The East Carolinian, November 24, 1987






INSIDE
Editorials��4
Style��mjj
Sports��9
Classifieds��6
STYLE
A new way to tone up your body available in
Memorial Gym � see STYLE, page 7.
SPORTS
An interim athletic director is named to replace
Karr � see SPORTS, page 9.
SJje iEaat Glanilttuatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 No. 25
Tuesday, November 24,1987
Greenville, NC
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Edwards critical of GSL plan
By KRISTIN A MURDEN
Suff Writer
An ECU financial aid official
said the secretary of education's
plan to punish colleges and trade
schools tor Guaranteed Student
loan (GSL) default rates of their
students is "misdirected
Secretary of Education William
Bennett said defaults in the GSL
program cost taxpayers more
than $1.6 million a year. So Ben-
nett proposed a plan in which
colleges and trade schools with 20
percent or higher student loan
default rates would be cut off
from all federal grants and assis-
tance.
Bennett is "misdirected in
terms of what he's proposing, and
the penalties he is proposing tor
institutions said Rav Edwards,
director oi financial aid.
Edwards said schools have
never been GSL lenders and be-
lieves it is unfair to hold them
accountable for something
they've never been responsible
tor, nor had any control over be-
fore.
Edwards does agree with Ben-
nett in that institutions should
provide loan counseling for pro-
spective students. Students need
to be a ware of repa vment resposi-
UIUUW and thr level of debt thev
are incurring, he said.
Bennett has also proposed that
admissions practices should be
improved, that academic tran-
scripts should be withheld form
loan defaulters, and improved
communication between school,
lenders and guarantee agencies
would be beneficial. Edwards
states that "those are very sound
prudent good management
things. We all support them and
are, in fact, working on them
But Edwards disagrees with the
main issue of Bennett's plan in
that "the extension of liability to
institutions and the severe penal-
ties he is advocating and propos-
ing is going to befall institu-
tions, and the individual
Edwards pointed out that a
higher than average default rate is
not necessarily an indication that
an institution has failed to comply
with program regulations.
The "default rate is a product of
how well the lender has serviced
loans Edwards said.
The prime violators are school-
in the proprietary sector these
schools that exist for a profit and
"aren't concerned with who they
let in the door he said.
These "fly-by-night institutions
that rely on federal aid generated
by poor students is an intolerable
situation Edwards agrees that
these schools should be cut off
fromall federal aid; not becauseof
their 50 percent default rate but
because what they're doing is
unethical.
If Bennett's plan takes effect,
lenders will begin to look at credit
worthiness. Those who need the
money the most will be cut off
completely, Edwards said.
Those from low-income fami-
lies will be exposed to subjective
evaluations about their academic
and financial potnential. Ed-
wards finds it outrageous to pe-
nalize future generations of stu-
dents for others' past mistakes.
"The unfortunate repercussion
from this is that it can no longer be
said that any student with the These 6th graders from WahlCoates Elementary School got a chance to leam about maps and other tools
ability can get a collegeeducation; used by geographers at ECU Thursday as part of National Geography Awareness Week (Esther Norton
onlv the ones who can afford it Photolab).
Geography Awareness Week
SGA opposes paving College Hill field
BTTIIUtUDTnv � .i � , .
BvTIM HAMPTON
Suit V nlct
1 he S .A passco a resolution
that opposes the chancellor's plan
to construct a parking lot on the
recreation field at the bottom of
College Hill Drive.
The passing of the resolution
at the Monday meeting came a
week after Chancellor Richard R.
Eakin presented to the SO A a plan
ailing for the creation 1,26 park-
ing spaces to be funded by dou
bling the $25 parking sticker fee.
In 1986-87, there were 22,010
registered motor vehicles and
5347 parking spaces on record,
according to parking authority
statistics.
The resolution opposes the
paving of the grass field west of
College Hill Drive and states that
Eakin's plan will only postpone
the parking problem.
Micheal Bartlett, the legisla-
tor who drafted the resolution,
said he has gathered 600 student
signatures on a petition opposing
the paving of the field.
Eakin's parking plan, the
resolution states, only postpones
the parking problem because of
expected increases in enrollment
of "two to three percent accord-
ing to the resolution.
The SGA "goes on record as
Democratic candidate's wife
expains husband's platform
teachers retiring within the next
five to 10 years.
"He (Dukakis) would push fora
National Teaching Excellence
Fund, a new education insurance
fund for college students and, so
important, a drive to cure illiter-
acy all over this nation.
Through these efforts he will
encourage our young college
graduates, through scholarship
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Managing fditor
The wife of a candidate for the
democratic nomination for presi-
dent said her husband supports
investing in education and would
continue to do so as president.
Kitty Dukakis, wife of Massa-
chusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis,
made the remarks while speaking
to a group of area residents and
students at the Willis Building aid, to go into the field of teaching
Saturday. and help our veteran teachers
Noting that her husband's through sabbatical programs and
work as governor was indicative research in their particular field
of what he would do as president, she said.
she said, "State funding for edu- Mrs. Dukakis often used her
cation has gone up at all levels, husband's gubernatorial experi-
Funding for higher public educa- ence as evidence of his ability to
tion has gone up 250 percent dur- lead the nation in all areas,
ing the last decade, and state Addressing economic con-
scholarship aid for our college cerns, she said, "As three-term
students has increased five-fold governor of Massachusetts, Mi-
in the last five years without our chael knows what it is to deal with
public school tuition rates going deficits. He inherited a $500 mil-
UP" lion deficit and turned it into mil-
Mrs. Dukakis said her husband lions of dollars of surplus,
sees there is a crisis in education "He knows how to balance
with one-half of the public school See WIFE page 2
urging more efficient plans for
solving the current and future
parking problems the resolu-
tion states.
"We need a long-term plan
Bartlett said.
However, the resolution did
not object to the part of the plan
that includes three proposed
parking lots on Charles Boule-
vard, Ninth Street, and an area
near Minges Coliseum. The pro-
posed parking area near the inter-
section of Charles and 14th would
hold 600 vehicles, while the lot
between 9th and 10th streets is
projected to have 90 new spaces.
The entire plan is expected to cost
$1 million, according to Bartlett.
Eakin plans to present the
plan to the Board of Trustees Dec.
4.
An amendment to the resolu-
tion states that the legislature
acknowledged Eakin's prompt
effort to remedy the present park-
ing problems. After the meeting,
SGA president Scott Thomas
spoke in support of Eakin's initia-
tive in trying to solve problems
facing students.
"For a man who has only been
here six months, Chancellor
Eakin has taken a great interest in
our existing problems. We sup-
port the chancellor in getting a
new recreation facility built and
his efforts to solve the parking
problem Thomas said.
In other business, the SGA:
�Appropriated $600 to the
Forensics Club for travel.
�Approved the constitution
for Students for Bob Dole for
President.
�Denied the proposed
constitution of the Ice Hockey
Club.
�Heard from SGA Treasurer
Chris Holland, who announced
that he is the new chairman of the
Media Board.
$157,000 raised in telefund
By JOHN TUCKER
Staff Writer
The ECU Alumni Annual Tele-
fund ended early last week after
earning an estimated $157,000,
according to the person in charge
of the fundraiser.
Cindy Kitrcll, annual giving
director and organizer of the tele-
fund, said that without the help of
student volunteers the telefund
could not have been a success.
"The cooperation of students
has been fabulous, they deserve
the thanks because they're the
ones who did a lot of the work
Kitrell said.
Kitrell estimated that $137,000
was raised by telephone and that
$20,000 was raised by mail.
This year, the telefund took a
new approach and solicited dona-
tions not only from alumni but
also from parents of all sopho-
more students enrolled at E.C.U.
Dave McDonald, director of
Institutional Advancement,
whose office oversees the tele-
fund operation said "I'm very
pleased with the results and espe-
cially delighted with the parents'
support
See STUDENTS, page 2
Conservatives play joke on Illinois liberals
URBANA-CHAMPAIGN, 111.
(CPS) � Conservative University
of Illinois students invented a
new student group "as a joke" to
keep a leftist campus group from
holding a rally Oct. 21, but now
others are charging the right-
wingers used dirty tricks to deny
them the right to speak.
"We wanted to have some fun
a t the expense of the campu s left
explained Greg Kosinovsky,
president of the facetiously
named Philistine Liberation Or-
ganization (PLO).
The humor, however, wasn't
universally appreciated. Illinois
leftist students want the group
disciplined for spoiling their
rally, and the student newspaper,
the Daily Illini, blasted the group
in an editorial for attempting to
"control and obstruct the free
speech of another campus organi-
zation
The controversy erupted Oct.
21, when students from across the
state were holding "Day of Ac-
tion" rallies to oppose deep cu ts in
state college funding.
That was when right-wing stu-
dents at Illinois, thinking the left-
ist United Progressives would
sponsor the Day of Action, de-
cided to beat them to the punch by
reserving an area called the Quad,
and holding their own rally.
To keep the Quad and the issue
out of their opponents' hands,
Kosinovsky and other campus
conservatives formed the "Philis-
tine Liberation Organization
and registered it as a student
group so they could reserve the
area.
'The fact remains you don't set
up a group for the purpose of
keeping other people off of the
Quad said Jennifer Keller of the
United Progressives. "We feel
(the Philistine Liberation Organi-
zation) needs to be punished
Kosinovsky � who freely
admits the group was formed to
annoy the left "and have some
fun" � noted the FLO'S purpose
is to "promote true egalitarian-
ism, and fight elitism of all kinds
such as academic achievement,
laissez-faire economics and other
petit bourgeois inhibitions
Campus conservatives, Kosi-
novsky said, were disenchanted
with previous efforts by the left to
rally students to pressure the state
legislature to increase higher
education funding.
Illinois leftists, he said, held a
funding rally earlier this year that
quickly turned from campus is-
sues to speeches about Judge
Robert Bork's nomination to the
Supreme Court, South Africa,
homosexual rights, and Nicara-
gua.
"Based on that first United Pro-
gressives rally, we thought this
would be an easy target to attack
Kosinovsky said.
"The left on this campus has an
idea that there are a number of
international issues that affect the
masses. The regime in Nicaragua
somehow gains when gay in Illi-
nois gets rights
The Philistines, he said, hoped
to focus exclusively on the state
funding issue at their rally. "We
wanted to prevent an important
issue to all students from becom-
ing a mockery
However, just minutes before
the Philistine rally was to be held,
the conservatives cancelled.
"We decided none of us has any
experience at organizing these
things Kosinovsky said. The
group gave its Quad reservation
to the Student Government Asso-
ciation, which conducted its own
"Day of Action" rally. Kosi-
novsky is also a student govern-
ment officer.
The United Progressives,
meanwhile, had staged a rally the
previous day because it did not
agree with the student
government's call for a tax in-
crease to boost higher education
funding.
To add to the confusion, the
Daily Illini, in an earlier story,
mistakenly had referred to the
Philistine Liberation Organiza-
tion as the Palestine Liberation
Oranization.
Although the paper ran a cor-
rection the next day, pro-Israeli
students turned out to picket.
i ��� �.


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'�' '�" �





s
2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 24,1987
Healthy advice about colds
How can l keep from getting a cold?
Colds, or upper respiratory ill-
nesses, are caused by viral infec-
tions. There are unfortunately no
measures to keep from getting a
cold. However, if you stay away
from alcohol and drugs and main-
tain a balance of rest, exercise and
nutrition, you may have a better
Health Column
By MARY ELESHA-ADAMS
ECU Student Health Canter
chance of avoiding a persistent
cold. Also, you should try to avoid
close contact with people who
already have colds.
What can 1 do to treat my cold?
A cold is a self-limited illness
meaning that it will get better
with time. Some medications and
treatments may ease the discom-
forts and annoyances of the com-
mon cold. You should:
�AVOID INHALING IRRA-
TATING SUBSTANCES SUCH
AS SMOKE, HAIR SPRAY, DEO-
DORANT AND OTHER
SPRAYS, AND CHEMICALS.
These substances irritat the tiny
hairs that work to clean out mu-
cous and dust from the breathing
passages.
�DRINK FLUIDS � Drink at
least 8 to 12gIassesof fluidsa day,
especially juices, warm drinks
and broths, to help reduce fever
and loosen up secretions and re-
duce cough and congestion. Us-
ing steam or a vaporizer will also
help.
�AVOID HOT SHOWERS OR
BATHS�Extreme heat can cause
dizziness or fainting.
�REST � Rest for a day or two
to help fight the symptoms of
your cold and to reduce the
chance of infecting other people.
Sleep with your head elevated on
pillows if sinus drainage is pres-
ent.
�GARGLE with warm salt wa-
ter to help reduce the pain and
swelling found with a sore throat.
Cough drops, throat lozenger,
and hard candy also relieve throat
irritation, but should not take the
place of gargling.
Medications that may help to
relieve cold symptoms include:
�ASPIRIN OR TYLENOL
will reduce fever and relieve
body aches
�DECONGESTANTS
will relieve stuffy nose and
Wife speaks on candidate's record
Continued from page 1
budgets, he's done it nine times.
And he knows how to produce
good jobs and good wages. When
Michael took office in Massachu-
setts our unemployment rate was
at 11 percent across the board. We
are now, and for the last 36
months have been, the state with
the lowest unemployment rate of
any industrialized state in the
United States � under 3 percent
She said Dukakis believes that
tough choices needed to be made
about spending.
that before the government starts
levying new taxes on those who
obey the law, it should crack
down on those who break it.
"We have today the lowest
compliance rate ever in the his-
tory of our country, 81 percent.
Nineteen percent of our fellow
Americans are not paying taxes
she said.
She said her husband has pro-
posed a national economic devel-
opment fund to invest in states
and regions whose economics are
lacking, a network of centers of
"That means recognizing that excellence and new and applied
pouring billions of dollars into technology and a national energy
Star Wars is not going to make it policy that emphasises natural
work. And that means chosing a gas and clean coal technology,
stronger conventional defense
over$50 billion fora new missile
Mrs. Dukakis said.
Mrs. Dukakis said it was time to
start collecting the billions of dol-
lars in taxes that have gone un-
paid each year. "Michael believes
In addition, she said, Dukakis
has a five-point plan for develop-
ing rural areas that includes
bringing working capital into
rural areas; training rural Ameri-
cans for new jobs; investing in
roads, bridges, sewer and water
Students to receive
prizes for fundraising
Continued from page 1
McDonald added that more
money might come in because
Alumni organizations in North
Carolina and the Tidewater area
of Virginia are still pushing to
raise more money for the tele-
fund.
The top three student volun-
teers who raised the most money
will recieve prizes of $150, $100,
and $50. Also all student volun-
teers are entered in a drawing.
The prizes include a night on the
town in a limousine with a dinner
at the King and Queen Resta-
raunt, or a night on the town in a
limousine. The limousine service
was donated by Bill Tripp.
The money raised by the tele-
fund goes to scholarships, books,
faculty research, general enrich-
ment programs, alumni events
and other special events, accord-
ing to Kitrell.
PARTY ANIMALS
Balloons Delivered In Costume
Gorilla-Grama
Gator -Grama
fcnquin (or Hire
Birthdays or any occasion
V.
830-1823
Mon. thru Thins. Night
Popcorn
Shrimp $3.65
KINGSTON
PLACE
WILL HAVE SEVERAL
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR NEXT
SEMESTER,
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393.
AFFORDABLE, LUXURIOUS
FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
BUILT SPECIFICALLY FOR
ECU STUDENTS.
systems in smaller communities;
providing technical assistance to
rural entrepeneurs, and offering
federal support for rural develop-
ment.
stopped up sinuses
�ANT1HISTAMINES
will relieve allergy-type
symptoms such as watery, itching
eyes, runny nose, and sneezing
�COMBINATION DE-
CONGESTANTS AND ANTI-
HISTAMINES
will relieve stuffy sinuses
accompanied by runny nose,
watery eyes, and sneezing
The self-care cold clinic at the
ECU Student Health Service pro-
vides a quick checklist of cold
symptoms and treatments. You
can use the cold clinic any time
during our student health hours.
If your cold symptoms do not
get better after four to five days
you should see a health care pro-
vider for evaluation and addi-
tional treatment.
Writer's note: If you have ques-
tions you would like answered in
the "Health Column" I'd like to
hear from you! Send your ques-
tions to Mary Elesha-Adams at
the ECU Student Health Center or
call 757-6841.
Hillcrest Lanes
Memorial Drive 756-2020
FREE
GAME
BowfOne Game & Receive j
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Limit 1 Coupon Per Person.
Stye Sort Carolinian
Serving the Ekist Carolina campus community since 1925.
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo
Shari Clemens Pete Ferna'd
Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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One color and black$90.00
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Inserts
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BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
Phones
.757-6366757-6557
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if
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$2.95 to $5.95
Classic Overcoats
Herring-Bone, Black
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$19.95 to $49.95
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Also: Wind breakers, Button down shirts Members
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The Coin & Ring Man
10:00-5:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 Sat.
400 S. Evans
752-3866
42 �&fc4�ii� '� ti
CLIFFS
rSeafood House and Oyster Bar f.
Washington Highway (N.C. 33 Ext.) Gr.env,il� North Carolina
Phona 752-3172
STUDENT
Owned and Operated by East Carolina University
Wright Building

