The East Carolinian, November 19, 1987






INSIDE
Editorials�ww 4
Entertainment��M$
Sports��,W.��12
Classifieds���0
ENTERTAINMENT
'Lovers and Other Strangers' reviewed, see
ENTERTAINMENT, page 8.
SPORTS
ECU Athletic Director O. Ken Karr resigns
SPORTS, page 12.
see
tttye iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina ampus community since 2925.
Vol. 62 No. 24
Thursday, November 19,1987
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Spock says kids are stressed
By M. BURBFLLA
Alititinl r� Idiliif
Hcndrix Theater was packed
Tuesday evening with crowds
anticipating a presentation by Or.
Benjamin Spock, acclaimed pe-
diatrician and best-selling author.
Dr. Spock's first bKk "Baby
and Child Care originally pub-
lished in 1943, designated Dr.
Spock as the child development
guru for parents of the Baby Boom
generation. The book has sold
32,00(1,000 copies and has been
translated in 31 languages.Spock
spoke animatelv to the audience
about mothers of an earlier age
who turned to their own mother.
usually a few houses away, for
child care advice. However,
Spock acknowledged the change
in modern-day culture.
"We've lost the sense of the
small, tightened community of
the United States Spock said.
"It's not only that people get
tomfort from the community but
also that they cannot contribute to
the community
No longer living in a closely
knit community causes stress on a
family, Spock said. Having to turn
to impersonal counselors has be-
come the "the thing to do
Another stress on today's soct-
ety is the lack of pride in one's
work. Assemby lines have be-
come a way of life, Spock said.
"Our species is meant to have
satisfaction in making beautiful
things; in the assembly line we've
lost that satisfaction Spock said.
"Back in times people got tremen-
dous satisfaction from what they
did � there's no humanity left in
work
Spock also cited the fact that
many children are disturbed
when both parents spend more
time at work.
"I think women have just as
much right to a career as men do
Spock said. "But the question is
still: who is going to take care of
the children?"
Day care, Spock said, needs the
support of young women and
men as well as the industries.
In today's materialistic society,
parents are trying to raise what
Spock calls "superkids
A parent's desire to see his or
her child succeed � according to
his or her own standards � may
push the child into a situation too
stressful for that child to handle,
according to Spock.
"The message children are get-
ting is get ahead, kid " Spock
said. "Summer camp is now more
deadly serious � you now go to
become a computer expert
Spock mentioned the teenage
suicide rate, which "has quad-
rupled considerably in the past
few years He linked teenage
suicides with "another disturbing
statistic" � that of divorce in the
United States. Thus we see the
evidence of the strains and
stresses of family life, according
to Spock.
Spock brought up one final
cause of stress in the family: vio-
lence. He told the audience he
"didn't know if (we) know how
violent the American civilization
is Spock offered the statistic that
"40 murders within a family oc-
cur per year by handguns
Thysical violence is not the only
cause of stress. Violence on televi-
sion helps to create problems in
the household, Spock said. A
child sees 18,000 murders on tele-
vision and "brutalizes it in his
own mind causing it to become
more "true to life
Dr. Spock said practically all
children worry � not of theirown
death in case of a nuclear war �
but of who will take care of them
if their parents are killed.
This threat of violence, Spock
said, affects teenagers as well.
Teens say "What's the use of
studying? I'll never have a career,
never get married, never have
children Spock said preoccupa-
tion with a possible future death
causes stress in present day life.
"This is a bad thing for us to be
doing Spock said. "We're bring-
ing up a generation of cynical
children
Towards the end of the lecture,
Spock offered several pointers to
help children feel loved and, in
result, feel less stress.
�Bring a child up thinking
"your job in the world is to help
solve it's problems
�Teach a child non-materialis-
tic values.
�Get a child involved in every-
day activities ("let a two year old
set a table, they think this is excit-
ing).
�Get teenagers to volunteer for
community services (i.e. can-
dystriping).
�Do not compare one child to
another.
�Well-intentioned fathers
should not demand perfection in
little league teams.
�Use no physical punishment
� this teaches a child to behave to
avoid being hurt, not because he
or she understands why he or she
was wrong.
Dr. Benjamin Spock told parents Tuesday in Hendrix Theater to
discourage materialism and not to use physical punishment In
raising their children (Thomas Walters, Photolab).
Stock market crash had little effect on ECU
By M. BURBELLA
A��l�Unt Nrwi Editor
While the stock market's crash
on Oct. 19 created panic in eco-
nomic circles and brought losses
to many heavy traders, the vice-
chancellor for business affairs
said it has had no gTeat effect on
the university.
Cliff Moore explained that the
university is represented in finan-
cial dealings by two organiza-
tions, the ECU Endowment Fund
and the ECU Foundation. The
ECU Endowment Fund docs not
deal in the stock market, Moore
said, while the foundation docs.
James L.Lanier Jr vice chancel-
lor for Institutional Advancement
and the executive secretary of the
foundation, said the foundation's
primary purpose is to raise and
manage money for scholarships.
It isa private corporationof which
the only beneficiary is the univer-
sity.
The foundation has $4 million
in assets, Lanicr said, with a ap-
proximately $3.5 million invested
in various holdings.
Lanier said the foundation has
strict rules governing the invest-
ment of the monies it accumulates
and that professional money
managers handle the invest-
ments. He noted that only 25 per-
cent of the foundation's liquid
assets can be invested in stock
equities. The other 75 percent is
invested in fixed assets, Lanier
said.
This arrangement helped carry
the university through the recent
stock market fall with minimal
damage.
chip" stocks. (Stock in companies
with good dividends and an es-
tablished track records is consid-
ered "blue-chip)
"We don't invest in any 'fly-by-
night' sort of things Lanier said.
"We have a very strict investment
policy
Lanier also said the foundation
does not invest in any companies
involved in South Africa.
There are some colleges which
are taking advantage of the so-
called "bargain" prices on stocks
created by the drop in the market.
The foundation, however, is in-
Geography Awareness Week
"When equities went down
fixed assets went up he said.
Lanier said the foundation was
cautious in its market dealings,
investing in "very stable blue-
volved in long-term stocks which,
according to Lanier, are the "best
earners of money
"We're going to keep 25 percent
in securities Lanier said. "I'm
sure securities have been bought
and sold, but the managers are in
charge. We simply don't exceed
the 25 percent rule
Lanier said the foundation in-
vests in a number of areas includ-
ing food industries, consumer
products and electronic areas.
"You'll find our money in the
stonger companies Lanier said.
Most of the money that the
Foundation invests comes from
gifts from individual donors
Lanier said.
In 1986-87, $5,964,000 was do-
nated to the university. Of that, $1
million went to athletics, $2.2
million for medicine (and related
areas) and $2.8 million to academ-
ics, according to Lanier.
Lanier believes the fall in the
stock market may cause some
donors to withdraw because of
individual losses in the market.
However, Lanier said the founda-
tion will not be affected that
much.
Geographic literacy encouraged
By CAMILLE COX
Sufi Writer
Geography Awareness Week is
being observed this week at ECU
and across the nation; according
to one ECU professor, Americans
are some the most geographically
illiterate people in the world.
"Ninety-five percent of Ameri-
can college freshmen cannot lo-
cate Vietnam on a map, and a
study conducted here at ECU also
found that 60 percent of freshmen
and sophomores could not locate
Japan on a map said Dr. Doug
Wilms, an ECU professor of geog-
raphy.
Wilms added, "So few students
are taking geography in high
school and there are teachers who
really don't have any back-
ground
"Americans are the most geo-
graphically illiterate people of
any industrialized country
The National Geographic Soci-
ety is spearheading a national ef-
fort to solve this problem. The
society is contributing a substan-
tial amount of money to states,
and North Carolina is one of those
states.
The North Carolina General
Assembly gave $50,000 to the ef-
fort and the society will match
that amount. The money will be
used for teacher training during
the summer institutes and re-
gional "PLACE" conferences.
As part of the awareness week
at ECU, a class of sixth grade stu-
dents are to visit the campus to-
day to leam about geography
tools and maps; and on Friday,
geography faculty members are
scheduled to judge geography-
related school projects at Aycock
Jr. High School.
According to Wilms, Prof.
James Johnson of UCLA will
speak about black migration to-
day at 7:30 p.m. The lecture will
be held in B-102, he said.
ECU professor explores geologic origins
Samuel Whitley and Michelle Parkin use their hypnotic powers as
vampires to encourage this woman to give blood at the Student
Residence Hall Association blood drive Wednesday. The blood
drive, also supported by Special Occasions Costumes, is to continue
12-6 pan. today in Mendenhall Student Center (Hardy Alligood,
Photolab).
By G.A. THREWITTS
ECU Ntwi lunu
Mention unrest in the Middle
East to Dr. Stanley Riggs, a geolo-
gist at ECU, and he'll take you
back 100 million years and more.
Back then, Riggs will tell you,
there were no such places as the
Persian Gulf or the Mediterra-
nean Sea or even the Middle East
for that matter. All the land
masses of Southern Europe,
Northern Africa and the Middle
East were underwater. Thou-
sands of miles of open ocean,
flowing from east to west, sepa-
rated the two continents.
But there has been unrest there
ever since.
At first the unrest was in the
form of strong currents within
this ancient ocean, called the
Tethys Ocean. In certain areas
these currents, extra rich in nutri-
ents, became filled with thick
masses of swirling organisms.
At certain spots around the
Tethys Ocean, the currents
dumped these organisms onto
huge deposits. It is these organic-
rich sediments, created at a time
when dinosaurs were bidding
their last farewell to the land, that
produced the vast oil and phos-
phate deposits of the Middle East
and North Africa that we depend
upon today.
Riggs is co-director of the Inter-
national Geological Correlation
Program No. 156 - Phosphorites, a
worldwide research project spon-
sored by the United Nations Edu-
cational, Scientific and Cultural
Organization (UNESCO) and the
International Union of Geological
Sciences (IUGS) to examine these
ancient sediments.
He says he wants to leam how
the sediments were formed,
where the currents were flowing
to form the sediments, and what
was happening on the earch over
the past 100 million years to pro-
duce these areas of extremely rich
organic matter in the ocean.
In collecting data about the
deposits, the ECU geologist trav-
els to many parts of the world but
much of his present research is in
the Mediterranean an Middle
East where currents of the Tethys
Oceans produced the most ex-
tenxsive deposits in the world.
This fall Riggs went to Tunisia,
in Northern Africa, where he met
with 68 other scientists from 18
countries including the Soviet
Union. They met to discuss and to
sample the country's rich depos-
its of phosphate.
"There is no oil in Tunisia but
the country is a major producer
and exporter of phosphate
Riggs said.
"We are trying to find out why
these deposits are there and what
their relationship is to the ancient
Tethys Ocean he said.
"We also want to know why
some of these organic-rich sedi-
ments became phosphate depos-
its while others produced petro-
leum and oil fields he said.
Political unrest in parts of the
Middle East and Mediterranean
makes research there difficult at
times. Riggs cancelled a trip to
Iraq last year after the VS.
bombed Libya.
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TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 19, 1987
Gum disease should be taken seriously
DO VOUr CUms blcoH whon m, the tnirr. Urn. Ik i. r
Do your gums bleed when vou
brush your teeth? Are your gums
tender or puffy? Do vou fre-
quently have a bad taste in your
mouth or bad breath?
These are earlv warning signs
of periodontal disease, a silent
destroyer of the support system
for your teeth. According to the
American Dental Association,
"Nine out of ten adults over 40
lose some teeth as a result of gum
disease
No one is immune, and TV
commercials are not exaggerating
when they say dentists see plaque
as a bigger problem for adults
than decay. What is plaque? A
thin, transparent, colorless
growth around each tooth and at
the gum line that accumulates
Health Column
By JUDITH STANCILL
Special lu the fait C'amlinian
and hardens into tartar (calculus).
Once plaque hardens, a dentist
needs special instruments to re-
move i t. The jagged edges of ta r ta r
irritate your gums and cause
pockets or space to form between
the gum and tooth in which bacte-
ria and food particles collect. Over
time, the pockets will deepen and
destroy the tissue and bone struc-
ture around your teeth.
That's the bad news. The good
news is you can prevent and con-
trol gum disease with early diag-
nosis and treatment because the
number one cause is poor oral
hygiene. Whether you eat or not,
bacteria reforms every 24 hours
and must be removed to interrupt
the destructive process.
Brushing and flossing properly
every day arc recommended to
disorganizebacteria.lfit'shardto
be concerned about something
you can't see happening or if find-
ing time to brush and floss daily is
a problem, you will have other
choices once the disease has ad-
vanced.
One option is a surgical proce-
dure in which the dentist cuts and
lifts a flap of your gum to scrape
away the tartar and diseased tis-
sue. Antibiotics may be injected to
destroy the bacteria before stitch-
ing the gum in place. Once the
disease goes past the point of no
return, you may turn to a dentist
for your own set of dentures.
What can you do to prevent and
control gum disease?
1 Pay attention to what you eat.
Include nutritious food every day
(the kind that isgood for you if not
always good to you). Think twice
before eating between meals.
Sweets incite bacteria to riot, so
cut down on candy and other
sugar-loaded snacks.
2. Visit the dentist at least twice
a year. There are over 30 dentists
in Greenville and several offer
office hours at night. From regu-
lar exams and x-rays, a dentist can
determine if there are pockets or
other signs of gum disease. You
may need to see a gum disease
specialist.
3. Brush and floss properly.
Technique is as much the secret to
effective oral hygiene as it is to
winning in sports. The hygicnist
or dentist can show you how to
jiggle the toothbrush under your
gum line and roll the brush up of
Tips to avoid being a victim
Thanksgiving is onlv a week
away. For some it will be a time to
go home to be with family and
friends, eat turkey and all its fix-
ings. For others it is a time to thank
God for all his blessings this year.
A time to get away from school to
go hunting, fishing or just plain
relax and watch Thanksgiving
Day parades. Whatever you do
this Thanksgiving Holiday you
want it to be a safe and happy one.
Last Thanksgiving was not
such a happy one tor Jill, who had
planned to spend the holiday
with her family. The day before
she was to leave to go home,
someone entered her room and
stole her pocketbook.
Pirate Police
Line
By CAPT. KEITH KNOX
Inside it was her plane ticket
home, along with what money
she had and all her identification.
Jill told the investigating officer
that she was only gone for a min-
ute. She had left her door un-
locked. As with a majority of stu-
dents who live in residence halls
locking the door and taking their
keys is too much trouble.
i have left it unlocked hundreds
of times before and no one has
ever bothered a thing. So had Jill.
It only takes the right person
(thief) to come along and take
advantage of that opportunity to
rip you off. Can vou afford to take
that risk?
Jill now locks her door each
time she leaves her room and even
when she's in. You see Jill did not
get to go home last Thanksgiving
as she had planned. This year she
hopes it will be different
Make today and this Thanks-
giving Holiday a safe and happy
one by practicing Crime Preven-
tion. No one wants to get ripped
off or return from a nice holiday to
find that they have been. Use the
following check list to help assure
that you won't be:
(1) Close and lock all windows
and the transoms above door-
ways. If it can not be secured no-
tify your resident director imme-
Black Psychologists to meet Friday
FCC Nrwi Bureau
Students from colleges and
universities across the state will
hold an organizational meeting
for the student division of the
North Carolina chapter of the
Association of Black Psycholo-
gists Friday at ECU.
The host official, Dr. Dennis
Chestnut, said the organizational
business meeting will include
election of officers of the student
division. Chestnut, of the ECU
psychology faculty, is national
president-elect of the Association
of Black Psychologists.
The keynote speaker for the
meeting will be Dr. Lisa Whittcn
of New York, national chairper-
son for student affairs and devel-
opment of the association. The
student delegates will be wel-
comed by Dr. Les Brinson, chair-
man of the psychology depart-
ment at N.C Central University,
Durham.
Chestnut said invitations were
extended to black psychology
students at all four-year colleges
and universities in the state and
that as many as 100 students from
a dozen schools might attend the
meeting at ECU's Mendenhall
Student Center beginning at 9
a.m.
f
East Carolina's
Finest Tea
o
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East Carolina
Tea Party
sY
Every Friday ���
at 4:00 p.m. P
�Free Pizza 6-7 p.mT
�Free Mason Jar
High Energy Music by
Big Al till 9:00 p.m.
Double Exposure 'till 1:00 a.m.
Come Early and Beat the Cover -
Must be 21 to enter
Sheraton Greenville ,
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
��
diately.
(2) Do not hide keys outside
your room or residence. Thieves
know exactly where to look for
them.
(3) If possible, take your valu-
ables with you, such as money,
jewelry, stereo components, TVs,
etc. (if you can't put them out of
sight).
(4) Tlace your bicycle in your
room to help guarantee it's secu-
rity or make sure it is properly
registered and secured in desig-
nated bike racks.
(5) Turn off or unplug all alarm
clocks and unnecessary electrical
applicances. This will' eliminate
false calls that something may be
wrong in your room and prevent
a possible fire.
(6) Report any suspicious per-
son or activity to Public Safety at
Mice (756-6150).
(7) Vehicles left on campus after
Nov. 25, should be parked in the
following areas to help assure
their security. College Hill park-
ing lot: in front of Tyler Hall or
College Hill Drive near residence
halls. West Campus: Mendenhall
parking lot or the parking lot
behind Greene Hall. No vehicle
(including freshmen cars) should
be left in any other areas on or off
campus. This will enable Public
Safety to provide better security
for them. (Freshmen will need to
move their vehicles back to fresh-
men parking areas before 8 p.m
Nov. 29 to avoid being ticketed or
towed).
(8) Lock your door when you
leave and make sure it's locked!
(9) Drive safely and defen-
sively. Watch out for the other
guy. Please do not drink and
drive.
The ECU Department of Public
Safety wishes you a safe and
happy Thanksgiving Holiday.
down each tooth to remove food
particles and accumulated
plaque. The toothbrush should
have soft bristles and be any tytx
that is comfortable for you to use
An effective home preparation
for reducing bacteria is 50:50 salt
and baking soda. Mix the sodd
and salt together in a bowl.Cover
with a tight lid and keep the mix-
hoc on hand in the bathroom
Because colonies of bacteria are
See FLOSSING, page 3
Gtye �at Carolinian
Serving tlw East Carolina campus community sinc 1925
James F. J. McKee. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo
Shari Clemens pete Ferna'd
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Student ai
WASHINGTON
freshmen and sophomores could
gel fell Grants and only juniors
and seniors could getGuai
Student Loans in the fut �
congress approves a bill ii
duccd last work by an influential
legislator from Mi
Rep. Bill Ford
influential memrvr t the H
education committet i
he thought the bill, inti
Nov. 3, would help minimi,
dent loan defaults and help
income Students finance colli
he bill is an attemj
two birds with one stone
Tom Wolanin a 11 �rd i I
deals with b problen
equ ility and d faults
Ford's measure

