The East Carolinian, October 13, 1987






INSIDE
Editorials a
stylejj
Sports�mmq
Classifieds�wD
STYLE
The Fixx shows nightclub style at Minges
STYLE, page 7.
see
SPORTS
Pirates come out of slump with big win over
Cincinnati � see SPORTS, page 10.
�Jj� 1�uBt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.62 No. 14
Tuesday, October 13,1987
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Chisholm encourages women
Bv TONI PAGE
Sun Wnlci
Speaking on women and work
in America, Shirley Chisholm. in a
Monday night speech, encour-
aged black and white women to
use their abilities and God-given
potentials to nuke a difference in
the world today.
"We need catalyst tor change.
We need women who are not
going to conform to the tradi-
tional roles they have been pre-
scribed. Tradition is not the an-
swer to today's problems, "Chish-
olm said.
Chisholm took her place in his-
tory first in 19 when she was the
first black woman elected to Con-
gress. In 1972, she campaigned to
be the Democratic Tarty nominee
for President.
Although she was not success-
ful, Chisholm is confident in the
belief that someday, through
"evolution a black person will
be elected to the highest office in
the nation
Chisholm spoke about
women's rights and the discrimi-
nation they encounter on the job.
1 am not talking about women's
rights because I am a woman, nor
because 1 am black. 1 am talking
about women's rights because 1
am a woman with the same attrib-
utes of any successful leader and
don't get the same rights
Chisholm said discrimination
in the work place is not a question
of civil rights, nor is it a question
of women's rights. It is an issue of
equity and justice in a society that
claims to believe in the phrase:
Liberty and justice for all
People should not merely be
concerned with manpower needs
in our country today but rather
with womenpower also, Chish-
olm said. According to Chisholm,
women cannot be passive and
complacent recipients of the roles
that society has given them: 'The
time has come when every seg-
ment oi society should be able to
run society Chisholm said.
Chisholm is proud of her trav-
els down a road which she said
has been difficult. Chisholm at-
tributes her success to "tremen-
dous confidence" in herself and
an "unshakable belief in God
"Yes, I'm going to say it, 1 know
I'm good Chisholm said, after
which the audience applauded
and laughed.
Chisholm encouraged this
same attitude for young women
both black and white and said that
it takes exceptional strength to
succeed in the world today if you
are a women among men who sec
you as a threat.
"Lets get over it Chisholm
said. "It has nothing to do with
women competing with men.
Women today are forced to work
by circumstances (such as raising
a family).
"It is going to take the collective
talentsof many to make this coun-
try work
Chisholm reflected on the six-
ties and encouraged students
today to become more involved in
politics. "You people today are
the result of the struggle and con-
victions of those of us in the sixties
who fought hard for what we
believed in. You students today
cannot afford to let us down
Chisholm expressed concern
over the overwhelming feeling of
"fear" and "paralysis" she has
seen evolve within the last dec-
ade. "People are so quiet Chish-
olm said.
But she added, "You need to
work together, and remember,
there is strength is unity
Chisholm is the author of two
books: "Unbought and Unbos-
sed her autobiography; "The
Good Fight the story of her 1972
bid for the presidency.
Chisholm's speech was spon-
sored by the Student Union Fo-
rum Committee.
This Wednesday, the Women's
Forum committee will sponsor
"Women of the 21st Century a
program "to sensitize and edu-
cate students about some of their
life choices available to them to-
day by bringing in various guest
speakers NASA Astronaut
Linda God win is to be the keynote
speaker when the programbegins
at 10 a.m. in Mendenhall Student
Center.
Shirley Chisholm speaks at a press conference before her speech to
students in Hendrix Theater Monday (Thomas Walters, Photolab).
Residence hall officials look for student leaders
Residence advisors a re a special
kind of people and looking for
them is not an easy job, according
to lanet lohnson, area coordinator
for West Campus.
A lot of red tape is involved
with choosing RAs, Johnson said.
It the applying students make
qualifications, they must be inter-
viewed by faculty and student
Staff members. They then would
be put into different group inter-
views in order to "see how they
Kt" in different situations.
Students who make it through
this process are then placed in
dorms which suit them.
"You need a well-rounded
staff Johnson said. "What you
do is try to fit different people in
the right position
Designated RAs must then
spend two-and-a-half days, dur-
ing the spring, working with the
Residence Director. In-service
training courses must be taken
durmgtheycar � individual RAs
may take "what they want for in-
service training Johnson said.
To be an RA, a student must:
�Be enrolled as full time stu-
dent � undergraduate, 12 hours;
graduate, nine hours.
�Be a sophomore (or higher
class standing).
�Have a minimum grade point
average of 2.2.
�Have a clear judicial record.
�Have time schedule free of
other commitments which would
Homecoming: Kimberlv Hines becomes Miss
ECU, student g
One coordinator of ECU's
homecoming activities said
homecoming weekend was "a
great weekend
Don Leggett, co-chairman of
the ECU Homecoming Steering
Committee, said all the events
were "well attended He added
that the alumni open house at the
alumni center had the biggest at-
tendance ever.
The football team's 56-28 vic-
tor over the University of Cin-
cinnati added to the enthusiasm
of the weekend, which was kicked
off by a 10 a.m. homecoming pa-
rade Saturday.
Kimberlv Hines, a sophomore.
roups show spirit Saturday
of the ECU Gospel Choir won the
honors of homecoming queen
and was crowned at halftime of
the game by former Queen Tonja
Howell Jolly, who represented
the gospel choir last year. Hines
also received the title of Miss ECU
1987 at the ceremony.
Also at halftime, ECU Chancel-
lor Richard R. Eakin presented
three ECU Outstanding Alumni
Awards to Dudley Hood, Kay
You and Alice Esther (see story
page 2).
The school of education took
first place in the float competition
at the parade, followed by the
school of home economics in sec-
ond place and Sigma Phi Epsilon,
a social fraternity, at third place.
Sigma Phi Epsilon won first
place in a decoration of university
houses contest. ECU Ambassa-
dors won second place and Delta
Zeta social sorority won third
place.
Tyler Hall won the residence
hall decoration contest. Cotton
and Greene halls took second and
third places respectively.
The J.H. Rose High School
marching band won first place in
a band competition; Bertie High
School's band took second place.
Kimberly Hines, of the ECU Gospel Choir, shows her suprise as she hears that she has just become Miss
ECU 1987. (Thomas Walters, Photolab).
interfere with the job.
�Be cleared by the financial aid
office.
But Johnson said a student
should also be "someone who has
shown leadership at one time
Students meeting these qualifi-
cations may attend "question and
answer sessions" at any residence
hall. Applications must be turned
in by Nov. 3.
"When I recruit, 1 do it for the
whole campus Johnson said.
Johnson said the turnover rate
is "usually 20 or 30 at spring
semester � this is an average �
we try to keep a pull at all times
Although an RA's job is to
uphold university policies, many
After weeks
of debate,
bill passes
By TIM HAMPTON
SUH Writer
The SGA passed a bill Monday
that will allow the Honor Board to
pass judgment on students before
a decision is reached in a court of
law, after vote on the bill was
delayed for two weeks.
The legislature also passed a
constitution for an ECU five-
member delegation to the N.C.
Constitutional Conference after a
long period of debate. The legisla-
ture appropriated $100 to the
delegation, which will represent
ECU in the Oct. 23-24 conference.
The judicary bill was divided
into two parts, the first part con-
cerned the Honor Board while the
second portion of the bill in-
volved the an amendment to the
procedures of the Academic In-
tegrity Board. The first portion of
the bill was debated for most of
the meeting.
Those opposed to first part of
the bill raised questions about
double penalties (penalties from
both the Honor Board and a court
of law) and the board's ability to
reach a fair judgement.
Legislator Russell Lowe led the
opposition, asserting the bill is
unfair by allowing the possibility
that a student could be fined by an
ECU court and a court of law for
the same transgression.
"What student has the money to
pay two fines? Lowe asked dur-
ing the debate. Lowe also ques-
RAs fed their job involves more
than that:
"The enforcing of rules is part of
our job Jeff Miller, a Garrett Hall
RA, said. "But what you want is
everyone to get to know everyone
on the hall everyone feels part of
a group
"We know what's going on
Teresa Schallock, a Slay Hall RA,
said. "And we know where
Schallock likes to think of herself
as more of a "big sister" � some-
one to talk to and someone to
trust. "I moved to Slay, it's smaller
� like a family
"I'm not a policewoman. When
you come to college you're re-
sponsible for your own actions
Schallock said. "I'm just a regular
college student
"I really like being an RA � it's
neat to see people growing
However, an RA's work is not
just involved with "being there
They are responsible for organiz-
ing "social and informative pro-
grams according to Laura Clark,
a Fletcher Hall RA.
"I like the thought of having a
community on my hall Clark
said. "I go around and visit them,
informing them of programs and
handing out stuff � since I have
all sorts of stuff to give out. They
know I can be there
"It gives you a feeling of satis-
faction to help someone out
Schallock said.
Michelle Cadswic, head resident advisor of Flemming Hall, posts up
a promotional notice about becoming an RA (Photolab).
tioned the competency of the Lowe walked out of the legisla-
seven-member Honor Board to
pass judgment on a student.
"Does any member of the board
have a law degree? I question
their overall ability Lowe said.
Those in favor of the bill said
double penalty was not the issue,
but rather that the responsibility
of the students was the issue in the
bill. Bennett Eckert, speaker of the
legislature, stepped down from
the speaker position to issue his
statement in favor of the bill.
"Students have the responsibil-
ity to conform to the Code of
Conduct, violators of the codes
should be processed by the Honor
Board first said Eckert.
"I consider my peers (the
Honor Board) competent to pass a
fair judgement Eckert said in
reference to Lowe's questioning
of the board's ability.
Before the vote on the bill,
hire room. As he left he said,
'There is nothing 1 can do The
legislature then passed the bill by
a voice vote.
The second portion of the bill
concerning the Academic Integ-
rity Board was passed after no
debate. The bill states that an in-
structor must announce he is
going to prosecute a student
within 14 days of discovering the
student in violation of the aca-
demic codes such as cheating or
plagarism.
Before the passage of this bill,
an instructor could wait years
before accusing a student of a
violation.
In other business, the legisla-
ture appropriated:
�$450 to Phi Alpha Theta, the
history honor club for speakers.
�$700 to the Poetry Forum for
speakers.
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Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 13, 187
Alumni Association makes awards to graduates
(ECU News Bureau) � The
ECU Alumni Association
awarded 1987 Outstanding
Alumni Awards Saturday at the
association's annual luncheon.
Sandra Kay Yow, North Caro-
lina State University's head
women's basketball coach and
head coach for the 1988 U.S.A.
Olympic women's basketball
team; Esther Morgan, associate
professor of elementary educa-
tion at the University of Florida at
Gainesville and Dr. Dudley E.
Flood, associate state superinten-
dent of Public Instruction re-
ceived the awards.
Chancellor Richard K Eakin
presented the awards as lames A
Hicks, president of the Alumni
Association, recognized the re-
cipients' accomplishments. The
presentation was repeated during
halt-time ot the ECU-University
ot Cincinnati football game.
The Outstanding Alumni
Awards recognize superior
achievement in professional,
civic, andor political endeavors.
Recipients are chosen bv the
Alumni Association awards
committee. Nominations were
solicited tromalumni. the Alumni
Association board of directors
and ECL' faculty and statt
"This is my first ECU Home-
coming and 1 must say, I'm quite
impressed with the participation
and excitement I've seen today
Eakin said.
"It's a pleasure to welcome our
alumni back tor homecoming, but
it is a special delight to recognize
three outstanding alumni who
have nude such positive impacts
on our world
Flood earned his MA at ECU in
1969. A native of Winton, he re-
ceived his bachelor's degree at
North Carolina Central Univer-
sity md his doctorate at Duke.
Upon receiving his award, he
said, "I feel that to be recognized
by an institution that was respon-
sible really tor my being able to be
in a position to make a public
contribution represents the high-
est form ot validation that one can
receive
"My family and 1 share in this
honor and hold the experience we
had at Fast Carolina to be among
the highest professional experi-
ences ot our lives Flood said.
He taught the middle school
grades in Winton and
Murtreesboro and high school in
Winton. He was pnn.pal of Be-
thel Union School prior to enter-
ing the N C. Department of Public
Instruction as an associate direc-
tor in the Division of Human Rela-
tions 1 le later became director of
that division and was assistant
state superintendent prior to his
current position.
Rood has conducted seminars
and provided keynote addresses
at education conferences around
the country. He is the recipient oi
the Southern Association of
Schools and Colleges Exceptional
Service and Contribution Award.
Gov. James B. Hunt Jr. inducted
Flood into The Order of the Long
Leaf Pine. Flood has received the
North Carolina Department of
Public Instruction's Student Serv-
ices Area Leadership and Hu-
manitarian Award and the Out-
standing Service Award from the
United Negro College Fund. He is
an honorary life member of the
National Congress of Parents and
Teachers and has received the
North Carolina organization's
Special Services Award.
Esther Morgan is a Hamett
county native and graduated
from ECU in 1944. She has spent
the last 43 years serving the needs
of children and elementary edu-
cation.
"It is an honor and a privilege to
be named one of East Carolina's
Outstanding Alumni. Although
many aspects of our society have
changed since my days as a stu-
dent, the values 1 learned from my
family and alma mater have re-
mained constant Morgan said.
"1 learned long ago that respect
for the interests of others and
sensitivity to others' needs are
vital qualities for an effective
educator and an involved citizen.
I have also learned that by caring
about the needs and people of
your community and by dealing
with local issues, you can make a
difference
Morgan's first teaching assign-
ments were in Wayne and Cabar-
rus Counties. After four years in
North Carolina, she moved to
Day tona Beach, Fla and taught in
the primary schools. Four years
later she joined with the Daytona
Junior Women's League and the
Easter Seal Society to establish an
education center for physically
and mentally handicapped chil-
dren.
Realizing that the children's
needs went bevond the capabili-
ties of volunteer organizations,
she began a campaign to move the
programs to public schools. In
11 a school was opened, and
education for the handicapped
became a permanent part of pub-
lic education in Volusia County,
Ha.
During the process of working
with and for handicapped chil-
dren. Miss Morgan earned a
master's degree in education
from UNC-Chapel Hill. She also
studied special education at
Syracuse and Columbia Universi-
ties.
She was invited bv the Univer-
sity ot Florida-Gainesville to
work with students preparing to
teach the handicapped. She has
been a faculty member in the
College oi Education there for
almost 30 years.
Morgan has served as interna-
tional president of the Associa-
tion for Childhood Education, as
well as president of the organiza-
tion at the state and local levels.
She joined this organization as a
student at East Carolina and
started a chapter at the University
of Florida, which she has advised
for 29 years.
She has also served as a delegate
to the White 1 louse Conference on
Children and Youth.
Kay Yow received a BA in Eng-
lish at ECU in 1964.
Upon receiving her award Yow
said, "It is with great appreciation
that 1 acknowledge the honor of
being selected as an Outstanding
4
This young pirate seems to be having some trouble with his drink
while he tailgates before Saturday's homecoming game. (Photo
bv Thomas Walters � Photolab)
(Ztye Cast Carolinian
Serving the Eu.sr Carolina campus community .sinre 1925
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representives
Anne Ixngh Mallory James Russo Shari Clemens
Pete Fernald Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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1807 Charles B'vd
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9)9 355-5866
Alumna of East Carolina Univer-
sity.
"I hold the University in high
esteem and value the opportuni-
ties it has afforded me. It is an
honor to have this special distinc-
tion and it is one that 1 will covet
always
Upon graduation from ECU,
Yow taught at Allen Jay High
School in High Point and began
her coaching career there. In four
years Ms. Yow's team won four
conference championships.
She taught and coached one
year at her former high school in
Gibsonville before deciding to
pursuea master'sdegree in physi-
cal education at the University of
North Carolina-Greensboro.
While working on the degree,
she taught at Elon College and
upon graduating, became Elon's
coordinator of women's athletics,
coach, and professor of physical
education.
Yow remained at Elon until
1979, compiling a 57-19 winloss
record. She then moved to her
current position at NCSU. As of
the 1986-87 season, Ms. Yow's
record at State was 281-88. Her
1986-87 team won the Atlantic
Coast Conference Championship
and finished with a 24-7 record.
Ms. Yow's success at N.C. State
led her to international coaching
experience She will take the
U.S.A. Olympic team to Seoul,
South Korea, in September, 198K
This will be Ms. Yow's second
Olympics; she was assistant coach
for the USA's gold-medal-win-
ning 1984 Olympic squad.
Study shows loans don't make grads suffer
SAN ANTONIO, Texas (CPS)
� Students' post-college life-
styles aren't suffering because of
their student loan repayments, a
new study indicated.
Released last week at a financial
aid conference here, the survey of
how monthly student loan repay-
ments affect recent New England
college grads' buying decisions
found that, though the students
complained about their debt bur-
dens, those burdens didn't seem
to stop them from buying things.
"In no case was the sie of the
monthly loan payment correlated
to the economic behavior in ques
tion said Tufts University Asst.
Prof. Saul Schwartz, who re-
ported conclusions gleaned from
the still-unfinished "New Eng-
land Student Loan Survey to a
joint meeting of the National
Council of Higher Education
Loan Programs and the National
Association of State Scholarship
and Grant Programs.
While 30 percent of the students
surveyed complained their
monthly payments hurt them, the
payments had no effect on
whether they decided to buy a car
or a home, get married or move
out of their parents' houses.
Schwartz warned, however,
that the study could be mislead
ing.
He pointed out most of the ex-
students mestioned graduated
from pn te colleges, and thus
were likelv to come from weahhv
families. 96 percent of the resp
dents were white, and their
average incomes already were at
or above the national medium
ATTIC
Sal.
752-7303
HA
presents
The
CoMedY
Zone
$i
87
T.ix till '� K)
lor members
LOUIS
JOHNSON
JR.
"SHOWTLMES
FUNNIEST
PERSON IN
AMERICA 1986'
;o i( hf-sfi) cover
THURSDAY
panic
panic
NEW MUSIC
ALL ECU
STUDENTS
$150
-L ADM.
&
DRAFT
150
ALL
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FRIDAY
BEACH MUSIC
ALL ECU
GREEKS
$100
1
off
Specialsonly 3.95
mi hides dessert
fonday - CHICKEN FLAUTA
Tuesday - ENCHILADA SUIZA
Wednesday - BEEF TOSTADA
Thursday - FLAUTA DELMAR
ridav - BEEF CHIMICHANGA
You're invited
to lunch
at
521 Cotanche St.
757-1666
Wednesday is
Draft Night
$1.50 Guys
$1.00 Ladies
10 r Drafts All Night
65 C Tails & Coolers
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Sponsored by (J)KT
i

Health group
(CPS ollegesl may
be the next most li)
to be at risk ot cor.tr .
the head of a map r i
pus health rou- is wamini
national speaking tour
The reason, sa , -
ing, health direct
sity ot Virginia and
the Amerudr. I i liege Healtl ind
Association (A HA MD5 tasl
force, is th.it st . �
likelv to be sexua proi
and in .
immortality less I .
tiee safe sex
Injune,moreover,I S.Sui
General C. Evi Kooi
C ongress
sion" in the number
gel Ail redimn u
ciency syndromi
that destroys the b I mun
system and rendei
vulnerable
ous erms
The disease is
taminated bl m 1 trai
Homosexuals seek re
r i
-
� 'unng ute
ed $1
WASHINGTON
Homosexual acth s
a march on Washinj
dreds of thousands
prints the same n
demonstrations by black n tl
earlv '60s civil rights
I "Feel the power of this moment
�nd carry the messagi
Lapitol former N'ationa
fcanization for Women
EleanorSmeal told th I
mrho stretched across tl
ftiore than a dozen bl � 1
fundav
I U.S. Park Police esl
�00,000 people parti
march past the Wl
tally near the Capitol
" The crowd, led bj
in wheelchairs and bearing
parrying messages like
God I'm Gay heard tr i
ers that included esse a-
the Democratic presidential ir
didate who attended d
demonstrations at the sam
tion more than 20 years
Yale president denie
h XtWHAVLVConn. .
Ppparentlv trying to calm alumni
fear? � and preservea rich source
J)t donations to the scfw
president Benno C. Schn
Iveek sent a letter to some 2
fundraisers condemning u
bust newspaper opinion :
Jhat called Sale a "eay s
: The article, run on a commen-
tary page of the Aug. 4 Wall Street
Jounal, alleged 2 percent
pale's students are horn -
Schmidt charged the p
fcvntten by Ya
freelance writer
painted a lurid
Mace" and had "no b
Strept throat
j V7u: is sfrepi :��� Hf?
I Strept throat is an infection
paused bv the streptococcal h
ha. People KM ween th
live and 20 are mostly liki
fctrcpt throat, although it
fur in all aces
: Symptoms are present in about
to percent of all cases of strept
throat. Forty percent of pi
iith strept throat have mild
�rmptorns. Symptoms include
� -nay be red
oi veil,us
�sore throat that may
$-ith the presence
patches or flakes
a
1
fever as high as 102-104
�difficult or painful swallow
g
�pain while turning the head
�nausea and vomiting
Health Column
s
By Marv hlesha- Adams
ECL Student Health center
The diagnosis oi a strept throat
i made bv obtaining a throat cul-
ire. Antibiotics are used to treat
Irept throat it s very important
take all. oi the antibiotics pre
:ribed bv your heath care pro-
ider. It you don't finish your
ntibiotics there is a good chance
tat the bacterial infection will re-
ur.
Complications may arise as the
?sult of strept infection Bronchi-
s, pneumonia, ear infections and
erected sinuses can occur. In
iddition, rheumatic fever, which
Fn result in serious heart or kid-
y disease, can occur.
� It's important to know that 97
percent of sore throats are due to
Viral infections, not the strepto-
coccal bactena. Antibiotics are in-
effective against viral infections.
Till
IV
An ir i
weigh j
endurancj
nent Re;
same as a
classes
Men & Wl
Sat
REGISTRAl
i.
,





