The East Carolinian, October 27, 1987






INSIDE
Editorials4
StyleZZZZZ9
Sports15
Classifieds
STYLE
The ghost of halloween past � see STYLE, page 9.
SPORTS
The Pirates lose big to South Carolina
SPORTS, page 12.
see
�ire iEast (Earaltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.62 No. 17
Tuesday, October 27,1987
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Survey says majority of
students drink alcohol
By TIM HAMPTON
Mill �ntrr
Eleven percent ol ECU stu-
dents purchase alcohol with false
indentification, according to an
alcohol-drug use survey con-
ducted by erry Lotterhos of the
ECU Health Department.
Lotterhos is studying the
impact of North Carolina's 21
year old drinking law on alcohol-
drug use amoung ECU students.
From a sample of 380 students, the
recent survey is part of a 5 year
study on effects of the September
lUvv law change.
Alcohol, used by 89 percent of
those surveyed in the last b
months was the most used sub-
stance in the study. Marijuana,
more used than the third ranked
cigarette was second. Fifty-one
percent of the students respond-
ing smoked the weed at least six
months prior to the survey.
Over halt, 53 percent, of those
surveyed said they had engaged
in sexual activity later regretted as
a consequence to drinking. Forty-
percent of the students surveyed
said they had vomited as a result
of consuming to much alcohol
once or twice in the last six
months.
Other negative conquencesof
drinking were cutting class be-
cause of a hangover, 2 percent,
received a lower grade because ot
drinking, 13 percent, andexperi
enced a blackout, 30 percent ol
those surveyed.
"ECU students have contin-
ued to use alcohol, but have
changed where they drink Lot-
terhos aid
The 21 ear old drinking law
had not effected the drinking
behavior of 71 percent of the stu-
dents surveyed. Also 71 percent
of those surveyed said they have
only changed the location of
drinking. Ten percent said they
stopped drinking because of the
drinking law.
Dorms and apartments were
cited as the location where 58
percent of the students consume
alcohol, a lb percent increase over
1986. In 1986, 30 percent of the
subjects drank in public bars as
opposed to onlv 10 percent in
1987.
' The overall effects of the law
maybe counterproductive in the
last analysis Lotterhos said. In
See SURVEYING, page 2
These students in Cotten dorm are enjoying themselves the non-alcoholic way as part of Vational
Alcohol Awareness week. (Photo by Ester Norton � Photolab)
Greenville prepares for Halloween celebration
Bv lODll 1 TZGERALD
two fari� on tru hbulomten ottebni
tion in icciivi'ac I'm year. 0
Thurs.ivj Tim Hampton will show
� � rsityis affected by the
Two blocks of East Fifth Street,
from Evans to Reed streets, and
two blocks from Cotanche to Reed
Circle will be bl icked oii the night
ot October 31 for one of
Greenville's traditional big
bashes Halloween.
'We re approaching it from the
same philosophy we had in recent
years, just containment' said
Randy Nichols, the interim chief
oi police in Greenville.
"We know it's going to be a
party atmosphere and we're not
there to break up the party. We're
there just to protect property. It
someone gets drunk and wants to
break out a window, or some
thing oi that nature, that's what
we're there for. If anybody starts a
fight and if anybody is going to
gel hurt, ot course, we're going to
step in jnd protect the people as
w ell as the property. But we're not
going to be there just to rush in
and arn1 people.
Although it's not legal to drink
on the streets during the celebra-
tion, Chief Nichols said as long as
it's not too blatant of a violation
the police will not arrest anyone
or break up the celebrations.
And we're not going to be down
there carding anyone either. We
like for them to come and have
their good time he said.
Chief Nichols stressed the im-
portance of party goers staying in
the area barricaded off, "instead
ofspreadingout in all directions
Tha t way the pol ice ca n ma ke su re
those celebrating are sale from
anyone bothering them, or from
cars running the barricades and
injuring someone.
Nichols said that before the city
started putting up barricades they
used to have problems with cars
driving through, nudging people,
and people beating on cars. But
that .ias Peen eliminated by the
barricades.
But if anyone does get hurt
during the celebration there will
be a rescue squad at Fifth and
Evans streets
There also will be extra police-
men on duty, about 50 or 60 in-
cluding the regular staff, to
handle the expected crowd,
Nichols said.
The only problems caused by
the event, according to Nichols, is
the extra manpower required and
the overtime pay involved. "It
�StS the taxpayers tor the police
service and the clean up, public
works, and that type of thing
Nichols said. "It takes maybe
twenty people from public works
to come in and clean up, usually
about 4 a.m. in the morning, right
after the celebration
Chief Nichols couldn't recall
any major problems last year.
"We had a couple of fights during
the night but 1 don't believe any-
one was arrested. It was just a big
party
Streater speaks at Mendenhall
for Alcohol Awareness Week
The flowers that seem to have taken over Flanagan Bunding are actually the in the windows of the new
building on campus. The fence finally came down last week, returning one more shortcut to students on
their way to class. (Photo by Thomas Walters � Photolab)
Registration mag. available
By ED W1LKERSON
SttJI Writer
The 1988 Spring Semester regis-
tration magazine will be available
to ECU students at the end of this
week as the university's
Registrar's Office prepares for
early registration.
The new publication is "much
clearer and is printed with an
improved format (over past pub-
lications) according to Gil
Moore, ECU registrar.
The East Carolinian published
the magazine for the first time this
fall. Last year an out-of-state
publisher was contracted by the
registrar's office for the publica-
tion.
Moore raid past plans to have
the magazine published by The
East Carolinian had been hin-
dered by a failure to locate a print-
ing company which could meet
the publication's printing specifi-
cations.
According to Daniel Maurer,
general manager of The East
Carolinian, finding Greenville-
based Flint Printing allowed The
East Carolinian to publish the
magazine to specifications.
Noting the improved quality of
this fall's magazine, Moore said
that transcription p oblems
prevalent in past publications
have been largely eliminated with
the change in printers.
"Students may obtain copies of
the magazine by Friday at any
University department of fice.The
lobby of The Student Supply Store
and the registrar's office in the
Wichard building Moore said.
The magazine, according to the
registrar's office, will contain reg-
istration procedures, the loca-
tions of on-line registration termi-
nals, exam schedules, specific
course information and regula-
tions governing student registra-
tion. Additionally, the publica-
tion will include a section of local
business advertisements.
Early registration is scheduled
to begin on Nov. 9, and continue
until the 17th. Student classifica-
tion will determine registration
ByM. BURBELLA
Assistant Nn�� tditor
Former University of North
Carolina Football star Steve
Streater will speak to ECU stu-
dents Thursday as part of Na-
tional Alcohol Awareness week
because he doesn't want students
to "be where I am
According to stories by the
Raleigh News and Observer,
Streater was active in several
sports during high school. He
went on to play football at UNC
and became the first Atlantic
Coast Conference player to make
the league's all-star team in two
positions. When his college career
was over, he signed a free-agent
contract with the Washington
Redskins.
Streator, however, was not to
play for the Redskins. While on
his way home after signing the
pro-football contract on April 30,
1981, his car skidded on a wet
road and overturned � breaking
Streater's neck and rendering him
paralyzed from the waist down.
Streater's doctors first classified
him as a quadriplegic � para-
lyzed from the neck down. How-
ever, after extensive rehabilita-
tion, Streater regained use of his
arms and upper torso.
Doctors say Streater will never
walk again, but Streater has other
ideas.
"I'll never be able to live with
the fact that I'll never walk again
� NEVER Steater told the News
and Observer. "Everybody has
his own walk; each walk is differ-
ent. I don't know exactly how I'll
walk, but I'll walk
After he completed rehabilita-
tion, Streater went home to Sylva
(a small town in Jackson County)
to answer the 20,000 letters sent to
N.C. Memorial Hospital during
his stay.
He then moved back to Chapel
11U1 to complete his degree in
education. The next year he went
to work as an assistant coach at
Chapel Hill High School, coached
a semi professional football team
in Durham called the Carolina
Pirates and worked for an exer-
cise studio, according to the News
and Observer.
In August 1983, Streater spotted
an annoucement about a new
position created to coordinate a
Students Against Drunk Driving
applied and was appointed to the
job bv Gov. James B. 1 lunt jr. the
next day, according to the News
and Observer.
Streater had a very active
schedule during his almost three
years as State Coordinator. Road
trips took up 80 to 83 percent of
each year, plus he ran an active
office with a statewide newsletter
and an annual state conference
that drew 250 participants in 1986,
according to the News and Ob-
server.
He also exceeded his original
goal of organizing 35 chapters of
See STRLATLR, page 2
(SADD) program in N.C. He
Committee works on plans
for new recreational facility
By TIM HAMPTON
Stiff Writer
ECU may have a new student
recreation center within five
years, according to SG A president
Scott Thomas.
Thomas created a committee
Monday with the intent of drum-
ming up student support for the
recreational facility- The new Stu-
dent Recreation Center Commit-
tee will pass a resolution endors-
ing the facility which will be sent
to Chancellor Richard Eakin,
Thomas said.
Memorial Gym, the present
recreation center, built around
1950, has a six goal basketball
court, an indoor swimming pool,
an aerobics room, and a 12 ma-
chine weight room. In addition,
Memorial houses the intramural
offices.
"Memorial is inadequate for
ECU's needs for recreation Tho-
mas said. Plagued by a leaky roof
and inadequate space. Memorial
Gym's problems have only risen
in recent years with theincreascof
student enrollment, according to
Thomas.
The seven member commit-
tee consists of leaders from vari-
ous campus organizations and
the student government. By pre-
senting proposals for the center to
several groups, Thomas hopes to
consolidate student support for
the facility. The committee will
meet on Wednesday.
After Chancellor Eakin re-
ceives the committee's drafted
resolution, he will consider
whether to pursue the building of
such a facility. The planning-de-
velopmental stages and construc-
tion of a recreation center could
take three to five years according
to Thomas.
Besides providing the stu-
dents with a better facility for
recreation, Thomas said the cen-
ter would make the university
more attractive to people consid-
ering enrollment in ECU.
1 �
r-
� i i � �MMwlt��r�fc m

r
n
ii
�. -�j





THE EAST CAROLINIAN!
OCTOBER 27,1987
Rooks speaks to School of Business students
ECU Nnri Bureau
A Virginia businessman whose
real estate firm averages $8 mil-
lion a day in property sales will be
the School of Business "Executive
on Campus Wednesday
through Saturday, at ECU.
W. Howard Rooks of Alexan-
dria, Va will lecture to students
in the business school and meet
with ECU faculty and community
business leaders. In addition, he
will bea speaker fora Chamber of
Commerce breakfast seminar
Thursday beginning at 7:15 a.m.
at the Sheraton Greenville.
Rooks is president of Mount
Vernon Realty, one of the top 10
privately owned real estate com-
panies in the United States. He is
also an alumnus of ECU and was
recently appointed as a member
of the ECU Board of Trustees.
The Executive on Campus pro-
gram at ECU is designed to get
national leaders in business to
share their experiences and ex- time supporter of East Carolina
pertise with audiences in eastern University Wheatley said.
North Carolina. Rooks graduated from ECU in
"It also lets us bring the real 1955 with a bachelor's degree. He
world (of business) into the class- taught business education in the
room" said Dr. Edward W. public schools, worked fora pub-
Whcatley, chairman of the De- hshing company and sold real U.S. real estate company to open
partment of Marketing and coor- estate before opening his own an office in West Germany. This
dinator for the executive pro- company. Mount Vernon Realty
gram. Inc in 1968.
"It is a special honor to have Mr. The firm operates 58 branch
Rooks because he is a member of offices from Annapolis, Md to
our Board of Trustees and is a long Fredcricksburg, Va with a staff
of over 3,000 sales associates.
Annual sale volume averages
over $2 billion.
In 1986 the company opened a
residential salesof fice in Sarasota,
Fla and became the first major
endowment for the establishment
of the Howard Rooks Center for
Real Estate Studies in the School
of Business.
office provides relocation serv-
ices to families returning to the
U.S. from Germany.
Help in treating lice, scabies
What is the difference between
lice, crabs, and scabies? How do
you get them and how do you get
rid of them?
Three species oi lice are known
to infest humans: the crab louse
(also called the public louse), the
body louse and the head louse.
The crab louse is shorter than the
other two types and can be found
in hairy places other than the
public area (armpits, beard, eye-
lashes, etc.). The head louse is
almost alwavs found on head
Health Column
By Mary Elesha-Adams
ECL' Student Health Center
hair.
Head and body lice are trans-
mitted by sharing combs, towels
and other personal items Public
lice may be picked up from objects
as well as by sexual contact. Both
adult lice and their eggs (nits) can
be seen by the naked eye upon
close inspection.
Scabies i a skin disease caused
by an organism not visible to the
naked eye caused by the "itch
mite Scabies is spread by direct
contact with another person who
is infested including shaking
hands. Exchanging clothing or
sharing a bed or towels is also a
means o( spreading scabies, how-
ever the scabies mite does not
survive very long in clothes or
linens.
It is usually best to seek profes-
sional help for the diagnosis and
treatment of lice, crabs and sca-
bies. The most commonly used
prescription medication used for
treating all three conditions is
Kwell. The person may also need
medications to relieve itching.
Several non-prescription medi-
cines are available including RID,
Triple X, and R & C Spray. Ask a
pharmacist how to use them
properly. Other measures that
should be taken to prevent rein-
festation include:
� Wash clothing, towels
and bed linens in hot water (dry-
cleaning is also ef-
fective).
Surveying use of fake I.Ds
Continued from page 1 One quarter of those sur
public bars there are some public veved said thev drink six to nine
controls restricting alcohol abuse beersper drinkingoccassion. One
such as the presence of bartenders third said thev drink two to five
and bar bouncers, according to beers during the same period
L�tteThos-u Ten percent of those sur-
ln other settings, such as veyed said they drink daily while
parties, there� .s more probability 18 percent said they used barbitu-
of abusive behavior towardsalco- rates everv dav. One percent of
hoi, he said, the students sureved aid thev
The assumption that the law would steal alcohol if denied bv
w changednnking behavior is other means of obtaining the bev-
ill founded he continued. erage.
Streater creates necessary
SADD chapters in N.C.
Continued from page 1
SADD in N.C. counties which
showed the highest rate of drug
and alcohol related accidents and
deaths among teenagers �
Streater organized more than 170
active chapters across the state.
"I want to be a part of trying to
help kids maneuver around the
obstacles Streater told the News
you to take that drink or smoke a
joint, it's so hard to say no
Streater resigned as State Coor-
dinator last May and was named
by Robert Anastas as the South-
cast Regional Representative for
the National SADD Program.
Streater will speak to ECU stu-
dents Thursday at 7:30 p.m. at
Mendenhall221. His trip isspon-
and Observer. "What we're trying sored by BACCHUS (Boosting
to combat is peer pressure. Espe- Alcohol Consciousness Conccrn-
cially if it's your best buddy or ing the Health of University Stu-
our girlfriend that's trying to get dents).
Tte 9ewImage
Beauty Salon
specializing in men and women
styles, perms and coloring.
Nexus, Redken, Paul Mitchell products available.
313 Plan Dr.
GiwenrilK N.C.
Appointments Moa.FrL &oo.�,oo
- - 8�t. a.oo LOO
754144
Coming October 29th
Steve Streater
to Speak to
E.C.U. Students
� Non-washable items
can be sprayed with disinfectants
containing pyrcthin - piperonyl
butoxide such as Raid and Black
Hag.
� Other people who
might be infected (roommates,
friends, sexual partners) must be
treated at the same time to avoid
reinfection.
' mill mil
m
0B� UIIJ
Appearing with Rooks at the
Chamber of Commerce Real Es-
tate Seminar breakfast on Thurs-
day will be Kroghie Andresen Jr
a senior vice president of
Cameron-Brown Company of
Charlotte and David S. Morris, a
The company also has its own partner with Ward and Smith of
mortgage company, a settlement Greenville. Andresen will discuss
department, an insurance agency, the outlook for commercial real
a property management division estate while Morris, an attorney
and a guaranteed sales program. wiH talk about real estate taxes
Last spring Rooks made a prop- The seminar is open to the pub-
erty gift to ECU valued in excess lie. Contact the Pitt-Greenvilie
of a quarter of a million dollars. Chamber of Commerce to regis-
Sale of the land will provide an ter.
Carolinian
ATTENTION BSN
CLASS OF 1988.
The Air Force has a special pro-
gram for 1988 BSNs If selected
you can enter active duty soon
after graduation without waiting
for the results of your State Boards
To qualify, you must have an
overall "B" average After commis
sionmg, you'll attend a five-month
internship at a major Air Force
medical facility It's an excellent
way to prepare for the wide range
of experiences you It have serving
your country as an Air Force nurse
officer For more information, call
MSgt Nick Nero (919)850-9549
Station to Station Collect
Serving the East Carolina campus community sine 1925
James F. J. McKee. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo Shari Clemens
Pete Fernald Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MOYTHLY RATES
O 49 Coulumn Inches $4 25
50 99 125
100-149171-44)6
150 199 395
200 249 ' 385
250 and above 3 75
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
(Charge in Addition to Regular Space Rate)
One color and blackS90.00
Two colors and black 155.00
Inserts
5,000 or less06 each
5,001-10.000055 each
10.001-12.00005 each
BUSINESS HOURS;
Monday- Friday
10:00 5:00 P.M.
737-�366
757-6337 787-6366
757-6556 757-630�
PHONES
Thursday, October 29th
- K2 and B07C
present
The First Annual
Nightmare on
Tenth St.
Kick off your
Halloween Weekend
with TheETHICS
and
The FADE AWAYS
Tickets $3.00 in Advance
$4.00 At the Door
BYOB
j-ni
m
ma
"Unscient
(CPS) - Stanford is the best of the
10 best "national universities" in
the country, U.S. News and
World Report asserted in its new
issue, but college presidents �
stung by the ever-growing num-
bers of unscientific "rankings" of
their schools � began blasting the
article as unfair 4 weeks ago
"Yours is a highly superficial
but highly visible analysis that
helps those who don't need it and
makes it harder for those who
need help Middlcburv College
President Olin C. Robison wrote
the magazine's editors, asking
them not to publish their list any-
more.
Indeed, more than 65 of the
presidents asked to rank colleges
by the magazine tried to stop U.S.
News & World Report from re-
leasing the results Oct. 17, but the
magazine ignored their pleas
"We use the same categories to
rank the schools as the Carnegie
Foundation (for the Advance-
ment of Teaching) U.S. News'
Paul Vizza said in defense of the
magazine's annual ranking of
campuses.
Student becoi
U.S.
dents
judges o
a clal
thcyconsJ
gories.
But thu
fed up wi
rankings i
diverse a
Magaziru
Piavboy.
Some ri
what para
campus s
be -
w
for "dumlj
While nl
"cori
are these
dents s
1.
EAST LANSING, Mich. (CPS)
� A Native American student
quit the Michigan State Univer-
sity marching band in protest af-
ter three band members pinned
her down and shaved her neck
and shoulders Sept. 26.
Cynthia Maggard, a Navajo
Indian, said she was the victim of
a hazing.
Ma.
up her hal
Sept 26 Mil
State footb
band mem
the hair on
because it
couldn't hal
Memorial plans for
KENT, Ohio (CPS) � Kent State
University's attempt to build a
memorial to the four students
killed and nine others injured
during a May 4, 1970, anti-war
demonstration has fallen short
again.
Seeking $500,000 to build a
memorial, KSU has managed to
raise just $30,000 from alumni and
nothing at all from foundations,
Rqjbert Beck, KSU's chief fun-
dnpiser, conceded last weeV.
flfs a damn shame said Dr
Ottavio Casale, dean of KSU's
honors college.
The tragedy of Kent State �and
the shootings of two students at
Jackson State University soon
thereafter � took place during a
national student strike called to
protest the American invasion of
Cambodia. National Guardsmen
sent to KSU to restore order sub-
sequently fired on a large crowd
of students, killing four.
"My own feeling is (the shoot-
ings) did more than anything to
stop the war in Vietnam Casale
said, adding many people, upset
by the vision of soldiers shooting
students, "soured on the war"
after Kent State.
History Dept.
holds lecture
In conjunction with the bicen-
tennial of the United States
Constitution, the ECU Depart-
ment of History will present a
lecture by a distinguished expert
on Constitutional history Wed-
nesday.
Dr. Milton M. Klein will deliver
the annual Lawrence F. Brewster
Lecture in History beginning at 8
p.m. in the Jenkins Auditorium on
campus. His topic will be "The
Constitution in the Public Imagi-
nation
Klein, who received his doc-
toral degree from Columbia Uni-
versity m 1954, currently is pro-
fessor of history emeritus at the
University of Tennessee. He also
taught at Long Island University,
Columbia University and the
State University of New York at
Fredonia. In 1962 he was ap-
pointed Fulbright Lecturer in his-
tory at the University of Canter-
bury, Christchurch, New Zeal-
and.
The recipient of numerous
awards for his many years of re-
search and writing, Professor
Klein has contributed extensively
to the literature on the American
Revolution and the early years of
the new republic. He has written,
co-authored, or edited seven
books, and has published twenty
articles in scholarly journals.
Further information on the
Lawrence F. Brewster Lecture in
History series is available from
the ECU Department of History at
757-6587.
Pressure
incider I
sified I
commit
countei
KSl it
I
ing �
calm �
some kinc
During ft
jectedasc(
for mcmonl
year, whet
build a set
Chicago arcj
In an int(
Press Sen i;
Beck rcp rf
raise monej
memorial hi
well so tar
He re I
For int'orr
who tc
Itlf
ARMY