dlK'v
h'
I
would f r .
year college sti
ing CSLs. Hi.
ever, v
Pell (.rants, fe
that stud
it p.
arid s
GSLs could co
t.
The next
e C.ramm-Rud:
�alanced-budget lav
has, as ot last week, inert
student � r Guarantee I
dent Loans (GSLs) nd. in
cases, kept students waiting I
their loan money.
On Oct. 20, the governn
raised GSL "origination
frompercent to 5.5percenl I
amount of the loan
In addition, the tees the govern-
ment p s to banks that parties
pate in the program were red
from 3.25 percent to 3 pero
the loan amount.
The move, announced
implemented withouj ad-
notice, confused and angered
some students, lenders and ad-
ministators.
"They sprung this without
warning. It's really added a lot ot
confusion said Dr. A. Dallas
Martin of the National Associa-
tion of Student Financial Aid
,Admimitr�j tori.
The changes, said Department
of Education spokesman Bill lam-
roz, were authorized b
Gramm-Rudman-Hollins
an attempt by Congress I
federal spending and reduce the
federal deficit
Gramm-Rudman requires the
government to keep the federal
deficit to $143 billion dunr.
1987-88 fiscal year, and empow-
ers the administration todo what-
ever it has to � refuse to spend
money, raise fees for government
services, etc. � to do so.
Some schools think theGramm-
Rudman axe will cost them in
other ways
University of Washington re-
search chief Donald Baldwin
worried last week that automatic
deficit reductions � about to be
triggered Friday unless Congress
comes up with an alternative �
could mean l'V will lose $10
million in federal research funds
Flossing can
help prevent
gum disease
Continued from page 2
continuouslv reforming, the best
way to disorganize them is to
pack the sail and soda mixutre
under the gum line This tech-
nique is easier to accomplish with
an electric toothbrush which has a
stop-action motion. Always nnse
thoroughlv and follow bv brush-
ing with toothpaste
4. Floss dailv. Choose the most
convenient time for vou ou mav
floss in the morning after lunch or
dinner, or before going to bed. It
doesn't matter as long as vou floss
about the same time every day.
Wrap the floss around each tooth
and pull down or up to phvsicallv
remove the plaque from all four
sides of each tooth. Thin or thick,
waxed or not waxed, mint fla-
vored or not � it doesn't matter
� choose the floss that is easiest
for you to use.
Products such as a plaque re-
ducing toothpaste or oral nnse
like Viadent and an oral irrigating
device such as Water Fik help;
however, they do not replace
proper brushing and flossing
every day.
To control or prevent gum dis-
ease, you can put in about 10
minutes every day now or put out
as much as $2,000 later for a pro-
fessional repair job.
Si
m
Ii
BUYOI
�nA MINI
WURACr "�
� s
Spnk � M
323 Arlington
(Across from Faq
Second Loci
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seriously
night, from regu- down each tooth to remove food
i rays, a dentist can particles and accumulated
�here are pockets or plaque The toothbrush should
It gum disease. You have soft bristles and be any type
sec a cum disease that is comfortable for you to use.
An effective home preparation
bid floss properly, for reducing bacteria is 50:50 salt
fcs much the secret to and baking soda. Mix the soda
hygiene .)� it is to and salt together in a bowl. Cover
r rhe hygienist with a tight lid and keep the mix-
p hvu you how to ture on hand in the bathroom.
� brush under your Because colonies of bacteria are
brush up of See FLOSSING, page 3
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Student aid changes proposed
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 19, 1987
WASHINGTON (CPS) - Only
freshmen and sophomores could
Set Tell Grants and only juniors
and seniors could get Guaranteed
Student loans in the future if
congress approves a bill intro-
duced last week by an influential
legislator from Michigan.
Rep. Bill Ford (D-MI), a very
influential member of-the House-
education committee, explained
he thought the bill, introduced
Nov. 3, would help minimize stu-
dent loan defaults and help low-
income students finance college.
'The bill is an attempt ot kill
two birds with one stone said
Tom VVolanin, a Ford aide. "It
deals with both the problems of
equality and defaults
Ford's measure, if passed,
would prohibit first and second
year college students from receiv-
ing GSLs. Those students, how-
ever, would be eligible to receive
Pell Grants, federal endowments
that students don't have to repay.
dents get Pell Grants of up to
$4,000 a year, up from the current
$2,100 limit.
Pell Grants may only be used to
pay for 60 percent of education
costs, and although Ford's bill
does not seek to change that pol-
icy, VVolanin said "we're open to
change
GSLs would be limited to up-
perclassmen and graduate stu-
dents, and the maximum amount
a student could borrow would be
increased from $4,000 to $7,000 a
year.
Community college and voca-
tional school students would
benefit most from the bill, VVol-
anin said, because they could
complete their 2-year educations
without incurring loan debts.
Existing federal student aid
programs discourage low-in-
come students from enrolling in
colleges, VVolanin said, because
many are reluctant to go into debt
to do SO.
Giving such students Pell
Grants instead of loaning them
money through the GSL program,
VVolanin said, would "help them
get started. Many students don't
know what direction they want to
go in when they first attend
school"
The proposal legislation would
reduce loan defaults, VVolanin
reasoned, because many defaul-
ters are underclassmen from low-
income backgrounds who drop
outof school when they don't find
their niche.
"The problem is we lend money
to people who are too high a risk
he said. Upperclassmen and
graduate students, who presuma-
bly after two years of school know
what they want to do with their
college educations, are better
credit risks, he said.
VVolanin doesn't believe the bill
would require greater funding for
education programs, since the
federal government would save
money from decreasing loan de-
faults and subsidies. Additional
GSLs could cost more by Fri.
(CPS) The next stage of en-
forcing the Gramm-Rudman-
Hollings balanced-budget law
has, as of last week, increased
student costs tor Guaranteed Stu-
dent Loans (GSLs) and, in a few
cases, kept students waiting to get
their loan money.
On Oct. 20, the government
raised GSL "origination fees"
trom 5 percent to 5.5 percent of the
amount of the loan.
In addition, the fees the govern-
ment pays to banks that partici-
pate in the program were reduced
from 3.25 percent to 3 percent of
the loan amount.
The move, announced and
implemented without advance
notice, confused and angered
some students, lenders and ad-
ministators.
"They sprung this without
warning. It's really added a lot of
confusion said Dr. A. Dallas
Martin of the National Associa-
tion of Student Financial Aid
.Administrators.
The changes, said Department
oi Education spokesman Bill Jam-
roz, were authorized bv the
Gramm-Rudman-Hollings bill,
an attempt by Congress to cut
federal spending and reduce the
federal deficit.
Gramm-Rudman requires the
government to keep the federal
deficit to $143 billion during the
1987-88 fiscal year, and empow-
ers the administration to do what-
ever it has to � refuse to spend
money, raise fees for government
services, etc. � to do so.
Some schools think theGramm-
Rudman axe will cost them in
other ways.
University of Washington re-
search chief Donald Baldwin
worried last week that automatic
deficit reductions � about to be
triggered Friday unless Congress
comes up with an alternative �
could mean UW will lose $10
million in federal research funds.
Flossing can
help prevent
gum disease
Continued from page 2
continuously reforming, the best
way to disorganize them is to
pack the salt and soda mixutre
under the gum line. This tech-
nique is easier to accomplish with
an electric toothbrush which has a
stop-action motion. Always rinse
thoroughly and follow by brush-
ing with toothpaste.
4. Floss daily. Choose the most
convenient time for you. You may
floss in the morning, after lunch or
dinner, or before going to bed. It
docsn' t matter as long as you floss
about the same time every day.
Wrap the floss around each tooth
and pull down or up to physically
remove the plaque from all four
sides of each tooth. Thin or thick,
waxed or not waxed, mint fla-
vored r not � it doesn't matter
� choose the floss that is easiest
for you to use.
Products such as a plaque re-
ducing toothpaste or oral rinse
like Viadent and an oral irrigating
device such as Water Pik help;
however, they do not replace
proper brushing and flossing
every day.
To control or prevent gum dis-
ease, you can put in about 10
minu tes every day now or pu t ou t
as much as $2,000 later for a pro-
fessional repair job.
If Congress and the administra-
tion can't agree on ways to cut the
overall budget by another 8.5
percent by Friday, various federal
college programs will lose an-
other $1.4 billion.
Because of the financial aid
changes made already, some
banks decided to hold all GSL
checks with a disbursement date
later than Oct. 20 until the changes
could be implemented. Other
GSLs were held up by lenders
who waited to see what changes
were coming before issuing
checks, Jamroz said.
Despite the cost increase and
the delays, Martin expects the
move to affect few students.
"We've not heard of large pro-
tests. Obviously some students
are going to bo affected but, he
added, the impact should be mini-
mal.
Students applying for GSLs for
spring, 1988 classes will be af-
fected most directly by the
changes. Martin said.
Sott Contact Lenses
funds would be available since
juniors and seniors would not be
eligible for Pell Grants.
"According to my figures, it
would be a wash. We would need
no new money. We would just use
what we already have available
more effectively
But Bill jamroz, a Department
of Education spokesman, said the
plan would bring additional
costs. Another problem, he said, is
that the bill calls for "a literal
shooing of money into schools
with no ties to the quality of edu-
cation" provided.
Other observers, while suppor-
tive of the bill's goals, are reserv-
ing judgement until further study
can be done.
"Ford is a very big student
advocate and the bill comes with
the best intentions said Mary
Preston of the United States Stu-
dent Association. But, "we're
going to study it and make some
recommendations
"We have no position on it yet
explained Dr. A. Dallas Martin of
the National Association of Stu-
dent Financial Aid Administra-
tors. Martin called the proposal a
"positive step away from the
heavv reliance on loans but said
the bill "needs some refine-
ments
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H
Si? Eaat (UntalMutx
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, cm�
Clay Deanhardt, Mr�, (,�,
Andy Lewis, s. ,AMES F.j. McKee, wttmMmm
OM CHANDLER, . W� MEG NEEDf JAM, a- Mf�
jotin Carter, r�. m. mike Upci iurci i, iw� M�,�r
SHELTON BRYANT, �.�, Jot tN W. MEDLIN, , rw
Debbie Stevens, s.� mac Clark, a
NOVEMBER 18,1987
Opinion
Page 4
Karr
Resignation opens doors
Ken Karr's resignation from the
position of athletic director can only
benefit the university.
Karr's tenure has been marked
with controversy and divisiveness.
Only one coach (Bill Carson, track)
has been here the length of Karr's
stay. The Pirate Club got into the
fracas last year when several of its
members tried to pass a resolution
asking for Karr's resignation or fir-
ing. The motion never reached the
floor after several parlaimentary
moves.
We also should not forget the inci-
dent last February when Karr alleg-
edly used the campus police to
remove several students from a
basketball game. These students
were holding up signs criticizing the
AD and his department.
But the two things that are really
indicative of the controversy sor-
rounding Karr are his treatment of
the women's basketball team two
years ago and his scheduling of col-
lege football games.
In 1986 the Lady Pirates were in-
vited to attend the National Invita-
tional Basketball tournament, a real
feather in the caps of Coach Emily
Man waring and the squad. Unfortu-
nately, Karr decided that "Going
after the best" didn't include the
Lady Pirates, and they remained
home while another squad took the
slot.
And everyone knows about the
football scheduling. While Karr has
upgraded our scheduling, his ten-
ure has seen E.C.U. football through
three straight 2-9 seasons. Many feel
scheduling teams the likes of Miami,
Auburn, Penn State, Florida, Florida
State and West Virginia is too much
to ask of a top twenty team, let alone
an independent without a well-es-
tablished program.
While there are many good rea-
sons to criticize Karr, one must
remember the several very good
things he has accomplished.
Karr took over the reigns of an
athletic program that operated in
the red for several years and now
has that program making money. In
addition he initiated the drive to
build the new sports medicine facil-
ity behind Ficklen Coliseum � a
facility which will do much to add to
the university's reputation. Karr is
also president of the Colonial Ath-
letic Association.
Still, the AD for a major university
needs to be open to the public and
answerable to the fans. The AD
needs to project a positive, friendly
image while seeing to the needs of
the entire athletic program rather
than just one aspect of it.
Karr, unfortunately, could never
be all of these things at once. Karr
did a good job at what he was sup-
posed to do, get the athletic depart-
ment back on its feet financially. It is
now time for new leadership to take
the next step �national promi-
nence for a school proud of both its
academic and athletic life.
A careful search must be con-
ducted for the next AD. He or she
must be a person of great character
and openness with the savy to make
shrewd business decisions. Above
all the next athletic director must
remember that athletics should be
for the students and for the univer-
sity and therefore must be account-
able to them both.
Military stereotypes are not
true according to Army officer
As a recent graduate of ECU as well as a newly commis-
sioned officer in the US Army, I am uniquely sensitive to the
conflict between well-intentioned anti-military students and
equally well-intentioned pro-military students. My assign-
ment as a cadre member of the ECU Army KOTC detachment
and my subsequent involvement with enrollment revealed to
me the intensity of that conflict.
I have heard many of the fears and objections ECU students
have voiced regarding the military, but perhaps the most
eloquent protest I found was one scrawled across an Army
ROTC scholarship information fiver that had been posted on
campus. The graffiti mocked: "SUPPORT AN INSTITUTION'
DEDICATED TO KILLING The key words in this state-
ment, I think, are "support" and "dedicated
Indeed, what sane, thinking human being could support
any institution dedicated to killing? Even further, is support
inclusive of only those people who actually wear the uniform
of the institution in question, or are the people who pay the
taxes which fund that institution equally responsible for its
actions?
Certainly, the apparent neccessity for the existence of
armies is one of the great tragedies endured by the peoples of
"civilized" societies - peoples who view themselves as com-
passionate and peace-loving. But is the United States Army
(and therefore the men and women who fill its ranks) "dedi-
cated to killing?"
1 spoke informally with students in a military Science 1001
(Introduction to ROTC and the Army) class in an effort to
ascertain their feelings toward these questions. This class was
composed of male and female freshmen, sophomores and
juniors who are not committed to the military but who have
shown an interest in the Armv. Most of the students in the
classare involved with ROTC because of the financial advan-
tages it offers as well as for the opportunities to learn leader-
ship skills. Some were attracted by the pay and job security of
military service, some by the chance to travel, and one needed
a credit hour.
All agreed that the Army is not dedicated to killing. While
the need to kill was seen as an undesireable future possibility,
the students in this class were willing to accept that prospect
because of their dedication to other principles. Specifically,
the students seemed to be dedicated to protecting things they
saw as worthwhile � things like freedom and their home-
land. When shown the scribbled protest on the information
fiver, the students commented that the protester had consid-
ered only one aspect of the many functions the Armv perfors
1 hccontnbutionsof the Army Medical Corps would alonebe
worthy of a separate writing. They felt that the view of the
Army as "dedicated to killing" was uninformed and narrow-
minded. One student advised: "Don't knock it until you try
As the reader may expect, I (having chosen the profession
of arms) agree with the students in the Military Science cl iss
V hile there are certainly cold, unfeeling people both in and
out of uniform, it is those who must actually endure the stine
of battle who are least likely to start a war. The true art of
generalship is to make a potential enemy's acts of aggression
too costly a prospect for him to pursue.
Unfortunately, these potential enemies exist - some per-
ceived, but some are very real. It is not by a dedication to
killing that we will be able to preserve the lives and liberties
Of our friends, but rather, by a dedication to principles for
which we are willing to kill and, if neccessarv die
CAMPUS SPFXTRLM
BY
MICHAEL McCLANAH AN
It is also important to remember that the Armv and her
sister services all function as extensions of policv established
by civilians. The armed forces only make policv that applies
to themselves. Distressing actions such as unfair draft acth i-
ties and unwise troop deployments are usually not the result
of a military decision.
That, I think, is the main point. The military serves the w
of America's elected officials � be they good or bad. We in the
military are sworn to execute the orders of our civilian lead
ers. We may sometimes disagree with those orders, and are
free to voice our disagreement in the proper forum; but when
a consensus decision has been reached we will perform our
duty in'the hope that our sacrifices will benefit the United
States and, hopefully, help prevent any further need tor
violence.
Letter writers pan drugs, clarify statements
To the editor:
Steve Sommers's Campus Spec-
trum article, "Drug use no big deal"
(Nov. 12) was so full of error we
hardly know where to begin. Perhaps
wc should start by quoting his last
two sentences: "I would like to think
that the American people will look
past any trivial finger pointing and
look at the ideas the candidates have
to offer. We can start now by not
rebutting this editorial
We agree with the first statement:
those who keep dismissing Pat
Robertson as a "radical" and who
constantly harp on the fact that his
wife of a quarterentury was preg-
nant when they were married sould
stop their trivial finger pointing and
should look at the experience, exper-
tise and pro-U.S.A. ideas Robertson
has to offer.
And surely,Steve, you wouldn't try
to restrict our First Amendment
rights to rebut your editorial and to
point out its many flaws by implying
that such exercise of our freedom of
speech is "trivial finger pointing
Come on. Liberal open-mindedness,
remember?
You claim that the "Just Say No"
anti-drug campaign is "sheer propa-
ganda What an incredible state-
ment! I suppose you think that Len
Bias' family doesn't wish that he had
"just said no" to drugs (he was the
famed basketball player).
Marijuana usage has been linked to
cancer, birth defects, premature ag-
ing, sterility, destruction of portions
of the brain, and impaired reflexes
(the latter are dangerous when one is
driving or operating machinery). Of
course, cocaine (crack or otherwise)
can simply kill you outright, or, if
you're lucky just rot your nose off.
By the way, Steve, we conservatives
don't need drugs to make us "curious
about our national foreign policy"
nor do we make that claim for anyone
else.
You claim that the CIA sells drugs
to aid the Contras in their fight
against Sandinista oppression. Per-
haps,and if so, well, we conservatives
certainly wouldn't condone such ac-
tions. However, you conveniently left
out the documented fact that the
Sandinstas are among the biggest
drug-runners in this hemisphere
You say we should ignore the lying,
cheating, and adultery that some (ex-
presidential candidates have en-
gaged in recently. You'd rather have a
president that wouldn't "step into my
life and tell me what to do Tell us,
Steve, are you for the total eradication
of all laws? After all, any law imposes
SOME system of morality on you;
every law restricts your license and in
a manner of speaking, "tellsyou what
to do and not do" in SOME way or
another.
You call conservatives "snooping
noses Gosh, Steve, then every law-
maker from the president to the Chief
Justice to Congress down to the local
sheriff is a "snooping nose if your
definition of one is someone who tries
to maintain a certain semblance of
law, order and decency in this coun-
try.
You claim conservatives are re-
sponsible for "record labeling, por-
nography censorship, anti-abortion
sentiment, a national drinking age set
at 21" and "mandatory drug testing
Did you know that liberal Democratic
presidential candidate Gore and his
wife have been among the front-run-
nersof the record-labeling campaign?
And that such labeling is not censor-
ship? After all, the movies have been
"labeled" with ratings for years.
Also, conservatives are proud to be
against obscenity that degrades and
promotes the abuse of women and
children. We're proud to be pro-life
activists who decry the senseless
mass murder of the innocent unborn.
The drinking age debate is a non-
partisan one; we conservatives are
nol neccessarily for it. And you'd
better believe if we get on a plane, a
bus, or a train that we'd want to be
sure that the pilot, driver or conduc-
tor has been tested for drug usage
Liberals orchestrated Ginsburg's
downfall, then blamed conservatives
for it when it was too late to recall him.
Incredible.
Justin Sturz
Media Chairman
College Republicans
Mary Fordham
Secretary
College Republicans
To the editor:
In response to Porcelli and Batizy.
There seems to be some misunder-
standing regarding my comments on
November 10 that I would like to clar-
ify.
I had no intention of giving the
impression that we completely forget
the recreation center, nor for that
matter, for students to take one class
per semester. The point I was trying to
convey is that the parking problem at
ECU is serious enough to warrant
lessened efforts on a rec facility. The
comments, misunderstood as they
were, rousted the feathers of some
asteemed peers and encouraged
comments on their behalf that I just
couldn't resist refuting.
I'm fairly confident that most stu-
dents at ECU are aware that it is nec-
essary sometimes to choose between
certain items. For example, many of
us would like to own a nice car and a
yacht. But, because "some of us" suf-
fer from a dilima known as "limited
resources we are forced to choose
the items that will yield the greatest
economic utility. We are not always
able to get everything we "want
Also, I owe an apology to all the
ECU students for even suggesting
that the university offer us an educa-
tion. It has been clearly brought to my
attention that ECU has a "physical
activity" obligation to its students. I
mean, for $389 bucks a semester, what
can you expect. If you want an educa-
tion, you need to go to Duke and pay
$6000 per semester. Right? Well, actu-
ally, no. The state of North Carolina
pays a large portion of our educa-
tional expenses and makes no im-
plied obligations to satisfying our
"physical activity" needs. This is a
clear result of rational persons draw-
ing irrational conclusions.
ECU students are not naive. Each
semester, staff and students purchase
a $25 hunting permit to hunt game
that is extinct. Batizy, if I could pur-
chase a park downtown like others
can purchase spa time (for the same
price), I wouldn't comlain. But I can't.
You noted that such schools as NC
State have "a new rec facility Ah,
but you failed to note that they also
have a parking deck (and one under
planned construction).
I am grateful for Chancelor Eakin's
announcement this past week regard
ing new parking areas and hope it is
only the beginning. I would also like
to note that Scott Thomas's efforts
should be commended, pointing out
that the formation of a committee is
only the beginning. The committee
must come up with a solution. The
clock is ticking.
Ed Hathaway
Sophmore
Physics
�����"� �� I1 i1 �1wlMtl miftr-ilii mnim�i-l
mm
wmmm
Secretary WilliomRen
Colleges with
anted btud
to default
i I f le a
ent
trade st ho
Thirl
:
WASHINGTON (CPS) i
leges and trade schtx ,1s who al
future student loan default rates
to exceed 20 percent could be
excluded from all federal grants
and assistance, IS Secretan
Education William Bennett r
atedduringaNov.4pn � �
ence
The Education IXpartment had
announced its intention to :
loans to students at schot �1 where
the default rate is high in
Federal Register in late Oct
DefaultsintheGuarant.
dent Loan program cost
ers more than SI 6 billii i
and have become "in!
Bennett said at the pi
ence
The Citade
CHARLESTON, S.( I I
In what may well be1 the n
radical campus AIDS p
adopted, The Citadel annou:
it will require all its applicar
undergo tests to see if they I
the fatal immune system illn.
Applicants who test posi ti �
the disease "most likely would be
denied entrance to The Citadel
reported Dr. Joseph C. Franz, the
military college's physician
Cadets already enrolled
seek AIDS testing on their ov.
on a doctor's recommend.r
Franz added. If a cadet is infect d
with the AIDS � short for ac-
quired immune deficient svn-
drome � virus, he will be subject
to a mandatorv medical evalu-
ation and may be discharged if he
develops AIDS.
A survey by the school newspa-
per, The Brigadier, indicated nnt
cadets favor the policv.
The announcement came soon
after other campuses throughout
the country also struggled with
questions raised by the AIDS epi-
demic during October, billed as
national AIDS Awarenes- M ntl
�The University of I
committee developing the
school's AIDS policy said marnia-
W,

V
�M
inn
Dr. Hfyppmannr , fr
joins med. school
FCL wi Bureau
Dr. Richard A. Hoppmann. a
rheumatologist, has joined the
ECU School of Medicine as assi -
tant professor in the Department
of Medicine's Section of Rheuma-
tology.
Before coming to Greem
Hoppmann completed a fell
ship in rheumatologv at Ro
Gray School oi Medicine in ir
ston-Salem.
The Charleston, S.C. native re-
ceived his mexiical degree from
the Medical Universitv of South
Carolina. He also holds a ma
degree from the Univen
Georgia and a bachelor s d -
from the Universitv ot S
Carolina. He completed a resi-
dency in internal me3icinc a:
ECU.
Heisa member of the Amor
�College of rhvsicians. the m -
can Association for the Ad a
ment of Science, the Southern
Medical Association and the
American Rheumatism Associa-
tion.
intrajI
OUTD
i
For!
An �iiahrthan Chnstmns ri
rv.rrr: - -
December 2-5, 1987, 7:00 p.
Mendenhali Student Center Multi-Pur;
East Carolina University
Advance Ticket Sales Om Admission 116.00 for Adults
SiQ.OO for High Scnool Youth a'
For forth Information contact. Tha Ctrai Tlckat Ottteo. m�p,c
Conttx, Eaat Caroa� " CKy. Oroowrtiio. NC �'���-oss
jjfllteAjjSCJUCTlON
J





Sw kTr,
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 19,1967 5
es are not
rmv officer
ine
Ul
VW1-
I -h
?st on the information
ie protester had consid-
the many functions the Army pcrfors.
rmy Medical Corps would alone be
They felt that the view of the
as uninformed and narrow-
Don't knock it until you try
having chosen the profession
he Military Science cJass.
eling people both in and
' .ictualiy endure the sting
start a war. The true art of
tential enemy's acts of aggression
r him to pursue
ntial enemies exist - some per-
real It is not by a dedication to
reserve the lives and liberties
ration to principles for
and. if neccessarv, die.
AMPUS SPECTRUM
BY
HAEL McCLANAHAN
remember that the Armv and her
�ns of policy established
nly make policy that applies
ns such as unfair draft activi-
yments are usually not the result
n point. The military serves the will
ygood orbad.Weinthe
the orders of our civilian lead-
gree with those orders, and are
the proper forum; but when
been reached we will perform our
" a rifices will benefit the United
vent anv further need for
tements
nda
the
� my
acal
�hat
�duca-
jid pay
Lactu-
Irolina
s a large portion of our educa-
� expenses and makos no im-
plied obligations to satisfying our
"physical activity" needs. This is a
clear result of rational persons draw-
ing irrational conclusions.
ECU students are not naive Each
semester, staff and students purchase
a S25 hunting permit to hunt game
that is extinct. Batizy, if 1 could pur-
chase a park downtown like others
can purchase spa time (for the same
price), 1 wouldn'tcomlain. But 1 can't
� noted that such schools as 'C
State have "a new rec facility Ah
but you failed to note that they also'
have a parking deck (and one under
planned construction).
I am grateful for Chancelor Eakin's
anno, ncement this past week regard-
ing rv parking areas and hope it is
the beginning. I would also like
te that Scott Thomas's efforts
i �uld be commended, pointing out
hat the formation of a committee is
nly the beginning. The committee
� come up with a solution. The
clock is ticking.
Ed Hathaway
Sophmore
Physics

