The East Carolinian, November 10, 1987






INSIDE
Editorials 4
styleZIZIZZZj
Sports��miq
Classifieds��6
STYLE
Handicapped Student Services provides equal
benefits � see STYLE, page 7.
SPORTS
Pirates keep alive hopes of a winning season with
31-26 win over Temple � see SPORTS, page 10.
�fj� i�uBt (EutQlinxun
Serving the East Carolina .impus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 No. 21
Tuesday, November 10,1987
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Early registration kept from most students
By TONI PAGE
Staff Writer
Despite the complaints of many
working students, the work peti-
tions previously granted for reg-
istration will be suspended inde-
finitely, according to Registrar
Gil Moore.
"Everyone with the exception
of handicapped students will reg-
ister this week according to their
accumulated hours and there will
be no exceptions made, not even
to football players Moore said.
In the past, students who
worked while attending school
were granted work petitions
signed by their employer in an
attempt to schedule around
working hours and help students
who work and go to school.
Moore said this system worked
well until students started abus-
ing it. Some students falsified
their petitions by either forgery or
claiming to work somewhere they
did not, according to Moore.
"Not a single exception will be
made to register early- We have
had numerous calls from stu-
dents, parents, faculty and em-
ployers. In order to be fair, we
can't make any exceptions
Moore said.
Suspicion of forged documents
surfaced when the number of
work petitions drastically in-
creased in Spring of 1987 This
forced administrators to investi-
gate some of the claims that were
made on a some of the petitions.
Moore said some of theemploy-
ers had never even heard of the
students who claimed to be work-
ing for them. In other cases,
Moore said, the forgeries were
obvious because some students
claimed they were employed
hours away from school and
commuted every day.
Some businesses falsely
claimed to be employing a stu-
dent on work petitions, Moore
said.
"Students do not realize first of
all that it is a crime to falsify an
official document, and they also
don't realize that they are hurting
other students who really need to
register early and get a seat in a
SGA refuses VAF transfer request
certain class said Trenton Davis
associate vice chancellor of aca-
demic affairs.
'The decision to suspend the
petition privilege was not taken
lightly and we are sympathetic to
the students to whom this will
have a negative effect. The ad-
ministration had no other choice
but to ban the privilege until a
modified version of the system
can be approved Davis said.
Davis said the university pres-
ently has neither the time nor the
personnel to look into all the
claims made on the petitions and
verify the information.
"We would like to think that we
don't have to check into such
things since students are expected
Bv TIM HAMPTON
Sufi Wnler
The SGA voted down a line-
item transfer for a student group
in the Art Department to build a
ceramic kiln after a long period oi
debate at the Mondav meeting.
The Visual Arts Forum (VAF),
had asked the Appropriation
Committee to transfer $1300 in
funds ar&inally slated for guest
speakersTmo a fund to help build
the kiln. The Appropriation
Committee recommended not to
allow the change in the line item
by an 8-0 decision.
The VAF has alreadv raised
most of the money, $3800, for the
proposed 125ubic-fcet ceramic-
kiln, according to Constance
Jones, president of the forum.
Jones said the forum needs the
$1300 to buy additional supplies
in order to begin building.
The committee decided that the
Art Department, rather than the
SGA, has the responsiblity to
provide educational tools for the
students, according to Steve
Hines, a member of the commit-
tee. Mines said that in the past, the
SGA has turned down other de-
partments that have requested
funding for educational tools,
such as a chemistry lab.
Jones argued that the SGA is
misinformed and biased towards
certain clubs.
"The SGA gives money to guys
who throw frisbees and surf, but
they won't give money to a viable
group which wants to broaden it's
horizons Jones said about the
vote after the meeting.
The legislature granted Jones
speaking privileges during de-
bate over the bill. She said that her
organization is not seeking addi-
tional funding but only wants to
After Jones told of the VAF
approval, legislator Bennett Eck-
ert said he was disturbed that the
VAF was not complying with the
SGA guidelines on how the
money is supposed to be used.
"I was never told by the SGA
how the money was supposed to
break down Jones said.
In other business:
�$230 was appropriated to the
ECU Council for Exceptional
Children.
�Constitutions were approved
for the ECU Cycling Club, ECU
Frisbee Club, ECU Rugbv Club
and ECU Surf Club.
to tell the truth Davis said.
Davis said he was also bothered
by the lack of concern on the part
of the offending students. He said
many students did not believe
they had committed a serious of-
fense nor did they think twice
about "cheating" someone else
out of a much-needed seat.
Scott Thomas, ECU Student
Government Association presi-
dent, is disappointed that a solu-
tion to the petition problem could
not have been reached prior to
pre-registration.
"From what I understand the
situation is temporary until a bet-
ter alternative can be reached. I
don't think that the present situ-
ation is a feasible solution, how-
ever, but it was an administrative
move which will be discussed
later after we see how registration
goes without the work petition
Thomas said.
"It does look like something
could have been done sooner.
Hopefully not much damage will
be done to the working students
who are trying to graduate on
time Thomas added.
tion of the academic integrity
policy, and therefore grounds for
suspension.
'The violations were not pur-
sued last semester, however, be-
cause the university did not have
the manpower ti check into all of
the claims; therefore, alternative
measures had to be taken in order
to control the manipulation of the
system, " Davis said
"The petition process is not a
right, it is a pnvelege given to
students to help them out with
their scheduling as much as pos-
sible Moore said.
"We ha ve oneof the finest regis-
trations of any institution any-
where and with our on-line sys-
tem there is no reason why stu-
dents with qualifying hours can't
get the classes they want Moore
said.
"It is not the time of the course-
many times that causes students
to get closed out of a section, it is
the structure of the course and
number of seats available which is
determined by the department
Usually the popular courses start
National Chemistry Day'
observed Friday
According to Davis, attempting closing out half-way through the
to falsify work petitions is a viola- sophomores Moore said.
North Carolina chemistry
teachers participated in a one-day
symposium in honor of National
� , i j , ayuiLnjsiuiii in nunor or iationai
ransfer money already allocated Chernistry Day at ECU Friday
from OnP inp ltnm intn annfhor 3 J. . ���
from one line item into another.
Jones said the eight individual
art major groups within the VAF
had approved the measure to
transfer funds in their meeting.
The eight groups within the VAF
represent the eight majors in the
Art Department.
featuring workshops, lectures
and demonstrations.
"They (the teachers) can use the
workshops to learn new class-
room procedures to prepare the
students for the future said Judi
tered technological problems of
societal importance.
Participants observed how in-
structional materials for the class-
room can be created by using the
Macintosh computer and IBM PC.
Visual aids and demonstrations
displayed science programs for
the handicapped, development
and use of videotapes for chemi-
Utleg of the ECU Chemistry De- cal instruction, and commercially
PUGWASH comes to ECU
and sponsors a fast
She anticipates a good
rc-
A new campus organization,
PUGWASH, will sponsor a stu- sponse to the'fast, which is de-
dent fast November 19, according signed to educate people about
to President Tracie May.
"The group has been in exsis-
tence for about six weeks. The
organization is focused towards
students who are interested in
learning about science and tech-
nology and how to solve world
problems in relation along with
science and technology May
said.
world hunger
The original PUGWASH was
partment
The ECU Chemistry Depart-
ment and Eastern North Carolina
Section of the American Chemical
Society sponsored the celebration
in Mendenhall Student Center.
"Wonderscience" � fun physi-
cal science activities for children
� was introduced by Terry
Switzcr from Washington, D.C.
available materials for the com-
puter.
"We had a really good tum out
of teachers, from both eastern and
piedmont regions of our state
said Utleg.
Hands-on workshops featured
Microcomputer-Based Laborato-
ries presented by Dr. John C Park
from North Carolina State Uni-
versity.
Switzer discussed activity book
started by Berrrand Russell and nts g l? dcve!�P lo&ca Political SCietlCe MnfprPnrP
Albert Einstein. "These two felt thinking skllls for middle school M l" science LUnjereUCP
that scientists play an intricate students-
I FAT CAROLINA .
Dr. Peter Yankwich delivers the keynote address, addressing the
issue of support for science and mathematics education (Jon Jordan
� Photolab).
part in world peace May said.
The organization now has
twelve members. To increase
membership they will have a
sign-up table in front of the stu-
dent store Nov. 16-17.
"ChemCom: chemistry in the
community" was a unique design
introduced during the workshop
sessions also. This design focused
on critical and decision-making
activities among chemistry-cen-
Hough speaks on USSR
By TIM HAMPTON
Staff Writer
"Gorbachev's Glasnost re-
forms are for real Jerry Hough of
Duke University said in a lecture
about the Soviet Union.
Hough, speaking Monday
night in Austin Bldg addressed
Soviet domestic politics and US-
USSR relations as part of a four-
lecture series on the USSR. The
series comes a week after the
USSR celebrated its 70th anniver-
sary of socialism beginning in
1917 with the Bolshevik revolu-
tion over the Russian Czar.
Glasnost, meaning openness
in Russian, is General Secretary
Mikhail Gorbachev's plan to
transform the superpower from a
traditional closed society into a
Hough said in order for the
Soviets to make this transition
they must first make the sacrifice
of high inflation, high prices and
high unemployment. Unemploy-
ment is currently non-existent as
the Soviets have adhered to
Lenin's ideals that every worker
should have a job.
Soviet workers have shown .
willingness to improve their con-
dition in the last decades, accord-
ing to Hough. He pointed out that
42 percent of Soviet workers had
high school diplomas in 1979
compared to 20 percent in 1970.
High prices are unheard of in
the Soviet Union : a loaf of bread
costs a quarter, a ride on the
Moscow metro costs 10 cents, and
ogy between the two world
superpowers, according to
Hough. Gorbachev referred to the
SDI program in his speech on 70
years of Soviet socialism last week
in Moscow.
"SDI may just be the boogie
man Gorbachev needs to con-
vince the Soviet people that they
need reforms to catch up with the
other powers Hough said.
Hough said Gorbachev has
consolidated power more rapidly
than any other Soviet leader.
"Gorbachev is moving cau-
tiously in implementing the radi-
cal glasnost reforms. He knows
the reforms which open the Sovi-
ets to western ideas will take time,
possibly 25 years to see a real
nation which will be open to some monthly rent for an apartment is change' Houehrsaid
Dr. Ann Benbow of A.C.S. instructs teachers about how to make hovercrafts Friday as part ot the
Wonderscience workshop (Jon Jordan � Photolab).
$25, according to an Associated
Press article in the Atlanta Hough is the author of "The
Constitution. Struggle for the Third World:
Hough also said the Soviets Soviet Debate and American
must fill the gap in the technology Options
differences; they lag five years The lecture series on the So-
behind other countries such as viet Union will continue tommor-
T?Uti orea' and � row as "Soviet-American Coop-
ntTtateS' eration: Payoff or Rippoff?" be-
Gorbachev is using President gins at 3:30 and "Soviet-American
tectionism if they want to exist as Reagan's Star Wars (Strategic Relations: Toward the Future"
a world superpower Hough Defense Iniatitive) program as a begins at 7:30 in the Brewster
saul. symbol of thedisparity in technol- Building B-102.
western ideologies.
The Soviet economy, for in-
stance, has for years shunned for-
eign investment, but recently,
Gorbachev has allowed
Volkswagen of Germany to open
a automobile factory on Soviet
soil, Hough said.
"The Soviets must dismantle
the iron curtain of economic pro-

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-21 IE EAST CAROLINIAN Mnvpuurp ,n 987


Schools see return of North
�PS) u. Col. Oliver North is
Kitting a second chance on the
nation's college campuses.
A videotape- of the slide show in
favor of the Nicaraguan rebels
that North was barred from giv-
ing last summer has become a
popular show at the universities
of Maryland, Southern Califor-
nia, Texas and other campuses in
recent weeks.
"It gives you a good idea of
what Oliver North was trving to
say this summer said Texas stu-
dent Chris Yostic after viewing
the slide show in Austin.
me congressional committee
investigating the Iran-Contra
scandal in July refused to permit
North to present the slide show
supporting the Reagan
administration's Central America
policy.
So North - through the slide
show is taking his message
directly to college students and
other interested groups, with as-
sistance from the Republican
Party
"Many of the slides, until re-
centl) were classified photo-
graphs, or show charts and
graphs of classified information "
said David Jensen, Sen. William
Armstrong's (R-Co) press secre-
tary. "They were declassified to
get the word out to show the
administration's position
The slides show Soviet ships
patrolling the Caribbean Sea,
Cuban children learning addition
with guns and grenades, war-torn
Central American families, strate-
gic airfields and the graves of
Contras, as the rebels trying to
overthrow Nicaragua's govern-
ments are called.
North, a marine and former
National Security Council em-
ployee, allegedly used the show
to solicit funds from private do-
nors for the Nicaraguan Contras
despite a congressional ban on
such fundraising.
The Senate Republican Policy
Committee distributed "about
100 copies" of the slide show to
Republican senators and state
party chairmen, said Jensen.
In turn, the senators and state
party officials have distributed or
presented the slide show to cam-
pus College Republican chapters,
conservative student organiza-
tions, civic groups and local Re-
publican leaders.
"It's a wonderful educational
tool' Jensen explained.
"A lot of people felt it's one of
the better things we could use to
give the administration's case
said Robert Potts, the Senate Re-
publican Policy Commitee's staff
director.
President Reagan is expected to
ask Congress to provide $270
million for Contra aid in Novem-
ber, but faces stiff opposition.
Opponents have blasted the
president for his continuing sup-
port of the Nicaraguan rebels,
which they say undermines a
peace plan signed earlier this year
by Central American leaders.
North's slide show, said Potts,
makes a more convincing argu-
ment for Contra aid than does the
president. "The administration is
not making a good case for its
case Potts added. "Col. North's
slide show does
More than 60 Maryland stu-
dents watched the slide show Oct.
7 while Maryland Republican
Party executive director Nelson
Warfield read a script prepared
by Northn � that described Cen-
tral America's strategic and eco-
nomic importance to the United
States.
When the slide show was pre-
sented at the University of Texas
by the Young Conservatives of
Texas, it drew about 100 students.
The University of Southern
California's Young Americans for
Freedom presented the slide
show Sept. 22 to about 20 stu-
dents. North is "an American
hero said YAFchairman Wayne
Bowen.
"Showing the slide show not
only revealed the truth about
what's going on in Central Amer-
ica said Phil Brusseau, a Mary-
land freshman, "but it also points
out some of the attitudes that
some people in Congress have
about the truth and how they're
willing to cover up the truth for
political reasons '
Not every student walked away
from the presentation with a good
impression, however. Texas jun-
ior William Fa son criticized the
show as one-sided.
"I want to ask questions Fason
complained, "but they (the Young
Conservatives of Texas) said
there was no one here to answer
them
Honor Program
Bright Students, Best Teachers, Small Classes
Coming This Spring:
Seminars.
Women's LivesWomen's Stories
Dream and WishesWishes and
Dreams (HUM)
Living on Spaceship Earth" (SCI)
Psychology (SOC SCI)
Plus
Literature of the Holocaust (FORL)
Interpreting Literature (ENGL)
Women's Studies (WOST)
Ethics (PHIL)
There's More:
ENGL 1200
HIST 1551
PHIL 1110
ENGL 1250
HIST 1553
SOCI2110
ANTH 1000
LIBS 1000
LIBS 3102
HLTH 1000
MATH 2172
SEED 3325
Ownership of artifacts debated
Any student with a 3.4 G.P.A. qualifies to take Honors courses
any time. See Dr. David Sanders 212 Ragsdale
Wst Coat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
James F. J. McKee. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo Shari Clemens
Pete Fernald. Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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(CPS) Utah may be on the
brink of war with Harvard Uni-
vcrsity about a collection of In-
dian artifacts.
1 iarvard's Peabody Museum oi
Archaeology and Ethnology has
them. But they came from a dig in
Utah, and Utah officials last week
asked tor them back for display in
the Clearcreek Indian Center at
I remont Indian State Park near
Richfield in central Utah.
1 he late Noel Morss excavated
the 1500 baskets, tools and clay
pots in the collection while on an
expedition funded by the Pea-
body Museum.
Morss himself said that he was
in favor oi sending the collection
back to its point of origin ex-
plained Ken kohler, curator at the
Indian Center.
Kohler has requested the arti-
facts' return.
"We do not give collections
away said Rosemary Joyce, as-
sistant director of the Peabody.
"The use of the word 'return' is
not appropriate
1 larvard had offered to loan the
collection to Kohler if the
Clearcreek Indian Center will pay
a fee oi $150 per item and $40 an
hour to locate the artifacts.
Although Kohler says the arti-
facts held by the Peabody "would
be an excellent display for us, we
will just let them go for now. In
time we may find better things
than thev have
But others may take a less philo-
sophical approach. As Kohler
notes, 'The consensus of the
people of Utah is to do battle over
this
Utah Congressman Howard R.
Niclson said Utah may "have le-
gal claim" to theartifacts if federal
permits filed by Morss are inva-
lid.
The permits, according to Mar-
garet Gaynor of the Smithsonian
Institution, confirm the artifacts
belong to the Peabody.
But Kohler claimed Harvard's
failure to display the collection
violated the 1906 Antiquities Act,
and questioned whether the Pea-
body qualifies as a public mu-
seum, a requirement for the dis-
play of Indian artifacts under the
act.
Additionally, "I wouldn't go to
Harvard to study Southwestern
archaeology said Kohler. "I'd go
to the Southwest to study it first
hand
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History texts described as 'bus schedules
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NEW YORK, N.Y. (CPS) �In a
broad review of American history
books used in U.S. schools, a
teaching reform group claimed
21 that the texts are mostly
lifeless" "bus schedules
cnts that drive students away
from studying the past.
In its report, called American
History Textbooks: An Assess-
ment oi Quality, the Educational
Excellence Network � a reform
group based at Columbia Univer-
sity � said publishers often tum
the texts into bland reflections of
what "special interest groups"
want them to say.
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COPIES from blueprints up to 36" wide
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Located in Downtown Greenville
next to Chicos Restaurant in the Georgetown Shops
, Night Club
presents f
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
THE LADIES ZOO!
The Pony Bar
with the Coldest Pony Bottles in Town!
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at Eastern N.Cs No. 1 Smokin' Nightclub, Beau'sof
course Doors open at 9 o'clock. 18 yr. olds are welcome
Phone: 756-6401
Located in the Carolina Fast Centre.
�������������
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A ic'i�n(
v.
(CPS) � Colleges aren t sure
what the stock market crash ot
Oct 19 � or the wild up and
down swings that are likely to
follow it will mean to their
health.
Campuses, of course, typically
own portfolios full of stocks, and
use the profits to pay for new
buildings and other big-money
construction projects
Schools with large endow
ments and portfolios, moreover,
have in recent years been usm
their stock profits to provide ti
nancial aid to students frozen out
of federal aid programs bv hi;
cuts.
While some officials worried
wealthy contnbuotrs might be-
come less generous, no one was
predicting the collapse- which
in percentage terms was ���
than the great crash of 1929
ushered in the economic der
sion of the 1930s ild hurt
students or campuses in the near
future.
The university will wait tor the
market to settle down re-
making any conclusions sa i
Stanford University Pro
James Rossc in a statement typical
of most colleges' attitude.
When the Dow Jones Industrial
Average plummeted 5!S p
Oct. 19, though, the valueofmanv
stock portfolios held bv sch
across the nation also fell pn .
tously.
Stanford's Si.5 billion end
ment "took a $200 million hit a- a
result of the crash, said sp �
man Bob Bycrs. The Unu rsirj
Texas system's endowment fell
from $2.9 billion to $2 6 bil
executive vice chancellor for
management Michael Patrick
said.
But because colleges plav the
stock market carefully and con-
servatively, said Jack Cox of the
National Association of College
and University Business Officers
(NACUBO), the impact was less
than other investors suffered.
Cox and other observers pre-
dicted the market would rebound
� as it did dunnc the davs iol-
lowing the crash � and offset the
�Ifjufs suffered on Oct. W nd
erarmg the rumulfnous marker
Students react agt
alleged takeover c
ATLANTA. Ga. (CPS) � Play-
boy Magazine's 1986 ranking oi
Mercer University � a Southern
Baptist institution � as one oi the
country's best part; schools last
week led to a large student rally
against what the students sav is a
struggle for control oi the school
An Atlanta businessman has
tried to get the Georgia Baptist
Covcntion to oust the school's
board of trustees because they
allegedly have let the campus
stray from rigid disciplinarv
rules.
Mercer President Raleigh Kirbv
Godsev called the takeover at-
tempt "political fundamental-
ism
Nonetheless, citing the Playboy
article and other "dramatic evi-
dence of fithy language, lewd
photographs, heresies, student
drunkenness and sexually ex-
plicit material businessman and
fundamentalist Baptist layman
Lee Roberts sent an open letter to
Baptist pastors, Mercer faculty
members and parents of Mercer
students criticizing the campus.
Roberts asked to have Mercer
placed in the hands of the Georgia
Baptist Convention, not the
school's board of trustees.
He accused Godsev of heresies
which included questioning the
deity of jesus.
Ethics teacher
apologizes
for plagiarism
AMHEKST, Mass. (CPS) �
Williams College has repri-
manded a philosophy and ethics
professor for allegedly plagiariz-
ing a magazine article.
Rosemarie Tong, a former Car-
negie Foundation professor of the
year confessed she'd "inadver-
tantly" used paragraphs from a
New Republic magazine book
review in a speech she gave in
September at Connecticut's
Greenwich High School.
Tong voluntarily apologized to
the high school, and returned her
honorarium. She also notified the
dean of the Williams College fac-
ulty, who last week issued the
school's lirst official reprimand.
Ij
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will �
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contr
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student :
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a ted
We an
added Hi
and
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it StHonor Program udents, Best Teachers, S Coming This Spring:mall Classes
fv"mon s StoriesPlus Literature Ok Interpretingtho ! loUvaust (FORL iterative ENOL) lies (WOST)
Theni s More
v � ,W 0 LI BS 0HITH 1000 MATH 2172
si i D J32S
a 4 GJP A. qualities to take Honors courses
See Di Pav id Sanders 212 Ragsdale
THE FAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 10.1987
t lEaat �aroltofan
a campus community since 1925
J. McKee, Director of Advertising
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757-6309
S4.95
$11.95 757-lfirS
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Student Stores
Nov. 10,11,12
9:00-4:00
hallengmg
" Many Air
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In
Air Force
9724

