The East Carolinian, November 3, 1987






IINSIDE
Editorials��4
STYLE
The latest in clothing fashion � see STYLE,
page 8.
SPORTS
The Miami hurricane blew through Greenville,
see the damage report in �SPORTS, page 11.
�he i�u$t (HutolMun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.62 No. 19
Tuesday, November 3,1987
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Problems plague production of '87 Buccaneer
By ANDY LEWIS
Nrw� Itlitor
Amid complaints about the 1986 Buccaneer, an
editor and a volunteer staff have less than two weeks
to finish the '87 yearbook.
The '8b yearbook came out a year late after a
controversy over the use of Tavlor publishing com-
pany to print the book. According to Beth Davis,
editor of the '86 and '87 yearbooks, delays caused by
the company compounded themselves and ulti-
mately affected the production of the '87 book.
Meanwhile, Buccaneer staff members disagree
about whether Davis has been a capable manager. In
addition, ECU Media Board members claim that,
until recently, they could not get Davis to come
before them and explain the status of the '87 year-
book
But at a special meeting Thursday, Davis ap-
peared before the board and apologized for not
having the book out on time saving, "I admit full
responsibility for why the yearbook did not come
out on time
Board members had many questions for Davis.
Several members questioned Davis on the lateness
o( the '87 book, seeking an answer to why the book
had not been finished.
"I wasn't readv to handle the responsibility at the
moment Davis answered, "but 1 am now
Davis agreed at the meeting to have the yearbook
ready for the printer in two weeks. She further
agreed with board Chairman Sven Van Baars that
the board could take back the $2,100 in salary it paid
her for her job as editor if she did not meet the
deadline, according to Van Baars.
Davis and a volunteer staff have until Nov. 12 to
design the remaining 200 pages of the book. The '87
Buccaneer, according to the new schedule, should
come out in January, Van Baars said.
In an interview after the meeting, Davis said that
although she takes full responsibility for what hap-
pened to the two yearbooks, other factors contrib-
uted to the problem.
Davis said the ECU Photolab, which produces
photographs tor all the campus media, failed to
bring in photographs on time. Davis also said troub-
les caused by Taylor publishing company over the
'86 yearbook affected her performance as editor of
the '87 yearbook.
Davis said she still had to deal with the '86 year-
book during the time she was supposed to be work-
ing on the '87 yearbook.
"1 thought that 1 could handle it, 1 thought 1 could
pull it all together fix the '86 book and do the '87
bookandgetitdonebyjune(19n7). Well 1 worked
and worked. I guess I was just so diversified and had
so many things going on that nothing was accom-
plished.
"I was burnt out
Davis said she made mistakes as a manager and
added, I'm just sorry that it's gotten this bad and
all of the headache and the frustration I've caused.
And I just hope that any of mv actions will not
reflect on the perception of any future Buccaneer
staff. It's not like this goes on all the time
Two Buccaneer staff members who worked under
Davis agree major problems with Photolab and
Taylor publishing interfered with their duties
Production Manager Tad Dew said Photolab
turned in some pictures months late, and agreed that
Taylor botched up printing most oi the pages in the
'86 yearbook.
Dew insists Davis was overly possessive of the
yearbooks and tried to make the '86 yearbook her
personal portfolio, delaying final publication be
cause she took too much work upon herself. Dew
also said Davis lied to the staff about progress on the
'87 yearbook.
"Everybody on last year's staff was pretty upsel
about the whole thing because she told everybody
the book was done Dew said. Davis told the staff in
May or June of 1987 that most of the book had been
sent to the printer, when, in fact, no pages had been
sent at all. Dew said.
"Nothing had been turned in (to the printer). We
had a call from the representative, Greg Whalen, of
Delmar (the printer) saying: 'Please tell us that you
didn't turn in the pages "
Dew pointed out that each ECU student pays $10
as part of hisher student fees to fund the yearbook,
which is why he is one of Davis's volunteer staff.
KimberlyKayes, editor of this year's yearbook and
staff member of the '87 yearbook, agreed that Davis
lied about the status of the book to her staff. Kayes
said much of the yearbook was kept as a "secret"
from the rest of the staff.
But Kayes said Davis shouldn't be "dragged
through the mud over the yearbook. Kayes said the
yearbook troubles have "a lot to do with Photolab
Da vis denied the charges that she told the staff that
pages had already been sent to the printer.
Work on two yearbooks, '87 and '88, continues at
the office of the Buccaneer, with Davis, Dew and
other volunteers working to put out the '87 year-
book.
Kayes said that although Davis's work is interfer-
ing with the production of the '88 Buccaneer, her
staff will have the '88 book out on schedule.
University to hold fall commencement
By EDWARD WILKERSON
Stiff Writer
ECU will hold a Fall commence-
ment for the tirst time in history,
university officials said last week
"tW iuaouuuearent w�s maV
Friday at a meeting of the ECU
Board oi Trustees. The fall com-
mencement exercise, to be held
Dec. 5, will recognize graduates of
the summer and fall semesters of
1987.
At the meeting, ECU Chancel-
lor Dr. Richard R. Eakin said
"both students and parents have
expressed enthusiasm for a fall
graduation which will permit a
more personalized ceremony
Addressing this Fall's gradu-
ates will be Dr. Tinsley E.
Yarbrough, a professor of Politi-
cal Science at ECU.
Eakin also announced that in an
effort to increase minority enroll-
ment, ECU will drop two admis-
sions requirements in upcoming
years.
The primary change, according
to otficiaii will permit ECU to
grant future admittance to stu-
dents who have not completed
three years of college preparatory
math provided the students com-
plete the requirement within one
year of admission.
The second admission change
states that ECU "will no longer
require a minimum SAT score for
students admitted to the
University's special studies pro-
gram according to Eakin. How-
ever, Eakin continued by stating
students will be required to have
held a minimum high school GPA
of 2.0 and a predicted GPA of 1.7,
as has been past policy.
These changes are the direct
result of the UNC Board of Gover-
nors which proposed that 13.3
percent of the students in the state
system be punoritics.
Of the 14,500 students currently
enrolled at ECU, 10.6 percent are
minorities, according to univer-
sity admissions officials. This
would necessitate a 2.7 percent
increase in minority enrollment in
order for ECU to meet the criteria
sot by the UNC system.
Recognizing future implica-
tions possibly caused by the
changes, Chancellor Eakin said,
"neither of the changes is ex-
pected to produce a dramatic
impact on the student body He
ilso said the changes "may allow
for the admission of some deserv-
Sexual Assault Awareness week begins at ECU
By JENNIFER PEARSON
Staff Writer
Editor's note: If you have happened
to see the hot pink flyers around
campus, you know ECU is observing
"Sexual Assault Awareness Week"
Nop. 2-6). The following is material
condensed from information pro-
vided by anet Johnson, West Area
coordinator for the Department of
Residence Life.
The message is simple � STOP
ACQUAINTANCE RAPE � or
"Date Rape Date rape refers to
"any forced or coerced sexual in-
tercourse by an assailant known
to the victim
The sad thing is most people do
not think of mixing the already
terrible idea of rape with perhaps
an even more frightening thought
� rape involving neighbors, co-
workers, dates and friends.
People are naturally going to be
trusting of their friends and
neighbors and other people they
thinkthey know very well.
Because these people spend a
lot of time with certain others or
are simply good acquaintances
with them, an instance of rape
could be overwhelming and leave
the victims hurt and unable to
understand how such a thing
could possibly happen to them.
Koss stated that one-fourth of all
college women have either been
victimsof rape or attempted rape.
And nearly 90 percent knew their
attackers.
Three important things to re-
member if you find yourself in a
date rape situation are: (l)try not
to panic (try to talk rationally in
order to buy some time to find a
way out), (2)scream (yell for help
and remember that unfortunately
more people will respond to
"fire" than to "rape"), and (3)fight
back (The National Rape Confer-
ence determined that the women
who fight back initially "with
some skill�self-defense tech-
niques have a much better chance
of avoiding the rape than those
who plead or try to talk their way
out of the situation)
This week at ECU: Self-de-
fense techniques will be demon-
strated on Nov. 3 in the lobby of
Greene Hall. On Nov. 4 in Jen-
kins Auditorium, issues con-
cerning aquaintance rape will be
presented by the faculty model-
ing the various roles related to
the trauma of date rape. Also on
Nov. 4, another self-defense
workshop will be held in Memo-
rial Gym.
ing and capable students who
otherwise might be denied the
opportunity
Other announcements at the
meeting included Saturdays'
dedication of the Ronald E.
Dowdy Student Stores. The dedi-
cation was to commemorate the
Universitys' first $100,000 gift for
academic purposes, a donation
commitment made by Dowdy.
In other business, Eakin intro-
duced the appointment of the
Campus Beautification Commit-
tee, with John S. Bell, assistant
vice chancellor for Business, as
chairman. The committee will
primarily focus upon "enhancing
the natural beauty of the cam-
pus Eakin said. Citing the neces-
sity of campus aesthetics, Eakin
stated that "the appearance of our
campus is important to the gen-
eral morale of students, faculty,
and staff The committee will
conclude the study and submit its
recommendations on March 31,
1988.
The board disclosed at the
meeting that the Mendcnhall Stu-
dent Center Addition bond sale
was approved by the UNC Board
of Governors and construction is
scheduled to begin in two
months.
The bids, which were received
on October 9 for the sale of reve-
nue bonds, totaled $1.2 million for
the 9,420 square foot renovation
and 31,280 square foot addition to
the center.
Officials announced at the
meeting that bids are to be re-
ceived on November 10 for the the
proposed contruction of ECU'S
sports medicine facility. The esti-
mated cost of the project is $7.5
million.
;
This rock and roller was one of the thousands of people to celebrate
Halloween in downtown Greenville Saturday night. (Ester Norton
� Photolab)
Halloween drew thousands
SGA passes resolution favoring new student athletic facility
By TIM HAMPTON
Stiff Writer
The Student Government As-
sociation Monday passed a reso-
lution calling for a new recreation
facility at ECU.
The resolution states Memorial
Gym is "inferior inadequate and
too small for the growing demand
for student recreation.
Drafted by a special executive
committee, the resolution "sup-
ports the building of a modern
recreation facility The resolu-
tion, passed by the SGA at a regu-
larly scheduled meeting Monday,
will be sent to Chancellor Richard
R. Eakin for further considera-
tion.
In other business, a bill for an
appropriation to the Arnold Air
Society caused debate at the meet-
ing. The Air Society, which is af-
filiated with the Air Force ROTC
program, is a service organiza-
tion, according to legislators in
Streater works to end drunk driving deaths
By TIM HAMPTON
Staff Writer
Last year 1700 teenagers died in
alcohol related automobile acci-
dents. Steve Streater is busy
trying to make that statistic de-
crease.
Streater, the director of Stu-
dents Against Drunk Drivers
(SADD) for the south-east region
(North Carolina, South Carolina,
Tennessee and Georgia), spoke to
a crowd of 40 on the ECU campus
Thursday night as part of Alcohol
Awareness Week. Confined to a
wheelchair, Streater said to the
audience, "you don't want to be in
my position because of an alco-
hol-related accident
Streater, 28, is from Sylvia, N.C.
where he played football, basket-
ball and baseball at Sylvia High
School. Turning down a chance to
play professional baseball,
Streater accepted a football schol-
arship at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill.
See STREATER, page 2
favor of the bill.
Legislator Olav Osland dis-
agreed with the proposed $500
appropriation on grounds that it
was not consistent with appro-
priations to other organizations.
"We need to conserve our funds
Osland said.
The bill was passed with only
one dissentor.
The other appropriation bill,
$425 to Phi Sigma Tau, the Phi-
losophy Honor Fraternity, for
speakers and a national conven-
tion was also passed.
Also, three new legislators were
voted in to the SGA. The new
legislators are Ana Cho, Green
Dorm, Lem Campbell, day repre-
sentative, Steve Brewer, Belk
Dorm.
By M. 13URBELLA
A�i�t4nt News tditur
An estimated 20 thousand
people hit the streets of down-
town Greenville Halloween
night.
The large number of people
forced police to move street barri-
cades to allow more space and
clean up crews to work from 3
a.m. until 11 a.m according to
Greenville Foice Capt. David
Bullock.
"It was the biggest gathering �
other than a ballgame � we've
ever had Bullock said.
Although the crowds were
large, they "restrained them-
selves Bullock said. There was
no major damage done to down-
town Greenville such as the bro-
ken store windows of past ECU
Halloweens, according to Bul-
lock.
There were overturned trash-
cans, fire discharges and paper
litteron campus but "there wasn't
any great amount of damage
according to Chief Johnny Rose of
ECU Public Safety.
However, Greenville Police
and Public Safety made several
arrests.
Eight to 10 arrests were made
downtown, ranging from drugs
to assualt and "stuff to that na-
ture according to Bullock. Rose
said Tublic Safety also had arrests.
"There were four (arrests) I dis-
tinctly remember Rose said.
"One personal assualt, two prop-
erty damages and one tampering
with a fire apperatus there may
be additional charges. Consider-
ing the numbers of people we
had, we were lucky
Approximately 10 people had
minor wounds treated by the
Rescue Squad stationed a few
blocks away.
Campus Police, however, broke
up more than a few conflicts.
"We had a number of small
groups that engaged in a (fight)
Rose said. "I think there were
about a dozen
Once the crowds dispersed
around 3 a.m. the clean-up crews
got to work. Public Works was
prepared for a mess but cleaning
up took longer than expected,
Mayo Allen, Head of Public
Works, said. Three full
dumptrucks of trash were taken
away.
Help was supplied by ECU fra-
ternities and without them the
private parking lots could not
have been cleaned, Allen said.
"City employees cannot clean
private lots Allen said. "Thanks
to the fraternities, we were able to
clean up the private parking lots"
1 ,
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� � '� ��i ni m ii. m�
I





2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 3. 1987


Advice to prevent date rape
Vhat can 1 do to prevent acquain
tance rape and what should I do if it
happens to me?
Acquaintance rape occurs
when the victim is manipulated,
coerced or forced by a friend or
acquaintance into engaging in
sexual intercourse. The assailant
may use threats, physical re-
straint or even physical violence
to force a woman into having sex.
There are several things that can
be done bv both men and women
Health Column
Bv KIM RUSCH
Sp�i4l lo the litl CarohniAn
to prevent acquaintance rape.
Ladies, know what vou want
concerning sex and set limits
based on those desires. It is your
right to set limits on how far you
are willing to engage in sex. If you
feel unsure about what you are
doing at any time, STOP, and talk
it over. Communicate your limits
to the person you are with. In
communicating your limits, be
firm and to the point: politeness
may be misunderstood or ignored
by the other person.
You should also be aware of the
nonverbal messages you yourself
are sending. Men may misunder-
stand your intention if you dress
"sexy" or flirt with them. Th.s
does not mean that your attire or
behavior is wrong, just be aware
that it may be misunderstood as a
message that you want to engage
in sex.
Another tip that will help pre-
vent the chances of you becoming
a victim of acquaintance rape is to
pay attention to what is happen-
ing around you and to trust your
instincts. If you see that a man is
Leaders resent campus pans
(CPS) Fducation-bashing
ha become a national fad, and
campus leaders while grateful
tor the attention say they're
beginning to resent it
Since 1983 when the Carnegie
Foundation and the U.S. Dept. of
Education issued separate,
widely influential reports criticiz-
ing American higher education
groups, associations and pub-
lishers have been releasing other
critiques at a dizzying rate
Die Education Commission of
the States, the American Council
on Education, the 1 lolmcs Group,
the National Education Associa-
tion, the National Council on
State Legislatures, among liter-
ally dozens of others, all have
contributed still more "reports
to the i.d in recent months.
As oi last week - when the
"Educational Excellence Net-
work" released a report blasting
American history textbooks as
"dull" � two books criticizing
colleges more generally were on
the bestseller lists.
Two weeks before that, 37 col-
lege presidents sent an "open let-
ter" to their colleagues, asking
them to champion "school re-
form " measures to improve
teacher education.
Since 1983, reports have sav-
aged the state oi college teaching
programs, college ethical instruc-
tion, student materialism, disre-
pair in campus research labs,
administrative bureaucracies and
virtually every other aspect of
Americarwhigher education.
The avalanche of reports, how-
ever, is beginning to strike some
educators as excessive.
'The extent of the problem is
vastly overstated said Prof.
Stephen Brookfield of Columbia
University Teachers College.
"We may well need to im-
prove added University of Cali-
fornia-Santa Barbara Chancellor
Barbara Uehling, "but we're not
in that bad a shape
"I give colleges a good grade
overall Robert Hochstein of the
Carnegie Foundation for the
Ad vanccment of Teaching of ficial
said. "But it's a grade that could
be improved
Colleges are easy targets for
criticism, Uehling noted. "There's
no tangible output measures, no
bottom line
Most higher education-bash-
ing, said the American Council on
Education's Elaine El-Khawas,
"has been rhetorical rather than
substantive, image-creating
rather than serious debate. I'm all
for a higher accountability, but
some oi the criticisms arc not of
value to educators. They serve a
political agenda
Many critics, she said, have not
been paying attention because
most campuses already already
have reviewed and reformed
their curricula.
"Their efforts may not have led
to a best seller El-Khawas said,
referring to the success of Allan
Bloom's "The Closing of the
American Mind" and ED.
Hirsch's "Cultural Literacy
which argue that colleges don't
teach students basic knowledge,
"but there's no doubt educators
have been addressing these is-
sues
"Some of the criticisms are un-
justified agreed Hood College
President Martha Church. "We're
trying to prepare students for the
future, but they're making it diffi-
cult for us to do so
Indeed, there's some evidence
all the criticism is eroding public
support for higher education.
Group Attitudes Corporation, a
research organization, found that
the number of Americans who
think the overall quality of higher
education in the United States is
good or excellent has declined in
recent years.
Such sentiments make it harder
10 get funding from Congressand
state legislatures.
Still, the criticisms are not un-
welcome on campuses. "Higher
education is certainly not a basket
case said University of Califor-
nia at Sacramento President
Donald Gerth, "but every genera-
tion we need to look at educa-
tion
"I interpret the whole atmos-
phere of the last 5 or 6 years as a
sign of society's recognition that
education is critical observed
Father William Sullivan, the
president of Seattle University.
"An educated populace is buy-
ing and reading these books
Hochstein said of the recent be-
stsellers. "That in itself says some-
thing about the success of Ameri-
can higher education
There's plenty right about
American higher cducaiton, oth-
ers assert. "Since I left Washing-
ton in 1985 said Terrel H. Bell,
President Reagan's first Secretary
of Education and now a professor
at the University of Utah, "I've
been able to look at education
quite carefully. I believe the criti-
cism is quite healthy, but we re-
ally do have a big advantage in
our outstanding higher education
system
See U.S page 3
Streater says talk is key
Continued from page 1
A standout football player at
UNC-CH, Streater was namca to
the 1981 ACC all-conference team
as both a defensive back and as a
transmitting nonverbal messages
of wanting sex from you or you
feel that you are being pressured
into unwanted sex, communicate
your limits and remove yourself
from the situation. Do not place
yourself in a vulnerable position.
Men, you should also know
your desires and limits concern-
ing sexual intercourse and com-
municate these to the person you
are with. If she says "No" to you
concerning sexual contact, take
this to mean "No" and do not read
any other messages into it. When
a woman says "No" she is not
rejecting you, but is rejecting the
act of sexual contact.
Another tip to prevent acquain-
tance rape is to understand that if
a woman dresses in a "sexy" way
or flirts with you, this is not a
message that she wants to have
sexual intercourse. Also, do not
assume that if she has given you
permission for sexual contact to
occur in the past, that this contin-
ues to hold true in the present
on my feet again said Streater.
In 1983, Streater was appointed
director of the North Caolina
SADD program by former Gov.
Jim Hunt. As director, he traveled
punter, the only player ever to be to high schools throughout the
named to two positions on the state to speak in front of student
team. After four years with Caro- bodies on drinking and driving.
Una, Streater signed with the In May, 1987, Streater was named
Washington Redskins as a free director of the SADD organiza-
agent on April 30, 1981. tion for the south east by the na-
'It was the happiest day of my tional SADD organization.
life and the worst day of my life
Streater said of April 30, 1981.
While driving through the rain
between RDU airport and Chapel
Hill, Streater lost control of his
just-purchased 280ZX and
flipped into a ditch � an accident
that rendered him paralyzed
from the waist down.
"While I had not been drinking
or used drugs prior to my acci-
dent, I saw how quickly a loss of
control can change your life said
Streater. His doctors said he
would never be able to walk
again, something he feels he can
disprove. "I'm ready to get back
"Why is it so hard to enjoy life
without drugs? Streater asked
the crowd. He said in playing the
game of life one can either win or
lose, the key is wanting to live.
Through communication and
common sense, Streater said,
teenagers can win the game of life.
One method of communication
Streater and SADD endorses is
the parent-child contract in which
the teenager agrees to call a parent
when he or she has been drinking
and needs a ride home.
Streater said the N.C SADD has
been the most responsive of the of
four states he travels.
� PMM P. ��
situation.
One tip that both men and
women should apply in prevent-
ing acquaintance rape is avoid
using alcohol and drugs exces-
sively. Alcohol and drugs impair
clear decision making and com-
munication. If these two functions
are impaired, then the chances of
misunderstanding by both par-
ties increases.
If acquaintance rape does hap-
pen to you, get in contact with a
friend or someone who can give
you emotional support. Then,
contact Public Safety at 757-6150.
For counseling assistance you
may call the ECU Counseling
Center (757-6661), the Student
Health Center (757-6841), or Real
Crisis Intervention (758-4357). An
excellent brochure called "Ac-
quaintance Rape: Is Dating Dan-
gerous?" is available on the bro-
chure racks at the Student 1 lealth
Center and at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
3tyt �a0t Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
James F. J. McKee. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo Shari C'emens
Pete Fernald. Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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PHI KAPPA TAU
PRESENTS
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NOVEMBER 6,1987 3-7 PM
featuring:
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.�� - �
Chemistry sj
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Educators and scientists from
eastern North Carolina will meet
at ECU Nov. 6 for the eighth an
nual chemistry symposium co
sponsored by ECU and the East
ern N.C. Section of the Ami i
Chemical Society.
The 1987 event. "( L
Innovations inhemical Educa-
tion coincides with National
Chemistry f)av Its workshop for
mat will focus on recent develop
ments in chemical curricula f r
middle grade and high s.
students and also offer idea
incorporating computers into
high school and college chemistry
classes.
Dr. Peter E Yankwich, senior
executive officer of the National
Science Foundation's Directorate
for Science and Engineering Edu-
cation, will be keynote speaker
His topic is "Has Ion n
Come7 A Look at Re
in the Support tor Science and
Gorbachev blasts hi
MOSCOW (AP)
leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev I
day blasted his critics in the
Communist Partv leadership as
too timid or too impatient n
called for a moderate but deter
mined course1 in rebuilding
society.
In a nationally televised
dress marking the 70th anniver-
sary of the revolution that
brought the Communists
power, Gorbachev accused os t
V. Stalin of "enormous and unf �r-
giveable" crimes and announ
formation of a commission to res
ume the rehabilitation t Stal
vicitms.
Under Stahn, who ruled I
Soviet Union from 1924 until his
death in 1953, millions perished in
the forced collectivization oi agri-
culture or were shot or sent I
labor camps as "enemies of the
people
Gorbachev also pledgi I
search for a "palpable bn ik
through" on long-range, or strate-
gic, nuclear forces and sp
weapons when he goes to Wash
ingWfc next month to sign a treatv
banning intermediate-range nu-
clear missiles.
The 56-year-old Commui
Party chief praised the I SSo
agreement now at hand, but sai I
it was agreed to in general terms
U.S. education
Continued from page 2
Bell, who toured lapan.
land, China and other natior
ter leaving his Education Per irt
ment post, concluded "W
quite supreme
"We also have a tremend
community college system that
meets vocational and academic
needs Bell said. "There's oppor
tunity for even kind oi student
As proof U.S. campuses tend to
be better than their counterparts
in other lands, Hochstein noted,
"Foreign students flock to our
campuses. We offer something
special, something for every-
body
Some of those now resentful ol
the education-bashing contrib-
uted to it.
Hochstein's Carnegie Founda-
tion has authored numerous re-
ports critical ot how colleges
teach. Bell was officially a co-au-
thor of the 1983 "Nation At Risk
report that some sav started the
avalanche of criticism.
Seattle's Sullivan signed the
September "open letter" to cam-
pus chiefs.
So, not surprisingly, they con-
cede the critics have been correct
about some things "We went too
far in loosening curriculum re-
quirements said Chancellor
Robert Corrigan oi the University
of Massachussetts-Roston 'We
need to return to a more strictly
defined curriculum to avoid frac-
rionahzation
"Students were leaving with
lopsided curricula Hood s
Church said. "We need to regain
some cohesivcness "
"As a nation, we haven't paid
enough attention to our schools
she maintained "We need a dra-
matic intervention to set things
right
To Columbia s Brookfield, the
greatest weakness is a cultural
one: "America is a consensus cul-
ture, a melting pot Reaching a
consensus on the role, strengths
and weaknesses of higher educa-
tion "is not important, but debate
is
S Cl
L
wl
CoJ
l
Locatoa
-j
4