Secretary William Bennett rh,�
Slfs with 20 student default rate stand to lose GSLs
WASHINGTON (CPS) - Col
leges and trade schools who allow
future student loan default rates
to exceed 20 percent could be
excluded from all federal grants
.stance, U.S. Secretary of
Education William Bennett reiter-
ated during a Nov. 4 press confer-
ence.
The Education Department had
announced its intention to deny
loans to students at schools where
the default rate is high in The
Federal Register in late October.
Defaults in the Guaranteed Stu-
dent Loan program cost taxpay-
ers more than $1.6 billion a vear
and have become "intolerable
Bennett said at the press confer-
ence.
'Virtually one-half of theGuar-
anted Student Loan budget goes
to default payments' Bennett
said. He called it "a disgraceful
situation that no one, neither
Congress nor the executive
branch, intended
Bennett released a campus-by-
campus list of default rates at
7,295 colleges, universities and
trade schools for fiscal year 1985.
Thirty-two percent of the institu-
tions had default rates greater
than 20 percent, including 500
with default rates of more than 50
percent.
The secretary has ordered an
immediate review of the schools
with default rates exceeding 50
percent, and if those investiga-
tions reveal evidence of "waste,
fraud or abuse the institutions
could be fined or declared ineli-
gible to participate in federal stu-
dent assistance programs.
Schools whose default rates fall
between 20 and 50 percent, Ben-
nett explained, have until Decem-
ber, 1989, to get thosedcfault rates
lower than 20 percent. If they fail
to do so, they could lose the right
to participate in the Guaranteed
Student Loan program.
Those schools would also be-
come ineligible to receive any
other federal money, including
research grants, Veterans Ad-
ministration funds and Pell
Grants, department spokesman
Bill Jamroz said.
About 2,000 � or 32 percent �
of the institutions named in
Bennett's list had default rates
greater than 20 percent. The over-
all default rate in the heavily sub-
sidized loan program is about 13
percent.
However, rates vary widely
from school to school. In West
Virginia, for example, almost half
of the loan recipients from West
Virginia State College had de
repay loans rests with former stu-
dents, but institutions bear a re-
sponsibility as well, Bennett said.
But punishing institutions for
the irresponsibility of their
alumni would punish future stu-
dents, said Mary Preston of the
United States Student Associa-
tion (USSA).
The plan would particularly
hurt low-income students who
attend trade schools, she said.
faultcd,comparedtothe9.95per- While trade schools'may have
cent default rate for West Virginia higher default rates than colleges
University.
Nationally, there are 2.2 million
borrowers defaulting on the
loans, worth $5.63 billion, Jamroz
said.
The primary responsibility to
The Citadel screens for AIDS
CHARLESTON, SC. (CPS)
In what may well be the most
radical campus AIDS policy yet
adopted, The Citadel announced
it will require all its applicants to
undergo tests to see if they have
the fatal immune system illness.
Applicants who test positive for
the disease "most likely would be
denied entrance to The Citadel
reported Dr. Joseph C. Franz, the
military college's physician.
Cadets already enrolled can
seek AIDS testing on their own or
on a doctor's recommendation,
Franz added. If a cadet is infected
with the AIDS � short for ac-
quired immune deficiency syn-
drome � virus, he will be subject
to a mandatory medical evalu-
ation and may be discharged if he
develops AIDS.
A survey by the school newspa-
per. The Brigadier, indicated most
cadets favor the policy.
The announcement came soon
after other campuses throughout
the country also struggled with
questions raised by the AIDS epi-
demic during October, billed as
national AIDS Awareness Month.
�The University of Utah
tory AIDS testing is no solution to
the AIDS crisis. "We prefer, if test-
ing is to bedone, that it be done on
a voluntary, informed basis said
Evelyn Hartigan, a Utah health
sciences center administrator and
member of the committee.
�Central Missouri State Uni-
versity considered distributing
coupons for free condoms during
the school's Safer Sex Week, but
Program, said kids' hormones,
sexual curiosity and peer pres-
sure are stronger influences than
blandishments not to have sex.
Teenagers "do not yet have the
amount of ego development that
allows the kids to say no and
understand their egos will be in-
tact he said.
�The University of Colorado
decided to install condom ma-
nixcxi the idea. "Placing a coupon chines in dormitories, although
committee developing the
school s AIDS policy said manda-M.nnesota's Adolescent
Dr. HoppmajnT
in the (safe sex information) pack
ets might have offended some
people, and it is of no educational
value said health center director
Merle Charney. "We feel it was
more important to educate people
about condom usage rather than
place the coupon in the packet
Using condoms correctly can
block transmission of the disease,
health officials say. But critics ��
including Secretary of Education
William Bennett � argue that
distributing condoms encourages
students to have sex. Instead,
abstinence or monogamy should
be emphasized, they say.
�Such arguments arc naive,
speakers at an AIDS conference at
the University of Minnesota said.
Michael Resnick, the director of
Health
the move contradicts the school's
housing policy that prohibits sex
in the dorms.
Also at Colorado, the Campus
Press reported that a CU profes-
sor has AIDS. The professor be-
gan teaching this semester but
had to quit when he became too ill
to continue. The university has
not released his name. "I respect
the confidentiality that must pre-
vail in these situations said stu-
dent health director Dr. Rolan
Zick.
�Students at the University of
North- Dakota grabbed up 6,000
condoms distributed with Safer
Sex kitsat an information booth in
the student union.
�An AIDS education class at
Ohio State has gotten mixed re-
views from students because
three videos shown to the class
contain often-graphic sexual
scenes. Some students also took
offense because condoms were
distributed to the class.
HELP
Erase
Crime at your
University
ECU Public Safety: 757-6150
and universities, they provide an
opportunity for the poor to re-
ceive training and establish ca-
reers. "There's no reason to pun-
ish all the people who benefit
from the institution because 1 out
of 5 don't repay their loans
The government, she said,
should review financial aid of-
fices to ensure students are prop-
erly counseled before taking out
loans. "There should be more
grants available she added.
'Pooolc from low-income fami-
lies can't always assume large
debts to continue their educa-
tion
The government should also
establish programs that allow
students to participate in commu-
nity service projects, like the
Peace Corps, in return for loan
forgiveness.
The cost of student loan de-
faults has skyrocketed in recent
years, largely becauseof the surge
in borrowing on campuses that
began in the late 1970s when the
government made it easier for
students to obtain loans.
The U.S. Senate has already
passed legislation that would
penalize institutions with default
rates above 25 percent. Defaulters
are also reported to credit bu-
reaus, and wages are garni shed if
defaulters are federal employees
The Internal Revenue Service
withholds defaulters' tax returns,
and private collection agencio
are hired to track down defaul
ters.
�ffijai
JW


joins med. school
FCL New Bureau
Dr. Richard A. Hoppmann, a
rheumatologist, has joined the
ECU School of Medicine as assis-
tant professor in the Department
of Medicine's Section of Rheuma-
tology.
Before coming to Greenville,
Hoppmann completed a fellow-
ship in rheumatology at Bowman
Gray School of Medicine in Win-
ston-Salem.
The Charleston, S.C. native re-
ceived his medical degree from
the Medical University of South
Carolina. He also holds a master's
degree from the University of
Georgia and a bachelor's degree
from the University of South
Carolina. He completed a resi-
dency in internal medicine at
ECU.
He is a member of the American
�College of Physicians, the Ameri-
can Association for the Advance-
ment of Science, the Southern
Medical Association and the
American Rheumatism Associa-
tion.
RESUMES
Professional Resume Composition
Atlantic Personnel Services
209 Commerce Street, Suite B
10 discount with this ad.
.355-7931
ifrtl TRIP
WINTERGREEN. VA
OPEN
HOUSE
Join Us and the
other Arlington Village
Merchants in a toast to the
upcoming holiday season.
Sunday, November 22nd 2-6 P.M.
919-A, Red Banks 756-1058
Arlington Village
INTRAMURAL - RECREATIONAL SERVICES
OUTDOOR RECREATION CENTER
Trip will be held: January 3 8.
Registration: November 1 - December 1
204 Memorial Gym
Cost: $405� which includes: Transportation, lodging
ski rentals, all lift tickets.
A non-refundable $85.00 Fee is Required
upon Registration.
For Additional Information Call:
Mark Ritter at 757-6387.
Thursday
Members Free
Friday
TViWttGDl DTOER
An �iuabcthan Christmas Irast!
rltrrttrrt btj gfaarln Moart
Elbo and Sig Phi Psilon present
All New Rush
Hour. 4-7
Members Free - Guest $1
Full Menu of $1 Drinks
Best in Rock and Progressive Rock
Check out Greenville's Newest Afternoon Party
with the Best Prices in Town!
December 2-5, 1987, 7:00 p.m.
Mendenhail Student Center Multi-Pur pose Room
East Carolina University
Advance Ticket Sales Only Admission: $16.00 tor Adults
�10.00 tor High School Youth and Under
for further informetloo eontect: The Central Ticket Office. Mendenhail atudent
Center, East CaroMne " 5f��y. Greenville. NC �Himjij, (91�)757-aeii
�xt. 266
mmmmtmmmmmm
THE STUDENT UNION COFFEEHOUSE COMMITTEE
PRESENTS IN A CABARET PERFORMANCE
THE ECU CONTEMPORARY JAZZ ENSEMBLE
FEATURING
MUSIC DIRECTOR - PIANIST, PAUL TARDIF
SPECIAL GUEST - SAXOPHONIST, JACK WILKINS
ERIDAY, NQVEMBERL-mZ
8:00 RML
ROOM 244, MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
ADMISSION - FREE
REFRESHMENTS SERVED
OPEN AUDITIONS DEC. 4 FOR SPRING SEMESTER
WNKiei n ii ii he iiiamjiiii,
mmammm
m � , m IMfcMh m ,m ,
����.�� �m





-�Wi Msam 'man Eaaae B rfr
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
FREE Tnp to Daytona plus commission
money. Going to Florida? Go for free
lake advantage of promoting the 1
Spring Break Trip. If interested call
designers of Travel 1-800-453-9074
Immediately!
RESIDENT COUNSELOR: Primarily
interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field No monetary
compensation, however, room, utilities
and phone provided Call Mary Smith at
the REAL Crisis Center 758-UELP.
COLLEGE REP WANTED to distribute
student Rate" subscription cards at this
campus. Good income. For information
and application write to: COLLEGIATE
MARKETING SERVICES, 251 Glen-
wood Dr Moorcsville, NC, 28115 704-
664-4063.
AIRLINES NOW HIRING. Flight At
tendants, Travel Agents, Mechanics,
ccUnS0mer Service Listings Salaries to
S50K. Entry level positions Call 805-687-
6000. Ext. A-U66.
OyRSEAS JOBS. Also Cruiseships
$15,000 - $95,400yr Now runng! 320
openings! 0) 805-687-6000 Ext OJ-U66.
WANTED: Student Agents to sell vaca-
tion tours. To Florida and Texas starting
at low $149.00 per person for 7 nights Call
for information: 1-800-222-4139 Trans-
portation available.
WANTED: True frozen yogurt lovers!
Come to Hank � Homemade, 321 East
Kth Street for a FREE taste of frozen de-
light. 758-0000.
HIRING! Federal govcrment jobs in your
area and overseas. Many immediate
opeings without waiting list or test $15-
68,000. Phone call refundable (602) 838-
8885. Ext. 5285
COLLEGE STUDENTS interested in
earning a free spring break in the Baha
mas! Call Campus Tours, Inc at (305) 523-
TOUR, that's (305) 523-8687.
FOR SALE
TROLL'S TUX AND TEES: Tired of
paying high prices for formal wear7 Try
Troll's Tux and Tees for your formal
needs. Designer and Traditional styles.
From $30 and up. 757-1007 or 758-0763.
FOR SALE: 1 or 2 round trip rickets to
Boston over Thanksgiving. Lowest fares
possible. Call Bill at 703-989-6854 or
Tommy Steughfon at 757-0234.
TROPICAL ZONE - Greenville's hottest
new concept in tanning Featuring State of
the Art Silver Solarium System with built
in high speed facial tanners. Best deals in
town Special rates for students Call for
your free appointments. 355-5120.
FOR SALE: Sofa, excellent conditon yel-
low, gold, green. $80. 752-5669, 6-9 p!m.
FOR SALE: Blue, '81 Chevette, automatic
new brakes, new shocks, $400.00 Ask for
Mike or leave message. 757-1901.
FROZEN YOGURT BLEND-INS Fresh
peach frozen yogurt with granola - yum!
only at Han k's Homemade, 321 E. 10th St.
(next to Wendy's) 758-0000.
KING SIZE BEDROOM, 4 piece with
almost new matrcss set. Very solid and
good condition. $800 or best offer. 746-
2727 after 8 p.m. or Sundays.
CARTOON CARICATURES for Christ
mas! Call Barbour, 752-5910.
2 COMPLETE SETS of snow skis. K2 180,
8 yrs. old. Olin 195 used once. Solomon
Bindings. Must sell. 752-0123.
PROFESSIONAL BUT NOT
EXPENSIVE! Progressive Solutions, Inc
offers professional word processing to
students and professionals. Term papers,
dissertations, themes, reports and much
more as low as $1.75 per page. (Please call
for quote on your project.) Price includes
printing on high quality bond paper and
spelling verification against a 50,000 word
electronic dictionary Ask about our spe-
cial offers. Laser printing now available'
Call Mark at 757-3440 after 7.00 p.m. for
free information.
TERM PAPERS - Thesis typed on IBM
wordprocessor. Letter quality print. Pro-
fessional editing Years of experience. Call
anytime and leave message or call after
3:00 p.m. Nanette Stillwell, 1-524-5241.
Cheap call-Best service! Pick up and deliv-
ery.
GOVERNMENT CONFISCATED cars
and trucks. Late model Porsches, Z-cars,
BMW's and Jeeps, for as low as $200. Also,
speedboats, cycles, motor homes. Send $10
for Regional Buyer's Kit to: FEDERAL
RESEARCH, LTD P.O. Box 888232. At-
lanta, Ga. 30356.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24 hours
in and out Guaranteed typing on paper up
to20hand written pages. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 E. 5th Street, (Be-
side Cubbies) Greenville, NC. 752-3694
Grammar, punctuation and spelling
corrected. Call JAMIE at 758-1161, M-F
9-5, or 758-4567 nights and weekends!
Fast, accurate and reliable.
ATTENTION BEER LOVERS a 16 07
pitcher $1.50 every night at Famous
Pizza 100 E 10th St and Evans St.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-2 br, 2 12 bth, condo.
Kingston Place. Avail. Jan. 1. Great at-
mosphere - pool!
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share apart
ment in Carriage I louse Apts. Private
bedroom $135 per month and 12 utili
ties. Call after 10:00 p.m 756-9248
1 OR 2 roommates wanted Cedar Court
Apartments. All appliances, rent based
on single or double occupancy 1 12
from campus Bus services. Call 757
0784.
ROOM NEAR campus. $125 includes
utilities. Call 757-3543.
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apartments
for rent-furnished. Call Hollie Si
monowich at 752-2865
WANTED- roommate to share 2 bed
room apartment at Tar River Estates
Will have private room No deposit Call
752-3032.
PERSONALS
CHI OMEGA PLEDGES AND
DATES-TH1S WEEKEND IS ESPE-
CIALLY FOR YOU AND WE HOPE
YOU HAVE A GREAT TIME! LOVE
SISTERS OF CHI OMEGA.
TIGHT BUDGET? Try our meal deal
$2.49 for any snadwich, fries, and drink
14 hamburger, ham and cheese, BLT,
roast beef, chicken filet, turkey, or pizza
burger. Also, homemade spaghetti and
lasagna ($3 95-garlic bread included)
Famous Pizza-comer o( 10th St and
Evans. Not for delivery.
HAPPY 23RD BIRTHDAY MARK
SCHECHTER! BE PREPARED, SUR-
PRISESARE IN ABUNDANCE!
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICES
758-8241 or 758-5488 ask for Susan
IS IT TRUE you can buy jeeps for $44
through the U.S. government? Get the facts
today! Call 1-312-742-1142 Ext. 5271-A.
WORD PROCESSINGletter quality
or laser printing Rush jobs accepted.
752-1933.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERV-
ICES: Papers, resumes, theses, etc. Rea-
sonable rates (most $125 per page)
BILL GRADY: Roses are red, Violets are
blue, I had a real good time laughing at
you. Love, Pat Malloy (The girl with the
dark green eyes).
TO THOSE FINE YOUNG MEN who
were turned away at the door of Menden-
na'L we, the Overseas Development
Network, were there! Please join us in our
next meeting, Thursday, December 3, 4
p.m in Speight R-151 (Mendenhall lost
their chance). Topic: Honduras�A Per-
sonal Experience
bowling Thursday, Nov. 19 at 7 p.m in
the Mendenhall bowling center. Knock
down 9 pins in 8 out of 10 tries and you
win! Call 757 6611 for details
CHUCK, BARRY, ROB, AND STACY
request your presence at Friday's Tea
Party at OFF Tl IE CUFF They say this
new batch of tea is "awesome free pizza
is great too.
OFF THE CUFF - OFF TO JAIL. $2 won't
buy you out of that DWI Jackson See you
at the Elbo Friday 4-7. $1 screwdrivers
DELTA DELIGHT WEEKEND, Nov.
20th 21st 1) DELTA DATING GAME!
Friday, Nov 20th Biology BIdg rm 103B
at 8 p.m. 2) DELTA DISCO! Friday, Nov
20th at the Cultural Center from 10 2 am
3) PARTY with DST at The UNLIMITED
TOUCH! - Saturday, Nov. 21st. ALL
ADMISSIONS $1.00!
THETA CHI The formal was awesome
The holidome has never rocked so hard
Thanks to everyone who helped doco
rate.
FOUND: CAT A young male, orange
tabby. Very sweet and friendly. Would
make excellent house pet. Anyone who
has lost a cat, or anyone who is inter-
ested, please call 757-1481. This cat
needs a home badly.
DRIBBLE: You've waited three years to
read one for you but I started to write, 1
didn't have a clue A flag-football game7
A night at the dorm? Oh no I've got it!
Here's how you perform At first, 1 won-
dered if you could move then Whitney
came on and you busted the groove To
top it all off, your scope was in high gear
and chest full of palm trees suddenly
came near Nervous and unsure' I under-
stand 1 just can't remember when the
choking began Thank Cod for TC, you
know CPR, Insert tongue, caress chest
and "pump it" real hard Needless to say,
I'm extremely proud, watching ya'll get
off in front of a crowd But please slow
down before you start coming, wc might
end up in VIRGINIA or something. Well
I did my best, hope it was satisfactory
- let's keep making trips to the I lershey
Kisses factory Love ya! Your roomie
COMPARE OUR PRICES AND GOOD
FOOD. Buy any large pizza and get a 2-
liter coke free. Buy a small pizza and get
2 free 16 oz. drinks Buy any sub and get
one free 16 oz. drink Call for FREE deliv-
ery Famous Pizza 757-1276 or 757-0731
GREEK OFFICERS who participated
last Sunday thanks for being such great
sports. Hope you all had fun. Love, The
AZD pledges.
THETA CHI would like to thank the
Ramones for the cake. It was smokin
CHEAP DRINKS are available any
where - quality drinks at a reasonable
price plus free food. East Carolina Tea
Party at OFF THE CUFF
WINA FREE TURKEY Turkey shoot in A2D SISTERS: Congratulations to all of
Announcements
SEA
Attention: Today's the last day to par-
ticipate in the annual Blood Drive spon-
sored by SRA in conjunction with Pizza
Hut. Come by Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter between 12:00 noon and 6:00 p.m to
donate. Each participant will receive a
coupon for a free personal pizza from
Pizza Hut of Greenville. Give life this
Thanksgiving Season!
ILQ
Status of the European Community:
The International Language Organiza-
tion, I.L.O invites you to attend a slide
show and lecture on "The Status of the
European Community Speaker will be
Dr. Donald Guest, professor of Marketing
of ECU Mon. Nov 23 at 3:30 p m at BC
103. I.L.O. members and everyone inter-
ested are welcome.
rriTcoMM.coiiFnF
Registration for Winter Quarter will be
Mon Nov. 30 Late registration will con-
tinue through Dec. 3 and classes will begin
on Tuesday Dec. 1 Day classes Nov 30 8
am. to 2 p.m Evening classes - Nov 30 6
p.m. to 8 p.m.
PRODUCTION TOMM,
io all members of the student union
productions committee There will be a
meeting on monday November 23, at 6
p.m. in front of the information center in
Mendenhall Please be ready to decorate
Ann'
Arts an
topics 1
hire -1:
REBEL MAr.A7.Np
incing new essay contest: "The
letters as a Cultural Force Any
osely associated of current cul-
erature, art, music, pop culture -
are encouraged. Papers should be typed
and under 15 pages. Become a published
scholar! Enter at the Rebel office (Publica-
tions Building) on Nov. 20 and 23 from 3-
5 p.m.
COOP EDUCATION
The North Carolina Internship Office
provides paid summer internship oppor-
tunities with state government. Positions
are available for a variety of majors
throughout the state. Jeff Age, Director of
the Program will be in Raw! 302 to speak
to interested students on Friday, Nov. 20
at 3 p.m.
BUCCANEER OFFICE
To anyone who ordered a new Student
Review. Please come by the Buccaneer
office to pick up your copy today.
GET PUBLISHED!
� -with the Rebel Magazine, Find ntry
dales for Prose, Poetry and Essay Contests
are Nov 20 & 23 from 3-5 p.m. in the Rebel
office on 2nd floor Publications Building.
Become a published writer and maybe
even win some extra cash.
AM A MEMBERS
There will be an "End of Fundraiser"
meeting on Monday the 23rd. The meet-
ing will start at 2.00 p.m all members
involved with the raffle tickets need to be
present.
This month's Society for Technical
Communication meeting will be held
Thursday, Nov. 19 at 7:00 p.m. in Austin
132. Mrs Nan McLaughlin of the ECU co-
op office will discuss co-op opportunities
for both graduates and undergraduates
Technical Writing, English, and Journal-
ism. The meeting is open to all ECU stu-
dents, faculty, and their guests.
TEACHER EDUCATION
There's still time to apply for the Work
Study Trip to Mexico during Spring Break
(March 6-13), sponsored by the School of
Education and Campus Ministries. Op-
portunities are available to observe and
teach at selected schools in Puebla, Mex-
ico. Get your application today in the
Dean's Office, Speight Building, Room
154.
INTERMEDIATE Clim
The Intermediate Education Qub will
meet Nov 23, 1987 at 430 p.m. in 312
Speight Speaker will be Janie Manning,
Principle of Bethel Elementary. All inter-
ested intermediate education majors
should attend.
SUBIECTS NFFDFD
The ECU Clinical Psychology Program
needs children, ages 6-15 to volunteer for
intelligence testing. This is to assist in the
training of MA. level students. A limited
amount of feedback will be given. Inter-
ested people can contact Dr. Larry Hines
at the Department of Psychology, 757
6800. '
CORAL RFFFD.VF PI TTB
If you enjoy scuba diving, snorkeling,
and adventuring with friendly outgoing
people, then you need to join ECU's Coral
Reef Dive Qub. For more info call 752-
4399 and ask for Glenn or Rob.
OMEGA PSI PHI
Reminder: All minority students with a
GPA of a 3.0 or above should turn their
confirmation letters in to PO Box 3014 or
give it to one of the members of the organi-
zation. Please confirm as soon as possible.
OMEGA PSI PHI
The 4th Annual Achievement Week
Program sponsored by the Omega Psi Phi
Fraternity, Inc. will be held Nov. 22,1987
at Jenkins Auditorium. Time 7 p.m. Mi-
nority students which have a 3.0 GPA or
better will be recognized as well as out
standing community leaders A reception
will follow the program. The public is
cordially invited to attend.
SALVATION ARMY
Family Fun Time - 7-9 p.m. Friday's
Recreation - Games - Fellowship.
ALPHA PHI AT.PHA
The Eta Nu Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha
Fraternity, Inc. will have a 50-50 raffle thru
Dec. 4. You can win up to $250. Proceeds
will aid the United Negro College Fund.
Please see any Alpha Phi Alpha brother or
LBG. Tickets $1
SKI TRIP
The Department of intramural-Recrea-
tion Services and the Outdoor Recreation
Center is sponsoring a ski trip to Winter-
green on Jan. 3-8. Registration for this trip
will be taken in 204 Memorial Gym from
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m through Dec 1 at
5:00.
CORAL RFFF PIVFCIm
Attention - The Coral Reef Dive Club
will have a meeting Thurs. Nov. 19 7:30 in
Room 212 Mendenhall Christmas partv,
dives and vacation trips will be discussed
Divers & non-divers are welcome.
SOPHOMORFSTI fNTfTRt;
This summer, take on the challenge of
ARMY ROTC Basic Camp at Fort Knox,
Kentucky and you'll be on your way to
earning a commission as a Second Lieu-
tenant in the US Army, the Army Re
serves, or National Guard Basic Camp
lasts only six weeks and you'll be paid
$600-$800 for attending; plus, completion
of Basic Camp entails no further
committment. For more info call Second
Lieutenant Mike McClanahan or Captain
Alvin Mitchell at 757-6967, or visit Erwin
Hall, Room 319.
NASWCORSO
Will be raking leaves to fund raise The
basic rate for a yard will be $15.00 Please
call for an appointment. 758-7985 (after
6:00 p.m.).
the new officers for spring semester
We're behind you all the way' Love, The
Beta Nu's
WEAK DRINKS? Mason ars are for
canning fruit and urine samples Come
down to the Elbo Friday afternoon and
have a real drink at a real price
DELTA SIC Congrats to the new Exec
Ray Madden, Pres, Carl Apgar, V P
Steve Shaefer, Trcs, Marc Beane, Sec,
Matt King, Sgt at Arms Keep the drive
alive' JSP
SIC EPS welcome SA.E to ECU.
THETA CHI formal dates - You're all
dreamgirls Thanks for a great formal
love the brothers and pledges
SIC EPS COINC TO ADPi - Be reack
party the weekend away The schnan
are on me
ATTENTION: Don't forget Alpha I
Delta's Happy Hour EVERY Wednosdj.
night at Pantana's
KELLY SLOAN The past few wool-
have been killer You're a good girl yoi.
will eventually make a great sister bur
most of all you're a terrific friend" I lavo a
nice formal, my thoughts will be wm"
you" T D
A O PI'S
What7
Are we ready to road trip or
PAM AND PATH: Hev vail' Lot
ready for the Christmas partv k'
thought I'd say hey' Cl
Just
A O PI'S I li ho 1 li ho to Sigma Chi we
go the bus leaves at six to mingle and mix
1 li ho, 1 Ii-ho, Hi ho to N C. State we go'
ZETAS: Get ready to have a blast Crown
Ball 1987 is here
PLEDCES OF ZTA: T! IANKS for such a
festive weekend at the Beach during the
retreat, we really had a great time Mandy
from Whiteville ain't . . , thanks for
everything Love, Exec Council of ZTA
WE'LL MAKE IT EASY ON YOU
Knock down 9 pins in 8 out of 10 tries and
win a free turkey! Turkey shoot in bowl
ing Thursday, Nov. 19 at 7 p.m. in Men
dcnhall bowling center Call 757 6611 for
details.
PIKES AND THEIR COCKTAIL
DATES: Are you ready for tomorrow7
Are you ready to gig7 Are you breathing
correctly? You better be Get psyched
and get plenty of rest cause you're gonna
need it! See ya tomorrow, boola boola
YO PIKES There's a brothers pre
downtown happy-hour tonight at the
Lewis St pad. starts at 7:30, be there ready
to commence to consume.
GREENVILLE'S ONLY HARD SERVE
YOGURT! Only 99 calories per serving
A Dieter's Dream and it tastes just like
ice cream Hank's, 321 E 10th St 758-
(XXX).
HANK'S HAS IT ALL! The Nations 1
Ice Cream and now Frozen Yogurt Only
99 calories per serving Pina Colada,
Chocolate, & Banana & Hank's -321 E
10th St. 758-0000
THE NEW STUDENT REGISTER HAS
ARRIVED! If you ordered one, please
come by the Buccaneer Office (Publica-
tions Rlrigtn pirlr up yourxaopy iada
FREE BAHAMAS TRIP Come down to
the Elbo and register for a trip for two to
the Bahamas spnng break $1 tickets
buy yours today
SIC EPS - The car wash scheduled for
Thursday has been cancelled due to free
beer in Dana's room
STEPHAMNE KAYE P: Thanks for a
fantabulous cruise. Special thoughts:
R.E.M a floating rose, Apollo 13, water-
melon, 5 questions, goose bumbs, flush-
ing, and "a whole lot Don't forget you
owe me 38 cents. Call me and I'll teach
you a song on mu favorite "musical in-
strument Again, Thank You. The
Musician
LAST DAY! International rock posters
sale at Mendenhall Student Center $5 to
$12. Don't miss out!
THETA CHI: Our cruise was the stuff
dreams are made of Perfect Gentlemen
and Beautiful Women made it a night to
cherish. A job well done to evervone who
helped. E13Q2.
SEEKING SAM-lla Ha, didn t think ! d
do it' Have a great day You know wh.
P S I want a space See you in Econ
KA LITTLE SISTER PLEDGES had ha
at the skating nnk You all are douij-
great' Love your pledge trainer'
SON OF A GUN, Malissa Bass ,s gonna
bo 21 1 lappy Birthday, Moo'
GRFFKS, CREEKS, CREEKS:OFFTill
C UfT staff can't wait Big Al is in a cold
sweat and Double Exposure doesn �
know what to expect By tomorrow oui
xxx batch of East Carolina Tea will N
perfect
KE: Troop 700 (10th St ), Scouts ou wer
on your honor last Thurs night
partv with you ANYTIME Chi Otneea
Troop 1501 (5ih St)
TKE: We had a (ammin' time at
RADD vvial ! lang ton follas' Love
Omega
TO K P. AND J.B. OF DZ: Hope vc.
enjoyed looking at mv formal dato som
you couldn't touch' I love vou guys
Thanks so much for everything' Lo�� 1
DZ pledge.
CHI OMEGA WHITE CARNATION
DATES: We can't wait until Sat night
Get your tuxes pressed and vour parU
shoes shined Fairfield Harbor is road,
and waiting The Chi Os
PARTY: End flat week with a bang Part)
with the Creeks Friday afternoon at The
Elbo, 4-7 Free admission SI screwdn
ers, shots, and Hi balls see vou Fndav
WORD-
BEST DEAL IN TOWN: $2 00 Toa.
Schooners for a buck. Double Exposure at
9:00 p.m , free pizza from 6-7 p.m. and a
mason ar to take home at OFF THE
CLLFE
BETH "HOP- HUFKINS: )us� wjnliMtn
congratulate you on being Sister of (no
Month We think vou are pretty terniK
The DZ Beta Pis ust LOVE you"
PI KAPPA PHI: B Team volleyball garm
tonight at 10:00! Come out and watch the
greatest V-ball team to ever touch the
surface at ECU!
PI KAPPA PHI: Congratulations to Mr
Georgee Lupton for setting up a "killer'
White Diamond! It was a great warm up
for Founders day in Feb. Get Psyched!
PATSY, you looked great You mado ooi
cruise date very special, too bad m
couldn't dance a lot, but the category
game was fun. You'll always be rm
Dream Girl The CRIP
DELTA ZETA: We just wanted to lot ou
know we had a gTeat time at the Rose
Formal - we will remember it al wa�-
guys did a temfic job' Lots of love and
thanks - your very own Beta Pi's
Typesetters Needed
For Monday and Wednesday Mornings.
If you can type, you can typeset.
"Earn $3.S0fir. and
Cearn to use the 'Macintosh $E!
Stop by the East Carolinian
and apply today.
Wanted:
Editorial page editor.
Experience preferred.
Got an opinion?
Beginning in January The East
Carolinian will have positions open
in the following areas:
�Layout Artists
�Staff Illustrator
�Darkroom Technician
�Typesetters
Apply. Hard work. Good times. Low pay.
me East Caroiinia fire at friends. Apply in person today

