The East Carolinian, October 1, 1987






INSIDE
Editorials� 4
Entertainment �
SP�rts�.12
Classifieds
ENTERTAINMENT
Andre Kole brought illusions to ECU Tuesday
night� see ENTERTAINMENT, page 8.
SPORTS
ECU football player profile: Mike Applewhite
see SPORTS, page 12.
Qfttz i�uzt (Hutalxniun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 No. 11
Thursday, October 1,1987
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
ECU judiciary subject of debate
Bv TIM HAMPTON
Sljtl WntrT
The ECU Honor Board, the
court which Irit-s students
charged with Honor Code viola-
tions, is the subject oi heated do
hate in the SGA.
! he argument concerns
. bother or not the board should
have to wait for a court ot taw to
resolve its charges against a stu
dent before making its own rul-
ing.
I nder the present system, for
example, if a student is charged
with a larceny on campus, the
1 lonor Board has to wait for the
resolution of anv concurrent
i riminal charges in a court of law.
A new bill debated in the SGA
'legislature Monday, if passed,
would give the Honor Board and
the Review Board the power to
decide on all violationsof theFCL'
(ode ot Conduct, regardless of
ponding public cases.
Rut 40 percent of all offenses are
actually decided bv the judiciary
coordinator, according to Ronald
P s;xier associate dean oi stu-
dent hie. tSpoier is the judiciary
oordinator).
Usually the student admits his
guilt and Speier decides on a fine
Md or assigns community serv-
ice using previous cases as prece-
dents, he said.
Fines are placed in a judicary
service fund, which last year to-
taled $8000. 'The money in the
fund is reverted back to usages
which benefit the student, such as
Alcohol Awareness Week
Speier said.
If the student pleads innocent,
he appears in a pnmarv hearing
with the student public defender
and the student attorney general.
There his case is assessed to see if
it should go before the Honor
Board.
Selected bv an executive
committee, the 7-student Honor
Board hears cases oi violations of
the Code of Conduct. The board
decides on the guilt or innocence
of the student.
If the board decides the student
is guilty, it passes judgment. It can
impose punishments such as aca-
demic probation, fines and even
expulsion from school.
The student may appeal the
ruling to the Review Board, also a
7-mcmber board which can re-
verse decisions passed bv all
boards except the Academic In-
tegrity Board.
(The integrity board hears cases
in which a facultv member accus-
ing a student of academic viola-
tions elects to omit an interview
by the Honor Board).
The Review Board also inter-
prets the SGA constitution and
determines how the Honor Board
applies the constitution to its rul-
ings.
In addition to these two boards,
there are other boards which rule
on student misconduct in nthir
areas of jurisdiction: the Resi-
dence Hall House Council Board,
the Intramural Recreational Serv-
ices Advisory Council, the Stu-
dent Residence Association Ap-
peal Board.
Speaking about the debated
bill, Dr. Elmer Meyer, vice chan-
cellor of student life, said the leg-
islators need to question the pos-
sibility of a double penalty for
sentenced students. "Is a double
penalty (punishment by both
public and student courts) in
minor cases really needed
Meyer said.
The double penalty principle
calls for the Uni versity not to exer-
cise its judicial power until the
non-university case is over "un-
less exceptional circumstances
compel otherwise according to
SGA law.
Speier said the proposed bill
would iron out this "exceptional
circumstances" wording to allow
See JUDICIAL, page 3
Traditional telefund raises money
Bv KAREN MANN
Suit Vnter
An annual fundraiser that has
earned more than $100,000 for
EC I in past vears will begin
Monday.
The 10th Annual ECU Tele-
fund, to be held at the Regional
Development Institute in the Wil-
lis Building, is part of the East
(. arolina Univcrsitv's Annual
Giving Program. The Telefund,
which is sponsored by the Office
tor institutional Advancement,
will last tor five weeks and em-
ploy over 300 student volunteers
in its fund raising effort.
"The Telefund is a tradition at
ECU said Annual Giving Direc-
tor Cindy Kittrell. "It builds
goodwill for the school, and the
alumni get a chance to find out
what's going on here. It's a lot of
tun for the volunteers, too
The Annual Giving Program is
designed to solicit funds each
year from alumni and non-
alumni. The money is used to
enhance various programs on
campus such as scholarships, fac-
Pirate Walk is back in action
By M. BL RBELLA
Stall Vntrr
The yellow jackets and sweat-
shirts of Pirate Walk escorts will
soon reappear on the ECU cam-
pus.
Pirate Walk, an SGA service
that provides escorts to students
who have to walkoncampusafter
dark, will begin operating Sun-
day. Any student needing an es-
cort across campus 8-12 p.m
Sunday through Thursdav, can
call the service.
Pirate Walk, a service recom-
mended by ECU Public Safety, is
beginning its operation late in the
semester due to lack of a director
and volunteers. But now, under
the leadership of Larry Murphv,
several escorts and operators are
ready to begin work on Sunday
evening.
"The delay was basically just
the organizing of it Murphv
said. "1 guess there wasn't any-
body capable of the directors'
)ob I just found out about it (the
opening) last week
Murphy gives Steve Brewer,
assistant director, most of the
credit for arranging Sunday
night's volunteers.
"He's been active already
Murphy said. "He's already got-
ten us some operators and walk-
ers. He's really doing an excellent
job
Murphy, chosen from several
volunteer candidates by Ross
Renfro, SGA vice president, said
he is ready "to make this the best
Pirate Walk ever
"Our purpose is if any girl
should feels she needs to be es-
corted from an area of campus to
another, she'll call our operators,
we'll call the walkers, and the
walkers will escort her to her des-
tination Murphy said.
Pirate Walk escorts work on a
volunteer basis. Murphy hopes to
be able to enlist help from campus
See PIRATE, page 3
ulty research, emergency loans
and student volunteer services.
"Private gifts represent the dif-
ference between being good and
attaining the highest level of
achievement Kittrell said. "The
gifts enable the university to ex-
pand its offerings and to enrich its
many worthwhile programs
Last year's Telefund netted over
$160,000 for the university, she
said.
"I'm very pleased with the sup-
port we've had over the last five
years Kittrell said. "Many of the
alumni we contact become major
donors In 1985, Ronald Dowdy,
an alumnus from Orlando, Fla
donated $100,000 after being con-
tacted during the Telefund.
Kittrell credits the success of
the Telefund to the student volun-
teers. "We couldn't do it without
the students' enthusiasm and
support. People from other
schools are very impressed with
our volunteers system. When I
tell them that we can get 300 stu-
dents io help each vear thev ,ust
can't believe it
A meeting room of the student j
Volunteers are recruited from
over 30 different campus organi-
zations including honor societies,
fraternities, sororities and the
dorms. The ECU Ambassadors,
original operators of the Tele-
fund, will be coordinating the
event. Chancellor Eakin, his staff
and several oi the deans will be
assisting the volunteers on Oct. 14
and 15.
udiciary system (Photolab).
Volunteers will meet nightly at
the institute where 25 telephones
will be set up for their use. While
working they will receive a free
long-distance phone call and din-
ner. Movie passes, t-shirts and
buttons will be given nightly to
the volunteers who raise the most
money. At the end of the Tele-
fundcash prizes of $50, $100, and
$150 will be awarded
News Bureau).
student volunteer finds some space for herself at the 1985 ECU Telefund. (Tony Rumple � ECU Mews Bureau).
SRA proposes improvements for dorms
LARRY MURPHY
By KRIS REYER
SUM Writer
The Student Resident Associa-
tion passed a motion to raise the
room change fee from $5 to $15
dollars at it's Tuesday meeting in
Mendenhall Student Center.
The extra $10 is to cover the cost
the phone company charges to
change its records which the uni-
versity is now paying, according
to Dean Carolyn Fulgham.
Fulgham said the university has
been paying these charges.
The SRA also endorsed a sug-
gestion to require returning stu-
dents to sign up for dorm rooms
the 3rd week in February instead
of the traditional March sign-up
period. This will give the staff a
chance to get new students as-
signed to rooms faster, possibly
before their orientation, Fulgham
said. Other reasons for the change
suggested by Fulgham were:
spring break, exams, elections,
and end of year parties � all of
which make March a hectic
month.
The $60 deposit will still be
required and the move won't
change the June 1 cancelling
deadline, Fulgham said.
Mary Francis White enlisted the
help of the SRA with Alcohol
Awareness Week, which is Oct. 22
� Oct 29. The SRA voted unani-
mously to participate by way of a
button campaign. There are to be
contracts for students to sign,
pledging they will not drink for
the awareness week. Those who
fulfill this contract will bring it
back and receive a button that
reads: "I did it for a week at ECU
other business at the meet-
nthia D. Kittrell sought
-pport for the 10th Annual ECU
Telefund. Kittrell asked for the
SRA members to enlist the help of
students in residence halls to man
the phones for one night a week
for 5 weeks. She told the SRA that
the first $1 million gift given this
year would be used toward aca-
demic excellence.
The SRA's primary purpose is to
See SRA, page 2
1
J
�x
1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 1,1967
Less students qualify for federal finance aid Charges th
(CPS) � As the summer rolled
on, Terilynnn Sanford began to
panic. When the University of
Texas junior didn't receive a letter
confirming her Guaranteed Stu-
dent Loan (GSL), as she had the
previous 2 years, she called the
financial aid office. This year, they
told her, she didn't qualify.
"1 can't go to school without a
student loan she said.
After some frustrating maneu-
vering, Sanford finally was ap-
proved for a GSL, and will con-
tinue her education this year.
Sanford is not the only student
finding that getting a loan this
year is much harder than last fall,
observers around the country
reported last week.
As many as 20 percent of the
students nationwide who got
GSLs in 1986 won't be able to get
them for this school year. Dr. A.
Dallas Martin Jr. of the National
Association of Student Financial
Aid Administrators reported.
The reasons can be found in the
new federal Higher Education
Act of 1986, most of which is just
going into effect this fall.
Those students, said Martin,
must take out more expensive
loans, such as parental loans, per-
sonal bank loans, or Supplemen-
tal Student Loans that come with
higher interest rates and begin
accruing interest soon after
they're issued, compounding the
rising cost of college education.
"This is going to be a tough year
for a lot of students said Univer-
sity of Nebraska at Omaha finan-
cial aid director Phil Shreves.
Thirty-five percent of the UNO
students who received GSLs last
year, he estimated, won't receive
GSLs this year. Of the remaining
students, Shreves said, "only a
few will have total eligibility
To determine if a student could
get a GSL in the past, financial aid
counselors figured in the
student's and parents' income,
the number of dependents in the
student's family and the number
of children in that family that
were in college.
Now the new Higher Education
Act requires the counselor to in-
clude other money � like home
values and investments � in de-
ciding if the student needs a GSL.
As a result of adding in the
"other sources of income" to a
family's wealth, many families
look like they earn too much to
qualify for the low-cost loans.
"We've had more denials as
GSL eligibility has gotten
tighter said Don Davis of Texas'
financial aid office.
The Higher Education Act of
1986 also raised the maximum
annual GSL from $2,500 to $4,000.
Particularly hurt by the new
requirements, said Dan Daven-
port of the University of Idaho
financial aid office, are graduate
students and older students.
Income from teaching or re-
search assistant jobs now is added
to a student's assets when deter-
mining GSL eligibility, Daven-
port said, reducing or eliminating
loans graduate students received
in the past.
"Nontraditional" students also
must declare their spouse's in-
come, also cutting or eliminating
loans, he added.
Despite the tighter GSL eligibil-
ity requirements, Martin said the
financial aid picture "looks pretty
favorable since students still
have access to other, though more
expensive loans.
"We thought we'd see a de-
crease in total available funds
Davis said. "But there's just as
much money, and there are just as
many students applying for aid.
We've processed as many, or
more, applications as we did last
year
"We're funded at the same lev-
els as last year Davenport
added.
"Frankly, this is a more stable
year than last year explained
Colorado College financial aid
Director Rodney Oto.
Martin, however, contended
that although the U.S. Depart-
ment of Education continues to
appropriate more money for stu-
dent financial aid, students are
not receiving as much assistance
as tncy have in the past.
Much of the actual dollar in-
crease, he said, is used to pay off
defaulters' loans.
Changes in aid distribution
have created "an increasing stu-
dent indebtedness Martin said.
The Pell Grant program, once the
dominant form of federal student
assistance, has been slashed.
Loans are now the dominant
form.
"There's been no increase in
true student aid said Martin.
'This has not been a growth in-
dustry. There are actually fewer
dollars to go around
"High-ability students from
low-income families are not being
served Martin continued.
'That's a loss of talent we're not
providing for. It's unfortunate
Terilynn Sanford almost
counted herself as one of the un-
fortunate students who couldn't
afford college this year. "1 was
afraid I'd get shut out she said.
But, with Davis' help, Sanford
reapplied and will receive a GSL
to continue her schooling.
"I'm praying for that check to
get here she said. "I haven't been
able to buy books yet 'cause I only
have $20 to my name at this
point
CAIRO, Egypt (AP) - The Arch
bishop of Canterbury, the most
Rev. Robert Rundc, will meet
with representatives of the Greek
Orthodox and Coptic churches
during a week-long visit to Egypt
Runcie, the spiritual leader of
the Church of England and the
world's 70 million Anglicans, ar-
rived here Monday.
Operation ID helps deter dorm thieves
Do you know the name brand of
the television set you watch? The
stereo system you listen to? The
bicycle you ride or other valuable
items you own?
If not, you are not alone. Most
people do not. Just knowing this
helps, but that may not be enough
to help police recover your prop-
erty if it is stolen. Can you posi-
Pirate Police
Line
By CAPTAIN KEITH KNOX ECU Public Safely
rively identify that stolen item as
yours? If not, neither can the po-
lice or courts.
How many Sony, Zenith, or
whatever the brand name televi-
sion sets are there on this campus,
in the city, county or country?
How about other valuables that
could be stolen? Hundreds
maybe even hundreds of thou-
sands. Right! That is why it helps
to provide authorities with posi-
tive identification of your per-
sonal property.
Help campus police help you.
Participate in Operation ID (Iden-
tification) a program that helps
deter thieves and burglars, assists
in the arrest and prosecution of
criminals and facilitates the re-
turn of lost or stolen property. By
marking (engraving) your valu-
ables with your drivers license
number preceded by the abbre-
viation of the state (NCDL
1234567) you positively identify
that item as yours.
This number is recognized by
law enforcement agencies
throughout the United States. In
SRA executives listed
Continued from page 1
�provide a student force to work with
the administration on such issues as
housing, visitation policies and im-
proved services for residence hall
students, according to an SRA pam-
phlet.
The SRA executive officers arc.
Thomas Denton � president, Mark
Carroll � vice president, Deena
Niewiadomski � secretary, Louise
Perreca � treasurer. Heather Eber-
wine � publicity chairman.
The ARC (Area Residence Coun-
cil) officers are:
�The Hill Mary Piland � presi-
dent, Roger Eaton � trice president,
Lisa Tariton � treasurer, Melissa
Sikes � secretary.
�Central Campus: Renee Fliner �
president, Tommy Arnold � vice
president, William Vood � secre-
tary, Tom Walters � treasurer.
�West Campus: Janet Batten �
president, Michelle Parkin � vice
president, Brenda Vaughan � treas-
urer, Amy Hinson � secretary.
The SRA meets at 4 p.m Tues-
days, in Mendenhall Studen Center.
usarviteXend
$ Need Money $
We pay Cash For Anything Gold or Silver
Classrings
Necklaces
Braclets
Coins, ect.
And, We also buy Stero's, T.Vs,
V.C.R.s, Furniture, Bikes, etc.
Coin & Ring Man
10:00 5:00 (M-F)
.10.00 3:00 Sat.
400 S. Evans
752-3866
REEL
GOOI
If you're hungry, if you're thirsty, or if you're just in the
mood for a fun evening, come on over to CharleyO's.
We're serving the freshest, most delicious seafood
available. Along with mesquite grilled beef, poultry
and pork ribs.
Mesquite Grilling And A Whole Lot Mote.
I liitiMi Inn Greenville � 264 Hypass at I looker Rd � 355-5000
North Carolina it is also against
the law to tamper, alter or remove
serial numbers or owner applied
numbers from property so
marked.
In addition, to help police and
insurance claims you should
make an inventory list of all your
valuables and major possessions
for future use in case of loss or
theft. This list should include
quantity, make, model, serial
number (if there is one), a brief
description (color, size, etc.) and
value. Place a copy of this in a safe
place, preferably not your home
in case of fire or theft.
Beginning October 6, from 2:30
p.m. � 7:00 p.m campus police
will be going into residence halls
on the ECU campus taking inven-
tory of and marking valuables for
Operation ID. Look for the
Operation ID sign-up sheets in
your residence hall. If you do not
live on campus, but would like to
join Operation ID, call your local
police or sheriff's department.
They will be glad to assist you.
Remember, crime prevention
begins with YOU!
3tye iSort Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
James F. J. McKee. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo Shari Clemens
Pete Fernald Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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One color and black$90.00
Two colors and black 155.00
Inserts
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BUSINESS HOURS:
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puranrc 10.00 500 P.M.
PHONES737-B366
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(CPS) � Sen. Joseph Biden (D-
Del.) may have been embarrassed
by revelations that, as a student in
1965, he cheated on a law school
paper, but cheating remains
widespread on American cam-
puses today, various sources say
Thirty to 50 percent of all col-
lege students say they've cheated
during their academic careers,
researcher William Raffetto
found in a Carnegie Commission
report in 1985.
Duke, Indiana, Pennsylvania
and Georgia universities, among
others, reported increases in the
number of accusations � though
not necessarily offenses � from
the 1985-86 to'the 1986-87 school
years
At Duke M i
ing increasi
professors take
demic dishorn-
Student Life
Twenty-three
charged with ch
1986-87 acaden
14 werechargo
and 12 were a
during 1
The in
campuswide,
down. VVa
individual t I
become more a
lem.
Biden
Inflation takes a bite o
(CPS) � Despite five straight
years of salary hikes, college
teachers are a little poorer than
their colleagues of 10 years ago.
the Center for Education Statistics
said last week.
Inflation, the center � the data-
gathenng arm of the LS Dept. of
Education � said Sept. 17, has
eaten up the salary gains of all
college faculty members nation-
wide except some of those teach-
ing at private campuses.
Inflation outran faculty salaries
during the 1977-1981 school years
by such a wide margin that col-
lege teachers' buying power in
1986 was 3-to-6 percent lower
than it was in 1976-77.
The center's report also shows
that colleges continue to pay fac-
ulty men "considerably" more
Judicial branch
powers reviewed
Continued from page 1
these cases prompt SG A heanngs
before dispensation in a court of
law. 'The current statement puts
the burden on the university to
justify why it's handling the case
on campus Speier said.
"This limits the jurisdiction of
the boards to control the behavior
of the students Speier said.
On the powers of the judicial
boards, Meyer said the boards
Should decide on it's power to
hear cases. "(The judicary) should
define the cases it would like to
hear Mever said.
Pirate Walk begins
first step of semester
Continued from page 1
fraternities and sororities.
"We're hoping to get the greeks,
and anyone else, involved
Murphy said. "1 guess it would be
to an advantage to get fraternities
and sororities to applv Pirate
Walk to their communitv serv-
ices
Murphy plans to organize the
Pirate Walk so it runs smoother
than in past years. He hopes this
will entice students to use its serv-
ices more, preventing possible
campus crime.
"Hopefully everyone will use
it Murphy said. "It'sa very good
program especially in the sense
it's useful to the ladies of ECU
The Pirate Walk escort service
number is: 757-6616.
than women
professor S
women in l1
more in ;
The av
regar :
compared t i
iPa
W1C
b
Thu:
Drafi
$1.50 adm. for guys
65 tails & I
10 Dra
Fri Sat. - Sun All wee!
Oct. 21 The Elbo will b
$1.00 Hi balls


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THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 1,1987
inance aid
aness, Martin said
t program, once the
n of federal student
,v Kvn slashed
w the dominant
vn no increase in
aid said Martin
Kvn a growth in
are actually fewer
roun 4
students from
- are not being
irtin continued
ent we're not
rtunate
Santord almost
� .is one of the un
couldn t
- vear 1 was
-
But, with Davis help, Sanford
reapplied and will receive a GSL
to continue her schooling.
"I'm praving for that check to
get here, she said, "lhaven'tbeen
able to bu Wnks vet cause I only
have $20 to my name at this
point
CAIRO, Egypt (AP) - The Arch-
bishop of Canterbury, the most
Re Robert Runcie, will meet
with representatives of the Greek
lAthodov and Coptic churches
during a week long visit to Egypt.
Runcie, the spiritual leader of
the Church of England and the
world s 70 million Anglicans, ar-
rived here Monday.
iEaut (ftarottttiati
s�rae 1925
. Director of Advertising
lvertislng Representlves
sso Shan Clemens
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
$4 25
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4 05
J! 95
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3 75
OLOR ADVERTISING RATES
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D
Charges that students are cheating on the rise
(CPS) � Sen. Joseph Biden (D-
Delmay have been embarrassed
by revelations that, as a student in
1965, he cheated on a law school
paper, but cheating remains
widespread on American cam-
puses today, various sources say.
Thirty to 50 percent of all col-
lege students say they've cheated
during their academic careers,
researcher William Raffetto
found in a Carnegie Commission
report In 1985.
Duke, Indiana, Pennsylvania
and Georgia universities, among
others, reported increases in the
number of accusations � though
not necessarily offenses � from
the 1985-86 to'the 1986-87 school
years.
At Duke, accusations of cheat-
ing increase when individual
professors take steps to curb aca-
demic dishonesty, said Dean of
Student Life Sue Wasiolek.
Twenty-three students were
charged with cheating during the
1986-87 academic year, she said;
14 were charged the previous year
and 12 were accused of cheating
during 1984-85.
The increase is not due to a
campuswide, organized crack-
down, Wasiolek said, but because
individual faculty members have
become more aware of the prob-
lem.
Biden, who recently dropped
his candidacy for the Democratic
presidential nomination � ad-
mitted Sept. 17 that he'd turned in
a paper as a first-year law student
at Syracuse University in 1965
that included 5 pages lifted di-
rectly from a published law re-
view article.
Biden also misrepresented his
academic record during a recent
campaign appearance, according
to Newsweek. Biden reportedly
said he graduated in the top half
of his law school class, but actu-
ally finished 76th in a class of 85.
Biden reportedly also said he at-
tended law school on a full schol-
arship, but actually received a
partial scholarship based on fi-
nancial need, the magazine said.
When caught in 1965, Biden
convinced the law school to let
him take the course again.
"I did something very stupid 23
years ago Biden said in a Wash-
ington, D.C press conference last
week.
But Biden might not have been
allowed to retake the course if he
was a student today.
Wasiolek said an ethics review
board may show mercy to an
undergraduate for Biden's of-
fense, but, for law school stu-
dents, "ignorance is not an accept-
able defense. Law students are
expected to know how to footnote
a research paper
Schools, in fact, are more vig-
ilant in watching students these
days.
Indeed, on Aug. 31 the Univer-
sity of Texas's Measurement and
Evaluation Center boasted that its
new practice of photographing
students had helped decreased
cheating on placement exams.
Texas also okayed, without
endorsing, a teaching assistant's
practice of searching students'
backpacks as they enter his class
to take tests.
Yale suspended 8 students
Sept. 4 for the fall semester for
allegedly cheating on a take-
home physics exam last spring.
Inflation takes a bite out of faculty salaries
(CPS) � Despite five straight
years of salary hikes, college
teachers are a little poorer than
their colleagues of 10 years ago,
the Center for Education Statistics
said last week.
Inflation, the center � the data-
gathenng arm of the U.S. Dept. of
Education � said Sept. 17, has
eaten up the salary gains of all
college faculty members nation-
wide except some of those teach-
ing at private campuses.
Inflation outran faculty salaries
during the 1977-1981 school years
by such a wide margin that col-
lege teachers' buying power in
1986 was 3-to-6 percent lower
than it was in 1976-77.
The center's report also shows
that colleges continue to pav fac-
ulty men "considerably" more
Judicial branch
powers reviewed
Continued from page 1
these cases prompt SG A hearings
before dispensation in a court of
law. 'The current statement puts
the burden on the university to
justify why it's handling the case
on campus Speier said.
"This limits the jurisdiction of
the boards to control the behavior
of the students Speier said.
On the powers of the judicial
boards, Meyer said the boards
should decide on it's power to
hear cases. "(The judicary) should
define the cases it would like to
hear Meyer said.
Pirate Walk begins
first step of semester
Continued from page 1
fraternities and sororities.
"We're hoping to get the greeks,
and anyone else, involved
Murphy said. "I guess it would be
to an advantage to get fraternities
and sororities to applv Pirate
Walk to their community serv-
ices
Murphy plans to organize the
Pirate Walk so it runs smoother
than in past years. He hopes this
will entice students to use its serv-
ices more, preventing possible
campus crime.
"Hopefully everyone will use
it Murphy said. "It's a very good
program especially in the sense
it's useful to the ladies of ECU
The Pirate Walk escort service
number is: 757-6616.
than women, giving male full
professors $4,600 more than
women in 1976-77 and $4,500
more in 1985-86.
The average faculty member,
regardless of rank, makes about
the same in constant dollars as 10
years ago: $32,400 in 1985-86
compared with $32,600 in 1976-
77.
The center also found the gap
between faculty salaries for pub-
lic and private universities con-
tinued to widen.
While public campuses paid
their teachers 4.9 percent less than
private campuses paid their fac-
ulty members in 1976-77, the dif-
ference had grown to 9.1 percent
in 1986-87.
$Mm
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ndi . � . i. i� �� � � � -





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 1,1987
inance aid
dness Martin said
t program, once the
n of federal student
lhas been slashed
n the dominant
�n no increase in
iui said Martin
t been a growth in
l actual!) fewer
around
students trom
are not being
Hartin continued
t talent ve re no!
niortunate
anford almost
as one of the un
r�K uhn . nilHn t
But, with Davis' help, Sanford
reapplied and will receive a GSL
to continue her schooling.
'I'm praying for that check to
get here shesaid " I haven't been
able to buv books yet cause I only
have S-0 to my name at this
point
CAIRO Egypt (AP)- The Arch-
bishop of Canterbury, the most
Ke Robert Runcie, will meet
with representatives of the Greek
Orthodox and Coptic churches
during a week-long visit to Egypt
Runcie, the spiritual leader of
the c hurch of Fngland and the
world's 70 million Anglicans, ar-
med here Monday.
�ast Carolinian
pus mity MJiz-p 1925
J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representives
sso Shari Clemens
Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
$4 25
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OLOR ADVERTISING RATES
Idition 1 � Space Rate)
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)
Charges that students are cheating on the rise
(CPS) � Sen. Joseph Biden (D-
Del.) may have been embarrassed
by revelations that, as a student in
1965, he cheated on a law school
paper, but cheating remains
widespread on American cam-
puses today, various sources say.
Thirty to 50 percent of all col-
lege students say they've cheated
during their academic careers,
researcher William Raffetto
found in a Carnegie Commission
report in 1985.
Duke, Indiana, Pennsylvania
and Georgia universities, among
others, reported increases in the
number of accusations � though
not necessarily offenses � from
the 1985-86 to'the 1986-87 school
years.
At Duke, accusations of cheat-
ing increase when individual
professors take steps to curb aca-
demic dishonesty, said Dean of
Student Life Sue Wasiolek.
Twenty-three students were
charged with cheating during the
1986-87 academic year, she said;
14 werecharged the previousyear
and 12 were accused of cheating
during 1984-85.
The increase is not due to a
campuswide, organized crack-
down, Wasiolek said, but because
individual faculty members have
become more aware of the prob-
lem.
Biden, who recently dropped
his candidacy for the Democratic
presidential nomination � ad-
mitted Sept. 17 that he'd turned in
a paper as a first-year law student
at Syracuse University in 1965
that included 5 pages lifted di-
rectly from a published law re-
view article.
Biden also misrepresented his
academic record during a recent
campaign appearance, according
to Newsweek. Biden reportedly
said he graduated in the top half
of his law school class, but actu-
ally finished 76th in a class of 85.
Biden reportedly also said he at-
tended law school on a full schol-
arship, but actually received a
partial scholarship based on fi-
nancial need, the magazine said.
When caught in 1965, Biden
convinced the law school to let
him take the course again.
"1 did something very stupid 23
years ago Biden said in a Wash-
ington, DC, press conference last
week.
But Biden might not have been
allowed to retake the course if he
was a student today.
Wasiolek said an ethics review
board may show mercy to an
undergraduate for Biden's of-
fense, but, for law school stu-
dents, "ignorance is not an accept-
able defense. Law students are
expected to know how to footnote
a research paper
Schools, in fact, are more vig-
ilant in watching students these
days.
Indeed, on Aug. 31 the Univer-
sity of Texas's Measurement and
Evaluation Center boasted that its
new practice of photographing
students had helped decreased
cheating on placement exams.
Texas also okayed, without
endorsing, a teaching assistant's
practice of searching students'
backpacks as they enter his class
to take tests.
Yale suspended 8 students
Sept. 4 for the fall semester for
allegedly cheating on a take-
home physics exam last spring.
Inflation takes a bite out of faculty salaries
(CPS) � Despite five straight
years of salary hikes, college
teachers are a little poorer than
their colleagues of 10 years ago,
the Center for Education Statistics
said last week.
Inflation, the center � the data-
gathering arm of the U.S. Dept. of
Education � said Sept. 17, has
eaten up the salary gains of all
college faculty members nation-
wide except some of those teach-
ing at private campuses.
Inflation outran faculty salaries
during the 1977-1981 school years
by such a wide margin that col-
lege teachers' buying power in
1986 was 3-to-6 percent lower
than it was in 1976-77.
The center's report also shows
that colleges continue to pay fac-
ulty men "considerably" more
Judicial branch
powers reviewed
Continued from page 1
these cases prompt SGA hearings
before dispensation in a court of
law. 'The current statement puts
the burden on the university to
justify why it's handling the case
on campus Speier said.
"This limits the jurisdiction of
the boards to control the behavior
of the students Speier said.
On the powers of the judicial
boards, Meyer said the boards
should decide on it's power to
hear cases. "(The judicary) should
define the cases it would like to
hear Meyer said.
Pirate Walk begins
first step of semester
Continued from page 1
fraternities and sororities.
"We're hoping to get the greeks,
and anyone else, involved
Murphy said. "I guess it would be
to an advantage to get fraternities
and sororities to apply Pirate
Walk to their community serv-
ices
Murphy plans to organize the
Pirate Walk so it runs smoother
than in past years. He hopes this
will entice students to use its serv-
ices more, preventing possible
campus crime.
"Hopefully everyone will use
it Murphy said. "It's a very good
program especially in the sense
it's useful to the ladies of ECU
The Pirate Walk escort service
number is: 757-6616.
than women, giving male full
professors $4,600 more than
women in 1976-77 and $4,500
more in 1985-86.
The average faculty member,
regardless of rank, makes about
the same in constant dollars as 10
years ago: $32,400 in 1985-86
compared with $32,600 in 1976-
77.
The center also found the gap
between faculty salaries for pub-
lic and private universities con-
tinued to widen.
While public campuses paid
their teachers 4.9 percent less than
private campuses paid their fac-
ulty members in 1976-77, the dif-
ference had grown to 9.1 percent
in 1986-87.
Show Tonight
Beverly Hills Cop 2 -R-
End Of The Line -PG-
Hell Raiser -R-
Starts Friday
No Way Out
Like Father, Like Son
Tonight
ROBOCOP
Starts Friday
DRAGNET
� ANY FOOT LONG SANDWICH m 2J0HE U 2&HE
I
I
I
I
I
I
ANY FOOT LONG SANDWICH
We bake our buns fresh and hot. Then we make the
biggest, freshest and most delicious foot long sand-
wiches in town! Save $1.00 on a hot deal at Subway.
Vie S$&J Jfkwitiv
c
THE PLAZA- 756-2110
208 E. Fifth St 758-7979
With purchase nf .i 22 oz soft drink Not valid with other coupons or
offers At participating stores only Expires October 15, 1987
5th Street
Entrance Now Open
presents
THURSDAY
Wild
Kingdom
Wild
Kingdom
15
Draft
All Night For
Everyone
FRIDAY
ECU
$1.00
off
wcoupon
SATURDAY
1k
1k
wr
ECU
Adm.
I $1.00
playing
RHYTHM & BLUES AND DANCE
18 yr olds welcome!
Doors Open at 9:00 p.m.
Phone: 756-6401
Located In Carolina East Center
(Beside Carolina East Mall)
ALL ABC Permits
Thursday
is
Nite
$1.50 adm. for guys Free for ladies til 12
65tails & wine coolers
10 Draft All Nite
Fri Sat. - Sun All weekend Memberships $1.06
Oct. 21 The Elbo will become a private club with
$1.00 Hi balls All Nite All Week.
Tanning Special!
Unlimited
Use
until Dec. 31st. (1 visit per day)
$49-00
Call today:
758-4359
Bring in this ad
for special
j
ftlmmm ��T�� m � m m� ��, m m �"
A

J





�te East Olarnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, c��miM��,�.
Clay Deani jardt, m, fjm
Andy Lewis, ta v AMES F.j. mcKee, dmam,
IIM C 1ANDLER, s rw ANTl iONY MARTIN, B��o�, M
jot in Carter. w Meg Need, iAM CmiiUium
Shelton Bryant, �w� MiKE upchurch, pvc, m�
Debbie Stevens, w jqhn W. Medlin, m, dw,
October 1, 1987
Opinion
Page 4
MR.PRgaP�A)L,CA0
P�R$(AA) SotP
Nffciidr?

77 e judiciary
Bill would violate rights
The proposed SGA bill that would
allow the Honor Board to try stu-
dents before the students appear in a
court of law is at best foolhardy and
at worst a danger to civil liberties.
It is true that the judicial processes
of the SGA needs better defining;
however, the bill authored by John
Simon would give students on the
Honor Board too much control over
a fellow student's future.
A simple example brings out an
obvious flaw in the bill. Suppose a
student is convicted of theft by the
Honor Board and is punished with
expulsion or a fine of some sort.
Later this student is found innocent
by a court of la w. It is too late to bring
the student back to school even
though he may not be guilty.
This poses another interesting
problem. Within the university,
which ruling would take prece-
dence? Obviously, if a court found
the student innocent, he or she could
sue for re-admittance to the univer-
sity, thus overturning the decision
of the Honor Board. This university
hnot be placed in such a vicari-
Sfcmft position simply for the sake of
judicial clarification.
The bill may not solve that many
problems anyway. Dr. Ron Speier,
associate dean of student life, said 90
percent of all honor code violation
cases are decided by himself when
the student initially pleads guilty to
the violations. Only 10 percent of the
cases ever come before the Honor
Board.
The question of students deciding
penalties for other students is not an
issue in this matter. As peers and as
adults, students have enough ma-
turity and prudence, in most cases,
to render sound decisions based on
available information.
The question that arises is that of
mistakes. It looms heavy on the
horizon. Can the honor board really
punish someone whom a profes-
sional group of people later find
innocent? Is it right for this person to
suffer at the hands of the board
when it seems obvious that civil
jurisprudence will take precedent
over that of the university?
More importantly, is the student
being subjected to the evil of double
jeapordy � a threat from which we
are protected by the U.S.
Constitution?
It seems so. Action taken after a
trial has been held is action taken
and punishment made within house
for an offense that has been
commited. Action taken before a
trial may be punishment made for
no offense at all.
The reverse is also true. What
happens if the Honor Board finds a
defendant not guilty, and then a
court finds him guilty? Is this person
then subject to penalty from the
university? We would hope not.
It seems, very simply, that this
proposal is not thought out well.
There are too many possible prob-
lems for a bill like this.
The SGA should create a commit-
tee to look into ways of improving
our judicial system. If the committee
finds the system needs more real
power, then any further proposals
should be investigated and debated
carefully before any action is taken.
As it stands now, the proposal
Simon authored seems to be a viola-
tion of student's rights as citizens no
matter how you look at it.
to ee osep im
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The draft

SSPfnSesrTTrIf
Bork has right to seat on high court
To the editor:
Where docs Bork get off thinking
that a judge in the Supreme Court has
the right to have opinions that are
different from Congress? Doesn't he
know that everyone is for abortions
and for continued Affirmative Ac-
tion? Besides, who is he to have such
an opinion? Doesn't he know that this
is a democracy? Where does he think
he is, the Soviet Union?
Besides, who is President Reagan to
recommend such a person? Who does
he think he is? He only won the last
two elections by a landslide. That
dwsn't give him the right to try to
make the Supreme Court more con-
servative. Besides, Senators like Jo-
seph R. Biden, who seems to have the
problem of people not being able to
destinguish his own words from
those of others, should be more able to
decide who should be on the Supreme
Court.
Sounds a little silly doesn't it. But
these are many of the arguments that
some are making to keep Judge Bork
off the Supreme Court. Aren't they
the same people that just this summer
said Lt. Colonel Oliver North should
listen to those against aid to the Con-
tras and not call those against his
ideas communist sypathisers or in
this case a radical right wing ideolo-
gist. Maybe they should practice
what they preach.
What they said is right. We in
America have the right to have differ-
ent opinions. This is what has made
this nation great because we take the
time listen to others' views and con-
cerns. Isn't this what a democracy like
ours is really like?
Should someone be able to turn a
person down in a job just because of
their political views. Is this something
that we want to establish? All I am
saying is that when deciding on such
an important job as a Supreme Court
Associate Justice, shouldn't we be
looking at qualifications and get the
best qualified for such an important
job. Instead of just what they think on
one or two issues. For that might
produce a Supreme Court that is
afraid to make tough decision neces-
sary to keep our democracy going.
For we don't want a Supreme Court
that is a mirror image of Congress so
much that they aren't capable of
checking on Congress to insure that
Congress doesn't violate the
Constitution. Fc. if the Supreme
Court is not capable of properly using
judicial review, Congress gains more
powerful leaning to their almost
absolute power over our national
government. Absolute power cor-
rupts absolutely.
Michael Hadley
Freshman
Political Science
The cabinet
To the editor:
I am sure that both students and
faculty have read about the Student
Government Association Executive
Cabinet, and probably did not fully
understand the purpose and goal of
the body.
The 1987-88 Executive Cabinet � is
created by Scott Thomas, SGA I
dent, with the goal of expanding the
visibility and responsiveness of t:
SGA Executive Branch. The dut: �
the SGA President are becomirv; si
vast, it is becoming difficult f �
person to be reponsi veto t he needs :
students. That is where the cabii
begins.
The cabinet is basically a polio
planning and information bod) : i
the SGA President, he cabinet will
be working closely with several or-
ganizations, committees, ECU ad-
ministration, media, SGA Legisla-
tures, and the communities v
surround ECU.
The cabinet is composed of ambi-
tious, responsive and experienced
students who will play a key role in
assisting Scott Thomas in providing a
professional administration. I can
speak for each cabinet member when
I say that we are dedicated to the
success of the Student Government
Association.
Any person who feelsYw or sYvant m
need the services of the SGA F i
rive Branch, or who would like to
make a comment or suggestion, is
encouraged to contact Scott Thomas
or myself.
I would like to encourage each stu-
dent to play an active role in
organizations and make his or her
valuable contribution to the success
of ECU.
Anthony D. Porcelli
Chief oi Staff
SGA Executive Cabinet
Campus Forum
Guilty stick doesn't apply in cases of
poverty when you just can't help it
By RUTH MOOSE
Special to The EaM Carolinian
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
ofjoyncr Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and clas-
sification, address, phone number and
signature of the authoris). Letters are
limited to two typewritten pages, double
spaced or neatly printed. All letters are
subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are reminded
that they are limited to one every two
weeks. The deadline for editorial material
is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday's edition and
5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday's edition.
Campus Spectrum
rules
Forum
rules
In addition to the "Campus Forum"
section of the editorial page, The East
Carolinian features the "Campus
Spectrum This is an opinion column
by guest writers from the student
body and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
in Brooklyn" was devoured sitting in a wild cherry tree in the
South. I learned poverty can live in cities. Beforel'd thought
1 overty is a stick the world beats you with and when the only country kids knew what it was like to live on "not enough
world no longer uses that stick, you use it on yourself. There's My father worked all his life. He didn't make a living wage
always the shame that somehow you did something to deserve My mother worked; she worked in school cafeterias a sock mill
this; that somehow you brought this social disease upon your- a grocery store, and took in sewing on the side She had five
seIf some simple act and there you areguilty. children. My grandmother lived with us, pieced quilts and
If one is guilty of being born ma certain time and place and to helped can summer vegetables. Rent for our five room house
certain parents, then the stick fits. But one is not. Words like cost my father a week's wages. Food cost another week's wages
chance and destiny don't help, even as an adult. The "If Only" Utilities another. We didn't own a car until I was in high school
game can be played over and over again and it doesn't help My father walked or got rides to work, mother too. We didn't
01 p- � , , , have indoor toilet until I was in junior high. No telephone. No
Poverty smells like a kerosene stove. It feels like wearing television. We didn't miss the last iwo There were books and
somebody else's clothes. It hurts like walking in shoes that fit books always helped me through anv time anv situation'
someone else first. It tastes and looks like liver mush. I didn't go to college until I was 45 though I was an honor roll
Wi learn phrases like "Make do" and "Do without the student in high school, most of the time straight A's and worked
latter more than the former. The former is good times. Good half days then, too. No one talked scholarships to me In the
times had hope and laughter. They were summer when you Fifties, girls in Southern mill towns got married made babies
were warm all over and the garden gave good things to eat. At my 25th high school reunion, I saw us still mostly the same
Fruits were free from trees and wild berries from the roadsides, the Haves still had, and the poor had half a dozen kids
Those days you beleived everyone was equal. grandkids. Education had moved a few to the middle class.
Diligence, a few more, but I could have drawn a neat line
�through the town that's still divided by more than the railroad
tracks.
Poverty still stands on those tracks, looks across, up and
down, for a way out. Poverty is always being on the edge of
good things going on. You are never allowed to join in. You
don't ask. Even for events that are free. You stand in the
shadows and accept. That's the worst poverty of all accept-
ing. r K
Poverty is the color of a bruise; a birthmark on your soul.
(Editor's Note: Ruth Moose of Albemarle, Rt. 2, is a poet and
short story writer. She has published stories in Atlantic
Monthly, Redbook, Ohio Review, Sou th Carolina Review New
It was only when you went in stores that you discovered Delta Review, Yankee, Greensboro Review, and other places A
different and learned to say very early to salesclerks, especially collection of short stories, 'The Wreath Ribbon Quilt " recently
in "dime stores "I'm only looking The chance you could buy was published by St. Andrews Press. She is currently poctrv
was small, most times none. But looking was free and full of editor of Arts Journal, and recently was the recipient of a PEN
dreaming. Awardand a Fellowship to the University of Utah VVnter at
If there are dreams, then poverty lossens its rope a little. You Work Series. She has published two poetry collections "To
learn this from literature. Gertie Nevels in "The Dollmaker" Survive" and "Finding Things In the Dark ' and individual
could give dreams because she had one herself. "A Tree Grows poems have appeared in numerous magazines)
Poverty
Scourge of the '80s
,
Man jailed
MADISON, Wis (CIS) A
University of Wisconsin law stu
dent has become the only Amen
can in prison for refusing to regis
ter with the Selective Service Sys
tern
Gillam Kerley, 2b, who enti
a plea of "not guilty by reasi
sanity was sentenced to three
years at Leavenworth Federal
Penitentiary and fined $10,001
Kerley served as the executive
director of the Washington ba
Committee Against Registration
and the I r:
While ser
John Shaba
tinuing cr
"aiding, ah
ing" other
The law
18-year-old
names and
Selective sH
L.S's militi
There is i4
tration i
Amnesty is
LONDON (AP) Amnesty
International, issuing its annual
report on human rights today,
accused the Soviet Union of harsh
treatment of political prisoners
and criticized the United States
for permitting the death penalty
The Nobel Prize-winning
group said it had received reports
of human rights abuses in 129
nations last year.
"Although it learned of fewer
political arrests, Amnestv Inter
national was disturbed that the
Soviet authorities continued to
imprison many citizens whose
conscience had led them to dis-
sent peacefully from official poli-
cies, and to apply compulsor)
psychiatric measures to others
the survey said
"There was no reduction in the
number of capital offenses; at
least eight people were executed
and Amnestv International
learned of a further 17 sentenced
to death the report said of the
Soviet Union.
The London-based group,
which opposes the death penalty
said 18 people were executed in
U.S. prisons in 1986, bringing the
number killed since the 1976 rein-
statement of the death penalty to
68. A record 1,838 prisoners were
on death row as of Dec. 20 last
year, it said.
Amnesty International also
reported
in the Ln
treated
Th
men
Th(
sands
lights abu
dratt cad(
tries
ire
Am- �
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eluded t
use ot amj
punishmer
The - :
worl
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ern Europe!
iticall
awav reh
nun
World
sn t
39 countnc
tenced to
said
only doci
that the &d
tainlv hic'n
TYu
Private colleges band toge
(AP) � For the first time, North
Carolina's 37 private colleges and
universities are banding together
to promote themselves and some
of their better-known alumni.
Gov. Jim Martin, "As The
World Turns" star Eileen Fulton,
Olympic gold medalist Nancv
Hogshead and golfer Arnold
Palmer, all graduates of private
colleges or universities in North
Carolina, will be featured in a new
advertising campaign by the col-
leges.
"This campaign is intended to
remind the people of this state
that some very successful people
got their start at our independent
colleges said John T. Henley,
president of the N.C Center for
Independent Higher Education.
The campaign is sponsored by
the center, a nonprofit organiza-
tion that conducts research and
promotional activities for the in-
dependent colleges and universi-
ties.
Its theme is "Success begins
with Independents
"This is our first cooperative
effort Hope Williams, executive
director of the center, told the
Greensboro News & Record
"This campaign is one way of
focusing on all the independent
colleges
The first ad appeared in Sep-
tember issue of North Carolina
magazine, which is published by
the N.C Citizens for Business and
Industry.
The issue also features an article
about the independent college
sector and a profileof each institu-
tion.
Featured in the first ad are
Martin, who graduated from
Davidson College, and Miss
mir
grad
graduati
Greensbi rl
in future al
Also apf
are the nj
VAVSSVSA'M
&
"

V
Su
.
B
Plaa
ordi
oft i
stort
Octi
75
$2.00
50 c
Sl.OO
RACK
i BRANDED SHO!
Greenville Buyer's Market
I Memorial Drive
I
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Xpen MonSat. 10-
Sunday 1-6
'�WWWMW
IW
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TO PROTECT
KUWAITI
SHIPS THAT
AR�
CARR9A16
OP&OIL
TD JAPAN
-C.VlCARAeilAN
on high court
Pinet was
is SGA Presi-
g the
" ss of the
I he duties of
becoming so
fu nit tor ne
n the ne ds of
c the cab
on bod) for
cabinet will
several or-
- ECl ad-
'� I i gisla-
lities which
mposed of ambi-
and experienced
play a key role in
-mas in providing a
istrarion. i can
t member when
are dedicated to the
� nt Governmenf
0 feels he or shocnav
- of the SGA Execu-
r vvho would like to
imcnt 01 stion, is
ntact Scott Thomas
� encourage each stu-
ike his or her
to the success
Anthony D. Porceili
Chief of Staff
SGA Executive Cabinet
rum
ply in cases of
t can't help it
is devoured sitting in a wild cherry tree in the
rty can live in cities. Before, I'd thought
-hat it was like to live on "not enough
fe. lie didn't make a living wage.
?rked in school cafeterias, a sock mill,
and took in sewing on the side. She had five
other lived with us, pieced quilts, and
� getabies. Rent for our five room house
r s wages. Food cost another week's wages.
I dn town a car until I was in high school.
- i or got ndes to work, mother too. We didn't
ilet until I was in junior high. No telephone. No
1 didn't miss the last two. There were books; and
nelped me through any time, any situation.
jto college until I was 45 though I was an honor roll
y school, most of the time straight A's and worked
In, too No one talked scholarships to me. In the
Southern mill towns got married, made babies.
jigh school reunion, 1 saw us still mostly the same;
had, and the poor had half a dozen kids,
ration had moved a few to the middle class.
. more, but I could have drawn a neat line
wn that's still divided by more than the railroad
ttl stands on those tracks, looks across, up and
vay out Poverty is always being on the edge of
kung on. You are never allowed to join in. You
ken for events that are free. You stand in the
accept. That's the worst poverty of all accept-
he color of a bruise; a birthmark on your soul.
)te: Ruth Moose of Albemarle, Rt. 2,is a poet and
;nter. She has published stories in Atlantic
Ibook, Ohio Review, South Carolina Review, New
1 Yankee, Greensboro Review, and other places. A
Vrt stories, 'The Wreath Ribbon Quilt recently
' by St. Andrews Press. She is currently poetry
Journal, and recently was the recipient of a PEN
Fellowship to the University of Utah Writer at
She has published two poetry collections, 'To
'Finding Things In the Dark and individual
jppeared in numerous magazines).
THE EAST r AROLIN1AN OCTOBER 1.1W7 S
The draft
Clip-N-Save
Man jailed for not registering
MADISON, Wis. (CPS) - A
University of Wisconsin law stu-
dent has become the only Ameri-
can in prison for refusing to regis-
ter with the Selective Service Sys-
tem. J
Gillam Kerley, 26, who entered
a plea of "not guilty by reason of
sanity was sentenced to three
years at Leaven worth Federal
Penitentiary and fined $10,000.
Kerley served as the executive
director of the Washington-based
Committee Against Registration
and the Draft (CARD).
While sentencing Kerley, Judge
John Shabaz cited Kerley's "con-
tinuing criminal activities" in
"aiding, abetting and encourag-
ing" other draft resisters.
The law, of course, requires all
18-year-old males to submit their
names and other information to
Selective Service, which runs the
U.Ss military drafts.
There is no draft now, but regis-
tration opponents say the 1978
registration law makes a draft
possible and encourages the U.S.
to risk war.
CARD'S acting executive direc-
tor, Zoltan Grossman, said the
judge was attempting to make a
political example of Kerley to in-
timidate other anti-draft organiz-
ers.
John Russell of the U.S. Depart-
ment of Justice denied the govern-
ment "singles out those who are
vocally against registering for the
draft Selective Service "ran-
domly picks people to see if they
are registered said Russell, "and
Justice has no stepped-up effort to
prosecute. We try to encourage
people to comply
Grossman said CARD has ap-
plied to Amnesty International
and the United Nations Commis-
sion on Human Rights, urging
Kerley's adoption as a prisoner of
conscience. CARD has initiated a
'campaign to free Gillam Ker-
ley
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Hnnfr'ff yrmrmfldff Ire Crewa
321 E. 10th St. Greenville (next to Wendy')
V 758-0000 I
m
758-0000
VOTED THE NATION'S 1 VANILLA
Buy 1 Sundae or Blend-in. Get 1
12 PRICE
one coupon per order please
coupon good thru October 5. 1987
�fi

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m

Amnesty issues annual report
Hank's Homemarlt fct Crtf�
321 E. 10th St. Greenville (next to Wendy's)
f-J 758-0000
VOTED THE NATION'S 1 VANILLA
NOW DELIVERS
Order your favorite ice cream treat and we'll bring it to your door!
FREE Delivery with this coupon
.
CALL 758-0000
one coupon per order please, coupon good through October 5. 187
I
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LONDON (AD � Amnesty
International, issuing its annual
report on human rights today,
accused the Soviet Union of harsh
treatment of political prisoners
and criticized the United States
for permitting the death penalty.
The Nobel Prize-winning
group said it had received reports
of human rights abuses in 129
nations last year.
"Although it learned of fewer
political arrests, Amnesty Inter-
national was disturbed that the
Soviet authorities continued to
imprison many citizens whose
conscience had led them to dis-
sent peacefully from official poli-
cies, and to apply compulsory
psychiatric measures to others
the survey said.
"There was no reduction in the
number of capital offenses: at
least eight people were executed
and Amnesty International
learned of a further 17 sentenced
to death the report said of the
Soviet Union.
The London-based group,
which opposes the death penalty,
said 18 people were executed in
U.S. prisons in 1986, bringing the
number killed since the 1976 rein-
statement ofthe death penalty to
68. A record 1,838 prisoners were
on death row as of Dec. 20 last
year, it said.
Amnestv International also
reported complaints of prisoners
in the United States being ill-
treated.
The 129 nations listed by the
independent group make up
four-fifths of the United Nations
membership.
The 400-page report cited thou-
sands of examples of alleged
rights abuses, from the jailing of
draft evaders in European coun-
tries to government-sanctioned
torture and killings in Latin
America, Africa, Asia and the
Middle East.
Alleged atrocities cited in-
cluded the massare of more than
150 prisoners by Peruvian secu-
rity forces, the execution by ston-
ing of eight people in Iran and the
use of amputations as a judicial
punishment in Saudi Arabia.
The report also accused the
world's richest nations, particu-
larly in North America and West-
ern Europe, of ignoring the plight
of political refugees and turning
away refugees in increasing
numbers.
Worldwide, 743 prisoners were
known to have been executed in
39 countries and 1,272 were sen-
tenced to death in 67, the report
said. It said the figures represent
only documented executions and
that the actual number was "cer-
tainly higher
The 1987 survey gives a coun-
try-by-country accounting of
work hy Amnesty International's
more than 500,000 volunteers last
year. It said omission of some
countries did not necessarily indi-
cate an absence of human rights
violations but could reflect a lack
of information.
The survey noted improve-
ments during 1986 in the human
rights records of several coun-
tries, notable the Philippines,
Uganda, Zimbabwe, Zaire and
Guatemala, but it did not attempt
to identify a worldwide trend.
In a report on alleged ill treat-
ment of prisoners in the United
States, the survey said Amnesty
International had expreessed
concern to U.S. authorities over
the death of Vinson Harris, who
perished near a federal prison in
Butner, N.C.
"A North Carolina coroner es-
tablished that Vinson Harris had
died of asphyxiation after guards
had tightly wrapped his head,
neck and face in bandages while
he was being transported by bus
to a federal prison in March 1986
it said.
The survey also reported alle-
gations that inmates of the peni
tentiary at Marion,III were
beaten by guards during a "lock-
down" in November 1983 follow
ing the killing of two prison
guards by inmates.
Private colleges band together to promote themselves
(AP) � For the first time. North
Carolina's 37 private colleges and
universities are banding together
to promote themselves and some
of their better-known alumni.
Gov. Jim Martin, "As The
World Turns" star Eileen Fulton,
Olympic gold medalist Nancy
Hogshead and golfer Arnold
Palmer, all graduates of private
colleges or universities in North
Carolina, will be featured in a new
advertising campaign by the col-
leges.
"This campaign is intended to
remind the people of this state
that some very successful people
got their start at our independent
colleges said John T. Henley,
president of the N.C. Center for
Independent Higher Education.
The campaign is sponsored by
the center, a nonprofit organiza-
tion that conducts research and
promotional activities for the in-
dependent colleges and universi-
ties.
Its theme is "Success begins
with Independents
"This is our first cooperative
effort Hope Williams, executive
director of the center, told the
Greensboro News & Record.
'This campaign is one way of
focusing on all the independent
colleges
The first ad appeared in Sep-
tember issue of 'orth Carolina
magazine, which is published by
the N.C Citizens for Business and
Industry.
The issue also featuresan article
about the independent college
sector and a profileof each institu-
tion.
Featured in the first ad are
Martin, who graduated from
Davidson College, and Miss
Hogshead, a 1984 Olympic swim-
ming gold medalist and Duke
graduate. Palmer, a Wake Forest
graduate, and Ms. Fulton, of
Greensboro College, will appear
in future ads.
Also appearing in the first ad
are the names of William Earl
Britt, chief U.S. judge for Eastern
North Carolina, who graduated
from Campbell University; D.
Wayne Calloway, chairman of
Pepsico corp Wake Forest Uni-
versity; Vicki Chastain, mayor of
Marietta, Ga Queens College;
U.S Rep. Howard Coble, R-N.C.
W
I
Visual Arts Committee Presents
The Magic of Neon
Exhibition
For more information, contact the
Student Union at 757-6611, ext. 210
1
j
BALLOON SALE
Place your
order in front
ofthe student
store from
October lst-6th
75 - Latex
$2.00 - Mylar
501 - Delivery
$1.00 - Delivery by Clown
Organizations call 752-1048
For Large Quanity Rate
Sponsored by Leisure Systems Studies
RACK ROOM,
BRANDED SHOES
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
Open MonSat. 10-9
Sunday 1-6
10
OFF
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(EXCEPT AIGNER. NIKE AND REEBOK)
The report added: "Amnesty
International wrote to the (U.S.)
authorities expressing concern
thatU.S. militaryassistancctothc
irregular armed forces (Conras)
opposing the government of
Nicaragua may have contributed
directly to killings, abduction and
torture by those forces
Commenting on soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev's policy of
Glasnost, or openness on selected
topics, the survey welcomed
plans to publish Soviet crime sta-
tistics regularly for the first time
since 1934.
But it said conditions in prison
and collective labor colonies
where most prisoners of con-
science were held remained poor.
"Prisoners were kept on mo-
notonous, meager rations with
only rudimentary medical care,
and had to meet excessively high
work targets often involving
heavy physical labor it said.
PARTY
ANIMALS
830-1823
Balloons Delivered
in Costumes
Gorilla - Grams
Gator - Grams
Penguin for Hire J
Clip-N-Save
United tttew
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
Why not come by the REAL Crisis Intervention Center: 312
E. 10th St; or call 758-HELP. For Free Confidential Counsel-
ing or Assistance.
Our Volunteers and Staff are on duty 24 nra. a day, year
around, in order to assist you in virtually any problem area
you might have. Our longstanding goal has always been to
preserve and enhance the quality of life for you and our com-
munity.
Licensed And Accredited By The State of North Carolina
m&
CHILDtEN,
ANYTIME
THEATfttS
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Grunnvillw Squarti Shopping Cinilnt
All Movies Starting Friday
ROLLING VENGEANCE
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1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
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Rated R
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CANT BUY ME LOVE
Rated PG-13
1 00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
STUDIO LINE
Presents a
Special College
Preview
r,
O
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UNITED ARTISTS PRESENTS
DIANE KEATON In
A NANCY MEYERSCHARLES SHYER PRODUCTION 'BABY BOOM-
HAROLD RAMIS SAM WANAMAKER and SAM SHEPARD as JEFF COOPER
MUSIC BY BILL CONTI Director of Photography WILLIAM A. FRAKER, A.S.C.
Written by NANCY MEYERS & CHARLES SHYER
Produced by NANCY MEYERS Directed by CHARLES SHYER
PG r��T �� swssnD � : Ik
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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6th - 8:00 P.M.
HENDRIX THEATRE
Sponsored By Student Union Films Committee
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i010tu0ttlf�- ��.� ���w�nl rfWW Oumi��Km�.u�MW�W m� �
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBFB 1
1987
A
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED - Recphonist needed
�or Drs office. Part-time in the after
noons 1-5 p.m. 5 days a week. Good with
the public and a fast learner Call 757-
WA1TRESS, WAITERS, BANQUET
SERVICE PERSONNEL, COOKS. The
Hobday Inn Greenville is now hiring for
the above positions Good working con-
ditions, excellent benefits. Applications
being accepted M-F9am - 5pm. No phone
calls please. 702 S. Memorial Drive.
TELEMARKETERS needed for Home
Improvement Company 20 hours per
week l-5pm M-F or 5-9pm Sun. - Th.
Desire assertive, mature persons who
need to work. Call 355-7108 between 1-
8pm.
MAKE QUICK MONEY! Earn $25 to $50
per car buying customer sent to me Call
Herab for details 355-5099
PICTURE FRAMERS NEEDED. Full
and Part-time positions available Experi-
ence helpful but not necessary Apply in
person only at Susan's Gallery, 1413-A
South Evans Street
BROD VS for men has full time and part
time sales associates positions, for enthu
siashc, fashion forward individuals. Re-
tail Clothing experience is required Bet-
ter than average starting salary Apply in
perosn, Brody's Personnel Director,
Carolina East Mall M-YV 2-4pm.
BRODVS has part time sales associates
positions for enthusiastic, out going in-
duviduals who enjoy working with
young contemporary Junior Fashions
Good salary. Apply in person, Brods
Personnel director, Carolina East Mall M-
W, 2-4pm.
A LEADING CLOTHING RETAILER
needs a full-time office associate to work
M-F 9 6. Individual must be accurate and
posses skills in accountingbookkeep-
ing Salary based on experience Good
salary and benefits package Apply in
person or call for interview appointment
Judith C Simon, Brodv's Personnel Di-
rector M W 2-4pm 756-2224.
GREENHOUSE TECHNICIANS
needed for part time employment Flex-
ible hours Weekends and after school
Call 756-0879.
GOVERNMENT JOBS $16,040
$59"30vr. Now Hiring Call 805-687-
6000 Ext R-1166 for current federal list.
AIRLINES NOW HIRING. Flight Atten-
dants, Travel Agents, Mechanics, Cus-
tomer Service. Listings. Salaries to S50K
Entry level positions Call 805-687-6000
Ext A-1166.
STOCKBROKER TRAINEE College
Grad, Opportunity for hardworking, en-
thusiastic individual, Send rusume to. P.O.
Box 8814 Virginia Beach, VA 23450.
FOR SALE: 1980 Mazda Rx7, 5 speed, air
conditioning, sun roof, am-fm cassette
stereo. For more information contact Lisa
at 758731.
AIRBRUSHED T-SHIRTS & other items
professionally done Custom one of a kind
�rt work Call Paul 752-2321 Also Tiedved
T-Shirts. r
ADOPT A PLANT Hants never wet the
floor or eat your new Reeboks! Come to the
Biology Club Plant Sale and adopt the
perfect "pet See the announcement sec-
tion for more information.
STUDENTS, FACULTY, STAFF: Lowest
prices, highest quality diskettes $.95 each,
$9.0010. Guaranteed with sleeves, hubs,
tabs included. Only from IMEX Oder
Today. Call 758-8395.
FOR SALE - Couch and chair, bed rue
Call 752-6597.
FOR SALE: Dance and Exercise Wear at
discount prices. Visit our Rody Boutique at
Total Eclipse - 422 Arlington Blvd 355
3531.
TUXEDO RENTALS. Low prices, high
quality Special Fraternity and Sorority
rates. Door to Door Service. Complete line
of tuxedos from $40 and up. Troll's Tux
and Tee's 757-1007 or 758-0763.
HALLOWEEN TS. While they last get
your Halloween '87 t-shirt We also carry
Stop Aids and Stickin' the Pack. Or we will
make any t shirt for any ocassion Call
Troll's Tux and Tee's 757-1007 or 758
0763.
FOR SALE. Trek 400 Series Racing Bike 23
inch frame. Price negotiable Call Danny
ON A TIGHT BUDGET?? Try our "meal
deal " -14 lb hamburger, hot roast beet
chick fellet, or pizzaburger - with fries and
drink $2.49 -Lasagna (or spaghetti)
with salad and garlic bread 'only $3 95
757-0731 or 757-1278 Famous Pizza -10th &
Evans (Specials not for delivery).
LOVE JEWELRY? Call for your invita
rion to a private showing of high quali t v.
low cost costume jewelry If interested,
you can host a show yourself and re
ceive FREE jewelry Ask for Barbara at
752-3152 between 9-5 M-F, and 756-8709
at other hours
TYPING AND WORD PROCESSING:
Two copies for the pnee of one! From
$150 a page. Also, custom signs, ban
ners and greeting cards 752-9637
ary. Ask about our special offers
COMING SOON LASER PRINTING
SYSTEM Call Mark at 757 3440 after
7:00 p.m. for free information.
NEED TYPING! Call758 1161 until 5 00
PM Call 758 2119 after 5:00p.m.
WORD PROCESSINGlctter quality
or laser printing Rush Jobs accodpted
752-1933
OUR COMPANY, DELTA IMAGES,
wil produce a professional TV. News'
Resume tape for you at a resonalbe
price. Your voice and stand ups profes-
sionally edited with actual new footage
ALso have your tape distributed nation
ally via satellite to potentionally hun
dredsof news directors, consultants and
agents Production crew scheduled in
your area soon Call for further informa
tion 919.933 8929
ELECTROLYSIS (permanent removal
of unwanted hair) by Barbara Venters
People who understand electrolysis will
not wax, tweeze or use electronic
tweezer or any other temperary
method Isn't it time to try the perma
nent method Call 830-0962 for free
consultation
DISKJOCKIE- The imitations are sim
ply that TRASHMAN DJ Service,
golden grooversbody movers, new
wax, new wave, top 40, any mixer, soi-
cal, Bar Mitzpha, pool party, etc
Contact 752 3587. Having a party and
need a DJ?
S1G EP's Don't forget the car wash on
Sat. and (he party Sat night
WORD PROCtSSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES. Wo offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes 24
hours in and out Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages SDF
Professional Computer Soravicos, 106
East 5th Street (Beside Cubbies)
Greenville, NC 752-3694.
PICK UP AND DELIVERY of term pa
pers, theses, resumes to be typed. IBM
wordprtvossmg bv professional with 13
vears experience Letter quality print and
professional editing Call Nanette in
Grifton at 1524-5241 Cheap call-the best
service!
ONE BEDROOM SPECIAL Tar Riverj
Estates: $150 off 1st month rent when
signing a 12 month lease or the option to,
sign a 9 month lease 1400 Willow St 1
752-4225.
WANTED Roommate or roommates
wanted to share 2 bedroom apartment at
Tar River Estates. Preferably female Call
Todd at 752-3032.
NEEDED: Female to share 2 bedroom
apt $125 mo l 2 utilities 3 blocks from
campus 758-9381
1 BEDROOM upstairs apartment avail
able (Xrtober 1 3 blocks from campus. All
utilities paid $250 per month Lease &
Deposit required 758-1274 after 5 00 pm
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apts for Rent
furnished Contact Hollie Simonowich
752-2865.
PERSONALS
FOR RENT
FOR SALE
PERSONAL COMPUTER
TUTORING! Learn to use a PC! (There
are dozens available on campus) In
structions and free word processing
software 752-9637
PROFESSIONAL BUT NOT
EXPENSIVE! Progressive Data Services
offers professional word processing to
students and professionals Term pa
pers, dissertations, themes, reports and
much more as low as $1 75 per page
(Please call for quote on vour project)
Price includes printing on high quality
bond paper and spelling verification
against a 50,000 word electronic diction-
KA'S: Thanks for having us over Satur
day night of Parents Weekend You guys
are great and We Love You. Love, The
Sigmas.
KAPPA SIGS: Polyester was great, we
love partying with ya'II, whenevei we get
together we always have a ball You were
dressed to impress in your clothes worth
a dime, let's do it again soon, it gets bette
every bmc Love, The Sigmas.
CONGRATULATIONS To Natalie
Moore 1987 1988 Homecoming Repre-
sentative of Sigma Sigma Sigma Good
Luck! Love, The Sigmas.
TRI SIGS, What away to start the
semester, Rumple mint and Polyester
Shaking and Baking and Throwin Down,
you girls really know how to rock this
town. We couldn't believe how fun it was
Tn Sigs, Kappa Sigs, and a killer Buzz!1
Love, The Kappa Sigs.
AZD PLEDGES: Don't forget about the
cookout tomte at 7:00 pm Be ready to
party with the sisters after the meeting.
SIC EP PLEDGES: Troy, Chns, Ted &
Steve It's late, but I know you'll under-
stand Partying with you all Induction
Night was an absolute blast1 You guys are
great and I know you'll give your 110
during pledging Good Luck Love Ya
KP, A DZ.
SIG EPS AND PI KAPPS You guys
raged at the ECU Tea Party See you again
Friday at 5 p.m. For $2 Iced Teas!
CREEKS, CREEKS Tea-off your
weekend, Fridays 5 p.m. until close with
16 oz. Long Island Iced Teas served in a
mason jar for only $2 Rock & Rol and
High Energy Dance Music. Sheraton's
Off the Cuff Lounge.
CHI OMEGAS - Thanks for making our
ECU Tea Party a smash Tea-off" time is
5 pm. every Friday at the Sheraton.
TIM, HAPPY LATE BIRTHDAY! Hope
you enjoyed last night as much as we did
We love you - Traci & Theb.
ZBT BROTHERS: Just wanted to let you
guys know how much fun we had this
past weekend It was a great party Love
your Little Sisters
COME AND HEAR the dynamic
speaker, Hon Shirley Chisholm, speak
on "Women and Work in America: Then
and Now Monday, October 17th at 8
p.m. in Hendrix Theater. Tickets are $2
students, $3 facultystaff, $5 public
door Sponsored by Student Union Fo-
rum Committee
FRESH AND HOT Call for fast free
delivery. Buy a large pizza, get 2-liter
coke FREE Buy a small pizza, get 2 drinks
FREE Call Now - Famous Pizza 757-1278
or 757-0731.
ATTENTION ALL BEER LOVERS: S 99
pitches with large pizza EVERY
NIGHT Famous Pizza - Corner 10th
Evans 757 1278 or 757-0731
I MADE SOME HEADWAY on whether
it is spelled THEATER or THEATRE A
friend told me that the French ssiell it R(
and the Americans spell it ER It would be
tu tu nice if you could help me out on
this Meet me at Wright Auditorium for
the North Carolina Dance Theater on
Monday, October 5th, at 8 00 p m I'll be
wearing the red carnation Signed, 100
Natural "Art"
ATTENTION: Don't forget Alpha Xi
Delta's Happy Hour Every Wednesdj,
night at Pantana's - It's the BEST excus,
for missing Thursday's classes'
SIG EP'S: The Happy Hour Wednesday
at Tequila Bar was a blast, has anyone
seen my hose7 Betty Sue
Nuggets
Trademark
Free 8-Pack Of ChiceFil-A Nuggets!
PI RTMASE ONE OP Ol.R CHICK ML A MEALS AND GET A KREF
nlgcets wrrn -mis COUPON
8 PACK OF CHICK HI. A
MraU delude Chick ftl A S-ndwlch�, or Chick HI A Nugru. Waffl, Potato Fn ind ro
Coupon no. good w�h �y oU offer One coupon prTn� p v�t clZ?sj�?
L� � � � � �Carolina East Mall
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
$21 5 Ahom.m from 13 lo IX weeks it addmonal cm
rn-gnanoy I cm. Bmh Control, and Prahler, Pregnancy
ouittding for ftinher information, call 132X1535 (toll
freenumNrr i-MO-532 S3S4)b�W8ai9aja ,nd5pm
weckdayi CJcncr. anesihcsu available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
��������j �Aiiuau coupon ���
1 UIi.y!Trr APPETITE?
Educators lend advice
to pres. campaign
BOSTON (AP) - Educators,
including former University of
North Carolina president William
Friday, say they are taking their
case for a more ethical, racially
balanced and competitive nation
to the presidential candidates of
both parties.
A commission of 32 higher
education leaders plans to play an
active role in the 1988 presidential
campaign by briefing all the can-
didates on a wide range of educa-
tion and policy issues. Racial
equality, economic competitive-
ness and ethical standards must
be stressed in college classrooms
to flourish in the world at large,
the educators said Tuesday.
"Our purpose was to develop
an agenda which a new president
might find help in shaping his or
her program for Congress, " said
Friday, chairman of the Commis-
sion on National Challenges in
Higher Education, known as the
Friday Commission.
Higher education has tried to
influence past political platforms,
but participants say the
cxrnrnission's efforts mark the
first coordinated attempt to de-
velop national education policy.
Commission members, includ-
ing Harvard University President
Derek Bok and Ernest Boyer of the
Carnegie Foundation, met over
the past year, a time when elations
between higher education and the
Reagan administration were
rocky at best and hostile at worst.
Friday said the commission's
goal is to re-establish a partner-
ship between academia and gov-
ernment "We had that partner-
ship in the '60s and 70s. It isn't
there today he said in a tele-
phone interview Tuesday.
"What has been a very success-
ful long-term relationship since
World War II between the federal
Washington-based organization
represents 54 of the nation's most
prominent colleges and universi-
ties.
Although the 25-page report
will discuss the need for more
federal spending on education,
including an increase in student
loan funding, Friday said: "This
paper is not a shopping list.
"It will obviosly take federal
funding to do some of these
things he said. "But the empha-
sis will be on the institutions look-
ing at themselves and saying
'we've got to do some things
too 6
The report is still in draft form,
but Friday said its broad outlines
are already clear. In addition to
equal opportunity, competitive-
ness and ethics, the report will
recommend:
� Broader efforts to secure peace
and international order in the
world.
�Better relations between gov-
ernment, pnvate enterprise and
universities.
�Cleaning up the environment,
improving health care and tack-
ling substance abuse, illiteracy
and uneven distribution of
wealth.
Friday said higher education
has had a rocky relationship with
the Reagan administration. But he
said the report is an attempt to
influence future policy, not criti-
cize past or present leaders.
"We're not pointing the finger at
anybody he said,
government and colleges and uni-
versities has fallen into despair in
the last decade or so said Robert
M. Rosenzweig, president of the
Association of American Univer-
sities.
Rosenzweig was not himself a
commission member, but his
JEAN H&PPER
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Whether it's Ringgpld Towers Condos or
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GreenvtiU NCV?,
9"i9 355-5866
PIZZA MENl'
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Two hems
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Tuna Melt
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Ham and Cheese
Vegetarian
SALADS
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SMALL MF fill V I U
1 19 2N
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BEVERAGES
Coca Cola. Diet Coke Small Medium Liter
Spnte. Mefc) YeJou 55 66 95
Cherry Coke
323 Arlington Blvd.
(across from Farm Fresh)
. . . owooat wom -nmat tow��
rrvmn Xfcu SS1 hfcw�i � g, ft, ,
SPECIALTIES
Freshly Fiaked Crazy Bread
� d m -�rm ftt Sc. �, .� cw� mm, - -
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756-7256
HOURS: SUN-THU 11 AM-12 MIDNIGHT
FRI-SAT 11 AM-1 AM
Looking for an" exciting and challenging
career? Where each day is different? Many Air
Force people have such a career as pilots and
navigators. Maybe you can join them.
Find out if you qualify. Contact your Air Force
recruiter today. Call
TSgt Steve White (919)850-9724
Station to Station Colect
� � m m Mn m m ��
�wtiwiam
;ojaiw6rk
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
SOCWCWS .II.MIU MAj(� �,
�wouraK�)regiSlerearht),1.nu(,
m Acteartytoaeelth, .
spngmdorsummer car,
��� advantage of Fed
Jto, or private industr)
NLKbl.N'GSTLIX.Mb
Stop by 312 Rawi for in
merous iiurse extern programs as
"�her opporrunito r ,un,nu.r
men, It b important to plan ahead ai
earlv to meet certain I
VVRI.i.TLINGU.l.B
Anvne interested in
turnor v

lowirf � I
R, j

All a

� �
I
� rt a, 75;
bers Ai, m
�� nii-m
DJV1TLLB
tfy���Py xuba diving and s
Wg, then y(,u ne-J to Din H I
Reef Div�
1399 and , . :
CQMMirnL I'UbiriUNb
Applications ar. now bein,
t�r students mshtn;
k '
ear Nineteen student
� I ommittees with
hisoi,
Ed C1). Canvassing . .
1, Internationai Student :�
Residence Life (1 Ff-campus). Rea
Jf� Appeals ' Status of Minori
� ' � : � Health Services 2) I a
ntinning Ed (1), Cui
�mputer (2), C
.r-ranev i) , and 7. .
Applications are avail-
ing locations Office ol
the Vke Chancellor for Si I
Whirhard, Mendenhall inl
Desk; SC A Office, Mendenhall
!li!J Directors Offices
about University Committee! i
berships may be directed to the (Iffice ol
the Vice Chancellor for Student I it.
MADRIGAL DINNER;
Tickets are now on sale tor Madrigal
Dinners to bo held Dec 2-5 at 700 p m m
Mendenhall Tickets are $10 for ECU stu-
dents and Sih tor all others Now is th.
lime to order vour tickets, as they always
Uqu . Central Ticket
661 ext 264
NhlL SIMON PLAY
I OUGHT TO BE IN PlCn I RES, a play
bv Neil Simon will be part of a dinner-
theatre production on Thurs , Oct 8 and
Fn , Oct 9at 6.30pm in the Mendenhall
Auditorium Tickets are I
dents and S16 for all others CaU tr
tral Ticket Office tor tickets j! ' 7 ��
ext 266 All tickets are by advance sales
5$o tickets will be solcl at the door
errsTorTxonorn! Dcnv -
be holding an organizational meet
830, Wed Sept 30 in Mendenhall
� j
D Iki
BR( �.
i
tfr"
sen
ents th
Mend
Ion Fr
inTl
mi
i
.aMroNtcV wil
are invited tj
STUDENT SPECIi
APPLIANC
Perfect fol
& apuf
Jppfo cofidg,
204 E. 5th St.
Open Mon. Sat. 10:00 a.m. 9
Get Ready For the
SPIRIT. Let Apple Record:
Select costumes, masks,
and accessories For Your
ized Halloween Appearai
our Catalog to order Youi
characters - From Pirate's
to Spuds MacKenzie masl
today!
Oh Yeh! Don't Forget
"BOO
��






1
JHEEASTCAKOMM1AN.
OCTOBER 1f 1987
A
4

Classifieds
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED - Recpbonist needed
lor Drs office. Part-time in the after
"�ons 1-5 p m 5 days a week. Good with
i323PUW,C Snd (aSt " CaU 757'
�pv.SS WAITES. BANQUET
SERVICE PERSONNEL, COOKS. The
Holiday Inn Greenville is now hiring for
the above positions Good working con
ditions, excellent benefits. Applications
being accepted M-F9am - 5pm No phone
calls please. 702 S. Memorial Drive
TELEMARKETERS needed for Home
Improvement Company 20 hours per
�eek 1-5pm M-F or Spm Sun. - Th
Desire assertive, mature persons who
need to work. Call 355-7108 between 1-
8pm
MAKE QUICK MONEY! Earn $25 to S50
per car buying customer sent to me Call
Herab for details. 355-5099
PICTURE FRAMERS NEEDED. Full
and Part time positions available Experi-
ence helpful but not necessary Apply in
person onlv at Susan's Gallery. 1413-A
South Evans Street
BRODVS for men has full time and part
time sales associates posibons. for enthu
siastic, fashion forward individuals. Re-
tail Clothing experience is required Bet-
ter than average starting salary Apply in
perosn. Brodv's Personnel Director
Carolina East Mall M W 2-4pm
BRODVS has part time sales associates
positions for enthusiastic, out going in-
duviduals who enjoy working with
young contemporary Junior Fashions
Good salary Apply in person, Brodv's
Personnel director, Carolina East Mall M-
W, 2-4pm.
A LEADING CLOTHING RETAILER
needs a full time office associate to work
M-F 9 6. Individual must be accurate and
posses skills in accountingbookkeep-
ing Salary based on experience Good
salary and benefits package Apply in
person or call tor interview appointment
Judith C. Simon, Brodv's Personnel Di-
rector M-W 2-4pm 756-2224.
GREENHOUSE TECHNICIANS
needed for part time employment Flex
ible hours Weekends and after school
Call 756-0879
GOVERNMENT JOBS $16,040
$59,230 yr Now Hiring CaU 805-687-
6000 Ext R-l 166 for current federal list.
AIRLINES NOW HIRING. Right Atten
dants. Travel Agents, Mechanics, Cus-
tomer Service. Listings Salaries to $50K
Entry level positions Call 805-687-6000
Ext A-1166.
STOCKBROKER TRAINEE College
Grad, Opportunity for hardworking, en-
thusiastic individual, Send rusume to P.O
Box 8814 Virginia Beach, VA 23450.
FOR SALE: 1980 Mazda Rx7, 5 speed, air
conditioning, sun roof, am fm cassette
stereo. For more information contact Lisa
at 758-6731.
AIRBRUSHED T-SHIRTS & other items
professionally done. Custom one of a kind
art work. Call Paul 752-2321 Also Tiedyed
T-Shirts
ADOPT A PLANT Hants never wet the
floor or eat your new Reeboks! Come to the
Biology Club Plant Sale and adopt the
perfect "pet See the announcement sec-
tion for more information.
STUDENTS, FACULTY, STAFF: Lowest
prices, highest quality diskettes $.95 each,
$9 0010 Guaranteed with sleeves, hubs,
tabs included. Only from IMEX Oder
Today Call 758-8395.
FOR SALE - Couch and chair, bed rue
Call 752-6597. R
FOR SALE: Dance and Exercise Wear at
discount prices. Visit our Rody Boutique at
Total Eclipse - 422 Arlington Blvd 355-
3531.
FOR SALE
TUXEDO RENTALS. Low prices, high
quality Special Fraternity and Sorontv
rates. Door to Door Service Complete line
of tuxedos from $40 and up. Troll's Tux
and Tee's 757-1007 or 758-0763.
HALLOWEEN TS. While they last get
your Halloween '87 t-shirt. We also carry
Stop Aids and Stickin' the Pack. Or we will
make any t-shirt for any ocassion Call
Troll's Tux and Tee's. 757-1007 or 758
0763.
FOR SALE. Trek 400Series Racing Bike 23
inch frame Price negotiable Call Dannv
757 -1367.
ON A TIGHT BUDGET?? Try our "meal
deal " -14 lb hamburger, hot roast beef,
chick fellet, or pizzaburger - with fries and
drink �$2.49 -Lasagna (or spaghetti)
with salad and garlic bread 'only $3 95�
757-0731 or 757-1278 Famous Pizza 10th &
Evans (Specials not for delivery).
LOVE JEWELRY? Call for your in vita
tiontoapnvate showing of high quality.
low cost costume jewelry If interested,
you can host a show yourself and re
ceive FREE jewelry Ask for Barbara at
752-3152 between 9-5 M-F, and 756-8709
at other hours
TYPING AND WORD PROCESSING:
Two copies for the price of one! From
$150 a page. Also, custom signs, ban
ners and greeting cards 752 97
PERSONAL COMPUTER
TUTORING! Learn to use a PC! (There
are dozens available on campus.) In-
structions and free word processing
software 752-9ex37.
PROFESSIONAL BUT NOT
EXPENSIVE! Progressive Data Services
offers professional word processing to
students and professionals Term pa
pers, dissertations, themes, reports and
much more as low as $1 75 per page
(Please call for quote on your project )
Price includes printing on high quality
bond paper and spelling verification
against a 50,000 word electronic diction
ary Ask about our special offers
COMING SCXN - LASER PRINTING
SYSTEM Call Mark at 757 3440 after
7:00 p.m. for free information.
NEED TYPING! Call 758 1161 until 500
PM CaU 758 2119 after 5:00p m
WORD PROCESSING letter quality
or laser printing Rush Jobs aceedpted
752-1933
OUR COMPANY, DELTA IMACES,
wil produce a professional TV. News,
Resume tape for you at a resonalbe
price Your voice and stand-ups profess
sionally edited with actual new footage
ALso have your tape distributed nation
ally via satellite to potentionally hun
dreds of news directors, consultants and
agents Production crew scheduled in
your area soon Call for further informa-
tion 919933 8929
ELECTROLYSIS (permanent removal
of unwanted hair) bv Barbara Venters
People who understand electrolysis will
not wax, tweeze or use electronic
tweezer or any other temperary
method Isn't it time to try the perma
nent method Call 830-0962 for free
consultation
DISKJOCKIE- The imitations are sim
ply that TRASHMAN DJ Service,
golden griKversbody movers, new
wax, new wave, top 40, any mixer, soi
cal. Bar Mitpha. pool party, etc
Contact 752 3587 I laving a party and
need a DJ'
SIG EP"s Don't forget the car wash on
Sat. and the party Sat night
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages SDF
Professional Computer Seravices, 106
Easl th Street (Beside Cubbies)
Greenville, NC 752-3694.
PICK UP AND DELIVERY of term pa
pers, theses, resumes to be typed IBM
wordpnvessing bv professional with 13
years experience. Letter quality print and
professional editing Call Nanette in
Cnfton at 1 524 5241 (heap call - the best
service!
ONE BEDROOM SPECIAL Tar River.
Estates: $150 off 1st month rent when
signing a 12 month lease or the option to,
sign a 9 month lease 1400 Willow St 1
752-4225.
WANTED Roommate or roommates
wanted to share 2 bedroom apartment at
Tar River Estates Preferably female. Call
Todd at 752 3032.
NEEDED: Female to share 2 bedroom
apt $125 mo l 2 utilities 3 blocks from
campus 7589381
1 BEDROOM upstairs apartment avail
able October 1 3 blocks from campus. All
utilities paid $250 per month Lease &
Deposit required 7581274 after 5:00 pm
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apis for Rent
furnished Contact I lollie Simonowich
752-2865.
PERSONALS
FOR RENT
KA'S: Thanks (or having us over Satur-
day night of Parents Weekend You guys
are great and We Love You Love, The
Sigmas.
KAPPA SIGS: Polyester was great, we
love partying with ya'll, whenever we get
together v e always have a ball You were
dressed to impress in your clothes worth
a dime, let's do it again soon, it gets bette
every time Love, The Sigmas.
CONGRATULATIONS To Natalie
Moore 1987 1988 Homecoming Repre-
sentative of Sigma Sigma Sigma Good
Luck! Love, The Sigmas.
TRI SIGS, What away to start the
semester. Rumple mint and Polyester
Shaking and Baking and Thro win Down,
you girls really know how to rock this
town. We couldn't believe how fun it was
Tn Sigs, Kappa Sigs, and a killer Buzz"
Love, The Kappa Sigs.
AZD PLEDCES: Don't forget about the
cookout tonitc at 7:00 pm Be ready to
party with the sisters alter the meeting.
SIG EP PLEDGES: Troy, Chris. Ted &
Steve It's late, but I know you'll under
stand Partying with you all Induction
Night was an absolute blast1 You guvs are
great and I know you'll give your 110
during pledging Cotxi Luck Love Ya
KP, A DZ
SIG EPS AND PI KAPPS You guys
raged at the ECU Tea Party. See you again
Friday at 5 p.m. For $2 Iced Teas!
CREEKS, CREEKS Tea-off" your
weekend, Fridays 5 p.m. until close with
16 oz. Long Island Iced Teas served in a
mason jar for only $2 Rock at Rol and
High Energy Dance Music. Sheraton's
Off the Cuff Lounge
CHI OMEGAS - Thanks for making our
ECU Tea Party a smash Tea-off" time is
5 pm. every Friday at the Sheraton
TIM, HAPPY LATE BIRTHDAY! Hope
you enjoyed last night as much as we did
We love you - Traci it Theb.
ZBT BROTHERS: Just wanted to let you
guys know how much fun we had this
past weekend It was a great party Love
your Little Sisters
COME AND HEAR the dynamic
speaker, Hon Shirley Chisholm, speak
on "Women and Work in America: Then
and Now Monday, October 17th at 8
p.m. in Hendrix Theater. Tickets are $2
students, $3 facultystaff, $5 public
door Sponsored by Student Union Fo-
rum Committee �
FRESH AND HOT Call for fast free
delivery Buy a Urge pizza, get 2 liter
coke FREE Buy a small pizza, get 2 dnnks
FREE Call Now - Famous Pizza 757 1278
or 757-0731.
ATTENTION ALL BEER LOVERS: $99
pitches with large pizza EVERY
NIGHT Famous Pizza - Corner 10th
Evans 757 1278 or 757-0731
I MADE SOME HEADWAY on whether
it is spelled THEATER or THEATRE A
friend told me that the French spell it K
and the Americans spell it ER It would be
tutu nice if you could help me out m
this. Meet me at Wright Auditorium lor
the North Carolina Dance Theater on
Monday, October 5�h, at 8 00 p m I'll be
wearing the red carnation Signed, lOO
Natural "Art
ATTENTION: Don't forget Alpha X,
Delta's Happy Hour Every Wednesday
night at Pantana's - It's the BEST excuse
for missing Thursday's classes'
SIC EPS: The Happy I lour Wednesday
at Tequila Bar was a blast, has anyone
seen my hose7 Betty Sue
Free 8-Pack O
"il-A Nuggets!
OfcT A rfW.F. 8 PACK OF OIK k h
PURCHASE ONT OF OCR CHICK F1L A
NCGG rrs WTTH TH IS CO! IPON
Meal. Include Chick ftl A Sandwich, or Chick fll A Nu�M. W.IW- PouUo tort- n
Coupon no.jK.dwHh.nyoO.nW One coupon person per vTkTsun
I nirnllna rir m�rll
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
S.1: J Ahoruon from 13 to 18 week. �i .ddmon.1 cod
Pregnancy lest. Birth Control, and ProMctn Pre�ji�ncy
Counseling For further information, call 32OS35 (toll
frrc nurr.hcr 1 -ROD S12 s 4) baween 9am and 5 p.m.
weekday! General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ao:aiji7atiauc
Educators lend advice
to pres. campaign
BOSTON (AP) - Educators,
including former University of
North Carolina president William
Friday, say they are taking their
case for a more ethical, racially
balanced and competitive nation
to the presidential candidates of
both parties.
A commission of 32 higher
education leaders plans to play an
active role in the 1988 presidential
campaign by briefing all the can-
didates on a wide range of educa-
tion and policy issues. Racial
equality, economic competitive-
ness and ethical standards must
be stressed in college classrooms
to flourish in the world at large,
the educators said Tuesday.
"Our purpose was to develop
an agenda which a new president
might find help in shaping his or
her program for Congress, " said
Friday, chairman of the Commis-
sion on National Challenges in
Higher Education, known as the
Friday Commission.
Higher education has tried to
influence past political platforms,
but participants say the
commission's efforts mark the
first coordinated attempt to de-
velop national education policy.
Commission members, includ-
ing Harvard University President
Derek Bok and Ernest Boyer of the
Carnegie Foundation, met over
the past year, a time when elations
between higher education and the
Reagan administration were
rocky at best and hostile at worst.
Friday said the commission's
goal is to re-establish a partner-
ship between academia and gov-
ernment. "We had that partner-
ship in the '60s and 70s. It isn't
there today he said in a tele-
phone interview Tuesday.
"What has been a very success-
ful long-term relationship since
World War II between the federal
Washington-based organization
represents 54 of the nation's most
prominent colleges and universi-
ties.
Although the 25-page report
will discuss the need for more
federal spending on education,
including an increase in student
loan funding, Friday said: "This
paper is not a shopping list.
"It will obviosly take federal
funding to do some of these
things he said. "But the empha-
sis will be on the institutions look-
ing at themselves and saying
'we've got to do some things
too �
The report is still in draft form,
but Friday said its broad outlines
are already clear. In addition to
equal opportunity, competitive-
ness and ethics, the report will
recommend:
� Broader efforts to secure peace
and international order in the
world.
�Better relations between gov-
ernment, private enterprise and
universities.
�Cleaning up the environment,
improving health care and tack
ling substance abuse, illiteracy
and uneven distribution of
wealth.
Friday said higher education
has had a rocky relationship with
the Reagan administration. But he
said the report is an attempt to
influence future policy, not criti-
cize past or present leaders.
"We're not pointing the finger at
anybody he said,
government and colleges and uni-
versities has fallen into despair in
the last decade or so said Robert
M. Rosenzweig, president of the
Association of American Univer-
sities.
Rosenzweig was not himself a
rommission member, but his
I
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; LATE NfTE APPETITE? �MBfeHm S
immm I BUY ONE I
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GET ONE Mil
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identical pizza FREE!
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BUY ONE PIZZA GET ONE FREE!
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single family homes, we can find a place for
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Gf.eenvi!f� NC ?'t-
919 355-5866
SMALL MEDIUMLARGE
8 pc 10 pc12 pc
535 7109 50
605 80010 60
675 8901170
7 45 �8012 8D
851 109014 10
�ZZAMENl
win
iree toms
Little Caesars Special
iFVtmn.� Muv.�m Gnv
Extra Items over J
'Extra Cheese
� I'HOOSr KtOM TrSSl TCWUNt.S
�Tt�t,�, Must� f�ir� Urn &�.�, (�
P��IW�. NrhlT��'twSSr,JC
Own � JHw
BEVERAGES
Coca Cola. Diet Coke Sma� Mecium
Sprite MeSo YeJow. 5S 66
Cherry Coke
70
150
90
200
I 10
2S0
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Liter
95
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(across from Farm Fresh)
CAESARS SANDWICHES"
Tun Melt
hafcar Sub
Ham and Cheese
Vegetarian
SALADS
Tossed
Greek
AntipasT
haarii luu,
SPECIALTIES
Freshly Baked Crazy Bread"
aiud� ����, v.�, �. l�, a 4 p
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p�ufv MnaAnai aaaaiu
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756-7256
HOURS: SUN-THU 11 AM-12 MIDNIGHT
FRI-SAT 11 AMI AM
Looking for an exciting and challenging
career? Where each day is different? Many Air
Force people have such a career as pilots and
navigators. Maybe you can join them.
Find out if you qualify. Contact your Air Force
recruiter today. Call
TSgt Steve White (919)850-9724
Station to Station Collect
- ,�
-PM
5UUAIYVQRK
CRIMINAL JUb IJ(. 1
���raged toregMtweari, Ms semesta
"id,i th�( operative Educatior, Oft
wt3i2 ArteartytomeetthedeadlHws
�orspmg andor summer careei -
"vrru Take advantage ,i.
��; or private mdusrj
NWlN'OSlLiMNJis
Stop by 312 Raw! forinJ � ��, ,
merous nurse extern programs as v.
other opportunities lor summer en
mart Itts important to plan ahead a,
early lomeel certain
Anyone interested in .
n me club tea
eppert at 7 )660 Old 1
bers welcome!
PJVf.CLLB
I' you enjoy scuba diving and sm
in ft then you n�.d , ,
COMMIT U'QSlTIQNb
Apphcahons are now being accepted
or students wishing to serve
��
ear Nineteen student a
'(-�' ' ommittees will . , .
AIDSEd Ad Hot Advisory
OrugEd (1). Canvassing A .
ampus (1), Internationa Student A
Residence Life (1 off-campus) Rest
denl Sums Appeals 0 , Status of M.non
ta t Health Services (2) Ca
� I � nbhumg VA l).urricti
turn . i ley Computer (2). General
Libraries (1) and Tea
Applications .
foil twing locations Iffi
the Vice I hanceHor lor Student
Whichard. Mendenhall Informa
tesk; SGA Office. Mendenhall, and I
" Mall Directors Ofl
rt "it Universitv fommin. .
berships ma U directed to rJv
the Vir Cham ellor for Stude: �
I
RV5 De.
R343 Maul
R223 Alial
to Kuth j
den
d
�� 7
:
("HAITER
itors
iejv.i �
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vou nuv in
D,
MADRIGAL DlN.NhRS
Tickets are now on sale for Madrigal
!nners to be held Dec 2-3 at 7 00 p m in
Mendenhall Tickets are $10 for ECU stu-
dents and $16 tor all others Now is the
time to order your tickets, as thev always
sell quickly C all the Central Ticket Of-
.it 757-6611, ext. 266
NEIL SIMON PLA
1 OUGHT TO BE IN PICTURES . pl
by Neil Simon will be part of a dinner-
theatre production on Thurs , Oct 6 and
Fn Oct 9 at 6:30 p m m the Mendenhall
Auditorium Tickets are $10 (or ECU stu
dents and $16 for all others Call the C i
tral Ticket Office for tickets at 7 6(
ext 266 AH tickets are b advance sales
jjo tickc, . will be sold at the door
I �� Vic. � 4 j
SlufeWsrxoriSfoncTiir'
vx- holding an organizational meeting at
Wed . Sept Vi in Mendenhall
The
en!s th
ith at
Offict
pm Mot
jr.
Mendi
r Com
ing The n
scum � � - � I
Mendenhall
ERESHJ
The ' J
irs :wt and tr
arshij. trr;
.K1X.t.x. Mil
are invited tj
Wed . CVt
Forfuithi
6967 or 697
STUDENT SPECK
APPLIANCI
Perfect fol
& apai
rJlNCH
REFRK
& M1C1
-4 �Call for me
I hottero
-T. C group
LApp& lcofids.
204 E. 5th St.
Open Mon. Sat. 10:00 a.m. 9.1
Get Ready For the
SPIRIT. Let Apple Record:
Select costumes, masks,
and accessories For Your
ized Halloween Appearai
our Catalog to order Youi
characters - From Pirate's
to Spuds MacKenzie masl
today!
Oh Yeh! Don't Forget
"BOO
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 1, 1987
1 KAPPS ou guvs
rea Party Sit? you again
01 s: Iced Teas!
�I KS 1 i tt" vour
is 5 p m until dose with
d ivi Tt �'red in a
v $2 Rock Rol and
e Musk SherjUn v
ks :or making our
i t" time is
Sheraton
IV BIRTHDAY! Hope
' as m uch as we did
I'rao & Thob
anted to let ou
un we had this
d) namio
'im speak
k Then
17th at 8
;ets are $2
- h
rum Committee.
FRESH AND HOT Call for fast free
delivery. Buy a large pizza, get 2-liter
coke FREE Buv a small pizza, get 2 drinks
FREE Call Now - Famous Pizza 757-1278
or 757-0731.
ATTENTION ALL BEER LOVERS: $.99
pitches with large pizza EVERY
NIGHT Famous Pva Corner 10th-
Evans 757 1278 or 757-0731
1 MADE SOME HEADWAY on whether
it is spelled THEATER or THEATRE. A
tnend told me that the French spell it RE
and the Americans spell it ER It would be
tu tu nice if vou could help me out on
this Meet me at Wnght Auditorium for
the North Carolina Dance Theater on
Monday October 5th, at 8 00 p m I'll be
wearing the red carnation Signed, 100
Natural "Art"
ATTENTION. Don't torget Alpha Xi
Deltas Happv Hour Every Wednesday
night at Pantana's It's the BEST excuse
tor missing Thursday s classes!
SIC EPS: The Happy Hour Wednesday
at Tequila Bar was a blast, has anyone
seen mv hose1 Betty Sue.
Nuggets
e 8-Pack Of Chick-Fil-A Nuggets!
, m- s ufl t red s pack of chick fiua
. (gtta w.fllr Potato Frit1 and colr�la
� pcsaan trt vu Cki Sundays
Carolina East Mall
�Al
�-s�-�
TE APPETITE? !
MUM PIZZAS
Onry
When you make pizza this good, dim just isn't mough
.( rouPO. lip ��! WU COUKM Bi0
irtttEi
I BUY ONE I
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i GET ONE FREE!
I
s tax
I pm
plus 2 itirmi
.a- pnce, get
l zza FREE'
iO LIMIT
Buy any size
zza at regular price, get
:dentical pizza FREE!
NO LIMIT
�.� � . . � � -�!�'
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Expires 9-30-87
IH r-xpires 9-30-87
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7256 EC 756-725 FCj
jcoukx � �����faMa viSucoupon �� rjl
lUCOUWX
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� �� �� l an � a iuau coumw at
�WI UW� Cae� OKopracv he
EEPIIIAI
IE PIZZA, GET ONE FREE!
MM . MFJXUMARGr
1 K !0 pc12 pc
�'950
. 0 60
-
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CAESARS SANDWICHES
Txn Melt
ltn Suf
Ham and CSwsr
V'ectanan
SALADS
m d
Green
AiMlt-W
2 76
236
236
236
SMALL MEDIUM LARGE
1 19 2 3" 3�
: W 289 469
1M
Srt Mfciur- Lrter
66 9S
igton Blvd.
irorr, Farm Fresh)
"aPFCIAl TIF S
Fresruv. � Crav Bread
A �. Bm ��r � (
Cw. �-�
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it KYMNGS
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1 19
nCiHW
36
756-7256
)LRS: SUN-THU 11 AM-12 MIDNIGHT
FRI-SAT 11 AMI AM
ihallenging
' Many Air
pilots and
m.
Air Force
9724
K.AlWOJnK
Announcements
CBJ-MiNALJUSTlCE
SOCWCRIM JUSTICE MAJORS are
encouraged to register early this semester
with the Cooperative Education Office in
Rawl 312 Act early to meet the deadlines
for sping andor summer, career related
employment Take advantage of Federal,
State, or private industry opportunities
op by .312 Rawl for info on the nu
merous nurse extern programs as well as
other opportunities for summer employ-
ment It is important to plan ahead and act
early to meet certain deadlines
WBr:5TLJNjCLL!B
Anyone interested in wrestling this
vear on the club team please call Tom
! oppert at 752 1660 Old and new mom
bers welcome!
riim
If you enjoy scuba diving and snorkel
ing, then you need to join ECU's Coral
Reef Dive Club For more info call 752
4399 and ask for Qenn or Rob.
COMMITTED POSITIONS
Applications are now being accepted
for students wishing to serve on Univer
sity Committees for the 198788 school
vear Nineteen student positions are
open Committees with vacancies are
AIDS Ed , Ad Hoc Advisory (1), Alcohol
Drug Ed (1), Canvassing Soliciting on
Campus (1), International Student Affairs
(1), Residence Life (1 off-campus), Resi
dent Status Appeals (1), Status of Minori
ties (2), Student Health Services (2), Ca
reer Ed. (1), Continuing Ed (1), Curricu-
lum (2), Faculty Computer (2), General
College (1), Libraries (1), and Teaching
Effectiveness (1). Applications are avail
able at the following locations: Office of
the Vice Chancellor for Student Life, 204
Whichard; Mendenhall Information
Desk; SGA Office, Mendenhall; and Resi
dence Hall Directors' Offices Questions
about University Committees and mem
berships may be directed to the Office of
the Vice Chancellor for Student Life (757
K541V
MAPBIGAL!L&S
Tickets are now on sale for Madrigal
Dinners to be held Dec 2-5 at 7:00 p.m. in
Mendenhall Tickets are S10 for ECU stu-
dents and SI 6 for all others Now is the
time to order your tickets, as thev always
sell quickly Call the Central Ticket Office
at 757-6611, ext. 266.
NEIL SIMON PLAY
1OUC1 IT TO BE IN PICTURES, a play
by Neil Simon will be part of a dinner-
theatre production on Thurs Oct. 8 and
Fri Oct 9 at 6:30 p.m. in the Mendenhall
Auditorium. Tickets are $10 for ECU stu-
dents and S16 for all others. Call the Cen-
tral Ticket Office for tickets at 757-6611,
ext 266. All tickets are by advance sales,
(jjo tickets will be sold at the Joox
3 SlilfesfeconontcTrXT'acTir
be holding an organizational meeting at
830, Wed , Sept. 30 in Mendenhall. -
SDLFiPS
Students interested in making applica-
tion for School of Business Scholarships
should secure forms from one of the fol
lowing department offices: Accounting
R325; Decision Sciences - R238; Finance -
R343; Management RI37; Marketing
R223. All applications must be submitted
to Ruth Jones (Rawl 334), Chairman of
School of Business Scholarship Commit
tee, by October 16. 1987. Students may
apply for one or more of the scholarships
listed below (even when funding is pend-
ing)
UNIVERSITY BOOK EXCHANGE:
$500, Academic merit. NCNB: $500, Aca
demic merit J. FRED HAMBLEN: S350;
Academic excellence in business law
course and good citizenship. CREDIT
WOMEN INTERNATIONAL: $200; Fi-
nancial need, scholarship, and citizen-
ship Recipient must have graduated from
public or private high school in Pitt
County. (Funding is pending- you may
make application.) CAMERON
BROWNFIRST UNION SCHOLAR
SHIP for a deserving student specializing
in finance, economics, real estate, or ac-
counting 3 at $500 each (Funding is pend
ing; you may make application.) AC
COUNTING MAIORS ONLY: LATNEY
W. PITTARD MEMORIAL: Annual earn
ings of established corpus; scholarship,
citizenship, and need. Permanent resi-
dence of a candidate for this scholarship
must be in Eastern North Carolina (East of
Highway 195) or any county west of
Highway 1-9j in which Pittard and Perry,
lnc , maintains an office. ACCOUNTING
MAIORS ONLY - RALEIGH DURHAM
CHAPTER INSTITUTE OF INTERNAL
AUDITORS $350; recipient must have at
least 3 00 GPA, must have completed 12
semester hours of accounting, and must
have expressed strong interest in internal
auditing profession. (Funding is pending,
you may make applicationDECISION
SCIENCE MAIORS ONLY - GRANT
FOR DECISION SCIENCES MAJORS
$125; scholarship, need, and citizenship.
FINANCE MAIORS ONLY - ARCHIE R.
BURNETTE: $600; Academic excellence
and citizenship.
PANCETHEATRE
The Dept. of University Unions pres-
ents the N.C. Dance Theatre, Mon Oct.
5th at 8:00 pm. in Wright Auditorium
Tickets are on sale at the Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall, from 11:00 a.m. - 6:00
pm. MonFri. For further info call 757-
6611. ext. 266.
THE FIXX
Major Concerts Committee is sponsor-
ing The FIXX in concert in Minges Coli-
seum, Oct 8th at 8:00 Tickets are on sale at
Mendenhall. The prices are $7 for stu-
dents and $9 for the general public.
FRESHMENSOPHOMORFS
The Military Science Dept. is beginning
its two and three-year Army ROTC Schol-
arship campaign. All students who are
MMW ri n Army ROTGScholarship
are invited to attend an info, session or
Wed , Oct. 7 at 6 p.m. in room 210 Ex win
For further info , call Capt. Mitchell at 757-
6967 or 6974
STUDENT SPECSAL!
APPLIANCE CABINETS
Fterfect for dorm rooms
& apartments
r-JlNCUJDEsl,
REFRIGERATOR
& MICRQWaVlS
Call for more information
iJ, group
758-0641
I 104 CLARK STREET
oApp. "ocofidg
204 E. 5th St. 758-1427
Open Mon. - Sat. 10:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Get Ready For the Halloween
SPIRIT. Let Apple Records Help You
Select costumes, masks, make-up,
and accessories For Your Personal-
ized Halloween Appearances. Use
our Catalog to order Your Favorite
characters - From Pirate's costumes
to Spuds MacKenzie masks! See us
today!
Oh Yeh! Don't Forget to say
"BOO
��whiiWiiii�����. ir �i�wi

!10Li
Plant Sale i Ne ECU Biology Club will
be sponsoring �� sale Thurs Oct. 1
and Fri Oct. 2. Th - ale will take place in
the Biology Greenhouse, room BS-111
from 7.V) a.m. to 1 �0 p.m.
LD MONTH
October is Learning Disabilities Month
in N.C. The Pitt County Association for
Children and Adults with Learning Dis-
abilities (ACLD) will meet Tues Oct. 6 at
7:30 p.m. at St. James United Methodist
Church, 2000 E. Sixth St Greenville, N.C.
This an open meeting. For more info
contact Debra Kerawalla at 756-2584.
NAVIGATORS
FLIGI IT 730! Come and join us for fun,
fellowship, and Bible study. Thurs. nights
at 7:30 in Biology 103.
LECTURE
HON SHIRLEY CHISHOLM will be
lecturing on "Women and Work in Amer-
ica; Then and Now The lecture will
begin at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theater on
Mon, Oct. 12. Tickets are $2 for students,
$3 for facultystaff, and $5 for the public
and at the door. Tickets are on sale now at
the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The Gamma Beta Phi National Ilonor
Society will have a meeting on Oct 6 at 7
p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium. Attendance
is required and dues must be paid by Oct.
20.
POETRY FORUM
The ECU Poetry Forum will meet in
Mendenhall 248 at 8 p m Thurs Oct. 1.
aai
The Student Council for Exceptional
Children will have a meeting on Thurs
Oct. 1 in Speight in room 211 Please At-
tend.
BACCHUS
Come join Bacchus (Boosting Alcohol
Consciousness Concerning Health of
University Students) Thurs night, Oct 1
at 730 in Mendenhall, room 242.
RESUME WORSHpp
A resume workshop is being offered at
the Career Planning and Placement Serv
ice on Thurs Oct 1 and Fri Oct. 2 at 3
p.m. at the Bloxton House. Worksheets
and workbooks will be supplied.
ORCHESTRA
The Dept. of University Unions pres-
ents the TONKVENSTLER ORCIIESTRA
OF VIENNA on Tues, Oct 13 at 8:00 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium Tickets are now on
sale at Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall,
757-6611, ext. 266.
DISCOVERING SPAIN
The Student Union Travel Committee
presents the opening TRAVEL-ADVEN
TURE film, Discovering Spain, on Thurs
Oct. 15 in Hendrix Theatre at 8:00 p.m
Tickets for this film are limited, but still
available. For further info contact the
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall, 757-
6611, ext. 266.
VOLUNTEERS
The Pitt County Juvenile Services Resti
tution Program needs volunteers to su-
pervise and interact with juveniles as they
perform various work activities within
the community. You may volunteer any
number of hours per week Mon. through
Sat. Volunteers need to be available four
to six hours per month. For further info
call 752 1811, ext 419.
BODY FAT ASSFSSMFNT
You can have your percent body fat
measured (free of charge) in a matter of
minutes. I need Caucasian male subjects
between 18 and 30 years of age for my
thesis research study. If you meet these
criteria, please call immediately All
measurements will be made at the 1 luman
Performance Lab (room 113) in Minges
Coliseum Call Kimberly Eastman Zirkle
at 758 2933 anytime TODAY' If not there,
leave name and number and call will be
returned A.S.A.P.
SWIM MEET
The Dept. of Intramural -Recreational
Services will be sponsoring the annual
swim meet. Registration will take place at
7 p.m in Bio-102. All swimmers are urged
to participate.
VT1ALL
Registration for co-rec water basketball
will be held Oct 7 at 6 pm. in Brewster D-
103. All faculty, staff and students are
welcome to participate.
NAACf
The East Carolina Chapter of th
NAACP will have a meeting Thurs , Oct
1st at Mendenhall. Persons interested in
chairing a committee should be present.
Upcoming events will be announced also.
ERASI
The ERASE (Eastern Regional All
Support and Education) Group will hold
its monthly meeting in First Presbyterian
Church on corner of Elm and 14th at 8 p.m
Tues , Oct 6 If you're interested in AIDS
education at the community level or help-
ing persons with AIDS, or just want to
know more for your own peace of mind,
call Jerry at 757 3990 or Stan at 7568453 to
get info
ENVIRONMENTAL
Environmental Health majors are en
couraged to register with the Cooperative
Ed. Office in 312 Rawl and to consider the
Career-Related work experiences avail-
able with the Federal and State Govern
ments as well as private industry Don't
miss the application deadlines
PHI BETA LAMBDA
We will be having a regular meeting
Wed , Oct 7 in R302 at 3 00 p m New
members are still welcome �Business
and Business Education Majors.
BASKETBALL
Intramural one on one basketball wi.l
hold its registration Oct 7 at 7 pm in
Brewster DKB For more info, call 757
6387.
Plant Sale
ECU Biology Club
Thurs. Oct. 1
Fri. Oct. 2
7:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
at the
Biology Greenhouse
Room Sill

if,

The Pitt
County Fair
(Fastest Growing Fair in N.C.)
will be in Greenville
with its giant exposition
all next week.
The Largest Midway
East of Raleigh.
Watch Next Tuesday's
Paper for details.
CO
EAST CAROLINA
TEA PARTY"
Every Friday
� $2.00 Iced Teas
FREE N
V
o
en, c
Sheraton Greenville
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
CROW'S NEST
Reasonable Prices
Complete Breakfast,
Lunch and
Dinner Meals
Open 24 Hours a Day
RESTAURANT
Monday, Tuesday, & Wednesday
7 a.m7 p.m.
Wear Something with E.C.U.
letters or colors and get:
Cheese Omelet $2.00
with choice of grits, hashbrowns, & toast
Student Special $2.00
with 3 Pancakes, 2 eggs & a meat.
Enjoy the game room & large screen TV.
Corner of 10th & Charles St.
758-2446
0
���'






THf 1 Mil VHOI INIAN
Entertainment
CXTOBER 1. 1987 Pago 8
Kole amazes audience at ECU
By GRETCHEN JOURNIGAN
Suff Writer
"I stand here in amazement and
wonder how 1 do that says fa-
mous illusionist, Andre Kole.
Kole performed many of his
own illusions Wednesday night
in Wright Auditorium. Through
his work asan entertainer, he tells
others his spiritual testimony.
As the light bulb disappeared
from under the red silk scarf, Kole
explained how Jesus Christ rose
from the grave Faster morning in
order to save man from sin.
"Religions are a dime a dozen
but Christianity is a relationship
with God said Kole.
He performed other original il-
lusions such as "the crazy lady"
and "the Bermuda Triangle
Kole appeared to cut his assis-
tant, Cathy, into three pieces
without blood shed and Kole
himself disappeared from a trian-
gular box.
Oscar, the mind reading duck,
performed a card trick with a
volunteer from the audience.
As Kole walked around the
audience, he collected coins from
people's noses and ears into his
tin can.
He also made a replica of the
Statue of Liberty disappear from
the stage by removing a purple
curtain which covered it.
Sophomore Michael Holton
said, "The show itself was really
entertaining and unexplainable
but the spiritual aspects of his life
testimony were outstanding
Pitt County fair opens Oct. 5
By GRFTCHFN JOURNIGAN
Opening its 68th season Oct. 5,
the Pitt County legion Agricul-
tural Fair will feature creative
exhibits, thrilling rides and
grandstand shows.
Organizations in Pitt and sur-
Andre Kole brought illusion and spiritual testimony to F.CV in his
performance in Wright Auditorium Tuesday night.
Pro wrestling missing action
ByCHIPFYBONEHEAD
Staff Wnter
The floor of the Rose high
svhool gvm is smothered in card-
board. The bulletin board in the
hall yellsout "Math is Fun in red
v instruction paper. Jaycoes are
selling three ounce cups o( Sprite.
Obviously, it must be the set-
ting for a night of professional
wrestling.
On the card tonight are some ot
the well, medium names in the
sport. Names like Gorgeous
limmy Garvin. Lazertron. Thud-
erfoot One and Two. Nothing in,
say, Cyndi Lauper's class. But
still, it's a real live pro wrestling
event here in Greenville.
Who showed up at the match?
Kids. Kids that watch a lot of
"ALF Kids that spend 10 bucks
on black t-shirts with Magnum
TA's face and upper body on
them.
Parents. Parents who are so
tired of watching thai furry little
bastard from space that they tork
out nine dollars a head to get
away from the television set Nine
dollars to take the kids to see
overweight, nearly naked men
with masks pick each other oil the
floor by their tights
Moms who wish they could use
the sleeper hold on the kids. Dads
who are audibly distressed when
Garvin's girlfriend walking
mannequin Previous doesn't en
ter the building.
Old people Old people who
didn't mind watching "AITand
have used their Efferdent mone)
to buy a ticket that allows them to
attempt to sleep while over 85
kids are screaming "Chokehold!
Strangler
Fat girls. Fat girls in lighl t
shirts who stomp their feet, buck
ling the already weak bleachers,
when the Italian Stallion wiggles
his embroidered underwear at
them
And what goes on at the center,
in the middle of the canvas stage?
A lot of yelling. A lot of abuse
directed at the blatantly ignorant
referee, because he didn't see that
mean bad guy pull the 310 pound
good guy's hair. Awww.
Wrestlers di veout of the ring an
average of two times a bout. Every
time, four Greenville police slide
up the aisies, presumably to keep
the kids from spilling their drinks
on the fighters.
Only once did a wrestler get
knocked into the seats. A little
rednecked kid kicked him, but a
cop saw it and the kid got booted
from the gym.
Current favorites this season
are Lazertron and. theMod Squad.
I -aze dresses like the old Japanese
Godzilla-fighter, Ultra Man, and
he does a lot of somersaults in the
ring. Rumors abound that he is
See WRESTLING, page 10
rounding counties will exhibit
special inbterests in agriculture,
industry, science, art and educa-
tion.
Agricultural exhibits will in-
clude "prize" livestock.
The W.C. Eagles Farm
Homc,ead,famed village, will
exhibit ideas pertaining to family
life as related to agriculture, edu
cation and general family living at
the turn of the century and be-
yond.
Making its 32nd appearance at
the Pitt County Fair, Amuse-
ments of America will provide
over 30 rides, shows, funhouscs
and concessions.
Special appearances includes
Herriotfs European Trained Ani-
mal Circus owned by John Hcr-
riot, former Ringling Brothers,
Barnum and Bailey ringmaster.
Circus shows are free with gen-
eral aadmission and will present
two 45 minute shows nightly
Tuesday through Saturday. It is
being sponsored by Coca Cola
bottling Company and Domino's
Pizza, both of Greenville.
Also, featured with the circus
will be Commerfords Petting Zoo
and Circus Menagarie that is free.
The fair is presenting a new
auto thrill show, "Hollywood
Stunt Worid dreeted by-ahc
famed Jack Kotchman.
At the grandstand, other thrill
shows will include The Monster
Beech Nut Crusher which will be
Wednesday and Thursday nights
at 7 p.m also free with general
admisssion.
The Buck Swamp Kicking
Cloggers will present a free folk
festival on the fair midway en-
trance, from Monday through
Friday nights at 7 p.m.
Midway music will be pro-
vided by the antique carnival
band organ, "Carrousel Queen"
during the week.
Fair Manager Elvy K. Forrest
said that preparations have been
under way since the first of the
vear to make this fair the best ever.
Thursday, Oct. 8, ECU and Pitt
Community College students will
See FAIR, page 10
The master illusionist has enter-
tained the globe through 7 world
tours during his career He has
traveled extensively through cit
ies in Japan and India.
Kole doesn't claim to have su
pernatural powers He said "Any
8 year-old could perform my illu-
sions with 15 years of practice
Kole said, 'There's not much to
be said but a lot to be seen
He is a consultant for David
Copperfield and has worked with
other professionals in his field of
work.
Kole has written books explain-
ing why and how he invented his
famous illusions and his spiritual
testimony , "Miracles or Magic?"
He is a staff member of Campus
Crusade for Chnst
Joe Shrader, member of the
crusade, said that Kole is a unique
individual and he presented good
Christian entertainment for the
public.
During Kole's career, he was
once involved with the Federal
Trade Commission proving that
psychic surgeons in other coun-
tries created false illusions of
healing the terminally ill
Kole's show was sponsonxi bv
Campus Crusade for Christ, In-
ter-Varsity, and Navigators.
'The Principal' lacks a realistic ruler
By CHRIS MITCHELL
Staff Writer
Christopher Cain's "The Princi-
pal" promotes itself as a realisic
view into a problem high school.
Although the film's realism is
questionable, Cain has directed a
film full of interesting characters
and excellent camera usage.
"The Principal's" drawing
power comes from actors James
Bolushi and LouisGossett Jr. Crit-
ics have favored Bolushi for vari-
ous supporting roles in comedv
while Gossett has won both criti-
cal acclaim as well as Academy
and Emmy awards.
The film centers on Belushi as
Rick Latimer, an educator fixed in
a frat lifestyle. Latimcr's attitude
has destroyed his marriage and
his career. As the school board
realizes Latimcr's position, they
straddle him with Brandel High.
Latimer accepts the position of
principal at the city's most-feared
high school.
Brandel High has flourished by
having the most delinquents
shuffled from other schools and
the most fearful teachers who
have fallen to educating only
those who want to be educated.
Latimer soon understands school
policies through the head of secu-
rity,JakePhillps(Gossett)� poli-
cies that allow Brandel to expel
students only if thev comit felo-
nies. The school's location and
student body have eventually
adusted school policies to the
standared of an education in Be
ruit.
Much of the film's characters
and actions deal in extremes. La-
timer attempts to make THF BIG
DIFFERENCE in turning around
the attitudes of students ami
teachers. The film's theme takes
tough love to the limits. "The
Principal" bringsout nearly every
parent's nightmare in Brandel
types. Disrespect for teachers and
other students, vandalism, illegal
drugs and violence fill the school.
To what extent Brandel is rypi
cal is hard to determine; the media
Again, The Principal" takes
place in an impoverished part of
the city where crime brings the
biggest profits. If the film does not
exaggerate the problems just to
obtain the price of a ticket, then
why do the hoods bother to con-
tinue school? Why not get out into
the real world of crime a few years
early?
Also, "The Principal" does not
fall into the rut of pulling down
the sheets to get its R rating. (The
language and violence provide
the R.) Litimer does not get in-
volved with the history teacher to
provide an overused romantic
subplot. Instead the story follows
Latimer tring to make the Big
Difference � helping the few
students that really want to learn.
There are no "good" students at
dominate the film as much as the
characters. Violence and potential
riots require various camera
angles and movements edited
together so that action is dynamic
and understood. The final chase
scene in the girl's showers winds
through a maze of stalls, swinging
doors and water pipes.
"The Principal" relies on a fast-
moving plot and intense charac-
ters. Only the question of realism
hampers the film but overall pro-
vides a longer look into the worst
of schools, longer than most news
shows allot.
Rick Latimer (Jim Belushi) tries to help a student out in "The Princi-
pal, now playing at the Plitt Theaters.
have recognized such extremes as Brandel, only a few who want a
being common to many urban
high schools. Is the film's degree
of extremes realistic? Students sell
and use drugs in the hallway,
students assault the principal and
one student openly pulls a gun on
him. Such blatant acts are treated
as extreme for the principal and
the audience; never does anyone
notify the police or punish the stu-
dents. The attempted rape of a
teacher is the exception, yet the
student never showed any reason
for the assault
better life but still make mistakes.
Perhaps the only casting flaw
might be Rae Dawn Chong as
Miss Orozco, the history teacher.
She is just a little too clean, too
pretty, too naive to be a teacher-
smart at Brandel High. The core of
the talent rests with the actors
portraying students. Most use
"The Principal" to showcase
skills barely exposed in a few-
other films.
The editing and set design
From the Not So Right
Pat lost without Mon. football
ByPATMOLtOY
Fall TV prediction: Video rentals the deal
ByMICAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
In the tradition of tabloids at
better check-out counters all over
the world, the East Carolinian is
proud to present its 1987 Fall-TV
preview.
William Conrad, former fat
detective, "Cannon is back 15
years later in "Jake and the Fat
Man Former "Riptide" star, Will
Penny, plays Jake. Conrad
playswell, let's just say the char-
acters will each be more readily
identifiable than "Starsky and
Hutch 1 would tell you to keep
an eye out for this show, but with
Conrad on the program, that
would beakintoanadmonition to
not trip over a beached whale.
"P.M. Magazine" will attempt
to appeal to more of 2020's audi
ence while maintaining its family
orientation. Look for typical seg-
ments on hang-gliding, Vanna
White and stamp collecting to
play along side new material on
gay brothels, inmates on death's
row and the mentally disturbed.
On Fridays, CBS is running
"Beauty and the Beast" starring
"Terminator" babe, Linda Hamil-
ton. Similar to "St. Elsewhere's"
star William Daniels loaning his
voice to "K.I.T.T" on "Night
Rider "Golden Girls star, Bea
Arthur will loan her face to the
Beast.
PBS will reportedly "put the fun
back in" "Wall Street Week"
when Candid Camera's Alan
Funt, joins the staff. Look for a lot
of whoopee cushions, talking
mailboxes and fake doggy do-do
to be interspersed among those
Dow-Jones averages.
Trying to top last year's "it was
only a dream" leg-pull opening,
"Dallas" producers have come up
with something to both surprise
the fans and remind the cast
they're not indispensable.
While that ol' beautiful
dreamer, Pam Ewing, snoozes
during her hospital recovery, her
latent psychic powers warp real-
ity, turning the "Dallas" charac-
ters into the cast from her favorite
show, "Leave It To Beaver Bar-
See FALL, page 10
My life has been hell. And if s
not your bask, everyday, fire-
and-brimstone, burn-forever
type of hell, either. Mine is worse.
It all started two weeks ago,
when I learned the players of the
NFL were planning to strike if
their monetary demands were not
met.
"Fairenough I thought, "If the
guy next to me was raking in $1.3
million per year to throw a foot-
ball, and I was paid only $870,000
to catch it, I guess I'd tell those
unreasonable idiots in the front
office to stuff their cash, too.
After all, integrity is the name of
that game.
Next came Monday night, and
the understanding that my
newly-purchased waveless wa-
terbed was not. This revelation
came to me after I downed 14
shots of Cuervo Gold, three
Bud weisers, one Margarita and a
taco. Not at the same time.
My apparent discomfort on
Tuesday morning did not elicit
much sympathy from professors,
thougha few did remark that they
appreciated the sun glasses I wore
throughout class.
The glasses, inddentally, were
donated bv mv mommafr. Cnr-
don, who spent much of that
Tuesday surgically attached to an
oxygen tank � the result of
spending Monday night surgi-
cally attached to a keg. My, but
we're all getting old.
Survival is the name of that
game.
On Wednesday, I developed
such a craving for Chinese food I
would have killed anything re-
sembling a wonton. Exactly what
a wonton is, nobody knows; but
then, I was going to eat until I
found one.
Unfortunately, the restaurant at
which I conducted my search
seemed to have even less knowl-
edge than I about the all-elusive
wonton. I'm not certain, but I
could swear my Moo Goo Gai Pan
was nothing more than a melted -
down can of Cheese Whiz with a
healthy dose of mustard.
My waiter did little to alleviate
the stress I was feeling. "Sir, I'm
sure if s just a slightly different
style than what you're used to. I
think you'll enoy it if you give ita
chance
My philosophy is simple: either
the food is Chinese, or it ain't
Style simply doesn't fit into my
philosophy. I expressed as much
to mv friendly waiter, who one
again insisted I give it a whirl
"Fine I 3aid, "why don't you
waddle over there and get me a
Chinese fork so 1 can try this
glop
The doctor released me on Sat-
urday, with strict orders to neve?
again mix mustard with Cheese
Whiz. "That shif 11 kill ya, boy
he said.
I spent the rest of that Saturday
lying around the house and turn-
ing off the television whenever a
Kraft Cheese commercial ap-
peared.
1 don't even know the name to
that game.
Finally, Sunday rolled around.
And, as promised, the guys were
simply not going to play any ball.
I spent the afternoon watching
Martina Navrattlova (you try to
spell it) and Stephi Graff chase a
ball around a court for a couple of
hours.
All was not lost, though. 1 found
that by sucking up a few golden
sodas, and then standing on my
head while watching television,
notonlydid I get an amazing look
up Steffi's skirt, but Martina bears
a mean likeness to Lawrence
Taylor.
If s the truth, I swear to God
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1 he master illusionist has enter-
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tours during his career He h.is
traveled extensive!) through ci!
n apan and India
Kole doesn t claim to have su
pernatural powers He said Am
8 year-old could perform mj illu
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Kole said ! here - not much to
but .i lot to Ix- soon
He i- a consultant tor David
I and has worked with
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acles or Magic?"
mber ot c ampus
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"Fine I said, "why don't you
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glop
The doctor released me on Sat-
urday, with strict orders to never
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Whiz. That shifll kill ya, boy,
he said.
I spent the rest of that Saturday
lying around the house and turn-
ing off the television whenever a
Kraft Cheese commercial ap-
peared.
1 don't even know the name to
that game.
Finally, Sunday rolled around
And, as promised, the guys were
simply not going to play any ball.
I spent the afternoon watching
Martina Navratilova (you try to
spell it) and Stephi Graff chase a
ball around a court for a couple of
hours.
All was not lost, though. I found
that by sucking up a few golden
sodas, and then standing on my
head while watching television,
not only did I get an amazing took
up Steffi's skirt, but Martina bears
a mean likeness to Lawrence
Taylor.
It's the truth, I swear to God.
And bullshit is the name of that
game.
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JO THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 1, 1987
Dinner Theatre shows Simon
Neil Simon's "I Ought To Be In
Pictures" will be served up as
Dinner-Theatre on October 8th
and 9th at &30 p.m. in Menden-
hall Student Center. This play,
called "a finely tuned blend of
hilantv and honesty will be
Staged by the Alpha-Omega Play-
ers of Rockport, Texas. This is the
same troupe that has staged such
hits as "The Good Doctor "Any
Wednesday" and "Last of The
Red Hot Lovers" previously at
Hast Carolina University's Din-
ner-Theatre.
Simon's credits read like a
who's who of American theatre.
He has penned such blockbusters
as "Barefoot in the Park "Chap-
ter Two "Biloxi Blues "Prom-
ises, Promises 'The Goodbye
Girl" and "The Odd Couple "I
Ought To Be In Pictures" is a
unique father-daughter relation-
ship of discovery.
The author charms hisaudience
with a delightful combination of
humor and poignancy by de-
picitng a fading Hollywood
scriptwriter who walked out on
his Brooklyn wife and two chil-
dren 16 years before. The plot
unfolds when his 19-year-old
tomboy daughter drops in on him
out of the clear, blue California
sky.
The Department of University
Unions will sponsor the Dinner-
Theatre. Tickets for this event
may be purchased at the Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, East Carolina Uni-
versity, Greenville, N.C 27858-
4353, or by calling (919) 757-6611,
ext. 266. Office hours are 11:00
a.m6:00p.m Monday through
Friday.
Dinner-Theatre ticket prices are
$16.00 for general public and
$10.00 for ECU students. For tick-
ets and further information, write
or call the Central Ticket Office
during business hours.
Playhouse leaves it to 'Jane
Greenville � Leave it to
lane the musical with Jerome
Kern melodies that became a New
York hit in 1920 and again in 1959,
will open the East Carolina Play-
house 1987-88 season. Perform-
ances will be October 7, 8, 9, 10
and 12intheMcGinnisTheatreon
the East Carolina University cam-
pus at 8:15 p.m.
"Leave it to Jane" is one of the
most enduring favorites of
American theatrical history. It
first gained popularity in 1904 asa
straight comedy by George Ade,
called "The College Widow
Around 1920 its tale of a campus
flirt's interference in the football
rivalry of two mid-western col-
leges was turned into the present
musical by the redoubtable trio of
Bolton, Wodehouse and Kern -
Guy Bolton and P.G. Wodehouse
taking care of the book and lyrics
and Jerome Kem, who was later to
compose the tunes for "Show-
boat supplying the music.
The rivals in "Leave it to lane"
are two fictitious institutions
called Atwater and Bingham Col-
leges. Things look poorly for dear
old Atwater as the fall term be-
gins, because Bingham is due to
field an awesome new quarter-
back named Billy Bolton. But as
Bolton passes through town on
his way to enroll at Bingham, of
which his father is a fanatically
loyal alumaui, he is lured by Jane
Witherspoon, the flirtatious "col-
lege widow" daughter of
Atwater's president, to switch to
her daddy's team.
The invincible Bolton is all set to
score touchdown after touch-
down for good old Atwater when
his father turns up for the big
game. Outraged at seeing his son
wearing the wrong-colored jer-
sey, Papa tries to stop the game.
Romantic and athletic complica-
tions keep the play's plot bub-
bling and the songs bouncing.
Performances of "Leave it to
Jane" will take place October 7,8,
9, 10 and 12 at 8:15 p.m. in the
McGinnis Theatre in the Messick
Theatre Arts Center, corner of
Fifth and Eastern Streets, on the
East Carolina University campus.
Season tickets for the 1987-88
season will be available through
October 12. For only $20.00 you
receive one reserved seat ticket
for all five Playhouse produc-
tions. Along with "Leave it to
lane the Playhouse will include:
"Lovers and Other Strangers"
� November 18-21
"The Lark" � February 10-13
"Terra Nova" � March 28-31
EC Dance Theatre � April 15,
16, 18, and 19
Single tickets for "Leave it to
Jane" will go on sale September 30
and are priced at $10.00 for the
general public, $8.00 for ECU stu-
dents, and $8.00 for groups of ten
or xuufe , ant .jn. Vi. rWMWI
All tickets may be charged on
VISA or Mastercard by telephon-
ing the box office (919) 757-6390,
or may be purchased at the
McGinnis Theatre Box office from
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday and until 8:3C
p.m. on performance days.
These three performers are rehearsing a scene from "I Ought to Be In Pictures tl e Nei
be performed at a dinner theater Oct. 8 and 9 at Mendenhall.
FBI suspected Hemingway, others, of leftist conspiracies
Houston writes about youth
Skip the rather philosophically-
fuzzy prologue to this collection
of pieces of "more or less true
recolections o( kinship" and
move right into "Prunepickcr
Author James D. Houston re-
ally shines here as he details the
way he was - or says he was - back
in 1951 and trying to cam a spot on
the football team at a small Texas
college.
"In the America of my vouth,
the curse of being too small was
that you could not go out for foot-
ball he ruefully recalls. "The
curse of being six-foot-two was
out for football, for fear your very
manhood would be questioned
Urged on by "my favorite and
most influential uncle, who be-
lieved in football with all his heart
and never had the chance to
play Houston gave the game his
best shot. But his heart wasn't in it
and he dropped out under cir-
cumstances that the reader will
find both funny and sad.
A variety of other pieces in "The
Men in My Life" deal with men
Houston has encountered and
who have influenced him one
way or another as he has pro-
NEW YORK (AP)-Ernest
Hemingway, Tennessee Wil-
liams, Norman Mailer and doz-
ens of other American authors
were placed under FBI surveil-
lance because of writings or ac-
tivities deemed subversive, ac-
cording to two magazine articles.
Herbert Mitgang, writing in
The New Yorker, and Natalie
Robins, whose article appears in
The Nation, based the articles on
FBI files they obtained separately
under the Freedom of Informa-
tion Act.
Mitgang's article in the October
5 issue said writers under surveil-
lance by the FBI included Sinclair
Lewis and Pearl Buck, criticized
for promoting black civil rights;
John Steinbeck, accused of tar-
nishing the nation's image, and
Truman Capote, deemed a sup-
porter of the Cuban revolution.
Other authors named were
Thomas Wolfe, Carl Sandburg,
Nelson AlgTen, John Dos Passos,
William Faulkner, Thornton
� w�deTmr wjffrTWUttHwn
ingway was considered by the FBI
to be a drunk with possible Com-
munist leanings, Mitgang said.
Although the documented sur-
veillance occurred from the 1930s
to the 1960s, Mitgang concluded
that "apparently the practice is
continuing" - a charge vehe-
mently denied Tuesday by an FBI
spokesman.
None of the more than 50 writ-
ers whose files were obtained was
convicted of any crime attributed
to them by the FBI or other federal
agency, The New Yorker article
said.
that you could not avoid going gressed through the years.
Fall TV falls back 20 years
Cont. from page 8
bara Billingsley as Miss Ellie,
Tony Dow as Bobby Ewing, Ken
Osmond as J.R. and Jerry Mathers
as Cliff Barnes. Turns out it's all
just another plot of J.Rs to get
Bobby "to give him the business
Pleased with the response to
their "Dukes of Hazzard" mara-
thon during Festival '87, PBS will
now run the episodes on a regular
basis. This is good news to
"Dukes" fans as it saves them
from getting up to change chan-
nels to watch "Master Piece The-
atre
You may have heard that Don
Johnson will marry a rock singer
on "Miami Vice Actually, it'll be
Wrestling unsatisfing sport
a contemporary gospel singer
played by Tammy Bakker. The
storyline has the '80's Gable and
Lombard meeting during a con-
cert. Johnson's Crockett rescues
Bakker when she hits a high note
and her facial make-up cracks.
Quickly grabbing a "paint by
numbers" set, Crockett saves her
face. Literally.
Ignoring Tubb's warnings
('That woman be a Jezebel"),
Johnson rushes headlong into a
steamy romanceuntil Bakker
misunderstands Johnson's liason �
with a beautiful Narc at a Florida m
hotel. g
Final Fall-TV prediction: Video-
rentals will be up during
weeknights this autumn. " (f
i
i
t
TheNationarticleincludesalist
of 134 writers whose files were
released to Ms. Robins, who is
preparing a book on the subject.
Several of the writers on her list
are still alive and include E.L.
Doctorow, Mailer, Elizabeth
Hard wick, Howard Fast, Kay
Boyle and William F. Buckley Jr.
Ms. Boyle told the Washington
Post on Tuesdy that when she saw
her file, she was surprised to dis-
cover "that I had a love affair with
Ezra Pound - when I was 10 years
old
According to Ms. Robins' ar-
ticle, to be released Friday in the
October 10 issue of The Nation,
poet Edna St. Vincent Millaycame
to the bureau's attention when
she entered a "free trip to Russia"
contest sponsored bv a group
trying to raise $40,000 to buy trac-
tors for Soviet peasants.
Mitgang and Ms. Robins said
the timing of the articles was coin-
cidental.
FBI spokesman Bill Carter said
the agency no longer has the time
or the inclination to conduct such
surveillance.
These days, Carter said, "The
only time the FBI investigates an
individual or a group for domes-
tic security issues is if they've
created a violation of federal law,
or if they've conspired to commit
a specific violation of federal laws
under FBI jurisdiction
"Expressing their constitu-
tional right to dissent is not a vio-
lation of federal law he said.
The FBI wrote in 1942 that
Hemingway was of "question-
able" sobriety and later incor-
JUDSON H. BLOUNT, III
ATTORNEY AT LAW
D WI and Traffic Offenses
Suite 12, Lee Building
111 East Third Street
Greenville, NC 27835
(9
Telephone:
19)758-8555
m
Cont from page 8
really Kurt Thomas.
The Mod Squad are two greasy,
pale and very rotund biker types.
They spent most of their match
asking the ref if he knew whether
the Italian Stallion had "come to
wrestle or come to dance" as they
hopped around in their comer.
Each bout would begin with the
referee trying to get the oppo-
nents to shake hands. It didn't
each other in the neck and pulling Q
masks to one side. �
The main match, G rvin and 2
Jimmy Valiantfa wild looking old J
man with a pony tail for a beard) f
vs. the New Breed(a California �
marine who dressed like Laz- �
ertron and a fat Hawaiian dude) gj
lasted three and a half minutes. �)
Thafs all. Maybe three minutes Q
forty-five, tops. And then every-
body got ready to leave. Kids got
even happen once. But half of the their Rock and Roll Express pen- �
guys ended up with one or the nants from Mom and Dad's seats �
other's head between their crotch
After not shaking, the wrestlers
would walk around and scream at
everything for a few minutes.
When the 13 year olds in the
upper bleachers would start
shouting, "Boooorrring the
e, 0 �
fighters would start punching watching "ALF
and then they all went home to 9
watch "Falcon Crest �
America is a scary place. People 5
get paid to lose competitions and J
people pay to go see them, over
and over again.
It's enough to make you start
� EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY 9
����f AND THE ��
m DEPARTMENT OF UNIVERSITY UNIONS ��
PRESENT THE A
Alpha-Omega Players
In
A DINNER-THEATRE PRESENTATION
OF
Neil Simon's
I OUGHT TO
BE IN
PICTURES
A Fin�ty Tuned Blend of Hilarity and Honesty
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8
AND
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
AUDITORIUM 244
Dinner: 6:30 p.m. Curtain: 8:00 p.m.
Advance Salaa Only, No Tickets At The Door
ECU. STUDENTS $10.00
ALL OTHERS $16.00
FOR TICKETS CALL: THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
757-6611, EXT. 266
A NATIONAL TOURING COMPANY
m


m
m
m
m

i

9
rectly labeled him as a "specialty
writer" for a Communist newspa-
per, The Daily Worker.
Another FBI memorandum
conceded there was no informa-
tion "which would definitely tie
him with the Communist Party
but added, "His views are liberal
and he may be inclined favora
bly to Communist political phi
losophy
I $2.00
Introducing
" NEW ,

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0
Represenative at the Student Stores
Oct. 6, 7,& 8 9:00 a.m. - 4: p.m.
v
provide
?n-
Gere stops film,
welcomes Dalai
NEW YORK (AP) - Richard
Cere a discipleo( the Dalai Lama,
interrupted filming a movie in
Iowa to introduce the Tibetan
Budhist leader at a news confer-
ence announcing creation of a
culture center in New York.
"1 can't believe this is happen-
ing Gere, star of "American
Gigolo" and "An Officer and A
Gentleman blurted Mondav as
he introduced the Dalai Lama,
who wore traditional maroon and
gold robes.
The spiritual leader of 6 million
Buddhists was completing a 10-
dav tour of the United States
Gere is chairman of the board of
Tibet House, a center to focus
American attention on the cul-
tural and religious heritage of
Tibet.
Fair starts up
Cont. from page 8
be admitted for $1.50 with student
identification.
Senior Citizen Day, Oct. 7, all
senior citizens will be admitted
free from 1-3 p.m.
General admission is $3 for
adults, children free until 6 p.m.
Weeknights after 6 p.m. and on
Sarurdav children will be admit-
ted for $1.50.
Oct. 5 and 8, a $7 wristband
allows any fair patron to unlim-
ited rides on the midway.
On Oct. 6, fairgoers with a $1 -off
coupon obtained by the purchase
of Coke or a Domino's Pizza de-
livery will be able to buy the spe-
cial wristband for only $6.
Wild Kingdom will appear tonight at
Greenville.
Kodak unveils Edu
to be forum for ph
Eastman Kodal � �
histor) pal � n i
graphi educat
through) iut the i �untr
and a number of other I n
asa star
To help expand th
support toedui itoi
programs and refii
Kodak has appoint
graph editors t Kodal
Educat! � '� :
council will maV
tions n programs si rtsoi
k.viak in supporl
tion.
Ruth Unzicker i il man-
ager of marketing and ice presi
dent of Kodak's Professional
Photography Division, says that
by establishing the council,
Kodak has strengthened its
commitment to photographic
education.
"The Council will
forum for all phot
present their sug
ideas directly to our key
Rochester Unzicker �
expect this council to !
!directlink,allowingplv
; tors to contact Kodak
Unzicker says Koc
going programs an - with
the photo education community
will be significantly improved b
the council because now ai
can present an idea :
member and have
by kodak
The con
meet Nov. 16-17in . ara
Calif.
Members of the council and
their addresses if you wish to
write to them are
-Dan Biferie, Southeast Center
for Photographic Studies Dav-
tona Beach Communitv G llce
cago, JL
err)
ment,
I
I
For
matit
757

J jam l"l'a '
"i" mm 'iiwm�i
A





fures the Neil Simon play to
eftist conspiracies
and
d definitely tie
-�nunit Tartv
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n he inclined favora-
munist political phi-
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:R GOOD THRU OCT. lO, 1987
R VUE OPTICIANS
.TANTONSBURG ROAD
ANTON SQUARE 752-1446
� COUPON
enative at the Student Stores
6, 7,& 8 9:00 a.m. - 4: p.m.
f -981 AflOvW CM Rap
�I
'�
i.
3
i
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i
x
e
Wild Kingdom will appear tonight at the Attic, bringing their brand of charged rock and roll to
Greenville.
Kodak unveils Education Advisory Council
to be forum for photography enlightenment
Eastman Kodak Co. has a long
history oi participation in photo-
graphic education projects
throughout the country via grants
and a numlxT of other forms of
assistance.
lb help expand the company's
support to educators, improve its
programs and refine its priorities,
kodak has appointed 12 photo-
graphic editors to a new kodak
.cation Advisory Council.The
council will make recommenda-
tions on programs sponsored hv
kodak in support of photo educa-
tion.
Ruth Unzicker, general man-
ager of marketing and vice presi-
dent or kodak's Professional
Photography Division, savs that
bv establishing the council,
kodak has strengthened its
commitment to photographic
education.
"The Council will provide a
torum for all photo educators to
present their suggestions and
ideas directly to our key people in
Rochester L'nzicker savs. "We
expect this council to serve as a
direct link,allowingphotoeduca-
' tors to contact Kodak
I nzicker says kodak"s on-
ing programs and contact with
the photo education community
will be significantly improved by
the council because "now anyone
can present an idea to a concil
member and have it considered
!n kodak
The council is scheduled to
meet Nov. 16-17 in Santa Barbara,
Calif.
Members of the council and
their addresses if you wish to
write to them are:
-Dan Biferie, Southeast Center
for Photographic Studies, Day-
tona Beach Community College,
Gere stops film,
welcomes Dalai
NEW YORK (AP) - Richard
Gere, a disciple of the Dalai Lama,
interrupted filming a movie in
Iowa to introduce the Tibetan
Budhist leader at a news confer-
ence announcing creation of a
culture center in New York.
"1 can't believe this is happen-
ing Gere, star of "American
Gigolo" and "An Officer and A
Gentleman blurted Monday as
he introduced the Dalai Lama,
who wore traditional maroon and
gold robes.
The spiritu 1 leader of 6 million
Buddhists was completing a 10-
day tour of the United States.
Gere is chairman of the board of
Tibet Ho -e, center to focus
American attention on the cul-
tural and religious heritage of
Tibet.
Fair starts up
Cont from page 8
be admitted for $1.50 with student
identification.
Senior Citizen Day, Oct. 7, all
senior citizens will be admitted
free from 1-3 p.m.
General admission is $3 for
adults, children free until 6 p.m.
Weeknights after 6 p.m. and on
Sarurday children will be admit-
ted for $1.50.
Oct. 5 and 8, a $7 wristband
allows any fair patron to unlim-
ited rides on the midway.
On Oct. 6, fairgoers with a $1 -off
coupon obtained by the purchase
of Coke or a Domino's Pizza de-
livery will be able to buy the spe-
cial wristband for only $6.
1200 West Volusia Ave Davtona
Beach, FL 32104
-Phillip S. Block, International
Center of Photography, 1130 Fifth
Ave New York, NY 10128
-Ernest H. Brooks II, Brooks
Institute, 801 Alston Rd Santa
Barbara, CA 93108
-Kathleen Collins, School of
Photographic Arts & Sciences,
Rochester Institute of Technol-
ogy, One Lomb Drive, Rochester,
NY 14623
-Fred Dcmarest, S.I. Newhouse
School of Communications,
Syracuse University, Svracure,
NY 13244-2100
-Benedict J. Fernandez, Depart-
ment of Photography, Parsons
School of Design, 66 Fifth Ave
New York, NY 10011
-Frederick E. Hutton, Art Cen-
ter College of Design, 1700 Lika
St Pasadena, CA 91103-1999
-William Kuykcndall, School of
Journalism, University of Mis-
souri-Columbia, Box 838, Colum-
bia, MO 65205
-John Mulvanv, Columbia Col-
lege, 600 S. Michigan Ave Chi-
cago, 1L 60505
-Jerry Uclsmann, Art Depart-
ment, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611
-Cheryl Younger, Film in the
Cities, 2388 University Ave St.
Paul, MN 55114
-Ann Zelle, American Univer-
sity, Mary Greydon Center, 400
Massachusetts Ave Washing-
ton, DC 20016
Eastman Kodak's representa-
tive on the council is Ken Lasiter.
That's a prestigious list. If you
are a photo educator with an idea
or suggestion, now you know
who to contact. As a side benefit
for any youngster considering a
career in photography, you now
have a list of some of the better
photography schools in the coun-
try.
On another note, although it's
only autumn, photographic
manufacturers are already begin-
ning their Christmas promotions.
Visit your local photo store and
look for special bargains on film,
rebates, special pricing on photo
greeting cards and sweepstakes.
Kodak is now offering specials
on its photo greeting card line into
which photos can be inserted.
Kodak is also offering a 3-for-2
special on poster prints made
from the same negative or trans-
parency.
Both Kodak and Fuji now have
- or will have - film specials on
display.
Both are also offering special
sweepstakes. "Fuji Helps You See
the USA" has prizes ranging from
rebates to airline tickets. In No-
vember, Kodak will announce its
"Go for the Gold" sweepstakes in
connection with its line of battery
products. This sweepstakes offers
a chance at a $25,000 grand prize
including a trip for four to the
1988 Winter Olympics in Calgary,
Canada.
Watch your local newspaper for
details.
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center i$ open
Mon Tues, & Wed. Fri. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
9 a.m2 p.m. & by appointmenj
For an appointment or more infor-
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline,
757-0003
111 East Third Street - The Lee Building
Greenville, N. C.
Free Pregnancy Test-
Confldentlal Counseling
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 1, 1987
11
Carson celebrates 25th year
with show and first biography
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Johnny
Carson's 25th anniversary as host
of NBC's "Tonight Show" will be
marked with the usual prime-
time special - and publication of
an unauthorized biography.
Carson, along with sidekick Ed
McMahon and band leader Doc
Severinsen, will appear on a 90-
minute retrospective Thursday,
the anniversary date.
The book, "Carson: The
Unauthorized Biography by
Paul Corkery and published by
Randt & Co is a look not only at
Carson's time on the show but his
entire life and career, as well as his
four marriages.
Corkery, a former reporter for
the Los Angeles Herald Examiner
and People magazine, said he first
became interested in Carson after
seeing him in the rarefield and
wealthy social whirl of Bel Air.
Corkery said he had "astonish-
ing luck" getting interviews with
Carson's first three wives. "Wife
No. 3, Joanna, had never given an
interview before on their life to-
gether he said in a telephone
interview from New York. "His
first wife, Jody, had not been in-
terviewed in 25 years. It took us
six months to find her. His second
wife, Joanne, is more accessible.
The first and third wives gave
some great insight into the man
Publicity-shy Carson was not
Aaron, Reese to
perform for Fisk
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) -
Baseball great Hank Aaron will
attend a fund-raiser to benefit an
art gallery at Fisk University, his
wife says.
Singer Delia Reese will perform
at the Fisk Jubilee Gala on Oct. 7
aboard Opryland's General
Jackson showboat.
The Van Vechten Gallery
houses the Alfred Steiglitz Collec-
tion, donated to the university by
artist Georgia O'Keefe, Steiglitz's
wife.
interviewed. The 256-page book
is the first biography of Carson,
although several other books are
rumored to be in preparation.
Much is made of the fact that it
is an unauthorized biography.
However, there's little in the book
that is not already public knowl-
edge. It appears to have been
written largely from previously
published material.
Corkery's book offers little in-
sight into Carson or the phenome-
non of his appeal and staying
power. It does deal with his failed
marriages and a few other legal
problems he's had, but the overall
tone of the book is laudatory.
Corkery notes Carson's emer-
gence as political commentator,
but skips any critical appraisal of
his place in television or the
American culture.
From the Kennedys to Nixon to
Reagan, through all the traumatic
upheavals, Carson has been there
with a quip.
In an interview for his 20th
anniversary, Carson said, "I think
The Tonight Show' is really a
kind of chronology of what the
hell has happened in this country.
It's topical. It's every day. It has to
do with comedy. It has to do with
what's happening politically and
socially in this country
He declined to be interviewed
for his silver anniversary.
A generation has grown up
since Carson took over "The To-
night Show" on Oct. 1, 1962. The
country has changed. And Car-
son, of course, has changed. He
has gained enormous confidence
and developed an instinct for the
right comment. And when a joke
doesn't go over, he is still able to
milk laughs by his reaction or
comeback line.
His show is at the top of the
ratings, although young peopk
now turn to David Letterman
who follows Carson on NBC, for
their nightly humor. Not to
worry, Carson owns the Letter
man show.
On Fnday night, NBC will re-
run "The Tonight Show" from
Feb. 13, 1973. The show, with
George Burns, Carl Reiner and
Sammy Davis Jr is considered
one of Carson's best.
IF YOU'RE PAVING MORE
THAN THIS FOR COPIES
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Major Concerts Committee presents:
HOMECOMING
CONCERT
Featuring
FIXX
Thursday, October 8th, 8:00 p.m.
MINGES COLISEUM
Tickets:
$7.00 students
$9.00 general public
Tickets on sale
Central Ticket Office
Sept. 24th.
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THEEASTCAROMNIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 1, 1987 Page 12
Hard-hitting Vinson Smith
helps to pace Pirate defense
By CAROLYN j
Sport Writer
A hard-hitting linebacker on
the held or a down-to-earth guy
ott the field, either way you see
him, Vinson Smith isn't going to
change.
The6T221 lb. senior defensive
leader is off to another great year.
I le leads the Pirates with 46 total
tackles, 18 of which were unas-
sisted. Smith also has made two
fumble recoveries, one intercep-
tion and one quarterback sack.
With this kind of aggressive
play and success one would think
it has gone to Smith's head, but
according to his friends, he's
hasn't changed a bit since he came
to ECU.
"A lot of people let their talent
go to their head, Vinson isn't like
that He'll always just be Vinson
said senior teammate Ron Gil-
liard.
According to defensive coordi-
nator linebacker coach Les Her-
nn, he won't accept Smith any
other way.
"1 want him to grow not only as
a football player but as a person.
Vinson is down-to-earth and his
way of getting along with people
is going to take him a long way in
lite.
Smith said that Herrin has been
a part of making him a better
person.
"He's tough and he pumps us
up. We've adoped his agressive-
ness and his attitude
Smith has certainly benefitted
from this attitude combined with
his talent. After being redshirted
position. 1 know that he is as good
as me and I know there are other
guys that are as good as me
Coach Herrin said no matter
irtSsatd about Smith, he'll al-
ways be a good plaver that as a
coach he won't forget.
The Statesville native's best
game so far this year was against
Illinois.
That could have been a great
win tor us said Smith. "We gave
the fans a good game. We keep
them on their seats
Smith's performance was one
reason for Illinois fans to take
notice of the Pirate squad. He
in 1983, he had 18 tackles during
his freshman season as a Pirate.
As a sophmore, Smith continued
to improve with 42 tackles, 30 of
which were unassisted, and he
made two interceptions.
Last year, Smith led the Pirates
in tackles with 116, 64 of them
unassisted. He also had a fumble
recovery and a sack.
These records show why Smith
has been tagged by many as being
one of the finest linebackers to
Vinson Smith
play at ECU.
Smith says he doesn't feel that
special.
"A friend taught me to play that
came a way with 15 tackles and one
fumble recovery.
A rematch of another edge of
the seat game will be coming up
this Saturday, as the Pirates travel
to West Virginia. Last year's game
ended when West Virginia scored
with just six seconds left in the
game, to pull out a 24-21 victory.
"A lot of guys think we have
something to prove when we go
to West Virginia said Smith. "I
don't think we have to prove
anything. We played hard last
year so we just have to go up there
and play even better
During Smith's career, his top
sta tist ical game of each season has
been against Southern Missis-
sippi. As a freshman he had one
individual tackle and three assists
against SMU. The next year,
Smith made five unassisted tack-
les and one sack. Again in 1987,
Southern Mississippi was the vic-
tim of a Vinson Smith attack as he
made 13 tackles. Eight of them
were unassisted, one was for a
lose and there was one quarter-
back sack.
Last years Southern Mississippi
contest was another tough loss for
the Pirates. Smith says he isn't
waiting for SMU to have his best
game of the season.
"I go into every game trying to
play my best game because you
never know when it might be
your last said Smith. "This
year's Southern Mississippi game
will be a big game, not only be-
cause of my track record and last
years outcome but because it will
be my last game as a Pirate
Applewhite glad to be playing
football in Pirate uniform now
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Motivated, determined and sat-
isfied.
Thats East Carolina's Mike
Applewhite in a nutshell. The 6-4,
270 pound defensive end from
Henderson, N.C. believes he has
his priorities and his heart in the
right place.
Applewhite has dedicated him-
self to play at a high level of inten-
sity. He is driven by personal trag-
edy.
While he was attending Vance
Senior High School a few years
ago, two of Applewhite's very
close friends, Michael Clayton
and William Watkins, lost their
lives. Applewhite says their
deaths were difficult for him to
accept. His way to cope was to
dedicate every football game he
played to them.
"I feel like that it is something
that I can do to keep them in my
memory says Applewhite. "Our
friendship was just too short and 1
just want to do it (dedicate games)
to remember Michael and Wil-
liam. They meant an awful lot to
me. I don't like to talk about it (the
deaths) a lot because it is just too
painful for me, so that is why I try
to show how much they meant to
me by dedicating my career to
them
Applewhite says he is also
motivated by his grandmother,
Armilla Mack, who raised him
from the time he was a toddler.
"She always gave me the best of
everything, the best that anybody
could possibly ever want he
says. "I want to make a success
out of myself whether in profes-
sional football or in the business
world so that 1 can give back to her
just part of the many things she
gave to me
Applewhite is trying to prepare
himself for life after football.
Entering this semester, the busi-
ness administration major had an
overall grade point a verage of 3.0.
But, make no mistake about it,
football is Applewhite's chosen
career. The sophomore in four
games this season has racked up a
total of 16 tackles.
"I think I have the potential to
do it (play professionally) says
Applewhite. "By my last year not
being until 1990, I definitely feel
like I have a shot
ECU coach Art Baker agreed
with Applewhite's assessment of
his potential.
"Mike's potential is really awe-
some Baker says. "He has all the
attributes to be a great defensive
player. He has the speed (4.95 in
the 40 yard dash) and the
strength. Of course, he needs to
become a great college player
first. But, we expect him to im-
prove along the way, afterall, he
has been out of football for two
vears
Mike Applewhite
Applewhite originally signed a
scholarship with North Carolina
following an All-Star career at
Vance. After one year at UNC, he
became disenchanted and at-
tempted to transfer to Virginia
However, UNC officials would
not release him to another ACC
school and he ended up at ECU.
"I learned a whole lot from that
situation (the changing of
schools) says Applewhite. "It
wasa very difficult timeof my life.
There were some technical rules
that were broken by Virginia and
of course the fact that it would
look bad for a person to transfer
from one conference school to
another also figured in. But, I
don't really think about it any-
more because it is something that
happened in the past. 1 feel like
that I am better off with the ECU
program. And my main concern
now is winning games here
However, it is natural to won-
der if Applewhite is fully satisfied
since ECU was never his first
choice.
"I am happy with the program
here says Applewhite. 'The
main reason I chose ECU was
because of the coaching philoso-
phy.
"I was looking for a coach that I
would be able to relate to both
mentally and physically contin-
ued Applewhite. "And in Donnie
Thompson (defensive line coach),
I found that. He is the best coach
that I've ever had for teaching
good technique.
"And, I also liked coach Baker a
lot continued Applewhite. "He
has great values and he cares for
each one of his players as people
not just as football players
And Applewhite, although a
dominant force on the field, is ob-
viouslv much more than just a
football player.
VanSant named to new post
Dr. Henry VanSant has been
named associate athletic director
for internal affairs at East Caro-
lina, ECU athletic director Ken
Karr announced.
VanSant, who will official!v
begin his duties today, has been
the Pirates' administrative assis-
tant to the athletic director for the
past two years.
The Hampton, Va native wasa
center and linebacker for ECU
teams from 1959-1961. He was the
1960 recipient of the E.E. Raw
outstanding student-athlete
award. He was an assistant foot-
Netters rally for win
East Carolina's Lady Pirate vol-
leyball team rallied from a 2-1
deficit to defeat UNC-Wilming-
tonTuesday night in MingesColi-
seum.
The 3-2 victory over the Lady
Seahawks raises East Carolina's
record to 3-5 and gives the netters
their first conference victory of
the season.
Kris McKay and Jemma Holley
combined for 20 of ECU's 48 kills.
Friday, the Lady Pirates depart
for Winthrop, SC for the
Winthrop volleyball Invivational.
At the tournament ECU will meet
host Winthrop college, UT-
Chatanooga and Campbell Uni-
versity.
The next home match will be
Tuesday Oct. 6 at 7 p.m. when The
Lady Pirates host Atlantic Chris-
tian College.
ball coach for the Pirates from
1962-1970.
He was ECU's freshman coach
from 1962-1966, as his squad was
the only undefeated freshman
team in ECU history. He also as-
sisted head coach Clarence
Stasavich as ECU won back-to-
back Tangerine Bowl titles in 1954
and 1955.
VanSant was also a head foot-
ball coach at the high school level
in North Carolina, as well as head
coach at Cuilford College and
Lenoir-Ryne College.
VanSant received his under-
graduate degree and Master's
Degree from ECU in 1961 and
1962.
VanSant received his doctoral
degree from the University of
Alabama in 1975.
ECU booters hope to regroup
Ruggers rout Appalachian St.
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sporb) Writer
Halfway through a disappoint-
ing season, head coach Charlie
Harvey and the ECU soccer team
are still trying to put together a
winning combination.
ECU, 1-8 overall and 0-5 in the
CAA, will travel to Wilmington in
search of its first conference vic-
tory Friday. UNC-W was the only
team that ECU defeated last year
in the conference, but the
Seahawks are much-improved
over last season whereas the Pi-
rates have fallen on hard times.
Most recently, UNC-W took
American University to a score-
less tie and loss to Navy in over-
time. As with any ECU-UNC-W
contest, the Seahawks will be
fired up when the Pirates come to
town.
"If we could give UNC-W a
good game and beat them, the
momentum would help us a lot
said Harvey.
The Pirates, battered by CAA
opponents in the last month, do
By EARL HAMPTON
Sport Writer
The ECU Rugby defeated the
Mountainneers of Appalachian
by the score of 36-3. Bob Eason
ignited the club with three first-
half scores.
"We juked them, we had total
dominance of the game, and I
want to credit the B team with
excellent play said head coach
Ralph Campano.
Eason, the veteran scrum
player, broke the club record for
individual scoresenroute to what
Eason termed "my best game
ever
The Mountaineers, who have
an experienced club with consid-
erable bulk, were held to a 30
meter penalty kick as their only
score. The hot weather, ECU
Rugby players said, was a factor
in the Appalachian downfall.
The Ruggers lead 18-0 at
halftime after Mike Brown as-
sisted Eason for three scores and
Philip Ritchie added a power-run
score. One of Eason's scores came
off a 40-meter sprint from mid-
field.
In second-half action, Ritchie
scored off a broken play and
Brown's converatn was good,
24-0 ECU. Albert Redbush scored
from a loose ball off the rook after
a 15-meter run. Mike Purrel ran
the ball in for the final score of 36-
3.
In the second game, the ECU
Rugby B team defeated Appala-
chian 6-0. "The B team is contrib-
uting more to this team than ever
expected Campano said.
Campano extended an invita-
tion to all persons interested in
playing Rugby. "All ECU stu-
dents are eligible and its never too
late, he said.
The undefeated ruggers will
Bob Tobtani (number 9) of the ECU rugby team prepares to level the
oppenent during the Pirates 36-3 victory over Appalachian Saturday.
have some breaks in the schedule.
In October, ECU will face the likes
of St. Andrews and Greensboro
College, teams that the Pirates
have traditionally beaten.
"A conservative guess would
be that we could go five of seven
in the month of October said
Harvey. "But the way we've been
playing, who knows?"
ECU's team stats are dismal.
The Pirates have been shut-out six
times this season and have only
six regular-season goals as a team.
Pirate opponents score an
average of 33 goals against them
for a total of 30 on the season.
In the spite of the number of
goals against, offense or lack of it,
has been a major problem for the
Pirates.
"A problem that we have is our
front runners said Harvey. "I've
tried different combinations,
moving mid-fielders up, backs
up, everything but moving the
goalkeeper up front
Being only halfway through a
season means that there is still
time. Time to spark an offense and
salvage a season. With the trip
south Friday, the Pirates may be
able to find the solution to their
problems and get on the winning
track.
r

GAMES
W(
ECU at West Virginia
Auburn at North Carolina
Arkansas at T( L
Virginia at Clemson
Honda at LSU
Miami (H.) at Ha. State
Ga. Tech at N.C State
Ohio St at Illinois
Mich. St. at Iowa
South Carolina at Nebraska
Intramur
and h
have
away
Spec
team
1
The Intramural Sport calendar
continues to heat up as teams play
their final game for the month of
September.
In co-rec Softball action, two top
ranked teams went to war and
played for the co-rec softball title
inagameotherwiseknovN rtas
game of the year Sumptin Spe-
rial kept their undefeated record
with a combination of base hits
Crum searchi
CHAPEL HILL, N.C (AP) -
North Carolina's Dick Crum mav
feel more like band conductor this
weekend instead of football coach
against No. 6 Auburn after an-
other week of "musical
tailbacks
Crum is searching for some
healthy runn.rs. Starter Torin
Dom and reserve Kennard Mar-
tin are still nursing injuries and
are "very questionable" for
Saturday's 1 p.m. game. Senior
Eric Starr sTSlatedrtD stett'at"
tailback, Crum said at this weekly
news conference Tuesday
"If we had to play today, neither
one of them (Dorn and Martin)
would play Crum said. Dorn stil
has a sore ankle he suffered in a
season-opening victory over Illi-
nois, while Martin has a slightly
pulled hamstring, said Sports In-
formation Director Rick Brewer.
"Our problem is we v plaved
musical tailbacks Crum said
A near-record crowd of more
than 50,000 is expected at Kenan
Staduim for Saturday's game.
North Carolina officials said.
From
King
horn.
road for
wears you
nice to be i
The Tar
0 to top-r
defeating'
Naw 45-
games. Thd
are coming
10th-ranke
" With add
quarterbac
putting th�
but Crum
be changul
Auburn s
"When vj
Auburn th
you miss th
and put nc
" ou
you try t.
son
Crum sa
balanced of
best defe
"icomparj
DRESS F
SOPH
It you're enrolled in the second ear of a con
degree from an accredited college unoersm
ing our junior and senior ears of college til
least 18 but not more than 25 years old. be a If
for the Baccalaureate Degree Commissioning
side of North Carolina I 800-528-813
CONTACT Lt BoatJ
Naw Re
October
Career


navy�
LEAD THE
A


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'age 12
to be playing
e uniform now
�pare


I) Kite
Apple hite originally signed a
scholarship with North Carolina
following an All-Star career at
ance After one year at UNC, he
became disenchanted and at-
tempted to transfer to Virginia.
However, UNC officials would
not release him to another ACC
school and he ended up at ECU.
i learned a whole lot from that
situation (the changing of
schools says Applewhite. "It
was a very difficult timeofmylife.
rhere were some technical rules
that were broken bv Virginia and
oi course the tact that it would
look bad tor a person to transfer
o conference school to
another also figured in. But, I
thmk about it any-
because it is something that
happened in the past. 1 feel like
I am better oft with the ECU
n And my main concern
ling games here
ivever, it is natural to won-
tvhite is fully satisfied
L was never his first
im happy with the program
here says Applewhite. "The
mam reason i chose ECU was
because ol the coaching philoso-
phy
king for a coach that 1
to relate to both
mentally and physically contin-
ued Applewhite. "And in Eonnie
Tiompson (defensive line coach),
1 found that. He is the best coach
that I ve ever had for teaching
hnique.
liked coach Baker a
( ntinued Applewhite. "He
values and he cares for
ne of his ph. .vrs as people
isl as football players
And Applewhite, although a
-ant force on the field, is OD-
much more than just a
plaver.
F tonew post
hleh
win
L 1 -
Uni-
ill be
coach for the Tirates from
2-1970.
He was ECL's freshman coach
from 1962-1966, as his squad was
the only undefeated freshman
in ECU history. He also as-
d head coach Clarence
:vich as ECU won back-to-
hack Tangerine Bowl titles in 1954
VanSant was also a head foot-
h at the high school level
rth C arolina, as well as head
h at Cuilford College and
ir-Ryne College.
VanSant received his under-
graduate degree and Master's
ree from ECU in 1961 and
tnt received his doctoral
Torn the University of
ima in 1975.
pe to regroup
ore-
:
i ks vt 11 be
� ttescome to
E MC-W a bc-at them, the Id help us a lot
ittered by CAA i iabt month, do
me breaks in the schedule.
'her, ECU will facethelikes
of St. Andrews and Greensboro
College, teams that the Pirates
have traditionally beaten.
"A conservative guess would
be that we could go five of seven
in the month of October said
Harvey "But the way we've been
playing, who knows?"
ECU's team stats are dismal.
The Pirates have been shut-out six
times this season and have only
six regular-season goalsasa team.
Pirate opponents score an
average of 3.3 goals against them
for a total of 30 on the season.
In the spite of the number of
goals against, offense or lack of it,
has been a major problem for the
Pirates.
"A problem that we have is our
front runners said Harvey. "I've
tried different combinations,
moving mid-fielders up, backs
up, everything but moving the
goalkeeper up front
Being only halfway through a
season means that there is still
time. Time to spark an of fense and
salvage a season. With the trip
south Friday, the Pirates may be
able to find the solution to their
problems and get on the winning
track.
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 1, 1987 13
Fearless Football Forecast
GAMES
ECU at West Virginia
Auburn at North Carolina
Arkansas at TCU
Virginia at Clemson
Florida at LSU
Miami (Fl.) at Fla. State
Ga. Tech at N.C. State
Ohio St. at Illinois
Mich. St. at Iowa
South Carolina at Nebraska
BRIAN BAILEYDEAN BUCHAN
WNCT-TV Sports DirectorECU Sports Information
Ust Week:Lut Week:
(7-3)(6-4)
OverallOverall:
(29-11)(28-12)
ECUECU
AuburnAuburn
ArkansasArkansas
ClemsonClemson
LSULSU
Florida StateMiami (Fl.)
N.C. StateGa. Tech
Ohio StateOhio State
IowaIowa
NebraskaNebraska
TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Lul Week:
(6-4)
Overall:
(28-12)
West Virginia
Auburn
Arkansas
Clemson
LSU
Florida State
Ga. Tech
Ohio State
Iowa
Nebraska
PAT MOLLOY
Assistant Sports Editor
Lml Week:
(6-4)
Overall:
(25-15)
West Virginia
Aubum
Arkansas
Clemson
LSU
Florida State
Ga. Tech
Ohio State
Iowa
Nebraska
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
lml Week
(5-5)
Overall.
(20-20)
ECU
Auburn
Arkansas
Clemson
LSU
Miami (Fl.)
Ga. Tech
Ohio State
Iowa
Nebraska
Intramurals calendar beginning to heat up
The Intramural Sport calendar
continues to heat up as teams play
their final game for the month of
September.
In co-rec Softball action, two top
ranked teams went to war and
played for the co-rec softball title
in a game otherwise known as 'the
game of the year Sumptin' Spe-
cial kept their undefeated record
with a combination of base hits
and home runs any squad would
have been proud of and came
away with a close win over the
Syndicate.
In the eight inning contest,
Special's Ricky Fischer drove in
teammate Sonya Dub ree to clinch
the 4-3 victory. No doubt that the
Syndicate will be back later to try
and rob their foes of the all cam-
pus championship title.
In other softball action, the
Homers defeated Silent Attack 12-
6, while the Executioners out-
lasted DDID 11-9.
Coming up on the Intramural
Sport Calendar of events will be a
new and exciting activity for all
those individuals and teams
wanting a little 'payback' for a
loss they have encountered.
Challenge day has been set up
as an opportunity for teams or
individuals to challenge ar-
Crum searching for tailbacks
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) -
North Carolina's Dick Crum may
feel more like band conductor this
weekend instead of football coach
against No. 6 Auburn after an-
other week of "musical
tailbacks
Crum is searching for some
healthy runners. Starter Torin
Dom and reserve Kennard Mar-
tin arc still nursing injuries and
are "very questionable" for
Saturday's 1 p.m. game. Senior
trie Starr sT slatedrtD stattaV
tailback, Crum said at this weekly
news conference Tuesday.
"If we had to play today, neither
one of them (Dorn and Martin)
would play Crum said. Dorn stil
has a sore ankle he suffered in a
season-opening victory over Illi-
nois, while Martin has a slightly
pulled hamstring, said Sports In-
formation Director Rick Brewer.
"Our problem is we've played
musical tailbacks Crum said.
A near-record crowd of more
than 50,000 is expected at Kenan
Staduim for Saturday's game,
North Carolina officials said.
"From our point of view, we're
looking forward to getting
home Crum said. "Being on the
road for three weeks kind of
wears you out and I think it will be
nice to be at home . .
The Tar Heels are 3-1, losing 28-
0 to top-ranked Oklahoma, and
defeating Georgia Tech 30-23 and
Navy 45-14 in their last three road
games. The Tigers are 2-0-1 and
are coming off a 20-20 tie with
lOth-ranked Tennessee.
" With a depleted running attack,
quarterback Mark Maye could be
putting the ball in the air more,
but Crum said his offense won't
be changing much to counter
Auburn's deadly pass rush.
"When you play a team like
Auburn that is good defensively,
you miss the boat if you go in there
and put new plays in he said.
"You've got to execute the things
you try to throughout the sea-
son.
Crum said Aubum features a
balanced offense and "one of the
best defenses in the country
"I compare them very favorably
to Oklahoma Crum said.
'They're certainly a powerful
football team
With the loss of All-American
tailback Brent Full wood to the
National Football League, Crum
said the burden of the Tiger of-
fense now falls on senior quarter-
back Jeff Burger, who has com-
pleted 44 of 64 passes for 587
yards in Auburn's first three con-
tests.
"He's (Burger) really mobile
and hasastrongarm'Crumsaid.
"People tend to downplay their
rushing game, but I think it's
pretty solid Crum added. "I
think everybody tries to compare
their tailbacks to Fullwood and
(former Heisman Trophy winner)
Bo Jackson. They've got good,
solid runners
Tiger coach Pat Dye, former
coach at East Carolina, will be
making his appearance at Kenan
Staduim since 1979, when the Pi-
rates tied the Tar Heels 24-24.
DRESS FOR SUCCESS.
SOPHOMORES
If you're enrolled in the second year of a college program leading to an associate or baccalaureate
degree from an accredited collegeuniversity, you could be earning more than $1,000 a month dur
ing your junior and senior years of college for a total of $24,000 by graduation. You must he at
least 18 but not more than 25 years old, be a US Citizen and have a 3.0 GPA. To see if you qualify
for the Baccalaureate Degree Commissioning Program (BDCP) Call: 1-800-662-72317419 or out
side of North Carolina 1-800-528-8713
CONTACT Lt. Boatright
Navy Representative
October 6
Career Planning and Placement Office
V NAVY OFFICER.
� - s'
�ICr �� ���" - Ll
LEAD THE ADVENTURE.
group of students to a game of
their choice. The Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services
will provide all officials needed,
equipment, and reserve any play-
ing site deemed necessary.
Registration for this one day
event will be held Wednesday,
Oct. 14 in room 104-A Memorial
Gym from 11 a.m6 p.m. The event
will take place Thursday, Oct. 22
from 4 p.m8 p.m. at the site of
your choice.
If you feel that you owe some-
body or some team SOME-
THING, challenge them to a per-
sonal grudge match, but remem-
ber, this activity is just for fun.
Registration for physical Fit-
ness aerobic, aquarobic and ton-
ing classes is upcoming in mid-
October. You can sign up to 'work
your body' Oct. 13-16 in room 204
Memorial Gym.
A fee of $10 for students and $12
for staff had been charged. For a
complete class schedule, drop by
room 204 Memorial Gym or call
757-6387 for more information.
For additional information re-
garding any of the programs and
services offered by the Depart-
ment of Intramural-Recreational
Services drop by room 204 Memo-
rial Gym or call 757-6387.
Read the Fearless Football
Forecast every Thursday in the
r
�JJ 1L
o o
311
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h





'age 12
to be playing
e uniform now
rcparc
had an
St
n four
.i u p a
:nt
i:
Applewhite originally signed a
scholarship with North Carolina
following an All-Star career at
Vance. After one year at UNC, he
became disenchanted and at-
tempted to transfer to Virginia.
However. UNC officials would
not release him to another ACC
school and he ended up at ECU.
1 learned a whole lot from that
situation (the changing of
ols says Applewhite. "It
was a very difficult timeof my life.
rhere were some technical rules
that were broken bv Virginia and
ol course the fact that it would
bad tor a person to transfer
ne conference school to
another also figured in. But, I
t really think about it any-
e because it is something that
happened in the past. I feel like
that I am better off with the ECU
.ram And my main concern
a - winning games here
However, it is natural to won-
der ppk white is fully satisfied
IL as never his first
choice
"1 am happy with the program
here sa - Applewhite. "The
mam reason 1 chose ECU was
because of the coaching philoso-
"1 was looking tor a coach that I
would be able to relate to both
mentally and physically contin-
ued Applewhite. "And in Donnie
Thompson (defensive line coach),
1 found that He is the best coach
that I've ever had for teaching
�A technique.
d. 1 also liked coach Baker a
continued Applewhite. "He
;reat values and he cares for
each one of his players as people
as football players
And Applewhite, although a
dominant force on the field, is ob-
much more than just a
I player.
to new post
ilete
win
Uni-
-h will be
�i The
hns-
ach for the Pirates from
2-1970.
was ECU'S freshman coach
62-1966, as his squad was
the only undefeated freshman
: ECU history. He also as-
d head coach Clarence
isavich as ECU won back-to-
� Tangerine Bowl titles in 1954
and 1953.
VanSant was also a head foot-
hat the high school level
in North Carolina, as well as head
h at Cuilford College and
noir-Ryne College.
VanSant received his under-
graduate degree and Master's
ree from ECU in 1961 and
VanSant received his doctoral
- from the University of
ibama in 1975.
pe to regroup
Ion hard times
a ill be
b Pirates come to
I MC-W a
boat them, the
Id help us a lot
ittered by CAA
ast month, do
I Ij
TiiLk
res to level the
lian Saturday.
have some breaks in the schedule.
In October, ECU will face the likes
Andrews and Greensboro
ege, teams that the Pirates
have traditionally beaten.
"A conservative guess would
be that we could go five of seven
in the month of October said
Harvey. "But the way we've been
playing, who knows?"
ECU'S team stats are dismal.
The Pirates have been shut-out six
times this season and have only
six regular-season goals asa team.
Pirate opponents sco.e an
average of 3.3 goals against them
for a total of 30 on the season.
In the spite of the number of
goals against, offense or lack of it,
has been a major problem for the
Pirates.
"A problem that we have is our
front runners said Harvey. "I've
tried different combinations,
moving mid-fielders up, backs
up, everything but moving the
goalkeeper up front
Being only halfway through a
season means that there is still
time. Time to spark anoffenseand
salvage a season. With the trip
south Friday, the Pirates may be
able to find the solution to their
problems and get on the winning
track.
f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 1, 1987 13
Fearless Football Forecast
GAMES
ECU at West Virginia
Auburn at North Carolina
Arkansas at TCU
Virginia at Clemson
Florida at LSU
Miami (Fl.) at Fla. State
Ga. Tech at N.C. State
Ohio St. at Illinois
Mich. St. at Iowa
South Carolina at Nebraska
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
La Weak
(7-3)
Overall:
(29-11)
ECU
Auburn
Arkansas
Clemson
LSU
Florida State
N.C. State
Ohio State
Iowa
Nebraska
DEAN BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
La Week:
(6-4)
Overall
(28-12)
ECU
Auburn
Arkansas
Clemson
LSU
Miami (Fl.)
Ga. Tech
Ohio State
Iowa
Nebraska
TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Lut Week:
(6-4)
Overall:
(28-12)
West Virginia
Auburn
Arkansas
Clemson
LSU
Florida State
Ga. Tech
Ohio State
Iowa
Nebraska
PAT MOLLOY
Assistant Sports Editor
Lai Week
(6-4)
Overall.
(25-15)
West Virginia
Auburn
Arkansas
Clemson
LSU
Florida State
Ga. Tech
Ohio State
Iowa
Nebraska
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
LM Week
(5-5)
Overall
(20-20)
ECU
Auburn
Arkansas
Clemson
LSU
Miami (Fl.)
Ga. Tech
Ohio State
Iowa
Nebraska
Intramurals calendar beginning to heat up
The Intramural Sport calendar
continues to heat up as teams play
their final game for the month of
September.
In co-rec softball action, two top
ranked teams went to war and
played for the co-rec softball title
in a game otherwise known as 'the
game of the year Sumptin' Spe-
cial kept their undefeated record
with a combination of base hits
and home runs any squad would
have been proud of and came
away with a close win over the
Syndicate.
In the eight inning contest,
Special's Ricky Fischer drove in
teammate Sonya Dubree to clinch
the 4-3 victory. No doubt that the
Syndicate will be back later to try
and rob their foes of the all cam-
pus championship title.
In other softball action, the
Homers defeated Silent Attack 12-
6, while the Executioners out-
lasted DDID 11-9.
Coming up on the Intramural
Sport Calendar of events will be a
new and exciting activity for all
those individuals and teams
wanting a little 'payback' for a
loss they have encountered.
Challenge day has been set up
as an opportunity for teams or
individuals to challenge ar-
group of students to a game of
their choice. The Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services
will provide all officials needed,
equipment, and reserve any play-
ing site deemed necessary.
Registration for this one day
event will be held Wednesday,
Oct. 14 in room 104-A Memorial
Gym from 11 a.m6 p.m. The event
will take place Thursday, Oct. 22
from 4 p.m8 p.m. at the site of
Crum searching for tailbacks
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) -
North Carolina's Dick Crum may
feel more like band conductor this
weekend instead of football coach
against No. 6 Auburn after an-
other week of "musical
tailbacks
Crum is searching for some
healthy runners. Starter Torin
Dorn and reserve Kennard Mar-
tin are still nursing injuries and
are "very questionable" for
Saturday's 1 p.m. game. Senior
Eric Slarrt�? &StedrtD startar
tailback, Crum said at this weekly
news conference Tuesday.
"If we had to play today, neither
one of them (Dorn and Martin)
would play Crum said. Dorn stil
has a sore ankle he suffered in a
season-opening victory over Illi-
nois, while Martin has a slightly
pulled hamstring, said Sports In-
formation Director Rick Brewer.
"Our problem is we've played
musical tailbacks Crum said.
A near-record crowd of more
than 50,000 is expected at Kenan
Staduim for Saturday's game,
North Carolina officials said.
"From our point of view, we're
looking forward to getting
home Crum said. "Being on the
road for three weeks kind of
wears you out and I think it will be
nice to be at home
The Tar Heels are 3-1, losing 28-
0 to top-ranked Oklahoma, and
defeating Georgia Tech 30-23 and
Navy 45-14 in their last three road
games. The Tigers are 2-0-1 and
are coming off a 20-20 tie with
lOth-rankcd Tennessee.
" Witha depleted running attack,
quarterback Mark Maye could be
putting the ball in the air more,
but Crum said his offense won't
be changing much to counter
Auburn's deadly pass rush.
"When you play a team like
Auburn that is good defensively,
you miss the boat if you go in there
and put new plays in he said.
"You've got to execute the things
you try to throughout the sea-
son.
Crum said Auburn features a
balanced offense and "one of the
best defenses in the country
"I compare them very favorably
to Oklahoma Crum said.
'They're certainly a powerful
football team
With the loss of Ail-American
tailback Brent Fullwood to the
National Football League, Crum
said the burden of the Tiger of-
fense now falls on senior quarter-
back Jeff Burger, who has com-
pleted 44 of 64 passes for 587
yards in Auburn's first three con-
tests.
"He's (Burger) really mobile
and has a strong arm Crum said.
"People tend to downplay their
rushing game, but I think it's
pretty solid Crum added. "I
think everybody tries to compare
their tailbacks to Fullwood and
(former Heisman Trophy winner)
Bo Jackson. They've got good,
solid runners
Tiger coach Pat Dye, former
coach at East Carolina, will be
making his appearance at Kenan
Staduim since 1979, when the Pi-
rates tied the Tar Heels 24-24.
your choice.
If you feel that you owe some-
body or some team SOME-
THING, challenge them to a per-
sonal gTudge match, but remem-
ber, this activity is just for fun.
Registration for physical Fit-
ness aerobic, aquarobic and ton-
ing classes is upcoming in mid-
October. You can sign up to 'work
your body' Oct. 13-16 in room 204
Memorial Gym.
A fee of $10 for students and $12
for staff had been charged. For a
complete class schedule, drop by
room 204 Memorial Gym or call
757-6387 for more information.
For additional information re-
garding any of the programs and
services offered by the Depart-
ment of Intramural-Recreational
Services drop by room 204 Memo-
rial Gym or call 757-6387.
Read the Fearless Football
Forecast every Thursday in the
�if
fl o
O
o
v
9

DRESS FOR SUCCESS.
SOPHOMORES
If you're enrolled in the second year of a college program leading to an associate or baccalaureate
degree from an accredited collegeuniversity, you could be earning more than $1,000 a month dur
ing your junior and senior years of college for a total of $24,000 by graduation. You must be at
least 18 but not more than 25 years old, be a US Citizen and have a 3.0 GPA. To see if you quahh
for the Baccalaureate Degree Commissioning Program (BDCP). Call: 1-800-662-72317419 or out-
side of North Carolina 1-800-528-8713.
CONTACT: Lt Boatright
Navy Representative
October 6
GOOD
WITH
SPECIALS
TOO!
$1.00 OF
NOT GOOD
WITH OTHER
COUPONS
ANY MEAL
At
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD 756-201II
03 SvanL expires December 31, 198
3ood -I rio rw NOT GOOD
Vyr-PH lUO jr r WITH OTHER
'r YOUR NEXT COUPONS
MEAL
At
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD 756-20111
1903 S. Evans St. expires December 31, 1987i
FOSDICK'S
189� SEAFOOD
V

Career Planning and Placement Office
NAVY OFFICER.
Tu. -�
I
Md
ADVENTURE.
2903 S. Evans St.
Takeout Orders; 756-2011
mum
"�"�'�" m �� inmmmmmmmmmmmmmmimmmmmmtmmm
i mee�mm � mmmmmimmmmm'
vatntf
i
ir

A
��j
�v





14 THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER I. 1987
Positions harden as NFL strike continues
NEW YORK (AP) - Positions arc
continuing to harden as 'he NFL
strike enters its ninth day, but
word of possible picket-line
crossings have started to spread.
While union head Gene Up-
shaw was continuing his cross-
country tour Tuesday vowing to
disrupt Sunday's games of re-
placement players, the Manage-
ment Council's executive
committee was continuing to take
a hard line , remaining adamant
that it will in no way give up its
control of the game by acceding to
the players' demand for free
agency.
Meeting in New York, the coun-
cil also formally announced that
last week's missed games will not
be made up. That will cost the
1,585 players anywhere from
$60,000 for the highest-paid su-
perstars to $4,000 for minimum-
salaried rookies.
It was apparently money that is
causing some of the league's big-
ger names to indicate they might
be crossing the picket lines.
Among the players mentioned
were Dallas' Danny White and
Tony Dorsett and San Francisco's
Joe Montana and Dwight Clark.
No new negotiations were
scheduled and none are planned
until at least after this weekend's
games, the first to be played by
teams of castoffs and other free
agents. Each side also formally
filed complaints with the Na-
tional Labor Relations Board as
they said they would.
Tuesday was also the final day
that fans could get full refunds for
season tickets and fans lined up at
ticket windows around the nation
to get back their money.
Meanwhile, hundreds of ticket
holders lined up at the New Eng-
land box office, and although no
official count was available, Patri-
ots General Manager Patrick Sul-
livan said his team appeared "to
be leading the league right now"
in refund tickets.
Upshaw was in Atlanta and
Elizabeth, N.J. to meet with
members of striking teams from
the area. He took a hard line in
both places.
"We don't advocate violence,
but we do advocate doing
whatever's necessary to stop
these games, and we will do it
Upshaw said after meeting with
representatives of six teams in
Atlanta.
"We'll haunt those games
Upshaw said. "They are really
Dallas'
White
to play
IRVING, Texas (AP) - Dallas
quarterback Danny White
crossed the picket line of striking
Cowboys players early today,
saying his reasons for doing so
"are strictly private
White, who lost $45,000 last
week when he honored the play-
ers' strike, slipped across the
picket line at 7:50 a.m. as it was
formed by late-arriving strikers.
White joined veterans Randy
White and Don Smerek. Also in
the Cowboys' camp are two play-
ers off the injured reserve, Chris
Duliban and Johnny "Lam" Jones.
Also expected to cross the
picket lines this week were run-
ning back Tony Dorsett, one of the
most outspoken pro-union mem-
bers of the team, and defensive
end Ed Jones. Both received let-
ters from cowboys management
saying they would jeopardize
their annuities if they didn't show
up.
Danny White informed the rest
of the team during a meeting on
Monday that because of financial
problems he would have to cross
the picket line later in the week
and return to work.
Dorsett said he received a letter
from Cowboys President Tex
Schramm on Tuesday that in-
formed him he stands to lose a
portion of his $6 milion annuity if
he doesn't return soon.
On Sunday, the Cowboys are
scheduled to play the Jets in East
Rutherford, N.J their first game
since the National Football
League Players Association an-
nounced the strike Sept. 21.
ECU
tearing down our product, and
we don't like it
Miami owner Joe Robbie,
meanwhile, predicted before the
owners' meeting that they would
be even more united after
Sunday'sgamesand added: "This
fight is over control of football, it's
not over money
"Owners are not going to sur-
render control of the games to the
union he said.
One game wiped out was the
Giants at the Dolphins' new sta-
dium, a privately financed edifice
named for Robbie. The two teams
had met just once previously.
"I just had the biggest gate in
the history of pro football wiped
out Sunday, my team against the
Super Bowl champions Robbie
said. It seems to me just willful
destruction to wipe out a game
like that
Hugh Culverhouse, owner of
the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and
chairman of the executive
committee, said after the meeting
that the owners had voted to al-
low any striking player who re-
ports by the Friday before a game
to be allowed to play that Sunday
and be paid for the game.
He also said the teams will be
allowed a 55-player roster, with
only 45 allowed to dress each
Sunday.
CBS and NBC have said they
will televise their regular games
Sunday, and ABC said it will
broadcast next Monday night's
game between the San Francisco
49ers and the New York Giants.
The networks have not said
whether they will televise any
further games, but Tex Schramm
of the Dallas Cowboys said after
Monday's management meeting
that he believed that deals could
be made with local stations if the
networks pull out.
In Philadelphia, Ed Manon,
executive director of the Profes-
sional Football Referees Associa-
tion, said regular referees would
work the replacement games.
While emphasizing his associa-
tion was not a union, Marion said:
"If we don't work, we don't get
paid
EXTRA LOW
PRICES!
mim
Fresh Whole Boneless - 5-7 Lbs. Avg.
PORK LOINS ,sliced FREE!
Fresh Whole
PORK TENDERLOINS
IVIERIOBgr
tSe
m-
Fresh Crisp Iceberg
LETTUCE
Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday, October 4, 1987.
We Reserve The Right To Limit
Quantities On All Items.

-
.

Fresh Large Baking Potatoes
Fresh Jumbo Yellow Onions
Fresh Sweet Potatoes
w,r-
USDA Choice Beef Full Cut
BONELESS
ROUND STEAK
Head
Lb.
Tasty
GWALTNEY
BACONl
SLICED BACON
I&H
USDA
CHOICE
Fresh Thompson
SEEDLESS
GRAPES
JttftfflMf CtfD
Chicken
Breasts
$118
Lb.
Holly Farms - Grade A
Regular Or Family Pack
Fresh Pan
Trout
$129
Fresh Eastern Red,
Gold Or Rome
Apples
Maxwell House
Coffee
$299
13 Oz. Vac. Bag - Decaffeinated ADEP
Instant Decaffeinated
Maxwell House Coffee s oz. 3.99
EXTRA LOW PRICES
Everyday

8 Oz. - Creamy ItalianltallanLt. Creamy
CucumberCreamy ButtermilkThousand
IslandOil Free ItalianCreamy Cucumber
It. Bacon I TomatoBacon A Tomato
CatalinaFrenclilt. Catalinalt. French
Peter Pan 18 Oz. � SmoothCrunchy
499�
Oz. Ozark Valley - Turkey Chicken J
Grape Jelly Or
JamApple Jelly
95 Oz. - PepperoniCombinationSausage
Shredded 11 Food Lion
Mozzarella! I Orange Juice
$15979
12 Oz. - Food Lion 12 Oz. � Frozen Concentrate
3$1
Ifc � Oipfrt Beef
�MfCMcfcftfUvtr



. Mr-�.nr��MJT.� . . B n m f J(
�MaMMMMWI
��!





14
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 1, 1987
Positions harden as NFL strike continues
NEW YORK (AP) - Positions are
continuing to harden as the NFL
strike enters its ninth day, but
word of possible picket-line
crossings have started to spread.
While union head Gene l'p-
shaw was continuing his cross-
country tour Tuesday vowing to
disrupt Sunday's games of re-
placement players, the Manage-
ment Council's executive
committee was continuing to take
a hard line , remaining adamant
that it will in no way give up its
control of thegame by acceding to
the players' demand for free
agency.
Meeting in New York, the coun-
cil also formally announced that
last week's missed games will not
be made up. That will cost the
1,585 players anywhere from
$60,000 for the highest-paid su-
perstars to $4,000 for minimum-
salaried rookies.
It was apparently money that is
causing some of the league's big-
ger names to indicate they might
be crossing the picket lines.
Among the players mentioned
were Dallas' Danny White and
Tony Dorsett and San Francisco's
Joe Montana and Dwight Clark.
No new negotiations were
scheduled and none are planned
until at least after this weekend's
games, the first to be played by
teams of castoffs and other free
agents. Each side also formally
filed complaints with the Na-
tional Labor Relations Board as
they said they would.
Tuesday was also the final day
that fans could get full refunds for
season tickets and fans lined up at
ticket windows around the nation
to get back their money.
Meanwhile, hundreds of ticket
holders lined up at the New Eng-
land box office, and although no
official count was available, Patri-
ots General Manager Patrick Sul-
livan said his team appeared "to
be leading the league right now"
in refund tickets.
Upshaw was in Atlanta and
Elizabeth, N.J. to meet with
members of striking teams from
the area. He took a hard line in
both places.
"We don't advocate violence,
but we do advocate doing
whatever's necessary to stop
these games, and we will do it
Upshaw said after meeting with
representatives of six teams in
Atlanta.
"We'll haunt those games
Upshaw said. "They are really
Dallas'
White
to play
IRVING, Texas (AP) - Dallas
quarterback Danny White
crossed the picket line of striking
Cowboys players early today,
saying his reasons for doing so
"are strictly private
White, who lost $45,000 last
week when he honored the play-
ers' strike, slipped across the
picket line at 7:50 a.m. as it was
formed by late-arriving strikers.
White joined veterans Randy
White and Don Smerek. Also in
the Cowboys' camp are two play-
ers off the injured reserve, Chris
Duliban and Johnny "Lam" Jones.
Also expected to cross the
picket lines this week were run-
ning back Tony Dorsett, one of the
most outspoken pro-union mem-
bers of the team, and defensive
end Ed Jones. Both received let-
ters from cowboys management
saying they would jeopardize
their annuities if they didn't show
up.
Danny White informed the rest
of the team during a meeting on
Monday that because of financial
problems he would have to cross
the picket line later in the week
and return to work.
Dorsett said he received a letter
from Cowboys President Tex
Schramm on Tuesday that in-
formed him he stands to lose a
portion of his $6 milion annuity if
he doesn't return soon.
On Sunday, the Cowboys are
scheduled to play the Jets in East
Rutherford, N.J their first game
since the National Football
League Players Association an-
nounced the strike Sept 21.
ECU
tearing down our product, and
we don't like it
Miami owner Joe Robbie,
meanwhile, predicted before the
owners' meeting that they would
be even more united after
Sunday'sgamesand added: "This
fight is over control of football, it's
not over money
"Owners are not going to sur-
render control of the games to the
union he said.
One game wiped out was the
Giants at the Dolphins' new sta-
dium, a privately financed edifice
named for Robbie. The two teams
had met just once previously.
"I just had the biggest gate in
the history of pro football wiped
out Sunday, my team against the
Super Bowl champions Robbie
said. It seems to me just willful
destruction to wipe out a game
like that
Hugh Culverhouse, owner of
the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and
chairman of the executive
committee, said after the meeting
that the owners had voted to al-
low any striking player who re-
ports by the Friday before a game
to be allowed to play that Sunday
and be paid for the game.
He also said the teams will be
allowed a 55-player roster, with
only 45 allowed to dress each
Sunday.
CBS and NBC have said they
will televise their regular games
Sunday, and ABC said it will
broadcast next Monday night's
game between the San Francisco
49ers and the New York Giants.
The networks have not said
whether they will televise any
further games, but Tex Schramm
of the Dallas Cowboys said after
Monday's management meeting
that he believed that deals could
be made with local stations if the
networks pull out.
In Philadelphia, Ed Manon,
executive director of the Profes
sional Football Referees Associa-
tion, said regular referees would
work the replacement games.
While emphasizing his associa-
tion was not a union, Marion said:
"If we don't work, we don't get
paid "
EXTRA LOW
FOOD LION
PRICES!
Center Cut
AMERI06(ur
Fresh Whole Boneless - 5-7 Lbs. Avg.
PORK LOINS (Sliced FREE!
Fresh Whole
PORK TENDERLOINS
Fresh Crisp Iceberg
LETTUCE
I
Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday, October 4, 1987.
We Reserve The Right To Limit
Quantities On All Items.
59
Fresh Large Baking Potatoes
Fresh Jumbo Yellow Onions
Fresh Sweet Potatoes
Hpari
USDA Choice Beef Full Cut
BONELESS
ROUND STEAK
USDA
CHOICE
Fresh Thompson
EEDLESS
GRAPES
Chicken
Breasts
$118t
Holly Farms - Grade A
Regular Or Family Pack
Fresh Pan
Trout
$ 129
Fresh t a si em ntm,
Gold Or Rome
Apples
39
EXTRA LOW PRICES
Maxwell House
Coffee
$299
13 Oz. Vac. Bag Decaffeinated ADEP
Instant Decaffeinated
Maxwell House Coffee s oz. 3.99
Everyday
8 Oz. - Creamy Itallanrtalianlt. Creamy
CucumberCreamy ButtermilkThousand
Island011 Free ItalianCreamy Cucumber
Lt. Bacon t TomatoBacon A Tomato
CaUllnaFrenchLt. CatallnaLt. French
Mr. P's
sm Pizza
4 99� 69�
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Stokely
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 1, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 01, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.562
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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