Stock crash affects colleges
(CPS) � Colleges aren't sure
what the stock market crash of
Oct. 19 � or the wild up and
down swings that arc likely to
follow it � will mean to their
health.
Campuses, of course, typically
own portfolios full of stocks, and
use the profits to pay for new
drops that preceded it.
"1 don't see aw appreciable
impact on endowments Cox
said.
Colleges, Cox added, invest in
real estate, trust funds and bonds
as well as stocks.
"With endowments so widely
diversified, the stock market
buildings and other big-money should not have much ol
construction projects.
Schools with large endow-
ments and portfolios, moreover,
have in recent years been using
their stock profits to provide fi-
nancial aid to students frozen out
oi federal aid programs by budget
cuts.
While some officials worried
wealthy contribuotrs might be-
come less generous, no one was
predicting the collapse � which
in percentage terms was worse
than the groat crash of 1929 that
ushered in the economic depres-
sion oi the 1930s � would hurt
students or campuses in the near and Annuity AssoriatfonUeet
future.
"The university will wait for the
market to settle down before
making any conclusions said
Stanford University Provost
lames Rosso in a statement tvpical
of most colleges' attitude.
When the Dow lones Industrial
an mi
pact on institutions Cox said.
Things might be different for
faculty members, who regularly
pay part of their current salaries to
a pension fund, which in turn
invests heavily in the stock mai
ket.
The fund, of course, uses the
profits from its investments to
make monthly pension payments
to retired faculty members
A long-term market crash then
retically could endanger the pay-
ments.
But Claire Sheahan ol the fund
called the Teachers Insuranc
Washington I n
I (Mils trcasun i i
"donors maj be
make donal
NltV
But NA( I
ver lining busil i
oral government
would ii esl n n
cation lo help i
oi a roi essi( n
"Highei �
investment esp
hard times he
education and rel
even mon
inking

SHERWOOD CAPITAL INC.
A C arcer in the Stockmarket. Learn how you can enter the exciting
and lucrative world of the professional stockbroker. Due toexpan
sion, we are seeking creative, intelligent individuals with an interest
in tht final i il sei ices industry If you have sales ability, and are
seckinj n onmeni that will allow you to grow. Send your
resume to
si 1KKWOOD CAPITAL, INC.
5171 Glenwood Ave Suite 202
Raleigh, N.C 27612
or call Mr. Jesse Russo
Branch Manager
i eli-phone 919-782-5900
Retirement Fund (TIAA-CREF)
� said "it's ux soon to call the
long-term or short-term tmpa ts
In recent weeks we became more
cautious as we felt something
coming
TIAA-CREF, criticized in recent
years as too conservative, didn t
Average plummeted 508 points believe the 'sustained rise in the
Oct. 19, though, the value of rruinv stock market over the last few
stock portfolios held by schools years could be sustained
across the nation also fell precipt- Sheahan said.
tousiy. The education pension fund
Stanford's $1.5 billion endow- also boasts diverse holdings Al
ment "took a $200 million hit" as a though it did not profit as much as
result oi the crash, said spokes- some members hoped tor during
man Bob Bvers. The University oi the stock market boom oi recent
Texas system's endowment fell
from $2.9 billion to $2.6 billion,
executive vice chancellor for asset
management Michael Patrick
said.
But because colleges plav the
stock market carefully and con-
servatively, said Jack Cox of the
years, it finds itself in good shape
now. "If playing it conservative
means playing it responsible,
we'reglad we've played itconser
vative Sheahan said.
While Oberlin College endow
ment manager David Maxson
figured a market rebound could
National Association of College helptheschoolrecoupitsone-day
stock losses oi $25 million out
of a total $200 million it had in-
vested � he worried the market's
ongoing uncertainty could have
"a chilling effect on dona tionsand
long-term commitments by con
tlUbttiwiC " v ' - '� '�'
' A& contributors personal
Wealth goes down agreed
and University Business Officers
iN'ACUBO), the impact was less
than other investors suffered.
Cox and other observers pre-
dicted the market would rebound
� as it did during the days fol-
lowing the crash � and offset the
te�Ts muttered on Oct. W rwi
irmg the tumultuous market
Ourthrt
two-year schol
make c ilk
'til
in �n't
Just easier t for.
��
TCBV
A Ha
I
.
Students react against
alleged takeover attempt
ATLANTA, Ga. (CPS) � Play
boy Magazine's 1986 ranking of
Mercer University � a Southern
Baptist institution � as one of the
country's best party schools last
week led to a large student rallv
against what the students say is a
struggle for control of the school.
An Atlanta businessman has
tried to get the Georgia Baptist
Covention to oust the school's
board of trustees because they
allegedly have let the campus
stray from rigid disciplinary
rules.
Mercer President Raleigh Kirby
Godsey called the takeover at-
tempt "political fundamental-
ism
Nonetheless, citing the Playboy
article and other "dramatic evi-
dence of fithy language, lewd
photographs, heresies, student
drunkenness and sexually ex-
plicit material businessman and
fundamentalist Baptist layman
Lee Roberts sent an open letter to
Baptist pastors, Mercer faculty
members and parents of Mercer
students criticizing the campus.
Roberts asked to have Mercer
placed in the hands of the Georgia
Baptist Convention, not the
school's board of trustees.
He accused Godsey of heresies
which included questioning the
deity of Jesus.
Ethics teacher
apologizes
for plagiarism
AMHERST, Mass. (CPS) �
Williams College has repri-
manded a philosophy and ethics
professor for allegedly plagiariz-
ing a magazine article.
Rosemarie Tong, a former Car-
negie Foundation professor of the
year confessed she'd "inadver-
tantly" used paragraphs from a
New Republic magazine book
review in a speech she gave in
September at Connecticut's
Greenwich High School.
Tong voluntarily apologized to
the high school, and returned her
honorarium. She also notified the
dean of the Williams College fac-
ia who last week issued the
school's tirst official reprimand.
Last week, Mercer's 6,(XTstu-
dents rallied to support Godsey
who told them, "This university
will not be taken over bv any-
body
Robert's charges were "simply
nonsense Godsey said.
"What we have going on here is
a movement of wanting to take
control of the affairs of the uni ver
sity in order to dictate what is
taught, in order to control who
teaches it, in order to control the
textbooks that are used and the
books that we publish
Karen Jacobs, editor of Mercer's
student paper, said Robert's alle-
gations "cannot be substanti-
ated
"We are not a party school
added Holly McCorkle, a senior
and student government vice
president. "Mercer's always had
rules. And it'salwaysbeen strict
i
with !� .�
lowei in
96 fai
mam .
from m
tops ;
11
TCBV"
1 V
�'
BUY ONE, sTFREE!
ANYTHING. IRE.
"ff"Ot J
-I
FREE SMALL SMOOTHIE
WITH ANY PURCHASE!
�TCBV
liJteEjjI .
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AT EYE-
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fangs are looking up. Now. you can get designer sunglass
frames and accessories at lowest prices Guaranteed.
Names like Ray Ban. Sarengetb. Bolle. Vuarnet and Carrera
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n e Ptaa Man lauuss from BroJys
The E.C.U. InterFraternity
Council
Presents
Fraternity Orientation Week
� Sunday, Nov. 15ih-Thursday, Nov. 19th.
� All Freshmen and interested men.
� Nov. 9th-13th sign up in Front of Student Store.
� Nov. 20th End of the Week Party with All Fraternities
and Sororities at the Sigma Tau Gamma House
"��Wi m fciwOi
� � 4 i � i rmi004k
I
I

�� -&





�itf Eaat �arnltnfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, cniM
Clay Deanhardt, Mm(mf um
T.M�ruAS JAMES Fj" McKEE-Df �t
1 MEGNeed� 1am� �
John Carter, r�, MlKE Upc IURC, u
S� lELTCJ BRYANT, nw, JoHN W. Medlin, � J
Debbie Ste-ens, s,
NOVEMBER 10, 1987
OPINION
Page
Students fall down on job
The problems that have plagued
recent years' production of the Buc-
caneer promise to have ramifica-
tions beyond the publication's
doors.
Mis-management has caused de-
lays in the production and distribu-
tion of the 1986 and 87 yearbooks.
This is disappointing because the
management of the Buccaneer is
composed entirely of students, as is
the case with all campus media.
These students have a responsibil-
ity, albeit a heavy one, to perform
like professionals while maintain-
ing their schoolwork. They know
that when they accept management
positions, and they go into the job
understanding what has to be done.
Unfortunately, the Buccaneer has
proven that some students aren't up
to the task. Despite good intentions,
mistakes can be made and errors can
compound themselves.
It appears the Media Board is
going to be forced to maintain
tighter control over the production
of campus media. Checks need to be
made to insure that mediums are
meeting their production deadlines.
This is frightening and sad. It is
frightening because it introduces
new powers to the board and asks
them to take more control over the
media. Extremists could make a case
that once the first step towards
tighter control is made, the second
and third come easier. Ultimately, it
could be argued, Media Board con-
trol could stifle the creative freedom
in all the media.
We don't, however, feel this is the
case. The Board's composition (it is
made of student representatives
from all facets of student life, plus a
faculty member and advisor) will
prevent it from becoming a domi-
nant force in student publications.
More likely, increased control will
result in subtle changes in publica-
tions. Editors, knowing they are
being watched, will do things con-
sciously and unconsciously to be
more appealing to the Media Board,
and thus the current political cli-
mate on campus. Instead of being
totally independent, mediums
might find they are changing to
meet the desires of people not on
staff.
Of course, the Board really has no
choice. The past staffs of the Bucca-
neer did not do their jobs. We have
no 1987 yearbook as of yet, and the
1986 book was at least eight months
late. The staff didn't do their jobs,
and the current staff and possibly
the remaining publications are
going to have to pay the price.
As for the staff of the 1988 Bucca-
neer, which is currently in produc-
tion, it is up to them to take steps to
cure the bad taste left from the past.
The new staff faces an uphill chal-
lenge not made easier by the fact that
Beth Davis and volunteers are work-
ing on the 87 Buc.
This is a test year for the Bucca-
neer. If Kim Kayes and her staff can
produce a quality yearbook on time,
and early indications are that they
can, them faith in the publication
might be restored. A third year of
mishaps may doom the book.
We hope that in remedying the
situation as it stands, the Media
Board uses careful judgement and
discretionary tactics so as not to in-
fluence the rightful autonomy of its
charges, the campus media.
Recreation facility should be
scrapped for parking deck
Registration
University does well
To the editor:
I remember in high school when I
voiced a complaint about some prob-
lem of society, my teacher would say
"Life's not fair Since that time, I
have continued to believe this until
recently, when I read about a decision
to plan the construction of a new
"Recreation Center" for ECU stu-
dents.
After learning of this, I came to a
conclusion. Life's not only unfair, it's
stupid. But stupid is not what we
make, because in reality, it is what we
are. We have students that seriously
believe a recreation center is a must.
They apparently believe a social
problem exists simply because the
facility we have is inferior and unsuc-
cessful to satisfying the needs of ECU
students. Well, to these people I say
with pride and confidence, "comeout
of the closet
If you want to see a serious social
�prsWem, look to the parking facility
of ECU. Some reported 5000 parking
spacesTorsometeported 23,000 regis-
tered automobiles. This is a social
problem. Actually, ECU should de-
fine "social problem" as "where to
park
1 can understand ECU students
wanting and needing a place to swim,
run, and play. But let's get serious. In
order to enjoy a nice recreation center,
you'll need to park your car. And with
current conditions, you may never
arrive at your new recreation center.
If the money is burning your pocket,
buy a parking deck!
Ed Hathaway
Sophomore
Physics
Conservative speaks
To the editor:
Larry Graham's Nov. 5 letter, "Lib-
erals, conservatives should moder-
ate is accurate in some respects.
However, several misconceptions
appear in his letter which I feel are of
importance to note and that need to be
cleared up.
First, we conservatives have not
ignored the fact that "our country is
founded on the Constitution" or that
the "Constitution represents a phi-
losophy of government as well as a set
of legal guidelines
Indeed, we have pointed out how
liberals in many respects do not fol-
low that very philosophy or even
their own philosophy consistently
and accurately. Graham goes on to
claim that "lawmakers follow the
philosophy of the Constitution in
making decisions He is mistaken.
One example of lawmakers' failure to
follow the philosophy of the
Constitution is seen is the way they
deliberately or indeljberatcly misrep-
resent the concept of "separation of
church and state First of all, the
terms "separation of church and
state" and "wall of separation" do not
even appear in the Constitution! They
originated in an 1803 letter from
Thomas Jefferson to the Danbury,
Conn baptists.
That fact noted, it needs to be fur-
ther pointed out that the Constitution
separated the institution of the
church from the state, but not a reli-
gious understanding of truth from
the state. The amendment provided
freedom for religion, not freedom
from religion, and this fact seems to
be largely ignored by many segments
of society today, particularly the judi-
cial system.
Indeed, to say that lawmakers fol-
low the Constitution's philosophy is
to ignore the blatant twisting and
misrepresentation of that philosophy
that is practiced and has been prac-
ticed for decades by the liberal activ-
ists judges of the Supreme Court (as
well as lesser courts).
Second, Graham claims that the
idea that "our government may make
no laws or do anything that favors an
institution of religion" is constitu-
tional. He's partially correct. The First
Amendment states "Congress shall
make no law respecting an establish-
ment of religion or prohibiting the
free exercise thereof The First
Amendment wasdesigned to prevent
the establishment of a national church
and to prevent the federal govern
ment from interfering or inhibiting
the practice of religion. When the
right of schoolchildren to voluntarily
pray and read their Bible in public
schools is taken away, this is a clear
violation of the First Amendment
because their right to practice their
religion has been prohibited and their
right to freedom of speech has been
denied.
Graham states that one religion
should not be favored in the schools,
"since that would infringe on the
rights of student' of other religious
backgrounds Exactly! Why then is
the religion of secular humanism
favored and promoted to the exclu-
sion of other religions in the schools?
Si vored treatment infnnges on
t nts of all students who believe
tfu -d is the center of the universe,
nofman, and is a blatant violation oi
the Constitution.
Lastly,Grahamclaims the mother's
rights take precedence m cases of
rape, and abortion is permtssable in
such cases. I ask: should an innocent
victim be killed for the crime of an-
other? In rape, the woman is the inno-
cent victim and the rapist is the cnmi-
nal, but in abortion the woman be-
comes the guilty party and the un-
born baby, the victim. Abortion does
not change the fact that rape has oc-
curred, but in fact makes the situation
worse. This fact is documented by
numerous studies, interviews, and
case histories. Abortion is not a solu-
tion. The intent and moral status of
the act of intercourse does not alter
the value of the child that may result
If a human life were not at stake, no
woman should be required to un-
dergo the degradation of bearing a
child in these circumstances, but even
degradation and emotional disrup-
tion are not the moral equivalent of
life. Only life is.
Justin Sturz
Junior
English
The decision to let only handi-
capped students pre-register early
for spring semester classes took
courage on the part of the registrar's
office, and they should be com-
mended for their decision.
It is a shame that it has to be this
way. The actions of a few people
who took unfair advantage of a
good thing (work petitions) has
forced the cancellation of a worthy
program. Work petitions helped
those students who had to work to
have the classes they needed to fit
their schedules.
Unfortunately, some students
decided it was necessary to cheat
and lie on their petitions. This was a
hinderance to students who really
needed the program, and it was a
severe violation of federal law and
the university honor code.
It appears those students had no
indication of what they had
wrought. The university was forced
to cancel work petitions in order to
prevent the mayhem that was oc-
curing. In doing that, they cited rea-
sons including the fact that the on-
line registration system makes work
petitions obsolete. Over the sum-
mer, when the decision was made,
Registrar Gil Moore noted that stu-
dents could now easily adapt their
class schedules to meet their work
schedule.
The couragous and appropriate
thing that Moore's office has done is
to eliminate early registration for
everyone (excluding handicapped
students) and not just for work peti-
tion students. This means that ath-
letes, band members and others
must take the same chances as the
rest of us in getting their classes.
The move shows the university's
continued support for academics.
Any other decision would have
been unacceptable and bigoted
towards extracurricular activities
within the school. By forcing every-
one to register on the same level, the
university is sending a message to
it's student body that all are to be
treated fairly and that athletes will
not get special consideration be-
cause of their physical skills.
European leaders showing two faces
At the presidential Republican debate in Houston a colli-
sion occurred when the subject came up of the forthcoming
INF treaty (designed to eliminate from the European scene
theater nuclear weapons of a range in excess of 300 miles).
Vice President George Bush reaffirmed his approval of the
treaty by citing the approval of it by European leaders. I have
just come back, he said, from a trip to Europe where I spent
time with the chiefs of government of Italy, West Germany,
Great Britain, France and all of those leaders welcome the
treaty.
Hash to Gen. Alexander Haig. Well, he said, he had just
come back from a similar trip to Europe, he had visited the
same leaders, and he reports that they look on the proposed
treaty with dismay. Gen. Haig, sitting six inches from George
Bu sh, looked him straight in the eye, and Vice President Bush,
sitting six inches from Alexander Haig, looked him back
straight in the eye; and they both held their ground.
Now, in such a quandry there is no obvious solution. Mr.
Bush does not lie, and in any event he would hardly elect to
lie about this, should it occur to him to begin lying. The chiefs
of government involved are publicly recorded as approving
the proposed treaty.
On the other hand, neither is Alexander Haig, running for
president of the United States, likely to make something up
out of wholedoth. And the observer, doing a little thinking on
his own, has got to acknowledge that sensible Europeans can
hardly rejoice over a treaty that disarms them from the
capability of returning a Soviet conventional offensive with a
touchof nuclear grapeshot. Why would Europeans be willing
to trade such weapons as cruise and Pcrshing II missiles for
bombers and submarines, let alone sr : egic weapons fired
exclusively at the will of a U.S. preside?
One arrives at the conclusion that :� . Thatcher et al. are
saying one thing officially to Ronald Re u . omething quite
different to AI Haig and to others in whor� Lw confide Why
the difference? Because since the reduc.c-i c' intermediate
nuclear forces is perceived to be a step towa-r1 disarmament
the European public inclines to applaud on such develop-
ment. This need not coincide in any respecc with private
convictions of Western European leaders.
So, seeking further perspective, the questioner addressed
Gen. Haig in Houston: If it is true that Western Europe will be
much weaker after an INF treaty than it now is, why can't we
count on representatives of the armed forces to make that
point m their testimony before Congress? Are they intimi-
dated by protocol? Or by loyalty to the commander in chief
or both?
Haig answered: both.
On the Right
By
William F. Buckley Jr.
u �fAmenCantfybUc is ,ett wUn a Problem of some gravity,
findeed most of the friendly leaders of Western Euroge deny
the advisability of removing our Pershings from Europe in
return for the destruction of the SS-20s, we can understand
that their domestic political concerns will prevent us from
knowing this. But shouldn't our own military speak up and
give their opinion of the question? Americans argue that if
indeed a general or an admiral saw the projected situation as
truly serious he would reach beyond protocol and commum-
h? �Ub PubHdy' Pred o Py the price of prema-
ture retirement in return for doing his duty byhis conscience.
pB REDCEQ5S from 8 00 am
� I K instructors being sought for the cember I at 5i
AjnencanRedCroaa If you are certified �
U K and want more information, contact
the American Red Cross at 752 4222
-
on
n ISAT
The Law School Admission Test m
offered at Eas, Carolina University
Saturday. December 12, 197 A; ; al ,
blanks are to be completed and ma:
Educational Testing Service Bo �. �
Princeton. N.J 06540 R. .
line is November 12. lv7 Registrations
postmarked after this date must be
pwuedbya$20, non-refui
istrahon
TheGra lateF
be offered at Last c
Saturday, December .
blanks are to be completed and mai
Educational Testing Service, ft � 961 �
Prince) i N 18540 Applications must
be postmarked no later than Noven
1987 Applications mav be obtained �� n
the Testing Center, Room KB, Sp ,
Building, East Carolina Univt i
ACIASiiSMEXT
The ACT Assessment will be offered at
East Carolina University on Saturday,
December 12,1987 Application blanks are
to be completed and mailed to ACT Reg
istrahon, PO Box 414, Iowa Gtv. Iowa
52243 Applications must be postmarked
no later than November 3 � �" Appbca-
tions may be obtained from the Te
Center, Room 105, Speight Building
Carolina university
GANLMAJLETAPlil
The Gamma Beta Phi Honor Sooet)
will be having a meeting on Tuesdan
November 17 at 700 pm in Jenkins '
tonum A sen, ice point will be givei
those who bring 3 cans of food tor
Greenville Food Drive
The Intramural Recreational Services
Department is now accept.ng applica-
tions for an Outdoor Recreation Supervi
sor for the Spring, 1988, semester This
person will be reponsible tor equipment
rental and leading Outdoor Adventure
Tnps Applications will be taken in Room
204 Memorial Gym, M-F from 8 00 a rr
5:00 p m. until Fndav, November 20
SKLTEIT
The Department of Intramural-Reava
tion Services and the Outdoor Recreation
Center is sponsoring a ski trip to Winter
green on January 3-8 Registration for this
tnp will be taken in 204 Memorial Cvm
Some schools
may lose GSLs

WASHINGTON (CPS) � Stu-
dents who go to colleges where
the student loan default rate is
high may be cut off from Guaran-
teed Student Loans in the future,
if a bill introduced in Congress
last week becomes law
The Reagan administration in-
troduced a bill that would drop
colleges that don't pursue ck
ters hard enough from the Guar-
anteed Student Loan (GSL) pro-
gram.
Efforts ranging from ticketing
defaulters' cars to withholding
income tax refunds have
helped lower the number oi de-
faulters from certain campuses,
explained William Knstol of the
U.S. Dept. oi Education.
"It really is a disgrace, schools
with 50, bO or 70 percent default
rates he said.
The department's figures show
that about 3,000 of the 8,000
schools participating in the pro-
gram have a default rate of ntrore
than 20 percent
More than half the students in
college todav, of course, get some
kind o( financial aid, and the GSL
program is the most pervasive
kind.
ERESH2
I
il aid M
A. student
IRISH! !
I Itimaf
:ma� X, at th�
J
�� App
i Richmond
JLL
. .� .
idenl St ir
erica
1M!
The African
with the other
and the O

grams and the
dent Adv . i
� �

the international I
a November 13
Episcolpa! Churc
HLJ
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��' � i in i �
ww iwmwipi





THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 10,1987 5
ity should be
Irking deck
m as designed to prevent
fa national church
lo prevent the federal govern-
interfering or inhibiting
pra religion When the
ildren to voluntarily
I read their Bible in public
iway, this is a clear
the First Amendment
ght to practice their
n prohibited and their
mol speech has been
- thai one religion
red in the schools,
d infringe on the
nts c4 other religious
tlv! Why then is
r secular humanism
ed and promoted to the exclu-
i other religions in the schools?
favored treatment infringes on
ill students who believe
terof the universe,
i blatant violation of
Graham claims the mother's
cedence in cases of
is permissable in
uld an innocent
r the crime of an-
' rap. � woman is the inno-
i the rapist is the crimi-
- rhon the woman be-
. lilt) party and the un-
.tim. Abortion does
she tact that rape has oc-
t makes the situation
fact is documented by
itudies, interviews, and
S. Abortion is not a solu-
intent and moral status of
� intercourse does not alter
the child that mav result.
human life were not at stake, no
man should be required to un-
the degradation of bearing a
:hild in thesccircumstances, but even
degradation and emotional disrup-
tion are not the moral equivalent of
life. Only life is
Justin Sturz
Junior
English
nirnwH k.
stitu-
Thel
-trst
wing two faces
finally to Ronald Re, .� .orriethingquite
and toothers in who v t. ey confide Why
Because since the reduction c' intermediate
s perceived to be a step toward d.sarmamcnt,
can public inclines to applaud on such dovelop-
is need not coincide in anv respec: with private
is ot Western European leaders.
Eking further perspective, the questioner addressed
" Houston: If it is true that Western Europe will be
leaker atter an QMFtreaty than it now is, why can't we
In representatives of the armed forces to make that
) their testimony before Congress? Are they intimi-
V protocol? Or by loyally to the commander in chief
iwcred: both.
On the Right
By
William F. Buckley Jr.
I �? ,?k � lST Wllh a Prob,emof ���cavity.
I most of the friendly leaders of Western Europe deny
sability of removing our Pershings from Europe in
r the destruction of the SS-20s, we can understand
Ir domestic political concerns will prevent us from
I this. But shouldn't our own military speak up and
Ir opinion of the question? Americans argue that if
I general or an admiral saw the projected situation as
fus he would reach beyond protocol and communi-
loubts publicly, prepared to pay the price of prema-
ement in return for doing his duty by his conscience.
i
REOCRQ&S
e.1 K instructors being sought for the
Amencon Red Cross If you are cert.f.ed ,n
U K and want more information, contact
the American Red Cross at 752 4222
LSAI
The Law School Admission Test will be
ottered at East Carolina University on
Saturday. December 12, IW. Application
blanks are to be completed and mailed to
fvducational Testing Service, Box J66R
Princeton, NJ S40. Registration dead-
line is November 12, 1087 Registrations
postmarked after this date must be accom
panied by a $20, non refundable late re
istration
from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m through De-
cember 1 at 500pm
Announcements
GRE
The Graduate Record Examination will
be ottered at East Carolina University on
Saturday, December 12, 1987 Applic.it.on
blanks are to be completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Service, Box R
Princeton, N J , 040 Applications must
be postmarked no later than November r,
1987. Applications mav be obtained from
the Testing Center, Room 105, Speight
Building, East Carolina University
ACT ASSESSMFNT
The ACT Assessment will tx offered at
East Carolina University on Saturday
December 12,1087 Application blanks are
to be completed and mailed to ACT Reg
istration, PO Box 414, Iowa City, Iowa
52243. Applications must be postmarked
no later than November D, 1�87. Applica-
tions mav be obtained from the Testing
Center, Room 105, Speight Building, East
Carolina university.
GAMMAB�TAPHI
The Gamma Beta Phi Honor Society
will be having a meeting on Tuesday
November 17at 700p.m. in Jenkins Audi-
torium. A service point wvll be given for
those who bring 3 cans of food for
Greenville Food Drive.
IXTRAMUiALS
The Intramural Recreational Services
Department is now accepting applica-
tions for an Outdoor Recreation Supervi-
sor for the Spring, NS8, semester This
person will be reponsible for equipment
rental and leading Outdoor Adventure
Trips Applications will be taken in Room
204 Memorial Gym, M-F from 8:00 a m -
5:00 p m. until Friday, November 20.
SKI TRIP
The Department of intramural Recrea
tion Services and the Outdoor Recreation
Center is sponsoring a ski trip to Winter
green on January 3-8, Registration for this
trip will be taken in 204 Memorial Gvm
Some schools
mav lose GSLs
WASHINGTON (CPS) Sfel
dents who go to colleges where
the student loan default rate is
high may be cut otr from Guaran-
teed Student Loans in the future,
if a bill introduced in Congress
last week becomes law.
The Reagan administration in-
troduced a bill that would drop
colleges that don't pursue defaul-
ters hard enough from the Guar-
anteed Student Loan (GSL) pro-
gram.
Efforts ranging from ticketing
defaulters' cars to withholding
income tax refunds have not
helped lower the number of de-
faulters from certain campuses,
explained William Kristol of the
U.S. Dept. of Education.
"It really is a disgrace, schools
with 50, 60 or 70 percent default
rates he said.
The department's figures show
that about 3,000 of the 8,000
schools participating in the pro-
gram have a default rate of mrore
than ?0 percent.
More than half the students in
college today, of course, get some
kind of financial aid, and the GSL
program is the most pervasive
kind.
fSESHMENSQEHMQKES
Take a course this spring semester that
will enhance your career opportunities
and open doors to scholarships and finan-
cial aid MLSC 100! is a one-hour elective
that entails no committment or obligation,
plus there are no uniform or lab require-
ments For more info , call captain Alvin
Mitchell at 757-6967 or visit Erwin Hall
Room 319
NCSL
All students interested in learning
more about the North Carolina Student
I egisla ture, please drop by MSC room 212
at 7 p m on Monday nights. Become one
of North Carolina's "Leaders of Tomor
row
HP$B�JLIQiJ�NAMENj;
The Frisbee dub is hosting its 10th semi
arnual Ultimate Frisbee Tournament,
in hmax X, at the bottom of College Mill on
November 14 and 15. Teams from Va Tech
UNC W, App. St UNC-C, Duke, NCSu!
and Richmond will be participating.
There will be a round table discussion
on the wnter and the writing process from
12 2 p m in Mendenhall, room 221 and
the wnter reading from her work and
reception at 800 p.m Mendenhall, room
244 on November 11. Both events are free
and open to the public. For further infor-
mation, please contact Julie Fay at 757-
6041.
ECQNQMICPEMOCRACY
Next week is Central America Week.
November 10 thru November 13, SED will
have an educational booth in front of the
Student Slore with literature on Central
Amenca.
i&immiiQNAL
The African Studies Committee along
with the other area studies committees
and the College of Arts and Sciences, of-
fice of the Director of International Pro
grams, and the office of the Foreign Stu-
dent Advisor are sponsoring a Dinner
Reception for all international students
enrolled at ECU The dinner is to welcome
the international students and is on Fri-
day, November 13, at 6:30 p.m at St. Paul's
Episcolpal Church on 401 E 4th St. Con-
tact Dr. J.A. Hill at Rawl MA or call 757-
6354
5:00 p.m. at the Methodist Student Center
then enjoy a delicious, all-you-can-eat
home cooked meal and good fellowship
The meal is $2 at the door, $1 50 if you sign
up in advance Call 758 2030 for reserva-
tions.
ALLIED HFA1.TH
Dr. Benjamin Spock, acdaimed podia
trician and best-selling author, will pres
ent "Stresses Affecting Families and Chil
dren" at 7:30 p m Tuesday, Nobcmber 17
in 1 lendrix Theater. Admission is free and
the lecture is opened to the genera! public.
1ACCHUS
BACCHUS will meet Thursday, No
vembcr 12 in room 242, Mendenhall at 7:30
p.m.
mi ETA SIGMA
There will be a Phi Eta Sigma meeting
on Wednesday, November II at 6:00 p m
in room 8f downstairs in Mendenhall. All
members are urged to attend.
CQLJLEGkMIU
Professional Studio Portraits will be
taken in Tyler I (all on November 11 and 12
If your're graduating, come and have
your cap and gown pictures made. Sign
up and price list available in Tyler. Don't
miss this golden opportunity.
POETRY READING
The Dominican poet Julia Alvarez will
be giving a reading of her works on
Wednesday, November II at 8:00 p m in
room 244 Mendenhall Everyone is wel-
come
EPUCATIQN MAJORS
There is still time to apply for the
workstudy trip to Mexico during Spring
Break (March 6-13) sponsored by the
School of Education and Campus Minis-
tries. Opportunities are available to ob
serve and teach at selected schools in
Puebla, Mexico. Get your application
today in the Dean's Office, Speight Build
ing. Room 154.
The D.H Conley High School Band
Boosters is having a Bar B-Que Dinner on
Saturday, November 14, from 11:00 am to
7 00 pm. at the Eastern Pines Fire Depart-
ment Tickets are $3.50 and can be pur-
chased from band members and they will
be available at the Eastern Pines Fire De-
partment on the day of the dinner
FRKliMENiSQPHMQRES
Army ROTC is continuing its two and
three year scholarship campaign. All stu-
dents interested in an army ROTC schol-
arship are invited to attend an informa-
tion session on Wednesday, November 11
at 600 p.m. in room 218 Erwin Hall For
more information, call Captain Alvin
Mitchell or second Lieutenant Mike
McClanahan at 757-69676974, or
room 311 Erwin Hall
IERMEPJAT��LiiB
The Intermediate Education Club will
meet November 23,1987 at 430 pm in 312
Speight Speaker will be Janie Manning,
Principal of Bethel Dementary Everyone
interested is welcome.
The ECU clinical psychology program
needs children, ages 6-15. to volunteer for
intelligence testing. This is to assist in the
training of MA leve. students A limited
amount of feedback will be given Inter
ested people can call Dr. Larry Hines at
the Department of Psychology, 757-6800
Seasonal positions are available with
the National Park Service at locations
throughout the nation Majors needed
include L.S.S, P.� Construction, and
I hstory For more informaiton see Coop-
erative Education 314 Rawl
UNIVERSITY liNIQNS
The Department of University Unions
and The School of Music present National
Public Radio's first Lady of Jazz-Marian
McPartland in Hendnx Theatre on Tuev
day, November K) at 8:00 p m Tickets are
now on sale in the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center from 11:00
am until 6:00 p m Monday thru Friday
DIVING CLUB
If you enjoy scuba diving, then you
need to pin ECU's Coral Reef Dive Club
For more information, call 752-4399 and
ask for Glenn or Rob.
TURKEY TROT
A Turkey Trot Run will be held by The
Department of Intramural Recreational
Services Registration will be held on
November 18 at 6 00 p m in Brewster D
103 For more information, call 757-6387
Hillcrest Lanes
Memorial Drive
756-2020
AUTOGRAPHING
SESSION
The ECU Student Stores invites you to attend
an autographing session for
Dr. William Stephenson, author
FREE
GAME
FELLQWSH1E
Worship God this Wednesday night at
f" BcrvvfOne Game"Receive j
I
I
l
J
I Another Game FREE With
This Coupon.
Limit 1 Coupon Per Person.
r
iff
THE WASH PUB
is an equal opportunity
advertiser!
We offer our specials to both sexes no matter
what age, race or religious
conviction they might be.
Monday - DRAFT & DRYER DAY 250 Draft & 250 for 16
minutes on the Dryers.
Tuesday - TWO FOR ONE DA Y Wash one load of clothes, the
2nd wash in on us.
Wed nesday - SOAP & SUDS DAYlSt Long Neck Bottle Beer
and Free Soap
MonFri. - FLUFF & FOLD SPECIAL 8 a.m10 a.m. drop
off 350 a pound.
Tuesday, November 17,1987-
2.00 p.m 400 p.m.
The book is available at the Student Stores,
Wright Building at a cost of
$11.95-paper, $17.95- cloth
plus sales tax.
Refreshments Will Be Served
T
K
E
2510 E. 10th St. CAR
752-5222 WASH
Every
Sun.
2:00
I Free Soft
I Drink
expires 113087
This Wednesday
7lK(p presents
The Lipsink contest
1st prize $60 in cash
2nd prize $50 in cash
3rd prize $25 in cash
$1 Drink Specials
95$ Tall cans
Admission $1 members $2 for guests
If interested sign up at the Elbo Wed. Night 9-10
Hit The Road.
And Save A Bundle,
With Our Special$5Q Fare.
Since it's break time, we're giving
you a break on rates. For just $59
one way, you can go anywhere in
the U.S.Trailways goes. But hurry.
These special tickets must be
purchased by December 15
If you're just traveling
vvithin thestate,you
won't believe how low
our fares are.
So whether you're
heading home with your
laundry, or striking out for
adventure, callTrailways.
Have we got a break foryou
�Special conditions may apply.
Call (919) 752-3483
GO FROM COLLEGE TO THE ARMY
WITHOUT MISSING A BEAT.
WeteGoingPbces.
The hardest thing about
ing into professional
music is�well, break
ing into professional
music. So if you Ye
looking for an oppor-
tunity to turn your
musical talent into
a full-time perform-
ing career, take a
good look at teA
Army
It's not
all parades
and John Philip1
Sousa. Army
bands rock,
waltz and boogie
as well as march,
and they perform J
before concert au-i
diences as well
as spectators.
With an average
break- of 40 performances a month, there's
also the opportunity for travel �
not only across America, but possibly
abroad.
Most important, you can
expect a first-rate pro-
fessional environment
from your instructors,
facilities and fellow
musicians. The Army
has educational
programs that
can help you
pay for off-
duty instruc-
tion, and if
you qual-
ify, even
L Kelp you
repay
your
federally-insured
student loans.
If yon can sight-
read music, performing in the Army
could be vour big break Write:
Chief, Army Bands Office, Fort
Benjamin Harnson, IN 46216- 5005
Or call toll free l-800-USA-ARMY
.
ARMY BAND.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
y(
"
�timMm � �� � � �
I
-� ���. r&





