The East Carolinian, November 12, 1987






INSIDE
Editorials�tmm
Entertainment�8
Sportsm12
Classifieds6
ENTERTAINMENT '�
An alien invades Earth, but it's nothing new, 'The
Hidden" reviewed see ENTERTAINMENT,
page 8.
SPORTS
This is it folks. The Pirates look to win last game of
the season and chalk up their first winning season
in four years � see SPORTS, page 12.
She tEaat (Earolintan
Serving the East Carolina utrtpus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 No. 22
Thursday, November 12,1987
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
AIDS information is available on campus
ByCHREiSrCHELl HMlth center involves coordi- some students feel slightly emba- The Student Health r�,iPrt�K vaeuenoss rn� .
By CHRIS MITCHELL
SUfl Unit-
Some ECU officials and student
leaders agree students do not util-
ize enough of the available AIDS
information they say exists cam-
pus wide.
But they agree the efforts oi the
ECU Student Health Center are
ul and could help those who
the health center involves coordi- some students feel slightly emba- The Student Health Center tests
n; tug programs focused on sexu- rassed and reluctant to discuss for HIV (the vfrus that causes
ally ransmmed diseases (STDs). AIDS, which has strong connec- AIDS) and counSs scents on
ns ll'f JTnma�CSprCrta" tlonsltho� and drug AIDS testing. While no known
�' . , , cases of A,�S are present on
But in spite of the difficulties,
student leaders say the
llH'
feel they don't know enough
about the deadly disease.
The health center works to
educate people in five main ways:
dissemination of information to
the mass media, a speakers bu-
reau tor campus groups, training
programs for student leaders and
services staffs, telephone infor-
mation and various AIDS re-
source materials isuch as pam-
phlets and videos).
Mary Elesha-Adams is one of
the people who will tell you that
information about AIDS is readily
available to ECU students. Much
of her job as health educator for
tions about STDs to residence
hall, campus clubs, sororities and
fraternities. Many of the pro-
grams center on AIDS, the fatal
STD that cripples the immune
system. Often the presentation
will include a videotape followed
by a chance for students to ask
questions.
"1 think the students out there
want to know all they can cer-
tainly at least how AIDS mav af-
fect them said the health educa-
tor.
Elesha-Adams says the ques-
tion and answer periods for these
sessions provide good insight
into the bewilderment that
plagues students about AIDS.
Firstly, the questions some-
times indicate a general feeling of
uncertainty and confusion. Sec-
ondly, Elesha-Adams believes
some student leaders say
AIDS education has helped.
Amanda Hodges, president of the
Panhellenic Council, said more of
the sororities "are better informed
and aware of the misconceptions
floating around Hodges insists
people are more careful with
whom they associate, that "more
students are wary of AIDS
Although the Inter-Fraternity
Council has not requested one of
the education programs on AIDS,
President Brook Stonesifer said
Elesha-Adams' work is outstand-
ing.
"People I know ha ven't actually
talked about it (AIDS) all that
much, but they are concerned and
more careful as a result Stone-
sifer said.
campus, Mary Elesha-Adams
cannot deny the likelihood AIDS
carriers may be present on cam-
pus.
'The odds are in favor that
some carriers (of AIDS) may be
here she said.
The guidelines set forth by the
Ad Hoc Advisory Committee on
Aids Education states that infor-
mation about test results is
disclosed to responsible univer-
sity officials only on a strictly
limited, need-to-know basis
However, ECU is legally obli-
gated to notify public health offi-
cials of all confirmed cases of
"active AIDS according to the
guidelines.
Elesha-Adams said such infor-
mation is not meant to be alarm-
ing but factual. Sensationalism,
Lecturer discusses meaning of Glasnost
By TIM HAMPTON
Sui Writer
A visiting political scientist
does not think Soviet leader
Gorbahcev's attempts of open-
ness will Loosen the compotiuve
relationship between the United
States and the Soviet Union.
of a conference' on the" Soviet
Union.
Roger Kanet, a political scientist Kanet said Gorbachev has ac-
from the University of Illinois at complished progressive changes
Urbana-Champaign, lecturing on within the Soviet governmental
L.SU.S.S.R. relations, spoke in system in onlv two years of office,
front of a crowd of sixty irBrewster But in Gorbachev's Closnost re-
Building Tuesday evening as part forms, Kaact said, the Soviet
leader has a ways to go to con-
vince the nation of their viability.
"It's going to take a Hercullian
(effort) to turn around the Soviet
Union Kanet said of
Gorbachev's reforms.
In diplomatic circles, the new
Soviet leadership has virtually
swept house, according to Kanet.
Kanet said 34 of the diplomatic
posts are held by new Soviet
ambassadors, which is a sign of a
new direction toward interven-
tion with other countries.
Kanet also said Gorbachev is
allowing scholars to enter the
Soviet government as respect is
growing for a learned approach to
directing authority. Primakov,
the director of the Chief Institute,
is one example of an academic
who was once suppressed and
censored by previous Soviet re-
-M Hmf ' I Hn Ji wM gimes and now holds an impor-
tant cabinet position, according to
Kanet.
"The Soviets' long term security
depends on the refurbishing of
their economy and technology
Kanet said.
In order to refurbish their econ-
omy, Kanet said the Soviets will
have to cut defense spending.
Kanet said the Soviet's conven-
tional forces for which they spend
$5-8 billion on Cuba alone will
have to be drastically reduced.
Other areas where the Soviets will
need to reduce conventional
Roger Kanet speaks to a crowd of 60 in Brewster Building as part of forCQs include Afghanistan, An-
a conference on the Soviet Union that was sponsored by the Political 8olia and Eastern Europe, Kanet
Science department (Todd Daniel � Photolab). said.
Chancellor reveals parking plan Tuesday
ECU News Bureau
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin
has proposed a plan to add 1,269
parking spaces on the ECU cam-
pus as a major step toward reliev-
ing a severe shortage of spaces.
Eakin's plan, disclosed Tues-
day to the Faculty Senate, envi-
sions six new surface parking lots
that would cost $396,000 and re-
quire a $25-a-year increases in
campus parking fees. The in-
crease would double the present
S25-a-year fee for students, fac-
ulty and staff.
cials said the university issues
approximately 10,000 parking
permits a year and maintains
about 6,000 parking spaces. Eakin
said part of the problem has been
"maldistribution" of available
parking space, plus the fact that
"we've never had the resources"
from parking fees and fines to do
more than maintenance and make
piecemeal additions.
Eakin said the university is
continuing to acquire property on
the edge of the main campus, be-
tween Ninth and 10th Street, for
but doesn't solve the problem he
said.
The plan to build additional
parking lots and expand another
has been discussed by the Finance
and Facilities committee of the
board of trustees. Eakin said "the
trustees are sympathetic
He plans to present the new
plan � which he called "a solu-
tion to the parking problem" for
the immediate future � to the
board of trustees Dec. 4 for ap-
proval.
At a 7 percent interest rate, the
It is time to solve the parking additional parking areas and that cost of the plan would be paid for
problem Eakin said. There are
other "more important" matters
needing attention, but none so
persistent and chronic as com-
plaints about parking on campus,
he said.
ECU traffic and security offi-
a small, landscaped parking lot
will be opened shortly on Fifth
Street near the entrance to main
campus.
These steps will afford only
limited relief and a broader plan
in needed, he said. "This is helpful
at $228,000 a year for five years,
Eakin said.
"This solution is going to cost
all of us he said. Parking fees
would be increased to $50 a year.
Eakin's plan would add two
See EAKIN, page 2
Kanet said the INF (Intermedi-
ate Nuclear Force) treaty ex-
pected to be signed in the next few
months by Gorbachev and Presi-
dent Reagan will not significantly
affect the superpower's defense
spending. Nuclear rmaments are
by far less expensive than conven-
tional forces as a means of defer-
ence, Kanet said.
The Soviets will also have to
keep external problems to a mini-
mum if the planned reforms are to
work, Kanet said. Also, Kanet
said, the USSR must stop antago-
nizing Western democracies in
their implementation of the new
programs.
Kanet said the Gorbachev plan
is not relying on a quick five-year
revamping of the entire Soviet
structure, but rather a slow proc-
ess of open ness to Western ideolo-
gies which could take 25 years.
Kanet's lecture was the last in a
four part scries on the Soviet
Union sponsorsed by the ECU
Political Science Department.
Kanet is the author of "Soviet
Foreign Policy in the 1980s" as
well as many other notable publi-
cations.
Dr. Spock will
speak at ECU
Dr. Benjamin Spock, acclaimed
pediatrician and best-selling au-
thor, will be the speaker at the
First Annual Adventures in
Health "Healthy Family Lec-
ture
Dr. Spock's presentation,
"Stresses Affecting Families and
Children will be held at 7:30
p.m. Tuesday in Hendrix Theater.
The lecture, which is free to the
public, is sponsored by the ECU
School of Medicine and Allied
Health Sciences, the Pitt County
Medical Society Auxiliary and
the Hilton Inn.
Dr. Spock will also be speaking
Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. in the Pitt
County Memorial Hospital Audi-
torium as part of the Dept. of
Medical Humanities "Perspec-
tive Series His lecture, "Raising
Children in a Nuclear Age is co-
sponsored by the local chapter of
the Physicians for Social Respon-
sibility and is free to the public.
With his first book, "Baby and
Child Care originally published
in 1943, Dr. Spock became the
child development guru for par-
ents of the Baby Boom generation.
The book has sold 32,000,000 cop-
ies and has been translated into
thirty-one languages.
According to Dr. Spock, his aim
See SPOCK, page 3
vagueness and reluctance all con
tribute to confusing the
uninformed, she said.
The media contributes to stu-
dents' confusion over AIDS is-
sues, Elesha-Adams said. Often
newspapers and news magazines
have balked at relaying specifics
of AIDS transmission, commonly
referred to as
mation can get it Stonesifer
said.
Elesha-Adams insists, "No
matter how much information we
can provide the information
does no good without the stu-
dents understanding it
The health educator also
stresses people are succeptible to
"exchange of body HIV through particular behav
fluids she said
Such exchanges include the in-
troduction of AIDS-contami-
nated blood or semen directly into
a healthy bloodstream. The'most
common and dangerous ex-
changcsofHIVincludcanal inter-
course and intraveneous drug
use.
The health center distributes
informative, factual brochures
about AIDS. The brochures sup-
plement presentations on AIDS,
assist health professors in class
and generally inform the reader of
high-risk behavior and precisely
how the virus is transmitted. One
particular brochure explicitly
details various sexual acts and
categorizes them as safe, risky or
dangerous. This document is
available only at the health center,
while others may be found in
Mendcnhall.
"Some students may find it too
explicit or embarassing we
provide the pamphlet at the Stu-
dent Health Center for those who
want them said Dr. Elmer
Meyer, vice chancellor for Stu-
dent Life.
Hodges agrees the brochure
should be at the health center
only. She says some people may
feel offended and slightly emba-
iors, not by being part of a high-
risk group. Further, the best be-
havior change for anyone con-
cerns communication.
"An important thing for stu-
dents to remember is knowing
your potential partner the 80s
have become a dilemma of phvsi-
ca! attraction versus a combined
physicalemotional attraction
she said.
Student Union president Lau-
reen Kirsch agrees. She feels the
average student has become more
aware of the virus.
"1 think many students are
changing their views reverting
back to traditional sexual norms
Most important Mary Elesha-
Adams emphasizes the need for
students to be informed and use
the information on AIDS.
"AIDS is pretty scary for all of
us these days, but not being in-
formed is a lot scarier she said.
The Ad Hoc Advisory Commit-
tee on AIDS Education headed by
Dr. Harry Adams has been re-
sponsible for determining ECU
guidelines pertaining to AIDS.
University guidelines dictates
neither students nor employees
who may become infected with
human immunodeficiency viru
IIV) may be be excluded form
rassed at the nature of the bro- enrollment or employment
chure.
But along with Elesha-Adams
and Stonsiefer, SGA President
Scott Thomas believes a brochure
should be available for those who
don't to the health center.
"Many students don't go the the
health center at Mendcnhall the
brochures can get more exposure
where people who need the infor-
Elesha-Adams, who has
worked with the committee, says
the group makes recommenda-
tions based on legal issues, educa-
tional needs and occupational
health issues. One aspect of ECU
guidelines directs any who have
reason to believe they might be
infected to seek assistance from
the student health services.
Dr. Benjamin Spock
As the guru for parents of the Baby Boom, Dr. Benjamin Spock's first
book, "Baby and Child Care sold 32 million copies and was pub-
lished in 31 languages. Dr. Spock will speak at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday in
the Pitt County Memorial Hospital Auditorium and at 7:30 p.m. in
Hendrix Theater; both lectures are free and open to the public
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I





T) IE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 12. 1987

-
V
Professors to promote geography next week
By G. A. THREEWITTS
K'l. News Bureau
Geography Awareness Week, a
national campaign to focus public
attention on the study of geogra-
phy, will be observed Nov. 15-21
and will include events at ECU
and throughout the state.
"We want to call attention to the
fact that geography, over the
years, has been put on the back
burner said Dr. Douglas C.
Wilms, geography professor at
ECU and coordinator of the N.C.
Geographic Alliance.
"We want to get it back into the
public school curriculum he
said.
To call attention to geography
Wilms said that public schools
and colleges are sponsoring spe-
cial programs during the week.
Geography faculty and students
from ECU will present about 30
programs on geography in the
public schools in the region. There
will also be an open house at the
ECU geography department
Wednesday.
On Nov. 19, there will be a spe-
cial presentation by Dr. James
Johnson, a geography professor at
UCLA, at 7:30 p.m. in room 102 of
the Brewster Building. Johnson, a
native of Pitt County, will discuss
"The Black Metropolitan Migra-
tion Turnaround
a.m. Awards will be given to stu-
dents with the best geography
posters.
Several schools across the state
will lauch balloons with return
postcards attached. Return of the
cards will enable the students to
trace wind currents.
Legislation proclaiming Geog-
raphy Awareness Week was ap-
Eroved last July in a Joint U.S.
louse and Senate resolution.
Governor James Martin issued a
proclamation last week.
The Congressional Resolution
American college freshmen could
not locate Vietnam on a world
map. And it said that 20 percent of
American teachers currently
teaching geography have taken
no classes in the subject.
Governor Martin's proclama-
tion said, "Knowledge of geogra-
phy is important because it helps
us to understand people, their
Wilms. "We're training students
to compete with Japan in the
world market and 60 percent of
the students don't even konw
where Japan is he said.
Wilms said that Americans are
considered the most geographi-
cally illiterate of all the residents
of the industrialized world.
The National Geographic Soci-
expressed concern that 20 percent
On Nov. 20, Professor Palmyra of American elementary school has virtually disappeared from
Leahy of ECU will coordinate an students placed the location of the the curricla of American schools.
awards program at Aycock Jr. United States, on a world map, in "We're in bad shape when it
High School in Greenville at 11 Brazil. It said that 95 percent of comes to geography said
enviroment and the resources ety is the prime sponsor behind
that are available to them. Geog- the efforts to promote the study of
raphy is one of the keys to under- geography. The society is spon-
standing Earth and its problems
Both documents express con-
cern that traditional geography
soring a Geographic Alliance
Network in 20 states. North Caro-
lina recently appropriated
$50,000 to support the network
which will be used for a series of
institutes and training programs
for teachers of geography.
While the campaign organizers
say that their goal is to get geogra-
phy back into the public schools
their message to the American
public is, "Without geography
you're nowhere
Eakin details parking plan
Continued from page 1
surface parking lots for freshman
vehicles in the Minges Coliseum
areas. One would provide 245
spaces at a cost of $170,000 and a
second, north of the coliseum on
Charles Street, would provide606
spaces at a cost of $473,000.
The university will lose a fresh-
nun parking lot containing 150
spaces located on 14th Street
south of Rose High School. Tins
lot is on property owned by the
high school which needs it for its
own student parking, Eakin said.
A lot east of College Hill Drive
near its intersection with 10th
Street would be expanded from
288 to 388 spaces at a cost of
$98,000. A "controversial" part of
the plan, he said, involves use of
green space and a band practice
area west of College Hill Drive for
a $195,000 parking lot for 318
spaces.
Eakin said aesthetics would be
considered and the areas land-
sea pod. "The beauty would be
Ereserved as much as possible
esaid.
The lot east of College Hill
Drive has been proposed for a
university parking deck
deck "would be
Such a
very expensive
but remains a possibility for the
future, the Chancellor said.
Headache a symptom
When is a headache considered
serious?
A headache is a symptom, not a
disease. It usually comes without
warning signs or symptoms. A
headache affects both sides of the
head, or the back of the head and
neck, or a band-like area around
the head.
Health Column
By MARY ELESHA-ADAMS
ECU Student Health Center
Tain or discomfort mav last for
hours, days, weeks, or even
months. Pain usually reaches
peak intensity in 2-4 hours. Nau-
sea, fatigue, dizziness, insomnia,
"poor concentration, diarrhea, and
loss of appetite may accompany
headaches.
Causes or triggering actions of
headaches may include:
�Eve strain
�Medicines (birth control pills)
�Alcohol, tobacco, andor caf-
feine use
�Hunger
�Exhaustion
�Menstruation
�Stress, frustration, tension
�Many illnesses and infections
(sinusitis, flu, meningitis, high
blood pressure)
Some ways to avoid head-
aches:
(a)Make changes in your life
style, for example decrease or
stop smoking
(b)Don't skip meals
(c)Rest your eyes periodically
while reading, using a computer
or doing other work with your
eyes
(d)Use measures to reduce
stress such as exercise, hobbies
and naps
(e)Take aspirin or a non-aspirin
medication
Inform your health care, pro-
vider immediately if during your
headache you have:
(DA high fever
(2)Double or blurred vision
(3)A nosebleed
(4)Local pain in the eye, ear or
elsewhere
(5)Any type of numbness, pa-
ralysis, weakness, or a change in
your speech
(6)A change or increase in pain
or your symptom
In addition, see your health care
provider i f your current headache
treatment is ineffective.
Our three-year and
two-year scholarships won't
make college easier.
Just easier to pay for.
r. en if you didn't start college on a sch Jarship, it
could finish on one. Army ROTC Scholarships
ay for full tuition and allowances tor educational
ees and textbooks. Along with up to 51.01 Id
a vear. Get all the facts.
P
K
For More Info: Contact
Capt. Mitchell at 757-6967
ARM RESERXtOia.RS TRAIN I
ML.
a iff
on
East Carolina's
Finest Tea
East Carolina
Tea Party
�Every Friday
at 4:00 p.m.
�Free Pizza 6-7 p.ni:
�Free Mason Jar
High Energy Music by
Big Al till 9:00 p.m.
Pat Cray Band 'till 1:00 a.m.
Come Early and Beat the Cover -
Must be 21 to enter
Sheraton Greenville t;
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
Si? �at (Carolinian
Serving t)w East Carolina campus community since 1925.
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo
Shari Clemens Pete Fernald
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Racial ten
I

