The East Carolinian, November 17, 1987






INSIDE
EditorialsM�m&
Style�wmijy
Sports�9
Classifieds5
STYLE

Nightlife in Greenville included The Ramones and
The Pressure Boys in one weekend � see STYLE,
page 7.
SPORTS
Pirates fall to Southern Mississippi by Ipur points
and end up with another losing season - see
SPORTS, page 9.
�lie East (Eawltttttn
Serving the East Carolina ampus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 No. 23
Tuesday, November 17,1987
Greenville, NC
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Chancellor speaks at meeting
SGA hears parking proposal
RvTIUUAUDTnxr �j r
By TIM HAMPTON
Staff Writer
Speaking in front of the SGA
Monday, Chancellor Richard R.
Eakin presented a plan that in-
cludes converting a field at the
bottom of College Hill Drive into
an asphalt parking lot.
The overall plan would be
financed by doubling parking
sticker fees.
The plan calls for turning the
field into a 318 space parking lot at
a price of $195,000, according to
Fakin. In addition the plan would
expand an existing parking lot,
situated across from the proposed
lot, by 95 spaces at a cost of
$98,000.
Eakin said the parking sticker
fee for students, faculty and staff
will rise from $25 to $50 to pay for
the expansion in asphalt lots.
Eakin said he will support the
plan in the next ECU Trustee's
meeting Dec. 4.
A number of the student leg-
islators voiced their disapproval
of the proposed project. Those
opposing to the plan said the
parking lot would cover a valu-
able recreation area that is pres-
ently used by many organiza
tions.
"I know you haven't been
here long, but we use that field a
lot. Where would these groups
ing lot would improve the present
parking problem.
Many legislators said alterna-
tive plans need to be considered in
solving the problem of the lack of
go?" a legislator asked Eakin. parking space. Several legislators
Eakin told the student he had a
good argument.
The. Student Welfare
Committee announced that it
would draft a petition to be circu-
lated among ECU students in
opposition to the proposed park-
ing lot, according to Legislator
Michael Bartlett. Bartlett said he
does not think a such a new park-
Judge upholds firing of former ECU dept. head
Dr. David Kritchevsky waits to give his lecture, which dealt with
cancer and nutrition, Thursday at Mendenhall Student Center
Hardy Alligood � PhotoLab).
Kritchevsky talks on relation
between food and cancer
By TIM HAMPTON
Staff Wnlrr
A former ECU professor plans
to appeal his case in which a N.C.
Superior Court judge upheld his
dismissal from the university,
according to his attorney.
John Kozy had been accused of
sexually harassing three female
students while they were taking
had touched their arms and put
his arm around their shoulders.
Superior Court Judge Bradford
Tillery, who reviewed the admin-
istrative procedures taken by the
university committee, made his
decision Nov. 5.
According to court records,
female students have accused
Kozy of sexual harassment since
the court record, she said Kozy
told her she would make an 'A'
regardless of whether she fin-
ished the course or not.
This female student did not file
a complaint to the university at
the time of Kozy's remarks, but
she did write a letter explaining
what transpired to Chancellor
John Howell six years after the
said they thought a parking deck
would be a viable alternative.
"Carolina and State have
parking decks, we are the third
largest university and we need a
parking deck instead of destroy-
ing a recreation field Bartlett
said.
Eakin said a parking deck
would be out of the question from
an economic stand point, point-
ing out that a parking deck could
cost as much as $2 million. A
ground level parking lot would
cost $1,000 per space, Eakin said,
compared to$5,000 per space fora
multi-level parking deck.
Other alternatives that the
legislators discussed included a
shuttle bus system to transport
parkers from the Bclk Allied
Health Building to the campus.
Legislators argued that the park-
ing area around the Belk building
By KAREN MANN
Staff Wriln
Health food enthusiasts wno
eat large amounts of fiber to ward
off cancer may not be doing them-
selves any good, according to a
Dr. David Kritchevsky, associate
director of the Wistar Institute of
Anatomy in Philadelphia.
Many different factors deter-
mine a person's resistance to can-
cer Kritchevsky said in a lecture at
Mendenhall Student Center
Thursday night. The lecture was
sponsored by the ECU School of
Medicine in conjunction with
Sigma Xi, the ECU Science Honor
Society.
"We hear a lot about causes that
are related to fat in the diet he
said. "As it turns out poor coun-
tries have different cancers than
rich ones
Kritchevsky explained that
poverty stricken countries have
higher incidences of cervix, eso-
phagus, liver, and stomach can-
cer. Affluent countries on the
other hand, have higher inci-
dences of breast, colon, and pros-
tate cancer. The reason for this,
Kritchevsky said, is that affluent
countries have a higher rate of fat
and calorie consumption.
Fiber alters a person's nitrogen
metalbolism, causing them to
excrete more energy, Kritchevsky
said.
"When you eat fiber you in-
crease energy excretion and you
don't take in as many calories
However, with the average
American's high calorie diet, the
energy released by the fiber is not
very helpful in reducing cancer,
he said.
"There still is a lot to be learned
at this period he said. "But one
way of helping to reduce calories
is to work hard People who
work at sedentary non-physical
jobs are more likely to have can-
cer, particularly colon cancer.
Kritchevsky also advised
against worrying about carcino-
gens (cancer causing agents) ii
food. "Almost everything you eat
contains carcinogens but you'd
have to eat a car load of it to have
any problem
���� ar,j (� , , � " J � ��o"�3H sintL- jonn nowcn six years alter tne ing area around the Belk building
uveitT icmr0nACCOrdm8t0 inridcntonOct. 2,1986, according could hold many cars and would
me university the testimony of the women, Kozv inraurtrPonMc � �� �w�L cu .�.
theuniversity the testimony of thewomcn,Kozy
Kozy, a philosophy professor, touched them or rubbed against
one-time department chairman them while they took exams in his
and a faculty member since 1963, class.
was fired in April after the Due One of the women said she re-
Process Committee found that he ceived an 'A' in Kozy's philoso-
was guilty of misconduct. The phy class after the professor had during an eLm
committee s charges of miscon- confronted her in November
duct stemmed from complaints 1980, with the possibility of en-
from students who claimed Kozy gaging in a sexual relationship. In
Delta Zeta sponsors Organ
Donor Drive this week
to court records.
In the summer of 1983, a female
student filed a complaint with the
university that Kozy had rubbed
her elbow with hiscrotch while he
was looking over her shoulder
The Delta Zeta Sorority began
sponsoring an Organ Donor
Awareness Week Monday.
As part of the week, which will
last until Friday, a booth will be
set up in front of the Student
Supply Store where people inter-
ested in becomi ng an organ donor
can sign organ donor cards, ac-
cording to Erma Dillender, soror-
ity member.
The goal was to get 100 people
to sign up, but they had an "excel-
lent response" Monday and have
already signed
Dillender said.
up 70 donors,
Delta Zeta is working in con-
junction with Carolina Organ
Procurement Agency (COPA) on
this project. According to Dillen-
der, COPA has a 24 hour number
In July, 1983, another female
student complained Kozy
touched her during an exam. She
said Kozy had played wi th a neck-
lace which was hanging near her
breasts.
In July, 1985, Kozy wrotea letter
to Philosophy Dept. Chairman
James Smith claiming that his
situation had "become utterly
ballistic and could blow this de-
partment (Philosophy) right out
of existence
In the fall semester of 1985,
Kozy was granted a semester's
leave with pay.
In the summer of 1986, Con-
stance Jones claimed Kozy
1-800-252-COPA, where you can touched her while she was taking
call and obtain more information a make-up exam in a small confer-
at any time. ence room .
The Delta Zeta booth will be
open 9 a.m2 p.m. every day this
week.
save the proposed field at the
bottom of the hill from unneces-
sary paving.
Eakin said the shuttle plan is a
"non-entity of an idea A shuttle
system was experimented with
several years ago and was ineffec-
tive, according to Scott Thomas,
SGA president.
Another legislator sug-
gested that the field at the bottom
of College Hill be paved and that
band and athletic organizations
be shuttled out to the fields sur-
rounding Bclk Building.
"The shuttle could transport
the band and athletic groups to
the Belk fields easier than shut-
tling parkers to and fro David
Sides said.
Speaker Bennett Eckert said
the tennis courts at the top of
College Hill would be an ideal
place for a parking lot. Eckert said
the tennis courts are not used due
to a lack of maintenance and
should be considered as an alter-
native parking lot location.
Dukakis appears at
ECU by way of telecast
ECU'S foreign students were honored at a special diner Friday at St Paul's Episcopal Church on Fourth SL (Thomas Walters � Photolab).
By CAMILLE COX
SuH Writer
Students at ECU were given a
chance to hear democratic presi-
dential nominee Mike Dukakis in
a live telecast and phone-in inter-
view that was screened in Jenkins
Fine Arts Center Friday.
Fifty schools in 25 states were
able to participate along with the
host: Texas A & M University. N.
C. State, Duke, UNC-Chapel Hill
and ECU were the schools from
North Carolina that were able to
participate.
Less than five students at-
tended the ECU screening, in
which the three-time governor of
Massachusetts opened by telling
the students thai "the country
needs strong economic leader-
ship However, "Americans
should not elect a president to be
a bookeeper or tax collector he
said.
Dukakis "hopes that young
people will become deeply in-
volved not as voters, but as par-
ticipants
"As much as John Kennedy
inspired my generation I hope to
inspire your generation
Dukakis said.
The interview began with a
question from the floor and then
viewers were then given a chance
to call in. One question asked
dealt with Dukakis' stand about
foreign policy towards Latin
America. "I feel the United States
should spend more time working
on relations with Mexico than
Nicaragua Dukakis said.
Another topic raised concerned
financial aid of education. "Some-
one should nobe denied an edu-
cation due to financial reasons.
More loans need to be established.
My proposal to the problem is an
income withholding payment
plan. I mean that after graduation
a percentage of students' income
should be withheld in order to
pay back the loan he said.
When asked about the Iran-
Contra Affair, Dukakis said, "It
was a failure and it's illegal
Then Dukakis was asked about
Star Wars "I don't think much of
it. I feel it's a fantasy and cannot
work. The program is expensive
and it comes at a time when the
United States doesn't have two
nickels to rub together Dukakis
said.
Mike Watkins, an ECU alumni,
is president of the ECU campaign
drive to elect Dukakis. There arc
currently 200 groups established
on 40 campuses, according to
Andi Levin, who is in charge of
the Dukakis campaign in the East-
ern part of the State.
The candidate's wife, Katherine
Dukakis, will visit ECU on Nov.
21, according to Watkins.
A
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THE EAST CARQUNIAN NOVEMBER 17.1987
Nearly $6 mill, given to ECU
KUNc.
ECU reports $5,964322 in total
private gifts for the 1986-87 fiscal
year. This figure represents a 13
percent increase over private eif ts
to ECU in 1985-86.
Gifts to the university are re-
ceived through three private
foundations that support differ-
ent areas within the institution. Of
the almost $6 million total in pri-
vate gifts, $2.8 million was given
for academic purposes; $2.2 mil-
lion for the School of Medicine;
and $1 million to support athletic
programs and scholarships.
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin
said, "I have been impressed with
the level of private support East
Carolina University attracts rela-
tive to schools of comparable size
with similar programs.
"This kind of support reflects
the level of quality demanded by
our faculty and researchers, as
well as recognition of their accom-
plishments and the importance of
their endeavor on the part of our
alumni and friends
Total giving figures are pre-
pared for The Annual Report of
the Council for Aid to Education
(CFAE), a national not-for-profit
organization which encourages
private support of education. The
organization is funded by contri-
butions from businesses nd pro-
vides support to education
through consulting and research
services, seminars, periodicals
and "how to" manuals. CFAE also
sponsors the public service adver-
tising campaign, "Give to the col-
lege of your choice
James L. Lanier Jr vice chancel-
lor for Institutional Advance-
ment, oversees fund-raising for
the University's research and
academic programs and heads
the East Carolina University
Foundation, Inc. The foundation
is comprised of private citizens,
corporate leaders, and alumni
who assist ECU in securing pri-
vate resources to advance the
university.
"Our success this year in pri-
vate giving makes a statement
about the condition of the U: iver-
sitv. It is an endorsement of our
efforts and an affirmation of the
University's quality by those who
know us best Lanier said.
"Much of the credit for our in-
creasing private gift support be-
longs to the many dedicated vol-
unteers who are assuming greater
responsibility in helping to gener-
ate interest, enthusiasm, and
commitment to East Carolina
among our alumni and the con-
stituents in our service area
Lanier also praised the staffs of
ECU'S three fund-raising founda-
tions for their professionalism
and hard work.
Projects accomplished through
the assistance of the ECU Founda-
tion include completion of a $2.2
million fund-raising campaign
commemorating the School of
Business's 50th anniversary;
funding of six new University
Scholars Awards (ECU's most
prestigious scholarships which
cover full tuition and fees); and
establishment of the second
$500,000 distinguished professor-
ship at ECU, this one for interna-
tional studies in the College of
Arts and Sciences.
Robert K. Adams, executive
director of the ECU Medical
Foundation, said, 'This year the
Medical School, through the
Medical Foundation, realized a
tremendous increase in private
giving for medical research. We
are most grateful to the pharma-
ceutical companies whose gifts
this year allowed us to begin
many new programs for which
state money is just not available.
"The ECU School of Medicine
continues to have a real need for
scholarship dollars, and we hope
to increase these kinds of gifts in
the next year Adams said.
DaveR. Hart, Jr. is the executive
director of the Pirate Club and
works with the ECU Educational
Foundation.
"As we strive constantly to
build an athletic program which
will reflect very positively on East
Carolina University, it is impera-
tive that we show the ability to
continue to expand our funding
base within the ECU Educational
Foundation Hart said.
"Our support base has illus-
trated again this year, a collective
willingness to contribute to an-
other record-setting year for the
Pirate Club. It's very encouraging
that we were able to exceed our
goals in both membership and
dollars in 1986-87
NOT ALL COPIES
ARE BLACK & WHITE
Violence reported atPenn.
PHILADELPHIA, Pa. (CPS) �
Some 200 University of Pennsyl-
vania students rallied Oct. 27 for
tighter security, escort services
and better campus lighting after 3
Penn football players were
stabbed by local youths during an
argument over whether the Bor-
ton Celtics or the Philadelphia
76ers are the best profession, 1
basketball team.
All 3 of the injured athletes �
Robert O'Brien, 20, Joseph Fyly-
powycz, 19, and Patrick Maley, 19
� are expected to recover frorr.
multiple stab wounds, a Penn
Medical Center spokesperson
said.
The attack intensified simmer-
ing student fears of crime on the
urban campus, where two rapes,
another knifing, an assault on 4
students by a plank-wielding
man and the rnugging of 4 varsity
wrestlers ha ve been reported over
the last year.
"People are afraid to walk
around at night, even if they have
a companion said Penn student
politician Sander Gerber.
While Perm's students were
protesting the attack on athletes,
however, other campuses were
coping with attacks and alleged
crimes committed by their ath-
letes.
Police arrested 2 University of
Nebraska football players �
La werence Pete and Neil Smith�
Oct. 14 for allegedly slashing the
tires on 2 police cars. Smith subse-
quently was suspended for 1
game.
At the University of Texas at El
Paso, police were called in � but
did not make an arrest � when
dorm residents complained back-
etball player Chris Sandle had
been disruptive and threatened
other students Oct. 18.
And on Oct. 18, Iowa City, Iowa
officials added more charges
against University of Iowa foot-
ball player Keaton Smiley for al-
legedly hitting a female classmate
last May.
Smiley also has been charged
with beating another woman
with a knife last June, and if con-
victed, could face a mandatory
life prison term.
Corrections
In an ECU News Bureau story
printed Thursday ("Faculty Sen-
ate votes to support academic
freedom"), it was reported erro-
neously that the vote of the ECU
Faculty Senate to support the fac-
ulty of Southeastern Baptist Theo-
logical Seminary was unanimous.
The vote was not unanimous
There was one "No" vote and one
abstention, according to the Fac-
ulty Senate minutes of the Nov. 10
meeting. There are 52 members of
the Faculty Senate.
In an article printed Oct. 27
-Survey says majority of students
drink alcohol a survey was in-
correctly cited about the number
of students using barbiturates.
1.8 percent of ECU students,
according to the survey, said they
use barbiturates everyday.
Earlier in October, a Pasadena,
Cal. judge sentenced suspended
University of Southern California
football player Aaron Emanuel to
14 days in jail, 3 years of probation
and 104 hoursof community serv-
ice for punching Sharon Hatfield,
another former USC athlete, at a
party in August.
Meanwhile, Michigan State
football player Blake Ezor and
University of Missouri football
coach Woody Widenhofer were
arrested for allegedly drunk driv-
ing in separate incidents on mid-
October.
NOW OFFERS
COLOR COPIES
Instant Service
Copies from slides
Copies to overhead projectors
Copies from books
e a o
Night Club
presents
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
THE LADIES ZOO!
With .25 Draft Beer and .50 Wine!
$1.25 Domestics, $1.50 Premiums,
$1 Schnapps and Tequila Shots
Spinning the Hottest Dance
Music in Eastern N.C
Eastern N.Cs No. 1 Smokin' Nightclub, BeauV.of
course Doors open at 9 o'clock. 18 yr. olds are welcome
4
Phone: 756-6401
1 ocated in the Carolina Last Centre.
Block Party
Tues Nov. 17 from 4-6 p.m.
Gary Jackson of W-DLX 93 FM
FREE PIZZA & PEPSI
Required:
West Area SRA Card & Picture I.D.
Non-SRA card holders:
$2.00 Admission
Other Games & Volleyball for your pleasure
Presented by: West Area Residence Council
SHf Sast (Earoltafan
Sewing the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
James F. J. McKee. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo
Shari Clemens pete Ferna'd
Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY RATES
0-49 Column inches $4 25
50-99 415
100-149 4 05
150 199 3 95
200-249iZZ"Z3.85
250 and above 3 75
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
(Charge in Addition to Regular Space Rale)
One color and black joq qq
Two colors and black155 qq
Inserts
5.000 or less6 uch
5-� � 10-��5.5c each
�.�01-12.0005tcach
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
Phones757-6366757-6557
757-6558757 6309
COMING ATTRACTIONS
11 I
THE WASH PUB
is an equal opportunity
advertiser!
We offer our specials to both sexes no matter
what age, race or religious
conviction they might be.
Monday - DRAFT & DRYER DAY 25tf Draft & 250 for 16
minutes on the Dryers.
Tuesday - TWO FOR ONE DAY Wash one load of clothes, the
2nd wash in on us.
Wednesday - SOAP & SUDSDAY75 Long Neck Bottle Beer
and Free Soap
MonFri. - FLUFF fc FOLD SPECIAL 8 a.m10 a.m. drop
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Limit one per person 0�(f
Expires 11-30-87 ���
Tuesday, November 17 at 8:00 P.M.
AUD. 244
BROADWAY STRUTTERS
Admission: $2.00 - E.C.U. Student
$3.00 - All others
Musical Presentation Sponsored by
the Minority Arts Committee
Wednesday, November 18 at 8:00 p.m.
Movie:
ERENDIRA
November 19-22 at 8:00 p.m.
Movie:
STAR TREK IV
i
November 20-21 at 11:00 p.m.
Movie:
ROUND MIDNIGHT
Friday, November 20 at 8:00 p.m.
Aud. 244 Free Admission
The ECU Contemporary Jazz Ensemble
featuring pianist. Paul Tardif. and special
guest - saxophonist, Jack Wilkins.
Refreshments Served
Sponsored by Coffeehouse Committee
For more information contact the
Student Union at 757-6611, ext 210.
at omg am to ��vf �
4Jhering place
-�- ���- I i � �I jn�
HHWI
� m�w�
- . - wft
New programs in the wnrL
ECU Non-tradi
By CHRISTY SMALL
KX Newt Murrau
ECU's School of Education
striving for innovations in ed
tion, has designed new pilot i i
grams for student leaching this
semester and isrecognimg that a
gTowing number of non-tradi
tional students, those 25 years old
or over, are entering the profes
sion.
Dr. Marjoricalhoun, coordi
nator of Student Teaching, has
worked with several academa
departments to implement new
student teaching models in ;
lish, Business-Marketing
Elementary Education.
The traditional teaching m
consists of a five-week methods
course followed by 10 weeks oi
student teaching "If we are g
to more effectively serve the
dents we must look tor new w,n 5
to improve their education Each
pilot program is unique and has
benefits for each department,
Calhoun said
Dr. A! Mutter, director of Lng
lish Education, proposed thv
English pili
dudes 14
ingalong wj
course tai
alhoun bel
allow a "i'
with the
md the stt
this mode
supervisor
problems aj
titular studl
Dr Altonj
Business,
cal Educatic
ness-Markd
which inch
dent teach!
night c I
semester 11
tt-r.i. tion Mi
the course
relevant sin
out Calhot
Dr. Horei
the depart!
Education
Elementary
will give aj
student teaci
Greek hazing troubl
AUSTIN, Texas (CPS) The
University of Texas just can't
break down a "conspiracy of si-
lence" among greek pledges long
enough to curb hazing on the
campus, an 111-page report is-
sued Oct. 20 staled.
The report suggested Te
as well as several other schools
trying to stop fraternity and 50
rority hazing of their own mem-
bers � is going to have a tough
time succeeding until student at-
titudes change
The report was issued bv a 26-
membcr Presidential Commis-
sion on Fraternal Organizations
created last year bv Texas Trcsi
dent William Cunningham to
investigate hazing, alcohol abuse
and disruptive behavior among
greeks.
Hazing is "like prostitution or
pornography. It is a consensual
activity, and this makes it ex-
tremely difficult to deal with
"s��d chairman loHn RatUff, a VJT
j faw professor. "Normally it does
not come to light until someone
gets badly hurt
And reports of severe injuries
are almost constant.
Two weeks ago, for instance a
University of Mississippi student,
Harry Cline, was killed when he
fell down a flight of stairs at the
Kappa Alpha house. He allegedlv
had been drinking, despite a
campus ban on drinking, and UM
officials are investigating
Duke put its Sigma Chi chapter
on probation for various partv
infractions, while University of
Maryland officials announced
they may install more rigid rules
to regulate off-campus greek par-
ties.
Also this fall, Penn State dis-
banded its Alpha Phi Alpha chap-
ter for pnysically abusing
pledges, while Loyola of New
Orleans issued a formal warning
to its Beggars fraternity for report-
edly harassing, mocking and ex-
cluding black students.
Stanford University's Zeta Psi
fraternity was "voluntarily dis-
banded" for 5 years following an
investigation of the drowning of a
member in 1986.
Texas has had more than its
share of greek troubles, however
Lee Roever, a former Alph 1 Tau
Omega pledge, recently won an
undisclosed out-of-court settle-
ment from the ATO national
chapter after threatening to sue
over a hazing incident. He and 20
other pledges were forced to stay-
awake for 4 days, and were pelted
with eggs.
In September, the parents of Phi
Kappa Psi pledge Mark Seeberger
filed a $40 million suit, seeking
damages for Seeberger's death by
alcohol poisoning during a haz-
ing ritual in 1986.
UT banned the fraternity after
the Seeberger tragedy, but last
week's report asserted stopping
hazing in advance may be impos-
sible.
The report cited 2 fraternities,
the Texas Cowboys and the Silver
Spurs, for continuing hazing de-
spite administration warnings to
stop.
Pledges were taken for "rides"
� driven far from home, then
abandoned � the report said.
Initiates also were shocked with
electric cattle prods and beaten
with peddles.
"As long as the participants
elect lo have this done to them-
selves end want to maintain this
secrecy, there's not a whole lot che
university can do Ratliff said.
The comn
- and thJ
� �� od t � r
�bail par
events. The
game
Wd
B
Thir
are
� Hjftai

