The East Carolinian, October 29, 1987






INSIDE
Editorials4
EntertainmentH
Sports17
Classifieds6
ENTERTAINMENT
'Prince of Darkness' is nothing new
ENTERTAINMENT, page 11.
see
SPORTS
Pirates to host third-ranked Miami
page 17.
see SPORTS,
Qftft �aat Carolinian
Sewing the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. n2 No. IS
Thursday, October 29,1987
Greenville, NC
20 Pages
Circulation 12,000
JARVIS HALL
Crowds converge on ECU
By TIM HAMPTON
Stall Wntcr
Thousands of people from
other colleges, cities and states
will converge on ECU Saturday as
the Pirates host the Hurricanes of
Miami at Ficklen Stadium and as
Greenville streets host crowds of
costumed goblins and ghouls
1 lallowccn night.
"Fans need to arrive at the sta-
dium early to assure a good seat
for the 12:10 p.m. kickoff said
Athletic Director Ken Karr of the
SRA meeting
Saturday football game. Karr said
the kickoff time had been pushed
back to accommodate an Univer-
sity of Miami television contract.
The game will only be televised in
the bade county area surround-
ing Miami, according to Karr.
"We expect a good sized crowd
for the game said Karr.
With the game and Halloween
festivities the campus will have
added traffic and parking prob-
lems. Johnny R. Rose, chief of
Campus Security, said he has
added another shitt of six officers
to aid the regular shift of seven
officers with traffic and parking.
Rose said he did not anticipate
any major problems with Hallow-
een. He said last year there were
minor cases of vandalism which is
to be expected on Halloween
said Rose.
The Halloween celebration in
Greenville is known throughout
the state as one of the biggest. An
estimated crowd of 10,000 filled
the barracaded streets of down
town last Halloween.
According to sources at North
Carolina State University and the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, students there are
planning to drive to Greenville to
share in the street partv. "Me and
my friends are taking full cars to
ECU tor I lallowecn said Jimmy
Edmonds, a NCSL) student.
Edmonds said he knows of
more than a hundred NCSU stu-
dents that are planning to make
the journey on Saturday.
Residence hall contest announced
1 hese creatures" show Halloween spirit during a celebration last
year I Photolab).
By KRIS REYER
Stiff Wnlrr
A Student Residence Hall Asso-
ciation official announced plans
and guidelines for an Outstand-
ing Residence Hall contest at a
regularly scheduled meeting of
the SRA Tuesday.
The Outstanding Residence
Hall contest is held every year,
according to Mark Carroll, vice
president. The "Most Outstand-
ing Hall' award will be given
according to a point system, ac-
cording to an SRA flyer. There
will be points allocated by partici-
pation in each of six categories:
energy contest, blood drives, resi-
dence hall projects, intramural
participation, informational pro-
grams, and ECU Telefund partici-
pation, according to the Over.
A list oi all activities and proj-
ects that each hall participated in
must be compiled and submitted
to 214 Whichard by April 4,1988,
Carroll said.
Also announced at the meeting
were plans for the Energy Con-
test. There will be one contest per
semester, according to Carroll,
and a prize of $200 will be given
each time. Judging will be done by
Outstanding Residence Hall
judges, Carroll said.
The months of the contests are
November, 1987, through Febru-
ary, 1988.
Mark Kalkwarf, representative
from Scott 1 all, announced plans
fora KissorTreatonThursday the
29th. During the program, the
escort rules will be lifted and all
girls wishing to participate will
put pumpkins on their doors sav-
ing Kiss or Treat, Kalkwarf said.
The guys then go and knock on
these doors and receive either a
kiss or a treat, Kalkwarf said.
On November 11 (Veteran's
Day) West Campus will have a
"Paint the Rainbow" block partv,
according to Janet Batten, repre-
sentative from West Campus. The
section of street between White
and Clement will be blocked off
and the fading rainbow will be re-
painted, according to Batten.
There will be a cook-out and they
are loking into the possibility ol a
military band, said batten.
A bloiH.1 drive sponsored bv
Pizza 1 hit will beheld 12to6p.m.
Nov. 18-19, according to I homas
Dcnton, president. Coupons lor
tree pizza v ill be given to donors,
Denton said. Dcnton also an-
nounced plans to trv to get vans to
drive residents from the Hill to
the bliKxi drive.
Louise Pcrrcca, treasurer, re-
ported on a Student 1 Icalth Serv-
ice- meeting which announced
Rape Awareness Week (Nov. 2-6).
The week is to include courses in
self-defense and skits about sex-
ual assault.
Defense secretary says congress is 'fed up'
BvTOM PAGE
� . : ss is fed up" these days
the North Atlantic treaty
Organization (NATO) burden,
rd ng to Dennis Kloske,
s ' mt secretary of defense.
Ehe issues of burden sharing
Itradt are on everyone's mind
ess and gaming greater
lity, kloske said. The fact
ur NATO allies are enjoying
surplus while we experi-
trade deficit has become an
which some members of
gross are meeting with the
it of cutting back on the
ber oi U.S. troops overseas.
t only now, but if we get an
. arms negotiation with the
S . fts, it will be interesting to see
pays for what around here.
on can be guaranteed that Con-
- m ill ask the allies to shoul-
greater share oi the defense
n and live up to their
mitment Kloske said.
1 he INF treaty would eliminate
rmediate-range nuclear force
issiles in Europe and has
� ned the debate over the
uecy of NATO's conven-
il forces and who should bear
the burden of improvements
should the U.SSoviet accord go
through, according to pentagon
officials.
In a defense report in the Na-
tional Journal, Kloske said that
members of Congress "are mak-
ing a direct link between burden
sharing and the trade deficit and
are fed up with it Kloske said
that there arc potentially danger-
ous undercurrents in Congress
pertaining to the issue and that
the frustration on trade will sim-
ply spill over into the political
arena if it continues and people
will start doing crazy things.
In the same article, economist
Mclvyn Krauss said that Ameri-
can troops in Europe "give Euro-
pean politicians the excuse thev
are looking for to justify their
unwillingness to cut into their
welfare state and spend on de-
fense
In terms of the Gross National
Product (GN'P), the United States
spent 6.9 percent on defense last
year which is twice as much as all
oi their NATO allies put together,
according to figures released by
the Commerce Department. The
United States ranks high above its
major allies, spending $1,079 per
person on the military in 1985,
followed most closely by Norway
(5433). In last place is Turkey
($47), followed by Portugal ($64)
and Japan ($113), according to the
report in the Journal.
The U.S. has 317,893 total troops
in NATO Europe and cxperinc-
ced a $113.7 billion dollar trade
deficit last year. By spending in
other areas, the Europeans are not
from the NATO countries in order
for the allies to share more in the
burden of defense. This measure
is causing the NATO countries to
panic because in order to increase
spending on defense they would
have to cut services or raise taxes
which would not be popular, ac-
cording to Rep. Patricia Schroder
in a defense report in the National
Journal.
Pentagon official Kloske said
that Schroder has been successful
it will be interse sting to see who pays for what
around here. You can be guaranteed that Con-
gress will ask the allies to shoulder a greater
share of the defense burden and live up to their
commitment �Dennis E. Kloske
meeting their NATO commit-
ment and are doing less for their
defense than are the Americans,
according to sources from the
Pentagon.
Some members of Congress are
proposing that the U.S. withdraw
troops from Europe gradually
in Congress lately on pushing her
legislation and getting it passed.
Schroder proposed a protection
fee that would require allied
countries to pay an import duty
equivalent to theshareof theGNP
that the U.S. spends on defense
which is 6.6 per cent minus the
percentage of GNP that the ex-
porting ally spends on defense.
These figures, according to the
National Journal, mean an ally
such as Greece which spends 7.1
per cent of its GNP on defense
would pay no fee while one such
as Japan would have to pay a 5.6
percent tariff because they only
spend 1 percent of their GNP on
defense.
Although it costs to have troops
in Europe, according to the de-
fense report it would also cost an
estimated $670 million to bring
American troops home with their
equipment and relocate them.
New facilities would also have to
be established in the U.S. which
could cost up to 5.9 billion with an
annual savings dropping to $540
million, according to the Congres-
sional Budget Office report in the
Journal.
Pentagon officials said in the
defense report that there is no
question that the withdrawals of
troops would not save money and
that the U.S. as an acknowledged
leader in the free world has an
obligation to do more than their
fair share.
Despite the conflicts pertaining
to trade and burden sharing, or
lack oi burden sharing in NATO,
American public opinion runs in
favor of continued strong in-
volvementin NATO. According
to a poll in the National Journal
conducted by the Gallup organi-
zation Inc. for the Chicago Coun-
cil on Foreign Relations, 70 per-
cent of the respondents favored
present or even more military
commitment to the alliance.
The INF issue plays a very big
role in the NATO arena and its
future, according to Rep. Jack
Kemp in a speech released by the
Heritage Foundation. Kemp said
there is no mystery as to why all
this (INF talks) makes Europeans
nervous. They have lived through
a pattern of reversals in U.S. mili-
tary commitments. The call for
withdrawal of troopsonly adds to
the tinge of "de-coupling" hys-
teria in Europe.
Kemp said what is at stake for
the Europeans in the INF negotia-
tions is more than an assortment
of missiles, it is the political
commitment those missiles have
come to represent at a time when
the strategic balance is shifting
increasingly in favor of the East.
New organization
ECU retired faculty meet
(ECU News Bureau) � Forty
retired members of the faculty of
ECU organized the ECU Retired
I acuity Associaton at a meeting
Tuesday night, elected officers
and launched a membership
drive.
Dr. James Batten, who is a re-
tired member of the School of
Education faculty, was elected the
first president of the group. Other
officers elected included Thomas
Herndon, of the history depart-
ment, vice-president; Dr. Richard
Capwell, professor of English-
emeritus and former dean of the
College of Arts and Sciences, sec-
retary, and Marquerite Austin
Pern retired former chairman
and professor of foreign lan-
guages, treasurer.
Directors and the departments
from which they are retired are
Dr. Lawrence F. Brewster, his-
tory; Herbert Carter, School of
Music; Elizabeth Drake, School of
Music; Dr. Robert Holt, philoso-
phy and former vice president
vice chancellor and dean; Dr.
Charles Price, history; Dr. Mary
Lois Staton, School of Education;
Dr. Richard C. Todd, history; Dr.
Henry Wanderman, professor
and former chair of foreign lan-
guages; Lee G. Williams, aca-
demic library services.
Dr. Floyd Mattheis, professor
and former chairman of the Sci-
ence Education department, was
elected chair of the membership
committee. The group also estab-
lished committees for social
travel activities, publication, pub-
lic and university relations and
finance.
Dues will be $10 a year or a
lifetime membership for $50.
Retired ECU faculty interested
in joining the association may
contact Mattheis at 756-2466, Wil-
liams at 756-2459 or Perry at 752-
6848.
Marquerite A. Perry, Dr. James Batten, Thomas Herndon and Dr. Richard Capwell (left to right)
organizational meeting of the ECU Retired Faculty Association (Hardy Alligood, Photolab).


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II IF L AST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 29, 118;
Association of Colleges survey reveals
aspirations of education majors
(Clb) - About 82 percent of
today's education majors want to
begin their teaching careers in
suburban or rural schools, the
American Association of Colleges
for Teacher Education (AACTE)
found in a survey released last
week.
The education majors' wishes,
the group concluded, may mean
large urban schools with minority
student bodies are going to have a
tough time attracting teachers to
work there.
Typically, said AACTE resi-
dent William Gardner, prospec-
tive teachers are white women
trom suburban backgrounds.
Only 3 percent of the education
majors in college today are black;
3 percent are Hispanic.
But even the prospective mi-
nority teachers did not want to
work in inner-city schools, the
survey indicated.
Inner-city schools, on the other
hand, may need teachers more
than others. Educators predict
that by the year 2000 about 40
percent o( thenation'selementary
and secondary school students
will be minorities.
Entitled "Teaching and Teach-
ers: Facts and Figures the
AACTE survey did not suggest
how to get majors interested in
teaching in inner city neighbor-
hoods.
Gardner, however, noted the
results confirmed the 1985 find-
ings of a coalition of education
deans called "The Holmes
Group which warned of a press-
irtg need to produce more minor-
ity education majors.
Ninety universities, including
Harvard and Johns Hopkins,
committed themselves to the
Holmes Group's goals.
But the prospective teachers,
regardless of their race or where
they want to work, are among the
brightest students on their cam-
puses, the AACTE found.
Education majors graduated in Chancellor nkins leads a standi. g ovation duri max of a ban
the top third ot their class, the � � �a:h:c ���u� � r- � , �
survi
poii
o � i � nain-ciiur r.meriius LeojenKins ieaas a standing ovation during tne climax ot a banquet
top nird ot their class, the and Mrs. William E. Laupus at the Greenville Hilton Friday night. More than 450 people P
vey showed, with a 3.1 grade Laupus, who plans to step down from his post after having served as the dean of the I (
nt average on a scale of 4. Medicine for more than 12 years (Tom Fortner).
honoring I
aid tribute
I School
Reports indicate enrollment up
(CIS) Bucking predictions
by demographers, preliminary
reports trom admissions offices
indicate enrollment at the
nation's colleges and universities
has increased again this fall.
"Informally, the sense 1 get is
that enrollment is not decreasing.
Chir hunch is that it's up said
Elaine El-Khawas oi the Ameri-
can Council on Education.
Smaller schools as well as huge
megaversities seem to be increas-
ing in size. Giants like the univer-
sities ot Texas, Oklahoma, Indi-
ana and Michigan State have re-
ported enrollment hikes in recent
�ks.
So have other campuses �
publicand private� like Christo-
pher Newport College (in Vir-
ginia), the universities oi New
Orleans and Portland (Ore.) and
Illinois Wesleyan.
None oi it was supposed to
happen.
Demographers predicted col-
lege body counts would fall 15 to
20 percent through this decade
because there are fewer 18-to-21
ear olds the people who typi-
cally go to college � in the popu-
lation.
For the seventh straight fall,
howcS ie. decline ha9ie
materialized.
In fact, enrollment has in-
creased. "Instead of declines in
enrollment, many campus presi-
dents are having to think about
limiting enrollment said Allan
W. Ostar, president oi the Ameri-
can Association of State Colleges
and Universities (AASCU).
The Texas Higher Education
Coordinating Board, for instance,
met Oct. 2 to discuss limiting en-
rollment at some state campuses.
AASCU counted 22 states that
have claimed increased enroll-
ments so far this fall, ranging from
two to ten percent. Fifteen states
report stable enrollments, while
three � Iowa, Montana and
Alaska � expect modest de-
creases. Ten states have not yet
filed their head counts.
Although data are not yet avail-
able for private schools, Paul
C loodwinot the National Associa-
tion oi Independent i i lieges and
Universities (NA1CU) asserted,
"the demographers are wrong
"We keep hearing about enroll-
ment increases at the more selec-
tive institutions, and the number
ot applications to private institu-
tions was up last year. But we
don't know about the thousands
of private schools not in the top
echelons yet Goodwin said.
Scattered reports suggest some
oi those smaller private colleges
also are doing well.
Oklahoma Baptist University's
enrollment rose 8.5 percent, for
example, while St. Olaf College,
and independent campus in Min-
nesota, broke its 1981 enrollment
record this fall.
College Bound, a higher endu-
cation newsletter, reported last
week that many top colleges were
flooded with applications and
never had to admit students from
their waiting lists this year.
Campuses, various experts say,
can thank "older" students,better
recruiting oi high school seniors
and anti-dropout programs for
the continuing enrollment sur-
prise of 1987.
St. Olaf Vice President Bruce
Moe attributed his school's in-
crease to improved "student re-
tention programs while, in Mis-
souri, Stephens College admis-
sions officers cited the same rea-
sons for keeping enrollments
from falling.
"Although there are no official
statistics available yet, so far it
appears that enrollments are up
because of increasing numbers of
nontraditional students (enroll-
ing) explained U.S. Dept. of
Education spokeswoman Victo-
ria Tripp.
In states facing economic diffi-
culties � such as slumps in theoil
and farm industries � "older"
people tend to enroll in college for
retraining, AASCU said. Other
nontraditional students have en-
O'Neal receives scholarship
ECU News Bureau) � The
annual Grover W. Everett Schol-
arship in Chemistry at East Caro-
lina University has been awarded
to Toiriste O'Neal of Belhaven,
N.C a junior chemistry major
with an outstanding academic
record.
O'Neal, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Enoch O'Neal, has a 3.535 grade
point average and is pursuing a
BS degree in chemistry. He is a
member of the ECU Gospel Choir,
ECU Christian Fellowship and
NAACP. He is a student legislator
and serves on the rules and judici-
ary committee of the Student
Government Association.
O'Neal also is a resident advisor
in Scott Hall and is employed in
the chemistry department as an
undergraduate lab assistant. He
has held the Beula Little Mason
Scholarship since 1985 and earlier
this year was awarded the Le-
donia S. Wright Scholarship. He
also plays intramural basketball.
Dr. Grover W. Everett was a
faculty member in the ECU chem-
istry department from 1955 to
1978, serving as chair of the de-
partment from 1955 to 1966. Upon
his retirement in 1978, his family
established a scholarship fund to
be used for an annual award to an
outstanding junior cherpistry
major to encourage scholarship
and development as a chemist.
Horses killed in barn fire
HIGH POINT, N.C (AP) �
Twenty-one horses, most of them
show horses just back from the
North Carolina State Fair, were
killed when a fir- troyed a
barn.
"It's a shame the rain didn't
start earlier said Earl Hammer,a
Davie County horse owner who
came Tuesday to offer help to
Steve Allred, the owner of the
barn.
The barn was engulfed in
flames when firefighters arrived.
Rain began about an hour later.
"When you hear about a barn
burning, it makes you worry
about your own Hammer said.
"When you first hear about it,
they never say whose it is, so you
jump on the telephone and start
calling everybody. Steve and Iare
friends, but we also compete in
horse shows. Whenever some-
thing like this happens, that's ir-
relevant
Allred had just brought the
horses back from the state fair in
Raleigh, Hammer said. Several of
the American Saddlebred horses
were valued at more than
$100,000 each.
The fire was reported about 2
a.m. at the Forsyth County barn
about nine miles outside High
Point.
Triangle Fire Chief Ray Smith
said he didn't know how long
firefighters would remain at the
scene while investigaors and in-
surance adjusters finished their
jobs. The cause of the fire has not
been determined.
rolled to pursue graduate degrees
or simply because they love to
learn, El-Khawas said.
Moreover, more hiuh school
seniors seem to be opting to go on
to college instead or getting jobs
after graduation.
"A college education Tripp
said, "is becoming a standard part
oi the American dream
Perhaps less mysticaly, El Kha-
was noted that, thanks to a blip in
childbearing patterns in 1970,
there happen to be more i8-year-
olds in the population this year.
So fall enrollment at North-
western State University of Lou-
isiana is the highest in the school's
103-year history, jumping 15.5
percent in a year.
Rhode Island College officials
say their 3 percent increase in total
student enrollment � 7,741, com-
pared with last fall's 7,534 � can
be traced to a 16 percent jump in
the number oi freshmen.
Students themselves tend to
notice such jumps in terms of
decreased quality of campus life.
At Oklahoma Baptist, for ex-
ample, students report crowded
dorm conditions. At Mankato
State in Minnesota, parking short-
ages have gone form bad to
worse, and The Reporter, the
campus paper, noted classrooms
are so full that some students have
to sit on the floor.
Still, not all schools are in on the
boom. The University of Arkan-
sas, although boasting a larger
undergraduate population this
year, has fewer graduate students
and fewer total students this fall.
Clarification
An article in Tuesday's paper
about Steve Streater contained
an error. Streater is to speak at
7:30 p.m. today in Mendenhall
244 � not 221.
3Hje tort (Earolftiian
Serving the Easf Carolina campus community siire 1925
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo Shan Clemens
Pete Fernald. Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY RATES
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COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
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Two colors and black 155.00
Inserts
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OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Creenvi
LI
lie J
.��� . � �.� .1�. � � -
Capt. Kn
Halloween is a time of ghosts,
goblins, vampires, and the like
Adults and little kids dress up in
everything trom store bought to
homemade costume contests It's
a night to have a good time and act
like a little kid again for some
Pirate Police
Line
BvCAPT. KFITHKNOX
II l Public Sc-
Some go to haunted houses
hoping ti have the wits scared out
of them Fur ECU students and
people fur all over even some
who come from out of state, it's a
chann �
lowcen
I"he cit)
the stn �
othei �
hop
li .
oi their
Which 1
Alotwil
those ai
I � �
and
Ho
that
Teacher had tc
) C olumbia
the wealthv
� in cori
NEW YORK
University told
teacher oi a clas
raiding to drop his r to 1 i
one of his students $1
week.
Corporate raider AsherB 1
man who is teaching a
called "Corporate Raiding
Art of War" � offered grad
dents $100,000 if, in the eoui
doing research for the class, any
should identify a companv I
man could over take.
Edelman has made millions
launching takeover attempts 1 I
various companies, including
Burlington Industries, Fruehauf
Corp. and Lucky Stores.
All of them eventually paid
Edelman a premuim for his stock
in return for him leaving them
alone. All had to borrow money to
do so.
Identifying such vulnerable
companies is not easy. It entails
calculating a company's assets,
comparing them to its market
values and determining whether
the difference between them can
be financed and eventually resold
profitably.
In any case, on Oct. 13 Colum-
bia business school Dean John C.
Burton told Edelman to cancel
what Edelman called a "finder's
fee
"We felt the linkage between
direct ecmnomic toeeflftlW' an,
what goes on in the classroom �
especially an incentive of this
magnitude � would bias the aca-
demic environment Burton ex-
plained.
Edelman protested that "this is
Open House
(ECU News Bureau) � ECU
will observe "Open House '87" on
Oct. 31 with programs and tours
of the campus tor prospective
students, their families and the
public.
Sponsored by the Office D
Undergraduate Admissions in-
formation sessions will be con-
ducted at the Mendenhall Student
Center from 9 a.m. until noon on
admissions, student orientation,
financial aid and student life at
ECU. Sessions are to begin at the
start of each hour.
Academic information sessions
will be conducted from 10 a.m.
until noon. Prospective students
will have the opportunity to meet
facultv members to discuss vari-
ousacademicprogramsand voca-
tional options.
Campus tours will be con-
ducted bv the ECU Ambassadors,
the university's student represen-
tatives.
I
teve bom 1
Wednesday
Bl
CfiLEND
UIR
TtKfl & The Dream fll
fire Looking For Bri
19 8 8 " 6 i
Carolina
No EHperice
Must be
Rll Welcome,
appc i
A






imax of a banquet honoring Dr.
? than Irk) people paid tribute to
lean ol the 1 s. I School of
�aat Carolinian
e, Directi ir ol rtising
vertising Representivcs
. i ('lemens
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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Hi JL ii

THF EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOHER 29, 1987
Capt. Knox urges having a safe Halloween
Halloween is a time of ghosts,
goblins, vampires, and the like.
Adults and little kids dress up in
everything from store bought to
homemade costume contests. It's
a night to havea good time and act
like a little kid again for some.
Pirate Police
Line
By CAPT. KEITH KNOX
ECU Public S�lty
Some go to haunted houses
hoping to have the wits scared out
of them. For ECU students and
people for all over, even some
who come from out of state, it's a
chance to attend the biggest 1 lal-
loween costume party around.
The city of Greenville blocks off
the streets to allow students and
others to have a good time and
hopefully a safe time.
However, there are those few
who jeapordize everybody's
good time and safety. For most,
Halloween will be the best night
of their life, for others their worst.
Which will it be for you?
A lot will depend upon you and
those around you. How many
good times have been spoiled by
those who overindulge in alcohol
and other impairing substances?
How many people do you know
that should never indulge in any
alcohol or impairing substance
because of the radical behavior
changes that occur in that person?
Think hard for a minute, could
that person be you or a friend?
Why not face the fact.
There are just some people who
can not handle it. Some of those
whocan and do indulgeare some-
times influenced by those few and
join in on the irrational behavior.
What do you think was behind
some of the recent bad publicity
that has brought shame and dis-
grace upon this great educational
institution � ECU � and
Greenville?
Those who fall into this group
are usually the ones who have the
worst night of their life or cause
someone else to. How many
fights, muggings, larccnys, sexual
assaults-rapes and down right
malicious vandalism will occur
this weekend?
Or anytime? Because of the
indulgences of impairing sub-
stances. How many lives will be
lost or serious injuries sustained?
How many will end up in jail?
How many victims will fall prey
to crime because of their impair-
ment? When indulging in these
substances, can you really be to-
tally alert to your surroundings,
think dearly and take the appro-
priate action in a given situation?
I would bet not. 1 low manv will
say things to someone they care
about, later regretting it, but
unable to undo the damage that's
dorie? How manv will not be able
to remember what they did or
what happened to them that
night? Who will walk through or
place their fist through a glass
door or window, seriously injur-
ing themselves, sometimes per-
manently? Will one of these
things happen to you or your
friends?
I would hope not. But unfortu-
nately most people think, "It can't
happen to me Will it take some-
thing serious happening to vour
or a close friend, relative or family
member to shock you into reality?
Fact is some people who use and
abuse alcohol and other impair-
ing substances affect a lot of
people besides themselves.
The biggest problem with soci-
ety today is that these individuals
never really stop to think about
the consequences of this or their
behavior and the others that it
affects.
Teacher had to drop $100,000 offer
NEW YORK(CPS) - Columbia
University told the wealthy
teacher of a class in corporate
raiding to drop his offer to pav
one of his students $100,000 last
week.
Corporate raider shcr B. Edel-
man - who is teaching a class
called "Corporate Raiding: The
Art of War" � offered grad stu-
dents $100,000 if, in the course of
doing research for the class, any
should identify a company Edel-
man could over take.
Edelman has made millions
launching takeover attempts of
various companies, including
Burlington Industries, Fruehauf
Corp. and Lucky Stores.
All of them eventually paid
Edelman a premuim for his stock
in return for him leaving them
alone. All had to borrow money to
do so.
Identifying such vulnerable
companies is not easy. It entails
calculating a company's assets,
comparing them to its market
values and determining whether
the difference between them can
be financed and eventually resold
profitably.
In any case, on Oct. 13 Colum-
bia business school Dean John C.
Burton told Edelman to cancel
what Edelman called a "finder's
toe
"We felt the linkage between
direct economic t�ceft�r an
what goes on in the classroom �
especially an incentive of this
magnitude � would bias the aca-
demic environment Burton ex-
plained.
Edelman protested that "this is
Open House
(ECU News Bureau) � ECU
will observe "Open House '87" on
Oct. 31 with programs and tours
of the campus for prospective
students, their families and the
public.
Sponsored by the Office of
Undergraduate Admissions, in-
formation sessions will be con-
ducted at the Mendenhall Student
Center from 9 a.m. until noon on
admissions, student orientation,
financial aid and student life at
ECU. Sessions are to begin at the
start of each hour.
Academic information sessions
will be conducted from 10 a.m.
until noon. Prospective students
will have the opportunity to meet
faculty members to discuss vari-
ous academic programs and voca-
tional options.
Campus tours will be con-
ducted by the ECU Ambassadors,
the university's student represen-
tatives.
a trade school, really, and I'm
trying to teach the students how
to go out and be entrepreneurial
and take success
Edelman then took a poll of his
class, which voted 13-1 to keep the
incentive open. But Burton then
threatened to cancel the course,
and Edelman announced he'd
withdraw the fee offer.
"If he wants to hire people to go
out and do stuff for him Univer-
sity of California at Berkeley Busi-
ness Prof. David Vogel com-
mented, "he has every right.
That's different from using his
privileged access with his stu-
dents to get a competitive advan-
tage over others. That's an abuse
of the role. I think he should be
fired
New York University business
Dean Richard K. West said such
offers tend to teach students col-
lege is "about just making
money
"It may be that some students in
our schoools may want to sell
their souls to the devil West
said, "but we should not have the
devil standing at the front of the
classroom
When you make pizza this good, one just tint enouqh
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' � j
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2 Small Little
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teve Sommers speaks at the "Soapbox Forum" sponsored by Students For Lcononomic Democracy
Wednesday (Hardy Alligood, Photolab).
$7
60
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I � i � to. Dk
Spme Mi i
'�
323 Arlington Blvd. 7Sfi-T?Si
I across from Farm Fresh i �vJ m JJ
HOURS: SUN-THU 11 AW-12 MIDNIGHT
FRI-SAT II AMI AM
9V(igritciur
presents
Saturday, Oct. 31st
Halloween
Billy Blazemore and Time Square (Floor Show)
Playing Beach, Top 40 & Rock-n-roll
Doors open at 9 p.m. 18 yr.
olds welcome
All ABC Permits
Phone: 756-6401
Located in the Carolina East Centre
CALENDAR GIRLS
WANTED
TtKfl & The Dream Rssociation Calendar Co
flre Looking For Bright New Faces For Our
1988 "Girls of East
Carolina" Calendar
No EHpericence Necessary,
Must be 1 7 or older
Rll Welcome, Call 752-3874 for
appointment
f -� i - Jl
"�
k
, � m





IV

max of .1 banquet honoring Or,
e than 10 people paid tt ibute to
is the dean of the III School of '
�aat (tanltaian
Dire � � �
vertising Representtves
11
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
: ISlIlg
OI.OR ADVERTISING RATES
inserts
SB B3
ECU
. ARIETIES
SERVE N SAVE
Sliced
Lunch Meat :
439
z�k �
8
KRAFT OR KROGER
Orange
Juice
o

99c
y
Bag
LAY S
Potato
Chips
99
JUS
HALLOWEEN FAVORITES
KROGER NATURAL
Pack
Raisins
88
r
l!2
'
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville

?


