The East Carolinian, October 8, 1987






INSIDE
Editorials� 4
Entertainmentu
Sports 15
Classifieds5
ENTERTAINMENT
"Leave it to Jane" reviewed, see ENTERTAIN-
MENT� page 11.
SPORTS
Can the Pirates recover in time for Homecomin?-
see SPORTS, page 15.
(Ufa iEant (�ar0lmtan
Serving tin- East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. h2 No. 13
Thursd.iv, October 8, 1MS7
Greenville, NC
18 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Chisholm speaks on
'Women and work'
H I 1M HAMPTON
I lu first black woman elected
ingress and a woman astro
I will speak on women and
work next week at Mendenhall
Student enter
Shirley Chisholm, a former
1 'ngresswoman (D-NY), will
ik a; 8 p m Monday . hish-
speakon the changes that
� i since women have
' � work place
I inda Iwin an astronaut,
i m ednesda
be the keynote
. day long forum,
v entur
el� v ted in 1969
ears in the I louse ol
She was the only
I) Bla k to sit on
5 v - Committee
1 hisholm became t!u
hrsl Black woman to serioush
1 Pai t nomi
� - ' 'resident She vas a
� mber ol the Black
� as als .1 member
iscEd i ation and I aboi
Committee Slu- has written 2
, hisholm is presented by the
t Union Forum Commit-
c I on a Batizy, v hairperson ol
the committee, said ticket prices
are $2 tor students, $3 tor faculty
and statt, and $5 for the public
l.mda Godwin will start the
Women's Forum "Women of the
? 1 st Century She has a doctorate
in physics and served as a flight
controller on several NASA
Shuttle missions, according to the
ECU News Bureau
Following Godwin, speakers
will include, "Women from the
community who have been sue
cessful in fields ot ser ice organi
zations, government, education
and business said Marie larr
director ot the Won en's Stud
Program
SRA meets
The Student Residence Hall
Association resolved at its rues
day meeting to sponsor a Pig
Pickin' Now 7 in honor of the last
home football game.
President Thomas Denton sue,
gested the idea tor the SRA's
approval. It will be held on the
held at the bottom of College Hill,
and tickets will be on sale the
week before the�vw�t, according
to Denton
Mark Carroll, vice-president,
announced plans for an energy
contest among the residence halls

f !


i.
lour freeze frai
! I and NC
ames of a news videotape which depict the suspect that officer, according to ECU Public Safety Capt. Keith Knox (Photos
it I ubhc Safety officials are looking for. Witnesses courtesy of ECU Public Safety).
have identified the man as the person who assaulted an N( SI
Suspect of NCSU violence to policeman identified via video
By ANDY LEWIS
V�� 1 Jitnr
Law ent trccmeiU officials trom
ECU and North Carolina State
University are using photographs
and ideotapes in their attempt to
track down the man who as-
suited an officer at the KCU-
NlSU iootball game.
"Somebody knows who this
person is said Captain Keith
Knox of ECU Public Safety. Knox,
speaking in an interview Wednes-
day, said "there is no dout
him being the guy indicau0 -
man depicted in videotapes of the
post-game incident.
The tapes were filmed after
ECU's 32-14 victory over NCSU
Sept. 5, when about 2,000 fans
rushed onto the field, destroying
a fence in the south end zone and
two goal posts, causing an esti-
mated $7,21X1 damage to Carter-
Finley Stadium.
During the incident. Officer
Robert W. Malason of NCSU
Public Safety was struck in the
face by a man he was trying to pull
off a goal post. Malason and other
witnesses have identified the man
as one of those depicted in vide-
otapes of the incident.
The man is wearing a purple,
pull-over knit shirt and jeans in
k; videotapes submitted by TV
new departments. In the upes,
the man is hanging on a toppled
goal post and swings a purple and
gold cloth while more than 50 fans
look up at him cheering.
Knox said he obtained the pho-
tos and videotapes last week.
Officers have yet to identify the
man in the videotape; they still do
not know if he is a student (of ECU
or NCSU).
Malason suffered a fractured
cheekbone and a cut to the eye as
a result of the assault, Knox said.
Malason has recovered nearly
normal vision, Knox said.
Knox said Capt. Laura Rey-
nolds and Detective Jeff Larock of
NCSU Public Safety visited ECU
last month and questioned differ-
ent people.
Police look for slingshot suspect
The Alpha Omicron Pi pledges hosted a dunking booth in front of
the Student Store Wednesday to raise money for the Arthritis Reserch
Found
ing an
ation. Alpha Omicron Pi pledge Becky Carter, is demonstrat-
easier way to dunk Sigma Phi Epsilon volunteer, Sam Smith:
By ANDY LEWIS
ECU Public Safety is requesting
the help of anyone with informa-
tion about a Sept. 28 incident in
which a student was struck in the
head by a steel projectile, accord-
ing to public safety Captain Keith
Knox.
Thomas Wayne Tebo, 18, of 439
Aycock was in his room when a 3
8-inch steel ball bearing struck
him on the side of his head, Knox
said in an interview Wednesdav.
Knox said the ball went through
the bug screen of an open window
in Tebo's room.
The Greenville Rescue Squad
treated Tebo at the site of the in-
jury for a wound which broke the
kin and drew blood, Knox said.
According to Knox, Tebo was not
taken to the hospital.
The trajectory appears to have
come from the north-west corner
of Scott dorm Knox said. He
speculated that the steel ball came
from a bathroom window on the
fourth floor of Scott.
An eye-witness saw some
people looking out of a fourth-
floor window and heard one of
them say, "We hit him Knox
said.
"You can kill a person with
those (hunting) sling shot" bul-
lets, Knox said.
Pirate Crime Busters (757-6266) is
offering up to $1,000 as a reward to
anyone with information about these
incidents. Callers do not have to give
their names.
HOMECOMING
it Vf I ��-

Nia ���!�
,





2 Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 8,1987
U.S. love affairs have unromantic dangers
By SHERRY DAISEY
Start Winer
"In the midst of an unprece-
dented epidemic of sexually
transmitted disease (STD), people
must recognize that the danger is
real' according to Dr. Mary Gui-
nan, a member of the Center tor
Disease Control (CDC).
Cuinan said people should
also realize "the need tor a new
ethic ot sevual responsibility
The sexual revolution and
America's affair with casual sex
for the last twenty years has led
many Americans to re-examine
their sexual practices.
According to a report from
the Public Agenda Foundation,
"An average of 33,000 people are
infected with STDs even- dav.
That adds up to 12 million new
cases a year At that rate it is esti-
mated that one in tour Americans
will eventually contract an STD
The report also noted that
chlamydia is the nation's leading
STD Chlamydia isanoftenmisdi-
agnosed infection which can
cause ectopic pregnancies and
infertility it left untreated. It is
estimated that one to three million
Americans will contract ch-
tamydia.
The report stated that herpes
simplex became a news item in
the late 1970s. At least 200,000
new cases will develop each year,
according to scientific estima-
tions.
Mary Elesha-Adams, health
educator at the ECU Student
Health Center, said, "In terms of
what we see here, wc see ch-
lamydia three to four times as
often as we see gonorrhea. This is
based on cultures run each week.
"On a given day we find that
about 10 out of every 70 students
tested are diagnosed positive.
This includes students who come
in for routine pap smears and also
those who experience symp-
toms
Shealsosaid herpesand geni-
tal warts are ranked third and
fourth after chlamydia which is
ranked first and gonorrhea
ranked second.
According to Dr. Shirley Wil-
liamson, M.D also from the ECU
Student Health Center, "Herpes
simplex is a disease that is seen
quite often here. There are certain
times of the year in which wc see
new cases such as the beginning
of the fall semester and after
spring break. But you see an in-
crease in other STDs as well
She also said chlamydia has
been around for a long time, but it
is just been in the last five years
that the test for it has become
more accessible to offices and col-
leges. The test is the most accurate
test available in detecting the dis-
ease which in turn prevents stu-
dents from being misdiagnosed.
"I try to make my patients
aware of the possibilities and
things they need to avoid, but I
think students need to consider
the long-term effects and to In-
considerate of others if they do
have an SID
As health educator, Elesha-
Adams is resjxmsible for coordi
nating and teaching programs in
residence halls, sorority houses,
and academic classrooms This
semester the student health center
has given five presentations in
residence halls on topics such as
STDs, safe sex and AIDS.
She was also involved in
bringing the documentary called
"Sex on Campus" to ECU. The
program was aired nationally
Sept. 30 to American colleges by
satellite,
Elesha-Adams has a health
column appearing in every Tues-
day edition of the East Carolinian
When comparing college stu-
dents today to students of previ
ous decades, she said, "I think
when you look at the students
now, they aren't doing anything
that they weren't doing 10 to 20
years ago She continued,
"When you look back to the days
of the sexual revolution there
were no incurable STDs to con-
tend with, but now we have AIDS,
which is a life-threatening dis-
NEW YORK CITY
The STUDENT UNION'S TRAVEL COMMITTEE
is presenting a trip to New York City (The Big
Apple) during Thanksgiving break.
4 Days & 3 Nights
Depart 8 p.m. Nov.25. 1987
Return: 11 p.m. Nov. 29. 1987
�� 7 Transportation Sr ashore Trallway llus Hotel Century Paramount
5 ' i Price per person: SI29 (quad occupancy); SI39
'triple occupancyand S149 (double occupancy).
. ?i�i s entral Ticket Office for details
M
ease
"It would be wise in this day
and age to discuss SlUs with
potential partners prior to sexual
activity
On a larger scale, college
educators across the nation are
impressing upon their students
the need to be more informed
about dangers and risks of con-
tracting an STD.
The "Chronicle of Higher
Education" (April, 1987) reported
that many heterosexual students
on American college campuses
have not yet changed their sexual
practices.
At Stanford University, more
than one-quarter of the students
polled could not identify the safer
sex practices, and an alarming
three quarters of the students said
they don't normally discuss sexu-
ally transmitted diseases with
their partners before intercourse,
according to a brochure from the
Public Agenda Foundation.
If students are serious about
their health and well-being, then
the concern about safer sex must
begin, Elesha-Adams said.
"Fortunately most STDs are
curable if detected. I would like to
point out to those students who
may get embarrassed about going
to the infirmary (that they) should
keep in mind that all appoint
mentsand conferences are kept in
the strictest of confidence, Elesha-
Adams said.
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ECU recei
(ECU News Bureau)
North Carolina Coum
opmental Disabi �
awarded Eastan
sity a $53,000 gra
program thai will �
ployment tor d(
disabled residents ol
"The purp s,
(Helping Individu i �
Employment) is
independent �
getting them into jol
Chaff in Clarl lirectoi
who are a ind ; end
can possii
living, not i n ating a
sitting at home doii .
Projei t
effort between tl
Universit) Sch n
Division ol & rvi
Center, a state upp
turn in Kinston for ti
retarded; the North
vision of Vocational
Students invited, prop
(EC L News Bi i
students interested
for the Scholastit ' ,
(SAT) are being invited to
themselves at Eastan lina
versity this fall.
"The Science and V, .
Education (enter owns I
puter programs
puter Preparati .
said Dr. Kathar
director. "We also ha
computer We an plea
fer the use oi this � , .
interested persons al
The lab v ill be availabU
following Thursdays ft n 4,
until7p.mOct.22and29
12 and 19, and Dec.
following Saturdays fr m -
until noon: Oct. 24 and
Nov. 14 and 21.
Because of the limited nun
of programs available, tin ;
ods must be res rved ahead
time. To make an appointm
call the center at 757-6885
Saturdav sessions, you n
before noon on Friday !
said.
. 1 lodgin stressed that the pro-
-am is setf-iri!tructnna. "V
fe not providing tutors sh&
id. A laboratory assistant
be in attendance to help with the
operation of the computers and to
monitor the use of the pn .
Facultv-student
seminar presented
(ECU News Bureau) � A
versity of North Carolina-Chape!
Hill sociologist will present a fac-
ulty-student seminar in the I
School oi Education Oct
"Th Underlving Debate C
Educational Policy
The seminar will be presented
by Dr. Henry Landsberger ol the
LNC-CH department oi sociol-
ogy at 2:30 p.m. in Room 312
Speight Bldg on the EC I cam-
pus. The public is invited.
"Francis Coppola
has made a classic
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dangers
n tliis da
n are
dents
se practices and an alarming
three quarters o( the students said
thej den t normally discuss sexu-
alK transmitted diseases with
their partners before intercourse,
ding to a brochure trom the
u genda Foundation
It students are serious about
their health and well being, then
cm about satcr sex must
lesha vianis said.
Fortunatcl) most STDs are
detected. I would like to
pomt out to those students who
barrassed about going
!rv (that the) should
in mind that all appoint-
nterences are kept in
I confidence, F lesha-
�aut Qlarolinfon
rising
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hi;
I 8 1987
ECU receives grant to establish HIRE program
(ECU News Bureau) The
North Carolina Council on Devel-
opmental Disabilities has
awarded East Carolina Univer-
sity a $53,000 grant to establish a
program that will provide em-
ployment tor developmental
disabled residents of Pitt County.
The purpose o� Project HIRE
(Helping Individuals to Realize
Employment) is to increase the
independence of these people b
getting them into jobs said Ann
( haffin Clark, director. People
who are as independent as they
can xissiblv be are out making a
living, not creating a tax drain by
sitting at home doing nothing
Project HIRE is a coordinated
effort between the East Carolina
I niversity School of Education
Division of Services; Caswell
c enter, a state supported institu-
tion in Kinston for the mental!)
retarded, the North C arolina Di-
vision oi Vocational Rehabilita-
tion anil Pitt County Mental Re-
tardation Services.
'By coordinating services and
funding tor supported employ-
ment through Project II1RE, these
agencies have been able to de-
velop an inter-agency network
that can provide more efficient
services to the clients Clark said
Developmental disabled per
sons IS and older who reside in
Pitt County are eligible tor the
program. "A developmental dis
ability is one that is attributable to
a mental andor physical impair-
ment manifested before the per
son reaches 22 years of age, is
likely to continue indefinitely and
results in substantial functional
limitations Clark said.
"Project I HRH will primarily be
concerned with individuals with
mental retardation
A committee made up of repre-
sentatives from agencies that pro
vie services for developmental I v
Students invited, propare for SAT's
lIC U News bureaul Area
students interested in preparing
for the Scholastk Aptitude rest
(SAT) are being invited to help
themselves at Fast Carolina I ni-
versity this fall.
"The Science and Mathematics
Education Center owns ten com
puter programs entitled Com
puter Preparation for the SA I
said Pr. Katharine W. Hodgin,
director. "We also have 22 IBM
computers We arc pleased to ot-
ter the use ot tlus equipment to
interested persons al no charge
The lab will Iv available on the
following Thursdays trom 4 p m
until 7 p.m Oct. 22 and 29, Nov. 5,
12 and ls and Dec 3; and on the
following Saturdays trom 4 a.m
until noon: Oct 24 and 31, .ui
Nov. 14 and 21.
Because of the limited number
ol programs available time peri
ods must be reserved ahead ol
time. To make an appointment
call the center at 757-6885 "lor
Saturday sessions, you must call
betore noon on Friday Hodgin
said.
Hodgin stressed that the pro
$ruMi is self-instructional. "We
ifc not provttiirvp tutors she
said. A laboratory assistant will
be in attendance to help with the
operation ot the computers and to
monitor the use ot the programs.
Faculty-student
seminar presented
(ECU News Bureau) A I m
versitv of North Carolina-Chapel
Hill sociologist will present a fac-
ulty-student seminar in the ECU
School of Education Oct. 13 on
"The Underlying Debate Over
Educational Policy
The seminar will be presented
bv Dr. Henry Landsberger of the
UNC-CH department of sociol-
ogy at 2:30 p.m. in Room 312,
Speight Bldg on the ECU cam-
pus. The public is invited.
which enable students to tutor
themselves and work at theirown
K OS.
I he center sees the project as a
way of improving students'
achievement in math and science.
Hodgin said. "The real objective is
to get more students interested in
math and science. We'd even like
for si me of them to become good
math and science teachers "
disabled adults screens each re
ferral to make sure that they are
suited for employment.
"We look at whether or not the
person can function independ-
ently and take care of his or her
own needs Clark said. "It helps
it thevhavea willingness to work,
if they've had any work experi-
ence, or if they've been in a school
program ihat has prepared them
for this
"( nc of the other things that's
important is family support
Clark added. "Hie family needs
to recognize the fact that this per-
son has the potential to work.
Sometimes that's a problem. They
also have to be willing to perform
other duties, like provide trans
portation and make sure the client
is appropriately prepared for
work each day
Once a referral is approved, an
entry level job is found and the
client is put to work. Each client is
taught how to do the work by a job
coach provided through Project
HIRE. The coach spends ever
hour on the job with the client
until the required skills are mas
tered.
"From dav one the employer is
assured that whatever produc-
tion rate established for that posi
tion will be met Clark said
"Initially it will lv more job coach
than client. Hut once the person
has mastered the job, the job coach
begins to fade out. Eventually the
)ob coach will not bo there at all
Periodic checks are made tin the
client to "make sure everything is
all right Clark said. "We'll go in
maybe once a day at tirst to che k
on them, then maybe twice a
week. If there is a problem, the job
coach will follow up until the
problem is solved
A study conducted by Virginia
Commonwealth University esti
mated that it takes between 160
and 2(X) hours to train a severely
mentally retarded person. "We
are finding that their estimate is
not hard and fast Clark said
"We may have a good referral, but
it may take more than 2(H) con
secutive hours to train them
According to Clark, Project
IIIRE provides many benefits for
employers. "Persons who are
mentally retarded make real good
workers she said. "They're
proud of their work, and they are
dependable. Job retention is high
because they're not interested in
)b hopping
"We are not asking forcharitj
she added "It you do a good
match with what your client's
strengths are and what he or she
likes to do, the job will accentuate
his or her strong points. That per
son will make a gixnl employee
because he wants to be there
Employ ers are only responsible
tor paying the employee's salary;
Project HIRIovers the cost ol the
job coach. "It the employer de
rides they want to train that jxt-
son for another position, the) r in
call us, and we will put the job
coach back in and train them
Clark said
The grant is renewable veail.
for a period of three years and will
be used to pa) the salaries oflark
and two job coaches, as well as
supplies and staff de elopment.
"Ibis is a new arealark said
"We're pioneers and as sue h have
i lot to le.irn from each other.
We reestablishing rules as we go
alon
Plans an b� ing made to provide
practicums for E( I. students
majoring m spe lal education or.
vocational rehabilitation and
human relations students al Pitt
( ommunityollege. "Under-
graduate students will probably
observe , lark said
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4 Tl IE EASTCAROf INIAN OCTOBERS. 1987
Sty iEaat QIarnltnran
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, cm�
Clay Deanhardt, ihrtu
Andy Lewis, n� e, james rj. mcKee, d
TIM Cl 1ANDLER, , ECto ANTIIONY MARTIN, Bmc� M�,t�
Jot in Carter, r�o�,� meg Needham,
Si ielton Bryant, m mike Ura iurch, p m,�
Debbie Stevens, s� jol 1N w. Medlin, � mm
(Vtober8, 1987
Opinion
Page 4
Homecoming
It's Homecoming 1987 � a time
tor celebration, joy, parties and the
return oi alumni from across the
country to their alma matter. It's a
time tor parades, dinners, tailgating,
football. Homecoming courts and
I lomecoming queens.
I ast year, I lomecoming was also a
time of controversy.
Confusion reigned as Tonja How-
ell became the first ever Miss ECU
through the I lomecoming pageant.
The representative of the Gospel
Choir, her picture was mistakenly
left out of the following Tuesday's
edition of The East Carolinian due to
unforseeable circumstances.
Charges of racism were levied
against this newspaper, made all the
more serious since a newspaper
should be a bastion of objectivity
and fairness in reporting. A mistake
is a mistake, however, and once a
newspaper goes to press there is not
much you can do to correct harm
done.
You can apologize, and we did.
Now we make a promise. Photo-
graphs of the 1987 Homecoming
Queen will appear in the Tuesday
edition of The East Carolinian NO
MATTER WHOM THE QUEEN IS.
If we do not get the photographs for
some odd reason, there will be an
explanation boxed on the front page.
Also included in the next paper
will be a wrap up of the weekend's
events and photos from many of
those events.
A disservice was done to Howell
last year, and we hope to keep from
doing the same this year. All efforts
will be made to see that mistakes do
not repeat themselves.
As for the weekend itself � enjoy
it- Several activities have been
planned around the event including
the Fixx concert tonight, the parade
Saturday and the free concert by the
Chairmen of the Board on Sunday
lake a break and enjoy the festivi-
ties.
The East Carolinian wishes everv-
one a happy I lomecoming for 1987
and wishes the best of luck to all the
candidates on the Homecoming
Court.
Judiciary amendment explained
Congressional clock never wound
Th S� Rrpublic
Hie Vietnam War inspired a debate that
continues to this day about the proper role
of Congress in foreign affairs and the use of
military force in particular.
Congressional resentment over Lyndon
Johnson's use of the Tonkin Gulf resolution
as authority to conduct the war and over
Richard Nixon's invasion oi Cambodia
with no congressional authority at all led
Congress, in 1973, to pass the VVar Powers
Resolution. That law (which passed over
Nixon's veto) forbids presidents to intro-
duce armed forces into actual or "immi-
nent" hostili ties for more than 60 days with-
out the explicit consent of Congress.
Doves routinely hail the War Powers Act
as a means of putting a check on "foreign
adventurism Hawks complain that no
strong foreign policy is possible when sec-
ond-guessed by "535 secretaries of state
But despite the bluster on both sides. Con-
gress has never once used the 60-day clock
(which can be extended, at the president's
request, to no more than 90 days) to ap-
prove or terminate a single military action.
Instead, senators and representatives
have been drawn to a provision in the law
that requires the president to consult with
Congress before sending troops into hostile
territory. Because it is only occasionally
observed by presidents, the consultation
requirement has given Congress frequent
opportunity, in times of crisis, to complain
that the orderly process of government has
been subverted.
Thus the true function of the War Powers
Act: It allows jittery members of Congress
to avoid responsibilty for risky military
actions, while at the same time avoiding
responibility for the consequences of not
taking action.
A case in point was the recent attack on
the Stark. You would think that the death of
37 American servicemen in a war zone
would set the 60-day timer ticking. But the
issue was complicated because the attacker,
Iraq, was our unofficial ally. After the Stark
incident, only one ,member on Congress -
Rep. Peter DeFazio, a freshman liberal
Democrat from Oregon - proposed that the
War Powers clock be set to May 17, the day
of the attack. The bill went nowhere.
Congress perked up a bit more during the
first week of June. President Reagan had
proposed to place American flags on 11
Kuwaiti tankers and accompany them with
naval convoys to keep oil flowing through
the Persian Gulfand to counter similar
efforts by the Soviets).
In response, the House and the Senate
passed War Powers-esque resolutions re-
quiring the secretary of defense to provide
Congress with classified and unclassified
information about U.S. actions in the Gulf.
Neither resolution addressed the question
of whether those actions ought to be carried
out, or whether CongTess ought to wind the
60-day clock. But both passed quickly, pro-
viding fresh evidence that the favorite war
power of Congress is the power to complain
�at it isn't being consulted.
A few brave souls, including Sen. Mark
1 latfield, R-Ore and Rep. Jim Leach, R-
lowa, denounced the resolutions as a wa-
tered-down substitute for the War Powers
Act. Another minority fretted that simply
asking for information implied that Con
gress was on the team. Rep. Toby Roth, R-
Wis said: "This resolution puts congres
sional fingerprints on our course of action
Rep. Donald Lukens, R-Ohio: "Does this
put the fingerprints and the handprints of
the Congress on that policy?"
These members were remembering the
Gulf of Tonkin resolution, which inadvert-
netly gave Lyndon Johnson the power to
wage war in Vietnem. A fresher memory
was the sending of Marines to Lebanon -
apporved by Congress in advance of the 60-
day War Powers deadline - and their hasty
retreat after 240 were killed in their barracks
by a truck bomb. But in the Tonkin and
Lebanon resolutions Congress had made
the mistakeof taking sides; the beauty of the
Persian Gulf resolutions was that they did
not.
Congressional leaders reassured nervous
dissenters that congressional hands would
remain clean. House Majority Leader Tom
Foley, D-Wash heatedly denied that he
was proposing "a sort of Gulf of Tonkin
resolution It was "merely a demand for
information Rep. Pat Schroeder, D-Colo
called the resolution a "teeny-weeny first-
step" that "doesn't commit the Congress in
any way Thus assured, the House passed
the measure. But a Talmudic dispute had
meanwhile arisen between the Senate and
the House on language.
The House version, which called for in-
formation within seven days of the law's
enactment, was perceived by the Senate as
too weak. Yet the Senate alternative, which
called for a report prior to administration
action, sounded to the House like tacit
approval. After each body passed its own
version, Senate Majority Leader Robert
Byrd, D-W.Va papered over the differ-
ence: "We now have both houses of Con-
gress firmly on record expressing reserva-
tions about the course of administration
policy in the Persian Gulf and insisting that
Congress be kept fully informed
It seems fair to ask whether Congress
cares as much about being kept informed as
it does about going on record pounding its
fi st and demanding that i t be kept informed.
The administration had promised that it
would notify Congress of its intentions in
the Gulf within seven days, as required by
the House resolution. Eight days later I
phoned a congressional staffer working on
the issue and asked him whether this ea-
gerly anticipated report had arrived. "It
slipped my mind he admitted. (The full
report didn't come in until five days later.)
Meanwhile Congress has, in Byrd's
words, expressed "reservations" about
Persian Gulf policy - but it has yet to say
whether it will either withdraw or act upon
those reservations. To be sure, a few mem-
bers have proposed getting off the fence.
Sens. Dale Bumpers, D-Ark and Hatfield
submitted a bill proposing that the 60-day
clock start ticking as soon as the reflagging
begins. DeFazio now proposes the same on
the House side. Another bill, by Sen.
Claiborne Pell, D-R.L, chairman of the For-
eign Relations Committee, goes futher,
proposing an outright ban on reflagging!
But conventional wisdom rates all these
proposals quixotic.
To the editor:
Recently, an incredible amount of
controversy has been stirred up over
the proposed amendment concerning
double penalties.
As Attorney General, I am highly
pleased to see this interest in our Stu-
dent Judicial System; however, I feel
the controversy arises from a basic
lack of knowledge about what we are
trying to amend and why.
First of all, the amendment is meant
to clarify the portion in our SGA
Documents concerning the policy
towards Double Penalties.
Last year the Joint Judicial Board
met and discussed ways to aleviate
the ambiguity in our student judicial
system caused by the following state-
ment, "When prompt public prosecu-
tion is anticipated or underway, the
University shall not exercise its juris-
diction until public officials have dis-
posed of the casc, unless exceptional
circumstances compel otherwise
This statement has left it up to the
Attorney General to decide what is
exceptional. We will try cases such as
grand larceny, rapes or assaults
immediately, but other cases which
may not seem as severe will not be
tried. Who are we to tell a student,
"I'msorry that your $3,000 gold Rolex
was stolen, but we fed it isn't excep-
tional' enough to try it on campus.
Let's wait and see what happens off
campus"?
This example, by the way, did oc-
cur. The student accused of the lar-
centy was not tried on campus and
therefore was allowed to remain in
hte residence halls. Recently he was
arrested for 5 counts of breaking and
entering into residence hall rooms
and stealing over $5,000 worth of ste-
reo equipment. Thiscase is now being
processed through our Judicial Sys-
tem. Wheredo we draw theline? Why
shouldn't we have tried him for both
incidences?
Last April, the Joint Judicial Board
which includes the Associate Dean of
Student Life, the Attorney General
and others voted unanimously in
favor of this amendment. The Vice
Chancellor for Student Life partici-
pated in the discussion and the final
recommendation. They approved an
amendment to replace the double
penalty clause with the general sum-
mary found on page 33 of the hand-
book. This summary states, (stu-
dents) should also realize the
commission of acts which violate
laws as well as the rules and stan-
dards of the University may legally
result in steps against you by an ap-
propriate court and by the University
as well
Many students, in oppostion to this
amendment, have posed the ques-
tion, "What if a student is found
guilty on campus and does not get the
same decision off campus?" This
could be due to a variety of reasons.
The Honor Board is not a court of la w;
the verdicts reached are based on a
preponderance of evidence. If by any
chance new evidence is brought up
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and clas-
sification, address, phone number and
signature of the authors). Letters are
limited to two typewritten pages, double
spaced or neatly printed. All letters are
subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are reminded
that they are limited to one every two
weeks. The deadline for editorial material
that was not available at the time of
the hearing, the case may be reo-
pened. It's possible, however, for an
oii campus court to drop a case be-
cause of a procedure error, or a reduc-
tion of charges through plea bargain-
ing. This does not mean a student is
innocent of the charges, and it would
not affect the on campus decision.
Ratification of this amendment
would allow the Attorney General to
process all code of conduct violations
in a timely manner. The Boards
would be able to hear and adjudicate
all cases and deliver sanctions consis-
tently and appropriately for each
violation.
Every student at East Carolina
University is here for a reason � to
get an education. The student Judicial
System is an educational system It is
intended to govern the behavior of all
students to learn, socialize, and recre-
ate. We can not assume or expect that
the courts will impose an educational
atmosphere conducive for East Caro-
lina students.
The only way to treat each student
at this university fairly is to try each
and every violation through our stu-
dent judicial system. I am asking that
everyone realize their responsibilities
at this university and that if you don't
live up to them you should be held
accountable by your peers.
Lisa Williamson
SGA Attorney General
Liberal responds
To the editor:
This letter is in response to Justin
Sturz's rally to the conservative cause
in the Oct. 6 The East Carolinian.
Sturz made many sweeping accusa-
tions against liberals and their ideas.
Unfortunately, Sturz failed to view
the issues objectively, and, after vehe-
mently attacking liberal viewpoints,
offered no alternative solutions.
Sturz condemns liberals for their
abortion stand, which advocates an
individual's right to freedom of
choice, which is also stated in the
Constitution. Regardless of any law,
abortions will occur. The question is
where abortions will be performed; in
a hospital, by a qualified physician, or
in a back room, with any sharp object?
Sturz makes a distinction between
liberals and Christians, Liberals "ac-
cuse Christians Docs this mean that
a liberal is not a Christian? Is that
what being a liberal entails?
According to Sturz, liberals "accuse
Christians" of enforcing their ideol-
ogy on others and of promoting cen-
sorship. By controlling the media, the
"liberals" force their "humanistic re-
ligion" and their ideas of "God, mo-
rality, and religion and, as a result,
the American society is rapidly de-
caying.
Humanism is not a religion; it is a
way of thinking. It stresses and
individual's personal worth and al-
lows for decisions to be made inde-
pendantly by each individual. How
is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday s edition and
5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursdays edition.
Campus
Forum Spectrum
rules
In addition to the "Campus Forum"
section of the editorial page, The East
Carolinian features the "Campus
Spectrum This is an opinion column
by guest writers from the student
could a way of thinking that allows
each individual personal freedom oi
choice cause a society's demise
The division between conser i
fives and liberals exists simplv be
cause of difference of opinion. We
need to work together, viewing each
issue objectively and be willing to
listen to the opposite point of i
and stop this foolish name calling
Only then will we be able to sit down
and work our problems out.
Chris (
Sophomore
English
Corrected letter
Editor's note: This letter is being run
ft r a second time a a court sy I Mi
s Due to an editing err � th
of the later was I si s m in its Hi I
printing I
To the editor
The only consistent thing about
liberals is their inconsistency
Thevclaim thaf the' s- h.j-no rrtrhf
to cietermmc"WtciYcT goverToran�
when speaking of Nicaragua, but that
the IS. has even, right to determine
another government when speakinc
of South Africa. Thev work for the
protection of homosexual rights,
introducing incredible pieces oi legis-
lation that, if made law, would
threaten society asa whole with expo-
sure to AIDS. Yet thev completely
ignore the innocent unborn by deny-
ing them THEIR Constitutionally-
stated right-to-life and thus are in-
strumental in the slaughter oi mil-
lions of perfectly normal, healthy
human beings.
They accuse Christians of trying to
force their beliefs on others and oi
censorship. They themselves, how
ever, through their contol of the man-
portion of the mass media and judi
cial Supreme Court activism, force
their humanistic religion on and cen-
sor the concepts of God, morality
religion, and the Christian heritage
background of the U.S. from the
public schools and society as a whole
They accuse North and Poindexter
of "shredding" the Constitution and
"going above the law" to preserve
democracy in Central America. But
they openly endorse liberal judges
who, through judicial activism, shred
and distort the Constitution to get
mostly unwanted and dangerous
decisions made law. The Boland
Amendment, the major piece of legis-
lation that the liberals accuse North
and Poindexter of disobeying (thev
in fact, did not) is itself unconstitu-
tional because it restricts the
President's constitutionally-given
power to implement foreign policy.
Liberals talk out of two sides of
their mouths at one time. The above
are only a few examples of their hypo-
critical double-standard. When Will
the American people wake up?
Justin Sturz
Junior
English
V
Maria Bell
Panhcllcnic Council

I
body and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information mav
contact the managing editor of The
East Carolinian at 757-6366, or stop bv
our offices on the second floor of the
MfiaMBH Fnililinr
Kimberlv Hines
Gospel Choir

,
Natalie Moore
Sigma Sigma Sigma
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A

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i
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ent explained
ttudcnt
nds
ause
man.
i-
their
s an
iom of
in the
n is
�rmed;in
sician, or
�bject?
tween
prals "ac-
lean that
Is that
accuse
dia, the
Inistic re-
d, mo-
la result,
jndly de-
in; it is a
ises and
and al-
de inde-
ai. How
Utionand
I edition.
ipus
�urn
les
Forum"
ie East
.am pus
I column
I student
. of thinking that allows
lividual p rsonal freedom of
ry s demise?
the division between conserva-
i arid liberals exists simply bc-
' difference of opinion. We
need to work together, viewing each
issue objectively and be willing to
listen to the opposite point oi view,
and stop this foolish name calling!
Only then will we be able to sit down
and work our problems out.
Chris Glass
Sophomore
English
Corrected letter
note: This letter is being run
as a courtesy to Mr.
� �1 editing error, the intent
let oas lost some in its first
the editor
only consistent thing about
liberals is their inconsistency.
They claim that the U.S. has no right
to dt'd'rmmc lSfltther government
speaking of Nicaragua, but that
s has every right to determine
i government when speaking
ith Africa. They work for the
n of homosexual "rights
ducing incredible pieces of legis-
that, if made law, would
n society as a whole with expo-
S. Yet they completely
o innocent unborn by deny-
m THEIR Constitutionally-
righl to-life and thus are in-
strumental in the slaughter of mil-
' pi rfectly normal, healthy
human bvings.
Tht y . se Christians of trying to
their beliefs on others and of
I hey themselves, how-
igh theircontolofthemajor
t the mass media and judi-
Supreme Court activism, force
- humanistic religion on and cen-
a r the concepts of God, morality,
and the Christian heritage
kground of the U.S. from the
public schools and society as a whole.
They accuse North and Poindcxter
of "shredding" the Constitution and
"going above the law" to preserve
democracy in Central America. But
they openly endorse liberal judges
who, through judicial activism, shred
and distort the Constitution to get
mostly unwanted and dangerous
decisions made law. The Boland
Amendment, the major piece of legis-
lation that the liberals accuse North
and Poindcxter of disobeying (they,
in tact, did not) is itself unconstitu-
tional because it restricts the
President's constitutionally-given
power to implement foreign policy.
Liberals talk out of two sides of
their mouths at one time. The above
are only a few examples of their hypo-
critical double-standard. When will
the American people wake up?
Justin Sturz
Junior
English
body and faculty. The columns
printed m the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of gram-
ma rand decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information may
contact the managing editor of The
East Carolinian at 757-6366, or stop by
our offices on the second floor of the
Publication. RnikW.
Tt IE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 8,1987 5
Julie Brogan
Chi Omega
Maria Bell
Panhellenic Council
Camille Cox
Pi Kappa Phi
The
1987
ECU
Homecoming
Court
D(H o ev
Kimberly Hines
Gospel Choir
Noelle Hogan
Lambda Chi Alpha
Natalie Moore
Sigma Sigma Sigma
Jane Wheby
Student Union
Lisa Pergerson
Alpha Delta Pi
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Tt IE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 8, 1987
HELP WANTED
Classifieds
WAITRESS, WAITERS, BANQUET
SERVICE PERSONNEL COOKS. The
1 lohday Inn Greenville is now hiring lor
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BRODY'S for men has full-time and part
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ashc, fashion forward individuals Retail
clothing experience is required Better
than average starting salary Apply in
person, Brody's Personnel Director,
Carolina East Mall M W 2-4 p.m.
BRODY'S has part-time sales associates
positions for enthusiastic, out-going indi-
viduals who enjoy working with young
Contemporary Junior fashions. Good
Salary Apply in person, Brody's Person-
nel Director, Carolina East Mall M-W 2-4
p.m.
WANTED - MALE MODELS. Inter
views will be on Saturday, October 24th
from 2-5 p.m and Monday, October 26th
from 5 9 pm at the Belk's Training
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experience necessary.
CAMPUS TRAVEL REPRESENTA-
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tour to Florida Earn money, free travel,
and outstanding marketing experience
Call Inter Campus programs 1-800-43.V
7747.
A LEADING CLOTHING RETAILER
needs a full time office associate to work
M-F9-6. Individual must be accurate and
possess skills in accountingbookeeping
Salary based on experience Good salary
and benefits package Apply in person or
call for interview appointment Judith C
Simon, Brodv's Personnel Director M-W
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GREENHOUSE TECHNICIANS
needed for part-time employment Flex-
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Call Lanny Lassiter at 756-087
FOR SALE
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Pat wants presidency
NEW YORK (AP) � Pat
Robertson, the fromer TV
preacher who wants to be presi-
dent, says it's up to Americans to
turn the United States into a
Christian nation, and he would
not push his religious views if he
were elected.
"There's a deep feeling in our
country that the church as an in-
stitution should be on one side
and the government as an institu-
tion should be on another the
Republican hopeful said Sunday
on the CBS News program "Face
the Nation
Asked if the United States
should be a Christian nation, he
replied, "1 don't think it's going to
be possible. We're not one now
and I don't frankly, see it happen-
ing at any time in the future
But, he added, "I don't want to
say no. And the reason is because
if the people want this to be a
Christian nation, it's up to the
people. But they can't do it
through law. It's got to be through
their own beliefs
Robertson said that he uses
prayer for guidance, but also
reads and would consult with
others before forming opinions as
president.
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SURPLUS CARS sell for $155 (average)!
Also jeeps, trucks, etc Now Available
Your Area Info 805-687-6000 Ext S-1166.
WORD PROCESSINGLETTER quality
or laser printing. Rush lobs accepted 752
1933
ELECTROLYSIS (permanent removal of
unwanted hair) by Barbara Venters
People who understand electrolysis will
not wax, twecze or use electronic tweez
ers or any other temporary method Isn't
it time to try the permanent methodCall
830-0962 for free consultation
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
N.C. 752-3694.
PICK UP AND DELIVERY of term pa
pcrs, thesis, resumes, to be typed IBM
wordprocessing by professional with 13
years experience. Letter quality print and
professional editing Call Nanette in
Grifton at 1-524-5241. Cheap call the best
service!
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apts for rent
furnished Contact Hollie Simonowich at
752-2865 to run through the summer!
THINKING ABOUT MOVING? 1 bed
room $175.00 or 2 bedroom duplex
$225.00; others 752-1375. Home locators
fee.
AVAILABLE NOW OR LATER, 4 bed
room $37500 or January, 3 bedroom
$315.00 752 1375. Home locators fee.
PERSONALS
FOR RENT
TWO BEDROOM furnished Heat, air
and water included Call Julie at 758 1 507
or Shron at 355 5706
ROOMATE WANTED: Rent $120, 13
utilities 830-0067 after 9:30 p.m.
ROOM FOR RENT - Beginning this
�pring semester $135.00 a month Great
location to campus. Full house
privledges. Call today at 757-3027.
HOUSE FOR RENT, 3 bedroom, bath
and a half, 2 p�arches, pecan tree, and utili-
ties Houses, nice yard, 1 minutes from
Greenville $100.00 deposit, $200.00
monthly 746-2446or753-2878.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Immaculate
condition a block from downtown and
campus Sycamore 1 lill Apts No 17 Call
Scott Patterson in Goldsboro (735 8376)
or Stephen Home (758-4333)
1 BEDROOM upstairs apartment avail
able October 1. Three blocks from cam
pus. All utilities paid. $250.00 per month
Lease and deposit required 758 1274 af-
ter 5:00 p.m.
SIG EPS: Have a safe homecoming
weekend And remember: V-O-M IT;
vomit, vomit you and me. If you don't
loose IT this weekend you ain't partied
hard enough Easy on the milk.
BETA IOTAs You girls are fantastic
You have taught me something special,
thanks Keep smiling. Alpha Love ALM
ATTENTION All ECU party fanatics
Come TEA-OFF your weekend with the
ECU cheerleaders at the Sheraton, Fri
day East Carolina Tea Party, 5-until
$2 00 Long Island Ice Teas served in a 16
oz. mason jar And delicious free pizza.
LISA PERSON: Congradulations! WE
arc so proud to have our "Pres " repre
sent us for homecoming. Were pulling for
you! Love, your ADPl sis's.
PI KAPPA PHI: The brothers of Pi Kappa
Phi would like to congratulate the Beta
Upsilon pledge class: Scott West, Joey
Paul, Jeff Keith, Sheldon Walker, Bo Mel-
ton, David Talbert.
VOTE: Marcie Green Marcie Green Mar-
ine Green Marcie Green Marcie Green
You may be LSS but your always first
with us, us, us Love PiKKmart
ATTENTION: Don't forget Alpha Xi
Delta's happy hour every Wednesday
night at Pantana's it's the BEST excuse
for missing Thursday's classes!
FREE drink with any sub - For fast, free
delivery 01 a mllp m.) call 'FAMOUS
PIZZA 757-1278 7570731. We deliver
everything on our menu (except BEER!)
HOMECOMING VICTORY PARTY
$ 99 pitchers ALL DAY (11-11) Co Pirates
Beat Cincinnati Famous Pizza - Corner
10th - Evans 757-1278 or 757-0731.
FRESH AND HOT Call for fast, free
delivery 01 a.m. - 11 p.m.) Buy a large
pizza, get 2 liter coke FREE Buy a small
pizza, get 2 drinks FREE Call Now -
Famous Pizza 757-1278 757-0731.
PAIGE BARBER: Good luck in the
homecoming elections You will always
be out homecoming queen The MEN of
Garrett.
GET NAS-TEA at "Off the Cuff" lounge
every Friday with Chuck and Rob $2 00
Long Island Ice Teas. All night long
ALPHA PHI OMEGA PLEDGES:
Demetrice Bland, Ricky Hardison, Laune
Uoyd, Scott Miller, Jeffrey Turner, and
Robbie Washington The Brothers of
Alpha Phi Omega welcome you and
looks forward to having you in the frater-
nity.
PIKKMART AND PLEDGES: Tis eve
of Friday night, sister and brotherhood is
in sight. Your future may have been in
doubt but PiKKmart has sought vou out
I know you can't wait for that evening to
start so come party with us at PiKKmart
CHRISTY: We're behind vou all the way.
We love You! Love the Sisters and
Pledges of Alpha Phi
ELIZABETH: "Miss Prez" Looking for
ward to this weekend and of course cele-
brating your birthday Get ready! Happy
Birthday We love you - The Sisters and
Pledges of Alpha Phi.
SHELLEY: I just want to welcome you to
Gamma Sig I hope you will enjoy it as
much as I have. Let's have a great year
with fun and surprises Love, "Your big
Sis
INTER VARSITY CHRISTIAN FEL-
LOWSHIP: Please join us' Wednesday
nights at 7:00 p.m in Speight 129 Fun
Food-Fellowship-Teaching
COME AND HEAR the dynamic
speaker, Hon Shirley Qusholm, speak
on "Women and Work in America Then
and Now Monday, October 12th at 8:00
p m in Hendrix Theater Tickets are $2 00
students, $3 00 facultystaff, $5 00 pub
liedoor Sponsored by Student Union
Forum Committee
DEAR ECU: We would like to formally
apologize for our actions due to alcohol
abuse Saturday night If we pissod vou
off, we're sorry I lig and Tolley
DEAR ADPi's SorTV for the Pantana
Panic Tolley and I lig
HOME COMING
c�
SPECIAL
&
"ROSINAS PIZZERIA"
752-1444 203 E. Fifth St.
1. By (1) slice of pizza and get another slice free (same topping)
(9:00 a.m4:00 p.m.).
2. One slice of cheese pizza .50c (9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.)
3. Show your football ticket and get $2.00 off any large (2) item
pizza. (This offer acceptable any time on Saturday.
Saturday, October 10,1987 ONLY
$ Need Money $
We pay Cash For Anything Gold or Silver
Classrings
Necklaces
Braclets
Coins, ect.
And, We also buy Stero's, T.Vs,
V.C.R.s, Furniture, Bikes, etc.
Coin & Ring Man
10:00-5:00 (M F)
.10:00-3:00 Sat.
400 S. Evans
752-3866
KAPPA SIGMA Stranger Muer was a
blast, we hope you liked us when you met
us at last We danced and partied the
night away, sorry our buses left us astray.
We had a good time though, hope you did
too, your Alpha Xi Delta dates just
wanted to thank vou Look forward to "D A TVTTUT CIJAI7C
partying with you guys Thursday night. � JjIVlli IJrylJ QjfUJjJyJ
ALPHA PHIS AND DATES: Home-
coming weekend will soon be here,
pledges and dates do not fear To the
Rotary Club we will cruise, with our
dates and with our booze Dancing and
drinking all nitc long, at Alpha Phi cock-
tail you can't go wrong!
ALPHA PHI PLEDGES: We love Y'all!
Get psyched for this weekend - you'll
never forget it! Love- The Sisters of Alpha
PM
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
free (fre) adj. Given or proaded without charge or cost,
such as the travel services of ITG Travel Center, at the Plaza
in Greenville. We charge you only the amount of your
tickets there is no service charge. We'll get those low fares
for you that the airlines advertise, and we'll explain all the
fine print. And sometimes we'll even find great rates that
you've never heard of, because we shop all available
airlines. Call ITG Travel Center for your next trip. 355-
5075.
Our Warehouse Runneth Over So Were Having An
IN STORE WAREHOUSE SALE
We want to clear out our Warehouse to
make room tor all the new & exciting Christmas
Merchandise which is arriving daily!
s Days onty- Thursday, Oct. 8th Through Monday, Oct. 12th
5 Days Only1
Plus Much Much More!
0
cr �
� � Co �0 0
'EAST CAROLINA
TEA PARTY"
Every Friday
� $2.00 Iced Teas
�FREE Pizza
5-7 PM
�No Cover
Charge
�ECU Football
Cheerleaders
Pep Rally live
6-7 PM
�?Af Transit
mmAuthority
Sheraton Greenville
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
THEFASrCARf i imAN

MASSAGE
The I'hvMcal Therapy Club will be
sponsoring a Massage dink Tueviav
October H from S � 9 � I kketa can be
purchased from am PI ,
studenKfi.00for�ininules)oratth.
'SI 25 for 10 minutes, Th dink mil be
held at the Allied Health Building m the
physical Therapy Lab
ELSiCMAALHiA
Meeting is Thursda) O � berfi n
in the Political Science ijbrarv
VI5LALAETS
ihe Student Union Visual Arts
Comnuttee ls sponsoring T), �
Neon a Smithsonian Insl
I dubihon Septembi - . - .
Mendenhall K -�, � � - - . .
worth of neon i rizes I be a
VVYOJFFE BANQU I
VN vdilff Associates, the lav am .��. .
A.diffe Bible Translators, will -
9 banquet lo celebrate twent years of in
solving i.n p�H,pie mmtstn-
;��' 2 087 at the Sheral
Tickets and information .1: bi � �
from Larr and Robin Bass at -
E�L OPERA TH! ATI R
The ECU School of Musk Op �
:cr presents an evening of opera -
1 N tobei 9 and Sarui la) � � - -
�t 8:00pm at AJ Fletcher Real
Tree admission
ORCHESTRA
The Department of Universtt) I. r
presents the Tonkuenstter Orchestra
Vienna on Tuesday, Octobei n - �
p m in Wr.ght Auditorium T .
now on sale For further informal
oatacttheCentra) Ticket!
hall Student center 757 6611 exl 264
S.LEL
The Students for Economic p. a . -
will be holding a meeting . n
October U at 7p.m m Mender hall Ro
SB C
TEACHER r-DUrATfQpJ
The School of Education, in coi
with Campus Ministries is sp i
Work 'Studv rriptoMexk .�
Break (March 6-C 1988 Opporl
observe and teach at a local -
available A minimum lev �
Spanish is required For tpp' a
more information, come bv Rr
Office of the Dean in Speight
ACCQLXTING SQQED
The Accounting Society will ma I
Monday Octobei Eth at -l � p
Mendenhall room 244 Representatives
from Coopers and Lybrand will speak
New members welcome
JEW
rhe Pitt Cour
tution Program
d mtei
-
a mo- �
mark
cqnur:
The
I
- �
TRAV1
anj'
KJRIM
CONSTRI
SIGMA G
L'NIVl R;
Studies show loan defl
(CPS) � College dropouts are
more likely to default on Guaran-
teed Student Loans than students
who complete their education, ac-
cording to a study bv the Univer-
sity of California at Los Angeles.
Black students, students from
low-income backgrounds and
students who dropped out ot high
school also arc more likely to de-
fault on loans, LCI-A professor
Wellford Wilms found.
In a study o( more than 6,000
students at community colleges
and vocational schools on the
West Coast in 1985, Wilms found
that 38 percent of students who
dropped out later defaulted on
Joans.
r By comparison, 17 percent of
jWudents who completed their
Studies did not repay their loans
JVilms wrote in his report, called
iWhose Fault is Default?"
� Wilms' study, mandated bv the
California state legislature and
junded by the state student aid
mmission, did not studv de-
bitors' motivations.
Wilms' studv focused exdu-
jvely on community colleges and
cational schools, he said, since
tiey have the highest percentage
'defaulters.
The study found that lender
school policies had little
ipact on the incidence of loan
faults. Students' characteris-
Wilms said, were the strong-
variable leading to defaults.
I College dropouts, Wilms
ulated, "either didn't have
hat it took or the program was
what they had hoped for.
became discouraged and
m't pay back what they owe '
1 Defaulters from low-income
imilies. he said, "don't have the
�biliry or desire to pay back
ians Blacks, Wilms theorized,
not pay back student loans
use thev are among the most
isenchanted and disenfran-
ised members of society
lacks receive the lowest earn
and face the most discrimina-
in the job market he said.
tf Wilms also determined that
�S. citizens are more likely to de-
It than students from other
Countries attending school in the
�United States.
"I'm not an enemy of the GSL
Stlgram Wilms explained. "It's
St good program, an important
one But the loan program, he
said, dist I
attending grai
cause the
accrued
graduati
To in
Wiln
to pr
dent;
disp �
keep a I .
Sch
program he
i i i
kicked
As:
215 E. 4th Si
752-2183
HOMEO
50
off
Bu
Pur
Choices
Ham & Cht
Ham. Sail
Ham. Boloj
(Not!

A

V
J





( OMI AND HIAR the dynam
speakef Hon hirio hiru!m sp� il
ind Work in Vmenca Then
i dNoM Monday October 12that8 �
p.m. in Hendm Theater rickets are 1 I
sfi' � 13.0 (acult) start (5.001
- d K Student I
Or
1H
We would like �
8 and
M K ori 9
'ME COMING
SPECIAL
&
&
NA'S PIZZERIA
i
ff
�irth st
amc lopping)
2 item
October 10, 1987 ONLY
0M
TAKE AN
EXTRA
0
OFF-
W PRICE I
K)
. or cost,
hut. at the Plaza
the amount of your
-Veil get th se low lares
LI explain all the
at rates that
ip all available
ur next trip. 355-
er So We're Having An
HOUSE SALE
our Warehouse to
& exciting Christmas
is arriving daily!
h Monday, Oct. 12th s Days omv.
I 11 � I i � � I M.JL3L
49.99
ftJ
�r
srf
M.M.M mmjt.
na
Credit & Layaway
Available
thndge & Cameron Village
thgate Malt
Fhe Plaza
nnmmmnn

THEEASTCAROtiMiAM
OCTOBER 8. 1987
Announcements
MASSAGE
The Physical Therapy Qub will be
sponsoring a Massage Clinic Tuesday
October 13 from 530-9:30 Tickets can be
purchased from any Physical Therapy
student ($1 00 for 10 minutes) or at the door
Si.25 tor 10 minutes). The dime will be
hold at the Allied 1 lealth Building in the
physical Therapy Lab.
PLSIGMAALEHA
Meeting ifl Thursday, October 8 at 5:15
in the Political Soenee Library.
VISUALARis
The Student Union Visual Arts
Committee is sponsoring "The Magic of
Neon a Smithsonian Institute Traveling
Exhibition, September 28 October 16 in
Mendenhall Register for over $200.00
worm o! neon pn.es to be awarded
WYCUFFE BANQUET
Wychffe Associates, the lay ministry of
VVvcliffe Bible Translators, will be hosting
i banquet to celebrate twenty years of in-
volving lay people in ministries on Octo-
ber 20, 1987 at the Sheraton-Greenville.
I ickets and information can be obtained
from Larry and Robin Bass at 830-1612.
ECILQPERA THEATER
The ECU School of Music Opera Thea
tor presents an evening of opera scenes on
Inda, October 9 and Saturday, October
10at 8 Wprn at A Fletcher Recital Hall
Tree admission
ORCHESTRA
The Department of University Unions
presents the Tonkuenstler Orchestra of
Vienna on Tuesday. October 13 at 8 (X1
p m. in Wright Auditorium. Tickets are
now on sale For further information,
contact theCentral Ticket Office, menden
hall Student center, 757-6611, ext, 266.
S.E.D.
The Students for Economic Democracy
will be holding a meeting on Sunday,
October 11 at 7 p.m. in MendenhaU Room
SB C
I�ACJLFJODJJCATIQN
The School of Education, in coniuchon
with Campus Ministries, is sponsoring a
WorkStudy trip to Mexico during Spring
Break (March 6-13,1988). Opportunities to
observe and teach at a local school are
available A minimum level of "survival"
Spanish is required For applicaions and
more information, come by Rcxim 154. The
Office of the Dean in Speight Building
AC�QUn:rALSQOETY
The Accounting Society will meet on
Monday, October 12th at 4 00 p m. in
MendenhaU room 244. Representatives
from Coopers and Lybrand will speak
New members welcome
JUVENILE SFRVTCFS
The Pitt County Juvenile Services Resti
nation Program needs volunteers to su
pervise and interact with juveniles as they
perform various work activities within
the community Volunteers are needed
any hours per week, but at least six hours
a month, Monday Saturday More mfor
mation, call 752-1811 ext. 419.
CONCERTS COMMITTEE
The F1XX will be in concert October 8 at
8 00 p.m. in Minges Coliseum. Tickets are
on sale at Mendenhall Student Center
$7.00 for students and $9.00 for general
public.
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
The opening of the travel adventure
film, "Discovering Spain will be Thurs-
day, October 15th at 8:00 p.m. in I lendrix
Theater Narrated by Willis Butler, the
film explores the history and lifestyles of
Spain Tickets are limited but available
For further information, contact the Cen-
tral Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student
Center, 757-6611, ext. 266.
FORUM COMMITTEE
Hon. Shirley Chisholm will be lectur-
ing on "Women and Work in America:
Then and Now " The lecture begins at 8:00
pm. in Hendrix Theater on Monday,
October 12th Tickets are $2 00 for stu-
dents, $3.00 for facultystaff and S5.00 for
public and at the door. Tickets are avail-
able at the Central Ticket Office in Men-
denhall Student Center
CONSTRUCTION MCMT
The Department of Construction Man-
agement and the ECU Student Chapter of
the Associated General Contractors are
sponsoring a seminar series for the fall
1987 semester. The seminars are open to
anyone interested. The next seminar is
Wednesday, October 28,1987 at 6:30 p m.
in 201 Flanagan The speaker is Dieter B
Rathke, VP Philip Holzmann USA, Inc.
The topic is 'International Construction
in the United States
SIGMA GAMMA FPSII ON
Dr. Richard L. Mauger, Dept. of Geol
ogy. East Carolina University, will be
speaking on "Earth Science Education in
the National Parks" October 9 at 2:00 p.m.
in Graham 301.
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
The play, "1 Ought To Be In Pictures
bv Neil Simon will be part of a Dinner-
Theater Production on Thursday, October
8, and Friday, October 9 at 6:30 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Student Center Auditorium
Tickets arc S10.00 for students and S16.00
tor the general public and are available at
the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center. Advance sales only, call
757 6611, ext. 266.
MIDDLE GRADES CTR
The first meeting of the Middle Grades
Qub will be October 12, 4:30-5:30, in
Speight 201 All Middle Grades maprs
welcome
TEACHER EXAM
The National Teacher Examinations -
Specialty Area Exams - will be offered at
East Carolina University on Saturday,
November 14,1987. Application blanks are
to be completed and mailed to the Educa-
tional Testing Service, Box 911-R, Prince-
ton, N.J. 08541 Applications must be post
marked no later than October 12, 1987
Applications may be obtained from the
ECU Testing Center, Room-105, Speight
Building, East Carolina University.
AHPAT
The Allied I lealth Professions Admis
sion Test will be offered at East Carolina
Unversity on Saturday, November 14,
1987. Application blanks are to be aim
pleted and mailed to the Psychological
Corp 555 Academic Court, San Antonio,
TX 78204-0952 to arrive by October 14
1987.
SPAN
The date of the Out ward Bound "Ropes
Course" is now Sunday, October 25 Fee is
$10.00 per member. If interested you must
attend the next SPAN meeting Wednes-
day, October 14 at 5.30 p.m. in Brewster D
209 for briefing Fees must be paid at this
meeting.
HANDICAPPED STUDENTS
A recruiter from the US Department of
Defensive will be on campus on Novem
ber 18,1987. To interview you for summer
or permanent employment. Contact
Caroline Smith, CO OP office, 757-6979,
for more information.
COLLEGE REPIIRIICANS
Meetings are every Wednesday at 700
p.m. in room 221 Mendenhall
CHAIRMEN
The Student Union Special Concerts
Committee presents The Chairmen Of
The Board in a free Homecoming Beach
Music Bonanza this Sunday, Oct 11 at 4
pm. on the Central Campus Mall
THE NAVIGATOR'S.
Meetings every Thursday night at 7 30
p.m. in Biology 103.
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
Tickets are on sale for Madrigal Din
ners to be held December 2-5 at 7:00 p m
in Mendenhall Student Center. Tickets are
$10.00 for ECU students and $16.00 for
general public. Call the Central Ticket
Office at 757-6611, ext 266.
CORAL REEF Diyp CMTt
For more information on the Coral Reef
Dive Qub, call Glenn or Rob at 752-4399
BLACK ALUMNI
The ECU Black Alumni Chapter is
sponsoring a Pig Pickin' on Friday, Oct 9
1987 6:30-930 at the Pirates Qub and a
Cheese and Wine reception on Sat. Oct 10
1987 8 0011:00 at Courtney Square Apts'
Club House (you must be 21 to attend the
receptionCost for both weekend events
is $15.00 or $8 00 per event.
ARMY ROTC
freshmanSophomores: The military
Science Dept is beginning its two-year
and three year Army ROTC scholarship
campaign All Students who are inter
ested in an Army ROTC scholarship are
invited to attend an info session on Wed
CX-t 7 at 6 00 pm. in room 210 Erwin For
further info, call Captain Mitchell at 757
6967 or 757974
ACimmiNXSOXlEIY
The Accounting Society will have a
meeting on Monday. October 12th at 4 00
pm in Mendenhall Room 244 Represen
tatives from Coopers and Lybrand will be
speaking New members are welcome
STUDENT HEALTH
The Student Health Centers Saturday
dime is October 10 from 1000 a m12:00
p m Sunday clinic hours will beheld from
2:00 pm 4 00pm
nAii&MAjkMMA
Beta Theta members with the health
and sciences honorary, there will be a
meeting October 9 at 2 00 pm at MC 105
C ontact Dr Chenoweth if unable to at
tend
AMBASSADtRS
The ECU Ambassadors will meet
Wednesday at 5 15 p m in the multi pur
pose room at Mendenhall Homecoming
plans will be discussed
PHI BETA I AMpDA
Phi Beta Lambda will meet Wednes
day, October 7 at 3 00 p m in room R302
Dues are due by October 15
German Music,
German Food
UndAWunderbar.
Studies show loan defaults
(CPS) � College dropouts are
more likely to default on Guaran-
teed Student Loans than students
who complete their education, ac-
cording to a study by the Univer-
sity of California at Los Angeles.
Black students, students from
low-income backgrounds and
students who dropped out of high
school also are more likely to dc-
tault on loans, UCLA professor
VVellford Wilms found.
In a study of more than 6,000
students at community colleges
and vocational schools on the
West Coast in 1985, Wilms found
that 38 percent of students who
dropped out later defaulted on
loans.
By comparison, 17 percent of
students who completed their
studies did not repay their loans,
"Wilms wrote in his report, called
"Whose Fault is Default?"
Wilms' study, mandated by the
California state legislature and
founded by the state student aid
commission, did not study de-
faulters' motivations.
Wilms' study focused exclu-
sively on community colleges and
vocational schools, he said, since
they have the highest percentage
of defaulters.
The study found that lender
and school policies had little
impact on the incidence of loan
defaults. Students' characteris-
tics, Wilms said, were the strong-
est variable leading to defaults.
College dropouts, Wilms
speculated, "either didn't have
what it took or the program was
not what they had hoped for.
They became discouraged and
don't pay back what they owe
Defaulters from low-income
families, he said, "don't have the
ability or desire to pay back
loans Blacks, Wilms theorized,
may not pay back student loans
because they are among the most
disenchanted and disenfran-
chised members of society.
"Blacks receive the lowest earn-
ings and face the most discrimina-
tion in the job market he said.
Wilms also determined that
US. citizens .e re likely to de-
fault than students from other
countries attending school in the
Lnited States.
"I'm not an enemy of the GSL
program Wilms explained. "It's
a good program, an important
one But the loan program, he
said, discourages students from
attending graduate schools be-
cause they balk at the debts they
accrued during their under-
graduate studies.
To improve the program,
Wilms suggests schools continue
to provide loan counseling to stu-
dents. Loans, he said, should be
dispersed in small amounts to
keep a tight rein on the money.
Schools that abuse the GSL
program, he said, "should be
kicked out of the program,
ASAP
OKTOBERFEST WEEK, OCTOBER 5-11
In the 1 liiton Inn Greenville � 355-5000
f-ntcr our Oktobortesl prize drawing and you can win a free
Hilton Great Escape Wi
Winner to be selected Sun
�kend for two! Enter
lay, October 11.
ill week.
here gut friends gel together for an oompah time.
r
I
I
I
I
I
When you moke pizza this good, one just isn't enough
vMiuaucouK mwmwmwwmwmm �uuau xi ��
WELCOME BACK
ALUMNI!
2 LARGE PIZZAS
$U70
plus tax
13 toppings for the price of 2
I (large size cheese and 3 Items)
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Ejrva -tr-s a-c ertre cites �a �a e at sac � ona cos
v� � coupe N ex- or ng tr� ;aews
Ont ccx-dc- or- cumne CXt Of �
Buy any size
pizza at regular price, get
identical pizza FREE!
NO LIMIT
Ottt'vd C'�M Mh coupon �� ("� Q4 "$ LH � CU
c"Vcxj�ov Expires: 10-31-S7
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i aaa �� � �uuuu coupon � warn wma �
FREE
BUY ONE I
y PIZZA J
GET ONE FREE!
I
Buy any size
p.a dt regular price, gel
identical pizza FREE'
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756 725lT ECj
vAiuaau coupon � m 1. M
�987 j��t Carw Inttumtn. mc
EfifEPIIIAl
BUY ONE PI
PIZZA MEM
One Item
Tuo hems
Three hems
brtk? t. �� Special
iPrmerrn MushcwTi� (jrter
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Exrra hems over 3
Extra Cheese
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8pc
535
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6 75
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70
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IZA,
GET ONE FREE
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10 pc
: to
800
890
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1090
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12 80
14 10
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250
CAFSARS S-VNOUTCHF s-
T Mi �
Su"
Hflrn and Cheese
Vegetarian
SALADS
deck
Anton
CHOObi FROM THfSF TOF5�v S
FVrprroo Mushr.mo (��� H�t Bacon GOurxi tW iimtr
U-js�r -���-Fkrx�- Annor, H� (Vptm Ifc, BW . OK�
BEVERAGES
Coca Coia LVt Coke " Medium brer
Sprite. Mello YeSow. 35 66 95
Cherry Coke
323 Arlington Blvd.
(across from Farm Fresh I
HOURS
SPECIAL TIES
FresrUv &3Ked Cra�
Cra Si
� � . - . �
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; ;3
756-7256
SUN-THU 11 AM-12 MIDNIGHT
FRI-SAT 11 AMI AM
jpmil
215 E. 4th St.
752-2183
I I , !� I
A COMPLETE MEAL ON A BUN
2 Locations
316 Greenville Blvd.
756-7171
HOMECOMING WFFKFND SPECIALS
50
off
Any Large
Sub
(Not Valid on Deliveries) 101787
TAILGATE
with our Subs
Buy any 2 large Subs
and Receive a
FREE Litre Pepsi
(Not Valid on Deliveries)
Expires
101787
rho�5?chase one" 172 Sub "nd
�ZlC1CS5 Receive
Ham & Cheese Rcceive
Ham, Salami, Cheese -
Ham, Bologni, Cheese
(Not Valid on Deliveries)
half Free
Expires
101787
SASSY AND
NEW!
formal,
Cocktail,
and
holiday
dressing
652 E. Arlington Blvd.
Greenville. NC 27858
a Certain
Things
756-3320
10-6 Mon. - Fri.
10-8Thurs.
1m
m m . �r j. - .j.
1
Vi-
J





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8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
CXTTOBER8, 1967
Doctors say don't remove earwax
NEW YORK (AP) - Don't try
to clean your ears!
That's the warning from Dr
Walter A. Petryshyn, medical di-
rector of the Deafness Research
Foundation.
and decreasing
fingernails or twisted paper the ear drum
The dangers include ear canal hearing ability,
infections or a perforated ear "An accumulation of wax
drum. This may cause a middle against the ear drum can even
ear infection and possibly spread cause dizziness and ringing in the
to the mastoid, causing perma- ears he says. "But, it's important
,nH �h 8ermvolved ncnt hearinS loss And if �nat- toconsultwithyourdoctor-and
seldom need to re- tended, it can precipitate a pos- don't try to remove it yourself
sible infection in the brain, ac- In most people, he explains,
C�r!?.ffou"da!ion. u "HE is Cleansing, gradu- mere mrevlnting'bTcteriaTrom
� � I� ?' 'S Why My d,Tn8 and W�rkin8 US W3y feeling the ear canal, he says,
people accumulate more out of the ear. addingWithout earwax the eare
move the earwax Petryshyn
says. "Most people fail to get the
wax out, and push it against the
eardrum, creating the possibility
of hearing loss.
"A doctor, unlike the person
with earwax, can see what's going
on in the ear and can avoid dam-
age to the canal or drum when
removing the wax. People can get
innovative in trying to clean their
ears, using paper clips, hairpins.
protects the ear canal, which must
have a clean surface to work prop-
erly, catching foreign material
that might cause infection, irrita-
tion or injury.
And it protects the ear canal
from water damage, which is of
particular significance to swim-
earwax than others Petryshyn
says, "Instead of drying and leav-
ing the ear, earwax gravitates
toward the eardrum, where it
diminishes hearing
PeLyshyn points out that ear-
wax is rriore uncomfortable than
dangerous, placing pressure on
Petryshyn notes that earwax would be dry and itchy.
Metcalf elected to NAMME
Correct info, can help police
You were just going next door
and would be gone a few minutes.
So why lock the door?
When you return to your resi-
dence (dorm room, apartment,
etc.) you find that someone has
entered it and stolen your purse
and other valuables. So you go to
the phone to call the police
You live in a residenc hall suite.
You are standing with the room
door cracked. Unknown to you,
the room next door has an over-
loaded electrical outlet which has
shorted and started a fire.
You begin to smell something
as if it is burning. It seems to be
getting stronger. You glance
around the room, nothing is burn-
ing. If there was a fire somewhere
else in the suite, the fire alarm
sensor would detect it and set off
an alarm.
(Note: As happens so many
times, someone has removed or
tampered with the sensor so it will
not work.) You finally notice
smoke swirl through your
cracked door. You rush to see
smoke coming from the room
next door.
You start screaming, "FIRE!
FIRE and knocking on the other
suite doors. You run to the nearest
fire alarm pull box, but it doesn't
work because someone has van-
dalized it also. You or someone
ttvgtjesterrWhetrte"ftfedepaTrt s
rrient
You and your friends were
partying, having a great time. But
Joe had a little too much to drink,
stumbles and falls through a plate
Pirate Police
Line
By Captain Keith Knox
BCD Public Safety
glass window. Not only is Joe
bleeding badly, but he is uncon-
scious. You run to a phone to call
the rescue squad
All three of the above scenarios
are calls for help. These and simi-
lar incidents occur much more
frequently than we would like to
think. When you make that call,
what you say and do can mean the
difference between bringing help
quickly or maybe not at all.
You would be surprised at the
number of calls for help request-
ing police, fire, or rescue, whereby
the caller, excited or whatever,
fails to give adequate information
and hangs up. Police, fire, and
rescue personnel can not help you
if they can not find you. In some
cases, minutes, even seconds can
mean life or death for someone.
For example, take the caller
who states that he needs a rescue
squad immediately. His friend is
cut and bleeding badly, (click up)
and hangs up the phone. Or the
one who calls and says: "I live in
Aycock, somebody has been in
my room and stolen my wallet.
Can you send an officer over?"
(click up) and hangs up the
phone.
But suppose he did give his
name. How many rooms are there
in Aycock Hall? It could be like
finding a needle in a haystack.
That's why it is important to do
the following when you need
help. Please follow these simple
rules when calling:
1) Remain calm, speak
clearly and state why you are call-
ing.
2) Give your name and the
telephone number from which
you are calling, in case of a need to
call you back for more informa-
tion.
3) Give a complete address
where help is needed. If an ad-
dress is not available or clearly
marked, give a description and
directions by using known land-
marks as a guide.
4) DO NOT HANG UP!
Until you ask or are told that is all
the information needed. (Note:
Some cases may require you to
mm�wm
remain on the phone to give fur-
ther information or to receive in-
structions on what todountil help
arrives).
Remember, help is only a phone
call away. But the initial informa
(ECU News Bureau) � Dr.
Zubic W. Metcalf, associate dean
for student opportunities and
minority affairs at the East Caro-
lina University School of Medi-
cine, has been elected vice presi-
dent of the National Association
of Medical Minority Educators,
Inc.
He was elected to the national
post last week at the
forts to improve the recruitment
and retention of minority stu-
dents in medical education pro-
grams. Recruitment and retention
efforts also encompass faculty,
administrators and candidates for
postgraduate medical training.
At the School of Medicine, Met-
calf is also the director of the
Center for Student Opportunites,
a unit within the medical school
Homecoming Specials
Friday and Saturday
at
?Prime Rib$8.95
?London Broil$5.95
?Chicken O'Cool$5.95
?Fajitas for Two$11.95
All Specials Served with Salads
"Casual Dining - Formal Drinking"
The O'Cool Cocktail, only $2.50
Amaretto 'White Rum Crcme de Banana 'Pineapple Juice
'Orange Juice
Ixxrated in the Farm pa Y
Fresh Center - Behind Quincy's �S-?ma
YOU'RE NEXT
to lose weight safely and effectively-
through Medical Weight Loss Systems.
j. ���� organization's annual meeting in a mm wmu
tiongiven can make thediffcrence Washington, DC. He will serve a responsible for minority student
in how quickly and efficiently you one-year term. recruitment and academic sup-
receive that help. The aims of the organization port services for ECU medical
include providing support to ef- students.
Danny Taylor & Co.
� designer accessories
� ready to wear
� made to order
Eastgate Plaza
2800 E. 10th St.
830-5341
PARTY
ANIMALS
"
830-1823
Balloons Delivered
in Costumes
Gorilla - Grams
Gator - Grams
Penguin for Hire
1987-88
-Season
71 I920's
jliusical
LEAVE IT
TO JANE
October 7, 8, 9, 10 & 12
8:15 pm
McGinnis Theatre
(corner of Fifth & Eastern)
General Public
ECU Students
$1000
$ 8.00
Call: 757-6390
Call unlay lor an
imuhatnn.
appointment and
ft
610 Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, NC
$100 off
Any Program
October 12-19. 1987
Must have coupon to
qualify
�Medically supervised, safe.
effective weight loss
program
�Cholesterol monitonng
�Nutrition education
�Behavior modification
�Doctors and nurses on staff
MC. VISA �i CHOICE ACCEPTED
756-2611
Wellness is the Key to Life.
i � 4'
r. ai
ABORTIONS UP
i JSk TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
$215 Ahonian from 13 to 18 weeks at additional coat
Pregnancy Tesl, Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy
Counseling For further information, call 832-0535 (toll
free number: 1-800-532-5384) between 9 am and 5 pm
week da y� General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
IMPORT SERVICE
WE REPAIR TOYOTA, HONDA, VW, FIAT.
PORSCHE, VOLVO, DATSUN, LOTUS, MER
CEDES. BMW, AUDI AND OTHERS
EXPERT WORKMANSHIP
756 - 9434
2204 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville
Service
'Homecoming
Specials
?Mum Football Corsages $5.00
?Yellow Pom Poms $5.00
?Yellow Sweetheart Roses $10.00
756-7226
698 E. Arlington Blvd.
Arlington Village
758-2183
117 W. 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
T
HOMECOMING -f
SPECIALS
October 8-10, 1987
Homecoming Corsages
$6.00
0C j
Bumper Stickers
2 for $1.00
&
?
Ties
10 Off
One group sweatshirts
25 to 30 off
One group coffee mugs
25 off
Student Stores
Wright Building
�' ��' �itm0mm0tmm0m
"mmmm
mm
Students
(CPS) � Few college students
choose to spend their vacations in
the New York's South Bronx se
tion. The nibble-strewn stre
one of the nation's worst ui
slums offer crime, ignorance and
a lifestyle far removed from com
fort
But a handful ot Brown Univ er
sity students have spent their last
two summer vacations in
South Bronx, clearing away ar
son-charred rubble and trash
from an abandoned lot and build
ing a community park and
den.
It's happening elsewhere
more college students
otyped earlier in the de a I
"me generation are vohil I
ing their time to assist the p
the disabled and the elderly
Tentatively, some obs I
note "a return to idealism" an
students nationwide
They use phrases like
ing social consciousness
"political awareness
haven't been heard on
campuses in years.
"You can feel someth
change said Paul Lipsi
former Brown student
started the project when hi a -
a South Bronx community service
organization: "If I deliver 11
backs, can you give them si
work to do?"
'When you see a kid who d
lun t
give a damn about anything, a kid
who killed everything he
plant a tomato plant and i an I -
and respect that plant, well I
empowering Lipson rha
dized.
Nobody knows exact!
many students and projects tin re
are now, though observers all
agree it has increased.
Stalking such statistic s
overwhelming job exi
Jane Kendall of the Natu �
ety for Internships and Experien-
tial Education, because man)
dentsare involved in proi
aren't linkcxt to campuses
Yet 43 percent of the bT colleges
polled by Campus Compa,
group that encourages stu
public service projects, reported
student voluntarism has in-
creased during the last five years
JgtA LamfUs ColnflacTs uS57T
"Students rmm sc
verse as Hood College in Mary-
land, Stanford University, the
University of Wisconsin-
Oshkosh, Midwestern State Uni-
versity in Texas, Brooklyn
lege and Illinois State are part ot
the effort.
Two weeks ago, Norwich Col
lege in Vermont observed en.
interest in the Peace Corps
another channel for activities thai
are more spiritually than finan-
cially rewarding � to start the
nation's first program to prepare
students for the Corps
Even at Harvard oft-cr I
as a vocational school tor the ac-
quisitive, the number oi law and
business school grads opting � -
public service jobs has increased
among the last two graduating
classes.
Some call it a swing away from
materialism
"There was a shift towards
(materialism) in the late 71 -
early '80s Kendall observed.
"Those were some prettv lean
years for us. But it has bottomed
out. People feel the need tor more
meaning in their lives for a
greater sense of community
"There's nothing wrong with
students focusing in on a career
allowed Dean Lois Cronholm ot
Temple University in Philadel-
phia. "What's wrong is to say this
is all 1 want
"The world needs stockbro-
kers added Deirdre Kell a Uni-
versity of Vermont student who
works with the elderly and dis-
abled. "But the human need is so
great
"The
'me generation' is
Id
Home-ec offers
two scholarships
(ECU News Bureau) The
Catherine Hill Tyndall and Betsy
Hill Owens scholarship in Home
Economics has been awarded to
Karen L. Edwards, daughter ot
Audrey Edwards of Newport, for
the 1987-88 academic year.
Edwards is a graduate student
at East Carolina University in
Home Economics Education and
is also working toward certifica-
tion.
The scholarship of $250 per
semester is awarded annually on
the basis of financial need, aca-
demic merit and interest in and
commitment to working in the
development of rural eastern
North Carolina.
news saij
dean of s
mg tht
Eve
The Skiei
GOI

i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
Gre
M
Shmip F I
iS't.i S I





mecoming Specials
iday and Saturday
at
i
Rib $8.95
Ion Broil $5.95
m OCool$5.95
tor Two$11.95
Ml Specials Served with Salads
Casual Pining Formal Drinking"
rhc O'Cool Cocktail, onlv $2.50
'White Rum Creme de Banana 'Pineapple Juice
"Orange I nice
Open 7 Days
, 11 a.m. - 1 a.m.
und Qunc s 355-2946
OU'RE NEXT
i weight safely and effectively
Medical Weight Loss Systems
Don t w.vl1 Lose unwanted pounds now snth
this gre.it ottei '
S
( Arlington Blvd.
senville, NC
$100 off
Any Program
October 12 19. 1987
Must have coupon to
qualify
'Medically supervised, safe,
effective weight loss
program
�Cholesterol monitoring
�Nutrition education
�Behavior modification
�Doctors and nurses on staff
AfC. MSA Si CHOICE ACCEPTED
756-2611
Iness is the Key to Life.
COMING rf
CIALS
- 10, 1987
ing Corsages
6.00
Bumper Stickers
2 for $1.00
V
p sweatshirts
to 30 off
coffee mugs
off
t Stores
Building
1
Students aid the improvished
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER�. 1987 9
(CPS) Few college students
choose to spend their vacations in
the New York's South Bronx sec-
tion. The rubble-strewn streets of
one of the nation's worst urban
slums offer crime, ignorance and
a lifestyle far removed from com-
fort.
But a handful of Brown Univer-
sity students have spent their last
two summer vacations in the
South Bronx, clearing away ar
son-charred rubble and trash
from an abandoned lot and build-
ing a community park and gar-
den.
It's happening elsewhere, too:
more college students, stere-
otyped earlier in the decade as the
"me generation are volunteer-
ing their time to assist the poor,
the disabled and the elderly.
Tentatively, some observers
note "a return to idealism" among
students nationwide.
They use phrases like "emerg-
ing social consciousness" and
"political awareness" that
haven't been heard on college
campuses in years.
"You can feel something
change said Paul Lipson, the
former Brown student who
started the project when he asked
a South Bronx community service
organization: "If I deliver 11
backs, can you give them some
work to do?"
"When you sec a kid who didn't
give a damn about anything, a kid
who killed everything he found,
plant a tomato plant and care for
and respect that plant, well, that's
empowering Lipson rhapso-
dized.
Nobody knows exactly how-
many students and projects there
are now, though observers all
agree it has increased.
Stalking such statistics is "an
overwhelming job explained
Jane Kendall of the National Soci-
ety for Internships and Experien-
tial Education, because manv stu-
dents are involved in projects that
aren't linked to campuses.
Yet 43 percent of the 67 colleges
polled by Campus Compact, a
group that encourages student
public service projects, reported
student voluntarism has in-
creased during the last five years,
fIB HampUs QJIHJUfli &UMA
hwartz. .
Students frvm scfcHWte "Mrsl�"�
verse as Hood College in Mary-
land, Stanford University, the
University of Wisconsin-
Oshkosh, Midwestern State Uni-
versity in Texas, Brooklyn Col-
lege and Illinois State are part of
the effort.
Two weeks ago, Norwich Col-
lege in Vermont observed enough
interest in the Peace Corps �
another channel for activities that
are more spiritually than finan-
cially rewarding � to start the
nation's first program to prepare
students for the Corps.
Even at Harvard, oft-criticized
as a vocational school for the ac-
quisitive, the number of law and
business school grads opting for
public service jobs has increased
among the last two graduating
classes.
Some call it a swing away from
materialism.
"There was a shift towards
(materialism) in the late '70s and
early '80s Kendall observed.
"Those were some pretty lean
years for us. But it has bottomed
out. People feel the need for more
meaning in their lives, for a
greater sense of community
"There's nothing wrong with
students focusing in on a career
allowed Dean Lois Cronholm of
Temple University in Philadel-
phia. "What's wrong is to say this
is all I want
"The world needs stockbro-
kers added Deirdre Kell, a Uni-
versity of Vermont student who
works with the elderly and dis-
abled. "But the human need is so
great
"The 'me generation' is old
Home-ec offers
two scholarships
(ECU News Bureau) � The
Catherine Hill Tyndall and Betsy
Hill Owens scholarship in Home
Economics has been awarded to
Karen L. Edwards, daughter of
Audrey Edwards of Newport, for
the 1987-88 academic year.
Edwards is a graduate student
at East Carolina University in
Home Economics Education and
is also working toward certifica-
tion.
The scholarship of $250 per
semester is awarded annually on
the basis of financial need, aca-
demic merit and interest in and
commitment to working in the
development of rural eastern
North Carolina.
news said Harry Kisker, the
dean of student affairs at the Uni-
versity of Washington in St. Louis
where, "90 percent of the under-
graduates are involved in one
form of community service dur-
ing their college careers
"Students now are more ideal-
istic he said, much like their '60s
predecessors. But unlike them,
today's students operate without
fanfare or attention. "Now, stu-
dents just do it
Others speculate the commu-
nity service interest corresponds
with a rise in political concious-
ness, noting students now regu-
larly mobilize around issues like
apartheid, U.S. foreign policy in
Central America, CIA recruiting
on campus and civil rights.
"Students are more active and
less passive now said Lois Geib,
a Hood College administrator.
Because community service
gets students off campus to "see
the upheavals of the world said
Stanford's volunteer coordinator
Tim Stanton, "they become more
responsive to political upheaval.
Both student activism and stu-
dent community service arc reac-
tions to the excesses of the Reagan
years
"There's a general awareness of
the whole earth and total commu-
nity prompted "by AIDS, the
Everything For
The Skier!
threat of nuclear war, the Iran-
contra scandal added Hal
Woods, who coordinates service
programs at Vermont.
"Also, it's a reaction to the yup-
pie thing Woods said of what he
calls an "increase � but not a
surge � in student activism
"Students are raising funda-
mental personal questions about
their responsibilities to the com-
munity
Yuppicdom, Washington's
Kisker said, "isn't all it's cracked
up to be
Kisker believes students like
community service projects be-
cause they "provide access out-
side the ivory tower. It provides a
counterpoint to students' daily
lives
"I've learned to get things done,
to work within a system said
David Townes, a Vermont junior
who works with inmates in the
state's Department of Correc-
tions. "I would have never met
people like that if I hadn't gotten
involved
Vermont senior Kim Parsons,
who spent the last two fail semes-
ters teaching in Honduras, also
noted that, when she graduates
and looks for a job, "if I didn't go
to Honduras, I'd just be another
� The latest in Skiwear Fashions.
� rhe latest in Ski Equipment.
� Complete certified repair shop.
� Ski packages available.
GORDON'S
Golt and Ski Shop
264 By-Pass 7S6-1003
� S � i i .� Ci - ��
�C �
Starting Friday
Like Father. Like Son
Surrender
Hell Raiser
XGik 'Theatre
Starting Friday
Living Daylights
Clip-N-Save
' "Cl
-�towps
10 OFF
homecoming
3010 A East 10th St
Greenville
Corsages
757-1892
Clip-N-Savei ������
MARATHON RESTAURANTS
'Dcdvcni 'Menu
vry
SUBS
Steak and Cheese3.95
Steak and Mushrooms3.95
Reuben with French Fries 4.45
Ham and Cheese 3.95
Roast Beef and French Fries 4.45
Cold Sub 3.95
Chicken Salad Sub3.95
Pastrami Sub3.95
Turkey and Cheese3.95
Super Sub4.45
B.L.T3.95
GREEK DISHES
GYRO Sandwich3.95
Souvlaki Sandwich3.95
Aegean Grilled Cheese2.95
GYRO Platter4.45
Marathon Special 4.45
Athenian-Style Chicken 4.45
SANDWICHES
Hamburger1.75
Cheeseburger 1.95
Hot Dog1.35
Chicken Salad Sandwich2.95
Chicken Breast2.35
Shrmp Eggroll 1.25
SALADS
Greek Salad3.95
Chefs Salad 3.95
Chicken Salad Plate3.95
Tossed Salad 1.95
Potato Salad1.70
GREEK PASTRIES
Baklava1.25
PIZZA MENU
9" 14"
Cheese Pizza3.505.50
Any 1 item4.006.50
Any 2 items4.507.50
Any 3 items5.008.50
Any 4 items5.509.50
Addl items501.00
Mushrooms Pepperonl
Ground Beef Onions
Green Peppers Sausage
Hot Peppers Olives
Anchovies Ham
Canadian Bacon
Marathon Deluxe: Pepperoni, Onions,
Ground Beef, Mushrooms, Green
Peppers
9" 14"
$7.00 $10.50
SOFT DRINKS
Small .70 Large .80
FRENCH FRIES
Small .65 Large .75
����������������a
MonJri. 4-11
Sat. & Sun. 11-11
752-0326
or
752-3753
person who just graduated
Some volunteers like Brown's
Lipson, who took a job with a
Bronx community service organi-
zation when he graduated in
May, even think the pendulum
has swung too far toward com-
munity service.
Lipson complains voluntarism
has become hip, that students are
involved in "sexy" issues like
homelessness and hunger be-
cause rock stars say ifs cool. "I
don't want to hear the Mother
Theresa stuff when he asks stu-
dents why they want to work in
the South Bronx. "I want them to
do it to satisfy themselves
But whatever the motives, Lip-
son is encouraged by students'
emerging social conscience.
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tO Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN!
NIAN OCTOBER 8, 1987
Minorities score highest ever on SAT's
(CPS) � Minority students
scored higher than ever on this
year's college aptitude tests,
while other students essentially
held their own, reports from the
sponsors of the SAT (Scholastic
Aptitude Tests) and American
College Testing (ACT) tests
showed last week.
But the highest scorers, reports
showed, once again tended to be
wealthy, male and white.
Generally, ACT scores showed
little change from last year, while
SAT scores have been stable for
three years.
Average SAT verbal scores
among students who are this
year's freshmen were 430, down
one point from 1986, while the
math average score rose one point
to 476, the College Board re-
ported.
The average composite ACT
score in 1987 was 18.7, down 0.1
percent from 1986 averages.
As the national average scores
stayed the same, however, black'
students improved their scores.
On the SATs, black test takers
raised their average verbal score
from 346 in 1985 to 351 in 1987.
Average math scores rose 1 point,
from 376 to 377.
Black ACT takers averaged 13.4
in 1987, up from 13.0 in 1986.
White students averaged 19.7,
and Asian-Americans 19.8.
As always, there wasabsolutely
no agreement just what the scores
meant.
U.S. Secretary of Education
William J. Bennett thought they
were "good news though
"we're still seeing an insufficient
payoff for what we've invested in
education. We need better results.
We need accountability for re-
sults
"The increasing number of stu-
dents taking the SAT is an encour-
aging sign since it means that a
great many more students are
actually considering going to col-
lege said Donald M. Stewart,
president of the College Board.
But at the same time, Stewart
termed the results "not dra-
matic
In general, average aptitude
test scores began falling in 1967,
and didn't stop until 1981.
Observers explained the long
decline with a variety of theories
ranging from less-rigorous high
schools to the shrinking size of
families to the atmospheric test-
ing of nuclear weapons through
1963.
Bennett continued to blame
high schools for failing to prepare
students to take the tests, while
the College Board itself saw
1987's results as a reflection of the
number of students taking the
test.
"The more kids that take the
test, the greater the variety of stu-
dents and the lower the scores
noted College Board spokesman
Fred Moreno.
The number of students taking
the test in 1987 rose eight percent.
Board research chief Robert
Cameron added, "There's no
doubt that the students who take
more challenging courses in high
school tend to do better on the
test
Indeed, ACT director of minor-
ity education Samuel D. Cargile
credited better high school prepa-
ration for the rise in minority
scores.
"Over the past several years,
the proportion of ACT-tested stu-
dents from minority groups tak-
ing a core high school curriculum
has increased noticeably Car-
gile said.
Nevertheless, wealthy, white
male test takers still outper-
formed other students, prompt-
ing critics again to label the tests
biased.
Students with family incomes
more than $70,000, averaged 523
math and 471 verbal on the SAT.
Students whose families had in
comes of less than $10,000 had
average scores of 416 math and
364 verbal.
"The continued large gender
gap on both the SAT and ACT
indicates there are still serious
flaws in both exams asserted
John Weiss, executive director of
FairTest.
"If test results were consistent
with other measures of academic
merit like high school and college
grades, girls would score the
same as or even slightly better
than the boys
Julienne's Florist
Celebrating ECU Homecoming "87
I lomecoming Corsages & Boutonnieres
Mums - $5.00
Carnations - $2.50
Group rates available
1703 W. 6th St.
752 5216
Spelman College excited about TV's 'A Different World
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center Is Open
Mon Tues, & Wed. Fn.9am.
9 a.m. - 2 p.m. & by appointment
For an appointment or more infor-
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline,
757-0003
1 1 1 Kast Third Strvct The Lee Building
Greenville. N. C
fVee f,rvgn;in-y Test
Confidential Counseling
ATLANTA, Ga. (CPS) �
Twenty-one students gathered in
the TV lounge at a dorm at Spel-
man College Sept. 24, waiting
with some eagerness and some
skepticism for the show "A Differ-
ent World" to begin.
The students had some special
reasons to be excited: the fictional
black college at which the show
takes place is based on Spelman,
and the produciton company had
filmed location shots on the cam-
pus, which had competed with
several other local black colleges
for the privilege.
And Spelaman, a 105-year-old
black women's college, had other
things at stake: unprecedented
and invaluable national exposure
for the school and black colleges
in general.
No one at Spelman, at the
show's production company or at
the United Negro college Fund
could remember another TV pro-
gram that has featured a predomi-
nantly black college.
"A Different World" isa spinoff
from the top rated Bill Cosby
Show, tracing the experiences of
Cosby's character's daughter,
Denise Huxtable � played by
Lisa Bonet � away from home for
the first time.
"It's about the college experi-
ence, also the maturing process,
the process of growing from
childhood to adulthood. The col-
lege is an important environment
for that process explained Joel
Brokaw, publicist for the show's
production company.
The students watching at Spel-
man recognized it.
Introductory scenes of Denise
Huxtable moving into her dormi-
tory elicited groans of recollec-
tion, while the dorm itself was
reminiscent of Spelman's
McVicar Hall, which is similarly
old, warm and has rounded win-
dows.
Another viewer recognized a
framed print in one scene as an en-
largement of the card the college
sends each student at Christmas,
ECU will sponcor
development courses
(ECU News Bureau) � The
ECU Division of Continuing
Education will sponsor three
developmental courses in mid-
October.
Intermediate Lotus 1-2-3 will be
Oct. 10 from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. in
Computerland at Carolina East
Centre. Students must have com-
pleted the introductory course
before taking this one. Space is
limited; students are encouraged
to register early. Tommy Harring-
ton, management consultant for
all the Lotus 1-2-3 seminars, will
instruct this seminar.
Advising the Real Estate Client
will be Oct. 13,15 from 7-9 p.m. in
Brewster building on the ECU
campus. Instructors will be Char-
les L. McLawhorn Jr. and Nancy
E. Short, attorneys-at-law. This
seminar is designed to be helpful
to real estate brokers, agents, and
investors.
Coping with Stress on the Job
will be Oct. 13 from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
in ECU's Rawl building. Kathy K.
Sprau, management supervision
and personal development
trainer, will direct this seminar.
For more information on these
seminars, call the Division of
Continuing Education, 757-6143.
a card handpainted every year by
Spelman graduate Varnette
Honey wood.
Others thought the characters
and situations seemed familiar,
including the everprescnt,
overeager young man trying to
hustle Denise and the "my room-
mate hates me" syndrome.
Not everyone was impressed.
"That Denise said one student,
"was an unbelievable character
Another viewer thought the
character's clothes were so "way
out" that they detracted from the
plot.
But in general, most seemed to
agree with student Beverly
Hillman's summation: "That was
a good show. I was surprised,
very much surprised
Educators also had reason to
like it.
Such national exposure can be
valuable to a school, especially a
relatively small institution that
doesn't get on TV much.
"Black colleges are known for
their academic excellence said
Adrienne Rhodes of the United
Negro College Fund. "The new
show will expose that to a broader
public
Rhodes hopes "it will show that
black colleges are places where
black students can get good role
models, find mentors and take
active roles in student govern
ment and clubs
Spelman Development Direc-
tor Tanya Moore adds "A Differ
ent World" can illustrate to the
nation that a young black
woman's "life at college is impor-
tant. That reinforces what we
say
But some of the benefits have
been more immediate.
"The exposure Spelman has
gotten through the show has
helped with recruitment and visi-
bility Moore reported. "We've
gotten letters from Iowa and
Nebraska, not all from black
people. The show has made Spel-
man stand out in people's
minds
Moore added a small founda-
tion in Florida had awarded a
grant to Spelman, as a result of the
uouas
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Celebrating ECU
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Whether it's Ringgold Towers
Condos or single family homes,
we can find a place for you!
n.� fa
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Street
Homecoming Corsages
81 Boutonnieres
Mums
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Sweetheart Roses
$8.50 & up
Boutonnieres
$3.00 fit up
show, and that the production
company itself had enhanced
Spelman's grounds and physical
plant by planting azaleas, dog
wood and other flowers on the
campus.
Neverthlcss, the students who
gathered to watch the premiere
episode didn't see much of the
campus.
And they may not see much
more of it during succeeding epi-
sodes.
After filming exterior shots at
Spelman, the Brokaw Company
reshot the first segment, using
"outdoor shots done in the stu-
dio
These shots, created by a set
designer, may be used through-
out the series, turning Spelman,
like many beginning actors, into
the face on the cutting room floor.
The Cut Above
Student Specials
2()ao OFF Permanent Waves
We Listen Before We Cut.
Men: $8.00 Women: $10.00
Includes Shampoo and Cut
Hours 9 Until
TRY OUR WOLFF TANNING BED'
201 E. 5th Street
757 1488
Kj Appointment
Necessary!
SUDAN TEMPLE
AND
ECU STUDENT UNION
SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE
PRESENTS
The Royal Hanneford's
Shrine Circus
ECUMinges Coliseum
Sunday, October 25th
3:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m.
$3.00 ECU students $5.00 all others
A11 tickets will be $5.00 at the door
Advance Tickets now on sale at the
Central Ticket Office.
11 a.m. - 6 p.m
Monday - Friday,
757-6611, ext. 266.
im f M � HH lH
'Leave it to
By JENNIFER PEARSON
Suit WnlTr
Festive musk fills the air as
the curtains untold, revealing a
most charming atmosphere ot
old-timey tun. The audience
grows silent and the Fast Carolina
Playhouse's premier production
"Leave It To jane" begins.
Despite the faltering light sV
tern, the delightful ploys of the
actors in the play's Nc.inning
sustained the audience's interest
The musical opens with the "Gala
Ensemble" singing the boastful
songs of Atwater College. The
characters cannot help eliciting
their pretentious attitudes and
snobery. With names like Stub
Talmage" and "lane Wither-
spoon the characters' words
and actions are nothing but tit
ting.
The slapstick antics o the
"BOYS such as their occasional
prancing off stage, provides
many laughs And the comical
duo of Stub, or "Stubby as his
friends call him, and Bessie are
i hr.tr �
simp
V i!� In
chanting V
1 es
othci
path
The plot rea
the second act
by Nina Blanto
rtived the fo
Bolt!
win the i
t;mine ai

in ttv
which she
all hi
truly a riot Their song "A Peach of hundred
N o-name Fix i
By QLW DFANHARDT
Managing Editor
what we
-t ret

coll
es jik
The Fixx tour has no name1
Think about it. Genesis had the
"invisible Touch" tour. Bowie
had the "Class Spider" tour. Even
K.F.M. had the "Work" tour. But
the Fixx tour will be nameless pendent I v
when it hits Minges Coliseum
Saturday at 8 p.m.
"I think all that's a bit preten-
tious We prefer no labels, no
predictions drummer Adam
new. unn
to their ol
The Chairmen of the Board, featuring General
October 11.
) Carnival rides ovne
j
By GRETCHEN JOL RMGAN
During the fall season, there's a
familiar scene at county fair-
grounds - bright lights, thnlling
rides and cotton candy stands
But have vou ever wondered
where or how the tradition origi-
nated?
Cathy Vivona. an ECU sopho-
more, and her family present 30 of
the rides and food stands at the
Pitt County Fair every year.
Their family business, Amuse-
ments of America, travels around
the eastern coast, from Florida to
Maine and even Canada featur-
ing their amusements at fair
spots.
The business j
the Vivona bro
ther, Phil, and
lohn. Babe andl
nallv trom lmn
The business
3 traveling opeJ
Morns work tog
and Dominjk, aJ
the other one-thl
They all travef
but appear in
throughout the i
says that they cc
when they plav
erally up north,
The Vivona
was inspired byj
tonio Vivona in I
f
i
. mr00mm rnm imn
� ���� ��� awai'iMi�riMngMJTrTawIBrjWMIlirrifiinM -it
nr tii nit





iienne's Florist
i oming 87
Boutonnieres
$2 50
Mip rates available
71 - �) i. � i
2 16
CAROLINA
"tNANCY CENTER
t or more infor
� Helpline,
bove
or
T I
C
MilTEE
anneforcTs
lircus
Coliseum
ober 25th
7:00 p.m.
s $5.00 all others
5.00 at the door
n sale al the
et Office,
6 p.m
Friday,
ext. 266.
HI I s K(� im
AN
Entertainment
OCR BI K 8 1987 Page 1!
' Leave it to Jane' opens at ECU
By MNNUIR Pi ARSON
SI jilt Wntft
Festive music fills the air as
curtains unfold, revealing a
�s! charming atmosphere of
I tirrtey fun. The audience
s s silent and the East Carolina
house's premier production
eave It To Jane" begins.
Respite the faltering light sys-
m, the delightful plovs of the
tors in the play's beginning
istained the audience's interest.
c musical opens with the "Gala
nscmblc" singing the boastful
ngs of Atwater College. The
aractors cannot help eliciting
uir pretentious attitudes and
nobery. With names like "Stub
almage" and "lane Wither-
p�oon the characters' words
nd actions are nothing but fit-
fhe slapstick antics of the
ikTi �; such as their occasional
g off stage, provides
laughs. And the comical
luo of Stub, or "Stubby as his
nenJs call him, and Bessie are
rulya riot. Their song "A Peach of
Life" reveals all the desires of the
Atwater bovs
The popular interest of the
chrarming boys of Atwater is to
simply domesticate a girl for a
wife in particular - the en-
chanting Miss jane Witherspoon.
Yes, the star of the show is none
other than the frolicsome, uppity-
lane, who manages to steal the
heart of every fellow along her
path.
The plot really begins to roll in
the second act. Miss Jane, played
bv Nina Blanton,has already con-
nived the football hero, Rill
Bolton, to remain at Atwater and
win the big game for her. Both of
these roles were played with good
timing and were constantly enter
taming for the vast audience in the
theater.
Some of the other notable char-
acters are the rude and boisterous
Flora Wiggins, played by Janice
V. Schriber, is hilarious especially
in the song Cleopatterer" in
which she attributes to Cleopatra
all her success in eliminating her
hundreds of lovers after she grew
tired of them.
Not to mention the spontane-
ous buffoon, Harold (Bub) Hicks,
played bv Scot Slusarick, who
actually is a hick and new student
at Atwater. These two outcast
characters even end up together
for a brief moment until, as ex-
pected, 1 lareld, falls for the capti-
vating lane but to no avail.
Perhaps the most comical
element of the play is the overall
attitudes of the characters them-
selves-pretending to be what they
most certainly were not. The idea
el the country bumpkin Bubba
becoming a well-kempt, self -as-
sured gentleman, after residing at
the Atwater College only a short
while, is simply absurd. 1 lis own
father, although just as flakev as
his son, hardly recognizes him.
The Mr ! Ion Elan i licks is played
by Jeffrey 1 larget and his charac-
ter certainly adds much humor to
the plaj through his obviously
"swinging in the money " stvle.
Other mentionable persons are
the very rich and pretentious Pe-
ter Witherspoon, played by Bren-
don Medlin, and Hiram Boltan,
played by Stuart Maxwell. Such
characters allowed the audience
10 witness the superficiality of the
upperclass of this time of the roar-
ing twenties. Their values rested
upon money, the right social
circle, and attending only the best
of schools, which was the Atwater
College for Mr. Witherspoon and
none other than Brigham for Mr.
Hiram Bolton.
In complementing the actors,
the music providesan exceptional
balance of entertainment. It often
reflects "the moonlight and soft
summer nights" of this fabu-
lously spunky time, that of the
1920s.
Overall this musical on itsopen-
ing night is delightful and holds
something for everyone-a view of
the snobbery and pretentiousness
of this society and for the less
discriminate audience, a comical
evening of entertainment provid-
ing many opportunities to laugh
- LOUDLY.
No-name Fixx tour plays Minges tonight
ByCLA DEANHARDT
Managing U,�r
The Fixx tour has no name.
Think about it. Genesis had the
Invisible Touch" tour. Bowie
tad the "Class Spider" tour. Even
: E.M. had the "Work" tour. But
he Fixx tour will be nameless
hen it hits Minges Coliseum
Saturday at 8 p.m.
1 think all that's a bit preten-
tious. We prefer no labels, no
predictions drummer Adam
Woods said in an interview Wed
nesday night. "Now we tend to do
what we like on the night. It's the
most refreshing thing about the
band
Woods said the Fixx is touring
colleges and selected clubs inde-
pendently of their record com-
pany, playing a large selection of
new, unrelcased tunes in addition
to their old hits
"For us it's the best thing of all
Woods said. Hie group is playing
10 new songs n fhe road now,
and by judging reacti �ns from the
audience they are determining
what to include on their next
album, he said
It's an album the public may not
see tor a year.
"We don't want to give the rec-
ord company another album until
they put the house in order
Woods said The group is also
changing from producer Rupert
Hirte, who worked on their first
I he Chairmen of the Board, featuring General Johnson, will be
October 11.
playing on the mall at 4 p.m. on
) Carnival rides owned by family business
By GRFTCHFN JOURNIGAN
SUff Wrilfr
I Hiring the fall season, there's a
familiar scene at county fair-
grounds - bright lights, thrilling
rides and cotton candy stands.
Hut have you ever wondered
here or how the tradition origi-
nated?
Cathy Vivona, an ECU sopho-
more, and her family present 30of
the rides and food stands at the
Pitt County Fair every year.
Their family business, Amuse-
ments of America, travels around
Hie eastern coast, from Florida to
Maine and even Canada featur-
ing their amusements at fair
spots.
The business involves all 5 of
the Vivona brothers- Cathy's fa-
ther, Phil, and her uncles Morris,
John, Babe and Dominik, origi-
nally from Irvington, NJ.
The business is divided up into
3 traveling operations. Phil and
Morris work together as one, John
and Dominik, and Babe operates
the other one-third.
They all travel at the same time
but appear in different spots
throughout the east coast. Morris
says that they combine their units
when they play bigger fairs, gen-
erally up north and in Canada.
The Vivona brothers' business
was inspired by their father, An-
tonio Vivona in the early IQSO's
"Times were hard back then
says Morris. He said that he could
remember when his father's tai-
loring business went bankrupt
during World War One. After the
loss, Antonio began to work with
an ice cream factory making ice
cream at ball games and area car-
nivals in Irvington.
"It was made by hand with ice
and salt- the old fashioned way, it
didn't come from machines like
we have today said Morris.
Then he began buying new
devices to make frozen custards
along with the icecream. Antonio
began the tradition when he
bought each of his sons, Morris,
See BROTHERS, page 12
four albums, to Hugh Padgham,
who produced the three studio
tracks on "React a live album
which is the Fixx's most recent
release. Padgham also has
worked with the Police, Phil
Collins and Genesis. Woods said
he forgave Padgham for the last
two.
Woods said bringing the new
tracks to live audiences before
they were recorded was a refresh-
ing change from falling into the
rut of working with record com-
panies.
"The record company is very-
isolated from the public. They
don't have a good grasp" on the
public's taste, he said. He called
the new production process
?"something move human than
what's been going on the last few
years (in music)
Just before the interview
Wcxxis was listening to XTC's
"Skylarking" Lp, he said. He said
he also enjoys the new Public
Ralph Bass and Nina Blanton star in last Carolina Playhouse's
production of'Leave it to Jane playing Oc�. 7, S, 9, 10, ' 2 at S:1S p.m.
in McGinnis theater.
Image Ltd. album, although he is
not a collector. "A lot of current
music leaves me cold
Woods said it was hard to clas-
sify Fixx music. 'That's our bit
problem, classifying it We don't
even think about classification
we take it very serious because
it's our life he said.
Woods noted that others have
called their music art rock, techno
rock and just plain English rock
While admitting that the Fixx
got their break in the U.S. (thev are
from England) through their
"Stand or Fall" video and MTV,
Woods said"1 think video a re a'
waste of time
"If 1 listen with just mv ears I
have a picture in mv mind and
that can change he said. He went
on to say that videos built walls
around the music, providing a
single in � wer.
"i prefer I lay ut I that kind
oi thing i am a drummer in a
band he said.
I le also said t! trend is
ivlygrii iingtoa halt 'It's the
� - thai are stopping it " he
tl .it college radio
stations pla what the students
want to hear, not sec
-1 ' . ght's show
sh and exciting.
' done ows now.
It's quiti
le saul tht- band would chose
�Hot�Lrrk'v�rf�Mop�av;and
inters- � from their previ-
ous
rickets tor the show, priced at
$7 for students are still available
at the Centra! ticket Office in
Mendenhall ai I al the gate.
A fast dinner with the Usuals
By EARL HAMPTON
S��f( Writer
It's 9:30 at night and Manute
Cain, the Usuals' bearded bass
player, motors the blue Usuals
van up a fast food drive through.
"Man, when we are on the road
this is what we live on Manute
says as he reaches for the burger-
packed bag.
For a year the Usuals,
Greenville's own rock and roll
band, have traveled four states.
On nights when I have that 6
p.m.deadlineand have tooome
up with that 18 inch column, and
my editor continues to introduce
me to his girlfriend who I've met
but tonight at 8 p.m. they will be
delighting their home bovs as
they open for The Fixx at Minges
Coliseum.
Besides ravaging various nighl
clubs and parties with their brand
of rock and roll, the Usuals have
released their first recording,
titled "Nothing to Fear But Lire
Itself
"It's scary music with a mes-
sage lead singer Sam Madison
said about the 10 track recording
of Usual's originals. Madison
wrote all but two of the songs on
the tape.
SOUnd differ-
ent whiv h is unlike Other bands
! their songs sound
the same said Madison.
Scott Stutts. drummer, and
Madison are the original mem-
l ts who formed the Usuals in
1983. year later, the band found
guitarist David Brockman, a
Sec FAST, page 13
I rlCKrlrlg tUG PQflEft
Super heroes not having sex
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Dark Kent never went
through this mess.
'Course, he bad that awesome
super speed and stuff. My basic
super powers are along the lines
of being able to recognise poetry
that 1st gir is wrote.
Not your most radical ability.
And it won't help you in bed
either, unless you're partial to jfe-
majes that collect ce&uhte like
Now
The sexual possibUitieshehad.
nagine stretching ANY part of
a
He could amuse himsetfmairuly
unique way,
the girl who did go
ban ffiW
I don't think the Flash will ever
be a dad. Not only would he
ejaculate at light speed, his vital
juices would probably evaporate
due to the high rate of friction.
If he ever did impregnate his
wife, she might enjoy a three
month pregnancy. Those quick
Httie tadpoles undoubtably ges-
tate at super speed. And the labor
wouldn't be too long either.
Wonder Woman always both-
ered me. She came from an all-
women island- Those Amazons
had not seen a guy in 3,000 years.
What did they do all that time?
Play Scrup4w"? Write bad po-
etry
But if she was of a mind to, she
could have any guy she wanted.
Her magic lasso would make you
do anything if yci were tied in it
Oh, maybe fhe Amazons in-
vented the SAM thing
the Human Torch had great
powers. He could light his
partner's cigarette afterwards.
But if he got too excited, it could
cause trouble. When girls get
third degree bums during sex,
and irs not due to the rug, they
Sims. Poor
gr would be a
stand,
Torch's sister,
Girt, would be kind
Personally, lulu to
turns into
� ��hi.
the Hulk, he gets big and he gets
green. Does he get proportion-
ately bigger? And greener? If he
did, why didn't his pants rip off
too?
Phantom Girl would be hard to
seduce. She'd just phase out And
maybe resolidify at an awkward
moment. You would either lose
your best friend or gain a new one
for life.
1 always wanted to see Shrink
ing Violet and Colossal Boy get
together. All that size changing;
Eventually she would drown or
he would get castrated. The hard
way.
Poor Planaria Man. It's tough
to have a good time when your re-
production cycle consists wholly
of cell division. Of cause, AIDS is
never a threat, but still.
The biggest puzzle to me is
Captain Marvel. As Billy Batson,
he's in a state of eternal child-
hood. Hell never hit puberty.
After he says "Shazami" is he able
to perform his manly duties?
With all their powers, devices
and strange bodies, I've yet to ac-
tually see a super hero do more
than kiss their respective part-
ners. Surely their hormones ate
carbonaong furiously from frus-
tration.
But I don't care, because 1 j
stretched out this column to
sir o Plastic Man s-
throat.
T

MBUBpiWi" � " '
.1
T






liienne's Florist
Homecoming "87
inw Boutonriieres
mis s i 00
$2.50
mip rates available
' 5216
CAROLINA
NANCY CENTER
Ill���llti:rJ& Open
9am -7pm
& by appointment
fntent or more infor
11 2 3 Hour Hrlpllne,
Cut Above
idem Specials
$10.00
rid C ul
JMNING BED'
' Tf
D
N UNION
S COMMITTEE
anneforcTs
Circus
Coliseum
ober 25th
7:00 p.m.
s $5.00 all others
5.00 at the door
low on sale at the
:et Office.
6 p.m
Friday,
ext. 266.
T
i
�HI- IASI CAKOI IMA
Entertainment
OCTOBl R S Wh7 Pa� 11
'Leave it to Jane' opens at ECU
By JENNIFER PtARSON
SU� Wri�rt
Festive music fills the air as
curtains unfold, revealing a
most charming atmosphere of
Id-timey fun. The audience
ows silent and the East Carolina
i house's premier production
. cave It To jane" begins.
Despite the faltering light sys-
n, the delightful plovs of the
tors in the play's beginning
stained the audience's interest.
I he musical opens with the "Gala
nsembie" singing the boastful
mgs of Atwater College. The
laractors cannot help eliciting
heir pretentious attitudes and
-nobory. With names like "Stub
.almage" and "lane Wither-
spoon the charactors' words
ind actions are nothing but fit-
ting.
The slapstick antics of the
BOi S such as their occasional
� iru ing off stage, provides
it v laughs. And the comical
luo of Stub, or "Stubby as his
friends call him, and Bessie are
truly a not. Their song "A Peach of
life" reveals all the desires of the
Atwater bovs.
The popular interest of the
chrarming boys of Atwater is to
simplv domesticate a girl for a
wife � in particular � the en-
chanting Miss Jane Witherspoon.
Yes, the star of the show is none
other than the frolicsome, uppity
lane, who manages to steal the
heart of every fellow along her
path.
The plot really begins to roll in
the second act. Miss Jane, played
by Nina Blanton,has already con-
nived the football hero. Bill
Bolton, to remain at Atwater and
win the big game for her. Both of
these roles were played with good
timing and were constantly enter-
taining tor the vast audience in the
theater
Some of the other notable char-
acters are the rude and boisterous
Flora Wiggins, played by Janice
V. Schriber, is hilarious especially
in the song 'Cleopatterer" in
which she attributes to Cleopatra
all her success in eliminating her
hundreds of lovers after she grew
tired of them.
Not to mention the spontane-
ous buffoon, Harold (Bub) Hicks,
played by Scot Slusarick, who
actually is a hick and new student
at Atwater. These two outcast
characters even end up together
for a brief moment until, as ex-
pected, I larold, falls for the capti-
vating ane - but to no avail.
Perhaps the most comical
element o( the play is the overall
attitudes of the characters them-
ter Witherspoon, played by Bren-
don Medlin, and Hiram Boltan,
played by Stuart Maxwell. Such
characters allowed the audience
to witness the superficiality of the
uppcrclassof this time of the roar-
ing twenties. Their values rested
upon money, the right social
circle, and attending only the best
of schools, which was the Atwater
College for Mr. Witherspoon and
none other than Brigham for Mr.
Hiram Bolton.
In complementing the actors,
selves-pretending to be what they the music provides an exceptional
most certainly were not. The idea balance of entertainment. It often
of the country bumpkin Bubba reflects "the moonlight and soft
becoming a well-kempt, self-as-
sured gentleman, after residing at
the Atwater College only a short
while, is simply absurd. 1 lis own
lather, although just as flakey as
his son, hardly recognizes him.
The Mr. 1 ion Elan 1 licks is played
by Jeffrey Harget and his charac-
ter certainly adds much humor to
the play through his obviously
"swinging in the money" style.
Other mentionablc persons are
the very rich and pretentious Pe-
summer nights" of this fabu-
lously spunky time, that of the
1920s.
Overall this musical on itsopen-
ing night is delightful and holds
something for everyone-a view of
the snobbery and pretentiousness
of this society and for the less
discriminate audience, a comical
evening of entertainment provid-
ing many opportunities to laugh
- LOUDLY.
No-name Fixx tour plays Minges tonight
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Managing Iditor
Hie Fixx tour has no name.
Hunk about it. Genesis had the
Invisible Touch" tour. Bowie
tad the "Glass Spider" tour. Even
I'M. had the "Work" tour. But
he Fixx tour will be nameless
vhen it hits Minges Coliseum
Saturday at 8 p.m.
' 1 think all that's a bit preten-
tious. We prefer no labels, no
predictions drummer Adam
Woods said in an interview Wed
nesday night. "Now we tend to do
what we like on the night. It's the
most refreshing thing about the
band
Woods said the Fixx is touring
colleges and selected clubs inde-
pendently of their record com-
pany, playing a large selection of
new. unreleasod tunes in addition
to their old hits.
"For us it's the best thing of all
Woods said. The group is playing
10 new sings on the road now,
and by judging reactii ns from the
audience they are determining
what to include on their next
album, he said
It's an album the public may not
SCC for a year.
"We don't want to give the rec-
ord company another album until
they put the house in order
Woods said The group is also
changing from producer Rupert
I line, who worked on their first
The Chairmen of the Board, featuring General Johnson, will be playing on the mall at 4 p.m. on
October 11.
) Carnival rides owned by family business
I !
By GRETCHF.N JOURNIGAN
Suff WritfT
During the fall season, there's a
i imiliar scene at county fair-
grounds - bright lights, thrilling
ndes and cotton candy stands.
Hut have you ever wondered
�vherc or how the tradition origi-
nated?
Cathy Vivona, an ECU sopho-
more.and her family present 30of
the rides and food stands at the
Pitt County Fair every year.
Their family business, Amuse-
ments of America, travels around
the eastern coast, from Florida to
Maine and even Canada featur-
ing their amusements at fair
spots.
The business involves all 5 of
the Vivona brothers- Cathy's fa-
ther, Phil, and her uncles Morris,
ohn, Babe and Dominik, origi-
nally from Irvington, NJ.
The business is divided up into
3 traveling operations. Phil and
Morris work together as one, John
and Dominik, and Babe operates
the other one-third.
They all travel at the same time
but appear in different spots
throughout the east coast. Morris
says that they combine their units
when they play bigger fairs, gen-
erally up north and in Canada.
The Vivona brothers' business
was inspired by their father, An-
tonio Vivona in the early 193CS.
four albums, to Hugh Padgham,
who produced the three studio
tracks on "React a live album
which is the Fixx's most recent
release. Padgham also has
worked with the Police, Phil
Collins and Genesis. Woods said
he forgave Padgham for the last
two.
Woods said bringing the new
tracks to live audiences before
they were recorded was a refresh-
mg change from falling into the
rut of working with record com-
panies.
"The record company is very
isolated from the public. They
don't have a good grasp" on the
public's taste, he said. He called
the new production process
"something move human than
what's been going on the last few
years (in music)
Just before the interview
Woods was listening to XTC's
"Skylarking" Lp, he said. He said
he also enjoys the new Public
Ralph Bass and Nina Blanton star in East Caiolina Playhouse's
production of'Leave it to Jane playing Oct. 7, 8, �, in, 12 at 8:15 p.m.
in McGinnis theater.
Image Ltd. album, although he is
not a collector. "A lot of current
music leaves me cold
Woods said it was hard to clas-
sify Fixx music. 'That's our big
problem, classifying it. We don't
even think about classification
we take it very serious because
it's our life he said.
Woods noted that others have
called their music art rock, techno
rock and just plain English rock
While admitting that the Fixx
got their break l n the U.Sl they are
from England) through their
"Stand or Fall" video and MTV.
Wood said, 1 think idv�wurea
waste of time.
"If I listen with just mv ears, 1
have a picture in my mind � and
that can change he said. He went
on to say that videos built walls
around the music, providing a
single image foi the iewer.
"Iprefcrto iv ut of that kind
or thing i am a drummer in a
band he said.
He also said the video trend is
ly grinding to a halt "It's the
thai are stopping it he
said, noting that college radio
stations play what the students
want to hear, not see.
Woods said tonight's show
pr misedtobi fresh and exciting.
"We've d ne a few shows now.
It's quite together "
I le saut thibond would chose
WoUHf f 2fKWWrt�iOplav; artf
intersperse cuts" From their previ-
ous albums
I ickets tor the show, priced at
S for students are still available
at the Centra! Ticket Office in
Mendenhail and at the gate.
A fast dinner with the Usuals
By EARL HAMPTON
S�i( Writer
It's 9:30 at night and Manute
Cain, the Usuals' bearded bass
player, motors the blue Usuals
van up a fast food drive through.
"Man, when we are on the road
this is what we live on Manute
says as he reaches for the burger-
packed bag.
For a year the Usuals,
Greenville's own rock and roll
band, have traveled four states,
but tonight at 8 p.m. they will be
delighting their home bovs as
they open for The Fixx at Minges
Coliseum.
Besides ravaging various night
clubs and parties with their brand
of rock and roll, the Usuals have
released their first recording,
titled "Nothing to Fear But Life
Itself
"It's scary music with a mes-
sage lead singer Sam Madison
said about the 10 track recording
"Times were hard back then
says Morris. He said that he could
remember when his father's tai-
loring business went bankrupt
during World War One. After the
loss, Antonio began to work with
an ice cream factory making ice
cream at ball games and area car-
nivals in Irvington.
"It was made by hand with ice
and salt- the old fashioned way, it
didn't come from machines like
we have today said Morris.
Then he began buying new
devices to make frozen custards
along with the icecream. Antonio
began the tradition when he
bought each of his sons, Morris,
See BROTHERS, page 12
of Usual's originals. Madison
wrote all but two ot the songs on
the tape.
' All of oui songs sound differ-
ent which is unlike other bands ,
where most of their songs sound
the same said Madison.
Scott Stutts. drummer, and
Madison are the original mem-
bers who formed the Usuals in
1983. A year later, the band found
guitarist David Brockman, a
See FAST, page 13
Picking the fionffs
Super heroes not having sex
By CHIPPY BONEHBAD
On nights when I hve that 6
p.m. deadline and hawe to come
up wimth 18 iwdb column, and
my editor continue to introduce
metohisgirlfrkmdwhorvemet
" rethneaab�adyr!saflwdaag
- Oark Kent neyer: m&
through mis mite.
'Course, he had that awesome
iper speed and stuff. My basic
super powers are along the lines
erf beirabte to recognise pctry
Not your moat radical ability
And it won't help you in bed
�iheMmk�votfmprgatr
rnates mat collect
glucose magnets.
Man, thai guy had a
The sexual possibilities ha had.
He could
himseJfinatruly
I don't think the Flash will ever
be a dad. Not only would he
ejaculate at light speed, his vital
juices would probably evaporate
due to the high rate of friction.
If he ever did impregnate his
wife, she might exuoy a three
month pregnancy. Those quick
Kttle tadpoles undoubtably ges-
tate at super speed. And the laboT
wouldn't be too long either.
Wonder Woman always both-
ered me. She came from an all-
women island- Those Amazons
had not seen a guy in 3,000 years.
What did they do all that time?
Play Scrupiarv? Write bad po-
Put If she was of a mind to, she
could have any guy she wanted.
Her magk lasso would make you
do anything if you were tied in it
Ob, maybe the Amazons in-
vented the S4M thing
the Human Torch had great
powers. He could light his
partner's cigarette afterwards.
fcrtifnegottQoexdteitcould
When girls get
third degree bums during sex
�hd W not due to the rug, they
for the rest of their
ty wmM be a
Girl Id be kind'
like to
�rtto
the Hulk, he gets big and he gets
green. Does he get proportion
ately bigger? And greener? If he
did, why didn't his pants rip off
too?
Phantom Girl would be hard to
seduce. She'd just phase out And
maybe resolidify at an awkward
moment. You would either lose
your best friend or gai n a new one
for life.
I always wanted to see Shrink-
ing Violet and Colossal Boy get
together. All that size changing.
Eventually she would drown or
he would get castrated. The hard
way.
Poor Planaria Man. It's tou
to ha vea good rime when your re-
product ion cycle consists wholly
of cell division. Of couse, AIDS a
never a threat, but still.
The biggest puzzle to me is
Captain Marvel. As Billy Batson,
he's in a state of eternal child-
hood. Hell never hit puberty.
After he savs" izami'isheable
toperfbn anhduties?
With all f powers, devices
and strange . uies, I've yet to ac-
tually see a super hero do more
man loss their respective part-
ners. Surely their hormones are
carbonaung furiously from frus-
tration.
But I don't care, because I p
stretched out mis column to the
size of Plastic Man's.
throat.
MMOH
� �
V






12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN!
OCTOBER 8, 1987
Brothers9 business is profitable
Continued from page 11
lohn and Babe a ice cream ma-
chine.
Morris was 13 years old when
his father gave him his machine
and at the age of lb he quit school
and his father sent him into the
business full time. Morns and a
man who took care of hnn trav-
eled from New. erse totheCaro
linas with their machines.
In 1939,threeyearslater, Morris
and his father bought their first
carnival ride, the Ferns Wheel,
from a man in New Orleans.
Morns first saw the ride at the
World's Fair in New ork.
rhe ride cost 52 200 compared
to $100,000 toda) , which was paid
by an installment plan financed
by the ride factories.
After the ride was bought in
October Antonio. 50, died that
following une.
Morris, the oldest brother, and
his mother were then responsible
for taking care of the brothers and
. ne sister. Morris said he worked
hard to support the family.
After his father's death, Morris
played his first spot, with his ride,
in New Jersey across form the
Ringling Brothers Circus.
It was there when various
people began to ask him if he
would play at other spots, such as
at a ladies home bazaar, featuring
his Ferns Wheel.
He gradually began to expand
his small business into a larger
and more profitable one.He later
purchased a second ride, The
Merry-Co-Round, from a busi-
ness man in Maine.
In 1943, he purchased his first
new ride , the Octopus, for
$14,000.
"One thing led to another says
Morris.
He said that good help and
hard, honest work made the dif-
ference. People back then wanted
to work and really needed the
money, therefore producing bet-
ter results for the business.
After Thil graduated form
Duke University and resigned
from his job, he joined his brother
Morris as a unit manager and
equal partner. The business was
then known as the Vivona Broth-
ers Amusements but later
changed to Amusements of
America.
Morris said that the change in
the business name was a logical
idea. The name Vivona is a name
that most people had trouble pro-
nouncing and never could re-
member. To make it easier for the
mind and more interesting they
made it sound bigger and more
exciting, thus Amusements of
America.
"After all, fun is our business
said Morris.
After John and Babe left the
army they also joined the business
and first contracted their fair
spots in the Carolina's and Vir-
ginia.
The business grew by leaps and
bounds and is now the biggest
show in the eastern United States.
Morris says that one of the con-
tributing reasons to a successful
business was that people liked the
Vivona brothers.
"We were well liked by all, we
were party guys and fun was the
business
In the past two years, the broth-
ers have purchased many rides -a
$200,000Givitron, the Gator and a
$175,000 Zipper. They were all
purchased from trade shows and
from Italian manufacturers.
A Vivona employec, Morris
Steigerwalt, has worked for the
fair for 14 years as a ride foreman.
He says he's caught up in the
excitement of the business.
"I've been able to see the coun-
try side and meet a lot of different
people said Steigerwalt.
The walls of the business office
tells much of their success. A pic-
ture of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Re-
agan wishing the Vivonas their
besthangs there, along with many
gold plated plaques presented to
the brothers in appreciation of
their dedicated work.
After being transported across
the Atlantic, Britain's historic
London Bridge was opened in
1971 as a tourist attraction at Lake
Havasu, Ariz
NEW & USED
BUY & SELL
FURNITURE AND APPLIANCES
DIRT CHEAP,
Inc.
"WE CAN SAVE YOU MONEY
758-1707
1212 N. Green St.
Greenville, N.C
An unidentified fairgoer enjoys the rides provided by Amusements of
fournigan).
Rosina's Picture Pic
erf the Wey1' "�4�
America.(Photo by Gretchen �
MALPASS MUFFLER i
See Us For All Your i
Automotive Needs;1
m
'�' 2616 East 10th Street :
� Greenville,NG 27834 I
758-7676 I

Julie Hrogan
It your Face Appears in Rosina's
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Greenville. NC 27834
(919) 355-6670
Great Pop from Great Britain.
3 Days Left For
The Great Pitt
County Fair
Largest Midway East
of Raleigh.
Tonight is College Night:
All ECU Students Admitted for
$1.50 with student I.D.
On Sale Through Oct. 14. 19,
�������� wt . un biiic through U-t. 14, 1987
CUMOMTY KILLED THI CAT -w'EJK SWING OUT SISTER
Keep Your Distance P It's Better To Travel
to
With 3 chart smashes
and a fanatical follow-
ing in the tT.K this
ultra-modern London
foursome may he the
definitive band of the
late SO's. Their debut
album Includes the
MTV fave, "Misfit"

x
Their smooth, jazzy
debut burst onto the
British charts at si.
Now this stylish trio,
featuring stunning
vocalist Corinne
Drewery, looks to
score stateside.
Includes the
hit "Breakout
The latest findings in music and video
THE PLAZACAROLINA EAST MALL
REMconc
By CHIPPY BON'EHLAD
SUM Write,
Three encores on Saturday
night. FOUR on Sunday What's
going on here? Is this really
R.E.M the band whose- bus once
travelled under the logo "Nobody
You Know"?
With two videos that have
made medium rotation on MTV,
it must be But from the perform-
ances at Duke and the title ol the
"Work Tour it seems the guys
aren't having as much fun as they
used to.
Both nights Here basicalk
same, a disappointment to thosi
who saw the shov twki Fhev
concentrated on songs from
"Document sprinkling in tunes
from "Life's Rich Pageant" and
"Fables of the Reconstruction "
For the second year in a r �
they ignored their EP "Chr
Town Surprisingl) I
neglected to perform am ol their
H si
their B si
"Dead Letti
ered thro Vel
SOTtgS, hut �
thes ' -
I he)
Worl h n
The I
ing v


tunes
whenthev
�ng"�
'ilk-
d r
the
Fast food conversation
the Usuals is 'Nothing t
Continued from page 11
lanky, long haired psychotic v.
gave new meaning to the term
Stage antics. Manute. the most
recent addition to the Usuals,
began thumping cords for the
band last March.
Stutts, who started plaving
drums at age 10, anchors the
band's sound with a strong back
beat. Like his drum play, Stutts
says "Our songs aren't shallow,
they have solid meaning Other
Usual members claim Stutts is the
only rational one in the band
With a punk music back-
ground, Madison has played in
bands since he was 13. Besides
performing lead vocals, Madison
plays guitar. His stage attire at
times consists of Lennon shades,
plastic beads and stringy hair in
his face.
"Sam is a showman, a pure
Sammy Da vis Jr. on stage Brock-
man jokes before retracting his
statement with a senous, "He is a
piire and serious
vyhile on the si
not joke arounaTTbul
known to dive into the crowd on
occasions.
Voted the band cIowti, Brock-
man sits on a couch in his
Greenville home smoking a ciga-
rette. He reflects on plaving his
acoustic guitar in the halls of
Aycock dorm five years ago,
when he was a novice to music
Since then he has developed a
style of professionalism which is
apparent when listening to his
knee level guitar licks.
Laved back Manute, with his
weird rings and demonic smile.
munches on the last of his late
dinner, a once warm cheese-
burger, as he tnes to answer a
question. After choking down a
pickle, he responds, "I idolized
Brockman, that's why I wanted to
play in the Usuals
"Nothing to Fear was re-
corded at CMC studio by Dave
Adams in Zebulon. NC The
Vsuals started production in May
and finished in August. Locally,
ve recording is on sale at Quick
Silver Records.
I The title cut is a scary song of
life's valleys and peaks with a
Fink Floyd influence. "If My
Dreams Came True is a song
ibout school with lyrics such as
like my future lies on security
"Abusing You has a reggae
found to the hard hitting words.
j "Libya co- written by Madison
p�d Fletch (the good time cm i
mm song with political overtones
which was written before US
t
Hop
Brc- i-
countr.
great red n
Car
man.
The Usuals, ph
the Fiw tonigh
Rei
v
Ai AJi
Today
IIOTT
Hai
A C

Springs!
Tom Pettv � i'
He
an:
Spy Catcher � The Candid Autobiography
Wright.
leaven and Hell � The Conclusion of the North
frlisery � is a nightmare only Stephen A. g
render in sueh gruesome detail by Stej
triot Games � by Tom Clancy, the author of
lime Hies � Aging is no laughing matter, but
by Bill Cosby.
Central Book andl
Greenville Square Shopping!
�I�H� �����
J






12
THE EAST CAROLINA AN
OCTOBER 8, 1987
Brothers9 business is profitable
Continued trom page 11
iohn and Babe a ice cream ma-
chine.
Morris was 13 years old when
his father gave him his machine
and at the age of Id he quit school
and his father sent him into the
business full time. Morns and a
man who took care of him trav-
eled trom New erse to theCaro-
linas with their machines.
In 1939, three years later, Morns
and his father Knight their lirst
carnival ride, the Ferris Wheel,
from a man in New Orleans.
Morns first saw the ride at the
World's Fair in New ork.
Hie ride cost $2 200 compared
to$100,000 today . which waspaid
by an installment plan financed
by the ride factories.
Alter the ride was bought in
October Antonio 50, died that
following une.
Morns the oldest brother, and
his mother were then responsible
for taking care of the brothers and
one sister. Morns said he worked
hard to support the family.
After his father's death, Morris
played his first spot, with his ride,
in New Jersey across form the
Ringling Brothers Circus.
It was there when various
people began to ask him if he
would play at other spots, such as
at a ladies home bazaar, featuring
his Ferris Wheel.
He gradually began to expand
his small business into a larger
and more profitable onc.Hc later
purchased a second ride, The
Merry-Go-Round, from a busi-
ness man in Maine.
In 1943, he purchased his first
new ride , the Octopus, for
$14,(XX).
"One thing led to another says
Morris.
He said that good help and
hard, honest work made the dif-
ference. People back then wanted
to work and really needed the
money, therefore producing bet-
ter results for the business.
After Phil graduated form
Duke University and resigned
from his job, he joined his brother
Morris as a unit manager and
equal partner. The business was
then known as the Vivona Broth-
ers Amusements but later
changed to Amusements of
America.
Morris said that the change in
the business name was a logical
idea. The name Vivona is a name
that most people had trouble pro-
nouncing and never could re-
member. To make it easier for the
mind and more interesting they
made it sound bigger and more
exciting, thus Amusements of
America.
"After all, fun is our business
said Morris.
After John and Babe left the
army they also joined the business
and first contracted their fair
spots in the Carolina's and Vir-
ginia.
The business grew by leaps and
bounds and is now the biggest
show in the eastern United States.
Morris says that one of the con-
tributing reasons to a successful
business was that people liked the
Vivona brothers.
"We were well liked by all, we
were party guys and fun was the
business
In the past two years, the broth
ers have purchased many rides -a
$200,000Civitron, theGatorand a
$175,000 Zipper. They were all
purchased from trade shows and
from Italian manufacturers.
A Vivona employee, Morris
Steigerwalt, has worked for the
fair tor 14ycarsasa ride foreman.
He says he's caught up in the
excitement of the business.
"I've been able to see the coun-
try side and meet a lot of different
people said Steigerwalt.
The walls of the business office
tells much of their success. A pic-
ture of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Re-
agan wishing the Vivonas their
besthangs there, along with many
gold plated plaques presented to
the brothers in appreciation of
their dedicated work.
After being transported across
the Atlantic, Britain's historic
London Bridge was opened in
1971 asa tourist attraction at Lake
1 lavasu, Ariz.
NEW & USED
BUY & SELL
FURNITURE AND APPLIANCES
DIRT CHEAP,
Inc.
'WE CAN SAVE YOU MONEY
758-1707
1212 N. Green St.
Greenville, N.C.
MALPASS MUFFLER I
See Us For All Your I
Automotive Needs!
An unidentified fairgoer enjoys the rides provided by Amusements of America.tPhoto bv Cretchen :
Journigan). i
2616 East 10th Street
Greenville.NG 27834
758-7676
Rosina's Picture Pic
6f the Vmfc" ;flH
(

Julie Brogan
It vour Face Appears in Rosina's
Picture Pic Contest You Win
f very Thurm
UakteXM
t-JKlTZ k MERA CENTERS
$2.00
-OFF
I HR DEVELOPING
LT- Ri VZ CAMERA HOUR Photofinishing
BIG
MotrCo"3
42 Carolina East Mall
Greenville. NC 27834
(919) 355-6670
Great Fop from Great Britain.
3 Days Left For
The Great Pitt
County Fair
Largest Midway East
of Raleigh.
Tonight is College Night
All ECU Students Admitted for
$1.50 with student I.D.
On Sale Through Oct. 14. 19
OJW0SITY KILLED THE CAT 'M. SWING OUT SISTER
Keep Your Distance v J H's Better To Travel
With 3 chart smashes
and a fanatical follow-
ing In the tJ.K this
ultra-modern London
foursome may be the
definitive band of the
late SO's. Their debut
album includes the
MTV fave, "Misfit"
m

5
GO5
Their smooth, jazzy
debut burst onto the
Britis -�artsatL
Now sh trio,
featuring stunning
vocalist Corinne
Brewery, looks to
score stateside.
includes the
hit "Breakout
Thelatest- findings in music'atsf video
THE PLAZACAROLINA EAST MALL
EM cone
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Sufi Wnto
their
Dead
�f
Three encores on Saturday
light. FOUR on Sunday. What's ered tt
oing on here7 Is this really songs
.EM the band whose bus i
travelled under the logo "ob.dv
Wiou Know"?
With two videos that have
fcrvade medium rotation on MTV,
Bt must be But from the perform-
ances at Duke and the title ot the
"Work Tour it seems the guys
t aren't having as much fun as they
used to.
Both nights were basically the
same, a disappointment to (host
who saw the show twice They
concentrated on songs from
"E)ocument sprinkling in tunes
from "Life's Rich Pageant and
"Fables of the Reconstruction
For the second year in a row
they ignored their LT "Chronic from
Town" Surprisingly, they also r.ipid r.
neglected to perform any of their tht
Fast food conversation
the Usuals is 'Nothing
thes �
The)
rkso
1 I M
flushed
drums
Stir p.
I
not Iimi
ing .
"Pageant
sourv:
rhis
ing" like
� llle "
Not to s.
Continued from page 11
lanky, long haired psychotic who
gave new meaning to the term
Stage antics. Manute, the most
recent addition to the Usuals,
began thumping cords for the
band last March.
Stutts, who started plaving
drums at age 10, anchors the
band's sound with a strong back
beat. Like his drum play, Stutts
says "Our songs aren't shallow,
they have solid meaning Other
Usual members claim Stutts is the
only rational one in the band.
With a punk music back-
ground, Madison has plaved in
bands since he was 13. Besides
performing lead vocals, Madison
plays guitar. His stage attire at
times consists of Lennon shades,
plastic beads and stnngy hair in
his face.
"Sam is a showman, a pure
Sammy Da vis Jr. on stage Brock-
man jokes before retracting his
statement with a serious, "He is a
pure and serious
VThile on the si
not joke aroum
known to dive into the crowd on
occasions.
Voted the band clown, Brock-
man sits on a couch in his
Greenville home smoking a ciga-
rette. He reflects on playing his
acoustic guitar in the halls of
Aycock dorm five years ago,
when he was a novice to music
Since then he has developed a
Style of professionalism which is
apparent when listening to his
knee level guitar licks.
Laved back Manute, with his
weird rings and demonic smile
munches on the last of his late
dinner, a once warm cheese-
burger, as he tries to answer a
question. After choking down a
E'ckle, he responds, "1 idolized
ockman, that's why I wanted to
play in the Usuals
"Nothing to Fear was re-
corded at CMC studio by Daw
Adams in Zebulon, N.C. The
Usuals started production in May
and finished in August. Locally,
the recording is on sale at Quick
Silver Records.
I The title cut is a scary song of
life's valleys and peaks with a
Pink Floyd influence. "If My
Dreams Came True is a song
about school with lyrics such as
!ike my future lies on security
tAbusing You has a reggae
i found to the hard hitting words.
I "Libya co-written by Madison
�pd Fletch (the good time guy), is
jL song with political overtones
lirhich was written before LS
bon

courv
J
man.
1
HLt
jjrmk
iWt. i�
The Usuals, pict
the Fixx tonight
Rcrrj
Wa!
Al APPi
Toda:
non
Hai
A C
�YES�A

Diveibo
Spi b igs
Tom Petty � H
Heads � Jimrl
AN
Now Ai
Spy Catcher � The Candid Autobiography
Wright.
leaven and Hell � The Conclusion of tht
isery � is a nightmare only Stephen K .
render in such gruesome detail b Stei
triot Games � by Tom Clancy, the author of(
'ime Flies � Aging is no laughing matter, but,
by BUI Cosby.
Central Book andl
Greenville Square Shopping!

I
�WHH"
fc !� �-
i
A





NEW & USED
BUY & SELL
URE AND APPLIANCES
CHEAP,
Inc.
SAVE YOU MONEY
58-1707
St.
Greenville, N.C
ating ECU Homecoming
MILY RESTAURANT
i) p.m.
� p.m.
rport Road Greenville, JVC
IS MUFFLER
or All Your
tive Needs
10th Street
le.NG 27834
-7676
b �) nr, ari' V
it's better to travel"
SWING OUT SISTER
's Better To Travel
Their smooth, jazzj
(i-hi11 Iiif�t onto ih�
British charts at 81.
Now this stylish trio,
feat u ring stunning
ocalist C torinne
Drewerj. looks to
-core stateside.
includes the
hit "Breakout
m
and video
MALL
r
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 8,1987 13
REM concertrtoomuchpolishi
Cllp-N-Save
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Three encores on Saturday
night FOUR on Sunday. What's
going on here? Is this really
R.E.M the band whose bus once
travelled under the logo "Nobody
You Know"?
With two videos that have
made medium rotation on MTV,
X must be. But from the perform-
ances at Duke and the title of the
Work Tour it seems the guys
aren't having as much fun as they
used to.
Both nights were basically the
same, a disappointment to those
who saw the show twice. They
concentrated on songs from
Divumcnt sprinkling in tunes
trom "Life's Rich Pageant" and
Fables of the Reconstruction
For the second year in a row
they ignored their EP "Chronic
Town Surprisingly, they also
neglected to perform any of their
B-sides, save for "Crazy On
their B-side compilation Lp
"Dead Letter Office" they cov-
ered three Velvet Underground
songs, but they shied away from
these too.
They opened with "Finest
Worksong" from "Document
The words "want" and "need"
flashed on a screen behind the
drums as lead singer Michael
Feel Fine)" was
punctuated with a blur of tele-
vision images. Towards the end of
the song, Stipe began praying to
the screen, then waving goodbye
as the clips faded.
"Fireplace" lacked the
saxaphone of the Lp's version but
guitarist Peter Buck substituted
with a moaning riff. An extra
guitarist played on stage through-
Stipe poured out the lyrics. If he's out both shows, apparently to to
"talking hereto me alone he's take some weight off Buck, but he
not listening.
"Worksong" shifted into a rous-
ing version of'These Days" from
"Pageant Consistently, the band
sounded more at ease with older
tunes. This was especially true
when they did songs off "Reckon-
ing" like "Don't Go Back to
Rockville
Not to say all of the material
from "Document" was weak. The
rapid rapping of "It's the End of
the World as We Know It(And I
Fast food conversation with
the Usuals is 'Nothing to Fear'
Continued from page 11
lanky, long haired psychotic who
gave new meaning to the term
stage antics. Manute, the most
recent addition to the Usuals,
tegan thumping cords for the
band last March.
Stutts, who started playing
drums at age 10, anchors the
band's sound with a strong back
beat. Like his drum play, Stutts
says "Our songs aren't shallow,
they have solid meaning Other
Usual members claim Stutts is the
only rational one in the band.
With a punk music back-
ground, Madison has played in
bands since he was 13. Besides
performing lead vocals, Madison
plays guitar. His stage attire at
rimes consists of Lennon shades,
plastic beads and stringy hair in
his face.
"Sam is a showman, a pure
Sammy Davis Jr. on stage Brock-
man jokes before retracting his
statement with a serious, "He is a
pure and sertous
Vftule on the B
not joke arouni
known to dive into the crowd on
occasions.
Voted the band clown, Brock-
man sits on a couch in his
Greenville home smoking a ciga-
rette. He reflects on playing his
acoustic guitar in the halls of
Aycock dorm five years ago,
when he was a novice to music.
Since then he has developed a
style of professionalism which is
apparent when listening to his
knee level guitar licks.
Layed back Manute, with his
weird rings and demonic smile,
munches on the last of his late
dinner, a once warm cheese-
burger, as he tries to answer a
question. After choking down a
pickle, he responds, "I idolized
Brockman, thaf s why I wanted to
play in the Usuals
"Nothing to Fear was re-
corded at CMC studio by Dave
Adams in Zebulon, N.C. The
Usuals started production in May
and finished in August. Locally,
the recording is on sale at Quick
Silver Records.
The title cut is a scary song of
life's valleys and peaks with a
Pink Floyd influence. "If My
Dreams Came True is a song
about school with lyrics such as
"like my future lies on security
"Abusing You has a reggae
sound to the hard hitting words.
"Libya co-written by Madison
and Fletch (the good time guy), is
a song with political overtones
which was written before U.S.
bombed Libya. "What's Sex For
with a fast paced punk sound
states the present delimma in
moral areas of sex.
"Booze Or Women written by
Brockman, is a commentary on
country music. "It's about the
great red neck culture in North
Carolina says the yankee Brock-
man.
was never identified.
Bassist Mike Mills began sing-
ing last year on the hit "Super-
man This time around he con-
tributed even more vocals, back-
up and another lead on a new
song. Even Stipe is into the musi-
cal role switching ; on "Oddfel-
lows Local 151" he plays a re-
spectable guitar line.
He still makes a habit of wear-
ing layers of clothes on stage and
shedding them as the show pro-
gresses. And he still wears a lot of
eyeliner. By the end each night, he
was down to a casual tee shirt and
jeans.
This striptease act is a trait he
shares with friend and opening
band member Natalie Merchant
of 10,000 Maniacs. They started
both concerts with a forceful and
funny stage presence.
Merchant whirls around ,
dances and plays with plastic
cows while singing. Much of their
act was devoted to their new
albumIn Our Tribe Especially
strong was "What's the Matter
Here?" and Stipe's unexpected
duet with Merchant.
The crowd's reaction to the
Maniacs was mediocre, sad for a
band that puts so much energy
and intelligence into their work.
Even the 1984 college hit "Scorpio
Rising" failed to get a reasonable
ovation.
Not so for R.E.M Saturday's
encores included an upbeat rendi-
tion of 'The One I Love pre-
ceeded by an eerily slow intro,
and a parody of Lou Grahm's Top
40 slushMidnight Blue which
went way over the audience's
head.
During Sunday's unheard of
four encore set, they ignored the
fans' demands and played more
loosely like the R.E.M. of old.
Stipe told the story of how "Good
Advices" was inspired, which
shored up a killer performance of
the song.
They also hit "Radio Free Eu-
rope a tune they don't do all that
much anymore, and hit it well.
Stipe's a capella introduction to "I
Believe" was hard to hear over the
applause, but still effective.
The highlights of an R.E.M.
concert are still outweighing the
polished glaze they are gathering
by playing to larger, more main-
stream crowds. They have
adapted well to the coliseum
show.
And their integrity is still
mostly uncompromised. But how
can any band making the spins on
Mtv stay in grace with older fans
who remember a time when the
band was totally unable to play
"Born to Run"?
That's a question R.E.M. will
have to keep in mind as they con-
tinue the "Work Tour 'Cause
when you get a promotion, you
also get more responsibility.
The waters of the Atlantic and
Pacific flowed together through
ie Panama Canal in 1913 after
U.S. engineers blew up the Gam-
boa dam.

L
Ffrnfc'g Homemade ice c�
321 E. 10th St. Greenville (next to Wendy's)
758-0000
VOTED THE NATION'S 1 VANILLA
Buy 1 Sundae or Blend-in. Get 1
12 PRICE

m
one coupon per order please
coupon good thru Oct. 14. 1987
'
'
rV
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
321 E. lOth St. Greenville (next to Wendy's)
758-0000
VOTED THE NATION'S 1 VANILLA
NOW DELIVERS
Order your favorite ice cream treat and we'll bring It to your door!
FREE Delivery with this coupon
CALL 758-00O0
one coupon per order please, coupon good thru Oct. 14. 1987
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
K
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Clip-N-Save
THANK HEAVENS
KIHKO'S IS OPEH
SUHDAYS
At Kinko's. we offer complete copying services seven days a
week. And our staff has a friendly, professional anitude
vou won't find anywhere else Try Kinko s We could be the
answer to your prayers.
kinko's
Open early. Open late.
Open weekends.
321 E. Tenth Street
752-0875
The Usuals, pictured here in an unusual setting, will be opening for
the Fixx tonight at 8 p.m. in Minges Coliseum.
Jw�q cofids
204 East 5th Street � Greenville, NC 27858
Phone: 758-1427
Remember When Rock-n-Roll
Was Better Than Great, It Was
CLASSIC
At APPLE RECORDS You Can Find
Today's NEWEST RELEASES and
HOTTEST SELLERS, But Also, We
Have SOMETHING MORE
A COMPLETE SELECTION OF
Grateful Dead � Rolling Stones � Pink Floyd � David Bowie
� YES � ACDC � James Taylor � The Who � Kiss � Elton John
� Elvis Costello � Aerosmith � Iron Maiden � RUSH �
Loverboy � Pat Benatar � Santana � ZZ Top � Bruce
Springsteen � Ozzy Osbourne � Bryan Adams � The Cars �
Tom Petty � Bob Seger � Billy Joel � Duran Duran � Talking
Heads � Jimmy Buflett � Bob Dylan.
AND MANY MORE!
East Carolina University Student Union
Major Concerts Committee presents:
HOMECOMING
CONCERT
Featuring
Now Available
Spy Catcher � The Candid Autobiography of a Senior Intelligence Officer by Peter
Wright.
Heaven and Hell � The Conclusion of the North and South Trilogy by John Jakes.
Misery � is a nightmare only Stephen King could have, and one only Stephen King could
render in such gruesome detail by Stephen King.
Patriot Games � by Tom Clancy, the author of Red Storm Rising.
Time Hies � Aging is no laughing matter, but Time Flies will change all that
by Bill Cosby.
Central Book and News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
THE
e Usuals
Thursday, October 8th, 8:00 p.m.
MINGES COLISEUM
Tickets:
$7.00 students
$9.00 general public
Tickets on sale
Central Ticket Office
Sept. 24th.
1
i





NEW & USED
BUY & SELL
URE AND APPLIANCES
1
CHEAP,
Inc.
SAVE YOU MONEY
58-1707
St.
Greenville, N.C
ating ECU Homecoming
A WALJ OF A MAL
lMILY restaurant
9 p.m.
p.m.
-port Road Greenville, JVC
S MUFFLER
or All Your
tive Needs
Oth Street
ie.N0 27834
-7676
.1) no y.t.ru
it'� better to travel"
SWING OUT SISTER
's Better To Travel
Their smooth, jazzj
debut hi nM onto the
Bril ish charts at si.
Now this stylish trio,
featuring stunning
ocalist (lorinne
1 )i'cu erj . looks to
score stateside.
Includes the
hit "HfcakoxiL"
and video
MALL
A
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 8,1987 13
REM concert: too much polish?
Clip-N-Save
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Three encores on Saturday
night. FOUR on Sunday. What's
going on here? Is this really
R.E.M the band whose bus once
travelled under the logo "Nobody
You Know"?
With two videos that have
made medium rotation on MTV,
it must be. But from the perform-
ances at Duke and the title of the
Work Tour it seems the guys
aren't having as much fun as they
used to.
Both nights were basically the
same, a disappointment to those
who saw the show twice. They
concentrated on songs from
Document sprinkling in tunes
trom "Life's Rich Pageant" and
Fables of the Reconstruction
For the second year in a row
the ignored their EP "Chronic
Town Surprisingly, they also
neglected to perform any of their
B-sides, save for "Crazy On
their B-side compilation Lp
"Dead Letter Office" they cov-
ered three Velvet Underground
songs, but they shied away from
these too.
They opened with "Finest
Worksong" from "Document
The words "want" and "need"
flashed on a screen behind the
drums as lead singer Michael
Stipe poured out the lyrics. If he's
"talking hereto me alone he's
not listening.
"Worksong" shifted into a rous-
ing version of'Thcse Days" from
"Pageant Consistently, the band
sounded more at ease with older
tunes. This was especially true
when they did songs off "Reckon-
ing" like "Don't Go Back to
Rockville
Not to sav all of the material
J
from "Document" was weak. The
rapid rapping of "It's the End of
the World as We Know IKAnd 1
Fast food conversation with
the Usuals is 'Nothing to Fear'
Continued from page 11
lanky, long haired psychotic who
i;ave new meaning to the term
stage antics. Manute, the most
recent addition to the Usuals,
began thumping cords for the
band last March.
Stutts, who started playing
drums at age 10, anchors the
band's sound with a strong back
beat. Like his drum play, Stutts
says "Our songs aren't shallow,
they have solid meaning Other
Usual members claim Stutts is the
only rational one in the band.
With a punk music back-
ground, Madison has played in
bands since he was 13. Besides
performing lead vocals, Madison
plays guitar. His stage attire at
times consists of Lennon shades,
plastic beads and stringy hair in
his face.
"Sam is a showman, a pure
Sammy Davis Jr. on stage Brock-
man jokes before retracting his
statement with a serious, "He is a
pure and serious
vhute on the s(
not joke around
known to dive into the crowd on
occasions.
Voted the band clown, Brock-
man sits on a couch in his
Greenville home smoking a ciga-
rette. He reflects on playing his
acoustic guitar in the halls of
Aycock dorm five years ago,
when he was a novice to music.
Since then he has developed a
style of professionalism which is
apparent when listening to his
knee level guitar licks.
Layed back Manute, with his
weird rings and demonic smile,
munches on the last of his late
dinner, a once warm cheese-
burger, as he tries to answer a
question. After choking down a
pickle, he responds, "I idolized
Brockman, thaf s why I wanted to
play in the Usuals
"Nothing to Fear was re-
corded at CMC studio by Dave
Adams in Zebulon, N.C. The
Usuals started production in May
and finished in August. Locally,
the recording is on sale at Quick
Silver Records.
The title cut is a scary song of
life's valleys and peaks with a
Pink Floyd influence. "If My
Dreams Came True is a song
about school with lyrics such as
"like my future lies on security
"Abusing You has a reggae
sound to the hard hitting words.
"Libyaco-written by Madison
and Fletch (the good time guy), is
a song with political overtones
which was written before U.S.
bombed Libya. "What's Sex For
with a fast paced punk sound
states the present delimma in
moral areas of sex.
"Booze Or Women written by
Brockman, is a commentary on
country music. "It's about the
great red neck culture in North
Carolina says the yankee Brock-
man.
Feel Fine)" was
punctuated with a blur of tele-
vision images. Towards theend of
the song, Stipe began praying to
the screen, then waving goodbye
as the clips faded.
"Fireplace" lacked the
saxaphone of the Lp's version but
guitarist Peter Buck substituted
with a moaning riff. An extra
guitarist played on stage through-
out both shows, apparently to to
take some weight off Buck, but he
was never identified.
Bassist Mike Mills began sing-
ing last year on the hit "Super-
man This time around he con-
tributed even more vocals, back-
up and another lead on a new
song. Even Stipe is into the musi-
cal role switching ; on "Oddfel-
lows Local 151" he plays a re-
spectable guitar line.
He still makes a habit of wear-
ing layers of clothes on stage and
shedding them as the show pro-
gresses. And he still wears a lot of
eyeliner. By the end each night, he
was down to a casual tee shirt and
jeans.
This striptease act is a trait he
shares with friend and opening
band member Natalie Merchant
of 10,000 Maniacs. They started
both concerts with a forceful and
funny stage presence.
Merchant whirls around ,
dances and plays with plastic
cows while singing. Much of their
act was devoted to their new
albumIn Our Tribe Especially
strong was "What's the Matter
Here?" and Stipe's unexpected
duet with Merchant.
The crowd's reaction to the
Maniacs was mediocre, sad for a
band that puts so much energy
and intelligence into their work.
Even the 1984 college hit "Scorpio
Rising" failed to get a reasonable
ovation.
Not so for R.E.M Saturday's
encores included an upbeat rendi-
tion of "The One I Love pre-
ceeded by an eerily slow intro,
and a parody of Lou Grahm'sTop
40 slushMidnight Blue which
went way over the audience's
head.
During Sunday's unheard of
four encore set, they ignored the
fans' demands and played more
loosely like the R.E.M. of old.
Stipe told the story of how "Good
Advices" was inspired, which
shored up a killer performance of
the song.
They also hit "Radio Free Eu-
rope a tune they don't do all that
much anymore, and hit it well.
Stipe'sa capella introduction to "I
Believe" was hard to hear over the
applause, but still effective.
The highlights of an R.E.M.
concert are still outweighing the
polished glaze they are gathering
by playing to larger, more main-
stream crowds. They have
adapted well to the coliseum
show.
And their integrity is still
mostly uneompromised. But how
can any band making the spins on
Mtv stay in grace with older fans
who remember a time when the
band was totally unable to play
"Born to Run"?
That's a question R.E.M. will
have to keep in mind as they con-
tinue the "Work Tour 'Cause
when you get a promotion, you
also get more responsibility.

Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
321 E. 10th St. Greenville (next to Wendy s)
758-0000
VOTED THE NATION'S 1 VANILLA
Buy 1 Sundae or Blend-in. Get 1
12 PRICE .
one coupon per order please
coupon good thru Oct. 14. 1987
m
t
V V
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
321 E. loth St. Greenville (next to Wendy s)
758-0000
VOTED THE NATIONS 1 VANILLA

NOW DELIVERS
Order your favorite Ice cream treat and we'll bring H to your doorl
FREE Delivery with this coupon
CALL 758-O0O0
one coupon per order please, coupon good thru Oct. 14, 1987
I
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I
I
I
I
I
I
K
I
I
I
I
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Clip-N-Save
THANK HEAVENS
KIHKO'S IS OPEN
SUNDAYS
At Kinko's, we offer complete copying services seven days a
week. And our staff has a friendly, professional anitude
you won't find anywhere else Try Kinko's. We could be the
answer to your prayers.
kinko's
The waters of the Atlantic and
Pacific flowed together through
the Panama Canal in 1913 after
U.S. engineers blew up the Gam-
boa dam.
Open early. Open late.
Open weekends.
321 E. Tenth Street
752-0875
The Usuals, pictured here in an unusual setting, will be opening for
the Fix tonight at 8 p.m. in Minges Coliseum.
cofcds
204 East 5th Street �
Phone:
Greenville, NC 27858
758-1427
Remember When Rock-n-Roll
Was Better Than Great, It Was
CLASSIC
At APPLE RECORDS You Can Find
Today's NEWEST RELEASES and
HOTTEST SELLERS, But Also, We
Have SOMETHING MORE
A COMPLETE SELECTION OF
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� YES � AC DC � James Taylor � The Who � Kiss � Elton John
� Elvis Costello � Aerosmith � Iron Maiden � RUSH �
Loverboy � Pat Benatar � Santana � ZZ Top � Bruce
Springsteen � Ozzy Osboume � Bryan Adams � The Cars �
Tom Petty � Bob Seger � Billy Joel � Duran Duran � Talking
Heads � Jimmy Buflett � Bob Dylan.
AND MANY MORE!
East Carolina University Student Union
Major Concerts Committee presents:
HOMECOMING
CONCERT
Featuring
e Usuals
Thursday, October 8th, 8:00 p.m.
Now Available
Spy Catcher � The Candid Autobiography of a Senior Intelligence Officer by Peter
Wright.
Heaven and Hell � The Conclusion of the North andSouth Trilogy by John Jakes.
Misery � is a nightmare only Stephen King could have, and one only Stephen King could
render in such gruesome detail by Stephen King.
Patriot Games � by Tom Clancy, the author of Red Storm Fisins.
Time Flies � Aging is no laughing matter, but Time Flies will change all that
by Bill Cosby.
Central Book and News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
MINGES COLISEUM
Tickets:
$7.00 students
$9.00 general public
�r
Tickets on sale
Central Ticket Office
Sept. 24th.
MHWM
� il mn�ma�MO�anwpfc. w � � .i.m. �� T WH '��
A





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I ndercover Cats
b parker THE VAMPIRE
by Mklver
il ISK m II INN
Pirates hop
By TIMHANDLER
Something positive rtuv K'
lurking on the horizon for the East
arolina football team
Even after being trounced b
Vest Virginia, 49-0, last Saturday
'irate head o,n h Art iiiker fi
tin- Pirates an moving in the right
piirection towards having a suc-
jssful season.
"Thismay sound strange (but)
I have a very strong, positivi
png about this team Baker
itter suffering his worst defeat
iince taking over the reins ol the
thusiasm
One are
�XL
t;ram
don't think
there is ever a time in a season, or
a time in .1 program I �
loss g ing tobej I � � . .
But, for some strange l i feel
that this loss is goinj
for us
"1 met v ith �ur i iffensi �
ers last night and I kn tl il
ar . inccnv i - i mtinued
"i think that we will ha
closer attention to details than we
had in the past ! think thc ui
stand now that the small I I
v i
i lunti �
retun
Pirati

Bakei season
complet . t becaua
ball gar:
� not a total di;
!er Baker said We still ha .
x sh.it at a winning
� ask iur playi i
commit these last six hx'thall
gamesto him. 1 t
Quarterback Travis Hunter�
s with Baker's ass.
mat something good is abou
happen�
"Proj lefinitel) be
made in practice this we -
Hunter . � e are g(
Swimmers pre
By PAT MOLLOY
Mmm��� Kobe has t
The ECU swim team, under the men's team i
tutelage of titthyear coach Rick school ai
Kc.tK - wiJl - opt-n thvir seascfn arc cither natid
against CAA rival James Madison YMCA i - -
University on Nov. 6. The match Spearhi
The ECU swim team htipes to repeat the success
Homecoming
for several Pi
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sports VVnwr
Homecoming at East Carolina
an exciting and special time. For
he Pirate football team it's also a
ime to make things happen.
Topping the excitment oi the
ls 1 lomecoirang was a 47-yard
fic-ld goal bv the Pirates' Chuck
jBerleth. with onlv 4 seconds re-
�rvaining in the game The kick
�helped to defeat Georgia South-
ern. 35 -
The win over Georgia Southern
ivas the first win of the season and
lit also ended a Pirate 15-game
sing streak.
This year, the Pira tcs, who are 2-
on the season and coming off a
9-0 loss to West Virginia, will
?t Cinncinati, who gave the
nhrates their only other win last
Beason.
Team members say the attitude
Wf this year s team is better than
"iat ot last year's at the time of
homecoming.
Senior Ellis Dillahunt, who
remembers th
ing as his best
anee ol the s,
though the teal
slump, that s A
"Oursen
team trj
problen
"We re going
nou and
tude and play
starting with
week, the hest
nuke things
Stumor Chud
his best perto
season at Hor
successfully
goals. His 4"
longest of the j
Homecomil
and 1 want to i
Berleth "But
same attitude
game, awav gJ
ing. I just wanl
whatever 1 car
Head coach I
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4
I HF FAST CAROI INIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 8,1987 Page 15
Pirates hope to bounce back for Homecoming
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport rdttur
Something positive may be
lurking on the horizon for the East
Carolina tootball team.
Even after being trounced by
IVest Virginia, 49-0, last Saturday,
rirate head coach Art Raker feels
the Pirates are moving in the right
direction towards having a suc-
�-stul season.
ITiis may sound strange, (but)
haw a very strong, positive feei-
ng about this team Baker said
fter suffering his worst defeat
iince taking over the reins of the
ECU program. "I don't think
re is ever a time in a season, or
i time in a program where a 49-0
loss is going to be good for you.
for some strange reason, i feel
hat this loss is going to be good
Us
i met with our offensive play-
ers last night and I know that they
� mcerned Baker continued.
1 think that we will have a lot
closer attention to details than we
had in the past. 1 think they under-
sl ind now that the small details in
game are a important as the
I Mil S
Faker said the season is not
completely lost because oi one
ill game.
We're 2-3. Its not a total disas-
Baker said. "We still have a
good shot at a winning season.
We're going to ask our players re-
ommit these last six football
games.
Quarterback Travis Hunter
agrees with Baker's assessment
that something good is about to
happen.
"Progress is definitely being
made in practice this week
Hunter said. "We are going out
there with a lot of emotion and en-
thusiasm
One area Baker did notice im-
provement in last Saturday was
the passing game. Hunter com-
pleted 11 of 18 passes for 157
yards, including gains of 43 and
24 yards.
"We did find out that when we
have to throw the ball that Travis
can throw it and we can catch it
Baker said.
Hunter also played a big part in
the Pirates' loss Saturday. He
threw an interception, which re-
sulted in an 84-yard touchdown
return and he fumbled on the next
Pirate possession setting up an-
other Mountaineer touchdown,
which put the Pirates down 21-0
at the half
"I'm not really pleased with my
performance so far this vear, but 1
don't think that any quarterback
anywhere is totally pleased with
his performance Hunter said.
"It just goes to show you that you
have to concentrate more on what
you are doing when vou are out
there
Although Hunter has commit-
ted mistakes this season, Baker
still feels he has done an adequate
job in leading the Pirates.
"I think Travis has done an
excellent job for us this season
Baker said. "He has made some
mistakes, but he has shown me
more integrity and class than I've
ever seen in a player. M v hat is off
to him, 1 think he is doing a great
job and he is going to continue to
improve
But, according to Baker, 1 lunter
and the entire Pirate team has got
to start improving immediately.
"We can sav anything we want
to, but if we are going to turn this
seasim around, we had better get
cranked up now Baker said.
"We can't wait another week
The team the Pirates will try to
get "cranked up" against this
week is Cincinnati. The Pirates
should definitely gain added en-
thusiasm from the game since it is
Homecoming week at ECU.
However, the Bearcats, 2-2 for the
season, may have an advantage
over the Pirates because they had
last week off, giving them two
weeks to prepare for the game.
Last season in Ficklen Stadium,
the Pirates won 32-19 on a wet,
dreary afternoon. The win came
in spite of 299 passing yards from
Bearcat quarterback Danny
MeCoin.
The Bearcats will once again
have MeCoin in their arsenal
when thev come to Greenville -
thanks to the open date.
MeCoin, who has passed for 781
yards this season in four games
including a career-high 399 yards
in his last outing against Miami of
Ohio, used the week off to recover
from orthoscopic surgery re-
quired after suffering a knee in-
jure in the 31 26 win over Miami
of Ohio.
1 lunter doesn't let the statistics
of the season or the talk from fans
eager for wins bother him. 1 Iis
mind is set on one thing- winning.
"The fans sav a lot of things
about this football team, but thev
don't know what thev are talking
about Hunter said. "We had a
team meeting and I think that we
are together now. We are going
out there to play hard Saturday
and do whatever it takes to win
A win would certainly erase1
some of the clouds now hovering
over the horion in Greenville.
w3qotss3itttt��yireire
I

3M.U0H
(T87
kvww�y
Swimmers prepare for season opener
By TAT MOLLOY
VsHisUnt spurt Fditor
1 he ECl swim team, under the
tutelage oi fith-year coach Kiek
Kjotoe; - w'�VV opcri fovWM 5a�5rv
against CAA rival lames Madison
I niversitv on Nov. 6 ITie match
will be held in Minges coliseum.
Kobe has fielded the largest
men's team in the historv of the
school;and all juniors and seniors
arc eittcr national qualifiers, or
YMCA national qualifiers.
Spearheading the men's team is
Andy lohns, a senior out of Holly-
wood, Florida, who is a varsity
record holder in the 200-yard
butterfly. Johns was also a finalist
in the independent nationals.
Anthony Pistorio, also a senior
from Florida, is the reigning CAA
champion in the 200 Individual
Medley (IM). While attending
Indian River Community College
in Fort Pierce, Florida, Pi,stprio
was named a Junior College All-
American. The Fort Pierce native
also finished second nationally in
the 400 IM at the junior college na-
tionals.
Other conference champions
for the men include senior Patrick
Brennan, who is the CAA cham-
pion in the 400 IM.
Ronald Fleming is the cham-
pion in the 100-meter breast
stroke; and Lee Hicks, a junior out
of Thomasville, is the reigning
conference champion in the 200-
meter breast stroke.
Kobe is expecting big things
from freshman John Farrell, who
swam for the Canadian National
team. Farrell was also a national
qualifier in distance freestyle
events.
For the women, who went 10-2
last year, losing only to inter-state
foes North Carolina and N.C.
State, Kobe foresees good things
from freshman Meredith Bridges.
Bridges is a YWCA national
champion in the 100-meter and
the 200-meter breast stroke.
Leslie Wilson, a sophomore
from Yorktown, Pennsylvania is a
varsity record holder in the 200
? it
j Lady volleyballers j
top ACC in three










I he ECU swim team hopes to repeat the success of last season whrn they begin competition on Nov. 6. See SWIMMERS page 17
Homecoming at ECU is full of memories
for several Pirate football players
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Spots Writer
East Carolina's Lady Pirate vol-
leyball team swept Atlantic Chris-
tian College 3-0 Tuesday night in
Minges Coliseum.
ECU took the Lady Bulldogs in
three games, 15-8, 15-1, and 15-6
to improve its record to 8-6 over-
all. At mid-season the Lady Pi-
rates have already won as many
matches as they did all last season.
ECU, off to one of its best starts
ever, was led by senior Kris
McKay with nine kills. Setters
Kerry Weisbrod and Debbie Tate
had 11 and 13 assists respectively
with Tate also having seven kills.
Atlantic Christian, falling to 13-
4, was unable to gain any offen-
' sive momentum and was shut
down by the ECU defense. The
Lady Pirates lead the nation in
blocking average with 4.7 per
game.
The Lady Pirates, somewhat
shaky in the opening minutes,
dominated the rest of the match.
"We started off a little off bal-
ance because they threw us a little
off-speed stuff head coach Imo-



gene Turner said. "But once we
got our timing down we plaved �
great
With the match well in hand J
ECU went to their bench often
ten of
and with good results. All
the Lady Pirates saw action in the
match. X
"I like to play my freshman a
li ttle at a time in game situations J
Turner said. "Our players came
off the bench just as strong as
anybody we had
ECU will defend its winning
record on the road this weekend
traveling to College Park to meet
the University of Maryland Fri-
day before returning to CAA play �
Saturday. The Pirates meet
George Mason and American
University in Fairfax, Va Satur-
day.
"We did not block well in our
tournament last weekend, so this
week we'll work on our blocking
and transition before going to
Maryland Turner added.
The Lady Pirates return
Minges Tuesday, Oct. 13 when
they host Virginia
Common-
A
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sport Writer
! lomecoming at East Carolina
is an exciting and special time. For
the Pirate football team it's also a
time to make things happen.
Topping the excitment of the
186 Homecoming was a 47-yard
field goal by the Pirates' Chuck
Berleth, with only 47 seconds re-
maining in the game. The kick
helped to defeat Georgia South-
ern, 35-33.
The win over Georgia Southern
was the first win of the season and
it also ended a Pirate 15-game
losing streak.
This year, the Pirates, who are 2-
3 on the season and coming off a
49-0 loss to West Virginia, will
meet Cinncinati, who gave the
Pirates their only other win last
season.
Team members say the attitude
of this year's team is better than
that of last year's at the time of
homecoming.
Senior Ellis Dillahunt, who
remembers the 1986 Homecom-
ing as his best defensive perform-
ance of the season, said that al-
though the team seems to be in a
slump, that's going to change.
"Our seniors had a talk with the
team, trying to figure out our
problems said Dillahunt.
"We're going to deal with them
now and go out with a new atti-
tude and play our last six games,
starting with Homecoming this
week, the best we can and try to
make things happen
Senior Chuch Berleth also had
his best performance of the 1986
season at Homecoming when he
successfully kicked two field
goals. His 47 yarder was also his
longest of the season.
"Homecoming is a special time
and I want to win this game said
Berleth. "But 1 go out with the
same attitude whether it's a home
game, away game, or Homecom-
ing. 1 just want to do my best and
whatever I can do to help us win
Head coach Art Baker said that
the Pirates have to win Home-
coming.
"It's a tradition here at East
Carolina that the East Carolina
football team win the Homecom-
ing game said Baker. "It's going
to be a very important game toour
players
East Carolina's Homecoming
tradition goes back over the past
15 years. During this time, the
only loss was in 1985 when the
Pirates lost a close 14-10 decision
to the nationally-ranked Miami
Hurricanes.
Senior fullback Anthony
Simpson says that there isn't as
much pressure this year as there
was last year.
"We're not up against a losing
streak, but we still need this win
said Simpson, who had his best
performance of the season in the
'86 Homecoming game with 131
yards rushing.
"There will always be pressure
though said Simpson.
"Because there are a lot of
people watching and comparing
you to the teams they saw when
they went to school. So you have
to go out there and perform your
best
Playing his best was what
earned Travis Hunter the starting
quarterback position in last year's
Homecoming game.
This year, Hunter said that
things are going much better.
"We're coming off a bad loss to
West Virginia, but it's not a long
losing streak said Hunter.
"We've made some good things
happen this year so we'll have to
come off the loss and prove that
we can play hard and win
So, the Pirates are looking for-
ward to capping off East
Carolina's 1987 Homecoming
with a win that's important to
everyone.
From the attitude of Baker and
his players we can expect good
things from the Pirates and look
forward to a very big game.
ECU head coach Art Baker hopes the Homecom
last Saturday's action against West Virginia.
ing scene is not as grim as
�tearf"
���!� � II i i �
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16 THE EAST
CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 8. 1987
1. Oklahoma (46)
2. Nebraska (8)
3. Miami, Fla. (6)
4. Notre Dame
5. Aubum
6. Florida State
7. LSU
8. Gemson
9. Ohio State
10. Tennessee
11. UCLA
12. Michigan
13. Arizona State
14. Penn State
15. Alabama
16. Georgia
17. Syracuse
18. Florida
19. Oklahoma St.
20. Arkansas
Ifti
4-0-0
4-0-0
3-0-0
3-0-0
3-0-1
4-1-0
4-0-1
4-0-0
3-0-1
4-0-1
4-1-0
3-1-0
3-1-0
4-1-0
4-1-0
4-1-0
5-0-0
3-2-0
4-0-0
3-1-0
(AD - Undefeated Syracuse is
making its first regular-season
appearance since 1971 among The
Associated Press Top Twenty col-
lege football teams.
Syracuse, 5-0, and Oklahoma
State, 4-0, climbed into this week's
rankings at No. 17 and No. 19,
while Arkansas, 3-1, returned at
No. 20 one week after dropping
out following a 44-point loss to
Miami, Fla.
"The only 5-and-0 team in the
country, I'm really not sur-
prised Syracuse Coach dick
MacPherson said late Monday.
"It's something I think the young
men have earned, and I think it's
wonderful. I'm just thrilled that
we're there, and we're going to
continue to do everything we can
to stay there.
Syracuse defeated Missouri 24-
13 and Oklahoma State was idle.
Arkansas, after losing 51-7 to
Miami, returned with a 20-10
triumph over Texas Christian.
Syracuse, Oklahoma State and
Arkansas replaced Texas A&M,
Washington and Iowa among the
elite 20. The Aggies lost to Texas
Tech 20-10, Washinton was upset
by Oregon 29-22 and Iowa bowed
to Michigan State 19-14.
At the top of the rankings, the
race between Nebraska and Mi-
ami of Florida for second place
behind Oklahoma tightened.
Oklahoma's 56-3 rout of Iowa
State earned the Sooners 46 of 60
first-place votes and 1,183 of a
possible U00 points from a na-
tionwide panel of sports writers
and sportscasters. Oklahoma has
been No. 2 every week. The Corn-
huskers rallied to beat South
Carolina 30-21.
The other six first-place ballots,
along with 1,012 points, went to
Miami, which remained third
with a 26-25 victory over Florida
State that saw the Hurricanes
score 17 points in the fourth quar-
ter.
Last week, Oklahoma had 44
first-place votes to 12 for Ne-
braska and four for Miami and led
in points i,181-1,136-1,088.
Notre Dame, which was idle,
replaced Florida State in fourth
place with 951 pointsand Auburn
jumped form sixth to fifth with
875 points be coming form behind
to defeat North Carolina 20-10.
Florida State was sixth with 863
points, while the next eight teams
remained the same as last week.
Seventh-ranked LSU outlasted
Florida 13-10 and received 858
points, No. 8 Gemson was idle
and polled 828 points, No. 9 Ohio
State received 718 points after
holding off Illinois 10-6 and No.
10 Tennessee, and easy 38-12
winner over California, totaled
69V points.
The Second Ten consists of
UCLA, Michigan, Arizona State,
Penn State, Alabama, Georgia,
Syracuse, Florida, Oklahoma
State and Arkansas.
ECU Ruggers blow
past Davidson, 28-0
By EARL HAMPTON
Sports Writer
Thil Ritchie and Tino Ferraro
scored two times apiece as the
ECU Rugby team defeated
Davidson College 28-0 in Char-
lotte last Saturday.
"We wanted to establish the
ground rules for Davidson so they
know what to expect next time
head coach Ralph Campona said
in an interview. Saturday's game
was the first game between the
two teams.
Playing into a stiff wind, the
ruggers of ECU were flat in the
first half. Mike Shunk started the
first scoring drive after he caught
a pass from Mike Brown.
Brown, with one assist in the
first half and two in the second,
broke the club record for career
assists. In six years with the team
he has complied 74 assists, break-
ing the old mark of 73.
Ritchie, with an impressive
game, rounded out the half with
"a power-surge score according
to Campona. At the half, ECU led
8-0.
The conditioning of the Pirates
proved to be the major factor in
the second half as Davidson
couldn't keep pace. Tino Ferraro
scored on his first trv of his career
as ECU led 12-0.
Bob Tobian scored at mid-point
o( the second half before Ferraro
added his second score to make it
16-0. Off an assist from Brown,
Parrish Nichols placed the ball in-
goal for his first-ever rugby score.
Ritchie then rambled 70 meters,
running over two Davidson play-
ers and out running two others,
enroute to the final points of the
day to make the score 28-0.
the players credited Dr. Rob
Carol, the skills coach, in helping
in the preparation for the game.
The ECU ruggers now face the
hardest part of their schedule
which includes UNC-G, Duke,
Wake Forest and N.C State. All of
these remaining games arc in the
North Carolina Rugby Football
Tom Togs Factory Outlet
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coupon must accompany order
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Football Mum Corsages $3.99
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deadline for these specials Fri. Oct. 9 at 2.00 p.m.
ALL
GROCERY STORE
COUPONS!
Vie Honor all Cents Off
Or Reduced Retail
Merchandise Coupons
An Items 15 Curry
Through Their
Expiration date!
It's Another Way
We Deliver
The Absolute Best Deal!
VRIRMFRESH
Fea
GAMES
BRI
WNCT-
Cincinnati at ECU
Ariz. St. at Washington
Arkansas at Texas Tech
LSU at Georgia
Illinois at Purdue
Michigan at Mich St.
Wake Forest at UNC
Notre Dame at Pitt
Oklahoma at Texas
Va. Tech at S. Carolina
Swimmers
readying
Continued from page 15
IM. Wilson broke the former rec-
ord in her freshman year.
Junior Patti Walsh is expected
to be a team leader this season,
and perform outstandingly over-
all.
Divers for the women include
junior bherry Campbell who is
one of the top divers in the CA A.
and senior Becky Kcrber, who
was a finalist on the one-motor
and three-meter boards.
The swim team will compote
against each other today in a pen-
tathalon consisting of the 200 IM
the 100-meter fly, the 100-meter
back stroke, the 100-meter breast
stroke and the 100-meter frees-
tyle.
The competition will begin at 4
p.in. in Minges Coliseum.
In a week, the swimmers will
compete in a biathalon in which
each swimmer will swim two
miles, run six miles and then
swim one more mile.
Kobe, no doubt, is expecting to
keep a winning tradition going.
aylor thinks
oth wrong
CHAPEL KILL (AP) - Law-
rence Taylor has never been once
to mince words. Now, in the
middle of a NFL player's strike, he
says both sides in the confronta-
tion are "dead wrong
"I look at what we're asking for
;and nothing is worth going on
strike for he said. "But then 1
1 Lok at what the owners are offer-
ing, and I see nothing worth going
! to work for
Taylor said he has wavered
about crossing the NFL picket
flines, but so far has sided with
players in their strike.
"1 have never been a union man,
ut I respect the players and what
Ithey are asking for, and 1 will not
ss the picket line at this time.
Two days from now, that might
jnge said Taylor, a former
llege player at North Carolina
id now a linebacker for the New
fork Giants.
Taylor, who has not joined the
icket lines, said he last consid-
I pining the Giants on Friday.
1 could have gone back last
?k but I decided not to . Every
� 1 thought about it, something
?pt me from going. The last time
as on Friday and I didn't go
cause that morning I saw a pic-
ire of the guys on th e picket line
11 said 1Mo, I couldn't do that
lid Taylor, who was in Chapel
"ill Monday night to sign copies
his book, "LT: Living on the
Taylor went to his home in
uston for a week, was in
ipel Hill Monday and will
ivel to Washington Tuesday to
I on The Larry King Show.
Although he has considered
crossing the picket line, Taylor
said he had "no respect for the
guys who never even gave it a
chance to work But he said he
had no hard feelings for the non-
union players who were called
into work.
S
Pirai
Lam
2(
G
�Pnvate
�Cookini
�Cable
�Ce
�Utilities!
�Fur-
�Sun Dc
Bl
�2 BIock)
a I
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Pro!
mai
REMOJ
9WSSSM
IrC0NS JtH�
Si
fc� 756


I
.1
� m � I liHagii
IMISJS��teiO��� �i i� n iMWaaSMfcaX
� aim � Miami
�����





years
eived 858
�as idle
: - No Ohio
s points after
6 and No.
� isj 8 12
i totaled
sts ol
State
I . : eja
�klahoma
film
DENT STORES
ri Building
n I
ng

INOR ALL LOCAL
QCERY STORE
COUPONS!
nor all Cents Oft
educed Retail
wndise Coupons
terns Vfe Carry
trough Their
wation Date!
Is Another Way
We Deliver
bsolute Best Deal!
?ARMFRESH
THi: EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 8, 19H7 17
Fearless Football Forecast
GAMES
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Direc tor
Last Week:
(7-3)
Overall:
(36-14)
Cincinnati at ECU
Ariz. St. at Washington
Arkansas at Texas Tech
LSU at Georgia
Illinois at Purdue
Michigan at Mich. St.
Wake Forest at UNC
Notre Dame at Titt.
Oklahoma at Texas
Va. Tech at S. Carolina
ECU
Washington
Arkansas
Georgia
Ilinois
Michigan
UNC
Notre Dame
Oklahoma
South Carolina
DEAN BUCHANTIM CHANDLERPAT MOLLOY
ECU Sports InformationSports EditorAssistant Sports Editor
Last WeekLast Week.Last Week:
(7-3)(7-3)(7-3)
Overall:Overall:Overall:
(35-15)(35-15)(32-18)
ECUECUECU
WashingtonWashingtonArizona State
ArkansasArkansasArkansas
GeorgiaLSULSU
PurdueIllinoisIllinois
Michigan UNCMichigan UNCMichigan UNC
PittsburghNotre DameNotre Dame
OklahomaOklahomaOklahoma
South CarolinaSouth CarolinaSouth Carolina
Dr. RICHARD LAKIN
ECU Chancellor
I �! Week:
(7-3)
Overall:
(27-23)
ECU
Washington
Texas Tech
LSU
Illinois
Michigan
UNC
Notre Dame
Oklahoma
South Carolina
Swimmers
readying
Continued from page 15
1M. Wilson broke the former rec-
ord in her freshman year.
Junior Tatti Walsh is expected
to be a team leader this season,
ind perform outstandingly over-
all.
Divers for the women include
junior Sherry' Campbell who is
one of the top divers in the CAA;
and senior Becky Kerber, who
was a finalist on the one meter
and three-meter boards.
The swim team will compete
against each other today in a pen-
tathalon consisting of the 20X1IM,
the 100-meter fly, the 100-meter
back stroke, the 100-meter breast
stroke and the 100-meter frees-
tyle.
The competition will begin at 4
p.vn. in Minges Coliseum.
In a week, the swimmers will
compete in a biathalon in which
each swimmer will swim two
miles, run six miles and then
swim one more mile.
Kobe, no doubt, is expecting to
keep a winning tradition going.
Taylor thinks
S both wrong
CHAPEL HILL (AP) - Law-
rence Taylor has never been once
to mince words. Now, in the
middle of a NFL player's strike, he
ays both sides in the confronta-
tion are "dead wrong
"I look at what we're asking for
and nothing is worth going on
strike for he said. "But then I
look at what the owners are offer-
ing, and I see nothing worth going
to work for
Taylor said he has wavered
ibout crossing the NFL picket
lines, but so far has sided with
players in their strike.
"I have never been a union man,
but I respect the players and what
they are asking for, and I will not
cross the picket line at this time.
Two days from now, that might
change said Taylor, a former
college player at North Carolina
and now a linebacker for the New
York Giants.
Taylor, who has not joined the
picket lines, said he last consid-
ered joining the Giants on Friday.
"I could have gone back last
veek, but I decided not to . Every
time I thought about it, something
kept me from going. The last time
was on Friday and I didn't go
because that morning I saw a pic-
ture of the guys on th e picket line
and I said 'No, I couldn't do that
said Taylor, who was in Chapel
Hill Monday night to sign copies
of his book, "LT: Living on the
Edge
Taylor went to his home in
Houston for a week, was in
Chapel Hill Monday and will
travel to Washington Tuesday to
be on The Larry King Show.
Although he has considered
crossing the picket line, Taylor
said he had "no respect for the
guys who never even gave it a
chance to work But he said he
had no hard feelings for the non-
union players who were called
into work.
Pirates'
Landing S�jf
200 West Eighth Street
Greenville, NC 27834
Phone: 758-6061
�Private Rooms
�Cooking Facilities
�Cable T.V. Available
�Central HeatAir
�Utilities Included In
Rent
�Furnished
�Sun Deck with
Barbeque grills
�2 Blocks From Campus
and Downtown
�Laundry Facilities
�Free Maid Service.
Professionally
managed by:
EMCO East. Inc.
CALL AMI AC
FAMOUS
H ij.1
MOT OVI �. MM
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AMD rtlMM 1MI'
QRItNVULf. ft c
rw no �o�wt
MMrnrnsKST
FOR FAST, FREE
. DELIVERY
PHONE 757-1278
OR 757-0731
Spaghetti or I asagne
FOR
HOMECOMING
GET 1 PITCHER
OF BEER FOR 99
with Garlic Bread and Salad $3.95
l ti tar delivery.
(Not For Delivery)
Its a Winning Tradition
Tradition
ECU and the Beef Barn!
Join us for dinner after
the game.
Special Saturday Football Opening Time of 5 p.m
PIZZA-SUBS-SANDWICHES
SPAGHETTI-LASAGNA
SALADS-TRY OUR GREEK
TACO OR PIZZA BURGER
45 DRAFT1
PIZZABURGER NIGHT
321
good iTh any olhef promotion
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TRY OUR MEAL DEAL $2.49
�BUY A iaf�;kHI Y A SMALLBUY A SMALL
�PEZA AND�PIZZA AND�OR LARGE SUB
GET A 2 UtER PEPSI�GET 2AND GET�
ranDRINKS KREEDRINK FREE�
BEEF
BARN
Bob Simon
Manager
?f
mra
iii
400 St. Andrews Dr
756-1161
fw
fr
tim:
Mon. thru Sat. from 6 nightl
Sun. from 5:30 to 9pm
The Student Union Special Concerts Committee
Presents
CHAIRMAN OF THE
BOARD
A Homecoming Beach Music Bonanza!
Sunday October 11th, 4 p.m.
Central Campus Mall
FREE!
Rain Location: Hendrix Theatre
The Wash House
10th And 14th St.
Laundramat - Dry Cleaning
752-6117 758-6001
Attendants - Snacks - Cable TV
Present Coupon Expiration Date Oct. 31, 1987
Qouppn
20 OFF
Dry Cleaning
or Shirt Laundry
Coupon
20 OFF
Fluff & Fold
Coupon
1 Soft Drink
Free
"Come Visit Our Friendly Staff
MMjm��1 ���� �� � i'Wil�l'�.i'�MW�-�-i � ��
'�'
I





18
TUP FASTCARPI INIAN
CXTOBFR8, 1087
Scabs may take home the
NFL bacon again this week
id

V
SHIN TON (AP) - An-
i week i'l substitute players
miss�xi pay hecks by striking
regulars was in the offing
e� mentatthenegofiat-
tableoi imajoi breadkownin
n solida :
r seemed likely as
lone I pshaw and
! negotiator lack
ii . " pared tor another
ng todav torrytoend the 15-
Ikoul
i I (lie outstanding
a ill take tune Donlan
il menl issued form his
- flicc follow inga live
; 1 uesday with Up-
undisclosed locatin
i s capital.
� nce the major is
nke was no! dis
ding to the state
N i I Management
. entered on two
i lub fines and
thi' statement
I 3v nor the Ml
ation had av com-
l bet n hope that a set-
ild be reat hed in time
: ers to report to
the owners' 1 p.m.
Havers who re-
I be paid and could
play this weekend's games.
But the statement from Donlan
and the union's determination
not to return en masse until an
agreement has been reached
seemed to end all hopes that
many of the regulars would suit
up-
Some defections were expected,
however.
Tight end Russ Francis, the first
San Francisco 4Vr to cross the
picket line, was expected to be
joined today by several team-
mates.
The striking 4Mer players met at
a Redwood Citv, Calif hotel
I uesday afternoon for an update
on Monday night's marathon
player representatives' meeting
in Chicago
"Keena Turner came back with
a report of what happened inhi-
cago, we had some discussion,
and then we took a vote co-
player representative Keith
Fahnhorst said. 'The 11 guvs who
were going to go in last week
voted to go in and the rest of us are
hanging in there
Fahnhorst refused to say who
would report, but published re-
ports said the list included quar-
terback foe Montana, wide re-
ceiver Dwight Clark, running
backs RogerCraigand loeCribbs,
cornerback Erir Wright,
placekicker Ray Wersching,
punter Max Runager and defen-
sive lineman Pete Kugler.
The union has softened its
stance on free agency, with the
player representatives saying
early Tuesday that they had given
Upshaw a commitment that no
single issue was to hold up an
agreement.
The renewed talks, the first in 11
days, followed a weekend in
which both sides were reeling.
The owners suffered through a
Sunday and Monday in which
stadiums were filled to just 25
percent of capacity rather that the
usual W percent. TV ratings were
not down dramatically for the 1
p.m. EDT timeslot, but curiosity
may have been responsible in part
tor that, the later games of Sunday
did show a marked decline, how-
ever, with CBS saying the second
half of its doubleheadergot a 10.8
rating compared to 21.3 on Sept.
20, two days before the strike
began.
Meanwhile, there were more
defections among striking play-
ers. Nearly 100 already have
crossed the line.
"1 think the pressures are begin-
ning to build on both sides
Commissioner Pete Rozelle said
Tuesday in testimony before a
Senate Judiciary subcommittee
hearing on the NFL's TV package.
GET IT
WHILE IT
Wolf pack "D" buckling down
�rth Caro- than four years Saturday with a
lefense in 17-0 ictory over Georgia Tech.
The Wolfpack is 2-3 overall af-
ter Saturday's victory and 2-1 in
the Atlantic Coast Conference.
rues was
.�.down on
defensive
or five big
ermine the
onday. "In
weren't
n the last
oints in its
Wolfpack
t in miTe
NState is idle this week before
hosting North C Carolina at Carter-
Finley Stadium on Oct. IS
Pate, who was tilling in for head
coach Pick shendan, who was
out oi town, said his defensive
squad got more excited went
along and as the shutout drew
nearer.
"Its easy to play with enthusi-
asm when you are successful
Pate said. "We got more confi-
dence as the game went on
Pate blames himself for the
defense's slow start in the early
season, when C State lost its
tirst three games.
"I don't feel like I was doing as
good as job as I shold have be-
cause we were making mistakes
we shouldn't have been making
I'ate said, "It's because we
weren't prepared
CALL DOMINI PIZZA
so
Off a Large.
Two or More
Topping
Pizza!
Otter good only at participating
Domino's Pizza locations
Not valid with other coupons or o
Otter good thru December 2 lc.
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DOMINO'S
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Serving
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8 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Mon. - Sat.
Sundays 1-6 p.m.
SHOP THESE SPECIALS
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24-12 oz. cans (suitcase) toctnM tCf
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99 �
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28
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For Your Tailgate Party! Call 752-5025
Freshly Cut In Our Deli -
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$3.99
Swift Premium Heavy Western
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"Where The Pirates Shop For Price,
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Prices Effective Through Saturday. October 1 o.
Corner Third & Jarvis Streets
Just 2 Blocks from ECU
OVERTONS
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A





Title
The East Carolinian, October 8, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 08, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.564
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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