students
endowment for the establishment
ps ot the Howard Rooks Center for
Real Estate Studies in the School
a of HtiMrto
Appearing with Rooks at the
m Chamber of Commerce Real Es-
- late Seminar ha-aktast on Thurs-
da m ill be kroghie Andrcscn Jr
i senior vice president of
Brown Company of
tte and David S. Morris, a
ici vMth Ward and Smith of
V Xndrosen will discuss
ill tor commercial real
n hile Morns, an attorney,
- ibi ut real estate taxes.
rvar is open to the pub-
: the Pitt-Greenville
ci ' Commerce to regis-
iaat arnitofan
�m� 1925
I Advertising
sing Representives
Shari Clemens
V ADVERTISING
S4 25
I 15
4 05
3 95
3 85
3 75
OR ADVERTISING RATES
Space Rate
Sl"iO 00
00
Inserts
737-W366
757-6368
T57-6309
r 29th
nual
on
t
��- AV
end
ICS
dvance
oor
11 at
House
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOW:K27, 1987
"Unscientific rankings" upset college presidents
(CPS) - Stanford is the best of the
10 best "national universities" in
the country, U.S. News and
World Report asserted in its new
issue, but college presidents �
stung by the ever-growing num-
bers of unscientific "rankings" of
their schools�began blasting the
article as unfair 4 weeks ago.
"Yours is a highly superficial
but highly visible analysis that
helps those who don't need it and
makes it harder for those who
need help Middlcbury College
President Olm C. Robison wrote
the magazine's editors, asking
them not to publish their list any-
more.
Indeed, more than 65 of the
presidents asked to rank colleges
by the magazine tried to stop U.S.
News & World Report from re-
leasing the results Oct. 17, but the
magazine ignored their pleas.
"We use the same categories to
rank the schools as the Carnegie
Foundation (for the Advance-
ment of Teaching) U.S. News'
Paul Vizza said in defense of the
magazine's annual ranking of
campuses.
U.S. News asks college presi-
dents � "the best informed
judges of American education
Vizza claimed � which schools
they consider best in various cate-
gories.
But the presidents say they're
fed up with the proliferation of
rankings of colleges by sources as
diverse as the Dow Jones Co Spy
Magazine, the Yale News and
Playboy.
Some rate schools according to
what parents need to know about
campus social life, which are the
best "educational bargains" and
even which are the best refuges
for "dumb rich kids
While no one knows how many
such "consumer" rankings there
are these days, the college presi-
dents say many of them arc use-
less and can hurt campus efforts
to attract and keep students.
Even the most reputable ones,
claimed St. Michael's College
(Vermont) President Paul). Reiss
in one of the protest letters sent to
US News, are "inconsistent" and
"unscientific
Reiss noted that while 40 per-
cent of the presidents responding
to U.S. News listed Stanford Uni-
versity as among the top 5 "na-
tional research universities 60
percent disagreed.
"This is fraudenlent
Middlebury's Robison com-
plained. 'This is an effort to sell
magazines
U. S. News' survey judges
which schools offer the "best"
undergraduate education, qual-
ity of teaching, faculty-student
ratios, "learning atmosphere
and advises how to pick a college
and pay for it.
But Money Magazine, for in-
stance, focuses on "Ten Great
Tuition Deals" in its ranking.
"We looked for the Berkeleys of
tomorrow, "the up-and-coming
schools explained Money
writer John Stickney. .
Money selected schools with a
"strong sense of mission a
hetcrogenous student body, a
strong liberal arts bias, with resi-
dential campuses and emphases
on undergraduate education.
Among the winners were Coo-
per Union, The University of Cali-
fornia at Irvine, Furman, and
Southwestern.
Presidents arc especially upset
because making � or not making
� such lists can have a big impact
on enrollments and fundraising.
Middlebury's Robison, whose
school was not on the magazine's
list of "national liberal arts col-
leges admitted getting "the
most extraordinary mail" asking
why the college hadn't been
listed.
After Connecticut's Wesleyan
University was mentioned by
U.S. News and received a high
rating on other lists last year,
freshman enrollment rose by a
huge 35 percent.
The University of Vermont,
praised in Richard Moll's "The
Public Ivys had a 17 percent
jump in applications
Evergreen State College in
Washington enjoyed a 43 percent
jump in freshman applications
after being highly rated by
Money, Time, and U.S. News.
"It was wonderful that (Money)
put us in the top 10 Cal-Irvine
spokeswoman Linda Grinnell
Student becomes victim of racism
recalled.
She sent rcprintsof thcaritclein
response to inquiries of letters to
support groups, though "UC-I
can stand on its own merits
Yet even the beneficiaries of the
rankings are skeptical. A former
admisssions officer at Pomona
College in California said Pomana
resisted advertising a good rating
it had gotten because it doubted
the study's validity.
"We are pleased, but we didn't
use it she said.
Although favorably rated by
"The Insider's Guide to the Col-
leges" for fostering independence
and creativity, New York's Sarah
Lawrence College doesn't pro-
mote the distinction, admissions
director Robin Mamlet said.
Mamlet faulted some of the rat-
ings as "sleazy" and saw their use
as "hucksterish symptomatic of
the big business aspects of the
college application process.
"It's ironic said Mamlet.
"The student wants us to see
him as a wonderful, complex per-
son, beyond scores and numbers.
The guidebooks are trying to re-
duce colleges to the same kind of
flat character
"The Best Buys in College Edu
cation by New York I imcsedu
cation editor lack Fiskc and Jo
soph Michalak, reminded Univcr
sity of TennesseehanccHor jack
Reese ol "restaurant guides
Some ill the surveys, of o
are openly facetious
Spy magazine, tor one, ranks
the 10best schools for "dumb ric h
kids using indices like the num
ber of squash racquets kids brine
to campus, while Playboy
half-humorousl) in 1986 tried to
rank the Top 40 Part)o!l.
"It's not totally st lent
it's not completely arbitrary
explained Playl .
who said the rush chaim
ternity presidents and can ;
club leaders at 250 schools had
been surveyed
"This is not to say that � hoots
aren't great intellectual
People can work hard and I
off steam hard too, but n
administrators faili d ton
this Paige said oi a storm of
protest form college offi ials thai
followed the article's publication.
EAST LANSING, Mich. (CPS)
� A Native American student
quit the Michigan State Univer-
sity marching band in protest af-
ter three band members pinned
her down and shaved her neck
and shoulders Sept. 26.
Cynthia Maggard, a Navajo
Indian, said she was the victim of
a hazing.
Maggard said she was pinning
up her hair shortly before the
Sept. 26 Michigan State � Florida
State football game when a female
band member told her to shave off
the hair on her neck and shoulders
because it was too dark and too
long.
"I explained to her that I
couldn't have it shaved because of
my religious beliefs and heri-
tage said Maggard.
A second woman then pushed
Maggard's head forward, and
another shaved the back of her
neck and shoulders with a dispos-
able razor, she said.
Maggard, a trombonist, re-
ported the incident Sept. 29 to
band director Dave Catron and
Memorial plans for students fall short again
KENT, Ohio (CPS) � Kent State
University's attempt to build a
memorial to the four students
killed and nine others injured
during a May 4, 1970, anti-war
demonstration has fallen short
again.
Seeking $500,000 to build a
memorial, KSU has managed to
raise just $30,000 from alumni and
nothing at all from foundations,
Robert Beck, KSU's chief fun-
draiser, conceded last week.
fit's a damn shame said Dr.
Ottavio Casale, dean of KSU's
honors college.
The tragedy of Kent State � and
the shootings of two students at
lackson State University soon
thereafter � took place during a
national student strike called to
protest the American invasion of
Cambodia. National Guardsmen
sent to KSU to restore order sub-
sequently fired on a large crowd
of students, killing four.
"My own feeling is (the shoot-
ings) did more than anything to
stop the war in Vietnam Casale
said, adding many people, upset
by the vision of soldiers shooting
students, "soured on the war"
after Kent State.
History Dept.
holds lecture
In conjunction with the bicen-
tennial of the United States
Constitution, the ECU Depart-
ment of History will present a
lecture by a distinguished expert
on Constitutional history Wed-
nesday.
Dr. Milton M. Klein will deliver
the annual Lawrence F. Brewster
Lecture in History beginning at 8
p.m. in the Jenkins Auditorium on
campus. His topic will be "The
Constitution in the Public Imagi-
nation
Klein, who received his doc-
toral degree from Columbia Uni-
versity in 1954, currently is pro-
fessor of history emeritus at the
University of Tennessee. He also
taught at Long Island University,
Columbia University and the
State University of New York at
Fredonia. In 1962 he was ap-
pointed Fulbright Lecturer in his-
tory at the University of Canter-
bury, Christchurch, New Zeal-
and.
The recipient of numerous
awards for his many years of re-
search and writing, Professor
Klein has contributed extensively
to the literature on the American
Revolution and the early years of
the new republic. He has written,
co-authored, or edited seven
books, and has published twenty
articles in scholarly journals.
Further information on the
Lawrence F. Brewster Lecture in
History series is available from
the ECU Department of History at
757-6587.
Pressure to memorialize the
incident on the campus inten-
sified through years of lawsuits,
commission investigations and
countersuits.
KSU at one point built a gym on
the site of the shootings, provok-
ing more protests and, in part to
calm the storm, agreed to erect
some kind of memorial.
During the next 10 years, it re-
jected a series oi ideasand designs
far memorial sculptures until last
year, when it finally agreed to
build a sculpture designed by
Chicago architect Bruno Ast.
In an interview with College
Press Service Oct. 14, however,
Beck reported KSU's efforts to
raise money to build the Ast
memorial haven't worked very
well so far.
He remains optimistic: "The
money can be raised. All it takes is
that one key interest, that one
person or organization. We'll
keep trying until we find it
Architect Ast was similarly
upbeat. "I'm sure they'll get their
act together
"I don't think they've tried as
hard as they could have or should
have charged Joe Gregor of the
May 4th Task Force, a student
group formed 16 years ago to
pursue the memorial and other
issues related to the tragedy.
"It will take some public pres-
sure to get the university to do
more said Gregor, who noted
KSU barely publicized the fund
drive.
Gregor maintained $500,000 "is
not that much. A lot more has
been raised for the university's
fashion museum
quit.
Maggard has not filed a formal
complaint or named her attack-
ers, according to MSU spokesman
Terry Dcnbow. School officials
arc investigating the incident, he
added.
The MSU marching band does
not require members to have
clean-shaven necks or shoulders,
Denbow said, and if the
university's investigation sub-
stantiates Maggard's allegations,
harsh measures will be taken.
Michigan State will not tolerate
racist behavior, he said: "We're
committed to opening doors, not
closing them
Catron said Maggard's is the
first allegation of hazing since he
began directing the band in 1970.
"We absolutely do not haze. It
was an unfortunate incident and I
wished it hadn't happened
Hedge mazes served as amuse-
ment parks in 17th-century Eng-
land.
fNCightcluK
presents
Wednesday
The Ladies Zoo!
- With .75c Ponys .25c Drafts
Wine & $1 Schnapps & Tequil
Featuring The Jammer left . 11

.33V
50�
V f
nois
Saturday Oct. 31 - Halloween
Billy Blazemore and Time Square (Floor
Playing Beach, Top 40 & Rock-n-roll
Door open at 9 p.m. 18 yr. olds w
.me
All ABC Permits
Phone: 756-6401
Located in the Carolina East Centre
Ringgold Towers
Offering
$150.00 Reward
For information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person
who tampered with Fire Equipment at Ringgold Towers,
on Thursday, October 22,1987
Information will be kept confidential
Call 752-2865
ri
Announcing Samples From
The Upcoming Menu
Offered All Day
Tuesday & Wednesday
Polio
Yucateco
Grille;
chera
4
rreast of chicken topped with bacor,
suce and me.red cheese and servec
Mexican rice and reined beans
521 CotancheSt.
The most exciting
fewhours
you'll spend all week.
Run. Climb. Rappel. Navigate. Lead.
And develop the confidence and
skills vou won't get from a textbook.
Enroll in Army ROTC
as one of your electives. Get the facts
today.
For More Information Contact:
Capt. Mitchell 757-6967
ARMY RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
Wednesday is our
ALL NEW
LADIES NIGHT!
w The Elbo Male Dancers
Ladies Only 9-10:30 p.m.
$1 Wine Coolers $1 Drink Specials
Guys in at 10:30 p.m.
Come Check Out Greenville's Newest Private Club.
Memberships available now for $5
Elbo is a private club for members and invited guests.
wGHtH&0toBittkMtmtttt -�- -t.i��i tttL m - � m m rm �- m,
� fc�
r� � - �'� ct �; ��.�� tk m. �i M � am
�i ip �' ����-�m m � � � �
" 1-
1





"
V L

�ff EaHt (Earnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, GmiM�,
ClayDeanhardt, - anir.
Andy Lewis, n�, ,� James f j McKeE I)iitclBrof
IM UIANPLER,mu, ANTIlONY MARTIN, mm ���
la in Carter, ,w�. e. Mec needham, c�,� u
bi Elton Bryant, � mike lira iurcii, fw,�
Debbie Stevens, s�, jol lN W. Medlin, , ��,
OCTOBER27 1985
Opinion
Page 4
New
gym
Students need facilities
With the growing student popula-
tion at ECU and the ever-growing
exercise habit, it seems time to build
a new indoor recreational facility for
the student body.
Memorial gym has become out-
dated. It is not pleasant to exercise
there, and the gym lacks modern
facilities such as raquetball courts.
The move by Scott Thomas to
generate some student support for
the idea is a timely one. Right now
student involvement is at a peak for
recent times, and the future is look-
ing bright. If Thomas can get many
students truly involved in pushing
tor the project, there may be some
way to move it up on the list of
university priorities.
Of course, a facility like this one is
not funded with state money. This
kind of gymnasium can only be built
through student fees. This, natu-
rally, is going to mean an increase in
the cost of an eduation.
But we are willing to pay it. There
is a definite need for a new gymna-
sium on campus, and Thomas has
done a good job by taking a first step
towards that goal.
Soon it will be up to administra-
tion to look at the situation, and we
can only hope it wil act swiftly in
meeting the needs of the students.
Student points out fault in review
m WI6HT, THE PemR 5CAB5 BEAT M tBI fVRK BUSWRS,
M WLLA5 WARTS CfWP THfWAMI B50S0RBS
SUPREME COURT
svccc&es iv HASrtiuwrap
To the editor:
1 now see the propriety of the sur-
name "Bonehead
Regarding Chippy's not so positive
review of the Durham R.E.M. shows;
the negativism could be swallowed a
little easier if he'd had his facts
straight.
The story Michael Stipe told pre-
ceding a particular song in one encore
set concerned a Mr. McCarthy. The
song was not "Good Advices" but
was "Life and How to Live It The
story is basically told in the song and
if your source of information was
paying attention, it was certainlv
obvious.
Maybe you should've at least
known the facts before you stepped
on the toes of a bunch of folks who
happen to love (and even criticize at
times) the "Three-Note-Band from
Athens
Renee Nobles
Same old issues
To the editor:
Sometimes I wonder how manv of
the people that write to the "Campus
Forum" have read more than one is-
sue. It seems that every vcar we (the
readers) get treated to the same argu-
ments between the "liberals" and the
"conservatives" over and over again.
Now and then a new issue will arise,
but eventually it all boils down to
second-grade name-calling, and I for
one am sick of it. I'm not real im-
pressed by an article that insults me
(or my intelligence) while trying to
make a point.
For example, I had never heard,
before Oct. 22, that "values of civi-
lized society" was anywhere in the
constitution. Is this a personal inter-
pretation or is that really the way it's
worded, and who's to decide exactly
what civilized society is?
Guess what sport fans! Nobody, or
at least very few people, wants to see
the country go down the tubes. Just
because some liberal views seem to be
destructive � there are some things,
such as equal rights, that have come
from the left. Also, I do recall some-
thing in the constitution about free-
dom of religion, so a decline in Chris-
tian dominance is not just a liberal
idea, but a constitutional one.
On the other hand, perhaps the
family is disintegrating. What can we
do? Well, it seems that everyone
wants to avoid communism, but ev-
eryone wants the whole country to do
things their way: that one way, the
right way. If that were to happen, then
the group that gets their way is
happy, and everyone else is forced to
observe that one way. Now, who can
give me a broad definition of commu-
nism? O.K it seems that the key here
is variety. So voice your opinion, vou
have every right to do so, but can't
you do it without insulting half of the
people you're writing to?
Andrew Miskavage
Junior
Music
Mad conservative
To the editor:
I am a conservative and I am angry
Conservatives and other concerned
Americans have every right to be
enraged at the state our society is in,
largely as a result of hypocritical lib-
eral jurisprudence and thinking. We
find ourselves in a nation in which the
law and the so-called justice svstem
are in such disarray as to be a mockery
of the very words law and justice.
We find a judicial system that often
frees its vicious criminals, and at the
same time sanctions the murder of the
innocent unborn; that, in the guise of
advocating "neutrality allows the
establishment and promotion of the
secular humanistic religion and the
simultaneous censorship of the
nation's Christian tradition in oir
public schools; that, in the name of
"free speech and press" unleashed a
floodtide of pornography on society
and, at the same time, prevents the
reading of the Bible, praving and
giving equal time to creationism in
our public schools.
The much vaunted liberal voice has
become the advocate of death as a
"cure" for social ills, the advocate of
the godless humanistic religion and
the biggest censor in this nation.
Much of the blame for this situation
can be placed squarely on the shoul-
ders of the liberal activist justices of
the Supreme Court. They have inter-
preted the Constitution in whatever
fashion may be needed to impose the
tenets of leftist social engineering the
nation.
Judge Burk, a moderate to c
vative in viewpoint who wou
been instrumental in cleaning u
mess resulting from liberal
has been hypocritically and t
branded an "extremist" and "ra
right-winger" by the lib i i
others. Bork has served his
and the citizenry in the m
able fashion as ,i Mariru
sor, solicitor general and
court judge but lias be
atcly defamed by (host wl
be of the "compassionate r
Borkisamanofextraordin it.
lectual courage, integrity ai :
passed learning in the field I
is being judged not tit to s n
Supreme Court by liars :
gianzers and a murden r
Bork was approved tor the
Circuit Court ol Appeals in
out a single dissentir �. �
Senate, winning appr ivalfi �
of the same senators w ;
ciously opposing him n
Where were the �
fulminations against rk 1
ago if his n cord over the past
is so reprehensible Retii :
lustice Warren Burger pa
that there is absolutely no I
evidence that Bork igainst
women "againstblacks r ic
pnvacv
Burger, whose opii
ten times the opinior - I
Tribe (Bork's strop . .
noted mat Bork is not I i
any sense of the word and that
oneof thebest Court nomii
years.
The Democrats (and other- d n I
oppose Bork for his suppos dlj
tremist" opinions, but becaus
likely give conservatives a � .
hold on the court Whatdistresst -1
Democrats is that a new court m
ity, in trying to clean up some oft
mess the liberal activists have
ated, would offend those nai
special interest groups (pro-abor
militant homosexual, radical fern
and radical civil liberatanan) that as
the Bork hearings reaffirm, appear I
have total sovereignty over
Democratic partv.
Justin Sturz
funior
Enc
ueti iut
f
I
Robertson picked on unfairly by press
A lot of extracurricular fun has been had at the
expense of the Rev. Pat Robertson. Extracurricular
because those who plead a special license to expose
(and slaver over) his personal past use as an excuse
for doing so that he is, after all, a candidate for the
presidency and for that reason liable to full bio-
graphical disclosure. They say this while also saying
that he has no greater chance of being nominated
than lesse Jackson. Indeed, there is the odd sense in
which Robertson is the Republicans' Jesse Jackson.
Now, there are two questions here. The first was
nicely launched by columnist Murray Kempton who
wrote with his customary charm and wit that The
Washington Post was in a great hurry to complete its
war against Robert Bork to punish him for his indif-
ference to the sacred American institution of pri-
vacy, so that it could get back to its public examina-
tion of just when a) Pat Robertson married, and just
when b) his first child was born. The conventional
difference between the two dates, we are heavily
reminded, is nine months-plus; the diffenence, in the
case of the Robertsons, ends up being something on
the order of 10 weeks.
When this news was released, the Rev.
Robertson's reply was devastating in its condor and
plausibility. He said that at the time his child was
conceived, Pat Robertson's life was devoted to
"wine, women, and song It wasn't until several
years later that he felt the afflatus that now moves
him, and became a preaching (and practicing) Chris-
tian. Moreover, whether he had or had not become a
Christian, for so long as there is any slight flavor of
disdain or even opprobrium felt against people who
were conceived out of wedlockin fact, there is
hardly any), it harms no one and conceivably pro-
tects against harassment of the child to rejigger the
marriage date, moving forward the required num-
ber of months. That is all that Robertson did, and it
is inconceivable that this would give offense to fair-
minded people, which � to reach for a loose figure
� would mean, oh, maybe 60 percent of Americans
On the second question, the minister � or, it one
accepts the formality, the ex-minister � running for
president, there is much to say and think about. But
whatever one's conclusions, they should not be in-
fluenced by the knowledge that, when a young man,
Robertson, as he put it, sowed his wild oats. And, of
course, thereare no historical grounds for supposing
that the American people will flatly exclude from the
White House anyone who ever fornicated. The Ju-
deo-Christian ethical system is based on the notion
of regeneration. If Rome could wait all those years
for Augustine to shape up, making him then the
bishop of Hippo and accepting him as the most
influential church father since St. Paul (who had his
own regeneration), presumably the United States
could survive a transgression of the flesh 33 years
old.
No, the problems that face Pat Robertson will not
ha ve to do wi th the question of his activity as a young
man. They do have to do with his formal occupation
as a minister, never mind that he has renounced that
calling, having recently been laicized, as the Catho-
lics would put it.
But the liacization of Pat Robertson is not quite the
same sort of thing we associate with others who lay
aside holy orders. Gary Hart was once a minister,
and so was Bill Moyers, and so was John McLaugh-
lin. None of them is thought of as remaining, in fact,
primarily a minister of God. But Pat Robertson is.