f?
ft
fi
Student opinion
Analysts say
(CPS) � A year before the 1988
elections, political analysts say
they think college students art'
more likely to support the Repub
lican presidential candidate than
the Democratic candidate
The same analysts, however,
caution that if the stock market
continues to falter, or if conflicts in
the Persian Gulf and Central
America escalate, college stu-
dents amay turn against the Re
publicans.
Barring that, Jesse Jackson
seems to be the only Democrat
with any measureable support on
campus, while all the Republican
candidates legitimately can claim
pockets of college support.
It's heartening news for the
Republicans, who are trving to
translate Ronald Reagan's colle-
giate popularity in 1980 and lsK4
into long-term voting patterns.
Young voters may have already
begun identifying themselves as
life-long Republicans, said Cath-
erine Rudder of the American
Political Science Association.
Young Americans tended to
vote Republican more than the
rest of the electorate in the I960
and 1984 presidential elections.
Young people, moreover, con-
tinue to be President Reagan's
biggest supporters, according to
the American Enterprise Institute
(AEI), a Washington, DC. think
tank.
Although the number of Ameri-
cans who approved of Reagan's
job performance dropped as a
result of the Iran-Contra scandal
his rating held steady among Is
to-24 year olds the institute re-
ported recentb.
Analysts svy that momentum
gives Repub'icans a slight advan
tage in woe ing the youth vote -
but that advantage is tenuous
The AFl's Karlyn Keene asserts
college students find the Republi
can Party more appealing not
because of its policies, but be-
cause of President Reagan.
The only 2 presidents most stu-
dents are old enough to remem-
ber arc Jimmy Carter and Ronald
Reagan, Keene noted, adding that
"The Carter administration is
seen as incompetent, while Re
agan is seen as providing leader
ship
"Reagan offered more hop,
than the Democrats said Curtis
Gans, the director of the Commit-
tee for the Study of the American
Electorate.
"But on other issues, students
don't agree with the Repub!
administration. The 1988
dential election explained Cans
"is not as likely to be as one sided
Republican as the previous 2 elec-
tions.
"It could even turn out to he
one-sided for the Democrats he
added. "That's up to how current
events unfold. If the stock market
continues to decline, students.
and the rest of the electorate, will
want a change
"An Iranian war would be
unpopular with young voters.
said Rudder. "The American
public does not want to be in
-t
�5
The East Carolinian
Pick it up
volved in torej
Last week tl
decrying U.S.
Gulf surfaced
Missouri at Ci
Still, Repuj
aspirants en)o
ognitionamor
analysts say,
temporary ar
crat may brit
pack of presial
destinguish hi
A IXttkh ral
definitely em
and New H
Rudder said
lookr
support'
Althou
u . �
dates i
young
cede do have
and -
students I'M
pla e
his � I
admj
But Ru
tuse
zatiort is !
student activ,
and ur
PR
Mor
For an
mation.l
757 00(
C"L'

h
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$12.95 to $14.95
Rugbv Shirts
$4.95 to S9.95
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Cook Books
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Sole B�9tns: Monday November 23

A
Student opinion
Analysts say republicans prefered
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 24, 1987
Y�SSM
(CPS) � A year before the 1988
elections, political analysts say
they think college students are
more likely to support the Repub-
lican presidential candidate than
the Democratic candidate.
The same analysts, however,
caution that if the stock market
continues to falter, or if conflicts in
the Persian Gulf and Central
America escalate, college stu-
dents amay turn against the Re
publicans.
Barring that, Jesse Jackson
seems to be the only Democrat
with any measureable support on
campus, while all the Republican
candidates legitimately can claim
pockets of college support.
It's heartening news for the
Republicans, who arc trying to
translate Ronald Reagan's colle
giate popularity in 1980 and 1984
into long-term voting patterns.
Young voters may have already
begun identifying themselves as
life-long Republicans, said Cath-
erine Rudder of the American
Political Science Association.
Young Americans tended to
vote Republican more than the
rest of the electorate in the 1980
and 1984 presidential elections.
Young people, moreover, con-
tinue to be President Reagan's
biggest supporters, according to
the American Enterprise Institute
(AEI), a Washington, D.C. think
tank.
Although the number of Ameri-
cans who approved of Reagan's
job performance dropped as a
result of the lran-Contra scandal,
his rating held steady among 18-
to-24 year olds the institute re-
ported recenth.
Analysts s?y that momentum
gives Republicans a slight advan-
tage in woi ing the youth vote �
but that advantage is tenuous.
The API's Karlyn Keenc asserts
college students find the Republi
can Party more appealing not
because of its policies, but be-
cause of President Reagan.
The only 2 presidents most stu-
dents are old enough to remem-
ber are Jimmy Carter and Ronald
Reagan, Keene noted, adding that
"The Carter administration is
seen as incompetent, while Re
agan is seen as providing leader-
ship "
"Reagan offered more hope
than the Democrats said Curtis
Cans, the director of the Commit-
tee for the Study of the American
Electorate.
"But on other issues, students
don't agree with the Republican
administration. The 1988 presi-
dential election explained Cans,
"is not as 1 ikely to be as one-sided
Republican as the previous 2 elec-
tions.
"It could even turn out to be
one-sided for the Democrats he
added. "That's up to how current
events unfold. If the stock market
continues to decline, students,
and the rest of the electorate, will
want a change
"An Iranian war would be
unpopular with young voters
said Rudder. "The American
public does not want to be in
volved in foreign interventions
Last week, for instance, posters
decrying U.S. policy in the Persian
Gulf surfaced at the University of
Missouri at Columbia.
Still, Republican presidential
aspirants enjoy greater name rec-
ognition among young voters, the
analysts say, but that may be a
temporary advantage. A Demo-
crat may break from the current
pack of presidential aspirants and
destinguish himself, Rudder said.
A Democratic front-runner will
definitely emerge after the Iowa
and New Hampshire primaries,
Rudder said. 'That candidate will
look credible and start receiving
support
Although the analysts say it is
too early to predict which candi-
dates have the most appeal to
young voters, several, they con-
cede, do have an advantage.
New York Congressman Jack
Kemp, said Rudder, offers "clear
and strong positions a neat ideo-
logical base that could appeal to
students. The former football
player, she said, also has a "you t h-
ful and energetic appearance
Vice President George Bush,
added Kecnc, could benefit from
his association with the Reagan
administration.
But Rudder feels Bush will fal-
ter because his campaign organi-
zation is seen by conservative
student activists as bureaucratic
and unexciting. And, she adds,
his connection with the Reagan
administration could hurt his
candidacy if Reagan's last year is
marked by war and a weakened
economy.
"Kemp said Cans, "has too
many inconsistencies. He'll get
beaten by the fact that he's a Buf-
falo, New Yorker running as a
conservative
Cans predicts New York Gov.
Mario Cuomo, if he announced
his candidacy, would gain stu
dent support because he is a
"fantastically eloquent speaker
who can put values into his pro-
grams
The announced Democratic
field, however, has not inspired
students, though Rudder feels
Massachussetts Gov. Michael
Dukakis will emerge as a "prag-
matic" choice. Tennessee Sen.
Albert Gore could appeal to con-
servative Southern Democrats,
she added.
But the only Democratic candi-
date who currently enjoys strong
student appeal is Rev. Jesse
Jackson, Rudder said. Jackson is
seen as courageous and as a good
role model for young blacks, and
he has been associated with cam-
pus anti-apartheid and civil rights
movements.
In 1984, Jackson's candidacy
sparked an intense outpouring of
support among black students in
the South, where supporters
competed for buses that trans-
ported people to help voters reg-
ister.
Gans adds that, unless some
candidate captures their imagina-
tions, students as a class aren't
likely to vote in overwhelming
numbers.
"At this point, the question is
not who students will vote for but
if they'll votcat all. Will they think
their vote is important?"
But it would be wise for both
Democrats and Republicans to
woo younger voters, said
Kathryn Muyrray of the Republi-
can National Committee. "Who-
ever goesaftcr that group must do
so strongly she said. "That's the
future of America
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Si? Eaat (EatalMatx
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, m m
Akrnv. ay Deanhardt, ��,
Andy Lewis, �.�, F, iJ-ft,�
TIM CHANDLER, liSl tW
JOHN CARTER. �. M.KE U�rH
SHELTON BRYANT, �w-� wf
DEBS, STEVENS, KT
NOVEMBER 24, 1987
Opinion
Bennett's plan is a danger
The plan which Education Secre-
tary William Bennett has proposed
to curtail the default rate on Guaran-
teed Student Loans (GSLs) is not
sound and is potentially dangerous.
The secretary proposes to cut all
federal financial aid to institutions
with a default rate of over 20 per-
cent. This is seen as a punitive meas-
ure to force universities to collect
from graduate deadbeats and to
better educate its students in loan
repayment while they are in school.
On the surface this seems like a
sound plan. An estimated $1.6 bil-
lion in education department funds
will go to paying GSL defaults. At a
time when budget cut-backs are
vogue and the deficit is out of hand
it is evident that something must be
done.
However, the beauty of Bennett's
plan is only skin deep. Below that
lies the horror of a wild beast.
The basic problem is this: Univer-
sities have never been held respon-
sible for administering or collecting
GSLs before now.
A GSL is granted through a bank
or other lending institution. The
university determines through its
records who among its students are
eligible, and then the bank makes
the loans.
The bank � not the university �
therefore, is responsible for collect-
ing those loans. They simply aren't
doing their jobs.
For instance, if you were a banker
and you knew you had $1 million in
loans out which were guaranteed
(even if they were defaulted upon
the government would refund the
money) and $800,000 in loans that
was not guaranteed, which would
you more vigorously track down? It
seems the answer is obvious.
Athletes are treated wrongly
while being tested for drug use
Drue test What COmes to vnnrminrl whonunn tV.inVr�k;c tt ia;ii ill. miij � -T
rates are somewhere well below 10
percent.
There are definite problems with
the GSL program. "Fly by night
schools so called because their
only intent is to get student and
federal money, must be eliminated.
In addition, banks and universities
should work more closely to track
down GSL defaulters and get them
to pay up. Positive steps in that di-
rection would include holding back
transcripts and being more selective
in admissions, which many univer-
sities already do. Drugtest What comes to your mind when you think of this tor! Well this time I didn't ant ci? L �
However, Vnnett's proposal is 7 'd? Abusive? Masoch.s.ic? vJS Helpful? Or known fa, andTidc for �,V?ta uKS�"�
no. a solu.ion �o those" proems SK �eSaSnTSulS �" " " ' MvX' "no.K ,
nstead.t creates more problems on Uhea.h.c.e.gourgennyMrfiiau.dsJi.oranyn.n.o te,SSStSSH'
rr, my d�"��� g� ha"dod a tiny pill bottle with a micro- seemyevelswlentmn ,hnmomg' a�aken to
Espectaly hard hit will be pre- opening, and head for the bathroom ,� a full canter. l�SSab�"to�"SK'&,8aVe
dommately black institutes of �cwatr�u"gr�n'the sinks helps set the mood in the Thirteen cups of watered�n cuoTT.�h. k .
higher learning - including Shaw a,��f beady eyes glarmg Minges thrs rrne. knowngeX� wcUmyT- S
muniSt1ecRha'ei8,h V � SSRZtSSZ -
munit and technical colleges. I'm not the only one with ny, nervous bladder I've
lenying federal aid to colleges wast�J hour upon hour with r "Pee buddies" waiting for
and universities such as these would the right moment-
effectively force them to close thpir rPlsaPP�'ntedIvvander aimlessly back out into the hallwav.
doors, thus depriving the countrv of "a I v �(TtCT" V"Cy " Thef don' undcrand I've
a vital Knit in fhol 8 . Y� drank Eth,�P,a drY and then some! Clutching my swollen
X �J 6 duCahon Pess. stomach I hobble over to the water fountain (bv this tim? I'm
in addition, education will be lo�kjng like the hunchback of Notre Dame) They say "walk
harder to get for underpriveleged around'jt mi8ht lp
students. Universities might be
. . o o�"�Minitvv�iu.T:isataunat
place long enough to see the men's soccer team, the women's
volleyball team, basketball team and swim team both the
men s and women's tennis teams, and over half 'the men's
swim team pass on through.
I tried everything! The elastic on mv shorts was snapping
Time was wasting. I, at two hours and fourtv-five minutes
finally went. The beady eyed hawk let out a squawk from that
sharp snappy beak, "If you can't go you'll have to be cathc-
denzed.
Honey if I could close that bathroom stall for only five
forced to check credit ratines' and scconds rd hraIcre'?ou8n in my bottle for the entire athletic
other financial information anH Z � Pro&a� aECU �" �Y � breath (before it come out of
admiQQinn n!ii � baSe my �arS) l Start "&& up and down the stairs.
i,r pi decisions on those fig- Yeah, sure, gravity works alright. I run to the bathroom
ures. hducation will once again be- think l can'l think) once again those beady eyes stare I
come reserved for only those who ;hlnk my bidder might as well burst because there's no way
can afford it. - JmJS�lnS to 8� with someone looking down on me like I'm
Anj a � . . some sort of prey.
the it 1h IT Tlg EveurVOne in d to be drug tested three times in a two year period
the United States has a right to the and its been hell. My first time ,t took me three hours before
: education possible, right on l could 8� By that time I had missed practice, all the other
CAMPUS SPECTRUM
BY
RYAN PHILYAW
A threat! A threat! I'd like to see it done.
First of all, it's an invasion of our privacy to urinate in front
of people. It makes me feel low, especiallv when I know I ha vc
done nothing to seriously indanger my body. Secondly, I have
nofhir �. UJ�1 s ii t, . J �
rougnt many years to earn that right, Iuthnnon i . try, just try to cathederize me
is frightening to think that basis adTrnlnTv"11 m? �n a firSt There's no waX � h� will be permitted and bv trving
t can take such a backwards vf S-l-JrSKSS
Or at least it is to the banks. The
most compelling evidence against
Bennett's plan can be found in the
default rate on loans administered
by the universities at the universities
with high GSL defaults. It has been
reported that in most cases those
and it
sSeSlva
Mep so easily. God forbid if you don't want the entire Minges complex
it is also frightening to think that underwater! Y
the secretary of education, no matter � �n the third and final hour'when mY hody so graciously
. . yr going to "scare
the pee out of me. Why don't they just sav, "It's a very slow
and painful process" - Why don't they just let us write our last
tvill and testament. That's what I'll have to do if I get cathedcr-
zed and get an infection. I can see it now, mv season would
While i, is obviously important ,o $�X'25S8ES wSffiH&M: T "hi'
crack down on GSL defaults, Ben- B" � I etched by hawk this time, she kerM locking a. her � imetninlone tLoulrMtT �"n" ' T �
nett must realize that his plan is wa'ch-She finally said, "I'm getting a little impatient now" ctnteau�i.hiH IA somcocr way they
inadequate and dangerous to the rf�f �'Wswoman: M,adVstheonfnlZ hSd?i.11S3SI!SS
future of higher education for all. Sr'?TbrA'raTy "�WX l-StaZ whS ThS
�uncomrortarjle carrying around enough watcrforacarradia- getting a little out of hand
Students write to protest change in columns
To the editor: hm�-wc .c uu
To the editor:
I have been waiting close to a month
to read the column "From the Not So
Right and I am highly disappointed.
For the past three years, Pat Molloy
vis provided countless laughs via his
article, and made reading The East
Carolinian worthwhile.
In Money's place, I noticed the
emergence of Chippy Bonehead;
please make him stop!
Bonehead is not only not funny, he
is droll and spastic in his writing.
In case you haven't noticed, 1 am
riardly the only one asking for Pat
ollos return.
Your compliance with these re-
quests will be much appreciated.
Kent File
Junior
Business
Bring back Pat
To the editor:
During the past few weeks I have
noticed a change in the contents of the
East Carolinian. This change is the
removal of Pat Molloy's column,
"From the Not So Right and the
inclusion of Chippy Bonehead's col-
umn. I feel that this change has dras-
tically affected the content of The East
Carolinian.
Malloy's column has appeared in
one form or the other for approxi-
mately three years. He filled the void
left by Mick LaSalle, another fine
I humorist. I find it amusing that the
editor would try to replace Molloy's
column with a column as droll and
humorless as bonehead's
As if the elimination of Molloy's
column was not enough, the editor
seems to feel that Bonehead's column
not only merits extra space, but he
should also have a weekly column.
I have read only one other pro-
Molloy letter in the editorials but I
know that there are many Molloy fans
out there. Please stand up and let your
voice be heard. Molloy needs your
help. Ask the Editor of The East Caro-
linian to give Molloy hiscolumn back.
I would like to personally request that
Molloy be given his column back.
Thank you.
John H. Snowden III
Alumnus
(Editor's note � Pat Molloy's column
was pulled from the Feature's section
because of internal problems. Thecolumn
will not return to the section, although toe
are currently searching for a writer to
share humour duties with the Bonehead.)
New parking plan
To the editor:
As we know by reading Tuesday's
East Carolinian, Chancellor Eakin has
a new parking plan he intends to
submit to the Board of Trustees on
Dec. 4.1 am glad to see the new chan-
cellor come to grips with the parking
problem that we do indeed have.
However. I strongly nrop FWm gg m
be so hasty and I especially urge him
not to close the door on revision. Now
that I've met the chancellor, I know he
is a nice man and you can be sure his
heart is in the right place, even though
I don't think his head is.
I am, of course, refering to the part
of the plan that calls for making a
parking lot out of the bottom of Col-
lege Hill. This field is used all the time
and I would really hate to lose it. But,
even more than that it is a dangerous
idea.
Already, there is a big problem wi th
an abundance of pedestrians crossing
Tenth Street. Imagine adding an extra
four hundred or more students cross-
ing the street at least twice a day.
Sooner or later somebody will get hit
and probably killed.
When the chancellor came to dis-
cuss parking with the SGA, he also
talked about his plans for a new rec-
reation center. This center will give
students a great new place to exercise
and work on keeping fit. I ask since
student fitness is so important, why
deprive us of a field that we use all
day, everyday? This I feel is the most
hypocritical part of the chancellor's
plan.
But I do not want to critize propos-
als without offering any alternative
ideas. So here are two plans that start
by making the spaces we have that do
not get used accessible. There are
hundreds of unused parking spaces
next to the Allied Health Building. So,
how do we go about getting an incen-
tive to make this lot appealing? The
SGA needs to provide a shuttle bus
that runs every ten to fifteen minutes
from these lots to Brewster.
Next, make the spacesat the bottom
ot the Hill more expensive. Let's
make parking right in front of
Brewster a convenience we have to
pay for. There is not any reason to
support the idea of the University
catering the laziest people on cam-
pus. If students want to be lazy, then
have it cost them an extra forty to fifty
dollars more than every body else. I
do not want to come down too hard
on lazy people because at times I cer-
tainly fit the role.
It would also be a good idea to limit
the number of permits sold for this
lot. It would be bad news to charge
some so much more and not have a
space for them.
I have found a minor problem with
this alternate plan that many people
would be overlooked. That is only
those students who can afford the
special permits will get them. There
creates some economic discrimina-
tion. So let me try and sell you on my
second plan, which is modified ver-
sion of the first.
This idea was stolen from what
someone else mentioned during the
SGA meeting Monday. Have the Tot at
the bottom of the Hill used by cars
that carry at least three or four passen-
gers. Basically, make it a high occupa-
tion vehicle lot with some good
spaces reserved for compact cars.
This plan will save more space, con-
serve energy and promote good basic
habits.
As it was noted in Tuesday's East
Carolinian the SGA's Student Wel-
fare Committee will be drafting a
petition to save our field. So, if you see
oneof these petitions, signit.Remem-
ber that Chancellor Eakin is new and
does not quite understand how much
we love that field. So, let's put our
names on this petition and tell him to
stop his parking lot paving plan that
victimizes the bottom of College Hill.
Steve Sommers
Junior
Political Science
Molloy wrong
To the editor:
This letter is written in response to
the article entitled "The Karr Era" by
Assistant Sports Editor Pat Molloy. It
is apparent that since the time Pat
Molloy became an Asst. Sports Edi-
tor, he has developed a "dislike" for
Ken Karr, and I use the word "dislike"
conservatively. What is disturbing to
me is that Pat Molloy was allowed to
utilize his position with The East
Carolinian to voice his "personal
glance" or, as I would say, "personal
attack" upon Ken Karr.
Pat Molloy is entitled to his opin-
ion. It is his constitutional right, but to
subject an audience of 12,000 readers
Campus
Forum
to personal critical judgment of an-
other person's dress, professional
career, and physical appearance is not
vrthy of print in The East Carolin-
ian. I question why the article was
even approved by the editor.
I have heard and agree with the
principle that "whatever is on the
inside of a person will be transferred
out" through their behavior and atti-
tudes. Thearticle speaks for lts'f and,
more importantly, Pat Molloy
As an interested student in the
overall development of ECU, I hope
that Pat Molloy and the other staff
writers will refrain from using their
positions with the paper and their
quality writing abilities in such a poor
manner
Brian Burke
Senior
Political Science
Services explained
To the editor:
I am excited about the idea that you
would do an article featuring "dis-
abled" studientsand their dilemmas
at East Carolina in your November 10
1987 issue.
f lowcver, I do feel that a one-sided
and biased view may have been pre-
sented concerning Handicap Services
at ECU In effort to get a more true and
inclusive picture of how this depart
ment functions, 1 questioned handi-
capped students, their friends, pro-
fessors, and individuals familiar with
the functions of Handicap Services
Department here at ECU A most
important clement lacking from The
East Carolinian's article was the ac-
tual views of the handicapped stu-
dents being served by the department
which Mr. C.C. Roe heads.
Who better to promote this pro-
gram than the disabled students
themselves?; so whv, then were no
views of ECU'S 150 handicapped stu-
dents expressed.
The general attitude of handi-
capped students is that they be given
fair and equal chance to participate in
the activites and functions of student-
life as any other ECU student. As one
individual put it, "We arc not asking
for pity; we just ask to be afforded
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wrongly
r drug use
5tai ling ovation, but I'm now
three hour period.
lean ' f another drug test.
I s i began to drink early
rhe next morning I awaken to
the liquid in my body, So I gave
' wouldn't make it).
Irank 13 cups! 1 took the bus to
too well my legs couldn't
ink more water! I sat at thai
the men - . r team, the women's
team and swim team, both the
I over half the men's
irts was snapping:
' urty-five minutes
squawk from that
i'U have to be cathe-
VMPUS SPECTRUM
BY
RYAN PHILYAW
lie out of hand
to urinate in front
a hen I know I have
Secondly have
� ' meone, anyone
tted and bv trving
ing to "scare
II sa very slow
ist let us write our last
getcatheder-
� my season would
ildn'thavegotten
majority) are acts which I
anner. I would like to
a me other way they
intial and not so embarressing,
ist simcone should do
ivatch over us. They are
r �
columns
ber that Chancellor Hakin is new and
not quite understand how much
love that field. So, let's put our
names on this petition and tell him to
his parking lot paving plan that
victimizes the bottom of College Hill.
c a
nlv
the
prp
hat
the
Mat
ars
?n-
pa
d
irs
n-
isic
last
W-
a
rm-
Steve Sommers
Junior
Political Science
Molloy wrong
the editor:
tter is written in response to
the article entitled "The Karr Era" by
� sistant Sports Editor Pat Molloy. It
pparent that since the time Pat
'XKame an Asst. Sports Edi-
� e has developed a "dislike" for
Karr, and 1 use the word "dislike"
- ratively. What is disturbing to
me is that Pat Molloy was allowed to
utilize his position with The East
ii linian to voice his "personal
glance" or, as I would say, "personal
attack upon Ken Karr.
Pat Molloy is entitled to his opin-
ion It is his constitutional right, but to
subject an audience of 12,000 readers
Campus
Forum

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 24,1987
to personal critical judgment of an-
other person's dress, professional
career, and physical appearance is not
worthy of print in The East Carolin-
ian. 1 question why the article was
even approved by the editor.
I have heard and agree with the
principle that "whatever is on the
inside of a person will be transferred
out" through their behavior and atti-
tudes. Thearticle speaks for itself and,
more importantly, Pat Molloy.
As an interested student in the
overall development of ECU, 1 hope
that Pat Molloy and the other staff
writers will refrain from using their
positions with the paper and their
quality writing abilities in sucha poor
manner.
Brian Burke
Senior
Political Science
Services explained
To the editor:
1 am excited about the idea that you
would do an article featuring "dis-
abled" studients and their dilemmas
at Fast Carolina in your November 10,
1987 issue.
1 lowevcr, 1 do feel that a one-sided
and biased view may have been pre-
sented concerning Handicap Services
at ECU In effort to get a more true and
inclusive picture of how this depart-
ment functions, I questioned handi-
capped students, their friends, pro-
fessors, and individuals familiar with
the functions of Handicap Services
Department here at ECU. A most
important element lacking from The
East Carolinian's article was the ac-
tual views of the handicapped stu-
dents being served by the department
which Mr. C.C. Roe heads.
Who better to promote this pro-
gram than the disabled students
themselves?; so why, then were no
views of ECU's 150 handicapped stu-
dents expressed.
The general attitude of handi-
capped students is that they be given
fair and equal chance to participate in
the activites and functions of student-
life as any other ECU student. As one
individual put it, "We arc not asking
for pity; we just ask to be afforded
equal opportunities as any other tui-
tion-paying student of this fine insti-
tution Indeed that should be a major
puropose of East Carolina's Handi-
cap Services Department. Though
some efforts may be made by this
department to fufill the needs of
handicapped students, 1 feel that it
could be doing a better job is some
positive changes could be made.
First of all, the article mentions the
Handicap Services Office is located in
Room 212 Wichard. How ironic that
this office be located on the second
floor of a building with no elevators,
and is therefore inaccessible to the
wheelchair-bound students it strives
to serve. Could this seemingly small
inconvenience be indicative of larger
problems within the Handicap Serv-
ices willingness to communicate and
work whole-heartedly to serve this
university's handicap student popu-
lation? 1 think it is.
The article indicates that a van is
available to transport handicapped
students. What it fails to mention is
that this one, ragged, ill-main-
tcnenccd van is insufficient for the
needs of handicapped students.
There are many problems with the
van being available for use since it is
driven by collegs students who have
busy schedules. The van is primarily
only available to transport students to
their classes, but what about their
other needs and opportunities to
participate in the community and
university life, i.e. grocery store,
shopping center, football games,
church, etc.
The van is not being made available
to the handicap population as it
should be, i.e. on weekends. Also
mentioned in the article is the ac-
quirement of a new van for handi-
capped students. Funny that there
has been talk of a new van for the past
several years with no subsequent
action in fufillment of this promise.
Words without action are meaning-
less, and the handicapped students
and their friends would like to speak
out in dissatisfaction of the inaction
and perhaps apathy of the university
to serve the needs of students as it
should.
Students views are presented by
The East Carolinain concerning im-
portant issues such as parking, how-
ever if a handicapped individual
wishes to express the opinion that he
is not being given equal riehts, he
may often be seen as a complainer or
trouble-maker.
It is not the purpose of this response
to personally attack anyone, how-
ever, it is time that students, faculty,
and administrators of this university
become aware of the needs and di-
lemmas of handicapped individuals.
Ideas for initiating positivechanges
I would suggest are regular meetings
of the Handicapped Student Services
Committee where handicapped and
other students could express them-
selves and make needs known, provi-
sion of trained student assistants to
work with the handicapped students,
an organization on campus where
handicapped students and friends
could fellowship.
Presently, I have been told there
does exist a Handicapped Student
Services Committee. My friend, who
is a student member of this commit-
tee, informed me that they do not
meet asa committe unless called to do
so by Chairman C.C. Roe, and the
committee has yet to meet this
semester. Could this be just a token-
committee? If it is, it is time that
changed. With student involvement
changes can be made.
In reference to Student Assistants
who help handicapped students in
every-day living tasks, there seems to
be a need for more available and
trained individuals to help. Evi-
denced by advertisments that request
these services, handicapped students
are not receiving these services as
they should by the university.
It is a shame that a handicapped
student must leave this university
because he can get no help in basic-life
tasks. This is the story I heard from
one student. With greater publicity
and initiation of a training program
for students interested in helping
handicapped studens take care of
simple every-day living tasks, this
problem could be solved.
Forming an organization in cam-
pus where handicapped studentsand
friends could gather and fellowship
would help to broaden the horizons
of all students here at East Carolina. I,
myself, have gained so much insight
and learned a great deal about life
from handicapped friends. It is a trib-
ute to them that they overcome,
achieve, and touch the lives of others
in such positive ways, that I do write
this letter.
M.J. Cherry
Graduate Student
Adapted. Physical Education.
���������
BUSCH GARDENS
Amenca's premier theme park in Williams-
burg, Va is conducting auditions for
over 200 singers, dancers, musicians,
variety artists, actors, technicians, and
supervisors You could be part of the
magic that truly makes Busch Gardens
an entertainment "experience " So get
your act together and 'shine' at our
1988 auditions.
Audition Date:
GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA
Wednesday, December 2nd
1-5 p.m.
University of North Carolina
FHi tt University Center
e Ballroom
-DlSCH
Gardens
i: (�:i�k�:i 2iiLi
WSUAn
An Affirmative ActionEqual OppQflurvty Imptoyer M H
Only on Tuesdays and Thursdays
THANKSGIVING
TMRSDAY. NOVEMBER Jh
g -MM. h
&
SfeM
A time to shun- the homm ol iIk mlv �n
with lowed eras near or hi
with a card fn�m American (inrtiiu
Student Stores
Wright Building
O M Ml WWII im-n i.n,lolc.(-�l �JT 'l WWV.II t i.ivi Ti vi.taj
AMERICAN GREETINGS
NOW AVAILABLE ON OUR SHELVES
A DAY IN THE LIFE OF THE SOVIET UNION - Collins Publishers
Photographed by 100 of the world's leading photojournalists on one day May 15 1987
20 YEARS OF THE ROLLING STONE - edited by Jann S. Wenner '
What a long, strange trip its been
Images of Excellence: CAROLINA BASKETBALL - by Sally Sather
�� cades of excellence in collegiate basketball has been defined by the Tarheels
THE TOMMYKNOCKERS - by Steven King arneeis
It begins with a nursery rhymeit becomes an unforgettable parable of dead
HOME TO JERICHO - by Hubert shuptrine
Come take a journey to this place of the heart - come home to Jericho
BALLOONSfor all occasions
CENTRAL BOOK
0 & NEWS
Greenville Square Shopping Center � 756-7177
Open Til 9:30 P.M. Seven Days A Week
The Elbo & HI present
Cl
The All Campus
Male Stripoff
1st $100
2nd $50
3rd $25
Ladies Only 9-10:30. Guys can sign up
at the Elbo or at the Student Store.
Oine Start your holidays
off right at
Student Union
(Productions Committee
CMRISIMAS rT�'E clI9d(Ml9�
"lues. Dec. 1,1987
M 4:30 p.m.
(Mendenhatt Lobby
MCStudents, faculty & Staff Invited!
�Tree hot & cold hors doeuvres
�Prizes for ornament competition
1st "Prize: $50
2nd(Prize: $25
3rd (Prize: $20
�Santa Clous
�ECU QospeC Choir.
Tree (Provided By:
Littles 9farsery, 9vWy264
I


ji-M ipa ����
Km&m





THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER24. 1987
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
22 Tyto Daytona P mmmAmkm
T?l , mg lo norida' Go tor tuv
��fce advantage of promoting the 1
W Break Tnp. If �� call
Signers of Travel 1800 453 0074
Immediately!
RESIDENT COUNSELOR: Pr.mar.lv
Wterested fan those with human service
tvukground wish.ng to gain valuable
xpenence in the field No monetary
omfvnsat.on, however, room, utilities
and phone prov.ded Call Marv Sm.th at
the REAL Crisis Center. 758 IIELP
AIRLINES NOW MIRING H.gh. Alton
dJnts, lravel Agents, Mechanics Cus
tamer Service 1 istmRs Sabnos to SVk
Entry level positions Call 805 687 6000
Ext All
WANTED True Frozen Yogurt Lovers!
tome to Hank's Homemade, 321 East
10th Street for a FREE TASTE of Frozen
Delight. 758-0000.
HIRING! Eederal
government obs in
vour area and overseas Many immediate
openings without waiting list or test Sl
W.(XX). Phone call refundable (wl2 ss
B88S Ext 5285.
COLLEGE STUDENTS interested ,n
earning a free Spring Hreak in the Haha
mas! Call Campus Tours, Inc At ("k)sl
523 TOUR. That's (305) 523 8687
FOR SALE
TYPING SERVICIS: Call Kim before
r 00 pm 758 1161 after 5 (X) poi 758-2119
APPLIANCE SALE: Washers, dryers
ranges refrigers and freeers eixd am
dition and guarantee! Call H Mills 746
2446
FOR SALE TWO Bl AC K CAR SFATS
I HESI CHAIRS ARE MO IN TED FOR
LSI IN VOL'R APARTMINT OR
HORM ROOM MAKES A GREAT
CONVERSATION PIECE. ONLY $2s
EACH. CAI L DAN 758-4779.
TROLL'S TUX AND TEES Tired of
paving high prices tor formal wear tr
Troll's tux and tees tor our formal needs
Designer and Traditional st!es. From
$30 and up 757 1007 or 758 0763.
FOR SALE: 1 or 2 trip tickets to Boston
over Thanksgiving Lowest fares Pos
sible Call Bill at 7(0-989 6854 or Tommy
at 757-0234.
FROZEN YOGURT BLEND-INS Fresh
Peach Frozen Yogurt with Cranola-
YUM'Onlyat Hank's Homemade,321 E.
10th St. (next to Wendy's) 758-0000.
CARTOON CARICATURES FOR
CHRISTMAS! Call Barbour, 752-5910
PROFESSIONAL BUT NOT EXPEN-
SIVE! Progressive Solutions Inc. offers
professional word processing to students
and professionals Term papers, disserta
tions themes, reports and much more as
Uw as l 7s per page. (Please call for quote
on your project.) Price includes printin on
high quality bond paper and spelling veri
ficat.on against a 50,000 word electroic
dictionary Ask about our special offers
taser printing now available. Call Mark at
'S? 3440after 7 (Klpm for free information
I r RM PAPERS �THESIS: typed on IBM
Wordprocessor Letter quality print. Pro
tessional editing Years of experience. Call
an) lime and leave message or call after
3 00 pm Nanette Still well 1 524-5241.
Cheap call Best Service! Pick up and
Delivery.
GOVERNMENT CONFISCATED cars
and trucks Late model Porsches, Z-cars,
BMWs and Jeeps, for as low as S200. Also,
speedboats, cycles, motorhomes Send $10
for regional Buyer's kit to FEDERAL RE
SEARCH. LTD P.O. BOX 888232 AT-
LANTA. CA 30356
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer tvp.ng
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24 hours
in and out. Guaranteed typing on paper up
to 20 hand written pages SDF Professumal
C omputer Service, 106 East 5th Street (Be-
side Cubbies) Greenville, N.C. 752-3694
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICES
758-8241 or 758-5488 ask for Susan
IS IT TRUE vou can buv Jeeps for $44
through the U.S. government'Get the facts
today' Call 1-312-742-1142 Ext. 5271-A.
WORD PROCESSINGLETTER QUAL-
11 Y or laser printing Rush lobs accepted
752-1933 h
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICE
papers, resumes, theses, etc. Reasonable
rates (most $1.25 per page) Grammar,
punctuation and spelling corrected Call
JAMIE at 758-1161, M F, 9 5 or 758-4567
nights and weekends. Fast , accurate and
reliable.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT 2 br, 2 1 2 bth condo. Kingston
Place avail. Jan. 1 GREAT ATMOSPI1ERE
- POOL! 758-4183.
1 OR 2 ROOMMATES WANTED Cedar
Court Apartments. All appliances, Rent
based on single and double occupancy. 1
12 from campus Bus service Call 757
0784
ROOM NEAR CAMPUS $125 includes
utilities. Call 757-3543
RINGGOLD TOWERS Apts for rent
furnished Contact 1 lollie Simonowich
752-2865
WANTED Roommate to share 2 bed
room Apartment at Tar River Estates
Will have private room No deposit Call
752-3032.
APARTMENT FOR RENT In Tar
River. Two Bedroom, 1 12 baths, ample
parking and great neighbors S360mth
Interested? Call 757 1169
APARTMENT FOR RENT (Subtette)
Single bedroom, 220.00 per month
Available January, month to month
contract available in May. Cable
hookup-laundry, ECU bus service
River Bluff Apts. Call 752 0092.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for next
semester or ASAP. Master bednxmi in
large2-brapartment. $145mo and l"
utilities ($20mo) 1 mile for campus
and bus services available Call 758
6342
FEMALE, rooms for rent private bath 2
rooms completely furnished in house'
$150 month and 1 3 utilities. Call Friday
after 5:00 pm. Sat 355-5034.
TWO ROOMMATES: Needed to share
townhouse in Wildwood Villas $135
mo. 752 4781. Call Julie.
Campus Call 83a 1797.
UTILITIES PAID, 1 Bedroom $2(X)or2
Bedroom $275. Open til 7 pm 752 1375
I lomelocators fee
WALK TO CAMPUS 3 bedroom 1 12
baths &3(K) or 4 bedrcxim. 2 baths, $460
752-1375 1 lomelocators small fee.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom Apt ,n
Rmggold Towers Fully furnished, lo
cated one 2nd floor withthe laundry
room. Available 1st of January through
July 31st Contact Kim or Wendy at 758
0400after 2 X)pm or 1 lolhe Simonowich
at 758 2865.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a
large 2 bcdnxim apt excellent location
SI73 per month, 12 utilities and 12
deposit Call 752 1793
MALE ROOMMATE to share 2 bed
room Apt in Wilson Acres. Furnished
private bedroom. S130mo starting
Dec. 15 or Jan. I 752 44.
WANTED: Mature female non smoke.
to share apartment in Wilson Acres
Very nice neighborhcxxd, cable and
water included in rent S1K0 a month
and 12 utilities 752-0576
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female non
smoker to share 3 bedroom apt at Wilson
Acres Tennis court, pool, sauna, laundry
water, and cable included S1O7 50 mo
Call 752 5886
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2 bed
room apt with 2 girls at Tar River Call
between 5 pm and 9 pm. 758-6507
FEMALE roommate wanted to share 2
bedroom apt 2 bhx-ks from campus
1 leather 757 0258!
ROOM FOR RENT: SI35 a month Full
house priviledges. Fully furnished
V alking distance to campus available for
spring semester Call 757-3027
PERSONALS
FOR RENT 3BR. house- 1 2 blocks fro
ATTENTION: Don't forget Alpha Xi
Helta's 1 lappy 1 lour EVERY Wednesday
night at I'antana's
GREENVILLE'S ONLY HARD SERVE
vOGURT! Only 99 calories per serving
Do vou become increasingly "pttery"
as finals approach, have trouble concen-
trating while studying avoid studying or
fed like studying won't help your test
performance, because you'll go blank
anyway? You're not alone and there is
hope! this workshop will include relaxa
non training, getting "psyched up" m a
positive way for finals and strategies ot
preparation and test taking to reduce
stress. Sessions will beheld 'o 30, Dec
2 & 4 in Wright Building, room 329 3 4
p m It is important to attend all three
meetings We will be practicing and build-
ing relaxation skills
PRODUCTION COMM.
All productions committee members
should meet at 6pm, Nov. 30, in front ot
the information desk at Mendenhal! Be
ready to decorate the tree'
PRODUCTIONS COMVI,
All faculty, statf and students are in-
vited to the tree trimming party on Tues
Dec. 1, 4:30 p m in the lobby ol Menden
hall. Free food, cash prizes to the the top
three ornaments, and Santa Glaus' Get in
the Christmas spirit!
GAMMA BETA PHI
The Gamma Beta Phi Honor Society
will be having their last meeting of the
semester Dec 1 at 7 p m in Jenkins Audi
toruim. Point cards will be collected.
kAJy!
Attention SAM members. All members
must pick up doughnuts on Fri , Dec 4th
from 3:00p.m. until 7:00p.m. in Raw! 105
Announcements
FRESrlMENSQPHOMQRES
Military Science 1001 (Intro, to ROTC
and the Army) is still open for the Spring
semester 1988. MLSC 1001 is a one-hour
elective credit that entails no
committment or obligation, no uniform or
lab requirements. Also, MLSC 1001 opens
doors to scholarships, financial aid, career
opportunities and more1 For more infor-
mation, call Captain Alvin Mitchell at 757-
6967, or visit Erwin 1 lall .room 319.
OVERS EASDEV,
Will meet Thursday, December 3, at 4
pm in Speight Building, R-151. Topic:
Honduras A Personal Experience
Sides and discussion Everyone inter-
ested is invited to attend.
A MN LSIYJNIERNVIL
Monthly meeting. Dec. 2, 8 p.m St
Paul's Episcopal Church, 401 E. 4th St.
THANKSGIVING DINNTFR
A Simple Thanksgiving dinner and
worship service sponsored jointly by the
ECU campus ministries will be observed
tonight at 5 30 p m at the Baptist Studtent
Union. An ottering will be collected for
the poor of Greenville.
TEACHER EDUCATION!
There's still time to apply for the Work
Study Trip to Mexico during Spring
Break Opportunities are available to
observe and teach at selected schools in
Puebla, Mexico. Applications can be
picked up in the Dean'sofficc, Speight
Building, Room 154.
Read
Pirate Police
Line
Only in the East Carolinian
m
-Wanted:
Would you like to do exciting things in the dark?
and get paid for it?
The East Carolinian is looking for
a reliable and technically inclined student with
experience in photography to operate a Coodkin vertical
Camera and PMT Processor.
The Darkroom Technician is responsible for the following:
The operation and maintenance of The East Carolinian Darkroom.
?Screening, enlarging, and reducing all photographs,
advertisements, and logos.
�Minimal advertising paste up.
Apply in person at The East Carolinian.
SJJBJ�CTJiJ�mED
The ECU clinical psychology program
needs children, ages 6-15 to volunteer for
intelligence testing. This is to assitst in the
trainingof MA level students. Interested
people can contact Dr Larry I lines at the
Department of Psychology, 757-6800.
FAMILY FUN
The Salvation Army Church sponsors
family fun time, 7-9 p.m. on Fridays.
Contact the Salvation Army Church for
more information.
CHARITY RAFFLE
The Eta Nu chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha
Fraternity, Inc. will have a raffle through
Dec. 4 You can win up to S250. Proceeds
will alrtd the United Negro College Fund.
Contact any Alpha Phi Alpha brother or
LBG for tickets.
&EJMAJQRS
The Physical Education Motor and
Physical Fitness Competent test is being
given Tuesday, December 8,1987 at 1 pm.
All students who intend to declare a
physical education major must pass this
test. Any student with a medical condi-
tion that would contraindicate participa-
tion in the testing should contact Dr. Israel
or Mike McCammon at 757 6497.
The East Carolinian
Is now accepting applications for the
position of Staff Illustrator, The job
includes designing the comics page
and providing illustrations as needed.
Apply in person at The East Carolinian,
second floor of the publications building.
A Dieters Dream and it tastes ust like Ice
Cream I lank's 321 E. 10th St 758-0000
HANK'S HAS IT ALL! The Nations al
Ice cream and now frozen yogurt Only 99
calories per serving Pina Colada, Qtoco
late and Banana at 1 lank's 321 1 10th St
758XXX).
THE NEW STUDENT REGISTER HAS
ARRIVED! If you ordered one, please-
come bv the Buccaneer officePublics
tions Bldg to pidt up your copy today
FREE BAHAMAS TRIP Come down to
the Elbo and Register for a tnp for two to
the Bahamas Spring Break $1 tickets "
Buy yours today
JOHN JR So you are finally legal The
big 21. I lope your da) is full of fun and
your night tilled with joy Love Boo
PIKES: Thanks for a wonderful surprise
Pj party you guys looked gret ,n your
lamies' Let's snooze again REAI ScxtN'
Welove vaTI Love the Alpha Phis
TO THE SOUTHERN GENTLEMEN??
Thursday night was a bunch ot bull
don't call us again, our schedule's full
Guess Who?
ALPHA PHI PI IDC,is hanksforthe
fantastic surprise social with the Pikes
We all had a blast and e er �ne looked so
cute in the PJ's! You pledges are the
GREATEST keep up the good work'
I ove, the Sisters ot Alpha Phi
CHI O. We were wet with anticipation
and vou didn't let us down Our aim
became progressively worse as the night
wore , �, but we all had a great time at the
Kappa Sig corral Kappa sigmas PS('
thanks lor the golden shower, love Keith
TKE MURF(PRES) You've got that look
Congratulations' I know you'll be the
best, you always are in whatever you do
Much love lacqtiehne
IO THE 1 GUYS: lust couldn't stay
away could vou7 From 1 to �r You've
come back is it a dream' In he last war
and a half We've spent nights serenading
and laughing and as you once said our
friendship will be everlasting We prom
lse not to put on a pink collar with bells,
but we don't promise not to rase any hell
We, welcome home guvs' Oh yes we are
ready to accompany Bailey and Bill,
Along with Buckwheat, and the greli
Love , the girls who remained in 3 p S
the collar could be spiked'
TO THE ADPI COCKTAIL DATES:
Our weekend was GREAT' It was all
because of you Thanks a million love
the sisters and pledges of ADPi.
TO THE PHI TAUS: Our social on Thurs
day was out of sight , we danced and
signed throughout the whole night We
hated the night to come to an end so the
only solution is to do it again 1 ove the
ADPis
TO THE ADPI PLEDGES: We hope vour
weekend was special - we were thinking
about you Keep up the good work Vail
are the BEST. Love the Sisters of ADPi.
NEW STUDENTS AND FRESHMEN!
Please come by the Buc office to pick up
your edition of the New Faces befor Dtv
7
FAMISHED? PARCHED? Then come
out and en)oy the specials at Pantana s
tonight and gig withthe Pike Free
nachos and cheap dnnks, what a gixxi
way to forget about Wed morning
classes You can't beat it with a stick'
WIN A MEAN RIDE FOR A BUC K Pj
Kappa Alpha is raffling oft a steak,
streamline, state of theart 1 londa Sa ,ter
This jewel will go from 0-90 in 2 seconds
(off a cliff) Drawing will be held the first
week of Dec Look for it in front of the
student store
DELTA HAS: Thursday night was
great' Dunking tor apples never tasted s.
good, huh Dave7 Had fun, lets do it again
The Delta Sigs
PHI TAU LIL' SIS' AND BROTH! RS
We missed you at BEAU'S on Wed
da) night, but lets make up for lost time
after Thanksgiving'
SNOOK A Wednesday night was �
much tun, but next time PLEAS! maki
sure both Mvks mat. b okay?
LAURA lust wanted to sav that you're
the best hi sis' anyone could ask �
Hope you had a great time Thursda)
night Just a few helpful hints for ya
Natural Light Room 443 3rd floor
Aycock - choking on a beer bong snag
Ring" pictures RANDY TRA Is
"wasted away again in GreenviB
We got home at two; how bout you7 s
we need to talk" I ove. your Phi Tau Big
Sis
LETTER FOUND behind Art Building
To Tina From Philip Picture End
(all Jennifer 75s s,�)or Susan 752 � - -
HE IROPH Al ZONI i sc
.reenville's hottest new concept in tan
ung. Featuring State ot the art silver so
arium system with built in high -
acial tanners Best deals IP t
Jtes tor students Call t r
xnntment 315-5120
TO THE 1987 Mf MB! KS Of IMF ECL
FOOTBALL TEAM Congratulate
�great year You came so dose to a much
deserving winning season! Hop
next year will be even better!Lov etl
Sigma Sorority
TOM IT S THE NIGHT FOR MJ Of
V)L HOT MEN TO SHOW v H I
YOU'VE GOT. It's meant
ott sponsored by the Qbo and th.
Sigs Come on down to the :
prizes will be awarded All ol vou ladies
come and see what you've been waiting
tor"
LAMBDA CHIS Even th. .
late, we wanted to tell vou the Hum
cane" s,cial was great' Come Rain or
Shine with the Lambda Chis we always
have a good time' Let s do it again soon
Love the Sigmas f's Thanks fbi
Roses! It was verv thoughtful'
TO J.K. ALIAS "THE DADDY" For a
birthday you'll always remember . meet
me in the Sauna - You bring the wesson,
the party hat, and the balloons and I'll
supply your favorite dessert. I lappy 24th
Sexy! Love A D PS "O, she's just mv
neighbor
SIC EPS - I lave a safe Thanksgiving
ANGIE S. - Fn nite was great and sa,
was even better Thanks for a great week
end Your local Rumple Mmze supplier.
Mike
I LOVE MY BIG BRO! Brain Morns' Phi
Tau has been so much fun since you came
into my hie "Well isn't that special"
Have a great Turkey-day, and lets get
together sometime soon' Lose i LS
Now Accepting Applications for
n?t s n irn � y z.ij,r; 7
Duties include:
�Advertising Layout
"Use of ReductionEnlargement scale
�Some computer experience helpful
'Pleasant attitude and able to work well with people
rra .?g�i feTm:
The East Carolinian
Publications Building
(In Front of Joyner Library)
No Phone Calls Please
GO FROM COLLEGE TO THE ARMY
WITHOUT MISSING A BEAT.
The hardest thin about break-
ing into professional
music is�well, break
ing into professiona
music. So if you're
lcxkinfj; for an oppor-
tunity to turn your
musical talent into
a full-time perform-
ing career, take a
gcxxi look at the
Army.
It's not
all parades
and John Philip
Sousa. Army
bands rcxrk,
waltz and boogie
as well as march,
and they perform
before concert au
diences as well
as spectators.
With an average
of 40 performances a month, there's
also the opportunity for trawl
not only across America, but possibly
abroad.
Most important, you can
expect a first-rate pro-
fessional environment
from your instructors,
facilities and fellow
musicians. The Army
has educational
programs that
can help you
pay tor ort-
dury instruc-
tion, and it
you qual-
ify, even
i help you
repay
your
federally-insured
student loans.
If vou can sieht-
read musk, pertorming in the Armv
could be your bio break Write
Chief, Armv Bands Office, Fort
Benjamin Harrison, IX 46216-5005
Or call toll free I-800-USA-ARMY
M ARMY BAND.
BEALLYOUCANBE.
no i v i , Akoi iia"s
New Unive
ByREBECC A VALENTINE
Memorial Gym �
received now i niv i
Machines this s,
of the rise ol inl i �
weight tnui!
holds five n.
tng the pn Also, t! �
used as an
weight lifl
Th
acces
Liin(!
weights ; cally us
rath. � �
Uni versa
Undergrou
ByC Him BOM HI
This wet t'shits
and indies; musii
Imgo tor undcrgi
pendent labels
we have some n a!
that hop fully won In �
Andrew and ihc '
Nashville hand 1'
album called "I ;
Robhn, in his ,
press release, is
nalisl' as well a:
dan Cute
He gol an
for carrying a tape n
his release, he real
Elvis ha v
common VV
ers of Graceland
The album is �
absorbanl songs.
Kind of the Boui
bands. It s good for its puq
butyou don't use paper tow
anything else
l his mini Lp contains nothing
o( notice, either as rock 01
pop. While some bands, lar.
small, are able to build br
over these two music chasm
Royal Crescent Mob com
mind) the Upstarts fail
way.
The single
is offered as a radio mix ai
inch version Neithc i
appealing, both sacril
rockabilly traces -
special effects
"Dr. Ruth .
The East Carolina University
Jazz Ensemble performed
Thursday in Wright Audito-
rium.
The group was directed by
George Broussard and made up
of 25 student players.
The Ensemble's playiist ranges
the music spectrum from classic
jazz to the "Flints
Vocalist Carol
Raleigh joined the
"Misty Erroll Ga
tune.
The Ensemble has
from its 17 tour 01
Una. (Photo bv Harl

'