IWEEASTCAPQLlNiAN NOVEMBER 10,1987
HELP WANTED
CASHIER WAITRESS WANTED
sT�"LPerSOn 100E IfthSl andFvans
No phone calls
SvEV1 rao2EN yocurt
rjT ComcloMank's21E lOthSt
�-or a free taste of froen delight 73000
STOCKBROKER TRAINEE College
��. Opportunity lot hardworking
enthusiastic individual. Send resume to
iwo 88u' v,rg,n,d Bcaoh' v,rn,a
NOW H1RINC: 120 pos.bon liable
Apply in person to R van's I-amilv Steak
House U37 S Memorial Drive
Greenville
BRODVS AND BRODYS FOR MFN
are now accepting application- tor spring
semester Cntheusiastic individuals who
enoy fashion and CM work flexible hours
should apply todav body's, Carohna
East Mall. Mon-Wed 2 4 pm
ATTENTION ECU. FACULTY AND
STAFF Brodv's has part time positions
for individuals interested in a flexible
work schedule to help stuff that special
Christmas stocking Call toda tor an
interview, appointment, or appl in per
son. Brodv's, Carolina Cast Mall Mon
Wed . 2 4 p.m.
BASKETBALL COACHES The
Greenville Recreation and Tarks Depart-
ment is recruiting for 10 to 14 part time
basketball coaches for the winter pro-
gram Applicants must posse- some
knowledge of basketball skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth Applicants must be able to coach
young people, ages 9 IS. m basketball
fundamentals I lours are from �pm to 7
p m , Monday through Friday and Mime
nights and weekends coaching The pro
gram will extend from December 2 to
mid February Salary rate So 55hour
Applications will be accepted starting
Monday, November 2 until positions are
filed, Coot.u-t Ben lames at 830-4543.
HIRING! Federal government jobs in vour
area and overseas. Many immediate open-
ings without waiting list or test. Sl
68,000. Phone call refundable (6021 808
8S85 Ext 5285 "
FOR SALE
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICE
Experience, quality work. IBM seloctnc
typewnter Call Lame Shive 355-3-22
GOVERNMENT CONFISCATED Cars
and Trucks Late model Porsches, Z-cars.
BMW's it Jeeps, for as low as $200 Also,
speedboats, cycles, motorhomes Send
$10 for regional Buyer's Kit to FEDERAL
RESEARCH, LTD. P.O. BOX 888232
ATLANTA. GA 30356
FOR SALE: '51 Honda CR 125 Dirt Bike
Lots of new parts Excellent Condition
757-6611, ext 135 before 5 00 pm
BEFORE YOU PAY FULL PRICE for a
ring for your honey consider this' 14K Fila
gree Cold Ameythst Ring Paid S1W 05 at
Carlyle r Co Asking 1 2 price S100 Call
757-1638 for more information.
TROLL'S TUX AND TEES: Tired of pa
ing high prices for formal wear, try Trail's
Tux and Tees for your formal needs Co-
signer and Traditional st les From 30 and
up. 757-1007 or 758-0763
FOR SALE - Really nice leather coat must
sell, need money - sie 12 or 13. S40, call
758-2590 in a.m.
VOLKSWAGON RABBIT FOR SALE
80-modcl, good condition. Price -S�50,
may negotiate, call 355-5386.
FOR SALE: Queen size water-bed mat-
tress in perfect condition. First reason-
able offer will take it. Call Jerry at 758-
6064.
FOR SALE: New refrigerator, great shape,
5 cu. feet 5150 00. Call Laura at 758-6601
FOR SALE: great condition 79 Mada
GLC, amfm cassette, seat cover $850
call after 6 752-1974
ALL STUDENTS: I lurry only 10 days left
to sign up for the travel committee's New-
York City! Hurry time's running out'
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICES
758-8241 or 758-5488 ask for Susan
ATTENTION BEER LOVERS a 16 oz.
pitcher $1.50 every night at Famous Pizza
100 E. 10th St and Evans St
IS IT TRUE You Can Buy Jeeps for $44
through the U.S. government Get the facts
today! Call 1-312-742-1142 , Ext 5271-A.
MUST SELL - Full mattress, microwave,
couch, coffe table and more. Reasonable
Leave message at 752-4372.
1986 HONDA CR250R DIRT BIKE.
Never raced. I lelmet and gloves available
20 hours riding time. Excellent condition
Motorcycle trailer also available. $1900.
Call 355-7812. After 6 p.m. or leave mes-
sage.
WORK PROCESSING letter quality or
laser printing. Rush jobs accepted. 752-
1933.
PROFESSIONAL BUT NOT
EXPENSIVE! Progressive Solutions Inc.
offers professional work processing to
students and professionals. Term papers,
dissertation, themes, reports and much
more as low as $1.75 per page. (Please call
for quote on your project.) Price includes
printing on high quality bond paper and
spelling verification against a 50,000 work
electronic dictionary. Ask about our spe-
cial offers. Laser printing now available.
Call Mark at 757-3440 after 700 pm for
free information.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24 hours
in and out. Guaranteed typing on paper up
20 hand written pages SDF Professional
Computer Services. 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville. N C 752
36�4
PICK UP AND DELIVERY of term
paper-theses, resumes to be typed. IBM
workprocessing by professional with 13
year- experience letter quality print
and professional editing Call Nanette
inC.nttonat 1 524 5241 Cheap call the
best service'
Classifieds
FOR RENT
ROOM NEAR CAMPUS $125 includes
utilities Call 757 3543
FEMALE ROOMMATE to -hare 2
bedroom Apt m Wilson Acres Tur
rushed Apt $11-(XI. mo starting rv
1 - or ian I 752 8734
MAI E ROOMMATE to share 2 hod
room Apt in Wilson Acres Furnished
private bedroom $I3C.00mo starting
'Vc 15 or an 1 752 9944
GRFFNMILL RUN APARTMENT to
sublet $255 Near campus Available
now Call after 1000 pm 758 71hi
TAR RIVER ESTATES 1300 oft 1st
months rent on all 1.2.&3 bedroom
apartmentsx-n house on Sat, Nov
14 and Sunday Nov 15. I .(H) p m -(H)
p m 752 4225
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
Wilson Acres, Dec. 1, own room, $145
rent, 13 deposit, 13 utilities. Call 752.
5630. Ask for Kathy, Tanya, or Rcncc.
RINGCOLD TOWFRS:furn.slud
Apts for rent Contact llollie Si
monowich for more information 75"1
2865
WANTED Roomate to share 2 bed
room apartment at Tar River Estates
Will have private room No deposit Call
752-3032.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Female, r.on
smoker, half of rent (167.50), security de-
posit (102.50), and utilities Available Dec
1, 1987. Call 355-7269 or 551 2481 (after-
noons)
moon we sure had candle light And what
about the band dannas and the short
kidnap joy ride, and how about that
champagne on ice. In other words corks
were popping and pants were dropping
and the Phi Kappa Tau 1 louse was surely
rockm' -We Love You, Your Little Sis
ters.
TO THE FAMILY, FRIENDS, AND
FELLOW STUDENTS OF THE LATE
DR. W1LKINS BOWDRE WINN:
Though his departure has been a cause
for deep sorrow, remember the part of
him that lives on within you. His
laughter and wit, the joy of learning he
filled his students with, the treasured
moments shared with the man, the pro-
fessor, the friend, and most importantly
carry with you always that same zeal for
life he radiated so contagiously His
death means a great loss to us all, but to
God a joyous gain.
T.D I've had the time of my life and I'm
looking forward to tonight and this week
end e t'aime beaucoup! A.N.G.
SCOTT SYNDER, SCOTT T: Glad you
liked the livestock experience. We'll have
to go again real soon Sorry about dusting
va II in the field I think its time for an
other meeting Love, Mary and Lon
AOPi: Clad to know you care Let's get
together and Party! Soon! Luv, SAE's.
SIGMAS: We had a good time partying
after the game Thanks for your support
Luv, SAE's.
All FRESHMEN AND INTERESTED
MEN sign up in front of the student store
during the week of Nov 9th 13th for the
Fraternity Orientation Week on Nov.
15th-Nov. 19th This is your chance to gel
more familiar with every fraternity and
meet the guvs before SpnnB Semester
RUSH
SICN UP at the Student Store next Mon-
day for the Fraternity Orientation Week
of Nov 15th Nov 19th Don't miss out
PERSONALS
LAMBDA CHI'S: No doubt about it
va'll make a gTcat gang, what we want to
know is Can you hang7" We'll see on
Thursday' Love, the Sigma- PS Tell
1 latTv R not to start without us"
PHI TAU'S TRANSFORMER, Thank-
to you my hair drank more than I did la-t
Sunday night And ves, it did do won-
ders. "Champagne" Blonde
"NOODLE" Thanks for a great time
Friday night Let's do Saturday cartoons
again sometime I guess you're not ust
the "Busbov" anymore. By the way
Who was that "purple" girP Love,
"New Skeleton
PHI TAU BROTHERS: What about
Sunday night? If we didn't have a full
ATTENTION FRESHMEN: Don t miss
the Fraternity Orientation Week during
Nov 15th and Nov. 19th Sign up in front
of the Student Store Nov. 9th - 13th This
is open to anyone interested in fraternity
life Itisagreat way to spend vour college
years.
PARTYTIME for Leanne S, Ben L. and
Scotty 11 A Happy Birthday to all! Love.
Roxanne
FREE Live Entertainment by John Dillin-
ger and The Seeds in the Underground,
Nov 6 at 8 00, free refreshments and t-
shirt raffle.
HANK'S HAS IT ALL! The Nation's 1
Vanilla and now frozen yogurt, Rasp-
berry, Peach, Pina ColadaOnly 99 calo-
riesserving' 321 E. 10th St. 758-0000
CONCRA'TUIATKUOS icuJLUzaboth
Pierson the winner of the Delta Sig March
of Dimes Fund Raiser Thanks to every-
one involved and a special thanks to Greg
"homeboy" Floyd and Steve Schaefer.
1 lackenda!
ANGIF SUMRELL: Thursday night was
GREAT! Thanks-Scott T
ALL ECU MALES: Si en up for pre-rush
The heat is on.
This summer may bo your last chance to
graduate from college with a degree and an
officers commission. Sign up for ROTC's
six-week Basic Camp now. See your
Professor of Military Science for details.
But hurry. The time is short.
The space is limited. The heat is on.
ARMY RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS
For More Info: Contact
Capt. Mitchell at 757-6967
a
COLLEGE GRADUATES
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Meet with our representative
Monday, November 16, 9:00 AM-5:00 PM
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253
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EVENING L
in front of the student store Nov. 9-13 and
be sure to visit Beta Theta Pi on Nov. 17for
some extra curricular activities.
YUM!YUM!YUM! Hanks has frozen
yogurt The nation's best ice cream store
now has a low calorie treat for the health
nut' (99 caloriesserving).
ATTENTION ALL HOT MEN: Get
ready and enter Tri Sigma's annual male
strip-off Nov. 24 sponsored by the Elbo
Cash Prixs will be awarded so come
down and flash those hot bodies
TO OUR PIKE STRANGERS: We had
waited for weeks and the night finally
came our dates were all strangers we
knew not their names but low & behold
when they finally arrived, what we found
next was such a surprise A bunch of
sweet guys and good looking too and at
the mixer the time really flew But now it's
all over and in the past and we want you
to know we all had a blast. The party was
fun so keep us in mind and give us a call
for another good time Love Your Alpha
I'hi Stranger Dates
MOPED MANIA It's the only way to
travel Tired of waiting 20 minutes for a
parking spot7 Tired of riding to class
clean and getting there a SVVLAt I IOC7
I've got 3 mopeds for sale Also 2 bikes!
Call Andy at 758 3941
SUITE 415 SCOTT GIRLS: Halloween
mte was out of site But so were you Put
up or shut up!
TO THE WARD FAMILY: Your hospi
tality after all the home football games
has been great! We really love the chicken
and chocolate chip cookies' Can't wait to
tailgate in 1988' Love, the Sisters and
Pledges of Chi Omega
ALPHA SIGS: Thanks so much for the
sunrise social! It was a great way to start
the Halloween day' Love, the AZD
Pledges.
CLARK GREENE: We arc all so proud of
you! Congratulations! Love. The Beta
Nu's.
PHI TAU: Congrats to the Pres you'll
make a super one, that's what everyone
says You might have to give up the bal
cony scene, cause the Phi Tau Pres can't
do that kind of thing. We've always loved
you and you know we won't quit even
though you're just a big piece of
Good Luck, the LB Sis
IT WAS SUCH AN AWESOME PARTY
SIGHT at the Phi Kappa Tau I louse Nov
1st night. The Lil' Sis' kidnapped all the
Bros and on a "Joy Ride" they did go
Champagne bottles turned up in the air
staying sober, we did not dare All over
our bodies J. Roget did Flow and then
"FULL MOONS" began glow On their
heads were bandanas and at their ankles
were their pants, to their Little Sisters-
they yelled awesome chants. To our big
Brothers it came as a surprise, But it just
goes to show, how much WE LOVE
YOU GUYS Love, Phi Tau Little Sisters
MR. SUNSHINE: Happy 19th Birthday
PS. I took thedawg for a wauk and gave
him some wauter Oh, T B possibly cares
too
CONGRATULATIONS to Inez Fnedly
for being nominated to Greenville's Gty
Council We Love You! Love, the Sigmas
ATTENTION: Don't forget Alpha Xi
Delta's 1 lappy 1 lour EVERY Wednesday
night at Pantana's
DENNY: You really had me drinking out
of your hands Sunday night 1 lope you
had a great birthday. So glad you're legal
and so glad you're mine1 Love, YLS April
COMPARE our prices and good food
Buy any large pizza and get a 2 liter coke
free But a small pizza and gel 2 free 1 ft oz
drinks But any sub and get one free 16 oz
drink Call for FREE delivery Famous
Pizza 757 1276 or 757 0731
CHEAP DRINKS: dollar shots and dol
IaMugffi3!sT1!ToTSr?ugnfTT?
Come out to downtowns newest PriVa,
Club, the Elbo-with all new musi. f,
mat
TIGHT BUDGET? Try our meal d.�
$2 49 for any sandwich, fries, and dnnl
1 4 hamburger, ham and cheese, BLT
Roast Beef, chicken file�, turkey or pi
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mous Pizza comer of 10th St and Evans
Not for delivery
FREE BAHAMAS TRIP Come dm,
to the Elbo and register for a trip t, r t
to the bahamas spring break $1 tickets'
but yours today"
YOUR MAMA DONT WEAR (
DRAWERS. At least not during th,�
Fp happy hour Friday afternoons a
Elbo
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old Toys provided Contact Karer
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OFFER GOOD FROM 11-12-87 TO 11-23-87
STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
The Student Union
Special Concerts Committee
presents
v
TTrrx-xc-pn-T HE? ' " r'x "VCC
QJOIMd)
rn
COMMODORES
Monday, November 16,1987
8:00 p.m Wright Auditorium
Free tickets available in advance at the Central
Ticket Office. Advance pick-up of tickets is strongly
advised.
IHI I ASI AROI INll
Handicap
B LALKA SALAZAK
S�-� Hn�w
When a person hears "handi-
capped visions o. a htvlrhair
rome to mind Al Fastaroliru
University however, handi-
capped includes those students
tht are quadraplegic, learning
disabled, blind, hemophiliacs and
epileptics.
ECU's Office of Handicapped
Student Services is located in 212
Whichard. The program's overall
purposv is to provide auxiliary
support services to students with
various disabilities so they mav
have equal benefits from all that
ECU has to offer
"Each person has his or her own
level of independence and every-
thing is pretty much done on an
individualized basis said C.C.
Rowe, Coordinator of Handi
capped Student Services.
He added, "I'm aware of ap-
proximately 150 handicaped stu-
dents at
by definition!
they've leamf
handicap. Tl
be people at
capped, but
because the
office "
I disabled s
Row
categories: II
dents with
conditions, si
ualand heanr
orthopedic (P
quire the assi!
wheelchairs
facilities. T
those v ith terf
resulting fr
a
In
Rchabilitati
the act statc-i
must do in
capped studerj
The Aspen Wind Quintet, pictured here after Tf
from chamber to jazz at Hendrix Theater.(Photo
Poet Julia
Eiuh rvpmr-t p Mm the process hel
Poet Julia Alvarez will be read- The table dial
ing from her at noon and Id
book, Homecoming Wednes- 221. Admissio
day night at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall free.
room 244. Earlier in theaftemoon, Alvarez is .
she will participate in a round writer. Bom u
table discussions on writing and she spent her i
Bowie director
Carlos Alomar, musical direc-
tor for David Bowie for the past 13
years, has made his first solo
album and, surprisingly, it's a
guitar synthesizer album of New
Age music, creating moods and
atmospheres.
The album, "Dream Genera-
tor is on Private Music Records
"I know it's like a curve ball for
me Alomar savs "This com-
pany told me, Go do anything
you want and 1 always wanted to
hear this
"This being mv first album. I
wanted to show that I'm a com-
poser and there is more to mv life
than being a rock 'n' roll player
"It has a big band sound, with
classical overtones. It has a New
Age ambiance; it's impression-
istic. It's thought-inspiring. And it
has the overtone of rock 'n' roll
because the nature of the guitar is
rock'n' roll
Alomar continues, "I don't
want it to put you to sleep. 1 want
it to be commercial. 1 want it to
create an environment. 1 want to
create a world and inside that
world is the music
Private Music released "In-
somniac a 12-inch, big band
dance single from the album.
Alomar says, "The only insomni-
acs I know are my buddies down
in the clubs saying, 1-et's find a
place that's open' and I'm saving.
It's daylight
"Dream Generator" is dedi-
cated to "all rhythm guitarists
Alomar says, "I'm a rhythm
guitar player. With lead all you
get is a little solo and that's it.
Rhythm guitar has to play from
beginning to end, constantly add-
ing melody and chordal structure.
The ego and the power is in the
lead. The flow is the rhythm. I
always and forever will be a
rhythm guitar player
Alomar choi
ment. viola, ovi
same reason
rhythm guitar (
ers aren't on ai
He was borr
Rico, in 1351,1
parents, two
sisters to es
8 years old
"Our father
an instrument,
into theory ar
basic approach
started strumr
You'veGotaL
viola and thev
guitar
He pined Shd
of 14. Luther
singer.
"Luther mi
Robin Clark
were 17. We've
years. She lust
singing with Sii
Their 9-year-
Lorian has pert!
says.
"We push
things. We kne
built in
As teen-ager
mar and Miss
My Brother at tl
Alomar descrl
Brother as a bla
raising group.
They were
Latins come frod
and I'm goini
stage?' Whatev
on that stage w;
he says.
Alomar, who I
number of perfj
Mick Jagger ar
hashi - began bi
'n' blues singer
Then he was i
a session Davu
to-
f








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"h Tju 1 in Sis
TannghbalTsTniHsnuigeTffT?
1 M
.1.1 vs ;
tj i.M 0
fl I Ml
I'
OS'
Come out to downtowns newest Privat
Hub. the CIKvwith ail new musk- f01
nv nia
cares TIGHT BUDGET? Try our meal deal
$2 1 lot an sandwicK tries, and drink
4 hamburger ham and cheese, BLT
cdly K�ast tvvt chicken filet, turkey or pi.j
i in burger Wso homemade spaghetti and la
�tj- sagna$3.95-garlic bread included) Fa
s Pizza comer of 10th si and Evans
, , Vt tor detn cr
rRrr BAHAMAS rniP Come down,
. Elbe and register tor a trip tor two
lo the tehamas spring break $1 tickets'
'� yours today '
tU K MAMA DON1 WrAR r,
DRAWERS V least not during the s(
itoui rndj afternoons at iht
UXWABLI PIPP NEEDS GOOD
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. - � v ided Contact Karen at 7SS
: �� do
CIAL PACKAGE PRICES
? . VALUABLE COUPONS
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24 Exp 36 Exp.
2.37 $4.47 $5.97
ER GOOD FROM 11-12-87 TO 11-23-87
iTUDENT STORES
Wright Building
lion
certs Committee
presents
LnJLs iou;
DORES
Iember16,1987
right Auditorium
in advance at the Central
tick-up of tickets is strongly
THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
Styje
NOVMEBER10,1987 Page 7
Handicap Services helps disabled students
By LAURA SALAZAR
Suit Writei
When �i person hears "handi-
capped visions of a wheelchair
omc to mind. At East Carolina
I nivcrsity however, handi-
capped includes those students
tht are quadraplegic, learning
i isabkxl, blind, hemophiliacs and
epileptics.
ECU'S Office of Handicapped
Student Services is located in 212
Whichard. The program's overall
purpose is to provide auxiliary
support services to students with
various disabilities so they may
have equal benefits from all that
ECU has to offer.
"Each person has his or her own
level o( independence and every-
thing is pretty much done on an
individualized basis said C.C.
Rowe, Coordinator of Handi-
capped Student Services.
t le added, "I'm aware of ap-
proximately 150 handicaped stu-
dents at ECU. A lot of people arc
by definition handicapped, but
they've learned to live with their
handicap. There could possibly
be people at ECU that are handi-
capped, but we are not aware of it
because they haven't come to our
office
Disabled students served by
Rowe's office are in two major
categories: The first includes stu-
dents with permanent disabling
conditions, such as learning, vis-
ual and hearing impairments, and
orthopedic disabilities that re-
quire the assistance of mechanical
wheelchairs or other devices for
mobility and access to university
facilities. The second includes
those with temporary disabilities
resulting from accidents andor
recent operations.
In 1973, congress passed the
Rehabilitation Act. Section 504 of
the act stated what universities
must do in reference to handi-
capped students. Rowe said, "The
act creates equal opportunity for
students with disabilities. The
overall role of the university is to
provide reasonable accomoda-
tions so that a student with a dis-
ability may participate in every
program and service on this cam-
pus
The Office of Handicapped
Student Services was opened in
June, 1977. According to Rowe,
funding for the program was
provided through the state. The
staff is small. Rowe said, "I am the
staff. There is a part-time secre-
tary and I have student help, but I
am pretty much the staff
There are 15 dormitories on
campus; Cotten, Garrett and Slay
dormitories are equipped for
wheelchair students. All other
handicapped students can live
anywhere.
According to Rowe, "Learning
disabilities are hidden. In most
cases, a learning disabled student
is above average or at least
average, but they just don't re-
ceive and process information the
same way we do In other words,
they learn differently
For a learning disabled student
to receive appropriate services, he
or she must provide the office
witha recentevaluation that iden-
tifies the nature of the learning
disability. A conference is then
scheduled so that required serv-
ices and academic accomodations
can be planned.
Rowe said that preferential
treatment is not given to handi-
capped students when it comes to
admission to the university.
Handicapped students are admit-
ted on the same criteria that any
other student is.
Because mobility to classes and
various places makes it difficult
for handicapped students to
travel, the Student Government
Association provides handi-
capped students with a van. Rowe
said, "We feel like havinga special
van serves our needs better. In
fact, the SG A has reserved money
to get a new van
Most activities for handicapped
students are not a problem, but
physical education can be quite a
challenge. According to Rowe,
"Handicapped students partici-
pate in adaptive activities PE pro-
gram. We don't waive any re-
quirement for a person with a
disability. The activity is person-
alized to their own disability
Rowe said that C. G. Moore,
Vice Chancellor for Business Af-
fairs, has helped handicapped
services greatly. He said, "Moore
has been very supportive for pro-
viding funds He has done a lot
of the big things
The objectives of the Offices for
Handicapped Student Services
and the Program for Hearing
Impaired Students includes:
1. That no student be discrimi-
nated against, denied the benefit!
of or excluded form participation
m a program solely on thebasisOi
the existence of a disability.
2. Removal of all physical and
attitudinal barriers insofar at
possible.
3. Assisting students todevclop
their abilities to the fullest extent
possible.
Typical academic support serV
ices include tutorial assistance,
counseling, developmental read-
ing and study skills assistance,
alternative testing procedure!
such as additional time and oral
testing, reader service, recorded
textbooks, notetaking servicOf
and instruction on the word prO�
essor and other specialized equip
ment. In addition, students can b
evaluated or re-cvalutated �o de-
termine the presence of a learning
disability. Ther services are pf��
vided at no costs to the studCftl
except in certain situations in-
volving tutorial assistance.
Aspen Wind Quintet masters
contemporary chamber music
The Aspen Wind Quintet, pictured here after Thursday night's show, played the music spectrum
from chamber to jazz at Hendrix Theater.tPhoto by ECU Photolab)
By CHRIS BRINCEFIELD
Suit Writer
The award winning Aspen
Wind Quintet performed at Hen-
drix Theater Thursday evening as
part of the East Carolina Univer-
sity Chamber Music Series
The quintet features the instu-
ments flute, clarinet, oboe, bas-
soon, and horn.
The group opened the program
with "Quartet No. 3 in F Major"
by famous opera composer
Fioachino Rossini, which was
orchestrated for flute, clarinet,
horn, and bassoon. The piece was
composed when Rossini was
twelve years old.
The quartet was an excellent
choice for an opening number
because of its vibrancy and exhila-
rating motives in all three of its
movements.
The oboist joined the group for
the second item on the program,
"Woodwind Quintet" by Allen
Shawn. The work was composed
specifically for the Aspen Wind
Quintet in 1985 and premiered at
Hart College in July of 1986.
The group proved their ability
to master the complex runs and
harmonies of contemporary
chamber music in their excellent
performance of this work.
After an intermission the group
returned with Samuel Barber's
"Summer Music, Op. 31
The work, which is neo-roman-
tkr in style, was superbly executed
if not quite as moving as Barber's
more popular "The Adagio fof
Strings
The next work was Nielsen i
"Quintet, Op. 43 a conservative
neo-classical piece which feedsdA
the old forms of the classical styl&
The work featured solo section!
for all of the instruments and sec-
tions that seemed to have instru-
ments in conversation.
This work enabled the individ-
ual performers to show off their
expertize on their instruments as
well as their perfection as an en-
semble.
The Quintet played an encof
entitled "Jumping which w
exactly that - a fast paced and
exciting short work "with armoS
jazzlike motives and themes.
Poet Julia Alvarez to read, discuss writings
tiwiuhrvMiiniMitPrrm. ����� the process behind it. the Dnminir-An RpnuMir h� m ��� �J
tngluh Department Preu Rrle;
Poet Julia Alvarez will be read-
ing from her
book, Homecoming" Wednes-
day night at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall
room 244. Earlier in the afternoon,
she will participate in a round
table discussions on writing and
the process behind it
The table discussions will begin
at noon and 1 p.m. in Mendenhall
221. Admission to both events is
free.
Alvarez is a poet and fiction
writer. Born in New York City,
she spent her early childhood in
the Dominican Republic, the
homeland of both her parents.
Bilingual from her early years, she
returned to New York at the age of
ten and later attended Abbot
Academy, Middlebury College,
and Syracuse University where
she earned a Masters in Creative
Writing, held the Jenny McKean Moore
She has served as Kentucky's Writing Fellowship at the George
poet in the schools for two years; Washington University. Her po-
Bowie director releases first Lp
Carlos Alomar, musical direc-
tor for David Bowie for the past 13
years, has made his first solo
album and, surprisingly, it's a
guitar synthesizer album of New
Age music, creating moods and
atmospheres.
The album, "Dream Genera-
tor is on Private Music Records.
"I know it's like a curve ball for
me Alomar says. "This com-
pany told me, 'Go do anything
you wantand 1 always wanted to
hear this
"This being my first album, I
wanted to show that I'm a com-
poser and there is more to my life
tiian being a rock 'n' roll player
"It has a big band sound, with
classical overtones. It has a New
Age ambiance; it's impression-
istic. It's thought-inspiring. And it
has the overtone of rock 'n' roll
because the nature of the guitar is
rock'n' roll
Alomar continues, "I don't
want it to put you to sleep. I want
it to be commercial. I want it to
create an environment. I want to
create a world and inside that
world is the music
Private Music released "In-
somniac a 12-inch, big band
dance single from the album.
Alomar says, "The only insomni-
acs I know are my buddies down
in the clubs saying, 'Let's find a
place that's open' and I'm saying,
It's daylight
"Dream Generator" is dedi-
cated to "all rhythm guitarists
Alomar says, "I'm a rhythm
guitar player. With lead all you
get is a little solo and thafs it.
Rhythm guitar has to play from
beginning to end, constantly add-
ing melody and chordal structure.
The ego and the power is in the
lead. The flow is the rhythm. I
always and forever will be a
rhythm guitar player
Alomar chose his tirst lnstu-
ment, viola, over violin for the the
same reason he says he prefers
rhythm guitar over lead: the play-
ers aren't on an ego trip.
He was born in Ponce, Puerto
Rico, in 1951, moved with his
parents, two borthers and twin
sisters to New York when he was
8 years old.
"Our father wanted us to take
an instrument at school. It got me
into theory and arranging, the
basic approach I still use now. I
started strumming 'Mrs. Brown,
You' veGot a Lovely Daughter' on
viola and they suggested I get a
guitar
He joined Shades of Jade at age
of 14. Luther Vandross was lead
singer.
"Luther introduced me to
Robin Clark Alomar said. "We
were 17. We've been married 18
years. She just finished a tour
singing with Simple Minds
Their 9-year-old daughter, Lea-
Lorian has perfect pitch, Alomar
says.
"We push her to do other
things. We know she has music
built in
As teen-agers, Vandross, Alo-
mar and Miss Clark joined Listen
My Brother at the Apollo Theater.
Alomar describes Listen My
Brother as a black consciousness-
raising group.
"They were telling me that
Latins come from black stock, too,
and I'm going, 'Where's the
stage?' Whatever it took to get me
on that stage was what I wanted
he says.
Alomar, who still works with a
number of performers - recently
Mick Jagger and Yukihiro Taka-
hashi - began by backing rhythm
'n' blues singers.
Then he was reecnu.vended for
a session David Bo'vie was pro-
ducing with Lulu.
"He looked horrible, 90
pounds, red hair, milky white
skin Alomar said. He invited
Bowie to his house in Queens for a
home-cooked meal.
"We ate, played guitar and
talked, got along real well. I took
him to the Apollo. He wanted to
do an Apollo Theater review with
a white lead singer, which became
his Young Americans tour. From
then on, I stuck with him.
"He needs one guy who can
teach all the stuff to anybody he
brings in. Itdoesn't matter how he
wants to go as long as he knows
one guy can take everybody there.
That one guy is me
He likes Bowie's "experimental
period" in 1977 and 1979 that re-
sulted in albums supervised by
Brian Eno, "Heroes "Low" and
"Lodger
Referring to his "Dream Gen-
erator" album, Alomar says,
"Thafs what I wanted to do with
this album; go back to the experi-
mental stage
He played almost everything
on "Dream Generator" himself.
"I wasn't familiar with any-
thing he says. "The new synthe-
sizer guitars were the vehicle for
the experiment. It takes a new
approach to an old instument.
The guitar has a subtle quality
that it is time to use; if s not just a
rock 'n' roll instrument. A year
ago I could not have done this
album.
"From that I went into comput-
ers and from that into 40 synthe-
sizers. I would tell the computer,
'Make this twice as long You can
isolate the best part of a song and
enhance it.
"The other part of the experi-
ment was the concept. Everything
on the album is related to dreams.
See ALOMAR, page 8
she has conducted creative writ
ing workshops for bilingual stu
dents in Delaware and senior citi-
zens in North Carolina, work-
shops which culminated in two
anthologies "Yo Soy1 am" and
'Od Age Ain't for Sissies"
She has taught English and
Creative Writing at California
etry and short fiction have been
published in small magazines and
anthologies, including "The
American Poetry Review" and
"Poetry Magazine
Her first collection of poems,
"Homecoming" was published
by Grove Press in 1984. Incollabo-
ration with two women artists,
State College, College of the Se- her series of housekeeping poems
quotas, Phillips Andover Acad- was make into a limited edition
emy, and the University of Ver- book, "The Housekeeping Book
mont. In 1984-1985, Ms. Alvarez which won a Vermont Arts Coun-
. '
cil grant and toured the state in
1984-85 as a traveling exhibition.
She has been a Scholar in poetry
and fiction (1979, 83), a Fellow in
fiction (1986), and a staff member
(1987) at the Breadloaf Writers'
Conference. Most recently, she
has won the Third Woman Press
Award in Fiction, a General Elec-
tric Younger Writers' Award,
1986, in fiction, and a national
Endowment for the Arts Fellow-
ship, 1987. Ms. Alvarez teaches
creative writing at the University
of Illinois and is currently at work
on a collection of her short fiction.
e morning after
art's week shot to
By EARL HAMPTON
Last week sucked. A lot of
weeks are full of no thing-go-right
events, but that one had all the
ctesnemsot sucKCtoro.
What a day Sunday was, sitting
a
I stuggled fortunately it was sunk on pur
between waking op and staying pose.
m bed. The fact that I had a" test Tuesday night some dude trte
today and somehow my cram to steal my cruiser bike. Ludtih
time lad been reduced to the one of my new roomates who
approximate length of a Michael idolizes Arnold Swartzeneggei
Jackson video movie made me heard the thief on the porch ar
decision easier. ran out with his infra-red aimr
Professors who schedule exams uziand said "SorrvJ don't impro
strung-out survivor of a nuclear the Monday after Halloween vise You should've seen tha
iisaster. Every bodily movement should be castrated m my opinion dude high tail,
vad to he coniernpiauted five anyway. If s the only possible Wednesday 1 had a guilt trip
date to take the exam, is a sorry and decided to go to a 8 am class
excuse and should be a violation I hadn't attended in a month,
of the student constitution Took a shower, even combed the
or trews, ana mey After flunking the exam by mop, and for the first time ever
proxy, I had to move all my crap had five minutes to spare as
burp surfaced. On from one hole to the wafi to a jogged up the stairs. No people
� back to haunt you "better and improved" holeinthe no insrt uctor, just a note on the
way that old Freddy Kmeger waB. I would rather have the door "Wednesday's class has
��ven trtoughtabout.lt was GreenviBe Police strip search me been cancelled
rernembered taking mat than have to pack, carry and IhadbunimedalightandaBfc
ninutea in advance. The burps
Parted coming without warning,
3L$trSl JPGfJUUutltS 01 D&rta&ltY CU
the comer of Co- unpackailmy
rand Fifth about 2 JO with
unpack aU my workbeWmg, fighter
which by the way, fit intoone buddk
from one of
my
buddies yesterday. With cigarette
'aised the lighter to thet
"
i sptawLrcu s

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Tar riitfhKd's ST 'HMorTugeTOfflPJf?
Come out to downtowns newest Private
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mat"
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Not for delivery
HUr BAHAMAS 1R1P Comedown
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ER GOOD FROM 11-12-87 TO 11-23-87
1TUDENT STORES
Wright Building
lion
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yjca
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DORES
ember 16,1987
right Auditorium
in advance at the Central
pick-up of tickets is strongly
THF EASTAROl INIAN
NOVMEBER10,1987 Page 7
Handicap Services helps disabled students
tiy LAURASALAZAR
Stall Writer
When a person hears "handi-
capped visions of a wheelchair
omo to mind. At East Carolina
I nivcrsity however, handi-
capped includes those students
ht are quadraplogic, learning
disabled, blind, hemophiliacsand
epileptics.
ECU'S Office of Handicapped
Student Services is located in 212
U hie hard. The program's overall
purpose is to provide auxiliary
support services to students with
�carious disabilities so they may
have equal benefits from all that
ECU has to offer.
"Each person has his or her own
level of independence and every-
thing is pretty much done on an
individualized basis said C.C.
Rowe, Coordinator of Handi-
capped Student Services.
I le added, "I'm aware of ap-
proximately 150 handicaped stu-
dents at ECU. A lot of people are
by definition handicapped, but
they've learned to live with their
handicap. There could possibly
be people at ECU that are handi-
capped, but we are not aware of it
because they haven't come to our
office
Disabled students served by
Rowe's office are in two major
categories: The first includes stu-
dents with permanent disabling
conditions, such as learning, vis-
ual and hearing impairments,and
orthopedic disabilities that re-
quire the assistance of mechanical
wheelchairs or other devices for
mobility and access to university
facilities. The second includes
those with temporary disabilities
resulting from accidents andor
recent operations.
In 1973, congress passed the
Rehabilitation Act. Section 504 of
the act stated what universities
must do in reference to handi-
capped students. Rowe said, "The
act creates equal opportunity for
students with disabilities. The
overall role of the university is to
provide reasonable accomoda-
tions so that a student with a dis-
ability may participate in every
program and service on this cam-
pus
The Office of Handicapped
Student Services was opened in
June, 1977. According to Rowe,
funding for the program was
provided through the state. The
staff is small. Rowe said, "I am the
staff. There is a part-time secre-
tary and I have student help, but I
am pretty much the staff
There are 15 dormitories on
campus; Cotten, Garrett and Slay
dormitories are equipped for
wheelchair students. All other
handicapped students can live
anywhere.
According to Rowe, Learning
disabilities are hidden. In most
cases, a learning disabled student
is above average or at least
average, but they just don't re-
ceive and process information the
same way we do In other words,
they learn differently
For a learning disabled student
to receive appropriate services, he
or she must provide the office
with a recent evaluation that iden-
tifies the nature of the learning
disability. A conference is then
scheduled so that required serv-
ices and academic accomodations
can be planned.
Rowe said that preferential
treatment is not given to handi-
capped students when it comes to
admission to the university.
Handicapped students are admit-
ted on the same criteria that any
other student is.
Because mobility to classes and
various places makes it difficult
for handicapped students to
travel, the Student Government
Association provides handi-
capped students with a van. Rowe
said, "We feel like having a special
van serves our needs better. In
fact, the SG A has reserved money
to get a new van
Most activities for handicapped
students are not a problem, but
physical education can be quite a
challenge. According to Rowe,
"Handicapped students partici-
pate in adaptive activities PE pro-
gram. We don't waive any re-
quirement for a person with a
disability. The activity is person-
alized to their own disability
Rowe said that C. G. Moore,
Vice Chancellor for Business Af-
fairs, has helped handicapped
services greatly. He said, "Moore
has been very supportive for pro-
viding funds He has done a lot
of the big things
The objectives of the Offices for
Handicapped Student Services
and the Program for Hearing
Impaired Students includes:
1. That no student be discrimi-
nated against, denied the benefit!
of or excluded form participation
m a program solely on the basisof
the existence of a disability.
2. Removal of all physical and
attitudinal barriers insofar a!
possible.
3. Assisting students todevclop
their abilities to the fullest extent
possible.
Typical academic support scrV
ices include tutorial assistance,
counseling, developmental read-
ing and study skills assistance,
alternative testing procedurCf
such as additional time and orll
testing, reader service, recorded
textbooks, notetaking service!
and instruction on the word prOCz
essor and other specialized equip1
ment. In addition, studentscan b
evaluated or re-evalutated to d?
tcrmine the presence of a learning
disability. Ther services are pr�-
vided at no costs to the student
except in certain situations trV
volving tutorial assistance.
Aspen Wind Quintet masters
contemporary chamber music
The Aspen Wind Quintet, pictured here after Thursday night's show, played the music spectrum
from chamber to jazz at Hendrix Theater.fPhoto by ECU Photolab)
By CHRIS BRINCEFIELD
SUfl Write
The award winning Aspen
Wind Quintet performed at Hen-
drix Theater Thursday evening as
part of the East Carolina Univer-
sity Chamber Music Series.
The quintet features the instu-
ments flute, clarinet, oboe, bas-
soon, and horn.
The group opened the program
with "Quartet No. 3 in F Major"
by famous opera composer
Fioachino Rossini, which was
orchestrated for flute, clarinet,
horn, and bassoon. The piece was
composed wben Rossini was
twelve years old.
The quartet Was an excellent
choice for an opening number
because of its vibrancy and exhila-
rating motives in all three of its
movements.
The oboist joined the group for
the second item on the program,
"Woodwind Quintet" by Allen
Shawn. The work was composed
specifically for the Aspen Wind
Quintet in 1985 and premiered at
Hart College in July of 1986.
The group proved their ability
to master the complex runs and
harmonies of contemporary
chamber music in their excellent
performance of this work.
After an intermission the group
returned with Samuel Barber's
"Summer Music, Op. 31
The work, which is neo-roman-
tic in style, was superbly executed
if not quite as moving as Barber's
more popular "The Adagio for
Strings
The next work was Nielsen
"Quintet, Op. 43 a conservative
neo-classical piece which feeds on"
the old forms of the classical styl&
The work featured solo section!
for all of the instruments and sec-
tions that seemed to have instru-
ments in conversation.
This work enabled the individ-
ual performers to show off their
expertize on their instruments as
well as their perfection as an en-
semble
The Quintet played an encore
entitled "Jumping" which w
exactly that - a fast paced and
exciting short work with armos
jazzlike motives and themes.
Poet Julia Alvarez to read, discuss writings
inii.hnrp,rtm�.tp�. Mwi the process behind it. the Dominican Republic, the Writing k u .k r w tx w � T
Poet Julia Alvarez will be read
ing from her
book, Homecoming" Wednes-
day night at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall
room 244. Earlier in the afternoon,
she will participate in a round
table discussions on writing and
The table discussions will begin
at noon and 1 p.m. in Mendenhall
221. Admission to both events is
free.
Alvarez is a poet and fiction
writer. Born in New York City,
she spent her early childhood in
Republi
homeland of both her parents.
Bil ingual from her early years, she
returned to New York at the age of
ten and later attended Abbot
Academy, Middlebury College,
and Syracuse University where
she earned a Masters in Creative
Bowie director releases first Lp
Carlos Alomar, musical direc-
tor for David Bowie for the past 13
vears, has made his first solo
album and, surprisingly, it's a
guitar synthesizer album of New
Age music, creating moods and
atmospheres.
The album, "Dream Genera-
tor is on Private Music Records.
"I know it's like a curve ball for
me Alomar says. "This com-
pany told me, 'Go do anything
you wantand I always wanted to
hear this
"This being my first album, I
wanted to show that I'm a com-
poser and there is more to my life
than being a rock 'n' roll player
"It has a big band sound, with
classical overtones. It has a New
Age ambiance; it's impression-
istic. It's thought-inspiring. And it
has the overtone of rock 'n' roll
because the nature of the guitar is
rock'n' roll
Alomar continues, "I don't
want it to put you to sleep. I w ant
it to be commercial. I want it to
create an environment. I want to
create a world and inside that
world is the music
Private Music released "In-
somniac a 12-inch, big band
dance single from the album.
Alomar says, "The only insomni-
acs I know are my buddies down
in the clubs saying, 'Let's find a
place that's open' and I'm saying,
It's daylight
"Dream Generator" is dedi-
cated to "all rhythm guitarists
Alomar says, "I'm a rhythm
guitar player. With lead all you
get is a little solo and thaf s it.
Rhythm guitar has to play from
beginning to end, constantly add-
ing melody and chordal structure.
The ego and the power is in the
lead. The flow is the rhythm. I
always and forever will be a
rhythm guitar player
Alomar chose his first instu-
ment, viola, over violin for the the
same reason he says he prefers
rhythm guitar over lead: the play-
ers aren't on an ego trip.
He was born in Ponce, Puerto
Rico, in 1951, moved with his
parents, two borthers and twin
sisters to New York when he was
8 years old.
"Our father wanted us to take
an instrument at school. It got me
into theory and arranging, the
basic approach I still use now. I
started strumming 'Mrs. Brown,
You'veGot a Lovely Daughter'on
viola and they suggested I get a
guitar
He joined Shades of Jade at age
of 14. Luther Vandross was lead
singer.
"Luther introduced me to
Robin Clark Alomar said. "We
were 17. We've been married 18
years. She just finished a tour
singing with Simple Minds
Their 9-year-old daughter, Lea-
Lorian has perfect pitch, Alomar
says.
"We push her to do other
things. We know she has music
built in
As teen-agers, Vandross, Alo-
mar and Miss Clark joined Listen
My Brother at the Apollo Theater.
Alomar describes Listen My
Brother as a black consciousness-
raising group.
"They were telling me that
Latins come from black stock, too,
and I'm going, 'Where's the
stage?' Whatever it took to get me
on that stage was what I wanted
he says.
Alomar, who still works with a
number of performers - recently
Mick Jagger and Yukihiro Taka-
hashi - began by backing rhythm
'n' blues singers.
Then he was recommended for
a session David Bo'vie was pro-
ducing with Lulu.
"He looked horrible, 90
pounds, red hair, milky white
skin Alomar said. He invited
Bowie to his house in Queens for a
home-cooked meal.
"We ate, played guitar and
talked, got along real well. I took
him to the Apollo. He wanted to
do an Apollo Theater review with
a white lead singer, which became
his Young Americans tour. From
then on, I stuck with him.
"He needs one guy who can
teach all the stuff to anybody he
brings in. It doesn't matter how he
wants to go as long as he knows
one guy can take everybody there.
That one guy is me
He likes Bowie's "experimental
period" in 1977 and 1979 that re-
sulted in albums supervised by
Brian Eno, "Heroes "Low" and
"Lodger
Referring to his "Dream Gen-
erator" album, Alomar says,
"Thaf s what I wanted to do with
this album; go back to the experi-
mental stage
He played almost everything
on "Dream Generator" himself.
"I wasn't familiar with any-
thing he says. "The new synthe-
sizer guitars were the vehicle for
the experiment. It takes a new
approach to an old instument.
The guitar has a subtle quality
that it is time to use; it's not just a
rock 'n' roll instrument. A year
ago I could not have done this
album.
"From that I went into comput-
ers and from that into 40 synthe-
sizers. I would tell the computer,
'Make this twice as long You can
isolate the best part of a song and
enhance it.
"The other part of the experi-
ment was the concept. Everything
on the album is related to dreams.
See ALOMAR, page 8
Writing, held the Jenny McKean Moore
She has served as Kentucky's Writing Fellowship at the George
poet in the schools for two years; Washington University. Her po-
etry and short fiction have been
published in small magazines and
anthologies, including "The
American Poetry Review" and
"Poetry Magazine
Her first collection of poems,
"Homecoming" was published
by Grove Press in 1984. Incollabo-
ration with two women artists,
she has conducted creative writ
ing workshops for bilingual stu-
dents in Delaware and senior citi-
zens in North Carolina, work-
shops which culminated in two
anthologies "Yo Soy1 am" and
"Old Age Ain't for Sissies
She has taught English and
Creative Writing at California
State College, College of the Se- her series of housekeeping poems
quoias, Phillips Andover Acad- was make into a limited edition
emy, and the University of Ver- book, 'The Housekeeping Book
mont. In 1984-1985, Ms. Alvarez which won a Vermont Arts Coun-
cil grant and toured the state in
1984-85 as a traveling exhibition.
She has been a Scholar in poetry
and fiction (1979, 83), a Fellow in
fiction (1986), and a staff member
(1987) at the Breadloaf Writers'
Conference. Most recently, she
has won the Third Woman Press
Award in Fiction, a General Elec-
tric Younger Writers' Award,
1986, in fiction, and a national
Endowment for the Arts Fellow-
ship, 1987. Ms. Alvarez teaches
creative writing at the University
of Illinois and is currently at work
on a collection of her short fiction.
The morning after
Earlfs week shot to
By EARL HAMPTON
longer queasier night, I stuggled fortunately it was sunk on pur
between waking up and staving pose
Last week sucked A lot of
weeks are full of nothmg-go-right
tvents, but that one had ail the
Vfill���� tn r-li rri rrtr iln ���)
rM!UVTu9 Of 9UGKCECDL
What a day Sunday was, sitting
mwtvionrhe cow feeling like a
strung-out survivor of a nuclear
disaster. Every bodily movement should be castrated in my opinion
tad 'to be cemtempiatated five anyway. "Ifs the only possible
date to take the exam, is a sorry
la bed. The fact that I had a test
today and somehow my cram
tine bad been reduced to the
aprroxima te length of a Michael
Jackson video movie made the
decision easier.
Professors who schedule exams
the Monday after Halloween
minutes m advance. The burps
Parted conung without warning,
gastraS remnants of partially di-
jested trick or treats, and' mey
wereranfc.
Tuesday night some dude tne
to steal my cruiser bike. Luckily
one of my new roomates who
idolizes Arnold Swartzeneggei
heard the thief on the porch an
ran out with his infra-red airninj
uzi and said "SorryJ don't impn
vise You should've seen th
dude high tail.
Wednesday I had a guilt trip
and decided to go to a 8 a.m class
I hadn't attended in a month.
Took a shower, even combed the
mop, and for the first time ever
sorry
excuse and should be a violation
of the student constitution.
After flunking the exam by
proxy, I had to move all my crap had five minutes to spare as
First a gin burp surfaced. On from one hole to the wall to a jogged up the stairs. No people
ilways comes back to haunt you "letterandiinproved"hDfeinthe no instructor, just a note on
na way OtatokiFtwidyKnieger wall. I would rather have the door "Wednesday's class
wver even thought about. It was Greenville Folk strip search me been cancelled
I remembered taking that man have to pack, carry and Ihadburnrnedalightanda
andFtfmaboutawim
Withcarett(
mmmmmm&m " mmmmrnHmmmmmmmmmmm
������

�I






.8 THEFASTr-Ap�
NOVEMBER 10,19�7
Computerized dolls ask for battery change
There ain't nothine like a doll IRM tvrcnn.i1 �
There ain't nothing like a doll,
nothing in the world.
Nothing talks like a doll; noth-
ing walks like a doll.
Once again, that's the tune of
toy manufacturers as the moun-
tain of the dolls reaches its Christ-
mas peak.
A computerized doll named
Julie is being touted by its manu-
facturer as the most technologi-
cally advanced doll ever, with a
64k memory - comparable to the
early Apple 1! - and a 32-bit Texas
Instruments microprocessor,
more sophisticated than an early
IBM personal computer.
The doll can be trained to re-
spond to its owner's voice, an-
swers questions with more than
100 sound-activated sentences,
and has sensors in its fingers that
make it appear it's reading from
books.
The 23-inch-taII doll also senses
heat, cold, light, darkness and
movement, and warns when the
batteries are low. Julie's eyes, face
and mouth move as she talks.
When taken in a moving car,
Julie asks: "Where are we going?"
she'll ask. In a dark room, it asks:
Can you see OK? It's kind of scale are Blooming Dolls, named
dark Juhe also can ask for a not for the department store but
sweatcrwhcntcmperaturcsdrop. because they start as flowers in a
pot and "bloom" into puppets
The recommended retail price
is $90 to $125, but some stores
already are selling the doll for
$200, said Bob Goldberg, execu-
tive vice president of marketing
for Worlds of Wonder inc mak-
ers of Teddy Ruxpin, the compu-
terized talking stuffed bear intro-
duced last Christmas.
Less costly on the financial doll
Nut gatherers bake pests
When you gather nuts, seed
pods, pine cones and other plant
materials for Thanksgiving and
other holiday projects, don't
bring home unwelcome house
guests.
Spiders, ants, weevils and moth
larvae could travel into the home
on craft materials and get into
tored food. Dried beans, nee and
pasta may be plagued by pests.
Seeds, nuts, grains and other
outdoor materials may be in-
fested with these insects, so take
precautions with the raw materi-
als.
A good way to make sure your
decorations are not bug-laden is
to bake them.
Alomar makes new age Lp
Continued from page 7
I don't remember many of my
dreams. I had to go to the library
and read, mostly looking at ex-
periments. I wanted to get every-
thing right ihc length of time
between notes 1 would need to
induce sleep, the cadence to insti-
gate or postpone sleep.
"The titles helped me emotion-
ally express the music. 'Siamese
Dreams 'Hallucination they're
terms I got from studying dreams.
Feline Lullaby' and 'Dream Gen-
erator' could make you go to
sleep
He adds, "I have found that
dreams are not relaxing. They're
rather stimulating
Alomar says that he'll makeone
more New Age album for Private
Music then go back to pop, rock
and rhythm 'n' blues. "It's going
to be an artistic triumph. They
said no singing but I'd like to do
something unusual with vocals
One more curve ball
SP0RTSW0RLD
Every Tuesday
College Night
from 8:00 to 11:00
$1.50 with college I.D.
.50$ skate rental
SPORTSWORLD
104 E. Redbanks Rd.
756-6000
"FADED" LEVIS
$2.95 to $5.95
Classic Overcoats
Herring-Bone, Black
Tweeds, Plaids, etc.
$19.95 to $49.95
TRENCH
COATS
(London Fog)
$12.95 to $14.95
Rugby Shirts
$4.95 to $9.95
Also: Wind breakers, Button down shirts, Members
only Jackets, Sport Jackets, Skirts. (Some mini),
Dresses, Etc.
The Coin & Ring Man
10:00-5:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 Sat. 40� S. Evans
752-3866
and then fabric dolls.
The Cap Toys product, de-
signed for preschoolers, retails for
about $20.
Toys from the Humane Society
at the United States come with a
message this holiday season. The
animal protection organization
provides a booklet with the
stuffed dogs and cats, explaining
proper care for real pets.
Many pets are given up by
owners who can't or won't take
care of them, says John A. Hoyt,
president of the Humane Society.
"Often he says, "the reasons
stem from lack of education about
a pet's needs and an owner's re-
sponsibilities
The booklet that accompanies
the toy animals, which are manu-
factured by Determined Produc-
tions of San Francisco, in trod uces
WE BUILT
APKOUD
NEW
FEELING
children to the ideas of care and
kindness and reminds adults
about he importance of taking
responsibility for pets, he says.
A portion of the purchase price
for the toys goes to the Humane
Society.
And, of course, soon after any or
all of these dolls are unwrapped
and hugged, they may need help
Enter the Witty Bitty Cast kit, with
a roll of cotton padding, a roll of
plaster bandage and "X-ray film "
The wisest investment you'll ever make
for your family begins with only. . .
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PRICES EFFECTIVE NOV 8 THRU NOV 14.1�i7 QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
oliday dir
You are making preparations
)r your family's Thanksgiving
linner How much water is
Reeded to prepare a holiday feast
r a family of eight
Several years ago, an agricul
iral engineer with Texas Agri-
lltural Extension Servio esti
lated that 42,674 gallons of water
Ire required to product the ingre
lients for the festive dinner He
ised this estimate on figures
rom the Freshwater Socieh
wa tei
"ft take
I on
ent o
tills .
;
A .i
ft .
stuffing - � .
lour used in a
The tablespoon ot all purpose
)ur in the sauce ot this n
iWavc vegetable casst n 1. I
trie sour cream smooth and
�rearm
MICROWAVE LIMA BEAN
AND APPLEASsi KOI E
Two 10 ounce pack on
1 tal
Recipe for Swiss Nut I
You couldn't tind a more
scrumptious dessert than tin-
elegant torte it vou searched the
fanciest pastrv shop Melted
sugar gives a rich flavor to the
nutty filling. The crust, which vou
just pat into the pan resembles
thedough used tor sugar Co. .
SWISS NUT TORTE
2 and 2-3rds cups all-pur:
flour
12 cup sugar
Dash salt
2-3rds cup margarine or butter
1 beaten egg
2 tablespoons rum or water
1 teaspoon finely shred
lemon peel
1 cup sugar
1 cup whipping cream at room
temperature
3 tablespoons honev
1 to 2 tablespoons kirsch or
other brandv
24 cups coarsely shopped wa!
nuts
1 slightly beaten egg oik
1 tablespoon milk
In a small mixing bowl stir to-
gether flour, 12 cup sugar and
saJkfcSet asidg 1� a large mixer
bobeat margarine with an dec-
tnP)hixcr on medium speed until
fluffy. Add flour mixture; beat
until crumbly. Combine the
whole egg, rum and lemon peel.
Stir into flour mixture until
moistened. Divide dough into
thirds. Pat one-third oi d
onto bottom of a 10-inch
spring form pan. Pat another third
of dough 1 inch up the sides ot
pan. On waxed paper roll remain-
ing dough to a l0-bv4-ineh rec
tangle about 1 4 inch thick, cover.
Chill crust and rolled dough for 30
minutes.
In a heaw large skillet heat 1
cup sugar over medium-low heat
without stirring until itjustbegins
to melt i

Rein i
w
Hi .
knife trim rec
I
I
C om
chilled. Makes
NutritJ i
inu 4.
dium
15 percent thi;
phosphi �
I
3
Trartsp n
Price per pel
(triple occupJ
s
Jiffy
The newest concept in
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PLUS a FREE
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.00 OFF
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COUPON GOOD DEC. 12th, 1987
HOURS
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7:30 am 'til 6 30 p m
Sat 7 30 am 'til 5O0 pm
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MHMMMMaHM
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I
-�THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 10.1987
Computerized dolls ask for battery change
Thcrp ain't nttk.n ia . j�ii iDti . ,� e J
There ain't nothing like a doll,
nothing in the world.
Nothing talks like a doll; noth-
ing walks like a doll.
Once again, that's the tune of
toy manufacturers as the moun-
tain of the dolls reaches its Christ-
mas peak.
A computerized doll named
Julie is being touted by its manu-
facturer as the most technologi-
cally advanced doll ever, with a
64k memory - comparable to the
early Apple II - and a 32-bit Texas
Instruments microprocessor,
more sophisticated than an early
Nut gatherers bake pests
When you gather nuts, seed
pods, pine cones and other plant
materials for Thanksgiving and
other holiday projects, don't
bring home unwelcome house
guests.
Spiders, ants, weevils and moth
larvae could travel into the home
on craft materials and get into
torcd food. Dried beans, nee and
IBM personal computer.
The doll can be trained to re-
spond to its owner's voice, an-
swers questions with more than
100 sound-activated sentences,
and has sensors in its fingers that
make it appear it's reading from
books.
The 23-inch-tall doll also senses
heat, cold, light, darkness and
movement, and warns when the
batteries are low. Julie's eyes, face
and mouth move as she talks.
When taken in a moving car,
Julie asks. "Where arc we going?"
she'll ask. In a dark room, it asks:
pasta may be plagued by pests.
Seeds, nuts, grains and other
outdoor materials may be in-
fested with these insects, so take
precautions with the raw materi-
als.
A good way to make sure your
decorations are not bug-laden is
�o bake them.
Can you see OK? It's kind of
dark Julie also can ask for a
sweater when temperatures drop.
The recommended retail price
is $90 to $125, but some stores
already are selling the doll for
$200, said Bob Goldberg, execu-
tive vice president of marketing
for Worlds of Wonder inc mak-
ers of Teddy Ruxpin, the compu-
terized talking stuffed bear intro-
duced last Christmas.
Less costly on the financial doll
Alomar makes new age Lp
Continued from page 7
I don't remember many of my
dreams. I had to go to the library
and read, mostly looking at ex-
periments. I wanted to get every-
thing right the length of time
between notes 1 would need to
induce sleep, the cadence to insti-
gate or postpone sleep.
The titles helped me emotion-
ally express the music. 'Siamese
Dreams 'Hallucination they're
terms 1 got from studying dreams.
Feline Lullaby' and 'Dream Gen-
erator' could make you go to
sleep
He adds, "I have found that
dreams are not relaxing. They're
rather stimulating
Alomar says that he'll make one
more New Age album for Private
Music then go back to pop, rock
and rhythm 'n' blues. "It's going
to be an artistic triumph. They
said no singing but I'd like to do
something unusual with vocal?
One more curve ball
SP0RTSW0RL0
Every Tuesday
College Night
from 8:00 to 11:00
$1.50 with college I.D,
.50$ skate rental
SPORTSWORLD
104 E. Redbanks Rd.
756-6000
"FADED" LEVIS
$2.95 to $5.95
Classic Overcoats
Herring-Bone, Black
Tweeds, Plaids, etc.
$19.95 to $49.95
TRENCH
COATS
(London Fog)
$12.95 to $14.95
Rugby Shirts
$4.95 to $9.95
Also: Wind breakers, Button down shirts, Members
only Jackets, Sport Jackets, Skirts. (Some mini),
Dresses, Etc.
The Coin & Ring Man
lO:OO-5:0O M-F AM
10:00-3:00 Sat. 400 s- Evans
752-3866
scale are Blooming Dolls, named
not for the department store but
because they start as flowers in a
pot and "bloom" into puppets
and then fabric dolls.
The Cap Toys product, de-
signed for preschoolers, retails for
about $20.
Toys from the Humane Society
of the United States come with a
message this holiday season. The
animal protection organization
provides a booklet with the
stuffed dogs and cats, explaining
proper care for real pets.
Many pets are given up by
owners who can't or won't take
care of them, says John A. Hoyt,
president of the Humane Society.
"Often he says, "the reasons
stem from lack of education about
a pet's needs and an owner's re-
sponsibilities
The booklet that accompanies
the toy animals, which are manu-
factured by Determined Produc-
tions of San Francisco, introduces
WE BOLT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
children to the ideas of care and
kindness and reminds adults'
about he importance of taking
responsibility for pets, he says.
A portion of the purchase price
for the toys goes to the Humane
Society.
And, of course, soon after any or
all of these dolls are unwrapped
and hugged, they may need help
Enter the Witty BittyCast kit, with
a roll of cotton padding, a roll of
plaster bandage and "X-ray film "
The wisest investment you'll ever make
for your family begins with only. . .
FUNK8.WAGNALLS
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Latest Edition
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DICTIONARY
ith Volumes J k ol the m vt loped
Volumes 2-29
only $4.99 ea.
iH CUT GRAIN FED BEEF
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meless
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Corn
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55JV Soup v I Op I Steaks 1"
BUTCHER S CHOICE MM �' � � . B AVG
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QQ0 ife Margarine 4 4QQ G Boneless
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ASSORTED
Chef Bov-Ar-Dpp Pi77a ' ' ftQc &��(�� o � nrv "?fFL8eL � , � rawTHMimsmiMnicoBwuf
oner ooyAruee Pizza By Sour Cream 2 :99c Palmolive Liquid -1.59 Fresh Pork Ham ,1.49
MINUTt MAIDfROEN CHEESE FOOD
Orange Ju.ce Vt 1.09 Ched-O-B Slices B 99 Aluminum Foil 49 S.rta leaKs " I 2.99
S4 o, OfV, 'N 'UICE SVRUP '�- BEEF � CHOPPED
- byc Dole Pineapple "v 79c Steak Patties - 1.69
hOMEStYlE
BREAKFAST DRINK
�� tSHt�KI-AST DRINK
Eggo Waffles 99c Bright & Early
ANNPAGt BANQUET ASSORTED
Ice Cream Sandwich !� 1.59 Pot Pies
2-0, � ?P THIN TRIM BEEF-BONE-ESS
� 79c Toaster Pastries 'tf 89c Rump Roast , 1.99
v KEEBiEfi STONE CREEK
1 CRACKERS S-MOZ pKG S1
rgr-) PEANu' 5JER CHiPS DE.XE
Sandies
12-13 oz
COCA COLA-fWET COKFClirKRY
C O K K � T A H � S I K t T E - D I f. T
I SPRITE-CAFFEINE HI El
I - frOKf.TAtrt.tSY KHEE DIET COKE
Coca-
Cola
99
MG -DirrTLASSIC COCA COLA-SIWIK
6IK 16oz irn.s $i m
LOCALLY GROWN
Collard Greens
CALIFORNIA GROWN
Fresh Carrots
RED RIPE
Salad Tomatoes
LOCALLY GROWN
Green Onions
SELECT MEDIUM
. 49c Yellow Onions
ALL VARIETIES
69c Maries Dressing "T 1.69
. 1.29
3TU99
JUMBO DIAMOND
'� 59c English Walnuts
LIBERTY BRAND
3 ocn5 99c Fruit Cake Mix
AMERICAN EXPRESS
Money
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25
SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
STOP N A&P FROZEN
E7 Orange
Juice
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SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
STOPi absorbent
slI? Bounty
Towels
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SEE STORE
FOR
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE WE NOW SELL U.S. POSTAGE STAMPS
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd
Open 24 Hours-Open Mon. 7 a.m Closed Sat. 11 p.m Open Sun. 7 a.mn p.m.
I
1
s
5
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOV 8 THRU NOV 14,19�7 OOANTTTV RIGHTS RESERVED
Holiday di
fa
Se
id on th
I
pcro
tins country
a nt �
He I
of the Thank

utesn �
constantly.
You are making preparations
for your family's Thanksgiving
Jinner. How much water is
icedcd to prepare a holiday feast
for a family of eight?
Several years ago, an agricul-
tural engineer with Texas Agn
rultural Extension Service esti-
lated that 42,674 gall, msol water
ire required to product theingre-
lients tor the festive dinner He
3ased this estimate on figures
from the Freshwater Society, a
lour used in a
The tablespoon of all purpose baby
Bour in the sauce of this micro 1 i
pvave vegetable casserole keeps
the sour cream smooth and
E'creamv.
MICROWAVE LIMA BEAN
ANDAPPI.FC ASsFRO! 1
Two 10 ounce packages frozen
Recipe for Swiss Nut I
You couldn't tind a more
scrumptious dessert than this
elegant torte if you searched the
fanciest pastry shop Melted
sugar gives a rich flavor i
nutty filling. Thecrust, winch you
just pat into the pan, resembles
the dough used for sugar co -
SWISS NUT TORTE
2 and 2-3rds cups all-purpose
flour
12 cup sugar
Dash salt
2-3rds cup margarine or butter
1 beaten egg
2 tablespoons rum or water
1 teaspoon finely shredded
lemon peel
1 cup sugar
1 cup whipping cream at room
temperature
3 tablespoons honey
1 to 2 tablespoons kirsch or
other brandy
24 cups coarselv shopped wal-
nuts
1 slightly beaten egg yolk
1 tablespoon milk
In a small mixing bowl stir to-
gether flour, 12 cup sugar and
-set asidfi. In a large rquer
beat margarine with an eUc
ixcr on medium speed until
fluffy. Add flour mixture, beat
until crumbly. Combine the
whole egg, rum and lemon peel.
Stir into flour mixture until
moistened. Divide dough into
thirds. Pat one-third oi dough
onto bottom of a 10-inch
springform pan. Pat another third
of dough 1 inch up the sides of
pan. On waxed paper roll remain-
ing dough to a I0bv4-inch rec-
tangle about 1 4 inch thick, cover.
Chill crust and rolled dough tor 30
minutes.
In a heavy large skillet heat 1
cup sugar over medium-low heat
without stirring until it just begins
knifi
.trim
saJk.sc
bcdV-
tnWih
Jiffy
The newest concept in
open in
Here's
appoint
1. We cN
2. We insi
3. We I
4. We ch�
5. We ch(
6. We ch(
7. We chel
8. We chel
9. We che
10. We ch
11. We chel
12. Ve Infl
13. We vacj
14. We evel
PLUS a FREE
Full S
�2.00bFF
FULL SERVICE
(with coupon)
Reg. $21.95
COUPON GOOD DEC. 12th, 1987
HOURS
Monday thru Fnda
7:30 am 'fit 6 30 pm
5ot 7 30am 'til 5:00 pm
1
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J
"East Carol
Favorite Oil


�m





change
" s explaining children to the ideas of care and
i ;x ts kindness and reminds adults
given up b about he importance of taking
or won t take responsibility tor pets he says.
hn Hoyt,
A portion of the purchase price
the reaa - tor the toys coon to the Humane
ration about Societ)
own And,ofcourse,soonafteranyor
all of these" dolls are unwrapped
and hugged they nu need help
Enter the Witty Bitty Cast kit, with
ed Pr � a roll of cotton padding, a roll of
piasterbandagt-and Vravtilm"
investment you'll ever make
family begins with only. . .
ALLS
DIA
Volume 1
only. . .
Volumes 2-29
onl $4.99 ea.
STOP I FRESH CUT GRAIN FED BEEF
WHOLE
Boneless
N.Y. Strip
Fryer
Breast
tik Cubed
Steaks
Li Boneless
-�" Smoked Ham
I29
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ORNlA RED
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ISA, 4 1FSTEB SPf RCOuPOK
�925
iunty
wels
ilf Ar Ajq I0 � M(Me Pw
SEE STORE
FOR
DETAILS
�OSTAGE STAMPS
'3 Greenville Blvd.
Open Sun. 7 a.m11 p.m.
ERVED
Holiday dinner needs water
You are making preparations
tor your family's Thanksgiving
dinner. How much water is
needed to prepare a holiday feast
tor a family of eight?
Several years ago, an agricul-
tural engineer with Texas Agri-
cultural Extension Service esti-
mated that 42,b74 gallons of water
are required to product the ingre-
dients for the festive dinner. He
based this estimate on figures
from the Freshwater Society, a
water conservation organization.
"It takes a lot of water just to put
food on the table said John
Seweeten. "Agriculture uses 47
percent of the water consumed in
this country while industry uses
another 43 percent
I le broke down the assembling
of the Thanksgiving dinner in this
way:
A 20-lb. turkey, 16,300 gallons-
stuffing, 6,004 gallons; potatoes!
1,824
gal-
lons; carrots, 1,000 gallons;
Waldorf salad, 680 gallons;
fresh fruit salad, 2,000 gallons;
bread, 300 gallons; margarine
(including margarine used in
cooking), 2,212 gallons; pumpkin
pie, 1,240 gallons; icecream, 1,142
gallons; milk for 4 persons, 1,000
gallons; wine for 4 persons, 8,000
gallons.
Sweeten estimated the amount
of water needed "would fill a 30-
just one cent a gallon, their
Thanksgiving meal would cost
$426.74 for water alone
"We are a society highly de-
pendent on water and we often
take it for granted the engineer
said. "So this Thanksgiving, let's
give thanks that this is a bountiful
nation blessed with an abundance
of natural resources such as wa-
ter, but let's also think about the
future and how we can help con-
serve these resources for genera-
tions to come
THE EAST CARPI INJIAM NOVEMBER 10. 1987 9
Make yourself marketable.
At The East Carolinian you can gain the
valuable experience needed to give you
the edge in today's highly
competative job market.
Apply in pejson today.
Clip-N-Save
5 2 gallons; scalloped corn, 1,824 by 50-foot wide swimming pool
gallons; green beans, 1,000 gal- and if consumers were charged
Flour used in applelima bean casserole
The tablespoon of all-purpose
flour in the sauce of this micro-
wave vegetable casserole keeps
the sour cream smooth and
creamy.
MICROWAVE LIMA BEAN
ND APPLE CASSEROLE
Two 10 ounce packages frozen
baby lima beans
1 medium apple, cored and
chopped
2 tablepoons water
12 cup mayonnaise or salad
dressing
1 2 cup dairy sour cream
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
Recipe for Swiss Nut Torte
You couldn't find a more
scrumptious dessert than this
elegant torte if you searched the
fanciest pastry shop. Melted
sugar gives a rich flavor to the
nutty filling. The crust, which vou
just pat into the pan, resembles
the dough used for sugar cookies.
SWISS NUT TORTE
2 and 2-3rds cups all-purpose
flour
12 cup sugar
Dash salt
2-3rds cup margarine or butter
1 beaten egg
2 tablespoons rum or water
1 teaspoon finely shredded
icmon peel
1 cup sugar
1 cup whipping cream at room
temperature
3 tablespoons honey
1 to 2 tablespoons kirsch or
other brandy
24 cups coarsely shopped wal-
nuts
1 slightly beaten egg yoll
1 tablespoon milk
In a small mixing bowl stir to-
gether flour, 12 cup sugar and
sail, set aside. 'n a kitje mixer
hoifclbeat margarine with an eiec-
trlCfuixer on medium speed until
fluffy. Add flour mixture; beat
until crumbly. Combine the
whole egg, rum and lemon peel.
Stir into flour mixture until
moistened. Divide dough into
thirds. Tat one-third oi dough
onto bottom of a 10-inch
springform pan. Pat another third
of dough 1 inch up the sides of
pan. On waxed paper roll remain-
ing dough to a H)-by4-inch rec-
tangle about 14 inch thick; cover.
v hill crust and rolled dough for 30
minutes.
In a heavy large skillet heat 1
cup sugar over medium-low heat
wi thout stirring until it just begins
to melt. Heat and stir 6 to 8 min-
utes more or until golden, stirring
constantly. Remove from heat;
slowly stir in whipping cream.
Heat and stir about 5 minutes
or until sugar dissolves. Add
honey and kirsch. Stir in nuts.
Remove from heat; cool 5 min-
utes. Spread mixture over crust.
Using a fluted pastry wheel or a
knife, trim rectangle of dough; cut
into seven 12 inch-wide strips.
I ialve one strip; place a half strip
at one edge of torte. Place remain-
ing half strip on opposite edge.
Criss-cross remaining strips on
top of torte.
Combine egg yolk and milk;
brush mixture over crust. Bake in
a 350-degree oven about 40 min-
utes or until crust is golden. Cool
1 hour. Serve torte warm or
chilled. Makes lb servings.
Nutrition information per serv-
ing: 427 cal 6 g pro 42 g carbo
27 g fat, 55 mg chol 102 mg so-
dium. U.S. RDA; 12 percent vit. A,
13 percent thiamine, 11 percent
phosphorus.
1 teaspoon finely shredded
lemon peel
14 teaspoon salt
1 4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 8 teaspoon pepper
1 4 cup oarscly chopped wal-
nuts
In a 2-quart microwave casse-
role combine frozen lima beans
apple and water. Microcook, cov-
ered, on 100 percent power (high)
8 to 10 minutes or until beans arc
tender, stirring twice. Combine
mayonnaise, sour cream, flour,
lemon peel, salt, nutmeg, and
pepper.
Stir into lima bean mixture.
Cook, uncovered, on high 3 to 4
minutes or until mixture is thick-
ened and bubbly, stirring twice.
Sprinkle with walnuts. Makes 8
servings.
Nutition information per serv-
ing: 262 cal 7 g pro 23 g carbo
17 g fat, 15 mg chol 186 mg so-
dium. U.S. RDA: 10 percent iron,
10 percent phosphorus.
$
w
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
and frozen yogurt!
321 E. 10th St. Greenville (next to Wendy's) 758- 001X)
New frozen Jogu rt!
Only 99 caloriesserving.
FREE TASTES


.v
Buy 1 Frozen Yogurt Sundae or Blend-in, Get 1
1 2 Price
� coupon prr order plfiw coupon good thru Nov If 1987
m
PHARMACISTS
SOCIAL WORKERS
PHYSICAL THERAPISTS
CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGISTS
The Air Force can make
you an attractive offer � out-
standing compensation plus
opportunities for professional
development You can have a
challenging practice and time
to spend with your family while
you serve your country Find out
what the Air Force offers. Call
TSgt Ken McCullen
(919)850-9549
Station to Station Collect
NEW YORK CITY
Only 10 days left to sign up
The STUDENT UNION'S TRAVEL COMMIT-
TEE is presenting a trip to New York City
(The Big Apple) during Thanksgiving break.
4 Days & 3 Nights
Depart: 8 p.m. Nov. 25,1987
Return: 11 p.m. Nov. 29,1987
Transportation: Seashore Trailways Bus,
Hotel: Century Paramount
Price per person: $129 (quad occupancy); $139
(triple occupancy) and $149 (double occupancy)
Sec MendenhaU 's Central Ticket Office for details. Don't
wait time's running out
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
and 'frozen Yogurt
321 E. 10th St. Greenville (next to Wendy -) 758 000
VOTED THE NATION'S 1 VANILLA
Buy 1 Ice Cream Blend-in or Sundae, Get 1
12 Price
one coupon per order please coupon good thru Now IW7
� "i� Clip-N-Save ����!
!

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PREPARING FOR A
SOCIAL OR PARTY IS
"A PIECE OF CAKE"
AT
'ANYTHING
V
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Jiffy Lube
The newest concept in car care maintenance is now '
open in Greenville!
Here's what we do in 10 minutes, no
appointment necessary
1. We change your oil with a major brand!
2. We Install a new oil filter!
3. We lubricate the whole chassis!
4. We check and fill transmission fluid!
5. We check and fill differential fluid!
6. We check and fill brake fluid!
7. We check and fill power steering fluid!
8. We check and fill window washer fluid!
9. W check and fill battery!
10. We check the air filter!
11. We check the wiper blades!
12. We Inflate the tires to proper pressure!
13. We vacuum the Interior!
14. We even wash vour windows!
PLUS a FREE Car Wash with
Full Service!
$2.00 OFF "l T "$l50
FULL SERVICE
(with coupon)
Reg. $21.95
COUPON GOOD DEC. 12th, 1987
HOURS
Monday thru Friday
' 30 am 'til 6 30 p.m
7 30 am 'fil 500 p.m.
I
I
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j COUPON GOOD DEC. 12th, 1987
"East Carolina's
I JIFFY CAR WASH!
i i
i
(with coupon)
Favorite Oil Change"
J
126 Greenville Blvd
Greenville
(Across from Golden
Corral Steak House)
Your Party Supplies Headquarters.
Plan Early and We Will Help With Sugges-
tions & Alternatives For Decoration And
Food Service Needs.
Helium balloons, decorations, cups,
plates, napkins, etc.
Anything you need for a party!
Hwy 43 S
Bells Fork Square
355-6212
Sponsored by The Films Committee
SHERMANS MARCH
General Sherman's Civil War
March
Nov. llth 8:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
Coffeehouse Committee Presents
SYLVEY
8:00 p.m. Underground
R&B Funk Band
Sponsored by the Films Committee
PLATOON
Academy Awards including Best Picture
8:00 p.m. Hebdrix Nov. 12-15
The United States Navy Band
THE COMMODORES
Jazz Band
Monday, Nov. 16th 1987
8:00 p.m. Wright Auditorium
The Minority Arts Committee Presents
BROADWAY STRUTTERS
A musical Revue Saluting Black Women Singers
Tues Nov. 17th, 8:00 p.m.
Auditorium Rm. 244 MendenhaU
Students $2.00 others $3.00
For more information, contact the
Student Union at 757 6611, ext 210.
i I
OUl �0 M�VT WX
LJ:
rSiering place


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j
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f
Sports
NOVEMBER 10, 1987 Page 10
Pirates roll to win over Owls,
improve season mark to 5-5
� ���-��
E2S�JX&SSE$ duri"B ,h vic,or-v Sa"m,ain Fick'fen
CAA volleyball tourney set
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sport Writer
East Carolina University will
host the 1987 Colonial Athletic
Association Championship Vol-
leyball Tournament Nov. 13-14.
All six CAA volleyball teams will
participate in the tournament
which will be held in Minges
Coliseum on the ECU campus.
This is the third Colonial cham-
pionship that ECU has hosted
since the league was formed in
1985. East Carolina was the site of
the 1986 baseball tournament and
most recently hosted the 1986
swimming and diving champion-
ships.
Women
ByKRISTEN HALBERG
Sports Hnlrr
Editor's Note: Both the men's and
women's Pirate svriming teams were
vicioi ous on Sunday, Nov. 8 in
meets against Furman. Full details of
that meet can be found in Thursday's
East Carolinian.
The East Carolina swimming
and diving teams began their sea-
son on Friday, hosting the power-
ful James Madison Dukes. Both
the men and the women swam
very well, but it was the Pirate
women who came out on top
beating the Dukes bv a score of
135-133.
"The women did an excellent
job of beating two-time defending
CAA champion James Madison.
It was one of the biggest wins in
our women's history head
coach Rick Kobe said.
The men also swam an out-
standing meet, but three disquali-
fications caused them to come up
short and lose to the Dukes 96-
121.
"Besides from the mental mis-
takes, the men swam a very fine
meet. It takes 109 points to win so
left Barber, administrative as-
sistant to Athletic Director Dr.
Ken Kan will serve as tourna-
ment director.
"We arc extremely pleased to be
the host institution for the 1987
CAA volleyball tournament
Barber said. "Our staff and
coaches have worked very hard i-
the prepcration of this event. We
would like to extend an invitation
to everyone to come out and see
quality volleyball
The tournament teams will be
organized into two pools with the
top four finishers playing in the
Championship round" Saturday.
Friday's matches will be at 11
am 1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m.
Saturday's contests will be at 11
am. and 1:30 with the champion-
ship match at 4 p.m.
William & Mary has been
seeded number one in the tourna-
ment followed by James Madison,
UNC Wilmington, George Ma-
son, American and East Carolina.
East Carolina, 0-5 in the CAA
will play UNC Wilmington at 1:30
p.m. and will meet the defending
champions, William & Mary at 4
p.m.
The Lady Pirates will count on
the services of junior setterhitter
See MINGES page 11
By TIM CHANDLER
ft
PATMOLLOY
Sporto Editor
The dream is alive and well at
East Carolina.
The Pirates maintained their
hopes of obtaining a winning rec-
ord Saturday by defeating
Temple, 31-26, and improving to
5-5 on the year.
"It wasn't a pretty win, but we
did the things needed at the right
time ECU coach Art Baker said.
"We've set a primary goal all sea-
son long to have a winning sea-
son, and now we're in a position
to achieve that mark
It was Senior Day in Greenville,
but it was the underclassmen that
did most of the shining offen-
sively for the Pirates.
Sophomore quarterback Travis
Hunter passed for 210 yards and
one touchdown, while sopho-
more running back Dcnell
Harper added a pair of rushing
touchdowns. Sophomore re-
ceiver Walter Wilson chipped in
with four receptions for 108
yards, and junior wingback Jar-
rod Moody hauled in a 59-yard
touchdown reception.
"Travis Hunter and Walter
Wilson had excellent games for
us Baker said. "Walter seemed
always to be in on the big play
today, and that's the spark we
need
After battling to a 10-10
halftime tie, and falling behind
13-10 at the start of the second
half, Hunter set the Pirates up for
the go-ahead score when he hit
Wilson for a 58-yard reception at
the Temple nine-yard line.
Harper then took care of the leg
work on a razzle-dazzle fake up
the middle and pitch to the right
side on a fourth-and goal at the
one.
Chuck Berleth's PAT gave the
Pirates the lead for good, 17-13,
with 2:37 remaining in the third
quarter.
TheOwlshadtakenal3-101ead
on thcopeningdrivcof the second
half following a 34-yard Bill
Wright field goal, which put the
lid on a 19-play, 57-yard drive.
The Pirates stretched their lead
further when Harper scored on an
identical fourth-and-goal play.
Hunter had once again aided
the drive woth a pass to Wilson,
this one for 30 yards. Holder Tony
Smith passed to George Franklin
for a two-point conversion to up
the lead to 25-13 with 10:20to play
in the game.
Back-up quarterback Matt
Baker closed the Owls to within
five, 25-20, when he plunged in
from one yard out with 7:41 to
play.
Baker's score was set up by a
fourth-down, 29-yard sprint' to
the Pirates' one-yard line by Todd
McNair, who tallied 120 yards
rushing on 29 attempts.
The Pirates, then seemingly
content to keep the ball on the
ground to use up some clock,
powered 60 yards in 11 plays!
primarily behind the running'of
second-string fullback Tim James,
for their final score.
Fullback Anthony Simpson re-
corded the score with a one-yard
plunge with 1:51 to plav.
Simpson's two-point conversion
run failed, leaving the Pirates on
top, 31-20.
The Owls didn't entertain any
ideas of losing hope, though, as
Mike Palys returned the ensuing
kickoff to the Pirates 40.
Baker then hit tight end Mike
Hinnant over the middle at the
Pirate's four, setting up a one-
yard score by McNair two plays
later.
The Owls' two-point conver-
sion try, and onsides-kick attempt
both failed, however, ending their
comeback hopes.
"I'mextremelypleased with the
win, to say the least Baker said
"We put together two 80-yard
drives and ran our offens fairly-
well.
"Our defense did not have a
very good day, as a whole Baker
continued. "We gave them too
may third-down conversions
The 3-6 Owls should have
known the game was going to
blow up in their face on the Pi-
rates' first drive.
Moody took a quick out pitch
from Hunter, and sprang free for
59 yards and a touchdown, to can
off an 80-yard drive at the 11:31
mark of the first quarter.
Following a Joe Possenti inter-
ception of Hunter, Temple moved
for its first scorcof the davon a 33-
yard field goal from Bill Wright.
The Owls then moved ahead
with 2:35 to play in the half when
Baker found Hinnant for a five-
yard scoring strike, Wright's PAT
gave the Owls a 10-7 lead.
Berleth pulled the Pirates even
with only 31 seconds to plav in the
half when he split the uprights on
a 26-yard field goal.
we were just 13 points short said
coach Kobe.
In the women's 200-yard med-
ley relay, it was the combination
of Keller Hodges, Ryan Philyaw,
Meredith Bndgcrs, and Sonya
Hemmingwav to claim first with a
time of 1:53.23.
Freshman J.D. Lewis was a
double winner in both the 1,000
yard and the 500 yard freestyle
events with Paul Brennan taking
second in the 1,000 yard freestyle.
In the women's 1,000 yard
freestyle, JMU's K. Kuester came
out on top with ECU's Leslie Jo
Wilson settling for second with a
time of 10.58.24.
Shining for the women was
Freshman Meredith Bridgcrs set-
ting two varsity records in both
the 100-yard breaststroke with a
time of 1.07.66, and in the 200-
yard breaststroke with a time of
2:26.69. Also placing in the 200-
yard breaststroke was Freshman
Carolyn Green swimming in be-
hind Meredith with a second
place time of 2:33.87.
Both the men and the women
s-mn; men perform well
placewelTm the 200-yard frees-
tyle with Freshman John FarrcII
claiming first and Freshman Brian
Kingsficld clinching second with
times of 1:46.07 and 1:46.82.
JMU grasped first for the
women but ECU's Patricia Walsh
and Ryan Philyaw received the
second and third place spots with
times of 1:59.74 and 2:01.72 re-
spectively.
JMU again came out on top in
the men's 200-yard individual
medley, but it was Tom Holsten
and Raymond Kennedy grabbing
the second and third spots for the
Pirates.
ECU took the first, second, and
third place spots in the men's 200-
yard backstroke with Mark
O'Brien clinching the victory with
a time of 2.00.02. George Walters
settled for second with a time of
2.00.80 and Tom Holsten swam
for third in 2:04.21.
In the women's 100-yard back-
stroke, Keller Hodges came out
on top with a time of 1:04.76 and
Angela Winstead came in for
third in 1:06.66.
Robin Wicks led the women
Pirate swimmers in the 200-yard
butterfly claiming first witha time
of 2:15.41. Susan Augustus swam
a respectable 2:17.20 to claim sec-
ond for ECU.
In the men's 200-yard
breaststroke, JMU was the win-
ner; however, Raymond Kennedy
and Lee Hicks swam for the sec-
ond and third spots in 2.15.69 and
2:15.74.
The men's 400-yard Medley
Relay also took a back seat to a
first place finish (3:34.87) by JMU.
ECU settled for second by medley
team George Walters, Ron Flem-
ing, Raymond Kennedy, and
Tyge Pistorio with a combined
time of 3:37.19.
The Pirates also clinched third
in this event with Mark O'Brien,
Greg Hall, Lee Hicks, and Sean
Callender swimming it in 3:42.17.
magic number for Keller Hodges
in the 200-yard backstroke swim-
ming it in 2:19.20.
In the men's 200-vard butterfly,
it was again the Dukes claiming
first and second place, while Tyge
Pistorio snagged third for the Pi-
rates.
The ladies' 100-vard butterfly
also found JMU victorious but
ECU's Patricia Walsh (1:02.07)
and Susan Augustus (1:02.42)
held on to the second and third
spots.
Again second and third place
surfaced for the men Pirate swim-
mers as Raymond Kennedy
(2:15.69) settled for second and
Lee Hicks (2:15.74) settled for
third.
In the women's 200-yard indi-
vidual medley, it was Leslie Jo
Wilson winning it for the Pirates
c u . � ���� nuuui u iu me i irate:
nya Hemmmgway swam witha time of 2:16.51 Gincer Car-
away with second on both the 50- rick also swam well clinching the
yard freestyle and the 100-yard
freestyle events with times of
25.54 and 55.81. Patricia Walsh
claimed third in the 100-yard
freestyle (56.53).
Second place was again the
second place spot in 2:17.37.
The ECU women divers also
were very successful with Sherry
Campbell winning both the 1 and
3 meter diving events. Becky Ker-
ber also proved successful clinch-
ing the third place spots for both
events.
JMU dominated the men's 1
and 3 meter diving with East
Carolina only being allowed a
fourth place finish in both events
by Scott Milligan.
rhe East Carolina men swim-
mers had an excellent finish in the
meet by claiming first in the 400-
yard freestyle relay. Tyge Pisto-
rio, J.D. Lewis, Ted Chnstensen,
and Sean Callender swam a win-
ning combined time of 3:21.54.
The women Pirate swimmers
also fared well taking a second
place in the 400-yard freestyle
relay. It was Susan Augustus, Pa-
tricia Walsh, Carolyn Green, and
Sonya Hemmingway who swam
it in 3:45.83, three seconds short of
JMU's first-place relay team.
So, overall the Pirates have got-
ten a great start to their 1987-88
season. If the men concentrate on
making less mental errors and the
women keep up the outstanding
domination, both the men and the
women swimmers will be well on
their way to a CAA title
. 9 � ��- � aSdm me ocra.so proved successful clinch- their way to a CAA
Defensive seniors bid farewell to grid team
By CAROLYN JUSTICE the m � M I'VWIII
Sport. Writer , tpnrhincr in �ho 1-trviliV. 1 r T? � � ��
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sport Writer
As the Pirates close out the 1987
- eight of the team's 17 sen-
iors remember how they've be-
come a family and team within
the team.
These eight are the senior de-
fensive players. All came through
their college careers together,
picked each other upafter defeats,
encouraged the injured and con-
gratulated the victorious.
Their hope and determination
is paying off as the Pirates enter
their final game with a 5-5 record
� only one win away from a win-
ning season.
These seniors are each as
unique and special as they are
united as a team.
Leading the Pirates secondary
is Ellis Dillahunt. Dillahunt, a
Jacksonville native, signed with
the Pirates in 1983 but a broken
neck suffered in a high school all-
star game caused him to miss the
season.
Today, Dillahunt is a pro pros-
pect majoring in Criminal Justice.
After graduation, if he doesn't
play professional football, he
wants to work with a division of
the Federal government such as
the FBI.
Dillahunt recalls his most
memorable play as his blocked
punt in the 1985 N.C. State game,
which he recovered for a touch-
down. The Pirates went on to win
33-14 and Dillahunt says it started
his season off right.
This year's N.C. State game was
noscguard Medrick Rainbow's
favorite time at ECU.
"The most exciting moment for
me was the feeling after the N.C.
State victory this year said Rain-
bow, a Con way, S.C. native.
Referred to as "Bow" by his
teammates. Rainbow says there's
nothing like being with his
friends and talking about the
good times and the bad.
Rainbow is an Industrial Tech-
nology major, whose concentra-
tion is in manufacturing.
Another Senior from the Defen-
sive line is Bruce Simpson or
"Bruiser" to his teammates.
Simpson, from Jacksonville,
N.C. says if he could recommend
a school to anyone it would be
ECU because "it's a place where
people really care about you and
your education
Simpson hopes he can help
others when he graduates by
teaching in the Health and P.E.
field with Drivers Education.
Simpson says ECU is very spe-
cial and that the memories formed
here will travel with him for the
rest of his life.
For Essray Taliaferro, a line-
backer from Smithfield, Va a lot
of his memories are of his presea-
son camp during his freshman
and sophomore years.
"Ray-Ban" to his teammates,
says he won't forget the four-a-
day practices during preseason
and can't believe that someone ac-
tually got him to practice that
many times a day.
Taliaferro is a Criminal Justice
majorand after graduation would
like to become a detective.
Ron Gilliard is also a Criminal
Justice major.
Gilliard, from Gamer, N.C,
would like to work with the SBI
after graduation. A member of the
defensive line, he likes to remem-
ber the 1987 victory over N.C.
State and how the wins this sea-
son are turning the program
around.
Linebacker John Williamson
says there is a lot of unity in the
seniors and the turn around is
expected because, "they always
stick together through thick and
thin
Williamson, from Laurinburg,
N.C, is an Industrial Technology
major whose emphasis is in
manufacturing.
His first start after being red-
shirted in 1983, was against N.C.
State. Williamson says this was
the most exciting moment for him
because it was a record-breaking
crowd and ECU won.
Vinson Smith and Bubba Wa-
ters finish out the list of outstand-
ing defensive seniors.
Noted by many as ECU's "dy-
namic duo Smith and Waters
shared their first start against
N.C State in 1985 as their most
exciting moment in their line-
backing careers at ECU.
Nearly identical on the field,
they've chosen different careers
for off the field.
Waters, from Bath, N.C, is a
Criminal Justice major who wants
tobecomea probation officer after
graduation.
Smith is a communications
major whose concentration is
broadcasting. Smith's future
goals include becoming a
sportscaster.
Both agree, as do all the seniors.
that they're a part of a very special And, no doubt, all will be mis-
family and program revolving sed by Pirate fans next season,
around Pirate football.
Pirate ru
Friday night in 30 de.
weather, under the lights of the
NCSU athletic fields, the Easl
Carolina Rugbv Team pounded
and abused the N.C State rug-
gers, 10-0, giving the Pirates their
first victory against the Wolfpack
since 1979
Throughout the 80's ECU has
consecutively finished m
d tl
champ
I
� i 'I
f


inges to be
AA vollevba
Continued from pae In
Debbie Tate The jui -
transfer from Florida
team in lulls and sets and i
with fellow Flondia: -
brod gives ECU a
tage at setter
Hitters Jemima Hoik) ai li
McKay will give EC
punch. Holley leads the teai
kills and McKay is expected I
at full strength after
ankle injury last wei I
The Tribe, under the direct
of head coach Debbie I
come to Greenville tool
their second consecu: .
volleyball crown.
"It always makes you a little
nervous when vou come in ex-
pected to win Hill said
positive thing is that we have been
in that position before and our
girls are somewhat used ti
Middies, India

titles in cross
4
Navy won the men's Colonial
Athletic Association cross coun-
try championships Saturday in
Wilhamsburg, Va while the
hosting Lady Indians of William
& Mary took the women stil
East Carolina's men uni-
fied for seventh while the women
took sixth place.
Mike McGehee tod the Pirate
men finishing 30th in 26:02. Fol-
lowing McGehee was Matt
Schweitzer, 36th in 270 Miles
Layton, 47th in 28:32; Rob Rice
49th in 28:46; Rustv Williams
50th in 28:57 and Joe Corlev �Pnd
in 30:22.
For the women. Kim Griffiths
led all Pirates finishing lhth in
19:38. Terri Lynch to k 29th in
20:26, followed by Dawn Til
32nd in 20:37; Bibi Rosas. 40th in
21:10; Judy Wilson, 42nd in 2
and Kim Abemethv,44th in 2
Head Coach John Wei born re-
flected upon the season after
o
HEI
:M Br-f
men rooi
I
l
I
I
I
i
I
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I
I
l
Greenville Buyer's M
Memorial Drive
Open MonSat. 10 9
Sunday 1-6
��������� With
Senior Ellis Dillahunt will loom over his last co�e�iatfv id MtSrT 1L
when the Pirates end their season at Southern Mississippi "WekeBd
Tanning Bed Sped a
$100 Q for full yea
unlimited use
only 20 memberships av,
Suntana Tanning Bet

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n over Owls,
'nark to 5-5
irates vMi
entertain an)
e though, as
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J the ensuing g-
J Mike
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. ptheir
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Rrt-varH
ftjc a
Baker
ave
J
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trate on
and the
anding
and the

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�'i
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1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 10, 1W7 11
Friday night in 30 degree
weather, under the lights of the
NCSU athletic fields, the Fast
Carolina Rugby Team pounded
and abused the N.C. State rug-
gers, 10-0, giving the Pirates their
first victory against the Wolfpack
since 1979.
rhroughout the 80's V.CV has
consecutively finished second
Wolpack, look to title
and third in the state. It's always
been the Wolfpack that has kept
the Pirates from capturing the
championship.
"This year it's our turn to be the
spoilers" said team president and
three year veteran Steve "Von
Hitlea" Kimm. 'This year the
team is determined to take the
I Minges to be site of
CAA volleyball event
Continued from page 10
ebbie Tate. The junior college
insfcr trom Florida leads the
� am in kills and sets and together
ivith fellow Floridian Kerry Weis
brod gives ECU a slight advan
i at setter.
Hitters lemma Holley and Kris
McKay will give ECU its offensive
ranch. Holley leads the team in
kills and McKay is expected to be
� full strength after suffering an
inkle injury last week in practice
The Tribe, under the direction
� head coach Debbie Hill, will
me to Greenville looking tor
r second consecutive Colonial
olleyball crown.
It always makes you a little
� ervous when you come in ex-
pected to win Hill said. "One
. sitive thing is that we have been
n that position before and our
girls are somewhat used to it
William & Mary, at 5-0, is the
only undefeated team going into
tournament. Hill attributes their
success to the team's passing abil-
ity.
Throughout the season we have
come to rely on our passing game
a lot Hill said. "In the big
matches that we have won it was
the passing that helped us
1 litter 1 leidi Erpelding has led
the tribe throughout the season
and is one of the reasons that
William & Mary is favored to
repeat as Colonial champion.
"We have an excellent player in
Heidi Hill said "I can alwavs
count on her to play her best. She
is iust an extremely talented
player
I here is no admission charge
tor the tournament. All FCC stu-
dents and the public are invited to
come support the Lady Pirates.
state championship and advance
to the nationals
N.C. State fielded a strong side
and as in the past, energy levels
ran high and the hitting was
fierce.
Faculty advisor Dr. Rob Carroll
said that it was one of the most
intense and well played games
that he had ever seen.
The first half was a see-saw
battle that was characterized by
lost opportunities. One ECU scor-
ing attempt, scored by Greg
"Sweet-Daddy" Roache was nuli-
fied by the line judge calling him
out of bounds.
A few minutes later ECU failed
again, when Mike "Top Gun"
Burrell out ran the entire oppos-
ing team, into the endzone and
clear past the end line (out of
bounds) without touching the
ball to the ground. (In rugby the
ball must be physically placed on
the ground in the endzone for a
try to occur).
Fortunately, NCSU missed two
field goal opportunities, and both
teams went into the half scoreless.
In the second half ECU's supe-
rior physical conditioning
f PARTY ANIMALS
Balloons Delivered in Coa(urrw�
Con 1U-Cram
Cat or -Crams
IVnquin for Hire
Birthdays or any occasion
830-1823
showed as they reigned supreme
over the Wolfpack.
In the early going Eric Mussler
received the ball from the ECU
team at the 22-meter line and
avoided several State defenders
to make the score 4-0.
The conversion by Mike Brown
was good, giving ECU the lead 6-
0. ECU continued to dominate,
and midway through the
halfSonny" Nagle took the ball
from the Midfield and high-
stepped through six defenders, at
the 30 he passed the ball to Bob
Dan Jon Tobinie, who slipped
through two tackles before later-
aling the ball to team captain "Mr.
Bullhead Hahn "Mr. Hahn"
then made a sensational run from
the 10-meter line plowing
through three opposing players
into the endzone.
The point after was wide and
the score stood at 10-0.
Late in the game the Wolfpack
rallied, but ECU held them back,
keeping the Wolfpack scoreless,
and achieving ECU's greatest vic-
tory in seven years.
To add insult to injury, the ECU
B-team blanked the State B play-
ers 8-0, extending the B-side rec-
ord to 4-1.
Following the games, Dr. Car-
roll said that ECU has the strong-
est team its had in years and that
the victories against NCSU, along
with continued hard work,
should give ECU the confidence
to win its two remaining games
This week ECU faces last years
state champs, Wake Forest, be-
hind the Allied Health Building
Saturdavat 1 00p.m. If victorious,
the Pirates will play the unde-
feated UNC-G Ruggers in
Greensboro for the state champi-
onship.

(alUi
236 Greenville Blvd. (The Tipton Annex)
November Special with ECU-ID
Haircuts Reg. $8.50, Special $6.00 (wLisa).
(pon M F
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Nov. 14, 1987.
Halfday(8am-12)-$20
FulIday(8am-4)-$30
If interested call 757-6967 or
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Offers accepted until 9 a.m
Nov. 14, 1987
Middies, Indians win
titles in cross country
CLIFFS
eafood House aid Oyster B&rj
WMhmgton Highway (N.C. 33 Ext.) Greenv.lle. North Carolina
Phone 752-3172
Navy won the men's Colonial
Athletic Association cross coun-
try championships Saturday in
Williamsburg, 'a while the
hosting Lady Indians ot William
& Mary took the women's title
East Carolina s men finished
tied tor seventh while the women
took sixth picv
Mike McGehee led the Pirate
vwen nmshing 30th in 26:02. i ol-
lowing McGehee was Matt
Aeitzer, th in 27:07; Miles
� ayton, 4th in 2s 32; Rob Rice,
49th in 2v4rv Rusty Williams.
in28 and (oe Corley, 52nd
22.
lor the women, Kim Griffiths
I all Pirates finishing 16th in
19:38 Tern Lynch took 29th in
. 26 followed by Dawn Tillson,
2nd in 20:37; Bibi Rosas, 40th in
21:10; Judy Wilson, 42nd in 21:19
1 Kim Abemethy,44th in 23:00.
1 iead Coach John Welbom re-
flected upon the season after
Saturday's finale.
We ve had a good, competi-
ti e season Welborn said. "This
group ot kids has been a pleasure
to coach and work with. I'm
pleased with the season
Mon. thru Thurs. Night
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I
Greenville Buyers Market
Memorial Drive
TAKE AN
EXTRA
10
OFF
Open MonSat. 10-9 our everyday low price
Sunday 1-6 (EXCEPT AIGNER. NIKE AND REEBOK)
��������� With this Coupon ������������IB
(im

Nautilus
Memberships
only
1 $30
for remaining
fall semester
November & December
Tanning Bed Special
$100gQ for full year
unlimited use
only 20 memberships available
Suntana Tanning Bed
corner of 10th & Evans
Greenville, NC
758-9584
Hours M-F 10 a.m9 p.m.
Sat. - Sun. 10 a.m 7 p.m.
Kentucky Fried
Chicken
Halloween Specials:
Buy 3 Chicken Littles� from
Kentucky Fried Chicken and
a Small Fries and get a FREE
Medium Drink.
TI
$2.49
Value
Buy a Kentucky Nuggets
Combo for $1.99
Includes: 6 nuggets, small fries
and a medium drink.
$2.49
Vain
e
� 2 PIECES OF CHICKEN (Original Recipe or Extra Crispy)
� 1 MASHED POTATO AXD GRAVY
� 1 BISCUIT
$1.75
on
pom over his last collegiate victims this weekend
season at Southern Mississippi.
for only $1.75 with this coupon. Limit one package per coupon. Good
combination orders only. Customer pays all applicable sales tax.
Kentucky Fried Chicken
All coupons expire November 30, 1QK7 anr are
redeemable at the following
Kentucky Fried Chicken Restaurants.
Greenville (East & West Greenville Blvd.), Kinston, Goldsboro, Wilson
Tarboro, Williamston and Jacksonville.
I
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:






12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 10
1987
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THIS MOTE IS LEGAL TENDER
FOR ALL DEBTS. PUBLIC AMD PRIVATE
nan
VJII
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i
10
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V.sill�;r)X.l.
10
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L� 165
BCRIKS
.�. UmtmJ '
&(&�
s� �� f.uy i.t j tan mi t
'MSI 1IOLL1UN
Buyaprinterwithyour
Macintosh and conserve paper:
g j A Macintosh"personal computer pupervoull save will have a lovely green glow.
I �� mta and an Apple You'll save a bundle of cash when youpur-
ImageWriter D chase an ImageWriter n printer along with our
printer will save choice of a Macintosh Plus or a Macintosh SE.
IU1;
ou hours of time. Not to mention gallons of cor- Eitherway vou'll be able to turn out beautifully
rection fluid and reams and reams of paper. written and beautifully printed papers.
Andiwjutxiyb()thnow,therirstreamof And well even try to helpou pay for your
purchase with a variety of financing options.
Vfe fed compelkd to tell ou,though,that
a deal like this can't last forever So it's a good
idea to see vour campus microcornputer center
today And join the conservation movement
The power to be your best"
Student Stores
Wright Building
A
v
a






Title
The East Carolinian, November 10, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 10, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.572
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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