Now, that is by no means a categorically disabling
association � but, of course, public perceptions
change. There has never been a minister or an ex-
minister who served as president of the United
States. This had to do less with hostility to religion
than with the assumption that ministers are primar-
ily men of God, and the office of the president is
associated not with the city of God but with the city
of man. Ministers were, on the whole, much more
highly regarded than they are today, back when they
were never thought to be tempted by secular offiC(
Up until 1899, no one had ever served as president
Yale University who wasn't an ordained minister
On The Right
By
William F. Buckley Jr.
But just as the ordained minister loses his special
identification with another calling, we have two
running for president: Jesse Jackson in the Demo
crahc Party, Robertson in the Republican Partv
Moreover, Robertson's program, as lightly surveyed
at this end, seeks an America not different in am
important respect from the America over which
every president up through Dwight Eisenhower
presided. Non-dcmoninational prayer sanctioned
in the schools, abortions illegal save in special cir
cumstances, homosexuals encouraged to return to
the closet � not the stuff of which nightmares were
made back then. Why it is otherwise now is the
question to be examined during the primaries.
m
!��� � �' �M � �
?�� aMMMMHt
T-
Reagan seeks
'tier d
as suj
mean L
H
n us;
on AB( 1
David Bru
what
dent:
SO Ilk
WASHINGTON (AP) - Prcsi
dent Reagan and the leaders ol
Congress are seeking speedv ac-
cord in deficit-reduction talks, but
neither side is sure where com
promise might be reached on
taxes or program cuts
Reagan, under pressure
cause of last week's Wall Stro I
Crisis, has declared that
everything's on the table e
Social Security But it is clear that
neither he nor the Democrats siv
the table as piled high wit!
tions.
Senate Minority Leader
Dole, R-Kan , one ot tho
ing with the president today
Sunday he didn't think then
entitlement programs
Social Secuntv, suet �
and pensions, would be : irt
any package ot sp
While the preside
offered few hints ot what hi- n
support, he said the $2 ; I
deficit reduction call 1 foi
the Gramm-Rudman lavs i
going to make that mui
impact "
"We ought to do moi
should be a multiyi ai i
said in an interview on (
"Face the Natior : � ram
Sen. Lawton c
man of the S .
Committee, said i n the sa
gram he didn t s
Summit might not h
WASHINGTON (AP)
U.SSoviet summit might
occur in the remaining
the Reagan administrate i I I
Soviet leader Mikhail S
bachev continues to thr
blocks in the way of an am
trol agreement. Secretar) I
George P. Shultz says
Shultz met with President
agan late Sunday afternoon tor a
briefing in the White House resi-
dence with national security ad-
viser Frank C Carlucci, the White
House said.
The meeting was set "to rea
a report on their recent itu
with Soviet leaders in Most
said a statement issued by v hite
House spokesman Marhnritzwa-
j ter.
j The spokesman gave no other
! detailexcept to sav Reagan's chief
i of staff, Howard H. Baker Ir , his
deputy Ken Duberstein and
I Carlucci deputy Colin Powell
planned to attend.
Earlier in the day. Shultz said a
U.SSoviet summit will i
when Gorbachev is "ready or, if
he waits too long, maybe we
: won't be ready
"This administration ends in
January 1989. And as ou get ii
j the heat of the election gn(
1 it's no time for a Soviet leader I
here Shultz said on NBC-TV s
"Meet the Press "So there s only
I a finite amount of time, onlj a
! finite amount of patience with .
' of this
Soviet Foreign Minister Ed-
ward A. Shevardnadze raised the
topic of a summit this fall during
meetings in Washington in Sep-
tember, Shultz said, adding that
during talks in Moscow last week
Gorbachev suggested that Re-
agan visit the Soviet Union next
year
Administration officials had
voiced puzzlement at
Gorbachev's sudden refusal Fn-
dav to fix a date for a summit, but
emphasized that the decision
should not block a treaty banning
intermediate-range nuclear mis-
siles.
Shultz said Sunday the admini-
stration was willing to sign a
treaty with the Soviets, even with-
out a superpower summit meet-
ing and he said he remains opti-
mistic about such an agreement.
The treaty, applying to missies
mostlv based in Europe, was the
projected centerpiece ol the next
summit meeting between Reagan
and Garbachev. The two have met
face to face twice before-in Ge-
neva in November 1985 and in
Reykjavik, Iceland, in October
1986.
Carlucci, who accompanied
Shultz on the trip to Moscow said
Sunday that Soviet leaders indi-
cated they would prefer to reach
an arms agreement with the Re-
agan administration, but Gor-
bachev said he would be willing
to wait for the next administra-
tion.
"He made the comment to the
effect that, 'Well, if you don't
come around to our position on
this, 1 mav have to deal with the
next administration, ' Carlucci
said on ABC-TV's "This Week
With David Brinkley
Sen. Sam Nunn, D-Ga chair-
You
s





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 27,187
k ���
:$Bcx;�i
ult in review
: to conscr-
' would've
up the
� and falsely
ind "radical
erals and
I I is country
st honor-
Marinc profcs-
I appellate
; dclibcr-
'se who claim to
: irty
� linar intel-
� i unsur-
: Haw, but
' won the
�ats, pla-
r the D.C.
�82 ivith-
� by the
" "i many
are vi-
. i wars
I hicf
ted out
�.nil via te
aeainst
.vrence
ic is
sedlv i
ausc he'd
i majority
tresses the
imc of the
have cre-
pt narrow
rtion,
minist
n that, as
appear to
over the
istin Shire
unior
English
press
si ular office
asprcsidento
ned minister
On The Right
By
William 1. Buckley Jr.
ned minister loses his special
identil il i with another calling, we have two
running tor president essc ackson in the Demo
' ertson in the Republican Tarty-
program, as lightly surveyed
' seeks an America not ditterent in any
?rtant respect from the America over which
.� president up through Dwight F.isenhower
ded. No-
H.IU up inuiugn ivwigiu r. i st 11 nv���
�on-dcnioninational prayef sanctioned
ii ute schools, abortions illegal save in special cir-
cumstances, homosexuals encouraged to return to
the closet � not the stuff of which nightmares were
made back then. Why it is otherwise now is the
question to be examined during the primaries.
Reagan seeks deficit reduction
WASHINGTON (AP) - Presi-
dent Reagan and the leaders of
Congress are seeking speedy ac-
cord in deficit-reduction talks, but
neither side is sure where com-
promise might be reached on
taxes or program cuts.
Reagan, under pressure be-
cause of last week's Wall Street
Crisis, has declared that
everything's on the table except
Social Security. But it is clear that
neither he nor the Democrats see
the table as piled high with op-
tions.
Senate Minority Leader Bob
Dole, R-Kan one of those meet-
ing with the president today, said
Sunday he didn't think the major
entitlement programs beyond
Social Socuritv. Mich as Medicare
' and pensions, would be part ot
; any package of spending cuts.
While the presidential hopeful
offered few hints of what he might
support, he said the $23 billion in
deficit reduction called tor under
the Gramm-Rudman law "is not
going to make that much of an
impact
"We ought to do more and it
: should be a multiyear plan, he
said in an interview on CBS TV's
'Face the Nation" program.
Sen. Lawton Chiles, the chair-
man ot the Senate Budget
J Committee, said on the same pro-
gram he didn't see people favor-
ing other domestic restraints. An
across-the-board budget freeze,
as suggested by some, might
mean layoffs at law enforcement
agencies, he said, an unlikely
thing for Congress or the White
1 lous�. to support.
Chiles, D-Fla said he'd go
along with the president in ruling
out many types of tax hikes.
The president's chief econo-
mist, Beryl Sprinkel, appearing
on ABC-TV's "This Week With
David Brinklev declined to say
what new tax increases the presi-
dent might accept. Asked what he
would consider not harmful to the
economy, Sprinkel said, "Well,
some would say closing certain
tax loopholes might be non-dele-
terious. But if you happen to be
the one whose loophole got
closed, that's not so good
Congress' two top tax-writers,
1 louse Ways and Means Commit-
tee Chairman Dan Rostenkowski,
D-lll and Senate Finance
Committee Chairman Lloyd
Bentscn, D-Texas, appeared on
the same program as Sprinkel.
The two chairmen also spoke of
closing loopholes and both said
the president's plan to sell off
more government assets should
not lv a main part any agreement.
"I'd like to know what they
object to in the bill that the 1 louse
and the Senate have put together,
as opposed to suggesting (asset
sales) Rostenkowski said. "As-
set sales is a one-time hit. That
docs nothing for the deficit in the
out years, and that's what's im-
portant
Bentsen said asset sales, might
be a way to exceed the $23 billion
minimum deficit reducton of
Gramm-Rudman for fiscal 1988.
Besides trying to quickly agree
on a deficit reduction plan to reas-
sure financial markets, the presi-
dent and lawmakers are seeking
to avoid having the Gramm-
Rudman law automatically cut
the $23 billion it requires in deficit
reduction.
The spending cuts will take ef-
fect Nov. 20 if an alternative plan
isn't enacted before then.
Under the law, half of the
spending cuts would come out of
military programs, with the ex-
ception of the payroll. The cut
means that weapons procure-
ment, maintenance and other
military spending could be cut
10.5 percent.
A broad span of domestic pro-
grams would absorb the other
$11.5 billion reduction. Social
Security, veterans benefits and
welfare programs are exempt, but
everything from AIDS research to
FBI investigations would be
slashed 8.5 percent.
t
Summit might not happen
WASHINGTON (AP) � A
ISSoviet summit might not
occur in the remaining months of
the Reagan administration if the
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gor-
bachev continues to throw road-
blocks in the way of an arms con-
trol agreement Secretary of State
George P. Shultz says.
Shultz met with President Re-
agan late Sunday afternoon for a
briefing in the White House resi-
dence with national security ad-
viser Frank C. Carlucci, the White
1 louse said.
The meeting was set "to receive
a report on their recent meetings
with Soviet leaders in Moscow
said a statement issued by White
I louse spokesman Marhn Fitzwa-
ter.
The spokesman gave no other
detail except to sa v Reagan's chief
of staff, 1 toward H. Baker Jr his
deputy Ken Duberstein and
Carlucci deputy Colin Powell
planned to attend.
Earlier in the dav, Shultz said a
U.SSoviet summit will occur
when Gorbachev is "ready or, it
he waits too long, maybe we
won't be ready
"This administration ends in
January 1989. And as you get into
the heat of the election campaign,
it's no time for a Soviet leader to be
here Shultz said on NBC-TV's
"Meet the Press "So there's only
a finite amount of time, only a
finite amount of patience with all
of this
Soviet Foreign Minister Ed-
ward A. Shevardnadze raised the
topic of a summit this fall during
meetings in Washington in Sep-
tember, Shultz said, adding that
during talks in Moscow last week,
Gorbachev suggested that Re-
agan visit the Soviet Union next
year.
Administration officials had
voiced puzzlement at
Gorbachev's sudden refusal Fri-
day to fix a date for a summit but
emphasized that the decision
should not block a treaty banning
intermediate-range nuclear mis-
siles.
Shultz said Sunday the admini-
stration was willing to sign a
treatv with the Soviets, even with-
out a superpower summit meet-
ing, and he said he remains opti-
mistic about such an agreement.
The treaty, applying to missies
mostly based in Europe, was the
projected centerpiece of the next
summit meeting between Reagan
and Garbachev. The two have met
face to face twice before-in Ge-
neva in November 1985 and in
Reykjavik, Iceland, in October
1986.
Carlucci, who accompanied
"Shultz on the trip to Moscow, said
Sunday that Soviet leaders indi-
cated they would prefer to reach
an arms agreement with the Re-
agan administration, but Gor-
bachev said he would be willing
to wait for the next administra-
tion.
"He made the comment to the
effect that, 'Well, if you don't
come around to our position on
this, I may have to deal with the
next administration Carlucci
said on ABC-TV's "This Week
With David Brinklcy
Sen. Sam Nunn, D-Ca chair-
man of the Senate Armed Services
Committee, said on CBS-TV's
"Face the Nation" that a summit
may not be necessary to conclude
an arms control treatv.
Going into the talks with the
Soviets on Friday, Shultz was
optimistic that many of the stick-
ing points oi an arms control
agreement could be worked out.
But Gorbachev informed Shultz
during their meeting that he was
not prepared to set a date to visit
Washington for a third meeting
with Reagan unless the White
1 iouse agreed to limit research on
the Strategic Defense Initiative,
commonlv known as "Star Wars
"A WONDERFUL
FILM
RICH IN IDEAS AN OVERPOWER-
1NC lii.AUTi. I WAS AMAZED AND
MOVED BV IT"
Cionr SlsWcL At Thr Movies'
"A SPECTACULAR FUSION OI
IMAGE AND SOUND
Playing Wed. Oct 28th
8:00 P.M.
Hendrix Theatre
FRANCIS FOKD COPPOLA
PRESENTS
KOYAANISQATSI
LITE OUT OF BALANCE
Original Music Computed By Philip Class
Village
Donna Edwards - Owner
Greenville's Oldest & Most Experienced Pet Shop
�All Coral 407r off!
�Starter 10 gal. kits $14.95
�Fresh Water Fish Specials
�Large Aquarium Discounts
�Complete Line of Dog, Cat, & Fish Supplies.
Master Card & Visa Welcome
Financing Available
511 Evans St.
Greenville, NC 27834
(Behind Cubbies)
756-9222
The Greenville Jaycees
DARE Y00 TO See THK VNCAHHY W
HOUSEon
ECU NIGHT - WED. OCT. 28
Show ECU I.D. & Receive $1.00 off
General admission of $3.00
Old Belk-Tyler Bldg.
E. 5th St. Downtown
This worker is putting the finishing touches on a window in the new classroom building on campus.
(Photo by Thomas Walters � Photolab)
Failure to rotate radial tires may
reduce the lifetime of many of
them, especially those on new
cars. The Rubber Manufacturers'
Association recommends that
most radial tires be rotated, ac-
cording to the manyfacturer's
recommendations, to optimize
tread wear.
V
College courses for career success.
Playing Wed. Oct 28th
After Koyannisqatsi
Hendrix Theatre
Course Title Name Nj Sec,
Intro to ROTC MLSC 1001 001
& Army
Intro to ROTC MLSE 1001002
& Army
Intro to ROTC MLSC 1001003
& Army
Map UseTerrain MLSC 1002 001
Anal.
Map UseTerrain MLSC 1002 002
Anal.
Map UseTerrain MLSC 1002 003
Anal.
Map UseTerrain MLSC 1002 004
Begin End Davs
1400 1500 :a
900 1000 W
900 1000 TH
1000 1100 M
900 1000 T
1000 1100 W
1200 1300 TH
ARM RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING LRPS
For More Information Contact:
Capt. Mitchell 757-6967
PAXTANA BOB'S
W 0 S I N A r S
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
OCTOBER 30, 1987
� 4:30-9:00
3 00 advance TICKETS
AWARENESS ART ENSEMBLE
CRWIS MEST
ACCU VARSITY BARBER
FREE
SSCOPY
SHOP � �"
. . 0ITCHII5U-
LB.E Lj
COOLERS WELCOME NOGLASS LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 500 ELIZABETH ST
�emm �� � �. m
ii mmmmmmmmm
S f





