't pay, it costs.
To the ECU Student Body:
All the Eakins join with me in wishing you a happy and joyous
holiday season. We need not be reminded that December is a
special time both on-campus and in our respective lives beyond the
red-tiled roof buildings. Of immediate interest are exams, post-
graduation plans for some, and mid-year break opportunities for
most others. Whatever the case, clearly we should not lose sight of
the larger meanings. Indeed, it is a time for caring, for loving, for
hoping, and yes for forgiving. May the real joys of the season be
known by you and shared by you.
Richard R. Eakin
Chancellor
How to cram for exams.
Before you pick up a book,
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-� '��������� r- -
s 'II





3 iEuBt �aralinfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, cim
Clay Deani iardt, m &�,�
Andy Lewis, . , jAMES F.j. mcKee, m,
TIM Cl UNDLER, Sport, mtm MEG NEEDI 1AM, cmum Mm.
Joiin Carter, rmm e� Mike Upoiurci i, pro� m��,�,
Si ielton Bryant, joi in W. Medlin, am ���
Debbie Stevens, s mac Clark, ��m
December 3,1987
Opinion
Page 4
Christmas
Take care as semester ends
As the semester winds to a close, it
is time once again for the holiday
season. We hope yours will be relax-
ing and joyful.
But before the season begins, stu-
dents face two of the toughest ob-
stacles of the year: exams and end of
the semester burn-out.
Despite the number of events
happening on campus to celebrate
the season, it will pay in the long run
to study and prepare now for exams.
Remember, while the celebrations
are going on, it is important to re-
member that grades are at stake. A
slip up now can ruin a semester's
worth of hard work, so be careful.
At the same time, try to avoid the
burnout that plagues students at
this time of year. Everyone has three
million things to do, projects to
complete and papers to write.
It can be easy to give up, become
frustrated and retire to a corner of
the room to take solace in a nice
nervous breakdown. Instead, take
heart. Remember that a long break is
right around the corner. If the crisis
gets too bad, visit the ECU Counsel-
ing Center for help to relax and get
the studying done.
One other wish for the yuletide
season: Don't drink and drive.
Nothing ruins the holiday season
like an arrest or a death.
Enough preaching; enough said.
We here at The East Carolinian
wish you and yours the best for the
holidays. Happy Hanukah. Merry
Christmas. Happy New Year.
Our new vear's wishes: Peace on
earth; free Africa.
THIS fS
AM�f?(CA,
W CANT ALUM THBM
10 S6tiP MAT COAPS
OF CRIMINALS 0Wm�

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5AI0U6H JAILS TO
mPTHmm�,

MISFITS,
SOCIAL
OUTCASTS,
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BACK7D�AJ&AA)R

�5PKIPL AMNcutEMeT
Students aren't hardened criminals
To the editor:
To those of you who are still cower-
ing under your beds in terror after
learning of the ruthless ECU I.D.
syndicate: Maybe if s time to peak out
- just a little.
I'm sure all of you were justifiably
appalled and disgusted upon learn-
ing that such a decadent operation
could be going on right under your
very noses, and on campus no less. If
not for the unfaltering bravery of
three campuscops, an officer from the
Department of Motor Vehicles, and a
call to the ECU Crime-stoppers' hot-
line by a "concerned student" doing
his "civic duty" the entire campus
might be armed with six-packs and
I.D.s. This is the picture the news
media painted of what we "crimi-
nals" affectionately call "l.D. Bust
'87 Allow me to enlighten you.
The Sunday October 18 issue of the
Greensboro News and Record stated
"Three East Carolina University stu-
dents have been arrested on a total of
19 charges arising from the alleged
sale of phony drivers licenses Nine-
teen charges, that's the key phrase.
When someone is arrested on nine-
teen charges of anything, that's news.
The truth is that six I.Ds were in
the process of being made and that
each student was charged with all six
counts. The extra charge, a misde-
manor, was given because one of the
students already had a fake I.D.
"If convicted, they face a maximum
penalty of three years in prison on
each of 6 felony counts of making and
selling fictitious licenses This is
what the October 18 Greensboro
News and Record had to say about
"I.D. Bust '87
The truth of the matter is that there
isn't a judge or jury in Pitt County that
would send three 18-year-old college
freshmen to jail for 18 years for mak-
ing fake I.Ds under these circum-
stances.
Another point I'd like to clear up is
the part of the quote that accuses the
men of "selling ficititious licenses
This implies that a profit was made.
There was no monetary gain of any
kind made on this venture and there
was no intention of making one. As
soon as any money was received it
was spent immediately on film and
flash only for the person who paid.
The news media painted a picture
of those of us unfortunate enough to
be involved in this incident as money
hungry conspirators. They also made
the "operation" appear to be an at-
tempt to mass produce I .D.s or at least
to make enough to pay for our re-
maining years at this university. This
is a load of crap. There were only nine
people involved in this incident, and
all of us knew each other. There were
no plans to find other people who
needed I.D.s and the board was to be
destroyed upon the completion of
ours.
As you can see, the age old adage
about not believing everything you
read still holds true today. Is there
such a shortage of real news in eastern
North Carolina that the press must
resort to embellishment of the issue?
None of the students involved in this
incident were ever asked to give their
side of the story. But fear not, as long
as our dedicated public servants and
campus narcs are doing their job you
will be protected from hideous
"criminals" such as us.
If you really want to know what
happened though, ask those involved
and save the newspapers for house-
training your pets.
John C Page
Freshman
Undecided
(Editor's note: Page was involved in the
identification incident as a recipient of
one of the l.D.s. He was not one of the
three students arrested at the time.)
To the editor:
Bobby Hall, Jr who wrote the Dec
1st letter to the editor "Contra-bash-
ing growing stale just doesn't see
the big picture about Nicaragua. It
seems he doesn't realize that there arc
lots of hungry people there!
What good are free elections to
people who's main concern is
whether or not they will be able to
feed their families tonight7 Countries
with as many poor and uneducated
people as Nicaragua has can not af-
ford the luxury of petty party bicker-
ing. The government which makes
reforms for the people is the best
government. Period. The Sandinistas
are changing poor conditions in their
country; perhaps they could do even
more good for their people it thev
were not forced to waste so much
money combatting the Contras
I think the U.S. government isbeing I
very selfish by forcing democracy on
Nicaragua. Besides, the Sandinistas
have just signed the Nobel prize
winning Arias Peace Plan, which calls
for free elections. This fact, coupled
with the fact that the Soviets have not
even asked to put military bases v
Nicaragua (they know the US would
not stand for it) is quite enough tc
make anyone wonder why the Con
tras are still hanging around there
So, why are the Contras still in
Nicaragua? To pacify our govern-
ment, that's why. Evidently we are
afraid that the political affiliation ota
country with a population less than
that of some of our major cities is
going to affect our standard of living.
Strange, isn't it?
I think Bobby Hall, Jr. of the "Col-
lege Republicans" should have a little
more concern for what is best for
Nicaragua's hungry people, not for
the U.S. government's resume of
imperialist victories.
Shannon Morrow
Sophomore
Campus
Forum
Buckley says let Gorbachev speak to Congress
It was a nice irony that the question was asked of
me by a reporter from The Washington Post at a
function in Washington to honor Vladimir
Bukovsky. The question put to me was, "What
would be your reaction to an invitation to Gor-
bachev when he comes here to address both houses
of Congress?"
The Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washing-
ton is an anti-totalitarian, Judeo-Christian-oriented
think tank whose board of directors includes Adm.
Elmo Zumwalt, Shelby Cullom Davis, Midge
Decter, Jeane Kirkpatrick, Richard John Neuhaus
and Donald Rumsfdd. The purpose of the evening
was to present the Shelby Cullom Davis Award to
Vladimir Buckovsky.
For those vho wish to be reminded, Buckovsky
was one of the spectacular victims of Soviet oppres-
sion. He wasarrestcd time after time for hisactivities
in behalf of human rights. His activities gained
considerable notoriety in the light of the protections
guarantee under the Helsinki Accords in 1975.
Bukovsky took full advantages of his hypothetical
freedoms to dissent and as result was consigned to a
psychiatric "hospital" where the tortures continued.
In 1976, a spectacular exchange was arranged: The
Chilean communist leader Luis corvalan, impris-
oned after Allende was toppled � free to go to the
soviet Union, where he belonged. And Bukovsky
free to go to the West�where he belonged. He came
here and wrote his book, 'To Build a Castle: My Life
as a Dissenter He lives in London and is co-chair-
man of Resistance International.
In accepting the award, Bukovsky said much that
was poignant and penetrating. One paragraph in
particular caught the ear. He said:
"It is frightening even to think what might happen
if tomorrow Comrade Gorbachev makes another
speech admitting the Soviet Union is indeed an evil
empire. Apparently we would have to scrap unilat-
erally all Western defenses in order to encourage
Soviet development. Call rne a reactionary, a cold
warrior or whatever you like, but I still cannot
understand the strange logic: When the South Afri-
can government announces some reform of apart-
heid, we encourage them with sanctions; but when
the Soviet leaders talk about reforms, we are ex-
pected to give them everything they ask. How come
Mr. Botha became a villain while Comrade Gor-
bachev became a hero?"
There is no easy answer to such questions, merely
facile answers. Should Gorbachev be invited to ad-
dress both houses of Congress? Why not? He
wouldn't sound all that different from what the sons
and daughters of U.S. congressmen hear at school;
not so different from what they read, here and there
in the papers and magazines that set opinion-trends!
Where � as and example � have we recently read
a call to relax sanctions against South Africa in
response to the palpable reforms initiated by Botha?
Such recommendations aren't found in the big Four
(The New York Times, The Washington Post, Time,
Newsweek).
When Khrushchev first came here in 1959, it was
a very different story. There were those who be-
lieved that the successor to Stalin, the man who
ordered the tanks to run over the students in hun-
gary, ought not to receive extra-utilitarian hospital-
ity in the United States. If he was here to talk busi-
ness, let him talk business.
And in those days sentiment was pretty general in
that direction. Broadcasters, for instance, joined in
agreeing not to interview Khrushchev, on the
grounds that to do so would only give him further
opportunities to repeat the same old blasphemies.
(Only the late David Susskind departed from the
voluntary association, inviting him on his program,
"Open End) When Khrushchev addressed the
National Press Club and was asked to account for the
hungarian oppression, he shouted and raved and
denounced the questioners � and made sure the
question was not asked again.
On The Right
By
William F. Buckley Jr.
But these days, although changes within the
Soviet Union are negligible and they are still booby-
trapping children in Afghanistan, the way is paved
by suchas VladinurPosrierandthestableoi commu-
nists who apear on Ted Koppel's show to display
their arts of dissimulation. We know the kind of
rung Gorbachev will say, and although it is fantasy
to assume that he will refer to his empire as evil it is
instructive to speculate, as Bukovsky did the other
night, on what would be the reaction of our princes
of peace were he to do so. Let him speak, let him go
u 7lmd r�" there will be a fallout.
Batten down the hatches.
College re
(CPS) The College Repubii
cans, perhaps the best organized
campus political organization in
recent years, is reeling Factional-
ism, dim politics and allegations
of an ejection scandal have rocked
the College Republican National
Committee, and shaken up
state and campus chapters
At the venter of tl
Stockton Reeves, the group -
chairman who his critics
charge bullied opponents
win his position meddled in
campus Republican affairs
angered others by effect
aligning the group with presiden-
tial candidate ack Kemp
Reeves himself said the char
stem from a "witch hunt
Whatever the source, the
trouble in the College Republican
National Committee (CRN
could take it out ot t:
dential campaign
Ifs made officials � ftht Repub-
lican National Committee
which runs the main p
"leery" of enlisting th�
group's eampaign help, an in-
sider wh. asked to remain anony-
mous said. A "tension" r,
between the party an
wing, he added
"The infighting will dilute the
effectiveness ot the College Re-
publicans in 1988 sa : '
Carolina state College Rep
can chairwoman an Bunn The
detractors will continue tor v hat-
ever masochistic reason �
loud noises tor monkev reas
'This continued controversy
doesn't reflect positively or
state party said R. ohnson, the
political director or the Florida
Repubi
� he com
critics sa
statt S
tur.
which �
budget to
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recruit. I
Mor
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For an al
mation.
757-0001
CIA right to recru
WATERVILLE. MAINE (CPS
� Faculty members have no right
to try to keep Central Intelligence
Agency recruiters from coming to
Colby College, Colby's student
government unanimously de
clared Nov. 11
The controversy at Colby is
the latest development in a grow
tnfe'edMpus movement to bar the
fllA from using school'fadnties q
interview potential employees
The Colby faculty had voted 4
22 to bar the agency from inter-
viewing on campus. The tinai
decision on CIA recruiting will be
made by college trustees at their
January meeting
Roger Bo wen, a Colbv profes-
sor who supports the ban, said the
move was aimed at getting the
CIA to halt illegal covert activi-
ties. The faculty motion cited the
spy agenev's involvement in
Nicaragua, arms sales and illegal
domestic investigations as rea-
sons why Colby should ban it
"They violate American lau-
nobody disputes that, but what
do you do then?" Bowen asked
"You can either encourage them
by aiding them, or you can tell
them 'We can't stop you and we
can't reform you. but we sure can
stop aiding vou
But John McNinch, a student
government representative, said
the facultv was overstepping
their bounds" and "acting like
parents
"We're not defending the CIA
in anv way. We're ust defending
the rights of Colby College
McNinch said
"We don't feel the faculty have
the right, we don't fed thev
should be dictating to us who m e
should see or not see he said.
"Thev don t trust the moral judge-
ment oi students
The issue emerged after about
30 students and teachers pro-
tested the appearance of two CIA
recruiters m a day of interview s at
the Colbv s career services office
Similar protests have emerged
at several other schools across the
nation:
As the drama unfolded at
Colby, Southern Cal and Univer-
sity of Minnesota students pro-
tested the appeal anoe of CIA re-
cruiters or their campuses.
In October. anti-CIA protests
occured at Duke and the universi-
ties of California-Santa Barbara,
Iowa, Washington and Vermont
Students were arrested during the
conflicts at Santa Barbara. Iowa
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Shannon Morrow
Sophomore
orum
Congress
- anan oppression, he shouted and raved and
'enounced the questioners � and made sure the
n was not asked again.
On The Right
By
William F. Buckley Jr.
But these days, although changes within the
oviet Union are negligible and they are still booby-
happing children in Afghanistan, the way is paved
fcy suchas Vladimir Posner and the stable of commu-
nists who apear on Ted Koppel's show to display
Iheir arts of dissimulation. We know the kind of
Ining Gorbachev will say, and although it is fantasy
�o assume that he will refer to his empire as evil it is
istrucrive to speculate, as Bukovsky did the other
kight, on what would be the reaction of our princes
ff peace were he to do so. Let him speak, let him go
b Disneyland, but remember there will be a fallout
fatten down the hatches.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 3.1987
College republicans suffer internal conflicts
(CPS) The College Republi-
cans, perhaps the best organized
campus political organization in
recent years, is reeling. Factional-
ism, dirty politics and allegations
of an election scandal have rocked
the College Republican National
Committee, and shaken up some
state and campus chapters.
At the center of the storm is
Stockton Reeves, the group's
chairman who � his critics
charge � bullied opponents to
win his position, meddled in
campus Republican affairs and
angered others by effectively
aligning the group with presiden-
tial candidate Jack Kemp.
Reeves himself said the charges
stem from a "witch hunt
Whatever the source, the
trouble in the College Republican
National Committee (CRNC)
could take it out of the 1988 presi-
dential campaign.
It's made officials of the Repub-
lican National Committee
which runs the main party �
"leery" of enlisting the campus
group's campaign help, an in-
sider who asked to remain anony-
mous said. A "tension" now exists
between the party and its student
wing, he added.
"The infighting will dilute the
effectiveness of the College Re-
publicans in 1988 said North
Carolina state College Republi-
can chairwoman Zan Bunn. "The
detractors will continue, for what-
ever masochistic reason, to make
loud noises for monkey reasons
"This continued controversy
doesn't reflect positively on the
state party said R.j. Johnson, the
political director of the Florida
Republican Party.
The "controversy Reeves'
critics say, began during his 30-
state, $50,000 campaign to cap-
ture leadership of the CRNC,
which has a $500,000 annual
budget to coordinate campus
party activities around the U.S.
Reeves "cheated to win as-
serted Jim Arnonc, the former
chairman of the California Col-
lege Republicans. Arnone, now a
first-year law student at Harvard,
was "shocked at the type of things
Reeves did" during the cam-
paign.
Reeves, elected by a landslide at
the College Republican national
convention in June in Philadel-
phia, allegedly inflated the num-
ber of Florida College Republican
chapters and members to gain
additional delegates, his critics
say.
His opponents were threatened
and attacked during Reeves'
campaign for the chairmanship,
they claim. Sheri Lee Roe, a South-
ern Cal College Republican who
backed Reeves' opponent John
Hester, said she received death
threats from Reeves' camp.
"I was appalled at the dirty
politics although the Hester
camp engaged in similar behav-
ior, said Jim Egan, the Wyoming
state chairman.
Susan Brackin, the CRNC's
executive director, is upset by the
charges. Reeves' opponents
"must feel cheated somehow be-
cause they only received 24 per-
cent of the popular vote, losing in
the worst landslide in recent Col-
lege Republicans history
"I won with an overwhelming
majority of votes Reeves added.
A few extra delegates, he noted,
"wouldn't have made a differ-
ence" in the vote, which he won
by a resounding 99-deIegate mar-
gin.
But Andy Busch, a Colorado
college Republican who sup-
ported Hester, attributed the
impressive convention vote for
Reeves to a change in the order in
which states voted.
The change, which Colorado
CR Chairwoman Julie Johansen
said was made possible by
Reeves' ties to then-chairman
David Miner, accented Reeves'
strength in eastern chapters,
building a momentum that left
midwestern and western dele-
gates scrambling to associate with
a winner.
Opponents say Reeves also had
more strength in one of those
chapters � Florida's � than he
deserved, allegedly inflating the
number of College Republican
clubs on various state campuses.
The 22-year-old Reeves, who
served as Florida's state College
Republican chairman, submitted
a list of 30 Florida CR clubs to the
convention credentials commit-
tee, thus earning 8 delegates
when, his critics say, there should
have been only three.
"I was shown evidence that a
significant number of clubs were
not legitimate explained Gene
Taylor, a member of the June
convention's credentials commit-
tee and former national vice chair-
man.
Thomas Taulbee, head of the
University of Miami's CR chap-
ter, reports, "There are officially
CIA right to recruit argued at Colby
WATERVILLE, MAINE (CPS)
� Faculty members have no right
to try to keep Central Intelligence
Agency recruiters from coming to
Colby College, Colby's student
government unanimously de
clared Nov. 11.
The controversy at Colby is just
the latest development in a grow-
ing' ca'fripUs movement to bar (he
CIA frorri using school'fadtities to
interview potential employees.
The Colby faculty had voted 49-
22 to bar the agency from inter-
viewing on campus. The final
decision on CIA recruiting will be
made by college trustees at their
January meeting.
Roger Bo wen, a Colby profes-
sor who supports the ban, said the
move was aimed at getting the
CIA to halt illegal covert activi-
ties. The faculty motion cited the
spy agency's involvement in
Nicaragua, arms sales and illegal
domestic investigations as rea-
sons why Colby should ban it.
"They violate American laws,
nobody disputes that, but what
do you do then?" Bowen asked.
"You can either encourage them
by aiding them, or you can tell
them 'We can't stop you and we
can't reform you, but we sure can
stop aiding you
But John McNinch, a student
government representative, said
the faculty was "overstepping
their bounds" and "acting like
parents
"We're not defending the CIA
in any way. We're just defending
the rights of Colby College
McNinch said.
"We don't feel the faculty have
the right, we don't feel they
should be dictating to us who we
should see or not see he said.
"They don't trust the moral judge-
ment of students
The issue emerged after about
30 students and teachers pro-
tested the appearence of two CIA
recruiters in a day of interviews at
the Colby's career services office.
Similar protests have emerged
at several other schools across the
nation:
As the drama unfolded at
Colby, Southern Cal and Univer-
sity of Minnesota students pro-
tested the appeal ance of CIA re-
cruiters on their campuses.
In October, anti-CIA protests
occured at Duke and the universi-
ties of California-Santa Barbara,
Iowa, Washington and Vermont.
Students were arrested during the
conflicts at Santa Barbara, Iowa
and Vermont.
Eventsalmost turned especially
bloody at Vermont.
Vermont student Charley
MacMartin had arranged for an
interview with theCIA,intending
to throw a bag of blood at the
recruiter to protest the agency's
covert activities. But when the
Vermont student pulled out the
bag, the recruiter allegedly said
"If that blood goes anywhere, I'm
going to knock your front teeth
in MacMartin hit the recruiter
with a lecture about intellectual
integrity instead.
12 legitimate CR clubs in Florida
today
Officials from 10 of the other
campuses said they didn't have
CR chapters.
Reeves said they're confused.
"You're dealing with administra-
tive officials, and smaller schools
do not have a student union. It's
difficult to register a club, and if
they do, it's rare
"We do not require CR clubs to
be officially recognized by the
administration. All they have to
do is meet on campus and have a
faculty sponsor Reeves said.
However, the Florida College
Republican state constitution
says "a club may be chartered
only after a letter from an offi-
cial of the college or university
states that the members are stu-
dents
North Carolina's Bunn, who sat
on the convention's credentials
committee, says the CRNC some-
times waives the official recogni-
tion rule because leftist adminis-
trators often make it hard to regis-
ter a College Republican chapter.
Brackin said Reeves didn't list
many of the schools his critics
claim, adding some colleges have
several campuses � with seper-
ate CR chapters � listed under
one institution. Most of the
schools that said they had no
chapter, however, are one-cam-
pus institutions.
Since the election, bitterness
about the campaign and infight-
ing between supporters of Reeves
and Hester � now head of the
Mississippi state CRs � have dis-
rupted a number of state groups.
Still other Reeves critics are
upset by Reeves' close tics to Jack
Kemp (R-N.Y.), who is seeking
the Republican presidential
nomination.
Reeves recently toured Central
America with Kemp, whild David
Miner � Reeves' immediate
predecessor � now works for the
Kemp campaign in North Caro-
lina. Critics add "it's no secret"
the CRNC supports Kemp, al-
though the group is supposed to
remain neutral until the party
picks its candidate next summer
"I'm concerned said
Wyoming's Egan. "It's not right
that the College Republicans sup-
port one candidate over another
"You need to take stands
countered Bunn. 'There's noth-
ing wrong with calling a spade a
spade K
College Republican activists
credit themselves with drum-
ming up significant campus sup-
port for the ReaganBush cam-
paign in 1984.
Whether the "tension" between
the youth and adult wings of the
party, the CRNC's Kemp bias or
itsbitter infighting ultimately will
obbviate another "student vote"
in 1988 is not yet clear.
"It's the state and local chapters
that are important Colorado's
Johansen added. "If you have a
good state organization the
CRNC doesn't matter
Reeves worries that the recent
splits will. His critics, he said, are
"not hurting me, they're hurting
the organization. I hope over time
they will realize that they need to
grow up and put forth the best
interests of the party over their
own interests
"I think the whole thing is silly
said Johansen. "But we have a
new leader, and we need to sup-
port him
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THE EAST CARPI INJI am
DECEMBER 3. 1987
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
PERSONAL LIVE-IN Aid for hand!
capped person, in exchange for room and
board Very responsible adult Contact
Joy Foster at 746-3513 or 758-2399
HELP WANTED: Part-time help needed
Young man for sales and stix-k room
Must be anble to lift. Apply Dec 7-9 at the
Youth Shop, Carolina East Centre No
Phone Calls
BE ON TV-Many needed for commcr
cials. Children too. Casting info (1) 80V
687-6000 Ext. TV- 1166
ATTENTION LADIES. Are you tired of
no money for rent, clothes, food, or (ust
plain fun? For the things you want in life.
Misty Blue is now accepting apppika-
tions for possible employment. $250.00
per week guaranteed to the right lady
Call 746-9997 for appointment M-F from
10 a.m6 p.m.
RESIDENT COUNSELOR: Primarily
interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field. No monetary
compensation, however, room, utilities
and phone provided. Call Mary Smith at
the REAL Crisis Center 758-1IELP
FOR SALE
U2 U2 U2 U2 U2 U2 U2 U2 U2 U2 U2 U2
L'2 Ticket for sale. Call 756-6922.
BABYSITTERS needed occasionally
Must have experience and own transpor-
tation. Call 756-2684 before 9:00.
TROLL'S TUX AND TEES: Tired of
paying high prices for formal wear' Try
Troll's Tux and Tees for your formal
needs. Designer and Traditional styles
From S30 and up 7574007 or 758 0763.
3 ONE WAY TICKETS available; ,n time
for Christmas vacation With American
Airlines to DallasFt. Worth, Texas or
Seattle, Washington. $50.00 each Call
830-1386.
NEED TYPING? 757-0398. Call anytime
after a 00 p.m. Low rates include proof-
reading, spelling and grammatical cor
rections; professional service. 10 years
experience - IBM TYPING.
FOR SALE: ECU-Don't be white this
Christmas! Great special, and 15 off on
gift certificates for students! Call or come
by today, California Tanning Salon 355-
7858.
FOR SALE - Scuba Gear, "Oceanic" Black
Max console. Includes: depth gauge, pres-
sure gauge, bottom timer, max depth indi
catior Call 83a 1166 after 5:00 p.m.
FOR SALE - TWO BLACK CAR SEATS
THESE CHAIRS ARE MOUNTED FOR
USE IN YOUR APARTMENT OR
DORMROOM. MAKES A GREAT
CONVERSATION PIECE. ONLY $25
EACH. CALL DAN 758-4779.
FOR TYPING SERVICES: Call Kim be-
fore 5:00 p.m. at 758-1161 after 5:00 p.m at
758-2119. r
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24 hours
in and out. Guaranteed typing on paper up
to 20hand written pages. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(Beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
WORD PROCESSINGletter quality or
laser printing Rush jobs accepted. 752-
1933
FOR SALE: ECU Great Christmas special
and 15"c off on gift certificates for students
- The Best Tan In Town-California Tanning
Salon - 355-7858.
APPLIANCE SALE, washers, dryers,
ranges, refrigerators and freezers. Good
condition and guaranteed, call B 1. Mills at
746-2446.
CARTOON CARICATURES for Christ
mas! Call Barbour, 752-5910.
PROFESSIONAL BUT NOT
EXPENSIVE! Progressive Solutions, Inc
offers professional word processing to
students and professionals. Term papers,
dissertations, themes, reports and much
more as low as SI.75 per page. (Please call
for quote on your project.) Price includes
printing on high quality bond paper and
spelling venficaiton against a 50,000 word
electronic dictionary. Ask about our spe-
cial offers Laser printing now available
Call Mark at 757-3440 after 7:00 p m. for
tree information
TERM PAPERS - Thesis typed on IBM
word processor. Letter quality print. Pro-
fessional editing. Years of experience. Call
anytime and leave message or call after
3:00 Nanette Still well 1-524-5241. Cheap
call-best service! Pick up and delivery.
FOR SALE - 1980 Volkswagon Scirocco.
Good condition 5 speed, AC, amfm
Stereo Cassette. Call 758-0275 or 746-6682.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICES
758-8241 or 758-5488. Ask for Susan.
IS IT TRUE you can buy jeeps for $44
through the U.S. government? Cet the
facts today!Call 1-312-742-1142 Ext. 5271-
A.
FOR SALE: sofa, $50; dbl bed, $40 large
mauve carpet, $50. Call 752-7461. Moving
Dec 11 must sell
QUALITY WORD PROCESSING
$1 50page. Call 752 7461.
FOR SALE - 23" Ross 12 speed. 23 lbs.
Great Racer and all around bike 1 year
old! $175.00. Call Jay, 758-9326.
FOR RENT
mmmmmemfrwwwwemHB
ROOMMATE WANTED 2 bedroom
apt. with cable, phone, rent and utilities
included for $120.00 per month. Private
bedroom. Immediately - call Ben or Tim
at 830-0595. Located at 110-B Baker St.
Close to campus.
FOR RENT: 3 bedroom, East 5th Street
$425.00. Call 758-5742.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: To
share 2 bedroom apt. at Carnage I louse.
Rent is $285.00, security deposit ot
$150.00 required. Available spring
semester. Call Shannon at 355-7235
FEMALE ROOMATE NEEDED - To
share 2 bedroom apt Non-smoker; 12
of rent (167.50) & 1 2 uithties Available
anytime. Call 355-7269 or 551-2481 (af-
ternoons).
2 FEMALE ROOMMATES needed Tar
River Estates. Grad or upperclassman,
non-smoker 11375month, 75.00 de-
posit, own room, 14 utilities. Available
Dec. 15. 758-6614.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED for
next semester Large private room in 2
bedroom townhouse. S157.50month
and 12 utilities (usu. S25mo.) Free
heat. Close to campus, bus service avail
able. Call 758-6265.
1 OR 2 ROOMMATES WANTED for
Cedar Court Apartments. All appli
ances, rent based on single or double
occupancy. 112 from campus Bus serv-
ice. Call 757-0784.
RINGCOLD TOWERS: Apartments
for rent-furnished. Contact I lollie Si-
monowich at 752-2865.
APARTMENT FOR RENT (sublette)
single bedroom, $220.00 per month
Available January, month to month
contract available in May. Cable hook
up, laundry. ECU bus service River
Blutt Apartments. Call 752-0092.
TWO ROOMMATES: Needed to share
townhouse in Wildwood Villas. $135
month Call 752-4781 and ask for Julie
FOR RENT: Two bedroom apt. in
Ringgold Towers. Fully furnished, lo-
cated on 2nd floor with the laundry
room Available 1st of January through
July 31st Contact Kim or Wendy at 758
0400 aftei 2:00 p.m. or I lollie Si-
monowich at 758-2865.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a
large 2 bedroom apt excellent location
S175.00 per month, 12 utilities and 12
deposit Call 752 1793.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 3 bed-
ommPar,m.Cnt amon8 3 People
$1200month and 13 utilities 5 blocks
from campus, bus available. Washer
Dryer. Call Mike at 758-6912
APARTMENT: Large bedroom. V large
living room. Suit couple or roommates
Near campus. $290.00 per month All
conveniences. Available immediately
Phone 737-61066121. Ask for Nick.
FEMALE NEEDED for spring semester
to share a two-bedroom at Tar River Es-
tates apartment Will have a private room
for no extra cost! Rent ,s $114 per month
and 13 utilities. Call 758-9351
2, to
ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED: 1 o
share house, 12 block from campus.
51120month for one, S75.00month for
two. Non-smoker preferred Call 758-
5485.
SUB-LEASE for I bedroom and full bath
and kitchen. All furnished. 519 Ringgold
Towers. Must be subleased before spring
semester. Call John at 758-0643.
MATURE- MALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: Non-smoker $145 and 12
utilities. No deposit. Apartment in Tar
River Estates. Call Dan 752-6781.
MALE ROOMMATE: Two bedroom
Split 1 3 rent and utilities. Tar River Apts
105 Oak 4. Call Doug at 758-7952.
ROOMMATE WANTED - $120 per
month, 13 utilities - private room, shared
bath, non smokerdrinker,
now, call after 500 i
' p.m.
Available
355-3759.
PERSONALS
FREE BAHAMAS TRIP Come down to
the Elbo and register for a trip for two to
the Bahamas spring break. $1 tickets! Buy
yours today
M9C4WMK9
ANYBODY WHO'S ANYBODY knows
that the New Deli is where it JAMS! Catch
Mike Edwards on Thursday, Flip Side of
Friday and don't dare miss the Connells
on Saturday!
DESPERATELY SEEKING ESSEN-
TIALS OF BUSINESS LAW textbook If
found, please call Lisa at 752-7396.1 need
it for the final! REWARD!
R. MICHAEL HAYES: Congratulations
on your graduation. You have done an
awesome job as Phi Tau President and
I'm sure you'll do an excellent job work-
ing for Phi Tau Nationals. Good luck and
have a blast this weekend We'll all miss
you! Stay crazy Love Ya Amanda
TO ALL CREEKS : The ChiOs want to
wish ya'll good luck on your finals and
hope you have a safe, happy holiday.
JUDY BATES-Hey sweetie' Just wanted
to let you know that I'm here for you if
you ever need anything! You have done
so much for me - especially making
pledging SO MUCH FUN! DZ love,
Kathie.
KA'S: Find a date and get dressed up
'cause your little sister pledges are ready
to party. Save your energy this week and
let's have a radical Friday night. Love,
Your lil' sister pledges.
KAPPA ALPHA BROTHERS: Get PSY-
CHED for a superb Friday night 'cause
we're gonna have a blast. Love, Your lil'
sister pledges.
KAREN PREVOST - Had a blast with
you "immitating" Beth and NIkki - I
think we were pretty accurate, huh7"
Could we pay for this during "help
week"? Anyway . . heres to you Beth
and Nikki-we love you both so much!
You guys are great Big Sisters DZ love
Kath
JOHNNY: Hope you had a SUPER
Thanksgiving weekend. I'm really ex-
cited about having you as my big brother
We'll have a GREAT time Get PSY-
CHED for Friday night. Love, you lil' sis
Shelley T.
LEE B. - The game may be over but some
truths need to be talked about D.
ATTENTION PHI TAU little sister and
brothers: Good luck on finals I lave a
great weekend and get psyched for
Champagne Breakfast this Saturday We
all know what happens when vou mix
Phi Taus and champagne Let's end the
semester up nght See ya at the house
L.V. - This is to my roommate who's only
THE BEST. You've made my senior year
the "killerest 1 couldn't have done this
much if it wasn't for you There va
Halloween, Phi Tau, and champaign
with LA, SW, JP, and I'W, too As
semesters go, I could call this one nice, but
what I really mean to say is, "I've had Un-
tune of my life " "IBB" Stacey
NEED A SANTA? 1 do parties, dorn:
socials, or deliver gifts to a friend Call
Ask for
now, time is limited 758-9570
Dave
HEY DELTA ZETA! Just want
everybody good luck on finals and
youguysfora KILLER somest.Tut;
ing we've had a blast and are to .
forward to next semester Gel ps
there may be a Sister's Party y,in
when7! And, with who Just be read
rage. sometime . weLOV ,
Beta Pi's.
R. MIKE HAYES So. you'n
going to graduate from college
almost a man now 1 gj ,
moving on to bigger and bettei
NATIONALS! Mike, vou h
realize the true meaning of Brotl
Keep that chin up
Your Friend, James
RMH (alias Pepe Chatkim
time we've experienced toe
Tau is hard to sum up (Xir ti,
been special and will be verv mem
Remember the musical lott with oui
in the Annex' Good Luck' Se you
airport and at the top Pet,
SAE: Can't wait til tonight far our (
mas Bash! Be ready to PARTY u
9:00 at 208th E CthSt Zeta
YO ADRIAN -Wild Kingdom is
Attic on Thursday and IBM on I
Lets keep the party going between -
at my piace.
BRUCE, Bruce, Bruce. Bm
Bruce, Bruce, Bruce, Bruce Bt
Bruce, Bruce, Bruce. Bru
Bruce, FRYE at Grogs V
ber 7
BEST DEAL IN TOWN S2 � leas
Schooners for a buck, tree pizza
600-700 pm, and a ma :
home at OFF THE CUFF
MOM, DAD, TED & CRH, Mem
Christmas! Can't wait to come home for
the holidays! Love, Bids.
ATTENTION All Mill!n I
of 1985. Trying to get a reunion
for Dec. 18 in Raleigh Call 758 77
len) if you are interested Net I
how many people can attend Si :
word
SeeCLASSIFIEDS page 7
MNMMNMB
S � xa
CHRISTMAS SPECIAL!
$49.eQ
ae
m