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 13,1987
0 graduates I health group warnsaboutAIDS
in
lo
unti
the 1986-87 season. Ms. Yovs
record at State was 281-88. Her
1986-87 team won the Atlantic
Coast Conference Championship
and finished with a 24" record.
Ms Yo� ; success at N.C. State
iod her to international coaching
�xperience. She will take the
S Olympic team to Seoul,
South krea in September, 1988.
rhis will be Ms. Yow's second
npics hewa assistant coach
the I S.A s gold-medal-win-
ning 984 01) mpic squad.
7 make grads suffer
ts had no effect on
v decided to buy a car
me get marned or move
oir parents houses.
ichwarU earned, however,
si : could be mislead-
nted oul most of the ex-
dents questioned graduated
m pn au i Ucges, and thus
v I come from wealthy
t ot therespon-
were white, and their
.nomc- already were at
i national medium.
THURSDAY
PAlliC
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(CrS) � College students may
be the next most likely population
to be at risk of contracting AIDS,
the head of a major national cam-
pus health group is warning on a
national speaking tour.
The reason, says Richard Keel-
ing, health director at the Univer-
sity of Virginia and chairman of
the American College Health
Association (ACHA) AIDS task
force, is that students are more
hkelv to be sexually promiscuous
and � in youthful feelings of
immortality � less likely to prac-
tice safe sex.
In une, moreover, U .S. Surgeon
General C. Everett Koop warned
Congress of a potential "explo-
sion" in the number of teens who
get AIDS (acquired immune defi-
ciency syndrome), a fatal virus
that destroys the body's immune
system and renders the victim
vulnerable to otherwise-innocu-
ous germs.
The disease is spread bv con-
taminated blood transfusions.
using dirty needles to inject drugs
and some kinds of sexual contact.
And when students get to cam-
pus, expalined ACHA spokes-
woman Ann Higley, "lt'sa period
of exploration" when many stu-
dents experiment with sex and
drugs for the first time.
"It's their first taste of freedom,
and often there's an unwilling-
ness to take responsibility
Some colleges have tried to
warn students by distributing
flyers, installing condom vending
machines to promote "safe sex"
and � like the University of
Massachusetts and Mount Hol-
voke, Smith, Amherst and Hamp-
shire colleges did Sep. 29 � stage
elaborate programs to educate
campus residents about the dis-
ease.
Schools seem to be announcing
new AIDSefforts weekly. Just last
week, for example, Michigan
State said it would start testing
students anonymously for AIDS,
while the University of Illinois
said it might require any student
it suspected of being a health
threat to take an AID �o��
In Pennsylvania, meanwhile,
Millersville University set up an
AIDS Review Board to plan how
to deal with the disease on cam-
pus in the future.
Still, the ACHA's Keeling
thi nks colleges are doing a bad job
teaching students about AIDS.
More than three-quarters of the
nation's campuses have done
"little or nothing" to teach stu-
dents, he figured.
"We're starting to talk in terms
of obligations, not options. AIDS
education is the moral and ethical
obligation of colleges, irrespec-
tive of whatever discomfort with
the topic trustees or alumni or the
community may feel Keeling
said.
The Department of Education
also has ignored its responsibility
to develop AIDS education pro-
grams, Keeling charged. "In an
See AIDS, page 5
ECU students march along beside the homecoming float sponsored by the School of Education in the
parade Saturday. The entry won first in a competition held among the floats.
Homosexuals seek results from march on Washington, D.C.
WASHINGTON (AD �
Homosexual activists are hoping
a march on Washington bv hun-
dreds of thousands of supporters
prings the same result as the
�emonstrations bv blacks in the
tarlv 60s: civil rights.
"Feel the power of this moment
ind carry the message to the
rapitol former National Or-
gan ia tion for Women President
Eleanor Smeal told the thousands
fvho stretched across the mall for
Jiore than a dozen blocks on
lunday.
; U.S. Park Folice estimated that
100,000 people participated in the
frtarch past the White Houseand a
Eally near the Capitol.
: The crowd, led by AIDS victims
In wheelchairs and bearing signs
(farrving messages like, "Thank
God I'm Gay heard from speak-
ers that included Jesse Jackson,
jthe Democratic presidential can-
didate who attended civil rights
demonstrations at the same loca-
tion more than 20 years ago.
Jackson drew a loud roar when
he said, "1 came because you
asked me, because 1 disagree with
those who divide us, who want to
isolate anvone who is different
After his speech, Jackson spoke
to a number of victims of acquired
immune deficiency syndrome
who sat in wheelchairs near the
stage. He shook their hands and
said, "God bless you
Activists say the AIDS crisis,
which has hit the homosexual
community in the United States
especially hard, has spurred an
increase in violence and discrimi-
nation against the nation's lesbi-
ans and homosexual men, whom
they estimate number 25 million.
Kay Ostbcrg, co-chairwoman of
the march, said the rally Sunday-
should send a message to the
government that the homosexual
movement is too large to ignore
and gays and lesbians deserve
civil rights.
"In the past year, the (gav)
community has felt incredibly
attacked with the Supreme
Court ruling in Bowers vs. Hard-
wick, which upheld Georgia's
sodomy law, and the conserva-
tive backlash due to the AIDS
epidemic, she said.
Under skies threatening rain,
the rally began with music and a
poignant statement from Dan
Bradley, a White House aide in
the Carter administration, who is
suffering from AIDS.
Bradley said that what he was
most proud of was that "after a
lifetime of struggle (and) fear 1
had the courage (in 1982) to say,
loud and clear, 'I'm gay and I'm
proud. I'm gay and I'm proud "
Organizers were hoping to the
use events Sunday and a planned
non-violent protest in front of the
Supreme court building today to
dramatize their calls for more
federal assistance for AIDS re-
search and treatment.
Activists began Sunday at sun-
rise by unfurling of a 7,000-pound
quil t bearing the names of victims
of AIDS.
The quilt bears 1,920 panels
made by companions or relatives
of people who ha ve died from the
disease, including actor Rock
Hudson, choreographer Michael
Bennett and entertainer Liberace.
Entertainers Whoopi Goldberg,
Robert Blake and Holly Near
spoke briefly, along with Cesar
Chavez, president of the United
Farm Workers of America.
Prior to Jackson's appearance,
Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass and
Rep. Gary Studds, D-Mass each
came to the stage. Both have said
they are homosexuals.
Police reported no arrests or
incidents.
AIDS is a blood-borne disease
that attacks the body's immune
system, rendering it incapable of
resisting other diseases and infec-
tions. There is no known cure.
Most of its victims have been
homosexual men and intrave-
nous drug users.
Yale president denies school is one-quarter gay
(MEW HAVENS Conn. cCPS �
Apparently trying to calm alumni
ears � and preserve a rich source
tf donations to the school � Yale
president Benno C. Schmidt last
jveck sent a letter to some 2,000
lundraisers condemning an Au-
gust newspaper opinion piece
ahat called Vale a "gay school
The article, run on a commen-
tary page of the Aug. 4 Wall Street
jounal, alleged 25 percent of
rale's students are homosexual.
Schmidt charged the piece,
written by Vale grad and
freelance writer Julie Iovine,
painted a lurid picture of this
ilace" and had "no basis in fact
Istrept throat
What is srrept throat?
Strept throat is an infection
auscd by the streptococcal bacte-
a. People between the ages of
ve and 20 arc mostly likely to get
Jtrept throat, although it can oc-
fur in all ages.
! Symptoms are present in about
io percent of all cases of strept
throat. Forty percent of people
rith strept throat have mild or no
iroptoms. Symptoms include:
� �sore throat that may be red
f'ith the presence of yellow
latches or flakes
-fever as high as 102-104
difficult or painful swallow-
Dunng the lytk-87 fiscal year.
Yale raised $31.1 million in dona-
tions from alumni, some of whom
wrote Schmidt in the
commentary's aftermath to ask
about its veracity.
In his letter, Schmidt lamented,
"It is too bad that serious, con-
cerned readers can be misled bv
such journalistic drivel
Journal Leisure and Arts page
editor Raymond Sokolov said he
was sorry Schmidt was upset by
the article, but refused to disown
it.
"I think the reaction has been
really extreme Iovine said. "I'm
not saying that Yale is overrun by,
gays Even if It was, "what's
wrong with that?"
Meanwhile, the Yale Daily
News reported on Sept. 18 that the
Yale chapter of the Kapj a Alpha
Theta sorority still had 1985
guidelines from the national
chapter for ridding the houses of
members "engaging in homosex-
ual acts
The guidelines, written by the
national chapter, suggest point-
ing out to the student invloved
that homosexuality is "illegal
and if the student continues to
flaunt the rules, says the chapter
should ask the member to resign.
f
�pain while turning the head
�nausea and vomiting
JHealth Column
By Mary Elesha-Adams
ECU Student H�Kh Cater
The diagnosis of a strept throat
made by obtaining a throat cul-
re. Antibiotics are used to treat
rept throat; it's very important
i take aJI of the antibiotics pre-
ribed by your heath care pro-
iider. If you don't finish your
ntibiotics there is a good chance
lat the bacterial infection will re-
ur.
Complications may arise as the
?sult of strept infection. Bronchi-
s, pneumonia, ear infections and
tfected sinuses can occur. In
ddition, rheumatic fever, which
an result in serious heart or kid-
fey disease, can occur.
� It's important to know that 97
percent of sore throats are due to
viral infections, not the strepto-
coccal bacteria. Antibiotics are in-
effective against viral infections.
East Carolina University
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Stye �aat (Earnlmfan
Sernri the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel maurer, cum,
Clay Deanhardt, ��,�
AndyLewis, AMESF, McKEE n�rto,o,UMrtwii
S�ESSf ANTONY MART,N' B�
joi tN Carter, Mec Needi lAM
Shelton Bryant, ���
Debbie Stevens, w�,
Mike Upchurch, ;��� m�
John W. Medlin, a� p
OCTOBER 13.1987 Page 4 OPINION
RAs
Important student jobs
Recruitment for resident advisors
(RAs) for the spring semester began
Monday (see story, page 1), and
once again the search is on for repon-
sible students willing to do a diffi-
cult job offering high rewards.
Janet Johnson, who is coordinat-
ing the search, said there was no
sure way of knowing how many
positions would be vacant, but that
generally there was a need for 20-30
new RAs in the spring.
The job of an RA is one of the more
important student jobs on campus.
The RA serves as a mediator be-
tween the university and on-cam-
pus students, working to solve the
problems of both while maintaining
a livable environment in the resi-
dence halls.
The RA also serves as an advisor,
helping hallmates with problems,
questions and dilemas. As an a RA,
one learns a great deal about what
the university has to offer its stu-
dents, and how the students can get
to those offerings.
A common myth held by many
students, especially incoming fresh-
man, is that an RA'is somewhat of a
junior police officer whose only
purpose is to be vigilant for rule-
breakers and bust them as often as
possible. That is partially true �
only to the point that an RA is en-
trusted with seeing that students
live within university policy.
Most of the time, however, the RA
is simply trying to help everyone on
the floor live together peacefully.
RAs do not go snooping around to
find students doing things wrong.
They simply react to blatant offenses
when necessary in order to protect
the university and the students. It is
not the best part of being an RA.
The best part is getting to know
everyone on the hall and helping
them get to know each other. The
community that RAs build on their
floors is an important thing, and
often it leads to new friendships that
will last a lifetime.
Programming is a big part of the
RAs job. Programs range from the
cultural to the athletic to the social to
the educational. They area vital link
in building that important commu-
nity, and they are entertaining and
informative as well. Programming
forces the RA to be creative and
industrious in order to keep the in-
terest of hall members.
Being an RA also offers individu-
als the chance to challenge them-
selves and to grow as leaders and
communicators. Many of the skills
required as an RA will come into
play in later life. Honing those skills
in a job with this much responsibil-
ity can give one an advantage
against job competitors after gradu-
ation.
Then, for the more self-oriented
students, there is the fact that the job
looks great on a resume.
The university needs strong lead-
ers in such important positions.
Take the time to apply, and follow
through with the sessions and inter-
views. It may be the smartes thing
you do all year. It will certainly be
the most rewarding.
THIS IS A LIBERAL,
f SPECIAL - INTEREST
Campus Forum
Clarke attacks liberal defense
Poet puts poverty to verse
By SHELBY STEPHENSON
SpaciaJ in The lMt Carolinian
I believe that everyone experiences pov-
erty or impoverishment or loss many times
in their lives. This poverty may be a poor-
ness of the soul or of the body which is truly
the worst kind. There is no svnonvm for
hunger.
As a poet and a teacher 1 try to contribute
to an atmosphere wherein an exchange
goes on, a going out of feelings. By telling
our stories, our feelings, thoughts, images,
we become more sensitive to each other's
needs. We become more human. We learn
that we do need each other. The hope is that
someone may see the truth and be helped in
even the most inconsequential way.
I have chosen some poems I have written
recently about the tenant farmers � white
and black � I grew up with, about the trap
of poverty they were caught in. Most of
them did not own any land. The money they
made went for food for the family
HISTORICAL LIMITS
When you consider the story ours, the
bare fact
that we had little to offer ourselves; when
you consider how
they would come Monday mornings
wanting a job to do;
when you consider Daddy saying I have
no money to pay
you with but I can swap you some eggs or
meat for your
work; when you consider how snuff
seemed to be the city
feel and taste on their tongues inside their
lower lips; when you
consider the balance they achieved
rarely, busting out often to
get drunk, fight, cutting one another in
the face, of all places,
asking Daddy or my older brother Paul to
Quick take me to the
Mergency Room; when you consider the
little brown babies on
pallets as the women and grandparents
picked our cotton; when
then history moves as in the tone sur-
rounding a dinner bell
far from a shanty, rings in the table full of
September
peas, sidemeat, souse, sweet tomato
wine.
"Historical Limits" offers a kind of
oblique look at part of a picture of my child-
hood: I grew up on a small farm in eastern
North Carolina, at Route One, Benson (now
called Route Three). I am writing out of the
early 195Cs�about ninety years after
President Lincoln freed the slaves. Though
we had very little or no money, we worked
together with our tenants and swapped
work with our neighbors.
The next piece has to do with praise.
HONOR THOSE
who
you consider the little bees in the honey-
suckle hedges sucking
the blossom, the big bees getting the
honey; when you consider
the little man working the crops, the big
man getting the money,
carry their babies on their hips
while their men go to town
to wallow and booze
away the weekends
until time shall be no more
Honor the drunk in the swing
(he's there because he's there)
the field waits for no saint
Honor them for they shall be left to what
they have
as mey go out to the whiskey ir
the hedge
growing around their shanties
Honor them for being in the thick of
things
the way their feet settle in the
way
Honor the light that comes up
over their heads and their skin
brown and white and black
giving the flared nostrils a rest
from the work,
longing to be eased from guilt
the sweat, the source
Honor the person going
forth among the dead
where the rows are the same
length for all.
To the editor:
I would like to respond to David
Class's letter, "Liberal Responds in
the Oct. 8 East Carolinian, itself a
reaction to Justin Sturz's letter on Oct.
(�. Due to space limitations, Sturz was
not able to offer "alternate solutions"
or give in-depth analytical coverage
oi the issues he raised. However, the
conservative students of ECU hope
that they will be allowed to write a
regular "From the Right" column for
the East Carolinian, beginning in the
near future. This column would ad-
dress the important issues Sturz
raised as well as many others in a
more complete, objective manner.
Sturz wishes to convey his apology
to any liberal Christians he might
have offended with his statement that
included the phrase, "liberals accuse
Christians What he meant and
means is "liberals accuse CONSER-
VATIVE Christians He acknowl-
edges his mistake and is sorry for the
misunderstanding.
Glass asserts that the liberal pro-
abortion stand "advocates an
individual's right to freedom of
choice, which is stated in the
Constitution Class is mistaken,
however. The Constitution does
guarantee Americans certain basic
rights, such as the RIGHT TO LIFE
and liberty, and freedoms of the
press, speech and religious groups.
Bui nowhere in the Constitution is
there "stated" a sweepng, across-the-
board "right to freedom of choice If
everyone in our society were free to
choose to do whatever they wanted to
do, anarchy and chaos would result.
Illegal drug users, rapists and child
molesters are not free to exercise their
"rights" to have the freedom to
choose whatever acts they wish to
commit.
Conservatives think that its incred-
ible that there are those who believe
that some vague and unstated "right
to freedom of choice" exists in the
Constitution that gives people the
"freedom to choose" whether or not
to murder their unborn child. Glass
further asserts that "regardlessofany
law, abortions will occur. The ques-
tion is where Ithey) will be per-
formed; in a hospital, by a qualified
physician, or in a back room, with any
sharp object?" This reasoning is il-
logical. One could just as easily say,
"regardless of any law, illegal drug
usage will occur. The question is
where it will be done: in a hospital,
under the supervision of a qualified
doctor, or in a back alley, with any
available needle Using this reason-
ing, one could justify the eradication
of ALL laws because people will do
wrong things anyway, regardless of
any law. Conservatives believe the
right to life, which is stated and guar-
anteed in the Constitution, extends to
ALL human beings, not just those that
happen to be deemed worthy to live.
Glass later makes this incredible
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
of foyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and clas-
sification, address, phone number and
signature of the authoris). Letters are
limited to two typewritten pages, double
spaced or neatly printed. All letters are
subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are reminded
that they are limited to one every two
weeks. The deadline for editorial material
statement: "humanism is not a reli-
gion Well, Mr. Glass, you'll have to
take on the Supreme Court on that
one. The court has declared that
humanism IS a religion twice: in 1961
(Torcaso vs. Watkins) and again in
1964 (U.S. vs. Seeger).
He then asks "how could a way of
thinking that allows each individual
personal freedom of choice cause a
sociry's demise?" The answer: the
Constitution guarantees the right to
LIBERTY, the freedom to choose to do
whatonewantsaslongasthcrightsof
others and the values of civilized
society are not undermined. How-
ever, those who push for seemingly
unlimited "freedom of choice" seek
LICENSE, the freedom to do what
civlized society's values. Humanists
push for licensefreedom but hav-
ing no Judaeo-Christian consensus to
contain it, their "freedom" leads to
chaos and ultimately, authoritarian-
ism.
Matthew Clarke
Chairman
ECU College Republicans
Liberalism
To the editor
In response to Justin Sturz'sletterof
Oct. 6.
First of all, liberalism is not a matter
of inconsistency! It's a matter of un-
derstanding facts and realities in the
world and trying to create and de-
velop new ways which are better for
individuals and the society as a
whole. Also, liberals are not a certain
group of people, but many groups,
who are looking for improvements in
the society, instead of the Conserva-
tive "status quo
You want Americans to wake up? I
hope so, because in that matter they
can take a trip to the big cities and see
people laying in the streets, kicked
out of the society. Or they can take a
trip to Capitol Hill with Poindexter
and see how individual assumptions
and egoism can lead to governmental
embarrassments.
Another thing, Mr. Sturz, as an
English major, you should at least be
capable, when you write a letter, to
first come up with facts and the rea-
sons for specific opinions, then cri-
tizicc them, backed up with your own
facts. If not, you and your collegues
are classicals examples of people who
solve everything by claiming the
faults of others (without presenting
your own solutions to the issues). I,
also, would be glad to discuss all of
the examples you present, but not
before you are arguing in a profes-
sional way. For example, you are
accusing me (I am a Christian) that I
accuse myself for forcing my belief on
others. Maybe you can clarify that?
As a liberal, Mr. Sturz, I also have
many conservative friends at cam-
pus. However we are not acccusing
each other's beliefs without trying to
is5p.m. Friday for Tuesday'sedition and
5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday's edition.
Campus
ForumSpectrum
rules
In addition to the "Campus Forum"
section of the editorial page. The East
Carolinian features the "Campus
Spectrum This is an opinion colu mn
by guest writers from thn student
understand each other's opinions.
We also respect each other as human
beings. Good Luck, next time!
Olav Osland
Senior
Marketing
Pirate Walk
To the editor:
It is quite a pleasure to see Pirate
Walk back in business for the current
school year. I believe people did not
realize what a service Pirate Walk
truly provided until it was not avail-
able. I sincerely hope the service will
continue for years to come.
It is hard to understand why Pirate
Walk has constantly been faced with
adversity. As a senior at ECU some
yearsago, I wasa "Pirate Walker"and
saw first hand what a valuable service
it could be. Even then (1985) Pirate
Walk faced trouble � and not neces-
sarily as a result of bad management.
Awareness was more of the culpnt,
even though the phone number was
posted in every female and coed
dorm, and in most buildings. I be-
lieve, from first hand experience and
observation, that the type of adver-
tisement is the problem even tcxlay.
Effective newspaper coverage and
handouts have been few and far be-
tween, which 1 feel is both the fault of
Pirate Walk itself, and, moreso. East
Carolina University.
In 1985 funds appropriated for Pi-
rate Walk were amusing, to say the
least. We felt at that time the SGA was
failing to completely recognize one of
the best services ECU had to offer.
Our concern then turned to reality as
Pirate Walk was put on hold. I'm glad
the tide has turned and Pirate Walk is
back in operation.
It is vital ECU women understand
that calling for an escort is a simple
and free task and the old adage of
"better safe than sorry" could apply
here. Such understanding comes
from both a thorough knowledge or
Pirate Walk itself and proper promo-
tion by the university.
If the university would step up its
efforts to really promote such a valu-
able service, Pirate Walk would never
again have to experience what lias
happened in the recent past. I really
believe the university should and
could provide funds in an outright
fashion instead of Pirate Walk having
to go through the SGA and all of its
legislative red tape. Why should such
a valuable service to the majority of
ECU students have to fight and beg
for funding?
I feel ECU has an obligation to its
students to provide an adequate and
effectively run organization such as
Pirate Walk. It would be heartening
as well as rewarding to see more
women use, and more men partici-
pate in, an organization which is
worthevery penny for which it fights.
Randy Mizelle
ECU Alumni
body and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept bv-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information may
contact the managing editor of The
East Carolinian at 757-6366, or stop by
our offices on the second floor of the
Publications Buildine.
Official Si
DURHAM (AP)
Carolina's historical!ba I
lie universities an , lUd
"depressing trend" of b
saken by black students par
ticularly those most j for
college, a Wack educator says
"The greatest threat
five colleges will not � . .
misinterpretation
Constitution, or v.me misai
cation of federal lavs or si
pointmenf of u I
Bork or the elimina
grants Chai
Richmond of N. entral
versity said Saturda
our greatest thn at
ment
Richmond made the comm
during a panel discussii i
future of Northat
public universities
annualmeetingotth. '�. .
of Afro-American Li
tory. He was joine : mm
Jenkins, chancellor
City State Univei
"A" Lyons Jr chan. �
ston-Salem State University
Richmond said trw �- �
consent decree req uiring the
versity of North Car
to increase the number of fc ick
its 11 predominantly wl
schools has succeeded in it r
ing integration. In 1972, for � i
ample, the five historica ly 1 .
campuses enrolled B4 p rcenl
the blacks in the 16-campus
UDS moves to stud
t
Continued from page 3
ideal world the Department I
Education would have taken sub-
stantial responsibility for devel-
oping AIDS education policy, but
that support has been absent
Higley reported onlv 75 stu-
dents have been diagnosed as
having AIDS-related illnesses
but added the disease ha -
latency penod, meaning
may be infected and not know it
At a Boston AIDS conference
last week, however, several doc-
tors claimed the risk of catching
the virus through heterosexual
contact is still relatively slight.
The chance of contracting AIDS
x"��,� & hc-temsexual con-
tact, reported Dr. lames Coedert
of the National Cancer Institute
mav be less than 1 in a million.
ettrv
voived hi
men or
dim n
tf CLIFFS
Seafood House and
Washington Highway N C 33 Ext
Plane "52-2 77
- Mon thru Thurs. Ni
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY Ci
The Center Is Op
Mon Tues, & Wed. Fn. 9
9 a.m. - 2 p.m. & by
For an appointment or more ii
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline.
757-0003
11 1 East Third Street � The Lee Bu.
Greenville. N C
Free Pregnancy Test
Confidential Counseling
Hillcrest L
Memorial Drive
FRE
GAM
Bowl One Game &
I Another Game FRJ
This Coupon!
Limit 1 Coupon Per Persj
'
A
i
i
!
�r � -





THE EAST CAROLINIAN (XTPBEK U l'W
HIS IS Pi GRASS'ROOTS
1GANIZATICN OF CONCERNED
rERICfiNS! w � ,
defense
im-
US
m
les
.rum
East
impus
lumn
tdent
: ers opinions.
K h other as human
k next time!
CMav Osland
Senior
Marketing
Pirate Walk
� quit a pleasure to see Pirate
k in business tor the current
ir I b lievc people did not
.1 service Pirate Walk
d until it was not avail-
erely hope the service will
� � . oars to come.
understand why Pirate
stantiy been faced with
- a senior at ECU some
a asa Pirate Walker "and
d m hat a valuable service
� en then (19$) Tirate
uWe and not neces-
� bad management.
as more o! the culprit,
the phone number was
vi in every female and coed
d in most buildings. 1 be-
n first hand experience and
n that the type of adver-
lent is the problem even tiKtay
iper coverage and
have been few and far be-
tch i fed is both the fault of
and. moreso, East
1985 funds appropriated for Pi-
- were amusing, to say the
eH at that time the SGA was
ig to completely recognize one of
services ECU had to offer.
i n turned to reality as
Wall ut on hold. I'm glad
as turned and Pirate Walk is
vration.
- vital ECL women understand
� �� an escort is a simple
k and the old adage of
afc than sorry could apply
- ich understanding comes
i thorough knowledge or
- : sd t a nd proper promo-
university.
iniversity would step up its
really promote such a valu-
rate Walk would never
n ha experience what has
I in the recent past. I really
university should and
de funds in an outright
instead of Pirate Walk having
igh the SGA and all of its
dtape Whv should such
liable service to the majority of
ECL students have to fight and beg
1 feel ECU has an obligation to its
stud nts I r �. dv an adequate and
tivei) run organization such as
Pirate Walk It would be heartening
as well irding to see more
is and more men parfiri-
in an organization which is
worth everv pennv for which it fights.
Randv Mizellc
ECU Alumni
.
body and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information may
contact the managing editor of The
East Carolinian at 757-6366, or stop by
our offices on the second floor of the
.Publications Buildine,
t
Official says black universities in trouble
DURHAM t.AP) � North
Carolina's historically black pub-
lic universities are experiencing a
"depressing trend" of being for-
saken bv black students � par-
ticularly those most prepared for
college, a black educator savs.
"The greatest threat to these
five colleges will not be some
misinterpretation of the
Constitution, or some misappli-
cation of federal law, or the ap-
pointment of Judge (Robert H.)
Bork or the elimination of Pell
grants Chancellor Tyronza
Richmond of N.C. Central Uni-
versity said Saturday. "1 believe
our greatest threat is abandon-
ment
Richmond made the comments
during a panel discussion on the
future of North Carolina's black
public universities held at the
annual meeting of the Association
of Afro-American Life and His-
tory. He was joined by Jimmy
Jenkins, chancellor of Elizabeth
City State University; Charles
"A" Lyons Jr chancellor of Win-
ston-Salem State University.
Richmond said the 1981 federal
consent decree requiring the L'ni-
versity of North Carolina system
to increase the number of blacks at
its 11 predominantlv white
schools has succeeded in increas-
ing integration. In 1�72, for ex-
ample, the five historically black
campuses enrolled 84 percent of
the blacks in the lb-campus UNC
system. In 1986, those schools
enrolled 61 percent.
But Richmond said the effort
had cost the historically black
campuses some of their better
students In the fall of 1986, he
said, black freshmen at UNC's 11
predominantly white institutions
had a mean combined score on the
Scholastic Aptitude Test of 797.
The same year, black freshmen at
UNC's predominantly black
schools had a mean total SAT
score of 645.
The highest possible score on
the college entrance exam is 1,600.
Richmond said the black com-
munity could remedy the prob
lem of abandonment by sendine
its money, support and children
to predominantly black cam-
puses
Thompson expressed concern
about how new emphasis on
"institutional accountability and
effectiveness" by accrediting as-
sociations would affect black
schools.
"These are the trick words that
will probably close 15 historically
black institutions in the country in
the next ear he said.
Thompson criticized the federal
government for its "rhetoric as
opposed to real action on ini
natives to help black schools, the
government steers the plans to
some $9,000-a-year bureaucrat
with no pencils, paper, who can't
even make a long-distance phone
call lTiompson said.
Other chancellors said linger-
ing racist attitudes also hurt black
campuses.
Lyons criticized public schools
for what he called "an unaccept-
able notion that the (black) kids
are inferior and can't cut it As a
result, he said, 60 percent of black
students are "tracked" into
classes that don't prepare them
for college-level work.
Those comments echoed re-
marks made less than two weeks
ago by UNC system Vice Presi-
dent Lyoyd V. "Vic" Hackley,
who criticized low standards for
black students.
Lyons said blacks had lost
many gains made in the 1960s and
cited "reverse discrimination"
lawsuits filed by whites, scarce
scholarship money for black stu-
dents and lagging affirmative
action programs.
He suggested, however, that
such trends were drawing black
students to historically black
schools.
"Blacks have left white colleges
where they were not successful
Lyons said, "and are not coming
cack to the black colleges � espe-
cailly those who have played out
their athletic eligibilty
Jenkins agreed that black
schools were more able to "empa-
thize" with black students.
I . u, iji
t.l I.IW , tlu
publu jtion
irs ; ,
Publii ation u20
fih
itioii92i
M
IHs I.in I
phon. hoc
iFjma
AIDS moves to student bodies
Continued from page 3
ideal world the Department of
Education would have taken sub-
stantial responsibility for devel-
oping AIDS education policy, but
that support has been absent
Higley reported only 75 stu-
dents have been diagnosed as
having AIDS-related illnesses,
but added the disease has a long
latency period, meaning others
may be infected and not know it
At a Boston AIDS conference
last week, however, several doc-
tors claimed the mk oi catching
the virus through heterosexual
contact is still relatively slight.
The chance of contracting AIDS
(rom.t aing)e Vtcteroaexual con-
tact, reported Dr. James Goedert
oi the National Cancer Institute,
mav be less than 1 in a million.
But Goedert quickly added the
report encourages "a false sense
of security and that ignoring
"safer sex" practices can be fatal.
"Only" 4 percent of the re-
ported AIDS cases in the U.S.
were transmitted through hetero-
sexual contact, and half the
heterosexual victims were born in
Africa or 1 laiti. where - because
venereal diseases and conse-
quently open sores in the genital
area are more common � AIDS
seems to be passed more readily
between men and women. Dr.
Jeffrey Harris of the Massachu-
setts Institute of Technology said.
Ninety percent of the reported
Alps cases in the U.S. have in-
volved homosexual or bisexual
men or drug users who shared
dirtv needles, Harris said.
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center Is Oven
Mon Tues, & Wed. Fri. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
9 a.m. - 2 p.m. & by appointment
For an appointment or more infor
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline,
757-oo3
111 East Third Street - The Lee Building
Greenville. N. C.
Free Pregnancy Test-
Confidential Counseling
Ay
Hillcrest Lanes
Memorial Drive 756-2020
FREE
GAME
j BowfOne GarrieT Receive j
I Another Game FREE With I
J This Coupon. J
Limit 1 Coupon Per Person j
WE BUILT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
SAV-A-CENTER
FOOD MARKETS
Ttitr freshest way to Save
Punk & Wagnalls
FAMILY MEDICAL
Oi iginalh published as M NPT )MS
llilps thi mr!i .lll
(li.i h lookitiq ,i) its v
� � tit im' an ilhH
PLAIN � SELF-RISING
Red Band
Flour
J 1? OFF � WHITE. YELLOWBLUE
White Cloud
Tissue
Limil One With An Add I $10 O More Purch
limit One With An Additional $10 00 O More Purchase
53 Crisco
ShorteningJ I
Duke's "7Q0
Mayonnaise f O
Orange
Juice
CAMPW LS '
Tomato
Soup
M0 � R�b
v � Roast

4 �C � R"mp
IO Roast
Lu-J Eight
A&P Vegetables 3
Applesauce 3
Corn Chips
3.4'
99
1.00 Cheez-lt Crackers "� 1.69 Klondike Bars
p Fryer 29
a Breasts I
2.39 Butter Bastea Turkevs 79
Tortilla Chips
1.00 Biscuits
� A.TEST
99 Sour Cream
A4P L ARGF � 'i M
99' Ultra Diapers
- 59 Pet Ritz Pies
BIRD- �
99' Cob Corn
7.69 Orange Juice
1.49 Steak Patties
1.89 Turkey Ham
79r Sirloin Steaks
1.59
2.99
Coors
Light Beer
49
6 12 oz. can ctn.
WASHINGTON STATE
RED OR GOLDEN
Delicious
Apples
CALIFORNIA GROWN
BULK RED OR
Natural
Pistachios
CALIFORNIA
COCA- Large Cucumbers Firm Carrots
COLA
$J09
� �� : . LB AVG
Large Pumpkins
.OCAUVGRiV N
1.99 Collard Greens
r.RISPv CALIFORNIA NORTH CAROLINA G Art
Green Leaf Lettuce 69c Sweet Potatoes
SELECT PRE
Diel Dr Pepper
6 l i tan t n
gg$ Cherry Tomatoes -99' Yellow Onions
i 69'
59'
� 99'
3 99'
Money
Orders
25
SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
QJQP j HOMOGENIZED
7 Flav-O-Rich
Limit One Pei Snoppef With An Add I $10 Or More Pixch Coupon Expires Ocl
SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
ST0P1P&Q
S�5? Sandwich
Bread
Limit One Per Shoppei With An Add I $10 Or Mo'e Purch Coupon E�p�es Oct 17. '987
SEE STORE FOR DETAILS
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Op�n 24 Hours-Open Mon. 7 a.m Closed Sat. 11 p.m Open Sun. 7 a.m11 p.
PRICES EFFECTIVE OCT 11 THRU OCT 17 1987 QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
- - m-m -m- � � ����� n m .j�i�inm
c-

-J
�i �-�





THE FAST CAROLINIAN (XTPBEK H, W7
BORK-
Y�S!
'HIS IS A GRASS-ROOTS
ZGMlZflTlCN OF CONCERNED
rERICMS! : � �
defense
ken en-
the
.). 1,
il of
not
ton
im-
in2
rain n
'US
rum
les
-omm
10 East
pmpus
I umn
ktiidenl
other s opinions.
u h other as human
k next time!
CHa Osland
Senior
Marketing
Pirate Walk
i pleasure to mv Tirate
k in business for the current
ar I believe people did not
a service Pirate Walk
: until it was not avail-
iincen l hope the service will
� r years to come.
understand why Tirate
stantiy been faced with
s a senior at ECU some
Pirate Walker" and
1 what a valuable service
n then (1985) Tiratc
We and not neces-
I bad management,
ss m a more ol the culpnt,
ig the phone number was
d in even, female and coed
dorm, and in most buildings. 1 be-
from first hand experience and
that the type of adver-
tisement is (he problem even today.
nrspaper coverage and
handouts have been few and far be-
hich 1 fed is both the fault oi
- I and. moreso. East
- aty.
In 1985 funds appropriated for Pi-
k were amusing, to say the
t .It at that time theSGA was
faihr. npletely recognize one of
est a rvices ECU had to offer.
( rn then turned to reality as
- is put on hold. I'm glad
is I ;rned and Pirate Walk is
. (ration.
It is vital ECU women understand
ing for an escort is a simple
free task and the old adage of
tcr safe than sorry" could apply
Such understanding comes
th a thorough knowledge or
Pirau �� n itself and proper promo-
the university.
If the university would step up its
illy promote such a valu-
able sen ice. Pirate Walk would never
n have to experience what has
n the recent past. I really
eve the university should and
ild . - . ide funds in an outright
instead of Pirate Walk having
rough the SCA and all of its
dative red tape. Whv should such
a valuable service to the majority of
ECU students have to fight and beg
r funding?
1 feel ECU has an obligation to its
students to provide an adequate and
effectively run organization such as
Pirate Walk It would be heartening
as well as rewarding to sec more
women use, and more men partici-
pate in, an organization which is
rthevery penny for which it fights.
Randv Mizelle
ECU Alumni
body and facility. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information may
contact the managing editor of The
East Carolinian at 757-6366, or stop by
our offices on the second floor of the
i Buildine.
Official says black universities in trouble
DURHAM (AP) � North
Carolina's historically black pub-
lic universities are experiencing a
"depressing trend" of being for-
saken by black students � par
ticularly those most prepared for
college, a black educator savs.
"The greatest threat to these
five colleges will not be some
misinterpretation of the
Constitution, or some misappli-
cation of federal law, or the ap-
pointment of Judge (Robert H.)
Bork or the elimination of Pell
grants Chancellor Tvronza
Richmond of N.C. Central Uni-
versity said Saturday. "1 believe
our greatest threat "is abandon-
ment
Richmond made the comments
dunng a panel discussion on the
future of North Carolina's black
public universities held at the
annual meeting of the Association
of Afro-American Life and His-
tory. He was joined bv Jimmy
Jenkins, chancellor of Elizabeth
City State University; Charles
"A" Lyons jr chancellor of Win-
ston-Salem State University.
Richmond slid the 1981 federal
consent decree requiring the Uni-
versity oi North Carolina system
to increase the number of blacks a!
Us 11 predominantly white
schools has succeeded in increas-
ing integration. In 1972, for ex-
ample, the five historically black
campuses enrolled 84 percent of
the blacks in the 16-campus UNC
system. In W8b, those schools
enrolled 61 percent.
But Richmond said the effort
had cost the historically black
campuses some of their better
students. In the fall of 1986, he
said, black freshmen at UNC's 11
predominantly white institutions
had a mean combined score on the
Scholastic Aptitude Test of 797.
The same year, black freshmen at
UNC's predominantly black
schools had a mean total SAT
score of 645.
The highest possible score on
the college entrance exam is l,o00.
Richmond said the black com-
munity could remedy the prob-
lem of abandonment bv sending
its money, support and children
to predominantly black cam-
puses
Thompson expressed concern
about how new emphasis on
"institutional accountability and
effectiveness" by accrediting as-
sociations would affect black
schools.
These are the trick words that
will probably close 15 historically
black institutions in the country in
the next year he said.
Thompson criticized the federal
government for its "rhetoric as
opposed to real action' on ini
tiatives to help black schools, the
government steers the plans to
some $9,000-a-year bureaucrat
with no pencils, paper, who can't
even make a long-distance phone
call Thompson said.
Other chancellors said linger-
ing racist attitudes also hurt black
campuses.
Lyons criticized public schools
for what he called "an unaccept-
able notion that the (black) kids
are inferior and can't cut it As a
result, he said, 60 percent of black
students are "tracked" into
classes that don't prepare them
for college-level work.
Those comments echoed re-
marks made less than two weeks
ago by UNC system Vice Presi-
dent Lyoyd V. "Vic" Hackley,
who criticized low standards for
black students.
Lyons said blacks had lost
many gains made in the 1960s and
cited "reverse discrimination"
lawsuits filed by whites, scarce
scholarship money for black stu-
dents and lagging affirmative
action programs.
He suggested, however, that
such trends were drawing black
students to historically black
schools.
"Blacks have left white colleges
where they were not successful
Lyons said, "and are not coming
cack to the black colleges - espe-
cailly those who have played out
their athletic eligibilty
Jenkins agreed that black
schools were more able to "empa-
thize" with black students.
r�Mpi
u law . i
puMk Jti
lls I.
phi
HI UIK1, I StJ
Id tiu Ik u
IRS h� two new
Publication 920
P
ation 92!
AIDS moves to student bodies
Continued from page 3
ideal world the Department of
Education would have taken sub-
stantial responsibility for devel-
oping AIDS education policy, but
that support has been absent
Higlev reported only 75 stu-
dents have been diagnosed as
having AIDS-related illnesses
but added the disease' has a long
latency period, meaning others
may be infected and not know it.
At a Boston AIDS conference
last week, however, several doc-
tors claimed the risk of catching
the virus through heterosexual
contact is still relatively slight.
The chance of contracting AIDS
fcom,�.�inglc heterosexual con-
tact, reported Dr. James Goedert
of the National Cancer Institute,
may be less than 1 in a million.
But Goedert quickly added the
report encourages "a false s nst
of security and that ignoring
"safer sex" practices can be fatal.
' Only" 4 percent of the re-
ported AIDS cases in the U.S.
were transmitted through hetero-
sexual contact, and half the
heterosexual victims were born in
Africa or Haiti, where � because
venereal diseases and conse-
quently open sores in the genital
area are more common � AIDS
seems to be passed more readily
between men and women. Dr.
loffrev Harris of the Massachu-
setts Institute oi Technology said.
Ninety percent of the reported
AJ.PS cases in the Uii. have in-
volved homosexual or bisexual
men or drug users who shared
dirtv needles. Harris said.
CLIFFS
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington H.ghway (N.C 33 Ext Greenville. North Carolina
Phone 752-3172
. Mon. thru Thurs. Night
Popcorn
Shrimp
$3.45
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center Is Open
Mon Tues, & Wed. Fri. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
9 a.m. - 2 p.m. & by appointment
For an appointment or more infor
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline,
757-0003
11 1 East Third Street - The Lee Building
Greenville, N. C.
Free Pregnancy Test-
Confidcntial Counseling
Hillcrest Lanes
Memorial Drive 756-2020
FREE
GAME
" BowfOne Game"& Receive
Another Game FREE With
This Coupon.
Limit 1 Coupon Per Person.
1
I
I
I
I
J
U�0iL
- H� W.t. ttr of if- tw,
WE BUILT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
SAV-ACENTER
Funk & Wagnalls
FAMILY MEDICAL GUIDE
Original!) publishedas SYMPTOMS
helps tin medk alh mil itoiedd kjik s
do b lookniy up its swnpi � � - ' � �
FOOD MARKETS
freshest wjy to Save
13 Crisco
Shortening
Duke's
Mayonnaise
78
Orange
Juice
CAMPS
Tomato
Soup
M0 SS� Rib
v -� Roast
Hl4 Eight viqq Liiili Ice
- O'Clock T - Milk
18
99
� GQ Rump
r" Roast
A&P Vegetables 3
Applesauce 3
Corn Chips
Tortilla Chips
1.00 Cheez-lt Crackers 1.69 Klondike Bars
1.00 Biscuits
. �
99 Sour Cream
W LARGE �MEI "
99- Ultra Diapers
59- Pet Ritz Pies
BIRD- � �
99- Cob Corn
7.69 Orange Juice
m Fryer 29
Breasts I
2.39 Butter Bastea Turkeys 79

1.49 Steak Pan ies 1.69
1.89 Turkey Ham 1.59
� � �
79' Sirloin Steaks 2.99
Coors
Light Beer
49
I
6 12 oz. can ctn.
WASHINGTON STATE
RED OR GOLDEN
Delicious
Apples
NCALIFORNIA GROWN
BULK RED OR
Natural
Pistachios
CALIFORNIA
jUxffjM COCA- Large Cucumbers 4 99c Firm Carrots
COLA
$109
'8 TO 20 LB AVG
Large Pumpkins
.OCAUVGROvV.
1.99 Collard Greens
1
rRISPv CALIFORNIA NORTH CAROLiNA A
Green Leaf Lettuce 69c Sweet Potatoes
SELECT PREMIUM
Diet Dr Pepper
(j 12 " i an i in
99 � Cherry Tomatoes -� 99c Yellow Onions
Money
Orders
25
SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
;ST0PP&Q
5? Sandwich
Bread
Linut One Pe� Shoppe With An Add I $10 Of Mce Purer Coupon Eupmjs Oct IT, 1987
SEE STORE FOR DETAILS
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open 24 Hours-Open Mon. 7 a.m Closed Sat. 11 p.m Open Sun. 7 a.m11 p.m.
PRICES EFFECTIVE OCT 11 THRU OCT 17 1987 QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
.2
JMhiiiiAai1 Aifc-
A
I
. . 4





6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 13.
1987
Classifieds
'HI I V . A, fc
HELP WANTED
WANTED: Very Patient Tutor For
Chemistry 1120 Call 355-4697.
DJ'S MUSIC LOVERS: We re look.ng
for honest, dependable, outgoing, intelli-
gent people for sales positions and DJ
work ant East Coast Music and Video
Applications Available at Apple Rec
ords, 204 East Fifth St; 758-1427
TRAVEL FIELD OPPORTUNITY: Cain
valuable marketing experience while
earning money Campus representatives
needed immediately for Spring Break
trips to Florida Call campus Marketing at
1-800-282-6221
MAKE QUICK MONEY! Earn $25 to $50
per car buying customer sent to me Call
I lerb for details 355-5099
BRODYS FOR MEN has full-time sales
associates positions, for enthusiastic,
fashion forward individuals. Retail cloth
ing experience is required Better than
average starting salary Apply m person,
Brody's Personnel Director, Carolina
East Mall M-W, 2-4 p.m.
BRODY'S has part-time sales associates
positions for enthusiastic, outgoing indi
viduals who enjoy working with young
contemporary Junior fashions Good Sal
ary. Apply in person, Brody's Personnel
Director, Carolina East MjII M-W, 2-4
p.m.
WANTED Male Models. Interviews will
he on Saturday, October 24th from 2-5
p.m and Monday, October 26th from 5-9
p.m at the Belk's Training Room, Caro-
lina East Mall. No previous experience
necessary
CAMPUS TRAVEL REPRESENTA-
TIVE needed to promote Spring Break
tour to Florida Earn money, fiee travel,
and outstanding marketing experience.
Call Inter Campus Programs 1-800-433-
7747.
BRODY'S. A leading clothing retailer
needs a full-time otfice associate to work
Mon Fri. 9-6. Individual must be accu-
rate and possess skills in accounting
bookkeeping Salary based on cxpen
cnee Good salary and benefits package
Apply in person or call for interview
appointment. Judith C Simon. Brody's
Personnel Director M-W 2-4 pm 756-
2224
GREENHOUSE TECHNICIANS
NEEDED for part tune employment
Flexible hours Weekends and after
school. Call 756-0879.
Jjflft SALE
Never raced I lelmet and gloves available
20 hours riding time Excellent condition
Motorcycle trailer also available. $1900
Call 355-7812. After 6 p.m or leave mes
sage
MOPED MANIA Its the only way to
travel Tired of waiting 20 minutes for a
parking spot? Tired of riding to class clean
and getting there a SWEAT-1 IOC? I've got
three mopeds CHEAP! Also two bikes!
Call Andy 758-3941
BUY EEL SKIN ACCESSORIES at whole
sale prices. Wallets, checkbook covers, key
chains, pocket books, belts, and any other
Eel products Don't hesitate to call David
Dupree at 752-4589.
TIRED OF PAYING HIGH PRICES AT
THE JEWERLY STORE? Well Stop Buy
14k Gold at wholesale prices. Gold brace
lets, necklaces, rings and precious gems
Styles like I lernngbone, rope, and nugget
Call David Dupree Wholesale Gold Dealer
at 752-4589.
NEED SUNGLASSES? Buy the best made
Rav Bans at wholesale prices. Call David
Dupree at 752-4589.
NEW 10-SPEED 27 $75.00 Call Keith at
758-2300until530;752 2830after6:00p.m.
FOR SALE: Dressers, Sofa, Tables and
Chairs plus much more 810 Dickinson
Ave. 830- 5288.
SURPLUS CARS sell for $155 (average)!
Also jeeps, trucks, etc Now Available in
Your Area Information 805-687-6000 Est
S-1166.
IS IT TRUE you can Buy Jeeps for $44
through the U.S. government? Get the facts
today'Call 1-312 742-1142 Ext 5271-A.
TYPING: Term papers, Resumes, Thesis,
etc. Cheap Rates (on xerox word proces-
sor). Call Becky 8:30 to 5:00 p.m 758-1161
after 5:00 pm 752-1321.
FOR SALE: Freezer and Refrigerator,
dryer and range $100 each. Good condi
tion and guaranteed Call 7462446.
FOR SALE: Discount prices dance and Ex
erase wear Visit our Body boutique at
Total Eclipse- 422 Arlington Blvd. 355-
3531.
PROFESSIONAL BUT NOT
EXPENSIVE! Progessive Data Services
offers professional word processing to
students and professionals Term pa
pers, dissertations, themes, reports and
much more as low as $1 75 per page.
(Please call for quote on your project.)
Price includes printing on high quality
bond paper and spelling verification
against a 50,000 word electronic diction-
ary. Ask about our special offers
COMING SOON - LASER PRINTING
SYSTEM Call Mark at 757-3440 after
7:00 p.m. for free information.
QUALITY OR LASER PRINTING
Rush jobs accepted 752-1933.
ELECTROLYSIS (permanent removal
of unwanted hair) Bv Barbara Venters,
People who understand electrolysis
Will not wax, tweee or use electronic
tweezer or any other temporary
method. Isn't it time to try the perma
nent method Call 830-0962 for free
consultation.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services We also sell
software and computer diskettes 24
hours in and out Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106
East 5th Street (Beside Cubbies)
Greenville, N.C. 752 3694.
PICK UP AND DELIVERY of term
papers, theses, resumes, to be typed.
IBM word pnx-essing by professional
with 13 years experience. Letter quality
print and professional editing. Call
Nanette in Gnfton at 1 524 5241 Cheap
call the best service!
2446 or 753 2878
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Immaculate
C ondition a block from downtown and
campus Sycamore I lit) Apts No 17 Call
Scott Patterson In Goldsboro (735 8376)
or Stephen I lorne (758 433.3)
1 BEDROOM APARTMENT: upstairs
apartment available October 1 3 blocks
from campus All utilities paid $250 per
month Lease and Deposit required 758-
1274 after 5:00 pm.
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apartments for
rent furnished contact Hollie Si
monownh 752 2865.
PERSONALS
FOR RENT
1986 HONDA CR250R DIRT BIKE. WORD PROCESSINCLETTER
SPEND FALL BREAK OR ANY UP-
COMING WEEKEND IN ATLANTIC
BEACH! Nice beach house for rent,
central heat and air, good location,
sleeps six Call Stephanie 757-656? or
evenings 75v7H46
ROOM AVAILABLE for female, near
Campus, work exchange Call 757 1798
WANTED: Roommate or roommates
wanted to share 2 bedroom apartment
at Tar River Estate 90 furnished Call
752-3032
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Very nice 2 Kir 112 bath townhousc.
rent $157 50; 1 2 utilities, 1 5 miles from
campus; nice neighborhood, private
yard; pool; dishwasher; microwave
757-0316
AVAILABLE NOW. Two Bedroom Fur
nishcd loat. Air & Water included. Call
Sharon at 355-5706 or Julie at 758-1507.
WF WANTED to share 2 BR apartment
at Tar River Estates Pay 1 3 uhlities. Will
have own private room Call Karen or
1 isa at 758 0700.
ROOMMATE WANTED Rent $120,13
utilities 830-0067 after 930 p.m.
ROOM FOR RENT: Beginning this
spring semester SI 35 a month Great loca
tion to campus. Full house privileges
Call today at 757-3027.
HOUSE FOR RENT: 3. Bedroom, 1 12
bath , 2 porches, Peacan Tree arid Utility
Houses, nice vard 15 min. from
Greenville 5100 Pep. C00 monthly. 746-
AZD STRANGER DATES: The night
started early next door but little did we
know there would be A LOT more The
bus did not show but many taxi's did go
The Kappa Sigs looked good in coat and
tie while the Phi Taus hung from the
rafters high. Lambda Chi Uncle Berny
brought his girl flowers and boy those
TKE's partied for hours Thanks to Chris
I lolland the night was great, even though
the KA's lost their bucks in the lake The
1'ika's raged on our dance floor and from
the rest of the guys you couldn't ask
anymore. The Sig Eps did cart wheels to
Wilson Acres that night, Amanda lost her
contact and trom then on had no sight. We
wanted to go home and hit the sac But it
wa CAMP CONTINUOUS. There was
no way back We love you guys the
AZD's '
AZD's, KA's and LAMBDA CHI's:
Don't forget Thursday is coming upsoon'
lie ready to party! Love, the Sigmas
AZD's, KAPPA SIG's, AND BETA'S:
The party Thursday was definitely one to
remember But of course alter a mpht like
that it s hard to remember anything' Let's
do it aj- nn soon Love, the Sigmas.
TKE's: Thanks for such a gTeat social!
"I leaven or I Icll" was definitely a blast
Can't wait to do it again Love, the Sig-
mas
KAREN COPE: Congradulations on
your new position as Jr. Panhellenic
Treasurer Love, the sisters of Delta Zeta
C EDWARDS � Eye contact's been fun,
but when do we meet Someone who's
"Tnppin"
JAMES AND MAURICE: When are we
going to Hawaii? Thanks for throwing
Beth's birthday party! It was a blast! We'll
have to do it again sometime. Love, the
DZ's
DELTA SIGS: The fun began before
sunrise - the fountain flowed freely much
to our surprise. All dressed up- you guys
looked great! When we party with the
MtaSigs, it's always first rate. Rockaero-
bics was definitely a smash - can't wait till
our next champagne bash' Much to our
dismay many of us missed our classes
that was from too many refills of our
champagne glasses (BOTTLES). Thanks
once again - You guys are great! Love, the
Zeta's.
THE SISTERS OF ZETA TAU ALPHA
ARE PROUD TO WELCOME: Nancy
Crabtree, Sandra Davis, Robin Duffy,
Barb Froio, Kim Geinly, Debra Hcrron,
Sara Home, Kelly Jones, Sarah Lanier,
Mandy Marlowe, Donna Matthews,
Maureen Mel lugh, Angela Powell, Paula
Rourke, Angie Strickland, Michelle
Weaver, Reba White, Shen Willauer, and
Staci Williamson into our Delta Pledge
Class! We are looking forward to a
GREAT semester with you We love you'
The sisters of ZTA
JODI YANKOWSKI HAPPY 2lst
BIRT1IDAY Don't get too wild I lave
fun in that Motel in San Antonio! Love
H.S.&E
TO THE NEW TRUE BLUE" ADPi SIS-
TERS Kristi Barr, Lisa Johnson, and
Angle South We waited and waited
FINALLY We love you The ADP. sis
ters
M.E.AND K, Beach was a blast. E T says
too bad M E had to phone home last
weekend Say K I lickee says to chill the
teeth just a little. Keep a knock in
ME your I lero still knows . Ewic and
Hero misses ya'Il
INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN FEL-
LOWSHIP Please Join Us Wednesday
nights at 7 00 p.m. Speight 129 Fun i ood
Fellowship-Teaching.
ATTENTION: Don't forget Alpha Xi
Delta's Happy hour every Wednesday
night at Pantana's It's the Best excuse for
missing Thursday's classes
RIDE NEEDED to Charleston S.C Of
nearby for Fall Break will help with gas
Call Teresa at 758-8615
ALL CREEKS come Par TEA with us
every Friday at the Sheraton Lounge 52
Long Island Ice Teas I iigh Enerpv Ri t
n Roll music
KAPPA SIG's thanks for making our
Tea Party such a great success Bettor see
you here every Friday at "OFF DIE
CUFF
CHI OMECA's: To our honararv hora
ton Lil sisters. Thanks for raging at the
East Carolina Tea Parry Come see us
every Friday for $2 Long Island Ice Teas
CONGRATULATIONS To Barb Froio,
Mandy Marlowe and Angle Strickland
the new pledge dass officers of Zeta Tau
Alpha. The sisters and your fellow Pledge
sisters wish you the best of luck in making
yourpledge class the best on campus Get
ready to JAM Love the Sisters and
Hedges of ZTA
CONGRATULATIONS: To the new sis
ters of Zeta Tau Alpha Jayme Ferguson.
Marcia Furamti, and Kim McKee We are
so proud of you Love, the sisters and
pledges of ZTA.
TO THE GIRLS WITH THE LUST FOR
SUITE 415 SCOTT We saw your ad and
we want you bad The guv in the sarocci.
will really rock you If you want a fling
ding, I'll lose my G string Ed who makes
you red has the water bed If you really
want to see my moves, I'll lose more than
just my shoes, and the guy with the eyes
can't wait to see between your thighs
Now that you know how we feel, let's
make a deal I lere's youi chance to dance
in our pants
ITS 19 TIME AND WE'VE ALWAYS
BEEN TRUE but not today we're
telbng all on you It started with lawman
who caught your eye he waved with hi
whole arm as you walked by Now listen
girl just change your tone, cause we al!
know who's that squiiTel really turns him
on A sad bus ride from Md without Pam
soon became bright, as you spotted the
runner with rolled up jams But the for
mal in Fla with the faithful Sigma Nu
wasn't quite as much fun as the night
before you flew The Tavern floor would
never be the same - those Teqtulla shot
aren't you ashamed7 Now the summer is
over you two-timer you, it's speech time
now so find someone new' Be mad i
cause a fuss cause you know you realK
love us'Happy lth LiC. intLaU Youi
Girls
HEYCLTIE There's fust a few last thins
that I wanted to sav vou are the best
thing that ever happened to me and
you re one hell of a special guv 111 miss
you thanks tor all of the wonderful
memories I'll never forget vou and I will
always love vou' Shan PS If you ever
need anyone
DEI TA irA: tonight! Don t miss it!
Fhc infamous Delta Zeta all u c.v.t .
spaghetti dinner Tickets are S3 Time - �
7 00 at the Delta Zeta I louse Be there or
be square!
PI KAPPA PHI: Alright guys, let s get
ready for a (ammen party t,dav with
ECU'S hottest new band 180 proot
SIG EPS - The cow is dead, the cookies
are .rushed, and after Sun Morning
we're all Dain Bramaged
PI KAPPA PHI: Great homecoming
weekend gus The formal was great I
hate to rape you bu Rusty but where 1
your date' 1 think Rick needs to drop out
of school and be a Solid Gold Dancer'
IS YOUR CAR DIRTY? Come to KA
little sister car wash at 1 lardcos on Cotan-
cheSt Oct 13,2 00-5.00
THE TEQUILA IS CHEAP - so is your
date. Crrvc to Sta Ep hoepv. hour -t.
Tequila bar Wfd ni�tt
Announcements
MQDELSNEED�D
Models tor figure drawing classes are
needed. It interested call Tiran Gordly
757-6259 or leave a message at 757-656.T
What do the 33,000 freshmen enrolled
in Army ROTC last year know that you
don't7 The Army Reserve Officers' Train-
ing Corps For more information about
the ECU Army Reserve Officers' Training
Corps Program, call Capt. Alvin J. Mitch-
ell at 757-6967 or 6974, or drop by Erwin
I toll, room 319.
AMBASSADORS
The Executive Council of the Ambassa-
dors will meet Wed , Oct. Hat 5:15pm in
Mcndcnhall.
AIR FORCE
Scholarships available Find out if you
qualify. Take the Air Force Officer Quali
fying Test on 22 Oct. (Thurs.) at 1 p m
Great job opportunities with salaries to
match. For more info stop by Wright
Annex, third floor, and speak with Capt
1 louston or call 757 6597
CQLLFJ
College Democrats meet every Wed at
4:00 in Mendenhall Upcoming events
within the state, organization, as well as
other events of particular interest are
among the topics presently being dis-
cussed. Anyone wishing to work for a
Democratic candidate for public office at
all levels are encouraged to attend For
more info, contact Melissa at 752-5611.
FREE LESSONS
The ECU Karate dub is offering FREE
beginning Karate Lessons Thurs Oct. 15
at 8:00 p.m. in Memorial Gym (dance
room downstairs) Karate lessons taught
under direction of Bill McDonald, 7th
Degree Black Belt.
NICARAGUA
Peter Kemmerle, who lived in the Nica
raguan war zones for 2 12 years will
speak tonight, Tues Oct. 13 at the Baptist
Student Center, 10th St a block east of
Wendy's, at 7:30 p.m.
GAJV1MABETAEHI
Gamma Beta Phi members may pick up
tickets for the raffle from Dr Dunlop,
Br wstcr A 317 Deadline for tickets is the
Nov. 7 meeting at 7:00 p.m Jenkins
Auditorium.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi is holding a raffle to
help raise money for travel expenses to
National Convention Prizes include: (1st)
prize SI00 gift certificate to Belk's; (2nd)
prize $75 gift certificate to Overton's
Sporting Goods; and (3rd) prize $50 gift
certificate to Record Bar. Tickets are 50
cents each and may be picked up in
Brewster A-317 or from any GBP member.
GOSPEL CHOIR
The ECU Gospel Choir is holding a
"Fall Fashion Show" on Oct. 13 at 9:00 in
Jenkins Auditorium. Admission is only
SI.
CTA
Clothing & Textiles meeting on Oct.
Appreciation bonds offered to
help with tuition payments
GREENSBORO (AP) � For the
first time Tuesday, North Caro-
lina will offer tax-free capital
appreciation bonds in denomina-
tions as low as $1,000 � bonds
that state officials hope parents
will set aside for college tuition.
There will be plenty of sup-
ply deputy state treasurer J.D.
Foust says. "People should check
with their banks or who they buy
bonds from
In the past, the smallest de-
nomination of the bonds was
$5,000.
Last summer, the General As-
sembly approved a bill allowing
the state to sell the bonds in
smaller-than-normal denomina-
tions with the idea that families
could buy them to help pay for a
child's college education.
But the money isn't restricted to
college expenses.
"It can be used for any purpose
whatsoever Sen. Marshall
Rauch, D-Gaston, the bill's spon-
sor, told the Greensboro News &
Record.
"But the main reason for doing
this is higher education
The bonds will accrue interest
on a compound basis and pay off
only once, instead of creating in-
terest every six months as most
bonds do.
"That's a real good feature of
capital appreciation bonds said
Benny Bowers, a financial analyst
with the state treasurer's office.
"You don't have to worry about
spending the money. It's auto-
matically reinvested for you
The bonds will be issued with a
maturity date ranging from one to
20 years. The shorter the time to
maturity the more the bonds will
cost.
Although the exact cost of the
bonds will not be known until
today, Foust said a $1,000 bond
that matures in 15 years at 8 per-
cent interest would cost approxi-
mately $308. The same bond ma-
turing in 20 years would cost
about $208.
Appropriately enough, the first
bond sale to include the low-cost,
tax-free bonds will help finance
part of a $44.1 million construc-
tion and renovation project at
Duke University.
Among other things, the bonds
will finance part of the construc-
tion of a new dorm, renovation of
Old Chemistry on West Campus
and the expansion of the Bryan
Center.
Bowers said $600,000 of the is-
sue will be capital appreciation
bonds.
The pricing period of the bonds
will run from today through Oct.
28.
"After the 28th, people may not
be able to buy as many bonds as
quickly as they want and would
have to pay a commission Bow-
ers said.
Foust said his office has had a
lot of inquiries about the bonds,
but added that people have
shown an interest in buying them
for purposes other than educa-
tion.
"Right now we have not devel-
oped a market for these and can't
let underwriters sit there and hold
them until somebody comes
along and wants them Foust
said. "We gauge the amount we
issue on the market demand
Eventually, Foust said, "We
may need to have a reserve avail-
able at all times so people can buy
them like savings bonds
22nd in Old Joyner Auditorium (in the
library) room 221; 4 45 pm�refresh-
ments, 500 p m.�speaker. Speaker is
Russ P. Consaul, Mgr of Executive Re-
cruitment, Miller and Rhodes, who will be
speaking on "A Career in Retailing: It May
Be For You
NAVIGATORS
Join us this Thurs. night for FLIGHT
730! We meet in Biology 103 at 7:30 p.m.
for a time of fun, fellowship, and Bible
study. See you there!
DISCOVERING SPAIN
The Student Union Travel Committee
presents the opening traveladventure
film. Discovering Spain, on Thurs Oct.
15th in I lendrix Theatre at 8:00 p.m Tick-
ets for this film are limited, but are avail-
able at the Central Ticket Office, Menden-
hall, 757-6611, ext. 266.
FORUM COMMITTFF
The Student Union Forum Committee
will have a meeting Wed Oct. 14th in
room 248 Mendenhall. We will bediscuss-
ing upcoming lectures and debates and
encourage input from all student, faculty,
and staff.
LIBRARY SCIENCF. 1000
New classes will begin soon. Mon.
Wed. dasses start Oct. 14 and Tues.
Thurs. classes start Oct. 13. Attendance
will be taken first day of classes.
BACCHUS
BACCHUS will meet Thurs night, Oct.
15 at 7:30 in Mendenhall, room 242.
BUSINESS STUDFNTS
The American Marketing Association
is hosting a presentation on '1 ntema tional
Marketing" with an emphasis on the Chi
ncse Market. Presentation will be held at
3.00 p.m Oct. 15 (Thursin Raw! Brown-
ing Room. Chancellor Dr. Eakin will be
present and he looks forward to meeting
all of you.
MADRIGAL DINNERS
Tickets are now on sale for Madrigal
Dinners to be held Dec. 2-5 at 7:00 p.m. in
Mendenhall. Tickets are $10 for ECU stu-
dents and $16 for all others Contact Cen-
tral Ticket Office for more info. 757-6611,
ext. 266
DIVE CLUB
If you enjoy scuba diving and snorkel-
ing, then you need to join ECU's Coral
Reef Dive Qub For more info, call 752-
4399 and ask for Glenn or Rob.
ORCHESTRA
The Dept. of University Unions pres-
ents the TONKVENSTLER ORCHESTRA
OF VIENNA on Tues, Oct. 13th at 8:00
p.m. in Wright Auditorium For further
info contact the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall at 757-6611, ext 266
WYCLIFFFBANJQI1FT
Wycliffe Associates, the lay ministry of
Wycliffe Bible Translators, will soon be
hosting a banquet in this area to celebrate
twenty years of involving lay people in
missions. The banquet will begin at 7:00
p.m. on Oct. 20 at Sheraton, Greenville
Tickets to this important event are compli-
mentary, and an offering will be taken.
Tickets and information can be obtained
from Larry & Robin Bass by callinp "19)
830-1612. The evening will feature tne
sharing of exciting Firsthand experiences
from a Wycliffe missionary, a complimen-
tary dinner, audiovisual presentation.
Christian fellowship, and full details on
the many ways that lav people can be
come directly involved in Bible transla
tion.
EDUCATION MAJORS
The School of Education, in conjunction
with Campus Ministries, is sponsoring a
WorkStudy trip to Mexico dunngSpnng
Break (March 6-13, 1988) Opportunities
to observe and teach at a local school are
available A minimum level of "sun. : al"
Spanish is required For applications and
more info , contact the Office of the Dean
in Speight Bldg room 154
SPAN MEMBERS
The date for our Outward Bound
"Ropes Course" has been changed to
Sun, Oct. 25th. Fee is $10memhcr It
interested, you MUST attend the next
SPAN meeting�Wed, Oct 14th, 5 30
p.m in Brewster D-209 for briefing Foes
also must be paid at meeting
HANDICAPPED STUDENTS
A recruiter from the US. Dept of De-
fense will be on campus on Nov 18 to
interview you for summer or permanent
employment Please contact Caroline
Smith, Co-op office, 757 6979 for more
info.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
Would you bke to learn some issues
and get involved in helping with current
local elections' Then College Republicans
are for you Meetings are every Wed at 7
pm. in room 221 Mendenhall Reagan is
cool.
The following organizations are asked to place their ads in the "Classifieds" section of The East
Carolinian due to limited space in the "Announcements" section. The East Carolinian will be glad to run
announcements for these groups relating to verifiable fund raisers in which proceeds go to charitable
organizations, guest speakers, special educational events, meetings, etc
Alpha Delta Pi
Alpha Kappa Alpha
Alpha Omlcron Pi
Alpha Phi
Alpha Phi Alpha
Alpha Sigma Phi
Alpha Xi Delta
Beta Theta Pi
Chi Omega
Delta Sigma Pi
Delta Sigma Theta
Delta Zeta
Kappa Alpha
Kappa Alpha Pal
Kappa Sigma
Lambda Chi Alpha
Omega Pal Phi
Phi Beta Sigma
Phi Kappa Alpha
Pi Kappa Phi
Sigma Gamma Rho
Sigma Nu
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Sigma Sigma Sigma
Sigma Tau Gamma
Tau Kappa Epsilon
Theta Chi
Zeta Beta Tau
Zeta Tau Alpha
"The above also applies to social fraternities, sororities, or other organizations not included in this
list
TheFixxs
By ANDY LEWIS
Seiwi lditor
U I III till
tlu Si
ing c.
as ' (n. I
Thursday night with The Fixx
was like a night al any nightclub
� without the bar, crowds or
mixed dnnkv
The Fixx took the stage pi4 I I
up Ihe instruments and took off
on an hour and a halt show Bas
sist Danny Brown immediate!)
seemed to grab attention h
trying not to be noticed He stood m i uid ir
stage right and-Iront in bU ,
pants, suspenders, white shirt H
and tie without moving an
but the lingers over his r i
black bass
But Ihe bass thumped out over
trie crowd, shaking the I
everything
1 wondered it there was son
hidden meaning in this n
groomed, red bearded man
ButtheanbcsofCyCurnin
vocalist, soon got my attentii
the opening number
mals Curnin suprised me
playing a hollow-bodied rhvtl n
guitar line This was the first tin
' had ever seen him pi
although I couldn't really hear tl
PARENTI
By LAURASALAZAR
Sufi ntcr
Bouts with nausea swollen
ankles craving for macaroni
and cheese with salt and in
potato chips . pregnancy
'Carla V stor
By LAURA SALAZAR
SUM Wttamr
(The situation depicted is real,
but the name of the mother has
been changed to protect her ano-
nymity.)
imagine being an 18-year-old
rrwjghp of two. Car). doesn't
child when she was 15 and her
second child when she was 17.
According to Carla, being an
adolescent mother of two can bea
trying ordeal.
Prom a family of stepbrothers
and sisters, and a working
mother, according to Caria, it
wasn't difficult for her to take
care of her two children because
she was used to feeding and bath-
ing her many cousins
She is not married and each of
her children have different fa-
thers. Pregnant with her first
child, Carla continued her
schooling
said she wj
pregnant
Carla, she
always hi
ond period j
stomach
thei
nant
Her mot
dayabout i
ach in. Carl
take her ci
sideways. "J
asked Cadal
that she didi
After a
pregnancy,
happy, scar
Accepting
Car la's mot
daughter. As
said, "He ws
After thefii
Habrichs
By SUSANNE NIELSEN
V .� � Vntf r
As a professor oi environ-
mental design with the E I
School of Art Fn-t Habrichs
teaches bv supporting students
efforts and trving to get them
involved with his enthusiasm He
tries lo raise1 their awareness .i
interior architecture as important
and active part of every period's
outer facade
Habrichs taught en ironmental
design mother parts of the United
States in the past before returning
to his native Germany. There he
later came to the conclusion that
everything had become too limit-
ing
So he returned to America
seeking a position with ECU's
School of Art. The death ot his
mother last year made his ties lo
Germanv soem few, he said The
confirmed bachelor, Habrichs ha
found a new home in Greenville
as a full faculty member of the art
school.
Habrichs said he finds
Greenville to be a challenge in
every way. He is involved in
trying to enliven the downtown
walking mall. Along with the
head of the environmental design
department, Dr. Abdul-Shakoor
Farhadi, Habrichs encourages the
students' involvements in such
restoration projects.
The attempts are not so much
geared to bringing store fronts up
todate, but rather to make them fit
back into the period thev were
constructed in This makes for an
eclectic mainstreet picture � pos-
sibly a turn of the century shop
next to a 30s building with neon
and smooth curvalincar facade
ana a
centui
Architex
cio-economicl
ation ot the ll
into the rood
lution
important pal
ot furniture
tion at thai ti
He said
struggle tor
its parallels i
dav obhA im-
portant re i
design va
technique ot
hot steam
sturd) light-l
are stiil in prcj
Habrichs d
tion ot dei
Ho It man throi
of this centur
into the diiled
innovations ei
European cota
said proudly,
production ai
turetodaj It I
b Italv and
After an inM1
concentrated
design He
Wright and tl
Brothers as
early 20th a
explained tl
American evl
played by thJ
ingcompanief
Miller.
In concludj
cussed the f
,
wmwww mtmim wwi i��� � j ii i �
" ���.� � -�� fr fiin inu ii r iirtmamun
i





K vlt I MIONS lb ihe new -is
� inJK M Kei Wc arc
i . ihf -isiI s .md
Wl 1M 1IU I I SI KIR
i JW Vi �J Jnd
i. thji
Ul ! Vi W V VS
JW HUM
with his
i.ts
Ull US k( i INIAN
Style
IXIOHIK 13, 1987 Page 7
The Fixx show reviewed
B Am LEWIS
Sr�� Uunt
hursday night with The Fixx
s like a night at any nightclub
without the Kir. crouds or
i drinks
he 1 ixx took the stage puked
tl e instruments and took ott
in hour and a halt show. Has
: Danny Brown immediately.
mod to grab attention b
ing not to be noticed 1 le stood
ge i ight And front in black
its suspenders, white shirt
! tie without moving am thine
t the lingers over his small
k Kiss
Mil the bas thumped out over
i rowd shaking the tones into
i v thing
i ondci i d it there was s
ld� n meaning in this neatly
Kmed red bearded nun
Mit theantu -oi CyCurnin lead
i ahs soon got my attention In
opening number: "Wild V, :
v urnm suprised me by
a hollow bodied rhythm
ne This u as the ln-t lime
I i : seen him plav guitar,
gh i i ouldn t n ,i In at 11u�
notes he played
In other songs, however.
Cumin engaged the audience
with theatrical gestures And ex
pressions in one song he made
the shape ot a heart with his hands
over his chest and then broke
his hands apart. And while sing
ing tin- more familiar songs such
as "One Thing 1 eads to Another"
or "Are We Ourselves Cumin
would inject spoken comments
siu h as tin) much IV or "Is
there a future?"
While Cumin (sporting shoul-
der length hair I brought drama to
the apocalyptic andor didactic
lyrics, guitarist lamie West-Oram
banged out the I laircut 100guitar
licks in a loose purple shirt West
( ram often fingered a free
winged molodv over the some
� hat predk table keyboard lines
but to credit the synthesizer
work, Rupert Green wall manipu
lated his DX7, PPG and Emula
t t2 keyboards like a mastei
Green wall was always busy, flip
pmg his hands from one board to
another, changing floppy disk-
on the Emulator or doing a solo
The keyboards were the domi-
nant musical character of the
show, enveloping the songs with
grand chords or bizzare special
effects
In the midst of all this, drummer
Adam Woods tossed out a flaw-
less funky beat. Woods truly
seemed to be enjoying himself;
dressed casually in shorts and a
colorful shirt, he worked up a
sweat quickly, but continued
smiling.
I here were no suprises here.
Every song played was com-
pletely danceable, and the band
played all the old favorites ("Se-
cret Separation "Saved by
Zero").
And the new tunes (which
haven't been released on vinyl
vet) were not radical departures
from what we have all heard from
The Fixx; although one song,
Shake and Watch was a scary
sting about watching the world
Ix'ing destroyed by man.
Musical geniuses they are not.
Hut they are one of the few bands
th.it has managed to put some
moral sense into popular music.
Popnuisters the Fixx rmk the crowd at Minges ('oii.seurn Thursday night, the group Is touring in order to lest
new material for an upcoming I.p. (Photo by ECU Photolabl.
sill
. or
PARENTING helping adolescent moms cope
Kv t t Rs.M
vith nausea
siv. 'Men
lU II V.H It is c HI P
is vour
. : a)
TION M JORS
.11 MM RS
It
tl
V
IT! P STL in NTS
to
�nt
RJ PUBLICANS
in � u es
section of The last i
lion. The East arolinian will be glad to run
p n proceeds go to charitable
meetings, etc.
La Theta pi Kappa Phi
Sigma Gamma Rho
ha Sigma Nu
ha Psi Sigma Phi Epsilon
Lna Sigma Sigma Sigma
pi Alpha Sigma Tau Gamma
I Phi Tau Kappa Epsilon
lgma Theta Chi
Alpha Zeta Beta Tau
Zeta Tau Alpha
lororities, or other organizations not included in this
me oi Mies ven un ps year old?
ptoms �losl adults Where tail adolescent parents
in cope with the trials and tribu turn when they need help1 One
craving tor macaroni lations ot being pregnant But choice is Project PARENTING
. with salt and vinegar what happens when the mother is (Proactive Assessment and Regu-
�� chips pregnancy van a ten year old and the father is a lation of Environmental Nurtur
CarlaV story is familiar tale
By LAUKA SALAZAR
Suff Writer
(The situation depicted is real,
but the name of the mother has
been changed to protect her ano-
nymity.)
Imagine being an 18-year-old
mother of two. Carla doesn't
schooling at D.H. Connelly. She
said she wasn't sure if she was
pregnant at first. According to
Carla, she slept a lot and was
always hungry during her sec-
ond period class. Carla said, "My
stomach would always growl at
the same time everyday when I
nafl Turn's
child when she was 15 and her
second child when she was 17.
According to Carla, being an
adolescent mother of two can be a
trying ordeal.
birth control pills, but then she
saidI just stopped taking them
and got pregnant again. I
thought, here we go again
According to Carla, her first
labor lasted 18 12 hours,
whereas her second labor lasted
only eight hours. But for a mother
dnfWktTfSg
fg-
ld�
nant.
Her mother questioned her one
day about why she held her stom-
ach in. Carla's mother told her to
take her clothes off and stand
From a family of stepbrothers sideways. "Are you pregnant?"
and sisters, and a working asked Carla's mother. Carla said
mother, according to Carla, it that she didn't know,
wasn't difficult for her to take After a test confirmed Carla's
care of her two children because pregnancy, she said she felt
she was used to feeding and bath- happy, scared and relieved,
ing her many cousins. Accepting the pregnancy.
She is not married and each of Carla's mother supported her adolescents, Carla says, "I wifl
her children have different fa- daughter. As for the father, Carla tell them that if they are thinkinp
fibers. Pregnant with her first said, "He wasn't around much of doing anything, to please come
child, Carla continued her Afterthe first child, Carla was on to me and we'll take care of it
can toe physically as well as men-
tally grueling. Although at the
age of 18 she has two children,
Carla said, "1 love children and I
love taking care of my children'
When Carla attends Agnes
Fullilove, her children are at the
day care center at the school. In
the evenings, the children are
looked after by Carla and her
mother.
As to ad vice she would give her
children when they are youi
Habrichs gives lecture
BySUSANNE MM SEN
s a professor of environ
ii design with the E( I
�ol ol Art Ernsl Hahnchs
hes bv supporting students'
fforts and trv ing to get them
ed with his enthusiasm. I le
s to raise their awareness of
rior an hitccture .is important
: i live part of every period's
r facade
ibrichs taught environmental
ign in other parts of the I Inited
5 in the past before returning
i his native Germany. There he
it r came to the conclusion that
. cry thing had become too limit
So he returned lo America
� ring .i position with IX I s
hool of Art The death ot his
mother last year made his ties to
lermany seem few, he said. The
infirmed bachelor, I labrichs has
lund a new home in Greenville
a tull faculty member of the arl
- hool
i labric hs said he finds
Ireenville lo be a challenge in
� trv way. He is involved in
trying to enliven the downtown
ilking mall Along with the
ead oi the environmental design
lepartment, Dr. Abdul-Shakoor
irhadi, I labrichs encourages the
tudents' involvements in such
restoration projects.
I lit attempts are not so much
ared to bringing store fronts up
' i date, but rather to make them fit
back into the period thev were
instructed in. This makes for an
eclectic mainstrcet picture � pos-
sibly a turn of the century shop
next to a 30s building with neon
'ind smooth curvalinear facade
and a bi iv k building from the lsth
century
List week, Habrichs lectured
on "Industrial Evolution in De-
sign oi Furniture Related to
An hitet lure
Habrichs characterized the SO-
cio economical and political situ
ation of the 1 (th century leading
into the roots of the industrial
revolution, w Inch to him plays an
important part in the revolution
of furniture design and fabrica-
tion at that time.
He said the 19th century
struggle lor more freedom finds
its parallels in the design of every
dav objects One of the most im-
portant revolutions in furniture
design was brought about the
technique of bending wood over
hot steam and manufacturing
sturdv, light-weight chairs that
are still in production today.
1 labrichs described the evolu-
tion of ciesign from Joseph
I loffman through the 70s and 80s
of this century. He gave insight
into the different tendencies and
innovations of design in various
European countries. Germany, he
said proudly, is number one in the
production and export of furni-
ture today It is followed directly
bv Italy and Denmark.
After an intermission, Habrichs
concentrated on U.S. furniture
design. He named Frank Loyd
Wright and the Green and Green
Brothers as major influences in
early 20th century design. He
explained the major role in the
American evolution of design
played by the large manufactur-
ing companies Knoll and Herman
Miller.
In concluding, Habrichs dis-
cussed the future of furniture
design. He said the Bauhaus
school, with its large impact on
20th century design, fulfilled an
necessary function moving de-
signs away from stuffy manner-
ism. But, he said, "modernity is
not a style of art -being up to date,
being new is what it is
In January, Habrichs will lec-
ture on the future needs of envi-
ronmental design.
ing and leaching interventions
for Normal Growth). Project
PARENTING is an educational
program that teaches parenting
skills to adolescent mothers in Pitt
County seh(Kls.
According to Taylor, PARENT-
ING began July 1986 as a result of
a proposal submitted through the
ECU School of Education to the
Children's Trust Fund. The
( hildren's Trust Fund s a divi-
sion of the North Carolina De-
partment ol Public Instruction.
rhe proposal was accepted, and
funding was provided by the
United Way and the Children's
Trust Fund. Additional funding
was provided by ECU'sSchool of
Education, the Caswell Center, a
state-supported institution in
Kinston tor the mentally retarded,
and the Pitt County schools.
In addition to Taylor, the pro-
gram employs, a social worker,
Cynthia Doctor. She is housed in
the Pitt County schools.
Taylor said the goals of project
PARENTING include: improving
parenting skills, increasing
knowledge of child development,
assisting the parent in meeting
health care needs oi children,
building self-esteem of parents
and children and planning for the
future.
Twenty mothers and twenty-
five children are presently on
project PARENTING'S caseload.
All ot the mothers .m stud nt at
llil,
Iv
Agne � r-uuiic
Greenville.
According to Taylor, Agnes
Fullilove School houses children
that are "high risk students She
said, "Most of the students at
Agnes Fullilove have either had a
bnish with the law, are adolescent
mothers or ust chose to go to
Fullilove The school is a public
school and is part of the Pitt
Count) school sv stem.
Agnes Fullilove schcxil has a
state-licensed day care center. It
the student qualifies for a subsi-
dized day care slot, the day care
services are free, otherwise, a
nominal tee is charged
One way an adolescent mother
can get involved with PARENT
ING is through a guidance coun-
selor. Taylor said the counselor
would inform the girl's family,
and from there PARENTING
begins to prov ide support until
the baby is born. After the birth,
PARENTING works with the
mother on self-esteem and other
goals oi the program
Taylor said, "Children ot
adolescent mothers do poorly
when they get to school. There
fore, we work with the mother
and child from the birth of the
child until age three She added
"It is believed that the age of the
mother is directionally propor
tionate to the quality of parenting
Tonkeunstler orchestra plays
The Tonkeunstler Orchestra
will play at Wright Auditorium
tonight at 8 p.m. This is a stop on
the orchestra's third American
tour.
The band is known for its
waltzes and polkas. They have
toured extensively throughout
Europe and Japan.
The band is conducted by
Alfred Esch we, noted forhis work
with the Strauss Orchestra in
Barcelona.
Other members of this famed
cast oi players include soprano
Gail Dobish and violin ptaye
Manfred Gevrhalter.
Dobish has soloed with the
Milwaukee Symphony and the
Opera Orchestra of New York
Geyrhalter has plavcd at
numerous musical festivals in
Europe.
Tickets mav be purchased at the
Central Ticket office in Mendehal
Student Center.
'Discover Spain' with film
that the child receives
All the mothers in the program
are not married and there is little
involvement from the fathers.
Taylor said that a lot oi the moth-
ers are from foster homes.
Project PARENTING directs
mothers to either the Greenville
Health Department of the ECU
Medical School tor pre natal and
follow-up visits. Birth control
counseling and education about
AIDS and sexuallv transmitted
diseases is begun immediately
following the birth of the babv.
According to Taylor, "The
PARENTING program is pretty
unique because it has three gen-
erations at once, the adolescent's
mother, the adolescent mother,
and the adolescent's child"
situation Robertson, an occupa-
tional therapy maior added, "I
was impressed with the dav care
at Agnes Fullilove The children
need to develop nght and to de-
velop right, they need a setting
like this According to
Robertson, it was Delta Sigma
Theta's vice president, Stephanie
Canty, who formulated the sup-
port group idea.
Working with adolescent moth-
ers takes a great deal oi time and
patience. When asked whv she
works with project PARENTING,
Taylor said, I have a real interest
with adolescents and a lot oi my
students got pregnant
Taylor reiterated that PAR-
ENTING is important because it
builds a support svstcm for the
mother and child as well as target-
ing their strengths and weak-
nesses
Delta Sigma Theta, an ECU so-
rority, has begun a program with
the mothers of PARENTING. The
fourteen women of the sorority
function as big sisters to the
mothers.
Kristin Robertson, Delta Sigma
Theta treasurer said, "We want to
let the mothers know that there
are people who care about their
Mrndrnhall Pm Mrlcur
Film maker Willis Butler with
his film, "Discovering Spain
will open the 1987-1988 EastCaro-
lina University Travel-Ad venture
Film Series on October 15, in
Hcndrix Theatre at 8 p.m. The
Travel-Adventure Film Series is
sponsored by the Student Union
Travel Committee.
In addition to producing lecture
films, Butler was commissioned
by NBC to produce a series of
television films in Africa and ra-
dio features in Europe. He has
produced two motion picturcson
missionary work in Africa for the
United Presbvterian Church of
J
America. Butler has also been
making professional motion pic-
tures used in classrooms across
the country.
While Butler is an expert photo-
graphic craftsman, years of
broadcasting experience have
also made him an outstanding
speaker and reporter. He displays
an unusual ability to penetrate
beneath the surface of his subjects,
bringing exciting new perspec-
tives in entertaining and informa-
tive programs.
In "Discovering Spain Butler
travels through Madrid's Retiro
Park, Prado Museum, and the
Royal Palace. Visit Avila, Spain's
highest provincial ccapital. Go
from the tranquil elegance of
Seville's cathedral, where Chris-
topher Columbus is buried, to the
festivities of Alicante's midnight
parade and spectacular bonfires
in honor of St. John.
Experience throuygh Butler's
expert camera work, Santiago de
Compostela, one of the three ma-
jor pilgrimage destinations in the
Christian world. Other sites in-
clude Barcelona, the cosmopoli-
tan port city on the Mediterra-
nean, and many other areas of
historical, cultural, and religious
significance in Spain.
Tickets for this exciting journey
to Spain can be purchased at the
Central Ticket Office located in
Mendenhall Student Center,
Monday-Friday, 11 a.m6 p.m.
Ticket prices are $4.00 for general
admission, $3.50 each for a group
oi 20 or more, and ECU students
are admitted free with their ID
and valid activity sticker.
For tickets and more informa-
tion call 757-6611, ext. 266, during
the above hours.
A farmer surveys the countryside in 'Discovering Spain a documentary
by Willis Butler, showing Thursday in Hendrix theater at S p.m
� .� �
1 �W
I 1





CONCRATUl fcTIONS To the new ms
tersol u l.m Mpha lavme Ferguson
Maraa Furanih jikI Kim MoK.iv We are
so proud ot von1 Love the sisters and
eso(
ri mi �ikisVMIM IIO 1 IS I FOR
SL 11141SCon o mw voui ad and
pn in tru- scirocco t vu want a time
. Niini; i d who makes
. IfcMtC- d II vou realty
mo e1 1! lose more than
� gu with the ovos
v bet�ivn voui thighs
kflOVthu we fed let's pui chan t. dance
IT'S 11 ! IMIsnWE'Vl i w s
Bl IS1KI 1�f t.i.i we're i" mith lawman . n. .i with hi � � Nom listen ton i-juv wo all � l turns him nMd withoutPam tied the : the i - � I Nu i tru- night .norn floor would - lequtlla shots sioi� tho summer is � speech time fv mad or wyou roallv
srant La I our .v .) iu is.t things VOU aro Ih host ened 1 -� and wonderful ffgetyouandl will ' vou ever
imeSOO
there or
get
mi riQLU A IS CIUA.P - so is your
- ���- r Sis : p haepi ha at
�ip and tull details on
nat Ijv poop'1' can rv
il transia
I Dl CATION MAJORS
si' AN 11MBIRS
to
!f !t
next
HANDICAPPED STlHI NTS
Is tO
anent
olin
more
COLLEGE REPUBLICAN'S
n'arr srr. issues
rrent
l � . 4Jeg � .ins
ngs are ever) vVed at 7
Mendonhall Reagan is
thetr ads in the "Classifieds" section of The Fast
ents" section. The EastCarolinian will beglad to run
ible fund raisers in which proceeds go to charitable
?vents, meetings, etc.
la ThetaPI Kappa Phi
Sigma Gamma Rho
haSigma Nu
ha PslSigma Phi Epsilon
maSigma Sigma Sigma
hi AlphaSigma Tau Gamma
I PhiTau Kappa Epsilon
�igmaTheta Chi
AlphaZeta Beta Tau
Zeta Tau Alpha
)rorities, or other organizations not included in this
'�It l ASI l AROI INIAN
Style
OCTOBER 13. 1987 I'age 7
The Fixx show reviewed
By ANDY LEWIS
V-ewn rdttor
rhursday night with The Rxx
a as like a night at any nightclub
without the bar, crowds or
mixed drinks
"he 11v took the stage, puked
ip the instruments and took oil
n an hour and-a-half show. Has
ms( Danny Brown immediately
mined to grab attention by
ing not to be noticed. 1 le stood
tight and-front in black
iMts suspenders, white shirt
ind tie without moving anything
;it the lingers over his small
Mack bass
But the bass thumped out over
rowd, shaking the tones into
erything
i wondered it there was some
idden meaning in this neatly
;roomed, red bearded man
But theanticsofCyCumin, lead
ocalist, soon got my attention In
tpening number: "Wild Am
rials, Cumin suprised me by
playing a hollow-bodied rhythm
guitar line This was the lust time
1 ad t ver seen him play guitar.
ouch 1 couldn't really hear the
notes he played.
In other songs, however,
Curnin engaged the audience
with theatrical gestures and ex-
pressions in one song he made
the shape of a heart with his hands
over his chest and then broke
his hands apart. And while sing-
ing the more familiar songs such
as "One Thing leads to Another"
or "Are We Ourselves Curnin
would inject spoken comments
siu h as too much TV or "Is
there a future?"
While Curnin (sporting shoul-
der length hair) brought drama to
the apocalyptic and or didactic
lyrics, guitarist amie West-Oram
banged out the I laircut 100 guitar
licks in a loose purple shirt. Wesl
Oram often lingered a free
winged melody over the some
what predictable keyboard lines.
But to credit the synthesizer
work, Rupert Creenwall manipu
lated his DX7, PPG and Emula
lor2 keyboards like a master
Creenwall was always busy, flip-
ping his hands from one board to
another, changing floppy disks
on the Emulator or doing a solo
The keyboards were the domi-
nant musical character of the
show, enveloping the songs with
grand chords or bizzare special
effects.
In the midst of all this, drummer
Adam Woods tossed out a flaw-
less funky beat. Woods truly
seemed to be enjoying himself;
dressed casually in shorts and a
colorful shirt, he worked up a
sweat quickly, but continued
smiling.
There were no suprises here.
Every song played was com-
pletely danceable, and the band
played all the old favorites ("Se-
cret Separation "Saved by
Zero").
And the new tunes (which
haven't been released on vinyl
yet) were not radical departures
from what we have all heard from
The Fixx; although one song,
"Shake and Watch was a scary
song about watching the world
being destroyed by man.
Musical geniuses they are not.
But they are one of the few bands
that has managed to put some
moral sense into popular music.
PopmeLsters the Fixx rock the crowd at Minges Coliseum Thursday night, the group is touring in order to test
new material for an upcoming Lp. (Photo by ECU Photolab).
PARENTING helping adolescent moms cope
By LAURA SAl AZAR
s.j'i i ritn
Bout
inkles
ind cheest
otato chips pregnancy
with nausea
craving for
sw ollen
macaroni
with salt and vinegar
,in
produce some ot these very un-
pleasant svmptoms. Most adults
i an cope with the trials and tribu-
lations ot being pregnant. But
what happens when the mother is
a ten year old and the lather is a
15 year-old?
Where can adolesccnl parents
turn when they need help? One
choice is Project PARENTING
t Proactive Assessment and Regu-
lation of Environmental Nurtur-
'CarlaV story is familiar tale
By LAURA cat aAH
Su
schooling at D.H. Connelly.
(The situatio
but the name �
been changed i
nymity.)
Imagine beii
mother of tw
Hump In irajo-i
child when sh
second child
According to
adolescent mot
trying ordeal.
From a (ami
and sisters,
mother, accor
wasn't difficult �v- ner to tan,
care of her two children because
she was used to feeding and bath-
ing her many cousins
birth control pills, but then she
ped taking them
pgggf again. I
Ipb, her first
12 hours,
labor lasted
for a mother
weflasmerv
ugh at the
children,
and I
children
are at the
the school. In
are
and her
Ant. a rest cu��.
pregnancy, she said she felt moWer. -
happy, scared and relieved. As to advice she would give her
Accepting the pregnancy, children when they are young
bne is not married and each of Carla's mother supported her adolescents, Carla says, "I war
daughter. As for the father, Carla tell them that if they are winking
said, "He wasn't around much of doing anything, to pleasecome
her children have different fa
there. Pregnant with her first
child, Carla continued her After the first child, Carla was on to me and weTl take care of it"
ing and Teaching Interventions
for Normal Growth). Project
PARENTING is an educational
program that teaches parenting
skills to adolescent mothers in Pitt
County schools.
According to Taylor, PARENT-
IMG began July 1986 as a result of
a proposal submitted through the
ECU School of Education to the
Children's Trust Fund. The
Children's Trust Fund s a divi-
sion of the North Carolina De-
partment of Public Instruction.
The proposal was accepted, and
funding was provided by the
United Way and the Children's
Trust Fund. Additional funding
was provided by ECU's School of
Education, the Caswell Center, a
state-supported institution in
Kinston for the mentally retarded,
and the Pitt County schools.
In addition to Taylor, the pro-
gram employs, a social worker,
Cynthia Doctor. She is housed in
the Pitt County schools.
Taylor said the goals of project
PARENTING include: improving
parenting skills, increasing
knowledge of child development,
assisting the parent in meeting
health care needs of children,
building self-esteem of parents
and children and planning for the
future.
Twenty mothers and twenty-
five children are presently on
project PARENTING'S caseload.
Habrichs gives lecture
All of the mothers are students at
Agnes Fullilove S hool in
Greenville.
According to Taylor, Agnes
Fullilove School houses children
that are "high risk students She
said, "Most of the students at
Agnes Fullilove have cither had a
brush with the la w, are adolescent
mothers or just chose to go to
Fullilove The school is a public
school and is part of the Pitt
County school system.
Agnes Fullilove school has a
state-licensed day care center. If
the student qualifies for a subsi-
dized day care slot, the day care
services are free, otherwise, a
nominal fee is charged.
One way an adolescent mother
can get involved with PARENT
ING is through a guidance coun-
selor. Taylor said the counselor
would inform the girl's family,
and from there PARENTING
begins to provide support until
the babv is born. After the birth,
PARENTING works with the
mother on self-esteem and other
goals oi the program
Taylor said, "Children of
adolescent mothers do poorly
when they get to school. There-
fore, we work with the mother
and child from the birth of the
child until age three She added.
"It is believed that the age of the
mother is directionally propor-
tionate to the quality of parenting
By SUSANNE NIELSEN
SUM VSnlff
As a professor of environ-
rtental design with the ECU
ichool of Art Ernst Habrichs
aches by supporting students'
efforts and trving to get them
rtvolved with his enthusiasm. He
tries to raise their awareness of
rtteriorarchitecture as important
ind active part of every period's
niter facade.
Habrichs taught environmental
lesign in other parts of the United
; ites in the past before returning
his native Germany. There he
iter came to the conclusion that
. in. thing had become too limit-
So he returned to America
seeking a position with ECU'S
School of Art. The death of his
mother last year made his ties to
iermany seem few, he said. The
nfirmed bachelor, Habrichs has
found a new home in Greenville
IS a full faculty member of the art
� hool
Habrichs said he finds
Greenville to be a challenge in
.trv way. He is involved in
trying to enliven the downtown
walking mall. Along with the
cad of the environmental design
department Dr. Abdul-Shakoor
I arhadi, 1 labnchs encourages the
students' involvements in such
restoration projects.
The attempts arc not so much
geared to bringing store fronts up
todate, but rather to make them fit
hack into the period they were
constructed in. This makes for an
eclectic mainstrcct picture � pos-
sibly a turn of the century shop
next to a 30s building with neon
and smooth curvalinear facade
and a brick building from the 19th
century.
List week, Habrichs lectured
on "Industrial Evolution in De-
sign of Furniture Related to
Architecture
Habrichs characterized the so-
cio-economical and political situ-
ation of the 19th century leading
into the roots of the industrial
revolution, which to him plays an
important part in the revolution
of furniture design and fabrica-
tion at that time.
He said the 19th century
struggle for more freedom finds
its parallels in the design of every
day objects One of the most im-
portant revolutions in furniture
design was brought about the
technique of bending wood over
hot steam and manufacturing
sturdy, light-weight chairs that
are still in production today.
1 labnchs described the evolu-
tion of design from Joseph
1 loffman through the 70s and 80s
of this century. He gave insight
into the different tendencies and
innovations of design in various
European countries. Germany, he
said proudly, is number one in the
production and export of furni-
ture today. It is followed directly
by Italy and Denmark.
After an intermission, Habrichs
concentrated on U.S. furniture
design. He named Frank Loyd
Wright and the Green and Green
Brothers as major influences in
early 20th century design. He
explained the major role in the
Amencan evolution of design
played by the large manufactur-
ing companies Knoll and Herman
Miller.
In concluding, Habrichs dis-
cussed the future of furniture
design. He said the Bauhaus
school, with its large impact on
20th century design, fulfilled an
necessary function moving de-
signs away from stuffy manner-
ism. But, he said, "modernity is
not a style of art - being up to date,
being new is what it is
In Januarv, Habrichs will lee-
ture on the future needs of envi-
ronmental design.
Tonkeunstler orchestra plays
The Tonkeunstler Orchestra
will play at Wright Auditorium
tonight at 8 p.m. This is a stop on
the orchestra's third American
tour.
The band is known for its
waltzes and polkas. They have
toured extensively throughout
Europe and Japan.
The band is conducted by
Alfred Eschwe, noted for his work
with the Strauss Orchestra in
Barcelona.
Other members of this famed
cast of players include soprano
Gail Dobish and violin plavcr
Manfred Geyrhalter.
Dobish has soloed with the
Milwaukee Symphony and the
Opera Orchestra of New York
Geyrhalter has played at
numerous musical festivals in
Europe.
Tickets may be purchased at the
Central Ticket of fice in Mcndehal
Student Center.
thai the child receives
All the mothers in the program
are not marned and there is little
involvement from the fathers.
Taylor said that a lot of the moth-
ers are from foster homes.
Project PARENTING directs
mothers to either the Greenville
Health Department of the ECU
Medical School for pre-natal and
follow-up visits. Birth control
counseling and education about
AIDS and sexually transmitted
diseases is begun immediately
following the birth of the baby.
According to Taylor, "The
PARENTING program is pretty
unique because it has three gen-
erations at once, the adolescent's
mother, the adolescent mother,
and the adolescent's child
situation Robertson, an occupa-
tional therapy major added, "I
was impressed with the day care
at Agnes Fullilove. The children
need to develop nght and to de-
velop right, they need a setting
like this According to
Robertson, it was Delta Sigma
Theta's vice president, Stephanie
Canty, who formulated the sup-
port group idea.
Working with adolescent moth-
ers takes a great deal of time and
patience. When asked whv she
works with project PARENTING,
Taylor said, "I have a real interest
with adolescents and a lot of my
students got pregnant
Taylor reiterated that PAR-
ENTING is important because it
builds a support system for the
mother and child as well as target-
ing their strengths and weak-
nesses.
Delta Sigma Theta, an ECU so-
rority, has begun a program with
the mothers of PARENTING. The
fourteen women of the sorority
function as "big sisters to the
mothers.
Kristin Robertson, Delta Sigma
Theta treasurer said, "We want to
let the mothers know that there
are people who care about their
'Discover Spain' with film
Mrmlrnhill Preu Rrlfuc
Film maker Willis riutler with
his film, "Discovering Spain
will open the 1987-1988 East Caro-
lina University Travel-Ad venture
Film Series on October 15, in
Hendrix Theatre at 8 p.m. The
Travel-Adventure Film Series is
sponsored by the Student Union
Travel Committee.
In addition to producing lecture
films, Butler was commissioned
by NBC to produce a series of
television films in Africa and ra-
dio features in Europe. He has
produced two motion pictures on
missionary work in Africa for the
United Presbyterian Church of
America. Butler has also been
making professional motion pic-
tures used in classrooms across
the country.
While Butler is an expert photo-
graphic craftsman, years of
broadcasting experience have
also made him an outstanding
travels through Madrid's Rctiro
Park, Prado Museum, and the
Royal Palace. Visit Avila, Spain's
highest provincial ccapital. Go
from the tranquil elegance of
Seville's cathedral, where Chris-
topher Columbus is buried, to the
festivities of Alicante's midnight
parade and spectacular bonfires
in honor of St. John.
Experience throuygh Butler's
expert camera work, Santiago de
Compostela, one of the three ma-
jor pilgrimage destinations in the
Christian world. Other sites in-
clude Barcelona, the cosmopoli-
tan port city on the Mediterra-
nean, and many other areas of
historical, cultural, and religious
significance in Spain.
Tickets for this exciting journey
to Spain can be purchased at the
Central Ticket Office located in
Mendenhall Student Center,
Monday-Friday, 11 a.m6 p.m.
Ticket prices are $4.00 for general
speaker and reporter. Hedisplays admission, $3.50 each for a group
an unusual ability to penetrate
beneath the surfaceof his subjects,
bringing exciting new perspec-
tives in entertaining and informa-
tive programs.
In "Discovering Spain Butler
of 20 or more, and ECU students
are admitted free with their ID
and valid activity sticker.
For tickets and more informa-
tion call 757-6611, ext. 266, during
the above hours.
A farmer surveys the countryside in 'Discovering Spain, a documentary
by Willis Butler, showing Thursday in Hendrix theater at t p.m
1

ummmm
wmm mm mi m

I





8
THE EASTC AROl INI N
(XHTOBER IT 1�87
'New age 'music is eclectic mix of artists and instruments
Bv MICAH HARRIS
Null Wnltt
New Age Music is a hard to-
pi n-do wn genre in tha 111 is ecclec-
tic, ambigious, and just plain ob-
scure It only counts for about two
percent of record and tape sales,
and self-promotion seems to be
something New Age artists are
unconcerned with, preferring to
let the music speak for itself.
However, interest in New Age
Music is growing; that "two per-
cent" of all sales looks small, but it
is a rate already rivaling classical
music sales. Also, the artists are
getting more exposure most nota-
bly on VH-l's "New Visions" and
the USA Network's
"Nightflight This visual empha-
sis for music works especially
well tor New Aee. because hear-
ing the music without seeing
imagery is like watching a color
movie in black and white.
But the imagery doesn't Kive
to be on a TV screen. Indeed, New
Age has been called a "sound
track for a movie of the mind It
conjures mental visions, espe-
cially since it tends to be instru-
mental. But what separates New
Age from mere Muzak
For one thing. New Age artists
take an intelligent, innovative
approach to their music, which is
frankly non-commercial. This
subtle distinction allows artists as
diverse as Stanley Jordan and
Kate Bush to be slid into the New
Age slot, although they varv from
what would be considered "New
Age proper which is something
of a synthesis of jazz and classical
insidcred
New 'Star Trek' not seeking new ground
By MICAH HARRIS
Suff Write,
rhe new Starship Enterprise
launched last week, but whether
the crew "will boldly go where no
man has gone before or merely
retread old ground remains to be
seen
The two-hour pilot of Star
Trek The Next Generation" de-
spite its "all new" emphasis, con-
tained some rather familiar mate
rial The story had the Enterprise
encountering an alien race which
submits them to a test in the
namoofhumanity Asitturnsout,
the tost involves freeing another
alien who has abilities that "ap-
pear to be magic. Harlan Ellison,
who wrote the popular City on
the Edge of Forever" episode oi
the original series, once com-
mented that "Star Trek" creator
(�one Roddenberry's one idea
was thai the Enterprise discovers
God who 'turns out to be insane,
or a child, or both
While 1 find Ellison's statement
exagerated, it's true that the Fn-
ise encountered its share of
� d like beings In the case of the
new crew God is nol a child or
insane, but a pair ol luminescent
jellyfish. While the story was well
plotted, the material was tm typi-
cal to make for a compelling de-
but. To compound this, this
week's episode (which, as we like
to say in the review business,
"wasn't available at press time")
looks to be a remake of 'The
Naked Time an adventure of the
original series.
Terhaps Gene Roddenberry
and his staff are trying too hard to
recapture the feel oi the oO's pro-
gram. Such .in effort is really
unnecessary, considering "Star
Trek" has proved to be timeless,
and is, in fact, more popular in the
80's than it was 20 years ago.
Other attempts to conjure nos-
talgia involve the sots and even
the color. The exteriors in the
premiere were obviously indoor
stages. Even the original series
was veering toward location
shooting. Hie i olor is too similar
to the original tor a 19808 pro-
gram. Hie bright colors were the
norm for color programs in the
uTs because color was something
new Low-key lighting and film-
ing such as you find on "LA
Law" or ' Hill Street blues" may
have added credence to the idea
that Star Irek" is an adult pro-
gram, and not "Tom Corbctt:
Space Cadet
Well, other than that, how'd
you enjoy the play Mrs. Lincoln?
Quite a bit, actually. DC. Fon-
tana, the current associate pro-
ducer, showed quite a knack for
characterization in her scripts for
the original series. That skill is
evident here, also. Mr. Data, the
androida groaner, I know) is a
futuristic Finnochio who'd trade
his superiority for humanity. The
Klingon crew member with a
streak oi savagery and Levar
Burton's blind navigator whose
infra-red heat sense of "radar" is
dependent on his constant, physi-
cal pain, both have possibilities.
The female characters (the ship's
doctor, security chief, and em-
pathic counsellor) arc intriguing,
and it's nice to see them in the
thick oi the action instead of just
pining over Kirk, Spock, or this
week's villian. Ironically, First
Officer Rikcr, the handsome,
Kirk figure, is the most bland.
Continuity between episodes
looks to be a possibility. The epi-
sodic format of the original series
was occationallv annoying. I al
ways hated it when K:rk had a
heavy love affair one week, and
then she wasn't even mentioned
the next The cameo of the 137
year old Doctor McCoy was a
touching moment, especially in
light oi the original cast's unhap-
piness over a new series. Now I
understand other originals are
interested in cameos.
All in all, "Star Trek: The Next
Generation" has great potential.
With some fresh story lines, and
proper character development,
the new crew should do their
music
New Age may bv cm
jazz transposed from its tradi-
tional urban setting ot neon and
asphalt, to the clean open pano-
ramas ol nature. This is a preoccu-
pation that becomes apparent
while watching the videos which
feature sweeping vistas of the
mountains or the ocean. This is
alsodiscovered in themusic itself,
as in Paul Winter and Paul
1 lalley's hauntingly beautiful col-
laboration (no joke) with a hump-
back whale, "A Lullabve From the
Great Mother Whale for the Baby
Seal Pops
But the rural emphasis is but
one facet of the jewel that is the
heart of New Age Music: a return
to a more innocent, lyrical time.
Thus, "New Age" is something of
a misnomer. Older, accoustic in
struments as the dulcimer, the
lute, harp, d.issica! guitar, Atn
can mbira, and anything baroque
tend to be played along with syn-
thesizers and state ot the art eloi
tronic instruments
New Age Musk is the audio
distillment of a dream, whether it
is an interpretation ot the descent
of Orpheus into Hades, or the
lullabve of whales It is as refresh i
ing in its way as the v ind over icy
mountain crags, or the retelling ol
an old mvth
GET
CAUGHT
predecessors prouc
I
I
I
I
Painting national parks is
artist's dream and acid test
i
KA1 ISrELL, Mont. (AP) Paint-
ing national parks is becoming a
lifestyle tor Mark Ogle, a local
artist who is increasingly finding
ublic appreciation for doing
what comes naturally.
He was notified recently that
his winter scene of Old Faithful
geyser in Yellowstone National
Park was one of 3 3 paintings cho-
sen to represent the region bv the
National Lark Academy oi Arts
The academy selected paintings
'rom three regions for a national
collection, with thousands of art-
ists competing for the honor of
being included.
1v dream has always boon to
paint the parks said Ogle, and a
.ear ago he began by painting
tour scenes of Glacier National
Park. When the originals and
prints were well received, he be-
gan painting other nearb) parks
Now he finds himself months
Ivhind on the demand that he has
created.
Ogle said he hadn't dared to
hope it would work that well
when he "plugged in a program"
to make his work fit his lifestyle.
rhe entire family now goes on
location to explore a national
park. Thcvbicyclealong the roads
and walk the trails. And when
Ogle sets up his easel to do an
artist's study of a scene, it's usu-
ally at a vantage point less fre-
quented bv tourists.
At work in his Kalispell studio,
he's used to people stopping by to
seen what he has on the easel. But
in the parks, he needs to concen-
trate on capturing the colors
unique to each scene.
"Whenever I can, I paint out-
doors Ogle said. He takes pho-
tographs, too, but finds that film
cannot do as well as his own eyes
in recording the colors within the
shadows and the overall effect
that he terms the "color harmony"
oJ a scene.
He has painted Glacier and
Yellowstone, as well as Canadian
parks, including Waterton in
Alberta, and has done prelimi-
nary work on the Tetons in Wyo-
ming. Next will come Grand
Canyon, Yosemite and Mount
McKinley.
"I Iovcpainting,and anything is
fair game Ogle said. "The proc-
ess is so intense for a period of
trme when I am focused on some-
thing - whether a boat or a house
or a landscape. It's exciting. My
whole world is centered on learn-
ing to see
For fledgling artists, "a little bit
of encouragement goes a long
way he said, and certainly the
public acceptance of his parks
series has been strong encourage-
ment for him.
"The acid test for me is that
when 1 get up in the morning and
want to get going, and when I fall
asleep right away at night, 1 know
I'm where 1 want to be
INSTANT REPLAY
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HOT DEALS
ON COOL
SHADES.
"GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
ON QUALITY SHADES"
If you re looking for shades, look to Sunglasses Plus. We
nave a full line of designer frames and accessories from
names like Vuarnet Ray-Ban. Bolle and Carrera. Lowest
prices. Guaranteed. Look to Sunglasses Plus for hot deals
on cool shades.
BUT comPETion
Gall for Entries
REQUIREMENTS
Open to current ECU
students
Limit of 5 pieces per artist
2-D work must be ready
to hang, framed or matted
and acetated
A completed entry form
must accompany
each piece.
A $1.00 entry per piece
3-D work must be self
supporting
CATEGORIES
unqa55e5
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756-9771
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TV Pirn Mall Ijcroy; from Brady s
Ceramics, Illustration, Photography, Design, Mixed Media,
Printmaking, Drawing, Painting and Sculpture.
ENTRY DATE
October 15,1987
Bring entries to Mendenhall Rm 244
from 9-5 p.m.
PRIZES
Best in Show $130.00
First Place per category $30.00
ATiTIC
art j( coeiero hop
5� SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
GRfEMVIlLI. KC 27B34
7S2-08M
art j( camera hop
M SOUTH COTANCHE STREET1
GHEENVIIL. KC J7834
752-oeaa
orld?s h
HEMPSTEAD, N V (AP)
Three weeks after getting stuck in
grdoorway, a man whobr k the
trales at 1,000 pounds
Popped gorging on junl
, ffdiet thai includes dried fruit and
frsame vt-ds
It's paid off
� Walter Hudson alrea I
ur inches around the kna
He ib still far heavier I
heaviest man listed in the iui
Book ot World Ri
less than v. � p, ind
Hudson has 1 . � ;
Watermelons Hi
waist That - � . . ,
are 51 inches ,r
55. His nii '?
The 42-year
weighed 2 12 p
was 12.
Somewhere along th
Wendy and Us
NEW YORK
peanngin twomovii
three million-sell i
making the cover I
magaine. Wend) M
Lisa Coleman still r :� �
people know them
"We have to think f it in tl
terms, because then
people we haven't rea hi
Melvoin, the guitarist ��
Revolution, Prince's rr .
etedbackupband.fortr- :
years. "We can t expect
people to just invite us in their
homes. We have to km tckp
and see if we can come
The tight rapping on their I
album, "Wendy and I a
change from their days
Trince's purple reign, w
Melvoin and keyboardist C
man helped the Minneapolis su
perstar break musical and m
picture ground with a series i I
ever-evolving records.
Coleman was a fixture
Prince's records dating back I
"Dirty Mind" in 1978, while
Melvoin wound up joining the
band in time for the multi-
platinum "Purple Rain" movie
CRe
eese soup contest
At the recent SOI
Recipe Contest, sports
Southeast United Dair)
Association, this Cheesj -
Soup was selected as t
prize winner
cheese tort ; a
(6 to servings
8 frozen (6-inch com I ri
thawed
12 cup milk
1 large egg
1 can (4 ounces' chopped �
chihes, undrained
1 package 112 ounces ta
seasoning mix
1 cup (4 ounces shi
sharp Cheddar cheese
� 1 cup cooking oil
4 tablespoons butter
' 1 2 cup chopped onion
�' 1 clove garlic, minced
3 cans (10 34 ounces a
chicken broth
'4 cups tomato juice
1 can (28 ounces) tomat
drained and chopped
1 cup (8 ounces) dair) - n
cfeam
�3 tablespoons flour
tablespoon sugar
:12 ounces sharp Cheddar
cheese, cut into small cubes
(Tortilla chips it desired
I Hot salsa, it desired
Tear tortillas into small pieces
d soak in milk 10 minutes Add
efeg, half of the green chihes with
I ll quid and halt ot the seasoning
lux
In blender container, process
llialf of the mixture at a time
b ending until smooth. Tush mix-
t ire down with spatula as neces
airy. Add shredded cheese to
I uxture; stir to mix.
Heat oil in a 10-inch skillet
i I rop mixture into hot oil bv small
. t'aspoons, try until golden
It rown. Dram on paper towels set
1 Side
Melt butter in 5-quart Dutch
I ven; add onion and garlic. Saute
'� ntil tender Add broth, tomato
ij lice, chopped tomatoes, remain-
II vg green chihes and seasoning
11 tix. Bring to a boil and cook 15
� linutes, stirring occasionally
I In small bowl, blend together
SPur cream, flour and sugar. Stir
aome of the hot soup into the sour
cream; add mixture slowly to
soup. Drop cheese cubes into
Balloom
in d
Wo-
v.
' V
"�
r �� �: " - � �

1





truments
ssical thesizers and state ol the art etec
tronic instruments
nsidered (-n Age Musk- is the audio
its tradi- distiHrnent of a dream, whether it
neon and is an interpretation of the deseenj
vn pano of Orpheus into Hades, or the
ipreoecu lullabye of whales It is as refresh!
apparent ing in its vva) as the wind over k'
a huh mountain ci ags, or the retelling of
is of the an old nn th
GET
CAUGHT
T
TANT REPLAY
� b
I
F-rames
nd
jgraphy
:s
FREE FREE
Enlargement Developing
With Purchase
Of Any Equal
Value Color
Enlargement
coupon exptrt 10 27
$1.99 Value
For Each Roll
Developed Printed
mm iif vm mi � turn, i i�
coupon expire 10-27-87
PETI0I1
Intries
ents
itr- torm
or pi ceo
Mixed Media,
d Sculpture.
ATE
15. 1987
idenhall Rm 244
p.m.
5130.00
itegory S30.00
IC
artcamera hop
SIS SOUTH COTiMCHB STRCEr
GR�MVHU tc J7B34
753-OSSS
5
4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 111987
World's heaviest man losing
HEMPSTEAD, NY. (AD -
ITiree weeks after getting stuck in
a doorway, a man who broke the
scales at 1,000 pounds has
stopped gorging on junk food for
a diet that includes dried fruit and
sesame seeds.
It's paid off.
Walter Hudson already has lost
tour inches around the knees.
He is still far heavier than the
heaviest man listed in theGuiness
Bpok of World Records, who is
' -ss than 900 pounds.
Hudson has biceps like flabby
watermelons. He has a 103-inch
waist. That's 8 1 2 feet. His knees
ire 51 inches around, down from
5i His neck is 22 inches.
The 42-year- old Hudson
weighed 212 pounds when he
was 12.
Somewhere along the way, he
said, he stopped caring what
people thought of him, and only
startevl canng again after he got
stuck in his bedroom doorway
and had to be extricated by rescue
workers three weeks ago.
"Sometimes it got real rough
he said Wednesday, explaining
that it was so hard to walk that he
waited two months at a time to go
to the bathroom.
Hudson's plight was widely
publicized. Hcgotcallsfromexer-
cise expert Richard Simmons,
Overeatcrs Anonymous and Dick
Gregory, the one-time comedian
who runs a weight-loss clinic in
the Bahamas.
"I'm absolutely surprised he's
not dead said Gregory, who has
taken on Hudson as a client, and
hopes to get him to lose enough in
three months that he can be taken
to the clinic.
Hudson estimated his own
weight at 1,200 pounds. Several
days ao, Hudson stood on a
scale, propped up by three
weightlifters. A spring popped on
the scale at 1,000 pounds.
- He has forsaken his daily
Thanksgiving-size meals, when
he would devour three or four
ham steaks and six large bottles of
soda pop for breakfast or lunch.
His grocery bill averages about
$300 a week.
Gregory has Hudson eating
mostly fruits, sesame seeds, dry
dates, raisins and three ounces ot
a special diet powder three times
a day.
Hudson said he's tried other
diets, but speaks with resolve
about this one as he lies on the bed
where he has spent much of the
last 27 vcars.
"Mr. Gregory's plan is the best I
ever tried because 1 don't feel
hungry he said.
Hudson hasn't been outside
since his family moved from
Brooklyn to this Long Island
community 17 years ago.
Gregory's long-term goal is to
get Hudson down to 190 pounds-
losing more than 80 percent of his
body weight.
Barbara A. Whitehead,
Hudson's niece who helps care
for him, said he has always
seemed happy. He listens to jazz,
blues and pop music and played
Monopoly, cards and checkers
with her. He reads the Bible every
day, she said.
"Overeating is a disease
Hudson said. "It's a habit for me.
When depressed, a man reaches
for a bottle of whiskey. I reach for
food. It becomes like a junkie
needing a needle
Wendy and Lisa knocking on the charts
NEW YORK (AP) - After ap-
pearing in two movies, playing on
three million-selling albums and
taking the cover of Rolling Stone
magazine, Wendy Melvoin and
1 isa Coleman still wonder if
people know them.
"We have to think of it in those
terms, because there's a lot of
people we haven't reached said
Melvoin, the guitarist with the
Revolution, Prince's multi-fac-
eted backup band, for the past fi ve
vears. "We can't expect these
people to just invite us in their
homes. We have to knock politely
and see if we can come inside
The light rapping on their debut
alburn, "Wendy and Lisa is a
hange from their days under
Prince's purple reign, when
Melvoin and keyboardist Cole-
man helped the Minneapolis su-
perstar break musical and motion
picture grourd with a series of
ever-evolving records.
Coleman was a fixture on
Prince's records daring back to
"Dirty Mind" in 1978, while
Melvoin wound up joining the
band in time for the multi-
and soundtrack. They played on
the subsequent "Around the
World in a Day" and "Parade"
LPs and appeared in the disas-
trous movie, "Under the Cherry
Moon" before the band went its
separate ways.
Along the way Prince began
recording their music: "Some-
times It Snows in April" and
"Mountains" from the "Parade"
LP were co-written by the pair,
marking the first time Prince had
recorded anyone else's music and
landed them on Rolling Stone's
cover.
But unlike the rock-funk fusion
perfected bv Prince, Melvoin and
Coleman brought a lighter, jazz-
ier feel to their project.
"Sounding like the Revolution
wasn't a concern of ours, but it
was of a lot of other people said
Melvoin, who co-wrote most of
the album with Coleman in the
studio. "No one knew what to
expect from the two of us
The pair knew what to expect
from one another - they grew up
together in California, where
their fathers were session musi-
"Wc've been familiar with one
another since we were in dia-
pers Melvoin said in a telephone
interview from Los Angeles. "We
know our limitations, and try to
convince each other we have
none. It's a bicycle built for two
After the dissolution of the
Revolution, the two went into the
studio within two weeks and
began working on the album -
self-financed without a record
contract.
The result ranges from the first
single, "Waterfall with Melvoin
singing over a soaring guitar line,
to "White a jazz-fusion instru-
mental number which closes side
one.
This Wednesday's film is "The
Mission" starring Robert de Niro
as fierce slave driver. After mur-
dering his brother in jealous rage
over a woman, he is recruited by a
monk (Jeremy Irons) to follow
him into the South American
jungles to save the old missions
Wednesday Movie
from the takeover by the Portu-
guese. The film is filled with
breathtaking beautiful picturesof
tropical jungles, huge, powerful
waterfalls and astonishing Span-
ish architecture of the mission
where the power struggle finally
climaxes.
platinum "Purple Rain" movie cians in Los Aneeles.
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Located in Downtown Greenville
next to Chicos Restaurant in the Georgetown Shops
At the recent SOUPER Dairy
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Southeast United Dairy Industry-
Association, this Cheesy Tortilla
Soup was selected as the grand
prize winner.
CHEESY TORTILLA SOUP
(6 to 8 servings)
8 frozen (6-inch) corn tortillas,
'hawed
12 cup milk
1 large egg
1 can (4 ounces) chopped green
chilies, undrained
1 package (1 12 ounces) taco
seasoning mix
1 cup (4 ounces) shredded
sharp Cheddar cheese
1 cup cooking oil
4 tablespoons butter
1 2 cup chopped onion
1 clove garlic, minced
3 cans (10 34 ounces each)
hieken broth
4 cups tomato juice
1 can (28 ounces) tomatoes,
drained and chopped
1 cup (8 ounces) dairy sour
cream
3 tablespoons flour
1 tablespoon sugar
12 ounces sharp Cheddar
cheese, cut into small cubes
Tortilla chips, if desired
Hot salsa, if desired
Tear tortillas into small pieces
and soak in milk 10 minutes. Add
egg, half of the green chilies with
liquid and half of the seasoning
mix.
In blender container, process
half of the mixture at a time,
blending until smooth. Push mix-
tore down with spatula as neces-
sary. Add shredded cheese to
mixture; stir to mix.
Heat oil in a 10-inch skillet.
Drop mixture into hot oil by small
teaspoons; fry until golden
brown. Drain on paper towels; set
aside.
Melt butter in 5-quart Dutch
clven; add onion and garlic. Saute
until tender. Add broth, tomato
)�ice, chopped tomatoes, remain-
ing green chilies and seasoning
mix. Bring to a boil and cook 15
minutes, stirring occasionally.
In small bowl, blend together
sour cream, flour and sugar. Stir
some of the hot soup into the sour
cream; add mixture slowly to
soup. Drop cheese cubes into
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Serve with tortilla chips and hot
salsa, if desired. Soup may be
made ahead and reheated.
Happy Birthday MARYELLEN ft
PARTY
ANIMALS
830-1823
Balloons Delivered
in Costumes
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Gator - Grams
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Love, James
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March 7-10
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Every Wednesday
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- . �4





IMF EAS1 (. AROl INIAN
Sports
(XTOBLK H, 1987 Pace 10
Pirates roll past Cincy for homecoming win
. ByTINLCiDLER out The extra point gave the Pi- in the contest on a 1-vard m�rh. v -�. . St, -
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Iditur
Saturday should be prove posi-
tive that one should never doubt
Art Baker.
Earlier in the week, the Fast
Carolina head coach told a gather-
ing of reporters he felt like like
Something positive was about to
happen to his team.
Indeed it did. The Pirates
touted Cincinnati, 56-28, before a
crowd of over 26,000a t homecom-
ing in Ficklen Stadium.
Rake- v. . .vd up to another ot
out. The extra point gave the Pi
rates a 28-21 lead with 5:11 left in
the third quarter.
"The blocked punt by Ellis Dil-
lahunt was definitely a big play
for us Baker said. "We've been
looking for something like that to
ignite us and Ellis is the type of
player who can do that
The Tirates stretched the lead to
35-21 with just over 13 minutes
remaining in the game when Wil-
lie Lewis scampered in from 7
yards out to cap off a 77-yard

"I his is the first EC I team to win three gomes since 1983,
and now we wont to become the first to win four and five and
o after our goal of achieving a winning season
- Art Baker
His promises made before the
game. 1 ie had said the coaches
h.d to find a waj to get the ball'
into Reggie McKinne s hands
more
McKinne) got the bail, alright.
Be junior tailback ripped the
frarcat defense apart with 212
jprds and a touchdown on 20
rashes That mark was the second
t or Dy a Pirate rusher.
3 'Reggie McKinne) is exactly
t$c type of runner we knew he
�as Baker said. Wehad just not
czme a good enough jobof getting
ram the football
,i In all. the Piratcbacks picked up
ardson theground, setting a
Stadium record.
Our offensive line did an out-
standing job blowing i'tt the hall.
peciali) : i second hah.
kersaid. All of our backs did a
sQivr job, both tailbacks and full-
i ks
�But with all the offense the Pi-
:i: s d, the play that
n urred the Pirates on
:t-st was made bv the defense
Bter the two teams had battled to
afcl-21 tie in the first halt. iCl'
stuck first in the second half fol-
flving Ellis Dillahunt's block of a
rr Jones punt, giving possession
i the PTfftcs at the Bearcat 25
ird line ��
5 Tour plays later. Anthony
Bimpson pounded in from 3 yards
IS
i
The Bearcats cut the lead to 35-
28 when quarterback Danny
McCoin, who threw for 2o8 yards
and four touchdowns, hit Steve
Sanders on a 30-yard touchdown
pass with 11:25 remaining.
That's when McKinney put the
icing on the homecoming cake as
he capped an 80-yard Pirate drive
with a 56-yard touchdown sprint
down the right sideline with just
over 10 minutes remaining to
stretch the Pirate lead to 42-28.
On the Bearcats next posses-
sion, McCoin fumbled and the Pi-
rates' Walter Bryant recovered at
the Bearcat 30.
Three plays later, Willie Lewis
went over from six yards out to
put the score at 49-28 with 8:30 to
play.
unior Robinson then inter-
cepted a McCoin pass on the next
Bearcat possession setting up the
final Pirate score of the d.w. I im
lames got the rout-capping score
with 2.01 to play. Chuck Berleth's
PA I gave the Pirates a 56-28 lead
" 1 his is the first time in my three
years here that 1 could actually
relax with a few minutes to go in a
game Baker said. "This is the
first ECU team to win more than
three games since 1983, and now
we want to become the first to win
Tour and five and go after our goal
of achieving a winning season
The Pirates struck for first blood
in the contest on a 1-yard touch-
down plunge by Anthony
Simpson with 12:57 left in the first
quarter. The score was set up by a
51-yard burst by McKinney on the
game's first play. Holder Tony
Smith took the low PAT snap and
ran it in for a 8-0 Pirate lead.
Cincinnati then took its open-
ing drive and moved 73 yards in
12 plays to score on a 16-yard pass
from McCoin to Roosevelt
Mukes. Phil Insalaco added the
PAT to make the score 8-7 with
8:24 to play in the first quarter.
The Pirates next struck on a 28-
yard field goal by Berleth at the
13:09 mark of the second quarter
to move ahead 11 -7.
McCoin then put the Bearcats
on top as he orchestrated a 74 yard
drive, which was capped off with
a 7-yard pass to Mukes with 10:45
left in the half. Insalaco's PAT
made the score 14-11.
Pirate quarterback Travis
Hunter put the Pirates back in the
lead when he vaulted in from 7-
yards out with 5:39 to play. The
run capped a 63-yard drive and
put the Pirates in "the lead 18-14.
The Bearcats then moved 85
yards in eight plays to retake the
lead on a 31 yard pass from
McCoin to Bill Davis with 2:45 left
in the half.
Backup quarterback Charlie
Libretto then directed the Pirates
on a 55-yard drive, which was
capped off with a 29-yard Berleth
field goal with six seconds left to
knot the score, 21-21.
"We knew at the half that we
had to get pressure on McCoin
Baker said. "If we had not, the
game would have been a matter of
who had the ball last and we did
not want a situation like that
Baker also credited the team's
preparedness for the victory.
"For several weeks we've been
our own worst enemy, and todav
there were no turnovers and the
result was a big win Baker said.
"We had a super week of concen-
tration and we were mentally
ready to play
And no one doubts that.
Photos bv .Ion Jordan
Photo Lab)
Runnin and gunnin9
BBMBk&q
McKinney
Travis Hunter (top photo) directs the Pirate offense, which generated a total of 60S vards SaturHv, while
the Pirate defense (bottom photo) prepares to gun down Cincinnati quarterback Dannj McCoin. "
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sporti Writer
Reggie McKinney says that in
his mind, he asks himself "What
can Reggie McKinney do for the
Pirates?" McKinnev's perform-
ance in Saturday's defeat of
Cincinnati probably answered
his question.
McKinney rushed for 212 yards
and one touchdown in the Pirates
third win of the season.
The 212 yards was the second
best rushing effort in a game by a
Pirate since official records have
been kept. McKinney was also
only the second Pirate rusher to
have over 200 yards in a single
game.
The Mt. Olive native is thankful
for the performances like that af-
ter a back injury kept him out of
play for the second half of the 1986
season and the '87spring practice.
McKinney had a swollen verte-
brate that made it nearly impos-
sible for the tailback to run, let
alone pick up speed.
"1 couldn't hardly run, so 1
couldn't pick up speed said
McKinney. It was my fifth verte-
brate that was giving me trouble
and it caused me not to be able to
bend over or pick upany weight
Despite the injury and missed
games, McKinney still finished
the season as the Pirates number
two rusher with 261 yards.
Yet the injury was frustrating to
the Pirate, who during his fresh-
man season was ranked fourth
nationally among Division I-A
kick off returners. McKinney
averaged 25.5 yards per return in-
cluding a 63 yard return against
Southwest Texas State.
McKinney is now obviously
back in top form. So far this sea-
"son, the junior has rushed for 288
yards on kick off returns, with an
average of 24 yards per return.
He also has the Pirate's longest
return of the season with a 46 vard
run against Georgia Southern.
McKinney has also rushed for 354
yards, after his outstanding game
Saturday, scored one touchdown,
and nude two receptions for 18
yards.
After McKinney's pcrf
Saturday, head coach Art txter
said the Pirate tailbacks did a
super job and were out there re-
ally enjoying themselves. Baker
was especially pleased with
McKinney's running.
Reggie is exactly the type of
runner we knew he was said
Baker "We had just not done a
good enough job getting him the
football
Some attribute the Pirate's
change in offensive formation to
their successful game. McKinney
says that he likes both of the for-
mations and that they both work
for the Pirates. To McKinney, it
doesn't matter which offense the
Pirates run as long as they win.
"1 like running the ball, but if
someone else can do it in a differ-
ent offense and we win said
McKinney, "then I'm all for it
McKinney says that the offen-
sive line is doing a great job and
ie Pirates couldn't win without
them. According to him, the
whole offensive staff, players and
coaches, is pulling together and
making a lot of positive things
happen.
Does McKinney have any goals
for the rest of the season? "Of
course said McKinney. "We
have a shot af a winning season.
That would be great considering
that we haven't won over two
games a season for the past three
years. I'm looking forward to all
the games They're all very im-
portant and I'm going to play
them just the way I play each play:
As hard as I played the last
Off to the races
Pirate running back Reggie McKinney is off to the races in the fourth
quarter as he sprints for a 56-yard touchdown run. McKinnev finished
the da with 212 yards rushing.
Linksters take 12th
VCU topples Pirate hooters Friday
By GEORGE OSBORXE
Sports Writer
East Carolina turned in a team
score of 619 to take 12th place in
the John Ryan Memorial Golf
Tournament Saturday in Dur-
ham, NC.
UNC-Charlotte captured first
place with a score of 599 followed
by N.C. State at 600. Georgia
Southern, Virginia Common-
wealth and Old Dominion were in
a three-way tie for third at 605.
Virginia Tech's Chris Green-
wood was the individual cham-
pion carding a two-day 142. Lee
Porter of Guilford shot a 145 to
take second and N.C. State's John
Gav was third with a 146.
Freshman Francis Vaughn led
ECU with a score of 149 which
placed him in a tie for ninth place
individually.
Chris Winkel was second for
the Pirates at 155 followed by
Chris Riley at 156, Paul Garcia at
160, Jim Mannosat 161 and Simon
Moyeat 162.
The tournament, named after
the Duke University golfer who
died in an accident, was played on
Duke's home course in Durham
and was the Pirate's third tourna-
ment of the fall season.
Thursday, ECU will travel to
Buies Creek for the Hargrove
Davis Invitational hosted by
Campbell University. The tourna-
ment will be played at Keith Hills
Country Club.
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sporti Writer
East Carolina was able to mus-
ter only one goal Friday as the
Pirates were downed by Virginia
Commonwealth University 3-1 in
soccer action at Varsity Field.
The loss, ECU'S fourth straight,
drops the Pirates to 1-10 on the
season. The Rams garnered their
fifth victory in a row and go to 5-
4-2.
Virginia Commonwealth
jumped out to a 2-0 halftime lead
after goals from Mike Sumncr and
Mahlon Moore. In the second
period, the Rams scored again
when when John Dugan already
with one assist for the day, kicked
one in at the 56:35 mark to make it
3-0 VCU.
With 15 minutes left in the
match, reserve Eddie Owens
spoiled VCU's plans for a shut out
scoring on an assist from Steve
McCarthy. The goal was Owen's
first as a Pirate.
The Pirates were hampered by
poor shooting taking 19 shots at
goal. Virginia Commonwealth
took 23.
ECU keeper Scott McCullough,
Women runners grab 1st
East Carolina's women took
first place at the Methodist Col-
lege Invitational Cross Country
meet finishing ahead of Method-
ist and Pembroke State.
Kim Griffiths was ECU's top
finisher placing second at 20:26.
Other times were Bibi Rosas (3rd,
21:37), Dawn Tillson (4th, 21:42),
Terri Lynch (6th, 21:56), Judy
Wilson (9th, 23:04) and Kathy El-
lis (11th, 24:01).
The Pirate men placed third
behind Duke and Methodist.
Leading the way for ECU was
Mike McGehee (11th, 28:22) fol-
lowed by Matt Schweitzer (16th,
28:50) Rob Rice (24th, 29:28),
Rusty Williams (31st, 30:20),
Rusty Meador (32nd, 30:29), Miles
Layton (35th, 31:00), Henry Pat-
rick (40th, 32:20), Joe Corley (41st,
32:38), and Freddie Fuller (42nd,
33:13).
This weekend the Pirates will
compete in one of their biggest
meets of the season The State of
North Carolina Cross Country
Championships in Raleigh.
replacingan injured MacKandall,
made his first collegiate start and
had seven saves. Wesley Ward
had five for Virginia Common-
wealth.
East Carolina will take a break
from conference play with home
matches against Elon College Fri-
day and Atlantic Christian Thurs-
day Oct. 22. Friday match will
begin at 3 p.m.
Volleyballers drop three
East Carolina's volleyball team
dropped to 8-9 after losing
straight matches over the week-
end.
The Lady Pirates lost to the
University of Maryland 8-15, 3-
15, and 6-15 at College Park, Md
Friday.
Saturday, ECU returned to
CAA action but came up empty-
handed losing to George Mason
University 9-15, 3-15, 8-15 and
American University 12-15,14-16
and 12-15. The conference losses
put the lady Pirates at 1-3 in the
Colonial Athletic Association.
"We are all real disappointed
with our play this weekend,
head coach Imogene Turner said�
"We just didn't do anything
right B
ECU will host Virginia Com-
monwealth University in a non-
conference match Tuesday, Oct
13 at 7 p.m. in Minges Coliseum.
Pirate swt
ByPATMOLLOY
AhisUM Sparta Lditor
The ECU Pirate swimmer's
pentathalon was held in Minges
Coliseum Thursday
Head coach Rick Kobe, pleased
with the speed of the men's team,
said it was the fastest pentathalon
in the history of the school
"It was our fastest match ever
Everyone, especially the fresh-
men did a great job It was a solid,
all-around team effort"
Freshman George Walters set a
new pentathalon record for the
100-yard backstroke with a time
of 55.9 seconds. Following a
stroke behind him was freshman
Mark O'Brian at 56 06 seconds;
and finishing third was freshman
John Farrell
Also setting a new team record
in the pentathalon was sopho-
more Raymj
nedy polish!
breaststroke!
Senior Re
second with
veteran swi
in at I A .
finish.
In the pi
Medley, Fai
anoth r firs
ing the �
sccord was
timi
third sp
In)
ing pr
strengtl
toa541 tirsj
mg the runnl
sten.
I
behind the
-
Paddlers look
Intrarm
dur
By JAY DeVAN!
Spitii! n The rot Carunrtun
Have you ever wanted to -
what it is like to paddle a kayak or
canoe through gentle rapids, or to
watch wildlife from the peace and
quiet of a boat floating down a
gently flowing stream1
If the answer is yes, you should
consider pining the recently es-
tablished ECU Paddling Club.
The ECU Paddling Club was
organized under the Division of
Club Sports of the Department of
Intramurals s
programs prod
� i
paddlers has
a club v.
expertise
Kav
nal
The Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services Outdoor
Recreation Program has been
designed to provide students,
faculty and staff with an opportu-
nity to enjoy the natural sur-
roundings through the use of
equipment and information spe-
cific to outdoor activities, and bv
participation in various adven-
ture programs.
These three main areas com-
prise the program and make this
particular division unique com-
pared to many outdoor programs
across the country.
Through East Carolina's pro-
gram, participants are able to rent
outdoor equipment on a dailv,
weedend or extended use basis
for a nominal fee. Equipment mav
be reserved up to four weeks in
advance of intended use. Tvpes of
equipment include: kayaks, tents,
backpacks, canoes, sleeping bags
and other apparall utilized in
most any outdoor adventure.
Got the equipment but no place
to go? The Center also acts as an
information resource center. In-
formation relative to state, na-
tional ad private parks as well as
other recreational areas are avail-
able free of charge. Maps, topor-
gaphical charts and descriptive
literature aid in the selection of
areas or activities for outdoor rec-
reational pursuits.
Can't decise which place to go1
Well, that's understandable with
all the adventure trips scheduled
by the Center through tout the fall
and spring semester calendar.
Locally sponsored trips, such as
canoeing, bike hikes, kayaking,
hang gliding, windsurfing, camp-
ing and backpacking are coordi-
nated through the Department
These activates are provided to
add spice to your life and increase
participation in the Outdoor Rec-
'reation division.
Love to go kayaking but have
"never even seen a kayak? Well.
the ORC will provide interested
persons with practice time dunng
scheduled clinics. These clinics
vide information and are pro-
fvided in an effort to spur interest
id provide a basic knowledge of
rdoor pursuits. Ginics are held
a variety of areas across cam-
pus.
O.K. so you're interested The
next outdoor adventure trip will
take place Oct. 23-25. An exciting
backpacking adventure is set up
for all faculty, staff and students
to enjoy. On Nov. 1 enjoy a lei-
surely scenic canoe tnp along the
I Tar River. For additional details,
drop by the ORC located in room
113 Memorial Gvm or call 757-
6911.
Swim conditioning is a pro-
gram for individuals who are
interested in developing speed,
endurance, stroke efficiency and
overall fitnf
signed for a
abilities anc
tration tor
Oct. 13-16 n
from 9 a.m.
week sessioj
$15faculty
ditioningisi
Wednesday!
p.m. in Mei
fr
$1.
wi" i mm

i
.
;





ing win
9L - 44
in Jordan - EC I Photo Lab)
'
U
CMFimn
rated a I 18 ards Saturday, while
quarterback Damn McCoin.
irate win
That
u : as i pi
is they win.
the ball, but it
- d it in a differ-
ind we win said
hen I'm all for it "
�'� al the offen-
job and
� .s in without
to him, the
: ' players and
tOj 'her and
e things
have any goals
f the season7 "Of
McKinney. "We
a winning season.
at considering
won over two
� r the past three
forward to all
re all very im-
1 m going to plav
a) I play each play:
ayed the last
Friday
injured Mac Kandall,
first collegiate start and
id � n saves Wesley Ward
five tor Virginia Common-
ilth.
t C aroiina will take a break
n conference play with home
matches against Elon College Fri-
ind Atlantic Christian Thurs-
� vt 22. Friday's match will
begin at 3 p.m.
alters drop three
(levball team
fter losing
;r the week-
lost to the
md 8-15, 3-
ic Park, Md
'turned to
up empty-
rge Mason
8-15 and
12-15,14-16
and 12-15. The conference losses
put the lady Pirates at 1-3 in the
Colonial Athletic Association.
"We are all real disappointed
with our play this weekend,
head coach Imogene Turner said.
"We just didn't do anything
right
ECU will host Virginia Com-
monwealth University in a non-
conference match Tuesday, Oct
13 at 7 p.m. in Minges Coliseum
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 13,1987 11
Pirate swimmers fare well in pentathalon
By PAT MOLLOY
Aimupil Sporti Editor
The ECU Pirate swimmer's
pentathalon was held in Minges
Coliseum Thursday.
Head coach Rick Kobe, pleased
with the speed of the men's team,
said it was the fastest pentathalon
in the history of the school.
"It was our fastest match ever.
Everyone, especially the fresh-
men did a great job. It was a solid,
all-around team effort
Freshman George Walters set a
new pentathalon record for the
100-yard backstroke with a time
of 55.9 seconds. Following a
stroke behind him was freshman
Mark O'Brian at 56.06 seconds;
and finishing third was freshman
lohn Farrell.
Also setting a new team record
in the pcntathalon was sopho-
more Raymond Kennedy. Ken-
nedy polished off the 100-yard
breaststroke in a smooth 1:01.73.
Senior Ronald Fleming placed
second wi th a ti me of 1:02.54 and
veteran swimmer Lee Hicks came
in at 1:04.20, posting a third-place
finish.
In the men's 200 Individual
Medley, Farrell took points for
another first-place finish, touch-
ing the wall in 2:04.69. Settling for
second was Tom Holsten with a
time of 2:04.79. Pulling up for the
third spot was Kennedy at 2:06.38.
In the 100-yard butterfly, Flem-
ing proved his upper-body
strength as he propelled himself
to a 55.41 first-place finish. Claim-
ing the runner-up spot was Hol-
sten, who finished one full second
behind the winner. And sopho-
more Greg Hall placed third with
a time of 56.93
In the final men's event, the 100-
yard frecstroke, Farrell once
again took first-place honors,
posting a 49.32 mark. Sophomore
Andyjceter finished second at
50.19. And Raymond Kennedy
sailed to a third-place showing at
50.97.
The overall winner for the men
was Raymond Kennedy, who
compiled an impressive 2,795
points against his teammates.
Skimming first place, but hav-
ing to settle for second was
Ronald Fleming with a 2,754-
point finish.
And cruising to a third-place
finish was senior Tyge Pistorio
who sailed in with 2,416 points.
Though coach Kobe was im-
pressed with the performance of
his women's team, mcoming
freshman Meredith Bridges
earned special acclaim. "She will
definitely help to get our season
off on the right foot said Kobe.
Getting off on the right foot is
exactly what Bridges did. In the
100-yard breaststroke, the YWCA
National Champion set a new
varsity record with a time of
1:08.16. Bridges beat the old rec-
ord, set in 1984 by Jessica Feinberg
by .26 of a second.
Pulling in at second place was
Ryan Philyaw with a time of
1:15.11; and settling for the third-
place points was sophomore
Leslie Wilson, who posted a time
of 1:16.29.
In the 200 IM, the sophomores
made a total sweep. Wilson
grabbed the points for number
one with a time of 2:18.47. Phi-
lyaw snagged second, posting a
Paddlers looking for a few good oars
ByJAYDeVANE
Special to The East Carolinian
Have you ever wanted to see
what it is like to paddle a kayak or
canoe through gentle rapids, or to
watch wildlife from the peace and
quiet of a boat floating down a
gently flowing stream?
If the answer is yes, you should
consider joining the rcccntlv es-
tablished ECU Paddling Club.
The ECU Paddling Club was
organized under the Division of
Club Sports of the Department of
Intramural-Recreation Services
during the Fall semester of 1986.
Under the advisorship of Dr.
lames E. Hix (Chemistry) a nu-
cleus of about 10 experienced
paddlers has been organized into
a club which has been sharing its
expertise with those students,
and will take a number of trips on
Whitewater rivers in the area.
IRS owns 10 Coleman canoes.
The club and IRS have recently
purchased three Noah kayaks for
instructional purposes. This
makes it possible for the new-
comer to try the sport without
faculty and staff who wish to try having to invest large sums of
kayak and canoe paddling.
The club will hold regular in-
structional sessions in paddling
and safety techniques in Memo-
rial Gym pool and the Tar River
Intramurals services
programs profiled
The Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services Outdoor
Recreation Program has been
designed to provide students,
faculty and staff with an opportu-
nity to enjoy the natural sur-
roundings through the use of
equipment and information spe-
cific to outdoor activities, and by
participation in various adven-
ture programs.
These three main areas com-
prise the program and make this
particular division unique com-
pared to many outdoor programs
across the country.
Through East Carolina's pro-
gram, participants are able to rent
outdoor equipment on a daily,
weedend or extended use basis
for a nominal fee. Equipment may
be reserved up to four weeks in
advance of intended use. Types of
equipment include: kayaks, tents,
backpacks, canoes, sleeping bags
and other apparall utilized in
most any outdoor adventure.
Got the equipment but no place
to go? The Center also acts as an
information resource center. In-
formation relative to state, na-
tional ad private parks as well as
other recreational areas are avail-
able free of charge. Maps, topor-
gaphical charts and descriptive
literature aid in the selection of
areas or activities for outdoor rec-
reational pursuits.
Can't decise which place to go?
Well, that's understandable with
all the adventure trips scheduled
by the Center throughtout the fall
and spring semester calendar.
Locally sponsored trips, such as
canoeing, bike hikes, kayaking,
hang gliding, windsurfing, camp-
ing and backpacking are coordi-
nated through the Department.
These activites are provided to
add spice to your life and increase
participation in the Outdoor Rec-
reation division.
Love to go kayaking but have
never even seen a kayak? Well,
the ORC will provide interested
persons with practice time during
scheduled clinics. These clinics
provide information and are pro-
vided in an effort to spur interest
and provide a basic knowledge of
ourdoor pursuits. Clinics are held
in a variety of areas across cam-
pus.
O.K. so you're interested. The
next outdoor adventure trip will
take place Oct. 23-25. An exciting
backpacking adventure is set up
for all faculty, staff and students
to enjoy. On Nov. 1 enjoy a lei-
surely scenic canoe trip along the
Tar River. For additional details,
drop by the ORC located in room
113 Memorial Gym or call 757-
6911.
Swim conditioning is a pro-
gram for individuals who are
interested in developing speed,
endurance, stroke efficiency and
overall fitness. Workouts are de-
signed for a variety of swimming
abilities and fitness levels. Regis-
tration for the second session is
Oct. 13-16 in 204 Memorial Gym
from 9 a.m4 p.m. Cost for the six
week session is $10students and
$15faculty and staff. Swim con-
ditioning is held on Mondays and
Wednesday's from 6:30 to 7:30
p.m. in Memorial Pool.
money into equipement before
knowing what to buy.
A meeting is held in Memorial
Gym every Tuesday. Contact Jim
Hix (757-6764 or 756-2970) for
more details.
The club went on several trips
�ast summer, including two for
beginners on the upper Cape Fear
River. This semester one trip has
been made down the Haw River
and two or three more are in the
planning stage.
The Cape Fear and Haw Rivers
have class one and two white
water, just enough rocks and
small rapids to keep things inter-
esting, especially for the begin-
ning kayaker. However, at least
one trip to the mountains to
paddle the Nantahala River is
being considered. The trips in-
volve about four hours of pad-
dling time, enough to know
Every Tuesday
College Night
from 8:00 to 11:00
$1.50 with college I.D.
.50$ skate rental
SPORTSWORLD
104 E. Redbanks Rd.
756-6000
REMEMBER YOUR BOSS
FRIDAY. OCTOBER 16

-233gktfS?J


. with a card from American Greetings
that expresses your true sentiments.
Student Stores
Wright Building
AMERICAN GREETINGS
you've had a good work out, yet
not be exhausted or sore the next
day.
The paddling club will be hold-
ing a meeting for interested par-
ticipants tonight at 9 p.m. in 105
Memorial Gym.
2:19.83 mark. And Ginger Carrick
stopped theclock at 2:21.59 to take
third.
After her third-place showing,
Carrick made an about face and
took first place in the 100-yard
backstroke with a time of 1:05.43.
Freshman Keller Hodges closed
in on second at 1:05.43; and
Wilson appeared again, claiming
third with a time of 1:09.15.
Junior Patti Walsh posted a time
of 1:02.98 to take first-place hon-
ors in the 100-yard flystroke
Philyaw made a solid second-
place showing with a time of
1:03.67; and junior Susan Augus-
tus snared the remaining points,
finishing at 1:04.13.
In the final event of the
women's pentathalon, the 100-
yard freestroke, Philyow finished
first at 57.35, Wilson took second
at 58.16; and freshman Sonya
Hemingway made an appearance
to grab third place at 58.40.
The overall winner for the
women in the pentathalon was
Ryan Philyaw with 3,188.
Placing second by one point
was Leslie Wilson; and taking
third-place honors was freshman
sensation Meredith Bridges
The next event for the Pirate
swimmers will be the Purple and
Gold meet Oct. 22 at 4 p.m. The
meet will be held at Minges Coli-
seum.
rhe
ast Carolinian.
ride,
otivation,
xperience,
friends.
Apply today.
I
I l( IV

1 ISSl()
1
Playing: Wed. Oct. 14th
8:00 P.M.
Hendrix Theatre
First Wachovia is looking for a
few good students for manage-
ment trainee positions in banking.
Recruiters will be on campus on
November 3,1987. Contact the
Career Planning and Placement
Office for an interview or further
information.
FIRST
WACHOVIA
An Equal Opportunity Employer
RACK ROOM,
TAKE AN
� BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
I
I
-Open MonSat. 10-9
Sunday 1-6
E-X-T-R-A
10
OFF
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(EXCEPT AIGNER NIKE AND REEBOK)
You should know
about new e.p.t. stick
test. It's the tast and easv
wav to hndout it ou're
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vou find out in private.
It the stick turns pink,
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lrvouhaean
questions about e.p.t call
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e.p.t. The tirst and
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WMI.WMII n�T�jii(,nvln�. Iiirp
't
MwSSMMMMlNl

.





12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 13.
1987
Elkins isn't complaining
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) -
they told Mike Elkins that he
would be throwing the ball a lot
Jess when Bill Dooley took over as
head football coach at Wake For-
est. After five games, Elkins isn't
Complaining.
Elkins tossed a first-quarter
touchdown pass and directed
drives which led to a school-rec-
ord five Wilson Hoyle field goals
& a 22-14 victory over North
Carolina. The victory gave Wake
Forest a share of first place in the
Atlantic Coast Conference, and it
demonstrated that Elkins was
iore concerned about the results
an the methods used to achieve
Stem.
"The biggest difference is obvi-
ously the record - we're 5-0 El-
Sns said Saturday. "There's a big
fference in the offensive phi-
losophy. We throw the ball effec-
tively, that's the big key.
Against the Tar Heels, Elkins
completed 13 of 25 passes for 181
yards and an 8-yard scoring pass
to tailback Darryl McGill on the
game's opening drive.
Elkins was a much more prolific
passer in 1986, when the Demon
Deacons were 5-6. In last year's
contest with the Tar Heels, Elkins
completed 21 of 48 passes for 297
yards, two touchdowns and two
interceptions in a 40-30 loss. That
was the result of Coach Al Groh's
pro-style offense.
Doolcy's offense is more of a
ball-control approach; the best
defense is a good offense, and
instead of emphasizing the big
play pilosophy, the team is more
inclined to try the short passes
with the intent of picking up
Giants teach thieves
base-stealing lesson
I SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - The
San Francisco Giants taught the
hieves from St. Louis a lesson in
txise-stcaling and outdinked the
"dink ball" champions.
San Francisco, one victory from
its first National League pennant
in 25 years, put on another show
of power and pitching Sunday
while beating the Cardinals at
their own game.
The Giants set a playoff home
run record, swiped three bases,
strung together some singles and
secured a 6-3 victory with reborn
relief pitcher Joe Price's brilliant
one-hit pitching over the last five
innings.
"They looked like the Gashouse
Gang today and we looked like a
bunch of leadfoots said St. Louis
Manager Whitey Herzog. "We
couldn't get them out with a can-
non
The victory gave the Giants a 3-
2 lead in the best-of-seven play-
offs with Game 6 on Tuesday
night in St. Louis. The Giants will
send Dave Dravecky against John
Tudor. The two met in the second
game when Dravecky threw a
two-hitter in a 5-0 victory.
Price became the latest surgi-
cally repaired hero for the Giants,
a team to make medical science
proud.
"It's every ballplayer's dream
Price said of his first playoff vic-
tory, calling it the most important
game in his eight-year career.
Price's dream game -he had six
strikeouts and one walk- held
more significance for him because
it marked the climax of his come-
back from elbow surgery.
Price was 2-2 with one save
during the regular season and he
quietly led the club with a 2.57
earned run average. With all the
big trades for pitchers Rick
Rcuschcl, Don Robinson and
Dravecky, hardly anyone noticed
Price.
"I think I'm really lucky be-
cause I'm one of the few guys who
didn't get traded away.
moderate yardage to maintain
possession.
Elkins did complete a 40-yard
pass play to Ricky Proehl on the
last play of the first quarter and a
25-yard pass play to Steve Brown
in the second quarter. But com-
pared to last year, the passing
game under Dooley is far more
conservative.
"We don't throw it a lot, but we
try to keep it effective he said.
"It's come around the last couple
of weeks.
"It's not a wide open pro-style
offense such as last year's, but you
can't argue with the 5-0 start he
said.
In his first two seasons, Elkins is
a 53 percent passer for 3,184
yards, 21 interceptions and 22
touchdowns. Through five
games, Elkins has completed 54.8
percent for 607 yards.
Breaking down the figures,
Elkins has attempted 109 passes
so far. At the same time last year,
he had thrown 192 times. After
the North Carolina game, Elkins
has 788 yards passing, compared
to 1,380 through five games last
year.
Clip-N
The difference comes down to
the unblemished season as op-
posed to a 3-2 start last year which
deteriorated into a sub-par finish.
Dooley is known for his
ground-oriented approach to
football, but Elkins notes that the
first-year coach is adapting his
style to the people available, and it
has produced an offense with a
low-risk factor.
"We probably work our person-
nel better and try to control the
ball Elkins said. "We don't try
and run up a lot of points like we
did last year
Elkins admits that there's more
to the offense than a quarterback
who likes to throw for big num-
bers. But as Dooley has used what
was available, Elkins has learned
to play the game with a new ap-
proach.
"There are so many more areas
that you have to concentrate on as
a quarterback besides just throw-
ing for yardage. This is really a
challenge for me to make this ad-
justment to a different offense
he said. "We feel really bad about
the offense. We're moving the
ball We feel very confident
-Save ������ihh
!�
Si
X
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
32 1 E. 10th St. Greenville (next to Wendy's)
758-0000
VOTED THE NATION'S 1 VANILLA
Buy 1 Sundae or Blend-in. Get 1
12 PRICE

one coupon per order please
coupon good thruOctober 21. 1987

Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
321 E. 10th St. Greenville (next to Wendy s)
758-0000
VOTED THE NATION'S 1 VANILLA
NOW DELIVERS
Order your favorite tee cream treat and well bring It to your doori
FREE Delivery with this coupon
CALL 758-0000
one coupon per ordtr please coupon good through October- 21,
19.8?

The
East Carolinian
Required reading
for the serious student.
STUDENT
SPECIALS
& Hold these coupons
cr For Future Savings �
Wheel Alignment: 4-Wheel Drum or
� Front Disc Reline and
�l �88, , � Rotor machined
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Winterize : T u .
0 . . � Lubrication, Oil
SerV1C�8 'Filter, Oil Change
� fc-ia88
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$17
(includes 1 Gal ArttiFreeze)
Used Tires
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� 4-Wheel Computer
� Balance and Rotate
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88
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�20 TOPPINGS AVAILABLE
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cookie Nc cootue onstes ptease'
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27 oz Small
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Guoranteed Good As A Home-
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FROZEN YOGURT IN COMPARISON TO ICE CREAM 4 Oz. Serving
Frozen Yogurt 130 calories .3 Fat
Baskins Robbins 240 Calories 12 Fat
Hagen Das 290 Calories 18 Fat
Being a fast food customer for years has always brought the same question to mind. Why doesn't
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 13, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 13, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.565
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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