The East Carolinian, December 1, 1987






INSIDE
Editorials���4
StyleZZZ9
SportsM�13
Classifieds5
STYLE
Protective Intervention Course teaches self defense
� see STYLE, page 9.
SPORTS
��������
Blue Devils pound Pirates in Monday action � see
SPORTS, page 13.
aUje i�uBt (Earnimian
Serving the East Carolina .impus community since 1925.
Vol.62 No. 26
Tuesday, December 1,1987
Greenville, NC
16 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Chancellor withdraws plan for paving field
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Managing liitor
Thegreen space at the bottom of
College Hill Drive is no longer
slated to be turned into a parking
lot. according to a statement is-
sued bv the ECU News Bureau
Monday morning.
The plan to pave the area, pro-
posed as part of a plan by Chan-
cellor Richard R. Eakin, came
under attack from student organi-
zations and independent stu-
dents when it was first announced
Nov. 10.
Eakin is to recommend the
remaining portions of the plan to
the Board oi Trustees on Friday.
The original plan would have
added 1,269 parking spaces at a
cost of $936,000 � increasing
campus parking fees by $25 per
student. The revised plan an-
nounced Monday would would
add 318 less spaces.
If the rest oi the plan remains
true its original intent (Eakin was
unavailable for comment or
elaboration on Monday), two new
freshman lots containing 851
spaces will be created near
Minges Coliseum. One hundred
spaces will be added to the exist-
ing large lot at the bottom of Col-
lege Hill. It is not known whether
the parking fees will still be in-
creased or not.
However, SGA President Scott
Thomas said he understood, in
talking with the chancellor, that
some of the proposed lots around
the Minges area would be desig-
nated as commuter parking with
shuttle buses to the university.
Thomas said he was pleased
with the chancellor's decision.
"It's a perfect example that
compromise is better than con-
frontation he said Monday af-
ternoon. "There's a lot of support
for the other points of his plan to
pave the other three areas
New plan affects grad assts.
By EDDIE FITZGERALD
Suit Writer
The Southern Association ot
Colleges and Schools (SACS) has
adopted a new policy that will
affect graduate teaching assis-
tants at all accredited colleges in
the southeastern region of the
United States next semester.
Graduate teaching assistants or
teaching fellows must now have
18 graduate semester hours in
their respective fields of study
before they can teach, according
to SACS's Commission on Col-
leges.
This new policy does not affect
those graduates who are assisting
with laboratory or physical edu-
cation activities, attending or
helping prepare lectures, grading
papers, keeping class records and
similar assignments. However, it
does affect those graduate assis-
tants who are teaching for credit,
unless the assistant is teaching
remedial courses for institutional
credit that docs not apply to anv
degree program.
There are about 300 graduate
ccistants currently employed at
iU, but not all of them will be
affected, according to Joseph
Bovette, dean of the graduate
school at ECU.
Many of the graduate assistants
have 18 hours, or more of gradu-
ate semester hours, or will have
enough hours the Spring
semester. And many more � his-
tory tutors, science lab assistants,
etc. � also will not be affected.
Bovette said the departments
probably most affected will be:
English, Math, and Psychology.
"Each department or school is
going to work out its own pro-
gram to get away from having
graduate students assigned to full
course responsibility Bovette
said. "The graduate school has
asked each department to explore
ways of meeting the Southern
Association's requirements
In the English Department
there are 51 graduate teaching
assistants, 23 of them arc below
the 18 hour requirement.
Since this policy change came
after registration for Spring
semester the English Department,
as an "emergency measure" to
deal with the now unqualified
graduate teaching assistants, is
planning to combine live or six
sections of freshman composition
into one large section. This large
section will be taught by faculty
members, according to Douglas
McMillan, director of graduate
students for the English Depart-
ment.
"Then the section will be bro-
ken down at least once or twice a
week into smaller sections with
graduate teaching assistants tu-
toring them he said.
McMillan is expecting three of
these large sections, with approxi-
mately 150 students per class, for
freshmen composition. "Next
year we'll try to work out the
schedules so there won't be those
large sections he said.
The only changes that will affect
the graduate assistants, according
to McMillan, is the duties as-
signed to them. "They will still be
paid the same, and be expected to
work the same amount of hours
for tutoring as they did for teach-
ing he said.
In the past, there were no re-
strictions for ECU graduate stu-
dents to teach other than comple-
tion of undergraduate work and
being enrolled in a graduate
course. "They could start teaching
as soon as they became graduate
students McMillan said.
Boyette said one of the main
reasons for the policy change was
because of "legitimate concern
about taking a student who might
have been a good undergraduate
student but might really not have
been outstanding, admitting him
to graduate school, and immedi-
ately assigning him to teach a col-
lege course. So there is something
a little bit lacking in quality about
that he said.
"In some cases we might have
to draw money that's now in the
graduate assistants' budget and
use it. So it might mean that some
graduate assistants might need to
be discontinued and faculty hired
to supervise groups of graduate
assistants.
"But I don't want to excite
graduate students with the idea
that, yeah, we're going to throw
out several groups of graduate
students and hire faculty, because
we might be able to manage with-
out doing that at all. We may keep
the number of graduate students
we have now and still hire some
extra faculty to work closely with
them
Both McMillan and Boyette said
the new rule is a positive move. "It
will give a little uniformity to the
teaching staff of freshman compo-
sition McMillan said.
"Right now there is a great
unevenness. You've got every-
thing from a brand new graduate
student with no course work fin-
ished, to a whole regular staff. So
I think this is an improvement for
the English Department and it
should be across the board. We'll
get better instructors for the fresh-
men, and maybe for the graduate
student, faster completion of their
own program
Thomas said it was important
for the SGA to work with the
chancellor on the parking
problem. "I feel what we have to
do on the part of student govern-
ment is to try and come up with
some alternatives. I feel we have
to institute some sort of shuttle
system. The transit buses already
go by Minges Coliseum, but I
think we are going to need to in-
crease the frequency for the new
lot
In addition, Thomas said, more
use must be made of available
parking in lots like those near Belk
Building.
Thomas said the plan was a
positive step for the future. "A lot
of people have been talking about
a parking deck, but you have to
look at prices he said. The chan-
cellor had said in earlier debates
that the deck cost much more per
space than a flat lot.
Thomas also said there must be
an alternative place to park while
a deck is being built over current
spaces, and that Eakin's plan
would help create those extra
spaces.
ECU students will be receptive
to Eakin's new proposal, Thomas
said. "I think the students will bt
happy and very receptive to the
new plan because that field was
used for several things he said.
The field is used for marching
band practice, ROTC drills, intra-
mural activities, residence hall
events and individual pick-up
games at various times during the
year.
"We are currently short on
space for recreation as it is. It 1 the
plan to pave the field) really got
the student's interest aroused as it
did about two years ago when it
wasalsoproposed'Thomassaid.
"It shows the students do have
some input on the decisions that
are made at this campus he said.
SGA discusses athletic facility;
looks at rules for painting street
'TU1��tS�'�N
SGA President Scott Thomas
issued an executive committee
report on a new student recrea-
tion center Monday in a regularly
scheduled meeting of the legisla-
ture.
After the report, the legislature
discussed a resolution that would
support giving organizations the
right to paint insignias on the
street in front of the ECU student
store. The resolution was sent
back to the Student Welfare
Committee for further considera-
tion.
The Student Recreation Center
Committee report that Thomas
issued at the meeting said there is
"overwhelming support from the
student body" for the building of
a recreation center.
Written support for the center
included in the report came from
the following organizations: Stu-
dent Union, Panhellenic Council,
Inter-Fraternity Council, Depart-
ment of Intramural Recreational
Services and the Student Resi-
dence Association.
The report follows the Nov. 2
resolution passed by the SGA that
states that Memorial Gym is "infe-
rior" and that the students de-
serve a new facility.
The report will be sent to Chan-
cellor Richard R. Eakin and the
Board of Trustees this week for
consideration, according to Tho-
mas.
"The Chancellor has indicated
strong support for the center and
will probably put it on his list for
new construction on campus
Thomas said.
Legislator Tripp Roakes,
speaking after Thomas' report,
read a street painting resolution
that calls for a "continuation of the
painting of organizational insig-
nias In reading the resolution he
authored, Roakes said painting
on the street has become a tradi-
tion for organizations.
Recently, the Student Store
street was paved. Prior to the
paving, tratermties and other
campus organizations could ap-
ply to the office of the assistant
dean of student life for a permit to
paint insignias on a designated
area of the street.
"It (the street) was a place
where organizations could show
their support and have recogni-
tion Marty Helms said in favor
of the resolution.
But Helms said it is unfair for
the Air Force ROTC to have its
insignia on the sidewalk near the
student store while other groups
are not allowed to paint insignias
on either the street or the side-
walk.
SGA Speaker Bennett Eckert
disapproved of the resolution,
saying that there would be great
competition among student
groups for space on the street.
In other business, the SGA ap-
propriated $100 to the Intermedi-
ate Education Club for materials.
Elizabeth Dole speaks,
cites husband's record
SGA President Scott Thomas presented a report on the status of
plans for a new recreational facility at Monday's SGA meeting.
Legislator s also discussed the fate of the painted street in front of
the Student Store. (Photo by Hardy Alligood)
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Managing Editor
Saying that her husband is
"running on a record, not a res-
ume former Secretary of Trans-
portation Elizabeth Dole urged a
group of area supporters to get
the word out about her husband,
Sen. Robert Dole.
Mrs. Dole, speaking at a $25 a
plate breakfast in Greenville Sat-
urday, said, "Bob Dole has been in
the Congress of the United States
for 27 years. He served as the
chairman of the Senate Finance
Committee It handles over half
of the president's budget�medi-
care, medicaid, international
trade � just so many key issues.
And as chairman of that
committee, it was Bob Dole who
shepherded through President
Reagan's programs. He helped to
make it happen. He made an
enormous difference there in get-
ting our economy turned
around
Mrs. Dole said three examples
of her husband's leadership were
in areas of solvency of the Social
Security program, the 1985 farm
bill and defecit reduction.
She said Dole, as majority
leader of the Senate in 1985,
brought together colleagues and
key players in the economy for
100 meetings to work on a solu-
tion to the nation's economic
woes. The group, she said, "ham-
mered out a package that would
save this country $135 billion over
three years. And it would have
produced a balanced budget in
the 1990s
The plan eventually was voted
down in the House of Representa-
tives, she said.
Mrs. Dole said a key to under-
standing her husband was in
knowing his past. Dole was shot
in the neck while trying to rescue
a wounded soldier in World War
II, resulting in paralysis from the
neck down. Dole was told he'd
never be able to be a doctor, but
that, if he worked at it, he might be
able to regain the use of most of
his body.
Dole did come back, and today
can use all of his body with the
exception of his right arm.
"There's no question in mv
mind Mrs. Dole said, "that
when you fight your way back
from extreme adversity, what-
ever it might be that you've expe-
rienced, it enhances inner
strength. Bob is as tough a person
as I've ever known
Adversity also enhances sensi-
tivity to the problems of others.
See DOLE, page 7
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER I, 1987
Peel endowment funds new Scholars Award
ECU Nna Bureau
"he I Woolard Peel University
Scholars Award endowment
fund has been established at ECU
in memory oi the late Martin
i ounty resident and former
mayoi vt Everetts, N.C.
i he endowment was funded by
Woolard s wile, Helen K. Peel of
! ven Its and their son. Dr. Jesse
K Peel ol Atlanta.
University Scholars Award
pro ides full tuition and fees fora
� ipi nt's entire four years at
ECU. University Scholars
chosen on the basis of
academic and leadership "capa
bihties through a competitiv
lection process
The
are oping. We just thought we
superior wanted to be a part of that devel-
opment
J. Woolard Peel earned a BS
degree in 1935 from North Caro-
n,VCrs,ty 1S doming lina State University.
more important to our commu
nity and to all of eastern North
Carolina Mrs. Peel said. "My
son and I decided to establish the
a ward at ECU because it's so close
to home. We have seen how the
University is growing and dcvel-
He was
mayor of Everetts from 1947 to
1963. He served in Europe in
World War II as a U.S. Army cap-
tain. He was a lifelong Martin
County resident and farmer be-
fore his death in 1986.
Peel was a member of the Ever-
etts Christian Church. He was
also a 32nd degree Mason with
the Scottish Rites and a Shriner.
Mrs. Peel attended Louisburg
College and is a 1935 graduate of
Hardbarger Junior College of
Business in Raleigh. She has been
active in the community and in
the Everetts Church for 50 years.
"The Peels' gift is a reflection of
their confidence in the
university's ability to enhance the
quality of life for the citizens of
Nischan receives writing award
Kt N1 Bureau
Dr. Bodo lsrh.in nrnfiicciii- ,f t-i����u .
. I c� Bureau
Bodo Nischan, professor of
sixteenth-centurv Lutherans and
U EC L, has been awarded Calvinists in Germany ov" the
the 1987 ArnosE Simpson Pnze question of exorcism and bao-
Dest article on European
spring
for t
history published during the'past
year.
Nischan's article on exorcism
and baptism in the late Reforma-
tion, I lie Exorcism Controversy
and Baptism in the LateReforma-
was published in The Six-
teenth Century oumal's
198 issue.
Charles F. Delzell oi Van-
L niversity, chair oi the
Simpson Prize Commit-
European Section, Southern
torical Association, said the
committee observed that
Nischan's article "is based on
painstaking research in German
libraries and sources and reflects
rommand oi the literature on
bap-
tism. r
Delzell said eight entries were
submitted for the prize selection
and that several were "especially
praiseworthy "The Prize
Committee is oi the unanimous
opinion that the (Nischan) article
is the winner of the 1987 competi-
tion he said.
The competition was for an ar-
ticle on European history pub-
lished by a member of the faculty
of a Southern collegeor university
including the South plus Dela-
ware, Kentucky, Maryland, Mis-
souri, Oklahoma. West Virginia
and the District of Columbia.
Nischan, a member of the ECU
history faculty since 1969, re-
ceived the prize at a luncheon
meet.ng of the European section
of the Southern Historical Asso-
ciation in New Orleans Nov. 13.
Nischan has spent several sum-
mers in Germany engaged in re-
search on aspects of the Protestant
Reformation of the 16th Century
our region ECU Chancellor
Richard R. Eakin said. "Endow-
ing scholarships that help ECU
attract a number of our state's and
nation's most talented young
leaders is one of my top priorities.
We are indebted to the Peels for
their generosity
Dr. Peel, an only child, gradu-
ated Phi Beta Kappa from the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill in 1963andearned his
MD at UNC-CH in 1965. He in-
terned in MedicinePediatrics at
Chapel Hill in 1965-66 and served
his residency from 1966-69 in the
Department of Psychiatry at the
Hospital of the University of
Pennsylvania.
en
Am
Hackney named president of
Friends of the ECU Library
"I grew up just 20 miles from
ECU, so I fed like it was in my
backyard for as long as I can re-
member Dr. Peel said. "My
mother and I believe that the
University Scholars Award is a
quality program and will help to
enhance ECU and eastern North
Carolina by attracting quality
students
A Vietnam veteran. Dr. Peel
served in the Medical Corps of the
U.S. Navy Reserve for two years
He then taught as an assistant
professor at the Vanderbilt Uni-
versity School of Medicine from
1971-76. Dr. Peel has been in pri-
vate medical practice at Atlanta's
Center for Psychiatry since 197h

ilC.
h
author has made a thor-
� exploration of one specific
�gical controversy and has
d it in a lucid, convincing
Izell said. "One has
the impression that very little
more can be said about this par-
ilar theological controversy in
late sixteenth-century Germany
Based on a paper which Dr.
Nischan presented to the Ameri-
can Society of Church History in
New York in December, 1985, the
irticle traces and analyzes differ-
�S that emerged between late
Wheeler joins
ECU Medical
School faculty
as cardiologist
Dr. Will
ECl Kewn Hurvau
iam S. Wheeler, a cardi-
ist has joined the faculty at
E C I School oi Medicine as
ass, mate professor in the Depart-
ment of Medicine's Section of
Cardiology.
In addition to responsibilities in
interventional cardiology, he will
( � r ; iv the school's cardiac
tation and prevention
am.
rhe rehabilitation segment of
the program is aimed at helping
heart attack victims return to a
normal lifestyle and avoid further
atta ns hile a number of meth-
(ids are used to help patients, diet
therapy and exercise are empha-
-i most in the program.
Wheeler said.
The prevention program assists
people at risk of developing car-
diovascular disease, showing
them ways to decrease their risks.
A native of Los Angeles, Calif
Wheeler earned his medical de-
gree at the UCLA School of Medi-
cine. After an internal medicine
residency and fellowship at the
University of Southern California
M dical Center, he completed a
three-year cardiology fellowship
at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in
Los Angeles, with specialized
training in cardiac cathcterization
and electrophysiology.
Wheeler was involved in the
private practice of interventional
cardiology in Des Moines, Iowa.
He also served as director of car-
diac rehabilitation programs at
Mercy Hospital and Iowa Lu-
theran Hospital in Des Moines,
both affiliates of the University of
Iowa.
Wheeler's research pursuits
include studies of angioplasty �
a procedure in which a catheter
with a balloon attachment is used
to open blocked coronary arteries
� exercise physiology and risk
factor identification and modifi-
cation.
He is a member r�f �he American
College of Physicians, the Ameri-
can College of Cardiology.
i v I N'ewi Bureau
Margaret (Marty) Hackney of
Blount's Creek has assumed the
presidency of the Friends of the
East Carolina University Library.
Her term of office runs until
November, 1988.
I lackney is president of Sun-
shine Video and operates a vide-
otape production studio. She also
serves on the board of a family
enterprise, Hackney Industries,
Inc. of Washington. Her other
memberships include the Pam-
lico-Tar River Association and the
Greenville Area Chamber of
Commerce.
An alumna of UNC-Greens-
boro, Hackney received a Master
of Business Administration de-
gree from ECU in 1981. She has
been a teacher and volleyball
coach in Colorado and played
semi-professional volleyball for
the Colorado Traveling Women's
Team.
Among her goals as president
of the Friends of the Library is
raising funds to help with decora-
tion and furnishing of the pro-
posed additions to ECU's Joyner
Library, she said.
A current Friends project is sale
oi the 1988 ECU Historical Calen-
der and reproductions of the 1733
Moseley Map oi North Carolina.
In addition, the Friends sponsor
semi-annual book sales of do-
nated volumes with proceeds
going to library enhancement
projects.
Before her election as president
oi the Friends organization,
Hackney had served on the
Friends board.
President-elect of the Friends is
Billie Jo Matthews of Rocky
Mount. Other board members are
Emily Boyce, JoAnn Eakin,
Ronald Speier, Joan Warren,
Beatrice Behr, Lawrence
Brewster, Charles Cain, Parma
Howard, Edgar Loessin, Mac
McKee, Katherine Whichard and
Frank Wooten, all of Greenville;
Dorothy Flicks of Rocky Mount
and Kelly Lewis of Farmville.
2tyt �at QwcalMm
Serving the East Carolina campus community sinct 1925
James F. J. McKcc. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo
Shari Clemens pete Ferna'd
Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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Students si
(CPS) � College money nun
agers say they're still tr ing to dig
out from under the debris of the
precipitous "Black Monday'
stock market crash of Oct 19, hut
some students seemed to have
done pretty well, at least on paper
In an investment game
signed to teach students how to
manage stcxrk holdings
ample, Babson Collegi inM
chusetts) students " n r:
dropped "only" S 7 pei
October while the rt � .
ket plunged neari) X . �
Prof. Bob Kleiman rep
Business departm. � �
their students manage
imagined stcx k port-
ing to "buy" oi �
maximize "profits
Inevitably some of (
investment clubs did worse than
others in the
which The I
Averages fell a n
in 1 day andint
of the market in
weeks.
At the Univei
for instance, busine s
lost a real $43 OOfi � � �
worth $:
Monday
Yale's student inves
tost about $1 I DO in the era


ECU his on n
K t r�. Hurrau
Scenes and dates f m
Carolina's history ai
"1988 I-X'l Historical alendar
a recent publication of the Friends
Habits change
MAniH'V W:
dents just aren't purs
opposite sex the wa v they used to,
University of Wisconsin journal-
ism students have found.
In response to a journal
department surve a maji r
Wisconsin-Madison stud
said their fear of AIDS (acquired
immune deficiency syndrorm
had convinced them to change
their sexual habits
Satefites faughf
ECU Sri Bureau
The latest developments in us-
ing satellites for instructional
purposes will be discussed and
demonstrated in a video telecon-
ference on Thursday, Dec. 3, from
1:30 p.m. to4-30 pm. at the Brody
(School of Medicine) Building at
ECU.
The conference t pdate on
Interactive Learning, will be
televised over satellite from New
York, Oklahoma and California.
Presentations will be made at
each site on what businesses and
colleges are doing with satellite
delivered learning.
The teleconference is free and
open to the public.
For more information contact
the Office of Non-Credit Pro-
grams in the ECL' Division or
Continuing Education at -
bl43.
Sonett wins
LCC Newt Bureau
Joshua R. Sonett, a fourth-year
medical student at the ECU
School of Medicine has been
awarded the Rock Slevster Fel-
lowship.
The award, sponsored by the
American Medical Association is
presented annually to up to 25
deserving senior medical stu-
dents who exhibit excellence in
scholarship and an interest in
psychiatric medicine
Named for a fornu - president
of the AMA, the Slevster fellow-
ship includes a stipend of $2300
Sonett is the first student at the
ECU School of Medicine to re
ccive the award, according to Pr
James Mathis, chairman of the
EX?partment oi Psychiatric Medi
cine, who made the nomination
Sonett is the son oi Mrs Alan
Sonett and the late Dr. Sonett
who was a practicing psychiatrist
in New Bern from 1981 to 1984

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rs Award
Ch
aid "
i.u he
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itc'sand member Pr Peel said. "My
oung mother and 1 believe that the
�riorities. University Scholars Award is a
Is for quality program and will help to
enhance ECU and eastern North
radu- Carolina by attracting quality
the students
a at Vietnam veteran, Dr. Peel
amed his s rved in the Medical Corps of the
H� I S Navy Reserve for two years.
Iiatries al He then taught as an assistant
j professor at the Vanderbilt Uni-
� vcrsity School ol Medicine from
r al the 1971-76. Dr Peel has been in pri-
: vate medical practice at Atlanta's
v enter for Psychiatry since 1976.
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Tl If. EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1 1987
Students survive crash on
(CPS) � College money man-
agers say they're still trying to dig
out from under the debris of the
precipitous "Black Monday-
stock market crash of Oct. 19, but
some students seemed to have
done pretty well, at least on paper.
In an investment game de-
signed to teach students how to
manage stock holdings, for ex-
ample, Babson College (in Massa-
chusetts) students' "portfolio"
dropped "only" 5.7 percent in
October while the real stock mar-
ket plunged nearly 30 percent.
Prof. Bob Kleiman reports.
Business departments often let
their students manage real or
imagined stock portfolios, learn-
ing to "buy" or "sell" stocks to
maximize "profits
Inevitably, some of the student
investment clubs did worse than
others in the crash � during
which The Dow Jones Industrial
Averages fell a record 508 points
in 1 day � and in the wild swings
of the market in subsequent
weeks.
At the University of Nebraska,
for instance, business students
lost a real $43,000 from a portfolio
worth $300,000 before Black
Monday.
Yale's student investment club
lost about $100,000 in the crash.
paper
And campus business manag-
ers didn't do any better.
Many colleges own portfolios
that include stock holdings, and
use the profits to pay for capital
improvements and to provide for
student financial aid.
Most campus portfolio manag-
ers, however, noted colleges typi-
cally are conservative investors,
and that the crash consequently
may not hurt them in the long run:
�The University of Pennsylva-
nia lost $40-50 million during the
crash, a 15 percent drop The loss
could have been worse, but the
university � sensing the stock
market would go through a "cor-
rectional phase" � had sold a
significant percentage of its stock
holdings prior to Black Monday.
�Perm State lost less than 10
percent of its130 million endow-
ment, and officials there also say
the pinch should not affect daih
operations. "We will still be abk
to fund all programs said senior
Vice President tor Financial
Operations Steve Garban.
�The University of Southern
California's $160 million stock
holdings dropped 13 percent, or
$20.8 million, on Black Monday.
�Duke postponed issuing tax-
exempt bonds that would help
finance several capital improve-
ment programs, figuring the
bonds would be hard to sell now.
"The volatile stock market could
scare bond investors said Mark
Reeder, an E.F. Hutton broker in
Durham.
�Faculty members nearing re-
tirement will bear the brunt of the
stock market's volatility, and crit-
ics of higher education's largest
pension companies said the pen-
sion managers are too rigid in
their planning. The Teachers In-
surance Annuity Association and
College Retirement Equities Fund
(TIAA-CREF) delayed establish-
ing other investments for faculty
members, denying them a port in
the stock market storm.
CREF funds lost 18 percent of
their value during October as the
company explored new and more
flexible investment vehicles.
�College fundraisers say the
market's violent swings have
diminished prospects for year-
end giving and capital improve-
ment campaigns. The University
of Arizona, for example, has de-
layed construction of football sta-
dium skyboxcs because the shaky
market has raised concerns about
financing the project.
�Students interested in work-
ing as brokers will face stiff com-
petition for jobs and may have to
ECU hisory now on calendar
FCU Ncwi Bureju
Scenes and dates from East
Carolina's history appear on the
"1988 ECU Historical Calendar
a recent publication of the Friends
Habits change
MADISON, Wis. (CPS) � Stu-
dents just aren't pursuing the
opposite sex the way they used to,
University of Wisconsin journal-
ism students have found.
In response to a journalism
department survey, a majority of
Wisconsin-Madison students
said their fear of AIDS (acquired
immune deficiency syndrome)
had convinced them to change
thejr sexual habits.
Satelites taught
FCU Nrwi Bureau
The latest developments in us-
ing satellites for instructional
purposes will be discussed and
demonstrated in a video telecon-
ference on Thursday, Dec. 3, from
1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Brody
(School of Medicine) Building at
ECU.
The conference, "Update on
Interactive Learning will be
televised over satellite from New
York, Oklahoma and California.
Presentations will be made at
each site on what businesses and
colleges are doing with satellite
delivered learning.
The teleconference is free and
open to the public.
For more information contact
the Office of Non-Credit Pro-
grams in the ECU Division of
Continuing Education at 757-
6143.
Sonett wins
ICL' Newt Bureau
Joshua R. Sonett, a fourth-year
medical student at the ECU
School of Medicine, has been
awarded the Rock Sleyster Fel-
lowship.
The award, sponsored by the
American Medical Association, is
presented annually to up to 25
deserving senior medical stu-
dents who exhibit excellence in
scholarship and an interest in
psychiatric medicine.
Named for a former president
of the AMA, the Sleyster fellow-
ship includes a stipend of $2,500.
Sonett is the first student at the
ECU School of Medicine to re-
ceive the award, according to Dr.
James Mathis, chairman of the
Department of Psychiatric Medi-
cine, who made the nomination.
Sonett is the son of Mrs. Alan
Sonett and the late Dr. Sonett,
who was a practicing psychiatrist
in New Bern from 1981 to 1984.
of the ECU library.
Photographs used to illustrate
the calendar s cover and 12 pages
depict the two-acre lake formerly
located on the southeast part of
campus, "Old Austin" Building, a
195i Maypole dance, the 1917
girl's basketball team, clad in uni-
form berets and middv blouses,
an interior view of the library
when it was housed in what is
now Whiehard Building and
other scenes.
Each month lists significant
events in the institution's history.
The pages for November and
December, for example, com-
memorate such historical high-
lights as the 1921 name change
from East Carolina Teachers
Training School to East Carolina
Teacters College, First Lady
Eleanor Roosevelt's 1941 visit to
East Carolina Teachers College,
the 1918 World War I victory cele-
bration on campus, a lecture by
Arctic explorer Sir Hubert Wilk-
ins in 1930, and the 1965 football
team's Tangerine Bowl victory
over the University of Maine.
"The calendars make suitable
Christmas gifts for anyone associ-
ated with East Carolina said
Morgan Barclay, director of the
ECU Archives. "We hope the cal-
endar itself will become an ECU
tradition which will promote in-
terest in our history and pride in
our university
The calendars are available for
purchase for $5 each if bought in
personat the Archives and Manu-
scripts area, 115 Joyner Library.
They a re a I so available by mail for
$6 each from Friends of the FCU
Library, co Archives and Manu-
scripts, Joyner Library, ECU,
Greenville, N.C 27858. '
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work in related fields until the
stock market stabilizes, a Univer-
sity of Iowa job placement officer
said. "Until the stock market re-
coups, the hiring that investment
firms do will be limited and
highly selective Nancy Noth
said. "It should make students
take a strong look at what they're
doing right now
Babson students, though, are
happy about "The Wall Street
Game the investment game
they've been playing since Sep-
tember.
"The product is quite good,
particularly for intro courses. It's
realistic Kleiman said.
The game, marketed and devel-
oped by Babson alumnus and
former stockbroker Tim 1 VMello,
allows students to buy, sell and
trade stocks in the American,
OTC and New York stock ex-
changes. Although no real money
changes hands, the students are
given mock $100,000 accounts to
"invest
Students call a toll-free tele-
phone number at DeMello's office
to arrange deals with "brokers
who, through satellite and com-
puter hook-ups, have immediate
access to the New York-based
exchanges. "It's a direct duplica-
tion of what brokers do said
DeMello.
"The students get to manage
portfoliosand the universities can
provide hands-on education
without incurring liabilities
DeMello explained.
Other schools use closing prus
from The Wall Street Journal to
detemine how well a student
manages a portfolio, but closing
prices don't indicate the value of a
stock when it is purchased or sold,
he added.
"They can do anything that's
done on Wall Street DeMello
said of Babson students.
Although Babson is the only-
college in the nation currently
using "The Wall Street Came
DeMello says several other
schools have signed up for the
spring semester and more will use
the game next fall.
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Qftlt SaHt (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, - mi, L
Clay Deani iardt, m, ilor
Andy Lewis, m.c. AMr,FI MrrT.
Tim riiAwni ro JAMES I.J. MCKEE, ihmtorofAh
11M CHANDLER,Spor�u,IOr MFfMrmiiAu,
JOI IN CARTER, ftei Mlw Mlk;F , ,
SHELTON BRYANT, . J �S
DEBBIE STEVENS, MAC Q AK ' " "
MAC vLARK, BusinasMonger
December 1, 198
Opinion
Page 4
Alright
Chancellor changes plans
The chancellor should be com- move (heir cars from h� ��
pi T� S1"8 WS P" lot Mi"8�lotsheforefoL b nimess"
a ftbottom ofPCoTle�eeeHnr Th" IT �P?" ����S?K
u couege Hill. The ers can park dose to the ; iHi�m?
5St?sas ass ���i-
iH s �asSS5
vi eamil a llt 7 lf?reS?nt a mak? " reP�rt II would bc a shame
well-earned au ard for all involved, to find that the money spent on this
In keeping with this spirit of coop- plan could have been' better usedin
eration and compromise, the chan- another way that wouTd have
oeUor now needs to answer a few helped the Stivers ty more in the
questions about his proposal: long run
1. Will any of the new lots around The chancellor has shown that he
Minges Coliseum be set aside for cares about the students of this unf
commuter use? SGA President Scott versity by abandoning hS
Thomas seems to think so, but Eakin plan to pave the field at the bottom
Ift ��aniy thG JSSUe of ColIc8G Hil1 However fhe?e are
If not, the net result of the parking still some important cue t on sor
planisanincreaseof only 100 lots for rounding the proposa andsevl
commuters. Will they still be forced issues need Jbe Sed
to pay a$25 increase in parking fees? If the chancellor is truly interested
I.would not be fur if they are in meeting the perceived needs of
charged that extra money for park- the students, perhaps he staid
mg they can't use. For that matter, hold offoiHuoposingPthe plan unfl
- wni (ho i i r " . We have waited this lone, another
Contra-bashing growing stale
To the editor:
I am sick and tired of Contra-bash-
ing propaganda. The Nov. 17 Cam-
pus Spectrum by Brown and Light-
ncr, "Contras should end misery is
an excellent example of such propa-
ganda. The article was short on facts
and long on emotional rhetoric.
Brown, Lightner and any others on
this campus who favor abandoning
the Contras should read two recent
remarkable front-page dispatches in
The New York Times and The Wash-
ington Post. Keep in mind that these
papers are both very influential and
very liberal. Times reporter Lindsey
Gruson, who traveled with the Con-
tras, found great popular support for
them. Peasants complained of an in-
flation-plagued economy and
Sandinista atrocities. Gruson notes
that "some said they now viewed the
Contras as protecting them from a
'brutal' government William Brani-
gan, of the Washington Post, discov-
ered "solid support for the Contras
and deep-seated oposition ot the
Sandinista government
Justin Strurz's pro-Contra, pro-
democracy spectrum atricle ("U.S.
must protect interests in Central
America") was, in contrast to the
BrownLightner article, short on
emotional rhetoric and chock full of
documented facts. The Gallup poll
statistics he cited show that the anti-
Contra, pro-Sandinista propaganda
the American people have been hear-
ing is just that: unadulterated pro-
Marxist propaganda which supports
Soviet foreign policy, goals in out
hemisphere. I for one am sick of it.
Let's look at the facts arid not some
twisted communist-influnced bed-
time story. America stands for free-
dom for all people and the protection
of the basic human rights of those
people. America supports the Con-
tras, the USSR supports the Sandinis-
tas. It's that simple.
Now let's look at the facts:
�The average age of a Contra is 18
years old; Somoza's national guard
numbered 7,000 and the Contras to-
day number over 20,000. These two
facts prove that most of the Contras
are NOT former Somozas.
� Eleven of the 17 Contra leaders are
former key Sandinistas. They de-
fected to the Contras when they fi-
nally realized that Ortega is not a
"democrat but a communist Dawn.
�There were two political prisons
under Somoza. There are now eleven
under the Sandinistas.
�Ortega regularly visits Castro,
Qadaffi, Gorbachev and other com-
munist leaders. The Sandinistas are
admitted Marxist-Leninist revolu-
tionaries.
�The Sandinistas, not the Contras,
are among the biggest drug-runners
in this hemisphere.
1 should like to know where Brown
and Lightner got the idea that the
Contras have "murdered 16,000 civil-
ians?" It is obvious to me that if this
were true, there wouldn't be such
widespread civilian support for the
Contras. Did Brown and Lightner
dream this figure up after their upset-
ting Ortega-inspired propaganda
bedtime story? I suggest that some
Coast soap might help awaken these
S.E.D. fellows the the reality of the
situation.
Emotionalism and propaganda
aside, the fact remains that the Soviets
are outspending us five-to-one in our
own hemisphere. What do these anti-
Contra people think the Soviets are
doing, throwing a garden party?
O.K so we don't let the Contras fight
for us. What do you propose then to
do about the situation? Are you for
sending our own men down there to
combat the communist threat? Or do
you propose that we sit back and
twiddle our thumbs until the commu-
nists are on our very doorstep?
I ask all Americans: do we want a
communist dictatorship to rule our
children?
Bobby R. Kali Jr.
VP, College Republicans
Junior
Robertson
To the editor:
I am a firm supporter of Pat
Robertson, one of the Republican
party's leading contenders for the
presidency. Many people know vir-
tually nothing about Robertson. In-
stead of trying to find out about his
qualifications, liberals and other
uninformed people merely dismiss
him as a "radical "right-wing fun-
damentalist or an "extremist
When they talk about him, they seem
interested only in parroting the vitu-
perative remarks made against him
by the left-wing news media. It's time
that the truth about Robertson be told.
Robertson's father, A. Willis
Robertson, wasa hailed leader of both
the U.S. House and the Senate for 34
years. Robertson is a descendant of
two U.S. Presidents, William Henry
Harrison and Benjamin Harrison
Robertson's determination and
know how built one of the nation's
largest communications networks
CBN, which also reaches 60 foreier!
countries. He started with only $70 in
1959; today, the CBN Cable Network
reaches 36 million households.
His business and administrative
expertise enabled him to establish a
highly-respected graduate school -
CBN University � as well as a con
structionhrm.anadvertisingagenev
and ME-TV, the most popular televi-
sion station in the Middle East.
Robertson has been involved in
important negotiations with interna-
tional business leaders in the U.S. and
15 foreign countries as a result of the
above and many other world-wide
business endeavors. His recognized
expertise in economics and interna-
tional affairs has made him a sought-
after advisor and news commentate -
in West Germany, the Republic c I
China, Israel and many other coun-
tries.
During two last years, over 15 mil-
on Americans were assisted
through several programs started bv
Robertson. Operation Blono. I
major private sector relief agencv,
assisted nearly nine million need,
Americans nationwide in 1985 alone
The 700 Club Crisis Counseling Cen-
ter estimates that it will receive about
five million phone calls this vear from
distressed and destitute' people
126,000 adults and children in urban
ghettos were taught to read through
the "Sing, Spell. Read and Write
program. All of this was accom-
plished without the use of a sing
penny of government aid.
Robertson has lived with the down
trodden of the Brooklyn ghettos; he
has served as an oficer in the Maine
Corps in Korea; he has fed and
clothed refugees in Sudan and Cen-
tral America. His dedication to hu-
manitarian service is UNPARAL-
LELED. He has received over 15 state,
national and international awards
and honors in recognition for his sen -
ice.
And to think that, not long ago, The
East Carolinian dimissed Robertson
as a "talk-show host
Pat Robertson in 1988. Leadership
Integrity. Compassion.
I am proud to be a supporter of Pat
Robertson for President.
Matthew Clarke
Senior
Zyiinwanting harsh Toshiba sanctions
when it all haoDoned MQ1-Rm J "J Corp The U.S. government has concurred in these a period of five vears. At rt. on,� �te uL
Director &
LINCOLN, Neb. CPS)
dents from farming families an
"�� m ore part t,m e jobs than
�r to get through college Uni-
versity of Nebraska aiddir,
W.lham McFarland said las,
week despite special efforts to
help them affordtostay in school
The culprits, McFarland said
were new federal rules 1 �
gets student aid
McFarland said farm far,
students are esp
School be
re tarj
lan.i
much tmarj
While th
dents
PORTLAND, Md PS
Westbrook College, a private
�I with about 800 students.
� njoyed a giant payda) No 12
The school got a $6,125 mill
windfall when a wealth) pa
of the school sold Vincent Van
Gogh's "Irises" at auction in New
York last week for a record
million, and, bv prior arrai
ment, gave 12 5 percent of the vile
price to Westbrook
It amounts to the largest single
Rift ever to the Maine campus.
But Judith Sobel, who runs the
Westbrook gallery at which
"In -
1975, admirjj
� describe
ible pov
Heir,
bought the
established tl
added, hai
"Irises" part
� �nt collt
"ided he n
Poland finds m
WARSAW, Poland (AP) �
Authorities Monday expressed
satisfaction with Poland's first
referendum in 41 years, despite
the lowest rate of voter participa-
tion since communists came to
power after World War II.
Results of Sundav's vote on
economic and political reforms
were expected to be announced in
Warsaw late Mondav.
A preliminarv estimate bv the
Central Referendum Commis-
sion said about 68 percent oi
Poland's nearly 26.8 million eli-
gible voters participated, lower
than the previously worst at-
tended elections in June, 1984
The referendum had been
strongly promoted bv Polish
leader Gen. Wojciech )aruze!ski
�� �t�pin the "aocimHst r�na"
of Poland in the years since the
1981 martial-law crackdown on
the Solidarity independent trade
federation.
Demonstrations against the ref-
erendum were staged in several
cities, including marches that
were dispersed by police in
Gdansk and Warsaw At least 12
people in three cities were de-
tained.
Pierce elected
Governme
Urban
' d the tui
l
voters and th
were di
urg-
vote a eharad
Ore
to endoi
nomi
ernment sai
improve
would b
incn t
appr i
political 1
include elevtu
opening rnon
non-pmrty i
At a hews ci
day, Urban do
Hv statement
regard the retel
ganda sig: J
voter turn
creases and wt
difficultie
Pola I
a greati
-
Solidarity sj.i
Onyszkiew
clinedimr
referendum.
flatly that such was not the case. "Toshiba" did not
know that "TMC" (Toshiba Machine Co.) was ille-
gally selling to the Soviet Union technology of such
huge importance as severely to jeopardize the secu-
rity of our submarine fleet.
Leomard Garment is, to be sure, serving ascounsel
Garment does not lie, not even on behalf of his
clients, and he has asserted the guiltlessness of
Toshiba most confidently. Moreover, the Japanese
conducted a police investigation, asdid the Japanese
Ministry of Trade, and Toshiba designated a blue-
ribbon panel of truth-seekers who will be guided by
independent American counsel. Their joint mission:
to ascertain whether, evidence to the contrary not-
withstanding, anybody in Toshiba did in fact know
what was going on. And to find out how many
people in TMC knew what was going on, and who
they were.
None of these investigations implicated Toshiba
, Z��� ���� wr.il lanj, aim as x idie nne were imposed on Toshibanpupr minA ui �� l" wmui. ineviw-
TCSM,u0U.yapanCSC discusions Allowing the thatitwasaninnocenTpartv-theL "ese who are satisfied that Toshiba is,nno
Toshiba (TMC) revelation, their penalties against a to $200 rrrillron: the vaZ of meWhsrT T '? ��'� SUSpeCt that We have come UP "��
violationoftheExportCodearenowassevereasour nomic transaction was $40 mi II ion Cr�US �" tomvokePrechon withoutcallmg.ta tarit
ak u u , . � We need to be very careful about excesses on this
JSSP g? US t0 ?"� 3ke Gam' a hi8hly re" othereasoioughttoteobvicrrl
fFtcd RfPVbhcan lnd.antiommunist. He wants exporters in America who have sold sensitive stuff!
for Toshiba in the ruckus now going onTbut Leonard uhrow3ES and ��f ommu�t- � wants exporters in America who have sold sensitive stuff,
Garment does not lie, not even on behl.fThis ifL "7 �le corporations, to the Soviet Union, f
On The Right
By
William F. Buckley Jr.
cianHc him ki, t � a �v v ,ac tuI F"���ons, to tne soviet union. I
stands him, his position is that a parent company is would gladly vote, if in Congress to string such
h'oTdsTaS
progeny, and the Export Administration Act sped- :tBm5M. '1� " WllUngly at Work to �rrate
�J?US u T1 aSainse unlike TMC is presumed noigu.1ttals?tote SS2S5?S2?l2SSl 1,S,ation "
parent body of a subsidiary, provided it is estab- unjust at the level of disproportionalitv and thS thT!TJ?� A�d T�sh,ba h- for J" l
l.shedthatsaidparentbodyisasinnocentasToshiba feStosnTI&erSStioSk wLTZJT.5255 m America and in h'nng US
insistsitisand will be proved to be by investigators, ainst blacks (if SSnfSSSS ntefarf"5- We ShOUld n0t PJapa-
Even so, Sen. Gam wants to impose a breathtaking him he shouldn't do it; if a black man ra pes the'eir Kn2, Y rruscamage of justice against
penalty on Toshiba. He has backed legislation that lynch him). It should not sumrteus"ffiwncsc' fe ,imt; and' inditly, ptmish
wouldbanToshibaexportsintotheUnitedStatesfor Smmmmb,y�S3S tSSST fr�m a yotl ot
Mi
�.��
��"�i mmmimm�
MMMtriMM
tCt ej Bureau
Eldean Rhodes Pierce, assistant
professor in the ECU School of
Nursing, was elected to a commit-
tee of Sigma Theta Tau, Interna-
tional Honor Society of Nursing,
at the society's biennial conven-
tion in San Francisco.
She was elected to a two-year
term as a member of the nominat-
ing committee of Sigma Theta
Tau. The committee'sduties will
involve selecting candidates for
the elected officer positions and
standing committees of the soci-
ety at the international level.
An active member of the local
Sigma Theta Tau chapter. Pierce
has served as president, vice-
president, secretary and treas-
urer. Since 1983, she has served as
Region 7coordinator with duties
-involving coordination of activi-
ties among the 21 chapters in the
tZarolmas, Georgia. Florida and
Puerto Rico. !
Pierce is a 1965 graduate of
Rosewood High School Her hus-
band. Hall Pierce, is also from the �
Rosewood area Pierce received 1
her nursing degrees trom ECU j
and a diploma from Watts Hospi- j
tal in Durham.
. Also attending the convention
in San Francisco were other offi-
�cersand members of the ECU Beta
Nu Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau
Lou Everett who wasa member ot
the 1986-87 international nomi-
nating committee; Dr. Bonnie
Duldt, Research Committeechair;
"Dr. Sylvia Brown who presented a
paper at the Scientific Sessions;
and Judith Brooks.
A first at the convention was the
acceptance of three honor socie-
ties outside the VS. as chapters.
These honor societies are located
in Canada, Korea, and the Repub-
lic of China. In addition, 39 honor
societies within the VS. were
accepted as new chapters of the
society.
S
I
I
1
And Don't Forcw
Party SubJ
6 Foot Party
�os aips
-lapiiins -
PDS oj Tea
Spec a, Hoima
$38 88
m
Our New
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5UB STflTlj
Try Our N�rw
on GrwnvUk Boi
J