s
I
s
s
s
I

Join The Spa now and re-
ceive a student membership
at an all time low of $49. As
an added bonus, to every
new member, The Spa will
give a free tanning member-
ship, valued at $55.00.
Limited Time Offer.
The Spa is only offering
this Christmas Special until
the end of December. Take
advantage of these 1987
prices NOW, because as of
January, 1988 they are
going to increase.
A Next Semester Mem-
bership at 1987 prices.
When you buy your mem-
bership to The Spa before
January 1, 1988 you will be
entitled to exercise at 1987
rates.
You won't believe what
The Spa offers.
With your membership you
can take advantage of our
exercise-aerobic classes, The
Wolfe Tanning System, Dy-
nacam equipment, York
Olympic weights, and dum-
bells from 3-100 pounds.
if
m
h
Give your body a thorough
workout then relax in the
whirlpool, sauna, steam
room, plus private showers
and dressing rooms. You'll
love the way you look!
All this and a tanning
membership FREE!
17-
Greenville's
best health club value.
SOUTH rAKKSIIOIMMNCICI-NlTk
GKEKNVILLE 7567991
MNNNKMHMNM
X
I
Ann
HOMECOMING
Application- are now being ho
for the position of Student rlomecomui
Committee Chairperson Vou must hi
enrolled in school full time with a 2
to apply Call Leslie Council at 7
for more information
ACCOUNTING 50CM It
The Accounting Society s
dinnermeeting will be hi
at 6.00 p.m at die Sheraton li
per pe son Turn in moi
Jill in the Accounting
Thursday, December 5 I testa
couraged to attend
HONORS ORGANIZATION
OnThursdjv
an ECHO
part) extravaganza � -
1 lonor- Lounge in I
(present and future, sh
SENIOR COUNCIL
Photo session for December .
Look for time and pia . onfl
around campus
ECLCOSPiL CHOIR
The ECU Cospi . -
$50.00 Christmas give awjv
$50 and can be purchased j:
store from Novernba - N -
The drawing will bi
cember 4
MOD! 1ING
The school of art has post I �-
models during the
$5J� per hour. Apply no
m the spring
IIV
be a
94 at
on Tuesda.
Clas
Continued from page b
CHI OMEGAS - Good luck on vour
finals! hope ya'll have i great holiday
See ya in January! love, Maria & Shan
JIMMY JO BOB It was a Frida
believe that vou and I had a date It m a
truely a treat, the event was go neat, the
night was unforgettably great In dress
mess and gown we took on the h �: b)
the end of the night we were �
drunks You were dared t so dtake
a midnight dip, 100 bucks without the
trunks Cime vour reply and not a whim-
pering cry - 1 lev Jen how bout m
Guess thats it you little pilot - maybe
some other dav Love Jen.
CHUCK, BARRV ROB, AND STAO
request vour presence at Fndav � Tea
Party at OFF THE CUFF They say this
new batch of tea is "awesome free pa
is great too
ELBO presents the 21 st annual Christmas
Party at Elbo Male Dancers on Wednes
day - 900 p m til 1 00 am SI 00 drink
specials, guys in at 1100 Laciies free til
"Owithmembership guestladiesSI I
Prizes all night plus a gra: d iw-
mg for S50.00.
ATTENTION ALL MALE CREEKS:
The first annual Best Male Greek Body
Contest is being held at the Elbo Mondaj
night December 7 by the Phi kappa Tau
hi' sisters First place is SI00.00 Contest-
ants win b) the best crowd res:vsc
Each male that enters the contest �rill also
receive tree drinks that evening Good
iuck and bnr.g s crowd.
CHRISTINE HOCAV ADAM
BLANKENSHIP. VVekorne to the Tjs-
Carohnian 1 lave a groat holiday & be
ready to work &. have fun when you get
back - Jimmv
PART ALL NIGHT - SLEEP ALL
DAV Parts at the Elbo Monday Come
and see the best looking Creek bodies and
vou, the audiance, get to pick the win-
ners. Everyone is invited
SIG EPS - find a date, because Monday
night is going to be a blast Partv :
sun rises cause we hac no
Tues. BOBGD.
BRIAN M. AND JAMES R. This
semester has been a blast with whj gu) 9
Good luck on finals Love va - Fred
ATTENTION ALL GREEKS: Beat Greek
Male Body Contest this Monde) Dec 7 at
?bo. It's the night betore Reading Dav -
no classes the net dav - no excuses See
ya at the Elbo Great drink specials
I WOULD LIKE TO WISH ALL OF THE
EAST CAROLINIAN ADVERTISING
STAFF A VERt MERRt X-MAS & A
HAPPY NEW EAR THANK OU
ALL FOR A VERt PRODUCTIVE &
SUCCESSFUL SEMESTER. - JIMMY
McKEE.
THE SIG EPS Would like to wish all
greeks a Men v Chnsmas and a 1 lappv
New Year
PHI TAU LITTLE SISTERS: Don t for
get champagne breakfast thus Sat 5 00 at
the Phi Tau house Also, be at the Elbo
Monday nigtht at 8 00 for the Greek Bodv
Contest. Next hi' sister meeting is Tues-
day Dec. 8 at 5.00. All money is due This
meeting is MANDITOK't Please make
plans to attend
DEBBIE STEVENS Have a great X mas
4 a happy New Year Thanks for all vour
help this semester Jimmv
JAMES RUSSa From bad batteries to
bad tires, to soccer and volleyball games,
from my dectriatv being cut off, to just
dealing with me You are the greatest big
bro and I love you. So here's to wishing
you a very HAPPY earlv birthday! But
ftr let py am 1 at cham-
pagne breakfast. Good-luck on you fi-
nals. And thanks for tust being YOU'
Love Ya - me.
Tuesday nie, i It really helped out Mike
SIG I
LOUNGE
TO BETH l I
MICHELL1
of Chi Or
SIG EPS
Edo I
TO AIL
OBCAN1ZA1
have
AnUnl
introduci
Clark Gallery
Weveaddedanur
of posters-a asr I
art posters as weill
printed posters wlf
any room decor a
OPEN THU1
SALE EN�





h S NYBOD" kn
ss
the k
semesl
what 1 realh
time ot rm li
couldn't have done this
i'I tor you There was
Iju. and champaign
! P and P VV . too. As
i.id v all this one nice, but
say is, "I've had the
MIP SANTA7 i do parties, dorm
gifts to a friend Call
nets 58-9570 Ask for
Ml i PI I I V I ! -V
st wanted to wish
i finals and thank
cmeshaofplodg
ind arc looking
i i-t psyched
� rj soon, but
usl be ready to
LOVI u" Ihe
finally
You're
mil t
tnings
�ade me
erhood
latkin): rhc long
Ihcr in l'h,
kir friendship has
rv memorable
with our gals
- Se you in the
I ernald.
I oui Oirist
. VRTV around
'i lau Alpha
m is at the
M on Friday
between shows
ruce, Bruce
Bruce, Bruce
� Bruce
Vcem
I OWN $2.00 Teas,
� free pizza from
son iar to take
v c.KIG: Merry
� to come home for
graduates
�n together
d Spread the
I "is 11 11 P S
page 7
IAL!
r bodv a thorough
then relax in the
�1, sauna, steam
us private showers
?sing rooms. You'll
way you look!
is and a tanning
ship FREE!
&
&
m
� '
i
M !
9
mi
i
i

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�P
8
1
I
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Greenville's
best health club value.
H TlirAKKSHOIMMNCU-NTI-k
GKEKNVILLE 7567991
?��W��g�Jgm�m;
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 3,1987
Announcements
HOMECOMING
Applications are now being accepted
,r the position of Student Homecoming
jxrtmittee Chairperson. You must be
i in school full time with a 2.2 CI'A
) Call Leslie Coundl at 752-8070
i more information.
ACCQUNTXN(i5QCJ�J
Accounting Society's December
meeting will be held December 7
I - 00 p m at the Sheraton Inn. Cost is $15
. in Turn in money and name to
tn the Accounting Dept. office by
-in. December 3 Guests are en-
igcd to attend
M QNORS ORGAMZATION
i rhursday, December3, there will be
HO business meeting-wrap up-
v!ravagan.a at 5:00 p.m. in the
ors 1 ounge in Ragsdale All members
� iit and future) should be there!
SENIOR COUNCIL
to session for December graduates
� k tor time and place on fivers posted
round campus
I CU GQSPELCHQIR
Ihe IXU CospeJ Choir is sponsoring a
� Christmas give away. Tickets are
and can be purchased at the student
. re trom November 30 - December 4
1 drawing will be held on Friday. De-
4
MODELINn
l"he school ot art has positions open tor
odcls during the spring semester at
10 per hour Apply now to begin work
' ' spring
FINTESSTFST
There will be a motor and physical fit-
ness test at Minges Coliseum at 1:00 p.m.
on Tuesday, December 8,1987. A passing
score on this test is required of all students
prior to declaring physical education as a
major. Students wishing to take this test
that have a medical condition should con-
tact Dr. Israel or mike McCammon at 757-
6497.
ILOISA
The International Language Organiza-
tion, LL.O, and the International Student
Association, ISA cordially invite all of
its members and international students to
a holiday party that will take place on
Sunday, December 6 at 7:00 p.m. - 9:00
p m. at the International I louse, 306 E. 9th
Street.
TEC
The Teaching Effectiveness Committee
in conjunction with Faculty Senate and
the Office of Academic Affairs is offering
instructive video taping to all ECU faculty
members and a teaching staff. A new
media service, lecture video taping de-
signed to assist faculty in evaluating their
teaching effectivenes. TEC is a senate
committee charged with the identification
and development of faculty teaching ef-
fectiveness and with the promotion of
teaching excellence Interested parties
should contact the Faculty Senate Office.
NOW
The Greenville chapter of the National
Organization for Women will hold its
monthly meeting at Chico's restaurant at
7:00 p.m. on Monday, December 7. We
will discuss and plan upcoming actions as
well as celebrate the semester's end and
the holiday season. Students especially
welcome. Please bring a gift for a child,
suitable wrapped, to be donated to the Pitt
County Family Violence Center. For more
information, call 756-1018.
PIVE CLUB
If you enjoy scuba diving and snorkel-
ing, then you need to join ECU's Coral
Keef Dive Club. For more information,
call Glenn or Rob at 752-4399.
SUBIECTS NEEDED
The ECU clinical psychology program
needs children, ages 6-15 to volunteer for
intelligence testing. This is to assist in the
training of MA. level students. A limited
amount of feedback will be given. Inter-
ested people can contact Dr. Larry 1 lines
at the Department of psychology, 757-
6800.
SAM
Attention SAM members. All members
must pick up doughnuts on Friday, De-
cember 4 from 3:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. in
Rawl 105.
OVERSEAS DEV.
There will be a meeting on Thursday,
December 3, at 4:00 p.m. in Speight Build-
ing, R 151. Topic: Honduras - A Personal
Experience. Slides and discussion. Every-
one interested is invited to attend.
MUCIC LISTENING
Job vacancies available for spring
semester. Morning hours available as well
as other shifts. Contact Lynn in the pro-
gram office, Mendenhall Student Center,
757-6611.
Classifieds
Continued from page 6
( Ml OMEGAS - Good luck on your
finals! hope ya'll have a great holiday.
See a in January! love, Maria & Shari.
IMM JO BOB-It was a Friday eve, I do
believe that you and 1 had a date. It was
truelv a treat, the event was so neat, the
� was unforgettably great. In dress
nd gown we took on the town, bv
: the night we were a couple ot
drunks on were dared to strip and take
a midnight dip 100 bucks without the
trunk1- Came your reply and not a whim-
pering crv I ley len how bout no vvj
Guess thats it you little pilot - maybe
some other dav I uv e, Jen
CUL i K, BARRY, ROB, AND STACY
request your presence at Friday's Tea
Patty ai vii HECUFF. They say this
lew batch � tea is "awesome free pia
- gr .it k-ki
11 BO presents the 21st annual Christmas
ar! al Elba Male Dancers on Wedncs-
r. iK) pm. til 100 a.m. SI 00 drink
ils, guvs in at 11:00 Ladies free til
; � :th membership, guest ladies$1.00
- all night plus a grand prize draw-
� r $50.00
MTFNTION ALL MALE GREEKS:
rst annual Best Male Greek Bodv
: test is being held at the Dbo Monday
� : December 7 by the Phi Kappa Tau
sisters. First place is S100.00 Con test-
u ts win bv the best crowd response
�.ale that enters the contest will also
ceive free drinks that evening. Good
- and bring 2 crowd.
t-HRISTINE HOGAN, ADAM
Bl WKENSHIP. Welcome to the East
ilinian Have a groat holiday & be
� ad) to work & have fun when you get
r limmv.
PART! ALL NIGHT - SLEEP ALL
OAY. Party at the Elbo Monday Come
md see the best looking Greek bodies and
the audiance, get to pick the Win-
ers Everyone is invited.
SIC FPS - find a date, because Monday
light is going to be a blast. Party 'till the
�-un rises 'cause we have no classon
Fues. BYOBGD.
BRIAN M. AND JAMES R. - This
semester has been a blast with you guys
,�d luck on finals. Love ya - Fred
TTENTION ALL GREEKS: Best Greek
Male Bodv Contest this Monday Dec. 7 at
Ibo It's the night before Reading Day -
no classes the next day - no excuses. See
� a at the Elbo. Great drink specials.
1 WOULD LIKE TO WISH ALL OF THE
EAST CAROLINIAN ADVERTISING
STAIF A VERY MERRY X-MAS & A
HAPPY NEW YEAR. THANK YOU
ALL FOR A VERY PRODUCTIVE &
SUCCESSFUL SEMESTER. - JIMMY
McKEE.
THE SIC EPS Would like to wish all
greeks a Merry Chrismas and a 1 lappy
New Year.
PHI TAU LITrLE SISTERS: Don't for-
get champagne breakfast this Sat. 5:00 at
the Phi Tau house. Also, be at the Elbo
Monday nigtht at 8:00 for the Greek Body
Gntest Next hT sister meeting is Tues-
day Dec. 8 at 5.00. All money is due. This
meeting is MAND1TORY Please make
plans to attend.
DEBBIE STEVENS- Have a great X-mas
& a happy New Year. Thanks for all your
help this semester - Jimmy.
JAMES RUSSO: From bad batteries to
bad tires, to soccer and volleyball games,
from my electricity being cut off, to just
dealing with me You are the greatest big
bro and 1 love you. So here's to wishing
you a very HAPPY early birthday! But
i let's party our faces off at Cham-
pagne breakfast. Good-luck on you fi-
nals. And thanks for just being YOU!
Love Ya - me.
Tuesday nic. �. It really helped out. Mike.
SIC EPS - Merry Christmas and have a
safe, but drunk New Year's eve. See you
in NY.
THE STAFF AT OFF THE CUFF
LOUNGE would like to wish the ECU
students a merry Christmas and a happy
New Year
TO BETH, JULIE, JAMIE, SUSAN, &
MICHELLE: just wanted to wish you
good luck and hope ya'll stay in touch.
We love you! Love, the sisters & pledges
of Chi Omega.
SIC EPS - Congratulations to the newly
elected Executive Board. President, Chris
Townsend, Vice President, Chuck De-
loatche; Comptroller, Alan White;
Alumni Director, Mick Romanek; Re-
cording Secretary, Jeff Emerson, Pledge
Educator, Mike Wvles. Hope you have a
su' ocaftd term - The out-going Exc.
Board
TO ALL GROUPS OR
ORGANIZATIONS who would like to
have their photo included in the year-
book, please contact the Bucaneer office
at 757-6501 Please give at least 1 weeks
notice and leave the following info: Date,
time, place, group name and a contact
with a phone number. Thanks!
SIGMASSIG EPS - The pj-pj party is
here! Grab those pj's, drink that r� and
watch out for the mistletoe. This is going
to be scary.
MARIA BELL: I've seen you in the night,
so fine. I think that we should spend
some time Having wine by candlelight;
and pondering "should he stay the
night?" I'd call you if you'd only hang on
long enough to give up that thang I mean
that, sincerely, P.M.
TYPESETTERS - Thanks for your help
and hard work this semester. Have a
good holiday break. Mike.
TO PEZ & ERNUL ST. - I'll miss you
guys. The parties were great Pez, hope-
fully you'll be ?!le to get out of town
soon. Watch uu. for those tools. I love
you, Les.
Monday, December 7th
n?
Bruce Frye
An Unbelievable Gallery Of
POSTEKS
We have both
framed and
unframed 1
posters I
anyone of which
would make a
lasting g�t for
someone special.
introducing our new Poster Gallery
Clark Gallery has expanded
We ve added an unbelievable gallery
of posters-a vast inventory or fine
art posters as well as popular
printed posters which will enhance
any room decor And of course we
always offer custom framing or do-
it-yourself framing that will make
your poster look like an expensive
work of art
Come see the many forms of art
and our new exclusive poster gallery
'CLARK
OPEN THURSDAY NIGHTS TIL 9PM
SALE ENDS NOVEMBER 22. 1987
646 Arlington Blvd In The Shops of Arlington Village
CORALRFFFniVFrillTI
Final meeting this semester Thursday,
December 3 in Room 221 Mendenhall 8:00
p m. The X-Mas party will be discussed
along with future dives. Everyone is in-
vited
ALPHA PHI AIPHA
The Eta Nu Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha
will have a Founder's Day dance at the
Cultural Center on Friday December 4
from 10:00 p.m2:00 a.m. All persons
wearing black and gold admitted free.
Black or gold half price. Admission is $1 00
Proceeds to aid the UNCF. $250 raffle
drawing at 12.00.
ALPHA PHI ALPHA
Alpha Phi Alpha will have a dance at
the Unlimited Touch Night Club on
Thursday, December 3. Proceeds will aid
our United Negro College Fund Scholar-
ship Drive. Admission is $1.00 with ID.
ALPHA PHI ALPHA
You can win up to $250.00 in a raffle to
aid the United Negro College Fund. Tick-
ets are $1.00 and can be purchased at the
bookstore or from and Alpha Phi Alpha
brother or LBC through Friday December
4.
Sigma Sigma Sigma and Pitt County M.A.D.D.
Invite You To A
m
W ((l,f

December 8, 1987 at 7:00 p.m.
Jcuvis Memorial United Methodist Church
510 S. Washington Street
Greenville. NC
Please Join Us
gason s
I would like to wish each
and every member of the
advertising staff a very
Merry Christmas and a
Happy New Year Thank
you for making this past
year a huge success.
Sincerely,
James F. J. McKee
P.S. Lets Make this holiday a safe one. I'll
see all of you Sunday, January 3rd.
� m m� m in�- nfi-oi wMfwx
� � W�i