A
TI IF EAST CAROLINIAN
OCR WE R 29, 1987
Capt. Knox urges having a safe Halloween
Halloween is a time of ghosts,
goblins, vampires, and the like.
Adults and little kids dress up in
everything from store bought to
homemade costume contests. It's
a night to have a good time and act
like a little kid again for some.
Pirate Police
Line
Bv CAPT. KEITH KNOX
lit Public Sifity
Some go to haunted houses
hoping to have the wits scared out
of them. For ECU students and
people for all over, even some
who come from out of state, it's a
chance to attend the biggest Hal-
loween costume party around.
The city of Greenville blocks off
the streets to allow students and
others to have a good time and
hopefully a safe time.
However, there are those few
who jcapordizc everybody's
good time and safety. For most,
Halloween will be the best night
of their life, for others their worst.
Which will it be for you?
A lot will depend upon you and
those around you. How many
good times have been spoiled by
those who overindulge in alcohol
and other impairing substances?
How many people do you know
that should never indulge in any
alcohol or impairing substance
because of the radical behavior
changes that occur in that person?
Think hard for a minute, could
that person be you or a friend?
Why not face the fact.
There are just some people who
can not handle it. Some of those
who can and do indulge are some-
times influenced by those few and
pin in on the irrational behavior.
What do you think was behind
some of the recent bad publicity
that has brought shame and dis-
grace upon this great educational
institution � ECU � and
Greenville?
Those who fall into this group
are usually the ones who have the
worst night of their life or cause
someone else to. How many
fights, muggings, larcenys, sexual
assaults-rapes and down right
malicious vandalism will occur
this weekend?
Or anytime? Because of the
indulgences oi impairing sub-
stances. How many lives will be
lost or serious injuries sustained?
How many will end up in jail?
How many victims will fall prey
to crime because of their impair-
ment? When indulging in these
substances, can you really be to-
tally alert to your surroundings,
think clearly and take the appro-
priate action in a given situation?
I would bet not. 1 low manv will
say things to someone they care
about, later regretting it, but
unable to undo the damage that's
done? How many will not be able
to remember what they did or
what happened to them that
night? Who will walk through or
place their fist through a glass
door or window, seriously injur-
ing themselves, sometimes per-
manently? Will one of these
things happen to you or your
friends?
I would hope not. But unfortu-
nately most people think, "It can't
happen to me Will it take some-
thing serious happening to your
or a close friend, relative or family
member to shock you into reality?
Fact is some people who use and
abuse alcohol and other impair-
ing substances affect a lot of
people besides themselves
The biggest problem with soci-
ety today is that these individuals
never really stop to think about
the consequences of this or their
behavior and the others thai it
affects.
Teacher had to drop $100,000 offer
NEW YORK(CPS) � Columbia
University told the wealthy
teacher of a class in corporate
raiding to drop his offer to pay
one oi his students $100,000 last
week.
Corporate raider Asher B. Edel-
man who is teaching a class
called "Corporate Raiding: The
Art of War" � offered grad stu-
dents $100,000 if, in the course of
doing research for the class, any
should identify a company Edel-
man could over take.
Edelman has made millions
launching takeover attempts of
various companies, including
Burlington Industries, Fruehauf
Corp. and Lucky Stores.
All of them eventually paid
Edelman a premuim for his stock
in return for him leaving them
alone. All had to borrow money to
do so.
Identifying such vulnerable
companies is not easy. It entails
calculating a company's assets,
comparing them to its market
values and determining whether
the difference between them can
be financed and eventually resold
profitably.
In any case, on Oct. 13 Colum-
bia business school Dean John C.
Burton told Edelman to cancel
what Edelman called a "finder's
foe. "
"We felt the linkage between
direct economic tafccctlMtfant'
what goes on in the classroom �
especially an incentive of this
magnitude � would bias the aca-
demic environment Burton ex-
plained.
Edelman protested that "this is
Open House
(ECU News Bureau) � ECU
will observe "Open House '87" on
Oct. 31 with programs and tours
oi the campus for prospective
students, their families and the
public.
Sponsored by the Office of
Undergraduate Admissions, in-
formation sessions will be con-
ducted at the Mendenhall Student
Center from 9 a.m. until noon on
admissions, student orientation,
financial aid and student life at
ECU. Sessions are to begin at the
start of each hour.
Academic information sessions
will be conducted from 10 a.m.
until noon. Prospective students
will have the opportunity to meet
faculty members to discuss vari-
ousacademicprogramsand voca-
tional options.
Campus tours will be con-
ducted by the ECU Ambassadors,
the university's student represen-
tatives.
a trade school, really, and I'm
trying to teach the students how
to go out and be entrepreneurial
and take success
Edelman then took a poll oi his
class, which voted 13-1 to keep the
incentive open. But Burton then
threatened to cancel the course,
and Edelman announced he'd
withdraw the fee offer.
II
"If he wants tt) hire people to go
out and do stuff for him Univer-
sity of California at Berkeley Busi-
ness Prof. David Vogcl com-
mented, "he has every right.
That's different trom using his
privileged access with his stu-
dents to get a competitive advan-
tage over others. That's an abuse
of the role. I think he should be
fired
fffffrrirrr.
New York University business
Dean Richard R. West said such
offers tend to teach students col-
lege is "about just making
money"
"It may be that some students in
our schoools may want to sell
their souls to the devil West
said, "but we should not have the
devil standing at the front of the
classroom
tr
X.
.v.
S
y
-�
WHen you moke pizza this good, one just isn't enouqh
VAiUAUt COUPON
j Just For You ECU!
2 Small Little
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VA1UAJU COUtOM
$7
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b 756-72
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Buy any size
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BlUKVits
ke Sma
� 66 �
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SALADS
- � �

Anrv

spt c iai m s
if
�� .
s,
K.
peaks at the "Soapbox Forum" sponsored by Students For Econonomic Democracy
Wednesday (Hardy Alligood, Photolab).
323 Arlington Blvd. 7Sfi-77S.fi
(across from Farm Fresh i Jl JmJ J
HOURS: SLN-THL 11 AM-12 MIDNIGHT
FRJ-SAT 11 AMI AM
3eau
9ightclur
presents
Saturday, Oct. 31st
Halloween
Billy Blazemore and Time Square (Floor Show)
Playing Beach, Top 40 & Roek-n-roll
Doors open at 9 p.m. 18 yr.
olds welcome
All ABC Permits
Phone: 756-6401
Located in the Carolina East Centre
AT.TIC
The 0 The
CoMedY CoMedY
ZONE 2DNE
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
(tufa ROIDAN
15 ft. Closed
Circuit T.V.
FRIDAY
jesse pout
JESSE WHS
$1.00 off for
ECU
SATURDAY I
panic
panic
$1.00 off for
ECU
CRLENDRR GIRLS
WANTED
TtKfl & The Dream Association Calendar Co
flre Looking For Bright New Faces For Our
1988 "Girls of East
Carolina" Calendar
No Enpericence Necessary,
Must be 1 7 or older
nil Welcome, Call 752-3874 for
appointment
��i � � � "���"�
��Jt � ����-���� ,�, m ��!�
'
1






i
�1b iEafit (Eanrliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, cimm
Clay Deanhardt, - � nrum
Andy Lewis, m- JAMES F.j. McKEE nmelorofUvahsiHt
TIM Cl IANDLER, s u ANTHONY MARTIN, Bue�, m,
Joi in Carter, Tmtm Mec Needi iam, c�� m.
Shelton Bryant, Uum� mike Upchurch, ��. �.�.
Debbie Stevens, h, John W. Medlin, a- q.
October 17
Opinion
Page 4
Halloween
Play it fun, but safe
The Halloween season is upon us
again.
Yes, it is time for costumes, parties,
trick-or-treats, parties, jack-o-lan-
terns and parties. Get the picture?
It can be a dangerous picture. It
was several years ago when there
was a riot downtown. It is every
time someone drinks and then
drives. It is everytime someone de-
cides to show off after drinking just
a little too much.
Halloween should be fun.
Greenville has the biggest party in
North Carolina every year on Oct. 31
and people come from miles around
to attend it. The crowd can be fes-
tive, but it's important to remember
that crowds can also become nastv.
As students here, it is important
that we set an example. Have fan,
V -
but play it safe. Don't let your out-of-
town friends cause trouble, and
don't do it yourself.
Remember that the university al-
ready has a bad reputation this year
for violence and unruliness: a repu-
tation that is perhaps undeserved.
Keep it that way. Make sure that
critics have nothing else to throw
against us.
Enough preaching.
Have fun. Enjoy the ball game, the
costumes and the beer. Popcorn,
candy corn, candied apples and
caramel balls: the sights and sounds
of Halloween.
Enjoy yourselves, but be safe.
Combine the two and have the best
holiday ever.
Go Pirates!
Other opinion
Friedman sold out
before stock crash
So the stock market goes to hell, what do
you do? First vou eliminate jumping out of
the window, which is reactionary. Then you
mull over your resources, foremost of
which, in my case, is Professor Milton
Friedman, who will answer mv telephone
call. He is, after all, a Nobel Prize winner,
the most celebrated living economist in the
world, and if you catch him with his mouth
open, you can bet that an opinion has just
come out of it. If you catch him with his
mouth closed, you can bet that he has just
bitten an opinion in two. And he is my
beloved friend.
How are you, Milton7
We're fine, how are vou?
was wondering whether you could do me a
favor. I would like 900 words for National Re-
inew on the market breakdown. We would need
it by Thursday, noon.
Nope.
Why not?
1 have never written an economic analysis
tailored to the market, and I'm not going to
start doing that now.
Why?
Because the behavior of the market
doesn't correlate in any significant way
with the behavior of the economy. It's a
mistake to imply that it does, and that's
what would be inferred it I wrote about it.
Well, why don't you write precisely on that
theme? And it wouldn't be cheating, would it, if
you were to suggest what the investor might
expect from the market, given the condition of
the economy?
Yes, it would � I would be in the business
of vetting the market, and I just told you, I'm
not going to do that. I make my own deci-
sions about the market, but not for public
instruction. I sold all my stocks during the
summer.
You did!
I did. And I'm going back into the market
tomorrow. Bulls can make money, and
bears can make money, but hogs can't make
money. The hog is the man who insists on
waiting until the stock market is at rock
bottom. He will be left behind.
Well, it seems to me you've already said
something interesting, right there �
The only thing you can say about the
market is what J.P. Morgan said about it. He
was asked and said: "The market will fluc-
tuate
But this has got to be more than fluctuation,
doesn't it? The talk is of another 1929 depres-
sion.
Nonsense. I have been predicting for
quite a while a recession in the next six to
nine months, but that's a long way from a
depression. Remember that the economy.
this time around, has not peaked. In 12,
the economy had peaked in August, so that
the two events are not comparable in the
most important way.
Well, do you go along with the proposition
that there are safeguards built into the system
that would prevent a depression on a 1929 scale?
In 1954, I delivered a lecture in Sweden
under the title, "Why the American Econ-
omy is Depression Proof I have seen no
reason since then, and see none now, to
change that conclusion.
But your position all along has been that ei'en
the Great Depression was avoidable, correct?
Even without the Federal Deposit Insurance
Corp and the SEC, and Social Security, etc. ?
On The Right
By
William F. Buckley Jr.
Yes. The economy from August 1929 to
the end of 1930 was more severe than dur-
ing the first year of most recessions, but if an
upturn had come shortly after, the episode
would have been classified as a garden
variety recession. It was converted into the
Great Depression by the collapse of the
financial system in successive waves. In
1931, 1932, and 1933. The stock market
played no significant role in this collapse.
The argument that the 1929 market crash
produced the 1931 -33 ccomonic contraction
is a prime example of post hoc, ergo propter
hoc �
You're saying that is could all have been
avoided?
Yes. The financial collapse of 1931-33
need not have occurred and would have
been avoided if the Fed had never been
established, or if it had behaved differently.
The fed's inept performance led to changes
in the financial system that make a similar
financial collapse highly unlikely.
Well, that's good news, isn't it?
Yes, that's good news.
still don't see why you won't write 900
words on just what you've said for National
Review.
You've go 900 words in what I've just
said.
Good point. Thanks a lot, Milton, and good
night.
Good night, Bill.
Anytime.
This is Bill Buckley, saying good night.
-�-i�-iiij wm ttmttitmm
Students support rec. center
To the editor:
As members of the SGA, we
would like to offer our support for
a new recreational facility- As
mentioned in last Tuesday's edi-
torial, a new facility is needed.
We teel a need to express our
strong support in the effort to
construct a center which would
replace Memorial Gym, which
was built about 35 years ago. The
gym is presently used for various
activities, including those pro-
vided by the Intramural Recrea-
tion Services.
As we understand, SGA Presi-
dent Scott Thomas has formed a
committee of seven campus lead-
ers, including representatives
from the Minority Student Or-
ganization, Student Resident
Association, Interfraternity and
Panhell inic Councils. The Student
Recreation Center Committee is
charged with writing a resolution
supporting the proposed facility.
The resolution will be passed on
to the presidents of the larger
campus organizations such as the
Student Union, SGA, and SRA. It
will then be voted on and the re-
sults reported to Scott Thomas.
The findings will then be passed
on the Chancellor Richard Eakin.
We urge all campus organiza-
tions and students to show their
support for this much needed
facility by approving the resolu-
tion, and thereby improving the
quality oi life for future ECU stu-
dents.
If you, or your organization,
would like to render its position
on this issue, please call 758-1440
for your copy o( the resolution, or
stop by the SGA Office in Men-
denhail Student Center.
Alan Manning
Mary Ford ham
SGA Day Representatives
Center needed
To the editor:
East Carolina � a growing
school, a changing concept, a
unique opportunity. Over the
years, ECU has grown and
changed to offer each student this
unique opportunity in education.
Along with this growth and
change in ECU has come the
opportunity to become involved
in more activities - intramurals,
sororities, fraternities, clubs,
physical fitness programs.
All of these groups have some-
thing in common - their members
frequently employ the recreation
facilities on campus. These mem-
bers need the present facilities
and have grown (and will con-
tinue to grow) to need more -
more facilities, better facilities.
These members would welcome a
change to better the opportunity
ECU offers them for life at school.
Such a change would consti-
tute the building of a Student
Recreation Center to be used by
everyone, these group members
plus individuals who merely
wish to stay fit andor join in the
fun of staying fit. ECU- the grow-
ing school, the changing concept,
the unique opportunity - calls for
a unique change in its growth: a
STUDENT RECREATION CEN-
TER.
Kelly Jones
Chairman
Student Welfare Committee
Dorm problems
To the editor.
It never ceases to amaze me
how when it comes to students
reporting complaints with where
they live it seems to get lost in the
mail somewhere.
At the start of the school year we
reported a couple of things that
were wrong with our room. Our
RA came back with a check list of
things that he thought were
wrong. We agreed and signed our
names to the sheet, only never to
see or hear anymore about them.
After two months of frustra-
tion, the list had grown to a total of
eight problems not two. Not being
able to reach my head resident I
called the housing department
and to my surprise the problems
we ftTed hisrjffcon "processed lfof
returned saying that one of them
was finished, when in reality it
was not.
I understand that it takes time to
get to everyone, and 1 do not want
any special attention. I just want
the problems fixed. I paid to live
here and it does not say in the
contract that problems will not be
fixed. I sometimes wonder if it
would not be better to live off
campus than to deal with a dirty
shower everyday.
After I called the housing de-
partment and talked to Miss Th-
ompson all the problems were
cither fixed or are in the process of
being fixed. I appreciate her help
in the matter, but it still stands. It
is not the students responsibility
to keep following up on a subject
that people are hired and paid to
do.
Travis Ennis
Sophomore
Business
Free thoughts
To the editor:
Not only are letters to the editor
not useful, they're actually
counter productive. Never the
less, I feel counter productive at
the present moment and don't
care. Life at ECU. Big money. Big
politics churning away, grinding
us down.
I would leave. Go back to the
land. Have a big garden a little
house and lay in the sun.
But
When all those are out of the
way that's exactly what I will do,
hopefully what we'll all do.
Walter Blades
Sophomore
Accounting
Religion explained
To the editor:
Before you read this paper, I
would like you to know that I am
not the son of an ultra-conserva-
tive pre ichcr. N thet - i �
gousfanati Many ; lonol
know anything about proi
besides immy Swaggarl s hell
and damnation propheev or im
Bakker's a : tion I : .
house. I his paper i- � - ted
toward people of Athiest, Protes-
tant, Catholic, Pagan and all I
beliefs
Television evangelists are pic-
tured as good in the mindsol even
the most rottm people in society
They scare the deepest cultic be-
lievers bj throwingabook in their
face
There is a fine line between a
true and a false prophet.hie false
prediction is the line but the evan-
gelists that do not predict the
world will end, like Herbert
Armstrong did, are the scariest
ones. Faith is something that can
take the place of all public scorn.
This is why most people can not
pick out cultic translations of the
bible. We spend too much time on
petty issues tike Jim Bakkcr and
Jerry FalwcU and wedonot ace
the Jim Jones figures.
"For all have sinned and come
short of the glory of God (Ro-
mans 3:23) I am sure that im and
Tammy Bakker often quote tl
their believers. Are their teach-
ings so bad, or are they just
crooks!1 Who is to find a Haw in
their teachings?
The only time they really said
b.s. is when they said that it is
God's will for his teachers to be
rich. This is not a false translation
because they do not make refer-
ence to the bible. It is the "perfect
people that we should look out
for. This is simply stated in 2
Corinthians 11 14 "And no mar-
vel: for Satan himself is trans-
formed into an angel of light
How many time have vou
received The Watch tower from a
Jahovah's Witness? "There is no
trinity stated in the bible one
Jahovah's Witness told me. "The
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are
separate he told me. Tin? con-
flicts many protestant religions
"It is in the Bible That is the
statement they all use. "The Bible
is wrong This is another saving
that is very common in cults.
Fundamentalists do not like
long hair. That is abruptly stated
and may not be true, but I know of
a Fundamentalist preacher that
asked a man who was attending
his church to get his hair cut. I am
sure he could work around bibli-
cal words to satisfy that state-
ment. If a 2S year old man will
follow through with this then he is
either coward, which is unlikely,
or he really believes that long hair
is evil.
We do not need a translator Or
do we? It is our decision to pick a
teacher but we should listen to all
teachers and not take all their
words at face value Any person
can change the words of the bible
to fit their own needs. Just try to
find the line between truth and
fiction. It is not very easy.
James Riddle
Freshman
Business
Campus Forum
m � iim hi ii Mi, �m mtmsm
Prof. Boy
(ECU News Burea
Emik S Boyce,whoh
years on the faculty o
hna University, pla
d '�.�� n a;
partmenl. t Libr
tion Studies at tl I
Congress and
WASHIN rON (A
cit redu tion I . -
White H
start � g on a
be I � -
� .�
� :
ii e
met with l
� . �
I.e. in the first ma
f tfv year, 1 .
.Jed th
lit
Lawn �
success, but sa 11
:
Droad terms 7 uesdav
as
Seven states to be re
at Health Careers 1
than 7 agencies tr
( .ire ' A t �
Carol B) Ik �

turn to EC t
ates about t.�
nities in hi-alth can
P rs nnel n� .
armed force
70 in �n m 1 � �
Marylandhavendicated
will attend.
Furncv lames,director of
reer Plannid Pla.
ECU, said tlie nimber of ins
tions attending tfisyeai -
s.
B
��
Patsv Ward gets a taste of what it's like to takej
part of Alcohol Awareness Week (Esather Nor
THE
SHOE OU
corner oi 9th and Wash
� Dress and Casual She
Athletic Shoes in All S
�Bass, Sperry, Topsider
and Canvas), Timberh
many others (Factory
� Discount shoes sold
wholesale
� Ladies shoes by Bass,
Gloria Vanderbelt, an
others (All First Qualij
Walking Distance From Campm
i
j





THE CAST CAROLINIAN

�ii'
rec. center
lartmcnt
roblems
t
lained
. a reli-
donol
� ' � phecy
irt's hell
or )im
I i �
� � d d
� Protcs-
I . . other
�l 5 irf pic-
� : feven
icty.
- � � i bc-
i;a kin their
tween a
�v false
but thcevan-
I predict the
: like Herbert
- wriest
thai can
� all publi s�.Mrn.
1 pe pie can net
; - translations of the
I too much time on
ivu issuos Uke Jim Bakkcr and
ierrv FaJvvcJ and we do not see
' � KO-
n � H mand
thisto
� tl r teach-
just
� : la 'law in
y reall) said
: t: at it is
- � hers to be
� . - translation
not make refer-
. th( 'perfect"
uld l( out
ply stated in 2
mar-
jell i- trans-
I it
have you
� -froma
� � is no
one
: : "Hie
rit a re
1 nrw rhis con-
prol tant n l.ions.
le " That is the
e Bible
ither living
in cults.
not like
' iptly stated
it I know of
' ' i her that
attending
i r cut. I am
� .1 bibli-
that state-
ir old man will
this then he is
h is unlikely,
that long hair
lati inslator. Or
n to pick a
ild listen to all
' take all their
Any person
rds of the bible
I - Just trv to
between truth and
It is not very easy.
lames Riddle
Freshman
Business
Forum
A
Prof. Boyce to step down as chairperson
(ECU News Bureau) Prof. 88 academic year.
Boyce, who has served 28 Dr. Eugene Ryan, dean of the
years on the faculty of Hast Caro
lina University, plans to step
down as chairperson of the De-
partment of Library and Informa-
tion Studies at the end of the 1987-
Collegc of Arts and Sciences, said
Prot. Boyce will chair a search
committee to choose her succes-
sor as administrative head of the
department, formerly Library
Science. Boyce has served as chair
since 1982 and will remain on the
faculty, Ryan said.
"Professor Boyce has served
very well for the past six years
Ryan said. "She has been a very
effective leader. During this time,
the department has formally pro-
posed to the American Library
Association (ALA) that the gradu-
ate program be accredited and we
anticipate that acccreditation will
be received in the near future.
"All of the work in preparation
Congress and White House discuss budget
WASHINGTON (AP) � Defi-
cit-reduction talks between the
White House and Congress are
starting on a positive note but it
may be tough to keep both sides
singing in harmony when they
start deciding on taxesand spend-
ing.
A team of White I louse aides
met with leading members of
C ongress at the Opitol on lues-
day in the first major budget talks
of the year, touching on topics
that included the size ol the deficit
cut.
Lawmakers called the session a
��uccess, but said the substance of
egislation was discussed only in
��road terms Tuesday.
Part of the two-hour meeting
was spent discussing different
onceptions of a broad spending
freeze" on domestic and military
programs, sources said. Freezing
jgency budgets, instead of allow-
ing them to increase with infla-
tion, could trim more than $10
billion from the fiscal 1988 deficit,
according to some estimates.
Some lawmakers and White
House officials have pointed to a
Ireee as something that could be
enacted quickly, with the political
plus of programs over others and
a final plan could require difficult
compromise.
1 louse Majority Leader Thomas
S. Folev, D-Wash was named
Seven states to be represented
at Health Careers Day
(ECU News Bureau) � More
than 70 hospitals and health care
agencies from seven states will be4
represented at the annual I lealth
Careers Day, Nov. 2, at ECU.
Activities will be held at the
Carol Belk Allied I lealth Sciences
Building from 1 - 5 pin.
1 heeventwill provide informa-
tion to ECU students and gradu-
ates about employment opportu-
nities in health-related careers
Personnel recruiters from the U.S.
armed forces and from more than
70 institutions from Florida to
Maryland have indicated they
will attend.
Furney James, director oi Ca-
reer Planning and Placement at
ECU, said the number oi institu-
tions attending thisyear'sevent is
almost double the number from
last year.
" There is a serious shortage of
professionals in nursing and in
the allied health fields said
lames.
1 le said the representatives
planning to attend the event have
indicated that they were espe-
cially- interested in talking with
students majoring in environ-
mental health, medical technol-
ogy, nursing, physical therapy,
psychology, social work, occupa-
tional therapy, special education
and other disciplines.
Health Careers Day is spon-
sored by the Career Planning and
Placement Service in cooperation
with the Schools of Nursing, So-
cial Work and Allied Health Sci-
ences.
Tuesday as chairman of the work-
ing group. He said there was
"good progress" and the group
went beyond purely procedural
matters. But he said the lawmak-
ers and White House officials
agreed not to divulge specifics for
fear of poisoning the atmosphere.
Negotiators "discussed the fact
that the (Gramm-Rudman) law
says we must do a minimum of
$23 billion" in deficit reduction,
said Rep. William H. Gray III, D-
Pa chairman of the House
Budget Committee.
"Tomorrow we get down to the
heavy lifting he said. At
Tuesday's session, he said, "both
sides simply said, "Here's the
kind of job we have to do
The group discussed a work
schedule that might include
weekend sessions to get the job
done.
"They want the American
people to understand this is top
priority said Sen. Bob Dole, R-
Kan the Senate minority leader.
President Reagan sent his chief
of staff Howard Baker, Treasury
Secretary James Baker, budget
director James Miller, and na-
tional security advisor Frank
Carlucci to the meeting. The presi-
dent released a statement before-
hand urging success.
"We owe it to the nation to get
the job done said the president,
warning that failure could hurt
the economy.
The session began under some
pressure to go beyond the $23
billion in deficit reduction man-
dated for fiscal 1988 by the
Gramm-Rudman budget balanc-
ing law to reassure the markets.
Lawmakers, however, said they
need to fcktus first on the basics.
1 louse Speaker Jim Wright, D-
Texas, said Democratic negotia-
tors want to find long-term sav-
ings that would reduce the deficit
in future years as well, and to
avoid gimmicks that do little to
put the deficit on a downward
trend.
Democratic and Republican
leaders in the Senate and I louse
named 14 members to negotiate
for Congress. If a compromise is
reached, the plan will be reviewed
again, presumably in a meeting
between Reagan and congres-
sional leaders.
It would then be subject to ap-
proval of both chambers of Con-
gress and require Reagan's signa-
ture.
If no agreement is reached, the
Gramm-Rudman law mandates
$23 billion in deficit reduction
anyway � through automatic
spending cuts taken half from the
military and half from domestic
programs. Those cuts will take
effect Nov. 20 if no alternative
legislation is approved.
Gramm-Rudman envisions a
deficitof$144 billion in fiscal 1988
as an interim step toward a bal-
anced budget in fiscal 1993. The
deficit for fiscal 1987, which
ended Sept. 30, was $148 billion
but estimates show it will rise this
year, partly because last year was
artificially low due to the income
tax law overhaul.
Jade, a centerpiece of Chinese
civilization for 5,1 KM years, sur-
passed ivory and gold as first
prize tor victorious athletes in
ancient games.
for this accreditation proposal has
been led by Professor Boyce he
said.
"She has been a very valuable
person, making great contribu-
tions to the department, to the
university and to education in
North Carolina Ryan said.
Ryan said Boyce "has been very
active in working for education
advances in North Carolina for a
number of years In 1982, when
she assumed the chairmanship of
the department, Boyce said ECU
could "become a regional center
of excellence in preparing gradu-
ates for a great variety oi jobs in
the knowledge industry
The department, then known a -
Library Science, revised existing
courses and added new courses in
response to a changing job envi
ronment. Boyce said that "the job
market for persons equipped
with the knowledge to work in the
modern library and information
management environment is very
bright
She succedded Dr. Gene Lamer
rhairman of the
who was the first
Department of Library Science.
Lamer, Dronstance Mellon
and Dr. DonId loilirts ol Li-
brary and Information Studies
and Dr ames LeRoy smith, pro
tess�r and chairman ol Phili -
phv, will serve with Boyce on the
search committee, Ryan said
Ryan said it is hoped that a new
chairman can be selected in an
internalexternal search by th
beginning ol the fall, 1988
semester
Boyce is a native f Rich Square
N C. She has an MA in Guidance
from Fast'arolina, an Ml.A from
the University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill and has done post-
graduate work at Catholic Uni
versity.
Asdeserl �
il) taken
hum.m n .
Osquan1 : nel
surface, i rdinj.
graphic
Tom Togs Factory Outlet
1900 Dickinson At n .�
Next Warehouse Sale Oct. 26th - Nov. 7th
Featuring Fashionable i McvrSuMtftM ' wu a.j- j- J u9 Is
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Wc Also Wholesale
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HOW TO GET
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1. Lse a dean white sheet of paper
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3. Leave at least fa inch margin on all sides.
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5. Use a fresh, dark ribbon in your typewriter or printer
6. "Screen" black and white photos for best
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752-0875
25 Free Copies
8 11 white '( auto-fed
Patsy Ward gets a taste of what it's like to take a breathalizer test as
part of Alcohol Awareness Week (Esather Norton, Photolab).
THE
SHOE OUTLET
corner of 9th and Washington St.
� Dress and Casual Shoes
Athletic Shoes in All Sizes
�Bass, Sperry, Topsider (Leather
and Canvas), Timberland, and
many others (Factory Returns)
� Discount shoes sold Below
wholesale
� Ladies shoes by Bass, 9-West
Gloria Vanderbelt, and many
others (All First Quality)
Walking Distance From Campus (3 blocks)
Shannon Williams
in the
Underground
Friday, Ocotber 30th, 1987
l 8:00
Inhering place1? Lve ntertfiment
n before Downtown
Free Refreshments
Free T -rt Raffle
Sponsored by Student Union
Coffeehouse Committee
Jkttp�Av i -
' I !
I
�I