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 27,1987
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
LOCAL BUSINESS neods consoent.ous
pawn far part-time dehverv and clerical
wort lav is hourly Needed 10 to 15
nours rvr week w.th flexible schedule,
v,all tommy at 757-0234
CASHIER; WAITRESS Appt) ,n per-
son FAMOUS PIZZA IO0E 10th St and
Evans. No phone calls
AEROBICSEXERCISE 1NSTRUC-
lOK. Part time position at aycee Park
leads and instructs aerobics exercise
classes must hae basic understanding
't exercise physiology, kinesioiogy, and
anatom) Should have working knowl-
edge oj choreographed exercise pro-
gram- tor adults children, older adults,
and pregnant women Must be able to
de-sign a sate dass and know t"PR Must
be in excellent physical condition, must
pass fditness exam and be willing to go
through acrobic's instructor training
program Applicant must be available to
teach clas-es irom 5PM to7PM. Monday
Tuesday and Ihursda) at (ayece Park.
maybe required to teach ocassional
classes al the Aquatics & Fitness Center
Salar) 5700 hour Application deadline
i-lr.djv October 23, 1987 AiTlv at the
v v oi Creenvilk Persontid Depart
PO Box 7207 201 West Fifth St
( recnville, NC 27833 7207
MAINTENANCE Part time position ni
Greenville Aquatics and Fitness Center
Position tor cleaning locker rooms gym-
nasium office areas, lobb) and other
areas of the Aquatics & Rtness Center
Uso responsible tor some outside mam
ce Must be able to work e enings r
10 PM and a regularly scheduled
i ekend 12 to lr. hours per week Salarv
is $3 55 houi Applications will be ac-
cepted until position is tilled Apph at
meCit) of Creenvilk- Personnel Depart
7207 201 West Fifth St
6 AM and 9 PM Oecassional weekend
work required Salary is SV85hour.
Applications accepted until position
tilled Apply at the City of Greenville,
Personnel Department, PO Box 7207.
201 West Filth St Greenville, NC 27�'?3-
72ir7
RECEPTIONIST, PART-TIME Answers
telephones, greets members and guests,
conducts tours and sells memberships!
performs light typing as required Apph
cant should be available to work 4 5 hour
shift between 8 AM and 1 PM, Monday
thru Friday, and occasionally on week
ends between 9 AM and 6 PM Salarv is
S.175hour. Applications accepted until
position is filled Apply at the City of
Greenville, Personnel Department PO
Box 7207, 201 West Fifth St, Greenville
NC 278.15-7207
TRAVEL FIELD OPPORTUNITY Gain
valuable marketing experience while
earning money Campus representatives
needed Immediately tor Spring Break trips
to Florida Call Campus Marketing at 1
800-282 r.221
BRODVS FOR MEN has full-time and
part-time sales associates positions, far
enthusiastic, fashion forward individuals
Ketail clothing experience is required
Better than average starling salary Apply
in person. Brody s Personnel director
Carolina East Mali M-W 2-4 PM
BRODVS has part-time sales ass�iates
positions for enthusiastic, out going indi-
viduals who enjoy working with young
contemporary Junior fashions Good sal
arv Apply in person, Brady's Personnel
Director, Carolina East Mall M-W 2 4 PM
weekends Fast, accurate and reliable
FOR SALE
ir
N
c it
HFEGl KP-SV1M INSTRUC ioRS,
v ' '�' Musi have advanced
ate or water satetv in
Applicants should be
�! �'���'� rk 3-5 hour shifts between
COUCH-FULL SIZE with pull out Double
bed gold, white and brown tweed, Exc
condition 1 vr old 732 9639.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICES
Papers, resumes, theses, etc Reasonable
rates (most SI 25 pagel grammar, punctua
Son & spelling corrected Call IAMIE at
758 1161 M-F 9-5 or 758 4"7 nights and
GRAND OPENING CELEBRATION:
Used furniture, antiques and collectable
Saturdav, Oct 31. Refreshments and Door
Prize. The Emporium. 705 Dickinson
Ave across from the License Plate Agency
1030-530 PM
WRITING YOUR PAPFR BY HAND
ANO THEN TYPING IT OVER? Save
time by writing Irom scratch on a com
puter The University has the computers
available for students, I can teach you how
Free word processing software' 752T7.
TIGHT BUDGET Try our meal deal
S2 49 for any sandwich, dies and drink 1
4 hamburger, I lam and cheese, BIT, Koast
beet, chicken lilet, turkey or pizza burger
Also homemade spaghetti and l.asagna
$3.95 (garlic bread and salad included)
FAMOUS PIZZA corner ot 10th St and
Ivans Not for delivers
TYPING AND WORD PROCESSING:
Two copies tor the price ot one done on
IBM Compatible compute! with Nl Q
printer Spelling checked against 70,000
word dictionary 7ri2 9637
TYPING SERVICE Papers Ohms let
ters, etc Typing done an computer lt
years experience Low tales call 756
8934 alter 5 10 PM
COMPARE OUR PKK I S AND
GOOD FOOD. Buy any large pizza nad
get a 2 liter Coke I Kl 1 Buy any small
Pizza and get 2 free lh oz drinks Buy
anv Sub and gel one tree 16 o drink
Call tor FREI delivery FAMOUS
PIZZA 757 1276or 757-0731
rYPING ot term papers and theses
done on a randy 1000 s Computer at
verv low rate. Call Wendy at 752 1521
after 1 (X).
M IU rYPINC v all km. al 758 1161
before 500PM 758 211� alter s (X) PM
EC U- Brew up the pcrfci t tan Don't be
a ghost Call about oui Halloween Sue
cial Today! California Tanning tor the
Best Tan in Town' 355 7858
FOR SALE: 81 1 Ionda CR 125 Dirt Bike
Lots of new parts Excellent condition
757 6611 Ext 255 after 5:00PM
ECU- Don't be a ghost' Call California
Tanning Today for the Best Tan in
Town' Ask about our Halloween Spe
dal. 355 7858
NEED TYPING Call Cindy - 757-0398
Call anytime after 5:00PM. Low rates
include prcxifreading, spelling and
grammatical corrections; professional
service 10 years experience -IBM TYP-
ING
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERV-
ICES 758 8241 or 758 5488. Ask for
Susan
1986 HONDA CR250R DIRT BIKE.
Never raced (1 lelmet and gloves avail
able) 20 hours ndmg time Excellent
condition Motorcyde trailer also avail
able S10(X). Call 355-7812 after 6 PM or
leave message.
IS IT TRUE you can buy Jeeps for $44
through the US. government7 Get the
iacts today! Call 1-512-742 1142 Evt
527I-A.
FOR SALE: Freezer and Refrigerator,
dryer and range $100.00 each' Good
condition guaranteed. Call 746 2446
WORK PROCESSINGLETTER
QUALITY or laser printing Rush fobs
accepted 752 1933.
ELECTROLYSIS permanent removal
of unwanted hair) By Barbara Venters
People who understand electrolvsis will
not wax, t weee or use electronic tweezer
or anv other temporary method Isn't it
time to try the permanent method Call
K.5CMW62 for free consultation
WORK PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services We also sell
software and computer diskettes 24
hours m and out Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (Beside Cubbies) Greenville,
NC 752 3694
Announcements
GENl RAL COLLECF
General C ollcge students should con-
tact their jd isers the week ot November
2 o to make arrangements tor academic
advising tor spring semester, 1988. Early
reg Oration will begin November S and
end November 17
ROWLING
Registration Kir intramural league
� � ingwitl be held on October 28 irom U
a m t p m in room 104-A Memorial Gym
CQ-IU C BASKETBAtL
( 0registration tor
tramId October 2s in
Brewstcrat 8 p m
CO-REC FOOTBAI,rf,
or co roc tootbai! will be
it7p.m inBrcwsterDt03
UNIV1 RSm UNION'S
I .Ul
1 lei
' I V part men t ot
Tie School oi M
N WIND 01 IN
�. November
niversi'v Unions
is present THE
ET in recital on
at s qo p m ln
x Theatre Tickets are now on sale
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall
dent Center trom 11 00 a m. until 6.00
p.m. Monday Friday Call 757-6611,
ext 2tx- Croup rate are available
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
Ihe Department at University Unions
and The School of Music presort National
Public Radio's first Lady of la Marian
McPartland-in I Icndrix Theatr- on Tues-
iay. November 10 at 8:00 p m Tickets are
now on sale in the Central Ticket office,
Mendenhall Student Center from 1! 00
am-600 pm MondavTru Call 757-
(�611 ext 2t6 Group rales available
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
Tl IE KING'S SINGERS will be in con-
ert : Mondav, November 50 in Wright
uditonum at 8 (XJ p.m. Sponsored by the
Department of University Unions as pert
of the 1987-88 ConcertTheatre Series
rickets are now on sale in the Ccntial
Ticket Office, Mendenhall Studenf Center
trom 11 00a m -6:tX) pm Monday ind.iv
Call 757 6611, ext 266 Group rates avail-
able
FRESHMAN7SOPHMORES
The Military Science Dept. is continu-
ing its two and three year Army ROTC
Scholarship campaign All students who
are interested in an Army ROTC Scholar-
ship are inv ited to attend an information
session on Wedsnesday, October 28 at 6
p.m in room 210 Erwin For more infor-
mation, call Captain Alvin Mitchell at 757-
6967 or 6974.
TURKEY TROT
A Turkey Trot Run will be held by the
Dept of Intramural Recreational Serv-
ices Registration will be held Nov. 18 at 6
p.m. in Brewstcr D-103 For more info
call 757-6387.
WORSHIPCELEBRATE-
Worship God and celebrate Commun
ion this Wed night at 5 p.m. at the Meth-
odist Student Center then enjoy a deli-
cious, all-you-can-eat home cooked meal
and good fellowship The meal is $2 at the
door, $1 50 if you sign up in advance Call
758-2030 for reservations.
SUPPORT GROUP FORHFP
A support group has been formed for
people who are caring for a parent,
spouse, or other loved one at home. The
group is led by Freda W. Cross, MSW, Pitt
County Memorial Hospital and Susan
Redding, R.N Creative Living Center.
The support group will be at St. James
United Methodist Church at 2000 E. 6th
St Greenville, on Tues Nov. 3 from 7-
� �� �-��
8 JO p.m Respite services are available To
make reserv ations tor respite care, call Ihe
Creative Living Center at 757 0303 from
B (Xa m to 5 l� p m 24 hours in adv ance
SPEAKER
Chris Schiappa, Geology Dept ECU,
will be speaking on "Petrology of the
Coronaca Pluton. Greenwood Countv,
South Carolina" on Thurs , Oct, 29 at 3 00
p m in Graham 501
CONSTRUCTION MGMT,
Dieter B Rathke, VP Philip 1 lolmann
USA, Inc. will be speaking on Interna-
tional Construction in the United States"
on Wed, Oct 28 at &30 p.m. in 201
Flanagan. Everyone is Invited.
MADRIGAL DINNFRS
Tickets are now on sale for Madrigal
Dinners to be held Dec 2 5 at 7 00 p.m in
Mendenhall Tickets are SlOfor ECU stu
dents and S16 for all others Now is the
time to order your tickets, as they always
sell quieklv. Call the Cmtral Ticket Office
at 757-6611, ext. 266.
ADVERTISING
The Triangle East Advertising and
Marketing Association is offering a schol-
arship for a rising senior who is majoring
in Advertising in the School of Art, Busi-
ness (Marketing), or Drama (Broadcast-
ing) at ECU. The applicant must have at
least a 3.0 GPA and intend to pursue a
career in advertising or an advertising
related field in eastern NC An applica-
tion form must be completed, and a 500
word essay typewritten explaining how
heshe became interested in advertising
as a career and why heshe should receiv e
the Scholarship. Finalists also participate
in an interview during the fall semester of
their senior year Slides of 5 works (name,
title, media, size) must accompany the
application form of an art student This
yearthcre will beavailablefor Spring 1988
and Fall 1988 S150 each semester. Apph
cation forms may be obtained in the
Media Center in the School of Art. The
deadline for application materials is Nov
19.
ART SCHQLARSjJIES
The School of Art of ECU is offering
scholarships for full-time art students
from the Richard Steven Bean Scholar-
ship Fund, the University Book Ex-
change Scholarship Fund and the
Gravely Scholarship Fund The recipient
of the Richard Steven Bean Scholarship
Fund must be a Commercial Art major
with a maintained 2.5 GPA. The $300
award is for the Spring 1988 and Fall 1988
semesters The University Book
Exchange Scholarship Fund grants two
scholarships in the amount of S500 for two
semesters, Spring 1988 and Fall 1988, to
two undergraduate art students with a
maintained 3.0 GPA. The Gravely Schol-
arship in the amount of $320 for the
Spring 1988 semester is available to a
Commercial Art student and will be a
renewal to last year's recipient. Addi-
tional info, and application forms can be
obtained in the Media Center in the School
of Art of ECU. The deadline for applica-
tions is Nov 19, 1987.P
HAIR PRODUCTS
The free samples of Studio Line hair
products are now available for those who
attended the sneak preview of "Baby
Boom To get your free sample, bring
your screen pass or movie program to
Mendenhall room 210 or 234, Monday-
Friday from 8 a.m5p.m. Offer expires
Friday, Oct 30,1987.
PHI ALPHA THEIA
The Phi Alpha Theta international
Honor Society in History will hold its Fall
cookout on October 30 from 5 pm 11.30
pm on the picnic area near Memorial
Gym Members and guests welcome Cost
is SI 50 tor members, S2 50 lor guests For
information about joining, please contact
the ECU I listorv Department.
GAMMAiU T.U'jUl
The National Gamma Beta Phi Honor
Society wilLhaw a mooting on October 27
at 7 p.m in Jenkins Auditorium Last day
to pav dues and attendance is required or
probation will result
EDUCATION MAJORS
The School ot I ducation, in conjuction
with Campus Ministries is jpons wing a
WorkStudy trip to Mexicoduring Spring
Break (March 6-13,1988 Ppoortuni esto
observe and teach at a fecal schoi I arc
available A minimum li i! ot "survival
Spanish is required For application and
more information, c; me to room . i
Speight
CORAL B�EJ OWEcziirt
It you enjoy scuba d. ing then vi
need to oin ECU'S Cna: Reel Cm a tie
For more info, call 752-4399 ,uJ ��' � -
Glenn or Rob.
LsssciatiY
A faculty auction sponsored by the LSS
Society wiil be held on Tuesday October
27 at 9.30 p m in the Biology LectUce room
KB. Come bid on Dr Wendlmg and other
LSS faculty
ASSERT! YE NESS
A three part workshop offered to stu-
dents at no cost by the University Coun-
seling Center is on October 29, November
5 and 12 All three sessions will be con-
ducted Irom 3-4 p.m. in 312 Wright Build-
ing Contact the Counseling Center at 757-
6661 for class content and registration.
COPING mTILSIRESS
A tree mini class will be offered by the
ECU Counseling (enter for students in-
terested in learning how to cope with
stress Dates for this class are November 3,
5, 10, and 12 in 529 Wright from 3-4 p.m.
( all or stop by the Counseling Center lor
further information 757 h661
EL'RRQUGHS- WELLCOME
SAM is sponsoring a tour of the Bur-
roughs-Wcllcome plant on November 11,
for all students Those micro-tod should
sign upon sheets posted m Rawl. Meet in
Rawl 105 (Browning rootr.) at LOO p.m.
Buses or vans may be available if needed.
CLLMIXER.
You are invited to atten the Occupa-
tional '�"herapy Mixer on Wed. Oct 28
from 7-9 pm in the Mendenhall Mulli
Purpose Room loin u, tor speakers dis
plavs, and retreshme: .�
ALL EO MAJORS
The ECU chapfej t SNCAE NEA urill
have a meeting Wed , Oct 28 at 4 30 p m
:n Speight 301 New members are wel-
come. All canv childhood, intermediate,
middle grades, sccoidiry and teaching
fellows are encouraged to join this proles
sional organization for teachers
CJ3U�CiDEMQCRAIS
ECU College Democrats meet every
Wed at 400 in Mendenhall, room 212
Anyone interested in becoming involved
in elections at all levels are encouraged to
attend. This Wed , we will be discussing
this past weekends Platform Convention
For more info, call Melissa at 752-5611
M.Q,
The International Language Organiza
tion, I.L.O, will have its next meeting on
Tues Oct. 27 at 4.00 p.m. at Chico's Res
taurant All members and anyone inter
ested are encouraged to attend If you
need a ride, please contact Patricia Car
dona, 758-8818 or George Lindsey 757-
3820
WELLNESS LI?NJrFIFOX!
Local chiropractor, Dr. Mark Jarmel
will speak on muscle balancing and sports
massagcaccupressure on Wed Oct 28
from noon until 1 p.m. in 221 Mendenhall.
Sponsored by Intramural Recreational
Services.
California Tanning Salon
"you can see the difference"
608 Suite A, Arlington Blvd.
355-7858
First Visit free with�idECU l!b7
Special ECU Rates
Extra visits free with purchase
"Don't Be A Ghost"
Call Today For
The Best Tan In Town
Come in Oct. 26-30 and ask about
our Halloween Special!
�MM
)i
�iiiwm
tffcMM
- e
�� ��
PICK UP AND DELIVERY ot term pa
pers, theses, resumes, to be typed IHM
wordprixessmg by professional with 15
years experience 1 etter quality print and
professional editing Call Nanette in
Crifton al 1 524 5241 Cheap call the best
service!
PROFESSIONAL BUT NOT EXPEN-
SIVE! Progressive Solutions Inc offers
professional word processing to students
nd professionals Term papers, disserts
lions, theses, reports and much more as
low as SI 75 per page (Please call for
quote on your projectPrice includes
printing on high quality bond paper and
selling verification against a 50,000
word electronic dictionary Ask about
our special offers Laser printing now
available C'all Mark at 757 54-10 alter 7 (X)
pm for free information
FOR HINT
GEORGETOWN townhousc apartment
tor rent Two bedrooms, now car,vt and
paint, dishwasher, disposal, washer
dryer hook ups $350 jht month plus
deposit 75rt 7Mn
RINGGOLD TOWERS Apis for rent
furnished Contact llolhe Simonowich
752-2865
PERSONALS
ATTENTION BLIR LOVERS Pitcher
for 99 cents every night FAMOUS PIZZA
corner of 10th and Ivans
BILLGRADY: last weekend wasperfo
tion You're more than 1 ever imagined
Would a permanent relationship be out of
the question? You know how to rea h me
Boy, you sure know how to reach me
Waiting to hear irom you the Orl with
the Dark Green i vis
SIG LP HAITI HOI R Win Mil
lamaica Night Red Strip Import SI 25
Rum Punch 52 (�) Reggae Music All nitc
ATI LSI ION: Don! forget Alpha Xi
Delta's Happy Hour every Wedncsda)
night at Pantana's It's the best excuse for
missmg Thusdjv 's class
INTERVARSm CHRISTIAN 111-
LOWSIllP Please Join us' Wednesday
nights at 7:00 pm Speight 129 Fun Food
Fellowship-Teaching
FOUND: Address and Phone Book in
Wright Auditorium call 757 6269or737
6290 and describe.
LAMBDA CHI'S, KA'S AND AZD-S
i lad a great time at the Wig paxtv t n
Thurs Let's all get together aain som
time soon. Love. The sgma's. PS. Lu
keep the wig on"
Cl KIA Than for the 1st have rope will
travel Only if you bu) lunch girl Tell
your roommate to take her own kej
va. Slim
ATTENTION: Are .
your favorite nsk jr. ; p synching to
videos that make them look like their
starring in a Japcnese monster movie1
Well, here's a solution Wednesday 9 30
pm The Attic R Emerson as "Meatloaf"
S Kane as "The 11 Bag Emerson as
The Doo Wap Girl You'll never see
anything like it Again!
HALLOWEEN AT RIO The doors will
creek open at 9pm Friday when our
haunted house becomes a live horrifying
experience! But wait, it won't end here
Join us on Saturdav where we will feature
our costume contest with S500.00 to be
given away Catch this thrill at RIO m tru.
HILTON
Thcta Chi: Cireat Fall Break Jere, doevi
it feel go�d to be out of the teen club'
Chris P and Greg L but you guvs had
fun We have a slush fund for your law
vers Gel ready, cause Dreamgirl cruise
and Chapter Installments are coming up
KAREN HEIM- Tall Break was a blast
and PULSATIONS was the heat Than!
for making mv 2 1st B day the best
Alpha love VLS Amanda
PAIGE JACKSON - BETA KAPPA
so glad you pledged AOPi You've b �
the greatest hl'sis at Phi Tau Get psy i bed
for lots of fun at AOPi and Phi Tau Gotta
love thoso M and M's Love va Bs
Amanda
ATTENTION ALL GIRLS: We kno
these two guys corn) as this mav ho a; ,
lous Al is the hrst and than there is
Anxious Al is his name, having
women he's not to blame don't ei
wrong he's really cute especially
he is decked in a suit What is fine i
Al? No need to ask, just walk right
grab his a Now there is BCB thesi in
onlv his initials, you s�-e cause he drives .
lurbo 4 bad as can be, he cool
dances, in graveyards lakes chances �
looks impress, his clothes never a n
Don't hate us forever, we did this n i �
love Fannv and Scopin Tins wj.
fun!
OCCLPAHONAI THERAP1
what you think' otn us to learn r ��
Wed Oct 7 9 pm Mend nhall
Purpose Room Speakers, Displays
fresh men ts
It) Ml &. K A1IAS V.S - n -
69-0,ourfavot Violet are blue I
lace the rose was red and so was !
face I lev K , what do veu s.n -
drootin Santa maybe coUesl � -
he ain't no tool lle'scominin butm
not with you! There was a lot
this weekend, where were
Taking any not shdnor lately lose
a grip, button vour hp Awori
don't close youi eves
jv be
ckit
MI
ATTENTlON:GirlsofEast ai
brothers ot Pi kappa Alpha ai
tor calendar girls lor Iheir
1 Of details call 752 J874
lAt ASH Kl Ni Y u wen nghl
didn't have to go to Disnev � .�.
nesday night was a total fa
wait to do it again We kw l, euvs
Vour Little rankheads
SIG EPS, TKE, PI KAPPS, KAPPA
S1CS, TRi-SIC, ADPi's and Chi O: The
Pre I lalioween iiash w as a t,jm Let'sdi
it again real soon. Ixivc the AZDs
TO THE PERSON WHO STOLE THE
CAMERA at Rosina s : . jr have the
camera but return the I N q lestii ns
askisd
JULIE: Well riximie here it - IT r.a-
sitied vou always wanted
v ou're having a rough vms f . I it one in
to cheer vou up Don t worn it 11 i
out Love, S.L.C
DANCE DANCE DANCE PARTV AT
BEAUS every Wednesday with
Kappa Tau little sisters" ($1 00 shots and
25 cents dra
ATTENTION PHI TAUS: ce: psyched
for a radical n:ght Don't ask quest! IB
We love vou guv s' i lave a great vvom d
we'll stv va at Bi Al s Love your lii
sisters
SUB STflTiW
215 E. 4th St.
752-2183
A COMF1 I I F MEAL . A BUN
2 Locations
316 Greenville Blvd
756-71
Think of us for your
Halloween Party or
Tailgate Party
5 ft Party Suh
stuffed with cheese and six
different meats. Topped with
lettuce, tomatoe, onions, salt,
pepper, oil, vinegar and oregano.
Comes with enough plates, cups,
napkins, chips, and Pepsi or tea.
(feeds 20-25 people)
Only $38.88
3 ft. Party S�h
Same as above
(feeds 10-15 people)
Only $21.88
�1WIP�I

Colleges
tin-1.
A
PAR
(el's) - A numlvr t.l colleges
reported increases in racial
sionson Iheirrampuses List wti. k,
following shil otJier incidet Is at
Illinois and at New York's I
kins-Cortlandommunit)
legc earlier in October
� Officials Oi a Mississippi
chapler of the National Ass
tion for the Advancement oi Col
ored People stv a p.lm invest,
ga tion of ablack student tlns
a "cover up" and a "put ��
Jerome Williams, a hl,i. k '
sissippt Slate student rjrot
Aug. 28 when he was thrown into
a swimming pool by tlmv v.
Students The three later admitted
Woods design
K l Nan tmmm
A 46.5-acre wckxIs along Otter
Creek in northwest Put Count
used as a lting outdoor lal
tory by ECU for 20 vears. has been
designa ted a "nal u ra! a rea "under
the state's protective Natural
Heritage program.
Officials of the university and
the N.C. Department of Natural
Resources and Community De
vclopment will participate in the
formal dedication of the area of
wooded slopes and ravines near
the Tar River on Nov. 11.
'The reserve will providee
lent opportunities for res.
and education in forest succes-
sion and other ecological proc-
esses said Charles Roe, manager
of the Natural i lerttage program
lor NRCD.
The land has been used fi t
environmental education and
biological research by FCL scien
tists and students since the early
1960s and was given to ECL la t
year by its owners, Mrs. Reid
Parker EUisofWintervilleand her
son, Howard Ellis
Pnor to Ellis's gift, the area was
used by ECU under a token lease
agreement.
A team of ECU scientists and
administrators made up an ad hoc
committee which proposed the
natural heritage area designation
and submitted an application and
inventory of the area's natural
resources.
A member of the committee, Dr.
Vince Bcllis, professor of biology,
announced that the area has been
designated to the state's Registry
of Natural Heritage Areas be-
cause of its unusual, varied ty-
pography, geomorphic features
and diversity of vegetation.
Roe said that the property has
not been timbered in thisccntun
and contains good examples ot
mature natural (forest) communi-
ties seldom found on the coastal
plain.
"Some of the plant species are
not typically found this far east
Roc said. These include galax and
mountain laurel growing in a
cool, moist environment on the
steep, north-facing ravines.
Natural community types in-
clude dry oak-hickory forest, drv
mesic oak-hickory, mesic mixed
hardwoods and Coastal Plain
small stream swamp, with a great
deal of variation between ihe
types, Bellis said. Few examples
of these communities remain in
this part of the state, he said.
The Otter Creek Natural Heri-
tage designation is the first such
designation in Pitt Countv under
the program. Roe said.
�-
s
)
r
CHAI
RESPi
0PP0RTUI
Important points when
As an Air Force ofticer
meaning You'll be in a
high-tech environment
start. You'll have opport
education and expand
t)Qfe all the rewards inc
salary, great benetits an
pay each year If you wc
your career, contact you
today. Call TSgt
(919)6
Station to





e will feature
' 0 to K-
ji KlOin iho
doesn t
: ' n club?
ys had
foi voui Ijiv
cruise
re coining up
w as j blast
isailkx
. si ever
kXITA- I'm
'� u've been
rpsyched
.olla
kJ VBS
('e kno
bv an
"�; Sow
' gel vis
lh whm
i iboul
II . V t-s .1
�ks he
ces his
i moss
in pun
i irit
i i hikp
not
a The
KAPPS, KAPPA
- and Chi O: The
i: last I el sdo
� th KZjy
Ail STOl F THE
. an ha e the
PARTY At
I'll
sour hi'
Ik Blvd
756-7171
ft. Party Sub
Same as above
(feeds 10-15 people)
lOnly $21.88
k of us for your
oween Party or
ailgate Party
ft. Party Sub
d cheese and six
in 3. Topped with
tomatoe, onions, salt,
oil, vinegar and oregano.
Ath igh plates, cups,
chips, and Pepsi or tea.
20 25 people)
mi $38.88
j
THE EAST C AKOl INIAN (KTC)BI:K 27, 1987 7
Colleges report increases in racial tensions
(CPS) A number ot colleges
reported increases in racial ten
sionson their campuses last week,
following still other incidents at
Illinois and at New York's Tomp
kins CortUtnd Community Col-
lege earlier in October
� Officials Ot a Mississippi
chapter of the National Associa-
tion tor the Advancement of Col
ored People sav a police investi
gationof ablackstudent'sdeath is
a cover up" and a "put off
lerome Williams, a black Mis
sissippi State student drowned
Aug. 2S when he was thrown into
a swimming jool by three white
students The three later admitted
i i
to throwing Uituamsin the pool.
Police did not arrest them because
they said thev threw Williams in
the pool as a joke.
I he St irkville, Miss , police
botched the investigation, the
X'A.U 1" charged.
DouglasConner the ice prcsi
dent of the Oktibbcha County
NAACP, said the three should
have been booked that night. "If it
had been three black people who
dumped a white person in the
pool, thev would have been ar
iested that night Conner said
"At least the students should have
been booked "
NAACP official Rov Perkins
said police conducted a much
more aggressive investigation
earlier this year when a white
MSU professor was murdered,
allegedly by two black youths.
A grand jury will investigate
Williams' death.
� The Indiana University Mus
Inn Student Association says a
fraternity dance held Sept. 26
degraded Arab and Moslem cul-
ture and beliefs.
The Phi Kappa Psi "Arabian
Knights" dance perpetrated in-
sulting stereotypes, according to
IU Saudi Arabian student Sami
Baroum. "It was making fun of
our culture, religion, everything.
I've been in America for 10 years,
and have never seen racism dis-
played so publicly
The fraternity distributed t-
shirts depicting two Arabs, a
camel, and a gagged woman.
"The shirt confirms insulting
stereotypes Baroum said. Pho-
tographs of the dance that ap-
peared in the IU student newspa-
per "showed girls dressed in of-
fensive clothing and bowing
down in a mocking way
Baroum said
The Muslim Student Associa
tion ma v st.ige formal demonstra
tions to protest the dance.
"It wasn't meant to be a mock-
ery of anything fraternity presi
dent Dave DeBrunner said
"We'vebeen having the dance for
about 75 years, and it's a tradi-
tion.
� Students at the University of
Colorado have revived efforts to
rename a dormitory now named
for a participant in the 1864 Sand
Creek Massacre.
in l4, the CU Board of Re-
gents named the dorm Nichols
Hall alter David H. Nichols, .
Coloradan instrumental in
founding the university. Nichol
however, also lead a voluntet r
cavalry that butchered more than
160 Indians at Sand Creek, Colo
Students and some univcrsiU
officials have called upon the r
gents to change the name of th
dorm to White Antelope Hall or
Chief Nnvot Hall, in memory ol
two Indians slain at Sand Creek
Woods designated for "natural area

EC! Nwr, Burrmj
A 46.5-aere woods along Otter
Creek in northwest Pitt County,
used as a living outdoor labora-
tory by ECU for 20 years, has been
designated a "natural area" under
the state's protective Natural
Heritage program.
Officials of the university and
the N.C. Department of Natural
Rosoura-s and Community De-
velopment will participate in the
formal dedication of the area of
woitded slopes and ravines mir
the Tar River on Nov 11
"i he reserve will provide excel
lent opportunities tor research
and education in forest succes-
sion and other ecological proc-
esses said Charles Roe, manager
�t liii Natural i Icritage program
for NRCD.
The land has boon used tor
environmental education and
biological research by ECU scien-
tists and students since the early
lbOs and was given to ECU last
vear by its owners, Mrs Reid
Parker Ellis of Wintcrvilk? and her
son, Howard Ellis.
Pnor to Ellis's gift, the area was
used bv ECU under a token lease
agreement.
A team ot ECU s, u-ntists and
administrators made up an ad hoc
committee which proposed the
natural heritage area designation
and submitted an application and
inventory of the area's natural
resources
A member of the committee. Dr.
Vinee Bellis, professor of biology,
announced that the area has been
designated to the state's Registry
of Natural Heritage Areas be-
cause of its unusual, varied tv-
pography, gcomorphtc features
and diversity of vegetation.
Roe said that the property has
not been timbered in this century
and contains good examples of
mature natural (forest)communi-
ties seldom found on the coastal
plain.
"Some of the plant species are
not typically found this far east
Roe said. These include galax and
mountain laurel growing in a
cool, moist environment on the
steep, north-facing ravines.
Natural community types in-
clude dry oak-hickory forest, dry
mesic oak-hickory, mesic mixed
hardwoods and Coastal Plain
small stream swamp, with a great
deal of variation between the
types, Bellis said. Few examples
of these communities remain in
this part of the state, he said.
The Otter Creek Natural Heri-
tage designation is the first such
designation in Pitt County under
the program, Roe said.
The site is along a small stream.
Otter Creek, which is a meander
ing tributary o the Tar River near
the town ol Falkland, N.C.
On uplands above its slope's are
mature stands ol loblolly pine
with an understory of hardwood
trees. Huge beech trees in the
ravines are estimated to be 130 to
200 years old The ravine wa
tercd bv seeping springs also
provide an ideal environment for
certain mosses, ferns and liver-
worts not commonly found in Pitt
GORDON'S
Lots of Free Advice
for The New Skier
(vj Bypass (Novt to McDonald's)
756 inm
County.
Upper hardwood forests in-
clude several types of oaks, two
types of hickory, sweetgum, dog-
wood, American holly and sassa
tras. Lower hardwoods include
many of the same trees along with
white oak, black walnut, mul-
berry, yellow poplar, beech and
i ten wood.
The stream swamp area con
tains bald cypress, river birch,
basswood and possum haw
ECU officials said the
PARTY ANIMALS
I II I I I
I AN"
"let Us Dress You Up
This Halloween"
Vintage Clothing,
Jewelry, & Collections
9TJ-752-17S0
university's biology, geology,
parks and recreation, conserva-
tion and leisure systems studies,
science education and environ-
mental health departments plan
to continue use of the area for
study and research. The School of
Art also has expressed interest in
the area for sites for painting of
landscapes and outdoor scenes.
Officials said that NRCD Secre-
tary Thomas S. Rhodes may also
participate in the Natural Heri-
tage area dedication if his sched-
ule permits.
Hillcrest Lanes
Memorial Drive
756-2020
FREE
GAME
r
i
i
i
i
L
Bowl One Game & Receive
Another Game FREE With I
This Coupon. J
Limit 1 Coupon Per Person
�RACK ROOM SHOES,

� BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
I
I
Open MonSi
Sunday 1-6
I
TAKE AN
EXTRA
10 off!
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICK I
(EXCEPT A1GNER. NIKE AND REEBOK I
COMING ATTRACTIONS
I i i
"$795 J
Every Wednesday
from 4 p.m. till closing
If you're a fan of tender,
delectable barbecue beef ribs,
then Annabel's has something V f
for v(xj to cheer about. Our ry -
all-you-tan-eat ribs are onlyN 7 C
$2 every Wednesday
from 4 p.m. till dosing.
; -
Aiwabcllc's
" RESTAURANT A PI IB
S
IL
f
The Plaza
Greenville Blvd
7560315
CHALLENGE.
RESPONSIBILITY.
OPPORTUNITY. REWARD.
Important points when you're considering a career.
As an Air Force officer, these words have real
meaning. You'll be in a challenging position in a
high-tech environment with responsibility from the
start. You'll have opportunities to continue your
education and expand your experience. And you'll
have all the rewards, including an excellent starting
salary, great benefits and 30 days of vacation with
pay each year. If you want the important things from
your career, contact your local Air Force recruiter
today Call T$gt Steve White
(919)850-9724
Station to Station Collect
' "y.E J
Wednesday
October 28th at 8:00 p.m.
Double Feature:
KOYAANISQATSI
MAN OF FLOWERS
October 29- November 1
at 8:00 p.m.
Movie:
THE FLY
October 30- 31 at 11:00 p.m.
Late Show:
FRANKENSTEIN
Sunday, November 1st
8:00 PM Minges Coliseum
In Concert
ANITA BAKER
ECU Students - $12.00 Public And
At The Door $14.00
For more information, contact the
Student Union at 757 6611. ext 210.
I !
i i
! I
1
V
f�y- xn to u�vi �r�
gathering place
mm







i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
XTOBCR 27, 1987
Religions not taught in new elementary books
(AP) North Carolina fifth-
graders will learn little about the
taith and motivations of Pilgrims,
Mormons and lews from reading
the three fifth-grade social studies
books selected by the N.C. Text-
book Commission last week. The
commission's top choice, "The
United States: Its History and
Neighbors published by Har
court, Brace and iovanovich says
this about the Mormons
"In 1946, the Mormons, a reli-
gious group joined the migration
ax ros Amci ica Under the leader-
ship ot oseph Smith, they had
first settled in Nauvoo, 111. Their
religious beliefs caused problems
with neighboring settlers
Students will be lett to wonder
what the Mormons believed, why
those beliefs caused problems
and what tl
roblems were.
Similarly, the other two books on
the list make it clear only that the
Mormons believed something
different than their neighbors.
It is the kind of account that
caused commission member John
Langley, principal of Rocking-
ham Junior I ligh School, to com-
plain Thursday that social studies
textbooks gave "bland, obscure
treatment" to religion.
but langley and the commis-
sion members judged the books
on the basis of how well they
matched the N.C. Standard
Course of Study, and that curricu-
lum does not specifically call for
teaching about religion in social
stdies courses. So the commis-
sioners will recommend Nov. 5
that the state Board of bducation
adopt for use in the state's
elasstoomsa lone list of books that
scrimp on religion.
It also will recommend that the
board establish a committee to
study how religion should be
treated, not only in textbooks and
the state's curriculum, but in
schools in general. That proposal
got a warm reception from educa-
tors interviewed Friday.
John N. Dornan, executive di-
rector of the Public School Forum
of North Carolina, in Raleigh, told
the News and Observer of Raleigh
he welcomed a study but was
fearful it "may make teaching re-
ligion more politicized than it al-
ready is
Dornan said children had been
deprived of any "meaningful dis-
cussion of religion" by publishers
fearful of attacks from Christian
fundamentalists. And students
cannot understand history or lit-
erature without understanding
the religious movement that
shaped both, he said.
"The point of view that expos-
ing a student to differcnt religious
ideas is threatening to them in my
estimation is the the biggest threat
of all Dornan said. "We need to
understand right now what
makes an Ayatollah tick, and that
what we view asa war over water-
ways and oil to them is a religious
war
Charles P. Bcntley of North
Wilkesboro, who recently
stepped down as president of the
N.C. Association for Supervision
and Curriculum Development,
said the textbook commission had
raised a legitimate issue.
"Anytime you have a big seg-
ment of the curriculum that
people think is being ignored, it is
legitimate for the state board to
say let's take a look at it Bcntley
said. "That is something we might
very well take a look at in the
future
It is wise to begin studying what
the role of religion in textbooks
and classrooms should be, said
Cathy J. Roscnthal, executive di-
rector of the North Carolina chap-
ter of People for American Way, a
liberal lobbying group founded
by television producecr Norman
Lear.
"I would really welcome the
opportunity to be involved in
discussing the issue Ms. Rosen-
thai said.
People for the American Way is
one of many groups in recent
years that have issued reports
concluding religion gets only cur-
sory treatment in textbooks
People for the American Way
commissioned a panel of histori-
ans and educators to review 31
American history textbooks. In
their 1986 report, the reviewers
said religion was not treated asa
significant element in American
Life.
"The two themes which have
been in tension since the earliest
colonial times�religiousintoler
ancc and religious idealism-are
not recognized as essential to an
understanding of the American
character the reviewers re-
ported.
Liberals write harsh criticisms
W �HiNCT (AP) 1 iberal
congressional
Iraitra committees have
mana1 write harsher criti-
(ismsof President Reaganintothe
latentversion ot the committees'
findii�gs,according toa published
repoit.
-� � 1kesman tor the Senate and
Dmmittees, however,
ul nfirm details of a
-k Tunes report
re enl draft
i
. �. sident wasdeny-
his subordi-
agii . in .i ieer
the summary as
committee spokesman
said the report, , re than 25
� 11 1 i ing prepared
but lie added, "I'm
Demonstration
to be held here
i i i Siewi bureau
rhe National Science Center for
- i m cati �ns and Electronic s
v CE) will i 1 eletrain !
1 , ;ing Inter
rive Technology Wednesday
n tii 3 p in. at EC I
session is designed to dem-
trate the use of t( i nuni-
E alone with
( quality f sci i �id
ith matics.
ECL is one of many places
where the NSCCE will hold the
teletr i s that will in
instructional
tei hnolog)
Teachers, school administra-
tors and trainers in industry are
encouraged to attend. Admission
details contact Karl
labaugh, ECU Division of
Continuing Education, 757-6143.
Solid waste
topic of seminar
at university
l I New Bureau
A statewide conference to dis
ot solid waste
. ment will be held Nov. 5
red by the ECU Re-
al Development institute, the
rence theme is "Life After
'tills" and will focus on the
problems and regulations affect-
the disposal of municipal
solid waste.
Methods to reduce community
waste and technology for solid
waste management will also be
discussed and demonstrated. The
program will be held at the
(Ireenville Hilton.
Solid waste experts from gov-
ernmental agencies, universities
and private industries will par-
ticipate as speakers for the pro-
gram. In addition, there will be
displays and demonstrations of
new equipment and services for
waste disposal.
Those attending the conference
will be city and county officials,
sanitarians, industrial generators
of solid waste, environmentalists
and other interested citizens.
An advance registration fee of
$20 will be charged. Persons who
are not pre-registered will be
charged $25. Contact Page Ayres,
ECU Regional Development In-
stitute, Greenville, N.C. 27858-
not going to comment on what's
in it
The committees investigating
the sale oi arms to Iran and the
diversion of proceeds from those
sales to the Nacaraguan rebels
originally planned to release their
closely guarded findings this Fri-
day.
But de-classification by the
White I louse and printing of the
report will delay its release- for
about two weeks I louse commit-
tee spokesman Bob Havel said
Sunday.
Havel, too, declinded any com-
ment on the Times report.
"he Times said liberal members
of the committee toughened lan-
guage on Reagan's role. Two
weeks earlier, conservatives had
secured major changes in the re-
port, including deletion of com-
parisons to the Watergate scandal
that brought down President
Nixon in 1974, the Times said.
The Times report did not dis-
close who provided the newspa-
per with material from an execu-
tive summary that will accom-
pany the full report.
The newspaper quoted the
summary as saying Reagan "cre-
ated Oi at least tolerated an envi-
ronment where those who knew
ol the diversion believed with
absolute certainty that they were
carrying out the president's poli-
cies
Another quoted paragraph
fn m the summary says: "Offi-
cials viewed the law not as a
boundary for their actions but as
an impediment to their goals.
When the goals and the laws col-
lided, the law gave way
The Times quoted Senate
committee member Orrin G.
Hatch, a Utah Republican, as say-
ing the draft is "still very trouble-
some
It also quoted a "conservative
official" it did not name as saying:
"The tone is much harsher. The
report now seems to say that the
president may have known about
the Contra diversion but that the
committees just can't prove it
Efforts to reach Hatch on Sun-
day were not successful. Phone
calls to two of his aides, in Wash-
ington and Utah, brought no an-
swer. The senator's home number
is unlisted.
Rep. Lev 1 lamilton, D-lnd said
last week that declassification by
the White House is taking longer
than expected. The report has
been prepared with the use of
some classified information pro-
vided to the committee, he said.
The voluminous report is ex-
pected to include both the execu-
tive summary and a minority
report.
Havel said security surround-
ing work on the report by mem
bers of Congress and their staffs
remains tight, with lawmakers
required to have a security officer
with them when they take copies
to their offices.
A staff source on one of the
committees, speaking only on
condition of anonymity, said
there has been no specific second
or third drafts on the report but
that variouschapters have under
gone several revisions.
The source described the proc-
ess as a bipartisan effort similar to
the conduct of the public hear
ings, with representatives of law
makers from both parties going
over each paragraph to see if it
was supported by the facts.
He said most of those working
on the report are lawyers and the
discussion over its content ha i
been "extremely collegial al-
though he acknowledged the
process "of course, has not been
without any regard to politics
S & R Computer Associates, Inc.
Sr
OKIDATA ia
School Special
Complete Computer
with Printer $1295
Leading Edge Model D
2 floppy drives
512k RAM
Monochrome graphics
LE wordprocessor
MS-DOS. GWBASIC
Citizen I 20D printer
Starter kit including
disks, paper and cable
LEADING EDGE
HEWLETT
PACKARD
530 Cotanche Street
( beside Bicycle Post)
Greenville, N.C. 27834
757-3279
Chicken 'n Bar-B-Q
TAILGATE PACK
12 pcs. Box of Chicken
2 dz. Hushpuppies
1 Gal. Ice Tea
Only $10.50
THE WASH PUB
is an equal opportunity
advertiser!
We offer our specials to both sexes no matter
what age, race or religious
conviction they might be.
Monday - DRAFT & DRYER DAY 25? Draft & 25 for 16
minutes on the Dryers.
Tuesday - TWO FOR ONE DAY Wash one load of clothes, the
2nd wash in on us.
Wednesday SOAP X SI IDS DA Y1H Long Neck Bottle Beer
and Free Soap
MonFri. - FLUFF & FOLD SPECIAL 8 a.m10 a.m. drop
off 35$ a pound.
T
K
E
2510 E. 10th St.
752-5222
20 off
r
i
All Dry Cleaning
j n�pirt. II J04J7
CAR
WASH
Sun.
Nov. 3
2:00
THE STUDENT UNION
MAJOR CONCERTS
COMMITTEE PRESENTS
IN CONCERT
Memorial Dr.
in Front of Hospital
752-3644
ANITA BAKER
SUNDAY, NOV. 1,1987
8:00 MINGES COLISEUM
Tickets: $12.00 Students
$14.00 General Public
AVAILABLE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE MENDENHALL
STUDENT CENTER
AND
FLAMINGO RECORDS EVANS STREET GREENVILLE
1 ! 1
1 HI EASI 1 HIU t lAS
m mm
)
rhese studer
lpproachini
lebrating H
iori -
Diary's '2X
ByCHIPn BONEHEAD
Su" A met
The first cut on Guada
iary's third 2X4
itled "Litanv
rVefl, life docs coi
.vhetheryou want it to on
itany part only o m
ou keep doing
jver and over
And the Diar lit
iand other 'pr
nave found that the
ronsumer's heart isl
ng your following and pul
:he same album out manv many
:imes.
Their first album "Walking in
he Shadow of the Big Man' had
;ome hummable tunes and
kjfbws better than to fool around
with its forrnufV
Ironically, "Lit am I the
stongest songs 0n Its
rather bleak r
by a soaring chorus '� � this
kind of contradiction w rksl ere,
on "Little Birds, them
rassing song on the album
flat.
"Birds" uses cl iched coi
present how a child is taught to
view the rid. But there is no
authentic child's voia present
add when the chorus
thing is coming true, Everyth
you've heard" neither thelistei
nor the child persona has any
reason why
"Let the Big Wheel Roll" is a
weak replica of those good times
that do a little bit of axis-turning
too. The rockabilly guitar r.tt is
thrown in for no good reason. It s
a Stray Cats riff anyway, com-
pletely unnecessary in the total
scheme of life am way
'Things Fall A par: has the best
Alb
i
ashanx
ittCT
. . .
o. ar
the crap Social
hum thcr
put out.
"Bop 'til
RamorM
Ibis empty seat once belonged to Koko, the gorilla (
M (also stuffed). Someone stole the two from their
tie Gazebo shop. (Photos by Thomas Walters
l
�� mnmmnwiw ��if n
� -��������' �.i�iiii�t� g� w m m m H�f��mi��
� � �� Wl �illMi i�� ICTUTT
�miiwmHi���n�m �� titt 'Mnifi�
J





�y books
years that have issued reports
krj iOiiv hiding religion gets only cur
sory treatment in textbooks
People for the American Way
missioned a panel of histon-
and educators to review 31
i rican history textbooks. In
their 1986 report, the reviewers
said religion was not treated as a
ml element in American
themes which haw
ion since the earliest
es religious intoler
rtigious idealism-arc
vd as essential to an
t the American
the reviewers re
r� Y "w�"
1A. NHPUB
.
s ices no matter
i �us
& 25tffor 16
c lothes, the
eck Bottle Beer
� n -10 a.m. drop
E. 10th St. CAR
2 3222 WASH
Sun.
fV, off Nov. 3
caning 2:00
UNION
CERTS
RESENTS
AKER
OlOtH
doesn I
ndutT
iy�had
urlaw
I cruise
�"gup
i blast
"hanks
A-I'm
e been
�ychod
Gotta
YBS
know
Seanx
sBGB
ig few
get us
when
�about
up and
esean
trivesa
ks, hi
-es,his
i mess
m pur
s great
It's not
more
Multi
vs. Re
ocre i-
erand
Ewk-
?ep on
kA but
maybe
nockin
' MX
� with
leww-
a:The
xkin;
.endar
it - We
'Wed
e can't
.guys'
;appa
OThe
et'sdo
r,�
EtftE
ave the
estions
ie clas-
ed sine
it one in
ill work
TY AT
th Phi
otsand
�sych cd
3stions
�ekand
our hi'
f. 1,1987
LISEUM
tudents
Public
FICE MENDENHALL
ER
REET GREENVILLE
THE FAST CAROLINIAN
styje
CX.TOBER 27, 1987 Page 9
A Halloween history lesson
ByLARISSATRIVETT
SUff Writer
Now is the time of year for get-
ting the craziest costumes and
inviting friends down for the
famous Halloween celebration
downtown. It is also the time of
the year that people are remem-
bering how that tradition started.
The events of Halloween 1975
brought about the roping off of
downtown, the tradition still lin-
gers. This began as a safety meas-
ure for students.
To the Greenville police, the
memory of that Halloween is one
of students refusing to disperse,
bricks and other objects being
hurled through the air, broken
windows, stolen merchandise,
and injuries. Greenville Police
Sergeant Doug Jackson was there
during the incident. He remem-
bers many injuries to policemen
rhese students are celebrating Halloween Greenville style back in 1984. With Halloween rapidly and students. "I saw a student
approaching, the memories of past celebrations and mishaps filter through the air. pick up a garbage can and throwit
through a jewlery store window,
and clean the place out said
Diary's '2X4y holds them back
By CHIPPY BOM HI AD
star Writer
The first cut on Guadalcanal
Diary's third album. "2 4 is
titled "Litany (1 ife Goes On)
Well, life does continue to go on
whether you want it to or not. The
htanv part only comes in when
you keep doing the same things
over and over.
And the Diary, like three thou-
sand other 'progressive' bands.
have found that the way to the
consumer's heart is by not of tend-
ing your following and putting
the same album out many, many
times.
Their first album "Walking in
the Shadow of the Big Man" had
some hummablc tunes and
qLjifV, nc'o-Dnda lyrics. "2 X4"
kws better than to tool around
with its fon'fuifh.
Ironically, "Litany" isoncof the
stongest soncs on the album. Its
rather bleak message is balnced
bv a soaring chorus. Wjile this
kind of contr idiction works here,
on "Little Birds the most embar-
rassing song on the album, it falls
flat.
"Birds" uses cliched couplets to
present how a child is taught to
view the world. But there is no
authentic child's voice present
and when the chorus oi "livery-
thing is coming trueEverything
you've heard" neither the listener
nor the child persona has any
reason why.
"Let the'Big Wheel Roll" is a
weak replica of those good times
that do a little bit of axis-turning
too. The rockabilly guitar riff is
thrown in for no good reason. It's
a Stray Cats riff anyway, com-
pletely unnecessary in the total
scheme of life anyway.
Things Fall Apart" has the best
line of the album, even if it doesn't
have anything backing it up. The
fact that they say things like "We
are not at home in this world
we've built for us" is misleading.
The line kind of implies they
know their limits and don't like it.
But they don't do anything
about it. They haven't stretched
beyond the point of a little back-
wards masking on "Lips of Steel
The rest of the album can pretty
much be summed up with a line
Album
more fun with the inane backup
chorus. If that's essential though,
"Weasel Face" is the uncut stuff.
15 words over and over again on
three chords.
"I Lost My Mind" is the rough-
est song. The less they have to say,
the better and louder they say it.
This homage to skin and gin is
major party fodder.
Debby Harry's surprise appear-
ance on "Go Li'l Camaro Go"
adds a lot. The bi 60s California
Gloved One, its nice to taste the
simpler pleasures. Like beer and
the Ramones.
Thanks must once again gc to
WZMB for their help in getting
this review ready.
Jackson.
The total estimated damages to
the area was around $4,000.
The police had already doubled
the men on duty downtown, an-
ticipating some trouble. 36 more
were called in later to help out.
57 people were arrested, mostly
on charges of failure to disperse
and inciting a riot.
Eight East Carolina students
were injured. Some by objects that
wore thrown, others were
trampled by the crowd of scream-
ing people. One girl was struck in
the head by a tear gas canister.
Six officers were hurt. One offi-
cer was shot in the jaw with a
pellet gun. Another, hit in the leg
by a flying object.
Through the viewpoint of many
students and alumni, Halloween
1975 marks the day of some great
injustices on the part of the police
department.
A number of issues were con-
fused. The students said thai they
did not hear a warning to de-
sperse. Since police cars blocked
the streets, they looked on the
police as protection against traf-
fic. When the police first sprayed
fog to move the crowd, the stu-
dents said they had no idea what
was happening, so they re-
mained. When tear gas was
sprayed, students said, is when
the riotous behavior began.
One student remembered being
slapped in the face by a police
officer after asking him what was
happening
Editorials referred to the police
action as unnecessary Some
alumni wrote in saying the police
had "largely overreacted "
The SGA convened that week
and passed a restitution to investi-
gate. They came to some decisions
to recommend to the city coun il
These included dropping all
charges on arrested students and
others, removal ot police chief
Glenn Gannon, and a boycott ol
downtown
47 cases were dropped, along
with the boycott ot downtown,
but Cannon remained
Some good things came oul ol
the trouble, however. Police tac-
tics toward riotschanged with the
use of megaphones to yell orders
to disperse, and the use ol water to
move crowds instead ot tear gas
The next year the tradition of a
safer Halloween celebration be-
gan. The Greenville police roped
off downtown tor the pai
Cannon said "there will be no
vehicles allowed in the streets,
just walking. This is so the people
downtown will have plenty oi
room to enjoy themscb.es and
have fun
Sergeant Jackson ot (ireenvillc
police department said I think
it's nice for the city to block ofl
downtown tor Hallo I just
can't understand anybod) spend
ingso much money for those nice
costumes to go stand in the street
and shout
Proper way to lose freshman 15
Review
from "Get Over It "Know it
hurts to bear the shame When
you have the talent that Guadal-
canal does and then use it for
songs that Poison could have
written well you should be
ashamed.
On the other turntable, the
Ramones are "Halfway to Sanity"
after a brief fling with commercial
production. Going back to a sim-
pler 50s attitude has helped them
a lot
Even with the strictly Missing
Persons lyrics imbedded in "I
Wanna Live it's a good tune.
Pop city, yeah, but Ramones pop
is going to be more hardcore than
the crap Social Disortion and a
hundred other punk Lite bands
put out.
"Bop 'til You Drop" is essential
Ramones idiocy, made all the
car song here, only it sound like it
was set in New Jersey.
But the most revealing song on
"Halfway" is "I'm Not Jesus The
Ramones have probably gotten
their share of idol worship. The
lines, "Got no holes in my hand
Don't accuse me of that crime"
put an end to that.
Tunes like "A Real Cool Time"
and the zany "Garden of Seren-
ity" prove that the Ramones arc
still radio death, but are still some
of the most innovative bands sur-
viving the punk implosion.
In an era where skatepunk vid-
eos make it onto ESPN and every
candy commercial looks like it
was choreocraphed by the Great
By ELANA GROSSMAN
SUff Writer
Most people come to college
looking good and feeling healthy.
Unfortunately, this quickly
changes. Between drinking beer
and consuming endless amounts
of fast food burgers, that step on
the scale becomes a dreadful
event.
Students find reasons for not
execrcising. "1 don't need to exer-
cise, I walk around enough not
too said an anonymous student.
Another unnamed student said,
"I don't have the time to do any-
thing I want let alone exercise
The fact is, they are all excuses.
Before all of us go home Thanks-
giving looking like a rather large
version of the old self, here are a
few helpful hints.
Statistics show that a large
problem in dieting is due to mid-
night snacking. It is only logical
that after a long night of studying
or partying, hunger is bound to
set in. The worst time to eat is after
8:00 p.m. The body is no longer
burning off calories like it did
during the day.
Food consumed after 8:00 p.m
remains in the body ready to turn
into fat. According to Dr. Ronald
Twenty-five pound gorilla
and pet kitten kidnapped
A. Ruden, a professor of nutrition
at Columbia University in New
York, the best way to combat the
midnight munchics is by eating
three healthy and balanced meals
This way the body will have re-
cieved all it needs to function, and
the person will be much more sat-
isfied.
Snacking is not a healthy habit,
according to Dr. Brian L.G. Mor-
gan also from Columbia Univer-
sity. He believes that snacking
makes one hungrier and usuallv
doesn't satisfy the bodies require-
ments So instead of grabbing that
bag of potato chips at 2:00 a.m
wait untill breakfast and eat a nu-
tritious meal.
In order to remain at a healthy
weight one must learn to eat prop-
erly. Instead of reaching for that
piece of cake, why not r- � a
fruit instead? Fruit car
desire for somethingswc. is
also good for the body.
The average fruit is under 100
calories, compared to 270 calories
in a piece of cake. Fruit provides
most of the vitamin C and a large
share of vitamin A necessary for a
proper diet.
Milk and milk products sup-
ply the body with vitamin D and
Calcium and can be consumed in
low-cal amounts to reduce the
calories. A source of food manv
college students deny is the meat
and fish group. These roods arc
valued tor protein and iron, and
along with the other groups make
a meal complete
Most college students eat on the
run and do not c at a healthy diet.
Besides not King healthy, tast
foods are much more fattening. A
McDonald's hamburgi r is 265
calories, compared to l85calories
in a hamburger made at home.
Although it might take a lot more
time to watch how one eats, it
would take a lot more tu:
the weight added on due to im-
proper eating
Exercise is a kev factor concern-
ing weight being gamed in col-
lege. People seem to a oid taking
the time to workout. Ail it takes is
30 minutes of aerobic activity
three days a week tor the body to
keep in shape. Aerobic activity
can take many forms logging,
swimming, aerobics, tennis, bi-
cycleriding and even walking all
fulfill this requirement For some
people it can be as simple as not
taking the bus to class, and in-
stead walking.
If people are more weight con-
scious and develop healthier eat-
ing habits, they don't have to
worry about stepping on the
scale. There w ill be no concern of
friends at home not recognizing
them, and guilt doesn't set in after
one beer.
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
SUff Wriler
The sight of a gorilla holding a
sign on the corner of Evans Street
and Greenville Boulevard during
rush hour on Friday afternoon
confused many, but a few knew
what "Koko, please come home to
the Gazebo" meant.
WNCT channel 9 had reported
earlier on the kidnapped simian
and regular customers of the
Gazebo gift shop missed her in
her official capacity of official
greeter for the store.
Koko, a 25 pound female, and
her pet kitten have not been seen
since October 12. Still, owner
Natalie Clark is optimistic that
she will be returned.
Clark was at home the day of
the theft. One of her employees
called her from the store, telling
her what happened.
A man from a neighboring store
had come in, saying that their
"bear" had been stolen. A young
man, who the cashier had noticed
hanging around outside the store-
front for sometime, had disap-
peared.
In the adjacent parking lot, they
saw a light grey or white car open
to admit a man carrying the help-
less Koko.
The police responded quickly.
After taking statements, they put
This empty seat once belonged to Koko, the gorilla (stuffed), and her out an all points bulletin and
cat (also stuffed). Someone stole the two from their place in front of promised to stay in contact with
the Gazebo shop. (Photos by Thomas Walters � Photolab) Clark and with the ECU campus
police.
Two weeks have passed. No
reward has been offered as Clark
refuses to "negotiate with terror-
ists Her friend Chip Py had an
idea to help get Koko back.
Py, who runs Party Animals,
has a male gorilla outfit he uses for
birthday and party greetings. A
frequent visitor to the Gazebo, he
missed the company of
Greenville's only female gorilla.
Clark was one of the first to use
Py's "Gorilla-grams so he was
eager to help out. So on Friday, he
marched to the Corner of Pitt
Plaza, sign in hand, to spread the
word of Koko's abduction.
He said that many people un-
derstood what was going on and
stopped to tell him. Clark added
that since the theft, she has re-
cicved many condolence cards
and calls.
Koko is a licensed plush replica
of the real Koko, the gorilla who
knows sign language and has
been featured in National Geo-
graphic several times.
The toy Koko is handsewn and
wholesales for $375. Part of this
price tag goes to the Gorilla Foun-
dation to help further research.
Koko lived in the Gazebo for
nearly a year. Now she is hidden
somewhere, with only a small
mute kitten to keep her company.
She will never know of the efforts
made to rescue her, but her captor
will.
And here is Koko's would-be rescuer,
Animals, hit the streets Friday to look
Chip Py. Chip, who owns Party
for Koko and her feline friend.
tm�
mmtmm"
� -&. 4(h' ffi
BW
� �tur,�
f