I
8
THE EAST CARPI INI am
DECEMBER 3, 1987
ruisewarc.wg
Activists harass cruise missile
LONDON (AP) - - When the
last U.S. cruise missile convoy
trundles through the English
countryside, a dedicated band of
anti-nuclear protesters will be
lying in wait, maintaining an
unbroken record of harassment
and planning more of the same.
"We won't be out of a job says
Ian Lee, a veteran of nearly four
years of crawling through barbed
wire, evading searchlights and
hiding in the woods to stage
demonstrations against the U.S.
nuclear presence in Britain
Thecruisc missiles are duo to be
eliminated under a US-Soviet
arms treaty that President Reagan
and Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev plan to sign at next week's
superpower summit. The accord
provides for the elimination of
cruise and other land-based inter-
mediate-range nuclear missiles
over three years.
But 97 percent of the world's
nuclear armaments remain, and
Europe's anti-nuclear groups say
they intend to keep up the pres-
sure.
"We'll moveon to the substitute
weapons they'll try to bring in
said Lee, 42, a key organizer of
Cruisewatch, a loosely knit group
whose most spectacular exploits
have been ambushing and forcing
cruise missile convoys to a halt,
spraying paint on the giant
launchers and climbing into the
cabs.
An offspring of Britain's Cam-
paign for Nuclear Disarmament,
Cruisewatch says it will monitor
the withdrawal of weapons under
the U.SSoviet treaty and then
turn its attention to sea and air-
launched nuclear missiles that it
says British Prime Minister Mar-
garet Thatcher will accept from
Washington.
Thousands rallied to protest the
deployment of the cruise missiles
in five Western European coun-
tries starting with an airlift to
Greenham Common on Nov 14
1983.
By contrast, the missiles' sched-
uled departure over three years is
BYU tries to recover stolen art
(CPS) � In return for a sus-
pended sentence delivered last
week and a fine of $1,000, a New
York art dealer will help Brigham
Young University recover art sto-
len from its collection during a
period oi 10years.
BYU accepted the cooperation
of Dion Oyatt because recovery of
the artwork, particulary two
sketches by Winslow Homer and
one by Claude Monet, "is more
important than punishment
likely to be anti-climactic.
Government officials say the
anti-nuclear movement had no
effect in leading the superpowers
to agree to eliminate the missiles.
Rather, they say, it was NATO's
determination to deploy the
weapons in Europe that moved
Moscow to negotiate.
Lee disagrees. "We can't quan-
tify it, a quarter or three-quarters,
but we have been a part of bring-
ing about this agreement he said
in an interview at the Campaign
for Nuclear Disarmament's Lon-
don headquarters.
"What we've done is to stop the
secrecy and therefore the military
logic of having these weapons
said Lee.
Not once, Cruisewatch says,
has a convoy managed to slip
undetected from the U.S. missile
base at Greenham Common, 50
miles west of London, on one of its
supposedly secret exercises.
The maneuvers, without nu-
clear warheads, have been held
about once a month on the 90,000-
acre Salisbury Plain in southwest-
ern England, site of the ancient
Stonehenge monument and 40
convoys
miles from Greenham Common.
As the quarter-mile-long con-
voys of four launchers, two con-
trol vehicles, up to 16 support
vehicles and British police escorts
roll out of Greenham, usually at
night, Cruisewatch goes into ac-
tion.
Alerted by telephone and two-
way radios, protesters converge
on the convoy incars, blocking the
road or darting between a
launcher and the police escorts.
U.S. military officials refuse to
comment on the activities of
Cruisewatch, which maintains a
network of hundreds of support-
ers in the south of England. Sol-
diers are under orders not to
touch or speak to the protesters,
but just sit in their vehicles while
British police haul the demonstra-
tors away.
A Cruisewatch lead ambush by
100 protesters who halted a con-
voy for an hour in November 1986
promoted a warning by Armed
Forces Minister John Stanley that
in wartime anyone obstructing
missile deployments would be
shot on sight.
New Location
1 Day Service
On Most BtFocal Prescriptions
We Can Make Arrangements To
1 lave Your Eyes Examined Today!
Evening Appointments Available.
752-1446
Christmas Specials
B&L Ray Ban Metal
Sunglasse.
T
I
Single Vision Lenses
1295l
B&L Ray Ban Wayfarer
$3195
. x MC mm m
' Prescription Is phis or mtnua) �
I 4 OO �pherr to 2 OO cylinder
OveT�ttrd Wnoco and tin la Ktna'
pttenTandLadles Plastic
Frames with Single
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!0-0$39
I
L
95
Proacrption lopkj or mnui 00 iprwra
10 2.00 cyfcndoi
�&HUOO) nt� and tints oxlra.
CLEA. VUE OPTICIANS!
2484 SUntonburg Road. Stacton Square. Greenville. H.C.
1 Discount Per Pair of Glasses - Hours: 9:00 to 6.00 lion. - Pri
Later Hours By Appointment
5 Locations To Serve You in Kinston. Goldsboro.
Wilson and Two in Greenville.
fghanist
BVL lawyer Bill Fillmore ex-
plained.
About 40 of the stolen pieces
have been returned to BYU, but
Fillmore said civil and criminal
charges may be filed to recover
the 200-300 pieces of significant
value still missing.
RYU discovered the thefts from
its 15,000-piece collection after
tips that some of its art was show-
ing up in different places around
the country.
Court rules on gay rights at Georgetown
J A selection kj
that'll knock gf
your stocking off.
WASHINGTON, DC. (CPS) -
In what has long been seen as a
major case for collegiate Rays, the
District of Columbia Court of
Appeals ruled Nov. 20 that Catho-
lic Georgetown University docs
not have to gTant student gay
groups official recognition.
The court did say Georgetown
must give homosexual groups the
same privileges � generally use
of campus meeting rooms � it
gives other student groups.
Gay groups sued Georgetown
for recognition in 1980, after
Georgetown officials refused to
give them official status because
Catholic doctrine condemns
homosexuality.
Emory blacks angry
about denied tenure
(CPS) � Evidence of wide-
spread black student impatience
with the pace of integration on
college campuses continued to
mount in November at Emorv
University in Atlanta and the
University of California at
Berkeley.
At Emory, black students were
angered by the school's decision
to deny tenure to Prof. Sondra
O'Neale, the only black teacher in
Emory's School of Arts and Sci-
ences and the first professor de-
nied tenure there since 1981.
About 450 students attended a
rally organized by O'Neale sup-
porters to protest what they called
overt and covert sexism and ra-
cism at the school.
O'Neale's supporters say she
was denied tenure because of her
race and gender. A faculty review
committee recommended
O'Neale not be granted tenure on
the basis of her scholarship and
research.
School officials say Emory,
which in 1962 became the first
private Georgia college to inte-
grate, has made significant strides
in recruiting black students and
faculty members. In 1980, 23 of
Emory's 949 faculty members
were black. This year, 41 of 1,022
faculty members are black.
In 1980, Emory officials say, less
than one percent of the tenured
faculty was black, compared to
four percent in 1987.
At Berkeley, more than 500
marched to Chancellor Ira
Heyman's office to blame the
general campus atmosphere for a
series of racial incidents � the
most recent being an Oct. 20 letter
to the African Students Associa-
tion headed "Dear Nigger" � and
to ask for better counseling to help
minority students stay in college.
Minority students at Tomp-
kins-Cortland Community Col-
lege in New York, the universities
of Pennsylvania, Texas, Indiana
and Illinois, among others, have
complained of racial insensitivity
on their campuses this fall.
Georgetown, as a private uni-
versity, argued it wasn't covered
by a Washington, D.C law that
forbids discrimination on the
basis of sexual preference.
But last week Judge Julia Coo-
per Mack disagreed, saying the
local law did cover Georgetown.
She added the school didn't
have to grant the Gay People of
Georgetown Unitersity or theGW
Right Coalition of Georgetown
Law School official status, How-
ever, because it would imply
Georgetown endorsed gays' life-
styles.
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WASHINGTON AP) -
ikhail Gorbachev says he wants
, pull his troops out of Afghani -
an, but the United States wants
�ore than a promise It is looking
bra specific timetable, preferably
Lrhen the Soviet leader calls on
resident Reagan next week.
The dispute over Afghanistan
- one of the biggest barruTs to
etter U.SSoviet relations � has
en the subject of more presum-
it maneuvering than any issue
iccept arms control.
Gorbachev said this week the
hole Afghanistan problem
juld be settled "quickly" if the
Jnited States and the' Sov
could workl
Najibulla
president
ally suggest
months for
estimated
the country
At the co
was a willinj
troops as lor
agTeed to
tance to Aft
that hau u
to bring
I
month timJ
duct'd it the!
eagan plans to
orbachev at Wt
WASHINGTON (AP) - Presi-
lent Reagan is willing to sign a
historic arms control accord with
fie Soviets, but says he won't be
jled into believing in a renewed
a of detente.
Reagan also is laughing off
-viet leader Mikhail
srvachev's network television
iterview this week, the opening
llvo in a pre-sumrrut propa-
inda blitz.
"I don't resent his popularity or
lything else � Good Lord, Ico-
arred with Errol Flynn once
eagan said Tuesday.
However, the president will
Vail himself of a similar forum by
ping an interview with four
Jtwork anchormen for broad-
est this evening. CBS, ABC, NBC
id Cable News Network will
irticipate, said presidential
Dkesman Marlin Fitzwater
eagan, who is under attack
m conservatives opposed to
U.SSoviet treaty banning
dium-range missiles, de-
ided his arms control policv
Airing a trip Tuesday to Jackson-
ville, Fla.
i
He a i
repression
abroad It
by Rea. j
vat.
dropp rj
toward the
he plans
with GorbJ
week's sumj
ington
"In the exl
rrut, the treal
rest, wemuj
mea ns i I
nor J
Jacksonville!
and their pal
Hesaidhe
warming of
more than
dubbed the
Soviets.
but also "w
the largest
world hi
"The stet
sion arouiK
bee ne mj
home Real
The presidl
Soviet citizens to toi
'arolina during su
)URHAM (AP) � When
nald Reagan and Mikhail Gor-
iev sit down to sign a nuclear
s-control agreement at their
kmmit meeting in Washington
pt week, most of the world will
! watching.
By coincidence, as the two lead-
i are discussing affairs of state,
Soviet citizens will be touring
arts of North Carolina as part of
U.SU.S.S.R. Bridges of Peace
pgram.
They aren't likely to attract
early as much attention as Re-
gan and Gorbachev. But in their
way, they and their hosts
elieve they are doing their part to
y to make life in the nuclear age
I bit more secure.
'It just happened that the visit
Coincides with the summit said
e Rev. Richard Edens of the
Jnited Church of Chapel Hill,
ne of the coordinators of the
)viet visit.
"But it is a nice little parallel. We
fught to look at it as citizen diplo-
acy. The more such visits that
r�re possible, the more we'll be
(ible to ameliorate some of the
ative feelings we get from
:me of our leaders Edens told
he Durham Sun.
The 11 Soviets, only one of
horn has ever visited the United
ptates before, will arrive in the
krea Monday and will spend
tuch of their time with host fami-
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THE EAST CAROLfNlAN
DECEMBER 3 1987
Afghanistan: Reagan tells Soviets to pull out
WASHINGTON! t &r �ii . .
WASHINGTON (AP)
Mikhail Gorbachev says he wants
�� pull his troops out of Afghani-
stan, but the United States wants
more than a promise. It is looking
tor a specific timetable, preferably
when the Soviet leader calls on
president Reagan next week.
The dispute over Afghanistan
- one of the biggest barriers to
better U.SSoviet relations � has
been the subject of more presum-
tnit maneuvering than any issue
ex.vpt arms control.
Gorbachev said this week the
whole Afghanistan problem
could be settled "quickly" if the
I nited States and the Soviets
could work out an agreement.
Najibullah, the Soviet-backed
president of Afghanistan, actu-
ally suggested a timetable � 12
months for the withdrawal of the
estimated 115,000 Soviet forces in
the country.
At the core of their statements
wasa willingness to withdraw the
troops as long as the United States
agreed to stop providing assis-
tance to Afghan resistance forces
that have used Western weapons
to bring down the Soviet and
Afghan Army troops.
Najibullah also said the 12-
month timetable could be re-
duced if the rebels would agree to
a cease-fire, an offer not likely to
be taken up by resistance forces
that have been fighting since So-
viet troops entered the country in
December 1979.
The United States responded to
the Soviet and Afghan proposals
with a simple message: set a date
for withdrawal.
"Pack up, pull out and go
home Reagan said Monday in a
speech to conservative support-
ers. "It's time they set a date cer-
tain for the complete withdrawal
of all trops from Afghanistan
Both sides have come a long
way since the November 1985
summit in Geneva when Reagan
first met Gorbachev and made his
first personal appeal for a Soviet
withdrawal from Afghanistan.
The Afghan struggle became a
global issue in December 1979
when Soviet Army forces inter-
vened on behalf of Moscow
backed politicians in Kabul.
Since then, resistance forces
aided by the United States, Paki-
stan and China have been battling
the Soviet divisions and Afghan
Army units in a classic guerrilla
war that gives the Soviets control
of the big cities while the resis-
tance forces operate with consid-
erable freedom in parts of the
Reagan plans to 'talk tough' with Mikhail
Gorbachev at Washington summit next week
countryside.
Private and State Department
analysts credit the resistance's
success to Usability to shoot down
Soviet airplanes and helicopters
with anti-aircraft arsenals that
include sophisticated U.S. Stinger
missiles.
The inability of the Soviet forces
to crush the resistance � drawing
comparisons between the inabil-
ity of American soldiers to defeat
Viet Cong and North Vietnamese
forces in the 1960s and 1970s � has
been accompanied in recent
months by settlement talks spon-
sored by the United Nations.
The outline of a peace plan in-
cludes the following major
elements:
�Establishment of a govern-
ment acceptable to the guerrillas
and able to inspire enough confi-
dence to spur millions of refugees
to return to Afghanistan from
camps in Pakistan.
�A new Afghan government
also would have to be acceptable
to the Soviets fearing any angry
and beligerent Afghanistan after
the troops leave.
�Elements of Afghan society
that supported the Soviet pres-
ence also would need to be as-
sured that they will not be the
victims of a bloodbath once the
Soviets leave the country.
�Finally, a formula and time-
table for the Soviet withdrawal
would have to be devised.
WASHINGTON (AP) � Presi-
dent Reagan is willing to sign a
historic arms control accord with
the Soviets, but says he won't be
holed into believing in a renewed
era or detente.
Reagan also is laughing off
Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorvachev's network television
interview this week, the opening
salvo in a pre-summit propa-
ganda blitz.
1 don't resent his popularity or
anything else � Good Lord, I co-
starred with Errol Flynn once
igan said Tuesday.
However, the president will
avail himself of a similar forum by
taping an interview with four
network anchormen for broad-
jast -his evening. CBS, ABC, NBC
and Gable News Network will
participate, said presidential
spokesman Marlin Fitzwater.
Reagan, who is under attack
from conservatives opposed to
the U.SSoviet treaty banning
medium-range missiles, de-
tended his arms control policy
Junnc a tnp Tuesday to Jackson-
ville, Fla.
He also accused the Soviets of
repression at home and brutality
abroad. It was the latest attempt
by Reagan to persuade his conser-
vative supporters that he has not
dropped his hard-line stance
toward the Soviets, even though
he plans to sign the arms treaty
with Gorbachev during next
week's summit meeting in Wash-
ington.
"In the excitement of the sum-
mit, the treaty signing and all the
rest, we must not forget that peace
means more than arms reduc-
tion Reagan told a group of
Jacksonville high school students
and their parents.
He said he knew that during the
warming of U.SSoviet relations
more than a decade ago �
dubbed the era of detente � the
Soviets were "talking friendship"
but also "worked even faster on
the largest military buildup in
world history
"They stepped up their aggres-
sion around the world, and they
became more aggressive at
home Reagan said.
The president said he will insist
in his third summit with Gor-
bachev that "we do not want mere
words. This time, we're after true
peace
The president said he planned
to talk tough with the soviet
leader, promising to "have a few
words" about persecution of po-
litical and religious activists as
well as Soviet military activity
around the world.
Citing the Soviet invasion of
Afghanistan as an example of
"what communist oppression
means Reagan said he will tell
Gorbachev that the Soviet Union
"has no legitimate purpose" in the
nation and press him to set a date
to withdraw the 115,000 Soviet
troops that have been battling the
Afghan rebels since 1979.
"I will also say it's time for them
to leave Cambodia, Ethiopia,
Angole and Nicaragua Reagan
promised.
Defending his drive for an arms
control accord, Reagan chided
those who said he wasn't sincere
when he first proposed the elimi-
nation of the medium-range mis-
siles, the so-called "zero option
Soviet citizens to tour North
Carolina during summit
Reagan said he plans "to keep
right on marching" on the arms
control path, pledging to keep
negotiators working on an accord
to cut in half the arsenals of long-
range strategic missiles, as well as
reducing the level of conventional
forces in Europe.
Reagan's appearance came one
day after Gorbachev granted an
hour-long television interview to
NBC-TV, in which he pledged to
match U.S. research efforts on a
space-based, anti-missile defense
system, but not to deploy it.
Reagan has pledged to move
ahead with his "Star Wars" sys-
tem, and has rejected Soviet ef-
forts to limit it in return for cuts in
long-range nuclear weapons.
Gorbachev presented a studied
mix of conciliation and conten-
tiousness, saying he is open to
improved ties with the United
States, but rejecting assertions
that his nation is guilty of human I
rights abuses.
Reporters also queried Reagan
on what he thought of his Soviet
counterpart.
"I've had a respect for him ever
since I met him Reagan replied.
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DURHAM (AP) � When
Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gor-
bachev sit down to sign a nuclear
-control agreement at their
Summit meeting in Washington
next week, most of the world will
b .witching.
By coincidence, as the two lead-
ers arc discussing affairs of state,
I & viet citizens will be touring
parts of North Carolina as part of
the L.SU.S.S.R. Bridges of Peace
j' gram.
They aren't likely to attract
nearly as much attention as Re-
acan and Gorbachev. But in their
Own way, they and their hosts
believe they are doing their part to
try to make life in the nuclear age
a bit more secure.
"It just happened that the visit
coincides with the summit said
the Rev. Richard Edens of the
Lmted Church of Chapel Hill,
one of the coordinators of the
Soviet visit.
'But it is a nice little parallel. We
right to look at it as citizen diplo-
macy. The more such visits that
�re possible, the more we'll be
aole to ameliorate some of the
negative feelings we get from
some of our leaders Edens told
the Durham Sun.
The 11 Soviets, only one of
vhorn has ever visited the United
States before, will arrive in the
area Monday and will spend
much of their time with host fami-
lies.
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10 Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN!
DECEMBERS 1987
Moscow
MOSCOW (AP) - Soviet tele-
vision censored Mikhail S.
Gorbachev's comment to NBC
News that he and his wife discuss
top government affairs, but
broadcast in full his statements on
touchy topics such as Soviet
troops in Afghanistan.
The exchange between the So-
viet leader and NBC anchorman
Tom Brokaw about Raisa Gor-
Dunng the interview, which
was broadcast Monday night in
the United States, Gorbachev
spoke about such sensitive sub-
jects as arms control, human
rights and Afghanistan, the Asso-
ciated Press obtained from NBC
News an English-language text of
the interview and compared it
with the Soviet television pro-
gram that was broadcast at 9 p.m
bachev took just a brief part of the Tuesday
TlhTIOn8 Jnterv,cw Nar � end of the NBC text
taped Saturday at the Kremlin -
and broadcast in full in the United
States.
The fact that part of the passage
on Mrs. Gorbachev was deleted
when the interview was broad-
cast Tuesday night in the Soviet
Union indicates how sensitive her
role is in Soviet society.
Mrs. Gorbachev's stylish
clothes and frequent presence at
her husband's side have de-
lighted the West but caused some
grumbling in the Soviet Union,
where families of top politicians
have traditionally maintained a
low profile.
Gorbachev also has broken
from the traditional style of Soviet
leaders, pushing for greater open-
ness on certain topics and sweep-
ing economic reforms.
Brokaw asked Gorbachev:
"We've all noticed the con-
spicuous presence of Mrs. Gor-
bachev in your travels. Do you go
home in the evening and discuss
with her national policies, politi-
cal difficulties and so on in this
country?"
"We discuss everything, " Gor-
bachev responded.
But the NBC text continued
with the following exchange
which was deleted from the So-
BI agen
viet TV tape:
Brokaw: "Including Soviet af-
fairs at the highest level?"
Gorbachev: "1 think that 1 have
answered your question in total.
We discuss everything
The Soviet tape picks up after
the first response, with Brokaw
y'ng, U accept youranswer
and going on to the next question
on how Gorbachev learns about
the United States.
There appeared to be no other
deletions in the Soviet tape.
Mrs. Gorbachev, 55, plans to
accompany her husband next
week on his trip to Washington,
where he will sign a historical
agreement with President Reagan
eliminating the superpowers'
shorter- and medium-range nu-
siles.
an intelligent woman
i.wwiedgable about politics, ac-
Mrs. Gorbachev, who studied
sociology at Moscow State Uni
versity and later taught there, has
also taken a prominent part in
cultural affairs.
But for many people in the
Soviet Union, which remains
deeply conservative on the social
roles of men and women, Mrs
Gorbachev has no place with her
husband on trips abroad or in
&&&&
cording to foreigners who have taking a highly visible place in
met her. Soviet society.
@���w�aiigttdNiaiagHMKMKMm
EXTRA LOW
News analysis
Gorbachev
interview
WASHINGTON (AP) �
Kremlin leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev gave American television
viewers a glimpse of the wily
negotiator who will engage Presi-
dent Reagan at the summit next
week.
While he tantalized his audi-
ence Monday night by saving a
strategic arms deal was possible
without banning "Star Wars" re-
search, he gave awav no concrete
negotiating points in an exclusive
interview on NBC-TV.
The interview with NBC news-
man Tom Brokaw offered an hour
of undiluted Gorbachev, who has
fascinated the West since he rock-
eted to the Kremlin's top spot 32
months ago.
A presummit wave of Gorby-
mania seemed unlikely, however,
based on brusque answers he
gave to questions on human
rights, Afghanistan, democracy
and the treatment of U.S. citizens
by their government
On arms control, Gorbachev
stated flatly that he and Reagan
"will sign" a pact on intermediate
nuclear forces, that there arc "rejl
prospects" for a deal by next
summer to cut superpower arse-
nals by half and that Star Wars "is
not a subject of negotiations
The key is Gorbachev's retreat
from his position at the Iceland
summit in October 1986 that no
arms deal was possible unless
Reagan curbed his plans for
space-based ballistic missile de-
fense, known alternately as Star
Wars or the Strategic Defense Ini-
tiative.
Gorbachev acknowledged a
point that administration officals
ha ve been sayi ng for fou r yea rs �
that the Soviets are working on
their own missile defenses.
But his comments also helped
explain the shift in his insistence
on curbing Star Wars: exotic
space-based systems can be de- J
feated "a hundred times cheaper"
than they can be built, he said. J
That is a popular point among '
Star Wars critics on this side of the I
Atlantic. $
"I guess we are engaged in
research,basic research, related to I
these aspects which are covered J
by SDI in the United States
Gorbachev said.
But "we will not build an SDI. i
We will not deploy SDI, and we k
call upon the United States to act i
likewise. If the Americans fail to
heed that call, we will find a re- 9
sponse he said. I
The issue will remain at the top i
of his agenda, as it did at his pre- I
vious two meetings with Reagan, I
Gorbachev indicated. m
"We shall be talking about 1
strict compliance with" the 1972 I
Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty $
which bars Star Wars defenses.
SDI backers believe Gor-
bachev will try to sink SDI by
insisting on strict compliance
with the ABM treaty, a position
that Congress took this fall.
On arms control and other is-
sues, Gorbachev showed himself
not only as a cagey negotiator, but
as a politician whose engaging
style differs markedly from that
of his three elderly predecessors.
Extra Lean Whole
Boneless
PORK LOINS
USDA Choice Beef Full Cut Boneless
ROUND STEAK
FOOD LION
PRICES
i
I'jFi
iiS
Mixed FRYER
PARTS
Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday, December 6, 1987.
We Reserve The Right To Limit
Quantities On All Items

Large Beautiful Frazier
CHRISTMAS TREES
Lb.
-w
"Available At
Most Sore
LYKES
BACON
$24M
Each
ERINES
S�
12 Oz
USDA Choice Boneless Top
Sirloin. USDA
Steak E
Each
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rcjjai
Cola
2 Liter
Pepsi Free, Diet Pepsi. Diet
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rr.
V vi
Hamburger Helper
125 Oz. - Ptaa Bake10 Oz. Sloppy
J�e7.5 Oz. Beef Romanoff
8 Oz Macaroni3 Oz Meat loaf;
65 Oz. Seef Noodle7.25 Oz. Chili
Tomato725 Oz. lasagna
ISwiss Miss
Cocoa
12 Pack Reg Mini Marshmallows
16 Oz Greei
'Ramen Pride
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589
Oz. ChickenBeefMushroom
� Dills
Ml Olive
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I Peanut Butter
1
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&
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� !�� Quartets
CHARLOTTE (AP, ,n
;ars of hanging out with the
utlaws motorcycle club A
rnce Emory got lntoa few fights
?aged a few drug deals and
ursed a biker wounded bv a
imb he had meant to use on d
?II s Angel
Nothing unusual, except sev
�al years ago, Emory made a
personal transformation from FBI
agent to gang member Inamarh -
jof days, his ties razors, barber
and Clint Eastw(Kd good looks
were tossed to the winds
He started wearing leather and
playing a lot of pool in biker bars
He took out a subscription
Biker Lifestyle magazine He left
his nice Charlotte home and vs ,t,
and moved into a messy trail.
the other, seedier, side of Mi I
lenburg County
But Emory sa.d he didn't have
much trouble remembering that
he was an undercover FBI agent
first, a biker second
For the first time, Emory has
agreed to talk to a newspaper
about his undercover years with
the Outlaws He had done under
cover work before in property
crimescases, organi zed crimeand
narcotics cases, but he said his
'Fear of Flying' da.
their fears, putting h
biker stint
most dithci
longer take'
Emory con
undercover
year at FBI nj
in QuantioJ
In 1980, '
Harley Davij
rode onto a
danger and
men
mot
that i-ln
Hi
I
alhr
Hai
He return
� ,an
it, after bri
mot '
to its� .
I
� p e
east
wit:
OMAHA, eb (AP) -
people who spent the past three
weeks getting up the nerve to step
into a jetliner graduated from
their "Fear of Flying" course on a
round-tnp flight to Des Moines
Some of the passengers on
American West Flight 254
clutched arm rests, others did
breathing exerciese to calm them-
selves and many gasped as the
Boeing 737 took off from Eppley
Airfield and landed in Iowa.
Although they didn t loosi
their fears, some participants said
the classes and the 25-minute
I flights made airline travel easier
to bear. Others called them a con-
ditional success.
'1 didn't throw up and 1 didn t
cry said Eleanor Bvme after
landing in Des Moines. And I
think I smiled
I "I want to go again � I had
apprehension todav. but now tha t
j I'vedone it I'm ready to go again
said LaVonne Franksen
The free, once-a-week classes
started on Nov. 10 and were spon-
sored by the Omaha Airport Au-
thority.
The group, under the direction
of psychotherapist Sandy Kutler,
met for more than an hour each
session, some of which were con-
ducted aboard parked airplanes
Participants avoided thing
because of claustrophobia, fear of
having a panic attack, tear of
heights or a reluctance to relin-
quish control of their lives to a
pilot, Kutler said.
Many said they weren t tearful
of a crash.
Tim Kasper, 24, said he doesn't
like being cooped up in an air-
plane "so many thousand feet off
the ground and the fear oi not
being able to go anv place if I had
to
'I've flown a commercial flight
Tore, but I had to use tranquiliz-
ts, which I didn't like said
isper, who didn t take any
rugs for Tuesday's flights
Diane Weier said takeoff s and
ndings frightened her.
1 didn't like the noise and the
ihrust of the engines when 1 take
if and land. 1 hear the landing
ear go up and go down and I'm
'raid it won't go up or down
hen its supposed to she said
Kutler said she explained to
udents the psychology of tear
the mechanics oi flving to
lp them confront and overcome
ir fears.
Relaxation training was an
iportant part of the class, she
id.
The graduates gathered in a
inference room to discuss their
clings before the take-off tor Des
ines. Terror, anxiety and panic
common.
At the gate, the students talked
ietly among themselves before
irding the regularly scheduled
;ht with about 30 other passen-
pOnce in the air, many relaxed.
So far so good said Lucile
xaroof Omaha assheclutched
husband's hand high above
1 farmland of western Iowa.
didn't expect it to be this
oth said Vaccaro, who was
flffclking her first flight. "I've �
ehad a phobia that when the
is closed, I wouldn't be able
to stay there.
has
ha e been abl
Aim �� �.
Si
Ne

R id
cnu
s I
IXuiiJ
I �� ij
rev ie
entv
niejiti
Charley


. �





10 THE
EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 3, 1987
Moscow
MOSCOW (AP) - Soviet tele-
vision censored Mikhail S.
Gorbachev's comment to NBC
News that he and his wife discuss
top government affairs, but
broadcast in full his statements on
touchy topics such as Soviet
troops in Afghanistan.
The exchange between the So-
viet leader and NBC anchorman
Tom Brokaw about Raisa Gor-
bachev took just a brief part of the Tuesday
During the interview, which
was broadcast Monday night in
the United States, Gorbachev
spoke about such sensitive sub-
jects as arms control, human
rights and Afghanistan, the Asso-
ciated Press obtained from NBC
Ncwsan English-language text of
the interview and compared it
with the Soviet television pro-
gram that was broadcast at 9 p.m
private, hourlong interview
taped Saturday at the Kremlin
and broadcast in full in the United
States.
The fact that part of the passage
on Mrs. Gorbachev was deleted
when the interview was broad-
cast Tuesday night in the Soviet
Union indicates how sensitive her
role is in Soviet society.
Mrs. Gorbachev's stylish
clothes and frequent presence at
her husband's side have de-
lighted the West but caused some
grumbling in the Soviet Union,
where families of top politicians
have traditionally maintained a
low profile.
Gorbachev also has broken
from the traditional stvle of So viet
leaders, pushing for greater open-
ness on certain topics and sweep-
ing economic reforms.
News analysis
Gorbachev
Near the end of the NBC text.
Brokaw asked Gorbachev:
"We've all noticed the con-
spicuous presence of Mrs. Gor-
bachev in your travels. Do you go
home in the evening and discuss
with her national policies, politi-
cal difficulties and so on in this
country?"
"We discuss everything, " Gor-
bachev responded.
But the NBC text continued
with the following exchange
which was deleted from the So-
BI agen
interview
WASHINGTON (AP) �
Kremlin leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev gave American television
viewers a glimpse of the wily
negotiator who will engage Presi-
dent Reagan at the summit next
week.
While he tantalized his audi-
ence Monday night by saying a
strategic arms deal was possible
without banning "Star Wars" re-
search, he gave away no concrete
negotiating points in an exclusive
interview on NBC-TV.
The interview with NBC news-
man Tom Brokaw offered an hour
of undiluted Gorbachev, who has
fascinated the West since he rock-
eted to the Kremlin's top spot 32
months ago.
A presummit wave of Gorby-
mania seemed unlikely, however,
based on brusque answers he
gave to questions on human '
rights, Afghanistan, democracy
and the treatment of U.S. citizens
by their government
On arms control, Gorbachev
stated flatly that he and Reagan (
vill sign" a pact on intermediate I
� .clear forces, that there are "rcJ
prospects" for a deal by next i
summer to cut superpower arse-
nals by half and that Star Wars "is J
not a subject of negotiations f
The key is Gorbachev's retreat i
from his position at the Iceland i
summit in October 1986 that no 5
arms deal was possible unless 5
Reagan curbed his plans for J
space-based ballistic missile de- j
fense, known alternately as Star I
Wars or the Strategic Defense Ini- k
tiative. jf
Gorbachev acknowledged a m
point that administration officals I
have been saying for four years� $
that the Soviets are working on 2
their own missile defenses. $
But his comments also helped &
explain the shift in his insistence S
on curbing Star Wars: exotic �
space-based systems can be de- (g
feated "a hundred times cheaper" fS
than they can be built, he said, ffl
That is a popular point among g
Star Wars critics on this side of the $3
Atlantic. fa
"I guess we are engaged in fa
research, basic research, related to m
these aspects which are covered
by SDI in the United States j
Gorbachev said. $j
But "we will not build an SDI. jjS
We will not deploy SDI, and we S
call upon the United States to act iff
likewise. If the Americans fail to ��
heed that call, we will find a re- 5
sponse he said. ?3
The issue will remain at the top S
of his agenda, as it did at his pre- �j
vious two meetings with Reagan, ?�
Gorbachev indicated. fa
"We shall be talking about fa
strict compliance with" the 1972 M
Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty jfc
which bars Star Wars defenses.
SDI backers believe Gor- �f&
bachev will try to sink SDI by $J
insisting on strict compliance &
with the ABM treaty, a position i�
that Congress took this fall. J
On arms control and other is-
sues, Gorbachev showed himself
not only as a cagey negotiator, but
as a politician whose engaging
stvle differs markedly from that
of his three elderly predecessors.
viet TV tape:
Brokaw: "Including Soviet af-
fairs at the highest level?"
Gorbachev: "I think that I have
answered your question in total.
We discuss everything
The Soviet tape picks up after
the first response, with Brokaw
saying, "I'll accept your answer
and going on to the next question
on how Gorbachev learns about
the United States.
There appeared to be no other
deletions in the Soviet tape.
Mrs. Gorbachev, 55, plans to
accompany her husband next
week on his trip to Washington,
where he will sign a historical
agreement with President Reagan
eliminating the superpowers'
shorter- and medium-range nu-
clear missiles.
She is an intelligent woman
Mrs. Gorbachev, who studied
sociology at Moscow State Um
versity and later taught there, has
also taken a prominent part in
cultural affairs.
But for many people in the
Soviet Union, which remains
deeply conservative on the social
roles of men and women, Mrs
Gorbachev has no place with her
knowledgable about politics, ac- husband on trips abroad or in
cording to foreigners who have taking a highly visible place
met her. Soviet society.
H&i&il
EXTRA LOW
Extra Lean Whole
Boneless
PORK LOINS
USDA Choice Beef Full Cut Boneless
ROUND STEAK
FOOD LION
PRICES
CiFi
Mixed FRYER
PARTS
38L
LYKES
BACON
Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday, December 6, 1987.
We Reserve The Right To limit
Quantities On All Items
Large Beautiful Frazier Fir
CHRISTMAS TREES
"Available At
Most Stores'
$24"
Each
qgr Large p
6" Pot r
POINSETTIASf TANGERINES
12 Oz.
USDA Choice Boneless Top
Sirl0' USD
SteaklcH0,ct
Each
Fresh
Each
gndurrjer
$2�
�i� of 6 12 & mr 8atttes
2ITN
2 Liter
Pepsi Free. Diet Pepsi. Diet
Pepsi Free
Extra Large California Seedless
Navel
Oranges
4$1
Hamburger Helper
99c
� 25 Or Pijza Bake10 Oz. Sloppy
Joe7.5 Oz. Beef Romanoff
8 Oz. Macaroni3 Oz Meat Loaf
65 Oz. Beef Noodle7.25 Oz. Chili
Tomato7.25 Oz. lasagna
Swiss Mis:
Cocoa
12 Pack Reg Mini Marshmalfows
c
16 Oz Greer
Ramen Pride
Noodles
589
3 Oz ChickenBeefMushroom
WV
46 Oz Ml Olive
JIF
Peanut Butter
$19
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RAISINS
�� 0z Reg Golden
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hate
it 0;
ICottonelle
I Toilet Tissue
99
Paut
i.iieBluc Velio w
Food Lion
Butter
1 lh. Quarter