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i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 17,1987
Nearly $6 mill, given to ECU
ECUNamh,
ECU reports $5,964322 in total
private gifts for the 1986-87 fiscal
year. This figure represents a 13
percent increase over private cif ts
to ECU in 1985-86.
Gifts to the university are re-
ceived through three private
foundations that support differ-
entareas within the institution. Of
the almost $6 million total in pri-
vate gifts, $2.8 million was given
for academic purposes; $2.2 mil-
lion for the School of Medicine;
and $1 million to support athletic
programs and scholarships.
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin
said, "1 have been impressed with
the level of private support East
Carolina University attracts rela-
tive to schools of comparable size
with similar programs.
"This kind of support reflects
the level of quality demanded by
our faculty and researchers, as
well as recognition of their accom-
plishmentsand the importance of
their endeavor on the part of our
alumni and friends
Total giving figures are pre-
pared for The Annual Report of
the Council for Aid to Education
(CFAE), a national not-for-profit
organization which encourages
private support of education. The
organization is funded by contri-
butions from businesses nd pro-
vides support to euiration
through consulting and research
services, seminars, periodicals
and "how to" manuals. CFAE also
sponsors the public service adver-
tising campaign, "Give to the col-
lege of your choice
James L. Lanier Jr vice chancel-
lor for Institutional Advance-
ment, oversees fund-raising for
the University's research and
academic programs and heads
the East Carolina University
Foundation, Inc. The foundation
is comprised of private citizens,
corporate leaders, and alumni
who assist ECU in securing pri-
vate resources to advance the
university.
"Our success this year in pri-
vate giving makes a statement
about the condition of the Univer-
sity. It is an endorsement of our
efforts and an affirmation of the
University's quality by those who
know us best Lanier said.
"Much of the credit for our in-
creasing private gift support be-
longs to the many dedicated vol-
unteers who are assuming greater
responsibility in helping to gener-
ate interest, enthusiasm, and
commitment to East Carolina
among our alumni and the con-
stituents in our service area
Lanier also praised the staffs of
ECU'S three fund-raising founda-
tions for their professionalism
and hard work.
Projects accomplished through
the assistance of the ECU Founda-
tion include completion of a $2.2
million fund-raising campaign
commemorating the School of
Business's 50th anniversary;
funding of six new University
Scholars Awards (ECU's most
prestigious scholarships which
cover full tuition and fees); and
establishment of the second
$500,000 distinguished professor-
ship at ECU, this one for interna-
tional studies in the College of
Arts and Sciences.
Robert K. Adams, executive
director of the ECU Medical
Foundation, said, 'This year the
Medical School, through the
Medical Foundation, realized a
tremendous increase in private
giving for medical research. We
are most grateful to the pharma-
ceutical companies whose gifts
this year allowed us to begin
many new programs for which
state money is just not available.
"The ECU School of Medicine
continues to have a real need for
scholarship dollars, and we hope
to increase these kinds of gifts in
the next year Adams said.
Dave R. Hart, Jr. is the executive
director of the Pirate Club and
works with the ECU Educational
Foundation.
"As we strive constantly to
build an athletic program which
will reflect very positively on East
Carolina University, it is impera-
tive that we show the ability to
continue to expand our funding
base within the ECU Educational
Foundation Hart said.
"Our support base has illus-
trated again this year, a collective
willingness to contribute to an-
other record-setting year for the
Pirate Club. It's very encouraging
that we were able to exceed our
goals in both membership and
dollars in 1986-87
NOT ALL COPIES
ARE BLACK & WHITE
Violence reported atPenn.
PHILADELPHIA, Pa. (CPS) �
Some 200 University of Pennsyl-
vania students rallied Oct. 27 for
tighter security, escort services
and better campus lighting after 3
Penn football players were
stabbed by local youths during an
argument over whether the Bor-
ton Celtics or the Philadelphia
76ers are the best professional
basketball team.
All 3 of the injured athletes �
Robert OBrien, 20, Joseph Fyly-
powycz, 19, and Patrick Maley, 19
� are expected to recover frorr.
multiple stab wounds, a Penn
Medical Center spokesperson
said.
The attack intensified simmer-
ing student fears of crime on the
urban campus, where two rapes,
another knifing, an assault on 4
students by a plank-wielding
man and the mugging of 4 varsity
wrestlers ha ve been reported over
the last year.
"People are afraid to walk
around at night, even if they have
a companion said Penn student
politician Sander Gerber.
While Perm's students were
protesting the attack on athletes,
however, other campuses were
coping with attacks and alleged
crimes committed by their ath-
letes.
Police arrested 2 University of
Nebraska football players �
Lawerence Pete and Neil Smith�
Oct. 14 for allegedly slashing the
tires on 2 police cars. Smith subse-
quently was suspended for 1
game.
At the University of Texas at El
Paso, police were called in � but
did not make an arrest � when
dorm residents complained back-
etball player Chris Sandle had
been disruptive and threatened
other students Oct. 18.
And on Oct. 18, Iowa City, Iowa
officials added more charges
against University of Iowa foot-
ball player Keaton Smiley for al-
legedly hitting a female classmate
last May.
Smiley also has been charged
with beating another woman
with a knife last June, and if con-
victed, could face a mandatory
life prison term.
Corrections
In an ECU News Bureau story
printed Thursday ("Faculty Sen-
ate votes to support academic
freedom"), it was reported erro-
neously that the vote of the ECU
Faculty Senate to support the fac-
ulty of Southeastern Baptist Theo-
logical Seminary was unanimous.
The vote was not unanimous
There was one "No" vote and one
abstention, according to the Fac-
ulty Senate minutes of the Nov 10
meeting. There are 52 members of
the Faculty Senate.
In an article printed Oct 27,
"Survey says majority of students
drink alcohol a survey was in-
correctly cited about the number
of students using barbiturates.
1.8 percent of ECU students,
according to the survey, said they
use barbiturates everyday.
Earlier in October, a Pasadena,
Cal. judge sentenced suspended
University of Southern California
football player Aaron Emanuel to
14 days in jail, 3 years of probation
and 104 hours of community serv-
ice for punching Sharon Hatfield,
another former USC athlete, at a
party in August.
Meanwhile, Michigan State
football player Blake Ezor and
University of Missouri football
coach Woody Widenhofer were
arrested for allegedly drunk driv-
ing in separate incidents on mid-
October.
NOW OFFERS
COLOR COPIES
� Instant Service
� Copies from slides
� Copies to overhead projectors
� Copies from books
758-2400
(Next to Chicos in the Georgetown Shops)
Block. Party
Tues Nov. 17 from 4-6 p.m.
Gary Jackson of W-DLX 93 FM
FREE PIZZA & PEPSI
Required:
West Area SRA Card & Picture ID.
Non-SRA card holders:
$2.00 Admission
Other Games t Volleyball for your pleasure
Presented by: West Area Residence Council
3tyt Sort Carolinian
Serving the Eist Carolina campus community sinct 1925
James F. J. McKee. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo
Shari Clemens Pete Ferna'd
Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY RATES
0 49 Column inches $4 25
50-99 4 15
100-149 4 05
150 199 3 95
200249Hales
250 and above 3 75
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
(Charge in Addmon 10 Regular Space Rate)
One color and black $90 qq
Two colors and black 155 qq
Inserts
5,000 or less6 Mch
S-001 - '�.000 5 U each
10.001-12.0005eich
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
Phones
757-6366757-6557
757-6558757 6309
COMING ATTRACTIONS
! I
Spinning the Hottest Dance
Music in Eastern N.C
Eastern N.Cs No. 1 Smokin' NightClub. BeauYof
:ourse Doors open ai 9 o'clock. 18 yr. olds arc welcome.
Phone: 756-6401
I ocated m ihe Carolina Last Centre.
Tuesday, November 17 at 8:00 P.M.
AUD. 244
BROADWAY STRUTTERS
Admission: $2.00 - E.C.U. Student
$3.00 - All others
Musical Presentation Sponsored by
the Minority Arts Committee
xr-
THE WASH PUB
is an equal opportunity
advertiser!
We offer our specials to both sexes no matter
what age, race or religious
conviction they might be.
Monday - DRAFT & DRYER DAY 250 Draft & 250 for 16
minutes on the Dryers.
Tuesday - TWO FOR ONE DA Y Wash one load of clothes, the
2nd wash in on us.
Wednesday -SOAP & SUDSDAY750 Long Neck Bottle Beer
and Free Soap
MonFri. - FLUFF & FOLD SPECIAL 8 a.m10 a.m. drop
off 350 a pound.
2510 E. 10th St. CAR
752-5222 WASH
g Every
I 1 Free Wash x Sun.
Limit one per person ft.AA
Expires 11-30-87 ��1PH
Wednesday, November 18 at 8:00 p.m.
Movie:
ERENDIRA
November 19-22 at 8:00 p.m.
Movie:
STAR TREK IV
November 20-21 at 11:00 p.m.
Movie:
ROUND MIDNIGHT
Friday, November 20 at 8:00 p.m.
Aud. 244 Free Admission
The ECU Contemporary Jazz Ensemble
featuring pianist. Paul Tardif. and special
guest - saxophonist, Jack Wilkins.
Refreshments Served
Sponsored by Coffeehouse Committee
For more information, contact the
Student Union at 757-6611. ext 210.
� �. OU1 TO M�v� Ou
CTrlatherins place
�.�$
lOtjuw
1
(
New programs in the wnrh
ECU Non-tradi
By CHRIST'SMALL
K L S��i Bureau
ECU'S School of duration
striving tor innovations in educa
tion, has designed new pilot i �
grams for student leaching tl
semester and is recognizing that a
growing number of non-tradi
tional students, those 25year
or over, are entering the profes
sion.
Dr. Marprie (aihoun,
coordi
nator of Student Teaching, has
worked with several academic
departments to implement new
student teaching models m Eng
lish, Business-Marketing and
Elementary Education.
The traditional teaching model
consists of a five-week methods
course followed by 10 weeks of
student teaching. "If we are going
to more effectively serve the stu-
dents we must look for new wa)
to improve their education Each
pilot program is unique and ha
benefits for each department'
Calhoun said
Dr. Al Muller, director of Eng
lish Education, proposed thx
Greek hazing troubl
English ptn
dudes 14
ingalong wj
course tai
aihoun 1x1
allow a "c
with the
md the sti
this model
supervisor
problems a
ticular studl
Dr Alton!
Business, V
cal Educ
ness Marki
which inch
dent teat ill
night class!
semester T
teraction wi
the course
relevant sn
out Cal hoi.
Dr Floret
the deparfi
Educatio
Elementary
will giv I
student teacl
AUSTIN, Texas (CPS) - The
University of Texas )ust can't
break down a "conspiracy of si-
lence" among greek pledges long
enough to curb hazing on the
campus, an 111-page report is
sued Oct. 20 stated.
The report suggested Texas
as well as several other schools
trying to stop fraternity and so
rority hazing of their own mem-
bers � is going to have a tough
time succeeding until student at-
titudes change
The report was issued bv a 26-
membcr Presidential Commis-
sion on Fraternal Organizations
created last year bv Texas Presi
dent William Cunningham to
investigate hazing, alcohol abuse
and disruptive behavior among
greeks.
Hazing is "like prostitution or
pornography. It is a consensual
activity, and this makes it ex-
tremely difficult to deal with
"said chairman John RatHff, a UT
M�w professor. "Normally it does
Tiot come to light until someone
gets badly hurt
And reports of severe injuries
are almost constant.
Two weeks ago, for instance, a
University of Mississippi student,
Harry Cline, was killed when he
fell down a flight of stairs at the
Kappa Alpha house. Heallegedlv
had been drinking, despite a
campusban on drinking, and I'M
officials are investigating.
Duke put its Sigma Chi chapter
on probation for various partv
infractions, while University of
Maryland officials announced
they may install more rigid rules
to regulate off-campus greek par-
ties.
Also this fall, Penn State dis-
banded its Alpha Phi Alpha chap-
ter for physically abusing
pledges, while Loyola of New
Orleans issued a formal warning
to its Beggars fraternity for report-
edly harassing, mocking and ex-
cluding black students.
Stanford University's Zeta Psi
fraternity was "voluntarily dis-
banded for 5 years following an
investigation of thedrowningot a
member in 1986.
Texas has had more than its
share of greek troubles, however
Lee Roever, a former Aiph i Tau
Omega pledge, recently won an
undisclosed out-of-court settle-
ment from the ATO national
chapter after threatening to sue
over a hazing incident. He and 20
other pledges were forced to stay
awake for 4 davs, and were pelted
with eggs.
In September, the parents of Phi
Kappa Psi pledge Mark Seeberger
filed a $40 million suit, seeking
damages for Seeberger's death bv
alcohol poisoning during a haz-
ing ritual in 1986.
UT banned the fraternity after
the Seeberger tragedy, but last
week's report asserted stopping
hazing in advance may be impos-
sible.
The report cited 2 fraternities,
the Texas Cowboys and the Silver
Spurs, for continuing hazing de-
spite administration warnings to
stop.
Pledges were taken for "rides"
� driven far from home, then
abandoned � the report said.
Initiates also were shocked with
electric cattle prods and batten
with paddles.
"As long as the participants
elect to havt this done to them-
selves and want to maintain this
secrecy, there's not a whole lot the
university can do RatHff said.
i no comi
d th
alii�wed t.
football gar
events Thei
to the 'leva;
ball games
We
Thir
are
"Gl
1Bl


A





ck Party
. Nov. 17 from 4-6 p.m.
ckson of W-DLX 93 FM
PIZZA & PEPSI
. tired:
RA card holders:
ir pleasure
inci
F�at Carolinian
Director of Advertising
;lng Representatives
:usso
SPLAY ADVERTISING
s
3 75
I OR 1) ERTISING RATES
MM SS HOI RS:
nday-Frida
10 00 5 00 p.m.
-6366
-6558
757-6557
757 6309
TRACTIONS
r 17 at 8:00 P.M.
E
TRUTTERS
E.C.U. Student
others
on Sponsored by
:s Committee
er 18 at 8:00 p.m.
de:
?IRA
at 8:00 p.m.
ie:
EKIV
1 at 11:00 p.m.
de:
IDNIGHT
20 at 8:00 p.m.
Admission
iry Jazz Ensemble
Tardif. and special
tt. Jack Wilkins.
Its Served
mouse Committee
tion, contact the
157-6611. ext. 210.
1
i i
r1
I
�.
gathering place
Tl iE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 17.1987 3
New programs in the works:
ECU Non-traditional students focused on
By CHRISTY SMALL
ECU rv�i Bureau
ECU's School of Education,
striving tor innovations in educa
tion, has designed new pilot pro
grams for student teaching this
semester and is recognizing that a
growing number of non-tradi
tional students, those 25 years old
or over, are entering the profes-
sion.
Dr. Marjorie Calhoun, coordi-
nator of Student Teaching, has
worked with several academic
departments to implement new
student teaching models in Eng
hsh. Business-Marketing, and
Elementary Education.
The traditional teaching model
consists of a five-week methods
course followed by 10 weeks of
student teaching, "if we are going
to more effectively serve the stu-
dents we must look for new w� s
to improve their education Each
pilot program is unique and has
benefits for each department
Calhoun said
Dr. Al Muller, director of Eng-
lish Education, proposed the
English pilot program which in-
cludes 14 weeks of student teach-
ing along with a 14- week methods
course taught at the school.
Calhoun believes this model will
allow a "closer communication
with the university supervisor
and the student teacher Also,
this model lets the university
supervisor "deal specifically with
problems and concerns that par-
ticular students have she said.
Dr. Alton Finch, department of
Business, Vocational and Techni-
cal Education, proposed the Busi-
ness-Marketing pilot program
which includes 10 weeks of stu-
dent teaching and a methods
night class taught during the
semester. This model allows "in-
teraction with the university" and
"the course work is much more
relevant since they are trying it
out Calhoun said.
Dr. Florence Weaver, chair for
the department of Counselor
Education, helped develop the
Elementary pilot program which
will give additional support to
student teachers from the school
counselors. Calhoun believes this
model will help student teachers
cope with the added stress of
working with younger children.
No one model is right for each
discipline so a variety of models
are encouraged to better serve
students and teachers, Calhoun
said.
Dr. Betty Levey, director of the
Division of Services, said the
School of Education must look for
new ways to meet the needs of
non-traditional students. Thus, it
has become important to explore
teacher education models which
will better serve non-traditional
students.
It will also be helpful to look "at
how other schools handle" a large
number of non-traditional stu-
dents. "Differential scheduling"
would be a possibility, levcy
said.
In the current fall semester,
there are 42 non-traditional stu-
dents who range in age from 25 to
the 40's. One student teacher is
even a grandmother.
Levey views the increased
number of non-traditional stu-
dent teachers at ECU as "an op-
portunity for eastern N.C. to at-
tract and keep graduating student
teachers. Some eastern N.C. areas
havedifficulty in recruiting teach-
ers because the graduates usually
wa n t to mo ve to bi ggcr ci tics she
said. Non-traditional students
would be more likely to stay in the
community if they have tics here,
she explained.
"Non-traditional students will
bring different experiences to the
classroom and the interaction
with traditional students will be
beneficial for both groups, Levey
said.
Levey also sees a trend in "life-
long learning" reflected in the
non-traditional students.
Greek hazing troubles Texas fSeafood House aid Oyster Bar
AUSTIN. Texas (CPS) - The
University of Texas just can't
break down a "conspiracy of si-
lence" among greek pledges long
enough to curb hazing on the
campus, an 111-page report is-
sued Oct. 20 stated.
The report suggested Texas
as well as several other schools
trving to stop fraternity and so-
rority hazing of their own mem-
bers � is going to have a tough
time succeeding until student at-
titudes change.
The report was issued bv a 2e-
member Presidential Commis-
sion on Fraternal Organizations,
created last vcar bv Texas Presi-
dent William Cunningham to
investigate hazing, alcohol abuse1
and disruptive behavior among
greeks.
Hazing is "like prostitution or
pornographv. It is a consensual
activity, and this makes it ex-
tremely difficult to deal with
said chairman John Ratliff, a UT
4aw professor. "Normally it docs
not come to light until someone
gets badly hurt
And reports of severe injuries
are almost constant.
Two weeks ago, for instance a
University of Mississippi student,
Harry Cline, was killed when he
fell down a flight of stairs at the
Kappa Alpha house. He allegedly
had been drinking, despite a
campus ban on drinking, and UM
officials are investigating.
Duke put its Sigma Chi chapter
on probation for various partv
infractions, while University of
Maryland officials announced
they may install more rigid rules
to regulate off-campus greek par-
ties.
Also this fall, Penn State dis-
banded its Alpha Phi Alpha chap-
ter for physically abusing
pledges, while Loyola of New
Orleans issued a formal warning
to its Beggars fraternity for report-
edly harassing, mocking and ex-
cluding black students.
Stanford University's Zeta Psi
fraternity was "voluntarily dis-
banded" for 5 years following an
investigation of thedrowning of a
member in 1986.
Texas has had more than its
share of greek troubles, however.
Lee Roevcr,a former Alphi Tau
Omega pledge, recently won an
undisclosed out-of-court settle-
ment from the ATO national
chapter after threatening to sue
over a hazing incident. He and 20
other pledges were forced to stay
awake for 4 days, and were pelted
with eggs.
In September, the parents of Thi
Kappa Psi pledge Mark Seeberger
filed a $40 million suit, seeking
damages for Seeberger's death by
alcohol poisoning during a haz-
ing ritual in 1986.
UT banned the fraternity after
the Seeberger tragedy, but last
week's report asserted stopping
hazing in advance may be impos-
sible.
The report cited 2 fraternities,
the Texas Cowboys and the Silver
Spurs, for continuing hazing de-
spite administration warnings to
stop.
Pledges were taken for "rides"
� driven far from home, then
abandoned � the report said.
Initiates also were shocked with
electric cattle prods and beaten
with paddles.
"As long as the participants
elect to havs this done to them-
selves and want to maintain this
secrecy, there's not a whole lot the
university can do Ratliff said.
The commission said the Cow-
boys and the Spurs should not be
allowed to represent the school at
football games and other official
events. The two fraternities tend
to the Texas mascot during foot-
ball games.
Welcome
To
ECU
Mickey's Un-common
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TC.l'A winter
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lake li huii le
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TCBV'PIE.
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only
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for remaining
fall semester
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unlimited use
corner of 10th & Evans
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758-9584
only 20 memberships available Hours M�F 10 a m 9 p m
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Tf
i