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fioe to pick up N � ; i. befof Dec
'�7 vtR HI 11? rhen come
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�v th j stick!
RIDI ' K Bl CK: Pi
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- i Id the first
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Accepting Applications for
out Artist
Duties include:
�Advertising Layout
r ReductionEnlargement scale
j computer experience helpful
attitude and able to work well with people
;p?ri'�' tkiniA'j rrr irrrrrTTi i
ie East Carolinian
Publications Building
(In Front of Joyner Library)
No Phone Calls Please
THE ARMY
A BEAT.
Am
t
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H6-5005
ARMY
ARMY BAND.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
!��� I ASI i ARDI INIAN
Style
NOVMEBER 24. 1987 Page 7
New Universal machines installed in gym
By REBECCA VALENTINE
Suit Wntrr
Memorial Gym has recently
received now Universal Weight
Machines this semester. Because
! the riNO of interesl in student
weight training Memorial Gym
holds five new machines replac-
ng the previous free-weights.
Ko. the new weights are being
tscd as a result of more CO-ed
ighl litters.
I he I niversal weights are more
iccessible to women, and mam
� tin a cleaner work out, than tree
aces.
ichts
rev' weights are basi
) used tor building mass
itherthan the definition that the
versal equipment encour-
Next semester, plans to move
the old Universal equipment out
of Minges Coliseum as well. The
older equipment is being moved
to Garret Dorm's weight room,
which includes the machines, and
tree weights from Minges and
Memorial.
1 he five new machines exist of a
military press, leg machine, tricep
machine, bench press, and inner-
outer thigh machine.
Most weight trainers use Nauti-
lus equipment; which isdesigned
for constant resistance, and is
basically hotter with concentrat-
ing on form, but the Universal
machines do serve the same pur-
pose, but at a cheaper cost. The
Nautilus machines can range
anywhere from $2-3000, while the
Universal ranges between $1-
2000.
Weight room attendent Mike
Wood said average 80-120
weight-lifters visit Minges daily
and the number for Memorial
averages a little less.
The weights at Memorial con-
sist of a military press that builds
deltoids (shoulder muscles), leg
machine which works the front
thigh muscle, tricep machine for
the triceps, hip extension for the
lower back, bicep machine, leg
press for the front thighs, and
hips, pec deck for the inner chest,
bench for the chest (entire), lat
pulldown for back, leg curl for the
ham strings, inner-outer thigh
machine for thighs and two sta-
tionary bikes and wide range of
dumbells.
Wood explained that to build
mass do 6-8 lower repititions us-
ing heavier weights with 2 minute
intervals between each set to
benefit any particular body part.
Four sets is sufficient to work out
muscle also. And free-weights are
usually best for this purpose.
Also, you should only work 3
body parts (maximum) a day, and
the work out should not last more
than 1 hour and a half, never over
straintrain yourself.
To define use higher repetitions
with lighter weight using 5 sets a
piece. It is best to use a mixture of
free-weight- ' -chines, wait-
ing 30-45 veen sets for
definition a� �urns more calo-
ries, this also helps vascularity.
Overall, you should train no
more than 4 times a week and try
to use weights and aerobics to-
gether to develop the cardiovas-
cular system as well as weight
mass. You should also keep a diet
high in carbohydrates for energy,
high in protein to rebuild muscles
with amino acids, and low in fats
and cholcstoral.
Before starting any weight pro-
gram check with your physician
for any heart problems.
Start slow, and read any materi-
als to get a good background be-
fore lifting. These can be found in
programs, and articles in
"FIex"and "Muscle and Fitness
Other information can be found
through pamphlets, or books
from the library
Memorial Gym is open Mon-
Thur 10 a.m9 p.m Friday 10-7
p.m Saturday 11 a.m5 p.m.
Minges is open Mon-Thur 3-9
p.m Friday 3-7, Sunday 12-5 p.m.
and is closed on Saturday. Be sure
to bring student ID. also.
Underground records lacking
���By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Stall Unlrr
s! his week let's hit some undies
'indies; music journalism
� tor underground and inde-
sedi; lit labels. Right oft the bat ave some real obscure bands
' l(Qpefully won't make it.
Andrew and the I pstartsarea ill band. They have an
M INC.
cailed Uproar Andrew
in his very personalized
ase is an upstart jur
� pstart musi-
' I lit KLt an racclcand
� i taj v re i �rder.
selhe realizes he 1
Ul 1 1 ive something in
� 1 w ere both prison-
If! FOR At I. Ohr Iceland
SHOW WHA1bum is full ol little selt
elines
d ol tin iragi'
: is. it s good tor its purpose,
. don t use paper towels for
. Ise
Vw mini t.p contains nothing
either as rock nr dance
lie some bands, large or
able to build bridges
�. o music chasm
st enl Mob come
pstarts fail in a big
"Forbidden lo e
is a radio mix and a 12-
i Neither one is too
th sacrifice the faint
'races in the song tor
Dr K
ho with this song
now has more media allusions
than Bette Davis)has many satiri-
cal possibilities. Unfortunatly,the
band never follows upon these.
"Watch i Hit for the I lumans" is
the kind ol fluff one might expect
from the Men Without Hats
people coy paranoia served on
white bread guitars. And you
thought Rockwell had vanished.
1 Ihink the major problem with
"I proar is that it keeps trying to
rock And moon walk at the same
time That's upsetting.
1 hen, on the other side of the
country, we have Cindy Lev
Berrryhill. She just released
Who's (ionna Save the World?"
. 'ii Rhino records, the people who
brought you " he Great Teenage
Death Hits "collection.
Cindy Lee is a guitarist and
vocalist. She also plays a mean
harmonica. All of this of course
screams "folk Music It is folksy,
in a weird Southern Cal kind oi
w ay.
1 he music is quirky, as is her
i m e. That's a plus. The minus is
that her lyrics are boring and cli-
i lied She always seems right on
the edge of coming up with some-
thing cool.
A prime example is
"DamrKWish 1 Was a Man) Al-
though the musical structure is
almost too rigid for this kind of
tun, she manages to fire off shots
likeDAMN Wish 1 were a man
I'd be sexy with a bellv like Jack
Nicholson"
But the other tunes are Uo er-
The East Carolina University
Jazz Ensemble performed
Thursday in Wright Audito-
rium.
The group was directed by
George Broussard and made up
of 25 student players.
The Ensemble's playlist ranges
the music spectrum from classic
jazz to the "Flintstone's" theme.
Vocalist Carol Bailey from
Raleigh joined the group to sing
"Misty Err oil Garner's classic
tune.
The Ensemble has just returned
from its 1987 tour of North Caro-
lina. (Photo by Hardy Alligood)
ratic to succeed. It's a shame,
becuase you find yourself wish-
ing she were just a little more
funny. The harmonica evokes a
lot of Dylan, and you wish she had
just listened to "Tangled Up In
Blue" one more time.
"Portholes" and "Whatever
Works" are just more Missing
Person mantras, slightly less in-
teresting due to the overworking
of a single point. Berryhill uses a
friend as an example and
stretches it out over two stanzas in
"Whatever Works Nothing is
worth that much space.
"Ballad of a Garage Band" suf-
fers from the same pretentions the
Upstarts indulge in. Narcissism is
bad, bad, bad. Look at what it did
to the entire Jackson family. Don't
write about yourself unless you'e
sure everybody else wants to hear
it.
Most serious musicians write a
lot of tripe in between the good
stuff. They might even think for a
while that it's worth recording.
That's when the producer
saysArc you serious? Trash
this
Perhaps if Cindy Lee and An-
drew learned to edit themselves a
little more or got a producer they
trust, these embarassing slices of
vinyl would never have hit the
light. But they did.
Fu tu re ga rage ba nd s, ta ke heed.
There is a lesson here.
New videos foolish
to countrified viewer
By MICAH HARRIS
Suff Writer
I was strolling around the mall
the other day, listening to my
"Cristy Lane Sings Songs Made
Famous by Red Sovine" tape
when I realized there've been no
new music video reviews for the
last couple of months.
Realizing I could earn enough
money in one column to pick up
that Slim Whitman Christmas
Album I've had my eye on, I
dashed home, placing my cable
box in my left hand, my pen in my
right, and began pandering to the
rock "music" (ha!) crowd.
Belinda Carlisle - "Heaven Is A
Place On Earth" - credit Diane
Keaton with the stylish look of
Carlisle's latest and best video.
Musically, she's not progressed
far from her Go-Go days, but no
one can sing a 60s love ditty like
Belinda or look as good doing it.
Dolly Parton has also slimmed
down these days, too, in case you
didn't know.
Michael Jackson - "The Way
You Make Me Feel" - Jackson's
previous video, "Bad was a
failed attempt to recapture the
magic of "Beat It" with the street
gang motif. It wears thinner in his
latest, with Michael hanging out
on the street with another bunch
of rough necks with happy feet. I
tell you, a guy with a prissy face
like that couldn't skip through
downtown Buck Swamp without
some good ol' boys beating him
up.
George Michael - "Faith" - No
it's not a Levi's commercial, that's
George Michael gone rock-a-billy
with his latest. A big improve-
ment over the visually and audi-
bly annoying, "I Want Your Sex"
(soon to be remade by Conway
Twitty).
Jody Watley - "Don't You Want
Me" - Why is this woman wearing
her unmentionables outside her
street clothes?
Eurythmics - "Beethoven" fea-
tures Annie Lenox as a schizo
housewife in a surreal video,
reminiscent in many ways of the
more mature work of Louise
Mandrell.
Bananarama - "I Can't Help It"
-1 like them thar purdy girls!
"Boy's Night Out" - Timothy
Schmidt - I must say, I like this
song and video by Mr. Timothy
Schmidt whom you may remem-
ber from that great country band,
"Poco" (named after a musical
term or a funny page character by
Walt Kelly, I'm not sure which).
But this video does look like one
of those classy beer commercials
you see on Sunday afternoon foot-
ball. It was so good, I thought it
was Buck Owens at first. Nuff
said.
The King Singers, pictured here, will perform in Wright Auditorium
at 8 p.m. on November 30. Tickets are on sale in Mendenhall Student
Center.
King Singers perform at ECU
Mendenhall Pma RcIum
The King's Singers, known as
one of the world's great vocal
ensembles, will perform at East
Carolina University in Wright
Auditorium at 8 p.m. on Novem-
ber 30. The ensemble gives well
over a hundred concerts each
season throughout England,
western Europe, the far east and
America.
Since the group's formation in
1968 at King's College, Cambr-
idge, the six Englishmen known
as The King's Singers have devel-
oped the most diverse repertoire
of any vocal group in the world.
They bring their unequalled com-
bination of musical excellence
and personal charm to everything
including the austere lines of
Renaissance polyphony, madri-
gals and folk music of many
lands, contemporary pieces, and a
wealth of popular music ranging
from Flanders & Swann to the
Beatles and Randy Newman.
Music has been written for
Hard to maintain the
right cholesterol level
Special to The tat Carolinian
By PATTI HOWARD
Cholesterol. You have probably
heard of it, but do you know ex-
actly what cholesterol is or how it
affects your body?
Cholesterol is a fat-like sub-
stance found in all body cells.
Eighty percent of the cholesterol
in the human body is manufac-
tured by the body itself, and the
remaining 20 percent comes from
the foods we eat.
Some of your vital body func-
tions such as the production of
vitamin D, the manufacture of sex
hormones, and the formation of
digestive substances are depend-
ent on the presence of cholesterol.
However, too much cholesterol in
the blood is associated with seri-
ous health problems including
coronary heart disease (CHD)
and stroke.
As cholesterol accumulates in
the blood, artery walls thicken
due to fatty deposits. "CHD can
result from plaque buildup in the
cardiac vessel said Mary Elesha
Adams, East Carolina Health
Educator. Heart attacks and
stroke occur when blood flow�
thus oxygen supply�to the heart
or brain is completely blocked.
According to Adams, high
blood pressure is also associated
with high cholesterol levels and
fat deposits because these condi-
tions force the heart to work
harder.
The level of cholesterol in the
blood is determined largely by
genetics. "Stress also has a ten-
dency to contribute to high cho-
lesterol said Adams. Other de-
termining factors include age,
amount of exercise, alcohol, and
diet.
Many physicians believe that a
low-fat, low-cholesterol diet re-
duces the risk of heart disease.
Animal products, such as red
meat, whole milk, eggs, and some
cheeses, are high in cholesterol
and should, therefore, be
avoided. According to Adams,
the negative effects of cholesterol
buildup can sometimes be re-
versed if you don't wait until they
reach the advanced stages.
Lowering blood cholesterol
levels, however, isn't simply a
matter of what you don't eat, but
also what you do eat. Recent re-
search suggests that fish and fi-
ber-rich foods such as oats and
apples may actually lower blood
cholesterol.
Certain guidelines should be
noted while shopping and cook-
ing and be incorporated into your
routine.
� Opt for low-fat dairy prod-
ucts.
� Limit yourself to three egg
yolks per week.
� READ LABELS. Avoid snacks
See EATING, page 8
them by some of this century's
finest composers including Ned
Rorem, Richard Rodney Bennett,
Gunther Schuller Gian-Carlo
Menotti, Krysztof Pendrecki and
Peter Maxwell Davies. On the
lighter side, a single recorded
with Paul McCartney topped the
English pop charts.
In the United States, from Car-
negie Hall to the Hollywood
Bowl, Houston's Jones Hall to
Washington's Kennedy Center,
sold-out concert tours take them
from coast to coast each season.
Repeat visits to the 'Tonight" and
'Today" shows, a perennially
popular "Evening at the Pops
and featured appearances on
many nationally syndicated radio
series have brought The King's
Singers to the delighted attention
of millions.
The group's American viewing
audience has grown further with
the release of the acclaimed six-
part series, "The King's Singers'
Madrigal History Tour filmed
on location in Europe and a new
"On Stage at Wolf Trap" special
appearing on PBS in 1987. Mean-
while, they have been featured on
the pages of Newsweek and Ljs.
magazines and have appeared
regularly in the headlines of ma-
jor newspapers across the coun-
try.
More than 20 albums have been
issued in the United States on the
MMG label, and their "Madrigal
History Tour" collection received
a 1986 Grammy nomination. A
new American relationship with
EMIAngel continues the Ameri-
can release of their latest record-
ing on LP and CD.
The King's Singers can be ex-
pected to present their six voices
with a stage demeanor that will
delight, charm, and enthrall all
who attend. Tickets for this per-
formance can be purchased at the
Central Ticket Office located in
Mendenhall Student Center
Ticket prices are $12 for general
admission, $10 for ECU faculty
staff, and $6 for ECU students and
nigh school youth and under
For tickets and more inforrna
tion, call 757-6611. mia