CHARLOTTF (AT) - ,n
years of hanging out with the
Outlaws motorcycle club A
Lance Emory got into a few fights
staged a few drug deals and
nursed a biker wounded bv a
bomb he had meant to use on a
Hell's Angel
Nothing unusual, except si
eral years ago, Emorv mack i
personal transformation from
agent to gang member Inarnartei
�f davs- his ties razors barber
and Clint Eastwood good I
were tossed to the winds
He started wearing leather and
playing a lot of pool in biker bars
He took out a subscription
Biker Lifestyle magame Hi
his nice Charlotte home and wit,
and moved into a messy trailer or
the other, seedier, side of Mi
lenburg County
But Emory said he didn � ha
much trouble remembering
he was an undercover FBI agent
first, a biker second
For the first time, Ernon has
agreed to talk to a newspaper
about his undercover years with
the Outlaws He had done uri
cover work before in properri
crimes cases, organized crimeand
narcotics cases, but he said his
'Fear of Flying' cla
their fears, putting h
Wter stmt
most dittu-i
�onger take:
r conj
undercover
yearai FBI
m Quantia
In
ger and
"Th
tha'
told
H ��� .
1L
sh
n
with r
OMAHA, Neb r
people who spent the past three
weeks getting up the nerve to step
into a jetliner graduated from
their "Fear of Flying" course on a
round-tnp night to Des Momes
Some of the passengers on
American West Flight 254
clutched arm rests, others did
breathing exerciese to calm them-
selves and many gasped as the
Boeing 737 took off from Epplev
Airfield and landed in Iowa.
Although they didn't toost
their fears, some participant-
the classes and the 25-rninute
flights made airline travel easier
to bear. Others called them a con-
ditional success
" didn't throw up and I didn t
cry said Eleanor Byrne after
I landing in Des Moines. And i
think I smiled
. "1 want to go again � 1 had
' apprehension fodav. but now that
j I've done it I'm ready to go again,
said LaVonne Franksen.
The free, once-a-week classes
started on Nov. 10 and were spon-
sored by the Omaha Airport Au-
thontv.
The gToup, under the direction
of psychotherapist Sandy Kutier,
met for more than an hour each
session, some of which were con-
ducted aboard parked airplanes
Participants avoided flyi
because of claustrophobia, fear gf
having a panic attack, fear of
heights or a reluctance to relin-
quish control oi their lives to a
pilot, Kutier said.
Many said they weren't tearful
of a crash.
Tim Kasper, 24, said he doesn't
like being cooped up in an air-
plane "so many thousand feet off
the ground and the fear oi not
being able to go anv place it I had
to
Tve flown a commercial flight
'fore, but I had to use tranquihz-
which I didn't like said
�sper, who didn t take any
irugs for Tuesday's flights
Diane Weier said takeoffs and
andings frightened her
"1 didn't like the noise and the
ist of the engines when 1 take
iff and land. I hear the landing
ear go up and go down and I'm
id it won't go up or down
rhen its supposed to. she said.
Kutier said she explained to
idents the psychology of tear
the mechanics oi flying to
them confront and overcome
ir fears.
(Relaxation training was an
ftportant part of the class, she
tid.
he graduates gathered in a
Inference room to discuss their
flings before the ta ke-oft for Des
ines. Terror, anxietv and panic
'common.
kl the gate, the students talked
Jy among themselves before
ling the regularly scheduled
fht with about 30 other passen-
� in the air, manv relaxed.
far so good said Lucile
iro of Omaha as she clutched
husband's hand high above
j farmland of western Iowa.
didn't expect it to be this
oth said Vaccaro, who was
ing her first flight 'I've al-
s had a phobia that when the
" is closed, I wouldn't be able
l&Stav then?
� I -
have been abi
Si
Ne
Si
I j
lev km
cm
ni-rui I
Charles1
-

�!
X
I '





hev remark
v Hi tape
� 55 plans to
H husband next
ir tii Washington
sign a historical
resident Reagan
superpowers
dium-range nu-
jlligent woman
vut politics ac
- v ho have
Mrs Gorbachev, who studied
sociology at Moscow State Uni-
versity and later taught there, has
also taken a prominent part in
cultural affairs.
But for many people in the
Soviet Union, which remains
deeply conservative on the social
roles of men and women, Mrs.
Gorbachev has no place with her
husband on trips abroad or in
taking a highly visible place in
Soviet society
ICES!
fa
i
fa
1
fa
fa
i
fa
m
fa
s
fa
I
i

Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday, December 6, 1987.
We Reserve The Right To Limit
Quantities On All Items.
ul Frazier Fir
S TREES
24"
Each
JUICY
ANGERINES
I
Each
Extra Large California Seedless
Navel
Oranges
4M
yday
Ramen Pride
Noodles
589
3 Oz ChickenBeefMushroom
fa

fa
fa
m
fa

fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
fa
Food Lion
Butter
$179
l LB Quarters
naradl
� �
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
f
DECEMBER 3,1987 11
FBI agent recounts experience as a biker
fSZS (AP) In � biker stint was the longest and
SrKn,�aJW,fi8h,S' Em conducts i3a" on
n�Sd m hZr 8 Su1 "Groover work several times a
kSk J hH w�und�i a year at FBI training headquarters
bomb he had meant to use on a in Quantico, Va.
vJhlT , In 1980' Em�T "nted his
Nothing unusual, except sev- Harley-Davidson Supcrglide and
ago, Emory made a rode onto a stage set with drugs
personal transformation from FBI
agent to gang member. In a matter
of days, his ties, razors, barber
and Clint Eastwood good looks
were tossed to the winds.
He started wearing leather and
playing a lot of pool in biker bars.
He took out a subscription to
Biker Lifestyle magazine. He left
his nice Charlotte home and wife
and moved into a messy trailer on
the other, seedier, side of Meck-
lenburg County.
But Emory said he didn't have
much trouble remembering that
he was an undercover FBI agent
first, a biker second.
For the first time, Emory has
agreed to talk to a newspaper
about his undercover years with
the Outlaws. He had done under-
cover work before in property
crimes cases, organized crime and
narcotics cases, but he said his
danger and dominance, and cast
by sleazy women and sleazier
men.
"The motorcycle is the cement
that glues everyone together he
told The News and Observer of
Raleigh.
used this evidence, including
more than 200 hours of taped
conversations, in 1982 to arrest 16
members and associates of the
Outlaws on drug, extortion and
prostitution charges.
All 16 were convicted and sen-
tenced to average terms of seven
to 10 years, Emory said.
"The bikers talked about three
things � dope, Harleys and
women Emory said.
For two years, so did he.
He started thinking and acting
like a biker. Almost.
Emory worried at times that he
wasn't believable, that he didn't
He arrived as Allen Ray Price, fit. For one thing, he had no tat-
Social Security No. 240-70-2929, toos. For another, he wouldn't
equipped with MasterCard, and smoke marijuana.
AT&T calling card and his official "I told them 1 had a health prob-
Harley-Davidson Club member- lem and couldn't use marijuana
he said. "They were skeptical for a
couple of months
And he wouldn't take any of the
women who, in the biker world,
are commonly passed around,
sold and traded, like baseball
cards. "Women were terribly
abused by bikers Emory said.
"And they had no place in the
biker hierarchy. I always alleged 1
had another woman
Once a week, Emory, who be-
ship.
He returned, as state FBI
spokesman Chuck Richards put
it, "after bringing the Outlaw
motorcycle club in the Southeast
to its knees
He and another undercover
agent posed as vendors of bike
accessories and would hold bo-
gus drug transactions in a north-
east Charlotte house they rigged
with recording equipment. They
Fear of Flying' class helps people face
their fears, putting them in a Boeing 737
OMAHA, Neb. (AP) � Fifty
people who spent the past three
weeks getting up the nerve to step
into a jetliner graduated from
their "Fear of Flying" course on a
round-trip flight to Des Moines.
Some of the passengers on
American West Flight 254
clutched arm rests, others did
breathing exerciese to calm them-
selves and many gasped as the
Boeing 737 took off from Eppley
Airfield and landed in Iowa.
Although they didn't loose
their fears, some participants said
the classes and the 25-minute
flights made airline travel easier
to bear Others called them a con-
ditional success.
"1 didn throw up and I didn't
cry' said Fleanor Byrne after
landing in Des Moines. "And I
think 1 smiled
" want to go again � I had
apprehension today,but now that
1 ve done it I'm ready to go again
said LaVonne Franksen.
The free, once-a-week classes
started on Nov. 10 and were spon-
sored bv the Omaha Airport Au-
thority.
The group, under the direction
of psychotherapist Sandy Kutler,
met for more than an hour each
session, some of which were con-
ducted aboard parked airplanes.
Participants avoided flying
because of claustrophobia, fear gf
having a panic attack, fear of
heights or a reluctance to relin-
quish control of their lives to a
pilot, Kutler said.
Many said they weren't fearful
of a crash.
Tim Kasper, 24, said he doesn't
like being cooped up in an air-
plane "so many thousand feet off
the ground and the fear of not
being able to go any place if I had
to
"I've, flown a commercial flight
before, but I had to use tranquiliz-
ers, which I didn't like said
Kasper, who didn't take any
drugs for Tuesday's flights.
Diane Weier said takeoffs and
landings frightened her.
1 didn't like the noise and the
thrust of the engines when I takp
off and land. I hear the landing
gear go up and go down and I'm
afraid it won't go up or down
when its supposed to she said.
Kutler said she explained to
students the psychology of fear
and the mechanics of flying to
help them confront and overcome
their fears.
Relaxation training was an
important part of the class, she
said.
The graduates gathered in a
conference room to discuss their
feelings before the take-off for Des
Moines. Terror, anxiety and panic
were common.
At the gate, the students talked
quietly among themselves before
boarding the regularly scheduled
flight with about 30 other passen-
gers.
Once in the air, many relaxed.
"So far so good said Lucile
Vaccaro of Omaha as she clutched
her husband's hand high above
the farmland of western Iowa.
"I didn't expect it to be this
smooth said Vaccaro, who was
making her first flight. "I've al-
ways had a phobia that when the
door is closed, I wouldn't be able
to stay there.
"1 think the airport authority
has done a wonderful thing to
help people with a fear of flying �
otherwise I don't think I would
have been able to go
Airport Authority marketing
i���������
director Michael Dishman said
the class was offered as a public
service.
"If that results in people becom-
ing frequent fliers, that's benefi-
cial Dishman said.
Sott Contact Lenses
Includes:
LensesCare KitFliow-up Care
For 30 Days
Eye Exam Additional
oPTOMemic
�Y�CAR�C�KT�R
Dr. John C Molnar
The Plaza Mall 756-9771
Bring Student I.D.
OD
PA
�sS�

There's A
New Place For A
New Experience
Reading CharieyO's menu is an experi-
ence in itself But wait until you taste'
Specialties created by our chef like Jack
Daniels Ribeye, Grated Swordfish, and
Fettucini Del Mar are receiving rave
reviews Some say it's our fresh ingredi-
ents, we say it's our tradition Join us
nightly for dinner.
X
HILTON INN
CharIeyO's207 S.W. Greenville Blvd.
355-5000
came an agent in 1969, would
meet secretly with a regular agent
to update him on Emory's prog-
ress and to keep his own enforce-
ment goals and original identity
intact lest he begin unwittingly to
take on the values of the motor-
cycle gang.
"You saw children raised in this
environment who were taught
anything but right and wrong.
They were taught how to steal,
they were encouraged to break
the law. Some were in school;
some weren't" he said.
At one point, a Charlotte mes-
sage parlor owner offered Emory
and another undercover agent a
contract to kill her husband who
also was her business partner.
Apparently, Emory said, she
wanted the business for herself.
"We told her we'd take the
contract simply because we didn' t
want her to give it to someone
else Emory said. The woman
was arrested by other agents and
later released � to her husband,
who wanted her back.
Bikers are always primed for a
fight, Emory said, and he got in a
few himself. He armed himself
with knives and handguns. But
had someone's life been in dan-
ger, he said, he would have had to
leave his cover.
"Nothing we do is worth losing
anybody, either physically or
psychologically he said.
Like all FBI undercover assign-
ments, this one first had to be
reviewed by committees in North
Carolina and Washington offices
and the Federal justice Depart-
ment. They consider the serious-
ness of the crime, the likelihood
that usable evidence will be col-
lected, the potential of danger for
the agent, the cost effectiveness of
the project and legal issues in-
volved.
The operation over, Emory
said, the hard part begins. "You
find that you're the one on trial
much more than the defendant
he said.
"You have a period of adjust-
ment when you come out. I had
lost a lot of weight because I didn't
eat very well he said. "I would
just catch a meal whenever I
could. I was always fearful of
getting a drink, for fear it might be
laced with something like PCP
A few weeks after completing
the undercover job, Emory and
his wife went out to dinner at a
nice restaurant. He said he re-
members staring at the linen nap-
kin by his plate. He hadn't seen a
linen napkin for a long time.
"You learn he said, "to appre-
ciate the little things
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DATE
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East Carolina University:
The Formative Years
1907-1982
THE PERFECT CHRISTMAS
GIFT: ECU'S Official history,
written by
Dr. Mary Jo Bratton,
professor and director of
graduate studies for ECU's
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t
12
THE EASTCAROLfNtANI
DECEMBER 3, 1987
Summit
Shultz says Soviets
failed to turn in data
SwmwtM.
a v i r r �
immmmmmmmmm.mmmmmi
i i t � . 4 i
WASHINGTON (AP) � The
Soviet Union has failed to turn
over all the data required to close
a nuclear missile agreement at
next week's summit meeting,
Secretary of State George P.
Shultz says.
"We must have that data
Shultz said Tuesday as he also
sharply criticized Iran for the way
it has dealt with a U.N. call for a
cease-fire in the Persian Gulf.
'The Iranians, I think, are delib-
erately making a monkey out of
the United Nations and I don't
like that Shultz said in an inter-
view with three news agencies.
He also criticized the Soviets,
saying they had helped Iran give
U.N. Secretary-General Javier
Perez de Cueflar and the U.N.
Security Council "a runaround
Shultz referred to Iran's hedg-
ing on whether it intends to ob-
serve a cease-fire in its seven-war
war with Iraq that the Security
Council ordered on July 20.
The Soviets had promised to
turn over the missile information
by the end of last week. Shultz
said he could not explain the
holdup.
"We don't quite see what is so
difficult Shultz said. "We don't
know why
The data concern the number
and location of some of the mis-
siles to be outlawed in the im-
pending U.SSoviet treaty on in-
termediate-range weapons.
The issue was one of the last
Shultz resolved last week in Ge-
neva with Soviet Foreign Minister
Eduard A. Shevardnadze as they
cleared the way for the trcatv to be
signed next week at the White
House.
"I know they are having trouble
getting it in satisfactory form
Shultz said.
The data relates to about 10
percent of the approximately
1,450 medium-range warheads
the Soviets have in storage. An-
other 1,565 warheads are de-
ployed on 683 missiles and will be
withdrawn over three years.
The United States, meanwhile,
will dismantle 364 missiles with
364 warheads. About 430 others
are in reserve.
Shultz also told reporters from
the Associated Press, United
Press International and Reuters
that he found nothing new in
Soviet leader Mikhail S.
Gorbachev's interview broadcast
Monday night on NBC television.
"I didn't see anything I hadn't
heard before Shultz said.
Asked if Gorbachev's approach
to the U.S. "Star Wars" anti-mis-
sile program had changed, Shultz
said "ltdoesn'tstrikemeasdiffer-
ent
But, he added, "that doesn't
mean things cannot be done
Shultz said both sides state their
positions in interviews but do not
bargain through the media.
"When you sit down together
you just have to see what takes
place he said.
The U.S. program seeks to de-
velop a space-based defense
against ballistic missiles. Gor-
bachev has attempted to impose
restrictions on it.
In the interview, the Soviet
leader said if the Strategic De-
fense Initiative, as Star Wars is
known formally, "does not run
counter to the ABM (Anti-Ballistic
Missile) treaty, let it � let Amer-
ica act, let America indulge in
research
On another subject Shultz was
critical oi the Soviets for not being
willing to seek a worldwide arms
embargo against Iran in the Sccu-
rity Council.
'To the extent that it'sclear they
don't want to move on, I think it
encourages the recalcitrance" of
Iran, Shultz said.
He said the Soviets want to keep
talking while the United States
would like to impose sanctions
against Iran to force it to negotiate
with Iraq.
f
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THE EASTCAROUNIAN
Entertainment
DECEMBER 3.1987
Memorial
By MICHAEL COX
Speciil to the tut Cirolinun
ou can see all types. Family,
friends, and groups of people are
huddled in corners; each of them
is waiting for a glimmer of good
news. A cloud of thick, whiteciga-
rette smoke greets newcomers as
they enter and gives a kind of crie
foreshadowing of things to come.
First reactions inevitably varv,
but one thing is certain. Waiting
oul lhe aBna in N C. Memorial
Hospital's second floor waiting
room, is a sight that one long
remembers.
The people arc basically
friendly and want to talk to you
about their situation. As they talk,
they look at you as if they hope
you can offer some encourage-
ment.
There's Brenda. She's been here
for five weeks waiting for her
husband to recover from a heart-
attack. Through thick glasses and
a forced smile, she jokingly says
"Aw, it's not that bad. The worst
part is getting used to sleeping on
the floor, and I did that weeks
ago
In the corner is Wanda. Hers is
the saddest of all the broken-
hearted stories. Her three-year-
old son drank some drano, and it
rotted his throat out. He'll never
talk again. She doesn't have a
husband, so everyone in the room
checks up on her and comforts her
to make sure she doesn't have to
go through this alone.
Looking around the room, one
can see Bibles everywhere. "It's
amazing how many people get
religion in a crisis remarked
John, a 27-year-old carpenter
from Ashville. "I wish someone
would just bust out laughing. I
think the whole room would fol-
low suit
His wish � however crude �
seemed to be true. The tension
was so thick you could inhale it.
Heads snapped and eyes wid- selves in the faces of those who
aXd0�rOPenedOr �ytoPutupaWh�
(whes rnoThk f I,0 d?Sk �" rCP�rter leaves thc waiting
n ho S x Seargent to the courageous few who by
m the Marines) calls out, "Cox chance or circumstance, were
family? He's been moved to the
fourth floor. You can go see him
now
So, for this reporter, the news is
forced to live this experience. He
wonders if he'll ever see Wanda
again or the others for that matter.
He remembers Wanda's last plea
for hope. "I just keep prayin It's
good. For others, the waiting con- all I can do. 1 just keep praym' and
hnues; it s a continuous cycle in waitin' for thedoctofbut hcdorrl
wh.chfearanddcspairetchthem come. I just keep prayin'
. . r v �-��. i jum eep prayin .
King s Singers Perform to
capacity crowd at Wright
By CHRIS BRINCEFIELD
Staff Writ�
Cinderella Returns to the Screen
By MICAH HARRIS
Stiff Wntrr
When Walt Disney's "Gnder-
lella" was originally released in
1950, it stirred a mixed reaction.
Audiences loved it; thev were at-
tracted, no doubt, by the simple,
appealing fairy tale narrative, the
plight ot the revavui 1� charming
heroine and her cute animal
friends, and a new bunch of those
delightful Disney tunes
Critics, however, found the
movie pedestrian. They wanted
the innovation and visual flash oi
"Snow White" or "Fantasia Be-
:ause "Cinderella" broke no new
ground, thev considered it a fail-
ure; in truth, these elements of
perceived "failure" are what con-
ribute to the movie's success.
Walt Disney had a passion for
technology rivaled only by his
contemporary (and rival) at Para-
rnont. Max Fleisher. Technical
innovations always work best
when they arc subscrviei.t to plot
and character in any movie. But
soon they become the reason for a
Disney film to exist The roots of a
story were not in character, but
split screens, complex camera
shots, frame size, and stereo
sound.
This approach was the stillbirth
Oi many a Disney film. For ex-
ample, in "Sleeping Beauty pro-
moted as Walt's masterpiece,
everything was geared to the styl-
ized, flat art style. The result was a
movie with characterization
jquaUy as flat.
"Cinderella a comparatively
non-assuming film, alsoboastsan
amount of stylization. Yet it is
clear that this is merely cake icing.
The heart of the film is Cinderella
herself. Although Disney's girls,
tend to appear as though they
gestatcd in a cookie cutter, Cin-
derella emerges as the most well-
rounded of his princesses.
No pun intended, but this isduel
partly to the way she's drawn. The
animation of her facial expres-
sions is incredibly flexible. But
this technical skill is best used in a
brief, understated moment when
the evil stepmother is piling more
tasks on the already overworked
girl. For a second, Cinderella
looks so ticked off; an expletive
See 'CINDERELLA page 14
The King's Singers performed
to a sold out crowd Monday night
at Wright Auditorium, as part of
East Carolina University Artist
Series.
The year 1968 was the first pro-
fessional season for the King's
Sngers who formed at King's
College, Cambridge, England.
Since then they have given thou-
sands of concerts throughout the
west and in the Far East.
The King's Singers are known
for their broad and diverse reper-
toire that ranges from Renais-
sance polyphony to music bv the
Beatles.
The group is made up of two
counter tenors, tenor, two bari-
tones, and bass.
The first portion of the King's
Singers performance was entitled
"Christmas Music of the Renais-
sance This portion included five
songs in Latin and French.
The second portion of the pro-
gram was "Five Songs for four-
part Male Voices all by Czech
composer Leos Janacek. The five
works were written for a quartet
ol bass and tenor voices.
The piece is about a voung
couple with the normal problems.
The young man is called to war in
the end. The work is a good ex-
ample of Czechoslovakian music.
The thiid section was "Time
Piece' a contemporary work that
gives a somewhat altered version
of the Genesis story.
It begins with rather eerie
sounds that represent thecreation
from the void. Then, the singers
sang of Adam and Eve and not the
apple but the watch which ruined
paradise.
"Adam what is it that you are
wearing on your wrist?"
The first section after the inter-
mission was for madrigals by
Theo Musgrave, with lyrics by Sir
Thomas Wyatt. This group of
works was another one dealing
with love.
"Masterpiece a light contem-
porary work in tribute to the great
composers of the last 400 years.
The lyrics of the work consisted
largely of the names of composers
such as Bach, Beethoven, Mozart,
Strauss, and Wagner, to name a
few.
"Arrangements in Close Har-
mony" was the fifth portion of the
concert. This is a section in which
the King's Singers sang popular
music.
Monday night they sang "I
Want To Hold Your Hand and
"I'll Follow the Sun" by John
Lennon and Paul McCartney,
"Stormy Weather and Christ-
mascarol "RejoiceChristisBorn
The King's Singers were called
back for two encores in which
they sang a jazzy version of "Deck
the Halls" and Tchaicovsks
"Crown of the Roses
Pretty in Pink' director plays with 'Trains'
By STAN ARNOLD
Suff Writer
"Planes, Trains and Automoto-
biles directed by John Hughes,
the king of teen films "The Break-
fast Club" and "Pretty in Pink" is
a little different from'what view-
ers may expect. Although differ-
ent in many ways from his earlier
films, Hughes succeeds in giving
viewers a good film on an adult
level.
Steve Martin, rather than his
usual leading role as a wild and
crazy guy gives a strong perform-
ance, but this time he's flic cynical
Quicksilver
adman, Meal Page. Martin in this
transitional role allows viewers to
sec new aspects of his acting abil-
ity.
In spite of Martin's fine per-
formance the true credit in this
film must go to John Candy.
Candy plays Del Griffiths, a loser,
a shower-curtain ring salesman.
At first Neal is repulsed by Del's
sedentary nature but somehow
finds he actually does have some
sumpathy and compassion for the
loquacious slob. The best feature
about the film is that the audience
empathizes with both the charac-
ters in the film, even though they
are vastly different.
The plot basically centers on
Neal and Del's attempts to get
from new York City to Chicago
when the weather turns bad two
days before Thanksgiving.
"Planes, Trains and Automo-
biles like Hughes' previous
films, is an excursion into moral-
ity and human nature. The more
the story unfolds the more the
lesson unfolds. If the ending of
this film appears to some to be a
bit maudlin, maybe these people
should meet more Del Griffiths of
the world and less of the Neal
Pages.
By CRETCHEN JOURNIGAN
Suit Wntrr
Tom Ives, owner and manager
of Quicksilver Records and Books
at 200 E. 5th St says that people
have a misconception oi what his
business isall about; it's simply an
"element of the unknown
Trading and selling used rec-
ords and books means more than
selling Lawrence Welk orchestra
music, says Ives. Instead, he tries
to create a different kind of atmos-
phere in his store unlike the
average, predictable record
stores, by offering a wider variety
oi classical books and unfamilar
music.
Ives offers more to the music
lovers than top twenty. He sells
and trades records in specialty
blues, reggae, jazz, new wave,
heavy metal, and classical. Ives
orders most of his records from
two main companies, Alligator
Records of California and
Rounder Records from Chicago.
Aside from what he orders, he
collects or buys from record
shows and conventions in the
area and adds to his store inven-
tory. He also has a trade system,
which allows people to come into
the store with their own pieces,
some old and new, and either sells
them to Ives or trades it in for a
new item in the store.
Ives says he has a good turnover
in his business and estimates at
collecting about 1,000 to 1,500
different records each month. He
says that college students sell a lot
of records and books to him, just
for extra money in their pockets.
His book collection consists of
science fiction, horror, classics,
mysteries, romance and Cliff
Notes. Primarily the most popu-
Irfrerr" rT' �f Qukksilvcr Records �d � �� to provide shoppers with a
different atmosphere by catering to a wider range of tastes. (Photo by Thomas Walters - ECU Photo
lar books are written by Stephen
King and Shakespeare.
Ives says that he knows of only
one other trade bookstore in the
area and decided that a combina-
tion of books and records would
be fun and different for his cus-
tomers.
Before moving to Greenville
and opening up his own business,
6 years ago, Ives managed record
stores in Jacksonville, NC for sev-
eral years.
Ives says that he had his own
way and style of managing a rec-
ord store that sometimes created
conflicts between him and the
owner. Therefore, Ives opened his
own business - Quicksilver.
Ives built his beginning capital
with the help of loans and rela-
tives in order to start the store.
Since then, his business has
moved twice within , with one
store also located in the down-
town area.
His current location, 200 E. 5th
St has allowed him to expand his
business over the past year due to
more room and more visibility.
During the past year, he has
concentrated on organizing his
business by increasing the inven-
tory and creating a store that isn't
so "industrialized said Ives.
Ivcs, 32, operates his business
alone. He says that he doesn't
need any help and he'd rather do
it all himself. To Ives, his business
isn't like a normal job but it's been
a hobby for him for many years.
Records and albums sell from
50cents to $3.50a piece which Ives
thinks is very reasonable. He says
if he were in a bigger town, the
prices would be higher.
Instead, he concentrates his
business on the college crowd
therefore his location is to his
advantage.
"ECUstudentsaren'tasdiverse
to what they listen to, it's mostly
heavy metal and new wave for
them" says Ives.
Ivcs says that with more expo-
sureofhisuniquebusiness, things
are likely to change and sales will
be even greater.
One way of advertising is by
playing unusual music during
business hours-Monday through
Saturday from 11-7.
During the next few months,
Ives is expecting to receive more
CD's, tapes, music magazinesand
unusual imrjorted posters.
See QUICKSILVER, page 14
Quicksilver is located on the corner of 5th and Cotanche (Photo K�
Thomas Walter - ECU Photo Lab.) �
'
ti
X