Sty Eaat (Eutalmmn
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer,cm��
Andy Lewis, . CU� DEAN'IARDT' m" �
TIM CHANDLER, s, ,lAMf Fj- McKEE- "��
I� Carter. Z � Mf "� lam, �
Shelton Bryant JZ. Mike Ura
DEBB.E STEVENS, C "��-
MAC CLARK. BmMtBulgrr
1 CONCERNED ABOUT
Af-iPUS "BEAUTIFICATION.
1 IRST XIMPRESSIONS ARE
Vi-RV TlfAPOfTANTl WHEN
PKOSPECTWE STUDENTS
MO THEIR PARENTS
VISIT ECU,T WAMTTKEM
rO SEE
Parking
New plan a drop in bucket
"PAT5KNG LOTS!
LOTS AND LOTS of
TALKING LOTS?!
- "1
EaCtf rab'reTl'nP'a8yCS ? m�"e' for the e ���
must tea ended toHo?' "1" A"d ,here are �'s to s�e
trary to News Bureau figures re- After all there arP vprwll i8 To bo honcsl we had �ver give,
ported earlier, there were 22 010 un vers iofnlhl? T IF "ll1 bought to the debate over eu.ha
motor vehicles registered in7qra In f ?' P � �r pnvate' that nasia N'cver had "� " forced to
87. In contrast therewere onv Ii7 W fref m?n to even hav cars on
parking spaces � SfllSS S3T fa
- r students do not necessarily depend
Admittedly, this figure includes muirTfllWy Comn!uterS
night students, and because of clas "an TT
schedules not all commuters, staff A�5SS52.
TrfHSVK
Contras should end miserv
Io be honest, we had never given raeli military tutors and later wore u,
Illnrli lnimKl �� �U� l�U,�.l ' Vl au Wier Were T-imKlnrvi T .l
raeli military tutors, and later were
apprenticed to masters in covert
- operations in the CIA. While initiallv
our relatives condition has erown ih�Unm.u. i ,
uT.wi Can te f asil' seen dents lhe Pn space at thebottom
em on campus"13 P Pr�b" �f CoIle' � and 't fr"
The chaSorr, , �her $195,000 for a $838,000 total
�MWraS tde sj-j �d�� -�a
SK-taSStaSn are JS V� � m'm�" � b
the university (a total of 5,965 arron inainvrn! w mWd' gcareadmedicalexport
spaces, a, an addia, cost of $25 igfi�ZMg?fflggSfSff SESBSgiiSgS
veryone who registers cure the parking problem. How- been consulted at the t
problem. To support their violent hab-
its, r r step-brothers smuggled as much
� ton of cocaine per week into the
xi States.
hen the Iran-Conrra connection
became public in the U.S support from
the Contras' American brothers and
sisters diminshed. Our step-brothers"
health worsened considerably Thev
condition "has grown they we're uhTho'S 2 S �n a"immod a1
w ?rse. We don't think they are going to themsel ves. Rather than teS m.l.W r the,r foster P�in
make it and think that they should be personnel in order to overthrow ?r Con?ress- Whlle Contrasmilitary
put ou, of ,he,r (and our) misery. Lest �icaraB arnvemnnt hel mLr SStSiT d6TeaSed fi�ntl
.ou h.nk, however, that what we sug- d,rcd �,000 Nicaragua" Zs bav- dto.IT! 7ltinued their mu
s ,s uncaring or inhumane, allow us in thousands more.h SS! Jer�US b,nSe had � �eir Central
to plead our case for pulling the plug on
our suffering brothers.
It is true that the Contras are not very
old. After the 1979 Nicaraguan revolu-
tion, a wedding of sorts took place. This
unholy union between former Nicara-
guan National Guardsmen, known as
Somocistas, and landed interests o( the
and residents are on campus 'a he irtfiiXtaS 5 Pl" IT ��S-S3S Zrtlm� ST � "�"��SSJSSS
same time. Still, it can be easily seen to?th7SIU" ��n"nn8"r inhumane, altowJs SSS fr�US bl" had "� � Central
a. there is a major parkinprob- o C itf m S??5 5!S ' SESSSCEfcE "hdlSab"n Amencanncghboiw,
nes.
CAMPUS SPECTRUM
BY
RICK BROWN & EVAN LIGHTNER
old regime produced some demented installations, theyESLfEIT J res,dentu Arias, devised a plan for
offspring, the Contras. Th.sb.rth might workers, teachers and fwS? on. This plan, signed by
not ha,v taken place, had it not bccnlor an effort to Sote� ScSTSSi SSSaSZ
-gcare�dmedicaIexpertiseof menfpro8nm.SNSriuSSP' 2" na,�fand Pported mtermhon-
ras" rnidwives, the U.Central emmently ml one fosSJJSSSj" ,y' E?�Sie eutharS, of
per year for everyone "who reekt7r T� 7r7'�iTHm?m. Agency in I981. (Had w UA Con sSnaSS;cSSr0'
avehiclp exery�neuho registers cure the parking problem. How- been consulted at the time, we would children's indefensible hnr As 6u brothers lanquish in a semi:
Tn AAM . ever, Eakin's plan is not that cure hdv0 ar�ued for abortion.) During en- passed laws requiring the RLIa c�matose state-kpt alive by injections
In addition to get those 418 The plan proposed by Eakin last sucinS Xcars'e Contras were con- nnistraliontorclaHoiTtiS' �fumanitariaaid, we see their exis-
SMS of Lxrused hy a s��ss�52S5 � in our w,ck"s,cp" ssassSSSaS �ft ssLrLSss
asKassssr punxrshouidbegl ��?�-�: ttaSS33ffi S82
mural teams and other students now I�X atoikfnTS r.aflhcf"nruly children. The Reagan ThroXrJ? R�uSa'admintration to lose chil-
who simply want a place to relax rbriTJ Th� t P'0,5315 for e Admimstrat�on, and later the U.S. Con- OliverNo rthLSE? 2S dren that they tured form birth, but
play a game of frxXll n I tutureThe parking deck may not be gross, provided financial support and saleoiastnF�n 8 - roJUghthe U "to us possible to council war
friWSl Tur thr�W the answer- but "either is taking m'sgudance that the Contrast � SefamZd Tntr. PPunder while working for peace, if PrSfctaS
to1CndSIfWeam- aW3y well-used space for only a Came austomed to and dependam L�Mna ReaSan is overcon? wi'th gtd
S P�u-grfnSpaCeto ely few more parking spaces nr�ur brothers received private �S. � TSSS?LS2" unfbletoattend the funeral, wVhumbly
buxldings and parkine lots W� � . fa y Jg J P3 hoohng, f.rst from Argentine and Is- and �o 1� "� �- eulogy for oul!
Comous Fnmm tl fated brothers
k,�-m,� j r . � o , "h"1 lw relatively tew more parking spaces
buildings and parking lots we will Even if a parking deck is buift it fs r
soon be boxed in by concrete. only going'to cur! the ilT for a'few CamDUS fomfyf
vparc Thorn i� �� i -
j vltlc. oniy going to cure the 1 for a fpw
Ougreen space is too precious. It yearsThere needs to be a Sm
should no be taken up unless hensive plan for the future of East
absolutely no other alternative can Carolina
beAf�Und' Hopefully that plan will leave stu-
And it seems there are other alter- dents the areas that they enjoy the
Foone whv nor rio v most'such as that wonderful green
a?v?S y- , the Parkin8 spaceatthebottomofColleeeHill It
To everyone:
It seems our country is back to itself
For awhile we were occupied with
everyone else.
There was Bakker and Hart and
Oliver North
While Reagan's next thought was-
Bork come Forth.
in I 1
Ha
Was Bakker forgiven? and was
art's story true?
Did OUie and Fawn do what they
were supposed to do?
The Persian Gult is boiling all the
time
with muscles and missiles we keep
everyone in line
The stock market fell and the whole
country gasped
"Is this another depression?" we
asked
Reagan wants a summit Gorbachev
says "no"
But the question remains: "will the
missiles go?"
As we sit in our chairs and hear all
this news
It's true that it all affects me and
you.
lody Henzler
Freshman
Communications
Communications
U.S. must protect interests in Central America
eUSSR.soutspendmgusf.ve-to.nemctra, was tak.ng charge of the consohdation of the Com- search InlteIof tur imV 11,00,
In 1984, according to the Department of Defense word?tl?a�t cSrou"?3 J tS?" uaSt A STS? abide the immunization of Central
the US sent a total of $1.14 billion in aid (econolnk- And vet when� F"ba Salvador) were polled. Average resu ts 5Sve 2�f!SU Cann0t �� viet bases on the nIn-
27mniion;milItary $321million)toallofCemral thoseJ t 1 ��2! S??S l� US' "P" the Sandinistas represent:only a smaUmutorilv Sf �f"Pre .In helping the NicarauLn
Ainerica;theUSSR.$55billion(ccon.$4MbuSS: earners"S bohcvc at they are "agrarian oSNicaragmlicvenu D!mocra1?c Restance, the Contras, WSS
miL $920 million) to N.caragua and Cuba alone fc �reSl toT� demOCratS I that the majority KcaaSs ?� w�derainral 1
The Soviets are engaged in a massive mimarv Thn7 �l I tl3Way from such words- suPP�rt e Contras, 17 beUeve a maiorifv m, w,bout the use of our won military forceT
ISlnZ md tHe S8 maSsive mi,itary P�rtS the Sa�dinistas; 68 believe thaTSSontiE ?eo?cowe weccl have wmUdWrne c?nsf
uld-up m Nicaragua is obvious: they desperately treat civilians in war zones better 10 �?;��?! datlon of a communist client state in XSi"
ant the establishment of a Soviet client stato in our the Sandini ZZ KSr1-0bcere that the spread of communis STSPf? and
J
buildmNfaaaX warsLrS: k C m�tiVC bchind the viet's massive military
-aEssrsas ssssbsssss; fessE5s �-i5sssB:
, �� � -&"��� ju�� waiaiupb nave Deen
sstemh.t ssajs onaSre sj�rs-sEs
aircraft just off the VirgTSacoatlTbJw S uTfn S2 a" CVCnt WOuld ta distrous to
been sending hundredfof T 55 and P? S I I! �re' P01to X the ,east-
SoSSSSS "V?hner:t0HR,Vr Ga"ant' Ambossad-El Salvador:
riying lank heh- -Where has Communism stopped? Why would
emg the most lethal communists ho ���. 3?- L7???
CAMPUS SPECTRUM
BY
JUSTIN STURZ
7T� � "l w��r zones oetter;
72 approve of U.S. mili tary aid to the Contras, 20
do not These people know whaf s going on; they're
�� au mnu-w riyine I ank" heli- "Where hac r� ,7 aown there where it's happening! Note: publiconin-
copters to Nicaragua, the latter being the most lethal communes � IS? SUKd? Why WOuld '�n P0�"?is ie8al in Nicaragua. pUtCOPm
weapon of its kind in the world nT I contented with a couple of little Radical-left "place" groups have norir m
r raSSE? SSSE?
CmUtmirictotteSlS Mexico is 2SL2!? T ows "he ?� Bigadistas (Witnesses for Peace "one sucMef is
NtangwrDSietoLl-n-i: fjvador ifsamuch larger area that they're after, tually benefit Arnericans" W1" ewn Aestctndworeto�tcornewouldbetohavetouse
S5SS Ssageaaassa. 3wS�&sbss S3S�Ma�
Such quotes CfcNKw -t Product�f North'Casey, or the U.S. government. It Similar things are mwbetnEsaWatou?thTfnJ i2�M OUr �"��"�� to their omuffi
aJssoMASiass &3s�8ar4fi� essssrsssB&SS SSSSfiS?wasS
�"STml" ��
w
s
Bennett t
(CPS) � Three weeks ago, clu
sive U.S. Secretary of Education
William Bennett, who normally
doesn't talk to the student press or
even college student representa-
tives, agreed to write for, of all
things, a handful of student news-
papers.
The apparent reason, it will be
for avowedly conservative news
papers that ostensibly share
Bennett's political views.
Ifs another sign, various cam-
pus newspaper observers sav, of
how college journalism is chang-
ing under the influence of conser
vative and liberal group money
cheaper technology and campus
political ferment.
If nothing else, there are now
more papers on a campus from
which students can choose, and
"traditional" student papers
regularly are drawing competi-
tion from stridently political jour-
nalson both sidesof the spectrum
"It's becoming easier to start
publications said Mark
Goodman of the Student Press
Law Center, which advises col-
lege newspapers on legal issues.
Computers, he noted, have
made starting a paper simple
while "universities are npe for
new publications because they're
closed audiences. Thev're fairly
effective.
polarizing
press
Since 19l
group ca!
Educanor
provided
launch 70
campuses
LenkowsM
On the
trum, a
called the
Policy start
help start
pus papers!
thelEA'sej
Less aba!
National SI
NS)be;
arv with soi
the Public
Group (PIR
cacy grouj
Nader.
I
conceding tl
it conccntral
dent activisj
"nonpartisa
liberal and
activit
manner
"Thev re
changing th
campus
Trustees supp
ATLANTA, Ga. (CPS) - Mer-
cer University's president won a
unanimous vote of confidence
from the school's trustees last
week, surviving an attempted
ouster by fundamentalists upset
among other things, by Mercers'
appearance in a Playbov maga-
zine listing of top party schools.
A similar conflict between reli-
gious fundamentalists and mod-
eratesover control of a college has
developed on Wake Forest N C
The president and dean of fac-
ulty at Southeastern Baptist Theo-
logical Seminary said thev will
resign rather than carrv out the
agenda of a new board of trustees
appointed fev conservative Bat?
Mater's 45 trustees called the
fundamentalist drive to take over
their university "a deplorable
spectacle of intolerance
The effort began in earlv Octo-
ber, when Atlanta businessman
and Baptist layman Lee Robert-
sent letters to students' parents
faculty members and pastors to
complain that Mercer no longer
followed Baptist principles
Roberts cited a 1986 Playboy
magazine ranking of Mercer as a
HOKKIMi STTDEtfTS:
When you fill out your Form
W-4 or W-4A. "Employee's
Withholding Allowance
Certificate remember:
If vou can be claimed on our
parent's or another person's tax
return, vou generally cannot be
exempt from income tax
withholding. To get it right, read
the instructions that came with
your Form W-4 or W4A
top party scl
maticevider
lewd photog
dent drunke
explicit matel
as proof of
He asked
tist Convent!
trustees for
But last we
tees refected
R. Kirbv
president, cl
mentahsts w
every perso
tion to adhere
doctrines anc
The problei
are sympVorr!
the Southern!
observers
members of tl
divided betwj
who believe i
tion of the bi!
PRE
SOCJ
"API
ft
Youl
Plan Ea
tions &
Heliu
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irWAf ROOi
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Thursday � FLAUTA DELMAR
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lJ





THJiBMiU
nd misery
m To support their violent hab-
ur stop hrotherssmuggledasmuch
is ne ton oi cocaine per week into the
�am
n the Iran-Contra connection
; public in the U.S support from
ntras' American brothers and
ied. Our step-brothers"
Mned considerably They
exist on an immodest allow-
ed by their foster parents in
SS While the Contras' military
es have decreased significantly,
have continued their mur-
; inge, had not their Central
an neighbors, led by Costa Rican
5 SPECTRUM
BY
6 KVAN LIGHTNER
lent Anas, devised a plan for
peace in the region. This plan, signed by
rs in the presidents of all five Central Ameri-
dop- can nations and supported intemation-
g,ov - aly, calls for the humane euthanasia of
e ailing relatives, the Contras.
As our brothers lanquish in a semi-
comatose state, kept alive by injections
of 'humanitarian" a;d, we see their exis-
- fence as a major impediment to peace in
rttral America. The only truly sen-
le and humane option Americans
ave is to repudiate the merchants of
death and their ignoble life. True, it
n't be easy for foster parents such as
iren. the Reagan administration to lose chil-
nny, iren that they nurtured form birth, but
ms to us impossible to council war
ile working for peace, if President
agan is overcome with grief and
to attend the funeral, we humbly
volunteer to deliver the eulogy for our
irug ill-fated brothers
Reagan wants a summit Gorbachev
says "no"
But the question remains: "will the
missiles go?"
As we sit in our chairs and hear all
this news
It's true that it all affects me and
you.
jody Henzler
Freshman
Communications
America
e cannot abide the communization of Central
nerica. We cannot have Soviet bases on the main-
id of this hemisphere. In helping the Nicaraguan
mocrahc Resistance, the Contras, we would
"lieve the outcome of democracy in central Amer-
without the use of our won military force. The
rse outcome we could have would be the consoli-
Jtion of a communist client state in Nicaragua and
u spread of communism throughout the region.
CAMPUS SPECTRUM
BY
JUSTIN STURZ
The second worst outcome would be to have to use
lencan forces. If we don't help the Contras now,
id let them fight for us, we'll have to send our own
fung people down there to combat the communist
reat. We cannot abandon the Contras, not only
cause of Nicaragua, but because c: all the other
ktions in the world who look to us and measure by
ir actions our commitment to their own struggles
tainst communism. How long will these people
io struggle for democracy worldwide, who rely
i and abide by us, stand by us if they don't believe
want democracy to triumph just a few hundred
iles from our own borders?
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 17,1987 5
Bennett to write for right-wing college papers
(CPS) � Three weeks ago. elu-
sive US. Secretary of Education
William Bennett, who normally
doesn't talk to the student press or
even college student representa-
tives, agreed to write for, of all
things, a handful of student news-
papers.
The apparent reason: it will be
for avowedly conservative news-
papers that ostensibly share
Bennett's political views.
It's another sign, various cam-
pus newspaper observers say, of
how college journalism is chang-
ing under the influence of conser-
vative and liberal group money,
cheaper technology and campus
political ferment.
If nothing else, there are now
more papers on a campus from
which students can choose, and
"traditional" student papers
regularly are drawing competi-
tion from stridently political jour-
nalson both sides of the spectrum.
"It's becoming easier to start
publications said Mark
Goodman of the Student Press
Law Center, which advises col-
lege newspapers on legal issues.
Computers, he noted, have
made starting a paper simple
while "universities are ripe for
new publications because they're
closed audiences. They're fairly
effective. But I don't see them
polarizing the traditional student
press
Since 1980, a Washington, D.C.
group called the Institute for
Educational Affairs (IEA) has
provided money and expertise to
launch 70 conservative papers on
campuses, IEA President Les
Lenkowsky reported.
On the other side of the spec-
trum, a Washington think tank
called the Center for National
Policy started tunneling money to
help start avowedly liberal cam-
pus papers, largely in response to
the IEA's efforts.
Less abashedly left-wing, the
National Student News Service
(NSNS) began in Boston last Janu-
ary with some financial help from
the Public Interest Research
Group (PIRG), a consumer advo-
cacy group founded by Ralph
Nader.
NSNS editor Bruce Allen, while
conceding the PIRG help and that
it concentrates on covering "stu-
dent activism insisted NSNS is
"nonpartisan" and reports both
liberal and conservative group
activities "in a non-advocacy
manner
"They're not substantially
changing the political bent of the
campus press said Tom
Rolnicki, the executive director of
the Associated Collegiate Press.
"They are giving an opportunity
for a small minority to be heard.
It's a healthy sign, to see that kind
of growth arid diversity
Conservative papers have been
the most active. Dartmouth,
Georgetown, Iowa, Texas and
Cornell all have typically long-
lived papers, while others tend to
fade after IEA funding stops.
"The nature of these papers is
'here today, gone tomorrow as
the various players graduate, lose
interest or run into financial diffi-
culty University of Massachu-
setts journalism Prof. Dario Po-
litella, who compiles a national
student press directory, said.
For example, a conservative
paper at the University of Colo-
rado in September published a
story charging CU was promot-
ing only leftist professors. By the
time a spectacular legislative and
campus-wide probe � which
found the accusation groundless
� was finished, the paper was out
of business.
By mid-October, however, still
another conservative paper �
The New Chronicle � had begun.
Lenkowsky of the IEA � whose
network convinced Sec. Bennett
in early October to agree to write
Trustees support Mercer pres.
ATLANTA, Ga. (CPS) � Mer-
cer University's president won a
unanimous vote of confidence
from the school's trustees last
week, surviving an attempted
ouster by fundamentalists upset,
among other things, by Mercer's
appearance in a Playboy maga-
zine listing of top party schools.
A similar conflict between reli-
gious fundamentalists and mod-
erates over control of a college has
developed on Wake Forest, N.C
The president and dean of fac-
ulty at Southeastern Baptist Theo-
logical Seminary said they will
resign rather than carry out the
agenda of a new board of trustees
appointed bv conservative Bap-
tists. �? "
Mercer's 45 trustees called the
fundamentalist drive to take over
their university "a deplorable
spectacle of intolerance
The effort began in early Octo-
ber, when Atlanta businessman
and Baptist layman Lee Roberts
sent letters to students' parents,
faculty members and pastors to
complain that Mercer no longer
followed Baptist principles.
Roberts cited a 1986 Playboy
magazine ranking of Mercer as a
top party school and other "dra-
matic evidence of filthy language,
lewd photographs, heresies, stu-
dent drunkenness and sexually
explicit material" around campus
as proof of his contention.
He asked for the Georgia Bap-
tist Convention to appoint new
trustees for Mercer.
But last week the current trus-
tees refected the idea.
R. Kirby Godsey, Mercer's
president, charged the funda-
mentalists were "trying to force
every person and every institu-
tion to adhere to a particular set of
doctrines and nothing else
The problems at the two schools
are symptoms of a conflict within
the Southern Baptist Convention,
observers say. The 14 million
members of the denomination are
divided between fundamentalists
who believe in a literal interpreta-
tion of the bible and an opposing
WORKING STUDENTS:
When you till out your Form
W-4 or W-4A. "Employee's
Withholding Allowance
Certificate remember:
If you can He claimed on vour
parent's or another person's tax
return, you generally cannot be
exempt from income tax
withholding. To get it right, read
the instructions that came with
vour Form W-4 or W-4A.
group of moderates who favor
giving individual churches and
institutions more flexibility in
interpreting it.
Mercer's Godsey explained that
if fundamentalists control the
board of trustees at a school, they
can control what is taught, what is
published and what books are
used.
In addition to the attempt to
oust Godsey, the fundamentalists
have said they will withhold
funds from Mercer unless they are
allowed to nominate the trustees
of the school.
Roberts said the trustees's vote
proved they were "following Dr.
Godsey and not Jesus. (They) are
simply not supporting what all
Christians believe
Mercer students generally
seemed to support Godsey, and
held a rally protesting the funda-
mentalitst position.
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4 opinion columns during the
school year for the conservative
papers it funds � noted that, of
the 70 papers the IEA had helped
start since 1980,34 were function-
ing as of last week.
"I call it the satellite press
PoJitella said. "They have trouble
getting space in the traditional
student press, so they put out
their own papers. The staffs are
usually guided by outside influ-
ences
Both left and right forces com-
plain the "traditional" campus
papers ignore them.
"Our studnets don't see the tra-
ditional student press represent-
ing their interests or their point of
view explained Kirk O'Donell
of the Center for National Policy
(CNP), the liberal Washington,
D.C. think tank that has helped
fund newspaper start-ups at Har-
vard, Boston University, George
Washington, Texas, North Caro-
lina and 22 other campuses.
On the right, Lenkowsky said,
"Our papers are an effort to offer
another opinion
"We feel the campus press has
been politicized for some time,
since the late '60s. The campus
press has moved to the left. Some
students think another voice
should be heard
Rolnicki conceded, "The
charges of liberal bias are proba-
b'v true Cnlloep students tend to
be more liberal across the board.
Shdent suuport for Ronald Re-
agan in the 1980 and 1984 elec-
tions had more to do with his
personality than his politics
Not everybody agrees.
Politella believed the main-
stream student press has become
more conservative, contending
few papers maintain controver-
sial, adversarial relationships
with school administrations.
"Even in the editorial pages
the CNP's Julie Goetz main-
tained, traditional student "news-
papersdon't deal with issues in an
in-depth way. There was a vac-
uum, but these publications allow
more expansive coverage of is-
sues
The traditional student press,
said Politella, can't accommodate
every student perspective.
'That's too much to ask
But O'Donell argued the main-
stream campus press will have to
deal with them. The political jour-
nals, he said, "will invigorate and
challenge the campus and the
student DaDer. Thev'll promote
political dialogue on campus. Tru-
problem with students is they
lack a political point of view
m
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
HiT-T I
Why not come by the REAL Crisis Intervention Center: 312
E. 10th St: or call 758-HELP. For Free Confidential Counsel-
ing or Assistance.
Our Volunteers and Staff are on duty 24 hrs. � day, year
around, in order to assist you in virtually any problem area
you might have. Our longstanding goal has always been to
preserve and enhance the quality of life for you and our com
m unity.
Licensed And Accredited By The State of North Carolina
Term Paper Due?
Call
Nanette Stillwell
Pick Up & Delivery
Letter Quality
Professional Editing
1-524-5241
(cheap! call)
'�in aasaai
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CLASS OF 1988.
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J





r
THEEASTCAHOIINIAM BBBBSB jg
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
WANTED True Froen Yogurt Lovers-
Came to Hank's Homemade, 321 East
lOft Street for a FREE TASTE of Froen
Delight 758 (XXJO.
MIRING Federal government jobs in
your area and overseas Man v immediate
openings without waiting list or test $1
68,000. Phono call refundable (602) 838
8885 F.t 5285
FOR SALE
LOFT: 4 SAl E Excellent condition' SSs.
Call after 1 30 pm 758-8666 Marv.
I OR SALE: Blue "81 Chevetto, automatic,
now brakes new shocks S4iX).00 Ask for
Mike or leave message 757 901
MI SSAGE CLINIC: Come get a 10 min-
ute massage at the Physical Therapy Lab
in Bolk Building on Nov. lMth between
:30-9-3Q. Advanced tickets are SI and
$1.25 at the door
I KOZEN YOGURT BLEND IN'S Fresh
I'each Frozen Yogurt with Granola -
1 UM! Only at I lank's I lomemade, 321 F
hlth Si (next to Wendys 758-0000.
KING SIZED BEDROOM, 4 piece with
almost new mattress set Very solid and
f?001 condition $800 or best offer. 746-
227 after 8pm or Sundays.
CARTOON CARICATURES FOR
( HRISTMAS! Call Barbour, 752-5910.
SNOW SKIS. 2 Complete sets. Olin 195
: e Solomon Bindings MUST
PROFESSIONAL BUT NOT EXPEN-
SE r gressive Solutions Inc offers
� ' I processing to students
(professionals reran papers, disserta
rts themes reports aid much more as
i- $1 75 pet page (Please call for
quote on your project) Pnce includes
printing on hiRh quality bond paper and
ng verification against a 50,000
word electronic dictionary Ask about
our special otters Laser Printing now
Call Mark at 757-3440 after
' pn I r tree information
II KM PAPERS - THESIS Typed on
IBM Wordprocessor. Letter Quality
Print Professional editing. Years of expe-
rience Call any time and leave message
or call after 3:00 pm. Nanette Still well 1-
524 5241 Cheap call - Best service! Pick
up and Delivery.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICE
experience, quality work, IBM Selectnc.
typewriter Call Lanie Shive 355-3522
GOVERNMENT CONFISCATED Cars
and Trucks Late model Porsches, Z-cars,
BMW's & Jeeps, for as low as $200. Also,
speedboats, cycles, motorhomes. Send $10
for regional Buyer's Kit to: FEDERAL
RESEARCH, LTD. PO BOX 888232 AT-
LANTA, GA 30356.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24 hours
in and out Guaranteed typing on paper up
to 20 hand written pages SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(Beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICES
758 8241 or 758 5488 ask for Susan.
IF IT TRUE YOU CAN BUT JEEPS FOR
S44 through the U.S. government? Get the
facts today! Call 1-312-742-1142 Ext 5271-
A
WORD PROCESSINGLETTER
QUALITY or laser printing Rush jobs
accepted 752-1933.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICES
Papers, resumes, these, etc. Reasonable
rates (most $1.25 per page) Grammar,
punctuation and spelling corrected Call
JAMIE, at 758-1161, M-F, 9-5 or 758-4567
nights and weekends. Fast, accurate and
reliable
FOR SALE-TREK: 410 perfect condition,
accessories included Best offer Call 752-
4589.
THE EELSKIN IS IN - new shipment of
eelskin in and another order soon to go
Get what you need for the Holiday's Call
David at 752-4589.
FOR SALE: Ross 13 in 12 speed. 23 lbs
bike Great racer andall around Shimano
components! Jav 758-9326.
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share 2 bed
room Apt in Wilson Acres. Furnished Apt
$115.00 mo starting Dec 15 or Jan 1 752-
8734.
MALE ROMMATE to share 2 bedroom
Apt in Wilson Acres Furnished Private
Bedroom $130.00 mo starting Dec 15 or
Jan 1.752-9944.
FOR RENT Private bedroom, female only
Kitchen Privileges Call after 6:30 pm 758
5422 Available now1
ROOMMATE WANTED to share a 3
bedroom house. 127 a month, lease and
deposit required. 757-0118. Call Sharon.
ROOMMATE NEEDED toshareapart
ment in Carriage I louse Apts. Private
bedroom $135 per month and 12 utili
ties. Call after 10 pm, 756-9248.
1 OR 2 ROOMMATES WANTED:
Cedar Court Apartments. All appli
ances, Rent based on single oudable
occupancy 1 1 2 from campus. Bus
Service. Call 757 0784.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a
large 2 bedroom apartment. Close to
campus and only S120mo. plus 12
utilities. Call 758-7990.
ROOM NEAR CAMPUS. $125 in
eludes utilities. Call 757 3543
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apt for rent
furnished. Contact 1 lollie Simonowich.
752-2865.
WANTED - Roommate to share 2 bed
room apartment at Tar River Estates
Will have private room No deposit. Call
752-3032.
PERSONALS
YO JOE HELLO TELLO Last Thurs
day night was incredibly great! We
wanted to thank you for letting us take
you guvs on a date. See ya in New York'
LYLS's Amv and 1 leather.
S & N AND TOLL-MAN Work it out!
BS&N
LAURA A. - I wanted to wish the best
little sister in the whole world the best
birthday ever! 1 hope you had a great
weekend Alpha Love YBS Heidi
PAIGE J. I Hope you had a great week-
end at home! Get ready for fun w the
AOPi'sand your big sis Alpha love YBS
Stcph
ATTENTION LADIES OF ECU: Phi
Kappa Tau is having a "Slave Auction"
Wednesday Nov. 18th at 8:00 pm at the
Phi Tau house Each brother will be
auctioned off to work for a period of 2
hours, with free dinners going to the
highest bidders and the slave of her
choice Proceeds will go to the Childrcns
Heart Foundation For more informa
tion call Jon Decker (7571584).
TKE RAFFLE sponsored by the broth
ers and little sister pledges Tickets are
$1 Grand Prize Earth Cruiser, 2nd $25
3rd $10
C. EDWARDS - Thanks for an awesome
night, it was killer �Someone who's
still trippin
RICH MARKER The lone Delta Dawg to
get initiated last week, well it's been a
long time coming, congrat's RICH
YOUR PiKA Brothers, sounds nice
huh.
CREENVILLE'S ONLY HARD SERVE
YOGURT! Only 99 calories per serving
A Dieters Dream and it tastes just like ice
cream. 1 lank's, 321 E. 10th St. 758-0000.
CONGRATULATIONS IRATES' Great
job atthe Charlotte tournament. Looking
forward to Ultimax X. Get horizooal
CRAIG - You're the only one I want to be
with forever 1 lope your 20th birthdav
was great. 1 LOVE YOU! Victoria.
JOHNNIE D Surprised that you asked I
had such a blast last Wednesday nite at
the house. Sorry about the ending - I
wasn't planning on spending the late nite
hours Thanks for a great nite! Love C.
HANK'S HAS IT ALL" The nation's 1
Ice cream and now frozen yogurt. Only 99
calories per serving. Pina Colada, Choco-
late, & Banana at 1 lank's - 321 E. 10th St
758-0000.
PI KAPPA PHI Alright guys, let's rule
thesocccr field tonight! Game time is 5:00.
Also we ha ve a B Team Basketball game at
8:30 in Memorial.
EDUCATION MAJORS
i low will you measure up as a student
teacher? i tnd out the answer to this
n M the next SNCAE meeting It
i Wed , Nov IS at 4 00 p m. in
I Dr. Patricia Terrell will he the
ker. Everyone is invited to attend
BLOCK PARTY
FREE PIZZA & DRINKS Games &
Volleyball also. Gary Jackson of WDLX 93
FM will be our D 1 Bring your West Area
SRA card and a picture ID Admission for
m r SRA card holders is 52. Come out
toda) .it MSC lawn from 4 6 pm Spon-
sored by West Area Residence Council.
AMBASSADORS
There will be a meeting Wed , Nov. 18
m the Mendenhall Multi-purpose Room
at 5 J 5 p m See you there!
SIC MEETING
This montn's Society for Technical
Communication meeting will be held
Thurs , Nov. 19 at 7:0C p.m. in Austin 132.
Mrs. Nan McLaughlin of the ECU co-op
office will discuss co-op opportunities for
both graduates and undergraduates in
technical writing, English, and journal-
ism The meeting is open to all ECU stu-
dents, faculty, and their guests.
WOMEN'S SOCCER CII IB
SOCCER SOCCER SOCCER SOCCER.
The ECU Women's Soccer Qub will be
holding a MANDATORY meeting on
Nov 19th, Thurs. Meet on the Intramural
fields and be ready for a practice session.
All NEW players are welcome!
GAMMA BETA PHI
The Gamma Beta Phi Honor Society
will be having a meeting Nov. 17 at 7 p.m.
in Jenkins Auditorium. A Service Point
will be given for those who bring 3 cans of
food for Greenville Food Drive.
TEACHER ED. MAJORS
There's still time to apply for the Work
Study Tnp to Mexico during Spring Break
(March 6-13), sponsored by the School of
Education and Campus Ministries. Op-
portunities are available to observe and
teach at selected schools in Puebla, Mev-
Announcements
ico Get your application today in the
Dean's Office, Speight Bldg room 134.
INTERMEDIATE CLUB
The Intermediate Education Club will
meet Nov. 23 at 4:30 p.m. in 312 Speight.
Speaker will be Janie Manning Principle
of Bethel Elementary. All interested inter-
mediate education majors should attend.
REBEL MAGAZINE
Announcing new essay contest: "The
Arts and Letters as a Cultural Force " Any
topics loosely associated with an event
culture, literature, art, music, pop cul-
ture�are encouraged. Papers should be
typed and under 15 pages. Become a pub-
lished scholar! Enter at the Rebel office
(Publications Building) on Nov 20 and 23
from 3-5 p.m.
WOMEN'S FRISBEE
Women's frisbee practice Wed. 4 p.m.
bottom of the hill. Please try to make it.
COOPERATIVE ED.
The N.C Internship Office provides
paid summer internship opportunities
with state government. Positions are
available for a variety of majors through-
out the state. Jeff Agee, Director of the
Program will be in Rawl 302 to speak to
interested students on Friday, Nov. 20at 3
p.m. For more info , contact Cooperative
Ed 314 Rawl.
SUPPORT GROUP
An organizational meeting for a Gay
and Lesbian Support Group will be Nov.
17th. For more info call 752-2816. Privacy
Respected.
GET PUBLISHED!
with the Rebel Magazine. Find
entry dates for Prose, Poetry and Essay
contests are Nov. 20 & 23 from 3-5 p.m. in
the Rebel office on 2nd floor Publications
Bldg. Become a published writer and
maybe even win some extra cash.
PRIME TIME
Come for fun, fellowship, and Bible
study this Thurs. and every Thurs. night
at 7:30 p.m. in Brewster C-103. See ya
there!
SRA
Attention Pizza Lovers! Student Resi
dence Association in conjunction with
Pizza 1 lut will sponsor a blood drive Nov.
18-19 from 12-6 in Mendenhall Each par
hcipant will receive a coupon for a free
personal pizza from Pizza Hut of
Greenville.
AMA MEMBERS
There will be a Business Meeting on
lues, Nov. 17to discuss and work out the
details on fundraising The meeting will
be at 3:30 in Rawl's Browning Room 105
Ail member should attend; sec you there
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda is having a meeting
Wed Nov. 18 at 3 p.m. in R302. Free
Enterprise week is Nov. 15 21. We will be
having a guest speaker. Refreshments will
be served following the meeting. Tom-
Wat is here, so plan on picking it up either
today (Nov. 17) or tomorrow after the
meeting.
SUBJECTS TVFFDfp
The ECU clinical psychology program
needs children, ages 6-15 to volunteer for
intelligence testing. This is to assist in the
training of MA. level students. A limited
amount of feedback will be given. Inter-
ested people can contact Dr. Larry 1 lines
at the Dept. of Psychology, 757-6800.
DIVE CLUB
If you enjoy scuba diving snorkeling,
and adventuring with friendly outgoing
people, then you need to join ECU's Coral
Reef Dive Qub. For more info call 752-
4399 and ask for Glenn or Rob.
TURKEYTROT
A Turkey Trot run will be held by the
Dept. of Intramural-Recreational Serv-
ices. Registration will be held Nov. 18 at 6
p.m. in Brewster D-103. For more info,
call 757-6387.
AnUnbeyeabteGateiyQf
POSTERS
Introductory Sale
HAPPY 19TH BIRTHDAY KAREN B !
1 lope your day is special, get some rest
'cause we're gonna party hard tonight!
Love ya like a sis, Melissa F.
TO THE PLEDGES ON ALPHA XI
DELTA! You girls are the BEST! Keep up
the good work You are doing GREAT'
WE LOVE YOU' Love, the sisters of AZD
PI KAPPA PHI PLEDGES The week of
1 loll is here at last But by NO means will
it go by fast. The time has come for you to
fear Crying and weeping we don't want
to hear. So do what your told and do not
fret. Cause you haven't been through
anything yet Although you will not feel
any pain' This week may drive you all
insain1 The brothers of Pi Kappa Phi
AOPi Thanks for a GREAT champaign
breakfast' We had a blast. Lets party to
gether again real soon! The brothers and
pledges of Pi Kappa Phi
SAINT PAUL MAY I CONFESS TO
YOU7 I LOVE YOU! -C
COME TO MSC LAWN OR BLOCK
PARTY TODAY We- ards
and ID are required. .ND
DRINKS Fun, food, ana lauulous time
Today from 4-6 pm. Sponsored by West
Area Residence Council.
KAPPA ALPHA BROTHERS AND LIL
SISTERS - Countdown for Christmas
cocktail has begun' Find those dates and
get psyched!
THE BROTHERS AND PLEDGES OF
KAPPA ALPHA Thanks for the help
with tapping our keg Thursday We love
you guys' Your little sisters
SIC EPS - don't forget the car wash on
Thurs Contact Lamb Chop for details
ALPHA PHI's. Thanks ladies for the big
shindig last week, we had a BLAST We
gotta gig again. The Pike�.
THE NEW STUDENT REVUE HAS
ARRIVED If you ordered one, please
come by the Buccaneer Office Publica
tions Bldg.to pick up your copy today
TO SUITE 415 SCOTT! The game is
over, we had ya'll going! No harm done,
its been lots of fun' All that"s left to tell
you all isHOWIE-CANT BE'
NOOOO VOLLEYBALL' We love you
all'
TO MY TAXI Itsal ways your fault Love
ya lots! Longie
LAURA B. had a wild time at
formal maybe a little too wild' Thanks
for the evening Mike
LADIES All campus Women's billiards
tournament Tues Nov 17, 6:30 m MSC
billiards Center Call 757 6611 for details
ZETAS: The dyes' Beer' Beer' Zetas'
Pikes' All these made a great part v Sorry
about the late "thank q" but hangovers
prevent some people form making news-
paper deadlines Thanks again, the I'ikes
FREE BAHAMAS TRIP Comedown to
the Elbo and Register for a trip for two to
the bahamas spring break SI tickets
Buy yours today.
ATTENTION: Don't forget Alpha Xi
Delta's I lappy 1 lour EVERY Wednesday
night at Pantana's
THE BROTHERS OF PI KAPPA
ALPHA wish to welcome the best pledge
class ever into our brotherhood, the
Zetas Kenneth Credle, Danny Hooper,
Cree Mitchell, Dean Momsson. Leslie
White, and David Wood Congrats Fellas'
Drinks are on GEORGE Boola-Boola
BASKETBALL OFFICIALS MEETING
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department will be having their first
organizational meeting for anyone inter
ested in officiating in the men's winter
basketball league on Tuesday, November
17,1987. at 7:30 PM at the Elm Street Gym
All interested officials should attend this
meeting For more information call Bruce
Bullock at 756-8775 or Ben James at B30-
4543
TO KAPPA SIC PRES, Thanks for a
great weekend You made formal perfect
Not 2 but 4 Lets do a movie Love Beth
REED AND JEFF Next time knock I'll
answer the door Oxxl luck touch!
Nikki. h
KAREN P. AND SUSAN NT B llooovc
you two. 1 had a great time partying with
vou at the formal Nikki
GREG CHRISTENSEN I had a gre. I
time at the formal It you ever need i
hand. Just call Love your date
last Carolina
Playhouse
presents
1987 88
cSeasoa.
November 18,
19, 20 & 21
8:15 pm
McCinnis Theatre
(corner of Fifth & Eastern)
General Public $5.00
ECU Students $4.00
Call: 757-6390
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FELLOWSHIP
invites you to meet
The Rt. Rev. B. Sidney Sanders
Bishop of the Diocese of East Carolina
Wednesday, November 18th
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
401 E. 4th Street
5:30 p.m. - Eucharist - Bishop Sanders,
Celebrant & Preacher
Fellowship supper following the service
Any Unframed
Or
Framed Poster
Stock
introducing ournew PosterGallery
J
"FADED" LEVIS
$2.95 to $5.95
Classic Overcoats
Herring-Bone, Black
Tweeds, Plaids, etc.
$19.95 to $49.95
Clark Gallery has expanded
We ve added an unbelievable eallery
of posters-a vast inventoryofhne
art posters as well as popular
printed posters which will enhance
any room decor And of course we
always offer custom framing or do-
it-yourself framing that will make
your poster look like an expensive
work of art
Come see the many forms of art
and our new exclusive poster gallery
OPEN THURSDAY NIGHTS TIL 9PM
SALE ENDS NOVEMBER 22. 1987
'CLARK
646 Arlington Blvd In The Shops of Arlington Village
TRENCH
COATS
(London Fog)
$12.95 to $14.95
Rugby Shirts
$4.95 to $9.95
Also: Wind breakers, Button down shirts, Members
only Jackets, Sport Jackets, Skirls. (Some mini),
Dresses, Etc.
CLOTHES
The Coin & Ring Man
10:QO-5:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 Sal. 400 S. Evans
752-3806
IHl
�k( H ini
amones, P
oys play d
By CHIPPY BONFHFAD
sun Wntcr
It was the rockingest of time it
was the drunkest of times And it
you stayed in Greenville this
weekend, surely you caught some
of the fallout from downtown
This year's coup d'etat was
staged by the Attic by signing the
Ramones, the grandaddies ot
punk, the quintessential rude
rock rebels. Friday's show
�opened by a thrash-happv Soul
�Train, was a skate punks wet
dream.
The Train came on strung, their
If rhythmic hooks beating on the
I headsofthecrowd. Unaffected hv
the posted "No Slam Dancing and
No Stage Diving" sign, the
: drunker skunks in the audience
persisted in body flinging.
This got many bounced. Boun-
cers were consistently pointing
flashlight beams on thrash lead-
ers. Other Attic staff mingled in
the crowd, keeping order.
After a long heavy metal video
interlude, the screen pulled up to
an empty stage. After two songs
played by an invisible band, the
Ramones came out in a furv of d rj
ice and spotlights.
The crowd, alreadv packed
tighter than an average container
of fudge, squished together.
People overflowed onto the stage
and were helped off. Slamming,
thrashing and basic heck-a jam-
ming got more bounced from the
club.
The band played loud but not
long. After one nearly incompre-
hensible set, with admittedly few
breaks between songs, the Ra-
mones went off stage and stayed
that way.
It seemed to be a concert of
greatest hits. Whether in the front
I or in the back, Joey Ramone's
�� vocals remained yelled mumbles.
"Warthog having few Ivrics.
was the most recognizable
Dee Dee gave out guitar picks
; tro.
front n
went h�
earr
Sadl)the ha;
.ndan he
��. dfiled ot
bought
tin