10
�T"E EAST CARPI IMi am OCTOBER 27
1987
Rock groups open for each other, works well
In 1981, the Australian group
Icehouse opened for the British
group Simple Minds in Britain
and Simple Minds opened for
Icehouse in Australia. Icehouse
singer-songwriter Iva Davies re-
calls that the 1981 arrangement
worked well for both bands.
"It was right after our second
album, 'Primitive Man Simple
Minds still was not huge, even in
Britain. In Australia, we were
very successful. They'd tell vou
themselves it was the first time
they really achieved recognition.
The dates we opened for Simple
Minds, we were received really
well.
"Eventually 'Primitive Man'
became a success in Europe and
we had a top 20 hit from it in
Britain, Hey Little Girl
Icehouse now has a new
Chrysalis album, "Man of
Colours and is touring in Amer-
ica, opening for the Cars. The title
song from Icehouse's fifth LP,
"Man of Colours has been said
to be inspired by Andrew VVyeth
and his Helga paintings.
Davies, who wrote "Man fo
Colours says he thought he was
writing about himself. "I wrote
the lyrics very quickly he said "1
wasn't aware of the Andrew
Metropolitan Museum of Art
exhibits court treasures
sup-
In a
NEW YORK (AP) - "The Age of
Suleyman the Magnificent the
exhibition at the Metropolitan
Museum of Art through Jan. 17,
1988, tempers a display of opulent
court treasures with the immedi-
acy of personal items.
Here are the elaborately pearl-
inlaid throne and the jeweled hel-
met of a mighty empire builder
and soldier. Here, too, is a leaf
from a volume of poetry written
in the sultan's own hand, and a
little pistachio-green silk kaftan
and pants set made for him as a
10-year-old
The exhibition's stunning and
varied selection of over 200 ob-
jects from the sultan's court richly
demonstrates that "The reign of
Suleyman was the golden age of
Ottoman culture, which flour-
ished under the sultan's personal
involvement and ardent
port a definition offered
guest curator Dr. Esin Atil.
Suleyman came to the throne in
1520 at the age of 26, and until his
death in 1566 ruled from Topkapi
Palace in Istanbul an empire that
he ex tended to include huge areas
ot North africa, eastern Europe.
the Balkans, the Middle East and
the fringes of Russia. The treas-
ures of the Ottoman sultans have
been carefully preserved in the
palace through the ages; it is now
a Turkish national museum and
the largest lender of items to this
exhibition.
Included are illuminated and
illustrated manuscripts from the
imperial painting studios; textiles
and kaftans from the imperial
wardrobe; ceramics from the
royal kilns, gem-studded weap-
ons, decorative objects in gold.
silver and jade, household items
and furnishings of peerless work-
manship. They reflect the taste
and interest oi an extraordinary
ruler who was revered in his time
as a legislator and statesman, and
who was also an enthusiastic and
enlightened patron of the arts.
Suleyman followed the tradi-
tion that every ruler of the Otto-
man royal line had to have a prac-
tical trade - his was that of gold-
smith. He was also an accom-
plished poet, the art most popu-
larly practiced at his court.
The very name of the sultan
serves as a kind of logo for the
exhibition, which includes sev-
eral versions of the official render-
ing of his signature - a graceful
calligraphic composition oi let-
ters, some illuminated with an
exquisite profusion of the natural-
istic floral patterns and cloud
forms that characterize Ottoman
decorative motifs.
In addition to the gloriouslv
decorated pages from volumes of
poetry, elegant royal proclama-
tions and other texts on display
are handsome stamped and
gilded bindings for these works,
sometimes incorporating gold,
jade and jewels.
Historic events from the life of
the sultan are shown in paintings,
while maps and plans reflect the
activity of campaigns and explo-
ration.
The sultan's treasure is pre-
sented by examples of the finest
accesories in age out hiscourt. The
splendid jeweled and gold inlaid
sward and personal water can-
teen encrusted with emeralds and
rubies that embodied the sultan's
authority can also be distin-
guidhed in miniature in a paint-
ingof his funeral that is among the
art works in the exhibition.
Pen boxes, belts, mirrors and
other trinkets in jasper, jade, ivory
and rock crystal glitter with lavish
embellishments of the favorite
emeralds and rubies as well as
with amber, jet and turquoises.
Heavenly blues and turquoises,
mostly on a white background,
trace sinuous floral patterns and
spiral scrolls over many examples
of ceramics from the royal kilns at
lznik; touches of purple, green
and rich tomato red vary the de-
sign on these tiles, plates, bowls
and pitchers.
Sumptuous textiles, silks and
velvets produced for the sultan
are shown in two main forms: as
clothing and as furnishings. Holh
show oil the vibrant use of color
and theembriodery and weaving
techniques oi contemporary
craftsmen.
The lavish furnishing fabrics
appear in quilts, cushion covers,
wall hangings and a series oi var-
ied floor coverings. The most eve-
catching ofthe latter isa 16-foot by
8 12 toot spread oi "catama
voided silk velvet woven with
gold nd silver metallic threads.
Among the first exhibits on
view is a Koran box, nearly 6 feet
high, a double cubical container
oi perfect proportions, on legs
and topped with a dome. It is
made oi ebony inlaid with ivory
and with mother-of-pearl that
catches the light and simulates an
array of softly glowing windows
lit from within.
Wycth story, but I must have been
subliminally.
"lt'saboutanold man who lives
in an attic and paints paintings of
some girl he was in love with 40 or
50 years ago. He never shows
them to anybody, just looks at
them himself. That's all he
needs
"Man of Colours" entered the
Australian charts at No. 1. It has
one song, "Electric Blue written
by Davies and John Oates of Hall
and Oates.
"I met him a long time ago in an
airport in Australia Davies re-
calls. "Last year he contacted me
and said it might be good to write
together. He came out to Austra-
lia, which 1 thought was amazing,
for 10 days. We toyed around
with a few songs, finished a
couple and both of us knew 'Elec-
tric Blue' was the better song. It is
No. 2 at the moment in Australia
Davies says it was great fun
working with Oates, whom he
"I'm not used to working with
people. He led in the initial stages,
until I felt comfortable. Then I
think I led him. He has very high
standards. A couple of times he
definitely pushed me to go for
something more direct and better
than I would have settled for
Davies says.
Davies played English horn on
"Man of Colours He says, "I
didn't want to use a synthetic
sound on this song. I wanted to
use a classical instrument
Davies started piano lessons at
the age of 6. "When I went to
school, I wanted to learn trum-
pet he says. "But they didn't
have any left so they gave me an
oboe. I spent 11 years in a music
conservatory
His sister is a violinist and his
brother plays cornet. His mother
is a pianist and painter. And his
father is a tenor. Davies explains,
"I come from a long line of Welsh
singing cola miners
After Icehouse toumed with
Simple Minds, both David Bowie
and Peter Gabriel invited Ice-
house to open American tours for
them . Icehouse did open for
Bowie in Britain and Holland in
1983. But Davies said "no" in
1981. He had promised video di-
rector Russell Mulcahy he'd com-
pose and perform a score for
Mulcahy's first feature film,
"Razorback
"It was an unlikely horror story
set in Australia Davies says.
"I think it probably will be
around tor a long time as a cult
movie. It's beautifully shot. The
soundtrack was not a brilliant
commercial success. It's not
rock'n'roll
In 1985 Davies and Icehouse
guitarist Bob Kretschmer com-
posed a score, "Boxes for the
Sydney Dance Company. Davies
says, "It played at the Sydney
Opera House for three weeks and
was an amazing critical success
"We wrote music and the story
and were on stage as characters.
The set wasa huge cube you could
see through. The dance company,
the inside people, atttempted to
get where the musicians, the out-
side people were
4
ruci. screvic c rrarevEL OGCncv
1101 Charles Blvd.
Greenville, N.C.
752-1663
SPRING BREAK SPECIALS
CANCUN:
S329.00
per person
JAMAICA:
S369.00
per person
MARDI GRAS:
�$367.75
per person
CARN1VALE:
�$481.00
per person
Mar. 6-10, 1988; Air out of Atlanta,
accomodations, transfers, Hotel
taxes.
Mar. 6-10, 1988; Air out of Atlanta, accomo-
dations at the Sea winds Beach Tower,
transfers.
3 Night cruise departing out of Ft. Lauder-
dale on Mar. 10, 1988; includes cruise, port
charges and tips.
4 Night cruise1 departing out of Miami on
Mar. 7, 1988; includes cruise, port charges
and tips.
prices are per person based on quad occupancy
SP0RTSW0RLD
Every Tuesday
College Night
from 8:00 to 11:00
$1.50 with college I.D.
.50C skate rental
SPORTSWORLD
104 E. Redbanks Rd.
756-6000
n
NEW YORK CITY
The STUDENT UNIONS TRAVEL COMMITTEE
is presenting a trip to New York City (The Big
Apple) during Thanksgiving break.
4 Days & 3 Nights
Depart: 8 p.m. Nov.25. 1987
Return: 11 p.m. Nov. 29. 1987
rranaportOtSOII Srashorr Trullwuys Hub Hotel Century Paramount
�rice per person: S129 (quad occupancy); $139
Kcup.mcv)and Sli'i (double occupancy).
Mcndenhall's Cen
Ticket Office fur (itul
THE
COMPETITIVE EDGE
MAYBE
YOUR RESUME
Don't get ignored in the paper shuttle. Have your resume
professionally typeset and reproduced at AccuCopy! Our
resume packages produce results by making you look
your best on paper.
High quality, fast service, and low prices are all part of
our resume packages available to you at AccuCopy.
FAST COPIES
FOR FAST TIMES
� 24-hour service available
� open early, open late
� open six days a week
THE RESUME PEOPLE
Next to Chicos in the Georgetown Shops
2v"
V
V,i
IN


The one, all purpose, CAM-
PUS Jacket, the Mountain-
Parka, by WOOLRICH. In-
side a lightweight wool
liningoutside a durable
cotton blend. Great looks,
great comfort, a great
price$95.00
offmgmA
MENS WEAR
Downtown Greenville
Carolina East Mall, Greenville
Tarrvtown Mall, Rocky Mount
"ANYTHING PAPER"
' !
Let's Party"
Halloween Party Supplies
�Decorations -Now 30 Off
�Pinatas
�Chip-Dip Trays
�Wine & Champagne Glasses
�Mylar Balloons
�Party Favors
�Color Coordinated Table Settings
�Cups now 3 0� Off
�Plates
�Napkins � Lots More
Face Masks - J�
� Bells Fork Square �ff
Open Fridays 'til 8 PM
A
U
355-6212
Jiffy Lube
The newest concept in car care maintenance is now
open in Greenville!
Here's what we do in 10 minutes, no
appointment necessary
1. We change your oil with a major brand!
2. We install a new oil filter!
3. We lubricate the whole chassis!
4. We check and fill transmission fluid!
5. We check and fill differential fluid!
6. We check and fill brake fluid!
7. We check and fill power steering fluid!
8. We check and fill window washer fluid!
9. We check and fill battery!
10. We check the air filter!
11. We check the wiper blades!
12. We Inflate the tires to proper pressure!
13. We vacuum the Interior!
14. We even wash your windows!
PLUS a FREE Car Wash with
Full Service!
.00 OFF
FULL SERVICE
(with coupon)
Reg. $21.95
COUPON GOOD DEC. 12th, 1987
I
HOURS
Monday thru Friday
7:30 a.m. til 6:30 p.m.
Sat 7:30 a.m. 'til 5:00 p m
r $T.5d
!JIFFY CAR WASH!
(with coupon)
COWONOODDEC. 12th, 1987
"East Carolina's i&SEXm
Greenville
Favorite Oil Change"�Ts���
I
I
I
I
J
I
Members of the Hanru I
"Minor planet" nam
TOLEDO, Ohio '�
was "1982 BT1 then it �
"minor planet 2954
minor planet, or asl I
the name of Dr
Dclscmme.a I i
professor of
"Delsemme isoiM
of objects in the a ir
ranging in size from I I
miles in diameter
"It is seen as a pil
One can guess its si;
brightness Delscmme said
closer to lOmiles (in .
it is difficult to saj h
Thc minor planitM was disc
9fecf by Dr. Edward Bowel 1
astronomer who srv,
minor planets, on fan '
while making observat
Lowell Observatory neai
staff. A; izona.
It was named aft i .
by the lnterna
cal Union (IAI
of astronomers fn pan, t
Soviet Union, the United
and 80 or more other c
Under rules oi the
tronomer who disco (i
planet has the perogatn e of na
ingit once it has been r�
in its predicted orbit after
complete trip around the si
"Delscmme was re-identil
its predicted orbit in 1986
In recent years the n
minor planets have beet
on peer recognition for or - -
entitic work Delsemme s.
A minor planet rather
comet, was named
Delsemme becuase corrw
usually named after their disci
erer, said Delsemme, who 1
never discovered a conic; (
ets, he said, are usually d
ered at random by amat urs
The asteroid, or minor
named after Delsemme i
thousands of objects traveling i
in
CRLENDI
U.IR
TIKfl & The Dream
fire Looking For Br
19 8 8 & i
Carolina
No EHperit
Must bel
Rll Welcome,
app

IPHW'1"
'�pm0' � � - �





)rks well
-nd his
explains
l Welsh
r:
d Bow ie
ted Ice
s for
pen tor
rid in
around tor a long time as a cult
movie. It's beautifully shot. The
soundtrack was not a brilliant
commercial success. It's not
rock'n'roll
in 1985 Davies and Icehouse
guitarist Bob Kretschmer com-
posed a score, "Boxes for the
Sydney Dance Company. Davies
says, It played at the Sydney
Opera 1 louse tor three weeks and
w .is art amazing critical success
We wrote music and the story
and were on stage as characters.
' he set wasa huge cube you could
sec through. The dance company,
the inside people atttemptod to
get where the musicians, the out-
side people were "
y Tuesday
lege Night
:00 to 11:00
ith college I.D,
tkate rental
RTSWORLD
Redbanks Rd.
56-6000
2 all purpose, CAM-
the Mountain-
by WOOLRICH. In-
lightweight wool
tside a durable
blend. Great looks,
omfort, a great
$95.00
oPftnans
MENS WEAR
� .ille
ill, Greenville
Rocky Mount
ube
care maintenance is now
reenviiie
at we do in 10 minutes, no
mt necesscry
your oil with a major brand!
a new oil filter!
ite the whole chassis!
and fill transmission fluid!
;and fill differential fluid!
jand fill brake fluid!
and fill power steering fluid!
and fill window washer fluid!
and fill battery!
the air filter!
the wiper blades!
the tires to proper pressure!
the interior!
ash your windows!
ar Wash with
�vice!
$1.50
IIFFY CAR WASH
(with coupon
ICOUPON GOOD DEC. 12th, 1987
ia's
iang;
���
126 Greenville Blvd
Greenville
(Across from Golden
Corrol Steok House)
P7T
�mwiiiw �
THE CAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 27,1987 11
r-
vc
he
-n,
�ly
:al
id
ry
r-
-
ite
?r-
to
cl-
lr-
�ut
he
la-
C.
th-
c
y
i-
1S
rs
rs
ef
5t
st
h
:e
:),
in
is
ty
i't
X-
d
ty
te
r-
e
e-
w
n,
ist
as
to
ye


rz
or
sh
Bagwell wins Chapel Hill tanning contest
DURHAM (AP) - Pat Bagwell
didn't think she had much chance
of winning a Chapel Hill tanning
contest, but the 37-year-old dark
horse parlayed her pigments into
a free vacation in the Bahamas.
"I'm not an exhibitionist said
Pat Bagwell, a legal secretary and
mother of three who entered a
tanned-legs contest at the urging
of friends.
"I was so nervous my legs were
shaking she said, recalling
standing behind a sheet with
other contestants with only their
legs showing. "You feel like an
idiot anyway. These women are
picking you apart and men are
wagging their tongues. I'd rather
be a fly on the wall
But Ms. Bagwell got a leg up on
competition, winning $50 and a
membership to the sponsoring
nightclub. And she decided to go
into serious training for a Sept. 9
total tan-off that had a Paradise
Island prize.
"Then I actively began laying in
the sun every minute 1 could she
said. Each morning meant an-
other application cf tanning accel-
erator followed by hours in a
chaise lounge, her only compan-
ions an FM radio and a Danielle
Stcele novel.
When it rained, Ms. Bagwell
drove to Morehead Citv for 30
minutes on a tanning bed.
"It really was a regimen. You
have to be devoted to it, 1 guess
she said. "I was about as black as
you can get
Still, there were other factors
that overshadowed her outlook.
"I'm going against 20 21 -year-
old girls Ms. Bagwell recalled
thinking. "This is ridiculous.
Those young girls have got me
beat. The age thing. No way
The other 10 contestants ap-
peared to be imitating a type: a
professor, a muscle man, a con-
struction worker, a genie, a wait-
ress - all working a semi-strip
tease into their routines. Ms. Bag-
well wondered whether her ap-
pearance with a white sundress
over a skimpy white bikini would
have enough drama.
Upon learning she would be the
first contestant, Ms. Bagwell said
she fled to a bathroom praying
"for God to take the fear away
When her routine began to the
strains of Billy Ocean's Caribbean
Queen, "I got tickled and forgot
about it, the crowd, everything
she said. "I got totally taken
away
She walked toward the judges
and the crowd went crazy.
Members of the Hanneford circus clown around during Sunday's show in Minges Coliseum.
"Minor planet" named for Dr.
TOLEDO, Ohio (AP)- First it
was "1982 BT1 then it became
"minor planet 2954 Now, the
minor planet, or asteroid, bears
the name of Dr. Armand
Delsemme, a University of Toledo
professor of astrophysics.
"Delsemme" is one of thousands
of objects in the solar system,
ranging in size from 10 to 1,000
miles in diameter.
"It is seen as a pinpoint of ligiU.
One can guess its size by Us
brightness Delsemme said. "It is
closer to 10 miles (in diameter) but
it is difficult to say he said.
7"ho minor planet was elisCOv-
"ered by Dt. Edward Bowel an
astronomer who specializes in
minor planets, on Jan 30, 1982,
while making observations at the
Lowell Observatory, near Flag-
staff, Arizona.
It was named after Delsemme
by the International Astronomi-
cal Union (IAU), an organization
of astronomers from Japan, the
Soviet Union, the United States,
and 80 or more other countries.
Under rules oi the IAU, an as-
tronomer who discovers a minor
planet has the perogative of nam-
ing it once it has been re-observed
in its predicted orbit, after one
complete trip around the sun.
"Delsemme" was re-identified in
its predicted orbit in 1986.
In recent years, the names of
minor planets have been "based
on peer recognition for one's sci-
entific work Delsemme said.
A minor planet, rather than a
comet, was named after
Delsemme becuasc comets are
usually named after their discov-
erer, said Delsemme, who has
never discovered a comet. Com-
ets, he said, are usually discov-
ered at random by amateurs.
The asteroid, or minor planet,
named after Delsemme is one of
thousands of objects traveling in a
zone between Mars and Jupiter,
some 150 million to 500 million
miles from the sun.
(3ardscBy
Qmerican
Qreetings
Cards for adults-to-childrn
including coloring books,
mobiles, and stand-ups
guaranteed to raise any
spirit.
STUDENT
STORES
Wright Building
S