�-





14
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1987

COMICS
THE VAMPIRE
by Mklver
'Cinderella'
successful for
Disney studios
Continued from page 13
crosses her mind she's a real
girl, not a cookie cutter Galatea.
My infatuation is sealed.
Understatement is the key also
in the scene as she cries over her
ruined party dress just prior to the
fairy godmother's appearance.
It's simply framed and emotion-
ally resonant. Thescene where the
stepsisters mercilessly tear her
dress is also reserved, yet horrify-
ing due to skillful editing and the
pointedncss of Cinderella's ex-
pressions.
"Cinderella" is the most suc-
cessful of Disney's "princess triol-
oey Hs character centered, less-
irncre formula has been enter-
taining the young at heart almost
forty years. Not bad for an un-
spectacular, critical failure.
Quicksilver gets
name from
San Fran, band
Continued from page 13
Also to attract more customers,
he is considering adding new top
30 releases and selling T-shirts
with the Quicksilver logo.
The Quicksilver name origi-
nated from a San Francisco band
called the Quicksilver Messenger
Service. Ivcs said that he wanted
his business name to "stan i out of
a crowd" and be dittcrent. "The
name Quicksilver caught my eye
and therefore adopted it he said.
Ives isn't expecting a boost in
sales during the Christmas season
due to the students vacation time
but he is expecting a change dur-
ing the first of the new year.
Along with giving away Quick-
silver stickers, Ives is planning to
circulate special coupons offering
discounts when a purchase ex-
ceed $5. Also, more arrivals of
Pink Floyd, Beatles, and Grateful
Dead, should increase future
sells.
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A
I ' �I i-1 Ml�� " � ' �
��T�' I
Shoppers
Neither rain nor economic un-
certainty could stop North Caro-
lina shoprx-rs from making their
traditional round of stores on the
day after Thanksgiving
"What stock market crash1
asked Million! B. Rourke of
Winston-Salem, clutching toys
under her arm at Toys R Us in
Durham
"Maybe people who bought
stock and lost money won't shop.
but I don't have any so here 1 am "
Negative predictions for sales
across the nation sprang from a
slowdown in!November sales and
speculation that consumers were
scared by the Oct. 19 stock ma rki-t
crash.
But on Friday, the dav that tra-
ditionally kicks off the Christmas
shopping season, retailers with
visions of record breaking salt-
dancing in their heads opened
doors early. Yuletide exhibits and
holiday sales enticed shoppers
who braved the crowds I
early start.
' Ptople are fired up, ready to
go Paul Syndet, manager
Fine's clothing store in Raleigh's
Crabtree Valley Mall, said a he
rung up a customer's order
Four department stores in Dur-
ham opened early and offered
markdowns of 20 to 40 precent on
merchandise.
At the remodeled Northgate
Mall in Durham, the Sears store
changed its sales strategy this
year to offer late-night as well as
early-bird specials. Manager A!
Stclzenmuller said throngs were
waiting for the doors to be un-
locked at 8 a.m.
"One of the most encouraging
things is we've had nice men
all week. That's a sign that busi-
ness will be good this weekend
Stclzenmuller said.
He added that the warm
weather might make sales soft,
but that the rain might convince
those with the day off to spend it
in a mall.
Dan Morgan, manager for Belk-
Leggett at South Square Mall in
Durham, said the store opened at
9 a.m. and that crowds began to
form 20 minutes before the doors
were unlocked.
� With a, rainy dzy hke tqda, it's
gumpiuUHM upwerrjwds, he
said. "We have a heavy inventory
and our markdowns are going to
be heavy. We had planned to have
a lot of inventory, but summer
wasn't as strong as we thought or
back to school
He said other Belk-Leggett
stores fared slightly worse in the
past week than those in the Tri-
angle.
"We're in a recession-proof
economy here in the Triangle he
said. Key's at South Square also
opened at 8 a.m. and manager
Michael Williams was standing at
the door to pass out coupons good
for 25 percentoff of any purchase.
"I'm handing out coupons left
and right. I would say there are
more people here this year then
last year Williams said.
In Raleigh, customers said the
sluggish economy would have
little impact on their spending
plans. Dozens stood outside the
Hudson Belk entrance as the
doors opened at 9 a.m. Models
clad in fur coatsgreeted shoppers.
Ronnieand Jeannette Pernell, of
Louisburg, examined video-
casette recorders at the Crabtree
Valley Sears. They said a VCR
would make a nice family Christ-
mas gift.
"We feel like we're three years
behind - everybody's got one but
us Pernell said.
His wife said clothes, instead of
toys, were atop her list for her two
children. "They've already got a
lot of toys Mrs. Pemell said.
"But if they didn't, we'd be look-
ing for them
Lee Rozakis of Raleigh, who
licked an ice cream cone outside
Thalhimer's, said he planned to
do most of his shopping by cata-
logue. He came to buy a shirt for
himself.
"I think it'll be a simpler Christ-
mas, but not so much because of
the economy he said. "It goes
back to the concept of giving
people more meaningful and
thoughtful gifts instead of
splashy, expensive gifts
Mike Hudson, manager of the
Jewel Box in Crabtree Valley Mall,
was upbeat but said it was too
early to predict how sales would
go-
Adverse economic news
"hasn't affected us Hudson
said. "Maybe it's hurt auto deal-
ers or something but not us
He said many of Friday's shop-
pers were looking rather than
buyingand that his best sales days
J
usual!
mas.
Carl
the C
said sj
I'm
prieet
items,
any (1

In F
hadhj
Chnst
ingint
By
Lodtk
1
- klel
LOS
thoi
Keal n
which
The I
eral" is!
I
"It w4
ite beca
his id!
Eleano





I
14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 3,1987
f All ire 'Cinderella'
lAWnllO successful for
mwMMMMMMmw Disney studios
THE VAMPIRE
?T7
by Mklver
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS:
GATHERING TIME AT
THE FIZZ
FROM 5:00 - 7:00 p.m.
Shrimp. Mozzarella Sticks or Chicken Wings -
25� each (minimum 1 dozen)
EBQftmffiLBAfi
Monday: Football Party with $2 Pitchers
Tuesday: Daiquiri Night. $2 Daiquiris All
Night
Wednesday: "2 For Tea" Night. $2 for Long
Island Ice Teas
Thursday: $2 for your favorite Highball.
Friday: Fiesta at Fizz. Tequila Sunrises and
Margaritas for $2
O
25 Discount
on all Food Items 3 p.m. until 8 p.m.
1 Coupon per check
expires 12-17-87
Tonight Thursday. December 3. 1987
Featuring- Jim Swinson
Saturday, December 5. 1987
Featuring: Klee Liles
No Cover Charge Before 10 p.m.
110 East Fourth St. Greenville. NC 752-5855
Continued from page 13
crosses her mind she's a real
girl, not a cookie cutter Galatea.
My infatuation is sealed.
Understatement is the key also
in the scene as she cries over her
ruined party dress just prior to the
fairy godmother's appearance.
It's simply framed and emotion-
ally resonant. The scene where the
stepsisters mercilessly tear her
dress is also reserved, yet horrify-
ing due to skillful editing and the
pointedness of Cinderella's ex-
pressions.
"Cinderella" is the most suc-
cessful of Disney's "princess triol-
ogy Its character centered, less-
is-more formula has been enter-
taining the young at heart almost
forty years. Not bad for an un-
spectacular, critical failure.
Quicksilver gets
name from
San Fran, band
Continued from page 13
Also to attract more customers,
he is considering adding new top
30 releases and selling T-shirts
with the Quicksilver logo.
The Quicksilver name origi-
nated from a San Francisco band
called the Quicksilver Messenger
Service. Ives said that he wanted
his business name to "stan d out of
a crowd" and be different. "The
name Quicksilver caught my eye
and therefore adopted it he said.
Ives isn't expecting a boost in
sales during the Christmas season
due to the students vacation time
but he is expecting a change dur-
ing the first of the new year.
Along with giving away Quick-
silver stickers, Ives is planning to
circulate special coupons offering
discounts when a purchase ex-
ceed $. Also, more arrivals of
Pink Floyd, Beatles, and Grateful
Dead, should increase future
sells.
mm � mi
"���
���" � � mm ii ��
���
MALPASS
MUFFLER
BRAKE SERVICE
METRIC HARDWARE
SPEEDOMETER SERVICE
AUTO PARTS
AUTO PARTS
758-7676
758-1818
7580594
.ki i w n i i v
�mmmm


i
if
I
B
SAVE 25�(
m
m
m
8
OFF
O REQULAR PRICE
7568310
Greenville
TWOTT
(-� SPECIALTY GIFTS
Hf
i
M
immmmMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmM
SPECIAL
GOOD
1 WITH
$1.00 OFF
ANY MEAL
At
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
NOT GOOD
WITH OTHER
COUPONS
�2903 S. Evans St.
756-20111
expires December C 1, 198
FOSDICK'S FRESH FISH
and
OYSTERS
Come from off Cape Hatteras and
are unaffected by the Red Tide

FOSDICK'S
X890 SEAFOOD
2903 S. Evans St.
Takeout Orders: 756-2011
e(�M�i
��� mijwm
Shoppers
Neither rain nor economic un-
certainty could stop North Caro-
lina shoppers from making their
traditional round of stores on the
day after Thanksgiving
"What stock market crash7"
asked Milhcent B Rourke of
Winston-Saksn, clutching tovs
under her arm at Toys R Us in
Durham
"Maybe people who bought
stock and lost money won't shop,
butldon'thaveanysoherelam "
Negative predictions for sales
across the nation sprang from a
slowdownin November salesand
speculation that consumers were
scared by the Oct. 19 stock mark, �
crash.
But on Friday, the dav that tra-
ditionally kicks off the ('hnstmas
shopping season, retailers with
visions of record breaking sales
dancing in their heads opened
doors early. Yuletide exhibits and
holiday sales enticed shoppers
who braved the crowds I
early start.
"People arv fired up, read) I
go Paul Syndet, manag - �
Fine's clothing store in Rj;
Crabtree Valley Mall, said as he
rung up a customer's order
Four department stores in Dur-
ham opened earlv and � - i
markdowns of 20 to 40 precenl on
merchandise.
At the remodeled Northgate
Mall in Durham, the Sears store
changed its sales strategy t!
year to offer late-night as well as
early-bird specials. Manager Al
Stelzenmuller said throngs were
waiting for the doors to be un-
locked at 8 a.m.
"One of the most encourac
things is we've had nice increases
all week. That's a sign that busi-
ness will be good this weekend'
Stelzenmuller said.
He added that the warm
weather might make sales soft,
but that the rain might convince
those with the day off to spend it
in a mall.
Dan Morgan, manager for Belk-
Leggett at South Square Mall in
Durham, said the store opened at
9 a.m. and that crowds began to
form 20 minutes before the doors
were unlocked
lY'ibJLHJnydav like toc,it's
geimK'lUNHri uptrirwtrwfshe
said. "We have a heavy inventory
and our markdowns are going to
be heavy. We had planned to have
a lot of inventory, but summer
wasn't as strong as we thought or
back to school
He said other Belk-Leggett
stores fared slightly worse in the
past week than those in the Tri-
angle.
"We're in a recession-proof
economy here in the Triangle he
said. Key's at South Square also
opened at 8 a.m. and manager
Michael Williams was standing at
the door to pass ou t coupons good
for 25 percent off of any purchase.
"I'm handing out coupons left
and right. I would say there are
more people here this year then
last year Williams said.
In Raleigh, customers said the
sluggish economy would have
little impact on their spending
plans. Dozens stood outside the
Hudson Belk entrance as the
doors opened at 9 a.m. Models
clad in fur coats greeted shoppers.
Ronnie and JeannettePernell, of
Louisburg, examined video-
casette recorders at the Crabtree
Valley Sears. They said a VCR
would make a nice family Christ-
mas gift.
"We feel like we're three vears
behind - everybody's got one but
us Pernell said.
His wife said clothes, instead of
toys, were atop her list for her two
children. "They've alreadv got a
lot of toys Mrs. Pemell said.
"But if they didn't, we'd be look-
ing for them
Lee Rozakis of Raleigh, who
licked an ice cream cone outside
Thalhimer's, said he planned to
do most of his shopping by cata-
logue. He came to buy a shirt for
himself.
"I think it'll be a simpler Christ-
mas, but not so much because of
the economy he said. "It goes
back to the concept of giving
people more meaningful and
thoughtful gifts instead of
splashy, expensive gifts
Mike Hudson, manager of the
Jewel Box in Crabtree Valley Mall,
was upbeat but said it was too
early to predict how sales would
go
Adverse economic news
"hasn't affected us Hudson
said. "Maybe it's hurt auto deal-
ers or something but not us
He said many of Friday's shop-
pers were looking rather than
buyingand that hisbest salesdavs
usual!
mas
( ad
theC
said si
"I'm
pricec
itemsj
any d
In F
hadhua
Christ!
ing irq
By
Lockk
throus
LockJd
which
The
eral" is!
"It V
ite bee.
his idj
Eleanc
i





MALPASS
MUFFLER
E SERVICE
METRIC HARDWARE
SPEEDOMETER SERVICE
AUTO PARTS
ANSA
mufflers
iw
AUTO PARTS
58-7676
58 1818
758-0594
Ml III I Nt
m z'z&.zz'zwm'&MMMU'im'MU
M
I
fi
if
VE 25�
a?
m
e
OFF
O REGULAR PRICE
nryon
J3aaJ
iALTY GIFTS
IAL
OFF
MEAL
NOT GOOD
WITH OTHER
COUPONS
UCK'S
1AFOOD 756-2011
expires ecember c 1, 1987
FRESH FISH
md
TERS
ape Hatteras and
by the Red Tide
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
1903 S. Evans St.
akeout Orders: 756-2011
y-ssssssss
�2�ccoocv55S.
X
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 3,1987 15
Shoppers swamp stores
Neither rain nor economic un-
certainty could stop North Caro-
lina shoppers from making their
traditional round of stores on the
day after Thanksgiving.
"What stock market crash?"
asked Millicent B. Rourke of
Winston-Salem, clutching toys
under her arm at Toys R Us in
Durham.
"Maybe people who bought
stock and lost money won't shop,
but 1 don't have any so here I am
Negative predictions for sales
across the nation sprang from a
slowdown in November sales and
speculation that consumers were
scared by the Oct. 19 stock market
crash.
But on Friday, the day that tra-
ditionally kicks off the Christmas
shopping season, retailers with
visions of record breaking sales
dancing in their heads opened
doors early. Yuletide exhibits and
holiday sales enticed shoppers
who braved the crowds to get an
early start.
"People are fired up, ready to
go Paul Syndet, manager of
Fine's clothing store in Raleigh's
Crabtree Valley Mall, said as he
rung up a customer's order.
Four department stores in Dur-
ham opened early and offered
markdowns of 20 to 40 precent on
merchandise.
At the remodeled Northgate
Mall in Durham, the Sears store
changed its sales strategy this
year to offer late-night as well as
early-bird specials. Manager Al
Stclzcnmullcr said throngs were
waiting for the doors to be un-
locked at 8 a.m.
"One of the most encouraging
things is we've had nice increases
all week. That's a sign that busi-
ness will be good this weekend
Stelzenmuller said.
He added that the warm
weather might make sales soft,
but that the rain might convince
those with the day off to spend it
in a mall.
Dan Morgan, manager for Belk-
Leggett at South Square Mall in
Durham, said the store opened at
9 a.m. and that crowds began to
form 20 minutes before the doors
were unlocked.
"With a rainy day like today, it's
pnmtwtwmd upt�rrowds- he
said. "We have a heavy inventory
and our markdowns are going to
be heavy. We had planned to have
a lot of inventory, but summer
wasn't as strong as we thought or
back to school
He said other Belk-Leggett
stores fared slightly worse in the
past week than those in the Tri-
angle.
"We're in a recession-proof
economy here in the Triangle he
said. Ivey's at South Square also
opened at 8 a.m. and manager
Michael Williams was standing at
the door to pass ou t coupons good
for 25 percent of f of any purchase.
"I'm handing out coupons left
and right. I would say there are
more people here this year then
last year Williams said.
In Raleigh, customers said the
sluggish economy would have
little impact on their spending!
plans. Dozens stood outside the
Hudson Belk entrance as the
doors opened at 9 a.m. Models
clad in fur coatsgreeted shoppers.
Ronnie and Jeannette Pernell, of
Louisburg, examined video-
casette recorders at the Crabtree
Valley Sears. They said a VCR
would make a nice family Christ-
mas gift.
"We feel like we're three years
behind - everybody's got one but
us Pernell said.
His wife said clothes, instead of
toys, were atop her list for her two
children. "They've already got a
lot of toys Mrs. Pernell said.
"But if they didn't, we'd be look-
ing for them
Lee Rozakis of Raleigh, who
licked an ice cream cone outside
Thalhimer's, said he planned to
do most of his shopping by cata-
logue. He came to buy a shirt for
himself.
"I think if 11 be a simpler Christ-
mas, but not so much because of
the economy he said. "It goes
back to the concept of giving
people more meaningful and
thoughtful gifts instead of
splashy, expensive gifts
Mike Hudson, manager of the
Jewel Box in Crabtree Valley Mall,
was upbeat but said it was too
early to predict how sales would
go-
Adverse economic news
"hasn't affected us Hudson
said. "Maybe it's hurt auto deal-
ers or something, but not us
He said many of Friday's shop-
pers were looking rather than
buyingand thathisbestsalesdays
usually came just before Christ-
mas.
Carolyn Gastineau, manager of
the Casual Comer clothing store,
said she seldom put items on sale.
"I'm selling coats, suits, higher-
priced items as well as smaller
items she said. "I haven't heard
any (economic) concerns from
customers
In Fayetteville, the rainy skies
had hardly begun to lighten when
Christmas shoppers began pour-
ing into local stores.
By 7:30 a.m. Betty and Leslie
Locklear had finished a spree
through K-mart, their arms laden
with gifts.
"We wanted to save money
Locklear said. He and his wife
said they had been shopping for
Christmas presents since August
and had almost finished the an-
nual chore.
A. B. Bryant, manager of J. C
Penny in Fayetteville, said the
store was packed 15 minutes after
opening.
"We probably had 500-600
people come in pretty much
immediately Bryant said.
Most customers at a High Point
K-mart were courteous to sales
personnel attempting to handle
extra business.
'They've been pretty good
Patsy Jernigan said from behind
the jewelry, watch and camera
counter at K-mart.
The King Singers performed to a sold out crowd in Mendenhall Student Center. See story page 13.
(Photo by Thomas Walters � ECU Photo Lab)
Documentary salutes screen legend
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Al-
though he remained in the movies
long past he silent era, Buster
Keaton's greatest triumph fit-
tingly enough was in a film in
which he never said a word.
The 1927 silent film "The Gen-
eral" is considered by many to be
his best work.
"It was his own personal favor-
ite because the whole thing was
his idea said his widow,
Eleanor, a former dancer who
married Keaton in 1940 and ap-
pears in a public television tribute
to the great silent clown.
In "The General Keaton
played a Southern locomotive
engineer who recovers a train
stolen by Northern spies in the
Civil War. Keaton deftly com-
bined adventure, romance, com-
edy and some breathtaking stunts
including a spectacular train
wreck.
"It's a true story from the Civil
War, and he thought it would
make a great movie Mrs. Keaton
said. "He had his gang of writers
and a technical man, and he
passed around a book about the
locomotive chase. He couldn't do
the real ending of the story be-
cause the Northern spies were all
hanged
Keaton, whose career began
when he was barely old enough to
toddle on stage and ended with
his death in 1966, is saluted in a
three-part series on "American
Masters" on PBS. The first two
parts of "Buster Keaton: A Hard
Act to Follow" will be shown
Wednesday and the third part
will air a week later, on Nov. 25.
"Buster really loved the silent
era said Mrs. Keaton. "Buster
started with Roscoe 'Fatt Ar-
buckle. He was going to do a
Broadway show when he ran into
Roscoe, and Roscoe invited him
down to watch some filming.
When he got there Roscoe got him
to throw a pie.
"By the time the day was over.
Buster had practically taken the
camera apart. He went back the
the Shubert Theatre, quit his $250
job in the play, which was a lot of
money in 1917, and went to work
for Roscoe for $40 a week
Keaton, whose trademark came
to be a squashed fedora and a
morose look, was born into a
vaudeville familv.
fpP
� ' - � 1 1 ��!�
;
��wWM4MMriha
�MM�MMMi�
� "iiiwATiMabiiBj
J





fi
9
9
MALPASS
MUFFLER
;e service
metric hardware
speedometer service
auto parts
ANSA
mufflers
AITTO PARTS
58-7676
58 1818
758 0594
i.KM W III I (
MMmMMMwmmmsA
IAL
NOT GOOD
WITH OTHER
COUPONS
OFF
MEAL
UCK'S
1AFOOD 756-2011
expires I)ecember C 1, 1987
FRESH FISH
md
?TERS
-ape Hatteras and
by the Red Tide
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
:903 S. Evans St.
akeout Orders: 756-2011
5SSSSSS8SSS