hosf
fi .s
ned�
and a t
1
'k-
In
F n -
Joey sings and Dee!
Thomas Wa
Geologists search
WEST MANSFIELD, OHIO
(AP) - At a leisurely 4 miles per
day, a curious caravan oi earth-
shaking trucks is wending
through the rolling farmlands oi
western Ohio, helping scientists
probe miles below the surface
where ancient continents mav
have collided.
If underground mountains can
be found, scientists say, thev
could be loaded with valuable
minerals and provide a picture or
what Earth was like 1 billion vears
ago.
"This is the beginning of the
effort to understand the large-
scale architecture, and ultimately
the history of Earth is wrapped up
in the architecture oi the crust.
says Doug Nelson, a senior re-
searcher at Cornell University in
Ithaca, NY.
Nelson is with the Consortium
of Continental Reflection Profil-
ing, COCORP, at Cornell, which
is funded by National Science
Foundation at a cost of about $3
million a vear. Scientists hope to
t ion of the a
Stah s � I
The k I
Seisr 5
Housf
at the Or
uniy and w -
earU
the Oh
rtia
InK
shak
and stal
'
tremors -spa
apart.
Minute changt -
tions
rocks are ur
The s
ground i
developed b
dustrv. not to -search I
t newly remodeled front of the Marathon restaurantj
irted this summer are finally finished, and the Greekj
I Hardy AJiigood)

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lkKr B
IOM I I Its always y out fault Love
U R
I MMl
' I s
a wild time at
1 too wild' Thank
n s billiard
n 17, 6 SO tn MS
6611 for details
Icei ' Ivor1 Zetas?
party Sm
vi but hangoveni
nakingnews
n, the Pikes

!
fKU BAH UfAS lKIli omedownto
I I iHO
ip tor two t.
SI tickets"
� forget Mpha i
ElO. Wednesday
k rill BROTHERS Of PI k-UM'
tin'
h ooper
M rnssoi
�'����� ellas
as B tSKl rBALI OFFICIALS Ml 1 I INC
real and i'ark
�en s wintei
Nc i embei
StreetGym
: attend thi�.
Bruce
i���� al s I
rO K1T SIC PUts, Thank tor a
: formal perfect
� movie Love Roth
REED MMIH Next time knock Hi
: luck tonigl
K VREN P WD SI W I H
iki
Li I
1987 88
Season
November 18.
8:15 pm
McGini � ati
arnei th & I aMern)
lc
( dl
-h!90
"FADED" LEVIS
$2.95 to $5.95
Classic Overcoats
Herring-Bone, Black
Tweeds, Plaids, etc.
$19.95 to $49.95
TRENCH
COATS
'London Fog)
$12.95 to $14.95
gby Shirts
'5 to $9.95
ers, Button down shirts, Members
Hi Jackets, Skirls. (Some mini),
ILOTHES
At
?in & Ring Man
400 S. Evans

i
THI I AST t AROl INIAN
St
Ramones, Pressure
Boys play downtown
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Suft Writer
It was the rockingest of times, it
was the drunkest of times. And if
vou stayed in Greenville this
weekend, surely you caught some
of the fallout from downtown.
This year's coup d'etat was
staged by the Attic by signing the
Ramones, the grandaddies of
punk, the quintessential rude
rock rebels. Friday's show,
opened by a thrash-happy Soul
Train, was a skate punks wet
dream.
The Train came on strong, their
rhvthmic hooks beating on the
headsof thecrowd. Unaffected by
the posted "No Slam Dancing and
No Stage Diving sign, the
drunker skunks in the audience
persisted in body flinging.
This got manv bounced. Boun-
cers were consistently pointing
flashlight beams on thrash lead-
ers. Other Attic staff mingled in
the crowd, keeping order.
After a long heavy metal video
interlude, the screen pulled up to
an empty stage. After two songs
played by an invisible band, the
Ramones came out in a fury of dry
ice and spotlights.
The crowd, already packed
tighter than an average container
of fudge, squished together.
People overflowed onto the stage
and were helped off. Slamming,
thrashing and basic heck-a-jam-
ming got more bounced from the
club.
The band played loud but not
long. After one nearly incompre-
hensible set, with admittedly few
breaks between songs, the Ra-
mones went off stage and stayed
that way.
It seemed to be a concert of
greatest hits. Whether in the front
or in the back, joey Ramone's
vocals remained yelled mumbles.
"Warthog having few lvrics,
was the most recognizable.
Dee Dee gave out guitar picks
and free knee feels to girls on the
front row. They squealed, and
went home to use the picks as
earrings.
Sadly, the band only played for
around an hour. Deflated, the
crowd filed outside. They still
bought wads of Ramones tee shirt
as they passed the gift shop
though.
Saturday night, the New Deli
hosted local favorites the Pressure
Boys. The Young Caucasians
opened, putting out large energy
and a fun and ragged version of
'Tears of a Clown
The Boys hit the stage with hits
and horns off their new album,
"Krandlebanum Monumentus
In order to catch Awarness Art
Ensemble at the Attic, the Pres-
sure Boys' set had to be cut in the
middle.
The crowd was small for AAE,
but perhaps even more lively.
Reggae bounded off the same
walls the Ramones had scorched
the night before.
A set and small encore later, the
Ensemble begged to go home and
the audience reluctantly let them.
The weekend started to draw to a
close, although blues band, the
Nighthawks, had yet to hit
Greenville.
The rockingest weekend this
town has seen in quite some time
proved to have fun, loudness and
a measure of integrity. AAE
ended their part in it with the cry,
"Free Afrika and 1 can see no
better way to end this paragraph.
Free Afrika!
The Ramones rock the roof and the walls and the floor of theAttic Friday night kicking off a week-
end of rock in downtown Greenville. (Photo by Thomas Walters)
Joey sings and Dee Dee flings guitar picks at the front row during
Thomas Walters)
Friday's show. (Photo by
Geologists searching for hidden mountains
WEST MANSFIELD, OHIO
(AP) - At a leisurely 4 miles per
day, a curious caravan of earth-
shaking trucks is wending
through the rolling farmlands of
western Ohio, helping scientists
probe miles below the surface
where ancient continents may
have collided.
If underground mountains can
be found, scientists say, they
could be loaded with valuable
minerals and provide a picture of
what Earth was like 1 billion years
ago.
"This is the beginning of the
effort to understand the large-
scale architecture, and ultimately
the history of Earth is wrapped up
in the architecture of the crust
says Doug Nelson, a senior re-
searcher at Cornell University in
Ithaca, N.Y.
Nelson is with the Consortium
of Continental Reflection Profil-
ing, COCORP, at Cornell, which
is funded by National Science
Foundation at a cost of about $3
million a year. Scientists hope to
build a model geologic cross sec-
tion of the crust under the United
States by 1990, based on the work
in Ohio and other states.
The journey by a crew from
Seismograph Services Corp. of
Houston, Texas, began in August
at the Ohio-Indiana line in Mercer
County and was to conclude in
early November at a point along
the Ohio River across from West
Virginia.
In between, the trucks will have
shaken the path along back roads
and state highways, sending vi-
brations up to 30 miles deep
which are reflected back to a con-
stantly changing 7.5-mile string of
geophones - instruments de-
signed to pick up the smallest
tremors - spaced about 14 feet
apart.
Minute changes in the vibra-
tions tell scientists what kinds of
rocks are underground.
The sophisticated under-
ground mapping technology was
developed by the petroleum in-
dustry, not to search for oil miner-
als, but to aid in the understand-
ing of the formation of the Earth's
crust.
"We're able to understand the
history of the Earth says Larry
Brown, another Cornell geo-
physicist who is one of the co-
directors of the project.
Work in the Appalachians has
revealed, for example, that those
peaks were not pushed up from
underneath, as some had theo-
rized, but rather were created
when a thin layer of rock from the
east was pushed westward, up
and over existing rock layers.
In Ohio, the scientists are
searching for what some believe is
an ancient fault line where two
continents collided a billion years
ago, forming a mountain range
that may be similar to the Hima-
layas, which were produced by
the collision of India and Asia.
The five trucks shaking the
earth draw a crowd of onlookers.
Like ungainly 22-ton ballerinas,
they slowly push themselves up
The newly remodeled front of the Marathon restaurant on Evans Street is pictured here. Renovations
started this summer are finally finished, and the Greek restaurant unveils its new look today. (Photo
by Hardy AJiigood)
on legs attatched to a pad that for
28 seconds vibrates the ground
from 10 to 45 times per second.
The vibrations penetrate the
soles of your shoes and seem to
shake every bone.
The trucks wait 15 seconds for
the vibrations to come back, then
they move 20 feet and repeat the
process.
Michael C Hanson of the Ohio
Geological Survey is excited by
the prospects of discovering the
mineral-rich Grenville Front, one
reason the state was proposed for
inclusing in the COCORP project
in 1983.
Rocks of the Grenville Front
surface in Canada, then dip under
the Great Lakes. Geologists theo-
rize the front runs under western
Ohio near Anna and Sidney, areas
of earthquake activity.
One theory is that the front was
formed by two land masses "that
collided and sutured to each
other, stuck together Hansen
says.
Toys banned
WASHINGTON (AP) - Two
federal agencies have launched a
crackdown on dangerous im-
ported toys.
The Consumer Product Safety
Commission and U.S. Customs
signed a memorandum officially
starting the cooperative effort in
October, just as the Christmas
shopping season got under way.
Spurred by the realization that
imports now make up 68 percent
of the toys being recalled for one
reason or another, the two agen-
cies also conducted a safety-in-
specting test of toys being im-
ported through Los Angeles and
San Francisco.
The result was seizure of more
dangerous toys than were re-
called in all of 1986, Safety
Commission Chairman Terrence
M. Scanlon said.
The concentrated efforts by the
two agencies in Los Angeles and
San Francisco resulted in seizure
of 70 shipments of toys containing
nearly 600,000 items which did
not meet U.S. safety standards,
Scanlon said.
��
NJMM
iron mnt m0imirmr f&m
Billy Joel's Russian
concert now an album
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Writer
Billy Joel went to Russia. He
played a concert there. It was a big
deal to the Russian kids, who have
never even heard of R.E.M.
And it was a big enough deal to
CBS records to make a double
album out of it. They named it
"Kohuept" which means
absolutely nothing in English and
the liner notes don't explain it ei-
ther.
Anyway as arrogant as Joel is
and as third grade as his music
often is, I find myself not slam-
ming the Lp as much as I'd like.
Basically, the guy has talent. He
just wastes it on songs about up-
town girls and second winds. It
took him a trip to the U.S.S.R. to
make him sound even mildly con-
vincing.
The record opens with a Rus-
sian choir group doing a little
number called "Odoya This also
is untranslatable. Since I've had
around zero years of Russian, I
relied on the liner notes to clue me
in to what it meant. Wrong.
Once Joel starts playing, it's
good ol' American English all the
way. He did learn to say "Thank
you" and "My name is Billy Joel"
without the aid of a translator,
and the fans went crazy.
Imagine, big capitalist rock star
cares enough about we lowly
Soviet fans to learn mother
tongue. We are most lucky people
in Moscow tonight.
Joel didn't even play his really
big hits. But on FM snoozers like
"Honesty he managed to sound
like he really was looking for a
little truth. Not an easy task on a
song so close to "Feelings" in
emotional depth and sincerity.
Joel and Charlie Daniels were
both raising public conciousrus-
about Vietnam long before the
guy in blue jeans even got over his
hungry heart. In concert, Joel
gives "Goodnight Saigon added
grit wothout losing himself in
greeting card sentimentality.
The growls and piano solo of
"Babv Grand" are hot and bluesy.
Joel relates to the crowd that he
recorded the song with the great
Ray Charles, but I never saw a 12-
inch single of it.
Surprisingly, lool tackled two
covers. Not just any two. but two
of the most famous songs of the
60s by the two gods of the era
This, was a mistake.
His rendition oi "Back in the
U.S.S.R though appropriate, is
weakened through his focus on
the piano at tho expense of the rest
of the band. � -
Joel's cover of Dylan's "The
Times They Are A Changin is
downright sacriligcous People
whose wives have been on the
cover of Sports Illustrated don't
really want the social order to
change.
But he goes on to the crowd
about what this song means, blah,
blah, blah. This kind of uncon-
cious hypocrisy makes the rest oi
Joel's musical statements ring a
litttle hollow.
But if you don't mind that sort
of political Spam, and vou don't
mind the fact that he didn't play
his best songs "Pressure" or "Still
Rock and Roll to Me" for the
deprived Russians, well, you'll
enjoy this album.
If you feel like the Russians
deserve better than this, don't
hold your breath. Rumors that the
Talking Heads will play Lenin-
grad are totally false and, in fact,
just made up at this moment.
Sanchez to give slide lecture
School of Art Preu lelax
East Carolina University's
School of Art Visiting Artists Pro-
gram will sponsor a public slide-
lecture by Juan Sanchez on Thurs-
day, Nov. 19 at 7:30 pm in Jenkins
Auditorium. A contemporary
Latin American painter,
Sanchez's visit and lecture have
been scheduled to coincide with
Gray Art Gallery's current ex-
hibit, "Images of Latin American
Cultures: Art and Artifact" and
East Carolina University's cele-
bration of Latin American Month.
Sanchez's paintings are on view
through November 25 as part of
the exhibit.
Juan Sanchez is a New York
born Puerto Rican Nationalist
whose mixed media collage-
paintings are steeped in the com-
plex issues of the cause of Puerto
Rican Independence. He studied
painting and photography at
See VI SITING, page 8
Paul Tardif will perform in a free public concert at Fletcher Recit
Hall tomorrow night The show starts at 8:15 p.m.
t
!





kRF B all'
rest
rJ tr IO.n I AM Its a ways your fault Love
ya lots' I ongie
� II'IU l IAUA B had a wild time at
' � il maybe a little too wild? Thanks
� c KI l ig Mike
1 Mills . imp - Women sbilliards
tournament. Tues Nn 17 6 JO in MSC
swill bi ntei Call 757-6611 for details
t 1 s The dyes? Beer? Beer? Zetas?
- made a great party Stu
it the late r-K q but hangovers
H ;i making news
i k s again the Tiki's
! RI 1 BAHAM s rRIP Come down to
Ibo and R � � a tup tor two to
il i� i si ili ' rickets
I'll I ION
: forget Alpha i
TK Wednesday
K Hit BROTHERS Ol PI KAPPA
Is M PHA Kishl - . ledge
lass u ��� �� erhood the
B A s k 1
kxu looia
FHCIA! S MEI nNG
Recreation and 1'ark-
n ing their fir
inter
ie tun Street i, m
should attend this
rmarioncall Bruce
n lames at KM
I 1
TO KAPPA SIC PRES, Thanks for a
i ; : rmai perfect
� Love Keth
RHP wnilll Next hme knock ill
k VKI P Wl'sl s H
ma
1987 88
Season

�?
November 18.
:1
8:15 pm
M( Cinn - '
orner oi F ifth & f astern)
00
( al
-6 VH)
' FADED" LEVIS
$2.95 to $5.95
Classic Overcoats
Herring-Bone, Black
Tweeds, Plaids, etc.
$19.95 to $49.95
TRENCH
COATS
'London Fo$)
$12.95 to $14.95
Igby Shirts
5 to $9.95
ers, Button down shirts, Members
rt Jackets, Skirls. (Some mini),
ILOTHES
At
in & Ring Man
400 S. Evans
752-3866
���
am,
THh I ASI (. AROI INIAN
St
Ramones, Pressure
Boys play downtown
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
SUff Wntrr
It was the rockingest of times, it
was the drunkest of times. And if
you stayed in Greenville this
weekend, surely you caught some
of the fallout from downtown.
This year's coup d'etat was
staged by the Attic by signing the
Ramones, the grandaddies of
punk, the quintessential rude
rock rebels. Friday's show,
opened by a thrash-happy Soul
Train, was a skate punks wet
dream.
The Train came on strong, their
rhythmic hooks beating on the
headsof thecrowd. Unaffected by
the posted "No Slam Dancing and
No Stage Diving" sign, the
drunker skunks in the audience
persisted in body flinging.
This got many bounced. Boun-
cers were consistently pointing
flashlight beams on thrash lead-
ers. Other Attic staff mingled in
the crowd, keeping order.
After a long heavy metal video
interlude, the screen pulled up to
an empty stage. After two songs
played by an invisible band, the
Ramones came out in a furvof drv
ice and spotlights.
The crowd, already packed
tighter than an average container
of fudge, squished together.
People overflowed onto the stage
and were helped off. Slamming,
thrashing and basic heck-a-jam-
ming got more bounced from the
club.
The band played loud but not
long. After one nearly incompre-
hensible set, with admittedly few
breaks between songs, the Ra-
mones went off stage and stayed
that way.
It seemed to be a concert of
greatest hits. Whether in the front
or in the back, Joey Ramone's
vocals remained yelled mumbles.
"Warthog having few lyrics,
was the most recognizable.
Dee Dee gave out guitar picks
and free knee feels to girls on the
front row. They squealed, and
went home to use the picks as
earrings.
Sadly, the band only played for
around an hour. Deflated, the
crowd filed outside. They still
bought wads of Ramones tee shirt
as they passed the gift shop
though.
Saturday night, the New Deli
hosted local favorites the Pressure
Boys. The Young Caucasians
opened, putting out large energy
and a fun and ragged version of
'Tears of a Clown
The Boys hit the stage with hits
and horns off their new album,
"Krandlebanum Monumcntus
In order to catch Awarness Art
Ensemble at the Attic, the Pres-
sure Boys' set had to be cut in the
middle.
The crowd was small for AAE,
but perhaps even more lively.
Reggae bounded off the same
walls the Ramones had scorched
the night before.
A set and small encore later, the
Ensemble begged to go home and
the audience reluctantly let them.
The weekend started to draw to a
close, although blues band, the
Nighthawks, had yet to hit
Greenville.
The rockingest weekend this
town has seen in quite some time
proved to have fun, loudncss and
a measure of integrity. AAE
ended their part in it with the cry,
"Free Afrika and I can see no
better way to end this paragraph.
Free Afrika!
The Ramones rock the roof and the walls and the floor of theAttic Friday night, kicking off a week-
end of rock in downtown Greenville. (Photo by Thomas Walters)
Joey sings and Dee Dee flings guitar picks at the front row during Friday's show. (Photo by
Thomas Walters)
Geologists searching for hidden mountains
WEST MANSFIELD, OHIO
(AP) - At a leisurely 4 miles per
day, a curious caravan of earth-
shaking trucks is wending
through the rolling farmlands of
western Ohio, helping scientists
probe miles below the surface
where ancient continents may
have collided.
If underground mountains can
be found, scientists say, they
could be loaded with valuable
minerals and provide a picture of
what Earth was like 1 billion years
ago.
"This is the beginning of the
effort to understand the large-
scale architecture, and ultimately
the history of Earth is wrapped up
in the architecture of the crust
says Doug Nelson, a senior re-
searcher at Cornell University in
Ithaca, N.Y.
Nelson is with the Consortium
of Continental Reflection Profil-
ing, COCORP, at Cornell, which
is funded by National Science
Foundation at a cost of about $3
million a year. Scientists hope to
build a model geologic cross sec-
tion of the crust under the United
States by 1990, based on the work
in Ohio and other states.
The journey by a crew from
Seismograph Services Corp. of
I louston, Texas, began in August
at the Ohio-Indiana line in Mercer
County and was to conclude in
early November at a point along
the Ohio River across from West
Virginia.
In between, the trucks will have
shaken the path along back roads
and state highways, sending vi-
brations up to 30 miles deep
which are reflected back to a con-
stantly changing 7.5-miIc string of
geophones - instruments de-
signed to pick up the smallest
tremors - spaced about 14 feet
apart.
Minute changes in the vibra-
tions tell scientists what kinds of
rocks are underground.
The sophisticated under-
ground mapping technology was
developed by the petroleum in-
dustry, not to search for oil miner-
als, but to aid in the understand-
ing of the formation of the Earth's
crust.
"We're able to understand the
history of the Earth says Larry
Brown, another Cornell geo-
physicist who is one of the co-
directors of the project.
Work in the Appalachians has
revealed, for example, that those
peaks were not pushed up from
underneath, as some had theo-
rized, but rather were created
when a thin layer of rock from the
east was pushed westward, up
and over existing rock layers.
In Ohio, the scientists are
searching for what some believe is
an ancient fault line where two
continents collided a billion years
ago, forming a mountain range
that may be similar to the Hima-
layas, which were produced by
the collision of India and Asia.
The five trucks shaking the
earth draw a crowd of onlookers.
Like ungainly 22-ton ballerinas,
they slowly push themselves up
on legs attatched to a pad that for
28 seconds vibrates the ground
from 10 to 45 times per second.
The vibrations penetrate the
soles of your shoes and seem to
shake every bone.
The trucks wait 15 seconds for
the vibrations to come back, then
they move 20 feet and repeat the
process.
Michael C. Hansen of the Ohio
Geological Survey is excited by
the prospects of discovering the
mineral-rich Grenville Front, one
reason the state was proposed for
inclusing in the COCORP project
in 1983.
Rocks of the Grenville Front
surface in Canada, then dip under
the Great Lakes. Geologists theo-
rize the front runs under western
Ohio near Anna and Sidney, areas
of earthquake activity.
One theory is that the front was
formed by two land masses "that
collided and sutured to each
other, stuck together Hansen
says.
Toys banned
WASHINGTON (AP) - Two
federal agencies have launched a
crackdown on dangerous im-
ported toys.
The Consumer Product Safety
Commission and U.S. Customs
signed a memorandum officially
starting the cooperative effort in
October, just as the Christmas
shopping season got under way.
Spurred by the realization that
imports now make up 68 percent
of the toys being recalled for one
reason or another, the two agen-
cies also conducted a safety-in-
specting test of toys being im-
ported through Los Angeles and
San Francisco.
The result was seizure of more
dangerous toys than were re-
called in all of 1986, Safety
Commission Chairman Terrence
M. Scanlon said.
The concentrated efforts by the
two agencies in Los Angeles and
San Francisco resulted in seizure
of 70 shipments of toys containing
The newly remodeled front of the Marathon restaurant on Evans Street is pictured here. Renovation? nearly 600,000 items which did
started this summer are finally finished, and the Greek restaurant unveils its new look today. (Fhoto not meet tj.S. safety standards,
by Hardy Aiiigood) Scanlon said.
Billy Joel's Russian
concert now an album
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Stiff Writer
Billy Joel went to Russia. He
played a concert there. It was a big
deal to the Russian kids, who have
never even heard of R.E.M.
And it was a big enough deal to
CBS records to make a double
album out of it. They named it
"Kohuept" which means
absolutely nothing in English and
the liner notes don't explain it ei-
ther.
Anyway as arrogant as Joel is
and as third grade as his music
often is, I find myself not slam-
ming the Lp as much as I'd like.
Basically, the guy has talent. He
just wastes it on songs about up-
town girls and second winds. It
took him a trip to the U.S.S.R. to
make him sound even mildly con-
vincing.
The record opens with a Rus-
sian choir group doing a little
number called "Odoya This also
is untranslatable. Since I've had
around zero years of Russian, I
relied on the liner notes to clue me
in to what it meant. Wrong.
Once Joel starts playing, it's
good ol' American English all the
way. He did leam to say "Thank
you" and "My name is Billy Joel"
without the aid of a translator,
and the fans went crazy.
Imagine, big capitalist rock star
cares enough about we lowly
Soviet fans to learn mother
tongue. We are most lucky people
in Moscow tonight.
Joel didn't even play his really
big hits. But on FM snoozers like
"Honesty he managed to sound
like he really was looking for a
little truth. Not an easy task on a
song so close to "Feelings" in
emotional depth and sincerity.
Joel and Charlie Daniels were
both raising public conciousnes
about Vietnam long before the
guy in blue jeans even got over his
hungry heart. In concert, Joel
gives "Goodnight Saigon" added
grit wothout losing himself in
greeting card sentimentality.
The growls and piano solo of
"Baby Grand" are hot and bluesy
Joel relates to the crowd that he
recorded the song with the great
Ray Charles, but I never saw a 12-
inch single of it.
Surprisingly, (oel tackled two
covers. Not just any two, but two
of the most famous songs of the
60s by the two gods of the era.
This, was a mistake.
His rendition oi Back in the
U.S.S.R though appropriate, is
weakened through his focus on
the piano at the expense of the rest
of the band.
Joel's cover oi Dylan's "The
Times They Are A Changin" is
downright sacriligeous. People
whose wives have been on the
cover of Sports Illustrated don't
really want the social order to
change.
But he goes on to the crowd
about what this song means, blah,
blah, blah. This kind oi uneon-
cious hypocrisy makes the rest of
Joel's musical statements ring a
litttle hollow.
But if you don't mind that sort
of political Spam, and you don't
mind the fact that he didn't play
his best songs "Pressure" or "Still
Rock and Roll to Me" for the
deprived Russians, well, vou'll
enjoy this album.
If you feel like the Russians
deserve better than this, don't
hold your breath. Rumors that the
Talking Heads will play Lenin-
grad are totally false and, in fact,
just made up at this moment.
Sanchez to give slide lecture
School of Art Pro Release
East Carolina University's
School of Art Visiting Artists Pro-
gram will sponsor a public slide-
lecture byjuan Sanchez on Thurs-
day, Nov. 19 at 7:30 pm in Jenkins
Auditorium. A contemporary
Latin American painter,
Sanchez's visit and lecture have
been scheduled to coincide with
Gray Art Gallery's current ex-
hibit, "Images of Latin American
Cultures: Art and Artifact" and
East Carolina University's cele-
bration of Latin American Month.
Sanchez's paintings are on view
through November 25 as part of
the exhibit.
Juan Sanchez is a New York
born Puerto Rican Nationalist
whose mixed media collage-
paintings are steeped in the com-
plex issues of the cause of Puerto
Rican Independence. He studied
painting and photography at
See VISITING, page 8
Paul Tardif will perform in a free public concert at Fletcher Recit
Hall tomorrow night The show starts at 8:15 p.m.
PWM
-ii ��iiniiM'iiirni Tng-aji
(Wtfc





8 THE EAST CARPI IMIam
NOVEMBER 17. 1987
'
I f
2!�ber sees highest spots of every U.S. state
Borons has 311; T1 l mX firsl stae high point summit in North America. It took Th� . .
Cnsnall heh .r?003 d ' 80t " S hih P�int
of AmoricaTom ho 8 P�m,S whcn ' was a scnior at Pi�Sord
m,t SnSoum TWy SUm" Hh Scho�1 he �)� That was
cj�5s ��, cyYork's 5344-foot Mount
Storlcr's barn � y'
Borons is s "oo.k I� -J�S � hiSh
of those restless souls in Vibram
soles who are always looking for a
new crag to scramble up and jot
down in their logbooks. It'ssort of
a hobby, like stamp collecting.
Last spring, Berens, a 38-ycar-
old lawyer who lives with his wife
and two kids in suburban Albany,
joined an elitegroupof .nountain-
oers who can boast of having
bagged the highest peak in each of
the 50 United States.
As far as those who keep track
of such things can determine, he's
the seventh person to do it.
jack Longacre, a 50-year-old
trailer park proprietor in Moun-
tain home. Ark claims to be the
sixth person to climb the high
points. He says he knows of about
two dozen others who are work-
ing on it.
Us an arduous task, with many
obstacles to overcome In Alaska
there are blizzards, crevasses
pulmonary edema. In Delaware'
there are speeding cars. In Indi-
ana, the high point is obscured bv
cornstalks.
It took Borons 21 vears, but he
bagged them all. 1 lc potted the last
one in his log book on May 27
1987 when he trudged through
thigh-deep snow to reach the
supposedly desert summit of
13,143-foot Boundary peak in
Nevada.
"When we got to the top, we
celebrated with champagne and
fruitcake, and just contemplated
our situation he says.
Berens, who works for the state
attorney general's office, traces
his zeal for hi king back to when he
joined the Boy Scouts in suburban
Rochester.
Visiting artist
to give lecture
Continued from page 7
Rutgers University and Cooper
, Union for the Advancement of
Science and Art in New York. His
work has been featured in over 60
group shows.
Sanchez's work has drawn criti-
cal attention in recent vears for his
skillful and innovative integra-
tion of varied materials, motifs,
graffitti and media images with
urgent political content. Art critic,
Helen Harrison of the Now York
Times concludes, "Since Mr. San-
chez is living and working in the
very system that promotes mass
acceptance of art as a consumer
commodity, can ho strike a bal-
ance between politics and aesteth-
ics? The answer, to a surprising
degree, is yes
In addition to his lecture Juan
Sanchez will be visiting class-
rooms and conducting individual
critiques in the School of Art Nov.
19 and 20. His visit is funded in
part by a grant from the National
Endowment for the Arts and his
paintings are exhibited through
the Museum of Contemporary
Hispanic Art in New York under
the direction of Nilda Peraza.
Jenkins Auditorium and Gray
Art Gallery are located in the Jon-
kins Fine Arts Center on the cam-
pusof East Carolina Universityin
Grenvillc, North Carolina. All
events arc tree and open to the
public. Parking is available in the
lots adjoining the Jenkins Center.
For more information, call (919)
757-6336.
beak hawnr" nn� w h r . Sl-wna n'Sn says- Because of the thin air, one
summit in North America. It took
a 17-day expedition to get to that
summit, Berens says.
"We had to wait out a two-day
snowstorm at 14,000 feet he
says. Because of the thin air, one
chusetts, when he was a student at
nearby Williams college. He
climbed Vermont's high point.
Mount Mansfield, while visiting
an uncle in Burlington.
"At that point I had three he
says, "and I realized I only had 47
to go Somehow it just snow-
balled from there.
The major obstacle to climbing
all the high points, besides having
the time and money to travel all
over the country, is that some
require technical rock and ice-
climbing skills. Realizing that,
Berens enrolled in a course at
Rainier Mountaineering Inc, in
Seattle.
In 1975, he climbed
Washington's high point, 14,410-
foot Mount Rainier, under the
guidance of two premier moun-
taineers: Phil Ershier, who in 1984
became the first American to
reach the summit of Mount Ever-
est via the north face, and Marty
Hoey, a young woman who died
on Everest's north face in 1982.
The most challenging of the
high points was Alaska's 20,320-
foot Mount McKinley, the highest
Pregnant?
Need Counseling?
Looking For
Alternatives?
Call 1-823-1527
in Tarboro
Sr. Mary Czaja, MSW
itefeikW.�:
the lungs with fluid
But Berens recalls the experi-
ence fondly. He says McKinley
was one of his favorite climbs
because of the fellowship among
the climbers, the sense of accom-
plishment, and the starkly beauti-
ful scenery.
"Each region is beautiful in its
own way Berens says. "Kings
Peak in Utah has beautiful mead
toUan,han8erOUfuhi8h P01 high P�ints' he Mys his �"�y �� Survey had determ.ned an-
tostandoneysstheonenear was piqued by notations ,n the other hill a few miles away was a
sign-in books on some of the foot higher. Last spring he got
summits. together with some other people
I read it again and again: This who were aspiring to do the 50
is my sixth, my twentieth he and climbed the new high point
says. I was curious to find just Mount Arvon
!L�W"?Ty P000 WCre doinK Hc discovered another new
this, boheputanad in thebackof survey when he happened across
Wilmington, Del. 'That's because
the high point of Delaware hap-
pens to be the double yellow line
of a road that goes over a hill
rhe lowest high point is an
Panhandle, 345 feet above
doesn't have. Granite Peak �
Montana has snarply defined sil-
houettes cleanly fractured gran-
ite with lots of angularity
The ugliest high point, he says,
was Clingman's Dome in the
Great Smoky Mountains in Ten-
nessee. "There's an asphalt side-
walk all the way to the top ho
says. "It's so crowded, you don't
get any sense of isolation or ac-
complishment "
scrubwSe" m fiPebackof survey when he happened across
scruDoy tittle hill a mountaineering magazine with a National CeoeraDhicarticle ihi
hortpinethickets his address, askmg �op,c who sa.d .owa'sh, was no
W�,TRthe5�,OVVritCtohim lon8�r l31-foot Ocheyedan
l d like to get some kind of an Mound in the northwest corner of
organization going he says, he the state, but a slightly hieher soot
corresponds with about 20 people on the farm of MemllSterlernear
who share his interest and occa- Sibley.
sionally puts together a newslet- Last spring Berens found the
e , general area on a topographical
Lonracre also keeps track of map, and then drove around until
!WSUrvCVSU'hirhhavorKlnnn,l W.� ri
level. "It's a
covered with short pine thickets,
Berens says. "It's kind of hard to
tell which point is the highest, so I
just wandered around until I was
convinced that I'd stood on every
little nubble
Berens says finding some the
the high points would be nearly
impossible without the help of a
ows and forests which McKinley Httleguidebookwrittcninl&Obv nowT !� ku'PS 5 of maP'an then drove around until
iJ3 pSsSS tst��"�-��
Frand Ashely and publisher by
La Siesta Press in California.
But the book itself is hard to
find.
"It's been out of print for 10
years Ashley said in a telephone
interview. "There's not much in-
terest in doing the high points. It
takes a lot of time and money
But Longacre says he thinks
interest is growing. During the
four years it took him to do the
some or the official high points Stcrler.
since Ashley wrote his book. "The Sterlers were very kind
Boron, discovered after ho and gracious he says. Thev
climbed 1979-foot Mount gavemeperm.ss.ontogoonthou
Curwood in the Upper Peninsula land, and even gave mea postcard
of Michigan that the U.S.Ceologi- showing their high point "
1
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Tuesday - November 17, 1987 -7:30 p.m.
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Bessie Smith,
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Ellas Fitzgerald,
Maxine Sullivan,
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Jiffy Lube
The newest concept in car care maintenance is now
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Here's what we do in 10 minutes, no
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A Musical Revue Saluting Black Women Singers
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A unique sisterhood - past, present and future - which has strutted,
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ECU Students $2 00 a others $3.00
foredby the Student Union Minority Arts Committee
1. We change your oil with a major brand'
2. We Install a new oil filter!
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I
I
I
j L OODpEC. 12th, 1987
"East Carolina's "wRCSCKT
GnMnviiii
(Agpom from Goldan
CofrojStp ujse)
�o Pm Favorite Oil Change"
mmm
m
rmi
THt FASTKCM isi
k
uru
o
mmnz season spm
Pir
By TIM CHANDLER
HATTIESBL'RG, Miss
lose, but yet so far a vs ay
That was the stor.
trolina Saturday ab it
uthcrn Mississippi -
mg its hopes of a winning sea
The Tirak'S finish the vcar with
5-6 record. Southern Mississippi
improved to 6-4.
The Pirates dug themselvt
lole early as the Golden Eat
tunt returner James Henry �
luthern Miss on the board :
when he returned a 49-yard Craig
sito punt 65 yards on the final
rlay of the first quarter tor a
touchdown. Chris Seroka
;ave Southern Miss a 7-0 lead
Thcriratesfellbehindl-I-Olaur
in the second quarter when quar
terback Brett Favre connected
-ith Darryl Tillman for a 2b ar J
uchdow n pass
ECU wasted little time chart
:k as it moved 74 yards in i
:ive plays for a touchd
rapped by Travis Hunter? 18
ard touchdown pass to Matt
IcLaughlin. The big play oi
Irive was Willie Lewis' 43-yard
in. Chuck Berleth's PAT pulled
ic Pirates to within 14-7 with
play in the first half.
Donald Porch then blocked a
Billy Knighten punt on the
Golden Eagles' next possession,
giving the Pirates possession at
the Southern Miss 26.
Eight plays later, Denell
Harper, picking up a fumbled
pitch from Hunter, sprinted in
from 1 yard out. Berleth's PAT
tied the score at 14-14 with two
seconds in the first half.
Southern Miss moved 80 vards
in 10 plays on the initial drive of
the second half, sconng on an 11 -
yard pass from Favre to Preston
Hansford. Seroka'sPAT made the
core21 -14 with9.31 to play in the
thigi quarter.
For thedav, Favre connected on
12 of 20 passes for 232 yards.
Henry then struck out against
the Pirates again.
Following a 41-yard Losito
punt, Henry broke free of several
tackles and sprinted SI yards
down the right sideline for a
touchdown. Seroka, with his PAT
increased the Golden Eagles' lead
to 28-14 with 7:17 to plav in the
third.
"We knew we'd have trouble
hemming him (Henry) up Pirate
ECU Swi
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sports Wntcr
The ECU men and women's
swim and dive team had vet an-
other successful meet as both the
men and the women defeated the
University of Richmond last
Wednesday. Needless to say,
coach Rick Kobe is very pleased
with both squads' performances
"This was a fairly easy meet for
us Kobe explained.
And easy it was as the women
won nine of the 11 swimming
Ievents and the men won seven ot
the 11 swimming events.
"We had our swimmers swim
off events so that it would be a
llittle morecompetitive and so that
Iwe could move our swimmers
Ho
The 198:
I
w
comes!
rma.
said K
The
an exce
time ot
tha:
Fan
George
2:04
The u !
their und
crushing the
Path Wah
A
V