�aat �ar0ltaiaii
the East Carolina campus community since 1925
s F J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representives
: Mallory James Russo Shari Clemens
Pete Fernald- Maria BeD
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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TAU
6,1987 3-7 PM
luring:
IE
Pizza by the
Slice fr,
�om
IFOR THEIR SUPPORT
OBS
STILL WATER INC.
MR. FERNALD
SUBSTATION II
.EY OS
;hpoit, inc
Chemistry symposium to
discuss science education
ECU New. lureau
Educators and scientists from
eastern North Carolina will meet
at ECU Nov. 6 for the eighth an-
nual chemistry symposium co-
sponsored by ECU and the East-
ern N.C. Section of the American
Chemical Society.
The 1987 event, "Classroom
Innovations in Chemical Educa-
tion' coincides with National
Chemistry Day. Its workshop for-
mat will focus on recent develop-
ments in chemical curricula for
middle grade and high school
students and also offer ideas for
incorporating computers into
high school and college chemistry
classes.
Dr. Peter E. Yankwich, senior
executive officer of the National
Science Foundation's Directorate
for Science and Engineering Edu-
cation, will be keynote speaker.
His topic is "Has Tomorrow
Come? A Look at Recent Progress
in the Support for Science and
Mathematices Education
Workshop topics and leaders
are:
"Introduction to Microcom-
puter-Based laboratories Dr.
John C. Park of the N.C. State
University Department of Science
and Mathematics Education;
"WONDERSCIENCE: Fun Physi-
cal Science Activities for Children
and Adults Dr. Ann Benbow of
the American Chemical Society's
Pre-High School Programs de-
partment;
"ChemCom: Chemistry in the
Community Dr. Conrad Stan-
itski of Franklin and Marshall
College, Lancaster, Pa "Micro-
computer Based Laboratory In-
struction for the IBM PC Drs. C.
R. Ward and J. 11. Recvesof UNC-
Wilmington; and "Development
of Instructional Materials Using
the Macintosh Computer Dr. I.
Dwaine Eubanks of Oklahoma
State University.
Also featured will be displays
and demonstrations featuring sci-
ence programs for the handi-
capped, development and use of
videotapes for chemical instruc-
tion, and commercially available
materials tor the computer.
Edith Rand of the ECU chemis-
try faculty is chairing a nine-
member committee on sympo-
sium arrangements. Financial
support for the symposium is
provided by several area firms
which employ chemists: Bur-
roughs Wellcome Co Fveready
Battery Co Coastal Chemical
Corp Exscl Industries, Inc
Southern Testing and Research,
Inc Takeda Chemical Products
U.S.A. and Texasgulf Corp.
Other sponsors are MicroAge
Computer Displays, Greenville;
Holt, Rinchart and Winston Pub
lishersand several academic units
at ECU.
Gorbachev blasts his critics in the Soviet party
MOSCOW (AP) � Soviet
leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev to-
day blasted his critics in the
Communist Party leadership as
too timid or too impatient and
called for a moderate but deter-
mined course in rebuilding Soviet
society.
In a nationally televised ad-
dress marking the 70th anniver-
sary of the revolution that
brought the Communists to
power, Gorvachev accused Josef
V. Stalin of "enormous and unfor-
giveable" crimes and announced
formation of a commission to res-
ume the rehabilitation of Stalin's
vicitms.
Under Stalin, who ruled the
Soviet Union from 1924 until his
death in 1953, millions perished in
the forced collectivization of agri-
culture or were shot or sent to
labor camps as "enemies of the
people
Gorbachev also pledged to
search for a "palpable break-
through" on long-range, or strate-
gic, nuclear forces and space
weapons when he goes to VVash-
in�Dh next month to sign a treaty
banning intermediate-range nu-
clear missiles.
The 56-year-old Communist
Party chief praised the U.SSoviet
agreement now at hand, but said
it was agreed to in general terms
U.S. education
Continued from page 2
Bell, who toured Japan, Hol-
land, China and other nations af-
ter leaving his Education Depart-
ment post, concluded, "We're
quite supreme
"We also have a tremendous
community college system that
meets vocational and academic
needs Bell said. "There's oppor-
tunity for every kind of student
As proof U.S. campuses tend to
be better than their counterparts
in other lands, Hochstein noted,
"Foreign students flock to our
campuses. We offer something
special, something for every-
body
Some of those now resentful of
the education-bashing contrib-
uted to it.
Hochstein's Carnegie Founda-
tion has authored numerous re-
ports critical of how colleges
teach. Bell was officially a co-au-
thor of the 1983 "Nation At Risk-
report that some say started the
avalanche of criticism.
Seattle's Sullivan signed the
September "open letter' to cam-
pus chiefs.
So, not surprisingly, they con-
cede the critics have been correct
about some things. "We went too
far in loosening curriculum re-
quirements said Chancellor
Robert Corrigan of the University
of Massachussetts-Boston. "We
need to return to a more strictly
defined curriculum to avoid frac-
tionalization
"Students were leaving with
lopsided curricula Hood's
Church said. "We need to regain
some cohesiveness
"As a nation, we haven't paid
enough attention to our schools
she maintained. "We need a dra-
matic intervention to set things
right
To Columbia's Brookfield, the
greatest weakness is a cultural
one: "America is a consensus cul-
ture, a melting pot Reaching a
consensus on the role, strengths
and weaknesses of higher educa-
tion "is not important, but debate
is"
during the second Reagan-Gor-
bachev summit in Iceland a year
ago.
"The world expects the third
and fourth Soviet-US. summits to
produce more than merely an offi-
cial acknowledgement of the deci-
sion agreed upon a year ago, and
more than merely continuation of
the discussion he said. "That is
why we will work unremittingly
at these meeting for a palpable
breakthrough, for concrete re-
sults in reducing strategic offen-
sive armaments and barring
weapons from outer space the key
to removing the nuclear threat
His reference to a fourth sum-
mit indicated he expects Reagan
to visit Moscow next year.
Gorbachev's nearly three-hour
speech to an assembly of Soviet
and international socialist figures
was his first appearance since the
disclosure last week that Moscow
party boss Boris N. Yeltsin had
offered to resign Oct. 21 over the
slow pace of Gorbachev's eco-
nomic and social reforms.
The 56-year-old Yeltsin, a non-
voting member of the ruling Polit-
buro, has been among the most
outspoken supporters of "per-
estroika Gorbachev's program
to restructure the Soviet state-run
economy and society as a whole
n
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Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3,1987
Chancellor Richard R. Kak in presents an artists conception of the Ron E. Dowdy Student Stores to Dowdy
and his wife in a dedication ceremony Saturday morning. The stores were named after Dowdy, who
helped spur on last year's fund raising drive with the Dowdy Challenge, at the ceremony (Jon Jordan
- Photolab)
Jiffy Lube
The newest concept in car care maintenance is now
open in Greenville!
Here's what we do in 10 minutes, no
appointment necessary
1. We change your oil with a major brand!
2. We Install a new oil filter!
3. We lubricate the whole chassis!
4. We check and fill transmission fluid!
5. We check and fill differential fluid!
6. We check and fill brake fluid!
7. We check and fill power steering fluid!
8. We check and fill window washer fluid!
9. We check and fill battery!
10. We check the air filter!
11. We check the wiper blades!
12. We Inflate the tires to proper pressure!
13. We vacuum the Interior!
i
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PLUS a FREE Car Wash with
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Monday thru Fnda
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Sat 7 30 am til 5 00pm
1
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j couponGOOD DEC 12th-1987
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126 Greenville Blvd
Greem ille
(Across from Golden
Corral Sfeok House)
A VERY SPECIAL
CLOTHING VALUE
FOR THE
YOUNG EXECUTIVE
TO BE
This new blend of Dacron and wool
especially tailored for our Fall, Winter
and early Spring wear is the perfect suit
to stretch a young executive's ward-
robe. Tailored for us in business tones,
we are proud to put our "University
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outstanding value at $255. Look for it on
the red hanger in our clothing depart-
ment at our downtown store only.
MENS WEAR
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE STORE ONLY
-� � �� m �i ep�mm

I





(31?e Saat (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, g��m��
Clay Deanhardt, M.r�, u
Andy Lewis, m. u, James FJ. McKee, mmi
Tim Chandler, srtouoor meg NEEDHAM,c.rt.j�.OT,M��r
John Carter, r.r. e� Mike Upci iurci i, ��. m,�
Shelton Bryant, iwm John W. Medlin, a ����,
Debbie Stevens, s�
NOVEMBER 3, 1987
Opinion
Page 4
Changes
Admissions still sound
The move to change some admis-
sion standards as announced by the
chancellor Friday may at first seem
contrary to the high goals a univer-
sity should have. On second glance,
however, it can be seen that the uni-
versity made the only move pos-
sible, and that move is in the right
direction.
It is a muddy picture, to be sure. It
began several years ago, when the
UXC Board of Governors decided to
raise admission standards for all its
constituent universities to include
three years of math in high school,
beginning in 1988. This was already
the admission standard here.
Recently the board saw that the
requirement could not be met. A
lack of communication between col-
leges and high schools could have
effectively prevented many other-
wise qualified students from enroll-
ing in college. In response, the board
wisely chose to postpone the change
until high school students were bet-
ter prepared.
They then conducted a large cam-
paign to insure that high school stu-
dents knew that only two years of
math would be required. The uni-
versity, according to Dr. William
Bloodworth, acting vice chancellor
for academic affairs, felt it had to
comply with those regulations.
Still, the university felt stronglv
enough about the math requirement
to insist that all students admited
with only two credits make up the
deficiency their first semester here.
That decision is commendable for its
fairness and insistance upon main-
taining high standards.
The second change in standards
has to do with Scholastic Aptitude
Jusr whsm vou thoo6ht it WASj
SAFE 10 60 BACK T01�
SUPREME COORTr
Test (SAT) scores. Bloodworth said
the chancellor decided this summer
to do away with minimum SAT
scores as an admission requirement.
This is because students must have a
1.7 projected GPA to be allowed into
ECU. This projected GPA is deter-
mined using a formula that com-
bines SAT scores, high school GPA
and class ranking.
Therefore, students who might not
do well on the SATs, but who have
high GPAs or class rankings, can be
admitted to the university. This is a
wise move that opens the doors to a
broader spectrum of students, ad-
vancing the idea that public educa-
tion should be available to as many
people as possible.
The move, without jeapordizing
overall admission standards, moves
towards a better keeping of that
educational promise. Students
admitted under this new policy will
be assigned to the university's spe-
cial studies program, Bloodworth
said.
Bloodworth told The East Carolin-
ian he will soon appoint a committee
on academic preparation to look at
admission requirements, the special
studies program and other univer-
sity programs that help students
with academic difficulties.
That is also a prudent move. ECU
should work hard to open its doors
to as many students as possible
without jeapordizing the academic
reputation of the university. It
should also move to insure that, in
the name of this broadening of
chances, highly qualified students
are not rejected for those who just
make the cut. We know it will not
happen, but better safe than sorry.
W OW, you "REALLY rsoT
"RO06HED (JP OUT
-�i
NEYT, WE TACKLE TrtrVT BEARD
AMP THAT HAtRt" &
YY n
OF COURSE WE
NWSTSEEEK APPKOMLj? �-
FROnTIIE 0?ACLE1 Jc r&$
FIRST, WE .�HEt SOtfl PcxjNDs!
CfVN&SOE YFARSO
VOlLrM 5rtE ?TlLOSOPHY,
FACKA6&!
Conservatives don't call names
To the editor:
1 would like to respond to Andrew
Miskavage'sOct.27Ietter, "Same Old
Issues Miskavage accuses conser-
vatives (and liberals) of "second-
grade name-calling He's wrong.
Sturz, Flail and myself, the three
conservatives Miskavage is in par-
ticular referring to because of their
recent letters, have not called the lib-
erals any names. They have pointed
out that" the way liberals approach
issues and apply principles is hypo-
critical and inconsistent, but they
have not called the liberals them-
selves anything.
Miskavage, you say you arc "sick"
of name-calling. Since the conserva-
tives you refer to have been careful
not to engage in such activity, you
must be referring to the outrageous
name-calling liberals do all the time.
Examples: branding Bork an "ex-
tremist "racist or "sexist claim-
ing that Reagan is a "war-monger
etc etc. That is name-calling, and
what's more, such names have no
legitimate basis in reality: they are the
result of paranoid dementiaMcCar-
thyism run wild.
in all fairness, 1 am against conser-
vatives calling peace activists "com-
munist propaganda mouthpieces' or
Kennedy a "communist even
though a case may be made support-
ing either instance. The rule to re-
member is "if the shoe fits, wear it If
someone calls Biden a plagiarizing
cheat and its backed up by the facts,
although strongly put, it's permis-
sible.
On the other hand, we conserva-
tives are sick and tired of people
branding Reagan a "war-monger"
when he is actually the exact oppo-
site: he is trying to do everything he
can to make sure that our country is
properly defended against aggres-
sive communist expansion.
Miskavagesays "I'm not impressed
by an article that insults me while
trying to make a point Miskavage, I
read articles, letters, and editorials
written by liberals all the time that
insult me and my intelligence, but
that doesn't mean that I disregard any
valid points made or anything else
worth closer examination that 1 find
in them.
You claim that the recent easy-to-
undcrstand conservative letters in
this forum "insulted your intelli-
gence However, those who wrote
those letters were not trying to over-
simplify the issues. Thcv were, rather,
presenting the basicfundamental
issues in a simple way. There is an
important distinction between over-
simplifying and missing the central
point of the issue, and being simple
and basic in stating the central point
of the issue. Oversimplification, what
you accuse us conservatives of, in-
volves only superficial "Surface-
scratching What we are actually
doing is stating the nitty-grittv of the
issues in a simple way.
Miskavage, Hall never claimed the
phrase "the values of civilized soci-
ety" appears in the Constitution. If
you will kindly refer to his letter, you
will see that Hall doesn't even men-
tion the Constitution in that para-
graph! He was simply making a gen-
eralized but valid point.
Miskavage claims that "equal
rights" have come from the left. Equal
rights for whom, the murdered inno-
cent unborn? Conservatives are for
equal rights for Everyone, all hu-
mans. True equal rights comes from
the right, not the left.
Two ways to avoid communism:
the right way to defend our countrv
and help other countries combat
communist aggression (conservative
stance); the wrong way to erode our
defenses and ignore the defenses of
other countries against communist
aggression (liberal stance). Opinion,
no; common sense, yes.
Matthew Clarke
Chairman
ECU College Republicans
Poetry in ink
To the editor:
HANDS
While reading the East Carolinian
from front to back,
I found that mv hands with ink
were covered black.
I know your operating budt u.
very thin,
but, please get a newsprint to which
ink will soak in
I read your paper to see what others
say and think,
but, please do something about that
damned ink.
Bob Matthews
class of 79
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and clas-
sification, address, phone number and
signature of the authoris). Letters are
limited to two typewritten pages, double
spaced or neatly printed. All letters are
subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are reminded
that they are limited to one every two
weeks. The deadline for editorial material
is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday's edition and
5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday's edition.
In addition to the "Campus Forum"
Forum
rules
The Reader Speaks
Campus
Spectrum
rules
section of the editorial page. The East
Carolinian features the "Campus
Spectrum This isan opinion column
by guest writers from the student
body and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tentonly with regard to rulesof gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information may
contact the managing editor of The
East Carolinian at 757-6366, or stop by
our offices on the second floor of the
Publications Building.
Buckley writes memo to President Reagan
Memo to: The Boss Omaha to FIRE ONE if Gorbachev strikes aeainst weren't eoine to bargain nn Star War? anH C�Sr
Memo to: The Boss
From: Yr faithful s'vt, XYZ
Here's how I look at it, Mr. President.
The Soviet Union has outsmarted us, you bet. I
know you disagree with me about this & that, but
you hired me to fire off the occasional memo giving
it to you with the basso profundo, so here is the
sequence of events as I view it, which is how (I'm
betting) history will view it:
� Gorbachev enters the scene, and he is the New
Soviet Leader. In fact, he is, but what you care about
is unchanged. The simplest way to put this, boss, is
that he wants what we have.
� The sum of the Soviet military-technological
effort during the past 15 years has been to build up
overwhelming nuclear strength. The Soviets have
just about got this done when � you pop up (March
1983) with Star Wars.
� They know that Star Wars will ruin what they idea of coming on over to Washington and signing
most want, which is the kind of preponderance that the INF Treaty, and he has you right to the point
subjugatestheWesternwill.Theyknowthisbecause where the bleacher-people have practically begun
their own people are deep into Star Wars. building for the big parade: Gorbachev, the New
� Gorbachev is truly unhappy about this, which Soviet Leader, who brings peace to our time, is
comes in on top of his other problem. That is your Coming to Town.
success in deploying the Pershings in Western Eu- � Ah, he says to Shultz in Moscow. There is the
rope. The Kremlin knows it's one thing for you to tell problem of � Star Wars. You told Shultz you
Omaha to FIRE ONE if Gorbachev strikes against
West Germany, something much less tnan that if
NATO does what it's supposed to do: Fire One to
deter a Soviet blitzkrieg. ONE could mean a nuclear
war, big scale. One would be merely a theater de-
fense by NATO � but with the Pershings, which
could reach right to the Kremlin.
� Gorbachev figures: Take Reagan up on the Zero
Option. Massive popular opinion will be in favor of
that, and after both sides have withdrawn their
theater nuclear weapons, we'll be left with a situ-
ation in which no European missiles can reach Rus-
sia, but Russia has plenty left that can reach Europe.
So all the hype goes into this, there is talk about a
major nuclear retrenchment � and the whole thing
fits into the picture of the New Soviet Leader.
� But the New Soviet Leader is thinking not only
about improving his position in Europe, but about
the main target, which is Star Wars. He coos at the
weren t going to bargain on Star Wars and Gor- program; thaTand an extension of the ABM Treaty
bachev says, too bad; well, there isn't all that much for maybe 10 years - which is all the Russians need
point now, is there, in going to Washington? to complete their Star Wars program
S� thgrKSSU�!lmCrSS!S: RR iS.ab�U!r WarS Now �y S"5 is tha Gorby doesn't think he can
a ZSJZZF" "bouim?re l3XKS�T ml wrin8 this out of y�u- No �tter. He will have the
dead bod ), and Gorby retreats into his castle, and Democratic candidates eating out of his pocket and
,ust waits for Western opinion to work on you - he thinks he has the peaceniks well on their way to
and, boss, on whoever your successor is going to be. controlling Congress. So, he figures, in 1988 he'll get
What s going to happen? the being g the retirernfnt Q'f the pgs
from Europe, and some time in 1989 he will get Star
On ThP Riaht Warseither formally put to one side or else gutted by
"�g"i Congress and tied into knots by the Nunn reading of
T�� the ABM Treaty. He figures that some time in 1989 or
J 1990 he can visit you at the ranch in Santa Barbara on
William F. Buckley Jr. SSJSaft?1 He wiU tel1 youthmaybe,
J "� "� h�, that Star Wars was always something that
belonged to Disney, not to the great powers. When
What's going to happen is this: He will execute the Star Wars goes public, we'll hear about it the wav we
INF Treaty. Oh, don't doubt that for a minute. He heard about Sputnik in 1957
wantsthosePershingsoutof Europenomatterwhat. My advice? Tell him his thoughts about the need
But on the cozmess bit, and on the joint visits to the for more comprehensive arrangements area good
Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, and that whole bit, he idea, and so you've decided to abandon INF and tie
isgomg to take the hard line. No Step Two - the the theater weapons to a general strategic d'isarma-
2S�!2 T?C nUdean weaP�ns r unti,ment8 the development of Star Wars. Then
someone (get that: someone') agrees to the strict goto work on Congress, and make Star Wars the big
interpretation of the ABM Treaty, which means no issue of the 1988 campaign
testing of the kind we need to develop the Star Wars Let me know if I'm fired.
MAMMM
mWWI" � '��� i i" mmMum �
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mum

Bloom say
(CPS) � It's only rock 'n' roll m
says best-selling author All
Bloom, and he doesn't like it An
In fact, the University of Chi- bi
cago professorbL.nesrock - and
other forms of popular culture
for closing the American mind in
Other educators, howvvi-r
Bhxmi's argument smacks A i �
ism, sexism and racism "Hi- sJ
at rock 'n' roll is ludicrous said
University of Oklahoma English
professor David Gross
Recent calls for rej
(CPS)-The debate about hightr
education's mission and form has
been fueled not only bv internal
discussion, but by best-selling
books, congressional hearings,
Department of Education parvr-
and think-tank reports
A partial list of the calls for
education reform in recent wars
includes:
�"Involvement in Learning:
Realizing the Potential oi Ameri-
can Higher Education 1984, re-
leased by the Department of
Education's National Institute- on
Education. 9
�"To Reclaim a Legacy 1984
issued by the National Endow-
ment for the Humanities.
�"Integrity in the College Cur-
riculum: a Report to the Academic
Community 1985, prepared b
the Associaiton of American Col
leges.
�"Excellence in Education The
States Take Charge 1985, issued
by the American Enterprise insti-
tute.
�"College: The Undergraduate
Experience in America 1986, bv
Ernest L. Boyer, the head of the
Carnegie Foundation for the
Advancement of Teaching.
�"Public, Four-Year Colleges
and Universities: A Healthy En-
rollment Environment 1986, is-
sued by the American Associa-
tion of State Colleges and Univer-
sities and the National Associa-
tion of State Universities and
Land-Grant Colleges.
�"1987 Carnegie Classification
of Higher Education 1987, is-
&jcxI byf�e Cmrncgje Foundation J nese ttaf
fbrthe AdvancemcntofTeachir? Thomas
Officials refuse
to join panel
LINCOLN. NE (CPS) � While
AIDS Awareness Month un-
folded on dozens of campuses last
week with condom giveaways
pamphlets being handed oul
formal announcements of new
AIDS policies, public officals re-
fused to join a panel discussion ai
the University of Nebraska al
Lincoln Oct. 20.
Three state senators and 2 pub-
lic health officials refused to par-
ticipate when they heard Paul
Cameron, a psychologist and an
anti-gay activist, wouldalsobeon
the panel.
Cameron advocates quarantin-
ing and tattooing AIDS victims,
testingall hospital, restaurant and
school employees for AIDS and
making all such people swear
they're not homosexuals or drug
users.
Upon hearing that state Sen.
Don VVeselv refused to oin
Cameron on the proposed panel
discussion, Cameron suggested
to a reporter for the Daily Nebras-
kan, the campus paper, that
"Maybe you should ask Wesely it
he's (a homosexual)
Cameron, whom the American
Psychological Association
dropped from membership in
1983 for an alleged "ethics viola-
tion also criticized Wesely's
"limp-wristed interests
Dr. Paul Stoesz of the Nebraska
Health Department, Dean Austin
of Lincoln Public Schools and
state Sen. Stan Schellpeper also
declined to join the panel
Elsewhere, programs about
AIDS � acquired immune deli
ciency syndrome, a fatal break-
down in victims' immune svs
terns that renders them vulner
able to all kinds of otherwise-cur-
able diseases � went off without
incident at Penn State, Notre
Dame, Shippensburg State, Con-
cordia College and Tulane,
among many other campuses.
The International Banana Asso-
ciation, however, did file a formal
complaint Oct. 21 with the Public
Broadcasting System about a pro-
gram, d"o to be shown on PBS in
NIovember, that uses a banana to
demonstrate the proper way to
use a condom.
Men
in Fi
Wt
scl
be
th
to
I
in the
rcspi 'i
to � Ji
Hw mci
inc qu
Schofa
Vicnd
Coi
� i





cv
I UPOSUCTlOMa 1 I(
t! 5MAE TtlLosorf4
� ?
nothing about that
Bob Matthews
class of '79
aks
npus
trum
rules
- � f the editorial page. The East
an teatures the "Campus
im "Thisisanopinioncolumn
t writers from the student
and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
a in current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
columns are restricted in con-
" nlj with regard to rulesof gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
must be willing to accept by-
' � ' r their efforts, as no en-
5 fr m ghost writers will be pub-
ed.
Persons interested in participating
?king further information may
i ta I the managing editor of The
� linian at 757-6366, or stop by
our offices on the second floor of the
5 Building
eagan
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3,1987
n't call names
� - havecomefrom the left. Equal
r whom, the murdered inno-
rn? Conservatives are for
s tor Everyone, all hu-
- Ynu equal rights comes from
� t the left
"wo ways to avoid communism:
' kvaj to defend our country
other countries combat
si aggression (conservative
a rang way - to erode our
ses and ignore the defenses of
intries against communist
n (liberal stance). Opinion,
n sense, ves.
Matthew Clarke
Chairman
ECU College Republicans
Poetry in ink
'lie editor.
HANDS
V hile reading the East Carolinian
from tront to back,
found that my hands with ink
were covered black.
! know your operating budget is
very thin,
get a newsprint to which
i tk in.
� 1 your paper to sec what others
program; that, and an extension of the ABM Treaty
for maybe 10 years � which is all the Russians need
to complete their Star Wars program.
Now my guess is that Gorby doesn't think he can
wring this out of you. No matter. He will have the
Democratic candidates eating out of his pocket, and
he thinks he has the peaceniks well on their way to
controlling Congress. So, he figures, in 1988 he'll get
the beginning of the retirement of the Pershings
from Europe, and some time in 1989 he will get Star
vVarseither formally put toonesideor else gutted by
Congress and tied into knots by the Nunn reading of
the ABM Treaty He figures that some time in 1989 or
1990 he can visit you at the ranch in Santa Barbara, on
his way to Disneyland. He will tell you then, maybe,
ho ho ho, that Star Wars was always something that
belonged to Disney, not to the great powers. When
Star Wars goes public, we'll hear about it the way we
heard about Sputnik in 1957.
My advice? Tell him his thoughts about the need
for more comprehensive arrangements are a good
idea, and so you've decided to abandon INF, and tie
the theater weapons to a general strategic disarma-
11 ment, pending the development of Star Wars Then
It go to work on Congress, and make Star Wars the big
issue of the 1988 campaign.
Let me know if I'm fired.