mmm
�-�
i





8 Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 24, 1987
Toys vs. God in billboard fight
RUTHERFORDTON, N.C.
(AP) - Andrea Morgan just
couldn't go along with cartoon
characters being proclaimed
Masters of the Universe
Not only did the phrase sound
wrong to her, if offended her
sense of religion. Kiddie toys as
rulers of the world? No way, she
thought.
That was Mrs. Morgan's reac-
tion after seeing a billboard an-
nouncing a movie based on a se-
ries of children's toys called
"Masters of the Universe Unlike
some people who might have
seen the sign and forgotten about
it, however, Mrs. Morgan took
action.
"1 looked above it and there was
an empty billboard that said,
"Available she said. "It was like
the Lord just spoke to me and
said, 'No, Jesus is master of the
universe 1 felt him saying to me,
'Move on it, now
In a few days, she convinced a
group of churchgoers to pay for
two billboards reading, "Jesus,
Master of the Universe
Downplaying her role in the
episode, Mrs. Morgan says she
merely responded to a request
from God. Two years ago, she felt
a similar calling, but didn't pur-
sue it.
"Sittinginchurchonedayjhad
a vision about billboards she
said. "It was like the Lord was
saying, 'I want somebody to put
my word on these billboards
Mrs. Morgan, a member of
Evangel Fellowship Church in
Spmdale, felt so moved by the
vision that she stood up and told
the congregation about it. In this
case, however, she wasn't sure of
the meaning. In search of direc-
tion, she turned to the Bible.
"I wanted to confirm his word "
she said. "So one day, I didn't
have my Bible and I used my
son's, and that led me to Habakuk
Mrs. Morgan was dumbstruck
to have found a passage that
spoke to her directly. The verse
according to The Living Bible
translation, reads: "The Lord said
to me, 'Write an answer on a bill-
board large and clear so that any-
one can read it at a glance and
rush to tell the others
"It blew me away; it's right
there she said. "I was fairly new
m the Lord then, so I wasn't famil-
iar with the Scriptures to begin
with. To find the exact thing was
really exciting
The excitement wore off, how-
ever, when Mrs. Morgan had
trouble choosing her next step. "I
had no idea this was for me to do "
she said. "I just sat and listened
and waited on the Lord
Two years passed. Mrs. Morgan
studied intently all the signs and
billboards she saw, trying to pic-
ture how a certain Bible verse
would look; but she kept waiting
Change in seasons brings
about change in skin care
Then, two months ago, she saw
the "Mastersof the Universe" bill-
board and knew her time had
come.
She drove to church and talked
to her pastor, Roger Gosnell, who
encouraged her to "go for it She
called the billboard company
Carolina Posters Corp and asked
if billboards were available to
private citizens.
"I was kind of hemming and
hawingand wondering, 'Howam
1 going to say this? she said. The
man asked if she wanted to put up
something like a happy birthday
message. She replied, "Not ex-
actly
When she finally got around to
telling him what she had in mind
he said, "Praise the Lord The
man, Operations Manager Billy
Justice, recently had become a
Christian.
"He was really excited about
doing something for the Lord
said Mrs. Morgan. "I told him my
vision and he said he'd see what
he could do about it
"I got chills, to be honest with
you Justice said. "Her faith was
very touching. Talking about it
today, I still get chills
Mrs. Morgan set about trying to
raise enough money for the bill-
board by calling people she
thought might be interested in
helping. But she hit another snag.
"I got nowhere she said. "It
was getting to be 10 o'clock at
night and I didn't want to bother
anybody later than 9, so I just kind
of laid it aside and said, 'What-
ever, Lord. I'll see you in the
morning
By 10 a.m. the next day, how-
ever most of the people had
called her back and pledged more
than enough money to pay for one
billboard. By the end of the fol-
lowing day, she had enough to
pay for a second one.
"It really came through; it was
so beautiful she said. "It was
only seven people, seven blessed
little saints - people who really
had a feel for it
Today, her billboards have been
replaced by more standard ad ver-
ging signs, but Mrs. Morgan
trusts they had an effect.
"It's got to work on vou she
said. "I had faith to know that God
was speaking to me and I had to
move out in action. He knows
what he's doing far better than I
do.
Eating healthy
5KI TRIP
WINTERGREEN. VA
r 7? r
!Ht t s . KUG
INTRAMURAL - RECREATIONAL SERVICES
OUTDOOR RECREATION CENTER
Trip will be held: January 3 8.
Registration. November 1 December 1
204 Memorial Gym
Cost: $405 which includes: Transportation, lodgiiuj.
ski rentals, all lift tickets.
�A non-refundable $85.00 Fee is Required
upon Registration.
For Additional Information Call:
Mark Ritter at 757-6387.
By ELANA GROSSMAN
Staff Writer
When the weather begins to get
cold that is a sure sign that your
skin needs some extra attention.
The wind and snow that winter
brings tend to dry the skin out and
cause irritation. According to Dr.
John Reeves of the University of
California, "Winter brings out the
most sensitive skin types. People
need to switch to lighter skin
products that are hypoaller-
genic
What the skin needs in the win-
ter time is to be moisturized more
than any other time of the year. It
is not although, how much one
uses a moisturizer but how good
the product is, according to Dr.
Norman Orentreich a professeur
of Dermatology at the University
of New York. He says "The best
winter moisturizer is petrolatum,
so the higher the percent of petro-
latum in the product the better
Water is essential for every cell,
tissue, and organ in your body,
including your skin. The low
humidity of winter causes the
water to be driven out of the skin.
This causes tissue damage, and
impairs the skins healing mecha-
nisms, according to Albert M.
Kligman a Professor of dermatol-
ogy at the University of Pennsyl-
vania. The answer for this is to
drink plenty of water and use a
good moisturizer.
It would help to bundle up in
severely cold weather and to
cleanse the face with water more
frequently than usual. Most of all,
it would help to realize that with
the change of seasons come a
change in your daily routine.
Continued from page 7
made with palm or coconut oils.
Vegetable oils (corn, sunflower)
are much healthier.
Eat plenty of fruits, raw vege-
tables, grains, and herbs. Thcv
have NO cholesterol.
Buy lean cuts of meat.
Remove skin from poultry
before cooking.
Avoid frying. Broil or roast
meat and fish so that the fat drips
away.
Be wary of seemingly nutri-
tious dishes such as taco salads.
The fried shell, beef, cheese, and
sour cream all boost the fat con-
tent.
Though heredity contributes to
the amount of cholesterol your
body produces, certain foods can
be a defense. Choosing low-fat
foods can improve your overall
health and reduce your chances of
developing high blood choles-
terol, a high-risk factor for heart
disease.
Open ALL DAY
THANKSGIVING
Traditional
Thanksgiving
Feast
$489
All You Care To EAT!
l.C.U. Students Get 109c Off with
RACK ROOM
Greenville Buyers Market
Memorial Drive
Open MonSat. 10-9 our everyday low price �
Sunday 1-6 (except aigner. nike and reebok)
1 � � �� � � � � � With this coupon ������������a
I
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d
Jiffy Lube
The newest concept in car care maintenance is now
open in Greenville!
Here's what we do in 10 minutes, no
appointment necessary
1. We change your oil with a major brand!
We Install a new oil filter!
We lubricate the whole chassis!
We check and fill transmission fluid!
We check and fill differential fluid!
We check and fill brake fluid!
We check and fill power steering fluid'
8. We check and fill window washer fluid'
9. We check and fill battery!
10. We check the air filter!
11. We check the wiper blades!
12. We Inflate the tires to proper pre sure!
13. We vacuum the Interior!
PROSE AND POETRY
REQUIREMENTS- Open to all current ECU students.
ENTRY DATE Tuesday, December 1 1987
Bring entries to the REBEL Office, or Media Board Office second floor
Pubhcauons Building. Please include name, address, and telephone nZter
AWARDS:
First: $100
Second: $75
Third: $50
ESSAY CONTEST
14. We even wash your windows!
PLUS a FREE Car Wash with
Full Service!
00 OFF r"$T.50
FULL SERVICE
(with coupon)
Reg. $21.95
COUPON GOOD DEC. 12th, 1987
HOURS
Monday thru Friday
7 30 am 'til 630 p m
Sat 730 am 'til 5:00 p m
I
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I
J
"East Carolina's
Favorite Oil Change"
I JIFFY CAR WASH!
I i
(with coupon)
L COUPOODDEC. 12th, 1987
126 Greenville Blvd
Greenville
(Across from Goldei
Corral Steak House)
THEME
THE ARTS AND LETTERS AS A CULTURAL FORCE-
The past 30 years and speculations on the future
REQUIREMENTS- Open to all currently enrolled ECU students
Doubled-spatedg �� Wm " 15 � W-
Title-page required Bibliography optional.
ENTRY hattt. t r. Publications Building.
NIRYDATE: Tuesday. December 1. 1987
1 ��, J k11168 t0 thC REBEL 0fflce no later tha 5:00 p.m
ORTMAT r u f0D,p9nled �� ENTOY �RM and SATCMENT OF
ORIGINALITY which can be picked up at the Media Board OfficeTrTe
Publications Building.
AWARds;
First: $75 and published in magazine
Second: $25
Sponsors
The Greenville Daily Reflector
and
Central Book and News
Hart is n
B H1( IIWDHi;
Spurts I drtoi
Dave ! art i
director al I
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named as i I
last Thurs
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intent to play I
next seas
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1
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THE EAST CAROIINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 24, 1987 Page 9
Hart is named interim AD
1 JlckesotCs
FAMILY BUFFET
3&5-2172 �� �
"�.�� I
)pen ALL DAY
NKSGIVING
ditional
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By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Have Hart Jr associate athletic
director at East Carolina Univer-
sity for the past four years, was
named as interim athletic director
List Thursday by ECU Chancellor
Dr. Richard Eakin during a news
conference.
The 38-year old Hart will take
over for former athletic director
Dr. Ken Karr, who resigned effec-
tive last Friday. Hart will continue
to serve as the interim director
until a internal search conducted
at ECU is completed.
1 fart, who has said he will defi-
nitely become a candidate for the
permanent athletic director's po-
sition, will serve as interim direc-
tor until about the last of Decc-
meber, according to Eakin.
I expert that the position va-
cancy will be advertised by De-
cember 1, 1987 and that a new-
director of athletics will be se-
lected by December 30, 1987
Eakin said.
1 lart is considered to be one of
the leading candidates to gain the
permanent position.
Eakin said that the position
would remain an in-house adver-
tised job because he felt that there
were qualified and capable
people already at the university to
take over the responsibilities left
behind by Karr.
"The simple fact of the matter is
that we need to get on with the
program Eakin said. "1 think
that it's important to us that we
have some stability in the pro-
gram and to be in place by the
beginning of the year with a new
director of athletics
When Hart came to ECU in 1983
he served as assistant athletic di-
taled last year by the club.
Hart has said that he will con-
tinue to serve the needs of both
positions until a final decision on
the athletic director's position is
made.
Hart graduated from the Uni-
versity of Alabama in 1971 and
later became the head basketball
coach at Oldham County High
School from 1977-1982 before
coming to East Carolina.
Karr, according to reports re-
leased earlier, will remain at the
university as a professor of physi-
cal education. He will also serve
as a consultant to the chancellor
on athletics for specified projects,
such as the new Sports Medicine
Building, which Karr was instru-
rector for marketing before taking mental in getting started
on his role of associate athletic
director and executive director of
the Pirate Club.
During his time as executive
director of the Pirate Club, Hart
helped the club reach its goal of
raising $1 million in one year of
fund raising. That figure was to-
Eakin refused to comment fur-
ther on Karr's resignation stating
that he felt the news release,
which was distributed last Wed-
nesday was sufficient. Eakin
however did reiterate his earlier
statement that he had accepted
Karr's resignation with regret and
that he had not asked for the resig-
nation.
In fact, according to Eakin, he
had no knowledge of the possibil-
ity of Karr stepping down until
last Sunday.
Eakin announced that a search
committee had already been
formed to conduct the internal
search to select the new director of
athletics.
According to Eakin, the search
committee will consist of CG.
Moore, vice chancellor for busi-
ness affairs; Richard A. Edwards,
executive assistant to the chancel-
lor; Riley Roberson, member of
the ECU Board of Trustees; Scott
Thomas, Student Government
Association president; Pam Pen-
land, assistant director of athletics
for academic counseling; Jo Ann
Bell, director of Health Sciences
Library; Jack Edwards, president
of the Pirate's Club and Ernest
Schwarz, professor of health,
physical education and recreation
it safety.
J 1 Y. " b �W� � Dave Hart, FXU's interim athletic director
Lady Pirate hoopsters preparing for opener
East Carolina's Lady Pirate "The tournament i, nm ��4 � u�, ; M
89
11 You Care To EAT!
Students Get HKr Off with I.D.

'ast Carolina's Lady Pirate
basketball team, under the direc-
tion oi first year head coach Pat
Pierson, will open the 1987season
Friday at the Lady Kat Classic in
Lexington, Ky. ECU will meet
ventral Michigan University in
the first round.
The Lady Chippewas, 17-11 last
ear, will center their attack
around senior Nancy Melissa, a
center, averaged 14.2 points per
game last season.
Central Michigan is well
coached and disciplined and
they'll be patient on offense
head coach Pat Pierson said. "It'll
be important for us to contain
Melissa
Louisvile meets host Kentucky
the second game.
"The tournament is pretty
evenly matched Pierson said.
"Everyone's record last year was
about the same
The Lady Pirates will count on
emerged as a constant threat in-
side.
"Our front line with Gretta and
Alma is definitely our strength
Pierson said. "Gretta has really
Pirate Classic. ECU will open Fn
day against Georgia Southwest-
size up front as they try to im- improved in her shooting and is
prove on last year's 16-13 record, very consistent "
Returning forward Monique
Pompili will anchor the
frontcourt. Pompili averaged 12.1
points per game last year before
being sidelined with a broken
wrist.
"Monique is shooting better in
practice, but is still bothered
somewhat by injuries Pierson
said.
Rounding out the front line are
center Gretta Savage and forward
Alma Bcthea. Savage, a junior, has
i ratty Piratessigned
POETRY
o all current ECU students.
ay. December 1. 1987
or Media Board Office, second floor
tame, address, and telephone number.
Laura Crowder and Mechelle
lones, who formed the Colonial
Heights (Va.) High School start-
ing backcourt for the last three
years, have each signed letters of
intent to play for East Carolina
next season.
Crowder, a shooting guard, and
nes, the point guard, led Colo-
nial Heights to a 20-2 record this
two players the caliber of Laura
and Mechelle said ECU head
coach Pat Pierson. "Both are hard-
workers, good students and out-
standing players. We feel both
girls have very bright futures at
ECU
Crowder, 5-4, averaged just
under 11 points per game in each
of the last two seasons, while
'ONTEST
iLME
AS A CULTURAL FORCE:
eculations on the future
currently enrolled ECU students.
re (han 15 typed pages.
Bibliography optional.
Publications Building.
ly. December 1, 1987
ffice no later tha 5:00 p.m.
ENTRY FORM and STATEMENT OF
ip at the Media Board Office in the
Building.
S:
ished in magazine
$25
iors
?ally Reflector
il including a district champion- shooting 55 percent from the
ship and a second-place finish in
the Central Virginia regional. Last
ear colonial Heights won district
and regional titles.
"We are very pleased to sign
floor. Jones was an all-District and
second team all-Regional per-
former this season as Colonial
competes in women's basketball
during the fall months.
Chris O'Connor will be back at
the two guard position and Irish
Hamilton will be at point. Sopho-
more Hamilton has the formi-
dable task of replacing Delphine
Mabry, who graduated last year
as ECU'S career steal leader.
"Irish has looked real good at
point so far, but really hasn't been
tested in game situations Pier-
son said. "We'll have to play a
disciplined game and be patient
on offense
Freshmen Wendy Morton and
Kate Kinney will add depth at
guard and Pam Williams is pro-
gressing well after knee surgery.
"Wendy will definitely help
this year especially against zone
defenses Pierson siad. "With
Pam back, we have an added de-
mension in that she can play at the
one, two and three positions
After five weeks of practice,
Pierson feels the team will be
ready for this weekend.
"They are confident, which is
good, and they are ready to get
started with the season. They
want to play someone other than
themselves Pierson said.
The Lady Pirates return to
Greenville the following week-
end, Dec. 4-5, to host the Lady
cm and Vanderbilt will take on
North Carolina Central. All
games will be at ECU'S Mingcs
Coliseum.
Karr not that bad of a guy
Sports thoughts
By
Tim
Chandler
Sports
Editor
and News
IC
Oft jl CQetCfQ hep
518 SOUTH COT�NCMC STZf.T
rsi-osaa
"Fire Ken Karr ECU Needs A
New Karr "Students Against
Ken Karr (S.A.K.K.)
Yes, you've heard it all before.
The many outspoken people voic-
ing their opinions against East
Carolina's former athlebc direc-
tor.
But did you ever stop and think
of the good that came to the uni-
versity because of the work Karr
did?
Karr came to East Carolina
seven years ago with one mission
� to get the athletic department
out of the red. When I say red, I
mean a $600,000 deficit.
In a matter of five years Karr
had not only erased the deficit,
but the department had a bank
account amounting to nearly
$500,000. Not bad, huh?
But in achieving his goal, Karr
stepped on a lot of toes. Schedul-
ing such national football power-
houses as Florida State, Miami
(Fl.), Illinois, South Carolina and
West Virginia, to name a few, was
a bit too much for some of the
Pirate faithful to swallow.
One of the first changes Karr
had to make for ECU when he
took over the athletic director's
reins was to decide whether to
keep ECU on the NCAA Division
I-A level or drop back to the I-AA
level.
Thomas A. Bennett, Chairman
of the ECU Board of Trustees, said
Karr made the decision to stay in
Division I-A in order for ECU to
keep pace with teams such as N.C
State.
"When the restructuring of the
divisions was going on, we had to
decide whether or not to stay in
Division I-A or drop back to Divi-
sion I-AA Bennett said. "In I-A
you get 95 scholarships for play-
ers; but you only have 75 in I-AA.
"If we wanted to continue to
play teams such as State � and
stay on even terms � then we had
to remain in I-A
Another key step ECU made
through Karr was joining the
College Football Association
(CFA). The CFA was formed pri-
marily for schools who are better
known throughout the country
for their football programs in-
stead of their basketball. The
membership of the CFA is ap-
proximately 78 schools.
By being part of the CFA, ECU
receives an annual income of
around $130,000 from television
revenue, even though a Pirate
game has yet to be shown on TV
by the CFA.
"Nobody will ever know the job
Ken did to get us in the CFA
Bennett said. "They (the CFA)
were about to draw the line on the
teams they were letting in without
including us (ECU). But because
ofhisconstantattention to getting
us in, and his contacts within the
organization, he managed to get
us in at the last minute
When speaking of Karr, one
should also look at the upgrading
that has taken place at the
university's various athletic fa-
cilities. First of all, there is the new
Sports MedicinePhysical Educa-
tion Facility, which is entering the
construction stages now. Also,
Scales Field House had a new
wing added, which now houses
the marketing department as well
as electronic media. The coaches
offices and meeting rooms have
also all been renovated in Scales,
as have the visitor's lockerroom at
Ficklen Stadium.
"Not too many years ago, the
visiting facilities were worse than
that on the high school level
Bennett said. "But, now we have
some of the best facilities in the
country
No doubt, the arguments and
complaints about Karr will con-
tinue to spill from the mouths of
many but I firmly believe, as does
Bennett that ECU will someday
reach the level Karr set out trying
to meet.
The sad thing is Karr will proba-
bly never get the credit for it ei-
ther.
Hinton to aid ECU cage squad
THE "PIRATES ANTICIPATE EEIH6
AT A SU6HT PSATVhHTf6EL
KEl6Trf-Wf.SE TlIS SEASON
By MARK SCHECHTER
Sporti Writer
Among this year's newcomers
to the East Carolina basketball
team is freshman point guard
Jimmy Hinton.
Hinton, a 5-7, 163 pound flash
from Little Rock, Ark averaged
10 points, 13 assists, and four
steals per game last year in lead-
ing Hall High School to its third of
three consecutive conference
championships with Hinton at
the helm.
His efforts earned him three
consecutive all-conference selec-
tions as well as being named first-
team all-state his senior year.
Last Tuesday, in the Pirates' 82-
76 opening exhibition loss to the
Czechoslavakian National team,
Hinton showed a knack for caus-
ing havoc for the Czechs on de-
fense by making eight steals,
which would have tied a school
record, had the game not been an
exhibition contest, and by forcing
numerous other turnovers.
Pirate team statisticians had
Hinton credited with 10 steals and
seven assists for the game.
He also displayed a scoring
touch, by contributing nine
points, and unselfishness, by
dishing out four assists.
"Coach Steele is a firm believer
that if you work hard in practice,
then you'll work hard in the
game said Hinton. "Because of
our height disadvantage, he ex-
pects us to go out there and give
our all, hounding and pressing
the ball all over the court, trying to
force turnovers and excite the
crowd
Hinton, who was heavily re-
cruited by Kansas, along with
Syracuse, Wake Forest, and sev-
eral other Midwestern universi-
ties chose East Carolina because,
"it was an excellent opportunity
to step in and play right away, and
I was impressed with the coach-
ing staff during the recruiting
process said Hinton.
Jimmy Hinton
Academically, Hinton intends
to major in business administra-
tion and later go on and get his
masters.
Pirate head basketball coach
Mike Steele credits Hinton with
being an exciting player to watch
and a player that makes anv team
he plays on an exciting team to
watch.
Hinton, who, according to Pi-
rate coaches, is probably the blue-
chipper of this season's recruiting
class, will alternate playing time
at the point guard position this
season with returning junior
guard Jeff Kelly.
Hinton and the other Pirates
will get their first taste of regular
season action this Saturday when
they play host to the Longwood
Lancers at 7:30 p.m. in Minges
Coliseum. 5
The Lancers, who are members
of the Mason-Dixon Athletic Con
ference, enter the game with two
starters back from a squad, which
last year accumulated a 13.14
overall record.
Following the Longwood con-
test, the Pirates will gct a stiff
early-season challenge from na
toonally-ranked Duke Universitv
on Monday, Nov. 30 in Camcron
Indoor Stadium before taking
week off and hosting CampbU


in� qmiwi"if �





10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 24,1987
Swimmers gain easy victories over UNC-C
ByKRISTEN�ALBERG F.rs. place was a mean, ,o be minc an unbc� �, , ,
?k� :�l.t� mine an unbelievable timo of c.�
By KRISTEN HALBERC
Sport. Writer
Victory was once again the
word of the day for the East Caro-
lina swimming and diving teams
as they once again proved them-
selves flawless by toppling UNC-
Charlotte last Saturday.
The men easily beat UNCC 82-
31 while the women had an
equally easy time of it winning 70-
43. Coach Kobe was indeed very
happy with the results.
For the men, this win puts their
record at 3-2. "The men totally
dominated this meet Coach
Kobe explained. "We mixed up
the hneup a bit to make it more
competitive. So, these aren't even
our fastest times
Raymond Kennedy proved to
be the outstanding swimmer of
2 by 8ainin8 &3I Place in
the 200-yard breaststroke with a
time of 2:13.30. ECU also took
third place in that race with Pat
Brcnnan swimming a time of
To start the meet off however it
was East Carolina all the way to
snag first in the 400-yard medley
relay. The relay team of Mark
LTBnen, Ron Fleming, Tyge Pisto-
rio, and Andy Jeetcr, swam a
winning time of 3:42:03.
The 1000-yard freestyle was
taken by Brian Kingsfield in
10:05.30 while George Walters
wound up in second in 10:09.40.
The 2aTyard freestyle put John
Farrcll in the spotlight as he came
up with the win in 1:47.90. A sec-
ond later, Andy Jecter (1:48.20)
swam into a second place slot.
r
First place was also meant to be
for the pirates in the 50-yard frees-
tyle as Ron Fleming's 22.49 swim
was enough to secure the victory.
The 200-yard individual med-
ley resulted in a first and a second
place for ECU as Pat Brennan
swam the winning time of 2:02.20.
Not far behind was Tyge Pistorio
who claimed second in 2:02.82.
The Pirates did not get the win
in the 1 -meter diving but Perry
Smith and Scott Milligan man-
aged to snag the second and the
third places respectively.
The 3-meter diving proved
more successful however, as Scott
Milhgan was able to claim first
with Perry Smith holdine on to
second.
Tom Holsten's time of 2:01.10
was enough to secure first in the
200-yard butterfly while Tim
Fnck (2:02.30) was only a second
behind Tom to claim second.
Only three tenths of a second
was the difference for first and
second places in the 200-yard
backstroke as George Walters
(1:59.60) just edged teammate
Mark O'Brien (1:59.90).
J.D. Lewis found success in the
500-yard freestyle as he swam a
winning time of 4:51.50.
The East Carolina women also
had an outstanding Saturday af-
ternoon as they stretched their un-
defeated record to 6-0 as a result of
the win over UNCC.
In addition, Meredith Bridgers
again broke the varsity recod that
she had just broken last week in
the 200-yard breaststroke swim-
Wanted:
Editorial page editor.
Experience preferred.
Got an opinion?
Apply.
The East Carolinian
THANK HEAVENS
KINKO'S IS OPEN
SUNDAYS
At Kinko's. we offer complete copying services seven davs a
week. And our staff has a friendly, professional attitude
you won't find anywhere else Try Kinko's. We could be the
answer to your prayers.
kinko's
Open early Open late.
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321 E 10th Street (919) 752-08
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Every Tuesday
College Night
from 8:00 to 11:00
$1.50 with college LD.
.50$ skate rental
SPORTSWORTX)
104 E. Redbanks Rd.
756-6000
ming an unbelievable time of
2:26.20.
ECU saw Ryan Philya w take the
victory in the 100-yard freestyleas
she swam in at 10:58.40. Not far
behind her to end up in third was
Tracy Bauman coming in at
11:04.10.
Next for ECU was a first and a
second place in the 200-yard
freestyle as Patty Walsh (2:00.00)
and Sonya Hemmingway
(2:04.50) eagerly claimed these
spots.
The Pirates were not as success-
ful in the 50-yard freestyle when
unfortunately, they were not able
to come up with the win. How-
ever, ' .redith Bridgers (26.40)
and Angola Winstead (26.70)
managed to hold on to the second
and third place slots.
In the 200-yard individual
medley relay, it was all Leslie Jo
Wilson as she pulled off a first in
2:16.50. Ginger Carrick soon fol-
lowed to grab second in 2:17.60.
The 1 and 3-meterdiving events
added to ECU's win when Sherry
Campbell won both these events
and Becky Kcrber places second
in both of these events.
2:15.80 was plenty of time for
Robin Wicks to hold onto first in
the 200-yard butterfly while
Susan Augustus settled tor third
place in 2:18.30.
In the 200-yard backstroke, it
was Keller Hodges taking first in
2:19.80 with Leslie jo Wilson fo.
lowing behind to take second in
2:22.70.
And finally, Patty Walsh again
had center stage as she won the
500-yard freestyle with a time ot
5:22.60. Ginger Carrick 5 Jo �
was fast enough to give her a third
place in that race.
The swimmers will be back in
action on Dec. 1, when they will
host the Wolfpack of N.C State at
Minges Coliseum.
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22THE EASTCAROUN1AN NOVFMRFH 24,1987
Swimmers gain easy victories over UNC-C
ByKRIS-rjENHALBERG First p.ace was also meant to bo minE an �. ,
tnmaitZi.ts-� mine an unbelievable time n( e�.�
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sport, Writer
Victory was once again the
word of the day for the East Caro-
lina swimming and diving teams
as they once again proved them-
selves flawless by toppling UNC-
Charlotte last Saturday.
The men easily beat UNCC 82-
31 while the women had an
equally easy timeof it winning 70-
43. Coach Kobe was indeed very
fwppy with the results.
For the men, this win puts their
record at 3-2. 'The men totally
dominated this meet Coach
Kobe explained. "We mixed up
the lineup a bit to make it more
competitive. So, these aren't even
our fastest times
Raymond Kennedy proved to
be the outstanding swimmer of
the meet by gaining first place in
the 200-yard breaststroke with a
time of 2:13.30. ECU also took
third place in that race with Pat
iTio" swimmins a time '
To start the meet off however it
was East Carolina all the way'to
snag first in the 400-yard medley
relay. The relay team of Mark
CJBnen, Ron Fleming, Tyge Pisto-
no, and Andy Jeetcr, swam a
winning time of 3:42.03.
The 1000-yard freestyle was
taken by Brian Kingsfield in
10:05.30 while George Walters
wound up in second in 10.09.40.
The 200-yard freestyle put John
Fan-ell in the spotlight as he came
up with the win in 1:47.90. A sec-
ond later, Andy Jecter (1:48.20)
swam into a second place slot.
First place was also meant to be
for the pirates in the 50-yard frees-
tyle as Ron Fleming's 22.49 swim
was enough to secure the victory.
The 200-yard individual med-
ley resulted in a first and a second
place for ECU as Pat Brennan
swam the winning time of 2:02.20.
Not far behind was Tyge Pistorio
who claimed second in 2:02.82.
The Pirates did not get the win
in the 1-meter diving but Perry
Smith and Scott Milligan man-
aged to snag the second and the
third places respectively.
The 3-meter diving proved
more successful however, as Scott
Milhgan was able to claim first
with Perry Smith holding on to
second.
Tom Holsten's time of 2:01.10
was enough to secure first in the
200-yard butterfly while Tim
Fnck (2:02.30) was only a second
behind Tom to claim second.
Only three tenths of a second
was the difference for first and
second places in the 200-yard
backstroke as George Walters
(1.59.60) just edged teammate
Mark O'Brien (1:59.90).
D. Lewis found success in the
500-yard freestyle as he swam a
winning time of 4:51.50.
The East Carolina women also
had an outstanding Saturday af-
ternoon as they stretched their un-
defca ted record to 6-0 as a resul t of
the win over UNCC.
In addition, Meredith Bridgers
again broke the varsity rccod that
she had just broken last week in
the 200-yard breaststroke swim-
ming an unbelievable time of
2:26.20.
ECU saw Ryan Philya w take the
victory in the 100-yard freestyleas
she swam in at 10:58.40. Not far
behind her to end up in third was
Tracy Bauman coming in at
11:04.10.
Next for ECU was a first and a
second place in the 200-yard
freestyle as Patty Walsh (2:00.00)
and Sonya Hemmingway
(2:04.50) eagerly claimed these
spots.
The Pirates were not as success-
ful in the 50-yard freestyle when
unfortunately, they were not able
to come up with the win. How-
ever, � .redith Bridgers (26.40)
and Angela Winstead (26.70)
managed to hold on to the second
and third place slots.
In the 200-yard individual
medley relay, it was all Leslie Jo
Wilson as she pulled off a first in
2:16.50. Ginger Carrick soon fol-
lowed to grab second in 2:17.60.
The 1 and 3-meter diving events
added to ECU's win when Sherry
Campbell won both these events
and Becky Kcrber places second
in both of these events.
2:15.80 was plenty of time for
Robin Wicks to hold onto first in
the 200-yard butterfly while
Susan Augustus settled for third
place in 2:18.30.
In the 200-yard backstroke, it
was Keller Hodges taking first in
in
2:19.80 with Leslie jo Wilson fo
lowing behind to take second
2:22.70.
And finally, Patty Walsh again
had center stage as she won the
500-yard freestyle with a time ot
5:22.60. Ginger Carrick's 530 50
was fast enough to give her a third
place in that race.
The swimmers will be back in
action on Dec. 1, when they will
host the Wolfpack of N.C Stale at
Minges Coliseum.
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The East Caroliniatj
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 24, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 24, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.576
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
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