r
V
N

F
t
c
t
�n
let
CIA age
STA BARBARA, Caltt
- A senior Centra! Inl
jrnre Agency ofhcial wx g, - �
teach thtsyearat the Lnr.
Cafornia at Sama Bar:
JCSB' aft" all. but onlv under
certain conditions, UCSB off.
decided Nov 7
Various student and 1 1
groups had protested I
pomtment of agent G� 1
v-hnttonjr.asa visit
� years in the scho
science department.
Under the CIA's Of I
dci
pal
at
CO
the
Bill
I
A I r.i
Ge
mi
SGA scandl
CHICAGO cr
cers of the University or Chit
student government ha I
ousted in the wake ot a :
scandal that has rocked the cam-
pus.
Within less than 2 weeks, the
student body president I �
muted to ballot-stufl I i
signed, the vice president
been ousted for not r
as a student and new
have been ordered to rep
officers elected in the Get '4 and
15 race for Student Government
Assembly seats.
"It's not unusual to have politi-
cal problems and bickering on
student governments here
anyplace else said ui
verl
I
n
I
Strippers for
PHILADELPHIA, a I
Hie top two officials of the L di-
versity of Pennsvlvania hae
warned campus fraternities r
hire female str.ppers to pert, tn
ruh functions again.

'The hiring of stnppers
dent Sheldon Hackney and
vost Michael Aiken wrote ill I
letter distributed to all fratet
houses last week, "portra
people as objects in a degra
dehumanizing and tasteless man-
ner
ff -ion
Bi


i
�mwWP





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 19, 1937
r �prinf; semester
� j' 1 n e The
su:epsc;oic; ioadp, Here�dyte
party iho weekend away The sehnaani
jre on mo
ATTENTION: Don't forget Alt
Delta �. I lappy I low EVER VVedn
night at Pantana s
un
kHh SLOAN The past tew w
hj e been killer ou re j good girl
will eventual) make a gre.n sister j
mostol ail you reatcrriiu inond" Ma
nice formal m thoughts will he with
youM TD
PAM M' PATTI I lev vail' Let's J
� : !h (hnstmas party, K I
. � d sa he' n
SEEKING SAM-rfa Ha, didn't think
! ije a great day ou know wh
want a space See von in Tain
KA LITTLI SISTER PLEDCES-kadf
skating rink You all are doing
� ur pledge trainer'
SONOI A GUN MalissaBassisKjnJ
ppi B rthday Moe!
CRI I ks, (.KM KS. GREEKS:OFFTHE1
an � wait Hig ,I is in a cold
Double Exposure doesn t
i po ! !U tomorrow our i
�� I arolina Tea will K
k I Ml
ki
kl
s '
M V
lush-
e setters 9eeded
;v and Wednesday Mornings.
can type, you can typeset.
Tarn $3.50hr. and
to use the Macintosh ST
:op by the East Carolinian
and apply today.
anuary The East
ve positions open
wing areas:
It Artists
tustrator
Technician
setters
imes. Low pay.
ly in person today.
IthSt I Scours you were
las) Ihurs night We'll
WVTIMP Chi Omega
We had a lammin time at our
' soda I tang ten fellas' Love. Chi
TO KJ�. AND B OK DZ: Hope you
nl" '�� looking at mv formal date, sorrv
touch! I love you guvs'
� tor everything! Love, a
edge
Oil OMEGA WHITE CARNATION
: A 11 S We can t wait until Sat. night'
� � tuxes pressed and vour partv
�s sh FajrneJd Harhor is ready
. ' be Chi Os
PARTI I nd Rat week with a bang Party
eeks Friday afternoon at The
admission SI screwdriv-
ts and Hi balls see you Friday,
BEST OrAl IN TOWN: $2.00 Teas,
ners for a buck. Double Exposure at
"M p.m free pizza from 6-7 p.m. and a
mason pr to take home at OFF THE
curr. .
KM II -HOT HOPKINS: Just wan led o f
Itulate vou on being Sister of trie
We think you are pretty terrific!
eta Pi's just LOVE you
PI KAPPA PHI. B Team volleyball game
tonight at 10:00! Come out and watch the
greatest V-ball team to ever touch the
surface at ECU!
PI KAPPA PHI: Congratulations to Mr
George I upton tor setting up a "killer"
White Diamond! If was a great warm up
tor Founders day in Feb. Get Psyched!
P ArN u �ked great You made our
� ��:� special, too bad we
I - i a lot, but the category
was I in You'll always be mv
am Girl The CRIP
D H T A ZETA We just wanted to let you
� we had a great time at the Rose
we will remember it always! You
I i terhfic job' Lots of love and
. � � �wn Beta Pi's.
CIA agent to teach at California university
SANTA ba� �
SANTA
!2? T A or Central h
BARBARA, Cali
cr
SSTtteu Wl"gct 5
CU( Vearatthe University of
ScsSrs a,�sama Barba"
2S ar aM' but onJv undc
acSoJ:rucsBof�
Various student and faculty
groups had protested the aP-
PO'ntment of agent George A.
r.ntton Jr. as a visiting fellow for
two years m the school's political
science department.
Under the CIA's Office in Resi-
dence Program, the spy agency is
paying certain officers to lecture
at several campuses around the
country, hoping to improve rela-
tions with academia and explain
the CIA's activities, spokesman
Bill Devine said.
This fall, the agency announced
agent fellowships for Geor-
getown University and the
Univeristy of Texas at Austin, as
well as for UCSB.
While the just-announced
Georgetown and Texas appoint-
ments have yet to provoke any
controversy, Santa Barbara fac-
ulty groups complained they had
not been consulted � as they
would have been on other teach-
ing appointments � and feared
Chritton would use his classroom
position to recruit students for the
CIA, USCB spokeswoman Mar-
garet Weeks reported.
On Oct. 30, UCSB's student
government passed a resolution
asking that Chritton be kept out of
political science classes, largely
because he did not have a doctor-
ate and, some added, he wouldn't
pnn-
be wedded to academic
ciples.
"Anybody who works for the
CIA is required by law to not tell
the entire truth Legislative
Council member Peter Shapiro
contended during the debate, the
Daily Nexus reported.
But on Nov. 7, USCB Chancellor
Barbara Uehling determined
Chritton could teach on campus,
though with a one-year fellow-
ship, not a two-year agreement.
Chritton, moreover, "may not
recruit for the CIA while he is in
the position Weeks said, and he
can only lecture in other profes-
sors' classes.
The CIA presence on campus
has become a major issue at a
number of schools this fall. As the
drama played out at Santa Bar-
bara, the College Satellite
Network's nationally televised
forum on foreign policy in late
October quickly turned into a
debateonthi. TA's role in Central
America.
On Oct. 28, police arrested 18
University of Vermont students
protesting the CIA's recruiting on
campus. Three weeks before, 33
University of Iowa students had
been arrested in a similar demon-
stration.
Univeresity of Oklahoma stu-
dents also demonstrated Oct. 28
but no arrests were made.
SGA scandal rocks Chicago University
CHICAGO (CPS) � All 50 offi
cers of the University of Chicago
student government have been
ousted in the wake of a political
scandal that has rocked the cam-
pus.
Within less than 2 weeks, the
student body president has ad-
mitted to ballot-stuffing and re-
signed, the vice president has
been ousted for not being enrolled
as a student and new elections
have been ordered to replace all
officers elected in the Oct. 14 and
15 race for Student Government
Assembly seats.
spokesman David Rosen. But,
"something quite as drastic (as
this) is not common
Yet at the same time, the Uni-
versity of North Florida's Student
Senate decided to invalidate the
results of a Sept. 30 election be-
cause a ballot box was mis-
handled.
UNFs new voting, however,
came off without incident Oct 27-
28.
The misadventures at Chicago
were considerably less accidental.
The scandal started when stu-
dent body President Kathryn
"It's not unusual to have politi- Sampeck admitted to stuffing
cal problems and bickering on ballot boxes while serving as a
student governments here and poll watcher. Sampeck said she
anyplace else said university was retaliating for what she con-
Strippers forbidden at Penn. frats
sidcred election violations by
Vice President Jim Jacobsen.
Jacobsen, meanwhile, was or-
dered to leave office Oct. 28 by a
student committee that learned
he wasn't enrolled this fall.
In addition, the committee dis-
covered that 1 or 2 of the 200 can-
didatesdidn'thaveenough signa-
tures on their candidacy petitions.
The committee "found in es-
sence no evidence of widespread
fraud and abuse in the election,
but certain procedural flaws, and
called for a new election" of all
officers Nov. 10, Rosen said.
Sampeck, in a statement re-
leased after her resignation,
called her actions "a momentary
PHILADELPHIA, Pa. (CPS) �
Tlte top two officials of the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania have
warned campus fraternities not to
hire female strippers to perform at
ru�;h functions again.
"The hiring of strippers Presi-
dent Sheldon Hackney and Pro-
vost Michael Aiken wrote in a
letter distributed to all fratemitv
houses last week, "portray!s)
people as objects in a degrading,
dehumanizing and tasteless man-
ner
Both the Zeta Beta Tau and
Alphi Chi Rho houses had strip-
pers perform at rush functions the
first week of October. At the ZBT
event, students reportedly en-
gaged in sexual acts with the per-
formers. One pledge said he felt
pressured to participate in order
to get a bid to join the house.
One freshman � whose name
officials would not divulge � was
so offended, however, that he told
campus officials about it, leading
Penn Women's Alliance Coordi-
nator Constance Natalis to
threaten to protest the fraterni-
ties' "insensitivity to women"
formally.
University of Illinois women
already have acted.
On Halloween, a group called
Women Rising in Resistance con-
ducted a "Tour the House of
Horrors" down UI's Greek Row,
where a woman reportedly was
raped in September.
Soon after the rape report, anti-
greek graffiti was spray-painted
on two houses on Greek Row.
lapse of judgement, and it has
taught me a lesson I will never
forget
Dr. Reidar K.
Lie of Norway
joins ECU
tt-L Ncwi Bureau
Dr. Reidar K. Lie has joined the
faculty at the ECU School of
Medicine as assistant professor in
the Department of Medical Hu-
manities.
Before joining the ECU faculty.
Lie was a research associate in the
Department of Anatomy at the
University of Bergen in Bergen,
Norway.
His specialty areas include the
history of cardiology, particularly
in the 19th and 20th centuries, and
the philosophy of science. He has
co-authored several articles and
reviews on topics in cardiology
and philosophy.
Formerly of Stavanger, Nor-
way, Lie completed graduate
studies in philosophy and re-
ceived his medical degree at the
University of Bergen in Norway.
He later received a doctorate
degree in philosophy at the Uni-
versity of Minnesota.
LOW COST
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
Abortion, from U to 18 wrka at additional coat Prrgrurvr)
1�. Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy Couratting, For
further information, call S32-OS15 (toll free nuirler 1-800-
532-5184) between 9a jrv. and 5 p m weekday General ane�-
tftnia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
SELF-SERVICE
COPIES
5
At Kinko s we offer the highest qualitv copies at a verv low
price. Our other services include binding, collating and a
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kinko's
Open early Open late.
Open weekends.
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9-OOOT -e-OOom
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he roar hat an �intrt ,� ��.��' ampak
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A Macintosh personal computer and an of paper youll save will have a lovely green glow with with a variety of financing options. Vie feel compelled to
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.

�4�PPPf
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I
semester
va' 1 ove Fhi'
tor
OHIO
and
Ml
K! sr K I
SIC EPS GOING TO ADPi - Be
pjrtv the weekend away The
ar on me
ATTENTION Wt torget Alph
Delia s 1 lappy 1 lour EVERY Wedm
night at I'antjna 5
Mll SLOAN The part few w
have been killet You're a gtvi girl
will eventual)v make a great sisterJ
mosl ol all you re a terrific friend Ha
nice forma nn thoughts will be
r.D
PAM M' PATTfc I io yrafl! let's
k thi (3tristmas party K Ji
ght I'd s.n hey! Q
SEEKING SAM-Ha I la. didn't think Vl
I lav i a great dav ou know wr
.S l� ml i space See you in Toon
k ill ill SISTERPLEDGiS-hadL,
4 - g rink You all are doir
.� �ur pledge trainer'
SON Ol Gl Y Malissa Bassists
Birthday, Moe!
CRI I Ks CREEKS, GREEKS: OFF THI
s,a" ' UJii Big Al is in a eok
ible i xposure doesn't 1
what to expert !U tomorrow our'
t i ast (. arohna Toa will be
n S( ' Scours you wen-
last Thurs night We'll
ANYTIME Chi Omega
IK I rVe had a lammin' time at our
ial Hang ten fdlas! Love, Chi
O K.P ASP B OF DZ. Hope you
" " ' "g J' nn� tormal date, sorry
touch! I love you guys'
- - : for everything! Love, a
CHI OMEGA WHITE CARNATION
DATES an'l wait until Sat night'
i youx tuxes presvd and your partv
5 lirfield Harbor is ready
m waitii g The Chi (s
" I nd flat week with a bang Party
� ks Friday afternoon at The
1 r� admission SI screwdnv
Is and Hi balls see vou Friday,
BEST DEAI IN TOWN: $2.00 Teas,
- oners tor a buck. Double Exposure at
- � p m tree pizza from 6-7 p.m. and a
mason iar to take home at OFF THE
CLiTF. .
BI IHHor HOI'MNS:JuMwant�lto t
Ite you on K-ing Sister ot the
We think you are pretty terrific!
Z Beta Pi's just LOVE vou
PI KAPPA PHI B Team volleyball game
tonight at 10:00! Come out and watch the
greatest V-ball team to ever touch the
surface at ECU!
PI KAPPA PHI: Congratulations to Mr
Georgee I upton for setting up a "killer"
White Diamond! It was a great warm up
fo� founders day in Feb. Get Psyched!
PATSY, ou looked great Vou made our
lab T special, too bad we
it e a lot, but the category
Fun You'll always be mv
am Girl The CRIP
DI1 TA ZETA We just wanted to let you
tve had a great time at the Rose
we will remember it al wavs' You
. I a terrific job' Lots of love and
inks v ui verv own Beta Pi's.
csetters 9�eeded
h '� nday and Wednesday Mornings.
can type, you can typeset.
'Earn $3J0fir. and
to use the Macintosh ST
:op by the East Carolinian
and apply today.
anuary The East
ve positions open
wing areas:
It Artists
lustrator
Technician
Isetters
imes. Low pay. I
ly in person today.
A
u
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 19,1987
CIA agent to teach at California university
SANTA BARBARA, Calif,
lorji 7 Senior Ccnlra! fe��-
�Sft�8Cncy offic,al w,n 8ct to
teach thtsyearat the University of
�SJSin? al Santa Barbra
5SB) afr all, but only under
rWJLCv?ditions' UCSB offl�ls
decided Nov. 7.
Various student and faculty
groups had protested the ap-
pointment of agent George A
nnttonjr.asa visiting fellow for
two years in the school's political
science department.
Under the CIA's Office in Resi-
dence Program, the spy agency is
paying certain officers to lecture
at several campuses around the
country, hoping to improve rela-
tions with academia and explain
the CIA's activities, spokesman
Bill Devine said.
This fall, the agency announced
agent fellowships for Geor-
getown University and the
Univcristy of Texas at Austin, as
well as for UCSB.
While the just-announced
Georgetown and Texas appoint-
ments have yet to provoke any
controversy, Santa Barbara fac-
ulty groups complained they had
not been consulted � as they
would have been on other teach-
ing appointments � and feared
Chritton would use his classroom
position to recruit students for the
CIA, USCB spokeswoman Mar-
garet Weeks reported.
On Oct. 30, UCSB's student
government passed a resolution
asking that Chritton be kept out of
political science classes, largely
because he did not have a doctor-
ate and, some added, he wouldn't
be wedded to academic prin-
ciples.
"Anybody who works for the
CIA is required by law to not tell
the entire truth Legislative
Council member Peter Shapiro
contended during the debate, the
Daily Nexus reported.
But on Nov. 7, USCB Chancellor
Barbara Uehling determined
Chritton could teach on campus,
though with a one-year fellow-
ship, not a two-year agreement.
Chritton, moreover, "may not
recruit for the CIA while he is in
the position Weeks said, and he
can only lecture in other profes-
sors' classes.
The CIA presence on campus
has become a major issue at a
number of schools this fall. As the
drama played out at Santa Bar-
bara, the College Satellite
Network's nationally televised
forum on foreign policy in late
October quickly turned into a
debateontheCIA'sroleinCentral
America.
On Oct. 28, police arrested 18
University of Vermont students
protesting the CIA's recruiting on
campus. Three weeks before, 33
University of Iowa students had
been arrested in a similar demon-
stration.
Univeresity of Oklahoma stu-
dents also demonstrated Oct. 28
but no arrests were made.
SGA scandal rocks Chicago University
CHICAGO (CPS) � All 50 offi
ccrs of the University of Chicago
student government have been
ousted in the wake of a political
scandal that has rocked the cam-
pus.
Within less than 2 weeks, the
student body president has ad-
mitted to ballot-stuffing and re-
signed, the vice president has
been ousted for not beingenrolled
as a student and new elections
have been ordered to replace all
officers elected in the Oct. 14 and
15 race for Student Government
Assembly seats.
Tt's not unusual to have politi
spokesman David Rosen. But,
"something quite as drastic (as
this) is not common
Yet at the same time, the Uni-
versity of North Florida's Student
Senate decided to invalidate the
results of a Sept. 30 election be-
cause a ballot box was mis-
handled.
UNFs new voting, however,
came off without incident Oct. 27-
28.
The misadventures at Chicago
were considerably less accidental.
The scandal started when stu-
dent body President Kathryn
Sampeck admitted to stuffing
cal problems and bickering on ballot boxes while serving as
student governments here and poll watcher. Sampeck said she
anyplace else said university was retaliating for what she con-
Strippers forbidden at Penn. frats
sidered election violations by
Vice President Jim Jacobsen.
Jacobscn, meanwhile, was or-
dered to leave office Oct. 28 by a
student committee that learned
he wasn't enrolled this fall.
In addition, the committee dis-
covered that 1 or 2 of the 200 can-
didatcsdidn't have enough signa-
tureson their candidacy petitions.
The committee "found in es-
sence no evidence of widespread
fraud and abuse in the election,
but certain procedural flaws, and
called for a new election" of all
officers Nov. 10, Rosen said.
Sampeck, in a statement re-
leased after her resignation,
called her actions "a momentary
PHILADELPHIA, Pa. (CPS) �
The top two officials of the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania have
warned campus fraternities not to
hire female strippers to perform at
ru�ih functions again.
"The hiring of strippers Presi-
dent Sheldon Hackney and Pro-
vost Michael Aiken wrote in a
letter distributed to all fraternity
houses last week, "portray(s)
people as objects in a degrading,
dehumanizing and tasteless man-
ner
Both the Zeta Beta Tau and
Alphi Chi Rho houses had strip-
pers perform at rush functions the
first week of October. At the ZBT
event, students reportedly en-
gaged in sexual acts with the per-
formers. One pledge said he felt
pressured to participate in order
to get a bid to join the house.
One freshman � whose name
officials would not divulge � was
so offended, however, that he told
campus officials about it, leading
Penn Women's Alliance Coordi-
r
nator Constance Natalis to
threaten to protest the fraterni-
ties' "insensitivity to women"
formally.
University of Illinois women
already have acted.
On Halloween, a group called
Women Rising in Resistance con-
ducted a "Tour the House of
Horrors" down LTs Greek Row,
where a woman reportedly was
raped in September.
Soon after the rape report, anti-
greek graffiti was spray-painted
on two houses on Greek Row.
lapse of judgement, and it has
taught me a lesson I will never
forget
Dr. Reidar K.
Lie of Norway
joins ECU
tCL Niwt Bureau
Dr. Reidar K. Lie has joined the
faculty at the ECU School of
Medicine as assistant professor in
the Department of Medical Hu-
manities.
Before joining the ECU faculty,
Lie was a research associate in the
Department of Anatomy at the
University of Bergen in Bergen,
Norway.
His specialty areas include the
history of cardiology, particularly
in the 19thand 20thcenturies,and
the philosophy of science. He has
co-authored several articles and
reviews on topics in cardiology
and philosophy.
Formerly of Stavanger, Nor-
way, Lie completed graduate
studies in philosophy and re-
ceived his medical degree at the
University of Bergen in Norway.
He later received a doctorate
degree in philosophy at the Uni-
versity of Minnesota.
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'
J





-
"If S CAROi INUN
Entertainment
Newman
NOVMEBER 19, 1987 Page 8
' Lovers' hits sarcastic angle
By JENNIFER PEARSON
"Lovers and Other Strangers"
opened last night taking its audi-
ence for a ride, and it never let
them off.
And when "sex" is mentioned
in the first sentence, it's obvious
that the crowd will get its money's
worth.
The amusing play was a collec-
tion of five short comedies taking
place within different apartments
in New York City.
In the first vignette, a guy and a
girl meet casually met at a bar and
must decide whether they should
go back to his place or not. The
girl, Brenda (played by Kelly
Anchors) giggles and cannot de-
cide if she likes "the sound of the
thing
Once they do decide, and end
up at Jerry's pad, he quickly
manages to send her to the bath-
room St) he can quickly set the
mood with the works � wine, soft
music and some big comfy pil-
lows. Jerry also somehow man-
ages to tell Brenda exactly what
she wants to hear � well almost.
The second comedy opens with
Cathy (played by Debbie Shirley)
bawling and claiming she has
nothing. Soon her night in shining
armor apears outside her door
demanding to come inside.
Hal (played by Matt
McCulloch) simply wants "every
one to be happyThat includes
his wife, his kids, himself and
even Cathy.
As Cathy gets sick over the
toilet, beautiful and mannerly Hal
checks out his own appearance in
the mirror. It is hilarious to hear
his soothing voice explain just
how much happier everyone
(namely himself) will be if they do
not tell his wife about their five
year affair!
The third comedy begins with a
tired husband in bed trying, with-
out much success, to watch TV.
He is unsuccessful because his
wife, Wilma (played by Teresa A.
Brooks) uses every possible antic
Second Sting Lp still jazzy
Mat! McCullock
W.ivhouse's prod
Thomas Walters)
and Debbie Shirley star in the Fast Carolina
urfion of 'I overs and Other Strangers (Fhoto by
ByMICAH HARRIS
sun MMt�
Court is in session on Sting's
latest album, Nothing Like The
Sun But judgement should not
be based on the current single
from that album, "We'll Be
Togther" which is a blatant,
candy-corn appeal of sweet taste
and emptvcalorics to that mass of
record consumers who chcerfullv
chirp, "I just listen to the beat I
never listen to the words as
though they should receive a
medal for it.
In that song, Sting has written
lyrics so lame and cliche they are
worthy of Madonna ("To have
you with me 1 would swim the
seven scas1 see you with me and
baby makes three"). It's an obvi-
ous appeal to "Top 40" status, an
Susie's Treehouse still growing,
plans for franchises in college towns
unusual move forSting. And now
there'sone of those nineor twelve
inch "dance versions
But the majority of the album's
songs confirm that the Sting of
"Dream of the Blue Turtles" is
alive and well and fulfilling the
promise of his previous solo ef-
fort.
Musically, he is still tapping
into jazz, in fact, even more than
before. And the results are beauti-
ful. Savor Sting's bass line on
"Sister Moon and the ethereal
saxophone of Branford Marsahs
on the same, or the Gil Evans'
Orchestra on an incredibly mel-
See STING'S, page 9
to seduce him. It has been a good
ten days since this couple has
made love.
The fourth presentation opens
with a tyrannically jealous fiance
storming over to his "woman's
house and raging because it is
taking her so long to answer the
door. Susan, (played bv Marilyn
Malloy) is more than innocent
and was sleeping in her bed
alone.
Nevertheless, Mike (played bv
Chris Chappel) frantically
searchs the apartment Actually,
Mike is overly paranoid of their
upcoming marriage and he is
quick to remind Susan that he can
certainly "takeback" his marriage
proposal. Susan takes everything
in stride and casually asks if he
has ordered the tux and the cuff
links.
The fifth skit moves slowlv in
comparison to the first fourAl-
though the acting is good, the plot
(an Italian couple tries to talk their
son out of getting a divorce) is too
drawn out.
Overall the acting is excellent
and thebackground music under-
scores the play's theme oi the
many facets of love ranging from
the misunderstandings of know-
ing a person to complete!v being
strangers. This collcctk n ot come-
dies provides entertainment for a
diverse audience and humor-
ously illustrates the possible
complications involved in the
game of love.
By GRETCHEN OL RMGAN
MjH n rim
Stipe's Treehouse Restaurant,
one ot downtown Greenville's
most popular hang outs, has in-
creased itsbusiness capacity, says
owner Susie Best
Best, 23, has been owner and
manager of her own restaurant
since 1984 and plans to continue
catering to the college crowds.
It all started when Misic's fa
ther. Bobby Best, picked her up
from Elon College during her
freshman year. 1 ie asked her then
wouldn't she like to own her own
business - a restaurant.
Susie said that she had never
really thought about the idea, but
before she knew it, she was out ot
school and working in the real
world.
Bobby, retired and residing in
Pamlico county, started the busi-
ness in Greenville where the Piz-
zana is now located. At the time,
the Treehouse had been managed
by George Martin for 15 years.
After Bobby bought the Tree-
house, he added the name Susie,
after his daughter and new-
owner.
Last lanuary, Susie's changed
its location to 123 East 5th Street
where an old book store had pre-
viously been located.
Renovations for the new restau-
rant took approximately a month
and a half.
Susie says that the restaurant
now has about 30 tables and
booths and has a stage for live
bands.
"Yes, business is bettor and
bigger even though rent is 7 times
more than it was before we
moved said Susie.
She says that the biggest ex-
pense is employees. "The payroll
use to be only $100 a week but
now it rangcs to be much more
There are 30 employees in all,
mostly part-time ECU students,
she says.
She's never had any formal
training in the business other than
6 years of waitressing experience
but it has made no difference in
the success of the business.
Susie works many shifts, some-
times up to 17 to 18 hours a day,
making sure things run smoothly.
"It would be nice to be out and
away from work sometimes but
it's almost impossible she said.
"You've got to be there all the
time she added, "especially at
night when people drink and tend
to get rowdv
Along with pizza, subs and
seafood, Susie's features ladies
night on Tuesday nights. Local
bands perform on a regular basis
such as Mike Edwards, Just in
Time, and other rock and roll
groups.
"I'm interested in hearing other
new groups too said Susie.
As business gets better and bet-
ter, Susuie foresees the Treehouse
as a franchise someday. She said
she would like to expand her
business to other college towns
such as Raleigh and Chapel Hill.
Susie is also considering going
back to college at night if time
permits.
Art grad student creates
backyard mural on fence
By SUSANNE NEILS EN
Stiff Writrr
When you visit Margaret
Shearin's garden you enter a
world apart. Enclosed by green-
ery and walls - a little paradise.
The longer you stay, the little
feline visitors, one by one, popu-
late the garden, settle in Shearin's
lap. play with each other, chase
butterflies. For them, as for the
owner, this is a haven, a retreat
from hectic everyday life.
At the far end of the small enclo-
sure is a large mural painted on a
brick wall. Shearin is a graduate
student at East Carolina
University's School of Art. The
work is - as is Shearin herself -
very quiet - a reflection of the art-
ist. The painting transmits the
feeling of tranquility upon the
viewer.
"This yard was so ugly
Shearin explains, " want my
home to be my refuge. I cannot do
anything about the sounds (street
noise), but I can make changes in
the visual environment She did
move an old barrel out and con-
verted a laundry line pole into a
work of art that she positioned to
one side of the grass area that is
the yard.
She used oil crayons, blending
them with turpentine and a brush.
She "sketches" with a can of spray
paint when she begins each piece.
She experimented with the cray-
ons in her mural and found them
to be a suitable medium for this
project.
The mural is part of the "visual
change" to create the enchanting
feeling of another world. She
explains, "So the natural thing to
See MURAL, page 9
Picking the Bones
Susie's Treehouse Restaurant, one of downtown's hottest hang-outs,
may expand by opening franchises in other college towns. (Photo by
Hardy Alligood)
Life and how to drink it
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Suff Welter
Graduate student Margaret Shearin has created a world of her own bv painting a mural on a wall in
her backyard on Holly Street (Photo by Hardy Alligood)
Last night I was drinking. And I
was thinking, Golly, I really
should be working on that rive
page paper on hormonal variants
in pregnant rats when foeti are
injected with hallucinogens.
But here I am, drinking expen-
sive beers and playing expensive
pool. The money I've blown to-
night could have fed some hun-
gry puppies in the Pitt County
animal shelter.
Gosh, I'm just another hedonis-
tic, valueless Westerner. Bum-
mer.
I thought all these things, lost
twice to my editor the shark and
drank one more beer. Then I went
home and didn't even think about
pregnant rats.
But this morning, I looked in the
mirror and said, "What's this lite
thing all about anyway? The
mirror, having a tongue full of
glass, declined to enlighten me.
So I thought long and hard. Life,
to me, was looking like a lot more
hours hunched over East Carolin-
ian typewriters, with no sordid,
cheap affairs or large sums of
money to break up the monotony.
Just seconds and minutes and
hours, sitting under floureaccnt
tubes, staring at a radioactive blue
screen. I almost screamed. For
this, I could have stayed home
and watched "Full House
So I decided to get drunk. I have
friends who believe inebriation is
the end-all of two thousand years
of civilization. At this point, I was
hard pressed to argue against
that
Sure, Kfe isn't to be frittered
away, checking the mail, sitting at
stoplights, brushing teeth. But
what can you do? It costs money
to go hangliding or scuba with
Jauques Cousteau.
What is the purpose of a 22 year
old white college male? The only
answer I heard and could believe
was To be a target audience for
Spuds McKenzie ccmtmerrials.
I hate that I wanted to some-
thing more out of the life game.
Fame, money, a chance to be a
Beasrie Boy. But tile facts were
irrefutable. I am destined to be a
beer consumer.
Not that I hate tnedriruong, it's
just welL sad to find oat your
role in life is basically preko-
hotic
And that's it too. Nothing else,
nothing to took for as I get older,
just more waist and moammim.
Eventually, the highlights of my
days will be trips to Virginia, the
land where beer has a substan-
tially higher alcohol content.
I guess subconciously I always
knew it. My parents must have
too, Dad would always give me
sips of beer when 1 was a little
bonehead. I lived for football
weekend then, and nothing has
come along to change that.
And on vacations, we always
ended up at Busch Gardens, home
of not only a brewery but a major
Oktoberfest too. Come to think of
it I was bom in October, and my
favorite bar is named the Brew
ery.
So, by this afternoon, I had ac-
cepted my new role in life. I felt
good about me. So good, 1 almost
drank some Crystal Lite. But I
stopped myself in time and had a
Bud Light.
Class seemed a tot quicker to-
day. After class, I went straight to
me store and got a six pack to last
until the column gets written.
And as this seems to be one of the
last paragraphs, I think ifs time i
head for the Stop Shop.
But first a toast To my true
Caffiaa May the hangovers be
r
Run
The filming ot a gn at
the American theater
treacherous enterprise H
a filmmaker aspire to '
the glowing interpretati
past, the gnat performai
made careers and theati 11
And how can a tilm o
the limitations ot a four chai
play set in one room a � !a so
fragile it could smash ti
eens in the wrong han
Devotees of the eni
liams masterptei. need
In the hands 01 direct f
Newman, the movie i
Menagerie' isaslumim
shimmering cryst il a
which it takes its nami
be the ultimati
ene" against which all �
bo measured in th.
With a gifted quarl I
notably the i
Wcxxiward .ui
Malkovich
wrought a tilm cla:
This is a ill m
plav, a heart-w rcr.
tion ot America in the �
one famil) 's pa I
tion with povert
physical handicap and '
for dreams that don't si .
It is also a piav al
that has never been i
than in Newman's ii
Joanne Wodvard grai
framing amazii
Amanda, the fa I I
beauty whose brok
a telephone linemai
love with long distal
Mural artist ij
Continued from pact s
do, is what 1 would ha i :
a child: plav make-bi
or not, the mood she has .
the garden is one ot being tar � u
�way in another world
The mural Shearin painted a
landscape, but the mood h.
much more light and airv than the
artist's previous "innerscapes
The brick wall is a little over
feet high and 15 feet long
The painting shows a hillv land-
scape with two trees and a
sky with clouds. The scene could
Sting's Lp still Aj
using heavy J
jazz influences
Continued from pace B
low version ot jimi Hendrix's
"Little Wing, a cut which also
features an outstanding g
solo by veteran jazz session musi-
cian, Hiram Bullock
Jazz may be the strongest influ-
ence here, but not the only one:
there's also some Latin new age
and tof course reggae so
stirred into the miv
But Sting's lvncs have a distinc-
tion as clear as his music, not only
in the poetics but subject matter as
well. "They Dance Alone'
cerns a pitiful ritual, the ' Gueca
Solo performed bv the wives
daughters, and mothers ot vic-
tims of unjust imprisonment and
torture in Chile.
"Fragile" was inspired by the
death this year of Ben Linder, an
American engineer, who vvasmis-
identified and killed bv the Con-
tras. "The Lazarus Heart' is an
apparent exercise in racial mem-
ory as Sting transcribed a dream
which turned out to be oddl)
similar to that oi the Fisher k
an Arthurian character whose
roots are in ancient Babvlonia fer-
tility worship.
Such subject matter adds a rest i
nance to Like Nothing the
Sun" as a whole. I don't expect the
album's superior cuts to go to the
Top 40. They're not the stufi
twelve-inch dance singles are
made of.
s
II Hi'
OPFN n
SAt tl
�RACK ROOi
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Greenville Buyer's Mj
Memorial Drive
Open MonSat. 10-9
Sunday 1-6
ii With t
?

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.





c angle
luce him it has been a good
ten days since this couple has
made love
Ine fourth presentation opens
tyrannically jealous fiance
over I � � " in s
be ause it is
her st ; to answer the
. : b Marilyn
u innocent
in her Ki
-the
Mike (pla ed by
el) frantically
I Actually,
J ot their
an
tie is
ho can
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- o he
l � Utt
a in Al the plot - 'heir is too ccellent cunder-oi the from know-ting ot come-lont tor a humor-ible in the