wing stale
tic
: in �mr
anti-
f ts are
partv
Are you for
there to
U? Or do
I and
mmu-
Harrison and Benjamin Harrison.
ire Robertson's determination and
know how built one of the nation's
largest communications networks,
which also reaches bO foreign
tries. He started with only $70 in
�: � toda) . the CBN Cable Network
wn rca hes 36 million households.
- business and administrative
rtiso enabled him to establish a
U -respected graduate school �
:c Universit) - as well as a con-
icrion firm, an advertising agency,
and ME-TV, the most popular televi-
station in the Middle East.
Robertson has been involved in
rtant negotiations with interna-
al business leaders in the U.S. and
15 foreign countries as a result of the
above and manv other world-wide
business endeavors. His recognized
expertise in economics and interna-
tional affairs has made him a sought-
atter advisor and news commentator
in West Germany, the Republic of
China, Israel and manv other coun-
During two last years, over 15 mil-
l-on Americans were assisted
through several programs started by
Robertson. (oration Blessing, a
major private sector relief agency,
assisted nearly nine million needy
Americans nationwide in 1985 alone.
� t a The 700 Club Crisis Counseling Cen-
ter estimates that it will receive about
five million phone calls this year from
ssed and destitute people
adults and children in urban
tos were taught to read through
Junior the Sing, Spell. Read and Write"
program. All oi this was accom-
plished without the use of a single
penny of government aid.
Robertson has lived with the down-
trodden of the Brooklyn ghettos; he
fat has served as an oficer in the Maine
iublican Corps in Korea; he has fed and
for the clothed refugees in Sudan and Cen-
? know vir- tral America. His dedication to hu-
lbertson. In- manitanan service is UNPARAL-
lt about his LELED. He has received over 15 state,
and other national and international awards
relv dismiss and honors in recognition for his serv-
fun- ice.
And to think that, not long ago, The
cm East Carolinian dimissed Robertson
he vitu- as a "talk-show host
nst him Tat Robertson in 1988. Leadership.
It's time Integrity. Compassion,
i be told 1 am proud to be a supporter of Pat
A. Willis Robertson for President.
taderofboth
mate for 34
jscendant of Matthew Clarke
llham Henrv Senior
iba sanctions
pch resent US. intervention of so draconian a degree,
pa But there is more there than xenophobia for the
pm- Japanese to suspect. We are talking about a major
Kof exporter, and everybody in Japan, as in the U.S.
jive Congress, knows that there is resentment in America
5u- over the imbalance in our trade with Japan. Inevita-
nd bly, Japanese who are satisfied that Toshiba is inno-
ie cent are going to suspect that we have come up with
a way to invoke protection without calling it a tariff.
On The Right
By
William F. Buckley Jr.
And we would appear to be doing it to the wrong
company. Toshiba is willingly at work to cooperate
with the government on model legislation to fine-
tune export control. And Toshiba has, for years, led
the way in investing in America and in hiring U.S.
labor and technicians. We should not punish Japa-
nese malefactors by a miscarriage of justice against
Japanese who are innocent; and, indirectly, punish
c, Americans who would suffer from a boycott of
Toshiba.
I
jive
ff,
. i
ich
?a,
I be
us
Jice
�ell
tit
THE CAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1,1987 5
LINCOLN, Neb. (CPS) - Stu-
dents from farming families are
working more part-time jobs than
ever to get through college, Uni-
versity of Nebraska aid director
William McFarland said last
week, despite special efforts to
help them afford to stay in school.
The culprits, McFarland said,
were new federal rules for who
gets student aid.
McFarland said farm familv
studen ts a re especially hurt bv the
fi
new rules, which became effec-
tive nationwide in January, that
require farm assets � things like
land and machinery � to be con-
sidered in determining how
much financial aid a student can
get.
While the rules apply to all stu-
dents � whose parents' homes
and property are now counted as
wealth that could be turned into
cash to help pay for college �
they've proven especially oner-
ous to the farm students, whose
families, reeling from the four-
year depression in agriculture,
are less apt to have cash to pay
tuitions, McFarland said.
He said the changes are forcing
farm students into part-time jobs
as alternatives to the loans or
grants they might have had.
For example, Nebraska-Lincoln
honors student Leland Wagner, a
major in ag education, said his
financial aid application came
back with the notation that his
family should contribute $20,000
to the education of its three chil-
dren in college.
"The only way to do that was to
sell all of our stuff Wagner told
the Daily Nebraskan, UNL's
campus paper. "They don't real-
ize that you have to replace equip-
ment and put money back into the
operation
Wagner, whose parents de-
clared bankruptcy, was able to
remain in school because he ob-
tained merit scholarships. Like
many farm family students, he
goes home to help on the farm on
weekends, making a part-time job
impossible.
Another UNL student, Elaine
Hoesing, was declared ineligible
for the $2,500 student loan she'd
had for two years, and now works
30 hours per week, twice the time
she worked last year.
have increased in spite of risky
new programs that some cam-
puses have started to help stu-
dents from farm families:
�Columbia College, a private
Missouri campus, offered free
tuition to farmers forced off their
land. "I can't control prices on the
market, 1 can't control parity, I
can't control the weather, but lean
control how we educate people
said Columbia's President Don
Ruthenbere.
School benefits from art sale
McFarland added the burdens
m Tt IKYYVPI1
PORTLAND, Md. (CPS) �
Westbrook College, a private
school with about 800 students,
enjoyed a giant payday Nov. 12.
The school got a $6,125 million
windfall when a wealthy patron
of the school sold Vincent Van
Gogh's "Irises" at auction in New
York last week for a record $49
million, and, by prior arrange-
ment, gave 12.5 percent of the sale
price to Westbrook.
It amounts to the largest single
gift ever to the Maine campus.
But Judith Sobel, who runs the
Westbrook gallery at which
"Irises" has been on display since
1975, admitted she was a little
"sad" to sec the painting � which
she describes as having "incred-
ible power" � leave the campus.
Heiress Joan Whitney Payson
bought the painting � done by
Van Gogh in 1889 � in 1947 for
$80,000, and her son, John Payson,
established the Payson gallery at
Westbrook in 1975. Payson, Sobel,
added, had intended to make
"Irises" part of Wcstbrook's per-
manent collection until he de-
cided he needed the money
selling the painting could bring.
To ease Westbrook's disap-
pointment, Payson agreed to
donate 12.5 percent of the pro-
ceeds to the college.
Not everyone is so appreciative
of campus art collections, how-
ever.
Officials at the University of
Minnesota Art Museum belatedly
discovered in August, 1986, that
they had hung a Georgia OKeeffe
painting the wrong way for more
than 30 years.
More recently, a University of
Portland alumnus donated a
Poland finds success
WARSAW, Poland (AP) �
Authorities Monday expressed
satisfaction with Poland's first
referendum in 41 years, despite
the lowest rate of voter participa-
tion since communists came to
power after World War II.
Results of Sunday's vote on
economic and political reforms
were expected to be announced in
Warsaw late Monday.
A preliminary estimate by the
Central Referendum Commis-
sion said about 68 percent of
Poland's nearly 26.8 million eli-
gible voters participated, lower
than the previously worst at-
tended elections in June, 1984.
The referendum had been
strongly promoted by Polish
leader Gen. Wojciecfi janrzelski
as���T.inthe"9ociahs�ret�vat"
of Poland in the years since'the
1981 martial-law crackdown on
the Solidarity independent trade
federation.
Demonstrations against the ref-
erendum were staged in several
cities, including marches that
were dispersed by police in
Gdansk and Warsaw. At least 12
people in three cities were de-
tained.
Pierce elected
ECU Non Bureau
Eldean Rhodes Pierce, assistant
professor in the ECU School of
Nursing, was elected to a commit-
tee of Sigma Theta Tau, Interna-
tional Honor Society of Nursing,
at the society's biennial conven-
tion in San Francisco.
She was elected to a two-year
term as a member of the nominat-
ing committee of Sigma Theta
Tau. The committee's duties will
involve selecting candidates for
the elected officer positions and
standing committees of the soci-
ety at the international level.
An active member of the local
Sigma Theta Tau chapter, Pierce
has served as president, vice-
president, secretary and treas-
urer. Since 1983, she has served as
Region 7 coordinator with duties
involving coordination of activi-
ties among the 21 chapters in the
Carolinas, Georgia, Florida, and
Puerto Rico.
Pierce is a 1965 graduate of
Rosewood High School. Her hus-
band, Hall Pierce, is also from the
Rosewood area. Pierce received
her nursing degrees from ECU
and a diploma from Watts Hospi-
tal in Durham.
Also attending the convention
in San Francisco were other offi-
j cers and members of the ECU Beta
Nu Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau:
Lou Everett who was a member of
the 1986-87 international nomi-
nating committee; Dr. Bonnie
Duldt, Research Committee chair;
T)r.Sylvia Brown who presented a
paper at the Scientific Sessions;
and Judith Brooks.
. A first at the convention was the
Acceptance of three honor socie-
ties outside the VS. as chapters.
These honor societies are located
in Canada, Korea, and the Repub-
lic of China. In addition, 39 honor
societies within the US. were
accepted as new chapters of the
society.
Government spokesman Jerzy
Urban said authorities consid-
ered the turnout good because
such votes were new to Polish
voters and the questions posed
were difficult. But critics had
urged a boycott and called the
vote a charade.
One question asked the public
to endorse a package of racial
economic reforms which the gov-
ernment said would eventually
improve living standards but
would bring about an average
increase in prices of 40 percent in
1988.
The second question asked for
approval of a democratization of
political life. The specific changes
include election law reforms and
opening more high positions to
r�.r�-party numbers.
At a news conference early to-
day. Urban denied that a Solidar-
ity statement advising voters to
regard the referendum as propa-
ganda significantly held down
voter turnout. Fear of price in-
creases and weariness with the
difficulties of everyday life in
Poland's moribund economy had
a greater effect on discouraging
voters, he said.
Solidarity spokesman Janusz
Onyszkiewicz late Sunday de-
clined immediatecommenton the
referendum.
group ot 12 prints by surrealist
Salvador Dali that, campus devel-
opent officer Jean Gorman told
the school paper in October, may
include some forgeries.
And on Nov. 6, three Harvard
art students formally objected to
Prof. Ritsuko Taho's assignment
for students to adopt a chicken,
watch it be slaughtered and then
build a sculpture from its bones.
"This experience Taho ex-
plained, "will reduce the distance
between art and object. It will
expand (the students') imagina-
tion and understanding

UMtldWtw
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
Why not come by the REAL Crisis Intervention Center: 312
E. lOth St: or call 758-HELP. For Free Confidential Counsel-
ing or Assistance.
Our Volunteers and SUIT are on duty 24 hrs. a day. year
around, in order to assist you In virtually any problem area
you might have. Our longstanding goal has always been to
preserve and enhance the quality of life for you and our com-
munity.
Licensed And Accredited By The State of North Carolina
SPEND
SPRING BREAK ON A CRUISE!
The Travel Committee Presents:
a 6-day cruise on the Funship Carnivale.
Depart: 6 p.m. March 6
Return: 4 a.m. March 12.
Via: Round trip to Miami on Seashore Trailways Bus.
Cruise aboard the Funship Carnivale.
Price: $475 (ECU Students) $520 (Non-students).
Call: Mendenhall's Central Ticket Office
for more details 757-6611.
7568310
Greenville
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Downtown (irrentille
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Raleigh, NC 27606
8 p.m Saturday 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.
- i





6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1,1087
HELP WANTED
NOW HIRING: stage crew for Nut-
cracker ballet Min wage up to 40 hrs
Work evenings 9th, 10th, and 11th and
days 12th, and 13th Call 752 1256
ATTENTION LADIES: are vou tired of
no money for rent, clothes, food, or iist
plain fun For the things vou want in life,
Misty Blue is now accepting applications
for possible employment $250.00 per
week guaranteed to the right ladv Call
7469907for apointment M-F, 10a m -6
p m
RESIDENT COUNSELOR: Primarily
interested in those with human service
background wishing to gam valuable
experience in the field No Btonetar)
compensation, however, room, utilities
and phone provided Call Marv Smith at
the REAL Crisis Center 758-1IELP.
AIRLINES NOW HIRING. Flight At
tendants. Travel Agents, Mechanics,
Customer Service. Li-hngs salaries to
S50K Entrv level positions Call 805 ks7
6000
IS IT TRUE YOU CAN BUY JEEPS FOR
$44 through the U.S. Government' Gel
the facts today! Call 1-312-1142 Evt 5271-
A.
FOR RENT
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: ECU - Don't be wh.te th.s
Christmas' Great special, and 15 off on
gift certificates tor students' Call or come
by today California Tanning Salon - 355
7858
FOR SALE Scuba gear, "Oceanic' Black
Max console. Includes depth gauge, pros
sure gauge, bottom timer, max depth
indicator Call 830-1166. after 5 00
FOR SALE: DM bed, less than vr old
$73.00; chest of drawers sot S35.00 Or
otters. Call Dallas 757-0024
FOR SALE -TWO BLACK CAR SE ATS
THESE CHAIRS ARE MOUNTED FOR
USE IN YOUR APARTMENT OR
DORM ROOM. MAKES A GRFA1
CONVERSATION PIECE. ONL 525
EACH. CALL DAN 758-4779
FOR TYPING SERVICES: Call kirn be-
for 3:00pm 758-2119.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed tvping on
paper up to 20 hand written pages SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville
NC 752-3694.
WORD PROCESSINGLETTER
QUALITY OR LASER PRINTING.
Rush jobs accepted. 752 1933
FOR SALE: ECU Great Christmas special
and 15 off on gift certificates for students
- the best tan in town, California Tanmne
Salon - 355-7858
APPLIANCE SALE: washers dryers,
ranges, refrigerators & freezers Good
cond & gauranteod, call B.J. Mills 746-
2446
CARTOOON CARICATURES FOR
CHRISTMAS! Call Barbour, 752-5010
PROFESSIONAL BUT NOT EXPEN-
SIVE! Progressive Solutions, Inc . offers
professional word processing to students
and professionals. Term papers, disscrta
tions, themes, reports and much more as
low as SI 75 per page. (Please call for quote
on your pro)ect). Price includes printing on
high quality bond paper and spelling veri-
fication against a 50,000 word electronic
dictionary. Ask about out special offers
Laser Printing now available. Call Mark at
757-3440 after 700 p.m. for free informa-
tion
TERM PAPERS � THESIS: Tvped on
IBM wordprocessor, letter quality print.
Professional editing. Years of experience.
Call anytime ii leave message or call after
3:00 p.m. Nanette StiUwell 1-524-5241.
Cheap call - Best service! Pick up and deliv-
ery.
tyu 'Deadlines for
CCassificds and
Announcements
For Tuesdays paper: Friday at
4:00 p.m.
For Thursdays paper: Monday
at 4:00 p.m.
Wo Txctviions F(tcur.
jToday is the last day to take
entries for the
REBEL Magazine's
Prose. Poetry and
Essay Contest.
Entries to be submitted to
Rebel Office. Pulbications
Center by 5:00 p.m.
KA-Rafters
AirBand '87
Wed. Dec. 2nd.
$100.00 1st Prize
.25 Draft
Sign up at RAFTERS
752-4668
PERSONALS
ATTENTION PHI TAUS: Hope you
Suffering
From Total
Mental Melt
Down? Need A
Mid-Week Break?
Classifieds
FOR RENT: 3 bedroom East Fifth $425
Call 758 5742
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED: To
share 2 br apt at Carriage 1 louse Rent is
S28.i; security deposit of SI50 required
Available spring semester. Call Shannon
at 337235.
FEMALE ROOMATE: 3 bedroom house2
blocks from ECU Private upstairs room
Smoker prefered Call 830-1524 after 12 -
leave message
2 FEMALE ROOMATFS NEEDED. Tar
River Estates Crad. or upperelassman,
non-smoker 113.75month, 75.00 deposit,
own room, 14 utilities. Available Dec 15'
"S (14
FEMALE ROOMATE NEEDED for next
semester Large private room in 2-br
townhouse. S175.50mo. and 12 utilities
(usu. S25mo) Free heat Close to cam-
pus, bus service available Call 758 6265.
1 OR 2 ROOMATES WANTED Ceder
Court Apartments. All appliances, rent
based on single and double occupancy. 1
12 from campus. Bus service, call 757-
0784
RINCOLD TOWERS Apts tor rent
furnished. Contact 1 lolhe Simonowich
752-2865.
APARTMENT FOR RENT. In Tar
River. Two bedrooms, ; baths
ample parking and great neighbors!
S360mo Interested1 Call 757 116
APARTMENT FOR RENT (sublettc)
Single bedroom, 220.00 per month.
Available January Month to month
contract available in May. Cable hook
up, laundry, ECU bus service Rive
Hufl Apts Call 752 0092
TWO ROOMATES: Needed to share
townhouse in VVildwood Vilas $135
mo 752-4781 Call Julie
FOR RFNT 3 br house, l2block from
campus, call 830 177
FOR RENT: Two bedroom apt in Rin
gold Towers Fully Furnished located
on 2nd floor with the laundry room
Available 1st of January through luiv
31svt Conact kirn or Wend) al 758
0440. After 2.00 p.m or 1 lolhe Si
monowich at 758 2865
ROOMATE NEEDED - To share a large
2 bedroom apt excellent location
S175.00 per month, 12 utilities & 12
deposit Call 752-1703.
ROOMATF WANTFD: Female non-
smoker to share 3 bedroom apt at
Wilson Acres Tennins court, pool,
sauna, laundrv, water, and cable in
eluded S107.50mo Call 752 5886
ROOMATE NEEDED to share 2 bed
room apt. with 2 girls at Tar River Call
between 5 p.m. and 9 pan. 758-6507.
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED to
share 2 bedroom apt 2 blocks form
campus 1 leather 757-0258!
.�ad an awesome break Good hkk on
Finals. See va at BEAUS Wednesday
Love - your hi' sisters
FREE BAHAMAS TRIP Come down
to the Elbo and register lor a trip lor two
to the Bahamas spring break SI tickets"
Buy yours today
ATTENTION: Don'l forget Alpha i
Delta's happy hour every Wednesday
night at I'antana's.
LETTER FOUND behind Art building
To: Tina, From Philip Picture enclosed
Call Jennifer 758 8090 or Susan 752
9069.
SIC EPS Don't forget elections tor new
officers will beheld Tuesday night. I i
lowed bv the party with the A( M'isat the
Elbo
SARAH MILLER (aka Derrick's main
squeeze Nancy M he Ivs, roomie') Hope
vou had a great Thanksgiving and keep
my underwear off ot the television' Love
Marv
SIC El's Congratulations to the Fall '87
Pledge class (or a job well done'
K.MBIRLYEASON rhanks for being
ebos RgSs-aZetacouldhave-AJso.
thanks tor cooking dinner for me. ZLAM
Angela (YLS).
BUCKLEY, parting with vou and the
Helta Stgs was a blast Thanks tor the
pizza and the shirt. Let's get together
agam soon Fran PS Beware of red
wooiy mammoths!
TO ALL CROUPS AND ORCANIZA-
IIONS who would like to have their
photo included in the yearbook, please
contact the Buccaneer office at 757-6501.
Please give at least 1 weeks notice and
leave the following info: date, time,
place, group name, and contact wphone
number! Thanks!
'YOU'RE THE APPLE OF MY EYE
Send and apple crush today! In front of
the Student Store, SI Sponsored by Delta
Zeta
HEY DELTA SICS: We want ya'll to
know that we had a blast partying with
va' I et's do it again sxn. Love, Delta
Zeta. PS Did a red hairy buffalo every
crawl through?
Dl I.TA ETA: "I've got a crush on you
Orange (rush sale for a very, very spe-
cial friend 1130 though 123 in front of
the Student Store. Only SI!
DELTA ZETA: We would wish to thak all
of those that participated in the Organ
Donor Drive It was a great success.
DO NOT MISS WEDNESDAY'S
I iesta Grande' at OFF T! IE CUFF Come
see Roberto, Miguel, Jcs'us, Pablo, and
Senior Cuerro behind the bar.
SICM AS Get those pj's ready for Thurs-
day night's pj - p party at the Sig Ep
house Anyone wearing wearing "see-
though" pj's will not be admitted under
any circumstances.
Season's Greetings
Spice up the holiday season this year with
the good food and good
cheer of Annabelle's
Restaurant. For holiday
office parties,banquets
family get- togethers, or an
intimate evening for two,
, there's simply no tastier
� k way to celebrate.
Come enjoy our weekly
special: Sundays-Two complete
Sirlom Steak Dinners only $9 95
" " RFsTAI
8
RESTAURANTS PUB
The Plaza � Greenville Blvd. � 756-0315
TODD & CARLOS - We couldn't be any
luckier than to have tow big brothers as
great as you guys We're looking forward
to the great bmes ahead in KA and with
you. Love Ya! Your new little sisters - Lisa
it Chnsta.
U2 U2 U2 U2 U2 U2 U2 U2 U2 U2 U2
U2 U2 U2 TICKETS FOR SALE 752-6922
PIKE BROTHERS & their cocktail dates
hope everyone had a blast, thanks to
Kevin T. for a night to remember.
SANDY WHITE: Congratulations on
becoming our 1987 Dreamgirl, the broth-
ers of Pt Kappa Alpha.
CREEKS, CREEKS, CREEKS: Best
happy hour besides Fridays are Wednes-
days at " Fiesta Grande' " at OFF Tl IE
CUFF Food is fantastic and the barten
dcrs aren't bad either.
ANYBODY WHO'S ANYBODY
KNOWS THAT THE NEW DELI IS
WHERE IT JAMS! Catch Mike Edwards
Thursday, Flip Side Friday, and don't
dare miss the Connells on Saturday
THE RESPONSE FOR THE ECU ICE
TEA PARTY has been soooo good that
we've decided to make you wait half the
time Introducing Fiesta Grande "
every Wednesday from 5 'til closing
Mexican imports $1 00. Currevo Shots
SI 50, Prarie Fires SI 00, and FREE tacos
n-nachos From 5-9 p.m.
SIG EPS - Dig up that dirt and get ready
for the annual Christmas "gag gift'
party, Thurday night before pj p with
the Sigmas
ATTENTION AOPI VOLLEYBALL
PLAYERS - Good luck in the big champi
onship game tonight You guys are awe
some.
(pakmont
Square Apte,
� 2 BDR TOWNHOUSE APTS.
� APPLIANCES FURNISHED. CARPETED
� FREE CABLE
� CENTRAL HEAT & AIR
� CONVENIENT TO ECU. & SHOPPING
� POOL. COMMUNITY ROOM & LAUNDRY ROOM
� 24 HR EMERGENCY MAINTENANCE
We Welcome All Students!
756-4151
1212 Redbanks Rd.
Office Hrs. 9:30 5:30 M-F
DAY STUDENTS
Do You Want To Make
A Difference?
Apply now for the position of Day Student
Representative on the ECU Media Board.
Help set policies for operations of WZMB
THE REBEL HE EAST CAROLINIAN
BUCCANE EXPRESSIONS, & THE
. HOTO LAB.
Apply in Media Board Office
2nd Floor, Publications Building
757-6009
Filing Dates: Dec. 1 - Dec. 7
12 p.m.
OFF
IKE
UFF
K4MI
O
Fiesta
Grande"
�FREETacos-n-Nachos 5-9
�All Mexican Imports $1.00
�Cuervo Gold Shots $1.50
�Prarie Fires $1.00
Come Early and Beat the Cover
Live entertainment 9-1.
x Must Be 21 To Enter
Sheraton Greenville
The Sheraton Greenville � 203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
DONT GO
HOME
WITHOUT
YOUR NEW
LOOK FOR
THE
HOLIDAYS!
�georges
hair designers
-�$�

7
CONTEMPORARY HAIRSTYUNG
WOLFF TANNING SYSTEM
FREE CONSULTATION
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT
756-6200
Open til 9 p.m.
U.ofA.e
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (CPS)
Hie on-again, off-again task of
gripping cancer-causing asbestos
from campus buildings has led
University of Alabama employ-
ees t consider suing me univer
sity
twelve English department
employees have filed a formal
complaint that LA worki r
posed them to hazard,
tos fibers when they wi n d
repair work in
Dole says campaign
Continued from page 1
she said
Mrs. Dole said her hu
campaign is going well The cam-
paign raised $13 million from
March to November, uhen Dole
announced his candidicv,
said
'The polls seem to indicate
constantly that we are down
two man race (for the Republican
nomination) she said, while
admitting that Vice President
George Bush was still dJuvt
Dole in most areas.
Asbesh
aneftectn
tally
nite
re l
a fatal til
. e w
At a hot
hia r
a n w
� 1 '
what
said J
tosh J
It's :
Dc
;n thj
i Dol
emo
Announcer
BJ A LEADER
a
to a;
tor d n
MUSIC US1 M(, (.1 Ml R
gram off ice, Menda 757 6611.1
NCS1 Nort turo meets every M in Met : : . lenlj
' . '�
AMNESTY INTERN ATL.
their a ting on V December 2nd si � p at
OVERSEAS DEV. The 1 rseas 1V . . �Mdl n H Decen aiscussioti tveryon inl resTeei'is ifhj ALEl
SAM Attention SAM members ' a � If � d ighnuts � ' �
GAMMA BETA PHI.
The Plaza
The Gamma Beta Phi lior. I
- -
�err.eter December I at 7 p.m
PRODUCTIONS COMM.
� i staff and studei - ;rc in-
vited to tTM I �v-
dav, December 1, Wpm in the k :
Mendenhall Free tood. cash prizes to the
top three ornaments, and Santa Qaus Gel
in the ChnTr.j spirit
SLBIECTS NEEDED
The ECU clinical ps i program
needs children, aces 6 1" to voJunte - � -
intelligence test si assist rj i
training ot V A level Students Interested
peopii contact Dr Larrv Mines at
the Depart: � Psj . - 757
FITNESS TEST
The Physical Education Stor and
Physical fitness Competency Test i
scheduled to take place at V.trges Coli-
seum at 1 p.m. Tuesdav, EX?cember
1987 A pasri; score on th;s test is re-
quired of all students pnor to declaring
physical education as a major Anv ques
borts should be rettored to Israel or
Mike McCammon at 757-6497
MODLELNG 1QBS
The Sehovii of Art has pv)s;tions apt
models during the spring semester at ;
per hr Applv now to rx-g work m the
spring.
GOSPEL CHOIR
The ECU Compel Chior is sponsoring a
S50 Qnsmas giveawa Tickets are fifty
cents and can be purchasi at the Student
Store from November v through Decem-
ber 4 The drawing will be held on Friday
December 4
SAILING CLUB
Anyone interested in loining the ECU
Sailing Club please attend an organiza
honal meeting Wcdenesday, December 2
at 5 p.m in Rm. 145 Minges
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
The Accountmg Sooety's December
Dinnermeetmg will be held December
7th at 6 p.m. at the Sheraton Inn Cost is
$15 per person Turn in money and name
to Jill in the Accounting Department
bv Thursday, December 3rd Guests are
encouraged to attend
SFNTOR COUNCIL
Photo sesion for December Graduates
Look for tame and place on flyers posted
around campus
FTUFORENSICS
Anyone intersted in enhancing their
communication skills come to Rm 211
Theatre Arts on Wednesday, December 2,
at 8 p.m.
Audi) -
tel
-


. �
mmmmmmmmm
� '� m-
� !���I





I'tbean) ANBOm WHO'S ANYBODY
jthcrsas KNOWS THAI THI NFW OELI IS
;forward WHERE IT AMS! Cakh Mike Edwards
jnd with Thursday Flip Side Friday and don't
ters 1 it dare miss tho v onrteils on Saturday.
UU RESPONSE FOR THE ECU ICE
U PARTY has been soooo ixi that
iu' v e decided t.i make ou wait halt the
time rig Fie -ta Grande'
ev� Wednesday trom 5 til cksing
Mexican im ts $1.00,urrevo Shots
s s Prarie Fires $1 01 and FREE taco&
i. Kos From -9 p.m
SIC 1 PS Pig up that dirt and get ready
for the annual Christmas 'gag-gift"
party Thurd.n night before pi pi with
ATTENTION AOI'I OUrYBALL
PI MKs d � n the big champi
night You guys are aw-
ikmont
TOWNHOUSE APTS.
VNCES FURNISHED. CARPETED
CABLE
vAL HEAT & AIR
2NIENTTO E.C.U. & SHOPPING
COMMUNITY ROOM & LAUNDRY ROOM
EMERGENCY MAINTENANCE
Welcome All Students!
756-4151
1212 Redbanks Rd.
Office Hrs. 9:30-5:30 M-F
Y STUDENTS
You Want To Make
A Difference?
for the position of Day Student
alive on the ECU Media Board.
olicies for operations of WZMB,
EL, THE EAST CAROLINIAN,
1EER, EXPRESSIONS, & THE
PI IOTO LAB.
in Media Board Office
loor, Publications Building
757-6009
Dates: Dec. 1 - Dec. 7
12 p.m.
georges
heir designers
The Plaza p
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 1.1987 7
U. of A. employees might sue
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (CPS) -
I he orvagain, off-again task of
stripping cancer-causing asbestos
from campus buildings has led
University of Alabama employ-
ees to consider suing the univer-
sity.
twelve English department
employees have filed a formal
complaint that UA workers ex-
posed them to hazardous asbes-
tos fibers when they were doing
repair work in a campus offic
building Oct. 6.
Asbestos � regularly used as
an effective insulation material in
virtually all buldings erected in
the United States for the 30 years
before 1970 � is thought to cause �
a fatal form of lung cancer in
people who breathe in its fibers.
At about the same time, a Phila-
delphia public library often fre-
quented by University of Penn-
sylvania students was closed
down when workers discovered
they couldn't install a new fur-
nace without disturbing old as-
bestos in the piping.
Students at Villanova, r.Jso lo-
cated in Philadelphia, say the
school is "covering up" the extent
of the asbestos problem in St.
Mary's Hall, a dormitory. Villa-
nova r'hVu.s have met with St.
Mary's residents to calm fears.
The school has no concrete plans
to remove the asbestos from the
dorm, and other Villanova build-
Dole says campaign is going well for husband
Continued from page 1
she said.
Mrs. Dole said her husband's
campaign is going well. The cam-
paign raised $13 million from
March to November, when Dole
announced his candidicy, she
said.
The polls seem to indicate
constantly that we are down to a
two man race (for the Republican
nomination) she said, while
admitting that Vice President
George Bush was still ahead of
Dole in most areas.
" think that the momentum is
what is important to look at she
said. "Because the polls continue
to show Dole coming steadily up.
It's not erratic. It's not up and
down. It's just a steady increase,
and that's a nice trend
Mrs. Dole said another high
point in the campaign is that her
husband is continually shown by
polls to be the most electable
Republican. She produced an
independent survey which com-
pared Dole and Bush with each of
the Democratic candidates, and it
Announcements
BE A LEADER
Applications jro now being accepted
for the position of Student i lomecoming
Committee, Cairperson You must be
enrolled in school lull time with a 2 2GPA
to apply Call Leslie Council at 752 8070
for more nitorm.it;
m.
MUSIC LISENING CFTVTFR
job vacancies available tor spi
semester Morning hours available as well
js other slut: Contact Lvnn in the pro
gram office
757-6611.
Mendenhal! Student Center
Nc
The
ture meet
in Mende
XC5L
th Carolina Student Li
�erv Monday night at
all student Center, Room 2i2
gisla
pm
starting next semester Members ck not
forget December 12th, Mid-Exam am
A MM STY INTERNATL.
�� nest) International will be having
thly meeting on Wednesday,
er2nd atspm at St Paul's Epis-
: irch 101 E 4th St
OVERSEAS DEV.
The Overseas Development Network
IT1 irsda) December 3, at 4 p.m
� aiding R 151 Topic 1 londu-
AscussioVt Everyone interested is invited
to attend
SAM
Attention SAM members All members
must pick up doughnuts on Fri , Decem-
ber 4th from 3:00 pm. until 7(X1 p.m. in
Raw! i 5
GAMMA BETA PHI
The Camm3 Ik?ta Phi Honor Society
will be having their last meeting of the
semester December 1 at 7 pm. in Jenkins
Auditorium. Point cards will be collected.
PRQDUCTIOXS COMM.
All faculty, staff and students are in-
vited to the tree-trimming party on Tues-
dav. December 1. 4:30 p.m. in the lobby of
Mendenhall. Free food, cash prizes to the
top three ornaments, and Santa Claus! Get
in the Christmas spirit
SUBJECTS NEEDED
The ECU clinical psychology program
needs children, ages 6-15 to volunteer for
intelligence testing This is to assist in the
training ot MA level students. Interested
people should contact Dr. Larry Mines at
the Department of Psychology, 757-6800
FITNESS TEST
The Physical Education Motor and
Physical Fitness Competency Test is
scheduled to take place at Minges Coli-
seum at 1 p.m Tuesday, December 8,
I 87 A passing score on this test is re-
quired of all students prior to declaring
physical education as a major. Any ques-
tions should be reffered to Dr. Israel or
Mike McCammon at 757-6497.
MODLELNG JOBS
The School of Art has positions open for
models during the spring semester at S5
per hr. Apply now to begin work in the
spring
GOSPEL CHOIR
The ECU Gospel Chior is sponsoring a
S50 Chnsmas giveaway Tickets are fifty
cents and can be purchased at the Student
Store from November 30 through Decem-
ber 4. The drawing will be held on Friday,
December 4.
SAILING club
Anyone interested in joining the ECU
Sailing Club please attend an organiza-
tional meeting Wedenesday, December 2,
at 5 p.m. in Rm. 145 Minges.
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
The Accounting Society's December
Dinnermeeting will be held December
7th at 6 p.m. at the Sheraton Inn. Cost is
SI5 per person. Turn in money and name
to Jill in the Accounting Department office
by Thursday, December 3rd. Guests are
encouraged to attend.
SFNIOR COUNCIL
Photo sesion for December Graduates.
Look for hme and place on flyers posted
around campus.
Anyone intersted in enhancing their
communication skills come to Rm. 211
Theatre Arts on Wednesday, December 2,
at 8 p.m.
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma members please remem-
ber the dinner meetinat Qmncy's Wed-
nesday, December 2, at 6 pm. Monev
from the doughnut sale will be collected at
that time.
PHI SIGMA PI
Phi Sigma Pi would like to congratulate
the following members of the Alpha
Gamma pledge class Vicky llraswell,
Jenny Campbell, Billy Daniel, Donna
Farler, Toiriste Cneal, Cindy Pittman,
Robin Sanford, Jeff Taft, Margaret VVirt,
and Lvnn Williams Welcome new broth-
ers
PHI SIGMA PI
There will be a business meeting for all
brothers on Wednesday, December 2, in
Austin 132
COMMISSION
Worship God in a beautiful candlelight
communion service, then enjoy a Christ-
mas dinner with turkey and all the trim-
mings, this Wednesday at 5 p.m. at the
Methodist Student Center The meal is
tree, an offering will be collected for the
poor ol Greenville. Call 758-2030 for reser-
vations.
ALPHA EPfilLON DEl.TA
Tonight at 7 p.m in F-307 Dr. Lou Ann
Baldree, a resident in pediatrics at Pitt
County Memronal 1 lospital will share her
experiences as a medical student and resi-
dent Pledge meeting at 6:30 with re-
freshements and officer's meeting at 6
pm.
ECJiC
Thursday, E)ecember 3, there will be an
ECI lO Business Meeting - wrap up party
- extravaganza at 5 pm. in the Honors
Lounge m Ragsdale. All members - pres-
ent and future - should be there
GAMMA BETA PHI
The Gamma Beta Phi Honor Society
extends and inivations to anyone who has
a 3.0 or better GPA to join our organiza-
tion. National and local dues are S26. If
interested you can join at out last meeting
which is December 1 at 7 p.m. in Jenkins
Auditorium. If you have any questions
contact John Thrift at 757-0660.
showed Dole beating each by a
larger margin than Bush.
Mrs. Dole resigned in March
from her position as secretary of
transportation in order to focus
on her husband's campaign.
The sale of Conrail, saving $2
billion for the government, was
the most rewarding action of her
tenure, Mrs. Dole said.
She also said that, as first lady,
she would continue to work on
many of the programs she en-
dorsed in her cabinet position,
including transportation safety
and random drug testing for some
jobs.
Mrs. Dole, a native of Salisbury,
spoke at ECU's commencement
ceremonies in 1986 at the request
of Sen. John East, a former profes-
sor here.
ings insulated with asbestos.
U A workers did not know there
was asbestos in he ceiling of Mor-
gan Hall when they began to fix it.
UA Prsidcnt Joab Thomas for-
warded the English Dcpt. com-
plaint to UA's attorney for re-
view.
Nationwide, a lack of money to
remove asbestos from campus
buildings has forced the effort to
progress fitfully.
On Oct. 21, the U.S. Environ-
mental Protection Agency an-
nounced new rules and appropri-
ated $3.1 billion to help primary
and secondary schools rid them-
selves of the material. No other
plans are afoot for college cam-
puses, however, EPA officials
said.
'��� uau
ATTENTION BSN
CLASS OF 1988.
The Air Force has a spec aI pro
gram for 1988 BSNs if selected
you can enter active duty soon
after graduation without waiting
for the results of your State Boot
To qualify you must have ar
overall "B average After comrr s
sionmg you li attend a five -monW
internship at a major Air Force
medical facility Its an excellent
way to prepare for the wide range
of experiences you II have serving
your country as an Air Force nurse
officer For more information col'
MSgt Nick Nero (9191850-9549
Station to Station Collect
(The
ast Carolinian,
ride,
otivation,
xperience,
riends.
Apply today.
STUDENT
SPECIALS
6 Hold these coupons

Wheel Alignment
$1588
(with coupon)
?�����������������
Winterize
Servicing
$1788
(includes 1 Gal. AntiFrece)
����������������a
Used Tires
and up
$800
4-Wheel Drum or
Front Disc Reline and
Rotor machined
q)D- (with coupon)
����������������a
Lubrication, Oil
Filter, Oil Change
4J-v3 (with coupon)
����������������a
4-Wheel Computer
Balance and Rotate
$1988
(with coupon)
VISA-Master Card-Amer. ExpDiscover-Money Express
COGGINS CAR CARE
(BFGoodrich
320 W. Greenville Blvd Greenville, N.C Phone 756-5244
9V(ightclub
CJS presents
2V
VT
-�!�
ggr Wednesday Night
The Ladies Zoo!
With .25 Draft Beer and .50c Wine!
$1.25 Domestics, $1.50 Premiums,
$1 Schnapps and Tequila Shots
Spinning the Hottest Dance
Music in Eastern N.C!
Eastern N.Cs No. 1 Smokin' Nightclub, Beau's of
course Doors open at 9 o'clock. 18 yr. olds are wel-
come.
Phone: 756-6401
Located in the Carolina East Centre.
KINGSTON
PLACE
WILL HAVE SEVERAL
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR NEXT
SEMESTER,
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393.
AFFORDABLE, LUXURIOUS
FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
BUILT SPECIFICALLY FOR
ECU STUDENTS.
A box of
Christmas cheer.
Kit -wffi .Rl f IIV tS �
Student Stores
Wright Building
Make Your Christmas
Shopping Easier With
Chico's Gift
Certificates
Celebrate Your Christmas
Parties In
Our Fiesta Room.
Accomodations To 60.
Reservations
757-1666
. 521 CoUnchc St
Misty Blue Relaxation
Studio
WATERBEDS
Be Pampered & Pleased As Never Before
A Relaxing Massage Just A Phone Call Away
Open 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.
Mon. - Sat.
2:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Sundays
Private Rooms - All Female Stqff
Complete Body Massages
l Christmas Special"1,
10 Off Misty
Blue Delight
Special Through Dec. 24,1987.
I
I
I
I
L
� m m � �- ' �i urn � it '� m
"
j





3 SgjASTCAKOUNlAN
DECEMBER 1, 1987
Inmates free hostages after La. prison riots
OAKl)ALE,U.(AP)-Cuban well before the a,kl� B� � . .
OAKDALE, La. (AP) � Cuban
inmates ended their uprising by
treeing all 26 hostages � dirty
hungry but healthy � after agrec-
'ng to reviews of their eases and
receuingblessings froma Cuban-
born bishop riding among them
in an open van.
Cuban prisoners holding 90
hostages at the U.S. Penitentiary
m Atlanta were briefed Sunday
on the agreement that ended the
eight-day standoff at the Federal
Detention Center here But fed-
eral officials would not say if the
Atlanta siege was any closer to an
end
Four Atlanta hostages were re-
leased Sunday morning by the
1.139 inmates holding that prison,
well before the Oakdale settle-
ment, officials said.
"There has been no reaction, no
celebrating, nothing discernible"
from the Atlanta inmates to devel-
opments at Oakdale, U.S. Justice
Department spokesman Thomas
Stewart said.
In Oakdale, the reaction was
one of joyous relief Freed hos-
tages beamed, and hostage rela-
tives and inmates alike wept and
cheered
"For the hostages and the rob
lives, tins is a day of jubilation
said Auxiliary Bishop Agustin
Roman oi Miami, who persuaded
the 950 Cubans to accept the
agreement and lay down their
makeshift weapons.
"For the Marielitos, ,t is a day of expressed willingness to work to
hope lor the community, a day of end the Atlanta prison takeover if
peace.
The agreement also promised
no reprisals for damage to the
year-old $17 million prison,
which was seized and torched
Nov. 21. Officials said it would be
rebuilt.
The riot followed a government
announcement of the deporta-
tions to Cuba of 2,500 undesire-
ables criminals or mentally ill
- who were among the 125,000 to
arrive during the 1980 Mariel
boatlift. The Atlanta prison was
seized a week ago Monday.
Roman, the highest-ranking
C uban-born priest in Miami's
Roman Catholic
officials asked him.
However, Patrick Korten, the
Justice Department's deputy di-
rector of public affairs, ruled out
an immediate invitation to the
bishop.
After their release, the Oakdale
hostages were taken by bus to
Humana Hospital.
"They're dirty. They're in good
spirits. They're hungry. They all
appear to be stressed somewhat
said Dr. Roy Harding. "All have
been checked and appear to be
doing very well
Guard Leon Smith said he and
the other hostages had been
�11 f � , . Roman Catholic Archdiocese, treated fairly and with re
Illegal wiretap may have helped Ginsbure fall
CAMBWDCE. Mass. (CPS) - .orsoRamsUhcRolvrUtorkn�. � J
"But we were all scared because
it was the first time we had to deal
with a situation like this he said.
He said he believed the hostages
were treated well because guards
had treated inmates fairly.
The agreement, typed on sta-
tionery from Attorney General
Edwin Meese Ill's office, included
guarantees of individual reviews
o. inmates' status and medical
w-?Mnent for those needing it.
"We did not give away the
sore said j.D. Williams, a re-
gional director of the U.S. Bureau
of Prisons. "I think it's a good
agreement
In a videotape olaycd for the
inmates earir.v Sunday, Roman
said he had discussed the accord
AMBRIDGE, Mass. (CPS) - torsagamst the Robert Borknomi-
An illegal wiretap on a Harvard nation in October, said he made
law professors phone may have confidential statements on his
Helped derail the nomination of
Douglas C.insburg to the U.S.
Supreme Court.
Law Prof. Laurence H. Tribe, an
influential legal scholar whose
opinion turned some U.S. sena-
office phone questioning
Ginsburg's lack of experience,
and that rumors that Tribe would
try to block the nomination began
circulating the next day.
On Oct. 31, three days after the
conversation police discovered late who might have tapped his
someone had put an illegal wire- phone P
tap on Tribe's phone.
Tolt'thynWyUpSCntingTribCSaid- Ginsbur8 withd� his candi-
"To think my private eonversa- dacy for the Supreme Court Nov.
tons were bang shared with a Safter public revelations that he'd
person w.th no scruples ,s defi- smoked marijuana as a s'udenl
n.telv not a good feeling and, m 1979 J�� ttroS
Tribe added he couldn't specu- sor. prores-
personally with Meese in Wash-
ington and urged them to accept
Roman celebrated Mass for the
Cubans, gave them communion,
then rode among cheering, weep-
ing inmates in an open van and
gave them his blessing, said the
bishop's legal adviser, Rafcl Pe-
nalver.
Williams said 200 of the least
dangerous prisoners would be
moved immediately to the
Army's Fort Polk about 50 miles
northwest of Oakdale. The re-
maining prisoners, including 38
Americans, will be kept at
Oakdale whileofficialsdeterminc
which of 45 federal prisons have
room for them.
IMPORT SERVICE
School suspends frat. students
rEANECK, N.J. (CrS) � Far-
�eigh Dickinson University sus-
pcndedanall white fraternity last
week : �r engaging in a slick-
wielding brawl between white
and black students in front of its
house Oct. 17.
On Nov. 11, FDU spokes-
woman Alice Olick said Sigma
OmicronBcta which isn't affili-
ated with any national fraternity
would be banned from campus
until 1991 for engaging in the
brawl, and to punish it for recent
violations oi other campus rules.
The October Farleigh Dickin-
s n brawl,moreover, wasoneofa
Si riesol racial confrontations that
have plagued the universities of
Pennsylvania, Michigan, Illinois
and Indiana, as well asTompkins-
Cortiand Community College in
New York, this fall.
And at tin- University of Mar
land last week, Middle Eastern
students submitted a petition
complaining about a "racist flyer"
circulating around the campus.
The Organization of Arab Stu-
dents displayed the flyer ad
vertising a take product called
"Arab Extra Dry" that said "You
don't have to be an Arab to smell
like one" and asked adminis-
trators tii "condemn any form of
racist humor aimed at any ethnic
group on campus
Meanwhile, the Campus
Friends of Israel at the University
of Texas at Austin charged Oct. 30
that a campus anti-apartheid
group � The Steve Biko Commit-
tee helped spread anti-Semi-
tism by inviting speaker Kwamc
Hire to campus.
In his speech at Texas as well
as at various other campuses �
lure sid, "I'll say it again: the
only good Zionist is a dead Zion-
ist
The Biko Committee responded
by inviting Jewish students to a
meeting, at which member Trina
Reed asserted their reading of
what constituted anti-Semitism
was wrong.
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Students face culture lag
SAL1 LAKE CITY, Utah (CIS)
Male collegians intent on
minding their manners among
female collegians are extending a
"cultural lag" that signals that
"women arc not as capable as
men. and should be treated differ-
ently a University ot Utah re-
searcher has concluded.
In a study of 190 college stu-
dents' attitudes, anthropologist
Seymour Parker found that the
people who valued such manners
most also tended to believe
women were "a little irrational"
and in need of "extra care
People with low regard for
manners thought the customs
conveyed the idea that women are
nforinr "
Undergrad
numbers
increase again
NEW YORK, N.Y. (CPS) �
Duri ng a decade in which demog-
raphers have been predicting
drastic enrollment decreases at
US. campuses, undergraduate
enrollment actually rose between
1985 and 1986, the'Collcge Board
reported last week.
The report counted almost 1
percent more undergrads en-
rolled in fall, 1986, than in fall,
1985, the board said.
In all, almost 10.9 million un-
dergrads registered for classes
last fall.
The U.S. Dept. of Education
counted a total of more than 12
million students, including grad
students, on campus last year.
Official numbers for the 1987-88
academic year won't be forthcom-
ing until next January.
Initial unofficial reports from a
wide range of campuses, how-
ever, indicate surprising in-
creases in the numbersof students
this fall, fueled particularly by
increases in the size of the schools'
freshman classes.
That was not the case in 1986,
the College Board's survey found'
First-time freshman enrollment
dropped by 3.1 percent from 1985
to 1986. The steepest drop was at
2-year public campuses, where
the number of fifst-time students
fell by 5.3 percent.
The overall increase in enroll-
ment, the board's Fred Moreno
noted, came mostly from older
students returning to school.
Tarker asked men to rate the
importance of opening a door for
a woman, opening a car door and
helping a woman out, paving the
lunch tab, giving up a seat on the
bus to an unimpaired woman of
the same age and stand i ng when a
woman enters the room.
He asked women to rank how
much they expected a man to
observe these practices.
To Park�r, such manners are
"out of tune. Thev no longer cor-
respond to the emerging position
of women
2204 Dickinson Ave.
BUSCH GARDENS
America's premier theme park in Wilhams-
burg, Va is conducting auditions for
over 200 singers, dancers, musicians,
variety artists, actors, technicians, and
supervisors You could be part of the
magic that truly makes Busch Gardens
an entertainment "experience " So get
"your-aet together and 'shine" at our
1988 auditions
Audition Date:
GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA
Wednesday, December 2nd
1-5 p.m
University of North Carolina
Elliott University Center
Cone Ballroom
Greenville
Busch
Gardens
An Affirmative Act.on Equdl Opportun.ty Employer MfH
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OPEN THURSDAY NIGHTS TIL 9PM
SALE ENDS NOVEMBER 22. 1987
Mb Arlington Blvd In The Shops of Arlington Village
rCI.ARK
THE PERFECT CHRISTMAS
GIFT: ECU'S Official history,
written by
Dr. Mary Jo Bratton,
professor and director of
graduate studies for ECU's
Department of History
This 550-page book includes more than 200
photographs as well as an extensive index and
appendix. With its rich purple hard cover and
gold lettering, this stately volume will make a
perfect gift for any occasion.
I to��22 and handUng lncluded)- North c��� ts � Set I
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Return order form to:ECUThe Fornuu.e Years. TaylorSlaughter AluTc7n:
gOjE. Fifth Street. Greenville. NC 27834.
.J
THh EASIAK


�.
V
J
t
Special education faculty members (left to r
Dr. Cindi Nixon and Vai Carmine demonstr
agressive clients during the Protective Intel
by Tony Rumple)
Music prof
By LAURASALAZAR
Stafl Wfim
harlesto
reaaber
"It was rather m.
oneof the onlv things ! .
pated in where polil s
side. There were no p
tones. It was a beautiful be
celebration said Paul
about his participation
orchestra for the re-ded
ceremonies of the Statu
erty in 1986.
Besides performing al I
dedication ceremonies
b cJlin SchoofcwtM Music
classical arra jazz pianm c v ten d'
a two-hour special, "Wolftrac
Salutes ASCAP Taped last
merat Washington DCs far
Wolftrap Center for the Perform-
ing Arts, the special was a tribute
to the talents of members of the
American Society of Composers,
Authors, and Publishers
With only three davs notice
Tardif was told to learn the firs!
movement of Gershwin's "Piano
Concerto in F for a ballet -
quence featuring members oi the
New York Ballet. Tardif said, "It
wasn't difficult to learn the piea
because it didn't have to be
memorized Tardif performed
with the orchestra; the production
was directed bv foe Lavton, ter-
mer director of North Carolina's
outdoor drama "The Lost Col-
ony
Tardif joined the ECU School ot
Music faculty in 1971. He has re-
leased recordings on the Dii
Arts Classical label and has
Rai
piano at th
father was
band and hi
S per-
formed as a classical artist on a
regular basis at The National Gal-
lery of Art in Washington, D C
Dieting, exercise is u.
He
mu:
imc
By PATTI HOWARD
Su(f Writer
There's an exercise bike in one
comer of my living room and a 20-
pound pair of dumbells in an-
other. I have a mini trampoline
against one wall, and a Gut-
Buster place strategically in the
center of the room. So vou think
I'm a fitness nut, righC Well, look
closer.
Anyone with even a hint of in-
telligence could discover that I'm
actually a lazv slob This is be-
cause each piece of equipment has
a layer of dust nine inches thick on
it. My Gut-Buster is rusted, and
my exercise bike has become a
permanent harbor for mv ironing
pile.
I quit working-out because I am
convinced that dieting and exer-
cise are unhealthy. Certainlv,
aerobic exercieses stimulate and
speed up the heart, but so do heart
attacks. Besides, only a select few
can have flawless figures, and I'm
not one of them. I could leap
around in an outfit the size of a
gum wrapper until my brain
turns to coleslaw, and I'd stll have
the body of a waiter buffalo.
If you think sweating like swine
isexhilirating, I think you've got a
screw loose.
.
scribed .s
low-cal
sential aspe.
That's accept!
occastor f
how can v.
with a nanl
mango, or v
body runnin!
machine.
If you readI
self-proclaim)
you should, vf
gain another i
taglucomonoi
pass. And I rq
ent listing
like "may al
lous.That me,
be whale bli
Knspies, ane
about it!
Don't belie
can take the pll
the related mj
acceptable siq
late. For that
an acceptablel
thing except
shoe polish,
fruit is not desl
Let's stop ti
and self-denu
voursclf to tha
��"iii mmm
A


I





rison riots
�all scared because
irst time we had to deal
ition like this he said
elieved the hostages
well because guards
runates fairly,
ment, tvped on sta-
i ttomej General
2 IH'soffice, included
t individual reviews
- ind medical
m I ngit
e awa) the
liams a re-
ar of L S Bureau
nk t's a good
iyed for the
- inday, Roman
e accord
personally with Meese in Wash-
ington and urged them to accept
it.
Roman celebrated Mass for the
C ubans. gave them communion,
then rode among cheering, weep-
ing inmates in an open van and
gave them his blessing, said the
bishop's legal adviser, Rafel Pe-
nal ver.
Williams said 200 of the least
dangerous prisoners would be
moved immediately to the
Army's Fort Polk about 50 miles
northwest of Oakdale. The re-
maining prisoners, including 38
Americans, will be kept at
Oakdale while of finals determine
which of 41- federal prisons have
room for them.
MPORT SERVICE
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ISCHE. VOLVO, DATSUN, LOTUS, MER
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a University:
ative Years
-1982
University: The Formative Years, 1907 1982 atl
led). North Carolina residents include 5 sales
Mail to:
Name
Address
City. State. Zip
ive Years. TaylorSlaughter Alumni Center.
Greenville. NC 27834.
J
THt EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
DECEMBER I, 1987 Page 9
Course teaches protection
By MARY HECKROTTE
Sufi Writer
You might not believe your eyes
if you peep into Speight 313 on
certain Fridays this semester.
People in there are swinging
punches, kicking, biting, pulling work-in 'agencies such'as group
hair and engaging in all sorts of homes, sheltered workshops,
or staff in charge, to help the client
get back in control. PIC is the only
sanctoned method to use in North
Carolina schools and other hu-
man services agencies said Car-
mine.
ECU students who are hired to
unacademic carrying-on.
Yey, they are ECU students �
and faculty. It's even university
sanctioned. It's called PIC � Pro-
tective Intervention Course.
"PIC is a non-offensive
method of self-defense used to
deal with aggressive clients in a
human services setting ex-
plained Val Carmine, a PIC in-
structor from Kinston who super-
vises PIC classes throughout east-
ern North Carolina. She said that,
like everyone, people who have
emotional problems or are men-
tally retarded sometimes get up
public schools, and mental health
centers, will need to know PIC,
Carmine said. Graduates from
psychology, social work, special
education, therapeutic recreation,
nursing, and many other disci-
plines may find that having PIC
listed on their resume will help
with getting a job in these agen-
cies.
"These ECU students are taking
the course voluntarily. On the job,
it won't be voluntary. A lot of
agencies require it stated Rita
Wooten, a PIC instuctor from
Kinston who, along with Greg
are called by professionals who
provide services for them, may
Special education faculty members (left to right) Dr. Mary Schmidt feS the abiUtYt0 exPress 'rustra-
Dr. Cindi Nixon and Val Carmine demonstrate theraputk holds for Tev mav'hTt 'St "
����"theProfectiveInterventioncoursePhoto SSCCSS&��
v "It's our job, if we're the teacher
��wrkThcseicnts'fsthf y Scott of Wilmington, is teaching
the ECU class. Wooten is em-
ployed in a community college
which provides classes for indi-
viduals who are mentally re-
tarded. Scott works in a group
home for children who are emo-
tionally disturbed. Both agencies
Music prof performs with celebrities
Bv LAURA SALAZAR
Staff Wnfcr
"It was rather moving; it was
one of the only things I've partici-
pated in where politics took a
side. There were no political over-
tones. It wasa beautiful, beautiful
celebration said Paul Tardif
about his participation with the
orchestra for the re-dedication
ceremonies of the Statue of Lib-
erty in 1986
Besides performing at the re-
dedication ceremonies, the East
CaroirrcV Schooof Music
processor's,chi�aBHpppts a$ a
elassic.il and jazz pianfctextend to
a two-hour special, "Wolftrap
Salutes ASCAP Taped last sum-
mer at Washington D.Cs famous
Wolftrap Center for the Perform-
ing Arts, the special was a tribute
to the talents of members of the
American Society of Composers,
Authors, and Publishers.
With only three days notice,
Tardif was told to learn the first
movement of Gershwin's "Piano
Concerto in F for a ballet se-
quence featuring members oi the
New York Ballet. Tardif said, "It
wasn't difficult to learn the piece
because it didn't have to be
memorized Tardif performed
with the orchestra; the production
was directed by Joe Lay ton, for-
mer director of North Carolina's
outdoor drama "The Lost Col-
ony
the Phillips Collection,
Charleston's Spoleto Festival and
the North Carolina Museum of
Art in Raleigh.
Tardif was the first to receive a
$5,000 grant in music composi-
tion awarded by the North Caro-
lina Arts Council to support jazz
composers and performers in ac-
tivities such as composing, per-
forming and recording.
As a featured event of the ECU
School of Music faculty recital
series, Tardif performed on No-
vember 18, imt-the-A. j. Fletcher
, K,optal .Hat ojhtj Schopt of Mi-
sic. The 'concert included classical
music from all major periods.
Works performed were Mozart's
"Adagio in B Minor K.540;
Schubert's "Sonata in A Major
D.664; Prokofieff's "Sonata No. 3
in A Minor Opus 28; "Valses
nobles et scntimentales by
Ravel and three preludes by Ra-
chamninoff.
Asked if he still got nervous
during a performance, Tardif
said, "I still experience some nerv-
ousness, but I get especially nerv-
ous when I am performing a solo.
When I perform, the overall im-
pression of my performance is
what I'm after
Originally from Buffalo, New
York, Tardif began playing the
piano at the early age of six. His
father was a musician in a dance
Tardif believes, "The younger
you get the aspiring piano stu-
dent, the better. Starting at age six
and progressing through the
ages, the student should have a
fully developed technique by age
18.
A former student of Cecile
Gcnhart and Leon Fleisher, Tardif
received his formal training at the
Eastman School of Music, the
United States. Practicing and per-
forming is much more up to the
individual. Pressure in Austria is
not as much as it is in the United
States
In performing for various funci-
tons, Tardif has accompanied
performers such as Bernadette
Peters, Glenn Close and Jeffrey
Osborne. In addition, he has per-
formed with orchestras for works
Peabody Conservatory, and the sung by Judy Collins, and Tony
Salzburg Mozarteum in Austria. Bennett, and composers Henry
In Austria, Tardif studied under
one teacher and received his artist
diploma.
Tardif said, "In Austria, the
piano students are mature at a
younger age as compared to the
Mancini, Marvin Hamlisch, Char-
les Strauss and Sammy Kahn.
Tardif, 59, resides in Greenville.
He is married and has a 26-year-
old son who is a medical student
at Chapel Hill.
require staff to be trained in PIC.
PlC techniques are demon-
strated by instuctors, and them
course participants practice with
one another, taking turns playing
the role of an aggressive client.
Participants learn how to block
punches and kicks, how to gain
release from chokes, hair pulls,
arm grabs, and other holds, and
how to gain control over an ag-
gressive client.
The key technique used to con-
trol an aggressive client is a thera-
peutic hold. With this hold, the
client's arms arc crossed in front
of the chest and the staff member,
standing behind the client, holds
the client's wrists. The client can
be held in a standing position,
placed in a chair or on the floor, or
can be lifted and carried to a safer
location by two or more staff
memebers.
Carmine explained the PIC
techniques "should only be used
as a last resort and only in situ-
ations where the client is about to
hurt himself or others She said
that these techniques are used to
control , but never to hurt, the
client, and that the clients can of-
ten be "talked down" so that they
stop behaving agressivelv with-
out staff having to use physical
measures. She stressed that ag-
gressive behavior can be pre-
vented by having good behav-
ioral programs, an interesting and
well-structured environment,
and positive relationships be-
tween staff and clients.
Convincing participants to be-
lieve in not hurting theclient is the
hardest part of teaching PIC, ac-
cording to Carmine. "It's just hard
to be kind to someone who has
just kicked you or choked you.
But these are clients we're talking
about. This isn't like being on the
street where you're maybe deal-
ing with a criminal. Clients are
people who need our help. We're
hired to be carcgivers she said.
The course is tough, according
written test and a physical profi-
ciency test. Students are required
not only to know each technique
perfectly, but also to be fast.
"If someone is choking you,
being slow could get you hurt or
worse. Doing the technique
wrong could hurt the client,
maybe even get you sued ex-
plained Carmine.
Dr. Cindi Nixon, a special edu-
cation faculty member, said that
of the 16 students enrolled in
ECU's first class, only five passed
the course.
"A lot of the students were not
read) for the physical part of the
class said Ethel Fordam, one of
the five passing students. "They
were surprised by the amount of
physical activity you have to do
the procedures correctly
Suzanne LaCroix, a special
education student currently com-
pleting her student teaching, feels
more confident as a result of the
course. "If I have a kid attack me
now, I won't freak out she said.
"What PIC docs, it helps you to
stop the behavior in a sensitive
kind of way, not to degrade them
(the clients) and not to put them
down said Fordam.
ion said that because special
education students are likely to
need PIC when they are em-
ployed, she wanted the class
available at ECU. She wrote a
grant which brought almost
$1,500 from the Office of Aca-
demic Affairs to support three
classes dunng 1987-1988. Stu-
dents who participated in the first
course were special education
seniors. A group of therapeutic
recreation majors will take the
course beginning November 6,
and the third class will be offered
to special education students in
the spring.
Now if you look into Speight
313, you'll know you aren't hav-
ing hallucinations too early for a
Friday afternoon, there really are
people in there engaged in
toCarrrune. It includes 15 hourso uniiauaiactivitics-B��tti�otiPICis
classroom instruction and many unusual, it teaches that aggres-
more hours of practice before stu- sivc clients can be dealt with in a
dents can expect to pass both a "sensitive kind of way
Art Enthusiasts hold auction to
begin raising funds for projects
School of Art Piw Relauc
The Art Enthusiasts of East
Carolina University, a newly
formed community organization
to develop art programming in
Eastern North Carolina, will hold
an art auction December 5 in the
Gray Art Gal lery on the campu s of
East Carolina University.
Work to be auctioned we be on
contrmporary art at the Mint in their studios. The Art Enthusi-
Museum in Charlotte. asts are also developing a seminar
Art work will be introduced series on art collection and conser-
and discussed by Patricia Fuller, vation. This programming effort
an independent art consultant is slated to start in the Spring 1988
Tardif joined the ECU School of
Music faculty in 1971. He has re- music in my family said Tardif.
leased recordings on the Digital Besides playing the piano,
Arts Classical label and has per- Tardif also plays the synthesizer,
formed as a classical artist on a
regular basis at The National Gal-
lery of Art in Washington, D.C
band and he also played theorgan display in the gallery Thursday
from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m and Friday
He teaches classes in chamber
music, applied piano and jazz
improvisation.
Dieting, exercise is unhealthy
By PATTI HOWARD
Suff Writer
Now let us consider the pre-
scribed "wonder diets Eating
There's an exercise bike in one low-calorie fresh foods is an es-
comer of my living room and a 20- sential aspect of weight loss,
pound pair of dumbells in an- That's acceptable; I can handle an
other. I have a mini trampoline occasional salad orgrapefruit. But
against one wall, and a Gut-
Buster place strategically in the
center of the room. So you think
I'm a fitness nut, right? Well, look
closer.
Anyone with even a hint of in-
telligence could discover that I'm
actually a lazy slob. This is be-
cause each piece of equ i pment has
how can you rely on anything
with a name like okra, tofu,
mango, or yogurt to keep your
body running like a fine-tuned
machine.
If you read food labels like the
self-proclaimed diet expers say
you should, you'd probably never
gain another ounce. Dimethopen-
�-� mmmmm -�v.�� y � v v. v� v-nu'iui it i i v . � y�� -��.� ������ am hv � � � ��- �" sj lvii
a layer of dust nine inches thick on taglucomonosodiol? Thanks, I'll
it. My Gut-Buster is rusted, and pass. And I really balk at ingredi
and Satruday, from 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. The evening of the auction,
December 5, the doors to the gal-
lery will open at 7 p.m. for a final
viewing of the work.
The reception catered by
Noura's Restaruant of Greenville
will preceed the art auction which
will begin at 8 p.m. The receptin is
sponsored by the Office of the
Chancellor and thr Office of the
Vice Chancellor for Institutional
Advancement of East Carolina
University.
The art auction is the Art Enthu-
siasts' kick-off fundraiser and fea-
tures donated art works form East
Carolina University's School of
Art faculty, students and alumni
as well as artiusts who have been
visitors to the faculty at East Caro-
lina University. The list of con-
tributors includes such artist as
Michael Ehlbeck, whose print
"Line Man (Art Kit)" is featured
most noted for her works with
public art projects and the wife of
Edward Levine, Dean of the
School of Art.
Some of the activities the auc-
tion procees are expected to fund
include a film series, a lecture
series, student scholarships, tours
of East Coast muesems and galler-
ies, meetings with curators, and
visits with contemporary artists
semester.
According to Stacy Brody, chiar
of the Art Enthusiasts Art Auction
people planning to attend and we
hop everyone interested in art
will join us
The Art Auction Committee
also consists of Carmen Albea,
Adele Callaway, Mary Francis
Garret, Marilyn Lancet, and Gail
Jeffries. For further information,
contact a committee member or
Committee, "A great deal of plan- Perry Nesbitt, Grav Art Gallery
ning and community cooperation Director at 757-6336
has gone into making this a gala
cultrual event. We know its going
to be an evening to enjoy as well as
an opportune one for art buyers.
We have had a very enthusistic
response from art donors and
Gray Art Gallery is located in
the Jenkins Fine Arts Center on
the campus of East Carolina Uni-
versity in Greenville, NC. All
events are free and open to the
public.
my exercise bike has become a
permanent harbor for my ironing
pile.
I quit working-out because I am
convinced that dieting and exer-
ci' are unhealthy. Certainly,
ae bic exercieses stimulate and
speed up the heart, but so do heart
attacks. Besides, only a select few
can have flawless figures, and I'm acceptable substitute for choco-
on the invitation; Paul Hartley,
ent listing that'include phrases Norman Keller, Marilyn and Tran
like "may also contain Fabu- Gordley, Chick Chamberlain and
many others from the East Car-
lolina University faculty as well
as Cynthia Careson a prominent
artist from New York City. Dona-
tions of art have also been made
from private collection in the
community.
may
lous. That means there "may also"
be whale blubber in my Rice
Krispies, and I'll never know
about it!
Don't believe that plain yogurt
can take the place of sour cream or
the related myth that carob is an
not one of them. I could leap
around in an outfit the size of a
gum wrapper until my brain
turns to coleslaw, and I'd stll have
the body of a watter buffalo.
If you think sweating like swine
is exhilirating, I think you've got a
screw loose.
late. For that matter, carob is not
an acceptable substitute for any-
thing except, perhaps, brown
shoe polish. And finally, fresh
fruit is not dessert; cake is dessert.
Fred Kessler of Charlotte, a
professional auctioneer well
known to the art community in
the state will be the auctioneer for
the evening. Kessler and his wife,
uiiisnoiaes5en,caKeisaessert. - - o� ������.� ����
Let's stop this foolish suffering 'ane' �"� had a ,ong association
id self-denial. Relax. And help WIth � V "?m which egradu-
and self-denial. Relax. And help �J E�U fromwhich she gradu- Michael Ehlbeck's print, 'The Line Man" graces the cover of invitations to the Art Enthusiasts auction on
yourself to that last fudgesicle. ated before becoming curator of Saturday night Pieces to be sold will be on display in Gray Gallery from Thursday to Saturday.

iWWWi �Pi" i m �i ��
lMliWH�1, ��i ���
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10
THEEASTCA ROL INI A N
DECEMBER 1,1987
Schwartznegger runs for film
LOS ANGELES rApx.w,b;� �j�
LOS ANGELES (AP)-YVorking based on a Stephen K.nC novel
it is something Arnold Srh ,h�,t t �,t 8. n .
out is something Arnold Sch"
vvarznegger looks forward to
every day.
"I've been doing it for 25 years,
and I've gotten such tremendous
joy out of working out, going to
the gym, lifting weights, pump-
ing iron the actor-body builder
said.
Not just joy, but millions of
dollars from his slam-bang mov-
ies. After an uncertain start with
"Conan the Barbarian Sch-
warzenegger found his audience
with 'The Terminator" and con-
tinued with "Commando "Raw
Deal" and "Predator
His latest is "Die Running
Man The Tn-Star release �
about a TV game show' in Los
Angeles circa 2019. Sch-
warzenegger plays an enemy of
the state who is stalked by a scries
of fierce behemoths armed with
chain saws, flame throwers and
razor-sharp hockey sticks. All live
on TV.
To help launch "The Running
Man Schwarncnegger flew in
trom Chicago, where he is filming
"Red Heat in which he plays a
Soviet cop in the Windy City.
"All 1 have to do is find out from
the director on each particular
film what kind of shape does he
see me in for this film the 40-
year-old performer said. "For
Running Man Paul Michael
Glaser wanted me to be around
225, very muscular, but at the
same time very agile and quick,
because I was running a lot in the
film. So 1 took a lot of aerobic
classes, bicycling and running, as
well as some weight training.
"For 'Red Heat Walter Hill
wanted me to lose 15 pounds. He
wanted me to look very Russian
and bony and to get a straight
haircut said the Austrian-born
Schwarznegger, who has
launched a lucrative film career
from his Mr. Universecredentials.
"1 understand when people
said there's too much action and
violence in the films, because
they're not everyone's cup of tea.
That's why there are different
n f . � ���wei mats why there are different
Bakkers, Rather recieve the 1987 Bozo awards
1 lart and Ms. Rice were joined
LOS ANGELES (AP) loan
Collins and Arizona Gov. Evan
Mceham each won Bozo Awards
trom television's original Bozo
the Clown, Lam- Harmon, who
also cited Jim and Tammy Bakker
tor preaching the gospel "accord-
ing to Gucci
Others cited Fridav were Gary
Hart, Donna Rice, Oliver North
and ousted Philippine president
Ferdinand Marcos and his wife,
Imelda, who received a Special
Life Achievement Bozo Award
because, 1 larmon quipped, "Two
hands in the till are better than
one
This is the fifth year the tongue-
in-cheek awards have been
handed out by Harmon, who cre-
ated Bozo the Clown in 1949 and
made his TV debut the following
year.
in Harmon's "funster" category
by Jessica Hahn, whose sexual
liaison with Bakker toppled the
minister from his TV pulpit.
The Bakkers topped the news-
makers category. "With all their
money, clothes, mansions and
cars, what else can we think when
they were supposedly preaching
the gospel, than it was really all
according to Gucci Harmon
said.
Miss Collins won in the show
business category for her recent
stormy divorce from Peter Holm.
"She created bigger entertain-
ment out of her own lite than
viewers got in the entire season of
Dynasty Harmon said.
North, the star witness of the
televised Iran-Contra congres-
sioanl hearings, was Harmon's
choice in government. "The Iran
scandal showed the American
public that the best soap operas
are still produced in Washington,
unfortunately at the taxpayers'
expense Harmon said.
Mecham, the target of a recall
drive, topped the politics cate-
gory, while Calvin Klein won
plaudits for ads Harmon said my
be the start oi "designer nudity
CBS anchorman Dan Rather
was noted for storming off the set
when coverage of the U.S. Open
tennis tournament ran into his
appointed news slot.
Sports winners George Stein-
brenner and Bill)- Martin were
picked tor their on-again, off-
again relationship as owner and
manager oi baseball's New York
Yankees.
kinds of films: love stories, action-
adventures, comidies Sch-
warzenegger said.
'The Running Man" may well
be the most action-filled Sch-
warzenegger film yet, and you
wonder how he can keep topping
himself.
"When 1 pick a movie, I don't
think in terms of 'topping myself
I'm trying to do one movie at a
time, and each time I think of the
public out there: What will the
public enjoy? What are the
elements?"
In May 1986, Schwarzenegger
married newscaster Maria
Shriver. He said the two have
managed to balance bicoastal ca-
reers.
"Maria and 1 live here in Los
Angeles he said. "On weekends
when she hosts the Today' show
on NBC, she flies to New York on
Friday morning, and she comes
back on Sunday afternoon
Their political backgrounds are
also divergent. "Maria comes
from a Democratic family: she
cannot change that. I come from a
kind of conservative background,
not as much socially as economi-
cally. I understand her point of
view and she understands mine
"We have interesting discus-
sions and interesting people at
our house, but there really isn't
any argument. Whether you're
liberal or conservative, both par-
ties work toward the same goal,
which is to make the country bet-
ter J
0, �� xaiiiwug lankees.
Wind Ensemble plays Thurs.
. Of Music's Select Inuring nm.ini. �
School of VIujic PrMs K. r.i.i-
A special holiday concert is
being presented by the East Caro-
lina University Symphonic Wind
Ensemble. The concert, spon-
sored by the Friends of the ECU
School of Music, will be presented
in ECU's Wright Auditorium. The
concert is free and open to the
public.
According to Harold A. Jones,
Director of the Ensemble, "The
conccrt will begin ar 7.30 p.rrr. and
will be under an hour in length so
families can have their children
home at a reasonable hour Jones
said that "the concert will feature
audience participation in the
singing oi several familiar carols
as well as the traditional visit from
St. Nicholas
Rick Bailey, Minister of Youth
and Education at The Memorial
Baptist Church in Greenville, is
guest soloist. He will sing three
traditional songs: "Grcensleeves,
"Gentle Mary Laid Her Child
and "Sweet Little Jesus Boy
The Ensemble, one of the School
Jazz ensemble
gives show in
Fletcher Hall
By CHRIS BRINCEFIELD
Sijff Writer
East Carolina School of
Music's Jazz Ensemble One gave
an exhibition of the versatility and
musical potential of percussive
instruments in their performance
last Monday night in A. J. Fletcher
Recital Hall.
The group is directed by
Mark Ford, ECU School of
Music's new percussion instruc-
tor.
The ensemble is made of stu-
dent percussionists Scott Allen,
Dan Davis, Dean Gottschalk,
Clark Harrell, Chris Holiday
Nick Holland, Glen Lilly, Chris
Moore, Hal Sargent, Scotty Sells,
Russell Sledge, Doug Walker, and
Gary Westbrook.
The first two works per-
formed by the group, "Uhuru" by
Thodore C. Frazeur, and "Pulse"
by Henry Cowell were composi-
tions of complex rhythmic mo-
tives which utilized a great vari-
ety of percussive instruments.
The ensemble performed an
a rra ngement of George H Green's
"Ragtime Robin a tonal work, in
which part of the group did a
short comedy routine that in-
cluded Sargent's "tripping" and
throwing a drum off the stage.
The group performed a piece
by director Ford called "Head
Talk" in which several members
of the ensemble sat on the floor
and engaged in rhythmic "talk"
using drum heads, parts of their
bodies, and the stage floor as their
instruments.
of Music's select tounng organi-
zations, is comprised of 53 music
majors and has performed tor
regional and national conven-
tions. In 1984 they premiered a
new composition by Vincent Per-
sichctti, commissioned ioi ECU
by the N.C. Bandmasters Eastern
Division.
Other familiar holidav pieces to
be performed Thursday will be
"Sleigh Ride by Leroy Ander-
son, Torme's "Christmas Song
and Victor Herbert's "March of
the Toys among others. ECU
music student Davis Clark will
conduct "Christams Fugue" by
Robert B. Brown.

w Corn� sfl on Our
to-ousrte patio ana e-Oy the best charbro.ied looa in town. Menu includes: burgers
HOEisl Fourth St Creenvfflr. c ?v.4croissants, and Met can entrees �19)7S2-W5