5 THFEASTCAROHNilAM
OCTOBER 79,1987
Classifieds

HELP WANTED
TRAVEL F1FLD OPPORTUNITY: Cain
valuable marketing experience while
earning money Campus representatives
needed immediately tor Spring Break
trip- to Honda Call Campus Marketing
at 1 800 282 rO:i
WANTED: Experienced part time stock
clerks. Must have stocking experience in
a chain grocery store, or in a large inde
pendent grocer) store Will work around
school schedule Apply in person at
Ovcrton's Supermarket, 211 arvis Street.
Greenville
THE HILTON INN is now accepting
applications tor front desk and bellman
positions Morning and evening hours
available, will include weekends AppK
in person No phone calls please
WANTED: Calendar Carls for Pika's
1988 C.i Is ot ECU" Calendar Call 752
38741 i appointment for Friday's photo
AEROBICS EXERCISE INSTRUCTOR
leads and instructs aerobics exercise
classes must have basic understanding
oi exercise physiology, kinesiology, and
anatomy Should have working know
edge of choreographed exercise pro-
grams tor adults children, older adults.
and pregnant women Must be able to
design a safe class and know CPR. Must
be in excellent physical condition, must
pass fitness exam and be willing to go
through aerobic's instructor training
program Applicant must be available to
teach classes from 5p.m. to7 p m Mon-
day, Tuesday, and Thursday at Javcoe
Park, maybe required to teach ocassional
classes at the Aquatics and fitness Cen-
ter Salary S7.00hour. Application dead
line is Friday, October 23,1987. Apply at
the Personnel Department, 201 VV. Fifth
St P.O. Box 7207, Greenville, N.C (W)
830-4492.
GREENVILLE AQUATICS AND FIT-
NESS CENTER Part-time maintenance
position for cleaning locker rooms, gym
nasium, office areas, lobby, and other
areas of the Aquatics and Fitness Center
Also responsible for some outside main
tenancc Must be able to work evenings 6
p.m. to 10p.m. and a regularly scheduled
weekend. 12 to 16 hours per week Salary
S3.55hour Applications will be ac-
cepted until position is filled. Apply at
the City of Greenville, Personnel Depart-
ment, P.O. Box 7207, 201 West Fifth St
Greenville, NC 27835-7207.
LIFE GUARD-SWIM INSTRUCTORS,
PART-TIME Must have advanced lifesav
ing certificate or water safety instructor
certificate Applicants should be available
to work 3-5 hour shitts between 6 j.m and
9 p m. (.Vcasional weekend work required
Salary is S3 85hour Applications ac-
cepted until position filled.
RECEPTIONIST, PART-TIME Answers
telephones, greets members and guests,
conducts tours and sells memberships,
collect fees, records collections, responds
to members and guests requests and ques
tions, provides information to the public
about memberships, performs light typing
as required Applicant should be available
to work 4 5 hour shift between 8 am and
1 p.m Monday thru Friday, and occasion-
ally on weekends between 9am and 6
pm. Salary is S3.75hour Applications
accepted until position is filled
FOR SALE
IS IT TRUE you cjh buy jeeps for S44
through the US government1 Get the facts
today! Call 1-312 742 1142 Ext 5271 A
IT'S THE MOST exciting thing you'll ever
do Learn to SKYDIVE! from the Pepsi
Skydiving Exhibition Team Oil 752-9682.
FOR SALE: ECU Don't be a ghost' Call
California Tanning today tor the best tan in
town' Ask about our 1 allowccn special
355-7858.
FOR SALE: Great condition 79 Mada
GLC, AMFM cassette, seat covers, $850.
Call alter 6 752-1974.
FOR SALE: Couch and matching chair in
very good condition Asking SI75 00 or
best offer. Call after 6 p m. 756-5183.
COUCH Full sie with pull out double
bed, gold, white and brown tweed, exc
condition 1 yr. old. 752 9639
ECU-Brcw up the perfect tan. Don't be a
ghost Call about our 1 lallowcen Special
today' California Tanning for the best tan
in town! 355-7858.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICES
papers, resumes, theses, etc Reasonable
rates (most SI 25 page) Grammar, punctua-
tion and spelling corrected Call Jamie at
758-1161 - M-F - 9-5 or 758-4567 nights and
weekends Fast, accurate and reliable
GRAND OPENING CELEBRATION:
Used furniture, antiques and collectable
Saturday, October 31 Refreshments and
Door Prizes The Emporium, 705 Dickin-
son Ave across from the License Plate
Agency. 10.30-5 30 pm.
WRITINC YOUR PAPER BY HAND
and then typing it over7 Save time by
writing from scratch on a computer The
University has the computers avaiiabc
for students, I can teach you how Fret-
word processing software! 752-9637.
TYPING AND WORDPROCESSINC:
Two copies for the price of one. Done on
IBM Compatible Computer with NLQ
Announcements
GENERAL COLLEGE
Gem ralollege students should con
� idv isers the week o: o ember
2 !� to make arrangements for academic
registratii n will begin November � and
end Novembei 17
HOWLING
! tral n : : intramural league
Id on Oi tobci 28 from 11
6p.m in room 11 ; Memorial Gym
CO-REC BASKETBALL
CO-REC FOOTBALL
;istrati( n i. : co rec foi tbaJl will he
bcr 28 at 7p.m in Brewstcr D-
103
UNIVERSITY UNION'S
. irtn : f Umversit) Unions
rh School of Mus pi sent THE
v- �' ND Ql iTLT in recital on
da N vembci 5, at 8.00 p.m. in
r: Theatre Tickets are now on sale
rickct Off Mendcnhall
nt Center fi am until 6:00
M : da i I rida) Call 757-6611 ext
2h Group rates arc available
LTNIVERSm UNION'S
tanan
T ues-
tho ECU I lis
-ailment
t"l I, ext Jx
idcnt Center from I
.londay-Friday Call 757
roup rails aailable
CONCERT
THE kN'G'SS1NII RS s.l be in con-
cert on M) v .n Wright
it SO ppons. red by the
1 icpartn .rsit) Unions as part
ol the .87-88 Q ;X hcatre Series.
Tickets asale in the Central
Ticket Oflhall Student Center
from 11 0(m. Monday-Friday
Call 737-)611, ext 256 Group rates are
available
FR1 SHMANSOPHMORES
The Military Science Dept. is continu-
g its two and three year Army ROTC
Scholarship campaign All students who
are interested in an Armv ROTC Scholar-
ship are invited to attend an Information
session on Wedsrtcsday, October 28 at 6
p m. in room 210 Erwm. For more infor-
mation, call Captain Alvin Mitchell at 757-
6967 or 6974.
HAIR PRODUCTS
The free samples of Studio Line hair
products are now available for those who
attended the sneak preview of "Habv
Boom" To get your free sample, bring
your screen pass or movie program to
Mendcnhall room 210 or 234, Mondav-
Friday from 8 a.m5p.m. Offer expires
Friday, Oct. 30, 1987.
PHI ALPHA THETA
The Phi Alpha Thera international
I lonor Society in I listory will hold its Fall
cookoui on October 30 from 5 pmU 30
pm on the picnic area near Memorial
Gym Members and guests welcome. Cost
is SI 50 for members, S2 50 for guests. For
information about joining , please contact
GAMMA BETA PHI
The National Gamma Beta Phi 1 lonor
Society will have a meeting on October 27
at 7 pm. in lenkms Auditorium Last ii.iv
to pay dues and attendance is required or
probation will result
EDUCATION MAJORS
The School ot Education in conjuction
with Campus Ministries is sponsoring a
Work 'Stud) triph Mi �i d iringSpring
Break (March 6-13 1988 Opt rl sto
observe aiui leach at a local schoi are
available A minimum level ol "survival"
Spanish is required For applications and
more information, come to kx�iii isj
Speight.
CORAL REEFJ2J VECLUB
It you enjoy scuba diving, then you
need to join ECU s Coral Reef Dive Club
lor more into, call 732 4399 and ask tor
llcnn or Rob
Lsssoom
A faculty auction sponsored by the LSS
Society will be held on Tuesday, October
2js p.m in the Biology Lecture room
103 Come bid on Dr. Wendling and other
LSS faculty
ASSERT1VENT.SS
A throe part workshop ottered to stu-
dents at no cost by the University Coun
sehng Center is on October 29, November
3 and 12 All three sessions will be con-
ducted from 3-4 p m in 312 Wright Build
ing Contact the Counseling Center at 757-
bhb for class content and registration
COPING WITH STRESS
A tree mini class will be offered by the
ECU Counseling Center for students
interested in learning how to cope with
stress Dates for this class are November 3,
5, 10, and 12 in 329 Wright from 3-4 p m.
Call or stop by the Counseling Center for
further information. 757-6661.
E URROUGHS-WELLCOM E
SAM is sponsoring a tour of the llur-
roughs-Wellcomc plant on November 11,
for all students Those interested should
sign up on sheets posted in Rawl. Meet in
Rawl 10 (Browning room) at 1 00 pm
Buses or vans mav be available if needed.
MAKING A DECISION
Making a Major Decision Group: This
program is designed to aid students in
choosing an academic major in a small
group format Each participant will also
receive individual aid from the group
leader if desired. Group participants will
increase sell knowledge of their interests,
values and abilities; learn how these relate-
to majors and career areas at ECU, a:ui
narrow their options through a systematic
career decision making process. The Ma-
jor Decision Group will meet; Mon , Nov
2, Wed Nov. 4, and Fri Nov. 6 in 329
Wright Bldg. from 3-4 PM (ATTEND ALL
3 MEETINGS). Although advanced regis-
tration is not required, we would appreci-
ate advance notification of interest to in-
sure that we have adequate materials on
hand Please contact the Counseling Cen-
ter in 316 Wright Bldg (757-6661) for fur-
ther info or to let us know you plan to
attend.
TURKEY TROT
A Turkey Trot Run will be held by the
Dept. of Intramural-Recreational Serv-
ices. Registration will be hold Nov 18 at 6
p.m m Brewstcr D-103 For more into,
call 757-6387
SUPPORT CROUP FORMED
A support group has boon formed tor
people who arc caring tor a parent,
spouse, or other loved one at home. The
group is led by Freda VV. Cross, MSW, Pitt
Count) Memorial Hospital and Susan
Redding, R.N Creative Living Center
The su group will be at St. James
I nit. d tl C hurch at 2000 E. 6lh
si , Greenville on Tucs No 3 from 7-
lOp.m Respite services are available. To
make reservations for respitccarc, call the
( ti ativc 1 iving drier at 737 0303 from
BrOQa.m to5:00p.m 24 hours in advance.
t hris Schiappa. G
SPEAKER
� Dept ECU,
will be speaking on Petrol of the
Coronaca Pluton, Greenwood County,
South Carolina" on Thurs , (At 29 ai 3 00
p m in Graham 301.
CONSTRUCTION MGMT.
Dieter U. Kathke, VP Pruhp llolmann
USA, Inc. will bo speaking on "Interna-
tional Construction in the United States"
on Wed , Oct. 28 at 6:30 p.m in 201
Flanagan Everyone is invited.
NCSL
All students interested in knowing
more about the North Carolina Student
Legislature, please drop bv MSCroom212
at 7 p m on Monday nights Become one
of North Carolona's "Leaders of Tomor-
row
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
The ECU Gospel Choir will be holding
their Fall Concert on Sunday. Novermber
8 at 4 U) p m. in I lendrix Theater Admis-
sion is SI 00.
AIR FORCE ROTC
Free pizza and chance to speak with
officers trom Seymour Johnson AFB. Talk
to pilots, navigators, and nurses about
rewarding careers in the Air Force. Come
to Wright Annex room 30.S on November
2 from 5:00-7:00
PUBLICATIONS
There will be a meeting of all produc-
tions committee members on Monday,
November 2 at 6 30 p.m. Everyone should
plan to attend
ECU DIVE CLUB
The ECU Coral Reef Dive Club will
meet Thursday, (-tober 2 in room 8-15
Mendcnhall Student Center Basement.
Everyone interested is urged to come
SPS
The Society of Physics Students will
take a field trip to TUN L (Triangle Univer-
sities Nuclear Laboratory) and the More
head Planetarium on Friday, October 30.
All going should meet in the Physics Dept.
room 102 at 945 a m. and will return at 1.00
p.m. All other interested students contact
Dr. Gaiser at 757-6894 between 8 am. and
5 p.m. or Bnnley Vickcrs at 758-3205 after
5 p.m.
SLAP MATORS
All General College students interested
in majoring in Speech-Language and
Auditory Pathology are to meet on Tues-
day, November 3 from 5:00-6.00 in
Brewstcr D-103. Advising for pre-registra-
tion for Spring Semester will take place at
that time
JiSiPBQQKS
The Student Stores will begin buying
back books at the Customer Service Desk
approximately October 23, 1987
ou can earn one, two, or three hours of
independent study credit while learning
campus health promotion skills. For more
details, call Mary Elesha-Adams at 757-
6841 or come by the Student Heaith Cen-
ter
MADRICAL DINNERS
Tickets are now on sale for Madrigal
Dinners to be held Dec 2 5 at 7 00 pm in
Mendcnhall Tickets are SI0 for ECU stu-
dents and $16 tor all others Now is the
time to order vour tickets, as thev always
sell quickly Call the Central Ticket Office
at 757 6611, ext 266.
SCHOLARSHIP
The Triangle East Advertising and
Marketing Association is offering a schol-
arship for a rising senior who is majoring
in Advertising in the Sehobl of Art, Busi-
ness (Marketing), or Drama (Broadcast-
ing) at ECU. The applicant must have at
least a 3 0 GPA and intend to pursue a
career in advertising or an advertising
related field in eastern N C An applica-
tion form must be completed, and a 500
word essay typewritten explaining how
heshe became interested in advertising
as a career and why heshe should receive
the Scholarship Finalists also participate
in an interview during the fall semester of
their senior year. Slides of Sworks (name,
title, media, sie) must accompany the
application form of an art student. This
year there will be available for Spring 1988
and Fall 1988 SI 30 each semester. Appli-
cation forms may be obtained in the
Media Center in the School of Art. The
deadline for application materials is Nov
19.
ART SCHOLARSHIPS
The School of Art of ECU is offering
scholarships for full-time art students
from the Richard Steven Bean Scholar-
ship Fund, the University Book Ex-
change Scholarship Fund, and the
Gravely Scholarship Fund. The recipient
of the Richard Steven Bean Scholarship
Fund must be a Commercial Art major
with a maintained 2.5 GPA. The S300
award is for the Spring 1988 and Fall 1988
semesters. The University Book
Exchange Scholarship Fund grants two
scholarships in the amount of $500 for two
semesters, Spring 1988 and Fall 1988, to
two undergraduate art students with a
maintained 3.0 GPA. The Gravely Schol-
arship in the amount of S320 for the
Spring 1988 semester is available to a
Commercial Art student and will be a
renewal to last year's recipient. Addi-
tional info, and application forms can be
obtained in the Media Center in the School
of Art of ECU. The deadline for applica-
tions is Nov. 19, 1987.
TECH WRITERS
The ECU chapter of STC presents
Carolyn Miller, nationally acclaimed
scholar in technical and professional
communication, speaking on 'The Tran-
sition from School to the Workplace: The
Place of The Technical Writer tonight at
7:00 in Brewstcr B-102. Anyone interested
in STC or communications is invited to
attend.
OPINION � Everyone's got one. Some people die for them.
Other people already have, so that we can express ours,
MAKE use of your right to have an opinion. Let people know what
you think. Write to the Campus Forum and the Campus Spectrum,
THE EAST GAROLJNIAN is devoted to giving every one a
chance to have their voices heard. Write today We alsq are conducting
a search for the best wliters on campus to write editorial columns
about campus issues, Apply today in our offices.
printer Spelling checked against 70,000
word dictionary 752-9637.
TYPING SERVICE Papers, thesis, let-
ters, etc. Typing done on computer 16
years experience Low rates Call 756-
8934 after 5 30 p.m
TIGHT BUDGET? Try our meal-deal
S2.49 for any sandwich, fries and drink
14 hambburgcr, ham and cheese BLT,
Roast beef, chicken filet, turkey or pizza
burger. Also, homemade spaghetti and
lasagna (S3 95 - garlic bread included)
Famous Pizza - corner of 10th St and
Evans Not for delivery.
COMPARE OUR PRICES and good
food Buy any large pizza and get a 2-
htcr coke free Buy a small pizza and get
2 free 16 oz drinks Buy any sub and get
one free 16 oz. drink Call for TREE deliv-
ery. Famous Pizza 757-1276 or 737-
0731
TYPING of term papers and theses
done on a Tandy lOOOsx Computer at
very low rates Call Wendy at 752-1321
after 1 00.
NEED TYPING? Call Kim at 758-1161
before 5.00 p m , 758-2119 after 3 00 p.m
FOR SALE: 19811 londa CR125 Dirt Bike
Lots of new parts Excellent condition
757-6611 ext. 235 after 5 00 p.m
NEED TYPING? Call Cindy - 757-0398
Call anytime after 5 00 p m Low rales
include: proofreading, spelling and
grammatical corrections; professioan!
service 10 years experience-IBM typing
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERV-
ICES- 758-8241 or 758-5488 ask for
Susan
1986 HONDA CR250R Dirt Bike Never
raced Helmet and gloves available 20
hours riding time Excellent condtion
Motorcycle trailer also available. SI9O0
Call 355-7812 after 6 p m or leave mes
sage
FOR SALE Freezer and refrigerator,
dryer and range SI00 00 each Good
condition guaranteed. Call 746-2446
WORD PROCESSINGLETTER
QUALITY or laser printing Rush f bs
accepted. 752 1933.
ELECTROLYSIS (permanent removal of
unwanted hair) by Barbara Venters
People who understand electrolysis will
not wax, twecze or use electronic tweez-
ers or any other temporary method Isn't
it time to try the permanent method' Call
830-0962 for free consultation
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services Weraho -U
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out Guaranteed tyfttng on
papWHp to 20 hand wriNeri pagevSDf
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street ("beside Cubbies) Greenville,
NC. 752-3694
PICK UP AND DELIVERY of term pa-
pers, these, resumes, to be tvped. IBM
wordprocessing by professional with L3
years experience. Letter quality print and
professional editing Call Nanette in
Gnfton at 1-524-5241 Cheap-call the best
PROFESSIONAL BUT NOT
EXPENSIVE! Progressive Solutions Inc.
offers professional word processing to
students and professionals. Term papers,
dissertations, themes, reports and much
more as low as $1.75 per page. (Please call
for quote on your project.) Price includes
printing on high quality bond paper and
spelling verification against a 50,000
word electronic dictionary. Ask about
our special offers. Laser printing now
available Call Mark at 757-3440 after
7:00 p.m. for free information.
DELTA ZETA: We ust wanted to thai V
you and let you know how much we
appreciate everything you have done for
us WE LOVE YOU GUYS Love the
Beta IVs
AMY BOWERS lappy "Wank"
day1 Don't worry, you re day w:i!
Have a GREAT day and git PSYC .
for this weekend Love va' k ,
JAMES RUSSO-Happ) iUkmci
psyched for a radical weekend i
the greatest big bro' Love .a
Amanda
ANN M. I lappy I lailowecn to the best
roomie and sis a person could asj for Are
you ready for the hunt Bctti r asl �
rather bald Tnxipcr Johl
Matail
HAPPY HOUR at the Ta-KtU-Ya
Discounts on Natural Lid's an
and Cokes. Sunday trom -
Sponsored bv the Gamma Gai
pledge ciass of Phi Kappa Tau Ni n - -
bershiprequired . . II a g .
pledges
WOW! It was 1 luge' If you were I �
Friday you missed the biggest : �
East Carolina Tea Party Fndav 5 i n
Sheraton Greenville "Off the I
ATTENTION: All Alpha PI . Eti
dates - get ready for our 2nd
stranger mixer' It v. ELY h
the BASI1 of the sen- -� -
be at the house at 8 43 in cbsg .
The Alpha Phis
ATTENTION: Girls of East Cat
brothers of PS Kappa Alpha ai
for calendar girN tor the- . ridai
For details, caii 752v"4
SHERATON CREENV1LLF m .
to thank all the members �
Omicron Pi, Sigma Phi
Sigma Sigma. Delta Zcta, Ka; pa
Pi Kappa Phi, TKE ambda
ADPi - and Q for t
turnout at the "ECU Tea Part)
that we did not forget ar . � but it w�
did let us know Thanks ( thi
LORI BENNETT AND MAR BACH 1
thar.x for the livestock expert r
; uui ai is gsj : act
the Cowl
ATTENTION PHI TAUS: Horn .
have a radical but sa HalloM en
end But save vour cnerv v
gonna need it real sxin R u
Don't ask quc� ns ls) g : ;�
Love, Your hi' sisters
DELTA ZETA-Thanks : - . if - ip
port. We've enjoyed your company
Keep in touch - SAE untercst groups
PAICE I futte W. Annette P. ar
Donna-M - IVsv; a �at � OktcdKerxl
and behave See ya at the hi' s.ster meet
ing Monday Love- i US Amanda
KAREN H,DELYNDA(FRED). & Mf
LINDA�What a family�you g u
the greatest Have a great Hal
weekend Look out for "the crcat -f
km Alpha love�Amanda
"TEA" OFF vour weekends vs
Teas at the East Caroi.na TEA i '
Free Pizza Inn pia 6-7pan
Rock & Roll and 1 li Energy dance
No cover charge ps Hallowed Part)
this week with SI 50 tor the best ci � rr
SlOOfor thescxiest. and S5i" tor Dm
est SI.50 Blue Kamtkaw she Is i
Carolina's Lx'gest Ha
dav, 5 p.m SheratonI envill
THE CUFF
FOR RENT
APT TO SUBLET: 2 bedroom. $315, no
deposit, all appliances. Near campus. Bus
service. Available December 1. 758-6015
nights or 752-3519 weekdays. Ask for apt.
200-C3.
FOR RENT- Private bedroom, female
only. Kitchen privileges. Call after 630
p.m. 758-5422. Available now!
TAR RIVER ESTATES S300.00 off 1st
months rent on all 1,2, and 3 bedroom
apartments. Open house on Saturday,
November 14 and Sunday, November 15,
1:00 p.m5:00 p.m.
ROOM AVAILABLE for female, near
campus, work exchange. Call 757-1798.
GEORGETOWN townhouse apartment
for rent. Two bedrooms, new carpet and
paint, dishwasher, disposal, washer
dryer hook-ups. $350.00 per month plus
deposit. 758-7836.
RINGCOLD TOWERS: Aprs for rent-
furnished. Contact Hollic Simonowich at
752-2865.
PERSONALS
THE BOLD, beautiful and wise gather
around. The esoteric ball is tomorrow
until moon shadow set. Like none other,
lime daquari's, 6 kegs and prime stoke,
come ready to party your face off. 82 and
you.
REWARD. Lost gold nugget bracelet
outside of Brewstcr Great sentimental
value. Call 758-9146
DONT FORGET: Tomorrow's the day
The 1st Annual Pre-Halloween Bash at
Lambda Chi Alpha with AAE Starts at
430.
SUITE 415 SCOTT: Sorry it took so long
for us to write back, but you know we still
want to jump in the sack. Halloween ni te
will be such a fright, so let's all spend the
night, cuz we just might
.� -V A 4 � y4 ��? :� II II II ,P� I
RAMONA�Thanx for Sa:
TIME! �Blake
-bll

"NO ONE PARTYS LIKE ECU ON
HALLOWEEN" Buy your button iron a
Tri Sigma They are only SI 00
EAST CAROLINA TEA PARTV
Long Island Ice Teas served in ama
that you get to keep S2 refills all nite
Pizza Inn pizza 6-7p.m No cover chare
Hi energy Rock & Roll and Dance Musk
played bv "Big AI " Fridays, 5 pm"
Sheraton Greenville "OFF THE CUFF
PARTV, PARTY, PARTY�The Stafl
Coastal Fitness Center would like to in
vite Ai'i ECU students to a Hallowec-
PARTY, PARTY, PARTY! Oct. 30. 7 I
until! Prizes given for best costume, hes1
recipe and most creative pumpkin Come
in COSTUME! All welcome' For more dc
tails call 756-1592
LAMBDA CHI�Our annual I allowed!
Social is here. It's something we've
waited for all year�once again we'll all
be in disguise, 1 lope we'll be able to rec-
ognize you guys! Get psyched tor to-
night. Love, the AZD's
MONDAY NIGHTS ARE GREAT!
"Monday Night Football S2 pitchers ol
Draft, Free I lot Dog Bar and ALL the Free
popcorn you can eat Largest video sys-
tem in Greenville NO cover charge Free
drawing at halftimc for Free Footballs
Sheraton Greenville. "OFF THE CUFF "
HALLOWEEN AT RIO The doors will
creek open at 9 p.m. Friday when our
haunted house becomes a live horrit ving
experience! But wait, it won't end here .
Join us on Saturday where we will feature
our costume con test with $500 to be given
away. Catch this thrill at RIO in the 1IIL-
TON
ATTENTION: Don't forget Alpha Xi
Delta's Happy Hour EVERY Wednesday
night at Pantana's � It's the BEST excuse
for missing Thursday's classes!
GREEKS! CREEKS! CREEK! "Hallow
ecn Party" Friday! $150 for Best overall
costume, $100 for sexiest, and $50 for the
funniest costume. $1.50 BLUE KAMI-
KAZE shots, $2 East Carolina Teas. East
Carolina Football Cheerleaders pep rally
And East Carolina's Largest Haunted
House. No cover charge. Free Pizza Inn
pizza 6-7 p.m. Friday starting at 5 p.m
Sheraton Greenville "OFF TI IE CUFF"
Nurse shortage
Hospitals offer
and � �
l IT -
"Wl
trend thai v i
i n � v i .
S
There an
plav in'
"Thcr
"Another
ha,
mon pi � �
median
cnimx -
a mea r. i
AP) A shortage of nurses has
recruiters criss-crossing the na
tion with offers oi better pay,
more flexible sehedulcsand other
incentives trying to lure a dimin
ishing number ot nursin. .
graduates, hospital officials sav
"Everybody is experiencing a
shortage' Mark Philhruk. Duke
I niverstty's nursing recruiter
said Tuesday "We (recruiters)
are like a gvpsv hand, you see the
same people all over the countrv
There isno part of the country that
hasn't been affected "
Philbrick said the lagging enroi-
lement of nursing student
going to make the situation i
worse in the future As a:
ample,hecitedthesituati natt
University ol North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, oneofthi
est nursing schools ne m
They used to graduau
125sentorsayear.Wcbclicvethal " " I
will drop to around I �
Arthur Kane
Wall Street's
MIAMI iAD - A disban
Missouri lawver got a new life
under federal witness protection
and threw it away eight years
later, gunning down two stock
brokers and killing himself after
losing a fortune in Wall Street's
crash.
Arthur Kane who shot him
in the head wtfh a
Magnum pistol in a Merrill Lynch
brokerage, was actually Arthur
Katz. a Kansas Citv lawver con-
victed ot insurance fraud in 1978
the Justice Department said Tues-
day.
"There was a severe threat
against his life and he was reluc-
tant to join the witness program
said John Russell, a Justice De-
partment spokesman. "But he
testified in at least one trial. He
provided a great service to his
country and we telt he was owed
tKis protection
The J.S. Miirhas 5-cv �.v re
settled Katz �n 1979, after he
pleaded guilty to conspiracy to
commit mail fraud and was sen-
tenced to six months in a mini-
mum-securitv prison and fined
53,000. He also was disbarred.
"He was dearly not a violent
person himself. He was intimi-
dated bv violence said David
B.B. Heli'rcv, former head ot Kan-
sas Citv's federal organized crime
strike force, who placed Katz in
the program.
In Miami, he used shrewd in-
vestments to build a fortune that
included a $430,000 home with a
pool and tennis court. With the
crash, Kane lost as much as $1C
million to $15 million, said p
sources wlio spoke on condition
of anonymity.
"We haw been in contact with
him and as tar as we know, he has
led an excellent life" since joining
the program, Russell said. "We
have no knowledge that anv of the
money was ill-gotten
Before killing himself Monday
Kane fatally shot Merrill Lynch
brokerage manager lose Argila-
gos, 51, and wounded 39-year-old
broker Llovd Kolokott. who re-
1
A H
I
Tagt � I
As �
Soci. I
help rec
3?
r
! 20
VOTE
MARTHAS.
COFFMAN
Pitt County Board
Of Education
District 3, Seat A
November 3. 1987
EXPERIENCED
k CONCERNED
INTELLIGENT
FAIR
Pwd tot by Commute Te Eteci
MartMS Corhnan
� x
� E(
,� �p





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOHFK2V, lvsr
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1 Bt'WI
Wtl
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(ar
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: the
ct
gcr
ial
be
set
ma
BACLE
ftp P and
� i V l Lui' a 1 ' r� iJn'lMtllil
- � ' l'DA (1 Rl Hi. &. ME-
'� are
it 1 lallowcen
great pump
F vour weekends with 52 Iced
. i a party
7 on Hi Energy
� . Jance music
ween Party
st i stumc.
r the funi i
ae shot- ar.ci Ea: '
� 1 use Fri-
� � or:
i RAM A rhanx : i Sat nite�BIG
"NO ONE PARIES 1IKF ECU' ON
HALLOWEEN' ittonfroma
� i Thev arc on. S
JEENT� Rl �i INA TI A PAR IV
as sen 1 a masor ai
v Free
m.N a charge!
� ind Dance Music
1 ndavs, 5 p.m. - ?
FF THE CUFF
PART PARTY, FAITH " e staff of
� � t ��� � � to m-
(s � a 1 allowcen
� : 7 30-
best mc best
Come
1 rcdC-
1 MBDA CHI
� it 'i r we've
we'll all
� � rec-
� . 1 for to-
ts M MDA NIGHTS ARE GREAT!
rs of
. the Free
ideo sys
it I r charge. Free

DNALSHA1 LOWI 1 AT RIO Tl tool wil

c becomes a live horrifying
: ird wIse gather expci twail Im n't end here .�
row oiri - . feature
une (5001 be given
thrill at RIO in the 11IL-
�' 1 nugget braivict
Great sentimental
)morrow's the day
Halloween Bash at
nth AAEStartsat
-rry it took so long
ut vou know we still
ack 1 lallowecn nite
Iso let s all spend the
rght
ATTENTION Don't forget Alpha Xi
Delta's ! lappy 1 lour EVERY Wednesday
night at Pantana's � It's the BEST excuse
fcr missing Thursday s classes!
GREEKS! GREEKS! GREEK! Hallow-
een Party" Friday! SI 50 for Best overall
costume, $100 for sexiest, and $50 for the
funniest costume $1.50 BLUE KAMI-
KAZE shots, $2 East Carolina Teas. East
Carolina Football Cheerleaders pep rally.
And East Carolina's Largest 1 launted
1 louse. No cover charge Free Viza Inn
pizza 6-7 p.m. Friday starting at 5 p m.
Sheraton Greenville 'OFF Tl IE CUFF
Nurse shortage
Hospitals offer incentives to students
(AD- A shortage of nurses has
recruiters criss-crossing the na-
tion with offers of better pay,
more flexible schedules and other
incentives trying to lure a dimin-
ishing number of nursing school
graduates, hospital officials say.
"Everybody is experiencing a
shortage' Mark Philbnck, Duke
University's nursing recruiter,
said Tuesday. "We (recruiters)
are like a gypsv band; vou see the
same people ail over the country.
There is no part of the country' that
hasn't been affected
Philbrick said the lagging enrol-
lment of nursing students is
going to make the situation even
worse in the future. As an ex-
ample, he cited thesituationat the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, oneof the state's larg-
est nursing schools.
They used to graduate over
125 seniors a year. We believe that
will drop to around 100 this year,
and junior class enrollment is just
over 80 students Philbrick said.
"What we're seeing now is just a
trend that will continue to be slid-
ing. We see that at all large univer-
sities.
"There arc several factors that
play into this Philbrick said.
"There's a declining number of
18-ycar-olds in the population
eligible to enter college
"Another factor is that careers
have opened up for women in
more profi table fields such as la w,
medicine, computer science and
engineering. Since 97 percent of
nurses arc female, that's been a
real drain he said.
Philbrick cited a study of chang-
ing values as another factor, with
students 20 years ago mentioning
a meaningful philosophy of life as
being most important in their
lives and a 1987 survey finding
their top goal as being well-off
financially.
Changes in nursing is the main
topic this week as the North Caro-
lina Nurses Association, repre-
senting the state's 51,000 regis-
tered nurses, begins its annual
meeting in Charlotte.
Nurscsare hoping the crisis will
help improve the image and prac-
tice of their profession.
"I love nursing said Denise
Jones, a former hospital staff
nurse in Charlotte, told The Char-
lotte Observer. "I think we have a
special place in the health care
delivery system But we do
more than just empty bod pans
and follow doctors around
Nationwide, 13.6 percent of
nursing jobs at the nation's hospi-
tals are vacant.
Similar shortages are reported
in North Carolina, officials said.
"The reason you're seeing
what's happening now is because
there's been such a demand for
nurses outside the hospital said
Arthur Kane kills himself after
Wall Street's Black Monday
MIAMI (AP) � A disbarred
Missouri lawyer got a new life
under federal witness protection
and threw it away eight years
later, gunning down two stock-
brokers and killing himself after
losing a fortune in Wall Street's
crash.
Arthur Kane, who shot himself
in the head with a 357-cahber
Magnum pistol in a Merrill Lynch
brokerage, was actually Arthur
Katz, a Kansas Citv lawyer con-
victed of insurance fraud in 1978,
the Justice Department said Tues-
day.
"There was a severe threat
against his life and he was reluc-
tant to join the witness program
said John Russell, a Justice De-
partment spokesman. "But he
testified in at least one trial. He
provided a great service to his
country and we felt he was owed
this protection
The U.S. Mirrmls Service rtf-
seided. Kata m 1979, after he
pleaded guiltv to conspiracy to
commit mail fraud and was sen-
tenced to six months in a mini-
mum-securitv prison and fined
$5,000. He also was disbarred.
"He was clearly not a violent
person himself. He was intimi-
dated bv violence said David
B.B. Hclt'rcy, former head of Kan-
sasCity's federal organized crime
strike force, who placed Katz in
the program.
In Miami, he used shrewd in-
vestments to build a fortune that
included a $430,000 home with a
pool and tennis court. With the
crash, Kane lost as much as $10
million to $15 million, said police
sources who spoke on condition
of anonymity.
"We have been in contact with
him and as far as we know, he has
led an excellent life" since joining
the program, Russell said. "We
have no knowledge that any of the
money was ill-gotten
Before killing himself Monday,
Kane fatally shot Merrill Lynch
brokerage manager Jose Argila-
gos, 51, and wounded 39-year-old
broker Lloyd Kolokoff, who re-
VOTE
MARTHAS.
COFFMAN
Pitt County Board
Of Education
District 3, Seat A
November 3, 1987
EXPERIENCED
CONCERNED
INTELLIGENT
FAIR
Paid for by CommittM To Elect
Martha S Cot t man
mained in serious condition to-
day with spinal damage.
Katz and his then-law partner
A. Henry Tager were indicted in
April 1978 by a Topeka, Kan
grand jury as part of a two-year
federal investigation into insur-
ance fraud, authorities said.
Katz and Tager allegedly
staged automobile accidents and
then got chiropractors to falsify
medical claims. Katz received
$110,000 over two years and
Tager $135,000 in the scheme, the
government said.
As Kane, he was hired by the
Social Security Administration to
help recipients file claims, a job
that paid less that $30,000 a year.
Kane's former Miami broker,
Norflcet McLellan, said he knew
Kane only as a sharp investor who
profited up to $600,000 in 1980-81
despite a market slump.
"Arthur Kane had two loves in
life � his family and securities
McLellan said. He said Kane also
loved risk arbitrage, the profitable
but risky speculation in the stock
of firms likely to be taken over by
other companies.
"Takeover candidates have
been hit harder than anv other in
the last two weeks said McLel-
lan, vice president of the govern-
ment securities division of First
Equity in Miami. "I'm sure he got
Lw'd"
Nancy Langston, dean of the Col-
lege of Nursing at the University
of North Carolina at Charlotte.
"Now hospitals are being re-
quired to change to be competi-
tive she said.
A half-dozen North Caorlina
hospitals, including Presbyterian
in Charlotte, offer to pay tuition
for student nurses who promise
to work at their hospitals later. As
a result, Presbyterian's School of
Nursing more than doubled its
entering class from 43 last fall to
95 this fall.
A number of hospitals have also
adopted a flexible scheduling
system, allowing some nurses to
work 12-hour weekend shifts and
others to work Monday through
Friday schedules.
Duke even offers incentives for
employees' children, Philbrick
said.
"If they work here two years
full time, we will pay for any
course work they do at the univer-
sity he said. "If a nurse works
five years fulltimc, we will pay 75
percent of their child's tuition at
Dukeor up to 75 percent of Duke's
tuition to send their child any-
where in the country if they don't
get accepted at Duke. We will
send two children per employee
for four years of undergraduate
study, so that's about a $60,000
benefit for their children's fu-
ture'
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f