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBERS, 197 15
Shoppers swamp stores
Neither rain nor economic un-
certainty could stop North Caro-
lina shoppers from making their
traditional round of stores on the
day after Thanksgiving.
"What stock market crash?"
asked Millicent B. Rourke of
Winston-Salcm, clutching toys
under her arm at Toys R Us in
Durham.
"Maybe people who bought
stock and lost money won't shop
ti�m ' . . rl
usually came just before Christ-
mas.
Carolyn Gastineau, manager of
the Casual Corner clothing store,
said she seldom put items on sale.
"I'm selling coats, suits, higher-
priced items as well as smaller
items she said. "I haven't heard
any (economic) concerns from
customers
In Fayetteville, the rainy skies
had hardly begun to lighten when
but I don't have any so here I am Christmas shoppers began pour
Negative predictions for sales ing into local stores
across the nation sprang from a
slowdown in November sales and
speculation that consumers were
scared by the Oct. 19 stock market
crash.
But on Friday, the day that tra-
ditionally kicks off the Christmas
shopping season, retailers with
visions of record breaking sales
dancing in their heads opened
doors early. Yuletide exhibits and
holiday sales enticed shoppers
who braved the crowds to get an
early start.
"People are fired up, ready to
go Paul Syndet, manager of
Fine's clothing store in Raleigh's
Crabtree Valley Mall, said as he
rung up a customer's order.
Four department stores in Dur-
ham opened early and offered
markdowns of 20 to 40 precent on
merchandise.
At the remodeled Northgate
Mall in Durham, the Sears store
changed its sales strategy this
year to offer late-night as well as
early-bird specials. Manager Al
Stelzenmuller said throngs were
waiting for the doors to be un-
locked at 8 a.m.
"One of the most encouraging
things is we've had nice increases
all week. That's a sign that busi-
ness will be good this weekend
Stelzenmuller said.
He added that the warm
weather might make sales soft,
but that the rain might convince
those with the day off to spend it
in a mall.
Dan Morgan, manager for Belk-
Leggett at South Square Mall in
Durham, said the store opened at
9 a.m. and that crowds began to
form 20 minutes before the doors
were unlocked.
"With a rainy day like today, it's
gtmr�t�Bld up nrrowds he
said. "We have a heavy inventory
and our markdowns are going to
be heavy. We had planned to have
a lot of inventory, but summer
wasn't as strong as we thought or
back to school
He said other Belk-Leggett
stores fared slightly worse in the
past week than those in the Tri-
angle.
"We're in a recession-proof
economy here in the Triangle he
said. Key's at South Square also
opened at 8 a.m. and manager
Michael Williams was standing at
the door to pass ou t coupons good
for 25 percent off of any purchase.
"I'm handing out coupons left
and right. I would say there are
more people here this year then
last year Williams said.
In Raleigh, customers said the
sluggish economy would have
little impact on their spending
plans. Dozens stood outside the
Hudson Belk entrance as the
doors opened at 9 a.m. Models
clad in fur coats greeted shoppers.
Ronnie and Jeannette Pernell, of
Louisburg, examined video-
casette recorders at the Crabtree
Valley Sears. They said a VCR
would make a nice family Christ-
mas gift.
"We feel like we're three years
behind - everybody's got one but
us Pernell said.
His wife said clothes, instead of
toys, were atop her list for her two
children. "They've already got a
lot of toys Mrs. Pernell said.
"But if they didn't, we'd be look-
ing for them
Lee Rozakis of Raleigh, who
licked an ice cream cone outside
Thalhimer's, said he planned to
do most of his shopping by cata-
logue. He came to buy a shirt for
himself.
"I think if 11 be a simpler Christ-
mas, but not so much because of
the economy he said. "It goes
back to the concept of giving
people more meaningful and
thoughtful gifts instead of
splashy, expensive gifts
Mike Hudson, manager of the
Jewel Box in Crabtree Valley Mall,
was upbeat but said it was too
early to predict how sales would
go-
Adverse economic news
"hasn't affected us Hudson
said. "Maybe it's hurt auto deal-
ers or something, but not us
He said many of Friday's shop-
pers were looking rather than
buyingand thathisbestsalesdays
By 7:30 a.m. Betty and Leslie
Locklear had finished a spree
through K-mart, their arms laden
with gifts.
"We wanted to save money
Locklear said. He and his wife
said they had been shopping for
Christmas presents since August
and had almost finished the an-
nual chore.
A. B. Bryant, manager of J. C.
Penny in Fayetteville, said the
store was packed 15 minutes after
opening.
"We probably had 500-600
people come in pretty much
immediately Bryant said.
Most customers at a High Point
K-mart were courteous to sales
personnel attempting to handle
extra business.
'They've been pretty good
Patsy Jernigan said from behind
the jewelry, watch and camera
counter at K-mart.
The King Singers performed to a sold out crowd in Mendenhall Student Center.
(Photo by Thomas Walters � ECU Photo Lab)
See story page 13.
Documentary salutes screen legend
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Al-
though he remained in the movies
long past he silent era. Buster
Keaton's greatest triumph fit-
tingly enough was in a film in
which he never said a word.
The 1927 silent film "The Gen-
eral" is considered by many to be
his best work.
"It was his own personal favor-
ite because the whole thing was
his idea said his widow,
Eleanor, a former dancer who
married Keaton in 1940 and ap-
pears in a public television tribute
to the great silent clown.
In "The General Keaton
played a Southern locomotive
engineer who recovers a train
stolen by Northern spies in the
Civil War. Keaton deftly com-
bined adventure, romance, com-
edy and some breathtaking stunts
including a spectacular train
wreck.
"It's a true story from the Civil
War, and he thought it would
make a great movie Mrs. Keaton
said. "He had his gang of writers
and a technical man, and he
passed around a book about the
locomotive chase. He couldn't do
the real ending of the story be-
cause the Northern spies were all
hanged
Keaton, whose career began
when he wasbarely old enough to
toddle on stage and ended with
his death in 1966, is saluted in a
three-part series on "American
Masters" on PBS. The first two
parts of "Buster Keaton: A Hard
Act to Follow" will be shown
Wednesday and the third part
will air a week later, on Nov. 25.
"Buster really loved the silent
era said Mrs. Keaton. "Buster
started with Roscoe 'Fatty' Ar-
buckle. He was going to do a
Broadway show when he ran into
Roscoe, and Roscoe invited him
down to watch some filming.
When he got there Roscoe got him
to throw a pie.
"By the time the day was over.
Buster had practically taken the
camera apart. He went back the
the Shubert Theatre, quit his $250
job in the play, which was a lot of
money in 1917, and went to work
for Roscoe for $40 a week
Keaton, whose trademark came
to be a squashed fedora and a
morose look, was bom into a
vaudeville family-
-km
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16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 3,1987
GREENSBORO (AP) - If you've
got patience, a sense of history,
and a corral out back, the U.S.
Bureau of Land Management has
just the thing for you.
Wild horses or burros- believed
to be descendants of steeds ridden
by the Spanish conquistadores
and captured from herds that
today roam on the range out
West-are available to North Caro-
linians who'll offer them foster
homes. Take your pick at an adop-
tion event, Dec. 4-6 at Avden in
Pitt County.
"This is a chance to own a living
legend says Cathy Applegateat
the bureau's office in Alexandria,
Va. "These are wild horses and
burros, and should be kept sepa-
rate from domestic stock, but they
definitely will relate to the person
who brings them food everyday
Food, patience and a little expe-
rience with horses is what it takes,
Mrs. Applegate says: "Basically a
lot oi patience
That's what Clyde Boden-
heimcr found when he adopted a
pairof six-month-old mustangs in
eks foster
the fall of 1984.
"Someone said I was foolish to
try it says Bodenheimer, a re-
tired Davidson County farmer
who has always had horses in his
life.
"And it was kind of a chal-
lenge
Bodenheimer, 68, remembers
being drawn to the little beige
horses (one from Nevada, the
other from California) because
they reminded him of a pair of
mules from his childhood
He named them Bill and Pete
after those mules, and introduced
them to farm work.
"1 have worked the little things,
but I haven't ridden them
Bodenheimer says. "I'm a little
too old to get on something I think
might buck
Bill has a sweet disposition.
Pete is more skittish.
Skittish seems an understate-
ment for a mishap involving Pete
and a hay rake that left Boden-
heimer with a broken ankle and
several broken ribs.
He brushes it off with the kind
of paternal excuse a father might
use for a mischievous boy.
"It was all my fault he says.
"The were too young Since the
advent of the Adopt-A Horse
Program in 1973, more then
80,000 horses and burros have
been saved from the rigors of
range life. North Carolina has
been home to more than 800 of
these including 100 adopted here
in the past year.
The horses are bays, Palaminos,
pintos and Appaloosas,
averaging a height of 13-14 hands
and 900 pounds, says Ms. Apple-
gate. A full-grown burro weighs
about 500 pounds and stands
abou 110 hands - about 40 inches -
she says. Animal ages vary, but
most arc under five, she says.
The adoption fee of $125 per
horse and $75 per burro covers
veterinary examination, shots,
shipping and handling.
Potential owners must fill out
an application including ques-
tions about feed and the type of
enclosure that they'll provide.
The program requires a corral of
at least 20 by 20 feet with a wood
fence at least six feet high, Ms.
Applegate says.
"These animals have been out
in the wild she says. "A little
wire fence will not hold them.
They need a fence they can see
Another requirement is that
owners bring a suitable trailer to
take the horse home. A stock
trailer with a swing gate opening
is preferable to a trailer with a
drop gate that requires the han-
dler to lean down under the
horses' hoofs to raise and lower it.
Another safeguard, designed to
protect animals from economic
exploitation, is that owners have
only foster parent status for their
first year with the animal. After
that, they can apply for a title.
Those interested can call the
Adopt-A-Horse Program, (703-
274-0231) to request an applica-
tion, she says. That application
can be brought to the East Caro-
lina Stockyard on N.C. 11, two
miles south of Ayden. Adoption
hours Dec. 4 and Dec. 5 are 8:30
a.m. to 5 p.m on Dec. 6,8:30 a.m.
to noon.
Prospective owners whose
applications have been reviewed
and approved start the process by
a random drawing to determine
order of pick. Walk-ins get served
last.
"We have lots of no-shows
says Ms. Applegate, "so we en-
courage walk-ups
Some, like Bodenheimer, pick
Charlotte Woman braves
dangers of ML Everest
WANTED
Sally McCoy has been to the
mountain, but she has not been to
the mountaintop.
But the 27-year-old Charlotte
native and Myers Park High
School graduate has climbed
higher on Mount Everest than all
but one American woman � un-
less one of the women still on
earth's highest mountains has
had better luck since Ms. McCoy
returned to the United States.
"My big toes have no feeling in
them whatsoever she told The
Charlotte Observer when she
limped off her Bangkok-Seattle
flight Oct. 31. "I rub them, and it
feels like they have Novocain in
them. I don't have anv frostbite,
but I'm going to lose one nail
McCoy was hungry for Ameri-
can food, grateful for abundant
oxygen and badly in need of
sleep. 1 lor opportunity to climb
Mount Everest had come by
chance when she was asked to join
the Snowbird Everest
Expedition's hurriedly forming
team.
It ended in a tiny tent half-bur-
ied in snow more than 3 miles up
in the I limalavas.
Today McCoy is rested and
back at work at The North Face, an
outdoor-gear manufacturer in
Berkeley, Calif that outfitted the
expedition to put the first Ameri-
can woman atop the 29,028 foot
peak on the Nepal-China border.
McCoy has spent most of her
life in the mountains since her
parents, Charlotte physicians
Helen and Joe McCoy, first took
her hikingasa young girl in Great
Smoky Mountains National Park.
She had trekked extensively in
the Himalayas and in Europe bv
the time she decided to move to
Berkeley in 1984.
She trains by riding an exercise
bicycle and running the steps of
the University of California's
76,000-seat football stadium
across town from her office.
"I'd always wanted to be on a
big-mountain expedition she
said.
This six-man, four-woman
team was organized by climber
Karen Fellerhoffer, 28, of Snow-
bird, Utah. It set out in August
with plans to reach the top in six
weeks, most of which would be
spent establishing a succession of
camps up the route used by Sir
Edmund Hillary of New Zealand
and Tenzing Norgay of Nepal, the
first climbers to reach the top of
the world.
Only six women - the first,
Junko Tabei of Japan - have
climbed Everest. Since Hillary
and Norgay's success in 1953,174
men have made it to the summit.
McCoy, The North Face's na-
tional sales manager, and partner
Mary Kay Brewster of Boulder,
Colo got past 25,000 feet Oct. 8
before a storm forced them back.
Two weeks later, while they
rested at the expedition's 18,000-
foot base camp on the Khumbu
Glacier, another snowstorm with
hurricane-force winds buried
their hopes of a second summit
attempt.
Annie Whitehouse of Al-
buquerque, N.M reached 28,000
feet in 1983 before being turned
back by high winds.
It took more than a week -�
including a 35-mile trek through
two feet of untracked snow � for
McCoy to return to the United
States. Four expedition members.
including Fellerhoffer and Kellie
Rhoads, 30, of Aspen, Colo re-
mained on Everest hoping the
storm would relent and allow a
final summit bid.
Despite the storms, McCoy said
she found the climbing not as
consistently difficult as she had
expected.
"My personal high point was
feeling pretty good at 25,000 feet
and seeing how beautiful the
Himalayas were and realizing I
didn't need oxygen at that point
she said.
One of the most beautiful �
and most hazardous � sites were
seraes, fragile towers of ice as big
as city buses standing on end.
"It was like your every dream of
ice castles McCoy said.
�Free Room
�Part time work
5 Blocks From Campus
�Private Study-
Male Roommate Only
Contact:
Robert Wilkerson
752-2101
Wilkerson Funeral Home
animals to be trained to farm
work, Ms. Applegate says. Other
families use them for pleasure or
show.
"But behind almost every adon
tion is an interest in saving the
West's wild herds from the perils,
of starvation, injury or death,
Ms. Applegate says.
Bodenheimer agrees.
"I have a feeling for those little
things he says. "I feel like (saved
at least one of their lives
And all's forgiven about the
ankle.
"Heck he says, "an auton
bi le driven by a drunk ran over me
one time, and I got a much worse
broken leg out of that
tHap-py holidays
from
Whether it's Ringgold Towers
Condos or single family homes,
we can find a place for you!
Jean 'Hopper
"BrokerOwner
Vies. 919756-9142
1807 Charles Blvd.
Greenville, NC 27834
919355-5866
CHRISTMAS TIME IS
PARTY TIME
For Decorations And
Party Supplies Visit
ANYTHING PAPE1
Bells Fork Square
DANCERS, MODELS, ARTISTS.
MUSICIANS, PERFORMERS,
STUDENTS AND FACULTY
For Your Professional Photography Needs From Head
Shots to Portfolios Portraits to Publicity Pictures
Call
PHOTOSPHERE
in Washington. NC only 25 rrtn Irom ECU. Studio or Any location
PAUL NURNBERG - PHOTOGRAPHER
135 N. Main St. Washinton, NC
i-Q7fi-PMfj
NAB A
Free NOIDS!
Collect all four from
participating Domino's Pizza stores.
Participating Eastern N C
Domino s Pizza stores are giving
away NOIDS � for a limited time with
your pizza order So order a large
three or more item pizza from
Domino s Pizza and get a NCMD' tor
the kids-just for the asking A new
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DOMINO'S
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Ot r�vers carr �ss mar $o
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422 Arlington Blvd. 7567202
I
I
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I
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Expires 121787 I
New idea
Outline p ,ssum and
not your usual holiday entrees
but some Northarolinians
thoso one-ol a kind taste a
tion can hit the spot during a sea
son crowded with rurk. .
ham.
"You can't be mid I
road as far as chitUngs are con
cerned. sa.d Sandra Crocket
Monroe resident and a -
fessed lover of chitlu .
either love them (r you don t
Even the smdl is that wa I
may take a sniff and th ru. '�
terrible But if you tow
and you walk into a 1 .
they're cooking, you
line tor the pot
MrsrockerVs into
her favorite cold v-
came 12 year: ago whet
tied L.wrence �
tamih had a long stand
hon of chitUngs for fhanl
and C hristmas
Oh, sure, the) had th. i
Sears conl
CHBCACO(AP) Giai
Sears, Roebuck & Co gn -
bigger in the past decadi ��
move into financial sen
real estate. However, th,
pains were agonizing at �
according to a writer
watched the process
"Saving Scars is like tumin
Queen Mary' in th
River author Dot i
quotes one Sears eve, �
saying during the ��
of restructuring in 197
Katz's bock, Ths
!rsdc the Crisis and K,
at Sears recently publish,
Viking, tells the story of thai I
ing.
When Edward R Telling :
over as Sears chairman in 197!
faced declining profits and falling
stock prices. Discount chains
were nipping at Sears from out-
side and a 50-year tradition of
Buy
ream
Mat
Mai
Macin


j





wild horses
Program, (703 animals to be trained to farm
jest an appiica- vork Ms Applegatesays.Other
hat application families use them tor pleasure or
o the Easl Caro show
But behind almost every adop-
tion is an interest in saving the
W est's v ild herds from the perils
of starvation injury or death
S pplegate sn s
id en heimer a grees
! have a feeling for those little
es hesays '1 feel like I saved
ist one oi their lues
.1 ail - forgiven about the
N
11 two
k he says, an automo-
bile dr i en b a d ni nk. ran over me
: got a much worse
; that
in iHolidaifs
t:
elao. txou Kon�WxMJc"
s Ringgold Towers
family homes,
I place ' ryou!
Hopper
v a
aia z
756-9142
Charles Blvd.
Greenville, NC 27834
919 355-5866
NAB A
FreeNOIDS!
Collect all four from
participating Domino's Pizza stores.
DOMINO'S
PIZZA
DELIVERS
FREE.
m�t� aetvry
tmas
Savings
ff 15
o
7202
Expires 121787
f
X
y
j
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 3,1987 17
New ideas for holiday dinners
Chitlings, possum and goat are
not your usual holiday entrees
but some North Carolinians say
those one-of-a-kind taste sensa-
tion can hit the spot during a sea-
son crowded with turkey and
ham.
"You can't be middle-of-the-
road as far as chitlings are con-
cerned' said Sandra Crockett,
Monroe resident and a self-pro-
tessed lover of chitlings. "You
either love them or you don't.
Even the smell is that way. People
may take a sniff and think it's
terrible. But if you love chitlings
and you walk into a house where
they're cooking, you make a bee-
line for the pot
Mrs. Crockett's introduction to
her favorite cold weather food
came 12 years ago when she mar-
ried L.wrencc Crockett, whose
family had a long-standing tradi-
tion of chitlings for Thanksgiving
and Christmas
"Oh, sure, they had the regular
turkey and ham Mrs. Crockett
told the Monroe Enquirer-Jour-
nal. "But a big pot of chitlings was
what they really liked. And I just
had to have a taste
Mrs. Crockett soon developed a
taste for chitlings. But not bat-
tered and fried These chitlings
are boiled with several pods of hot
pepper, vinegar and hot sauce.
"Then 1 like to serve them with
slaw, greens, cornbread and can-
died yams Mrs. Crockett said.
'The only problem with chitlings
is they have such a high fat con-
tent and are so high in cholesterol
that 1 trv not to serve them very
often. They're so good, but not so
good tor you
For Velma and Grover Hinson
of Monroe, fall means possum
hunting. After their all-night hunt
and a three weeks' wait, they
feasted on their catch.
"Back when mv husband
would hunt, he'd bring home a
live possum that we'd keep caged
and feed it to fatten it Mrs. Hin-
son said.
"Then after about three weeks,
I'd cook it. It was really good
The three-week interval be-
tween catching and eating were
important, Mrs. Hinson said, be-
cause that eliminated the fear of
any disease.
But how does it taste?
"Well she says, "it tasted like
possum. It isn't like squirrel and
it's wilder than chicken. It's pos-
sum, but really good
The secret of good possum
cooking is to rub the meat with
baking soda after the critter is
cleaned with scalding hot water.
A little hot pepper will cut the
wild taste, Mrs. Hinson says. Af-
ter the meat is tender, placing it in
a baking dish surrounded with
sliced sweet potaoes adds the fi-
nal touch.
Then there are old goats. Jim
Igou says you don't want those
"When you cook goat lgou
said, "it's important to start with a
young kid, about 20 or 25 pounds.
Anything else will be tough
Igou and his kitchen partner,
Sas Saffores of Marshville, dis-
covered their method of barbecu-
ing goat by trial and error. They
enjoy experimenting with differ-
ent foods and trying them out on
their friends. Their most widely-
acclaimed results are their mari-
nade for goat and their popcorn-
like turkey fries.
"This isn't something I do at
home ever)- weekend Igou said.
"But 1 cook enough to know the
blend of herbs you need
The right touch for grilling goat,
he explains, consists of a cup of
olive oil, a cup of white wine, a
half cup of lemon juice and six
cloves of garlic with basil, thyme,
tarragon, won-hestershire sauce
and white pepper. From there, the
secret of success is to grill the meat
exactly the right amount of time.
m
KINGSTON
PLACE
WILL HAVE SEVERAL
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR NEXT
SEMESTER,
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393.
AFFORDABLE, LUXURIOUS
FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
BUILT SPECIFICALLY FOR
ECU STUDENTS.
Sears completes turnaround
CHICAGO (AD - Giant retailer
Sears, Roebuck & Co. grew even
bigger in the past decade with its
move into financial services and
real estate. However, the growing
pains were agonizing at times,
according to a writer who
watched the process.
"Saving Sears is like turning the
Queen Mary' in the Chicago
River author Donald R. Katz
quotes one Sears executive as
saying during the troubled time
oi restructuring in 1978.
Katz's book, "The Big Store:
Inside the Crisis and Revolution
at Sears recently published bv
Viking, tells the story of that turn-
ing.
When Edward R. Telling took
over as Scars chairman in 1978, he
faced declining profits and falling
stock prices. Discount chains
were nipping at Sears from out-
side and a 50-year tradition of
decentralization was threatening
the nation's largest retailer with
paralysis from within.
According to Katz' 590-page
account, Telling had to do no thing
short of fomenting revolution,
and had to gather revolutionaries
around him to do it.
Before beginning the book, Katz
had been covering wars and revo-
lutions as a foreign correspon-
dent, and he tinds the analogy apt.
"A writer friend told me, Try to
do a book about the Pentagon,
instead; ifs easier to get into" the
35-year-old author recalled re-
cently on a visit to his native Chi-
cago.
"Other business writers
seemed to consider Sears a sleepy,
bucolic American company - not
sexy like Exxon - but I came to
realize it was unexplored turf
That iva'ization, though, didn't
do him "��. a good in his first
i.e i.mg with Sears management,
wliicr had a long-standing policy
�: secrecy.
;ears managers are no less reti
cent about commenting on Katz's
book.
"We've sort of decided we're
not going to be a part of the pro
motion on the book and we really
don't have any comment on it
said Doug Fairweather, director
of media relations.
It took Katz two years, and a
stint as a temporaryhristmas
sales worker at a Sears store on
Long Island in New York, before
he got any official cooperation.
"I wrote Ed Telling this lone
letter, an essav, real
and
agreed to meet me in January
1983 the writer recalled. Katz
said he didn't feel the interview
went well, but someone from
Sears called him the next day.
From then on, Kat had greater
access to the inner workings of the
company than any writer had
ever enjoyed in the 101-year his-
tory of Sears.
Kat devotes many pages to
analysis of the chairman's com-
plex character. Although Telling
publicly presented the down-
home image oi "a country boy
from Danville, 11 wore
rumpled suits and jingled his
pocket change, Katz came to see
him as an obsessed visionary.
Sears' retail stores have out : Id
its catalog operations since 1931,
and the company has grown into
an empire. Its corporate revenues
in 1985 - Telling's last vear in
charge - reached $40.7 billion.
lolling and his successor, Ed-
ward A. Hrennan, have tri-
umphed, but Katz doesn't know
their reaction to 'The Big Store
'The inner circles at Sears are
now just ascl 11 as they ever
were before i g t in he said.
STUDENTS DAY
SURVIVAL GAMES!
"Discounted game play for students with any college I.D.
Gun rentals with 100 paint
pellets and pig pick at end
of days games.

ko A
.
First 40 Call to Make Reservations
:TAG
758SURV.
"i
�23
cy
Must Be 15 or Older!
In ha it aa
BuyaprintwithyourMam
A Macintosh personal computer and an of paper you'll save will has e a lovelv green glow with with a variety of financing options .Vie feel compelled to
jylm imageWriterD printer Presidents on it So here's the deal: bu 11 saw a bundle tell you, though, that a deal like this cant last brewer So
will save you hours of of cash when ou purchase an ImageWriter II printer it's a good idea to see our campus microcomputer cen-
time. Not to mention along with your choice of a Macintosh Plus or a ter today. And ioin the paper conservation movement,
gallons of correction fluid and Macintosh SE. Either way youTl be able to aim ait beau- �
reams of paper. And, if you buy both now. the first ream tifullv prepared papers. And we U even try to help vou tTierx�-tobeDurbesr'
Macintosh Christmas Special
Macintosh Plus & Image Writer II Printer
was $1,860 Now $1,775.00
Macintosh SE & Image Writer II Printer
was $2,573 Now $2,455
Macintosh SE HD20 & Image Writer II Printer
was $3,148 Now $2,999
Student Stores
Wright Building
-fcmi i-r m- i-1'
' w �
' mi ail
mmmmmm�mmmmmm
'� � � �� i ii � �

I





wild horses
gram, (703 animals to be trained to farm
I an applica work Ms Applegate says. Other
�plication families use them tor pleasure or
l Caro shew
sj. 11 two "But behind almost every adop-
doption turn is an interest in saving the
? are 8 est s v ild herds from the perils
a m ot starvation injury or death
Ms Applegate vi S
Bodenheimer agrees
"1 have a feeling for those little
ngs hesays I feel like I saved
: oneol their lues
Vnd rgh en about the
w nose
en reviev
k he says an automo-
. en b) -i drunk ran over me
: a much worse
tol that '
lappy Holidays
I?
i owers
fe family homes,
i place for you!
11
11
11
q i o
56-9142
Charles Blvd.
enville, NC 27834
919 355-5866

NAB A
FreeNOIDS!
Collect all four from
participating Domino s Pizza stores.
DOMINO'S
PIZZA
DELIVERS
FREE.
tmas
Savings
ff 15
7202
Expires 121787


THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 3,1987 17
New ideas for holiday dinners
Chitlings, possum and goat are
not your usual holiday entrees
but some North Carolinians say
those one-of-a-kind taste sensa-
tion ean hit the spot during a sea-
son erowded with turkey and
ham.
"You can't be middle-of-the-
road as far as chitlings are con-
eerned said Sandra Crockett,
Monroe resident and a self-pro-
fessed lover of chitlings. "You
either love them or you don't.
Even the smell is that way. People
may take a sniff and think it's
terrible. But if you love chitlings
and you walk into a house where
they're cooking, you make a bee-
line for the pot
Mrs. Crockett's introduction to
her favorite cold weather ftxd
came 12 years ago when she mar-
ried Lawrence Crockett, whose
family had a long-standing tradi-
tion of chitlings for Thanksgiving
and Christmas.
"Oh, sure, they had the regular
turkey and ham Mrs. Crockett
told the Monroe Enquirer-Jour-
nal. "But a big pot of chitlings was
what they really liked. And 1 just
had to have a taste
Mrs. Crockett soon developed a
taste for chitlings. But not bat-
tered and fried. These chitlings
are boiled with several pods of hot
pepper, vinegar and hot sauce.
"Then 1 like to serve them with
slaw, greens, cornbread and can-
died yams Mrs. Crockett said.
'The only problem with chitlings
is they have such a high fat con-
tent and are so high in cholesterol
that 1 try not to serve them very
often. They're so good, but not so
good for von
For Velma and Grover Hinson
of Monroe, fall means possum
hunting. After their all-night hunt
and a three weeks' wait, they
feasted on their catch.
"Back when mv husband
would hi.nt, he'd bring home a
live possum that we'd keep caged
and feed it to fatten it Mrs. Hin-
son said.
"Then after about three weeks,
I'd cook it. It was really good
The three week interval be-
tween catching and eating were
important, Mrs. Hinson said, be-
cause that eliminated the fear of
any disease.
But how does it taste?
"Well she says, "it tasted like
possum. It isn't like squirrel and
it's wilder than chicken. It's pos-
sum, but really good
The secret of good possum
cooking is to rub the meat with
baking soda after the critter is
cleaned with scalding hot water.
A little hot popper will cut the
wild taste, Mrs. Hinson says. Af-
ter the meat is tender, placing it in
a baking dish surrounded with
sliced sweet potaoes adds the fi-
nal touch.
Then there are old goats. Jim
Igou says you don't want those.
"When you cook goat Igou
said, "it's important to start with a
young kid, about 20 or 25 pounds.
Anything else will be tough
Igou and his kitchen partner,
Sass Saffores of Marshville, dis-
covered their method of barbecu-
ing goat by trial and error. They
enjoy experimenting with differ-
ent foods and trying them out on
their friends. Their most widely-
acclaimed results are their mari-
nade for goat and their popcorn-
like turkey fries
"This isn't something I do at
home every weekend Igou said.
"But 1 cook enough to know the
blend of herbs you need
The right touch for grilling goat,
he explains, consists of a cup of
olive oil, a cup of white wine, a
half cup of lemon juice and six
doves of garlic with basil, thyme,
tarragon, worchestershire sauce
and white pepper. From there, the
secret of success is to grill the meat
exactly the right amount of time.
KINGSTON
PLACE
WILL HAVE SEVERAL
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR NEXT
SEMESTER,
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393.
AFFORDABLE, LUXURIOUS
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APARTMENTS
BUILT SPECIFICALLY FOR
ECU STUDENTS.
Sears completes turnaround
CHICAGO (AD - Giant retailer
Sears, Roebuck & Co. grew even
bigger in the past decade with its
move into financial services and
real estate. However, the growing
pains were agonizing at times,
according to a writer who
watched the process.
"Saving Scars is like turning the
Queen Mary' in the Chicago
River author Donald R. Katz
quotes one Sears executive as
saying during the troubled time
of restructuring in 1978.
Katz's book, "The Big Store:
Inside the Crisis and Revolution
at Sears recently published bv
Viking, tells the story of that turn-
ing.
When Edward R. Telling took
over as Scars chairman in 1978, he
faced declining profits and falling
stock prices. Discount chains
were nipping at Sears from out-
side and a 50-year tradition of
decentralization was threatening
the nation's largest retailer with
paralysis from within.
According to Katz' 590-page
account, Telling had to do nothing
short o( fomenting revolution,
and had to gather revolutionaries
around him to do it.
Before beginning the book, Katz
had been covering wars and revo-
lutions as a foreign correspon-
dent, and he finds the analogy apt.
"A writer friend told me, Try to
do a book about the Pentagon,
instead; it'seasicrtoget into the
35-year-old author recalled re-
cently on a visit to his native Chi-
cago
"Other business writers
seemed to consider Sears a sleepy,
bucolic American company - not
sexy like Exxon - but I came to
realize it was unexplored turf
Thai vix � tion, though, didn't
do mm �:��:�. ii good in his first
de iling vith Sears management,
�v!iicr had a long-standing policy
� secrecy.
Sears managers are no less reti
cent about commenting on Katz's
book.
"We've sort of decided we're
not going to be a part of the pro
motion on the book and we really
don't have any comment on it
said Doug Fairweather, director
of media relations.
It took Katz two years, and a
stint as a temporary Christmas
sales worker at a Sears store on
Long Island in New York, before
he got any official cooperation.
"I wrote Ed Telling this long
letter, an essay, really, and he
agreed to meet me in anuary
1983 the writer recalled. Katz
said he didn't feel the interview
went well, but someone from
Sears called him the next day.
From then on, Katz had greater
access to the inner workings of the
company than any writer had
ever enjoyed in the 101-year his-
tory of Sears.
Kat devotes many pages to
analysis of the chairman's com-
plex character. Although Telling
publicly presented the down-
home image ot "a country boy
from Danville, 111 wore
rumpled suits and jingled his
pocket change, Katz came to see
him as an obsessed visionary.
Sears' retail stores have outsold
its catalog operations since 1931,
and the company has grown into
an empire. Its corporate revenues
in 1985 - Telling's last year in
charge - reached $40.7 billion.
Telling and his successor, Ed-
ward A. Brennan, have tri-
umphed, but Katz doesn't know
their reaction to 'The Big Store
'The inner circles at Sears are
now just as closed of f as they ever
were before 1 got in he said.
STUDENT'S DAY
SURVIVAL GAMES!
'Discounted game play for students with any college I.D.
Gun rentals with 100 paint
pellets and pig pick at end
of days games.
"�. ft'�


?a

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Buy aprinterwilh Macintosh and conserve paper.
A Macintosh personal computer and an of paper you'll saw will ha e a lo eh green glow with with a variety of financing options Ik feel compelled to
I lmageWriterI printer Presidents on it. So here's the deal: Sou 11 save a bundle tell you, though, that a deal like this can t last forever So
i will save you hours of of cash when you purchase an ImageWriter II printer its a good idea to see vour campus rrucrocomputer cen-
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Student Stores
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1
1





Walkin' The Plank

m
mm
K
1 �
tUt tASTC AROI INI
Swimmer,
By PAT MOLLCn
rhe last Carolina I
s immers dropped their
latch ot the season, and l
fell to 3 3 as tht k :
rtfl Carolina State scorched f he
ites m 1 uesday night's meet
We simply lost to a better
i " said head coach Rick Kobe
i! ui the loss. 'The men swam
well, with freshman J.D.
ewis winning the 1000-meter
freestyle, and sophomore Ray-
m �nd Kennedy taking the 2 -
ter breast-stroke,
lor the women (now 6
Meredith Bridgets broke her own
rsity record for the third rime m
200-meter breaststroke with a
t me of 2:2oa
rhe individual efforts were
admirable, to be sure; however
they were hardly enough to sus-
tain any threat to the Pack, as State
trounced the Pirates, claiming
ictories in 25 or the 29 events.
In the 1000-meter win for the
Pirates Lewis sailed awav in a
-tunning 9:45.44 display, taking
cond was state's K. Dow. who
early congealed while placing a
mark of 9.48.nW
!om there the pressure m as on
i at Carolina to keep pace with
the Wolfpack.
1 Vopping eight of the next nine
events, the Pirates found them-
Ives marking impressive times
.
bc-fort- data
more than
flew in at lii
clocked in t
at I 45 48
rate- ii
wrn
: �
Ron Flemir

ter: . -
hoi.
si � �
put inai
ing
in the i
Medley, the
better than
Dowling from
4:11.31 first
infer thebrcn;
Tom H
ECU
ML Lotz wasi
the Wolfpack
first in the 2 j
the clock at 1:
for second pla
Christen-
tune oi 2
Stunning Fa
100-meter free
Dick Cru
Ry CHARLES CHANDLER
Printed wrth pcrmukion from
The Durham Monmt Herald
ee rrlatrd skwkri m Mt pt 23
A.s Dick Crum and his assistant
iches considered the conse-
uences of impending doom in
eoent days, their thought echoed
the lyrics of singer Whitney
Houston's latest hit 'Didn t we
tbnost have it all?"
1 rumandtheTar Heels were so
-i�sc to the pinnacle of college
football only a few wars ago
IL w they fell so tar so fast is a
mvstery to manv most of all the
eo-iches who have begun looking
toi new jobs.
'n case someone doesn't re-
nv mber or never knew the Tar
1 iels spent parts ot four straight
I K�tball seasons � 1980-83 � in
ine Assooated Press Top 10 rank-
ings. From 1981-83, they ap-
pWNd at least once in the Top
Ft ve and several times got as high
as third.
Iean Smith doesn't do much
better then that.
Third in the nation ranked the
Tar Heels up there with the likes
of Oklahoma,
State. Mkhigaj
State-the elite
Crum was thj
UNC Kb ah
lieved in the e
UNCs footbal
Schools from
wanted to steal
Chapel Hill T,
happen. UNC
year contract.
Now, tour ve;
of the 10-year dj
ing town. He ij
commodity.
And UNC is nl
power. The Taj
corded onlv orw
in the last four
not won a bowl i
"Whathapper
the million-doll
Chapel Hill. a
could figure ou
why Crum's tra
railed would qu
However, ther
factors in the fall I
No one could
house down alor