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easons
THE VAMPIRE
THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 1.1987 11

rV
rutings
from
e 'East Carolinian
Staff
SSb.
CLIFF'S -4J'
od House and Oyster BaY
n. thru Thurs. Night
opcorn
Shrimp vO.OO
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very Tuesday
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m 8:00 to 11:00
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r
i2JHEEASTCAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1,1987
'Southern' is a proud dialect
NASHVIl LE, Tenn. (AP) is dropped are believed to be wouldn't be surprised 11 'y'all'
Southerners should be proud of similar to accents from ancient was used touTm.J! Y t ther'onal sounds are chang.ng,
the way they talk, and res.st pres- England, he said. ' Tnd rettnig eWaHy for young Southerner
surestoalterthe.raccentr.ter- "se MsfS we m Z" S S �W �' �"
have known ahni ("� - fes,dcnce at thc University of
Line
Only in the East Carolinian
sures to alter their accents, a liter
ary critic says
"1 wish my Southern country-
men could live in the East for
awhile If they listened to the ac-
cents there, they might be a little
slower to change. It's a rasping,
unpleasant sound said Cleanth
Brooks, a professor emeritus of
Yale University.
"If the Southern accent dies, it
will be out of pure ignorance he
said at the Tennessee Literary
Festival, a writers conference held
during the weekend in Nashville.
Brooks, who has written several
books on literary technique and
rhetoric, said many of the sounds
of typical Southern accentsdate to
17th and 18th century England.
Southern accents, for example,
in which the sound of the letter "r"
Scholars agree that the moth-
erland changed the pronuncia-
tion while the colonists held onto
it he said. "In Britain, it became
cockney In the United States it
became plantation Southern
While Southern accents have
often been portrayed as synony-
mous with ignorance, attempts to
wipe out the distinctive sounds of
the South have been unsuccessful,
conference participants were
told.
And some traditionally South-
ern words, such as "y'all" for you-
all, arc spreading to other parts of
the country, said Michael
Montgomery, an associate profes-
sor of linguisticsat the University
of South Carolina.
"Within 20 to 30 years, I
known about for a lone Y;l � �c .Y�t,c7 �T
time Montgomery said � S,SSIPP' wh� will assume the
'TheSoutferTJrawhsspread- CoUoTe 2 P 2 "
ing into the Midwest, and phrases 22f ' '
can'are SSt' !?J2 A � �� ster than
can are turning up in the North we used t0 . she id �A� this
Atlantic states he said �� � ' .
But though Southern accents hTrSlT JT? �'
c likely to remain JSS harunderstand young people
New Location
1 Day Service
On Most BiForal Prescriptions
"
752-1446
are likely to remain distinctive, nowaday
Diabetes victim makes music
from syringe, other implements
SHELBY, N.C. (AP) - It's not
enough that Tony Blanton has
taken insulin for his diabetes for
27 years - he got to play music on
the syringe from which it's in-
jected.
When you meet this overgrown
kid in overalls who bears a strik-
ing resemblance to Hank Wil-
liams, Jr it's easy to figure out
why he turned his serious condi-
tion into a laughing matter.
A native of Shelby, he'll trans-
form anything he gets his hands
on into a bona fide musical instru-
ment.
He started out blowing old fa-
vorites into his fist, then moved
on to more accessible tools of his
bizarre trade - a plastic container
of Head & Shoulders, Diet Moun-
tain Dew bottleand Stanley hand-
saw. He has even gone the con-
ventional route, strumming ban-
jos and plucking fiddles.
Blanton, 36, calls himself the
Lazy Acres Racket Maker after a
years ago.
"I like them old-time corney
jokes and old-time music he
said. "If I'd been born about 50
years ago, I'd probably have got-
ten famous as a hillbilly musi-
cian
Blanton, a passionate bargain
hunter, transformed many of his
instruments from basic, house-
hold items found at yard salesand
pawn shops. That's how he came
up with the idea of squeezing
melodies from simple drinking
glasses with his fingers.
He said Benjamin Franklin in-
vented this off-the-wall musical
feat by strapping a foot pedal and
pullv to a set of crystal filled with
different levels of water. The
more water in a glass, the lower
the musical note.
Blanton's updated version of
Franklin's "glass harmonica" in-
cludes pieces of tin and plastic to
strap in the glasses, which sit on a
wooden board placed in a galva-
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Monday - Tuesday - Saturday 10 6
Wednesday Friday 10 8
638East Arlington Hlvd
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calf on the family farm. His hobby nized metal tray. He alternately
lu�. .1.33V1H3 iur d Dn
I Blanton plays music by
I takes his act out on the roa
is noisy - and unusual.
He loves giving impromptu
performances of Beethoven's
Fifth Symphony on the back of a
crumpled plastic bag, or the Star
Spangled Banner on 14 partially-
empty drinking glasses anchored
to a galvanized metal tray.
"There are two secrets he said
of the latter method. "You need a
wet finger and a clean finger 1
started with four glasses. I had no
idea it'd work
Blanton owns more than 100
musical instruments, about 25 of
which he molded with his bare
hands, a pocket knife, a few pen-
nies and plenty of imagination.
"Once you learn 15-20 instru-
ments, the rest come easy he
said. "It's just like learning to hum
or whistle
Blanton has so much trouble
remembering all his instruments
that he introduces them in
alphabetical order when he per-
1 forms. His renditions are strictly
instrumental. He never sings.
2 Although he took guitar and
; banjo lessons for a brief time,
ear. He
� road about
: twice a week, pulling up to out-
edoor festivals in his rusted, blue
; station wagon, which carries most
1 of his homemade instruments.
Wedged between the dash-
2 board and windshield is a sign
tthat reads: "I'm Fiddlin' Around
I With Bluegrass It's a fitting
claim for Blanton, who traced his
ffamily's preoccupation with the
i fiddle back seven generations. It
� was on his grandfather's fiddle,
purchased in 1918 for $5, that he
ffirst fiddled around.
"What really got me started was
I was laid off from work about a
year, and I came across my
� grandfather's fiddle he said. "I
used to go down to cow pastures
and serenade the cows. They
didn't seem to mind too much
When he was younger,
Blanton's father discouraged him
from blowing melodies into his
fist. Things were different with
his mother. He'd leam about 90
percent of his act from songs she
used to hum around the house.
Others were picked up from epi-
fsodes of the television show
f"Hee-Haw
Blanton's repertoire, which in-
cludes mostly bluegrass, country
and hillbilly songs, is as cluttered
as his collection. A great many of
those songs were written before
- he was bom. He doesn't go for
�J rock 'n' roll. Ifs too monotonous,
too modern. Blanton didn't even
own a record player until five
spreads his fingers on the lip of
each glass, producing an angelic
yet eerie sound that covers more
than an octave range.
This he considers one of his
more conventional contraptions.
There's nothing special about
pumping bicycle tires, but it's
music to Blanton's ears. He'll
moisten his fingers, place them
over the hand pump's plastic
tubing and crank out a song.
0 rfr


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Freshman Marc Lao fires a jumper in the Pir
courtesy Thomas Forrest � I he Daih Ri
Orange Bow
By the Associated Press
The Orange Bowl o
smiling, but keeping its fii . i
crossed.
When it selected top-ran)
Oklahoma and No. 2 Miami to
meet on on New Year's Day, it
hoped the game would decide the
national champion.
There were two small hitches
however. Miami still had tw
-regular-season games remaining
against No. 10 Notre Dame aikf
No. 8 South Carolina.
On satrudav. the Hun
crushed Notre Dam. 24
their record to 10
receiver Michael Irvm said
despite the big vict i
canes are stiil not 1
Football s
By PAT MOLLOY
Aui.Unt Spore fditor
East Carolina officials an-
nounced last week that Ten;
Tech would he added to the
football schedule in pLao
North Carolina State. The swap
will give East Carolina a rare sixth
home game, and leave the Pirates
with only five contests on the
road.
Tennessee Tech was added to
fill a one-game void in the Pirate s
schedule because of a one-year
suspension placed on the annual
ECUNCSU rivalry.
The contract tor the game with
Tennessee Tech, a Division I-AA
member of the Ohio Valley Con-
ference, was signed bv former
athletic director Ken Ran- late last
week.
Over a decade has passed sai
East Carolina played more than
five contests at Ficklen Stadium.
and the extra game should be a
welcomed one
"Opening the season at home
should represent a welcomed
change for our fans, said interim
athletic director Dave 1 tart Our
1988 schedule otters East Carolina
supporters the opportunity to see
our first siv games without anv
extensive travel involved. It s I
great schedule in every respect
The 1988 Pirate football sched-
ule was also released last week
Times have been set for the home
games, but the road contests are to
be announced at a later date
On Sept. 3 the Pirates open their
campaign at home for the first
time in recent memory against
the Golden Eagles of Tennesse
Tech. Kickof f is slated for 7 p.m. at
Ficklen Stadium.
The first of the five road games
for the Pirates will be held Sept.10
against the Hokies of Virginia
Tech. The Hokies were beaten this
year by a fired-up Pirate squad 32-
21. The win ties the record be-
. � tapering i
:m V -si
rn to
Oci : to I
two teams
v game.
Remair
� rs oi
and g
a 19-0 los
who -
last seasoi
game w
Can Unas
ties, and kickj
On Oct
will invade T
off against
Bowden n
every con
thus far. Th�j
have come
1983, when t
Tallahassee.
Syracuse vJ
dium for the t
Orangemen,
Don McPheH
place in the pa
year. Kickott
The Owls ol
will host the!
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
DECEMBER 1,1987 Page 13
Pirate hoopsters open season
by splitting first two contests
Freshman Marc Lacy Tires a jumper in the Pirates 65-57 win over Longwood College last Saturday. (Photo
courtesy Thomas Forrest � The Daily Reflector)
Orange Bowl seemingly set
By the Associated Press
The Orange Bowl committee is
smiling, but keeping its fingers
crossed.
When it selected top-ranked
Oklahoma and No. 2 Miami to
meet on on New Year's Day, it
hoped the game would decide the
national champion.
There were two small hitches,
however. Miami still had two
-regular-season games remaining,
against No. 10 Notre Dame and
No. 8 South Carolina.
On satrudav, the Hurricanes
crushed Notre' Dame 24-0 to run
their record to 10-0. But Miami
receiver Michael Irvin said thai
despite the big victory, the Hurri-
canes are still not looking at the
Jan. 1 date against Oklahoma.
"I think South Carolina will be
better than Notre Dame Irvin
said. "And since they're not na-
tional champions, they want to
stop somebody else from being
champions. It's just the American
way, I guess
In other games Satrudav in-
volving ranked teams, No. 3Flor-
dida State defeated Floride 28-14,
No. 5 Nebraska downed Colo-
rado 24-7, No. 14 Georgia stopped
Georgia Tech 30-16 and No. 16
Tennessee nipped Vanderbilt 38-
36.
Augustana College had its 60-
game unbeaten streak and a bid
for a fifth straight national title
ended when they lost to Dayton
38-36 in a Division III playoff
quarterfinal game. The Rock Is-
land, 111 school had gone 59-0-1
since losing to West Georgia in the
1982 Division III title game.
Miami held the Fighting Irish to
82 yards rushing, 187 below their
average. The Hurricanes also had
nine tackles behind the line.
"To do that to Notre Dame is
something I'll remember the rest
of my life said linebacker
George Mira Jr who made 17
tackles.
Fullback Melvin Bratton scored
on two short runs for Miami,
which gained 417 yards. Halfback
Leonard Conley scored the other
touchdown on a 6-yard run and
Greg Cox added a 30-yard field
goal.
By TIM CHANDLER
Sporu Editor
DURHAM � After winning its
season opener, the East Carolina
basketball team was brought back
down to earth Monday night as
Duke trounced the Pirates 94-45.
"What do you want me to say?"
Pirate head coach MikeSteelesaid
following the loss. "No one got
killed out there isall I know to say.
I just checked in the lockerroom
and everyone is still alive
Everyone might have been alive
but the Pirates seemed to be al-
most non-existent offensive-wise
for the entire game. For the con-
test, the Pirates only connected on
a meager 30.4 percent of their
shots (17-of-56).
A good indication of how the
game would end up came right at
the beginning of the contest as
Duke moved out to a 12-0 lead
with 14:53 to play in the first half.
The Pirates played good defense
during the span but atrocious
shooting kept them from getting
on the scoreboard.
Freshman point guard Jimmy
Hinton finally got the Pirates un-
packed when he threw up a
prayer, which was answered at
the 14:12 mark of the half trim-
ming the Blue Devils lead to 12-2.
The Blue Devils then stretched
the lead to 14, 16-2, before the
Pirates mounted their only seri-
ous threat of the game.
Freshmen Marc Lacy and Ter-
hern Harvey along with sopho-
more Gus Hill all scored in suces-
sion for ECU to trim Duke's lead
? ?????? ?-??-�
Gus Hill, in his first collegiate
game, scored 19 points and pulled
down six rebounds to lead East
Carolina to a 65-57 victory over
Longwood College Saturday
night in Minges Coliseum.
Saturday's victory was the first
for the young Pirate team and the
first for first-year head coach
Mike Steele.
"It sure wasn't pretty but it was
a win Steele said. "Some folks
have told us that we wouldn't win
a game this year, so at least that's
behind us
Longwood center Darryl Rut-
ley hit a five-foot jumper with 13
minutes left in the first half to put
the Lancers up by three but ECU
to 16-8 with 10:47 left in the half.
The Blue Devils however an-
swered back with a 3-pointer
from freshman Greg Koubek and
a score from senior Billy King to
move back out 21-8 and end the
Pirates run.
The Duke lead reached its
height in the first half following
layups by Robert Brickey and Phil
Henderson, which boosted the
score to 36-15 with 2:55 to play.
A score by sophomore Reed
Lose and a free throw by Harvey
closed the Pirates to within 36-18
before John Smith sank a jumper
with three seconds left in the half
to send the Blue Devils in at inter-
mission with a 38-18 lead.
"I wasn't pleased with our play
offensively in the first half Duke
coach Mike Krzyzewski said. "I
think our performance might
have had a lot to do with East
Carolina's defensive pressure
The Pirates had a chance to pull
closer at the start of the second
half when Duke went scoreless
for the first three minutes of the
half. However, the Pirates also
went blank during that time span.
Smith got the second half scor-
ing untracked for Duke when he
nailed in a layup with 17:00 left in
the half. A slam dunk by Kevin
Strickland at the 16:30 mark
boosted the Blue Devils up 42-18
and forced Steele to call a timeout.
After a pair of free throws by
Lose, the Blue Devils reeled off
five more points before Hinton's
second prayer of the game was
answered at the 13:50 mark.
The Blue Devils payed little at-
tention however as they ran off
seven more unanswered points to
put the final nails in the Pirates'
coffin.
The Blue Devils' Koubek led all
scorers with 19 points, while
Strickland added 14 and Joe Cook
13. The Pirates were led by Lose
with 11 points and Hinton with
eight.
"They (ECU) are just under-
manned now Krzyzewski said
"Mike (Steele) has a big rebuild-
ing job to do but they'll be fine.
"The experience that they are
getting now will really help. I
think he (Steele) is doing the right
thing by playing the young kids
now. They will get there
"Its not the end of the world
Steele said of the loss. "I'm defi-
nitely glad its over with now. I
went into the lockerroom after the
game and told the players that
this was the worst loss that I had
ever been associated with as far as
points. But now we have to move
on and concentrate on our next
game
For this game was one that was
just not meant for the Pirates.
Perhaps Krzyzewski had the best
explanation.
"When we play just as hard or
harder, we're the better team
Krzyzewski said. "They are just
too small now and they aren't as
good as we are right'now. But
they'll get there
guard Jimmy Hinton, taking full
advantage of Longwood's 21
first-half turnovers, turned three
steals into six points as the Pirates
rallied to a 32-25 half time lead.
Longwood dominated the
boards grabbing 17 rebounds to
ECU'S six in the first half.
In the seond half, Longwood
came back scoring nine
unanswered points to tie the score
at 34. Reed Lose's three pointer
put the Pirates back up with 15
minutes left.
The lead then traded hand sev-
eral times, but ECU regained
control when Gus Hill hit from 15
feet out to give the Pirates a 50-47
advantage with six minutes left.
Freshman Stanley Love sealed it
for the Pirates on a breakaway
slam with two minutes left in the
game.
"Gus Hill really had a nice
game Steele said "He was one
of nine players playing in their
first college game tonight, and he
really made the difference for us
Jimmy Hinton, with 16 points
was ECU'S second leading scorer.
The freahman guard also led the
team in assists and steals with
four.
Kevin Jefferson led Longwood
with 21 points and six rebounds
but it was the Lancer's 32 turn-
overs that put Longwood out of
the game.
By PAT MOLLOY
Assistant Sports Fditor
East Carolina officials an-
nounced last week that Tennessee
Tech would be added to the 198,8
football schedule in place of
North Carolina State. The swap
will give East Carolina a rare sixth
home game, and leave the Pirates
with only five contests on the
road.
Tennessee Tech was added to
fill a one-game void in the Pirate's
schedule because of a one-year
suspension placed on the annual
ECUNCSU rivalry.
The contract for the game with
Tennessee Tech, a Division I-AA
member of the Ohio Valley Con-
ference, was signed by former
athletic director Ken Karr late last
week.
Over a decade has passed since
East Carolina played more than
five contests at Ficklen Stadium,
and the extra game should be a'
welcomed one.
"Opening the season at home
should represent a welcomed
change for our fans said interim
athletic director Dave Hart; "Our
1988 schedule offers East Carolina
supporters the opportunity to see
our first six games without any
extensive travel involved. It's a
great schedule in every respect
The 1988 Pirate football sched-
ule was also released last week.
Times have been set for the home
games, but the road contests are to
be announced at a later date.
On Sept. 3 the Pirates open their
campaign at home for the first
time in recent memory against
the Golden Eagles of Tenncsse
Tech. Kickoff is slated for 7 p.m. at
Ficklen Stadium.
The first of the five road games
for the Pirates will be held Sept.10
against the Hokies of Virginia
Tech. The Hokies were beaten this
year by a fired-up Pirate squad 32-
21. The win ties the record be-
schedule fi
tween the two schools at 1-1. The
Hokies trounced East Carolina
37-2 when they met back in 1956.
After Virginia Tech, ECU will
roll into Columbia to meet the
Gamecocks of South Carolina.
The 'cocks lead the scries 5-0,
defeating the Pirates 33-12 last
season; and Todd Ellis (only a
sophomore) is showing no signs
of tapering off in his quest for the
Hcisman. Gameday is Sept.17.
Back at home on the 24th, The
Pirates will once again face South-
ern Mississippi. The past two
games for these two teams have
been decided by four points or
less, with Southern Miss, taking
both victories. The game will be
played on Parent's Day, and kick-
off is at 1:30 p.m.
Southwestern Louisiana will
return to Ficklen Stadium on
Oct.l to battle East Carolina. The
two teams traditionally play a
close game. Kickoff is at 1:30 p.m.
Remaining at home on Oct.8,
ECU will take on the Mountain-
eers of West Virginia. The purple
and gold will be seeking to avenge
a 49-0 loss to the Mountaineers
who suffocated the Pirate offense
last season in Morgantown. The
game will highlight East
Carolina's homecoming activi-
ties, and kickoff is slated for 2 p.m.
On Oct. 15, Art Baker's troops
will invade Tallahassee to square
off against Florida State. Bobby
Bowden's Seminoles have won
every contest against the Bucs
thus far. The closest the Pirates
have me to winning was in
1983, when they slipped 47-46 in
Tallahassee.
Syracuse will visit Ficklen Sta-
dium for the first time Oct. 22. The
Orangemen, led by quarterback
Don McPherson, are expected to
place in the pre-season top 10 next
year. Kickoff is 1:30 p.m.
The Owls of Temple University
will host the Pirates on Nov. 5.
been released
The series is led by ECU 4-3;
however, the Owls are expected
to improve between now and
then.
On Nov. 12, ECU will play their
final home game against the Hur-
ricanes of Miami. Miami leads the
series against the Pirates 6-0, and
East Carolina will seek to even
that record. Kickoff is at 1:30 p.m.
East Carolina will end their
1988 campaign with an away
game at Cincinnati. The Pirates
lead in the series against the Bear-
cats 3-0; however, Heisman-
hopeful Danny McCoin returns as
the Bearcats' signal caller, and
could lead Cincnnati to an upset
over the Pirates.
In this years' game, the Pirates
mauled the Bearcats 56-28, and
tailback Reggie McKinnev
cruised to a 212-yard finish � the
second-best rushing effort in a
game by a Pirate since official
records have been kept.
Lady Pirates return
home with 1-1 mark
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sportt Writer
East Carolina's Lady Pirate
basketball team brought home a
1-1 record after losing to Ken-
tucky 93-75 in the championship
game of the Lady Kat Classic in
Lexigton, KY.
ECU edged Central Michigan
78-77 in the opening round Fri-
day. The tournament served as
the season opener for the Lady
Pirates and gave head coach Pat
Pierson her first victory as ECU
women's basketball coach.
Friday against CMU, the Lady
Pirates jumped out front early
scoring ten unanswered points
before Central Michigan's Sherry
Kelly hit from six feet out to give
the Cippewas their first bucket.
ECU saw its lead dwindle half-
way through the first period and
CMU tied the score at 34 with five
minutes remaining.
The Lady Pirates rallied with
under four minutes left as Mo-
nique Pompili hit three in a row
and guard Pam Wiliams sunk one
from 16 feet out to give ECU a 45-
42 halftime advantage.
ECU led throughout most of the
second half but had to fend off a
last minute surge by Central
Michigan. CMU's Molly Piche
laid it in with one minute left to
put the Cippewas up 77-76. Pam
Williams put out the fire with a 15
foot jumper with four seconds left
to give the Lady Pirates their first
victory.
Monique Pompili led ECU with
20 points and Gretta Savage
grabbed nine rebounds.
In the championship game,
Alma Bethea had 24 points and 12
rebounds but the Lady Pirates
were a victim of poor shooting
hitting only 42 of their shots.
Chris O'Connor's downtown
shot from 18 feet tied the score at
20 with under nine minutes left in
the first half. A minute later ECU
and Kentucky exchanged baskets
to make it 22-22 but UK pulled
away and took a 43-30 lead at the
half.
It was all Kentucky in the sec-
ond half ad the Kats put ECU
away 93-75 to take the tourna-
ment crown.
Alma Bethea and Monique
Pompili's 20 point efforts in the
tournament earned them a spot
on the all-tournament team.
ECU will play in its second
tournament, its own Lady Pirate
Classic, this weekend. ECU will
meet Georgia Southwestern and
Vanderbilt will take on NC Cen-
tral Friday in Minges Coliseum.
Monique Pompili, shown in earIier action, helped lead the Lady Pirates to
�second-place finish in the Lady Kat Classic. (Photocourtesy ECU Sports
Information)
'
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� � ii





I
JiJiiEEASrCAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1,1987
buggers finish up Cinderella season
By EARL HAMPTON Not wanHno �L ,
By EARL HAMPTON
Staff Writer
It was a Cinderella season for the
ECU Rugby team, but they lost a
heartbreaker, 8-6, to UNC-Greens-
boro in the State Rugby Champion-
ship in Greensboro Saturday.
The championship game pitted
the two undefeated clubs, both 6-0,
for the battle of the title. In the end,
the ECU ruggers shook the victors'
hands and walked off the field in
anticipation of the spring season.
The game, played in cold, windy
weather at Grimsley High School,
proved to be a grudge match be-
tween defenders. Although UNCG
nowclaimsbraggingrightsafterthe
win, the game was played in an air
of controversy.
The controversy stemmed from
the bias of the referee who blew his
whistle 12 times on ECU while
penalizing UNCG only twice. The
referee was moonlighting from his
job as head coach of UNCG.
Not wanting to comment on the
referee situation, Ralph Campano,
ECU head coach praised the play of
his team. "This was ECU Rugby's
best season in six years, and the
boys should be proud Campano
said.
ECU entered the title game after
shutting out N.C State. 10-0. in the
regular season finale. That Pirate
victory was the first against the
Pack ruggers in eight years.
Midfieldsmen, Mussler and
Hahn scored in the early going
against State in what was to be the
only offensive output of the game.
Mollifying the Pack in the second
half, the Pirate's strong defensive
effort was prevalent in securing the
high energy win. The shutout was
the third game in the season in
which ECU did not allow their
opponents to score.
In the ruggers first win, Davidson
College was routed by a well-bal-
anced Pirate attack, as ECU
stomped its way to a 28-0 trashing
of the Wildcats. Senior stars Phillip
Ritchie, with his power-surging
scoring, and Mike Brown, with
precise kicking and timely assists,
led the team in the season opener
With Head Coach Campano, both
Rithchie and Brown returned to
their high school alma mater of
Grimsley to play the state champi-
onship.
troversial 11 minute injury timeout.
With eight minutes left in the first
half, Spartan Pete Zealman heaved
a ten-meter run to score. While it
was questionable whether Zealman
had possession of the ball when
crossing the goal line, the officials
vision was blocked on the play.
From the onset of the title game
bodies flew in the trenches. Trading
the rock back and forth, the two
teams failed to penetrate deep into
enemy territory, driving most of the
nrst half. Many kicks were side
outs.
Eason, who scored three times
against Appalachain, enroute to a
36-3 devastation of the Mountain-
eers, is one of the team's offensive
catalysts with his bloodthirsty style
of play. Eason is also credited with
the first goal in the down trudging
of Wake Forest, 30-12
Greensboro's first-score attempt
faultered as a penalty kick hooked
to the left. Shortly afterwards, Pi-
rate Mike 'Top Gun " Birrell stuck a
Spartan bull carrier, sending the
carrier to the sidelines after a con-
IRS Informal Recreation
Memorial Gyninasiurn
Fri.
Thurs
Mon.
Mon.
Fri.
Sac .
Sun.
MonThurs
Fri -
Sat.
Sun.
MonThurs
Fri.
Sun.
Mon. -Fri .
MonFri.
Mon & Wed.
Tues & Thurs.
Fri .
Sac.
Sun.
MonWedFri
Sun .
12:00 noon
4:00 p.m.
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Weight: Rooms
Memorial
Mingcs
10:00 a.m.
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11:00 a.m.
12:00 noon
3:00 p.m.
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12:00 noon
1:30 p.m.
9:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
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7:00 p.m.
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u ?r tes into the second
half ECU blocked a Spartan pen-
alty kick which fired up the club In
second half action. Pirate Parrish
Er'StSP8 a S�ting run to
the UNCG 20. Long-play man
Ritchie scooted 40 meters down the
sidelines as both teams continued to
exchange possession.
Greensboro scored again in the
mid-tpoint of the second half. After
the kick failed, UNCG lead 8-0.
ECU got on the board with 12
minutes left in the game as the Pi-
rates ran for the score. Kicker
Brown nailed the points-after with a
boot into the wind. With timedwin-
dling, UNCG lead 8-6.
The crowd of 75 saw an intense
match between the two best rugby
teams in North Carolina. Campano
and team are looking for revenge on
UNCG next season.
The ruggers now focus on the
spring season as they will play in
the South East Tournament during
Easter of 1988 in Atlanta
Hng applications forth�
9 llfustrator. The fob
�na the comics page
' ms as needed.
Apply in person at The East Carolinian,
second floor of the publications building.
PARA p S E
ec Ma ss-sj it
S'tc y
"M
329 Arlington
Blvd.
756-1579
r
Swimming Pools
Memorial
Minges
7:00 a.m.
12:00 noon
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7:00
5:00
5:00
Intramural
Where Fun
ls1
ALL HAIR SERVICES
MAKEUP-MANICURES
TANNING BEDS
20 Discount Off Any Service.
Good Through 12-31-87
in
Happy Holidays
PETEY HATHAWAY, Owner
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Equipment Check-out
Memorj ,il Cym 1 1 5
10:00 a.in
10:00 a.m
1J :00
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noon
10:00 f,m. �
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(J:00 p.m
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� rTTHfaWTT-riMepHLEWfaWJ�a ITU �
U.uiquot hall Cuurta
.� -� u �is; lit sit? v " T2 �����'��� fc��.i-
Intramurals
skiing trip
is planned
The Outdoor Recreation Center
is offering a SKI TRIP to Winter-
green, Va Jan. 3-8.
The cost of $405 includes trans-
portation, lodging, ski rentals and
all lift tickets.
Registration will be held
through December 1. A $85 regis-
tration fee is required.
To register and get more infor-
mation about this New Year
Adventure, call Mark Ritter at
757-6387.
travel
to foreign
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wed. nites
film 8pm
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Featuring
TEL: 919-756-9175
� Racquetball
� Indoor Track
� Free Weights
� Steam & Sauna
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� Nautilus
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� Aerobic Exercise
� Hot Tubs
� Indoor Tennis
Open 7 Days A Week
$10.00 off student
membership
� (with coupon)
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� Gymnasium
� Pro Shop
� Nursery
� Juice Bar
� Cardiovascular center I
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?��Delivery Hours
Monday - Friday
4:00- 11:00
Saturday & Sunday
11:00- 11:00
752-0326 or
752-3753
560 Evans Street
Greenville, NC 27834
Wednesday is Our
20th Annual Christmas Party
with the Elbo Male Dancers
Member Ladies Free.
Guest Ladies $1.00 til 11 p.m.
Guys in at 11p.m.
Prizes for everyone plus a
$50 Grand Prize
Dollar drink Specials all night plus other specials too!
Thursday Members Free - $1 Drink Specials
Howard s
WASHINGTON (AP)-A fed-
eral judge allowed play to begin
Saturday in the first round of the
NCAA Division I-AA playoffs
but Howard University says it
rffJT?8 ,ts lawsiht & �
NCAA by asking for an injunction
to halt next weekend's second
round.
U.S. District Judge John Garret!
Penn rejected a request tor a tem-
porary restraining order even
though he said Howards suit
charging its football team was ille-
gally denied a post-season bid
raises "substantial and severe
questions
"Any delay of these games at
this point will be disruptive
cause severe hardships to th.
Bruce, OSU
teams
sup
1 ridaj s ri
"It
will 1, b
. i mc
fter fu
gu merits
ranking
i Hoi
V A A bd
- b
vou, i
An
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AT
out-of-court settlement un
which Ohio State Universit)
pay fired football coach
Bruce $471,000 todropalawsuiti!
totally in the university's inter
ests, its attorney says.
"It was in the interest of all par
ties to get this resolved' ohn (
Elam said at a news conference
Friday where the settlement ol
Bruce's $7.4 million suit was
closed.
Bruce, 56, was tired Nov. lt by
university president Howard
nings, who has never disc:
the reasons for his action. Atl
Director Rick Bay resigned in
protest the same day.
Bruce's dismissal took effect
following the Buckeyes season-
ending victory over Michigan
The coach filed suit Nov. 20 in
Franklin Countv Common Pleas
Court.
In the suit, Bruce's attorney,
John Zonak, accused Jennir.
firing Bruce because Jennings
knew the coach disproved of
Jenning's lifestyles. At a news
tended
ment r- I
latesthat tl
Lebo paces Ta
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) - eff
Lebo has a message tor those in
the NCAA responsible (or setting
the distance of the S-pom line.
"I think its about the right range
where it is now Lebo said Satur-
day night after going 7-of-10 from
beyond the 19-foot-9-inch stripe
to lead the third-ranked Tar Heels
to a 87-76 victory over Richmond
in the championship game of the
Central fidelity Holiday Classic
Basketball Tournament.
Lebo, a 6-foot-3 junior guard
finished with a career-high 28
points and added five assists and
la steal in being named the
tournament's most valuable
player.
North Carolina, which had to
� struggle in a Friday night victory
Over Southern California, moved
Ito 3-0 with the tournament title
r game, in which the Tar Heels held
ia 43-22 rebounding edge.
I "We got offensive rebounding
ithrough our size and effort
gkoach Dean Smith said Our de-
fense was effective, and of course
?bo made some 3-poinl shots If
xve keep improving, I'll tod a lot
otter about tHs team
North Carolina freshman for-
ward Rick Fox ignited an 18-n Tar
ieels' surge when he slammed
home a missed jumper by team-
�nate Pete Chilcutt to give the Tar
frlec-lsa 27-24 advantage with tv04
�eft in the first half.
Lebo added a pair oi 3-potnters
fend Ranzino Smith had two fast-
�reak layups as the Tar Heels, 3-0,
xiilt a 43-30 intermission lead
Richmond cut the lead to six
?ints twice in the second halt, the
ast time at 56-50 on a short bank
lot by Peter Woolfolk with 12 55
emaining, but North Carolina
cored the next five points and
jchmond was unable to get
Closer than 10 points in the final
Eight minutes.
The Tar Heels' Scott Williams
id Kevin Madden were assessed
chnical fouls in seperate inci-
dents in the second half. Williams
'as charged with shoving
tichmond's Ken Atkinson and
Madden was cited for throwing
n elbow.
North Carolina's JR. Reid fin-
ked with 15 points and the Tar
leels also got 11 from Williams
knd 10 each from Madden and
?mith.
Guard Rodney Rice led
u'chmond, 1-1, with 27 points, 18
n 3-pointers. Woolfolk added 17
ints and center Steve Kratzer
ntributed 12 before fouling out
ith 7:22 to play.
were
bo
rxckr i,
but wej
t
eaten
sibtiitvl
wherv
suco
CH
� Yoi
GIFT
THE Bl SI

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t
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 1, 1987 15
East Carolinian
w accepting applica,tons for the
lion of Staff Illustrator, The job
ides designing the comics page
providing illustrations as needed,
ly in person at The East Carolinian,
nd floor of the publications building.
A O S E
329 Arlington
Blvd.
756-1579
ALL HAIR SERVICES
1AKEUPMANICURES
TANNING BEDS
Discount Off Any Service,
od Through 12-31-87

Happy Holidaxjs
TEY HATHAWAY, Owner
Athletic Club
' �v,�� ���'�'���' .�����- ������
ULLE, N.C.
aturing
TEL: 919-756-9175
� Gymnasium
� Pro Shop
� Nursery
� Juice Bar
� Cardiovascular center
tys A Week
Iff student
ership
oupon)
i
l

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l
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lay is Our
hristmas Party
Male Dancers
faaies Free.
1.00 til 11 p.m.
it 11 p.m.
Tyone plus a
tnd Prize
ht plus other specials too!
Je - $1 Drink Specials
WASHINGTON (AP) - A fed-
oral judge allowed play to begin
Saturday in the first round of the
NCAA Division I-AA playoffs,
but Howard University says it
will press its lawsuit against the
NCAA by asking for an injunction
to halt next weekend's second
round.
U.S. District Judge John Garrett
Penn rejected a request for a tem-
porary restraining order even
though he said Howard's suit
charging its football team was ille-
gally denied a post-season bid
raises "substantial and severe
questions
"Any delay of these games at
this point will be disruptive and
cause severe hardships to the
llfighti
teams, the schools and their
suporters Penn said after
Friday's ruling.
"It appearsthe public interest
will be best served by allowing
the games to go forward
After hearing two hours of ar-
guments concerning the NCAA
ranking system, Penn also re-
jected Howard's request that the
NCAA be ordered to add four
teams to the 16-team field.
Howard officials said they
would seek a last-minutecompro-
mise to get Howard into the play-
offs, but were not optimistic about
the possibility.
"We will go ahead with the
preliminary injunction request
next week Francis Smith
Howard's deputy general coun-
sel, said.
The eight winners of Saturday's
games are scheduled to play in the
second round on Dec. 5.
"On the basis of what the judge
said, while the suit is in its early
stages, it is of sufficient merit to
pursue it to its ultimate conclu-
sion Howard president James
Check said.
Howard filed a $9 million suit
Wednesday charging the NCAA
violated anti-trust regulations
and contract provisions and was
racially discriminating against
the historically black school by
not extending them a playoff bid.
Howard finished with a 9-1
record this season, better than any
other school in the Division 1-AA
playoffs.
1 he Bison, ranked 20th for most
of the season, finished 18th in the
final poll. NCAA lawyers said
Howard was rated so low because
of a weak schedule that included
four teams below the Division I-
AA level.
Before ruling against Howard,
Penn said he was most interested
in how they ended up behind
North Texas State, a 7-4 team that
had been tied with the Bison
going into the final week. North
Texas State jumped ahead of
Howard in the rankings by beat-
ing a 3-8 team while Howard beat
then-No. 14 Delaware State.
'if this is their idea of fairness,
then they must think we should
still be pickin' cotten and strippin'
tobacco Smith told Penn.
"I still can't understand how the
ratings at the end of the season,
with the ratings of the previous
week, turned out as they did
Penn said. "It does seem Howard
would have ended up with a
higher ranking
Near Dark - R
The Princess Bride
PG 13
Date With An Armel
PG 13
Bruce, OSU reach agreement
fill ItMRllC mAm t . ��'
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) � An
uit-ot-court settlement under
winch Ohio State University will
pay tired football coach Farle
Bruce $471,000 to drop a lawsuit is
totally in the university's inter-
ests, its attorney says.
It was in the interest of all par-
ties to get this resolved John C
Ham said at a news conference
I riday where the settlement of
Bruce's $7.4 million suit was dis-
closed.
Bruce, 56, was fired Nov. lb bv
university president Howard Jen-
nings, who has never disclosed
the reasons for his action. Athletic
Director Rick Bay resigned in
protest the same day.
Bruce's dismissal took effect
following the Buckeyes' season-
ending victory over Michigan.
The coach filed suit Nov. 20 in
Franklin County Common Pleas
Court.
In the suit, Bruce's attorney,
fohn Zonak, accused Jennings of
tiring Bruce because Jennings
knew the coach disproved of
enning's lifestyles. At a news
conference announcing the law-
suit, Zonak accused Jennings of
excessive drinking.
Flam said Jennings had im-
properly been brought into the
matter.
"I believe that this was, and this
is the basis of the settlement, a
contract dispute between Coach
Bruce and the university. Any-
thing else, in my viewpoint, was
improper Flam said.
He said the incident had placed
a "tremendous strain" on all those
involved.
"That is one of the reasons why,
in the statements that have been
issued both by President Jennings
and Earle Bruce, you will see the
expressions of regret Elam said.
Neither Bruce nor Jennings at-
tended the hastily-called news
conference. Except for prepared
statements they issued, the agree-
ment provided for both not to
comment on the incident.
The two-page agreement stipu-
lates that the university pay Bruce
$471,000 within three business
days.
Overall, the university's poten-
tial financial obligations to Bruce
had he remained on the job and
taken early retirement would
have totaled $351,680, Elam said.
If Bruce finds a new job before
July 1, 1989, he will have to pay
back whatever he earns as part of
the settlement.
Elam said the settlement was
fair to both parties and that uni-
versity trustees support the
agreement. Edmund C. Redman,
chairman of the Board of Trustees
said formal approval of the settle-
ment was expected at the board's
meeting this Friday.
Elam said the settlement grew
out of his talks with Zonak.
They were certainly aware
that through the rumors and the
other things that this was adverse
to the university, and some might
contend also adverse to Coach
Bruce Elam said.
FAMOUS
100 E. 10th St. and Evans
� Pizza
� Subs
� Sandwiches
� Hamburgers
� Salads
� Spaghetti
�Lasagna
� Daily Specials
Try Our Meal Deals
(not for delivery)
For Fast Free Delivery
Phone
757-0731 or
757-1278
(Minimum $5.00 for delivery)
60 oz. Pitcher of Beer
$1.50 every night
Lebo paces Tar Heels
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) Jeff
1 ebo has a message for those in
the NCAA responsible for setting
i'ne distance or the S-potrrt lino.
"I think its about theright range
where it is now Lebo said Satur-
day night after going 7-of-10 from
beyond the 19-foot-9-inch stripe
to lead the third-ranked Tar Heels
to a 87-76 victory over Richmond
in the championship game of the
Central Fidelity Holiday Classic
Basketball Tournament.
Lebo, a rVfoot-3 junior guard,
finished with a career-high 28
points and added five assists and
i steal in being named the
tournament's most valuable
player.
North Carolina, which had to
struggle in a Friday night victory
over Southern California, moved
to 3-0 with the tournament title
game, in which the Tar Heels held
i 43-22 rebounding edge.
"We got offensive rebounding
through our size and effort
coach Dean Smith said. "Our de-
fense was effective, and of course,
Lebo made some 3-point shots. If
we keep improving, I'll feel a lot
better about this team
North Carolina freshman for-
ward Rick Fox ignited an 18-6 Tar
1 feels' surge when he slammed
home a missed jumper by team-
mate Pete Chilcutt to give'the Tar
1 ieels a 27-24 advantage with 6:04
eft in the first half.
Lebo added a pair of 3-pointers
and Ranzino Smith had two fast-
break layups as the Tar Heels, 3-0,
built a 43-30 intermission lead.
Richmond cut the lead to six
points twice in the second half, the
last time at 56-50 on a short bank
shot by Peter Woolfolk with 12:55
remaining, but North Carolina
scored the next five points and
Richmond was unable to get
closer than 10 points in the final
eight minutes.
The Tar Heels' Scott Williams
I and Kevin Madden were assessed
technical fouls in scperate inci-
dents in the second half. Williams
was charged with shoving
Richmond's Ken Atkinson and
j.Madden was cited for throwing
an elbow.
North Carolina's J.R. Reid fin-
ished with 15 points and the Tar
Heels also got 11 from Williams
land 10 each from Madden and
(Smith.
Guard Rodney Rice led
(Richmond, 1-1, with 27 points, 18
Ion 3-pointers. Woolfolk added 17
points and center Steve Kratzer
Icontributed 12 before fouling out
with 7:22 to play.
"It's pretty obvious that we
were overwhelmed on the
boards said Richmond coach
pic Tafrtmt. "We prayed harcf
but we just couldn't rebound with
these people
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16
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 1.1987
y�mww�n��mwm
UBE COUPON SALE
Do your Christmas Shopping Early and Save
Now Thru Saturday December 5th.
U.B.E:
516 S. COTAJSCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
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$2.00
3"
1
Plain crewneck sweatshirt
�1 Regular $8.95
ffl
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$2.00 off
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�J Regular $11.95 and $13.95
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gl limit one coupon per item-good thru 12-5-87
I $5.00 off
All Nylon Jackets
Prices start at $28.95
limit one coupon per item - good thru 12-5-87
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it one coupon per item - good thru 12-5-8711 limit one couPon per item- good thru 12-5-87
$ 5.66 off i$ i 6oo of
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$2.00
All Far side T-Shirts
Regular $8.95
!� limit one coupon per item-good thru 12-5-87
$2.00
is
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Regular $7.95
limit one coupon per item - good thru 12-5-87
$3.00 off I $4.00
Plain hooded sweatshirts
Regular $11.95
Plain hooded Zipfronts
Regular $13.95
limit one coupon per item-good thru 12-5-87 "i �.
limit one coupon per ite:n- good thru 12-5-87-
Selected Hoods Wild Coupon if
�5.00 with this coupon �� - �
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Big selection of mostly medium i I
& small hoods in assorted " llem m 0ur sPortwear store
colors. Regular11.95 hmit one c�upon per person
Jansport Circle Sweatshirt
in grey, gold & white
Prices start at $14.95
P.D. all over Sweatshirt
Regular $24.95
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Tailgating Sweatshirts
Great Gift for Mom & Dad
Regular $17.95
ECU Sweater in
purple & gold
Regular $29.95
� Hmit one coupon per item- good thru 12-5-81limit one coupon per item - good thru 12-5-8J
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Big selection of small
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Any T-Shirt in our store
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Pirates Chenille Sweatshirt
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Title
The East Carolinian, December 1, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 01, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.577
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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