The East Carolinian, November 5, 1987






INSIDE
Entertainment9
)r " -����������������?�������?�.�14
ClassifiedsM��.6
ENTERTAINMENT
Playwright's fund helps with production
ENTERTAINMENT, page 9.
see
SPORTS
Pirates look to Owls for improving record� see
SPORTS, page 14.
3Ute i�nBt (UntBlMun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.62 No. 20
Thursday, November 5,1987
Greenville, NC
16 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Former department head appeals dismissal
By EDWARD WILKERSON
Sutf Writer
The former chairman of the
ECU philosophy department is
protesting his April 23 dismissal
from ECU by university officials.
Dr. John Kozy Jr who had boon
a university faculty member since
1963, was discharged after uni-
versity officials charged that he
had sexually harassed three fe-
male students on separate occa-
sions � in July, 1983, March 184
and the summer of 18r
On Oct. 2 kozy, 56, filed a peti-
tion with the Titt Countv clerk of
court. The appeal requests that
the court reverse the universitv's
ruling oi his dismissal. Judge
Bradford Tillery received the peti-
tion on Monday oi this week and
is to review the case today.
According to the petition, Kozy
received a letter from then ECU
Chancellor John Howell on Oct. 7,
1986, which stated the
universitv'sintenttodismisshim.
On Oct. 24, 1986, Kozy re-
quested that Howell provide
"specification of reasons for in-
tent to discharge According to
the petition, Kozy additionally
requested a hearing before a due
process committee of the univer-
sity. As a result of his request, a
five-member committee was con-
vened.
The petition states that "a ma-
jority oi the due process commit-
tee found against Dr. Kozy on six
oi the ten specifications (allega-
tions of sexual harassment), and
concluded that he should not
continue as a member of the fac-
ulty
Despite Kozy's consequential
discharge, a minority conclusion
was filed with the committee's
report which stated, "dismissing
Dr. Kozy at this time is not war
ranted and that sanctions other
than termination of his employ-
ment should be explored seri-
ously and invoked
Kozy's petition fails to cite the
allegations made in the charge
specifications. The petition refers
to the specifications by number
only.
Chancellor Richard Eakin,
Howell's successor, contacted
Kozy by letter on April 23, giving
notification that he was officially
discharged. Kozy then submitted
an appeal to the ECU Board of
Trustees.
After a review of the appeal, the
board determined that "a prepon-
derance of the evidence with re-
spect to four of the original ten
specifications reasonably sup-
ported the chancellor's action ter-
minating Kozy's employment
according to the petition.
Kozy then filed a petition for the
review of the decision of the ECU
Board of Trustees with the Uni-
versity Board of Governors.
The court petition states that on
Sept. 11 the UNC Board of Gover-
nors denied Kozy's petition for
reversal of the decisions made by
Eakin and the ECU Board of Trus-
tees. Kozy states in his Oct. 2 peti-
tion that his dismissal was unjust
on the basis that "the evidence
was insufficient to support the
findings that the "findings were
not sufficient to support the con-
clusion reached and that "the
conclusions reached did not jus-
tify Dr. Kozy's discharge
The petition reiterates Kozy's
own opinion that "unconstitu-
tional procedures were used by
administration officials and that
his dismissal "under all the cir-
cumstances is unfair and unjust
and contrary to the applicable
rules
According to the petition, 'The
petitioner (Kozy) has exhausted
all administrative remedies by
statute or rule of East Carolina
University and the University of
North Carolina
By attaining judicial review.
Kozy desires to be found compe-
tent and be permitted to perform
his duties as a tenured professor.
His petition states that Kozy is to
"be paid the emoluments of his
employment that he would be
entitled to receive had he been
continued as a member of the
faculty
University officials declined to
disclose the specific nature of the
allegations brought against Kozy.
Kozy's attorney, Robert Rouse
Jr was unavailable for comment.
A nati veof Bamsville, Pa Kozy
received his undergraduate de-
gree from the Pennsylvania State
University, his master's degree
from Cornell and his doctorate in
philosophy from Penn State in
1963.
Chancellor discusses adult education at meeting Wednesday
By M. BURBELLA
AitiAUnt News Editor
Improving the conditions for
the ECU Adult Education Asso-
ciation (ECUAEA) was on Chan-
cellor Richard Eakin's main
agenda Wednesday evening at
the Association's fall meeting in
Mendenhall Student Center.
The ECUAEA is an applied
field of practice which focuses on
the processes of planning, imple-
menting and evaluating the in-
struction of adults, according to a
printed summary given to Eakin.
The Association's major goal is
helping the adult learn how to
learn so that heshe may then
become a more self-directed
learner.
The ECUAEA placed several
Captain Keith Knox of ECU Public Safety discusses self defense techniques Wednesday (Photolab).
questions before Eakin concern-
ing the continuation of the adult
student's educational needs,
helping the high rate of adult illit-
eracy and helping promote and
enhance ECU'S adult education
program image.
New group
seeks to up
Third World
awareness
A graduate assistant is trying to
form a campus organization to
make students more aware of
political issues in Third World
countries.
The Overseas Development
Network already exsists on 40
university campuses and Mari-
anne Exum hopes ECU will be the
next. The advisors to the organi-
zation will be Dr. Charles Coble,
dean of Education, and Rev. Dan
Earnhardt, director of Campus
Ministries, Exum said.
"ODN is unique and it is impor-
tant that college students can re-
ally make a difference. ODN tries
to make people aware of that
Exum said.
The network publishes a
monthly newsletter, "Merging
World and portions of it will be
occasionally published in The
East Carolinian (see page 4).
The network will hold a meet-
ing at 4 p.m. Tuesday in the multi-
purpose room in Mendenhall.
Eakin addressed these ques-
tions and offered points for the
ECUAEA's "consideration and
reflection Eakin stressed, how-
ever, that,althoughhiscomments
"are preliminary and qualified"
he offers "no simple prescriptions
especially since 1 have so much to
lcam about this university and
about North Carolina higher
education
First of all, Eakin said his "im-
pressions are positive but they do
need to be sharpened in keeping
with this, he plans to meet with
President Charles E. Russell of
Pitt Community College to dis-
cuss ways "ECU can be more re-
sponsive in assisting older and
non-traditional students
Eakin also mentioned possibly
acquiring Instructional Televi-
sion Fixed System (ITFS) which, if
adequately funded, could "dra-
matically and substantially im-
prove ECU'S capacity to serve the
adult learner
In answer to the question of
adult illiteracy, Eakin agreed that
"this university should do more
in the area of developmental edu-
cation
Eakin also agreed "priority
treatment should be given to the
older non-traditional student
who is attending ECU He men-
tioned Dr. Lucy Wright, asst. dean
of Student Service who is in the
process of preparing a handbook
which will assist non-traditional
students in their ECU orientation.
Eakin said he wants to "begin
planning for a special service
center now and begin defining
our thinking of designation and
use of such space He went on to
say he was familiar with a former
group, The Returning Older Stu-
dents for Education Society (The
ROSE Society). Eakin says he
hopes to "rekindle the spirit of
that pioneering group of stu-
dents
Asa final point, Eakin proposed
a "creation of a special, chancel-
lor-appointed study commission
for trie purpose of accessing
ECU'S role in this relationship
with the adult, non-traditional
learner
"1 would welcome a direct
working relationship with the
ECU Adult Education Associa-
tion Eakin said. "And, the inclu-
sion of members of the Associa-
tion on this study committee
"In short, I'm going to need
your help and your council
Eakin said. "And, I shall look for-
ward to working with your presi-
dent in structuring the make-
up and agenda for a study
commission
Committee to survey
students about writing
Students taught self defense at Awareness Week seminar
By JENNIFER PEARSON
Stiff Writer
Describing a rapist is nearly
impossible, according to Captain
Keith Knox, of ECU Public Safety.
Rapists range from the average
looking "boy next door" to the
handsome clean-cut husband and
father of two to the guy that still
lives with his mother to the men-
tally retarded psychopath, ac-
cording to Knox.
Tuesday evening, Knox con-
ducted a defense techniquedem-
onstration at Memorial Gymna-
sium in which Dale Land, presi-
dent of the Karate Club, and
Margaret Laughinghouse, an in-
structer at McDonald Karate
School, demonstrated effective
methods of defense for rape pre-
vention.
Knox pointed out that women
who strongly fight back are more
Faculty members act out rape scenarios
By JENNIFER PEARSON
St�ff Writer
Is dating "dangerous?" One
issue being adressed during Sex-
ual Assault Awareness Week is
date rape, and in a Tuesday-after-
noon seminar in Jenkins audito-
rium, Dr. Diane Byington pre-
sented information on how to ef-
fectively avoid date rape.
Assisting her were Dr. Karen
Baldwin and Dr. David Sanders,
both of the English Dept, who
acted out skits directly involving
a possible date rape situation.
In each dramatized situation,
alcohol was a part of the scene.
The first skit depicted both per-
sons going back to the man's
apartment and when he sug-
gested playing a little music for
dancing purposes it appeared he
had some other intentions as well.
Instead of expressing herself
clearly and being firm in her
choice to say no, the woman gave
out signals that were uncertain.
When her date's hands slipped
intentionally below the waist, she
loosely placed each hand, one at a
time, back to its proper position
and continued dancing. Because
the woman did not communicate
clearly by firmly saying "no she
would end up in a precarious and
traumatic situation � she was
raped.
The best advice presented by
Dr. Sanders is "you are safer by
not having sex" if there is a cir-
cumstance of uncertainty (she
says no or seems as if she does not
really want to have sex).
In the second demonstration,
the couple had been drinking al-
cohol and returned to the man's
See DATE, page 2
successful in avoiding rape. And
only 1 percent of all reported
rapes end up in death.
Knox emphasized that a
woman should not allow, herself
to be alone with someone who
makes her feel uncomfortable �
even if she thinks she knows him
well. It is simply a matter of avoid-
ing being at the "wrong place at
the wrong time Knox said.
If a woman finds herself in a bad
situation, an element of surprise is
important, Knox said. Knox ex-
plaind the "target points" in de-
fending oneself; these can be
found at the throat, nose, inside of
the elbows, knees ears and the
groin to name a few.
Knox emphasized that women
should remeber that they are not
defenselfess.
Karate instructions are given at
108 Memorial Gym for women on
Tues. at 8:30 p.m. and Thurs. and
7:30 p.m. Classes for guys are
given on Tues. at 7:30 p.m. and
Thurs. at 830 p.m.
By TIM HAMPTON
Staff Writer
A survey to gather students'
attitudes toward course-related
writing assignments will be con-
ducted by a faculty committee,
according to a member of the
committee.
"We want to find out how stu-
dents feel about writing said
Prof. Kenneth Wilburn of the
History Department.
Wilburn is a member of the
Writing Across the Curriculum
Committee in the ECU Faculty
Senate. The focus of the 14-mem-
ber committee is on student writ-
ing skillsand the methods various
academic departments use to
promote writing in the classroom.
On Friday, the survey will be
mailed to a cross section of 828
ECU students, Wilburn said. The
survey will reflect a direct propor-
tion of students in relation to sex
and race, according to Wilburn.
"We are implementing a scien-
tific approach in conducting the
survey Wilburn said.
Sample questions on the survey
include items such as: What kind
of writing do you do for class? Are
journals used in any of your
classes? Do you write outside of
class?
Wilbum said in general that
ECU students lack valuable writ-
ing skills. Blaming the writing
programs used in North Carolina
high schools, and particularly
high schools in Eastern North
Carolina, he said students are not
prepared for writing tasks in col-
lege.
Wilburn also said course in-
structors at ECU are hesitant to
assign writing assignments be-
cause they would be extra work.
He said journal writing could be
used in many courses to improve
students' views of writing as well
as give the instructor feedback on
the course.
This survey is a part of a broad
study of how writing is perceived
as a educational tool at ECU.
Under the faculty senate commit-
tee are 3 subcommittees, one sub-
committee will compile students'
views, another will survey and
compile faculty views, and the
last subcommittee will report on
how effectively writing skills are
used on other campuses.
" i
A
1

flirT' ��dr1t�fcr"�4 x �- - �' - � M � - 4jr :

"r!li
����
31 � f" j-
U I
I





INSIDE
Editorials4
Entertainment�9
Classifieds��M.6
ENTERTAINMENT
Playwright's fund helps with production
ENTERTAINMENT, page 9.
see
SPORTS
Pirates look to Owls for improving record� see
SPORTS, page 14.
�je i�nBt (�ar0itman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 No. 20
Thursday, November 5,1987
Greenville, NC
16 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Former department head appeals dismissal
By EDWARD WILKERSON
Sl.II Writer
line former chairman of the
ECU philosophy department is
protesting his April 23 dismissal
from ECU by university officials.
Dr. John Kozy Jr who had been
a university faculty member since
1963, was discharged after uni-
versity officials charged that he
had sexually harassed three fe-
male students on separate occa-
sions � in July, 1983, March 1984
and the summer oi 1986.
On Oct. 2 Kozy, 56, filed a peti-
tion with the Pitt County clerk of
court. The appeal requests that
the court reverse the university's
ruling of his dismissal. Judge
Bradford Tillery received the peti-
tion on Monday of this week and
is to review the case today.
According to the petition, Kozy
received a letter from then ECU
Chancellor John Howell on Oct. 7,
1986, which stated the
university'sintcnt todismisshim.
On Oct. 24, 1986, Kozy re-
quested that Howell provide
"specification of reasons for in-
tent to discharge According to
the petition, Kozy additionally
requested a hearing before a due
process committee of the univer-
sity. As a result of his request, a
five-member committee was con-
vened.
The petition states that "a ma-
jority of the due process commit-
tee found against Dr. Kozy on six
oi the ten specifications (allega-
tions of sexual harassment), and
concluded that he should not
continue as a member of the fac-
ulty
Despite Kozy's consequential
discharge, a minority conclusion
was filed with the committee's
report which stated, "dismissing
Dr. Kozy at this time is not war
ranted and that sanctions other
than termination of his employ-
ment should be explored seri-
ously and invoked
Kozy's petition fails to cite the
allegations made in the charge
specifications. The petition refers
to the specifications by number
only.
Chancellor Richard Eakin,
Howell's successor, contacted
Kozy by letter on April 23, giving
notification that he was officially
discharged. Kozv then submitted
an appeal to the ECU Board of
Trustees.
After a review of the appeal, the
board determined that "a prepon-
derance of the evidence with re-
spect to four of the original ten
specifications reasonably sup-
ported the chancellor's action ter-
minating Kozy's employment
according to the petition.
Kozy then filed a petition for the
review of the decision of the ECU
Board of Trustees with the Uni-
versity Board of Governors.
Thecourt petition states that on
Sept. 11 the UNC Board of Gover-
nors denied Kozy's petition for
reversal of the decisions made by
Eakin and the ECU Board of Trus-
tees. Kozy states in his Oct. 2 peti-
tion that his dismissal was unjust
on the basis that "the evidence
was insufficient to support the
findings that the "findings were
not sufficient to support the con-
clusion reached and that "the
conclusions reached did not jus-
tify Dr. Kozy's discharge
The petition reiterates Kozy's
own opinion that "unconstitu-
tional procedures were used by
administration officials and that
his dismissal "under all the cir-
cumstances is unfair and unjust
and contrary to the applicable
rules
According to the petition, 'The
petitioner (Kozy) has exhausted
all administrative remedies by
statute or rule of East Carolina
University and the University of
North Carolina
By attaining judicial review,
Kozy desires to be found compe-
tent and be permitted to perform
his duties as a tenured professor.
His petition states that Kozy is to
"be paid the emoluments of his
employment that he would be
entitled to receive had he been
continued as a member of the
faculty
University officials declined to
disclose the specific nature of the
allegations brought against Kozy.
Kozy's attorney, Robert Rouse
Jr was unavailable for comment.
A nati veof Barnsvillc, Pa Kozy
received his undergraduate de-
gree from the Pennsylvania State
University, his master's degree
from Cornell and his doctorate in
philosophy from Penn State in
1963.
Chancellor discusses adult education at meeting Wednesday
By M. BURBELLA
Assistant m�t Iditor
Improving the conditions for
the ECU Adult Education Asso-
ciation (ECUAEA) was on Chan-
cellor Richard Eakin's mam
agenda Wednesday evening at
the Association's fall meeting in
Mendenhall Student Center.
The ECUAEA is an applied
field of practice which focuses on
the processes oi planning, imple-
menting and evaluating the in-
struction of adults, according to a
printed summary given to Eakin.
The Association's major goal is
helping the adult learn how to
leam so that heshe mav then
become a more self-directed
learner.
The ECUAEA placed several
questions before Eakin concern-
ing the continuation of the adult
student's educational needs,
helping the high rate of adult illit-
eracy and helping promote and
enhance ECU's adult education
program image.
New group
seeks to up
Third World
awareness
A graduate assistant is trying to
form a campus organization to
make students more aware of
political issues in Third World
countries.
The Overseas Development
Network already exsists on 40
university campuses and Mari-
anne Exum hopes ECU will be the
next. The advisors to the organi-
zation will be Dr. Charles Coble
dean of Education, and Rev. Dan
Earnhardt, director of Campus
Ministries, Exum said.
"ODN is unique and it is impor-
tant that college students can re-
ally make a difference. ODN tries
to make people aware of that
Exum said.
The network publishes a
monthly newsletter, "Merging
World and portions of it will be
occasionally published in The
East Carolinian (see page 4).
The network will hold a meet-
ing at 4 p.m. Tuesday in the multi-
purpose room in Mendenhall.
Eakin addressed these ques-
tions and offered points for the
ECUAEA's "consideration and
reflection Eakin stressed, how-
ever, that, although his comments
"are preliminary and qualified"
he offers "no simple prescriptions
especially since 1 have so much to
learn about this univcrsitv and
about North Carolina higher
education
First of all, Eakin said his "im-
pressions are positive but they do
need to be sharpened in keeping
with this, he plans to meet with
President Charles E. Russell of
Pitt Community College to dis-
cuss ways "ECU can be more re-
sponsive in assisting older and
non-traditional st
Eakin also me- sibly
acquiring Instructional Televi-
sion Fixed System (ITFS) which, if
adequately funded, could "dra-
matically and substantially im-
prove ECU's capacity to serve the
adult learner
In answer to the question of
adult illiteracy, Eakin agreed that
"this university should do more
in the area of developmental edu-
cation
Eakin also agreed "priority
treatment should be given to the
older non-traditional student
who is attending ECU He men-
tioned Dr. Lucy Wright, asst. dean
of Student Service who is in the
process of preparing a handbook
which will assist non-traditional
students in their ECU orientation.
Eakin said he wants to "begin
planning for a special service
center now and begin defining
our thinking of designation and
use of such space He went on to
say he was familiar with a former
group. The Returning Older Stu-
dents for Education Society (The
ROSE Society). Eakin says he
hopes to "rekindle the spirit of
that pioneering group of stu-
dents
Asa final point, Eakin proposed
a "creation of a special, chancel-
lor-appointed study commission
for the purpose of accessing
ECU's role in this relationship
with the adult, non-traditional
learner
"I would welcome a direct
working relationship with the
ECU Adult Education Associa-
tion Eakin said. "And, the inclu-
sion of members of the Associa-
tion on this study committee
"In short, I'm going to need
your help and your council
Eakin said. "And, I shall look for-
ward to working with your presi-
dent in structuring the make-
up and agenda for a study
commission
Captain Keith Knox of ECU Public Safety discusses self defense techniques Wednesday (Photolab).
Students taught self defense at Awareness Week seminar
Committee to survey
students about writing
By JENNIFER PEARSON
Staff Writer
Describing a rapist is nearly
impossible, according to Captain
Keith Knox, of ECU PublicSafcty.
Rapists range from the average
looking "boy next door" to the
handsome clean-cut husband and
father of two to the guy that still
lives with his mother to the men-
tally retarded psychopath, ac-
cording to Knox.
Tuesday evening, Knox con-
ducted a defense techniquexiem-
onstration at Memorial Gymna-
sium in which Dale Land, presi-
dent of the Karate Club, and
Margaret Laughinghouse, an in-
structor at McDonald Karate
School, demonstrated effective
methods of defense for rape pre-
vention.
Knox pointed out that women
who strongly fight back are more
Faculty members act out rape scenarios
By JENNIFER PEARSON
Staff Writer
Is dating "dangerous?" One
issue being adressed during Sex-
ual Assault Awareness Week is
date rape, and in a Tuesday-after-
noon seminar in Jenkins audito-
rium, Dr. Diane Byington pre-
sented information on how to ef-
fectively avoid date rape.
Assisting her were Dr. Karen
Baldwin and Dr. David Sanders,
both of the English Dept, who
acted out skits directly involving
a possible date rape situation.
In each dramatized situation,
alcohol was a part of the scene.
The first skit depicted both per-
sons going back to the man's
apartment and when he sug-
gested playing a little music for
dancing purposes it appeared he
had some other intentions as well.
Instead of expressing herself
clearly and being firm in her
choice to say no, the woman gave
out signals that were uncertain.
When her date's hands slipped
intentionally below the waist, she
loosely placed each hand, one at a
time, back to its proper position
and continued dancing. Because
the woman did not communicate
clearly by firmly saying "no she
would end up in a precarious and
traumatic situation � she was
raped.
The best advice presented by
Dr. Sanders is "you are safer by
not having sex" if there is a cir-
cumstance of uncertainty (she
says no or seems as if she does not
really want to have sex).
In the second demonstration,
the couple had been drinking al-
cohol and returned to the man's
See DATE, page 2
successful in avoiding rape. And
only 1 percent of all reported
rapes end up in death.
Knox emphasized that a
woman should not allow, herself
to be alone with someone who
makes her feel uncomfortable �
even if she thinks she knows him
well. It is simply a matter of avoid-
ing being at the "wrong place at
the wrong time Knox said.
If a woman finds herself in a bad
situation, an element of surprise is
important, Knox said. Knox ex-
plaind the "target points" in de-
fending oneself; these can be
found at the throat, nose, inside of
the elbows, knees ears and the
groin to name a few.
Knox emphasized that women
should remeber that they are not
defenselfess.
Karate instructions are given at
108 Memorial Gym for women on
Tues. at 8:30 p.m. and Thurs. and
7:30 p.m. Classes for guys are
given on Tues. at 7:30 p.m. and
Thurs. at 8:30 p.m.
By TIM HAMPTON
Staff Writer
A survey to gather students'
attitudes toward course-related
writing assignments will be con-
ducted by a faculty committee,
according to a member of the
committee.
"We want to find out how stu-
dents feel about writing said
Prof. Kenneth Wilburn of the
History Department.
Wilburn is a member of the
Writing Across the Curriculum
Committee in the ECU Faculty
Senate. The focus of the 14-mem-
ber committee is on student writ-
ing skills and the methods various
academic departments use to
promote writing in the classroom.
On Friday, the survey will be
mailed to a cross section of 828
ECU students, Wilbum said. The
survey will reflect a direct propor-
tion of students in relation to sex
and race, according to Wilburn.
"We are implementing a scien-
tific approach in conducting the
survey Wilbum said.
Sample questions on the survey
include items such as: What kind
of writing do you do for class? Are
journals used in any of your
classes? Do you write outside of
class?
Wilbum said in general that
ECU students lack valuable writ-
ing skills. Blaming the writing
programs used in North Carolina
high schools, and particularly
high schools in Eastern North
Carolina, he said students are not
prepared for writing tasks in col-
lege.
Wilbum also said course in-
structors at ECU are hesitant to
assign writing assignments be-
cause they would be extra work.
He said journal writing could be
used in many courses to improve
students' views of writing as well
as give the instructor feedback on
the course.
This survey is a part of a broad
study of how writing is perceived
as a educational tool at ECU.
Under the faculty senate commit-
tee are 3 subcommittees, one sub-
committee will compile students'
views, another will survey and
compile faculty views, and the
last subcommittee will report on
how effectively writing skills are
used on other campuses.
A
I
IT
aj
t0 T � I �ii 1W TTii
����� a a
� � -�-� �a' �� a J �" - � - - - a- - - V






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 5,1987
$100
ECU N�w� Butmu
Ted B. and Peggy T. Lanier of
Sanford, NC. have established a
scholarship endowment fund at
ECU in memory of their daughter,
LuAnne, who died in 1977 at the
age of 13.
The $100,000 endowment will
fund scholarships designated for
students from several North
Carolina high schools. Only the
income from the endowment will
fund scholarships, preserving the
principal to earn and support fu-
ture scholarships.
Vice Chancellor for Institu-
tional Advancement James L.
Lanier Jr. said, "We greatly appre-
ciate Ted and Peggy Lanier's
generosity and commitment to
education. This scholarship fund
New tech. increases ECU reach
ECU New. Bun
With a long distance telphone
hookup and the flick of a modem
switch, instruction in calculus
flashed onto a screen at ECU.
Equations flowed across the
screen and the voice of an instruc-
tor "explained the problems and
how to solve them.
The instructor was a professor
at Harvard, 700 miles away, and
the instruction, in two40-minutes
class sessions, was received in a
classroom in Speight Building on
the ECU campus.
It was a realistic demonstration
of the capability ECU is achieving
as part of a growing telecommu-
nications network which has
worldwide outreach.
"This teaching method is
proving to be just as effective for
manv courses as having a live
teacher in the room said John
Spagnolo of ECU'S Rural Educa-
tion Institute (RED who con-
ducted the demonstration.
"With this new capacity, ECU
can reach a class in anv location
throughout North Carolina in-
cluding the most rural counties
Spagnolo said. Through RE1, a
component oi the School oi Edu-
cation, ECU already is conducting
telecommunications classes in
schools in Beaufort, Hyde and
Pamlico counties in eastern North
Carolina, but the recent demon-
stration featured new equipment
and techniques and a much
greater scope.
The equipment used was an
Optel Telewriter 3 which uses an
AT&T computer, a writing tablet
and a special modem which deliv-
ers both voice and graphics infor-
mation over a single phone line.
The system also has the ability
to send a still frame video image
from one classroom to another.
The teacher and students can
speak with each other, send infor-
mation back and forth and change
the graphics which appear on a
television monitor.
"We're totally interactive
Spagnolo said. "The only differ-
ence between this and the regular
classroom is that teachers and
students arc not looking at a live
image of each other.
"This means that teachers have
to be better organized and that
students have to focus and listen
carefully he said. Test results
indiciate that students taught in
this way do as well or better than
students taught in the traditional
classroom, he said.
Dr. Charles Coble, dean of the
School of Education, said he was
enthusiastic about the possibili-
ties.
"This will let us provide univer-
sity credit classes in any school in
the state which has compatible
equipment Coble said.
"We can let teacners stay in
their home community, rather
than taking hoursaway from their
time to drive to a campus. We can
also help local schools meet the
requirements of the Basic Educa-
tion Plan by either providing spe-
cific classes directly from ECU, or
by assisting the schools in setting
up a system which will let them
use one teacher to deliver classes
to several schools
The network has an interna-
tional aspect. In the spring, 1 lar-
vard will start teaching a class to
Beijing Normal University in
China.
"Our main concern is providing
quality education in North Caro-
lina Coble said. "But it's inter-
esting to know that we have the
capability to teach or receive
courses form a university on the
other side oi the world
Business major scholarship set up
ECL Ntwi Bureiu
The Greenville-Pitt Countv
Board oi Realtors Scholarship
Endowment Fund has been estab-
lished at ECU. The purpose oi the
fund is to recognize and reward
outstanding undergraduate stu-
dents seeking degrees in the ECU
School of Business with a concen-
tration in real estate.
At a breakfast meeting held at
the Sheraton GreenvilleThursdav
morning, Elaine Troiano, presi-
dent of the realtor's board, and
Mane Davis, president-elect, pre-
sented a $3,000check to Dr. Ernest
Date rape
discussed
Continued from page 1
apartment. Although the lady
took off her rather large necklace
because it was bothering her, this
was not a signal that she wanted
to have sex.
This time when the couple be-
gan to dance and the man once
again let his hands wander, the
women was immediately asser-
tive and tactful in saying no and
returning his hands to a more
discreet position.
During the discussion, one stu-
dent mentioned what a shame it
was that people "cannot go to a
date's apartment and watch T.V.
and simply get to know one an-
other better
Male students attending the
presentation were asked whether
or not they would ask a girl out
again if she had turned them
down.
Realizing that a rejection of a
sexual encounter is not personal,
the guys agreed that they would
certainly ask the girl out again "if
they really liked her
Women have the responsibility
to let their dates know exactly
where the line will be drawn.
Otherwise, according to Bying-
ton, the man will invade a
woman's private space and if she
docs not do anything about it she
could find herself in a situation in
which date rape could occur.
Byington closed the discussion
by listing the various places to go
for help after actually suffering
such a crisis as date rape. Some
places mentioned were the ECU
Counseling Center, the Student
Health Center, or the police.
B. Uhr, dean of the ECU School oi
Business, initiating the fund.
"We felt it was our job to bring
some oi the business aspects back
to the school said Troiano. "It
will also benefit the real estate
industry by helping the standards
grow to meet our requirements.
We are thrilled to be associated
with ECU she said.
Selection of scholarship recipi-
ents will be made by the ECU
student financial aid office from
recommendations made by the
dean of the School of Business.
Seniors who have completed
more than 90 semester hours, take
part in university activities and
have high academic standings
will be considered for the $250
annual award.
"Scholarships are important to
our students said Uhr, "and we
have a number of them in the real
estate curriculum. This, however,
is the firsl scholarship dedicated
to that program. We arc pleased
with the board's action today and
hope that they will choose to ex-
pand this fund
fp
When you make pizza this good, one just isn't enough
I vaiuaju COUPON �������� vAiUAiu cex�o�
A Taste of Italy
2 Medium Pizzas
$Q95
J plus tax
Little Caesars Best
tpepperoni. mushrooms, green peppers,
onion and Italian sausage)
No limit
756-7256
Buy any size
pizza at regular price, get
identical pizza FREE!
NO LIMIT
FREE
�"f
I
I
I
BUY ONE I
. PIZZA
GET ONE FREE!
I
I
I
J
Buy any size
pizza at regular price, get
identical pizza FREE!
NOIIMIT
Pr t �r�� StprAdwfl o� w� �d mjmbe-r -ad lopp"?
ordered ViMliiMh((M9ortt p�rtKpa(inLi'il� Caewrt
c�rrvXiO�t Expires: Doc. 31, 7m
756-7256 EC M
-pirev
11, 1987
SE3j
756-725? ECJ
VA1UAMJ COUPON ��Bji
� 1987 uttJe C�e�r tnterpnm, Inc
FREE PIZZA!
BUY ONE PIZZA, GET ONE FREE!
SV1AU MEDIUM UKRGl
PIZZA MENl
On hem
Two herib
Three hems .
Little Caesars iapei i
I . - v room
ftn" Owjn and tW"
Extra hems over 1
Extra Cheese
Bpc
5 35
605
675
7.45
85!
10 pc
7 10
800
890
980
1090
90
200
!2pc
�9
1060
11
12 80
14 10
1 10
250
hi �isi i rom rccs n wt is
lpperoni Mushrooms Osons Kjf BKO I ' �jnd bWr ttasar-
Slus Grivn FVopns An. n,��s Mr Pitx�t Kjnqj BL� k OW,
Cmttv (W.
BEVERAGES
Coca Coia�. Diet Coke Small Medium Liter
Sprite. Mello Yellow. 55 66 95
Cherry Coke
323 Arlington Blvd.
(across from Farm Fresh)
CAESARS SANDWICHES"
Tuna Ms'it
Italian Sub J in
Him and Chw 2 to
Vegetarian 2 o
SALADS SMAI 1 MEDB M iKe.t
Tossed , 1,19 J I o9
Greek . 1.39 2.89 �� m
Antipast. 1.39 2.89 4
SPECIALTIES
Freshly Baked Crav Bread 1
AloiolwhiMannBnudSiicktvMihGsvh K � , � � assnQ.
CraA Sau, e
756-7256
HOURS: SUN-THU 11 AM-12 MIDNIGHT
FRI-SAT 11 AM-1 AM
enables them to share their love
for LuAnne as they assist other
bright and deserving young
people at East Carolina
The first award will be made in
the spring of 1988 to a graduate
from Lee Senior High School in
Sanford, N.C.
Recipients will be chosen on the
basis of financial need and aca-
demic merit. Scholarships may be
continued through four years as
long as the recipient maintains the
required grade point average.
The endowment will eventu-
ally support four Lanier scholars,
one at the freshman, sophomore,
junior and senior level.
Ted Lanier said, "LuAnne wasa
blessing, not only to her familv
but to all who knew her. We hope
that through these scholarships,
other young people will have
opportunities to develop their
capabilities to the fullest poten-
tial
Mrs. Lanier added, "We
wanted to perpetuate the mem-
ory of our daughter, LuAnne, in a
way that would help many young
people secure a college education.
Shealways wanted to share what-
ever she had with her friends. We
are very pleased to be able to as-
sist young people through the
LuAnne Lanier Scholarship
A native of Rocky Mount, N.C,
Ted Lanier graduated from West
Ca a. Edgecombe High School and re-
StUdentS tO get cclvcd his bachelor's degree in
� accounting at ECU in 1959. He is
also a graduate of the Stonier
Graduate School at Rutgers Uni-
versity.
Lanier has served as dean of the
questionnaires
Office of Institutional Research
Pros Release,
During the week of November
9-14, a survey of student opinion
of instruction will be conducted at
ECU. Questionnaires will be dis-
tributed in every class with enroll-
ment greater than five. All stu-
dents will have the opportunity to
express opinions on the teaching
effectiveness of their instructors
in those classes.
The survey will be conducted
during class time and will take
approximately 15 minutes to
complete. Student participation is
voluntary and no identities are
requested. Instructors have been
requested to leave the classroom
while the questionnaires are
being completed.
The teaching effectiveness
questionnaire was created by the
Faculty Senate Committee for
Teaching Effectiveness and the
Oiiicc oi Institutional Research.
The results of the survey, along
with other information and fac-
tors, is used for administrative
evaluation of the instructor by the
supervising administrator within
the department or division.
North Carolina School of Banking
at the University of North Caro-
lina at Chapel Hill where he was
also an instructor for 15 years
He isa member of the East Caro-
lina University Foundation, Inc
and serves as chair of the
Foundation's investment
committee.
Peggy I-anier is a graduate of
Tarboro High School. She is a
homemaker and works as a vol-
unteer with senior adults, as well
as participating in various civic
and social activities.
The I timers have twoother chil-
dren, Patricia, a C PA. with
Glaxo, Inc. in the Research Tri-
angle Park, and Joseph, a senior at
The Asheville School. The Earners
are members of the First Baptist
Church of Sanford.
Applicants for the LuAnne
Lanier Scholarships should con-
tact the ECU Financial Aid Office
for more information, (919) 757-
fS610.
2tye lEaat Carolinian
Serving tlve East Carolina campus communuy since 1925
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representives
Anne Iigh Mallory James Russo Shari Clemens
Pete Fernald. Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY RATES
0 49 Coulumn inches S4.25
50-99 15
100-1494,05
150 199 3.95
200 249 3.85
250 and above 3.75
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
(Charge in Addition to Regular Space Rate!
One color and blackS00.OO
Two colors and black 155.00
Inserts
5.000 or less06 each
5,001-10,000055 each
10,001-12.00005 e;uh
BUSINESS HOURS;
Mondav Friday
,�,�vc 10:00 5:00 I' M
PHONES737-�366
757-6557 757-6366
757-6558 757-6309
ATTIC
The- I The,
COMedYA COMedY
2XJNE 2PNE
WED
WED
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
752-7303
THURSDAY
Back Street
Back Street
Back Street
$1 ECU w
This Coupon
FRIDAY
School Boy
Crush
$1.00 off for
ECU
SATURDAY
New
Potatoe
Caboose
Dead, Feat
And Much More
207. OFF ALL ARTSUPPLIES
' LARGE SELECTION OF 1 2 PRICE ART SUPPLIES
PAINTS ART PADS
DISCONTINUED MDSE.
'5:OFFOUR DISCOUNTED PRICES ON ALL
CAMERAS LENSES IN STOCK.
'20OFFALL FILM-PHOTO SUPPLIES
DARKROOM ITEMS
All Sales Cash Only!
NO Charge Account Purchases.
or Credit Card
NO Dealers Please.
art j( camera hop
518 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
752-0688
MON. NOV. 2 THRU SAT. NOV.7
Libya: kid
The young curly haired Libyan
has learned his lessons well
smoothly denouncing American
"imperialism" and boasting
about leader Moammar Gadhafi
between drags on his Marlboro
cigarette
"America is attacking us from
all sides Ibrahim tells an Ameri-
can visitor, frowning into the
sunlight and fingering a
Kalashnikov assault rifle slung
over green fatigues. As he speaks
he watches hundreds of Soviet
tanks rumble by Central Green
Square in the annual Sept 1 anni-
versary celebration of Gadhafi's
ascent to power in a militarvcoup
in 1969.
"You have tried to turn Tunisia
(to the west) and Fgvpt (to the
east) against us You attacked our
homes, our children, with bombs,
from the sea to the north Nov
America is trying to get us tr;m
the south, from Chad, but to e �
never give in "
Ibrahim is 22 years old, a mem-
ber of his country's vigilante
Revolutionary Committees i I
fortlessly, sometimes with a
glower, sometimes flashing a
toothy smile, he parrots Libyan
officialdom and the words oi his
leader.
He is a member of the Gadhafi
generation.
More than half of this North
African country's 3.5 million in-
habitants are age 18 or under and
have never known life other than
under Gadhafi.
Nationalism and a revolution-
ary fervor have been carefully
nurtured, at school and at ideo-
logically oriented summer
camps. And sometimes, observ-
ers say, traditional education
takes second place to revolution-
ary goals.
Kids grow up with slogans
from Gadhafi's Green Book mani-
festo - on classroom walls, at the
supermarket, at the soccer sta-
dium. Daily tirades against
American evils, on the radio, on
television, are as much a part of
their landscape as date palms and
soccer games in dusty lots.
CVvidrer as yov�rp as lO vears
I old can bsMHp at televised politi-
cal meetings, solemnly calling for
Arab nations to withdraw their
assets from American banks in
; retaliation for U.S. government
sanctions, or threatening to form
"suicide squads
At summer camps, mandatory
for children between ages eight
and 16, youngsters make scale-
model bombs and draw unflatter-
ing caricatures oi Uncle Sam,
along with more standard arts
and crafts.
Is this Libya's future?
"The vounger generation is
pretty radicalized you can't
reallv see them returning to a
bourgeois, pro-Wester outlook
says one Italian government
source with long experience in
Libyan affairs.
The revolution has provided a
social framework for young
people in this still basically ultra-
traditional Moslem society.
In a society where drinking is
officallv banned and contacts be-
tween the sexes tightly controlled,
it provides a place to meet and be
with friends.
At the public rallies, voung men
and women trade shy glances
between chants. The younger
girls giggle The guys strut a bit.
Sometimes romances start that
way.
Take Ibrahim and Fatia Sacher,
who met in the early days of
Gadhafi's revolution, and say
they were attracted by mutual
commitment and ideals. "We had
something in common she says
Todav, in their early 30s, they
appear'a model couple - by revo-
lutionary standards. Fatia, who
caught Gadhafi's attention at age
18 when when addressed a Social-
ist Union meeting, is today one of
his most trusted aides Ibrahim is
working in military intelligence.
Similar ties are often found
among up-and-eoming Libyans.
At the Information ministry, for
example, many of its young male
employees attended the same
revolutionaj
youthful v&
within the
placing oldd
logicailv zed
This youi
members o
member Re
tees, appeal
nificant adv
decade, alth
till to k.
more expo
in key pt
oil industr.
And whil
encourages
ane-
at plavin fl
other
will often pi
lutionar. I
tion an I
I bscrer-
,s,) I
amhi
through I
Gadhafi h:
numerous
voung peo
life failed t�
tent H �wem
OlCTi'
expr
tear of bn
auth
ECU
ECU
l ri'
friend
Be: -
under M I
break up thtj
repeatsr .
FA
All
GREE
New
Buffalo
Atlanta
Orland
Chic age
Chariot
VVashinl
Baltimq
Dallas
Omaha I
Miami
Des Ma
Los Ani
Houstoj
Seattle
ClevelaJ
Detroit
Phoenr
Philadei
Denvei
Columt
St. Loui
Londoi
Nassau!
REAO
THE
FINE
PRINT
TRA
The Intfrfi
THE PLAJ
M0N0AY-FF






$100,000
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 5.1987
ll t!
School of Banking
: ot North Caro-
I ii 11 where he was
or tor 15 years,
erol the East Caro-
I oundation, Inc
is chair of the
investment
r is a graduate of
School She is a
A works as a vol-
ior adults, as well
.�� in various civic
ities
ive two other chil-
a C.P.A. with
Research Tri-
I h .i senior at
chool I he L anicrs
I irst Baptist
In.Anne
. - should con-
il Aid Office
�ast (taolntiaa
ismg
PL-AY ADVERTISING
DYERTISING RATES
nserts
757-6366
-57-6309
1
RTSUPPLIES
PRICE ART SUPPLIES
I RICES ON ALL
OCK
SUPPLIES
int Purchases.
era hop
h cotanche street
LE, N.C. 27834
IRUSAT.NOV7
f

Libya: kids see the other side of the conflict
The young curly haired Libyan revolutionary camps, part of a
youthful vanguard moving up
within the government and re-
placing older, perhaps less ideo-
logically zealous officials.
This young radical elite, often
members of the 2,000 to 3,000-
member Revolutionary commit-
tees, appears to have made sig-
nificant advances during the past
decade, although Gadhafi is care-
ful to keep a cadre of older and
more experienced professionals
in key posts, such as running the
oil industrv.
has learned his lessons well,
smoothly denouncing American
"imperialism" and boasting
about leader Moammar Gadhafi
between drags on his Marlboro
cigarette.
"America is attacking us from
all sides Ibrahim tells an Ameri-
can visitor, frowning into the
sunlight and fingering a
Kalashnikov assault rifle slung
over green fatigues. As he speaks
he watches hundreds of Soviet
tanks rumble by Central Green
Square in the annual Sept. 1 anni-
versary celebration of Gadhafi's
ascent to power in a military coup
in 1969
"You have tried to turn Tunisia
(to the west) and Egypt (to the
east) against us. You attacked our
homes, our children, with bombs,
from the sea to the north. Now
America is trving to get us from
the south, from Chad, but we will
never give in
Ibrahim is 22 years old, a mem-
ber of his' country's vigilante
Revolutionary Committees. Ef-
fortlessly, sometimes with a
glower, sometimes flashing a
toothy smile, he parrots Libyan
officialdom and the words of his
leader.
He is a member of the Gadhafi
generation.
More than half of this North
African country's 3.5 million in-
habitants are age 18 or under and
have never known life other than
under Gadhafi.
Nationalism and a revolution-
ary fervor have been carefully
nurtured, at school and at ideo-
logically oriented summer
camps. And sometimes, observ-
ers say, traditional education
takes second place to revolution-
ary goals.
Kids grow up with slogans
from Gadhafi's Green Book mani-
festo - on classroom walls, at the
supermarket, at the soccer sta-
dium. Daily tirades against
American evils, on the radio, on
television, are as much a part of
their landscape as date palms and
soccer games in dusty lots.
Children as younp as lO years
old can be seen at televised politi-
cal meetings, solemnly calling for
Arab nations to withdraw their
assets from American banks in
: retaliation for U.S. government
sanctions, or threatening to form
"suicide squads
At summer camps, mandatory
for children between ages eight
and 16, youngsters make scale-
model bombs and draw unflatter-
ing caricatures of Uncle Sam,
along with more standard arts
and crafts.
Is this Libya's future?
"The younger generation is
pretty radicalized you can't
really see them returning to a
bourgeois, pro-Wester outlook
savs one Italian government
source with long experience in
Libyan affairs.
The revolution has provided a
social framework for young
people in this still basically ultra-
traditional Moslem society.
In a society where drinking is
offically banned and contacts be-
tween the sexes tightly controlled,
it provides a place to meet and be
with friends.
At the public rallies, you ng men
and women trade shy glances
between chants. The younger
girls giggle. The guys strut a bit.
Sometimes romances start that
way.
Take Ibrahim and Fatia Sacher,
who met in the early days of
Gadhafi's revolution, and say
they were attracted by mutual
commitment and ideals. "We had
something in common she says.
Today, in their early 30s, they
appear a model couple - by revo-
lutionary standards. Fatia, who
caught Gadhafi's attention at age
18 when when addressed a Social-
ist Union meeting, is today one of
his most trusted aides. Ibrahim is
working in military intelligence.
Similar ties are often found
among up-and-coming Libyans.
At the Information ministry, for
example, many of its young male
employees attended the same
And while the Libyan leader
encovirages the young revolution-
aries on the one hand, he is skilled
at playing factions against each
other to keep them in check, and
will often publicly upbraid Revo-
lutionary committees for corrup-
tion and power-grabbing.
Observers say Gadhafi is al-
ways attentive to potential threats
from ambitious youngsters rising
through the ranks. After all,
Gadhafi himself was just 28 when
he came to power.
During four trips to Libya,
numerous conversations with
voung people from all walks of
life failed to turn up a real malcon-
tent. However, contacts with for-
eigners, especially journalists, are
generally rigidly controlled and
most Libyans are reluctant to
express any criticism, whether for
fear of bringing reprisal from
authorities or distrust of outsid-
ers.
There is Fatma, a dreamy and
friendly 29-year-old mother who
writes poetry for a living and is
getting a divorce.
Before the revolution, a man
under Moslem-based law could
break up the marriage simply by
repeating to his wife three times in
public: "Divorce Now, women
have a nearly equal say in the
decision.
"Gadhafi is a very nice man
Fatma says. "And he has done a
lot for women
At the women's military acad-
emy in Tripoli, 1st Lt. Nouria
Assias, 22, is a harsh critic of U.S.
President Ronald Reagan and of
Western social mores she says
"exploit" women. She is a seem-
ingly fierce devotee of the revolu-
tionary struggle against "imperi-
alist forces that threaten us from
all sides
"We are answering the call of
our leader to all Arab women of
all Arab nations to speed up the
arming of the people she says.
"We believe woman should
stand beside her countryman
and not just in paradise, but in
hell, and by hell I mean war
Her words typify the state of
seemingly permanent "mobiliza-
tion" and sense of conflict with
outside forces that pervade daily
ECU
ECU
FANTASTIC
AIRFARES
FROM
GREENVILLE, N.C.
New York $138
Buffalo
Atlanta
Orlando
Chicago
Charlotte
Washington
Baltimore
Dallas
Omaha
Miami
Des Moines
Los Angeles
Houston
Seattle
Cleveland
Detroit
Phoenix
Philadelphia
Denver
Columbus
St. Louis
London
Nassau
READ
THE
FINE
PRINT
Ti�se 'ires art sub�ct to cfiang�
Sea's are iim.ied Advance reserve
lions are requires Weekend siav is
necessary Prices based on Monday
afternoon through Thursday morning
"avei Travel other days slightly
highe' Fares over Thanksgiving and
CnnstrnaVNew Years higher
.
TRAVEL CENTER
The Inicrtwttfinj. Ti�-cl Group Compjnwi
THE PLAZA � GREENVILLE
355-5075
MONDAY-f RIOAY 9:00 A.M5.00 P.M.
life here. She and her peers have
inherited from Gadhafi a ten-
dency to blame many of their
country's troubles, whether eco-
nomic or political, on the outside
world. It's a country constantly in
quest of redress for past colonial
crimes.
Many young people admire
Gadhafi for challenging the
world, and ,in their eyes, putting
Libya on the map.
"Whatever else you may say
about Gadhafi, he has given the
young a sense of national pride
that never existed here before
saysone Asian diploma, speaking
on strict condition of anonymity.
Such sentiments are echoed by
Redar Sanussi, a 28-year-old Uni-
versity of Ohio graduate who
plays center fielder on Libya's
national team under one of the
first Libyan coaches.
"We used to depend on foreign
coaches he says. "They came
here for business and it didn't
matter to them whether we won
or not.
"Now we really play our hearts
out. We play for cluband country.
We play for pride, not money
Although anti-Western rhetoric
is a staple of Libyan life, many
people in this country, like
Sanussi, have been educated in
Europe or the United States.
Many miss pastimes, or girl-
friends they left behind, and al-
most invariably tell American
visitors: "We really like Ameri-
cans. It's your government that is
causing problems
Many faithfully watch "Dallas"
every Tuesday nigh although it
is ostensibly shown to demon-
strate the evil ways of the Ameri-
can rich, while Pepsi-Cola is the
preferred thirst-quencher of the
young.
Some observers speculate that
exposure to Western lifesyles may
ultimately prove the undoing of
the Gadhafi regime, and that the
Libyan young educated outside
the country, like many intellectu-
als before them, many not return
Two years ago, a collection of
Western musical instruments was
burned in Tripoli's main Qrwn
Square, with officials exhorting
Libyans to return to their "own
culture
Yet on a recent evening in the
port city of Misurata, hundreds of
Libyans packed the town square
to hear a nine-piece rock band
play such hits as Rod Stewart's
"Sailing" and selections from
Pink Floyd's "The Wall
All of a sudden, two youths got
up and began break-dancing,
soon followed by four little boys
and a man who began gyrating in
a passable imitation of Michael
Jackson. The crowd burst into
cheers a rare, truly spontaneous
public display of enthusiasm.
PHI KAPPA TAU
PRESENTS
CHILL
THRILL
'87
NOVEMBER 6,1987 3-7 PM
featuring:
Live Remote
by
103
FM
(Raffle: Earth Cruiser
90S
TICKETS AVAILABLE IN
FRONT OF STUDENT
STORE $3.00 IN AD-
VANCE $4.00 AT THE
DOOR!
Pizza by the
Slice from
(DKT THANKS THESE BUSINESSES FOR THEIR SUPPORT
PANT AN A BOBS
BUCKS AMOCO STILL WATER INC.
FAMOUS PIZZA MR. FERNALD
BAURBAND & ASSOCIATES SUBSTATION II
HILTONRIO CHARLEY OS
BANNER ASSOCIATES OF HIGHPOINT, INC.
th st.V. ESSES st. U.B.E.
weather site: Attic
Cotanche St.
I
i 8






I

A
�i?e Saat (Earolintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, -� -m u.
Clay Deanhardt, MmqUh
Andy Lewis, n� e�. )AMES f.j. McKee, iw,0, �����,
i im Chandler, s bo. Meg Needi 1AM CmiJtUitm ttmt�m
joi in Carter. ��- mike Una iurci I, i m.
bi jelton Bryant, h�� jol ,N w. Medlin, � tw.
Debbie Stevens, s,�
NOVEMBER 5, 1987
Opinion
Page 4
Support the arts
Students should get involved
Editor's note: The following editorial
appeared in a summer edition of the East
Carolinian. But ice feel the problems
discussed here have not been solved, so
we are printing it again for those not
mre during the summer.
East Carolina University has long
had a strong tradition in the field of
fine arts, and deservedly so. With an
art school that ranks among the best
in the nation, a theater arts program
that boasts national-award-winning
professors, and a school oi music
that has also received national rec-
ognition, it is no wonder that the arts
and the humanities blend so well at
ECU.
Take for example, the Summer
Theater. Recognized as an ac-
claimed regional theal re, the pro-
gram brings stars froi
screen and television
right here in Greenville
represent the best of Br 3
off-Broadway.
The summer's casts included Jen-
nifer Savidge (Lucy en "St. Else-
where"), Joseph Mascclo (here last
year in "Deathtrap" an i an actor in
many movies), Catherine Bach
(Daisy Duke), Grant Sr ow (Rick on
"Ryan's Hope"), Kaien Grassle
(Caroline Ingalls on "The Little
I louse on the Prairie"), Orson Bean
(star of stage and tel vision) and
Kim Hunter, an acac emv award
winner for her portray il of Stella in
"sire
known for
and a large
"i the stage,
o the stage
in plays that
id way and
"A Streetcar Named D
The productions an
their professionalism,
part of the work on eaclji play is done
n runs trom
through Au-
by students. The seaso
the first week in July
gust.
In production this veAr were "Born
Yesterday "Bus Stop "Painting
Churches and the w 3rld peremi-
ere of "Let's Lunch,
Muriel Resnick, a Be
who is famous for hr play "Any
Wednesday
This fall we have see
dent art shows and
a play by
tufort native
i several stu-
one student
production, "Leave it to Jane
Often it appears that the only
people attending
scheduled "cultural" events at the
university are either Greenville resi-
dents or friends of the performers
What's the problem with the rest of
the student body?
Is it not enough time? Is it lack of
intelligence? Is it a lack of concen-
trated publicity by the parties in-
volved? Is it a total lack of funds
(most campus events are, after all,
held to a minimum price level)? Or is
it that most dreaded of all condidi-
tions, apathy?
We prefer to hope that it is not
apathy, although many signals
point to it.
Instead we like to think that maybe
the whole thing is caused by a lack of
communication. Somehow, stu-
dents don't always get the message
about what's going on on campus,
and they miss out because of it. A lot
oi this is the student's responsiblity
too.
Students should make a more
concerted effort to find out what
kind of activities are happening on
campus so that they can get in-
volved in them. Time and money
problems can be worked around,
but you can't enjoy something when
you don't know it's happening.
We encourage you to get involved
in attending these entertainment
events and to make a serious effort
to find out about them. A university
program is only as strong as the
support it gets from its student
body, and we don't support our arts
programs enough.
Take some time to learn more
about the arts at ECU, if you haven't
already. Gray Gallery are both excel-
lent places to start.
For more information about the
ECU Playhouse and student pro-
ductions, call 757-6390. For Gray
Gallery hours, call Perry Nesbitt at
2.
Liberals, conservatives, should moderate
To the editor:
Through all of the blathering be-
tween liberals and conservatives at
this campus, I think two important
ideas have been ignored.
First, our country is founded on a
constitution, and that constitution
represents a philosophy of govern-
ment as well as a set of legal guide-
lines. Our constitution cannot pro-
vide exact guidelines for everv legal
situation, so lawmakers follow the
philosophy of the constitution in
making decisions.
Second, our svstem of government
provides us with many freedoms.
This puts the burden of individual
responsibility on each citizen to fol-
low the country's philosophy. Since
in our governmental system citizens
help create policy, they must worry as
much about the country's philosophy
as lawmakers. In order to illustrate
how these important ideas affect
Americans, let's look at some 'hot'
issues.
Concerning the issue of religion in
public schools, the constitution and
its philosophy are very clear: our
government may make no laws or do
anything that favors an institution of
religion. This means that schools that
are government funded must walk a
tightrope, since those schools must be
responsible to students of any reli-
gious background. To follow the
constitution's philosophy, those
schools must not favor Christianity,
since that would infringe on the rights
of students of other religious back-
grounds. As a result, schools might
seem 'humanistic but in truth they
are only being responsible to our
constitution's philosophy.
The constitution is more vague
when it comes to abortion. We are
guaranteed the right to "life, liberty,
and the pursuit of happiness but we
as a country have not really decided
yet whose life, the mother's or the
baby's, we are speaking of. I person-
ally favor the baby's rights to life,
except in the case of rape � I think the
mother's life, liberty, and happiness
takes precedence then. The rise in
number of abortions for the most part
is a direct result of people forgetting
or ignoring their responsibilities to
themselves and to the country's phi-
losophy.
However, if we as a country adopt a
right to life' stance, we should be
consistent about it. We should con-
sider the right to life of convicts on
de�th row and the right to life of
people dying from weapons we have
produced. We should support gov-
ernments at least partly on the basis of
how they treat their citizens. We can-
not have a selective philosophy. It has
to apply to everyone to be valid.
Some students have complained
about our legal system, which to them
seems to be overly-liberal and re-
leases dangerous criminals while
treating crime victims poorly. While I
would be the last to assert that our
court system is perfect, I think it has
received unfair condemnation. When
the framers of the constitution were
mapping out our government, they
realized that the government could
be a people's worst enemy. They real-
ized, of course, that a too weak gov-
ernment meant anarchy, and a too
powerful government meant dicta-
torship. Our legal system was de-
signed to protect the rights of the
individual by constraining govern-
mental power (in other words, the
police).
If we were to let the government
have greater police powers, a much
greater number of innocent citizens
would be mistreated by the govern-
ment. If you do not believe this asser-
tion true, look at Russia, a good ex-
ample of a strong police state The
founding fathers knew that either the
people or the government could be
the enemy; they chose to point the
country between the two extremes.
Some students have written about
our American freedoms. Remember
that, as one letter writer pointed out,
freedom is not license It is responsi-
bility. American freedom and our
system of government dictate that
each citizen must think about the
country as a whole - how an idea
affects all people - not just the group
heorsheismost interested in. Each of
us has to be responsible for everyone
else, because we are our government.
These are just a several of the issues
discussed recently (between liberals
and conservatives) in The East Caro-
linian; there have been many others.
However, they all boil down to the
question of whether or not a In w or a
situation follows our country's phi
losophy and whether or not lawmak-
ers are making laws responsibly.
Tcrhaps some of the conservatives
writing letters to the editor should
consider whether their views really fit
in with the constitution's philosophy
Hv the same token, leberals
pus should give more thought to their
responsibility to the constitution and
to moderation.
Larry S. Graham
Graduate student
Bioloev
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
ofjoyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and clas-
sification, address, phone number and
signature of the authoris). Letters are
limited to two typewritten pages, double
spaced or neatly printed. All letters are
subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are reminded
that they are limited to one every two
weeks. The deadline for editorial material
is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday's edition and
5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday's edition.
Forum
Campus
Spectrum
rules
In addition to the "Campus Forum"
section of the editorial page, The East
Carolinian features the "Campus
Spectrum This is an opinion column
by guest writers from the student
body and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information may
contact the managing editor of The
East Carolinian at 757-6366, or stop bv
our offices on the second floor of the
Publications Bui'dine
Aquino's regime is shifting to the right
The grace period folio
now clearly over in the
nineteen months since
been at least five map
against the Aquino
insurgency has not fadec
Manila's streets had di
leftist union, peasant,
openly demonstrate for
TheCatholicChurch, '
landowners now all pres
right. Right-wing vigilar
ganized in the countrysi
torture, and destruction
tion.
President Aquino's
tion has passed. While
made sweeping politidal
changes, today she is po
sures from the military
protected by the mili
Ramos, Aquino has to tt
first coup attempt, the
to do 30 pushups as
most serious coup attempt
for stern punishment,
rebels for
' ring the fall of Marcos is
Philippines. During the
Mjarcos's ouster, there have
military coup attempts
government, the communist
away, and tranquility on
lisabpeared as nationalist and
stu lent, and religious groups
more economic progress.
the bid oligarchy, and the large
ure Aquino to move to the
te groups have been reor-
le, leaving a trail of death,
; igainst the civilian popula-
ting
one
'reindoctrina ion
ret els
for decisive political ac-
year ago she could have
and military reforms
ideally weakened by pres-
Having been repeatedly
faction of General Fidel
their demands. After the
were ordered by Ramos
After the last and
, contrary to Aquino's call
released all caputured
. Clearly the military
pun ishment
R� mos
can act with impunity; Aquino cannot.
While vocally supporting Aquino, the Reagan
Administration has expressed concern about the
direction of her administration. Washington is espe-
cially concerned about nationalists in her cabinet
and the growth of the anti-US bases sentiment in the
Philippines Congress. US Assistant Secretary of
Defense Richard Armitage, citing recent intelligence
figures which showed the communist New People's
Army had grown by nine percent in 1986 and had
extended control to over 20 percent of the country-
side, said that Aquino had "regrettedly" failed to
develop a comprehensive counterinsurgency pro-
gram.
The Reagan Administration has escalated the
long-time US military involvement in the Philip-
pines Armed Forces (AFP) and its counter-insur-
gency program. From 1980-86, military sales to the
Philippines have totalled nearly $152 million, in-
cluding $90 million in 1985-86 alone. For the first
time, in 1985-86 the Philppines received Military
Assistance Program funds totalling another $113
million. In March 1987 President Reagan approved
authorization for an additional $10 million in US
covert CIA funds for the Philippines, and increased
the number of CIA operatives in the country.
Civilan right-wing vigilante squads, once active
under the Marcos regime, have returned to the Phil-
ippines countryside. The groups include Alsa Masa
(est. 10,000 members), Nakasaka, Tadtad, and Caca
(est. 1000 members each). The Counter-Insurgency
Command (C1C) from the province of the former
Defense Minister Juan Ponce Entile, has a reported
2,000 regular members and 100,000 sympathizers.
CIC leaders have admitted their group has the back-
ing of "the military and an international anti-com-
munist organization led by retired General John
Singlaub
Reports of human rights abuses by these right
wing death squads have been documented by
human rights and religious organizations within the
Philippines. Secretary of State George Schultz, en-
dorsing Aquino's support for these vigilante
groups, remarked "as far as the citizen's groups are
concerned, they are being organized within the
framework of government authority President
Aquino has supported that approach and we sup-
port what she is standing for"
The right-wing organization CAUSA, founded in
1980 by the South Korean Reverend Moon to fight
communism in Latin America, has also become ac-
tive in the Phillipines. Philippines Vice-President
Laurel stated that "the need for the struggle
mounted by CAUSA is most urgent in the case of the
Philippines CAUSA should find the Philippines a
fertile field for its activities and programs CAUSA
is working to create more Filipino civilian vigilante
groups, helping elect local right wing officials, and
influencing public opinion on the upcoming US
bases negotiations. Using CAUSA materials, the US
Information Agency (USIA) has been sponsoring
anti-communist seminars.
The Merging World
By
Michael Bedford
Aquino, attempting to hold onto power, is moving
rapidly to the poltical right. Indebted to the Ramos
faction of the military and to Washington's support,
she had given a pay raise to the military, released
coup participants, ended negotiations with the left,
and has increasingly used the police to crack down
on the growing street demonstrations. This means
the course of her administration will increasingly be
run by the Philippines military and Washington,
both of whom want a more aggressive counter-
insurgency war. This reality provides little hope for
a peaceful and just Philippines.
-
. - -�
He said he was going luiiiti,
Gallo charged
WASHINGTON (AP) An ti
unemployment chemist who al
legedly threatened to kill Pi
dent Reagan and Seen tary
Mate George P. Shultz i
held without bond on federal
state charges and is to ui
psychiatric evaluation
L s Magistrate Jean Dw) �
sued th � rs Tuesd
Edward Lev illo,4
ester Ma was an
charged vnh trail ;
weapon across state liru �
out a threat against a pul I
cia!
He also is charged ii Ma
setts with threatening ,
fficial
I lowing his arrest at a �"�
ington motel, ii .
s i'
AR-15ril a
30-round ma
Veteran negotiat
will sign treaty r
powers v. , sign iti itvi
to reduce their strategic ars�
bj 5 percent and bar :
of space weapons tor a tin
veteran Soviet arm-
predicted
Viktor P. Kaq
of the Soviet negotiat
the Geneva arms talks ai
senior adviser in the I i .
Ministry, made th
Tuesday, citing what h
"an understanding" betw � i I
superpowers
A senior L s official
said there had been progn
no clear breakthrough n I
ture of President Rea gai
based defense sj stem p ; .
known as Star Wars. The i -
stymied negotiators for n
than two years
Karpov predicted then
be an agrevment on stral
long-range nuclear arsi
space weapons at a summit u
Soviet Union nc� year His ac
count was reported bv TJrtS, the
official Soviet news agency
Tass sought his pii
scheduled Dec 7 sumn I
Washington between Pre
Regan and Soviet leader Mil
S. Gorbachev
Reagan and Gorbachev
expected at the meet I
agreement eliminating their
Proposition up i
DEL MAR. Calif. (AT
porters oi a strict art. -
initiative they hoped would s I
healthy example for the nal
Saw their dream go up in smoke as
voters rejected Proposition
"Del Mar should ha
first city to come forward
ard Roe, a former mayoi
sponsor of the initiative sa d
Tuesday "If it isn't this time it
will be next time I
come back and raise tr c iss
The Del Mar Health initiative
would have banned smoking in
all public streets, alleys parks
beaches and meeting places, nortr
Tax seminar
to be held
tl l Vt-Mft Bureau
A tax planning seminar will be
heldat ECU on Saturday. Nov. 21.
from 9 am. until noon in the
Browning Room ot the Rawl
Building (School of Business).
The seminar will present infor-
mation about the features of the
1987 tax law. It will also investi-
gate the passive loss rules for
sheltered investments, and will
discuss depreciations, partner-
ships, corporations and planning
for the Alternative M lnimum Tax
Donald E. Duke and Brian A.
CDoherty, professorsof account-
ing at ECU, will direct the semi-
nar. Both are published writers
about taxes and finance.
The seminar is sponsored by the
ECU School of Business, Bureau
of Business Research, the Eastern
Carolina Chapter ot the National
Association of Accountants and
the Coastal Tlains Chapter of the
N.C. Association of Certified
Public Accountants.
Registration for the seminar can
be made bv mailing $25 to Wil-
liam Ford, co Planters Bank, P.O.
Box 1220, Rocky Mount, NC
278C2-1220. For more information
contact "the ECU Department of
Accounting at 757-6055.