A
I
Bloom says rock music closes American minds
(CPS) � It's only rock 'n' roll,
says best-selling author Allan
Bloom, and he doesn't like it.
In fact, the University of Chi-
cago professor blames rock � and
other forms of popular culture -
for closing the American mind.
Other educators, however, sav
Bloom's argument smacks of elit-
ism, sexism and racism. "His shot
at rock 'n' roll is ludicrous said
University of Oklahoma English
professor David Gross. "It's his
mind that's closed
Bloom's "The Closing of the
American Mind a nationwide
bestseller for more than 20 weeks,
has sparked considerable debate
about the role of higher education
in American society. Bloom's
book argues that higher educa-
tion is failing because curricula no
longer emphasize classical West-
ern cultural studies.
Popular culture, Bloom writes,
has made Americans intellectu-
ally lazy and inept.
Bloom describes a typical rock
fan as "a pubescent child whose
body throbs with orgasmic
rhythms; whose feelings are
made articulate in hymns (about)
the joys of onanism or the killing
of parents; whose ambition is to
win fame and wealth in imitating
the drag queen who makes the
music
The sentiment doesn't sit well
in some places.
Recent calls for reform make long listing
(CPS) - The debate about higher
education's mission and form has
been fueled not only by internal
discussion, but by best-selling
books, congressional hearings,
Department of Education papers
and think-tank reports.
A partial list of the calls for
education reform in recent years
includes:
�"Involvement in Learning:
Realizing the Potential of Ameri-
can Higher Education 1984, re-
leased by the Department of
Education's National Institute on
Education.
�"To Reclaim a Legacy 1984,
issued by the National Endow-
ment for the Humanities.
�"Integrity in the College Cur-
riculum: a Report to the Academic
Community 1985, prepared bv
the Associaiton of American Col-
leges.
�"Excellence in Education: The
States Take Charge 1985, issued
by the American Enterprise insti-
tute.
�"College: The Undergraduate
Experience in America 1986, bv
Ernest L. Boyer, the head of the
Carnegie Foundation for the
Advancement of Teaching.
�"Public, Four-Year Colleges
and Universities. A Healthy En-
rollment Environment 1986, is-
sued by the American Associa-
tion of State Colleges and Univer-
sities and the National Associa-
tion of State Universities and
Land-Grant Colleges.
� "1987 Carnegie Classification
of Higher Education 1987, is-
A�c4 rfbpc Irtcge Foundation
for the Ad vancement of Tcachin g
Officials refuse
to join panel
LINCOLN, NE (CPS) � While
AIDS Awareness Month un-
folded on dozens of campuses last
week with condom giveaways,
pamphlets being handed out and
formal announcements of new
AIDS policies, public officals re-
fused to join a panel discussion at
the University of Nebraska at
Lincoln Oct. 20.
Three state senators and 2 pub-
lic health officials refused to par-
ticipate when they heard Paul
Cameron, a psychologist and an
anti-gay activist, would also be on
the panel.
Cameron advocates quarantin-
ing and tattooing AIDS victims,
testing all hospital, restaurant and
school employees for AIDS and
making all such people swear
they're not homosexuals or drug
users.
Upon hearing that state Sen.
Don Wesely refused to join
Cameron on the proposed panel
discussion, Cameron suggested
to a reporter for the Daily Nebras-
kan, the campus paper, that
"Maybe you should ask Wesely if
he's (a homosexual)
Cameron, whom the American
Psychological Association
dropped from membership in
1983 for an alleged "ethics viola-
tion also criticized Wcsely's
"limp-wristed interests
Dr. Paul Stoesz of the Nebraska
Health Department, Dean Austin
of Lincoln Public Schools and
state Sen. Stan Schellpeper also
declined to join the panel.
Elsewhere, programs about
AIDS � acquired immune defi-
ciency syndrome, a fatal break-
down in victims' immune sys-
tems that renders them vulner-
able to all kinds of otherwise-cur-
able diseases � went off without
incident at Pcnn State, Notre
Dame, Shippensburg State, Con-
cordia College and Tulane,
among many other campuses.
The International Banana Asso-
ciation, however, did file a formal
complaint Oct. 21 with the Public
Broadcasting System about a pro-
gram, d'ir� to be shown on PBS in
November, that uses a banana to
demonstrate the proper way to
use a condom.
�"The Closing of the American Cultural Literacy 1987, by
Mind 1987, by University of University of Virginia Prof. E.D.
Chicago Prof. Allan Bloom. Hirsch.
These three rialloweeners are ready for any costume contest.
(Thomas Wafers � Photolab)
A sign in Bowling Green State
University's (Ohio) popular cul-
ture department's office predicts
"Allan Bloom will burn in hell
Bloom would have "a small
elite group of people define what
is of value and ram it down
people's throats said Bowling
Green pop culture professor Jack
Nachbar.
Popular culture studies are of-
fered at Bowling Green, said
Nachbar, to help students under-
stand their environment better.
"We provide a means for stu-
dents, a way to understand their
environment better and to help
them think critically
Bloom also attacks academics
for teaching "relativism exam-
ining issues comparatively, with-
out imposing absolute values.
Young people view any idea as
just as good as any other, Bloom
argues. As a society, we should
apply an absolute standard to all
ideas, philosophies and teach-
ings, he says.
"We see it (relativism) as a
wonderful development said
Bowling Green's Nachbar.
"When you disregard relativism
you open yourself up to academic
fascism
"He puts down pluralism so
easily said Gross, who lectures
on rock and roll lyrics at Okla-
homa. "He talks so easily about
THE TRUTH. But wisdom is not
some self-contained platitude
from Plato. It's ridiculous to say
that everything you need to know
about truth and wisdom is con-
tained in a few books
"Bloom assumes the achieve-
ments of the white, male, Western
tradition are the only ones we
need Gross added. "That's rac-
ist in practice
Nachbar agrees Bloom's argu-
ments smack of racism and sex-
ism, but points out that it's
unintentional. His worship of
Plato, Shakespeare and
Beethoven, Nachbar said, reflects
a "white, male-dominated cul-
ture not a conscious effort to
exclude female and non-white
male artists and philosophers.
T S J fj'
mt&taelci
Chicken 'n Bar-B-Q
TAILGATE PACK
12 pcs. Box of Chicken
2 dz. Hushpuppies
1 Gal. Ice Tea
Only $10.50
Memorial Dr.
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become a nurse and0
the leadership skillsu
to be a better one.u z
Start )ur career �ith advantages other
nursing students won't have.Z
Arm) Reserve ()tfk'ers' I raininglorps is
a great way to learn the self-confidence andr
leadership skills that are important to anvP
career, and indispensable in nursingi
lbu deal u ith real people and real problems.�
And learn to manage, inspire and lead. KcnLU
before you graduate.M
When you do graduate, vou'll have a college i
degree in nursing and an officer's commission11 ,
in the Armv Nurse (krps. With theO
responsibility most other graduates will hae
to wait vears for.
For more information about Armv RO 1 (. and
the qualifications for Armv R()T( Nursingo
Scholarships, talk to vour Professor of MilitarvLU r r
Science, today.lG
For More Info:
Contact Capt. Mitchell
757-6967
Although Bloom decries popu-
lar culture as brain candy, Gross
says rock, popular movies and
other media have value as culture
and art. "Rock and roll, like Dick-
ens, has an appeal to the masses,
but it can also engage the soul on
very important issues
"The majority of rock is mind-
less entertainment, but the best
stuff can be engaging Gross
said.
"Bruce Springsteen � on every
single album there's a raw energy
there as well as an extremely
thoughtful introspection Gross
asserted, citing songs such as
"The River "My Father's
House and "Darkness on the
Edge of Town
'That line from The River Is a
dream a lie if it don't come true
has direct connections to the work
of Langston Hughes and Ecclesi-
astes Gross asserted.
Nachbar said pop artists won't
replace Beethoven and Plato as
cultural icons, and it's "irrelevant
to analyze them in such terms, like
comparing oranges and apples
Gross, however, predicts Bob
Dylan and the movie "Casa-
blanca" will be viewed reveren-
tially be future generations.
Many of Bloom's icons, such as
Shakespeare, wrote for mass au-
diences, Nachbar said. "In fact, he
was condemned during his life by
the elite because he didn't have a
college educaiton
Help Wanted:
The East Carolinian is
in need of an editorial
page editor. perience
preferred. We will train.
Apply in person, today.
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center Is Open
Mori Tues, & Wed. Fri. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
9 a.m. - 2 p.m. & by appointment
For an appointment or more infor
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline,
757-0003
1 1 1 East Third Street - The Lee Building
Greenville. N. C.
Free Pregnancy Test-
Confidenttal Counseling
521 CotanchcSt.
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IVS
.





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3,1987 5
sfft a r YrzzSj
rft call names
from the left. Equal
the murdered inno-
nservatives are for
I . eryone all hu-
ts comes from
- � avoid communism:
' di fend our country
� countries combat
s ion conservative
ong wa to erode our
ind ignore the defenses of
nines against communist
vr.il stance). Opinion,
- nse, yes.
Matthew Clarke
Chairman
ECU College Republicans
Poetry in ink
HAiNDS
the East Carolinian
ont to back,
nd that my hands with ink
wen
i' ��� your operating budget is
m,
� �� get a newsprint to which
� :� ;n.
iper to see what others
thing about that
Bob Matthews
class of '79
beaks
npus
trum
rules
I ria I page, The East
ian features the "Campus
is an opinion column
' writers from the student
ind faculty. The columns
in the "Campus Spectrum"
itain current topics of concern
ampu�. community or nation.
ins are restricted in con-
11 regard to rulesof gram-
ncy. Persons submitting
s must be willing to accept by-
lit for their efforts, as no en-
m gh it writers will be pub-
terested in participating
irther information may
managing editor of The
ai�at757-6366,orstopby
our i n the second floor of the
ns Building
eagan
program; that, and an extension of the ABM Treaty
for maybe 10 years � which is all the Russians need
complete their Star Wars program.
my guess is that Gorby doesn't think he can
No matter. He will have the
candidates eating out of his pocket, and
he thinks he has the peaceniks well on their way to
controlling Congress. So, he figures, in 1988 he'll get
the beginning of the retirement of the Pershings
rom Europe, and some time in 1989 he will get Star
�her formally put to one sideor else gutted by
Congressand tied into knots by the Nunn reading of
the ABM Treaty. He figures that some time in 1989 or
he can visit you at the ranch in Santa Barbara,on
his way to Disneyland. He will tell you then, maybe,
ho ho ho, that Star Wars was always something that
belonged to Disney, not to the great powers. When
Star Wars goes public, we'll hear about it the way we
heard about Sputnik in 1957.
My advice? Tell him his thoughts about the need
tor more comprehensive arrangements are a good
idea, and so you've decided to abandon INF, and tie
the theater weapons to a general strategic disarma-
11 ment, pending the development of Star Wars. Then
It go to work on Congress, and make Star Wars the big
k issue of the 1988 campaign.
Let me know if I'm fired.
Bloom says rock music closes American minds

(CPS) � It's only rock 'n' roll,
says best-selling author Allan
Bloom, and he doesn't like it.
In fact, the University of Chi-
cago professor blames rock � and
other forms of popular culture -
for closing the American mind.
Other educators, however, say
Bloom's argument smacks of elit-
ism, sexism and racism. "His shot
at rock 'n' roll is ludicrous said
University of Oklahoma English
professor David Gross. "It's his
mind that's closed
Bloom's "The Closing of the
American Mind a nationwide
bestseller for more than 20 weeks,
has sparked considerable debate
about the role of higher education
in American society. Bloom's
book argues that higher educa-
tion is failing because curricula no
longer emphasize classical West-
ern cultural studies.
Popular culture, Bloom writes,
has made Americans intellectu-
ally lazy and inept.
Bloom describes a typical rock
fan as "a pubescent child whose
body throbs with orgasmic
rhythms; whose feelings are
made articulate in hymns (about)
the joys of onanism or the killing
of parents; whose ambition is to
win fame and wealth in imitating
the drag queen who makes the
music
The sentiment doesn't sit well
in some places.
Recent calls for reform make long listing
(CPS) -Thedebate about higher
education's mission and form has
been fueled not only bv internal
discussion, but by best-selling
books, congressional hearings,
Department of Education papers
and think-tank reports.
A partial list of the calls for
education reform in recent years
includes.
�"Involvement in Learning:
Realizing the Potential of Ameri-
can Higher Education 1984, re-
leased by the Department of
Education's National Institute on
Education.
�"To Reclaim a Legacy 1984,
issued by the National Endow-
ment for the Humanities.
�"Integrity in the College Cur-
riculum: a Report to the Academic
Community 1985, prepared bv
the Associaiton of American Col-
leges.
�"Excellence in Education: The
States Take Charge 1985, issued
by the American Enterprise insti-
tute.
�"College: The Undergraduate
Experience in America 1986, bv
Ernest L. Boyer, the head of the
Carnegie Foundation for the
Advancement of Teaching.
�"Public, Four-Year Colleges
and Universities: A Healthv En-
rollment Environment 1986, is-
sued by the American Associa-
tion of State Colleges and Univer-
sities and the National Associa-
tion of State Universities and
Land-Grant Colleges.
�"1987 Carnegie Classification
of Higher Education 1987, is-
iovi toyrtvc Cerr�ege Foundation
for the Ad vancement of Teaching
Officials refuse
to join panel
LINCOLN, NE (CPS) � While
AIDS Awareness Month un-
folded on dozens of campuses last
week with condom giveaways,
pamphlets being handed out and
formal announcements of new
AIDS policies, public officals re-
fused to join a panel discussion at
the University of Nebraska at
Lincoln Oct. 20.
Three state senators and 2 pub-
lic health officials refused to par-
ticipate when they heard Paul
Cameron, a psychologist and an
anti-gay activist, would also be on
the panel.
Cameron advocates quarantin-
ing and tattooing AIDS victims,
testing all hospital, restaurant and
school employees for AIDS and
making all such people swear
they're not homosexuals or drug
users.
Upon hearing that state Sen.
Don Wesely refused to join
Cameron on the proposed panel
discussion, Cameron suggested
to a reporter for the Daily Nebras-
kan, the campus paper, that
"Maybe you should ask Wesely if
he's (a homosexual)
Cameron, whom the American
Psychological Association
dropped from membership in
1983 for an alleged "ethics viola-
tion also criticized Wesely's
"limp-wristed interests
Dr. Paul Stoesz of the Nebraska
Health Department, Dean Austin
of Lincoln Public Schools and
state Sen. Stan Schellpeper also
declined to join the panel.
Elsewhere, programs about
AIDS � acquired immune defi-
ciency syndrome, a fatal break-
down in victims' immune sys-
tems that renders them vulner-
able to all kinds of otherwise-cur-
able diseases � went off without
incident at Penn State, Notre
Dame, Shippensburg State, Con-
cordia College and Tulane,
among many other campuses.
The International Banana Asso-
ciation, however, did file a formal
complaint Oct. 21 with the Public
Broadcasting System about a pro-
gram, d1 to be shown on PBS in
November, that uses a banana to
demonstrate the proper way to
use a condom.
�"The Closing of the American �"Cultural Literacy 1987, by
Mind 1987, by University of University of Virginia Prof. ED.
Chicaco Prof. Allan Bloom. Hirsch.
These three Haiioweeners are ready for any costume contest.
(Thomas Waters � Photolab)
Chicken 'n Bar-B-Q
TAILGATE PACK
12 pcs. Box of Chicken
2 dz. Hushpuppies
1 Gal. Ice Tea
Only $10.50
Memorial Dr.
in Front of Hospital
752-3644
We'll give you the
scholarship money to
become a nurse and
the leadership skills
to be a better one.
Start youi i arccr w ith advantages other
nursing students won't have.
Arm Reserve ()rncers'Training (lorps is
a great wa to learn the self-confidence and
leadership skills that are important to an
career, and indispensable in nursing
ou deal with real people and real problems.
And learn to manage, inspire and lead. Even
before you graduate
When you do graduate,you'll have a college
degree in nursing and an officer's commission
in the Arm Nurse (lorps. With the
responsibility most other graduates will have
to wait years for.
For more information about Arm R()T(. anil
the qualifications for Army R()T( I Nursing
Scholarships, talk to vour Professor of Military
Science, today,
For More Info:
Contact Capt. Mitchell
757-6967
c
o
u
!J
z
z
I�
u
O

UJ
I
A sign in Bowling Green State
University's (Ohio) popular cul-
ture department's office predicts
"Allan Bloom will burn in hell
Bloom would have "a small
elite group of people define what
is of value and ram it down
people's throats said Bowling
Green pop culture professor Jack
Nachbar.
Popular culture studies are of-
fered at Bowling Green, said
Nachbar, to help students under-
stand their environment better.
"We provide a means for stu-
dents, a way to understand their
environment better and to help
them think critically
Bloom also attacks academics
for teaching "relativism exam-
ining issues comparatively, with-
out imposing absolute values.
Young people view any idea as
just as good as any other, Bloom
argues. As a society, we should
apply an absolute standard to all
ideas, philosophies and teach-
ings, he says.
"We see it (relativism) as a
wonderful development said
Bowling Green's Nachbar.
'When you disregard relativism
ou open yourself up to academic
ascism
"He puts down pluralism so
easily said Gross, who lectures
Ml rock and roll lyrics at Okla-
homa. "He talks so easily about
THE TRUTH. But wisdom is not
some self-contained platitude
from Plato. It's ridiculous to say
that everything you need to know
about truth and wisdom is con-
tained in a few books
"Bloom assumes the achieve-
ments of the white, male, Western
tradition are the only ones we
need Cross added. "That's rac-
ist in practice
Nachbar agrees Bloom's argu-
ments smack of racism and sex-
ism, but points out that it's
unintentional. His worship of
Plato, Shakespeare and
Beethoven, Nachbar said, reflects
a "white, male-dominated cul-
ture not a conscious effort to
exclude female and non-white
male artists and philosophers.
Although Bloom decries popu-
lar culture as brain candy, Gross
says rock, popular movies and
other media have value as culture
and art. "Rock and roll, like Dick-
ens, has an appeal to the masses,
but it can also engage the soul on
very important issues
"The majority of rock is mind-
less entertainment, but the best
stuff can be engaging Gross
said.
"Bruce Springsteen � on every
single album there's a raw energy
there as well as an extremely
thoughtful introspection Gross
asserted, citing songs such as
"The River "My Father's
House and "Darkness on the
Edge of Town
'That line from The River Is a
dream a lie if it don't come true
has direct connections to the work
of Langston Hughes and Ecclesi-
astes Gross asserted.
Nachbar said pop artists won't
replace Beethoven and Plato as
cultural icons, and it's "irrelevant
to analyze them in such terms, like
comparing oranges and apples
Gross, however, predicts Bob
Dylan and the movie "Casa-
blanca" will be viewed reveren-
tially be future generations.
Many of Bloom's icons, such as
Shakespeare, wrote for mass au-
diences, Nachbar said. "In fact, he
was condemned during his life by
the elite because he didn't have a
college educaiton
Help Wanted:
The East Carolinian is
in need of an editorial
page editor. Experience
preferred. We will train.
Apply in person, today.
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center Is Open
Mon, Tues, & Wed. Fri. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
9 a.m. - 2 p.m. & by appointment
For an appointment or more infor-
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline,
757-0003
1 1 1 East Third Street The Lee Building
Greenville. N. C.
Free Pregnancy Test-
Confldentlal Counseling

521 Cotanche St
ANNOUNCES
SAMPLES FROM
OUR UPCOMING
MENU
Tues & Wed Polio Yucateeo
Cnlied frzmst ofehxken tjpped n.th bucon iMeftpep
pet. ranckero smuch and melted ckaese vr-� tM �$
$4.95
Thurs Seafood Fajitas For Two
GnLled Shrimp and mm legs .th mild Ortega ir: tt-sji
(mums Servedat ycyftabiemasizziingpidtterv.ithfL'iir
tytiUs.guACMrmte hot muceand bans V ��
�" $11.95
757-1666
�TOT Yogurt.
A Hard Act To Follow!
Nobody upstages "TCBY"
frozen yogurt. All the great
taste of premium ice cream,
with fewer calories. It's
lower in cholesterol and
96 fat-free, too.
Good for you,
delicious, and served so
many ways. Take it
from me. Nothing
tops "TCBY
Take It From Me
�-
� 1986 TCBY Systems, Inc.
TCBV
The Country Best Kxjurt
All Of The Pleasure. None Of The Guilt
325 Arlington Blvd. - Greenville
WINTER WARMER,99? OFFER
BUY ONE, GET SECOND ONE FOR 99C
One coupon per purchase ai participating
TCBY stores Void where prohibited
Offer F.pires: Nov. 9,1��7
"TCBV"
Ike t tmrf Arv hnun.
� - � � m m w � m �
" ajwhfchwaii iiniMNaW�w

.� W





-2TlfE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBERS 1987
Classifieds
�:
Offenders