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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
DECEMBER 3,1987 Page 19
WHAT WOULD X LIKE
FOR CHRSTMA5
THIS YEAR?
Lady Pirate Classic a goal for
women this coming weekend
r? � a "�!�� � � � .
East Carolina's women's bas
kctball team will open its home
schedule Friday in the Lady Pirate
Classic against North Carolina
Central University.
The Lady Pirates are 1-1 after
finishing second in the Lady Kat
Classic in Lexington, KY. ECU
won the first round game 78-77
against Central Michigan Univer-
sity before losing to Kentucky in
the championship 93-75.
Seniors Monique Pompili and
Alma Bcthea combined for 75
points and 32 rebounds and were
both chosen for the all-tourna-
ment team.
Bcthea lead the Lady Pirates in
scoring with 20.5 points per game
and 6.5 rebounds.
North Carolina Central is 1-5
after losing two games in the
Francis Marion Invitational last
weekend. Greenville native Kim
Dupree scored a team high 20
points in the Lady Eagles 81-56
loss to Norfolk State.
The Vanderbilt Lady Commo-
dores, ranked 19 in the AP poll,
will meet Georgia Southwestern
College Friday also. Vanderbilt
won its season opener at Illinois
State 63-75 and defeated David
Lipscomb 79-49 Tuesday night.
The Lady Commodores only loss
was a 68-73 upset at Illinois.
Georgia Southwestern will
come in undefeated with victories
over West Florida, 69-68, and
Montibell, 56-54. The Ladv Hurri-
canes finished second in NAIA
district 25, but only return one
starter, forward Carol Turner,
from that team.
Turner, a 5-10 sophomore,
leads the team in scoring
averaging 15.5 points per game.
In the first round Friday, Van-
derbilt will square off against
Georgia Southwestern at 6 p.m
and East Carolina will take on
M.C Central at 8 p.m.
All games will be played at
Minges Coliseum.
The consolation game will be
Saturday at 6 p.m. and the cham-
pionship at 8 p.m.
Tickets for the tournament are
avilable at the ECU athletic ticket
office in Minges.
This week's EC top 20 poll
1. North Carolina Yep, for
now anyway I'll have to eat my
words. Dean Smith has done it
Sports thoughts
4tm&
By
Tim
Chandler
Sports
Editor
again. Another great year should
be in store for the Tar Heels even
if injuries set in. After stunning
Syracuse and rolling through the
Central Fidelity Classic field, the
Heels stand at 3-0 for the year
heading into tonights game
against wr ol' Stetson. Dick
s-ru' ' wishes now he
had h asketball.
2. Kentucky � Rex Chapman
paved the way for the Wildcats to
bolt to 2-0 earlier this week as he
chipped in 22 points in a 101-77
rout of Cincinnati. Rob Lock also
seemed unstoppable for Eddie
Sutton's much-improved club
against the Bearcats with an 18
point showing.
3. Pittsburgh � The Panthers
are 2-0 after toppling a couple of
pansies in their opening games.
Charles Smith certainly appears
to be a solid performer though as
he tossed in 20 fhisgame-high23
points in the second halt of Pitt's
96-70 win over Robert Morris
earlier this week By the way,
where is Robert Morns.
4. Indiana � Oh my, Bobby
Knight seems to have another
jewel of a team, even without
See CHANDLERS page 20
Swimmers fall victim to N.C. State Wolf pack
By PA f MOLLOY however, when it came to touch- wun ci�i , a-? bo � � MT
Hu-
me
H PAT MOLLOY
�M�Unt Sports Jilor
Fast Carolina University
i swimmers dropped their
l match oi the season, and the
a fell to 3-3 as the Wolfpack of
: th Carolina State scorched the
' ites in Tuesday night's meet.
We simply lost to a better
n said head coach Rick Kobe
� x ut the loss. 'The men swam
� well, with freshman J.D.
I ewis winning the 1000-meter
freestyle, and sophomore Ray-
m nd Kennedy taking the 200-
m ter breaststroke.
For the women (now 6-1)
� 1 Tedith Bridgers broke her own
arsity record for the third time in
the 200-meter breaststroke with a
I me of 2:26.05 "
The individual efforts were
admirable, to be sure; however,
they were hardly enough to sus-
tainany threat to thePack,asState
trounced the Pirates, claiming
ictories in 25 of the 29 events.
In the 1000-meter win for the
Pirates, Lewis sailed away in a
stunning 9:45.44 display. Taking
second was State's K. Dow, who
icarly congealed while placing a
mark of 9:48.69
; rom there, the pressure was on
East Carolina to keep pace with
the Wolfpack.
1 topping eight of the next nine
i ents, the Pirates found them-
i.ves marking impressive times;
however, when it came to touch-
ing the wall. State was there every
time to snag the win.
S. Fredrick, swimming for the
Red and White took East
Carolina'sJohnFarrelltothecdge
before claiming a win of slightly
more than one second. Fredrick
flew in at 1:44.38, while Farrell
clocked in for a third-place finish
at 1:45.48.
The Pack squeezed by the Pi-
rates in the 50-meter freestyle
when K. Bamhill wished himself
to a 22.10 first-place finish over
Ron Fleming, who blazed in at
22.32. Claiming third was B. Sat-
terfield for the Pack, in 22.64; and
holding tight to the fourth-place
slot was ECU's Andy Lewis, who
put in an impressive 22.99 show-
ing.
In the 400-meter Individual
Medley, the Bucs could do no
better than third place, as B.
Dowling from State blasted to a
4:11.31 first-place finish. Limping
in for the bronze-medal finish was
Tom Holsten, a freshman for
ECU.
M. Lotz was the next victor for
the Wolfpack when he eased into
first in the 200-meter fly, stopping
the clock at 1:59.36. Stretching out
for second place was Pirate Ted
Christensen, slicing water to a
tune of 2:01.75.
Stunning East Carolina in the
100-meter freestyle was D. Judge,
who stroked to a 47.89 win, and
Scatterfield, who tore up the lane
in 48.58. The two swimmers from
State left ECU on the starting
blocks, as Sean Callender crept
home in 50.34, and Andy Lewis
finished just behind him with a
time of 50.35.
The women fared somewhat
better for coach Kobe, raking in
three of the four wins posted by
the whole squad. However, be-
fore hitting the "W" column, the
ladies also felt the heat the Pack
was churning out.
In the 100-meter freestyle, M.
Codelli took the win for the Pack,
edging out ECU's Sonya Heming-
way by forty-three one-hundre-
ths of a second. Codelli touched
the wall at 55.02. The women Pi-
rates grabbed third and fourth,
also when Ryan Philyaw nailed
the edge at 56.80, and Patricia
1 Walsh splashed to a 58.03 finish.
The ladies came close again, this
time in the 1000-meter freestyle as
State's J. Pananen closed out
freshman Carolyn Greene. Pan-
anen breezed in at 10:48.56, while
Greene screeched to a 10:59.77
halt. ECU sophomore, and all-
around nice person Leslie Wilson
claimed her stake on third place,
snaring a time of 11:04.79.
Greene returned to haunt the
Pack in the 100-meter breast
stroke, as she rolled in for another
second-place finish in 1:12.65. A.
Nordin bolted down first for
NCSU in 1:10.17.
Patricia Walsh led the women
to one of the rare victories when
she held on to first place in the
100-meter fly with a time of
1:02.24 � good enough to steal
the blue ribbon away from State's
J. Emerson, who slipped into sec-
ond in 1:02.29.
And for the third first-place
finish for the ladies, Philvaw,
Hemingway, Greene and Susan
Augustus teamed up in the 200-
meter Freestyle Relay to slip by
the Wolfpack m 1.43.89.
gf
The men's and women's swimming teams had a difficult time in nearly every event Tuesdav in the
Minges Coliseum Natitorium against N.C. State. The next action for the Pirate swimmers will be
Saturday when both the men's and women's teams travel to Duke for matches.
Dick Crum's success may have hurt career
RvfHARIFSrHAMni.FR of Oklahoma NJphrlra Ok; (�(�� ,jl-L, j j ,
Ry CHARLES CHANDLER
Printed with permia�ion from
The Durham Morning Herald
-� related iluki on Baft 11 pnfc 2
�Xs Dick Crum and his assistant
' iches considered the consc-
iences of impending doom in
icent days, their thought echoed
lyrics of singer Whitney
11 uston's latest hit: "Didn't we
almost have it all?"
rum and the Tar Heels were so
!� e to the pinnacle of college
football only a few years ago.
11( w they fell so far so fast is a
�nvtpry to many � most of all the
� i- hes who have begun looking
ioi new jobs.
'n case someone doesn't re-
rm mber or never knew, the Tar
I � els spent parts of four straight
�'tball seasons � 1980-83 � in
he Associated Press Top 10 rank-
ings. From 1981-83, they ap-
xared at least once in the Top
i e and several times got as high
il third.
'�ean Smith doesn't do much
better then that.
Third in the nation ranked the
Tar Heels up there with the likes
of Oklahoma, Nebraska, Ohio
State, Michigan, Miami and Penn
State-the elite of college football.
Crum was the right man for the
UNC job, almost everyone be-
lieved in the early 1980s. He was
UNC's football answer to Smith.
Schools from across the nation
wanted to steal him away from
Chapel Hill. To assure that didn't
happen, UNC gave Crum a 10-
year contract.
Now, four years short of the end
of the 10-year deal, Crum is leav-
ing town. He is no longer a hot
commodity.
And UNC is no longer a football
power. The Tar Heels have re-
corded only one winning season
in the last four years. They have
not won a bo wl game in five years.
"What happened?" has become
the million-dollar question in
Chapel Hill. Any person who
could figure out all the reasons
why Crum's train to glory de-
railed would qualify as a genius.
However, there are some clear
factors in the fall of the Tar Heels.
No one could have brought the
house down alone. Instead, those
factors, and probably others,
operated almost like a cancer to
bring about a fatal end.
I offer these factors for consid-
eration:
�Recruiting. Crum always
lured good players to Chapel Hill.
However, the Tar Heel's inability
to score well in their home state
and UNC's increased entranced
requirements in recent years have
been hindrances. When Crum
and UNC were riding high, the
decision was made to begin re-
cruiting on a national scale. As a
result, not as much attention was
paid to prospects in North Caro-
lina.
There was a time when UNC
could get away with that, but not
after its competition became
tough. If the presence of four
other Division I-A programs in
the state was not already enough,
CJemson and South Carolina built
strong programs and began to call
North Carolina a home away
from home.
After Proposition 48 was intro-
duced three years ago, national that were too high to begin with,
powers such as UCLA, Penn State Injuries and major shoulder
and Michigan also began taking a surgery caused Maye to have only
bite out of the in-state crop. about half of a normal career. He
Also worth noting is Virginia's was limited in 1984 because of a
emergence under coach George sore arm and did not play in '85
Welsh, which hurt the Tar Heels after major shoulder surgery. The
in a state that has been a prime re-
cruiting target for years.
Crum has made no secret of the
fact that admission requirements
have been raised substantially
si nee he has been at UNC. He soon
found that speed and skill more
often than not have a direct corre-
lation to grades and SAT scores.
Crum has insisted that some of
the Tar Heels' tougher opponents,
such as Oklahoma, Auburn and
Clemson do not have to play by
the same rules of admission.
Crum himself may have put it
best when he said the UNC estab-
lishment wants to be Harvard
Monday through Friday and
Oklahoma on Saturday.
�Mark Maye. The quarterback
brought in as the future of the
franchise in 1983 had his career
Tar Heels were 10-11-1 those two
years, and Maye's problems were
a big part of the reason. Had he
been healthy and at the helm of
the Heels, maybe a couple of
down years wouldn't have been
so bad.
Even during the time Maye was
unable to play, his presence in the
program probably hampered his
coaches' attempts to recruit other
top quarterbacks.
�Scheduling. This worked for
and against the Tar Heels. Had
they played as tough a schedule in
'84 and '85 as they did this year,
their record might have been dis-
astrous.
On the other hand, had their
schedule this year been similar to
those of a few years ago, the story
might be altogether different. It is
cut in half by injuries and was probable that the Heels would
never able to fulfill expectations have had a good year and now be
preparing for a bowl game.
�Staff Changes. When Crum
came to UNC from Miami of Ohio
in 1978, he brought seven assis-
tants with him. Those eight men
formed the nucleus of a staff that
knew each other and worked well
together.
Some attrition from that staff
was not surprising. It is natural
that assistants would want to bet-
ter themselves. But for various
reasons � salary is one that has
been suggested � Crum's staff
had more than its share of
changes. This past season, only
assistant head coach Denny
Marcin and offensive coordinator
Randy Walker remained form
Crum's original staff.
This is not to suggest that the
quality of the coaching staff suf-
fered, but perhaps the chemistry
did. 7
�The 1983 Peach Bowl. UNC
suffered an embarrassing 28-3
loss to Florida State, which was a
signal that all was not well with
the Tar Heels. The defeat was
See EARLY page 23
WmjjB !� 1 �. H
�a�m�mj
�����
I
,





20
THE EASTCAHm INIAN
DFCFMRFR1 1987
Chandler's top teams
���� IIWIIMW
Continued from page 19
Steve Alford. Freshman guard Jay
Edwards may be the Hoosicrs
answer to Alford. Edwards
scored seven straight points and
12 of the Hoosiers' final 16 points
to lead Indiana to a 76-59 victory
over a solid Notre Dame team.
Edwards' points came during a
16-3 Hoosier run over the last five
minutes of the game.
5. Arizona � Lute Olson's team
just might should be the top team
in the nation. Behind the sharp-
shooting of Stove Korr the Wild-
cats have built a 3-0 record over
some tough competition. First,
Michigan fell by a supnsingly
large 15-point margin in The
Great Alaska Shootout. Then
Arizona easily disposed of
Syracuse in an 11-point champi-
onship game victory. Not bad
huh?
6. Purdue - The Boilermakers
let me down early on by allowing
Iowa State to Knit them from the
Big Apple N'lT. But the key point
here is that it is early. A 1-1 record
is not where the Boilers wanted to
be for sure, but that makes Wic-
hita State's job that much tougher
tonight. Look for the Boilermak-
ers to bounce back in impressive
fashion.
7. Michigan � The Woverines
are 3-1 for the year and, like Pur-
due, angry about an early loss.
With all the talent looming
around in Ann Arbor this season,
don't look for a "L" to appear on
the slate again for sometime
probably not until the Big Ten
action gets heated.
8. Temple � The boys from
Phillv travel across the country to-
night to get their first taste of
hoops action for the season. The
task will not be easy though as the
Owls have to open up in Paulev
Pavillion against Walt Hazzard's
UCLA Bruins. The Bruins, no
doubt, will be out to show
Arizona that they will have some-
thing to contend with in the PAC-
10.
9. Louisville � The Cardinals
have yet to take the floor but thev
will get a stiff challenge Saturday
from a fiery mad bunch of Irish.
The Irish will be trying to rebound
from the thrashing suffered at the
hands of Indiana Tuesday. If Per-
vis can keep away from getting
nervous then Denny Crum's de-
but this season could be an enjoy
able one.
10. Georgetown � The Hoyas
are being under ranked in every
poll across the country. You can
believe that John Thompson's 2-0
bunch is for real � but aren't they
always? Even they the competi-
tion hasn't been stiff yet, the fellas
ARE good.
11. Syracuse � What a bunch of
copouts! Everybody was picking
the Orangemen to be the tops in
the land. But after getting
pounded by Arizona, jimmy
Boehoim's squad seems to bo just
a bunch of stars with no team
players. If the Orangemen don't
roll Saturday against South Flor-
ida and improve to 3-2, then they
are good as gone from the top 20.
12. Duke � Who knows if these
guys are good yet? Sure they
rolled past Appalachian State and
ECU but that is not saving much.
Personally, I believe that, after
seeing the Devils in action, that
Carolina has got something for
them. Duke, now 2 0, will face
another breeze Saturday in
Northwestern.
13. Missouri � Hie Tigers have
yet to get their season started up
yet but they are playing in the
perfect tournament this week to
get untracked - the Show Me
Classic. The Tigers are all but
guaranteed to show North Texas
State what they've got in the first
round of the event. Look for the
Tigers to climb in the rankings in
the coming weeks.
14. Iowa � The Roy Marble
paced Hawkeyes are probably a
lot better than the ranking that
I've given them. But, truth is, I
forgot to put them in earlier. In-
cluded in their 4-0 record are
impressive victories over Villa-
nova (97-74) and Kansas (100-81)
Pardon the mistake Hawkeve
fans, I promise to boost your club
drastically next week it their rec
ord stays clean.
15. Florida � Norm Sloan
seems to have another dynamite
club. The Gators have roared to a
4-0 start and the championship ot
the Big Apple NIT Vcrnon
Maxwell paced the way for Flor-
ida in the championship victory
of the tournament with 27 points
in a 70-68 win over Soton 1 lall. The
Gators almost blew a huge lead in
the second half before hanging on
for the win.
16. Wyoming - 1 he Cowboys,
depending on whether they got
past Colorado late last night, are
2-0 for the season and looking like
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the king of the Rockies. Fennis
Dembod still think that is a crazy
name) paved the way toa opening
season 113-82 rout of Denver
University with 24 points. Dembo
and the Cowboys will easily roll
through the weaker opponents of
the WAC this year.
17. Iowa State � The Cyclones
knocked off my number one Boil
ermakers earlier in the Big Apple
NIT before bowing to eventual
champion Florida in the semifi-
nals Theydones bounced back
alter the defeat after the defeat
though routing New Mexico 107-
in the consolation game. Iowa
State is now 4-1 and looking for
more victims.
18. Oklahoma � The nearly-
torgotten Sooners have jumped
out to a 2 0 start this season with a
pair of impressive wins. Tuesday,
the Sooners rolled into State Col-
lege and thrashed the Nittany
1 ions 93-59. That win was after a
l(il 80 victory over Texas A&.M.
19. Memphis State � There is
live after! )ana Kirk in Tiger Town
anyway. Memphis State has bar
relied out toa 2-0start and should
easily breeze past lowly Arkansas
State Saturday.
21). Seton Hall Soton Hall
rolled to a 3 1 record and a sec-
ond-place finish in the Big Apple
NIT. The guys showed a lot of
guts in battling back in the cham-
pionship game against Florida
before tailing short 70 68.
The
ast Carolinian,
ride,
otivation,
xperience,
riends.
Apply today.
r
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Would ou like to do exciting things in the dark?
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the Fast Carolinian is looking for
a reliable and let him all inclined student with
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I he Darkroom Technician is responsible for the following:
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�Screening, enlarging, and reducing all photographs,
advertisements, and logos.
Minimal advertising paste up.
Applv in person at The Fast Carolinian.
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The Sheraton Greenville � 203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
Sheraton Greenville
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
S Turkey
ramural Turkev trotters
led the pavement mat.
stretch of excitement
1 with teams of men, women
co-recreational runners
Hot the bird
fcjrteen men s squads
pteted the event with the number
onesqad claiming an tips I
I0ry.fr an attempt u dethrone the
perenr.i.i: � nte the �
YUK, lour young men ).
competition and
�ROC with a time ot 4
YUK Pi 11 K
aprured

Terps
leave
school
O0LHGEPARK,Md.(CPS
About a third of the students m ho
irop out of college leave for
noney reasons, a five-year exami-
ation of dropout patterns by the
Jniversitv of Maryland
rluded last week
Some of the dropouts ir
lave graduated "it thev had re-
reived the bem
programs or services 5ti
Affairs Vice Chancellor Richard
Stimson said.
Trying to discover why st
dents k: je before grad
tng, Maryland s Student Affairs
Office started following the prog-
ress of some SiX1 1980 freshmen,
divide into a representative
group" of students from varied
backgrounds and a "mir
group" of black students.
In all, almost 18 percent of the
"representative group and 21
percent ot the "minority gi
evenruallv left college
Thirtv-two percent of the 1
resentative and 44 percent of the
minoritv dropouts said thev left
for financial reas
That's a problem that higher
education is facing right now
conceded Maryland Chancellor
John Slaughter 'This ear,
must (provide more financial
aid), but this campus shares that
problem with the rest of the na-
tion
The Marvland stud also
showed that few ot the dropouts
used the counseling and advising
resources available on the cam-
pus to help them solve money
problems
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I 1
s
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to do exciting things in the dark?
ind get paid for it?
Carolinian is looking for
ethnically inclined student with
graph? to operate a (Joodkin vertical
�a and PMT Processor.
ikian is responsible for the following:
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at The East Carolinian.
box of
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It? � 203 W Greenville Blvd. � 355 (A
THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 3. 1987 21
IRS Turkey Trot champions
Intramural Turkey trotters
mnded the pavement in a two-
ile stretch of excitement re-
ntly with teams of men, women
id co-recreational runners
ting tor the bird.
llnrteen men's squads com-
, ed the event with the number
u squad claiming an upset vic-
r In an attempt to dethrone the
rtial favorites the TEAM
K four young men joined the
petition and captured first
with a time of 45:53. The
K BUSTERS, lead bv Charlie
lustice walked away with top
honors.
Taking third place in the men's
race were the LOSERS followed
by the RANGERS in fourth.
The run stretched from Har-
rington field around Ficklen Sta-
dium playing fields and throught
Greenville residents neighbor-
hoods before winding down to its
finish.
Although eligibility rules dis-
qualified some runners in the
women's field, excellent times
were posted by the ladv trotters.
Capturing top honors were TOPT
followed by the ladies of ALPHA
PHI and ALPHA OM1CRON PL
One co-rec squad entered the
competition and completed the
distance with a time of 62:05. SUB
4 CLUB came away with the co-
rec prize.
The Department of Intramural
Recreational Services would like
to thank Canteen Corporation
(ECU Dining Services) for provid-
ing the first prize turkeys and
pumpkin pies for the runners-up.
Several individual finishers
received a Thanksgiving entree'
and dessert for their participa-
tion. Barry Scott posting the over-
all best men's time of 10:14
walked away with a Thanksgiv-
ing Turkey.
Becky Peabody with a 14:38
captured individual female top
honors. Taking second place
overall for the men was Charlie
Justice while Connie Dupree
placed second in the women's
race. Congratulations Intramural
Champions!
Trot Meisters
Join Tim Chandler
and the sports
department each
week in
The East Carolinian
The best in sports reporting
In top photo, the men's team cham-
pion in the Turkey Trot, the YUK
Busters is pictured, while the
women's top finisher in the Turkey
Trot is pictured in the bottom
photo.
(Intramural photos provided cour-
tesy of Nance Mize � Director of
Intramural Recreational Services)
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Terps
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COLLEGE PARK, Md.(CPS)�
uta third of the students who
Irop out of college leave for
i iney reasons,a five-vcarexami-
� n of dropout patterns by the
rsiry ol Maryland con-
. d last week,
me of the dropouts might
ive graduated "if they had re-
ived the benefits of existing
rams or services Student
rs Vice Chancellor Richard
�a n said.
I rying to discover why stu-
left college before graduat-
. Maryland's Student Affairs
t'fice started following the prog-
s of some 800 1980 freshmen,
. ided into a "representative
roup" of students from varied
tckgrounds and a "minority
;roup" of black students.
In all, almost 18 percent of the
representative group" and 21
ercent of the "minority group"
.entuallv left colleee.
I hirty-two percent of the "rcp-
sentative" and 44 percent of the
inority dropouts said they left
r financial reasons.
"That's a problem that higher
lucation is facing right now
needed Maryland Chancellor
lohn Slaughter. "This campus
� (provide more financial
lid), but this campus snares that
roblem with the rest of the na-
' Tl
The Maryland study also
m ed that few of the dropouts
- d the counseling and advising
:rces available on the cam-
pus to help them solve money
t blems.
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1





22
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
r
DECEMBERS .987
The Final Fearless Football Forecast
GAMES
California Bowl
Eastern Mich. vs. San Jose St.
Independence Bowl
Tulane vs. Washington
Ail-American Bowl
Virginia vs. Brigham Young
Sun Bowl
Oklahoma St. vs. West Va.
Aloha Bowl
Florida vs. UCl A
Liberty Bowl
Arkansas vs. Georgia
Freedom Bowl
Air Force vs. An State
Holiday Bowl
Wyoming vs. Iowa
Gator Bowl
South Carolina vs. LSI
Bluebonnet Bowl
Fitt vs. Texas
Citrus Bowl
Clemson vs. Penn State
Fiesta Bowl
Fla. State vs. Nebraska
Cotton Bowl
Notre Dame vs. Texas A&M
Sugar Bowl
Syracuse vs, Auburn
Rose Bowl
Mich. State vs. Southern Cal
Orange Bowl
Oklahoma vs. Miami
Peach Bowl
Tennessee vs. Indiana
Hall of Fame Bowl
Mulligan vs. Alabama
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Last Week:
(5-5)
Overall:
(80-40)
San lose State
Washington
Virginia
Oklahoma State
UCLA
Georgia
Air Force
Wyoming
South Carolina
Texas
Clemson
Florida State
Notre Dame
Syracuse
Michigan State
Miami
Indiana
Alabama
DEAN BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
Last Week:
(5-5)
Overall:
(79-41)
San Jose State
Washington
brigham Young
Oklahoma State
UCLA
Georgia
Arizona State
Iowa
LSU
Pitt
Penn State
Florida State
Notre Dame
Auburn
Southern Cal
Oklahoma
Indiana
Alabama
Mrs. Crum admits agreement
FAYETTEVILLE, N.C (AP) -
Shirley Crum, wife of the former
North Carolina head football
coach Dick Crum, says a buy-out
agreement with the school in-
cludes a gag order between her
husband and the media, a news-
paper reported Wednesday.
Crum, the winningest football
coach in the school's history, an
nounced his resignation Monday
night.
"Part of the agreement is that
Dick cannot talk to the media
Mrs. Crum told The Fayetteville
Times by telephone from her
Chapel Hill home.
UNC Athletic Director John
Swofford did not return tele-
phone messages But Dick Bad-
dour, UNC associate athletic di-
rector, said he didn't know of any
such stipulation.
"I am not aware Of any such
agreement on that Baddour
said. "My understanding is that
the joint statement that was sub-
mitted Monday is going to be his
statement and the university
statement
Crum, who has remained mum
on his resignation, effective Jan.
31, would not comment, his secre-
tary said.
Crum, Swofford and UNC
Chancellor Christopher Ford ham
released a joint statement Mon-
day announcing Crum's resigna-
tion after 10 years as head coach.
UNC officials said Crum will be
paid an initial $400,000 and
$100,000 per year over the four
years that remain on his 10-year
contract. Crum's lOassistants'also
have had contracts since July that
will be fully honored, according
to the school.
wwgSJL
UflEN
When you till out out Form
W-4oi W-4A, "Employee's
Withholding Allowance
Certificate remember:
It you can be claimed on i oui
parcnt oi anothei person's tax
return, you generall) cannot b-
exempt from income tax
u ithhokung To gel it right. read
the iiistuii dons that came with
v.mr Form W-4 or W-4A
rhe
East Carolinian,
ride,
btivation,
xperience,
riends.
Apply today.
Asked what her husband's fu-
ture plans are. Mrs. Crum said,
1 oday is the day not to even ask
me. We're extremely disturbed
about what has gone on. It's more
than a trying positionThe two
of us are just exhausted. We just
need some time together and time
to work out a few things
Swofford on Tuesday named a
seven-member search committee
that will head efforts to find a
replacement tor Crum. Swofford
will head the panel.
Meanwhile, John Sehultz, presi-
dent of the Cumberland County
Chapter of UNC's fund-raising
Educational Foundation, said the
entire process - speculation and
reports that Crum would not be
retained for the 1988 season began
as early as Nov. 17 - had not been
handled properly.
"I guess I'm family oriented
Sehultz said. "I know thisman has
a family. I really think Dick Crum
is a fine man and it could have
been handled better
"It's fair to say the situation
required careful discussions be-
tween the university and Coach
Crum Baddour said. "It just
took time
Crum concludes his stint in
Chapel Hill with a 72-41-3 record.
He also led the Tar Heels to four
post-season bowls. This season,
however, UNC finished 5-6 with a
team that was eir3ecled to con-
tend for the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference championship.
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TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Last Week:
(6-4)
Overall:
(76-44)
San Jose State
Washington
Virginia
Oklahoma State
UCLA
Georgia
Arizona State
Iowa
South Carolina
Pitt
Clemson
Florida State
Notre Dame
Auburn
Michigan State
Oklahoma
Tennessee
Alabama
PAT MOLLOY
Assistant Sports Editor
Last Week:
(4-6)
Overall:
(68-52)
San jose State
Washington
Virginia
Oklahoma State
UCLA
Georgia
Arizona State
Iowa
South Carolina
Pitt
Clemson
Florida State
Notre Dame
Syracuse
Michigan State
Miami
Tennessee
Alabama
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
Last Week:
(5-5)
Overall:
(68-42)
San jose State
Tulane
brigham Young
West Virginia
Florida
Georgia
Arizona State
Iowa
South Carolina
Texas
Penn State
Florida State
Notre Dame
Syracuse
Michigan State
Miami
Indiana
Alabama
cTf tSfiEcLaL Dfiought f
xom
oPPman'f
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Early succ
Continued from page 19
UNC's fourth in its last five
games. Before that collapse, UNC
was 7-0 and ranked third nation
ally.
The Peach Bowl was a factor as
much for circumstances which
led to the game as for the final
result. Crum encountered disci-
plinary problems with plavers the
week before the game and had to
make some decisions which were
hard to live down, even in future
seasons.
� Crum's image This was per-
haps the most deadly poison.
As has been well documented
Crum is not a showman. On cam-
era and in front of large groups of
reporters, he is business-like He
is not an actor. What you see is
what you get.
As long as the Tar Heels were
winning, Crum's quiet demeanor
didn't seem to matter To UNC
fans, he was their version of Tom
Landry.
As the losses began to accumu-
late in recent years, however,
Crum's personality became a
handicap. He was not whetting
supporters' appetites on the held
and was unable to charm his wav
out ot a ntt'b-
The publi
(rum bega
� h and
sridicul
constant spt
status is bo
imna t on r
n
tht
�i u
und
I he Si
UNC finally se
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP .
Former North Carolina
coach Dick Crum will reo
$800,000 from the school over the
next four years after an 'erosion
of support" spurred his resigna-
tion, university officials sa
Following two weeks of specu-
lation over his status, a statement
was released jointly Monday by
Crum, UNC Chancellor Chi
pher Fordham and LNC Athletic
Director John Swofford It indi-
cated that a study was conducted
to determine the status of the I
ball program under Crum
"This study found that the pro-
gram no longer enjoyed the
support of all elements of the
university community the state-
ment said. "This erosion of sup-
port was a source of concern to
coach Crum and to the Univer-
sity
UNC officials said Crum will be
paid an initial $400,000 and
$100,000 per year over the four
years remaining on his contract.
Crum's assistants have had con-
tracts since July which will be
fully honored, the school said.
"In addition to recognizing
10 years of honorable service
these figures represent his salary
i over the four-year period plus ap-
proximately half of the value of
his outside activities associated
with the posirion of head football
coach the statement said.
The statement said Crum was
� given the option oi remaining to
coach the final years oi his con-
tract.
"However, Coach Crum and
the university have reluctant I v
determined that it is in Crum's
best interest, the best interest oi
the players that he recruited, and
the best interest oi the university
for him to submit and for the uni-
versity to accept his resignation
effective January 31,1988 the
statement said.
Swofford said he expected to
name an advisory committee to
begin searching for Crum's suc-
cessor within the next couple of
sch-
rm: I
This I
and the un:
conclus
in the �
Cru-
Reports in d
indi �

take-
chrI
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Mon. - Fri. 9:30-6:00
� -v.
1L x

j





22
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
f
DECEMBER 3, i987
The Final Fearless Football Forecast
GAMES
California Bowl
Eastern Mich. vs. San Jose St.
Independence Bowl
Tulane vs. Washington
Ail-American Bowl
Virginia vs. Brigham Young
Sun Bowl
Oklahoma St. vs. West Va.
Aloha Bowl
Florida vs. UCLA
Liberty Bowl
Arkansas vs. Georgia
Freedom Bowl
Air Force vs. Ariz. State
Holiday Bowl
Wyoming vs. Iowa
Gator Bowl
South Carolina vs. 1 SI
Bluebonnet Bowl
Pitt vs. Texas
Citrus Bowl
Clemson vs. Penn State
Fiesta Bowl
Fla. State vs. Nebraska
Cotton Bowl
Notre Dame vs. Texas A&M
Sugar Bowl
Syracuse vs, Auburn
Rose Bowl
Mich. State vs. Southern Cal
Orange Bowl
Oklahoma vs. Miami
Peach Bowl
Tennessee vs. Indiana
Hall of Fame Bowl
Michigan vs. Alabama
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Last Week:
(5-5)
Overall:
(80-40)
San Jose State
Washington
Virginia
Oklahoma State
UCLA
Georgia
Air Force
Wyoming
South Carolina
Texas
Clemson
Florida State
Not re Pa me
Syracuse
Michigan State
Miami
Indiana
Alabama
DEAN BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
Last Week:
(5-5)
Overall:
(79-41)
San Jose State
Washington
Mrigham Young
Oklahoma State
UCLA
Georgia
Arizona State
Iowa
LSU
Pitt
Penn State
Florida State
Notre Dame
Auburn
Southern Cal
Oklahoma
Indiana
Alabama
Mrs. Crum admits agreement
FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. (AP)
Shirley Crum, wite oi me former
North Carolina head football
coach Dick Crum, says a buy-out
agreement with the school in-
cludes a gag order between her
husband and the media, a news-
paper reported Wednesday.
Crum, the winningest football
coach in the school's history, an
nounced his resignation Monday
night.
"Part of the agreement is that
Dick cannot talk to the media
Mrs. Crum told The Favettevillc
Times by telephone from her
Chapel Hill home.
UNC Athletic Director John
Swofford did not return tele-
phone messages. But Dick Bad-
dour, UNC associate athletic di-
rector, said he didn't know of anv
such stipulation.
"I am not aware of any such
agreement on that Baddour
said. "My understanding is that
the joint statement that was sub-
mitted Monday is going to be his
statement and the university
statement
Crum, who has remained mum
on his resignation, effective an.
31, would not comment, his secre-
tary said.
Crum, Swofford dnd UNC
Chancellor Christopher Fordham
released a joint statement Mon-
day announcing Crum's resigna-
tion after 10 years as head coach.
UNC officials said Crum will be
paid an initial $400,000 and
$100,000 per year over the four
years that remain on his 10-year
contract. Crum's 10 assistants'also
have had contracts since July that
will be fully honored, according
to the school.
W�R�L.
U hen you till out your lim
W-4oi W-4A, "Employee's
Withholding Allowance
C Certificate remember:
It you can be claimed on oui
parent's oi anothei person's tax
return, you generally cannot be
exempt from income tax
withholding. To get it right, read
the instructions that came with
your Form W4 or W4A.
UiSMUi
The
East Carolinian,
ride,
crtivation,
xperience,
riends.
Apply today.
Asked what fur husband's fu-
ture plans are. Mrs Crum said,
I oday is the day not to even ask
me. We're extremely disturbed
about what has gone on. It's more
than a trying positionThe two
of us are just exhausted. We just
need some time together and time
to work out a few things
Swofford on Tuesday named a
seven-member search committee
that will head efforts to find a
replacement for Crum. Swofford
will head the panel.
Meanwhile, John Schultz, presi-
dent of the Cumberland County
Chapter of UNC's fund-raising
Educational Foundation, said the
entire process - speculation and
reports that Crum would not be
retained for the 1988 season began
as early as Nov. 17 - had not been
handled properly.
"I guess I'm family oriented
Schultz said. "I know thisman has
a family. I really think Dick Crum
is a fine man and it could have
been handled better
"It's fair to say the situation
required careful discussions be-
tween the university and Coach
Crum Baddour said. "It just
took time
Crum concludes his stint in
Chapel Hill with a 72-41-3 record.
Me also led the Tar Heels to four
post-season bowls. This season,
however, UNC finished 5-6 with a
team that was expected to con-
tend for the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference championship.
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TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Last Week:
(6-4)
Overall:
(76-44)
San Jose State
Washington
Virginia
Oklahoma State
UCLA
Georgia
Arizona State
Iowa
South Carolina
Pitt
Clemson
Florida State
Notre Dame
Auburn
Michigan State
Oklahoma
Tennessee
Alabama
PAT MOLLOY
Assistant Sports Editor
Last Week:
(4-6)
Overall:
(68-52)
San Jose State
Washington
Virginia
Oklahoma State
UCLA
Georgia
Arizona State
Iowa
South Carolina
Pitt
Clemson
Florida State
Notre Dame
Syracuse
Michigan State
Miami
Tennessee
Alabama
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
Last Week:
(5-5)
Overall:
(68-42)
San Jose State
Tulane
ririgham Young
West Virginia
Honda
Georgia
Arizona State
Iowa
South Carolina
Texas
I'enn State
Florida State
Notre Dame
Syracuse
Michigan State
Miami
Indiana
Alabama
erf Sfisaia Dhoucjht fi
xotn
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Special
id Quality
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Park Operations� i id. ihoatro,
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Finance�accounting Inks
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Warehouse�material handlers
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resort and conference center. A
variety of full-time and part-
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the following areas:
Food Service�food servers, bus
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utility persons, cooks
Room Service�bell persons, door
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Transportation�drivers
Housekeeping�lobby attendants
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Front Desk-reservationists, PBX
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and conference facility.
Early succ
Continued from pjj.e 19
UNC's fourth in its last five
games. Before that collapse. UNC
was 7-0 and ranked third nation-
ally
The Peach Bowl was a factor as
much for circumstances which
led to the game as for the final
result. Crum encountered disci-
plinary problems with players the
week before the game and had to
make some decisions which were
hard to live down, even in future
seasons.
�Crum's image. This was per-
haps the most deadly poison.
As has been well documented
Crum is not a showman. On cam-
era and in front of large groups of
reporters, he is business-like. He
is not an actor. What vou see is
what you get.
As long as the Tar Heels were
winning, Crum's quiet demeanor
didn't seem to matter. To UNC
fans, he was their version of Tom
Landry.
As the losses began to accumu-
late in recent years, however,
Crum's personality became a
handicap. He was not whetting
supporters' appetites on the field
and was unable to charm his wav

rhe public'
C rum began
ach and the
iss ridicule of
constant srx ul
status is bounj
impact on rec
I hi
UNC finally se
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. 'AP) - davs
CHAPEL HILL, N.C.
Former North Carolina football
coach Dick Crum will receive
$800,000 from the school over the
next four years after an "erosion
of support" spurred his res
tion, university officials say.
Following two weeks of specu-
lation over his status, a statement
was released jointly Monday by
Crum, UNC Chancellor Christo-
pher Fordham and UNC Athletic
Director John Swofford. It indi-
cated that a study was conducted
to determine the status of the
ball program under Crum.
"This study found that the pro-
gram no longer enjoyed the full
support of all elements of the
university community the state-
ment said. "This erosion of sup-
port was a source of concern to
coach Crum and to the Univer-
sity
UNC officials said Crum will be
paid an initial $400,000 and
$100,000 per year over the four
years remaining on his contract.
Crum's assistants have had con-
tracts since July which will be
fully honored, the school said.
"In addition to recognizing his
10 years of honorable service
these figures represent his salary
over the four-year period plus ap-
proximately half of the value oi
his outside activities associated
with the position of head football
coach the statement said.
The statement said Crum was
given the option oi remaining to
coach the final vcars of his con-
tract.
D
ment th
"This :
and tl
conclus
this amid
Neil
datu n nor it
in the : I
Crum's r I
Reports in I J
indicated I
known as th
taken part in tru
CH
"However, Coach Crum and
the university have reluctantlv
determined that it is in Crum's
best interest, the best interest of
the players that he recruited, and
the best interest of the university
for him to submit and for the uni-
versity to accept his resignation
effective January 31,1988 the
statement said.
Swofford said he expected to
name an advisory committee to
sbegin searching for Crum's suc-
cessor within the next couple of
GIFT Cl
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Mon. - Fri. 9:30-6:00
7
A

j





St

"rRICHARD 1AKIN
I CU Chancellot
I ast Week
(5-5)
Overall:
(68-42)
ose Stae
fulane
Uj
ate
A72. . .
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I -I i W.l f-Vl
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1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 3,1987 23
Early success doomed Crum
Continued from page 19
I NC's fourth in its last five
games. Before that collapse, UNC
was 7-0 and ranked third nation-
ally.
The Peach Bowl was a factor as
much for circumstances which
led to the game as for the final
result Crum encountered disci-
plinary problems with players the
n eek before the game and had to
make some decisions which were
hard to live down, even in future
seasons.
� Cram's image. This was per-
haps the most deadly poison.
As has been well documented
r "m is not a showman. On cam-
: a and in front of large groups of
reporters, he is business-like. He
is not an actor. What you see is
what you get.
As long as the Tar Heels were
v, inning, Crum's quiet demeanor
didn't seem to matter. To UNC
fans, he was their version of Tom
I andrv.
As the losses began to accumu-
ate in recent years, however,
Crum's personality became a
handicap. He was not whetting
supporters' appetites on the field
was unable to charm his way
out of a mess.
The public's perception of
Crum began hurting both the
coach and the UNC program.
Mass ridicule of Crum and almost
constant speculation about his job
status is bound to have had an
impact on recruiting and or the
thinking of the players already at
UNC.
In the end, Crum is probably a
victim of his own success. The fact
that he got the Tar Heels so far up
the college football ladder raised
expectations. When Maye came
on board, fans considered the sky
the Heels' only limit.
When the bottom fell out,
people who once supported
Crum began askingWhat have
you done for me lately?"
Make no mistakes about it close
only counts in horseshoes. Al-
most doesn't cut it.
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SEX
he Sl'H-4 Club claimed the championship in the co-rec turkey trot championship.
UNC finally settles issue over Crum
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) -
Former North Carolina football
. h Dick Crum will receive
- ),000 from the school over the
next tour years after an "erosion
of support" spurred his resigna-
tion university officials say.
Following two weeks of specu-
lation over his status, a statement
was released jointly Monday by
rum, UNC Chancellor Christo-
pher Fordham and UNC Athletic
Director John Swofford. It indi-
cated that a study was conducted
to determine the status of the foot-
ball program under Crum.
This studv found that the pro-
gram no longer enjoyed the full
support of all elements of the
uruversity community the state-
ment said. "This erosion of sup-
port was a source of concern to
a ach Crum and to the Univer-
sW"
UNC officials said Crum will be
d an initial $41X1,000 and
$100,000 per year over the four
years remaining on his contract.
Crum s assistants have had con-
since uly which will be
. I) honored, the school said.
addition to recognizing his
10 years of honorable service,
figures represent his salary
. ir the four-year period plusap-
r ornately half of the value of
utside activities associated
with the position of head football
coach the statement said.
The statement said Crum was
given the option of remaining to
h the final years of his con-
tract.
"However, Coach Crum and
I university have reluctantly
-mined that it is in Crum's
best interest, the best interest of
the players that he recruited, and
the best interest of the university
for him to submit and for the uni-
versity to accept his resignation
effective January 31,1988 the
statement said.
Swofford said he expected to
name an advisory committee to
begin searching for Crum's suc-
cessor within the next couple of
days, according to Rick Brewer,
UNC Sports Information director.
Swoffard will chair the panel.
Discussions between Crum and
school officials took place in a
"mutually supportive environ-
ment the statement said.
"This decision by Coach Crum
and the university represents the
conclusion reached by them fol-
lowing this amicable review
Neither the Educational Foun-
dation nor its members took part
in the negotiations that led to
Crum's resignation, officials said.
Reports in the last 10 days had
indicated that the foundation,
known as the Rams Club, had
taken part in the negotiations to
buy out Crum's contract.
Crum's college coaching career
began at Miami of Ohio, after 12
years spent in the high school
ranks. He was the defensive back-
field coach for one season for the
Redskins then spent four years as
defensive coordinator before
being named head coach prior to
the 1974 season.
He coached Miami of Ohio for
four years, leading the Redskins
to a 34-10-1 record and two victo-
rious trips to the Tangerine Bowl
during that span.
Crum replaced Bill Dooley as
the Tar Heels' coach in 1978. He
led North Carolina to a 5-6 record
his first season, then to 8-3-1,11-1
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and 10-2 records and victorious
bowl trips the next three seasons.
In the latter two seasons, the Tar
Heels finished in the top 10 in the
Associated Press final polls.
Crum was named the ACC coach
of the year by the Atlantic Coast
Sports Writers Association fol-
lowing the 1980 season.
The Tar Heels also went to
bowls the next two seasons, fin-
ishing each year with a 8-4 record.
North Carolina slumped to 5-5-1
and 5-6 marks the next two sea-
sons before rebounding with a 7-
4-1 record in 1986, including a loss
in the Aloha Bowl to Arizona.
Crum's record at North Caro-
lina is 72-41-3.
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in ��!��� MH� -
A





24 Tl
E EAST CAROLINIAN DECFMRFB 3,1987
Elway shaking shadow cast early by Marino I Ge�rgia S
l UnhlSunday. Dan Marino has ma 27-0 loss , R��.n �� : . J � ATUVT.u. �
Until Sunday, Dan Marino has
been the shadow lurking over
fohn El way's shoulder.
Elway, the first player chosen in
the 1983 NFL draft, had an
overpublidzed nightmare of a
rookie season while Marino,
taken 26th, emerged as an instant
star.
The next year, Elway led the
Denver Broncos to the playoffs.
But Marino led the Miami Dol-
phins to the Super Bowl, setting
an NFL record with 48 touch-
down passes.
Elway began to catch up in the
public eye when he drove the
Broncos 98 yards in the final min-
utes to tie Cleveland in the AFC
championship game last season,
setting up the overtime victory
that put the Broncos in the Super
Bowl. Now he may have reached
the same exalted plane - Marino
and Elway, Elway and Marino,
take your pick.
On Sunday, for example, Mar-
ino went without a touchdown
pass for the first time in 31 games
in a 27-0 loss at Buffalo while
Elway threw for 347 yards and
three touchdowns as Denver won
a critical 31-17 decision at San
Diego.
"I don't think about those
things Elway said with a smile
when asked about the rivalry
with Marino. "Stuff like that is for
the media to worry about
El way's exploi ts this year are on
the same plane as Marino. He has
15 touchdown passes to 18 for
Marino, one less interception and
a rating of 89.6 to 89.0 for the
Miami quarterback.
In the last three games, Elway
has been everything he was
touted to be when he left Stanford
five years ago. Elway, with the
exception of Philadelphia's still-
developing Randall Cunning-
ham, is the only quarterback
around who can throw a 50-yard
strike on the run.
In victories over the Bears,
Raiders and Chargers, Elway
passed for a combined 986 yards
and seven touchdowns as Denver
improved to 7-3-1 and moving
within a half-game behind the
Chargers.
Two of the four best total of-
fense totals of Elway'scareer have
come in the last four games.
His 372 yards in the 31-29 vic-
tory over Chicago three weeks
ago was his fourth best and the
387 against San Diego on Sunday
equalled the total he had against
the New York Giants last season.
His best game, 432 yards, was at
DICE YOUR I
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2nd Floor, Publications Building
757-6009
Filing Dates: Dec. 1 - Dec. 7
1-2 p.m.
Seattle in 1985. All were big games
and those against the Bears,
Giants and Seahawks came
against three of the league's
toughest defenses.
Elway was the main reason the
Broncos coverted 12 of 15 third-
down opportunities on Sunday,
when he also rushed for 40 yards
in six carries. One of the carries
wasa 16-yard scramble on a third-
and-14 that set up the Bronco's
third touchdown.
He also has a resilience that
makes him a unique competitor.
On Denver's first possession, he
drove the Broncos from their own
20 to the Chargers' 6, only to
throw an interception that Vencie
Glenn returned an NFL-record
103 yards for a touchdown. Then
the scoreboard flashed Elway's
career totals against the Chargers:
"Two touchdowns, 13 intercep-
tions r
He came back quickly, hitting
Mark Jackson with a 52-yaru
bomb that set up the tying score.
Why did it take Elway five
years? Because it takes most quar
terbacks five years. He may get
even better, which could be scary
"He sees things so much better
now Denver Coach Dan Reeves
said.
"The more you see things, the
more they become second nature
and things are becoming second
nature to him now
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SJOP NORTH ATLANTIC
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FRESH FROM THE FLORIDA
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CALIFORNIA
Coca-Cola
89 C
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Wh.te Grapefruit 3 98c Firm Carrots
SELECT MEDIUM
SL'N GiANT BRAND
Yellow Onions L 88c Seedless Raisins W 99c
PI ANTATk IN OiP
Pineapples
WATEREIEID BRAND
Boston Lettuce
BFAUTIF HOC DAv.6 POT
1.29 Pomsettias 4"c 3.99
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STOP ' A&P FROZEN
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CA
I
I

ATLANTA (AP) - Georgia
Southern is on a roll, but if the
Eagles are to remain in contention
for an unprecedented third con-
secutive Division 1-AA national
championship they will ha
play a near-perfect game atur-
day, says Coach Eric RUy
The Eagles face No 1 seed
Appalachian State in a quarterfi-
nal matchup
"We've got tf plav a rrusl I
free game and thin plav the
game we've played Ru
whose squad had won five
straight, said I uesday in an inter-
view from theStatestx -rocan
He also is concerned tvith
size of Appalachian State which
Russell said "might be ti
est physical mismatch i I
tury
"These people are r �
folks, they are outstanding
ball players Russell sa
prepared his squad for I
p.m. EST kickofl Satui
home field ol Api n in
Boone, C
"They've just j
strong, fast peopk � :
Appalachian, 9-2, which av -
260 pounds on the offens
headed by tackle Derrick Gra-
ham, a b-tooto, 2v0-pounder
"We don't match up very sell
there. Our biggest guy i ndefena
is probably Jeff Banks at 6-1
and 240' Russcll said.
"But their strong point is �
blv on the other side ol the
Howard once
KANSAS CITi V
NCAA has rejected a
expand the Division
ball playoffs bv four
way of settling
University's 59 million su �
being excluded from the 16-1
championship
Howard, a predomii
black school which had � s
ond-best record in Division I A
at 9-1, claims it was raciaih d -
criminated against and denied a
berth in the playoffs in v;
of antitrust regulations and ex-
tract provisions.
After U.S. District Court u
-lohn Garwtt Penn turnud-viwwo
the Washington. DC school -
request to halt first-round gam
last week, the university pr
posed that the second round
the playoffs be postponed volun
tanly while four additional team
play first-round games.
The NCAA initially had n
sponse to the proposal, but
spokesman Jim Marchionv aid
today that the 1-AA football
committee declined to alter the
playoff structure for this year.
There are several reasons forthe
rejection, Marchionv said, but the
most important was that "the
committee feels the 16 teams cho-
sen were chosen in a fair manner
with no regard for race
Marchionv said the committee
also decided it would be unsafe
forcollegeathletes to play in three
football games in 11 days; the
revised schedule would interfere
with class and exam schedules.
and it would be a financial hard-
ship for schools in the playoffs to
change travel and housing plans
Asked if the committee might
consider an expanded playoff for
next year. Marchionv said there
would be no reason to consider it.
"The membership has indicated it
wants a 16-team playoff. There
EAT IN FA
OR
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Sp,
Mai
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This offer Not good with any other promotion.
r

r-
A






f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
I
DECEMBER 31 m? 25
Marino
r resilience that
lique competitor.
prt possession, he
s from their own
rgers' 6, only to
ptton that Vencie
an PL record
down Then
led Elwav 5
nsl the Chargers;
- 13 intercep-
quick.lv. hitting
Mark (ackson with a 52-yara
bomb that set up the tying score.
Why did it take Elway five
years Because it takes most quar-
terbacks five years. He may get
even better, which could be scary.
"He sees things so much better
now Denver Coach Dan Reeves
said
"The more you see things, the
more they become second nature
and things are becoming second
nature to him now
Genuine 24�0 Full Lead Crystal
Glassware
This Week s Feature
CHAMPAGNE FLUTE
ea
witn every
S5 purchase
A temsare - .
always on sale I .49
� ���.� -UKult UOVXIS Jm'IH �7 �
ffij Fryer
3� Breast
29
lKj Sliced
Bacon
1
19
Boneless jqq
Smoked Ham �
1.19 Rutip Roast '
2.99 Sirloin Steaks
99: Fryer Parts
2.29
2.99
49"
1.79 Smoked Sausage -2.29
m
E IDAHO
NORTH ATLANTIC
FRESH
HTi
Ocean
I Perch Fillets
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69
m
99
3.99
1.29
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!
Georgia Southern is on roll
ATLANTA (AP) - Georgia
Southern is on a roll, but if the
Eagles are to remain in contention
for an unprecedented third con-
secutive Division 1-AA national
championship they will have to
play a near-perfect game Satur-
day, says Coach Erk Russell.
the Eagles face No. 1 seed
Appalachian State in a quarterfi-
nal matchup.
"We've got to play a mistake-
tree game and then play the best
game we've played Russell,
whose squad had won five
straight said Tuesday in an inter-
view from theStatesboro campus.
He also is concerned with the
size of Appalachian State, which
Russell said "might be the great-
est physical mismatch of the cen-
tury
"These people are not just big
folks, they are outstanding foot-
ball players Russell said as he
prepared his squad for the 1:30
p.m. EST kickoff Saturday at the
home field of Appalachian in
Boone, N.C.
"They've just got lots of big,
trong, fast people he said of
Appalachian, 9-2, which averages
2r�0 pounds on the offensive line,
headed by tackle Derrick Gra-
ham, a 6-foot-5, 290-pounder.
"We don't match up very well
there. Our biggest guv on defense
is probably Jeff Banks at 6-foot-3
and 240 Russell said.
"But their strong point is proba-
bly on the other side of the ball
he said, where the Mountaineers
defensive line is even bigger at an
average of 280 pounds with nose
guard jimmy Snowden the big-
gest at 6-foot-4 and 310 pounds.
Georgia Southern, 8-3, averages
242 pounds on the offensive line
and 235 pounds on the defensive
line.
"On offense they run more than
they pass it and they're big
enough to line up and just drive it
down your throat Russell said.
'They just overpower you
Russell said he will take his
team to Boone on Friday for a
workout on the artificial turf field
as opposed to the grass at Georgia
Southern's Paulson Stadium
where the Eagles are 6-0 this sea-
son and have won 18 in a row.
"We've only played on it (artifi-
cial turf) once this season and we
beat Western Carolina (37-16), but
we'd rather play on grass at
home he said.
Russell, whose Eagles are un-
beaten in the playoffs since reach-
ing them for the first time in 1985,
ran the string to nine last week in
a 31-28 overtime victory over
Maine.
Appalachian will be more diffi-
cult, he said, pointing out that the
Mountaineers have an outstand-
ing defensive team. Asked if they
were tougher against the run than
the pass, Russell said: "It's hard to
say. That's what we do (run) he
said. "But they don't give up very
many yards or very many points.
They're only giving up about 10
points a game
Appalachian, which defeated
Richmond 20-3 in the first round
last week, is led on offense by
running backs Rich Melchor and
Tom Sanders. Melchor has rushed
for 718 yards and Sanders for 691.
Freshman quarterback Bobby
Fuller, who became a starter only
three games back, has thrown for
414 yards and three touchdowns
in completing 36 of 63 passing
attempts.
Georgia Southern is led by a
pair of freshmen, running back
Joe Ross and quarterback Ray-
mond Gross. Ross has run for
1,104 yards while Gross has
rushed for 702 yards and passed
for another 547 after taking over
the first string job midway in the
season.
Worumdf Premiere
Perfume Of The World.
Colors I)e Bknetra
CAA tabs Woolfolk
RICHMOND (AP) - Peter
Woolfolk of Richmond has been
named the men's basketball
player of the week in the Colonial
Athletic Association, league offi-
cials announced Tuesday.
Woolfolk, a 6-foot-5 senior for-
ward, had 42 points, 19 rebounds,
four steals and two assists as the
Spiders split two games at the
Central Fidelity Holiday Classic.
He had 25 points and 15 rebounds
as Richmond downed Boston
University 66-61 in the semifinals
and 17 points and four rebounds
in an 87-76 loss to North Carolina
in the tournament championship
games.
Woolfolk's efforts earned him a
spot on the all-tournament team.
The CAA said Debbie Wade of
William & Mary is the women's
player of the week. The senior
forward from Blacksburg had 31
points and 24 rebounds as Wil-
liam & Mary took both games and
the championship of its own in-
vitational tournament. She also
was named to the all-tournament
squad.
Howard once again is denied
TAXPAYERS
with dependents
HERE'S A TAX TIP.
Boginning with your 1987 income
tax return that you will file in
1988. you generally must list social
security numbers lor dependents
who are at least five vears old In
the end ot 1987. It any ot your
dependents do not have this
number, get an application torm
today from the Social Security
office in your area.
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) - The
CAA has rejected a proposal to
expand the Division 1-AA foot-
ball playoffs by four teams as a
way of settling Howard
University's $9 million suit over
being excluded from the 16-team
championship.
Howard, a predominantly
black school which had the sec-
ond-best record in Division 1-AA
at 9-1, claims it was racially dis-
criminated against and denied a
berth in the playoffs in violation
of antitrust regulations and con-
tract provisions.
After U.S. District Court judge
lohn. Gartatt Perm turnod-dowiv-
the Washington, DC, school's
request to halt first-round games
last week, the university pro-
posed that the second round of
the playoffs be postponed volun-
tarily while four additional teams
play first-round games.
The NCAA initially had no re-
sponse to the proposal, but
spokesman Jim Marchiony said
today that the 1-AA football
committee declined to alter the
playoff structure for this year.
There are several reasons for the
rejection, Marchiony said, but the
most important was that "the
committee feels the 16 teams cho-
sen were chosen in a fair manner
with no regard for race
Marchiony said the committee
also decided it would be unsafe
for college athletes to play in three
football games in 11 days; the
revised schedule would interfere
with class and exam schedules,
and it would be a financial hard-
ship for schools in the playoffs to
change travel and housing plans.
Asked if the committee might
consider an expanded playoff for
next year, Marchiony said there
would be no reason to consider it.
"The membership has indicated it
wants a 16-team playoff. There
would be no reason to implement
a different selection process next
year he said.
Penn refused last week to order
an expanded field for the playoffs
but said there were "substantial
and severe questions" raised by
the pending suit.
He cited as particularly troub-
ling Howard's ranking behind
North Texas State in the final
NCAA 1-AA poll after the teams
had been tied for 20th the previ-
ous week. In their final games,
North Texas State beat a Division
1-AA team with a losing record,
while Howard beat No. 14 Dele-
ware State. North Texas State
moved ahead of Howard in the
rankings, which were used by the
NCAA in awarding playoff bids.
"It does seem Howard would
have ended up with a higher
ranking the judge said last
week.
Imti:d Ohors Of Bkmxton
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Open til 9 p.m.
JS





26
THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 3,1987
a
wmmmmmmmmmmammmmtmm
f .i . j .� . .? : r j :r:o
UBE COUPON SALE
Do your Christmas Shopping Early and Save
Now Thru Saturday December 5th.
U.B.Ei
516 S. COTAJCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
ft
IK
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$2.00 off I $3.00 off jj $4.00
Plain crewneck sweatshirt
Regular $8.95
limit one coupon per item - good thru 12-5-87
w. � 111111 .Jll.
Plain hooded sweatshirts
Regular $11.95
limit one coupon per item - good thru 12-5-87
Plain hooded Zipfronts
Regular $13.95
limit one coupon per item- good thru 12-5-87
$2.00
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I
jj $5.00 with this coupon $1QQ Qff
Plain heavyweight crewnecks n Big selection of mostly medium Si
Regular $11.95 and $13.95 �� & small hoods in assorted "any ltem m �Ur sPortwear store -
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limit one coupon per person
$5.00 off$5.00 off$ 10.00
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Title
The East Carolinian, December 3, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 03, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.578
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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