: cai
INIAN
" lOKI R29 1987
Officials point loan-default finger at schools I Iltl�mnc
rRTwi;RnDn .� O �r South's high infant morta
T' (A,) llu' lkt- tlu arc' ,orl �W 'he againsMoan defaults whirh rrvci r t;�: n , results largely from doi
rt admin stratinn m.t c ,�. HnvHichnm tv �. i .f' . mh' u'IU" 1l' ' radihonall v, colleeos or trade AmmlinLir � h.y '
lpRO (AP) llu- fact, they are Fort told tin
ninistration and Con Greensboro News & Record.
M to i lamp down on That is totally inappropriate I
Hi high default rates on question the morality of it. I resent
ins Imit s� liool officials it "
ildn't be Warned for Officials at mam ol North
I problems ot their Carolina's historically black insti
tutions, small private colleges,
immunity colleges and trade
hools are worried and even
angry
Main ol those schools have
I gh default rates on Guranteed
Student I oans, a need based pro
as tar as we a gram that is annually the largest
m the nation in terms ol lending
saving that iolume.
ivas first initiated Department of Education offi-
ce not h Ki ae ials said Tuesday they soon ex
uddenl aftei the vi to announce a new assault
v minuses ac
: ething ovei
r i link eontn I
�I I dward Fort ot
U I n i i � r s 11 "Wo
nts to pa hack tho
against loan defaults, which cost
taxpayers more than $1.7 billion a
year.
Action also is expected in Con
gross.
Ihe Senate has tacked a provi
sionontoa trade bill now in con-
ference with the House that
would allow state agencies to ref-
use to guarantee loans to institu-
tions with default rates oi more
that 2 percent.
Experts have said that the loss
of Guaranteed Student I oaneligi-
bility would force some schools to
close their doors.
"Whether that is true in North
� arolina remains to be seen Forl
said. "It's certainly true nation-
ally
traditionally, colleges or trade
schools have had little to do with
ex students who don't repay their
loans. The schools do not have to
collect the loans, which aw made
by banks or lending agencies.
And when a student defaults, the
government pays off the loan.
Supporters of a crackdown on
defaults point to the rising costs.
Last year, the cumulative figure
in student loan defaults reached
$5.6 billion, rising from $J77 mil-
lion eight years earlier.
The annual cost climbed from
$530million in 1983 toa projected
$1.7billion this year, boosting the
nice tag for defaults to one of the
Education Department's biggest
spending items
According to a recent national
survey, 34 schools in North Caro-
lina have default rates of 20 per-
cent or more, including A&T,
32.74 percent; Bennett college!
32.15 percent; and Guilford Tech-
nical Community college, 20 31
percent.
The figures cover defaults
through Sept 30, 1986.
The reader immediately as-
sumes 'what is wrong with those
schools That's not always the
case said Stan C. Broadway,
executive director of the NC
State Education Assistance Au-
thority, an agency within the
University of North Carolina sys-
tem that is responsible for state-
wide student-assistance pro
New rules would require revealing sex partners
j i . . .
I rteryl
t at tin
M
ii se
iol the
fforts
!iom
ill be
,1 art-
niver-
hapel
� state
i i
. - and
h the dis-
endows
holarship in
narents' name
I : ' i M
chol irship will
' ian ou island -
itions
in h(" A� aids
i semester i to be
1 oli inter
ilas I i Reite p k nts wS v .1ar-ol
1.1. 1lo meml. i s er
1eiiu. Isan East
ilunnaancemployeeof
� s 1ureui.
. aid recipients
n in tlutopten
r nign S( hoot
trati 'ii ol interest
nl to a i .liver in
U asting and e i-
ed An award
i od foul times tor
- ho maintain superior
idemii grade pomt averages.
. i: hip applications will be
roened and recipients rocom-
i In the 11 t I )epartment
rheater Arts scholarship
mmittee
Accepting the Rees gift, ECU
ancellor Richard Eakin said,
here can be no greater gitt to
. her education than the gift of
her education to a deserving
i lent the Rocs Scholarship
; nl fund will grant gen-
ttion alter generation of our
Ii nts the opportunity to learn.
it is is especially rewarding to
to km iw thai you, as univer-
employees, are willing to
I plemenl your considerable
t- ol lime and talent in this
he said.
i ailureto rotate radial tires may
i the lifetime of many of
m, especially those on new
The Rubber Manufacturers'
im iation rexiimmends that
il radial lires be rotated, ac-
ording to the manyfacturer's
ommendations, to optimize
dwear.
� i-jii�-
I lie re ision oi the rules lues
0 removed an option, available
jn earlier version, for an All S
itient to avoid mandatory re
�rting ot his sexual partners to
ie state it he volunteered to con
ct the partners himself.
1 he rules also would require
doctors, or local health clinics that
provide anonymous testing, to
obtain the list of sexual partners
from any patient they knew to be
i ifected with the All S vims. The
-�octors or clinics would be re
aired to pass the list son the slate
health officials for notification. epidemic Kaufman said. "It
A patient who refused to coop- will, in effect, drive underground
crate could be subject to a series ol people who might have tested
penalties ranging fom warnings positive and who might, being
from a local health director to given the information, adjust
quarantine or even arrest and their sexual behavior accord-
imprisonment. Iin;lv
Canson R. Kaufman, spokes- ohn P. Barkley, an attorney for
man for the Gav and Lesbian the Division of Health Services
1 iealth Project in 1 hirham, said
the rules are "abhorrent
"The continued emphasis on
control measures, rather than
education, will only serve to hin-
der efforts to contain the AIDS
who participated in drawing up
the rules, said violators would be1
punished with quarantine or
imprisonment only in the most
extreme cases. Asked how a doc-
tor, or the state, could force people
to reveal their sexual partners, he
said, "I'm not exactly sure how
that's going to word yet. We want
to look at that on a case-by-case
basis
The proposed rules will be- sub-
ject to comment at a series of
public hearings planned in No-
vember throughout the state. Af-
ter the comment period, the pro-
posed rules will be considered by
the state Commission on Health
Services, a state agency that has
the power to give them the force
"f laws.
grams
"You've got to look at the type
ol student, m hat the dropout rate
is, how long the program lasts. It's
far more complex than looking at
a default rate and turning around
and blaming a school
Overall, North Carolina has a
default rate of 7.7 percent, com
pared with thenationalaveragcol
12.1 percent
The survey, a joint project of the
National' inference of State I eg
islatures and the National Gover-
nors' Association, found 34 insti
tutions across the nation that had
default rates of 60 percent ormore
and more than SI million m d.
fault.
In North Carolina, onlv Shaw
University fell into that catec
Like everyone else, Shaw official
say Ihey have little control i
the payback ofguarcnteed loans
" I here isa problem said i
nis Spellman, a consult
brought in to guide Shaw thn
a period of financial difficult
But "Washingl ight tol kal
itself and Congi ueht I
change the rules without hassling
the institutions he snd.
Spokesmen for the Depart men I
otommunity l �� ges and t(
I N( system agree.
"To punish the institutions is
the wrong approach said Jay
Ki '1'inson,
a I C vice presid i
� . m-m ������ �� 0& V ��
, - tr "H-Hi - - - - - � -��- !� - �
"�MHMMWMM
. -
SAVANNAH, Ga (AP
South's high infant morta
results largely from po
norance and inadequah
care for pregnant teen ai
arc not ready to tak.
sponsibilities of parontr
a physician who is adv i
makers in 15 Southern
Dr. Ginger Flovd, a sp it
the Southern Legislartv
crcc Tuesday, noted thai
11 states with the high
mortality rates arc in th
"It's povcrtv under
and a lack al can
Floyd, the - � �
health servi for tr
Department ol
sources "We kr
AIDS-infected work
continue inspectin
WASHING" N
oral meat and i
who get AIDS can it
)ob as long as the. u
satisfactorily- and
down with an add
gious disease, the
Department says
"If all they had was
would not be removed fr rr l
plant situation just becau .
had the disease unl
determined thevcol ii
job Karen Stuck, a : �
woman for the departi
Food Safety and Inspect, r
ice, said Tuesday
Stuck said it has been tht I i
agency's policy all along to re
move inspectors from dul -
cases of contagious d;sc:
if an inspector devek red a c nta
giousdiseasem addil n to
the worker would be ord. - : fl
the job
News stones circulated about r
six weeks ago that a ni.
proposal would mean the firii
inspectors who developed AH S
The policy was drafted atter
of the department's 7 2 I
tors employed nationwide was
Morbid curiosity
People get it
GREENSBORO AD - A urn
versify researcher says humans
often indulge in morbid curiosity
because they are bored, bu:
the trait also may be an ancient
response to the presence oi dan- ri .
ger.
"The bored individual wants to
increase arousal to a more pleas
ant level, which causes her to set k
out external sources that might
gratify the need for stimulati
said Dr. Emily Edwards, an assis-
tant professor of broadb-
and cinema at the University ot
North Carolina at Greensboro
A curious individual I is I
opposite situation she h p - I
reduce arousal through a seai
for information which will solve a
problem or lower her anxiety
Morbid cunositv differs from
normal cunositv. Edwards said,
in that the morbid variety �- fasci-
nation with auto wrecks, grue-
some murders and horror movies
� is irrelevant to most peO
lives. Interest in unpleasant mate-
rial is not morbid if it is useful toa
person's life, she said.
Although morbid cunositv is
marked bv irrelevance, it mav
c
Introducing
. AH N�W
752-144-
PIZZA am
203 E Fifth Street � Greenville NC 2785J
WOK ROOi
Greenville Buyers Mi
Memorial Drive
en MonSat. 10 9
Sunday 1-6
i With tl

A





8
III!
EAS1 c.AKOI INIAN
lOHHv?1, 1985
Officials point loan-default finger at schools I ��nc
v �, , - �r South'shigh infant morta
� RI r Tin
Ministration and l on
want ti clamp dow n on
w i tli high default rates on
but s. h.n'l officials
� uldn t bo blamed for
� I problems ot their
t. Ills
; inn; campuses ac-
foi �. imething o er
ha e little �'ntii'l '
lloi I divard Fort ol
State Unix ersit) e
i dents to pa back the
! t that's as far ,iv w e can
eel the air s.i inv that
ne .r tirsl initiated
i re not !u Id ac
� : uddenh after the
fact, they are Fort told tlu
(Irecnsboro News & Record.
That is totally inappropriate I
question the morality ol it 1 resent
it "
Officials at main- ol North
( arolina's historically black insti
tutions, small private colleges,
community colleges and trade
St hools are worried and even
�mgry.
Many oi those schools have
high default rates on Gurantecd
Student I oans, a need based pro
gram that is annually the largest
in the nation in terms of lending
volume.
Department ol Education offi-
ials said Tuesday thee soon ev
; vt to announce a new assault
against loan defaults, which cost
taxpayers more than1.7 billion a
year.
Action also is expected in Con
gress.
The Senate has tacked a provi
sionontoa trade bill now in eon
ferencc with the House that
would allow state agencies to ref-
use to guarantee loans to institu-
tions with default rates of more
that 25 percent.
Experts have slid that the loss
of Guaranteed Student Loancligi
bility would force some schools to
close their doors.
"Whether that is true in North
- arolina remains to be seen Fort
snd. "It's certainly true nation-
ally.
Traditionally, colleges or trade
schools have had little to do with
ex students who don't repay their
loans. The schools do not have to
collect the loans, which are made
by banks or lending agencies.
And when a student defaults, the
government pays off the loan.
Supporters of a crackdown on
defaults point to the rising costs.
last year, the cumulative figure
in student loan defaults reached
$5.6 billion, rising from $977 mil-
lion eight years earlier.
The annual cost climbed from
$530millionin 1983toa projected
$1.7billion this year, boosting the
price tag tor defaults to one oi the
Education Department's biggest
pending items.
According to a recent national
survey, 34 schools in North Caro-
lina have default rates of 20 per-
cent or more, including A&T,
32.74 percent; Bennett college,
32.15 percent; and Cuilford Tech-
nical Community college, 2031
percent
The figures cover defaults
through Sept. 30, 19M6.
"The reader immediately as-
sumes 'what is wrong with those
schools That's not always the
case said Stan C. Broadway,
executive director of the N.C.
State Education Assistance Au-
thority, an agency within the
University of North Carolina sys-
tem that is responsible for state-
wide student-assistance pro-
New rules would require revealing sex partners
� uld require
the Ml s
li t ol theii sex
pp mentsol the
ill hin iii effoi is
.1 . i the deadly
awa trom
thej will be
l heryl McX art
t at the I ni er
a in Chapel
bei ot the state
the role ot
ike things
1 I think it
;r us ai lu
lh Ihi d
s endows
?larship in
parents' name
. : v l la M u lup will in outstand-
ii nuniv ations
. i 1989. Awards
semester) to be
interest ol the
ii to out ol state
idents who
e in broadcast
at ECU.
n ship w as en
bi i�ad� astir in
1nent ol 1 heater
ol his late par i lents ol Pa 1 i es v .nne
i ji ilt member.
ine, is an last
:and oinplov eeot
; reci lents
m in 1 top ten i high schi�1
�n ol interest
nl toa areer in
asting and evi-
ed. An award
t foui times tor
honaintain superior
gadepoint averages.
holarsllipappications will be
i -ard rtcipients recom-
;bhe 1( I Department
i he;terArts scholarship
mmittt'e
AcceptingtheRecs gift, ECU
lanceilirRichird Eakin said,
here canbe ni greater gift to
. her eiluitioithan the gift of
,her eiiKation to a deserving
idenlThe Kees Scholarship
dowment1 L1IUi will grant gen-
ition .ilter geeration ot our
. lentstheoppirtunity to learn.
It is isesjeciaIlv rewarding to
to kiowthatyou, as univer-
entj.loees,arc willing to
1 plemMilyoiir considerable
Is ol11)1� and talent in this
heS.lld.
I ailure to rotate radial tires may
. e the lifetime of many of
�' in, especially those on new
I he Rubber Manufacturers'
ociation recommends that
Sl radial lues be rotated, ac-
irding to the manyfacturer's
ommendations, to optimize
i idwear.
1 he revision of the rules lues
: iv removed an option, available
�i earlier version, for an All S
I atient to avoid mandatory re-
porting ot his sexual partners to
the state if he volunteered to eon
: ict the partners himself.
1 he rules also would require
doctors, or local healthclinics that
provide anonymous testing, to
obtain the list of sexual partners
trom any patient they knew to be
ifected with the All S virus. The
doctors or clinics would be re-
quired to pass the lists nn the state
health officials for notification. epidemic Kaufman said "It
A patient who refused to coop will, in effect, drive underground
erate could be subject toa series ol people who might have tested
penalties ranging torn warnings
trom a local health dirc tor to
quarantine or even at rest and
imprisonment.
Garison R. Kaufman, spokes-
man for the Gay and I esbian
Health Project in Durham, said
the rules are "abhorrent
"The continued emphasis on punished with quarantine or
control measures, rather than imprisonment only in the most
education, will only serve to hin- extreme cases. Asked howadoc-
der efforts to contain the AIDS tor.or the state, could force people
positive and who might, being
given the information, adjust
their sexual behavior accord-
ingly
ohn P. Barklcy, an attorney for
the Division ot Health Services
who participated in drawing up
the rules, said violators would be
to reveal their sexual partners, he
said, "I'm not exactly sure how
that's going to word yet. We want
to look at that on a case-by-case
basis
The proposed rules will bo sub
ject to comment at a series of
public hearings planned in No-
vember throughout the state. Af-
ter the comment period, the pro-
posed rules will be considered by
the state Commission on Health
Services, a state agency that has
the power to give them the force
of laws.
grams.
"You've got to look at the type
of student, what the dropout rate
is, how long the program lasts. It's
far more complex than looking at
a default rate and turning around
and blaming a school
Overall, North Carolina has a
default rate of 7.7 percent, com
pa red with the na t iona 1 a v erage 111
12.1 percent.
The survey, a joint project of the
National Conference of State Leg-
islatures and the National Gover-
nors' Association, found 34 insti
tutions across the nation that had
defaul t ra tes of 60 percent on
and more than SI million in de
fault.
In North Carolina, only Shaw
University fell into that i itee
Like everyone else, Shawofficial
say they have little control ovci
the payback ofguarcnteed loans
" I here isa problem said I en
nis Speilman, a consultai I
brought in to guide Shaw tin.
a period of financial diffi
But "Washington ought to look at
itsolf and Congress ought to
change the rules without hassling
the institutions he s lid.
Spokesmen tor the I cpartn
olommunity Colleges and the
I N( system agree.
"To punish the institutions is
wrong approach,
lobinson, a UN(
sau
av
VICC president
SAVANNAH. Ga (Ar,
South's high infant morta
results largely from p
norance and inadequate
care for pregnant teen a;
are not ready to tak � �
sponsibihtiesof parenth
a physician who is ad i
makers in 15 Southern sl
Dr. Ginger Floyd, a speak � it
�he Southern Legislate
ence Tuesday, noted th.e
11 states with the highest u
mortality rates are in the South
"It's p vert) under
and a laci F med
Floyd, the lirectoi f fa
health servi for th
Department i I Hun u
sources. "We kn
AIDS-infected work
continue inspecting
WASHINGTON A
eral meat and i
who get AIDS can rcma
job as long as they an ablet
satisfactorily and d i I
down with an add.1
gious disease, the A
Department says
"If all they had was AIDS, tl
would not be removed
plant situation just becaus I
had the disease uri
determined thevcould: tdothcii
job Karen Stuck, a
woman for the depai
Food Safety and Inspection Sen -
ice, said Tuesday.
Stuck said it has been
agency's policy all along t �
move inspectors from
cases of contagious disease
if an inspector developed a
giousdiscaseinadditie: � VIDS
the worker would be ordered. . r:
the job
News stories circulated about
six weeks ago that a new ' 51
proposal would mean thefir:r
inspectors who developed A
The policy was dr i
of the department's 7,200 insj
tors employed nationwide was
Morbid curiosity
People get it d
GREENSBORO (AD � A uni-
versity researcher savs humans
often indulge in morbid run
because they are bored, but that
the trait also may be an ancient
response to the presence oi dan-
ger.
"The bored individual wants to
increase arousal to a more pleas-
ant level, which causes her to seek
out external sources that might
gratify the need for stimulate
said Dr. Emily Edwards, an assis-
tant professor of broadcasting
and cinema at the Universil
North Carolina at Greensboro
A curious individual has the
opposite situation: she hopes
reduce arousal through a search
for information which will solve a
problem or lower her anxietv
Morbid cunositv differs from
normal cunositv, Edwards said,
in that the morbid variety � fasci-
nation with auto wrecks, grue-
some murders and horror movies
� is irrelevant to most peoples'
lives. Interest in unpleasant mate-
rial is not morbid if it is useful
person's life, she said
Although morbid curiosity is
marked by irrelevance, it may
CiiH
rn
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 29. 1987
at schools
nation.
ve got to look at the type
nl w hat the dropout rale
ungthe program lasts. It's
� complex than looking at
and turning around
ni nc a school
North Carolina has a
i 7 7 percent, com
ith the national aver agooi
cent.
ir c a joint protect ol the
nferenceol Slate Leg-
National c lovcr-
und 34 insti-
l' nation that had
cnl or more
illion in de-
� I) Shaw
� "gory
iw . fficiah
' '� 0 Cl
I ins
aid Den-
tant
tin �ugh
ticulty.
�oka!
hi to
issling
irtment
a d the
cns is
said fay
president.
:
v ,v wx
'
as
'�. I I
libl
sthai ink. l
. i ' -
ii TikT rates or sen ice,
� � 'pre
ivs stand
totalki .� . Jusi all
I -sou 222-0300
hoohvorkand
mr friends keep v �ti busv.
hut call hi ime and find i mi
what she's wrapped up in.
AT&T
The right choice.
M I I
I
i
Ignorance blamed for infant mortality rate
SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) � The
South's high infant mortality rate
results largely from poverty, ig-
norance and inadequate medical
care for pregnant teen-agers who
are not ready to take on the re
sponsibilities of parenthood, says
a physician who is advising law-
makers in 15 Southern states.
Dr. Ginger Floyd, a speaker at
the Southern Legislative Confer
ence Tuesday, noted that 10 of the
11 states with the highest infant
mortality rates arc in the South
"It's poverty, under-cducation
and a lack of medical care said
Floyd, the director of family
health services for the Georgia
Department of Human Re-
sources. "We know that if we can
feed you and provide prenatal
care, we can help you have a
healtiy baby"
Georgia Cov. Joe Frank Harris
has assigned Dr. Floyd to work
with the Southern Leadership
Conference in developing infant
mortality programs.
Harris also is hosting a meeting
in Atlanta Nov. 4 on behalf of the
SLC aid the Southern Governors
Associition to determine how
chucruk can help reduce infant
deaths and his wife Elizabeth is
leading a campaign to reduce
tecn-ai pregnancies.
"If wf can instill in teen-agers
self-esteem, we can postpone sex-
ual in�lvement Floyd told the
legislators, noting that 50 percent
ot all Georgia teen-agers over the
age of 17 are sexually active. "The
bottom line is how to say no
"Teen parents are not ready to
be parents she added in an inter-
view. "Legislators need to get
involved. We can't solve these
problems bv ourselves
Sarah Suptrine, another
speaker at a session on teen preg-
nancies and infant mortality, said
teen pregnancies doom many
young mothers to a life of poverty
and greatlv increase their risk of
bearing unhealthy or handi-
capped children.
Suptrine, who is conducting a
teen-pregnancy study for the
Southern Governors Association
AIDS-infected workers are allowed to
continue inspecting meat for the USDA
WASHINGTON (AD - Fed-
eral meat and poultry inspectors
who get AIDS can remain on the
job as long as they arcable to work
satisfactorily and do not come
down with an additional conta-
gious disease, the Agriculture
Department says.
"If all they had was AIDS, they
would not be removed from the
plant situation just because they
had the disease unless it was
determined they couldn't do their
job Karen Stuck, a spokes-
woman for the department's
Food Safety and Inspection Serv-
ice, said Tuesday.
Stuck said it has been the
agency's policy all along to re-
move inspectors from duties in
cases of contagious disease. Thus,
if an inspector developed a conta-
gious disease in addition to AIDS,
the worker would be ordered off
the job.
News stories circulated about
six weeks ago that a new USDA
proposal would mean the firing of
inspectors who developed AIDS.
The policy was drafted after one
of the department's 7,200 inspec-
tors employed nationwide was
diagnosol as having AIDS.
But Slick said in an interview
than the Iroposal was only one of
several rations under considera-
tion by a fcsk force at the time and
was not adopted. The final deci-
sion was cleared by a White
House coordinating committee
on AIDS, the said.
Last month, a senior official of
USDA'siiipection agency, Lester
M. Crawfird, said the depart-
ment had no reason to believe
AIDS can U transmitted through
food, but neatpacking industry
officials had expressed fear that
the discasecould bo transmitted
through bbod from knife cuts
and other injuries common
among plait workers.
Crawforqsaid the agency had
been working with the federal
Centers for lisease Control since
1985 about aiy actions that should
be taken on AIDS among food
workers. Tin CDC said AIDS is
not spread though food.
The task nrce studying the
problem dceiled it was unneces-
sary to conduct mandatory test-
ing for AIDSantibodies because
having the vius alone � human
immunodeficiency virus, or HIV
"posed no risk to the individual
or his-her performance, co-work-
ers or product wholesomeness
Crawford, who since has been
promoted to head of the
department's food Safety and
Inspection Service, concurred in
the task force's recommenda-
tions:
� "Since there is no data indicat-
ing a risk to employee safety or
product wholesomeness based
upon the presence of an individ-
ual who tests positive for the HIV
virus, no changes or precautions
need to be initiated at the
workplace.
� "Since federal personnel regu-
lations already address medical
disabilities, an employee diag-
nosed as having AIDS will be
treated no differently than anv
other employee with a medical
disability.
�"The agency should develop
an educational program for its
employees. The program could be
used to address the nature of the
disease, its transmissibility, and
types of medical counseling and
suport resources
and the SLC, said the problem is
acute in the South and results
from many complex causes, such
as low self-esteem and a lack of
goals among teen-age girls.
'This is a very, very serious
economic problem she said,
noting that 56 percent of the
women on welfare in South Caro-
lina either were teen mothers or
had signed up while they were
teen mothers.
Suptrine, a consultant from
Columbia, S.C said teen preg-
nancy ratesare not increasing, but
more teen mothers are deciding to
keep their babies, and that adds to
the number of single-parent fami-
lies, which tend to be plagued by
poverty.
"The children of those families
are suffering greatly she told
members of the SLC, who are
meeting in Savannah for three
days. Other issues discussed at
the conference were the Super
Tuesday primaries and caucases,
the cost of treating increasing
numbers of AIDS victims and the
importance of international trade.
The SLC helps lawmakers in 15
states, plus the District of Colum-
bia and Puerto Rico, solve state
and regional problems and iden-
tify important issues. About 300
legislators and state government
employees are attending the
Savannah meetings, which ended
today.
'The Southern legislators are
looking at priorities in their states
and across state boundaries to see
how they compare said the
SLC's executive director, Charley
Williams. "If they find enough
states have the same problems,
the states can work together to
find innovative, imaginative
ways to solve common prob-
lems
Maryland state Rep Tyras
Athey, an SLC viccchairman, said
Southern states need to investi-
gate international trade opportu-
nities.
"We have to get involved, in-
vestigate and see what we do
have to offer he said during an
interview prior to an export meet-
ing.
"The biggest problem is know-
ing what's needed and being able
to make the proper contacts so
that we can supply it
Athey, a Jessup, Md , Democrat
who chairs the Ways and Means
Committee in the Maryland
House of Delegates, said exports
help create new markets for U.S.
goods.
"It's obvious we can move all
kinds of products, agricultural,
whatever he said, noting that
Maryland Gov. William Shacffcr
has just returned from a trade
mission.
9 �(g) �&&&�&��
Morbid curiosity
People get it diiei to boredom
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0



GREENSBORO (AD � A uni-
versity researcher says humans
often indulge in morbid cunosity
because they are bored, but that
the trait also may be an ancient
response to the presence of dan-
ger.
"The bored individual wants to
increase arousal to a more pleas-
ant level, which causes her to seek
out external sources that might
gratify the need for stimulation
said Dr. Emily Edwards, an assis-
tant professor of broadcasting
and cinema at the University of
North Carolina at Greensboro.
A curious individual has the
opposite situation: she hopes to
reduce arousal through a search
for information which will solve a
problem or lower her anxiety
Morbid curiosity differs from
normal curiosity, Edwards said,
in that the morbid variety � fasci-
nation with auto wrecks, grue-
some murders and horror movies
� is irrelevant to most peoples'
lives. Interest in unpleasant mate-
rial is not morbid if it is useful to a
person's life, she said.
Although morbid curiosity is
marked by irrelevance, it may
TntrocUicIri
the All
have evolved from a biological
readiness to rrspond to danger,
she said.
"Just as wemust exercise our
bodies in this ton temporary pe-
riod of sedentiry employment,
we may also have to exercise our
behavioral structure in an age
when predators are generally not
the kind that we can physically
run away from or turn to fight
tooth and nail she said.
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V
A
I

10
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOHCR29, 1987
Chrysler would have suffered in spite of crash
HIGHLAND PARK, Mich.
(AP) � Chrysler Corp. would
have needed to make deep cuts in
its white-collar work force and
close plants regardless of the
stock market crash and gloomy
economic forecasts, an analyst
says.
Chrysler Chairman Lee Iacocca
said Tuesday the automaker will
eliminate 3,500 white-collar jobs
by year's end, cut white-collar
benefits and close at least one
plant in a belt-tightening acceler-
ated by Wall Street's spasms and
expectations of a recession.
The nation's No. 3 automaker
added 5,700 employees to its sala-
ried workforce of 32,300, and four
assembly plants to its nine when it
bought American MotorsCorp. in
August.
Because of the merger, Chrysler
needed even before last week's
stock market plunge to cut its
costs and eliminate excess factory
space, said Chris Cedergrcn, an
analyst with H.D. Power & Asso-
ciates of Westlake Village, Calif.
But the move shows Iacocca is
working to ensure that Chrysler
will remain profitable in an eco-
monic downturn, Cedcrgren
said.
"Chrysler may be again trying
to restructure the company, put-
ting it back on a diet where it can
be a profit center in a much
smaller (vehicle) market Ceder-
grcn said.
"Chrysler car sales have been
horrible, down anywhere from 30
to 40 percent in the past couple ol
months. I think Chrysler has real-
ized their long-term prognosis,
even in a normal market situation
without the plunge, is vulner-
able
Michael Luckey, an analyst
with Shcarson Lehman Brothers
Inc said his firm estimates 1987
car and light-truck sales of 14.8
million. Luckey last week pre
dieted 14 million in 1988.
Scientists say ozone layer is in danger
WASHINTON (AP) - - Scien-
tists are warning Congress a new
international agreement to begin
controlling ozone-destroying
chemicals is far short oi what is
needed to protect the world's
population and environment.
Greater reductions in chlo-
rofluorocarbons, or CFCs, or per-
haps o" immediate banning of
CFCs arc needed beyond what is
proposed in the ozone-protection
protocol signed by most indus-
trial nations last month in Mon-
treal, scientists told a Senate hear-
ing on Tuesday.
"I don't think the global com-
munity can wait Sherwood
Rowland, the University of Cali-
fornia, Irvine chemistry professor
who is a pioneer in researching
interaction between stratospheric
ozone and CFCs, told two sub-
committeoes of the Environment
Committee.
Under prodding by the United
States, the signatories proposed to
freeze CFC emissions in 1990 at
1986 levels, reduce emissions by
20 percent in 1994 and another 30
percent by 1999.
But Rowland and other scien-
tists said that even with a ban, the
massive and increasing loss of
ozone that researchers ha ve docu-
mented over Antarctica in the
past several years will exist for
centuries because of the long life
span of the ozone-depleting chlo-
rine molecules already released
from widely used CFCs.
Stratopheric ozone is a natural
Prison AIDS problem ranks below
society's, official says
RALEIGH (AP) � Prison offi-
cials say mandatory AIDS testing
in the federal prison systems and
some state prisons has shown that
fewer prisoners have the deadly
disease then generally thought.
"The general population has a
bigger tAIDS) problem than the
prison population Aaron f.
Johnson, correction secretary in
North Carolina, said Tuesday at a
meeting of the Southern Correc-
tional Administrators Associa-
tion.
Sue Cunningham, president of
the American Correctional Asso-
ciation, said governors and legis-
latures in many states had or-
dered mandatory testing and
other measures to control AIDS in
their states' prisons and jails.
In many cases, the actions were
required with insufficient input
oners' privacy rights, Cunning-
ham said.
"The general public has the
impression that prisons are one
big sex orgy G Paul Phelps,
secretary of the Department of
Public Safety and Correction in
Louisiana said. "For those that are
running programs that are consti-
tutional, that's not true
Gary Maynard, acting director
of the Department of Correction
in Oklahoma, said mandatory
testing of 10,000 inmates in his
state had turned up only one
AIDS case. Another 38 prisoners
tested positive for the AIDS virus.
Testing is not required in Geor-
gia, said David C Evans, comis-
sioncr of that state's Department
of Corrections. But he said about
50 cases had been discovered in
his system, resulting in 12 deaths,
from prison and health experts, in the past three years. Georgia's
she said.
"Nobody can tell us right now
whether that's the right thing to
do Cunningham said in an inter-
view. "And then after you test,
whether those numbers are very
small or they're very large, how
are you going to deal with them?"
Some states might be tempted
to establish "leper colonies" to
segregate AIDS patients from
prison population is around
18300.
In North Carolina, inmates are
tested when undergoing medical
treatment that involves taking
blood. Johnson said. About 40
have tested positive for the AIDS
virus and six or seven have con-
tracted the disease, he said.
A bill to require AIDS testing in
North Carolina's prisons failed in
other inmates or take other steps the General Assembly this year.
that might not be justified, she The ACA has created a task
said. force to probe issues raised by
Another question is whether AIDS in prison and recommend
AIDS information can be made actions. The panel is expected to
public without violating the pris- issue the report by January 1988.
I
NEW rORK CITY
The STUDENT UNION'S TRAVEL COMMITTEE
is presenting a trip to New York City (The Big
Apple) during Thanksgiving break.
4 Days & 3 Nights
Depart: 8 p.m. Nov.25. 1987
Return: 11 p.m. Nov. 29. 1987
Transportation: Seashore Trlway� Bua Hotel: Century Paramount
r& Price per person: SI29 (quad occupancy); $139
(triple occupancy)and $149 (double occupancy).
Sge Mendenhall's Central Ticket Officefor details
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SPECIALTY GIFTS
-air
shield against the sun's cancer-
causing ultraviolet rays. The
Environmental Protection
Agency has warned that without
action against CFCs, the world
faces a sharp increase in skin can-
cer.
The Montreal agreement fell far
short of FPA's call for an 85 per-
cent cut in CFCs, which are used
as refrigerants, industrial sol-
vents and in the production of
plastic foam.
"We need to act now and im-
pose severe restrictions on CFC
emissions immediately if we
want to bring the chlorine concen-
trations in the atmosphere under
control by early in the next cen-
tury Rowland said.
"The proposed control will
have relatively little effect on the
amounts of chlorine in the at-
moshpere before the year 2(XX1
Rowland testified.
On une 14, 1777, theContincn-
t.il Congress in Philadelphia
made the Stars and Stripes the
national flae
"This doesn't reflect a reces-
sion, just a slow-growth mvi-
romnment with consumer confi-
dence being mediocre he aid
During a recession, combined
car and light truck sales woutl fall
to about 12 million a year, l.ickov
said.
Robert Lutz, executive vice
president of Chrysler, said last
week at an auto exposition in
Paris that the company expvts a
U.S. recession that will cut 10
percent from the domestc car
business and keep the indistry's
car sales at about 9 million during
thel 988 model year.
Iacocca said Chrysler wll close
an assembly plant, but hasn't
decided which one, and he for
mer AMC metal-stampire plant
in Milwaukee.
Cedergren said Chryspr a Is,
needs to close to three agug AMC
assembly plants in Kenosha,
Win Toledo, Ohio, andBramp-
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ton, Ontario � and transfer their
work elsewhere.
Chrysler will noticy workers
affected by the cuts on Nov. 11
Under the AMC purchase
agreement, former AMC workers
whoare laid off will recci ve sever-
ance payments ranging from less
than a month to a full year's pav
Non-AMC workers asked to
leave will be offered early retire
ment or other provisions, said
Chrysler Vice Chariman Roberts
Miller.
Chrysler, meanwhile, said
third-quarter earnings were up
7.7 percent over a year ago, but
earnings tor the first nine months
of 1987 dropped 11.9 percent.
General Motors Corp. led the
big three automakers, earning
$812.3 million in the third quarter,
compared with $70.12 million for
Ford Motor Co in sixth consecu-
tive record quarter for the nation's
No. 2 automaker, and $253 mil-
lion for Chrysler.
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Two thousand
primitive Christ u
container which held I
son buried in the
couldn't lestroyl
they became
Brotherhood ol
turn became ,1 seen t sect '
Catholic hurch
Since the 19505, I
bottle" has been in the basi
of an urban, Americar
(located, one presumes
tage Villag
originally hid hi
as he wa
another din
lite line ba k I
junior is wal
basement
Such l- the pn n
Carpenter's Prii
The plot its f is
amalgram ol s
thor Grej ford's

pi-P
V
Jameson Parker talks to Dennis Pun
Darkness now playing at the B
Director S
Bv CHRIS MITCHELL
Sta'i fc-rpr
"Someone to Watch Over M
opened at the Plaza Cinema last
Friday after opening nationalh
three weeks ago amid ambivilent
reviews. Much of the negative
criticism fell on the storyline, that
the plot drag- I ten. Whi
neither fresh nor inspiring, the
essence of the film is its st U
look, further redemption ot li
ingand design
The film opens on Mike
Keegan's party celebrating the
cop's promotion to detective
Tom Berenger as Keegan witl
Lorraine Bracco as his urife
the film a realistic glimpse at the
urban middle cl iss at pla
The apartment is crew,
noisy and confused tlu
simple, in manhattan's upper
East side. Claire Gregory rubs
elbowsand snob-at what appears
to be THE CLUB amid paparazzi
Cotten trick or tn
By GRETCHI IOURNIG W
Stjtl Vnter
Getting into the Ha
spirit has been a major priori!
most ECC students this �
especially for the girls in Cotten
Hall.
Cotten Hall's House Cou
has sponsored "Hallograms f i
50 cents each to raise mone) I
the dorm. Secretive messages
trick or treat candy is included or
the Hallograms. which are pump-
kins made out oi construction
paper.
"Trick or treat "Happy Hal-
lowee or "Just thinking of you"
have been some oi the I lallogram
messages.
"It's a neat little gift to send and
if s the thought that counts" says
Joanna Taylor, a Cotten Hall resi-
dent.
Other Cotten girls participating
in the "Secret Spook" game have
made new friends this week by
leaving Halloween tricks and
and
pm
me i
At 4
Cotten �
and treat- t
volutoers ha1
money for
donations fi






I
-J THEEASTCAROIJNIAN OCTOBER 29, 1987
Chrysler would have suffered in spite of crash
HIGHLAND PARK, Mich.
(AP) � Chrysler Corp. would
have needed to make deep cuts in
its white-collar work force and
close plants regardless of the
stock market crash and gloomv
economic forecasts, an analyst
says.
Chrysler Chairman Lee Iacocca
said Tuesday the automaker will
eliminate 3,500 white-collar jobs
by year's end, cut white-collar
benefits and close at least one
plant in a belt-tightening acceler-
ated by Wall Street's spasms and
expectations of a recession.
The nation's No. 3 automaker
added 5,700 employees to its sala-
ried workforce of 32,300, and four
assembly plants to its nine when it
bought American MotorsCorp. in
August.
Because of the merger, Chrysler
needed even before last week's
stock market plunge to cut its
costs and eliminate excess factory
space, said Chris Cedergrcn, an
analyst with H.D. Power & Asso-
ciates of Westlake Village, Calif.
But the move shows Eacocca is
working to ensure thai Chrysler
will remain profitable in an eco-
monic downturn, Cedergren
said.
"Chrysler may be again trying
to restructure the company, put-
ting it back on a diet where it can
be a profit center in a much
smaller (vehicle) market Ceder-
gren said.
"Chrysler car sales have been
horrible, down anywhere from 30
to 40 percent in the past couple ol
months. I think Chrysler has real
ized their long-term prognosis,
even in a normal market situation
without the plunge, is vulner-
able
Michael I.uckey, an analyst
with Shearson Lehman Brothers
Inc said his firm estimates 1987
car and light-truck sales of 14.8
million. Luckey last week pre
dieted 14 million in 1988.
Scientists say ozone layer is in danger
WASHINTON (AP) - - Scicn
tists are warning Congress a new
international agreement to begin
controlling ozone-destroying
chemicals is far short of what is
needed to protect the world's
population and environment.
Greater reductions in chlo-
rofluoroearbons, or CFCs, or per-
haps an immediate banning of
CFCs arc needed beyond what is
proposed in the ozone-protection
protocol signed by most indus-
trial nations last month in Mon-
treal, scientists told a Senate hear-
ing on Tuesday.
"I don't think the global com-
munity can wait Sherwood
Rowland, the University of Cali-
fornia, Irvine chemistry professor
who is a pioneer in researching
interaction between stratospheric
ozone and CFCs, told two sub-
committeccs of the Environment
Committee.
Under prodding bv the United
States, the signatories proposed to
freeze CFC emissions in 1990 at
1986 levels, reduce emissions by
20 percent in 1994 and another 30
percent by 1999.
But Rowland and other scien-
tists said that even with a ban, the
massive and increasing loss of
ozone that researchers have docu-
mented over Antarctica in the
past several years will exist for
centuries because of the long life
span of the ozone-depleting chlo-
rine molecules already released
from widely used CFCs.
Stratophenc ozone is a natural
Prison AIDS problem ranks below
society's, official savs
RALEIGH (AP) � Prison offi-
cials say mandatory AIDS testing
in the federal prison systems and
some state prisons has shown that
fewer prisoners have the deadly
disease then generally thought.
"The general population has a
bigger (AIDS) problem than the
prison population Aaron I.
Johnson, correction secretary in
North Carolina, said Tuesday at a
meeting of the Southern Correc-
tional Administrators Associa-
tion.
Sue Cunningham, president of
the American Correctional Asso-
ciation, said governors and legis-
latures in many states had or-
dered mandatory testing and
other measures to control AIDS in
their states' prisons and jails.
In many cases, the actions were
required with insufficient input
from prison and health experts,
she said.
"Nobody can tell us right now
whether that's the right thing to
do Cunningham said in an inter-
view. "And then after you test,
whether those numbers are very
small or they're very large, how
are you going to deal with them?"
Some states might be tempted
to establish "leper colonies" to
segregate AIDS patients from
other inmates or take other steps
that might not be justified, she
said.
Another question is whether
AIDS information can be made
public without violating the pris-
oners' privacy rights, Cunning-
ham said.
"The general public has the
impression that prisons are one
big sex orgy C. Paul Thelps,
secretary of the Department of
Public Safety and Correction in
Louisiana said, "lor those that are
running programs that are consti-
tutional, that's not true
Gary Maynard, acting director
of the Department of Correction
in Oklahoma, said mandatory
testing of 10,000 inmates in his
state had turned up only one
AIDS case. Another 38 prisoners
tested positive for the AIDS virus.
Testing is not required in Geor-
gia, said David C. Evans, comis-
sioncr of that state's Department
of Corrections. But he said about
50 cases had been discovered in
his system, resulting in 12 deaths,
in the past three years. Georgia's
prison population is around
18,500.
In North Carolina, inmates are
tested when undergoing medical
treatment that involves taking
blood. Johnson said. About 40
have tested positive for the AIDS
virus and six or seven have con-
tracted the disease, he said.
A bill to require AIDS testing in
North Carolina's prisons failed in
the General Assembly this year.
The ACA has created a task
force to probe issues raised bv
AIDS in prison and recommend
actions. The panel is expected to
issue the report by January 1988.
NEW YORK CITY
The STUDENT UNIONS TRAVEL COMMITTEE
is presenting a trip to New York City (The Big
Apple) during Thanksgiving break.
4 Days & 3 Nights
Depart: 8 p.m. Nov.25. 1987
Return: 11 p.m. Nov. 29. 1987
Transportation: Seashore Trailwaym Bus Hotel: Century Paramount
f$ Price per person: $129 (quad occupancy); $139
� (triple occupancy) and $149 (double occupancy).
See Mendenhalls Centred Ticket Office for details
SAVE 25
OFP
RKOULAR PmCU
7SM310
QrMtwill
k
TMgOOTT gp
1I"T-
SPECIALTY GIFTS
iT
shield against the sun's cancer-
causing ultraviolet rays. The
Environmental Protection
Agency has warned that without
action against CFCs, the world
faces a sharp increase in skin can-
cer.
The Montreal agreement fell far
short of EPA's call for an 85 per-
cent cut in CFCs, which are used
as refrigerants, industrial sol-
vents and in the production of
plastic foam.
"We need to act now and im-
pose severe restrictions on CFC
emissions immediately if we
want to bring the chlorine concen-
trations in the atmosphere under
control by earlv in the next cen-
tury Rowland said.
"The proposed control will
have relatively little effect on the
amounts of chlorine in the at-
moshpere before the year 2000
Rowland testified.
On unc I4, I777, IheContinen-
tal (, ongress in Philadelphia
made the Stars and Stripes the
national flae
"This doesn't reflect a reces-
sion, just a slow-growth �nvi-
romnment with consumer onfi-
dence being mediocre he aid
During a recession, combined
carand light truck sales wouH fall
to about 12 million a year, lackey
said.
Robert Lut, executive vice
president of Chrysler, said last
week at an auto exposition in
Paris that the company exrrcts a
U.S. recession that will tut 10
percent from the domestc car
business and keep the indistry's
car sales at about 9 million during
the 1988 model vear.
Iacocca said Chrysler wll close
an assembly plant, but hasn't
divided which one, and he for-
mer AMC metal-stamping plant
in Milwaukee.
Cedergren said Chryser also
needs to close to three agi�g AMC
assembly plants in henosha.
Win Toledo, Ohio, andBramp-
��fer
THE WASH PUB
i.s an equal opportunity advertiser!
We offer our specials to both sexes no mailer what
age, race or religious conviction they might be.
Monday - DRAFTS DRYERDAY25C Draft & 25c for 16 minutes on
the Dryers.
Tuesday - TWO FOR ONE DAY Wash one load of clothes, the 2nd
wash in on us.
Wednesday - SOAP & SUDS DAY 75c Long Neck Bottle Beer and
Free Soap
MonFri. - FLUFFS FOLD SPECIAL 8 a m10 a m drop off 35c a
pound.
2510 E. 10th St. I 1 Free Wash
752-5222 I Limil one Pcr Person
Expires 11 1(1 87
ton, Ontario - and transfer their
work elsewhere
C hrvsler will noticy workers
affected by the cuts on Nov. 11
Under the AMC purchase
agreement, former AMC workers
who are laid off will receive sever-
ance payments ranging from less
than a month to a full year's pav
Non-AMC workers asked to
leave will be offered early retire
merit or other provisions, said
Chrysler ViceChanman Robert S
Miller.
Chrysler, meanwhile, said
third-quarter earnings were up
7.7 percent over a year ago, but
earnings tor the first nine months
of 1987 dropped 11.9 percent.
General Motors Corp led the
big three automakers, earning
$8123 million in the third quarter
compared with $701 2 million for
Ford Motor Co in sixth consecu-
tive record quarter for the nation's
No. 2 automaker, and $253 mil-
lion for Chrysler.
inmg
Formal Drinking
2M rn I1
Stadium
yd
fjreern il i
- . I�r.
Il ira rJ1 ' '��
. ;o coois
Formerly known as Hooter's
Locate, behind Qumo s VC ieaners
irfarm Fresh Shopping � enter
11 aml a.m every day � 355-2946
"Come iheck out our New Menu
Wid In The Streets
Maniac metal from the Cireat White
North guaranteed to drive you wild!
EACH
MciUUY SCHDKER GROUP
Perfect retting
I wonaru-rock'in' heavyweights team
up Dr a blistering barrage of sound.
e i c o � �
On Sale Through Novemoir 4
The latest findings in music and video
THE PLAZA CAROLINA (AST MALL
IHt .KS t AHol IM
'Prince o
ByMlCAH HARRIS
1 wo thousand . u
primitive Christians I
container win. hi
son buried in the
couldn't dcstl
they became his
Brother!
turn becan � a ret sect
Catholic Churd
Since the b Vs. t in a
bottle" has been in the biv i
of an urban. American 11
(located, one pr
tage Villa;
originally hid his noi
as he was ab
another d to serve as
life line I
junior i- wal
basemeni
Such is I
Carpenti i
The plot itself is a htm I
amalgram of scici
thor Grccon nford's
1.
Jameson Parker talks to Denni
Darkness now playing at the
Director S
Bv CHRIS MITCHELL
Sufi irr
Someone to Watch Over Mc
opened at the Plaza Cinema last
Friday after opening nationall)
three weeks ago amid ambivilent
reviews. Much of the nega
criticism fell on the storyline
the plot drags too often Whih I
neither fresh nor inspiring the
essence of the film is us style and
look, further redemption i I
ing and design.
The film ope on Mike
Keegan's party celebrating the
cop's promotion to detective.
Tom Berenger as Keegan with
Lorraine Bracco as his wife give
the film a realistic glimpse at the
urban middle class at plav
The apartment is crowded
noisv and contused though
KcCi
simple, in manhattan's upper
East side, c laire Gregory rubs I is '�
elbowsand snobs at what appears
to be THE CLUB amid papara
Cotten trick or tr
ByGRETCHIN OURNIG N
SUM Vnti
Getting into the Ha
spirit has been a major priw ity 1
most ECU students this week
especially for the girls in Cotton
Hall.
Cotten Hall's House Cot
has sponsored ' 1 lallograms tor
50 cents each to raise mone foi
the dorm. Secretive messages
trick or treat candy is included or
the Histograms, which are pump
kins made out o construction
paper
"Trick or treat "Happ Hal
lowee or "Just thinking ol you'
have been some ot the 1 laltogram
messages.
"It's a neat little gift to send and
if s the thought that counts" savs Cotten r
Joanna Taylor, a Cotten Hall rest �nd trca
dent.
Other Cotten girls participating
in the "Seovt Spook" game have �ohit
made new friends this week by mone) fo
leaving Halloween tricks and donations I
ip to
�weei
mo -
At A .
A

-j
f





iiite of crash
ton Ontario and transfer their
i will noticv workers
d by the cuts on o 11.
�ML purchase
reement torn r AMC workers
laid off will receivesever-
� n rangii e, from less
i a mont to a full year's pay.
w irkers asked to
be offered early retne-
othei provisions said
nan Roberts.
� hile, said
gs were up
� i year ago, but
lirsl nine months
percent.
orp led the
I rs earning
rd quarter,
; 2 mil ion tor
nsccu-
rfoi the nation's
� � md $253 mil-
j�tn suvkjn "V I saloon
iuni;
Drink
IHR
;ocoois
as Hooters
la � 355 2946
k out our New Menu
J
c a r v


&
,
IUUY SCHENKER GROUP
Perfect fining
� v w eilit- lea ni
a hlisteriiijj barrage sound.
Cauiot"
I
I
lc and video
Mil t s I kii IM s
Entertainment
P�K� II
Trince of Darkness' has worn out plotline
By Mil All HARRIS
Still Writn
cape 11 P. Lovecraft's "Cthulu what sets tins movie apart from
Mythos some misconstrued the t pica! barf-o-rama. It fact, his
rwo thousand years ago, some scriptures from the book of Reve- louch is "Prince ol Darkness
litivc Christians discovered a lations, and "Chariots ol the only strong point. There are se-
inner which held the devil's Gods Given that there's no such quences that .ire roller coaster
son buried in the desert They thing as an original idea, and thai rides and sequences that creep
in t destroy the little tvke, so the film's attempt to reconcile over on you like spiders. (One lcg-
they became his custodians, "the physics and the occult i initial!) pull is guaranteed to make the
Irothcrhood of Sleep which in intriguii what we ultimately whole crowd jump.) And, unlike
im became a secret sect ol the
Catholic Church.
Since the 1950's, this "imp in a
bottle" has been in the basement
t an urban. American church
I vatrd. one presumes at fieri
tage Village). Seems the devil
jinally hid his son on eai tli jusl
as he was about to be banished t
another dimension to serve .is a
line Kn k to our planet. Set ms tunatel
ior is waking up in that church movie.
ment
Such is the premise ol John
Carpenter's "Princeof 1 darkness
plol itselt is something of an
an tlj ram ot science fiction au
thor Gregory Benford's "Times-
l live Barker ("Hellraiser"), Car-
penter recognizes and manipu-
li.iv e lure is an unsati; !
mash. Alter slushing through al
the jargon ol tachyons, telekinc lates the relationship of humor
sis, and entropy, we're left with and horror so thai much of the
just another hokcy time paradox, ghastliness has the edge
and the worn out chestnut that the softened, but not much
devil is an ali But, even Carpenter doesn't
ohn Carpenter made his repu make this movie worth four bucks
tation with the modern classic plus popcorn (although, given the
"1 lalloween, a thi iller with more gore, you may pass on that any-
suspensv I . � A-hich unfor - iv I A lack i t internal logic
ittei undei the guise ol theoretic
is later films, Carpen science, flaws this movie, and
ter got caught up in the i � I you'll probably leave the theater
hespawi I : Pri ark- thinking "Huh?" As one of the
ncss"isi there's stufl characters says, common sense
going ' .iethat would breaks down on a sub-atomic
gag a ma I level And sometimes a whole tot
but Can nter's dire tion is before.
Victor Wong and Donald Pleasence watch the changes in the anti-christ's in
Darkness
nee of
Artist-in-residence takes care
to explain work and process
By SUSANNE NEILSEN
Slalt Hula
Mark ! larris is artist-in-resi-
dence for the tall semester at
�a
x'liooi (i
I Art. 1 le is a very
and the United States
1 le is alw tys intei ted in stu-
dents' worl I net
approach in critiqu
torts. 1 In re is a cl ar ana
mind at work in tl irtisl
-
Jameson Parker talks to Dennis Dun after he has a Satanic nightmare in John Carpenter's 'Prince of
Darkness now playing at the Buccaneer theater.
quiet gentle English man who is
very serious about all issues he is 1 hs lecture .
concerned with - and most of all mind at work.
with his vocation as a visual artist. "As �
1 le took great care to explain his
views it his own work ad de-
velpment at a public lecture he
gave at the fcnMn�; Auditorium
on October d-Barus holds paint- attention on two ni
ing degrees from Fomburrrn CM- First, how d.vs the art kl
lege of Art and the Royal College nate?Secondly, what is tl
ot Art, London. I le has shown his ers relationship to the 1
"arge abstract works in Europe oaintinc? Harris fo
"As artists I the lec-
ture, "we tend
we doand not dia
I tarns tends to ana
tion more carefully , I x
Ham
ope painting
Director Scott creates mood in film
t iu-
: the
' tl C
ris
ul ist
I - to
.
n ,�r(
r BBS
(ed
cd
. cts
-tal cx-
: by
By CHRIS MITCHELL
Staff lntrr
"Someone to Watch Over Me"
opened at the Plaza Cinema last
Friday after opening nationally
three weeks ago amid ambivilent
reviews. Much ot the negative
criticism fell on the storyline, that
the plot drags too often. While it is
neither fresh nor inspiring, the
essence of the film is its style and
look, further redemption of light-
ing and design.
The film opens on Mike
Keegan's party celebrating the
cop's promotion to detective.
Tom Berenger as Keegan with
Lorraine Bracco as his wife give
the film a realistic glimpse at the-
urban middle class at plav.
The apartment is crowded,
noisy and confused though
simple, in manhattan's upper
fast side, Claire Gregory rubs
elbows and snobs at what appears
to be THE CLUB amid paparazzi,
strobes and glitz.
In the club's basement bar,
Claire (Mimi K. .� witn s i ��
murder. Keegan mu I i rotect the
witness until Claire can identif)
the killer in a line up - it the killer
can be arrested lirst.
'1 he real and predictable part oi
the story begins when Keegan
becomes exposed to the glamour
and money ol Claire's world - and
to Claire herself. All this is a bit
much for the cop and family man
from Queens, and for the viewer
as well.
Keegan must try to maintain a
balance between his family life in
Queens and Claire's lifestyle that
he is striving to protect in Manna t-
ten.
Acclaimed "new and rising
star" Berenger must have caught
director Ridley Scott's eye after
his Academy-nominated per-
formance in "Platoon Any actor
able to leap from the television
Gotten trick or treats
Stall Writer
By GRETCHLN jfOURNIGAN treats to girls in the dorm that they
don't particularly know.
At the beginning of this week,
girls who signed up with their
RA's to participate, drew names
to be their designated spook of the
week.
Participant, Amy Gotten, said
that it was a lot of fun getting
small surprises from someone she
didn't know that well.
On October 30, all the secret
spooks will reveal their identities.
Also, the girls are going as a
group to get spooked prior to
Halloween by watching scary
movies - The Fly, Oct. 29, and Un-
original Frankenstein, at 11 p.m
Oct. 30 and 31.
At 4 pm Thursday afternoon,
Cotton residents will give candy
and treats to kindergarteners of
campus employees.
Also during the week, Gotten
voluteers have been collecting
money for UN1CEF by taking
donations from Cotton residents.
Getting into the Halloween
spirit has been a major priority for
most ECU students this week,
especially for the girls in Cotten
Hall.
Cotten Hall's House Council
has sponsored "Hallograms" for
50 cents each to raise money for
the dorm. Secretive messages and
trick or treat candv is included on
the Hallograms, which a re pump-
kins made out of construction
paper.
"Trick or treat "1 lappy 1 lal-
lowee or "Just thinking of you"
have been some of the Hallogram
messages.
"It's a neat little gift to send and
H's the thought that counts" says
Joanna Taylor, a Cotten Hall resi-
dent.
Other Cotten girls participating
m the "Secret Spook" game have
made new friends this week by
leaving Halloween tricks and
caraciture he played in "The Big
Chill" to the cynical sergeant in
"Platoon' would nol have any
trouble portra) ing a New York
cop confronting the upper crust.
Berenger pulls it off well, not
Academy Award material but
noteworthy nonetheless.
For the most part, Rogers comes
across as more than a newcomer
to films in this 1980s gothic tale.
Leaving behind her most notice-
able roles in "Gung 1 lo" and the
short lived television show "Pa-
per Dolls she comes to the part
of a rich girl in trouble with more
than an MTV' seductress' skills.
Critics have knocked "Someone
to Watch Over Mes "weak plot"
and "mediocre acting Those
that have enjoyed Scott's director-
ship in the pasK"Alien "Blade
Runner") will ignore the negative
comments and focus on the film's
strengths.
The film's title comes from a
George and Ira Gershwin song
about needing someone, a song
about nature and simplicity.
"Someone contains three ver-
sions of the song by Sting, Roberta
Flack and an orchestral arrange-
ment.
All three versions are heard
during kev points in the movie; all
three establish different angles lor
the love triangle.
In short, the soundtrack is
widely ranged but effective. The
line Young Cannibals, Steve
Winwood and the Blasters arc-
packaged in with Irene Dunne
and Vangelis. Scott also included
classical pieces "Viens Mallika"
and an aria from "La Wally This
is not an album designed to sup-
port a bad film like the "Who's
That Girl?" soundtrack did.
Trademarks of Scott films hone
in on camera movement, lighting,
sound and set design. Scott might
soon be considered an artist for
his use of allure much as Alfred
Hitchcock was heralded for his
suspense.
Remember Harry Dean
Stanton's search for Itty Bitty
Kitty in "Alien?" The slow rhyth-
mic ride the camera took aover
Los Angeles in "Blade Runner?"
The same kind o( movements
wash throughout "Someone to
Watch Over Me
Scott's camera eases above noc-
turnal Manhatten in search ot a
peaceful viewpoint. The camera
also journeys with Berenger on
his chaotic rides between bor-
oughs.
In many ways Scott I is ri
fined the use of light in his films
incorporating it .i a i
handed mood, nearly a :
prop on the v t. In the .
disco scene, Claire is sp!
with lights and strobes in a
ner most hallucinogens car; t in-
Sec'SOMEONE page i:
in
�lv.
nthe
- eHARH
pace 12
Picking the Bones
An alliterative costume
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Writer
Halloween. The time of year
that a young bonehead's thoughts
turn to flights from policecarsand
wardrobe selection on the only
day when what you wear matters.
To avoid being arrested this
year while I cavort across campus
causing cowardice among co-eds,
I calculated the need for a cos-
tume. One that would interfere
with my identity, thus freeing me
to disturb and delight the deni-
zens of the Emerald City.
With said intentions, and feet
calloused by a semester's worth of
bicycling and bypassing the
brush barefooted, I merged into
the mall zone to measure the
extent of mercantile madness I
would have to endure to make a
mask of that Marine Marvel,
Aqua man.
Three hours, two malls and
three-fourths of a tank later, I re-
turned to my attic abode to asses
this astringent assignment. My
aquatic acheivement was less
than actual.
In a pit-sized town populated
with purple and gold pirates, the
more casual colors of the common
chroma are as cast out as chloride
crystals. Orange and green were
my overall goals to outfit my gar-
ish garb.
Yellow too, was an elusive
shade, at least to terns of belts.
While toe shirts and tights arc
textiles that can be tie dyed to tints
appropriate, basic brown leather
belts and boots tend to turn ter-
rible shades in the tub.
Green gloves I located at a gift
shop for the grisly price of $5.95 a
hand. Mothers ordered their off-
spring to obtain one glove tins
year and the other next season.
My bank account advised me to
ascertain the alternative routes
for assembling an Aquaman out-
fit.
Fortunately, other options were
open tome. Cast off curtain shears
in my crawlspace of a commune
comitted themselves to a curiosly
correct cape, reminicsent of the
Stevie Nicks kind.
Lacking funds to form a more
fantasty oriented costume or
humorous motif, the momentary
malfunction of my medulla ob-
longata mentioned that I might
mimic a middle aged music mys-
tic
High heeled boots in size 13 and
one half proved hard to hang onto
while walking, not to mention
when hitting the hiccup harmo-
nies of a hapless horse riding
hymnist.
Teaching myself the timing of
tamboruine tunes was treacher-
ous and my casual common sense
coursed through my cerebrum
and called it a cacaphony of con-
fusion. I deleted my diligence for
this disguise.
Making myself into Mike
Jackson was mildly mollifying.
Until thepreorbital pricetagofthe
prerequisite plastic pinching
punctured m preparations.
Choices were calamitous. Leg-
ends listed from the I one Ranger
to lascivious Lisa-Lisa lacked lo-
coness or lush legs Halloween
loomed with no perfect path
proferred itself tor my perusing.
It seemed as though I was pre-
destined to portray an ocean bred,
ostentatious gypsy with one sea-
weed green glove and yards of
orange lace. Downtown
Greenville would be disgraced
with a clumsy columnist's at-
tempt at capturing the caricature
of his chosen costume.
Then, 1 glanced outside. On the
green grass, a German shephard
wasgnawing on a greyish piece of
skeletal nutter. Bounding out the
door, I engaged in a out and out
opposition for the osseous stick
After sustaining several slashes
from his sharpened incisors, I
purloined my prize from him.
Washing it, I welded its weight to
the top of my head. It fit!
I had a costume. Not the one !
previously planned, but one that
anesthetized my aesthetic analo-
gies. After all, costumes ami
masks are mere mirrors of what
you are anyway.
And I remain a Bonehead.
�.H
bwwpwii1-� '� � �' . i.i p� �' �win
���u �� m nlrt�fc�ft�ggafrflfc
I





12
THE EASTCARm
iK fOBER 29, 1987
Harris lectures about his artistic influences
Continued from page 11
hiked as far as Teheran, Iran, and
igypt, and Sudan
also to Grceo
l.ator he visited France and ItaK
In 1982 1 larris was awarded a
scholarship to the Brcra Ac-
cademia do BcH'e Am in Milan
Italy. The three years spent there
brought him recognition as an
artist. Here tor the first time he
was a practicing artist and he said,
most importantly" he was
treated like one. This is quite dif-
ferent, he explained, from Eng-
land, where an artist lives and
works much more isolated
Milan made a strong impres-
sion on I larris. I le described the
strange new location, the vivid-
ness of the Italian landscape by
quoting the writer Adrian Stokes.
1 he artist does quite a lot of
reading and points out literary
influences upon Ins paintings.
Atter a large seven ft. square
woodcut titled "City drawings
followed and then more paint-
ings. One painting tilled the entire
15 ft. wall of his Milan studio. This
piece's title "Grey Ladder" points
to the influence of Yeats' poetry.
In all oi the artist's work the aet
of self-definition is the underly-
ing theme, said Harris, the
struggle to find himself in his
work, the struggle with art his-
tory, and the impossibility to get
away from the work itself. 1 larris
began working in monochro-
matic ranges of reds or greys us-
ing oil paints on paper.
In 198-1 Harris received a schol-
arship to stud) mural paintings in
Mexico. There he was strongly
influenced by such great artists as
Sequeros. He also described their
influence on such artists as Pol-
lock and Guston.
1 larris returned to London and
used an old church as studio
space. There he painted large
pieces using color independent
from line. 1 le returned to more
recognizable imagery at the time
using monochromatic greys.
The piece shown in this year's
EC I faculty show was less mono-
chromatic, loaded with very d
namic marks, shapes and c1 rs
Harris's concluding remarks
dealt with his views on what lite is
like tor an artist. "C )nc stands in a
Stressful relationship to the world
tcmpramentalv and often finan-
cially. Being an artist stimulates
illusions, perversions, and gross
selfishness, and it often brings
disappointment
"A painter works as it there
were nothing else in the world. 1 le
is ma state of (constant) prepared-
ness Tor himself 1 larris keeps -
like many artists before him - a
tered when standing in front ot a
Poussin painting, he said. They
are very minute detailed analysis
ol formal elements, color descrip-
tions, and connections between
all elements of each painting he
viewed
1 larris has also come to feel that
oil painting on a flat surface is the
"ultimate painting technique" to
him. This medium offers the artist
the only possibility for satisfac-
tion, his reason for painting "The
satisfaction will never be com-
plete and is well beyond easy
reach the artist noted as a final
remark. Harris is continually
working toward his goals that
seem to take a lifetime to even
liarv. His writings are only en- Co me close to.
Tom Berenger and Lorraine Brae
playing at the Plaza Cinama.
'Someone'
filmed darkly
continued from page II
co star with Mimi Rogers in Ridley Scott's gothic police storySomeone to Watch Over Me now
Much of I '
and tert;
hat I
Am
it puns no
: pro rtions are
� � exterior shots, i os
lex 11 Ristorante for
� � rs and the Queen
Mary for man more.
tl : million dollar
apartment execdesone's expecta-
tions for the raj Mahal. The cam-
era goes f r .) . e details, from
the alabaster foyer to the glass
encased di i m.
Scott's efforts do not save a
shallow film, they mere!) inten-
sity an ahead) intriguing one.
Anyone watching tor a film that
make- a C I -e tor cinema as art and
not merely an industry should
watch (ver this i
ECU prof goes
on piano tour
Mt'iiiit-nhji. PlCM Krk-itc
Pianist PaulTardif.a member of
the East Carolina University
School of music keyboard faculty,
will present three recitals in east-
ern North Carolina during No-
vember.
Tardif will perform Nov. 13. at
8 pm at the Fishtowne Perform-
ance Hall in Beaufort; Nov. 13,at
3 pm at the BIount-Bridger 1 losue
in! arboroand Nov. 18at8:15pm
in the Recital Hall of PCX's
Fletcher Music Center.
The Beaufort and Tarboro recit-
als are sponsored by local arts
councils. The recitals are free and
open to the public.
Works to be performed include
Mozart's Adagio in B Minor, K.
540, the Schubert Sonata in A
Major, D. 664, Prokofieff'sSonata
No. 3 in A Minor,Opus28; Ravel's
"Valses nobles et sentimentales"
and three Rachmaninoff prel-
udes.
Since joining the FCU music
faculty in 1971, Tardif has main-
tained an active performing
schedule, with appearances at the
Spolcto Festival in Charleston, S.
C. and at the National Gallery and
N.C. Art Museums. He has also
been pianist at Kennedy Center
honors galas.
7WVDRIQa, DINNER
An �iualifthan (Christmas ftnV.
rhrrrlrrt bv Charlrs iflunrr
December 2-5, 1987, 7:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center Multi-Purpose Room
East Carolina University
Advance Ticket Sates Only Aom sson $16 oo� Adults
$10.00 'or High School Youth and Under
For further information contact The Central T.ck.t Ott�:t. M.nd.nh.1! Stud.ni
Center. East Carolina University. Greenville NC 27858-4353 (91�757-��11
� it 266
CAROLINA:�
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center Is Open
Mon. Tues, & Wed. Fit 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
9 a.m2 p.m. & by appointment
For an appointment or more infor-
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline,
757-0003
1 1 1 East Third Strvet - The Lee Building
Greenville, N. C.
Free Pregnancy Test-
Confidential Counseling
.OQJfte A MSC PRODUCTION
SUB snmq a
215 E. 4th St.
752-2183
A COMn r TE MEAL ON A BUN
2 Locations
316 Greenville Blvd.
756-7171
Think of us for your
Halloween Party or
Tailgate Party
5 ft. Party Sub
stuffed with cheese and six
different meats. Topped with
lettuce, tomatoe, onions, salt,
pepper, oil, vinegar and oregano.
Comes with enough plates, cups,
napkins, chips, and Pepsi or tea.
(feeds 20-25 people)
Only $38.88
3 ft. Party Sub
Same as above
(feeds 10-15 people)
Only $21.88
THE STUDENT UNION
MAJOR CONCERTS
COMMITTEE PRESENTS
IN CONCERT
ANITA BAKER
SUNDAY, NOV. 1,1987
8:00 MINGES COLISEUM
Tickets: $12.00 Students
$14.00 General Public
AVAILABLE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE MENDENHALL
STUDENT CENTER
AND
FLAMINGO RECORDS EVANS STREET GREENVILLE
rxxxxxxxxz
CIXXXX
Walkin' lln Pbnli
KOfii
Mi
Hellion
rL�M v rjg
Metf M4A ffi


i
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5einert? I Zufbour
ndercover Cats
W
iV
Overkill
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A





12
THr t s c AKOI mian
OCTOBER 29. KS7
Harris lectures about his artistic influences
Continued from page 11
hiked as far as Teheran, Iran, and
also to Greece, Egypt, and Sudan
later he visited France and Italy.
In 1982 1 larns was awarded a
scholarship to the Brcra Ac-
cademta do belle Am in Milan.
Italy. The three years spent there
brought him recognition as .m
artist. Here tor the firs! time he
was a practicing artist and he said
'most importantly" he was
treated like one. This is quite dif-
ferent, he explained, from Eng-
land, where an artist lives and
works much more isolated.
Milan made a strong impres-
sion on Harris. He described the
strange new location, the vivid-
ness ot the Italian landscape by
quoting the writer Adrian Stokes.
The artist does quite a lot of
reading and points out literary
influences upon his paintings.
Atter a large seven ft. square
woodcut titled "City drawings
followed and then more paint-
ings. One painting filled the entire
15 ft. wall of his Milan studio. This
piece's title "Grey Ladder" points
to the influence of Yeats' poetry.
In all of the artist's work the act
ot self-definition is the underly-
ing theme, said Harris, the
struggle to find himseli in his
work, the struggle with art his-
tory, and the impossibility to get
away from the work itself. Harris
began working in monochro-
matic ranges of reds or greys us-
ing oil paints on paper.
In 1984 1 larris received a schol-
arship to study mural paintings in
Mexico. There he was strongly
influenced by such great artists as
Sequeros. He also described their
influence on such artists as Pol-
lock and Guston.
1 larris returned to London and
used an old church as studio
space. There he painted large
pieces using color independent
trom line. 1 le returned to more
recognizable imagery at the time
Tom Berenger and Lorraine Brace
playing at the Plaa Cinama.
'Someone'
filmed darkly
continued from page 11
duce
Much oi the film is shot in quite
dark ways. No sunlight or bright
overheads, onh subtle secondary
and tertiary bulbs
For design Xott pulls no
punches epic proportions are
used on occasion. He usod Man-
hatten for exterior shots, Los
Angeles' Rex 11 Ristorante for
some interiors and the Queen
Mary for main- more.
ure's three million dollar
apartment excedes one's expecta-
tions for the Taj M hal. The cam-
era goes tor all eic details, trom
the alabaster foyer to the glass
encased dressing room.
Scott's ettorts do not save a
shallow film, they merely inten-
sity an already intriguing one.
Anyone watching for a film that
makes a case tor cinema as art and
not merely an industry should
watch over this one.
ECU prof goes
on piano tour
Mendvnhjil Press Kclc4��
Pianist Paul Tardif, a member oi
the East Carolina L'niversitv
School of music keyboard faculty,
will present three recitals in east-
ern North Carolina during No-
vember.
Tardif will perform Nov. 13, at
8 pm at the Fishtowne Perform-
ance Hall in Beaufort; Nov. 15, at
3 pm at the Blount-Bridger 1 losue
in Tarboroand Nov. 18 at 8:15 pm
in the Recital Hall of ECU'S
Fletcher Music Center.
The Beaufort and Tarboro recit-
als are sponsored by local arts
councils. The recitals arc free and
open to the public.
Works to be performed include
Mozart's Adagio in B Minor, K.
540, the Schubert Sonata in A
Major, D. 664, Prokofieff'sSonata
No. 3 in A Minor, Opus 28; Ravel's
"Valscs nobles et sentimentales"
and three Rachmaninoff prel-
udes.
Since joining the ECU music
faculty in 1971, Tardif has main-
tained an active performing
schedule, with appearances at the
Spolcto Festival in Charleston, S.
C. and at the National Gallery and
N.C Art Museums. He has also
been pianist at Kennedy Center
honors galas.
using monochromatic greys.
The piece shown in this year's
ECU faculty show was less mono-
chromatic, loaded with very dy-
namic marks, shapes and colors.
Harris's concluding remarks
dealt with his viewson what life is
like for an artist. "One stands in a
stressful relationship to the world
tempramentaly and often finan-
cially. Being an artist stimulates
illusions, perversions, and gross
selfishness, and it often brings
dissappointment
"A painter works as if there
were nothing else in the world. 1 le
is in a state of (constant) prepared-
ness For himself 1 larris keeps -
like many artists before him - a
tered when standing in front ot a
Poussin painting he said. They
are very minute detailed analysis
of formal elements, color descrip-
tions, and connections between
all elements of each painting he
viewed.
Harris has also come to feel that
oil painting on a flat surface is the
"ultimate painting technique" to
him. This medium offers the artist
the only possibility for satisfac-
tion, his reason for painting. "The
satisfaction will never be com-
plete and is well beyond easy
reach the artist noted as a final
remark. Harris is continually
working toward his goals that
seem to take a lifetime to even
diary. His writings are only en- come close to.
immGBl DIttNER
An liiuahrthan Christmas iPrast!
rfirrrlrrt hi (fdmrlrs fflnurr
o star with Mimi Rogers in Ridley Scott's gothic police storySomeone to Watch Over Me now
CAROLINAr-r-
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center Is Open
Mon Tues, & Wed. Fri. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
9 a.m. - 2 p.m. & by appointment
1 1 1 East Third Street - The Lee Building
Greenville N. C.
Free Pregnancy Test-
Confidential Counseling
December 2-5, 1987, 7:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center Multi-Purpose Room
East Carolina University
Advance Ticket Sales Only Admission $16.00 fc Adults
$10.00 tor High School Youth and Under
For further information contact The Central T.cket Ot1.ce. Mendenhall Stu�efM
Center. East Carolina University. Greenville. NC 27858-4353. �1�757-��11.
ext 266.
Qjjfe A MSC PRODUCTION fjjjjfjfq
For an appointment or more infor-
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline,
757-0003
p smq a
215 E. 4th St.
752-2183
A COMH TTE MEAL ON A BUN
2 Locations
316 Greenville Blvd.
756-7171
of us for your
Halloween Party or
Tailgate Party
5 ft. Party Sub
stuffed with cheese and six
different meats. Topped with
lettuce, tomatoe, onions, salt,
pepper, oil, vinegar and oregano.
Comes with enough plates, cups,
napkins, chips, and Pepsi or tea.
(feeds 20-25 people)
Only $38.88
3 ft. Party Sub
Same as above
(feeds 10-15 people)
Only $21.88
THE STUDENT UNION
MAJOR CONCERTS
COMMITTEE PRESENTS
INCONCERT
ANITA BAKER
SUNDAY, NOV. 1,1987
8:00 MINGES COLISEUM
Tickets: $12.00 Students
$14.00 General Public
AVAILABLE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE MENDENHALL
STUDENT CENTER
AND
FLAMINGO RECORDS EVANS STREET GREENVILLE
fHIHTTT
, m i i IXX
Walkin" I hi Plank
WMWl
� 'num.
3
.
A $t; , i 4&f

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7
Influences
n standing in front or a
ainting, ho said Thcv
ite detailed analysis
foments, color descrip-
I connections between
ts ol each painting he
omc to feel that
i flat surface is the
itc to
rs!iii artist
t) for satisfac-
for painting 'The
n will never In com-
s m v II be ond easy
; not a: .is .i final
irris is continual! j
- goals that
ki a fetimo to even
Imas Jrrast!
ber 2-5. 1987. 7:00 p.m.
udent Center Multi-Purpose Room
olina University
and l ndei
ca Mendenaii Student
NC "858-4353. (919)757-�S11
JCTION rJnW
�-�l
JT UNION
VCERTS
"RESENTS
ERT
AKER
V. 1,1987
OLISEUM
Students
1 Public
OFFICE MENDENHALL
ENTER
STREET GREENVILLE
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 2, 1987 13
COMICS MGE
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.t





14
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN CXTnnFB 29. 1987
Wind Quintet
Mrndenhall Preu Rclru.
The Aspen Wind Quintet will
generate unprecedented excite-
ment in woodwind chamber
music when they appear in Hcn-
drix Theatre on the campus of
East Carolina University on
November 5. Their performance
is sponsored by the Department
of University Unions' Chamber
Music Series.
The Aspen Wind Quintet has
emerged as one of the most excit-
ing and promising young groups
of the decade. Their extensive and
varied repertoire includes works
from the Renaissance, Baroque,
Classical and Romantic Eras and
the Golden Age of French wind
music. They have also distin-
guished themselves as champi-
ons of new music.
Since winning the 1983 Artists'
International prize and the
Naumburg Chamber Music
Award in 1984, the Aspen Wind
Quintet has established a careerof
notable stature. Yet, their begin-
nings were quite informal. In
1978, they played together for
personal enjoyment and an occa-
sional concert while fulfilling
other professional obligations at
the Aspen Music Festival. In 1981,
they organized themselves as a
year-round ensemble, and later
became the first wind quintet to
be invited to join the chamber Raleigh News and Observer,
music faculty of the Aspen Music "The Aspen Wind Quintet is an
Festival.
According to the Washington
Post, "As individuals, the Aspen
The Aspen Wind Quintet will play Hendrix Theater on November 5. Tickets are available from the
Central Ticket office in Mendenhall, $6.00 general admission, $4.00 for ECU students.
Soviet fashion designer
opens first show in America
KTT714T VAni � T-� Ti 1 . �
NEW YORK (AP) - The Amcri
can debut of Raisa Gorbachev's
favorite couturier was heralded
as a historic marketing venture,
but for the Soviet fashion designer
it realized different dreams.
� Fasnionlslnbt business. It is a
jncans of self-expression said
Wiyacheslav ZaitseTwh� basked
in applause Tuesday night fol-
lowing the unveiling of his made-
in-America collection at the
swank Waldorf-Astoria hotel.
"I want to present all this
beauty to so many people who
hunger for it. It is important for
me to have this be a Russian be-
ginning
Zaitsev, the premier designer
for the Moscow House of Fashion,
creates costumes for the Bolshoi
Ballet as well as outfits for the
Soviet first lady.
"I am a Russian artist, filled
with Russian culture, folk tradi-
tions he said in an interview.
"But I am also a modern man
His American collection, for
spring 1988, featured well-
draped designs with a sophisti-
cated, Russian influence - mostlv
in black, white, charcoal or red,
with a sprinkling of springy, un-
structured cotton pastels.
Only his neon-colored, glitter-
studded party dresses diverted
from classical themes, some re-
vealing a flash of knee above
bubble-skirts.
"I would like to stress that there
is very little difference" between
Soviet and American tastes, Zait-
sev said through an interpreter.
"Women the world over all want
to be appealing
The same problems that excite
my clients excite other clients as
well: "beauty, asthttfcs, �he�a&
that clothes are varied he added.
"And we're all looking for com-
fortable apparel
The beaming, energetic de-
signer, wearing an electric-green
jacket and matching tic, sprinted
torg.
Since high duties on Soviet
goods make importing too costly,
the garments will be made with
American fabric by Tanner Com-
panies Inc a North Carolina
apparel manufacturer.
Tanner president James T. Tanj-
neVhacbntracted fora maximum
of 30 styles per season, or about
6,000 garments. He has projected
that the first year's sales could
total $750,000 to $1 million.
Zaitsev, whose salary is re-
ported at around $375 a month, or
onstage, waving his arms wildly about the price of one of his eve-
at the show's finale.
His fashions were brought here
by Tamara N. Kcrim, a 50-ycar-
old Russian-born business-
woman who was inspired after
attending a Zaitsev fashion show
in Moscow last January.
Her Sacramento, Calif com-
pany, Intertorg, signed a three-
year deal in Moscow with the
state trading organization to
make and sell Soviet fashions in
the United States. It was billed as
the first venture of its kind be-
tween the two countries.
"I knew it would be interesting
and unusual. But I honestly did
not anticipate it (interest in the
event) would be this broad she
said.
The fashions will be marketed
by the House of Zaitsev in San
Francisco, a subsidiary of Inter-
ning dresses, will receive a license
fee and royalties.
Asked whether his interna-
tional recognition was overdue,
the designer smiled and said,
"Yes But he added: "I didn't
wait. I worked
PARTY ANIMALS
fUllaoni Delivered In Caeunei
Gorilla-Cnm
Gator-Gnnv
Penquln for Hire
Birthday or any i
830-1823
Winds are all top calibre young
players, and as a group they are
exceptionally well-disciplined,
rhythmically in sync and sure of
their direction Included in the
group arc: Barli Nugent, flute;
Claudia Coonce, oboe; David
Krakauer, clarinet; Timothy
Ward, bassoon; Kaitilin Mahony,
hom.
The Quintet particularly enjoys
its collaboration with contempo-
rary composers, yet their per-
forming repertoire spans several
centuries. They have presented
innovative programs with such
notable artists as the late singer-
actress Martha Schlamme, tenor
Paul Sperry, the late cellist Claus
Adam, bass clarinetist Dennis
Smylie, and pianists Cipa Dichter,
Christopher ORilcy, and Mary
Louise Vetrano.
Some highlights of the Aspen
Wind Quintet repertoire include
Walden by Hans Abrahamsen,
one of Europe's foremost young
composers, In Mcmoriam by
David Sampson, written after the
death of Sampson's brother dur-
ing the uprising at Kent State
University, Raleigh Divertimento
by Pulitzer Prize winner, Robert
Ward, and many more.
From the concert halls of the
John F. Kennedy Center and Car-
negie Recital Hall to nationwide
broadcasts on National Public
Radio, the Quintet has received
rave reviews. According to the
11a.m. - 6 p.m. Ticket prices are
$6.00 for general admission, $5.00
ensemble with an exceptional for ECU staff and faculty and
blend and balance . . . their forte $4.00 for ECU students and youth
lies in the warm blend of diverse For tickets and more informa-
timbres, sharply articulated lively tion, call 757-661 l,ext. 266, during
rhythms and beautifully coordi- the above hours.
nated phrasing
Tickets for this performance can
be purchased at the Central Ticket
Office located in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, Monday-Friday,
The performance is sponsored
in part by a grant from the Na-
tional Endowment for the Arts,
Washington DC, a federal
agency.
Sott Contact Unses
Includes:
LensesCare KitFollow-up Care
For 30 Days
Eye Exam Additional
OD
Pa
OfTOMeiRK
�Y6CAR�C�KT�R
Dr.JolinC. Moliur
The Plaza Mall 756 9771
Bring Student I.D
ECU DEPARTMENT OF UNIVERSITY UNIONS
ALL-CAMPUS BILLIARDS TOURNAMENT
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3
6:30 PM MSC BILLIARDS CENTER
, tt s.
Trophies will be awartfedvv U A A
call 757-6611 for more information
a $2 entry fee is required by
5 pm Monday, November 2
WINNER WILL RECEIVE AN ALL
EXPENSE PAID TRIP TO fll JC
KNOXVILLE, TN TO COMPETE IN THE REGIONAL
TOURNAMENT
RESUMES
Professional Resume Composition
Atlantic Personnel Services
209 Commerce Street, Suite B
10 discount with this ad.
355-7931
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Expires 11 787 I
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"Greek Owned and Operated Since 1979"
SUBS, SANDWICHES, GREEK DISHES, SALADS
Call Us - Fast Free Delivery

Delivery Hours
Monday-Friday 4:00-11:00
Saturday & Sunday 11:00-11:00
752-0326 or 752-3753
560 Evans Street
Greenville, NC 27834
Stewe Streater
speaks on
ALCOHOL AWARENESS
in
Rm
at
7:30 p.m. Tonight
-Steve is a former U.N.C
Football player who is
presently the national
speaker for S.A.D.D.
Sponsored by BACCHUS
Grandmo
SUMMERLAN'D KEY. Fia
(AP) It's not listed inlhcYi
Pages, but for 20 years I
Draper's place has been an ,
for truckers who drive tl
seas highway to Key V.
There's ne "welcome
distinguish her weathcrb
mobile home from otl - in the
trailer park frc nting US 1 here
only the citizens band antenna on
the roof that links "Yankee Leu"
with truckers passing by
"Thi

Draper r
� �
the

And. We ii
VCR. �
Coin
� 5 �;vq
� -
Ginseng root
Ginseng is hard to find, hul
prices at more than
pound there is no
people looking.
"In many areas I
plant hasbivnduN ngil
almost imp to find
Teena Scchlcr, a pul
tion officer for I
HooaerNati �
ern Indiana
the Wayne Nat Foi
southern Ohio, Ms. S
from her office in B II rd
The Forest Service
vesting of the plan: �
parts of Asia as Mr. � �
and cure-all, in a!l itsfoi
harvest times differ froi
state. In Indiana, it ma)
vested from Aug 15 tl �
31.
Ginseng grows w ild in the �
ern United States and .
primarily in
can get $130 per pound for I
dried root of wild plan �'
grown in plots it brings I
to $50 because of the be I . 11 it
wild root is more potent.
In China, g I in
such herbal remedies as
cry of Youth Pills" and 'T
Nourishment and Nerve Stal
Medicine" made at the Hangzhou
No. 2 medicine factor)
Hangzhou. One pr duct
seng-royal jelly tonic, is said to be
therapeutic for heart disi
thntis, anemia, gastric ul -
hepatitis and early senility. Then
JVJFZ. disguise
fools bartender
LA CROSSE, Wis. AP) - It hap-
pened two weeks ago, but Mike
Weber says he's still getting
ribbed about the day a stranger
stopped at his tavern and intro-
duced himself as Damn Nelson,
the Minnesota Vikings running
back.
Weber says the stranger ex-
plained that he just had to gel
away from Minneapolis and the
National Football League plavers
strike. The man "laid a pile of
money on the bar" and ordered a
beer, Weber said.
The man bought a drink tor the
house; other customers recipro-
cated. Weber and a customer, Dan
Kelly, accompanied the man to
another tavern.
"Pretty soon people were there
with cameras, and he was holding
up little kids to have their pictures
taken Weber said.
Weber and some of his custom-
ers wined and dined the man,
who reciprocatc-d by buying them
dinner with borrowed money. He
was loaned about $200. He prom-
ised some of his new-found fans
tickets to the World Series. Others
were promised tickets for a Vi-
kings-Grcen Bay Packers game
Kelly said he became suspi-
cious while out for dinner with
the man. There was a resem-
blance he said, but the man was
not Darrin Nelson.
A call to a Vikings public rela-
tions assistant confirmed that the
real Darrin Nelson had not left
Minneapolis.
The police were called in and
visited the man's hotel. The man
didn't have identification but
gave a name different from
Nelson's, said he was from Min-
neapolis and hadn't been using
Nelson's name, Detective Joe
Dunham said.
"His hotel bill was paid, and as
far as we could figure out, he
hadn't broken any laws Dun-
ham said.
Kelly said he called the man at
his hotel Oct. 15, the third morn-
ing he was in town, and told him
Weber was looking for him. After
that, the man checked out and left
town.
Weber, interviewed at the tav-
ern, said his customers have been
getting their digs in by announc-
ing on arrival that, I'm Lynn
Dickey or saying, "Hi, I'm Sid-
ney Moncrief
For inform!
who taj
Ink
yoi
ARM






t Hendrix
I Observer, Ha m b p.m. Ticket prices are
: in jn So 00 tor general admission, $5.00
for ECU tatt and faculty, and
their forte 54 00 for ECU studentsand youth.
f vr tickets and more lnforma-
57-661 l.cxt 2u-�,during
the above hours
The performance is sponsored
in part by a grant from the Na-
tional Endowment tor the Arts,
A tshington PC a federal
"5
Contact Lenses
Includes:
Can Kit Follow-up Care
For 30 Davs
Additional
OPTOMeTWC
CAR�C�KT�R
Ur John Moln.tr
lie Pfaza Mall 7771
Bring Student ID
VIVERSm UNIONS
PS TOURNAMENT
EMBER 3
ARDS CENTER
(beawartJedlMV u .11I
re information
'red by
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 29,1987 15
2
iCEIVEAN ALL
ID TRIP TO fRSC
ETE IN THE REGIONAL
MENT
reater
:s on
ARENESS
1 Rm 244
Tonight
rmer U.N.C.
yer who is
e national
S.A.D.D.
BACCHUS
Grandmother plays nurse to highway knights
SUMMERLAND KEY, Fla.
(AP) It's not listed in the Yellow
Pages, but for 20 years Eloise
Draper's place has been an oasis
for truckers who drive the Over-
seas highway to Key West.
There's no "welcome" sign to
distinguish her weatherbeaten
mobile home from others in the
trailer park fronting U.S. 1 here
only the citizens band antenna on
the roof that links "Yankee Leu"
with truckers passing by.
"There's no one in the world
who doesn't like her said John
Ogden Jr a Miami trucker whose
radio handle is "Gemini
"Yankee Leu will help you in
any kind of emergency - day or
night added Ogden, who has
driven the Key West route for 28
years.
With yellow emergency lights
mounted on top of her rusty sta-
tion wagon, the 72-year-old Mrs.
Draper responds to truckers
stranded on the two-lane road-
way during the early morning
hours.
"I've got every kind of tool they
ever made in my station wagon
laughed Mrs. Draper, standing
amid a collection of truckers'
paraphernalia in her cluttered
home.
A couple dozen hats, souvenirs
of truckers, are piled on a couch
not far from the microphone and
four radios she uses to communi-
Ginseng root expensive harvest
Ginseng ishard to find,but with
prices at more than $100 per
pound there is no shortage of
people looking.
In many areas of the forest the
plant has been dug so long that it's
almost impossible to find said
Tecna Sechlcr, a public informa-
tion officer for the 188,000-acre
1 loosier National Forest in south-
ern Indiana. The same is true in
the Wayne National Forest .n
southern Ohio, Ms. Sechlcr said
from her office in Bedford, Ind.
The Forest Service allows har-
vesting of the plant, regarded in
parts of Asia as an aphrodisiac
and cure-all, in all its forests, but
harvest times differ from state to
state. In Indiana, it may be har-
vested from Aug. 15 through Dec.
31.
Ginseng grows wild in the east-
em United States and is cultivated
primarily in Wisconsin. Hunters
can get $130 per pound for the
dried root of wild plants. When
grown in plots it brings only $30
to $50 because of the belief that the
wild root is more potent.
In China, ginseng is used in
such herbal remedies as "Recov-
ery of Youth Pills" and "Blood
Nourishment and Nerve Stability-
Medicine" made at the Hangzhou
No. 2 medicine factory in
Hangzhou. One product, gin-
seng-royal jelly tonic, is said to be
therapeutic for heart disease, ar-
thritis, anemia, gastric ulcers,
hepatitis and early senility. Then
there is Ginseng Cola, produced
in the region of northern China
formerly known as Manchuria.
The chalky root has also joined
coconut oil, walnut leaves and
extract oi placenta as a shampoo
ingredient in the United States.
A woman from the Detroit sub-
urb of Warren even came up with
a ginseng-based cocktail in a non-
alcoholic drink contest sponsored
by the Auto Club of Michingan
last December. Isabel Noble made
her drink, the Isabella, by adding
Vernor's ginger ale to ginseng tea.
"I'm an agnostic when it comes
to ginseng said James A. Duke,
an economic botanist for the fed-
eral Agriculture Department's
Agricultural Research Service in
the Washington suburb of
Beltsville, Md. "I'm not convinced
that it actually does any good, but
I'm growing a little (of the plant)
just in case
One theory is that ginseng may
be an adaptogen, a substance that
increases the body's ability to deal
with disease and other external
threats.
Duke says any herbal medicine
faces substantial economic
hurdles. "The problem is that in
the United States it costs $125
million to prove that a drug is safe
and efficacious he said, citing a
trade journal called Chemical
Marketing Reporter. "How
would a drug company benefit
from proving that, if you and I
could go out and harvest our
NFL disguise f fluffy
own?"
This year's harvest of wild and
cultivated ginseng is expected to
bring nearly $41.7 million, ac-
cording the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service. Estimates are that 1.3
million pounds of cultivated and
110,000 pounds oi wild ginseng
will be harvested.
Finding the plant it can take
350 to produce 1 pound of root
often entails exhausting searches
through rough terrain. Hunters
generally check shady, well-
drained areas oi hardwood for-
ests. The plants are 8 to 20 inches
tall and usually have several
leaves, each with five leaflets.
Only mature plants, distin-
guished because they have four or
more fronds, should be picked,
the U.S. Forest Service says.
Smaller ones will have underde-
veloped roots and will be almost
worthless. No permit is required
to harvest ginseng of Forest Serv-
ice lands, but pickers are urged to
replant seeds tound in the plant's
berries to ensure another ginseng
generation.
Ginseng is not an endangered
species, but its export is con-
trolled by a 1975 treaty signed by
94 countries.
"There's a question about
whether the plant is endangered
because oi (international) trade
said Ron Singer, senior biologist
for the Federal Wildlife Permit
Offire in Arlington. Va.
cate with drivers. Magazines,
comic novelties and sundries left
by her many CB friends are every-
where.
A microwave is filled with
cookies and snacks for visitors
and the top of her refrigerator is
covered with first-aid items and
medications.
Ice tea is available and near the
sink is the coffee maker that is
always on. Next to it arc stacks of
coffee mugs.
"Each one has their own cup
Mrs. Draper explained, showing
nicknames to identify them.
Many of Mrs. Draper's visitors
have become more than acquain-
tances since she first went on the
airin 1968 when hcrhusband, Bill,
died. Her first radio was a gift
from her son "something to keep
me busy
A grandmother, she serves as a
mother figure and counselor for
many of the men. Photos of driv-
'Bad' is theme
song for Pepsi
NEW YORK (AP) - Michael
Jackson is back on tour and back
promoting Pepsi.
A pair of commercials featuring
Jackson will debut Friday and
Saturday on MTV, both backed by
the song, "Bad the title cut from
his new album, Alan Pottasch,
Pepsi senior vice president, said
Tuesday.
The first ad is a 90-second piece
featuring Jackson performing; the
second is a 60-second spot in
which Jackson meets a young fan
backstage.
The ads will be on network and
local television Sunday. Jackson
and his brothers did a pair of
Pepsi commercials in 1984 during
their "Victory Tour
The singer's fee for the ads was
not disclosed.�
An anonymous saying has it
that "Good luck is a lazy man's
estimate of a worker's success
fools bartender
LA CROSSE, Wis. (AP) - It hap-
pened two weeks ago, but Mike
Weber says he's still getting
ribbed about the day a stranger
stopped at his tavern and intro-
duced himself as Damn Nelson,
the Minnesota Vikings running
back.
Weber says the stranger ex-
plained that he just had to get
away from Minneapolis and the
National Football League players'
strike. The man "laid a pile of
money on the bar" and ordered a
beer, Weber said.
The man bought a drink for the
house; other customers recipro-
cated. Weber and a customer, Dan
Kelly, accompanied the man to
another tavern.
"Pretty soon people were there
with cameras, and he was holding
up little kids to have their pictures
taken Weber said.
Weber and some of his custom-
ers wined and dined the man,
who reciprocated by buying them
dinner with borrowed money. He
was loaned about $200. He prom-
ised some of his new-found fans
tickets to the World Scries. Others
were promised tickets for a Vi-
kings-Green Bay Packers game.
Kelly said he became suspi-
cious while out for dinner with
the man. "There was a resem-
blance he said, but the man was
not Darrin Nelson.
A call to a Vikings public rela-
tions assistant confirmed that the
real Darrin Nelson had not left
Minneapolis.
The police were called in and
visited the man's hotel. The man
didn't have identification but
gave a name different from
Nelson's, said he was from Min-
neapolis and hadn't been using
Npc name, Detective Joe
Lunham said.
"His hotel bill was paid, and as
far as we could figure out, he
hadn't broken any laws Dun-
ham said.
Kelly said he called the man at
his hotel Oct. 15, the third morn-
ing he was in town, and told him
Weber was looking for him. After
that, the man checked out and left
town.
Weber, interviewed at the tav-
ern, said his customers have been
getting their digs in by announc-
ing on arrival that, "I'm Lynn
Dickey or saying, "Hi, I'm Sid-
ney Moncrief
We pay Cash For Anything
Gold or Silver
And. We also buy Stem's, T.Vs,
V.C.R. s, Furniture, Uikes, etc.
Coin & Ring Man
10.00 5:00 (MF)
10 OO 3.00 Sat.
400 S Evans
7B3-38S6
CAN
"Let Us Dress You Up
This Halloween"
Vintage Clothing,
Jewelry, & Collections
116 E. 5th Street
919-752-1750
Ringgold Towers
Offering
$150.00 Reward
For information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person
who tampered with Fire Equipment at Ringgold Towers,
on Thursday, October 22,1987
Information will be kept confidential.
Call 752-2865
The most exciting
few hours
you'll spend all week.
Run. Climb. Rappel. Navigate. Ivead.
And develop the confidence and
skills vou won't get from a textbook.
Enroll in Army ROTC
as one of your electives. Get the facts
today.
For More Information Contact:
Capt. Mitchell 757-6967
ARMY RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
ersand their families arc pasted to
the refrigerator.
She speaks affectionately of
"Little Skunk whose son was
shot and is a paraplegic; and
"Grasshopper who survived a
severe heart attack and bypass
surgery.
Mrs. Draper has visited the
homes of many of the truckers
and she carries pictures of their
children in her wallet.
Her hospitality and kindness
aren't confined to truckers, how-
ever.
She's a teacher's aide at a local
school, helps in community fund
drives, and collects aluminum
cans to cuild an addition at Big
Pine Methodist Church.
Mrs. Draper takes neighbor-
hood shut-ins shopping and visits
the elderly confined to rest homes
as far away as Key West, 25 miles
to the south.
Truckers bring her used cloth-
ing which she distributes to less
fortunate families living in the
Lower Keys. Canned goods, day-
old bakery products and fresh
vegetables and fruit are left at
Yankee Leu's to help the poor.
On her wooden porch are two
open boxes where these food-
stuffs arc kept.
"I ask people to take only what
they need she explained. "I'll
help anyone if they try to help
themselves
A native of Muskcgon, Mich
she explained her radio handle:
"Leu was my maiden name and
being from Michigan, what else
could I be but a Yankee
Mrs. Draper shuns praise.
"I want no thanks she said,
"and if a trucker left money on the
table, he wouldn't be invited
back
'Too bad there aren't more like
her said Ogden.
Wierd, Wild, Colorful
Halloween Clothes
�pafrte
GonS
A little bit of everything!
CLOTHES
At
The Coin & Ring Man
10:00-5:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 Sat. 400 S. Evans 752-3866
CAREER SEMINAR
GIVEN BY

SHERWOOD CAPITAL, INC
frw
A NATIONAL STOCK BROKERAGE FIRM
A CAREER IN THE STOCK MARKET
LEARN HOW YOU CAN ENTER THE EXCITING AND LUCRATIVE
WORLD OF THE PROFESSIONAL STOCKBROKER. DUE TO EXPAN-
SION WE ARE SEEKING CREATIVE, INTELLIGENT INDIVIDUALS
WITH AN INTEREST IN THE FINANCIAL SERVICES INDUSTRY. IF
YOU HAVE SALES ABILITY, AND ARE SEEKING AN ENVIRONMENT
THAT WILL ALLOW YOU TO GROW:
COME SEE US
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2ND
6:00 P.M.
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
ROOM 248
Interested students may send resume to:
SHERWOOD CAPITAL, INC.
ATTN: George Hubbard
621 Lynnhaven Parkway Suite 220
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23452
PHONE - (804) 498-1100
SHERWOOD CAPITAL, INC.
ATTN: James R. Guntie, Jr.
5113 Leesburg PikeSuite 206
Falls Church, Virginia 22041
PHONE-(703) 845-4200
TOLL FREE - (800) 368-5038
(Washington, DC. area)
SHERWOOD CAPITAL, INC
ATTN: Mark Brackett
7202 Glen Forest Drive 2nd floor
Richmond, Virginia 23226
PHONE - (804) 288-9090
�n i'�a�ia� �i awawpiiKui m
m -wihiip liftujp
- - :
i





16
THE EAST CARPI INJAN
IKTOBFR 20. 1987
)


X

BLOOM COUNTY
by Berke Breathed
UNION THU&5 VAfJPAL l(C
ftettuN comic by
XMWUNO AN AN! I
wNf�)�mjr o�X(ni'v
MrniN me miwork to
These ink MtiptNO
TtRROKlSrs mete cm
pe pur ONE GESf&ttt .
net(HTfh�;
VtblLAHtt
FURTHER
KecpntL
' P?STtn
Voice students in opera scenes
I ur voice students in
Carolina University
dusic were featured on
pera 1 heater's annual
nes program on cam-
and Delilah Donizetti's "L'EIisir lina pcrformano
d'Amore" and Stravinsky's "The "Les Mamelles de ! i
Rake's Progress Ibert's "An�
The ECU Opera Theater, di- the ECU Opera TheaU
rected by Dr. Clyde Hiss of the the world premiere i
IC U School of Music voice fac-
ulty, presents evenings of opera
us presented scenes
n well-known operas:
Britten's "Peter
'ossini's "Italian Girl in
and "Cinderella
loore's "Ballad of Baby
tint-Saens" "bamson
scenes each fall and a full opera
production each spring.
ECU voice students have per-
formed such operatic fare as 'The
Magic Flute "Falstaff "Die
Fledermaus" and "Cosi fan
Tutte" as well as first North Caro-
Kosteck'
southeastern premii -
1 lagemann's "The Music Cure
1 he I lagemann opera
formed by the 1 (. UOp
with the composer conducti
last November in Los Angeles
invitation tor the annual c rw
tion of the National Opera As
ciation.
ing Friday
Lost Boys -R
Like Father, Jilcn
Son-PG-13
Someone to r;iffh
Over Me- R
nc
Starts Friday
Holl-Rnisor - R
$1.50 All Times
fromi-
Greenville's Only
Premium
Quality Cleaners
Since 1935
have 2 sweatcfs TfJndered Shirt
or skirts cleaned;
3RD PAIR CLEANED J Special
freeL-JSJForZJML
111 W. 10TH ST.
Expires October 31. 1987 corner of iothevans
Coupon must be presented with incoming order
C3
r?
ibrar
i
K
fi

X
f

Lj
��3
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leading the way among Pirate ' 1
scorers thus tar this seas r
45. He has been perfect on ll-oi
Hish and inside
Mollov reml
BvPATMOLUn
Re Jfnl Kv -jt V h 1
For about .1 century now .
with a surplus ol pent-up
sion � and women wil 1 1 stra
dose ol testosterone � have 1� 1
playing a game called fool
The word football deri' s
the Latin root Split! 11
umolous meaninghavir
headacheMiss) V 1
The game itself derives fi m
somewhere in the Mid
where the number of vs
pent-up aggression fai
the number of worn r
relieve it. Hence the is wet
forced into banging eachV1 iiiv
heads, as it were.
The inclination to plaj 1
is instilled in a child
�till quite young. Mar
I remember my father telling
in the huddle to go aV irvr
"Run 15 steps and turn left
dad said; 'When you
around, the ball will N
Inevitable, 1 would wait fc
count, run mv pass route turn
around to catch the ball and
promptly receive a blow tt
head that would make Mike Ij
son want to sell shoes.wear theij
I was never keen on hand eyebest J
coordination.kne
But then take someone likeNext in
Barth Cinderblock. Barth was mvMow e
next door neighbor, and the Stevegray mat!
Largent of the fifth grade Heunderstan
could catch a ball when it was in1 ve reach
another time zone. Brent
Musbergcr and Jimmy The Greek
would have called Barth a childin a v
prodigy. I have my own theoriesor not thij






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C1987. Zenith DaU Syitemj
THE EAST CAROI INIAN
Sports
OCTOBLR 29, 1987 Pjge 17
Pirates readying for
Hurricanes' arrival
Several Pirates shine in last week's defeat
-JjerJitil�fcUI
leading the way among Pirate
scorers thus far this season with
45. He has been perfect on 11 -of-
xtmift
ce&&
14 i)Id goal attempts this season
and even better, a splendid four-
of-five from 40 to 49 yards out.
Coin' Through The Air- After
a drought dating back to last sea-
son with no touchdown passes,
the Pirates have picked up scoring
tosses in its last two contests.
Travis Hunter teamed up with
fullback Tim James on a 74-yard
strike against Virginia Tech and
backup Charlie Libretto flipped a
two-yard pass to Walter Wilson
against South Carolina.
Back and Forth - Incidentally,
Wilson mmoved ahead of re-
ceiver Ron Jones last week as the
Pirates' leading pass catcher of
the season. The two have been
battling it out for the top spot for
the past few weeks. Wilson cur-
rently has 12 grabs for 185 yards,
while Jones has hauled in 11 for
157 yards.
Blame It On The Clipping -
Junior Robinson almost pulled off
the big one last Saturday. The
sophomore cornerback picked off
a Todd Ellis pass late in the first
half of last week's game and
rambled 76 yards to the endzone,
including a brilliant cut back
across the field. But, the bad news
was the play was brought back
due to a clipping penalty. Maybe
next time, Junior.
Knocking 'Em Down - Al-
though Ellis turned in a record-
setting passing performance last
Saturday, the Pirate defensive
line had some fun of its own. Jun-
ior defensive end Walter Bryant
sacked Ellis twice as did sopho-
more end Mike Applewhite. Sen-
ior Medrick Rainbow and junior
Shannon Boling also got in on the
action with one sack apiece.
�Tim Chandler
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport Idilor
East Carolina, which has faced a
season full of tough challenges,
meets its stiffest competition thus
far Saturday in Miami, (FL).
The Hurricanes, ranked third
nationally in both the AP and L'Pl
polls, will invade FicklenStadium
for a 12:10 p.m. contest. The game
will be telecast regionally by the
Raycom Sports Network.
Tiratc head coach Art Baker
knows his team is facing a pow-
erful opponent in the Hurricanes.
"It doesn't take a Phi Beta
Kappa to realize they're a great
team Baker said. "They're obvi-
ously one of the best teams in the
country
Even so, Baker and his players
are going about practice this week
with a positive attitude.
"Football is a strange game
Baker said. "I have always be-
lieved that anything can happen
in a football game. I'm not going
into practice this week preparing
for a loss. That's something 1
wouldn't know how to do. You've
always got to think you can win
But, Baker added that the Pi-
rates would not be able to win the
game by using trick or gadgets in
the playbook.
"We're going to keep it simple
and just try to execute the basic
fundamentals Baker said. "Mi-
ami is not the tvpeof team you can
beat by going out there and trying
to fool them. For us to win, they
(Miami) will have to make some
mistakes - and that is possible
Noseguard Medrick Rainbow
seems to feel the whole team is
looking towards the Halloween
Day matchup positively.
"Everybody is fired up about
playing them Rainbow said. "It
definitely is not going to take
anything from the coaches to get
us fired up and ready
But, at the same time, Rainbow
is realistic about the Pirates'
chances.
"It's (the opportunity to win) is
going to take a total team effort
Rainbow said. "We'll have to
eliminate the little things that
have caused us problems in the
past
Receiver Don Gavlor agreed.
"We've )ust got to go out in
practice this week and get our
mind readv and then go out and
beat them Saturday C.avlor said.
"I look at the Miami game as a
great challange and a great chance
to go out and prove ourselves
That all sounds fine, but looking
at the game on paper makes the
Pirates' assignment seem awful
rough.
The 1 lurricants, vho will come
into Ficklen as the highest ranked
team ever to plav there, have not
lost a regular season game in their
last 2f outings
Miami has also made mince-
meat over two well-known oppo-
nents this season in moving to 5-0.
The Hurricanes rolled past Flor-
ida, 31-4, and crushed Arkansas
on the road. 51-7. They also beat
Florida State (26-25), a team that
ripped the Pirates in Ficklen 44-3
the second week of the season.
But, Baker has not been in hid-
ing, he is aware of all of this.
"I believe our players are going
to react real well to the loss (34-
12 at South Carolina last week)
Baker said, "it's just too bad that
they have to come back against a
team as good as Miami. But, it is a
home game and 1 rust feel that
they are going to plav well.
"I think they t Miami) are better
than Florida State or South Caro-
lina Baker continued. 'Thev
probably have the best receiving
corps in the country
Perhaps no one has the answer
right now for how the game will
go, but no one can argue with
Baker's assessment
"If Miami plays their best and
we plav our best, then we will
probably get beat Baker said.
"But, if Miami slips a little - and
they might - and we plav our best
- which we haven't vet - then I
think we can win
It sounds like a lot o( ifs and
maybes, but if there was ever a
day for freaky and crazy things to
come into ruling, it is Halloween.
After all, a lot of the ghosts that
rome on Halloween are some of
the original Pirates.
Booters record first shutout
High and inside
Molloy remembers football
By PAT MOLLOY
Resident Football A Italy id
For about a century now, guys
with a surplus of pent-up aggres-
sion � and women with a stray
dose of testosterone � have been
playing a game called football.
The word football derives from
the Latin root "Splitonious Crani-
umolous meaning "real bad
headache
The game itself derives from
somewhere in the Midwest,
where the number of guys with
pent-up aggression far outweighs
the number of women willing to
relieve it. Flence, the fellas were
forced into banging each others'
heads, as it were.
The inclination to play football
is instilled in a child while he is
still quite young. Many is the time
I remember my father telling me
in the huddle to go down and out.
"Run 15 steps and turn left my
dad said; "When you turn
around, the ball will be there
Inevitably, I would wait for the
count, run my pass route, turn
around to catch the ball, and
promptly receive a blow to the
head that would make Mike Ty-
son want to sell shoes.
I was never keen on handeye
coordination.
But then take someone like
Barth Cinderblock. Barth was my
next door neighbor, and the Steve
Urgent of the fifth grade. He
could catch a ball when it was in
another time zone. Brent
Musbergcr and Jimmy The Creek
would have called Barth a child
prodi gy. I have my own theories
about people like him.
You see, while I was going out
for those passes, and getting
"Spalding" indelibly tattooed on
my icc, Barth was laughing by
the oak tree awaiting his turn.
There wasn't anything he
couldn't catch. Trying to pass
block Barth was a worse fate than
having to play spin the bottle with
Missy Newbomb � and nobody
in his right mind wanted that job.
Eventually, I realized the only
way to stop Barth from catching
the ball was to give him some-
where else to put his hands. In-
geniously, I introduced Barth to
Missy.
And Missy soon introduced
Barth to Missy.
I never heard of Barth after that
afternoon, but when the light hits
him just right, Pete Axthelm looks
just like Barth Cinderblock. So
much for your child prodigies.
After sand lot football comes
high school football. Nobody re-
ally cares about high school foot-
ball, save for guys who can't pass
algebra, and real horny cheer-
leaders. The players enjoy game
day though because they get to
wear their jerseys to class. The
best things in life are free, ya
know.
Next in line is college football.
Now I've clouded quite a bit of
gray matter in an attempt to
understand this phenomenon.
I've reached the conclusion that
"ours is not to reason why
Collegiate football players exist
in a world all their own. Whether
or not this is bad is left to your
discretion � I would never at-
tempt to prejudice public opinion.
Take the AU-American full back
from Wazoo U, Vinnie "straight-
jacket" Bambini. Vinnie is in his
fifth year at Wazoo, studying
criminal pathology. Ask Vinnie
what he thinks his team's chances
are against OSU, and Vinnie re-
plies: "Well, you know, coach say
we got to buckle down and shit,
you know; but like, you know if
we play as a team, well, you know
� say, home boy, you got a
light?"
Well, then again, maybe Vinnie
isn't a particularly ideal represen-
tative of the student athlete. For a
clearer picture, perhaps we
should speak to a more upright
person in the collegiate football
hierarchy.
Hold tight, for we are about to
venture into the world of the
collegiate booster.
Spotting a booster is pretty
easy, once you get the hang of it.
Just look for a rich guy in a Mer-
cedes handing a manila envelope
to a mountain in a Porsche.
There's one now. Lef s get a
word with him.
"Excuse me, sir. May we speak
to you about Wazoo U's chances
against OSU?"
"Uh, are ya'll boys with the FBI,
the CIA, the KGB, or the campus
cops?"
"No sir, we're just interested
citizens
"No problem, boys. Well, you
know, coach say we got to buckle
down and shit
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sports Writer
There was a shutout at East
Carolina's Varsity Soccer Field
Wednesday afternoon, but for the
first time this season, it was the
Pirates who slammed the door as
they defeated Greensboro Col-
lege 2-0.
Wednesday marked ECU'S last
home match of the 1987 season
and their third home victory.
The win boosted the Pirates to
3-13 and helped bring an end to a
three-game losing streak. Prior to
Wednesday's match, the Pirates
had not scored a goal since their 3-
1 win over St. Andrews College,
Oct. 12.
Jeff Corson broke open a score-
less tie at the 38 minute mark in
the second half on an assist from
Robert Larrison.
Larrison, with only one minute
remaining in the contest, scored
the other Pirate goal on an assist
from Jeff Kime.
Corson, now with three goals,
leads the Pirates in scoring and
Larrison is the assist leader with
four.
"We got off to a bad start, but we
didn't quit head coach Charley
Harvey said. "We played
Reminder
Greensboro's game in the first
half
ECU fired 21 shots at goal dur-
ing the match, while limiting
Greensboro to only 14.
"After we scored, we got our
confidence and began to play our
game Harvey said.
East Carolina goal keeper Scott
McCollough tallied eight saves in
garnering his first collegiate shut-
out.
The Pirates have one match
remaining on their schedule. That
contest will be played at North
Carolina Weslevan, Nov. 3.
Time change
The starting time for the East
Carolina-Miami (Fl.) football
game scheduled this Saturday,
Oct. 31 has been changed to 12:10
p.m. as announced earlier.
The game, which originally was
slated to kickoff at 1.30 p.m. in
Ficklen Stadium, was moved to
accomodate a television contract
for the contest.
The game will be televised live
by the Raycom Sports Network
on a regional basis in Florida and
across the southeast.
(Photo by Mar Startari - ECU Photo Lab"
The action was heated during the Pirate soccer team's 2-0 shutout victory
over Greensboro College at the Varsity Field Tuesday.
fi000mtmmmi0� w��n "�� wwx nm����' � �
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;





t
18 THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 29, 1987
Weight
Weight training is just one of the
many activities that individuals
may participate in to build a
toned, strong body. However, for
the novice, just walking in to a
weight room may be a formid-
dable experience.
In an effort to help individuals
interested in beginning a weight
training program of their own,
Intramural-Recreational Services
is offering a beginning weight
training workshop.
The workshop will introduce
participants to principles and
techniques of fixed weight train-
ing programs.
A general orientation, maxi-
mum strength testing, and super-
vised workout will be the content
of the three session workshop.
Session dates have been set for
Nov. 10, 12, & 14.
Registration for the workshop
will be held Nov. 2-6 from 9 a.m
4 p.m. in room 204 Memorial
Gym.
Students will be charged $3.00
and a $5.00 charge has been as-
sessed for faculty, and staff. For
additional information, call 757-
6387.
For those individuals working
out on their own, Intramural-Rec-
reational Services offers three fa-
cilities for weight training pur-
poses. A variety of weight train-
ing equipment is available for
participants by presenting a valid
ECU identification card on arri-
val.
The facility in Memorial Gym-
nasium is open 10 a.m9 p.m.
Monday-Thursday with hours of
operation available over the
weekends.
The facility has recently been
Ice Hockey Club victorious
By DREW BOURQUE
Spetiai la The Im CuolinUa
The ECU Ice Hockey team trav-
eled to Cary Monday and came
from behind in the third period to
defeat the Cary All-Stars 8-5.
ECU got off to a slow start fall-
ing behind 3-0 after the initial
period, but started to roll when
Dean Gentile suprised Cary's
goaltendcr with a slapshot from
the right point. Only 15 seconds
later, Ryan Walton broke down
the right side and put his shot past
the Carv- defenders for ECU's sec-
ond goal.
Alan Rutledge tipped a Drew
Bourque shot in to start the scor-
ing in the final period tying the
game at three. Two minutes later
Cary pulled ahead 4-3 and then
scored again 35 seconds later to
take a 5-3 lead. The lead lasted
until the final five minutes of the
game when ECU started a flurry
of unanswered goals.
Chris Gormley started the scor-
ing by pushing the puck past
sprawling Cary defends in front
of the Cary net.
Roscoe Flotkin tied the score
with a wrist shot from the slot
with 3:53 remaining. Twenty-six
seconds later Drew Bourque took
the puck down from center ice
beating Cary defenders to put
ECU ahead to stay.
An insurance goal was added
when Mike Anderson tucked the
puck between the pads of an
embarrassed Cary goalie. Cap-
ping the scoring off was Eddie
Winiki beating Cary's goaltender
up in the right side of the net.
David Kern, Chris Santos and
George "The Belly" Sunderland
along with goalie Ruiz Emory
backed the scoring up with a
tough defensive game.
ECU will be back on the ice to
face the Cary men's league Nov.
17th in Cary.
renovated and provides partici-
pants with a novel atmosphere for
attaining maximum weight train-
ing goals.
Adjacent to Minges Coliseum
basketball courts is yd a second
facility for weight lovers. The
Minges weight room has also
been renovated to satisfy student,
faculty and staff needs and pro-
vides individuals with fixed and
free weight set ups.
Hours tor the facility may vary
in accordance with program
needs, but have been designated
travel
to foreign
lands
on a Monday, Wednesday, & Fri-
day basis from 8 a.mlO p.m. The
weight room is also open on Sun-
day for weekend enthusiast.
West Campus residents are
invited to participate in the new-
est recreational facility available.
The Garrett weight room is now
open to all faculty, staff and stu-
dents with presentation of a valid
ECU identification card.
A variety of Universal stations
and free weights are available for
utilization. Additional equip-
ment and accessories will be
added throughout the year.
The Department of Intramural-
Rccrcational Services wants all
East Carolinians to strive toward
gaining maximum health benefits
and help in 'building a better
body
Be a part of the piogram.
Ruggers roll past Duke, 21-6
By BOB TOBIN
Special to The .mt Cjfoliniu
The ECU Rugby Club moved to
4-0 Saturdav bv defeating the
Duke Blue Devils 21-6.
The Ruggers, who were coming
off a two-week break in the sea-
son, played sluggish in the first 20
minutes. Midway through the
first half Duke capitalized on an
ECU penalty to lead 3-0. Duke
would never again have the lead,
however as the Tirates retaliated
with a just assist from Steve Kimm
Parade
honors
Twins
ST. PAUL, Minn. (AD - A mo-
torcade carrying members of the
World Series champion Minne-
sota Twins inched through a bliz-
zard of confetti and rice as hun-
dreds of thousands of deliriously
happy fans jammed city streets to
glimpse and touch their heroes.
"I could cry. That is so nice I
could cry team owner Carl
Tohlad said as he rode at the head
of the parade Tuesday.
With 17,500 pounds of confetti
and untold reams of toilet paper
drifting from skyscrapers onto
the parade route, two convert-
ibles carrying Twins players
caught fire.
"Flames were coming out of the
sides said catcher Sal Butcra. He
said hot engine manifolds
sparked the fires under his car
and one occupied by pitcher
George Frazier.
No one was reported injured. A
third confetti fire broke out under
a parked convertible just after the
Twins arrived at the parade-end-
ing rally at the state Capitol, but
State Patrol troopers
extinguished it.
Police estimated that more than
200,000 fans turned out for the
start of the parade in Minneapolis.
Its arrival in St. Paul was delayed
by more than an hour because
fans slowed progress to a stop-
and-go crawl.
Some officers had their toes run
over by cars in the motorcade as
they struggled to buffer the press-
ing crowd. Fans stood on traffic
lights at nearly every intersection,
where the masses were up to 50
deep. Construction workers
waved from girders nearly 60 sto-
ries high, and people hung from
openings in parking ramps and
office buildings.
"It makes you want to start
playing again tomorrow so you
can do it again next year said
pitcher Bert Blyleven, who like
many of his teammates was
wrapped in a knee-length fur
coat. "If s the best recognition that
any club could ever want
As the parade headed east on an
eight-mile stretch of freeway be-
tween the two cities, fans waved
from nearly every overpass.
to Parish Nichols, who went over
for the game's first try. ECU led 6-
3 at the half.
The ECU Ruggers opened the
second half on fire scoring on two
big plays.
Freshman sensation, Mike
Shunk, scored on a 20-meter side-
line dash. Five minutes later, Greg
"Sweet Daddy" Roche took an
excellent pass from Thilip Ritchey
for the half's second score.
Ralph "Labamba" Campano
was quoted as saying "the two

quick scores seemed to break
Duke's back
Duke came back on a three-
point penalty kick, but with 10
minutes remaining, Shunk, who
had intimidated the Blue Devil
offense all day with crushing
tackles, put the icing on the cake
with a 40-metcr run through the
lapless Duke defense.
Perennial-star Mike Brown led
the scoring with two conversions
and a penalty kick.
ECU travels to Raleigh to play
rival N.C. State next weekend.