:
:
(CPS) � Racial tensions on
many American campuses
to have escalated again in re
weeks, but some observers think
the incidents that have caused the
tensions are less "overt" and vio-
lent than the headline grabbing
attacks of the 1986-87 school)
Minority students at bmp-
kins-Cortland Community Col-
lege and the universities of Illinois
and Indiana, among other p!
have filed complaints t r
� cnsions since Septembi r
The worst incident . �
the University of Penns
where 5 black students a
physically attacked 2 ��
dents the first week in�
Campus leaders nev
say the nature of most o! I
confrontations has changed since
last year, when often-physical
tensions erupted at (
Duke, The Citadel, Texas
rado, Massachusetts and I i
campuses
Minority student - i
schools, though, haw
in defense, thrcatei
tion if school official
swiftly to discipline racist bi
ior.
"If you engage in racist acti.
ties warned Tanaquil Jones I
the Concerned Black Student- �
Columbia, "you'regonna ha.
deal with the justice of the
streets
"The degTee to which things u
improving relates to the dii I
efforts by blacks and other Third
World students and their allu
smash racism said Uni
Illinois-Chicago student
Iosbaker, a member of �
gressive Student Network PSN
a leftist national polii up.
"Racists, whitechauvir ar I
Dr. Spock
to speak
Continued from page 1
in writing the book was to "cover
thecmohonal as well as the physi-
cal aspect of child care m a tone
which whould support rather
than scold parents With the
early 1980s revision of the book,
Dr. Spock has gained renewed
popularity among today's voung
paiciiis. bi. Spock Jas written or
collaborated on nine other books
and has had a monthly column in
Rcdbook Magazine since 1963
Dr. Spock has served on the
facultystaff of Camell Medical
Hospital, New York Hospital, the
Mayo Clinic, the Rochester Child
Health Institute, the Universil
Pittsburg School of Medicine, and
Western Reserve University. His
special professional interest has
always been the psychological
health of children and child de-
velopment. He has done resi-
dency in pediatrics and psychia-
try.
In the sixties Dr. Spock became
a controversial figure within the
medical establishment because of
his stance on the Viet Nam War.
He joined the National Commit-
tee for a Sane Nuclear Policy in
1962 and became the co-chairper-
son and spokesperson for the
peace movement.
"I thought we needed a test ban
treaty to protect children form the
radiation of fallout Dr. Spock
explains. During the sixties he
spoke against the war at over S00
university and colleges at the
invitiation oi undergraduates.
Adventures in Health, a re-
gional health sciences teaching
and exhibit center to be located in
Greenville, is coordinating the
event as part of its Community
Health Education Program.
Dr. Spock, 84, continues to
make presentations around the
country on topics relating to child
development and nuclear disar-
mament. As in this case. Dr. Spock
often donates his honorarium
back to worthy non-profit organi-
zations.
Student booted for
running sex service
CHICAGO, III. (CPS) � A part-
time DePaul University student
last week confessed to running a
sex service out of her dorm room
at the Catholic college.
Joyce Owens, 22, was sentenced
to 2 years' probation and a SI .000
fine Oct. 28 for using her phone at
McCabe Hall to link customers
with prostitutes working for her
"Exposure Unlimited" operation
DePaul had suspended Owens
in June, soon after police arrested
ber on prostitution charges
"Owens police Set lack
Halpin said, "was strictlv a mid-
dleman between the prostitutes
and the customers
� � ed to
Rat ismon ma
"been dn ven
maintaind Pat�
of the Universil
chapter
"But I don't t
has changed Si
rtness
no t :
l e

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next week
�ing students soring a Geographic Alliance
i in the Network in 20states.NorthCam-
erccnt oi lina recently appropriated
even konvs $50,000 to support the network
m hich will be used for a series of
imcricans arc institutes and training programs
ographi- (or teachers of geography.
the r� iidents While the campaign organizers
I world sa that their goal is to get geogra-
. Soci ph back into the public schools
onsor behind their message to the American
lyol public is, Without geography
pon iMi re nowhere
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 12,1987 3
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James Russo
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,
Racial tensions present, but not like before
(CPS) Racial tensions on
many American campuses seem
to have escalated again in recent
weeks, but some observers think
the incidents that have caused the
tensions are less "overt" and vio-
lent than the headline-grabbing
attacks of the 1986-87 school year.
Minority students at Tomp-
kins-Cortland Community Col-
lege and the universities of Illinois
and Indiana, among other places,
have filed complaints of racial
tensions since September.
The worst incident occurcd at
the University of Pennsylvania,
where 5 black students allegedly
physically attacked 2 Asian stu-
dents the first week in October.
Campus leaders nevertheless
say the nature of most of the racial
confrontations has changed since
last year, when often-physical
tensions erupted at Columbia,
Duke, The Citadel, Texas, Colo-
rado, Massachusetts and other
campuses.
Minority students at some
schools, though, have organized
in defense, threatening retribu-
tion if school officials don't move
swiftly to discipline racist behav-
ior.
"If you engage in racist activi-
ties warned Tanaquil Jones of
the Concerned Black Students of
Columbia, "you'regonna have to
deal with the justice of the
streets
'The degree to which things are
improving relates to the direct
efforts by blacks and other Third
World students and their allies to
smash racism said University of
Illinois-Chicago student Joe
Iosbaker, a member of the Pro-
gressive Student Network (PS),
a leftist national political group.
"Racists, white chauvinists and
Dr. Spock
to speak
Continued from page 1
in writing the book was to "cover
the emotional as well as the physi-
cal aspect of child care in a tone
which whould support rather
than scold parents With the
early 1980s revision of the book,
, Dr. Spock has gained renewed
popularity among todav's young
puicius. Di. Spock. )vas written or
collaborated on nine other books
and has had a monthly column in
Redbook Magazine since 1963.
Dr. Spock has served on the
facultystaff of Camell Medical
Hospital, New York Hospital, the
Mayo Clinic, the Rochester Child
Health Institute, the University of
Fittsburg School of Medicine, and
Western Reserve University. His
special professional interest has
always been the psychological
health of children and child de-
velopment. He has done resi-
dency in pediatrics and psychia-
try.
In the sixties Dr. Spock became
a controversial figure within the
medical establishment because of
his stance on the Viet Nam War.
He joined the National Commit-
tee for a Sane Nuclear Policy in
1962 and became the co-chairper-
son and spokesperson for the
peace movement.
"I thought we needed a test ban
treaty to protect children form the
radiation of fallout Dr. Spock
explains. During the sixties he
spoke against the war at over 800
university and colleges at the
inviriation of undergraduates.
Adventures in Health, a re-
gional health sciences teaching
and exhibit center to be located in
Greenville, is coordinating the
event as part of its Community
Health Education Program.
Dr. Spock, 84, continues to
make presentations around the
country on topics relating to child
development and nuclear disar-
mament. As in this case, Dr. Spock
often donates his honorarium
back to worthy non-profit organi-
zations.
Student booted for
running sex service
CHICAGO, 111. (CPS) � A part-
time DePaul University student
last week confessed to running a
sex service out of her dorm room
at the Catholic college.
Joyce Owens, 22, was sentenced
to 2 years' probation and a $1,000
fine Oct. 28 for using her phone at
McCabe Hall to link customers
with prostitutes working for her
"Exposure Unlimited" operation.
DePaul had suspended Owens
in June, soon after police arrested
her on prostitution charges.
"Owens police Sgt. Jack
Halpin said, "was strictly a mid-
dleman between the prostitutes
and the customers
white supremacists have been
forced to watch themselves
Racism on many campuses has
"been driven undrground
maintained Pat Kearns,a member
of the University of Iowa's PSN
chapter.
"But I don't think the climate
has changed said Kearns. "The
overtness may have. But there's
no change in attitude
"People are now aware of overt
incidents noted Willie Terry, a
City University of New York
Medgar Evcrs College student.
"But subtle racism still exists. It's
a cycle. It goes underground, then
comes up
"Overt racism is down added
David Moore, president of the
University of Massachussetts
Black Student Union. "It's just
shifted to a more superficial
level
For example, at Indiana Univer-
sity, the Muslim Student Associa-
tion says a fraternity party held
Sept. 26 degraded Arab and Mos-
lim culture and beliefs. The Phi
Kappa Psi "Arabian Knights"
dance perpetuated insulting
stereotypes, the group says.
A brochure on long-distance
love affairs published at the Uni-
versity of Illinois raised student
ire earlier this fall by featuring a
section of a map with "Nigger
Mountain" � a real place in
Montana � on it. The university
apologized.
Not all this semester's incidents
have been as subtle. Racial slurs
were written on a bathroom mir-
ror and feces-filled toilets were
clogged Oct. 22 at the University
of Michigan. The custodian re-
sponsible for cleaning the
restroom �- the only black who
works in the building � charged
her supervisor did it to punish her
for union activities.
Michigan officials are investi-
gating the incident.
On Nov. 1, University of Cali-
fornia at Berkeley black students
complained someone had carved
Ku Klux Klan initials in a
classmate's dorm door and that
white students had chased an-
other black student from a recent
football game.
And at New York's Tompkins-
Cortland Community College, 36
Central American exchange stu-
dents were transferred en masse
after they were physically and
verbally harrassed when 2 foreign
students were charged with sex-
ual assault.
"Reapanism has taken its toll
said Sibby Burpee, a University of
Colorado student leader. "He's
fostered ignorance of people of
color. His attitudes have made
racism more allowable
"Reagan's disregard of people
of color breeds this Moore as-
serted. "The administration
treated Haitian refugees like
cattle, putting them in concentra-
tion camps. The policy towards
South Africa said that black
people are expendable. This lends
a tolerance to racism
Last year at Michigan � long
seen as a tolerant campus � black
students were threatened by an
'inonymous note slipped under a
door that declared an open-hunt-
ing season on blacks, and a stu-
dent disc jockey raised racial ten-
sions by cracking anti-black jokes
on a radio program.
In response, anti-racist activists
at Michigan formed the United
Coalition Against Racism
(UCAR) to combat racism on the
Ann Arbor campus. "It was more
than one incident said Marty
Ellington, a Michigan medical
student and member of UCAR.
"There were a series of attacks,
altercations, and name-calling
incidents. Black people are as-
saulted as a whole in a very com-
pact time period
"It was too much at once said
Ellington. "People responded.
Over time, blacks may have be-
come de-sensititized to racism,
but with the increased tension,
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we're no longer willing to let it
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The slurs and insensitivitics, in
fact, in recent months have helped
swell the membership of minority
student groups, to which students
turn in defense.
Once weakened by apathy,
black student unions at predomi-
nantly white campuses have
gained new members and new
energy, organizers reported.
Their efforts, moreover, are fit-
fully national. In August, UCAR
and the Concerned Black Stu-
dents of Columbia (CBSC) spon-
sored a national conference, at-
tended by represen tatives from 18
colleges, to build an active, ag-
gressive anti-racist student move-
ment.
"We put students on notice
CBSC's Jones said.
Black students, she said, would
no longer tolerate incidents like
the March, 1987, attack by white
Columbia football players on a
group of black students.
Asian students at the Univer-
sity of Califomia-Davis formed
the Asian Pacific Coalition to
confront racism at the school,
promote understanding of Chi-
nese, Japanese, Filipino, Vietnam-
ese and Korean cultures, and as-
sist Asian students in an often
hostile and confusing cnviron-
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' A
�i?� iEaat QIaroIiman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, g�,
Clay Deanhardt, mji
Andy Lewis,��4rw iamtcpi mrr
Tr �, JAMES KJ. MCKEE, n.r,fitfr0f,wWTiis.�.
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Si .ELTON BR ANT, ,w�. Joi ,N W. Medun � J
Debbie Stevens, s
NOVEMBER 12, 1987
Opinion
Page 4
fWAFRWWJfW
�owe KNOWS
AMV7HW6 ABOUT
VOO,
AIDS
Students should know more
It is important that students be- control explicitness, and by space to
COwf�re aWai� �f AIDS- contr�l the deP story can be
AIDS is a proven killer and it is taken to.
spreading to wider segments oi our Pamphlets offered by the Health
population. We hear reports again Service, though, are' necessarily
and again that the disease could be explicit and informative. Every stu-
the next big epidemic, wiping out dent who decides to engage in sex-
hordes of people regardless of age, ual activities of any kind should
race, sex or sexual preference. read this important literature first
tor that reason, it is important that Today's buzzword is "Safe Sex "
the public become as knowledgable To most people that means using a
as possible about ways to prevent condom, but there is more to it Stu-
tne spread of AIDS, and about ways dents should be sure they undor-
to defend against contracting the stand what practices, sexual and
X1ll?S � , , . . otherwise, put them at a risk for
That is why this is AIDS Aware- getting AIDS.
ness Week in XorthCarolina.lt is an " Remember, the only one respon-
attempt to make citizens alert to the sible for your getting AIDS is you.
tacts about ADS. Discretion, it has been said, is the
We are lucky at ECU to have a better part oi valor. Today it is the
available better part of staying alive.
wwRemwt
VOIP Of AVIV RIAL
50 W COUCP
flTH6R MOW
I AWNS -v
V
kiiORBEA
RGAGAAi
SUPRfMg
COURT
dosnee,
"iavrvrrezfriM6 sr.
Student responds to SGA denial
A fK, � -J
Rec. facility
at our fingertips. The Student
Health Service provides pamphlets
Get all the information on AIDS
and counseling tor students. They you can get, but more importantly
also oiler private, discretionary and pay attention to it. Remember the
very confidential testing for stu- next time you face the decision of
dents who teel the need to take the whether or not to have sex, let there
�tV . . , be a conscious decision whether or
I he media is limited in its ability to not to use a condom
report on the disease. We are bound Casual sex without caution could
by rules of decency and taste to be a fatal kiss.
Drug use no big deal
So, Reagan's new Supreme Court nomi- cerning the mining of a nation's harbors
nee used to smoke a little reefer from time to that America is supposedly not at war with,
time. It seems he is not the only political like Nicaragua, but those laws that they
hopeful that has smoked pot. have broken in their personal lives.
As we have seen in the news recentlv.
presidential eanidates Bruce Babbitt and Did Ron and Nancy drink alcohol during
Albert Gore have admitted to indulging in prohibition or even before they were of a
this simple pleasure. Of course, they are legal drinking age, or mavbe'exceed the
now apoligizing to no end for it and claim- speed limit? It should be pointed out that in
ing they will never do it again. My question some states such as Reagan's home state oi
is, what is all the fuss over? Rumours have California the use of marijuana is treated
it that John F. Kennedy took a couple rides much like a simple traffic violation. So, are
on that acid powered celestial steamboat to we to check presidential candidates' d'riv-
Hades, but yet he was not compelled to ing records before we vote?
share this with the nation. The personal activities of the eanidates I
However the present administration think we need to deal with rather than
appears to be much more up-front about former adulterous behavior, drug use, and
this topic. Reagan himself has peed in a cup term paper plagerizing is whether or not
to prove his purity. However, the "Just Say they are going to step into mv personal life
No" campaign is just sheer propoganda and tell me what to do. I am not too happy
and hopefully a passing fad. with the snooping noses in the present
At one time, smoking pot was the "come administration. The present conservative
on man, everyone does it" kind of thing, but element has brought us record labeling,
it has now become nearly sedition. Drugs pornography censorship, anti-abortion
are not "good" for America because they sentiment, a national drinking age set at 21
will emerseour youth intoa counterculture and, of course, a dramatic risein mandatory
that will make them unproductive, liberal drug testing. With all of that firmly under
and, God forbid, curious about our national their belt, it certainly seems natural they
foreign policy. would point their sanctimonious finger and
Although it is funny how drugs are say, "You smoked dope
"good" for America when they are sold by
Campus Spectrum
by
Steve Sommers
the C.I.A. in order to keep those commie
killing Contras in bullets and guns. While
litigation is pending, reports are that evi-
dence is accumulating tving together the
Contras, the C.I.A George Bush and, oh,
about a ton of cocaine smuggled into the
United States every week. But, that is get- Imagine for a minute that Babbitt and
ting off the subject of why previous drug Gore lose the nomination because cannabis
use should not be an issue when consider- consumption controversy ruins their name
ing who should be America's leaders. and a precendent is set. So, anyone who
What permanent changes occur after ever illegally used drugs would not be able
someone has smoked grass that alters their to obtain public office. Who is going to be
leadership ability? Let's see. Hmmm. Well, lefttorun?Itcanbeassumcdthatourfuture
ahh no that won't work. No, wait a minute, leaders (i.e. present students) who drink
I get it. If someone has smoked pot then that today do not take the age restriction into
person has broken the law. Therefore he or any real consideration when they choose if
she is a criminal and dangerous to the they are going to drink or perhaps not to
public's interest. But, this is assuming the drink. Are these people shamless crimi-
public's interest and the law are the same nals? Are Albert Gore and Bruce Babbitt
tmng- shamless criminals? I do not know. But, I
Here at ECU, according to The East Caro- would like to think that the American
hnian, there are a greater number of stu- people will look past any trivial finger
dents who smoke pot than students who pointing and look at the ideas thacanidates
smoke cigarettes. I wonder if Ron and have to offer. We can start now by not
Nancyhaveeverbrokenalaw.Iwillnottalk rebutting this editorial,
about all of the international laws that they (Steve Sommers is a junior and a political
have busted wide open, such as those con- science major.)
To the editor
Monday evening I had the distinct
displeasure of representing the stu-
dents group turkey at an SGA
Thanksgiving dinner. A bill came
before SGA from the Visual Arts Fo-
rum (the umbrella group which gov-
erns all School of Art student groups)
concerning the construction of a salt
kiln for the Ceramics Guild. The ap-
propriations committee shot VAF
down and SGA ate us for dinner.
Our request was simple one: VAF
was asking for a transfer of funds
from one line item to another � not
additional funding, mind you �
simply permission to spend funds
already allocated to us in a manner
which would benefit the students
represented within VAF more com-
pletely than what had been set down
by SGA in its annual appropriations
committee meeting last spring.
I went into the appropriations
committee meeting feeling fairly
good about what I was attempting to
do for VAF, then suddenly found
myself stewing in a broth thick with
accusation and objecton. The un-
founded accusation tossed my wav
contained remarks insinuating that
the VAF was attempting to spend
money in ways that SGA deemed ille-
gal, that we were attempting to pull
the proverbial wool over SGA eyes in
other ways, and that we were deny-
ing groups within VAF funding in
irder to build this kiln. I was shocked
and amazed at the obvious distrust
and dislike displayed toward the
VAF by SGA.
The main objection to our line item
trasfer, and the one that killed us, is
that SGA felt that it is the Ceramics
departments responsbility to fend
this endevor. What very few repre-
sentatives were willing to listen to is
that the building of this kiln - a project
undertaken wholely by the Ceramics
Guild - is being funded in largely by
the department through budget and
donations, even though the school is
not required to fund this project.
The Guild wants this kiln because it
offers students within the group and
the school as a whole a broader, more
complete education.
The appropriations committe
voted unanimously against this bill,
however it was called for discussion
before SGA and I went into debate
with assorted representatives con-
cerning the point of departmental
responsibility. I agree that it is a de-
partments responsibility to fund
equipment for its majors � however,
this kiln is not required for complet-
ing a degree in ceramics. This kiln
represents the high level of enthusi-
asm for a selcted major that few de-
partments can boast. These students
have raised three thousand dollars
through assorted fundraisers and
donations to construct this kiln. They
are donating their time and strength
to this project. All that the Visual Arts
Forum is asking is permission to
grant the Ceramics Guild the remain-
ing $1244 to complete the project. This
money has already been appropri-
ated to VAF, and I am stunned that
SGA will not permit us to spend it on
an educational project, while approv-
ing thousands of dollars every
semester to social organizations and
sports clubs.
Has SGA forgotten that ECU is a
university whose prime goal should
be education? Does SGA have the
right to squelch student enthusiasm
for such a beneficial educatioanl proj-
ect? Apparently it does. The bill failed
almost unanimously on the floor of
the SGA. It is my opinion that these
policies need immediate review, as
well as considerable revision.
Constance H. Jones
President,
Visual Arts Forum
Reader complains
To the editor:
I have been a faithful reader of The
East Carolinian for four years and I'll
have to tell you I am very disturbed
that the column, "From the Not so
Right" is not running anymore. I truly
believe that this column not only was
the best column in features, but the
best column in the whole paper.
My question to you is why? Why do
you have to take away good writing
and self expression in a school news-
paper. It's not like The East Carolin-
ian is what America turns to for the
most accurate news. The East Caro-
linian will never be compared to the
New York Times or the The Washing-
ton Post so my advice to you is to ease
up a little.
The students of this campus are
quite the opposite from boring. We
want a paper that has good humor as
well as news and sports. I'm sorrv but
without, "From the Not so Right
I he East Carolinian is bonng. Please
do something to remedy the problem.
I'at.MolIoydoesagoodjobandisvery
tunny. We want to hear more of what
the boy has to say.
Gordon Williams
Senior
Business Ed.
Work on i&,
To the editor:
In response to Ed Hathawav on
November 10th.
Granted, the parking problem on
the ECU campus is an issue which
deserves great attention. The univer-
sity parking and traffic committee is
working deligently to find a solution
to that issue. But, would not you
concur that to raise the "quality of
life" on the ECU campus we must
work on several issues at the same
time. If a student was to take one class
per semester, it would take years to
accomplish hisher goal of gradu-
ation. The same is true for a university
to accomplish its goal for excellence.
ECU has been one of the fastest
growing universities in North Caro-
lina. To meet the needs of the present
and future student body, we must
begin now to plan for the future. This
includes parking, housing, curricu-
lum, as well as a recreation facility.
The key to a successful future ECU is
a responsible plan for the future to-
day.
SGA president Scott Thomas has
recognized the need for efficient long-
range planning by appointing a stu-
dent recreation center committee
composed several campus leaders.
This committee will make plans for
future development of a recreation
facility.
I would like to encourage every one
to support the recreation facility and
to ensure ECU as an attracitve institu-
tion for scholarship.
Anthony D. Porcelli
Senior
Political Science
To the editor
I sympathize with Ed Hal
about the need for impn
facilities at ECU, howev �
think that it should be a i
a new recreational fa �.
should beconsideredm �
then the other As s
versify, we expect the ui
fulfill certain obligal :
the enrollment at E
eted over recent years, tl
will soon have to irr
their extra income to rr I
needs.
1 would like to exj
recreational facility is a l
the students. 1 irsl ol all, mam i
hold the belief that tota
ness requires a certain d
physical fitness to mail
equilibrium. It has been ; rovei I
physical activity is beneficial in n
merous ways, one i I
creased mental stability (so
1000). As students attempt
crease our knowledge, we ma
partake in physical activity U
other reasons.
Memorial Gvm was constfui j
1931 when the student body w.
3,000 and there were ar
ultv and sj ;�� �
ECU has a stud neai
15,000 mark
and staff members Mem
covers about 51,000 square I �
originally had jh intend d -
approximately 3,250 people 11
would suggest that we need a re
tional facility of 273 - squai
properly provide for a
over 17,000. The request . s
the new building is 225 �
feet.
Another point is that E(
the only schools who hasr tr
added a new facility b
for its growth. UNGC11.1 V' � S
Central,NCState, WCUand
chian all have new facilities
belittle ECU's rec. facility, tho
have approximately the same ei
ment levels.
Further, it would not be negfcc
by the students. Currently, 49 pera r I
of the males and 30 percent of tl
females enrolled at ECU are invoh i
in intramural activities. These per-
centages don't include our athletes
and those who work out individually
That calculates to over 10,000 people
who use the facilities, which wen
built to accomodate 3,250 people.
Part of our student fees go toward
intramural facilities. Unfortunately
many students are having to join local
Greenville health clubs, which are
relatively expensive for college stu-
dents, and pay an activity fee because
wedonot have theadequatefacilities
I encourage students to look at
what the university is providing us
for the fees we pay. If one feels that we
arc not receiving sufficient funding in
certain areas, heshe should make
inquiries as to why the facilitiespro
grams are inadequate. If the need is
basic enough, like parking and rec-
reational facilities, and it's universal
to the academic community, some-
thing can be done. Currently, SGA
Prcs. Scott Thomas has formed a spe-
cial committee addressing the isssue
of the new recreation facility and
steps are being taken to improve the
situation.
Tonya Batizy
Senior
English
Campus Forum
ikmi i v m i�im�
"
Faculty Senate
votes to support
academic freedom
MM
Sm
�a s�l
The ECU Faculty Senate voted
Tuesday to support the position
taken on academic freedom and
shared governance taken by the
faculty of Southeastern Baptist
Theological Seminary
It adopted unanimously a res.
lution stating support of the ECU
faculty and directed ECU dele-
gates to present the resolution I
the Faculty Assembly ot the I ru
versity of North Carolina system
onDec.4.TheECUresolutioi
be sent to the faeultv of the semi-
nary.
The faeultv of S
Baptist The,
Wake Forest, (
odds with the truste
seminary. The spona
resolution, Dr Lawei
Hough of the polil
faculty, said that "in . �
vetopments at Southeastern
tist Theological Semii
seemed proper thai i
support
Hough's resolul
the ECU faeultv
tradition of shared g
the university and acaden
dom in the classroom and in I
research endeavors and
continually been opposed I
criminatory practices (and tl
for continued viability the �
roment for higher educal
North Carolina requires a
openness of inquiry and colic
ltv
Oakley joins
ECU Medical
School staff
Han
� �
ICL' Nfwi Bcrrj�
Dr. Stanley P. Oakley has
the faculty at the ECU Scha
Medicine as assistant professor of
psychiatric medicine.
The Charlotte native was s, � �
registrar for the psychogeriati
team and a forensic psychiatric
team at HUlcrest Hospital in Ade-
laide, South Australia before as
suming his faculty appointment
at ECU
He received his medical degree tj vorabfe I
from the ECU School of Medicine
and his undergraduate d.
from the University ot N
Carolina at Chapel Hill. He com-
pleted an internship and resi-
dency in psychiatric medicine at
Pitt County Memorial Hospital
While in residency training he
was named as an acting chief
dent and was a senior psj
unit inpatient resident.
He is a member ot the American spi
Medical Association, the Amen- a p
can Psychiatric Association, the
NC Medical Society and the N C v ei
Psvchiatnc Association. S3
I
J
Links between diet and
to be discussed tonwh
ICL ewi Bureau
Possible links between diet and
cancer will be the topic of a free
public lecture at 8 p.m Nov. 12 at
ECU'S Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter.
Dr. David kntchevsky, associ-
ate director oi Wistar Institute oi
Anatomy Biology in Philadel-
phia, will be the guest speaker for
the talk co-sponsored by the ECU
School of Medicine, the National
Dairv Council and the ECU chap-
ter oi Sigma Xi, an honorary soci-
ety of scientific researchers.
Kntchevsky, a participant in
the National Dairy Council's vis-
iting faculty program, will pres-
ent an informative discussion of
the role oi nutrition in cancer
prevention. For many years, the
eminent scientist has studied the
relationship between cancer and
nutrition in addition to other re-
search involving lipid biochemis-
try, atherosclerosis and the rela-
tionship between nutrition and
J





ur
ii ��fc
mwmwnun
VJOlPOPAWRCAC l
tf
imiORK A
RSAOAAJ
SUPRfMfi
COURT
JUSTICE,
SG A denial
Rec. facility
is
� latnawa)
er 1 do not
riority over
ity. Neither
v important
I i
mam pi
' tal mental nt-
certain degree oi
to maintain bodily
as been proven that
is beneficial in nu-
ne or which is in-
see Health
ittempting to in-
( dge, we may opt to
:al activity for tins or
Mi'inon
people. Ihat
need a recrea-
j square feet to
r a
c toi
luare
: nt is thai E I is one of
- v. I o has not recently
ity to compensate
CH,I NC-G,NC
ties which
. . though we
the same enroll-
n t Ix1 neglected
irr ntl. 49percent
nt of the
I at E ti involved
iral activities. Those per-
include our athletes
dividually.
people
That calculates to ove
his
l C l-v
onus has
� ition
ievery one
ftbiity and
:veinstitu-
Porcelli
Senior
tal Science
H
huh were
people.
toward
rtunately,
tudenl ire having ti ji m local
health which are
For ege stu
- itj fei because
i (equate facilities.
t l.Hik at
ling us
ivepay If one feels that we
' � nt funding in
he should make
why the facilitiespro-
ire inadequate. If the need is
h, like parking and ree-
il facilities, and it's universal
to the academic community, some-
thing can be done. Currently, SGA
Pros. Scott Thomas has formed a spe-
cial committee addressing the isssue
oi the new recreation facility and
steps are being taken to improve the
situation.
Tonya Batizy
Senior
English
TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 12,1987
orum
Faculty Senate
votes to support
academic freedom
ECU Nmi lureau
The ECU Faculty Senate voted
Tuesday to support the position
taken on academic freedom and
shared governance taken by the
faculty of Southeastern Baptist
Theological Seminary.
It adopted unanimously a reso-
lution stating support of the ECU
faculty and directed ECU dele-
gates to present the resolution to
the Faculty Assembly of the Uni-
versity of North Carolina system
on Dec. 4. The ECU resolution will
be sent to the faculty of the semi-
nary.
The faculty oi Southeastern
Baptist Theological Seminary at
Wake Forest, N.C has been at
odds with the trustees of the
semi nary. The sponsor of the ECU
resolution, Dr. Lawerence E.
Hough oi the political science
faculty, said that "in light of de-
velopments at Southeastern Bap-
tist Theological Seminary it
seemed proper that we offer our
support
Hough's resolution said that
the ECU faculty "has enjoyed a
tradition of shared governance in
the university and academic free-
dom in the classroom and in their
research endeavors and have
continually been opposed to dis-
criminatory practices (and that)
for continued viability the envi-
ronment for higher education in
North Carolina requires a spirit of
openness of inquiry and collegial-
itv
Oakley joins
ECU Medical
School staff
FCC N(wi Burrju
Dr. Stanley P. Oaklev has joined
the faculty at the ECU School of
Medicine as assistant professor oi
psychiatric medicine.
The Charlotte native was senior
registrar for the psvehogcriatric
team and a forensic psychiatric
team at Hillcrest Hospital in Ade-
laide, South Australia before as-
suming his faculty appointment
at ECU.
He received his medical degree
from the ECU School of Medicine
and his undergraduate degree
from the University oi North
Carolina at Chapel Hill. He com-
pleted an internship and resi-
dency in psychiatric medicine at
Pitt County Memorial Hospital.
While in residency training he
was named as an acting chief resi-
dent and was a senior psychiatric
unit inpatient resident.
He is a member of the American
Medical Association, the Ameri-
can Psychiatric Association, the
N.C. Medical Society and the N.C.
Psychiatric Association.
Small, harmless flakes fall Wednesday to the suprise of many students, who enjoyed sunny skies and
temperatures in the 70s a few days before (Hardy Alligood � Photolab).
$ Need Money �
Band storms newspaper
TALLAHASSEE, Ha. (CPS) �
Some 20 members oi the Florida
A&M university marching band
invaded the campus newpaper
Oct. 28 and stoic 1,500 copies of
the edition of the FAMUAN' that
charged the band with hazing.
The story said a parent had
accused members oi the March-
ing 100 of beating other band
members for being late for per-
formances.
In response, 20 members
"stormed into the office scream-
ing and making threats to myself
and the staff news editor Ellen
Moran told the Associated Press.
They proceeded to throw
bundles of paper out windows
and down stairwells until the FSU
police arrived.
"This is not the way things
should be done on campus Mi-
chael Abrams, the paper's faculty
adviser told College Press Serv-
ice. But the incident focused "na-
tional attention" on the hazing
charges. "They did themselves
harm by coming here. They por-
trayed themselves as they were
portrayed in the story
The paper, said Abrams, will
continue to investigate the hazing
allegations, despite threats oi
lawsuits from the band's directors
and pressures to portray the band
� and Florida A&M in a more
favorable light.
In mid-October, a Michigan
State University student quit the
marching band, alleging she'd
been hazed and had her hair forci-
bly cut. The student, Cynthia
Maggard, a Native American,
subsequently sued the band and
MSU for discrimination.
Elsewhere, Baylor University
last week suspended its Tau
Kappa Epsilon at least until
spring, 1988, tor allegedly hazing
a pledge.
A jury awarded a former Uni-
versity of Delaware student
$30,000 for burns he received
when oven cleaner was poured
over his head during a fraternity
hazing rite. Jeffrey V. Furek was
injured during Sigma Phi
Epsilon's 1980 "Hell Night" while
he and other pledges were being
initiated at the campus fraternity
house.
Furek was burned by the caus-
tic solution on the neck, head and
back. 1 le allowed the oven cleaner
to be poured over him, he said,
because he "wanted to be a
brother
We pay Cash For Anything
Cold or Silver
And. We also buy Stem's, TV's.
V.C.K. s. Furniture, Hikes, etc.
Coin & Ring Man
1OO0 5.00(M r
IO (X) 3QO Sal
400 S Evans
7S2-3S6C
Rosina's Picture Pic
of the Week
If your Face Appears in Rosina's
Picture Pic Contest You Win
Fvery Thurm.
Lfififc 1 BI Issi
Plaza Cinema �&�
Starting Friday
Hiding Out-PG-13
Death Wish 4-K
Hide and Go Shriek
The Offspring-R
)Ocxk Theatre
Starting Friday
TheBigTown-R
$1.50 All Times
FIZZThe newest gathering place in town.
Menu includes:
Hawaiian Chicken,
Stir-fried vegetables,
croissants, gourmet
burgers, soups &
salads.
Featuring: Jim Swinson
tonight 10 1
Open Mon -Sat.
HOE. Fourth St.
919-752-5855
All ABC Permits
Check into our "Clinic" Friday,
the 13th of November for the
Drini Specicis!
Hourly
"Remedy" Prizes!
What Are You Afraid Of?
Hilton Inn
207 W. Greenville Blvd.
355-5000

Links between diet and cancer
to be discussed tonight
KL Newt Bureau
Possible links between diet and
cancer will be the topic of a free
public lecture at 8 p.m Nov. 12, at
ECU'S Mcndenhall Student Cen-
ter.
Dr. David Kritchevsky, associ-
ate director of Wistar Institute of
Anatomy Biology in Philadel-
phia, will be the guest speaker for
the talk co-sponsored by the ECU
School of Medicine, the National
Dairy Council and the ECU chap-
ter of Sigma Xi, an honorary soci-
ety of scientific researchers.
kritchevsky, a participant in
the National Dairy Council's vis-
iting faculty program, will pres-
ent an informative discussion of
the role of nutrition in cancer
prevention. For many years, the
eminent scientist has studied the
relationship between cancer and
nutrition in addition to other re-
search involving lipid biochemis-
try, atherosclerosis and the rela-
tionship between nutrition and
aging.
During his three-day visit to
ECU, he will also deliver scientific
research lectures on topics related
to nutrition to faculty and stu-
dents at the School of Medicine.
gathering place Fri. Nov. 13th
8:00
Downstairs Mendenhall
Free
Free Refreshments
Free T-shirt Raffle
Open Auditions Dec. 4th for Spring
Semester
The E.C.U. InterFraternity
Council
Presents
Fraternity Orientation Week
�Sunday, Nov. 15th-Thursday, Nov. 19th.
�All Freshmen and interested men.
�Sign up in Front of Student Store Today and Friday.
�Nov. 20th End of the Week Party with All Fraternities and
Sororities at the Sigma Tau Gamma House
m,m m m � ��fait� t ti 'mmimagmmmmtlmt
��





r

6THE
EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 1? 1987
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
HIRING! Federal government jobs in
your area and overseas. Many immediate
openings without waiting list or test. $15-
68,000. Phone call refundable (602) 838-
8885. Ext. 5285.
THE GREENVILLE Recreation and
Parks Department is recruiting for 10 to 14
part -time basketball coaches for the win-
tor program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of basketball skills and
must be able to coach young people, ages
9-18, in basketball fundamentals Hours
are from 3-7 p.m M-F, and some nights
and weekends coaching. The program
will extend from December 2 to mid-
February Salary rate of $3.55hour
Applications will be accepted starting
Monday, November 2 until positions are
filled contact Ben James at 830-4543.
ATTENTION ECU FACULTY AND
STAFF Brodv's has part time positons
for individuals interested in a flexible
work schedule to help stuff that special
Christmas stocking Call today for an
interview appointment or apply in per-
son Brodv's, Carolina East Mall, M-F, 2
4 p m
BRODV'S and Brodv's for men are now
accepting applications for spring
semester. Enthusiastic individuals who
enjoy fashion and can work flexible hours
should applv todav. Brodv's, Carolina
Cast Mall, M-F, 2-4 p.m.
NOW HIRING: ?20 positions available
Applv in person to Ryan's Family Steak
House, 3437 S. Memorial Drive,
Greenville.
STOCKBROKER TRAINEE: College
Crad, Opporhimry for hardworking,
enthusiastic individual, send resume to:
P.O. Box 8814, Virginia Beach, Virginia
23450 V
CASHIER AND WAITRESSES wanted
Applv in person 100 E. 10th St. and Evans
St. No phone calls.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Smith Corona electric type-
writer with correction. Price negotiable
355-2441, ask for Ben.
CARTOON CARICATURES for Christ
mas" Call David - 752-5910.
FOR SALE: 19811 londa DR 125 dirt bike
Lots of new parts. Excellent Condition.
757-6611 ext. 235 before 5:00 p.m.
MOPED MANIA - It's the only way to
travel Tired of waiting 20 minutes for a
parking spot7 Tired of riding to class
clean and getting there a SWEAT-HOC7
I've got 3 mopeds for sale. Also 2 bikes'
Call Andy at 738-3941.
TROLL'S TUX AND TEE-Tired of pay-
ing high prices for formal wear? Try Troll's
Tux and Tees for vour formal needs. De-
signer and Traditional stvles from 30 and
up 757-1007 or 758-0763
TERM PAPERS�Thesis typed on IBM
Wordprocessor. Letter quality print. Pro-
fessional editing, years of experience. Call
anytime and leave message or call after
300 p.m. Nanette Still well, 1-524-5241.
Cheap call-best service! Pick up and deliv-
ery.
"ECU - THE ULTIMATE PARTY EXPRI-
ENCE" T-shirts. Put one on vour body
today' Call 757-0305; ask for Shawn or
Russ.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICE
experience, quality work, IBM sclectric
typewriter. Call Lanie Shive at 355-3522.
GOVERNMENT CONFISCATED cars
and trucks. Late model Porsches, Z-cars,
BMW's and Jeeps, for as low as $200. Also,
speedboats, cycles, motorhomes. Send $1C
for Regional Buyer's Kit to : FEDERAL
RESEARCH, LTD. P.O. BOX 888232,
ATLATA, GA. 30356.
Hallmark gives
apology to
Transylvania U.
LEXINGTON, Ky. (CPS) �
Hallmark Cards, Inc. apologized
on Halloween Eve to Transylva-
nia University.
In connection with Halloween,
Hallmark had been producing
and selling nationwide "Transyl-
vania University" sweatshirts
featuring small blood marks and
insignia reading "We Go For The
Throat" and "E Pluribus Biten
In an Oct. 27 apology written
less than a week after Charles
Shearer, president of the real,
1,000-student campus in Ken-
tucky, complained about the
shirts, Hallmark officials agreed
to stop producing the shirts.
"We have apologized, and sent
them a letter agreeing to no longer
manufacture or ship the t-shirt
company spokeswoman Diane
Wall said.
Hallmark apparently had been
unaware that there was a real
Transylvania University, at-
tempting instead to exploit the
myth of the fictional Count Drac-
ula who drank human blood and
lived in the Transylvania region
of Eastern Europe.
Wall added that, since many
Hallmark stores are locally
owned, some may still sell the
shirts that remain in their invento-
ries.
FOR SALE: New refrigerator, great shape
5 cubic feet, $150.00. Call Laura at 756-6601
FOR SALE-great conditon 79 Mazda GLC
AMFM cassette, seat covers, $850 Call
after 6, 752-1974.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICES
758-8241 or 758-5488, ask for Susan
ATTENTION BEER LOVERS a 16 oz.
pitcher $1.50 every night at Famous Pizza.
100 E. 10th St and Evans St.
IS IT TRUE you can buy jeeps for $44
through the U.S. government? Get the facts
today! Call 1-312-742-1142 Ext. 5271-A.
MUST SELL-Full matress, microwave,
couch, coffee table and more. Reasonable
Leave message at 752-4372
1986 HONDA CR250R dirt bike. Never
raced. 1 lelmet and gloves available. 20
hours riding time. Excellent condition
Motorcycle trailer also available. $1900.
Call 355-7812 after 6 p.m. or leave message.
WORD PROCESSINGletter quality or
laser printing. Rush jobs accepted. 752
1933.
PROFESSIONAL BUT NOT EXPEN-
SIVE! Progressive Solutions, Inc. offers
professional word processing to students
and professionals. Term papers, disserta-
tions, themes, reports and much more as
low as $1 75 per page (Please call for quote
on your project) Price includes printing on
high quality bond paper and spelling veri
fication against a 50,000 word electronic
dictionary Ask about our spedal offers
Laser printing now available! Call Mark at
757-3440 after 7.00 p.m. for free informa
tion.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106
east 5th Street (Beside Cubbies)
Greenville, N.C 752-3694.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERV-
ICES-Papers, resumes, theses, etc. Rea-
sonable rates (most $1.25 per page)
Grammar, punctuation and spelling
corrected. Call JAMIE at 758 1161, M-F, 9-
5 or 758-4567 nights and weekends Fjst,
accurate and reliable.
WANTED-roommate to share 2 bed-
room apartment at Tar River Estates
Will have private room. No deposit Call
752-3032.
PERSONALS
FOR RENT
ONE BEDROOM apt, sublease avail-
able in January, first month rent free,
deposit required. Call Bettv or Carol
752-0526 after 6:30 p.m.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a
large, 2 bedroom apartment. Close to
campus and onl v 5120mo. and 12 utili-
ties. Call 738-7990.
ROCfcHftar campusincfudes
utilities. Call 757-3543.
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share 2 bed
room apt. in Wilson Acres. Furnished
apt $115 00 a month, starting Dec. 15 or
Jan. 1. Call 752-8734.
MALE ROOMMATE to share a 2 bed
room apt in Wilson Acres. Furnished
private bedroom $130.00 a month, start-
ing Dec. 15 or Jan. 1. Call 752-9944
GREENMILL RUN APARTMENT to
sublet, $255.00. Near campus, available
now. Call after 10:00 p.m 758-7165.
TAR RIVER ESTATES-$300 00 off first
months rent on all 1, 2, and 3 bedroom
apartments. Open House on Saturday,
November 14, and Sunday, November 15
from 1:00-5.00 p.m. Call 752-4225.
RINGGOLD TOWERS apts for rent
furnished. Contact Hollie Simonowich
at 752-2865.
TCBY: The Country's BEST yogurt! All
of the pleasure, none of the guilt. Check
newspaper for valuable coupons. 325
Arlington Blvd. Greenville (Next to
Little Caesar's).
SIGEP STRANGER DATES - Get ready
for the BRAILLE BASII Thursday night.
It's always better with a stranger
FREE LIVE MUSIC: before downtown
See Silvey in the Underground on Friday
November L3 at 8.00 p.m. Free refresh-
ments and T-shirt raffle.
"NEW SKELETON" Saturday Car-
toons, huh? At least you've still got your
"morals" What a JOKE Another first
nighter? Could this be habit formine7"
"lion" 8
CHEAP DRINKS are available any-
where quality drinks at a reasonable
price plus free food. East Carolina Tea
Party at OFF Tl IE CUFF.
CHUCK, BARRY, ROB, MIKE, AND
STACY request your presence at Friday's
Tea Party at OFF Tl IE CUFF They say
this new batch of tea is "awesome free
pizza is great too.
BEST DEAL IN TOWN: $2 00 Teas,
Schooners for a buck, The Pat Cray Band
at 900 p.m free pizza from 6:00-7:00
p.m and a mason jar to take home at OFF
Tl IE CUFF.
CREEKS, GREEKS, GREEKS: OFF Tl IE
CUFF staff can't wait. Big Al is in a cold
sweat and The Pat Cray Band doesn't
know what to expect. By tomorrow our
xxx batch of East Carolina Tea will be
perfect.
AMANDA JI LOVE YOU! YBB
ATTENTION, FRESHMEN-don't miss
the Fraternity Orientation Week during
November 15-November 19. Sign up in
front of the Student Store November 9-13
This is open to anyone interested in Fra-
ternity Life it is a great way to spend your
college years!
KNOCK DOWN 9 pins in each 9 out of 10
tries, win a FREE TURKEY, $2.00 per try,
try as many times as you like on Thurs-
day, November 19, 7.00 p.m. in Mendcn-
hall Bowling Center.
ALL FRESHMEN and interested men
sign up in front of the Student Store dur-
ing the week of November 9-13 for the
Fraternity Orientation Week on Novem-
ber 15 9. Tfuuyrianre to get rn-ye
familiar wifTieWT'rarermtv and meet
the guvs bofcjs Spring Semester RUSH.
CET PSYCHED ZTA PLEDGES! Our
pledge trip is going to be a blast Ocean
Isle here we come. Don't forget to be at
Mendenhall at 5:30 sharp on Friday THE
13th! This will be an event you'll not soon
forget! Love the sisters of ZTA.
PIKA-Thanks for the jammin Tye Dye
social! We had a blast-sure hope y'all did.
Must have-we all slept hi noon! Lets do it
again soon Love, the Zeta's.
CONGRATS to the new Exec, of ZTA:
Katrina Harris,President; Kim Eason,
VicePresident; Debbie 1 lurd, Vice-Presi-
dent 2; Joyce Daniels, Secretary; Teresa
Allison, Treasurer; Michelle Taylor,
I lisorian-Reportr, Crina Kern, Member-
ship Chairman, Natalie Sncllings, Rituals
and Jodi Turner, Panhellenic Rep. Best
wishes in the year ahead! The sisters and
pledges of ZTA.
DONNA MATHEWS-You are the best lil
sis a Zeta could wish for. I sure hope that
Take
the
Sign up for Array ROTC Basic
CampLbull get six weeks of
challenges that can build up your
leadership skills as well as your
lxdy. You II also get almost S700.
But hurry.This summer may be
your last chance to graduate from
college with a degree and an officer's
commission.
See your Professor of Military
Science for details.
For More Info: Contact
Capt. Mitchell at 757-6967
plunge
this
summer.
ARMY RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
��
�� �
-� �
all goes well for you this weekend! Take
care and I love you! YBSDebbie.
PI KAPPA PHI, the Halloween pre-game
bash was great! I Icre's to tailgaters of the
week! Let's do it again soon! Love, the
sisters and pledges of AOTT.
HEY DZ'S: Get psyched for the Rose
Formal this weekend. It's going to be
quite a Rush, right Beth?! We all know
that I've got the coolest date, but I'm
going to be eyeing yours, Kathie
THETA CHI ROADTRIPPERS-Satur
day night was killer. Pat, tell your parents
thanks for the hospitality. Mr. O'Brien,
we're gone-you can come out of the car
now. Polly want a cracker? I ley Bueford,
thanks for the showers.
NCSL: Travel across North Carolina,
meet now people, debate current issues,
and bea part of thestudent's voice of N.C
Meetings are Monday's at 7:00 p.m. in 212
MSC.
WENDY Dthe Lock in was great, we
had the best time. You did a good job!
Thanks, the pledges of ZTA.
ALPHA XI DELTA cocktail dates: Hey
guys get yurself in gear, because the big
day is finally here! Get psyched-We love
you! Love the AZD's
MANY THANKS to ANN RSI IER and
MICHELLE TAYLOR for helping us out
during our car wash. Thanks to all the
sisters who supported us! We love ya-
Pledges of ZTA.
PLEDGES OF ZTA-You guys are doing a
great job so far! We just wanted to con
gratulate you for all the hard work and
time put in this semester. Keep up the
good work-we love you-sisters of ZTA
B-SQUARE! Get psyched for Saturday
night-were going to throw down! I love
you! Mary
THETA CHI PLEDGES Good ,ob on
Sunday Keep up the good work and be
ready for dreamgirl Friday night!
DELTA ZETA-Sure hope you guys are as
psyched as we are about the Rose Formal-
We were going to print Beth and Nikki's
poem, but decided it might be a bit much
to handle! Do we have to sing the pledge
song at Tl IIS one? We love you guys so
much-CET READY FOR SATURDAY
NIGHT-WE ARE Love, the Beta Pi's.
LADIES-all campus women's billards
tournament on Tuesday, November 17 at
6:30 in MSC billards center. Call 757-6611
for details.
THE OMEGA PSI PHI Fraternity is
sponsoring a raffle for prizes which in
chidejjli�hjsstaya the Hilton, Dinner
for two ai the Sheraton and Dinner for
two at Annabelle's. Tickets are SO cents
WANT A D.W.I? - Don't drive drunk
Walk down to the EL BO on Friday for Sig
Ep happy hour, and drink your face off
$4,000 for a $2 tea? Ours are stronger
anyway
DELTA ZETA: Hey Beta Pi pledge class,
juist want to let you know that we think
ya'H are doing a super job. Keep up the
good work and get ready to rage on Satur
day Love, the Sisters.
LESLIE ANN MILLIKAN, this one is for
you: Roses arc red, violets are blue, its
your 19th birthday and you have nothing
to do. Love, Susan, Judy, Tammy,
Angela, Danielle, and Adrienne.
TO THE DZ who is eyeing Kathie's Rose
Formal date: Look all you want, just don't
touch By the way, who are you? I bet I
know
K1SSY, KISSY, moo moo moo, kissy
kissy, I LOVE YOU Happy Anniversary
FREE BAHAMAS TRIP Come down to
the Elbo and register for a trip for two to
the Bahamas spring break $1 00 bckets"
Buy yours today
TIGHT BUDCET7? Try our meal deal
$2.49 for any sandwich, fries, and drink
14 hamburger, ham and cheese, BLT
roast beef, chicken filet, turkey or pid
burger Also, homemade spaghetti and
lasagna ($3 95-garUc bread included)
Famous Pizza-corner of 10th St and
Evans. Not for delivery
CHEAP DRINKS: dollar shots and dol
lar high balls. $2 50 for a HUGE Ice Tea"
Come out to downtowns newest private
club; the Elbo-with an all new music for
mat
COMPARE our prices and good food
Buy any Urge pizza and get a 2 liter coke
free Buy a small pizza and get 2 free !6o
drinks Buy any sub and get one free 16 oz
drink. Call for FREE delivery Famous
Pizza, 757-1276 or 757)731
ftimc
TanTheDoor- 1
manYouSaw 1
ThisAdAnd 1
Racatv A FREE 1
8 um p� r 1
StlckarM!
Eastern N.C.I
Largsst
Giant Scraan
is root
Tatavltion
For
CALL 752-7303 ooteii.
Tl
ICE WATER
MANSION
' 'Rockin Thru Th Eight
� Wrth VL
ntwyowcpowh lOCKIH
Coming
Thur. 19
CLEAR LIGHT n
Pink Floydtf Tj fcjf ;
FRIDAY, 20' '
TX BOOGIE TX
22 top Boogie
$100 BEST LEGS CONTEST
VFSttf.
flfiE
Awareness Art Ensemble
South 1 Reggae Band"
"HALFWAY TO SANITY" CONCERT
SOUL TRAIN
WgEW
r ,ak i v �
Featuring Jimmy Hall
Formerly of Wot Wi'lie
y
The Student Union
Special Concerts Committee
presents
sttk
rvrvrvTTT
�I M - w - i �� -1
rn
w
COMMODORES
Monday, November 16,1987
8:00 p.m Wright Auditorium
Free tickets available in advance at the Central
Ticket Office. Advance pick-up of tickets is strongly
advised.
�.�� r1.Knftl.BI

mmmmm
Bennett re
WASHINGTON (AD - Bill
Bennott, who brought the horn
lock for Douglas Cinsburg to
drink after the Supreme (
nominee admitted he had
smoked mariu.ina while a profes-
sor oflaw, knows a) about what it
was like growing up in the 1
The secretary of education is an
unabashed fan of vintage
rock'n'roll who toyed with join
ing the radical Students fbr a
IXMnocrahc Society as an under
graduate, worried about whether
he would go to Vietnam if dr
and once had a blind date i
rock legend
What did
livingn h -
a drug overs
"Hey, that!
business or.
Drank a cotd
told The As
interview M
i ie brush
that a lot of
answering
maniuana
Ann
FRISBH TOURNAMFMT
The Fnsbee Club i has
semi a
merit. Ultima Mo 14 4
.
� ' : � watch the Ira
� s tr.rr. �

� State, k Richn 1 d
ting gaoM 1 si.
o came out ii
sling - n
INTERNATL. STUDENT
The African Studies1 but ��
uth the other area stud ttees
' - ' Arts and -� icr es
1
I at ECU. Tl
' ' ntributton the ��. . sru
nts maki I I - and I
e dinner reception will - �
lurch 401 E 4th
aend Conl
Rj I A 757 63;

certified in cm?
� rs being
I Cross � .
� ' . .
D -
� :� 7 2 4222
I SAT
ind n
.1 Admission Test ��.
jr Dec ; 2 -


r 854
� this da
� S3 non-i
late rti&uaun.
ACT ASSESSMFNT
� c T Assessment wtil I
: " Sa�- Dec. 12. 1967 �
ks are to tv romp ted
ACT Rep-tranon mi
wa 52243 Applications n
frr.jrked no later thars o ' :
Applications ma be obtained trom the
Testing Center; Room 105 Speszhi
ECU
GAMMA BETA PHI
The Canuna Beta lone Sober) vmII be
having a meeting Now 17 a: 7 vm m
Vr.kins Auditorium A Service Point
be given tor those who bring3cansoJ food
tor Greenville Food Drive
THEY'RE HERE
to anyoj tt who ordered a new Student
Review please come bv the Buccaneer
office to pick up vour copv today
SUPPORT GROUP
An organizational meeting for a Ca
id esbun Support Group w
h Tor more information ca'
be Nm
52 2816
Privacy Respected.
SPEECHINTERPRETATION
Interested in speaking and mterpreta
t:on tor competition or practice"1 Join the
Forensic Team Meeting Wed No 11 at
v p m in the Theatre Arts rm 211. AI
welcome
"ASSEMBLY LINE"
"Assembt) Line Winterguard v be
holding its first rehearsal tor the Mfl
season on Sun. Nov. 15 from 7-9 pm
Anvonc interested should attend. Meet in
the lobbv of Fletcher Music Bldg For fur-
ther questions caD Paul at 1256
LIFE PLANNING
This workshop is intended to provide
assistance to students unsure of the direc-
tion they wish their lives to take The tocus
will be on hfestvles tor the future Partici-
pants in Lite Planning will engage in a
process of self examination ot present
behaviors, goal setting and decision mak
ing. The Life Planning Workshop will
meet: Nov 16. 18 20 23 in 312 Wright
Bldg. from .V4 p m (ATTEND ALL FOUR
MEETINGS) Although advance
registration is not required, we wiould
appreciate advance notification of interest
to insure that we have adequate materials
on hand Please contact the Counseling
Center in Mb Wright Bldg (757-6661) for
further into or to let us know vou plan to
attend
CAMPIS MINISTRY
Classic films will be shown Fn night,
Nov. 13, at 730 pm at the Methodist
Student Ctr located at 301 East Fifth St,
across from Garrett Dorm Tentatively
scheduled: Charlie Chaplin's "City
Lights" ti Humphrey Bogart in "Casa-
blanca Free admission, refreshments
available. For further info , call 752-7240
PHI BETA LAMBDA
PBL will be having a meeting Nov 18 at
3:00 in R302. Nov. 15 - Nov. 21 is free
enterprise week. We will be having a
guest speaker with refreshments served
following the meeting
bALl
OM

4
: -4 v J
�:uuem� -u
dub at 757-1
w
�Frequq
rrl
a
�Buy 1
�Week
�Reptile;
�Compk
�'ev shl
h
I S,�:m
r
20�7o
PE'






Ids ILOVEY0U tbppyAr.nncrsary.
FREI BAHAMAS TRIP1! Come down to
drank !h�' EM� nd register for a trip (or two to
the Rahamas spnng break $1 00 tickets
yours todayfi
nCHT BUDGET?? Try our meal deal
K W t.i anv sandwich, tries, and drink:
4 hamburger ham and cheese, BLT
: last bed chicken tdet, rurkev or pizza
Also homemade spaghetti and
Lasagna vSJ1 g garlic bread included)
Famous IY-� cumer of KHh St and
v ans Sit tor delivery
CHEAP DRINKS dollar shots and dol
lai high halls s: 50 tor a HUGE Ice Tea"
( ome out to dowi I . ns newest private
(lub the FJbo-with an all new music tor
mat"
- OMPARE our pricei and go�Kl food
m Large pizza and get a 2 liter coke
free Buy a small pizza and ge 2 free l6oz.
drinks Bin anysubandgetonefreel6oz
drink Call tor FREE delivers Famous
��a 757 1276 or 757 07? 1
� ��
TIC
fc.St.f n N C S
Larajaai
Qlant Scr�n
1 5 Foot
ono Fof
603 Datan
ATER
SION
III
Coming
Thur. 19
CLEAR LIGHT .
Pink Floyd � '
FRIDAY, 20 v
TX BOOGIE "A
2: top Boogie
$100 BEST LEGS CONTEST
our
POWER POCK
-0
E
Art Ensembift
w
�HALFWAY TO SANITY" CONCERT
SOUL TRAIN
BPafflBOLT
Featuring Jimmy Hall
Formerly of Wet Willie
n
erts Committee
presents
rjT
x
m�)
DORES
iber 16, 1987
iht Auditorium
advance at the Central
:k-up of tickets is strongly
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 12.1987 7
Bennett refuse
ifi
WASHINGTON (AD - BUI
Bennett, who brought the hem-
lock for Douglas Cinsburg to
drink after the Supremo Court
nominee admitted he had
smoked marijuana while a profes-
sor of law, knows all about what it
was like growing up in the 1960s.
The secretary ot education is an
unabashed tan of vintage
rock'n'roll who toyed with join
mg tin? -radical Students for a
Democratic Society as an under-
graduate, worried about whether
he would go to Vietnam it dratted
and once had a blind date with
rock legend Janis Joplin.
VVhat did he do with the hard-
living rock siren, who later died of-
a drug overdose?
"Hey, that really is none of yotaf
sions to make, I will make them to
a priest. I will stipulate for the
record, however, I was young
Bennett has said flatly in prior
interviews that he never tried il-
business or anybody's business vis licit drugs. Indeed, he earned his
Drank a couple of beers BenneMt fwrs as an anti-drug crusader in
told The Associated Press �;b$$70asa Harvard Law student in
interview Monday night.
He brushed aside the question
that a lot of politicians have been
answering since Ginsburg's reve-
lation last week: Did you ever use
marijuana?
"I will not join this procession of
ronfessors. If I have any confes
jfee freshman dorm where he
lived as a proctor.
Bennett scoffed at the notion
that any aspirant to high office
must be "crystal clean and 99
percent pure but made an ex-
ception for Ginsburg, who used
marijuana while on the Harvard
Announcements
Law faculty.
"When you are a professor, you
are supposed to be a role model
he said.
"Youthful indiscretions are al-
lowed. Youthful indiscretions
should not be a bar to public office
and public trust. The question is
when, what were the circum-
stances, what were your responsi-
bilities?"
"It would be crazy to say that
anybody who ever smoked mari-
juana is therefore disqualified
Bennett declined to discuss the
details of his fateful telephone call
Friday to Ginsburg, in which he
gave the nominee his first big
shove toward the door. Ginsburg
asked Reagan to withdraw the
nomination on Saturday.
But Bennett said he stood by the
account of his press aide, Loye
Miller Jr who said Bennett first
called Reagan on Friday and was
told, "Do what you think is right
Reagan told reporters Monday
there was some "distortion" in the
way the story was reported, and
White House spokesman Marlin
Fitzwater challenged Miller s ac-
count.
Bennett had never met or talked
with Ginsburg, 41, who taught at
Harvard long after Bennett re-
ceived has taw degree in 1971.
Bennett was influenced by the
Rev. William Sloan Coffin, a for-
mer Williams chaplain who later
led anti-Vietnam war protests.
F RISHI I�TQURXAMFAT
rhc Frisbee club is hosting its 10th
semi annual Ultimate FYisbeo Tourna
menl Ultima Y Nov 14 & 15 at the
��' l ollege Hill Everybody is in
i itch the Irates compete against
ite reams from 'a Tech UNC-
�'��" ngfon APP St UNC-Chariotte,
ti i State, & Richmond Ultimate
is a fast & exciting game played with a
�: isbee So come out & watch the ECU disk
slingers in action
INTIRNATL, STUDENTS
The African Studies Committee along
with the other area studies committees
he College ot Arts and Sciences, of-
fice of the director of International Pro-
grams and the office of the foreign stu-
soi .ir. sponsoring a dinner
pi : l all international students
it ECU The dinner, reception is
ntribution the Int i stu
maket ECl and to welcome them
I nner rot eption will he at f .10 p m ,
Fri No 13 at St Paul's Eptscolpa
h, 401 1 1th St The faculty will bo
serving homemade dinners and deserts
tcrnational Students are invited and
d to attend Contact Dr I A
�� Rawl 111 A or phone 757-6354
Cl RTIFIFD IX CPR?
sti . r being sought for the
� d ross If you are certified in
d tvai ' more info contact the
� in Red I rvi: 752 4
LSAT
�top
tat
N
is V
Test will be
1987.
� completed
esting Serv
08540 Keg
1987 Regis-
5 date must
refundable
ACT ASSESSMENT
( 1 ssessment will be offered at
! w Application
'�� tx �:�;� ted and mailed to
. -�:� n I' O Box 414. Iowa
A i 2243 Applications must be
ked ik later than Nov. 13, 187
ions ma) be obtained from the
Center R.xm 105, Speight Bldg ,
GAMMA BETA PHI
i
ma iVta 1 lonor Society will be
a meeting Nov 17 at 7 p.m. in
� kins Auditorium A Service Point will
i n for those who bring 3 cans of food
tor Greenville Fod Drive.
THEY'RE HERE
lb ar yone who ordered a new Student
Re iew please come by the Buccaneer
office to pick up your copy today.
SUPPORT GROUP
An organizational meeting for a Gay
ind 1 esbian Support Group will be Nov
17th Tor more information, call 752-2816.
Privacy Respected.
SPEECHINTERPRETATION
Interested in speaking and lnterpreta-
n for competition or practice? Join the
F irensic Team. Meeting Wed , Nov. 11 at
. m. in the Theatre Arts, rm. 211. All
welcome
"ASSEMBLY LINE"
Assembly Line" VVinterguard will be
I Iding its first rehearsal for the "1988"
season on Sun Nov. 15 from 7-9 p.m.
Vnyone interested should attend. Meet in
bby of Fletcher Music Bldg. For fur-
r luesbons, call Paul at 752-1256.
LIFE PLANNING
This workshop is intended to provide
assistance to students unsure of the direc-
tion they wish their lives to take. The focus
will be on lifestyles for the future. Partici-
pants in bfe Planning will engage in a
process of self examination of present
behaviors, goal setting and decision mak-
ing The Life Planning Workshop will
meet Nov. 16, 18, 20, 23 in 312 Wnght
Bldg from 3-4 p.m. (ATTEND ALL FOUR
riNGS). Although advance
registration is not required, we would
appreciate advance notification of interest
'�� � insure that we have adequate materials
on hand Please contact the Counseling
' enter in 316 Wright Bldg. (757-6661) for
further info, or to let us know you plan to
attend
CAMPUS MINISTRY
1 lassie films will be shown Fri. night,
No 13, at 730 p.m. at the Methodist
Student Ctr. located at 501 East Fifth St
across from Garrett Dorm. Tentatively
scheduled: Charlie Chaplin's "City
Lights" it Humphrey Bogart in "Casa-
tianca" Free admission, refreshments
available For further info call 752-7240.
PHI RFTA LAMBDA
PBL will be having a meeting Nov. 18 at
3 00 in R302. Nov. 15 - Nov. 21 is free
enterprise week. We will be having a
guest speaker with refreshments served
following the meeting.

,
mmm
SALVATION ARMY
Family fun time - 7-9 p.m. Friday's.
Recreation - games � fellowship.
OMEGA PSI PHI
The 4th Annual Achievement Week
program sponsored by OPP will be held
No 22 at fenkins Auditorium at 7 p.m.
Minority students which have a 3.0 GPA
or better will be recognized as well as
outstanding community leaders. A recep-
tion will follow the program. The publicis
cordially invited to attend
OMEGA PSI PHI
Reminder: All minority students with a
GPA of a 3 0 or above should turn their
confirmation letters in to P.O. Box 3014 or
give it to one of the members of the organi-
zation Please confirm as soon as possible.
SKI TRIP
The Dept. of Intramural-Recreational
Services and Outdoor Recreation Centsr
is sponsoring a Ski Trip to Wintergreen on
Ian 3-8 Registration for this trip will be
taken in 204 Memorial Gym from 8:00 a.m.
to 5 00 p m through Dec. 1.
N.C.S.L.
Join the North Carolina Student Legis-
lature every Man. night at 7 p.m. in 212
MSC Meet new people, debate current
topics or public interest, and earn class
credit Become a part of the Student's
Voice ol NC Join N.C.S.L.
BIOLOGY CLUB
Science Students: The ECU Biology
Dept will be hosting a N.C Collegia
Academy workshop Sat Nov. 14 at ECUt
Registration begins at 9:30 a.m. in the
Biology lobby Topics to be covered ak.
elude use of resources, experimental de-
sign, data analysis, research funding and
more The workshop is free to all ECU
students. For more info call the Biology
Qub at 757-6286
SUPERVISOR NEEDED
The Intramural-Recreational Services
Dept. is now accepting applications for an
Outdoor Recreation Supervisor for the
Spring, 1988, Semester. This person will
be responsible for equipment rental and
leading outdoor adventure trips. Applica-
tions will be taken in rm. 204 Memorial
Gym MonFri 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. until Fri,
Nov. 20.
TURKEY TROT
A Turkey Trot run will be held by the
Dept. of Intramural-Recreational Serv-
ices. Registration will be held Nov. 18 at 6
pjn. in Brew. D-103. For more info , call
737-6387.
PIVE CLUB
If you enjoy scuba diving, snorkeling,
and adventuring with friendly outgoing
people, then you need to join ECU'S Coral
Reef Dive Club. For more info, call 752-
4399 and ask for Glenn or Rob
SUBJECTS XFFDFD
The ECU Qinical Psychology program
needs children, ages 6-15, to volunteer for
Intelligence testing. This is to assist in the
training of MA level students. A limited
amount of feedback will be given. Inter-
ested people can contact Dr. Larrv Mines
at the Dept. of Psychology, 757-6800.
INTERMEDIATE ri.ITB
The Intermediate Education Qub will
meet Nov 23 at 4:30 p.m. in 312 Speight
Speaker will be Janie Manning, Principle
of Bethel Elementary All interested inter
mediate education majors should attend
BAR-B-QUEJ2INKER
The D.H. Con ley High School Band
"4k�6ters Assoc is having a pork Bar-B-
�ue Dinner on Sat Nov 14 from 11 a.m.
to 7 p.m. at the Eastern Pine Fire Dept.
attu Greenville. Funds raised will help
4�nd the Marching Vikings to Texas in late
Dec. where they will participate in the
Houston-Blue Bonnet Bowl Festival. Tick-
ets are S3.50 and can be purchased from
band members and they will be available
at Eastern Pines Fire Dept. on the day of
the dinner
TEACHER FD. MAJORS
There's still time to apply for the Work
Study Trip to Mexico during Spring Break
(March 6-13), sponsored by the School of
Education and Campus Ministries Op
portunities are available to observe and
teach at selected schools in Puebla, Mex-
ico. Get your application today in the
Dean's Office, Speight Bldg room 154
BACCHUS
BACCHUS will meet Thurs Nov. 12 in
rm. 242 of Mendenhall at 7:30 p.m.
COLLEGE HILL
Professional studio portraits will be
taken in Tyler Hall on Nov 11 - Wed &
Nov. 12 - Thurs. If you're graduating,
come and have your cap Si gown pictures
made Sign up and price list available in
Tyler. Don't miss the golden opportunity
FRESHMENSOPHOMORFc;
Take a course this spnng semester that
will enhance your career opportunities
and open doors to scholarships and finan-
cial aid. MLSC 1001 is a one-hour elective
that entails no committment or obligation,
plus there are no uniform or lab require-
ments. Army ROTC can add an exciting
new dimension to your college career as
well as your future. For more info call
Capt Alvin Mitchell at 757-6967 or visit
Erwin Hall, room 319.
GORDON'S
Golf & Ski Shop
Gift Ideas For
Your Favorite Skier
�Skis & Boots
�Binding & Poles
�Ski Outfits
�Ski Coats
�CB Jackets
�Stretch Pants
�Bibs
�T-Necks
�Long Johns
�Socks
�Ski Gloves
�Toboggans
�Ski Wax
�Fanny Packs
�Ski Care Kits
�Ski Visors
�Ski Caps
�Ear Muffs
�Ski Sweaters
�Ski Holders
�Car Top Ski Racks
�Goggles
�Sunglasses
�Ski Totes
�Boot Bags
�Ski Bags
�After Ski Boots
�Boot-ins
�Head Bands
264 ByPass (Next to
Greenville TV & Appliance)
756-1003
&
VILLAGE
Donna Edwards
- Owner
Greenville's Oldest & Most
Experienced Pet Shop
�Frequent Buyers Program ($10 of free
merchandise with $100 or more
accumulated purchases.)
�Buy 1 get 1 FREE - Outside Filter Cartridges
�Weekly Specials
�Reptiles
�Complete line of Dog, Cat & Fish Supplies
�New shipment of Fish has arrived
Master Card & Visa Welcome
Financing Available
511 Evans St.
Greenville, N.C. 27834 - 756-9222
STd TTCC�
Including
Bessie Smith,
Billie Holliday.
Dinah
Washington,
Ellas Fitzgerald,
Maxine Sullivan,
Ivie Anderson.
A Musical Revue Saluting Black Women Singers
Tuesday, November 17, 8:00 P.M.
A unique sisterhood - past, present and future - which has strutted,
sashayed, stompted and strolled across the state of America.
ECU Students $2.00 All Others $3.00
Sponsored by the Student Union Minority Arts Committee
d
329 Arlington
Blvd.
7561579
ALL HAIR SERVICES
MAKEUP-MANICURES
TANNING BEDS
! 20 Discount Off Any Service, j
I Good Through 11-30-87 �

PETEY HATHAWAY, Owner
Thursday
Members Free
$1.00 Drink Specials
Best in Rock n' Roll & Top 40
Friday
4-7 Rush Hour
it's back with all new $1.00 Drink Specials. Free for members $1.00 guest.
Don't limit your choice to just one drink when you can have a full selection of
specials to choose from!
The Best in Rock n1 Roll 4-7
Friday At The
Elbo!
- � � � fi ii m ,mm
m m m � iii
9t
Vr ;J






THI FAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
NOVFMBrR 12, 1987 I'j. B
Movie Review
'Hidden' rehashes plot
Kyle Maclachlan, holding the ray gun, stars with Micael Nouri in the science fiction thriller 'The
Hidden Maclachlan portrays an extraterrestrial FBI agent.
By MICAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
"The Hidden" scores no points
for originality: the plot threads
arc sewn together from 'The Ter-
minator" and John. Carpenter's
remake of "The Thing and the
seams show.
A psychopathic alien with a
libido arrives on planet earth and
commences oozing his way down
unsuspecting folks' throats and
possessing their frames, the better
to act out his passions.
The alien leaves a trail of car-
nage so obvious you could sec it a
light year away. As a matter of
fact, someone has another slug
(this one a respectable family
man) is after the no-goodnik for
slaughtering his wife, kid, and
friend. The good slug assumes the
I.D. of an FBI agent and enlists the
aid of a local police department in
his manhunt across the stars.
So who has original plots these
days anyway? The actual story-
telling here is flawless painfully
predictable but everything is set
up properly.
I'll take a well crafted story that
telegraphs itself over something
that's arbitrary any day. Where
"The Hidden" misses the mark is
in the area of character.
Compare 'The Hidden" with
its predecessor, "The Termina-
tor both are definitely action
movies, but weaving through the
car chases and violence of the lat-
ter is the development of the char-
acter of Sarah Conner. We see her
Latin Art Show at Gray reviewed
By SUSANNE NIELSEN
Staff Writer
Three geographically linked
exhibitions are on view at the
School of Art's Gray Gallerv.
They bring to us art and artifacts
of Latin American culture and
span the time from early civiliza-
tions of Latin America to present.
One exhibit shows a collection
of pre-Columbian artifacts, an-
other a group of Mexican dance
masks. The artifacts are on loan
from theDcpartmentof Sociology
and Anthropology Archeology
Lab Both of its directors. Or.
David Thclps and Dr. Hollv
Ma thews gave interesting lec-
tures in connection with the dis-
play at the Gray Gallerv.
The artifacts are presented in
new glass cases that give the
impression of wandering through
an anthropological museum.
Graduate assistant Pam Rogers
was responsible for setting up this
particular display.
As you enter the gallerv you
first face a large petition wall with
a large group of Mexican dance
masks. These colorful objects, in
the collection of ECU since 1986,
set the mood for the contempo-
rary exhibition on all other walls
of the gallery. Colors and imagery
seems much closer than to the
earth tones of the pre-Columbian
artifacts in cases in the center area.
The masks that date from 1890
to 1950 emphasize the folklore
influence prevalent in many of the
contemporary paintings. These
artworks, 17 pieces by Latin
American artists, are on loan by
the Museum of Contemporary
Hispanic Art in New York City.
The museum's director, Nilda
Peraza. will be giving a public
lecture at the School of Art on
Monday, November 16 at 7:30
p.m.
The works are by such nation-
ally known artist as Luis Cruz
Azaceta, Cuban; juan Boza, Cu-
ban; Manuel Macarulla, Domini-
can; Juan Sanchez, Puerto Rican;
and Jorge Tacia, Chilean. Of the
works shown, few are by women
artists and their vision seems to
differ very much from their male
colleagues.
The paintings either reflect their
upbringing in a male-dominated
society (in the case of Elba Damast
from Venezuela) or convey cmo-
scem mask-like and, hung near
the mask display create possible
affinities between the different
exhibitions.
Artists Tacla and Sanchez cre-
ate strong political imagery.
Tacla's work is a large expression-
ists canvas divided into three
sections. The bright side pieces
draw and puzzle viewers. The the female "voice" to be in his
tior.G of living in today's society and large middle panel deal with
and the threats that it poses (in the
vision of Puerto Rican Elizabeth
Grajales).
The overall feeling the viewer
may experience is that of walking
through a very colorful parade
with bright colors that seem to
move in on you. The mood of cele-
bration changes as you take a
closer look at each painting.
The works speak of the struggle
tor identity, ot keeping in touch
with one's Latin American origin
in a world of multitudes and of
different influences powerfully
taking over.
The exhibition shows works bv
artists with strong political con-
viction. The colors are bright,
underlining symbolic content (as
did the masks). They also remind
us of the artists' Latin American
origin, the lighting being much
more intense and calling for such
color treatment of painted sur-
faces.
Carlos Duque's very simplistic
portraits remind us of the colors in
portraits by German Expression-
ist painter Emil Nolde. Other art-
ists of the same movement come
to mind in the paintings of this
exhibition as well as do nco-ex-
pressionists such as Elvira Bach
when we look at Manuel Pardo's
"Mrs. Hoffa-Midnight Supper It
is interesting in this context to
look at the Latin-American arti-
facts again. The German expres-
sionists looked to artifacts of Afri-
can cultures which heavily influ-
enced their art.
Strangely enough, there is a
painting of an African mask in
this contemporary exhibition, as
well. Azaceta's self-portraits
the theme of bondage and
struggle for existence. "This Red
Color is Your Meat Under Your
Skin" is the title.
One of the exhibition's main
focuses is a large oil painting with
the inscription??????"
It is again a very political and
apocalyptic piece that seems to
stand in the tradition of Goya or
Bosch. The symbolic and narra-
tive content is such that it mav
realism of all the elements that
seem at first accessable bring out a
variety of conclusions and inter-
pretations. Here the animals be-
come strong political and socio-
logical symbols.
Nieves Saah's two large paint-
ings "Dualism" and "Daliance"
show dream worlds filled with
Leger-like structured conglomer-
ates of ladders, human
cacoonsnd building blocks. We
enter a childlikecircusof a world.
Sanchez has two pieces in this
exhibition. Perhaps the most
"vocal" in their political messages
the works employ a variety of
media, from photos and newspa-
per clippings to scribbled crayon
text and paper doilies.
The artist creates what he sees
work "Symbols for a Lonely
Woman with a Defined Destiny
Artists Louis Lowrita and ls-
mael Frigerio both use religious
symbolism in their works. The
size and shape of their depictions
of Madonna or cross points to the
important role of religion in l.atin
American culture.
mature from whimp ring wait
rcss to self-reliant matrian hot the
future
The leads ot "the II I n
Gallagher and Beck an chara
tor-wise, m the pi r tin v wen
when the story began It's rather
obvious that they are not acting
on their environment hut being
manipulated tor plot purposes
And speaking ot motivation,
why is this evil alien running
amuck? Brutal as th fern
was heat least had apui � '
of "The Hidden'&' murders an
arbitrary. In real life some i lown
mav well walk into a McDonald's
and start shooting people but a
Somerset Ma ugh n said t.u t is a
poor storyteller.
The only effective 'real lif
connection the movw mal i
perhaps an unintentional ne to
us of the AIIS generation that
someone's biological system can
be invaded in such a way that he
are unwillingly transformed into
a "killer
If such an allegory oa urred to
the creative team they exchanged
it, along with characterization tor
a series of pursuits Asitb v iew
ing 'The Hidden van be put ofl
until its video releasefen the
small screen, the seams may not
be as obvious
'Lovers and Other Strangers'
Tpf�� Release
The East Carolina Flayhouse
will present its second show of the
season, "Lovers and Other
Strangers" by the married team of
Renee Taylor and Joseph Bolo-
gna, Wednesday through Satur-
day at 8:15 p m in McGinnis The-
atre.
"Lovers and Other Strangers"
ran on Broadway in 1968 and was
made into a film a year later with
a cast including Bea Arthur and
Gig Young.
Reminiscent of "Love Ameri-
can Style the play is a collection
of five short comedies concerned
with attitudes toward male-fe-
male relationships.
The first comedy deals with the
preliminaries to a seduction. Jerry
is a young man on the make who
has brought a newly-met girl,
Brenda, to his bachelor pad. He
finds himself somewhat flabber-
gasted by her continuous quota-
tions from numerous experts on
amorous relationships, from He-
len Gurley Brown to Kahlil
Gibran.
Undeterred, he comes to the
point of their evening, when she
stalls him: "Let's wait she says,
"for the first date. I don't believe
in fooling around until the first
date
In the second comedy, a mar-
ried man, Hal, is having an argu-
ment with his mistress, Cathy, in a
bathroom. He says he loves her
but hecan'tleavehis wife until the
children grow up a little.
She claims he's been telling her
that for years and she no longer
wants to see him. Just as they say
goodbye, they pause and then
lock in a passionate embrace.
The third comedy is a trip into
the private life of a couple, Johnny
and Wilma. They are having a
bedroom battle because he wants
to go to sleep and she wants to
See PLAY, page 9
Picking th? Bones
Attic is hot club; Ramones, Nighthawks play
By LAURA SALAZAR
SUM Wri�t�
said that a person wearing an
Attic t-shirt was seen in a New
From a desert in Israel to a York candy store and someone
candy store in New York, a "vari- wearing an" Attic cap was seen in
ety" of Attic paraphenalia can be the desert of Israel.
found. Attic owner Tom Haines According to Haines,
'Many
The Ramones will play the Attic Friday night Opening for the
grandfathers of punk will be local band, Soul Train.
people think the Attic is a heavy
metal room with mostly red-
necks. After coming to the Attic,
people found out that it was the
opposite of what they expected
they were surprised
Haines said, "Our main goal for
the past 16 years has been 'vari-
ety This can be attested to by our
schedule. We have six ap-
proaches, five of which are music
and one is comedv The Attic's
schedule this week includes Ice
Water Mansion tonight, the Ra-
mones on Friday, Awareness Art
Ensemble on Saturday and the
Nighthawks on Sunday.
Haines said, "We get a variety
of people; the band determines
the crowd He added, "I think
the students have a pre-conceived
idea that the Attic plays only one
type of music - heavy metal. We
try to have a variety of bands to
please everyone
According to Haines, the
thought of changing the name of
the Attic has been considered so
that the "heavy metal" label could
be shaken.
The Attic has been in existence
since September 7, 1971. Haines
was then the manager. The Attic
was originally located at 209 E. 5th
St. from 1971-1975. After a fire
See THE ATTIC, page 10
Marilyn Malloy and Chis Chappell star in the East Carolina Play-
house production of'Lovers and Other Strangers starting Wednes-
day night at McGinnis Theater.
Fear and Loathing in Atlanta
By CHIPPY BONEH EA D
it with only minor wrong turns.
We beamed into the Base with
These are the voyages tf The East only minutes to spare before our
Carolinian Slag. Tkwr me weekend reservations were automatically
masfonrtoexpiorelargenewaties,to cancelled by the Sheraton corn-
so out new party forms, to boldly pater matrix.
cover what no man should. Once safely set up in our rooms,
East Carolinian Ship's Log, Sta- we pondered options. News Off i-
rdate 11068.7, Yeoman Bonehead oar Lewis's whine-o-meter hit
red, and he began screaming for back on the flashing roped off
over food. He became uicoherent and stage.
reporting.
The can
from the crew's wallets. Never
forgetful of the Prime Directivi
the News Officer porceeded to
ruthlessly interrogate the youne
est stripper.
Though degrading, she ap-
peared to enjoy it, indeed she
came back to our table again. A
private jiggle for us and she was
captain has taken
nanual control of the van in order had to be sedated with a pillow.
to navigate through the asphah Dinner and drinks had to be
webtheRornulansnavesetnpin sought oat and gathered. Time
order to prevent us from reaching was short for bom duties, al-
he conference. though the planet was blessed
Starbase Sheraton on the Planet with inhabitants that recognized
Atlanta is under stege by over 500 THE NEED for beverage stores
�rrectional lens-wearing trogio- doit closed at midnight,
iytes bent on uncovering It most have been the third Sex
TRUTH. They are me college in- On The Beach, or the Tequila
wstigative reporters, a feared Sunrises at dinner that persuaded
Jecies. us to actually contemplate visit-
Ourmission: to boldly infiltrate ing the native entertainment es-
he event and give mem new tabtishments.
ruths on parrying. We must keep We were offered "Atlanta's
nrnind however the Prime Dtrec- Finest Adult Entertainment by
ive. COVER THE STORY. the nearby Dreamt Girl Lounge, with a rude wakeup call
Although we had an hour delay Junior CTewmembers, Bonehead, bathing facilities, apparenriv,
nUunchingtherefurbishedIg& Lewis and Earl the Recreation signed by the peoples n? ,
Jksl (now complete with purple Officer, beamed over, while the Midgetis Galaxy, forced i h� J!
wanbag and unsecured sola), at cap aid Gunsekr Burbella to kneel while trying to 1!
Varp seven speed we came out of (whose name would later become fteling uncleansed and
yperspace in the galaxy GA. On a drunken party yodel) stayed at things in dizzy camera an�uT$
mpube power we leacrMrf plane- the Base to rest and check out the crew stumbled to the traif
KM � elevator to beam downT!1
Romuka's new Highway Atw�drmkinriimumand the conference activities
?� wWled ajsrter belt of exotic Journalistic master.
lothrough dancers tractor beamed money SeeSHrre, '
The main servi ng wench wa s a n
ugly creature, perhaps Klingon
bred. In glasses and leather, she
repeatedly asked for tips. After
our beer, cigarettes and footstools
evaporated, she influenced us to
leave.
Back in our room, we found the
captain and counselor passed ou t
The pay-movie channel box was
uncooperative, due to the primi-
tive technology of the planet. We
fell asleep watching a frog pupped
and a bear discussing rmanria
policy.
Our duties began the next da

previous
machine trv
tun
It!
Ship's log r
Continued from page 8
across the galaxy lectured on the
proper techniques in COVERING for I
IHESTORY. Lunch wasserved in
between seminars b insolent
Base staff
The meal itself consisted ot
stringy fat culled from a lei-ran
milk producing beast Our i
was slighted in the acqui I
carbohydrates andtl . liq
uids we reeieved wen
plant leaves
After hours mon I
speakers, we were li
begin the sei � nd leg ol r mi
sion. Attractive femal
own home planet tri k 11
Officer into
to a nighti lub d
When he return ;
night, he reported a I
dence ol transvesl tisi
planet He had sal
way back to the Ba
obviously shal
The rest ol th
ordered pizza bull
McPartland Trio conceA
shows jazz competence
By CHRIS BRINCH II LD
St A - kci
The Marian McPartl u
performed in Hendrix
Tuesday evening befon
audience as part ol the ! i
lina University Con crl
The trio consists of McPari
piano, and a bassist and .i :
mcr.
Marian McPartland is i
woman who start I hei
reer touring vauck
During World War II
the ENSA, (the English ; u
the USO,) and later tran ferredi
the USO. It was with thei
she met and performed v
netist immv McPartland
she later married
McPartland's sense of I
was evident during the shi
in the program , which stab
the listed songs would be pi
"Depending upon the Baron tri
pressure, the State of the I
and the- strange promptings
Spirit
The group opened with I
clagSic-Take the 'A' Trail
Billy Strayhorn. Their re
was unusual but not so di
as to take a way from the
music.
The group played a p
was written by Ellis Ma-
ther of VVynton and
Marsalis, called "Syndi
"Their whole famiK is ry tal
ented said McPartland.
The brio also did a rei
Stevie Wonder's
Lovely that was, in I
Play opens
Wednesday
at McGinnis
Continued from page 8
make love. 1 le
is not in the mood iv.
not only because she i
siveasa person and too succe
at her work but because that
he himself lost an important busi-
ness account. To which she dryh
remarks "1 had no idea your sex
life was so dependent on your
sales volume
The fourth corned) is a por
traval of a voting man, Mike sul
tenng from premarital jitters The
groom-to-be is afflicted with cold
feet when he faces the fact that his
marnage to Susan is only four
. days away.
At four o'clock in the mom
I he knocks on his fiancee s door to
tell her he can't marry her One ot
��his hysterical reasons is that her
arms are too thim She lets him
rant and rave but then asks it he
has picked up the tuxedos and
through tear) eyes he smiles and
"fays yes
The fifth and last comedv Is- the
longest and most touching Frank
and Bea are a couple who have
been married for over thirty years
and have come to think ot matri-
mony as a troublesome but neces
sary institution
Long settled into compiacencj
they have a sudden problem
their son, Richie, alter six years of
marriage to loan, is planning a
divorce. The two paren ts set ou t to
end the rift. In bitter-sweet but
amusing confessions, lather talks
to son and mother to daughter-in-
law, and no one gets anywhere,
.but on the way there are humor
and truth.
renown as one
PAKH
830-1
IIAVE 2 SV
iOR SKIR
i 3RD PAIR
i FRB
Coupon
w
i-ou've survivj
produced a
and let Kinkl
efficiency amj
Cre;
321 E 1
.M

-a � mmm-wmi-m' ���
mr





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 12, 1987
ashes plot
i�
it in
.n t
to
to
i
ol
fc
r,
a
d
).
i

1 happell star in the East Carolina PI
- and Other Strangers starting Wedr
Theater.
g in Atlanta
ng turns
ise with
jfore our
Imatically
Iton com-
I third Sex
Tequila
jrsuaded
ire visit-
ant es-
and the
)f exotic
money
from the crew s wallets N
forgetful ot the Prirrw . i
the News Officer porceeded
ruthlessly interrogate thi
est stripper
Though degrading, s
peared to enjoy it, inde I
came back to our tabk
private jiggle for us and si �
back on the flashing, roped
stage.
The main serving wen
ugly creature, perhaps f
bred, in glasses and k at
repeatedly asked for Hi
our beer, cigarettes and I
evaporated, she inilueno
leave.
Back in our room, we f. ,und
captain and counselor pa
The pay-movie channel I
uncooperative, due to th.
tive technology of the plane!
fell asleep watching a frog pupn,
and a bear discusss
policy.
Our duties began the i .
with a rude wakr
bathing facilities, appare-
signed by the pev;
Midgetis Galaxy, forced the crew
to kneel while trying to showw
Feeling uncleansed and
things m dizzy camera Mi
crew stumbled to the rrar
elevator to beam doW7,
conference activities
Journalistic masters h,
See SHIP'S. Pao
I
Ship's log reveals fear and loathing in Atlanta
continued from page 8
across the galaxy lectured on
proper techniques in COVERING
THESTORY. Lunch wassorved in
between seminars, by insolent
Rise staff.
The meal itself consisted of
stringy fat culled from a Terran
milk producing beast Our party
was slighted in the acquistion of
carbohydrates andthe only liq-
uids we recieved were unsueared
plant leaves.
Alter hours more ol notes and
speakers, we were dismissed to
begin the second leg of our mis
sion. Attractive females from our
own home planet tricked the Rec
Officer into accompanying them
to a nightclub downtown
When he returned late that
night, he reported a high inci-
dence of transvestitism on the
. lanet. He had safely made his
s ay back to the Base, but he was
b iously shaken.
l"he rest of the crew almost
rdered pizza, but the cost ol the
necessary amount needed to feed
mo Libel's officers was too much
for budgets devastated by the
previous nights excesses.
An expedition to find a bank
machine that accepts Starfleet
cards proved fruitless. We re-
turned to the restaurant we hit the
night before, where a waitress
moving at sub-impulse power
kept us hungry for an hour.
Returning to the Base, we
beamed from level to level,
investigating(and always COV-
ERING) parties. The best one,
located on the fourth floor, held
our attention for a few hours.
Its chief attractions were a bath-
tub of free beer and the chance to
trade insults with the Chapel Hill
delegation. After the tub drained
and the UNC losers exited, we
rallied with a loud "M
BURRRRBELLLAH and headed
to the lobby.
Said lobby and adjacent bar was
crammed with overpriced drinks
and overpaid speakers trying to
woo nubile young college report-
ers. A television screen put Satur-
day Night Live in thering with the
ongoing show in the lobby.
The counselor soon engaged in
conversation with a Gregg All-
man lookalike from Australia.
News officer Lewis locked him-
self in the room at the demise of
the first party and wouldn't come
out. The captain occupied himself
with various females, trimming
the fat, so to speak.
Eventually, the main thrust of
the gathering, pushed by the close
of the Base bar, headed to a new
location on the second level. In
this room, drinkagc was continu-
ally promised. It never appeared
and at last, the remnants of the
Libel crew went to bed.
Rec Officer Earl crawled home
later and reported his adventures
in Downtown. The Counselor's
whereabouts were questioned.
She finally surfaced in the room
around sunrise. Lewis remained
comatose until checkout time.
Noon came all too soon. The
remains of the rum and our good-
will were sandwiched into the
cooler. We pulled free of the
Romulan Web and found a bank
machine.
Buttering underfoot in the
bank oarking lot, a Pizza Hut
coupon swayed our lunch deci-
sion. After a Meat Lover's pizza,
punctuated with old Prince songs
on the jukebox, we set course for
Greenville.
By the sixi'n hour of the journey,
tempers wjre fraying. Sugges-
tions- were made to keep the
peace. For the remainder of the
journey, we sang the only song we
all knew'Movin' On Up" from
"The Jeffersons 37 times.
Outside of Wilson, one last
mission remained. We had COV-
ERED THE STORY, got our
sources and now it was time for
one last prank.
We contacted Commodore
Mallard on sub-space radio. The
captain informed him we had
been imprisoned by the authori-
ties in Columbia, under suspicir
of posessing illegal substances.
The Libel and been im-
pounded, and over 500 credits
were needed to secureour release,
he spazzed, understandably, as
we told him our transmission was
being jammed.
We contacted him again, min-
utes later, and told him of our
clever prank. Ill, he broke trans-
mission. We flew home and thus
icd the COVERAGE of Fear
nd Loathing In Atlanta.
Commodore Mallard still re-
fuses to acknowledge our return
home. He will have to eventually
though, so we can get shore leave
to COVER Dallas next year.
Yeoman Bonehead, out.
McPartland Trio concert
shows jazz competence
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center Is Open
Mon Tues, & Wed. Fri. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
9 a.m. - 2 p.m. & by appointment
By CHRIS BRINCEFIELD
Suit l ntrr
he Marian McPartland Trio
rformed in Hendrix theater
day evening before a large
nee as part ot the East Caro
niversity Concert Series
� (consistsof McPartland on
and a bassist and a drum-
Si irian McPartland is a British
in w ho started her jazz ca
. audeville theaters.
� Id War II. she joined
. sh parallel of
i ! iter transferred to
� � as w ith them that
� mod with cor-
M Partland, whom
:
M - e ol humor
i show and
stated that
the listed - I be played
Dc pend . irometric
Union,
-of the
in group o � the jazz
dasMc "TnVr the I rain" by
ndition
different
the original
d a piece that
I llis Marsalis, fa
' n and Branford
d "Svndrone
�' : �lc family is very tal-
� I said McPartland
also did a rendition of �
transformation of the piece from a
rockish ballad to one of pure jazz.
The program was composed of
other classics such as Charlie
Parker's "Scrapple From the
Apple Cole Porter's "1 Love
You and another of Billy
Strayhorn'shits; "The Intimacy of
Blues"
The group also played some
more recent works such as "Dol-
phin Dance" by Herbie Hancock
and Windows" by Chick Corea.
McPartland remains busy
apart from her touring and re-
cording. She owns her own rec-
ord company, Halcyon Records,
and hosts a National Public Radio
show called "Marian
McPartland's Piano Jazz" which
can be heard locally own WTEG-
FM, Newborn.
She is also an active author and
is currently working on a book
about women in jazz.
Mrs. McPartland exhibits a
thorough understanding of jazz
music and virtuosity of the piano.
She proved that 4fVrJheTvcs her
renown as one dfpMfifittbt
important figures in j�i7z'
PARTY ANIMALS
KafiooM I Vlivcrcd inC'oatumr
dallti Cuff
Cator Cum
IVnqu.n (or 1 Iinr
Birthday or any MEMtio
For an appointment or more infor
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline,
757-0003
1 1 1 East Third Street - The Lee Building
Greenville. N. C.
Free Pregnancy Test-
Confidential Counseling
� 5�
� � � �� Ulvl �
Mkrion "McPartland, i versatile jazz performed'composer is
shownhere practicing before her ECU concerUPhoto by Thomas
ntures
Health
1st Annual "Healthy Family Lecture"
presents
Jin evening xinth
(Dr. (Benjamin Spocfi
Topic: Stresses Affecting Families and Children
Tuesday - November 17, 1987 -7:30 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
Mendenhall Student Center
ECU Campus
Sponsored by:
ECU School of Medicine and Allied Health Sciences
Pitt County Medical SocietyAuxiliary
The Hilton Inn of Greenville imMuik.i
Through the generosity of our sponsors and Dr Benjamin Spock the presentation is
FftEE TO THE PUBLIC
830-1823
RESUMES
Professional Resume Composition
At Ian he Personnel Services
209 Commerce Street, Suite B
10 discount with this ad.
355-7931
Wonder's "Isn't Sh
that was, in affect.
Play opens
Wednesday
at McGinnis
&OJWAI"
Greenville's Only
Premium
Quality Cleaners
Since 1935
Continued from page 8
make love. He
is not in the mood, he claims
not only because she is too aggres
sue as a person and too successful j
at her work but because that day �
he himself lost an important busi-
ness account. To which she dryly
remarks "I had no idea your sex
life was so dependent on your
sales volume
The fourth comedy is a por-
trayal of a young man, Mike, suf-
fering from premarital jitters The
groom-to-be is afflicted with cold
feet when he faces the fact that his
marriage to Susan is only four
davs away.
At four o'clock in the morning
he knocks on his fiancee's door to
tell her he can't marry her. One of
his hysterical reasons is that her
arms are too thim. She lets him
rant and rave but then asks if he
has picked up the tuxedos and
through teary eyes he smiles and
says yes.
the fifth and last comedy is the
longest and most touching. Frank
and Bea are a couple who have
been married for over thirty years
and have come to think of matri-
mony as a troublesome but neces-
sary institution.
Long settled into complacency,
they have a sudden problem �
their son, Richie, after six years of
marriage to Joan, is planning a
di vorce. The two parents set out to
end the rift. In bitter-sweet but
amusing confessions, father talks
to son and mother to daughter-in-
law, and no one gets anywhere,
but on the way there are humor
and truth.
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lOR SKIRTS CLEANED
i
3RD PAIR CLEANED
FREE
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111 W. 10THST.
CORNER OF 10THEVANS
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a pi res December 8, 1987
THESES.
WE DELIVER.
You've survived months of labor pains. And youve
produced a beautiful, healthy thesis. Now. breathe easy
and let Kinko's reproduce your brain-child with speed,
efficiency and plenry of TLC.
kinko's
Great copies. Great people.
321 EiotJi street
Frtck 71)0vn-1ftM�m
(919)752-0875
� �00pr"
WOMEN'S BILLIARDS
TOURNAMENT
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1987
MSC BILLIARDS CENT ;R - 6:30 P.M.
Call 757-6611
Entry Fee: $2.00 - Due Monday, November 16,
5:00 p.m.
If sufficient participation permits, the winner will
receive an all expense paid trip to Knoxville, Tn
to compete in the Regional Tournament.
.J
� mmm
mnmmm
rt
1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 12, 1987 9
ashes plot
irtmrnt in
to
to
al
k:
r,
a
d
).
d
H happell star in the I ast Carolina Pla
- and Other ;$ starting Wed
Theater
g in Atlanta
ng rums,
pase with
?fore our
fanatically
ton com-
irrcoms,
lews Offi-
cer hit
iming for
?rent and
pillow.
id to be
Time
luries, al-
s blessed
cognized
fge stores
third Sex
Tequila
?rsuaded
�te visit-
ant es-
, and the
f exotic
money
from the crew is. ?
forgetful of the I mt I
the News Officer n
ruthlessly interrogate t!u
est stnppcr
Though degrading,
pea red to enjoy it,
came back to our table .
private jiggle for us
back on the flashing ropi
stage.
The main serving wei I
ugly creature, perhaps I
bred. In glasses and leatl
repeatedly a�-ked for tips
our beer, cigarettes and
evaporated, she tnflueno :
leave.
Back in our rcxm, w
captain and counselor j :
The pay-mo vie cham
uncooperative. du
rive technology of the
fell asleep watching
and a bear discus
policy.
Our duties began t
with a rude traki
bathing facilities, appar,
signed by the pei
Midgetis Galaxy, forced
to kneel while trying to
Feeling uncleansed anc
things in dizzy camera angles "
crew stumbled to the tra
elevator to beam do, J
conference actiries
Journalistic masfe
See SHIP'S. na,f

Ship's log reveals fear and loathing in Atlanta
Continued from page 8
across the galaxy lectured on
proper techniques in COVERING
THE STORY. Lunch was served in
between seminars, by insolent
Rise staff.
The meal itself consisted of
stringy fat culled from a Terran
milk producing boast Our party
was slighted in the acquistion of
carbohydrates andthe only liq-
uids werecicvcd were unsugared
plant leaves.
After hours more of notes and
speakers, we were dismissed to
begin the second leg of our mis-
sion Attractive females from our
own home planet tricked the Rec
Officer into accompanying them
to a nightclub downtown.
When he returned late thai
night, he reported a high inci-
dence of transvestitism on the
planet. He had safely made his
x.n back to the Base, but he was
iously shaken.
1 he rest ot the crew almost
rdered pizza, but the cost ol Un-
necessary amount needed to feed
the Libel's officers was too much
for budgets devastated by the
previous nights excesses.
An expedition to find a bank
machine that accepts Starfleet
cards proved fruitless. We re-
turned to the restaurant we hit the
night before, where a waitress
moving at sub impulse power
kept us hungry for an hour.
Returning to the Base, we
beamed from level to level,
investigating(and always COV-
ERING) parties. The best one,
located on the fourth floor, held
our attention for a few hours.
Its chief attractions were a bath-
tub of free beer and the chance to
trade insults with the Chapel 11 al 1
delegation. After the tub drained
and the UNC losers exited, we
rallied with a loudM. .
BURRRRBHLl LAM and headed
to the lobby-
Said lobby and adjacent bar was
crammed with overpriced drinks
and overpaid speakers trying to
woo nubile young college report-
ers. A television screen put Satur-
day N ight Li ve in the ring with the
ongoing show in the lobby.
The counselor soon engaged in
conversation with a Gregg All-
man lookalike from Australia.
News officer Lewis locked him-
self in the room at the demise of
the first party and wouldn't come
out. The captain occupied himself
with various females, trimming
the fat, so to speak.
Eventually, the main thrust of
the gathering, pushed by the close
of the Base bar, headed to a new
location on the second level. In
this room, drinkage was continu-
ally promised. It never appeared
and at last, the remnants of the
Libel crew went to bed.
Rec Officer Earl crawled home
later and reported his adventures
in Downtown. The Counselor's
whereabouts were questioned.
She finally surfaced in the room
around sunrise. Lewis remained
comatose until checkout time.
Noon came all Ux soon. The
remains of the rum and our good-
will were sandwiched into the
cooler. We pulled free of the
Romulan Web and found a bank
machine.
Fluttering underfoot in the
bank oarking lot, a Pizza Hut
coupon swayed our lunch deci-
sion. After a Meat Lover's pizza,
punctuated with old Prince songs
on the jukebox, we set course for
Greenville.
By the sixth hour of the journey,
tempers w�re fraying. Sugges-
tion? were made to keep the
peace. For the remainder of the
journey, we sang the only song we
all knewMovin' On Up" from
"The Jeffersons 37 times.
Outside of Wilson, one last
mission remained. We had COV-
ERED THE STORY, got our
sources and now it was time for
one last prank.
We contacted Commodore
Mallard on sub-space radio. The
captain informed him we had
been imprisoned by the authori-
ties in Columbia, under suspicion
of poscssing illegal substances.
The Libel and been im-
pounded, and over 500 credits
were needed to secureour release,
he spazzed, understandably, as
we told him our transmission was
being jammed.
We contacted him again, min-
utes later, and told him of our
clever prank. Ill, he broke trans-
mission. We flew home and thus
ended the COVERAGE of Fear
and Loathing In Atlanta.
Commodore Mallard still re-
fuses to acknowledge our return
home. He will have to eventually
though, so we can get shore leave
to COVER Dallas next year.
Yeoman Bonehcad, out.
McPartland Trio concert
shows jazz competence
By CHRIS BRINCEFIELD
Suit Wnlcr
i Marian McPartland Trio
rformed in Hendrix theater
;day oenmg before a large
nee as part oi the East Caro
niversit) Concert Series.
io trioconsistsol McPartland on
and a bassist and a drum
ii M Partland is a British
uman w ho started her jazz ca-
aude ille theaters.
rid W ar II. she joined
i nglish parallel of
1 later transferred to
.is with them that
: formed with cor-
M Partland, whom
the
w of humor
the show and
ich stated that
ild be played
e Barometric
t the Union,
ptingsof the
i
Tht en
cassc TtvVo One A
ith the jazz
I ram" by
ndition
different
he original
transformation of the piece from a
rockish ballad to one of pure jazz.
The program was composed of
other classics such as Charlie
Parker's "Scrapple From the
Apple Cole Porter's "I Love
You and another of Billy
Stra horn's hits; "The Intimacy of
Blues "
The group also played some
more recent works such as "Dol-
phin Dance" by Herbie Hancock
and "Windows" by Chick Corea.
McPartland remains busy
apart from her touring and re-
cording. She owns her own rec-
ord company, 1 lalcyon Records,
and hosts a National Public Radio
show called "Marian
McPartland's Piano azz" which
can be heard locally own WTEG-
I M. Newborn.
She is also an active author and
is currently working on a book
about women in jazz.
Mrs. McPartland exhibits a
thorough understanding of jazz
music and virtuosity of the piano.
She proved that &rhcrvos her
renown as one Uf jBtiUtfikflbst
important figures in j.177
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center Is Open
Mon Tues, & Wed. Fri. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
9 a.m. - 2 p.m. & by appointment
For an appointment or more infor
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline,
757-0003
l l l East Third Street - The Lee Building
Greenville, N. C.
Free Pregnancy Tcst-
Confidential Counseling
l ft
d a piece that
is Marsalis, fa-
n and Branford
illed "Svndrone
le family is very tal-
nd McPartland.
0 did a rendition of J
Vondcr's "Isn't Sh
that was, in affect.
PARTY ANIMALS
Halii�ns IViivrrrd in Coitumw
CunlU-Orarra
Cator -Crams
IVnqu.n Km l liir
Birthday or any occawt
830-1823
"
wKM?Fart1' " Veri,e jazz P��nntf � composer, is
shown here practicing before her ECU
Walters)
concert.fPhoto by Thomas
rrtures
Hearth
1st Annual "Healthy Family Lecture"
presents
9bn eveningzintfi
"Dr. "Benjamin Spocfi
Topic: Stresses Affecting Families and Children
Tuesday - November 17, 1987 -7:30 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
Mendenhall Student Center
ECU Campus
Sponsored by:
ECU School of Medicine and Allied Health Sciences
Pitt County Medical SocietyAuxiliary
The Hilton Inn of Greenville titeivnrtrvr
Through tht generosity of our sponsors and Dr Benjamin Spock the presentation is
fUee to the: PUBLIC
RESUMES
Professional Resume Composition
Atlantic Personnel Services
209 Commerce Street, Suite B
10 discount with this ad.
355-7931
Flay opens
Wednesday
at McGinnis
Continued from page 8
ike love. 1 le
is not in the mood, he claims,
i t only because she is too aggres-
sive asa person and too successful
at her work but because that day
he himself lost an important busi-
ness account. To which she dryly
remarks "I had no idea your sex
life was so dependent on your
sales volume
The fourth comedy is a por-
trayal of a young man, Mike, suf-
fering from premarital jitters. The
groom-to-be is afflicted with cold
feet when he faces the fact that his
marriage to Susan is only four
da vs away.
At four o'clock in the morning
he knocks on his fiancee's door to
tell her he can't marry her. One of
his hysterical reasons is that her
arms are too thim. She lets him
rant and rave but then asks if he
has picked up the tuxedos and
through teary eyes he smiles and
says yes.
the fifth and last comedy is the
longest and most touching. Frank
and Boa are a couple who have
been married for over thirty years
and have come to think of matri-
mony as a troublesome but neces-
sary institution.
Long settled into complacency,
they have a sudden problem �
their son, Richie, after six years of
marriage to Joan, is planning a
divorce. The two parents set out to
end the rift. In bitter-sweet but
amusing confessions, father talks
to son and mother to daughter-in-
law, and no one gets anywhere,
but on the way there are humor
and truth.
Greenville's Only
Premium
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Since 1935
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OR SKIRTS CLEANED1, Sneril
! 3RD PAIR CLEANED j P �
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i
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111 W. 10THST.
xpires December 8, 1987 CORNER OF 10TH . EVANS
Coupon must be presented with incoming order

THESES.
WE DELIVER.
You've survived months of labor pains. And youve
produced a beautiful, healthy thesis. Now, breathe easy
and let Kinko's reproduce your brain-child with speed,
efficiency and plenty of TLC.
kinko's
Great copies. Great people.
321E 10th Street
(919)752-0875
jfrfofits
WOMEN'S BILLIARDS
TOURNAMENT
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1987
MSC BILLIARDS CENT ;R - 6:30 P.M.
Call 757-6611
Entry Fee: $2.00 - Due Monday, November 16,
5:00 p.m.
If sufficient participation permits, the winner will
receive an all expense paid trip to Knoxville, Tn
to compete in the Regional Tournament.
�!�.�� r ci�, a r mmmm��mmm





I
10
THE EAST CAROMNll AIM NOVEMBER 12, 187
Burr still
television
NEW YORK (AD - Raymond
Burr, leaning on a cane, made his
way across the loading dock in the
basement of NBC.
Throughout the recently ended
strike against the network, NBC
brought stars to the studio this
way to avoid picket lines.
The loading dock was crowded
with blue-collar workers, manvof
them black, Hispanic and Orien-
tal. "Look, Terry Mason they
said, nudging each other. "Hi, Mr.
Mason
They all waved at each other -
the workers and the actor - as if
they were old friends. Then, wait-
ing for the freight elevator, he
turned to a reporter and said,
"Remember what I was saving
earlier, about the minorities?
There's your proof
Earlier, in an interview at his
hotel, Burr was explaining why
Terry Mason" is still so popular
three decades after it premiered
on Sept. 21, 1957. The show, fea-
turing the brilliant defense attor-
ney created by author Erie Stanley
Gardner, ran on CBS until 1966.
Since 1986, NBC has found the
subsequent "Perry Mason"
made-for-TV movies so popular
that it runs them during
"sweeps the four months a year
when ratings determine advertis-
ing rates. This November sweeps,
there's Terry Mason: The Case of
the Scandalous Scoundrel air-
ing Sunday.
First of all we try to do as good
a show as we possibly can as far as
entertainment is concerned, that's
the first responsibility Burr said.
"Then, we enjoy something that
our audiences didn't know much
about until the Terry Mason' sto-
ries came along, and that is our
system of justice When I started
as Terry Mason, most or" the mi-
norities in this country didn't
know what they had. They didn't
realize our court system covered
everybody
It was not fust Terry Mason and
Burr's other popular character,
Ironside, who became popular,
but the system of justice they rep-
resented. Burr said.
"Around the world, 'Terrv
Mason' and 'Ironside' both have
been the two most popular
American dramatic hours, espe-
cially in the countries with the
Napoleonic code, guilty until
proven (innocent) - Spain, France
and Italy. Portugal and one or two
other countries.
"When Terry Mason' went on
the air in Italy, one of the (Italian)
senators said, 'You - Terrv Ma-
son' and shows like you - are
going to cause changes in the Ital-
ian law And they have. We had
Spuds is on
best dressed
list
NEW YORK (AT) - Liz Taylor,
Madonna and Spuds Mackenzie
topped Teople magazine's list of
best-dressed celebrities, while
Cher, jane Fonda and Britain's
Duchess of York, Sarah Ferguson,
flunked the fashion test.
One of the judges, designer
Oleg Cassini, said Spuds, the
mascot for a beer company 3 ad-
vertising campaign, was "defi-
nitely the best-dressed man
you've shown me Spuds, how-
ever, is female.
Miss Taylor won praise in
Teople'sNov. 16 issue for her look
in an hourglass gown, while
Madonna's cycling duds were
rated "imaginative" by one judge.
Also getting high marks for
stylishness were Iran-Contra wit-
ness Fawn Hall, called "great
looking and Farrah Fawcett,
who was praised for a sleek new
look.
Fonda was criticized for a dress
that detracted from the body she
keeps so fit, and one judge called
"dreadful" a gown worn by the
Duchess of York. "The band at the
hips emphasizes what she doesn't
want to emphasize said another
judge, designer Arnold Scaasi.
Low ratings also went to Teter
Holm, for his shiny, poorly fitting
suits, and Lisa Bonet, shown in an
outfi t one judge said had a bra that
looked "too much like her hair
playing
lawyer
muiiMi.M.i,
ECU
ECU
dinner again last year, he's a very
old man, but he said, 'You sec?'
They've made many changes in
the Italian law based on the re-
sentment of guilty until proven
innocent
On the brief ride up Fifth
Avenue, even jaded New Yorkers
gawked at the familiar figure in
the limousine. They couldn't hear
Burr complaining that the show
that made him so famous also
ruined his private life.
"It prevented me from any kind
of life at all he said.
He had planned "Ironside" as a
movie, but it, too, became a series,
running for eight years on NBC,
until 1975. Burr played a San
Francisco police chief paralyzed
by a bullet but still fighting crime
from his wheelchair.
East Carolina
Play House
nn st-nt s
1987 SS
iScaaon
November 18
19, 20 A. 21
HIS piti
M( (jinnis fheatrt
(corner ot Fitth & fasterm
General PublU $5.00
ECU Students $4.00
Call: 757-6390
Mark Wenner, Pete Ragusa and Jan Zukowski, the Nighthawks, will
play the Attic Sunday night.
The Attic remains a top draw in Greenville
Continued from page 8
destroyed the Attic in 1975, it was
moved to the corner of 4th and
Cotanche Street. The Attic is pres-
ently located at 209 E. 5th Street.
Haines said, "We learned from
experience that a nightclub
should be stategically laved out.
The Attic is very well laved out.
We have sectional sofas, hanging
plants and a nice atmosphere
The Attic has a gift shop where
"75,000 t-shirts haw either been
sold or given away The giant 15-
foot television is "used quite a
bit according to Haines.
He added, "We have always
worked under the premise of no
dead time, we always try to have
something going on between
breaks so that the audience has
something to do
The Attic began as a private
nightclub in April, 1986. An Attic
membership is $3.00, and guests
are $5.00. Haines' partner is Ste-
wart Campbell.
Haines said, "Students should
be aware that the prices they get
for entrance to clubsdowntown is
much lower than the national
average and state average. This
includes the cover charge and the
price of drinks at the bar
Only on Tuesdays
and Thursdays
Son Contact Lcnse
NEW YORK CITY
Only 5 days left to sign up
The STUDENT UNIONS TRAVEL COMMIT-
TEE is presenting a trip to New York City
(The Big Apple) during Thanksgiving break.
4 Days & 3 Nights
Depart: 8 p.m. Nov. 25,1987
Return: 11 p.m. Nov. 29, 1987
Transportation: Seashore Trailwavs Bus,
I lotel: Century Paramount
Price per person: $129 (quad occupancy); $139
(triple occupancy) and $149 (double occupancy)
See Mendenhall's Central Ticket Office for details. Don't
wait time's running out

xzx
U.ilkin h, ink
; fc�
It's Time To Get
"Pumped Up"
About Energy Savings
If you live in an apartment that has a heat pump, you can volunteer for
Greenville Utilities' pilot project which will test an innovative ideal �
lowering our community's power costs
The pilot project will operate a lot like our successful Bcat-the Peak
Program which has saved S4.5 million in power costs since January
1985.
A switch will he connected temporarily to the air handler o4 your heat
pump so we can control the electrical heat strips during periods oi peak
electrical use. If we can successfully shift the heal strip usage loofl
peak hours, it could mean savings for ou - and the entire community!
If you're interested in volunteering, call George Keel at 752-7166, et
219 and sign up for the pilot project which will run from December 1.
1987 lo April JO, 1988
Permission from the aparuneru management is required for program
participation.
You Can Make A Difference!
Volunteer! vclcicil uill receive a S25 IX) partKipat.on fee
l i
4
THE VAMPIRE
Greenville
Includes:
LensesCare KitFollow-up Care
For 30 Days
Eye Exam Additional
OPTOMOWC
�Y�CAR�C�MT�R:
Dr. John C. Molnar
The Plaza Mall 7S6 9771
Bring Student I.D.
4
?


?
4
Utilities

521 Cotanche St
ANNOUNCES
SAMPLES FROM
OUR UPCOMING
MENU
Tues &. Wed Polio Vucatcco
GnBed bfcatf of chicken f jtto -i? laea Dritm per
pr� ranhe ��- i jnj �net irv evetl uth beans
And ice
$4.95
Thurs Seafood Fajitas For Two
GrUlad SmnmwMmdIflRctnsftufft waid w'fJ prrrr-sand
ommmt V�wi�i mhi ttbk m j nxxhmtwtrttm nfA li m
tjriilla .fMOMpIl fatMKlWJMWI MdfcfMf MM
$11.95
7571666
l ndereoerat
THE WASH PUB
is an equal opportunity
advertiser!
We offer our specials to both sexes no matter
what age, race or religious
conviction they might be.
Monday - DRAFT & DRYER DAY 250 Draft & 25tf for 16
minutes on the Dryers.
Tuesday - TWO FOR ONE DA Y Wash one load of clothes, the
2nd wash in on us.
Wednesday - SOAP & SUDS DAY 15$ Long Neck Bottle Beer
and Free Soap
MonFri. - FLUFF & FOLD SPECIAL 8 a.m10 a.m. drop
off 350 a pound.
T
K
E
2510 E. 10th St. CAR
752-5222 WASH
rj Every
i Free Soap i Sun
i
L
expires 113087
.1 rm
-�
S?
("arnpiiN 'inu
2:00

i

mm
- r'

s






�Ilflvi
1987 88
Reason
heatre
& i astern)
h m
To Get
1 I n
ir heat
rf peak
mnii
program
Make A Difference!
&IL
Utilities
co
S4.95
SH-95 757-1 ij
what you
a 3nt is something
soft and wildly pretty
Shop at
Certain
Things
1
and
652 E Arlington Blvd
Arlington Village
756 322C
6MS
OPENTHURSDAYTIL8P-
I
i
I
2" i � � � �
i

COMICS PAGE
IIIIIX
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 12,1987 11
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Overkill
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70S' - YOU MU5T
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By BARBOL R
KCT0MLYTHE?UNN!M6
PMsT ISN'T M.LTttrVX
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IIU � ASI i AROI INIAN
Sports
OVLMBER 12. 1987 Page 12
Pirates look for winning mark
on road against Southern Miss
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport Fditor
The East Carolina football team
heads to Southern Mississippi
Saturday with one thing on its
mind � a winning season.
The Pirates, 5-5, will be enter-
tained by the Golden Eagles, 5-4,
in a 2 p.m. EST con test.
The game is not only the final
one of the year for the Pirates, but
it also gives the squad a chance to
record their first winning record
since a 8-3 mark in 1983.
"We've set a primary goal all
season long to have a winning
season ECU head coach Art
Baker said. "And now we're in a
position to achieve that mark
Pirate fulback Anthony
Simpson looks to the game as a
chance to heal some of the mental
wounds which have occurred to
him over the past three seasons.
Seasons which saw the Pirates
record a trio of 2-9 marks.
"It (a winning season means a
lot to us (the seniors) Simpson
said. "After going 2-9 for three
straight seasons you have a hurt-
ing feeling inside. If wedon't have
a winning season this year we are
going to leave here feeling like we
didn't contribute to the program
� and we don't want to feel like
that
Simpson, heading into the
Southern Mississippi game
needs only 32 yards of rushing to
break the 2,000-yard plateau for
rushing yards in his career. He
currently has logged 1,968 yards.
Pirate senior safety Ellis Dil-
lahunt agreed with Simpson's as-
sessment of the Southern Miss
game saying that since he had not
been a winner since he came to
ECU, the win would mean every-
thing to him.
Dillahunt alsoadded that he felt
a winning season would get the
ECU program back on the nght
track by ways of getting more
people involved in the Pirate Club
and helping a great deal in the
recruitment of players next year.
The Pirates have other reasons
than the winning season to in-
spire the team to play at their best
That reason is the wav the Golden
Eagles defeated the'Pirates last
season.
East Carolina, behind the pass-
ing of freshman quarterback
Charlie Libretto, moved 80 yards
in 1:40 to score what appeared to
be the winning touchdown and
two-point conversion with only
eight seconds showing on the
clock.
But much to the Pirates' dis-
may, Golden Eagle quarterback
Andrew Anderson hit Lvneal
Anderson for a 73-yard comple-
tion, but the ball was whistled
dead at the Pirates' 20aftcr Alston
had made an illegal forward lat-
eral pass.
The Pirates were left with the
decision of whether or not to al-
low the touchdown, which hap-
pened off the lateral or to accept
the 5-yard penalty from their own
20. They chose to take the penalty
Southern Miss kicker Rex Rinks
then calmy split the uprights with
no time showing on the lock I
boost Southern Miss to a
victory.
"I can still seeit now Dillahunt
said. "I couldn't believe it when it
happened
The play brought about a rule
change in college football which
states that if such circumstances
arose again the penalty would be
enforced from the original line of
scrimmage There, a untimed
play would take place
"I still feel that we won the
game last year Baker said "The
head of the officials said the play
should have been dead and that
we should have won, so I defi
nitelv feel like we won the game
But how much of an inspiration
will the loss be to the team this
year, coach?
"We will no doubt talk about it
this week Baker said "We all
remember it and it is something
that will be on the player's mind
Dillahunt agreed
"We haven't talked about it yet,
but it will probably be on the fel-
lows' minds Dillahunt said
And so will the thoughts of
obtaining a 5-5 record.
Game notes: This is the 13th
meeting between the Pirates and
the Golden Eagles with Southern
Miss holding a 9-3 advantage in
the series. The Pirates have not
defeated the Golden Eagles since
completing the 8-3 1983 regular
season with a 10-6 win in Hat-
tiesburg at Southern Miss
Roberts Stadium.
Ym � �-�u- tnencatmy split the uprights with Roberts Stadium
VIS swlmmers win over Furman Sunday
w�?LBERG Pu& t� women at 2-0 for the place spots coming ,n at 14550 nl, �k-�i � V� Cl J
C arolina swimming
amw had an awe-
- ndwithborhrhemen
? '���'� men emerging victOri-
m oll ge in their
meet of the season
� hosted by E I on
a complete success
,s nea : i h Rick Kobe
k c're en
both squads thus far
� where wo want to
'a son
: ��� d to be in the
����' n meet two days
irlier. fne Furman moot was
't I solely by the men who
I the 11 swimming events
� Idition, Freshman George
alters was awarded the meet's
t valuable swimmer. 1 le had
i outstanding 200-yard back-
roke sw im touching the wall in
58.96.
Mark O'Brien wasn't far be-
i - rie came swimming in
; I lorn Holsten held
third in 2 05.24 with ECU
gall three places m that race.
I he I . I women swimmers
re no less spectacular than the
n who, in a close race, came out
top of Furman 62-51. This win
season
Sherry Campbell won both the
1 and the 3-meter diving events
and her mark of 157.00 on the 1-
rnt ter diving qualified her for the
( A A regional diving meet to be
held in March. Campbell is the
first swimmer this season to qual-
ify for the NCAA's.
In the women's 400-yard med-
ley relay, it was the swimming
combination of Keller Hodges,
Meredith Bridges, Robin Wicks!
and Sonya Hemmingway easily
defeating Furman in 4:09.82.
The men's 400-yard mod lev re-
la) was equally successful with
George Walters, Ron Fleming,
Raymond Kennedy, and Andy
K tor taking first in 3:38.80 while
Mark O'Brien, Fee Htrks. Andy
I ewis, and Chip Kline swam for
third with a time of 3:44.35.
ictory was again in the Pirate's
favor as f.D. Lewis snared first in
the 1000 yard freestyle in 9:59.92.
Pat Brennan settled for second
coming in at 10:02.87.
The women were not as suc-
cessful in the 1000-yard freestyle
as A. Myers of Furman managed
to gain first in 1:57.02. However,
ECll took the second and third
spots as Carolyn Green came in at
11:13.05 and Ginger Carrick fol-
lowed in 11:21.56.
In the men's 200-yard freestyle,
it was Brian Kingsfield and John
Farrell taking the first and second
and 1:47.04 respectively.
Only 1 100 of a second was the
difference iiMkcwincn'sSO-yai
freestyle as Sonj&t lemmiwgway
managed to come out on top of
Furman's T. Meredith with a
winning time of 26.17.
First and second place was
taken in the men's 50-yard frees-
tyle with Ron Fleming swimming
in at 22.55 and Tvgc Pistorio fol-
lowing behind nearly a second
later in 23.22.
The women's 200-yard back-
stroke saw Ginger Carrick shine
as she swam in at 2:17.44. Keller
Hodges' time of 2:19.86 was
enough to grab second place.
The men's 500-yard freestyle
was dominated' by Brian
Kingsfield swimming a first place
time of 4:51.70. J.D. Lewis had to
settle for second with a time of
4:51.93.
Victory also sought after Leslie
Jo Wilson (5:22.22) as she easily
grasped honors in the women's
500-yard freestyle event.
Effort was the only award for
both the men and the women's
400-yard freestyle relay as neither
squad could come up with the
win.
A score of 136 was not high
enough of a score for Scott Milli-
gantobeat Furman's score of 189
and, consequently, Milligan had
to settle for second in the men's 1-
meter diving event. P. Smith
The men's 3-meter diving saw
virtually the same results as P.
Smith could only grasp second.
5cott Milligan wound up in third
place in this event.
breaststroke saw the same marks
in both the men and the women as
Raymond Kdv WMM9
p �& �o �9t
and Pat Brennan (2:17.23) settled
ird. Meredith Bridges easily
defeated J. fngold of Furman
swimming a winning time of
�28.58 as Carolyn Green, orfb
icorid beturtd InpjM; u�acA
fnird.
summing team Is currently 1-1, while the women's J3E1taCtal,T
farewell to Pirate ft
John O'Dnscoll, a senior on the
offensive line is not only Berleth's
ECU teammate, but he was also
his Harper College teammate.
"OD" as he is known to his
teammates savs his most exciting
moment at ECU was the 32-14 win
this year over N.C State. He says
his most embarasstng one was in
the spring, when he won the
coaches All-American award for
holding.
According to "OD the most
special thing about ECU is, "this
year the team has come together
as family and made the sacnfices
necessary to win
Leon Hall, also an offensive
lineman is from Cambria
Heights NY. Hall isanlndustnal
Technology major who savs his
wht��� w. se�mSE� a?�w; SSgpre
SSw-s-ej-s SS? Jsassssa: Sawa
he looked at me as if to sayYou'd while he hs been at ECU. fc.��
See SENIORS page 13
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sporti Writer
For several Pirate seniors on
offense last Saturday marked the
end of their playing careers at
ECU.
Tony Smith, a Fayetteville,
N.C, native, is one of the Pirates
most versatile seniors. Smith, a
wide receiver, is also a punt re-
turner and holder for the place
kicker.
A criminal justice major who
wants to work with the federal
government, Tony remembers his
most exciting moment in Pirate
football as his first collegiate
touchdown in 1986against the de-
fending national champions Penn
State.
Smith says his most emba-
rassing moment was during his
freshman year. " was playing at
better go back to plavmg with
your Tonka Toys, boy
Chuck Berleth, ECU's
placekicker says that Smith and
Matt McLaughlin deserve a lot of
credit for his success at ECU.
Berleth, a Palastine, II native
and Harper Junior College trans-
fer, came to the Pirates who were
m need of a place kicker after the
graduation of Jeff Heath, ECU's
all-time leading scorer.
An Industrial Technology ma-
jor who wants to work in sales and
service after graduation, Berleth
says last year's homecoming
game was a memorable one for
him.
"My best moment was the 47
yard field goal against Georgia
Southern with 12 seconds remain-
ing in the game said Berleth.
'It was great because we won
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Drop-in aerobics cla i
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Tl IE F.AST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 12.1987 13
112
winning mark
Southern Miss
on the clock to
� Miss to a 23-21
ec it now Pillahunt
n t Ivlio e it when it
' about a rule
football which
circumstances
�nail) would be
n the original line of
re a untimed
. .uo
i that we won the
ii Baker said "The
- said the p!av
� �' t n dead and th.it
lave won. so 1 dcfi-
��� ' the game "
1 an inspiration
be to the team this
ubt talk about it
- said "We all
ed about it vet.
) n the fel-
mt said
� �uehts of
Thi- is the 13th
n the Pirates and
es v ith Southern
� ; ad antage in
Pirates have not
den Eagles since
- ; 1983 regular
� 6 v. in in Hat-
v'Uthern Miss'
I
i Sunday
ridges easilj
' I gold of Furman
uning a winning time of
ss. J-2S.S8 .is Carolvn Green. oiTc
n SB! ft nd behind f"pcii. rKJI

�rr,r,9'
la meet during Sunday's victory over Furman. Look
rek's sports section ofThe East Carolinian. The men's
d stands .it 2-0.
ate fans
am
�. ma-
in sales and
Berleth
imecoming
�able one for
It was the 47
linst Georgia
pnds remain-
id Berleth.
kusc we won
e our losing
lat coach Tom
g help to him
ECU.
r scoll, a senior on the
nsive line is not only Berleth's
male, but he was also
r College teammate,
as he is known to his
- :��-says his most exciting
moment at ECU was the 32-14 win
year over N.C. State. He savs
his most embarassing one was in
the spring, when he won the
coaches All-American award for
holding.
According to "OD the most
special thing about ECU is, "this
year the team has come together
as family and made the sacril
necessary to win
Leon Hall, also an of) �
lineman, is from C , rja
Heights,N.Y. Hall is an Industrial
Technology major who savs his
most exciting moment at ECU
was his first game. A pfdved
against Florida State
HaO says the most special thimj
about ECU is the people that he
See SENIORS pag.
.

A
1

IRS News
Outdoor recreation service update
The ORC is offering a five-day and students are eligible to par-
nul .ive-n.ght sk, trip to Winter- ticipate. An $S5 deposit ,s re-
i:ann Ti?r?c1988- �uircd uP�n registration. For
rT , "Eludes lodg- more information, see Mark Ritter
.ng, htt tickets, ski rental and in 115 Memorial Gym or call 757-
transportation. All faculty, staff 6387.
Turkey Trot registration reminder
Be sure to register Nov. 18 at 6 rington Field,
p.m. in Brewster U-103 for the The final fall event INDOOR
annual Turkey Trot. The run will SOCCER, will hold its registra-
rs held Nov. 24 and cover a two t.on Nov. 24 at b p.m. in Brewster
mile distance beginning at Har- D-1G3.
Drop-in aerobics classes still being
offered by Intramural Department
1 hrop-in aerobic fitness classes able. The second Weight Training
a ill be available through Dec. 4. Workshop will be held this week
let vour drop-in fitness cards in in the Memorial Gym Weight
. 4 Memorial Gym daily. A com- Room
k te class schedule is also avail-
Seniors to play in last contest
Continued from page 12
has met. "Just being around the
people on this team has been spe-
cial Hall said. "It'sancxperience
that I will never forget
Ron Jones began his career at
ECU as a starting quarterback in
1985. Today, Jones is a wide re-
ceiver who has proved very valu-
able to the Pirates.
A native of Portsmouth, Va
Jone says his most memorable
moment was starting as quarte-
back against N.C. State in 1985.
The Pirates behind the play of
Jones, won 33-14.
Jones is an Industrial Technol-
ogy major an he feels that the Pi-
rates are "just one big family
"ECU is special said Jones.
"Because the program takes in an
outsider and makes him feel like
part of the family
Another member of the Pirate
family is senior Ben Billings. Bill-
ings is a junior college transfer
from Lees-McRac College. A
Charlotte native, he says that the
friendship of his teammates is
very special to him.
Billings, a tight end for the Pi-
rates, is majoring in Driver's Edu-
cation with a minor in Criminal
Justice. After graduation, he
would like to teach and sell real
estate.
Billings says that he won't for-
get this year'sN.C. State game not
only because ECU won, but also
because the fans ran onto the field
and he was tackled by one.
Another junior college transfer,
is senior Jackie Armstrong. Arm
strong, from South Bend, in,
came to ECU from Ellsworth un-
ior College in Iowa.
A wide receiver for the Pirates,
Armstrong remembers his most
embarassing moment at ECU.
"When I visited ECU, 1 came
from -45 degree weather. I came
dressed in full winter attire and it
ended up being 72 degrees when 1
landed in Kinston Armstrong
said. "I loooked pretty stupid
George Franklin, a senior from
Mt. Airy, N.C, savs his most em-
barassing moment was during his
freshman year.
"1 was put in my first college
game against Southwestern Lou-
isiana. We were losing 42-20
when they threw me a pass with
33 seconds left. I tried to run over
everyone on the field and got the
life beat out of me recalls Fran-
klin. "They had to carry me off the
field and the guvs picked on me
all the way back to Greenville
Franklin is a criminal justice
major who would like to be a pro-
bation officer and work with juve-
niles.
Perhaps the most noted of the
offensive seniors is fullback An-
thony Simpson. "The Bull ol
Broadway" is a Brooklyn, N.Y
native.
Among lus many memories,
Simpson savs hell always treas-
ure ECU's victory this vear over
N.C. State. Among his most em-
barassing moments said Simpson
is a 45-yard kickofl return.
"I took the kkkolt 45 yards
without being touched and still
managed to trip over my own feet
and fall
Hie seniors will be able to add
another special memory at South
ern Mississippi this weekend as
they take a 5-5 record into the
game A win would finish off a
very successful 6-5 senior cam-
paign.
Informal Recreation
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I 2 00 noon 1 .10 p m
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14
)
TUF HAST CAKQL.INIAN NOVEMBER 12, 1967
Fearless Football Forecast
GAMES
ECU at Southern Miss
UNC at Virginia
Alabama at Notre Dame
Auburn at Ga. Tech
N.C Statoat Duke
Michigan at Illinois
Indiana at Mich. Stato
Penn Stato at Pitt
Boston Coll. at Syracuse
Washington at UCLA
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Last Week:
(8-2)
Overall:
(67-33)
ecu
Virginia
Notre Dame
Auburn
N.C. Stato
Michigan
Michigan Stato
Penn Stato
Syracuse
UCLA
DEAN BUCHAN
1 C I Sports Information
last Week:
(b-i)
Overall:
(66-31)
ECU
UNC
Notn- Dame
Auburn
N.C State
Michigan
Michigan Stato
Pitt
Syracuse
UCLA
TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Last Week:
(8-2)
Overall:
(64-36)
ECU
UNC
Alabama
Georgia
N.C. Stato
Michigan
Michigan Stato
Penn Stato
Syracuse
UCLA
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
Last Week:
(7-3)
Overall:
(56-44)
ECU
UNC
Notre Dame
Auburn
N.C State
Michigan
Mulligan State
Penn State
Syracuse
Washington
PATMOLLOY
Assistant Sports Editor
Last Week:
(8-2)
Overall:
(56-44)
Southern Miss
UNC
Notre Dame
(.eorgia
N.C. State
Michigan
Michigan Stato
Pitt
Syracuse
UCLA
Irates grab Charlotte tourney VRftCK ROOM SHOES
By R.ALLEN hips held at Penn State ihe h�mirn " W W V V W W VfffV�lV
BvR. ALLEN
(Tie campus of UNC-Charlotte
was the site as the ECU Frisbee
( lub took championship honors
at Charlotte's first Queen City
I hmiatum Ultimate Frisbee tour-
nament held Nov. 7 & S.
I'he 1 rates went undefeated
,h their tivt
and
game:
outscored the oppostition 75-31.
( luh president ohn Quasar
Brady attributed the clubs suc-
cess in Charlotte to its defensive
nsity and credited the newly-
implemcntcd "Wobblehead
Plan" tor the spark that ignited
the team.
I he defensive domination was
complemented by patient offen-
sive teamwork as the Irates de-
feated host Charlotte 15-5, D.Cs
Death Piggies 15-b and them
Wake Forest 15-6 in Saturday's
games.
Sunday's play saw the Irates
spank Wilmington's Gale Force
15-3 m the semi-final round and
then take on the combined forces
of the Death Piggies .nd Wake
i -rest in the finals.
Although the combination
team proved to be the Irates'
toughest competition ot the tour-
nament, it too was unable to stop
them Ihe ECU squad led 8-6 at
halt and went cm to win 15-11.
The Irates enjoyed surprisingly-
solid play from their rookies
along with the dependable plav of
their experienced veterans.
Rookie player Gary Hurley was
chosen tournament MVP by the
club.
The tourney title is only the
second ever won by the ECU
squad at an away tournament.
"Hie tirst such title came this past
spring at Collegiate Sectionals m
Richmond, 'a.
Thai victory began a campaign
that culminated in a trip to the
Collegiate National Champion-
;CU
m
CAA
volleyball
schedule
East Carolina University will be
the host for the 1987Colonial Ath-
letic Association Championship
Volleyball Tournament this Fri-
day and Saturday, Nov. 13-14.
All six CAA volleyball teams
will participate in the event,
which will be held in MingesColi-
scum.
The tournament teams will be
organized into pools with the top
four finishers playing in the
championship round Saturday.
Friday's matches wil be at 11 a.m
1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m.
Saturday's matches will be at 11
a.m. and 1:30 p.m. with the cham-
pionship match set for 4 p.m.
ECU will play UNC-Wilming-
ton at 1:30 p.m. Friday before bat-
ling top-seeded William and
Mary at 4 p.m.
Entry to the entire tournament
will be free of charge.
ships held at Penn State, fne
Irates compiled a record of only 1
5 at Nationals due in large part to
their being outmanned at least
two to one by nearly every team
they faced.
This year's team, with an im-
pressive bunch of new recruits
and its best ever core of veterans,
plans a return trip to Nationals
but this time is aiming tor domi-
nation - not just participation.
The club now turns its attention
to itsown tournament, Ultimax X,
to be held Nov. 14 & 15 at the
bottom of College Hill
learns from Duke, N.C State,
Virginia lech, U.Va Wilming-
ton, and Washington, DC are
expected to participate. Plav will
begin each d.w at 1 1 am. and
should continue until about 4
p.m.
ihe irates are geared up to
claim their third Ultimax victory
and m ite everyone to come out
and experience the last-paced
I Itimate action and cheer them
on to yet another tournament
championship
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
TAKE AN
EXTRA
10
OFF
Open MonSat. 10-9 OUR EVERYDAY LOW PR
Sunday 1-6 (EXCEPT AIGNER. NIKE AND F
��' With this coupon
A

� � .
FN
A
� i. -�r





14
)
TIH KAS1 tAKPIlN'IAN NXMEMBER 12, 1987

Fearless Football Forecast
GAMLS
ECU at Southern Miss
UNC at Virginia
Alabama at Notre Dame
Auburn at Ga. Tech
N.C. State at Duke
Michigan at Illinois
Indiana at Mich. Stale
IVnn State at Pitt
Boston Coll. at Syracuse
Washington at UCLA
BRIAN BAILIY
VVNCT-TV Sports Director
Last Week:
(8-2)
Overall:
(67-33)
ECU
Virginia
Notre Dame
Auburn
N.C State
Michigan
Michigan State
Penn State
Syracuse
UCLA
DEAN BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
last Week:
(6-4)
Overall:
(66-34)
ecu
UNC
Notre Dame
Auburn
N.C. State
Michigan
Michigan State
Pitt
Syracuse
UCLA
TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Last Week:
(8-2)
Overall:
(64-36)
ECU
UNC
Alabama
Georgia
N.C. State
Michigan
Michigan State
Penn State
Syracuse
UCLA
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
Last Week:
(7-3)
Overall:
(-44)
1 �( U
UNC
Notre Dame
Auburn
N.C. State
Michigan
Mil higan State
Perm State
Syracuse
Washington
PAT MOLLOY
Assistant Sports Editor
Last Week:
(8-2)
Overall:
(56-44�
Southern Miss
UNC
Notre Dame
Georgia
C State
Michigan
Michigan State
Pin
Syracuse
IX LA
Irates grab Charlotte tourney VRAfikRi)?iM"i'lini'c
ByR.ALLLN shins held at Penn State. The 111 lVl I Vf7(feJ
Bv R. ALLEN
�� ial to The li� iru
"he campus of I C Charlotte
was the site as the ECU Frisbec
C lub took championship honors
at Charlotte's first Queen City
Ultimatum Ultimate Frisbee tour-
nament held Nov. 7 & 8.
1 he Irates went undefeated
ugh their five games and
outscored the opposition 75-31.
Club president ohn "Quasar"
Brady attributed the club's suc-
i ss m Charlotte to its defensive
: tensity and credited the newly-
implemented "Wobblehead
iii for the spark that ignited
the team.
1 he defensive domination was
complemented by patient offen-
sive teamwork as the Irates de-
feated host Charlotte 15-5, D.Cs
Death Piggies 15-h and them
Wake Forest 15-6 in Saturday's
games.
Sunday's play saw the 1 rates
spank Wilmington's Gale Force
15-3 in the semi-final round and
then take on the combined forces
� �! the Death Piggies and Wake
1 orest in the finals
Although the combination
cam proved to be the Irates
toughest competition o( the tour-
nament, it too was unable to stop
them The ECU squad led 8-6 at
hall and went on to win 13-11.
1 he Irates enjoyed surprisingly
solid play from their rookies
along with the dependable play of
their experienced veterans.
Rookie player Gary Hurley was
chosen tournament MVP bv the
club.
1 he tourney title is only the
second ever won by the ECU
squad at an away tournament.
Hie first such title came this past
spring at Collegiate Sectionals in
Richmond, Va.
That victory began a campaign
that culminated in a trip to the
Collegiate National Champion-
tCU
CAA
volleyball
schedule
East Carolina University will be
the host for the 1987Colonial Ath-
letic Association Championship
Volleyball Tournament this Fri-
day and Saturday, Nov. 13-14.
All six CAA volleyball teams
will participate in the event,
which will be held in MingesColi-
seum.
The tournament teams will be
organized into pools with the top
tour finishers playing in the
championship round Saturday.
Friday's matches wil be at 11 a.m
1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m.
Saturday's matches will be at 11
a.m. and 1:30 p.m. with the cham-
pionship match set for 4 p.m.
ECU will play UNC-Wilming-
ton at 1.30 p.m. Friday before bat-
ling top-seeded William and
Mary at 4 p.m.
Entry to the entire tournament
will be free of charge.
ships held at Penn State. Tin
irates compiled a record of only 1
1 at Nationals due in large part to
their being outmanned at least
two to one bv nearly every team
they faced.
I his year's team, with an im-
pressive bunch oi new recruits
and its best ever core ol veterans.
plans a return trip to Nationals
but this time is aiming tor domi
nation - not just participation.
The club now turns its attention
to itsown tournament. I ltima Y
to be held Nov. 14 & 1 at the
bottom of College Hill.
Teams from Duke, N.C. State,
Virginia Tech, U.Va Wilming-
ton, and Washington, D.C are
expected to participate Play will
begin each day at 11 a.m. and
should continue until about 4
p.m
1 he Irates are geared up to
claim their third Ultimax victory
and inv ite everyone to come out
and experience the fast-paced
Ultimate action and cheer them
on to yet another tournament
championship.
Greenville Buyers Market
Memorial Drive
TAKE AN
EXTRA
10
OFF
Open MonSat. 10-9 OUR EVERYDAY LOW prn e
Sunday 1-6 (EXCEPT AIGNER NIKE AND REEB K
� m� with this coupon ������������!
Call your mummy
rDfri
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 12, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 12, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.573
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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