etter-hitlf r Debbie Tate and the Pirate volleyball
volleyball title this weekend in Minges Coliseum, tl'l






U.S. state
S IUs v'Unosit
tationsin the
SOITICol the
i 1 his h he
IS t tilid tlst
doing
tack of
o him
ll
cal Survey had determined an
other hill a few miles away was a
toot higher Last spring, he got
together with some other people
who were aspiring to do the 50
and climbed the new high point.
Mount An on
He discovered another new
surve) w hen he happened across
a National Geographic article that
said Iowa's high point was no
longer 1,631-foot Ocheyedan
Mound in the northwest corner of
the state but a slightly higher spot
on the farm of Merrill Sterlernear
Siblc
Berens found the
general area on a topographical
map and then drove around until
ie i� a mailbox with the name
ler
lhe Sterlers were very kind
s he says They
me permission to go on their
ind even ei c me a postcard
high point
thing to
u Back On
opes.
l pment,
erb
DON'S GOLF AND SKI SHOP
264 By-Pass 756-1003
�?.� la Of IWl � 'V �nd tppnincc
insmily
9 p.m
ANNING BEDS
Jiing System
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SPECIAL
OF 10 VISITS OR MORE.
itmas with Georges'
ift Certificates.
1
I
I
ILube
car care maintenance is now
lir Greenville'
what we do in 10 minutes, no
itment necessary
hange your oil with a major brand!
vstall a new oil filter!
-ate the whole chassis!
heck and fill transmission fluid!
leek and fill differential fluid!
Iheck and fill brake fluid!
Iheck and fill power steering fluid!
Iheck and fill window washer fluid!
Iheck and fill battery!
Iheck the air filter!
heck the wiper blades!
lfiate the tires to proper pre sure I
;uum the interior!
ten wash your windows!
Car Wash with
lervice!
r5V�a�i
�Y50
!JIFFY CAR WASH!
I I
(with coupon)
COUPON GOOD DEC. 12th, 1987 J
llina'c 126Greenv.ll. Blvd
Flllld & Ww,lle
Chnvf" (Acfwi from Golden
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Winning season spoiled
Sports
NOVEMBER 17, 1987 Page 9
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
HATT1ESBURC, Miss. � So
dose, but yet so far away.
That was the story for East
Carolina Saturday as it fell to
southern Mississippi 38-34, end-
rg its hopes of a winning season.
The Tirates finish the year with
i 5-6 record. Southern Mississippi
improved to 6-4.
The Pirates dug themselves a
hole early as the Golden Eagles'
punt returner James Henry put
southern Miss on the board first
hen he returned a 49-yard Craig
I osito punt 65 yards on the final
play of the first quarter for a
touchdown. Chris Seroka's PAT
cave Southern Miss a 7-0 lead.
The Pirates fell behind 14-0 later
in the second quarter when quar-
terback Brett Favre connected
with Darryl Tillman for a 26-yard
touchdown pass.
ECU wasted little time charging
back as it moved 74 yards in only
five plays for a touchdown,
apped by Travis Hunter's 18-
vard touchdown pass to Matt
McLaughlin. The big play on the
drive was Willie Lewis' 43-yard
run. Chuck Berleth's PAT pulled
the Pirates to within 14-7 with 3:51
to play in the first half.
Donald Porch then blocked a
Billy Knighten punt on the
Golden Eagles' next possession,
Civing the Pirates possession at
the Southern Miss 26.
Eight plays later, Dcnell
Harper, picking up a fumbled
pitch from Hunter, sprinted in
trom 1 yard out. Berleth's PAT
tied the score at 14-14 with two
seconds in the first half.
Southern Miss moved 80 yards
in 10 plays on the initial drive of
the second half, scoring on an 11 -
yard pass from Favre to Preston
Hansford. Seroka's PAT made the
score21-14 with 9.31 to play in the
third quarter.
For theday, Favre connected on
12 of 20 passes for 232 yards.
Henry then struck out against
the Pirates again.
Following a 41-yard Losito
punt, Henry broke free of several
tackles and sprinted 81 yards
down the right sideline for a
touchdown. Seroka, with his PAT
increased the Golden Eagles' lead
to 28-14 with 7:17 to plav in the
third.
"We knew we'd have trouble
hemming him (Henry) up Pirate
Pirates fall to Golden Eagles; finish 5-6
ft?
head coach Art Baker said,
worked all week on that.
"There's no doubt that those
two plays hurt us an awful lot
today out there
The Pirates didn't throw in the
towel, though.
Later in the quarter, following a
23-yard Knighten punt, Hunter
moved the Pirates 44 yards in six
plays for a touchdown to close to
within 2S-21 with 19 seconds left
in the third period.
Hunter capped the drive with a
2-yard dive. The touchdown was
set up when 1 larper found an
opening on the right side and
rambled 27 yards to the Golden
Eagle 6.
Southern Miss then used an-
other big plav to boost in front of
the Pirates 35-21. On a third and
five at the Golden Eagle 37, Favre
hit Chris McGhee down the right
sideline for a 63-yard touchdown
reception.
"We've had trouble with third
down coversions all year long
Baker said. "Today wasnodiffer-
ent. We just couldn't come up
with the big plav
Seroka later moved the Golden
Eagles out in front 38-21 with just
under seven minutes remaining
following a Seroka held goal.
That brought out the Pirates'
sophomore backup quarterback
Charlie Libretto and the hurry-up
offense. Libretto quickly moved
the Pirates 72 yards in a mere
seven plays to cut the deficit to 38-
28 when George Franklin plowed
in from 2 yards out with 4:27 to
play in the contest.
The big play in the drive was a
32-yard pass completion from
Libretto to Ron Jones.
After forcing Southern Miss to
punt, Libretto ignited an 80-yard
scoring drive. Passes of 26 arid 15
yards to Tony Smith along with a
17-yard toss to Jarrod Moody
aided the drive, which culmi-
nated with 1:30 remaining in the
game when Libretto hit Smith in
the endzone for a 8-yard recep-
tion.
Tim James' two point conver-
sion run was stopped short leav-
ing the score 38-34.
The Golden Faglcs, then recov-
ered an ECU onsideskick attempt
and managed to hang on and run
the clock out.
Libretto, in almost becoming
the game's hero, completed seven
passesinl2attemptsfor 131 yards
and a TD.
The comeback effort by the Pi-
rates left Baker with a good feel-
ing about the team as a whole.
Finis was a different team out
there today Baker said. "They
showed how bad they wanted the
winning season by the way they
kept fighting back and not giving
up.
"But it (a win) just wasn't in the
cards todav

Comeback attempt
Tim James (top photo) was unsuccesful in a two-point conversion try late in the Pirates 38-34 season-�ndin� loss
to Southern Mississippi Saturday. (Photc by Harold Wise � ECU Sports Information)
Hoopsters begin year
The 1987-88 version of the East
Carolina men's basketball team
takes to the court tonight at 730in
Minges Coliseum for an exhibi-
tion contest against the Czecho-
slovokian National team.
The Pirates will be headed by
first-year head coach Mike Steele,
who comes to the ECU program
after serving a six-year stint at Di-
vision III DePauw University.
While at DePauw, Steele's squads
accumulated a 124-40 record, in-
cluding one trip to the Division 111
Final Four.
This year's Pirate hoop squad,
sorely depleted by graduation,
return only two players from last
year's 12-16 team. Returning for
the Pirates are junior guard Jeff
Kelly and sophomore forward
Reed Lose.
Kelly and Lose combined re-
turn an average of less than four
points and less than one rebound
per contest trom last year.
Taking the court for the Pirates'
nine-man squad will be a quintet
of freshmen, a pair of sophomores
and a pair of juniors. No seniors
occupy spots on the Pirates' ros-
ter.
Other than Kelly, junior college
transfer Dominique Martin, a for-
ward, rounds out the junior class.
Forward Gus Hill joins Lose as the
other sophomore.
Freshmen for the Pirates in-
clude guards Jimmy Hinton,
Ronney Gibbs and Terhern Har-
vey. Also, forwards Stanley Love
and Marc Lacv.
Libretto to leave football team
Sophomore backup quarter- Monday that he would not return
back Charlie Libretto announced to the Pirate football squad for the
Libretto in action against Southern Mississippi. (Photo by Harold Wise-
ECU Sports Information)
1988 season.
Libretto, in explaining his de-
parture, said that he "was a pass-
ing quarterback on a option foot-
ball team
Just recently, Libretto led the
Pirates in a near come-from-be-
hind victory against Southern
Mississippi last Saturday. In that
game. Libretto came off the bench
with less than seven minutes to
play with the Pirates trailing 38-
21. He then directed the ECU of-
fense on two scoring drives, one
of 72 yards and the other of 80
yards, to close the final margin to
38-34.
In that span. Libretto connected
on seven of 12 passes for 131 vards
and threw one touchdown, an 8-
yarder to wide receiver Tony-
Smith.
Libretto has listed his prospec-
tive schools which he might trans-
fer to as the University of Horida
and Central Horida.
ECU Swimmers gain wins over Richmond
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sportt Writer
The ECU men and women's
swim and dive team had yet an-
other successful meet as both the
men and the women defeated the
University of Richmond last
Wednesday. Needless to say,
coach Rick Kobe is very pleased
with both squads' performances.
"This was a fairly easy meet for
us Kobe explained.
And easy it was as the women
won nine of the 11 swimming
events and the men won seven of
the 11 swimming events.
"We had our swimmers swim
off events so that it would be a
little more competitive and so that crushing the Lady Spiders 117-86
we could move our swimmers Patty Walsh and Sonya Hem
around to see what other areas
they would be dominate in also
said Kobe.
The men, by a score of 122-93
brought their record to 2-1 when
defeating Richmond.
In addition, the most outstand-
ing swimmer was awarded to
freshman Mark O'Brien who had
an excellent 200-yard backstroke
time of 1:59.52. Better still, was
that ECU also took the second and
third spots in that race with John
Farrel coming in at 2:01.62 and
George Walters taking third in
2:04.35.
The women also continued
their undefeated record of 3-0 by
mingway were nominated best
swimmers of the meet with Walsh
swimming a winning time of
1:89.83 in the 200 yard freestyle
(25.74) and the 100 yard freestyle
(55.19) event.
Both the men and the women's
400-yard medley relay team came
in first over Richmond with the
men swimming in at 3:43.22 and
the women swimming a fine time
of 4:13.09.
In the men's 1000-yard freestyle
event, ECU blew past Richmond
taking all three places. It was
Brian Kingsfield leading off for
the men swimming a superb time
of 10:21.68 while George Walters
(10:22.22) settled for third.
The men also found ultimate
victory in the 200-yard individual
medley taking once again the
first, second, and third-place
spots. This time it was Pat Bren-
nan (2:03.00) who would shine for
the Pirates. Next, Tom Holsten
place hme of 5:30.94.
Victory however was not
shared only among the swimmers
as the women's diving team had a
superb day against Richmond.
Sherry Campbell managed to take
(2:04.84) came in and finally, Tyge first place in both the 1 -meter and
3-meter diving events. Becky
Kerber also had a good day taking
second in both diving events.
Pistorio (2:04.01) finished it off
taking third place.
Doom was in store for the
women Richmond swimmers
also as they could not escape the
wrath of East Carolina either. It
was the Pirate women who took
all three places in the 500-yard
freestyle with Leslie Jo Wilson
taking first in 5:23.74. Three sec-
onds later CarolynGreen (5:26.41)
came in and to finish it off, it was
Tracy Bauman swimming a third
The men had a little bit of a
problem in the 1-meter diving as
P. Smith could not outscore
Brauastein of Richmond and had
to settle for second. However, P.
Smith took charge in the 3-meter
diving winning first place while
ECU'S Scott Milligan clung to
second.
The women Pirates fell short to
Richmond in the 200-yard back-
stroke when Ginger Carrick
(2:18.69) had to settle for second
behind N'anan (2:16.72) of
Richmond. Keller Hodges came
in 5 seconds later behind Ginger
to claim third.
To finish it off, the efforts of
Brian Kingsfield, Tom Holsten,
John Farrell, and Sean Callender
paid off as they swam for first
place in the 400-yard freestyle
relay with a time of 3:17.57. East
Carolina also took third in that
race with J. D. Lewis, Peter
Sengenberger, Chip Kline, and
Ron Fleming finishing up in
3:31.09.
Tribe wins CAA volleyball crown
Setter-hitter Debbie Tate and the Pirate volleyball team were unsuccessful in their attemt to win the CAA
volleyball title this weekend in Minges Coliseum. (Photo by Mar Startari � ECU Photo Lab)
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sporti Writer
William & Mary won four
matches, including a five game
come-from-behind contest
against James Madison, to take
their third straight Colonial Ath-
letic Association volleyball cham-
pionship last weekend in Minges
Coliseum.
The Tribe breezed through the
first round and semi-final
matches, never playing more than
three games, before meeting a
tough James Madison team in the
championship. It took the Tribe
five games before overcoming the
Dukes, 8-15,15-6,12-15,15-0,15-
9.
The loss broke a 14-match win-
ning streak for James Madison
and gives the Dukes a 33-7 season
record. William & Mary finishes
at 23-7.
East Carolina was eliminated
Friday in the first round dropping
its first match to UNC Wilming-
ton4-15,15-17, and 2-15. The Lady
Pirates lost again that afternoon to
William & Mary 10-15,5-15 and 9-
15.
ECU closes out the 1987 season
with a 9-18 mark overall with no
conference wins.
American University was also
eliminated in the first round los-
ing to George Mason 16-14,14-16,
13-15 and 10-15. The Eagles were
shut down by James Madison in
the second match 4-15,6-15,7-15.
American's season records stands
at 10-26.
In other first round matches,
William & Mary defeated UNC-
Wilmington and James Madison
stopped George Mason.
Saturday in the semi-finals,
James Madison cinched a berth in
the championship match by
knocking off UNC Wilmington
15-5,15-10,17-15. William & Mary
made short order of the George
Mason Patriots, 15-11,17-15,15-5.
In the consolation match for
third place, UNC Wilmington
went head to head with George
Mason in what was the longest
and most intense match of the
tournament. The Lady Hawks,
down 2-1, won two straight
games to come back and capture
third place 12-15,15-5, 7-15,15-8,
18-16.
UNCW finishes the season at
23-11 and George Mason at 13-25.
The All-CAA teams were an-
nounced at the tournament ban-
quet and William & Mary's Heidi
Erpelding was named player-of-
the-year. She shared first team
honors with teammate Kate
Jensen, James Madison's Rose-
mary McHugh and Cathy Cole,
Joyce Johansen of George Mason
and Yvonne Holan form UNC
Wilmington.
On the All-Tournament team
were: Mary Lou Ryan, UNC
Wilmington; Chrissie Penas,
James Madison; Dina Thomas,
James Madison; Heidi Erpelding
William & Mary; Kate Jensen,
William & Mary and Jennifer
Noble, William & Mary. Ameri-
can University's Kizzie Mailan-
der was named CAA coach of the
year.
r"i






f
U.S. state
otati
ms in
again:
ntieth
Survey had determined an
s curiosit
the other hill a tew miles away was a
the foot higher Last spring, he got
together with some other people
Ins who were aspiring to do the 50
he and climbed the new high point,
id jus! Mount Arvon
He discovered another new
vukol survey when he happened across
a National Geographic article that
i who said Iowa's high point was no
ohim longer 1,631-foot Ocheyedan
lot .m K� J l-
IH'
Mound in the northwest corner of
the state but a slightly higher spot
on the farm of Mem 11 Sterlernear
le
Last spring Borons found the
general area on a topographicaJ
map and then drove around until
iw .i mailbox VNith the name
Sterlers were verv kind
he says. They
me permission to go on their
gave mea postcard
their high point
tiling to
u Back On
pes.
If an a of
I ment,
ler
DON'S GOLF AND SKI SHOP
264 By-Pass 756-1003
9 p.m.
OR
INNING BEDS
ning System
UDENT
SPECIAL
OF 10 VISITS OR MORE.
itmas with Georges'
tft Certificates.
I
I
Lube
:ar care maintenance is now
in Greenville
what we do in 10 minutes, no
itment necesscry
f ge your oil with a major brand!
new oil filter'
ite the whole chassis!
Iheck and fill transmission fluid!
heck and fill differential fluid!
Iheck and fill brake fiuid!
Iheck and fill power steering fluid!
Iheck and fill window washer flu'd!
Iheck and fill battery!
Iheck the air filter!
heck the wiper blades!
ifiate the tires to proper pre surl
icuum the Interior!
en wash your windows!
Car Wash with
lervice!
!JIFFY CAR WASH!
(with coupon)
COUPON GOOD DEC. 12th, 1987 J
linaTs r"S
(Acro�s from Golden
Gorrol StP-i- uJSe)
Change"
THE EAST CAROL INIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 17, 1987 Page 9
Winning season spoiled
By TIM CHANDLER
Sporti Editor
HATT1ESBURG, Miss. � So
close, but yet so far away.
That was the story for East
Carolina Saturday as it fell to
iuthern Mississippi 38-34, end-
ing its hopes of a winning season.
1 he Pirates finish the year with
j 5-6 record. Southern Mississippi
improved to 6-4.
The Pirates dug themselves a
hole early as the Golden Eagles'
punt returner James Henry put
Southern Miss on the board first
hen he returned a 49-yard Craig
1 osito punt 65 yards on the final
play o( the first quarter for a
touchdown. Chris Seroka's PAT
gave Southern Miss a 7-0 lead.
1 he Pirates fell behind 14-0 later
in the second quarter when quar-
terback Brett Favrc connected
with Darryl Tillman for a 26-vard
touchdown pass.
ECU wasted little time charging
back as it moved 74 yards in only
five plays for a touchdown,
apped by Travis Hunter's 18-
vard touchdown pass to Matt
McLaughlin. The big play on the
drive was Willie Lewis' 43-yard
run. Chuck Berlcth's PAT pulled
the Pirates to within 14-7 with 3:51
to play in the first half.
Donald Porch then blocked a
Billy Knighten punt on the
Golden Eagles' next possession,
pving the Pirates possession at
the Southern Miss 26.
Eight plays later, Denell
Harper, picking up a fumbled
pitch from Hunter, sprinted in
trom 1 yard out. Berleth's PAT
tied the score at 14-14 with two
seconds in the first half.
Southern Miss moved 80 yards
in 10 plays on the initial drive of
the second half, scoring on an 11 -
yard pass from Favre to Preston
Hansford. Seroka's PAT made the
score 21-14 with 9:31 to play in the
third quarter.
For theday, Favre connected on
12 of 20 passes for 232 yards.
Henry then struck out against
the Pirates again.
Following a 41-yard Losito
punt, Henry broke free of several
tackles and sprinted 81 yards
down the right sideline for a
touchdown. Seroka, with his PAT
increased the Golden Eagles' lead
to 28-14 with 7:17 to plav in the
third.
"We knew we'd have trouble
hemming him (Henry) up Pirate
Pirates fall to Golden Eagles; finish 5-6
head coach Art Baker said. "We
worked all week on that.
'There's no doubt that those
two plays hurt us an awful lot
today out there
The Pirates didn't throw in the
towel, though.
Later in the quarter, following a
23-yard Knighten punt, Hunter
moved the Pirates 44 yards in six
plays for a touchdown to close to
within 2S-21 with 19 seconds left
in the third period.
Hunter capped the drive with a
2-yard dive. The touchdown was
set up when Harper found an
opening on the right side and
rambled 27 yards to the Golden
Eagle 6.
Southern Miss then used an-
other big plav to boost in front of
the Pirates 35-21. On a third and
five at the Golden Eagle 37, Favre
hit Chris McGhee down the right
sideline for a 63-yard touchdown
reception.
"We've had trouble with third
down emersions all year long
Baker said. "Today was no differ-
ent. We just couldn't come up
with the big plav
Seroka later moved the Golden
Eagles out in front 38-21 with just
under seven minutes remaining
following a Seroka field goal.
That brought out the Pirates'
sophomore backup quarterback
Charlie Libretto and the hurry-up
offense. Libretto quickly moved
the Pirates 72 yards in a mere
seven plays to cut the deficit to 38-
28 when George Franklin plowed
in from 2 yards out with 4:27 to
play in the contest.
The big play in the drive was a
32-yard pass completion from
Libretto to Ron Jones.
After forcing Southern Miss to
punt, Libretto ignited an 80-yard
scoring drive. Passes of 26 and 15
yards to Tony Smith along with a
17-yard toss to Jarrod Moody
aided the drive, which culmi-
nated with 1:30 remaining in the
game when Libretto hit Smith in
the endzone for a 8-yard recep-
tion.
Tim James' two point conver-
sion run was stopped short leav-
ing the score 38-34.
The Golden Fagles, then recov-
ered an ECU onsideskick attempt
and managed to hang on and run
the clock out.
Libretto, in almost becoming
the game's hero, completed seven
passes in 12 attempts for 131 yards
and a TD.
The comeback effort by the Pi-
rates left Baker with a good feel-
ing about the team as a whole.
"This was a different team out
there today Baker said. "They
showed how bad they wanted the
winning season by the way they
kept fighting back and not giving
up.
"But it (a win) just wasn't in the
cards today
Comeback attempt
Tim James (top photo) was unsuccesful in a two-point conversion try late in the Pirates 38-34 season-endin� loss
to Southern Mississippi Saturday. (Photc by Harold Wise � ECU Sports Information)
Hoopsters begin year
The 1987-88 version of the East
Carolina men's basketball team
takes to the court tonight at 7:30 in
Minges Coliseum for an exhibi-
tion contest against the Czecho-
slovokian National team.
The Pirates will be headed bv
first-year head coach MikeSteele,
who comes to the ECU program
after serving a six-year stint at Di-
vision III DePauw University.
While at DePauw, Steele's squads
accumulated a 124-40 record, in-
cluding one trip to the Division III
Final Four.
This year's Pirate hoop squad.
sorely depleted by graduation,
return only two players from last
year's 12-16 team. Returning for
the Pirates are junior guard Jeff
Kelly and sophomore forward
Reed Lose.
Kelly and Lose combined re-
turn an average of less than four
points and less than one rebound
per contest from last year.
Taking the court for the Pirates'
nine-man squad will be a quintej
of freshmen, a pairof sophomores
and a pair of juniors. No seniors
occupv spots on the Pirates' ros-
ter.
Other than Kelly, junior college
transfer Dominique Martin, a for-
ward, rounds out the junior class.
Forward Gus Hill joins Lose as the
other sophomore.
Freshmen for the Pirates in-
clude guards Jimmy Hinton,
Ronney Gibbs and Terhern Har-
vey. Also, forwards Stanley Love
and Marc Lac v.
Libretto to leave football team
Sophomore backup quarter-
back Charlie Libretto announced
Monday that he would not return
to the Pirate football sauad for the
Libretto in action against Southern Mississippi. (Photo by Harold Wise -
ECU Sports Information)
1988 season.
Libretto, in explaining his de-
parture, said that he "was a pass-
ing quarterback on a option foot-
ball team
Just recently, Libretto led the
Pirates in a near come-from-be-
hind victory against Southern
Mississippi last Saturday. In that
game, Libretto came off the bench
with less than seven minutes to
play with the Pirates trailing 38-
21. He then directed the ECU of-
fense on two scoring drives, one
of 72 yards and the other of 80
yards, to close the final margin to
38-34.
In that span. Libretto connected
on seven of 12 passes for 131 yards
and threw one touchdown, an 8-
yarder to wide receiver Tony-
Smith.
Libretto has listed his prospec-
tive schools which he might trans-
fer to as the University of Horida
and Central Horida.
ECU Swimmers gain wins over Richmond
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sportt Writer
The ECU men and women's
swim and dive team had yet an-
other successful meet as both the
men and the women defeated the
University of Richmond last
Wednesday. Needless to say,
coach Rick Kobe is very pleased
with both squads' performances.
"This was a fairly easy meet for
us Kobe explained.
And easy it was as the women
won nine of the 11 swimming
events and the men won seven of
the 11 swimming events.
"We had our swimmers swim
off events so that it would be a
little more competitive and so that crushing the Lady Spiders 117-86.
we could move our swimmers Patty Walsh and Sonya Hem-
around to see what other areas
they would be dominate in also
said Kobe.
The men, by a score of 122-93
brought their record to 2-1 when
defeating Richmond.
In addition, the most outstand-
ing swimmer was awarded to
freshman Mark O'Brien who had
an excellent 200-yard backstroke
time of 1:59.52. Better still, was
that ECU also took the second and
third spots in that race with John
Farrel coming in at 2.01.62 and
George Walters taking third in
2:04.35.
The women also continued
their undefeated record of 3-0 by
mingway were nominated best
swimmers of the meet with Walsh
swimming a winning time of
1:89.83 in the 200 yard freestyle
(25.74) and the 100 yard freestyle
(55.19) event.
Both the men and the women's
400-yard medley relay team came
in first over Richmond with the
men swimming in at 3:43.22 and
the women swimming a fine time
of 4:13.09.
In the men's 1000-yard freestyle
event, ECU blew past Richmond
taking all three places. It was
Brian Kingsfield leading off for
the men swimming a superb time
of 10:21.68 while George Walters
(10:22.22) settled for third.
The men also found ultimate
victory in the 200-yard individual
medley taking once again the
first, second, and third-place
spots. This time it was Pat Bren-
nan (2:03.00) who would shine for
the Pirates. Next, Tom Holsten
(2:04.84) came in and finally, Tyge
Pistorio (2:04.01) finished it off
taking third place.
Doom was in store for the
women Richmond swimmers
also as they could not escape the
wrath of East Carolina either. It
was the Pirate women who took
all three places in the 500-yard
freestyle with Leslie Jo Wilson
taking first in 5:23.74. Three sec-
onds later CarolynGreen (5:26.41)
came in and to finish it off, it was
Tracy Bauman swimming a third
place time of 5:30.94.
Victory however was not
shared only among the swimmers
as the women's diving team had a
superb day against Richmond.
Sherry Campbell managed to take
first place in both the 1 -meter and
3-meter diving events. Becky
Kerber also had a good day taking
second in both diving events.
The men had a little bit of a
problem in the 1-meter diving as
P. Smith could not outscore
Brauastein of Richmond and had
to settle for second. However, P.
Smith took charge in the 3-meter
diving winning first place while
ECU'S Scott Milligan clung to
second.
The women Pirates fell short to
Richmond in the 200-yard back-
stroke when Ginger Carrick
(2:18.69) had to settle for second
behind Nanan (2:16.72) of
Richmond. Keller Hodges came
in 5 seconds later behind Ginger
to claim third.
To finish it off, the efforts of
Brian Kingsfield, Tom Holsten,
John Farrell, and Sean Callender
paid off as they swam for first
place in the 400-yard freestyle
relay with a time of 3:17.57. East
Carolina also took third in that
race with J. D. Lewis, Peter
Sengenberger, Chip Kline, and
Ron Fleming finishing up in
3:31.09.
Tribe wins CAA volleyball crown
Setter-hitter Debbie Tate and the Pirate volleyball team were unsuccessful in their attemt to win the CAA
volleyball title this weekend in Minges Coliseum. (Photo by Mar Startari � ECU Photo Lab)
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Spam Writer
William & Mary won four
matches, including a five game
come-from-behind contest
against James Madison, to take
their third straight Colonial Ath-
letic Association volleyball cham-
pionship last weekend in Minges
Coliseum.
The Tribe breezed through the
first round and semi-final
matches, never playing more than
three games, before meeting a
tough James Madison team in the
championship. It took the Tribe
five games before overcoming the
Dukes, 8-15,15-6,12-15,15-0,15-
9.
The loss broke a 14-match win-
ning streak for James Madison
and gives the Dukes a 33-7 season
record. William & Mary finishes
at 23-7.
East Carolina was eliminated
Friday in the first round dropping
its first match to UNC Wilming-
ton4-15,15-17, and 2-15. The Lady
Pirates lost again that afternoon to
William & Mary 10-15,5-15 and 9-
15.
ECU closes out the 1987 season
with a 9-18 mark overall with no
conference wins.
American University was also
eliminated in the first round los-
ing to George Mason 16-14,14-16,
13-15 and 10-15. The Eagles were
shut down by James Madison in
the second match 4-15,6-15,7-15.
American's season records stands
at 10-26.
In other first round matches,
William & Mary defeated UNC-
Wilmington and James Madison
stopped George Mason.
Saturday in the semi-finals,
James Madison cinched a berth in
the championship match by
knocking off UNC Wilmington
15-5,15-10,17-15. William & Mary
made short order of the George
Mason Patriots, 15-11,17-15,15-5.
In the consolation match for
third place, UNC Wilmington
went head to head with George
Mason in what was the longest
and most intense match of the
tournament. The Lady Hawks,
down 2-1, won two straight
games to come back and capture
third place 12-15,15-5,7-15,15-8
18-16.
UNCW finishes the season at
23-11 and George Mason at 13-25.
The All-CAA teams were an-
nounced at the tournament ban-
quet and William & Mary's Heidi
Erpelding was named player-of-
the-year. She shared first team
honors with teammate Kate
Jensen, James Madison's Rose-
mary McHugh and Cathy Cole,
Joyce Johansen of George Mason
and Yvonne Holan form UNC
Wilmington.
On the All-Tournament team
were: Mary Lou Ryan, UNC
Wilmington; Chrissie Penas
James Madison; Dina Thomas
James Madison; Heidi Erpelding
William & Mary; Kate Jensen
Wtlham & Mary and Jennifer
Noble, William & Mary. Ameri-
can University's Kizzie Mailan-
der was named CAA coach of the
year.
)(
MM
I
� � � � � ��' �
J





10 THE EAST CARPI tN� am
NOVEMBER 17, 1987
Pirate rugby team rips Wake
Forest 30-12 Saturday at home
Last SaturHavf :i� iu� �n- 3 . i� ��� �. . .
li ,SL turdav at the Allied
Health Athletic Fields, the East
Carolina Rugby team played its
toughest and most impressive
game of the season, coming from
behind to defeat the defending
state champs, Wake Forest, 30-12.
In the early going the pirate
ruggers looked sluggish, and the
Deacons capitalized, scoring a
quick 6 points. Soon after, ECU
bounced back when Bob "The
Running Key" Eason barreled
through several defenders to give
ECU its first try (touchdown).
The point after was wide, and
the Deacs led 6-1. Wake Forest
then marched back down the
field, and on a broken play took
the ball in uncontested from the
30-meter line.
At this point ECU was down 12-
4. "Our pride was broken" said
team president Steve kimm
"Wake was the first team to cross
intoourendzonein fouranda half
the ECU ruggers
games
However
would not let the deficit bring
them down. Midway through the
first half, ECU pulled it together
on a set up team "try
Veteran Mike Brown set up the
score when he punted the ball
from the 50-meter line, ran down
field, and crushed the Wake For-
est defender, forcing him to cough
up the ball.
Wake's attempt to kick the ball
downfield turned to disaster
when ECU's team captain "Mr.
Bullhead Hahn" blocked the kick
and pounced on it in the end zone
tor four more ECU points.
The kick-after was good, and
ECU had reduced the Deacon's
lead to 12-10.
Lite in the half, following a
solid drive, ECU took the lead
when Philip Ritchie grabbed the
ball from a five-meter
scrumdown and dived over the
line (scrumdowns occur follow-
ing an infraction, i.e. a forward
pass.)
During scrumdowns, both
teams form two tightly-grouped
units of eight men who smash
together directly over the ball and
try lo gain possesion bv walking
over the ball.
Ritchie's score gave ECU a 14-
12 lead at the end of the half.
The next forty minutes were
marked by ECU domination that
destroyed Wake Forest, and
thrilled the 300-plus Pirate fans.
Rookie Parrish Nichols chalked
up the first points of the second
half when he took the ball in from
30 meters, building ECU's lead to
18-12.
Next it was the veteran Bob
Dillahunt
tabbed
Fast Carolina's Ellis Dillahunt
has been chosen to participate in
the 50th annual Blue Cray All-
Star Game in Montgomery, Ala
on Dec. 25.
Dillahunt, a senior free safety
on this year's 5-6 football team,
was chosen to participate in the
Blue-Gray Caw, which each sea-
sons brings together top senior
from the south to battle seniors
from the north, prior to last
Saturday's 38-34 Pirate loss at
Southern Mississippi.
"It is a great honor to be chosen
to play in the game Dilahunt
said. "To know that you're con-
sidered one of the top seniors in
the country is something very
special
f

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'Don Tobeanie" Tobin, who
scored off a pass from Ritchie. Fi-
nally, Mike "Macho Man" Brown
scored his first try of the year
when he juked two Wake defend-
ers for a thirty-meter score.
Brown's point after was good,
making the final score 30-12, and
East Carolina an 18 point winner
over last year's state champions.
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j





10 THE EAST CARPI imi am
NOVEMBER 17, 1987
Pirate rugby team rips Wake
Forest 30-12 Saturday at home
Heal h Athletic Fields, the Fast
Carolina Rugby team played its
toughest and most impressive
game of the season, coming from
behind to defeat the defending
state champs. Wake Forest, 30-12.
In the early going the pirate
ruggers looked sluggish, and the
Deacons capitalized, scoring a
quick 6 points. Soon after, ECU
bounced back when Bob "The
Running Key" Eason briefed
through several defenders to give
ECU its first try (touchdown).
The point after was wide, and
the Deacs led 64. Wake Forest
then marched back down the
field, and on a broken play took
the ball in uncontested from the
30-meter line.
At this point ECU was down 12-
4. "Our pride was broken" said
team president Steve Kimm
"Wake was the first team to cross
into our endzonein fourand a half
games
However the ECU ruggers
would not let the deficit bring
them down. Midway through the
first half, ECU pulled it together
on a set up team "try"
Veteran Mike Brown set up the
score when he punted the ball
from the 50-meter line, ran down
field, and crushed the Wake For-
est defender, forcing him to cou eh
up the ball.
Wake's attempt to kick the ball
downfield turned to disaster
when ECU'S team captain "Mr.
Bullhead Hahn" blocked the kick
and pounced on it in the end zone
tor four more ECU points.
The kick-after was good, and
ECU had reduced the Deacon's
lead to 12-10.
Late in the half, following a
solid drive, ECU took the lead
when Philip Ritchie grabbed the
ball from a five-meter
scrumdown and dived over the
line (scrumdowns occur follow-
ing an infraction, i.e. a forward
pass.)
During scrumdowns, both
teams form two tightly-grouped
units of eight men who smash
together directly over the ball and
try to gain possesion bv walking
over the ball.
Ritchie's score gave ECU a 14-
12 lead at the end of the half.
The next forty minutes were
marked by ECUdomination that
destroyed Wake Forest, and
thrilled the 300 plus Pirate fans.
Rookie Parrish Nichols chalked
up the first points of the second
half when he took the ball in from
30 meters, building FCU's lead to
1H-12.
Next it was the veteran Bob
Dillahunt
tabbed
Fast Carolina's Ellis Dillahunt
has been chosen to participate in
the 50th annual Blue-Cray All
Star Came in Montgomery, Ala
on lv. 25.
Dillahunt, a senior free safety
on this year's 5-6 football team,
was chosen to participate in the
Hue-Gray Game, which each sea-
sons brings together top senior
from the south to battle seniors
trom the north, prior to last
Saturday's 38-34 Pirate loss at
Southern Mississippi.
"It is a great honor to be chosen
to play in the game Dilahunt
said. "To know that you're con-
sidered one of the top seniors in
the country is something very
special
"Don Tobeanie" Tobin, who
scored off a pass from Ritchie. Fi-
nally, Mike "Macho Man" Brown
scored his first try of the year
when he juked two Wake defend-
ers for a thirty-meter score.
Brown's point after was good,
making the final score 30-12, and
East Carolina an 18 point winner
over last year's state champions.

Imported Giant Rock Posters
From
EUROPE
On Sale At: Mendenhall Student Center
jy On: Tuesday. Wednesday. & Thursday
S
O,
$5 to $12
W
.
Every Tuesday-
College Night
from 8:00 to 11:00
$1.50 with college I.D.
.50$ skate rental
SPORTSWORT.n
104 E. Redbanks Rd.
756-6000
. INSTANT REPLAY
�One Hour Color Prints
�One Hour Color
Enlargements
�One Hour Wallets
�Video Transfer
�Slides and Black & White
�Film, Cameras, Frames
and Albums
�Passport and Visa Photos
�Studio Photography
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POSTAGE STAMPS!
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd
Open 24 Hours-Open Men. 7 a.m Cosed Sat. 11 p.m Open fun 7 L 1 P.m.
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOV 15 THRU NOV 21 1987 QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED

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Title
The East Carolinian, November 17, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 17, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.574
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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