The East Carolinian, October 6, 1987






INSIDE
Editorials��4
StyleM10
Sports��14
Classifieds��6
STYLE
ECU theater arts alumni make it big � see STYLE,
page 10.
SPORTS
Mountaineers roll over Pirates 49-0 � see SPORTS,
page 14.
�ije iEaat darnlttttan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. b2 No. 12
Tuesday, October 6, 1987
Greenville, NC
16 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Former ECU activist speaks
Greenville 1 lunger Coalition.
O'Neill protested against such
U.S. military recruitment on col-
lege campuses and U.S. military
training of Salvadorian troops. He
was sentenced to 26 months in a
federal prison for his involvement
with Plowshare's nuclear missile
disarmament movement. "I am
convinced that time spent impris-
oned can only strengthen one's
commitment to thecause of global
peace O'Neill said at the meet-
ing.
O'Neill emphasized that "dedi-
cated student involvement is the
most powerful force S.ii.D. can
utilize to gain public sentiment. A
Christian pacifist, O'Neill encour-
aged students to lead visible,non-
violent protest against a nuclear
arms build-up, social program
budget cuts by the Reagan ad-
ministration and the Reagan
administration's policy in Central
Americal.
O'Neill also sought participants
in the upcoming Oct. 24 protest of
the government's nuclear missile
testing at Cape Canaveral, Flor-
ida. This demonstration is slated
for the 25th anniversary of the
Cuban Missile Crisis.
Evan Lightner, a junior, said
S.E.D. is tentatively planning a
demonstration to protest the "al-
location of US funds to Nicara-
guan troops" Lightner said
S.E.D. intends to distribute litera-
ture concerning the role of US
military in Central America.
Darrcll Fnckc, a junior, said the
group plans to hold "soap-box
forums" on campus, a public
awareness ttvhnique previously
cmploved by O'Neill in past
years.
"We are a student organization
interested in stimulating campus
involvement and awareness
Frickc said.
k O M. addresses the Students for Economic nomocracy
meeting Sunday night (Photolab).
Club day informs students
I H N1 PAGE
. ' nt organizations
� � the Student I nion
i nment Asso
� i ai mial Club Awar-
, � da
layis an oppor
n irganizations
inform students
themselves answer ques
I ' a little re ruiting.
v c ha e had partici-
�. inizations
id alternating repre-
.t- .it various times ot the
S President Scott
irsday rhomas said
eness Day will get
tudents involved in cam-
i ities and enable them to
make the most of their college
years.
Die clubs displayed literature
and provided club representa-
� -
lives to talk to students.
vid Monroe, a student who
became interested inooperative
Education during last ear sQub
warnessl a said, "By pursuing
mj interest ino-op from the in-
formation 1 recieved on Club
Awarness Day, 1 was able to land
a reall) great job this past sum-
mer. It really paid off.
1 Ins is the third year that the
Student I nion and SGA haveco-
sponsored this event according to
Laureen Kirsch, President of the
Student Union. "Although par-
ticipation is not as great this year
a it has been in the past, �e hope
to expose as many students as
possible to what thi campus has
to otter. A lot of times students are
not even aware ot what is out
there. Hopefull) tins will spark
some interest and get people in-
volved
By EDWARD WILKERSON
SUll Writrr
A former ECU activist who has
been in prison for denting nuclear
missiles spoke at an open meeting
of Students for Economic Democ-
racy Sunday evening in Menden-
hall Student Center.
The meeting was held to plan
for upcoming demonstrations
protesting U.S. involvement in
Central America.
Patrick O'Neill, former ECU
student and news editor of The
East Carolinian, advised the
group about activism on campus.
C i Neill was also a founder of The
SGA Judicial
bill postponed
1 he SC.A legislature again post-
poned the vote on a bill which
would change the powers of the
ECU judiciary boards at its regu-
larly scheduled Monday meeting.
The bill, debated at the Sept. 29
meeting of the legislature, would
give the Honor Board the power
to try a student before a court of
law has passed judgement on
him.
Those wio favor the bill said
the bill is needed to protect the
university, while opponents of
the bill raised the issue of double
penalty (penalty by both courts).
At Monday's meeting, the SGA
moved to hold a special meeting
ot the legislature at 4 p.m. next
Monday. The meetings purpose SGA Speaker Bennett Eckert conducts Monday night's SGA meeting, were legislators continued the
is to give the SC.A a chance to hear discussion over the judiciary bill (Photolab).
different opinions on the bill. funds.
"This is the most important
piece of legislation before this
body in years said speaker Ben-
nett Eckert
But the most discussed bill at
the meeting was a $1,000 appro-
priation to Phi Sigma Pi, a na-
tional co-ed honor fraternity.
Legislator Alan Manning intro-
duced the bill.
Phi Sigma Pi raised $20,000 last
year for non-profit organizations,
according to Manning. Several
members of the legislature ar-
gued that if rhi Sigma Pi raised
money for other organizations, it
should be able to raise it's own
Legislator Olav Osland, speak-
ing in favor of the bill, said,
"These are 60 people (in Phi
Sigma Pi) who spend a lot of their
free time to help others Osland
said.
After the debate, the legislature
unanimously passed the bill,
which is to pay for advertise-
ments and other costs.
in other business, the SGA ap-
propriated:
�$987 to the ECU Rugby team
for uniforms and balls.
�$350 to the Graduate Student
Organization of the School of
Nursing.
Homecoming activities include
record number of bands
By JEANETTE HERRERA
Suff Writer
The eight contestants will make
up the 1987 Homecoming Court
Then, in a second student vote
Friday, a queen and two runner-
ups will be chosen Voting booths
will be set up Wednesday and
Friday at the Student Store and
Mendenhall Student Center from
0 a m. to 3 p.m. Students must
1 their student ID. cards to
This year, the Pep Rally will bo
held at 7 p.m. Thursday, before
the Fixx concert, said Council
"We are trying to encourage
people to come over to the Pep
Rally before the Fix Concert,
since the Pep Rally will be over at
7'30 Council said.
At 6:30 p.m. Thursday, the
Marching Pirates will parade up
College Hill to Ficklen Stadium.
The Tep Rally will be hosted bv
Mike Mann, who will be accom-
panied bv the ECU Cheerleaders.
During a presentation bv the foot-
ball team, two players will ad-
dress the crowd and Senior foot-
ball players will be recognized,
according to Council.
Frisbees will be thrown to the
crowd during the Pep Rally,
Council added.
The Student Homecoming
Committee is also in charge of the Committee is made up of eight
It is Homecoming Week, and
there are plenty of festivities for
everyone to enjoy this year spon-
sored by the Student Union, the
Student Homecoming Commit-
tee, and the Homecoming Steer-
ing Committee.
The annual homecoming p
rade is produced by the Studei
Homecoming Committee. It will
be one of the highlights, with a
record eleven high school march-
ing bands entering the competi-
tion, according to Leslie Council,
chairwoman of the Student
Homecoming Committee. Most
of the bands will come from east-
ern North Carolina. $750 will be
a warded to the band winning first
place in the competition.
Twelve decorated floats will
also be a part of the parade this
year. All organizations with floats
were given some financial assis-
tance from the SGA for the con-
struction and decorations of their
float, Council said. The first place
float will recieve $200.
The parade will begin at 10 a.m.
Saturday and travel down Fifth
and Elm Streets.
The Student Homecoming
Dorm and House Decoration
contest. 'This year 12 of the 15
dorms are participating. We're
real pleased with that number
said Council. Six houses have also
entered the contest, most of them
along Fifth Street. The winner will
receive $50.
Winners in each of the three
contests will be announced dur-
ing halftime at the Homecoming
Football Game Saturday.
Students will have 31 contest-
Fundraiser begin
student members and is part of
the Homecoming Steering
Committee, which is in charge of
making all final decisions con-
cerning homecoming. The steer-
ing committee is made up of fac-
ulty representatives, athletic per-
sonnel and students representing
various organizations. Council
said.
"Everyone on the Student
Homecoming Committee works
on a volunteer basis, year round
Patti Jones and Keith Johnson help to kick off the 10th annual ECU
Telefund Monday night. Volunteers solicit funds to enhance various
programs on campus. The fundraiser will continue for seven weeks
in the Willis Building (Thomas Walters, Photolab).
ants to choose from in the Home- Council said. A student chairper-
coming Court Election. A cam- son is elected in April "so they can
pus-wide election Wednesday get started on plans for the next
will narrow the number of con- year Council said,
testants down to eight. See HOMECOMING, page 2
�.
I �' � � � � � . � -�
�� -�� � � � ���� �� .�-� �. . mijmamm-
- - - ' - �" '�
i





INSIDE
Editorials.
Style
Classifieds
����.MH�.�,MWM,B.M-�,B4
6
����?����?��?������������������������
STYLE
����
ECU theater arts alumni make it big � see STYLE,
page 10.
SPORTS
Mountaineers toll over Pirates 49 0 � see SPORTS,
page 14.
&t iEafit (Kamltniatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.62 No. 12
Tuesday, October 6,1987
Greenville, NC
16 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Former ECU activist speaks
Patrick O'Neill addresses the Students for Economic Democracy
meeting Sunday night (Photolab).
Club day informs students
by TONI PAGE
Stiff Writer
About 15 student organizations
turned out for the Student Union
and Student Government Asso-
ciation third annual Club Awar-
ness Day Thursday.
The awareness day is an oppor-
tunity for various organizations
on campus to inform students
about themselves, answer ques-
tions and do a little recruiting.
"This year we have had partici-
pation of about 15 organizations
who have had alternating repre-
sentatives at various times of the
day said SGA President Scott
Thomas Thursday. Thomas said
Club Awareness Day will get
more students involved in cam-
pus activities and enable them to
nuke the most of their college
years.
The clubs displayed literature
and provided club representa-
tives to talk to students.
David Monroe, a student who
became interested in Cooperative
Education during last year's Club
Awarness Day said, By pursuing
my interest in Co-op from the in-
formation I recieved on Club
Awarness Day, 1 was able to land
a really great job this past sum-
mer. It really paid off
This is the third year that the
Student Union and SGA have co-
sponsored this event according to
Laureen kirsch, President of the
Student Union. "Although par-
ticipation is not as great this year
as it has been in the past, we hope
to expose as many students as
possible to what this campus has
to offer. A lot of times students are
not even aware of what is out
there. Hopefully this will spark
some interest and get people in-
volved
By EDWARD WILKERSON
Suff Writer
A former ECU activist who has
been in prison for denting nuclear
missiles spoke at an open meeting
of Students for Economic Democ-
racy Sunday evening in Menden-
hall Student Center.
The meeting was held to plan
for upcoming demonstrations
protesting U.S. involvement in
Central America.
Patrick O'Neill, former ECU
student and news editor of The
East Carolinian, advised the
group about activism on campus.
O'Neill was also a founder of The
SGA Judicial
bill postponed
The SGA legislature again post-
poned the vote on a bill which
would change the powers of the
ECU judiciary boards at its regu-
larly scheduled Monday meeting.
The bill, debated at the Sept. 29
meeting of the legislature, would
give the Honor Board the power
to try a student before a court of
law has passed judgement on
him.
Those who favor the bill said
the bill is needed to protect the
university, while opponents of
the bill raised the issue of double
penalty (penalty by both courts).
At Monday's meeting, the SGA
moved to hold a special meeting
of the legislature at 4 p.m. next
Monday. The meeting's purpose
is to give the SGA a chance to hear
different opinions on the bill.
"This is the most important
piece of legislation before this
body in years said speaker Ben-
nett Eckert.
But the most discussed bill at
the meeting was a $1,000 appro-
priation to Phi Sigma Pi, a na-
tional co-ed honor fraternity.
Legislator Alan Manning intro-
duced the bill.
Phi Sigma Pi raised $20,000 last
year for non-profit organizations,
according to Manning. Several
members of the legislature ar-
gued that if Phi Sigma Pi raised
money for other organizations, it
should be able to raise if s own
Greenville Hunger Coalition.
O'Neill protested against such
U.S. military recruitment on col-
lege campuses and U.S. military
training of Salvadorian troops. He
was sentenced to 26 months in a
federal prison for his involvement
with Plowshare's nuclear missile
disarmament movement. "1 am
convinced that time spent impris-
oned can only strengthen one's
commi tment to the cau se of global
peace O'Neill said at the meet-
ing.
O'Neill emphasized that "dedi-
cated student involvement" is the
most powerful force S.E.D. can
utilize to gain public sentiment. A
Christian pacifist,O'Neill encour-
aged students to lead visible, non-
violent protest against a nuclear
arms build-up, social program
budget cuts by the Reagan ad-
ministration and the Reagan
administration's policy in Central
Americal.
O'Neill also sought participants
in the upcoming Oct. 24 protest of
the government's nuclear missile
testing at Cape Canaveral, Flor-
ida. This demonstration is slated
for the 25th anniversary of the
Cuban Missile Crisis.
Evan Lightner, a junior, said
S.E.D. is tentatively planning a
demonstration to protest the "al-
location of U.S. funds to Nicara-
guan troops Lightner said
S.E.D. intends to distribute litera-
ture concerning the role of U.S.
military in Central America.
Darrell Fricke, a junior, said the
group plans to hold "soap-box
forums" on campus, a public
awareness technique previously
employed by O'Neill in past
years.
"We are a student organization
interested in stimulating campus
involvement and awareness
Fricke said.
Homecoming activities include
record number of bands
SGA Speaker Bennett Eckert conducts Monday nighfs SGA meeting, were legislators continued the
discussion over the judiciary bill (Photolab).
funds.
I-egislator Olav Osland, speak-
ing in favor of the bill, said,
'These are 60 people (in Phi
Sigma Pi) who spend a lot of their
free time to help others Osland
said.
After the debate, the legislature
unanimously passed the bill,
which is to pay for advertise-
ments and other costs.
In other business, the SGA ap-
propriated:
�$987 to the ECU Rugby team
for uniforms and balls.
�$350 to the Graduate Student
Organization of the School of
Nursing.
By JEANETTE HERRERA
Staff Writer
It is Homecoming Week, and
there are plenty of festivities for
everyone to enjoy this year spon-
sored by the Student Union, the
Student Homecoming Commit-
tee, and the Homecoming Steer-
ing Committee.
The annual homecoming pa-
rade is produced by the Student
Homecoming Committee. It will
be one of the highlights, with a
record eleven high school march-
ing bands entering the competi-
tion, according to Leslie Council,
chairwoman of the Student
Homecoming Committee. Most
of the bands will come from east-
em North Carolina. $750 will be
The eight contestants will make
up the 1987 Homecoming Court.
Then, in a second student vote
Friday, a queen and two runner-
ups will be chosen. Voting booths
will be set up Wednesday and
Friday at the Student Store and
Mendenhall Student Center from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Students must
present their student I.D. cards to
vote.
This year, the Pep Rally will be
held at 7 p.m. Thursday, before
the Fixx concert, said Council.
"We are trying to encourage
people to come over to the Pep
Rally before the Fixx Concert,
since the Pep Rally will be over at
7:30 Council said.
At 6:30 p.m. Thursday, the
awarded to the band winning first Marching Pirates will parade up
Fundraiser hegins
Parti Jones and Keith Johnson help to kick off the 10th annual ECU
Telefund Monday night Volunteers solicit funds to enhance various
place in the competition.
Twelve decorated floats will
also be a part of the parade this
year. All organiiations with floats
were given some financial assis-
tance from the SGA for the con-
struction and decorations of their
float, Council said. The first place
float will recieve $200.
The parade will beginat 10a.m.
Saturday and travel down Fifth
and Elm Streets.
The Student Homecoming
Committee is also in charge of the
Dorm and House Decoration
contest. 'This year 12 of the 15
dorms are participating. We're
real pleased with that number
said Council. Six houses have also
entered the contest, most of them
along Fifth Street. The winner will
receive $50.
Winners in each of the three
contests will be announced dur-
ing halftime at the Homecoming
Football Game Saturday.
Students will have 31 contest-
ants to choose from in the Home-
coming Court Election. A cam-
College Hill to Ficklen Stadium.
The Pep Rally will be hosted by
Mike Mann, who will be accom-
panied by the ECU Cheerleaders.
During a presentation by the foot-
ball team, two players will ad-
dress the crowd and Senior foot-
ball players will be recognized,
according to Council.
Frisbees will be thrown to the
crowd during the Pep Rally,
Council added.
The Student Homecoming
Committee is made up of eight
student members and is part of
the Homecoming Steering
Committee, which is in charge of
making all final decisions con-
cerning homecoming. The steer-
ing committee is made up of fac-
ulty representatives, athletic per-
sonnel and students representing
various organizations, Council
said.
"Everyone on the Student
Homecoming Committee works
on a volunteer basis, year round
Council said. A student chairper-
son is elected in April "so they can
programs on campus. The fundraiser will continue for seven weeks
in the Willis Building (Thomas Walters, Photolab).
pus-wide election Wednesday get started on plans for the next
will narrow the number of con- year Council said.
testants down to eight. See HOMECOMING, page 2
A

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X





TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 6,1987
Reagan refuses to give up on Bork until the endl Purvey sh�
C-7 M (ECU News Bureau Mam t tivelv address i
WASHINGTON (AP) � Presi- sion, said "no" when reporters
dent Reagan, rebuffing sugges- asked if he thought his nomina-
tion of the conservative appeals
tions that he withdraw the Su
prcme Court nomination of
Robert H. Bork, is embarking on a
string of events designed to high-
light support for the embattled
jurist.
The president and his aides are
looking beyond today's vote on
the nomination in the Senate Judi-
ciary Committee and are concen-
trating instead on winning the
nomination on the Senate floor.
Reagan, returning to Washing-
ton on Sunday on the eve of
Monday's Supreme Court scs-
court judge was dead.
Asked whether he was consid-
ering withdrawing Bork's name
from Senate consideration, Re-
agan said: "I'm going to continue
with his nomination
Washington attorney Leonard
Garment, a friend of Bork, called
The New York Times on Sunday
to say he was "authorized by
Judge Bork to say that he will not
ask the president to withdraw his
name prior to the full Senate vote
on his nomination the newspa-
per reported today.
Reporters at the White House
also asked Reagan a question
dealing with his policies involv-
ing the Nicaraguan civil war.
"I'm fighting another war
Reagan quipped, adding, "Bork
Asked about the president's
remarks. White House spokes-
man Marlin Fitzwater said the
White House had scheduled a
string of "activities" for Reagan to
keep the nomination battle mov-
ing.
"Every day we'll be doing dif-
ferent things Fitzwater said, but
he refused to be specific.
The spokesman said Reagan
had not called any senators over
the weekend, but planned to
make contact with some this
week.
Fitzwater pointed to comments
by Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, R-Utah,
who said Reagan intends to press
for a vote on Bork by the entire
Senate even if the Judiciary
Committee fails to recommend
the nominee on Tuesday.
Hatch, interviewed on NBC-
TV's "Meet the Press said the
president will not withdraw
Bork's name even if an over-
whelming number of senators say
they plan to vote against him.
"The president has authorized
College students getting involved in Bork nomination debate
me to say on this program this
morning that he's going to press
Utrough to conclusion, to a vote
on the Senate floor Hatch said.
The split among senators who
have declared how they will vote
on Bork's nomination narrowed
slightly Sunday to 32-28 as Sen.
Thomas A. Daschle, D-S.D an-
nounced he would vote against
the nomination.
Forty senators have not yet
declared either way, according to
a poll by The Associated Press.
Hatch, a member of the Judici-
ary Committee, said he believed
the full floor vote could come in
two weeks and that Reagan ulti-
mately will succeed in getting
Bork on the high court.
On Saturday, Reagan used nib j
weekly radio address to charge
that liberal opponents of the
nominee were trying to intimi-
date judges and "thwart the dk
sire of the American people for
jurists who will bring criminals te
justice.
Sen. Howell Heflin, D-Ala , an
undecided member of the
committee, said he will take a
stand onTuesday, basing his deci-
sion on whether Bork is a "conser-
vative or an extremist
Reagan nominated Bork, a
judge on the U.S. Court of Ap-
peals for the District of Columbia
and a former U.S. solicitor gen-
eral, to succeed Justice Lewis F
Powell, who retired in Julv
(CPS) � The U.S. Senate Judici-
ary Committee room wasn't the
only place people debated Presi-
dent Reagan's nomination of
Robert Bork to the U.S. Supreme
Court last week.
On college campuses during
the last two weeks, students have
rallied and petitioned almost
constantly:
About 250 people attended a
rally at the University of Iowa
Sept. 14 to voice opposition to
Bork's nomination. "This man is
against everything that guaran-
tees the civil rights of this
country's citizens Ul Black Stu-
dent Union President Rodncv
Sturgeon said.
A newly formed group, "Yale
Students Against Bork boasts
nearly 100 members and is cm-
barking on a petition and letter
writing campaign to persuade the
Senate to block Bork's appoint-
ment to the high court. Sixteen
members of the Yale College
Republicans protested the
group's first meeting, holding
signs with slogans such as "Lib-
eral Scare Tactics? Just Say No"
and "Stop Liberal McCarthyism
The Yale College Republicans is
mounting its own letter writing
campaign in favor of Bork's nomi-
nation.
At the University of Colorado,
700 students mailed anti-Bork
postcards to Colorado senators
Tim Wirth and Bill Armstrong.
Liberal student activists gathered
about 400 signatures on petitions
opposing Bork's nomination.
Conservative students at the
University of Texas hailed Bork
and called for the senate to con-
firm his nomination at a rally cele-
brating the U.S. Constitution
Sept. 17. UT Democrats said the
constitution celebration was an
inappropriate forum for a pro-
Bork rally.
Twice as many University of
Alabama students favor Bork's
nomination as oppose it, accord-
ing to petitions circulated on
campus. A pro-Bork petition re-
ceived 182 signatures as of Sept.
14. A petition opposing Bork's
confirmation to the Supreme
Court seat received 85.
"He's a staunch conservative
said Alabama College Republican
President Scott Miller. "I'm all for
the court leaning to the right. I'd
like to see the court more conser-
vative in its decisions
About 200 University of Illinois
students attended an anti-Bork
rally organized by the school's
Abortion Rights Coalition Sept.
16.
Homecoming activities will
surpass preceeding years
Continued from page 1
The SGA funds Student Home-
coming Committee activities.
Other homecoming activities
include:
�The Alpha Thi Alpha Frater-
nity will hold a homecoming
dance 11 p.m. to 2 a.m. Friday at
Mendenhall Student Center.
�The Alumni Association is
sponsoring an alumni dance 9
p.m. to 12 a.m. Friday at the
Greenville Sheraton in honor of
the 1962, 1977, and 1987 classes.
The association is also holding a
post-game social at the Hilton
from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, accord-
ing to Audric Strickland, Alumni
Service coordinator.
"There will be live entertain-
ment by the Monitors band, and
all are welcome Council added.
(There will be a $2 admission fee
at the door).
�Omega Psi Phi will hold its
homecoming dance 9 p.m. to 2
a.m. Saturday in Memorial Gym.
Introducing
"jFU "752-1444
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(ECU News Bureau Mam
Eastern Carolina's more complex
problems such as economi, :
velopment and education
being addressed locally and as a
result, the region's he'artlar
medium-sized cities is imi
ing dramatically a new 5)
shows
At the same time, h study bv
an East Carolina Univi i
libcal scientist indicates thai the
region's local ,
probably lack the
lively addres s
lems as unen i
erty
�. ffibalssi
l that mti
problems, when k
d either b k
eral or state pnl
some extent bv tM
These finding
by Dr Carmine
ECU political soeJ
directed research
spring and sumrr
ECU use of
(ECU School 1 � v ;
Officials of the ECL Schoo
Medicine have implemented a
one-year moratorium on the use
of dogs in medical student teach-
ing laboratories, citing th
tional debate and 1 no
na
Laup
I
med
Laupu
We're all affecd
Each time I attend ud
my ears ring for a �
my head feeb stopped up whe .
this mean7
Too much noise for long peri-
ods of time, or certain tvp.
noise for even short periods of
rime, can lead to a hearing loss It
your ears ring for several days this
may mean that you have an
irreversible hearing loss.
lead
hear
music
mav 1
Health
By Man
Excessive noise is a
cause of hearing loss; disease, in-
jury and age arc others 'iour
hearing is important for three
reasons: learning, communica-
tion and safety.
Much of our information is
gained from listening. One ot the
most important ways of getting
along with others is bv spoken
Jones joins school of
everyone i�
�e t o so n
(ECU News Bureau) � Harold
A. Jones, a veteran ot 2 earsr
the faculty, has been appointed
acting chairman of the instrumen-
tal department in the School or
Music at East Carolina University
and acting director of the ECU
Symphonic Wind Ensemble
m both capacities, Fones suc-
ceeds Herbert L. Carter who re-
tired last Spring after more than
20 years ot service in the School of
Music.
Carter has been appointed as a
part-time visiting professor with
responsibilities in the area of re-
cruiting, Dr. Charles Stevens,
dean oi the School oi Music, an-
nounced.
Jones, who joined the School ot
Music faculty in 19t2, has the
academic rank of professor ot
percussion and since 1985 has
served also as director of the EL'
Summer Band Camp.
He has been active in manv
professional societies, serving as
chair of the N.C. chapter and on
the national board of directors of
the Percussive Arts Societv and as
Southern division chair of the
National Association of College
Wind and Fercussion Instructors
He is a columnist for several
L
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until the end
vn this program this
at he's going to press
conclusion to a vote
ite floor Hatch said.
It among senators who
Vi how they vv ill vote
nomination narrowed
indav to 32-28 as Sen
Pa-
ir,
chic
uld
inak
ha.
an
against
not yet
rding to
ther way au
ssociateu Press.
member ol the iudici-
rttv said he believed
r vote could conic in
and that ulh-
- cceed in getting
i
On Saturday, Reagan used his
weekly radio address to charge
that liberal opponents of the
nominee were trying to intimi-
date judges and "thwart the de-
sire o( the American people" for
funsts who w ill bring criminals to
justice.
Sen. Howell Heflin, D-Ala an
undecided member of the
committee, said he will take a
sta nd on Tuesday, basing his deci-
sion orvyvhether Bork is a "conser-
vative or an extremist
Reagan nominated Bork, a
ludge on the U.S. Court of Ap-
peals tor the District of Columbia
and a former I$. solicitor gen-
eral, to succeed Justice Lewis F.
Powell, who retired in July.
e �afit (teolfcifaa
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 6.1987 1
Survey shows NC city changes may be needed
(ECU News Bureau)�Many of
Eastern Carolina's more complex
problems such as economic de-
velopment and education are
being addressed locally and, as a
result, the region's heartland of
medium-sized cities is improv-
ing dramatically a new study
shows.
At the same time, the study by
an East Carolina University po-
litical scientist indicates that the
region's local governments
probably lack the power to effec-
(ECU School of Medicine) �
Officials of the ECU School of
Medicine have implemented a
one-year moratorium on the use
of dogs in medical student teach-
ing laboratories, citing the na-
tional debate and controversy
tively address such massive prob-
lems as unemployment and pov-
erty.
City officials surveyed believe,
however, that most of the region's
problems, when identified, can be
solved either by local action, fed-
eral or state programs and to
some extent by the private sector.
These findings were reported
by Dr. Carmine P. Scavo of the
ECU political science faculty who
directed research during the past
spring and summer, concentrat-
e of lab
over this issue.
The decision was announced
Tuesday by Dr. William E.
Laupus, ECU vice chancellor for
health sciences and dean of the
medical school.
Laupus said faculty members
ing on 122 members of city coun-
cils and school boards, city man-
agers and department heads and
political leaders in the cities of
Goldsboro, Greenville, New
Bern, Roanoke Rapids, Rocky
Mount, Wilmington and Wilson.
In an interview, Scavo said "the
prevailing view is that most cities
in the region are improving rather
dramatically but that the region as
a whole still has some distance to
go to catch up with the rest of the
state
This, Scavo said, may reflect a
"two South" scenario "in which
we now have a region composed
of relatively healthy medium
population cities on the one hand
and deteriorating rural areas on
the other
He conceded that the 1987
study did not include problems of
the region's rural areas. But these
will be included in a later study.
"The differences between the
cities indicate that certain areas of
the region are perceived to be
will take advantage of the morato-
rium to continue their evaluation
of alternatives to using dogs as
subjects in two basic science
teaching laboratories. Those alter-
natives could include the use of
computer programs, computer-
We're all affected by noise
Each time I attend a bud concert
my ears ring for a couple of days and
my head feels stopped up; what does
this mean?
Too much noise for long peri-
ods of time, or certain types of
noise for even short periods of
time, can lead to a hearing loss. If
your ears ring for several days this
may mean that you have an
irreversible hearing loss.
Excessive noise is a leading
cause of hearing loss; disease, in-
jury and age are others. Your
hearing is important for three
reasons: learning, communica-
tion and safetv.
Much of our information is
gained from listening. One of the
most important ways of getting
along with others is by spoken
words. Our personal safety is
dependent upon our ability to
hear. Also, we get pleasure from
music, hobbies and sports that
may be dependent on our ability
to hear.
Health Column
By Mary Elesha-Adams
ECU Sfudrni Health Center
Some people are more sensitive
to noise than others, however,
everyone is affected by excess
noise to some degree. Factors that
may increase your likelihood of
receiving hearing loss include
loudness, pitch, length of expo-
sure to a noise, age, previous ear
trouble, distance from the source
of the noise, and the position of
the source (are you standing di-
rectly in front ofan amplifier or to
its side?)
How can I decrease my chance of
devebping a hearing loss?
Have regular professional care
and hearing examinations. Wear
protective equipment such as ear
plugs or earmuffs when working
around machinery or if you plan
to go to a loud concert; make sure
theequipment isin good shape. In
case of an accident or injury in-
volving the ear, seek medical at-
tention.
Take care of your hearing � it
can't be replaced.
ized electronic mannequins or
videotapes.
"We have made the decision to
suspend the use of dogs in these
teaching laboratories to allay any
concern that our students or
members of the general public
may have about this aspect of the
educational program at the East
Carolina University School of
Medicine said Laupus.
Laupus called the basic science
teaching laboratories a "valuable
experience which will prove diffi-
cult to simulate But he stressed
the school's long-standing em-
phasis on seeking alternatives to
use of animal subjects in educa-
tion and research when other
approaches are available and do
not compromise the educational
or scientific objective.
Laupus added that the morato-
rium does not apply to animal
involvement in medical research.
Faculty members at the school are
involved in wide-ranging re-
search programs that employ ani-
mal models, including studies of
diabetes, organ transplantation
and cardiovascular disease.
prosperous and healthy (notably
New Bern and Greenville) while
other areas (Goldsboro) are not
he said.
"These differences should be
reflected even stronger in com-
parisons between the larger cities
of the region and the smaller
towns and rural areas Scavo
said. He said such a comparison is
the next step in the research proj-
ect with surveys of small towns
and rural areas planned next year.
Some evidence for the "two
South" scenario can be found in
Scavo's study, he said. There are
fairly large differences between
the seven cities in terms of the
number of problems cited by the
city officials, whether they think
their city has improved over the
last 10 years, and how satisfied
they were with their city. Percep-
tions of 14 problems were as-
sessed.
City officials in New Bern and
Greenville saw their cities as hav-
ing very few serious problems
while city officials in Wilson and
Goldsboro saw their cities as hav-
ing somewhat more serious prob-
lems.
Perceived city improvement
also varied by city. City officials in
New Bern were unanimous in
saying that their city had im-
proved in the last 10 years while
only 58 percent of the city officials
in Goldsboro and Rocky Mount
said that their cities had im-
proved. Although all cities clus-
tered near the upper end of the
scale of overall satisfaction with
one's city, Goldsboro came in
lowest while New Bern came in
highest.
In the seven city survey, no one
problem dominated the concerns
of city officials but the largest
number were concerned about
economic development (29 per-
cent), unemployment (19 per-
Jones joins school of music
(ECU News Bureau) � Harold
A. Jones, a veteran of 25 years on
the faculty, has been appointed
acting chairman of the instrumen-
tal department in the School of
Music at East Carolina University
and acting director of the ECU
Symphonic Wind Ensemble.
In both capacities, Jones suc-
ceeds Herbert L. Carter who re-
tired last Spring after more than
20 years of service in the School of
Music.
Carter has been appointed as a
part-time visiting professor with
responsibilities in the area of re-
cruiting, Dr. Charles Stevens,
dean of the School of Music, an-
nounced.
Jones, who joined the School of
Music faculty in 1962, has the
academic rank of professor of
percussion and since 1985 has
served also as director of the EC I
Summer Band Camp.
He has been active in many
professional societies, serving as
chair of the N.C. chapter and on
the national board of directors of
the Percussive Arts Society and as
Southern division chair of the
National Association of College
Wind and Percussion Instructors.
He is a columnist for several
professional journals: "The North
Carolina Music Educator "Per-
cussive Notes "NACWPI Jour-
nal "The Percussionist He is a
consultant for Ludwig Drum Co
Chicago; Premier Drum Co Lon-
don; and the Miisic Teachers
National Association. He is an
adiudic.tRjMVOM
throughout the United States and
has performed as an orchestral
and solo player also in the USSR,
England, Roumania and Egypt.
He holds the master's degree
from East Carolina University
and the bachelor of music from
the University of Michigan.
The instrumental department is
one of five departments within
the ECU School of Music and in-
cludes 18 faculty members in the
areas of strings, woodwinds,
brass and percussion.
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cent), poverty (19 percent), ano
education (18 percent).
"These figures are not out of
line with similar sized cities in
other regions of the country
Scavo said.
Levels of satisfaction with the
region's cities is high, he said. On
a scale of one to nine, the officials
rated their cities an overall
average of 6.4, ranging from 7.2 in
New Bern to 5.9 in Goldsboro. In
addition, 75 percent said that
conditions in their cities have
remained unchanged and 10 per-
cent said conditions had wors-
ened.
Scavo pinpointed certain diffi-
culties in making comparisons of
the eastern region with the state as
a whole. Comparing unemploy-
ment rates may be misleading, he
said, since the rest of the state
includes the Research Triangle
which has the lowest unemploy-
ment rate in the nation.
City officials interviewed were,
on the whole, willing to accept
responsibility for the problems
except for those of unemploy-
ment and poverty, Scavo said. He
said 34 percent of the officials
thought that the federal govern-
ment should have responsibility
for poverty problems. Officials
split evenly between the private
sector and federal government as
to who should bear responsibility
for unemployment.
"Most officials think that the
area's problems can be solved
Scavo said. 'This view is also
richer since the officials have
identified specific problem areas
which need to be worked on in
order to better the quality of life
for all eastern North Carolinians
Scavo said.
Scavo's research was supported
by a grant from the Research
Creative Affairs Committee of the
university.
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�te iEaat Olarnltttrcti
Strviif A? �ar Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, cm�
CLAY DEANHARDT, MmmtmtE
ANDY LEWIS, n�. , IAMES RJ McKEE p,
TIM a 1ANDLER, s. e, ANTHONY MARTIN, ������
Joi in Carter, f-�. e� meg Needham, cm,m m�
Shelton Bryant, mike Upchurch, p ��,�,
Debbie Stevens, s, John W. Medlin, m p
October 6,1987
Opinion
Page 4
Gro wth
Happy Birthday ECU
In addition to being homecoming
week for ECU, this week is also a
birthday of sorts.
It was 80 years ago, in October of
1907, that the normal school that
would become ECU was given
clearance by the general assembly of
North Carolina to admit students
and begin classes.
Eighty years.
That doesn't sound very old, espe-
cially when compared to such ven-
erable institutions as Harvard and
William and Mary, but it is still
something to be proud of.
Over the past 80 years, the school
has transformed from that original
normal school to a teacher's college
and then into a full fledged univer-
sity. Suddenly we have a medical
school, master's programs, a re-
spected liberal arts curriculum and
alumni who are making it big in the
real world. At 80 years old, the uni-
versity has come of age.
The signs of the growing strain are
all around us, too. Parking has be-
come a serious problem rather than
a simple nuisance. Student Union
committees are filled to capacity for
the first time in years. Even The East
Carolinian has grown, producing
more pages per week than ever be-
fore.
Perhaps the most tangible sign of
our growth is enrollment figures
which show ECU finally reaching
for the 15,000 mark. Ten years ago
that might have seemed an impos-
sible dream. Today it is a reality.
It is encouraging that we are facing
new growth with new leadership.
Chancellor Richard Eakin has
proven himself a savvy administra-
tor and a fine representative of the
university and seems poised to
move ECU into the 21 st century. The
appointment of new members and a
new chairman to the Board of Trus-
tees is a sign of encouragement and
provides hope that new members
will plan well for the future of the
university.
But a birthday party is about the
past.
ECU's past has been varied and
wonderful. The university has
grown faster than most thought it
would, and, being in the eastern part
of North Carolina, it has had to fight
hard for every break. The addition of
the medical school has brought with
itan increased reputation among the
academic world, and ECU is taking
a strong role in the everyday lives of
eastern North Carolinians.
And that is the most important
role ECU can play. The school motto
is, after all, "to serve and students
must remember that as they leave
school for the real world.
ECU must not rest on the laurels of
the past 80 years, but must instead
work even harder to meet the re-
quirements of its motto and the
demands of its students.
WHAT ARE HIS
CHANCES FOR
88?
Poverty changes the quality of life
O
Russian 'kouLsrte
JCOUEGEHIUiW
Student argues against Bork's seat
To the Editor:
In response to Michcal Hadley's
letter, published Oct. 2.
Yes, Mr. Hadley, everyone is en-
titled to having their own opinions
whether they be liberal or conserva-
tive. I don't think that the controversy
over Bork's nomination concerns
President Reagan's right to further
strengthen his opinions in the U.S.
Government by appointing a Su-
preme Court Judge with political
views similar to his own. He does
have the right to do that. That is not
what many people are having diffi-
culty with.
Perhapsifyou view the nomination
from the point of view of a woman or
minority, you can visualize the prob-
lem more clearly. Since the civil rights
movement and women's movements
began over twenty years ago, prog-
ress for minorities and women has
been an ongoing battle with only a
few victories along the way. An ex-
ample of a couple of the basic rights
which have been attempted to be
obtained are equal pay and the halt-
ing of sexual discrimination in our
, society. The attempt to pass the Equal
Right Amendment in the 70's tried to
tackle these problems. Currently,
Affirmative Action is trying to accom-
plish the same goal. Though Affirma-
tive Action has good intentions, the
possibility of reverse discrimination
is inherent so it remains highly con-
troversial. I'm not writing this letter
to argue the pros and cons of Affirma-
tive Action or ERA because everyone
is entitled to their own opinions.
I mention them to prove a point.
Even if Affirmative Action never
becomes national law, minority
groups and women groups will con-
tinue to fight for equality under
whatever guise necessary. They may
change a few points surrounding
their future policies, but their basic
goal will still be to obtain equality.
Due to legal loopholes in our system,
steps that appear to be major leaps
forward have, in actuality, been a
slowand ardvouscrawl. The nomina-
tion of Bork would not only bring the
slow crawl forward to a halt, but it
would be a step backwards. After all
of the hard earned breakthroughs,
few as they are, that have occurred
over the past 20 years, who is Presi-
dent Reagan to turn the clock back-
wards?
You implied in your letter that since
Reagan won by two landslide victo-
ries, his opinion is a valid representa-
tion of the American public. You
failed to mention the much more re-
cent Democratic turnover in con-
gress. Maybe national opinion has
taken a turn since the 1980 and 1984
presidential elections. A lot has hap-
pened since then and caused
Reagan's popularity ratings to drop.
If you arc a white male, it mav be
easy to forget that not all citizens of
the United States excercise the privi-
leges that you do. Women and mi-
norities can not forget and therefore
will continue to fight for equality.
That is why minority figureheads
such as Shi rev Chisholm, have spo-
ken out and will continuetospeakout
against Bork's nomination.
Tonya Batizy
English
. Senior
Liberal inconsistency
To the editor:
The only consistent thing about
liberals is their inconsistency. They
claim that the U.S. has w right o
determine another government when
speaking of South Africa. They work
for the protection of homosexual
"rights introducing incredible
pieces of legislation that, if made law,
would threaten society as a whole
with exposure to AIDS. Yet they
completely ignore the innocent un-
born by denying them THEIR Consti-
tutionally-stated right-to-life and
thus are instrumental in the slaughter
of millions of perfectly normal,
healthy human beings. They accuse
Christians of trying to force their be-
liefs on others and of censorship.
They themselves, however, through
their contol of the major portion of the
mass media and judicial Supreme
Court activism, force their humanis-
tic religion on the censor the concepts
of God, morality, religion, and the
Christian heritagebackground of
the U.S. from the public schools and
society as a whole. They accuse North
and Poindexter of "shredding" the
Constitution and "going above the
law" to preserve democracy in Cen-
tral America. But they openly en-
dorse liberal judges who, through
judicial activism, shred and distort
the Constitution to get mostly un-
wanted and dangerous decisions
; is
made law. The Boland Amendment
the major piece of legislation that the
liberals accuse North and Poindexter
of disobeying (they, in fact, did not I i
itself unconstitutional because it re-
stricts the President's constitution
ally-given power to implement for-
eign policy.
Liberals talk out of two sides of
their mouths at one time. The above
areonlyafewexamplesoftheirhvpo-
cntical double-standard. When'wiil
the American people wake up?
Justin Srurz
Junior
English
Bork
To the editor:
In its October 1st edition, The East
Carolinian printed a campus forum
letter from an ECU student, Michael
Hadley, supporting the confirmation
of Robert Bork as an United States
Supreme Court Justice. While I share
1 ladlcy's feeling in that respect, I dis-
agree as to whv.
Hadley questions the right of the
Senate to refect a Court nominee
-because of their politkif view
Rather, he feels, a justice shoiridbo
"qualified" in terms of scholarship
and experience "instead of just what
they think on one or two issues
In recent years, the Supreme
Court's decisions have fluctuated
between moderate and liberal views
However, the confirmation of Bork,
as a direct result of his political ideol-
ogy, would tilt the Court to the right,
and shape the Court's decisions
throughout the twentieth centurv. No
one is questioning Bork's credentials,
but rather his stand on such issues as
citizens' privacy, abortion, and af-
firmative action.
Indeed, this particular nomination
is crucial for the American people. In
being so, it requires an answer on the
part of the Senate to Reagan's call for
"statesmanship not partisanship"
and the closest scrutiny possible by
the Senate Judiciary Committee on
Bork's scholarship, experience and
political views.
Stephen T. Parker
Freshman
Political Science
Campus Forum
Emotional scars left in youth never heal
By SALLY BUCKNER
Spatial to Th tmt Camtiaiaa
Maida almost never missed a meal, yet all her life
she was starved.
Because the family lived on a farm when Maida
was growing up, there was always something that
could go on the long board table. In summer, they
could expect fresh vegetables from the garden, and
pears, peaches, and apples�what the worms left�
from the orchard. In mid-winter, however, the diet
could be sparse and very monotonous: yams, dried
beans, salted pork, cornbread.
There were few extras. The larder might be
stocked with preserves and jam, if there had been
money enough for sugar the previous summer. And
if the corps had been good, the Christmas stocking
might feature a rare treat: on orange bulging in the
toe.
Thus the menus were usually basic and lean. But
what food was available kept Reuben Stackleather,
his wife and six surviving children alive until spring
again breathed promise into those Peidmont hills.
So it wasn't pain in the belly that haunted Maida
Stackleather through seventy-eight melancholy
years. It was pain in the heart.
Some of the pain stemmed from low self-esteem.
Hunting, fishing, working the farm, the family could
furnish its own food; and with woods nearby, fuel
wasn't a major problem. But clothes couldn't be
furnished so independently. They cost cash � and
cash was hard to come by.
So it was beg, borrow, hand-me-down, and never
mind the fit or the style so long as the apparel
provided warmth and covered nakedness. Or bleach
the trademark off the muslin flour sacks � and
tougher feed sacks � to obtain cloth for dresses
underclothes, and shirts.
Around home, make-do wardrobes didn'4 matter.
But at school, when Fannie Mae Helm's pretty plaid
skirt flared in the wind and showed a lace-trimmed
petticoat, Maida's envy was instantaneous and
natural. And when the same wind betrayed Maida's
flour-sack petticoat and step-ins, classmates weren't
too tactful to snicker and shout.
The snickers and envy left their mark. A pretty girl
with even features, a smooth, rosy complexion, and
chocolate-bright eyes, Maida could never look at her
reflection and see beauty � just the unstylish figure
that tried to hide itself on the back row at classroom
or church.
Others in the family fared even worse. Medical
help cost cash, too. So teeth decayed and blackened;
scars from the multiple injuries one can get working
on a farm healed naturally � and visibly. One
sister's crossed eyes never got straightened; one
brother's disfigured face never knew a plastic
surgeon's artistry.
But the worst deprivation Maida and her siblings
suffered centered on family security. Reuben Stack-
leather loved his family, wanted to do right by them,
worked to do right by them. But sometimes fate �
drought, hail, flood, blight, frost, the market �
confounded the efforts Reuben (and every member
of the family big enough to walk) put into making a
living.
And then Reuben turned to the whiskey bottle
pat bottle may have brought him minutes of com-
fort, but it meant terror for the family. A peaceable
man when sober, with alcohol and frustration ex-
ploding ,n his blood, Reuben turned violent and
SJ�?2K KlS qUiet W�e without Provocation,
yelling at whoever was within earshot. One particu- I
larly awful night he forced a harness over Maida's
head and commanded her to pull their heavy wagon
around the yard. Her humiliation endured far be-
yond that night m her daughter's tortured memory. l
hJnH'l31"30 and even-
SullZ� 1 th0n,e " �"�� t, indoor i
plumbing,awasiunginachine,aivdafullpantry.But i
MonZVZ.elt PPerous or worthwhile,
blv Ilan!SSion' � Sor wha would .
mow ned Si- ��� Phas- i
signified. Poverty didn't mean just beans every
dimity.threatCned 0ne's safetyone's love, one's
JEL?S! 7Lhavfa8 accumulated over a
an entirely nappy day.
1 " � I I mi
"9X
��0Hm n � � i.
vmmmmm
Changing mascots
'Savage Sa
(CPS) � The University of
North Dakota, responding to
complaints by Native American
students, limited the use of the
school's "Fighting Siou nick-
name and logo Sept 3 and
banned sports cheers that parodv
Native American rituals
Native American students said
t-shirt caricatures of Sioux Indi-
ans sold on campus depict Native
Americans in a negative way The
varsity Bards, a UND choral
group that
warwhoorx
dian dan inl
d as racl
can studentf
UND thuJ
schools in dj
names thai
lound offeni
In recent1
and Stanfon
nickname- tl
replacing thl
Professional society
(ECU News Bureau) Dr
Charles R. Coble, dean of the ECU
School of Education, announced
today the formal establishment of
a School of Education pr �
sional society to network alumni.
faculty, students and th. br ider
education community.
"The Professional Society will
fill a vital role in the future ot the
ECU School of Education
said. He said it is desij i
serve as a catalyst and hd e
reaching" ej
tion betwe
constituent
Citing thj
spotlight th
tion, Coble
pr �
the Sena
both interni
uah
curr
dents
Ex pa ndinl
Martin focuses onfij
YOKOHAMA, Japan (AP)
Gov. Jim Martin told a consor-
tium of scientific researchers in
Japan that cooperative efforts
between countries could provide
the basis for increased research
among nations.
Martin proposed that Japanese
and American scientists coordi-
nate their efforts in collaborative
research ventures, stating that
the best of relations will depend
upon mutual cultural under-
standing and collaborative rather
than exclusive research efforts
He also urged the cooperation
of education, government and the
private sector to encourage the
development of the fifth genera-
tion of computers capable oi pat-
tern recognition and artificial in-
telligence.
As a model for such coopera-
tion, Martin detailed the success
of the Research Triangle Park in
North (arc
Carolina
Ted
"Th-
ship K � j
ment and
and other sv
led to the
technoi
research and
growth in I
in remark!
EDTSarurm
in Japan
Martin, wl
istry with a
ton, address
Yokohama
become the
nor todehvi
Japan The al
by research
and stientn
searach pci
Japanese coi
AL
THI!
WEE
THE 1987 EXHIBIT)
exhibit buildings showin
pride in Agriculture, Induj
Livestock and Educatioi
Twenty buildings in
Eagles Farmstead Mui
our regional pride in our
hibits in each building, sh'
talgia of our area's Family
culture Education & Indi
THE 1987 MIDW
ments of America's giai
motion, mirth, music &
again give Greenville the
way east of Raleigh as
1985 8t 1986 - Bigger than
thrill rides and much, mud
THE 1987 FREE
TIONS�1. On Tues
Fri. & SatDomino's Pij
Coca Cola Bottling Co.
will present Herriotts Euroi
6 Big Days
& Nights
Oct. 5 - Oct. 10th
1987
J





nst Bork's seat
tenc
� law I"he Boiand Amendment,
piece of legislation that the
cum1 North and Toindexter
g (they, in fact, did not) is
unconstitutional because it re-
- the President's constitution-
power to implement for-
v
erals talk out of two sides of
mouths at one time. The above
eu examples of their hypo-
uhietandard When'will
ri an people wake up?
Justin Sturz
junior
English
Bork
j �
ber 1st edition, The East
I a campus forum
student, Michael
'tire the confirmation
rk as an United States
ourt lutice While I share
feeling in that respect, I dis-
si ns the right of the
r � a Court nominee
political views
e should be
terms I scholarship
nstead of just what
r two issues
irs, the Supreme
ns have fluctuated
and liberal views.
nfirmation of Bork,
t his political ideol-
Court to the right,
Court's decisions
� e t wentiethcentury. No
ning Bork s credentials,
- stand on such issues as
�s pr racy, abortion, and af-
vn.
particular nomination
r the American people. In
- � requires an answer on the
x'nate to Reagan's call for
manship not partisanship"
sest scrutiny possible by
! jdiaarv Committee on
- nolarship, experience and
a) views.
Stephen T. Parker
Freshman
Political Science
Forum
er heal
Jure
pom
lical
led;
ung
ne
nc
istic
Pgs
-k-
lem.
Iber
im-
Ible
nan when sober, with alcohol and frustration ex-
ploding in his blood, Reuben turned violent and I
beating his quiet wife without provocation, '
veiling at whoever was within earshot. One particu-
iarlv awful night he forced a harness over Maida's
head and commanded her to pull their heavy wagon
around the yard. Her humiliation endured far be- j
vond that night in her daughter's tortured memory, f
Years later, Maida mained a good man and even- )
tually lived in a home with central heat, indoor j
plumbing, a washing machine, and a full pantry. But �
she never felt either prosperous or worthwhile.
Money became an obsession, not for what it would
buy � she remained frugal her entire life, purcnas- i
ing only what was needed �but for what itsabsence
signified Poverty didn't mean just beans every ,
meal; it meant ridicule. It didn't just threaten one's
diet; it threatened one's safety, one's love, one's
dignity.
She died at 78, having accumulated over a
hundred thousand dollars. But she never achieved
an entirely happy day.
THEEASTCAROtlN IAN
OCTOBER 6,1987
Changing ma
'Savage Sam' and other characters eliminated
(CVS) � The University of
North Dakota, responding to
complaints by Native American
students, limited the use of the
school's "Fighting Sioux" nick-
name and logo Sept. 3 and
banned sports cheers that parody
Native American rituals.
Native American students said
t shirt caricatures of Sioux Indi-
ans sold on campus depict Native
Americans in a negative way. The
varsity Bards, a UND choral
group that closes its shows with
warwhoops and parodies of In-
dian dancing, also has been criti-
cized as racist by Native Ameri-
can students.
UND thus joined several other
schools in dropping mascots and
names that minority groups
found offensive.
In recent years, both Dartmouth
and Stanford dropped "Indians"
nicknames for their sports teams,
replacing them with "Big Green"
and "Cardinal" respectively.
In 1977, Florida State replaced
its "Savage Sam" mascot, a char-
acter dressed up as a Native
American and encouraged to
whoop on the sidelines, with a
Seminole character students
found less objectionable.
Somewhat less successfully, the
University of Mississippi in 1984
formally asked fans to stop wav-
ing Confederate flags and singing
"Dixie" at football games, out of
deference to black students.
At North Dakota, Native
American students generally
supported UND President Tho-
mas Clifford's memo outlining
how he wanted to keep the Sioux
nickname and use more carefully
the school's logo of a geometric
Indian head.
Leigh Jeanotte of UND's Cul-
tural Awareness Committee said
the logo is acceptable as long as
Indians are not depicted as sav-
ages or in other disrespectful
ways, and as long as the Bard's
warwhoops and dancing are out.
The limitations "make for more
campus racial sensitivity
Jeanotte said.
In a poll, North Dakota re-
searcher Dean Schieve found
most Native American students
were offended by t-shirts sold in
the university bookstore that fea-
tured a Sioux logo and depicted
Professional society to play a role in ECU's future
Indians as hunters or warriors,
"not as the doctors or engineers
they're preparing to be While
Schieve doesn't see the shirts as
"blatantly racist he did say they
are "silly and disrespectful
The survey revealed that Na-
tive American students prefer
North Dakota's geometric, styl-
ized, black-and-white logo be-
cause it is "passive and digni-
fied Schieve said.
(ECU News Bureau) � Dr.
Charles R. Coble, dean of the ECU
School of Education, announced
today the formal establishment of
a School of Education profes-
sional society to network alumni,
faculty, students and the broader
education community.
"The Professional Society will
fill a vital role in the future of the
ECU School of Education Coble
said. He said it is designed to
serve as a catalyst and have "far-
reaching" effects on communica-
tion between the school and its
constituencies.
Citing the national and state
spotlight that is focused on educa-
tion, Coble said he feels that the
professional society "will enable
the School of Education to grow
both internally and externally in
the quality of programs serving
current, former and future stu-
dents
Expanding involvement will
enable the School of Education to
provide grants for faculty re-
search, media acquisitions, stu-
dent assistance and the funding
required to bring nationally rec-
ognized educational leaders to
the ECU campus for direct inter-
action with students, faculty and
society members, Coble said.
The acting society president,
Beth Ward, said she anticipates
enthusiastic response through the
growth of active and sustaining
memberships. "The Society's po-
tential for professional growth
and momentum will offer in-
creasing benefits to the School of
Education and it's alumni and
friends Ward said.
Further information on society
memberships may be obtained
from the Office of the Dean,
School of Education, East Caro-
lina University, Greenville, N.C.
27858.
Martin focuses on fifth generation computers, biotechnology
YOKOHAMA, Japan (AP) �
Gov. Jim Martin told a consor-
tium of scientific researchers in
japan that cooperative efforts
between countries could provide
the basis for increased research
among nations.
Martin proposed that Japanese
and American scientists coordi-
nate their efforts in collaborative
research ventures, stating that
the best of relations will depend
upon mutual cultural under-
standing and collaborative rather
than exclusive research efforts
He also urged the cooperation
of education, government and the
private sector to encourage the
development of the fifth genera-
tion of computers capable of pat-
tern recognition and artificial in-
telligence.
As a model for such coopera-
tion, Martin detailed the success
of the Research Triangle Park in
d.
North Carolina and the North
Carolina Board of Science and
Technology founded in 1963.
"The public-private partner-
ship between academia, govern-
ment and industry through these
and other such organizations has
led to the development of new
technology, a stronger climate for
research and healthier economic
growth in the state Martin said
in remarks delivered at 9 p.m.
EDT Saturday, or 10 a.m. Sunday
in Japan.
Martin, who isadoctor of chem-
istry with a degree from Prince-
ton, addressed the researchers at
Yokohama City University to
become the first American gover-
nor to deliver a scientific paper in
Japan. The address was attended
by researchers from that school
and scientific management re-
searach personnel from major
Japanese corporations.
The governor's presentation,
titled "Biotechnological Images
and Public Policy was accompa-
nied by similar talks by professors
at North Carolina State Univer-
sity and Bowman Gray Medical
School.
Martin's presentation was de- W
signed to draw attention to North
Carolina's technical strengths, u
especially in biotechnology and �
microelectronics.
His paper focused on the poten- I
tial application of biotechnology
and biochemistry to the develop- �
ment of fifth generation comput- i
ers capable of pattern recognition
and artificial intelligence.
"The revolution generated by
the new biotechnology offers a i
new horizon for possible solu- .
tions of how to achieve a flexible '
artificial intelligence required for t
the fifth generation of comput-
ers Martin said. "Thisbiochemi-
cal process of pattern recognition
may well solve the problem of
how to design a computer capable
of expressing an expert system
closer to that of human intelli-
gence
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638-B East Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, N.C. 27858
10-6 Monday-Saturday
355-7473
RACK ROOM,
BRANDED SHOES
TAKE AN
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
Open MonSat. 10-9
Sunday 1-6
EXTRA
10 off!
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE I
(EXCEPT AIGNER. NIKE AND REEBOK)
armuboiq
I I I I I I I I I I
ALL
THIS
WEEK
American Legion Agricultural
Truly Eastern Carolina's Greatest Regional Exposition!
OCT. 5th
thru
OCT. 10th
1987
MIMJIMIIII I 11111 111 1111
THE FASTEST GROWING FAIR IN NORTH CAROLINA!
THE 1987 EXHIBITS�Two main
exhibit buildings showing the regional
pride in Agriculture, Industry, Science,
Livestock and Education.
Twenty buildings in the famed W.C.
Eagles Farmstead Museum showing
our regional pride in our past. Many ex-
hibits in each building, showing the nos-
talgia of our area's Family Living in Agri-
culture Education & Industry.
THE 1987 MIDWAY�Amuse-
ments of America's giant Carnival of
motion, mirth, music & memories will
again give Greenville the largest Mid-
way east of Raleigh as it was in 1984,
1985 & 1986 - Bigger than ever with new
thrill rides and much, much more!
THE 1987 FREE ATTRAC-
TIONS�1. On Tues Wed Thurs
Frl. & SatDomino's Pizza and the
Coca Cola Bottling Co. of Greenville
will present Herriotts European Trained
Animal Circus Free To Everyone. 2
shows nightly. Much Circus quality!
2. Commerfords Petting loo & Circus
Menagarie - back by popular demand -
will be showing all week free to all! (Small
charge for elephant and pony rides)
3. Wed. & Thurs. 7:00 P.M. - Jack Kotch
man's new auto thrill show sensation - Hol-
lywood Stunt World along with the great
Monster Crusher - (yes, it will be back) -
free to all at the grandstand!
4. Monday, thru Friday 7:00 P.M. - Folk
Festival on outdoor stage featuring the
nationally known Buck Swamp Kickin
Cloggers - presented by area businesses
Free - Midway entrance.
5. The 1910 Antique Carnival Band
Organ playing every night - all night -
Midway entrance.
GENERAL ADMISSIONS�
Adults $3.00 - Kids free until 6:00 p.m. - Kids
$1.50 at night & Sat.
Mon. Oct 5 and Thurs. Oct 8. These are
wristband nights - a $7.00 wristband gets
you in the gate 8c unlimited rides on the
Midway!
Tues. Oct. 6 Only�This is Coke & Domi-
no's day and night. Get a coupon from
any store where Coke is sold or from a
Domino's Pizza delivery and get a $7.00
wristband for $6.00 after presenting the
coupon at the gate - Covers admission &
unlimited rides!
Sat. Oct. 10�Wristband on sale until 4:00
p.m. honored until 6:00 p.m.
College Night - Thursday Oct. d�ECU
8c Pitt Community College Students
Admitted for $1.50 With Student ID!
Senior Citizens Day - Wed. Oct. 7�All
senior citizens free 1-3 p.m!
ft.
6 Big Days
& Nights
Oct. 5th - Oct. 10th
1987
Pin COUNTY FAIR
Eastern Carolinas Greatest Regional Exposition!
Sponsored by the American Legion Posts of Greenville, FarmviHe I Ayden

ia�aaa�j�����-�� � ��'�. mi.toxii ��
miii arm
f
��.





Till EAST CAROLINIAN
(XTOBER 6, 1987
Classifieds
Monks lo
A
HIXP WANTED
WAITRESS, WAITERS, BANQUET
SERVICE PTRSONNEl COOKS. The
1 loeteUy Inn Greenville is now hinng for
tho above sitions Good working con
ditions, excellent benefits. Applications
being accepted M F 9am 5pm No phone
calls pease. 702 S. Memorial Drive
MAKr gUICK MONEY! Cam $25 to$50
t v.ir buying customer sent to me Call
1 lerb tor details 355 5099
HROPY'S tor men has full time and part
tune sale associates positions, for enthu
siastic, fashion forward individuals Re
tail Clothing experience is required Bet
ter than average starting salary Apply in
person, Brody's Personnel Director,
Carolina East Mall M W 2 4pm
BRODY'S has part time sales asociates
positions tor enthusiastic, out going indi
viduals who enjoy working with young
contemporary unior fashions, Good sal
arv Appi) in person, Brodv's Personnel
Directoi (. arlmj East Mall M-W; 2-
4 pm
A 1 I ADINC CLOTHING RETAILER
needs a full time office associate to work
M F9-6 Individual must be accurate and
iHisvs-s skills m accountingbookkeep-
ing Salary based on experience Good
salary and benefits package Apply in
person oi call tor interview appointment
ludilh C Simon. Brady's Personnel Di
rev-tor M W, 2 4pm 75t 22.24
GREENHOUSE TECHNICIANS
needed tor part time employment Flex
ibJe hours Weekends and after school
( all ri 0879
I AR.N UP ID $5000.00 this school vear
managing on campus marketing pro-
grams tor top national companies, Flex-
ible i'art time hours Musi be a rumor,
senior or gr.id stud.nl Call asnun or
Dee at 1 NHl 592 2121
K)R SALK
ON A TIGHT BUDGE I ?? 1 r our Meal
Deal l4ib hamburger hot roast beef
chick fillet, ot pizzaburgcr with fries and
drink 2 49 Lasagna (or spagetti) with
�silad and garlic bread "onK $3.95 757
0731or75; 1278. FAMOUS PIZZA 10th
and Evans (specials not for delivery).
IS IT TRUE you can buy jeeps for $44
through the U.S. government? C�et the
facts today! Call 1 312 742 1142, Ext 5271-
A
THE FIXX: ECU Student Union is spon
soring the Fixx on October 8th at 8:00pm
in MingesColliseum ECU students$7
TYPING: Term papers. Resume's, Thesis,
etc Cheap Rates (on xerox word proces-
sor) Call Becky 8M to 5:00pm 758 1161
after 5 00pm 752-1321
AIRBRUSH T-SHIRTS & other items pro
fessionally done Custom one of a kind art
work Call Paul 752-2321. Also Ticdyed T
shirts
FOR SALE: Schwinn Cruiser - blue frame;
almost brand new Call 758-9574.
FOR SALE - Freeer & Refrigerator, drver
and range $100 each. Cood condition
guaranteed. Call 74rV2446.
HONDA SCOOTER for sale; low miles,
red 1987, dependable and affordable Call
757-0128.
FOR SALE: 1980 Mazda Rx7, 5 speed, air
conditioning, sun roof, am-fm cassette
stereo For more information contact Lisa
at 758 6731
FOR SALE: 1975 Super Beetle VW Excel
lent condition Owned by an Auto-Me
ehanic $1500.00 Call 7584211 after 7.00
p.m.
FOR SALE: Dance and Exercise Wear at
discount prices. Visit our Body Boutique at
Total Eclipse - 422 Arlington Blvd. 355-
3531.
PROFESSIONAL BUT NOT
EXPENSIVE! Progressive Data Services
offers professional word processing to
students and professionals Term papers,
dissertations, themes, reports and much
more as low as $1 75 per page (Please call
for quote on your project.) Price includes
printing on high qualify bond paper and
spelling verification against a 50,1X10 word
electronic dictionary Ask about our spe
cial offers Coming Soon - LASER PRINT
INC SYSTEM Call Mark at 757 3440 alter
7:00 p.m for free information
WORD PROCESSING letter quality or
laser printing Rush jobs accepted 752
1933.
ELECTROLYSIS (permanent removal of
unwanted hair) by Barbara Venteis People
who understand electrolysis will not wax,
tweeze or use electronic tweezer or any
other temporary method Isn't it time to try
the permanent method Call 830 0962 for
free consultation
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24 hours
in and out. Guaranteed typing on paper up
to 20 hand written pages SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(Beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752
3694
PICK UP AND DELIVERY of term pa
pcrs, theses resumes to be typed IBM
wordprocessing by professional with 13
years experience 1 etter Qulaity print
and professional editing Call Nanette
in Cnfton at 1 524 5241 Cheap call the
best service
FOR RENT
TWO BR IURN1SHF.I). Heat, air &
water included Call lulieat 758 1507 or
Sharon at 355 5706
APARTMENT FOR RENT mmacu
late condition, a block from downtown
and campus Sycamore 1 hi! Apts No
17. Call Scott Patterson in Coldsboro
(735-8376) or Stephen 1 lorne (758 4333)
1 BEDROOM upstairs apartment avail
able October 1 3 blocks from campus
All utilities paid $250per month Lease
& Deposit required 758 1274 alter 5 (XI
pm
RINCCOLD TOWERS: Apts h.r rent
furnished Contact Holiie Simonowich
752 2865
WANTED Roommate or Roommates
to share 2 bedroom apartment at Tar
River Estates. Male or Female Call 752
3032.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Rent $120,
13 utilities 8.30 0067after 9:30p.m.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2 bed
room apt in Eastbrook. $155 mo rent
plus 1 2 utilities Will have own rm
Call 758 4749
PERSONALS
ALRIGHT ADPI, were 22 enough7
I lope you enjoyed all of them Thanks,
Rosina.
MAR STAR: Happy Birthday! You're
finally "Legal at Last" and all that B S
Now for the real birthday news: What
are you doing Oct 23 25? "Can you say
Road Trip?" I low does a visit to-oh, I
don't know a certain college wsome
certain Theta Chi's at their 1 lomecom-
mg sound? (Look out Todd Temple')
Maybe you'll even get a PIECE of
b'day cake. What better way to follow
up Nags Head7 Its a given Love, the
Boat Commander PS - Ooh dat's nicesh!
IF YOU HAVE A SOCIAL let meknow,
you never know what might happen
Rosina.
SHELLEY I ust want to welcome you to
(.amma Sig I hope you will enjoy it as
much as I have Let's have a great year
with fun and surprises Love, "Your Big
Sis"
ATTENTION Save your Homecoming
football stubs & get $2 off any Lg. 2 item
pizza or come in & get 1 free slice at
Rosina's.
SIC; TAU'S, Thanks for the great time at
the lU-er Olympics We really enjoyed it a
lot let's do something together again
real soon. Ixive, ThcCamma Sig's
STUDENTS, ADMINISTRATORS,
TEACHERS Come out to the AOTT
Dunking Booth in front of the Student
store on Wed Oct 7 and dunk your
"favorite" East Carolina student
SIG TAU: You guys are really great! We
didn't know that "Beer Olympics" could
be so mil. h Fun. Can't wait to do it again!
Thanks for a wonderful time! Love,
.amma Sig.
LOOK FOR YOUR PICTURE in the
Rosma's Pic Picture Contest If its you -
win a tree Lg pizza of your choice. Must
claim by next issue.
ALPHA PHIS, Thank you for all your un-
derstanding and support in helping me to
deal with my loss. Thanks especially to
Rhonda my big sis, Lou - my HI sis, and
k.iren mv roomie for my flowers! 1 love
all you guys' Amy.
HEY TRI-SIG GIRLS I promise you
won't get fat. Thanks for ordering from
your Friendly Neighborhood Pizza Place
Rosina's
INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN FEL-
LOWSHIP Please Join Us! Wednesday
Nights at 7:00 pm Speight 129 Fun Food
Fellowship Teaching.
COME AND HEAR the dynamic
speaker, lion Shirley Chisholm, speak
on "Women and Work in America: Then
and Now Monday, October 12th at 8
pm. in Hendrix Theater Tickets are $2
students, $3 faculty staff, $5 public
door Sponsored by: Student Union Fo-
rum Committee.
ATTENTION Don't forget Alpha Xi
Delta's Happy Hour Every Wednesday
night at Pantana's It's the BEST excuse
for missing Thursday's classes!
PI KAPPA ALPHA. The brothers and
little sisters of Pi Kappa Alpha want to
congratulate all the new girls that are
pledging our little sisters, you've joined
the best and we want to thank you
PI KAPPA ALPHA: Football and Pika,
two words that go great together, great
job A & B team See ya ta the next game,
the brothers & little sisters.
AZD PLEDGES: Thanks so much for the
surprise sister party We had a blast, and
we love the Beta's! You guys are too much
- We love you! Love the sisters of AZD
LAMBDA CHI - Thanks for making
Wednesday night at Pantana's a great
success Let's do it again sometime! Love,
the Alpha Xj Delta's.
OCT 1: Thursday night at Rafters: Our
eyes met several times and we even ex-
changed hello's, but we never got a
chance to talk. You wore black pants with
a white shirt and a yellow sleeveless(7)
cardigan. Your friend said your name
was Liz. 1 would really like to meet yoiu
perhaps over lunch? If interested please
respond in personals. Desperately
seeking Liz.
TO THE GUYS IN SUITE 415 SCOTT.
The're some girls on the hill that think
you're real hot. We're saying no names
but it's the truth. We're all semi-desper
ate and a little uncoth. That guy in the
scirocco really makes us drool, but that
swimmer girl you're around is pretty
uncool' FJbo man in the C-string, how
about a fling ding' Ed, oh Ed, you turn us
beet red The man without the shoes,
we're sure you know the nght moves
And the guy with the eyes, when we see
you, we could just die So luss all thos
ugly girls goodbye they haven't a chance,
cause we're standing by Let us dance m
your pants
DELTA SIG. The total toga tab-tearing
fundraising throwdown - featuring
"Nick" was a definite philanthropic
experience Maybe by Halloween the
pledges will be able to hang with the
"boys HACKENDA
ZETA'S: Breakfast was great, the cham
pagne was flowing and heads were spin
ning' 1 low about the Prvs boy?1 Co back
to bed Chip' I lad fun let's do it again
Delta Stgs
HOMECOMING VICTORY PARTV
99 cent pitchers ALL DAY (11-11) Go
Pirates BEAT CONC1NNAT1" Famoui
Pizza Corner 10th and Evans757 0731 or
757-1278
DEAR, DEAR, little Mike, they wouldn't
print what I wanted to write so let me jus)
say I complement you on your comebai
What a literary genius you are' Bet .
were awake all night writing that
Sincerely, The Winches
FRESH AND HOT Call for fas
delivery. (11 am - 11 pm) Buy a
pizza, get a 2 liter coke FREE. Buy a ��,
pizza, get 2 dnnks FREE. Call now
Famous Pizza. 757-1278 or 757 073!
HELL NIGHT Thanks to evervb. i
one heckuva surprise party, you guys �
the best And to everyone at Pantana
Bob's last Thurs night, you onlv �
once, thank Cod The embarras
old
SIG EPS - Don't forget about
tice this Sunday Morning at � �
Milk and Cookies reception to I
KA's: We're glad you won yourgai
we wish you could have been at th s a
sooner1 The punch was doing us
and the clams were almost �
couldn't leave because lirrrr. Buff ��
was plavmg so strong' Let's I
Margantaville again real so i
Chi Omegas
THE FIXX: coming fa E I nOct �
8 p m at MingesoUiseuni �.
$7 00 for FC U students ar : � � � j
others
Announcements
COMMITTEE POSITIONS
Applications are? now being accepted
lor students i : ui� to serve on Uruver-
sit Committees for the 1987-88 school
ar Nineteen student psitions are
open Committees with acancie. are
� DSEd Ad Ik Advisory (1), Alcohol
Drug Ed ' 11 i am assing & Soliciting on
i ampus(l) International Student Affairs
Residence 1 ife (1 oil campus) Resi
;it status .npvals (n. Status ot Minon
ties (2) Student Health Services (2), Ca
reer Ed (1), Continuing Ed 0), Curricu-
lum 2 I acuity Computer (2), General
( otlcg (1), libraries (1). and Teaching
I fiectjveness (1) Applications are avail
able at the following locations Office of
ine Vice Chancellor for Student Life, 204
Whichard Mendenhall; SCA Office,
Mendenhall; and Residence Hall Direc-
tors Offices Questions about University
� ommittees and memberships may be
directed to the Office of the Vice Chancel-
lor tor Student Lite (757-6541)
MADRIGAL DINNERS
Tickets are now on sale for Madrigal
i tinners to Ik- held Dec 2-5 at 7:00 p.m in
Mendenhall Tickets are $10 for ECU stu
dents and Slf for all others. Now is the
time ti) order your tickets, as they always
sell quickly Call the Central Ticket Office
at 757-6611, ext 266.
NEIL SIMON PLAY
I Ought To Be In Pictures, a play by Neil
Simon, will be part of a dinner theatre
production on Thurs Oct. 8, and Fn . (-t.
9 at 6:30 p m in the Mendenhall Audito-
rium Tickets are $10 for ECU students
and $16 for all others Call the Central
Ticket Office at 757-6611, ext 266 for more
info. No tickets will be sold at the door.
SIGMA GAMMA EPSJLQN
"Earth Science Education in the Na
honaJ Parks' will be presented by Dr
Richard I. Mauger, Dept. of Geology, at
2:00 p.m on Fri Oct. 9 m Graham 301
NAVIGATORS
FL1CI IT 730! Come and join us for fun,
fellowship, and Bible Study. Thurs. nights
at 7:30 in Biology 103.
CHISHOLM LECTURE
1 Ion. Shirley Chisholm will be lectur-
ing on "Women and Work in America:
Then and Now The lecture will begin at
8 p.m in 1 lendrix Theatre on Mon Oct.
12th. Tickets are $2 for students, $3 for
facultystaff, and $5 for public and at the
door Tickets are on sale in Central Ticket
Office.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi will have a meeting on
Ott 6 at 7 p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium.
Attendance is required and dues must be
paid by Oct 20.
BIBLE TRANSLATION
Wycliffe Associabes, the lay ministry of
Wycliffe Bible Translators, will soon be
hosting a banquet in this area to celebrate
twenty years of involving lay people in
missions. The banquet will begin at 7:00
p.m. on Oct. 20 at the Sheraton-
Greenville. Tickets are complimentary,
and an offering will be taken. Tickets and
information can be obtained from Larry &
Robin Bass by calling 830-i612. The eve-
ning will feature the sharing of exciting
firsthand experiences from a Wycliffe
missionary, a complimentary dinner,
audiovisual presentation, Christian fel-
lowship, and full details on the many
ways that lay people can become directly
Involved in Bible translation.
NEON EXHIBIT
The Visual Arts Committee is sponsor
ing "The Magic of Neon a Smithsonian
Institute Traveling Exhibition, Sept 28 -
(V1 16 in Mendenhall. Register for over
$200 worth of neon prizes to be awarded.
PI SIGMA ALPHA
Members please attend the meeting on
Thurs, Oct.8 at 5:15 in the Political Sci-
ence Library Finalized plans will be made
for the remainder of the semester.
FRESHMENSOPHOMORES
The Military Science Dept is beginning
its two- and three-year Army ROTC
Scholarship campaign. All students who
are Interested in an Army ROTC Scholar
ship are invited to attend an information
session on Wed , Oct. 7 at 6 p.m. in room
210 Erwin. For further info, call Capt.
Mitchell at 757-6967 or 6974.
AMBASSADORS
The ECU Ambassadors will meet Wed.
at 5:15 p.m. in the multipurpose room at
Mendenhall. 1 lomecoming plans will be
discussed All members are asked to at-
tend
MASSAGE
The Physical Therapy dub will be
sponsoring a Massage Clinic Tues Oct.
13 from 5:30-9:30 Tickets can be pur-
chased from any Physical Therapy stu-
dent ($1 for 10 minutes) or at the door
(SI .25 for 10 minutes). The clinic will be
held at the Allied Health Bldg in the
Physical Therapy Lab.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda will be having a regu
lar meeting Wed, Oct 7 at 3:00 p.m. in
room R.302. Dues are due by Oct. 15.
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Health majors arc encouraged
lo register with the Cooperative Education
office m 312 Rawl.
ORCHESTRA
The Department of University Unions
presents the Tonkucnstler Orchestra of
Vienna on Tuesday, October 1.3th, at 8
p.m. in Wright Auditorium. Featuring the
musice of the Viennese Ballroom Era.
Tickets are now on sale. For further
information, contact the Central ticket
office, Mendenhall Student Center 757-
6611, Ext.266.
SNEAK PREVIEW
The soon-to-be-rcleascd major feature
film "Baby Boom starring Diane Keaton
and Sam Shepard, will be shown tonight
at 8 p.m. in I lendrix Theater. Free L'oreal
Studio hair-care products for those who
attend. Sponsored by the Student Union
Films Committee. No charge.
HANDICAPPED STUDENTS
A recruiter from the US. Dept. of De-
fense will be on campus on Nov. 18 to
interview for summer or permanent em-
ployment. Please contact Caroline Smith,
CoHop Office, 757-6979, for more info.
WRESTLING CLUB
The ECU Wrestling Club will be having
an organizational meeting on Wed Oct. 7
at 530 p.m. in Memorial Gym. An addi-
tional meeting will be held the following
night, same time and place, for anyone
interested who couldn't make it Wed. If
you have interest whatsoever, call Tom
Lcppert at 752-1660 for more info, or just
drop bv the meeting
SNEAK PREVIEW
The soon to be released major film
Baby Boom" starring Diane Keaton and
Sam Shepard will be shown tonight at
8:00 p.m in 1 lendrix Theatre. All those at-
tending will also receive a free L'Oreal
Student hair care product Free admis-
sion
SPAN MEMBERS
The date for our Outward Bound
"Rope Course" has been changed to Sun
Oct. 25th Fee is $10 per member If inter-
ested you must attend the next SPAN
meeting�Wed Oct. 14th, 5:30 p.m. in
Brewster D 2W for briefing Fees also
must be paid at meeting
NTEEXAM
The National Teacher Examinations�
Specialty Area Exams�will be offered at
ECU on Sat, Nov 14. Application blanks
arc to be completed and mailed to the
Educational Testing Service, Box 911-R,
Princeton, N.J 08541. Applications must
be postmarked no later than Oct. 12. Ap-
plications may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Room 105, Speight Bldg.
AHPATEXAM
The Allied 1 lealth Professions Admis-
sion Test will be offered at ECU on Sat
Nov. 14. Application blanks are to be
completed and mailed to the Psychologi-
cal Corp 555 Academic Court, San An-
tonion, TX 78204-0952 to arrive by Oct. 14.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta lambda will meet on Wed
Oct. 7 in Rawl 302 at 3 00 p.m. New
members are still welcome! For Business
and Business Education, Majors'
presents the opening travel adventure
film, Discovering Spain, on Thurs, Oct.
15th, in 1 lendrix Theatre at 8:00 p.m. Tick-
ets for this film arc limited, but still avail-
able. For further info contact the Central
Ticket Office at 757-6611, ext. 266.
THE FIXX
Major Concerts Committee is sponsor-
ing THE FIXX in concert in Minges Coli-
seum Oct 8th at 8:00. Tickets are on sale at
Mendenhall and are $7 for students and
$9 for the general public
BODY FAT ASSESSMENT
You can have your percent body fat
measured (free of charge) in a matter of
minutes. I need Caucasian male subjects
between 18 and 30 years of age for my
thesis research study If you meet these
criteria, please call immediately. All
measurements will be made at the Hu-
man Performance Lab (room 113) in
Minges Coliseum Call Kimberly East-
man Zirkle at 758-2933 Anytime TODAY!
If not there, leave message and call will be
returned ASAP.
SWIM MEET
The Dept. of Intramural-Recreational
Services will be sponsoring the annual
swim meet. Registration will take place at
7p.m. in Bio102. All swimmers arc urged
to participate.
TEACHER ED. MAIORS
The School of Education, in conjunction
with Campus Ministries, is sponsoring a
Work Study trip to Mexico during Spring
Break (March 6-13, 1988). Opportunities
to observe and teach at a local school are
available. A minimum level of "survival"
Spanish is required. For applications and
into, contact the Office of the Dean in
Speight Bldg no. 15. � ��. � �
b i ' toiesggrfj asg-iuq nrlt
The American Marketing Association
is hosting a Faculty Reception in the
mulh purpose room at Mendenhall on
Tues Oct 6 from 430 to 630. All market
ing faculty and A MA members and
guests are invited
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
Would you like to learn some issues
and get involved in helping with current
local elections? Then College Republicans
are for you. Meetings are every Wed. at 7
p.m. in room 221 Mendenhall. Reagan is
cool
RESUME WORKSHOPS
If you need help preparing a resume,
then an evening program is offered at the
Career Planning and Placement Service
on Wed Oct. 7 at 7:00 pjn. The first 20 lo
come will receive workbooks and work-
sheets.
BASKETBALL
Intramural one-on-one basketball will
hold its registration Oct. 7 at 7 p.m. in
Brewster D-103. For more info call 757-
6387. Registration forco-rec water basket-
ball will be held Oct. 7 at 6 p.m. in
Brewster D-103. All faculty, staff, and
students are welcome to participate.
YQLUMIEERS NEEDED
The Pitt County Juvenile Services Res-
titution Program needs volunteers to
supervise and interact with juveniles as
they perform various work activities
within the community. You may volun-
teer any number of hours per week Mon-
day through Saturday. Volunteers need
to be available four to six hours per
month. For further info call 752-1811, ext
419.
ERAit
The- ERASE (Eastern Regtuul AriVS
Support and EdHot � � 'ujilf,
its monthly meeting in Fir : Presbytenan
Church on comer of Elm and 14th at 8
p.m. Tues Oct 6. We will be piar.rung for
the state-wide AIDS Awareneai Week in
Nov If you're interested in A!DS Educa-
tion either call Jerry at 757 J990 or Star at
756-8453 to get info or plan n be
Tues. night.
DJVELCLLB
If you empy scuba diving and snorkel-
ing then you need tojoin ECU sCcrai Reef
Dive Club For more info call iN
and ask for Glenn or Rob
OPERA THEATER
The East Carolina University School at
Music Opera Theater presents an evening
of opera scenes Fri, Oct. 9 and Sat. CX-t 10
at 8:00 p.m. at A.J. Fletcher ReataJ Hall
Free admission.
COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
ECU College Democrats meet ever
Wed. at 4:00 in Mendenhall, room 212
Anyone interested in campaigns for can-
didates for offices at all levels are encour-
aged to attend. For more info , please cal
Melissa at 752 5611
MIDDLE GRADES CI.1H
The first meeting of the Middle Crades
Club will be Oct. 12, 430-5:30, in Speight
201. All middle grades majors are wel-
come.
ACCOUNTINC. SOCIETY
The Accounting Society will meet on
Mori Oct. 12th at 4 p.m. in Mendenhall
Room 244. Representatives from Coopers
and Lybrand will speak. Refreshments
will be served. New members are wel-
come
Greenville is part of Voice of America link
GREENVILLE (AP) � Soaring
up to 450 feet above the tobacco
and corn fields of Pitt County are
the antennas that broadcast
America's voice to the world.
Miles of antenna cable, strung
between giant steel towers, beam
news and entertainment in 31
languages to Europe, the Soviet
Union, the Middle East, Africa
and Latin America.
The Greenville facility, named
for veteran CBS Radio newsman
and Guilford County native
Edward R. Murrow, is the largest
and most powerful of Ihe Voice of
America's 19 transmitting sta-
tions worldwide.
"We get information to people
who don't have access to any-
thing other than what's canned
and given to them said John F.
Moss, station manager since
April. 'It's the broadcast arm of
the U.S. government
The facility will become the
gateway for all overseas feeds
later this year when it gets its own
large satellite dish. For now, in ad-
dition to broadcasting directly to
Europe, Africa and Latin Amer-
ica, the Greenville transmitters
serve as a back-up feed for pro-
gramming to Voice of America
transmitting stations in Europe
and Africa when they lose their
satellite transmission. Those sta-
tions broadcast to places the
Greenville transmitters can't
reach.
"We actually will be relaying
the programs originating from
Washington to the international
satellite system Moss said.
Worldwide, Voice of America
broadcasts in 43 languages, reach-
ing more than 120 million people
a week. Its first broadcast, in Ger-
man, was Feb. 24,1942,�79 days
after the Japanese bombed Pearl
Harbor.
The Greenville facility is mas-
sive. Completed in 1963 at a cost
of more than $23 million, the sta-
tion comprises three sites totaling
more than 6,000 acres. One site
receives microwave signals from
Voice of America headquarters in
Washington where programming
originates; it relays the signals to
transmitters a t the other two site.
Each transmitting site contains
11 transmitters. All are used each
day�including 10 that broadcast
at a power level of 500 kilowatts
and six that broadcast at 250 kilo-
watts. By comparison, commer-
cial FM radio stations in the
United States may transmit at up
to 100 kilowatts, the power output
of most FM stations in the Triad.
Together, the transmitters suck
down most of the station's
$130,000 monthly electric bill �
enough to serve more than 1,100
homes. That accounts for a large
part of the $4.6 million it is ex-
pected to cost to operate the facil-
ity this year.
They're hungry dudes ob-
served Moss, a 59-year-old Iowa
native who has been with Voice of
America since 1962.
Many of the transmitters at
Greenville are large enough to
walk around in. Some tubes used
to ampli'y their signals cost
� i�w iminjnsji
mmm
t
$75,000 each and must be lifted
into place with cranes because
they weigh up to 170 pounds For-
tunately they have a life expec-
tancy of 10,000 hours or more. The
average transmitter is used about
3,000 hours a year.
Voice of America transmitters
broadcast on a high-frequency
range � normally between 6 and
26 megahertz. Thaf s beyond " e
range of standard AM-FM radios
in the United States, but most
radios available in foreign coun-
tries can pick up the signal.
The broadcast languages as
weU as the countries targeted
change with world events. Before
the Shah of Iran was toppled in
1979, for instance, few broadcasts
were aimed at the then-friendly
Middle Eastern nation. After the
hostile Ayatollah Khomeini
seized control, however, broad-
casts to Iran were stepped up.
It takes 90 people � mostly
Civil Service employees � to run
the station, which broadcasts 24
hours a day, seven days a week.
LHASA, Tibet'Af Buddhist
monks at Tibet's three leading
monasteries issued d statement
Monday asking the United Ma-
Hons to support their call for inde-
pendence, and the deah �
a pro-independence dem
tionrose to 12.
"We Tibetans haw asked the
Chinese who haw occupied our
country to leave sa
ment issued by religious leaders
at the Sera. Ganden and Drenunc
monasteries
Madlen Huber, a Swiss tourist
who arrived today r I
Sichuan province whicl �-
Tibet said she saw h r
at the Lhasa airp -� � J.tiv night
and a third this morning Each
carried at least 100 Chinese -
nty troops, she said
Another tourist, Virginia
Burkhead of Charlotte. N also
reported seeing a plar-
troops arrive in Lhasa todav
Plamclothes police pat
Lhasa today and workmen
razing the ruins of the police sta-
tion in the central Jokl
Mexico, Germany, G
Africa are among na
(ECU News Bureau.) � A I
of 93 students from 37 foreign
nations are enrolled at East Caro-
lina University this semester This
figure does not include foreign-
born students who are natural-
ized citizens or permanent resi-
dents of the U.S.
The 14 Malaysians at ECU p
comprise the largest group from Other
ECU School of MedL
for college students ti
Temple s
Thursdav
station an)
smaller i
strati on to
The moj
The Chir
our humar
the Tibetar
ever -
as lea
"TV
lust cause
of human H
-e to
stat.
i ne U(
civil and
Chir -
layan
centuries-d
The Dalai
a failed up!

I
Unit �
Peo:
(ECU School of Media ne) �
Individuals, particularly college
students, troubled by eating dis-
orders are being sought to partici-
pate in a newly established sup-
port group operahng through the
Department of Psychiatric Medi-
cine at tfce ECU School o Medi-
cJfW 'i - - nuti 1 � n
In a supportive environment,
participants will engage in group
discuss: J
underh
disc- lei -
ing efl
be examedj
Hmia, a
individual
then purge
The grot
under the si
Just In
"Classic" Oven
Black, Brown, Twee)
Herring Bone,
150 To Choose
$19.95 to $
CLOTHES
At
The Coin & Ring Mj
10:00-5:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 Sat. 40� S Evans
INSTANT REPL
�One Hour Color Prints
�One Hour Color
Enlargements
�One Hour Wallets
�Video Transfer
�Slides and Black & White
�Film, Cameras, Frames
and Albums
�Passport and Visa Photos
�Studio Photography
r
EC
Ti
FREE
2nd Set
OfPrinti
At time of processing
MM�
EC
FREE
Enlargement
With Purchase
Ot Any EqusJ
Vslue Color
Enlargement
l0-l�-r7 I
Ti
�� ,�. w





A Kt I
about a fling dmg' l:l oh Ed, you turn us
txvt red The man without the shoes
mm re svire you know the nght moves.
And the giv with the ees. when we see
you we could fust die So Wiss all thoe
uglv girl goodbve thev haven't a chance
, just- we re standing bv Let us dance in
.Hit pants
DEI TA SIC: The total toga tab-tearing
fundraising throwdown - featuring
N ?. w a definite philanthropical
iperv Maybe bv Halloween the
ges will tv able to hang with the
- �' HACKENDAJ1
i 1 S Breakfast was great, the cham-
n i- flowing and heads were spin
� .ibout the Pr bov ' Co back
I hip 1 Lui tun let's do it again -
MIc. MCTOIO PARTY
ers VI I DA (11-11) Go
EAT( CINCINNATI Famous
nei I Oth and i vansS7 0731 or
K PI K ttieMike thov wouldn't
w i ! d to write so let me just
implemenl you on v our comeback
. genius you are' Bet vou
ghl writing that one
ESH M' HOT ull for fast, free
I p m.) Buy a large
ke FREE. Buv a small
Innks FREE. Call now
278 or 757-0731.
N � 1 anks to everybody for
- party vou guvs are
everyone at Pantana
- nighl vou only turn 21
od The emban-ased 21 vr
ret about choir prac-
La Morning at 8 00 am
. lues reception to follow
I you won your game but
jve been at the social
inch was doing us wrong
u - were almost gone but we
because Iimmv Butfett
- strong' Let's all go to
Igaill real soon Love the
to ECU on Od 8th at
ps . oluseum Tickets are
students and $3 00 lor all
I;RAS�
k Eastern RefffhMf AriVS
JucatioiV) Group wMXIfd,
in First Presbyterian
i Elm and 14th at 8
- IA e will be planning for
MDS Awareness Week in
terested in AIDSEduca-
II 757-3990 or Stan at
or plan to be there
DIVE CLUB
scuba diving and snorkel-
. eed to join ECU'S Coral Reef
- more info call 752-4399
� " - Clenn or Rob
OPERA THEATER
I st Carolina University School of
- r.i "heater presents an evening
�t.i scenes Fn , Oct 9and Sat Oct. 10
00 p m at AJ. Fletcher Reatal Hall
admission
3ALL
CQLLLGI
CRAJS
�rvices Res-
needs volurte.
: ou may .
t hours per week Mon-
ohinteers need
tour to six hours per
r info, call 752-18
America link
here programming
relays the signals to
it the other two sites
Imithng site contains
Irs All are used each
ng 10 that broadcast
?vel of 500 kilowatts
broadcast at 250 kilo-
pmpanson, commer-
lio stations in the
l may transmit at up
Itts, the power output
Stations in the Triad.
be transmitters suck
of the station's
itiy electric bill �
trve more than 1,100
accounts for a large
�.6 million it is ex-
: to operate the facil-
uingry dudes ob-
a 59-year-old Iowa
is been with Voice of
1962.
Ithe transmitters at
re large enough to
in. Some rubes used
i their signals cost
Tl IF EAST CAROLINIAN DCTOHFP 1987 J
9

C �ge Democrats meet every
I I in Mendenhall, room 2l2.
� rested in campaigns for can-
diet's at all leveLs are encour-
ittend For more info , please call
aaat 752-5611
MIMIE GRAPES�LIZB
The first meeting of the Middle Grades
Club will be Oct. 12, 4.30-5:30, in Speight
201 All middle grades majors are wel-
come
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
The Accounting Society will meet on
Mem , Oct 12th at 4 p m in Mendenhall
Room 244 Representatives from Coopers
and Lybrand will speak. Refreshments
will be served New members are wcl-
:om
$75,000 each and must be lifted
into place with cranes because
they weigh up to 170 pounds. For-
tunately they have a life expec-
tancy of 10,000 hours or more. The
average transmitter is used about
3,000 hours a year.
Voice of America transmitters
broadcast on a high-frequency
range � normally between 6 and
26 megahertz. Thaf s beyond e
range of standard AM-FM radios
in the United States, but most
radios available in foreign coun-
tries can pick up the signal.
The broadcast languages as
well as the countries targeted
change with world events Before
the Shah of Iran was toppled in
1979, for instance, few broadcasts
were aimed at the then-friendly
Middle Eastern nation After the
hostile Ayatollah Khomeini
seized control, however, broad-
casts to Iran were stepped up.
It takes 90 people � mostly
Civil Service employees � to run
the station, which broadcasts 24
hours a day, seven days a week.
Monks
SLsSJLTrJ2 SsVC- and loo.cd .he
monasteries issued a statement
Monday asking the United Na-
tions to support their call for inde-
pendence, and the death toll from
a pro-independence demonstra-
tion rose to 12.
"We Tibetans have asked the
Chinese who have occupied our
country to leave said the state-
ment issued by religious leaders
station and stoned police. A
smaller independence demon-
stration took place Sept. 27.
The monks' statement read:
"The Chinese have taken away
our human rights for 30 years but
the Tibetans will continue to for-
ever recognize (the) Dalai Lama
as leader.
"The U.N. should support our
i��K�c r j � TZJ� me u.iN. mkhiiu support our
morr Drepung just cause and we hope the lovers
monasteries
Madlen Huber, a swiss tourist
who arrived today in Chengdu,
Sichuan province, which borders
Tibet said she saw two jets arnve
at the Lhasa airport Sunday night
and a third this morning. Each
carried at least 100 Chinese secu-
rity troops, she said.
Another tourist, Virginia
Burkhead of Charlotte, N.C also
reported seeing a planeload of
troops arrive in Lhasa today.
Plainclothes police patrolled
Lhasa today and workmen began
razing the ruins of the police sta-
tion in the central jokhang
of human rights will come to Tibet
to see for themselves said the
statement, written in Tibetan. A
copy of it was obtained by The
Associated Press and translated
by Tibetan sources.
The Dalai Lama was Tibet's
civil and religious leader until
China annexed the remote Hima-
layan region in 1950, enforcing a
centuries-old territorial claim.
The Dalai Lama fled in 1959 after
a failed uprising by his support-
ers, and has since lived in India.
Sera monks made up the major-
ity of those killed, wounded and
arrested in Thursday's protest,
which involved at least 2,000
people.
But Western physicians visiting
Lhasa as tourists said victims in-
cluded an 8-year-old boy shot in
the back, a 25-year-old man shol
in the chest, a 16-year-old boy shot
in the face and a monk shot by
officers in the police station. They
said two other monks were killed
but did not give details.
"The death toll is definitely
more than that said Dr. Blake
Kcrr of Buffalo, NY one of two
Americans detained briefly by
Lhasa police last week for dis-
playing Tibetan flags on their
luggage.
Kerr and John Ackerly of Cam-
bridge, Mass remained in Lhasa
today. The U.S. Embassy in Bei-
jing said they were detained for a
few hours and had their passports
taken for several days.
Tibetan sources told the AP that
six monks seriously wounded by
gunshot were in the Lhasa
People's Hospital, but were not
receiving treatment. The sources,
speaking on condition of ano-
nymity, quoted one monk as say-
ing that he was happy because he
knew ho had killed two Chinese
police.
Dozens of people were known
to have been arrested, but no firm
estimate could be obtained.
In Beijing, an official in the
COmmunist Party's International
Liaison Department reiterated
that Tibet is "a sacred part ol
China
'Hew (Deadlines for
Classifieds and
Announcements
For Tuesdays paper: Friday at
4:00 p.m.
For Thursdays paper: Monday
at 4:00 p.m.
"Mo T-xccptions Tltas
SP0RTSW0RLD
Every Tuesday-
College Night
from 8:00 to 11:00
$1.50 with college I.D.
.50$ sk - rental
SPORTSWORLD
104 E. RedbanksRd.
756-6000
Mexico, Germany, Cameroon, Kuwait, South
Africa are among nations represented at ECU
(ECU News Bureau) � A total
of 93 students from 37 foreign
nations are enrolled at East Caro-
lina University this semester. This
figure does not include foreign-
bom students who are natural-
ized citizens or permanent resi-
dents of the U.S.
The 14 Malaysians at ECU
comprise the largest group from
any of the foreign nations.
Six students are from India. The
United Kingdom, Canada and the
People's Republic of China are
each represented by five students.
Represented by at least three
students are Greece, Jordan, Iran,
Taiwan, Korea, Norway and Ja-
pan.
Other nations represented this
semester are France, Germany,
Venezuela, Costa Rica,
Cameroon, Kuwait, the United
Arab Republic, South Africa,
Thailand, Hong Kong, Togo, Ber-
muda, Honduras, Colombia,
Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, In-
donesia, Pakistan, Bangladesh,
Singapore, Chile, Peru, Brazil and
Mexico.
ECU School of Medicine offers support group
for college students troubled by eating disorders
(ECU School of Medicine) �
Individuals, particularly college
students, troubled by eating dis-
orders are being sought to partici-
pate in a newly established sup-
port group operating through the
Department of Psychiatric Medi-
cine at the ECU School oi Medi-
felMfctto" M-
TV
In a supportive environment,
participants will engage in group
discussions aimed at determining
underlying reasons for eating
disorder behavior and develop-
ing effective ways of coping with
it. While all eating disorders will
be examed, the focus is on bu-
limia, a behavior in which the
individual eats, excessively and
then purges themgested food.
The group will meet weekly
under the supervision of Dr. Mi-
chael Rainey and Dr. Julie Orli.
For futher information about
the group, contact the Depart-
ment of Psychiatric Mecicine at
551-2404. AH inquiries will re-
main confidential.
afteen
Women's FIRST QUALITY
Sportwewar always 35 to 70
of suggested retail price.
-Columbus Day Sale
20 off
already low: Outlet Prices
on Selected fall merch.
4-days Only!
Oct. 9,10,11,12
Fashionable Knit Coordinates
skirts, tops, slacks and
SWEATERS
Always unadvertised specials
Made in U.S.A.
Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
756-0484
Mon. - Sat.
10-9
Sun. 1-6
Just In
"Classic" Overcoats
Black, Brown, Tweed, Blue,
Herring Bone, Etc.
150 To Choose From
$19.95 to $49.95
c
JHE CLOTHES MAM
At
The Coin & Ring Man
10:00-3:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 Sat.
400 S. Evans
752-3866
INSTANT REPLAY
�One Hour Color Prints
�One Hour Color
Enlargements
�One Hour Wallets
�Video Transfer
�Slides and Black & White
�Film, Cameras, Frames
and Albums
�Passport and Visa Photos
�Studio Photography
EC
FREE
2nd Set
OfPrinti
Tec
I
I
J At time of processing
� lO-lS-ST
FREE
Enlargement
With Purchase
Of Any Equal
Value Color
Enlargement
aayiro 1S-1S-S7
FREE
Developing
$1.99 Value
DmbHtMM
f&rtuKtu
TUXBRANDOS
�'�
?atflI
i
f7?iM
i ; (' i .iih'no r h i, �)
331
THE BRANDOS
Honor Among Thieves Simple Things
Take a socxi doee of uitar-laeed With a new, all-electric sound, this
roots rook. Add hard-hitting lyrics legendary symbol of tho Woodstock
filled with prrit and wit. Mix in generation takes his music into
four eruys dressed in black. JC � die future, blending an unmis-
And you've got one of the
truly great rook 'n' roll
debuts of the year!
Includes "Xiottysburg
3k takable voice and style with
f thoroughly modern
rhythm and blues.
Includes "Drtvtn
On Sale Through Oct. 14
The latest findings in music and video
THE PLAZACAROLINA EAST MALL
W I





THE EAST CA ROL IN IAN
OCTOBER 6.1987
hrviruv
It R
douse you
erins (torn
s m
�boul a rting ding' Ed oh Ed. you turn us
bed rod The man without the shoes
we re sure you Wnow the right moves.
And the guv with the ees, when we see
vi'u we oould just die So kiss all thos
ugly girls goodbye they haven't a chance
, juse we re standing hv Let us dance in
wnir pants
PH TA Sit; The total toga tab-teanng
tunduising throwdown - featuring
Nick w.is a definite philanthropical
experience Mavhe by Halloween the
, es will be able to hang with the
, HACkFMM?!
l!s Breakfast was great, the cham-
pagne - a flowing ami heads were sptn-
t low .irsiut the Prys boy" Go back
�i Chip' I lad fun let's do it again
HOMECOMING
99 cenl pit' hers
VICTORY PARTY
�ML DAY ill 11) Go
c INN ATI "Famous
and rvans7S7-07l or
'UK DEAR, little Mike thoy wouldn't
anttl to write so let me just
you on y our comeback
�nius vou are' Bet vou
i�.ht writing that one
HOT v all for fast, free
11 p mBuy a large
ltd k�-FREE. Buy a small
: rtks FRFE. Call now -
757 12 78 or 757 0731
inks to everybody for
party, vou guvs are
r i everyone at Panfana
rs night, vou only turn 21
si The embarrased 21 vr
� forget about choir prac-
a) Morning at 8 00 am
ties reception to follow
won your game but
ave been at the social
inch was doing us wrong
were almost gone but we
because Iimmv Buffett
� strong' Let's all go to
igain rial sKn Love the
ECUonOd 8th at
iseum Tickets are
and00 for all
&ELBALL
rKtBh NE�I2�P
j uvenile Services Res-
needs volurteers to
n
rs per week Mon
day v ihmteerc need
:iur to su hours per
info, call 7 -
America link
� here programrrung
relays the signals to
la t the other two site.
Imitting site contains
Vs. All are used each
ling 10 that broadcast
?vel of 500 kilowatts
?roadcast at 250 ktlo-
mparison, commer-
lio stations in the
i may transmit at up
Itts, the power output
stations in the Triad.
the transmitters suck
R of the station's
Inthly electric bill �
prve more than 1,100
I accounts for a large
i.6 million it is ex-
to operate the facil-
tungry dudes ob-
, a 59-year-old Iowa
is been with Voice of
1962.
the transmitters at
re large enough to
; in. Some tubes used
their signals cost
hRAS�
Iie LKAbfc Eastern RegtttUl MD9
)) e,roup wa!hi�S
i n First Presbyterian
I Bm and 14th at 8
� � a e will be planning for
wide AIDS Awareness Week in
. MedinAIDSEduca-
err) at 757-3990 or Stan at
or plan to be there
DIVE CLUB
scuba diving and snorkel-
ou need to pin ECU'S Coral Reef
� more info, call 752-4399
tin or Rob
QPHRAItiEAIEB
1st I arolina University School of
pera "neater presents an evening
v enes Fn , Oct 9 and Sat Oct. 10
m as A.J Fletcher Reatal Hall
: tssaon
COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
ECU College Democrats meet every
j' 4 X ;n Mendenhall, room 212.
terested in campaigns for can-
� ff ices at all levels are encour-
i '� nd For more info , please call
sa a; 752 5611
The fust meeting of the Middle Grades
Club will be Oct 12, 4:30-5:30, in Speight
Ml middle grades majors are wel-
come
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
The Accounting Society will meet on
Mon , Ocl 12th at 4 p m in Mendenhall
Room 244 Representatives from Coopers
and Lybrand will speak. Refreshments
will be sen New members are wel-
come"
W1
I
$75,000 each and must be lifted
into place with cranes because
they weigh up to 170 pounds. For-
tunately thev have a life expec-
tancy of 10,000 hours or more. The
average transmitter is used about
3,000 hours a year.
Voice of America transmitters
broadcast on a high-frequency
range � normally between 6 and
26 megahertz. Thafs beyond e
range of standard AM-FM radios
in the United States, but most
radios available in foreign coun-
tries can pick up the signal.
The broadcast languages as
well as the countries targeted
change with world events. Before
the Shah of Iran was toppled in
1979, for instance, few broadcasts
were aimed at the then-friendly
Middle Eastern nation. After the
hostile Ayatollah Khomeini
seized control, however, broad-
casts to Iran were stepped up.
It takes 90 people � mostly
Civil Service employees � to run
the station, which broadcasts 24
hours a day, seven days a week.
Monks
moa,T'blr-(sAthrBrddHhiSt TemPIe uare Protcsrs �"
Monday asking the uSedTrS T T A
tinnsinonnK un"ea Na- smaller independence demon-
hons to support their call for inde- stration took place Sept 27
r"leandihedeat.ht�from Tnc monks' statement read
which involved at least 2,000
people.
But Western physicians visiting
Lhasa as tourists said victims in-
cluded an 8-year-old boy shot in
pro-independence� dc'rnonst�' "tITX"0" llcm?m reaa: the back, a 25-year-old man shot
nrosetoT2 aern�nstra- The Chinese have taken away in the chest, a 16-year-old boy shot
our human rights for 30 years but in the face and a monk shot by
the Tibetans will continue to for
tion
"We Tibetans have asked the
Chinese who have occupied our
country to leave said the state-
ment issued by religious leaders
at the Sera, Ganden and Drepung
monasteries.
Madlen Huber, a swiss tourist
who arrived today in Chengdu,
Sichuan province, which borders
Tibet said she saw two jets arrive
at the Lhasa airport Sunday night
and a third this morning. Each
carried at least 100 Chinese secu-
rity troops, she said.
Another tourist, Virginia
Burkhead of Charlotte, N.C also
reported seeing a planeload of
troops arrive in Lhasa today.
Plainclothes police patrolled
Lhasa today and workmen began
razing the ruins of the police sta-
tion in the central Jokhang
ever recognize (the) Dalai Lama
as leader.
"The U.N. should support our
just cause and we hope the lovers
of human rights will come to Tibet
to see for themselves said the
statement, written in Tibetan. A
copy of it was obtained by The
Associated Press and translated
by Tibetan sources.
The Dalai Lama was Tibet's
civil and religious leader until
China annexed the remote Hima-
layan region in 1950, enforcing a
centuries-old territorial claim.
The Dalai Lama fled in 1959 after
a failed uprising by his support-
ers, and has since lived in India.
Sera monks made up the major-
ity of those killed, wounded and
arrested in Thursday's protest,
officers in the police station. They
said two other monks were killed
but did not give details.
"The death toll is definitely
more than that said Dr. Blake
Kcrr of Buffalo, N.Y one of two
Americans detained briefly by
Lhasa police last week for dis-
playing Tibetan flags on their
luggage.
Kerr and John Ackerly of Cam-
bridge, Mass remained in Lhasa
today. The U.S. Embassy in Bei-
jing said they were detained for a
few hours and had their passports
taken for several days.
Tibetan sources told the AP that
six monks seriously wounded by
gunshot were in the Lhasa
People's Hospital, but were not
receiving treatment. The sources,
speaking on condition of ano-
nymity, quoted one monk as say-
ing that he was happy because he
knew he had killed two Chinese
police.
Dozens of people were known
to have been arrested, but no firm
estimate could be obtained.
In Beijing, an official in the
Communist Party's International
Liaison Department reiterated
that Tibet is "a sacred part of
China
Ceu 'Deadlines for
Classifieds and
Announcements
For Tuesdays paper: Friday at
4:00 p.m.
For Thursdays paper: Monday
at 4:00 p.m.
r0 Exceptions jQgfia
SP0RTSW0RLD
Every Tuesday-
College Night
from 8:00 to 11:00
$1.50 with college I.D.
.50$ skate rental
SPORTSWORLD
104 E. Redbanks Rd.
756-6000
Mexico, Germany, Cameroon, Kuwait, South
Africa are among nations represented at ECU
(ECU News Bureau) � A total
of 93 students from 37 foreign
nations are enrolled at East Caro-
lina University this semester. This
figure does not include foreign-
born students who are natural-
ized citizens or permanent resi-
dents of the U.S.
The 14 Malaysians at ECU
comprise the largest group from
any of the foreign nations.
Six students are from India. The
United Kingdom, Canada and the
People's Republic of China are
each represented by five students.
Represented by at least thr�?
students are Greece, Jordan, Iran,
Taiwan, Korea, Norway and Ja-
pan.
Other nations represented this
semester are France, Germany,
Venezuela, Costa Rica,
Cameroon, Kuwait, the United
Arab Republic, South Africa,
Thailand, Hong Kong, Togo, Ber-
muda, Honduras, Colombia,
Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, In-
donesia, Pakistan, Bangladesh,
Singapore, Chile, Peru, Brazil and
Mexico.
ECU School of Medicine offers support group
for college students troubled by eating disorders
(ECU School of Medicine) �
Individuals, particularly college
students, troubled by eating dis-
orders are being sought to partici-
pate in a newly established sup-
port group operating through the
Department of Psychiatric Medi-
cine at the ECU School ot Medi-
�tve
TV
In a supportive environment,
participants will engage in group
discussions aimed at determining
underlying reasons for eating
disorder behavior and develop-
ing effective ways of coping with
it. While all eating disorders will
be examed, the focus is on bu-
limia, a behavior in which the
individual eats excessively and
then purges theyngested food.
The group will meet weekly
under the supervision of Dr. Mi-
Just In
"Classic" Overcoats
Black, Brown, Tweed, Blue,
Herring Bone, Etc.
150 To Choose From
$19.95 to $49.95
CLOTHES
At
The Coin & Ring Man
10:00-5:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 Sat. 400 s Evans
752-3866
. INSTANT REPLAY
�One Hour Color Prints
�One Hour Color
Enlargements
�One Hour Wallets
�Video Transfer
�Slides and Black & White
�Film, Cameras, Frames
and Albums
�Passport and Visa Photos
�Studio Photography
EC
FREE
2nd Set
Of Print
T
EC
. At ttme of processing ,
� �� �iii& � �� I
FREE
Enlargement
With Purchase
Of Any Equal
Value Color
Enlargement
WMl�lMT
FREE
Developing
$1.99 Value
FatbckM
IknltHi k Priit�4
10-11
chael Rainey and Dr. Julie Orli.
For futher information about
the group, contact the Depart-
ment of Psychiatric Mecicine at
551-2404. All inquiries will re-
main confidential.
leeii
Women's FIRST QUALITY
Sportwewar always 35 to 70
of suggested retail price.
-Columbus Day Sale
20 off
already low: Outlet Prices
on Selected fall merch.
4-days Only!
Oct. 9,10,11,12
Fashionable Knit Coordinate?
skirts, tops, slacks and
SWEATERS
Always unadvertised specials
Made in U.S.A.
Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
756-0484
Mon. - Sat.
10-9
Sun. 1-6
THE BRANDOS
Honor Among Thieves
Take a gcxxl dose of guitar-laced
roots rook. Add hard-hitting lyrics
filled with grit and wit Mix in
four guys dressed in black.
And you've got one of the
truly groat rock n' roll
debuts of the year!
Includes Tirttysbitrg
RICHIE HAVENS
Simple Tnincps
With a new,all-electric sound, this
legendary symbol of the Wtxxlstoek
generation takes his music into
Ajpl A the future, blending an unmis-
rV takabie voice and sty le with
thoroughly modern
rhythm and blues.
Includes "Tt'?ri
On Sale Through Oct. 14
The latest findings in music and video
THE PLAZACAROLINA EAST MALL
�tf�i!iaMtai






8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER
M987
Georgann Athanelo
Alpha Omicron Pi
'
Paige Barber
Carrett Hall

�v
Kelly Harper
White Hall
Lisa Pergerson
Alpha Delta Pi
kmm jfw� ��� imwwpim.li
Maria Bell
Panhellinic Council
Wanda Battle
Sigma Gamma Rho
Kimberly Hines
Gosper Choir
Kathleen Heister
Belk Hall
Kathy Rattary
Beta Theta Pi
Ellen Proia
Greene Hall
in mn� tmm
���� - -
Christy Bennett
Alpha Phi
f
Noel Hogan
Lamda Chi Alpha
Maggie Rudd
Clement Hall
"Wiii�iwm'w mm�i�t��yi
Ramona Brady
Day Representative
if
i
Julie Brogan
Chi Omega
Cat
Pi
E
Heiftier Hooks
TaV�aipYflo
Kris Kelly
� 11
Laura Salazar
The East Carolinian
I I
Yvette Smithey
Alpha Sigma Phi
V





A
i
A
Kamonj Rrady
Pj Representative
v
Mf
heather Hooks
Laura Saiazar
The Hast Carolinian
I iudd
err.ent Hall
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 6,1987 9
t f
i- -vA
Julie Brogan
Chi Omega
Camille Cox
Pi Kappa Phi
E
Kris Kelly
Wendy Croom
Alpha Xi Delta
Joyce Daniels
Zeta Tau Alpha
Nikki Malhmood
Delta Zeta
Natalie Moore
Sigma Sigma Sigma
Paulette Dupree
Cotten Hall
Maxcie Green
LSS Society
Ginger Payne
Phi Kappa Tau
All photos provided by the ECU Homecoming Steering Committee
�wrp,
1
A
1





IHI i-ASTi'AROt INIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 6, 1W7 Page 10
onkeunst
Mountaineers
i
Tough going
The Pirate running
backs did not have
much room to run
against West Virginia
Saturday. In top
photo, Pirate full-
backAnthony
Simpson is wrapped
up by the Mountain-
eer defense, while
Reggie McKinney
(bottom photo) is
shown trying in vain
to get yardage
against the Mountie
(Photos by Elbert Kennard - ECU
Sports Information)
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport Editor
MORGANTOWN, W. Va. - Mis-
takes once again told the story for
East Carolina as the Pirates fell to
West Virginia 49-0 Saturday.
The Pirates' demise in the contest
began with 5:18 to play in the first
quarter. After driving from its own
37, sparked by a 36-yard run by full-
back Anthony Simpson, ECU
moved to the Mountaineer 20 set-
ting up Chuck Berleth for a 37-yard
field goal attempt.
The kick was wide, however,
sending the Pirates away empty-
handed.
West Virginia then drove 80-
yards to grab the early lead. The
touchdown drive was capped off by
a 31-yard pass from Major Harris to
Phillips.
The Pirates threatened again
midway through the second quar-
ter. Quarterback Travis Hunter
hooked up with Walter Wilson for a
43-yard pass completion to set the
tone of the drive.
Facing a third-and-3 at the Moun-
taineer 19-yard line. Hunter was hit
by Theron Ellis while attempting to
pass. The result was an interception
and 84-yard touchdown sprint by
Bo Orlando. Charlie Baumann's
PAT put the Mountaineers in con-
trol 14-0.
ECU'S trouble continued when
Hunter fumbled on the second play
of the Pirates next possession, again
following a hit by Ellis. Brad Hunt
recovered for West Virginia at the
ECU 21.
Six plays later, Harris found Har-
vey Smith in the comer of the
endzone for a 21-yard touchdown
pass. Baumann's PAT gave West
Virginia a 21-0 lead, which it held at
halftime.
"It definitely turns the game
a round when you ha ve a better pass
rush, make some sacks, get some
balls, make some interceptions -
that just rums the game around
said Hunt.
I think big plays like that can
make a difference and they defi-
nitely made a difference today
The Pirates, now 2-3 for the sea-
son, threatened again early in the
third quarter, driving from their
own 33 to the Mountaineer 32. But
on fourth-and-1,Denell Harper was
stopped short of the first down
marker, giving the Mountaineers
possession.
"The blocking just simply broke
down on that play explained Pi-
rate head coach Art Baker.
West Virginia, which improved
to 2-3 with the win, took advantage
of the missed ECU opportunity,
driving 68 yards in 10 plays with
Undra Johnson's 4-yard run for the
touchdown putting the Mountain-
eers ahead 28-0 with 7:41 to play in
the third quarter.
The next Pirate miscue came onlv
minutes later when punter Craig
Losito shanked a 10-yard punt giv-
ing the Mountaineers the ball at the
Pirate 46.
Four plays later Johnson tacked
on his second touchdown of the day
with a 9-yard burst. Baumann's
point after made it 35-0 with 4:25 left
in the third quarter.
"I was happy to get in the ball-
game said Johnson, who tallied 99
yardson 16 carries after being called
on to replace an injured Eugene Na-
poleon. "1 think our showing today
should give the offense a lot of con-
fidence
The Mountaineers were set up for
another scoring drive following a
26-yard punt by Losito, which gave
them possession at the ECU 48.
Harris took care of the work for
the next score, as he went in on a 17-
yard bootleg run on a fourth-and-
one situation. Following the point
after, the Mountaineers led 42-0
with 14:31 left in the game.
After a desperation fourth-and-4
play by the Pirates failed midway
through the final period, West Vir-
ginia backup quarterback Ben Reed
led the Mountaineers on their final
scoring romp of the day, anil -play,
56-yard drive, which was capped
by a 6-yard run by Aaron Evans.
Following his worst loss at the
Pirates' helm, a distraught Baker
blamed missed opportunities for
the loss.
"You have to give West Virginia
credit said Baker. "They had been
turning the ball over in previous
games, but they came in here today
and took advantage of their oppor-
tunities and we didn't.
"We had the opportunity to get in
the game early and we didn't. I
think after we failed on that fourth-
and-1 play that it told the talc for our
team for the rest of the game con-
tinued Baker. "1 think that is when
our players felt like they were out of
it (the game).
"I was embarrassed -ind the
coaches were embarrassed about
the way we played. In most jobs,
when you have a bad day you can
go and tuck your tail and hide, but 1
have to face up to the loss and talk
about it It isn't easy
"This was one of those days when
everything went right for us West
Virginia coach Don N'ehlan said
after the Mountaineers first shutc
in two years. 'This team was on the
verge of exploding and today it
did
West Virginia had lost the ball 19
times in its first four games, but it
played nearly perfectly Saturday
The two fumbles that did occur
bounced right back to the Mounties
"Had we been able to do that (in
losses to Ohio State, Maryland and
Pittsburgh), they would have
turned out a little bit differently
Nehlan said.
The win was the Mountaineers
biggest margin of victory since a 55-
3 romping of Ohio University in
1983. For the Pirates, it was' the
worst defeat in six seasons
And, to make matters even worse
for the Pirates, they have still yet to
score a touchdown in Morgantown
in three games.
"It exploded said Hunt "We've
been plaing pretty good ball. We
just weren't sure when the offense
was going to click. Today it just
Cross country teams fare well
Nance Mize named to IRS post
y .M i pi ical educa-
tion and recreation specialist with
nine years of experience at East
Carolina University, has been ap-
pointed director of the department
of Intramural-Recreational Serv-
ices.
K - ��: � intment, which was
effective Sept. 28, was announced
by Dr. Elmer Meyer Jr vice chan-
cellor for Student Life. She was
chosen after a national search for a
new director to succeed Stephen 1.
Cohen, who resigned, Meyer said.
"We are all happy to have Nance
Mize as the new director Mover
said. "She has the background here
at East Carolina University and
elsewhere to do a fine job in one of
our most important departments
which serves primarily students
but also faculty and staff
The Texas-bom Mize holds de
grees in health, physical education,
recreation and exercise physiology
from Texas Woman's University,
Den ton, Texas. Previously associate
director of the department, she be-
came acting director last June when
Vollevballers second
O 'hen resigned to take a position at
C. Wesleyan College.
She is a former director of intra-
murals services at Pittsburg State
University, Pittsburg, Kansas, from
1971-1974, and at Sam Houston
State University, Huntsville, Texas,
from 1975-1978. She came to East
Carolina in 1978 as a lecturer in the
Nance J. Mize
Department of Health, Physical
Education, Recreation and Safety
and also as assistant director of in-
tramurals in the Division of Student
Life.
She served for one year, 1985, as
director of the Greenville Athletic
Club and had served as physiology
technician, fitness instructor and as
corporate fitness consultant to the
club in 1983 and 1984.
Her responsibilities in the intra-
murals department have included
planning, administering and super-
vising the departmental programs
including men's, women's and co-
recreational intramural sports ac-
tivities, informal recreation, club
sports, physical fitness programs,
outdoor recreation, non-credit in-
structional classes, sports care serv-
ices and recreational services for
handicapped students.
Additional administrative duties
have included formulating and im-
plementing program policy,
budget administration and man-
agement, program and staff super-
vision and evaluation.
East Carolina's women's cross
country team grabbed first place in
a three-team meet hosted by Lyn-
chburg, Va. College over the week-
end, while the men's squad fell to
the hosts.
Pirate runner Kim Griffiths gar-
nered first place in the women's
race with a time of 21:18. Bibi Ross
finished second at 21:27, while
Dawn Tillson, fourth overall in the
race, was the third fastest Pirate
with a clocking of 21:40
Other times for the women's
squad included Terri Lynch, eighth
overall, with a time of 22:37; Kim
Abernathy, 11th place, 23:48 and
Kathy Ellis, who placed in the 15th
position with a time of 25:12. across the finish l.ne with a time of
Rob Rice led the men's runners 29:15, which placed him in sixth
place overall. Mike McGchcc was
next for the Pirates, seventh overall,
with a time of 29:27. Rusty Wil-
liams, eighth place, and Rusty
Meader ninth place, were next for
the men with times of 29:49 and
30:08 respectively.
Other men's finishers were Mike
Iiyton, 10th place, 31:48; Matt
Schweitzer, 11th, 32:16 and Freddie
Fuller, 12th, 32:48.
Both the men's and women's
teams will return to action Satur-
day, Oct. 10 at the Methodist Col-
lege Invitational in Fayetteville.

Kim (.riffiths
Seahawks top Pirate booters
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sport Writer
ECU wins four of five matches
The Lady i 'irate volleyball team
finished in second place in the
Winthrop College Invitational over
the weekend, winning four of five
contests.
The Pirates opened the eight-
team tournament with a victory
over Tennessee-Chattanooga. The
Pirates then went on to defeat the
likes of Winthrop, Campbell Uni-
versity and Stetson University to
f xtend its longest winning streak in
three seasons to five matches. Others performing well for the Pi-
FCU, however, fell in the title rates over the weekend included
match in staright games to Tennes- hitters Michelle Mclntosh, Kris
see-Chattanooga, 15-7,15-2,15-13. McKay and Jemma Holley.
Pirate sophomore setter Debbie
Tatc was named the tournament's
Most Valuable Player for her per-
formances. Tate, the only Pirate
named to the All-Tournament
team, has performed in a dual role
this season , setting and sometimes
leading ECU in hitting percentage.
The Pirates, currently 7-6 overall
and 1-0 in the CAA, have three
matches upcoming this week. On
Friday, the Pirates will battle Mary-
land in a non-conference match,
foil wed by two CAA matches
against George Mason and Ameri-
can at Fairfax, Va.
of 3p.m. on our snots amj maybe mp j
i imt lAri . r ,Th,s weck we wiU have to work UP changes Harvey said.
UNC-Wilmington s Denis Ham- -
let scored two goals to lead the
Seahawks to a 3-0 shutout over East
Carolina Friday in CAA soccer ac-
tion.
The loss drops the Pirates to 1-9
overall and 0-6 in the CAA. UNC-W
goes to 5-5-1 and 2-1.
Hamlet scored first for the
Seahawks at 11:06 in the first half on
an assist from Dean Morrell to give
UNC-W a 1-0 halftime lead.
Hamlett struck again in the sec-
ond half at the 20:01 mark on a pass
from Mike Gaines. Tim Langmeyer
kicked in the final goal unassisted
with two minutes left in the match.
As if ECU did not have enough
problems that afternoon, starting
keeper Mac Kendall injured his
thumb in the match and will be out
for at least a week.
"Losing Mac really hurt us head
coach Charlie Harvey said. "We
will probably go with one of our
freshman at goal
Once again the Pirate offense
came up short as ECU took only five
shots at goal to UNC-W's 18.
'It's the same old story Harvey
said. "We let down a couple of times
and they took advantage of it
Wilmington had a much improved
team over what they had last year
ECU will have most of the week
off, with there next match being at
home Friday against Virginia
Commonwealth University. The �Bf��1�iPBi3SSS8Piii
matchhasascheduled starting time ECj SOccer player Mike Donui slKm�bliTt)
Meadenruli Pro. !�.���
turning for its third tour t tj� UH.
� United States, a Viennese' .ala
th the Tonkuenstler (n hestra and
sure to enchant the audit �
stCarolina University -
jditorium at 8 pm (�n October
Vienna is internationallv re
wned for inspiring a wealth t ment fo
iltzes, polkas, and musical set B I
5s, and the Tonkuenstler Or
stra is recognized asunequ.il qu
in 'ts masterful rendering ot
rich musical heritage
orchestra, which lias .� tal
its reputation throughout
istria, has toured extensive Escl
ughout Europe and a 11
has appeared at the w
ijor music festivals Signifi
oreign stude
Continued from page 10
w many people and to r 1
tomed to other types ol ti
he said,
also received help and sup
from his parents, wh
ind his decision to com
?rica.
is family understands tin
of an education. His father
from a government posi-
in Togo, holds a law deg
Iteacheslaw in Lome. 1 k I
ie with a post-doctoral degree
fcfctcience education and anotl
tiaade with a master's dt - �
.Sgriculture research.
H TheUniversitedu Benin, which
.gfeonly 12 years old, has an enn
runent of about 6,000 students
hording to Agbodjan
i "Here you have fifteen th
sand students but it doesn't seem
like it he said. "In mv sch -
Titheremight be forty-five students
-?toa room. Here the lab classes arc
n much smaller.
9 The relationship between the hs
iGallery show
-
.
mc

imagi
ism
is an inqui
formation
irrwi.
works 1
ing the film
n Continued from page 10
our instincts once more.
i- Matthew Savino, graduate stu
5 dent at ECU, can be visited with
'� his sculptures in his studio His
b'ceramic piece was accepted into
the exhibition, but sadly arrived
in pieces upon its return to r
shown at the Gray Art Gallen
Many more sculptures are wort!
taking a close looking at in thi?
exhibition,
to
rfj Gilad Ophir is a photographer
eovhose work seems to have at tin
Jf tea much more with drawings ot
-(Charcoal or pencil than with pho-
vlography. His black and white
ibECU theater progranj
Continued from page 10
�UjCOllcludes Biehn. 1
Hi The new summer theater pro-
9ijp�m now incorporates drama a-
"Well as musicals, encouraging
pDre variety in the acting pro-
ggpram. Summer productions as
4,well as other productions are
Open to all students. In addition to
gaming from acting, many actors
tin the experience oi working
rith professionals
in
ma)
atu
As
This past summer ECU stu-
its acted with accomplished
I like Michael Learned and
im Hunter.
prv f
com
Biehn reite
talent laving dl
departmi -I
speaking with
521 Cotanche St
HAPPY 80TH ANNIVE
EAST CAROLINA UNIVEl
WE SUPPORT AND I
CONGRATULATE YOl

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K t
Page l,
Pirates
0.0 w n
aineers
Following his worst loss at the
sea Pirates helm a distraught Baker
n ihc blamed missed opportunities for
their the loss
But You have to give West Virginia
m .is (i edit said Baker "They had been
turning the ball over in previous
games, but they came in here toda
and took advantage ot their oppor
tunities and we didn't
iained We had the opportunity to get in
the game early and we didn't. 1
v ed think after we ailed on that fourth
dvantage and lplaythatit told the tale for oui
vrtumu team for the rest of the game cor
nvith tmued Baker 1 think that is when
the our players felt like thev w ere out ol
. game)
to play in I w.i- embarrassed and the
- were embarrassed about
nh the wav we played In most jobs.
when you have a bad da) you can
k v. ur tail and hide, but I
ip to the loss and talk
I easy
icked .oneoftl sedays when
� ' ' t tor i:s West
Pen Nehlan said
� � neers first shuti iul
s team wason the
ding and today it
a had lost the ball 19
ts � rsl tour games, but it
perfectly Saturday
s that did occur
ht back to the Mounties
been able to do that (in
State Maryland and
rgh thev would have
� a little bit differently "
is the Mountaineers
nofvi tory since a 55-
niversitv in
he Pirates, it was the
it in six seasons.
matters oven worse
� ites they have still vet to
hdown in Morgantown
said Hunt. "We've
aing pretty good ball. We
an li-pla. iust weren t sure when the offense
ch was capped was going to click. Today it iust
van a wt� � "
earns fare well
NJ�
irifTiths
ush line with a time of
cd him in sixth
' - Mc iehee was
- enth overall,
a time ol 29 27 Rusty Wil-
th place, and Rusty
ninth � ,ere next for
men with times of 29:49 and
tnelv.
- finishers were Mike
th place. 31:48; Matt
iweitzer, 11th, 32 1 hand Freddie
J2:48
the men's and women's
ms will return to action Satur-
t 10 at the Methodist Col-
itational in Favetteville.
Pirate booters
shots and maybe some line
inges " Harvey said.

A.
�Photo submitted by Mar Startari)
Mike Doran shown in action against American
r
ITU LAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 6,1987 11
Tonkeunstler to play at ECU
Maadenhall Prau Releuc
Returning for its third tour of
the United States, a Viennese Gala
with the Tonkuenstler Orchestra
is sure to enchant the audience at
last Carolina University's Wright
Auditorium at 8 pm on October
- 13. Vienna is internationally re-
nowned for inspiring a wealth of
waltzes, polkas, and musical set
b tings, and the Tonkuenstler Or
n chestra is recognized as uncqual-
i led in its masterful rendering of
. this rich musical heritage.
The orchestra, which has estab-
lished its reputation throughout
Austria, has toured extensively
, throughout Europe and Japan
and has appeared at the world's
major music festivals. Significant
among the talented members of
the orchestra are Alfred Fschwe,
conductor; Gail Dobish, soprano;
and Manfred Ceyrhalter, violin
soloist.
Eschwe first came to interna-
tional attention as the replace
ment for the famous Willi
Boskovsky with the Strauss Or-
chestra in Barcelona. He subse-
quently conducted the orchestra
at the Gwendhaus in Leipzig and
Weimar, Monte Carlo, and in
Ravenna. In addition to conduct
ing the Tonkuenstler Orchestra,
Eschwe also regularly conducts
opera throughout Germany.
Dobish has been heard at the
Metropolitan Opera in "Ara
bella "L'Enfant et let Sor-
tileges Adele in "Die Flcder-
maus and Olympia in "Tales of
I loffman She sang leading roles
with the New York City Opera
including Leila, Lucia, and
Susanna. She has also performed
at the Opera de Nice as Servilla in
"L Clcmenza di Tito Miss
Dobish has been soloist with the
M il waukee Symphony, the Opera
Orchestra of New York, the Colle-
giate Chorale and has been heard
at Spolcto USA and the Aspen
Festival.
Ceyrhalter returns for his third
American tour with the Tonkuen-
stler Orchestra. He has appeared
as soloist throughout Europe and
at numerous music festivals in-
cluding those of Salzburg, Flan-
ders, Florence, and Montreux
Enjoy a sentimental, sensuous
evening of Old World charm from
the Ballroom Era as only the
Tonkuenstler Orchestra of Vi-
enna can provide.
Tickets for this enchanting per-
formance can be purchased at the
Central Ticket Office located in
Mendenhall Student Center,
Monday-Friday, 11 am - 6 pm.
Ticket prices are $12 for general
admission, $10 for ECU faculty
staff, and $6 for ECU studentsand
high school youth and under. For
tickets and more information, call
757-6611, ext. 266, during the
above hours.
Exchange program
for overseas studying
Continued from page 10
with at least a 2 5GPA.
In contrast, to win a position in
1SEP is "fierce" for foreign stu-
dents, according to Hursey.
"It's highly valued to be se-
lected as an 1SEP exchangee from
Europe, or from a foreign country,
and to come to the United States.
There are not that many spots
availible Hursey said.
There are five foreign exchange
students studyingat ECU thisfall:
Emmanuelle Allien from France
WWW� . I
las.wi Lane from the British Chan
ncl Isles, Giovanni Rossi from
Scotland, Katharina Wiklund
from Sweden and Akouete
Agbodjan from Togo Africa.
Students from ECU studying
abroad this semester are: Stephny
Boyd in France, Sara Cobler in
Scotland, Jenifer Dallas in Eng
land, Terrence McEnally in Bel
gium, and Robin Warren in Eng-
land.
For more information about
ISEP students can contact Hursey
at Austin 222.
Foreign student points out differences
Continued from page 10
know many people and to be ac-
customed to other types of tradi-
tions he said.
He also received help and sup-
Iport from his parents, who stood
behind his decision to come to
America.
His family understands the
value of an education. His father,
retired from a government posi-
tion in Togo, holds a law degree
and teaches law in Lome. I le has a
uncle with a post-doctoral degree
in science education and another
uncle with a master's degree in
agriculture research.
TheUnivcrsitedu Benin, which
only 12 years old, has an enroll-
ment of about 6,000 students, ac-
cording to Agbxxijan
"Here you have fifteen thou-
sand students but it doesn't seem
like it he said. "In my school
there might be forty-five students
to a room. Here the lab classes are
much smaller.
"The relationship between the
professors and the students (at
ECU) is quite different (from
Lome). It I can not understand
something I can go and ask the
teacher. At home, of course, you
can do this but most of the stu-
dents do not. Here if someone has
a question he has not to think
about it, he has not to look for the
answer to find it, he can just ask an
instuctor
In comparing ECU with the
Universite du Benin, Agbodjan
said: "Du Benin might seem more
difficult because there isn't as
much lab equipment. There are
not as many books as here. At my
university there might be one
book that many students need
Here you have many books, but
thev cost a lot " he laughed.
"1 think if you work hard it's just
as easy in both schools But the
hardest part ot studying here lor
me is the language problem said
Agbodjan, who speaks Minahis
native language). Trench, Eng-
lish, and a little German.
He pulled out pictures of his
country and pointed out his
grandfather's village in southern
Togo. It is 27 miles from Lome,
situated on a golden beach and
surrounded by palm trees. He
noted the traditonal mud huts
with dome roofs that keep the
insects and humidity out. People
still wash by rubbing straw over
their skin and they still sleep on
woven mats, he said.
He was quick to point out that
Lome was much larger and more
modern. It sits on a sandy coastal
strip, a bustling port city of about
300,(XX) people, with modern
government buildings and new
offices.
Agbodjan is still undecided
about returning to Africa at the
end oi the year. If he goes back he
will have completed his require-
ments for his degree it takes only
three years at the Universite du
Benin to get a chemistry degree).
If he stays he said he would like to
become an engineer and some-
how help his country.
In a reflective mood Agbodjan
said: "If I can have a practice here
and go back to help people over
there, that is what 1 would appre-
ciate a lot
"I would like to help people
improve thier condition, because
you have to face many problems
in Africa He mentioned over-
population, high unemployment,
and problems in agriculture. "If
you don't try to work on these
problems what will happen?" he
shrugged. "You have to try
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1
Gallery show gets good review
Continued from page 10
our instincts once more.
Matthew Savino, graduate stu
dent at ECU, can bo visited with
his sculptures in his studio. His
ceramic piece was accepted into
the exhibition, but sadfyi (arrived
in pieces upon its return to In?
shown at the Grav Art Gallery.
Many more sculptures are worth
Liking a close- looking at in this
exhibition.
Gilad Ophir is a photographer
whoso work seems to have affin-
ites much more with drawings of
charcoal or pencil than with pho-
tography. His black and white
images are closely linked to the
movement ot abstract expression-
ism. Ophir comments, "Mv work
is an inquiry into the nature of the
formation ol the photographic
image' The artist creates his
works with 35-mm camera, giv-
ing the film multiple exposures.
'ITlis layering of reality produces
dreamlike visions of light and
shadow. There is a definite mood
in his pieces, the feeling of time
passing, ot moving through and
past
Ophir has two major concerns
in his creative process. The first is
to develop a vocabulary his
an
own means of expression as
artist, his own "symbols
Secondly, his goal is to arrive at
a level of communication with
others through these symbols. He
is not interested in capturing a
�moment, but rattier tffaTrrvcat'an
image over time by fragmentation
and construction of an image in
the photographic process.
Ophir tries "to make photo-
graphs that will force the viewer
to lose the grounds of identifica-
tion so that he will have to organ-
ize himsel! on unfamiliar
ground" Ophir's photography
nonetheless seems to attract the
gallery's visitors first.
ECU theater program looks for non-majors
Continued from page 10
concludes Biehn.
The new summer theater pro-
gram now incorporates drama as
well as musicals, encouraging
more variety in the acting pro-
gram. Summer productions as
well as other productions are
open to all students. In addition to
learning from acting, many actors
i;ain the experience of working
with professionals.
This past summer ECU stu-
dents acted with accomplished
actress like Michael Learned and
Kim Hunter.
Biehn goes further by insisting
"much of an actor's success relies
on contacts and luck. Someone
you work with for a few weeks
may give you a foot in the door
after college
As the program has flourished,
ECU now holds the reputation for
providing quality actors. Biehn
feels "agents and other 'nisiness
professionals watch for what
comes out of our program
Biehn reiterates the need for
talent laying dormant outside the
department. Anyone interested in
speaking with Loessin or Biehn
V
may contact the theater arts de-
partment office.
For a look at success, upcoming
productions include this week's
premiere of "Leave it to Jane" as
well as "Loversand Other Strang-
ers" and " Terra Nova
E.C.U. SPRING BREAK NASSAU
March 7-10
Air, Transfers and hotel accom.
Air Via Piedmont Airlines
Hotel - Cable Beach Inn
Mexican Resta
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12 THE EAST CARPI IN! am
OCTOBER 6, 1987
Lamos and Thomas to revive 'Hamlet9 in modern setting
HARTFORD, Conn. (AD -
Three summers ago, Mark Lamos
wandered into a production of the
Tennessee Williams' "Vieux
Carre" at the Williamstown Thea
ter Festival in Massachusetts.
Even from the back of the
house, he was struck by a per-
former on stage.
"I immediately thought, 'This is
an actor I want to work with,
recalls Lamos, artistic director of
the Hartford Stage Company.
"There wasan intellect behind his
work, an intellect combined with
an instinct that was purely
theatrical
The actor was Richard Thomas,
known to most Americans not for
his stage work, but for his por-
trayal of television's John Boy on
"The Wal tons" and as the father of
the country's most celebrated set
of triplets.
But Thomas, who has acted
professionally since he was 7
years old, has had an extensive
theater career, playing everybody
from Franklin D. Roosevelt's son
John in "Sunrise at Campobello"
to an embittered Vietnam veteran
in Lanford Wilson's "The Fifth of
July
Now Thomas and Lamos, two
intense, verbal and highly articu-
lateartists, have joined forces for a
new production of "Hamlet" with
Lamos directing and Thomas
starring as the enigmatic Danish
prince. The play will be on view at
Hartford Stage through Nov. 7.
For the 36-year-old Thomas, the
role is a long-delayed return to
Shakespeare, his first attempt
since he was 15 and played the
youthful Duke of York in a pro-
duction of "Richard III" in New
York's Central Park.
For Lamos, this revival is his
third go around with what many
consider to be Shakespeare's
Harris to present slideshows
greatest - and most difficult - play.
The 41 -year-old Lamos portrayed
Hamlet at San Diego's Old Globe
Theater in 1977 and directed the
play three years later when he ran
a short-lived Shakespeare festival
that sprouted near Sequoia Na-
tional Park in Visalia, Calif.
Since then, Lamos' reputation
as one of country's foremost di-
rectors of Shakespeare has been
cemented by a series of produc-
tions he supervised at Hartford
Stage. Among his successes were
a sleek, sophisticated "Twelfth
Night" described by one critic as
"intoxicating" and surrealistic
retelling of "Pericles
Shakespeare's most phantasma-
gorical tale.
Discussions with Thomas be-
gan earlier in the year. Among the
School of rt Pr�� Kclca
ECU School of Art's slide lec-
ture series offerings for the month
of October will feature New York
art critic Particia Phillips and tour
artists with international origins.
All the lectures will be held at
Jenkins Auditorium at 7:30
p.m.
Painter Mark Harris, speaking
October 8, is a School oi Art artist-
in-residence from London, Eng-
land. Asa faculty member tor the
fall semester, Mr. Harris' work
was included in Gray Art
Gallery's faculty exhibit during
September. His large canvases are
loaded with a visual cacophony of
marks, shapes, color and move
ment.
The effect is a startiingly com
plex and active surface which al
temately asserts and negates
spacial relationships. Mr. Harris
is degreed in painting from Ed
inburgh College of Art and the
Royal College of Art, London.
Showing widely in the United
States and Europe, he has also
received several important
awards and scholarships includ-
ing Italian and Mexican govern
ment scholarships, a British
Council Exhibitions Abroad grant
and a Fulbright Fellowship for
1986.
Kevin McCloskey is an artist
and writer from New Jersey
teaching illustration as a visiting
lecturer in communication arts.
He has published hundreds of
drawings including over 50 for
The New York Times. His work
ranges from cartoons to water-
color paintings.
On October 12, he will show his
drawings from "The New York
Times, " "The Village Voiee"and
San Francisco Bay Guardian, as
well as slides of travel sketches
and watercolors from his book
"Walking Around Hoboken
October 26, art critic Patricia
Phillips will lecture on "Criticism
and the Art of Public Life" as a
part oi her three day participation
in the School of Art's Visiting
Critics program. While on cam-
pus she will also be visiting class-
rooms and critiquing individual
work Presently Ms. Phillips is
associate chairman of the Depart-
ment of Environmental Design at
Parsons School of Design in New
York as well as a writer and re-
viewer for " Artforum magazine
Among her many published
works are reviews of such nation-
ally important exhibits as the
Whitney Museum's "Metaman-
hattan 1984; Knoll
International's "Robert Venturi
I4; the Museum of Modem
Art's "Alvar Aalto: Furniture and
Class 1985; the Museum of
MntJexrvAjri's "Ludwig Mies van
der Rohc
Gallery's
son 1985.
1986; and Pace
'Louise Nevel-
plays considered - and rejected -
by the two men were "Richard II"
and "Measure for Measure By
April, they had settled on "Ham-
let But Thomas didn't plunge
immediately into memorizing the
mammoth part. While at home in
California, he began reading eve-
rything he could get his hands on
about the play, the author and the
period during which it was writ-
ten.
"I like having a sense of con-
text Thomas says. "I just wanted
to be fortified with some of the
wisdom of the ages about the play
to help me along. I'm very greedy
for help
Lamos began preparing for the
production by also avoiding the
play.
"The first production of 'Ham-
let' I directed came together for
me because when I should have
been studying the script, I found
myself studyingall kindsof schol-
arly books about the Hapsburg
Empire and Vienna he says The
result was a "Hamlet" that looked
and sounded like tum-of-the-cen-
tury Vienna, a world succumbing
to corruption and complacency.
The current production is not as
easy to pin down or describe, says
Lamos. While not a modem-dress
"Hamlet the production, ac-
cording to the director, is set in the
present, in an abandoned theater
about to be destroyed.
The director's current thoughts
and feelings about "Hamlet"
were fueled by unexpected
sources.
Jenkins Auditorium and Gray
Art Gallery are located in the Jen-
kins Fine Arts Center, East Caro-
lina University in Greenville,
North Carolina. All events arc
free and open to the public. Park-
ing is avalable in lots adjoining
the Jenkins Center. For more in-
formation, call 757-6336.
Clip-N-Save
C PARTY
ANIMALS
830-1823
Balloons Delivered
in Costumes
Gorilla - Grams
Gator - Grams
Penguin for Hire J
COUPON.
Cynthia
10 OFF
Homecoming
Corsages
3010 A East 10th St. ,oft1
Greenville j-LoyZ
IClip-N-SaveB i
COUPON
BAUSCH & LOMB
COUPON
Wayfarer
$3 1 .95plus tax
Large Metal Sunglass
$37.95plus tax
SINGLE VISION
LENSES
$12.95
Up to t or 3 00 sph
up to 2 00 cyl
LINE
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ONE HOUR SERVICE
SINGLE VISION � OLASS � PLASTIC
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OFFER GOOD THRU OCT. 15. 1987
CLEAR VLJE OPTICIANS
2484 STANTONSBURG ROAD
STANTON SQUARE 752-1446
COUPON
COUPON
� COUPON
The Student Union Special Concerts Committee
Presents
CHAIRMAN OF THE
BOARD
A Homecoming Beach Music Bonanza!
Sunday October 11th, 4 p.m.
Central Campus Mall
FREE!
Rain location: Hendrix Theatre
Ittsie Bittsie Tinnie
Weenie Tighest Tank Top
Contest
First Prize: $100
Second Prize: $50
Third Prize: $25
In Cash
Wed. Oct. 7th
Ladies sign up at Elbo
Ladies 501 Admission
Guys $1.50 Admission
95 Tails all night
Doors open at 9 p.m.
Elbo will be private Oct. 27th
Memberships still on sale for a $1.00
GTOLD1SCYM!
Tanning Special!
Unlimited
Use
until Dec. 31st. (1 visit per day)
$49.00
Call today:
758-4359
Bring in this ad
for special
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tudent of
JCHMOND, Minn. (AP) - Ja-
Najarak has sat at the same
was with master tutors Pablo
casso and Salvador Dali, and
Is displayed his paintings in
tme of the finest galleries in the
lorld - in Vienna, Oslo and Paris.
Despite those credentials, not
lany people know about
lajarak, who lives on the Horse-
loe Chain of Lakes near
iichmond.
But if his latest plan is success
il, people immediately will no-
Ice Najarak and his art, which
ill be displayed in the world's
jrgest gallery of all: the outdoors.
Najarak's most recent endeavor
"environmental art a fancy
jme for the fiberglass and steel
:ulptures that Najarak hopes
ill someday dot the countryside
Najarak, 46, recently completed
ne of his works, a 25-foot wild
irkey that weighs about 22,000
junds, done for the community
;f Frazee. And if all goes well,
,asy recipes
That convenient side-dish mi
n your cupboard shelf can also
the starter for main dishes such
s this heartv, home-stvle pork
ntree.
PORK STEAKS ROMANOFF
4 pork shoulder blade steaks
ut 12-inch thick (about 2
unds).
2 tablespoons cooking oil.
12 cup tomato sauce.
One 5-ounce package noodles
with sour cream-flavored sauce.
1 tablespoon snipped chives.
4 teaspoons all-purpose flour.
2 tablespoons cold water.
Trim excess fat from steaks In a
large skillet brown steaks slowly
on each side in hot oil; remove
steaks. Drain off fat. Return all
steaks to skillet.
Stir together tomato sauce,
sauce mix from the noodle mix
and chives; add to skillet. Cover
and cook over low heat for 30-35
minutes or until meat is tender.
Remove steaks from skillet
Spoon off excess fat from drip-
pi ngST�' ������ � mmmmm
Wk1&V�er f1cRJ�f�l ��
AcB to sfcutUct. Cook and stujuntil
thickened and bubbly. Cook and
stir 1 to 2 minutes longer. Mean-
while, cook noodles according to
package directions; drain. Place
noodles on platter; top with
steaks and sauce. Makes 4 serv-
ings.
Nutrition information per serv-
ing: 508 cal 36 g pro 27 g carbo
26 g fat, 139 mg chol 420 mg
sodium. U.S. RDA: 54 percent
thiamine, 30 percent ribofla vin, 32
percent niacin, 18 percent iron. 2
percent phosphorus.
within the ye;
be built and
and a mamr
German h
Albany
'They're gq
important tcf
said Najarak,
whose last rj
until hechanj
bit more dish
old fa mi K nail
gin, he said
He says ht
eight months
with Picasso
"He didn i
paint V,
how to mak
darak sai :
business end
gallene-
what vou'rt
public
He met Pi
France, in 1Q
from H i
Seaf
xVashint

h,
Ho
DRESS F
SOPH
It you're enrolled m the second year ot a colic
degree from an accredited college university.
mg your unior and senior years of college tol
least 18 hut not more than 25 years old. he a ij
for the Baccalaureate Degree Commissioning
side of North Carolina 1-800-528-8713
CONTACT Lt Bom
Navy Rel
October
Career
� cr-
NAVY-�
rV�
LEAD THE
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 6,19S7 13
setting
A rejected -
Richard 11"
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led on Ham
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jmorizingthe
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�ading eve-
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cr greedy
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let 1 directed came together for
me because when 1 should have
been studying the script, 1 found
myself studying all kindsof schol-
arly books about the Hapsburg
Empire and Vienna he says. The
result was a "Hamlet" that looked
and sounded like tum-of-the-cen-
tury Vienna, a world succumbing
to corruption and complacency
The current production is not as
easy to pin down or describe, says
Lamos While not a modem-dress
Hamlet the production, ac-
cording to the director, is set in the
present, in an abandoned theater
about to be destroyed.
The director's current thoughts
and feelings about "Hamlet"
were fueled bv unexpected
sources.
COUPON
BAUSCH&LOMB
� COUPON

Large Metal Sunglass
$37.95dIus tax
SINGLE VISION
LENSES
$1295
� � 3 00 sph
LINE
BIFOCALS
$39 95
v - FLAT TOP
I Arrangements
nammed Todav
Jments Available
-1446
PROGRESSIVE
NO-LINE BIFOCALS
$79 95
: 30 spr-
� - 3 0C odd
ONE HOUR SERVICE
SifcGLfc VlSiOK � 3LASS � PLASTIC
ONE DA SCRVtCl ON BIFOCALS
OOD THRU OCT. 15. 1987
R VUE OPTICIANS
STANTONSBURG ROAD
f ON SQUARE 752-1446
COUPON
COUPON
GYM
pecial!
ited
e
visit per day)
.00
day:
359
this ad
ecial
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5
!
!
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I
)
Student of Picasso creates giant sculptures
RICHMOND, Minn. (AP) - Ja-
son Najarak has sat at the same
canvas with master tutors Pablo
Picasso and Salvador Dali, and
has displayed his paintings in
some of the finest galleries in the
world - in Vienna, Oslo and Paris.
Despite those credentials, not
many people know about
Sajarak, who lives on the Horse-
shoe Chain of Lakes near
Richmond.
But if his latest plan is success-
ful, people immediately will no-
nce Najarak and his art, which
will be displayed in the world's
largest gallery of all: the outdoors.
Najarak's most recent endeavor
is "environmental art a fancy
name for the fiberglass and steel
sculptures that Najarak hopes
will someday dot the countryside.
Najarak, 46, recently completed
one of his works, a 25-foot wild
turkey that weighs about 22,000
within the year a 50-foot crow will
be built and erected for Belgrade,
and a mammoth cow led by a
German farmer will go up near
Albany.
"They're going to become very
important tourist attractions
said Najarak, a Red Wing native
whose last name was Jacobson
until he changed it for somthing a
bit more distinctive. Najarak is an
old family name of Armenian ori-
gin, he said.
He says he owes much to the
eight months he spent working
with Picasso.
"He didn't teach me how
Najarak said. "He taught me the
business end - how to approach
galleries, how to get ideas about
what you're doing out to the
public
He met Picasso in Le Havre,
pounds, done for the community France, in 1971 after graduating
l Frazee. And if all goes well, from Harvard
I knocked on his door for three
weeks. The fourth week he talked
to me and let me in his studio
Najarak said.
Najarak says his environmental
art will be the art of the future.
"How many people go to muse-
ums? This brings the art to them.
It's tree to anyone. I want to bring
the art back to the country, to
where I live and to the people 1
love"
The large-scale projects are time
consuming and expensive,
Najarak said. For instance, the
turkey that now stands in Frazee
required 700 gallons of resin,
paint. What he taught me was which costs about $28 a gallon. A
how to make a living from art big bird or cow costs about $1,200
to
a foot.
Townsfolk in Albany are rais-
ing money to have their cow and
farmer built, Najarak said. Plans
call for the art to stand about 40
feet high.
Theartist isone of justa handful
of people who make large-scale
creations out of fibergalss and
steel. Few artists work with these
materials because they are espen-
si ve and dif f icul t to shape, he said.
But Najarak has refined the
process to allow him much more
control over the fiberglass. He can
achieve detailed features on what
once was nothing more than a
hard, smooth surface.
He has developed a resin that he
mixed and then supplies to the
fiberglass shell of his sculpture.
Before the resin sets, he carves it.
After it sets he paints it with an air
brush.
That is where Najarak says he
believes the artist in him will be
able to appear in his environ-
mental art. Unlike other artists
Easy recipes
That convenient side-dish mix
on vour cupboard shelf can also
be the starter for main dishes such
as this hearty, home-style pork
entree.
PORK STEAKS ROMANOFF
4 pork shoulder blade steaks,
cut 12-inch thick (about 2
(xiunds).
2 tablespoons cooking oil.
1 2 cup tomato sauce.
One 5-ounce package noodles
with sour cream flavored sauce.
1 tablespoon snipped chives.
4 teaspoons all-purpose flour.
2 tablespoons cold water.
Trim excess fat from steaks. In a
large skillet brown steaks slowly
on each side in hot oil; remove
steaks. Drain off fat. Return all
steaks to skillet.
Stir together tomato sauce,
sauce mix from the noodle mix
and chives; add to skillet. Cover
and cook over low heat for 30-35
minutes or until meat is tender.
Remove steaks from skillet.
Spoon off excess fat from dnp-
pincst �-� r
3B?ri�rtg�fter rtoirarttf ?��?�"
AdB to skiHct Cook and stir until
thickened and bubblv Cook and
stir 1 to 2 minutes longer. Mean-
while, cook noodles according to
package directions; drain. Place
noodles on platter; top with
steaks and sauce. Makes 4 serv-
mgs.
Nutrition information per serv-
ing: 508 cal 36 g pro 27 g carbo
26 g fat, 139 mg chol 420 mg
�x'dium U.S. RDA: 54 percent
thiamine, 30 percent ribofla vin, 32
percent niacin, 18 percent iron, 27
percent phosphorus.
who work with large-scale fiber-
glass projects, Najarak hopes to
make his creations come to life
with paint.
The crow Najarak hopes to have
completed for Belgrade's centen-
nial celebration next summer will
be beautiful, he said, because he
will put layer upon layer of glow-
ing black paint over the fiberglass.
"Basic black is the most beauti-
ful color to work with. When the
color catches the light it shows
every color in the rainbow. This
will be one of my most beautiful
works. I'll paint each feather sepa-
rately he said. "That to me is the
fun part
He said he learned about large
paintings while living for nearly a
year at Dali's Port Lligat house in
Spain in 1973-74. "Up to then I'd
been almost a miniaturist
He became interested in creat-
ing huge outdoor art pieces by
accident. About six years ago a
boyhood friend who had become
a sculptor asked if Najarak could
assist him on a large-scale project.
Najarak agreed and immediately
became hooked on that type of art.
"I was trying to find a niche that
related to my home state. All my
other work was surrealistic. I
liked it well enough that I went
into it full time said Najarak,
who stands more than 6 feet tall,
and wears a bushy beard and
mustache below a head of slicked -
black hair.
Abri?ft
TO
Whatever the
weather, we
have a Special
Outfit for that
Special Day
Homecoming 1987
Mon Tuc, Fri Sat 10:00-6:00
Wed. and Thur. 10:00-8:00
919 A, Red Bank Road 756-1058
HOMECOMING 1987 SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
October 5 - Theatre Arts Series: North Carolina Dance Theatre. Wright Auditorium. 8:00 p.m.
October 6 - Sneak Preview Movie: Baby Boom starring Diane Keaton, Sam Shcpard, and Harold Ramis. 8:00
p.m. 1 lendrix Theatre
October 7 - Movie: Police 8:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre.
October 8 Pep Rallyl 7:00 p.m. Ficklen Stadium (The Marching Pirates will march up College Hill at 6:30
p.m.)
Major Concert: The fixx. Minges Coliseum, 8:00 p.m.
Movie: Peggy Sue Got Married. 8:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre. fThis movie also shows on October 9.
10 and 11.)
Dinner Theatre: 1 Ought to be in Pictures" 6:30 p.m. Mendenhall Student Center (Also playing
on October 9)
A0A Dance: 11 -2 Mendenhall Student Center. Multipurpose Room.
October 9 � �1?0 Dance. 9-2 Memorial Gym.
October io Homecoming Dav:
Alumni Coffee Hour and Open House TaylorSlaughter Alumni Center, 901 E. Fifth Street.
(Saturday, 9 a.m.)
Northern Telecom Art Exhibit - Gray Gallery. (Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. 5 p.m.)
Homecoming Parade Fifth Street. Band contest will be conducted during the parade (Satur
day, 10 a.m.)
Chancellor' Awards Luncheon - Minges Coliseum. The Outstanding Alumni Awards will be
presented at this occasion. All Alumni are Invited. Cost: $8.50 per person (See reservation
coupon.) Advance reservations are necessary. (Saturday. 11:45 a.m.)
Football Game - ECU Pirates vs Cincinnati Bearcats. Ficklen Stadium. Mall ticket orders to
Athletic Ticket Office, Minges Coliseum. ECU. Greenville. N.C. 27858. Tickets are $13.00 each.
plus $2.00 per order for handling. Ticket orders should be made early! (Saturday. 2 p.m
parking lots open for tailgating at 9 a.m.)
Traditional Alumni Post-Game Social - Hilton Inn. Greenville Blvd. Admission $2.00 per
person. Cash Bar. Entertainment by The Monitors (Saturday, 5-7 p.m.)
October 11 - E.C.U. Orchestra Concert. 3:15 p.m. Wright Auditorium Beach Music Concert: Chairman of the
Board. On the Mall 4:00 p.m.
COMING ATTRACTIONS
DRESS FOR SUCCESS.
SOPHOMORES
If you're enrolled in the second year of a college program leading to an associate or baccalaureate
degree from an accredited collegeuniversity, you could be earning more than $1 .(XX) a month dur-
ing your junior and senior years of college for a total of $24,000 by graduation. You must be at
least 18 but not more than 25 years old, be a US Citizen and have a 3.0 GPA. To see if you qualih
for the Baccalaureate Degree Commissioning Program (BDCP). Call: 1-800-662-72317419 or out
side of North Carolina 1-800-528-8713.
CONTACT: Lt. Boatright
Navy Representative
October 6
Career Planning and Placement Office
NAVY OFFICER.
i��mr �v����m
� - . Njaa-ij ? - �� �� � -� - � -��y�; i- - Jt
LEAD THE ADVENTURE.
Wednesday.October 7th at 8:00 p.m.
Movie:
POLICE
October 8th-11th at 8:00 p.m.
Movie:
PEGGY SUE GOT MARRIED
Thursday, October 8th at 8:00 p.m.
In Concert:
"THE FIXX"
Minges, Ticket Prices:
$7.00- Students
$9.00- Public and at the door
(Presented By Major Concerts Committee)
Sunday, October 11th at 4:00 p.m.
In Concert:
"CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD"
On The University Mall
(Presented by Special Concerts Committee)
Monday, October 12th at 8:00 p.m.
In Hendrix Theatre:
"Hon. Shirley Chisholm"
Lecture: "Women And Work In America
Now And Then"
(Presented by the Forum Committee)
Visual Arts Presents
Exhibition
"THE MAGIC OF NEON"
Mendenhall Gallery through October 22
Register for over $200.00 worth
of neon prizes to be awarded.
for more information, contact the
Student Union at 757-6611. ext 210.
, cxn to itvf �ou
ILsSrlK
OSatherins place
� " '� HOKIHOI � �i� �i ��"�
mmm0mmm





1IU I ASF t AROI INIAN
StyJe
OCTOBER 6.1987 Page 14
ECU theater arts
grads seek fame
ECU graduate Sandra Bullock will star in the film "Terminal Bliss.
Mixed media show at Gray
Gallery evokes primitivism
By
SUSANNE
NIELSON
exhibitions .ire on
Iray Art Gallery .it
of Art through Oc-
Two I1CW
view at the
ECU s School
tobor. They arc Gilad Ophir's
photographic works and the
northern Telecom Sixth Annual
Exhibition ol North Carolina
Sculpture.
We encounter an crossection oi
contemporary sculpture with a
fairly good representation of art-
ists from ECL"s School ol Art.
They arc either students or have
graduated in the past years out oi
the department.
All possible materials have
been utilized,from pieces made of
metal, clay or wood and a variety
ol mixed media. But all materials
have been used to create unique
visions. Each sculpture evokes its
-own feeling in the viewer.
'� Some seem IcT draw trio viewer'
the
intt
as Arlene Burke-Morgan's
pieces, Nyeema's lourney
eir quiet atmosphere such
lay
and
"Hydra U" both oi 1984. Using
her own face in the sculpture, the
artist creates an "earth mother"
feeling thai touches our inner
most instincts The shell hair
piece points to Afro American
heritage, but also to deep affini-
ties with nature and creation
Another graduate . Mark
Brown, is well remembered for
his humorous sculptures with
equally smile evoking titles. The
small, mostly pastel-pink colored
earthenware piece in this exhibi-
tion is named "St Lawrence's
Kiln tor the Underbred It is a
tiny kiln with little room for fir-
ing, but more for possible (board)
game
Close by rests David Cherry's
"Sonny Boy a little bronze
sculpture that shares it's humor
with his former fellow student
Brown. There is again lots oi room
for interpretation.
Tim Davis, who does not come
out of ECU, but who has studied
under Norman Keller of ECU in
Italy in the summer of 1984, re-
minds us right away of this inter-
action of ideas. Davis's alabaster
sculpture Liquid Series I" of
1986 points directly to Keller's
two pieces shown in last month's
faculty show at the Gray Galleryi
There is the similar feeling of
standing before a sacred vessel for
offerings. The shiny material he
used is reminiscent oi Roman rel-
ics and found sculptures depict-
ing heoric figures from ancient
history. This sculpture goes a step
beyond and points back towards
Burke-Morgan's pieces- the hu-
man body as a holy container for
the generations ahead.
Much of the sculpture moves
away from refined polished sur-
faces to a more rough primitivist
treatment. Some, although
smooth and curvalinear in shape,
too, evoke the feeling of coming
from the beginnings of time.
Martha Dunigan's "Double
Pod a large vessel of wrapped
twigs, gives us this feeling as
much as Clara Couch's "Annun-
ciation" and "Homage to New
Mexico II Both works seem to
come straight out of the tradition
of all-American artist Georgia
Cr-Keefe.
Evan Stanford is another ECU
graduate. His large untitled wood
sculpture gathers various influ-
ences brought to the School of Art
over the recent years, such as na-
tionally aclaimed artist Alice
Aycock's world of ideas.
An exhibition and lecture
brought her to the School of Art
this past year. In her world daily
items turn into monstrously
threatening machines; she lives
out her nightmares in her work. In
a strange way Stanford's piece
captures the same feeling. A very
high high-chair is perched on top
oia base that could be a sea-saw or
catapulting maching. The threat is
ever present.
Rosie Thompson's 1987 piece
"Cettin' Closer" brings together
humorous and threatening as-
pects to forma sculpture that may
leave viewers puzzled, but still in
awe. She also graduated from
EtU asdid Susan E. Ward "whose
mixed media pieces bring us back
to feelings oi ancient and sacred
objects. The choice of materials
and the wrapping techniques
underline this interpretation.
Several animal sculptures,
some more "real" than others,
either draw or appall the viewer.
They seem to be mammals from
the attributes given to them by
their creators. Whereas the "Gere-
nuk" by John Paul Harris appeals
in its realistic representation and
almost crosses the border to
humans as it stands on two hind
legs.
By CHRIS MITCHELL
S�f Writer
The ECU Theater Arts Depart-
ment offers its graduates some-
thing no other department can - a
twenty percent success rate.
Though the department's New
Professional Action Training Pro-
gram has graduated only 2 classes
of 20 graduates, five actors have
already begun impressive ca-
reers.
Most notably, Sandra Bullock
has completed one major motion
picture, "Walking Point The
public will soon see her in 'Termi-
nal Bliss" and other films. Others
to watch for are Scott Ryrner in
the daytime drama "Ryan's
Hope" and Jennifer Paulson in the
forthcoming broadway musical
"Legs Diamond
Edgar Loessin, chairman of
theater arts, attributes the success
of the new program to various
professionals on the staff. The
faculty includes Tracy Donohue,
Dr. Cedric Winchell, Helen Steer
and Don Biehn. Many came to
ECU after having studied with
Lee Strasberg, Uta Halen and
Sanford Meisner.
Biehn has won the outstanding
teacher's award at both ECU and
West Virginia University. Biehn
cites various changes in the acting
program as well as its staff as
reasons the program has pros-
pered.
First, the program offers four
years of acting rather than two,
patterned after the New York
Studio Training.
"Actors need to learn by acting,
not by preparing to act Biehn
says about the change.
"Our program is still based on
Stanislavsky's Method. Each class
is more specific in what it offers,
unlike the "samples" of acting
other universities teach
One important change is the
addition of a new course,
Winchell's film and television
action. The seniors act in real tele-
vision and film studios, provided
by Carlton Benz in broadcasting.
"Students not only gain experi-
ence in film and TV acting, they
may have videotapes as part of
their resumes
One policy change should gain
the attention of many students
outside of theater arts.

Scott Rymer, former ECU theater student, stars in "Ryan's Hope
"We want to encourage non
masons outside theater arts to
enroll in the program" Biehn says
of allowing non-masons into the
acting program. The program is
based on talent, not major.
"Certainly non-majors profit in
ways acting majors don't
Loessin concurs.
Certain careers whicn may
benefit from such an intensified
program include sales, business,
teaching and pre-law.
"Anyone in a 'person-to-per-
son' business learns much from
our program since we focus on
behavior rather than textbooks
See ECU page 11
Halbrooks gives slide show and lecture
By SUSANNE NIELSON
Sttft Writer
Darryl Halbrooks was the first
to give his slide lecture at ECU's
School of Art in this fall's artist
and critic lecture series. Hal-
brooks is one of two Artists-in-
Re'dence at the School of Art for
this Fall semester.
Halbrooks is a painter, print-
maker, filmmaker and professor
of Art at Eastern Kentucky Uni-
versity in Richmond, Kentucky, artist's descriptions draw qui bit
Hegraduatcd with Master of Fine of laughter from tr,e audience
Arts Degree from Southern Ilh- here as he explains, "The images
nois University in 1972 and exhib- were influenced by a news report
ts nationally. He is also an avid of a 3,000 pound cheese dug up in
traveler - by bicycle or motorcycle Ireland after � had been hufor
- always in search for new ,deas some time The influence of a
for his work. Landscapes are an visit to Ireland two years ago
inherent part of his drawings and brought impressions of Irish
it'rather formal He is most con-
cerned with the visual impact of
his pieces although the titles carry
a lot of weight too. He uses a
sketch book, planning quite a bit.
The book is a "tool" for him, con-
taining sketches as well asgrocery
lists or sometimes just "doodles
Some of the pages are shown in
slides and demonstrate the eclec-
tic character of the book.
Next we see the most recent
work (on view at his office). The
panic "I woke up one morning
and felt I was becoming some-
thing other than an artist. I was
worrying more about my life than
about making images So he was
driven by this panic and guilt to
spend more time creating.
He collected numerous images
during his travels. The sketches
that came out of this experience
give him images of the landscape
and old architecture he encoun-
tered. They are interwoven with
images of a displaced looking dog
and a caution post painted in
paintings. It became, Halbrooks
explains, "a symbol for myself. Of
this displaced midwestern
American in the midst of all this
history He feels like a part of
Indiana, a "plain American" with
no urge to seek long lost roots.
It is this feeling that seems to
make his landscapes look so alien,
like an entire other world with no
connection to the people or ob-
jects in them. With his dog Jen-
nifer suspended in mid-air at an
old Scottish Abbey in mind we
may look forward and wonder
landscape and the cheese image
together. Halbrooks says, he
thought of this cheese as a wheel.
So out of the black paper there
glows the giant cheese wheel half
paintings, although they become
more and more abstract as his
work progresses.
The artist's work had been on
view at the Gray Art Gallery as a
part of the School of Art Faculty buried in a strange landscape
Exhibit. The pieces shown were The artist then explains the lay-
paintings on masonite board, ers of thought involved in this
edges cut to match the ouside of series of pastels. He is very much
the painted shapes, creating a 3-D concerned with the origins of
effect. Halbrooks refers to them things. In this case he is combin-
humorously as "the painter's ing the excavation of the cheese
I he large White Animal" by cheap way out of making sculp- with the construction of the first
ames Herring brings on an en- fure Halbrooks gave insights wheel and it's subsequent arche-
into his way of thinking and
working and shared his world of
ideas with all who had come to see
and hear.
He expains first of all his
method of working. He calls
bright fluorescent color The latter what images Darryl Halbrooks
is found again and again in later may-find in North Carolina.
African exchange student
enjoys ECU but misses home
By EDDIE FITZGERALD
MHMtai
tirely diffemt reaction. It seems so
foreign and yet so close to us in its
features. Herring's "Howling
Head" takes these feelings yet a
step further, communicating with
See GALLERY page 11
Although he likes Eastern
North Carolina, and enjoys chal-
lenges and different aspects of life
here at ECU, Akouete Agbodjan
said he misses Africa.
He said he misses his little
brother the most, as his eyes
shone with memories.
Agbodjan is a 25 year old ex-
ological finding and digging out. change student from Togo, Af-
rica. He came here through Inter-
As the cheese wheel series pro- national Student Exchange Pi
gresses the artist adds new gram (ISEP), and is working to-
nnages, a pretzel and Canadian wards a chemistry major,
landscape from a more recent trip. He decided to come to ECU for
"I figured if they're going to dig the challenge and the experience
up cheeses they might as well dig of studying in America and was
up pretzels, " comments Hal- encouraged by American ex-
brooks. The imagery as well as change students, whom he
titles are drawn from the artist's befriended at the Universite du
surroundings. Titles such as "The Benin near Lome, the capital of
Cheese PIT or 'The Big Cheese Togo and Agbodjan's home town.
Perspective refer to his new Togo is one of the smallest na-
home in Pitt County or to his tions in Africa. Geographically it
!?f!ynS ?f ?rawing classes at sits between Ghana and Benin, on
ECU's School of Art, he says.
Halbrooks brings on more amuse-
ment with his piece "The Orlando
Cheese Proposal "If cheeses like
the one found in Ireland found
their way into the U.S. they would
the west coast. Although ifs
small, it has a great variety of
ethnic groups, customs, and tra-
ditions. Most of the Togolese live
on subsistence agriculture and
"about eighty percent of the
� li , x . .� ��w.ui cigiuy ucatni or era
probably end up near Orlando, population lives in rural prov
(hmeofDl.sneyVor,c)' �)� inces Agbodjan said. French is
Comments such as these show
the artisf s humor in these and
more abstract drawings. Earlier
series such as the Mr. Happy Face
Series or the autobiographical
Agbodjan is a tall, lean young
man, with a serious expression
that easily dissolves into a
friendly smile. At times he uses
his hands to sweep away the frus-
tration of English and gather in
elusive words.
"For two years 1 worked as a
tutor of mathematics and physics
to French students at Ecole Fran-
caise to pay my travel and staying
expe 'scs. This helped me a lot to
See FOREIGN page 11
Study abroad!
By EDDIE FITZGERALD
Have you ever dreamed of
going to the Ivory Coast, or Hong
Kong, or some other exotic coun-
try to study and experience a dif-
ferent culture?
Well, your first step could be as
close as Dr. Robert Hursey's of fice
at 222 Austin Building.
Hursey is the coordinator of
International Student Exchange
Program (ISEP) at ECU. In front of
his office, posted on the wall, are
fliers and brochures explaining
the ISEP program and encourag-
ing interested students to drop in
and find out more about it.
ISEP, founded in 1979, is a pro-
gram created to acquaint Ameri-
cans with different people and
Alfred Eschwe will conduct the Tonkuenstler Orchestra when they
play at ECU's Wright Auditorium OcL13 at 8 p.m. See story page 11.
the official language, but there are
about forty different dialects spo-
ken there.
Commenting on Agbodjan's cu'l runes of the workmrough
arrivial in Greenville this sum- student exchange. It is funded bv
senes involving the artist and his mer, Dr. Robert Hursey, coordi- the United sires InJoration
idol Joe Hall show the comical nator of ISEP at ECU, said: "When Agency and currently honors 130
aspects more openly. he first came here it was very hot universities in 242�S� in-
In these line drawings the artist and when he got off of the plane eluding the U S
points out certain situations in a hesaid 'if s just like being horne "ISEP is the most cost effective
humorous way, at the same time "Greenville is a small town The
questioning them. Titles such as people and community are
"35 Mile Per Hour Happy Face extraordinary Agbodjan said in
Crash Test" or "Happy Face a heavy accent that has a strong
Street Crime" underline the French flavor to it. "I appreciate
artist's intention in these pieces. everything. I don't want to say ifs Carolina UiuJSSS wJSlrfS-
different (here), but of course if s ford to eo to some of the best
Halbrook has travelled in past different. But it doesn't seem universities in the world "hesaid
years. Two major nips and the strange for me because I've read a Students are eligible to partici-
impressions gathered on them lot about this country and I have pate in the proeiam if they've
seem to be dominant m his work American friends in Lome. been going to an ISEP honored
He expains, that he was prompted "I appreciate theopportunity to university for a year and are cur-
to travel initially when seized by study in America. For the rently listed as full time students
what he refers to as an "Art �����Ml is not a regret for me
program now in effect for foreign
exchange students. They pay the
same tuition as instate ECU stu-
dents Hursey said.
"If you can afford to go to East
Pack tun
RALEIGH, (AP)-Theda
started with an interception but the g
bieak beginning for North Carolina Woll
State only served to inspire ti �
VVolfpack to avenge a yi
grudge
"It was the defens. ld twas ,
linebacker Scott Auer after
State's 17-0 Atlanta I
ence football victory over Q
Tech Saturday
'The biggest step, abou
is how they come on and hum I p
gether. Alotoftean tie
gone downhill. But our I Isandour to�
coachesdidn't panic We stuck wil
the things we were doinj
the faith said N. P
hdc
Dick Sheridan.
Though th,
for the Wolf ack N
control in the fir:
terback Preston
tor a touchdown
Poag, a redshirt h
intercepted I .
Results frl
Mow th Associated P-
� otballte
this week and schedule f
No. 1 Oklahoma (4 1 A
State 56-3 �� s lexas atg
No. 2 Nebraska 4 E-
Carolina . s Kansa
No 3 Miami
Honda State 26-25 . - arland
No. 4 Florida State (4� N
: Miami, Ha. 2-2; ats.
Mississippi.
No. 5 Notre Darn,
Burger re
CHAPEL HILL, NC (AP) - '
3urgcr used to be the Auburn quar-
erback whose job it was to get the
sail to the Tiger tailbacks. But in the
20-10 football victory over North
Carolina Saturday, he became the :
nan who made the offense click on
iis own.
Burger threw two third-quarter
uchdown passes, including a 2-
ifd scoringjgatd2Jffiffimfcrvforps
.vith 1 :T8 left in the period t
.he Tigers to a road victory.
In the two previous seasons. Bur-
ner was in the backfield wih Hi
-nan Trophy winner Bo ackson a
Brent Fullwood. He said he was vir-
tually a spectator.
"I've been in an offense where all
1 did was turn around and pitch the
hall to Bo and Brent and not
invthing Burger said ! n a
like being involved as much as! am
.ind having a little contr
there
Burger said the game
tovK on
See EXCHANGE page 11
HOMECO
ECU SO
Five Color
22 oz. Plastic
Cup Filled With
Your Favorite
Softdrink
Offer Good Throul
Available at Soda Sh
STUDE
Owned and Operatedl
'

wmmnmmm �"
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 6, 1987 15
OCTOBER 4 t�7 Page 1
E CU theater student, stars in "Ryan's Hope
ton- Certain careers wiucn mav
from such an intensified
�gram include sales, business,
teaching and pre-law.
- ne in a 'person-to-per-
n business learns much from
n our pro-am since we focus on
� than textbooks
see ECU page 11
and lecture
'me-
)st painted in
lor The latter
am in later
t
paintings. It became, Halbrooks
explains, "a symbol for myself Of
this displaced midwestern
erican in the midst of all this
rj He feels like a part of
ma. a plain American" with
;rge to seek long lost roots.
It is this feeling that seems to
his landscapes look so alien,
like an entire other world with no
connection to the people or ob-
lects in them. With his dog Jen-
nifer suspended in mid-air at an
old Scottish Abbey in mind we
may look forward and wonder
what images Darryl Halbrooks
may find in North Carolina.
xchange student
CU but misses home
GERALD
jies Eastern
I "hai-
djan
-es his little
as his eves
is.
year old ex-
bm Togo, Af
through Inter-
ixchange Pro-
Is working to-
jmator
fme to ECU for
t perience
?nca and was
American ex-
whom he
lUniversite du
the capital of
's home town.
fe smallest na-
)graphically it
and Benin, on
uthough it's
?at variety of
toms, and tra-
Togolese live
iculture and
Jrcent of the
rural prov-
ed. French is
.but there are
It dialects spo-
Agbodjan's
lle this sum-
irsey, coord i-
P, said "When
was very hot
f of the plane
?inghome
11 town. The
fmunity ire
ijan said in
has a strong
"I appreciate
ant to say it's
of course it's
loesn't seem
ise I've read a
and I have
Lome.
portunity to
a For the
ret for me
Agbodjan is a tall, lean young
man, with a serious expression
that easily dissolves into a
friendly smile. At times he uses
his hands to sweep a wav the frus-
tration of English and gather in
elusive words.
For two years 1 worked as a
tutor of mathematics and physics
to French students at Ecole Fran-
caise to pay my travel and staying
expe scs This helped me a lot to
See FOREIGN page 11
f
Study abroad!
By EDDIE FITZGERALD
Staff Writer
Have you ever dreamed of
going to the Ivory Coast, or Hong
Kong, or some other exotic coun-
try to study and experience a dif-
ferent culture?
Well, your first step could be as
close as Dr. Robert Hurse s office
at 222 Austin Building.
Hursey is the coordinator of
International Student Exchange
Program (ISEP) at ECU. In front of
his office, posted on the wall, are
fliers and brochures explaining
the ISEP program and encourag-
ing interested students to drop in
and find out more about it.
ISEP, founded in 1979, is a pro-
gram created to acquaint Ameri-
cans with different people and
cultures of the world through
student exchange. It is funded by
the United States Information
Agency and currently honors 130
universities in 24 countries, in-
cluding the U.S.
"ISEP is the most cost effective
program now in effect for foreign
exchange students. They pay the
same tuition as instate ECU stu-
dents Hursey said.
"If you can afford to go to East
Carolina University, you can af-
ford to go to some of the best
universities in the world he said
Students are eligible to partici-
pate in the program if they've
been going to an ISEP honored
university for a year and are cur-
rently listed as full time students
See EXCHANGE page 11
Pack turns around bad start
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) - The day
started with an interception but the
bleak beginning for North Carolina
State only served to inspire the
Wolfpack to avenge a year-old
grudge.
It was the defense's day said
linebacker Scott Auer after N. C.
state's 17-0 Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence football victory over Georgia
I a h Saturday.
The biggest story about his team
is how they come on and hung to-
gether. A lot of teams would have
vne downhill. But our kidsand our
�aches didn't panic. We stuck with
v things we were doing and kept
e faith said N.C. State coach
v k Sheridan.
Though thegamedidn't start well
for the Wolfpack, N.C. State took
tntrol in the first half behind quar-
back Preston Poag, who passed
r a touchdown.
Poag, a redshirt freshman, was
ntercepted by Riccardo Ingram on
the game's first play, giving Geor-
gia Tech possession on the
Wolfpack 20. But the Yellow Jackets
went only six yards on their first
offensive series, and Thomas
Palmer missed a 31-yard field goal.
It was the first of three misses for
Palmer, whose team was able to
move inside the N.C. State 20 only
once after the first series.
Poag came back early in the sec-
ond quarter, scrambling out of the
pocket on fourth down to hit junior
tight and Bobby Harrell on a 2-yard
touchdown pass with 14:55 left in
the half. The Wolfpack stayed on
the ground for most of the drive but
Poag's 13-yard shovel pass to full-
back Marty Karriker on third down
pushed N.C. State deep into Geor-
gia Tech territory.
Georgia Tech quaterback Rick
Strom Fumbled after he was sacked
by Auer, and tackle John Adleta
recovered for N.C. State, setting up
Bryan Carter's 31-yard field goal
with 3:03 left in the second quarter
for a 10-0 lead.
The scoring stopped until the fi-
nal 21 seconds, when tailback Todd
Varn hurled himself into the end
zone for a 1-yard touchdown, cap-
ping a 72-yard drive.
After the final touchdown, senior
linebacker Mark Smith knew they
were going to avenge a 59-21 loss to
Georgia Tech last season and hold
the Yellow Jackets scoreless.
"We weren't going to lose that
shutout then he said. "We'd had a
year to think about those 59 points.
We weren't going to forget in a few
seconds
It was N.C. State's first shutout
since 1983, and the first time Geor-
gia Tech suffered a scoreless defeat
since 1982.
"We blitzed at times and that
helped put pressure on their quar-
terback Sheridan said. "But when
you blitz, you also put pressure on
our secondary and our kids did a
good job
Strom completed 13 of 24 passes
for 99 yards. He was replaced in the
third quarter by senior Darrell Gast,
who completed his first two passes,
and moved the Yellow Jackets close
enough for Palmer's third field goal
attempt.
Gast was 3-for-5 for 92 yards, as
the Yellow Jackets went primarily
to the air in the second half. Georgia
Tech managed 81 yards on the
ground.
"We talked at halftime about not
turning the ball over and putting
pressure on our defense Sheridan
sai "Our defense hung in there
and, with the fourth quarter drive, I
thought that was the key to our
game
It was the second straight victory
for N.C. State, 2-3 and 2-1 in the
ACC, after opening the season with
three losses. Georgia Tech dropped
its third straight gameand is 1 -3 and
0-3 in the conference.
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Results from AP top 20 teams
rt the Associated Press Top
nty college football teams fared
- week and schedule for Oct. 10:
I Oklahoma (4-0-0) beat Iowa
ite 56 3; vs. Texas at Dallas.
: Nebraska (4-0-0) Beat South
irolina 30-21; vs. Kansas.
? Miami, Ha. (3-0-0) beat No. 4
rida State 26-25; vs. Maryland.
4 Honda State (4-1-0) lost to No.
Miami, Fla. 26-25; at Southern
Pittsburgh.
No. 6 Auburn (3-0-1) beat North
Carolina 20-10; vs. Vanderbuilt.
No. 7 Louisiana State (4-0-1) beat
No. 19 Florida 13-10; at No. 20Geor-
gia.
No. 8 Clemson (4-0-0) is idle; vs.
Virginia.
No. 9 Ohio State (3-0-1) beat Illinois
10-6; vs. Indiana.
I
Notre Dame (3-0-0) is idle; at No. 10 Tennessee (4-0-1) beat Cali-
fornia 38-12; is idle.
No. 11 UCLA (4-1-0) beat Stanford
49-0; is idle.
No. 12 Michigan (3-1-0) beat Wis-
consin 49-0; at Michigan State.
No. 13 Arizona State (3-1-0) beat
Texas-El Paso 35-16; at No. 15
Washington.
No. 14 Penn State (4-1-0) beat
Temple 27-13; vs. Rutgers.
No. 15 Texas A&M (2-2-0)lost to
Texas Tech 27-21; vs. Houston.
No. 15 Washington (3-2-0) lost to
Oregon 29-22; vs. No. 13 Arizona
State.
No. 17 Alabama (4-1-0) beat South-
western Louisiana 38-10; at Mem-
phis State.
No. 17 Iowa (3-2-0) lost to Michigan
State 19-14; at Wisconsin.
No. 19 Florida (3-2-0) lost to No. 7
Louisiana State 13-10; vs. Fullcrton
State.
No. 20 Georgia (4-1-0) beat Missis-
sippi 31-14; vs. No. 7 Louisiana
State.
Burger revives Tiger offense
CHAPEL HILL, NC (AP) - Jeff
irger used to be the Auburn quar-
erback whose job it was to get the
all to the Tiger tailbacks. But in the
10-10 football victory over North
larolina Saturday, he became the
nan who made the offense click on
11s own.
ttinvrr threw two third-quarter
wn passes, including a 2-
ps, toneci, iLifOi
f left in the period to guide
added meaning after the 20-20 tie sarv to win this game "
with Tennessee last weekend. He Auburn coach Pat Dye, whose
got hot in the second half and Au- two previous visits to Chapel Hill
burn took advantage. resulted in a loss and a tie while he
"We kept thinking that our was coach at East Carolina, said he
whole season was on the line he issued a challenge to his Tigersbe-
�sauLnVe had to do what was neccs- fore the game and at halftime. when
iurger
1
I igers to a road victory.
In the two previous seasons, Bur-
cr was in the backfield wih Heis-
nanTropfn winnei Bo Jackson and
nt Full wood. He said he was vir-
ually a spectator.
I v e been in an offense where all
did was turn around and pitch the
Bo and Brent and not do
inything Burger said. "I really
ke being involved as much as I am
nd having a little control out
Burger said the game took on
Julienne's Florist
m.r r,
a6 Drtfi �(1, i fuui
Celebrating ECU Homecoming "87
I lomccoming Corsages & Boutonnieres
Mums - $5.00
Carnations - $2.50
Group rates available
1703 W. 6th St.
752-5216
they were in a 3-3 tic.
"I think you could sense that we
were a different team in the second
half Dye said. "Our players have a
lot of pride and they know what it
takes to win a football game
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Softdrink
95 $
Offer Good Through Saturday, Oct. 10th
Available at Soda Shop - Wright Bldg. & Croatan
STUDENT STORES
Owned and Operated by East Carolina University
East Carolina University Student Union
Major Concerts Committee presents:
HOMECOMING
CONCERT
Featuring
FIXX
with the Usuals
Thursday, October 8th, 8:00 p.m.
MINGES COLISEUM
Tickets:
$7.00 students
$9.00 general public
Tickets on sale
Central Ticket Office
Sept. 24th.

j
"II ��.H ,





16 THE HAST CAROLINIAN CXTOHFB 6, ,
987
IRS Oct. slate full of events
The Intramural Sport Calendar
will begin the month of October
with several events holding regis-
tration session this week.
On Oct. 7, registration for co-rec
water basketball and one-on-one
basketball will be held in Brewster
D-103. Both events will be hooping
it up in the Memorial Gym area
providing participants with exer-
cise, hilarity and a chance to be
crowned champion.
Co-rec water basketball sign tips
begin at 6 p.m. followed by one-on-
one basketball. On Oct. 8, the Intra-
mural swim meet will hold registra-
tion at 7 p.m. in Biology 102.
If you missed out on the first ses-
sion of Thysical Fitness aerobic, aq-
uarobic and toning classes, you still
have a chance to work away your
extra poundage and tighten your
muscles.
Second session classes will begin
Oct. 20 Dec. 4, just in time for the
holiday fat. All classes are available
on a drop in basis for a nominal fee.
Classcostsare set at $10 for students
and $20 for faculty, staff.
Registration will be held Oct. 13-
16 in room 204 Memorial Gym.
A variety of other programs have
been designed for the fitness fanat-
ics around campus.
The Pepsi Physical Fitness Club,
Aerobic Challenge, and Exercise
WISE-ly arc just a few of the classes
being offered through the Physical
Fitness division. Weight training
classes, swim conditioning and
supra aerobic classes are also sched-
uled on the calendar.
The Outdoor Recreation Center is
pleased to announce that there are
presently two tandem bicycles
available for rental purposes. Both
are 5-speed models and available
for a $2 and $3 fee.
Advance registration is required.
For more information, call 757-6387
or 757-6911.
Read The
East Carolinian

&


&
&



Niekro ends career
ATLANTA, Ga. (AP) Phil game by Manager Chuck Tanner
Niekro has thrown his last knuckle after the first five Giants reached
ball in major league competition , base in the fourth inning.
ending a 23-year career the way he Pearl Sandow, who has attended
alwaysdesired-wearing an Atlanta every Braves home game since the
Braves uniform. team arrived in Atlanta in 1966,
1 couldn't think of a better way to said, "l'mcmotional like everybody
retire than with an 'A' on my cap else. I'm so glad that he came back,
Niekro said Sunday after pitching even if it's just for one day
into the fourth inning of San Niekro had originally turned
Francisco's 15-6 victory over the down an offer from the Braves to
Braves, a triumph that nailed down pitch one last time in Atlanta but
at least a share of the National reconsidered and started against
i eague West titl" for the Giants. the Giants.
i he 4S year-old Niekro made it Niekro departed with a 5-2 lead
official at the packed news confer- and the bases loaded, but reliever
ence following the game. Chuck Can was greeted by Candy
"1 am officially announcing my Maldonado's pinch grand slam that
retirement today he said. I've put the Giants ahead to stay.
been thinking about this for threeor
lour months, not just the last few Niekro got out o� bases-loaded
days, it wasn't a tough decision to james in the first and third innings,
make but showed the effects of a long
Niekro. one of the most popular layoff, being out of the games since
sports figures in Atlanta history,
received seven standing ovations he was released by the Toronto Blue
from a crowd ol 26,019, the last a (ays on Aug. 31. He gave up five
prolonged tour-minute salute runs, six hits and walked six in the
when he was removed from the three-plus innings he worked.
��
U � u da ucuw ramWadc
11
1807 Charles "Blvd.
QrtenxniU, C 27834
919 '355-5866
'lean Hopper
'Broker 'Owner
es. 19756-9142
HAPPY 80th ANNIVERSARY
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Whether it's Ringgold Towers
Condos or single family homes,
we can find a place for you!
m
MIS
iQMt H0US'�C
CLIP THIS AD
JUST ARRIVED
1987-88 GIFT CATALOGUE!
PICK UP YOUR CATALOGUE
FREE WITH A COPY OF THIS AD
DAWSONS
"GREENVILLE'S LEADING JEWELERS"
EAST
CAROLINIAN
611 E ARLINGTON
GREENVILLE
355-5252
102 E. MAIN ST.
BELHAVEN
943-2121
Cmkikmm i
Co?c floral
Service, Inc.
.�
Homecoming
Specials
�Mum Football Corsages $5.00
�Yellow Pom Poms $5.00
�Yellow Sweetheart Roses $10.00
756-7226
698 E. Arlington Blvd.
Arlington Village
758-2183
117W. 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
WE BUILT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
SAV A CENTER
titift&titifrti&timrfttiftftftfr
The wisest investment you'll ever make
for your family begins with only.
FUNK & WAGNALLS
NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA
Latest Edition
FOOD MARKETS
77i freshest wiy to S.tve
FREE
2-Volume Matching
DICTIONARY
ith Volume 2 & 3 Of The Encyclopedia
STOP j A&P BRAND $1.28 OR
wCrisco
Shortening
.STOP FAMILY PACK FRESH
�r Fryer Leg
Quarters
Volume 1
only 9C
wrtii $5 purchase
Volumes 2-29
only $4.99 ea.
JUICY CALIFORNIA
WHITE
Grapes
can
Limit One With An Additional $10 O More Purchase
PLAIN-SELF-RISING
Red Band
Flour
FRESH CUT WHOLE BONELESS
Boneless
N.Y. Strip
MONTEREY BRAND
Fresh
Mushrooms
CUSTOM
CUT FREE1
Limit One With An Additional $10 O' More Purchase
fSTOPj A&P BRAND QT 58; OR
w Duke's
Mayonnaise
STOP
CHUNK LIGHT � IN OiL OR WATER
A&P
Tuna
BEAN COFFEE
Eight
O'Clock
6.5 oz.
can
Jne With An Additions $10 Or More Purchase
CAMPBELLS
Limit Two Wh Ar A-tditiona1 V0 O' More Pun
t�mit One With Ar Addttiora SV 0� More Purchase
Tomato
Soup
DELICIOUS
Flav-O-Rich
12 Milk
tnTi
10.75 oz
can
18 s 159
ANN PAGE V
Ice
Cream
"J39
COCA-COLA
$1.09
Diet Dr. Pepper
612 oz. can ctn
t imit Three With An Add I $10 Or More Purch
SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
99
SAV-A CENTER SUPER COUPON
STOP
s-r A&P GRADE A
Large
Urrw One Coupon "V Shopper Witt. �n
SEE STORE
FOR DETAILS
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open 24 Hours-Open Mon. 7 a.m Closed Sat. 11 p.m Open Sun 7 a.m11 p.m.
PRICES EFFECTIVE SUN . OCT 4 THRU SAT. OCT 10 1987 QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
J
na.wffM�
�W��ll 1
�mil 11 m m ��� � i �� .i�.
�"�"��w�taji





16 Tl it: FAST CARPI IN1AN OCTOBER 6. 1
W7
IRS Oct. slate full of events
&&&&&&-&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&
The Intramural Sport Calendar
will begin the month of October
with several events holding regis-
tration session this week.
On Oct. 7, registration for CO rec
water basketball and one-on-one
basketball will be held in Rrewster
D 103. Both events will be hooping
it up in the Memorial Gym area
providing participants with exer-
cise, hilarity and a chance to bo
crowned champion
Co-rec water basketball sign ups
begin at 6 p.m. followed by one-on-
one basketball. On Oct. 8, the Intra-
mural swim meet will hold registra-
tion at 7 p.m. in Biology 102.
If you missed out on the first ses-
sion of Physical Fitness aerobic, aq-
uarobk and toning classes, you still
have a chance to work away your
extra poundage and tighten your
muscles.
Second session classes will begin
Oct. 20-Dec. 4, just in time for the
holiday fat. All classes are available
on a drop in basis for a nominal fee.
Classcostsare set at $10 for students
and $20 for faculty, staff.
Registration will be held Oct. 13-
16 in room 204 Memorial Gym.
A variety of other programs have
been designed for the fitness fanat-
ics around campus.
The Pepsi Physical Fitness Club,
Aerobic Challenge, and Exercise
WISE-ly are just a few of the classes
being offered through the Physical
Fitness division. Weight training
classes, swim conditioning and
supra aerobic classcsare also sched-
uled on the calendar.
The Outdoor Recreation Center is
pleased to announce that there are
presently two tandem bicycles
available for rental purposes. Both
are 5-speed models and available
for a $2 and $3 fee.
Advance registration is required.
For more information, call 757-6387
or 757-6911.












Read The
East Carolinian







&
-&


&
Niekro ends career
ATI ANTA, Ga. (AP) Phil
Niekro has thrown his last knuckle-
ball in major league competition .
ending a 23-year career the wa) he
alw ays desired wearing an Atlanta
Braves uniform.
"I couldn't think of a better way to
retire than with an A' on niv cap
Niekro said Sunday after pitching
into the fourth inning of San
Francisco's 15-6 victory over the
Braves, a triumph that nailed down
at least a share of the National
jue West title for the Giants,
he 48-year-old Niekro made it
official at the packed news confer-
ence following the game.
1 am officially announcing my
retirement today he said. "I've
been thinking about this for three or
tour months, not just the last few
days. It wasn't a tough decision to
make
Niekro one of the most popular
sports figures in Atlanta histon
received seven standing ovations
from a crowd of 26,019, the last a
prolonged tour-minute salute
when he was removed from the
game by Manager Chuck Tanner
atter the first five Giants reached
base in the fourth inning.
Pearl Sandow, who has attended
every Braves home game since the
team arrived in Atlanta in 1966,
said, "1'memotional likecverybody
else. I'm so glad that he came back,
even if it's just for one day
Niekro had originally turned
down an offer from the Braves to
pitch one last time in Atlanta but
reconsidered and started against
the Giants.
Niekro departed with a 5-2 lead
and the bases loaded, but reliever
Chuck Gary was greeted by Candy
Maldonado's pinch grand slam that
put the Giants ahead to stay.
Niekro got out of bases-loaded
james in the first and third innings,
but showed the effects of a long
layoff, being out of the games since
lie was released by the Toronto Blue
lavs on Aug 31. He gave up five
runs, six hits and walked six in the
three-plus innings he worked.
llVtt da ucutx ruurveaxik
1807'harUs 'B
greem ifle HC 27854
919 '355-5866
lean Hopper
'Broker Oztmer
Ufa. 919756-9142
HAPPY 80th ANNIVERSARY
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Whether it's Ringgold Towers
Condos or single family homes,
we can find a place for you!
m
MIS
ti
IQUAl MOuSKC
CLIP THIS AD
JUST ARRIVED
1987-88 GIFT CATALOGUE!
PICK UP YOUR CATALOGUE
FREE WITH A COPY OF THIS AD
DAW SONS
GREENVILLE'S LEADING JEWELERS'
611 E ARLINGTON
GREENVILLE
355-5252
102 E. MAIN ST.
BELHAVEN
943-2121
T2.
ggsi
Co?c floral
Service; Inc.
Homecoming
Specials
�Mjm Football Corsages $5.00
�Yellow Pom Poms $5.00
�Yellow Sweetheart Roses $10.00
756-7226
698 E. Arlington Blvd.
Arlington Village
758-2183
117W. 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
WE BUILT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
SAV A CENTER
FOOD MARKETS
The freshest iy to S.v(
The wisest investment you'll ever make
for your family begins with only. . .
FUNK & WAGNALLS
NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA
Latest Edition
FREE
2-Volume Matching
DICTIONARY
With Volume 2 & 3 Of The Encyclopedia
Volume 1
only9c
wrtTi S5 purchase
Volumes 2-29
only $4.99 ea.
STOP I A&P BRANL
P'Cris
Shorti
can
Limrt One With An Additional $1
PLAIN'SELF-RISING
Red Band
Flour
FRESH CUT WHOLE BONELESS
Boneless
N.Y. Strip
MONTEREY BRAND
Fresh
Mushrooms
CUSTOM
CUT FREE'
Limit One With An Additional $10 O' More Purchase
STOP I A&P BRAND QT 58- OR
f Duke's
Mayonnaise
jne With An Additional $10 Or More Purchase
CAMPBELLS
Tomato
Soup
DELICIOUS
Flav-O-Rich
12 Milk
10.75 oz
18 s 159
ANN PAGE
Ice
Cream
-39
COCA-COLA
$1.09
Diet Dr. Pepper
612 oz. can etn.
Limit Three With An Add I $10 Or More Purch
SAV A-CENTER SUPER COUPON
99 �
SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
STOP
A&P GRADE A
Large
Urn One Oouoon Q Shoppe Wtif An acm V0 0C l or Pwc
CvXJOxy Eape Oct '0
SEE STORE
FOR DETAILS
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open 24 Hours-Open Mon. 7 a.m Closed Sat. 11 p.m Open Sun 7 a.m-11 p.m.
PRICES EFFECTIVE SUN . OCT 4 THRU SAT. OCT 10.1987 QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
I eBpHBjm
�tnnmm.wm'1!1"
w��i'wwmum �� in�li
l"





Title
The East Carolinian, October 6, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 06, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.563
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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