V Vi
; . -r �'
J&
rant, one of downtown's hottest hang-outs,
ranchises in other college towns. (Photo by
drink it
(veblue
L For
home
I have
lation is
years
Jit, I was
I against
ittered
ittingat
th. But
money
with
122 year
only
I believe
for
ils
some-
game.
to be a
were
to be a
,ifs
it your
ilco-
;else,
older,
waste.
Eventually, the highlights of my
days will be trips to Virginia, the
land where beer has a substan
tially higher alcohol content.
I guess subconciously I always
knew it. My parents must have
too. Dad would always give me
sips of beer when I was a little
bonehead. I lived for football
weekend then, and nothing has
come along to change that
And on vacations, we always
ended up at Busch Gardens, home!
of not only a brewery but a major
Oktoberfest too. Come to think of
it, 1 was bom in October, and my
favorite bar is named the Brew-
ery.
So, by this afternoon, I had ac-
cepted my new role in life. I felt
good about me. So good, 1 almost
drank some Crystal lite But 1
stopped myself in time and had a
Bud Light.
Class seemed a lot quicker to-
day. After class, 1 went straight to
the store and got a six pack to last
until the column gets written
And as this seems to be one of the
last paragraphs, I think it's time to
head for the Stop Shop.
But first a toast. To my true
Calling � May the hangovers be
gentle, but the buzzes intense.
o
s
N
I!
iy
�y
v-
y;
at
la
m
d
ie
it
ic
i.
r
v
!
ar
re
rv
IV
u
s?
id
THE EAST CA -MIAN NOVLMBfK 19, 19W;
Newman directs "Menagerie'
The filming of a great classic of
the American theater can be a
treacherous enterprise. How can
a filmmaker aspire to transcend
the glowing interpretations of the
past, the great performances thai
made careers and theater history?
And how can a film overcome
the limitations of a four-character
play set in one room - a play so
fragile it could smash to smither-
eens in the wrong hands?
Devotees of the Tennessee Wil-
liams masterpiece need not fear.
In the hands of director Faul
Newman, the movie "The Class
Menagerie" is as luminous as the
shimmering crystal animals from
which it takes its name. This may
be the ultimate "Glass Menag-
erie" against which all others will
be measured in the future.
With a gifted quartet of actors -
notably the incomparable Joanne
Woodward and the talented John
Malkovich - Newman has
wrought a film classic.
This is Williams' "memory
play a heart-wrenching evoca-
tion of America in the 1930s and
one family's painful confronta-
tion with poverty, a daughter's
physical handicap and the search
for dreams that don't shatter.
It is also a play about love, and
that has never been more evident
than in Newman's interpretation-
Joanne Woodward, gray hair
framing amazingly blue eves, is
Amanda, the faded Southern
beauty whose broken marriage to
a telephone lineman "who fell in
love with long distance" has left
her with two grown children,
Tom and Laura.
Although Laura is painfully shy
and walks with a limp, Amanda
clings to the dream that one day a
"gentleman caller" will come
through the door and sweep her
sweet daughter into marriage and
security for the family that now
depends on Tom's salary at the
warehouse.
Miss Woodward's perform-
ance is a wonder. Her "jonquil"
speech should be studied by as-
piring actesses.
As Tom, the play's narrator, a
poet forced into a job he hates,
Malkovich is formidable. From
his opening speech: "I have tricks
in my pocket he lures us quickly
into a remembered world where
"everything happens to music"
and hurts are as clear as the soar-
ing moments of triumph.
Karen Allen gives Laura a
sweet, wide-eyed naivete, and
James Naughton as the Gentle-
man Caller offers an unusually
sensitive portrayal of a man nor-
mally depicted as a robust glad-
hander.
Photography director Michael
Ballhaus and production de-
signer Tony Walton have given
the film the look of a lovingly
restored antique.
Newman has directed as if he
was holding a precious piece of
glass up to the light, illuminating
colors and curves we never
guessed were there. A feat as rare
as unicorns.
"The Glass Menagerie" is rated
PC It has neither sex nor violence,
but its themes may be a bit sophis-
ticated for the very young.
Run-D.MC tech in serious condition inRaleigh
RAl ITCl I (AP) - Raleigh police
are seeking a Brooklyn, N.Y man
in connection with the weekend
shooting of a crewmember of
Run D.M C, a nationally known
rap music group.
The suspect was identified as
Frank Nittv on a warrant issued
by the Wake County magistrate's
office, Raleigh police detective
1R Evans said Monday. The
warrant charged Nitty with as-
sault with a deadly weapon with
intent to kill.
Garfield McDonald, 21, of
Queens, NY the technical direc-
tor tor the group, was shot once in
the head at the Radisson Plaza
1 lotel Saturday night, police said.
1 liscondition was upgraded from
critical to serious Monday in the
neurological intensive care unit at
Wake Medical Center.
said Nitty had fre-
the Shaw University
but was not a student
Police
quented
campus,
there.
"He's been in this area for the
last two or three weeks and stay-
ing with some (Shaw) students in
the Avent Ferry Road area
Raleigh Police Sgt. M.R.
I.ongmire said. "He's not been
seen since the incident
Group member Jason Mizell of
Queens said the band had refused
to go on stage for a scheduled
Shaw University homecoming
concert at Dor ton Arena on the
North Carolina State Fairgrounds
because the promoter did not
have all the money required by
his contract and because atten-
dance was sparse.
Victor Au try of Raleigh, a repre-
sentative for promoter Entertain-
ment Enterprises, said difficulties
had preceded concert prepara-
tions all day Saturday and that the
group had been paid $16,000 in
cash to perform.
Bill Adler, spokesman for Run-
D.M.Cs manager Rush Produc-
tions, said the group's contract
called for a $20,000 payment.
Adler also said other problems
included no limousine to meet the
group at the airport and food
prior to the concert that didn't
meet specifications.
The group had been scheduled
to play Saturday night at Dorton
Arena, but refused to go on stage
and had gone to their hotel rooms.
The shooting occurred shortly
before midnight in a 14th floor
hallway crowded with the
group's fans.
109 E. 5th St. 752-8926
Wed. Night - $1.25 Highballs
Thurs. Night - The Heat Band
Frt Night - Tequila Night
Sat. Night- Upsidedowns $1.50
R
ufittf
S E
329 Arlington
Blvd.
756-1579
Mural artist paints backyard fence
ALL HAIR SERVICES
MAKEUP-MANICURES
TANNING BEDS
Continued from page H
do, is what 1 would have done as
a child, play make-believe Real
or not, the mood she has given to
the garden is one of being far, far
away in another world.
The mural Sheann painted is a
landscape, but the mood here is
much more light and airv than the
artist's previous "innerscapes
The brick wall is a little over four
feel high and 15 feet long
Thepaintingshowsa hilly land-
scape with two trees and a blue
sky with clouds. The scene could
Sting's Lp still
come trom a children's book, this
seems to be intentional. The mood
is that ot walking "Through the
Looking Class" into Alice's
world. On the left a cat sits
musingly in the grass, looking far
beyond.
sheann points out that her in-
tention was not in this case to
create "serious art but to please
the eve. She has taken the idea for
the mural from the Romans. Their
society was highly urbanized, a
fact that seems similar to our
world today.
The Romans felt a need to recre-
ate nature in their direct environ-
ment, thus murals were a very
popular feature in their homes.
Beautiful landscapes were
painted on the walls.
Shearin, who holds a B.A. from
Wake Forest University and has
had her M.F.A. Thesis exhibition
in the Spring of 1986 at ECU'S
Gray Art Gallery, is currently
working on an irregular (teach-
ing) certification degree. She feels
r
using heavy
jazz influences
Continued from page 8
low version ot )imi Hendrix's
"Little Wing a cut which also
features an outstanding guitar
solo by veteran jazz session musi-
cian, Hiram Bullock.
Jazz may be the strongest influ-
ence here, but not the only one:
there's also some Latin, new age,
and (of course) reggae sounds
stirred into the mix.
But Sting's lyrics have a distinc-
tion as clear as his music, not only
in the poetics but subject matter as
well. "They Dance Alone" con-
cerns a pitiful ritual, the "Gueca
Solo performed by the wives,
daughters, and mothers of vic-
tims of unjust imprisonment and
torture in Chile.
"Fragile" was inspired by the
death this year of Ben Linder, an
American engineer, who was mis-
identified and killed by the Con-
tras. "The Lazarus Heart" is an
apparent exercise in racial mem-
ory as Sting transcribed a dream
which turned out to be oddly
similar to that of the Fisher King,
an Arthurian character whose
roots are in ancient Babylonia fer-
tility worship.
Such subject matter adds a reso-
nance to Like Nothing the
Sun" as a whole. I don't expect the
album's superior cuts to go to the
Top 40. They're not the stuff
twelve-inch dance singles are
made of.
An Unbelievable Gallery Of
POSTERS
introductory Sale
that she is not an ambitious per-
son. It seems that she is leading a
very contented existence, creating
her environment to her personal
needs.
She will come to look at the
mural sometimes at night. She
saysYou'd be surprised how
well vou can see when the moon
lights up the painting
The painting can be seen in
Shearin's yard on Holly Street.
Visitors, feline or other are wel-
come.
20 Discount Off Any Service.
Good Through 11-30-87
PETEY HATHAWAY, Owner
:�
Sales Position
Available
Any Unframed
Or
Framed Poster
Stock
introducing our new Poster Gallery
always otter custom framing or do-
it-yourselt framing that will make
your poster look like an expensive
work ot art
Come see the many forms of art
and our new exclusive poster gallery
OPEN THURSDAY NIGHTS TIL 9PM
SALE ENDS NOVEMBER 22. 1987
Clark Gallery has expanded
Weveadded an unbelievable gallery
ot posters�a vast inventory of fine
art posters as well as popular
printed posters whic h will enhance
anv rexm decor And of course we
r CLARK
Mo Arlington Blvd In The Shops ot Arlington Village
�RACK ROOM SHOES
! Greenville Buyer's Market
I Memorial Drive
TAKE AN
EXTRA
"Open MonSat. 10-9
Sunday 1-6
10 OFF
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(EXCEPT AIGNER. NIKE AND REEBOK)
� With this coupon �������������
The East Carolinian
is now accepting
applications for
advertising sales position.
Requirements:
Previous Sales Experience
Excellent Communication Skills
Good Organizational Skills
Must Have Own Transportation
Basic Computer Knowledge
Apply in Person at
The East Carolinian
ublications Building
(In Front of Joyner Library)
�hmh
��HMHi
mmmm
Moam





c angle
si e him it has been a good
s since this couple has
�t
'tii presentation opens
ly jealous fiance
a man s'
:m it IS
a or the
. d bj M irilyn
n locent
. in her bed
less Mil laved by
frantically
� ally,
and he is
ca n
riage
hin r,
. isks if he
It
. s v in
first 1 M-
� ol the
from
�t know-
K being
: v orrte-
ora
humor-
ble
in the
� I FOTAURrVfT
rant, one of downtown's hottest hang-outs,
ranchises in other college towns. (Photo by
drink it
jveblue
For
home
LI have
lation is
Id years
it, 1 was
against
ittered
ittingat
th. But
! money
with
122 year
only
I believe
for
ils
some-
game.
to be a
were
to be a
re-alco-
;ebe,
older,
Eventually, the highlights of my
days will be trips to Virginia, the
land where beer has a substan-
tially higher alcohol content.
I guess subconciously I always
knew it. My parents must have
too. Dad would always give me
sips of beer when I was a little
bonehead. 1 lived for football
weekend then, and nothing has
come along to change that
And on vacations, we always
ended up at Busch Gardens, home
of not only a brewery but a major
Oktoberfest too. Come to think oi
it, I was born in October, and my
favorite bar is named the Brew-
eTy.
So, by this afternoon, I had ac-
cepted my new role in life. I felt
good about me. So good, I almost
drank some Crystal Lite. But I
stopped myself in time and had a
Bud Light.
Class seemed a lot quicker to-
day. Alter class, I went straight to
the store and got a six pack to last
until the column gets written.
And as this seems to be one of the
last paragraphs, I think it's time to
head for the Stop Shop.
But first a toast To my true
Calling � May the hangovers be
gentle, but the buzzes intense.
hmoi
t!
iy
�y
ie
v-
y;
IS,
at
is
IE
to
te
d
te
te
ie
I.
r
P
!
or
re
rv
i
so
u
id
JL-
TlIE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 1 1987
Newman directs "Menagerie'
The filming of a great classic of
the American theater can be a
treacherous enterprise. How can
a filmmaker aspire to transcend
the glowing interpretations of the
past, the great performances that
made careers and theater history?
And how can a film overcome
the limitations of a four-character
plav set in one room - a play so
fragile it could smash to smither-
eens in the wrong hands?
1 Vvotees of the Tennessee Wil-
liams masterpiece need not fear.
In the hands of director Paul
Newman, the movie "The Glass
Menagerie" is as luminous as the
shimmering crystal animals from
which it takes its name. This may
be the ultimate "Class Menag-
erie" against which all others will
be measured in the future.
With a gifted quartet of actors -
notably the incomparable Joanne
Woodward and the talented ohn
Malkovich - Newman has
wrought a film classic.
This is Williams' "memory
play a heart-wrenching evoca-
tion of America in the 1.930s and
one family's painful confronta-
tion with poverty, a daughter's
physical handicap and the search
tor dreams that don't shatter.
It is also a plav about love, and
that has never boon more evident
than in Newman's interpretation.
Joanne Woodward, gray hair
framing amazingly blue eyes, is
Amanda, the faded Southern
beauty whose broken marriage to
a telephone lineman "who tell in
love with long distance" has left
her with two grown children,
Tom and Laura.
Although Laura is painfully shy
and walks with a limp, Amanda
clings to the dream that one day a
"gentleman caller" will come
through the door and sweep her
sweet daughter into marriage and
security tor the family that now
depends on Tom's salary at the
warehouse.
Miss Woodward's perform-
ance is a wonder. Her "jonquil"
speech should be studied by as-
piring actesses.
As Tom, the play's narrator, a
poet forced into a job he hates,
Malkovich is formidable. From
his opening speech: "I have tricks
in my pocket he lures us quickly
into a remembered world where
"everything happens to music"
and hurts are as clear as the soar-
ing moments of triumph.
Karen Allen gives Laura a
sweet, wide-eyed naivete, and
James Naughton as the Gentle-
man Caller offers an unusually
sensitive portrayal of a man nor-
mally depicted as a robust glad-
hander.
Photography director Michael
Ballhaus and production de-
signer Tony Walton have given
the film the look of a lovingly
restored antique.
Newman has directed as if he
was holding a precious piece of
glass up to the light, illuminating
colors and curves we never
guessed were there. A feat as rare
as unicorns.
"The Glass Menagerie" is rated
PG. It has neither sex nor violence,
but its themes may bca bit sophis-
ticated for the very young.
Run-D.MC tech in serious condition iriRaleigh
RAl EIGII (AP) - Raleigh police
are seeking a Brooklyn, N.Y man
in connection with the weekend
shooting ot a crewmember of
Run-D.M.C, a nationally known
rap music group.
1 he suspect was identified as
Frank Nitty on a warrant issued
by the Wake County magistrate's
office, Raleigh police detective
.R. Evans said Monday. The
warrant charged Nitty with as-
sault with a deadly weapon with
intent to kill.
Garfield McDonald, 21, of
Queens. N. the technical direc-
tor tor the group, was shot once in
the head at the Radisson Plaza
I lotel Saturday night, police said.
1 lis condition was upgraded from
critical to serious Monday in the
neurological intensive care unit at
Wake Medical Center.
said Nitty had fre-
the Shaw University
but was not a student
Police
quented
campus,
there.
"1 le's been in this area for the
last two or three weeks and stay-
ing with some (Shaw) students in
the Avent Ferry Road area
Raleigh Police Sgt. M.R.
Longmire said. "He's not been
seen since the incident
Group member Jason Mizell of
Queenssaid the band had refused
to go on stage for a scheduled
Shaw University homecoming
concert at Dorton Arena on the
North Carolina State Fairgrounds
because the promoter did not
have all the money required by
his contract and because atten-
dance was sparse.
Victor Autry of Raleigh, a repre-
sentative for promoter Entertain-
ment Enterprises, said difficulties
had preceded concert prepara-
tions all day Saturday and that the
group had been paid $16,000 in
cash to perform.
Bill Adler, spokesman for Run-
D.M.Cs manager Rush Produc-
tions, said the group's contract
called for a $20,000 payment.
Adler also said other problems
included no limousine to meet the
group at the airport and food
prior to the concert that didn't
meet specifications.
The group had been scheduled
to play Saturday night at Dorton
Arena, but refused to go on stage
and had gone to their hotel rooms.
The shooting occurred shortly
before midnight in a 14th floor
hallway crowded with the
group's fans.
109 E. 5th St. 752-8926
Wed. Night - $1.25 Highballs
Thurs. Night - The Heat Band
Frt Night- Tequila Night
Sat. Night - Upsidedowns $1.50
329 Arlington
Blvd.
Mural artist paints backyard fence
Continued from page S
do, is what 1 would have done as
a child: play make-believe Real
or not, the mood she has given to
the garden is one of being far, tar
away in another world.
The mural Shearin painted is a
landscape, but the mood here is
much more light and airy than the
artist's previous "innerscapes
The brick wall is a little over four
feet high and 15 feet long.
Thepaintingshowsa hilly land-
scape with two trees and a blue
sky with clouds. The scene could
Sting's Lp still
using heavy
jazz influences
Continued from page 8
low version oi )imi Hendrix's
"Little Wing a cut which also
features an outstanding guitar
solo by veteran jazz session musi-
cian, Hiram Bullock.
Jazz may be the strongest influ-
ence here, but not the only one:
there's also some Latin, new age,
and (of course) reggae sounds
stirred into the mix.
But Sting's lyrics have a distinc-
tion as clear as his music, not only
in the poetics but subject ma tter as
well. "They Dance Alone" con-
cerns a pitiful ritual, the "Gueca
Solo performed by the wives,
daughters, and mothers of vic-
tims of unjust imprisonment and
torture in Chile.
"Fragile" was inspired by the
death this year of Ben Under, an
American engineer, who was mis-
identified and killed by the Con-
tras. "The Lazarus Heart" is an
apparent exercise in racial mem-
ory as Sting transcribed a dream
which turned out to be oddly
similar to that of the Fisher King,
an Arthurian character whose
roots are in ancient Babylonia fer-
tility worship.
Such subject matter adds a reso-
nance to Like Nothing the
Sun" as a whole. 1 don't expect the
album's superior cuts to go to the
Top 40. They're not the stuff
twelve-inch dance singles are
made of.
come from a children's book, this
seems to be intentional.The mood
is that ot walking "Through the
looking Class" into Alice's
world. On the left a cat sits
musingl) in the grass, looking far
beyond.
Shearin points out that her in-
tention was not in this cast to
create "serious art but to please
the eye. She has taken the idea for
the mural from the Romans. Their
society was highlv urbanized, a
fact that seems similar to our
world today.
The Romans felt a need to recre-
ate nature in their direct environ-
ment, thus murals were a very
popular feature in their homes.
Beautiful landscapes were
painted on the walls.
Shearin, who holds a B.A. from
Wake Forest University and has
had her M.F.A. Thesis exhibition
in the Spring of 1986 at ECU'S
Gray Art Gallery, is currently
working on an irregular (teach-
ing) certification degree. She feels
that she is not an ambitious per-
son. It seems that she is leading a
very contented existence, creating
her environment to her personal
needs.
She will come to look at the
mural sometimes at night. She
saysYou'd be surprised how
well you can see when the moon
lights up the painting
The painting can be seen in
Shearin's yard on Holly Street.
Visitors, feline or other are wel-
come.
ALL HAIR SERVICES
MAKEUP-MANICURES
TANNING BEDS
20 Discount Off Any Service.
Good Through 11-30-87
PETEY HATHAWAY, Owner
An Unbelievable Gallery Of
POSTFIX
: �- ,
es Position
Available
ji
Any Unframed
Framed Poster
Stock
introducing our new Poster Gallery
always offer custom framing or do-
it-yourself framing that will make
your poster look like an expensive
work ot art
Come see the many torms of art
and our new exclusive poster gallery
OPEN THURSDAY NIGHTS TIL 9PM
SALE ENDS NOVEMBER 22, 1987
Clark Gallery has expanded
We ve added an unbelievable gallerv
ot poMers-a vast inventory of fine
art posters as well as popular
printed posters which will enhance
anv room decor And of course we
re 1. ARK
646 Arlington Blvd In I he Shops ot Arlington Village
RACK ROOM SHOES.
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
"Open MonSat. 10-9
Sunday 1-6
10 off!
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE I
(EXCEPT AIGNER. NIKE AND REEBOK) I
i With this coupon �������������!
The East Carolinian
is now accepting
applications for
advertising sales position.
Requirements:
Previous Sales Experience
Excellent Communication Skills
Good Organizational Skills
Must Have Own Transportation
Basic Computer Knowledge
Apply in Person at
The East Carolinian
ublications Building
(In Front of Joyner Library)
MMH
mmmmm
�M





T
NOVEMBER 19, 1987
NC chocoholic starts candy business
SNOW CAMP M , Am ��- - - -
n,nWDCAMr'NC(Ar�'s
l'oconolic.
The admission is made easily
d"d without shame by the 40-
y-ar-old Wilson, who TJ&
"(vn ,n his P- of southern
Alamance County as the candy
man. His abiding love for choco-
Wtes is what led him to become a
rvill-timecandv manufacturer last
year.
"1 got started in the business just
as a hobby said Wilson, who
won a blue ribbon in 1980 at the
North Carolina State Fair for his
chocolate fudge entry.
formerly the owner and
operator of Somers' Seafood Res-
taurant in Burlington, Wilson
continued entering his candy in
various fairsand shows in the two
I arolinas. Noting one dav that he
had more than 150 first-place rib-
bons, he named his new business
Prize Winning Fudge Company.
Although the company is small
- with cooking and packaging
operations set up in the basement
of his home along Old Dam Road
- it is highly prolific, with well
over 100 types of products.
As he discusses his business,
Wilson is surrounded by stacks of
candy - some in boxes and plastic
bags, others in gift baskets. Then,
some fudge or other candy from
time to time - for his own enjoy-
ment and to share with some
friends and customers. The de-
mand for his candy over the past
six years has grown rapidly.
Wilson's chocolates literally
sold like hot cakes, he says with a
laugh.
When he first started, he says, "I
did most of the work in one pot
, " uiu 11ii.3i in me work in one not
too there are the countless trays Now the kitchen and packing
of fudee readv in ho n �,h ;� . , . f' "iVcS
of fudge ready to be placed in r.
cooler.
"It's gotten out of hand
Wilson told the Burlington Times-
News. "1 didn't mean for it to get
this big
He says he does most of the
work himself, but is often assisted
by his mother, Ruby Wilson, and
on extremely busy days he calls in
another helper.
When he was operating the res-
taurant, he says, he would make
room are fully equipped and
automated. Finally, to keep up
with the demand, I went into this
full time
He markets much of his candy
himself at trade shows, large flea
markets and other major events.
But a part of his production is sold
through other dealers. A store
that will open won in Burlington
Manufacturer's Outlet Center
will sell Wilson's candy exclu-
sively.
Hamlin stars in 'Laguna Heat
. LOS ANGEI IS (AD The
name "laguna Heat" suggests a
sizzling detective movie, but
I A Law" star Ham Hamlin
remembers freezing while film-
ing a love scene in the pounding
surf tor the made-tor-cable
movie.
Hamlin and co-star Catherine
Hicks not only got chilled, but
were thrown about by the heavy
surf and rubbed raw by barnacles
On the pilings of a nearby pier.
But not to worry Both came
through it fine. And the movie.
which Home Box Office will begin
showing Sunday, has its own raw
edge and, yes, it does sizzle at
times
Hamlin. who stars (in NBC's
"I A law plays Laguna Beach
police detective Tom Shephard
1 he movie is based on the book by
I Jefferson Parker in which
Shephard investigates a scries of
murders leading to a long-buried
scandal involving his father and
his mother's murder.
"I approach every project in a
different way said Hamlin.
'With Laguna Heat' 1 wanted to
create an environment of absolute
realism. Some people say that's
not cinematic, but 1 think they
interject a false energy into the
word.
"I wanted to have no imposed
veneer on the character. I wanted
him raw and sensitive. He's just
been through an experience that's
lowered his self-esteem
In the story, Shephard has onlv
recently joined the Laguna Beach
police, where his father had also
once been a detective. 1 le quit the
Los Angeles police when he was
unable to shoot an armed youth,
who then killed Shephard's part-
ner. The movie opens with
Shephard undergoing psychiatric
treatment.
"Laguna Heat" also stars jason
Robards as his father. Rip Torn as
a local developer who's also his
godfather, Hicks as a young
woman whose father is killed,
and Anne Francis as a tipsy ma-
tron who knows too much and
can't keep her mouth shut. Simon
Langton directed from a screen-
play by Pete Hamill and collabo-
rators D.M. Eyre and David
Burton Morris.
This is Hamlin's first role as a
policeman. 'The fact is I've never
played anybody who carried a
gun he said. "I think this cop is
different from the way cops are
usually portrayed. He's not mak-
ing any macho choices. We're
trying to do a murder storv with-
out gun battles or car crashes. It's
more of a character study than a
study of violence
Before "L.A. Law Hamlin
played boxer Joey Popchik in the
film "Movie, Movie and starred
in the miniscnes "Studs Loni-
gan Master of the Game" and
"Space He had also played a
writer who falls in love with a
married man in the movie "Mak-
ing Love That was a role some
told him would be career suicide.
Hamlin said he saw it as a chal-
lenge.
The Christmas season, Wilson
says, is usually the busiest for his
candy business, which just re-
ceived an order for 60,000 pieces
from a Greensboro dealer.
Wilson, who uses his own reci-
pes for the candy he makes, thinks
his company is somewhat unique
for the South. In the northern
states, he says, candymakers are
not hard to find; but he thinks the
only other operation like his in the
state is located in Charlotte.
"I invented some of the candy I average week
sell. I work on various recipes, ,�
tinker with them until I get some-
thing he says, laughing. He says
his most successful inventions are
his chocolate-orange fudge bars,
and his cherry-vanilla fudge.
Two of his other products are
based on improved recipes from
Wilson's late great-grandmother
and an aunt.
"I got the (Irish) potato candy I
make from my great-grand-
mother Ruth Curtis' recipe
Wilson said. His ancestor used to
make the candy years ago while
living in Morganton.
The candy pieces shaped like
turtles are made on a recipe
Wilson inherited from his aunt
Lola Baker, who made and sold
candy in Lenoir many years ago.
Wilson says his best-selling
candy is chocolate nut bars, fol-
lowed by peanut butter and
chocolate fudge. Maple and black
walnut fudge also are popular
items, as are chocolate truffles He
makes 300-400 pounds of candy
(of various products) during the
Starting Friday
Near Dark - R
The Princess Dririo
PG 13
Date With An Anm
PG 13
Pcxk 7Jte.tr
Hide and Gn SrvrH
R
$1.50 All Times
&XWA&
Greenville's Only!
Premium
Quality Cleaners
Since 1935
iOR SKIRTS CLEANED! o , .
Special
5 For $2.99
i
Artist lecture
3RD PAIR CLEANED
freje: j
Expires December 8 147 m w.Toth st?h
CORNER OF 10THEVAN'S
Coupon must be presented with incoming order
Mr. Potato Head must
lose pipe after 35 yfflrs
NEW YORK (AD - After a 35
year-old pipe habit, Mr. Potato
1 lead is going cold turkev.
The popular plastic potato toy
will no longer include a pipe in his
accessories, in honor of the Great
American Smokeout, the Ameri
'This toy is very popular with
young children who learn both
good and bad habits by example
and imitation Eyre said.
Mr. Totato Head, started 35
years ago, is a molded plastic toy-
that comes with a sen of eves, ears,
E�H Cnaifau Pljytmm Nrw� Rtlraar
The Fast Carolina Playhouse
will hold open auditions for 'The
Lark" on November 30 and De-
cember 1 from7:30p.m. to 10p.m.
m Room 206 in the Mcssick The-
atre Arts Center on the ECU cam-
pus.
'The Lark" is the storv of the
French maiden-soldier Joan of
Arc. Written bv Jean Anouilh and
adapted bv Lillian I lellman, 'The
Lark" details the trial of Joan of
Arc, her subsequent burning at
the stake and eventual martyr-
dom.
Roles are avialable for approxi-
mately 30 men and women over
16.
Scripts are in the Reserve Room
of Joyner Library. Actors are
asked to prepare a scene or mono-
Joguc of .Jheir choice to audition,
"tr they may read a scene of their
choice with the stage manager.
Rehearsals will begin in Janu-
ary and will be in the evenings
and on weekends until the per-
Tirunce begins.
Allflition nnPtl �n Canccr Society announced nose, lips, teeth, hat, arms,shoes'
1UUIUVIH U J C11 Sunday. and eyeglasses. But from now on,
no pipe.
Society president Dr. Harmon J. Thursday's 11th annual Great
Eyre applauded the decision by American Smokeout is intended
layskool, a division of Hasbro to encourage smokers to quit or
cut down on smoking for the day.
Sd Ml nl rt rrra� Ri-Iur
lustrator
�i,
Julian Allen will
show slides of his work Monday
al p.m. at Jenkins Audito-
rium. The lecture and reception to
follow is free and sponsored bv
Design Associates.
Allen was bom in Cambridge
England and trained at Cambr-
idge College of Art. He now lives
in New York City and teaches at
Farsons School of Design. His
works appear in publications in
the U.S Britain and Canada, in-
cluding 'The London Times
"Newsweek" and "Vanitv Fair
His work has been praised bv
Steven Heller of the "New York
Times" and in Paul Hogarth's
book, "The Artist as Reporter
Allen's series of paintings of
Richard Nixon for "New York
Magazine" in 1972 earned him a
reputation of being the best at
what he does, re-creating a scene
that thecamera could never catch.
In May of 1986, "Newsweek"
called on Allen to do their cover
painting of the explosion at Cher-
nobyl.
s "New York Magazine" sent
Allen to cover the Arab-Israeli
War in 1973. When a land mine
exploded and blew off his knee-
cap, the artistjournalist pro-
duced a story for the magazine
about his two week stay in an
Israeli hospital.
A RESUME
IS A TERRIBLE
THING TO WASTE
At AccuCopy we realize the importance of clean,
professional-looking resumes. Our resume packages let
you choose between phototypesetting, laser printing, or
basic typewriter originals.
In addition, we offer the widest range of paper and
envelope choices in the area.
FAST COPIES
FOR FAST TIMES
24-hour service available
open early, open late
open six days a week
THE RESUME PEOPLE
Next to Chicos in the Georgetown Shops
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar mm
on the nght means you command respect as an Army officer
earning a BSN write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box
Clifton, NJ 07015. Or call toll free 1 -800-USA-ARMY.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU Ok
If you're
7713.
This Christmas
put some ski gear
under the tree.
v
Skis: Rossignol, K2, Dynastar, Olin
Boots: Xordica, Salomon
Bindings: Salomon
Sweaters, T-Necks,
Parkas, Bibs, Pants:
Obcrmcycr, CB, Skyr.
Sun Ice,
White Stag
Sunglasses,
Goggles:
SSu Revo i. Bolle .
UvexrsRT,
Vuarnet, Ray-Ban, Suncloud.
Gordons Golf and Ski Shop
264 ByPass (next to McDonalds) 756-1003'
GET IT
WHILE IT'S
CALL DOMINO'S PIZZA
Off a Large,
Two or More
Topping
Pizza!
j Offer good only at participating
Domino's Pizza locations.
Not valid with other coupons or offer.
Offer good thru December 1, 1987
I
� Please provide nameaddressvphooe on coupon
BEFORE driver arrives
Name
I
I
Address
PtWM
Have you ever gotten cold
pizza? The NOID" did it! Call
Domino's Pizza' we AVOID
THE NOIDs" Domino's Pizza
Delivers' quality pizza, hot
and delicious. We're quick in
the store, so we safely deliver
your hot custom-made pizza
in less than 30 minutes Don't
let the NOID chill your pizza
Call Domino's Pizza1
DOMINO'S
PIZZA
DELIVERS
Serving
Central Greenville
and ECU Campus
758-6660
1201 Charles Btvd
Serving East Greenville
752-6996
Rivergate Shopping Center
Serving West Greenville
756-9998
2405 W Dickinson Ave
Serving Ayden
and Winterville
746-4042
106 N. Lee St
Hours:
11:00am-1am Sun -Thurs.
1100am-2amFn &SAf
ExceotAyten
ll�fcm-l2midniBh�S-n -rhun.
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�id sold
v years ac
Plu.u Cinema
Starting Friday
Near Dark - R
The Princess Bride
PG 13
Date With An Angel
PG 13
$1.50 All Times
Greenville's Only
f Premium
Quality Cleaners
W10A& Since 1935
i Laundered" Shirt
ANEDj
ATI) '
Special
5 For $2.99
111 W. 10TH ST.
CORNER OF 10THEVANS
�sented with incoming order
Christmas
ome ski gear
er the tree.
Skis:
I, K2, Dynastar, Olin
Boots: Nordica, Salomon
Bindings: Salomon
Sweaters, T-Xecks,
Parkas, Bibs, Pants:
Obermeyer, CB, Skyr,
Sun Ice,
White Stag
M Sunglasses,
c& Goggles:
Uvex;
Vuarnet, Ray-Ban, Suncloud
s Golf and Ski Shop
756-1003
'S PIZZA
r gotten cold
)ID -didit'Call
ra we AVOID
)omino's Pizza
ility pizza, hot
. We're quick in
e safely deliver
sm-made pizza
I minutes Don't
Jhill your pizza
i Pizza1
INO'S
Serving
Central Greenville
and ECU Campus
758-6660
1201 Charles Blvd
Serving East Greenville
752-6996
Rivergate Shopping Center
Serving West Greenville
756-9998
2405 W Dickinson Ave
Serving Ayden
and Winterville
746-4042
106 N. Lee St
Hours
11 00am-1am Sun-Thurs.
11:00am-2amFn &GAt
ExceptAyden
11 00am-12midnight Son - fnura.
11 am-2amFri &?�;�
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rom his aunt
Play.it Cinema
Starting Friday
Near Dark - R
The Princess Bride
PG 13
Date With An Angel
PG 13
and
ind bi.n k
popular
5 He
. the
ido and Go Shrink
R
$1.50 All Times
vrfj
Greenville's Only!
Premium
Quality Cleaners
WJIPA& Since 1935
s rLaundered"Shirt
1 E WTT)1
ED j Special
�5j?orjj52J99
111 W. 10TH ST?"
CORNER OF 10TH EVANS
t be presented with incoming order
Christmas
ome ski gear
er the tree.
ki
v.is:
signol, K2, Dynastar, Olin
Hoots: Nordica, Salomon
Bindings: Salomon
Sweaters, T-Necks,
Parkas, Bibs, Pants:
yer, CB, Skyr,
Sun Ice,
White Stag
Sunglasses,
Goggles:
Revo. BoVJe
I Vex; fSro
Vuarnet, Ray-Ban, Suncloud.
�s Golf and Ski Shop
756-1003
'S PIZZA
r gotten cold
did it1 Call
we AVOID
)omino's Pizza
lity pizza, hot
We're quick in
e safely deliver
jm-made pizza
(minutes Don't
Ihill your pizza
i Pizza'
INO'S
Serving
Central Greenville
and ECU Campus
758-6660
1201 Charles Blvd
Serving East Greenville
752-6996
Rivergate Shopping Center
Serving West Greenville
756-9998
2405 W Dickinson Ave
Serving Ayden
and Winterville
746-4042
106 N. Lee St
Hours
11 00am-1am SunThurs.
11 00am-2amFri &S
ExceptAyden
11 OOarn-12midnight Sun -Thurs
11 am-2amFri SP?
Love And Justice
H (il OSM )
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THK VAST CAROI INIAN
SRorts
m
NOVEMBER 19 1987 Page 12
letes is best characterized by the
creation under his leadership of
an academic counseling program
for athletes
Eakin also said that he had re-
quested Karr to continue to serve
the athletic department as con-
sultant to the chancellor for ath-
letics to assist with the new Sports
Medicine Building and other proj-
ects as assigned.
Pirates' fourth athletic director.
His primary goal was to bring the
athletic program back to promi-
nence. Karr has achieved that
goal.
He has achieved the monetary
status wanted by scheduling such
football powerhouses as Florida
State, Illinois, Miami (Fl.), West
Virginia, Virginia Tech and
Syracuse. In scheduling such
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Amid a sea of unanswered
questions, athletic director Dr.
Ken Karr resigned from his posi-
tion Wednesday morning.
Karr, who has been athletic di-
rector at ECU, will be officially
relieved of his duties effective
Friday, ECU Chancellor Richard
Eakin said. An interim athletic
director was scheduled to be "Yesterday b.ds were opened ESjirSISJS
named by Eakin at a 10 a.m. press or the construction of a Sports excessiv'cSSrism rom Tat e
conference this morning. Medicine Building. Dr. Karrhas backers
The highly-controversial Karr played a key role in conceptual- "I have mixed about it (Karr
will remain at the university as a mg and planning this facility resignation�' Herman Vnni7
professor of physical education. Eakm said. "Because of his excel- preset of the Fn Counry
Eakin, ,n a prepared statement, 't leadership in bringing the Pirate Club chapter said Tfed
f&oueh didne BUi,din8 th3t he has � "� S�d
through the pre-construction
stage, I am asking Dr. Karr to
continue to serve the university as
a liason for the project through its
completion
Karr, Eakin and members of the
athletic department refused fur-
said that he had "accepted Dr.
Karr's resignation with regret.
"Dr. Karr has served East Caro-
lina University with distinction
Eakin said. "He has brought fi-
nancial stability, competition at
the highest levels, and a concern
for the academic progress of ath
�b K11 itiusc-u rur-
ictes to the university's athletic thcr comment on the resignation
program. His concern for the aca- Wednesday.
demic well-being of student-ath- Karr came to ECU in 1980as the
things for the university.
Gentry went on to say that he
did not know of any organized
move by members of the Pirate
Club pushing for Karr's resigna-
tion.
"I think that there may have
been some individuals (in the
club) that were pushing for it
Gentry said. "But, to my knowl-
Kt n Karr as athletic director in Tile photo.
Intramurals update
H - � �"� "u�� "iv Midwi- mings nice
Pirates defeated by Czechs 82-76
edge, there was no move by the
club to ask for the resignation 1
personally, had heard nothing
about it (the resignation) until
early this morning when a friend
called me
The resignation, for the most
part, took all Pirate coaches by
surprise.
"The first news I heard of it was
when I called back to the office
this morning Pirate football
coach Art Baker, who is recruiting
in South Carolina, said. ' ! was a
surprised by the news, though I
would like to wish him (ka rr
in his new endeavors
"It took me bv kind of surpr
Colonial Athletic Assooal
commissioner Tom Yeagcr said
(Karr currently serves as
president of the CAA). I didn't
even have an inkling that some-
thing like this was about to hap-
pen. '
"1 realize though that it is the
nature of the business. Sometimes
things like this are necessary
On Tuesday, Dec 8, students,
faculty and staff are invited to
become a part of one of the fasting
growing programs on campus
I he aerobic fitness program at
East Carolina University contin-
ues to provide participants with
quality work-outs and fun! For
the fanatics, fitness instructor try-
outs will be held for spiring
semester.
Intramural-Recreational Scrv-
ices is searching for dedicated,
quality instructors to teach our
classes. As a part of the try-outs,
each person will be asked to com-
plete a 30-question exam covering
exercisc physiology, basic anat-
omy and kinesiology along with
exercise programming and lead-
ership techniques.
A practical try-out will also be
completed including a non-ver-
bal exercist demonstration, three-
five minute individual instruc-
tion and a group aerobic mini-
Busy
See IRS paj-e 13
East Carolina lost 82-76 to the
Czechoslovakian National team
Tuesday night in Minges Coli-
seum, but proved in the process
that thenation'sleastexperienced
college basketball team can be
competitive in the 1987-88 season.
The Pirates' roster lists no one
over 6-6, no seniors, only one jun-
ior, and less than three points per
game returning from last year's
12-16 team.
First-year head coach Mike
Steele has nine newcomers in-
cluding five freshmen, two walk-
ons and a junior college transfer.
Tuesday, however, the young
and pesky Pirates gave the Czech
National team fits. If not for a
dismal six-of-15 shooting per-
formance from the free throw line
by ECU, combined with a fine 56
percentage from the floor by the
Czechs, the outcome could have
been reversed.
"I was very pleased with our
overall performance Steele said.
"Every player on the court, with
the exception of Jeff Kelly, was
literally playing in their first col-
lege game. It was very rough
under the boards, and I think we
definitely showed we're going to
hustle and not quit
Czechoslovakia was led by cen-
ter Oto Maticky, who scored a
game high 18 points while pulling
down 18 rebounds. The taller
Czechs outrebounded ECU by a
47-21 margin and had to over-
By KRISTIN HALBERG
Sports Writer
It was a very- busy weekend for
the East Carolina swimming and
di ing teams as they hosted three
meets last Saturday and Sunday
in MingesColiseum. It was nearly
a (lawless weekend also as the
women won two of the meets
against George Washington Uni-
versity on Saturday and against
William and Mary on Sunday,
and the men just missed a victory
over Navy on Saturday.
rhe girls, having an excellent
season, brought their record to 5-
with last weekend's victories
leaving Coach Rick Kobe very
pleased with the women's squads
performance thus far. Said Coach
Kobe, "We are right where we
want to be
I he ECU women easily beat
George Washington on Saturday
with a final score of 82-58. In addi-
tion, the women swimmers had a
few standouts against GWU.
Meredith Bridgers set a varsity
record in the 100-yard
breaststroke swimming an awe-
some time of 1:06.99.
Sony a Hemmingway also took
the spotlight by winning two
events for the Pirates: the 50-yard
freestyle (25.88) and the 100-yard
freestyle (56.43).
Sherry Campbell again won
both the 1-meter and 3-meter
boards and quaiifyed for the
NCAA's in the 3-meter diving
event. So now Campbell, because
she qualified for the NCAA's in
the 1-meter diving event last
week against Furman, will now
represent the Pirates in the NCAA
regional diving meet to be held in
proves
come 24 turnovers, including 16
Pirate steals to keep ECU in the
game.
The Czech team led by as many
as nine points early in the first
half, but the upstart Pirates rallied
behind freshman center Stanley
Love and lightning-quick fresh-
man point guard Jimmy Hinton
and led 30-26 with seven minutes
left in the first half.
Hinton, a 5-foot-9 speedster,
created havic among the Czech
backcourt. The Little Rock, ARk
product recorded a school-record
eight steals and was responsible
for more than half of the national
team's 24 turnovers. Love, who
played the post against the 6-11
Maticky most of the evening, led
ECU in scoring with 17points.
It was on the boards, however,
where the Pirates took their
lumps. With a front lineof 6-11 6
9 and 6-9, the Czechs recorded a
rebounding advantage of 26, in-
cluding 15 offensive and 32dcfen-
sive rebounds. Six-foot-three
Reed Lose and 5-9 left Kelly had
four rebounds each to lead ECU.
"Our coaches felt that if we
could keep them off the boards
that we could win the gan
Steele said. " ou look and we had
only seven turnovers. Consider-
ing the short amount of time this
team has been together, that's a
very encourae ure
See PIRATES page 13
A personal glance
March, on both boards.
The 200-yard medley relay
started the meet off as Keller
Hodges, Robin Wicks, Meredith
Bridgers, and Angela Winstead
swan for first with a time of
1:55.49.
Patty Walsh was all by herself
as she easily claimed first in the
1000-yard freestyle in 11:05.49.
Tracy Bauman soon followed to
claim second in 11:09.20.
ECU saw Carolyn Green take
the 200-yard breaststroke with a
time of 2:35.79.
And in the 200-yard individual
medley relay event, it was Leslie
jo Wilaon stretching for first in
2:16.08 with Meredith Bridgers
settling for second with a time of
2:17.08.
The men however did not fare
as well as the women on Saturday
By PAT MOLLOY
Auislant Sport Iditor
1 remember where I was when I
found out.
1 was about three swallows into
a Natural Light and two steps
away from an unnatural act with a
blonde.
I spat out the beer (if you can
believe that), forgot the'babe (I
can't believe that), and wept tears
of joy.
Ken Karr, wizard behind the
Pee-Dee-the-Pirate campaign; the
man who not only stops the buck,
but saves it; the silent, football-
minded guru who resembles a
constipated Andy Rooney, is re-
signing.
As I regained my composure, I
studied my situation. Things
weren't as pretty as they seemed:
first, Karr was gone. That in itself
was a blessing. But also gone were
those killer off-the-rack blue suits
he wears.
You know the suits, fellas.
They're the ones your mother
always made you wear when high
school pictures were taken.
Secondly, I realized just what
the man plans to donow. Now get
this he wants to teach physical
education.
Personally, I believe in the free-
dom to dream. I do it constantly. I
dream of owning Anheuser-
Busch. I dream of oneday making
enough money to buy Montana.
The Karr era
And 1 also dream of nailing a cer-
tain brunette in my journalism
class.
1 don't, however, expect any of
these dreams to come true.
If you look at the above picture,
I think you'll realize what I mean
about dreaming. Professor Karr is
not what people in the physical
fitness profession would call
"ripped
This, of course, is my opinion,
but it seems to me Ken has or-
dered Dominos a few times too
many. In other words, the man
has not avoided the Noid.
Ken probably ate him.
But "looks don't make the
man as the saying goes. That's
reassuring too, for if looks made
the man, Ken Karr would be one
massive dumpling.
But that's just my opinion.
The third realization that hit me
like a nine-iron was the fact that
Karr is planning to stay at East
Carolina. "That's just great I
said to the vacuous space left by
my blonde friend. "It's not bad
enough we had to live with his
decisions as they affected our
sports programs, now he's going
to effect our grades
Just imagine, a man who took a
football team with a 2-9 record
against mediocre teams and pit-
ted them against the toughest
football powers in the nation �
expecting to win, some would
think � is going to teach people.
I wouldn't count on a grade
curve in Ken Karr's class.
In fact, unless you were also
accepted to MIT or Yale, I don't
think I'd attempt the course.
My last and largest problems
with Karr's resignation are his
habits concerning speech as they
will affect his classes.
As a writerreporter, my job is
to interview people, get them to
talk, decipher the garbage, and
write it into understandable,
meaningful information fit for
public consumption.
1 feel I understand and do my
job quite well.
As Athletic Director of East
Carolina, Ken Karr's job was to let
me interview him and get him to
talk. Bu t Ken had many of his own
ideas about my job and his job.
And I fear those ideas are going
to carry over into the class room.
Ah, I can see the cursed day even
as I write this.
A young, agressive student will
stand to ask professor Karr a ques-
tion on sports medicine � per-
haps concerning bone fractures.
Karr fields the question
checks left looks back to stare
down the attacker and says: "I'm
sorry, no comment. But you may
check with my staff after class
All's well at East Carolina.
as they were just 10 points short ot
a victory over Navy losing 99-116.
The guys swam a great meet
Coach Kobe "Navy is ranked in
the top 10 in the East. We were just
10 points from winning
In addition, Coach Kobe com-
mends the whole team for its ef-
forts against the Midshipmen.
The Pirates suffered a great loss
on the 200-yard fly and on both
the 1 and 3-meter boards. Other
than that, the men were verv
competitive winning six of the 11
swimming events.
The 400-yard medley relay saw
George Walters, Ron Fleming
Raymond Kennedy, and John
Fan-ell shine as they swam a first
place time of 3:36.13, one second
head of the Midshipmen.
Tom Holsten took the 200-yard
individual medley relay as he
swam in at 2:01.06 to take first
while Raymond Kennedy
stretched for third in 2:02.31.
Success was also in store for
George Walters as he touched the
wall in 1:58.56 with Mark O'Brien
(1:59.71) right behind him to place
in second in the 200-yard back-
stroke.
The 500-yard freestyle was also
dominated by the Pirates as Brian
Kingsfield (4:48.26) snared first
and J.D. Lewis (4:49.47) settled for
second.
It was all Raymond Kennedy in
the 200-yard breaststroke as he
easily claimed first place swim-
ming a superb time of 2:13.61. Lee
Hicks and Pat Brennan swam in
for second and third with times of
2:16.39 and 2:17.10 respectively.
The 400-yard freestyle relay
was also a success for the Pirates
as Sean Callender, George Wal-
ters, Andy Lewis, and Tom Hol-
sten swam a first place time of
3:19.47.
Sunday's meet against William
and Mary was a close meet for the
women with the end result com-
ing down to the final race, but the
Pirates were able to overcome and
win it by 10 points, 136-126.
"They were behind the entire
meet and pulled it out in the last
relay said coach Kobe.
The first victory by the Pirates
was in the 100-yard breaststroke
when Meredith Bridgers claimed
first with a time of 1:0833.
Next, ECU saw Patty Walsh win
the 50-yard freestyle in 25.97 with
Sonya Hemmingway right be-
hind her to claim second for the
Pirates in 26.09.
Sherry Campbell, as always,
was superb in diving as she again
won both diving events on Sun-
day also.
Sonya Hemmingsay (56.49
took first in the 100-yard free le
event as Ryan Philaw close
lowed to grab second in n
All eves were watching as
Meredith Bridgers claimed first
place in the 200-yard breaststroke
swimming a time ot 231.17.
Carolyn Green found 2:34 52 a
quick enough time to secure her a
second place spot as well
ECU again saw Meredith Bridg-
ers snag another first place as
won the 200-yard Individual
medley relay in 2:16.98. Leslie o
Wilson soon followed to (
second in 2:17.02.
And finally, tor the women, the
relay team of Sonya Hemming-
way, Tracy Bauman, Carolyn
Green, and Tatty Walsh (3 44.88)
and the relax team of Angela Win
stead, Keller Hodges, Robin
Wicks, and Leslie Jo Wilson
(3:51.00) secured the ultimate vic-
tory taking first and second place
in the 400-yard freestyle relay to
claim the meet against William
and Mary.
This Saturday, both the men
and the women Pirate swimmers-
will beon the road as they travel to
Charlotte to swim against UNC-
Charlotte.
V
f
v
I
Yep, its that time of vear again
Once again ! will venture out on
a limb and put forth my picks tor
the college basketball season Be-
fore any of you sarcastic know-it-
alls calls me a mindless fool M
you see my picks, just ,
glance back at the pn .
4. Mil
like t i
Wit hi. J
Hughes)
picks for the last two years
Yea. thai s right I p -
ana last vear and
year before
So, sit lh I ,
I. Purdue
got my pick tor the best in the
land With the returning quartet
Iro) Lewis Even
Todd Mitchell ai I M
Mc anl
abilit) ot fii rj Q ne t
due will be hard I
and I verette may
upbetngoneofi
combos in the lit v �
isa gem ak ng
2. Syracuse� im
though lacking in bench str
and definitely hurtii
sonality cat � . has thi
turning pla) Imakc
any coach green with envy
man Ron) Scikalycomb
Derrick Coleman ai I
Douglas make
look tough Throw in �
popular sixth n
case is the spacious i
Dome and Sr
through Big I ast oppoi
3. Kentucky � rhe '�
will definitely return to toi
this season. With a pail
arrivals (Eric Manuel and
Ellis) Rex Chapman and I
ender will have more d
possibilities inside, that is when
they're not popping the threes
But, don't sweat it Rex U you
don't win it all at the Final Four
the sun will still come out tomor-
row.
w
-
Ic
bal
. i.
Pirates fall ir
Continued from p;iSe 12 j
Lose w-nopfavccl'sparinTrK-a� lei tftne
freshman last season, hit four I
six shots from behind the tl i
point line in the first half to k� p
the Pirates close.
The Czechs took a 41-4. lead
with just 1:40 remaining in the
first halt on a Maticky layup, juJ
the Pirates would come close, but
never lead again
Love, Kelly and Lose each hit
C 2
IRS
news
Continued from page 12
class.
It you are interested in becom-
ing a part of the department en
car. r us Where Fun is �y con-
tact Kathleen Hill at 757-6387
Try-outs will be held from '
5 p.m.
Nov. 24 marks the last registra-
tion day for fall intramural sports.
Indoor Soccer participants arc
urged to sign-up m o p.m. in
Brewster D-103.
To
M
iu
Betl
woiikix; STl M.IS:
u h
u
VI �
lt
remember:
withholdine
PR
W-A �
H$3UIm
Mci
For an
mationj
757-00
Specialson,v 3.95
Monday CtBCXEN FLAITTA
i.n ENCMUUM
Wednesday beef tost
Thursday Ft AIT A DEI M
FnJ.H BEEF CH1MICHANG
The backstroke was one of the many events that the Pirate swim tmm .v.ni
(Photo by Thomas Walters- ECU Photo Lab) team excel,ed � ring wins over the weekend.
IALT ri
ASUIZjJTk
�STADA ,i
ELMAR Wj
m
521 Cotanche St.
757-
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t -0g0M� ir iw� � � ii i m m � m
�i�i
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e Friday
K the
t
until
i friend
he most
s b
i a was
ie office
ate football
� ruiting
� .is a
s 82-76
iad
nis
s a
v PIR n s page !3
tankers
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'im team excelled in during wins over the weekend
1
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 19,1987 13
Y ep, its that time of year again.
Once again 1 will venture out on
a limb and put forth my picks for
the college basketball season. Be-
forc any of you sarcastic know-it-
alls calls me a mindless fool when
you see my picks, just take a
lance back at the preseason
4. Michigan � Who wouldn't
like to be in Bill Frieder's shoes?
With Gary Grant, Glen Rice, Mark
Hughes and Loy Vaught all back
from last season and with the
addition of even more talent, the
Woverines could challenge Pur-
due hard for the Big 10 title. The
that danged program in his fists.
7. Indiana � Bobby Knight has
lost pretty boy Steve Alford from
last year's squad however he still
returns Keith "Not To" Smart,
Dean Garrett and Ricky Cal-
loway. Toss in a pair of graduates
(Lyndon Jones and Jay Edwards)
Preseason basketball poll
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
picks for the last two years.
Yea, that's right. I picked Indi-
ana last year and Louisville the
year before.
So, sit back and read.
1. Purdue � The Boilermakers
ot my pick tor the best in the
and With the returning quartet
I froy Lewis, EveretteStephens,
rodd Mitchell and Melvin
McCants, along with the coaching
ability oi fiery Gene Keady Tur-
due will be hard to stop. Lewis
and Everette may possibly wind
up being one of the best backcourt
i ombos in the line, while Mitchell
I- a gem along the baseline.
2. Syracuse � Jim Boeheim, al-
though lacking in bench strength
and definitery hurting in the per-
sonality category, has three re-
turning players that would make
iny coach green with envy. Big
man Rony Seikaly combined with
VTrick Coleman and Sherman
Douglas make the Orangemen
look tough. Throw in the ever-
popular sixth man. which in the
v ase is the spacious, noisy Carrier
Dome and Syracuse could roll
through Big Fast opponents.
3. Kentucky � The Wildcats
will definitely return to top form
this season. With a pair oi new
arrivals (Eric Manuel and I.eRon
Ellis) Rex Chapman and Ed Dav-
ender will have more dish-off
possibilities inside, that is when
they're not popping the threes.
But, don't sweat it Rex. If you
don't win it all at the Final Four
the sun will still come out tomor-
row.
only reason they aren't ranked
higher is because Frieder hasn't
proven that he has a lick of coach-
ing ability yet. But, he can darn
sure recruit.
5. Pittsburgh � The Panthers
with the return of the nation's re
bound king Jerome Lane (6-6) and
Charles Smith will challenge
Syracuse harshly for the Big East
title. A good recruiting class
makes a lot oi people think the
Panthers can go all the way but I
can't see it happening. Tradition
Still plays a big part in clutch
games.
6. Louisville � If the Cardinals
don't bounce back this season
then it is guaranteed that Pervis
will become quite nervous. But
with the addition of freshman
sensation LaBradford Smith to
the lineup, Denny Crum may just
beallsmilesagainattheendol the
year. But he'll still be crinkling
from Marion I ligh, which gar-
nered three straight prep titles in
basketball-prominent Indiana,
along with red-shirt frosh Todd
ladlow, a 6-10 skyscraper, and the
I loosicrs may be back in business.
8. North Carolina � If Deano
can keep his troops in Chapel Hill
and on the hardwood the Heels
could rock 'n roll in the ACC. With
eff Lebo and freshman King Rice
runnin' things in the backcourt,
f.R. "Swingmeister" Reid, Steve
"Spitmeister"Bucknall,Scott Wil-
liams and Kevin Madden will
take care oi the other bizness that
needs tendin' to. The Heels still
will need that spark to emerge as
the floor leader. Lebo is capable.
9. Temple � Yep, the fellas'
from Philly will rock the house
again this season. Nate Blackwell
may be gone but Mark "Bring
Home the Bacon" MaconandTim
Perry will be big boosts for coach
Chaney as he attempts to rule the
Atlantic 10.
10. Georgetown � A lot of
people are calling it an off year for
the Hoyas. But when John Th-
ompson is running the show it is
never an off year. Look for Perry
McDonald and Johnny Edwards
to run the show in the paint, while
Charles Smith and Dwayne
Bryant take care of the perimeter.
11. Kansas � With Danny-
Manning inside the Jayhawks are
going to always be a threat. Add
to that the supreme coaching
abilities of the much-travelled
Larry Brown and Kansas will
shine in the Big Eight.
12. Duke � Sure Tommy
Amaker is gone but the Blue
Devils are still sporting seven key
returners from last season's
squad. With Danny Ferry and
John Smith on the inside team
ming up with Kevin Strickland
and Quin Snyder, Duke will not
surprise opponents; they will just
beat 'em.
13. Missouri � The Tigers will
prove to be the Jayhawks main
contender in the Big Eight this
season will all five starters back
from a club, thaf lasn year didn't
look to shabby. If Derrick
Chievous gets hot against the ay-
hawks, you can go ahead and
mark up the "W
14. Notre Dame � Even if sen-
ior point guard wizard David
Rivers took the court by himself
the Irish would probably win half
their games. But when you con-
sider the fact that center Gary
Voce has had a year to improve,
Digger might not come bustin'
out of his coat in anger much this
season.
15. Arizona � The return of
three-point popping Steve Kerr
teamming up with all-around
forward Sean Elliott will propel
the Wildcats to the top of the Pac-
10 and keep Lute Olson's hair
from getting any whiter.
16. Iowa � Gerry Wright and
Brad Lohaus are gone and will be
hard for Tommy Davis to replace.
He does have Roy Marble left to
pull off the sweet jumpers from
the corner though.
17. Georgia Tech � Bobby
Cremins will have one of the best
forward duos in the country this
season with Duane Ferrell and
Tom Hammonds. If the graying
wonder can fill the point guard
shoes left open his ranking could
rise.
18. Wyoming � With Fennis
Dembo (who would name their
kid that?) leading the way again
this season the Cowboys will not
be a big surprise this season if they
show up in the round of 16 again
when NCAA time rolls around.
19. DePaul � Dallas Comegys
is gone but "Squirt" Meyer has
Rod Strickland back in the
backcourt to run the Blue Demons
right back to the NCAA's.
20. Florida � The M&M crew is
seperatcd but ex-N.C. State
mentor Norm Sloan still has a
team that won't melt under pres-
sure led by Vernon Maxwell (one
half of the M&M punch) and
Dwayne Schintzius.
Rosina's Picture Pic
of the Week
If your Face Appears in Rosina's
Picture Pic Contest You Win
lvery Thurv
lusktmiasi'
Term Paper Due?
Call
Nanette Stillwell
Pick Up & Delivery
Letter Quality
Professional Editing
1-524-5241
(cheap! call)
leers drop first game of year
The ECU Hockey learn trav-
eled to Gary Tuesday night and
were handed their first loss to
N.C. State 8-3.
N.C. State dominated the first
two periods scoring six times on
eight power plays always capital-
izing on Pirate mistakes. Hard
fought battles in front oi State's
goaltender always ended up in a
Pirate penalty forcing ECU to be
down a man most of the came.
EC I tried to make a valient
comeback in the third period scor-
ing three unanswered goals but
penalties hurt them again as State
added two more powerplay goals
to take the wind out oi the Pirate
Sills.
Chris Pvle and Eddie Winick
set up Drew Bourqueashe tucked
the puck in the upper right hand
corner beating a sprallmg State
goal tender at the 1:22 mark of the
Pirates fall in exhibition game
Continued from page 12
� o wrup!aved sparingly as a"
man last season, hit tour of
ix shots from behind the three-
point line in the first half to keep
the Pirates close
The Czechs took a 41-40 lead
with just 1:40 remaining in the
I rst half on a Maticky lavup, and
the Pirates would come close, but
never lead again.
Love, Kelly and Lose each hit
baskets early in the second half to
Hull ECU to rjfri� oe pomu.
Each thVie, however: the visitors
answered to maintain their lead
Ihe lead gradually grew to as
many as nine points when Stefan
Svitek scored on a lavup to give
C zechoslovakia a 79-70 advan-
tage with 1:54 remaining.
Czechoslovakia, which de-
feated UNC-Wilmigton 72-69
Monday night, placed five play-
ers in double figures. Love led
ECU with 17 points, while Lose
nA bpi-llMnoIV fius.Hill added
14 each.
Despite the loss, there were
several Pirate bright spots. Hin-
ton, a fiery southpaw, already has
his sites set on ECU season and
career steal records. Love, who
committed to the Pirates after the
national signing date impressed
the 1,160 at Minges Tuesday
nicht.
third period getting the Pirates on
the board.
Chris Gormley scored at the
Pirates second goal at 5:12 tipping
a John Van Nest slapshot between
N.C. State's goal tenders's legs
making the score 6-2. Hard check-
ing play kept both teams scoreless
until Mike Anderson and Allen
Rutledge connected to Ray Mad-
den for the Pirates third goal at the
13 second mark of the quarter.
State then scored two power-
play goals to ice the game 8-3.
The loss to N.C. State dropped
ECU'S record to 2-1 with play
resuming next semester.
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
.Adults s22i
5:30
CHILDREN
ANYTIME
n
BUCCANEER MOVIES
t 756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Canter
SUSPECT
CINDERELLA
Rated G
1:00-2:30-4:00-5:30
PRINCE OF
DARKNESS
Elated R 7:00-9:00
�k
Starts Friday
TEENWOLF TOO
Rated PG
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
IRS
news
Continued from page 12
class.
It you are interested in becom-
ing a part of the department on
campus "Where Fun is 1" con-
tact Kathleen Hill at 757-6387.
Try-outs will be held from 3 p.m
5 p.m.
Nov. 24 marks the last registra-
tion day for fall intramural sports.
Indoor Soccer participants are
urged to sign-up at 6 p.m. in
Brewster D-103.
Tom Togs Factory Outlet
I900Dickii n Avenue
Next Warehouse Sale Nov. 19th, 20th, 21st
Nothing in Warehouse over S10.00
9:30-G:00 p.m.
20 off of all merchandise in Outlet Store
iJ k; ire j ni'vviomrr id town, wc i
hrjih at Momhead Ctty, visit oiii
Hwy.64 East Between
Bethel and Tarboro
Conetoe, N.C
Avenue It vuu are going to
. trum rk'fingies )
Hwy.70West
Morehead City, N.C.
WedS.it.q-s Wed- - Sat- 9"5
We Also Wholesale
M.T-tTi-aTd & Wj Aacptp.i
tHIltitlMi STUIM'INTS:
Wln-n you till .nit your Form
W-4oi W-4A, "Employee's
Withholding Allowance
' rl ' .tt remember:
It ii t.m be i laimed on youi
parent's oi another person's tax
return, you general!) cannot be
exempt from income t.ix
withholding To eft it light, read
tile instructions th.it came with
voui Form W-4 01 W-4A.
t&MMM
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center T: Qpen
MonTues, & Wed. Fri. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
9 a.m. - 2 p.m. & by appointment
For an appointment or more infor-
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline.
757-0003
1 1 1 East Third Street - The Lee Building
Greenville, N. C.
Free Pregnancy Test-
ConfidentiaJ Counseling
Specials0
Monday CHICKEN FLAUTA
Tuesday - ENCHILADA SUIZ
Wednesday BEEF TOSTADA
Thursday - FLAUTA DELMAR
Friday - BEEF CHIMICHANGA
You're invited
to lunch
521 totanche St.
757-1666
art comPETion
PROSE AND POETRY
REQUIREMENTS- Open to all current ECU students.
ENTRY DATE: Tuesday. December 1 1987
Bring entries to the REBEL Office, or Media Board Office, second floor
Publications Building. Please include name, address, and telephone number
AWARDS:
First: $100
Second: $75
Third: $50
ESSAY CONTEST
THEME
THE ARTS AND LETTERS AS A CULTURAL FORCE:
The past 30 years and speculations on the future
REQUIREMENTS- Open to all currently enrolled ECU students.
Length should be no more than 15 typed pages
lt"80 ' Bibliography optional.
Title-page required Publications Building
ENTRY DATE: Tuesday, December 1. 1987
Bring entries to the REBEL office no later tha 5:00 p m
All entries should be accompanied by an ENTRY FORM and STATEMENT OF
ORIGINALITY which can be picked up at the Media Board Office in the
Publications Building.
AWARDS:
First: $75 and published L tgazine
Second: $25
Sponsors
The Greenville Daily Reflector
and
Central Book and News
ATTIC
art coecfo hop
5W 90UTM COTANCH6 STREET
STREET
GREENVILLE. M.C 27S34
7M-OBM
artcaeera hop
SIS WITH COTAHCHE STREET1
aREEMVItLe. M.C 27834
732-06M
' ����
� mm
� 'p �-
B �. �





-M THE EASTCAROi INIAN NOVEMBER 19, 1087
(.AMIS
Fearless Football Forecast
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Last Week:
(8-2)
Overall:
(75-35)
DEAN BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
Last Week:
(8-2)
Overall:
(74-36)
TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
I ast Week:
(5-5)
Overall:
(69-41)
PAT MOLLOY
Assistant Sports Editor
Last Week:
(8-2)
Overall:
(64-46)
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
Last Week:
(7-3)
Overall:
(63-47)
Duke at UNC
Purdue at Indiana
Oklahoma at Nebraska
Ohio St. .it Michigan
Virginia ai i State
Notre Dame at Pcnn St
( lemson .it Saroltna
i (:i a at i S(:
West Va. .it Syra use
Wake Forest .it (i. fech
UNC
Indiana
Nebraska
Ohio St.
Virginia
Notre Damre
S. Carolina
UCLA
Syracuse
Ga. Tech
UNC
Indiana
Nebraska
Michigan
N.C. State
Perm St
S. Carolina
UCLA
Syracuse
Ga. Tech
UNC
Indiana
Oklahoma
Ohio State
Virginia
Notre Dame
S.arolina
UCLA
Syracuse
Ga.Tech
UNC
Indiana
Nebraska
Michigan
Virginia
Notre dame
Clemson
UCLA
Syracuse
Wake forest
UNC
Indiana
Oklahoma
Michigan
N.C. State
Notre Dame
S. Carolina
UCLA
Syracuse
Wake Forest
rates capture Ultimax event
By R. All IN
-pr. la Is The 1 as) l .mil, lu
I s Irate I Itimate Frisbee
team has captured its second
tournament championship in as
my weeks.
rhe title came as ECU hosted
I ltimax at the bottom oi Col-
I lilionNov. 14 Lv 15. as in the
( harlotte Ultimatum a week be-
'�� ire, the) never lost a game.
mSaturda) ECl began with a
?-6 vi tor) over W ET term Co-
lumbia, SC. The Irates then took
rn the alumni reunion team No
and showed them exactly
' with a 15-0 drubbing
� s Triangle challenged the
next and came up on the
�rt nd ot a 15-7 score.
In Sunday's first game ECU
faced arch rival Gale Force from
nington. Gale Force had also
undefeated in its three Sat-
nrda) games ECU won that game
-9. No Mercy merged with
V I f to challenge the Irates in the
semi-final round and lost 15-6.
The finals matched ECU against
a C.ale force team hungry to
avenge its only loss. The teams
traded points through a first half
that ended with the Irates leading
8-i. the Irate squade came to-
gether in the second halt and won
the game 15-12.
Hie tournament title was cred-
ited to ECU'S teamwork. No indi-
vidual MVP could be named. Said
team co-captain Bob DeMan,
"Everyone did what they had to
do to win this tournament. Every
player was vital to our success "
Although! Ultimax closes out
the fall tournament season, regu-
lai practices will continue
through the winter months. The
EC U team has set its sights on a
return trip to the Collegiate Na-
tional Championships in May
and plans to held a championship
caliber team in the Memorial Day
weekend event.
The spring schedule wi
dude tournaments in Wilming-
ton, Raleigh, Richmond, and
Blacksburgas well as Ultimax XL
I he Spring Break trip to Florida
should include at least two other
tournament appearances. The
season will conclude with Sec-
tionals, Regionals, and finally
Nationals.
The Irates thank all player and
spectators who helped make this
great weekend of sun and fun
such a big success and ask for
your continued support on the
road to Nationals.
aaturaay, Nov. 2
(j 10 p.m. - l a.m
m Featuring:
j
GUITAR � VOT.CI
r
in-
Intramural
Where Fun
Is 1
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS:
Saturday, Nov. 21st
f SQATHERING TIME AT
( THE FIZZ
FROM 5:00 7:00 p.m.
Shrimp. Mozzarella Sticks or Chicken Wings
25� each (minimum 1 dozen)
Monday: Football Party with $2 Pitchers
Tsday: Daiquiri Night. $2 Daiquiris All
Night
Wednesday: "2 For Tea' Night. $2 for Long
Island lee Teas
Thursday: $2 for your favorite Highball.
Friday: Fiesta at Fizz. Tequila Sunrises and
Margaritas for $2
O
x-
-Zv3 C Discount
q on all Food Items 3 p.m. until 8 p.m. '
pV � expires 1 1-30-87
�" "� m �� �� an ��� ��� aaj
THANKSGIVING SAVINGS
MICHELOB and Ij
MICHELOB i
LIGHT BEER
tf
ALL COKE PRODUCTS AND
COCA-COLA
l 3
Closed Thanksgiving Day,
Thursday, November 26th
N
MICHELOB
.
$5.99
NO
LIMIT
97
ciassk:
12 pack- 12 oz. cans
Pride of the Farm
TURKEY B
5-7 lb. avg.
Limit One
99 r
RICHFOOD
SUGAR
fr
macaroni &
Kraft 20 Free Bonus Pack
MACARONI &
CHEESE DINNER
2$1.00
8.75 oz. box
5 lb. bag
Limit One
2 Liter
Bottle
Fresh
BROCCOLI
bunch
PLANTERS
DRY ROASTED
COCKTAIL PEANUTS
$1.99
(12 oz. Jar) Of (12 oz. can)
PUMTERS
Cocktail
Del Monte
Vegetables
Cul Green Beans, Garden Peas, Whole Kernel
Com, Cream Style Golden Com. 16 oz. cans.
39$
Kraft AMERICAN
SINGLES .
$1.49
12 oz. pkg.
d�
SINGLES
AMEBCAN
Richfood
MARGARINE
Kraft Chilled
ORANGE JUIC:
12 gallon carton
4$
1 lb. pkg. quarters
Open 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. Monday - Saturday, Sunday 1 - 6 p m
Prices Effective Wednesday, November 18 Through Wednesday November 2S iqr7
"HOME OF GREENVILLE'S BEST MEAT" AND "FRESHEST PRODUCE"
WHERE THE PIRATES
SHOP FOR PRICE
QUALITY & CONVENIENCE
! rWO BLOCKS FROM ECU CAMPUS)

��.
OVERTONS
Supernal
Comer Third & Jarvis Streets
Just 2 Blocks from ECU

I
V
k
.I
I i
I





Title
The East Carolinian, November 19, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 19, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.575
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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