wed. nites
film 8pm
Join Tim Chandler
and the sports
department each
week in
The East Carolinian
The best in sports reporting
Rosina's Picture Pic
of the Week
If your Face Appear in Ro�tna'� Picture Pic
Contest You Win A 2 Topping Large Piza
tvery Thurv
JicJyjpOnlv
bendfon
20 off
Select groups of merchandise
Friday, October 30 &
Saturday October 31
Celebrate Halloween
638-B Fast Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, N.C. 27858
1-6 Monday - Saturday
355-7473
Georgia Ti
ATLANTA (AP) - The
guy might look at Duk andse
football team that's A
straight losses ,
Coach Bo! I y R
unbeaten in Durham thai lost
close games en the road to I
the best teams in I
( oast Conference
Tech i ts Duke ! . � �
the Blue Dev
"Steve Spurrier I a
job Ross said I
first-year road , � :
respe t for him
couple ol tough i,
good football U m
NFL owners
KANS N( . � �
ownc rs i -
from tl, 24-dav I
hopethc) cai restart
with the uni
repercussions such as the p
bility ol postpoi
expansion schcduli I I
Bui th m :� isn I
and t!u - � rl problei
the last two weeks,
Man:
wiped of i $4
million pension fund surplus
may add a n
league's labor pr I
At their annual fall me I
Tuesday, trw
recoup from the strike
only to
for the rest ol the regu
with 4 alii - : �
game
tree mo
they were -�.
the start I
thai in i
players
But a much ballyhooed pro
ppsal to split the seasoni
teams to the playoffs never
Up it larch had more titan on
I
red resen
sed to have fro
KV have
T
Hagler
to talk
LAS i GAS, Nev i V Mai
velous Marvin Hagler will b.
hand to talk about the I
Hearns-Juan Domingo Roldan
middleweight title fight an
talk about the princij
"I'm evaluating the situati
the former undisputed
weight champion said at a i
conference when asked wh
he would challenge the winn
Thursday night's fight for I
World Boxing Council title.
"I'll be watching thes .
see what happei
who will serve as a televi
commentator and who will .
duct an in-the-ring interview
the winner.
The scheduled 12-round figl :
outdoors at the Las
will start about 8 m. PS1
will be shown on : rcuil
and pay-per-viev : as
will Bobby Czy2 - sch
round International I �
erationlightheav) w de-
fense against Charles W illiai -
"There's no telling what Tho-
mas does and says at that time
Hearns said oi the possibilil
being interviewed by the man
who knocked him out in the third
round of a sensational fight on
April 13, 1985.
As for a rematch I learns said
"I don't want to comment on that.
1 have another obstacle in front oi
me
Hearns, a former World Boxing
Association welterweight and
World Boxing Council super wel-
terweight champion, rebounded
from his loss to Hagler to win the
WBC light heavyweight title. He
relinquished it to tight Roldan in a
bid to become the first man to win
four titles.
"1 would like to wait until it (the
title) gets back together Hagler
said of a possible comeback from
his upset loss to Sugar Ray Le-
onard last April 6. "Right now it's
a big joke
However, unifying the title
might take longer than Hagler
wants to wait. .
"I might not fight again
Hagler said. And promoter Bob
Arum said, "My advice to him
would be not to fight again
3
Am pi
from!
Airp
and
NJ
2 nl$
Pledi
from I
taxes!
and
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I





I
18 THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 29,
1987
Weight
Weight trainingis just oneof the
many activities that individuals
may participate in to build a
toned, strong body. However, for
the novice, just walking in to a
weight room may be a formid-
dable experience.
In an effort to help individuals
interested in beginning a weight
training program of their own,
Intramural-Recreational Services
is offering a beginning weight
training workshop.
The workshop will introduce
participants to principles and
techniques of fixed weight train-
ing programs.
A general orientation, maxi-
mum strength testing, and super-
vised workout will be the content
of the three session workshop.
Session dates have been set for
Nov. 10, 12, & 14.
Registration for the workshop
will be held Nov. 2-6 from 9 a.m-
4 p.m. in room 204 Memorial
Gym.
Students will be charged $3.00
and a $5.00 charge has been as-
sessed for faculty, and staff. For
additional information, call 757-
6387.
For those individuals working
out on their own, Intramural-Rec-
reational Services offers three fa-
cilities for weight training pur-
poses. A variety of weight train-
ing equipment is available for
participants by presenting a valid
ECU identification card on arri-
val.
The facility in Memorial Gym-
nasium is open 10 a.m9 p.m.
Monday-Thursday with hours of
operation available over the
weekends.
The facility has recently been
Ice Hockey Club victorious
renovated and provides partici-
pants with a novel atmosphere for
attaining maximum weight train-
ing goals.
Adjacent to Minges Coliseum
basketball courts is vet a second
facility for weight lovers. The
Minges weight room has also
been renovated to satisfy student,
faculty and staff needs and pro-
vides individuals with fixed and
free weight set ups.
Hours for the facility may vary
in accordance with program
needs, but have been designated
on a Monday, Wednesday, & Fri-
day basis from 8 a.mlO p.m. The
weight room is also open on Sun-
day for weekend enthusiast.
West Campus residents are
invited to participate in the new-
est recreational facility available.
The Garrett weight room is now
open to all faculty, staff and stu-
dents with presentation of a valid
ECU identification card.
A variety of Universal stations
and free weights are available for
utilization. Additional equip-
ment and accessories will be
added throughout the year.
The Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services wants all
East Carolinians to strive toward
gaining maximum health benefits
and help in Tnnlding a better
body '
Be a part of the piogram.
By DREW BOURQUE
Spxul lo The ul Caroliniaa
The ECU Ice Hockey team trav-
eled to Cary Monday and came
from behind in the third period to
defeat the Cary All-Stars 8-5.
ECU got off to a slow start fall-
ing behind 3-0 after the initial
period, but started to roll when
Dean Gentile suprised Gary's
goaltendcr with a slapshot from
the right point. Only 15 seconds
later, Ryan Walton broke down
the right side and put his shot past
the Cary defenders for ECU'S sec-
ond goal.
Alan Rutlcdge tipped a Drew
Bourque shot in to start the scor-
ing in the final period tying the
game at three. Two minutes later
Cary pulled ahead 4-3 and then
scored again 35 seconds later to
take a 5-3 lead. The lead lasted
until the final five minutes of the
game when ECU started a flurry
oi unanswered goals.
Chris Gormley started the scor-
ing by pushing the puck past
sprawling Cary defends in front
of the Cary net.
Roseoe Tlotkin tied the score
with a wrist shot from the slot
with 3:53 remaining. Twenty-six
seconds later Drew Bourque took
the puck down from center ice
beating Cary defenders to put
ECU ahead to stay.
An insurance goal was added
when Mike Anderson tucked the
puck between the pads of an
embarrassed Cary goalie. Cap-
ping the scoring off was Eddie
Winiki beating Cary's goaltender
up in the right side of the net.
David Kern, Chris Santos and
George "The Belly" Sunderland
along with goalie Ruiz Emory
backed the scoring up with a
tough defensive game.
ECU will be back on the ice to
face the Cary men's league Nov.
17th in Carv.
travel
to foreign
lands
Ruggers roll past Duke, 21-6
By BOB TOBIN
Sprojl to The last Ciiw inian
The ECU Rugby Club moved to
4-0 Saturday by defeating the
Duke Blue Devils 21-6.
The Ruggers, who were coming
off a two-week break in the sea-
son, played sluggish in the first 20
minutes. Midway through the
first half Duke capitalized on an
ECU penalty to lead 3-0. Duke
would never again have the lead,
however as the Tirates retaliated
with a just assist from Steve Kimm
Parade
honors
Twins
ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) - A mo-
torcade carrying members of the
World Series champion Minne-
sota Twins inched through a bliz-
zard of confetti and rice as hun-
dreds of thousands of deliriously
happy fans jammed city streets to
glimpse and touch their heroes.
"I could cry. That is so nice I
could cry team owner Carl
Pohlad said as he rode at the head
of the parade Tuesday.
With 17,500 pounds of confetti
and untold reams of toilet paper
drifting from skyscrapers onto
the parade route, two convert-
ibles carrying Twins players
caught fire.
"Flames were coming out of the
sides said catcher Sal Butera. He
said hot engine manifolds
sparked the fires under his car
and one occupied by pitcher
George Frazier.
No one was reported injured. A
third confetti fire broke out under
a parked convertible just after the
Twins arrived at the parade-end-
ing rally at the state Capitol, but
State Patrol troopers
extinguished it.
Police estimated that more than
200,000 fans turned out for the
start of the parade in Minneapolis.
Its arrival in St. Paul was delayed
by more than an hour because
fans slowed progress to a stop-
and-go crawl.
Some officers had their toes run
over by cars in the motorcade as
they struggled to buffer the press-
ing crowd. Fans stood on traffic
lights at nearly every intersection,
where the masses were up to 50
deep. Construction workers
waved from girders nearly 60 sto-
ries high, and people hung from
openings in parking ramps and
office buildings.
"It makes you want to start
playing again tomorrow so you
can do it again next year said
pitcher Bert BIyleven, who like
many of his teammates was
wrapped in a knee-length fur
coat. "If s the best recognition that
any club could ever want"
As the parade headed east on an
eight-mile stretch of freeway be-
tween the two cities, fans waved
from nearly every overpass.
to Parish Nichols, who went over
for the game's first try. ECU led 6-
3 at the half.
The ECU Ruggers opened the
second half on fire scoring on two
big plays.
Freshman sensation, Mike
Shunk, scored on a 20-meter side-
line dash. Five minutes later, Greg
"Sweet Daddy" Roche took an
excellent pass from Philip Ritchey
for the half's second score.
Ralph "Labamba" Campano
was quoted as saying "the two



quick scores seemed to break
Duke's back
Duke came back on a three-
point penalty kick, but with 10
minutes remaining, Shunk, who
had intimidated the Blue Devil
offense all day with crushing
tackles, put the icing on the cake
with a 40-meter run through the
lapless Duke defense.
Perennial-star Mike Brown led
the scoring with two conversions
and a penalty kick.
ECU travels to Raleigh to play
rival N.C. State next weekend.

wed. nites
film 8pm
Join Tim Chandler
and the sports
department each
week in
The East Carolinian
The best ii
East Carolina
Rosina's Picture Pic
of the Week
If your F�ce Apptan in Rotiiu'i Picture Pic
Contest You Win A 2 Topping Large Puj
lvery Thuri.
ifibeneflon
20 off
Select groups of merchandise
Friday, October 30 &
Saturday October 31
Celebrate Halloween
638-B Fast Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, NC 27858
1-6 Monday - Saturday
355-7473
Georgia 7i
ATLANTA (AP) - Tl
guv might look at Dul I see a
football team that's 3-4 I �
straight losses rgia
Coach Bol b R
unbeaten in 1 Hirham thai
close games on the n ad I
the best teams m t'h.
( oasti inference
Tech vi iits 1 uk ! lay for
the Blue Devils
"Steve Spurriei r a
job Ross said
first-year
respci t for him !
couple of tougl
good football l
NFL owners
KANS SCITY,M
owners, picking up t
from tl . .
hopetht ��
with the uni
repercussions such as the r
bility oi p istponing tl I
expansion s . Juli d for 1989
Hut the union isn't interested
and tlu � - �
the last � iveeks, w
Management Council
wiped out $39 million of I I
million pension fund s, �
may add a new snag I
league's lab
At their annual fall i
Tuesday, the owners did littl
recoup from the strike, v
only t i maintain a 50-man r
forth � rest of the regular si
with 45allov I todi
game.
Thi f
tree mo es . I resei
they were supposed to ha fron
the start of the season, mca
that in effect, they have 13 extra
players.
But a much ballyhooed pi
posal to pht the season or
leams to the playoffs never came
up it barely had more than oi
r
i.
Hagler
to talk
Vi
t
LAS VEGAS N .
velous Marvin Hagler will be on
hand to talk about the Thomas
Hearns-Juan Domingo Rol
middleweight title fight an
talk about the princip
"I'm evaluating the situatu -
S
the fi
rnvr un.
hi ted
weight champion said at a nev
conference when asked wi
he would challenge the winner i
Thursday night's
World Boxing Coi�
"I'll be watching
see what happens who will serve a commentate r andsa s a wh(
will . HlX
duct an in-the-ringinterview with
the winner.
The scheduled 12-r
outdoors at the 1 �
will start about 8 m. PST and
will be shown on
and pay-per-view h n as
will Bobby Czjz s kh d ikd 15-
round Internationa! Boxing Fed-
eration light hea w eight titlede-
fenseagainst Charles Williams.
"There's no telling what 1
mas does and says at that time
Hearns said of the possibility ol
being interviewed by the man
who knocked him out in the third
round oi a sensational fight on
April 15, 1985
As for a rematch, I learns said.
"I don't want to comment on that
I have another obstacle in froi
mo
Hearns, a former World Boxing
Association welterweight and
World Boxing Council super wel-
terweight champion, rebounded
from his loss to Hagler to win the
WBC light heavyweight title. He
relinquished it to tight Roldan in a
bid to become the tirst man to win
four titles.
"I would like to wait until it tthe
title) gets back together Hagler
said of a possible comeback from
his upset loss to Sugar Ray Le-
onard last April 6. "Right now it's
a big joke
However, unifying the title
might take longer than Hagler
wants to wait.
"I might not fight again
Hagler said. And promoter Bob
Arum said, "My advice to him
would be not to fight again
THEP
A
I
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� "�� ' �
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O






I
IIII EASTCARCM INI N
V)
� �
ctivity
and tree weights are available for
utilization Additional equip
and accessories will be
i,hout the year.
. artment en Inrramural-
tal Via ices wants all
rtians ! strive toward
i mum health benefits
in building a better
rt of the program.
im Chandler
the sports
lartment each
week in
ist Carolinian
oest in sports reporting
beneflon
20fr Off
- of merchandise
October 30 &
October 31
rate Halloween
� batur la)
55- 473
BDA CH ALPHA
) 00
B LE
IEE
:
Georgia Tech's Ross wary of Blue Devils
Ml NTA (AP) - The average Maryland very well. Duke had
might look at Duke and see a them beat except for a fantastic
� ill team that's J-4 with tour catch on a 2 point play
traight losses Georgia lech
oach Bobby Ross sees a team Maryland downed Duke 23-22
iten in Durham that lost last Saturday.
ie games on the road to twool The week before, Duke was tied
best teams m the Atlantic u lth conference power Clemson
10 10 going into the fourth quar-
-t , onterence
le� h i its Duke Saturday foi
e Blue Devils' homecoming.
ter before losine 17-10.
I or its part, Tech is coming off
two straight kisses to nationally
ranked Southeastern Conference
SteveSpurrierhasdoneagreal teams, Tennessee and Auburn.
Ross said Tuesday ol 1 Hike s rech lost a cry close decision to
� year coach "I've got a lot ol ' rs, then came out flat last
pect tor him. The took a weekend and found itself in a 19-
l ol tough losses to some 0 hole at half time against Tenncs-
otba 11 teams. fhe played see before losing 29-15.
After Tuesday's practice, Ross
said starting defensive tackle
Willie Burks had been suspended
for at least one week "perhaps
longer, for violation of squad
rules
Burks will not make the trip to
Duke, Ross said. He will be re-
placed by redshirled freshman
jerimiah McClary, a 6-foot-1, 260
pounder.
Ross laid the lack of emotion in
Knoxville at his own doorstep,
and vowed to avoid it in the fu-
ture.
"That's my responsibility, and 1
have to take full blame he said.
"In our preparations, game plan
and so forth, we were very ready.
But we have to make a strong ef-
fort to be emotionally ready
"It won't happen again. We'll
see to that if we have to scrim-
mage Friday afternoon
Ross put the Yellow Jackets
through a strenuous workout in
full pads Monday night, a break
from routine. It was not any form
ot punishment, he said, but a de-
termination to work on both rush-
ing and protecting the passer.
"I was pleased with it Ross
said. "We did it so well 1 cut it
short, and 1 don't normally do
that, either
Duke, molded in the image of
the ex-quarterback Spurrier, likes
NFL owners ready to sit and negotiate
KANSASCm Mo (AD 1 1 voteletal
let alone the
itnecdedtobc Instead, the talk was of trying to Commissioner Pete Rozelle
resume negotiations on a new hinted that without a new labor
ic owners did approve two contract with the NT I. Players contract, he might have to delay
bition Rames outside the Association, which filed an anti- appointing a committee on e-
,t summer. One ,rust su' seeking free agency and pansion, which he had planned to
picking up the pieces
the 2-1 dav players' strike,
the) can restart negotiations
the union to forestall new nite
cussions such as the possi will pit thehicago Bears against an crd to the draft at the same do at the general league meetings
of postponing the two-team the Minnesota Vikings in Cote- time it sent its players back to in March. Under the present
nsion scheduled tor I9S9 borg, Sweden Aug. 12 or 13 and work Oct. 15. plans, two new teams would be-
l the union isn't interested the other will be the Cleveland Jack Donlan, the executive di- gin play in 19S9.
he stock market problems ol Browns s. New York lets in rector of the Management Coun-
isl two weeks, which the Montreal the next weekend. cil and the owners chief negotia- Asked if the absence of a.
For the tirst time in three years, tor, said he hoped to be back in agreement could delay expan-
iot.
to throw the ball.
Steve Slayden has completed
116 of 201 passes, nearly 38 per-
cent, for 1,474 yards and eight
touchdowns. I le has also, how-
ever, been intercepted 12 times.
I lis favorite receiver is tailback
Roger Boone, who leads the team
in catches with 30 as well as in
rushing with !Vls yards on 88 car
ries.
Another likely target is wide
receiver Clarkson Mines, who
caught eight passes for 154 yards
against Maryland. I lines is fifth in
the ACC with 29 receptions tor
580 yards and two touchdowns.
Tech will be entering the game
without starting quarterback Rick
What if???,
We advertised
in the
Kast
Carolinian
Strom, but this time backup Dar
rell Cast has a full week to pre-
pare. Strom was injured on the
last play ot practice last Wednes-
day, and Cast had ust two prac-
tices to adjust to the starting role.
"Knowing Darrcll will be there,
we can practice more to his
strengths as opposed to Rick's
Ross said. "It will help, there's no
question about that "
"I've got a longer time to focus
on what needs to be done he
said. "We're in a tough sitqation.
We are struggling. We just need
something or somebody to step
torward and make something
happen in a big way Saturday
million ol the $40 however, there will be no presea- touch next week with union head sion, Rozelle replied: "I hope iw
son game in London, where the Gene Upshaw. but it could
ind Cowboys played two
.i : I a new snag to the Bea
it s labor problems. years ago and the Rams and Bron-
'� their annual fall meeting cos played last year.
i) the owners did little to I he o ners also set next April
from the strike, voting 24 as the opening day of the 1988
to maintain a "0 man roster draft, the first time it will be held
� fthi regular season - on a Sunday. The final eight
1 to dress I ra - rounds will be held the next day,
making it the first two-day draft
�. o . a e teams all ei ght sin el
i movi oil injured reserve , ial over whether to
ipi cd to have from all x teams to sell stock publicly
tarl ot tl seas n, meaning was tabled after a long and vocif-
� the have 13 extra erous debate. The Green Bay
players Pa ire a community-owned
a much ballyhoood pro
split the season or add non profit corporation with 1,800
shareholders but no other NFL
i .mi allows public ownership.
posai
lean
i!s ih er came
more than one
The
East Carolinia
equired reading!
for the serious student i
Fours Enuff
2500 North 1 leritage Street, Kinston
Every Thursday Nite -
Ladies Nite with 25c Draft
Friday, October 30th
Our Annual Halloween
Costume Party
with 10c Draft
A Total of $500 Cash to be given
Hagler
to talk
S EGAS N'ev. (AD Mai
is Man in 1 lagler will be on
I to talk about the Thomas
irns-Juan Domingo Roldan
ewcight title fight and to
ut the principals.
I'm evaluating the situation
former undisputed middel-
ht champion said at a news
rencc when asked whether
uld hallenge the winner ol
I.e. night's fight tor the
� i dng i Council title.
II . � watching theseguysand
�' happens " said I lagl r
� w ill sen e as a television
mentator and who will con-
. tan in-the-ring interview with
inner.
�� scheduled 12-round fighl
I rs at the las Vegas 1 lilton
� : irl about 8 p.m. 1ST and
be shown on closed-circuit
per-vicw television, as
bby Czyz's scheduled 15-
ind International Boxing Fcd-
erationlight heavyweight titlede-
againsl Charles Williams.
re's no telling what Tho-
rn is does and says at that time
. irns said of the possibility ot
g interviewed by the man
k nocked him out in the third
round of a sensational fight on
�pril 15, 1985.
As for a rematch, I learns said,
n't want to comment on that.
e another obstacle in front of
I learns, a former World Boxing
Association welterweight and
World Boxing Council super wel-
terweight champion, rebounded
from his loss to I lagler to win the
WBC light heavyweight title. He
relinquished it to fight Roldan in a
bid to become the first man to win
four titles.
"I would like to wait until it (the
title) gets back together Hagler
said of a possible comeback from
his upset loss to Sugar Ray Le-
onard last April 6. "Right now it's
a big joke
However, unifying the title
might take longer than Hagler
wants to wait.
"I might not fight again
Hagler said. And promoter Bob
Arum said, "My advice to him
would be not to fight again
0
When you till out your Form W-4 or W-4A,
"Employee's Withholding Allowance Certificate
remember:
It ou can he- claimed on your parent's or another
person's ux return, you generally cannot he exempt
from income tax withholding. To get it right,
read the instructions that came with your Form
W-4oi W-4A
a
LOW COST
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
Abortion from 13 lo 18 week at additional cox Pregnancy
Teat. Birth Control and Problem Pregnancy Counaehng, For
further Information, call 832-OS15 (toU fie nuner 1-800-
532-534) between 9 a m and 5 p.m. weekday. General anes-
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RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
r?
Tours
ITG TOURS
SPECIAL
PACKAGES
LAS VEGAS
2 nights with air on
American Airlines
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&
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taxes. Broadway Discounts,
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00
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The International Travel Croup Comparing
THE PLAZA GREENVILLE 355-5075
$2.49
Value
Kentucky Fried
Chicken
Halloween Specials:
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Kentucky Fried Chicken and
a Small Fries and get a FREE
Medium Drink.
Buy a Kentucky Nuggets�
Combo for $1.99
Includes: 6 nuggets, small fries
and a medium drink.
$2.49
Value
� 2 PIECES OF CHICKEN (Original Recipe or Extra Crispy) JL
� 1 MASHED POTATO AND GRAVY
� 1 BISCUIT
31.75
for only $1.75 with this coupon. Limit one package per coupon. Good on
combination orders only. Customer pays all applicable sales tax.
Kentucky Fried Chicken
All coupons expire November 15,1987 and are
redeemable at the following
Kentucky Fried Chicken Restaurants:
Greenville (East & West Greenville Blvd.), Kinston, Goldsboro, Wilson,
Tarboro, Williamston and Jacksonville.

� �� m ���� i ram �� m lira wm f'MMMaaaaaamaMMBWiWatWMaaaaaai
A





20
'111 I AMCAKPi : OCTOBERS 1987
Fearless Football Forecast
BRIAN BAILEY
YVNCT-TV Sports Director
Last Week:
(5-5)
Overall:
GAMES(54-26)
Miami (11) at ECUECU
I Wat MarylandUNC
� UCLA at Ariz. StateUCLA
Florida at AuburnFlorida
Indiana at IowaIowa
Michigan St. at Ohio StOhio State
N State at South CarolinaSouth Carolina
Syracuse at PittsburghPitt
Boston . oil. at renncsseeFennessoe
Wake 1 orest at ClemsonClemson
DEANBUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
Last Week:
(4-6)
Overall:
(53-27)
Miami
UNC
UCLA
Florida
Iowa
Ohio State
South Carolina
Syracuse
Tennessee
Clemson
TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Last Week:
(4-6)
Overall:
(51-29)
ECU
UNC
Arizona State
Auburn
Indiana
Ohio State
South Carolina
Syracuse
Tennessee
Clemson
FATMOLLOt
Assistant Sports Editor
Last Week:
(3-7)
Overall:
(45-35)
ECU
Maryland
UCLA
Florida
Indiana
Ohio State
South Carolina
Pitt
Tennessee
Clemson
Dr. RICHARD (AKIN
ECU C hancellor
Last Week:
I'vil
Overall:
(43-37)
ECl
UN
UCLA
Auburn
Indian.i
OSL
Suth Carolina
Syracuse
Tennessee
Clemson
tigers seeking for a "Dooley Double"
: EMSON, S.C. (AT1 -
n will be going for a
0I03 1 ouble" this weekend
en the 14th ranked Tigers take
A ikcl rest
: �havealread beaten
ii it.i and . oach Vince 1 Joolcy.
they get a shot at
lunger brother Bill, in
irat Wake Forest
ist vear, ("1 mson lost its sea-
1 !4 to Virginia
h was coached by the
It . lemson coach
savs he sees some
I . een last year's
�. am and this year's
nsquad
eii d fensc is like all the
i . ix n teai s ���: . ooley
Ford said I u sdaj at
wet kly new s conferei i e
similar to v. lemson
nccrned, and
- . Ikins is ne ol the best
, ks in the conference
I ig�: s are coming oft a 30-
loss to North Carolina State -
their tirst loss ol the season. Ford
said his team must forget that
game or it may find itself on the
wrong end of the score again this
weekend.
"We've got to go back and get
fundamentally a little better than
we were List week lord said.
"Wake Forest is going to get alter
us, move around and knock us
around. It we don't play well,
we'll get beat. It we play well, we
have a chance to win
Clemson trailed 30-0 at the half
against the Wolfpack but rallied
for 28 points m the final 15:58. The
comeback tell short when Rodney
Williams' fourth down pass fell
incomplete.
"They (the Clemson players)
had a lot ol fun in the second half
last week, kts ol enthusiasm
lord said. "Why the) wereenthu-
siastic about being 30 points
down I'll never know, but they
were
"Why, why, why. 1 have no al-
ibi, no excuses. If we keep sitting
around thinking about why we'll
get beat this week,too he said.
But, he added, "This football
team have pride in themselves.
Pride that they can bounce back
after defeat. Somehow, some way
we're going to correct (the mis-
takes in the N.C. State game). I
have a lot of confidence we can do
it
The loss dropped the Tigers
from No. 7 to No. 14 in The Asso-
ciated Tress college football poll.
The loss also loft Clemson, 6-1
overall, tied for the lead in the
Atlantic Coast Conference with
Maryland at 3-1.
Despite the loss, Ford was sur-
prisingly upbeat Tuesday.
"We're not a bit different team
this week than we have been
Ford said. "We've got the same
football players we had when we
were undefeated
Still, Ford remembers last vear.
After losing to N.C. State 27-3,
Clemson struggled to beat Wake
Fares 3&.2Q. , ��
"We didn't play very well last
year Ford said.
Ford hopes this year's loss to the
Wolfpack won't carry over to Sat-
urday when the Tigers plav host
to the Demon Deacons.
"Last year we didn't come back
as strongly as we'd like, but we
found a way to win. North Caro-
lina State did a fine job against us,
but I think Wake will do better
TAXPAYERS
u ith dependents
ft pnnu g �h . ir 1987ui � �
t.tx 11-1urn tn.t vou "A ill t
I 'Hh, � nrralh musi list - i
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' I '8 If .ur, i it oui di : nd nt
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IJA
ECU FOOTBALL
in the
East
Caroliniar?
W
s&.
(I
stfSJSS
W'
X
M'
Limit 4 of your 11
"V
f.
t
�Miller Lite Beer
s
ffly
2S5
e
7 L�c
$4.99 �
12 pack - 12 oz. cans BwaJ
Reg. & Diet
Pepsi Cola
Additional Pepsi's & other flavors each 99c Bottle
Grade "Aff
Whole Fryers
lb.
36
Limit 3
Gwaltney
Franks
99 ?
12 oz. pkg.
Kraft Chilled QQA
Orange Juice
12 gallon carton
Taste-Great
Homogenized
Milk
I 2 gallon jug 99 �
Fresh
Broccoli
buiwh
49
Lay's Regular
Potato Chips
612 oz. bag
All Flavors!
Golden Ripe
Bananas
lb.
180
Duke's
Mayonnaise
89
quart jar
Econ Imitation
American Cheese Singles
79
12 oz. pkg.
Deli Specials
Provolone Cheese
lb v. 9
Baked Ham
ib y2.9y
Blue Bonnet Margarine n. pkg. qtre.
m 39;
Jo81 V
� Bonnet
j.
Party Trays available by special order!
Choose from meat, cheese, & vegetable
trays freshly prepared in our kitchen.
24 hours advance notice required.
OVERTONS COUPON
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 31
RICHFOOD SUGAR �
sib. bag ?
99
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with this coupon. ����
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Without coupon $1.69 ���
Limit on per customer . ��
HI HUM1"1 r-xpirw 10-31-87. ECU PIX'fSI ���.
OPEN 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. MONDAY-SATURDAY,
SUNDAYS 1-6 p.m.
PuuCtMl
SU6M
Fresh From Our Bakery
DECORATED HALLOWEEN
CUPCAKES
dozen vvJ
Cheddar Cheese Bread
16 oz. loaf
$1.19
French Bread
16 oz. loaf
99
PLEASE PHONE AHEAD FOR LARGE ORDERS
WHERE THE PIRATES
SHOP FOR PRICE.
QUALITY & CONVENIENCE
(TWO BLOCKS FROM ECU CAMPUS)
OVERTON'S
Corner Third & Jarvis Streets
Just 2 Blocks from ECU I

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Title
The East Carolinian, October 29, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 29, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.569
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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