The East Carolinian, October 22, 1987






INSIDE
Editorials4
Entertainment�9
Sports��15
Classifieds���6
ENTERTAINMENT
'Surrender' reviewed � see ENTERTAINMENT,
page 9
SPORTS
The Pirates begin a winning streak � see SPORTS,
page 15.
(Eht iEafit (Carol in tan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 No. 16
Thursday, October 22,1987
Greenville, NC
18 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Three ECU students face fake ID charges
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Managing 1 ditor
rhrcc ECU students living in
mstead Hall were arrested
hursday after an investigation
iblic safety into the counter-
of N.C. drivers' licenses,
ding to Police Chief lohnny
� rk Wesley Cassady, 18, ot
nstcad; John Todd Gentel,
- o( Greensboro; and lames
IS Armstrong, 19, of Oak
were arrested at 5 p.m.
ida) after they turned them-
- in to officers so warrants
� sen ed, Rose said.
llu-ir arrests were the result of a
p d into the ECU Cri-
mebusters Hotline on Wednes-
day, Rose said.
Cassady and Armstrong were
each charged with six counts of
reproducing and ottering tor sale
counterfeit and fictitious drivers'
licenses and were released on a
$500 secured bond. Gentel was
charged with six counts oi aiding
and abetting the reproducing and
offering for sale counterfeit and
fictitious drivers'licenses and one
count of using a false birth certifi-
cate to obtain a license (a charge
levied bv the Department ot Mo-
tor Vehicles, which assisted Pub-
lic Safetv in making the arresto
He was released on a $600 secured
bond.
Rose said the three face up to
three years in jail for each count of
thechargesand the possibility of a
fine levied bv the judge.
Rose explained how the stu-
dents were counterfeiting the li-
censes.
"They made a board that had
the appearance of a regular North
Carolina driver's license less a
place for a picture. They would
back the people up that were
buying the license against the
wall against a big board attached
and take the picture and just cut
the head out of the picture Then
they would laminate the license
together. Rose said.
Rose said the men use large
stick-on letters to change names,
birthdates and other information
on the license.
"Our information was that it
was just recently that the
operation had started Rose said.
"Like within the last week
He said six other students have
been referred to Ronald Speier,
associate dean of student affairs,
for buying the licenses. Rose ex-
plained that the students' punish-
ment would be handled by the
university.
"That waskind of a co-opagrcc-
ment between our office and the
D A'soffice that they would not be
tried because these are misde-
meanors Rose said.
Alcohol A wareness Week
The irony of the arrest � that it
was just one day short of being ex-
actly one year since thearrest of 21
students for similar offenses �
was not lost on Rose.
"Quite frankly it didn't surprise
us that another attempt was made
at it because the legislation dic-
tates now that you must be 21
years of age to buy alcohol and a
lot of clubs downtown require
identification showing that
you're 21 for admittance.
"So whether or not these kids
want to drink or not, they want to
get admitted. It's one of the two
reasons and we feel like it's going
to be a continuing problem.
"And it's one that we will inves-
tigate and we will enforce the
same as these last two inci-
dences he said.
"We consider it a serious of-
fense he continued. "It's serious
todo it (counterfeit). It's serious to
buy them if it is done
Rose continued, "It's a criminal
record. And if they're convicted
� and I'm not saying they will be
� if they are convicted of the
charges it leaves them with a
criminal record which could af-
fect their statusasstudents. And it
could affect them throughout life
after they leave the university
"They just have to weigh, in my
opinion, whetheror not they want
to run the risk of being charged
with either possessing or repro-
ducing (a fictitious license)
Officials encourage sensible drinking
CO e
By TOM PAGE
Null Vntr
v-s. ill observe "Alcohol
icss Week" Oct. 22-29 as
national campaign to
responsible decisions
use of alcoholic bever-
college udents.
�g the week, student
ups a faculty committee Mid
rs wil! sponsor activities on
campus to inform and alert stu-
dents about problems associated
! abuse.
' Awareness Week at
initiates a vear-round em-
p isis on alcohol education and
recognizes the individual's ulti-
mate responsibility for decisions
regarding his or her use or non-
use of alcohol said Dr. Elmer
Meyer Jr vice chancellor of Stu-
dent Life.
The week will include various
workshops, displays and activi-
ties, according to Laura Sweet, an
Alcohol Awarness Commute
member. Both sorority members
and dorm residents will be par-
ticipating in programs to make
students aware of the law and
alcohol abuse, Sweet said. Some
downtown bars will be participat-
ing tonight by providing specials
on non-alcoholic beverages.
"In the past, the week has been
very successful in terms of stu-
dents attending the events
Sweet said.
Mary Elesha-Adams of the Stu-
dent Health Center said one of the
objectives of the week is to make
students aware ways to have fun
without drinking.
Students need to know that
there are health implications as
well as the possibility of doing
harm to others Elesha-Adams
said.
Steve Streeter, a spokesman for
the national organization Stu-
dents Against Drunk Driving
(SADD) will be speaking Oct. 29
to close out the eventsof the week,
according to Elesha-Adams.
Streeter, a former football player
at the University of North Caro-
lina, was permanently injured in
an automobile accident involving
a drunk driver.
Streeter will be sponsored by
BACCHUS (Boosting Alcohol
Consciousness Concerning
Health of University of Students).
BACCHUS is a peer-education
group that provides information
and counsels the student about
alcohol abuse and responsible
drinking.
Group seeks to start new fraternity chapter
BvTONIPAGE
Surf Writer
I interestgroupSigmaAlpha
is well on its way to be-
: g ECL s next social frater-
ac ording to group member
Greg hristonsen.
. he local interest group cur-
I) has thirty membersand has
ret ieved a lot of national support
i chapters all over the country
in terms of starting a chapter at
E I Christenscn said.
The national chapter of Sigma
Alpha Epsilon has already ac-
cepted the ECU group and they
are now in the processof coloniza-
tion, according to Ralf D'Angelo,
vice president of the grou
"VVe are basically on our own.
There is a lot of work to do but we
are confident it will be worth it
D'Angelo said.
According to D'Angelo, a na-
tional representative will be visit-
ing ECU in November to advise
and possibly colonize the group.
"We hope to be colonized by the
end of the semester D'Angelo
said.
Members in the group said in-
terest in starting the fraternity
began with a few students from
ECU who knew members from
other schools and wanted to start
a chapter on campus. The mem-
bers are confident the group will
succeed because, they have a
"strong national" with "a lot of
support from alumni
According to Christensen,
Sigma Alpha Epsilon isknown for
being the largest national frater-
nity. The organization has over
200 chapters in 46 states and is
recognized for its solid alumni
association.
Christensen said some of the
members attended the Sigma
See IMAGE, page 2
The SRA holds its regularly scheduled meeting in Mendenhall
Student Center Wednesday, gearing up for Alcohol Awareness Week
(Photolab).
Lab fees to be returned to students
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Managing I ditor
Students who paid a $25 lab fee
for fall semester 1987 will receive
the money back in credit on their
spring tuition, according to John
Bell, assistant vice chancellor for
business.
Those who paid the fee but do
not register for spring semester
classes will be sent a $25 check the
third week in the semester, Bell
said.
The refund is necessary because
revenues generated from the new
fee were not included in the
university's 1987-88 budget by
the N.C. Legislature, Bell said.
He said the fee was originally
proposed by the university ad-
ministration last year. Students
were asked to voice their opinion
on the issue in an open forum,
which he said was not well at-
tended.
After the administration ap-
proved the measure, it was in-
cluded as part of the total fee
budget submitted to the Univer-
sity of North Carolina Adminis-
trative Offices, he said. Upon re-
ceiving approval there, the meas-
ure was passed by the UNC Board
of Governors in July.
Bell said bills for the fall
semester were sent to students in
July on the assumption that the
fee had been cleared. Unfortu-
nately, when the legislature ap-
proved the university's budget
late in its extended session, fee
revenues were not included.
"For reasons unknown to any of
us, the money to be raised by the
proposed fee was not included in
the budget Bell said.
"Accordingly we can not bill
and collect fees, even though it
was approved, since it was not
part of the budget per se he
continued. Bell went on to say that
the legislature docs not have to
approve the fee as a scparatcitem,
only include it in budget alloca-
tions.
Bell said the university applied
for special consideration of the fee
after the state budget division
notified the university of its prob-
lem.
"I presume they would have
had to reconvene the legislature
to ammend the budget. They cer-
tainly were not going to do that
he said. "We were notified some-
time in September that we would
not be able to retain the fee.
"What really messed this thing
up was the late adjournment of
the legislature. But that (the late
adjournment) is not unusual
Bell said large notices were
being placed on official notice
bulletin boards on campus to
explain the problem to students.
When students receive their
spring semester bills, the $25 will
See LAB, page 2
SRA makes plans at meeting
Students in Joyner Library look over "cheap books The Friends of
the Library began the sale Wednesday and continues the sale today
from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Money raised in the sale is earmarked for library
programs (Esther Norton, Photolab).
The Student Residence Hall
Association discussed the details
of several future events during its
Wednesday meeting at Menden-
hall Student Center.
The SRA will set up booths Oct.
22-23 on College Hill, West Cam-
pus and in the Student Store. At
these booths, students can obtain
contracts in which they pledge
not to drink during Alcohol
Awareness Week, which begins
today.
For students who honor their
contracts, the SRA plans to re-
ward them with "I Did It For a
Week at ECU" buttons.
The association also discussed
the pig pickin' to be held Nov. 7
(before the last home game). Each
representative at the meeting re-
ceived 10 tickets and was encour-
aged to sell at least 20 more. Each
$5 ticket is worth a plate of Bar-B-
Que chicken, field peas, boiled
potatoes, cornbread, and free
"seconds
The final business of the meet-
ing was promoting a blood drive
to take place Nov. 18-19
"
�r��M� .�-� "� -
r





fill 1 'AST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 22, 1W
Dean of School of Medicine to be saluted
(ECU News Bureau) � Dr.
William E. Laupus, ECU vice
chancellor for health sciences and
dean ot the School oi Medicine,
will be fluted Friday, Oct. 23,
w vth a banquet in his honor and a
symposium directed toward a
long standing career interest
excellence in medical education.
ECU c hancellor Emeritus Leo
W enkins will serve as master of
ceremonies tor the 7:30 p m. ban-
quet, at which Laupus' wife Eve-
K ii and their tour children will
also be recognized. The banquet
will be held at the adjacent 1 lilton
and Sheraton hotels, which will
be linked via closed circuit televi-
sion
Laupus, whose emphasis on
excellence in teaching, research
and service has been a hallmark of
his academic career, has been
dean of the School of Medicine
since the four-year M.D. program
was established in 1975. In 1983 he
was appointed university vice
chancellor, and in July of this year
he was named head of the new
HCU Division of I lealth Sciences,
comprising the schools of medi-
cine, nursing and allied health
science's.
He has announced that he will
step aside as medical school dean
when a successor is identified and
joins the univcrstiy sometime in
1988. 1 le will continue to serve as
vice chancellor.
The symposium proceeding the
banquet will include some of the
nation's most prominent medical
educators and evaluators.
Among the guest speakers at the
Brody Medical Sciences Building
will be several former Laupus
colleagues and pupils who have
achieved national stature.
Their task will be to examine the
elements that constitute the con-
tinuum of the medical education
experience from early academic
preparation through continuing
medical education. From this
perspective of excellence, the par-
ticipants will consider such topics
as the process of student selection,
the role of research and the prob-
lems of financing a medical edu-
cation.
Laupus became interested in
standards of excellence through
his work with the American
Board of Pediatrics and the
Amencan Board of Medical Spe-
cialties, both of which he has
served as president.
New commencement plans unveiled
(ECl News Bureau) - HCU
announced plans I ucsdavtohave
its tirst tall commencement Dec. 5
m which approximately 1,200 tall
and summer graduates will be
awarded degrees
Dr. Tinslc) E. arbrough, pro-
kssor and former chairman of
political science, has accepted an
invitation to deliver the com-
mencement address, according to
Dr. Richard R. Eakin, ECU chan-
cellor.
1 his is a commencement,
omplcte with speaker and all oi
the formal trappings Eakin said.
Because approximately one-
halt ot nearly 3,000 ECU gradu-
ate s ou h year complete require-
ments tor degrees during the
summer or in the fall semester,
university officials said it was
dt emed appropriate to schedule a
tall commencement
In the past ECU lias had one
traditional commencement per
in May. lor the past two
i ai s, tall and summer graduates
were recognized m a December
ceremony which was not a com
meneement.
The Dec. 5 event, however, will
feature the graduates in caps and
gowns, a processional into
Mmges Coliseum, a formal com
meneement address and the cere
monial conferring of degrees.
ClaibomeC.Rowe, chairman ol
the university's commencement
committee, said that a fall com-
mencement was considered be-
cause attendance at the May
commencement has become so
large. Between 12,500 and 13,000
persons attended the 1987 com
meneement on May 9 in Ficklen
Stadium.
In the event ot inclement
weather, it would have been diffi-
cult if not impossible to move
such a crowd into Mmges t oh
scum. Rowe said.
Rowe said the tall commence-
ment schedule includes a band
concert, the traditional academic
procession and a commencement
Lab fees still to be decided
on by NC legislature
itinued from page 1 nob again in onJci u, K, pu, m fo
ip .is a credit toward their use.
nt. Hesaid he felt confident that the
addition, Pel! said, the fee measure would pass the test again
not be assessed for the 1988 and this time be included in the
g semester or summer ses-
i U said the proposal would be
resubmitted this spring for im-
mentation in the fall, and that it
: go through the same chan-
linage of the utrue gentleman
is goal of prospective fraternity
Continued from page 1
ia Epsilon National Leader-
ship School over the summer in
Evanston, 111 This school has
helped in organizing the group
and writting the by-laws, he said.
Currently the group has a
sealed membership and is work-
ing on organization. "For the time
vim
we need a small group of
f
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Dr. Yarbrough, a senior faculty District Judge). Wanes Waring ot
member selected to deliver the South Carolina, was published
commencement address, has earlier this month by Oxford Uni-
been mi tin E( I political science versity Press.
faculty since 1967.1 lislatest book.
The 'East Carolinian
is presently accepting
applications for the following positions:
BUSINESS MANAGER
approved budget, but that the
outcome was not a certainty.
"At this point 1 don't tlunkl
anyone could answer UX1 percent
that it is going to be effective next I
fall or not he said.
9
dedicated people because we
have a lot to oo Christcnsen
said.
The long term goal of the group
will be building on the already
strong national foundation to es-
tablish and maintain the image of
the "true gentleman ' that Sigma
Alpha Epsilon is known for,
D'Angelo said.
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36 foreign s
DRYDEN, NY (CPS) In
what apparently is the first maor
flare-up of campus ra ial tensions
this school year, student harsass
ment pushed 36entral Amen-
can students to transfer trom
Tompkins ortland C ommunity
college last week
A group of students turned
against seemingly all their His
panic classmates after two of the
Central Ann � n the ram
pus as part ot .i student
scholarship pi gram run by
Georgetown Uni in Wash-
ington, I)( , were accused ot
sexually assaulting two white
females
Several students allegedly
threw rocks indi i! slurs at the
( entral Americans
malan student
rape and burg
ran student w.i-
sexuaJ abuse and b
"The (
del �
were charged witl
college Presidt
said ot the sub -
the other i I .
"These st
demned b
Whi
bv the
the . �
da) �
this
cat
Contra aid plan
(CISi President Reagan's
Septemberannouncementthathe
wants to continue supporting in '
Nicai . � ntrai nd his
ske
about
entral
plan
American p at
the region's id rs has fueled
protests and d am-
puses during the last few weeks
Rea u ItoaskCoi
gress to pi I r � �
Contra aid next month as an "in-
surance policy" I ' r Nicara-
gua lo complj w ith th( i
peace a ard In September, (
gress appropriated 5 million in
"humanitarian aid" to the rebels
While there were no organized
national prot I ' stu-
dents spontaneous!) reacted to
the events
� At Indiana I ni
50 protesters armei
and a petition a
U.S. involvement in �
America rallied on cam;
29. "Nicaragua-bashing
Reagan is doing said IU Pr
sor Russell Salmon. "He is r
man to be trusted
�About 130 attended an anti-
Contra aid rally at the Inn
of Iowa Sept. 25. The ra
was held to support the Central
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It may not be the amount of
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saluted
gh continuing Uupus became interested in
Bon From this standards of excellence through
kellence,thepar his work vMth the American
I r such topics Board ol Pediatrics and the
lentselection American Board of Medical Spe-
r, h and the prob ciaHies both of which he has
It a medical edu served as president
: "East Carolinian
is presently accepting
cations for the following positions:
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36 foreign students harassed in New York
DRYDEN, N.Y. (CPS) � In
what apparently is the first major
flare-up of campus racial tensions
this school year, student harass-
ment pushed 36 Central Ameri-
can students to transfer from
Tompkins-Cortland Community
college last week.
A group of students turned
against seemingly all their His-
panic classmates after two of the
Central Americans, on the cam-
pus as part of a foreign student
scholarship program run by
Georgetown University in Wash-
ington, D.C were accused of
sexually assaulting two white
females.
Several students allegedly
threw rocks and racial slurs at the
Central Americans after a Guate-
malan student was charged with
rape and burglary, and a Hondu-
ran student was charged with
sexual abuse and burglary.
"The Central American stu-
dents were identified as if they all
were charged with the crimes
college President Eduardo Marti
said of the subsequent attacks on
the other Hispanic students.
"These students were con-
demned before they were tried
While the attacks were sparked
by the sexual assaults, Marti said
they were also motivated by "the
day-to-day racism that exists in
this country and is hard to es-
cape
The 36 students were enrolled
at Tompkins-Cortland as part of
the federally funded Central
American Scholarship Program.
Georgetown established the pro-
gram in 1985 with funds from the
Agency for International Devel-
opment, and adminsters it at 14
other community colleges across
the country, Georgetown spokes-
woman Anne Klass explained.
The students, moved at their
own request, will be placed in
community colleges in California
and New Mexico.
At other schools, central Ameri-
cans are housed with American
host families. At Tompkins-Cort-
land, however, many of the stu-
dents lived in an apartment build-
ing near the campus.
Marti now thinks housing them
there was a mistake because it
isolated them from the rest of the
student body, and left them to get
caught up in an inappropriate
party atmosphere.
After one of those parties Sept.
12, two women who live in the
building pressed charges against
Marcos Moran of Guatemala,
who, they said, entered their
apartment and assaulted one of
them as they slept. Jose Orlando
Cordova of Honduras was ac-
cused of fondling the second
woman in the room. Both men
pleaded not quilty to the charges.
A judge released the two men
on their own recognizance after
they turned in their passports.
Contra aid plans stir college protests
(CPS) President Reagan's
September announcement that he
wants to continue supporting
Nicaragua's Contra rebelsand his
skepticism about the Central
American peace plan signed by
the region's leaders has fueled
protests and debates on U.S. cam-
puses during the last few weeks.
Reagan is expected to ask Con-
gress to provide $270 million for
Contra aid next month as an "in-
surance policy" to force Nicara-
gua to comply with the regional
peace accord. In September, Con-
gress appropriated $3.5 million in
"humanitarian aid" to the rebels.
While there were no organized
national protests, groups of stu-
dents spontaneously reacted to
the events:
�At Indiana University, about
50 protesters armed with signs
and a petition calling for an end to
U.S. involvement in Central
America rallied on campus Sept.
29. "Nicaragua-bashing is what
Reagan is doing said IU Profes-
sor Russell Salmon. "He is not a
man to be trusted
�About 150 attended an anti-
Contra aid rally at the University
of Iowa Sept. 25. The rally also
was held to support the Central
American peace plan. "Why docs
Reagan insist on keeping this war
in Central America? asked
speaker Renee Hernandez, a Sal-
vadoran student attending Iowa.
"What kind of right does he have
in assuming Central America can
not solve its own problems?"
Suzanne Chouteau of the New
WaveStudent Progressive Net-
work urged the crowd to protest
CIA recruitment at Iowa. The spy
agency, she said, is guilty of ille-
gally supplying the Contras and
training the rebels in terrorism.
"We have to challenge the UI's
role. The Ul already bans indus-
tries (from recruiting on campus)
who discriminate. It's now time to
ban groups which carry out rape,
torture and murder
�The University of Texas-El
Paso student government passed
a resolution Sept. 9 supporting
continued assistance to the Con-
tras. UTErs Young Democrats
are circulating petitions opposing
Contra funding and the resolu-
tion.
�In an attempt to provide "the
truth about Nicaragua the Uni-
versity of Southern California's
Young Americans for Freedom
presented "The Ollie North Slide
Show" on campus Sept. 22. About
20 students viewed a videotape
showing the slides Lt. Col. Oliver
North was not permitted to show
during this summer's Iran-Con-
tra hearings. The program de-
scribed communist involvement
in Central America.
North is "an American hero
YAF chairman Wayne Bowen
said.
�A coalition of peace and Chi-
cano student groups at the Uni-
versity of tcxas sponsored an anti-
Contra rally in Austin Sept. 29.
Musicians, poets, actors and
speakers called for an end to U.E.
assistance to the Contras.
"I have been to Nicaragua, and
can assure you the people do not
want this support said Matt
Wirzburger, a Texas student said.
"We are really angry that billions
of dollars put into a country the
size of Iowa to create chaos there
Other speakers accused the CIA
of funding the Contras through
cocaine trafficking.
But Tcxas sophomore and
Young Conservatives of America
member Brian Wordell told the
protesters that the United States,
hrough Contra aid, is battling
Soviet expansionism. "Instead of
yelling 'CIA out of Nicaragua'
they should have been yelling
'KGB out of Nicaragua
�Ohio State University stu-
dents joined Catholic nuns and
lay people at the Columbus, Ohio
Federal Building to protest contra
aid Sept. 29. OSU's Young Repub-
licans and Americans for a Free
Central America policy.
"The Russians are there
Young Republican president
Herb Gillcn said. "We must in-
crease economic aid to democra-
tize Nicaragua
1
They have returned to Geor-
getown pending grand jury delib-
erations in New York.
During the 1986-87 school year,
various kinds of racial confronta-
tions occurcd at a startling array
of campuses, including The Cita-
del, Tufts, Columbia, the univer-
sities of Pennsylvania, Michigan,
Massachusetts and California at
Los Angeles, among many others.
Some of the campuses are still
sorting through the aftermaths. In
early September, the University
of Massachusetts disciplined
many of the white students in-
volved in an October, 1986, beat-
ing of a black classmate. On Oct. 7,
a grand jury indicted white Cita-
del students for hazing a black
cadet last fall.
Although Tompkins-Cortland
had not suffered any such dra-
matic incidents, discrimination
did exist, the Central Americans
say.
"Things really went bad after
the arrests, but before that there
were signs of discrimination
said Gregory Choc, a computer
science student from Belize.
"They used this incident to say
what they wanted to say
Marti, a Cuban refugee! said "as
a Hispanic, as someone who has
suffered at the hands of racists I
am deeply disturbed by this '
But, he added, most Tompkins-
Cortland students welcomed the
Central Americans. Only a small
number harbored ill will against
the 36. In the past, he said, foreign
students attending Tompkins-
Cortland were accepted warmly
at the school.
"As a member of a minority
group, I want to take advantage of
this as an educational opportu-
nity Marti said. The school will
offer date-rape, alcohol and drug
and racial relations workshops as
a result of the incident, he said. "I
think we can learn something
form this"
Disciplinary actions have not
been taken against those students
who participated in racist actions,
he said, because the Central
Americans refused to name their
attackers. If the administration
learns who was invloved, he said,
those students will face a discipli-
nary board.
Join individuals and organizations
who an- helping nearly one
million pi-opli- with their tax
returns. The people being helped
are low-income, elderly,
handicapped or have difficulty
with English. The IRS will tram
you. The program is called VITA
Volunteer Income lax Assistance.
For details, call the nearest IKS
office listed in voui local telephone
directory.
Friends: how to address an alcohol problem
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People deal with stresses and
problems in their lives in different
ways; some withdraw and avoid
contact or closeness with other
people while others increase their
contact with people. Some people
spend more time than usual on
schoolwork, and other people
turn to alcohol and other drugs to
help them cope.
It may not be the amount of
alcohol someone drinks that
causes a problem as much as the
reasons behind his or her drink-
ing and the effect of the drinking
on studies, relationships, future
plans and jobs.
If you're concerned that a friend
has a drinking problem, don't be
afraid to bring it up. Try to show
your concern so that you don't
cause your friend to have a defen-
sive reaction. If you tell the friend
that he or she has a drinking prob-
lem they will most likely deny it
and become angry.
A better approach is to ask the
person if he or she is concerned
with the consequences of drink-
ing or to ask if he or she has a
problem. Be prepared for possible
outcomes of raising the question
of a drinking problem. Even if you
raised the issue in an appropriate
manner, the person may react
with defensiveness or denial.
It's important to remember that
you can't take control of anyone's
life and you shuld not feel guilty
about not "helping her get bet-
ter
It would be helpful for you to
learn more about alcohol abuse
and alcoholism. The Student
Health Center has an excellent
brochure entitled "How to Help a
Friend With a Drinking Problem"
and additional information about
alcohol and drugs that you can
pick up. BACCHUS, a student
alcohol education group located
in 301 Erwin Building, has trained
student educators who can dis-
Health Column
By Mary Elesha-Adams
ECU Student Health Center
cuss alcohol use with you. The
Counseling Center provides re-
source materials about alcohol
and drugs.
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J






�te Eaat (Karnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, omou
Clay Deanhardt, mu
andy Lewis, wr rAMES Fj. mcKeEo.
11M CHANDLER,s��, Anti joj Makt1n H�lrair
John Carter. Meg Neediiam.o
SHELTON BRYANT, M,KE UPCl IURC11, ft, u
DEBBIE STEVENS, taq j0 in W. MCDLIN, , d��.
October 22 1987
Opinion
Page4
Alcohol
Awareness important
Alcohol Awareness week begins
tomorrow and runs seven days,
once again bringing the message of
responsible drinking to campuses
across the nation.
Several events have been planned
at ECU, including a speech by Steve
Streeter on Thursday Streeter, na-
tional spokesman ' tor Students
Against Drunk Driving, is a former
UNC-Tarheel football star who was
permanently injured in a car acci-
dent.
Other encouraging activities in-
clude a campaign by the Student
Residence Association to have
people pledge not to drink for one
week (see page 1 story).
Statistics compiled by Jerrv Lotter-
hos show that approximately 89
percent oi ECU students have had a
drink within the last six months.
More alarmingly, 10 percent say
they drink on a daily basis.
The numbers go on. 11 percent say
they attended class after drinking
once or twice in the past six months;
29 percent say they cut class the
same number ol' times with a hang-
over.
What do the figures show? Alco-
hol awareness is something we
could all use a little refresher in.
Alcohol can ruin futures and take
lives. Abused, alcohol can end
friendships, alter behavior perma-
nently and cause physical disorders.
The arrest oi three students last
week for manufacturing and dis-
tributing fake drivers' licenses
brings up another point of alcohol
awareness.
Be aware oi the laws that govern
the consumption oi alcoholic bever-
ages and obey them, or be willing to
pay the price. Consuming alcohol
while under age is nothing more
than an infraction; however, drunk
driving and counterfeiting identifi-
cation carry suffer penalties, as does
buying alcohol for someone that is
underage.
We hope you will attend some of
the events planned for the week.
Sign the SRA contract and go drv for
a week, and make a concerted effort
to help a friend you think may be
drinking too much. You have noth-
ing to lose, and evervthing to gain.
Student defends conservative stand
To the editor:
Matthew Clarke's Oct. IS letter
would seem to contain ,u error. I
believe what he meant to say was: the
Constitution guarantees the right to
LIBERTY, the freedom to do what one
wants as long as the rights of others
and the values of civilized society are
not undermined. However, liberals
humanists, those who push for seem-
ingly unlimited "freedom of choice
seek LICENSE, the freedom to do
wh.it one wants even if the rights of
others and the values of civilized
society are undermined.
My letter is a response to Olav
Osland's Oct. 13 response to Justin
Stur's expose of liberal hypocrisy.
Mr. Osland, you say "liberalism is not
a matter of inconsistency 1 lowever,
Sturz was not attacking the assump-
tions that t lie philosophy of liberalism
is based upon. He was attacking the
way thai liberals inconsistently apply
their own assumptions.
1 he liberalshumanists are incorti-
sisteni in that they don't play by the
very rules they espouse: the rules of
open-rnindedness, fair-play and
equality under the law. For example,
although liberalism is based upon
open-mindedness and fair-play, lib-
erals' minds slain shut when asked to
give equal time to views that are not
their own such as a realistic perspec-
tive of the communist threat or pro-
life.
Liberalism is based upon equality
under the law for everyone, but in
actual practice, liberals DO NOT
grant everyone equality under the
law. They in fact are very selective in
choosing which individuals in our
society are "worthy" to receive equal-
ity under the law and which are not.
They claim that they are for "equal
rights vet they grant only some
human beings, such as homosexuals
and radical feminists, many rights
that go beyond mere equality under
the law, while they completely ignore
even the basic rights of other human
beings, such as unborn children.
Osland S3) s "liberals are looking
tor improvements in society Mr.
Osland, consider some ol the "im-
provements" the liberal-humanist
philosophy has bestowed on our soci-
ety: the lost potential of one-a
half million American children ay ai
the release ol a floodgate of hard
pornography, the decline of the
Christian moral atmosphere in the
public school system, and the disinte-
gration of the basic family unit.
Osland links Poindextcr with "in-
dividual assumptions and egoism
but this linkage is just not evidenced
by reality. Poindextcr sacrificed his
career and his name in order to insure
that the fight against communism
and for democracy in this hemisphere
would continue that is egotistical?
Conservatives will be the first to
admit that each individual has th
right to his or her own opinion
However, when some opinions obvi-
ously warp the basic values thai soci-
ety is founded upon, conservatp.es
reserve the right to defend ourselves
and our country by pointing out the
error and dangerous folly 0f such
points-of-view. And that is exactly
what Justin Sturz was trvng to do.
bby R. Hall Jr.
Management
Junior
u KNOW
m NOT
SUPPOSE
TOUKe
HIM
imiwiEHUW mammHmmii
By MARY KRATT
Spitial to The Eaal Cjruiinian
" We was in a pitiful condition, and didn't
ever think we would get out of it. But now,
I feel like I'm just kinda flying � flying with
the Lord, catching the breeze of His good will
Old as I is, this is the first good house I ever
lived in
Lillie Mae Brownes, Americus, C.a.
When former President Jimmy Carter
came to Charlotte in July to hammer and
finish 14 houses for the poor, 1 rcmem-
i bered a stormy church meeting in 1982.
Associate ministers just out of semi-
nary are supposed to be liberal zealots,
and ours at Myers Park Baptist had just
proposed that church leaders endorse a
radical program to provide interest-free
loans to poor people so they could own
homes. Imagine them, Dale Mullinix
urged, people who struggle all thicr
lives just to pay rent, owning a modest
house, working on it themselves, pay-
ing for it. The idea wascalled Habitat for
Humanity.
The concept came from Georgia, he
said. It was working, he said. He had
been there and seen it. He told stories of
changed lives, gave facts and figures.
The idea was to gather donations, loans
and volunteer labor, to offer houses not
as acts of charity , but to sell them to the
poor for what they cost, without interest
or profit, and to use payments for new
construction. The skeptical doctors,
lawyers, and businesspersons of the
affluent church questioned. "You've
got to be kidding some said. "Being
Christian, tithing, investing in social
programs is one thing, but interest-tree
loans are bad business. Irresponsible
Still, they voted for it. I watched them.
And four nearby churches' leaders did
too, Presbyterian, Methodist, Epis-
copal, forming a financial coalition that
reached into one of the worst neighbor-
hoods in Charlotte � Optimist Park, a
decaying, crime-ridden relic of a mill
village. Strong leaders from within the
Optimist Park neighborhood met the
churches and made it happen.
In 1987 Optimist Park has earned its
name. The neighborhood has radically
changed in spirit and sight, with thirty
Habitat houses built by skilled volun-
teer labor and intricate community
planning.
In The Charlotte Observer, Optimist
Park leader Richard Banks describes
habitat as "not just a house-building
program. It is a community-building
program For people who have been
the "objects of mistrust all their lives,
suddenly people are saying, 'I trust you
to pay the mortgage. I trust you to be a
good neighbor The new homeowners
are proud. They are paying monthly
mortgage installments of about $150.
And prior to Jimmy Carter's coming
with a massive voluteer labor force to
raise fourteen new houses from con-
crete slabs in one week's time. Optimist
residents raised $2,500 door to door.
'The neighborhood, says Banks, "is no
longer the same
Throughout North Carolina, Habitat
affiliates have raised an additional
thirty basic houses in Brevard, Durham,
Roanoke Rapids, Chapel Hill, Ra
Winston-Salem, Marion and Tryonl
Local leaders with clout, such as Pre I -
terian layman-builder John Croslar -
have made an lm per tart differ
Crosland, selected as "1985 Builder J
the Year" by Professional Builder maga-
zine, became a forceful chairman ol tlA
fledgling Habitat Board in Char! e
after visiting Habitat housing in Ai
icus.
The Charlotte affiliate of 1 lab.tat
employs a full-time builder, Drew (
thell, a skilled craftsman with deep reli-
gious convictions. Executive din
Julia Maulden, a retired Char.
teacher and school board member,
serves without pa v.
Habitat's primary founderand, i
izer, Miller Fuller, is a tall, rangv tra cl-
ing man, fervent in speech and
enormously successful in his advocacjj
effort with over 200 affiliates, whicfj
since 197b have built over 2000 houses m
U. S. and Canada with projectsalso in 13
countries. Fuller believes, "The em;
sis today particularly with some tele. -
sion evangelists, seems to be on what
can God do for me? It seems to me that i
off the path. The whole purpose ol
Habitat is to offer good news for the
poor � but also give affluent people arj
opportunity to serve
For information or to make donation
contact Habitat For Humanity, 419 :
Church St Americus, Ga 31709.
(Editor's note: This is the last in a series oj
articles by North Carolina authors about
poverty in the state.)
Confirmation of Reagan treaty would be a dangerous mistake
We are approaching the days (weeks? months?)
when the Senate Foreign Relations Committee will
hear the arguments for confirming the treaty ar-
ranged by Reagan-Shultz to remove intermediate
nuclear weapons from Europe. The Panama Canal
Treaty of 1979 kept he Senate committee listening to
testimony for 16 weeks. Proponents of the treaty
insisted that vital interests of the United States
would not be jeopardized; rather, they would be
enhanced by the proposed treaty. Ten years having
gone by without a crisis in which the new arrange-
ments in Panama proved damaging, it is fair to say
inat at least in the short term the treaty was sound. It
is Dy no means confidently satd that 10 years from
K.1 KrtaLintcresls of hc United States will not
havebeen affected by the INF Treaty being pro-
Thc main trouble is that thedamage is really done,
and it makes little difference how the Senate acts. Dr!
Henry Kissinger for example, plans to testitfy. And
he will give his reasons why he thinks the treaty is
not merely bad, but profoundly bad. But we cannot
talk m the subjunctive mood about the damage the
treaty would do if ratified. Kissinger's point is well
taken, that the damage has already been done
The years 1981-1983 will probably be viewed by
historians as the watershed. During those years
Ronald Reagan flatly insisted on proceeding to
deploy the intermediate-range nuclear missiles first
demanded by Helmut Schmidt in 1977 when the
intimidating shadow of the Soviet SS-20s reached
the Bundestag. The reasoning then was that nuclear
equality between the forces of the Soviet Union and
those of the Umted States worked to the disadvan-
tage of the West in that the superpowers, having
neutralized each other's ultimate forces, their penul-
timate forces emerged as of dominant military rele-
vance. And these are, of course, the conventional
forces. The Soviet Union, with its deployment of the
SS-20s, was really engaged in adding nuclear
strength to its preponderant tactical advantage The
benefit that lay waiting for the allies was that by
deploying counter-nuclear weapons, they neutral-
ized at one and the same time not only the Soviets'
SS-20s but also the massive Soviet tactical arsenal
The European left, plus European ambiguists,
fought as hard as the American isolationists in 1940
and 1941 to prevent deployment, but Reagan said-
That is the way it is going to be. And Americans
abroad, joining with realistic Europeans, ardently
detailed the advantages to be got from the counter-
vailing nuclear weapons. The deployment of these!
weapons was the most sign.f.cant achievement ol
the foreign policy of Ronald Reagan.
On The Right
Bv:
William F. Buckley Jr
L SllHHrnK, . � . . �
petard �5jE5sF WC Werc hoist bX � �l
Nv diSnn"iCccUr" rcc�Sni2 that I) XX proba
by doesn t need SS-20s to intimidate Europe b) if A
fern TVfrhCm "P without �y "S FH
vilonnfT StdtCS is astomed to Soviet:
toTeratfon nVtKatyiCrmS aS witncss our continuing
toleration of the radar station at Krasnoyarsk
� '
Habitat gives homeless shelter,
the wealthy a chance to serve
College s
; (CPS)� The price students pa)
Jfor computers, stereos, greeting
icards and maybe even text;
fat campus bookstores nation.
pay be rising again soon, perhaps
fby as much as 20 percent, college
jstore managers say
The U.S. Treasure wai �
change a small part of tl
�code, and, if it's subsi
jendorsed by Congn
Jwill soon issue its opini
jthe change � campu-I . , �
jjwill lose the sp
fchat let them chargi
jiterns they sell
I
; It's the small busirw
Khe same things jusl f
that want the code i
They say they ca;
;with campus busim i
;turn, an , ; ;�
:that thev thcms
"I can assun . .
Brong,ownerofa
just off the Wash
University campu
fWash told a House
mit-
Heritage Foundatio
WASHINGTON, D.( PS)
The Reagan administi I
: fondest hope for ending stu
:loan defaults and reforming
ident aid may be "an experiment
� that cannot work the i nsen
jtive Heritage Foundatioi a I
week.
The foundation
-particularly noteworthy be.
j the group has formed mam
"education ideas th.
; tion has tunned into p lio
: 1980.
Clemson University Pr
�Robert Staff, who prepared
; heritage report, figured the new
Income Contingent Loan (ICL)
Purvis joins E
(ECU News Bureau)� Dr. ohn
R. Purvis has joined the I
School of Medicine faculty as u
assistant professor of fai
medicine.
Before assuming his fa
physical inljnroctC
The Miami, Fla. nativerea
his medical degree from the Uni-
rtll a TV
Cu-e at Clu
tl
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Having a Dorr si torei
nearby is likej
nen: a.
room serv ce
call and oraer you
pizza We'll d� � .
door in less
So pick up the phc
room serviceDorr
Delivers'1
i siOff Any One or More
i3 1 1 OMe -1 DowTopping Pizza!
Notvattd n "
1 Offer go. 1 � 9EF

m 40dreSS
I 1 1L S
Our drners carry �eM " Lnd drbvery area
�arfh- ��- �-�





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
iZIOBER22,1987
777
s
servative stand
tl ol one-and-a-
i hildrenayear,
itcof hard-core
e decline of the
'sphere in the
m and thedisinte-
c family unit.
k xter with In-
ns and egoism
usl not evidenced
uter sacrificed his
ic in order to insure
mmunism
in this hemisphere
it is egotistical?
r the first to
. idual has the
ler own opinion.
me opinions obvi-
.alucs thai soci-
K�n, conservatives
fend ourselves
� pointing out the
us folly of such
�A that is exactly
-vas trvng to do.
Bobby R. 1 lall Jr.
Management
Junior
eless shelter,
ce to serve
- R ipids. Chapel Hill, Raleigh
m, Marion and Tryoni
i i( rswithclout,suchasPresby
tan-builder John Crosland Jr.
an important difference
lected as "1983 Builder of
Professional Builder magal
a forceful chairman of th�
I ibitai Board in Charlotte
E I iabitat housing in Ameri
affiliate of Habitat
i ill time builder. Drew Caul
I craftsman with deep reli
s Executive director;
a retired Charlotte-
. r and school board member!
it pay.
. nmary founder and organ!
: Fuller, is a tall, rangy travel
man. fervent in speech and
� � successful in his advocacy
� ivith over 200 affiliates, which;
7 hav built over 2000 houses in
and an ida v. ith projects also in lf
� tries Fuller believes, "The empha-t
ticularly with some televi-i
evangelists, seems to be on what
canL, Id r rrn
ms to me that's
le purpose of
i news for thd
uent people ar
utunor to make donation!
itat For Humanity, 419 Wj
�mencus, Ga 31709.
He This is the lost in a series o
orth Carolina authors about
laU
pal
pie
ur
he
gerous mistake
ling nuclear weapons. The deployment of thesd
ipons was the most significant achievement oi
the foreign policy of Ronald Reagan.
On The Rightl

William F. Buckley Jnj
And then suddenly, we were hoist by our owni
petard. The Soviet Union recognizes that a) it proba-e
Wy doesn I need SS-20s to inumidate Europe; b) if ie
did, !t could scratch them up without any real prob-J
- the United States is accustomed to Sovierl
violation of treaty terms as witness our continuing!
toleration of the radar station at Krasnoyarsk
J
College store costs to rise, managers say
I (CPS)�The price students pay
jfor computers, stereos, greeting
Jeards and maybe even textbooks
Sat campus bookstores nationwide
Snay be rising again soon, perhaps
jby as much as 20 percent, college
jstore managers say.
The U.S. Treasury wants to
change a small part of the tax
jcode, and, if it's subsequently
endorsed by Congress � which
�will soon issue its opinion about
the change � campus bookstores
jwill lose the special advantages
jthat let them charge less for the
�items thev sell.

It's the small businesses that sell
kthe same things just off campus
that want the code changed.
They say they can't compete
� with campus businesses that, in
: turn, are supported by state taxes
S that they themselves pa v.
"1 can assure you Gerald R.
: Brong, owner of a computer store
:just off the Washington State
i University campus in Pullman,
jWash told a House subcommit-


tee hearing last summer, "that
private, for-profit, taxpaying or-
ganizations would be overjoyed if
they could develop 80 percent
membership base in the commu-
nity, enjoy special postage privi-
leges, ha ve direct access to the 1 ine
of credit of the state university, re-
ceive discounted rates in a local
newspaper, have all utilities pro-
vided from a central utility serv-
ice, have access to a government
telecommunications system, plus
have the good reputation of a
university
Brong's company declared a
torm oi bankruptcy after being
unable to match the computer
prices offered by the VVSU com-
puter center.
It's happening in and around
most campuses.
College store discounts arc
"definitely restricting the growth
of some companies said Kcnton
Pattie oi the International Com-
munication Industries Associa-
tion, a trade group that represents
small computer, video and audio
retailers and manufacturers. "In
some cases, they're killing off
businesses
"Small businesses have their
backs up against the wall Pattie
said.
The small businesses' com-
plaints, in turn, prompted the U.S.
Treasury to propose to prevent
nonprofit groups like colleges
from using their tax-exempt
status to compete unfairly with
off-campus retail stores.
But the change, campus book-
stores officials say, would raise
the prices of most items, and
might even make it harder to get
textbooks for small classes.
"Most colleges lose money on
textbooks claimed Garis Distel-
horst of the National Association
of College Stores, a Cleveland,
Ohio, based group that represents
campus bookstores.
That accounts for why stores
greater margin ot profit and make
up for textbook losses Distel-
horst said.
"Without the sale of supplies
under the control of the univer-
sity he added, "supplies might
not be available for a given class
"Not only do schools have a
right to be in these endeavors
Distclhorst asserted, "they have a
responsibility
Colleges, Dr. Caspa Harris of
the National Association of Col-
lege and University Business Of-
fices in Washington, D.C, added,
"are there to serve the students,
not to make a profit for the small
businessman. If they're seeing
sales they can't compete for, well
that's tough as long as we pay the
proper taxes
Such logic, of course, drives off-
campus businesspeople crazy.
'The whole philosophy is bad
said Jan Koal, who owns Asahel
Computer Sales in Pullman. "The
state can out-com pete the private
where the state takes over the free
enterprise system"
Students, in this case, seem
happy to support the "socialist"
stores.
They're less interested in the
debate than in "good quality and
good prices Washington State
senior Ron Martinez reported.
When students do shop at cam-
pus bookstores, they do so be-
cause it's "convenient Martinez
said. "You don't have to travel
downtown
And it's cheaper. Computer
store owner Brong said WSU's
on-campus computer center
could charge "hundreds of dol-
lars less" for machines he sold for
$500.
WSU's computer center prices
typically arc 20 percent less than
those offered off-campus, WSU
computer center manager Chuck
Koehler estimated.
Other kinds of off-campus busi-
sell other products: shirts, mugs, sector any day. It's turning this
and other things. They have a country into a socialist state
Heritage Foundation claims loan default plan may not work
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS) -
The Reagan administration's
�fondest hope for ending student
: loan defaults and reforming stu-
:dent aid may be "an experiment
that cannot work the conserva-
tive Heritage Foundation said last
� week.
The foundation's opinion is
: particularly noteworthy because
j the group has formed many of the
"education ideas the administra-
tion has turned into policy since
:1980.
Clemson University Prof.
: Robert Staff, who prepared the
heritage report, figured the new
� Income Contingent Loan (ICL),
would actually be a bad deal for
students.
The ICL is designed to let stu-
dents repav their college loans in
amounts that depend on how
much thev earn after leaving
school.
But students who expect to get
moderate- to high-paying jobs
after graduation would actually
have higher monthly payments in
repaying an ICL than they would
in repaying a Guaranteed Student
Loan (GSL).
For instance. Staff calculated
that a student earning $17,760 a
year would spend $304 a month to
repay an ICL, compared to $222 a
month for a GSL. If it took the
student 10 years to repay a college
loan in full, and ICL would cost
the student $9,840 more than a
GSL.
Sen. Claiborne Pell (D-R.I.)
concocted the ICL idea, and spon-
sored a 5-year ICL "pilot pro-
gram" that starts on 10 campuses
this fall to see how it might work.
But last January before the pilot
program even began, U.S. Secre-
tary of Education William Bennett
made income-contingent loans
the center of his suggested fiscal
1989 higher ed budget.
Bennett proposed cutting all
student aid programs by about 50
Purvis joins ECU med school
(ECU News Bureau) � Dr. John
R. Purvis has joined the ECU
School of Medicine faculty as an
assistant professor of family
medicine.
Before assuming his faculty
past, i'urvisw.rt.i privutopmcticv
physMiiafc inMonroeN C
The Miami, Fla. native received
his medical degree from the Uni-
versity of South Florida School of
Medicine and his bachelor's de-
gree from the University of Flor-
ida at Gainesville. He completed
an intemsip at Tallahassee Me-
morial Hospital, Tallahassee, Fla
and a residency in family medi-
cine at Charlotte Memorial Hos-
pital in Charlotte.
His other work in the medical
profession includes employment
as a staff physician at the student
health services center at the Uni-
versity of North Carolina at Char-
lotte and emergency room staff
physician at Union Memorial
Hospital ir Monroe.
He is a diplomatc of the Ameri-
can Board of Family Practice.
percent, making GSLs much
harder for students to get, and
drastically increasing the budget
for the still-unprovcn ICL.
Bennett explained the ICL
would cut thedefault rate because
students' loan repayments would
not outstrip their ability to pay
back the money.
Congress ultimately rejected
Bennett's proposal, opting in-
stead to see how the pilot pro-
gram would work out before re-
placing other student aid pro-
grams with it.
In his report, "Problems With
The New Student Aid Pilot Pro-
gram Staff predicted the 5-year
experiment "will reveal very
little, except perhaps that the stu-
dents enrolled in it know little
about financial principles
The Education Dept though, is
still "very much behind the pro-
gram spokesman Dan Schectcr
said. "Maybe in theory it's im-
practical, but in practice it can
work
nesscs in Pullman, as well as col-
lege towns around the country
have trouble competing with
their subsidized counterparts on
campus.
Andy Wolfe, publisher and
editor of the Pullman Herald, said
his paper has been devastated by
competition from the WSU-subsi
dized Daily Evergreen
WSU restaurants, which don t
have to charge a sales tax, also
steal business from Pullman eat-
eries, businesspeople say.
"It will take a reform in the law
to make things more fair Pattie
concluded. "All we're interested
in is seeing the playing field made
more level
So a House Ways and Means
subcommittee is expected to rec-
ommend keeping or changing
part o the tax code � called the
Unrelated Business Income Tax
� in late October or early Novem-
ber.
COME SEE US FOR YOUR HALLOWEEN ACCESSORIES
SAVE 25
OFF
REQULAR PRICE
756-8310
Greenville
TAPWl
tr
GIFTS
Having a Domino's Pizza store
nearby is like being on a perma-
nent vacation: You can order
room service every night! Just
call and order your favorite
pizza. We'll deliver it to your
door in less than 30 minutes.
So pick up the phone and order
room service. Domino's Pizza
Delivers
Off Any
One or More
Topping
Pizza!
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
Offer good only at participating
Domino's Pizza locations
Not valid with other coupons or offer
Offer good thru November 4, 1987
Ptease provide nameaorlresvprione on coupon
BEFORE drive arrives
Nam�
Address
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Phone
I
I
s !
Serving
Central Greenville
and ECU Campus
758-6660
1201 Charles Blvd
Serving East Greenville
752-6996
Rivergate Shopping Center
Serving West Greenville
756-9998
2405 W. Dickinson Ave.
Serving Ayden
and Winterville
746-4042
106 N Lee St
Hours:
11:00am-1am SunThurs.
11:00am-2amFri & Sat.
ExceptAyden
11 00am-12midnight Sun -Thurs
11 am-2am Fn I Sat
DOMINO'S
PIZZA
DELIVERS
Our dnvers carry less than S?0 00 Urmtad
c 1987 Domino s Pizza Inc
ALCOHOL AWARENESS WEEK
Thursday, October 22
9 P.M. -til
Friday. October 23
8 P.M10 P.M.
Sunday. October 2:
3P.M. and 8 P.M.
Monday, October 26
7 P.M10 P.M.
Tuesday. October 27
8:30 P.M9:30 P.M.
"Combo Night"
Special on Non-alcoholic
beverages
Refreshments
Circus
$5.00 Public
$3.00 ECU Students
Oktoberfest
German Festival
Various Charges for Food
"Risk Management"
Speaker: Representative from
Sigma Phi Epsilon Headquarters
Sponsored by the Interfraternity
Council
The Attice, Grogs, Chico's
Corrigans, The Elbow
Rafters. Darrvls, Hooters
Mendenhall Coffee House
Minges Coliseum
Tvler Resident Hall
Lobbv
Old Joyner Librarv
Room 221
Wednesday, October 2g
7 P.M9 P.M.
"LiteNite"
Alcohol Awareness Information Lobby
Fair
Hctchcr Residence Hall
Thursday. October 28
7:30 P.M9:00 P.M.
BACCUS Meeting Mendenhall
Featuring: Steve Streeter Room 244
National Representative for
SAAD, Student Against Drunk
Driving
Introduction by:
Walter B. Jones, Jr.
House of Representatives
The kevs to
All programs open to
ECU Students, Faculty
and Staff. Unless indi-
cated, no fee.
responsible decisions
.0



AAt'U' " �- - j A
�!��� II III I I l.l.
w��i�iiiiii�tiii�jiaii � '� omaMwqw�MMpi
'


A





6 11 IE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 22,1987
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
BAR MAIDS WANTED. Must be 21
years ol age No experience necessary.
Will trjm Call 758 0058. Ask for lack or
Kav
SAlls Kl I'RESENTATIVES. You
Guys, j;irN are doing a ;reat nb Lets
keep up the good work I SOLVED TI IE
M S ISslip PROMLCM
OVERSEAS )OBS SiOiX S.UOOvr.
Abo Cmiscships travel Hotels Call
B05-687-6000 I t OJ 1166 tor current
TRAVEI FIELD OPPORTUNITY: Gam
valuable marketing experience while
earning mono) i ampus representatives
needed immediateh for prmK Bak
i. .ill . ampus Marketing
trips I
at I SO
8221
BROD1 s FOR M1N has full-time and
part : sales associates positions, for
enthusiastii fashion forward individu-
als iv. � ill I thine, experience is re-
. tter than average starting sal-
. in person. Brody's Personnel
( arolina Last Mall M-W 2-4
(.Kl
PAR
ing
trail
.r, ai
ENVILLE RH.RFAHON AND
Ks DEPARTMENT. Part time po-
- Vcrobics 1 xercise Instructor at
ai k 1 eads and instructs aero-
exercise classes, must have bask
rstanding of exercise physiology, ki-
and anatomy. Should have
g knowledge ol choreographed
isc programs tor adults, childen,
and pregnant women Must
�ign a sate class and know
' be in excellent physical condi
� pas fitness exam and be will-
through aerobic's instructor
�.ram Applicant must be
al li � teah classes form 5 I'M to 7
positions for enthusiastic, out oine indi-
viduals who enjoy working with young
contemporary Junior fashions Good Sal-
ary Apply in person, Brody's Personnel
Director, Carolina East Mall M-W 2-4 pm.
WANTED- Male models Interviews will
be on Saturday, Oct. 24th from 2-5 pm and
Monday, Oct. 26th from 5-9 pm at the
Belk's Training Room, Carolina East Mall
No previous experience necessary.
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
PARKS DEPARTMENT. Part time reecp-
tionist needed Answers telephones,
greets members and guests, conducts
tours and sells memberships, collect fees,
records collections, responds to members
and guests requests and questions, pro-
vides information to the public about
memberships, performs light typing as re-
quired. Applicant should be available to
work 4-5 hour shift between 8 AM and 1
PM, Monday thru Friday, and occasionally
on weekends between 9 AM and 6 PM.
Salary is S3.75hour. Applications ac-
cepted until position is filled. Apply at tne
City of Greenville, Personnel Department,
P.O Box 7207, 201 West Fifth St
Greenville, NC 27835-7207.
GREENVILLE AQUATICS & FITNESS
CENTER. Part-time position for Life-
guard-Swim instructors. Must have ad-
vanced lifesavmg certificate or water
safety instructor certificate. Applicants
should be available to work 3-5 hour shifts
between 6 AM and 9 PM. Occasional week-
end work required Salary is 53.85hour.
Applications accepted until position filled.
Apply at the City of Greenville, Personnel
Department, P.O. Box 7207, 201 West Fifth
St, Greenville, NC 27835-7207
FOR SALE

rum
1 ! '
r Salary $7hour. Applica
is Friday, Oct 23, 1987
: ot Greenville, Personne
O Box 7207, 201 West
i nvilfc NC 27835 7207
GREENVILLI AQUATICS AND FIT-
NESS CINIIR Part-time position in
Maintci e Position for cleaning locker
room; isium, office areas, lobby,
- ot the Aquatics & Fitness
i Also responsible for some out-
sidc n aintenance Must he able to work
ev enings t pm to 10 pm and a regularly
scheduli d weekend 12 to Iti hours per
week salar) isS3.55 hour. Applications
ted untill position is tilled.
. . the City of Greenville,
Personnel Department, P.O Box 7207,
. � esl i ifth St . Greenville, NC 27835-
BRODyS hes part-tirjie sales associates
GRAND OPENING CELEBRATION:
Used furniture, antiques and collectables.
iav and Thursday at Saturday, Oct. 31 Refreshments and Door
Prizes. The Emporium, 705 Dickinson
Ave across from the License Plate Agency
10:30-5.30 PM
maybe required to teach
al classes at the Aquatics anc
STUDENTS, FACULTY, STAFF: Tre-
mendous savings on Programming lan-
guages, like BASIC, COBOL, FORTRAN,
BASCAL Not copy protected - with man-
ual. Call Imex today for details. 758-8395.
DJ OUTFIT - 2 turntables and mixer in
console. In great shape! S400 00 neg. 752-
5876 Call anytime. Will deliver.
WRITING YOUR PAPER by hand and
then typing it over? Save time by writing
from scratch on a computer. The university
has the computers available for students, I
can teach you how. Free word processing
software! 752-9637.
TYPING AND WORD PROCESSING:
Two copies for the price of one. Done on
IBM Compatible Computer with NLQ
printer Spelling checked against 70,000
word dictionary. 3-V637.
FOR SALE: Couch, Loveseat, Chair,
Coffee Table All in good condition 3-4
years old. Price negotiable Call 758
0113 M-F, 9-5pm. After 5 call 756-7494.
TYPING SERVICE Papers, Thesis,
Letters, etc Typing done on computer
16 years experience Low rates Call 756k
8934 after 5:30 pm.
FOR SALE: Draft beer dispenser
Comes with C02 cartridge, Budwciser
handle and spill tray. Never been used.
Call Scott at 758-2479.
TYPING of term papers and theses
done on a Tandy 1000 SX Computer at
very low rates. Call Wendy at 752-1321
after 1:00.
NEED TYPING? Call Kim at 758-1161
before 5:00 pm. 758-2119 after 5:00 pm.
ECU- Brew up the perfect tan. Don't be
a ghost. Call about our I Ialloween Spe
cial today! California Tanning for the
best tan in town! 355-7858.
BRAND NEW HONDA ELITE 50
Scooter Helmet only 3 miles on it.
$550.00. 1 lave to sell Call Jeff Stallings
756-8878.
FOR SALE: Couch and matching chair
in very good condition. Asking SI75 00
or best offer. Call after 6 pm 756-7165.
FOR SALE: '81 1 londa CR125 Dirt Bike.
Lots of new parts Excellent condition
757-6611 ext 235 after 5 pm.
FOR SALE: ECU Don't be a ghost! Call
California Tanning today for the best
tan in town! Ask about our I Ialloween
special. 355-7858.
BICYCLE- New 10-speed, blue, ridden
twice. S75. Call 752-2830.
FOR SALE: Color TV like new SI25.
Antique Dresser - make offer. Emerson
Stereo tapephonotuncr $50 758-
7643.
EMPORIUM HAS ALL TYPES of used
furniture, jewelry and much more Dirt
cheap. 705 Dickinson Ave. across from
the License Plate Agency Tues Fri.
12:00-6pm Sat. 10:30-5:30pm.830-5288
NEED TYPING? Call Cindy - 757-0.398
Call anytime after 5 pm Low rates in-
clude: proofreading, spelling and gram
matical corrections; professional serv
ice. 10 years experience - IBM TYPING
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERV-
ICES: 738-8241 or 758-5488 ask for
Susan.
1986 HONDA CR250R DIRT BIKE.
Never raced. 1 lelmet and gloves avail-
able. 20 hours riding time. Excellent con-
dition. Motorcycle trailer also available.
S19CK). Call 35V7812 after 6 pm or leave
message
IS IT TRUE you can buy )eeps for $44
through the Us government? Get the
facts today! 1-312 742 1142 Ext 5271 A.
FOR SALE: Freezer and Refrigerator,
dryer and range SKX) each Good condi
tion Guaranteed Call 746 2446.
WORD PROCESSINGLETTER
QUALTIY or laser printing Rush obs
accepted 752 1933.
ELECTROLYSIS (permanent removal of
unwanted hair) By Barbara Venters
People who understand electrolysis will
not wax, tweee or use eh tronic tweeer
or any oilier temporary method Isn't it
time to try the permanent method Call
830-0962 for free consultation
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We otter typing
and photocopying services We also sell
software and computer diskette. 24
hours in and out Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (Beside Cubbies) Greenville,
NC. 752 3694
PICK UP AND DELIVERY of term pa
pers, theses, resumes to he typed IBM
wordprocessin bv professional with 13
years experience Letter quality print and
professional editing Call Nanette in
griffon al 1-524-5241 Cheap call the best
service!
PROFESSIONAL BUT NOT
EXPENSIVE! Progressive Solutions Inc.
offers professional word processing to
students and professionals. Term papers,
dissertations, themes, reports and much
more as low as $1.75 per page (Please call
for quote on your projectPrice includes
printing on high quality bond paper and
spelling verification a;amst a 50,000
word electronic dictionary Ask about
our special offers 1 ascr printing now
available Call Mark at 757-3440after 7:00
pm for free information
I OR RENT
Kl.NSTON PLACE 2 BK 2 12 bath
condo available Jan 1 Great atmosphere
pool! Into ial! 758 41s
ROOMMATE WANTED: 2BR house 4
blks fromcampus 5130.00 and 12 utili-
ties. 757 ls'ofi
RINCGOLD TOWERS: Apts tor rent
furnished contact llollic Simonowich.
752-2865.
PERSONALS
SAE: Delta Zeta wishes to give the new-
est fraternity to invade theFCl campus a
warm welcome We're looking forward
to showing you boys how much fun
Creek life can be!
NP.M. - I LOVE YOU - W.M.U.
PAULA G Thank you very much for
working this weekend You did a super
job The ads are definitely straight Also
thank you for Saturday Night
JAMES RUSSO 1 lappy Halloween Get
psyched for a radical weekend You're
the greatest big bro' Love Ya - YLS
Amanda
FOUND Address and Phone Book in
Wright Auditorium call 757-6269 or 757-
6290 and describe
GREEK WEEK?! Tomorrow?! Yes, Fall
Greek week starts Friday Oct. 23 with
Sig Tau Tug-o-war, Saturday Oct. 24 is
Sig-Ep volleyball, and Sunday is
Lambda Chi Field Day. Come out all
greeks invited. Bring driver's license.
PHI TAUS: Hope you had a great Fall
Break We missed you guys' 1 lave a great
weekend Love your hl'sisters
JOHN MEDLIN THANK YOU FOR
ALL YOUR WORK AND DEDICA-
TION OVER FALL BREAK. WE PUT
TOGETHER A KILLER PRE-REGIS-
TRATION. I COULDN'T HAVE DONE
IT WITHOUT YOU. THANKS ACAIN
. JIMMY.
LOST: 5 mo. old kitten Gray Tabby with
white face and stomach Lost on Eastern
St. Sat night. Oct. 9th (he got out of the
house- if you took him home because he
was lost, Please return him- We love and
miss him so much) Return to 213-A East
ern or call 752-9111
LOST: "Gasoline" Blue Jean jacket
Reward ottered If found �-all 355-7481
1NTERVARS1TY CHRISTIAN FEI-
LOWSH1P PLEASE JOIN US Wednes
day nights at 7:00 pm Speight 129 Fun
Food Fellowship-Teaching
ATTENTION: Don't forget Alpha i
Delta's happy hour every Wednesdav
night at Pantana's- If s the best excuse tor
missmg Thursday's classes!
BILL GRAD I saw you in Panta:la s
and I saw you in Grog's Was that your
girlfriend, or simply a one-night compan
ion' 1 hope she was the latter If you're
interested in discussing this matter fur
ther. Call 758 3861 (The g.rl with the
deep green eves)
DELTA SICS - Thanks for our surpnse
trip "around the world " Did we gradu
ate or what' Let's do it again soon! Love
the sisters and pledges ot AOP
LACHELLE - Thanks tor putting in the
extra time over Fall Break All the pictures
worked out great. Jimmy
ROSEN - I !ad a great time in Charlotte
Thanks for everything. Love ya Robin
AOPI Fall Cocktail was great thanks tQ
our dates, we took a cruise on the party
caboose, grabbed our booze and got loon
at the moose' Cheers to a fantastic cork-
tail
TO ALL THE HAPPY CAMPERS ynu
know who you arc It's time to remind
you on Sat night, don't be at the bars
Cause the Red I louse will bejammm full
of Karma and fun, and you all are ex
pected to party 'till all 8 kegs are done
Because there will be a good excuse to
rage, it's Babs' 22nd and Bev and I prom
ise it will be a night not to forget 5 pm
RICHARD C OF DELTA SIC �
happy as hell can't you see7 Cu i a
and you got me This year will t
with fun 1 ley big bro , you're second tr
none' Love your little sis"
SALESREPS I know last week wj
with three deadlines 1 want to thank vou
for your extra effort The Pre-Registral -
Magazine looks great lets keei
good work' Sell, Sell, Sell
TO RYAN WALTON: I wna-
just one thing Who gave you that ador
able "pinky" ring1 Did it come u a t
lover while under the cover7 I hope it .
from your mother" Hide ar.d �
Ryan I am
TO E.T. AND SANTA CLAUS
please put your shi�s n causev
coolest of the axil' I T vou re m best
friends' boyfriend, but you reallv make
me drool Don't bother , � .
you can t come in � s I,
want to know "Who shop the
guvs - What's the score? With lov
L's
LAURIE - 1 lope your 19th Birthday b
special as you are' I
me
CAN VOU DO IT FOR A WEEK71
t! Register the 22nd and 23rd in fl
the student store, Tyler lobby and West
"ampus residence halls
ATTENTION" I . rls i I as) Cat ru
The brother ot Pi kappa Alpl i oking
for calendar girls I t " - I -�-
For details 752 ;�4
JENNIFER CARPENTER Happy 21st
Birthday" This is IT trv to keep it under
control! Love, the AZD;s
KA, SIGMA S, LAMBDA CHI'S-Wed
nodav night was . much! good thing
fall break f Uosved because we needed :t
ton - rate' We love vou guvs' Lets
& �� ���� sa i Love the AZLTs
DELTA ZETA: We wish to welcome the
newest members ot the Beta Pi pledge
dass - Michelle Dark. Kathi Messer.
Suzanne Brown, Erin Cruz, Tiaa Pilad,
and Fuie Met Have fun girs and re- I
member we love vou'
Announcements
1UI KINGS SINGERS
. . ti :kets now for one of the
al groups ever�THE KING'S
;n concert Mon , Nov. .Wth in
iditorium at 8 p m. Tickets are
in sale in the Central Ticket Office in
. � in 11 a.m. until 6 p.m.
ri Call 757 6611, ext 266. Group
FILM
The Student Union Tilm Committee's
m - nd film, NO MERCY, will be shown
atS 0 m Oct 22,1 (MX)p.m.Oct.23,and
8:00pmV t 24 & 25 in I lendnx Theatre.
NAVIGATORS
in us tor an exciting Rally
3. in Biotory 103. The fellow
ship is great.
STOP VIOLENCE
Are you living with violence? Is anvone
you know living with violence? You can
help end violence in the family or the
community by simply calling 752-3328,
and by attending the 20 hour Advocate
Training Course starting Sat Oct. 24th.
NASVVCORSO
The student group for Social Work and
Criminal Justice majors will meet Mon
Oct. 26at 4 p.m. in Belk, rm. 108. All majors
and intended majors are requested to at-
tend. Many topics to discuss.
CIRCLE K-CKI
Attention Students: CKI-Circle K Inter-
national will be having their first meeting
and its topic will be "Alcohol: I low it
Affects You The meeting will be held in
the Multi-purpose room of Mendenhall at
7:00 on Oct. 27, refreshments will be given
afterwards CK1 "The World's Largest
Service Organization
FRESHVSOPHOMORES
The Military Science Dept. is continu-
ing its two- and three-year Army ROTC
Scholarship campaign. All students who
are interested in an Army ROTC Scholar-
ship are invited to attend an information
session on Wed Oct. 28 at 6 p.m. in room
210 Erwin. For further info call Capt.
Alvin Mitchell at 757-6967 or 6974.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The National Gamma IVta Phi Honor
Society will have a meeting Oct. 27 at 7
p m. in Jenkins Auditorium Last day to
pay dues and attendance is required or
probation will result
TEACHER ED. MAJORS
The School of Education, in conjunction
with Campus Ministries, is sponsoring a
WorkStudy trip to Mexico during Spring
Break (March 6-13, 1988) Opportunities
to observe and teach at a local school are
available A minimum level of "survival"
Spanish is required For applications and
more info contact the Office of the Dean
in room 154, Speight Hldg
DIVE CLUB
If vou enjoy scuba diving, snorkeling,
1 1 & rf i dj P p p p p&$$$$
tii tii tii tii & p p p p p tii tii tii tii tii p pi p �4 ifCIMCLCL.SCICA'KpLlHj&'Jt�mi�S�Si�Vi�J
� III!
fc til til til til p p p p Pis presently accepting applications for the following�$$$$
til til til til til p p p �ip fpaid positions:�$$$$
t til til til til P p p p PLMJSHNIESS MANAGER CREDIT MANAGER�$$$$
til til til til til p p p p p 4v vi' ��� :i JVOROJILATHON MANAGER11 1 1 l
Q cfc cb (t cfc S ip Jp If H5Make yourself marketable.
b h cb tii tii P 5p 5 �cp 5p $$$$$At The East Carolinian you can gain the valuable experience needed to give you the edge in today's highly competative job market.5$$
5$$
$$$$$Apply in person today.$$
$$$$$5$$
�!W!K!�nvna �&m uh�uh iuh iua iua turnx iuh turn iub i t fc til til
pK V VL p p 'ppppppppppppJ P P P P
and adventuring with friendly outgoing
people, then you need to join ECU'S Coral
Reef Dive Club. For more info call 752-
4399 and ask for Glenn or Rob
SQCVVcj
Students who have completed their
first faculty interview for admission into
the School (SOCW & CJ) must meet with
Mr. Gartman for their second interview
on one of the following dates: Mon Oct.
26th at 5 p.m. in room 108 - Allied 1 lealth;
OR Tues Oct. 27th at 5 p.m. in room 108
- Allied 1 lealth. Your attendance is man-
datory in order for your application to be
processed by the AdmissionsRetentions
Committee.
There will be a School Meeting
(SOCWCJ) for all majors and intended
majors on Tues Nov. 3 at 7 p.m. in the
Allied Health Bldg. Auditorium 101 All
undergraduate students and intended
majors are expected to make an effort to
attend this meeting.
All SOCWCJ majors who plan to enter
Field Placement for the Spring Semester
1988 must sign up to meet with the Coor-
dinator of Field Studies to review their
applicationsplacement. Please sign up in
Room Al 1-308 for your interview as soon
as possible. We will be seeing students
through the end of Oct.
HAIR PRODUCTS
The free samples of Studio Line Hair
Products are now available for all those
who attended the Sneak Preview of "Babv
Boom To get your free sample, bring
your SCREEN PASS or movie program to
Mendenhall, room 210 or 234, MonFri 8
a.m. - 5 p.m. First come, first served. Offer
expires Fri Oct. 30 You must present a
screen pass or movie program to receive
your gift. NO EXCEPTIONS.
PHI ALPHA THFTA
The Phi Alpha Theta International
Honor Society in 1 listory will hold its fall
cookout on Oct. 30th from 5 p.m. 'till 11:30
p.m. Members and guests are invited to
join us at the picnic area near the front of
Memorial Gym. (Cost: $1.50 members,
52.50 guests). For info, about joining Phi
Alpha Theta, contact the ECU History
Dept.
CAR. WASH
Oct. 24th 9a.m. to4 pm at the Fuel Doc,
10th St. and 264. $2car.
SUMMER JOBS
It's never too early to begin thinking
about that perfect summer job that's chal-
lenging, exciting, and professional. The
Institute of Government (IOG) Summer
Intern Program offers you all of the above
benefits and more. The Co-op office urges
you to learn more about these opportuni-
ties by attending a meeting on Oct. 27, at
2:00 p.m. in room 302 Rawl. A representa-
tive from IOG will be available to discuss
in detail the 10-week internship with vari-
ous state agencies located in Raleigh. All
applicants must be a sophomore, junior,
or senior status and must be returning to
school after the internship For further
info , call the Co-op office at 757-970
SJJPZDRIGRQLT
A support group has been formed tor
people who are caring tor a parent,
spouse, or otheT loved one a: home The
group is led by Freda W.Cross MSW
County Memorial Hospital and Susm
Redding R.N Creative Living Cerv:
The support group will be at St lames
United Methodist Church at 20 E 6th
St Greenville, Nov. 3 from 7-8-30 pm
Respite services are available To rrajkC
reservations for respite care, call the Crea-
tive Living Center at 757-Q303 from 800
am. to 5:00 pm 24 hours in advance
GUEST SPEAKER
Mark Purser, Geology Dept, ECU will
be speaking on "Geomorphologica. CI I
trols Over Tidal Marsh I3evclopmert or
the N C Outer Banks" on Thurs , Oct 8
at 300 p m in Graham 301.
MADRIGAL DINNERS
Tickets are now on sale for Madrigal
Dinners to be held Dec 2-5 at 700 pm in
Mendenhall Tickets are S10 for ECU sh
dents and SI 6 for all others Call the Con
tral Ticket Office at 757-6611, ext 266
REGISTRATION
General College students should con-
tact their advisers the week of Nov 2-f to
make arrangements for academic adv is-
ing for spring semester, 1988 Early regis-
tration will begin Nov. 9 and end Nov 17
BOWLING
Registration for Intramural league
bowling will be held Oct. 28 from 11am
- 6 pm in room 104-A Memorial Gvm
CO-REC BASKETBALL
Registration for Intramural co-rec bas-
ketball will be held Oct. 28 in Brcwster l
103 at 8 p.m.
CO-REC FOOTBALL
Registration for co-rec football will be
held Oct. 28 at 7 pm in Brcwster D 103
Dept IRS.
ASPEN WIND QUINTET
The Dept. of University Unions and the
School of Music present THE ASPEN.
WIND QUINTET m recital on Thurs
Nov. 5th, at 8.00 p.m. in Hcndm Theatre
Tickets are now on sale in the Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall from 11 an
until 6 pm MonFri. Call 757-6611, ext
266. Group rates are available
MARIAN McPARTLAND
The Dept. of University Unions and
The School of Music present National
Public Radio's first Lady of Jazz�Marian
McPartland� in Hendrix Theatre or
Tues Nov. 10th at 8:00 p.m. Tickets arc
now on sale in the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall from 11 a.m. until 6 pm
Mon -Fri. Call 757-6611, ext. 266 Group
rates are available.
mqb
I
News Analysis
Religious
DURHAM (AP) The Rev
ii'rry Falweil's division not to gel
deeply involved in the 1988 cam-
paign is symtomatir of the reli
gious right's waning clout in
presidential pohches, some ob-
servers sav
But a strategist for Sen less,
Helms, who helped galvanize
( hristun conservatives in previ-
ous elections, savs political fun-
damentalists will wield as much
strength as ever if a candidate
wins their hearts as President
Reagan did
Falwell, the Baptist preacher
and televangciist whom liberals
to hate, says he wants to re
turn full-time to the pulpit
"I don't plan ever again to worl
with any candid
Konald Ri as; ti Falwell said last
week prior to a give-and-take
session with students as Duke
University
He said hi
founding th
registering
building a caj
servativestoj
wjs finished!
"Preaching!
calling, and t
the rest of m'
Whether r
forthespotlii
tive cau
chburg, a
ticking remai
Equali.
in the am
right" will i
.
Lnlesv
C
and
laim
UN debates
l NITED ONS M
Environmental destru I n is � rl
becoming a critical problem n
throughout the world, and is in-
Teasingly harmful to developing
nations, foreign leaders said at a -j
U.N. debate
"While economic and social
I ment suffer from a
national and global imba
to the environment are
oming global in scope and
in scale and effect effo
said Norwegian Prime Minister tion
Gro Harlem Brundtland, chair- tr
Brochure offends
men
CPS) � University of Illinois brochun
ffkiaJs apologized last week for shop
ublishing a brochure that of- tanci
fended Li minontv students. cover a:
"It's one of those unfortunate a rr
'iungs that happen said Asst
Dean of Students Ronald
rVooifok, who added the man Montana
responsible for the brochure � had chos
counseling director Ralph of a Montana!
THrrAle � is&ucxi ar immediate, brochure,
embarrassed apology. Nevcnne.
Trimble's office printed 1.200 were
SENIORSGRADUATE:
1. Want to live year-round ir
rustic environment?
2. Enjoy backpacking cai
rafting?
3. Want to help problem youth
4. Looking for a year or more
experience or a career in
childcare?
If you said - YES!
Please contact the Placement 0
INTERNSH1
Eckerd Family Yoi
Regional R
P.O
Chariot)
1-704-371-8355
CflLENDi
HIHN
TJKH & The Dream fls Are Looking For Brid
19 8 8 "G i r Carolina11
No EHpericen Must be RU Welcome, CJ 1 appoi
i
J





M I
forward
,uh tun
rhanks for everything Love ya Robin.
OV Fall Cocktail was grea thanks to
oui dj we look a cruise on the party
v aboose grabbed our booze and got loose
at tho moose! Cheers to a fantastic cock-
tail
ro U l 1Mb HAPP CAMPERS- you
- . . . o you are It s time to remind
in 'xit night Jon t be at the bars.
( aus the Red House will be janimin full
� Karma and tun and you all are ex-
pe ted to party til! all S kegs are done.
lei i - there will be a gixni excuse to
it's Babs 22nd and !V and 1 prom-
ight not to forget. 5 pm
RICHARD ( Oi DELTA SIC: I'm
i . . � see 'Cuzl got you
- year will be filled
bro vou ro second to
s i 1 K1 1V- know last week was hectic
I wan) to thank vou
Pre Registration
reat lets keep up the
RYAN WALTON wnat to ask vou
gave you that ador
I come from a
� eiI hope it's
lide and watch,
IP 1
l KIl
P sM Cl AUS: Santa,
its es ausc you're the
. 1 you're my best
: but vou really make
� l thei knocking cause
in Who's 4? We stiU
a - . the cake Hey
t's th score? With love from
px ui 19th Birthdavtsas
� i an Loveya lots" Gather
DOn 1 OR A WEEK?? Prove
22nd and 23rd in front of
I v ler lobby and West
e halls
ni
'V' Girls of Cast Carolina:
' Pi kappa Alpha looking
� sfbr their 1988 Calendar
- - a 752 J874
ENNIFER CARPENTER Happy 21st
�:�-in IT trv to keep it under
� theAZD's
K si CM VS. LAMBDA CHI'S - Wed-
-dav night was too much' good thing
ak followed, because we needed it
11 rate! We love you guvs' Let's
soon! Love the AZD's.
ELTA ZETA: We wish to welcome the
� members of the Beta Pi pledge
Michelle Dark, Kathi Messer,
ne Brown, Erin Cruz, Ticia Pilati,
and hilie Mot I fave fun girls and re-
Tiomber we love vou'
�- '
d intended
an effi irl �
. ir
lOt
their
kIR PRODUCTS
� i 'hose
�wof "Baby
brine
igram to
ALPHA JHJETA
guests are invited to
aroa near the front of
lost SI 50 members,
ibout K"ning Phi
act the ECU History
CAR WASH
4pm at the Fuel Doc,
ULMMERJQBS
�too early to begin thinking
pried summer job that's chal-
ltmg, and professional The
merriment (KXi) Summer
km offers you all of the above
nore The Co-op office urges
ore about these opportune
Lng a meeting on Oct. 27, at
m 302 Rawl. A representa-
p will be available to discuss
10-week internship with vari-
iries located in Raleigh All
lust be a sophomore, junior,
lus and must be returning to
ter the internship For further
o-op office at 757-6979.
SOPQKL Q RQJJE
jupporl group has been formed for
who are caring for a parent,
r other loved one at home The
I b) Freda W Cross, MSW, Pitt
Memorial Hospital and Susan
R Creative Living Center
s pport group will be at St. James
- v thodisl Church at 2000 E. 6th
. . . No 3 from 7-8.30 p.m.
- are available To make
s for respite care, call the Crea-
ing C enter at 757-0303 from 8:00
am to5:00p.m 24 hours in advance.
HI 1FST SPEAKER
Mark Purser Geology Dept ECU will
be speaking on ' Ceomorphological Con-
trols Over Tidal Marsh Development on
the N C Outer Banks" on Thurs Oct. 22
at 3 0ip m in Craham 301.
MADRIGAL DINNERS
. f.ots arc now on sale for Madrigal
Dinners to be hold Dec 2-5 at 7:00 p.m. in
v : : ketsareSl tor ECU stu-
IS16for all thi rs Call the Cen-
tral Ticket Office a: 757 6611, ext. 266.
REGISTRATION
' ieneral College students should con-
tact their advisers the week of Nov. 2-6 to
make arrangements for academic advis-
ing for spring semester, 1988 Early regis-
bratj n will begin Nov. 9 and end Nov. 17.
BOWLING
Registration for Intramural league
bowling will be held Oct. 28 from 11 a.m
6pm in room 104-A Memorial Gym.
CO-REC BASKETBALL
Registration for Intramural co-rec bas-
al) w ill be hold Oct 28 in Brewster D-
� at 8 p m
QQ-REC FOOTBALL
Registration for co-rec football will be
hold Oct 28 at 7 pm. in Brewster D-103
Dept. IRS
ASPEN WIND QUINTET
The Dept of University Unions and the
School of Music present THE ASPEN.
WIND QUINTET in recital on Thurf
Nov. 5th, at800pm in 1 lendrixTheatre
Tickets are now on sale in the Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall from 11 a.m
until 6 p m Mon Fn. Call 757-6611, ext
266 Group rates are available.
MART AM McPARTLANP.
The Dept of University Unions and
The School of Music present National
Public Radio's first Lady of Jazz�Marian
McPartland� in Hcndrix Theatre on
Tues, Nov 10th at 8:00 p.m. Tickets are
now on sale in the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall from 11 a.m. until 6 p�
Mon -Fit Call 757-6611, ext. 266. Group
rates are available.
I
News Analysis
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER XL 1987 7
Religious influence in presidential campaign waning
DURHAM (AP) � The Rev.
lorry Falwell's decision not to get
deeply involved in the 1988 cam-
paign is symtomatic of the reli-
gious right's waning clout in
presidential polictics, some ob-
servers say.
But a strategist for Sen. Jesse
Helms, who helped galvanize
Christian conservatives in previ-
ous elections, says political fun-
damentalists will wield as much
strength as ever if a candidate
wins their hearts as President
Reagan did.
Falwell, the Baptist preacher
and televangelist whom liberals
love to hate, says he wants to re-
turn lull-time to the pulpit.
"1 don't plan ever again to work
with any candidate as 1 did for
Ronald Reagan Falwell said last
week prior to a give-and-take
session with students as Duke
University.
He said his political work �
founding the Moral Majority,
registering millions of voters,
building a cadre of religious con-
servatives to advance the cause �
was finished.
"Preaching the gospel is my
calling, and that's all I want to do
the rest of my life
Whether Falwell, with his zest
for the spotlight and the conserva-
tive cause, can retire to Lyn-
chburg, Va and abandon poli-
ticking remains to be seen.
Equally unclear is what others
in the amorphous "religious
right" will do. Many don't seem
enthusiastic about any of the 1988
presidential contenders.
Unless the situation changes,
Christian conservatives might be
less of a factor next year than in
1980 and 1984, when � their lead-
ers claim � thev were central to
Reagan's overwhelming victory
margins.
"There's a lack of focus in the
religious right. They're internally
divided � without a leader Ted
Arrington, professor of political
science at the University of North
Carolina at Charlotte, said.
Falwell, for example, supports
Vice President George Bush, who
has drawn lukewarm support at
best from most arch-conserva-
tives. Rep. Jack Kemp, R-N.Y is
trying to establish himself as
Reagan's philosphical heir but
has yet to catch on.
Then there's Pat Robertson,
who recently resigned from the
Christian Broadcasting Network
to run for president.
While some Christian conser-
vatives fervently back Robertson,
others arc squeamish about
preachers in politics, Arrington
said. Additionally, tclevangelists
have an image problem in the
wake of the Jim and Tammy
Bakker scandal. And Robertson's
admission that he conceived a
child prior to marriage won't
help.
David Paletz, political scientist
at Duke, says what the religious
right docs next year is less impor-
tant than some think because its
strength has been exaggerated.
"It's not clear at all that there's a
distinctive ideological religious
right out there, or if so, that it's
that big Paletz said. "And even
if it were, there's a difference be
twecn voting for Ronald Reagan
because the economy is doing
well and voting for him because
Jerry Falwell says so
Paletz says Falwell's decision
on the 1988 race may reflect a dis-
satisfaction with politics many
Christian rightists feel as
Reagan's term winds down.
They think Reagan has done too
little to advance their social
agenda, including a ban on abor-
tions and restoration of school
prayer, Paletz said.
There's a certain frustration
and fatigueon their part he said.
Carter Wrenn, executive direc-
tor of the National Congressional
Club, Jesse Helms' political or-
ganization, agreed conservatives
are frustrated. But he said they
blamed liberal Democrats, not
Reagan, and aren't ready to quit.
The president's nomination of
Robert Bork to the Supreme Court
pleased the Christian right,
Wrenn said. But the Senate, with
its Democratic majority, is ex-
pected to reject Bork.
"Each (recent) election has
brought a new group of Christian
conservatives into the political
process Wrenn said. "There's
probably better grassroots leader-
ship than in the past
Arrington says Christian right-
wingers need a charismatic leader
to inspire them because most are
not political junkies.
For most of the century, "their
political involvement was just
awful Arlington said. It took the
radical changes in moral values,
the political scandals of the 1960s
and 1970s and Reagan'seloquence
to jolt them into activism.
But Wrenn says Christian con-
servatives won't lapse into inac-
tivity without someone as color-
ful as Reagan on the ballot.
"The conservative Christians
are portrayed inaccurately as a
mass of people who move in lock-
step Wrenn said. "Really, it's a
diverse group. The best way to
appeal to them is like you appeal
to others � on the issues
UN debates environment damage
UNITED NATIONS (AP) -
Environmental destruction is
becoming a critical problem
throughout the world, and is in-
creasingly harmful to developing
nations, foreign leaders said at a
U.N. debate.
"While economic and social
development suffer from severe
national and global imbalances,
threats to the environment are
becoming global in scope and
devastating in scale and effect
said Norwegian Prime Minister
Gro Harlem Brundtland, chair-
woman of the U.Nsponsored
World Commission on Environ-
ment and Development.
Brundtland's group in April
issued a report, based on three
years of work by members from
22 countries, that calls for im-
plementation of the concept of
worldwide "sustainable develop-
ment
"Early, we came to recognize
that poverty is the main causeand
effect of environmental degrada-
tion in many developing coun-
tries Brundtland said at
Monday's debate.
Encroachcmnt of desert, loss of
rain forests, a worldwide warm-
ing trend, acid rain, rising ocean
levels, ozone depletion and over-
use of agricultural land were
among the numerous difficulties
cited during the U.N. General
Ascmbly debate.
Indian Prime Minister Rajiv-
Gandhi said developing coun-
tries need assistance and industri-
alized countries need to conserve.
"The lion's share of the world's
natural resources has been pre-
empted by a few countries he
added. "The average citizen of the
industrialized countries con-
sumes 10 times more fossil fuels
and minerals than the average
citizen of the developing world.
Canadian Environment Minis-
ter Tom McMillan said history has
been characterized by "seemingly
unbridled planetary destruction.
"It is as though our ultimate
purpose is to exploit every natural
resource until nothing remains of
it he said.
Brochure offends minority students at Illinois
(CPS) � University of Illinois
officials apologized las week for
publishing a brochure that of-
fended UI minority students.
"It's one of those unfortunate
tilings that happen said Asst.
Dean of Students Ronald
Woolfok, who added the man
responsible for the brochure �
rounseling director Ralph
Trimble � issued .an immediate,
embarrassed apology.
Trimble's office printed 1,200
brochures to advertise a work-
shop called "Loving in Long-Dis-
tance Relationships and for the
cover approved using a section of
a map that, in turn, showed a
place called "Nigger Mm
There is, in fact, such a place in
Montana, and the graphic artist
had chosen to tear out that section
of a Montana map to illustrate the
brochure.
Nevertheless, "several students
were very upset about it
Woolfok said.
Laureen Bonner, head of UI
Minority Affairs Committee, was
"certain that the graphics student
who put the map on the flier knew
what was going on especially in
light of several racist incidents on
campus recently.
The Illini Review, the campue
conservative newspaper, angered
minority groups in September
when it advertised for "a token
minority" to serve on its staff.
During the summer, moreover,
the La Casa Cultural Latina office
was vandalized.
Trimble apologized for the
graphic as soon as it was pointed
out to him. In proofreading the
brochure, "I looked at the flier and
I did not look at the map
SENIORSGRADUATES
ECKERDI
a
FAMILY!
YOUTH!
Ukisl.k'ttialabl
INC
1. Want to live year-round in a
rustic environment?
Enjoy backpacking, canoeing,
rafting?
Want to help problem youths?
Looking for a year or more
experience or a career in
childcare?
If you said - YES!
Please contact the Placement Office for interview times and schedule.
INTERNSHIPS AVAILABLE
Eckerd Family Youth & Alternatives Inc.
Regional Recruiting Office
P.O. Box 31122
Charlotte, NC 28231
1-704-371-8355 1-800-222-1473
CHLENDHR GIRLS
UIRNTED
n'Kfl & The Dream Association Calendar Co
Are Looking For Bright New Faces For Our
1988 "Girls of East
Carolina11 Calendar
No EHpericence Necessary,
Must be 1 7 or older
All Welcome, Call 752-3874 for
ppointment
Every Tuesday
College Night
from 8:00 to 11:00
$1.50 with college I.D.
.50$ skate rental
SPORTSWORLD
104 E. Redbanks Rd.
756-6000
COMING ATTRACTIONS
i
October 22-25 at 8:00 PM
Movie:
NO MERCY
?October 23 at 10:00 PM only
Sunday, October 25
Minges Coliseum
THE HANNEFORD
CIRCUS
Shows at 3:00 PM and 7:00 PM
(Presented By Shrinera and the Special Events
Committee)
Upcoming Event:
In Concert
ANITA BAKER
Sunday, November 1st
8:00 PM Minges Coliseum
ECU Students - $12.00 Public And
At The Door - $14.00
For more information, contact the
Student Union at 757 6611. ext 210.
, I
�komg txn to uvt it
��c��� � i , lp, � MWaiUmWi m








8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN!
OCTOBER 22, 1987
Baptist school ranks on 'Playboy' party list
MACON,Ca. (AP) �These are
strange times at Mercer Univer-
sity, a Southern Baptist college
whose unexpected depiction by
Playboy magazine as a "party
school" has touched off a holy war
for control of the administration.
Since the article appeared, some
fundamentalist Southern Baptists
have branded the school's moder-
ate president a heretic and called
for Mercer to be taken out of the
hands of its board of trustees.
Student reaction has been swift,
and angry. Last Wednesday,
hundreds of clean-cut students
packed Mercer's student center
for a hurriedly called appearance
by Raleigh Kirby Godsey, a for-
mer Southern Baptist minister
and the 17th president in Mercer's
148-year history.
Cheers erupted when the soft-
spoken Godsey vowed, "Tins
university will not be taken over
by anybody
Earlier this year, when Playboy
magazine ranked the college the
nation's ninth best "party
school many here figured that
someone was pulling Playboy's
leg.
The 6,000-student school is an
unabashedly Southern Baptist
institution. Beer isn't permitted
on campus even if students are
old enough to drink it.
The Playboy article was fol-
lowed by another issue contain-
ing a nude pictorial featuring
women from the "party" schools,
including two Mercer co-eds who
posed nude.
Then, earlier this month, Lee
Roberts, a suburban Atlanta busi-
nessman and Baptist layman,
mailed a 16-page "open letter" to
Baptist pastors, Mercer faculty
members and the parents of Mer-
cer students.
The letter contained "dramatic
evidence of filthy language, lewd
photographs, heresies, student
drunkenness and sexually ex-
plicit material
Roberts included photocopies
of the Playboy photos and a stu-
dent newspaper ail in which
someone seeks a backpack lost "in
a drunken frenzy Saturday
night
He listed R rated movies on
campus, including "M-A-S-H"
and "Rosemary's Baby and 33
instances of profane words and
phrases found in a book pub
lished by the Mercer University
Press.
He quoted from Godsey
speeches on theology, including
one in which the president said
that "any historical search to vali-
date the deity of Christ is likely to
fail
Roberts called for an overhaul
of Mercer operations to permit a
panel oi the Georgia Baptist Con-
vention, not Mercer's Board ol
Trustees, to nominate new board
members.
Conservatives gain control
Students talk of leaving school
RALEIGH (AP) � Officials at
the one Baptist seminary that has
retained its moderate reputation
say they began getting calls from
students at Southeastern Baptist
Theological Seminary shortly af-
ter that school's conservative
majority on the board of trustees
began taking charge last week.
"We welcome transfers, but we
don't encourage them David K.
Wilkinson, vice president of semi-
nary relations for Southern Bap-
tist Theological Seminary in Lou-
isville, Ky told "The News and
Observer" of Raleigh.
"Southeastern is still a good
school There's no way to pre-
dict how they'll ultimately react,
but I wouldn't be surprised if
many of its students decide to
come here Wilkinson said.
In a three-day meeting last
week, conservatives on
Southeastern's board of trustees
swept all the board offices and
presidents who use their appoint-
ive powers to place like-minded
colleagues on policy-making
boards.
The convention, the nation's
largest Protestant denomination,
hasbeen embattled in recent years
because of differences between
conservatives and moderates on
basic Baptist principals. Conser-
vatives say the foundation of faith
is biblical inerrancy, the belief that
the Bible is without error. Moder-
ates say their guiding principle is
the individual's freedom to inter-
pret Scripture according to his or
her own conscience.
At Southeastern, trustees
openly admit they plan to hire
inerrantists, but they also contend
professors will be hired only as
vacancies occur. Barring whole-
sale departures, they say, it could
take 15 to 20 years for inerrantists
to gain a majority.
There now are two declared
most in their mid-40s toearly 50s.
The crucial question, some ob-
servers said, is whether trustees
plan to wage an open battle on the
issues.
"The war also might be more
subtle than that said Nancy T.
Ammerman, a sociologist who
teaches at Emory University's
Candler School oi Theology in
Atlanta. "What fundamentalists
have done in oilier settings is to
introduce lots of little, picky
things changing funding fo-
cuses, emphasizing doctrinal
questions in interviews so that
the atmosphere becomes one ol
'have you seen what they've done
now1
Despite the uncertainty, profes
sors say they are committed to
staying at the seminar)
"We have a resolve to maintain
our prophetic role said Richard
yL. Hester, a professor of pastoral
care and the president of the
adopted policies to make it easier vacancios at Southeastern and Southeastern chapter of Ameri
to hire professors who will teach
the conservative concept of the
inerrancy of the Bible.
Although no one was fired or
told what doctrines to teach, it
was perfectly clear, as seminary
President W. Randall Lolley told
students after the meeting, that
the policy changes would create a
new vision for Southeastern.
Since fundamentalists took
control of the Southern Baptist
Convention's presidency in 1979,
conservatives have redefined
agendas by electing a string of
Follow the latest
in Pirate action.
Read the sports
page in The East
Carolinian.
Simply the best.
two more expected within the
next year. Three professors are
close to or over 65 and another
three are around 60. But beyond
that, the majority of the 33-mem
ber staff is relatively young
can Association of University
Professors. "You don't back off
just because the battle's become
more difficult. Our position is still
the same: We will not be told what
to teach
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And he noted "strong rumors"
that the Georgia Baptist Conven-
tion, at its mooting next month,
might strip Mercer of its $2 mil-
lion allocation, call tor the re
placement of all 45 trustees or
sever church ties to Mercer.
In reaction, Atlanta's lirst Bap
tist Church, home of fundamen-
talist leader and former Southern
Baptist Convention President
Charles Stanley, said it would no
longer contribute to Mercer's $2
million allocation.
However, Augusta's I irst Bap
tist Church, where the denomina-
tion was founded in 1845. ba ked
Godsey and said it would lend the
school financial support.
"It makes me mad said Karen
facobs, a senior from Monticello
who edits the student newspaper.
"(Roberts) has made attacks that
cannot be substantiated
"We are not a party school
said Holly McCorkle, a senior
from Jacksonville, Ha and stu-
dent government vice president.
"Mercer's always had rules. And
it's always been strict
The struggle reflects a larger
one between fundamentalist and
moderate (actions in the nation's
largest Protestant denomination
since the fundamentalists took
control of the Southern Baptist
Convention eight years ago.
In an interview last week, God-
sey called the takeover attempt
"political fundamentalism
"This whole matter has galva-
nized the university community
said Godsey, who dismissed
Roberts charges of heresy as
"simply nonsense
"What we have going on here is
a movement ot wanting to take
control of the affairs of the univer-
sity in order to dictate what is
taught, in order to control who
loaches it, in order to control the
textbooks that are used and the
books that we publish
To defuse the situation, Godsev
recently wrote a letter to The
Christian Index, a Georgia Baptist
newspaper, in which he stressed,
"Jesus is the center of my faith
Godsey said Roberts' "take
over" attempt will fail because
Mercer's charter gives the board
of trustees power to nominate
future trustees and the charter
cannot be changed unless the
trustees themselves vote to do so
"We will not compromise our
commitment to religious free-
dom, religious diversity, the tol-
erance of religious differences
That's the heart of a Baptist um
versify he said.
As for the Georgia Baptist
Convention's $2 million, Godsev
said that if Mercer has to live with-
out it, it will. He said the school
could go directly to Baptist
churches and their members for
support.
Alpha Gamma Pledge Class 2(e V
YOU
are the key to responsible
decisions
concerning alcohol
Help prevent alcohol abuse through education
East Carolina University Supports
Alcohol Awareness Week
Oct. 22-29,1987
��� mmmmmmmimm0m
llWMTll�
mmm
-��2S

v.
' Hf t sn,tl s,AS
Sally I ield, shown here in an earlier mi
C aine in the new film 'Surrender now plaj
A VCR Hallov
BvMiCAH HARRIS
medy is most
enjoyed v hen shared. That's why
there's m.re than one car on a
r. And why a partv at
Halloween is the best place and
put a horror movie in the
time
VCR
llowing movies have two
' des genre) in com-
mon � are both available on
video tape and are relatively (and
undeservedly) obscure. In other
words, if you're tired oi ason and
Freddy Tart 1001, read on.
"The Haunting director
Robert VN is s ettort commonly
ttrffgnl HM - as.xttte definite
�vaunted house movie, adapted
from Shirley Jackson s re
"The Haunting oi Hill House
Wise is from the "Yal Lewton
(producer of the original Cat
People') school oi terror He
pro es hat you don't see is scar-
ier than what you do see. His di-
recting, along with a literate
script, combine to create a genre
classic.
Wise id shioned his film after the
architecture oi Hill House itself,
with angles distorted just enough
to put the viewer off balance
Along with creative use1 oi black
and white film and sound ma-
nipulation, a sense oi terror is
dishII d
Then s no monster or even
"Poltergeist" pyrotechnics. In
Picking the bones
"Th � .
the po
maki
can t
deleted
prod i
smart
stc pmother .hJ
Noah. Th.u I i
"Audrey
Change
arc low-ke
ad I
tea; .
drer
pass i
little ch;
"Dead
the c'
Dan (
h w a- -
same tin
nowhere
hokej
!
Cut � 'i
SCO v. . 11
Random jo
BvCHirn BONEHEAD
SUfl V�-ic
B when I do my j,
this is what I think about
Conceptual artist Laurie An-
derson said that And at three
o'clock in the morning on pro-
duction night at The Bast Caro-
linian. 1 can see what she s
Baying.
So. A quick trip over random
notes in the Bonehead journal is
called for
And ht-rc we go
I think it would be cool if you
could get a little spray bottle of
the AIDS virus. You could go
around, disguise it like a can of
mousse or something and spntz
people who really need to die,
like Jim and Tammy Bakkor or
your English teachers.
Albums should be required by
law to be exactly 45 minutes in
length. It's frustrating to try and
find songs to put at the end of
your tapes. Getting the last tune
cut off in the middle it sucks.
Dana Carvey muirt lay awake
at night and think he's going to
be reincarnated as a cave beetle
for starting a trend that forces
Otherwise sane human beings to
screw up their faces and
SquealIsn't that special
Hell for most of us will be a
complete compact disc collection
of the Osmonds' hits.
Before babies are born, they
should get to see interuterine
I
- could I
though it w I
office ba �
WcKei
You
dun:
- '
his t
- I pull his I
socket and
icetray. It was :J
but I'm real tij
cornea juice out!
Cocaine v. I
It's just the moj
realize that vi
your boogers o
rush thai . -
rest.
When will
the National Er
printing those si
attentionMost)
true anyway U
ignored them, tl
start getting ir
feelings and sa
means.
In real life. i
pain. Nancy
upset sometime
watch "Falcon C
a woman who dc
Oreo ice crear
worried about wj
J





arty list
u Knk thai we publish
to defuse the situation, Godsey
And recently wrote a letter to The
Christian Index, a Georgia Baptist
newspaper, in which he stressed,
us is the center of my faith
Godse) said Roberts' "take-
ion ovei attempt will fail because
Mercer's charter gives the board
list of trustee's power to nominate
future trustees and the charter
cannot be changed unless the
trustres themselves vote to do so.
We will not compromise our
commitment to religious free-
rt ligious diversity, the tol-
e oi religious differences.
- the heart of a Baptist uni-
versit he said
- tvr the C.eorgia Baptist
invention s $2 million, Godsev
t Mercer has to live with-
i it will He said the school
d go directly to Baptist
churches and their members for
support
IT
Ah- iffA
Pock ioT;ri
Pledge Class 2(H
responsible
ons
ning alcohol
itive Lifestyle
n, Kducation
�use through education
liver si ty Supports
Ireness Week
!9,1987
IMF t simn iis
Entertainment
cxrroBCR2 iwh7 vc
'Surrender' is money-happy
By JENNIFER PEARSON
SuffWrilcr
Sally Field and Michael Caine
star in "Surrender" a delightful
and appropriately titled film
which depicts two people with
completely hopeless pasts in the
loverelationship game.
Sally Field plays Daisy Morgan.
an attractive artist with no real
aspiration in her career. (She is an
assembly line painter.) Her door-
mat type nature and insecurities
cause her to stay with a jerk of a
boyfriend, Marty Caesar (played
by Steve Guttenberg). Marty
snaps for everything he wants.
The funny thing about it is: Daisy
immediately responds to h s
needs � or "snaps Marty's own
saving grace is: he is loaded and
without a doubt, Daisy enjoys his
paying for her car, dentist bills,
vacations and anything else that
comes to mind.
Unfortunately, Marty does not
easily provide the definite idea of
a lasting commitment which
Daisy feels she desperately needs
as her biological clock ticks a way.
Daisy just knows that there is a 47
percent chance of her becoming a
"lonely alcoholic" if she does not
remarry soon. ("Remarry" be-
cause her past track record with
male-female relationships is not
too promising.)
Obviously pulled by her lover's
strings, she leads a life according
to his plans. He certainly falls
short of bestowing any sort of
mental encouragement as far as
her career (he forgets she's an art-
istpainter), or personal welfare
go-
It is hilarious how he whines to
her and being even more the
"door-mat she welcomes his
every whim.
In fact, she cannot "just say no"
Marty calls one evening �last
Th
thini
m
und(
taj
en
Sally Held, shown here in an earlier movie, appears with Michael
C aine in the new film 'Surrender now playing at the Plaza Cinema.
A VCR Halloween
tact, it's comparatively slow by
today's standards. It's also a supe-
rior film.
'The Watcher In The Woods" is
similar in tone to "The Haunting"
but more upbeat and accessible to
contemporary audiences. Again,
it's the power of suggestion that
makes the skin crawl as an Ameri-
can family rents a country British
home and learns "there's some-
thing out there An elaborate cli-
matic special effects scene was
deleted to this Disney
production's benefit. That's right,
smart guy, 1 said Disney. The guy
who sent pee running down your
leg when Snow White's wicked
stepmother changed into a witch.
Yeah. That Disney.
"Audrey Rose" and "The
Changeling" are also films which
rely on suggestion to chilling ef-
fect ("Rose" is a later Robert VVise
film). Like The Haunting both
are low-key and lend themselves
to an adult audience: both also
feature disturbing scenes of chil-
dren dying, so you may want to
pass on these two if you have any
little children around the house.
"Dead and Buried a film by
the creative team behind "Alien
Dan O'Bannon and Ron Shusett,
which was released about the
same time and went absolutely
nowhere. Although the premise is
hokey, this story of voodoo in a
small New England town is at-
R
By MICAH HARRIS
Sud Writer
like comedy, is most
enjoyed when shared. That's whv
there's more than one car on a
roller coaster. And whv a party at
Halloween is the best place and
time to put a horror movie in the
VCR.
I iwing movies have two
iesides genre) in com-
� are both available on
v and are relatively (and
. edl) obscure. In other
you're tired of Jason and
�art 1001, read on.
Haunting director
Vise's effort commonly
rtreegsarett. asatBa definite
�vaunted house movie, adapted
Tfroin Shirle) Jackson's novel,
"The Haunting of Hill House
Wise is from the "Val Lewton
(producer of the original 'Cat
PeopU ' school of terror He
proves what you don't see is scar-
ier than what you do see. His di-
recting, along with a literate
script, combine to create a genre
clas
Wise fashioned his film af ter the
architecture of Hill House itself,
with angles distorted just enough
to put the viewer off balance.
Along with creative use of black
and white film and sound ma-
nipulation, a sense of terror is
distilled.
There's no monster or even
"Poltergeist" pyrotechnics. In
See SCARY, page 12
Soul singer Anita Baker will perform November 1 at 8 pjn. in Minges Coliseum. Tickets are $12 for
students and $14 for the general public. The concert is being presented by the Student Union.
minute of course and a-k- her
to a party When die politely in-
forms him that she ha, work to do,
he whimpers: "Oooh honey, don't
bepissy with me " They gp to the
party.
This party reveals the dramatic
climax of the plot, where Daisv
bored with the upper-class stiffs
� amuses herself by sketching a
protraitofanchsnobona napkin
After putting it down (as her at-
tention is drawn elsewhere she
notices a stranger, Michael Caine,
picking up the designed napkin
and enjoying it enough to put it
inside his jacket.
The party being crashed by
some perverted weirdos � whose
only wish is to strip the guests and
tie them together � causes Daisy
to lose her escort and literally
winding up with Michael "Sean
Stein" Caine. He decides it appro-
priate to introduce himself as they
arc in a rather personal (nude)
and precarious (horizontal) situ-
ation.
See FIELD, page 12
Ringwaid isn't
swayed by
Tick-up Artist'
By JENNIFER PEARSON
Staff V - T
Despite the audience consist-
ing of a mere group of four (my-
self included), the movie "The
Pick Up Artist" was a definite hit.
Robert Downey's charismatic
good looks, not to mention his
sharp wit, offered much to the
film's appeal.
Watching jack, as he is called,
causually rehearse his "lines" of
the day is nothing but hysterical.
His most prized possession, not
surprisinglv enough, is a scraglv
piece of paper full of the names
and numbers of every beautiful
girl he has somehow managed to
interest.
After coming across Randy,
(Molly Ringwald), a spunkv red
head, all Jack's charm seems to
backfire. The tables are turned on
him when, for once in his life, he
feels "real love" instead of a
simple one-night-stand and vet
Randy refuses to stick around.
Not being able to fully under-
See PICK-L'P, page 12
Picking the bones
Random journal notes
Bv CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Writer

Because when I do my job
this is what 1 think about
Conceptual artist Laurie An-
derson said that. And at three
o'clock in the morning on pro-
duction night at The East Caro-
linian. I can see what she's
ing.
So A quick trip over random
notes in the Bonehead journal is
called for.
And here we go
1 think it would be cool if you
could get a little spray bottle of
the AIDS virus. You could go
around, disguise it like a can of
mousse or something and spritz
people who really need to die,
like Jim and Tammy Bakker or
your English teachers.
Albums should be required by
law to be exactly 45 minutes in
length. It's frustrating to try and
find songs to put at the end of
your tapes. Getting the last tune
cut off in the middle it sucks.
Dana Carvey muf t lay awake
at night and think he's going to
be reincarnated as a cave beetle
for starting a trend that forces
otherwise sane human beings to
screw up their faces and
squealIsn't that special
Hell for most of us will be a
complete compact disc collection
of the Osmonds' hits.
Before babies are born, they
should get to see interuterine
movies about life. Movies could
include "Back to the Future" and
footage of Baby Jessica's well
trip.
Trash cans need more variety.
Shapes like triangles and octa-
gons could be explored, even
though it would mean the end of
office basketball.
Spuds McKenzie laughs at us.
You can tell he wants to fart
during his commercials, but he
knows they'd probably cancel
his royalty checks.
My roommate's favorite trick
is to pull his eyeballs out of the
socket and freeze them in the
icetray. It was funny for a while,
but I'm real tired of scraping
cornea juice out of my drinks.
Cocaine won't really kill you.
It's just the moment when you
realize that you are scraping
your boogers out for one last
rush that gives you cardiac ar-
rest.
When will people realize that
the National Enquirer is really
printing those stories just to get
attention? Most of them aren't
true anyway. If everybody just
ignored them, the paper would
start getting in touch with its
feelings and say what it really
means.
In real life, there is a lot of
pain. Nancy Reagan gets so
upset sometimes, she can't even
watch "Falcon Crest And she's
a woman who doesn't cry easily.
Oreo ice cream is okay. I'm just
worried about what will happen
when they try to market Pixie
Stix sherbert. Those little gran-
ules don't hold together very
well when they get frozen. I tried
it already.
Parties are good places to get
to know people. It's hard to deal
with all the paperwork after-
wards though. The carbon paper
always gets wet. Maybe every-
one could rent a little portable
Xerox machine.
Air conditioner is the wrong
phrase. It brings up images of
trying to spray Chap Stick like
Lysol. It could really be called
"Cold air blower
Sex is really funny. Basically,
you try to stick a waste produc-
ing organ into another one and
move it around a lot. Humans
spend a lot of time doing this.
But I still wouldn't want to be a
fish. Their waste hangs out all
the time. That's gotta be messy.
And they don't make condoms
that small.
If the space people ever land
on Earth, they're going to be real
surprised. Because we don't
really look like they think we do.
We're a lot taller in real life. And
we use a lot more bean bag
chairs.
God messed up when he made
toes. They don't move right and
too many things grow there. A
more rounded structure, or even
box-like would be better, except
when you needed to climb
See RANDOM, page 12
From the Not so Right
Letter from slow class
I I H I I I I � i i
ByPATMOLLOY
I've decided to try something
different this time � something
out of die mainstream.
In the spi ri t of higher learning
� and because if I didn't make
today the professor was
going to wri te me off as another
Jim Morrison � this particular
1rom the Not so Right column
is emanating;from the soiled halls
and crumbling walls of Austin
You see, this is what I do while
my professor babbles oi how a
semi-coloncan actually be used in
poetry to describe anguish and a
lack of aelf-confidence
"You must feel the despair'
sayshe.
"You must feel like a moron
says me.
This article, of course, can be
compared to the hundreds of let-
terswrittendaUybystodentswho
simply wish to remain condousin
a class where uiKondousness is
the norm, Philosophy and Span-
ish are also big winners in that
have precious few phrases 1
can remember from Spanish 1001
due in no;
Sorry to say I still have three
semesters to go. Yo quiero macho
cerveza.
On to philosophy. Now hare's a
class in which you can really write
a letter � or you don't have to
write a letter at all You don't even
have to show up�but you can if
you wish. .
My professor, for logic was, and
continues to be, one of the strang-
est people fve encountered here
- and fve encountered some
beauties.
He shared in Einstein's theory
that man should dress the same
way everyday, thereby eliminat-
ing unnecessary brain stress-
However, what my teacher did
not comprehend was that Albert,
no matter how boring his attire,
was, at feast, dean.
, fe this tesowL tnv professor
shared in Pigpen's (of Charlie
Brown feme) theory which holds:
if your pants can stand up by
themselves, you should stand up
in them.
Pigpen was never big on
Thoreau.
And this puiz of � professor
knows diddfy about poetry, fees,
Even I know fee stuff's gotta
Iri fast common fcnowl-
But trying to tefliny teacher
functions, (using the word
"senseless here would merely be
redundant) and mugging him. At
best, he'll get a new attitude; at
worst, I'll wind up with a few
dollars and some pocket lint
All will not be lost
Well if s my rum to recite my
poem. You know, I could really
loose control here and bungle it
However, we all know that won't
happen. I simply don't have the
screw-up chromosome in my
DNA.
Okay, I'm pumped up. Here ti
goes:
In my dreams
You're all I sees�
Boobs butt and knees.
Be my main squeeze.
Please.
Now that's literary perfection.
I mean that.
Sfocerery.
�Editor's note Oboiomhf, Pa
MoJfoy & unaware tint yew anal
tfum your sources or your nmsfm-
per am get sued for plagarism and
editors tend to spaz out and kkk de-
it i tbsf jy not &sbs$ Bh
reiLaled btows
Theabom "poem" a from i
strip 8tow County wi
cimmctxr Steve Dalles (GThe
tngton PastCe,) We hop Ms
aflBMHS the crtulive forces of
9triptMd weproeuse to severei$ '
Molioycn the soles with broken i
��
jfofKmwv m m w m �i am��lnfm�W�-





arty list
And
arger
A and
books that we publish
Io defuse the situation, Godscy
recently wrote a letter to The
i. hristian Index, a Georgia Baptist
newspaper, in which he stressed,
jesus is the center of my faith
v lodse) said Roberts' "take-
over attempt will fail because
Mercer s charter gives the board
vr trustees power to nominate
re trustees and the charter
t be changed unless the
ustces themselves vote to do so.
will not compromise our
rutment to religious free-
religious diversity, the tol-
ce ol religious differences.
- the heart of a Baptist uni-
said
- for the Georgia Baptist
ention's $2 million, Godsey
that it Mercer has to live with-
I it will He said the school
Ck directly to Baptist
hes and their members for
Hrt
I am- im
oCK tor"sTi
Pledge Class 2(o V
responsible
ons
ning alcohol
e Lifestyle
Hdueation
?use through education
liversity Supports
reness Week
U9,1987
I'M EAS1 CAROI INIAN
Entertainment
(X.TOBCR 2 1�H7 Pap
'Surrender9 is money-happy
By JENNIFER PEARSON
SuffWritcr
Sally Field and Michael Caine
star in "Surrender" a delightful
and appropriately titled film
which depicts two people with
completely hopeless pasts in the
loverelationship game.
Sally Field plays Daisy Morgan.
an attractive artist with no real
aspiration in her career. (She is an
assembly line painter.) Her door-
mat type nature and insecurities
cause her to stay with a jerk of a
boyfriend, Marty Caesar (played
by Steve Guttenberg). Marty
snaps for everything he wants.
The funny thing about it is: Daisy
immediately responds to h s
needs � or "snaps Marty's ow;i
saving grace is: he is loaded and
without a doubt, Daisy enjoys his
paying for her car, dentist bills,
vacations and anything else that
comes to mind.
Unfortunately, Marty does not
easily provide the definite idea of
a lasting commitment which
Daisy feels she desperately needs
as her biological clock ticks away.
Daisy just knows that there is a 47
percent chance of her becoming a
"lonely alcoholic" if she does not
remarry soon. ("Remarry" be-
cause her past track record with
male-female relationships is not
too promising.)
Obviously pulled by her lover's
strings, she leads a life according
to his plans. He certainly falls
short of bestowing any sort of
mental encouragement as far as
her career (he forgets she's an art-
istpainter), or personal welfare
go-
It is hilarious how he whines to
her and being even more the
"door-mat she welcomes his
every whim.
In fact, she cannot "just say no
Marty calls one evening �last
13 MilAH HARRIS
Stafl Writer
Sally Meld, shown here in an earlier movie, appears with Michael
aine in the new film 'Surrender now playing at the Plaza Cinema.
A VCR Halloween
tact, it's comparatively slow by
today's standards. It's also a supe-
rior film.
'The Watcher In The Woods" is
similar in tone to "The Haunting"
but more upbeat and accessible to
contemporary audiences. Again,
it's the power of suggestion that
makes the skin crawl as an Ameri-
can family rents a country British
home and learns "there's some-
thing out there An elaborate cli-
matic special effects scene was
deleted to this Disney
production'sbenefit.That's right,
smart guy, I said Disney. The guy
who sent pee running down your
leg when Snow White's wicked
stepmother changed into a witch.
Yeah. That Disney.
"Audrey Rose" and "The
Changeling" are also films which
rely on suggestion to chilling ef-
fect ("Rose" is a later Robert Wise
film). Like "The Haunting both
are low-key and lend themselves
to an adult audience: both also
feature disturbing scenes of chil-
dren dying, so you may want to
pass on these two if you have any
little children around the house.
"Dead and Buried a film by
the creative team behind "Alien
Dan O'Bannon and Ron Shusett,
which was released about the
same time and went absolutely
nowhere. Although the premise is
hokey, this story of voodoo in a
small New England town is at-
rroi like comedy, is most
enjoyed hen shared. That's whv
there's more than one car on a
aster. And whv a party at
Halloween is the best place and
time to put a horror movie in the
VCR.
The following movies have two
(besides genre) in com-
: the are both available on
vid � tape and are relatively (and
undeservedly) obscure. In other
words, it j ou're tired of Jason and
Fredd) Tart 1001, read on.
� Haunting director
I rl iVisi 5 effort commonly
1 tliiJfffiitseVL. ds:rfee definite
luui'iua house movie, adapted
. Jackson's novel,
Haunting of Hill House
is from the "Val Lewton
r of the original 'Cat
school of terror He
pro es vn hat you don't see is scar-
ier than what you do see. His di-
recting, along with a literate
script combine to create a genre
Wise
(prod �,
fashioned his film after the
I cture of Hill House itself,
angles distorted just enough
to put the viewer off balance.
ith creative use oi black
B I white film and sound ma-
nipulation, a sense of terror is
distilled.
There's no monster or even
"Poltergeist" pyrotechnics. In
Picking the bones
,See SCARY, page 12
Soul singer Anita Baker will perform November 1 at 8 pjn. in Minges Coliseum. Tickets are $12 for
students and $14 for the general public. The concert is being presented by the Student Union.
minute of course and asks her
to a party. When she politely in
iorms him that she has work to do,
he whimpers: "Cknih honey, don't
bepissy with me They go to the
party.
This party reveals the dramatic
climax of the plot, where Dai
bored with the upper class stiffs
� amuses herself by sketching a
protraitofanchsnobona napkin
After putting it down (as her at-
tention is drawn elsewhere, she
notices a stranger, Michael Caine,
picking up the designed napkin
and enjoying it enough to put it
inside his jacket.
The party being crashed by
some perverted weirdos� whose1
only wish is to strip the guests and
tie them together � causes Daisv
to lose her escort and literally
winding up with Michael "Sean
Stein" Caine. He decides it appro-
priate to introduce himself as thev
are in a rather personal (nude)
and precarious (horizontal) situ-
ation.
See FIELD, page 12
Ringwald isn't
swayed by
'Pick-up Artist'
By JENNIFER PEARSON
Staff Vntrr
Despite the audience � consist-
ing of a mere group of four (my-
self included), the movie "The
Pick L'p Artist" was a definite hit.
Robert Downey's charismatic
good looks, not to mention his
sharp wit, offered much to the
film's appeal
Watching Jack, as he is called,
causually rehearse his "lines" o(
the day is nothing but hysterical
His most prized possession, not
surprisingly enough, is a scraglv
piece of paper full of the names
and numbers of every beautiful
girl he has somehow managed to
interest.
After coming across Randy,
(Molly Ringwald), a spunky red
head, all Jack's charm seems to
backfire. The tables are turned on
him when, for once in his life, he
feels "real love" instead of a
simple one-night-stand and yet
Randy refuses to stick around.
Not being able to fully under-
See PICK-UP, page 12
Random journal notes
I3v CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Suff Wnlcr
H( cause when I do my job
this is what I think about
Conceptual artist Laurie An-
derson said that. And at three
c 1 lock in the morning on pro-
duction night at The East Caro-
linian. I can see what she's
G tying.
So. A quick trip over random
notes in the Bonehead journal is
called for.
And here we go
I think it would be cool if you
could get a little spray bottle of
the AIDS virus. You could go
around, disguise it like a can of
mousse or something and spritz
people who really need to die,
tike Jim and Tammy Bakker or
your English teachers.
Albums should be required by
law to be exactly 45 minutes in
length. It's frustrating to try and
find songs to put at the end of
your tapes. Getting the last tune
cut ofTin the middle it sucks.
Dana Carvey mu?t lay awake
at night and think he's going to
be reincarnated as a cave beetle
for starting a trend that forces
otherwise sane human beings to
screw up their faces and
squeal.Tsn't that special
Hell for most of us will be a
complete compact disc collection
of the Osmonds' hits.
Before babies are born, they
should get to see interuterine
movies about life. Movies could
include "Back to the Future" and
footage of Baby Jessica's well
trip.
Trash cans need more variety.
Shapes like triangles and octa-
gons could be explored, even
though it would mean the end of
office basketball.
Spuds McKenzie laughs at us.
You can tell he wants to fart
during his commercials, but he
knows they'd probably cancel
his royalty checks.
My roommate's favorite trick
is to pull his eyeballs out of the
socket and freeze them in the
icetray. It was funny for a while,
but I'm real tired of scraping
cornea juice out of my drinks.
Cocaine won't really kill you.
It's just the moment when you
realize that you are scraping
your boogers out for one last
rush that gives you cardiac ar-
rest.
When will people realize that
the National Enquirer is really
printing those stories just to get
attention? Most of them aren't
true anyway. If everybody just
ignored them, the paper would
start getting in touch with its
feelings and say what it really
means.
In real life, there is a lot of
pain. Nancy Reagan gets so
upset sometimes, she can't even
watch "Falcon Crest And she's
a woman who doesn't cry easily.
Oreo ice cream is okay. I'm just
worried about what will happen
when they try to market Pixie
Stix sherbert. Those little gran-
ules don't hold together very
well when they get frozen. I tried
it already.
Parties are good places to get
to know people. It's hard to deal
with all the paperwork after-
wards though. The carbon paper
always gets wet. Maybe every-
one could rent a little portable
Xerox machine.
Air conditioner is the wrong
phrase. It brings up images of
trying to spray Chap Stick like
Lysol. It could really be called
"Cold air blower
Sex is really funny. Basically,
you try to stick a waste produc-
ing organ into another one and
move it around a lot. Humans
spend a lot of time doing this.
But I still wouldn't want to be a
fish. Their waste hangs out all
the time. That's gotta be messy.
And they don't make condoms
that small.
If the space people ever land
on Earth, they're going to be real
surprised. Because we don't
really look like they think we do.
We're a lot taller in real life. And
we use a lot more bean bag
chairs.
God messed up when he made
toes. They don't move right and
too many things grow there. A
more rounded structure, or even
box-like would be better, except
when you needed to climb
See RANDOM, page 12
From the Not so Right
Letter from slow class
ByPATMOlXOY
I've decided to try something
different this tote � something
out of the mainstream.
In the spirit of higher learning
- and because if I didn't make
class today the professor was
going to write roe off as another
)im Morrison � this particular
"From the Not so Right column
is ernanating from the soiled halls
and crumbling walls of Austin
Building.
You see, this is what I do while
my professor babbles oi how a
semi-colon can actually be used in
poetry to describe anguish and a
lack of setfconfidence.
"You must feel the despair
says he.
Ybu must led Jflte a moron
saysme.
This article, of course, call he
comparedto the hundreds of let-
ters written daily bystudentswho
simply wish to remain conctous to
a class where unconciousness is
the norm. Philosophy and Span-
ish are also h winners to that
regard.
I have predous few phrases 1
can remember fern Spanish 100!
� due to no small part to Senora
HkeChato with her
firerIthmkththigi8
r and "Yo tango jue
Sorry to say I still have three
semesters to go. Yo quiero mucho
cerveza.
On to philosophy. Now here's a
class in which you can really write
a letter � or you don't have to
writea letter atall You don't even
i�but you can if
r for logic was, and
to be, one of the strang-
est people I've encountered here
� and Fve encountered some
beauties.
He shared in Einstein's theory
that man should dress the same
way everyday, thereby eliminat-
ing unnecessary brain stress.
However, what my teacher did
not comprehend was mat Albert,
no matter how boring his attire,
was, at least, dean.
In this reeartt mv professor
Shared ill Pigpen's (of CharHe
Brown feme) theory which holds;
If your pants can stand up by
themselves, you should stand up
in them.
Pigpen was never big on
Thoreau.
And this putz of a professor
knows dtddiy about poetry. Jeexv
Even I know the stuffs gotta
if � fust common kaowl-
But trying to tell my teacher
trytogte�evivethe&&
, fifc simpiy not going to
f sfxnmMt repeated blows
toft
wmimmmmmtmmiitmim'
functions, (using the word
"senseless here would merely be
redundant) and mugging him. At
best, he'll get a new attitude; at
worst, I'll wind up with a few
dollars and some pocket lint
All will not be lost
Well if s my turn to recite ray
poem. You know, I could really
loose control here and bungle it
However, we all know that won't
happen. I simply don't have the
screw-up chromosome in my
DNA
Okay, I'm pumped up. Here!
goes:
In my dreams
You're all I sees�
Boobs butt and knees.
Be my main squeeze.
Please.
Now thats literary perfection.
I mean mat
Sin" .
fc '5 note: Obviously, Pet
Maltoy unaware that you mutt
(fwttyour sources or your newspa-
per am get sued for plagamm end
editors tend to spaz out and kkk 4e-
ftnsekss file cabinets when this hap-
pens
Theabooe"poem" isfromlhecomk
strip Moom County urntim '
ihamcter Steve DoBest� The
ington Past Co,) Yk hope tkk
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by Mklver
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NEW YORK (AP) - Just as
you've concluded yet again that
ftcncw network shows have little
0 offer, PBS offers another reason
D sit in front of the set each week
The Bretts" premiers Sunday
On Mobil Masterpiece Theatre
Figure on being hooked for the
entire eight-week run
The Bretts are a fictional British
1920s theater family, an eccentric,
�gg to, on and offstage
Their behavior is matched only by
that of
housthi l
It the
"Upstair
because
writer o
Downbtaj
creator
Barbar
Rodwvd
Brett, t
stage � i
falling in I
MAK I NG THE
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SENIOR � EXHI
BFA COMMUNICATl
OCTOBER S5NQV
MENDENHALLG
RECEPTION OCTOBER
BRYANT LI
Shelton Bryant, staff illustrator for The East cJ
his senior art show with John Little beginning
hall Student Center. Shelton will graduate, we
Under New
Pool Prices: $1.
12 Pricel
Now Comple
�Including
�MorePinball
�Coin Operated Chall
�New Pool equipi
j �Coldest
�New Expand
Mon. - Wed. 800 ajn. -120 p.m. Thurs. �
Look For Upcoming
A
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by Mklver
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PZ?S premieres new comedy
NEW YORK (AP) - Just as
you've concluded yet again that
the new network shows have little
to offer, PBS offers another reason
to sit in front of the set each week.
"The Bretts" premiers Sunday
on Mobil Masterpiece Theatre.
Figure on being hooked for the
entire eight-week run.
The Bretts are a fictional British
1920s theater family, an eccentric,
engaging lot, on and offstage.
Their behavior is matched only by
that of their equally offbeat
household staff.
If the series is reminiscent of
"Upstairs, Downstairs that's
because Rosemary Anne Sisson,
writer of numerous "Upstairs,
Downstairs" episodes, was co-
creator.
Barbara Murray and Norman
Rodway are Lydia and Charles
Brett, first couple of the London
stage, alternately bickering and
falling in love again, consummate
MAKING THE MARK
INIIOR - EXHIBITION
COMMUNICATION ARTS
OCTOBER 25-NOVEMBER I
MENOENHALL GALLERY
RECEPTION OCTOBER 31, a-B PM
SHELTOIM JOHN
BRYANT LITTLE
Shelton Bryant, staff illustrator for The East Carolinian, will exhibit
his senior art show with John Little beginning Sunday in Menden-
hall Student Center. Shelton will graduate, we think, this December.
actors even at home.
Three of their children are in the
business: Edwin, played David
Yelland, an unemployed actor;
his twin sister, Martha, a party girl
hiding grief over the war death of
her husband, and Thomas, a
struggling avant-garde play-
wright.
Frank Middlemass and Helen
McCarthy play Charles' parents,
octagenarian thespians still tread-
ing the boards along the back
roads.
Tim Wylton plays butler Alfred
Sutton, himself a failed actor. Billy
Boyle is good-time Hegarty, the
Irish chauffer. Janet Maw is secre-
tary Jean Laccy, an island of san-
ity.
In the first episode, the family is
appalled to be under siege from
bill collectors and concludes
Charles requires a secretary.
He hires a "war widow a co-
quette who hasdifficulty working
in work around her busy social
schedule, dashing of f in her sports
car. Lydia flounces out of the
house, demanding a divorce un-
less Charles gets rid of the
woman.
"He'd rather die than admit
he's wrong, and she'd rather die
than spoil a good exit notes
Alfred.
Meanwhile, Charles is forced to
put up his own money to produce
the only play offered him re-
cently, a lame, old-style melo-
drama called "The King Shall Not
Die The play gets mostly poor
notices, but an emissary from
King George comes around,
sparking speculation that Charles
is to be knighted.
The children use the social
implications of a knighthood, and
the ramifications of divorce, to
lure Lydia home. She delivers
Charles an ultimatum: "The war
widow goes - lock, stock and
beastly little two-seater
In Episode 2, Edwin takes over
the lead in "The King Shall Not
Die Charles buys the theater,
and Thomas gets a play pro-
duced, with Martha in the lead.
tyu 'Deadlines for
Classifieds and
Announcements
For Tuesdays paper: Friday at
4:00 p.m.
For Thursdays paper: Monday
at 4:00 p.m.
ro Zxceptions TUast
GORDON'S
For Your Next &
Pair of Skis
iW typ � l�� to MtPaaM M 7S-10Q3
"Let Us Dress You Up
This Halloween"
Vintage Clothing,
Jewelry, & Collections
116 E. 5th Street
919-752-1750
THE
SHOE OUTLET
corner of 9 th and Washington St.
� Dress and Casual Shoes
Athletic Shoes in All Sizes
�Bass, Sperry, Topsider (Leather
and Canvas), Timberland, and
many others (Factory Returns)
� Discount shoes sold Below
wholesale
� Ladies shoes by Bass, 9-West,
Gloria Vanderbelt, and many
others (All First Quality)
Walking Distance From Campus (3 blocks)
4?
tfYS POOL Ho
o
517 Cotanche St.
'
Under New Management
Pool Prices: $1.50 per hour per person
12 Price for Ladies
Now Completely Remodeled
�Including Ladies Bathroom
�More Pinball & Video Games
�Coin Operated Challenge Tables - .50games
�New Pool equipment and accessories
� Coldest Beer in Town
�New Expanded Business Hours
Mon. - Wed. 8:00 aan. -1200 pjn. Thurs. - Sat 8:00 ajn. -1:00 a.m. Sun. 1:00 p.m. - lfcOO p.m.
Look For Upcoming Tournaments and Specials
nn���i mtmtonmmmGmw�
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
CKTOBER22 1987 11
The Blushing Brides, a Rolling Stones tribute band, will play at the Attic Friday night.
Circus acts
Mcndcilhall Pru Relouc
Magic tricks and illusions,
pyrotechnics and performing ani-
mals will appear at East Carolina
University Sunday when the
Royal Hanneford Circus presents
two shows in Minges Coliseum at
3 and 7 p.m.
The Sarasota, Flabased travel-
ing troupe emphasizes theatrical
glamour and Broadway produc-
tion style in its shows. Some of the
highlights will include an original
set of illusions presented by Ring-
master Senor Rai, an aerial ballet,
bareback rider Mark Karoly, the
Norwegian Welde family with
their performing bears, and per-
formances by the Hanneford
elephants and a set of miniature
horses.
The circus show ends with a
pyrotechnic finale paying tribute
to the Shrine organization, the
circus sponsor, and Shrine hospi-
tals for handicapped children.
The ECU circus shows are spon-
sored by the ECU Student Union.
California Tanning Salon
"you can see the difference"
60S Suite A, Arlington Blvd.
First Visit free with valid ECU I.D.
Special ECU Rates
Extra visits free with purchase
"Don't Be A Ghost"
Call Today For
The Best Tan In Town
Come in Oct. 26-30 and ask about our Halloween Special!
I �"� in
Friday, October 23T
8:00 PM
At
����������
ff�15Bil
Zj gathering place
ECU STUDENT UNION
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU
t
i
GUITAR � VOICE!
FREE Mor-tails
& refreshments
Upcoming Events
Friday, Nov. 6 John Dillinger
Friday, Nov. 13 Silvery
Friday, Nov. 20 Paul Tardiff
(Aud. 244)
i mimmm mnmimm&tm0tm0tt'tm0l0t&vt0taf00�
immmtl0tm0i0m&m �� '� ������
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I
12
THE EAST CARCU1NIAM
OCTOBER 22, 1987
Field, Caine have good chemistry on film
Continued from page 9
Antics of this sort provide this
film with much entertainment �
not to mention the actors them-
selves are excellent in their roles.
The action moves along quickly
and the audience never knows
exactly what to expect.
Michael Caine's character is
absolutely outstanding. The ex-
tremelv wealthy novelist lives in a
gorgeous home in the center of
Beverly Hills and, yes, it is lovelv
that he, himself, has so much
money. But as his best friend and
attourney of law points out "so
does every woman he's slept
with
Desperate in his attempts to
find a truly honest woman � who
won't take him to the cleaners as
he is so accustomed � Sean lies
about his real financial statis to the
new woman in his life, Daisy
Morgan.
He shows her the time of her life
without spending a single dime.
They dance on her patio as the sun
'Pick-up Artist' is the ticket
Continued from page 9
j stand his situation, Jack finds
j himslf involved in a riveting fi-
j asco that eventually leads him to
r Atlantic city to help out his des-
perate latest love and her "boy-
friend
Jack knows Randy is different
I from any of countless array of
women, and his decision to
j commit himself to win her affec-
; tions is touching. He makes sev-
eral ploys to prove his ardent love
tor her, even going as far as selling
his classic convertable Camaro,
the very scene of their first and
only romantic encounter.
With the money from the car in
hand, lack shows up at the infa-
mous Atlantic city to gamble and
win enough money to pay-
Randy's boyfriend's debts and
hopefully make Randv happy.
All of lack's antics are perhaps
too successful and yet Randy
remains indifferent and says that
the two of them are no- good to-
gether They take too many risks
and tlv is ,i st not good enough.
But what is?
Jack gives up nearly everything
and does indeed learn a lesson �
one that money cannot buv. For
when he finally turns away and
leaves Randy to herself, now she
finally realizes just how much a
� good friend, is worth.
Randy sees that Jack for what he
really is, beneath the lines and
swift moves, he is a true friend to
her � laying it all on the line time
and time again.
The chemistry between these
two young actors is undenyinglv
present. Their "back and forth"
quick comebacks provide much
oi the humor in the movie.
Moreover, in spite of the rather
slow beginning, the plot gradu-
ally thickens and when it does, the
story boils. The action becomes
intense, as the true love and con-
cern Jack holds for Randy be-
comes increasingly more evident.
In the beginning of the film, it is
evident Jack is not just obsessed
with Randy for her firery disposi-
tion with the red hair to match.
Furthermore, she is most likely
the only girl who treats him the
very way he treats his multitude
oi women �the "one night is
enough" attitude.
After their backseat encounter,
lack naturally assumes Randy to
be his own now. Unfortunate for
him, Randy politely thanks him
and nukes the move � the wrong
move � to leave. She has no inten-
tion oi "seeing" him again and he
is heartbroken.
It is his consistent determined
attitude that causes him to do
anything short of giving his life to
prove to Randy that she is not just
one of his girls.
Fler overall stand-offish dispo-
sition is amusing � she actually
refrains from giving Jack her last
name or number after their night
together.
However, through the course of
the movie, Randy certainly comes
to understand what she means to
Jack and what he means to her.
So, if you need to work on your
moves and maybe learn the more
successful ways to the ladies'
heart, "The Pick Up Artist" is a
sure ticket.
Bonehead journal entries
Continued from page 9
t,hngs. Screw on attachments
would solve that problem.
What does time look like? I
think it's sort of shaped like a
toungue, diced into about Fifteen
equal pieces and stuck to the
bottom of a square plastic ash-
tray, in concentric circles.
Many people are frightened
by snakes. Some people eat
snake meat. Nastassia Kinski
takes pictures with snakes.
What's next, a damn snake civil
rights movement? Snake con-
gressmen? Or will they just stay
second class citizens?
Gravity is not something to
mess around with. Just yester-
day, my cousin got some bad
gravity and had to go to the
hospital for observation. He said
he didn't do it on purpose or
anything, but all his friends
were doing it. You should know
its effects before you try
hardcore stuff like that.
I Ws scene from the North Carolina State Fair in Raleigh is typical of
what fairgoers have been experiencing all week.
goes down and spend time amus-
ing themselves with the simpler
things life has to offer.
Although Daisy is in love by
this time, she is also in immense
debt. After visiting her tennis-
Rum father, she soon goes back to
money-bags Marty. Of course
Sean is distraught and ironically,
it was the same night he had
planned to reveal his true wealth.
Sean had thought he had finally
met a woman who wanted him
for himself � not his bank ac-
count. One who was also "totally
unselfish
As the movie comically pro-
gresses, Daisy picks up a newspa-
per before leaving with Marty to
some outlandish foreign country,
and sees Sean on the front page in
all his glorious wealth.
The movie's final moments
contain even more comical events
but leave the audience with an
overall good feeling about love,
relationships and money. After unromantu to sign a prcnui
all, money is not everything �- or agreemcnt?Or, perhaps, is it i i
is it? And, incidentally, is it really necessary to do so?
Scary movies for your VCR
Continued from page 9
mospheric and, by turn, sus-
penseful and funny. Try and spot
Robert England, famous now as
Freddy Krueger, in a bit part as
one of the local zombies.
"Black Sabbath Mario Bava's
obscure, American Internal.
Italian import from the 60s is that
hidden jewel on the racks
Drop of Water" segment isoi I
the most truly frightening btl
cinema you're likely to see
where. Don't watch it alone V i :
WE BUILT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
m
SAV A CENTER
The freshest way to Save.
The wisest investment you'll ever make
for your family begins with only. . .
STOP
PLAIN OR SELF-RISING
Red
Band Flour
jumbo
rolls
limit One Wit An AdO' $10 O' Mc"e Pvn
ASSORTED GREEN BEANS � PEAS � CORN
Stokely 3
Vegetables "2T I
limit Two With An AdO I $10 O' Mo'e P
Crisco
ASSORTED
Viva
Towels
L'S!l0 i "168 Ground
Shortening 3 I � Chuck
Tomato
Soup
HOMOGENIZED- JGht �BUTTERVL
Flav-O-Rich
Milk
Duke's
Mayonnaise
78
99�
ASSORTED
Scot
Tissue
4 1
STEMS 4 PIECES A&P TROPiCANA
Mushrooms 2 V 98c Apple Juice
� REAM
1.39 Klondike Bars
Tea Bags
LONG GRAIN
A&P Rice
DRV CAT FOOD
Friskies
SELECTED VOGCR1
- 1.49 Light N Lively b 1.69 Orange Juice
BUTTER ME NOT
1.19 A&P Biscuits 2 99c Entrees
SELECTED BANOUET FAMHA
MEDIUM CHUNK
NUTRI-GRAIN
STOP FLAV-O-RICH
5r ice
Cream
2.46 Kraft Cheddar S 1.49 Eggo Waffles
STOPCALIFORNIA GROWN
Boneless
Smoked Ham
i Cubed
Steaks
2.39 Fryer Breast
� 1.09 Steak Patties
" 1.79 Round Steaks
t 1.19 A&P Turkeys
1.99
1.69
1.99
79-
5r Granny
Smith Apples
V2 gal
ctn.
STOPl FRESH-SWEET
1 Bay
Scallops
PAMItV PACK RED
COCa-Cola RiPe Tomatoes
? 99c Firm Carrots
AVEHiCA
2 18TO20IBAVG LARGE
Liter Large Pumpkins ea1.99 California Celery 69c
Bottle
99
JUICY WHITE
Seedless Grapes
LOCALIV GROWN
Green Onions
NEW ZEALAND
99c Kiwi Fruit
3 99c
SELECT MEDIUM �
3o99c Yellow Onions J 99c
Money
Orders
250
SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
STOP 12TY
5? Paper
Towels
"919
I
I
I
inw One Pfet Stopper Witn An Ado i $'0 O' M � � � ' Coupon E�pwes Oct M
SEE STORE FOR DETAILS
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open 24 Hours-Open Mon 7 a.m Closed Set. 11 p.m Open Sun. 7 am -11 p
PRICES EFFECTIVE OCT II. THRU OCT 24 19�7 QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
WAT
b tl
I
war:
casl
Phi
airinc
College ra
(CPS)�Many local music fans say
thought of VVUSB, the State Lm stati.�n n I
versity of New York at Stony I
Brook's FM station, as Long
Island's hippest radio outlet The
station, after all, often played
new, radical music no on
did.
But not anv mure
Like hundreds ot college ra
stations this (all, VVUSB ha .gotten
a lot blander on purpose At some
campuses, the changes have torn
apart staffs, and led to rhetorical
wars with station managers and
college officials
Like hundreds of other stat,
VVLSB will stay safe at least
the end of October, when
Federal Communicat.
Commission (FCC) is due t
spond to a broadcasters pc :
to change its rules about what
kinds oi racy material the)
allow (n the air.
The station's retreat t
music and programming bf
casters say. began
when the FCC revise I
cencv" guideline
The FCC s April r .
stations from using "lanj
material that depi tsor d
in terms of patently c
measured bv contemporary star,
dards for the broadcast medium
sexual or excret ry
organs
The result, the campus
casters say, was new confus
about what material was -
use. If they guessed �. r � .
FCC could cancel their lie ns -
"The guidelines that us A I
give the appearance ot being
Crete are now fuzzy said Inter-
collegiate Broadcasting Sysl
President Jeff Telhs.
The FCC will respond to
petitions to reconsider the ind
cency policy Oct. 29, said FCC
attorney Ben Halprin, but, until
then, broadcasters say they'll
keep censoring themselves.
While advertisers and ra:
battles tend to keep off-campus
stations close to the mainstream
�nyway, the FCC's Apnl rule
change drastically altered pro- Cal
gramming at campus stations,
which feature experimental
shows and often celebrate the
outrageous.
"Collegeradio isat the forefront
of doing things different said
VVUSB station manager Norm
Prusslin. "Every time you have to
ask yourself 'can I do this that's a
chilling effect. Stations are smart
to be cautious, but it stifles crea-
tivity
So at the University oi Wash-
ington, KCMU jocks no longer sav
"the Butthole Surfers" when re-
ferring to the thrash band, in or-
der to plav it safe. "Now our DJs
Proud cigarette
packaging
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (AP)
- Jim Betts says he was growing
tired of defending his two-pack-
a-dav cigarette habit to critics, so
he designed his own brand oi
smokes to respond for him.
Rising out of red flames on each
pack is the CO TO HELL! brand
name. The packages carry the
federally mandated health warn-
ings, plus the message: "I like em
and I'm going to smoke 'em and
the slogan, "Cheaper than psy-
chiatry. Better than a nervous
breakdown
"Being that I'm a two-pack-a-
day smoker and getting tired of
getting pushed around, I thought
this would be a good expression
of a personal-choice product
Betts told the Winston-Salem
Journal in an interview last week.
The brand, selling for $1.75 a
pack, was created for Betts at the
cost of about SI,000. Betts. owner
of the New Product Development
Newsletter in Point Pleasant. N.I
said he'd wanted to use the name
of the cigarette for the parent
company but had to settle for
GTH Inc. when the telephone
company refused to let him have a
listinr under GO TO HELL
"The cigarettes are made for us
by the G.A. Georgopulo Co
about the onlv people in the world
who make privately labeled ciga-
rettes Betts said. "They actually
make them in the most unlikely
place - New York City "
Betts sent -promotions on the
cigarettes to about 4,000 retail
cigarette stores and attended the
Retail Tobacco Dealers Associa-
tion Show in Atlanta in August to
push the idea. He said he expects
to sell more than 10,000 cartons by
I the end of the year. Already, 200
I stores across the country are
selling them.
If yoj
have!
nar
price
on cfl
GUARAf
i y piar?'
i
A

-T"
a . . . mmm , , . n, , , , njjBjmaa,
�mmmmtm
A
.i





12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
tKTOBER 22, 1987
Field, Caine have good chemistry on fdm
Continued from page 9
Antics of this sort provide this
film with much entertainment �
not to mention the actors them-
selves are excellent in their roles.
The action moves along quickly
and the audience never knows
exactly what to expect.
Michael Caine's character is
absolutely outstanding. The ex-
tremely wealthy novelist lives in a
gorgeous home in the center of
Beverly Hills and, yes, it is lovely
that he, himself, has so much
money. But as his best friend and
attourney of law points out "so
does every woman he's slept
with
Desperate in his attempts to
find a truly honest woman � who
won't take him to the cleaners as
he is so accustomed � Sean lies
about hisreal financial statis to the
new woman in his life, Daisy
Morgan.
He shows her the time of her life
without spending a single dime.
They dance on her patio as the sun
'Pick-up Artist' is the ticket
Continued from page 9
stand his situation, Jack finds
himsll involved in a riveting fi-
asco that eventually leads him to
Atlantic city to help out his des-
perate latest love and her "boy-
friend
Jack knows Randy is different
from any oi countless array of
women, and his decision to
commit himself to win her affec-
tions is touching. He makes sev-
eral ploys to prove his ardent love
(or her, even going as far asselling
his classic convertablc Camaro,
the very scene of their first and
only romantic encounter.
With tine money from the car in
hand, lack shows up at the infa-
mous Atlantic city to gamble and
win enough money to pay
Randy's boyfriend's debts and
hopefully make Randv nappy.
All of Jack's antics are perhaps
too successful and yet Randy
remains indifferent and says that
the two oi them are no good to-
gether They take too many risks
and this is i st not good enough.
But what is?
Jack gives up nearly everything
and does indeed learn a lesson �
one that money cannot buy. For
when he finally turns away and
leaves Randy to herself, now she
.finally realizes just how much a
� good friend, is worth.
Randy sees that Jack for what he
really is, beneath the lines and
swift moves, he is a true friend to
her � laying it all on the line time
and time again.
The chemistry octween these
two young actors is undcnyinglv
present. Their "back and forth"
quick comebacks provide much
of the humor in the movie.
Moreover, in spite of the rather
slow beginning, the plot gradu-
ally thickens and when it does, the
story boils. The action becomes
intense, as the true love and con-
cern Jack holds for Randy be-
comes increasingly more evident.
In the beginning of the film, it is
evident Jack is not just obsessed
with Randy for her fircry disposi-
tion with the red hair to match.
Furthermore, she is most likely
the only girl who treats him the
very way he treats his multitude
oi women �the "one night is
enough" attitude.
After their backseat encounter,
Jack naturally assumes Randy to
be his own now. Unfortunate for
him. Randy politely thanks him
and makes the move � the wrong
move � to leave. She has no inten-
tion of "seeing" him again and he
is heartbroken.
It is his consistent determined
attitude that causes him to do
anything short of giving his life to
prove to Randy that she is not just
one of his girls.
Her overall stand-offish dispo-
sition is amusing � she actually
refrains from giving Jack her last
name or number after their night
together.
However, through the course of
the movie. Randy certainly comes
to understand what she means to
Jack and what he means to her.
So, if you need to work on your
moves and maybe learn the more
successful ways to the ladies'
heart, "The Tick Up Artist" is a
sure ticket.
Bonehead journal entries
Continued from page 9
things. Screw on attachments
would solve that problem.
What does time look like? I
think it's sort of shaped like a
toungue, diced into about Fifteen
equal pieces and stuck to the
bottom of a square plastic ash-
tray, in concentric circles.
Many people are frightened
by snakes. Some people eat
snake meat. Nastassia Kinski
takes pictures with snakes.
What's next, a damn snake civil
rights movement Snake con-
gressmen? Or will they just stay
second class citizens?
Gravity is not something to
mess around with. Just yester-
day, my cousin got some bad
gravity and had to go to the
hospital for observation. He said
he didn't do it on purpose or
anything, but all his friends
were doing it. You should know
its effects before you try
hardcore stuff like that.
i his scene from the North Carolina State Fair in Raleigh is typical of
what fairgoers have been experiencing all week.
goes down and spend time amus-
ing themselves with the simpler
things life has to offer.
Although Daisy is in love by
this time, she is also in immense
debt. After visiting her tennis-
oum father, she soon goes back to
money-bags Marty. Of course
Sean is distraught and ironically,
it was the same night he had
planned to reveal his true wealth.
Sean had thought he had finally
met a woman who wanted him
for himself � not his bank ac-
count. One who was also "totally
unselfish
As the movie comically pro-
gresses, Daisy picks up a newspa-
per before leaving with Marty to
some outlandish foreign country,
and sees Sean on the front page in
all his glorious wealth.
The movie's final moments
contain even more comical events
but leave the audience with an
overall good feeling about love,
relationships and money. After unromantic to sign a prenui
all, money is not everything � or agreement7Or, perhaps, is it i
is it? And, incidentally, is it really necessary to do so7
Scary movies for your VCR
Continued from page 9
mospheric and, by turn, sus-
penseful and funny. Try and spot
Robert England, famous now as
Freddy Krueger, in a bit part as
one of the local zombies.
"Black Sabbath Mario Bava's
obscure, American lnkrn.it:
Italian import from the 60s is that
hidden jewel on the racks. "Tin-
Drop of Water" segment isom I
the most truly frightening bit
cinema you're likely to see ai
where. Don't watch it a!
WE BUILT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
AP
SAV A CENTER
The freshest way to Save.
The wisest investment you'll ever make
for your family begins with only. . .
FUNK&WAGNALLS
NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA
Latest Edition
Volume 1
only. . .
fRtf
DICTIONARY
Volumes 2 29
only $4.99 ea.
DM GRAIN FED BEEF
OP BONELESS
irloin
teaks
mm rlFfc
ASSORTED GREEN BEANS � PEAS � CORN
100
Stokely 3 Ep Crisco 46a EEI Ground
�ST 1 v Shortening 3 I00 Chuck
Vegetables
Tomato ftc dTi Duke'
Soup
HOMOGENI7F: � GHT-B ITERM -
Flav-O-Rich
Milk
s
Mayonnaise
78
ASSORTED
Scot
99 Tissue 4 179
STEMS & PIECES A&P
TROP'CANA
Mushrooms 2 V 98c Apple Juice
R AV
� 1.39 Klondike Bars
Boneless
Smoked Ham
Cubed
Steaks
2.39 Fryer Breast
ObR OWN
Tea Bags
LONG GRAIN
A&P Rice
DRV CAT FOOD
Friskies
SELECTED YOGURT
r � �. � � �- �
1.49 Light N'Lively Y.1.69 Orange Juice 1.09 Steak Patties
BUTTER ME NOT
1.19 A&P Biscuits 2
MEDIUM CHUNK
SElECTED BANQUET PAMk � -�
99c Entrees 1.79 Round Steaks
O C MtUIUM CHUNK NUTRI GRAIN A �� n
V 2.46 Kraft Cheddar 1.49 Eggo Waffles 1.19 A&P Turkeys
1.99
1.69
199
79-
STOP FLAV ORICH
.w ice
Cream
SfflOPjCALIFORNIA GROWN
Granny
Smith Apples
STOP I CALIFORNIA LARGE
� Head
Lettuce
STOP I FRESH-SWEET
- Bay
Scallops
v? gal
ctn.
EAMUV PACK RED
COCa-Cola Ripe Tomatoes ?��99c Firm Carrots . 39c
f Y . 18TO20LBAVG LARGE
Z Liter Large Pumpkins �1.99 California Celery 69c
Bottle
990
JUICY WHITE
Seedless Grapes
LOCALLY GROWN
Green Onions
NEW ZEALAND
99c Kiwi Fruit
SELECT MEDIUM
3 99c Yellow Onions
h 99c
Money
Orders
25
( SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON918
I STOP ' A&P FROZEN jW
iSTaJin 111 rIfci1� JJ
Juice � trniiiOnie Pet Sfipppef VtfctfjAi AOfl �' �.�. 1 COo)or E�7
SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
STOP 2TTY
J Paper
Towels
1 umoo 1 rolli
1 Or, Pei V oppe- With An Aaa � S'O 0i Mp'e Pu� CoopO" E�pv,
'919
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
SEE STORE FOR DETAILS
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open 24 Hours-Open Mon. 7 a.m Closed Set. 11 p.m Open Son. 7 a.m-11 p.m.
PRICES EFFECTIVE OCT It. THRU OCT 24 1917 QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
College ra
(CPS)�Many local music fans
thought of VVL'SB, the State Uni-
versity of New York at Stony
Brook's FM station, as Long
Island's hippest radio outlet The
station, after all, often played
new, radical music no one else
did
But not any more.
Like hundreds of college radio
stations this fall, WUSB has gotten
a lot blander on purpose At some
campuses, the changes have torn
apart staffs, and led to rhetorical
wars with station managers and
college officials.
Like hundredsof other stati
WUSB will stay safe at least until
the end of October, when
Federal Communicat; i
Commission (FO I is due I -
spond to a broadcasters' petil
to change its rules about what
kinds of racy material they can
allow on the air
The station's retreat t
music and progr
casters sa began last
when the FC revised il
cency" guidelines
The FCC's April r
stations from using "lang .
material that depk ts or d
in terms of patent!)
measured by contemporary stan-
dards for the broadcast medium
sexual or excrete ry ad s oi
organs
The result, the campus br
casters sav, was new confu
about what material was t
use. If they guessed wt
FCC could cancel their licenses
"The guidelines that used to
give the appearance of being con-
crete are now fuzz sa d inter-
collegiate Broadcasting System
President Jeff Telhs.
The FCC will respond to
petitions to reconsider the inde-
cency policy Oct 29, said FCC
attorney Ben Halprin, but. until
then, broadcasters sav they'll
keep censoring themselves.
While advertisers and ratings
battles tend to keep off-can
stations close to the mainstream
anyway, the FCC's April rule
change drastically altered pro-
gramming at campus stations
which feature experimental
shows and often celebrate Vhe
ou trageous.
"College radio isat the forefront
of doing things different said
WUSB station manager Norm
Prusslin. "Even time you have to
ask yourself 'can I do this that's a
chilling effect. Stations are smart
to be cautious, but it stifles crea-
tivity
So at the University oi Wash-
ington, KCMU jocks no longer say
"the Butthole Surfers" when re-
ferring to the thrash band, in or-
der to plav it safe. "Now our DJs
Proud cigarette
packaging
WIN'STON-SALEM, N.C. (AD
- Jim Betts says he was growing
tired of defending his two-pack-
a-day cigarette habit to critics so
he designed his own brand oi
smokes to respond for him.
Rising out of red flames on each
pack is the GO TO HELL! brand
name. The packages carry the
federally mandated health warn-
ings, plus the message: "1 like em
and I'm going to smoke 'cm and
the slogan, "Cheaper than psy-
chiatry. Better than a nervous
breakdown
"Being that I'm a two-pack-a-
day smoker and getting tired of
getting pushed around. 1 thought
this would be a good expression
of a personal-choice product"
Betts told the Winston-Salem
Journal in an interview last week.
The brand, selling for 51.75 a
pack, was created for Betts at the
cost of about SI .000. Betts. owner
of the New Product Development
Newsletter in Toint Pleasant, N 1
said he'd wanted to use the name
of the cigarette for the parent
company but had to settle tor
GTH Inc. when the telephone
companv refused to let him have a
listing under CO TO HELL
"The cigarettes are made for us
by the GA. Georgopulo Co
about the only people in the world
who make privately labeled ciga-
rettes Betts said. "They actually
make them in the most unlikely
place - New York City
Betts sent -promotions on the
cigarettes to about 4,000 retail
� cigarette stores and attended the
I Retail Tobacco Dealers Associa-
t uon Show in Atlanta in August to
push the idea. He said he expects
I to sell more than 10,000 cartons by
the end of the year. Already, 200
I stores across the country are
I selling them.
sa th.
station manal
John Murp

airs Lei
because
- . � tal tim�.
ing
material
sensibilil
by the
-
turl
tur-

wan.
Phila
-
ainr

II yd
have
name
pnee
on en
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r





on film
and monc After
mantic t- sign a prenuptial
ierocmont?OT perhaps is it most
movies for your rCR
lnternatuui.il
the 60s i that
tf racks. 1 u
ment is one oi
itening hit of
v to see any-
ne, kids.
st investment you'll ever make
family begins with only. . .
k wus
II )PEDIA
on
Volume 1
only. . .
Volumes 2 29
onl $4.90 ea.
68�" Ground Chuck
lCLlJ Boneless Smoked Ham
79d-J Cubed Steaks
2.39
'09 Si
I -� I St �-
.49
89
1
1.19
99
1.99
1.69
199
79-
ORNIA LARGE
FRESH SWEET
Bay
Scallops
� mmmj
3
39: til
69
99
99
Money
Orders
25
it, 4 Ct'l'fl'
'915
OUNTY
Paper
Towels
oppe- With An Add I SiO O Moe PurcK Coupon Eipres Oa 24 1987
freenvifle Blvd.
sn Sun ' am-11 p m
hlGHTS RESERVED
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 22 1W7 13
College radio stations fighting censorship law
(CPS)�Many local music fans
thought of YVUSB, the State Uni-
versity of New York at Stonv
Brook's FM station, as Long
Island's hippest radio outlet. The
station, after all, often played
new, radical music no one else
did.
But not any more.
Like hundreds of college radio
stations this fall, VVUSB hasgotten
a lot blander on purpose. At some
campuses, the changes have torn
apart staffs, and led to rhetorical
wars with station managers and
college officials.
Like hundreds of other stations,
WUSB will stay safe at least until
the end of October, when the
Federal Communications
Commission (FCC) is due to re-
spond to a broadcasters' petition
to change its rules about what
kinds of racv material they can
allow on the air.
The station's retreat to "safe"
music and programming, broad-
casters say, began last April,
when the FCC revised its "inde-
cency" guidelines.
The FCC's April revision bars
stations from using "language or
material that depicts or describes,
in terms of patently offensive as
measured by contemporary stan-
dards for the broadcast medium,
sexual or excretory activities or
organs
The result, the campus broad-
casters say, was new confusion
about what material was okay to
use. If they guessed wrong, the
FCC could cancel their licenses.
"The guidelines that used to
give the appearance of being con-
crete are now fuzzy said Inter-
collegiate Broadcasting System
President Jeff Tellis.
The FCC will respond to the
petitions to reconsider the inde-
cency policy Oct. 29, said FCC
attorney Ben Halprin, but, until
then, broadcasters sav they'll
keep censoring themselves.
While advertisers and ratings
battles tend to keep off-campus
stations close to the mainstream
anyway, the FCC's Apnl rule
. change drastically altered pro-
gramming at campus stations,
which feature experimental
shows and often celebrate the
outrageous.
"College radio isat the forefront
of doing things different said
WUSB station manager Norm
Prusslin. "Even1 time you have to
ask yourself 'can 1 do this that's a
chilling effect. Stations are smart
to be cautious, but it stifles crea-
tivity
So at the Universitv of Wash-
ington, KCM U jocks no longer say
"the Butthole Surfers" when re-
ferring to the thrash band, in or-
der to plav it safe. "Now our DJs
Proud cigarette
packaging
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (AP)
- Jim Betts says he was-growing
tired of defending his two-pack-
a-day cigarette habit to critics, so
he designed his own brand of
smokes to respond for him.
Rising out of red flames on each
pack is the GO TO HELL! brand
name. The packages carry the
federally mandated health warn-
ings, plus the message: "I like 'em
and I'm going to smoke 'em and
the slogan, "Cheaper than psy-
chiatry. Better than a nervous
breakdown
"Being that I'm a two-pack-a-
day smoker and getting tired of
getting pushed around, I thought
this would be a good expression
of a personal-choice product
Betts told the Winston-Salcm
Journal in an interview last week.
The brand, selling for $1.75 a
pack, was created for Betts at the
cost of about $1,000. Belts, owner
of the New Product Development
Newsletter in Point Pleasant, N.J
said he'd wanted to use the name
of the cigarette for the parent
company but had to settle for
GTH Inc. when the telephone
company refused to let him have a
listinp under CO TO HELL
"The cigarettes arc made for us
by the G.A. Georgopulo Co
about the only people in the world
who make privately labeled ciga-
rettes Betts said. "They actually
make them in the most unlikely
place - New York City
Betts sent -promotions on the
cigarettes to about 4,000 retail
cigarette stores and attended the
Retail Tobacco Dealers Associa-
tion Show in Atlanta in August to
push the idea. He said he expects
to sell more than 10,000 cartons by
the end of the year. Already, 200
stores across the country are
selling them.
say the FCC Surfers cracked
station manager Chris Knab.
John Murphy of the University
of Connecticut's WHUS no longer
airs Lenny Bruce monologues
because the comedian�arrested
several times 25 years ago for us-
ing what was called indecent
material�might offend 1987 FCC
sensibilities. "The guy's in the
grave and he's still getting hit
with this stuff
And University of Vermont
program director Dave Smith
warns volunteers not to air music
by the Dead Kennedys and other
punk bands if they're not sure the
music doesn't contain sexual ref-
erences.
"We don't plav as much
hardcore and rap and that dis-
turbs me a lot Smith said. "If
someone is offended, they can
turn off the radio. It's another at-
tempt by the government to cen-
sor music. But we don't want to
end up in a legal battle
The FCC's new rule also has
chased some gay, sev education,
poetrv and drama broadcasts off
the air, reported Pat Watkins of
the National Federation of Com-
munity Broadcasters, which
counts about 100 college stations
as members. "There's no question
about it, this has had a chilling
effect
College stations, typically run
on shoestring budgets, generally
have knuckled under to it, Wat-
kins added, because "they don't
have the resources to mount a
fight
"It's important tor stations and
their staffs to understand the rules
and the implications said Prus-
slin. "Do you really want to risk
vour license to broadcast a few
dirty words?"
The FCC demonstrated it will
play hardball when it issued
warnings to 3 stations for broad-
casting indecent material in 1986:
Philadelphia's WYSP for shock
jock Howard Stern's morning
program, Los Angeles' KPFK for
airing the homosexual play
"Jerker and the University of
California-Santa Barbara's KCSB
for playing the Pork Dukes'
"Makin' Bacon which contains
references to oral and anal sex.
The moves, said Watkins, are
politically motivated: "Clearly,
the Reagan administration is
linked with the Moral Majority
and the religious right, which
wants to impose its own morality
on the rest of us and clean up the
airwaves. And Pacifica she said,
referring to the non-profit foun-
dation that owns KPFK, "has
alwavs bothered Republicans
"The FCC and the right
agreed Pacifica Executive Direc-
tor David Salnicker, "are out to
get us
Pacifica, a leftist radio network,
lost a 1973 battle with the FCC,
which stopped one of its stations,
WBA1 in New York, from airing
comedian George Carlin's "7
dirty words" monologue, in
which he lampoons the FCC for
banning certain words.
Last year, the FCC referred
Pacifica to the Justice Department
for prosecution for broadcasting
"Jerker but the Justice Depart-
ment declined to take action.
Pacifica, too, is playing it safe.
KCSB station manager Malcolm
Gault-Williams says the network
is playing it too safe. Although the
station was condemned for
"Makin' Bacon the FCC's ruling
"hasn't hindered our ability to air
alternative programming
'The implications are tremen-
dous, since Pacifica is emulated
and respected as a leader in this
field. They've gone overboard
KCSB DJs, however, are re-
quired to pre-screen material. The
station also has limited the hours
potentially objectionable material
can be aired.
"Makin' Bacon' is one of our
most-requested songs. We just
don't play it until the early morn-
ing Gault-Williams said.
"We've been very aggressive
legally fighting this countered
Salnicker. "It's cost us$100,000 to
battle this ruling. I'm disap-
pointed KCSB hasn't filed its own
appeal
But college radio stations can't
be as aggressive as Pacifica, Prus-
slin said. Not only do they have to
fight the FCC, but they must also
win over their own schools' ad-
ministrations and trustees. C al-
lege radio licenses are usually
held by trustees.
"That's a lot of red tape
Indeed, last week the Univer-
sity of New Mexico's student
Senate refused to give $500 to a
group of students wanting to re-
sist a programming change at
KUNM, which will no longer air
cultural, Hispanic, Native Ameri-
can or protest music.
But Mankato State University's
KMSU already limits itself to clas-
sical and jazz music because the
station is "a reflection of the uni- in the Minnesota Bible B
versity station manager Bill have to be sensitive of our listen6
McGinlcy noted. "We're located ers
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14 THE AST CAROLINIAN! OCTOBER 22, 1987
Air Force one cook brings fare to restaurant
HARDYVICk- m;� ,Ar,v a � ai;��.�� n r k�i jj
mi t ,si k(it iNi
HARDVV1CK, Minn. (AP)
Clarke Lat ten, who served as cook
aboard Air Force One for five of
the last eight U.S. presidents, now
s giving restaurant patrons a
chance to sample his culinary
presidential fare.
Latten, who cooked for 17 years
aboard the Air Force One jet
group, oversees cooking at the
Green Lantern Restaurant.
The retired Navy cook worked
during the terms of Harrv Tru-
man, Dwight Eisenhower, lohn
Kennedy. Lyndon ohnson and
Richard Nixon, serving aboard
the seven jets that make up the Air
Force One group
The aircraft are stationed at
seven different airports around
the country, Latten said, and
w'hen the president decides to
travel, all seven identical planes
fly to Washington, D.C but only
one lands to pick up the president.
"They do thai tor safety rea-
sons Latten said. "No one
knows which one is going to get
the pickup
Latten joined the Navy in 1937
and began his military duty as a
fireman and military policeman.
Then he volunteered for subma-
rine duty.
After a year oi submaring
school, Latten spent time at cook-
ing and baking school and then
for the next 12 years was an un-
derwater cook.
"When 1 got shore duty in San
Diego I'd always go to this one
officer's club and cook there he
said.
Lattcn's cooking skills im-
pressed some military bigwigs
and they urged and recom-
mended he join the. u.
crew.
Working on that crew meant
learning about flying airplanes
and Latten was sent to Pensacola,
Fla to flight school.
"You had to know how to
operate the plane" to be on one of
the Air Force One crews, Latten
said.
After finishing flight school,
Latten went to Seattle to join his
flight crew. As a cook, Latten
didn't just practice making roast
beef and mashed potatoes. Each
member of the crew of seven had
specific duties tied to the plane.
As a flight nearcd its destina-
tion, Latten kept his eyes on
gauges that monitored the
engine's heat and oil pressure.
Once on the ground, he helped
with servicing the aircraft before
u nau to takeoff again.
"All of the guys wore a lot of
hats he said.
Presidents weren't the ony VIPs
that use Air Force One. Senators,
cabinet members and other gov-
ernment officials also flew on the
planes.
"There were seven of us and a
lot of times there was only one
passenger Latten said.
Cooking for dignitaries meant
receiving a health record on the
individual or group and creating
menus that fit what they could
eat. Before jets replaced slower
airplanes, menus for several
meals had to be prepared.
"Of course that's changed be-
cause it only takes about 3 12
hours to get anywhere Latten
said.
1 got to know Truman and
Rare books rotting on shelves
Nixon said Latten, who retired
in 1970. "The other guys would
say, The meal was good, the
flight was good and that's about
it.
"Truman and Nixon were the
type that whatever crew picked
them up, they knew their names
and their wives' and children's
names.
"Truman, as soon as the seatbelt
light was out, he was up getting a
cup of coffee, talking to the crew
Serving the presidents usually
wasn't a problem because menus
has been chosen earlier and most
of the time they didn't want an
unusual meal, Latten said.
The challenge came when the
plane picked up hitchhikers.
"Those were people, dignitaries
who could ride on the plane for
free, who got on board at the last
minute
Then there was a scramble to
check and see if there was enough
food on board to feed everybody,
Latten said.
"We did have an inventorv of
food on board he said And
appliances were very modern
"We even had microwaves on
board at that time. We had refrig
erators and freezers
He recalled one of the more
hectic trips during his Air Force
One career.
"It was in early 1970. We picked
up six or seven senators and went
to San Francisco. Then we went to
Sydney, Australia. From Sydney
we went to Spam and then to Italy
Then to Germany and to New
York, back to German v. It was
two weeks before we got back "
After 32 years, 11 monthsand 17
days, Latten retired from the
Navy with a rank of E-9. "At E-9
you could command a small
ship he said.
GREENSBORO (AP) - North
Carolina's history is slowly rot-
ting on the shelves, library experts
say, the victim oi acid found in
pavr made trom wood pulp.
"Our intellectual civilization is
basically recorded on paper that is
self-destructing says ferry D
Campbell, librarian at Duke Lm-
versity. ' We're losing books
daily
Spokesmen at Duke and UNC-
Ch ipel 1 lill say at least 25 percent
ol their collections are so deterio-
rated they either can't bo used,
need extensive, cost repair or
need to be transferred to another
medium.
"It's very critical says Mar-
cclla Grendler, associate librariai.
tor special collections at L'NC-
C it you would fold down the
corner of a page it would break off
and crumble in your hands
"Anybody that has information
on paperofa certain age is having
conservation problems says
William S. Price Jr director of the
North Carolina Division oi Ar-
chives and History, the keeper of
the state's valuable papers.
"U we don't remedy (the situ-
ation) within the next decade we
may be talking about not having
material to preserve
"We've had this book for 30
years Emilie Mills says as she
carefully leafs through a rare and
valuable 18th-century work by
English naturalist Mark Catesby.
"And I've watched it deteriorate
The book is one oi the prize
volumes at the University of
North Carolina at Greensboro,
where Ms. Mills is special collec-
tions librarian.
In universities, small-town li-
braries and even in the state ar-
chives, millions of books, manu-
scripts, drawings, maps, newspa-
pers and music scores are silently-
rotting away.
Before 1S50, books were printed
on paper made oi cotton or linen
rags. As printing spread, the
demand for paper increased and
Monkey glad
to see owner
HICKSVILLE, N.Y. (AP) - After
13 hours as a chimp on the lam,
Kvd Wyz wasglad to be back with
his master.
Kyd Wyz finally was cornered
by a dozen police officers in a
vegetable garden Tuesday after a
day of freedom.
Police were told to be on the
lookout for a hairy, long-armed,
toothless 4-footer wearing blue
pants, white socks and size 6EE
wingtips.
He was wanted by the law
shortly after he walked out of his
master's house, shutting the door
behind him.
During his half-day of freedom,
Kyd Wyz climbed trees and
fences around the neighborhood,
frightening some residents, enter-
taining 240 schoolchildren out-
side a grade school, others and
setting off a flood of calls to police.
He knew it was over said
Officer Rick Hannsgcn, a Suffolk
County policeman. The chimpan-
zee resisted capture at first, pull-
ing theoff.cer's hand off his collar,
but was "kind of tired out
Hannsgen said
When Kyd Wyz saw his owner,
he jumped nght m his arms
Hannsgen said.
i.THhcu;ovvTrack Rynsky sa
Kyd Wyz had left the house be-
fore but always came back. He
said he 11 try to restrict Kyd Wyz
to the trade shows, fairs and mall
openings at which he performs
cheaper methods had to be found.
Around the middle oi the 19tH
century, manufacturers turned to
wood pulp. But the process of
making paper from wood in-
volved the use oi an acid compo-
nent. When the acid combines
with light and the moisture in the
air, the paper begins to break
down.
The deteriora tion can bo slowed
or stopped by deaciditing the
paper, but it's an expensive proc-
ess.
"We fall further behind every
year Ms. Grendler says. "We
could spend $800,00 to $1 million
a war on preservation. (But) we
just nibble around the edges
Officials at UNC-CH, Duke,
and N.C. State University plan to
organize a task force to deal with
the preservation problem.
"The problem is too big to du-
plicate effort when it isn't neces-
sary Campbell says. "We've got
3.6 million books. If only 20 per-
cent of them (need attention),
that's 720,000. You can't do some-
thing about 720,000 volumes
tomorrow
Because money is tight, most
efforts at controlling the decay
center around humidity and tem-
perature conditions.
A temperature of 65 to 68 de-
greesand a humidity of 45 percent
to 50 percend is ideal, experts say.
But for a book likeCatesbv's "A
foting&t winking
Casual Dining
Formal Drinking
�A V.
ladiurn
fhe
(
-U- I in.
frm!( leaners
Arm
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Formerly known as Hooter's
Located behind Qutncj s � Ace (leaners
in harm Fresh Shopping (enter
11 a.ml a.m every day � 355-2946
"Come check out our New Menu
GREAT COPIES
GREAT LOCATION
GREAT PRICES
Great hours, too. Kinko's is open early, open late and open
weekends. For quality copies at a price you can afford.
kinko's
Great copies. Great people.
321 E. Tenth Street
752-0875
Natural History of Carolina, Flor-
ida and the Bahama islands val-
ued at thousands of dollars, it
may be a good investment to re-
store and deacidify it, Ms. Mills
said.
If the price is right, she says,
"we'll end up with a nearly per-
fect copy
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Guys In At 10:30
Hungry
m -
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport i
BLAC KSB!
key isfinallv of! ol tl
Una Pirates � Pirati
Saturday's
Pirate over Virginia
Blacksburg, Va
time since i 98 : a ithorn 1 lu
Mississippi that the Pii
won a game
Northan ilina I
tantly, the win moved the Pii il
to 4-3 tor irand kept a
the team - isoi
having a w inning - i
"It (not vs inning out �id
state in tour years i
that we were ver
into this game E( L h
Art Baker said "W tall t d
about it and weft h ti.
going to get this progi
around we had to do it 1
Leading the ay 1
was sophomore qu irtei
Travis 1 iunter Hui
school record for tola
the game wit
the old record of 285 yard -
1979 by Leander in-
complete ; 10 of 18 pa
yards and he picked ip 91 yard
rushing.
In the earl v tlool
the Hokies mig
hide from the Pii .
jumped out to a 10-0 lead
first quarter.
On its first drive,
moved to the Pirate � I foi
stalling and settling for a 49
Chris Kiner fiel i goal
to play in the first quark r
After stopping the Pirates th
Hokies then moved 73 yards I
score when Erik Chapman coi tril
nected with Myron Richardson I
for a 20-yard TD pass I
the PAT, it was 10-0 with 4:1 I
play in the first quarter.
ECU then got in gear and si
moved 76 yards fora scoreearlyin
the second quarter on a 1-yard a
dive by Hunter. On the drive.
Hunter rushed for 27 yards and
passed Jtor 20 niijre. Chuck
'lpW�TrtVid�e .Of
with IfrToleft in the halt.
The Hokies, however, for the
third straight possession, m
for another score. Chapman led
the Hokies on a 65-yard drive,
which he capped with a 1-yard
touchdown dive. Chapman
passed for 22 yards on the drive
and scrambled for 33 on the
ground.
The Pirates closed to within
turned it
Five play
(Tare
A
Freshman goalie Scott McCollough punts the
game against Virginia Commonwealth L'niveH

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i
i
estaurant
check and seeH there was enough
food on board to feed everybody,
I atten said
Ve did have an inventory of
on Kurd, he said. And
appliances were very modern.
We even had microwaves on
board at that time We had refrig-
rs .nd freezers "
rev. ailed one ot the more
trips during his Air Force
career
Itwasinearl) 1970 We picked
-v r seven senators and went
I rancisco Then we went to
stralia from Sydney
Spain and then to Italy,
rman) and to New
Germany. It was
�e got back
2ycai monthsand17
n tired from the
rankol E-9. "At E-9
mmand a small
� said
pp& lpcofidg
i w D kdm gki 11
I WOKll 1 H M)s
Sat
Plan"
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TRIPPERS
RM
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Members of the
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B
A
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a
. $2.00 Guests
11s and 752
iser
110:30
IHl- I AST l AROl INIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 22,1987 p,ge 15
Hungry Pirates roll past Virginia Tech 32 - 23
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport iditur
BLACKSBURG Va. - The mon-
key is finally off of the Fast Caro-
lina Pirates' back.
Saturday's 32-23 victory by the
Pirates over Virginia lech in
Blacksburg, Va marked the first
tune since 1983 against Southern
Mississippi that the Pirates had
won a game outside ot the state ot
North Carolina. But more impor-
tantly, the win moved the Pirates
to 4-3 tor the year and kept alive
the team's season-long goal o(
having a winning season.
It (not winning outside of the
state in four years) is something
that we were very aware ot going
into this game ECU head coach
Art Baker said. "We talked a lot
about it and we felt that it we were
going to get this program turned
around we had to do it today
leading the way to the victory
was sophomore quarterback
Travis 1 lunter. 1 lunter sot a new
school record for total offense in
the game with 319 yards breaking
the old record of 235 yards set in
197s by Leander Green. Hunter
completed 10 oi 18 passes for 228
yards and he picked up 91 yards
rushing.
In the early going, it looked as if
the Hokies might run away and
hide from the Pirates as they
lumped out toa 10-0lead after the
first quarter.
On its first drive, Virginia lech
moved to the Pirate 32 before
stalling and settling for a 49-yard
Chris Kinzer field goal with 2
to play in the first quarter.
After stopping the Pirates, the
Hokies then moved 73 yards for a
score when Hrik Chapman con-
nected with Myron Richardson
for a 20-yard TD pass. Following
the PAT it was 10-0 with 4:10 to
play in the first quarter.
ECU then got in gear and
moved 7b yards for a score early in
the second quarter on a I-yard
dive by Hunter. On the drive.
Hunter rushed for 27 yards and
passed lor 20 mjre. Chuck
rletirMT iTudtW'uc saJH 10
with 14-IMel't in the half.
The Hokies. however, lor the
third straight possession, moved
for another score. Chapman led
the Hokies on a 65-yard drive,
which he capped with a 1-yard
touchdown dive. Chapman
passed for 22 yards on the drive
and scrambled for 33 on the
ground.
The Pirates closed to within
seven, 17-10, with 2:09 to play in
the half when Berleth split the
uprights on a 40-yard field goal.
Ellis Dillahunt then gave the
Pirates another crack on offense
when he intercepted Chapman at
the Pirate 36 with :32 showing on
the clock.
Hunter connected with Ron
Jones for gains of 20 and 27 yards
setting up Berleth for a 34-yard
field goal as time expired in the
tirst half.
The Pirates opened the second
half with the same explosiveness
they closed the opening half with.
1 lunter guided the Pirates on a 80-
yard touchdown drive,which he
put the finishing touches on with
a 35-yard sprint off the option
down the left sideline.
"Individually, obviously Travis
Hunter ran our offense well
baker said. "We planned to throw
the ball a lot today, actually more
than we did. But our option was
working well with Travis so we
stayed with it
Hokie head coach Frank
Beamer agreed.
"The Fast Carolina quarterback
(Hunter) came into his own last
week against Cincinnati Beamer
said. "Thata when he started get-
ting better and he really had an
outstanding game today. He's a
very good athlete and as you saw
he is capable of making things
happen out there
After the Hokies blocked
Berleth's PAT attempt, the Pirates
let 19-17 with 11:36 to play in the
third quarter.
Virginia Tech struck next in the
contest when Chapman hit Karl
Bordon for a 10-yard scoring
strike. kinzer's PAT moved the
Hokies ahead 23-19 with 4:57 to
play in the third quarter.
After Hunter was picked off on
the 1-yard line by John Granby
stalling a Pirate drive, cornerback
Roswell Streeter gave the Pirates
another crack when he inter-
cepted a Chapman pass and re-
turned it 25 yards to Hokie 17.
Five plays later, Hunter took
CarCviMhe work as he went over
from 6 yards out for his third
touchdown of the day. Berleth
missed another PAT leaving the
score 25-23 Pirates with 9:21 to
play.
"The key for us is that for the
second straight week, we've done
a gixd job of taking advantage of
what the defense gives us Baker
said. "We weren't doing that
against Illinois (a 20-10 loss) or
West Virginia (a 49-0 loss)
The Pirates put the icing on the
victory late in the third quarter
when, facing a second and 21,
Hunter connected with fullback
Tim James on a screen pass, which
broke free for a 74-yard touch-
down.
"The main thing we were trying
to do was get a first down on the
play James said. "But, after I got
the ball the blocking opened it up
and all I was thinking then was
getting into the endzonc
Baker agreed that the screen
pass was a key play.
"Virginia Tech did a good job of
shutting down our trap to the
fullbacks, and they also kept Reg-
gie McKinncy from the big play'
Baker said. "But our screen pass
Pirate quarterback Travis Hunter (5) looks downfield for a receiver in Saturday's victory over the Hokies
of Virginia Tech. (Photos by Mar Startari � Photolab)
was especially effective todav
and the pass to T.m James was
probably our biggest in my three
years here
With the Hokies falling to 1-5
with the loss, Beamer feels that his
team is just a little bit away from
making the big plays necessary to
win.
"We are doing a lot of little
things wrong and those little
things turn into big things
Beamer said. "We are just a step
away it seems"
New head
coach leads
lady Pirates
Eight veterans return, includ-
ing three starters, as first-year
East Carolina women's basketball
coach Pat Pierson will try to im-
prove upon the 16-13 mark turned
in h" � Lady Pirates one year
a8
P. n comes to ECU after nine
years at Northwestern State (La.)
� her alma mater � where she
compiled a 166-89 record. Eight of
Pierson's nine Lady Demon
teams owned winning records,
including the 1985-86 team that
went 25-7 and went to the finals of
the National Invitational Tourna-
ment.
HKr Ji �MJm La injuries and inconsistency, fm-
VSftd " JSfyT "y ished 8-6 in the Colonial Athletic
If ISKK afflfiiC w n- Association. Gone from that team
E? WfflSmWHfflm �P5tv' j�� is point guard Dclphine Mabry,
who graduated as ECU's all-time
career steal leader, and part-time
starters Jody Rodriques at guard
and Valerie Cooper at center.
At Northwestern State,
Pierson's philosophy included an
up-tempo offense that saw her
Lady Demons among the nation's
leaders in scoring. However, with
good depth in the frontcourt,
coupled with an inexperienced
backcourt, Pierson may be more
apt to slow the pace down and
look inside.
"Our strong point is definitely
in the frontcourt said Pierson, a
1977 NSU graduate. "We'll look
to push the ball up the floor, but
we won't hesitate to pull up and
look inside to our strength.
"Our forwards � Monique
(Pompili) and Alma (Bcthea) �
�� � �iwwMitiMMHyuMHMMj.uwKiitaii wkMiHWMiMUdMmmmiaKm are both quick for their size. We'll
Reggie McKinney (20) scrambles around to find the right hole to squeeze through the Virginia Tech be countine on them heavily "
defense.The Hokies kept McKinney in check most of the day, but could not keep the Pirates from victory. See VETS, page 17
ECU golfers take seventh place
in Hargrove Davis Tournament
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sports Writer
East Carolina turned in a team
score of 613 to take seventh place
in the Hargrove Davis Memorial
golf tournament held last week-
end at Keith Hills Country Club in
Buies Creek, N.C.
The University of Richmond
won the tournament, hosted by
Campbell University, with a score
of 598. Augusta College was sec-
ond with a 599 total followed by
Coastal Carolina at 608; Elon at
609andCuilfordat611.
Andy Pitts from Appalachian
State was the individual cham-
pion shooting a two-day 146.
Guilford's Lee Porter was second
with 147 and Richmond's Tom
Stone placed third with a 148.
East Carolina was lead by Chris
Winkel whose 150 earned him an
eighth-place finish. Carter Lucas
shot a 151 and finished in a tie for
12th. Other Pirate scores were:
Brian Connor, 155; Francis
Vaughn, 157 and John Lynch, 164.
With just one tournament left in
the fall season head coach Hal
Morrison is not pleased with the
team's progress so far.
"I'm just not satisfied with the
way we've been playing all fall
Morrison said. "The thing that has
hurt our team scores is that we
don't have one player who can
turn a consistenly low score every
tournament
Veteran Chris Winkel has lead
the Pirates in two of their four fall
tournaments, but according to
Morrison, he can play better.
"Winkel has gotten some good
scores but he really isn't hitting
the ball all that well Morrison
said. "Our freshmen have
sparked some time, but you really
can't expect freshmen to play that
consistently. They are usually up
and down
Morrison has been playing dif-
ferent combinations this fall as he
tries to settle on a top five to take
him through the spring season.
"I've been trying a lot of people
to see who can help us this
spring Morrison said. "I don't
have anyone right now that has
played steadily
East Carolina will close out the
fall season Oct. 30-31 at the Sea-
scape Invitational at Nags Head,
NC Although the fall season has
not been a particularly successful
one, Morrison is optimistic about
the spring season which is the
official golf season.
"I'm confident that once we get
into the spring season we'll come
around Morrison said.
Elon shuts out Pirates
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sportt Writer
second goai at the 21:00 minute
mark of the second half to make it
� � . a 2-0 final.
East Carolina fell to 2-11 in soc-
xr after being shutout by Elon Both teams were even in shots
College Friday at Varsity Field, on goal with Elon taking seven
Friday's match marked the sev- and ECU nine, however theChris-
freshman goalie Scott McCollough punts the ball away from the goal after a save in the Pirate booters'
game against Virginia Commonwealth University last week. (Photo by Mar Startari � Photolab)
enth time the Pirates had been
shutout this season.
ECU was able to hold off Elon
most of the first half, but with two
minutes left Mike Greer scored to
give the Fighting Christians 1-0
halftime lead.
Todd Johnson kicked in Eton's
tians were more accurate with
Elon goaltender Kip Rackely hav-
ing to make only two saves. Pirate
keeper Scott McCollough had
seven saves Friday to give him 18
in just over three games.
ECU will host Atlantic Chris-
tian College today at 3:30 p.m.
"I really don't know much
about ACC I don't think they
have very many returners this
year head coach Charlie Harvey
said. "I think that we can beat
them, but I've said that before
Rest may be a factor in the favor
of the Pirates, ECU has had six
days to prepare for the Bulldogs.
"The team has had some time
off and we should be ready to play
Thursday Harvey said.
ECU will try for its first confer-
ence victory of the year when it
travels to the University of
Richmond for a CAA match
Saturday.
a
'
�H
ii "i i m w� ��� �' "�-








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11s and 75c
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110:30
1 HI EASTCAROt 1NIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 22, 1987 P,ge 15
Hungry Pirates roll past Virginia Tech 32 - 23
By TIM CHANDLER
Spurt I ditor
BLACKSBURG Va. -Themon-
key is finally off of the Hast Caro-
lina Pirates' back
Saturday's 32-23 victory by the
Pirates over Virginia Tech in
Blacksburg, Va marked the first
time since 1983 against Southern
Mississippi that the Pirates had
won a game outside of the state ot
North Carolina. But more impor-
tantly, the win moved the Pirates
to 4-3 tor the year and kept alive
the team s season-long goal of
having a winning season.
It (not winning outside of the
state in tour years) is something
that we were very awareoi going
into this game ECU head coach
Art Baker said. "We talked a lot
about it and we felt that it we were
going to get this program turned
around we had to do it today
1 eading the way to the victory
was sophomore quarterback
Iravis Hunter. Hunter set a new
school record for total ot tense in
the game with 319yards breaking
the old reeord of 285 yards sot in
197 by Leandcr Green. Hunter
completed 10 of 18 passes for 228
yards and he picked up 91 yards
rushing.
In the early going it looked as if
the Hokies might run awa and
hide from the Pirates as they
lumped out to a 10-0 lead alter the
first quarter.
On its first drive, Virginia Tech
moved to the Pirate 32 before
stalling and settling for a 49-yard
Chris Kinzer held goal with 9:25
to play in the first quarter.
Alter stopping the Pirates, the
lokies then moved 73 yards tor a
score when Erik Chapman con-
nected with Myron Richardson
tor a 20-yard FTJ pass. Following
the PAT, it was 10-0 with 4:10 to
play in the tirst quarter.
ECL then got in gear and
moved 76 yards for a score early in
the second quarter on a 1-yard
dive by Hunter. On the drive,
Hunter rushed for 27 yards and
passed Jor 20 iujre. Chuck
auilotiGjjp; rrwdet;to vot io-
with iMfHeftin the half.
The Hokies however, tor the
third straight possession, moved
tor another score. Chapman led
the Hokies on a 65-yard drive,
which he capped with a 1-vard
touchdown dive. Chapman
passed for 22 yards on the drive
and scrambled tor 33 on the
ground.
The Pirates closed to within
seven, 17-10, with 2:09 to play in
the half when Berleth split the
uprights on a 40-yard field goal.
Ellis Dillahunt then gave the
Pi rates another crack on offense
when he intercepted Chapman at
the Pirate 36 with :32 showing on
the clock.
Hunter connected with Ron
lones for gains of 20 and 27 yards
setting up Berleth for a 34-yard
held goal as time expired in the
tirst half.
The Pirates opened the second
halt with the same explosiveness
they closed the opening half with.
1 lunter guided the Pirates on a 80-
yard touchdown drive,which he
put the finishing touches on with
a 35-yard sprint off the option
down the left sideline.
"Individually, obviously Travis
Hunter ran our offense well
Baker said. "We planned to throw
the hall a lot today, actually more
than we did. But our option was
working well with Travis so we
stayed with it
Hokie head coach Frank
Beamcr agreed.
"The Hast Carolina quarterback
(Hunter) came into his own last
week against Cincinnati Beamer
said. "Thata when he started get-
ting better and he really had an
outstanding game today. He's a
ery good athlete and as you saw
he is capable of making things
happen out there
Alter the Hokies blocked
Berleth's PAT attempt, the Pirates
let 19-17 with 11:36 to play in the
third quarter.
Virginia Tech struck next in the
contest when Chapman hit Karl
Borden for a 10-yard scoring
strike. Kinzer's PAT moved the
Hokies ahead 23-19 with 4:57 to
play in the third quarter.
Alter Hunter was picked off on
the 1-yard line by John Granbv
stalling a Pirate drive, corncrback
R swcll Streeter gave the Pirates
another crack when he inter-
cepted a Chapman pass and re-
turned it 25 vards to Hokie 17.
Five plays later, Hunter took
earevfnhe work as he went over
from f yards out for his third
touchdown of the day. Borleth
missed another PAT leaving the
score 25-23 Pirates with 9:21 to
play.
"The key for us is that for the
second straight week, we've done
a gtxni job of taking advantage of
what the defense gives us Baker
said. "We weren't doing that
against Illinois (a 20-10 loss) or
West Virginia (a 49-0 loss)
The Pirates put the icing on the
victory late in the third quarter
when, facing a second and 21,
Hunter connected with fullback
Tim James on a screen pass, which
broke free for a 74-yard touch-
down.
"The main thing we were trying
to do was get a first down on the
play James said. "But, after I got
the ball the blocking opened it up
and all I was thinking then was
getting into the endzone
Baker agreed that the screen
pass was a key play.
"Virginia Tech did a good job of
shutting down our trap to the
fullbacks, and they also kept Reg-
gie McKinney from the big play
Baker said. "But our screen pass
Pirate quarterback Travis Hunter (5) looks downf ield for a receiver in Saturday's victory over the Hokies
of Virginia Tech. (Photos by Mar Startari � Photolab)
Reggie McKinney (20) scrambles around to find the right hole to squeeze through the Virginia Tech
defense. The Hokies kept McKinney in checkmostof the day,but couldnotkeep the Pirates from victory.
was especially effective todav
and the pass to Tun James w4s
probably our b.ggest in my three
years here
With the Hokies falling to 1-5
with the loss, Beamcr feels that his
team is just a little bit away from
making the big plays necessary to
win.
"We are doing a lot of little
things wrong and those little
things turn into big things
Beamcr said. "We are just a step
away it seems
New head
coach leads
lady Pirates
Eight veterans return, includ-
ing three starters, as first-year
East Carolina women's basketball
coach Pat Pierson will try to im-
prove upon the 16-13 mark turned
in by the Lady Pirates one year
ago.
Pierson comes to ECU after nine
years at Northwestern State (La.)
� her alma mater � where she
compiled a 166-89 record. Eight of
Pierson's nine Lady Demon
teams owned winning records,
including the 1985-86 team that
went 25-7 and went to the finals of
the National Invitational Tourna-
ment.
Last year ECU, plagued with
injuries and inconsistency, fin-
ished 8-6 in the Colonial Athletic
Association. Gone from that team
is point guard Dclphinc Mabry,
who graduated as ECU's all-time
career steal leader, and part-time
starters Jody Rodriqucs at guard
and Valerie Cooper at center.
At Northwestern State,
Pierson's philosophy included an
up-tempo offense that saw her
Lady Demons among the nation's
leaders in scoring. However, with
good depth in the frontcourt,
coupled with an inexperienced
backcourt, Pierson may be more
apt to slow the pace down and
look inside.
"Our strong point is definitely
in the frontcourt said Pierson, a
1977 NSU graduate. "We'll look
to push the ball up the floor, but
we won't hesitate to pull up and
look inside to our strength.
"Our forwards � Monique
(Pompili) and Alma (Bcthca) �
are both quick for their size. We'll
be countine on them heavily
See VETS, page 17
ECU golfers take seventh place
in Hargrove Davis Tournament
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sports Writer
East Carolina turned in a team
score of 613 to take seventh place
in the Hargrove Davis Memorial
golf tournament held last week-
end at Keith Hills Country Club in
Buics Creek, N.C.
The University of Richmond
won the tournament, hosted by
Campbell University, with a score
of 598. Augusta College was sec-
ond with a 599 total followed by
Coastal Carolina at 608; Elon at
609andGuilfordat611.
Andy Pitts from Appalachian
State was the individual cham-
pion shooting a two-day 146.
Guilford's Lee Porter was second
with 147 and Richmond's Tom
Stone placed third with a 148.
East Carolina was lead by Chris
Winkel whose 150 earned him an
eighth-place finish. Carter Lucas
shot a 151 and finished in a tie for
12th. Other Pirate scores were:
Brian Connor, 155; Francis
Vaughn, 157and John Lynch, 164.
With just one tournament left in
the fall season head coach Hal
Morrison is not pleased with the
team's progress so far.
"I'm just not satisfied with the
way we've been playing all fall
Morrison said. "The thing that has
hurt our team scores is that we
don't have one player who can
turn a consistenly low score every
tournament
Veteran Chris Winkel has lead
the Pirates in two of their four fall
tournaments, but according to
Morrison, he can play better.
"Winkel has gotten some good
scores but he really isn't hitting
the ball all that well Morrison
said. "Our freshmen have
sparked some time, but you really
can't expect freshmen to play that
consistently. They are usually up
and down
Morrison has been playing dif-
ferent combinations this fall as he
tries to settle on a top five to take
him through the spring season.
"I've been trying a lot of people
to see who can help us this
spring Morrison said. "I don't
have anyone right now that has
played steadily
East Carolina will close out the
fall season Oct. 30-31 at the Sea-
scape Invitational at Nags Head,
NC. Although the fall season has
not been a particularly successful
one, Morrison is optimistic about
the spring season which is the
official golf season.
"I'm confident that once we get
into the spring season we'll come
around Morrison said.
Elon shuts out Pirates
Freshman goalie Scott McCollough punts the ball away from the goal after a save in the Pirate booters'
game against Virginia Commonwealth University last week. (Photo by Mar Startari � Photolab)
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sports Writer
East Carolina fell to 2-11 in soc-
:er after being shutout by Elon
College Friday at Varsity Field.
Friday's match marked the sev-
enth time the Pirates had been
shutout this season.
ECU was able to hold off Elon
most of the first half, but with two
minutes left Mike Greer scored to
give the Fighting Christians 1-0
halftime lead.
Todd Johnson kicked in Elon's
second goal at the 21:00 minute
mark of the second half to make it
a 2-0 final.
Both teams were even in shots
on goal with Elon taking seven
and ECU nine, however the Chris-
tians were more accurate with
Elon goaltender Kip Rackely hav-
ing to make only two saves. Pirate
keeper Scott McCollough had
seven saves Friday to give him 18
in just over three games.
ECU will host Atlantic Chris-
tian College today at 3:30 p.m.
"I really don't know much
about ACC I don't think they
have very many returners this
year head coach Charlie Harvey
said. "I think that we can beat
them, but I've said that before
Rest may be a factor in the favor
of the Pirates, ECU has had six
days to prepare for the Bulldogs.
"The team has had some time
off and we should be ready to play
Thursday Harvey said.
ECU will try for its first confer-
ence victory of the year when it
travels to the University of
Richmond for a CAA match
Saturday.
mmmmmm
VRM4ri00MpM 0VaWVlpgfN fKMMhgk �
m i m i ���WBiii�i'iwii.wnwi�i'�"� rr'M' ��





16
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 22.1987
Intramural Recreational Roundup
"Swimmers Take Your
Mark.Get Set. BANG The
last line seemed to be a very- popu-
lar saying at the Intramural-Rec-
reational Services annual swim
meet.
Amidst the mass contusion oi
intramural participants and
workers, this years meet was a big
success and tun for all who par-
ticipated. Oi course, some teams
and individuals enjoyed the thrill
of victory a little more often than
others.
Take tor example, the ladies of
Delta Zeta. In capturing the first
place title, D.Z totaled 127 points,
doubling their second place com-
petitors. They alone captured first
place individual spots in nine of
the 13 scheduled events. Seven oi
the events were theirs in the run-
ner up position. Robin Morrison
captured first place in the 50 yard
backstroke and her teammates
followed with the results:
Dana Bailey 1st place
Melanie Gibson 1st place
Lisa Webber 1st place
Kathv Llnch 1st place
Melinda Walker 1st place
Lisa Webber 1st place
In rounding out the competi-
tion, Alpha Phi. lead by Sarah
Daughertv and Stoph'Creasy
swam ior&7 total points and Tyler
Dorm picked up the third spot
with a solo performance in the 50
yard backstroke by Lottie West.
In the mens competition, it was
a battle of the fraternities for the
second spot which carried over to
the final 2tX" yard freestyle relay.
Tau Kappa Epsilon led the way
into the last event until the men
Gaetti goofs
in game three
Swim meet, softball finals end with a bang
��Y�r tromSigmaPhi Epsilon captured But what about the euvs from , . &
from Sigma Phi Epsilon captured
second place in the 200 yard,
freestyle relay, thus putting both
teams in a deadlock. Both earned
40 total points.
But what about the guys from
Lambda Chi? These fellows are
perennial swimming powers and
have once again taken the IRS
swim meet hands down. They
alone swam for 96 points and
placed first in seven events. Their
first place finishes included all the
relay events. Lambda Chi was
lead by Dave Feast who placed
Informal Rec Hours
Fri.
VMoriThur
� VFri.
v�
Sun.
I f. I
i
� VMoninn
� VFri .
1. . �: � .
f i
inui's
Men.Fri.
Thurs
Fi j .
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Fri
Sat .
' Lin.
-Thur:
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-x
ST. LOUS (AP) - Gary Gaetti,
who had done little wrong in the
postseason for the Minnesota
Twins, did little right in Game
Three of the World Series.
Gaetti, the Twins' third base-
man whose offensive and defen-
sive heroics spurred Minnesota to
an American League playoff
triumph over the Detroit Tigers,
was 0-for-4, left three runners on
base and may have been in the
wrong position for a big St. Louis
hit Tuesday night. The Cardinals
defeated the Twins 3-1 to cut
Minnesota's lead in the best-of-
seven World Series to 2-1.
Gaetti was told that tonight's
starter for St. Louis, left-hander
Greg Mathews, was a clone of
John Tudor, who shut down the
Twins in Came Three. He was
then asked if he would change
anything tonight.
"I didn't do against Tudor �lJPJl
Gaetti said. "I hope to change
something
After Tudor walked two
straight batters wi th one out in the
sixth inning, Gaetti took a ball �
the ninth Tudor had thrown in a
10-pitch span �and then popped
out to the catcher.
Asked if he should have taken
another pitch from the suddenly
wild Tudor, Gaetti snapped: "I
should have hit it out It was
right down the middle
With two out and a runner on
third in the eighth, he lined out
against Cardinals reliever Todd
Worrell.
Defensively, Gaetti was playing
oii the third-base line when Vince
Coleman slapped the two-run
double that erased Minnesota's 1-
0 seventh-inning lead.
With runners on second and
third he said, "I'm playing in. If
I'm playing back, maybe I can
knock it down. Of all places to hit
the ball I knew he was going to
do it sometime. He can't pull the
ball
Coleman said he noticed that
Gaetti "was farther away from the
line than most National League
third basemen
"1 knew if I got it to the left side
of the infield wc would score a
run he said. "It got by him and
we scored two
Twins Manager Tom Kelly said
he would come back tonight with
left-hander Frank Viola, theCame
One winner. Viola won Game
Four of the AL playoffs, also on
three days rest.
"I'll be ready to go as often as
they need me Viola said. "They
asked me to go (tonight) and that
won't be any problem
Bert BIylevcn, who has won
three postseason games already,
is the likely starter for Thursday's
(jame Five.
"Frankie and Bert have done a
good job for us all year Kirby
Puckett said. "I don't think it's
going to stop now
'0 noon -4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m. -1 1:00 a . m . 12:00 noon -1 S 1 ' 5:30 j . :00 p.m :00 p.m :00 p.n :00 p.ti
� : 00 .i . in . -10:00 a.m. -1 i : 00 a.m . 12:00 noon -9:00 pn. I p.m J : ' p.m. P-m.
2S J:00 p.m. -3:00 p.m. . : 00 noon -9 5: 00 : 00 p.m.
. i i 7:00 a.B . �� . 3:00 p.m. � 4:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. -3:00 p.m. -11:00 a.m. 12:00 noon -fi: 00 -� -r 1:3 9 : . 5:30 p � . 9:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. j:00 p.w. 5:0 p.m.
8:00 p.m. -12:00 noon -10:00 p.m. ' : p.m.
Eq u : pm rat 1 Memorul Che � -out
J0:00 a.m. -10:00 a.m. -11 :00 a.m. -12�00 noon9: 7: 5: 500 p.m. i p.ir 00 p.m. on p
iirts
1
5
t.
f.
y.
I
i
t.

i
i
.

first in the 100 yard backstroke.
Matt Ritcher with first in the 100
yard breast stroke and Rob New-
man who placed first in both the
100 yard butterfly and 50 yard
freestyle.
The 1987 co-rec softball cham-
pion has been crowned and it was
a 'natural' victory. The unde-
feated 'Naturals' with a 7-0 win-
loss record met a team of Execu-
tioners who held a 7-2 record into
the finals. The Naturals got a
break early on in the contest when
they scored one from an Execu-
tioner error in the second inning.
The visiting Naturals then
found another opening in the
fourth inning as Tim Merrill
drilled a line drive down center
field scoring teammates Cheryl
Curtis and Mark Carter. Another
point was added in the fifth and
two in the sixth to bring their total
to six runs.
The Executioners started a rally
in the sixth inning trying f()r a
comeback but fell short Brian
Swain earned both runs batted in
by hitting a hot grounder down
center field. The Executioners
were unable to execute up to par
and scored only two runs leaving
the contest and the 1987 season
with a second place position
Flag football will be winding
down its playoff action this week
on the IRS fields adjacent to Fick-
len Stadium Going into the men's
division with firs place wrapped
around their heartsand handsaa-
U.S. POUSA. The Enforcers are
looking for an all campus victory
in the women's division
Be sure to tune in to WMB 9 3
fm each Tuesday and Thursday
for the Intramural-Recreational
Services RFC-RAP This progr in
is designed to inform all faculty,
staff, and students about the pro-
grams and services offered by the
IRS. Air time is 2:30 and 5 30 pm.
IntramL ign up dates
n
�691 1
Lions
t.
f.
(.

i
i

f.
Bowling Oct. 28
Co-Rec Basketball Oct. 28
3-on-3 Basketball Nov. 4
11 a.m6 p.m
8 p.m.
6 p.m.
MG KM -A
Brewster D-103
Brewster D-103
7
00
�lv
�:�'� ���'�.
���.o� ���;
�.�-��'�
Coming October 29th
Steve Streater
to Speak to
E.C.U. Students
feawAk
Greenville's Only
Premium
Quality Cleaners
Since 1935
havO swTCFtS-TLiaered Shirt
OR SKIRTS CLEANED'
3RD PAIR CLEANED
Special
5 For $2.99
I Expires October 31. 19S7
Coupon mutt be presented with incoming order
111 W. 10TH ST.
CORNER OF 10THEVANS
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center Ts Opf n
MonTues, & Wed. Fri. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
9 a.m. - 2 p.m. & by appointmer
For an appointntent or more infor-
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline.
757-0003
111 East Third Street - The Lee Building
Greenville, N. C.
Free Pregnancy Test-
Confidential Counseling
THE
COMPETITIVE EDGE
MAYBE
YOUR RESUME
Don t get ignored in the paper shuttle. Have your resume
professionally typeset and reproduced at AccuCopy! Our
resume packages produce results by making you look
your best on paper.
High quality, fast service, and low prices are all part of
our resume packages available to you at AccuCopy.
Drinking in
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your favorite
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FOR FAST TIMES
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� open early, open late
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Next to Chicos in the Georgetown Shops
bq
W
i
rfj
ot
jIi!
8
od
ita
on
BUD I
LIGHT J
P MICHEl
MICHELOB
Natural
MICHELOB lflMtyfc
BUSCH
.
Copyright 19W. AfltMuwr-BuKtv Ine . St. Loun Ho
.?SSSSSSSk5�SSSSS
F
GAMES
BR1
Vt II
I
I t
ECU at South C aroiina
Illinois at Mich. State
Wake Forest at Virginia
N.C. State at Clemson
Duke at Maryland
Southern Cal at Notre Dame
West Virginia at Boston Coll
Oregon at Stanford
Northwestern at Wisconsin
Michigan at Indiana
��� - - -
Volfpack prepares jo
RALEIGH (AP) Neither
turday's loss to Atlantic coa
onference nval North Carolina
tor next week's impending dash
vith league-leading Clemsn t;
urt North Carolina State's posi
ve outlook, Wolfpack coach
)ick Sheridan said Monday
" just don't believe with the
ets aid L
Continued from page 15
Pompili, a 6-foot senior tor
rard, led the Lady Pirates in scor-
ig (12.1 points per game) and
njnding (8.0 rpg.) last year,
while Bethea, a 6-foot senior,
played in every game last season
Scoring 11.8 points and grabbing
6t2 rebounds per outing.
Pompili and Bethea, the only
seniors on the roster, are each le-
gitimatecandidates for all-confer-
ence honors in 1987-88.
Joining the bookend forwards
.in the frontcourt will be 6-2 junior
center Gretta Savage (7.9 ppg 4.1
rpelor 6-2 junior Rose Miller 0.5
ppg-TOBrpg.) . Savage, a left-
hander with a soft touch, will log
nearly 20 minutes a game.
Another key performer figures
to be junior Chris O'Connor (7.3
ppg 3.4 rpg.), who can play ei-
ther the big guard or small for-
ward positions and started in 25
aames last season. Junior guard
Iram Williams (4.9 ppg 1.5 apg.)
h one of three Lady Pirates trying
,10 recover from off-season knee
purgerv.
Six-toot sophomore forward
irah Gray � will not recover
)m her surgery in time to plav
taycar. Gray (4.9 ppg 4.4 rpg
ras a member of the CAA's all-
fRookie team last year as a fresh-
man.
Holding down the point guard
position appears to be sophomore
fjfpeedster Irish Hamilton (2.3
.) who played behind the rec-
rd-holding Mabry last year.
Pierson, who got a late start on
ftcruiting, did manage to sign a
lir of guards � 5-6 Kate Kinney
inston-Salem, NO and 5-7
fendy Morton (Concord, NO �
th of whom could contnbute
Ipfri mediately
f "We've set some loftv eoals tor
isyear Pierson said. 'We want
win the conference and we d
ce to win 20 games this year
)th goals will be hard to reach
cause our conference is so
rang.
"It will take time for this team to
im a new system and adjust to a
iw style. I think we'll be a fun

COACH PIERSON
a
h
w
M
200
Gol
PE"

A
j
MMUMfMH





ith a bang
lu in the sixth inning trying for a
inthelOO comeback but tell short. Bnan
Swain earned both runs batted in
both the bv hitting a hot grounder down
d center field The Executioners
were unable to execute up to par
and scored only two runs leaving
�ntest and the 1987 season
vith a second place position.
all will be winding
' a tion this week
ds adjacent to Fiek-
Going into the men's
n with first place wrapped
eartsand hands are
S i he Enforcers are
' � an all campus victory
- vision.
- intoWZMB91J
� and Thursday
�' al Recreational
VP rhis program
nn all (acuity,
�out the pro-
ffered by the

t
j HJ pm.
ral sign up dates
7
October 29th
c Strcater
Speak to
L Students
U fl
rn
.the
to
ilil
3d
m
schbeer.
Natural
elob 4-Light BUSCH
ICopyngM 1983 Anheuser-Busch inc . St. Lou.�
Mo
I
r
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
r
CXTOBER 22. 1�87 17
.�SSSSSSSSSSSSSS�
�WSW�
SN.V
Fearless Football Forecast
GAMES
BRIAN BAILEY
VVNCT-TV Sports Director
Last Week:
(8-2)
Overall:
(49-21)
DEAN BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
Last Week:
(7-3)
Overall:
(49-21)
TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Last Week:
(6-4)
Overall:
(47-23)
PAT MOLLOY
Assistant Sports Editor
Last Week:
(5-5)
Overall:
(42-28)
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
Last Week:
(6-4)
Overall:
(38-32)
rCU at South Carolina
Illinois at Mich. State
Wake Forest at Virginia
N.C State at Clemson
Duke at Maryland
Southern Cal at Notre Dame
West Virginia at Boston Coll.
Oregon at Stanford
Northwestern at Wisconsin
Michigan at Indiana
South Carolina
Michigan State
Virginia
Clemson
Maryland
Notre Dame
West Virginia
Oregon
Wisconsin
Michigan
South Carolina
Michigan State
Wake Forest
Clemson
Maryland
Notre Dame
Boston College
Stanford
Wisconsin
Michigan
South Carolina
Michigan State
Wake Forest
Clemson
Duke
Notre Dame
West Virginia
Oregon
Wisconsin
Michigan
South Carolina
Michigan State
Wake Forest
Clemson
Maryland
Notre Dame
Boston College
Oregon
Wisconsin
Michigan
ECU
Michigan State
Wake Forest
Clemson
Maryland
Notre Dame
West Virginia
Stanford
Wisconsin
Indiana
9.
f.
)

'

Wolfpack prepares for big clash with Clemson after disheartening loss to rival North Carolina
RALEIGH (AP) Neither
Saturday's loss to Atlantic coast
i onference rival North Carolina
nor next week's impending clash
with league-leading Clemson has
rt North Carolina State's posi-
tive outlook, Wolfpack coach
Pick Sheridan said Mondav.
"I just don't believe with the
caliber of people we have, even
though some of our goals are
very, very long shots, that we are
going to back off and stop trying
Sheridan said at his weekly news
conference.
"I think there is a pride that just
won't let them he said. "No
doubt that it is more difficult to
reach down and be at practice
every day. I have confidence in
them to keep trying and to get
better for every game
While N.C. State had hoped to
challenge for the ACC crown, the
Wolfpack has fallen to 2-4, 2-2 in
the conference. After the 17-14
loss to the Tar Heels, a trip to
Death Valley to play undefeated
Clemson looms large, Sheridan
said.
"Our opponents seem to be
getting better he said. "We have
got to continue to improve every
week if we want the opportunity
to be successful
The Wolfpack, which gained
ony 26 yards rughing against the
Tar Heels while giving up 269
yards on the ground, must turn
things around, Sheridan said.
"We have got to be able to rush
the ball consistently and control
the line of scrimmage from a de-
fensive standpoint he said.
Even though Dukeand Virginia
had some success passing against
the Tigers, N.C. State will strive
for a balanced offense, Sheridan
said.
ECU
Vets aid Lady PiratesiWtfAf ROOM SHOES,
Continued from page 15
Pompili, a 6-foot senior tor-
m ard, led the Lady Pirates in scor-
ing (12.1 points per game) and
n bounding (8.0 rpg.) last year,
Ahile Bethea, a 6-foot senior,
played in every game last season
coring 11.8 points and grabbing
� 2 rebounds per outing.
Pompili and Bethea, the only
eniors on the roster, are each le-
gitimate candidates for all-confer-
ence honors in 1987-88.
Joining the bookend forwards
in the frontcourt will be 6-2 junior
center Gretta Savage (7.9 ppg4.1
rpK-fypr 6-2 junior Rose Miller (1.5
ppgT7T� rpgT) . Savage?"a left
hander with a soft touch, will log
nearly 20 minutes a game.
Another key performer figures
to be junior Chns O'Connor (7.3
ppg 3.4 rpg.), who can play ci-
ther the big guard or small for-
ward positions and started in 25
Sames last season. Junior guard
Pam Williams (4.9 ppg 1.5 apg.)
is one of three Lady Pirates trying
to recover from off-season knee
Mirgery.
Six-foot sophomore forward
Sarah Gray � will not recover
trom her surgery in time to play
this year. Gray (4.9 ppg 4.4 rpg')
vvas a member of the CAA's all-
Rookie team last year as a fresh-
man.
Holding down the point guard
position appears to be sophomore
speedster Irish Hamilton (2.3
ppgwho played behind the rec-
ord-holding Mabry last year.
Picrson, who got a late start on
recruiting, did manage to sign a
pair of guards � 5-6 Kate Kinney
(Winston-Salem, NO and 5-7
Wendy Morton (Concord, NO �
both of whom could contribute
immediately.
"We've set some lofty goals for
this year Piersonsaid. "We want
to win the conference and we'd
like to win 20 games this year.
Both goals will be hard to reach
because our conference is so
strong.
"It will take time for this team to
ioarn a new system and adjust to a
new style. I think we'll be a fun
COACH PIERSON
team to watch this year, and that
we'll be a better team in February
than we will in December
ECU's schedule includes a
double round-robin trip through
the CAA, highlighted bv nation-
ally-ranked James Madison. The
Lady Pirates also play Duke and
will play in three tournaments
with such national powers as
Sou thern Cal, Vanderbilt and Old
Dominion.
BRANDED SH
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
TAKE AN
EXTRA
10
OFF
Open MonSat. 10-9
Sunday 1-6
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(EXCEPT AIGNER. NIKE AND REEBOK)
329 Arlington
Blvd.
756-1579
ALL HAIR SERVICES
MAKEUP-MANICURES
TANNING BEDS
! 20 Discount Off Any Service.
! Good Through 10-31-87
PETEY HATHAWAY, Owner
SUDAN TEMPLE �
AND
ECU STUDENT UNION
SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE
PRESENTS
The Royal Hanneford's
Shrine Circus
ECUMinges Coliseum
Sunday, October 25th
3:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m.
$3.00 ECU students $5.00 all others
AU tickets will be $5.00 at the door
Advance Tickets now on sale at the
Central
Office
11 a.m. - 6 p.m
Monday - Friday,
757-6611, ext. 266.
� � mm0m
.�
� -mm
�-�- u m m m mm0mmi m � i, �i� m.
'T �
I
v





ith a bang
ke.
it-t in the UV
b New-
both the
in the sixth inning trying for a
comeback but tell short. Brian
Swain earned both runs batted in
b hitting a hot grounder down
ter field The Executioners
w rc unable to execute up to par
scored only two runs leaving
ontest and the 1987 season
with a second place position.
Rag football will be winding
� oft action this week
fields adjacent to Fkrk-
m Going intothemen's
tirst place wrapped
hearts and hands an?
S The Enforcers are
I an all campus victory
n� n s diision
toWZMB9U
and Ihursdav
ral Recreational
! his program
I


m all faculty,
ibout the pro-
i
b) the
V pm.
ral sign up dates
D 103
I
i October 29th
e Streater
Speak to
J. Students
� w
(� I
jni
hi
11
rn
.the
to
rfj
schbeer.
Natural PFfH
elob 4fcLightgt BUSCH
ICopynght 1983 Anheuser-Busch Inc . St. Lou.�, Mo
s
1
.
r
THE EAST CAROLINIAN (KTOBCR n IW7 17
�vVSSSSSSSSSSSSSS?
s0�����
t
I
�i
���-�
?.V.V� '������.
Fearless Football Forecast
GAMES
BRIAN BAILEY
VVNCT-TV Sports Director
Last Week:
(8-2)
Overall:
(49-21)
DEAN BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
Last Week:
(7-3)
Overall:
(49-21)
TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Last Week:
(6-4)
Overall:
(47-23)
PAT MOLLOY
Assistant Sports Editor
Last Week:
(5-5)
Overall:
(42-28)
Dr. RICHARD LAKIN
ECU Chancellor
Last Week:
(6-4)
Overall:
(38-32)
ECU at South Carolina
Illinois at Mich. State
Wake Forest at Virginia
N.C State at Clemson
Duke at Maryland
Southern Cal at Notre Dame
West Virginia at Boston Coll.
Oregon at Stanford
Northwestern at Wisconsin
Michigan at Indiana
South Carolina
Michigan State
Virginia
Clemson
Maryland
Notre Dame
West Virginia
Oregon
Wisconsin
Michigan
South Carolina
Michigan State
Wake Forest
Clemson
Maryland
Notre Dame
Boston College
Stanford
Wisconsin
Michigan
South Carolina
Michigan State
Wake Forest
Clemson
Duke
Notre Dame
West Virginia
Oregon
Wisconsin
Michigan
South Carolina
Michigan State
Wake Forest
Clemson
Maryland
Notre Dame
Boston College
Oregon
Wisconsin
Michigan
ECU
Michigan State
Wake Forest
Clemson
Maryland
Notre Dame
West Virginia
Stanford
Wisconsin
Indiana
t.
i



I
Wolf pack prepares for big clash with Clemson after disheartening loss to rival North Carolina
RALEIGH (AP) - Neither
xiturday's loss to Atlantic coast
ionfcrcnce rival North Carolina
nor next week's impending clash
w ith league-leading Clemson has
urt North Carolina State's posi-
tive outlook, Wolfpack coach
Pick Sheridan said Monday.
"1 just don't believe with the
caliber of people we have, even
though some of our goals are
very, very long shots, that we are
going to back off and stop trying
Sheridan said at his weekly news
conference.
"1 think there is a pride that just
won't let them he said. "No
doubt that it is more difficult to
reach down and be at practice
every day. 1 have confidence in
them to keep trying and to get
better for every game
While N.C. State had hoped to
challenge for the ACC crown, the
Wolfpack has fallen to 2-4, 2-2 in
the conference. After the 17-14
loss to the Tar Heels, a trip to
Death Valley to play undefeated
Clemson looms large, Sheridan
said.
"Our opponents seem to be
getting better he said. "We have
got to continue to improve every
week if we want the opportunity
to be successful
The Wolfpack, which gained
ony 26 yards rughing against the
Tar Heels while giving up 269
yards on the ground, must turn
things around, Sheridan said.
"We have got to be able to rush
the ball consistently and control
the line of scrimmage from a de-
fensive stand point he said.
Even though Dukeand Virginia
had some success passing against
the Tigers, N.C. State will strive
for a balanced offense, Sheridan
said.
ECU
Vets aid Lady PiratesiWflK ROOM SHOES,
Continued from page 15
Pompili, a 6-foot senior tor-
m ard, led the Lady Pirates in scor-
ing (12.1 points per game) and
bounding (8.0 rpg.) last year,
hile Bcthca, a 6-foot senior,
played in every game last season
scoring 11.8 points and grabbing
6 2 rebounds per outing.
Pompili and Bethca, the only
seniors on the roster, are each le-
gitimate candidates for all-confer-
ence honors in 1987-88.
Joining the bookend forwards
in thefrontcourt will be 6-2 junior
center Gretta Savage (7.9 ppg 4.1
rp.jr 6-2junior Rose Miller (1.5
ppgTof rpg) . SavageTa left
hander with a soft touch, will log
nearly 20 minutes a game.
Another key performer figures
to be junior Chris O'Connor (7.3
ppg 3.4 rpg.), who can play ei-
ther the big guard or small for-
ward positions and started in 25
parries last season. Junior guard
Pam Williams (4.9 ppg 1.5 apg.)
is one of three Lady Pirates trying
to recover from off-season knee
surgery.
Six-foot sophomore forward
"Narah Gray � will not recover
trom her surgery in time to play
this year. Gray (4.9 ppg 4.4 rpg')
was a member of the CAA's all-
Rookie team last year as a fresh-
man.
Holding down the point guard
position appears to be sophomore
speedster Irish Hamilton (2.3
ppg) who played behind the rec-
ord-holding Mabry last year.
Pierson, who got a late start on
recruiting, did manage to sign a
pair of guards � 5-6 Kate Kinney
iWinston-Salem, NO and 5-7
Wendy Morton (Concord, NO �
both of whom could contribute
immediately.
"We've set some lofty goals for
thisyear Pierson said. "We want
to win the conference and we'd
like to win 20 games this year.
Both goals will be hard to reach
because our conference is so
strong.
"It will take time for this team to
iearn a new system and adjust to a
new style. I think we'll be a fun
team lo watch this year, and that
we'll be a better team in February
than we will in December
ECL's schedule includes a
double round-robin trip through
the CAA, highlighted by nation-
COACH PIERSON
ally-ranked James Madison. The
Lady Pirates also play Duke and
will play in three tournaments
with such national powers as
Southern Cal, Vanderbilt and Old
Dominion.
BRANDED SH
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
10
Open MonSat. 10-9
Sunday 1-6
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(EXCEPT A1GNER. NIKE AND REEBOK)
SUDAN TEMPLE �
AND
ECU STUDENT UNION �
SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE
PRESENTS
ALL HAIR SERVICES
MAKEUP-MANICURES
TANNING BEDS
20 Discount Off Any Service.
Good Through 10-31-87
PETEY HATHAWAY, Owner
The Royal HanneforcTs
Shrine Circus
ECUMinges Coliseum
Sunday, October 25th
3:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m.
$3.00 ECU students $5.00 all others
A11 tickets will be $5.00 at the door
Advance Tickets now on sale at the
Central Ticket Office.
11 a.m. - 6 p.m
Monday - Friday,
757-6611, ext. 266.
i
�mmmmamm

-��-r-
��"�f
"���
��� � M fc �m jmt i i
I ,
I
I





18
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 22,1987
Demon Decons regroup;
prepare for tough VA offense
WINSTON-SALEM (AP) �
Wake Forest football coach Bill
1 tooiey said Tuesday the Demon
Deacons must regroup from their
first loss of the season and play
tough defense against offensive-
minded Virginia this coming
weekend.
"We face a major challenge in
Charlottcsville, (Va.), because
Virginia has moved the football
very well against most of its oppo-
nents Dooley said at his weekly
news conference. "Virginia can
move it on the ground and they
can move it in the air with two
excellent receivers in (John) Ford
and (Keith) Mattioli, and they
have a quarterback � Scott
Scvules � who can get the ball to
those receivers
Both teams are coming off
tough losses. South Carolina
dumped the Cavaliers 58-10 last
Saturday, while Wake Forest
dropped its first decision in six
games to Maryland 14-0.
"From a standpoint of effort, we
played well enough to win the
game against Maryland Dooley
said. "We were down there four
times � three times beyond the
10-yard line. You have to givca lot
of credit to the Maryland defense
for keeping us out of the end
zone
Dooley said he thinks the Cava-
liers, 3-4 overall and 1-2 in the
Atlantic Coast Conference, will be
ready on Saturday.
'They have a stable of running
backs � 1 think Durwin Greggs is
a very good fullback Dooley
said. "On top of that, Virginia is a
much-improved defensive
team
NFL Players back on the job
(AP) � When someone is
stomped, he can have a long
memory - league officials con-
cede that if there had been a for-
mal back-to-work agreement be-
tween the union and the NFL
Management Council the regu-
irs who reported Thursday
uld have played on Sunday-
The only rule in sports nego-
ons is that when you have
r foot on someone else's neck,
don't Mop on it because he'll re-
verse the situation at some point
one agent said this week.
"They took proud men who are
er macho and already hurting
And ground them into the dust.
i or the first time in the whole
strike, they got fans feeling rela-
tively sorrv for plavers
Wait until the next negotiations.
!t management held the edge
this time because the players had
no clear-cut issue to rally around,
there's sure to be one the next time
resentment over the way the
m ners rubbed it in.
One reason for the hard-line
approach was the makeup of the
Management Council executive
ommittee, which contains three
ol the NFL's toughest bargainers
Tex Schramm of Dallas, joe
Robbie of Miami and Mike Brown
of Cincinnati � with only Dan
Rooney of Pittsburgh as a moder-
ate balance. Combined with Jack
Conlan, the Council's executive
director, they played hardball all
the way through the 24-day strike.
Moderation?
Commissioner Pete Rozelle,
who desperately wanted to avoid
what did happen, could do little
but bring the sides together from
time to time. He received calls
from union leader Gene Upshaw
on Tuesday and Wednesday
nights, the last two before the end
of the strike, but couldn't get the
hard-liners to compromise on a
back-to-work agreement that
would haveended thestrikemore
amicablv.
Al Davis, whose links to Up-
shaw, a former plaver for him
with the Los Angeles Raiders,
could have served the owners
well, was rendered ineffective be-
cause past lawsuits have left him
isolated. His so-called "West
Coast Plan which would have
allowed free agency after 10
vcars, was never even considered.
Veteran Pirate netter John Melhorn lines up for a shot in a match
against Atlantic Christian College. The ECU men wound up the
regular season splitting a pair of matches last week, beating UNC-
Greensboro and losing to ACC. The team takes a 7-1 overall and 2-1
CAA record into the conference tourney this weekend. (Photo by
Thomas Walters � Photolab)
Tom Togs Factory Outlet
1900 Dickinson Avenue
Next Warehouse Sale Oct. 26th - Nov. 7th
Featuring Fashionable Fall Merchandise, Casual Wear, and Famous Brand.
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& I-amou iitm Iat Wr Cannot Mention HI I M w
i
Trocadero lank Top, link Irenes, Bicycle t'anta. Walk Shorts. Mini Skirt 4 Tops
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If you ire a nrwcomrr to town, we invite you to visit our store at 1900 Dickinson Avenue If you are going to
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We Also Wholesale
Mastercard & Visa Accepted
Join Tim Chandler
and the sports
department each
week in
The East Carolinian
The best in sports reporting
Rosina's Picture Pic
of the Week
fit k
Paige Barijer
If your Face Appcan in Roaina'i Picture Pic
Contest You Win A 2 Topping targe Piya H
Fvery Thurm.
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 22, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 22, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.567
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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