B w
�te afit �ar0ltman
Serving the I Mist Carolina campus community since 1925
Andy Lewis, iwe
Tim Chandler,
John Carter. �
Shelton Bryant
Debbie Stevens, s�h
NOVEMBER 5. 1987

Daniel Maurer, - r
Clay Deanhardt, m�i
James F.J. McKee, Dwcrofuwrfu
��" Meg Needi jam, cm,�, m�
"� MlKEUPCHURCH,ProArh�M�p,
� John W. Medlin, An ���,
Opinion
Page 4
Support the arts
s
owing editorial
ition oftheEast
I the problems
been solved, so
n for those not
Editor's note: The fol
appeared in a summer a
Carolinian. But zve fe
discussed here have noi
ice are printing it aga
here during the sutnme
East Carolina Univt rsitv has long
had a strong traditior in the field of
tine arts, and deservet
art school that ranks a
in the nation, a theate:
that boasts national-ai
udents should get involved
ly so. With an
nong the best
arts program
ard-winning
professors, and a scljool of music
that has also received
ognition, itisnowond
and the humanities bl
ECU.
Take for exam pile,
Theater. Recognizec
claimed regional the.
gram brings stars fire
screen and television
right here in Greenvillin plays that
represent the best of B roadway and
off-Broadway.
The summer's casts
nifer Savidge (Lucy
where"), Joseph Masc
year in "Deathtrap" ai
manv movies), Cat
(Daisy Duke), Grant S
Ryan's Hope"), Ka
(Caroline Ingalls on
House on the Prairie"
(star of stage and te
Kim Hunter, an aca
winner for her portra al of Stella in
"A Streetcar Named Efesire
The productions ar� known for
their professionalism and a large
part of the work on eac play is done
by students. The season runs from
the first week in Julv
gust.
In production this year were "Born
Yesterday "Bus Sto� "Painting
Churches and the world peremi-
ere of "Let's Lunch a play by
Muriel Resnick, a Bcjaufort native
who is famous for hpr play "Any
Wednesday
J
This fall we have sen several stu-
dent art shows and one student
national rec-
r that the arts
nd so well at
the Summer
as an ac-
tre, the pro-
m the stage,
to the stage
ncluded Jen-
in "St. Else-
Mo (here last
d an actor in
terine Bach
low (Rick on
ren Grassle
'The Little
, Orson Bean
evision) and
iemv award
through Au-
production, "Leave it to Jane
Often it appears that the only
people attending
scheduled "cultural" events at the
university are either Greenville resi
dents or friends of the performers
What's the problem with the rest of
the student body?
Is it not enough time? Is it lack of
intelligence? Is it a lack of concen-
trated publicity by the parties in-
volved? Is it a total lack of funds
(most campus events are, after all,
held to a minimum price level)? Or is
it that most dreaded of all condidi-
tions, apathy?
We prefer to hope that it is not
apathy, although many signals
point to it.
Instead we like to think that maybe
the whole thing is caused by a lack of
communication. Somehow, stu-
dents don't always get the message
about what's going on on campus,
and they miss out because of it. A lot
of this is the student's responsiblity
too.
Students should make a more
concerted effort to find out what
kind of activities are happening on
campus so that they can get in-
volved in them. Time and money
problems can be worked around,
but you can't enjoy something when
you don't know it's happening.
We encourage you to get involved
in attending these entertainment
events and to make a serious effort
to find out about them. A university
program is only as strong as the
support it gets from its student
body, and we don't support our arts
programs enough.
Take some time to learn more
about the arts at ECU, if you haven't
already. Gray Gallery are both excel-
lent places to start.
For more information about the
ECU Playhouse and student pro-
ductions, call 757-6390. For Gray
Gallery hours, call Perry Nesbitt at
�eau Stw? you
- OtfTfNT�llK�
�&
Liberals, conservatives, should moderate
To the editor:
Through all of the blathering be-
tween liberals and conservatives at
this campus, I think two important
ideas have been ignored.
First, our country is founded on a
constitution, and that constitution
represents a philosophy of govern-
ment as well as a set of legal guide-
lines. Our constitution cannot pro-
vide exact guidelines for every legal
situation, so lawmakers follow the
philosophy of the constitution in
making decisions.
Second, our system of government
provides us with many freedoms.
This puts the burden of individual
responsibility on each citizen to fol-
low the country's philosophy. Since
in our governmental system citizens
help create policy, they must worry as
much about the country's philosophy
as lawmakers. In order to illustrate
how these important ideas affect
Americans, let's look at some Tiot'
issues.
Concerning the issue of religion in
public schools, the constitution and
its philosophy are very clear: our
government may make no laws or do
anything that favors an institution of
religion. This means that schools that
are government funded must walk a
tightrope, since those schools must be
responsible to students of any reli-
gious background. To follow the
constitution's philosophy, those
schools must not favor Christianity,
since that would infringeon the rights
of students of other religious back-
grounds. As a result, schools might
seem 'humanistic but in truth they
are only being responsible to our
constitution's philosophy.
The constitution is more vague
when it comes to abortion. We are
guaranteed the right to "life, liberty,
and the pursuit of happiness but we
as a country have not really decided
yet whose life, the mother's or the
baby's, we are speaking of. 1 person-
ally favor the baby's rights to life,
except in the case of rape � I think the
mother's life, liberty, and happiness
takes precedence then. The rise in
number of abortions for the most part
is a direct result of people forgetting
or ignoring their responsibilities to
themselves and to the country's phi-
losophy.
However, if we asa country adopt a
'right to life' stance, we should be
consistent about it. We should con-
sider the right to life of convicts on
death row and the right to life of
people dying from weapons we have
produced. We should support gov-
ernments at least partly on the basisof
how they treat their citizens. We can-
not have a selective philosophy. It has
to apply to everyone to be valid.
Some students have complained
about our legal system, which to them
seems to be overly-liberal and re-
leases dangerous criminals while
treating crime victims poorly. While I
would be the last to assert that our
court system is perfect, I think it has
received unfair condemnation. When
the framcrs of the constitution were
mapping out our government, they
realized that the government could
be a people's worst enemy. They real-
ized, of course, that a too weak gov-
ernment meant anarchy, and a too
powerful government meant dicta-
torship. Our legal system was de-
signed to protect the rights of the
individual by constraining govern-
mental power (in other words, the
police).
If we were to let the government
have greater police powers, a much
greater number of innocent citizens
would be mistreated by the govern-
ment. If you do not believe this asser-
tion true, look at Russia, a good ex-
ample of a strong police state. The
founding fathers knew that either the
people or the government could be
the enemy; they chose to point the
country between the two extremes.
J
Some students have written about
our American freedoms. Remember
that, as one letter writer pointed out,
freedom is not license. It is responsi-
bility. American freedom and our
system of government dictate that
each citizen must think about the
country as a whole - how an idea
affects all people - not just the group
he or she is most interested in. Each of
us has to be responsible for everyone
else, because we are our government.
These are just a several of the issues
discussed recently (between liberals
and conservatives) in The East Caro-
linian; there have been many others.
However, they all boil down to the
question of whether or not a law or a
situation follows our country's phi-
losophy and whether or not lawmak-
ers are making laws responsibly.
Perhaps some of the conservatives
writing letters to the editor should
consider whether their views reallv fit
in with the constitution's philosophy.
By the same token, leberals on cam-
pus should give more though t to their
responsibility to the constitution and
to moderation.
Larry S. Graham
Graduate student
Biology
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
of Joy tier Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and clas-
sification, address, phone number and
signature of the authoris). Letters are
limited to two typewritten pages, double
spaced or neatly printed. All letters arc
subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are reminded
that they are limited to one every two
weeks. The deadline for editorial material
is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday's edition and
5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday's edition.
Forum
Campus
Spectrum
rules
In addition to the "Campus Forum"
section of the editorial page. The East
Carolinian features the "Campus
Spectrum This is an opinion column
by guest writers from the student
body and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information may
contact the managing editor of The
East Carolinian at 757-6366, or stop by
our offices on the second floor of the
Publications BuOdintr
Aquino's regime is shifting to the right
The grace period follov ing the fall of Marcos is
now clearly over in the
nineteen months since M; rcos's ouster, there have
been at least five major
Philippines. During the
military coup attempts
against the Aquino government, the communist
insurgency has not faded away, and tranquility on
Manila's streets had disappeared as nationalist and
leftist union, peasant, student, and religious groups
openly demonstrate for riore economic progress.
The Catholic Church, the o d oligarchy, and the large
landowners now all pressi ire Aquino to move to the
right. Right-wing vigilant� groups have been reor-
ganized in the countrysid, leaving a trail of death,
torture, and destruction ag ainst the civilian popula-
tion.
President Aquino's timt for decisive political ac-
tion has passed. While on year ago she could have
made sweeping political and military reforms
changes, today she is politically weakened by pres-
sures from the military. Having been repeatedly
protected by the military faction of General Fidel
Ramos, Aquino has to mee their demands. After the
first coup attempt, the rebe were ordered by Ramos
to do 30 pushups as punis tment. After the last and
most serious coup attempt, contrary to Aquino's call
for stern punishment. Ram s released all caputured
rebels for "reindoctrinatio it Clearly the military
can act with immunity; Aquino cannot.
While vocally supporting Aquino, the Reagan
Administration has expressed concern about the
direction of her administration. Washington is espe-
cially concerned about nationalists in her cabinet
and the growth of the anti-US bases sentiment in the
Philippines Congress. US Assistant Secretary of
Defense Richard Armitage, citing recent intelligence
figures which showed the communist New People's
Army had grown by nine percent in 1986 and had
extended control to over 20 percent of the country-
side, said that Aquino had "regrettedly" failed to
develop a comprehensive counterinsurgency pro-
gram.
The Reagan Administration has escalated the
long-time US military involvement in the Philip-
pines Armed Forces (AFP) and its counter-insur-
gency program. From 1980-86, military sales to the
Philippines have totalled nearly $152 million, in-
cluding $90 million in 1985-86 alone. For the first
time, in 1985-86 the Philppines received Military
Assistance Program funds totalling another $113
million. In March 1987 President Reagan approved
authorization for an additional $10 million in US
covert CIA funds for the Philippines, and increased
the number of CIA operatives in the country.
Gvilan right-wing vigilante squads, once active
under the Marcos regime, have returned to the Phil-
ippines countryside. The groups include Alsa Masa
(est. 10,000 members), Nakasaka, Tadtad, and Caca
(est. 1000 members each). The Counter-Insurgency
Command (CIO from the province of the former
Defense Minister Juan Ponce Enrile, has a reported
2,000 regular members and 100,000 sympathizers.
CIC leaders have admitted their group has the back-
ing of "the military and an international anti-com-
munist organization led by retired General John
Singlaub
Reports of human rights abuses by these right
wing death squads have been documented by
human rights and religious organizations within the
Philippines. Secretary of State George Schultz, en-
dorsing Aquino's support for these vigilante
groups, remarked "as far as the citizen's groups are
concerned, they are being organized within the
framework of government authority President
Aquino has supported that approach and we sup-
port what she is standing for"
The right-wing organization CAUSA, founded in
1980 by the South Korean Reverend Moon to fight
communism in Latin America, has also become ac-
tive in the Phillipines. Philippines Vice-President
Laurel stated that "the need for the struggle
mounted by CAUSA is most urgent in the case of the
Philippines CAUSA should find the Philippines a
fertile field for its activities and programs CAUSA
is working to create more Filipino civilian vigilante
groups, helping elect local right wing officials, and
influencing public opinion on the upcoming US
bases negotiations. Using CAUSA materials, the US
Information Agency (USIA) has been sponsoring
anti-communist seminars.
The Merging World
By
Michael Bedford
Aquino, attempting to hold onto power, is moving
rapidly to the poltical right. Indebted to the Ramos
faction of the military and to Washington's support,
she had given a pay raise to the military, released
coup participants, ended negotiations with the left,
and has increasingly used the police to crack down
on the growing street demonstrations. This means
the course of her administration will increasingly be
run by the Philippines military and Washington,
both of whom want a more aggressive counter-
insurgency war. This reality provides little hope for
a peaceful and just Philippines
� !�

He said he was going h until
Gallo charged
WASHINGTON (AP) An don a
unemployment chemist who al- shoti
legedly threatened to kill Presi-
dent Reagan and Secretary of sawed o(
State George P Shultz is being numerou
held without bond on federal and with hue k
state charges and is to undergo a As p �11
psychiatric evaluation be book
US. Magistrate Jean Dwyer is- .
sued the orders Tuesday after I
Edward Lewis Gallo, 41, of Worc-
ester, Mass, was arrested and
charged with transporting a
weapon across statelines to carry i
out a threat against a public offi- . �
cial.
He also is charged in Ma
setts with threatening a pub
official
Following his arrest at a N a
ington motel, investigal
searching Gallo's car found a
AR-15 rifle with three fully loa
30-round magazines of ammuni- n
Veteran negotiat
will sign treaty i
MOSCOW (AP) � Tr
powers will signa treaty next year ra
to reduce their strategic arsenals
bySOpercentandbardeployrnent
of space weapons for a time a
veteran Soviet arms n
predicted.
Viktor P. Karpov, fom
of the Soviet negotiating team il
the Geneva arms talks aiui - i
senior adviser in the Foreign '
Ministry, made the statement
Tuesday, citing what he called tl
"an understanding" between th
superpowers.
A senior U.S. official, however bi
said there had been progress hut
no clear breakthrough on th( hi
ture of President Reagan's space- ' i
based defense system, popularly
known as Star Wars. The issue ha-
stymied negotiators for more
than two years.
Karpov predicted there would
be an agreement on strategic,
long-range nuclear arsenals, av.i
spaco weapons at a summit in the il
Spviet Union next year. His ac
cdunt was reported bv Tass, the cfr
official Soviet news agency
Tass sought his opinion of the
scheduled Dec 7 summit in
Washington between President
Regan and Soviet leader Mikhail
S. Gorbachev.
Reagan and Gorbachey are
expected at the meeting to sign an
agreement eliminating their
Proposition up i
DEL MAR, Calif. (AP) � Sup- Sm k
porters of a strict anti-smoking
initiative they hoped would set a
healthy example for the nation as si
"saw their dream go up in smoke a
voters refected Proposition V
"Del Mar should have been the : h a
first citv to come forward Rich-
ard Roe, a former mayor and
sponsor of the initiative, said what
Tuesday. "If it isn't this time, it natu
will be next time. I'm going to law
come back and raise the issue onenj
The Del Mar Health initiative would K
would have banned smoking in would d
all public streets, alleys, parks, the seaside
beaches and meeting places, north oJ do
Tax seminar
to be held
K I S�wi Bureau
A tax planning seminar will be
held at ECU on Saturday, Nov.21,
from 9 a.m. until noon in the
Browning Room of the Rawl
Building (School of Business).
The seminar will present infor-
mation about the features of the
1987 tax law. It will also investi-
gate the passive loss rules for
sheltered investments, and will
discuss depreciations, partner-
ships, corporations and planning
for the Alternative Minimum Tax.
Donald E. Duke and Brian A.
ODohertv, professors of account-
ing at ECU, will direct the semi-
nar. Both are published writers
about taxes and finance.
The seminar is sponsored by the
ECU School of Business, Bureau
of Business Research, the Eastern
Carolina Chapter of the National
Association of Accountants and
the Coastal Plains Chapter of the
N.C Association of Certified
Public Accountants.
Registration for the seminar can
be made bv mailing $25 to Wil-
liam Ford, co Planters Bank, P.O.
Box 1220, Rocky Mount, NC
2780 1220. For more information
contact the ECU Department of
Accounting at 757-6055.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBERS, 1987
LOOK ON TH5
CORRECTION,
�.
(oW moderate
to at the Cvncrnment
towers, a much
number of innocent citizens
bi - � ated by thegpvern-
�� tbelievc thisasser-
tion ti k Russ a a good ox-
f a stj g p o state The
tour rs knew that either the
r the government could be
� they chose to point the
n the two extremes
-v m students have written about
in freedoms Remember
ttei wnter pointed out,
freedom is not Ik a I is responsi-
merican freedom and our
� government dictate that
zen must think about the
is a whole - how an idea
pk - not just the group
nosl interested in. Each of
ble for everyone
t st becausf we are our government
These arc just a several of the issues
issed recently bet ween liberals
and conservatives) in The East Caro-
linian; there have been many others.
However, they ail boil down to the
auction of wVietV�er or not a law or a
situation follows our country's phi-
ano whel
makmc
ter or not! jwmak-
aws responsibly.
the conservatives
� -r should
5 really fit
and

ry S. Graham
Graduate student
Biology
J
npus
It rum
rules
teci in tne c .
contain curren
ie cami u -
e columns
� Spectrum"
- �concern
ty or nation.
i
in con-
sofgram-
bmitting
: KCpl by-
their effi rts, as no en-
l writers will be pub-
I in participating
ther information may
r�g editor of The
at 757-6366, or stop by
nd floor of the
right
jrhilippines.CALS A should find the Philippines a
rtile field for its activities and programs CAUSA
m irking to create more Filipino civilian vigilante
oups, helping elect local right wing officials, and
influencing public opinion on the upcoming US
Ibases negotiations. Using CAUSA materials, the US
Information Agency (LSIA) has been sponsoring
anti-communist seminars.
The Merging World
By
Michael Bedford
Aquino, attempting to hold onto power, is moving
rapidly to the poltical right. Indebted to the Ramos
faction of the military and to Washington's support,
she had given a pay raise to the military, released
coup participants, ended negotiations with the left,
and has increasingly used the police to crack down
on the growing street demonstrations. This means
I the course of her administration will increasingly be
run by the Philippines military and Washington,
Iboth of whom want a more aggressive counter-
I insurgency war. This reality provides little hope for
la peaceful and just Philippines.
He said was eoinff hunting
Gallo charged with planning to kill Reagan
WASHINGTON (AP) fa
unemployment chemist who Al-
legedly threatened to kill Presi-
dent Reagan and Secretary jot
State George P. Shultz is beiftg
held without bond on federal ad
state charges and is to undergo? a
psychiatric evaluation.
U.S. Magistrate Jean DwTer is-
sued the orders Tuesday afjcr
Edward Lewis Gallo, 41, of Worc-
ester, Mass was arrested and
charged with transporting a
weapon across state lines to caijry
out a threat against a public offi-
cial.
Healso ischarged in Massachu-
setts with threatening a public
official.
Following his arrest at a Wash-
ington motel, investigators
searching Gallo's car found a G lt
AR-15 rifle with three fully loadbd
30-round magazines of ammuni-
tion; a Mossberg semi-automatic
shotgun; a Remington Model 870
12-gauge pump shotgun with
sawed off barrel and stock; and
numerous shotgun shells loaded
with buckshot.
As police were taking Gallo to
be booked, he said he was on
vacation and planned to do some
hunting.
Gallo's mother told a State
Department investigator in Mas-
sachusetts on Sunday that her son
left their home with his guns
wrapped in a fatigue jacket, ac-
cording to court papers.
His last words to his mother
were "Shultz, you're dead the
papers said.
Rose Gallo also said her son had
told her several days earlier, "Kill,
kill Reagan
"It is her belief he is unstable
mentally' assistant U.S. Attor-
ney John Finnigan told the magis-
trate.
He said Gallo "has been hearing
voices" for the last two years and
said Mrs. Gallo told authorities
that the episodes had become
more frequent.
Gallo, wearing a blue button-
down shirt and brown corduroy
pants, told the magistrate, "My
mother can probably arrange for a
lawyer but then accepted a
court-appointed attorney when
told his defense could be expen-
sive.
Gallo was laboratory manager
at the Upper Blackstone Water
Pollution Abatement District in
Worcester from 1976 to Septem-
ber 1986, according to plant man-
ager Arthur Levesque.
Levesque would not explain the
circumstances under which Gallo
left his job.
Sgt. Michael Vacca of the Worc-
ester Police Department said he
had been told that Gallo spent his
time watching television news
shows and often became quite
upset.
"He distrusted politicians in
general and said he was going out
to kill politicians Vacca said.
State Department spokesman
Charles Redman said the
department's Bureau of Diplo-
matic Security increased its pro-
tection of Shultz and launched an
investigation after being tipped
by Worcester police.
Gallo was found by District of
Columbia police at a motel in the
northeast section of the city, sev-
eral miles from the State Depart-
ment.
1 Ie was arrested after a brief
struggle in which a police officer
suffered a dislocated shoulder,
according to D.C police.
Veteran negotiator says superpowers
will sign treaty next year
MOSCOW (AP) � The super-
powers will sign a treaty next vear
to reduce their strategic arsenals
by 50 percent and bar deplovmcpt
of space weapons for a time, a
veteran Soviet arms negotiator
predicted.
Viktor P. karpov, former chief
of the Soviet negotiating team at
the Geneva arms talks and now a
senior adviser in the Foreign
Ministry, made the statement
Tuesday, citing what he called
"an understanding" between the
superpowers.
A senior U.S. official, however,
said th. e had been progress but
no clear breakthrough on the fu-
ture of President Reagan's spa e-
based defense system, popularly
known as Star Wars. The issue has
stymied negotiators for more
than two years.
Karpov predicted there would
be an agreement on strategic, or
long-range nuclear arsenals, and
space weapons at a summit in the
Soviet Union next year. His ac-
count was reported bv Ta'sS, the
official Soviet news agencv.
Tass sought his opinion of the
scheduled Dec. 7 summit in
Washington between President
Regan and Soviet leader Mikhail
S. Gorbachev.
Reagan and Gorbachev are
expected at the meeting to sign an
agreement eliminating their
countries' short- and meduim-
range nuclear missiles.
Tass said: "An understanding
was reached that the Washington
meeting will outline the basis
for an agreement for a 50 percent
cut in the strategic offensive
arms" on condition of a period of
time being set to disallow with-
drawal from the 1972 Anti-Ballis-
tic Missile treaty.
Karpov was quoted as saying
the Soviets recommend a 10-vear
prohibition on withdrawal from
ABM, which it maintains would
be violated by the Star Wars pro-
gram. But he acknowledged it
was subject to further negotiation,
Tass said.
A fourth U.SSoviet summit, to
be held in Moscow in the first half
oi 1988, "will sum up that work
Karpov said.
"A Soviet-American agreement
on a 50 percent cut in the strategic
offensive arms is to be signed at
it Tass said.
Although the Reagan admini-
stration and tr Soviets disagree
on how much research and devel-
opment of a space-based defense
may be conducted within the
limits of the ABM treaty, both
sides acknowledge the document
prohibits deployment of a defen-
sive shield like that envisioned by
Reagan.
Either side is free to break out of
the treats- on six months' notice,
and the Soviet Union has sought a
non-withdrawal pact to block
deployment of Star Wars, offi-
cially known as the Strategic De-
fense Initiative.
A senior American official fa-
miliar with the state of U.SSovict
negotiations said the goal of sign-
ing a strategic arms reduction
treaty next year is "a realistic
one
But the official, who spoke on
condition of anonymity, said
there has been no breakthrough
that would lead to resolution of
the dispute on the Star Wars proj-
ect.
Now Available in Paperback
Whirlwind by James Clavell - The gripping epic of a world-shattering up-
heaval that altered the Destiny of Nations.
Through A Glass Darkly by Karleen Koen - as opulent and passionate as
the 18th century it celebrates. Through A Glass Darkly will sweep you
away to the splendors of a lost era.
The Corps - Book II. Call To Arms by W.E.B. Griffin - The bestselling
Author of the acclaimed Brotherhood Of War saga continues the epic story
begun in Semper, Fi.
Regrets Only by Sally Quinn - the compelling novel of Two Passionate and
Talented women, and the man they both loved.
Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy - A chillingly Authentic vision of modem
war. Red Storm Rising is as powerful as it is ambitious.
Central Book and News
Greenville Square Shoppingenler
Open 7 Days A Week
Proposition up in smoke
DEL MAR, Calif. (AP) � Sup-
porters of a strict anti-smoking
initiative they hoped would set a
healthy example for the nation
saw their dream go up in smoke as
voters rejected Proposition N.
"Del Mar should have been the
first city to come forward Rich-
ard Roe, a former mayor and
sponsor of the initiative, said
Tuesday. "If it isn't this time, it
will be next time. I'm going to
come back and raise the issue
The Del Mar Health initiative
would have banned smoking in
all public streets, alleys, parks,
beaches and meeting places.
Tax seminar
to be held
ECU N�vn luicau
A tax planning seminar will be
held at ECU on Saturday, Nov. 21,
from 9 a.m. until noon in th
Browning Room of the Rawj
Building (School of Business).
The seminar will present infor-
mation about the features of the
1987 tax law. It will also investi-
gate the passive loss rules for
sheltered investments, and will
discuss depreciations, partner-
ships, corporations and planning
for the Alternative Minimum Tax.
Donald E. Duke and Brian A.
Cy Doherty, professors of account-
ing at ECU, will direct the semi-
nar. Both are published writers
about taxes and finance.
The seminar is sponsored by the
ECU School of Business, Bureau
of Business Research, the Eastern
Carolina Chapter of the National
Association of Accountants and
the Coastal Plains Chapter of the
N.C. Association of Certified!
Public Accountants.
Registration for the seminar can
be made by mailing $25 to Wil-j
iiam Ford, co Planters Bank, P.O.
Box 1220, Rocky Mount, NC
27?.f I-1220. For more information
contact the ECU Department of
Accounting at 757-6055.
Smoking would have been al-
lowed at three designated out-
door areas, which critics derided
as smoking pens. Violators would
have received at least one warn-
ing, followed by fines up to $200.
With all seven precincts
counted in Tuesday's election,
989 voters, or 58 percent, opposed
what would have been the
nation's strictest anti-smoking
law, while 718 voters supported it.
Opponents said the initiative
would be unenforceable and
would drive business away from
the seaside town, about 18 miles
north of downtown San Diego.
� unit mi i
. JV
gathering place
Presents
John Dillinger
and
The Seeds
Friday, November 6.1987
8:00 p.m.
in the Underground
in Mendenhall
�Free refreshments
�Free live entertainment
before downtown
�Free T-shirt Raffle
Open Auditions Dec. 4th for Spring Semester
The E.C.U. InterFraternity
Council
Presents
Fraternity Orientation Week
� Sunday, Novl5th-Thursday, Nov. 19th.
�All Freshmen and interested men.
� Nov. 9th-13th sign up in Front of Student Store.
� Nov. 20th End of the Week Party with All Fraternities
and Sororities at the Sigma Tau Gamma House
���� m �� m mmii��,t� �� ' ��� m pim i�inm i � - � A�. � -
� � .
� � �� �. ��� m � m irM0m0mmi0
� �






JM EAST CARPI tMi am
NOVEMBERS, 1W7
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
2-4
CASHIER AND WAITRESSES wanted
PPlv m person 100 E 10th St and Evans
at. No phone calls
WANTED True Frozen Yogert Lovers
come lo Hank's 321 E 10th St for a free
taste of frozen delight - 758 0000
STOCKBROKER TRAINEE College
grad, opportunity for hardworking, en
inus,astic individual. Send resume to
lO Box MM, Virginia Beach. Vi
i lrginia.
NOW HIRING: 120 posit.ons available
Applv in person to Ryan's Family Steak
House 3437 S Memorial Drive
I uvnville
BASKETBALL OFFICIALS MEETING.
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department will be having the first or
ganizational meeting tor anyone inter
ested in officiating tor the men s winter
basketball league on Tuesday November
lOtt at Dm Street Cvm at 730 p m All
interested officials should attend this
meeting For more information call 830-
4343
BRODYS AND BRODYS FOR MEN
are now accepting applications for spring
semester Enthusiastic individuals who
enjoy fashion and can work flexible hours
should apply toda Rrodv s, Carolina
East Mall. M W, 2-4 pm.
ATTENTION ECU FACULTY AND
STAFF-Brody's has part-time positions
tor individuals interested in a flexible
work schedule to help stuff that special
Christmas stocking Call today for an
interview appointment or apply in per-
son Brodv's. Carolina East Mall. M W
BASKETBALL COACHES The
Greenville Recreation and Parks Depart
ment is recruiting for 10 to 14 part-time
basketball coaches for the winter pro
gram Applicants must possess some
knowledge of basketball skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
vouth Applicants must be able to coach
voung people, ages 9-18, in basketball
fundamentals I lours are from 3 pm to 7
pm , Monday-Friday, and some nights
and weekends coaching The program
will extend from December 2 to mid
February Salary rate of $3.55hour
Applications will be accepted starting
Monday. November 2 until positions are
filled Contact Ben James at 830-4543
WANTED: Experienced part-time stock
clerks Must have stocking experience in
a chain grocery store, or in a large inde
pendent grocery store Will work around
school schedule Applv in person at
Overton's supermarket, 211 Jarvis Street,
Greenville
FOR SALE
ATTENTION BEER LOVERS A 16 oz
pitcher $1 50 every night at Famous Pizza
100 E 10th Street and Evans Street
JVC RECEIVER 70w 1VC Cassette Deck
2 Marantz speakers New Sg00 sacrifice for
$700 Negotiable Call Stu at
leave name and number
'5S i:
GREENVTLLES ONLY Hard serve frozen
yogurt now at Hank's Homemade. 321 E.
10lh street. 758-000.
FOR SALr LXI series compact stereo
AMFM digital tuner, cassette plaver w '
calTZ'J' hCr' re NEED TYPING? Call Kim at 758-1161
or �A it ft� "STS n�rmdl More 50� P m � -2�� "� 500 pm
or metal tape Only 3 years old S300 sys
NEED TYPING? Call Cindy-757-0398
Call anytime after 5:00 p.m. Low rates
include proofreading, spelling and gram
matical corrections, professional service
10 years experience IBM typing
MUST SELL Full matress, microwave,
couch, coffee table and more Reason
able Leave message at 752 4372
ELECTROLYSIS (permanent removal
of unwanted hair) by Barbara Venters.
People who understand electrolysis will
not wax, tweezeor use electronic tweez-
ers or any other temperary method Isn't
it time to try the permanent method'
Call 830 02 for free consultation
1986 HONDA CR250R dirt bike Never
raced 1 lelmct and gloves available, 20
hours riding time Excellent condition
Motorcycle trailer also available S1900
tall 353 7812 after 6pm or leave ntes
sage
WORD PROCESSINGletter quality
or laser printing Rush jobs accepted
752 W33
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services We also sell
soHware and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106
East 5th Street (Beside Cubbies)
Greenville, N C. 752-3694
tern for $I(X) 752 8781
FRESH PEACH, Raspberry, French Va
nilla Frozen yogurt and many more only
at Hank's, 321 E 10th St 758 0000
MUSICIANS! Yamaha Acoustic Guitar
with steel strings Also bronze set, pick and
case Like new' Must sell! S140 IX) neg 752
9107 before noon, 946-9925 after 9pm
FOR SALE: Three shelf bookcase $15.00;
pair of Phase Research stereo speakers
$60 00, pair of BSR stereo speakers $35.00;
3 tiered torch lamp $30 (X), Microwave
Cart $25 (XI, 2 drawer plastic file cabinet
$25 00. Call 355 5692 leave message
RED HOT BARGAINS! Drug dealers-
cars, boats, planes repo'd. Surplus. Your
Area Buyers Guide (1) 805 687-MXX) Ext
S-44
IS IT TRUE you can buy Jeeps tor $44
through the U S government?Gel the facts
today! Call 1 312-742 1142 Ext. 5271-A.
FOR SALE great condition 1979 Mazda
GLC AMFM cassette, seat covers, $830
Call after 6 752 1 s74
PROFESSIONAL TYP1NC SERVICES
Papers, resumes, theses, etc Reasonable
rates (most $125 per page) Grammar,
punctuation and spelling corrected Call
Jamie at 758-1161. M-F, 9-5 or 758 4567
nights and weekends Fast, accurate and
reliable
TYPING SERVICE -Papers, thesis, letters,
etc. Typing done on computer, 16 years
experience Low rates Call 7568934 after IBM
5 30pm
PICK UP AND DELIVERY of term
papers, theses, resumes to be typed
wordprocessing by professional
with 13 years experience
print and professional
Announcements
Letter quality
editing Call
"ASSEMBLY LINE"
Assembly Line" VVinterguard will
begin its 1988 season with a meeting on
Sun Now g, at 300 in the lobby of
Fletcher music building Anyone inter-
ested should atend For questions, call
Paul at 758-1256
SKI TRIP
The Department of Intramural-Recrea-
tional Services and the Outdoor Recrea-
tion Center is sponsoring a Ski Trip on
January 3-8 Registration for this trip wil
be taken in 204 Memorial Gym from 8 00
aan. to 5:00 p.m. through December I.
SUPERVISOR
The Intramural Recreational Services
Department is now accepting applica-
tions for an Outdoor Recreation Supervi-
sor for the Spring, 1988, semester This
person will be responsible for equipment
rental and leading outdoor adventure
trips Applications will be taken in room
2 4 Memorial Gym Mondav-Fndav from
B a m -5 pm. until Friday, N'obember 20
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
The Accounting Society will hold its
November meeting on Monday, Novem-
ber 9th at 4 p.m. in Mendenhall room 244
Representatives from theGAO will speak
INTERMEDIATE CLUB ,
The Intermediate Club will meet on
November 9, 1987 at 4:30 p.m. in 312
Speight Speaker from Cooperative Edu-
cation. All interested m Intermediate
Education majors should attend.
MIDDLE GRAPES CLUB
The Middle Grades Club will meet on
Monday, November 9 in Speight 201 at
4:30 New members welcome.
PUG WASH
Student Pug Wash, a new organization
addressing world problems, will be hold-
ing their first open meeting on November
at 100 in Flanagan 307.
SUBIECTS NEEDED
The ECU clinical psychology program
needs children, ages 6-15, to volunteer for
intelligence testing. This is to assist in the
training of MA. level students. A limited
amount of feedback will be given. Inter-
ested people can contact Dr. Larry Hines
at the Department of Psychology, 757-
6800.
SIGMA GAMMA EPSILON
Dr. Stan Riggs will be speaking on the
"Relationship of the Great Barrier Reef to
the evolutionary history of the East Aus-
tralian carbonate-poor continental mar-
gin" on Nov. 5,1987 at 3:00p.m. in Graham
room 301. Call 757-6360 for more informa-
tion.
THIRD WORin ISSUES
There will be an organizational meet
ing for those interested in Third World
issues on Tuesday, November 10,1987 at 4
p.m. in Mendenhall, Multi-Purpose room-
Sponsored by the ECU Chapter of the
Overseas Development Network.
RESUME WORrCSFJQpc.
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton House is offering
one hour programs on preparing resumes
for your job search. Handouts and
samples will be given out to the first 20
people to come to each session. No sign up
required These sessions are held in the
Career Planning Room on November 3
9,12, and 24 at 3:00 pm.
INTERVIEW WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton House is offering
one hour sessions to aid you in developing
better interviewing skills. A film and dis-
cussion of how to interview on and off
campus will be shared. These sessions are
held in the Career Planning Room on
November 4, 5,18, and 23 at 3:00 p.m.
m -ECHO
There will be a mandatory ECHO
meeting on Thursday, Nov. 5, at 5 p.m. in
Mendenhall 212 All members should at-
tend
NATIONAL EA&KSJERVJCE
Seasonal positions arc available with
the National Park Service at locations
throughout the nation Maors needed
include L.SS P.E, Construction, and
1 listorv For more information see Coop
eratjve Education 314 Rawl
REBEL MAGAZINE
The Art-N-Camera Frame Shop and
Gallery will hold the Rebel Art Show
Wednesday, November 4 Wednesday.
November U. On Saturday, November 7
from 1-2 30 p m awards will be pre
sented. Public is invited. An Exhibition of
award winning art selected tor East Caro-
lina University's Literary Magazine.
ECU GOSPEL CHJQIR
The ECU Cospel Choir will be holding
their Fall Concert on Sunday, November
8, at 400 p.m. in Hendnx Theater Admis-
sion is $1.00
REGISTRATION
General College students should con-
tact their advisors the week of November
2-6 to make arrangements for academic
advising for spring semester, 1988. Early-
registration will begin November 9 and
end November 17.
UNIVERSITY UNION
The Department of University- Unions
and The School of Music present THE
ASPEN WIND QUINTET in rental on
Thursday, November 5th, at 8:00 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre Tickets are now on sale
in the Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall
Student Center from 11 00 a.m. until 60C
pm. Monday-Friday. Call 757-6611, ext
266 Group rates are available
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
The Department of University Unions
and The School of Music present National
Public Radio's first Lady of Jazz-Marian
McPartland-m Hendrix Theatre on Tues-
day, November 10th at 8 00 p m. Tickets
arc now on sale in the Central Ticket (t
tice. Mendenhall Student Center from
!i 00 a m until b 00 p m Monday Friday.
Call 757 Hb 1, ext 2ti Group rates avail-
able
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
Buy your tickets now tor one of the
'most vocal groups ever THE KING'S
SINGERS-m concert Monday, November
30th in Wright Auditorium at 8 tX) p.m.
Sponsored by the Department of Univer-
sity Unions as part of the 1987-88 Concert
Theatre SeriesMMMWfcWtaci saletn
the Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall
Student Center from 11 (X) a m until MX)
pm. Monday Friday Call 757-6611, ext
26t Group rates available
CORAL REEF DIVE CLUB
If you enjoy scuba diving, call Glenn or
Rob at 752-4399 tor more information
about ECU's Coral Reef Dive Club
BURRQUGHS-WELLCOME
Open to all students Society for Ad-
vancement of Management is sponsoring
a tour of the Burroughs Wellcome plant
on November 11th. Students interested
should sign up on sheets posted in Rawl or
other areas. Meet in Rawl 105 (Browning
Room) at 1.00 p.m. Buses or vans may be
available if needed.
TURKEYTROT
A Turkey Trot Run will be held by The
Department of Intramural-Recreational
Services. Registration will be held No-
vember 18 at 6 p m in Brester D 103. For
more information, call 757-6387.
SUHQLAR5HJP
The Triangle East Advertising and
Marketing Association is offering a schol-
arship for a rising senior who is majoring
in Advertising in the School of Art, Busi-
ness (Marketing), or Drama (Broadcast-
ing) at ECU. The applicant must have at
least a 3.0 grade point average and intend
to pursue a career in advertising or an
advertising related field in eastern North
Carolina An application form must be
completed, and a 500 word essav tvpe
written explaining how heshe became
interested in advertising as a career and
why heshe should receive the Scholar
ship Finalists also participate in an inter
view during the fall semester of their
senior year Slides of five words (name,
title, media, sie) must accompany the
application form of an art student. This
year there will be available for Spring 1988
and Fall 1988 SI50.00 each semester Apph-
caiton forms may be obtained in the
Media Center in the School of Art. The
deadline for application materials is
November 19.
SCHOLARSHIPS
The School of Art of East Carolina
University is offering scholarships for
lull time art students from the Richard
Steven Bean Scholarship Fund, the Uni-
versity Book Exchange Scholarship
Fund, and the Gravely Scholarship
Fund. The recipient of the Richard Steven
Bean Scholarship Fund must be a Com-
mercial Art maor with a maintained 2.5
grade point average. The $300.00 award is
for the Spring 1988 and Fall 1988 semesters.
The University Book Exhange Scholar-
ship Fund grants two shcolarships in the
amount of $500.00 for two semesters,
Spring 1988 and Fall 1988, to two under-
graduate art students with a maintained
3.0 grade point average The Gravely
Scholarship in the amount of $320.00 for
the Spring 1988 semester is available to a
Commercial Art student and will be a
renewal to last year's recipient Addi-
tional information and application forms
can be obtained in the Media Center in the
School of Art of East Carolina University.
The deadline for applicaitons is Novem-
ber 19, 1987.
CONSTRUCTION MrTMT.
On Wednesday, November 11,1987, Phil
Wessell, Anderson Homes, Raleigh, NC,
will be speaking on the subject of "Prefab-
rication as an Alternative to Stick Building
in Residential Construction" in room 201
Flanagan.
Nanette in Gnfton at 1 524 5241 Cheap
call the best service'
PROFESSIONAL BUT NOT EXPEN-
SIVE! Progressive Solutions, Inc offers
professional word processing to stu-
dents and professionals Term papers,
dissertations, themes, reports and much
more as low as $1 75 per page. (Please
call for quote on your project) Price
includes printing on high quality bond
paper and spelling verification against a
50,000 word electronic dictionary Ask
about our special offers Laser printing
now available! call Mark at 757 3410
after 7 00 p m for free information
FOR RENT
APARTMENT to sublet 2 bedroom
$315 00, no deposit, all appliances Near
campus Bus service Available Decem
ber 1 758-6015 nights or 752 3519 week
days Ask for apt 200-C3.
FOR RENT private bedroom, female
only Kitchen Privileges Call after 6 30
pm 758 5422. Available now'
TAR RIVER ESTATES $300 off 1st
months rent on all I, 2, and 3 bednxim
apartments Open house on Sat, Nov. 14
and Sunday, Nov. 15 from I 00 pm 5 (X)
pm 752-4225
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apartments for
rent-furnished Contact Ho)lie Si
monowich at 752-2865
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Wilson Acres, Dec. 1. Own room, $145, 1
3 rent, 13 deposit, 13 utilities. Call 752-
5630. Ask for Kathy, Tanya, or Rcnee.
STUDENTS-don't wait for winter
semester to start Begin looking for your
new home today We have early rentals
available now Confirm vour choice to
day 752 1375 Homelocators Small fee
3 OR 4 bedroom house, 1 12 baths, den,
$300.00 or 5 bedroom, 2 baths, $400.00,
others 752 1375 Homelocators Tee
YLS, Kathie
HANKS HAS IT ALL! the Nations
number 1 vanilla and now froen yogurt
raspberry. Peach. Pina Colada Only 94
calories per serving 321 E 10th Street
758-OIXX)
SIG EPS Happy hour Fri afternoon at
the ELBO Start your formal date at 4 p m
THE BETA PI PLEDGE CLASS OF DZ
would like to give special thanks to la
Woolen, who is teaching us everything
we know, and Melissa Lord fur making
sure we know it" We love you N.th"
YUM! YUM! YUM! Hank's has froen
yogurt The nation's best ice cream store
now has a low calorie treat for the hi-alth
nut' (99 caloriesserving)
LOST-KEYS No kv
Approximately fc keys
found, call 7r: 8304
-ham. iust a nri�
1 are dorm keys h
AW MCHAI L: I lappy I lappj Birthda)
to you' Congratulations you final
made it to the very big 21 But, it is vet
mifxirtant that you do not wast, this
privilege because there are ust to nur.v
unfortunate voung people out here that
are not legal, like me' ENJOY I lovi
very much" Kath
LOST: Man's g
blue band Left
Minges on Sat, ()t 24
Call 73K 9660
d citizen wjt
in dressing r
R u i
h with
�m
iffei
in
PERSONALS
TIGHT BUDGET? Try our meal deal
$2 49 for any sandwich, fries, and drink
I4 hamburger, ham, and cheese, BLT.
roast beet, chicken filet, turkey or pij
burger. Also, homemade spaghetti and
lasagna ($3 95-garlic bread included)
Famous Pizza-corner of 10th Street and
Evans Not for delivery.
COMPARE OUR PRICES and good
food. Buv anv large pizza and get a 2-liter
coke free. Buy a small pia and get 2 tr�e,
16 oz. drinks Buy and sub and get one free
16 oz. drink. Call for FREE delivery-
Famous Pizza 757-1276 or 757-0731
WHERE CAN YOU have froen yogurt
blend-in's???? Only at 1 lank's (next to
Wendy's) 321 E 10th St. 758-0000
BETH GOLDSMITH Just wanted to
thank you for being the BEST Big Sis a Lil
Sis could ever hope to have! Thanks for
everything you are such a sweetheart' I
Love ya! Love in DZ and especially me.
CHEAP DRINKS: dollar shots and do!
lar high balls, $2 50 for a huge H I . v
Come out to'downtowns newest private
club, the Elbo with an all new music lor
mat"
ORGANIA I IONS that have been con-
tacted by the Buccaneer Yearbook, call
the office today to schedule your group
photo. You don't want to be Kit out"
CREEKS: Win drive millions of miles foi
a good drink special? Come to the Elbo
i riday afternoon 4 7 and partv with tl i
Sig EpsM! Dollar shots dollar high hj:is
and $2 50 for a homongous ice tea1! See
vou lrida'
MACC1E CARNWATH no. this Hud is
for you, sivivti. ' i iu desen e it' 1 OU have
not only been a terrific DZ pledge sister,
but the best friend a person could ask tor'
I love ya' Kathie
HAPPY HOUR IS BAC K come out and
party with the Sig Fps this Friday after
noon from 4-7 at the Elbo! Free admis-
sion, dollar shots, dollar high balls, $1 00
screw Drivers and $2.50 for ar giant ICC
TEAM &
FREE BAHAMAS TRIPCome down"
to the Elbo and register for a trip for two
to the Bahamas spring break $1 00 tick
ets Buy yours today
REWARD-Lost gold nugget bracelet
outside of Brewster great sentimental
value Call 73s. M4ti
SIG EPS - I lave a safe formal P S parK
till you puke
SLACK Tun is tun. but please, can I have
my license back7 Call letters SLACK
Reward for recovery or information
Stye -East (Earnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Sports Writers
Needed
Call 757-6366
The East Carolinian
seeks an editorial page editor
who can work Monday and
Wednesday evenings. Apply in
person at the publications
building today.
Artist cro
CHICAGO(AP) Crossoneol
this city's 43 bridge by night, and
you may become an unwitting
participant ,n the latest form of
performance art: climbing
bridges or rather, climbing
under them, courtesy of artist
Keith Alexander
For two years, Alexander has
been exploring the city's under-
belly in what he says is a form of
artistic expression aimed at ant
mating something most urban
dwellers take for granted
He even leads nocturnal
bndge-climbing tours for a $2( f to
$25 fee
"Most people don't even not, .
the underside ot a bridge, yet I
has a real profound effect on us in
quiet ways the 27-year
exandersaid
Alexander's climbing met!
vary with v,
width, althol
vimc atop
supports thi
'��t ran. rure, tri!
one side to th
the other
more than 3
"It's d
vud in an
nieht "1 I
T
i
I
rush
break ur
Al
r the
i tendf
of Alexande
ing expoditirj
FDA stands b its dedi
WASHINGTON (AD - The
Food and Drug Admit tral
says it has reviewed 3
plaints and found no scier
evidence undermining its conl
dence in the artificial sweeti
aspartame, which is marketed as
NutraSweet.
FDA Commissioner Frank
Young told the Senate Labor and
Human Resources Committee on
Tuesday that most of the com-
plaints were mild, involving re-
ported reactions such as head-
aches and dizziness.
He said the number of com-
plaints is relatively low tor a prod-
uct so widely used and that there
tne Di
jmed
n ptx
artai
quii
he r i
Businessmen and dipl
indicted on smugglin
WASHINGTON KP Two
Japanese businessmen and two
Hungarian diplomats have been
indicted on charges of smuggling
high-technology laser equipment
from the United States to Hun-
gary
The 15-count indictment, which
was handed down Tuesdav bv a
federal grand jury in Abbeville,
N.C, capped a lVree-vear invest!
gation by federal authorities into
the diversion ot" U.S. high-tech-
nology equipment to the Soviet
bloc. "
The Japanese and Hungarians
are accused ot smuggling an
American-made laser trimming
system from America through
Japan to Hungary, in an effort to
circumvent U.S. law prohibiting
sale of high-technology devices
with military applications to
communist countries.
Those charged arc Yoshio
Fujinuma and Keisuke Katsuta
and their company, Kunomoto
Trading Co. Ltd. of Tokyo. The
two Hugarian diplomats are
Istvan Rona and Clara Uitz, who
were based in Tokyo a t the time of
the alleged crime, which the in-
dictment said took place from
May 1982 through Nov. 7,1983
None of the four has been ar-
rested and their exact where-
abouts are not known, Commerce
Department spokesman Donald
Creed said.
Faul Freedenberg, acting Com-
merce undersecretary for export
administration, said this tvpe of
laser trimmer was a kev compo-
nent in the production of semi-
conductors used in computers.
"This semiconductor manufac-
turing equipment is highly
sought by Soviet-bloc coutnes for
military modernization
Freedenberg said in a statement.
According to the indictment, Uitz
and Rona arranged for the two
Japanese to purchase the laser
trimmer in the United States
through a North Carolina busi-
nessman, Charles Mover
Mover, 62, was arrested in
Charlotte, N.C. on Sept. 24 by
special agents of the U.S. Com-
merce Department and pleaded
guiltv to charges stemming from
his involvement in the scheme.
After purchase and delivery of
the equipment to Mover's North
Carolina company, the indict-
ment alleges, Katsuta arranged to
have the svstem exported to Ja-
pan.
To avoid detection at the
American border, the indictment
says, Katsuta claimed to U.S.
Customs agents that the laser
trimmer was an ordinary "elec-
tronic carpet trimmer
After being shipped to Tokyo,
the laser system was smuggled
from Japan to Budapest in the
diplomatic household effects of
Rona, the indictment charges.
The indictment alleges that the
mau
trimmer s
ans. The
defendants
of up to $lmi
five-to I
count.
.
eei
We pax
Ciok
And �
V C
Coin &l
4th St.
stul
diff.
letlul
peppej
Come!
napki:

�, - , . T� . mmtV i, �� n, T �n�mummnmniiii-

"� �'����ii�i�i��i�ii �nti.m W





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 5. 1987
tUK s s II All! the Nation's
. v frozen yogurt.
' icAada OnI 99
w "OS C 10th Street
Happy houi Fn afternoon at
uui forma date at 4 p m
K
n pI IXi 11 ass of nz
1 s.oal thanks to Li
-ng us everything
d Sdi -�k! tor making ve you Kth"
1auk s has frozen -�t ice cream store the hoalth Hist a ring keys It hviav h n a 11 s wrs waste this si � mam ' here that vc you ftat. h with ' - m in ffered -� t pi sic tor i i been con-r earbook. callOUI group ill out"
A Mil
TT .V"
a giant ICE
M s T KIT
L-etet
�ntal
�i e
�Ck
tast Carolinian
orts Writers
Needed
all 757-6366
n
e editor
y and
Apply in
itions
Artist crosses under bridges
CHICAGO(Ar) Crossoneof
this city's 43 bridges by night, and
you may become an unwitting
participant in the latest form of
performance art: climbing
bridges � or rather, climbing
under them, courtesy of artist
Keith Alexander.
For two years, Alexander has
been exploring the city's under-
belly in what he says is a form of
artistic expression aimed at ani-
mating something most urban
dwellers take for granted.
He even leads nocturnal
bridge-climbing tours for a $20 to
$25 fee.
"Most people don't even notice
the underside of a bridge, vet it
has a real profound effect on us in
quiet ways the 27-year-old Al-
exander said.
Alexander's climbing methods
vary with each bridge's size and
width, although the route is the
same: atop the diagonal steel
supports that run beneath the
structure, from the river bank on
one side to the top of the bridge on
the other. Most supports are no
more than 3 feet wide, he said.
"It's definitely dangerous he
said in an interview Monday
night "I could fall in the river or
on top of other girders. Some are
so rusted through they could
break under your feet
All of the city's bridges stretch
over the Chicago River.
He climbs only at night, he said,
to aviod the risk of having bridg-
etenders raise a bridge while he's
climbing it.
Police have yet to interrupt any
of Alexander's 28 bridge-climb-
ing expeditions so far, although
he doesn't know if that's because
they've failed to detect him or
simply ignored him.
He even has advertised his
services as a bridge-climbing
guide in community newspapers
and has found a few takers, in-
cluding Larry Adams, a 23-year-
old computer operator and writer
who made a two-hour climb in
September so that he could write
about it.
"I got sick and threw up after-
ward Adams recalled Tuesday
night. "It was very scary to be
suspended over the river like that,
as people walked over my head.
"It wasn't especially hard, just
scary. 1 was filthy � covered with
dirt and rust from head to toe, all
scratched up and bruised up
Alexander's bridge-belly
climbing began when a friend
took the neophyte "spelunker"
across the underside of the Co-
lumbus Drive bridge, near the
city's lakefront.
"1 was petrified he said. Risk-
ing physical danger for his art is
nothing new to Alexander, who
holds a degree in sculpture from
the University of lllinios at Chi-
cago.
Three years ago, he drew atten-
tion when he climbed 60 of
Chicago's Northwest buildings at
night to paint large, Aztec-style
graphics in white on the black,
tarred roofs.
Now, Alexander is thinking of
expanding his bridge-climbing
beyond Chicago to San
Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge
and perhapseven bridges abroad.
Said Alexander: "Someday, I'd
like to do London Bridge
Casual Dining
Formal Drinking
FDA stands by its decision on NutraSweet safety
WASHINGTON (AP) � The
Food and Drug Administration
says it has reviewed 3300 com-
plaints and found no scientific
evidence undermining its confi-
dence in the artificial sweetener
aspartame, which is marketed as
NutraSweet.
FDA Commissioner Frank
Young told the Senate Labor and
Human Resources Committee on
Tuesdav that most or the com-
plaints were mild, involving re-
ported reactions such as head-
aches and dizziness.
He said the number of com-
plaints is relatively low for a prod-
uct so widelv used and that there
is no consistent pattern of symp-
toms that can be attributed to the
use of aspartame.
Aspartame is a popular artifi-
cial sweetener marketed under
the brand name NutraSweet. It is
consumed by an estimated 200
million people around the world
in various food products.
"We do not have any medical or
scientific evidence that under-
mines our confidence in the safety
of aspartame Young said.
"Based on the evidence to date,
the agencv has concluded that
aspartame has withstood the re-
quirements of the law that there
be reasonable certainty of no
harm
Several individuals who blame
aspartame for assorted health
problems testified before the
committee. Larry Taylor of Ar-
lington, Texas, said he had three
seizures prior to eliminating Nu-
traSweet from his diet.
Michael Collings, a former Air
Force pilot, said he began suffer-
ing tremors in his arms in-1983.
264 By-Pass
Stad

mm b
1 I he Plaa
(ireenullr Bkt
�a
Z
c
2
B
t

r arm
fresh
JOuilHV S
Acc lr
( lewer
O'Cools
Formerly known as Hooter's
Located behind Quincy s '? Ace Cleaners
in Farm Fresh Shopping Center
11 a.m a.m every day � 355 2946
"Come check out our New Menu
Businessmen and diplomats
indicted on smuggling charges
DANCERS. MODELS. ARTISTS.
MUSICIANS. PERFORMERS.
STUDENTS AND FACULTY
For Your Professional Photography Needs From Head
Shots to Portfolios Portraits to Publicity Pictures
Call
PHOTOSPHERE
in Washington. NC - only 25 w tram ECU Studio or Any Socst"
PAUL NURNBERG - PHOTOGRAPHER
135 N Main St. Washinton, NC
1i7frffii.fi
WASHINGTON (AP) � Two
Japanese businessmen and two
Hungarian diplomats have been
indicted on charges of smuggling
high-technology laser equipment
from the United States to Hun-
gary
The 15-count indictment, which
was handed down Tuesdav bv a
federal grand jury in Asheville,
1ST.C, capped a thrve-vear investi-
gation by federal authorities into
the diversion of U.S. high-tech-
nology equipment to the Soviet
bloc. '
The Japanese and Hungarians
arc accused of smuggling an
American-made laser trimming
system from America through
Japan to Hungary, in an effort to
circumvent U.S. law prohibiting
sale of high-technology devices
with military applications to
communist countries.
Those charged are Yoshio
Fujmuma and Keisuke Katsuta
and their company, Kuriomoto
Trading Co. Ltd. of Tokyo. The
two Hugarian diplomats are
Istvan Rona and Clara Uitz, who
were based in Tokyo at the time of
the alleged crime, which the in-
dictment said took place from
May 1982 through Nov. 7,19&1.
None of the four has been ar-
rested and their exact where-
abouts are not known, Commerce
Department spokesman Donald
Creed said.
Paul Freedenberg, acting Com-
merce undersecretary for export
administration, said this type of
laser trimmer was a key compo-
nent in the production of semi-
conductors used in computers.
"This semiconductor manufac-
turing equipment is highly
sought by Soviet-bloc coutries for
military modernization
Freedenberg said in a statement.
According to the indictment, Uitz
and Rona arranged for the two
Japanese to purchase the laser
trimmer in the United States
through a North Carolina busi-
nessman, Charles Moyer.
Moyer, 62, was arrested in
Charlotte, N.C on Sept. 24 by
special agents of the U.S. Com-
merce Department and pleaded
guilty to charges stemming from
his involvement in the scheme.
After purchase and delivery of
the equipment to Meyer's North
Carolina company, the indict-
ment alleges, Katsuta arranged to
have the system exported to Ja-
pan.
To avoid detection at the
American border, the indictment
says, Katsuta claimed to VS.
Customs agents that the laser
trimmer was an ordinary "elec-
tronic carpet trimmer
After being shipped to Tokyo,
the laser system was smuggled
from Japan to Budapest in the
diplomatic household effects of
Rona, the indictment charges.
The indictment alleges that the
Hungarian diplomats paid
Fujinuma and Katsuta approxi-
mately $380,000 to obtain the laser
trimmer system for the Hungari-
ans. The Japanese paid about
5200,000 of that amount to pur-
chase the system, the indictment
savs.
If extradited to the United
States and convicted, the four
defendants could each face fines
of up to$l milliow per count and a
five-to 10-year prison term per
count.
f$keed Money $T
Wc pay Cash For Anything
Gold or Silver
And, We also buy Stcro's, T.Vs.
V.C.Rs. Furniture, Hikes, etc.
Coin & Ring Man
lotaM
Free 8-Pack Of Chick-Fil-A Nuggets!
PURCHASE ONE OF OUR CHICK FIL A MEALS AND GET A FREE 8 PACK OF CHICK nL A
NUGC.ETS� WITH THIS COUPON
Mrala tm-rude Chick ftl A Sandwiches or Chick M-A Muffle la� Waffle Potato Fries� and coleslaw
Coupon not good with any other offer One coupon per person per vsrtt. Closed Sundays
A D 1 S E
Step .nfo Pl'Jff'SS
S'mc 0:
Sir�
329 Arlington
Blvd.
1579
ALL HAIR SERVICES
MAKEUP-MANICURES
TANNING BEDS
L . Oarolina. East Mall
10 00 5:00 IMF)
10 00 3.00 Sat
400 S Evans
7S2 3116
Rosina's Picture Pic
of the Week
If your Face Appears in Rosina's
Picture Pic Contest You Win
Every Thura.
Ufia ha Iff'
215 E. 4th St.
752-2183
A COMPLETE MEAL ON A BUN
2 Locations
316 Greenville Blvd.
756-7171
Think of us
for your
Tailgate Party
5 ft. Party Sub
stuffed with cheese and six
different meats. Topped with
lettuce, tomatoe, onions, salt,
pepper, oil, vinegar and oregano.
Comes with enough plates, cups,
napkins, chips, and Pepsi or tea.
(feeds 20-25 people)
Only $38.88
3 ft. Party Sub
Same as above
(feeds 10-15 people)
Only $21.88
20 Discount Off Any Service.
Good Through 11-30-87
PETEY HATHAWAY, Owner
SERVICE
a IF '
Having a Domino's Pizza store
nearby is like being on a perma-
nent vacation: You can order
room service every night! Just
call and order your favorite
pizza. We'll deliver it to your
door in less than 30 minutes.
So pick up the phone and order
room service. Domino's Pizza
Delivers!
3
Off a Large,
Three or More
Topping
Pizza!
Offer good only at participating
Domino's Pizza locations
Not valid with other coupons or offer
Offer good thru November 18,1987
Please provide nameaddressphone on coupon
BEFORE drivef arrives
Name
Address
Phone
I
I
I
Serving
Central Greenville
and ECU Campus
758-6660
1201 Charles Blvd
Serving East Greenville
752-6996
Rivergate Shopping Center
Serving West Greenville
756-9998
2405 W. Dickinson Ave.
Serving Ayden
and Winterville
746-4042
106 N Lee St
Hours:
11:00am-1am SunThurs.
11.00am-2amFri &Sat.
Except AycJen
11 OOam-12midn�cht Sun -Thurs
11 am.2am Fn & Sat
DOMINO'S
PIZZA
DELIVERS
Our dnvars carry less than $20 00
. c 1967 Oommos Ptua mc
'
m i�- - m m m�m � �� m i� -�
�'If
1
I :
J





I
NOVEMBER 5,1087
Researcher says AIDS info, overwhelming
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) -
earch into AIDS is turning out
fountains of facts more quickly
r�an scientists can analyze them
forcing some doctors to take edu-
cational shortcuts to keep up, a
University of North Carolina pa-
thologist says.
Dennis W. Ross, a pathologist at
the Univcrstiy of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill, said medical
knowledge usually evolves
slowly, in minute increments. But
the AIDS epidemic is turning out
information that is outdated just
weeks after publication.
At the same time, valuable re-
search in other public health areas
is short-circuited and side-
tracked, he said. And all the
while, there is little or no time to
scrutinize closely new AIDS re-
search findings, Ross says.
"There have been about 10,000
articles written on AIDS since
inception. Who could have read
but a small fraction of those Ross
said in an interview published
Tuesday in the Greensboro News
& Record. "I could spend all my
waking hours just reading about
rcss of AIDS patients there.
Ross increasingly sees rare
forms of pneumonia, cancer and
other infections appearing be
cause the AIDS patient's immuni
up
AIDS and I wouldn't be keeping system is weakened and canno
fight back. Those complication
� infrequently found in the eld-
erly, the newborn or the surgical
patient � are turning up else-
where in greater numbers.
In a recent article in the Journal
of the American Medical Associa-
P
As a pathologist, Ross studies
how diseases develop and prog-
ress. As director of the hematol-
ogy lab at N.C. Memorial Hospi-
tal, he helps analyze blood
samples and monitors the prog-
Caspar Weinberger refuses to comment on the recent reports
that he will resign as secretary of defense
WASHINGTON (AP) - Cas-
par Weinberger Wednesday re-
fused to comment on reports he is
resigning as secretary of defense,
saying "I don't go into any ru-
mors But his wife, Janecon-
firmed that her husband will step
down.
Asked why he wouldn't re-
spond to the reports he isquitting,
Weinberger said on NBC-TV's
'Today" show, "I've always tried
to stay on substantive matters and
matters that involve the immedi-
ate issues that we have before us
Weinberger's resignation, re-
ported earlier by sources who
spoke on the condition of ano-
nymity, was confirmed by his
wife in an interview published
today in the New York Times.
"It must be a little depressing
for the president, when you're in
the last 14 months, that there are
fewer and fewer folks around
who are the longtime stalwarts
Iranians celebrate in Death
to America Day" party
saidtheofficial,insistinghenotbe
named.
Weinberger's asssociation with
Reagan dates back two decades,
when he teamed up with the then-
new governor of California as his
director of finance. Except for
Samuel Pierce, the secretary of
Housing and Urban Develop-
ment, Weinberger is the only
member of Reagan's original
Cabinet still on the job.
Weinberger, pressed during the
television interview about the
resignation reports, said, "I don't
go into anv rumors and later
added, "nobody's confirming
them. Why don't we talk about
NATO?"
He was interviewed from Mon-
terey, Calif where he wasattend-
ing a conference of NATO mili-
tary leaders.
tion, Ross wrote, "What were for
merely rare opportunistic infec-
tions and tumors have suddenly
become common. The AIDS
epidemic is providing clinical
experience in this area, but at a
rate too fast to assimilate "
Young doctors have tradition-
ally turned to older colleagues of
specialists for ad vice But because
AIDS is relatively new with so
much information to be absorbed,
there are no specialists, Ross said
"If you went to a conference six
months ago to learn somehting
about AIDS, you may need to do it
again now Ross said. "Most of
us have never treated a disease
where six months makes you out
of date.
"The biggest impact will be,
how do you choose the lab tests
that will monitor AIDS patients
more effectively. So we're learn
ing what kind of tests to do.
What's new now is in the labora
E.C.U Army ROTC
Rcnt-A-Cadet,
Nov. 14, 1987.
Halfday(8am-12)-$20
Full day (8 am-4) - $30
If interested call 757-6967 or
757-7974 between 8 am - 5
pm M-F.
Offers accepted until 9 a.m. -
Nov. 14, 1987
MANAMA, Bahrain (AP)
Millions of Iranians chanted anti-
American slogans at rallies in
Tehran and other cities Wednes-
day to mark the eighth anniver-
sary of the N7s storming ot the
U.S. Embassy, Iran's official news
agency reported.
On Tuesday, the Pentagon in
Washington said it was investi-
gating reports that a U.S. Navy
frigate in the Persian Gulf fired on
a fishing boat, not a hostile Iranian
craft as the Pentagon believed,
and that the attack killed an In-
dian crew member
The Islamic republic News
Agency, monitored in Nicosia,
said hundreds oi thousands of
Revolutionary Guards, soldiers
and government officials were
demonstrating on "Death To
America Dav
Prime Minister Hussein
Musavi and other leaders had
exhorted Iranians to make the
national holiday "a dav on which
America should tremble with
fear
'The news agency said throngs
of Iranian demonstrators crowd-
ing into Azadi Square in western
Tehran for a major rally shouted
slogans denouncing the interven-
tion of the United States and its
European allies in the gulf.
Today also is the birthday of the
Prophet Mohammed, founder of
Islam.
It is also the 24th anniversary of
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini's
exile to Turkey, and later Iraq and
France, by the late Shah Moham-
med Reqa Pahlave for fomenting
unrest against his rule.
Fourteen years later, pro-
Khomeini students staged anti-
Shah protests, triggering the Is-
lamic revolution that in 1979
toppled Iran's Peacock Throne
and brought Khomeini back in
triumph from exile in France.
On November 4, 1979, the US.
Embassy was stormed by mili-
tants calling themselves students.
Dozens of American diplomats
and embassy personnel were
seized.
Most were released soon after.
But 52 Americans were held hos-
tage for 444 days until being freed
in January 1981 under an agree-
ment mediated by Algeria.
On Tuesday, Ayatollah
Hussein Ali Nomtazeri,
Khomeini's chosen successor,
said on Tehran radio that the
embassy takeover had "shattered
the myth of American power
The radio predicted millions of
Iranians would take part in
marches in Tehran and other cit-
ies "to demonstrate their firm
resolve to turn the Persian Gulf
into a graveyard for the American
aggressors
Parliament Speaker Hashemi
Rafsanjani was quoted by the
news agency as saying "unprece-
dented enthusiasm" for the rallies
would show how Washington's
"stupid policy" in the gulf will
"yield sinister consequences
Meanwhile, the 15th convoy of
U.S. warships and reflagged
Kuwaiti tankers continued
steaming north through the wa-
terway.
Gulf shipping sources said
Tuesday a U.S. Navy frigate fired
on a fishing boat Sunday night
and killed an Indian crew mem-
ber.
The sources quoted anothei
crewman as saying the warship
fired machine guns, although the
fishing boat and two others with it
showed lights and were making
way for the frigate and a refueling
tanker it was escorting out of the
gulf. The Pentagon identified the
Navy ship as the USS Carr.
The shipping sources' account
of the shooting incident, which
the Pentagon said incurred near
the Iranian island of Abu Musa,
I
teaiete
Greenville's Only
Premium
Quality Cleaners
Since 1935
; have 2 sweaters j Laundered Shirt
iOR SKIRTS CLEANED
1 3RD PAIR CLEANED �
Special
was similar in many respects to FREE. jj fQt 51 �i- �-
that offered earlier by officials in
Iran. They also denied any Iranian
boats were involved in an en-
counter with the Navy.
111 W. 10TH ST.
Expires December 8,1987 corner or iothevans
Coupon must be presented with incoming order
tory, the quantitative measure
ments of how they are doing, be
fore they are sick and while they
are sick
To keep up, doctors disdain the
more detailed medical reports
and opt for the bottom line, he
said
"What you tend to do is get the
briefest possible summary, the
last sentence of the article he
said. "What you depend on are
the drug companies and govern
mental agencies that put out these
throw-away magazines 1 proba
bly get 20of those in any week and
a third of them are related to
AIDS
"So, you go to the summarv
article The information is very
heavily abstracted You lose de
tails, that pave of information
that could be cntcal to you. You
become too dependent on
abstracted and watered-down
u'fsl"ns
Sott Contact Lenses
Includes:
LensesCare KitFollow-up Care
For 30 Days
Eye Exam Additional
OrTOfemjc
�VECAR�C�KTCR
Ur John Moln.ir
The Plaza Mai 756 9771
Bring Student I.D.
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center Is Open
Mon Tues, & Wed. Fri. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
9 a.m. - 2 p.m. & by appointmer
For an appointment or more infor-
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline,
757-0003
1 11 East laird Street The Lee Building
Greenville, N. C.
Free Pregnancy Test-
Confldcntlal Counseling
�RACK ROOM SHOES,
TAKE AN
EXTRA
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
10 off!
"EAST CAROLINA C.
&
if
A
A
&

TEA PARTY"
Every Friday
� $2.00 Iced Teas
�FREE Pizza
5 7 PM
�No Cover
Charge
�ECU Football
Cheerleaders
Pep Rally live
6-7 PM
ySjLW Transit
tmAuthonty
Sheraton Greenville
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
Open MonSat. 10 9
Sunday 1-6
m m m � With this coupon l
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRW
(EXCEPT AIGNER. NIKE AND REEBOK)
0
MH HM l KH IMAS
Playwrigh
By STAN ARNOl.D
SUM Wnlrr
excellent I
pla wright ti
I ID
men! ol tl
I r of
ton in d
The Playwrights I undo! North
Carolina, founded 7 years ago bv
Christine Rusch, is an organiza
tion dedicated to helping pla
wrights in North Carolina and
throughout the Southeast to de
velop scripts and aid in the pos
sible future productions ot plays i
by workshops and informal stage I � N
readings. According to Phil year
Heins, administrative director for Accordi
Gray gallery
Art Vhoo! Prr� krkra�r
"Images of Latin American
Culture: Art and Artifact titles a
collaborative exhibit at East (
lina University School of Art 5
Crav Art Gallerv form November
2nd through November 2th
Scheduled to coincide with l.atin
American Month at ECU, the
exhibition offers a multi-dimen
sional perspective on Latin
American culture featuring a col-
lection of pre-Columbian arti
facts, Mexican dance masks and
contemporary Latin American
painting.
A combined effort by the
University's Latin American
Studies Committee, the School of
Art and Department of Sociology
and Anthropolgv, the show is 00-
curated by N'lda Peraza, Director
of the Museum of Comtemporar)
Hispanic Art in New lork and
Perry NIesbitts, Director ot the
Gray Art Gallery. The project has
been funded bv the North Caro-
lina Humanities Council.
The art of Latin America por-
trays an ongoing quest to under
stand how and whv life was
ated and to come to terms with the
meaning of death for individual
hu��ns and for civilization. The
exhititiorxhas bwn organized
Saround foirrlK?mes 1 natrprrflng-
the substance and evolution of
. Latin American cultural trade
tions: "The Quest for Understand-
ing: Defining What it Means to be
Human "Continuity and Trans-
formation: The relationship ot
Humans to the World Around
Them "The Duality of the Spirit
Humansand theGodsand "Life
and the Meaning of Death: Crea-
tion and Regeneration
These themes, as explained in
the brochure available at the ex-
hibit, aid the viewer in relating the
various art objects to each other
and to the unique Latin American
expression of the human values
and experience explored in the
works.
The pre-Columbian artifacts on
view are on loan from the Depart-
ment of Sociology and Anthro-
pology Archaeology Lab, under
the direction of Dr. David Phelps
and Dr. Holly Mathews. where
thev are housed as a research and
� �
turns the
LlK
con ternporan
ited express m
in Latin
VV.1V
depict the tn.
bom ot the n
tion to a mof
wor .
nati
relii
Hi spam
Bak!
BvMid
Rilph�
net. as
the
charactt r
reputation
troversial
Look in
more comm
disa .
ards,� and his
pleted ad
gs
After tw J
called it quit!
and, frartkl)
His vau
through
maki
McPartland brings ja
thuMri fi. �rie�e outanx
Marian McPartland, a white sum I
English woman who has carved American
Marian McPartland, acclaimed jazz pianist, will!
drfar Theafer on Nov. 10. Tickets are $6, $4 for Ei

i"







helming
e Kr 'orv the quantitative measure-
nf� nunts of how they are doing, be-
lenh fore the are sick and while they
.ill' sK k
ro keep up doctors disdain the
it a more detailed medical reports
and opt tor the bottom line, he
said
W hat you tend to do is get the
briefest possible summary, the
last sentence of the article he
What you depend on are
the drug companies and govern-
mental agencies that put out these
throw ava magazines 1 proba-
ot thoseinany week and
i I rd ol them are related to
S , to the summary
i he information is very
heavil abstracted You lose de-
tails that pieee ot information
that could !v cntcal to you. You
me too dependent on
tracted and watered-down
Contact Lenses
p Care
OPTOrVKTRJC
�Y�CAR�C�NTCR
Ur lohii t Moiuar
I1k� Plaza Mall 756-9771
D
SNOBS.
et
TAKE AN
EXTRA
10
i
i
i
i
i
OFF!
) Khi-Ji
()K) I
li coupon �
when what you
want is something
soft and wildly pretty
Shop at
Certain
Things
652 E Arlington Blvd
Arlington Village
756-3320
10-6 MS
OPEN THURSDAY TIL 8 P.M.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
NOVEMBER 5, 1987 I'ago 9
Playwright's Fund helps develops production
By STAN ARNOLD
Staff Wrilrr
The Playwrights Fund of North
c arolina, founded 7 years ago bv
( hnstine Rusch, is an organiza-
tion dedicated to helping play-
wrights in North Carolina and
throughout the Southeast to de-
velop scripts and aid in the pos-
sible future productions of plays
by workshops and informal stage
readings. According to Phil
1 loins, administrative director for
the group, the PFNC provides an
excellent opportunity for the
playwright to benefit from audi-
ence feedback and it provides the
audience with entertainment in
which they can participate.
The PFNC is located in the base-
ment of the Humbar 1 louse on the
corner of 5th Street and Washing
ton in downtown Greenville. A
non-profit organization, the
PFNC showcases 7 to 9 plays a
year.
According to a pamphlet put
out by the PFNC, the group
operates on a unique six-phase
process. First, the PFNC actively
solicits new scripts from play-
wrights. These scripts are indi-
vidually critiqued by the group's
Literary Director and staff.
Scripts not developed to the
workshop level are returned to
the playwright with comments
and suggestions. Plays that are
accepted are given cold readings
by actors and are evaluated for
artistic and literary merit. The
work is then presented to two
different audiences, who give
their post production opinions of
the work.
Later the play isdiscussed at the
PFNC's Southeastern Play-
wrights conference. As a final
step, a transcript of the play issent
to appropriate markets for publi-
cation or production.
Hcins says that although there
is no formal affiliation with ECU,
many of the board members, in-
cluding the president. Dr. Rich-
ard Lang, are affiliated with the
University. Hcins expressed a
desire to see more collaboration
between the two groups in the
future.
Heins also stated the impor-
tance of the audience in the ex-
ploratory environment. "We sec
the audience; from actors and
directors to students and farmers.
Even if you don't think you know
anything about the theatre come
and voice your opinion because
you opinion is important
The PFNC's next play showcase
is scheduled for No vember 14 and
everyone is invited to attend. Two
showings of Glenn Rawl's "Fam-
ily Reunion" will be given in the
basement of the 1 lumbar House.
The showings are scheduled for
12 noon and 8 pm Although there
is no charge to attend the show-
ings, the group relies on the sup-
port of its patrons, so contribu-
tions are accepted.
Gray gallery hosts Latin art show
Art School Prru Rrlcisr
"Images of Latin American
Culture: Art and Artifact" titles a
collaborative exhibit at East Caro-
lina University School of Art's
Gray Art Gallery form November
2nd through November 25th.
Scheduled to coincide with Latin
American Month at ECU, the
exhibition offers a multi-dimen-
sional perspective on Latin
American culture featuring a col-
lection of pre-Columbian arti-
facts, Mexican dance masks and
contemporary Latin American
painting.
A combined effort bv the
University's Latin American
Studies Committee, the School of
Art and Department of Sociologv
and Anthropolgv, the show isco-
curated by N'lda Peraza, Director
of the Museum of Comtemporarv
Hispanic Art in New York and
Perry Nesbitls, Director of the
Gray Art Gallery. The project has
been funded by the North Caro-
lina Humanities Council.
The art of Latin America por-
trays an ongoing quest to under-
stand how and why life was cre-
ated and to come to terms with the
meaning of death for individual
humans and for civilization. The
exhibifionh.is been org.im'itxl
laround foiFNbemes inlirpreflng
the substance and evolution of
Latin American cultural tradi-
tions: "The Quest for Understand-
ing: Defining What it Means to be
I Human "Continuity and Trans-
formation: The relationship of
S Humans to the World Around
I Them "The Duality of the Spirit:
Humans and the Gods and "Life
' and the Meaning of Death: Crea-
I tion and Regeneration
These themes, as explained in
s the brochure available at the ex-
hibit, aid the viewer in relating the
various art objects to each other
'�� and to the unique Latin American
expression of the human values
and experience explored in the
works.
The pre-Columbian artifacts on
view are on loan from the Depart-
ment of Sociology and Anthro-
pology Archaeology Lab, under
the direction of Dr. David Phelps
and Dr. Holly Mathews, where
thev are housed as a research and
study collection which ECU be-
gan accumulating in 19H0.
The Mexican Dance masks in
the exhibit are from a New York
collection donated to ECU last
year. Collected in the l'Ws, the
masks themselves date from 1890
to 1950 and represent the type's
and purposes of those still in use
in the less developed areas of
Mexico and South and Central
America. The exhibit includes
masks used in such ritual dances
as the Technotli or Conquest
Dance, and Dance of the Tiger, the
Rain Petitioning Dance, the
Dance of the Moors and Chris-
tians, the Vaquero Dance and
several Carnival dances.
Like the artifacts and masks, the
contemporary paintings exhib-
ited express some of the changes
in Latin American traditional
ways of life and belief. The works
depict the tremendous conflicts
born of the necessity o adapta-
tion to a modern technological
world -where Latin American
nations are often exploited and
reluctant partners in the moderni-
zation process
Hie Museum of Contemporary
Hispanic Art has loaned the ex-
hibit approximately 17 pieces
from such nationally known art-
ists as Luis Cruz Azaceta (Cuban),
Juan Boza (Cuban), Manuel
Macarulla (Dominican), Jorge
Salazar (Mexican), Juan Sanchez
(Puerto Rican), and Jorge Tacla
(Chilean).
A public slide-lecture series at
7:30 p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium
accompanies the exhibitionn dur-
ing the month of November. The
opening lecture on Monday,
November 2nd, will be given by
Phelps. He will speak on "The
indigenous Art of the Americas
Phelps is well known as the lead-
ing expert on Eastern North Caro-
lina archaeology in addition to
specialties in Latin American ar-
chaeology.
The following Monday,
Mathews will lecture on "Chang-
ing Faces Mexican Dance Masks
in Transition Mathews is a cul-
tural anthropologist degreed
from Duke University and has
published widely in the major
anthropological journals and
elsewhere.
Peraza, founder and Director of
the Museum of Contemporary
Hispanic Art in New York, lec-
tures November 16th on "His-
panic Art: Acculturation or Al-
ienation Peraza's credentials as
a speaker and panelist on Latin
American Art include engage-
ments for the National Endow-
ment for the Arts, W
The last lecturcNovembcr 19th,
features Juan Sanchez, one of the
painters exhibiting. Mr. Sanchez
is a participant in the School of
Art's Visiting Artists Program
funded by the National Endow-
ment for the Arts. A New York
born Puerto Rican Nationalist,
Sanchez still lives and works in
the city. A political artist, his
mixed media collage style paint-
ings use combinations of selected
motifs, graffitti, and media
images. He graduated with an
MFA from Rutgers University
and has been featured in over
sixty shows nationally and inter-
nationally.
A reception for the exhibition
will be held November 16 at 8:30
p.m. in Gray Art Gallery follow-
ing Peraza's lecture. The public is
cordially invited.
Juan Sanchez's mixed media piece is one of the many Latin
American artworks on display at Gray Gallery til Nov. 25.
Bakshi puts new life into Mighty mouse cartoon
ByMICAH HARRIS
Stiff Writer
Ralph Bakshi first gained noto-
riety as "animation's bad boy" for
the alleged first X-rated cartoon,
"Fritz the Cat based on Robert
Crumb's underground comics
character. 1 le maintained this
reputation with successive con-
troversial (and subsequently
rarelv seen) animated features as
"coonskin" and "Hey, Good
l.ookin" before producing the
more commercial (and ultimately
disappointing) cartoons, "Wiz-
ards and his still only half-com-
pleted adaptation of "Lord of the
Rings
After two more features, Bakshi
called it quits with animation,
and, frankly, it was about time.
His vaunted technical break-
through which was supposed to
make "Lord of the Rings" so
wondrous was nothing more than
the rotoscope, a process of tracing
live action footage into animated
footage, invented by Max Fleis-
cher over 50 years earlier.
Bakshi's retirement from ani-
mation was short lived and he
returned to supply the animated
suquences of the Rolling Stones
Video, 'The Harlem Shuffle
There was not a trace of rotoscop-
ing and the animation was de-
lightful. In addition, the whole
sense of design had a sixties jazz
and coffee house "hip" feel to it,
providing an appropriately seedy
feel.
Bakshi has brought this look
(minus the seediness) to his latest
endeavor, the current Saturday
morning cartoon, "Mighty
Mouse, the New Adventures
Along with "Pee Wee's Play-
house" which preceeds it on CBS,
this cartoon makes one of prime
time TV's best hours.
Superficially, Bakshi's involve-
ment seems to be a step back ward:
he began his career at Terrytoons
(the original producers of
"Mighty Mouse") as an young
animator and Saturday morning
seems low grade compared to the
big screen, epecially considering
the loss of creative freedom due to
Halloween reunion too scary
McPartland brings jazz technique to Hendrix
Mendcnhali fnmt Release
Marian McPartland, a white
English woman who has carved
!�
out a niche for herself in a profes-
sion long dominated by black
American men, will present her
Marian McPartland, acclaimed jazz pianist, will perform at Hen-
drix Theater on Nov. 10. Tickets are $6, $4 for ECU students.
faultless jazz technique in Hen-
drix Theatre on the East Carolina
Univeristy campus on November
10. This performance is part of the
1987-88 Chamber Music Series,
cosponsored by the Department
of University Union and the
School of Music.
In her youth, McPartland was
headed for a career in classical
music. She studied at the Guild-
hall School of Music in London
but had already fallen in love with
jazz. During World War II,
McPartland joined the ENSO, the
English equivalent of USO, and
later transferred to the USO. Her
small combo played for troops at
the front lines.
In 1946, McPartland moved to
the United States and spent sev-
eral years playing in her
husband's quintet in Chicago be-
fore forming her own group. She
opened inNew York in 1950at the
Embers Club. Two years later, the
Marian McPartland Trio played
what was to have been a two-
week engagement at the Hickory
House on 52nd Street, but they
were held over for a year.
The Hickory House became
home base for McPartland and
her group until the 1960's. During
this time, they made several re-
cordings for Capitol Records, one
of which was Marian McPart-
land at the Hickory House.
See McPARTLAND, page 10
ridiculous network restrictions.
But Bakshi has retained indi-
vidual freedom to a large extent.
Not since the days of Jav Ward's
"Bullwinkle" and "Underdog"
has there been such an adult Sat-
urday morning cartoon. Plus, the
animation's better.
Like "Bullwinkle the new
"Mighty Mouse" is not short on
wit. But its main focus is parody.
So far, Bakshi has lampooned
such sacred pop culture cows as
Shoney's Big Boy, Batman, the
Hinstones, "2001: A Space Odys-
sey, " An American Tail, and
Disney's DTV.
In addition, there are cracks too
sophisticated for the little tykes
(luring a male crab monster away
from distraught ants, Might
PicHiqg e fipnes,
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
izett
By the time the next Communist
U. defector arrived, the barstool's
Halloween, by defmition, is a friend from Raleigh, soon dubbed
scary holiday. This one knows P.Borplanaria brain, had spilled
that. This one should have been
prepared for his past tocome back
and haunt him.
But given the widespread re-
known of Green ville's downtown
celebration (second only to the
many beers and broken the hosf s
attractive ceramic eagle hatrack.
leechlike m their persistence.
After the hour's walk from
Susie's Treehouse to Rafter's, this
one and two others expressed a
desire to find somewhere with
less than 379 people per square
inch. We retired to the East Caro-
linian offices and debated op-
tions.
Two shots each of the vodka
Filled us with a homing instinct.
We gravitated back to our host's
house in hopes of finding a car.
Cm the way, we becaine margin-
Not merely one wing was
sheared. No, in a masterpiece of
uncoordination, both wings had
hype surrounding Ayden's Cci- shattered. This one kept thinking,
lard Festival) even this one could dry and crumbly dry and crum-
not have predicted die surge of bly.
visitors from thisone'sold school. After an emotional trip or two ally involved in a racial incident.
This one once attended a neo- and some stinging barbs on the and at least three Greeks tried to
facist Baptist university. This subject of overweight bo vines, a proposition this one's brother,
page's new preoccupation with bonfire was lit and the drinkers Once off the main roads, we flew
libel laws, so often broken before headed outdoors. Another phone past a drunk stumbling home.
in this column, prevent this one call announced the arrival of the Back at the house, we encoun-
from naming the school. next former schoolmate. tered more partyers, but our en-
This one's old roommate once She arrived with this one's little
said that whenever three or more brother in tow. This one's brother
of us malcontents got together arrived with make up and Church
outside of the aforementioned Chat lady drag in tow. Psycho-
nameless school, weird dungs logical wreckers were going to be
follow like yeflowfackets. needed by the time this night was
Or to use his quote, The fabric over.
of reality gets my and cramhiy � More time passed and the ad- our automobile. We repelled him
like Rome And so it did. wnturers decided it was time to and sped off in search of pizza.
Beginning with ait ewiy morn- mobilize. We reached downtown The next morning, we returned
ing phone call from a girl com- with a minimum of urinary stops to our host's house to return vari-
moruy recognized as having the and a long layover at the Second ous props and to catch the
personality of a barstool (fun to sit Street Fast Fare. Redskin's game. We learned that
on, not much good for talking) Beer purchasing took some our drunk had later gained entry
this one mimed events were time. So the barstool and her to their house and slept on the
pushing him in a reunion filled friend took it into their heads to hosf s bed until he was forcibly
stinwtistn mala (nnnrl un)h )KomiilHhiHanf rpmftvtvl '
durance was gone. This one de-
clined anymore beer in favor of
food. As we left, the drunk we
passed earlier was trying to force
open the screen door of our host's
kitchen.
Failing this, he tried to invade
direction
make friend with me multitude of removed.
She invited this one to a keg Greenville police officers present To our extreme happiness the
party (presumably with the bless- This caused some agitation barstool and her planaria-brained
ings of'the people purcbasmg the among this one's group, as this friend were also long gone But
keg) This or accepted, and upon one's underage brother harbored before they toft, they had called
arriving at -designated party an open bottle of Popov vodka in Raleigh and discovered thevwai
corifines, fbad another former his attractive leopard print skirt, being evicted from their am.
classmate. Once downtown, the saner ment
Kegs tapped, beer flowing, members of the party tried to dis-
endless tape loops of Fun Boy lodge the barstool and friend, but all the guests, and
Three' ThB i&QSSKKk. Pw8d they proved to have radar sense.
y.OtyaHtHf irtj pp mid htat.any people could stay to-
ftea Whe� 1W 4PBft ��&� gtherdowntowrt, but they were
To mem, to the ECU parti, i
II the guests, and espeeXL
Ry-UkeRome.rnan.1
�m '���nm,mmmimimurutir,0m0�0
� � 'OMIMWflN
�"?
i