HELP WANTED
WANTED: Phil. 1500 (LOGIC) Tutor.
Must be patient. Call 756-1549.
STOCKBROKER TRAINEE: College
Grad, Opportunity for hard working,
enthusiastic individual, Send resume to:
P.O. Box 8814, Virginia Beach, Va. 23450.
NOW HIRING: 120 positions available
Apply in person to Ryan's Family Steak
1 louse 343? S Memorial Dr Greenville
BASKETBALL OFFICIALS MEETING:
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department will be having the first or-
ganizational meeting for anyone inter-
ested in officiating for the men's winter
basketball league on Tuesday, November
10th at Dm Street Gym at 7:30 PM. All
interested officials should attend this
meeting For more information, call 830-
4543
NOW HIRING: Brody's and Brody's for
Men are now accepting applications for
spring semester Enthusiastic individu-
als who enjoy fashion and can work flex-
ible hours should apply today Brody's,
Carolina East Mall Mon Wed 2 4 p.m
ATTENTION ECU FACULTY AND
STAFF: Brodv's has part-time positions
for individuals interested in a flexible
work schedule to help stuff that special
Christmas stocking Call today for an
interview appointment or apply in per-
son Brodv's, Carolina Fast Mall, Mon -
Wed , 2-4 p.m.
BASKETBALL COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation and Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting for 10 to 14 part time
basketball coaches for the winter pro
gram. Applicants must possess some
knowledge of basketball skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth Applicants must be able to coach
young people, ages 9-18, in basketball
fundamentals. Hours are from 3 PM to 7
PM, Monday through Friday, and some
nights and weekends coaching. The pro-
gram will extend from December 2 to
mid-February Salary rate of $3.55hour
Applications will be accepted starting
Monday, November 2 until positions are
filled. Contact Ben James at 830-4543
WANTED: Experienced part-time skx
clerks. Must have stocking experience in
a chain grocery store, or in a large inde-
pendent grocery store. Will work around
school schedule. Apply in person at
Overton's Supermarket, 211 Jarvis Street,
Greenville.
TRAVEL HELP OPPORTUNITY: Gain
valuable marketing experience while
earning money. Campus representatives
needed immediately for Spring Break
trips to Florida Call Campus Marketing
at 1-800-282-6221
THE HILTON INN is now accepting
applications for front desk and bell man
positions. Morning and evening hours
available, will include weekends. Apply in
person No phone calls please
MAINTENANCE: (Part-time). Position
for cleaning locker rooms, gymnasium,
office areas, lobby, and other areas of the
Aquatics it Fitness Center. Also respon-
sible for some outside maintenance. Must
be able to work 16 hours per week. Salary
is $3.55hour. Applications will be ac-
cepted until position is filled. Apply at the
City of Greenville, Personnel Department,
P.O. Box 7207, 201 West Fifth St
Greenville, N.C. 27835-7207.
LIFEGUARD-SWIM INSTRUCTORS,
PART-TIME: Must have advanced
lifesaving certificate or water safety in-
structor certificate Applicants should be
available to work 3-5 hour shifts between 6
AM and 9 PM. Occasional weekend work
required. Salary is $3.85hour. Applica-
tions accepted until position filled Apply
at the City of Greenville, Personnel De-
partment, P.O. Box 7207,201 West Fifth St
Greenville, N.C 27835-7207.
AEROBICS EXERCISE INSTRUC-
TORS, PART-TIME: Leads and instructs
aerobicsexerasc classes; must have basic
understanding of exerase physiology,
kmesiology, and anatomy Should have
working knowledge of choreographed
exercise programs for adults, children,
older adults, and pregnant women. Must
be able to design a safe dass and know
CPR. Must be in excellent physical condi
tion, must pass fitness exam and be willing
to go through aerobic's instructor training
program. Salary is $7.00hour. Applica-
tions accepted until position is filled.
Apply at the City of Greenville, Personnel
Department, P.O. Box 7207, 201 West Fifth
Street, Greenville, N.C 27835-7207.
RECEPTIONIST, PART-TIME: Answers
telephone, greets members and guests,
conducts tours and sells memberships,
collect fees, records collections, responds
to members and guests requests and ques-
tions, provides information to the public
about memberships, performs light typing
as required Applicant should be available
to work 4-5 hour shift between 8 AM it 1
PM, Monday thru Friday, and occasionally
on weekends between 9 AM it 6 PM. Sal-
ary is S3 75hour. Applications accepted
until position is filled. Apply at the City of
Greenville, Personnel Department, P.O.
Box 7207, 201 West Fifth St Greenville
N.C 27835-7207. EOEAA MFM.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Diamond Earrings it Neck-
lace. 133 ct. 14K Yellow Gold. Price Nego-
tiable. Call 752-8346
MUSICIANS! Yamaha AcousticCuitar
wsteel strings. Also Bronze Set, pick
and case. Like New! Must Sell! $140.00
neg. 752 9107 before noon946-9925
after 9 p.m.
FOR SALE: Three shelf bookcase
$15 00, Pair of Phase Research Stereo
Speakers $60 00; Pair of BSR Stereo
Speakers $35 00; 3 tiered torch lamp
$30.00; Microwave Cart $25 00; 2
drawer plastic file cabinet $25.00 Call
355-5692 leave message.
FOR SALE: VCR and 19" Color TV.
Both in Excellent Condition. $300 for
both of will sell separately! Ask for Steve
at 758-1388 after 500 p.m.
eyv.
ATTENTION ALL CREEKS: H
Why don't you send a penguin-gram to
your brother, sister. Big Brother, little
sister, old mother, dog, cat, cop who
busted you, boyfriend, girlfriend, Al,
BGB (with Turbo-4), Tankheads, Aunt,
Uncle, Girl with dark green eyes, your
bondsman or anyone else. Birthdays or
any occasion Only $1995 through
Thanksgiving. So chip in, it can be fun.
Party animals 830-1823 Koko come
home. Peace�Love�Gorilla-Grams.
Announcements
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton House is offering
thase one hour programs-on preparing
resumes for your job search Handouts
and samples will be given out to the first
20 people to come to each session. No sign
up required These sessions are held in the
Career Planning Room on Nov 3 9 12 &
24 at 3 PM
INTERVIEW WpRKSHQPq
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxton I louse is offering
these one hour sessions to aid vou in
developing better interviewing skills. A
film and discussion of how to interview
on and off campus will be shared These
sessions are held in the Career Planning
Room on Nov. 4, 5, 18 & 23 at 3 PM
E.C. HONORS PK(r.
There will be a mandatory ECHO
meeting on Thurs Nov. 5 at 5 PM in
Mendenhall 212. All members should at-
tend.
FRESHMENSOPHOMORES
Register for a course this spring
semester that can show you how to: com-
pete for scholarships and financial aid,
earn $8,000-$l2,000 during your junior
and senior years, earn $2,000 tax-free,
enhance your career opportunities. MLSC
1001 is a one-hour elective that will show
you how to take advantage of this. The
course has no uniform or lab requirement
and entails no obligation. For more info ,
contact Capt. Alvin Mitchell at 757-6967
6974, or visit Erwin Hall, room 319.
PIG PICK1N'
SRA Pig Picking�catered by Bill's
Barbeque Nov. 7, before the game. The
cost is $5 a ticket: seconds are on us. See
your residence hall vice-president for
tickets or call the SRA office in MSC.
CIRCLE K
All interested students are invited to
attend our meeting Tues Nov. 3 at 7:00
PM room 221 Mendenhall. We also ex tend
a special welcome to former key club
members.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The Gamma Beta Phi Honor Society
will be having a meeting Nov. 3 at 7 p.m.
in Jenkins Auditorium. Please have ticket
money and prize winners will be drawn.
ART SCHOLARSHIPS
The School of Art of ECU is offering
scholarships for full-time art students
from the Richard Steven Bean Scholar-
ship Fund, the University Book Ex-
change Scholarship Fund, and the
Gravely Scholarship Fund. The recipient
of the Richard Steven Bean Scholarship
Fund must be a Commercial Art major
with a maintained 2.5 GPA. The $300
award is for the Spring 1988 and Fall 1988
semesters. The U.B.E. Scholarship Fund
grants two scholarships in the amount of
$500 for two semesters, Spring 1988 and
Fall 1988, to two undergraduate art stu-
dents with a maintained 3.0 GPA. The
Gravely Scholarship in the amount of
$320 for the Spring 1988 semester is avail-
able to a Commercial Art student and will
be a renewal to last year's recipient. Addi-
tional info, and application forms can be
obtained in the Media Center in the School
of Art of ECU. The deadline for applica-
tions is Nov. 19.
GOSPEL CHOIR
The ECU Gospel Choir will be holding
their Fall Concert on Sun Nov. 8 at 4:00
pm in Hendrix Theatre. Admission $1
SUPPORT GRDirp
A support group has been formed for
people who are caring for a parent,
spouse, or other loved one at home. The
group is led by Freda W. Cross, MSW, Pitt
County Memorial Hospital and Susan
Redding, R.N Creative Living Center.
The support group will be at St. James
United Methodist Church at 2000 E. 6th
St CreenviUe, NC, on Tues, Nov. 3 from
700 p.m. - 830 p.m. Respite services are
available. To make reservations for res-
pitecare, call the Creative LivingCenterat
757-0303 from 8:00 am. to 5 00 p m 24
hours in advance.
SCHOLARSHIP
Tne Triangle East Advertising and
Marketing Association is offering a schol-
arship for a rising senior who is majoring
in Advertising in the School of Art, Busi-
ness (Marketing), or Drama (Broadcast-
ing) at ECU. The applicant must have at
least a 3.0 GPA and intend to pursue a
career in advertising related field in east-
ern N.C. An application form must be
completed, and a 500 word essay type-
written explaining how heshe became
interested in advertising as a career and
why heshe should receive the Scholar-
ship. Finalists also participate in an inter-
view during the fall semester of their
senior year. Slides of five works (name,
title, media, size) must accompany the
application form of an art student. This
year there will be available for Spring 1988
and Fall 1988 $150 each semester. Appli-
cation forms may be obtained in the
Media Center in the School of Art. The
deadline for application materials is Nov
19.
GC REGISTRATION
General College students should con-
tact their advisers the week of Nov. 2-6 to
make arrangements for academic advis-
ing for spring semester, 1988. Early regis-
tration will begin Nov. 9 and end Nov. 17.
ASPEN WIND QUTNTFT
The Dcpt. of Univ. Unions and The
School of Music present THE ASPEN
WIND QUINTET in recital Thurs Nov.
5th, at 8:00 P.M. in Hendrix Theatre. Tick-
ets are now on sale in the Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall, from 11:00 a.m. - 6:00
p.m. MonFri. Call 757-6611, ext. 266.
Croup rates are available.
MARIAN MCPARTI ANip
The Dept. of Univ. Unions and The
School of Music present National Public
Radio's first Lady of Jazz�Marian
McPartland�in Hendrix Theatre on
Tues Nov. 10th at 8:00 p.m. Tickets are
now on sale in the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall, 11:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Call
757-6611, ext. 266. Group rates are avail-
able.
THE KING SSINGFRS
Buy your tickets now for one of the
finest vocal groups ever� THE KING'S
SINGERS� in concert Mon Nov. 30th in
Wright Auditorium at 8:00 P.M. Tickets
are now on sale in the Central Ticket Of-
fice, Mendenhall from 11:00 a.m. - 6:00
p.m. MonFri. Call 757-6611, ext. 266.
Group rates are available.
DIVE CLIJB
If you enjoy snorkeling then you need
to join ECU's Coral Reef Dive Club. For
more info call 752-4399 and ask for Glenn
or Rob.
COPING WITH STRFSS
A free mini dass offered by ECU Coun-
seling Center for students: You can�
identify sources of stress, make positive
changes, manage your response to stress-
ful situations, learn to relax, improve self
confidence. Nov 3, 5, 10, it 12 in 329
Wright Bldg. from 3-4 p.m. No advance
registration is required. Call or stop by the
Counseling Center for further info. (316
Wright Bldg), 757-6661.
BURROUGHS-WFII COMF
Open to all students. SAM is sponsor-
ing a tour of Burroughs-Wellcome plant
on Nov. 11th Students interested should
sign up on sheets posted in Rawl (or other
areas) Meet in Rawl 105 (Browning Rm )
at 1:00 p m. Buses or vans may be available
if needed.
TURKEY TROT
A Turkey Trot run will be held by the
Dept. of Intramural Recreational Serv-
ices. Registration will be held Nov 18 at 6
pm in Brewster D-103. For more info
call 757-6387.
NATL. PARK SFRVICF
Seasonal positions are available with
the National Park Service at locations
throughout the nation. Majors needed
include L.S.S P.E, Construction, and
History. For more info see Cooperative
Ed, Rawl 314.
REBEL ART SHOW
The Art-n-Camera Frame Shop and
Gallery will hold the Rebel Art Show
Wed Nov. 4th - Wed Nov. 11. On Sat
Nov. 7th from 1-2.30 p.m awards will be
presented. The public is invited. An Exhi-
bition of award winning art selected for
ECU's Literary Magazine.
AED
Meeting Nov. 3 in F-307: 6:00 p.m.�
Officers Meeting; 6.30 p.m.�Pledge
Meeting; and 7:00 p.m. Regular Meeting
with speaker to follow.
WES-FEL
Wes-fcl is a joint PresbyterianMeth-
odist Fellowship. Come to the Methodist
Student Center this Wed. night at 5 p.m.
and every Wed. night for a delicious, all-
you-can-eat home cooked meal with a
short program afterwards. The meal is is
$2 at the door, $1.50 if you sign up in
advance. Call 758-2030 for reservations.
PI SIGMA ALPHA
There will be a meeting of Pi Sigma
Alpha on Thurs Nov. 5th at 5:15 p.m. in
the Political Science library. Please make
an effort to attend.
ACCOUNTING SOr.FTY
The Accounting Society's Nov. meet-
ing will be held Mon Nov. 9th at 4 P.M. in
Mendenhall room 244. GAO representa-
tives will speak. The Dec. banquet will be
discussed. Refreshments will be served!
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda will be having a regu-
larly scheduled meeting Wed Nov. 4 at
3:00 p.m. in R3Q2.
AMBASSADORS
Come to the meeting Wed Nov. 4 at
5:15 p.m. in Mendenhall ready to have a
good time and eat pizza. The general
meeting will follow the party.
Sell us your used books! The Student
Stores will begin buying back books at the
Customer Service Desk approximately
Oct. 23,1987.
1973 MGB convertible Red with Black
interior. Clean and runs well $1000 neg
758-3955 after 4 p.m.
RED HOT BARGAINS! Drug dealers'
cars, boats, planes repo'd. Surplus. Your
Area Buyers Guide (1) 805-687 6000
Ext. S44
IS IT TRUE You Can Buy Jeeps for $44
through the US government? Get the
facts today! Call 1 312 742 1142, Ext
5271-A.
FOR SALE: Great condition 79 Mazda
GLC, AMFM cassette, seat covers,
$850. Call after 6�752 1974
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERV-
ICES: Papers, Resumes, Theses, etc.
Reasonable rates (most $125 page)
Grammar, punctuation it spelling cor-
rected. Call JAMIE �758-1161 -M-F-9-5
or 758-4567 nights it weekends Fast,
accurate it reliable.
WRITING YOUR PAPER BY HAND
And Then Typing it Over? Save time by
writing from scratch on a computer The
University has the computers available
for students, I can teach you how Free
word processing software! 752-9637
TYPING AND WORD PROCESSING:
Two copies for the pi ice of one Done on
IBM compatible computer with NLQ
printers Spelling checked against
70,000 word dictionary. 752-9637.
TYPING SERVICE: Papers, Thesis,
Letters, etc. Typing done on computer
16 years experience. Low rates Call 756-
8934 after 5:30 p.m.
TYPING of Term Papers and These?
done on a Tandy 1000 SX computer at
very low rates. Call Wendy at 752-1321
after 1:00.
NEED TYPING? Call Kim at 758-1161
before 5:00 p.m 758-2119 after 5:00 p.m.
NEED TYPING? Call Cindy - 757-0398.
Call anytime after 5:00 p.m. Low rates
include: proofreading, spelling and
grammatical corrections; professional
service. 10 years experience - IBM TYP-
ING.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICES
� 758-8241 or 758- 5488 ask for Susan
1986 HONDA CR250R DIRT BIKE
Never Raced. I lelmet it Gloves available.
20 hours riding time. Excellent condition
Motorcycle trailer also available $1900
Call 355-7812 after 6 p.m. or leave mes-
sage.
WORD PROCESSING letter quality or
laser printing. Rush jobs accepted. 752-
1933.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We aLso sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 handwritten pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (Beside Cubbies) Greenville,
N.C. 752-3694.
PICK UP AND DELIVERY of term pa
pers, theses, resumes to be typed. IBM
word processing by professional with 13
years experience. Letter quality print and
professional editing. Call Nanette in
Gnfton at 1-524-5241 Cheap call�the
best service!
PROFESSIONALS BUT NOT EXPEN-
SIVE! Progressive Solutions Inc. offers
professional word processing to students
and professionals. Term papers, disserta-
tions, themes, reports and much more as
low as $1.75 per page. (Please call for
quote on your project.) Price includes
printing on high quality bond paper and
spelling verification against a 50,000
word electronic dictionary. Ask about
our special offers. Laser Printing now
available. Call Mark at 757-3440 after 7:00
p.m. for free information.
TIGHT BUDGET? Try our meal deal
$2.49 for any sandwich, fries it drink. 1
4 hamburger, ham and cheese, BLT, roast
beef, chicken filet, turkey or pizza burger.
Also, homemade spaghetti and lasagna
$3.59 (garlic bread and salad included).
FAMOUS PIZZA corner of 10th St. and
Evans. Not for delivery.
COMPARE OUR PRICES And Cood
Food Buy any large Pizza and get a 2 liter
Coke FREE. Buy any small Pizza and get
2 free 16 oz. drinks Buy any sub and get
one free 16 oz. drink Call for FREE DE-
LIVERY FAMOUS PIZZA 757-1276 or
757-0731.
FOR RENT
APT. TO SUBLET: 2 bedroom $315, no
deposit, all appliances Near Campus
Bus service Available December 1 758-
6015 nights or 752 3519 weekdays Ask
for Apt 200 C3
FOR RENT: Private bedroom, female
only Kitchen Privileges Call after 6 30
p m 758 5422. Available now!
TAR RIVER ESTATES: 752 4225 $300
off 1st months rent on all 1, 2, & 3 bed
room apartments Open House on Sat,
Nov. 14 and Sunday, V OOp.mS
p.m.
R1NGGOLD TOWERS: Apts. for rent-
furnished Contact Hollie Simonowich.
752-2865.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Stratford Arms, Oakmend Sq. area. Call
after 6 p.m. 756-6883
HOUSE TO SHARE: Private room w
full kitchen priviledges Rent includes
electricity, heat, gas. $165 per month plus
deposit12 month lease House located at
504 E 12th St, 3 blks. from ECU campus
Available Nov 25. Call 758 1274 after
5 30 pm.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Wilson Acres. Dec. 1, own room, $145
rent, 13 deposit, 13 utilities. Call 752-
5t30. Ask for Kathy, Tanya, or Rente.
STUDENTS DONT WAIT for Winter
Semester to Start Begin looking for your
new home today We have early rentaLs
available now. Confirm your choice to-
day 752-1375 Homelocators Small Fee
3 OR 4 BEDROOM HOUSE, 1 1 2 baths,
den, $300 or 5 bedroom, 2 baths, $400
others 752-1375 Homelocators Fee.
PERSONALS
BILL GRADY: This weekend j m,
tnck or treat, your tricks were my treat,
Do vou want some more candy little
PPV. 1 know 1 do. Keep your door un-
locked for a late night visit. See yg
Won�The girl with the dark gree n eyes
MALE STRIPPERS; Come dpwp to The
Elbo's all new ladies night. Ladies only
till 1030. Male strippers for the ladies. $1
shots and $1 Highballs all the time See
you Wed. night
JAMES AND BRIAN: Friday night was
slightly outrageous From cheeseburgers
without the burgers to holes in panty-
hose. Thanks for lending us your "Porce-
lain God I bet you never had four girls
spend the night before Thanks for the
slumber party' - "The Fantastic Four-
some
ADPI: The Gang At Rosinas just Luv you
Gals
LADIES NIGHT: The Flbo present la-
dies night from 1030 (Ladies Only)
tejtunng The Elbo male strippers this
Wed night.
THETA CHI: when it comes to Pizza You
guys just don't bull around
KELLY SLOAN: Looking forward to
stranger night at the Phi Tau house.
Couldn't ask for a better stranger And
don't stress out we have lots of bushes for
ya! T.D.
ZTA: Thanks for the Lock up. Wish I was
there. Rosina.
LOST: Man's gold Citizen watch with
blue band. Left in dressing room in
Minges Sat Oct. 24. Reward offered. Call
758-9660.
CHEAP DRINKS: dollar shots and dol-
lar high balls; $2.50 for a huge Ice TEA
Come out to downtowns newest pnvate
club, the Dbo�with an all new music
format
TO ALL OF THE ALPHA DELTA PI
STRANCER MIXER DATES. Cet
psyched for Thursday! "We can't wait to
meet our dates " Love, the Alpha Delta
Pi's
ORGANIZATIONS THAT HAVE
BEEN CONTACTED BY THE BUCCA-
NEER YEARBOOK: Call the office today
to schedule your group photo You sjojjj
want to be left out'
WE KNOW THIS IS LATE Very Late.
But we wanted to say congratulations
to Natalie Moore�second runner up
and Noelle Hogan� first runner up on
the Homecoming Court Sigma couldn't
have two better representatives Love,
The Sisters and Pledges of Sigma Sigma
Sigma
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON: We wanted
to wish you good luck and to let you
know we are behind you! You're doing a
great job! Love, The Sigmas
TO THE PLEDGES OF SIGMA SIGMA
SIGMA: Our surprise trip to the haunted
house was a blast' You guys are terrific
But from a great pledge class�what can
you expect" I lad a great time' Love, The
Sisters
GREEKS: Why drive millions of miles for
a good dnnk special Come to the Elbo
Friday afternoon 4 7 party wthe Sig
Eps dollar shots, dollar high balls, and
$2 50 for a humongous ICE TEA" See you
Friday"
HAPPY HOUR IS BACK: come out and
party with the Sig Eps This Friday after-
noon 4 7 at the Elbo' free admission, do!
lar shots, dollar high balls, $1 00 screw
drivers and $2 50 for a giant ICE TEA"
P1KAS: We appreciate you joining us last
Weds for the pumpkin carving We had a
great time and we hope you did too'
Hope you had a safe Halloween Love.
The Sigmas
COME JOIN THE SIGMAS Tues Nov 3
at l'antana Bobs for happy hour Free
nacho bar for everyone'
ALPHA SIG: There is no better way to
start Halloween Day, than being with
you guys! Let's do it again next year! We
love you' Love, the AZD's
FREE BAHAMA TRIP Come down to
the Elbo and register for a trip for two to
the Bahamas Spring Break. $1 tickets
buy yours today
SIGMAS: Thanks for having us over for
the pumpkin carvin' and marshmellow
roast. It'was a'blast, love' those smores,
woia (opMniorward Ki 'WU1 m�U� �
wuhrt'llsow.ttr the Vttyriarrfcttyctir
pumpkin was the best Thanks, The
Pikes
SIR LANCELOT: It was nice seeing you
again on Thursday! Even though that talk
was short�I realized how much I wish
we shared a friendship' Let's make plans
to do lunch sometime " Darrvl's
Suzanne.
TRI SIGMA SISTERS: Surprise, sur
prise! We hope you had fun To look at
your faces we thought you'd run We bet
you didn't know you were well on your
way, to be kidnapped for Halloween
play. The goblins were mooning, bats
were screeching, and ghosts moaning
boo! Yes, we planned this all for you We
love you so much! Tn Sigma Pledges
REWARD: Lost Gold Nugget Bracelet
outside of Brewster Great Sentimental
Value. Call 758-9146.
ATTENTION: Don't forget Alpha Xi
Delta's Happy Hour EVERY Wednesday
night at Pantana's�It's the BEST excuse
for missing Thursday's classes!
PHI TAU LITTLE SISTERS - THANKS
FOR THE CHAMPAGNE BLOWOUT
AND ALL THE EXTRA CURRICULAR
ACTIVITIES YOU GIRLS ARE CREAT
LETSS DO IT AGAIN REAL SOON
THE BROTHERS.
SIG EPS - The money for champagne
breakfast pictures is due Wed Get psy-
ched for a killer formal
Spring Registraion
Magazines are here
Pick up your copy at:
� Any university department office,
� The lobby of the Student Supply Store,
� The Register's office in Whichard Building.
�i m � n � imnmj
� -�,
convicted
paired win
a Breathah
att-d Amo
is presume
stan
be convict
Under th
one blowin
w ho refusi
will rx a
counties, ev�
tween Ian
II. Cal
der. ;
and
and coa
lationsi j
(V
be reconun
Wl o
i! tre
-
victed
with
than
Highwa
GREENSBORO (AP) Begin-
ning Jan. 1, as many as two-fhtrds
of all DWI offenders will be re
quired to undergo assessment for
possible drinking problems, state
officials say.
And in 10 pilot counties anyone
convicted of drunk driving will be
tested, no matter what their
blood-alcohol level
The new program was ap
proved this year by the legislature
in response to studies that show
70 percent or more of people con
victed of drunken driving have
drinking or drug abuse problems
but only about 20 percent .
fenders receive treatment.
"The feeling is the current sys-
tem merely scratches the surface
of the number of people who need
substance abuse treatmentClint
Horton, a state Department of
Human Resources official who
works with mental health profes-
sionals in Alamance and Forsyth
counties, told the Greensboro
News&r Record.
"We want to more readilv iden-
tify these people and get them
treated
The system also is designed to
help officials determine whether
existing facilities are sufficent to
handle the number of drunken
drivers with drinking problems,
Horton said.
Under current law, anvone
Florida grad student:
TALLAHASSEE, Ha. (CPS)
Students at all 9 Florida state uni- teac
versities will start a "fluency rem
check" to make sure forcign-bom tor, the �
grad students teaching courses versitv
peak understandable Englisr
the Florida Student Association alread)
(FSA) announced last week
The FSA, executive director r,
GregHull-Rydcsaid isaskingthe
student governments on all 9 cent
campuses to help gather the their
names � even by placing "moni-
tors" in classes � oi instruct
students have trouble under- vert
standing. les ;�
New Jersey Senator
WAS1 HNGTON (AD - When
FjWkLauianbergs daughter
warned Wan 29 years apo about
his smoking, she didn't know just
how seriously he'd take her
Not only did Lautenberg quit,
but as a New Jersey senator he led
a successful drive last week to
sharply curtail smoking on the
nation's airlines.
Recalling his daughter's scare
warning � "Please stop smoking,
Daddy, or you'll get a black box in
your lungs" � Lautenberg won
approval for a plan to keep "No
Smoking" signs permanentlv lit
aboard nearly three-quarters of
the nation's commercial flights.
The Senate passed a Lautenberg
measure calling for a two-vear
ban on smoking on all domestic
flights of 90 minutes or less.
The limit, accompanied bv an
even tougher House ban, appears
likely to survive House-Senate
negotiations. President Reagan
has threatened to veto it, how-
ever, as part of an overall spend-
ing package he deems too expen-
sive.
For Lautenberg, his then fVyear-
old daughter's idea grew into an
eycball-to-eyeball confrontation
with tobacco-state senators and
their powerful constituents.
"It was stare-down at tobacco
ranch Lautenberg said.
The fight first flared a month
ago when the Senate transporta-
tion appropriations subcommit-
tee voted to include the airline-
smoking ban in a $11.1 billion fis-
cal 1988 spending bill.
The subcommittee, chaired bv
Lautenberg, voted to stop smok-
ing on ail flights up to two hours
for three years.
But tobacco-state senators, led
by Jesse Helms, R-N.C immedi-
ately threatened a filibuster
Eakin to speak
Dr. Richard Eakin, ECU chan-
cellor, is scheduled to speak on
The University's Role in Ex-
panding Adult Learning Oppor-
tunities in Eastern North Caro-
lina" at a campus meeting Nov. 4.
Eakin will be the featured
speaker at the fall meeting of the
ECU Adult Education Associa-
tion (ECUAEA) at 6:30 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Student Center. An
informal question and answer
discussion will follow.
For more information about the
ECUAEA and its meetings, con-
tact Dr. Leonard Lilley or Dr.
Elizabeth Knott in the ECU Adult
Education office at 757-6825.
TVk n.
rnal -
trated a cap
Sena te f
opposing
himself g
messages
Ll
�One
�One
Enlar
�One
�Videol
�Slide
�Film,
and
�Passf
�Studi
EC
:
� �� �� �MB





t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3,1987
hTRICES And Goodclub, the Dbo�with an all new music
tfl?a and get a 2-literformat
a -imall Pizza and get
m ub and getTO ALL OF THE ALPHA DELTA PI
tor TREE PESTRANGER MIXER DATES. . . . Get
. 757 I27K orpsyched for Thursday! "We can't wait to meet our dates " Love, the Alpha Delta Pis
RRENTORGANIZATIONS THAT HAVE BEEN CONTACTED BY THE BUCCA-
NEER YEARBOOK: Call the office today
131; noto schedule vour group photo You don't
( ampuswant to be left out!

weekdays AkWE KNOW THIS IS LATE Very Late.
tomile
4 S300
2 & 3 bed
be on Sat
X1 pjR5
owidl
v INTED:
n area Call
IMATt NEEDED:
1, cmn room, $145
" utihtjes. Call r-
tr-� larva or Renee
?aths
14 I
�NALS
ej;i�nd. it was
icjnoje.candy little
lecp. j:qui dwr un-
night Visit. See ya
th the dark green eyes.
IS Come down tg The
iies night Ladies onlv
he ladje SI
:k up Wish I was
Citizen watch with
jin dressing room in
t4 Rev. u ��. red Call
shuts and dol-
huge Ice TEA"
newest private
But we wanted to say congratulations
to Natalie Moore�second runner-up
and Noelle Hogan�first runner-up on
the I iomecoming Court Sigma couldn't
have two better representatives Love,
The Sisters and Pledges of Sigma Sigma
Sigma
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON: We wanted
to wish vou good luck and to let you
know we are behind vou' You're doing a
great pb1 Love, The Sigmas
TO THE PLEDGES OF SIGMA SIGMA
SIGMA: Our surprise trip to the haunted
house was a blast' You guys are terrific.
But from a great pledge class�what can
vou expect!? Had a great time' Love, The
Sistors
GRFFKS: Vhv drive millions of miles for
a good drink special Come to the Elbo
Frida) afterimoti 4-7 party wthe Sig
.ir shots, dollar high balls; and
S2 ; for ahumongous ICE TEA!1 See you
Friday "
HAPP HOUR IS BACK: come out and
party with the Sig Eps This Friday after-
noon 4 7 at the Elbo' free admission; dol-
lar shots dollar high balls, $1 00 screw-
drivers and S2 50 for a giant ICE TEA
PI k A S: We appreciate you joining us last
� iis tor the pumpkin carving We had a
great time and we hope you did too!
i lope vou had a safe Halloween Love,
The Sigmas
I OME JOIN THE SIGMAS Tues Nov 3
at Pantana Bobs for happv hour Free
nacho bar for evervone!
ALPHA SIG: There is no better way to
start Halloween Day, than being with
� vs' Let's do it again next vear! We
Love, the AZD's
FREE BAHAMA TRIP Come down to
the Elbo and register for a trip for two to
the Bahamas Spring Break. $1 tickets
buv yours today"
SIGMAS: Thanks for having us over for
the pumpkin carvin' and marshmellow
roast. It was a'ftast, love'fndse smores,
w'wloukin.iruard t-rr 'Wi.llp��"j r, 1 m
with rttll soon-flr the wSvrf�rrtet)�TOr
pumpkin was the best Thanks, The
Pikes
SIR LANCELOT: It was nice seeing you
again on Thursday! Even though that talk
M as short �I realized how much I wish
n 1 shared a friendship' Let's make plans
do lunch sometime " Darryl's?
TRI SICMA SISTERS: Surprise, sur-
prise' Wc hope vou had fun. To look at
vour faces we thought you'd run We bet
vou didn't know vou were well on your
way, to be kidnapped for Halloween
The goblins were mooning, bats
were screeching, and ghosts moaning
boa es, we planned this all for you We
love vou so much! Tn Sigma Pledges
REWARD. Lost Gold Nugget Bracelet
outside of Brewster. Great Sentimental
Value. Call 7S8-9146
ATTENTION: Don't forget Alpha Xi
Deltas Happy Hour EVERY Wednesday
night at Pantana's�It's the BEST excuse
for missing Thursday's classes!
PHI TAU LITTLE SISTERS - THANKS
FOR THE CHAMPAGNE BLOWOUT -
AND ALL THE EXTRA CURRICULAR
ACTIVITIES YOU GIRLS ARE GREAT.
LETSS DO IT AGAIN REAL SOON
THE BROTHERS.
SIG EPS - The money for champagne
breakfast pictures is due Wed Get psy-
ched for a killer formal.
gistraion
are here
ur copy at:
artment office,
judent Supply Store,
:e in Whichard Building.
Offenders must take test
GREENSBORO (AP) � Begin-
ning Jan. 1, as many as two-thirds
of all DWI offenders will be re-
quired to undergo assessment for
possible drinking problems, state
officials say.
And in 10 pilot counties anyone
convicted of drunk driving will be
tested, no matter what their
blood-alcohol level.
The new program was ap-
proved thisyear by the legislature
in response to studies that show
70 percent or more of people con-
victed of drunken driving have
drinking or drug abuse problems,
but only about 20 percent of of-
fenders receive treatment.
"The feeling is the current sys-
tem merely scratches the surface
of the number of people who need
substance abuse treatment Clint
Horton, a state Department of
Human Resources official who
works with mental health profes-
sionals in Alamance and Forsyth
counties, told the Greensboro
News & Record.
"We want to more readily iden-
tify these people and get them
treated
The system also is designed to
help officials determine whether
existing facilities are sufficent to
handle the number of drunken
drivers with drinking problems,
Horton said.
Under current law, anyone
convicted of driving while im-
paired who blows .20 or higher on
a Breathalyzer test must be evalu-
ated. Anyone blowing .10 or more
is presumed impaired under the
state's DWI law, although one can
be convicted with lower levels.
Under the new program, any-
one blowing .15 or higher � or
who refuses a Breathalyzer test �
will be assessed. In the pilot
counties, everyone convicted be-
tween Jan. 1, 1988, and June 30,
1989, will be tested.
Besides Alamance and Forsyth,
the pilot counties are Buncombe,
Iredell, Cabarrus, Rowan, Wake,
Wayne, New Hanover and Fen-
der. They constitute a mix of rural
and urban, mountain, Piedmont
and coast counties, whose popu-
lations closely reflect the state as a
whole, Horton said.
Once assessed, the driver will
be recommended either for the
state's driver education program
for DWI offenders or for psycho-
logical treatment.
The assessment is the responsi-
bility of the area mental health
center where the driver is con-
victed.
Statewide in 1986, there were
7,334 people convicted of DWI
with blood alcohol levels higher
than .20, according to the state
Highway Patrol.That constituted
about 22 percent of all DWI con-
victions statewide.
But more than twice that many
� 14347 � were convicted with
blood alcohol levels of .16 to .20.
So if the same proportions hold
true in 1988, the percentage of
DWI offerders undergoing as-
sessment will increase from 22
percent to about 67 percent.
"Right up front, our work load
will more than double said
Robert Windham, director of
substance abuse services for the
Alamance-Caswell Area Mental
Health Center.
"We're going from about 600
assessments a year to 1,200 or
1,400
Under current law, the presid-
ing judge decides whether an of-
fender enters an education pro-
gram or psychological treatment.
After Jan. 1, that will be up to the
psychological assessor.
Assessment will cost the indi-
vidual $50 under state law, and, in
all but the pilot counties, traffic
school will be $100 per person.
In pilot counties, offenders will
have to pay $125, with $50 cover-
ing the assessment and the bal-
ance going either to traffic school
or treatment. Persons undergoing
treatment likely would incur
additional costs for that, based on
their ability to pay, Horton said.
Florida grad students must take fluency exam
TALLAHASSEE, Ha. (CPS) �
Students at all 9 Florida state uni-
versities will start a "fluency
check" to make sure foreign-born
grad students teaching courses
speak understandable English,
the Florida Student Association
(FSA) announced last week.
The FSA, executive director
Greg Hull-Ryde said, isasking the
student governments on all 9
campuses to help gather the
names � even by placing "moni-
tors" in classes � of instructors
students have trouble under-
standing.
"This is unfair McCarthyism a
teaching assistant who asked to
remain nameless told the Alliga-
tor, the student paper at the Uni-
versity of Florida. "They already
make us take tests, and students
already (write class) assessments.
To have a language monitor in the
room is distracting
"Instructors with slight ac-
cents she added, "could lose
their classroom positions
Hull-Ryde said the FSA will
forward the names the State Uni-
versity System Chancellor Char-
les Reed.
Under Florida law, department
chairmen at the state campuses
can administer English profi-
ciency tests to instructors, who
typically are drawn from the grad
school population. Hull-Ryde,
however, charged no department
on any of the 9 campuses actually
has given an English test since the
law was p.issed in 1983.
Some other states � Illinois,
Ohio and Missouri � also have
begun requiring foreign-born in-
structors to prove their English
competence before being allowed
to teach.
New Jersey Senator leads anti-smoking move
WASHINGTON (AP) � When
!rAuVvL4UiMAberg's .daoighjUir
warned - him 2G yeafte -ago abtrut-
his smoking, she didn't know just
how seriously he'd take her.
Not only did Lautenberg quit,
but as a New Jersey senator he led
a successful drive last week to
sharply curtail smoking on the
nation's airlines.
Recalling his daughter's scary
warning � "Please stop smoking,
Daddy, or you'll get a black box in
your lungs" � Lautenberg won
approval for a plan to keep "No
Smoking" signs permanently lit
aboard nearly three-quarters of
the nation's commercial flights.
The Senate passed a Lautenberg
measure calling for a two-year
ban on smoking on all domestic
flights of 90 minutes or less.
The limit, accompanied by an
even tougher House ban, appears
likely to survive House-Senate
negotiations. President Reagan
has threatened to veto it, how-
ever, as part of an overall spend-
ing package he deems too expen-
sive.
For Lautenberg, his then 6-year-
old daughter's idea grew into an
eyeball-to-eyeball confrontation
with tobacco-state senators and
their powerful constituents.
"It was stare-down at tobacco
ranch Lautenberg said.
The fight first flared a month
ago when the Senate transporta-
tion appropriations subcommit-
tee voted to include the airline-
smoking ban in a $11.1 billion fis-
cal 1988 spending bill.
The subcommittee, chaired by
Lautenberg, voted to stop smok-
ing on all flights up to two hours
for three years.
But tobacco-state senators, led
by Jesse Helms, R-N.C, immedi-
ately threatened a filibuster.
Eakin to speak
ECU Nan. Bun.
Dr. Richard Eakin, ECU chan-
cellor, is scheduled to speak on
The University's Role in Ex-
panding Adult Learning Oppor-
tunities in Eastern North Caro-
lina at a campus meeting Nov. 4.
Eakin will be the featured
speaker at the fall meeting of the
ECU Adult Education Associa-
tion (ECUAEA) at 6:30 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Student Center. An
informal question and answer
discussion will follow.
For more information about the
ECUAEA and its meetings, con-
tact Dr. Leonard Lilley or Dr.
Elizabeth Knott in the ECU Adult
Education office at 757-6825.
The nation's largest cigarette
rnaker, Philip Morris, orches-
trated a campaign that flooded
Senate offices with Mailgrams
opposing the ban. Lautenberg
himself got nearly 4,000 of the
messages.
But he counted among his allies
30 national health groups and a
solid core of senators who � like
himself � personally opposed
smoking.

236 Greenville Blvd. (The Tipton Annex)
November Special with ECU-ID
Haircuts Reg. $8.50, Special $6.00 (wLisa).
OpenM-F
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Lisa Sexton
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11-1047
Stephanie Smith (in the blazer) leads a group of visiting high school students and their parents on a
tour of campus at Saturday's Open House for prospective students. (Ester Norton � Photolab)
Fights begin at end of outdoor rock concert
NEWTON, N.C. (AP) � More
than two dozen people were ar-
rested and several others suffered
minor injuries Sunday night
when fights broke out toward the
end of a rock concert at the Hick-
ory American Legion Fairground
in Catawba County, police said.
Witnesses said the fights began
shortly before 6 p.m as the day's
featured rock group, Night
Ranger, was finishing its per-
formance.
Maj. Richard Cannon of the
Catawba County Sheriff's De-
partment said about 20 people,
many of them intoxicated, started
the fights.
Most of them were charged
with being drunk and disruptive,
Cannon said.
"That's the way it goes when
you have an event like this he
said. "People were getting out of daylong concert, officials said,
hand The concert was scheduled to
At least 15,000 attended the run until 8 p.m. Sunday.
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T'





V
THE FAST C AROI INJAN
NcwMr.iu:K ivh7 Page h
Denim and minis are in vogue
By KATHY BOWEN
Staff Writer
Bright colors, oversized sweat-
ers, and the western look was all
the rage last fall, but that was last
year. According to Cathy Peers,
an accesories buyer for Brody's,
neutral colors, more shapely fit-
ting clothes, and the sophisticated
look is the new direction for fall
1987.
The classics are hotter than
ever, but updated to look as
you've never seen them before.
As seen so far this season the most
popular classic is the miniskirt
Peers even admits it is one of the
hottest selling items this fall. The
once thought, "here today, gone
tomorrow" cliche has been aban-
doned as miniskirts make their
mark and take the lead in this
fall's new direction.
Minis come in all shapes and
sizes this fall. As seen in Women's
Wera Daily, such examples of
these are pleated minis, bubble
skirts, and even skating skirts, but
the one that really stands out is the
straight-cut body shaping mini.
Of course if miniskirts weren't
meant for vou there is no need for
despair. According to Madem-
oiselle, thcr are alternatives to the
mini whch arc just as stylish. Thev
are the pencil skirt, circle skirt,
and classic pleated pants and if
worn to the right extreme make
just as an important statement as
the mini.
As pictured in File, and other
leading fashion magazines,
denim also plays a big part in this
fall's new direction. Classic
denim updated to fit today's look
means more than just a pair of
jeans. Jeans are almost always
complimented with a denim
jacket.
Jean dresses also make a big hit
this fall along with jean minis and
straight skirts. The most popular
type of denim is now stone-
washed and Cloroxed. Denim
though is not the only popular
material this fall. Other popular
materials according to Peers are
leather suede.
The top half ot this tail's new
direction is going to all lengths to
be different. Sweaters and cardi-
gans are worn either past the hip
or cropped. According to Peers,
knit is still the most popular fabric
for sweaters.
Turtlenecks are coming on
strong this season and make a
fashion statement that should not
be ignored. Thev are showing up
not only on shirts, but sweaters
and sweatshirts also
Since this season puts the em-
phasis on sophistication, give
your outfit that extra touch by
adding a belt. As shown in
Mademoiselle, the belts to look
for this season are texturized rep-
tile animal skins such as snake
and crocodile. Other popular ani-
mal prints are giraffe, ostrage, and
leopard.
Peers points out that his
season's belts are not only more
texturized, but are also wider and
in more neutral colors. She also
agrees that it is a good idea to
coordinate your belts with your
pocketbooks and shoes by color
and texture.
The colors that are standing out
in fashion magazines and stores
this fall are autumn shades such
as rust, gold, copper, burgandy,
brown, and mustard. Peers also
mentions that the cooler colors to
look for are peach, light blue,
white, and pink. Bold colors such
as black, red, purple, and fuschia
are stil coming on strong from last
season, but arc reserved for night
time wear.
Other popular accessories to
watch out for are hose, earrings,
watches, and scarves which
highly accent an outfit. The
scarves are worn around the neck
01 waist. When worn around the
waist, thev arc often worn under a
thin belt. The most popular
scarves are in neutral colors.
"The hose that are more popu-
lar this fall are opaque or textur-
ized says Peers. She explains
they are worn with more empha-
sis this fall then last, but in a subtle
way such as by print or color.
Popular earrings are the button
or hoop style made out of metals
such as burnished copper or
bronze according to Peers. Ani-
mal texture earrings also seem to
stand out this fall.
Watches are definitely keeping
up with the times. Peers says that
Swatch watches are still popular,
but puts emphasis on the antique
and moon watches. They come in
burnished colors with larger
faces.
Peers also mentions scatter
pins. They are small pins which
you 'scatter' across you shirt,
jacket, or really anywhere else
you get the urge. Peers says that
the most popular scatter pins
being sold at Brody's are the heart
pins, pins accented with pearls,
and gold filigree (worn gold)
pins.
Shoes are headed in a new di-
rection. They are still bold acces-
sories, but in a more subtle way
this year. Last fall everybody
See FALL, page 9
Grad student Suzanne Hayes Yelkin models one of this fall's hot
fashions, the jean jacket. (Photo by ECU Photolab).
Baker puts crowd into 'Rapture' at Minges
By JENNIFER PEARSON
Staff Writer
As the hustle and bustle of the
crowd found their way through
the doors of Minges Coliseum, it
was quite obvious that it was
going to be a "standing room
only" situation.
Excitement in the air was grow-
ing intense as the masses steadily
gTew. People began to clap in a
rhythmic frenzy and began to
shout "Anita When the lights
were turned down and a single
spotlightappearedintheccnterof
the stage's curtain. The audito-
rium was filled with cheers and
applause. And yet the slight fig-
ure wrapped in a dashing hot
pink and black dress was clearly
not Anita as she attempted to
persuade the audience to join her
in a sing along.
The crowd's disapproval was
quicklv made known by a roaring
"boo The young lady on stage,
who had been introduced as
Rhonda Handsome, handled the
scene rather well with a snappy
attitude and soon had the audi-
ence roaring with laughter.
Handsome successfully enter-
tained, providing the viewers
with a comic act bordering on the
rank side of humor.
She mentioned all the problems
and pleasures of sex and touched
on the areas of birth control, self
control, (or lack of) and PMS. Not
to mention her hilarious imita-
tionsof the men found on all street
corners of New York trying to
pick up "anything" that hap-
pened to walk by. This spunky
comedian left the audience crack-
ing up and more than willing to
join her in a warm reception of the
awaited star of the show, Miss
Parking at ECU too tough
By EDDIE FITZGERALD
Suft Writrr
There's a quiet aggravation
underlying the mild academic life
at ECU. It's seen in the faces of
students walking through the
cold towards campus, and in the
frustrated eyes of those circling
the parking lots in their cars, and
in the obscenities expressed at the
sight of little red tickets on wind-
shields.
Michael Crossan, a senior at
ECU, is one of those students. By
his quiet, easy-going manner you
would never suspect he was af-
fected.
Even Mike Cox, a junior who
lives on campus, is not immune to
the frustration and indignation.
The problem is parking.
It led Crossan to give up his car
and get a motorcycle. "One of the
main reasons I got a bike was
because it's so convenient. You
just park and go he said. "It's
easy for me to find a place. I can
just pull up beside anybody
Even though he seems to have
found a solution, he still sees the
problem. "Whenever I get up to
go to class there are always long
lines And even with his solution
he has still managed to get five
tickets since he's been at ECU.
For the students and staff it's
highly annoying and frustrating.
For the Department of Traffic and
Security it's highly profitable.
They issue 30,000 citations a year,
according to Pat Gertz, assistant
director of traffic services, and
this year she has ordered 35,000
tickets and plans to use them all.
In 1987 the budget for the Traf-
fic Services Department was
$368,425. Vehicle registration
made up $264,790 of that budget,
while $83,425 was generated fron
illegal parking.
Neither Cox nor Crossan
seemed very surprised at the
large number of citations handed
out each year. Crossan wondered
where the money went.
When told that the $368,043 fee
fund is used, in part, for the pur-
chasing of land and the construc-
tion of parking lots, Cox said,
"That's a joke! There's a whole
bunch of surolus land that's not
being used. They could clear the
woods behind Jones Dorm and
run a parking lot all the way down
to the small commuter lot on Elm
Street
Crossan just shrugged hope-
lessly. He said there arc only three
designated parking areas for
motorcycles, but there's plenty of
room. 'The bad thing about the
lots is they're all dirt, and it's easy
for your bike to fall when you put
the kickstand down. They should
be paved
Cox doesn't think the fines are
bad when they're only $2. "But
when they're $5 and $10 that can
add up he said. He has been
issued three tickets since he's
been at ECU. The first one he got
made him angry he tore it up.
"Luckily there was no record of it
at the end of the semester he
said.
If fines aren't paid a student
can't get his grades, register for
classes, or graduate.
The parking problem is not
confined to the campus alone.
Since there are only 5341 parking
spaces, and currently there are
See PARKING, page 10
Anita Baker.
There was a break in between
the acts and for awhile the crowd
grew restless - apparently tired of
listening to the music on the loud
speakers.
Finally, the lights dimmed once
more and as the band began to
play, the crowd went wild, al-
though Baker could not yet be
seen. The curtains were slowly
drawn up and she stepped fore-
ward, to the audience's hysterical
welcome.
She warmly thanked everyone
and broke into song with her
powerful voice singing "Mys-
tery Afterwards, the crowd
voiced their immense approval
and overall excitment. Baker en-
couraged them to simply "listen
to me
Her voice was soft and gentle
murmuring these words and she
sounded almost maternal as she
gently instucted her avid fans
who were rushing forward to the
stage, "now don't do that Her
dazzling presence was well re-
spected as well as her message to
"love one another" because it is so
"easy" to love.
With these remarks, she quietly
encouraged everyone to reach out
and nearly every arm of every
person there began to sway back
and forth in constant motion. The
crowd was eager to hear Baker's
warm, sweet voice. Thus, began
the popular hit "Rapture with
everyone singing along.
Although Baker was certainly
well received, it soon grew appar-
ent that she could not properly be
heard. She asked it the people
could hear her and when an over-
welming "no" responded, she
said "I didn't think so and went
off stage to straighten things out
ft took aWfuleloCOrrivt the tectvl
nical difficulties, but Baker the
perfectionist persisted in main
taining the proper frequency and
sound in the Coliseum.
The musical director uis well as
keyboard player) of the show was
Bobby Lyle. The band members
consisted of: Donald Griffen on
guitar, David Swanson on key-
boards, Donnell Spencer on
drums, Dwavne Decarlo Smith on
bass and Pete Escavido (Prince's
drummer Sheila Es father) on
percussion.
Andy Cleaves played the trum-
pet while Scott Mayo entertained
with the sax and Reggie Young
with the trombone. The backup
vocals were provided by the
lovely Perry sisters: Carol,
Sharon, I ori and Darlene.
Moving into the spirit or soul of
Motown, Baker sang one of her
favorites entitled "Ain't it Pecu-
liar?" Her voice was consistantly
strong and exuberent and Baker's
stage performance was nothing
but dynamic. She danced across
the stage swinging her long pink
sequined dress in all directions.
Immediately following this
number was a selected tune by
one of the more cherished mem-
bers ot the blues community -
Billy Holiday.
Baker briefly spoke about the
distressing situation of poverty
and how Holiday died without a
tfimafti Uir iHKJket ma th� t just
'simply not a good thing
Perhaps the most popular song
Baker sang was the recent hit "No
One in the World When the first
notes began, the audience could
not be silenced. People joined arm
in arm, and gently swayed back
and forth singing each word.
Baker had her songs numbered,
he cal led casuallyout for number
nine and this being - "Same Old
Love (365 days of the year)
Towards the close of the con-
cert, Baker asked the audience if
anyone there had someone spe-
cial with them. One member of
the audience offered her own sis-
ter as an answer,and Baker began
"Joy" which led into her first big
hit, "Sweet Love
The popular performer finished
up with "Missing You" and told
all her fans to be safe on their trip
home. Overall, the concert was
evidently enjoyed by those who
attended. Anita's genuine spirit
allowed her to catch her aud �
lence in the "Rapture" of it.
ECU a normal school ?
Campus has puzzling structure
By BILL UPCHURCH
S��ff Writer
Parking tickets like these are a constant aggravation to students. The ECU Department of Traffic and
Security issues approximately 30,000 citations a year to illegally parked cars (Photo by ECU Photo-
lab).
I often ponder the reasoning
behind some of the things on this
campus. What's the stuff outside
of the art building? It ain't art
When my neice was in first grade,
she super-glued all the silverware
and various other household
items to the refrigerator.
At ECU you get to put some-
thing like that on display in front
of the school. In normal homes
throughout America, you get a
butt whipping. Stacked rocks re-
ally impress me I don't under-
stand the concept, but hey, that's
art
Why are there missle silos be-
hind the art building? ROTC is a
biggrouponthiscampus,butMX
missle silos? Well, maybe those
round things aren't missle silos.
Maybe they're places for the
squirrels to sunbathe. Who
knows.
I heard the sidewalks and ce-
ment circles spelled ECU from the
sir. Makes sense The airways
above ECU are constantly full of
tourgroupson the "See ECU from
the Air tour.
What year does the current
yearbook cover? We waited 2
years, but yearbooks are always a
SSSSL
the events from the previous year.
If we missed a year, where is it?
Maybe the publisher messed
up. Maybe the staff messed up.
We just want a yearbook. If I leave
before I get my yearbook from the
previous year which is 2 years
behind schedule and might be
current if 2 yearbooks are pub-
lished in one year, covering the
last 2 years never mind.
What happend to the street in
front of the student store? The
street used to be painted with the
symbols and crest of different
organizations. It was a colorful
representation of the variety of
groups on this campus. Now, if s
painted black and is supposed to
be covered with bricks in the fu-
ture.
Of course the bricks won't
match the bricks of any other
building on this campus. I never
knew there were so many differ-
ent colors of bricks, but if they
make it, ECU will use it. Back to
the original point. Which is of
course pointless. Once again an-
other symbol of individuality is
dismantled.
If students who work can't get
permission to register early and
obtain a class schedule that will
allow mem to continue to work
can we get
school to force our bosses to allow
us to work around our class
schedules? How about if we bring
a note from our parents and swear
on a student handbook mat we
work and need to register early?
Where is the bell tower on this
campus? Many mornings, on the
way back from downtown, I hear
bells. One morning I spent 2 hours
looking for the bell tower because
I had a killer hangover and a bru-
tal headache and 1 wanted to kill
the bellman. I couldn't find htm. f
know he must be in the bell tower,
wherever that is
What's a normal school? If you
walk home from downtown,
going up Fifth street you'll see one
of those historical landmark signs
stating that ECU was established
as a normal school.
We have bells with no tower.
We have missle silos on campus.
Our yearbooks have no years.
This is not a normal school. If it
a normal school, why do so many
abnormal people go to school
here? Shouldn't we all be at m
abnormal school. I'm onrused.
Now that we yearly play 1
in football, could we pick
Oklahoma and Nebraska also?!
we are going to play so
good
Student co!
By CHRIS BRINCEFIELD
Sum Writ�
The East Carolina University
School of Music presented pre-
miere performances of works by
ECU student composers Thurs-
day night in A. J. Fletcher Recital
Hall. The composers are the stu-
dents of Dr. Mark Taggart, assis-
tant professor of music and com-
poser in residence.
Taggart, in his introduction of
the program, said that the test of a
composition is not the first per-
formance but getting the second
and third perfl
dieted that mal
the program v
performances
was "very plej
dents' work.
"Do You Nol
by Jonathan C
for tenor and
formed by C
Mark Gansor
"Three Tie
Sean Park, cor
ments: "lnnoctj
Dolls and
Hairstyles Ion
By ELANA GROSSMAN
SuH Writer
Being on a campus as large as
East Carolina University, one is
bound to see a large variety of
hairstyles.
Even though Greenville is not a
major city, people in it like to keep
up with the newest fashion
trends.
According to John Sahag of Elle
magazine, "The shape of hair to
come: witty and surprising with a
playful edge. The right length is
no longer an issue. The newest
cuts combine a little bit of every-
thing - long, chin length, and
short
In the fall of 86, long hair be-
came more and more popular. In
1985 short hair took the new style.
In the fall and winter of 1987 hair
is as different as the untame mane
Campus sites
Continued from page 8
Oklahoma in Ficklen stadium
would be great, just think of the
money we could make.
Then after that we could get our
basketball team to play Carolina,
State, Louisville and other nation-
ally ranked teams. Its not whether
we win or lose, its how much
money we make. Money which is
spent on "going after the best
Which e$alns why we didn't
send our girls basketball team to
the NIA tournament after they
won our conference I think.
If you are on the meal plan, why
can't you eat what you want to,
when you want to? Supposedly,
after you buy the plan vou are
issued a card which allows you to
� eat your meals in one of the fine
dining halls on this campus. You
are only allowed to eat one meal
during each of breakfast, lunch
and dinner.
What if 1 don't feel like eating
one meal at the prescribed time
What if I want to eat one meal a
day for a week and then use the
rest of my meal budget on O.J. for
screwdrivers and chips for my
hangover. It can't be done.
What if I have a date and want
to take her to a place with a fine
atmosphere that's really cheap1
Mendenhall won't let me use my
ticket for both of us. Why aren't
the meal tickets more like credit
cards in reverse? You could pay a
certain amount of money at the
beginning of the semester, and
then eat what you want, when
you want.
Some questions are uanaswer-
able and all this thinking is driv-
ing me to inebriation. Now if I can
just figure out why we can't have
U2 at Ficklen stadium
Fall fashion
Continued from page 8
went straight for gold or silver
but this year everyone seems to be
leaning towards pumps m more
neutral colors with texture. Peers
points out texturized prints as
being the hottest selling shoe this
season.
Peers sees the overall new di-
rection for fall as sophisticated,
but with a feminine touch.
from the sup
according to Nl
Studio in New
According td
University H
students are d
home, and
hairstylist
going for man
les mostly has
they want to n!
said, "A,
very short hail
lot of length aj
Angela Gai
said that, "Sal
for what is
Line, a conl
shoulder ler
She also mei
are going for J
of really shoi
The punk n
When you fill out your Form
W-4 or W-4A, "Employee's
Withholding Allowance
Certificate itwmbw.
If you can be claimed on your
parent's or another person's tax
return, you generally cannot be
exempt from income tax
withholding To get it right, read
the instructions that came with
your Form W-4 or W-4A.
frt
$.
Also:V
only i
Dresset
a
I
l0:O0-5.
10:00-3:
mi �� ����,i�ii �i. m � n ��w Atpmmmmm��i
m m mi m m �f





this fall's hot
inges
I tune by
'nshed mem-
umitv
�ke about the
n oi poverty
a ithout a
r irst
idience could
: ,irm
I ed back
i word.
. numbered
ill f r number
Same Old
t the year)
. se of tho con
audience if
id someone spe-
�n� member ot
?red her own sib-
and Baker began
her first big
�rformer finished
g "i ou" and told
safe on their trip
rncert was
the
th,
ho
i s genuine spirit
to catch her aud �
re" of it.
ling structure
car.
�here is it?
Iher messed
messed up
k If Heave
ok from the
is 2 years
might be
;� are pub-
)vering the
und.
I street in
store? The
Ited with the
f different
a colorful
variety of
'��. it s
jpposed to
ks in the fu-
icks won't
any other
�us 1 never
wny differ-
but if they
it. Back to
fhich is of
again an-
fiduality is
rk can't get
early and
lie that will
: to work
school to force our bosses to allow
us to work around our class
schedules? How about if we bring
a note from our parents and swear
on a student handbook that we
work and need to register early?
Where is the bell tower on this
campus? Many mornings, on the
way back from downtown, 1 hear
bells. One morning 1 spent 2 hours
looking for the bell tower because
1 had a killer hangover and a bru-
tal headache and I wanted to kill
the bellman. 1 couldn't find him. I
know he must be in the bell tower,
wherever that is.
What's a normal school? If you
waik home from downtown,
going up Fifth streetyou'll see one
of those historical landmark signs
stating that ECU was established
as a normal school.
We have bells with no tower.
We have missle silos on campus.
Our yearbooks have no years.
This is not a normal school. If it is
a normal school, why do so many
abnormal people go to school
here? Shouldn't we all be at an
abnormal school. I'm confused.
Now that we yearly play Miami
in football, could we pick up
Oklahoma and Nebraska also? If
we are going to play so many
good teams, lets really go for it
See CAMPUS, page 9
TI tE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3, 187
Student composers give premiere concerts
By CHRIS BRINCEFIELD
S�� Writer
The East Carolina University
School of Music presented pre-
miere performances of works by
ECU student composers Thurs-
day night in A. j. Fletcher Recital
Hall. The composers are the stu-
dents of Or. Mark Taggart, assis-
tant professor of music and com-
poser in residence.
Taggart, in his introduction of
the program, said that the test of a
composition is not the first per-
formance but getting the second
and third performances. He pre-
dicted that many of the works on
the program would receive those
performances. He said that he
was "very pleased" with his stu-
dents' work.
"Do You Not Dream My Lady"
by Jonathan Guy Buck, is a work
for tenor and piano and was per-
formed by Charles Maxwell and
Mark Gansor.
"Three Pieces for Piano" by
Sean Park, consist of three move-
ments: "Innocence "Dance With
Dolls and "Mischief It was
performed by pianist Anthony
DcAngelo.
"Fugue in A Minor" by Michael
Little, a composition for organ,
was performed by Lawrence
Gocring.
"Opus 13 by Chris Moore, is a
work for vibraphone and was
performed by Moore. It is the first
of a multi-movement work.
"Return to Asgard by Hal
Sargent a work for trumpet,
french horn, and trombone, was
performed by James Barnard,
Paul Francis, and Scott
Ruedger.Sargent said, "If I could
go back to Asgard, this is what I'd
expect to hear
"Hope (Emily Dickinson)" by
Ed Pierce, is a soprano and bari-
tone duet with piano accompani-
ment. It was performed by Janna
Brendel and Pierce, with Alisa
Wetherington on piano.
"Afterthoughts" by Michael
Bell, is a composition of electroni-
cally produced sounds. The work
was prerecorded and played over
the recital hall's sound system.
Bell described his composition as
Hairstyles long and short this season
By ELANA GROSSMAN
Suff Wri��r
Being on a campus as large as
East Carolina University, one is
bound to see a large variety of
hairstyles.
Even though Greenville is not a
major city, peopie in it like to keep
up with the newest fashion
trends.
According to John Sahag of Elle
magazine, "The shape of hair to
come: witty and surprising with a
playful edge. The right length is
no longer an issue. The newest
cuts combine a little bit of every-
thing - long, chin length, and
short
In the fall of 86, long hair be-
came more and more popular. In
1985 short hair took the new style.
In the fall and winter of 1987 hair
is as different as the untamc mane
Campus sites
Continued from page 8
Oklahoma in Ficklen stadium
would be great, just think of the
money we could make.
Then after that we could get our
basketball team to play Carolina,
State, Louisville and other nation-
ally ranked teams. Its not whether
we win or lose, its how much
money we make. Money which is
spent on "going after the best
Which eicfSalns why we didn't
send our girls basketball team to
the NIA tournament after they
won our conference I think.
If you are on the meal plan, why
can't you cat what you want to,
when you want to? Supposedly,
after you buy the plan you are
issued a card which allows you to
eat your meals in one of the fine
dining halls on this campus. You
are only allowed to eat one meal
during each of breakfast, lunch
and dinner.
What if I don't feel like eating
one meal at the prescribed time?
What if I want to eat one meal a
day for a week and then use the
rest of my meal budget on O.J. for
screwdrivers and chips for my
hangover. It can't be done.
What if I have a date and want
to take her to a place with a fine
atmosphere that's really cheap?
Mendenhall won't let me use my
ticket for both of us. Why aren't
the meal tickets more like credit
cards in reverse? You could pay a
certain amount of money at the
beginning of the semester, and
then eat what you want, when
you want.
Some questions are uanaswer-
able and all this thinking is driv-
ing me to inebriation. Now if I can
just figure out why we can't have
U2 at Ficklen stadium
Fall fashion
Continued from page 8
went straight for gold or silver,
but this year everyone seems to be
leaning towards pumps in more
neutral colors with texture. Peers
points out texturized prints as
being the hottest selling shoe this
season.
Peers sees the overall new di-
rection for fall as sophisticated,
but with a feminine touch.
from the super smooth mane,
according to Mitch Barry of GAD
Studio in New York.
According to Phil Jones of the
University HaircuttersMany
students are cutting their hair at
home, and coming in to have a
hairstylist emulate it They are
going for many different hairsty-
les mostly based on what image
they want to recognized as. Jones
said, "A lot of people are going for
very short hair on the sides and a
lot of length and volume on top
Angela Gay from Hair Plus 100
said that, "Some people are going
for what is called the Signature
Line, a contemporary look of
shoulder length to short hair
She also mentioned "Few people
are going for the progressive look
of reallv short and really long
The punk rode look is coming to
gf!Ji!0fB'
When you fill out your Form
W-4 or W-4A, "Employee's
Withholding Allowance
Certificate remembtt:
If you can be claimed on your
parent's or another person's tax
return, you generally cannot be
exempt from income tax
withholding. To get it right, read
the instructions that came with
your Form W-4 or W-4A.
an end, and instead different hair
designs are taking its place, ac-
cording to Clair Garrison of Sub-
urban Beauty Salon. These hair
designs are used with many
beauty products such as mousse,
gel, and styling lotion. She said,
"many people come in simply to
get their hair french braided
As one can tell there is no set
hairstyle for the fall. A look
around campus will prove this
statement to be true. Although
there is no set style, there are
styles that tend to stand out.
Many people have noticed the
hairstyle of one freshmen music
major, Matt Short. His hair is
black and blonde, short and long.
His hair was cut at Mantrap hair
designs in Durham, 'md is very
different from the majority of
people on campus.
When asked why he chose that
Every Tuesday
College Night
from 8:00 to 11:00
$1.50 with college I.D.
.50$ skate rental
SPORTSWORLD
104 E. Redbanks Rd.
756-6000
"FADED" LEVIS
$2.95 to $5.95
'A
Classic Overcoats
Herring-Bone, Black
Tweeds, Plaids, etc.
$19.95 to $49.95
TRENCH
COATS
(London Fog)
$12.95 to $14.95
Rugby Shirts
$4.95 to $9.95
Also: Wind breakers, Button down shirts, Members
only Jackets, Sport Jackets, Skirts. (Some mini),
Dresses, Etc.
The Coin & Ring Man
type of hairstyle Short responded,
"You know how people dress up
for Halloween? Well, I like to do
that everyday, because it's fun
In rather opposite extremes, a
student Alison Jones said, "I have
my hair long because I like to do
different things with it Yet Col-
leen Luther a student with short
hair said, "Short hair is much
more convenient for college life. I
don't have the time to spend
hours curling my hair like I used
to in high school
Although Greenville is not New
York City, we are still keeping up
with fashion.
"apocalyptic
"The Moon Queen" is Scott
Allen's duet for flute and ma-
rimba. It was performed by Tho-
mas Mease and Allen.
"Contours Ledford Wilson's
work for trombone solo; Jeff
Skillen, Bert Sullivan, Forrest
Doster, Dennis Klophaus, and
Phil Smith. Wilson conducted the
performers. "Contours" is an-
other work that will be multi-
movement when complete.
"On Children" is a string or-
chestrated composition.The sec-
ond movement, "Lullaby" was
performed on piano. The string
orchestra consisted of Carol
Moore, Susan Paxton, Jay Bolger
and Lori Buchanan on violin; John
Wright on viola, Johanna Wright
on cello, and Eddie Turnage on
bass. Lynctte Ma ready performed
the second movement.
"Primitive Instincts by An-
drew Miskavage is a work for
euphonium (a mid-range brass
instument) and percussion en-
semble. Todd Brewer performed
on euphonium and Nick Holland,
Clark Harrell, Chris Holiday,
Russell Sledge, Scott Sells, and
Rod Howard performed on van
ous percussive instruments. The
performers were conducted by
Miskavage.
Miskavage said that this was
the first of three movements of
constrasting styles. Miskavage
also added that "I'd like to thank
all my players, they really played
the hell out of it
Dr. Brett Watson, conductor of
the ECU Concert Chior, said that
he appreciated the "diversity of
style and the "excellent student
performances
Ringgold Towers
Offering
$150.00 Reward
For information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person
who tampered with Fire Equipment at Ringgold Towers,
on Thursday, October 22,1987
Information will be kept confidential.
Call 752-2865
RACK ROOM SHOES.
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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3
6:30 PM MSC BILLIARDS CENTER
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T
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBERS, 1987
High school law class make out their wills
They are high school students
and they live in Levittown, a land
mark in the first flight of Ameri-
cans to te suburbs and the small
house and piece of greenery
young couples could afford.
� That was 40 years ago. The
expansion attics have long since
been expanded, the carports en-
closed, the porches or family
rooms added. The adoloescents
who frolic or sulk here now repre-
sent the second generation of
teen-agers in the development.
A recent classroom exercise
reveals remarkable strides in their
lifestyle and life support svstems.
They were asked to write their
wills.
These students liveon lanesand
roads - not streets - named Or-
chid, Sparrow, Periwinkle,
Castle, Harvest, Mistletoe, Pas-
ture, Vista, Morning Glorv, Ab-
bey, Blacksmith, Sandpiper,
Chimney, Bavberry.
They belong to families named
Kelly, Rijo, Hefferman, Berju,
Beller, Cody, Weese, Grimes
Cailla, Calabro, Wengerter, Mit-
tel, McDonough, Czachor, Coco-
man, O Shea, Talkachov.
1 he are lMo 18yearsold, 11th
and 12th-graders in Division
Avenue High School, levittown
They were taking an elementary
course in "every day law" from
Suan Calland, learning about
criminal and civil law,about laws
relating to contracts, consumers,
marriage, divorce, adoption,
wills.
For their will-writing assign-
ment, Ms. Calland stipulated that
their bequests deal with their ac-
tual worldly goods, not fictional
assets.
Well, now.
Kathryn was prodigious in her
bequests to her four sisters. To
Margaret, she left her jewelry. To
Elizabeth, "my shoes, clothes and
my softball golvc To Lorraine,
"my hair spray, blow-dryer and
brushes To Patricia, "my car,
stereo, cassettesand my retainer
The laws of probate do not re-
quire kathryn to specify whether
the aforesaid retainer relates to
music or teeth. If her car bequest
seems casual, it is because more
than half of her classmates own
their own cars. Among the early
settlers of Levittown in 1947 and
1948 most parents were lucky to
own a car.
The wills submitted to Ms. Gal-
land suggest that today's high
school student is building a var-
ied estate.
(oseph bequested his 1967
Mustang to his father, his radio,
walkman and tapes to brother
Michael, his baseball gloves to
brother lames, his weights to
Michael, one lacrosse stick to ea li
brother, his "bank account and
cash" to be divided equally
among his parents and sister and,
finally, "my car magazines to my
friend Thomas
Marc revealed a particularly
fine hand in assembling a diver-
sified portfolio.
I le left his car to his friend Dave;
his diamond ring to his father; his
gold rope chain to his brother
Scott; his gold Yankee (baseball)
and Islander (hockey) charms to
brother lam; "all of my baseball
and hockey equipment" to his
friend Sal; his color television and
stereo to his friend Joe; his gold
bracelet to his friend Wendy; $500
in savings bonds to each of friends
Mike and Rich; his NBA basket-
ball and NFL football to friend
Bill; $2,000 to each of his brothers;
"control of my stock account" to
his mother and father; "all the rest
of my property" to his parents. If
any of the legatees dies before
Marc does, he stipulates that their
gifts become part of his residuary
estate, which estate, he further
stipulates, will pay "all taxes
Marc got an A-plus.
Norman left his 1974 Super
Beetle Volkswagen to his buddy,
Anthony, and his jewelry and part
of his bank account to his girl
friend, Suzy. Glenn left his la-
crosse sticks and all of his bank
account to his girlfriend, Lynn,
but not his "Air Jordan" basket-
ball sneakers. They went to Tom.
Noreen consigned her bagpi pos
to her father, her teddy bear to her
brother Jerry "to give to one of his
children when he has them" and,
to her friend Kathleen, "my
Swatch watch and all the clothes I
never gave back to her
Lest readers assume that the
young testators of Levittown
think only materialistically,
Julia's last will and testament
should be noted. To her brothers
and sisters, nieces and nephews
and friends, she bequeathed her
jewelry, pink radio, light bulb
poster, stereo, stuffed animals
and favorite pillow.
But she added the proviso that
these assets should go to Good-
will Industries if her beneficiaries
predecease her.
Rambo cut
Sylvester Stallone laughed off a
close call he had with a helicopter
on the set of "Rambo III
"I suppose if it had gotten any
lower I could have saved the cost
of a haircut production spokes-
man Tom Gray quoted Stallone as
saying Sunday after the helicop-
ter missed his head by a few
inches. Stallone ducked just in
time and escaped unharmed,
Gray said.
Gray said the scene called for a
French-made Puma helicopter to
buzz Stallone as explosives went
off and fire flared around the ac-
tor.
Parking situation not improving
Continued from page 8
22,976 registered vehicles trving
to use those spacer, v-ars have to
spill over into the residential
streets to park.
Anne Hargett, a junior at FCL
knows onlv too well how frustrat-
ing the situation has become. She
was towed this semester tor park-
ing over-time on Lewis St.
Fortunately her lather, a profes-
sor at ECU, happened to be on
campus. "Had he not been on
campus I don't know what I
would have done she said.
r
Her lather was "extremely en-
raged" because of the two hour
parking on the residential streets.
He thought it was very unfair to
the students, who usually have
more then two hours of classes a
day. Especially since adequate
parking has not been provided by
the university, Ms. Hargett
added.
Ms. Hargett had to go to the
Greenville police station and pay
a $5 fine for parking over-time.
Then she had to go to a service
station near the Pepsi plant and
pay $35 to get her car back. It took
her about an hour to track her car
down and pay all the fines.
"It's just like we students arc
second rate citiens and it infuri-
ates me Ms. Hargett said "Not
just because of all the money we
spend here at ECU but look at all
the money Green villemakesoff of
the students as well
The problem is so bad that
there's a ten-member advisory
committee set up to review it. But
Dr. Elmer Meyer, theoverseeerof
the committee, said if the problem
was alleviated then the price of
rcgisteration stickers would have
to raised because the state would
not pay for the building of park-
ing lots.
So, we'll continue to see them,
the aggravated, walking through
the rain for blocks on cold winter
mornings, their eyes glassy with
contempt as they glance back at
their cars, with the $21 rcgistera-
tion stickers glistening in the rain.
0"l"
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Kim left her "K" ring to friend
Kcrri, her heart ring to her cousin
Jody and "my ring on laya way (if
it is paid in full at the time of my
death) to my mother
Toother family and friends, she
left her radio, tapes, watch,
earrings,gold bracelets, gold
chair, bicycle and bank account.
And she specified that her Archie
comic books be given to a re-
tarded boy in her school.
Thomas was probably the star
of the class philanthropists. He
provided for a fund to be admini-
stered by his brother Michael, that
would include money from Tho-
mas' bank account and money
obtained from the sale of his car,
television, VCR, stereo, phone,
phone answering machine and
"all other personal possessions
All monies in the fund, Thomas
instructed his executor, are to be
used for the care, feeding and
"extra needs" of his dog, Dokey.
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vv
a
Hem
Jh action was at a fever pitch Saturdav v� hen ih
ByedastMMqsJhBAHrtfft
top photo, defensive end Shannon Bofinjj eers a HU
the bottom photo, defensive backs Junior Robinsoj
Melvin Bratton for a flip through the air.
Swimmers
Coming off one of its finest sea-
sons, the East Carolina University
swimming and diving team h p
ing for more in 1987-88,operu
season Friday against fames
Madison University at the Mingt -
Aquatic Center. The women be-
gin at 3 p.m while the men start
competition at 5 p.m.
Last season, ECL's second in
the Colonial Athletic Association,
sixth-year head coach Rick Kobe
guided the men and women to
third and second-place finishes
respectively. The men won the
league title in 1986.
Kobe has led the Tirates to an
81-37 (men and women com-
bined) record during his five sea-
sons as head coach. Kobe came to
?ECU in 1980 as an assistant to
then-head coach Rav Acharf, and
he was named head coach when
1 Acharf retired two years later
Kobe's teams, as do most colle-
giate swimming teams, tend to
with tx :
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by .
won
haps the : a i
Caycet P
tnerous time
Kobe, h,
ot the best re
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Combii
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that thes
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"This certai
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Lady Pirates e.
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sport Writer
The Lady Pirate basketball team
is faced with one extremely com-
petitive 1987-88 season.
Headed by first vear coach Tat
IPierson, the Lady Pirates have a
tough schedule ahead oi them.
Their season begins on Nov. 27-
128 when the Pirates travel to Lex-
ington, Kentucky for the Lady Kat
Classic. There they will play Cen-
tral Michigan, who went to the
NCAA playoffs two years ago.
The next weekend the Pirates
will host the Lady Pirate Classic,
where they will face Vanderbilt,
who is expected to be the strong-
est team in the tournament.
Later in the season, the Pirates
will participate in the Reebok
Roundball Classic tournament at
Old Dominion University in Nor-
folk, Va.
There the Pirates will face the
University of Southern Califor-
nia, who is an extremely powerful
team
The competj
not end with
Four teams!
twenty in prA
ECU iame
has won the C
tor the past twl
gone to the f
they will detn
beat America!
Wilmington.
University al
strong opponc
Lady Pirates
tough N.C.
Raleigh. The
NCAA tournj
past.
So, the Piraj
their work cut
are going to wj
ence title. TM
tremely tougr
remains optir
"Our schc

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ir wills
�id
SUl
of the class philanthropists He
pro ided tor a hind to be admini-
stered bv his brother Michael, that
would include money from Tho-
mas bank account and money
obtained trom the sale of his car,
television, VCR, stereo, phone,
phone answering machine and
other personal possessions
All monies in the hind, Thomas
structed his executor, are to be
i tor the care, feeding and
extra needs" ol his dog, Dokey.
n is judged by
pany ne keeps.
II he keeping some ven select
he serving vtith some ol the
.�otter Officers that will be
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f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 3, 1987 Page 11
� Hurricanes cruise past ECU,
41-3, Saturday in Ficklen
The action was at a fever pitch Saturday when the Pirates played host to the nationally-ranked Hurricanes of
Miwi if 11 �11 yed�!��� �� �� fin! h,f ,ifu ftMtttvfMlim�Miwmti,4h iymtoii t�4-5 lor the year. In the
top photo, defensive end Shannon Holing pets a Illegal facernask grip on the Hurricanes' John O'Neill, while, in
the bottom photo, defensive backs Junior Robinson (left) and Roswell Streeter (right) send Hurricane fullback
Melvin Bratton for a flip through the air. (Photos by Thomas Walters � ECU Photo Lab)
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Kdilur
East Carolina's chances of
knocking oft third-ranked Miami
(Fl.) vanished in less than a
minute's worth of time Saturday
afternoon as the Hurricanes
rolled to a 41-3 victory in Ficklen
Stadium.
Trailing just 7-3 in the second
quarter before an ecstatic crowd
of 31,797, the Pirates allowed
Hurricane quarterback Steve
Walsh, who passed for 212 yards
and three touchdowns for the af-
ternoon, to connect with Leonard
Conlcy for a 4-yard touchdown
pass with only 39 seconds remain-
ing in the first half.
The extra point by Greg Cox
gave Miami, which has won 27
consecutive regular season games
� the longest streak in the nation
� a 14-3 halftime advantage.
But, as spirit-shaking as that
play might have been for the Pi-
rates, it didn't hold a candle to
what happened at the start of the
second half.
On the first play of the thrid
quarter, ECU's Reggie McKinney
fumbled a pitch from quarterback
Travis Hunter and Bill Hawkins
recovered for the Hurricanes at
the Pirates' 18.
Miami's Warren Williams then
ran 18 yards down the right side-
line for a touchdown to put the
Hurricanes up 21-3 just 12 sec-
onds into the second half.
"It (the fumble) was so demor-
alizing said ECU head coach Art
Baker. "You want to come out and
have a sustained drive, and to
fumble a pitch just seemed to take
the air out for evervone.
"We knew (coming in to the
game) we could drive the football
on them, but we had to eliminate
mistakes � and we didn't
Miami stretched its lead to 28-3
and took the crowd completely
out of the contest with 5:42 left in
the third period on a 9-yard
touchdown pass from Walsh to
Brian Blade�The score capped a
10-play, 85-yard drive.
Cox moved the Hurricanes in
front 31-3 with 8:54 left in the
game with a 23-yard field goal.
Cox added three more points
just 34 seconds later when he split
the uprights on a 52-yarder, a
career best for the senior hooter.
The score was set up when ECU's
Junior Robinson fumbled a kick-
off return and Roland Smith re-
covered for the Hurricanes.
Cleveland Gary capped the
scoring and placed the final nail in
the Pirates' coffin when he scam-
pered in from the 4-yard line with
1:43 to play capping a seven play,
64-yard drive.
Miami head coach Jimmy
Johnson said he did not consider
the Hurricanes to be running up
the score in the fourth quarter.
"We don't make a habit of play-
ing at our opponents level
Johnson said. "We play at our
level at all times of a game � no
matter what the score.
"I thought we were much
sharper today compared to last
week (a 47-10 victory over Cincin-
nati) continued Johnson. "To-
day we went out and executed
well. The offense did a good job
and the defense, I felt, did an ex-
cellent job
The Hurricanes drew first
blood in the game, taking the
opening kickoff and marching 75
yards in 12 plays fora touchdown.
The score came with 9:30 left in
the first quarter when Walsh hit
Blades from 5 yards out with a
pass.
The Pirates came right back and
moved in for the only points they
would collect on the afternoon.
Hunter directed the Pirates on a
16-plav, 71-yard drive aided by a
trio of mistakes by the Hurri-
canes.
Miami was whistled offsides to
sustain the Pirates' drive. Then,
with the Pirates at the Hurricane
24 with a first-and-10, a personal
foul called on the Hurricanes
pushed the ball to the 10-yard
line.
Anthony Simpson bulled to the
3 on a pair of carries, but Hunter
tripped and fell down attempting
to run the option cm a crucial third
down play and the Pirates settled
for a 19-yard Chuck Berleth field
goal with 1:18 to play in the first
quarter.
That score too was set up by a
Hurricane mistake Berleth had
missed a 24-yard attempt before
the Miami defense was whistled
for offsides giving him another
crack.
The Pirates had a chance later in
the half to pull within one point,
but Berleth was short ona4h-vard
field goal try. The field goal at-
tempt was set up after the Pirates
had driven from their own 38
before stalling at the Hurricane
29-yard line.
"I do think that weplaved much
better today than we did last Sat-
urday at South Carolina (a 34-12
loss) Baker said. "We were able
to move the ball between the 20 s,
but that was as far as we could get.
We have to get tougher when we
get into scoring position. Too
many opportunities went bv the
boards with one missed assign-
ment or a fumble
Miami, 6-0, amassed 300 of its
449 total yards of offense through
the air.
The victory gave Johnson-
coached Hurricane learns a 23-0
mark against unranked schools
and improved the dominance bv
Miami over the Pirates to 6-0 in
the scries record
The Pirate offense, as Baker
said, had little tr. tuble moving the
ball between the 20's, and ran up a
33-27edge in possession minutes.
But the Hurricane defense kept
ECU's rushing game, which was
averaging 248 yards per game
before the contest, down to a mere
110 yards.
For the Pirates, 4-5, the loss
means back to the drawing board
for Baker and his staff.
"Our goal from day one this
year has been to have a winning
season, and now our backs are to
the wall Baker slid. "We have
Temple here next Saturday and
then we go to Southern Missis-
sippi. We have to pick ourselves
up and achieve our goal
Swimmers look for more as season opens
Coming off one of its finest sea-
sons, the East Carolina University
swimming and diving team, hop-
ing for more in 1987-88, opens the
season Friday against James
Madison University at the Minges
Aquatic Center. The women be-
gin at 3 p.m while the men start
competition at 5 p.m.
Last season, ECU's second in
the Colonial Athletic Association,
sixth-year head coach Rick Kobe
guided the men and women to
third and second-place finishes
respectively. The men won the
league title in 1986.
Kobe has led the Pirates to an
SI-37 (men and women com-
bined) record during his five sea-
sons as head coach. Kobe came to
ECU in 1980 as an assistant to
then-head coach Ray Acharf, and
he was named head coach when
Acharf retired two years later.
Kobe's teams, as do most colle-
giate swimming teams, tend to
start slowly and pick up the pace
with better time as the season pro-
gresses. "Last year's team wasn't
the most talented group at the
begining of the season said
Kobe, "but we became a very
good team by season's end
But those teams were hit hard
by graduation, especially the
women's team, which lost per-
haps the two best swimmers in
school history in Scotia Miller and
Caycee Poust, who appear nu-
merous times in the record book.
Kobe, however, welcomes one
of the best recruited groups in the
Southeast, and he doesn't antici-
pate a huge drop in performance
for either the men or the women.
Combined with some talented re-
turning swimmers, Kobe believes
that these could be among his
fastest teams at ECU.
"This certainly could develop
into perhaps the fastest team
we've had at tCU said Kobe,
"and, at least on paper, we have
the most depth ever for an ECU
team
That depth, from the men's
side, comes in the form of two
events: the middle distance and
distance freestyle events, which
are at their strongest point in ECU
swimming history.
Senior Patrick Brennan (Char-
lotte South Mecklenburg) is per-
haps the key to the Pirates' suc-
cess this season. Brennan won the
200 individual medley at last
season's CAA championships
and is ranked among the top-12
swimmers in ECU history in the
200 I.M. and the 200 brcaststroke.
Others who added to the tre-
mendous depth and talent in this
area include Andy Johns (senior,
Hollywood, Ha.), Andy Jeter
(Sophomore, Charlotte Provi-
dence Day), and a trio of newcom-
ers which includes John Farrell
(Long Beach, N.Y.), Brian
Kingsfield (High Toint Central)
and J.D. Lewis (Charlotte Myers
Park).
Other Pirates who figure heav-
ily in Kobe's plans for the 1987-88
season include Lee Hicks (senior,
Thomasville East Davidson) and
Raymond Kennedy (Goldsboro
High) in the breaststroke, fresh-
man George Walters (Charlotte
East Mecklenburg) and Mark
O'Brien (Lehigh, Ha.) in the back-
stroke, Tyge Pistorio (senior, Ft.
Pierce, Fla.) in the indicidual med-
ley, and Ronald Fleming (senior,
Petersburg, Va.) in the sprint
freestyle. Kobe also has the serv-
ices of three freshman divers.
The women's team is small in
number this season, with only 14
swimmers on the roster, but that
shouldn't stop them from ap-
proaching last season's 10-2 dual
meet record.
"We'll be good this season
said Kobe. "How good depends
on how hard our women's team
works to reach the goals they've
set for themselves this season
Individually, the team should
center around sophomore Ryan
Philyaw (High Point Central), a
multi-talented performer who
can swim almost any event. Join-
ing Philyaw are Leslie Jo Wilson
(sophomore, Yorktown, Va.) and
freshman Tracy Bauman (Tean-
eck, NJ.) as the trio combines to
give ECU strength in the individ-
ual medley.
Philyaw also lends her talents to
the butterfly, where Robin Wicks
(sophomore, Fayetteville
Westover), Patricia Walsh (junior,
Charleston, S. C.) and Susan
Augustus (junior, Louisville, Ky.)
combine to make that event a
strength as well.
Divers Sherrv Campbell (jun-
ior, Charlotte Myers Tark) and
Becky Kerber (senior, Staten Is-
land N.Y.) hold virtually all ECU
records between them.
The Pirates play host to non-
conference foes Furman, North
Carolina and North Carolina
State this season, in addition to
facing the CAA's top squad- so
there's plenty i good competi-
tion ahead for the Pirates. This
season's CAA championships
will be at Navy (last season's were
held at Minges Auatic Center),
and ECU should be a factor in
both the men'sand women's com-
petition.
Lady Pirates expecting tough challenges
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sport. Writer
The Lady Pirate basketball team
is faced with one extremely com-
petitive 1987-88 season.
Headed by first year coach Pat
Pierson, the Lady Pirates have a
tough schedule ahead of them.
Their season begins on Nov. 27-
28 when the Pirates travel to Lex-
ington, Kentucky for the Lady Kat
Classic. There they will play Cen-
tral Michigan, who went to the
NCAA playoffs two years ago.
The next weekend the Pirates
will host the Lady Pirate Classic,
where they will face Vanderbilt,
who is expected to be the strong-
est team in the tournament.
Later in the season, the Pirates
will participate in the Reebok
Roundball Classic tournament at
Old Dominion University in Nor-
folk, Va.
There the Pirates will face the
University of Southern Califor-
nia, who is an extremely powerful
team.
The competition however, does
not end with the tournaments.
Four teams ranked in the top
twenty in pre-season play await
ECU. James Madison University
has won the CAA conference title
for the past two seasons and have
gone to the NCAA playoffs. So
they will definitely be the team to
beat. American University, UNC-
Wilmington, and George Mason
University also promise to be
strong opponents. In addition, the
Lady Pirates will play the always
tough N.C. State Wolfpack in
Raleigh. The Pack has been an
NCAA tournament team in the
past.
So, the Pirates definitely have
their work cut out for them if they
are going to win the CAA confer-
ence title. Their schedule is ex-
tremely tough yet coach Pierson
remains optimistic.
"Our schedule is challenging
yet exciting in the fact that when
you play the best, you should get
better Pierson said.
The Pirates do have experience
on their side with three returning
starters: senior Alma Bethea, sen-
ior Monique Pompili, and junior
Gretta O'Neal. Chris O'Connor,
who also saw a lot of playing time
last season, will be returning to
the squad also.
The seniors, Pompili and Be-
thea, have an especially difficult
task ahead. Pierson will expect
them to be offensive threats as
well as team leaders. "They must
be consistent in offensive contri-
butions for us to be successful
Pierson said.
Pierson went on to stress that
Pompili and Bethea have been
looking good in practice, have
positive mental attitudes, and are
eager to accept the responsibili-
ties as team leaders.
Pierson points out that as far as
strategy goes, the Pirates are
going to be a fast-break orientated
team but stresses that this will not
be their only weapon.
With 6-2 Bethea and 6-0 Pom-
pili, the Pirates will also have an
edge in size. Pierson would like to
run controled fast breaks, but
wants to be able to "have enough
discipline to slow it down and
work the ball inside for a high
percentage shot
Pierson feels that in order for
the Pirates to be strong with their
tough schedule, they will have to
be a well-balanced team. Last
season the girls greatly depended
on their point guard but this sea-
son they "won't have the luxury
of depending on one person
The key for the Pirates to be
competitive in their conference
lies in a more poised, equalized
attack dependent on not just one
Elayer, but on the entire basket-
all squad.
Alma Bethea is expected to help lead the Lady Pirates this season.
!�����-��� �.� !����-�??- � in !l �iHMiiH�1�W��'�'i 1i�i� m mr � ?


SI�i�n�����My

I
1





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBERS 1087
IRS plans holiday ski action
&�&&&&&&&&&&&&&&
Oh, to ski over the Christmas
holidays.
For some, this may be a dream
come true. How about adding a
little excitement to this dream by
offeringall who registcra five day
and night stay at Wintergreen,
Va with all lift tickets, ski rental
and transportation included in
one low price.
The Dcpartcmnt of Intramural-
Recreational Services can make
your dream come true.
Start off 1988 with an adven-
ture of a lifetime and register Nov.
1-Dec. 1 for the Outdoor Recrea-
tion Center trip to Wintergreen.
The cost is set at $408 for the
five-day affair. At the time of reg-
istration, an $85 deposit is re-
quired to reserve your spot. The
initial deposit is non-refundable
unless the Outdoor Recreation
Center must cancel the trip. Final
payment is due on Dec. 15 at 5
p.m.
For more information please
call 757-6387 and ask for the Intra-
mural Outdoorsman Mark Rittcr.
strategy
DURHAM, N.C. (AP) - When
Duke made it clear that it planned
to peg its offense on the passing
game, Blue Devil coach Steve
Spurrier waited for the Georgia
Tech defensive wave to move in
on his quarterback.
The message seemed clear after
Steve Slayden threw 34 times in
the first half.
"They were in a three-deep
zone 3 ! vith man coverage
underneath Spurrier said. "We
were prepared for more blitzes in
the second half, but they never
really came
So Slayden seized the opportu-
nity and broke the Atlantic Coast
Conference single-game touch-
down passing record with six
scoring throws. And Duke
notched its first ACC victory of
the season Saturday with a 48-14
victory.
"It seemed so easy today
Slayden said. "And the offensive
line-I've never had so much time
in my life
"We weren't having any
trouble with our protection
Georgia Tech coach Bobby Ross
said. "We felt like we could move
the ball. Our protection hung in
there pretty good. If there was an
element of the game today which
was pretty solid, it was probably
our offensive line
"I'm at a total loss. I've tried
everything with this football
team, and I haven't reached
them Ross said. "We weren't
very good
Turnovers contributed to Geor-
gia Tech's problems. The Yellow
Jackets committed four of them,
and Duke capitalized on them all.
Although Georgia Tech showed
passing prowess of its own, with
416 yards through the air, the
Yellow Jackets couldn't find their
way into the end zone.
"We even won the fourth quar-
ter for a change Spurrier said.
Thisis the first full game we've
played all season he said.
CLIFFS
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
W.shmgton Highway (N.C. 33 Ext.) Greenville. North Carolina
Phone 752-3172
Mon. thru Thurs. Night
Popcorn
Shrimp $3.65
&Q
AP
All-You-
CanEat
BARBECUE
BEEF RIBS
Every Wednesday
from 4 p.m. till closing
If you're a fan of tender,
delectable barbecue beef ribs, p. �
then Annabelles has something V s
for you to cheer about. Our ff
all-youan-eat ribs are only j'C
ffi every fcdnesday
from 4 p.m. till closing, f -
a
AniffibcIIc's
The Piaza
Greenville Blvd.
756-0315
The Outdoor Recreation Cen-
ter is open Monday & Friday 1:30
p.m5:30 p.m. & Tuesday &
Thursday 3 JOp.rn5.30 p.m.
In the latest Intramural Sport
action, congratulations to Mr.
Ivey Powell for capturing the 1987
Racquetball championship in the
open division. From this victory,
Powell went on the take the all
campus title scoring on excellent
volleys and ace serves.
Jim Parks came away with the
intermediate men's divisional
title while ladies favorite Ann
Ellen captured the all campus
gold. F
For information regarding any
of the programs and services of-
fered by the Department of Intra-
mural-Recreational Services call
757-6387 or drop by room 204
Memorial Gym.
Soccer's



Read The
�a
East Carolinian
JJ-A r -tt-tr Tfr A -A -tr-tt �&�&�&�& �&�&�&& �&�&�&
top five
Men's Division:
1. The Tools
2. The International
3. Sigma Phi Epsilon A
4. Scott Tissue
5. Omni Returns
Women's Division
1. Lady Pirates
2. Chi Omega
3. Enforcers
4. Phoenix
5. Delta Sigma Phi Sweethearts
Volleyball's
best bets
MEN'S DIVISION
1. Lucky Seven
2. Scott Slammers
3. Phi Kappa Tau
4. Alpha Sig
5. Pi Kappa Alpha A
WOMEN'S DIVISION
l.FORE
2. Enforcers
3. Campus Crusade
4. Alpha Omega Pi
5. Woodstock
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
� NEED HELP?
Why not come by the REAL Crlaia Intervention Center: 312
�. 10th St; or call 758-HELP. Por Free Confidential Counsel-
ing or Assistance.
Our Volunteers and 8taff are on duty 24 hrs. s day. year
around, la order to assist you In virtually any problem area
you might have. Our longstanding goal has always been to
preserve and enhance the quality of life for you and our com-
munity.
Ijggyd And Accredited By The State of North Carolina
Village
Donna Edwards - Owner
Greenville's Oldest & Most Experienced Pet Shop
�Weekly Specials
�Reptiles
�Complete Line of Dog, Cat, & Fish Supplies
�New shipment of Fish has arrived.
Master Card & Visa Welcome
Financing Available
511 Evans St.
Greenville. NC 27834
(Behind Cubbies)
756-9222
I i I
COMING ATTRACTIONS
m Mi
Wednesday
November 4th
at 8:00 p.m.
Double Feature:
SHANE
McCABE & MRS.
MILLER
Friday.
November 6th
at 8:00 p.m.
Movie:
CRIMES OF THE
HEART
i
Friday.
November 6th
at 8:00 p.m.
Coffeehouse Performance
Featuring:
JOHN DILLINGER
In the Underground
For mare information contact the
Student Union at 757 661I, ext 210.
?Jfc
Steele plea
By TOM MORRIS
ECU basketball eoa I !A -
Steele unveiled his 1987-88 -
to the public Saturday and while
the Pirates look a bit rough
around the edges, he said thin
were some positive res
the scrimmage
"1 think the biggest thii .
we're trying to do is wi
many young kids and ki I
no experience a! thislevi
just nice to get out hei
said. "We just wanted to get I
in front of some peoj
The Pirates ha i I. .
overs form last �.
Reid Lose and left Kel
also joined by Cus I i.
by the former stall
playing beca
his two years -
roster is comprised
man, one junior coll
and three walkons.
The scrimmage feal n
15-minute periods wit!
ous play. The Cold team k
Hill's 11 point!
!he score in th
� in tht
Ronne) (Jibbs
inch.
-
n I
� Photo cnuru-s (TifTHollN
Reed Lose (left)and Stanle Love (right battle
Pirates Purple-(;old Intra-Squad Scrunmagi -
ATTENTION BSN
CLASS OF 1988.



- :�, - -
MSgt N �
. . .
The E.C.I
Fraternit
� Sunday, 1
� All Frc
� Nov. 9th-13th
�Nov. 20th End oi
and Sororities
'

X
m.iM�.wi " "

J
� ��� �-nrwimqg0tyjp j






Read The J
st Carolinian
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
Jme by the REAL Crisis Intervention Center: 312
r call 758 HELP, For Free Confidential Counsel-
or
r� and Staff are on duty 24 hra. a day, year
:r to assist you in virtually any problem area
c Our longstanding goal has always been to
enhance the quality of life for you and our corn-
Arid Accredited H The State of North Carolina
Village
ards - Owner
Eldest & Most Evperienced Pet Shop
�Weekly Specials
�Rep
& Fish Supplies
h shipmei sh has arrived.
I Visa Welcome
Fit iwilable
o
511 Evans St.
Greenville. NC 27834
(Behind Cubbies)
756-9222
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 3,1987 13
Steele pleased with hoopsters
By TOM MORRIS
Special to The EM Carotin iin
ECU basketball coach Mike
Steele unveiled his 1987-88 squad
to the public Saturday and while
the Pirates look a bit rough
around the edges, he said there
were some positive results form
the scrimmage.
"1 think the biggest thing that
we're trying to do is we have so
many young kids and kids with
no experience at this level that it's
just nice to get out here Steele
said. "We just wanted to get them
in front of some people
The Pirates have only two hold-
0 .rs form last year's 12-16 team,
Reid Lose and Jeff Kelly, They .ire
also joined by Gus Hill, recruited
by the former staff, but never
playing because of injuries during
his two years here. The rest of the
roster is comprised of five fresh-
man, one junior college transfer
and three walkons.
The scrimmage featured two
15-minute periods with continu-
ous play. The Cold team, led by
Hill's 11 points won both periods.
The score in the first was 18-8 and
the score in the second was 15-14.
Ronney Gibbs added 10 points,
including two rim-rattling slams
on the fast break.
But for Steelc, the most impor-
tant thing was just getting his
team in front of a crowd.
"Today's scrimmage, the kids
were nervous the first four or five
minutes and didn't make any
shots but they arc passing the ball
and looking for the open man he
said. 'They're playing unselfishly
and I think they played pretty
hard today and that's what we're
trying to do.
"Just to be out and have some
people watch them and to have
the people here see how hard they
work. There were some real posi-
tive things. They're an enthusias-
tic group and they're unselfish
The Pirates debuted the flex of
offense and exercised a great deal
of patience with their passing
game and Steelesaid that patience
is going to be a key for his young
squad.
"We just don't have any size
he said. (Indeed, the tallest player
on the roster is 6-6 Dominque
Martin). "It's going to be difficult
for us to take it inside. We're
going to have to get the ball down
quickly and the first good shot
we're going to take it. We want to
run up and down the floor and
look to break but if we don't have
anything then we're going to have
to have some patience.
"The thing we're trying to get
accomplished now is everybody
knowing their spots on offense
and their roleand again when you
start out with a new situation,
there is so much teaching in-
volved. The thing that is difficult
is to teach juniors and sopho-
mores the same as freshman so we
don't have other players. I think
we're making progress. (But)
there's a lot to do before that first
game.
ECU opens the season Nov. 28
at home against Longwood.

&






Want to write?
Apply at the East
Carolinian today!








SHADES
ATEYE-
PfflCES
(Photo courles Cliff Hollis � The Daily Reflector)
Reed Lose (left) and Stanley Love (rijjht) battle for a loose ball during the
Pirates Purple-Cold Intra-Squad Scrimmage Saturday.
����1 UMUi
p MMTl rnun ,
ATTENTION BSN
CLASS OF 1988.
The Air Force has a special pro-
gram or 1988 BSNs If selected
you can enter active duty soon
after graduation without waiting
for the results of your State Boards
To qualify, you must have an
overall "B" average After commis-
sioning you II attend a five-month
internship at a major Air Force
medical facility Its an excellent
way to prepare for the w de range
of experiences you II ro;e serving
your country as an Air Force nurse
officer For more information call
MSgt Nick Nero (919)850-9549
Station to Station Collect

GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
ON QUALITY SHADES"
Tilings are looking up. Now. you can get designer sunglass
frames and accessories at lowest pricesGuaranteed.
Names like Ray-Ban. Sarengetti. Bolle. Vuarnet and Carrera
are all available at eyeopening prices. Come see us at
Sunglasses Plus today.
ungla55Q5
The Plaza Mall (across from Brady's)
756-9771
$5.00 Off Sunglasses.
"GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES ON QUALITY SHADES
Full Line Of Sunglasses. Eyeglass Frames.
Contact Lens Solutions And Eye Accessones
Eyeglass Frames from $9.95
iUMGLGltel
VOL
The Plaza Mall (across from Brady sj
The E.G.U. InterFraternity
Council
Presents
Fraternity Orientation Week
� Sunday, Nov. 15th-Thursday, Nov. 19th.
�All Freshmen and interested men.
�Nov. 9th-13th sign up in Front of Student Store.
�Nov. 20th End of the Week Party with All Fraternities
and Sororities at the Sigma Tau Gamma House
Hank's
Homemade Ice Cream
i
321 E. 10th St.
758-0000
New
Hank's
Frozen
Yogurt
FREE TASTES
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream is
Greenville's National award win-
ning ice cream store. Now you
can enjoy the taste of Hank's
super premium ice cream with-
out paying the price in calories!
Hank's new Frozen Yogurt has
only 99 calories per 4 ounce
serving yet it has the taste and
consistancy of old fashioned
hard ice cream.
Hank's Frozen Yogurt is low in
cholesterol low in fat, and high
in calcium.
You can enjoy Hank's Frozen Yo-
gurt as a delicious nutritious
lanch or as an anytime healthy
snack.
You can get Hank's Frozen Yo-
gurt in a variety of delicious fla-
vors and in all you favorite ice
cream specialities: sundaes,
waffle cones, blend-in's, shakes,
even banana splits!
Stop in for a FREE taste of Hank's
Frozen Yogurt today at Hank's
Homemade Ice Cream (and
Frozen Yogurt), on East 10th
Street, beside Wendy's.
ONLY 99
Calories Serving
Hank's
Homemade Ice Cream
321 E. 10th St
758-0000
Buy 1 Frozen Yogurt mend-in,
Sundae or Large serving
Get 1 FREE
lioifapr aider good thru Man Nov. 9.19C7
� � �ciip-a- vtm m m i
I
MM
mmmmmmm
!
(
��
4
��� .�,
I





&&&&&'&& ft Aft &&&&&&
Read The
st Carolinian
FEELING LOW? A
UNCERTAIN? Af&L
NEED HELP? I f"r)
bine by the REAL CrUU Intervention Center: 312
r call 758 HELP. For Free Confidential Coun�el-
mce
teer and Staff are on duty 24 hxa. a day. year
tier to assist you in virtually any problem area
re Our longstanding goal has always been to
enhance the quality of life for you and our com-
And Accredited Hv The State of North Carolina


THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 3. 1987 13
Steele pleased with hoopsters
VILLAGE
dwards - Owner
p Idest & Most Experienced Pet Shop
�Weekl) Specials
�Rep:
le oi Dog, Cat, & Fish Supplies
v shipment of Fish has arrived.
n I & Visa Welcome
. ble
511 Evans St.
Greenville. NC 27834
(Behind Cubbies)
756-9222
By TOM MORRIS
SfxUl la The tut Caruliniin
ECU basketball coach Mike
Steele unveiled his 1987-88 squad
to the public Saturday and while
the Pirates look a'bit rough
around the edges, he said there
were some positive results form
the scrimmage.
I think the biggest thing that
ive're trying to do is we have so
many young kids and kids with
no experience at this level that it's
just nice to get out here Steele
s,iul "We just wanted to get them
in front of some people
Fhe Pirates have only two hold-
overs form last year's 12-16 team,
Reid ' ose and left Kelly, They .ire
joined by Gus Hill, recruited
the former staff, but never
'laying because of injuries during
tis two years here. The rest of the
ostcr is comprised of five fresh-
nan, one junior college transfer
ind three walkons.
Hie scrimmage featured two
5 minute periods with continu-
es play. The Gold team, led by
Hill's 11 points won both periods, squad.
The score in the first was 18-8 and "We just don't have any size
the score in the second was 15-14. he said. (Indeed, the tallest player
Ronney Gibbs added 10 points, on the roster is 6-6 Dominque
including two rim-rattling slams Martin). "It's going to be difficult
ais
hi
on the fast break.
But for Steele, the most impor-
tant thing was just getting his
team in front of a crowd.
"Today's scrimmage, the kids
were nervous the first four or five
minutes and didn't make any
shots but they are passing the ball
and looking for the open man he
said. 'They're playing unselfishly
and 1 think they played pretty
hard today and that's what we're
trying to do.
"Just to be out and have some
people watch them and to have
the people here see how hard they
work. There were some real posi-
tive things. They're an enthusias-
tic group and they're unselfish
The Pirates debuted the flex of
ol tense and exercised a great deal
of patience with their passing
game and Steele said that patience
is going to be a key for his young
for us to take it inside. We're
going to have to get the ball down
quickly and the first good shot
we're going to take it. We want to
run up and down the floor and
look to break but if we don't have
anything then we're going to have
to have some patience.
"The thing we're trying to get
accomplished now is everybody
knowing their spots on offense
and their roleand again when you
start out with a new situation,
there is so much teaching in-
volved. The thing that is difficult
is to teach juniors and sopho-
mores the same as freshman so we
don't have other players. I think
we're making progress. (But)
there's a lot to do before that first
game.
ECU opens the season Nov. 28
at home against Long wood.




M

H
fc
Want to write?
Apply at the East
Carolinian today!








FACTIONS u
!
t 4th
i.m.
iture:
SHADES
ATEYE-
mtHMG
(Photo courtesy Cliff Hollis � The Daily Reflector)
Rvt'd Lose (left) and Stanley Lot e (right) battle for a loose ball during the
Pirates Purple-Cold Intra-Squad Scrimmage Saturday.
�m uiu
ATTENTION BSN
CLASS OF 1988.
The Air Force has a special pro-
gram for 1988 BSNs If selected
you can enter active duty soon
after graduation without waiting
for fhe results of your State Boards
To qualify you must have an
overall "B" average After commis-
sioning you II attend a five-month
nternship at a major Air Force
medico! facility I?son excellent
way to prepare for the wide range
of experiences you II have serving
your country as an Air Force nurse
officer For more information, call
MSgt Nick Nero 1919)850-9549
Station to Station Collect
"GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
ON QUALITY SHADES"
Things are looking up. Now. you can get designer sunglass
frames ami accessories at lowest pricesGuaranteed.
Names like Ray-Ban. Sarengetti. Bolle. Vuamet and Can-era
are all available at eyeopening prices. Come see us at
Sunglasses Plus today
VOL
The Plaza Mall (across from Brady's)
756-9771
$5.00 Off Sunglasses.
"GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES ON QUALITY SHADES"
Full Line Of Sunglasses. Eyeglass Frames.
Contact Lens Solutions And Eye Accessories
A?lu5 Eyeglass Frames from $9.95
The Plaa Mill jacross from Brotys
The E.C.U. InterFraternity
Council
Presents
Fraternity Orientation Week
�Sunday, Nov. 15th-Thursday, Nov. 19th.
�All Freshmen and interested men.
�Nov. 9th-13th sign up in Front of Student Store.
�Nov. 20th End of the Week Party with All Fraternities
and Sororities at the Sigma Tau Gamma House
Hank's f
Homemade Ice Cream
V Of
321 E. 10th St.
758-0000
New
Hank's
Frozen
Yogurt
FREE TASTES
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream is
Greenville's National award win-
ning ice cream store. Now you
can enjoy the taste of Hank's
super premium ice cream with-
out paying the price in calories!
Hank's new Frozen Yogurt has
only 99 calories per 4 ounce
serving yet it has the taste and
consistancy of old fashioned
hard ice cream.
Hank's Frozen Yogurt is low in
cholesterol, low in fat, and high
in calcium.
You can enjoy Hank's Frozen Yo-
gurt as a delicious nutritious
lunch or as an anytime healthy
snack.
You can get Hank's Frozen Yo-
gurt in a variety of delicious fla-
vors and in all you favorite ice
cream specialities: sundaes,
waffle cones, blend-in's, shakes,
even banana splits!
Stop in for a FREE taste of Hank's
Frozen Yogurt today at Hank's
Homemade Ice Cream (and
Frozen Yogurt), on East 10th
Street, beside Wendy's.
ONLY 99
Calories Serving
Hank's
Homemade Ice Cream
Buy 1 Frozen Yogurt Slend-in,
Sundae or Large serving
Get 1 FREE
1 coupon per order food thru Mob. Nov. 9. I�t7
321 E. 10th St
758-0000
Icllp-n-MTi
� ���m
��
ii i�n
mmmmmmm
A

-m�
r
j
.��






14
JHE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 1 1W
M
H �
v
s

2ar Z��s picked to take ACC hoop crown
GREENSBORO, N.C (AD-No
matter who Dean Smith has play
ing for him or what he says about
hisclub, it always seems his North
Carolina basketball team is
picked to win the Atlantic Coast
Gamecocks
obliterate
N.C. State
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP)-lt was a
case of revenge.
That's what the I9th-ranked
Gamecocks were out for Saturday
when they mauled North Caro-
lina State. The Wolfpack came
from behind to beat South Caro-
lina last year 23-22.
"All week we considered this to
be the payback game said South
Carolina runningback Harold
Green. "And we were able to exe-
cute the game very well today
Even Gamecock coach )oe Mor
rison indicated his players re-
membered the 1986 loss. "I think
this game's been on their minds
for a long time he said
Green, who scored three touch
downs, was just one of main
Gamecocks to make the
Wolfpack's Halloween a bad
dream.
"It was a night mare for our
quarterbacks said North Caro-
lina State coach Dick Sheridan.
The bad dream included five
sacks, three interceptions, minus-
13 yards rushing, two tumbles,
just three first downs, and only
yards total offense.
"We were obviously outplayed
by a very fine football team Sh-
eridan added. "Give South Caro-
lina Credit. Their offense played
very wez defense swarmed all
over us
The win marked the firt time
that South Carolina, now 7-2 for
the year, had earned a shutout
since beating Duke 21-0 in 1984.
North Carolina State, which fell
to 3-5, was so totally dominated
that it crossed midfteld onlyonce-
to the South Carolina 49. Nine of
their 16 possessions resulted in
lost yardage.
Green, who returned to dutv
two weeks ago after knee su rgerv.
got two second-quarter touch-
downs and a third in the third
quarter while the Gamecock de-
fense was picking up steam.
North Carolina State, which
upset then-No. 7 Qemson 30-28
last weekend, trailed 27-0 at
halftime and was never able to get
its offense untracked, especially
in thesecond half.
Conference title.
This year is no different, even
with the loss of five seniors, three
of whom were starters.
The Tar Heels won the poll of
sportswritersand broadcasters at
"Operation Basketball" by four
points, 727-723 over Duke. Ihe
Blue Devils drew 49 first-place
votes, however, while North
Carolina got 43.
"Nobody remembers after four
weeks Smith said. "1 go by more
of what you have coming back
than freshmen coming in
Smith is starting his 27th season
with a very young team-one sen-
ior, two juniors and four walk-ons
among the 15 players.
We are going very slowly, intro-
ducing things Smith said.
"Repeating fundamentals over
and over again. We'll go very
slowly
junior Jeff Lebo inherits the
point guard position full-time
from Kennv Smith. In the middle
is sophomore J.R.Reid, the6-foot-
9 player who brought more physi-
cal play to the Tar 1 leel front line.
Currently, Reid is awaiting a
hearing on assault charges
brought against him by Raleigh
man two weeks ago. Reid and
another player Steve Bucknall, al-
legedly assaulted the man at a
night spot. Smith has yet to issuea
statement regarding any discipli-
nary action, but he joked "I have
told them when we go to Raleigh
to paly (N.C. State) once a year,
that's the only time they're sup-
posed to go to Raleigh
North Carolina also returns 6-5
sophomore forward Kevin Mad-
den, who sat out last season to
upgrade his academic status, and
6-9 Scott Williams, who returned
to practice last week after his par-
ents died in what police say was
m apparent murder-suicide.
"We won't be as strong Smith
said. "We could be a very good
team. We're not now
North Carolina lost to North
Carolina State in the finals of the
ACC tournament, but advanced
to the round of eight, where the
Tar Heels lost to Syracuse in the
East Regional finals.
Duke reached the round of 16,
where they lost to eventual na-
tional champion Indiana. Coach
Mike Krzvzewski lost point
guard and floor leader Tommy
Amaker, but coming back are
Dannv Ferry, Billy King, John
Smith and backcourt players
Quin Snvder and Keving Sriek-
land. All are loaded with experi-
ence, but none among them
started every game last season.
Linksters take third
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sporti Writer
East Carolina closed out its fall
golf season with a third-place fin-
ish in the Old Dominion-Seascape
Collegiate Invitational last week-
end at Nags Head, N.C.
The University of Marvland
won the tournament with a 570
team total followed by Richmond
at 580. ECU was three strokes be-
hind at 583, Virginia Tech was
fourth at 584 and Elon fifth at 586.
Individually, it was Maryland's
Joe Greenalwalt in first place with
a two-day total of 137. Rich Purch-
pic of ODU and Barry Durfree of
Richmond were tied for second at
140. Virginia Tech's John Tyler
was fourth and Mike Kazkar
(Maryland) and Andy
Brock(Richmond) each had a 143
to give them fourth and fifth place
respectively.
Chris Rilcy had the best score
for the Pirates. The senior from
Virginia Beach carded a two-day
145 that placed him in a tie for
lOth-place overall. Other ECU
scores were: Chris Winkel, 146;
Carter Lucas, 149; Francis
Vaughn, 151; and Paul Garcia,
152.
Freshman Francis Vaughn re-
covered form a poor start shoot-
ing a 67 in a last round rally
The Seascape was the last of
ECU's five tournament fall season
and its best team finish.
The Pirates, who won the 1987
Colonial Athletic Association golf
crown, have been up and down
throughout the fall season. How-
ever, coach Hal Morrison, himself
the CAA coach of the year, feels
that the team will be ready for the
spring.
"We will go on a conditioning
program this winter and we will
be ready to go when the spring
season comes around Morrison
said.
The spring golf season is the
official conference season and
ECU will participate in a full slate
of tournaments including the
Chris Schenkel Invitational,
which is regarded as one of the
top in collegiate golf.
�����������������
hii.if' r " � mr.nirj.iwn
ill�lMHl

"We're looking for a consis-
tency of effort and, in some re-
spects, a consistency of excellent
play from a couple of our veter-
ans Kryzyzewski added.
Georgia Tech was third in the
balloting. The Yellow Jackets,
who lost returning center Antoine
Ford to Virginia Commonwealth
but return inside strong men
Duane Ferrell and Tom Ham-
monds, received six votes for first-
place and 567 points. N.C. State
got the last vote for first-place and
521 points.
Maryland got 369 points for
fifth place in the poll. The team
finished 9-17 last season, but has
an extra year of experience to rely
on as well as a strong freshman
class led by 6-10 Brian Williams.
Meanwhile, second-year Coach
Bob Wade is awaiting word from
doctors on the status of 6-9 senior
IX'rnck Lewis, the team's leading
scorer and rebounder last season.
A flare-up of Lewis' high blood
pressure and hypertension has
kept him out of preseason prac-
tices and he will not play until he
gets permission from doctors and
school officials, Wade said.
"We're very optimistic Wade
said when asked if he thought
Lewis would play this season
"We're following doctors' orders
until we're advised to allow him
to participate
Virginia, which has a wealth of
talent in the backcourt but is miss-
ing Mel Kennedy in thefrontcourt
because of academic deficiencies
received 293 points.
Clemson, 10-4 in the league last
year, was picked to place seventh.
Wake forest was chosen on 86 of
the 99 ballots to finish last and got
113 points.
WE BUILT
APB0UD
NEW
FEELING
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SAV A CENTER
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FUNK&fWAGrcALLS EDITION
Webster's New World
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Synonyms At
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Out 300 000
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Arranged
STOP
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can
Limit. One Witn Ar Additional $10 O More Purchase
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I Scot 4QO
� Towels 2 1UU �
LIMIT ON� WITH AN ADD L $10 OR MORE PURCH
� j Duke's TQ0 �8,M
H Mayonnaise
LIMIT ONF WITH AN ADD L $10 OR MORE P. �� �
j Tide
Detergent
SK � E1C � �0C � JT ONE P U �0C. K OP MORE "M
Maxwell jgc
House ;� �
LIMIT THREE WITH AN ADO I $10 OR MORE PURCH
Tomato
Soup
LIMIT v i a. oL $10 OR MORE PURCH
Eight O'Clock
Coffee
FAMILY PACK -FRESH
FIORIDAGOLD
Orange Juice
SELECTED
98c Banquet Chicken
Fryer Leg Aq0
Quarters TZ
'00 PURE BEEF � CHOPPED
Steak
Patties
a. ; . m aw
SABGENT0 CHEDDAR � M022ARELLA A4P
Shredded Cheese 2.09 Oran i Juice
CREAM OF CHICKEN OR CELER 2 FRESH CUT-1
� 2.99 Campbell's Soup 89c Whole Rib Eye
RAISIN BRAN � GOLDEN CRISP ' H N TRIM GRAIN FED BEEF
. 79c Post Cereal �, 1.99 Rib Eye Steaks � 4.99
LANDO LAKES
Butter
CINNAMON � CRESCENT
A&P Rolls
GREEN GIANT
DIXIE CRYSTALS
1.99 Com On The Cob 99c Sugar
GLAD LARGE
l� 99c Garbage Bags
A4P
79c French Fries
1.59 Round Roast 1.99
THIN TRIM GRAIN FED � EYE OF
2.39 Round Roast , 2.89
TOSTITOS
Tortilla
Chips
WASHINGTON STATE
RED OR GOLDEN
Delicious
Apples
FRESH FLORIDA
Bay
Scallops
RED OR WHITE
WATERFIElD
Dole Grapefruit 3 � 99c Boston Lettuce
ZIEGLER S FRESH PRESSED
6 -o, 99c Apple Cider
SUNSWEET � 24 OZ
1.59 Breakfast Prunes oS FREE
ClaSSiC Coke Tangelos
Diet Coke
Sprite
Jj " OQ Fresh Mushrooms J 1-49 English Walnuts
DOLE
Pineapples
CAMPBELL S
EJmJfH AMERICAN EXPRESS
199 Money
Orders
JUMBO DIAMOND
SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
CTQP ' HOMOGENIZED
n�u Fla v-O-R ich
Milk
SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
STOPjp&Q
j Sandwich
Bread
I One Pef Sopoe'
SEE STORE FOR DETAILS
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open 24 Hours-Open Mon. 7 a.m Closed Sat. 11 p.m Open Sun. 7 a.m11 p.m.
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOV. 1 THRU NOV. 7. tM7. QUANTITY MOOTS RESERVED
� � �mmmmmmmmtmmmmmtmmmmm

j
A





14
THE EAST CARPI INI AN NOVEMBER 3,1987
Tar Heels picked to take ACC hoop crown
GREENSBORO, N.C. (AD-No
matter who Dean Smith has play
ing for him or what he says about
hisclub, it always seems his North
Carolina basketball team is
picked to win the Atlantic Coast
Gamecocks
obliterate
N.C. State
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP)-lt was a
case of revenge.
That's what the Nth-ranked
Gamecocks were ou t for Sa turd.i v
when they mauled North Caro-
lina State. The Wolrpack came
from behind to beat South Caro-
lina last year 23-22.
"All week we considered this to
be the payback game said South
Carolina runningback Harold
Green. "And we were able to exe-
cute the game very well today
Even Gamecock coach Joe Mor
rison indicated his players re-
membered the 1986 loss. " think
this game's been on their minds
for a long time he said
Green, who scored three touch
downs, was just one ot many
Gamecocks to make the
Wolfpack's Halloween a bad
dream.
"It was a night mare for our
quarterbacks said North Caro
lina State coach Dick Sheridan.
The bad dream included five
sacks, three interceptions, minus-
13 yards rushing, two fumbles,
just three first downs, and only 36
yards total offense.
"We were obviously outplayed
by a very fine football team Sh-
eridan added. "Give South Caro-
lina Credit. Their offense played
very wez defense swarmed all
over us
The win marked the first time
that South Carolina, now 7-2 tor
the year, had earned a shutout
since beating Duke 21-0 in 19S4.
North Carolina State, which fell
to 3-5, was so totally dominated
that it crossed midfield only once-
to the South Carolina 49. Nine ot
their 16 possessions resulted in
lost yardage.
Green, who returned to duty-
two weeks ago after knee surgery,
got two second-quarter touch
downs and a third in the third
quarter while the Gamecock de-
fense was picking up steam.
North Carolina State, which
upset then-No. 7 Clemson 30-28
last weekend, trailed 27-0 at
halftime and was never able to get
its offense untracked, especially
in thesecond half.
Conference title.
This year is no different, even
with the loss of five seniors, three
of whom were starters.
The Tar Heels won the poll of
sportswritersand broadcasters at
"Operation Basketball" by four
points, 727-723 over Duke. The
Blue Devils drew 49 first-place
votes, however, while North
Carolina got 43.
"Nobody remembers after four
weeks Smith said. "I go by more
of what you have coming back
than freshmen coming in
Smith is starting his 27th season
with a very young team-one sen-
ior, two juniors and four walk-ons
among the 15 players.
We are going very slowly, intro-
ducing things Smith said.
"Repeating fundamentals over
and over again. We'll go very
slowly
Junior Jeff Lebo inherits the
point guard position full-time
from Kenny Smith. In the middle
is sophomore J. R. Reid, the tv-foot-
9 player who brought more physi-
cal play to the Tar J leel front line.
Currently, Reid is awaiting a
hearing on assault charges
brought against him by Raleigh
man two weeks ago. Reid and
another player Steve Bucknall, al-
legedly assaulted the man at a
night spot. Smith has yet to issue a
statement regarding any discipli-
nary action, but he joked "I have
told them when we go to Raleigh
to paly (N.C. State) once a year,
that's the only time they're sup-
posed to go to Raleigh
North Carolina also returns 6-5
sophomore forward Kevin Mad-
den, who sat out last season to
upgrade his academic status, and
rv9 Scott Williams, who returned
to practice last week after his par-
ents died in what police say was
an apparent murder-suicide.
"We won't be as strong Smith
id. "We could be a very good
team. We're not now
North Carolina lost to North
Carolina State in the finals of the
ACC tournament, but advanced
to the round of eight, where the
Tar Heels lost to Syracuse in the
East Regional finals.
Duke reached the round of 16,
where they lost to eventual na-
tional champion Indiana. Coach
Mike Krzyzewski lost point
guard and floor leader Tommy
Amaker, but coming back are
Danny Ferry, Billy King, John
Smith and backcourt players
Quin Snvder and Keving Srick-
land. All are loaded with experi-
ence, but none among them
started every game last season.
Linksters take third
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sports Writer
East Carolina closed out its fall
golf season with a third-place fin-
ish in the Old Dominion-Seascape
Collegiate Invitational last week-
end at Nags Head, N.C.
The University of Maryland
won the tournament with a 570
team total followed by Richmond
at 580. ECU was three strokes be-
hind at 583, Virginia Tech was
fourth at 584 and Elon fifth at 586.
Individually, it was Maryland's
Joe Greenal wait in first place with
a two-day total of 137. Rich Purch-
pic of ODU and Barry Durfree of
Richmond were tied for second at
140. Virginia Tech's John Tyler
was fourth and Mike Kazkar
(Maryland) and Andy
Brock(Richmond) each had a 143
to give them fourth and fifth place
respectively.
Chris Riley had the best score
for the Pirates. The senior from
Virginia Beach carded a two-day
145 that placed him in a tie for
lOth-place overall. Other ECU
scores were: Chris Winkel, 146;
Carter Lucas, 149; Francis
Vaughn, 151; and Paul Garcia,
152.
Freshman Francis Vaughn re-
covered form a poor start shoot-
ing a 67 in a last round rally
The Seascape was the last of
ECU's five tournament fall season
and its best team finish.
The Pirates, who won the 1987
Colonial Athletic Association golf
crown, have been up and down
throughout the fall season. How-
ever, coach Hal Morrison, himself
the CAA coach of the year, feels
that the team will be ready for the
spring.
"We will go on a conditioning
program this winter and we will
be ready to go when the spring
season comes around Morrison
said.
The spring golf season is the
official conference season and
ECU will participate in a full slate
of tournaments including the
Chris Schenkel Invitational,
which is regarded as one of the
top in collegiate golf.
��������������������
"We're looking for a consis-
tency of effort and, in some re-
spects, a consistency of excellent
play from a couple of our veter-
ans Kryzyzewski added.
Georgia Tech was third in the
balloting. The Yellow Jackets,
who lost returning center Antoine
Ford to Virginia Commonwealth
but return inside strong men
Duane Ferrell and Tom Ham-
monds, received six votes for first-
place and 567 points. N.C State
got the last vote for first-place and
521 points.
Maryland got 369 points for
fifth place in the poll. The team
finished 9-17 last season, but has
Derrick Lewis, the team's leading
scorer and rebounder last season
A flare-up of Lewis' high blood
pressure and hypertension has
kept him out of preseason prac-
tices and he will not play until he
until we're advised to allow him
to participate
Virginia, which has a wealth of
talent in the backcourt but is miss-
ing Mel Kennedy in thefrontcourt
because of academic deficiencies.
an extra year of experience to rely gets permission from doctors and received 293 points.
on as well as a strong freshman
class led by 6-10 Brian Williams.
Meanwhile, second-year Coach
Bob Wade is awaiting word from
doctors on the status of 6-9 senior
school officials. Wade said.
"We're very optimistic Wade
said when asked if he thought
Lewis would play this season
"We're following doctors' orders
Clemson, 10-4 in the league last
year, was picked to place seventh.
Wake Forest was chosen on 86 of
the 99 ballots to finish last and got
113 points.
WE BUILT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
JP
SAV A CENTER
The freshest way to Save.
FurmerwAGiwxs edition
Webster's New World
THESAURUS
� vnonmsar
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Own .300, o(X)
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Alphabetically
Arranged
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Scot
Towels
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Duke's
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Coffee '�
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FLORIDAGOLD
Orange Juice "
SARGENT0 CHEDDAR � MOZZARELLA
Shredded Cheese '�?
98c
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Sugar
GLAD LARGE
Garbage Bags
89
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1.59
5? 2.39
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Whole Rib Eye
THM TRIM QfU NFE1 BEEC
Rib Eye Steaks
nm v iMufb s rro�BEU
Round Roast
THIN TRIM GRAIN FED � EVE OF
Round Roast
3.29
4.99
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2.89
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mp Tortilla
Chips
A WASHINGTON STATE
JP RED OR GOLDEN
Delicious
Apples
FRESH FLORIDA
' Bay
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RED OR WHITE
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Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
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pwce� tmenvt mow. 1 thhu nov. t, wr. quantity wonts rckrvco

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T I





Title
The East Carolinian, November 3, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 03, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.570
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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