AMERICAN GREETINGS
c MCMLXXXVI American Greetings Corp
Congratulations
to the best,
from the Marine Corps.
This past summer, these iiuli icinals
overcame the most physical!) and mentalK
demanding challenge they've ever faced.
James Johnson
Marine Officer Candidate School.
Ue an' proud of tluir individual accomplishment
Now tlkA ;uv oik- ot ilk' few
Marines
Wfrelooking fua fe� good men.
Captain Thomas E. Williams. Jr.
I SMC OFFICER SELECTION OFFICE
Suite 210-D Stockton Unite Bldj.
509 Creedmore Road
Raleigh. North Carolina 2"612
WE GIVE YOU MORE PLACES TO GO
WITH YOUR CAREER.
As a Navy nurse, you'll find more
career possibilities than you ever
thought possible.
Right now. we have nursing
positions in our hospitals and station
facilities all around the world, and
we need your expertise.
Of course, you can expect a lot in
return.
You'll be part of a team of profes-
sionals -keeping current with state-
of-the-art technology and facilities
and providing your patients with
the very best medical treatment
available.
You'll get the respect and respon-
sibility that come with being a Navy
officer-along with a solid starting
salary, generous benefits'including
30 days1 paid vacation I, and world-
wide travel possibilities after an
initial LJ.S. assignment.
The Navy also offers you many
free opportunities for specialty
training and advanced education
So find out more about
taking your career further.
Call 1-800-662-72317419
today- There's no obligation.
Contact: Lt. Boatright on November 2,1987
at Nursing Career Day.
NAVY NURSE.
ITS NOT JUST A JOB, ITS AN ADVENTURE.
� mmwpMwom
m
���
. i






i

�KT-
THKFAST t AROl INIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 27, 1987 Page 12
Ellis paces South Carolina by
Pirates, 34-12, in Columbia

By TIM CHANDLER
Sports rditot
COLUMBIA, S.C. - It was called
Parent's Day at South Carolina,
but by the time Cameccvk quar-
terback Todd Ellis was finished
playing against East Carolina Sat-
urday, it was easy to see whose
day it really was.
The sophomore from Greens-
boro passed for 425 yards and one
touchdown to lead the Game-
cocks to a 34-12 victory over the
Pirates. His passing total made
him the first quarterback in the
school's history to pass for over
4i") vards in a game.
Ellis also established school
records Saturday for most career
passing yardage and most career
completions. Ellis has now paed
tor 5,201 yards and completed 363
passes.
Ellis wasted little time getting
the Gamecocks going. On their
first drive, he hit Sterling Sharpe
tor a 51-vard scoring strike.
Sharpe caught the ball off of a tip
from Pirate defensive back Ellis
Dillahunt.
"That play was an indication of
how we seemed to bo playing all
dav East Carolina coach Art
Baker said. "It was sort oi a cheap
touchdown, but you take them
however you can get them
After stopping the Tirates on
their first possession, the Game-
cocks stretched the lead to 10-0on
their second drive of the game.
The 36-yard Coll in Mackie field
goal came with 7:15 remaining in
the first quarter and capped oii a
60-yard drive.
The Pirates then drove for its
first scoring threat oi the day
Paced by a 28-yard Travis 1 iunter
completion to Walter Wilson, the
Pirates moved from their own 28-
yard line to the Gamecock 25 be-
fore stalling and settling for a 42-
yard Chuck Berleth held goal
with 3:53 to play in the first quar-
ter.
On the ensuing kickoff. South
Carolina kick returner Shed
Diggs fumbled the return and
Charlie Tyson recovered for the
Pirates at the Gamecocks' 24-yard
line.
Pour plays later, after the of-
fense had once again stalled, Ber-
leth connected with a 38-yard
field goal with 2:57 remaining in
the opening quarter to close the
Pirates to within 10-6.
Following a crucial delay of
game call on the Pirates on a
fourth and less than one situation,
which forced ECU to punt, the
Gamecocks went on a scoring
drive to increase their lead to 17-6.
The score came with 9:35 to play
in the half when Harold Green
scored on a 2-yard run for the first
oi three touchdowns for the
tailback on the dav.
"We knew if we did not take
advantage of our opportunities
early, that we'd have a very long
day Baker said. "1 also thought
Travis had a hard time handling
the blitz and that's all to South
Carolina's credit.
"On that particular play, Travis
had looked to the referee for help
because of crowd noise Baker
explained. 'That is something
that we (the coaches) and the offi-
cials had told him to do. But, the
official did not give him any
time
On their next possession, the
Pirates replaced Hunter at the
starting quarterback spot with
backup sophomore Charlie Li-
bretto. The result was an intercep-
tion three plays later.
Scott Windsor picked off
Libretto's pass, setting up the
Gamecocks with good field posi-
tion at the Pirate 26.
Five plays later, Green scored
again, tins time on a 3-yard scam-
per off the right side. Mackie's
PAT put the Gamecocks in front
24-6 with 6.18 to play in the first
half.
The Pirates had another scoring
opportunity stripped away from
them late in the half. Gornerback
Junior Robinson picked off an
Ellis pass and returned it 75 yards
for a touchdown. A clipping pen-
alty called on the play against the
Pirates, however, erased the
score.
"That's the way it went for us all
day long Baker said. "It seemed
like whenever we did something
right, something went wrong to
take it away
Hunter agreed.
"I'm not going to take anything
away from them (South Caro-
lina) Hunter said. "We just
played poorly, and every time we
got close to the end zone we'd get
a penalty or make a mistake
The Gamecocks, now 5-2 for the
season, stretched their advantage
to 31-6 with 9:40 to play in the
third quarter when Green picked
up his final touchdown of the day
ona 2-yard plunge to cap an eight-
play, 56-yard drive.
South Carolina, after missing
on a pair of field goals in the third
quarter, got its final score of the
game with 9:44 remaining in the
contest when Mackie connected
on a 38-yard field goal to put the
lid on a eight-play, 61-yard drive.
The Pirates, 4-4 for the season,
finally found the endone with 29
seconds left in the game. Libretto,
who came back in during the
fourth quarter, fired a 2-yard pass
to Walter Wilson for the score,
completing a 77-yard drive.
Libretto's two-point conver-
sion pass fell incomplete, leaving
the final score at 34-12.
And worst of all for the Pirates,
the touchdown did little to erase
the effects of "Ellis Day" at South
Carolina.
In last year's action against South Carolina, Pirate defender Kllis Dillahunt puts the clamp on a South Carolina
runner. Dillahunt recorded a fair number of tackles Saturday, however, the (Jamccocks managed to roll past
the Pirates, 34-12.
ECU swimmers pleased with ,
Purple-Gold meet standings
By PAT MOLLOY
rVwIrtllrl Sport Iditor
The East Carolina Pirate swim-
mers, who met Thursday for the
annual Purple and Gold swim
meet, proved once again their
intentions oi attaining the Colo-
nial Athletic Association champi
onship were for real.
"Both the men and women
swam very well said head coach
Kick Kobe. "We swam 90 percent
ot the events this year in faster
times than the year before. We are
right on track (for theCAA title)
In the 200-meter backstroke,
Mark O'Brien took the fast lane
for a time of 2:01.96.
Raymond Kennedy touched in
2:15.96 to place first in the men's
200-meter breaststroke.
Freshman standout Meredith
Bridgers took first in the women's
200-meter breaststroke with a
time of 2:30.37.
Keller 1 lodges, Meredith Bridg-
ers, Angela Winstead (all fresh-
man recruits), and sophomore
Ryan Philyaw combined for a
time oi 4:14.12 in the women's
400-meter medley relay. The CAA
record for that event is 4:08.24.
Raymond Kennedy, along with
his first-place finish in the 200-
breaststroke, also garnished first
place honors in the 100-meter
treestroke, and the men's 4(X)-
meter medley relay.
Sophomore Leslie Wilson also
placed first in three events, with
wins in the 1000-meter freestyle
(11:0S.0), the 200 1M (2:18.93); and
the 400-meter free relay (3:53.84).
In the 200-meter freestyle, Rvan
Philyaw stroked to first in 2:03.0,
followed bv junior Susan Augus-
tus who came in at 2:04.46
The 50-metcr freestyle was
squeaked out by freshman Sonya
1 lemingway in 26.17 over Angela
Winstead and Meredith Bndgcrs,
who finished in 26.41 and 26.84
respectively.
In the men's 1000-meter frees-
tyle, CD. Lewis squeaked out a
See SWIMMERS paye 14
U.S. Pou-Sa snatches men's IRS grid crown
K
The members of U.S. Pou-Sa
clamped down hard on theSig-Ep
"A" team Monday night to win
the men's championship in intra-
mural flag-football.
Fonv Robinson, leading the
Pou-Sas with a solid air attack,
drew tirst blood on a touchdown
bomb to Kennv Earmer on a
fourth-down effort.
Earmer then ran the ball in from
three yards out on the extra point
try to up the score to 7-0 m favor of
the Pou-Sas.
The Sig Ep team attempted to
run the ball to the corners oi the
Pou-Sas, but were held to small
gams. Figuring to borrow a chap-
terout oi their opponent ssconng
drive, the "A" team quarterback,
left Emerson, tired a bullet to
ohnny Reid who slid and dodged
his way to the Pou-Sa's one-yard
line before going out of bounds.
The Pou-Sas made a goal-line
stance and turned the Sig Eps
away scoreless.
from there, a new quarterback,
Donald Terry, stepped in to toss
for the Pou-Sas. Terry brought his
team all the way down to the Sig
Ep 10-yard line before being inter-
cepted by left Emerson.
The Sig Eps, though lead by
outstanding offensive performers
Russ "The Crush" Emerson and
Ty "The Iceman" Salzler, were
stalled on their second offensive
series and were forced to turn the
ball over to the Pou-Sas.
Back at the quarterback slot,
Robinson once again launched a
rocket, this time for 40-yards, to
Farmer. The play, which brought
around halftime, was broken up
by Jeff Emerson.
The score, in favor of the Pou-
Sis, was 7-0.
On the first offensive series of
the second-half, the "A" team,
unable to advance the ball,
punted for the first and only time
in the game.
Donald Terry once again took
over the signal calling for the Pou-
Sas and was promptly inter-
cepted by Salzler, who took the
ball to the five-yard line.
The Pou-Sa's defense held on
for another four downs as it again
turned the Sig Eps away with
nothing.
On their second possession, the
Pou-Sas, riddled with penalties,
were forced to turn the ball over to
the "A" team.
The Sig Eps were able to capital-
ize on this turnover, and con-
verted it into six points on a pass
from Jeff Emerson to Johnny
Staley with just over two minutes
to go in the game.
Failing on the extra-point con-
version, the "A" team had to settle
for six.
That was as far as the Sig Eps
went before the Pou-Sas put the
stall into effect and placed the
game out of reach for the "A"
team.
X-country teams results
East Carolina's women took
third place and the men fourth on
Saturday at the Virginia Com-
monwealth Invitational in
Richmond, Va.
Kim Griffiths led the Lady Pi-
rates, who finished behind VCU
and Richmond and ahead of
American. Griffiths placed sixth
in 20:16. Terri Lynch finished 13th
in 21:03; Bibi Rosas, 14th in 21:06;
Dawn Tillson, 15th in 21:09; Judy
Wilson, 17th in 21:23 and Kim
Abernethy ran the course in 23:02.
Leading the way for the men
was senior Mike McGehee finish-
ing 10th in 21:35. Other finishers
for the men were Matt
Schweitzer, 27th in 22:56; Rob
Rice, 31st in 23:10; Rusty Wil-
liams, 34th in 23:25; Rusty
Meador, 36th in 23:50; Miles Lay-
ton, 38th in 24:30; Joe Corley, 45th
in 25:31; and Henry Patrick, 46th
in 26:09.
The Pirates will compete in a
scrimmage meet Saturday, Oct. 31
against the local Tiger team before
closing out their season on Nov.7
at the Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion meet at William & Mary.
Soccer team drops two
East Carolina saw its soccer
record dip to 2-13 after losing
Enforcers roll past Delta
Zetafor women's crown
Jeff Emerson (top photo) attempts to haul in a pass during the men's intramural flag football championship
Tuesday night. Emerson's Sig Ep "A" team came up on the losing end to U.S. Pou-Sa, 7-6. In bottom photo, the
Enforcers Jody Rodriquez laterals a pass off to a teammate. The Enforcers rolled to the women's title over Delta
Zeta, 33-6. (Photos by Jon Jordan - ECU Photo Lab)
The Enforcers struck early and
often Monday evening in record-
ing a 33-6 victory over Delta Zeta
in the women's intramural flag
football championship.
At the 15:04 mark of the first
period Cheryl Curtis found her-
self on the receiving end of a
touchdown pass from quarter-
back Laura Bellows. Following a
one-point conversion pass to for-
mer womcn'sbasketball standout
Jody Rodriquez, the Enforcers led
7-0.
The Enforcers increased their
lead at the 10:53 mark of the open-
ing half when Bellows went by air
to Laura Conway. The point after
failed leaving the score at 13-0.
Defenses took over for the re-
minder of the half leaving the
score at 13-0 at intermission.
With only 45 seconds gone in
the second half Kim Adams pow-
ered her way into the endzone off
a lateral pass. Bellows then con-
nected with Adams for a one-
point conversion pass boosting
the Enforcers lead to 20-0.
Delta Zeta finally got on the
scoreboard with 5:12 to play in the
contest when Melissa Lord
hauled in a touchdown pass. The
one-point conversion was unsuc-
cessful leaving the score at 20-6.
Belows went back to the air late
in the contest to a streaking Rodri-
quez for yet another score for the
Enforcers. Following the unsuc-
cessful extra point try, the Enforc-
ers led 26-6 with 1:48 to play.
The Enforcers put the final
damage on the scoring total with
1:04 remaining when Bellows
picked off a Delta Zeta pass and
scurried in to the endzone. The
extra point try was successful for
the final tally of 33-6.
matches to Atlantic Christian
College and the University of
Richmond. -�
Atlantic Christian shut out the
Pirates 1-0 Thursday afternoon at
Varsity Field on a goal by Brian
Fahey. The win put the Fighting
Bulldogs up to 14-2 overall. )
Saturday, ECU went to:
Richmond in search of its first .
CAA win of the season but was l
shut out again, 5-0. That shut out
marked the ninth time ECU has
been shut out, breaking the old i
record of seven set in 1979. n
Greg Sluyer, Mark Choi, Mike
Wright and Oliver Weiss all had
first half goals to give the Spiders
a 4-0 halftime advantage.
Mike Wright scored his second
goal of the day 10 minutes into the
second period to put Richmond
up 5-0.
Richmond out-shot ECU 24 to
eight with Richmond keeper Britt
Weber making three saves and
ECU'S Scott McCullough making
The Pirates will play their final
home match of the season Wed-
nesday at 3 p.m. when they host
Greensboro College.
- -� � '
i mm n �� "
k if , 1 ;�
BUI McDonah
for Pirate Kan
If you entered Bill McDonald's
insurance establishment in
Greenville, NO during an
average work day, you would
flre than likely hear the sounds
pj 0ffice managers filing, typing
and discussing indurance figures
th local clients But. there is
something behind the scenes
An air of confidence rings
throughout, and indeed it should
Not only in the fact that
McDonald's agency is steadily
moving upward on the insurance
ladder of success but that its
namesake, Bill M I Knaldisan ex-
perienced black belt karate spe
cialist.
This year marks Mr
McDonalds 25th year with East
Carolina University and his role
as advisor, sponsor and instructor
for the Karate Club, a division
UNC's
Reid,
Bucknall
charged
RALEIGH (AP) North Caro
lma basketball players J.R. Reid
and Steve Bucknall have been
charged with assaulting a North
Carolina State student at a night
spot, authorities said
Warrants filed with the Wake
County Clerk of Court said the
charges were filed early Sarurdav
morning by Taul James Doherty
In the warrants, Doherty said
Bucknall hit him "with a clenched
fist to the right eye and that Reid
spit in his face
Doherty said in an interview
with The Raleigh Times that the
blow knocked him to the floor and
his head hit a support column.
Doherty said he suffered a
chipped tooth and was taken to
Rex Hospital where he received
nine stitches for cuts on his eye-
brow and nose. A Rex spokesman
said Doherty was treated at the
hospital and released.
TrialsinW! : TJLct Court for
Reid and Bucknall ha ; been set
for Nov. 16.
UNC basketball coach Dean
Smith was not immediately avail-
able for comment and UNC sports
information director Rick Brewer
said, 'That's the first I've heard of
it
Doherty, 21, said the incident
occurred about 12:30 am. Satur-
day at the Shooters II club near the
N.C Statecampus He said Reid. a
6-foot-9, 250-pound sophomore
from Virginia Beach. Va and
Bucknall, a 6-6 junior from Lon
don, England, "confronted me
and started to ask me if I was talk-
ing about them or trving to start a
tight with them
"I tried to tell them I had no idea
what they were talking about
Doherty said. "They left again
and then one minute later thev
returned all over again. I tried to
explain that I didn't know what
was going on. This time Reid be-
came more vocal again and more
violent.
Reid began cursing and, after a
friend of Doherty fried unsuccess-
fully to intervene, spit in
Doherty's face, Doherty said. "I
put my hand up and I can't say
that I even touched him he said.
"As I put mv hand up 1 was just
punched. I was blind sided
Witnesses identified Bucknall
as the assailant. Doherty said
Raleigh police Lt. CA. Watson
said police interviewed 12 to 15
witnesses.
"It appears there was some type
of verbal encounter between the
victim and several of the basket
ball players and that it escalated
from that Watson said.
He said the two players were
officially charged Sunday and
voluntarily came to Raleigh to be
interviewed bv police.
within the i m
mural Ri-
McDonald
rather unusvw
permission tol
nal Cvm tdcj
alone b I I
street light
While m
dentv
and t-
.
that same
modest
Club gn m
ment orj
itself or
populai
winnir ,
clu'r
the Sp '
' I
or
tlv � trl
Y �� ��
hv ��
WOKKI. OTUMNISi
When you fill out our Form
W-4oi W-4.V "Employ"
Withholding Allowance
Certificate remember:
If vou can he claimed on sour
parent's or anothci person's tax
return, vou gencralh cannot be
exempt from income tax
withholding To get it right, read
the instructions that came with
your Form W-4 or W-4A
mor�
ers � �
wor
ha ve bee
V.
pren
for tl
Bi.
lives
vusit)
lmry "
st or
�ve. n
ev, wi
pne
on
! "GUAM
? Pita
� �� mm
M





Paw i:
m. �? i
I '
Bill McDonald leads way
for Pirate Karate Club
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 27, 1987 13
If you entered Bill McDonald's
msurance establishment in
Greenville, N.C. during an
average work day, you would
more than likely hear the sounds
rjj office managers filing, typing
and discussing indurance figures
with local clients. But, there is
something behind the scenes.
An air of confidence rings
throughout, and indeed it should.
Not only in the fact that
McDonald's agency is steadily
moving upward on the insurance
ladder of success but that its
ru mcsake, Bill McDonald is an ex-
perienced black belt karate spe-
cialist.
This year marks Mr.
McDonalds 25th year with East
Carolina University and his role
a advisor, sponsor and instructor
tot the Karate Club, a division
�-��

ill.ihunt ptit the clamp on a South ("arolina
iever, tin Gamecocks managed to roll past
I UNC's
Reid,
I Bucknall
pleased with charged
et standings
si i Wilson also
r. events, with
m � r freestyle
' ' :18.93); and �
tree rela : 53.84).
eter fn estvlc, Ryan
� first in 2:03.0,
rSu! m Augus-
- 4.4o
� free st) le was -
freshman Sonva
26 17 over Angela
dith Bndgers, �
n 2641 and 2684 -
- I -rncter frees-
. is squeaked out a
See SWIMMERS page 14
id crown
( xtra-point con-
team had to settle
ir as the Sig Fps
! Pou-Sas put the
t and placed the
?ach for the "A"
itrv teams results
in 21:35. Other finishers
he men were Matt
tzer, 2th in 22:36, Rob
.1st in 23:10; Rusty Wil-
J4th in 23:25; Rusty
in T; 50; Miles Lay-
th in 24:30; loeCorlev, 45th
I and Henrv Patrick, 46th
in u
Th
irates will compete in a
meet Saturday, Oct. 31
local Tiger team before
it their season on Nov.7
at thi nial Athletic Associa-
� at William & Marv.
r team drops two
Delta
rown
� oft
n con-
ims for a one-
ting
: . . t on the
:12to play in the
I Lord
Idown pass. The
ion was unsuc-
�re at 20-6.
:k to the air late
treating Rodri-
er score for the
ing the unsuc-
trv, the Enforc-
48 to play.
put the final
enng total with
i when Bellows
Zcta pass and
endzone. The
is successful for
-6.
matches to Atlantic Christian
College and the University of
Richmond.
Atlantic Christian shut out the
Pirates 1-0 Thursday afternoon at,
Varsity Field on a goal by Brian
Fahey. The win put the Fighting
Bulldogs up to 14-2 overall
Saturday, ECU went to
Richmond in search of its first.
CAA win of the season but was
shut out again, 5-0. That shut out
marked the ninth time ECU has
been shut out, breaking the old
record of seven set in 1979.
Greg Sluyer, Mark Choi, Mike
Wright and Oliver Weiss all had
first half goals to give the Spiders
a 4-0 halftime advantage.
Mike Wright scored his second
goal of the day 10 minutes into the
second period to put Richmond
up 5-0.
Richmond out-shot ECU 24 to
eight with Richmond keeper Britt
Weber making three saves and
ECU'S Scott McCullough making
10.
The Pirates will play their final
home match of the season Wed-
nesday at 3 p.m. when they host
Greensboro College.
RALEIGH (AP) North Caro-
lina basketball players JR. Reid
and Steve Bucknall have been
charged with assaulting a North
( arolina State student at a night-
spot, authorities said.
Warrants filed with the Wake
County Clerk of Court said the
charges were filed early Saturday
morning bv Paul James Doherty.
In the warrants, Doherty said
Bucknall hit him "with a clenched
fist to the right eye and that Reid
spit in his face.
Doherty said in an interview
with The Raleigh Times that the
Mow knocked him to the floor and
his head hit a support column.
Doherty said he suffered a
chipped tooth and was taken to
Rex Hospital where he received
nine stitches for cuts on his eye-
brow and nose. A Rex spokesman
said Doherty was treated at the
hospUai and released.
Trials in Wake District Court for
Reid and Bucknall have been set
�ir Nov. 16.
UNC basketball coach Dean
Smith was not immediately avail-
able for comment and UNC sports
nformation director Rick Brewer
nd, "That's the first I've heard of
it
Doherty, 21, said the incident
occurred about 12:30 a.m. Satur-
day at the Shooters II club near the
C. State campus. He said Reid, a
Moot 9, 250-pound sophomore
from Virginia Beach, Va and
Bucknall, a 6-6 junior from Lon-
don, England, "confronted me
and started to ask me if I was talk-
ing about them or trying to start a
fight with them
"1 tried to tell them I had no idea
what they were talking about
Doherty said. "They left again
and then one minute later they
returned all over again. I tried to
explain that I didn't know what
was going on. This time Reid be-
came more vocal again and more
violent.
Reid began cursing and, after a
friend of Doherty tried unsuccess-
tully to intervene, spit in
Doherts face, Doherty said. "I
put my hand up and I can't say
that I even touched him he said.
"As I put my hand up I was just
punched. 1 was blind sided
Witnesses identified Bucknall
as the assailant, Doherty said.
Raleigh police Lt. CA. Watson
said police interviewed 12 to 15
witnesses.
"It appears there was some type
of verbal encounter between the
victim and several of the basket-
ball players and that it escalated
from that Watson said.
He said the two players were
officially charged Sunday and
voluntarily came to Raleigh to be
interviewed by police.
within the Department of Intra-
mural-Recreational Services.
McDonald began his reign in a
rather unusual fashion. Without
permission to utilize the Memo-
rial Gym facility, he practiced
alone behind the gym under a
street light.
While working out, two stu-
dents approached the karateist
and became his first pupils. Prac-
tice sessions were held beneath
that same street light. From its
modest beginnings, the Karate
Club grew to a 300 plus enroll-
ment organization, establishing
itself on campus not only as a
popular program, but one of the
winningest university karate
clubs in the United States.
McDonalds own background in
the sport is varied. Starting out in
judo and amateur boxing, he
found that through karate, he was
able to enjoy the best of both
sports through hand boxing, one-
on-one competition and the kick-
ing clement.
He became the youngest black
belt in North Carolina. His per-
sonal achcivements are endless
ranging from a Golden Glove in
boxing to a National Instructor of
the Year by the Korean-American
Karate Association Board.
McDonalds achcivements mav
J
be analized more appropriately
by the many students he has
taught over the years. He alone
has instructed over three world
kick boxing champions, a heavy
weight, light heavyweight and
super light weight champion.
He holds the record of having
more world champion kick box-
ers in the United States and more
world ranked. Six U.S. champions
have been under the leadership of
McDonald, his most recent ap-
prentice, Dale Frye, is preparing
for the world championship.
Bill McDonald has touched the
lives of many East Carolina Uni-
versity alumni and played an
important role in their success
stories. Former student, Ronny
Rowe, now a North Carolina at-
torney, was a former point fighter
WOKKIMi STUDENTS:
When you fill out your Form
W-4 or W-4A, "Employee's
Withholding Allowance
Certificate remember:
If you can be claimed on your
parent's or another person's tax
return, you generally cannot be
exempt from income tax
withholding To get it right, read
the instructions that came with
your Form W-4 or W-4A.
at East Carolina.
Vicki Morrow, whose story is
unique in its own right, is pres-
ently running one of the states
most successful karate schools
located in Raleigh, N.C. many
others have gone on to successful
careers.
McDonald feels that, "Karate
knowledge has just given them
the confidence in every day life
and to succeed in business, so we
feel like it is as much a part, if not
karate some other sport, some-
thing else that gives them this
kind of confidence at ECU, as well
as their regular educational
courses
The department of Intramural-
Recreational Services is proud to
have Bill McDonald involved in
its programs. Through his efforts,
the Karate Club has flourished
into one of the most successful
clubs in the United States.
He has not only developed
great sportsmen but successful
professionals as well. Congratu-
lations on your 25th anniversary.
The Karate Club is presently
accepting members. Meetings are
scheduled for women each Tues-
Action heats up to a fever pitch when the ECU Karate team, led bv Bill McDonald, takes to the mat
(Photo by Jon Jordan - ECU Photo Lab)
day at 7:30 p.m. and Thursday at
8:30 p.m. in room 108 Memorial
Gym. Interested men should at-
tend sesssions on Tuesday at 8:30
p.m. and Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. at
the same location.
Fours Enuff
2500 North Heritage Street, Kinston
Every Thursday Nite
Ladies Nite with 25 tf Draft V
Friday, October 30th
Our Annual Halloween
Costume Party
with 10$ Draft
A Total of $500 Cash to be given
STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
�- V . V �;
otetv Greatly Reduced! 0

TRICK OR TREAT
jw��
Cra aooks SPECIALS
VV
ve
v

&
Gift Books
Sale Starts October 27
HOT DEALS
ON 000L
SHADES.
"GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
ON QUALITY SHADES"
If you're looking for shades, look to Sunglasses Plus. We
have a nil line of designer frames and accessories from
names like Vuamet Ray-Ban. Bolle and Carrera. Lowest
prices. Guaranteed. Look to Sunglasses Plus for hot deals
on cool shades.
YOU
are the key to responsible
decisions
concerning alcohol
'unsla55Ql
Trie Plaza Mall (across from Brody's)
756-9771
$5.00 Off Sunglasses,
'GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES ON QUALITY SHADES
Full Line Of Sunglasses. Eyeglass Frames.
4MA Contact Lens Solutions And Eye Accessories
jOlu5 Eyeglass Frames from $9.95
Tta PUa Mall (across Iran Brodysl
Help prevent alcohol abuse through education
East Carolina University Supports
Alcohol Awareness Week
Oct. 22-29,1987

v
�"mh mmmimmm�wm�im'm
" " "MMMMPi
9 i m win
I





14 THE EASTCAROi ivm am
OCTOBER 27, 1987
Continued from page 12
blue-ribbon finish in 10:08.57.
Patrick Brcnnan came in at
10:16.66; and freshman Steven
Dean settled for third with a time
of 10:34.19.
John Farrell snared first in the
200-meter freestyle at 1:47.86,
leaving Andy Jeeter (1:48.77) in
second, and freshman Brian
Kingsfield (1:51.42) bringing up
the back.
The men's 50-meter freestyle
was topped bv senior Ronald
Fleming in 22.48. Placing second
ready ft
was standout sophomore Andy
Lewis who posted a mark of 23.42.
And touching the wall for third
was Chip Kline, who stopped the
clock at 23.73.
For the women's 200-meter fly,
Ryan Philyaw stretched to take
first place in 2:20.28, leaving
Robin Wicks with 2:20.36 and a
disappointing second place.
One-onchundredth of a second
was the difference in the women's
100-meter freestyle event, when
Patti Walsh blinked and came
away number two to
1 lemingway's 57.14 finish.
Sophomore Ginger Carrick
Twins ready to party
M1NNEAPLOIS (AF) The
party is on in Minnesota, home to
the biggest home-bodies in base-
ball.
The World Series champion
Twins returned to the Metrodome
field for the last time in 1987 to
take a bow before their fans. There
couldn't have been a more fitting
tribute.
Home, after all, was where it all
happened for the Twins.
"Go party Gary Gaetti told
what was left of a crowd of 55,376
asheand his teammates took their
trim at the microphone. "And
have a good time. You deserve it
Even with the Metrodom half-
empty, the roar still was deafen-
ing.
Never had a team won a World
Series by winning all its home
games without winning on the
road. How could it have been oth-
erwise?
The Twins built the best home
record of any team in baseball this
season, 56-25, but had the worst
road record of any team to ever
win a pennant, 29-52.
After hitting seven homers in
the first six games all but one at
home Minnesota had none in its
4-2 victory over St. Louis in Game
7 Sunday night. The Twins scored
their go-ahead run with three
walks and an infield hit bv Greg
G gne, and the World Series MVP
of the homer-happy Twins was a
pitcher, Frank Viola.
The Twins got one of their runs
on a questionable call bv first-base
umpire Lee Weyer. A bad call by
Weyer, a National League um-
pire, took the Cardinals out of a
possible scoring situation later in
the game.
The Cardinals, who have been
to three World Series in the '80s,
came here with their home-run
leader. Jack Clark, lost entirely
and Terry Fendleton limited by
injuries.
"They are the world champi-
ons, there is nothing to comment
on said Cardinals center fielder
Willie McGee. They are the best
team in baseball
Viola pitched eight innings, re-
tiring 11 in a row after he allowed
the second of two RBI singles in
the second inning. Viola wan
Game 1 in Minnesota and lost
Game 4 in St. Louis.
The Twins won the series under
rookie Managei Tom Kelly, after
losing 91 games in 1986.
When the Twins won Sunday
night, they closed the longest gap
between World Scries titles in
major-league history from the
1924 Washington Senators to the
'87 Twins. It was b2 years of futil-
ity that was supposed to end.
The turnaround did not come
without change.
The Twins got Jeff Reardon
from the Montreal Lvpos in Feb-
ruary, and he had 31 saves. Dan
Gladden, the only player oneither
team to hit in all seven games of
the World Series, came in a trade
from San Francisco last March.
Don Baylor came over from Bos-
ton on Aug. 31, the cutoff date for
postseason eligibility, and hit a
game-tying home run in the sixth
,v;ame.
j INSTANT REPLAY
r
�One Hour Color Prints
�One Hour Color
Enlargements
�One Hour Wallets
�Video Transfer
�Slides and Black & White
�Film, Cameras, Frames
and Albums
�Passport and Visa Photos
�Studio Photography

ri
EC
FREE
2nd Set
Of Prints
n
EC
FREE
Enlargement
With Purchase
Of Any Eqiml
At time of processing . Value Color
Enlargement
coupon ezpirei 11-3-87 , ,
I coupon crplret 11-3-87
Ti
EC
FREE
Developing
$1.99 Value
For Each Roll
Developed Printed
coupon expire
Wierd, Wild, Colorful
Halloween Clothes
fpatvte
1
A little bit of everything!
The Coin & Ring Man
10:00-5:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 8at. 400 S. Evans
752-3866
pulled ahead in the women's 200-
meter backstroke to post a time of
2:22.05 to Hedges' 2:24.40.
Steven Dean nabbed a winning
slot in the men's 200 fly; the so-
phomore raced in at 2:05.23, leav-
ing Tyge Tistorio to claim second
with a mark of 2:07.68; and Tom
Moisten to take third at 2:08.60.
Rounding out the rest of the
swimmers was G.D. Lewis at
2:09.10; Doug Markoff at 2:13.10;
and Andy Lewis at 2:13.56.
In the 100-meter freestyle, Ken-
nedy returned to top form with a
50.20 mark. Freshman Sean Cal-
ender cruised in at 51.71; first-
year man Chip Kline took third in
52.70; and Hoppy Hopkinson
hobbled in at 55.35.
John Farrell led the pack in the
500-meter freestyle with a 4:59.11
performance. Brian Kingsfield
stole second place (5:00.33) from
Andy Jeter, who placed a time of
5:00.62.
Scorching her teammate by
seven seconds, Meredith Bridges
won the 200-meter breaststroke
over Carolyn Green in 2:30.37
And finishing first in the 400-
meter freestyle, Leslie Wilson
touched the wall in 3:53.84, over
number two, Angela Winstcad
(3:55.11).
In the men's 200 meter
breaststroke, Kennedy crushed
the other swimmers bv a tl
and
second margin. Finishing m
2:15.96, Kennedy's nearest com-
petitor was Patrick Brennan who
placed at 2:1935. Taking the slacl
was Lee Hicks, at 2:19.72; Ted
Christenson at 2:21.90
Ronald Fleming at 2 22.40'
And rounding out the men's
competition with the 400-metef
freestyle, Andy eter took the
honors in 3:29.69; and lygePisto-
no netted the number two spot
with a time of 3:25
WE BUILT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
AP
SAV A CENTER
The freshest way to Save
The wisest investment you'll ever make
for your family begins with only.
FUNK&WAGNALLS
NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA
Latest Edition
Volume 1
only. . .
FJtf
I .lum�- Mih
DICTIONARY
Wuh loiumrt Ik )(ihr I
Volumes 2-29
only $4.99 ea.
STOP
A&P BRAND 1 28 OR
Crisco
Shortening
ASSORTED
- - � nojunicu
wCharmin
Tissue
MARKET FRESH
3 LBS. OR MORE
L'J J Lbb OR MORE
Ground
Beef
can
mn One With Ar Aoa.hor.a. $10 O' Moe Putcfti
vt One W.tn An Additional $10 Or More Purchase
Red Band
Flour
Duke's
Mayonnaise
Tomato
Soup
68 conr I58
78
18
Bounty
Towels
VANILLA
Pet Ice
Cream
79
Fryer
Breast
Cubed
Steaks
�J29
J99
17Q th.d Smoked
' � Ham
DUNCAN MINES-SElfv T QUARTERS c
Crt -t On JaUAM'5Hb � FlAV-O RICH ICE CREAM
Frosfin9 1.39 Mrs Filberts Margarine 38c Sandwiches
1.19 Fresh Turkeys
W4. .� � y v H
. iGmT n liveo
Ultra Pampers 9.69 Cottage Cheese 1.59 Orange Juice VS 89s Sirloin Steaks
SAFE FOR SURFACES FRENCH OR GREEN ONION � DA
��� BET"
Comet Cleanser 2 99c Deans Dip 2 99c Golden Crinkles 2, 1.29 SteakPatt.es
76- OFF LABEL HOMESTYLE- BUTTERMILK ChiCKETURKEY-SH
Gain Detergent : 1.59 A&P Biscuits 79c Banquet Dinners �1.09 Rump Roast
79�
2.99
1.69
1.99
WHEAT Tmims � BETTER
CHEDOERS � TRISCUITS
1M602'89
Nabisco
Nilla Wafers
EASTERN GROWN
RED OR GOLDEN
Apples
NEW CROP
FLORIDA
Navel
Oranges
FRESH CALIFORNIA
Pepsi Cola
2 Liter
Bottle
99
NORTH CAROLINA GROWN
Sweet Potatoes 4 � 99c Celery Hearts
WATERFIEID LABEL
Boston Lettuce
LARGE CREAMY
Florida Avocados
RED RIPE
Plum Tomatoes
SELECT MEDIUM
69c Yellow Onions
NEW ZEALAND
69c Kiwi Fruit
MURRAY S BRAND
59c Apple Cider
99
3 99'
3 99
1.99
AMERICAN EXPRESS
Money
Orders
25
( SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
f STOP quarters
Ss?' Parkay
Margarine is,
Limn One Pet Shopper With An Add i $10 Or Mcxe Pun
SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
SEE STORE FOR DETAILS
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open 24 Hours-Open Mon. 7 a.m Closed Sat. 11 p.m Open Sun. 7 a.ml 1 p.m.
PRICES EFFECTIVE OCT 25 THRU OCT 3' '98- QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
A
f
i��fn�mm
mir.r ms j icmm-M" immrn
.





14
THE EAST CAROnNUM
OCTOBER 27, 1987
Continued from page 12
blue-ribbon finish in 10:08.57.
Patrick Brennan came in at
10:16.66; and freshman Steven
Dean settled for third with a time
Of 10:34.19.
John Farrell snared first in the
200-meter freestyle at 1:47.86,
leaving Andy Jeeter (1:48.77) in
second, and freshman Brian
Kmgsfield (1:51.42) bringing up
the back.
The men's 50-meter freest vie
ready fi
was standout sophomore Andy
Lewis who posted a mark of 23.42.
And touching the wall for third
was Chip Kline, who stopped the
clock at 23.73.
For the women's 200-meter fly,
Ryan Philvaw stretched to take
first place in 2:20.28, leaving
Robin Wicks with 2:20.36 and a
disappointing second place.
One-onehundrcdth of a second
was the difference in the women's
1 Oil-meter freestyle event, when
Patti Walsh blinked and came
awav number two to
was topped by senior Ronald Hemingway's57.14 finish.
Fleming in 22.48. Placing second Sophomore Ginger Carrick
Twins ready to party
MINNEAPLOIS (AP) The
party is on in Minnesota, home to
the biggest home-bodies in base-
ball.
The World Series champion
Twins returned to the Metrodome
field for the last time in 1987 to
take a bow before their fans. There
couldn't have been a more fitting
tribute.
Home, after all, was where it all
happened for the Twins.
"Go party Gary Gaetti told
what was left oi a crowd oi 55,376
as heand his teammates took their
trun at the microphone. nd
have a good time. You deserve it
Even with the Metrodom halt-
empty, the roar still was deafen-
ing.
Never had a team won a World
Series by winning all its home
games without winning on the
road. How could it have been oth-
er wise?
The Twins built the best home
record of any team in baseball this
season, 5-25. but had the worst
road record of any team to ever
win a pennant, 29-52.
After hitting seven homers in
the first six games all but one at
home Minnesota had none in its
4-2 victory over St. Louis in Game
7Sunday night. The Twins scored
their go-ahead run with three
walks and an infield hit bv Greg
Gagne, and the World Series MVP
of the homer-happy Twins was a
pitcher, Frank Viola.
The Twins got one of their runs
on a questionable call bv first-base
umpire Lee Weyer A bad call bv
Weyer, a National League um-
pire, took the Cardinals out of a
possible scoring situation later in
the game.
The Cardinals, who have been
to three World Series in the '80s,
came here with their home-run
leader. Jack Clark, lost entirely
and Terry Pendleton limited by
injuries.
"They are the world champi-
ons there is nothing to comment
on said Cardinals center fielder
Willie McGee. "They arc the best
team in baseball
Viola pitched eight innings, re-
tiring 11 in a row after he allowed
the second of two RBI singles in
the second inning. Viola wan
Game 1 in Minnesota and lost
Game 4 in St. Louis.
The Twins won the series under
rookie Manage! Tom Kelly, after
losing 41 games in 1986.
When the Twins won Sunday
night, they closed the longest gap
between World Series titles in
major league history from the
1924 Washington Senators to the
'87 Twins. It wash2 years of futil-
ity that was supposed to end.
The turnaround did not come
without change.
The Twins got Jeff Reardon
from the Montreal Expos in Feb-
ruary, and he had 31 saves. Dan
Gladden, theonlv player on either
team to hit in all seven games of
the World Series, came in a trade
from San Francisco last March.
Don Baylor came over from Bos-
ton on Aug. 31, the cutoff date for
postseason eligibility, and hit a
game-tying home run in the sixth
game.
-INSTANT REPLAY
�One Hour Color Prints
�One Hour Color
Enlargements
�One Hour Wallets
�Video Transfer
�Slides and Black & White
�Film, Cameras. Frames
and Albums
�Passport and Visa Photos
�Studio Photography
r
FREE
2nd Set
Of Prints
At time of processing
coupon urpirci 11-3-87
Tf
EC
FREE
71
EC
FREE
Enlargement Developing
With Purcha.e 1 99 Val
Of Any Equal ror RoI1
Value Color Developed a Printed
Enlargement � �-�- ��. u.
coupon txptm 113-87 coupon expire
Wierd, Wild, Colorful
Halloween Clothes
rpatvte
Govms �es
A little bit of everything!
CLOTHES
At
The Coin & Ring Man
10:00-5:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 Sat. 400 S. Evans
732-3866
pulled ahead in the women's 200-
meter backstroke to post a time of
2:22.05 to Hedges' 2:24.40.
Steven Dean nabbed a winning
slot in the men's 200 fly; the so-
phomore raced in at 2:05.23, leav-
ing Tvge ristorio to claim second
with a mark of 2:07.68; and Tom
Holsten to take third at 2:08.60.
Rounding out the rest of the
swimmers was G.D. Lewis at
2:09.10; Doug Markoff at 2:13.10;
and Andy Lewis at 2:13.56.
In the 100-meter freestyle, Ken-
nedy returned to top form with a
S0.20 mark. Freshman Sean Cal-
lender cruised in at 51.71; first-
year man Chip Kline took third in
52.70; and Hoppy Hopkinson
hobbled in at 55.35.
John Farrell led the pack in the
500-meter freestyle with a 4:59.11
performance. Brian Kingsfield
stole second place (5:00.33) from
Andy Jeter, who placed a time of
5:00.62.
Scorching her teammate by
seven seconds, Meredith Bridges
won the 200-meter breaststroke
over Carolyn Green in 2:30.37
And finishing first in the 400-
mrk-r freestyle, Leslie Wilson
touched the wall in 3:53.84, over
number two, Angela Winstead
(3:55.11).
In the men's 200-meter
breaststroke, Kennedy crushed
the other swimmers bv a three-
second margin. Finishing in
2:15.96, Kennedy's nearest com-
petitor was Patrick Brennan who
placed at 2:19.35. Taking the slack
was Lee Hicks, at 2:19.72; Ted
Christenson at 2:21.90and
Ronald Fleming at 2:22.40
And rounding out the nun's
competition with tin- 400 meter
freestyle, Andy Jeter took the
honors in 3:29.nM; and I yge Pisto-
no netted the number two spol
with a time of 3:2.10
WE BUILT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
m
SAV A CENTER
The freshest way to Save
The wisest investment you'll ever make
for your family begins with only. . .
FUNK&WAGNALLS
NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA
Latest Edition
Volume 1
only. . .
rREI
Volurnr Mu hin
DICTIONARY
V. ilh V�l�mrs IK 1 the I ,� v( 1rtT
Volumes 2 29
only $4.99 ea.
Red Band
Flour 5
68
Duke's im
Mayonnaise 8
Tomato
Soup
18
Folgers
Coffee
ASSO
& Bounty
Towels
VANILLA
Pet Ice
Cream
i Fryer
Breast
�J29
7QC (Sj Cubed
5J " Steaks
QUARTERS
DUNCAN MINES-SELECTED
Frnetmn � 1 On U' c. A. O RICH ICE CREAM
Kost,n9 - 1.39 Mrs Filberts Margarine 38c Sandwiches
smauk-ue: vi-
Smoked
Ham
p4 1.19 Fresh Turkeys
Ultra Pampers 9.69 Cottage Cheese 1.59 Orange Ju.ce 89' Sirio'in Steaks
SAFE FOR SURFACES
FRENCH OR GREEN ONION
Comet Cleanser 2 , 99c Deans Dip
UHfc IDA
99c Golden Crinkles 2, 1.29 Steak Patties"
�'OFF LABEL HOMESTYLE- BUTTERMILK CHICKE � TmrkFV . U �� b, acre
Gam Detergent .1.59 A&P B.scu.ts 79 SSKKtaSTw 1jQ9 Rump Roast
79'
2.99
1.69
1.99
wheat thins �SEttER
ChEDDEhS-TRiSCUITS
tMfiQZtr
Nabisco
Nilla Wafers
EASTERN GROWN
RED OR GOLDEN
Apples
NEW CROP
FLORIDA
Navel
Oranges
Pepsi Cola
2 Liter
Bottle
99 �
NORTH CAROLINA GROWN
Sweet Potatoes 4
WATERFIELD LABEL
Boston Lettuce
LARGE CREAMY
Florida Avocados
RED RIPE
Plum Tomatoes
99c
69c
69c
59c
FRESH CALIFORNIA
Celery Hearts
SELECT MEDIUM
Yellow Onions
NEW ZEALAND
Kiwi Fruit
MURRAY S BRAND
Apple Cider
AMERICAN EXPRESS
Money
Orders
25 ?
SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
QUARTERS
WParkay
Margarine
OrMorePurch Coupon E�p,res Oct 3' 198:
SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
SEE STORE FOR DETAILS
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open 24 Hours-Open Mon. 7 a.m Closed Sat. 11 p.m Open Sun. 7 a.m11 p.m.
PRICES EFFECTIVE OCT 25 THRU OCT 31 1987 QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
J
�Mimn I -
AMManniM





Title
The East Carolinian, October 27, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 27, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.568
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy