The East Carolinian, October 15, 1987






INSIDE
EditorialsM�m
Entertainment�� 7
SportsM ' j
Classifieds�m$
ENTTERTAINMENT
ECU students make plans to renovate downtown
areas � see ENTERTAINMENT, page 7.
SPORTS
Can the Pirates do it again? � see SPORTS, page 10.
Qftlt Safit damltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. b2 No. 15
Thursday, October 15,1987
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Police assailant from NCSU
identified and charged
By ANDY LEWIS
Law enforcement officials said
they will arrest the man charged
with assaulting a public safety
officer at the melee alter the Sept.
5 ECU-North Carolina State Uni-
versity football game.
Keith Douglas Philbeck, 21, of
Cary is to be charged today with
assaulting Inspector Robert W.
Malason, according to NCSU
Public Safety Captain Laura Rey-
nolds.
Philbeck has never been a stu-
dent at either ECL or NCSU, offi-
cials said.
People from both Greenville
and Raleigh identified Philbeck to
police officials alter various me-
dia made available videotape's
and photographsoi who had been
seen on top of a goalpost at the
game.
The material was filmed after
ECU's32-14 victory over NCSU at
Carter-Finley Stadium, where
over 2,000 tans spilled onto the
field and caused an estimated
$7 200 to the stadium.
v-u.c . .dcuUii)ijiupi.cU a man
assaulting Malason. The same
man apparently then scaled a
g( wlpost and waved to a crowd of
football tans below.
Two ECL' students identified
Philbeck as the suspect Friday,
according to ECL Public Safety
Captain Keith Knox. Both stu-
dents identified Philbeck after
seeing a story and a picture in The
East Carolinian.
The warrant, which charges
Legislation
changes role,
honor board
By TIM HAMPTON
Stilt Writer
With the passage of new legisla-
tion by the SGA Monday that will
change the role of the 1 lonor
Board, it remains to be seen how
the Board's extended power will
affect students.
The Honor Board can now hear
and reach judgement on all cases
which involve violations of the
code of conduct. Prior to the new-
legislation, the Honor Board had
to wait for judgment to be passed
in a court of law before it could act
on the case.
"The major effect of this will be
that the boards will have to re-
view more cases said Dr. Elmer
Meyer, vice chancellor of student
lite.
Ronald Speier, associate dean of
student life, said he did not think
the extended power of the Honor
Board would cause a decrease in
campus crime. Speier said it
would make the students more
responsible to upholding the
codes of conduct.
Both Meyer and Speier thought
the board is competent to make
just decisions. "1 can't see them
changing their attitudes for deter-
mining appropriate sanctions
Speier said.
Meyer said it was too early to
tell if more cases will be appealed
to the office of the dean of student
life as a result of the new legisla-
tion. He said only a few cases have
been appealed to this person in
the last decade.
"This was the most important
piece of legislation to come
through the SGA in quite a long
time said Bennett Eckert,
speaker of the legislature. "It will
hold students more responsible
for theiracfions to the university
Eckert said.
Philbeck with assault, inflicting
serious injury, came as the result
of a cooperative investigation
between ECU and NCSU public
safety departments, Knox said.
One ECU student called Pirate
Crime Busters and identified
Philbeck Friday, Knox said. The
other student snowed ECU Public
Safety officers a 1984 Sanderson
High School (of Raleigh) year-
book that included Philbeck's
picture, Knox said.
The student viewed a videotape
of the incident in Knox's office
and positviely identified Philbeck
as the assailant, Knox said.
Reynolds said her office had
made arrangements with
Philbeck's lawyer to serve the
warrant today.
Vice chancellor search begins
Bv ED WILKERSON
Suff Wnltr
The search for a new vice chan-
cellor of academic affairs for ECU
began Tuesday when Chancellor
Richard R. Eakin announced the
appointment of Dr. Carl Adler to
chair a search committee.
Eakin made the announcement
at the meeting of the ECU Faculty
Senate. The position was left open
when Dr. Angelo Volpe became
president of Tennessee Techno-
logical University in July.
Adler, a professor and chair-
man of the physics department,
will head a five member commit-
tee in conducting a national
search to fill the position.
The committee will begin ad-
vertising in national academic
media beginning in November,
according to an ECU News Bu-
reau press release.
In addition to Adler, Eakin
named Dr. Holly Mathews of
sociology and anthropology, Dr.
Conner Atkeson of the historv
department, Dr. Clinton Down-
ingof the School of Education and
Dr. Edward Levinc, dean of the
School of Art.
Janice Faulkner, director of the
North Carolina Humanities
Council, spoke to the Senate re-
garding grant funding awarded
by the council, which totals ap-
proximately $600,000 annually.
University departments which
qualify represent any of the hu-
manities or educational disci-
plines.
"The primary purpose of the
grants is to engage university
scholars with the public commu-
nity Faulkner said. "The Hu-
manities Council will continue to
aid in funding of public programs
and educational student forums
The proposed expansion of
Mcndenhall student center was
reviewed at the meeting. Con-
struction is slated to begin by
November of this year, according
to director Rudolph Alexander,
who said a total of 31,000 square
feet will be added to the building,
expanding all 3 levels.
The construction, according to
Alexander, will add a cafeteria
with a seating capacity of 400,
additional student government
offices, a student multi-purpose
room and an elaborate "great
room" which will be utilized for
buffet dinners, the accomodation
of public speakers and presenta-
tion of theater productions.
Dr. Elmer Meyer, Vice Chancel-
lor of Student Life, commented on
the growth of the university's
student work-study program.
The program's directors evalu-
ate individual student financial
status and then offer assistance in
locating employers who have
advertised openings for employ-
ment positions.
Work-study employers include
both public and private factions
on-campus and in the surround-
ing Greenville area, according to
Pam Spell, Assistant Director of
Student Services and employ-
ment. Spell commented the "475
students received checks on the
last payroll, a marked increase in
the number of students involved
at this time last year
The ECU Alumni Telefund was
brought to the attention of the
senate members in an effort to
boost the amount of $45,000 cur-
rently raised.
see TELEFUND, page 2
Marie Farr, Linda Godwin and Linda Could (left to right) at the "Women in tne 21st Cei.turv" program
in Mendenhall Student Center Wednesday (Jon Jordan, Photolab).
Godwin experiences NASA
By TO NT PAGE
Staff Writer
NASA astronaut Linda God win
was the keynote speaker at the
Women'�Forum Committee pro-
gram entitled "Women of the 21 st
century Wednesday in Men-
denhall Student Center.
Godwin spoke on her experi-
ences in the NASA space program
and encouraged students in the
science and math fields to pursue
their interests. "If you take some-
thing that is challenging that you
like then there is no limit to what
you can do in that field Godwin
said.
Godwin talked about her at-
tempts to get into the space pro-
gram before being accepted and
added, "Enjoy what you are
doing and don't stop trying to get
what you want
Godwin presented a slide se-
ries on the space program and
also addressed questions from the
audience. Among the questions
asked were those pertaining to the
progress of the space shuttle.
Godwin expressed sorrow to the
colleagues lost in the Challenger
disaster and said major im-
provments will be made in the
area of hardware and test and
check-out. Godwin said most of
the training procedures will re-
main the same except for extra
manuevcrs in the crew escape
system.
"We should see a launch by
1988, hopefully in June Godwin
said.
After recieving her doctorate
degree in 1982, Godwin went to
work for NASA as a flight officer.
In 1985 she was selected as an
astronaut candidate and missions
specialist for space shuttle flight
crews.
Godwin was one of many
speakers who participated in the
program, "Women of the 21st
Century on Wednesday. Ac-
cording to Linda Gould, chairper-
son for the Women's forum, the
program went exceptionally well.
"We had a great turnout. Hope-
fully students were able to gain
knowledge from the speakers and
at the same time become inter-
ested and more familiar with our
organization Gould said.
Gould said the main objectivcof
the day was to educate students
about some of their life choices
and give them encouragement to
continue their education and pur-
sue their goals.
Throughout the day various
speakers addressed the topics of
service organizations, govern-
ment, education and business.
Some of the speakers included, Jo
Ann Eakin from the chancellor's
office; Sandra Babb, secretary for
the Board of Trustees, Jeanne
Meiggs, superintendent for Cur-
rituck County Schools; Sissy
Gamble from the ECU school of
Medicine and Glenda Steele, vice
president of NCNB, who came in
from Concord.
Marie Farr, a professor for the
Women Studies Program. Lk
tated the dav's events and s�
"Every talk was a learning experi-
ence. The speakers addressed
important women's issues and
talked about career choices a-
well as the personal choices in
volved. All together we had about
300 people attend throughout the
day. It was a great success
Kennerle discuses Contra
effects on Nicaragua
By TIM HAMPTON
Stiff Writer
A man who said he has seen the
U.S. backed Contras terrorize and
kidnap their fellow Nicaraguan
people in the war zones of the
Central American country spoke
in Greenville Tuesday night.
Peter Kemmcrle, who spent
two-and-onc-half years in Nicara-
gua as a peace volunteer, told an
audience of 30 at the Baptist Stu
land mine. The priest was return-
ing from a trip to a settlement,
where he had transported seed
and agricultural tools to farmers,
when the truck was mined,
Kemmerle said. Kemmerle said
'Tiie Contras are solving
terror in the countryside of
deTn'atteeqpaier Nicaragua. They are kid-
in the war torn country. napping and murdering the
"The Contras are sowing terror
Peter Kemmerle speaks at the Baptist Student Union Tuesday about
his experiences in Nicaragua (Ester Norton, Photolab).
in the countryside of Nicaragua.
They arc kidnapping and mur-
dering the civilian people
Kemmcrle said.
The Contras, the rebel army
armed and trained by U.S. Army
advisors, have been fighting the
established Sandista regime since
1981, Kemmerle said. The Sandin-
istas came to power after the wake
of the 1979 Nicaraguan revolution
in which the dictator, Samosa was
ousted from office.
Kemmerle described several
accounts of the Contras terroriz-
ing and kidnapping civilians. In
one incident, Kemmerle said,
Contra soldiers stopped a pick-up
truck. Later, Kemmcrle found out
that the man arrested was a school
teacher. The man was never seen
again, according to Kemmerle.
"Often the Contras would kid-
nap a man and his entire family
would feel threatened
Kemmerle said. He said threat-
ened families usually left their
land and moved into a sen ta mien-
tos, or resettlement villages,
where the civilians would have
some shelter against such attacks.
As a volunteer with Witness for
Peace, an organization with a
commitment to non violence,
Kemmerle said he traveled to 13
resettlement villages. The volun-
teers gave construction materials
to the people in these villages to
build houses, schools and sewage
systems, according to Kemmerle.
He said while he was in the
town of Rio Blanco, a Catholic
priest was killed as the truck he
was driving was blown up by a
civilian people'
Kemmerle
Peter
he believed the Contras set the
mine.
Kemmerle said the Contras tar-
geted school teachers and health
workers as occupations which
they thought would undermine
the rebel effort. They also attack
rural peasant settlements,
Kemmerle said.
"The principle attack of the
Contras is on people who have no
choice Kemmerle said of the
peasant settlements.
Kemmerle said the Contras are
concentrating more on fighting
the civilians than the Sandinistas.
'They never attacked seriously
any military instalation
Kemmerle said.
Most of the Contra officers are
former national guardsmen, who
were members of Samosa's army,
according to Kemmerle. He said
the foot soldiers were usually
sons of disgruntled landowners
who had lost land after the 1979
revolution.
In some cases the Contras kid-
napped men to Honduras where
they were trained to fight in the
militia against their will, accord-
ing to Kemmerle. He talked with
men who had been to Honduras
and escaped from the Contras, he
said.
"The Reagan Administration is
way out of line in supporting the
Contras. We need to condemn the
action of aid to this group
Kemmerle said.
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Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 15, 1987
Wornom endowment pays recipient's tuition
(ECU News Bureau) � Samuel
J. Wornom III of Sanford, N.C
and his wife have endowed one of
the prestigious University Schol-
ars Awards at East Carolina Uni-
versity. The awards arc endowed
at $40,000 and, through interest
income, provide full tuition and
fees for a recipient's entire four
years at ECU.
Wornom co-founded The Pan-
trv, Inc a chain of 480 conven-
ience stores employing 3,000
people in five states. He recently
sold his interest in that company
and founded Nouveau Invest-
ments, Inc a multi-diversified
investment company.
"Sam Wornom's leadership
abilities in the business commu-
nity have enabled him to reach the
top of his profession said James
L. Lanier Jr ECU vice chancellor
for Institutional Advancement.
School stores honor Dowdy
(ECU News Bureau) � The
ECU Student Stores will be
nanuxi in honor of alumnus
Ronald E. Dowdy to signify ap-
preciation of Dowdy's leadership
as an advocate and benefactor of
the university, ECU officials an-
nounced Tuesday.
The stores, which include the
campus bookstore and two snack
bars will be named for Dowdy at
a formal ceremony at 9 a.m Oct.
31, in Wright Auditorium.
Ron Dowdy's allegiance to his
alma mater is a source of pride
said Dr. Richard R. Eakin, ECU
chancellor. "His steadv support
has permitted East Carolina Uni-
versity to provide students with
opportunities that would other-
wise not have been possible. We
are proud to be able to recognize
Mr. Dowdy's contributions
A self-made millionaire.
Dowdy is an entrepreneur in
Orlando, Fla who has prospered
through real estate development
and investments. At ECU he
worked his way through school
by providing a laundry delivery
service to students and by book-
ing dance bands for local shows.
He recei ved a bachelor's degree in
accounting in 1966.
Dowdy gave a $100,000 chal-
lenge gift in 1985-86. Through the
annual giving program, his gift
was matched by alumni contribu-
tors for a total of $200,000. He has
also pledged $25,000 to the School
of Business Golden Anniversary
Campaign.
Dowdy is an Alexandria, Va
native. He was a member of the
Air Force ROTC at East Carolina.
After graduation he entered the
Air Force as a second lieutenant
and served for five years as a
navigator and bombardier for the
Strategic Air Command in Viet
Nam.
"Sam recognizes the signifi-
cance of a university experience.
He wants this investment to be an
incentive for talented young lead-
ers to stretch their limits and excel
in new ways Lanier said.
University Scholars are chosen
on the basis of superior academic
and leadership capabilities
through a competitive selection
process.
Wornom is a 1965 ECU gradu-
ate with an AB degree in Business
Administration and his wife is
also an ECU graduate.
"I would hope that the recipient
of a University Scholars Award
would not only be academically
outstanding, but would shine as a
motivated student leader in other
SRA discuses alcohol awareness
BV KRIS REYER
S��il WriW
The Student Residence Hall
Association dealt with finaliza-
tion of the button campaign plans
for Alcohol Awareness Week at
its Tuesday meeting.
Students can sign contracts
pledging not to drink Oct. 25-30
according to Thomas Denton,
president. The group agreed to
have sign ups in each ARC area
and the Student Store on Oct. 22-
- -�
"i
It they fulfill their contracts,
Denton said, they can turn them
in to the directors of their resi-
dence halls or the Student Store (
in the case of non-residents). In
return for their contracts for an "I
Did It For a Week at ECU" button.
The SRA also approved a mo-
tion to put $b00 more into the
student loan fund, bringing the
total to $1500, according to Louise
Perreca, treasurer. This fund is
available for small loans up to $25
with a SRA card and student I.D
said Perreca. The loan must be
paid back within a month and
mav be applied for at 214
Whichard, stated Perreca.
The association furthered plans
on a pig pickin' to be held Nov. 7,
before the last home game. It
agreed on a cost of $5 a plate
which will include Bar-B-Q,
chicken, field peas, boiled pota-
toes, combread and tea. Seconds
will be free, Denton said.
Perreca announced plans to try
to form a NRHH Chapter at ECU.
The NRHH (National Residence
Hall Honorary) is a connection
between RA's and hall represen-
tatives, stated Perreca. The or-
ganization will promote such
thingsashallrepresentativeof the
week and program of the month'
contests, said Perreca. Member-
ship is a lifetime thing; once you
move out of your residence hall
you are an alumni, stated Perreca.
Mary Piland, president of the
Hill area, announced plans to try
to get more sand on the beach on
the hill and nets on the tennis
courts.
A representative from Scott
announced plans for a breakfast
before the last home football
game and the possibilities of
fund-raisers for new vacuum
cleaners for the residence halls
and a VCR for Scott.
This weekend, members of the
Pi Kappa Phi fraternity will be in
Greenville assisting the Pitt-
Greenville Crime stoppers in
their telethon to raise money for
the crime fighting program.
According to Pi Kappa Phi
President Dillion Kalkhurst, the
fraternity members will be help-
ing by answering phones and
taking pledges during the tele-
thon. Kalkhurst said the fratcr-
nity will also donate $500 to the j
telethon.
Council focuses onfall rush
Bv TON1 PAGE
Staff Wriwr
Fall rush week was the focus of
attention at Wednesday's Inter-
Fraternal Council meeting.
Fall rush week will be held Nov.
15-19 and is open to those stu-
dents interested in joining a fra-
ternity who were not eligible the
first semester. According to coun-
cil President Brooke Stonesifer, no
bids will be given at this time. The
rush merely an opportunity for
interested persons to get a second
look at the fraternities of their
choice.
"1 think the program should be
benificial to the guys interested in
rushing next semester because it
wil 1 gi vc them double exposure to
the fraternities and they will be
able to meet more people this
way Stonesifer said.
Students who are interested in
fall rush week can sign up in front
of the student store the week prior
to rush week. Each fraternity
house will havea scheduled event j
each night, and at end of the week
a party will be held for the pro-
spective pledges at the Sigma Tauj
Gamma house, according to
Stonesifer.
Also discussed at the IFC meet-
ing was the issue of Halloween I
clean up. This year the fraternities
will have close to 50 members I
assisting the Greenville Public
Works Department in cleaning up
the downtown area after the tra-
ditional Halloween celebration
takes place, Stonesifer said.
Ron Speier, IFC faculty advisor,
stressed having fun while still
maintaining control. "Let's have a
good time but try and avoid any
problems Speier said.
Telefund pushing 'Pass the Buck' slogan
continued from page 1
The 1987Telefund, managed by
annual giving director Cindy
Kittrell, is pushing its slogan of
"Pass the Buck" in hopes of rais-
ing more money than last year
before its November 12th termi-
nation date. "All proceeds are
intended for the purpose of aca-
demic enrichment according to
Program Assistant Swen Van-
Baars.
Chancellor Eakin will direct the
allocation of telefund proceeds to
campus activities Womom said.
Womom is a member of the
ECU Board of Trustees, the ECU
Foundation Board of Directors
and the Chancellor's Society. He
also hasbcen on the Alumni Asso-
ciation Board of Directors, and he
is a plank member and an endow-
ment member of the Pirate Club.
In 1981 Womom received the
ECU Outstanding Alumni Award
for his professional contributions
to the business community.
Womom and hiscompany have
long supported ECU. They pro-
vided the lead gift of $100,000 to
begin the 1986-87 School of Busi-
ness Golden Anniversary Cam-
paign, a drive which raised over
$2 million.
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin
said, "It is because of the commit-
ment of alumni like Sam and
Sandy Wornom that the Univer-
sity Scholars Awards have been
made possible. They arc continu-
ing the tradition of service they
experienced as ECU students
while creating the legacy for
tomorrow's alumni
As a native of Hampton, Va
Wornom recognizes the extent of
ECU'S outreach. "East Carolina
has come a long way in a rela-
tively short period of time. The
university has always meant a lot
to the people of eastern North
Carolina, but the best is yet to
come he said.
"People far beyond the borders
of our state are hearing about East
Carolina University
Wornom's wife, the former
Sandra Leonard of Faycttcville,
was also a business ma jor a t ECU
She is involved with organiza-
tions which seek a medical break
through for Alzheimer's Disease
She also supports educational
programs for learning disabled
students.
The Womoms have two daugh
ters � Lesley, a junior at Central
Carolina Technical College in
Sanford, and Laurie, a senior at
Lee County Senior High School
The Womoms are members of
Jonesboro Heights Baptist
Churcru
sucn causes as student scholar-
ships, academic research and the
continued support of the ECU
allumni foundation.
Senate Chairman Atkeson ac-
knowledged the death of Dr.
Edward Ryan, Professor of Biol-
ogy, who passed away Saturday,
October 10th. Dr. Ryan, who re-
ceived his doctorate from The
University of Hawaii in 1959, had
been a professor of biology at
ECU since 1965. He was acting
chairman of the biology depart-
ment from 1978-81.
HAIR AND FASHION REVIEW
WED OCT. 21,1987
P A " (f4 9:30 P.M. Scott's
r
Ciotking
750
DRAFT
3tye Cast (Earolinimi
Si-ruing the IZast Carolina campus community since 1925
James F. J. McKee. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representlves
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo Shari Clemens
Pete Fernald Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY RATES
0 49 Coulumn inches S4 25
50 99 4.15
100-1494.05
150 199 3.95
200 249 3.85
2SO and above 3.75
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
(Charge in Addition to Regular Space Rate)
One color and blackS9O.0O
Two colors and black 155 00
Inserts
5.OO0 or ess06 each
5.001 10.000055 each
10.001 -12.00005 each
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday Friday
10:00 5:00 P.M.
PHONES737t366
757-6557 757-6366
757-6558 757-6309
Trustees v

i
WAKE FOREST (AP) � Con-
servative trustees at Southeastern
Baptist Theological Seminary
won a daylong series of clashes
with moderates, seizing control of
a panel that oversees the hiring of
professors and forcing a closed-
door meeting with the seminary
president over his objections.
"I am viscerally opposed to this
kind of a closed meeting Presi-
dent W. Randall Lolley said Tues-
day before a 14-10 vote to meet in
secret. "If you vote for a closed
session. 111 obey � I won't be
fired for insubordination � but
we don't need to go behind closed
doors to do God's work
Lolley said secrecy would exac-
erbate the tension between the
students and faculty and the con-
servatives. 'The trust level is
zilch. There are people on campus
who don't trust you. You don't
trust them
The Re lames R. DeLoach, a
conservative from Houston
elected vice president of the board
Monday, proposed the pmate
meeting. He said the board
needed to discuss Lollev's role
and relationship with the board
"The Bible talks about if you
have something to bnng up with
your brother to go to him in pri-
vate said William D. Delahoyde.
a Raleigh conservative. He said
reporters might "distort the
words we sav" if allowed to hear.
William R. Lonis, a Morrison,
Colo conservative, said he did
not want "boos and hollering"
from the students, faculty and
alumni who packed the meeting
and have voiced staunch opposi-
tion to the fundamentalists.
A group of students at first re-
fused to leave, then did so at
Lollev's urging. About two dozen
stood outside the room singing
hymns until the doors were reo-
pened.
N'o action was taken in the one-
hour closed meeting, Lolley said
afterward, and he and the trustees
refused to say what was dis-
cussed.
The conservatives brushed
aside protests of outnumbered
moderates on
edly cast vote!
control over thel
nary with rapid
the opposition.
"They are
over Richard
who has led fa
the fundament
E. Leon SmitJ
tor from Go
seeking the p
Baptist State
senbed thecoruj
as "religious p
"It looks like
nrs- are wint
"We may suttJ
time But trustfj
truth being tai
seminary or an
Baptist congxej
Baptist spir
On tlu
semi-annual
conservative
Fall b
Fall bi �
weekend
to the beach,
where at all '
-
that thn i
Yes, these arj
or female, wl
blind who
aris
Fail break
great time
to get caught
seen by a
ting on tl
not be t
who all
not wanl
These are t
some re i -
the victim, it
ness, it d
it? "i ou or so
could be his
about it!
What ever
good neighr.
in general?
Crime stoppers hold
The Pitt-Greenville Crime Stop-
pers Committee will hold a tele-
thon Oct. 17 and 18 to raise money
for the crime-fighting program,
according to a press release.
The telethon will be televised
live on cable channels 7 and 9 and
will feature live local entertain-
ment as well as pretaped music
videos featuring local Pitt County
community leaders and citizens
lip-svneing to popular new and
old songs, the press release states.
The telethon will run like an old
radio request show, with viewers
calling in and pledging $25 to
have their favorite music videos
reshown. For a $50 pledge, con-
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INSIDE
Editorials�4
Entertainment��7
Sports11
Classifieds�6
ENTERTAINMENT
ECU students make plans to renovate downtown
areas � see ENTERTAINMENT, page 7.
SPORTS
Can the Pirates do it again? � see SPORTS, page 10.
She lEaat daraltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. b2 No. 15
Thursday, October 15,1987
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Police assailant from NCSU
identified and charged
Bv AND LEWIS
Law enforcement officials said
the) will arrest the man charged
with assaulting a public safety
officer at the melee after the Sept.
5 ECU-North Carolina State Uni-
versity football game.
Keith Douglas Philbeck, 21. of
Carv is to be charged today with
assaulting Inspector Robert W.
Malason, according to NCSU
Public Safety Captain Laura Rey-
nolds.
Philbeck has never been a stu-
dent at either ECl or NCSU.offi-
cials said.
People from both Greenville
and Raleigh identified Philbeck to
police officials after various me-
dia made available videotapes
and photographs ol who had been
seen on top of a goalpost at the
game.
The material was filmed alter
ECU's32-14 victor) overNCSUat
Carter! inlev Stadium, where
over 2,000 tans spilled onto the
field and caused an estimated
0 n
Philbeck with assault, inflicting
serious injury, came as the result
of a cooperative investigation
between ECU and NCSU public
safety departments, Knox said.
One ECU student called Pirate
Crime Busters and identified
Philbeck Friday, Knox said. The
other student snowed ECU Public
Safety officers a 1984 Sanderson
assaul tine
High School (of Raleigh) year-
book that included Philbcck's
picture, Knox said.
The student viewed a videotape
of the incident in Knox's office
and positviely identified Philbeck
as the assailant, Knox said.
Reynolds said her office had
made arrangements with
Philbcck's lawyer to serve the
warrant today.
Vice chancellor search begins
the stadium.
l)c �.t)U �i nun
ilason The same
man apparently then scaled a
� st and waved to a crowd of
ball tans below.
Two ECL students identified
Philbeck as the suspect Friday,
according to ECU Public Safety
captain Keith Knox. Both stu-
dents identified Philbeck after
seeing a story and a picture in The
East Carolinian.
Hie warrant, which charges
Legislation
changes role,
honor board
Bv TIM HAMPTON
Stall Hnw:
With the passage of new legisla-
tion bv the SG -V Monday that will
change the role of the Honor
Board, it remains to be seen how
the Board's extended power will
affect students.
The 1 lonor Board can now hear
and reach judgement on all cases
which involve violations ot the
code of conduct. Prior to the new-
legislation, the Honor Board had
to wait tor judgment to be passed
i n a court oi la w before it could act
on the case.
"The major effect of this will be
that the boards will have to re-
view more cases said Dr. Elmer
Mover, vice chancellor of student
life.
Ronald Speicr, associate dean of
student life, said he did not think
the extended power of the Honor
Board would cause a decrease in
campus crime. Speier said it
would make the students more
responsible to upholding the
codes of conduct.
Both Meyer and Speier thought
the board is competent to make
just decisions. "1 can't see them
changing their attitudes for deter-
mining appropriate sanctions
Speier said.
Mover said it was too early to
tell if more cases will be appealed
to the office of the dean of student
life as a result of the new legisla-
tion. He said only a few cases have
been appealed to this person in
the last decade.
"This was the most important
piece of legislation to come
through the SGA in quite a long
time said Bennett Eckert,
speaker of the legislature. "It will
hold students more responsible
for their actions to the university
Eckert said.
Bv ED WILKERSON
Stall Wnltt
The search for a new vice chan-
cellor of academic affairs for ECU
began Tuesday when Chancellor
Richard R. Eakin announced the
appointment of Dr. Carl Adler to
chair a search committee.
Fakin made the announcement
at the meeting of the ECU Faculty
Senate. The position was left open
when Dr. Angelo Volpe became
president of Tennessee Techno-
logical University in July.
Adler. a professor and chair-
man oi the physics department,
will head a five-member commit-
tee in conducting a national
search to fill the position.
The committee will begin ad-
vertising in national academic
media beginning in November,
according to an ECU News Bu-
reau press release.
In addition to Adler, Eakin
named Dr. Holly Mathews of
sociology and anthropology, Dr.
Conner Atkeson of the history
department. Dr. Clinton Down-
ing of the School of Education and
Dr. Edward Lcvinc, dean of the
School of Art.
Janice Faulkner, director of the
North Carolina Humanities
Council, spoke to the Senate re-
garding grant funding awarded
by the council, which totals ap-
proximately $600,000 annually.
University departments which
qualify represent any of the hu-
manities or educational disci-
plines.
"The primary purpose of the
grants is to engage university
scholars with the public commu-
nity Faulkner said. "The Hu-
manities Council will continue to
aid in funding of public programs
and educational student forums
The proposed expansion of
Mendenhall student center was
reviewed at the meeting. Con-
struction is slated to begin by
November of this year, according
to director Rudolph Alexander,
who said a total of 31,000 square
feet will be added to the building,
expanding all 3 levels.
The construction, according to
Alexander, will add a cafeteria
with a seating capacity of 400,
additional student government
offices, a student multi-purpose
room and an elaborate "great
room" which will be utilized for
buffet dinners, the accomodation
of public speakers and presenta-
tion of theater productions.
Dr. Elmer Meyer, Vice Chancel-
lor of Student Life, commented on
the growth of the university's
student work-study program.
The program's directors evalu-
ate individual student financial
status and then offer assistance in
locating employers who have
advertised openings for employ-
ment positions.
Work-study employers include
both public and private factions
on-campus and in the surround-
ing Greenville area, according to
Pam Spell, Assistant Director of
Student Services and employ-
ment. Spell commented the "475
students received checks on the
last payroll, a marked increase in
the number of students involved
at this time last year
The ECU Alumni Telefund was
brought to the attention of the
senate members in an effort to
boost the amount of $45,000 cur-
rently raised.
see TELEFUND, page 2
Marie Farr, Linda Godwin and Linda Cuuld (left to right) at the "Women in tne 21st Cei.tury" program
in Mendenhall Student Center Wednesday (Jon Jordan, Photolab).
Godwin experiences NASA
By TON! PAGE
Sufi Writer
NASAastronaut Linda Godwin
was the keynote speaker at the
Women'iForum Committee pro-
gram entitled "Women of the 21 st
century Wednesday in Men-
denhall Student Center.
Godwin spoke on her experi-
ences in the N AS A space program
and encouraged students in the
science and math fields to pursue
their interests. "If you take some-
thing that is challenging that you
like then there is no limit to what
you can do in that field Godwin
said.
Godwin talked about her at-
tempts to get into the space pro-
gram before being accepted and
added, "Enjoy what you are
doing and don't stop trying to get
what you want
Godwin presented a slide se-
ries on the space program and
also addressed questions from the
audience. Among the questions
asked were those pertaining to the
progress of the space shuttle.
Godwin expressed sorrow to the
colleagues lost in the Challenger
disaster and said major im-
provments will be made in the
area of hardware and test and
check-out. Godwin said most of
the training procedures will re-
main the same except for extra
manucvers in the crew escape
system.
"We should see a launch by
1988, hopefully in June Godwin
said.
After recicving her doctorate
degree in 1982, Godwin went to
work for NASA as a flight officer.
In 1985 she was selected as an
astronaut candidate and missions
specialist for space shuttle flight
crews.
Godwin was one of many
speakers who participated in the
program, "Women of the 21st
Century on Wednesday. Ac-
cording to Linda Gould, chairper-
son for the Women's forum, the
program went exceptionally well.
"We had a great turnout. Hope-
fully students were able to gain
knowledge from the speakers and
at the same time become inter-
ested and more familiar with our
organization Gould said.
Gould said the main objective of
the day was to educate students
about some of their life choices
and give them encouragement to
continue their education and pur-
sue their goals.
Throughout the day various
speakers addressed the topics of
service organizations, govern-
ment, education and business.
Some of the speakers included, jo
Ann Eakin from the chancellor's
office; Sandra Babb, secretary for
the Board of Trustees; Jeanne
Meiggs, superintendent for Cur-
rituck County Schools; Sissy
Gamble from the ECU school of
Medicine and Glenda Steelc, vice
president of NCNB, who came in
from Concord.
Marie Farr, a professor for the
Women Studies Program, tacili
tated the day's events and said,
"Every talk was a learning experi-
ence. The speakers addressed
important women's issues and
talked about career choices a
well as the personal choices in-
volved. All together we had about
300 people attend throughout the
day. It was a great success
Kennerle discuses Contra
effects on Nicaragua
Peter Kemmerle speaks at the Baptist Student Union Tuesday about
his experiences in Nicaragua (Ester Norton, Photolab).
By TIM HAMPTON
Staff Writer
A man who said he has seen the
U .S. backed Contras terrorize and
kidnap their fellow Nicaraguan
people in the war zones of the
Central American country spoke
in Greenville Tuesday night.
Peter Kemmerle, who spent
two-and-one-half years in Nicara-
gua as a peace volunteer, told an
audience of 30 at the Baptist Stu-
dent Union about his experiences
in the war torn country.
"The Contras are sowing terror
in the countryside of Nicaragua.
They are kidnapping and mur-
dering the civilian people
Kemmerle said.
The Contras, the rebel army
armed and trained by U.S. Army
advisors, have been fighting the
established Sandista regime since
1981, Kemmerle said. The Sandin-
istas came to power after the wake
ofthel979Nicaraguanrevolution
in which the dictator, Samosa was
ousted from office.
Kemmerle described several
accounts of the Contras terroriz-
ing and kidnapping civilians. In
one incident, Kemmerle said,
Contra soldiers stopped a pick-up
truck. Later, Kemmerle found out
that the man arrested was a school
teacher. The man was never seen
again, according to Kemmerle.
"Often the Contras would kid-
nap a man and his entire family
would feel threatened
Kemmerle said. He said threat-
ened families usually left their
land and moved into asenta mien-
tos, or resettlement villages,
where the civilians would have
some shelter against such attacks.
As a volunteer with Witness for
Peace, an organization with a
commitment to non violence,
Kemmerle said he traveled to 13
resettlement villages. The volun-
teers gave construction materials
to the people in these villages to
build houses, schools and sewage
systems, according to Kemmerle.
He said while he was in the
town of Rio Blanco, a Catholic
priest was killed as the truck he
was driving was blown up by a
land mine. The priest was return-
ing from a trip to a settlement,
where he had transported seed
and agricultural tools to farmers,
when the truck was mined,
Kemmerle said. Kemmerle said
'The Contras are sowing
terror in the countryside of
Nicaragua. They are kid-
napping and murdering the
civilian people' � Peter
Kemmerle
he believed the Contras set the
mine.
Kemmerle said the Contras tar-
geted school teachers and health
workers as occupations which
they thought would undermine
the rebel effort. They also attack
rural peasant settlements,
Kemmerle said.
"The principle attack of the
Contras is on people who have no
choice Kemmerle said of the
peasant settlements.
Kemmerle said the Contras are
concentrating more on fighting
the civilians than the Sandinistas.
'They never attacked seriously
any military instalation
Kemmerle said.
Most of the Contra officers arc
former national guardsmen, who
were members of Samosa's army,
according to Kemmerle. He said
the foot soldiers were usually
sons of disgruntled landowners
who had lost land after the 1979
revolution.
In some cases the Contras kid-
napped men to Honduras where
they were trained to fight in the
militia against their will, accord-
ing to Kemmerle. He talked with
men who had been to Honduras
and escaped from the Contras, he
said.
"The Reagan Administration is
way out of line in supporting the
Contras. We need to condemn the
action of aid to this group
Kemmerle said.

H. - -��- '
"i
lii
r
J





V
n


S
Tl iE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 15,1987
Wornom endowment pays recipient's tuition
(ECU News Bureau) � Samuel
J. Wornom 111 of Sanford, N.C
and his wife have endowed oneof
the prestigious University Schol-
ars Awards at East Carolina Uni-
versity. The awards arc endowed
at $40,00(1 and, through interest
income, provide full tuition and
fees for a recipient's entire four
years at ECU.
Wornom co-founded The Pan-
try, Inc a chain of 480 conven-
ience stores employing 3,000
people in five states. He recently
sold his interest in that company
and founded Nouveau Invest-
ments, Inc a multi-diversified
investment company.
"Sam Wornom's leadership
abilities in the business commu-
nity have enabled him to reach the
top of his profession said James
L. Lanier Jr ECU vice chancellor
for Institutional Advancement.
School stores honor Dowdy
(ECU News Bureau) � The
ECU Student Stores will be
named in honor of alumnus
Ronald E. Dowdy to signify ap-
preciation of Dowdy's leadership
as an advocate and benefactor of
the university, ECU officials an-
nounced Tuesday.
The stores, which include the
campus bookstore and two snack
bars, will be named for Dowdy at
a formal ceremony at 9 a.m Oct.
31, in Wright Auditorium.
Ron Dowdy's allegiance to his
alma mater is a source of pride
said Dr. Richard R. Eakin, ECU
chancellor. "His steady support
has permitted East Carolina Uni-
versity to provide students with
opportunities that would other-
wise not have been possible. We
are proud to be able to recognize
Mr. Dowdy's contributions
A self-made millionaire,
Dowdy is an entrepreneur in
Orlando, Fla who has prospered
through real estate development
and investments. At ECU he
worked his way through school
by providing a laundry delivery
service to students and by book-
ing dance bands for local shows.
He received a bachelor's degree in
accounting in 1966.
Dowdy gave a $100,000 chal-
lenge gift in 1985-86. Through the
annual giving program, his gift
was matched by alumni contribu-
tors for a total of $200,000. He has
also pledged $25,000 to the School
of Business Golden Anniversary
Campaign.
Dowdy is an Alexandria, Va
native. He was a member of the
Air Force ROTC at East Carolina.
After graduation he entered the
Air Force as a second lieutenant
and served for five years as a
navigator and bombardier for the
Strategic Air Command in Viet
Nam.
SRA discuses alcohol awareness
Bv KRIS REYER
StMlt Wnttr
The Student Residence Hall
Association dealt with finaliza-
tion of the button campaign plans
tor Alcohol Awareness Week at
its Tuesday meeting.
Students can sign contracts
pledging not to drink Oct. 25-30
according to Thomas Dcnton,
president. The group agreed to
have sign ups in each ARC area
and the Student Store on Oct. 22-
It they fulfill their contracts,
Dcnton said, they can turn them
in to the directors oi their resi-
dence halls or the Student Store (
in the case oi non-residents). In
return tor their contracts for an "I
Did It For a Week at ECU" button.
The SRA also approved a mo-
tion to put $600 more into the
student loan fund, bringing the
total to S1500, according to Louise
Perreca, treasurer. This fund is
available for small loans up to $25
with a SRA card and student I.D
said Perreca. The loan must be
paid back within a month and
may be applied for at 214
Whichard, stated Perreca.
The association furthered plans
on a pig pickin' to be held Nov. 7,
before the last home game. It
agreed on a cost of $5 a plate
which will include Bar-B-Q,
chicken, field peas, boiled pota-
toes, cornbread and tea. Seconds
will be free, Dcnton said.
Perreca announced plans to try
to form a NRHH Chapter at ECU.
The NRHH (National Residence
Hall Honorary) is a connection
between RA's and hall represen-
tatives, stated Perreca. The or-
ganization will promote such
things as hall representative of the
week and program of the month'
contests, said Perreca. Member-
ship is a lifetime thing; once you
move out of your residence hall
you are an alumni, stated Perreca.
Mary Piland, president of the
Hill area, announced plans to try
to get more sand on the beach on
the hill and nets on the tennis
courts.
A representative from Scott
announced plans for a breakfast
before the last home football
game and the possibilities of
fund-raisers for new vacuum
cleaners for the residence halls
and a VCR for Scott.
This weekend, members of the
Pi Kappa Phi fraternity will be in
Greenville assisting the Pitt-
Greenville Crime stoppers in
their telethon to raise money for
the crime fighting program.
According to Pi Kappa Phi
President Dillion Kalkhurst, the
fraternity members will be help-
ing by answering phones and
taking pledges during the tele-
thon. Kalkhurst said the frate-
nity will also donate $500 to the
telethon.
Council focuses onfall rush
By TON!PAGE
Staff Wnm
Fall rush week was the focus of
attention at Wednesday's Inter-
Fraternal Council meeting.
Fall rush week will be held Nov.
15-19 and is open to those stu-
dents interested in joining a fra-
ternity who were not eligible the
first semester. According to coun-
cil President BrookeStoncsifer, no
bids will be given at this time. The
rush merely an opportunity for
interested persons to get a second
look at the fraternities of their
choice.
"I think the program should be
benificial to the guys interested in
rushing next semester because it
will give them double exposure to
the fraternities and they will be
able to meet more people this
way Stonesifer said.
Students who are interested in
fall rush week can sign up in front
of the student store the week prior
to rush week. Each fraternity
house will have a scheduled event
each night, and at end of the week
a party will be held for the pro
spective pledges at the Sigma Tau
Gamma house, according to
Stonesifer.
Also discussed at the IFC meet-
ing was the issue of Halloween
clean up. This year the fraternities
will have close to 50 members
assisting the Greenville Public
Works Department in cleaning up
the downtown area after the tra-
ditional Halloween celebration
takes place, Stonesifer said.
Ron Speier, IFC faculty advisor,
stressed having fun while still
maintaining control. "Let's have a
good time but try and avoid any
problems Speier said.
Telefund pushing 'Pass the Buck' slogan
continued from page 1
The 1987Telefund, managed by
annual giving director Cindy
Kittrell, is pushing its slogan of
"Pass the Buck" in hopes of rais-
ing more money than last year
before its November 12th termi-
nation date. "All proceeds are
intended for the purpose of aca-
demic enrichment according to
Program Assistant Swen Van-
Baars.
Chancellor Eakin will direct the
allocation of telefund proceeds to
sucn causes as student scholar-
ships, academic research and the
continued support of the ECU
allumni foundation.
Senate Chairman Atkeson ac-
knowledged the death of Dr.
Edward Ryan, Professor of Biol-
ogy, who passed away Saturday,
October 10th. Dr. Ryan, who re-
ceived his doctorate from The
University of Hawaii in 1959, had
been a professor of biology at
ECU since 1965. He was acting
chairman of the biology depart-
ment from 1978-81.
"Sam recognizes the signifi-
cance of a university experience.
He wants this investment to be an
incentive for talented young lead-
ers to stretch their limits and excel
in new ways Lanier said.
University Scholars are chosen
on the basis of superior academic
and leadership capabilities
through a competitive selection
process.
Womom is a 1965 ECU gradu-
ate with an AB degree in Business
Administration and his wife is
also an ECU graduate.
"I would hope that the recipient
of a University Scholars Award
would not only be academically
outstanding, but would shine as a
motivated student leader in other
campus activities Womom said.
Womom is a member of the
ECU Board of Trustees, the ECU
Foundation Board of Directors
and the Chancellor's Society. He
also hasbeen on the Alumni Asso-
ciation Board of Directors, and he
is a plank member and an endow-
ment member of the Pirate Club.
In 1981 Womom received the
ECU Outstanding Alumni Award
for his professional contributions
to the business community.
Wornom and hiscompany have
long supported ECU. They pro-
vided the lead gift of $100,000 to
begin the 1986-87 School of Busi-
ness Golden Anniversary Cam-
paign, a drive which raised over
$2 million.
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin
said, "It is because of the commit-
ment of alumni like S?m and
Sandy Wornom that
sity Scholars Awards i
made possible. They are continu-
ing the tradition of service they
experienced as ECU students
while creating the legacy for
tomorrow's alumni
As a native of Hampton, Va
Womom recognizes the extent of
ECU's outreach. "East Carolina
has come a long way in a rela-
tively short period of time. The
university has always meant a lot
to the people of eastern North
Carolina, but the best is yet to
come he said.
"People far beyond the borders
of our state are hearing about East
Carolina University
Wornom's wife, the former
Sandra Leonard of FayettevilK-
was also a business major at ECU.
She is involved with organize
tions which seek a medical break
through for Alzheimer's Disease
She also supports educational
programs for learning disabled
students.
The Womoms have two daugh
ters � Lesley, a junior at Central
Carolina Technical College in
Sanford, and Laurie, a senior at
Lee County Senior High School
The Womoms are members oi
Jonesboro Heights Baptist
Church
HAIR AND FASHION REVIEW
WED OCT. 21,1987
P A B qf: 9:30 P.M. Scott's
V Clothing
DRAFT
w
207 S. W.
GREEWILLE
BLVD.
355-5000
Club
(HI?t �art Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
James F. J. McKec. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo Shari Clemens
Pete Fernald Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY KATES
O 49 Coulumn inches ;j o;
50 99 , 1C
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150 199 Qt-
200 249 3
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COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
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One color and block S0 00
Two colors and black .155 00
Inserts
5.O00 or less06 each
5.001-10.000055 each
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BUSINESS HOURS;
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PHONES 10:00-5.00 I'M
7j7-s366
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�t �
Trustees
WAKE FOREST (AP) - Con-
servative trustees at Southeastern
Baptist Theological Seminary
won a daylong series of clashes
with moderates, seizing control ot
a panel that oversees the hiring of
professors and forcing a closed-
door meeting with the seminary
president over his objections
"I am visceral!y Opposed to this
kind of a closed meeting Presi-
dent W. Randall Lolley said 1 ues-
day before a 14-10 vc e to meet in
secret "If you vote U r a dosed
session, I'll obey I von't be
fired for insubordinatuu - but
we don't need to go behind closed
doors to do God's work
Lolley said secrecy would exac-
erbate the tension between the
students and faculty and the con-
servatives 'The trust level i
zilch. There are people on campus
who don t trust you. You don't
trust them "
The Rev lames R DeLoach, a
conservative from Hous
elected vice president oi the board
Monday, proposed the private
meeting He said the board
needed to discuss Lollev's role
and relationship with the board
"The Bible talks about if you
have something to bnng up with
your brother to go to him in pri-
vate said William D. Delahoyde,
a Raleigh conservative. He said
reporters might "distort the
words wc say" if allowed to hear.
William R. Lonis, a Morrison,
Colo conservative, said he did
not want "boos and hollering
from the students, faculty
alumni who packed the meeting
and have voiced staunch opposi-
tion to the fundamentalist
A group of students at first re-
fused to leave, then did so at
Lolley's urging. About two dozen
stood outside the room singing
hymns until the doors were reo-
pened.
No action was taken in the one-
hour closed meeting, Lolley said
afterward, and he and the trustees
refused to say what was dis-
cussed.
The conservatives brushed
aside protests of outnumbered
moderatl
edlv cas
control i
nary wif
the opp
"Thevl
over R
who ha
the func
E Leo!
tor froij
seeking
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The Pitt-Greenville Crime Stop-
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according to a press release.
The telethon will be televised
live on cable channels 7 and 9 and
will feature live local entertain-
ment as well as pretaped music
videos featuring local Pitt Countv
community leaders and citizens
lip-syncing to popular new and
old songs, the press release states
The telethon will run like an old
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calling in and pledging $25 to
have their favorite music videos
reshown. For a $50 pledge, con-
tributors can receive a videocas-
sette containing all the music vid-
eos, according to the press release.
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f s tuition
pl� far beyond the borders
state arc hearing about East
I niversit)
Womom's wife, the former
Sandra 1 eonard ot Fayettcville,
siness major at ECU.
- involved with organiza-
ms vl- eeka medical break. -
� Alzheimer s Disease.
supports educational
- tor learning disabled
noms have twodaugh-
t .1 junior at Central
rucal College in
auric a senior at
Lee( unh Senior High School.
are members of
� : � ghts baptist
Caat Carolinian
ing
resentives
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T � PAST CAROLINIAN
(XTOBER 15,1987
Trustees vs. moderates
WAKE FOREST (AD � Con-
servative trustees at Southeastern
Baptist Theological Seminary
won a daylong series of clashes
with moderates, seizing control of
a panel that oversees the hiring ot
professors and forcing a closed
door meeting with the seminary
president over his objections.
I am viseerally opposed to this
kind of a closed meeting Presi-
dent W. Randall Lolley said Tues-
day before a 14-10 vote to meet in
secret. "If vou vote for a closed
session, I'll obey I won't be
fired for insubordination � but
we don't need to go behind closed
d.xrs to do God's work
Lolley said secrecy would exac-
erbate the tension between the
students and faculty and the con-
servatives. "The trust level is
moderates on the board, repeat-
edly cast votes solidifying their
control over the 37-year-old semi-
nary with rapidity that stunned
the opposition.
"Thev dre prepared to take
over Richard Hester, a professor
who has led faculty resistance to
the fundamentalists, said.
E. Leon Smith, a moderate pas-
tor from Coldsboro who is
seeking the presidency of the
Baptist State Convention, de-
scribed the conservatives' actions
as "religious persecution
"It looks like the forces of dark-
ness are winning Smith said.
"We may suffer for a period of
time. But trustees cannot prevent
truth being taught, either by the
seminary or among members of a
Baptist congregation The true
zilch. There are people on campus Baptist spirit will prevail
who don't trust vou. You don't
trust them
The Rev lames R. DeLoach, a
conservative from Houston
elected vice president ot the board
Monday, proposed the private
meeting He said the board
needed to discuss Lollev's role
and relationship with the board.
"The Bible talks about if you
have something to bring up with
your brother to go to him in pri-
vate said William D. Dclahoyde,
a Raleigh conservative. He said
reporters might "distort the
words we say" it allowed to hear.
William R. Lords, a Morrison,
Colo conservative, said he did
not want boos and hollering"
from the students, faculty and
alumni who packed the meeting
and have voiced staunch opposi-
tion to the fundamentalists.
A group of students at first re-
fused to leave, then did so at
Lollev s urging. About two dozen
stood outside the room singing
hymns until the doors were reo-
pened .
No action was taken in the one-
hour closed meeting, Lollev said
afterward, and he and the trustees
refused to sav what was dis-
cussed.
The conservatives brushed
aside protests of outnumbered
On the second day of a crucial,
semi-annual meeting, the board's
conservative majority voted to:
�Replace committee assign-
ments proposed by the outgoing
Nominating Committee with an
alternate list that gives conserva-
tives a 4-1 majority on the power-
ful Instructional Committee. That
committee has a key role in hiring
faculty.
�Adjust the policy on selecting
new faculty in a manner that gives
the president more influence and
the faculty less. Some moderates
have voiced fear the board will
replace Lolley, which conserva-
tives strongly deny.
�Accept for discussion a con-
troversial report issued by the
Southern Baptist Convention's
"Peace Committee a group ap-
pointed to reconcile differences
between moderates and conser-
vatives.
The report was referred to the
new, conservative-dominated
Executive Committee for study
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin makes an appearance at the ECU Telefund Wednesday. The Telefund,
which is being held in the Alumni Center, has earned more than $100,000 in previous vears. The
fundraiser is scheduled to continue for a few more weeks U'hotolab).
Fall break for students, big break for thieves says Capt. Knoxy public safety
Fall break is upon us. This
weekend you may be going home,
to the beach, etc or maybe no-
where at all. You may be taking a
break from school, but you can bet
that thieves won't.
Yes, these are the persons, male
or female, who will steal you
blind when the opportunity
arises.
Fall break time to some thieves
is a great time. They are less likely
to get caught in the act. Even if
seen bv someone, the thief is bet-
tingon the odds that someone will
not be the police, but instead one
who allows them to get away by
not wanting to get involved.
These arc the people who for
some reason feel that, "If I am not
the victim, it's none of my busi-
ness, it doesn't affect me Or does
it? You or someone you care for
could be his next victim. Think
about it!
What ever happened to being a
good neighbor, friend, or citizen
in general? It seems that today's
criminals are betting that you
won't be. Believe it or not, many
are winning because of it.
Enough about that, what other
things are the thieves always bet-
ting on? He's betting on you, the
potential victim to make things
easy for him. What do you mean
make it easy for him? For starters,
easy for him to get at your valu-
Pirate Police
Line
By Captain Keith Krox
Ttt Public S�rty
ablcs. A window, transom, or
door left unlocked or poorly se-
cured is one way.
Just how easy is it to get into
your room, apartment, or home?
Do you lock up each time you
leave and double check it to make
sure it's secure?
How about being able to see
your valuables from the outside?
Are your curtains, blinds, etc.
closed or valuables out of sight?
Do you own a VCR, TV, stereo
system, camera, computer, ex-
pensive jewelry, or leave money
lying around? These are top items
on the thief's list.
If stolen, could you positively
identify them? The thief is betting
that you can not. Thieves do not
like marked items (Operation ID)
because they can be traced and
not easily pawned or fenced
Thieves that are known to vou
are betting that vou will not sus-
pect them. They mav already
have knowledge as to what vou
own and where it's kept. Would
you be surprised at who will
steal?
Whv not surprise him if he
breaks in? Take your valuables
that are most likely targets of theft
with you. Maybe hide them, bet-
ter still, leave them with a trusted
friend or relative.
you say. The thief is betting you
will think just that You must ask
yourself, "How much trouble is it
going to be to replace those valu-
ables it stolen?" Some sentimen-
tal or one-of-a-kind items stolen
can never be replaced
Remeber: Crime prevention
begins with OL ' And the thief is
beting that it won't! Who's going
to win this bet?
�PX�J LOW COST
ftH ' ' M'liJL ABOKTIOSSCP
B Bjm TO 12lh WEEK OF
FU M � rJ PREGNANCY
m W&FiB
klrrfTVUhrJHMj
rm j. . A � t
�H "� - vv; rvtwrfR 9 rn nd - r " ��u v
'J m ' YrW I ht"�L4 tV� a ' .i
frj RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
rBlli�liiB -tK ORGANIZATIONS
Crime stoppers hold telethon
The Pitt-Greenville Crime Stop-
pers Committee will hold a tele-
thon Oct. 17 and 18 to raise monev
tor the crime-fighting program,
according to a press release.
The telethon will be televised
live on cable channels 7 and 9 and
will feature live local entertain-
ment as well as pretaped music
videos featuring local Pitt Countv
community leaders and citizens
lip-syncing to popular new and
old songs, the press release states.
The telethon will run like an old
radio request show, with viewers
calling in and pledging $25 to
have their favorite music videos
reshown. For a $50 pledge, con-
tributors can receive a vidcocas-
sette containing all the music vid-
eos, according to the press release.
Pitt-Green villc Crime Stoppers,
the press release states, was initi-
ated by the Pitt-Greenville Cham-
RESUMES
Professional Resume Composition
Atlantic Personnel Services
209 Commerce Street, Suite B
10 discount with this ad
355-7931
ber of Commerce in Sept 1983.
The concept of Crime Stoppers is
simple � citizens can call the
special Crime Stoppers telephone
number, 758-7777, and provide
information on criminal activity
in the county according to the
press release.
Callers are issued code num-
bers to guarantee anonymity.
They do not have to appear in
court, and they are paid cash
rewards of up to $1,000 if the in-
formation provided leads to an
arrest, the press release states.
More than 1,000 callers have
given information to Crime Stop-
pers in the past 3 12 years, the
press release states. To date,
Crime Stopper calls have resulted
in 406 arrests with more than
$1,000,000 in narcotics and stolen
property being recovered, ac-
cording to the press release.
MACK ROOM
Rosina's Picture Pic
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LOUIS
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JR.
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tWO THCKKAMKO CQVEK
THURSDAY
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�IB Saat (Earnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, r��iM�p
Clay Deani iardt, MuPt &�
Andy Lewis, n�g� James F.J. McKee, iw �
TlM Cl 1ANDLER, s,�s iMtm ANT1 lONY MAPTIN, bu�i m�
Jen in Carter, r0 e� Meg Needi onw. m.
Si ielton Bryant, w,�r �m Mike Upci iurci i, numrji h.
Debbie Stevens, s Joi in W. Medlin, m dm,
October 15,1 "87
Opinion
Pago 4
Students'rights
Passage of bill is a threat
The passage oi the SGA bill giving
more sweeping power to the judicial
branch is a foolhardy threat to the
rights of students as individuals and
students. It is a threat the university
should not be able to make.
The new measure allows a student
charged with a crime to be tried bv
the university's 1 Ionor Board before
being declared guilty by a court of
law. The board can, if it finds the
student guilty, punish the student in
accordance with university policy.
One small group becomes judge,
jury and executioner.
Much has been made, by this
newspaper and others, of the prob-
lem of double jeapordv, or trying
and punishing a student twice for
the same offense.
The responses to this charge were
technically correct: Double jeapordv
does not apply in these cases be-
cause the I Ionor Board is not a court
of law. However, a sense o( the
double jeapordv idea is applicaple,
and the "What if" question can not
be written off as easily as some
would like to.
The "What if" question basically
runs like this: What if a student is
found guilty by the Honor Board
and later determined not guilty by a
court of law? We all, after allhave
the right to presumption of inno-
cence before being proven guilty.
Many, including Dr. Ron Speier,
associate dean for student affairs,
say the question is irrelavant. In a
lobbying effort before Monday's
SGA meeting, Speier distributed a
paper which stated that in the time
he has been at ECU nothing of the
sort has ever happened.
He goes on to say that many times
a person plea bargains or his case is
thrown out because of a technicality,
neither which confirm innocence.
The many are wrong. The question
is relavant, but for different reasons
than the ones they defend against.
We do not question the integrity or
the ability of the Honor Board to
make fair decisions based on their
knowledge. We do question if the
board has enough legal knowledge
to render decisions in some cases,
and if defendants will get proper
representation in those cases.
What if a student is found not
guiltv by the courts after being
found guilty by the board? Speier's
counterpoint is not a good one. As a
matter of a fact it makes a strong
point against the passage of the bill.
Let's say that the court throws out
a case on a technicality � usually
because the rights of the defendant
have been violated in some real way.
Some say the person could still be
guilty, and therefore open to pun
ishment by the university.
True, the student could have
committed the offenses. But if his
rights are violated in proving that,
then what right does the university
have to punish him or her? Does the
Honor Board have some power that
makes it immune to the same con
straints that bind the American judi
rial system? Does the SGA think that
it can improve the judicial process
by ignoring the resul t of 200 years of
judicial evolution in the protection
of individual rights?
Far from being irrelavant, the
"What if" question is crucial to the
heart of the issue. It seems that the
rights of students as individuals and
as citizens are threatened by the new
legislation.
True, nine times out of ten, or
maybe 99 out of 100, this is not going
to happen. The I Ionor Board and the
courts will reach the same decision,
and no one's rights will have been
violated. It is that one case that we
are concerned with, not only for the
protection of the individual but also
for the protection of the university,
which could be sued should it se-
verely punish a person that the
courts find innocent.
Yes, the university has a right to
protect itself, and an obligation to
protect its students, from students
who commit illegal acts on and off
campus. However there has to be a
better plan than one which is this
drastic and this sweeping.
It seems that, in the interest of
individual rights, the Honor Board
should not be allowed to try crimi-
nal cases until the courts are finished
with them. Moving any sooner en-
dangers the rights of the student and
possibly the legal stand of the uni-
versity.
Whatever plan is finally enacted, it
should first be reviewed by the uni-
versity attorney to insure that ECU
could not be held liable for any
posible outcomes. As far as we
know, this has not been done.
We suggest the bill be reconsid-
ered and a serious study be done
into alternative measures. The pos-
sible violation of student rights, no
matter how slight, is a matter not to
be taken lightly. "What if" ques-
tions can not be dismissed since the
"What ifs" of today often become
tomorrow's headlines.
Campus Forum
Britain � U.S. share poverty
To the editor:
While visiting East Carolina to lec-
ture on health care systems in Great
Rritain, I read the 1st and 6th October
issues of The East Carolinian which
included articles on how poverty re-
stricts personal lives. I thought of an
organization in Britain, the Child
Poverty Action Group. Started in
1967, it is now one of the most re-
spected pressure groups in the coun-
trv. When it came into being, one of its
sponsors, an English peer, said that it
would be pointless asking for a seven
year subscription to be authorized
because poverty would have been
eradicated, and the Group made re-
dundant, long before then. Yet today
the CPAG is handling more cases
than ever before. More than that, it
feels that those for whom it is fighting
are under even greater threat than at
any previous time.
In Britain, the attitude of the gov-
ernment to poor people, to disabled
people, to defenseless people, is hard-
ening and becoming increasingly
judgmental. The concept of collective
responsibility is being replaced by an
ethos of personal and individual re-
sponsibility. To be poor is to be a
failure, inadequate and undeserving.
In a major speech last month, the
Secretary of State for Social Services,
John Moore, said "Everyone knows
the sullen apathy of dependence and
can compare it with the sheer delight
of personal achievement
Fine words, but with an unemploy-
ment rate of 80 percent in some areas,
with few vocational rehabilitation
schemes for people with disabilities,
with childcare facilities at a premium
for single mothers (my own countv,
with a population of 1.6 million has 30
places), what chance have these
people of ever getting ou t of poverty?
If one was pushed off a high building,
being told to learn to flv on the way
down would be of little use.
The speech attracted an outcry
from the left, particularly in the light
;f recent very high pay awards to
"top" people � judges, generals, civil
servants � and tax cuts, put forward
as "incentives
"Why is it asked the leader of the
opposition, "the rich are given more
as incentives to work and the poor are
given less, for exactly the same rea-
son
-�-
Asa nation, Britain hasa centuries-
old tradition of nurturing the weak
and supporting the vulnerable. The
philosophical changes which have
taken place over the last few years
have shamed manv of us and caused
organizations such as CPAG to be
even more determined to ensure that
the poor are not trampled underfoot.
Judith Oliver
Parliamentary Liaison Officer,
BASW
London, England
Buckley comments on 'Bork screw'
Coming out of the Senate chamber last Wednesday, three or
four Republican senators were asked about the disposition of
the Bork case. Sen. Phil Gramm of Texas gritted his teeth and
said he was made uncomfortable by senators "who cheated in
college" challenging the probity of Robert Bork. That is very
tough, and not pleasant, talk, but it reflects the indignation,
not to say fury, felt by many who witnessed the democratic
and intellectual travesty over the last month. A big lesion has
opened up within America.
Norman Podhoretz, the influential editor of Commentary
magazine, speaks of it as a form of civil war. Listen to this: "In
spite of murderous pressures, many (intellectuals) could not
bring themselves to join a lynch mob, even one dressed in
academic robes, but a disgracefully large number could and
did. Leading this mob was Professor Laurence H. Tribe of
Harvard, who constructed the tortured rationale for disquali-
fying Bork on ideological grounds alone. If that is now the
name of the game, then no quarter should be given by conser-
vatives to any liberal a future Democratic president might
nominate to the Supreme Court, beginning with Professor
Tribe himself. But hoisting Tribe and his ilk by their own
petard will come later. For now, conservatives will have to
figure out new ways of responding to the lesson of the Bork
nomination, which is that the war against them and their
ideas has heated up again and that it is being conducted as
nothing less than a war to the death
The most adroit examination of what is called "The Bork
Screw" was done in The New Republic by Andrew Sullivan.
He begins by quoting the artist Robert Rauschenberg, whose
pop is better on canvas than in print: "In my defensive
research of Bork I have discovered a compulsive insistence on
the letter of the law Comments Sullivan: "As anti-Bork
hysteria goes, Rauschenberg's was moderate. Apart from the
Supreme Court nominee's worrying legalism,
Rauschenberg's only other concern was the fate of human
civilization: "The Supreme Court is a final discriminating
force to guide us into the future of global concerns What he
failed to mention, of course, were the fetus funerals. Accord-
ing to Planned Parenthood'S media package, if Judge Bork is
nominated, there'll be no end to the little coffins. People for
the American Way restricted itself to the slightlv worrying
chance that the day after Bork gets on the court, mass sterili-
zations could be imposed. Their ads begin: "The nomination
of Robert Bork hascaused a lot of controversy. And hasa lot
ol people worried. With good reason. But don't takcourword
for it. You be the judge 'STERILIZING WORKERS
BILLING CONSUMERS FOR POWER THEY NEVER GOT
NO PRIVACY TURN THE CLOCK BACK ON CIVIL
RIGHTS? NO DAY IN COURT
On The Right
bv
William F. Bucklev Jr.
Mr. Sullivan summarizes: "In a complex summary oi the
constitutional arguments behind the carefully selected cases,
the ad's climax hardly leaves the reader dangling in philo-
sophic midair: 'Judge Bork has consistently ruled against the
interests of people Anyone for animal rights?"
Mr. Sullivan bores in. "If you'd naively planned on a sex life
after Bork, Planned Parenthood had news for vou: Tiobert
Bork's Position on Reproductive Rights? YOU DON'T HAVE
ANY In another flyer, they added: 'STATE-CONTROLLED
PREGNANCY? It's not as farfetched as it sounds Carrying
Bork's position to its logical end, 'states could impose
family quotas for population purposes, make abortion a
crime, or sterilize anyone they choose And senators wonder
why the polls show a drift away from the Bork nomination
It's the genital gap
Proven Reaganomics formula under attack
People who only a few years ago were lamenting
a miscreated front called Reaganomics are nowa-
days looking about to find, retroactively, flaws in the
grand design. An instructive example of this took
place on the David Brinklcy hour on Sunday. Rep.
jack Kemp, identified beyond any other man with
the retreat from high marginal tax rates, and associ-
ated therefore with the idea of supply-side econom-
ics, was being given a hard time by Sam Donaldson
and George Will.
G.W. began by probing two points. Supply-side
economics had promised that it would encourage
the propensity to save; in fact, the American people
are saving less now than they ever saved before.
Second, how is it that our deficit is so large when it
was promised that for every dollar in reduced taxes,
there would arise a corresponding dollar in govern-
ment revenues from energized industrial activity?
Kemp did not handle the challenge with preci-
sion, which is a pity since he is vastly instructed in
the general subject.
Concerning the rate of savings, it is true that the
United States' 3 percent savings rate is miserable in
comparison with, for instance, that of West Ger-
many (12 percent) and Japan (16 percent). In the
years beginning with the first tax reduction law of
1981, savings have dropped from 6.7 percent to the
present rate.
The reasons for this are obvious, and less obvious.
People tend to save in order to finance the major
contingencies in life. The first of these is medical
health, and here the governments, state and local,
and the insurance companies have, with Medicare,
Medicaid, Blue Cross and the like, substantially
removed the public fear of running out of money to
pay the doctor.
The cost of living in retirement is greatly reduced
by Social Security, indexed for inflation. It is unfair to
point out that the stability of Social Security is in
doubt: The public correctly assumes that there will
be no default in it.
The one major item to worry about is the education
of one's children. The costs of non-public colleges
are huge. But in the last few years, grants from state
and federal sources, and help from the colleges
themselves, have eased the problem, even though
the young doctor, lawyer or professor can find
himself $100,000 in debt.
Now at the other end you have first the spectacular
rise in the stock market. It is a minority that benefits
directly from that rise (47 million buy and sell shares
in their own name); but many more millions have
interests in pension plans that have benefited from
the rise in the stock market. During the past 10 years,
stocks have increased in value by 217 percent.
And then there is the rise in the value of housing.
In 1977, the median value of a single family house
was $36,000. In 1983, it was $59,000. It's probably
more than $75,000 now.
One can see that the father of a family who sees 13
percent of his income going into Social Security, 10
percent into a pension fund, 2 percent into medical
insurance and 25 percent into a house mortgage
payment, on top of which he saves an additional 3
percent � that man thinks himself to be prudently
managing his money.
Now, thisconcededly is not as in days gone by. But
our concern for savings has traditionally been less
because we worry about the indigent elderly than
because we worry about the shortage of capital.
But there is no shortage of capital at the moment.
This, granted, is significantly owing to the flow of
capital from abroad, as one would expect, given the
trade imbalance. The strategic impact of foreign
capital invested in the United States isn't obvious to
- - II ifw Milieu llMi
i'Wiwi s�4lm&�i0l&4llittm6m��H��W '
most economists. It is obvious that our unemploy-
ment rate continues to decrease � and all of this
notwithstanding the shibboleth about Americas
failure to save.
There are other reasons than merely economic in
favor of saving. Husbandry of a kind helps the
character, though it is thought vaguely un-Ameri-
can not to consume. We consume greatly on credit,
as we know, but that credit is based in most cases on
realistic estimates of earning power. The call for
increased savings, in the light of the experience of the
past few years, is rather the call of the ethics profes-
sor than the economics professor.
By William F. Buckley Jr.
Su pplytdehasTone�rcTryveT!�Tnosevho
predicted that additional revenues would exactly
equal taxes diminished were not scientists � they
were the voodoo men. And they should not be
3uoted back at such as Kemp, who never made the
ollar-to-dollar prediction. All that Kemp said was
that we should go in a particular direction. We have;
and the republic is better off for it.
m
Reagan st
WASHINGTON (AP) - Presi-
dent Reagan, sounding resigned
to defeat on Robert H Bork's
nomination to the supreme court,
vows that any new candidate he
picks will upset liberal opponents
"just as much
Reagan's statement Tuesday
drew quick cnticism from Senate
Majonty Leader Robert Byrd, D-
W. Va, who warned that harsh
comments from the president
could jeopardize his next nomi-
nee
"It's not h4
Reagan's st
this kind 01
coming out 1
Byrd said
"engage in
ness" the ne:
endangered!
Meanwhill
and Republij
the timing o
nothing wa'
New course offered
for social studies tech
(ECU News Bureau) � A new 5300 ha
course for social studies teachers, si
surveying the civilizations of Af- hers
rica, India, China, Japan and the informa-
Middle East, has been developed 'ndia, iapal
at ECU and will be offered in the East Gowi
spring semester G 0 wen
Through the Department of Wilbun
History, two specialists in non- be instruct
western cultures will conduct the which will
course, "Comparative History of nesda
Non-Western Civilizations in the spring
answer to the increasing demand in January
for such surveys begin V
Dr. Robert Gowcn, former coor-
dinator of the ECU Asian Studies Cow en. '
program and director of the ern histol
state's Japan Center East, said the extensively
offering "is a unique course being former coor
offered for the first time in eastern Studies cor
North Carolina and perhaps the at the Lni
whole state tersrand in
An innovative course. History Africa
Few male teac
on elementary
WINSTON-SALEM (AP) �
Education officials say a combina-
tion of low salanes and tradition
has kept most men out of elemen-
tary education, where 91 percent
of the teachers are women.
"Elementary school teachers
have the image of not onl v being a
tcmcher; tr mother says
Stephen A. Thornton, a teacher at
Parkland High School in Win-
ston-Salemand chairman of a task
force examining wh jo few men
become elementary teachers.
The tast force, formed by the
North Carolina Association of
Educators, also will look at the
effect the male teacher shortage
has on children.
"That was a main concern �
not having a male role model in
the elementary school, especially
today with single-parent homes
Thornton told the Winston-Salem
Journal.
Nationally, 31 percent of the
teachers are men. Fourteen per-
cent of the elementary school and
50 percent of the secondary school
teachers are men.
In North Carolina the figures
are even lower. At the secondary
level, 37 percent of the teachers
are men, and overall 21 percent of
them are men.
J. Waco knott, a teacher at Kim-
berly Park Alternative School, has
been teaching for 13 years and is
one of only two male teachers at
the school.
"Elementary is pretty much a
woman's world' Knott said. 'It's
a little bit strange at times. It can
be lonely
Knott said he chose to work
with elementary school students
TAXPAYERS
with dependents
HERE'S A TAX TIP
Beginning �uh out I � �com
tax return (hat vow wil
1WH. vou gcncralb mm � �� �
security numbers tot dependent
who arc at least five yean old" b
the end of IW7 If an ofyow
dependent1, do not har this
number, get an application form
todav from the Social SecuntJ
office in vour area
because ot
eageme
definite lad
"There is:
attached ta
teachers
the men tall
bihtics suc
some reas
children is 1
role
Male teacl
administratil
cause thev
can't afford
"I Keel like
the incom
family 1 WC4J
what I do
Coaching
sues that the
ine.
"A lot of
ing are havj,
agreement!
Thornton
teach, you
Looking
something
tion, Thorntc
of what mei
the task fore
vev ol male
L
Crl
Centr;
Greeni
0
J
Co:
S
E
i

i





fa
e poverty
pay awards to
udges generals, civil
md tax uts, put forward
is it asked the leader of the
the rich arc given more
rk and the poor are
ictl) the same rea-
Britain has a centurics-
on of nurturing the weak
'fvrtm; the vulnerable. The
changes which have
act over the last tew vears
imed many of us and caused
- such as (.TAG to be
mined to ensure that
I trampled underfoot.
Judith Oliver
Parliamentary Liaison Officer,
BASVV
1 ondon, England
1 'Boric screw
en the fetus funerals. Accord-
media package, if Judge Bork is
I : the little coffins. People for
' the slightly worrying
- on the court, mass sterili-
icira Is begin: "The nomination
ntrm ersy. And has a lot
t don't takeour word
I R1LIZING WORKERS
IWER rHE EVERGOT
IE CLOCK BACK ON CIVIL
he Right
b
William F. Bucklev Jr.
lr a ci mtiplcx summary of the
lind the carefully selected cases,
reader dangling in philo-
rk 1 iistentl) ruled against the
� r ai imal rights?"
.id naivelv planned on a sex life
Tent hood had news for vou: 'Robert
; ights? YOU DON'T HAVE
-I TE-CONTROLLED
irfctched as it sounds Carrying
al end, 'states could impose
n purposes, make abortion a
c they choose And senators wonder
Irift away from the Bork nomination.
er attack
momists It is
ntinues t
n'KH
decrease
is that our unemploy-
and all of this
ng the shibboleth about America's
There are other reasons than merely economic in
r f saving Husbandry of a kind helps the
aracter, though it is thought vaguely un-Ameri-
nol to consume. We consume greatly on credit,
but that credit is based in most caseson
realistic estimates of earning power. The call for
increased savings, in the light of the experience of the
past few years, is rather the call of the ethics profes-
sor than the economics professor.
By William F. Buckley Jr.
has done pretty well. Those who
predicted that additional revenues would exactly
equal taxes diminished were not scientists � they
were the voodoo men. And they should not be
quoted back at such as Kemp, who never made the
dollar-to-dollar prediction. All that Kemp said was
that we should go in a particular direction. We have;
and the republic is better off for it.

i
t

I
A
J
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 15,1987 5
Reagan statement draws criticism from Byrd
WASHINGTON (AP) � Presi-
dent Reagan, sounding resigned
to defeat on Robert H. Bork's
nomination to the supreme court,
vows that any new candidate he
picks will upset liberal opponents
"just as much
Reagan's statement Tuesday
drew quick criticism from Senate
Majority Leader Robert Byrd, D-
W. Va who warned that harsh
comments from the president
could jeopardize his next nomi-
nee.
"It's not helpful Byrd said of
Reagan's statement. "1 deplore
this kind of remark, this tone
coming out of the White House
Byrd said if Reagan is going to
"engage in innuendo and bitter-
ness" the next nominee would be
endangered.
Meanwhile, Senate Democrats
and Republicans skirmished over
the timing of the Bork debate, but
nothing was settled.
New course offered at ECU
for social studies teachers
Reagan, abandoning the low-
key tone suggested by Bork him-
self on his nomination, derided
tactics used against his nominee
as "a political joke
With the ranks of Bork's critics
still growing in the senate �
reaching 54 with an anti-Bork
declaration from Sen. Harry Reid,
D-Nev. � Reagan planned to talk
about the nomination in an ad-
dress late this afternoon from the
Oval Office.
Reagan, in a series of appear-
ances in New Jersey on Tuesday,
softened his rhetoric about Bork's
opponents in one speech but then
turned up the heat in a later ad-
dress when a woman at a Repub-
lican fund-raiser shouted, "We
want Bork, too
"You want Bork, too? So do I
Reagan said in a resolute voice.
Dropping the restrained ap-
proach that aides said he adopted
in deference to Bork's wishes, the
president spoke with emotion
about his embattled nominee.
"Yes, Bork is staying in, and we
know the odds are against getting
enough people to turn around
their vote Reagan continued.
However, he said, "What's at
issue here is not one man and
what happened to him. What's at
issue is that we make sure that the
process of appointing and con-
firming judges never again is
turned into such a political joke
Speaking over the applause of
the audience, Reagan added,
"And if I have to appoint another
one, I'll try to find one that they'll
object to just as much as they did
for this one
Back in Washington, Byrd cau-
tioned against just such a move.
In remarks on the Senate floor,
Byrd scolded the administration
for not listening to Democratic
advice that Bork would becontro-
(ECU News Bureau) � A new
course for social studies teachers,
surveying the civilizations of Af-
rica, India, China, Japan and the
Middle East, has been developed
at ECU and will be offered in the
spring semester.
Through the Department of
History, two specialists in non-
western cultures will conduct the
course, "Comparative History of
Non-Western Civilizations in
answer to the increasing demand
for such surveys.
Dr. Robert Gowen, farmer coor-
dinator of the ECU Asian Studies
program and director of the
state's Japan Center East, said the
offering "is a unique course being
offered for the first time in eastern
North Carolina and perhaps the
whole state
"An innovative course. History
5300 has been developed in re-
sponse to the need of social stud-
ies teachers for broad background
information about Africa, China,
mdia, Japan and the Middle
East Gowen said.
Gowen and Dr. Kenneth
Wilbum of the history faculty will
be instructors for the course
which will be offered each Wed-
nesday, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m during
the spring semester which begins
in January. Pre-registration will
begin Nov. 9.
Gowen, a specialist in far east-
ern history, has traveled
extensively in Asia. Wilbum is a
former coordinator of the African
Studies committee and a lecturer
at the University of the Witwa-
tersrand in Johannesburg, South
Africa.
Colleges fail segregation goals
versial, saying Reagan "could
have saved Judge Bork a trau
matic experience
"It's important that the ad mini
stration listen to the counsel of
some of the people in this body
before it sends up another norm
nee Byrd said.
Bork, a constitutional scholar,
had raised fears among critics
who said his hardline views
would tip the ideological balance
of the high court. Opponents
spent millions of dollars on televi
sion spots and advertisements
attacking Bork's philosophy.
Few male teachers
on elementary level
WINSTON-SALEM (AP) �
Education officials say a combina-
tion of low salaries and tradition
has kept most men out of elemen-
tary education, where 91 percent
of the teachers are women.
"Elementary school teachers
have the image of not only being a
Stephen A. Thornton, a teacher at
Parkland High School in Win-
ston-Salem and chairman of a task
force examining wh) jo few men
become elementary teachers.
The tast force, formed by the
North Carolina Association of
Educators, also will look at the
effect the male teacher shortage
has on children.
"That was a main concern �
not having a male role model in
the elementary school, especially
today with single-parent homes
Thornton told the Winston-Salem
Journal.
Nationally, 31 percent of the
teachers are men. Fourteen per-
cent of the elementary school and
50 percent of the secondary school
teachers are men.
In North Carolina the figures
are even lower. At the secondary
level, 37 percent of the teachers
are men, and overall 21 percent of
them are men.
J. Waco knott, a teacher at Kim-
berly Park Alternative School, has
been teaching for 13 years and is
one of only two male teachers at
the school.
"Elementary 's pretty much a
woman's world Knott said. "It's
a little bit strangeat times It can
be lonely
Knott said he chose to work
with elementary school students
because of their receptivity and
eagerness. But he admits there is a
definite lack of prestige in his job.
"There is somewhat of a stigma
attached to elementary school
teachers he said. "In high school
the men take on other responsi-
bilities such as coaching. For
some reason working with little
children is considered a woman's
role
Male teachers often end up in
administrative positions, not be-
cause they want but because they
can't afford not to, Knott said.
"1 feel like it was more or less for
the income he said. "If I had a
family I would not be able to do
what I do
Coaching is another of the is-
sues that the task force will exam-
ine.
"A lot of men going into teach-
ing are having to sign coaching
agreements to be hired
Thornton said. "If you want to
teach, you have to coach
Looking at men's concerns is
something new for the associa-
tion, Thornton said. To get an idea
of what men think the issues are,
the task force is conducting a sur-
vey of male teachers.
WASHINGTON (AP) � North
Carolina's community college
system has failed to meet federal
desegregation goals established
in 1978, but has demonstrated
"varying degrees of progress" in
achieving certain affirmative ac-
tion goals, U.S. officials have
found.
Accourding to reports released
this month, the 58-campus system
has failed to live up to a commit-
ment to boost the number of
blacks enrolled in programs lead-
ing to transfers to four-year col-
leges.
At the same time, however,
systemwide enrollment of blacks
in all programs reached target
levels for most of the current dec-
ade, slipping somewhat in 1985.
Officials for the U.S. Depart-
ment of Education pointed to
imporvements in course comple-
tion rates for blacks, hiring of new
black faculty members and boost-
ing black membership on govern-
ing boards for community and
technical colleges in North Caro-
lina.
In most cases, however, the
advances fell below goals set out
in the desegregation plan under
review by the department's Of f ice
of Civil Rights.
"We obviously have got to do a
better job Bob Scott, president of
Danny Tavlor & Co
� designer accessories
� ready to wear
� made to order
Eastgate Plaza
2800 E. 10th St.
830-5341
t)ANm
"Let Us Dress You Up
This Halloween"
Vintage Clothing,
Jewelry, & Collections
116 E. 5�h Street
919-752-1750
TAXPAYERS
with dependents
HERE'S A TAX TIP:
Beginning with your 1987 income
tax return that you will file in
l')KK. vou generally must list social
security numbers for dependents
who are at least five years old by
the end of 1987. If any of your
dependents do not have this
number, get an application form
today from the Social Security
office in your area.
? Local and Out of Town Newpapers
Full selection of 1988 Calendars
'Greeting Cards For All Occasions
Central Book and News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 7 Days A Week
Coming October 29th
SteveStreeter
to Speak to
E.C.U. Students
toMwi
v
the community colleges system,
told the News and Observer of
Raleigh Tuesday. Scott said it was
uncertain what action civil rights
authorities might take after they
review the state's effort.
"A lot is going to hinge on
whether we have made a good-
faith effort" in the eyes of the offi-
cials, said Scott, a former gover-
nor.
The state community college
system is among higher educa-
tion systems in 10 states, most of
them in the South, where desegre-
gaton plans have lapsed but are
under review by the civil rights
office. The office is expected to
rule later this year on the states'
performance.
The U.S. House Government
Operatons Committee earlier this
month issued a report sharply
critical of the U.S. Justice
Department's Office of Civil
Rights' vigor in enforcing deseg-
regation plans.
The committee based much of
its criticism on a report on North
Carolina's community college
plan prepared by the Department
of Education regional office in
Atlanta.
The reported said only about
$700,000 had been spent on efforts
to boost black enrollment in the
college transfer programs.
ONE-STOP
COPY SHOP
We copy, collate, and bind.
We make enlargements, reductions,
transparencies, and overlays.
We take passport and I.D. photos.
We sell paper, pens, tape, and other office
supplies.
We are open early, open late, and open
weekends.
We are your one-stop business copying
center.
kinkes
Great copies. Great people.
321 E. Tenth Street
752-0875
ART compETion
Call forntries
REQUIREMENTS
Open to current ECU
students
Limit of 5 pieces per artist
2-D work must be ready
to hang, framed or matted
and acetated
A completed entry form
must accompany
each piece.
A $1.00 entry fee per piece
3-D work must be self
supporting
CATEGORIES
Ceremics, Illustration, Photography, Design, Mixed Media,
Printmaking, Drawing, Painting and Sculpture.
ENTRY DATE.
October 15,1987
Bring entries to Mendenhall Rm 244
from 9-5 p.m.
PRIZES
Best in Show $130.00
First Place per category $30.00
ATTIC
art i cQBcro hop
SM SOUTH COMNCHC ��T
MMlf. ICC. 27�M
art j( camera hop
n SOUTH COTAHCHt STTWt
rat-
�.�
�� �� - - - rniirirr rilflf irwrirm u
�(b- ����





THE CAST CAROLINIAN nr-r�.r, ,c �e7
r A
HELP WANTED
OVERSEAS JOBS $15,000$95,000'vr.
Also Cruisoships Travel Hotels 805-
687-6000 Ext OJ 1166 tor current )obs
TRAVEL EIELD OPPORTUNITY Gam
valuable marketing experience while
earning money Campus representatives
needed immodiatelv tor Spring Break
trips to Florida. Call Campus Marketing
at I 800 282 6221.
MOOrS FOR MEN has full time and
part time sales associates positions for
enthusiastic fashion forward individu-
als Ket.ul clothing experience is required
Hctter than average starting salarv. Ap-
pl in person body's Personnel director,
Carolina last Mall M-W, from 2 4 p m
BROPVS has part time sales associates
positions tvir enthusiastic, outgoing indi
vuiiols who enjoy working with voung
contemporary junior fashions Good sal-
aiv Apply in person. Brody's Personnel
Director Carolina East Mall M-W, from
2 4 p tn
W 11 P-MAIE MODELS. Interviews
will bo on Saturday, October 24 from 2-5
p m aiui Monday, October 26 from 5-9
p m at the Bolk 5 Training room, Caro-
lina Fast Mall No previous experience
nocossurv
CAMPUS TRAVEL REPRESENTA-
TIVE needed to promote Spring Break
tour to Honda Cam money, free travel,
and outstanding marketing experience.
Call Inter Campus Programs I 800-433-
7747
A LEADING CLOTHING RETAILER
needs a full time office associate to work
M 1 from 9 f. Individual must be accu-
rate and possess skills in accounting
bookeeping Saalarv based one experi-
ence Good salarv and benefits package
Applv in person or call for interview ap-
pointment Judith C Simon, Brady's Per
sonnet Director M-W, 2 4 p m 756 2224
GREENHOUSE TECHNICIANS
NEEDED tor part-time employment
nexible hours Weekends and after
school Call 756-0879
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Color TV like new' S125 00
antique dresser make offer Emerson Ste-
reo TapePhonoTuner S5000. 738-
7M3
THE EMPORIUM has all types of used
furniture. pMMlsy and much more. Dirt
cheap 705 Dickinson Ave across from
the License Plate Agency Tuesdav-Fri
da from 12 00-6:00, Saturdav from 10:30-
5 30. Call 830-5288.
NEED TYPING? Call Cindy at 757-0398
anv time after 5:00 p.m. Low rates include
proofreading, spelling and grammatical
corrections, professioanl service 10 years
experience- IBM TYPING.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICES
758-8241 or 758-5488. Ask for Susan.
PINK FLOYD TICKETS 2 pair Call 522
0478.
W86 HONDA CR250R Dirt Bike Never
Raced Helmet and gloves available. 20
hours riding time Excellent condition.
Motorcycle trailer also available $1,900.
Call 355-7812 after 6 pm. or leave message.
BUY EEL SKIN accessories at wholesale
prices Wallets, checkbook covers, key
chains, pocketbooks, bells, and any other
col products Don't hesitate to call David
Dupree at 752-4589.
TIRED OF PAYING HIGH PRICES AT
THE JEWELRY STORE? Well stop Buy
14K gold at wholesale prices. Gold brace-
lets, necklaces, rings and precious gems
Styles like herringbone, rope, and nugget
Call David Dupree at 752-4589
NEED SUNGLASSES? Buv the best made
Ray-Bans at wholesale prices. Call David
Dupree at 752-4589.
IS IT TRUE that you can buv jeeps for $44
through the U.S. government?Get the facts
today! Call 1 312-742-1142 Ext 5271-A.
TYPING: Term papers, resumes, thesis,
etc Cheap rates (on Xerox word proces-
sor) Call Becky from 830-500 p m. at 758-
1161 after 5:00 p m. 752-1321.
FOR SALE Freezer and refrigerator,
dryer and range $100 00 each Good condi-
tion guaranteed Call 746-2446.
FOR SALE - Discount prices on dance and
exercise wear Visit our Bodv Boutique at
Total Eclipse 422 Arlington Blvd 355-
3531.
PROFESSIONAL BUT NOT
EXPENSIVE! Progressive Data Services
offers professional word processing to
students and professionals Term papers,
dissertations, themes, reports and much
more as low as $1 75 per page (Please call
for quote on your project) Price includes
printing on high quality bond paper and
spelling verification against a 50,000 word
electronic dictionary Ask about our spe-
cial offers COMING SOON LASER
PRINTING SYSTEM Call Mark at 757
3440 after 700 p.m. for free information.
WORD PROCESSINGIetter quality or
laser printing Rush jobs accepted 752
1933
ELECTROLYSIS (permanent removal
of unwanted hair) by Barbara Venters.
People who understand electrolysis will
not wax. tweeze or use electronic t weez-
methodCall 830-0962 for free consulta
tion.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERCVICES: We offer tyr
ing and photocopying services. We also
sell software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106
East 5th Street (beside Cubbies)
Greenville, N.C. 752-3694.
PICK UP AND DELIVERY of term
papers, thesis, resumes to be typed. IBM
wordprocessing by professional with 13
years experience. Letter quality print
and professional editing. Call Nanette
in Grifton at 1 524 5241 Cheap- call the
best service!
FOR RENT
utilities paid $250.00 per month. Lease
and deposit required. 758-1274 after 5:00
p.m.
RINGGOLD TOWERS Apartments for
rent - furnished. Contact Hollie Si-
monowich at 752-2865.
PERSONALS
ers or any other temporary method.
Isn't it time to rrv the permanent
WANTED Roommate or roommates
to share 2 bedroom apt. at Tar River
Estates. Male or female Call 752-3032
ROOMATE WANTED: To share 3
bedroom, 2 bath, microwave, furnished
Cathedral ceiling, ceiling fan, washer-
dryer 13 rent and utilities. Call 758-
4481 or 747 3980.
NEAR CAMPUS 3 bedroom with den,
garage $315.00or 4 bedroom for $375.00.
752-1375 Homelocators Small Fee.
UTILITIES PAID, 1 bedroom $205 00 or
2 bedroom $295 00 Now or January
752-1375. I lomelocators Small Fee.
FOR RENT Spend Fall Break or any
upcoming weekend in Atlantic Beach!
Nice beach house for rent, central heat
and air, good location, sleeps six. Call
Stephanie - 757-6563 or evenings 756-
7846.
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED: very
nice 2 bedroom, 1 1 2 bath townhouse,
rent $157.50; 12 utilities; 1.5 miles from
campus; nice neighborhood; private
yard, pool; dishwasher; microwave
757-a316.
TWO BEDROOM FURNISHED. Heat,
air and water included. Available now.
Call Sharon at 355-5706 or Julie at 758
1507
WF WANTED to share 2 BR apartment
at Tar River Estates. Pay 13 rent, 13
utilities Will have own private room
Call Karen or Lisa at 758-0700
HOUSE FOR RENT, 3 bedroom, bath
and half, 2 porches, pecan tree and utili-
ties. I louses, nice yard, 15 minutes from
Crecnville. $100 00 deposit, $200 00
monthly 756-2446 or 753-2878.
1 BEDROOM, upstairs apartment avail-
able October 1 3 blocks from campus AH
HAPPY ANNIVERSARY ! Thanks for
the best year we are going to share to-
gether and for the happiest year of my
life I LOVE YOU ROBBIE' Love Always
Lisa
TO FJC 111: Thanks so much for cocktail. I
hope you enjoyed it as much as I did but
sometimes I wish I'd never meant vou -
AWB J
ROBB HUTCHISON: Happy Birthday
Sweetness Love, T.
BONNIE ARMENTROUT: Happy Be-
lated Birthday! Teresa H.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new Sis-
ters of Alpha Omicron Pi: Rachel Barger,
Elizabeth Beany, Eileen Gealy, Patty
Clandcr, Stephanie Patton, Heidi
Schafcr, Tracy Voss.
BETA KAPPAS OF ALPHA OMICRON
PI: You guys really "Styled and Profiled"
at Cocktail 87 Everything looked great
We love ya! The Sisters of Alpha Omicron
Pi r
MANY THANKS to all the participants
in the AOTT Dunking booth It was a
definate success. Your help was greatly
appreciated. The Pledges of AOTT
HEIDI S. You're the best little sister
anyone could ever have. Congratulations
on your initiation, I'm so proud of you.
Thank-you for all of your help last week
I hope your keys get returned! Alpha
Love, Leslie
LOST: 5 mo. old kitten Gray tabby with
white face and stomach. Lost on Eastern
Street Saturday night, October 9 (he got
out of the house - if you took him home
because he was lost, please return him -
we love and miss him so muchReturn to
213-A Eastern or call 752-9111
TICKETS FOR LAMBDA CHI
ALPHA'S Pre-Halloween bash with
AAE arc now on sale at the student store.
S.V00 Limited amount of tickets
TO THOSE WE KNOW IN AYCOCK,
We have and will still enpy; playing fris-
bee, watching football, beach music, the
pyromanlacs, yelling across the way, fro-
zen beers, and partying all night
Thanks for the good times 7th floor
Clement Hall.
TO C.C AND G.W. in Aycocfc Lets party
with the TIME Love ya. Marsupial
BERRY: Thanks for a rocking Homecom-
ing! Too bad you couldn't 'rogue' on the
high school chick, oh well Had a great
time anyway! Thanks again! Love ya,
Tracy.
MONDAY NITES are not boring any
more. All beer lovers! All hotdog lovers!
All popcorn lovers! All football lovers
The Sheraton has East Carolina's biggest
Monday nite football party in Greenville!
$2.00 pitchers of draft, the hotdog bar is
free, and all the popcorn you can cram in
your mouth. Six-foot television with 3
26" monitors make us East Carolina's
most sophisticated video bar Drawing at
halftime for free footballs
ACIE- Couldn't have had a better date for
homecoming. Let's cut the rug again
sometime. Do you eat lettuce when you
have a buzz. Have a good break Thanks
again for a great time Liz.
MELISSA-You're the best! I love you'
Bobby.
ADPi LIZ : Happy late birthday, you
wild woman! You're the greatest! Love,
Your big Sis, Stephanie
HAPPY 89TH BIRTHDAY ZETA TAU
ALPHA! Founded Oct. 15, 1898
GET N AS-TEA - at "Off the Cuff" lounge
every Friday with $2 00 Long Island Ice
Teas. All nite long Free pizza 6-7 pm Big
Al playing hi energy rock and roll PS
Halloween Eve will be the biggest "treat"
of all
THETA CHI - 1 lomecoming was a blast
The Alumni were too wild. And who
gave daydog that cheese platter? Gross,
so give some to the sheriff Hey, homegiri
G.F. Nice pledge pin, Dave Be prepared
for retaliation. We a partied hard (except
for Mitch), but what's new By the way,
what are we going to do with a five foot
�88?
MEN OF CARRETT - Once again thanks
for all your support during homecoming
Sec Delbert I told you everything would
bcokay Thanks Jay George and Jeff the
Secret Service couldn't havedone it better
and they probably wouldn't have
brought me candy! I love you! Paige
LOST - "Gasoline" blue jean jacket
Reward offered If found call 355 7481
R - Homecoming was a blast and you
were a great date Amanda
K.P.R. - AOH PLEDGE: Thanx for mak
ing the homecoming weekend that much
more fun. I hope you have a great fall
break and whenyou're home remember,
get some sleep. Thinking of you, A Sig Ep
Friend
CHI OMEGA SISTERS: Twas the night
before homecoming and all through the
house, not a sister was stirring not a lite
night to be found. The sisters were
nestled all snug in their beds with
dreams of KAs, Phi Taus and TKEs (to
name a few) danced through their heads
When all of thesuddent there arouse such
a clatter, the pledges were here! That was
the matter! Five minutes to get ready,
where were we going' To the best kid
napping bash the Chi Os could have had
We got you up early Not knowing what
was in sight, but we did it because we love
you and we did it right Love, the Chi ()
Pledges
INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP: Please join us' Wednes
day nights at 7 00 pm Speight 129 Fun
Food Fellowship Teaching
ATrENTION: Don't forget Alpha Xi
Delta's happy hour every Wednesday
night at Pant ana's It's the best excus. f �
missing Thursday's classes'
LIFE IS SWEET because of the fnends we
have made And the things which in
common we share We want to live n
not because of ourselves, but because of
the ones who would care It's living and
doing for somebody else On that all of
We s splendor depends And the joV of ,1
all when we count it all up, is found in (he
making of friends Alpha Mu's
TO NANCY JO. the �1 pledge trainer
your Alpha Mu pledge class r,allv appre
cutes the love and support you have
given us We'll do our very best to add as
much as we can to Alpha Delta Pi Love
the Alpha Delta PI pledges
LOST - my mind and mv bra at SiE Ed
happy hour. Wed n.ght a. Tequila'bar It
found please bring to happy hour next
Wed for reward Betty Sue
WOW! - It was the b.gges. one yet! Fn
days at the SHERATON TEA PARTY
ust keeps on gcttlng bgger
SIC EPs 1 lave a safe fall break
GREEKS! CREEKS! CREEKS! TLA off
your weekend at the East Carolina Tea
lartv 16 oz Long Island Ice Teas served
in a mason jar. that vou get to keep $" 00
refills all nite long Free Pia SJpja Hi
energy rock and roll by big Al The
Sheraton's "Off the Cuff Lounge
SOME BARS CHARGE 3 some bars are
free If I pa,d Id be Pd If 1 had 3. I'd
get me a lea East Carolina Tea Party"
Sheraton "Qfl the Cuff. ' Fridays starting
at 5 pm
TOTAL FOR HOMECOMING WEEK-
END- 10 kegs, appro 200 fifths of liq-
uor from Sat night, 540 bodies of cham
pange. 6 or more bushes, 20 or more
dates' 1 sweater. 1 tooth. 1 flot.7!uch��
1 window, and approx SOT) handovers
ANITA BAKES Now 1 at Minges Col
hseum Contact the C cntral Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center
Announcements
FRESHMEN
What do the 33,000 freshmen enrolled
in Army ROTC last year know that you
don V The Army Reserve Officers' Train-
ing Corps Tor more information about
the ECU Army Reserve Officers' Training
Corps Program, call Capt Alvin J Mitch-
ell at 757 rWr.7 or c.974, or drop by Erwin
Hall, room 319.
AIR FORCE
Scholarships av ailabtc Find out if you
qualify Take the Air Force Officer Quali-
fying Test on 22 Oct (Thursat 1 p.m.
Great job opportunities with salaries to
match For more info, stop by Wright
Annex, third floor, and speak with Capt.
I louston or call 757-6597.
FREE LESSONS
The ECU Karate Qub is offenng FREE
beginning Karate Lessons Thurs, Oct. 15
at 800 pm. in Memorial Gvm (dance
roorr, downstairs) Karate lessons taught
under direction of Bill McDonald, 7th
Degree Black Belt
BACCHUS
BACCIIUS will meet Thurs. night. Oct
15 at 730 in Mendenhall, room 242.
BUSINESS S-ninFNrrs
The Amencan Marketing Association
ls hosting a presentation on "International
Marketing with an emphasis on the Chi-
nese Market The presentation will be
held at 3:00 p.m. Oct. 15 (Thurs.) in Raw!
Browning Room Chancellor Dr. Eakin
will be present and he looks forward to
meeting all of you.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi members may pick up
tickets for the raffle from Dr. Dunlop,
Brcwster A -317 Deadline for tickets is the
Nov. 7 meeting at 700 p.m Jenkins
Auditorium.
� GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi is holding a raffle to
help raise money for travel expenses to
National Convention Pnzes include: (1st)
prize SI00 gift certificate to Belk's; (2nd)
prize $75 gift certificate to Overton's
Sporting Goods; and (3rd) prize $50 gift
certificate to Record Bar. Tickets are 50
cents each and may be picked up in
Brewster A-317 or from any GBP member.
CCA
Clothing & Textiles meeting on Oct.
22nd in Old Joyner Auditorium (in the
library) room 221; 4:45 p.m.�refresh-
ments, 5:00 pm.�speaker. Speaker is
Russ P. Consaul, Mgr. of Executive Re-
cruitment, Miller and Rhodes, who will be
speaking on "A Career in Retailing: It May
Be For You Everyone is invited.
DISCOVER INJC. SJAIM
The Student Union Travel Committee
presents the opening traveladventure
film, Discovering Spain, on Thurs, Oct.
15th in 1 lendrix Theatre at 8:00 p.m Tick-
ets for this film are limited, but are avail-
able at the Central Ticket Office, Menden-
hall, 757-6611, ext. 266.
T MAJRifJALeiNNJEES
Tickets are now on sale for Madriea
Dinners to be held Dec. 2-5 at 7:00 p m in
Mendenhall. Tickets are $10 for ECU stu-
dents and $16 for all others Contact Cen-
tral Ticket Office for more info 757-6611
ext. 266. '
DIVE CLUB
If you enjoy scuba diving and snorkel-
ing, then you need to join ECU's Coral
Reef Dive Club. For more info call 752-
4399 and ask for Glenn or Rob.
EDUCATION MAJORS
l he School of Education, in conjunction
with Campus Ministries, is sponsoring a
WorkStudy trip to Mexico during Spring
Break (March 6-13, 1988). Opportunities
to observe and teach at a local school are
available. A minimum level of "survival"
Spanish is required. For applications and
more info contact the Office of the Dean
m Speight Bldg room 154.
HANDICAPPED STUDENTS
A recruiter from the U.S. Dept. of De-
fense will be on campus on Nov. 18 to
interview you for summer or permanent
employment. Please contact Caroline
Smith, Co-op office, 757-6979 for more
info.
NEON EXHIBIT
The Student Union Visual Arts
Committee is sponsoring The Magic of
Neon a Smithsonian Institute Traveling
Exhibition, Sept. 29-Oct. 16 in Menden-
nall. Register for over $200 worth of neon
prizes to be awarded.
WYCUFFFBANQUrT
Wyciiffe Assodates, the lay ministry of
Wydiffe Bible Translators, will soon be
hosting a banquet in this area to celebrate
twenty years of involving lay people in
missions. The banquet will begin at 7:00
p m. on Oct. 20 at Sheraton, Greenville.
Tickets to this important event are compli-
mentary, and an offering will be taken.
Tickets and information can be obtained
from Larry & Robin Bass by calling (919)
830-1612. The evening will feature the
sharing of exciting firsthand experiences
from a Wydiffe missionary, a complimen-
tary dinner, audiovisual presentation,
Christian fellowship, and full details on
the many ways that lay people can be-
come directly involved in Bible transla-
tion.
PHI BETA LAMBDA,
There will be a meeting on October 21 at
3:00 in room R3Q2. Speaking on the subject
of interviewing will be Robert Bowman
from Burroughs Welcome.
GAMMA BETA PHI
There will be a mandatory meeting
October 27 at 7:00 p.m. in Jenkins Audito-
rium. Dues must be paid and lack of atten-
dance will result in the individual proba-
tion of members.
INTRAMIIRALS
The Department of intramural-Recrea-
tional Services has a Backpacking Trip
planned for the weekend of October 23
25. Registration for this trip will be taken
in 204 Memorial Gym from 8:00 a.m. to
6:00 p.m through October 16.
campus r.nti.srrMrrs
There will be a New Member Pinning
Ceremony on Thursday, October 15 in
Mendenhall at 7:00 pm. For more infor
mation, call Katie at 752-8960 or Nancv at
551-2583.
PHI SIGMA PI
There will be a car wash on October 24
from 9:00 a an. to 4:00 p.m. at the Fuel Doc
on 10th St and 264 The cost is $2 00 per car
FILMS CQMMITTFF
Hie free samples of Studio Line Hair
Products are now available for all those
who attended the sneak preview of "Baby
Boom Bring Screeen Pass or movie pro-
gram to Mendenhall, room 210 or 234
Monday-Friday from 8.00 a.m-5.00 p m
Offer expires Friday, October 30.
ECusuRFcnm
tv-U burfing Qiampionshop will be
held the weekend of October 24. All surf-
ers planning to go to Cape Hatteras for
Fall Break contact Johnny Ghee or Robert
Hurst for information. There will be a
meeting on Wednesday, October 21 in
room 248 Mendenhall at 5:30.
PM ALPHA TT.FTA
There will be a cookout on October 30
from 5:00 p.mU30 p.m. for members and
guests at the picnic area near Memorial
Gym. The cost is $1 50 for members and
$2.50 for guests For more information
about Phi Alpha Theta Honor Society in
History, contact the ECU History Depart
ment
ECU COMPUTER CLUB
There will be a meeting in Austin 223 on
Thursday at 3:00 pm Guest speaker will
be Ernie Marshburn, manager of Aca-
demic Computing All interested stu
dents and faculty welcome
ECU POETRY FOELM
There will be a meeting at 8:00 p m in
Mendenhall room 248 Those wishing to
have their work discussed should bnng 8
10 copies of each poem Meeting open to
public, observers welcome
CXX2PmATL�Em
The Institute of Government Summer
Intern Program urges students to learn
more about summer jobs by attending a
meeting on October 27, at 2 00 p.m. in 302
Rawl A representative from IOG will be
available to discuss a 10-week into nship
with various state agencies located in
Raleigh All applicants must be of sopho-
more, junior, or senior status anc must be
returning to school after completing the
internship. For more information, call the
Co-op office at 757-6979
FOREIGN STTinFNTS
International Students and interested
members are encouraged to come and
vote in the election of officers on Wednes-
day October 14, 1987 at 5:00 pm. at the
international I louse on 306 E 9th Street
'Copter gets ticket
The sight of slick new Army
helicopters landing at Embry-
Riddle Aeronautical U. in Day-
tona Beach, Fla isn't all that
unusual, as the armed forces
regularly drop in to try to impress
and recruit the aviation special-
ists the school produces.
But on Sept. 14 Army recruiters
unknowingly landed a UH-60
Blackhawk helicopter in a storm
of campuswide grumpiness
caused by a new set of strict park-
ing regulations, which had stu-
dents and faculty upset and wor-
ried about where they were going
to park to attend classes.
To have precious parking
spaces consumed by a helicopter
was apparently too much for a
campus cop, reported Paul Nova-
cek, editor of The Avion, the
university's paper.
When the recruiters returned to
the helicopter, they found it had
been ticketed for violating the
new parking regulations.
'Hot' items selling
The National Association of
College Stores, which from its
office in Oberlin, Ohio, tracks
sales at campus bookstores, re-
ported in its most recent bulletin
that it expects the following items
to be big sellers among students
this fall:
The Couch Potato, "a soft
brown pillow (that) is on
everyone's 'musf list to keep the
TV watched while classes are in
session Corona Beer t-shirts, a
$25 alarm clock shaped like a soft-
ball that you turn off by hurling
against a wall, no-smoking neck-
ties and hairstyles with "the 'Les
Miserables' waifish look de-
scribed as something that "takes
lots of mousse to achieve the un-
combed, ringleted, mussed look
Campus stores nationwide,
meanwhile, sold $1 million worth
of Domino Pizza Noid t-shirts
during the first 5 days they were
offered. Coming soon: Pizza Noid
dolls.
New awards given
The National Organization for
Women's Legal Defense and
Education Fund Sept. 28 awarded
U.S. Secretary of Education Wil-
liam Bennett a "Lifetime Under-
achievement Award" for install-
ing a policy that withholds from
pregnant teenagers education
funds set aside for single parents
and homemakers.
Also given a facetious "Silver
Snail Award Oregon Gov. Neil
Goldschmidt, who once said that
Title LX � the law that forbids
discrimination on the basis of
gender� had led to "mediocrity"
in Oregon intercollegiate sports.
Fixing grades
In 1985, the University of Geor-
gia endured a long, embarrassing
public trial for effectively fixing
the grades of some football play-
ers so they could remain eligible
to play.
Since the UGa, like a number of
schools, has strained to tout the
accomplishments of its "student-
athletes" � athletes who also do
well in class � loudly.
So it convinced the Atlanta
Journal-Constitution to run an
Aug. 30 feature on player Kim
Stephens, who in his fourth year
already has earned an undergrad
degree in math and math educa-
tion and is working on hi s masters
in business administration.
For a photo to accompany the
article, Stephens posed in front of
a chalkboard on which he had
written a quadratic equation.
He wrote it incorrectly.
Helping vagrants
Two local off-campus groups�
the Hillsborough Street Mer-
chants Association and the Uni-
versity Neighborhood Planning
Council � have voted to ask
North Carolina State students not
to be so kind.
Students and faculty members
apparently give money to va-
grants often enough to have won
the campus a reputation as a
charitable place that, in turn, has
attracted more vagrants to the
area.
But some of the vagrants use the
money to get drunk, can be abu-
sive to passersby and cause cus-
tomers to avoid the businesses
across the street from the campus
"It's a social problem said
NCSU spokesman AJ Lamer, who
hopes to channel students' larg-
esse into local charities and soup
kitchens comfortably distant
from the business district.
Vagrants don't limit them-
selves to N- -th Carolina State.

� ���� , �WW � ,� a
THFFASTt Allot INIAN
ECU enviro
class to reno
By MICHELLE SHEERAN
Slid Knie,
A group of ECU environmental
design students, k-d by Dr. Ab
dul Shaktxir Farhadi, is planning
to renovate the downtown an a
of two North Carolina towns
'I he students are from Farhadi 's
Preservation, Revitalization and
Adaptive Re-use Studio, where
they study architecture, interior
design, landscape and urban
planning
The Department of Natural
Resources and Cornmunit) de-
velopment (NRCD) recently con-
tacted Farhadi to have his class
design plans lor the renovati
Plymouth and Hertford.
Farhadi said the two main ob
jeetiyes of the project are to re-
vitalize the area and to recreate
the look the buildings originally
had.
He said the people in these
communities felt restoring the
downtown areas would create
more business and promote a
better economy
In preparation for the project
Farhadi had his students �
the history of the two towns The
students later went to Hertford to
study
dimensai
Am
the) J
UOk f
I lien t
.
pia.
tiu-old t:
stud
because
with
Hv
Indents
enovatii
"S ?
Farl 1
k ed oi
vatkij
teenth Sti
low-cost
Fifteen!
Fleetwoo
By JOHN T. CARTER
teaturr tditor
Fleetwood Mac is twenty years
old this year. Juniors in the big
music college of life. And for the
past ten years, their major has
been mystique with a double
minor in pop sensibility.
I hey gave the crowd what u
wanrpd, a greatest hits concert,
Friday night at the Smith Center
in Chapel Hill Buttons and shirts
proclaimed "The Mac is Bavk"
and even minus Lindsay Buck-
ingham, it was.
Critics are continuously saying
the band has lost its driving force
with Buckingham and that re-
placement guitarists Biliv
Burnette and Rick Vito are the
rock equivalent of football scabs
Well, you can't really argue
with that, but when listening to
the Mac you have to realize a few
things. One is, this is not a band
that ever claimed to have integ
rite, musical or otherwise
The other is, when you were in
junior high school, punk wasn't
around and your choices were
pretty much limited to Fleetwood
Mac and ACDC. The tirst
'Acorn lady'
County; tru
albums v
you alwai
So it '
mystique
grade ier
are like i
Stevie "ij
Witho
ham and I
the Mac
when thi
1976 VYitl
that pair
rests on t
vide the iq
And tha
playing t
solo Lp
Mc
seems e of
its future
Nicks
sing and
Her

"Tar. :
proved th
nes with
always
other hon
men m as
ahties cai
BYRSON CUT, N.C. (AD -
Authorities say a skeleton found
in the Nantahala Gorge over the
weekend may be the remains of a
mysterious woman who had
lived along the Appalachian Trail
since last year and was known
only as the "aam lady
The only identification found
on the body was a 1984 Georgia
fishing license issued to Gwen
Collette Ratic in Mount Airy, Ga
and a food stampapplication. The
name was also found in one of
several Bibles and on religious
tracts inside her plastic covered
tent, said Swain County Sheriff
Ray Cline.
Swain County authorities be-
lieve the woman died in lune. Her
remains, discovered by a hiker
Saturday, have been sent to the
state medical examiner in Chapel
Hill to determine the cause of
death and a positive identifica-
tion.
The mystery of the acorn lady
began in September 1986 when
Clay County Sheriff Tony Woody
received a call that a woman with
no money or food was sleeping
under the High Bridge on Lake
Chatuge She had come there
pushing a bicycle loaded with her
belongings.
Woody told The Asheville Gti-
zen he anf
found the M
the bn
starved dovl
Ms RaticI
thonties shl
term fob ad
earlier in thj
She clan
so she packl
the bicvele
North Carol
Woodv aj
her to the ia
gave herdr
over her tor
was strongc
She stavt
family for
she moved
In Octot
constructiol
Duke of the I
Nantahala
Ms. Ratic caij
lachian Trail
She was
because sh
spring wat
acorns.
Ms. RaticI
reporter Kc
years old ai
some work
ing out str
trash
.1





tmeconi
�' n the
& .1 peal
drams oi KAs Phi Taus and TKEs (to
name a few) danced through thoir heads.
hon allot thesuddent there arouse such
a clatter, the pledges were here' That was
the matter' Five minutes to get ready,
where were we going' To the host kid
napping bash the v'hi IV could have had
We cot you up earl) Not knowing what
I .is in Mght hut we did it tvvaux' we love
d it right 1 ove, the Chi O
lriKKMM CHRISTIAN
(Hi OWSHIP Please iom us' Wednes-
day mgl � pjn Speight 129 Fun-
iod-1 vsl p Teaching
VU llON
'rget Alpha Xl
�rv Wednesday
e Nt excuse tor
I At
i great rail
(�member
lot vou, ASigEp
1IR ISSWEI r because ol the friendsm�
hav nude And the things which in
���� share We want to live on,
s� ol ourselves but because of
ps M ho would care It s living and
� somebod) else (n that all of
nds And the jov of it
ill up istoundinthe
fc Mpha Mil s
TO NANO fO the �! pledge trainer,
' '�" -1 � � pledge class really appre
and support vou have
ay er N-st to add as
an to Alpha Vita Pi Love,
i Pi pledges
1 OS1 m mind and mv bra at Sig Ep
hour Wed night at Tequila bar. It
- bring to happv hour next
ward Bottv SUe
WOW! Il was the biggest one vet' Fn-
it the SI D RATON TLA PARTY
" " fti"g bigger Cast Caro
to 1 a m at the Sheraton's
JFP
SIC 1 Ps 1 lave a sale tall break
(.Kirks' CREEKS! GRFFKS! TEA off
weekend at the East Carolina Tea
Part) a Long Island Ice Teas served
jar, that you get to keep S2 (X)
rig Free Pizza 6-7 pjn Hi
ck and roll by big Al The
� - "Ofl the Cufl lounge'
- Ml BARS CHARGE 3 some bars arc
13, I'd bePd if I had 3, I'd
gel me .i lea East Carolina Tea Partv"
eCuff Fridays starting
rOTM FOR HOMECOMING WEEK-
rP Kegs approx 200 fifths of liq-
uor from Sat night, 540 bottles of cham-
pange, 6 or more bushes, 20 or more
dates?. sweater 1 tooth. 1 fl.ut. 7�uches.
f window and appro VIO hangovers.
K Kl K V
. 1 at Wmges Col
ntral Ticket Office,
enter
COLTS
LMA PI
IMMUTI
A3
my Ghee or Robert
There will be a
. (Vtober 21 in
530
for members and
rea near Memorial
cost is $1.50 tor members and
six For more information
l Theta 1 lonor Society in
�ntact the ECU 1 listory Depart-
ECLCOMPUTERQJLIB
There will be a meeting in Austin 223 on
Thur.sdav at 3 00 p m Guest speaker will
Marshburn, manager of Aca-
demic C ompuhng All interested stu
dents and faculty welcome
1 CL POLTRY FORUM
tx j meeting at 8 00 p m. in
� ��m 2-18 Those wishing to
their � rk liscussed should bring 8-
i : poem Meeting open to
bserv ers wel . mc
COOPERATIVE ED.
Institute or Government Summer
tern Program urges students to learn
� t iboul summer nibs bv attending a
meeting on October 27 at 2 (X) p.m. in 302
resent itive from KXi will be
liscuss a 10-week internship
� �� i- b stal agencies located in
ir's must be of sopho-
m r rsa - status and must be
ifter completing the
in: r more information, call the
fficeat 757-1
FOREIGN STUDENTS
International Students and interested
members are encouraged to come and
vote in the election of officers on Wednes-
day (Vtober 14. 1987 at 5 00 p m at the
international ' louse on VKi F 9th Street.
Ites who also do
ludly.
the Atlanta
hon to run an
jon player Kim
his fourth year
an undergrad
id math educa-
Jg on his masters
istration.
accompany the
osed in front of
which he had
ic equation.
rrectly.
igrants
ipus groups�
th Street Mer-
and the Uni-
lood Planning
voted to ask
North Carolina State students not
to be so kind.
Students and faculty members
apparently give money to va-
grants often enough to have won
the campus a reputation as a
charitable place that, in turn, has
attracted more vagrants to the
area.
But some of the vagrants use the
money to get drunk, can be abu-
sive to passersby and cause cus-
tomers to avoid the businesses
across the street from the campus.
"It's a social problem said
NCSU spokesman AI Lanier, who
hopes to channel students' larg-
esse into local charities and soup
kitchens comfortably distant
from the business district.
Vagrants don't limit them-
selves to North Carolina State.
THFEASTCAROMNIAN
Entertainment
OCTOBER 15, 19K7 Page 7
ECU environmental design
class to renovate N.C. towns
By MICHELLE SHEERAN
SUH Writer
A group of ECU environmental
design students, led by Dr. Ab-
dul-Shakoor Farhadi, is planning
to renovate the downtown areas
of two North Carolina towns.
The students are from Farhadi's
Preservation, Revitalization and
Adaptive Re-use Studio, where
they study architecture, interior
design, landscape and urban
planning.
The Department of Natural
Resources and Community De-
velopment (NRCD) recently con-
tacted Farhadi to have his class
design plans for the renovation of
Plymouth and Hertford.
Farhadi said the two main ob-
jectives of the project are to re-
vitalize the area and to recreate
the look the buildings originally
had.
He said the people in these
communities felt restoring the
downtown areas would create
more business and promote a
better economy
In preparation for the project,
Farhadi had his students study
the history of the two towns. The
students later went to Hertford to
study the buildings and their
dimensions inside and out.
After completing the study,
they made preliminary plans and
took them the Hertford city hall.
Then they surveyed towns-
people, discovering what they
liked and disliked about the
plans.
Students in the program said
they have found that objections to
the renovations were few because
the community wants to preserve
the old tradition. Farhadi said the
students went to such lengths
because he believes in designing
with the people, not for the
people.
He said the renovation process
will be costly Before the subcon-
tractors can begin to renovate, the
tudents will estimate the cost of
enovatingeach building. Thecit-
s hope to obtain donations and
tans from the government,
Farhadi said.
Farhadi said his classes last year
worked on two other projects, the
renovation of old houses on Four-
teenth Street and the designing of
low-cost housing for Greenville.
Fi fteen students arc in the class,
and two students are presently
working on the project, he said.
Farhadi said he enjoyed work-
ing with his students and tries to
help them find a job when they
graduate. Last year twelve stu-
dents that graduated with con-
centrations in evnironmental de-
sign found jobs immediately with
Farhadi's help.
Jo Leichte, an environmental
design student working on the
project, said she enjoys working
on these projects. "It is something
that the town wants done and
through my resources can be
done she said.
She has been working since the
beginning of the semester on the
project, which has been in prog-
ress for almost one year. She said
she is looking forward to working
in Plymouth because of the inte-
rior design to bedone in the build
ings.
Farhadi said all the main street
buildings will be renovated in
Hertford. He said subcontractors
will clean and repair buildings,
replace aluminum awnings with
canvas ones and install glass win-
dows.
BEFORE- Existing downtown building in Hertford. Dr. Abdul-Shakoor Farhadi's environmental
design class made studies to plan renovations.
1 & t -Vi.
HIIIHIIWI
� � . .�
AFTER-Proposed re-creation of the building's original facade. Subcontractors will replace aluminum
awnings with canvas, install glass to give the building its traditional look.
FleetwoodMac attack losing mystique, power
By JOHN T. CARTER
teaturrs Iditor
Fleet wood Mac is twenty years
old this year. Juniors in the big
music college of life. And for the
past ten years, their major has
been mystique with a double
minor in pop sensibility.
Ihev gave the crowd what it
wanted, a greatest hits concert,
Friday night at the Smith Center
in Chapel Hill. Buttons and shirts
proclaimed "The Mac is Back"
and even minus Lindsay Buck-
ingham, it was.
Critics are continuously saying
the band has lost its driving force
with Buckingham and that re-
placement guitarists Billy
Burnotte and Rick Vito are the
rock equivalent of football scabs.
Well, you can't really argue
with that, but when listening to
the Mac you have to realize a few
things. One is, this is not a band
that ever claimed to have integ-
rity, musical or otherwise.
The other is, when you were in
junior high school, punk wasn't
around and your choices were
pretty much limited to Fleetwood
Mac and ACDC. The first
albums you ever pay lor arc ones
vou always associate with.
So if you buy into the Mac
mystique, as hundreds of eighth
grade females do, dressed as they
are like Franklin Mint replicas of
Stevie Nicks, it was a good show.
Without doubt it was Bucking-
ham and Nicks who jumpstarted
the Mac truck onto the charts
when they joined the band in
1976. With the positive clamp of
that pair of cables gone, the focus
rests on the negative end to pro-
vide the juice.
And that shedid. With the band
playing two songs off of Nicks's
solo Lp's and none off Christine
McVie's or Mick Fleetwood's, it
seems even the Mac knows where
its future hits lie.
Nicks didn't do anything but
sing and wear foot-high heels.
Her stage presence suffered, be-
short of musical hooks. The
"Tango in the Night" album
proved they can rehash past glo-
ries with the best of them. What
always set this band above the
other homogenized Top 40 fresh-
men was how hard their person-
alities came across in their tunes.
When you heard a McVie song,
you knew you would get melo-
dies and some greeting card lyr-
ics. Nicks stings were character-
ized by horror movie background
music and Ouija board words.
Buckingham tried anything so he
could be the weirdest guy in the
band.
On this tour, none of this is get-
ting across. It's a parody; the old-
est divorced couple in rock, their
friend the nasty drummer and a
middle aged coke addict pretend-
ing to be seventeen. Add two
unknown and unexciting guitar-
ists and "The Mac is Back
The tour will continue and a
new album is being planned. But
where the Mac used to sav,
"Chains keep us together, "
right now they're only bound by
Stevic's lace.
cause she couldn't do her trade-
mark Dance of Usclessness wear-
ing those shoes.
But her voice is still strong and it
roused fans everytime she came
back to the stage after one of her
wardrobe changes. Especially
powerful was the almost spoken
rendition of "Has Anyone Ever
Written Anything for You set
starkly against McVie's drifting
piano notes.
The band played the breadth of
its history. Starting with "Don't
Stop" and 'The Chain" to "Seven
Wonders" and "Little Lies they
hit everything except several of
their landmark hits.
Most noticeable among the
missing in action were "Sara
"Hold Me" and Buckingham's
'Tusk Also lost in Mac limbo
was Nicks' most intelligent ballad
"Landslide" and (thankfully)
"Big Love
The "Mirage" album was ig-
nored except for a pathetic, coun-
trified "Gypsy The song's nos-
talgic quality wassheared in favor
of a heavier guitar.
Bassist John McVie was casual
throughout, supporting all the
songs with solid work. A naughty
drum solo by Mick Fleetwood
drew laughter and hard applause.
The new guys were spotlighted
each time Nicks ran to the dress-
ing room. Bumettc's blues riffs
were nice and Vito played a for-
gettable pop tune. Their overall
performance with the group
wasn't too swift, but they have to
be commended for learning the
Mac repetoire in one month.
Though the audience obvi-
ously wanted more, the group
only did two encores. It was later
discovered that Nicks was sick
and this could be the reason for
their short second set.
The entire Mac came out first lo
do a weak "Go Your Own Way"
� a song they need to take to
heart. Then Christine cameout for
a sap-filled but well played piano
solo.
Fleetwood Mac has never been
ECU News Bureau - Documen-
tary films concerning graphic and
performance arts will be screened
today and Oct. 22 in East Carolina
University's Jenkins Fine Arts
Center Auditorium.
Both screenings, scheduled for
noon, are part of the ECU School
of Art's Thursday Lunchtime
Movie series and are about one
hour in length.
Showing today are
"Wordswede a film about a
north German artists' colony
'Acorn lady' remains found in Macon
County; true identity still a mystery

A
BYRSON CUT, N.C. (AP) -
Authorities say a skeleton found
in the Nantahala Gorge over the
weekend may be the remains of a
mysterious woman who had
lived along the Appalachian Trail
since last year and was known
only as the "acorn lady
The only identification found
on the body was a 1984 Georgia
fishing license issued to Gwcn
Collette Ratic in Mount Airy, Ga
and a food stamp application. The
name was also found in one of
several Bibles and on religious
tracts inside her plastic covered
tent, said Swain County Sheriff
Ray Cline.
Swain County authorities be-
lieve the woman died in June. Her
remains, discovered by a hiker
Saturday, have been sent to the
state medical examiner in Chapel
Hill to determine the cause of,
death and a positive identifica-
tion.
The mystery of the acorn lady
began in September 1986 when
Clay County Sheriff Tony Woody
received a call that a woman with
no money or food was sleeping
under the High Bridge on Lake
Chatuge. She had come there
pushing a bicycle loaded with her
belongings.
Woody told The Asheville Citi-
zen he answered the call and
found the woman huddled under
the bridge. "She was about
starved down when I found her
Ms. Ratic told Clay County au-
thorities she had ended a long-
term job as a personal servant
earlier in the year near Helen, Ga.
She claimed she had no family,
so she packed her belongings on
the bicycle and started out for
North Carolina.
Woody and his deputies took
her to the jail where they fed her,
gave her dry clothes and watched
over her for several days until she
was stronger.
She stayed with a deputy's
family for several weeks. Then
she moved on.
In October 1986 Forest Service
construction supervisor Tom
Duke of the Wayah District of the
Nantahala National Forest found
Ms. Ratic camping near the Appa-
lachian Trail in Macon County.
She was called the acorn lady
because she was subsisting on
spring water, flour cakes and
acoms.
Ms. Ratic told Franklin Press
reporter Ken Sexton she was 54
years old and had hoped to get
some work along the way clean-
ing out streams and picking up
trash.
She was " a tall, frail, grand-
motherly lady Sexton said.
Local agencies in Macon
County attempted to help Ms.
Ratic, but she refused, telling au-
thorities she preferred to live in
the woods.
"She was very self-sufficient.
She had a mind of her own and the
outdoors was her world said
Frances Slagle, a staff member of
the Macon Program for Progress.
"We called her the acorn lady
because she loved ground-up
acorns for coffee
Everyone who remembered
Ms. Ratic Tuesday said she de-
tested any governmental assis-
tance, but would accept coffee
and cigarettes from individuals.
She told them she loved the ani-
mals in the forest and she felt safe
in the woods.
Nancy and Tom Duke took her
into their home during a snow-
storm early in 1987.
"She said she had no family
Mrs. Duke said Tuesday. "She
said one night at the dinner table
that she once lived in Atlanta in 'a
beautiful house' with her family,
she claimed she had two children
the government killed. She
wouldn't say anything else, but
she once mentioned a sister.
"I don't think she was always
poor. The way she presented her-
self, talked and ate, 1 think that at
one time she was in a good home
- a very good home. Her manners
and all impressed me. I think she
was well educated
Ms. Ratic returned to her camp
near the Appalachian Trail. And
as the winter wore on and the
weather became colder authori-
ties again became concerned
about her. Macon county depu-
ties, rescue squad members and
wildlife officers hiked into her
camp one extremely cold night
and had to practically force her to
leave.
Ranger Ronnie Raum of the
Wayah District of the Nantahala
National Forest said Ms. Ratic's
tent had nearly collapsed from the
snow and she was huddled under
some plastic with a candle to keep
warm.
Her last contact with Forest
Service and county officials was
sometime in late March or April.
Then she dropped out of sight.
When Swain County deputies
Steve Cloer and Roger DeHart
arrived at her camp Saturday they
couldn't tell whether the body
was that of a man or woman. All
that remained was a skelton.
Inside her tent, which was cov-
ered with sheets of clear and black
Art films to show at Jenkin's
known as the residence of painter
Paula Modersohn-Beckcrand the
poet Rilke; "Pina Bausch and the
Wuppcrtal Dance Theatre a
rehearsal work featuring Pina
Bausch choreography of "The
Rite of Spring" and "Dada and
Neo-Dada photo-collages of
John Heartfield.
Scheduled for Oct. 22 arc "Emil
Nolde" and "A Portrait of Paula
M odersohn- Becker
All screenings in the art series
are free and open to the public.
ECU drummers in 'top 12'
ECU News Bureau - Six mem-
bers of East Carolina University's
"Marching Pirates" marching
band have concluded a season of
touring across the nation with
U.S. Drum and Bugle Corps
groups.
The tours ended recently in
Whitewater, Wise, at the Drum
Corps International World
Championships; all corps repre-
sented by members of the March-
ing Pirates made the "top
twelve
ECU band members participat-
ing were Todd Brewer of Fairfax,
Va ECU's head drum major, who
performed with the "Garfield
Cadets" corps; Scotty Sells of
Richfield and Bucky Cross of
Creedmoor, performers with the
"Spirit of Atlanta Matt Minick of
Raleigh, member of the "Garfield
Cadets Nick Holland of
Pittsboro, member of the "Sky
Ryders and Jeff Weaver of Ron-
ccverte, West Va member of the
"Bridgemen
"While traveling three months
provides participating students a
chance to tour dozens of states
and compete almost nightly,
these students, consequently, re-
turn to ECU and provide strength
and leadership to the band said
Marching Pirates director Dr.
Thomas Goolsby.
The "top twelve" is selected
from among several hundred
competing corps, each with ap-
proximately 128 members, he
said.
Opera tryouts start Oct. 21
ECU News Bureau - Auditions
for the February production of
the East Carolina University
Opera Theater will be held Oct.
21-22 from 7:30 until 10 p.m. in
Room 269 of the Fletcher Music
Center at ECU.
Auditions are open to any
interested persons. Singers
should be prepared to sing
something of their choice for
solo roles; those auditioning for
the chorus do not need to
prepare a special piece. An
accompanist will be provided.
The full-length opera produci-
ton will be presented Feb. 11-14.
Further information is available
from Dr. Clyde Hiss, director of
the ECU Opera Theatre, at 757-
6851.
plastic, was a calendar. I ne days
had been crossed out on the calen-
dar until June 14, Rag Day - a
Sundav.
"She loved theoutdoors. I don't
think she would have starved. She
wanted to live outside Slagle
said.
Ms. Ratic didn't leave much
behind. She had less than $1 in
change, her blue Monarch bike,
some herbs, the Bibles, assorted
clothing including a green pair of
WWn 5 !ubDer boots given her in
Macon County, several plastic
sacks filled with litter she appar-
ently picked up in the woods and
her tattered tent. The deputies
also found a receipt for $25 from
where she bought the bicycle in
Mount Airy, Ga.
"She never bothered anybody.
In fact, nobody really remembers
her dine said. "I'd sure like to
make sure who she is
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LONDON (AP) Actor Simon
Vard has rcturnt-d home from a
Hospital and says he can't re al
iOW he suffered a fractured skull
Ward, 45, best known for hi
tamng role in the Richard Atten
orough film "Young Winston,
aid Tuesday he believes h
Hacked Oct 1 in or around his
Jorth London Home Hi-
ound unconcious bv his
Uexandra, in their li me r
Scotland Yard vud it is trying to
letermine whether Ward
ttacked
"It is hkelv that he vsav' sa
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nquines are continuing
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Bmefromaperforma
jondon's theater disti
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iter stepping thi
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He said he developed
Field is comfortabh
NEW YORK (AP) - Sail ,
�as fared well on the choppj -
f stardtm, but she says it
akes guts to put her -a �rk bt I i
he public.
The productive idem)
ward-winning actress i- ab
odeliver a babv in DtvcmK-r and
as two new romantic ct�me
:omingout: "Surrender out this
veek; and "Punchline out early
lext vear
"Some people sav that corned)
sharder she said. "Probabiv it -
larder because when vou
ou fall so broadly - without am-
iort of saving grace When you
all in drama it seems a little m. ire
graceful. When vou fall in com-
�dy, you splat
Such insight is squeezed from a
lfetime spent in show business
as the daughter of Paramount
actress MaRgie Field Mahoney;
the" sr'c!paa'urtfr of Toot Mfa-
honey, a star of Westerns and two
Tarzan films; and now, as the wife
of producer Alan Greisman
"Retch "Modem Pr
and " night. Mother)
Field also seems entrench�
her domestic role with her i
rropped hair and casual m
tity clothes - the flip side ot her
:
and )
goes av ,i �.
Such
frailties have
the - �
UnttdiMw
FEELING LOW
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
Why not come by the REAL Crisis Interver.d
E. lOth St; or call 758 HELP. For Free Co: .
Ing or Assistance.
Our Volunteers and Staff are on duty 24
�round. In order to assist you in virtually an
you might have. Our longstanding goal has
preserve and enhance the quality of life for y
xn unity.
Licensed And Accredlte
C6tt'�
foanehA
Grot"
Quali
"HAT 2 SWEATERS TLailflck
OR SKIRTS CLEANE Dj g
5 Foi
i 3RD PAIR CLEANED j
Bv FRIEDRICH
THE VAMPIRE
by Mklver
i
i
I Efcpiirs October 31. L9�
Coupon must be presented with incoming
CORVERl
First Wachovia is looking
few good students for mal
merit trainee positions in
Recruiters will be on cam
November 3,1987. Contai
Career Planning and Plat
Office for an interview or
information.
FIRST
WACHOVII
An Equal Opportunity EmpLj
�. .
� M iMfMROMMi
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
CKTOBER15.1987
People in the news
LONDON (AP) - Actor Simon
Ward has returned home from a
hospital and says he can't recall
how he suffered a fractured skull.
Ward, 45, best known for his
tarring role in the Richard Atten-
vrough film "Young Winston
viid Tuesday he believes he was
ittacked Oct. 1 in or around his
Morth London Home. He was
found unconcious by his wife,
Alexandra, in their living room.
Scotland Yard said it is trying to
determine whether Ward was
,i stacked.
It is likely that he was said a
vlice spokesman, speaking an-
nvmously in keeping with Brit-
ish custom. "There is no proof of
tus having been attacked and our
inquiries arc continuing
Ward said he was returning
me from a performance in West
ondon's theater district and that
"ie first assumed he had fainted
it'ter stepping through his front
door because there were no obvi-
us signs of injuries.
He said he developed severe
eadaches three days later and
that a brain scan revealed a frac-
tured skull and a large blood clot.
Ward underwent surgery to
remove the clot and had 24 metal
staples inserted in his skull to
close the wound, said Colin
Boakes of Charing Cross Hospi-
tal.
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - Ro-
sanne Cash's rock-swing song
"Hold On" was the winner of
BMI's Robert . Burton Award,
given to the country music song
played most often by broadcast-
ers, company officials an-
nounced.
Paul Overstreet was named
Songwriter of the Year for his
songs "No Place Like Home
"OnThcOthcr Hand "One Love
At a Time "You Can't Stop
Love" and "You're Still New to
Me
Tree Publishing Co. won Pub-
lisher of the Year honors, BMi said
Tuesday.
Citation of Achievement
awards were given to writers
and 75 publishers in recognition
of popularity in country music at
a ceremony Tuesday evening.
The awards are based on the
number of broadcast perform-
ances for the period of April I,
1986, through March 31,1987.
BMI is a composer, songwriter
and music publishing company
performing rights organization
that collects and distributes per
formance royalties.
BENTONVI1.LF, Ark. (AP) -
Billionaire Sam Walton had no
comment about being placed at
the top of Forbes magazine's list
of 400 richest Americans for the
third-straight year.
"Absolutely mine' Jim Von
Gremp, spokesman for Walton's
Wal-Mart Store chain, said Tues-
day.
Forbes said Monday that
Walton's holdings were worth
$8.6 billion.
BEVERLY HILLS. Ca.lif. (AP)
Jack Valenti, head of the Motion
Picture Industry Association of
America, is warning of a televi-
sion programming monopoly.
Valenti noted Tuesday that a
Justice Department consent de-
cree requiring networks to use
some independent produciton
will expire in 1990.
"At that time, all three networks
will be free to produce and own
l(K) percent of all their 22 hours of
weekly prime-time program-
ming he said at a meeting of the
1 loUywood Radio and Television
Society.
One network executive dis-
agreed with Valenti. "The only
network produced show on pn-
metime right now is 'Moonlight-
ing' on ABC said John Agoglia,
NBC executive vice president for
business affairs. Angoglia said he
doubted the networks want to
dominate produciton and said he
saw no trend toward that.
IRVING, Texas (AP) - Televi-
Field is comfortable with her role as mother
NEW YORK (AP) - Sally Field
has fared well on the choppv sea
of stardom, but she says it still
takes guts to put her work before
;he public.
The productive Academy
Award-winning actress is about
to deliver a baby in December and
has two new romantic comedies
coming out: "Surrender out this
week; and "Punchline out early
next year.
"Some people say that comedy
is harder she said. "Probably it's
harder because when you fall,
you fall so broadly - without any
sort of saving grace. When you
tall in drama it seems a little more
graceful. When you fall in com-
edy, you splat
Such insight is squeezed from a
lifetime spent in show business.
as the daughter of Paramount
actress Maggie Field Mahoncy;
the sftpaluftter-6f tr4J&
honey, a star of Westerns and two
Tarzan films; and now, as the wife
of producer Alan Greisman
"Fletch "Modem Problems"
ind " 'night, Mother)
Field also seems entrenched in
her domestic role with her close-
cropped hair and casual mater-
nity clothes - the flip side of her
provacati ve pose on the cover of a
1986 Playboy magazine. Alreadv
the mother of Peter, 17, and Eli, 14,
she plans to "play it by ear" about
ending her next maternity leave.
"Even in the past, I would only
do a picture every one to two
years she said, "i did two pic-
tures this year, which was
unusual for me
What's it like to go back onto the
set after such a hiatus?
"It's always hard she said.
"And every actor I've ever talked
to feels this way
"You always, the first day of
shooting, are a nervous wreck.
You're trembling all over, be-
cause you're saying, '1 once knew
how todo this but I've forgotten it
now she said. "Then you get up
and you start to work and it sort of
goes away
Such admissions of human
' frail ties have brougkiiher grief in
the past. Critics and fans alike
groaned after she gushed during
her 1985 Oscar acceptance speech:
"You like me! You really like me
But in an August interview,
Field's own favorite actress,
Katharine Hepburn, expressed a
similar revelation. Hepburn said
she was surprised that the audi-
ence was not out to shoot her after
she sang in the 1970 Broadway
production of "Coco
"It was a warm discovery to
me. And I thought, 'They must
like me. That's why they're here
After hearing I lepburn's re-
marks, Field laughed heartily.
"Aha! There it is! She said it much
more clearly than I did. 1 lad I said
that, 1 wouldn't be in trouble
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Bring Student I.D.
sion evangelist Jerry Falwell is
keeping a close watch on the foot
ball career of Kelvin Edwards, a
Dallas Cowboys wide receiver
who graduated from Falwell's
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Va.
Edwards said he was in his
hotel room Sunday night after the
Cowboys' 41-22 victory over the
Philadelphia Eagles when Falwell
telephoned him.
"Or. Falwell said that he an-
nounced my name in c .urch that
morning Edwards said. "He
said everybody started cheering
in church. 1 said, 'Wait a minute!
People were cheering for me in
church?
Edwards has scored three
touchdowns and set up three oth-
ers while playing for the
Cowboy's replacement team dur-
ing the NFL players' strike.
Told that Falwell has taken an
interest in one of his most talented
replacements, Cowboys Coach
Tom Landry said Monday, "That
would help. We'll take all the help
we can get
1NGLEWOOD, Calif. (AP)
John McEnroe says television in
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month.
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those mikes on the court McEn
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fv3 victory over Miloslav Mecir in
the Ma helm Challenge Series.
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heard for the sake of everybody
and for the spectators he said
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I





10
JHE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBFR 15, 1987
Harvard glass flowers a blooming attraction
CAMBRIDGE. Mae AP . lr. tenth nl M ;u l � . . . �"
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) - In
'924, Marianne Moore began a
poem by recalling something her
father once said: "Superior people
never make long visits, have to be
shown Longfellow's grave or the
glass flowers at Harvard
Long visits are still the curse of
the well situated, and
Longfellow's grave, at Mount
Auburn Cemetery in this univer-
sity town, remains onlv a modest
attraction. But the glass flowers at
the Harvard Botanical Museum
now rank as the university's big-
gest tourist attraction.
The fragile beauties - 847 repli-
cas of 780 species - were fashioned
into likfelike color and form by
father and son artisans from Dres-
den for use as teaching aids in
botany classes.
The plants range from uncom-
plicated (lowers such as the morn
ing glory to a cactus with nary a
spike missing and a stem of gold -
enrod with hundreds of flower-
ing heads averaging about one-
tenth of an inch long
The displays include a section
aptly known around the museum
as "rotten fruit created for the
study of disease. Most of the ex-
hibits are surrounded by their key
pollination parts, and many
plants are detailed right down to
their thread-thin roots - all in
glass.
Model one, an orchid, arrived
100 years ago, and model 847, an
apricot in flower was delivered in
1936, shortly before the death of
Rudolf Blaschka, who did the fi-
nal work on the project he had
begun with his father, Leopold.
A following for this rare blend
of art and science has been build-
ing steadily and quietly over the
years, and now more than 100,000
people a year come to sec the
Blaschka handicraft.
The attraction has grown
largely through word-of-mouth,
enhanced by widely circulated
murmunngs that the flowers
were born of a secret formula the
Blaschkas took to their graves
The exhibit's inconspicuous
location on the third floor of a
cluster of little museums - there is
no sign outside the building indi- what one would bring at auction
ios palm-like cogollo and the rat
A plant lent to Corning after the pineapple, include little mounds
flood was insured for $20,000, and of broken glass. Visitors, in an-
- probably a fraction of gling for better views, have con
'Mi!J K i i-t . � . .i �� a � �
eating the flowers are inside -
makes every first trip to sec the
flowers a small adventure that
adds to the anticipation.
The flowers travel occasionally,
always with the special care they
is the only value ever put on the
flowers. The Blaschkas ended up
being paid roughly $250 per
plant.
Museum officials are beginning
to talk about such mundane
Ware and her mother decided to
finance the project in honor of
Charles Eliot Ware, Harvard class
of 1834.
Whatever happens, the mys-
tique of the flowers will continue,
even though the secret of their
creation was long ago made pub-
have been given since first being things during what has become
sent from Germany in elaborately somcthingofasummcrofreckon-
stuffed crates the Blaschkas de-
veloped for their other main line
of work, glass marine specimens.
Three of the flowers once went
on loan to Japan. The package was
ticketed as "Mr. Box" and pro-
vided a seat in the first-class sec-
tion of an airplane, next to their
keeper. Another group was taken
to New York 10 years ago in two
hearses.
In 1972, six of the flowers on loan
to the corning Glass Words were
destroyed in a flood, and no one
could estimate the extent of the
ing for the world's most precious
mimic garden. New caretakers
are needed because Richard
Evans Schultes recently retired as
museum director, and William A.
Davis, who tended the flowers
after the death of Louis C. Bier-
weiler, their custodian for more
than 60 years, is ailing and also
recently retired.
Time, sonic booms and fluctua-
tions in humidity have worn
some of the paint and produced
some hairline cracks and break-
age. Some displays, such as the
tributed to the flaking by bump-
ing the cherry wood and glass
cases holding the flowers.
The recent addition of air-con-
ditioning will control the climate he bv Leopold Blaschka
and arrest deterioration. Still, a
few flowers will need repairs. "The only way to become a
The museum will meet with glass modeler of skill, I have often
glass experts over the next few said to people, is to get a good
months and is considering more great-grandfather who loved
modern lighting and some other
cosmetic changes in the sur-
roundings.
There also will be talk of how to
raise donations, the first major
quest for money since Mary Lee
glass; then he is to have a son with
like tastes; he is to be your grand-
father. He in turn will have a son
who must, as your father, be pas-
sionately fond of glass You, as his
son, can then try your hand
'Beloved ' a haunted and haunting novel
HWYORK(AP)-Thcrmhl.sh- onlv mavmafp �wj�. u uitv. . . .
NEW YORK (AP)- The publish
crs oi Toni Morrison's spellbind-
ing new book, "Beloved are call-
ing it her Great American novel.
Hut the author chafes at the notion
that she set out to create a work
bearing such an impressive onus.
"No, I wasn't trying to write the
great American anything Mor-
rison said in a recent interview.
But I think the story is a great
American subject
Hie subject is slavery, and is
presented in "Beloved" in its
many degrading forms and un-
mitigated horror. "Imagine the
Holocaust she said in her soft,
careful voice. "Now imagine it
lasting for 200 years
"Beloved" tells the tale of Sethc,
an escaped slave from Kentucky,
struggling to survive in post-Cavi
War Ohio in a house haunted bv
the ghost of her dead baby. Her
two sons have fled the vexatious
spirit; her remaining moodv
daughter considers the ghost her
onty playmate
Along comes Paul D a slave
from the plantation from which
Sethe escaped; he brings with him
a flood o(memoriesand discover-
ies that add to Sethe's pain. But he
provides her with much-needed
companionship and drives away
the spirit. Or so it appears. Soon
afterwards, a mysterious young
woman who can't remember her
past comes to live with them. She
calls herself Beloved, the one
word that Sethe could afford to
have carved on the tombstone for
her dead child.
Morrison, 56, is the author of
four other novels, including 'Tar
Bay and "Song of Solomon
which won the 1978 National
Book Critics Circle Award for fic-
tion. A play, "Dreaming
Emmett was produced last vear.
Although her earlier works
have earned her much acclaim,
she is at her finest in "Beloved
The language is as rich as any-
thing by William Faulkner and
the tale is as poignant as Alice
Walker's "The Color Purple
Morrison's deft pacing and her
talent in weaving riveting flash-
backs into the suspenscful ongo-
ing story make for mesmerizing
reading.
"Beloved" is based in part on a
true account of an escaped slave
named Margaret Garner who
decided to kill her child rather
ihan see it return to bondage. "I
didn't document that woman's
life said Morrison. "I simply
took a small portion of it and in-
vented another life for her
She was asked if Sethe loved her
children too much, and
Morrison's response sums up the
bitter irony that is at the heart of
the book.
"I think Sethe was obsessive
about those children because it
encompassed her perception of
herself she said. "Because slave
women were not permitted deci-
sion making, deciding anything
about their children, so that what
she is doing is claiming that right
in this very grotesque, excessive
way . . . (She) is saying, 'I am the
mother; I can decide what hap-
pens to them which is what the
slaveholders said about her "
THERE'S A LOT
OF CHATTER
ABOUT OUR
CHOWDER
Roasted CorrK rahnvat Chowder
t mc nn in and ttvsome ll II bowl vim mvi
Hilt'
RESTALRANT bA�k
(.1.
ypass
ALCOHOL AWARENESS WEEK
Thursday, October 22
9 P.Mtil
Friday, Qctabex23
8 P.M10 P.M.
Sunday, Qclobej; 25
3 P.M. and 8 P.M.
Monday, October 26
7 P.M10 P.M.
Tuesday, October 27
8:30 P.M9:30 P.M.
Wednesday. Qctnhpr 28
7 P.M9 P.M.
"Combo Night"
Special on Non-alcoholic
beverages
Refreshments
Circus
$5.00 Public
$3.00 ECU Students
Oktoberfest
German Festival
Various Charges for Food
"Risk Management"
Speaker: Representative from
Sigma Phi Epsilon Headquarters
Sponsored by the Interfraternity
Council
"Lite Nile"
Alcohol Awareness Information
Fair
The Attice, Grogs, Chico's
Corrigans, The Elbow
Rafters, Darryls, Hooters
Mendenhall Coffee House
Minges Coliseum
Tyler Resident Hall
Lobby
Old Joyner Library
Room 221
Fletcher Residence Hall
Lobby
Thursday, October 28
7:30 P.M9:00 P.M.
BACCUS Meeting Mendenhall
Featuring: Steve Streeter Room 244
National Representative for
SAAD, Student Against Drunk
Driving
Introduction by:
Walter B.Jones, Jr.
House of Representatives
The kevs to
All programs open to
ECU Students, Faculty
and Staff. Unless indi-
cated, no fee.
responsible decisions
free (fre) adj. Given or provided without charge or cost,
such as the travel services of ITG Travel Center, at the Plaza
in Greenville. We charge you only the amount of your
tickets there is no service charge. We'll get those low fares
for you that the airlines advertise, and we'll explain all the
fine print. And sometimes we'll even find great rates that
you've never heard of, because we shop all available
airlines. Call ITG Travel Center for your next trto 355-
5075. F'
hMrJ&
mm
m

SUDAN TEMPLE
AND
ECU STUDENT UNION
SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE
PRESENTS
The Royal Hanneford's
Shrine Circus
ECU Minges Coliseum
Sunday, October 25th
3:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m.
$3.00 ECU students $5.00 all others
A11 tickets will be $5.00 at the door
Advance Tickets now on sale at the
Central Ticket Qflfeg,
11 a.m. - 6 p.m
Monday - Friday,
757-6611, ext. 266.
iHf f am akn r
ca v u.
Iej�x�i
Inexperience
By PAT MOLLOV
�i�Unt Spurts Iditor . . ,
. . � b I
ihe East Carolina menba .
ball team is going to be under tre-
mendous stress this year as
open with no returning Start -
only two players with an)
time whatsoever (6-3 s :
guard Reed Lose, and 5-9
guard Jet! Kelly � and onl. -
has started in a coUegial
before), and a new head
Pirate head coach Miki Si
Opens basketball practio I i
1987-88 season today reali;
there a re two limiting fact rs
Which he must contend: then
an obvious lack of size on t!
rate squad, and an e.
severe lack of experience.
When Steele got the nod to re-
place former head coach Q
Harrison in April, there were at
least four players returning 1
up this season. However
clearing house of the acad
ally ineligible and shedc.
players facing non-acad( n
Ctblems, Steele found hirns
rrung a whole new basketba
�fogram within the span of tvo
months.
Theodore Blue" Edwards was
(fee most recent player on the Pi-
pe starting roster to be rek
cause oi off-the-court prob-
lems.
Chancellor Eakin announced
today that the star forward, who
t ifferaged just over 14 points per
me, would be suspended for
year because of his involve-
En't in the theft of over $6,000
creos and other equipment in a
iversity residence hall on Dec
of last year. (See related stop. I
Ul legal trouble aside Steele
ive for those three. (Kelly,
tse, and Hill), the rest of the
ivers are new, leaving major
tes in experience and height.
te tallest player for the Pirates i -
ior Dominique Martin a t
insfer from Lake Sumter Junior
is u
Harris
Mik,
dwards to sit
teodore "Blue" Edwards, the
iing returning scorer and rv-
lnder for East Carolina's bas-
tball team, has been declared
eligible for varsity play during
1987-88 season due to an m-
ction of the school's student
Je.
iwards was charged, along
th three former ECU basketball
lyers, in connection with the
ft of more than $6,000 in stc-
and other equipment in a
iversity residence hall on Dec.
26, 1986
Edwards,
Walstonburg i-
to trial Ocl -
trict Court.
"In consultatij
Director Ken ka
OOadl Mike Steel
that Theodore (I
not eligible for
ing the academic
infractions of tl
ECU chanceUo
said in a prepai
i
.� - - - -r. �

Y- �


�"V-
nwim jMwa�qippqn
J





ttraction
tnd the rat
little mounds
rs m an
have con-
hv r
Ware and her mother decided to
finance the project in honor of
Charles 1 hot Ware, Harvard class
oi 1834
Whatever happens, the mys-
tique of the flowers will continue,
even though the secret of their
creation vas long ago made pub-
lic b 1 eopold Blaschka:
"The only wav to become a
glass modeler of .skill, I have often
It next few vud to people, is to get a good
ing more great grandfather who loved
e other glass; then Ik? is to have a son with
k tastes, he is to he vour grand-
father. He in turn will have a son
� k �w to who must as your father, be pas-
y fond of glass. You, as his
' M - in then trv vour hand
rn pump
mate
till, a
with
RE'S A LOT
CHATTER
OUT OUR
TOWDER
HARLEYf
?d without charge or cost.
Yavel Center, at the Plaza
nly the amount of your
We'll get those low fares
id we 11 explain all the
ven find great rates that
e shop all available
for your next trip. 355-
MPLE
'S
T UNION
COMMITTEE
nneford's
ircus
Coliseum
ber 25th
:00 p.m.
5.00 all others
.00 at the door
on sale at the
t Office.
p.m
riday,
Ixt. 266.
e
i
t,
n
I HI I AST t'AROl INIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 15, 1987 Page 11
Pirates try to keep momentum
rolling Saturday at Va. Tech
Inexperience dots hoopsters
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports I dilur
Can the Pirates do it again?
That is a question being
bounced around this week by
nearly everyone close to the ECU
football team following last
week's 56-28 romp over Cincin-
nati.
Pirate head coach Art Baker
knows the task will be difficult
this week when his squad takes
the field against Virginia Tech for
the first time in 31 years Saturday
in Blacksburg, Va. Virginia Tech
won the lone meeting between the
two schools 37-2.
"Sometimes it is very difficult to
prepare a team after a day like we
had Saturday, particularly on
Saturday Baker said. "All of a
sudden, you begin to feel like you
are pretty good and that you do
not have to work as hard.
"1 think it will be a tough job on
the coaches this week continued
Baker. "We have no reason to go
in there expecting anything but a
tough ball game
Virginia Tech will no doubt be
hungry for a win Saturday as first-
year coach Frank Bcamer's squad
has played well this season, but
have only managed a 1-4 record
thus far.
Among the losses for the Hok-
ies this season are a 22-10 loss to
nationally-ranked Clemson, a 14-
13 heartbreaking loss to arch-rival
Virginia, a 35-21 loss to nation-
ally-ranked Syracuse and a 40-10
drubbing at South Carolina last
week.
The lone victory thus far for
Virginia Tech came at the expense
of Navy, 31-11.
Last season, the Hokies posted a
By PAT MOLLOY
si.tjnt Sports Kditor
iJ"ho Eait Carolina men'sbaskct-
ball team is going to be under tre-
mendous stress this year as they
open with no returning starters,
only two players with any game
time whatsoever (6-3 sophomore
guard Reed Lose, and 5-9 junior
guard Jeff Kelly � and only Kelly
has started in a collegiate game
before), and a new head coach.
Pirate head coach Mike Steele
'pens basketball practice for the
1987-88 season today realizing
there are two limiting factors with
which he must contend: there is
an obvious lack of size on the Pi-
rate squad, and an even more
severe lack oi experience.
When Steele got the nod to re-
place former head coach Charlie
' larnson in April, there were at
least four players returning to suit
up this season. However, after
clearing house of the academi-
cally ineligible and shedding
players facing non-academic
problems, Steele found himself
forming a whole new basketball
program within the span of two
months.
Theodore "Blue" Edwards was
the most recent player on the Pi-
rate starting roster to be released
because of off-the-court prob-
lems.
Chancellor Eakin announced
today that the star forward, who
averaged just over 14 points per
amc, would be suspended for
one year because of his involve-
ment in the theft of over $6,000 in
tereos and other equipment in a
university residence hall on Dec.
26 of last year. (See related story).
All legal trouble aside, Steele
us
Save for those three, (Kelly,
Lose, and Hill), the rest of the
players are new, leaving major
gaps in experience and height,
rhe tallest player for the Pirates is
junior Dominique Martin, a 6-6
transfer from Lake Sumter Junior
College.
- Wu.)ki,nJ�onny Murphy, at 6-3,
i� the only other junior on the
team besides Martin and Kelly.
And except for Lose and Hill, who
are both entering their sopho-
more years, the remainder of the
Pirate basketball team are fresh-
men.
Steele isu.so concerned with the
height oi his squad � the tallest
member is6-5 Stanley Love. "Like
the Marines, we're looking for a
few good men � tall, good men
iniid Steele.
But Steele has good feelings
about the people in his program
now. "We feel good about the kids
in our program. We just finished a
six-week running program, and
everyone showed improvement.
Our weight program also showed
great improvement.
Displaying obvious concern
must find a way to win basketball
games despite his three-returner
handicap. Another Pirate who
returns, but has yet to see any
playing time is Gus Hill, a 6-3
sophomore who was recruited by
Harrison.
9-2-1 record and came away with
the championship of the Peach
Bowl. However, gone from that
squad are two prize running
backs, Maurice Williams and
Eddie Hunter, who combined for
1,901 yards rushing. Both backs
were drafted to play in the NFL.
With Williams and Hunter
absent, the Hokie ground attack
has been limited to only 440 yards
total through the first five games.
To put that into context, it is 60
yards fewer than the Pirates
amasses in last week's contest
against Cincinnati.
The Hokies leading rusher this
season is freshman jon Jeffries.
Jeffries has totaled 195 yards on 39
carries thus far.
Leading the Virginia Tech of-
fense this year is returning starter
Erik Chapman from his quarter-
back position. Chapman, who
threw for 1,627 yards last season
and had only six interceptions the
entire season has already thrown
eight interceptions and has been
sacked 20 times.
Baker said that he did not feel
like those stats were revealing of
the way Chapman can play.
"He is a very fine quarterback
Baker said. "A lot of the problems
they are having is because of inex-
perience along the of fensi ve line
Baker said that the main
weapon Chapman will try to util-
ize through the air will be tight
end Steve Johnson, who has
hauled in 20 catches this season
for 200 yards.
Heading into the contest, the
Hokies have been the general fa-
vorite on betting lines with about
a touchdown margin of victory
expected. But, that doesn't seem
to bother sophomore comerback
Ricky Torain.
"The media and fans get down
on us a lot Torain said. "It both-
ers us to open up the paper and
read that we aren't supposed to
win, but it also makes us work
that much harder to prove that we
can win. We know what weareca-
pable of. We just have to go out
and prove it
Torain also said he felt the, Pi-
rates would be ready for the game
Saturday.
"We know it will be tough, but
if we work hard and concentrate
we know we can win Torain
said.
Baker agreed that concentra-
tion could play a big part in a
possible Pirate victory.
"1 have been telling our players
all along that if we eliminate our
turnovers there is no telling how
good we could be Baker said.
"And after what we did Saturday
(ECU had no turnovers) I know
that is true
According to Baker, the Pirates
have passed one test, now a new
test awaits this weekend
"I thought our players and our
coaches handled the adversity (of
the 49-0 loss to West Virginia)
well last week Baker said. "This
week, we will sec how we can
handle success
Although Baker sees the games
as a difficult one to win, he also
sees a win as necessary if the Pi-
rates plan to keep their goal of
having a winning season.
"I think it will be a tough foot-
ball game, but I also think it is a
vital football game for our sea-
son Baker said.
Mike Steele
Hill has not seen any action to
date because of a knee injury;
however, he is expected to play
some this season.
"Gus' knee is better and he has
lost 20 pounds, too said Steele,
"1 thinkhe'll have a chance to help
over the academic status of the Pi-
rates, Steele pointed out that at
least one member of the coaching
staff eats breakfast with the team
each morning. "This gets them
started off right said Steele.
"They arc going to classes and
making good grades. This is a
positive step for us
This positive feeling is carrying
over into recruitment. Steele, who
recently brought five new recruits
to campus, trusts in his players
enough to let them handle the re-
cruits.
"1 have enough confidence in
this team to let them take over the
recruits. And I'll be talking with
them about the recruits. What
they have to say will be important.
We don't want kids who won't fit
in here. If there is no chemistry, it
won't work
We're not going to sign some-
one just to sign them early. We
want to make sure we're getting
someone who can come in here
and help us
But Steele is still looking for
help in the form of walkons, and
will be holding tryouts today. He
feels the whole team will be en-
thusiastic about playing.
"1 think our team is going to be
enthusiastic. Our freshmen are
excited about being here. Hope-
fully, that excitement will lead to
good play, and not mass confu-
sion which usually goes along
with inexperience
And when it comes to winning
basketball games and talking
about what his teams' wonlost
record will be like, Steele speaks
realistically. "I don't know what it
will be like. We'll just try to win as
many as we can
VOifotHps past volleybwallers
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sports Writer
East Carolina mounted a last
game rally but couldn't hold off
Virginia Commonwealth losing
to the Rams 3-2 in volleyball ac-
tion Tuesday night in Minges
Coliseum.
The loss drops the Lady Pirates
to 8-10 for the season. VCU im-
proved to 6-16.
ECU started out hot taking the
Rams 15-11 in the first game but
cooled in the next two losing 7-15
and 3-15.
The Lady Pirates came back in
the fourth game routing VCU 15-
2 to tie the match at two games
apiece.
Virginia commonwealth took
the lead in the final game, but
ECU rallied scoring seven
unanswered points before losing
15-10.
Kris McKay and Debbie Tate
paced the Lad'v Pirates with seven
kills each. ECU had 13 team
blocks to the Rams six.
"We looking to play more con-
sistently head coach Imogene
Turner said. "We have flashes of
brilliance but then we fall back
and get behind
The Lady Pirates will resume
conference play this weekend
when they host C AA rivals James
Madison and William and Mary.
The matches will be played in
Minges Coliseum Friday and Sat-
urday.
"We will have to be ready to
play this weekend. JMU and Wil-
liam and Mary will both come in
here fired up and ready Turner
said.
Booters win second of year
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sports Writer
East Carolina got its second
soccer win of the season defeating
St. Andrews 3-1 Monday.
The win improved the Pirates
record to 2-10 and halted a four-
game losing streak.
ECU scored early in the first half
on a penalty kick by sweeper
Larry Bennett. Fifteen minutes
later at the 23 minute mark Roy
Andersch kicked one in on an
assist from Larry Bennett.
St. Andrews' Ben Krauss scored
at the37minute mark to make it 2-
1 ECU at the half.
Jeff Kimc scored on a pass from
Steve McCarthy with 10 minutes
left in the match to seal it for the
Pirates at 3-1.
"We played a good first half but
were weak in the second half
head coach Charlie Harvey said.
"In order to win more we are
going to have to play a complete
game
The Pirate defense held St.
Andrews to just seven shots at
goal and ECU goaltender Scott
McColough made just two saves.
"Scott has come in and done a
real good job for us at goal Har-
vey said. "He has improved a
great deal
ECU'S offense spent most of the
day on the St. Andrews side of the
field taking 34 shots.
"We hope to have good prac-
tices this week and go into
Friday's match strong Harvey
said.
East Carolina will host the Elon
Fighting Christians Friday, at 3
p.m.
Edwards to sit out basketball this season
Theodore "Blue" Edwards, the
leading returning scorer and re-
bounder for East Carolina's bas-
ketball team, has been declared
ineligible for varsity play during
the 1987-88 season due to an in-
fraction of the school's student
code.
Edwards was charged, along
with three former ECU basketball
players, in connection with the
theft of more than $6,000 in ste-
reos and other equipment in a
university residence hall on Dec.
26,1986.
Edwards, a senior from
Walstonburg, is scheduled to go
to trial Oct. 23 in Pitt County Dis-
trict Court.
"In consultation with Athletic
Director Ken Karr and basketball
coach Mike Steele, I have decided
that Theodore (Blue) Edwards is
not eligible for varsity play dur-
ing the academic yearasa result of
infractions of the student code
ECU chancellor Richard Eakin
said in a prepared statement.
ECU officials refused to com-
ment on any of the details of the
suspension, citing the provisions
of the Privacy Act.
"Hopefully, after he sits out this
year and does all the things that
are required of him, that there will
be a chance that he will come back
and finish his career at East Caro-
lina Steele said in a news confer-
ence Monday.
"The only thing I can say is that
Blue Edwards has done every-
thing that we asked of him. He's
been a good person and the kind
of guy that I want in my program.
We just have to hope that Blue will
do everything he has to and I be-
lieve he will
Edwards, the lone returning
starter from last year's 12-16 team,
averaged 14.4 points and 5.6 re-
bounds a game last season. He
was a second team All-American (Photo by Mar Startari)
at Louisburg Junior College dur- pi.ate sweeper Larry Bennett got his first goal of the season against St
ing the 1985-86 season. Andrews, Monday.
mmmmmmmi0miimmimm
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�22 IE E&SL CAROLINIAN (OCTOBER 15, 1
987
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Fearless Football Forecast
GAMtS
ECU at Virginia Tech
Tennessee at Alabama
Texas at Arkansas
Auburn at Georgia Tech
Texas A&M at Baylor
UNC at N.C. State
Iowa at Michigan
Maryland at Wake Forest
Nebraska at Oklahoma St.
Perm State at Syracuse
DEAN "THE DREAM"
BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
Lul Wrrk;
(7-3)
Ovrrall:
(42-18)
ECU
Alabama
Arkansas
Auburn
Baylor
UNC
Michigan
Maryland
Nebraska
Penn State
BRIAN "BOO BOO"
BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Utf Wctk.
(5-5)
Overall
(41-19)
ECU
Alabama
Arkansas
Auburn
Baylor
UNC
Michigan
Maryland
Nebraska
Syracuse
TIM "RAPPIN'TIMMYC
CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Lul Week:
(6-4)
Overall:
(41-19)
ECU
Tennessee
Arkansas
Auburn
Texas A&M
UNC
Michigan
Wake Forest
Nebraska
Penn State
PAT "NO STRESS ME1STER'
MOLLOY
Assistant Sports Editor
Lot Week
(5-5)
Overall:
(37-23)
ECU
Tennessee
Arkansas
Auburn
Baylor
UNC
Michigan
Wake Forest
Nebraska
Penn State
Dr. RICHARD "THE BOSS'
EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
UM Week.
(5-5)
Overall
(32-28)
ECU
Alabama
Arkansas
Auburn
Texas A&M
N.C. State
Michigan
Wake Forest
Nebraska
Penn State
I

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I wins prove they can win big games on road
DETRJOT(AP) -The Minnesota
Twins found winning on the road
wasn't so difficult if you hit the
road with a full head oi steam.
The Twins great hope now is
that they can take the same for-
mula they used to beat the Detriot
Tigers in the American League
Playoffs and win the World Series
with it.
Tom Brunansky keyed a four-
run Minnesota second inning
with a two-run double and belted
a home run to start a three-run
ninth inning Monday as the
Twins beat the Tigers 9-5, win-
ning thebest-of-sevenseries4-l to
advance to their first World Series
in 22 years.
Minnesota third baseman Gary
Gaetti, who was named most
valuable player for the series, set
the tone in Game 1 when he hom-
ered his first two at-bats.
Thai got the Twins rolling and
they never slowed.
The Twins, whose 36-25 record
in the Metrodome was the best
home record in baseball, won
both playoff games there before
their frenzied fans, who waved
their "homer hankies and Min-
nesota used that momentum to
beat Detriot twice in Tiger Sta-
dium.
"Tins is a tough place to plav
Gaetti said. "You can get rattled
here pretty easily. Butopening the
series in Minnesota helped relieve
the tension and we knew after
winning the first two games, we
would return to Minnesota any-
way
Twins Manager Tom Kelly said
Gaetti's two opening-game hom-
ers, and the Minnesota fans' reac-
tion the them, set the tone for his
young ballclub.
"1 think it showed the rest of the
guys that we were capable of
doing some damage said Kelly,
the sixth rookie manager and
third in the AL to win a playoff
title since the inception of divi-
sional play in 1969. "If Gary can
hit the ba'll out of the park off
Doyle Alexander, then maybe the
rest of us can get something
going, too.
"That was the big key to getting
us going on the right foot
Another key factor was the way
the underdog Twins shut down
the Tigers big guns. Detriot's key
hitters - Alan Trammell, Darrell
Evans and Kirk Gibson - were
never a factor.
"Those early games gave them
confidence said Trammell, who
could only contribute a 4-for-20
performance. "At the same time,
we had guys like me who were
going into slumps
"To me, that was the key to this
series
Evans, the 40-year-old veteran
who has become the Tigers
unofficial captain, also made
three errors in the series, plus a
crucial base-running blunder
which might have cost Detriot the
fourth game.
"It's not one or two people
Evans said. "This has been a club
where everybody has contrib-
uted. There are no big stars here.
"You shouldn't be surprised at
Minnesota. They're a good
ballclub. They didn"t let us get
away with any mistakes. I just
wish we had plaved a little bit
better.
The Tigers starting pitchers,
thought by many to be Detriot's
biggest advantage, didn't win a
game. The only Detriot victory
went to rookie Mike Henneman,
in relief, after Pat Sheridan hit a
surprise two-run homer in the
eighth inning of Game 3.
"They just beat us up Detriot
Manager Sparky Anderson said.
"They beat us up with offenseand
defense and everything.
"It started when we opened. We
should never have opened. They
just jumped right on us. There was
no turning point
As fate would have it, the World
Series begins in the Metrodome
on Saturday night, the first time it
has ever been played indoors. The
San Francisco Giants lead the
National League playoffs 3-2 with
Game 6 scheduled for tonight in
St. Louis.
Only the 1973 New York Mets
who went 82-79, had a worse
regular-season mark than
Minnesota's 85-77 and still mad�
it to the World Series.
But in a short series, as the
Twins proved against Detriot,
regular-season records don't
guarantee victory.
Call your mummy
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You remember. She was
always there when you were
frightened. And if you go!
hurt, she was standing by
with bandages. Wouldn't it
feel good to talk to your
mother again right now?
Calling over AT&T Long
Distance Service probably
costs less than you think, tot)
And if you have am questions
about AT&T rates or sen ice.
a customer service repre-
sentative is always standing
bv to talk to you. lust call
1800 222 0300.
Sure, your schoofwork and
your friends keep you busy.
But call home and find out
what she's wrapped up in.
AT&T
The right choice.
J ana Col��o Meet the Muma
198 Untr�rsat City Sjudi�, Inc.
- tf�4� fey M�rct��ni8 Cofp
�r(e�,loc.
lIBWAWr
Intramura
competil
the nil
sports such as
or basketball
Aind iv.
at thus point w
Club In the
n nj
collegia ti
first
s
The Sport Club Program, an
integral part of the Department ot
Intramural-Recreational Serv
ices, may at times be unidentih
able to students of the University
due to the nature of the program
However, Sportlubs are nut
NCAA sanctioned events, nor arc
they intramural sports scheduled
within the IRS calendar ol ew
Rather, Sport Clubs are grouj
students interested in competing
bn the state regional and national
level in a variety ol sports not
offered through the E L Atl
department
These activities maj
unusual to the averaj
husiast but arc- none the less as
NFL players u
R05EMONT, for the n
second week in a row, tta striking
'FL players union has con
with a plan that may avert mas
defections.
But once again, the owners mav
reject the plan setting up a third
week of games plaved bv replace
Bias' mother beh
son accomplish
WAYNE. Neb (AP) - Loni
Bias, the mother of the late
University of Maryland bas-
ketball star Len Bias, said
Monday she believes her
accomplished more bv dving
than he would have by living
"I believe that Cod tools Len
to save so manv other young
people Mrs. Bias said. "Len
hasdonemore in death forthis
nation than he could have ever
done in life
Mrs. Bias spoke in an mter-
$ view before giving a speech to
y students and faculty at Wayne
� State College of Nebraska dur-
6 ing Alcohol Awareness Week.
jf She said people need to real-
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about, ��
and . 1
in our I
She called
ful your
Bia
tion in ;
hew t�
I
)regon enters

Ifter 17 year hi
Oklahoma, Nebraska and Mi-
i remained 1-2-3 in the Associ-
ed Tress college football poll for
e third week in a row todav
hile Notre Dame fell out of the
p Ten and Oregon made the
nkings for the first time in 17
ars.
Oregon, No. lb this week, last
peared in the AT poll oi o 9
70, when the ducks were 6-3.
jcv have had onlv three win-
ting seasons in the last le years,
Hit are 4-1 atter defeating Wash-
Igton and Southern California in
Recessive weeks
Oklahoma's 44- victory over
fcxas enabled the Sooners to
(tmain No. 1 in their quest to
ecome the first team ever to hold
ic top spot from the preseason
rough postseason poll. The
iooners received 47 oi bO first-
lace votes and 1.184 of a possible
XI points from a nationwide
fcne! oi sports writers and
Vrtscasters.
Nebraska, which has been the
fcnner-up in even, poll this sea-
n, crushed Kansas 34-2 and re-
ived seven first-place ballots
id 1,122 points. The other six
st-place votes went to Miami,
friich beat Maryland 4b-lb and
rned 1,111 points.
Last week, Oklahoma s lead
er Nebraska and Miami was46-
6 in first-place votes and 1,183-
120-1,112 in points.
Notre Dame, No. 4 last week.
� upset by Pitt 30-22 and
pped to 11 th place Mean-
ile, Florida State pounded
uthem Mississippi 61-10 and
pod past Auburn from sixth
ce to fourth with 935 points,
burn remained fifth with 934
ints following a 48-15 tnumph
or Vandcrbilt
U climbed from seventh to
th with 901 points by rallying
defeat Georgia 26-23. Clemson
t Virginia 38-21 and moved up
m eighth to seventh with 880
ints.
ennessce was idle but im-
ved from 10th place to eighth
th 752 points. UCLA, another
m which had the weekend off,
ped from 11th to ninth with
ints. Ohio State, No. 9 last
, lost to Indiana 31-10 and
N
Round
defending na
Tenn State. T
the Top Ten
season recei
beating Rut�
The S
Notre I
Svr.K IS)
Ohio -
gan State and I
Last v e -
Alabama, Ge
Florid
kansas
But Michiga
State 17-11, Ar
to Washingto
bama dropped
Memphi-
Michigan ta
Twenty after
absence while
Top Twenty for
the final
hadn't beaten
last 31 meeting
Top
1. Okalhoma
2. Nebraska C
3. Miami. Fla.
4 Florida Stat
5. Auburn
6 LSU
7. Clemson
8. Tennessee
9. UCLA
10 PennS
11. Notre Dam
12 Oklahoma
13 Syracuse
14 Florida
15. Arkansas
lb Oregon
17 Ohio State
IS. Georgia
19. Michigan St
20. Indiana
Other recei vil
sota 79, Michil
State 73, Wake
Washington 41
South Carolinal
Kentucky 10,
4. Iowa 3, Bosto
A&M1.
'J'
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f
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 15, 1
987


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sssssssssssssssssssseseessmeaasesssseseeassssssssss
Fearless Football Forecast
GAMES
ECU at Virginia Tech
Tennessee at Alabama
Texas at Arkansas
Auburn at Georgia Tech
Texas A&M at Baylor
UNC at N.G State
Iowa at Michigan
Mary land at Wake Forest
Nebraska at Oklahoma St.
Perm State at Syracuse
DEAN "Till.DREAM"
BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
Lut Mtaife
(7-3)
Overall:
(42-18)
ECU
Alabama
Arkansas
Auburn
Baylor
UNC
Michigan
Maryland
Nebraska
Fenn State
BRIAN "BOO BOO"
BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
U�t Wrrk:
(5-5)
Overall:
(41-19)
ECU
Alabama
Arkansas
Auburn
Baylor
UNC
Michigan
Maryland
Nebraska
Syracuse
TIM "RAPPIN' TIMMYC"
CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Uui Week:
(6-4)
Overall:
(41-19)
ECU
Tennessee
Arkansas
Auburn
Texas A&M
UNC
Michigan
Wake Forest
Nebraska
Penn State
PAT "NO STRESS MEISTER'
MOLLOY
Assistant Sports Editor
Lai Week:
(5-5)
Overall:
(37-23)
ECU
Tennessee
Arkansas
Auburn
Baylor
UNC
Michigan
Wake Forest
Nebraska
Pcnn State
Dr. RICHARD THE BOSS'
EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
Lax Week
(5-5)
Overall.
(32-28)
ECU
Alabama
Arkansas
Auburn
Texas A&M
N.C. State
Michigan
Wake Forest
Nebraska
Penn State



i



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Twins prove they can win big games on road
DETRIOT(AP) The Minnesota
Twins found winning on the road
wasn't so difficult if you hit the
road with a full head oi steam.
The Twins great hope now is
that they can take the same for-
mula they used to beat the Dctriot
figcrs in the American league
Playoffs and win the World Series
with it.
Tom Brunansky keyed a four
run Minnesota second inning
with a two-run double and belted
a home run to start a three-run
ninth inning Monday as the
Twins beat the Tigers 9-5, win-
ning thebest-of-sevenseries4-l to
advance to their first World Scries
in 22 years.
Minnesota third baseman Garv
Gaetti, who was named most
valuable player for the series, set
the tone in Game 1 when he hom-
ered his first two at-bats.
That got the Twins rolling and
they never slowed.
The Twins, whose 56-25 record
in 'the Metrodomc was the best
home record in baseball, won
both playoff games there before
their frenzied fans, who waved
their "homer hankies and Min-
nesota used that momentum to
beat Detriot twice in Tiger Sta-
dium.
"This is a tough place to play
Gaetti said. "You can get rattled
here pretty easily. But opening the
series in Minnesota helped relieve
the tension and we knew after
winning the first two games, we
would return to Minnesota any-
way
Twins Manager Tom Kelly said
Gaetti's two opening-game hom-
ers, and the Minnesota fans' reac-
tion the them, set the tone for his
young ballclub.
"1 think it showed the rest of the
guys that we were capable of
doing some damage said Kelly,
the sixth rookie manager and
third in the AL to win a playoff
title since the inception of divi-
sional play in 1969. "If Gary can
hit the ball out of the park off
Doyle Alexander, then maybe the
rest of us can get something
going, too.
"That was the big key to getting
us going on the right foot
Another key factor was the way
the underdog Twins shut down
the Tigers big guns. Detriot's key
hitters - Alan Trammell, Darrell
Evans and Kirk Gibson - were
never a factor.
"Those early games gave them
confidence said Trammell, who
could only contribute a 4-for-20
performance. "At the same time,
we had guys like me who were
going into slumps
"To me, that was the key to this
series
Evans, the 40-year-old veteran
who has become the Tigers
unofficial captain, also made
three errors in the series, plus a
crucial base-running blunder
which might have cost Detriot the
fourth game.
"It's not one or two people
Evans said. "This has been a club
where everybody has contrib-
uted. There are no big stars here.
"You shouldn't be surprised at
Minnesota. They're a good
ballclub. They didn"t let us get
away with any mistakes. I just
ECU
ECU
wish we had played a little bit
better.
The Tigers starting pitchers,
thought by many to be Detriot's
biggest advantage, didn't win a
game. The only Detriot victory
went to rookie Mike Uenneman,
in relief, after Pat Sheridan hit a
surprise two-run homer in the
eighth inning of Game 3.
"They just beat us up Detriot
Manager Sparky Anderson said.
"They beat us up with offense and
defense and everything.
"It started when we opened. We
should never have opened. They
just jumped right on us. There was
no turning point
As fate would have it, the World
Series begins in the Metrodomc
on Saturday night, the first time 11
has ever been played indoors. The
San Francisco Giants lead the
National League playoffs 3-2 with
Game 6 scheduled for tonight in
St. Louis.
Only the 1973 New York Mcts,
who went 82-79, had a worse
regular-season mark than
Minnesota's 85-77 and still made
it to the World Series.
But in a short series, as the
Twins proved against Detriot,
regular-season records don't
guarantee victory.
Call your mummy
'fr
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-
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F�s
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V"
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198 U�rv�rsl G�y Sudlc�. Inc.
' - ftMKtby M�rcha�KHeimj Cor fi
rte�,roc
18MT�T
You rememlxfr. She was
always there when you were
frightened. And if you got
hurt, she was standing by
with bandages. Wouldn't it
feel good to talk to your
mother again right now?
Calling over AT&T Long
Distance Service probabry
costs less than you think, tot
.And if you have any questions
about AT&T rates or service,
a customer service repre-
sentative is always standing
by to talk to you. lust call
1800 2220300.
Sure, your schoolwork and
your friends keep you busy
But call home and find out
what she's wrapped up in.
AT&T
The right choice.
Intramura
the n,
Sports such as
or basketball
Aii
mt to
the p
as ��
collegiate teanf
The Sport Club Program, an
integral part of the Department of
Intramural-Recreational Sen
ices, may at times be unidentiti
able to students of the University
due to the nature of the program
However, Sport Clubs an i I
NCAA sanctioned events, norare
they intramura! sp rts scheduled
within the IRS calendar of events
Rather, Sport Clubs are grout
btudents interested in competing
on the state, regional and nati
level in a vane rts not
offered through th Athletic
(Department
Thest may
unusual to the average ;
thusiast but are none tP
NFL players u
ROSEMONT, 11! - Fi rthe
second week in a row, the strik
NFL players union has com
(with a plan that may avert mass
defections.
But once again, the owners ma)
reject the plan, setting up a third
week oi garner played bv repl i
Bias' mother bel
son accomplish
WAYNE, Neb. CAP) - I
Bias, the mother of the late
University of Marvland bas-
ketball star Pen Bias, said
Monday she believes hi. -
accomplished more by dying
than he would have bv living
"I believe that God took Pen
to save so manv other young
people Mrs. Bias said. "Pen
hasdone more in death for this
nation than he could have ever
done in life
Mrs. Bias spoke in an inter-
view before giving a speech to
$ students and faculty at Wayne
& State College of Nebraska dur-
� ing Alcohol Awareness Week
She said people need to real-
Bje?, - . - - -
Dregon enters
fter 17 year hil
i

an
ver
about
am:
in our I
St
ful .
Bias d
Celtics in tli
Oklahoma, Nebraska and Mi-
tmi remained 1-2-3 in the Associ-
led Press college football poll for
he third week in a row today
rhile Notre Dame fell out oi the
'op Ten and Oregon made the
nkings for the first time in 17
ars.
Oregon, No. lo this week, L
peared in the AP poll of No 9
70, when the ducks were f
ey have had only threx win-
ing seasons in the last lo years
t are 4-1 after defeating Wash-
gton and Southern California in
ccossive weeks.
Oklahoma's 44- victory over
xas enablexl the Sooner to
main No. 1 in their quest to
ome the first team ever to hold
top spot from the preseason
rough postseason poll. The
ners received 47 ci 60 first-
ce votes and 1,184 of a possible
!00 points from a nationwide
nel ot sports writers and
rtscasters.
Nebraska, which has been the
nner-up in every poll this sea-
n, crushed Kansas 34-2 and re-
ved seven first-place ballets
d 1,122 points. The other six
�st-place votes went to Miami,
uch beat Marvland 46-16 and
irned 1,111 points.
ist week, Oklahoma s lead
rer Nebraska and Miami was46-
in first-place votes and 1,183-
120-1,112 in points,
sotre Dame. No. 4 last week
is upset by Titt 30-22 and
pped to 11th place Mean-
�ule, Florida State pounded
uthem Mississippi W-10 and
iped past Auburn from sixth
�ce to fourth with 935 points.
lburn remained fifth with 934
ints following a 48-15 triumph
frer Vanderbilt.
U climbed from seventh to
tth with 901 points by rallving
defeat Georgia 26-23. Clemson
it Virginia 38-21 and moved up
m eighth to seventh with 880
Mnts.
Tennessee was idle but im-
)ved from 10th place to eighth
fth 752 points. UCLA, another
im which had the weekend off,
iped from 11th to ninth with
ints. Ohio State, No. 9 last
lost to Indiana 31-10 and
Pen- 5
the Top Ten
seas
i
Syrac a
S
gan Stat
Past to i �
car. Al
Alabama. (
Florid
kansas
But '
State 17-11 I
to Washingt
bam di I
Memphis S
Mkhiga
Twenty a)
absence i
Top Twenty to
the final 1979
hadn t boa
last 31 meet i
Top
1. Ok
2. Nebraska
3. Miami Fla
4 � rid
5 -uburn
em son
in r
"nn -
11. Notre P
12 Oklahoma
13 Syracuse
14. Florida
15. Arkansas
lev Oregon
17. Ohio State
18. Georgia
19. Michigan St
20. Indiana
Other receivil
sota 79. Michi
State 73, Wake
Washington 41
South Carolinal
Kentucky 10,
4, Iowa 3, Bosto
A&M 1.

N i
'i





��,��v"
St
i

Di RICHARD THEBOSS'
1 AKIN
ECU Chancellor
(5-5)
Ovr-�.
(32-28)
is -WM
V 5'�� fc�
hi din
kc Forest�
Nebraska�
Pcnn State t
s on road
markthan
- 71 made
-� .as the
against IVtnot,
sondon't
iy
II
m
lightened And it you g l
hurt, she was si E�by
� bandages W uldn't it
theragain right now
TT1,
istance Service pr ba
ink '
tn questii ns
i " ice.
ro-
tative is a i - standing
bvtotalk u �you Just call
1 800 222-0300
Sure, ur - I and
vour friends keep you busy.
Hut call home and find out
what she's wrapped up in
AT&T
The right choice.
t-mmmm
wmmmmmm
f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 15, 1987 13
Intramural clubs now in full gear for fall
The Sport Club Program, an
integral part oi the Department of
ntramural-Recreational Serv-
ices may at times be unidentifi-
able to students ot the University
due to the nature oi the program
! iowever, Sport Clubs are not
NJ A - sanctioned events, nor are
they intramural sports scheduled
w ithin the IKS calendar ot events.
Rather, Sport Clubs are groups ot
students interested in competing
the state, regional and national
in a variety oi sports not
Ifered through the ECU Athletic
partment.
1 best activities may seem
usual to the average sport en-
ist but are none the less as
competitive and at times more so
than the more recognizeable
sports such as baseball, football,
or basketball.
A individual club worth noting
at this point would be the Karate
Club In the past the karate club
has won national acclaim as a
collegiate team boasting several
first-place rankings.
The club has participated in
several local, state, and national
tournaments in both style and
fighting. The key to their success
is sponsor, instructor, advisor Bill
McDonald. McDonald has been
the leader of the club for the past
12 years
Tonight, in room 108 Memorial
Gym, Bill McDonald and several
members of the club, will offer a
free class to all ECU students. The
course will serve as a registration
meeting to answer questions and
explain the course. The course
will be comprised of sell defense
karate, competition sport karate
and physical fitness.
The meeting will be held at 8:00
p.m. and all students are invited
to attend.
Several other Club Sports are
open for participation by faculty,
staff and students of the Univer-
sity. For more information re-
garding any of the Club Sports
available or if there is an interest
in starting a new club, contact Pat
Cox at 757-6387
Have you still got that old fris-
bee from your high school years?
Nowisthetimeforyou togetyour
disc out of the closet and head out
to the frisbee golf course for a
round of unusual golf action. No
need for a caddie, golf cart or
money for green fees. The frisbee
golf course is free for all members
of the University community.
One of the finest courses of it's
kind located on the East coast,
East Carolina's own 18-hoIe
course is located directed along
highway 264 adjacent to the var-
sity softball field.
Funding for the course was
provided by the SG A, the Frisbee
Disc Sport Club and the Depart-
ment of Intramural-Recreational
Services.
The course consists of 18 'hole
poles' and accompanying T
markers, hole 'layouts' and rules
signs. The course was developed
and installed by members of the
Frisbee Disc Club
Take advantage oi one of the
most unique facilities available
for recreational enjoyment on the
Fast Coast.
'WMMxmMMBWMH
NFL players union trying to avoid mass defections this week
ROSEMONT, 111. (AP) - For the ment players and those who
. i. nd week in a row, the striking choose to cross the picket line.
F1 players union has come up "No lack Donlan, executive
.vith a plan that may avert mass director of the NFL Management
ctions. Council replied early today when
But once again, the owners may asked if he thought the council's
ject the plan, setting up a third executive committee would ap-
iveek of games played by replace- prove the proposal when it met
Bias' mother believes
son accomplished
WAYNE, Neb. (AP) - Lonise
Bias the mother oi the late
I niversity of Maryland bas-
ketball star Len Bias, said
Monday she believes her son
accomplished more by dying
than he would have bv living
1 believe that God took Len
� tii save so many other young
people Mrs Bias said. "Len
has done more in death for this
I nation than he could have ever
� done in life
. Mrs. Bias spoke in an inter-
v view before giving a speech to
v students and faculty at Wayne
y State College ot Nebraska dur-
A ing Alcohol Awareness Week.
She said people need to real-
git��-��-��. .�
le that there is a drug and
alcohol problem among young
people.
"Many people expect me to
come and eulogize my son. It's
quite thecontrary she said. "I
come with a message about life
and that no matter what ad-
verse circumstances come
about, we must rise above it
and go on. We must keep hope
in our hearts
She called her son a "beauti-
ful young man
Bias died of cocaine intoxica-
tion in une 1986, shortly after
he was selected bv the Boston
Celtics in the National Basket-
ball Association draft.
this afternoon in New York.
The new plan emerged from a
six-hour meeting Monday of the
28 player representatives.
The players would agree to re-
turn while a federal mediator
tried to resolve the dispute for six
weeks. If that failed, it would then
go to binding arbitration.
"We think this is a fair way to
end the dispute said Gene Up-
shaw, executive director of the
NFL Players Association, who
announced the new plan. But the
owners want no part of general
arbitration, although it's possible
they might be willing to submit
such economic issues to an arbi-
trator.
"I've told Gene many times that
we won't go to arbitration and I
don't think we'll do it this time
Donlan said.
Tex Schramm, president of the
1 Villas Cowboys, a key member of
the Management Council's
Committee, also doubted the pro-
posal would be approved.
"We're not going to put the fu-
ture of the NFL in the hands of an
arbitrator he said.
If the owners do reject the play-
ers' proposal - which also de-
manded that the 1982 contract be
honored, that striking players
remain on the roster, and player
reps and alternates be protected -
the question is how many pla vers
will cross the picket line? Last
week, there were 37 defections,
fewer than expected after a Mon-
day meeting of player reps at the
same O'Hare Airport hotel in
which the players seemed to back
off their demand for free agency.
That led to six days of negotia-
tions that broke off Sunday with
free agency still a major obstacle
to settlement of the three-week
walkout.
Monday's meeting took place in
the face of reports that the 37 de-
fections of last week might triple
or quadruple this week, particu-
larly on teams such as the Wash-
ington Redskins, Chicago Bears,
Oregon enters top 20
after 17 year hiatus
Oklahoma, Nebraska and Mi-
ami remained 1-2-3 in the Associ-
ated Tress college football poll for
the third week in a row today
while Notre Dame fell out of the
Top Ten and Oregon made the
rankings for the first time in 17
years.
Oregon, No. 16 this week, last
appeared in the AP poll of Nov. 9,
when the ducks were 6-3.
1 hey have had only three win-
ning seasons in the last 16 years,
but are 4-1 after defeating Wash-
ington and Southern California in
(essive weeks.
Oklahoma's 44-9 victory over
Texas enabled the Sooners to
remain No. 1 in their quest to
become the first team ever to hold
the top spot from the preseason
through postseason poll. The
Sooners received 47 of 60 first-
place votes and 1,184 of a possible
1,200 points from a nationwide
panel of sports writers and
sportscasters.
Nebraska, which has been the
runner-up in every poll this sea-
son, crushed Kansas 54-2 and re-
ceived seven first-place ballots
and 1,122 points. The other six
first-place votes went to Miami,
;which beat Maryland 46-16 and
banted 1,111 points.
Last week, Oklahoma's lead
over Nebraska and Miami was 46-
8-6 in first-place votes and 1,183-
1,120-1,112 in points.
Notre Dame, No. 4 last week,
-was upset by Pitt 30-22 and
dropped to 11th place. Mean-
�while, Florida State pounded
Southern Mississippi 61-10 and
jumped past Auburn from sixth
?placc to fourth with 935 points.
Auburn remained fifth with 934
points following a 48-15 triumph
over Vanderbilt.
LSU climbed from seventh to
sixth with 901 points by rallying
do defeat Georgia 26-23. Clemson
beat Virginia 38-21 and moved up
from eighth to seventh with 880
points.
Tennessee was idle but im-
proved from 10th place to eighth
with 752 points. UCLA, another
team which had the weekend off,
jumped from 11th to ninth with
713 points. Ohio State, No. 9 last
week, lost to Indiana 31-10 and
fell to No. 17.
Rounding out the Top Ten is
defending national champion
Penn State. The Nittany Lions, in
the Top Ten for the first time all
season, received 606 points after
beating Rutgers 35-21.
The Second Ten consists of
Notre Dame, Oklahomc State,
Syracuse, Florida, Arkansas, Ore-
gon, Ohio State, Georgia, Michi-
gan State and Indiana.
Last week, it was UCLA, Michi-
gan, Arizona State, Penn State,
Alabama, Georgia, Syracuse,
Florida, Oklahoma State and Ar-
kansas.
But Michigan lost to Michigan
State 17-11, Arizona State bowed
to Washington 27-14 and Ala-
bama dropped a 13-10 shocker to
Memphis State.
Michigan State cracked the Top
Twenty after a three-week
absence while Indiana made the
Top Twenty for the first time since
the final 1979 poll. The Hoosiers
hadn't beaten Ohio State in their
last 31 meetings.
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center Is Open
Mon Tues, & Wed. Fit 9 a.m. p.m.
9 a.m. - 2 p.m. & by appointment
For an appointment or more infor
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline,
757-0003
1 1 1 East Third Street - The Lee Building
Greenville. N. C.
Free Pregnancy Test-
Confidential Counseling
Tom Togs Factory Outlet
1900 Dickinson Avenue
Next Warehouse Sale Oct. 26th - Nov. 7th
I-Yatunng Fashionable Fall Merchandise, Casual Wear, and Famous Brands.
Everything In Store Facept Hosiery
1st Ouahty�OverrunsCcoutsSelected Irregular

L Ftmous Stmes Thai Ve Cannot Mentionjftu3Ui
"nmm
Irocadero Tank Tops, Tank Dresses, Bicycle Pants, Walk Shorts, Mini Skirt & Tops
lams Camp Shirts. Shorts, Slacks. lillovers & The Original T-Shirts. 100 Cotton (Unisex)
Panama lack T-shirt
H you are a newcomer to town, we invite you to visit our store at 1900 Dickinson Avenue. If you are going to
beach at Morehead City, visit our new location on Hwy 70 (just across from Bojangles.)
Mwy. 64 East Between
Bethel and Tarboro
Conctoe, N.C.
We Also Wholesale
WedSat.9-S
Hwy. 70 West
Morehead City, N.C.
Wed. - Sat9-5
Mastercard & Visa Accepted
Top 20
1.0kalhoma(47)5-0-0
2. Nebraska (7)5-0-0
3. Miami, Fla. (6)4-0-0
4. Florida State5-1-0
5. Auburn4-0-1
6. LSU5-0-1
7. Clemson5-0-0
8. Tennessee4-0-1
9. UCLA4-1-0
10. Pcnn State5-1-0
11. Notre Dame3-1-0
12. Oklahoma State5-0-0
13. Syracuse5-0-0
14. Florida4-2-0
15. Arkansas4-1-0
16. Oregon4-1-0
17. Ohio State3-1-1
18. Georgia4-2-0
19. Michigan State3-2-0
20. Indiana4-1-0
J
Other receiving votes: Minne-
sota 79, Michigan 77, Arizona
State 73, Wake Forest 58, Pitt 48,
Washington 41, Air Force 33,
South Carolina 31, Alabama 10,
Kentucky 10, Baylor 9, Wyoming
4, Iowa 3, Boston College 2, Texas
A4M1.
i r �� wm
� .
� -�,�
0 I o o c �
�tl- &i$�!���� V'fKtf'
� ��! l
P&!&1 j �� �?
Restaurant � Sundries
(Now Open Under the New Management of Pescatore's, Inc.)
Try our Old-Fashioned Soda Fountain!
sfc
S
Old Fashioned Milkshakes
Choice of Flavors
Chocolate, Vanilla, Strawberry,
Pineapple, Cherry 95C
Ice Cream Sundaes
Chocolate85
Pineapple85
Strawberry85
Walnut95
Chocolate Nut1.05
Banana Spits
1.99
Sodas
Chocolate80
Pineapple80
Strawberry80
Vanilla80
Cherry80
Hours: Monday - Friday 6:45 a.m5:30 p.m.
Saturday 7:45 a.m5:30 p.m.
CLOSED SUNDAYS
Saturday Special:
Cheeseburger, French Fries, & Medium Drink $1.99
11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturdays only
416 Evans St
752-3131
New York Giants and Cleveland
Browns, who so tar have re-
mained solidlv on strike. So far,
133 of the 1,585 players under
union jurisdiction have returned
to work.
In announcing the new plan,
Upshaw raised the possibility
that rejection by the owners
would mean a season-long strike.
"1 would say if the owners de-
cline this, then we're out for the
duration, out for the year he
said.
But rejection todav also would
raise the possibility of mass defec-
tions by the reporting date
Wednesday as players face the
prospect of losing their fourth
paycheck of the season - one quar-
ter of their yearly salary.
Among expected to join re-
placement plavcrs was last
season's league MVP, Lawrence
Taylor of the Giants.
The New York Times, quoting a
source close to the All-Pro line-
backer, reported today that Tay-
lor would return to the Giants on
Wednesday. Tlie newspaper said
it could not reach Taylor for con-
firmation, but quoted his Hous-
ton-based agent, Gary Kovaes, as
saying there was a "strong
chance" his client would cross the
picket line in time to play and be
paid for this week
The owners, meanwhile, are
feeling their own pressure.
While attendance was up from
last week's tirst strike games, in-
cluding 61,230 Monday night at
Mile High Stadium, where Den-
ver beat the Los Angeles Raiders
30-14, television ratings contin-
ued to decline.
In overnight ratings from 15
cities for Sunday's games, NBC
had a 10.2, a drop of 13 percent
from lastSunday, while CBS drew
a 13.(S rating ior its first regional
games and 10.7 for the second
games, a decrease oi 14 percent.
P A R A D S E
. fro -4z s
Srw �Sty9
329 Arlington
Blvd.
756-1579
ALL HAIR SERVICES
MAKEUP-MANICURES
TANNING BEDS
20 Discount Off Any Service.
Good Through 10-31-87
PETEY HATHAWAY, Owner
"ii-in �wi
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14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 15, 1987
THE LOCAL CHAPTER
OF ZENITH
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 15, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 15, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.566
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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