10
THF EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBERS, 1987
Navy jazz plays ECU
An evening ot jaz2 will be pre-
sented b the "Commodores the
I S Nav) Band's jazz ensemble
from Wahington, D.C at a free
concert in Last Carolina
University's Wright Auditorium
No 16, at S p.m.
I he Mavy Hand Commodores
feature 18 top jazz "big band,
musicians offering a mixture ot
styles ranging trom "Suing bra"
sounds to contemporary high-
energy music. Dizzy Gillospie,
Grover Washington jr. and Poto
Cristiieb are a few of the guest jazz
musicians who have appeared
with the "Commodores The
group was formed in 1969 and is
the only military ensemble to
appear at the Newport Jazz Festi-
val.
The group's fall tour program
includes selections by Don
Menza, Bob Mintzer, Sonny
Rollins and Rick Henderson, and
special arrangements of familiar
prices, such as "Big Band Med-
ley" and "Sweet Georgia Brown
Upside Down
While the concert is free, tickets
are required. Free tickets may be
picked up at the ECU Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center or ordered by mail.
Any unclaimed seats will beavail-
able to non-ticket holders just
prior to concert time.
Veal recipe expensive but good
Porcini are expensive but su-
perb, i ou'll find them in gourmet
food shops and in some super-
markets. They're dried and must
be soaked before using for best
flavoi
VI AL WITH PORCINI SAUCE
l 2 cup dry white wine
1 4 cup dnod porcini mush-
rooms
1 green onion thinly sliced
I s teaspoon ground white
pepper
dash dried tarragon, crushed
dash dried chervil, crushed
1 pound boneless veal leg
round steak cut 1 4 inch thick
1 2 cup margarine or butter
1 8 teaspoon dried tarragon,
crushed
2 tablespoons cold water
3 egg volks
In a small saucepan combine
wine, mushrooms, onion, white
pepper, dash tarragon and cher-
vil. Bring to boiling; reduce heat.
Cover, simmer 2 minutes. Re-
move from heat. Let stand, cov-
ered, 15 minutes.
Cut veal into 8 pieces. Place a
piece between 2 pieces of clear
plastic wrap, pound with flat side
of meat mallet to 18-inch thick-
ness. Season with salt and pepper.
Repeat with remaining pieces. In
a 12-inch skillet cook veal in 2
tablespoons of the margarineover
medium-heat 1 to 1 12 minutes
per side or until brown. Transfer
to ovenproof platter. Cover; keep
warm.
Drain mushrooms, reserving 2
tablespoons liquid; remove and
discard any stems. Slice mush-
rooms. Combine reserved liquid,
the 18 teaspoon tarragon and
cold water. In top of double boiler
( not over water) lightly beat egg
yolks. Slowly add water mixture.
Add 2 tablespoons of the marga-
rine; place over boiling water
(upper pan should not touch
water). Cook and stir about 2
minutes or until margarine melts
and sauce begins to thicken. Add
remaining margarine, 2 table-
spoons at a time, stirring con-
The Commodores, a U.S. Navy jazz ensemble, will play at Wright Auditorium on November 16 at 8
p.m.Tickets are free, and may be picked up at the ECU central ticket office.
stantly. Cook and stir about 2
minutes or until the consistency
of thick cream. Remove from heat;
stir in mushrooms. Serve over
veal. Makes 4 servings.
Nutrition information per serv-
ing: 452 cat 24 g pro 2 g carbo
36 g fat, 285 mg chol 328 mg
soduim. U.S. RDA: 24 percent vit.
A, 17 percent riboflavin, 23 per-
cent niacin, 19 percent iron, 26
percent phosphorus.
McPartland is long time jazz veteran
ontinue
t tli
l 11
Alley
trom page 9
� ippeared in
ntn - most pres-
ubs in clud i ng Bclema n s
: her that the piano
lled. the Cafe Carlyleof
� i Carlyle, Blues
Washington, the Mon-
in Rochester, Rick s
tfeinChicago and the Interlude
m Kansas I
She is lar guest at the
major jazz festivals: Monterey
: Festival Newport Jazz Festi-
val, Kool azz Festival, Kansas
Cit) Women's jazz Festival, and
festivals in Detroit, Salt Lake City,
Nice i ranee) and others.
After years ot recording tor
tol records, McPartland
her own record company,
��� r i h now catalogues
foi . . She has made a
nui ccords for Concord
New Mighty
Mouse cartoon
aimed at adults
Continued from page 9
v !� a blond wig and
i " In another
upj swe t but im-
poverished Disney type heroine
marries the materialistic wiseguy
who's boon harassing her after
has appan rttlj melted his
heart of stone.
They drive a way into the sunset
as the sweet and cutesy animals
look on, and the narrator quips
that her new husband gave the
former waif a job foreclosing
mortgages. Presumably on wid-
ows with children.
Bakshi is shaking up the sterile
valium wonderland pressure
groups have made of Saturday
morning. Personally, I suspect his
efforts will amount to zilch in this
bland age of glorified toy com-
mericials that waste the air waves.
But, Bakshi has proved he's still
got the bad boy in him.
And, at last, the animation field
's the better for it.
fazz and has also recorded for
RCA Victor, Savoy, Bainbridge,
and lmprov.
McPartland also writes music.
1 lor music has been performed by
such greats as Peggy Lee, Tony
Bennett, Sarah Vaughan, Gary
burton, Ray Anthony, and the
Thad ones-Mel Lewis Orchestra,
whose recording of Ambiance
received a nomination for a
Grammy award.
Her Peabody Award-winning
radio show, Marian McPartland
Piano lazz. has been featured for
nine seasons on National Public
Radio, this remarkable artist has
published record reviews and
articles for periodicals such as the
New York Times and Esquire and
is engaged in a long-term project,
a book about women in jazz.
McPartland's regular television
appearances (which began in the
'50s on Gary Moore's and Steve
Allen's shows) include Charles
Kuralt's "Sunday Morning" on
CBS; a number of PBS specials,
"Now's the Time" with other
women jazz musicians, a
children's program called "The
Day of D is Daffodil Yellow and
"Live at Wolf Trap and cable
shows such as a "Syncopation"
with George Shearing and Billy
Taylor, and "Women in jazz for
which she serves as moderator,
she has performed pops pro-
grams withthe Minnesota Or-
chestra, New Orleans Symphony,
New Amsterdam Orchestra,
Orlando Symphony, Nassau
Symphony and the London Sym-
phony Orchestra.
McPartland has been acclaimed
as one of jazz music's foremost
tales emotional, romantic,
and highly inventive Her inno-
vative style and the special joy she
brings to all her music will pro-
7WVDRIGSL
Ait Elizabethan Christmas ifeast!
ritrrrtrrl bo CCharlrs iflnnrr
�PCI
December 2-5, 1987, 7:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center Multi-Purpose Room
East Carolina University
Advance Ticket Sales Only Admission: $16.00 for Adults
$10.00 for High School Youth and Under
j For further information contact: The Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student
I Center, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. (919)757-6611
I ext. 266.
JOllfe a MSC PRODUCTION jjffe
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Qrps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar , . ���
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. If you're
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O Box 7713
Clifton, NJ 07015. Or call toll free 1-800-USA-ARMY.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALLYOU CAN BL
vide an evening of exceptional
entertainment that will swing in
the memories of all who hear.
This production is funded in
part by a grant from the National
Endowment for the Arts, Wash-
ington, DC, a federal agency.
Tickets for this exciting per-
formance can be purchased at the
Central Ticket Office located in
Mendenhall Student Center,
Monday - Friday, 11 am - 6pm.
Ticket prices are $6 for general
admission, $5 for ECU faculty
staff, and $4 for all ECU students
and high school youth and under.
We'll give you the
scholarship money to
become a nurse ami
the leadership skills
to be a better one.
Start nur career with achantages other
nursing students won't have.
rm Reserve OfficersIraining(-orps is
j Uie.it ui to learn the self-confidence ami
leadership skills that are important to an
ureer. ami indispensable in nursing.
Vn deal with real people and real problems
nd learn to manage, inspire and lead Even
before you graduate
When you do graduate, vout hasc a cutiege
degree in nursing ami an officers commission
in the Army Nurse (.orps With the
responsibility most other graduates vill base
to wart years tor
lor more information about rm k() I and
the qualifications for Army k()( Nursing
Scholarships, talk to voui Professor ol Military
Science, tocbn
For More Info:
Contact Capt. Mitchell
757-6967
8
z
z
1
O
'S)
3
W
m
-�' �
jp
4
sf
oNN-
V"
-

c

&
A
i,

W
C -986 lC�� Cats (
Student Stores
Nov. 10,11,12
9:00-4:00
Thursday
Members 1
$1.00 Drink Specials
Best in Rock n' Roll & Top 40
4-7
Friday
Ho
Don
it's back with all new $1.00 Drink Specials. Free for members $1 00 guest
ml limit your choice to just one drink when you can have a full selection of
specials to choose from!
The Best in Rock n' Roll 4-7
Friday At The
Immigran
In New York, people buy vege
tables from Koreans and newspa-
jpers from Indians, pav rent to
Albanians, and ride cabs driven
ffcy Haitians to eat at Chinese res
Hurants in Little Italy
Puerto Ricans twirl dough in
Italian pizzerias and Dominicans
wash dishes in Greek diners
Outside office towers and jewelry
Stores on Madison Avenue, Sene
galesc merchants peddle every
thing from umbrellas to hand hags
to fake Kolex watches
New York turns on its immi
grant economy - those round-the
Clock jobs that provide basic serv-
ices to residentsof.all ethnic back
grounds -and a new generation ot
new Americans is reviving old
trades and invigorating others
"Immigrantsarehavinga major
effect on the New York retail
economy, the street economy
Says Emanuel Tobier, a professor
of economics and planning at
New York University who stud-
ies immigrant life, "they've kept
the texture of small business here
They've made the city more di-
ver than it otherwise would
have been
Like their European immigrant
forebears, recent arrivals are carv-
ing out a niche in specific occupa-
tions - opening family businesses,
bringing relatives to work in
them, providing financial help to
new arrivals and setting up net-
works of job referrals.
They are the newsstand opera-
tors from New Delhi and the
green grocers from Seoul, immi-
grants from developing countries
who arc dominating specific retail
trades that don't require much
capital or spoken English - just
hours of toil, often for little
money.
"There's a network, there's
alwaysanetwork, "saysElizabeth
Bogen, director of immigrant af-
fairs at the city's planning depart-
ment. "How is it the Dominicans
and Chinese wound up in the
garment industry? How is it the
Koreans wound up in the fruit
industry? That's the sweet mvs-
ty V
Ajit Patd workeJ in a meat
niirkct in East StroucNburg, Pa a
delicatessen in Somerville, N.J a
small metal factory in South
Amboy, N. J an auto repair shop
on 33rd Street in Manhattan and a
stationery store on 7th Aventp -
all run bv Indian immigrants K-
ii ii
t, n
stand b
"Th,
con
S3) -
fron
Men
m com
Em
immi
impact on k
other parts
ingt
In (
can 11;
metal m -
Gull
leva
ans ai I hinei
small I
ban- a
the o
Bui �
stop for mat
ew "i
F. Kei Air
Island
groups
unparalleled.
In 1986, the Ui
gration and NatJ
ice i
grant
.
ranc
the' i
v esl
Tci
ensal
Plaza Cin
Starting
Death Wl
starring Chai
' 'ke Fa
star:
Hiding Ot
stamnc ll
Pc � 7ke.
Starts
Witches .
starring Ja
V�$1.50 AI
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
sTIL
5:30
CHII
BUCCANEER MOV
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping
STEEL DOWN
Rated R
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
Held Over
Rated R jice Cooper in
PRINCE OF DARKNE!
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9
Starts Friday
SOMEONE TO WATCH OVE
Rated R
2:00-4:30-7:00-9.20
-&B&
THE WASH PUB
L an equal opportunity
advertiser!
We offer our specials to both sexes
what age, race or religious
conviction they might be.
Monday - DRAFT & DRYER DAY 25c Draft &
minutes on the Dryers.
Tuesday - TWO FOR OS'E DA Y Wash one load o
2nd wash in on us.
Wednesday - SOAP & SUDS DA Y 75c Long Ned
and Free Soap
MonFri. - FLUFF & FOLD SPECIAL 8 a.m.
off 35c a pound.
T
K
E
2510 E. 10th St.
752-5222
j 2 For 1 Washes '�
Pay For One Get One
FREE expires 113087
���
�MWMfi
J





THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 5, 1987 11
J
riqht Auditorium on November 16 at 8
. kel office.
ve vou the
irship money to
ie a nurse arid
fciership skills
fetter one.

More Info:
t Capt. Mitchell
6967
u
5
f.
J
s

Student Stores
Nov. 10,11,12
9:00-4:00
:
pay
Free
Best in Rock n' Roll & Top 40
ay
Hour
jals. Free for members S1.00 guest,
rhen you can have a full selection of
se from!
k n' Roll 4-7
,t The
.
Immigrants carve niche in NY
In New York, people buy vege-
tables from Koreans and newspa-
pers from Indians, pay rent to
Albanians, and ride cabs driven
by iaitians to eat at Chinese res-
taurants in Little Italy.
Puerto Ricans twirl dough in
Italian pizzerias and Dominicans
wash dishes in Greek diners.
Outside office towers and jewelry
stores on Madison Avenue, Sene-
galese merchants peddle every-
thing from umbrellas to handbags
to fake Rolex watches.
New York turns on its immi-
grant economy - those round-the-
v lock jobs that provide basic serv-
ices to residents of all ethnic back-
grounds - and a new generation of
new Americans is reviving old
trades and invigorating others.
"Immigrants are having a major
effect on the New York retail
economy, the street economy
says I manuel Tobier, a professor
of economics and planning at
Mew York University who stud-
ies immigrant life. "They've kept
the texture of small business here.
fhey've made the city more di-
verse than it otherwise would
have been
Like their European immigrant
t orebears, recent arrivals are carv-
ing out a niche in specific occupa-
tions - opening family businesses,
bringing relatives to work in
them, providing financial help to
new arrivals and setting up net-
works of job referrals.
They are the newsstand opera-
tors from New Delhi and the
green grocers from Seoul, immi-
grants from developing countries
who are dominating specific retail
trades that don't require much
capital or spoken English - just
hours of toil, often for little
money.
"There's a network, there's
alwavsa network saysEliza both
Bogen, director of immigrant af-
fairs at the city's planning depart-
ment. "How is it the Dominicans
and Chinese wound up in the
garment industry? How is it the
Koreans wound up in the fruit
industry? That's the sweet mys-
tjry K,
Aj;t Patel worked in a meat
market in East StroucNburg, Pa a
delicatessen in Somerville, N a
small metal factory in South
Amboy, N. an auto repair shop
on 33rd Street in Manhattan and a
fore a friend suggested the news-
stand business.
'The main reason everyone
comes to America is the money
says Patel, 30, who emigrated
from Gujarat, India, in 1985 with
$15 in his pocket and now man-
ages a lobbv shop in Rockefeller
Center. "1 also came for that too.
Here one dollar is equal to $13 in
my country"
Enclaves of new non-European
immigrants also are having an
impact on local economies in
other parts of the country, accord-
ing to scholars and U.S. immigra-
tion officials.
In Chicago, large numbers of
New Mexican and Central Ameri-
can immigrants are entering
metal working industries. In the
Gulf of Mexico off southeast
Texas, Vietnamese captain
shrimp boats. In California, Kore-
ans and Chinese run farms and
small businesses. In Miami, Cu-
bans are involved in all sectors of
the economy.
But the tirst - and often final -
stop for many immigrants still is
New York, though today it's )ohn
F. Kennedy Airport and not Ellis
Island. "In the range of immigrant
groups New York is probably
unparalleled says Tobier.
In 1986, the United States Immi-
gration and Naturalization Serv-
ice registered 89,810 new immi-
grants from 153 countries legally
living in New York City. They
ranged from 16,257 arrivals from
the Dominican Republic to one
each from Brunei, Angola and
Western Samoa.
Tens of thousands of illegal ali-
ens also came to the city, swelling
PlaAi Cinema
Starting Friday
Death Wish 4 -R
starring Charles Bronson
Like Father. Like Son- PG-1,
the ranks of immigrant neighbor-
hoods such as Washington
Heights in upper Manhattan,
Jackson Heights in Queens, and
Crown Heights in Brooklyn.
Overall, 2.3 million of New York's
7 million people were born out-
side the United States.
The most prominent of New
York's new immigrant entrepre-
neurs are the Koreans, whose
numbers grew in the late 1960s
liter the liberalization of U.S.
immigration laws and surged in
the 70s as the first arrivals sum-
moned their families.
The early Korean immigrants
were professionals - doctors,
nurses, pharmacists, scholars,
artists and engineers, highly edu-
cated people seeking better op-
portunities in the United States.
At the end of the '60s the Korean
community in New York num-
bered about 2,000. with a handful
See IMMIGRANTS, page!2
IB wm M Wk M M Clip-N-Save IB �� �� �� �
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
a nd froze n fogu rt!
321 E. 10th St. Greenville (next to Wendy's) 758 OOOO
Buy 1 Frozen Yogurt Sundae or Blend-in. Get 1
12 Price
one coupon per order please coupon food thru November 11.1007
� �

I
I
I
I

starring Dudley Moore
Hiding Out-PG 13
starring John Crver
stationery strwp on
all run bv Indian immi
th Avenue -
migrants be-
Starts Friday
Witches of Eastwick - R
starring Jack Nicholson
$1.50 All Times
Jf�Wl!IM:U3lFrAtc TIL CHILDREN r-A
m�!lJ-li'lyftgmftflU"sr 5:3u I anytime J
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
Starts Friday
STEEL DOWN
Rated R
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
Held Over
Rated R Alice Cooper in
PRINCE OF DARKNESS
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
Starts Friday
SOMEONE TO WATCH OVER ME
Rated R
2:00-4:30-7:00-9:20
�iii mi
�� ������ �� �������:���' uu
" 1 �� d
'ri
s
'H
THE WASH PUB '
is an equal opportunity
advertiser!
We offer our specials to both sexes no matter
what age, race or religious
conviction they might be.
Monday - DRAFT & DRYER DAY 250 Draft & 25? for 16
minutes on the Dryers.
Tuesday - TWO FOR ONE DA Y Wash one load of clothes, the
2nd wash in on us.
Wednesday - SOAP & SUDS DAY 7 5t Long Neck Bottle Beer
and Free Soap
MonFri. - FLUFF & FOLD SPECIAL 8 a.m10 a.m. drop
off 350 a pound.
T
K
E
2510 E. 10th St. CAR
752-5222 WASH
Every
Sun.
2:00
2 For 1 Washes
Pay For One Get One -
I
FREE expires 113087
Lb ������ � � ���� ����
What would you do on stage
for 5 minutes for $1,1001?
r0M� 0N�! C0M� fllll
COME SEE THE DARING EXPLOITS ofthe-j' TOTALLY UNINHIBITED
ABNORMAL!
u.vt-jrj.ivife
SENSUAL A SENSATIONAL!
ALTOGETHER
RIQINA
X UK n�
profitable
TU�SrW
What is the
WACKIEST
MOST UNINHIBITED
ZANNIEST
ORIGINAL
SILLIEST
Entertaining
MOST DRAMATIC'
DARING
. OR
I hat hj woulJ IVrtiH-in
" s for r.
l,100n?
Thai isn't
ILLEGAL
IMMORAL
FATTENING
TUESDAYS
ifto!
The Club
f t The Club
207 W. Greenville Blvd.
For more details call the Rio at 355-5000
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream jgL
and'frozen yogurt! ' K
;321 K. 10th St. Greenville next to Wendy's) 758 OOOO
VOTED THE NATIONS 1 VANILLA
NOW DELIVERS
Order your favorite ice cream treat and we'll bring it to your door
FREE Delivery with this coupon
thru November 11.1967
Clip-N-Save
one coupon per onter plcaic coupon good thru November 11.1967
MHMHMiaiBI Clip-N-Save � ����iMMM
X
HILTON INN
;
lflf CharleyO's Choices
Broccoli Cheese Melt
Fresh liroccoli Ioikti'Mcs stuffed with herbal i es�?
buttermilk buttered tuui deep fried to i golden brown.
$3.95
Roasted CornCrabmeat Chowder
Fusli roasted com wUhcrabmeat, green onions. celery, u rbs and a U m
cilartfro topping. $2 95
Jack Daniels Ribcye
('twice cut ribeie sti'nk seasoned with our dock
marinade.
$9.95
Sweet Potato Pineapple Cake
Witlx coconut cream frosting.
S2.50
207 S. W. Greenville Blvd. - 355-5000
,i
hgnksgiving
KROGER
All Meat
Wieners
99
Favorites mpL

ii
DIET PEPSI.
PE�SI FREE OR
Pepsi
Cola
A
CAROLINA PRIDE
All Meat
Bologna
X
12
Oz.
Pkg
"J29
BOLOGNA L
V
FLEECE
Paper
Towel
Jumbo
Roll
39c
SHELLED
Pecan
Halves
Lb.
MINUTE MAID REGULAR
COUNTRY STYLE OR
CALCIUM PLUS
Orange GaV
Juice cm
99c
GOLDEN. RIPE
Dole
Bananas
39

OLDE ITALIAN BRAND
PEPPERONI OR
KROGER
English
Muffins-
RED OR WHITE I
40 CT SIZE
Florida
Grapefruit
3!119
WkW Pkgs �?
2 88
ASSORTED
ASSORTED
Texas Gold
Ice Cream
2 Gal. mA
Ctns
Fresh Baked
Cookies
$
Doz
�f99
�?� r MM HinniH �-
tM "f� ��09t" �.���
� � SO �- On O �" �"
����" �0 �Ow' T0

,��- o�' if��
OPEN 7
600 Greer,
URS EVERYDAY
? Blvd - Greenville
&mmimm0uma0mmmltmar1i9t in
�i��� . m
1
A
j





?-
�:���� f
f (lf i rx��iV � I in mini
t I
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN movfuhep 5, 1Q87
TT111I1IIITTT
Pop star's safe reveals Hollywood memories
TIXIXXT11IHTTTrT
Ivalkin'The Plank
LOS ANGELES (AP)-A safe
sealed by crooner Rudy Vallee in
1942 held love letters from
Dorothy Lamour, Hedy Lamarr
and Alice Faye along with other
Hollywood memorabilia.
The contents of the safe, which
was opened Tuesday, were part ot
a collection of Vallee's sheet mu-
sic, records, correspondence and
other material purchased by the
Thousand Oaks Library for
$275,000, officials said.
at a time when Hobwood was
doing very little to perserve it-
self said Marvin Paige, a casting
director and archivist who at-
tended the event
The love letters were the biggest
Rudy started collecting things surpnse and will be returned to
Nominations requested for hackneyed words
SAULT STE. MARIE, Mich
(AP)-An English language
cleanup crew at Lake Superior
State College is accepting nomi-
nations for its latest edition of
improper, misused or hackneved
words and phrases.
Nominations for the "New
Year's Dishonour List of Words
Banished from the Queen's Eng-
lish for General Usclessness, Mis-
, Mai or Over-Use" will be ac-
cepted from Nov. 15 through Dec.
15, the college said.
The list has been released each
New Year's Day since 197d and
Immigrants
find new jobs
Continued from pagell
of Korean-owned stores serving
the needs of the ethnic commu-
nity.
Now. after 20 years, we have in
New York City 200,000 Korean-
Americans and 9,500 Korean
mom-and-pop stores savs Sung
Soo Kim, director of the Korean
American Small Business Service
Center of New York
Koreans are opening stores in
all of New York's multifold busi-
ness and residential neighbor-
hoods. They have revived and
updated two tradesdominated by
Italian and Jewish immigrants a
generation ago. green groceries
and fish markets.
In some neighborhoods, three
and four Korean grocers per block
display neat and colorful pvra-
mids of polished apples, pears
and oranges on sidewalk stands.
Open 16 to 24 hours a dav, the
groceries have adapted to fit the
times - hot and cold salad bars
cater to New York's growing
numbers of young professionals.
There are 1300 Korean green
grocers in New York, 85 percent of
the city's total, and the same
number of fish markets, where
you can get fish scaled and fried.
Ten years ago Korean families
owned 30 groceries.
"There was vacuum savs
Hosea Lee, who heads the Korean
Produce Association at the
Hunt's Point Market in the Bronx,
where the grocer's starts at 4 a.m.
"The first generation of Jews and
Italians tried to give the business
to the second generation, but thev
didn't want it. The business was
dying
Koreans have made the green
grocery trade something of an
ethnic franchise, with stores and
equipment passed on from one
Korean immigrant to the next.
Their business network also in-
cludes a centuries-old tradition of
pooling resources in what
amounts to an informal credit
union known as a "kyeh
About a dozen families or inti-
mate friends contribute a fixed
sum of money each month- anv-
where from $100 to $2,000. The
"kyeh" meets over a meal in one
of the 150 Korean restaurants in
Flushing, Sunnyside or other
Queens neighborhoods along
what the immigrants call the
"Lucky 7" elevated subwav line.
A different family takes home the
cash at each monthly gathering,
normally using it for business
improvements.
The practice has fueled expan-
sion; the one-time grocer is a
building owner now. There are
about 10 Korean contractors in
New York who specialize in re-
modeling stores for Korean entre-
preneurs.
South Asian immigrants - in-
cluding Indians, Pakistanis and
Bangladeshis - have helped in-
crease the number of sidewalk
newsstands by 30 in the last two
years to almost 300. The trade had
sunk to all-time lows in the early
'80s.
"They are very visible. When
you walk in New York you see
dozens of Indian newsstands
within a few blocks says Par-
matma Saran, a sociology profes-
sor at Baruch College and author
of the "Asian Indian Experience
in the United States" who emi-
grated from India in 1967.
"Most see it as a stopgap ar-
rangement because it's hard work
-16 to 18 hours a day Saran says.
afterfeel" on the label of a bottle of
skin lotion.
To nominate a word, write:
Banish, Lake Superior State Col-
ege, Sault Ste. Mane MI 49783.
published in poster torm.
The 1987 list included "after-
feel nominated by Denise M.
Brummel of Hammond, Ind who
spotted the phrase "no ereasv
the actresses, said Chris Harris,
the late singer's publicist.
The Thousand Oaks Library's
special collection covering
American radio and television
alsoacquired more than500boxes
of material and the contents of
several file cabinets from the Val-
lee estate.
Vallee, who became the
country's first pop singing sensa-
The safe was opened in a small
theater in Vallee'shomeattheend
of a driveway dubbed "Rue de
Vallee" in the Hollywood Hills
overlooking Los Angeles.
Among the first items Vallee's
widow, Eleanor, plucked from
the dull gTeen strongbox was a
yellowed check for $100 made out
to Vallee's first wife, Fay Webb.
Mrs. Vallee,
years after he had closed the safe.
Among the other items Mrs
Vallee pulled out of the safe were
the original manuscript for "The
Vagabond Lover sheet music,
an autographed photo of actor
John Barrymore; a large photo-
graphic negative of Vallee and the
Connecticut Yankees, one of his
first bands; a magaphone; a pistol;
cigarette cases; a newspaper
headlining the Japanese attack
iboo Mocmm Hutu ��
3 ita'viHwviniiiE (&A
iuvlAll!WtfN7
. reacting with a
t.on during the 1920s with "The touch of dismay, later explained against Pearl Harbor, a 1931 stock
h.tfenpoof Song, died July 2, that she married the celebrated certificate and various mov.c
1986, at age 84. Vagabond Lover" in 1949, seven posters.
WHo vfoil
V�c.6tfEw
a-ao
E
EXTRA LOW
PRICES!
Food lion Grade A 10.14 L�s A�g
Fresh Cut Assorted Chops
QUARTER PORK LOINS
Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday, November 8, 1987.
We Reserve The Right To Limit
Quantities On Ail items.
'fcril i & 1 nwl -1
r�
C

Tasty
GWALTNEY
BACON
U.S. No. 1
WHITE POTATOES
$199
20 Lb. Bag
California Thompson
Fresh
GREEN UjLm mmm m
BROCCOLIGRAPES
1 � � o
�v ��?
. A
. 1
�. 'IPS
r �
S-Zt
Fenster
1 Lb.
Chicken
Breasts
$128
Lb.
Holly Farms Grade A � Family Pack
BunchV
2 Liter - Pepsi-Free, Diet Pepsi, Diet
Pepsi-Free
Old
Milwaukee
$199
Pkg. of 6 - 12 Or Cans
$269
Pkg. of 6 - 12 0z. Cans Ref. ft it.
y
EXTRA LOW PRICES Everyday
vief-
a�'
Vea
-AIT
289m
16 0z. Bca
Del Monte
Vegetables
3$1
16 Oz. Cut Or French Style Green
Beans16 Oz. Whole Kernel Or Cream
Style Corn17 Oz. Sweet Peas
Duncan Hines 11 Bake-Rite
Cakejixes 11 Shortening
99
Del Monte 1 (Budget Gourmet
Pudding cups Dinners
994 $149
18.25 Oz. -
Assorted Flavors
4 Pack - ChocolateVanilla
Chocolate FudgeBanana
Evaporated
Milk
10 0z. - Assorted Frozen
Charmin
Toilet Tissue
36 0z.
4 Pack � WhiteBlueYellow
H 12 Oz. - Food Lion
Sturdyware
Plates
1 Lb. � Quarters
Squeeze Parkay
Margarine 1 Lb. .99
leed
50 Ct. � 8 78"
Li- � CMMi
I
I
iOWRwr,
fLTiLTHEFir
(
�an to anOn 4rtrowrt
m o '
1 3Pf4?
mti&)4
A

H
j
J





s" :�"�� �� ���
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN Mnvnumcp 5, 1987
Pop star's safe reveals Hollywood memories
LOS ANJrP! PC iapa �- j-t-j.
ralkin The Plank
LOS ANGELES (AD-A safe
sealed by crooner Rudv Vallee in
1942 held love letters from
Dorothy Lamour, Hcdv Lamarr
and Alice Faye along with other
Hollywood memorabilia.
The contents of the safe, which
wasopened Tuesday, were part of
a collection of Vallee's sheet mu-
sic, records, correspondence and
other material purchased bv the
Thousand Oaks Library for
$275,000, officials said.
"Rudy started collecting thing
at a time when Holywood was
doing very little to perserve it-
self said Marvin Paige, a casting
director and archivist who at-
tended the event.
The love letters were the biggest
surprise and will be returned to
Nominations requested for hackneyed words
CAITTT CTT kiinn- �� .
SAULT STE. MARIE, Mich
(AP)-An English language
cleanup crew at Lake Superior
State College is accepting nomi-
nations for its latest edition o!
improper, misused or hackneyed
words and phrases.
Nominations for the "New
Year's Dishonour List of Words
Banished from the Queen's Eng-
lish for General Uselessness, Mis-
, Mai or Over-Use" will be ac-
cepted from Nov. 15 through Dec.
15, the college said.
The list has been released each
New Year's Day since 1976 and
Immigrants
find new jobs
Continued from pagell
of Korean-owned stores serving
the needs of the ethnic commu-
nity.
Now, after 20 years, we have in
New York City 200,000 Korean-
Americans and 9,500 Korean
mom-and-pop stores says Sung
Soo Kim, director of the Korean
American Small Business Service
Center of New York
Koreans are opening stores in
all of New York's multifold busi-
ness and residential neighbor-
hoods. They have revived and
updated two trades dominated bv
Italian and Jewish immigrants a
generation ago green groceries
and fish markets.
In some neighborhoods, three
and tour Korean grocers per block
display neat and colorful pyra-
mids of polished apples, pears
and oranges on sidewalk stands
Open lb to 24 hours a dav, the
groceries have adapted to fit the
� 'i. - hot and cold salad bars
cater to New York's growing
numbers of young professionals.
There are 1,300 Korean green
grocers in New York, 85 percent of
the city's total, and the same
number of fish markets, where
you can get fish scaled and fried.
Ten years ago Korean families
owned 30 groceries.
"There was vacuum savs
Hosea Lee, who heads the Korean
Produce Association at the
Hunt's Point Market in the Bronx,
where the grocer's starts at 4 am
"The first generation of Jews and
Italians tried to give the business
to the second generation, but thev
didn't want it. The business was
dying
Koreans have made the green
grocery trade something of an
ethnic franchise, with stores and
equipment passed on from one
Korean immigrant to the next.
Their business network also in-
cludes a centuries-old tradition o(
pooling resources in what
amounts to an informal credit
union known as a "kveh
About a dozen families or inti-
mate friends contribute a fixed
sum of money each month- any-
where from $100 to 52,000. The
"kyeh" meets over a meal in one
of the 150 Korean restaurants in
Flushing, Sunnyside or other
Queens neighborhoods along
what the immigrants call the
"Lucky 7" elevated subway line.
A different family takes home the
cash at each monthly gathering,
normally using it for business
improvements.
The practice has fueled expan-
sion; the one-time grocer is a
building owner now. There are
about 10 Korean contractors in
New York who specialize in re-
modeling stores for Korean entre-
preneurs.
South Asian immigrants - in-
cluding Indians, Pakistanis and
Bangladeshis - have helped in-
crease the number of sidewalk
newsstands by 30 in the last two
years to almost 300. The trade had
sunk to all-time lows in the early
'80s.
"They are very visible. When
you walk in New York you see
dozens of Indian newsstands
within a few blocks says Par-
matma Saran, a sociology profes-
sor at Baruch College and author
of the "Asian Indian Experience
in the United States" who emi-
grated from India in 1967.
"Most see it as a stopgap ar-
rangement because it's hard work
-16 to 18 hours a day Saran says.
atterfeel" on the label of a bottle of
skin lotion.
To nominate a word, write.
Banish, Lake Superior State Col-
lege, Sault Ste. Mane MI 49783.
published in poster form.
The 1987 list included "after-
feel nominated by Denise M
Brummel of Hammond, Ind who
jJDOtted the phrase "no creasv
the actresses, said Chris Harris,
the late singer's publicist.
The Thousand Oaks Library's
special collection covering
American radio and television
also acquired more than500 boxes
of material and the contents of
several file cabinets from the Val-
lee estate.
Vallee, who became the
country's first pop singing sensa-
tion during the 1920s with "The
Whiffenpoof Song died July 2
1986, at age 84.
The safe was opened in a small
theater in Vallee's home at theend
of a driveway dubbed "Rue de
Vallee" in the Hollywood Hills
overlooking Los Angeles.
Among the first items Vallee's
widow, Eleanor, plucked from
the dull green strongbox was a
yellowed check for $100 made out
to Vallee's first wife, Fay Webb.
Mrs. Vallee, reacting with a
touch of dismay, later explained
that she married the celebrated
"Vagabond Lover" in 1949, seven
years after he had closed the safe
Among the other items Mrs
Vallee pulled out of the safe were
the original manuscript for "The
Vagabond Lover sheet music,
an autographed photo of actor
John Barrymore; a large photo-
graphic negative of Vallee and the
Connecticut Yankees, one of his
first bands; a magaphone; a pistol,
cigarette cases; a newspaper
headlining the Japanese attack
against Pearl Harbor; a 1931 stock
certificate and various movie
posters.
EXTRA LOW
PRICES
Food Lion Grade A
i
10-14 Lbs. Avg
Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday, November 8, 1987.
� V �. 'ill
Fresh Cut Assorted Chops
QUARTER PORK LOINS
a:
We Reserve The Right To Limit
Quantities On All Items.
$158
Tasty
GWALTNEY
BACON
W


U.S. No. 1
WHITE POTATOES
i-vyW
c?
v
JM
$199
Oft II
20 Lb. Bag
aiifornia Thompson
Seedless Or Red
RAPES
ftiS
t�a

Fenster
1 Lb.
Chicken
Breasts
$128
Lb.
Holly Farms Grade A - Family Pack
2 Liter � Pepsi-Free, Diet Pepsi, Oiet
Pepsi-Free
Pkg. of 6 - 12 0 Cans
$269
Pkg- of 6 - 12 0z. Cans R�f. 4 It.
EXTRA LOW PRICES Everyday
fi�
289�
16 0z.
Del Monte
Vegetables
3$1
16 Oz. Cut Or French Style Green
Beans16 Oz. Whole Kernel Or Cream
Style Corn17 Oz. Sweet Peas
Del Monte Budget Gourmet
Pudding cups Dinners
994 $149
4 Pack - ChocolateVanilla
Chocolate FudgeBanana
Duncan Hines
Cake Mixes
18.25 0z. -
Assorted Flavors
42 Oz.
36 Oz.
Charmin
Toilet Tissue
Evaporated
Milk
4 Pack - WhiteBlueYeliow
12 Oz. - Food Lion
Sturdyware
Plates
10 0z. - Assorted Frozen
Parkay Margarine
j:n, : �
S llitr
JT5
fVerkilli
1 Lb. - Quarters 'l
Squeeze Parkay
Margarine 1 u. .99
50 Ct. � 8 78"
40 Lb.
keed
I
s
SB
"7
�un mt MMn antracm
.(XWANT,
RlTiLTHEWT
(ffr Clf
"S
V
;
u
-
1





memories
losed tho safe.
r items Mrs
the safe wore
script foi "The
(t music,
( t actor
� photo-
TTIlIllllllIITTllllI�lIllllHll�yTTT�MrTTttflMttlIlIfIITTTTTTTTTTIlII
COMICS PAGE
rTrrrnTTTTTTTTTTrTTTTyM�iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiTTilllll
ttalkiiT The Plank
; .v &u:Mm � Hutu's tti-
Bv A GUY loe And Justice
H GLOSSON
rices in this ad good thru
iwday, November 8, 1987.
" �wwwwmm'm�qmmmmmmmf
h
X
-rf






HIE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 5. 1987
Pirates begin quest for 6-5
mark Saturday against Owls
By TIM CHANDLER
spm� I ditar
East Carolina takes to the field
Saturday against Temple with the
goal of the entire season resting on
the outcome.
1 he Pirates' season-long goal
has been to finish the year with a
winning record. With only two
games remaining to be played
and ECU holding a 4-5 mark, it is
obvious that the Pirates must win
contests in order to achieve
oal. !
S c feel like thai perhaps this is:
the most important game in three
years that we've played in our1
,1111
:X U head coach Art!
� � said "We're in a position
thai we ve been trying to get into
tor three years now. We're in a'
position that it we win our last,
:u, ballgames we're gonna have
��� inning season.
And this is something that we !
not enjoyed in the pas! the
e years anyway
ol that considered, the Pi-
rates should be fired up enough to j
run the 3 5 Owls right out ol Fick- j
Stadium Right?
Not se. according to Baker.
Hie thmg thai we have to
remember is that they're about as
r fora winasweare Baker
said. Il sa must football game for
both ol us. I hey're 3-5 and we're
4 i so we both still have opportu-
- al having a winning season
but we have to win our re-
maining games
the Owls enter the 1:30 p.m.
contest sporting a four-game los-
ing streak The record is some-
I misleading though. Temple
opened the season with three
wins in its first four contests in-
cluding a 24-21 road victory over
perennial-powerhouse Pitts-
burgh.
Then trouble set in. The Owls
outstanding junior running back
Todd McNair has missed the last
three con tests due to strained liga-
ments in his left loot and two
weeks ago, the Owls starting
quarterback fames Thompson left
the squad for personal reasons
after amassing 985 yards passing
in the first six games Also, the dif-
ficulty of the Owls schedule has to
considered.
"Ihere schedule has been very
tough just like ours' Baker said.
" rhey've played Penn State (a 27-
13 loss) Florida (a 34-3 loss) and
Boston College (a 28-7 loss)
McNair, who ranked seventh
nationally in rushing with 724
yards on 174 carries when he was
injured, is expected to return to
the lineup Saturday. That in itself
may be bad news for the Pirates.
According to Baker, McNair had
been compared to former Owl
running back Paul Palmer.
"He (McNair) practiced on
Thursday of last week Baker
)id. But. 1 expect they held him
outol last weeksgameUi 17-71oss
to Army) because it was being
played on astro-turf. That would
he real tough on someone's
ankle
Baker si id that in order for the
Pirates to have a shot at winning
the Temple contest, they will have
to control the line oi scrimmage.
Tor the last two years they've
handled us pretty well, particu-
larly on the line oi schmmage
Baker said. "Paul Palmer went for
a national record in rushing last
year and 1 think that we would
certainly remember that we've
lost to them the last two years
mainly because we failed to con-
trol the line of scrimmage and this
is something that will be on our
minds alot
Palmer tallied 349 yards rush-
ing last season, which was the sec-
ond-highest total in NCAA his-
tory, as the Owls rolled to a 45-28
win in Philadelphia. He is now a
member of the Kansas City Chiefs
of the NFL.
Baker said that he doesn't ex-
pect anything fancy from Temple
this year, just a good, hard-fought
football game.
"They are a football team that
doesn't do a lot of fancy things
Baker said. "They line up and
come right after you. You're not
gonna have a hard time locating
them, they are going to line up
and come looking for you
But, returning to the subject of
having the opportunity at a win-
ning season � that by itself might
be all the Pirates and fans need to
remember for Saturday to be a
successful day.
"Ifsexciting to know that wedo
have first this ballgame and then
the Southern Mississippi game
left Baker said. "If we win tins
ballgame then we have a great
opportunity to go into the final
game of the season and earn the
winning mark.
"1 think that tells you how im-
portant this game is to us and
players and coaches
No doubt coach, enough said.
By L. SHELL BAKER
Specialta The ra�t Caruhnun
Going up and down College
Hill you've probably noticed at
one time or another a group of
guys throwing the frisbee oppo-
site the commuter parking lot at
the bottom of the hill.
It these individuals seem to
resemble a fusion oi psychedelic
He-dyes sprinting up and down
the field it's more than likely the
Irah -
I hey aren't a group oi bitter
evangelists like the name might
imply; instead they are the mem-
bers of the Fast Carolina Ultimate
Team.
Ultimate is a highly-structured
game played with a frisbee that
incorporates different character-
istics of football, basketball,
j hockey and soccer. The game was
j invented around 19 in New
j Jersey by a group of Columbia
: 1 hgh School students. East Caro-
lina has been involved with the
game since the fall of 1980.
The bates are scheduling their
home tournament, Ultimaz X, for
Nov. 14-15, at the bottom of Col-
lege Hill. The tournament will
start around 11 a.m. Teams from
Wilmington, Appalachian and
other college teams will be attend-
ing the event.
Bob DeMan, president of the
Irates, says, "We love people to
come watch us play, because if
you come watch us play you'll
know what the game's about, and
if you know what the game's
about you may just be interested
enough to play
The game starts with the cap-
tain of each team flipping the fris-
bee to see who pulls first. The term
pull refers to the throw off, similar
to the kickoff in a football game.
Booters thinking about future
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sports Writer
East Carolina's final soccer
match against North Carolina
Wesleyan, scheduled for Nov. 3,
was cancelled because the Bish-
ops received a bid to the NCAA
division 111 soccer playoffs.
Weslevan would have been
unable to play ECU and meet
travel deadlines for the playoffs.
The Pirates will end the 87 sea- ;
son with a 3-13 record, one of their
worst in recent history. ECU lost
all of its Colonial Athletic Asso-
ciation matches finishing the sea- '
son 0-7.
teams are ranked regionally and
are 5-1-1 with GMU defeating
William & Mary earlier this sea-
son.
Lack of offense was the down-
fall for ECU this season. The Pi-
rates only scored 12 goals in 16
games and were shutout nine
times.
Jeff Corson accounted for a
quarter of the teams goals leading
the Pirates in scoring with three
goals. Robert Larrison and Roy
Andersch were next with two
apiece.
Larrison, a junior from Raleigh,
was the assist leader with four
TheCAA crown, decided bv the ,
best conference record, will likely and was recognized by Harvey as
be a shoot out between William & ; one of the hardest workers on the
Mary and George Mason. Both team.
Senior T J. Aspden in earlier '87 soccer action
"Larrison's motivation and
drive gave him a great attitude.
He constantly wanted to get bet-
ter Harvey said.
A key loss for ECU will be sen-
ior Larry Bennett who was a
leader for the team on and off the
field.
"Larry had to adjust to a lot of
changes throughout the season
Harvey said. "He played stopper,
sweeper and outside back and he
had a great winning attitude
ECU will be strong at keeper
next year with two starters return-
ing. Mac Kendall was the regular
starter until sidelined by a broken
thumb over halfway through the
season. He was replaced by fresh-
man Scott McCollough who
stepped in and did an admirable
job, getting his first collegiate
shutout last week against Greens-
boro College.
"I was really pleased with Scott
this year. He improved steadily
and reached the caliber of play
that he is capable of Harvey
said.
Harvey, in his first year as head
coach, took his dismal record in
stride as he made plans for next
season.
"Just having a season under our
belts and playing together helped
me as a coach Harvey said. "I
learned a lot
Harvey has already made plans
to begin recruiting for next year's
team with a stop at one of the
premiere prep tournaments, the
Capital Cup tournament in Wash-
ington D.C. Offense, offense, of-
fense will be at the top of the shop-
ping list.
"What I'm really looking for is
someone who is big and can shoot
like crazy Harvey said.
Once the flip has been decided,
each team, which consists of
seven players, lines up on the
opposite end zones and waits for
the throw. Like basketball, once
stopped you are allowed to pivot
on one foot only.
The object of the game is to
throw the frisbee to your team-
mate into your opponents' end
zone to score a point. The disc
must be caught in the end zone
and not just thrown in it to score.
Last year in May, the Irates
demonstrated their talent at Tow-
son State University in Maryland
by winning the collegiate Mid-
Atlantic Sectionals. ECU then
placed third in the Regionals held
at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg,
Va with Princeton in first place
and Carnegie-Mellon in second.
These three teams and the top
teams from the other four regions
went to the Nationals at Penn
State May 16-17. The Irates ended
up the season placing 12th out of
14 in theentire United States colle-
giate Ultimate tournament.
One of the mosi unique aspects
of an ultimate game is that it is
self-officiated. There are no refe-
rees. The players are on their
word to call plays as they are in-
stead of how they want them to
be. If you foul someone it is your
responsibility to call it.
'There are disagreements
sometimes, but they usually get
ironed out pretty quickly says
Randy Allen, one of the members
of the Irates.
According to the Irates, the
main concern of everyone playing
the game is to play with the "spirit
of the game The "spirit" is being
honest and fair in the actions you
make while playing the game and
being able to shake hands with
everyone afterwards. Complete
and total sportsmanship.
If you are interested in watch-
ing or playing Ultimate, the Irates
usually practice on Tuesday,
Thursday, and Sunday after-
noons. According to John Welsh,
one of the two team captains, the
team is welcoming new players to
come out because they are start-
ing to train people for the Nation-
als now.
DeMar, the other team captain
says, "Just come down and watch
us play. If you want to play and
you don't know how to play we'll
explain it to you real quick and
put you on the field because
there's no better way to learn than
just start playing
Out of Bounds
Molloy falters in forecast poll
By PAT MOLLOY
AMisUnl Sport Editor
Football, football, football
that's what seems to be upper-
most on my mind since I took firm
control of last place in the "Fear-
less Football Forecast" � a posi-
tion which, until now, had been
dominated by my good friend
and fellow Buffett fan, Chancellor
Eakin.
Now you see, when the big guy
was in last place, the rest of us
doing the picks had a good laugh
behind his back. Not that Richard
is the type of guy you want to
laugh at automatically�he's not.
We simply thought he didn't
know diddly about collegiate
football.
I no longer consider the chan-
cellor to be a football illiterate. I
now realize that he is, in fact, a
genius.
It was his style that had me so
confused.
One weekend the boss would
pick Alabama to upset Tennessee
(a pick that showed tremendous
insight into the workings of the
game), and the next he would pick
ECU to clobber FSU (a pick that
really didn't show too much of
anything).
"How does he do it?" I won-
dered week after week, beer after
beer. "How does he pick such a
close game one week, and then When the picks are tough such
lose his shirt on a game where the as the FSUAuburn game I
point spread is expected to equal reccommcnd tequila. Dark'or
the national debt of Uganda?" clear - it's up to you. But make
My questions were answered sure it's Pepe Lopez There's
"ZrJWh�u i h?PP�ned uP�n something about Wsftmlcy Pan-
anoW phone b,I. o the great one. cho that makes the decision3, Eftte
HuSanTLCa"St0t,heWhitC CaKSier May � the color
nouse, and the Kremlin, were scheme.
nine calls to Jean Dixon of the And lastly, there's positioning
c� inquirer. Now this is crucial, in that all
suddenly, it all made sense. l�mbs must be totally relaxed I've
Of course, Richard's method seen people do this wrong and
isn t the hardest to figure out. For end up in a coma.
weeksl'vehad people stumped as Once you're relaxed, drink ex-
to how I can pick a loser faster actly 17 shots of tequila, and do a
than most people blink. head stand.
It's really not that difficult, once This may sound silly at first but
you get the hangover of it. The has been proven legitimate in
trick is to not put so much thought laboratories across the nation
�rea�y ,ike , � Wlth JTJZ&SlS
someone ugly ,� ,ha, lhc more stand, throw down obofn�t
yonconcentrate, the .ess fun you Cie W, ZZigfg
Z l but life ain't Drettv
You have to cloud the mind a bit Wait
SrLSS u Now then- � you're spend-
IS H"81 unor- in8a equality timeinihSSS
thodox, for sure; but if you give it room askimT T� E2S , "
a go, I think you'll find fi Zto dtiTanJSC
matter which team wins, you still scream ou your choSS to�?
come out on top. �w " ff�"88 to you-
�'hJ"8"l�ve,odo,s J5ffi�KliS?"
decide on what tvoe of aMknfcnl i� i�;�� � re
made (Of course this involves be able to comZLZ"1,nev1er
L� T Karr You make the
Which Te
COLLEGE PARK, Md (AP)
Which University of Marylarx
football team is going to sh
for its game against Perm
Saturday?
The one that shut out
ously undefeated Wal
and roared from behind ii
fourth quarter to stun Duke i n
her this season?
Or the one thai cam
as a pancake last veek in a
loss to North Carolin i
Terrapins needed to wii
their Atlanta Coast
championship hopes i
"I wish I had the ar - �
Syracuse coa
CHAPEL HILL, N.
Syracuse baskt tl ill
Boeheim said ! -
that suspended cei
and forward St . �
won't be playii
angemen take or N
in the Hall ol lam,
sic.
North Carolina
Smith Tuesdaj
Reid, a sophon-u n
a junior, for the first
1987-88 season Rei :
nail were arrested afl
tation Oct. 24 al
Raleigh nightclub
scheduled Nov. 16
County Distm-t C
"We feel the rea
uled the game is bt
wanted to play a gr i
Boeheim said in a I
Intramural Dej:
receives open lei
Dear IM-REC Services:
On behalf of all the feathered
species around the area. 1 must
protest the running of the 1987
Intramural Turkey Trot. I can per-
sonally speak for mysell
least 10 of my cUviot obbiera
uhci 1 say that there is NO WAY
you can expect us to trot around
ijQr�envine, N C. when it's so close
to 'DOOM'S DAY You don't
know what it's like, waiting all
year, getting fatter and fatter by
the minute, eating your face off,
knowing you'll never see C1
mas!
You people need to get a clue'
We know that as soon as we hit the
pavement for the 2 mile trot,
Canteen Corporation will be
waiting on every corner armed
with finely sharpened axes aim-
ing for our jugulars! I don't mean
to put a damper on your plans or
anything but we don't feel too
thankful at this point! Eat OUR
heart out-NOT MINE
Sincerely.
Ticked Turkey & Company
Dear T. T. & C:
You've missed the point, tor al
least you've dodged it tor a
while). The Intramural Turkey
Trot is for faculty, staff and stu-
dentsof ECU. The 2 mile run start-
ing at Harrington Field will be
held at 4:00 p.m. November 23.
IM-REC Services in coopera-
tion with Canteen Corporation
(ECU Dining Services) is putting
on the event in YOUR honor!
Unfortunately, some of your pals
may be involved in the awards
ceremony, but what better way to
end an otherwise miserable exis-
tence than bv being the tirst place
trophy. Runners up receive a
pumpkin pie, and you don't see
those big orange gourds com-
plaining-do you?!
We can offer you a little hope
though. Tell vour 'boss' to register
(
SpecialsonI 3.95
Monday chicken FLAUTA
Tuesday - ENCHILADA SI EZJ
Vednesdav BEEF TOSTAOA
Thursday - FLAUTA DELMAR
Fndav BEEF CHIMICHANGA
D
521 CoUnche St
W wi��ii�
picks.

)A
j
,�.� j






11 K 5 l87
nament
n their
are m-
-
nbers
irates, the
$1 and fair in the actions you
make while playing the game and
being able to shake hands with
everyone afterwards. Complete
total sportsmanship.
Ir you are interested in watch-
ing or playing Ultimate, the Irates
usually practice on Tuesday,
Thursday, and Sunday after-
noons. According to John Welsh,
one of the two team captains, the
team is welcoming new players to
come out because they are start-
mi; to train people for the Nation-
al- now.
De.Mar, the other team captain
says, "Just come down and watch
us play. If you want to play and
you don't know how to play we'll
explain it to you real quick and
put you on the field because
there's no better way to learn than
just start playing "
in forecast poll
a ea 1
Of
and then
where the
�qua I
answered
happened upon
of the great one
alls to the White
� Kremlin, were
Dixon of the
Can
Ir
nse
method
jure out. For
When the picks are tough, such
as the FSLAuhurn game, I
mmend tequila. Dark or
clear it's up to you. But make
sure it's Pepe Lopez. There's
something about his funky pan-
cho that makes the decision a little
easier Maybe it's the color
scheme.
And lastly, there's positioning.
Now this is crucial, in that all
limbs must be- totally relaxed. I've
seen people do this wrong and
end up in a coma.
Once you're relaxed, drink ex
ple stumped as
tick a loser faster actly 7 shots of tequila, and do a
lie blink head stand.
lthat difficult, once This may sound silly at first, but
�ngover of it. The u nas been proven legitimate in
It so much thought laboratories across the nation.
Once you have downed the
p having sex with shots, and completed the head-
-i that the more stand, throw down a gob of Little
the less fun you Debbie's. It's gruesome, I know;
but life ain't pretty.
loud the mind a bit Wait.
�� Now then, while you're spend-
somewhat unor- ing a little quality time in the bath-
I; but if you give it room, asking the Lord to let you
Su II find that no live to do it again, have a friend
�m wins, you still scream out your choices to you.
�� "We got Florida State at Au-
; you have to do is burn, Pat. What'H it be?"
type of alchohol is It is now, in your most apathetic
be decisions to be state, that you realize you'll never
rse this involves be able to concentrate on the
d you expect, picks, and you say "To hell with it.
Dr. Karr. You make the picks
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 3,1987 15
!
Which Terp team will battle Nittany Lions?
. � " vAP) - question Maryland Coach loo Thai �hmilH hr mntiuHnn ki nhvi i Rhimnro'c MnmA. "KUl i.�i;�Lw�v�mui v,ioh 1K1 u,k i.i
COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP)
Which University of Maryland
football team is going to show; up
tor its game against Penn State
Saturday?
The one that shut out previ-
ously undefeated Wake Forest
and roared from behind in the
fourth quarter to stun Duke ear-
lier this season?
Or the one that came out as flat
as a pancake last week in a 27-14
loss to North Carolina - a game the
Terrapins needed to win to keep
their Atlantic Coast Conference
i hampionship hopes alive1
1 wish 1 had the answer to that
question Maryland Coach Joe
Krivak said Tuesday at his weekly
press luncheon. "For the last three
or four weeks, we've gone in
spurts
If the Terps 4-4, are ever going
to be up for a game, this should be
the one.
Penn State, 6-2, has beaten them
the last 2b times the interstate ri-
vals have played, a streak that
dates back to 1961.
Maryland has come tantaliz-
mgly close to ending that streak in
recent seasons - losing to the Ni-
tany Lions by a total oi five points
over the past three meetings.
That should be motivation
enough for an inspired perform-
ance.
Still, Krivak isn't convinced -
despite the fact that a loss Satur-
day would all but ensure his
team's second straight non-win-
ning season.
"I really don't know he said.
"Maybe Saturday we'll come out
and jump around like a bunch of
Banshees. If they do, I'll be excited
about it. But 1 just don't know
Krivak announced sophomore
quarterback Neil O'Donnell
would be his starting quarterback
for Saturday's game, which will
be played at Baltimore's Memo-
rial Stadium.
O'Donnell made his first career
start last week against North
Carolina and completed 15 of 23
passes for 241 yards. He had one
touchdown and was intercepted
once before being replaced by
senior Dan Henning in the fourth
quarter.
Krivak said his decision to start
O'Donnell doesn't mean he's
given up on the rest of the season.
Instead, he explained, it is an at-
tempt suit his offense to kind of
defenses the Terps will be seeing
in their final three games.
'Neil is a little bit more mobile
(than Henning) and the next three
teams we play have a good pass
rush Krivak said. "That hurts
us. 1 think we would be better off
in that situation with a guy who
can move around a little better.
Neil is the guy we're going with
Defensively, Maryland's most
pressing task will be stopping
Penn State's junior tailback Blair
Thomas, who rushed for a career-
high 181 yards last week against
West Virginia.
"He's the kev to their offense
Krivak said, describing him as
"oneof the premier running backs
in college football
"He's got giHd speed, good
acceleration and he can catch balls
out of the backfield He's got the
ball about 50 percent of the time
they're on offense Krivak said.
UNC suspensions
i
Syracuse coach dislikes Heels' suspension
HILL, N.C
(AID -
basketball coach I lim
CHAPE1
s racuse
Boehetm said he's disappointed
� suspended center JR. Reid
: forward Steve Bucknall
won't be playing when the Or-
ngemen take on North Carolina
in the 1 lall of Fame Tip-Off Clas-
orth Carolina coach Dean
smith Tuesday suspended J.R.
Reid, a sophomore, and Bucknall,
a junior, for the first game of the
1987-88 season. Reid and Buck-
nail were arrested after a confron-
tation Oct. 24 at Shooters 11, a
Raleigh nightclub. A hearing is
scheduled Nov. lb in Wake
unty District Court.
We fee! the reason we sched-
uled the game is because we
wanted to play a great team
Soeheimsaid in a telephone inter-
view from Syracuse, N.Y. "We
think with those two guvs they
are a great basketball team. We
still think they are a good basket-
ball team
"We would love to play them at
full strength and let the best team
win added Bocheim. "When the
ball goes up I'm sure everyone
will forget who is thereand who is
not there. It will be Syracuse-
North Carolina
Syracuse, which lost in the
NCAA championship game to
Indiana last season, and North
Carolina will meet Nov. 21 in
Springfield, Mass.
"Although the players were
verbally harassed and pushed in
an effort to provoke some kind of
response, 1 am taking disciplinary
steps against them for not getting
cuit when the verbal harassment
started Smith said in a statement
released through the North Caro-
lina sports information office.
"This is a team maKer and will
be handled internally Smith
said. "However, since the suspen-
sions will be obvious, I am going
ahead and announcing that part
of my action
Paul James Doherty, who said
he was attacked by Reid and
Bucknall, said the two attacked
him without provocation.
The 6-foot-9 Reid, selected the
Atlantic Coast Conference rookie
oi the year last season, averaged
14.7 points and 7.4 rebounds a
game. The 6-6 Bucknall saw spot
action, averaging 3.7 points a
game.
"1 haven't had to deal with a
situation like this in the past
Smith said. "While I don't believe
physical action should ever settle
any confrontation, I realize inci-
dents like this are common occur-
rences across the country. But, we
have been lucky that in my 27
years as head coach that this is the
first time I've had to deal with a
matter such as this
Neither Reid nor Bucknall
would comment on the incident.
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) -
North Carolina basketball coach
Dean Smith said today he has
suspended basketball players JR.
Reid and Steve Bucknall for the
first game of the 1987-88 season.
Raleigh police charged the two
with simple assault after a con-
frontation at a Raleigh nightclub,
and Smith said the disciplinary
action stemmed from the inci-
dent.
Reid and Bucknall will be sus-
pended for the Tar Heels' season
opener against Svracuse on New.
21 in Springfield, Mass Smith
said in a prepared statement.
Intramural Department
receives open letters
Hear 1M-REC Services: j
On behalf of all the fe. thered
species around the area, 1 must
protest the running of the 1987
Intramural Turkev Trot. I c an per-
sonallv speak for myself and at
least 10 of mv closest gobblers
v,t.oi I say that there is (p WAY
you can expect us to trot ground
Careenville, N.C. when it's fo close
t( DCk5M'S DAY You don't
. what it's like, waiting all
' ir getting fatter and fatter by
the minute, eating vour fjace off,
knowing you'll never see Christ-
mas!
i ou people need to get a ch:e!
We know that as soon as we hit the
pavement for the 2 mile trot,
( anteen Corporation will be
waiting on every corner armed
with finely sharpened axes aim-
ing for our jugulars! I don't mean
to put a damper on your plans or
anything but we don't 'feel too
thankful at this point! Eajt YOL'R
heart out-NOT M1NE
Sincerely,
Ticked Turkey & Company
Dear T. T. & C:
You've missed the point, (or at
least you've dodged it for a
while). The Intramural Turkey
Trot is for faculty, staff and stu-
dentsof ECU. The 2 mile run start-
ing at Harrington Field will be
held at 4:00 p.m. November 23.
IM-REC Services in coopera-
tion with Canteen Corporation
(ECU Dining Services) is putting
on the event in YOUR honor!
Unfortunately, some of your pals
; may be involved in the awards
ceremony, but what better way to
end an otherwise miserable exis-
tence than by being the first place
j trophy. Runners up receive a
pumpkin pie, and you don't see
those big orange gourds com-
: plaining-do you?!
j We can offer you a little hope
though. Tell your 'boss' to register
for the event November 18 at 6:00
p.m. in Brewster D-103. Who
knows, maybe once he gets
started in the race, he'll never fin-
ish, and he'll croak before you do
I lave a good Christmas - OOPS! I
mean Thanksgiving.
Bom to Run F or Fun,
IM-REC Services
204 Memorial Gvm
757-6387
GORDONS
For CB Great Shapes
off With This Ad
rani nod to McDoiuld't 756-1009
Honor Program
Bright Students, Best Teachers, Small Classes
Coming This Spring:
Seminars
Women's LivesWomen's Stories
Droam and WishesWishes and
Dreams (HUM)
I iving on "Spaceship Earth" (SCI)
Psychology (SOC SCI)
This.
Literature of the Holocaust (FORD
Interpreting Literature (ENGL)
Women's Studies WOST)
Ethics (PHIL)
There's More:
ENGL 1200
HIST 1551
Phil mo
ENGL 1250
HIST 1553
SOC1 2110
ANT! I 1000
LIBS 1000
LIBS 3102
HLT11 1000
MATH 2172
SEED 3325
S & R Computer Associates, Inc.
VS&
School Special
Complete Computer
with Printer $1295
Lead.ng Edge Model D
2 floppy drives
SI 2k RAM
Monochrome graphics
LE wordprocessor
MS-DOS. GWBASIC
Citizen I 20D printer
Starter kit including
disks, paper and cable
ny student with a 3.4 G.P.A. qualifies tc ike Honors courses
any time. See Dr. David Sanders 212 Ragsdale
OKIDATA C3
LEADING EDGE
HEWLETT
PACKARD
530 Cotanche Street
( beside Bicycle Post )
Greenville, N.C. 27834
757-3279
110 Fait Fourth S�.
C"mTv C ?8t4
Come 88 on out
outside Dao and
enoy the best
charorotled food
tn town M�nu in-
ches burgers,
croissants, and
Mexcan entrees
(919) 732-MU
PARTY ANIMALS
Balloons Delivered in Costumes
Gorilla -Grams
Gator -Crams
Penquin for Hire
Birthdays or any occasion
830-1823

IF YOUTH PAYING MORE
THAN THIS FOR COPIES
YOU'RE GETTING BUFFALOED
At Kinko's we offer the highest quality copies at a very low
price Tn Kinko s For great copies And great deals
kinko'i
Great copies. Great people.
321E 10th Street
Mony - Friday 7t��n- lOtOOpn
(919)752-0875
Mhrtay 0ten - e.Wpm
rSpecialsonly 3.95
includes desa
ncludes dessert
Monday - CHICKEN FLAUTA
Tuesday - ENCHILADA SUIZ
Wednesday - BEEF TOSTADA
Thursday - FLAUTA DELMAR
Friday BEEF CHIMICHANGA
You 're invited
to lunch
at
521 Cotanche St.
757-1666
!i�
y ji �
� � i m m mi m
O

P





NO 1MH1 K 5, 1987
rnament
led
ttuir
re m-
ur
n
ie members
the
playing
y with the "spirit
� Spirit" is being
st and fair in the actions you
make while playing thegameand
being able to shake hands with
everyone afterwards. Complete
and total sportsmanship.
It you are interested in watch-
ing or playing Ultimate, the Irates
usually practice on Tuesday,
Thursday, and Sunday after-
noons. According to John Welsh,
one of the two team captains, the
team is welcoming new players to
come out because they are start-
ing to train people for the Nation-
als now.
DeMar, the other team captain
says, "Just come down and watch
us play. If you want to play and
you don't know how to play we'll
explain it to you real quick and
put you on the field because
there's no better way to learn than
just start playing "
in forecast poll
l' i b and then
a gam where the
expected to equal
bt of Uganda
were answered
happened upon
it one
to the White
h Kremlin, were
an Dixon of the
irer
ill made sense.
tichard's method
gureout For
�pie stumped as
:k a loser faster
Me blink.
hat difficult, once
Ingover of it. The
t mi much thought
having sex with
in that the more
the less fun you
loud the mind a bit
o
somewhat unor-
; but if you give it
)u'll find that no
�m wins, you still
you have to do is
ypeofalchoholis
be decisions to be
rse this involves
'd you expect,
When the picks are tough, such
as the FSUAuburn game, I
reccornmend tequila. Dark or
clear it's up to you. But make
sure it's Pepe Lopez. There's
something about his funky pan-
cho that makes the decision a little
easier Maybe it's the color
scheme.
And lastly, there's positioning.
Now this is crucial, in that all
limbs must be totally relaxed. I've
seen people do this wrong and
end up in a coma.
Once you're relaxed, drink ex-
actly 17 shots of tequila, and do a
head stand.
This may sound silly at first, but
it has been proven legitimate in
laboratories across the nation.
Once you have downed the
shots, and completed the head-
stand, throw down a gob of Little
Debbie's. It's gruesome, I know;
but life ain't pretty.
Wait.
Now then, while you're spend-
ing a little quality time in the bath-
room, asking the Lord to let you
live to do it again, have a friend
scream out your choices to you.
"We got Florida State at Au-
burn, Pat. What'll it be?"
It is now, in your most apathetic
state, that you realize you'll never
be able to concentrate on the
picks, and you say 'To hell with it,
Dr. Karr. You make the picks
0 �
w� iniiMia
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBERS, 1987 15
Which Terp team will battle Nittany Lions?
rnilFCF PARk M,1 liPi�i�, ��
COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP)
Which University of Maryland
football team is going to show up
tor its game against Penn State
Saturday?
The one that shut out previ-
ously undefeated Wake Forest
and roared from behind in the
fourth quarter to stun Duke ear-
lier this season?
Or the one that came out as flat
as a pancake last week in a 27-14
less to North Carolina - a game the
errapins needed to win to keep
their Atlantic Coast Conference
championship hopes alive?
1 wish I had the answer to that
question Maryland Coach Joe
Krivak said Tuesday at his weekly
press luncheon. Tor the last three
or four weeks, we've gone in
spurts
If the Terps 4-4, are ever going
to be up for a game, this should be
the one.
Penn State, 6-2, has beaten them
the last 2b times the interstate ri-
vals have played, a streak that
dates back to 1961.
Maryland has come tantaliz-
ingly close to ending that streak in
recent seasons - losing to the Ni-
tany Lions by a total of five points
over the past three meetings.
That should be motivation
enough for an inspired perform-
ance.
Still, Krivak isn't convinced -
despite the fact that a loss Satur-
day would all but ensure his
team's second straight non-win-
ning season.
"I really don't know he said.
"Maybe Saturday we'll come out
and jump around like a bunch of
Banshees. If they do, I'll be excited
about it. But I just don't know
Krivak announced sophomore
quarterback Neil O'Donnell
would be his starting quarterback
for Saturday's game, which will
be played at Baltimore's Memo-
rial Stadium.
O'Donnell made his first career
start last week against North
Carolina and completed 15 of 23
passes for 241 yards. He had one
touchdown and was intercepted
once before being replaced by
senior Dan Henning in the fourth
quarter.
Krivak said his decision to start
O'Donnell doesn't mean he's
given up on the rest of the season.
Instead, he explained, it is an at-
tempt suit his offense to kind of
defenses the Terps will be seeing
in their final three games.
"Neil is a little bit more mobile
(than Henning) and the next three
teams we play have a good pass
rush Krivak said. "That hurts
us. I think we would be better off
in that situation with a guy who
can move around a little better.
Neil is the guy we're going with
Defensively, Maryland's most
pressing task will be stopping
Penn State's junior tailback Blair
Thomas, who rushed for a career-
high 181 yards last week against
West Virginia.
"He's the key to their offense
Krivak said, describing him as
"oneof the premier running backs
in college football "
"He's got good speed, good
acceleration and he can catch balls
out of the backfield He's got the
ball about 50 percent of the time
they're on offense Knvak said.
UNC suspensions
Syracuse coach dislikes Heels' suspension
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) -
Svracuse basketball coach Jim
Roeheim said he's disappointed
.it suspended center JR. Reid
and forward Steve Bucknall
m t be playing when the Or-
men take on North Carolina
n the 1 lall of Fame Tip-Off pas-
North Carolina coach Dean
Smith Tuesday suspended! J.R.
Reid,a sophomore, and Bucknall,
nior, for the first game of the
1987-88 season. Reid and Buck-
nall were arrested after a confron-
tation Oct. 24 at Shooters II, a
Raleigh nightclub. A hearing is
scheduled Nov. 16 in Wake
( ounty District Court.
We feel the reason we sched-
uled the game is because we
wanted to play a great team
A eheim said in a telephone inter-
view from Syracuse, N.Y. "We
think with those two guvs they
are a great basketball team. We
still think they are a gcxxi basket-
ball team
"We would love to play them at
full strength and let the best team
win added Boeheim. "When the
ball givs up I'm sure everyone
will forget who is there and who is
not there. It will be Syracuse-
North Carolina
Syracuse, which lost in the
NCAA championship game to
Indiana last season, and North
Carolina will meet Nov. 21 in
Springfield, Mass.
"Although the players were
verbally harassed and pushed in
an effort to provoke some kind of
response, I am taking disciplinary
steps against them for not getting
out when the verbal harassment
started Smith said in a statement
released through the North Caro-
lina sports information office.
"This is a team matter and will
bo handled internally Smith
said. "However, since the suspen-
sions will be obvious, I am going
ahead and announcing that part
of my action
Paul James Doherty, who said
he was attacked by Reid and
Bucknall, said the two attacked
him without provocation.
The 6-foot-9 Reid, selected the
Atlantic Coast Conference rookie
of the year last season, averaged
14.7 points and 7.4 rebounds a
game. The 6-6 Bucknall saw spot
action, averaging 3.7 points a
game.
"I haven't had to deal with a
situation like this in the past
Smith said. "While I don't believe
physical action should ever settle
any confrontation, I realize inci-
dents like this are common occur-
rences across the country. But, we
have been lucky that in my 27
years as head coach that this is the
first time I've had to deal with a
matter such as this
Neither Reid nor Bucknall
would comment on the incident.
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) -
North Carolina basketball coach
Dean Smith said today he has
suspended basketball players JR.
Reid and Steve Bucknall for the
first game of the 1987-88 season.
Raleigh police charged the two
with simple assault after a con-
frontation at a Raleigh nightclub.
and Smith said the disciplinary
action stemmed from the inci-
dent
Reid and Bucknall will be sus-
pended for the Tar Heels' season
opener against Syracuse on Nov.
21 in Springfield, Mass Smith
said in a prepared statement.
Intramural Department
receives open letters
Dear IM-REC Services:
On behalf of all the feathered
species around the area, I must
protest the running of the 1987
Intramural Turkev Trot. I can per-
sonally speak for myself and at
least 10 of mv closest gobblers
wfcen t say that there is NO WAY
you can expect us to trot around
fjrqenviHe. N.C. when it's s&close
t( ' ' 'OM'S DAY You don't
ki what it's like, waiting all
ii getting fatter and fatter bv
the minute, eating your iace off,
� . ing you'll never see Christ-
i ou people need to get a clue!
We know that as soon as wehit the
pavement for the 2 mile trot,
Canteen Corporation will be
waiting on every corner armed
with finely sharpened axes aim-
ing for our jugulars! I don't mean
to put a damper on your plans or
anything but we don't feel too
thankful at this point! Eat YOL'R
heart out-NOT MINE
Sincerely,
Ticked Turkey & Company
Dear T. T. & C:
You've missed the point, (or at
east you've dodged it for a
while). The Intramural Turkey
Trot is for faculty, staff and stu-
dentsof ECU. The 2 mile run start-
ing at Harrington Field will be
held at 4:00 p.m. November 23.
IM-REC Services in coopera-
tion with Canteen Corporation
i ECU Dining Services) is putting
en the event in YOUR honor!
Unfortunately, some of your pals
� may be involved in the awards
ceremony, but what better way to
end an otherwise miserable exis-
. tence than by being the first place
: trophy. Runners up receive a
pumpkin pie, and you don't see
those big orange gourds com-
plaining-do you?!
We can offer you a little hope
�; though. Tell your'boss'to register
for the event November 18 at 6:00
p.m. in Brewster D-103. Who
knows, maybe once he gets
started in the race, he'll never fin-
ish, and he'll croak before you do
Have a good Christmas - OOPS! I
mean Thanksgiving.
Bow tv Run For Fun,
IM-REC Services
204 Memorial Gvm
757-6387
GORDONS
For CB Great Shapes
off With This Ad
as next to McDonald'�) 756-1003
Honor Program
Bright Students, Best Teachers, Small Classes
Coming This Spring:
Seminars:
Women's LivesWomen's Stories
Dream and WishesWishes and
Dreams (HUM)
Living on 'Spaceship Earth (SCI)
Psychology (SOC SCI)
Tlus:
Literature of the 1 iolocaust (FORD
Interpreting Literature (ENGL)
Women's Studies (WOST)
Ethics (PHIU
There's More:
ENGL 1200
HIST 1551
PHIL 1110
ENGL 1250
HIST 1553
soa 2no
ANTl 1 1000
LIBS 1000
LIBS 3102
HLTH 1000
MATH 2172
SEED 3325
Any student with a 3.4 G.P.A. qualifies to take Honors courses
any time. See Dr. David Sanders 212 Ragsdale
S & R Computer Associates, Inc.

School Special
Complete Computer
with Printer $1295
Leading Edge Model D
2 floppy drives
SI 2k RAM
Monochrome graphics
LE Aordprocessor
MS-DOS. GWBASIC
Citizen I 20D printer
Starter kit including
disks, paper and cable
OKIDATA
A
LEADING EDGE
HEWLETT
PACKARD
530 Cotanche Street
( beside Bicycle Post )
Greenville, N.C. 27834
757-3279
110 East Fourth St.
Crrrnv.We. NC gB4
Come s� on our
outside patio and
enjoy the best
charoroiled food
in town. Menu in
cU.des. burgers.
croissants, and
Meican entrees
I'M) 732-MS5
20
PARTY ANIMALS A
Balloons Delivered in Costumes
GonlU-Crams
Gator -Crams
Penquin for Mire
Birthdays or any occasion
830-1823
IF YOU'RE PAYING MORE
THAN THIS FOR COPIES
YOUHE GETTING BUFFALOED
At kinko's we offer the highest quality copies at a very low
price Tr Kinko s For great copies And great deals
kinkes
Great copies. Great people.
321E lOtti street
(919)752-0875
�:00�m - 6:00p�
zm.
rSpecialsonly 3.95
includes dessert
Monday CHICKEN FLAUTA
Tuesday � ENCHILADA SUIZ
Wednesday - BEEF TOSTADA
Thursday - FLAUTA DELMAR 1
Friday - BEEF CHIMICHANGA
You 're invited
to lunch
at
521 Cotanche St.
757-1666
� in mm �iinnpinmn N ii, mmummmmmmmmmmt
tl





16 THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 3,1987
Fearless Foothtall Fot'ecast
DEAN BUCHANkJ kj ML JrA wmJ BRIAN BAILEYTIM CHANDLERDr. RICHARD EAKINPAT MOLLOY
ECU Sports InformationWNCT-TV Sports DirectorSports EditorECU ChancellorAssistant Sports Editor
Last Week:Last Week:Last Week:Last Week:Last Week:
(7-3)(5-5)(5-5)(6-4)(3-7)
GAMESOverall:Overall:Overall:Overall:Overall:
(60-30)(59-31)(56-34)(49-41)(48-42)
temple at ECUECUECUECUECUECU
Clemson at UNCNorth CarolinaClemsonClemsonClemsonClemson
Alabama at LSULSULSUAlabamaAlabamaLSU
Fla. State at AuburnHa. StateFla. StateFla. StateFla. StateAuburn
1 Hike at Wake ForestWake ForestWake ForestDukeDukeWake Forest
Georgia at FloridaFloridaFloridaFloridaFloridaGeorgia
Virginia at Ga. TechGa. TechVirginiaVirginiaGa. TechVirginia
Illinois at IndianaIndianaIndianaIndianaIndianaIndiana
Boston Coll. at Notre DameNotre DameNotre DameNotre DameNotre DameNotre Dame
Stanford at Southern CalSouthern CalSouthern CalSouthern CalSouthern CalSouthern Cal
Crum says Clemson is ACC's top team
CHAPEL HILL. N.C. (AD -
When it comes to the Atlantic
istonference,Clemson is in a
iss by itself, North Carolina
I h Dick Crum says.
"They sure are Crum said
sday when asked if the Tigers,
the defending ACC champions,
were a level above the rest oi the
onference. "That's just where
j .ire. I think it's a true state-
tit that they are in their own
lass
rhey maybe are the best
Clemson team in the 10 vears I've
been here' Crum said at his
weekly news conference. "Thev
� complete. They have a good
ft use - very steady. Defensively
i xtreme speed and quickness.
And, oi course, thev alwavs have
a good kicking game
1 'ne game has been switched
from a 12:05 p.m. start to a 4 p.m.
to accommodate ESrN, which
will show the contest to a national
cable audience.
The lOth-ranked Tigers, 7-1
overall and 4-1 in the ACC, have
won the last five out of six meet-
ings with the Tar Heels, 5-3 and 3-
1. But, it's last season's 38-10 loss
at Clemson, S.C that Crum is still
worried about.
"Thev are a powerful ballclub
Crum said. "They really beat us
badly last year and I'm very con-
cerned about the effects that will
have on our team from the stand-
point of the game was out of con-
trol early and we didn't have
much of a chance
However, despite three losses,
Crum said he's happy with the
way his squad has played lately.
"You work all year to put your-
self in a position where you can at
least - toward the end of the sea-
son - be competitive to win the
conference championship he
said.
After North Carolina,
Clemson's only other ACC game
is at Maryland, while the Tar
Heels travel to Virginia and host
Duke.
Crum said tailback Torin Dorn,
injured since gaining more than
100 yards in the season-opening
game against Illinois, may see
some action. However, he said
Dom is still having difficulty in
making cuts with his sore ankle.
He's had a week longer to
heal, but as far as him playing I
don't think we're going to know-
that until we get into theballgamc
and see if we get in a position that
we have to put him in
"He will not play like he played
against Illinois Crum added.
Eric Starr, who has gained 461
yards and scored three touch-
downs, will start at tailback,
Crum said.
Starr will be going up against
one of the nation's top defenses.
Crum called Clemson's right
tackle Michael Dean Perry "an ex-
cellent player and the Tigers'
whole defensive front line "ex-
tremely good
"They can get off the ball and
run he said. "I just hope our kids
aren't going to be afraid of them
TAXPAYERS
with dependents
HERE'S A TAX TIP:
Beginning with youi 1987 income
tax return th.it 'u vmII tilt- in
1988, hi general!) must Iim social
iecurit numbers toi dependents
who are at Kist five years old In
the end oi V's It ,m ol oui
dependents do noi have this
number, ert an application sum
toj.n from tin' Social Securit)
office m out ,iui
� .i
LOW COST
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
Arxirtion from 3 to 18 weeks �t addition com Prrgruncy
Trtt. Birth Confrol and Proolrm Pregnancy Counseling, For
further information, call 832-0535 (toll free number 1-400-
532-S;M) between 9am and Sp m week-day. General anes-
thesia avadabk
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATTOHS
Tom Togs Factory Outlet
1900 Dickinson Avenue
Next Warehouse Sale Oct. 26th - Nov. 7th
Frarurma; Fashionable Fall Mwrhandl Casual Wear, and Famous Htands
Everything In S�Gf Eacrp Hwurry
l�tQuality�Overrun��Ckvout��Srl�cti .ireguUr
-lA(h
raOCAMBO h�ffj
it Famous Namrt That We Cannot Mention
at t
USjj
Trocadero Tank Tops, Tank Drwrs. Bicycle Pants. Walk Short, Mini Skirts 4 Tops
lilDj Camp Shirts. Shorts. Slacks. Pullovers & The Original T-Shirts. 100 Cotton Onaes)
tssM IttX T-Shirt
H vou arc a newcomer to town, we invite you to visit our store at 1900 Dfcckunson Avenue 11 you are going to
beach at Morehead City, visit our ne. I ion on Hwy 70 (just across from Bojangles )
tJJMUt
Hwy. 64 East Betweer
Bethel and Tarboro
Conctoc, N.C
Wed. - Sat. 9-5
Hwy. 70 West
Morehead City, NC.
Wed. - Sat. 9-5
I We Also Wholesale
Mastercard it Visa Accepted
Limit 4 of your choice
ARE GREAT
m Miller Lite BeerC
$4.99
12 pack-12 oz. cans
Reg. & Diet
Pepsi Cola
89 r
2 Liter
Additional Pepsi's & other flavors each 99c Bottle
Grade "A"
Whole Fryers
lb.
36 ?
Limit 3
Richfood Natural or Butter Flavor
Microwave Popcorn
10.5 oz.
Kraft Chilled QQA
Orange Juice
12 gallon carton
Taste-Great
Homogenized
Milk
12 gallon jug
990
Bounty Paper
Towels
Giant roll. Limit 3 rolls.
69 f
OPEN 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. MONDAY-SATURDAY,
SUNDAYS 1-6 p.m.
Campbell's
Tomato Soup
10 oz. can. Limit 6 cans
vamp&lh
99 28 ?
Tomato
ri
Hot Price From Tixe Tropics
Golden Ripe
Bananas
17$
lb.

Regular or Diet
Dr. Pepper & Sprite
2 liter bottle
990
FABRIC
Fab
Detergent
42 oz. box. Limit one.
99
Richfood Assorted Varities
Yogurt
6 oz. cup
390
Hot Food Bar!
Scoop up the Hot Meal of your choice for lunch or dinner!
Now Featuring Different lunch & Dinner menus! Our food
is always freshly prepared using only the finest
ingredients! Come See Us!
COME CELEBRATE WITH US
DURING OUR FIFTH ANNI-
VERSARY RICHFOOD BRAND
SALE! OVERTON'S OFFERS
YOU LOW, LOW PRICES ON
RICHFOOD BRANDS, PLUS
GREAT SAVINGS ON YOUR
FAVORITE NATIONAL
BRANDS! COME IN TODAY!
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH
SATURDAY,NOVEMBER 4-7
iv
WHERE THE PIRATES
SHOP FOR PRICE.
QUALITY & CONVENIENCE
i fWO BLOCKS FROM ECU CAMPUS)


rf



OVERTON'S
SifeM
Corner Third & Jarvis Streets
Just 2 Blocks from ECU

n

y
A
I
.j.iiii ' �� �" irmm
��-�,
.





16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3,1987
Fearle DEAN BUCHANssFooth BRIAN BAILEYall For TIM CHANDLERecast Dr. RICHARD EAKINPAT MOLLOY
ECU Sports InformationWNCT-TV Sports DirectorSports EditorECU ChancellorAssistant Sports Editor
Last Week:Last Week:Last Week:Last Week:Last Week:
(7-3)(5-5)(5-5)(6-4)(3-7)
GAMESOverall:Overall:Overall:Overall:Overall:
(60-30)(59-31)(56-34)(49-41)(48-42)
Temple at ECUECUECUECUECUECU
Clemson at UNCNorth CarolinaClemsonClemsonClemsonClemson
Alabama at LSULSULSUAlabamaAlabamaLSU
Fla. State at AuburnFla. StateHa. StateHa. StateHa. StateAuburn
Puke at Wake ForestWake ForestWake ForestDukeDukeWake Forest
Georgia at FloridaFloridaHoridaHoridaHoridaGeorgia
Virginia at Ga. TechGa. TechVirginiaVirginiaGa. TechVirginia
Illinois at IndianaIndianaIndianaIndianaIndianaIndiana
Boston Coll. at Notre DameNotre DameNotre DameNotre DameNotre DameNotre Dame
Stanford at Southern CalSouthern CalSouthern CalSouthern CalSouthern CalSouthern Cal
Crum says Clemson is ACC's top team
CHAPEL HILL. N.C (AP) -
When il comes to the Atlantic
isl Conference, Clemson is in a
iss bv itself. North Carolina
i ich Dick Crum says.
Riey sure are Crum said
! uesday when asked if the Tigers,
defending ACC champions,
re a level above the rest of the
onference. "That's just where
they are. 1 think it's a true state-
rent that they are in their own
I hev maybe are the best
lemson team in the 10years I've
been here Crum said at his
veekly news conference. "Thev
complete. Thev have a good
i(u nse - very steady. Defensively
( xtreme speed and quickness.
: id oi course, they always have
a good kicking game
1 he game has been switched
from a 12.03 p.m. start to a 4 p.m.
to accommodate ESr which
show the contest to a national
cable audience.
The lOth-ranked Tigers, 7-1
overall and 4-1 in the ACC, have
won the last five out of six meet-
ings with the Tar Heels, 5-3 and 3-
1. But, it's last season's 38-10 loss
at Clemson, S.C, that Crum is still
worried about.
"They are a powerful ballclub
Crum said. "They really beat us
badly last year and I'm very con-
cerned about the effects that will
have on our team from the stand-
point of the game was out of con-
trol early and we didn't have
much of a chance
However, despite three losses,
Crum said he's happy with the
way his squad has played lately.
"You work all year to put your-
self in a position where you can at
least - toward the end of the sea-
son - be competitive to win the
conference championship he
said.
After North Carolina,
Clemson's only other ACC game
is at Maryland, while the Tar
Heels travel to Virginia and host
Duke.
Crum said tailback Torin Dorn,
injured since gaining more than
100 yards in the season-opening
game against Illinois, may see
some action. However, he said
Dorn is still having difficulty in
making cuts with his sore ankle.
He's had a week longer to
heal, but as far as him playing, I
don't think we're going to know
that until weget into theballgame
and see if we get in a position that
we have to put him in
"He will not play like he played
against Illinois Crum added.
Eric Starr, who has gained 461
yards and scored three touch-
downs, will start at tailback,
Crum said.
Starr will be going up against
one of the nation's top defenses.
Crum called Clemson's right
tackle Michael Dean Perry "an ex-
cellent player and the Tigers'
whole defensive front line "ex-
tremely good
'They can get off the ball and
run he said. "I just hopeour kids
aren't going to be afraid of them
TAXPAYERS
with depen dents
HERE'S A TAX TIP:
Beginning nh ova 1987 in ome
tax return th.it VOU will tile in
lvsh, on generally must Iim s hi.i1
security numbers tot dependents
who are at least five eais old In
the end o( 1 's It any ��( oui
dependents do not have this
number, crt an application torm
t.vl.n hum the- s.h i.il Sci in it
LOW COST
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
Abortions from 13 to 18 wrrk at additional coat Prrgnancy
Te. Birth Control, and ProbWm Pregnancy Counaehng, For
further miormjtion. cjU S32-OS35 (toll free number 1-SO0-
532-S3&4) between 9 a.m. and Spm. weekday. General anes-
thesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Tom Togs Factory Outlet
1900 Dickinson Avenue
Next Warehouse Sale Oct. 26th - Nov. 7th
Featuring Fashicmabl Fall Mmchandl Casual Wear, and Famouj Hrandi
F.v�ylhing In Stcr- Excrf Hosiery
1st Quality�Overrunj�Olo-out��Slct�i Irregular
ottue in our area
4 PuAM. knlcf of ttm m
.IMh
TROCADMU
li Famous Names That We Canned Mention
�in n
Trocadero Tank Tops. Tank Dres�e�. Bicycle Pants. Walk Shortm. Mini Skirt h Tops
I�mj Camp Shirts. Shorts. Slacks. Pullovers It. The Original T-Shutm 100 Cotton fL'nae�)
Panama lack T-Shirt
li you are a newcomer to town, we invite you to volt our store at 1900 Dickinson Avenue. II you are going to
beach at Morehead City, visit our new location on Hwy 70 (just across from Bojarglrs 1
Hwy. 64 East Between
Bethel and Tarboro
Conetoe, N.C.
WedSat. 9-5
Hwy. 70 West
Morehead City, N.C.
WedSat. 9-5
We Also Wholesale
Mastercard 4t Visa Accepted
limit 4 of vour choice
AP
Grade "A"
Whole Fryers
lb.
36
Limit 3
Richfood Natural or Butter Flavor
Microwave Popcorn
10.5 oz.
99 28 r
Kraft Chilled
Orange Juice
99
12 gallon carton
Taste-Great
Homogenized
Milk
12 gallon jug
99
Bounty Paper
Towels
Giant roll. Limit 3 rolls.
69
OPEN 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. MONDAY-SATURDAY,
SUNDAYS 1-6 p.m.
ampueiis
Tomato Soup
10 oz. can. Limit 6 cans
Reg. & Diet
Pepsi Cola
89�
2 Liter
Additional Pepsi's & other flavors each 99c Bottle
(amp&ih
Tomato
From T)ie Tropics
Goiden Ripe
Bdnanas
lb.
17
3
Regular or Diet
Dr. Pepper & Sprite
2 liter bottle
99
ypHNCff;
FABRK
Fab
Detergentj
42 oz. box. Limit one.
99
Richfood Assorted Varities
Yogurt
6 oz. cup
39
Hot Food Bar!
Scoop up the Hot Meal of your choice for lunch or dinner!
Now Featuring Different lunch & Dinner menus! Oar food
is always freshly prepared using only the finest
ingredients! Come See Us!
COME CELEBRATE WITH US
DURING OUR FIFTH ANNI-
VERSARY RICHFOOD BRAND
SALE! OVERTON'S OFFERS
YOU LOW, LOW PRICES ON
RICHFOOD BRANDS, PLUS
GREAT SAVINGS ON YOUR
FAVORITE NATIONAL
BRANDS! COME IN TODAY!
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH
SATURDAY,NOVEMBER 4-7
Mi
WHERE THE PIRATES
SHOP FOR PRICE,
QUALITY & CONVENIENCE
OVERTON'S
A
TWO BLOCKS FROM ECU CAMPUS)



Corner Third & Jarvis Street
Just 2 Blocks from ECU
SupemM

"A

t
Igtmmmmt mn �i m �h�
�������IpnMMMIjf
�i��miin� �'�i �'
- �" w"��so��tmmmmm
I





Title
The East Carolinian, November 5, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 05, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.571
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy