The East Carolinian, September 29, 1987








INSIDE
Editorials a
Stylem�7
Sports�10
Classifieds���6
STYLE
The Fixx and Anita Baker are coming to Minges
Coliseum � see STYLE, page 7.
SPORTS
Pirates defeat Georgia Southern on Parents Day
see SPORTS, page 10.
�be �uBt (UntBlMun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.62 No. 10
Tuesday, September 29,1987
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
New bill proposed
SGA legislators argue over judiciary powers
Legislator Marty Helms addresses the the SGA Monday in support of the bill which would change the
pay the judiciary deals with students (Photolab).
Chief Rose talks about this year's crime and gives advice
Crime on campus, according to
initial observations, is no worse
than it was last vcar, said Chief
johnny R. Rose'of ECU Public
Safety.
Rose did note that there has
been a problem with breaking,
entering and larceny in the high-
rise residence halls such as Clem-
ent and White. Many of these
were due to rooms having been
left unlocked, Rose said.
Rose also mentioned recent
break-ins and thefts to cars in iso-
lated campus parking lots like
those on Fifth and Reade St. and
14th and Berkely St. He rccom-
ended that students parking in
such lots check on their cars more
than once a week.
There have not been any major
assaults such as rape or assault
with a deadly weapon reported
this semester. Rose said.
By TIM HAMPTON
Staff Writer
The SGA debated a bill which
would allow the SGA judiciary
branch to pass sentence on stu-
dents before they arc tried in a
court of law.
The debate took up most of the
SGA's Monday night meeting,
although the legislature did pass
some appropriat on bills.
The debate concerned whether
or not the student judiciary
should rule on student miscon-
duct before a court of law deals
with criminal charges against a
student.
"Currently we (the SGA) have
to wait to see what happens to an
accused person in the cirv court
before we can act upon the indi-
vidual said legislator Marty
Helms. Helms, who advocates the
bill, said manv times the city
courts take years to hand down a
decision.
"While cases against individu-
als are pending in other courts,
the university cannot take actions
in it's best interest Helms said
on the SGA floor. He said the
proposed bill would make stu-
dents accused of a crime more
accountable to the university for
their actions.
"This bill would give judicial
boards increased judgement and
increases the possibility of dual
punishment (by the city court and
the SGA judicial branch) said
Dr. Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor
of student life, who expressed
doubts about the bill.
Several legislators were con
cerned with the consequences of
passing the proposed bill. "Sup
pose a student is convicted (by the
SGA judiciary) and thrown out of
school and later is proven inno-
cent by the city court said legis-
lator Tim Mills.
'The judicary's decision would
have no bearing on the citv case
said John Simon, the public defen-
der and the author of the bill.
"This bill is to clarify some am-
biguous language in the student
constitution and to alleviate some
past problems said Simon in a
interview after the meeting.
In drafting the bill, Simon
weighed the precedent of Paine v.
Board of Regents of the Texas
(university) System he said. In
this case the court stated, "the
disciplinary process is to protect
the university, while the criminal
process protects the society
After a period of debate, 1 lelms
proposed that speaking privel-
opes be allowed for Simon and Dr.
Ronald P. Spcier, associate dean
of student affairs. Helms said the
two would be able to explain the
bill to the legislature. But the leg-
islators outvoted this request.
"The refusal to allow speaking
privileges irritated me Simon
said after the meeting. "They (the
legislature) need to fulfill their
duties on this vote
The legislature moved to con-
tinue discussion on the bill in next
week's meeting.
In other business, the legisla-
ture appropriated:
�$300 to the Biology Club.
�$1,9M to the SGA executive
council for a new computer.
�$575 to the Medical Records
Association.
�$600 to Sigma Gamma Ep-
llson, the earth sciences fraternity
by a 22-16 vote, the only one
which had to be counted.
Thomas receives post
SGA President Scott Thorn
was elected vice president ol the
University of North Carolina
Association of Student Gover-
ments in a meeting Saturday fat
Greensboro.
The association is a statewide
organization of student body
presidents from the 16-member
UNC system. The association
serves as a student voice ol the
UNC system in the General As-
sembly, the UNC Board of Gover-
nors and the UNC generai admin-
stration.
TheUNCASG

students in North Carolina.
If s very important to have
ECU well represented. J see the
possibilities as being positive,
Thomas said.
1 look forward to working
with other student leaders
throughout the state to see mat
higher education in North Caro-
lina continues to progress and at
the same time keep tuition rateast
a reasonable level Thomas said
Chief Johnny R. Rose
New rules affect poster placement on campus
By M. BURBFLLA
A�itant Newt Editor
The beginning of this school
vear saw the activation of new
restrictions on putting up posters
on campus.
The Committee on Canvassing,
Peddling and Soliciting on Cam-
pus revised the policies and pro-
cedures April 17,1986. These new
procedures, approved by Chan-
cellor Richard R. Eakin, are now in
effect.
Student organizations are pro-
hibited from putting up posters at
certain areas of the campus and
there are new restrictions govern-
mg non-student organization
posters as well.
Discrepancies between policies
dealing with student government
and those dealing with residence
halls initiated the changes, ac-
cording to Associate Dean Ronald
Speier, Director of Student Serv-
ices.
"he original policy stated any-
one could advertise via posters in
the designated areas on campus.
Under the new policy, only or-
ganizations registered with the
division of student life can adver-
tise without permission.
Furthermore, the sale ot goods
on campus by student organiza-
tions is restricted by the policy.
According to the committee's
policy, notices of any kind "are to
be placed only on unrestricted
bulletin boards found throughout
the campus Student organiza-
tions can sell goods only at desig-
nated places. Art work may be
sold at gallery areas on campus
and special outdoor show sights.
Food and similar items pre-
pared by an organization may be
sold at the lobby of the Student
Stores or in designated areas of
the residence halls. Flowers and
balloon arrangements may be
sold in the lobby of the Student
Stores, in the Student Organiza-
tion Booth in Mendenhall Student
Center, and in designated places
in residence halls.
The abundance of SGA election
posters placed on unauthorized
areas was one reason for the pol-
icy change.
"We brought Student Govern-
ment in line with the other organi-
zations so we have one consistent
policy Speier said. "Basically I
think most students comply with
the policies and understand the
reason behind them � and that
contributes to a well informed
student body and a beautiful
campus
The committee also placed con-
flicting residence hall policies
under the new revisions.
According to the committee's
policy, the general rulesand regu-
lations are as follows:
�All sales, solicitation, and
similar activities conducted on
campus shall conform to Univer-
sity policies, North Carolina, Pitt
County and Greenville ordi-
nances and laws.
�There shall be no soliciting or
similar activities that are in con-
flict or which violate a university
contract with existing campus
agencies except by special per-
mission of the director of such
agencies.
�It shall be the responsibility of
the petitioner andor the organi-
zaiton represented to police,
clean-up and remove all materials
at the site of the approved project
or activity when such is con-
cluded.
�Violationsof the rules, regula-
tions, procedures and any other
University policies concerning
sales, solicitation and similar ac-
tivities may result in loss of such
privileges or other measures as
deemed appropriate.
The committee "will be on the
lookout for any violations of the
policy Violators will recieve one
letter warning and a second viola-
tion will result in a fine "of at least
$25 Speier said.
Any organization interested in
rules concerning putting up post-
ers can get The Where Can I Put
My Posters (And Not Get In
Trouble) Brochure" at Speier's
office or in the Program Office in
Mendenhall Student Center.
The policy committee is look-
ing for new members, interested
persons can contact Speier.
Widely known expert to
speak at ECU workshop
(ECU News Bureau) � Jean
Berg, director of volunteer serv-
ices for Arlington County, Va
will direct the first workshop in
the 1987-88 Library Science Series
at ECU beginning October 3.
Berg is nationally known for her
work with volunteerism and she
has shared her ideas on both radio
and TV. During the workshop,
which is helpful to anyone who
deals with volunteers, she will
describe her model for volunteers
and how they should view their
work.
The workshop, sponsored by
the East Carolina Division of
Continuing Education, is sched-
uled for 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and
will be held in room 221 of Joyner
Library on the ECU campus.
For further information contact
Allen Churchill, Continuing Edu-
cation, ECU, 757-6143.
A collage of messages at the Student Store. One way of knowingthat plastered on walls, bulletin boards, trees, etc. But at ECU there
vou are on a college campus is by the number of posters you see new regulations concerning putting up posters (Photolab)

A







Tl IF rASI i ,K( H INI AN SFHTMRFR 29, 1Q87
Educators will receive outstanding alumni
(ECL) NewsBureau) Kay
Yuo. NorthC,Carolina State I rti-
Vrsity, the heal coach ol the 1988
UsOlympicWomen's basket-
kteam, anctwo nationally
kinvn educalors will receive
Outstanding Alumni
�u rds from 1ast , arolina I Ini
V! Stj
11c awardsbestowed b the
(tAlumni A cntcd at tlssociation, will be e annual alumni ItoYow to Esther
Mi iran. assoate pnifessor oi
-pentai oridacation I niversih to Di Dudle) 1
d .is( state super
� -eident ol puli instruction.
:(1 s Outslanding Alumni
Aw;rds reeo;ni. e superior
acentinnal, civic
inr pt m i! u, j Iiffaii s a ording
to i. ki i , � cipici. istant to Hoi foi institu-�ent. t tin- yeai bt . an
careti in public s hool
edUlation 1 c,getl noted "All ined ediK ition c in fact, . t leadei
j is anobsen ation 1 am
i -d to note during
th-t�� I reform BA in 1 nglish
1st V, .1964. She
il .jt Allen in Hit ii School in
I ligh Point and began her coach-
ing career there. In tour wars at
Allen Jay her teams won tour
conference championships.
She taught and coached one
year at her former high school in
( abonsville, N.C. before deciding
to pcrsue a master's degree in
physical education at the Univer-
sity of North Carolina at Greens-
boro.
Meanwhile, she taught at Eton
College and upon graduating,
became Eton's coordinator ol
women's athletics, coach, and
professor oi physical education.
Yow remained at lion until
1979, compiling a 57-19 winloss
record. She then moved to her
current position at N C. State
University. A of the 1986-87 sea
son, Yow's record at N.C. State
was 281-88. Her 1986-87 team
won the Atlantic Coastouter
ence Championship and finished
with a 24-7 record
xi ow's success at N.C. State led
her to international coaching ex
penence. She will take the 1 SA
Olympic team to Seoul, Korea, in
September, 1988. This will be
i ow's second Olympics; she w as
assistant coach tor the USA's
gold-medal winning 1984Hym-
pic squad.
In 1986 she was head coa( h for
the team that won gold medals at
both the World Championships
and the Goodwill Games, each
time beating the USSR team.
Yow has also coached interna-
tional teams at the Pan American
Games and World University
Games. Her experiences have
taken her to Mexico, Brazil, Vene-
zuela, Cuba and countries
throughout Europe.
Alice Esther Morgan graduated
from East Carolina in 1944 and
has spent the last 43 years in
North Carolina, she moved to
DaytonaBeach Ha and taught in
the primary schools. After four
years there she joined with the
Daytona junior Women's League
and the I aster Seal Society to es-
tablish a center where physically
and mentally handicapped chil-
dren could be educated.
She soon realized that the
children's needs went beyond the
capabilities oi volunteer organi-
zations and began a campaign to
move the programs to public
schools. In 1961 a school was
opened, and education for the
handicapped became a perma-
nent part oi public education in
Volusia County, Fla.
During the process of working
with and for handicapped chil-
dren, Morgan earned a master's
degree in education from the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel 1 till. She also studied spe-
cial education at Syracuse Univer-
DC officials explain rising tuition
sity and Columbia University.
She was invited to come to the
University of Florida at
Gainesville to work with students
preparing to teach the handi
capped. She has been a faculty
member in the College ol Edu a
tion there for almost 30 years.
Esther Morgan is known in
Gainesville for her work to save a
camping facility that has served
thousands of school children
since 1948. Morgan took on the
issue as a personal crusade ami
gained the support of 200 civil
organizations. She served as
president oi the Campry'stal
Lake Coalition, a grass roots
group which fought the sale of the
camp and lobbied tor its reriova
tion.
The camp was almost sold in
1978. After eight years ol debate
as well as fund raising and work
by the coalition, Camp Crystal
Lake re opened in 1986 as a reno
vated and modernized $500,000
camping facility
The camp now has a full time
camp director and serves school
children year round with afford-
able opportunities for outdoor
education.
Dr. Dudley E. Rood, associate
state superintendent in the N.C
Department of Public Instruction,
earned his M.A. at Hast Carolina
in 1969. A native of Win ton, N C.
he received his bachelor's degree
at North Carolina Central Univer-
sity and his doctorate at Duke.
Hood taught the middle school
grades in Winton and
Mnrfreesboro and high school in
Winton. He was principal of Be-
thel Union Schuxil prior to enter
ing the N.C. Department of Public
Instruction as an associate direc-
torin the Division of Human Rela-
tions. He later became director of
that division as assistant state
superintendent.
Hood has conducted seminars
and provided keynote addresses
at education conferences around
the country. I le is the recipient of
the Southern Association of
Schools and Colleges Exceptional
Service and Contribution Award
Former Gov. James B. Hunt Jr
inducted Hood into the Order o
the Long Leaf Pine. He has re
reived the North Carolina D
partment of Public Instruction
Student Services Area Leadership
and Humanitarian Award and
the Outstanding Service Award
from the United Negro College
Fund. He is an honorary life
member of the National Congress
of Parents nd Teachers and has
received the North Carolina,
organization's Special Services
Award.
Communist leader Mao Tse-
Tung proclaimed the People'
Republic of China in 1949
WA
� varic
i i
a me
fast.
Hi it
Department ot Education offi
i i.ils have criticized campus offi-
. ials because tuition has been ns
ing taster than inflation in recent
years complained I C 1 A's IV
Kenneth C ireen.
"I low ever, what the) hat e n t
(said I is thai campusesareaikx al
ing more funds for student aid
because fewer college students
are now eligible to parti, ipate in
various federal aid programs
"In most instances said
( rctar) Arthur I lauptman of the Ameri
m Bennett's can Council cm Education, "the
tuition in- increase in aid has been financed
I alifornia at
ii ul u an
tion aiming
� � le I louse
i Ian
16 to defend
students. This is sometimes re-
ferred to as the Robin Hood ef-
fect
University ol Missouri Presi-
dent C Peter Magrath conceded
that tuition in Missouri has gone
up an average oi 11 percent dur-
ing the 80s, as the Consumer Price
Index (CPI) has risen an average
of onlj 53 percent.
But during the 70s, he added,
tuition increased 6.2 percent
while the CPI went up al a faster
rate of 7.5 percent a year.
But Asst. Education Secretary
Chester Finn, himself a former
Vanderbilt professor, charged
many colleges "may not be maxi-
mizing efforts to' hold down
costs thus avoiding the need to
raise tuition.
Stye �at (Earolittfan
Serving Oie East Carolina campus community since 1925
-James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representlves
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo Shari Clemens
Pete Fcrnald Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY RATES
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COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
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Two colors and black 155.OO
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5.000 or Jess � each
5.001 10.000 055 t.ach
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BUSINESS HOI (RS
Monday Friday
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737-W366
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Allegations made ify m
Professors
eyases are unaecessary?-
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J F J A
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BOSTON, Mass. (CPS) � Four
professors claimed last wet the
New England School of Law fired
them because they associated
with a leftist legal academic
group.
Charging the school with
"McCarthyism the four filed a
complaint with the American Bar
Association (ABA).
In a similar case, the University
of- Colorado Board of Regents
held up the reappointment of the
head of the political science de-
partment to weigh charges that.
as a Marxist, he discriminates
against conservatives.
The Coioradi
ever, arc expectei
Prof Edward C,rJ
the department sii
investigation fouf
to the allegation
David Abronv
Houy, Steve Parni
Williams had bci
several years at si
& hool of Law
v� ar solidly end!
the contract
il's trusl
cember to oven!
vote.
se peopli
Ministers claim yoga
CHICAGO, III. (CPS) � Yoga is
a Religion, and doesn't belong
college campuses, a group of
ministers says
The group of 6 ministers asked
Morton College and Tnton Col-
lege Sept. 11 to stop offering non-
credit courses in voga, calling it a
form of religious worship that the
schools, by offering them, en-
dorse.
"It's an offense against Christi-
anity said lay minister John
Bbrgcaud, who added his group
also wants the schools to drop
courses on parapsychology, as-
trology and anything having to
do with Eastern mysticism.
Rev. Bill Arruda of Hillsdale
(111.) Baptist Church, another
member of the group, explained,
"yoga is to Hinduism what prayer
is to Christian and Jewish relig-
ions
"We an
the teaching
Rev. R:
manuel :
111. v
ing pro!
leees
in : .
tion r;
COU'
While '
course on its a
Truppa Sdid the
advised hir
ther hex
lirigatu �
Triton Vice Presi
tried to diffuse the
meeting with
group a
Caffeine
The effects on your bo
Can caffeine be harmful to your
health7
Caffeine, ingested in moderate
amounts, is generally considered
safe for most people. However,
more research about the effects of
caffeine on the human body is
needed.
The average American drinks
or eats about 200 mg of caffeine a
day through coffee, iced or hot
tea, chocolate, and colas. Some
prescription and over-the-
counter medicines contain caf-
feine as well. Cold tablets, certain
aspirin compound pain killers,
Health Column
By Mary Elesha-Adams
r
4
the kidnev and
been studied. So
feel that caffeine
sible for these ccj
others do not.
It's possible to
drawal effects
Symptoms mav
after the last catj
include a feeling i
head followed
headache, yawml
tabilitv, runnv nc
Sources of cattel
mav include:
�1 cupof COffe
�1 cupof decatf
mg)
� 1 cupof chocoi
�1 cup oi tea
� 1 glass of ice
�1 12 ounce
enstrual drugs and stimulants
niay contain 30 to 200 mg of caf-
feine.
Drinking two cups of coffee (85-
2p0 mg of caffeine) increases al-
timess and reduces drowsiness (
arid fatigue, just the effects one i
4ants in the morning "eye-
qpener" or late night studying
"pick-me-up However, as the I
akiount of caffeine rises aboe 250
mg so do the chances of becoming
mg)
�1 piece of choj
frosting (16 mg
r
i
more nervous and developing
tremors (the caffeine shakes). In-
somnia, restlessness, and in-
creased urination and bowel
movements may also occur.
a
a
The possibility that caffeine in-
take is related to heart attacks,
frirocystic breast disease (lumpy
of knotty breasts), and cancer oi
-
OPEN
ATTIC
A'
The I The
CoMedYI CoMedY
ZONE A ZONE
(J
WEH
THURSDAY
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10 off!
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Wednesday
Champagne by
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Coming next
Tuesday Oct. 6th
BRUCE FRYE
Presents
WednesdaN
Night
Of it j k.nd rvZI
LADIES IO
Ladies Onl ft XV to
Crtiyi Admitted in a �
All tl YEAR OlDS
tlpefi Twsd� Suil
AF1 OMton





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 29.1987 3
g alumni
Allegations made that
im it
Ser ice and Contribution Award
Former Co v. lames B. Hunt Jr. if
inducted FUvvi into the Order of!
the Long Leaf Tine. He has re �
reived the North Carolina DeM
t of Public Instruction's �
I Services Area Leadership I
Humanitarian Award and "�
t.uviing Service Award I
I nited Negro College-
I le is an honorary life i
of the National Congress rj
nts and Teavhers and has M
A the North Carolina 1
ization s Special Services I
Professors fired for associating with leftists
imunisl leader Mao Tse-
ned the People's I
� China in 1449.
�aat �ar0lnt!an
ctor oi Au ertising
ig Represcntives
SI ari Clemens
AY ADVERTISING

.i.tfa
)R ADVERTISING RATES
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lie Bivd Greenville

BOSTON, Mass. (CPS) � Four
professors claimed last week the
Niew England School of Law fired
them because they associated
with a leftist legal academic
group.
Charging the school with
' McCarthyism the four filed a
complaint with the American Bar
Association (ABA).
In a similar case, the Universitv'
of- Colorado Board of Regents
held up the reappointment of the
head of the pc tic science de-
partment to weigh charges that,
as a Marxist, he discriminates
against conservatives.
The Colorado regents, how-
ever, are expected to reapppoint
Prof. Edward Greenberg to head
the department since a university
investigation found no substance
to the allegations.
David Abromowitz, Margaret
1 louy, Steve Parnes and Christine
Williams had been teaching for
several years at the New England
School of Law, and the faculty last
year solidly endorsed renewing
the contracts of all four. But the
school's trustees decided in De-
cember to override the faculty
vote.
"These people did not meet our
standards said school attorney
lames DcGiacomo. "Their con-
tracts were not renewed after a
fair and equitable procedure was
followed
The dismissed professors and
75 other legal scholars who have
written the ABA in support of the
4, however, charged the school
with "McCarthyism
The four professors contend
they were fired because of their
interest in the Critical Legal Stud-
ies (CLS) movement.
"There is a purge, and it's not
just limited to New England
Schoolof Law said Prof. Morton
Horwitz of Harvard. Horvvitz, a
founder of the Conference on
Critical Legal Studies, said the
movement � which boasts 250 to
3(X) core members � has a leftist
orientation and views the law as a
tool of the rich and powerful.
"This entire episode smacks of
McCarthyism said Nancy Gert-
ner, the Boston attorney repre-
senting the 4 teachers, 3 of whom
returned to practicing law. "All of
them have been driven out of
teaching
The complaint charges that the
firings violated the established
standards of facutly governance
Ministers claim yoga on campus offends Christianity
and academic freedom.
"It's a baseless complaint said
DcGiacomo. "It has no basis in
reality whatever
If the ABA rules against the
school, it could suspend it or place
it on probation.
In Colorado, conservative stu-
dents and Republican state legis-
lator Carl Bledsoe complained in
late August to the regents that the
poli sci department discriminated
against conservatives and Repub-
licans.
But an investigation indicated
the allegations had no merit.
"It doesn't apppear any of the
allegations have been substanti-
ated said regent Lynn Elhns, a
Republican.
The political science depart-
ment controversy mirrors a threat
by some regents to cut public
funds to the university's Cultural
Events Board because it allegedly
brings an inordinately large
number of liberal speakers to
campus.
The destruction of the 200-year-
old Order of the Knights of Tem-
plar began in 1307. The leaders of
the order were burned at the stake
in 1314.
-Save ��������
CHICAGO, 111. (CPS) � Yoga is
a religion, and doesn't belong on
college campuses, a group of
ministers says.
The group oi b ministers asked
Morton College and Triton Col-
lege Sept. 11 to stop offering non-
credit courses in yoga, calling it a
form of religious worship that the
schools, by offering them, en-
dorse.
It's an offense against Christi-
anity said lay minister John
Bttrgeaud, who added his group
a$o wants the schools to drop
cirses on parapsychology, as-
trology- and anything having to
do with Eastern mysticism.
;Rev. BUI Arruda of Hillsdale
(ifi.) Baptist Church, another
member of the group, explained,
"yoga is to Hinduism what prayer
is to Chnstian and Jewish relig-
!
jf � ��4�mimm
?
J
ions.
"We are very concerned about
the teaching of the occult added
Rev. Richard Wager of the Em-
manuel Bible Church in Berwyn,
111. Wager's congregants are send-
ing protest letters to the two col-
leges.
Morton spokesman Michael
Truppa termed the class in ques-
tion, Exploration in Parapsychol-
ogy, a "hobby or leisure time
course
While Morton will keep the
course on its schedule for now,
Truppa said the schools' lawyers
advised him not to comment fur-
ther because of the "potential for
litigation
Triton Vice President Janet Kooi
tried to diffuse the controversy by
meeting with the ministers'
group, and showing it an outline
ot the course.
"These courses a re not involved
in advocating theological posi-
tions asserted Triton spokes-
man Richard Fonte. Triton will
keep them on its schedule.
Charles Milligan, a religion
professor at the lliff School of
Theology in Denver, thought the
ministers' objections "narrow
minded
"Remember he counseled,
"that many silly and stupid things
are taught under the rubric ot
Christianity and other religions.
Religions are not immune to idi-
ocy
Milligan said. "Christianity
might have something to learn
from other religions. People must
use their minds, and think criti-
cally
Mixing religion and education.
of course, has been a hot issue in
recent years.
U.S. Secretary of Education
William Bennett last year raised
scholarly hackles by giving New
York University Prof. Paul 'it a
second grant to see if "the role of
religion" has been excluded from
American history texts.
Vitz already had published one
report asserting that it has.
In early September, moreover,
federal appeals courts overturned
two controversial I486 rulings
that allowed Christian funda-
mentalist parents to teach their
children at home from "Chris-
tian" books of their own choosing
and that barred from Alabama
schools 42 texts some Christian
groups considered as tracts pro-
moting a religion called "secular
humanism
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
m
m
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
321 E. 10th St. Greenville (next to Wendy s)
758-0000
VOTED THE NATION'S 1 VANILLA
Buy 1 Sundae or Blend-in, Get 1
12 PRICE
one coupon per order please A
coupon good thru October 5. 1987 I
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream -
321 E. 10th St. Greenville (next to Wendy s)
758-0000
VOTED THE NATION'S 1 VANILLA
m
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I

NOW DELIVERS
Order your favorite toe cream treat and we'll bring it to your doort
FREE Delivery with this coupon
CALL 758-0000
one coupon per order please, coupon good through October 5. 1987
I
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I
Clip-N-Save
Caffeine
The effects on your body
Can caffeine be harmful to your
health7
Caffeine, ingested in moderate
amounts, is generally considered
safe for most people. However,
more research about the effects of
caffeine on the human body is
needed
The average American drinks
or eats about 200 mg of caffeine a
day through coffee, iced or hot
tea, chocolate, and colas. Some
prescription and over-the-
counter medicines contain caf-
feine as well. Cold tablets, certain
aspirin compound pain killers,
Health Column
4
By Mary Elesha-Adams
enstrual drugs and stimulants
ntay contain 30 to 200 mg of caf-
feine.
i
Drinking two cups of coffee (85-
40 mg of caffeine) increases al-
timess and reduces drowsiness
afid fatigue, just the effects one
vfants in the morning "eye-
?ner" or late night studying
ick-me-up However, as the
amount of caffeine rises above 250
mg so do the chances of becoming
more nervous and developing
tremors (the caffeine shakes). In-
somnia, restlessness, and in-
creased urination and bowel
movements may also occur.
the kidney and urinary tract has
been studied. Some researchers
feel that caffeine may be respon-
sible for these conditions while
others do not.
It's possible to experience with-
drawal effects from caffeine.
Symptoms mav occur 18 hours
after the last caffeine intake and
include a feeling of fullness in the
head followed by a throbbing
headache, yawning, fatigue, irri-
tability, runny nose, and nausea.
Sources of caffeine in your diet
mav include:
� 1 cup of coffee (115 mg)
� 1 cup of decaffeinated coffee (3
mg)
� 1 cup oi chocolate milk (5 mg)
� 1 cup of tea (40 mg)
� 1 glass of iced tea (70 mg)
� 1 12 ounce soft drink (40-50
mg)
� 1 piece of chocolate cake and
frosting (16 mg)
JEAN HOPPER
BROKEROWNER
Res. 919756-9142
Whether it's Ringgold Towers Coidos or
single family homes, we can find a place for
. you!
Ei�
1807 Charles Blvd
Greenville. NC 27834
919355-5866
IQUAt NOUSitG
RACK ROOM
MARK JENS0NS EYES
HAVE NEVER SEEN FASTER SERVICE
It starts u ith the exam. It ends with the perfect glasses. And it takes
just hours.
At Pearle. v.e have a lab right in the store. With professionals
working to exacting standards. So, in many cases, we can give you your
glasses in just hours.
Add to that a thorough exam by 3 uDoctorofOptomctry
next to Pearle. Hundreds of frames. Aju .ieu consultant to help you
choose the right pair.
At Pearle. we know how glasses work. And care how glasses look.
And fast service is one more reason you be coming to Pearle. Fast.
T?
&KANBEE SK
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
10 OFF
' � Sbt Prescription Eyewear. $49.95 Value
Available Colors: Black, Tortoise, Red, White
"
FREE l-(?$ Way TAKER
Sunglasses with purchase of complete I
I
I (This coupon valui thru Oct 15, 19K? only at Pearle Vision Center laud below Tku I
coupon must be presented at lime of purctuast So other discounts apply S100 mini
I mum purchase )
V
PEARLE V
vision center M
I
I
OPENMON-SAT 10-9
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICK
(EXCEPT AIGNER, NIKE AND
j The possibility that caffeine in-
take is related to heart attacks,
ffcrocystic breast disease (lumpy J SUNDAY 1-6 REEBOK)
o knotty breasts), and cancer of Li � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
I
I
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J
N0B0L CARES FOR EYES MORE THAN PEARLE.
CAROLINA EAST MALL
756-8834
Douglas lirannon
Adanx Baits
Licensed Opticians
Man. Sat.
10 a.n9 p.m.
e 1987 Pearle Health Services. Inc.
ATTIC
'A
The
CoMedY
ZONE
WED (J WED
The
CoMedY
ZONE
HOURS
Open 'Til
1 1pm S-Wed
3am Th-Sat
THURSDAY
WILD KINGDOM
FRIDAY
In Concert: KLXX
SATURDAY
THE POINT
Comer ot 5th
and ReodeSt
758-1857
ps
L ABC Permits
. T8eSt
Burgers in Town j
Soft Ice Cream Ask Anyone! j
All Burgers Are 14 lb Pure EJeef
Bring this ad for
10 off
any sandwich selection '
DAILY LUNCHEON SPECIALS
$3 95 MonFn 11 am-3pm
The "Steamroller" is bock by
popular demand
Mark Johnson-Every Thursday
beginning ai 10 pm. $1 Admission
In the Fiesta Room. Join us for
Dnnks and Appetizers. Must be 21
or older.
S21 Countnt
Georgetown Shoot
Wednesday
Champagne by
the Bottle $2.99
Coming next
Tuesday Oct. 6th
BRUCE FRYE
mi nit iinacn
�The First Of Its Kind Downtown
LADIES NIGHT
Ladies Only 8:30-10:30
Guys Admitted in at 10:30
All 18 YEAR OLDS ARE
WELCOME!
Open Tuesday - Sunday.
3m SI.00 Wine 25
APl Coolers DRAF1
Top 40- Dance -Rock 'n Roll
Every Tuesday Is
College Night
7 p.at11 p.m.
9KSUBS
Your Choke of
Pepperoni, Salami and Cheese
Turkey and Cheese
Ham, Turkey and Cheese
Ham and Cheese
Bologna and Cheese
Ham, Salami and Cheese
Not Valid On Deliveries
60 Oa. Pitchers SI.99 �
II am II p.m.
215 E. 4th Si
7522113
111 EAST 5TH STttrr
G1EIHVUXE, NX. 17154
(SI) 7SS-III4
Thursday Oct. 1st
The Moody Dudes
Saturday Oct. 3rd
Tlie Mike Edwards Band
MEMBERSHIP SPECIAL
Ladies $2.00 Gents S5.00
Available for Private Partys
Call 758-3114
������
Voted No. 1
Hamburger
n Pitt County
T Tits Hmoc'S p�' V
Philly Chsasastaaks
Shrimp Burgers
$& Hoi Dogs
. C and mors
C�MW� Mfc t ����
S
�����
LIVE THE
EXPERIENCE
POOL DARTS-FOOD
ROCK 'N ROLL
11 AM - Until
Downtown Greenville
757 3658
Intxodsactitfl
WedLadies Night
Plus The Elbo
Male Dancers
Tall Cans and Coolers
.65 All Night
Every Night!
Fri. 4-7 FREE Adm.
FOR ALL!
Sun. LADIES FREE
,
I IMA
CHINATOWN
EXPRESS
airsluh �sa�ssj ttmturwfiim
$3.39
Dinner Combo:
Two entree
One Eggroll
Filed Rice or Lo Meln
Soup
Fortune Cookie
BSSS.lt
Hours: Ham Daily
Mon-Sat-Sun-4-lam
LUNCH SPECIAL
2 Slices (1 top) and 12 oz. Drink
Everyday SI.99 'til 4pm
FRI-Med. Pizza (2 top)
ond Pitcher of Drink
$6.99
SAT Dollar Day
$1 OH Any Size Pizza
SUN Buy Large 16" Pizza
5et 2 Fme 16 oz. Cokes
KAREN'S
FROZEN
YOGURT
25 OFF
with tills Ad
Good with any
purchase
ezp: Sept. SO, 1967
(Across from China Town)
218 E. 8th Street
�.
P





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 29.1987 3
Allegations made that B
� l� � ���� mm in
g alumni Professors fired for associating with leftists
llkl
Public
Sen ice and Contribution Award.
Former Gov. James B. Hunt Jr.
inducted FliHxi into the Order o
the I ong Leaf Tine. He has re-8
reived the North Carolina
partment of Public Instruction's
identSen ices Area leadership
I lumanitarian Award and
Outstanding Service Award
i the United Negro College
1 Ic is an honorary life
oi the National Congress
nts and Teachers and has
: the North Carolina
ition s Special Services
mmunisl loader Mao Tse-
aimcd the People'sf
BOSTON, Mass. (CPS) � Four
professors claimed last week the
Mew England School of Law fired
them because they associated
with a leftist legal academic
group.
Charging the school with
McCarthyism' the four filed a
complaint with the American Bar
Association (ABA).
In a similar case, the University
of- Colorado Board of Regents
held up the reappointment of the
head of the political science de-
partment to weigh charges that,
as a Marxist, he discriminates
against conservatives.
The Colorado regents, how-
ever, are expected to reapppoint
Prof. Edward Greenberg to head
the department since a university
investigation found no substance
to the allegations.
David Abromowitz, Margaret
Houy, Steve Parnes and Christine
Williams had been teaching for
several years at the New England
School of Law, and the faculty last
year solidly endorsed renewing
the contracts of all four. But the
school's trustees decided in De-
cember to override the faculty
vote.
"These people did not meet our
standards said school attorney
James DeGiaeomo. "Their con-
tracts were not renewed after a
fair and equitable procedure was
followed
The dismissed professors and
75 other legal scholars who have
written the ABA in support of the
4, however, charged the school
with "McCarthyism
The four professors contend
they were fired because of their
interest in the Critical Legal Stud-
ies (CLS) movement.
"There is a purge, and it's not
just limited to New England
School of Law said Prof. Morton
Horwitz of Harvard. Horwitz, a
founder of the Conference on
Critical Legal Studies, said the
movement � which boasts 250 to
3(X) core members � has a leftist
orientation and views the law as a
tool of the rich and powerful.
"This entire episode smacks of
McCarthyism said Nancy Gcrt-
ncr, the Boston attorney repre-
senting the 4 teachers, 3 of whom
returned to practicing law. "All of
them have been driven out of
teaching
The complaint charges that the
firings violated the established
standards of faculty governance
China in 149.
Ministers claim yoga on campus offends Christianity
and academic freedom.
"It's a baseless complaint said
DeGiaeomo. "It has no basis in
reality whatever
If the ABA rules against the
school, it could suspend it or place
it on probation.
In Colorado, conservative stu-
dents and Republican state legis-
lator Carl Bledsoc complained in
late August to the regents that the
poli sci department discriminated
against conservatives and Repub-
licans.
But an investigation indicated
the allegations had no merit.
"It doesn't apppear any of the
allegations have been bstanci-
ated said regent Lyn. Ellins, a
Republican.
The political science depart-
ment controversy mirrors a threat
by some regents to cut public
funds to the university's Cultural
Events Board because it allegedly
brings an inordinately large
number of liberal speakers to
campus.
The destruction of the 200-year-
old Order of the Knights of Tem-
plar began in 1307. The leaders of
the order were burned at the stake
in 1314.
Save � SSMMM
lEafit Carolinian
. ty since 1925
. of Advertising
ig Re presenttves
Shari Clemens
I
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
i i:i
;R ADVERTISING RATES
u Spa e Rate
Inserts
757-ts366
757-6366
757-6309
CHICAGO, 111. (CrS)� Yoga is
a religion, and doesn't belong on
cojlege campuses, a group of
ministers says.
The group of 6 ministers asked
Morton College and Triton Col-
lege Sept. 11 to stop offering non-
credit courses in yoga, calling it a
form of religious worship that the
schools, by offering them, en-
dorse.
; It's an offense against Christi-
afiirv said lay minister John
Btirgeaud, who added his group
also wants the schools to drop
courses on parapsychology, as-
trology and anything having to
dc with Eastern mysticism.
Rev. Bill Arruda of Hillsdale
Ull.) Baptist Church, another
member of the group, explained,
"yoga is to Hinduism what prayer
is: to Christian and Jewish relig-
V
1-
m.
i

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SERVE N SAVE
Sliced
Lunchmeat
�(29
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Bleach
Gal
Jug
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9
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WinGermany
Compliments of the
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See Details in Store
'
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OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Creenvil
3
ions.
"We are very concerned about
the teaching of the occult added
Rev. Richard Wager of the Em-
manuel Bible Church in Bcrwyn,
111. Wager's congregants arc send-
ing protest letters to the two col-
leges.
Morton spokesman Michael
Truppa termed the class in ques-
tion. Exploration in Parapsychol-
ogy, a "hobby or leisure time
course
While Morton will keep the
course on its schedule for now,
Truppa said the schools' lawyers
advised him not to comment fur-
ther because of the "potential for
litigation
Triton Vice President Janet Kooi
tried to diffuse the controversy by
meeting with the ministers'
group, and showing it an outline
of the course.
Thesecoursesarenot involved
in advocating theological posi-
tions asserted Triton spokes
man Richard Fonte. Triton will
keep them on its schedule.
Charles Milligan, a religion
professor at the lliff School of
Theology in Denver, thought the
ministers' objections "narrow
minded
"Remember he counseled,
"that many silly and stupid things
are taught under the rubric ol
Christianity and other religions.
Religions are not immune to idi-
ocy
Milligan said, "Christianity
might have something to learn
from other religions. People must
use their minds, and think criti-
cally
Mixing religion and education,
of course, has been a hot issue in
recent years.
U.S. Secretary of Education
William Bennett last year raised
scholarly hackles by giving New
York University Prof. Paul Vitz a
second grant to see if "the role of
religion" has been excluded from
American history texts.
Vitz already had published one
report asserting that it has.
In early September, moreover,
federal appeals courts overturned
two controversial 198b rulings
that allowed Christian funda-
mentalist parents to teach their
children at home from "Chris-
tian" books of their own choosing,
and that barred from Alabama
schools 42 texts some Christian
groups considered as tracts pro-
moting a religion called "secular
humanism
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Jfc

m
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
321 E. 10th St. Greenville (next to Wendy s)
7580000
VOTED THE NATION'S 1 VANILLA
Buy 1 Sundae or Blend-in. Get 1
12 PRICE
� one coupon per order please i
coupon good thru October 5. 1987 g
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream jti �
321 E. 10th St. Greenville (next to Wendy's)
s
A
t&
758-0000
VOTED THE NATIONS 1 VANTLLA

NOW DELIVERS
Order your favorite ice cream treat and we 11 bring it to your door!
FREE Delivery with this coupon
CALL 758-0000
one coupon per order please, -oupon good through October 5. 1987
I
I
I
I
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I
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I
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� ������ Clip-N-Save �������
Caffeine
The effects on your body
I
Can caffeine be harmful to your
health7
Caffeine, ingested in moderate
amounts, is generally considered
safe for most people. However,
more research about the effects of
caffeine on the human body is
needed.
The average American drinks
or eats about 200 mg of caffeine a
day through coffee, iced or hot
tea, chocolate, and colas. Some
prescription and over-the-
counter medicines contain caf-
feine as well. Cold tablets, certain
aspirin compound pain killers,
Health Column
By Mary Elesha-Adams
r
njenstrual drugs and stimulants
njay contain 30 to 200 mg of caf-
feine.
I Drinking two cups of coffee (85-
2f0 mg of caffeine) increases al-
tirness and reduces drowsiness
afid fatigue, just the effects one
vfants in the morning "eye-
?ner" or late night studying
ick-me-up However, as the
atttount of caffeine rises above 250
mg so do the chances of becoming
more nervous and developing
tremors (the caffeine shakes). In-
somnia, restlessness, and in-
creased urination and bowel
movements may also occur.
the kidney and urinary tract has
been studied. Some researchers
feel that caffeine may be respon-
sible for these conditions while
others do not.
It's possible to experience with-
drawal effects from caffeine.
Symptoms may occur 18 hours
after the last caffeine intake and
include a feeling of fullness in the
head followed by a throbbing
headache, yawning, fatigue, irri-
tability, runny nose, and nausea.
Sources of caffeine in your diet
may include:
� 1 cup of coffee (115 mg)
� 1 cupof decaffeinated coffee(3
mg)
� 1 cup of chocolate milk (5 mg)
� 1 cupof tea (40 mg)
� 1 glass of iced tea (70 mg)
� 1 12 ounce soft drink (40-50
mg)
�1 piece of chocolate cake and
frosting (16 mg)
r
1807 Charles Blvd
Greenville NC 27834
-919355-5866
IQUAl H0USC
RACK ROOM
MARK JENS0NS EYES
IIAVE NEVER SEEN RASTER SERVICE.
It starts with the exam. It ends with the perfect glasses. And it takes
ist hours.
At Pearle, we have a lab right in the store. With professionals
orking to exacting standards. So, in many cases, we can give you your
glasses in just hours.
Add to that a thorough exam by an Independent Doctor of Optomctry
next to Pearle. Hundreds of frames. And a trained consultant to help you
choose the right pair.
At Pearle, wc know how glasses work. And care how glasses look.
And fast service is one more reason you be coming to Pearle. Fast
fat
-
11
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
I OPEN MON-SAT 10-9 (EXCEPT AIGNER, NIKE AND
m' 13 itriau-Tj .j mull utu�-w,
tiirocystic breast disease (lumpy SUNDAY 1-6 REEBOK)
Of knotty breasts), and cancer of �.�������1� � � � � � � � � �� � � � � � � � � � � � � �
:The possibility that caffeine in-
take is related to heart attacks,
FREE �f-$�m � Way FARER
Sunglasses with purchase of complete I
.SSEJ Prescription Eyewear. $49.95 Value
Available Colors: Black. Tortoise, Red, White
(rhis coupon valid thru Oct. 15. 1987 only at Pearle Vision Center listed below. This I
coupon must be presented at time of purcltase So other discounts apply S100 mini-
mum purchase )
K
PEARLE D-B
V vision centery
N0B0LWCARES KJR EYES NI0RLTHAN PtARl.t.
CAROLINA EAST MALL
756-8834
Douglas lirannon I0o.m-9p.rn.
Adam Batts
Licensed Opticians
�1987 Pearle Health Services. Inc.
ATTIC
'A
The ft The �
CoMedYl CoMedY
ZONE A ZONE
(J WED
HOURS
Open 'Til
1 lpm S-Wed
3am Th Sot
WED
THURSDAY
WILD KINGDOM
FRIDAY
In Concert: KTXX
SATURDAY
THE POINT
Comer of 5th
and Read St
758-1857
Si
Rurrvo
P
LL ABC PermilJ
The Best
Floats fm
Burgers in Town
Soft Ice Cream Ask Anyone!
All Burgers Are 14 lb Pure Beef
Bring this ad for
10 off
any sandwich selection
DAILY LUNCHEON SPECIALS
$3 95 Mon-Fn 11am 3pm
The "Steamroller" is back by
popular demand.
Mark Johnson-Every Thursday
beginning at 10 pm. SI Admission
In the Fiesta Room. Join us for
Dnnks and Appetizers. Must be 21
or older
$11 Conncne
Georgetown Shoos
Ull Mat lanicii
3s
Champagne by
the Bottle $2.99
Coming next
Tuesday Oct. 6th
BRUCE FRYE
jww:
pspij
������
Voted No. 1
Hamburger
In Pitt County
12 IAST STH STam
Gamrvim. ax. ntu
(1�) 7H-MM
Thursday Oct. 1st
The Moody Dudes
Saturday Oct. 3rd
The Mike Edwards Band
MEMBERSHIP SPECIAL
Ladies S2.00 Gents S5.00
Available for Private Partya
Call 758-3114
t T �� UtAce't Po 8'
Pttilly ChMtaalaaka
Shrimp Burgora
(j�i Hot Doga
and mon
m
cww �mm f �m
ru
s-&i
H )0��
'The First Of Its Kind Downtown
LADIES NIGHT
Ladies Only 8:30-10:30
Guys Admitted in at 10:30
All 18 YEAR OLDS ARE
WELCOME!
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(Eije lEust (Eartflfnfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurcr, rmdM�r
Clay Deaniiakdt, mheh
Andy Lewis, n ames F.J. McKrx, d�fMM,
Tim Ci iandler, s em. anti ion Martin, b. c� m
Fch in Carter. i��,b �, meg nEEdi iam, c�j�, m�
Si elton Bryant. mike Ura iurct i, p u.
Debbie Stevens, s�n, oi in w. Medi.in, a ,��
September 29, 1987
Opinion
Pago 4
The fans
Pirates need our support
The display put on in the stands by
some students at Saturday's football
game was disgraceful.
No, these students weren't obnox-
iously drunk. They weren't fighting.
They weren't plotting to tear down
the fences. o, these students were
doing something that may be more
ridiculous even than those things.
They were cheering for Georgia
Southern and booing the Pirates
What1 Georgia Southern tans on
the ECU side of the field. Couldn't
be. But there they were � sitting in
all their glory � cheering for GS.
These students are commonly
known as fair weather fans. They are
the ones that scream the loudest
when the Pirates are winning, and
scoff the most when they loose.
They are also the ones who call for
a coach to be fired and then lament
his los when the next coach can't
perform.
A true fan sticks with a team
through thick and thin. A true fan
knows that booing his team in time
ot need and cheering for the other
team can be demoralizing and self-
defeating. What tjeam wants to plav
its best when all its fans are pulling
against it?
It is understood that three straight
2-9 seasons can weaken the fiber oi
even the strongest of fans. Obvi-
ously something needs to be done in
order to improve the situation, but
the changes need to come on the
field, not in the stands.
Those that cheered for Georgia
Southern against their own team
showed they have little class and
less school spirit. They demon-
strated once again that some stu-
dents here just might fit the descrip-
tion assigned to us all after the game
at NCSU.
Those that support the Pirates
through it all should be com-
mended. We know that there is light
at the end oi the tunnel, as the supe-
rior game the team played in the
State game demonstrated.
The rewards oi a winning football
program will be greatest for those
tans who remain true. Still, it seems
sad that the fair weather fans will
probably be the ones strutting the
most when the Pirates are success-
ful. - i �
WT6 me AJR. STRIKE, ABC Witt, COWHUE WBRIN6
VOU TUE MONPAV M6HT6AMeOF M� UietK.
Junior saw it's the breakfastofchampovs
INTRODUCING: THE "OFFICIAL' ECU
fimmm
i
o

o
Beat stkv�-
( FRONT
VIEW
LETS V00
KNOW
THEVVN
"piReaioM!
"Rear
VIEW
l-�kk
�ate
1HS ;f(
Poverty is a disgrace in today's American economy
there came an idea and a question: Who erty, too many are functionally illiterate
better to tell the story of poverty than the too many drop out of school and t
A British statesman oi many years ago creative writers and the newspapers ot many are forced to leave the land " Fr
has been quoted as saying, "Poverty is no the state? wnt on to My that self-interest alone
A gathering ot writers was held in should compel more people to accept a
Southern Pines and each was asked to civic responsibility to join the battle
write out of their lives and the lives of against poverty, citing the well docu
others, and perhaps to advance some mented fact that poverty is "a breeding
ways to deal with the problem. ground of enme
Officers ot the North Carolina Press Government, as an instrument of th
Association agreed to distribute the con- people, has a major role in the battle
tributions from the writers to all the
members of the association and this
By SAM RAGAN
Si'r. ul la Ihr I a l jruli nun
disgrace, but is damned uncomfortable
A latter day economist, J. Kenneth
Calbraith, has said, however, that in an
affluent society such as America enjoys it
is indeed a disgrace.
William C. Friday, chairman of the
North Carolina Poverty Project, is in-
clined to agree with 1 )r. Calbraith, and in
speeches and statements since he retired
iidi
as rresiaenl i the University oi North series on Poverty in North Carolina is the
Carolina he has driven home the point result. There will be a weekly contribu-
ted! ing must be done to ease the tion from more than a dozen creative
against poverty, and civic responsibility
calls for people to demand that their
government accept the responsibility
Education also has a major role, and the
thai something must bo done to ease the tion from more than a dozen creative long range effort is certain to bear fruit
plight ot the many thousands ot North writers of North Carolina, and it is our but a greater awareness on the part of al
C arolinians who suffer the pangs of pov- hope that this series will help to define the is the first step
crty- problem and create a greater awareness Out of the Poverty Project advisory
I nday heads a board ol twelve other of .t in our state. council meeting some educators are look
distinguished citizens o! the state who This is the first in the series, and those to ing at ways do develop that awareness
head up the North Carolina Poverty Proj- follow will include contributions from At PembrokeState University Dr Robert
ect, which describes itself as "An educa- Robert Mason, Ruth Moose, Sally Buck- Reising, with the help of'Dr Shelbv
tional program about poverty and civic ner,ShelbyStephenson, Mary kratt,John Stephensonsdevelopingacourseforhis
responsibility Dr.). Cordon Chamber- Foster West, Charles Port. Agnes students on the literature of poverty
lain ol Crrenstx.ro is the executive who McDonald, Ronald H. Baves and others Thcreare hundreds of novels stonesand
directs the education coordinators. � all well known novelists, short story poems which graphically tell the story of
I was appointed to an advisory council writerspoets, critics, playwrights and poverty and its degradations of the
which has met on two separate occasions historians. humarvbOdy and the human spirit.
to discuss the problems of poverty and There is little dispute on the extent of This series by the creative writers of
what to do about it. Everyone agreed that poverty in North Carolina. When the North Carohna'is a beginning toward the
there is a "civic responsibility and that writers gathered they were given a newly goal of alleviating this blight on mankind
the need tor an educational program is released report from the North Carolina and civilization. We hope the people of
quite evident. Many approaches to Child Advocacy Institute which showed North Carolina will respond,
achieving those aims were Tdvanced,and there are more poor children in the state (Editor's Note: Sam Raganof Southern
asthctalkcontinueditbecamequiteelear today than there were five years ago. Tines is the editor and publisher of The
that an overwhelming need is to develop 'Today, one of every four children living Pilot. He is a former president of the
a greater public awareness of poverty in North Carolina is growing up in pov- North Carolina Press Association and the
and the toll it inflicts on the people of crty the report declared. Associated Press Managing Editors As-
North Carolina. In a recent address Bill Friday declared, sociation of America. He is the Toet Lau-
Out of the advisory council meetings Many of our citizens are living in pov- reate of North Carolina and the author. �
The Tost Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tit ns Building, across from the entrance
' Joyner library.
i . r purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and clas-
iification, address, phone number and
signature o) the authoris). letters are
limited two typewritten pages, double
spaced or neatly printed. All letters are
subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are reminded
lluit they are limited to one ezery two
weeks. The deadline f �r editorial material
is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday's edition and
5 p.m. Tuesday tor Thursday's edition.
Forum
rules
TJie Reader Speaks
Campus
Spectrum
rules
In addition to the "Campus Forum"
section of the editorial page, The East
Carolinian features the "Campus
Spectrum This is an opinion column
by guest writers from the student
body and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information mav
contact the managing editor of The
East Carolinian at 757-6366, or stop bv
our offices on the second floor of the
Publications Buildinr.
Poor southerners face mechanized welfare beauracracy
By ROBERT MASON
Special to The fjmt Garolinuui
A speaker extolling a churches-sponsored food
bank said that by easing desperation, it would re-
ward contributors and workers with joy. He re-
plantaton slaves, endured inadequate shelter and
mean fare, no matter what apologists for the latter
may argue. During the Civil War over slavery,
"There is no question that thousands, indeed tens of
thousands, of North Carolinians went hungry
marked that governmental welfare agencies, while notes Paul D. Escott in a new book about the mighty
clearly necessary, were "about the coldest places in and the meek in this state during the latter half of the
the world 19thCentury. Food riots erupted, with women often
I am not persuaded that welfare offices are leading them; "robbery became social bandrity
uniquely unfeeling. Surely police stations and court- schools withered as counties, the state, and the
rooms are equally so. If those comparisons are not Confederacy "made unprecedented efforts to
suitable, I gladly will substitue a tax window, a extend government aid to the poor An internal war
licensing bureau or a registration desk. One petition- erupted within the intersectional strife, and rccrimi-
ing the bureaucracy for a fees adjustment, a drainage nation lasted for two generations,
ditch or rescue from marauding dogs should not
expect an outpouring of pleasantries. George Tindall devotes a thick chapter of "Emer-
For public servants, elected and employed, are gence of the New South" to health disasters oozing
bound by statues, regulations, and objectivity. Fun from poverty during the opening quarter of this
and games should be no more expected of the wel- century. A Rockerfeller agency, the Sanitary
fare director, social worker, and food-stamps clerk Commission on the Eradication of the Hookworm
than of the sheriff, tax administrator, and santiation Disease, between 1909 and 1914 contributed to the
inspector.I imagine, meanwhile, that personsapply- treatment of 694,494 cases in 11 Southern states,
ing for assistance favor practiced efficiency and a Malaria stood second to hookworm as "probably the
quiet departureoverdemonstrativegivingandritu- most serious obstacle to the development of a civili-
alistic receiving. zation in the region where they prevail reported
The poor says the Book of John, "always ye have the International Health Board, which also was
with you In this region and state it is not necessary funded by the Rockerfeller Foundation. The third of
to consult the Scriptures for that assurance. To poke the South's "lazy" diseases, pellagra, was the most
into any period of the past and to look about us will stubborn in resisting medical science,
do. The earliest settlers in this back country sub- Nicholas Lemann, author of "Origins of the Un-
sisted poorly. Scrabbling farmers and their rivals, derclass traces all aspects of today's ghetto culture
to the starvaion diet of Southern sharecroppers a
generation ago. If the sharecropper now has all but
disappeared, along with the riverbank mill hand
and his working household, he has been replaced in
the economy by the seasonal laborer, the unskilled
drifter, the bottom-wages employee, the unem-
ployed, and the uninspired and the hopeless.
Want, in any event, continues. It is undeniable.
Yet, it is denied; indeed, as the poor are constant,
so is a reluctance among the affluent, the compla-
cent, and the uncaring to admit that poverty and
hunger abound. When the Public Health Service in
1921, drawing on medical knowledge six years old,
accurately warned that the boll weevil and a collaps-
ing cotton market would spawn an epidemic or
pellagra, it was badgered into inactivity. Senator
Harris of Georgia denied knowledge of a single case
their bare cupboards. That makes hunger all the
more the moral issue that William Friday, former
president of the University of North Carolina, de-
clared it to be in reporting last year for a committee
investigating hunger in North Carolina. Above all,
hunger is a challenge to social justice.
Justice entails the use of authority to uphold what
is right as well as what is written into the law
Charities and volunteerism are welcome auxiliaries
to, but unreliable substitutes for, systemized assis-
tance to the needy. One need not be cynical to
suggest that compassion in parishes and neighbor-
hoods may be fickle and transient, and at best is
limited; and that, if conditions were otherwise,
government would exploit them. Surely no man
should have to depend on the state of another man's
grace, for his health, nor should his dignity be an
of hunger in his state. Representative Byrnes of even swap for his dinner. Public programs are as
South Carolina protested that Southerners "were
not seeking charity President Roosevelt's label of
the South, a dozen years later, as the nation's Eco-
nomic Problem No. 1 outraged Southern boosters
and politicians, with Senator Bailey of North Caro-
lina, chairman of the Commerce Committee, leading
essential to the protection of all of us against calam-
ity and defeat as they are to the protection of all of us
against crime and fire. Support for that truth is as
worthy as support for community service.
(Editor's Note: Robert Mason of Southern Pines is
the author of "One of the Neighbor's Children
the howl. Much more recently, Senator Hollings of published this past spring by Algonquin books. A
South Carolina, reversing political form with disclo- native of North Carolina who grew up in Mebane
sures of "hidden hunger" among his constituents, and graduated in Journalism at UNC-Chapel Hill,
was accused of defaulting on his raising. Mason is the retired editor of the Virginian Pilot in
Hunger, then, is a social and political no-no. Even Norfolk. He also is a former editor of the Sanford
its victims, loyal to the poor-but-proud principle of Herald, and worked on newspapers in Raleigh and
the joke and the tragedy, too often make a secret of Durham.)
f
Munisteii
havi
adrrunisl
the posit
"They
then
departm
doesn t
"It's
signed
( uce Vc
forv. ard I
ma'
re-e
wealth'
dean i
Simon
CPS) Student R
Munisten resigned as the
Department of Education's linl i
the American student bodv Sept
4 because, he said, the staff tn
him and his pos with an .
and disrespt �
Munisten, who took th.
Student Liaison I "� . -
Aug 3, cited "a number I
sons, both personal and pr f
sional tor leaving the pb
"The reason I loft is not I -
I was totally in disagreem
the statt and the way the) ti
position Munisten �
of Texas student, said B il I -
sented b. ing ised as a ��
piece" and "puppet" for 1
partment.
The federal government �
ated the student liais r
dunng the mid M � �
dents and student gn � ,an
nel of communication I
cymakers Some groups
notably the U S Studi nt Ass
tion (USSA), the A
DCbased grouj . .
ticians from around tru
Student refuses
ROCHESTER. N.Y (CPS) �
The University of Rod
parentlv embarrassed hv
enrolling" of a Japan ��� rud
who worked for the busirK �
of a major L'R contnbutor. as,
the student to return, but the stu-
dent has refused
Rochester "disen
Tsuneo Sakai in early September
when Eastman Kodak
has given millions of d
school, threatened to take its ; 5
employees out of classes thei
Sakai, who works for k
archrival Fup Photo Film
would inhibit Kodak employees
in the same class from
ideas company
plained to the school.
Kodak also worried Sakai
might steal company secrets.
L'R, in turn, "disenrolled
Sakai, helping him transfer to the
Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology in Boston
The transfer, however, p
voked accusations from educa-
tion groups around the country
that Rochester was sacrificing the
lntegnty of its classrooms and the
rights of its students to please a
ECU art major wins natii
(ECL News Bureau) � An es-
say by Steven F. Reid Jr oi Hav-
elock, an art major at East Caro-
lina University, is the winning
entry in a national co-
graphic arts students sponson I
bv the national Associahon of
Printing Ink Manufacturers
Reid received the associat:
President's Service award and
Group formed
for parent caring
tPCMH) � A support group
has been formed for people who
are caring for a parent, spous
other loved one at home. The
group is led bv Freda W Cross,
MSW, Titt Countv Memorial
Hospital and Susan Redd
RV Creative Living Center.
The support group will meet at
St lames Lnited Methodist
Church, 2000 E. Sixth St on Octo-
ber b from 7-8:30 p.m.
Respite services are available
dunng the meeting time. To make
reservations for respite care, call
the Creative Living Center at
0303 from 8 am to 5 p.m. (24
hours in advance).
Area social work professionals
will discuss the process oi Nurs-
ing Home Placement.
return or
ment
why he
"1 thin
est �
�n as s
KodaV
dk r &ai4
suffkier
sible 1
� r -
$1,00 I
Vital Roll
in My Pr
I
NAP
Har I
a:a
Reid
bachelo
at ECL
The
East Carolinian.
Pride,
Motivation,
Experience,
riends.
Apply today.
$1


��-





:iftC ecu
�.
"Rear
view
�tefctf�
w
merican economy
n are functionally illiterate,
di ; out of school, and too
d to leave the land Friday
vn say that self-interest alone
compel more people to accept a
lit) to join the battle
citing the well docu-
d fact that poverty is a breeding
d ol crime
Government, as an instrument of the
has a major role in the battle
. rt) and civic responsibility
. to demand that their
rnmenl accept the responsibility.
- has a major role, and the
ffort is certain to bear fruit,
� areness on the part of all
� the Poverty Project advisory
meeting some educators are look-
ays do develop that awareness.
rr broke State University, Dr. Robert
with the help of Dr. Shelby
hi nson,isdevelopingacoi rseforhis
lents on the literature of overty.
rs rhen arehundredsof novels, stories and
ry poems which graphically tell the story of
" i poverty and its degradations of the
human body and fhe human spitit.
This series bv the creative writers of
arolina is a beginning toward the
I alleviating this blight on mankind
lizati n We hcpe the people of
Carolina will respond.
- s Note: Sam Ragan of Southern
�is thi editor and publisher of The
He is a former president of the
rthCarolina Tress Association and the
� si iated Tress Managing Editors As-
ition of America. He is the Poet Lau-
r it : orth Carolina and the author of
t
by
US
les
n addition to the "Campus Forum"
� t the editorial page. The East
roliman features the "Campus
This is an opinion column
writers from the student
d faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
he campus, communitv or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
. with regard to rules of gram-
mar and decency. Tersons submitting
. mns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
fr m ghost writers will be pub-
ed.
Tersons interested in participating
r seeking further information may
contact the managing editor of The
� Carohniar at 757-6366, or stop by
our offices on the second floor of the
TuHicaHonBmldine
auracracy
ieir bare cupboards. That makes hunger all the
lore the moral issue that William Friday, former
Resident of the University of North Carolina, de-
jred it to be in reporting last year for a committee
vestigating hunger in North Carolina. Above all,
inger is a challenge to social justice.
utice entails the use of authority to uphold what
right as well as what is written into the law.
Ihantiesand volunteerism are welcome auxiliaries
V but unreliable substitutes for, systemized assis-
Ince to the needy. One need not be cynical to
lggest that compassion in parishes and neighbor-
jods may be fickle and transient, and at best is
ited; and that, if conditions were otherwise,
)vernment would exploit them. Surely no man
tould have to depend on the state of another man's
�ace, for his health, nor should his dignity be an
en swap for his dinner. Public programs are as
ksential to the protection of all of us against calam-
� and defeat as they are to the protection of all of us
�ainst crime and fire. Support for that truth is as
orthy as support for community service.
(Editor's Note: Robert Mason of Southern Pines is
ie author of "One of the Neighbor's Children
lblished this past spring by Algonquin books. A
itive of North Carolina who grew up in Mebane
id graduated in Journalism at UNC-Chapel Hill,
lason is the retired editor of the Virginian Pilot in
lorfolk. He also is a former editor of the Sanford
jerald, and worked on newspapers in Raleigh and
irham.)
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 29,1987 5
Munisteri
(CPS) � Student Richard
Munisteri resigned as the U.S.
Department of Education's link to
the American student body Sept.
4 because, he said, the staff trea ted
him and his post with arrogance
and disrespect.
Munisteri, who took the job
Student Liaison Officer (SLO)
Aug. 3, cited "a number of rea-
� have criticized the Reagan
administration for "politicizing"
the position.
"They want a student to be
there to give the impression that
there's student input into the
department Munisteri said. "It
doesn't exist. It's BS
"It's unfortunate Richard re-
signed said USSA President
sons, both personal and profes- Circe Pajunen. "We were looking
sional for leaving the job.
"The reason I left is not because
1 was totally in disagreement with
the staff and the way they treat the
position Munisteri, a University
of Texas student, said. But he re-
sented being used as a "mouth-
piece" and "puppet" for the de-
partment.
The federal government cre-
ated the student liaison office
during the mid-1970s to give stu-
dents and student groups a chan-
nel of communication to poli-
cymakers. Some groups � most
notably the U.S. Student Associa-
tion (USSA), the Washington,
D.Cbased group of student poli-
1 ticians from around the country
forward to working with him.
"We feel the SLOs role is com-
municating policy, not making
policy department spokes-
woman Victoria Tripp said of
Munisteri's claims. "Richard is a
young man with a lot of ambition.
We liked him, and we're sorry to
see him go. But right now, he's not
ready to become the Secretary of
Education
The former state chairman of
the Young Conservatives of
Texas, Munisteri has "thegreatest
respect for Secretary (William)
Bennett and his policies But the
department's mid-level bureau-
crats "don't like some newcomer
coming to Washington with no
gray hair trying to get things
done
Past student liaison officers
were free to speak and corre-
spond to whom they wished,
Munisteri said, but the depart-
ment staff rifled through his cal-
endar and computer disk to check
up on him.
The staff also told him what to
write in his newsletter and "ed-
ited it with a hatchet
"I would have loved to have
spent 6 months up there and rein-
vigorate the position. But there
are people who have been up
there for 6 years. Those vulture
staff members would have just
torn down all that I built up
Munisteri explained.
"As a conservative, I was ap-
palled. There was no receptive-
ness to students by the staff he
said.
Munisteri had hoped to address
campus civil rights issues, easier
access for handicapped students
and other concerns, but was told
to "just focus on financial aid he
said.
"Students have a lot at stake in
more issues than financial aid
Pajunen noted. "It's unfortunate
that the definition of the job has
been narrowed to dealing with
financial aid
The student liaison officer's job
description had not been altered
since 1981, Tripp said. "It's pri-
mary mission has always been to
be a liaison
Munisteri recommended "rec-
reating" the job to assign clerical
work to interns and include more
access to the Secretary of Educa-
tion. "What's the use of saying I
have access to the secretary when
I have to be canonized to get an
autographed picture?" Munisteri
asked.
Student and higher education
groups were consulted in past
years before a student liaison offi-
Proposal lifts school to upper echelon
Student refuses re-enrollment
ROCHESTER, N.Y. (CPS) �
The University of Rochester, ap-
parently embarrassed by its "dis-
enrolling" of a Japanese student
who worked for the business rival
of a major UR contributor, asked
the student to return, but the stu-
dent has refused.
Rochester "disenrolled"
Tsuneo Sakai in early September
when Eastman Kodak Co which
hasgiven millions of dollars to the
school, threatened to take its 205
employees out of classes there.
Sakai, who works for Kodak
archrival Fuji Photo Film Co
would inhibit Kodak employees
in the same class from "sharing
ideas company officials com-
plained to the school.
Kodak also worried Sakai
might steal company secrets.
UR, in turn, "disenrolled"
Sakai, helping him transfer to the
Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology in Boston.
The transfer, however, pro-
voked accusations from educa-
tion croups around the country
that'Rochester was sacriBeing the
integrity of its classrooms and the
rights of its students to please a
wealthy corporate contributor.
"If Kodak 4 nulled all its
employees, tha. iuld have de-
stroyed the school because we
wouldn't have had the money to
pay the bills Paul MacAvoy,
dean of Rochester's William E.
Simon Graduate School of Busi-
ness, said.
But even the school's name-
sake, former U.S. Treasury Secre-
tary William Simon, blasted UR
for submitting to "blackmail
while half the business faculty
formally protested the action.
So MacAvoy invited Sakai to
return on Sept. 11, but the student
declined.
"I had a hard time settling in
Boston and finding an apart-
ment Sakai said, explaining
why he chose to stay at MIT.
"I think the University of Roch-
ester is a very good school, but I
didn't know the relationship be-
tween the university and Kodak
was so strong
Kodak Chairman Colby Chan-
dler said the company was "not
sufficiently sensitive to the pos-
sible interpretations of our ac-
tions"
DURHAM (AP) � Duke Uni-
versity administrators and pro-
fessors unveiled an ambitious
five-year proposal to lift the
school into the upper echelon of
the nation's research universities
by strengthening its academic
programs, upgrading the quality
of its student body and hiring
more professors.
University trustees were told
Friday that improving academic
quality was critical for the
school's survival in a time of in-
creased competition among the
nation's best schools for top-qual-
ity high school graduates, star
faculty members and federal re-
search funds.
A campus committee headed
by Provost Phillip A. Griffiths
recommended that Duke trim its
student-professor ratio from 13-
to-1 to 11-to-l by hiring five more
professors each year, mostly in
the humanities, and by cutting
undergraduate enrollment from
5,850 today to 5,700 by 1991. The
group also called for other steps to
improve the quality of instruction
and the caliber of Duke's student
body.
University officials said they
would consider financing those
steps in several ways, including
tuition increases.
ECU art major wins national contest
(ECU News Bureau) � An es-
say by Steven F. Reid Jr of Hav-
elock, an art major at East Caro-
lina University, is the winning
entry in a national contest for
graphic arts students sponsored
by the national Association of
Printing Ink Manufacturers.
Reid received the association's
President's Service award and
Group formed
for parent caring
(PCMH) � A support group
has been formed for people who
are caring for a parent, spouse or
other loved one at home. The
group is led by Freda W. Cross,
MSW, Pitt County Memorial
Hospital and Susan Redding,
RjN. Creative Living Center.
The support group will meet at
St. James United Methodist
Church, 2000 E. Sixth St on Octo-
ber 6 from 7-8:30 p.m.
Respite services are available
during the meeting time. To make
reservations for respite care, call
the Creative Living Center at 757-
0303 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (24
hours in advance).
Area social work professionals
will discuss the process of Nurs-
ing Home Placement.
$1,000 for his essay entitled, "The
Vital Role Printing Ink Will Play
in My Printing Industry Career
according to Ronald C. Baker,
NAPIM president, at the
association's headquarters in
Harrison, N.Y.
ECU School of Art professor
Donald R. Sexauer, Reid's faculty
advisor, also received special rec-
ognition for encouraging student
participation in the contest, Baker
said.
Reid is a candidate for the
bachelor of fine arts (BFA) degree
at ECU.
CAROLINA PREGNANCY CENTER The Center is open Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. For an appointment or more information, call24-Hour Helpline, 757-0003. 111 East Third Street-The Lee Building Greenville, North Carolina Free Pregnancy Test-Confidential Counseling All Services and referrals are free of charge.

Less than a Dime and open til Nine We're your one-stop copy shop with more services available than you will find at any copy shop anywhere. Color Copies � Blueprinting � Laser Type Copies up to 36" x 40" � Office Supplies 758-2400
op�n early open late open six daysACCU 53COPY
Located in Next to Chicos RestaDowntown Greenville urant in the Georgetown Shops

cer was selected, but now the
department appoints someone
without input from others.
Munisteri said the selection proc-
ess should again include those
organizations.
"Students need to be respected
as adults Pajunen agreed. "We
need some say in the decisions
that affect us. The department is
not paying as much attention or
respect to students as it should.
We've lost some of the respect we
deserve
GORDON'S
Golf & Ski Shop
Downhill Specialists. Ski Repairs.
All Major Brands of Skis. Boots.
Bindings. Accessories and Skiwear.
For the
Entire
Family
Rentals
Trade-ins
Major
credit cards
accepted
r
Gordon's Golf & Ski Shop
264 By-Pass (Next to McDonald's)
756-1003
oAppCo cofids
204 E. Sth St.
Open Mon.
Sat. 10:00 cum.
758-1427
9:00 p.m.
Get Ready For the Halloween
SPIRIT. Let Apple Records Help You
Select costumes, masks, make-up,
and accessories For Your Personal-
ized Halloween Appearances. Use
our Catalog to order Your Favorite
characters - From Pirate's costumes
to Spuds MacKenzie masks! See us
today!
Oh Yeh! Don't Forget to say
"BOO
JUDSON H. BLOUNT, III
ATTORNEY AT LAW
DWI and Traffic Offenses
Suite 12, Lee Building
111 East Third Street
Greenville, NC 27835
Telephone:
(919)758-8555
rhe
Ea$t Carolinian.
'ride,
lotlvatton,
ixperience,
�rlends.
Apply today.

mm-mmmww
Every Tuesday
College Night
from 8:00 to 11:00
$1.50 with college I.D.
.504 skate rental
SPORTSWORLD
104 E. Redbanks Rd.
756-6000
Lube
in car care maintenance is now
open in Greenville!
Here's what we do in 10 minutes, no
appointment necessary
1. We change your oil with a major brand!
2. We install a new oil filter!
3. We lubricate the whole chassis!
4. We check and fill transmission fluid!
5. We check and fill differential fluid!
6. We check and fill brake fluid!
7. We check and fill power steering fluid!
8. We check and fill window washer fluid!
9. We check and fill battery!
10. We check the air filter!
11. We check the wiper blades!
12. We Inflate the tires to proper pressure!
13. We vacuum the interior!
14. We even wash your windows!
PLUS a FREE Car Wash with
FuJJSemce!
95C
JIFFY CAR WASH
(WITH COUPON)
COUPON GOOD SEPT. 30trv 1987.
(WITH COUPON,
Reg. $21.95
MorXFridoy "East Carolina's Answer
J?�5K To The Oil Change Problem"
126 Greenville Blvd
Greenville
(Across from Golden
Corrol Steok House)
miiniUMixirm, i� � � p - t i ni n mum i in r t
i i�w �� nxnuii w�mwi�iiiiHwii ��i ii tm
Mk





6 Tt IF
EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 20, 1987
FOR RENT
Classifieds
RlvlBBpE�R�OM SP.AL TAR
RIVER ESTATES: $150 off Is month
' whon s'Rn'ng a 12 month lease or the
'Ption to sign a s month lease 1400 VVil
�ivSti7S2-4225
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 1
rxsJroom house. $100 rent plus 11 ut.h
"v-s C all Cathy or Laurie 7h 4781
1 BEDROOM UPSTAIRS APART
MENT AVAII.ABl E: October 1 1 blacks
from campus All utilities paid $25000
per month Lease & Deposit required
s 1274 afta 5O0p.ni
of tuxedos from 40 and up Troll's Tux and
Tee's 757 1007 or 758-0763.
HALLOWEEN T'S: While they last get
your I lalloween '87 T shirt. We also carry
Slop Aids and Sbckin' the Pack Or we
will make any Tshirt for any ocassion
Call Trolls Tux and Tee's 757 1007 or
758 0763
HR SAl L: Trek 400 Series Racing bike
23 inch Frame Price Negobable Call
Danny 757 1167
WANTED- Roommate or roommates to
share apartment at Tar River Estates
Female or male Mostly Furnished Call
Todd 752 .1Q12
ROOM EOR RENT: Beginning this
spring semester $115 00 a month Croat
location to campus Full house pm ileges
Call today at 757 $017
RESPONSIBLE
WANTED: To shar
tame Fireplace, 1 oft
tfuch More! it you re
ROOMMA II
con temporal y
Pool, A C and
i M campu
musing this ls what you haw- been look
ng for! t all J55 (w aftei 8 pm
WF ROOMMATE NEI DI D: In 2 bed
room apartment at Wilson Acres No
deposit Many Extras' (. all 758 fWf,7
ROOMMATE WANTED: Private room
2 bedroom apt on arvis st i bk from
campus 125mol2utlities CaUNancv
758-4856
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apts tor rent
furnished Contact HoBie Simonowich
752 25
FOR SALE
TUXEDO RENTALS: Low Prices, high
quality Special Fraternit) and Sorority
rates door to Door Service Complete line
ON A TICMT BUDGET?? Try our "meal
deal " 14 lb hamburger, hot roast beef,
chick fillet, or pizzaburger with fries and
drink S2.4s�! Lasagna (or spaghetti)
with salad and garlic bread ONl Y $.1 45
757-0731 757 1278. Famous IVa 10th &
Evans (Specials not for delivery.)
LOVE JEWELRY? Call for your invitation
to a private showing of high quality, low
cost costume jewelry. It interested, you can
host a show yourself and receive FREE
we!r Ask tor Barbara at 752 .1152 bo
Iween s 5 M 1. and 756 87(N at other
hours
NEED TYPING? PROPER ECU FORMAT
I BED FOR PAPERS, Tl 1ES1S, DISSERTA-
TIONS, ETC. WILL PROOFREAD AND
CORRECT GRAMATICAL ERRORS
IMPRESS YOUR PROFESSORS Will I A
KM WELL DONE. 758 6141
TYPING AND WORD PROCESSING:
Two copies for the price of one! From $1.50
a page Also, custom signs, banners and
greeting cards 752 9637.
PERSONAL COMPUTER TUTORING:
1 earn to use a PC! (There are doens avail
able on campus.) Instructions and free
word processing software 752-9617
PROFESSIONAL BUT NOT EXPEN-
SIVE! Progressivi Data Services offers
professional word processing to students
and professionals Term papers, disserta-
tions, themes, reports and much more as
low as SI 75 per page (Please call tor quote
on your project.) Vice includes printing on
high quality bond paper and spelling veri
fication against a 50,000 word electronic
rJSST Ask about our sPial offers.
SSX, C?ON LASER PRINTING
SYSTEM Call Mark at 757-3440after 7 00
pm for free information
NEED TYPING DONE? All 758-1161 until
5:00 pm. Call 758 2119 after 5:00 pm Ask
for Kim
WORD PROCESSING: Letter quality or
laser printing. Rush jobs accepted 752-
OUR COMPANY, DELTA IMAGES:
Will produce a professional TV News,
Resume tape for you at a resonable price-
Your voice and stand ups professionally
edited with actual news footage, Also have
vour tape distributed nationally via satel-
lite to potentionally hundreds of news
directors, consultants and agents. Produc-
tion crew scheduled in you area soon. Call
for futher information 919-933-8929.
ELECTROLYSIS: (Permanent removal of
unwanted hair) By Barbara Venleis.
People who understand electrolysis will
not wax, tweee of use electronic tweezer
or any other temporary method Isn't it
time to try the permanent method. Call
830-0962 for free consulation.
NEED TYTING? Call Cindy 757(1198
Call anytime after 5:00 p m 1 ow r.its
include: proofreading, spelling and
grammatical corrections; professional
service. 10 years experience IBM TYP-
ING.
DISK JOCKIE: The mutations are sim-
plv that TRASHMAN DJ service
Golden groovershodv movers, new
wax, new wave, top 40, any mixer, so
nal, liar Mitzpha, pool party, etc Con
tact 752 1587 1 laving a party and need a
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes 24
hours in and out Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106
last 5th Street (Beside Cubbies)
Greenville, N.C 752-3694
PICK UP AND DELIVERY: Of term
papers, theses, resumes to be typed
IBM wordprocessing by professional
with 13 years experience Letter Quality
print and professional editing Call
Nanette in Griffon at 1 524 5241 Cheap
call - the best service!
IS IT TRUE : You Can Buy jeeps for $44
through the U.S. government? Get the
facts today! Call 1 112742 1142 Ext
5271 A
HELP WANTED
TELEMARKETERS NEEDED: For
Home Improvement Company 20
hours per week 1 5 pm M E or 5 9 pm
Sun. - Thur. Desire assertive, mature
persons who need to work Call 355-
7108 between 1 8 pm
MAKE QUICK MONEY! Earn $25.00to
30.00 per car buying customer sent to
me. Call I lerb for details 355 5099
PICTURE FRAMERS NEEDED Full
and Part-time positions available Expo
rience helpful but not necessary Apply
in person only at Susan's Gallery, 141.1 -
A south Evans Street.
BRODY'S FOR MEN: Has full tim
and part time sales associates positions
for enthusiastic, fashion forward ind'
viduals. Retail Clothing experience is
required. Better than average starting
salary Apply in person, Brady's Per
sonnel Director, Carolina East Mall M
W2 4pm
BRODY'S: Has part rime sales assoxi
ates postions for enthusiastic, out going
individuals who en)oy working with
young contemporary Junior fashions.
Ckxid Salary Apply in person, Brady's
Personnel Director, Carolina Fast Mill
M W2 4pm.
A LEADING CLOTHING RETAILER
NEEDS: A full time office associate to
work M F 9-6 Individual must be accu
rate and possess skills in accounting
bookkeeping Salary based on experi-
ence Good salary and benefits package
Apply in person or call for interview ap-
pointment Judith C Simon, Brody's Per-
sonnel Director M W 2 4 p m 756-2224
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING
ACCEPTED: For students wishing to
serve on University Committees for 1987
88 year Questions about University
Committees may be directed to the Office
of the Vice Chancellor for Student Life
757 6541
CRFFNHOUSE TECHNICIANS
NEEDED: For Part bme employment
Flexible hours Weekends and after
school Call 7564)879
GOVERNMENT JOBS: $16,040
$59,2.30vr. Now hiring call 805-687
oOOO Ext R 1166 for current federal list
AIRLINES NOW HIRING: Right Atten
dants. Travel Agents, Mechanics, Cus-
tomer Service Listings Salaries to S50K
Entry level positions Call 805 687 6000
Ext A 1166
STOCKBROKER TRAINEE: College
C.rad, Opportunity for hardworking,
enthusiastic individual. Send resume to
P.O. Box 8814 Virginia Beach, VA 23450
MACKENZIE SECURITY: Is seeking
students to work as part time, weekend
security guards Ciood Pay! Must have
dependable transportation to work
MUST have telephone MUST NOT have
police record Apply in person at 1127
South Evans Street 752174
PERSONALS
CET READY All Campus Party at
Lambda Chi House, Oct 30, with AAE.
MOM AND DAD - Hello from
Greenville I lope everything is fine in Ole
Miss. We're stall hoping the house gets
sold soon' Take care. Love, James
Matt Chance, Chip Shell, Kraig Mullcr,
Jeff Emerson, Billy Neil, Joe Tippett-
Thanks for all the help last Tuesday night
ca BOm FAT ASSESSMENT
You can have your percent body t.it
measured (free of charge) in a matter of
minutes 1 need Caucasian male subjects
between IS and 30 wars of age for my
thesis research studs It you meet this
criteria, pleas call immediately All
measurements will be made at the I luman
Performance Lab (room 113) in Minges
Coliseum .Call Krrnberlv Eastman Zirkle
at 758-2933 anytime TODAY! It not at
home, picas leave name and number on
answering machine and call will be re
turned A S A P
liiiOiLaLLXlXATJLN
The school ol education, m conjucricw
with Campus Ministries, is
sponsoring a
W orkStudy trip to Mexico during Spring
beak (March 6 13 1988) Opportunities to
and teach at a
ooserve
availagbie
infonnatioi
Ln at a local v!ik1 are
r -i. lit ations and more
ntact the Office of the Dean
n Speight Building Rm 154.
SIGMA GAMMA EPSILON
Sigma Gamma Epsilon is presenting
"ACADEMICOMPUTING AT EAST
CAW �l INA UNIVERSITY' by Mr Ernie
Marshburn, Manager o! Academic Com
puting ECU at 3:00 pm on Oct. 1 in
Graham 301.
BSL
The Baptist Student Union would like
to invite all students to dinner on Monday
nights Dinner starts at 5 30 p m and the
cost is $2 OnThurs nights at 7:00 wehave
our worship service It is an informal type
w. irship come as you are!
PANEL DISCI JSSION
On Sept 30, 1987, 8 pm m room 244
Mendenhall, a panel discussion, "Sex On
Campus" will be shown, live via-satellite
Please Attend This Tree Showing
PADDUNCn.IIB
Put some excitement into your life! We
meet every week with in-water instruc
bon every other meeting. We have all the
equipment Join us Tuesdays in Memorial
105 or in the Memorial pool at 9:00 p.m.
Call Jim I lix at 756-2970 or Rav Irvin at
a30-1215.
SWIM MEET
The Dept of Intramural-Recreational
Services will be sponsoring the annual
swim meet. Registration will take place at
7 p.m. in Bio102. All swimmers are urged
to participate.
TECA
Organizational meeting for all who are
interested on Wed Sept. 30 in 309 Rawl at
7 p.m.
ENVIRONMENTAL
Environmental I lealth majors are en-
couraged to register with the Cooperative
Ed Office in 312 Rawl and to consider the
Career-Related work experiences avail-
able with the Federal and State Govern-
ments as well as private industry Don't
miss the application deadlines.
CONSTRUCTION
There will be a Construction Manage-
ment Seminar held Wed , Sept. 30 at 6:30
p.m. in 201 Flanagan. The speaker will be
James G Hite, Architect, Greenville, N.C.
and will speak on "Architects Role in the
Construction Process
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
The Pitt County Juvenile Services Resti-
tution Program needs volunteers to su-
pervise and interact with juveniles as they
perform various work activities within
the community. You may volunteer any
number of hours peT week MonSat. Vol-
unteers need to be available four to six
hours per month For further info call
752-1811, ext. 419.
Announcements
NAACP
I he last Carolina chapter of the
N A c P will have a meeting Thurs CVt
1st at Mendenhall Persons interested in
chairing a committee should be present.
Up oming events will be announced also
JiQOETY
There will be a meeting of the LSS Soci-
ety Tues Sept 29 at 5 pm. at the LSS
Building All interested LSS students are
welcome to attend Memberships will be
sold tor $5 IX) a semester or $7.50 for the
COMMITTEE POSITIONS
Applications are now being accepted
tor students wishing to serve on Univer-
sitv Committees for the 1987-88 school
year Nineteen student positions are
open Committees with vacancies are.
AIDS Education, Ad Hoc Advisory (1),
Alcohol Drug Education (1), C amassing
& Soliciting on Campus (1), International
Student Affairs (1), Residence Life (1 off-
campus), Resident Status Appeals (1),
status of Minorities (2), Student Health
Services (2), Career Education (1), Con
turning Education (1), Curriculum (2),
Faculty Computer (2), General College
(1), libraries (1), and Teaching Effective
ness (1) Applications are available at the
following locations: Office of the Vice
Chancellor for Student Life, 204
Whichard; Mendenhall Information
Desk ScA Office, Mendenhall, and Resi-
dence 1 iall Directors' Offices Questions
alxiut University Committees and mem
berships may be directed to the Office of
the Vice Chancellor for Student Life (757-
6541)
PKE-PTSTUPENTS
Any sophomore (or higher) wanting to
make application to the Physical Therapy
program for May 1988 must go to the P f
Dept (Allied I lealth Belk Building) to
confirm eligibility toapply Please contact
the PT. Dept by mid Sept to confirm
eligibility and receive P T. admission
packet and application for the Allied
Health Professions Test Completed
admission packet must be returned by
Nov. 1. Application deadline for the
AHPATisOct. 16.
"LUNCHTIMF MnviFQ"
We will be showing Lunchtime Movies
about Art in Jenkins Auditorium 12 noon
til 1 p m Everyone is invited. Showing
Tues 929, "Five British Sculptors Work
& Talk
SOCIAL WORK
CRIMINAL JUSTirF
SOCWCR1M. JUSTICE Majors are
encouraged to register early this semester
with the Cooperative Ed. Office in 312
Rawl Act early to meet the deadlines for
Spring andor Summer, Career-Related
employment. Take advantage of Federal,
State, or Private Industry Opportunities.
GOSPEL CHOIR
The ECU Gospel Choir is celebrating
their first album by holding a concert on
Tues Sept. 29 at 700 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre. Admission is free.
COlOP AND NURSINC,
NURSING STUDENTS: Please stop by
312 Rawl for info, on the numerous nurse
extern programs as well as other opportu-
nities for summer employment. It is im-
portant to plan ahead and act early to meet
certain deadlines.
COOPERATIVF pp.
Cooperative Education Positions are
available with Northern Telecom in Re-
search Triangle Park for Spring 1988.
Majors needed include: CSCI, DSCI, and
INDT. A variety of majors are needed for
positions with a major utility company
located in Virginia. For more info contact
Cooperative Ed in 313 Rawl.
COUNSELING CENTER
STRATEGIES FOR TAKING STAN
DARD1ZED TESTSHOW TO DO WELL
ON THE CiRE Are vou planning on tak
ing the GRE, LSAT, MAT, MEDCAT, or
other standardized tests? This workshop
will cover basic info, about these tests, test
taking strategy and sample items. Sept.
30, Wed Standardized Tests, from 4 5
p rn in-3T2 WtTRm BflMding If you are
planning on taking tfwCRE tor admission
to graduate school this workshop can
help vou prepare c Vt 1, Thurs , Prepar
ing for the GRE from 4 5 pm ,n 312
Wright Building
The Dept. of Intramural-Recreational
Services has organized a sailing trip for
a maximum of 6 people The trip will be
from Washington, N G into the Pamlieo
Sound on Sunday, October 11 If you or
your group are interested, please call the
Outdoor Recreation Center at 757-6387
from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. or register in
204 Memorial Gym
BACCHUS
C ome (oin BACC1IUS (Boosting Alco-
hol Consciousness Concerning I lealth of
University Students) Thurs. night, Oct. 1
at 730 in Mendenhall rm 242.
BACKPACKING TRIP
The Dept. of Intramural-Recreational
Services has a Backpacking Trip planned
for the weekend of October 2 4 to the
Uwharne National Forest. Registration
for this trip will be taken in 204 Memorial
Gym from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
I.L.O.
The International Language Organiza-
tion, ILO, will have a meeting on Tues
Sept 29, at 3:30p.m. in BrewsterC-304. All
students interested in cross-cultural un-
derstanding, foreign languages, interna-
tional connections are invited and encour-
aged to attend and become members.
More info contact Patricia Cardona, 758-
8818, or co Foreign Langs, and Lits
campus, 757-6232, Brewster A 427.
PHI SIGMA PI
There will be a pledge meeting this
Wed Sept 30 at 5 p.m. in Austin 132.
There's a general business meeting for all
brothers immediately following the
pledge meeting.
WESFEL
Worship God and share communion,
this Wed. at 5 p.m. at the Methodist Stu-
dent Center, then stay for a delicious, all-
you-can eat home cooked meal. The meal
is 52 at the door, $1.50 if you sign up in
advance. Call 758-2030 for reservations.
KERYGMA
A Bible study only for those who are
serious about studying the Bible. Weekly
meetings will be scheduled to accomodate
those who are interested. Kerygma is an
interdenominational program. For more
info call "Mike" at 752-7240
INTERVIEW WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning & Placement Serv-
ice in the Bloxton I louse is offering these
one hour sessions to aid you in developing
better interviewing skills for use in your
job search. A film and discussion of how to
interview on and off campus will be
shared. These sessions are held in the
Career Planning Room on Tues Sept 29
at 3:00 and 7.O0 p.m. and on Wed Sept. 30
at 3:00 p.m.
UNIVERSITY IINTTONS
The Dept. of University Unions pres-
ents the TONKVENSTLER ORC1IESTRA
OF VIENNA on Tues Oct. 13th at 8:00
p.m. in Wright Auditorium. Tickets are
now on sale. For further info contact the
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall, 757-
6611, ext. 266.
SCHOLARSHIPS
Students interested in making applica
tion for School of Business Scholarships
should secure forms from one of the tol
lowing department offices: Accounting
R325, Decision Sciences - R2.38; Finance
R34.3; Management - R137; Marketing
R223 All applications must be submitted
to Ruth Jones (Rawl 334), Chairman of
School of Business Scholarship Commit
tee, by October iJJW. Students may
apply for one or more of the scholarships
listed below (even when funding is pend
ing).
UNIVERSITY BOOK EXCHANGE:
S500; Academic merit NCNB S500; Aca-
demic merit J. FRED HAMBLEN: $350;
Academic excellence in business law
course and good citizenship CRFDIT
WOMEN INTERNATIONAL. $200; Fi-
nancial need, scholarship, and citien
ship Recipient must have graduated from
public or private high school in Pitt
County. (Funding is pending, vou may
make application). CAMERON
BROWNFIRST UNION SCHOLAR-
SI IIP for a deserving student specializing
in finance, jyp no mi cs, real estate, orae-
counring. 3 at $500each. (Funding Ls pend
ing; you may make application). AC
COUNTING MAIORS ONLY�1 AT.
NEY W. PITTARD MEMORIAL: Annual
earnings of established corpus; scholar-
ship, citizenship, and need. Permanent
residence of a candidate for this scholar
ship must be in Eastern North Carolina
(East of I ligh way 1-95) or any county west
of Highway I 95 in which Pittard and
Perry, Inc maintains an office. AC-
COUNTING MAJORS ONLY-
RALEIGH DURHAM CHAPTER INSTI-
TUTE OF INTERNAL AUDITORS: $350;
recipient must have at least 3 00 GPA,
must have completed 12 semester hours
of accounting, and must have expressed
strong interest in internal auditing profes-
sion (Funding is pending; you may make
application) DECISION SCIENCE MA-
IORS ONLY - GRANT FOR DECISION
SCIENCE MAJORS: $125; scholarship,
need, and citizenship. FINANCE MA-
IORS ONLY - ARCHIE R. BURNETTE:
$600; Academic excellence and citizen
ship.
RES LnyiEjyyo 8 K5 Hops
Career Planning and Placement is of-
fering a program on preparing resumes at
the Career Planning and Placement Office
on Thurs Oct. 1 and Fn Oct. 2 at 3:00
p.m Come into the Bloxton House to re-
ceibve worksheets and workbooks
DANCE THFATRF
The Dept of University Unions pres-
ents the N.C. Dance Theatre, Mon Oct
5th at 8:00 pm. in Wnght Auditorium
Tickets are on sale at the Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall, from 11:00 a.m. - 6:0f
p.m. MonFri. For further info, call 757
6611, ext 266
PISCOVFRIVC-SPAIN
The Student Union Travel Committee
presents the opening TRAVEL-ADVEN-
TURE film, Discovering Spain, on Thurs
Oct 15th in Hendnx Theatre at 8.00 pm
Tickets for this film are limited, but still
available For further info contact the
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall 757-
6611, ext. 266
A meeting will be held for all (old &
new) members on Wed, Sept 30 The
meeting will be held in rm 8 D.E.F down-
stairs in Mendenhall at 6:00 p.m.
SURFTEAMCHJR
There will be a meeting Wed , Sept. 30
at 5:00 p.m. in the Multi-Purpose Room in
Mendenhall. Team trials will be dis-
cussed.
ECUSNCFA
There will be a membership drive Sept.
29-30 in Speight lobby for the ECU chapter
of SNCEA. All Education Majors are
urged to pin. Annual dues are $15.00
MADRIGAL PINNERS
Tickets are now on sale for Madrigal
Dinners to be held Dec. 2-5 at 7:00 p m. in
Mendenhall. Partake orf a scrumptious
holiday meal amid the festivities of an
Elizabethan Manor Hall preparing for the
Christmas season. Tickets! are $10 for ECU
students and $16 for all others. Call the
Central Ticket Office at 757-6611, ext 266
setting up for the Basketball Blowout
You guys are tmely gentlemen! and
scholars I FC exec
LOST: Set of keys on Phi Sigma Pi key
ring Lost in vicinity of leased parking lot
on comer of 5th St and Reade Grcle
Please call if found' 752-6274
TO MARK B: I cherish those late, late
night sessions we spent together Stealing
awayifonlyformomentsatatime Hope-
fully our next encounter will show how
much we really mean toeach other Love,
Claudia
FRESH AND HOT Call for fast free
delivery Buy a large piza, get 2 liter
coke FREE Buy a small pizza, get 2 dnnks
FREE Call now - Famous Pizza 757-1278
757-0731
ATTENTION ALL BEER LOVERS: $99
pitchers with large pizza EVERY
NIGHT Famous Pizza - Corner 10th
Evans 757 1278; 757-0731.
I WAS FACED WITH A REAI DI-
LEMMA YESTERDAY: I saw there the
North Carolina Dance Theater was com
ing as part of the Theatre Arts Series
Then it struck me' Which is right' Tl IEA
TER or Tl 1EATRE' I haven't slept since
I'm so confused Help me decide Meet
me at Wright Auditorium on Monday
October 5th, at 8 00 p m I'll be wearing
the red carnation Signed, 100 Natural
"Art"
TO THE BITCHES: Who live upstairs,
Sorry you couldn't hang with my Big
RED Thang
ATTENTION: Don't forget Alpha Xi
Delta's 1 lappy I lour EVERY Wednesday
night at Pantana's - It's the BEST excuse
for missing Thursday's classes'
INTER VARSITY CHRISTIAN FEL-
LOWSHIP: Please Join Us' Wednesday
Night's in Speight 129 at 7 00 pm Fun
Fellowship - Food Teaching.
KRISTEN EDMUNDS we miss seeing
you around the house We love you. The
sisters and pledges of Delta Zeta
SIG EPS - Thanks for the raging soaal
lets do it again soon and we'll try to keep
Mandv off the beer truck - Love the Delta
Zeta's.
PI KAPPs We had a blast at the social
Stacey Try to get us there alive Leslie - a
bruise on your chin, oh well no pain no
gain. Love Delta Zeta.
CHEAP ALCOHOL, GOOD MUSIC,
FREE SEX All of this and more at the Sig
Ep happy hour at Tequila Bar on Wednes-
day nights. Maybe.
NHL SIMOlZLAi:
IQuyhtTollelnpvctyre, .pi.yKyKii
Simon, will be part of a dinner-theatre
reduction on Thurs Oct 8 and Fn Oct
at 630 p.m in the Mendenhall Audito-
rium Tickers are now on sale at the Cen-
tral Ticket Office in Mendenhall. ECU
students is $10 and all others are $16 Call
now for your tickets - 757-6611, ext 266
ALL TICKETS ARE BY ADVANCE
SALES NO TICKETS WILL BE SOLD AT
THE DOOR
EJVELCljjb
If you enjoy scuba diving, snorkebng,
and adventuring with friendly outgoing
people, then you need to ,�,� ECU's Coral
Reef Dive Qub For more info call 752-
4399 and ask for Glenn or Rob
COOPERATIVE FD
Walt Disney World will be on campus
to recruit students for spring semester
Students from all maprs are encouraged
to participate Merchandise, food, and
attractions, among other positions are
available Representatives will be at ECU
on Sept 29 & 30 Contact the office of
Cooperative Ed m the Rawl Bldg for
more info
vy0ME0CXEiCU3
rnA"fls "Crested in playing on the
ECU Women s Soccer Team should con
act Renee at 355-4644 ' Th,s dub offers
the opportunity for travel 4 competition
at other schools The team is coached by
LCU s men soccer coach. Charl.e Harvey
VvTVETUNLCLliB
Anyone interested in wrestling this
year on the club team please call Tom
Lepport at 752 1660 Old and new mem
bers welcome'
ATTENTION
BSN CLASS OF 1988
Why wait to start your nursing career'? The Air
Force has a special program for 1988 BSNs If
selected, you enter Air Force active duty soon
after graduation- -without waiting for the
results of your State Boards. To apply, you must
have an overall "B" average and meet other
basic officer entry requirements. As a newlv
commissioned nurse, you'll attend a f ive-
�??ih !?ternsniP at a �jor Air Force medical
facility. If s an excellent way to prepare for the
wide range of experiences you'll have servina
your country as an Air Force nurse professional
For more information, call u.yss.onai
�?PLAnne Butcher
(919)850-9471 Cclect
l"HE E ASTa I I
The Fivx, shown here in a publicity i
ing week festivities at EC I Tickets are $7
DC comics releases
novel; super heroes n
By CHIPPY BOM HI AD
This could bo the comic 1
that ends up in college literature
books within the next 20 years
With the "Watchmen" grapl
novel, writer Alan Moore has -
tablished super hero character- �
viable as Holden Cault'ield V
tives. dialogue and situations ai
as real as gum under a di sK
But perhaps the book's greal
strength is its liberal usage ol a
technique not possible in stan-
dard prose, and largelv ignored in
Enigma tries h
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
S��� w � �
11M M -
M�im M - M J 1 in . �
Erup?na-w�ercts trigs hard
They started in 1982 (according
to the album liner notes) and are
"going strong in 1987 Well.
that's great, but vou have to re-
member, this is' the label that
markets Strvper, the only heavy
metal band endorsed by ferrv
Falwell.
At least tluv aren't on I
compilation. "Enigma Variatii ns
2" is all the stronger for that And
it's cheaper than the first Vari- prod.
ations" released in 1984
Back then, they had a wider
range of artists such as Tex and
the Horseheads and ohn i r
and the Ugly Janitors Thai
pier LP only had one song for each
artist, while "Variations 2 has
two for everybody.
So much for "going sti
Well, it's not that grim
does have those near gods Mojo
Nixon and the Dead Milkn
which is really cool. And Win
too, which is great But not much
else on here is on "thecuttinge
of rock and roll (also from I
liner notes.)
The first two sides feature
tracks that have been previous!)
released. Sides three and four an
mostly from the vaults Sui
there was more than two
worth oi songs waiting to be sen!
forth into the cold world of music it's sti
consumption.
TSOL is a nice surprise. Espe-
cially their cut. "Colors (Take Me
tor Ivrics rh,�n
0
mental an
throwawa
See ECLE
The book
Book reveals 4Confessil
By SHERRY DAISEY
i rim
"Confessions of a Space Cadet:
The Transformation of a
Teacher by Dr. John Marshall
Carter, Professor of Medieval
History at ECU. Hamilton Press.
$6.95.
In the book. Carter addresses
the question "What makes a good
teacher?" In tracing his own edu-
cational background (which was
very extensive) he provides the
reader with amusing anecdotes
about previous teachers who he
feeb fit the mold of a "space ca-
By his definition a space cadet is
"� teacher who is eccentric, crea-
tivc, extroverted.
bit of a hum
A space cadet is j
out or theordinar
planet, as he woul
vises method s of 1�
fun and memorat
He thinks a teac
rive unless heshei
cere and whole-hf
"making conr
grating discipline
real understandin
the book he sak
integration is at ti
root of Education.
Another point!
standing teachers I
to teach and comi
V '


- I - - -�iir� j.
V





Il.
setting up tor the Basketball Blowout.
. ou guvs are truelv gentlement and
��hvljr I 1 c exec
I OS1 Set or ke-v on Phi Sigma Pi key
ost in vicinity ot leased parking lot
i per .t th St and Reade Qrcle.
� .all it tound' 752-6274
TO MXKk. B I .hensh those late, late
jj sessions we spent together Stealing
n i ' nl) w moments at a time Hope-
fulln our next encounter will s) w how
much w real!) mean to each other Love,
H SP HOT call tor tast free
r H i .1 largo pia, get 2 liter
�mall pia, get 2 drinks
Famous Pizza 7571278
N All BUR I OVERS:9s)
�tl I irge pizza EVERY
Corner 10th -
A s Uip WITH A RIVAl PI-
MM A MM1 RDAY: 1 saw there the
a Dance Theater was com.
t the Theatre Arts Series.
- me! Which is right' Tl IEA-
K or Tl IEATRE? I havep t slept since.
vi I lelp me deride Meet
im on Monday,
HOOp.m III be wearing
d 100 Natural
iHI BIH HtS Who live upstairs.
voi. � hang with mv Big
I U NTION ' rget Alpha Xi
irEVER'i VVednesdav
o BEST excuse
irsda s classes!
iMIK VARSIT CHRISTIAN FEL-
ts in Us! Wednesday
11 7:00 pm Fun �
od Teaching
KRISTEN EDMI NDS we miss seeing
Ve love vou The
d edges of Delta Zeta.
! ;v s Tl anks tor the raging soaal
- � n and we'll trv to keep
� � truck Love the Delta
k xriv
IS) at the social
alive L eslie a
.h well no pain no
CHr P
i Ri 1 SI
:Vlta Zeta
1OHOL, GOOD MUSIC,
: this and more at the Sig
our at Tequila Bar on Wedrtes-
Maybe
LM v
IhNJJiS
ule for Madrigal
f D p.m. in
the fa r a
i preparing tor -he
Ikef.areSiOfor ECU
others Call the
57 tr ext 266
NEIL SIMQLELAY.
lhlghl To Be In Pictures, a pt�v bv Neil
Simon, will be part of � dinner-theatre
production on Thurs , Oct. 8 and Fn , Get
9 at 6.30 pm in the Mendenhall Audito-
rium Tickets are now on sale at the Cen-
tral Ticket Office in Mendenhall ECU
students is $10 and all others are $16 Call
now for vour tickets - 757-6611, ext 266
ALL TICKETS ARE BY ADVANCE
SALES NO TICKETS WILL BE SOLD AT
THE DOOR
mYEXLO
� - a diving, snorkehng,
ith friendly outgoing
�i to join ECU's Coral
n re info call 752-
i r I 1'nn or Rob
IQUHRATIVE ED.
�'� rid will be on campus
lit students for spring semester
s from a. majors are encouraged
Merchandise food, and
tl et positions are
- ntatives will beat ECU
� H Contact the office of
d in the Rawl Bldg for
WOMEN'S SQCCEB CLUB
h rested in playing on the
Women 5 So oer Team should con-
. H355-4644 ' This club offers
rtunit) for travel & competition
' ' l Is h team is coached by
smcnsoi ei j h Charlie Harvev
WRESTLING CLUB
interested in wrestling this
lub team please call Tom
- r"� (M and new mom-
ITION
OF 1988
ursmg career" The Air
gram for 1988 BSNs. If
hve duty soon
' � ; ting for the
Irds To apply, you must
rage and meet other
frements. As a newly
)u'll attend a five-
ajor Air Force medical
ay to prepare for the
ces you'll have serving
)rce nurse professional.
utcher
47 1 Collect
r'U'itf
I
5
i
a
s
a
s
3
I
i 1

-J
IKE I ASI tAROI INIAN
Style
SEPTEMBER 29, 1987 Page 7
ECU hosts Fixx, Anita Baker
The Fixx, shown here in a publicity photo, will appear in Minges Coliseum Oct. 8 as part of Homecom-
ing week festivities at ECU. Tickets are $7 for students and are available at the Central Ticket Office.
DC comics releases 'Watchmen'graphic
novel; super heroes now literarily legitimate
By LARISSA TRIVETT
SHU Witcr
Whoever printed the bumper
sticker "Greenville has it all"
obviously knew about upcoming
attractions here.
The Fixx, a British rock band,
will perform in Minges Coliseum
next month. Soul singer Anita
Baker is coming in November.
The Fixx has enjoyed great suc-
cess with albums such as "Phan-
tom "Reach the Beach "React
"Shattered Room" and "Walka-
bout Like most bands, the Fixx
came from rather modest begin-
nings. They began by playing
small gigs in London.
Lead vocalist Cy Cumin, who
was supporting himself by win-
ning fishing tournaments, met
drummer Adam Woods while
they were attending the same
London drama school. Curnin
joined a band that Woods played
in at a show at the school, and they
hit it off.
Later, the two advertised for a
keyboard player. Rupert Green-
hall was the only one to answer
the ad � he got the job. The band
also includes Jamie West-Oram,
and Danny K. Brown.
In an interview in Rolling Stone
Magazine, Woods said it was the
first time he had met someone
who could write songs and un-
derstood the power of words to
the extent he did when he was a
student. Woods said they aimed
their creative expressiveness at
the generation who could appre-
ciate it, and they made it big.
The Fixx puts much of their own
beliefs into the intense lyrics of
their music. The subjects include
anything from nuclear war to
social fascism.
Whether you get into the anti-
nuke verses or the popular beat of
the Fixx's music, the upcoming
show promises to be an exciting
one.
On the other end of the music
spectrum, R&B vocalist, Anita
Baker will be showcasing her
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Sufi Wnlcr
This could be the comic book
thai ends up in college literature
books within the next 20 years.
With the "Watchmen" graphic
ovel, writer Alan Moore has es-
iblished super hero characters as
iable as Holden Caulfield. Mo-
tives, dialogue and situations are
as real as gum under a desk
But perhaps the book's greatest
strength is its htvil usage ot a
technique not possible in stan-
dard prose, and largely ignored in
tilm visual irony.
Some ot this is used to a humor
ous effect. As a reporter interro-
gates the multi-powered Dr.
Manhattan, saying "Am 1 starting
to make you feel uncomfortable?"
thecaption crosses to an ad jioning
panel where the Silk Spectre, in-
volved in a mugging attempt.
knees a crook in the groin.
A major portion ol the irony is
concerned with the perception ol
lime. For Dr. Manhattan, time
does not How in one line, rather, it
is a painting viewed all at once.
rhis especially evident towards
the end, when he sjx-aks to one
person in his present and one in
his future Thcj ask him unre-
lated questions, and his single
reply answers lxth.
Another theme hit upon is isola-
tion. A supporting character is
shown reading a comic book
which allegorically summarizes
the plot ot "Watchmen
The philosophy ol "the needs of
the mam
tl
few
nit weighs the needs of
Enigma tries hard
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
S4aH Wntrr
Ji u� i - . m.u naji � �
Eruma Tecerdts trijw hard.
Thev started in 19S2 (according
to the album liner notes) and are
going strong in 198 Well,
that's great, but vou have to re-
member, this is the label that
markets Strvper, the only heavy
metal band endorsed by erry
ralwell.
At least thev aren't on this
ompilation. "Enigma Variations
2" is all the stronger for that. And
it's cheaper than the first "Vari-
ations" released in 1984.
Back then, thev had a wider
range of artists such as Tex and
the Horseheads and John Trubee
�nd the Ugly Janitors. That sam-
pler LP only had one song for each
irtist, while "Variations 2" has
two for everybody.
So much for "going strong
Well, it's not that grim. Enigma
loes have those near gods, Mojo
ixon and the Dead Milkmen,
�vhich is really cool. And Wire,
too, which is great. But not much
else on here is on "the cutting edge
of rock and roll (also from the
iiner notes.)
The first two sides feature
�racks that have been previously
released. Sides three and four are
mostly from the vaults. Surely
there was more than two sides
worth of songs waiting to be sent
torth into the cold world of music
consumption.
TSOL is a nice surprise. Espe-
cially their cut, "Colors (Take Me
Away) It's some hard, Cult-
tinged ruck Onlv thev write liet
ter lyrics than the Cult, and don't
sound like Led Zep Jr.
SO, the group that told Stacey
Q "Surehoney, you can sing in the
band and thus turned her loose
in the world, turns in a cute instru-
mental and a damn funny song
that Big Audio Dynamite should
cover.
Both Don Dixon (hallowed be
thy name) and Wednesday Week
cover "Why And why not? Don
produces both the Week and
himself. They owe him a song or
two. Both versions are good, but
the girl from WVV is better kxik-
ing. Sorry Don.
I never heard of Peter Hammill,
but he is obviously schizo. He
can't decide if he's Buster Poin-
dexteror David Byrne. These two
cuts of his may be supposed to
show his versitilitv, but he's too
wimpy in either of his identities.
Mo jo's "Amsterdam Dogshit
Blues" is hilarious "Burn Down
the Malls" shows he's not infal-
lible and he only knows two or
three riffs. But when you're that
funny, who notices?
The Milkmen's The Thing that
only Eats Hippies" is required
listening for those who thought
punk was evaporating. Their un-
released "Stupid Maryann" is
fast, but not fast enough to save
it's stupid plot.
Plan 9 and Agent Orange are
throwaway LA bands, even
See ECLECTIC, page 8
presented in the pirate
comic and the book containing it
with similar horrifying results.
One of the Watchmen and a ship-
wrecked pirate mirror each other
as thev shoulder similar moral
dilemmas. The actions thev take
to solve each of their respective
problems are hell-bent with good
intentions.
Artist Dave Gibbons uses a
simple layout. For the most part,
"Watchmen' is told in regular
nine panel grids Thus, when full
page illustrations appear, the
dramatic impact is heightened.
See WATCHING, page 8
Songstress Anita Baker will appear in Minges on Nov. 1. Tickets are
on sale now at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall.
talents as a major, multi-faceted
artist.
Previously known as a jazz and
R&B vocalist, she oversaw her
debut Elektra album, "Rapture
as executive producer, and is fea-
tured as an arranger, composer
and musician.
Baker first experienced fame
when she was lead vocalist for the
group Chapter 8 from her home
city of Detroit. Afte the group's
first LP received only marginal
success, Baker returned to Dctriot
and took a nine to five job.
The Beverly Glen label tracked
her down and offered her a deal,
launching her 1983 'The Song-
stress" LP, and her popularity
began to grow. She later left Bev-
erly Glen and stgned with Elektra
Records, giving her license to cre-
ate "Rapture
Her hard work paid off with the
success of her new album. The
album climbed the charts and
won two Grammy awards in the
Rhythm and Blues category.
Baker took home the title of best
female vocalist, and her big hit,
"Sweet Love won best song.
For her performance in Novem-
ber, we can look forward to her
usual spirited and bubbly person-
ality, combined with a powerful,
three octave voice.
Some may not agree that
"Greenville has it all but we will
have the Fixx on October 8, and
Anita Baker on November 1 .Tick-
ets forbothshowsareon sale now.
The Fixx arc $7 for students and
$9 for all others For more infor-
mation call the central ticket office
at Mendenhall, 757-6611 ext. 266.
Ophir lectures
at art gallery
Gilad Ophir, an Israeli photog-
rapher currently working in New
York, will discuss his work Thurs-
day at 7:30 p.m. at Jenkins Audito-
rium.
Ophir will be on campus in
connection with Gray Art
Gallery's exhibi tion of hi s abstract
photographic art. His slide-lec-
ture will be followed by the
exhibit's opening reception in the
gallery at 8:30 p.m.
Captain Proofreader's secret identity
Professor writes to educate
By SHERRY DAISEY
Sl IN: '���
"it vou care about teachers then
vou ultimately care about stu-
dents said Dr. John Marshall
Carter, professor of Medieval
1 listorv, in an interview last Tues-
day
Carter is a native North Caro-
linian, born in what was
Leaksville now referred to as
Eden. This 39 year-old man, gre-
garious, humorous and extrovert-
ed' is quite an interesting charac-
ter.
1 le received a bachelor's degree
from Elon College, master's de-
gree in history from the Univer-
sity of North Carolina at Greens-
boro, and a doctorate in history
from the University of Illinois in
Champaign.
Carter has taught, supervised
and coached at the junior high
and high school levels in North
Carolina, Virginia and Illinois
before becoming a university
professor.
Carter is a gentleman scholar
and a rhythm guitarist. He con-
siders himself an all-around crazy
character. 1 must agree.
His office is cluttered with mis-
cellaneous viking-warrior, gar-
goyle-type trinkets and his walls
are covered with historic paint-
ings and photographs of castles
and knights-in-armor. He has
quite a collection of small porce-
lain mythical creatures such as
unicorns and flying horses. A
large oriental rug covers the floor.
Carter has published over 200
articles, essays, stories and
poems, along with four books.
His works have appeared in
many state and national journals
of history, English and education,
such as "Military Affairs
"American Benedictine Review
"Social Education and "The
Clearinghouse
His love of the English lan-
guage led him to create a series of
pamphlets on grammar and syn-
tax. In order to make the informa-
tion fun to learn. Carter devised a
character called Captain Proof-
reader. He would dress up in a
bright orange hunting suit, a
space helmet and carry around a
laser gun. His lessons would in-
clude practices of "zapping" out
common English errors.
He invented Captain Proof-
reader to instill in students an
enthusiasm for reading and writ-
ing. This somewhat bizarre idea
has sparked national recognition.
Other teachers around the coun-
try have invented similar charac-
ters such as General Grammar,
Professor Punctuation and Ser-
geant Syntax. He still performs
The book
Book reveals 'Confessions of a Space Cadet'
By SHERRY DAISEY
iff Write
"Confessions of a Space Cadet:
The Transformation of a
Teacher by Dr. John Marshall
Carter, Professor of Medieval
History at ECU. Hamilton Press.
$6.95.
In the book. Carter addresses
the question "What makes a good
teacher?" In tracing his own edu-
cational background (which was
very extensive) he provides the
reader with amusing anecdotes
about previous teachers who he
feels fit the mold of a "space ca-
det"
By his definition a space cadet is
"a teacher who is eccentric, crea-
tive, extroverted, honery, and a
bit of a hum
A space cadet is a teacher who is
out ot the ordinary (or on another
planet, as he would say) and de-
vises methods of learning that are
fun and memorable.
He thinks a teacher is not effec-
tive unless heshe provides a sin-
cere and whole-hearted effort in
"making connections and inte-
grating disciplines in order for
real understanding to occur In
the book he said, "knowledge
integration is at the ground and
root of Education
Another point he makes is, out-
standing teachers have the ability
to teach and communicate ideas
on a subject at different levels ol
the educational hierarchy
He dubs a space cadet as an
"individual who is intellectually
and culturally alive
By creating fictitious characters
such as Professor Ancient, Ms
Glamorpuss and Mrs. Shoe, he
portrays situations that are very
real to ail those involved in the
educational realm of our society
today.
The book appeals to the
reader's individual and humanis-
tic values and mores concerning
teaching and learning.
Carter's "Confessions
Space Cadet" is enjoyable, easy
read and humorous.
of a
�asytal
ECU professor John Marshall Carter stands posed for the cover of his
new cassette, "Trans-Atlantic Tete-A-Tete
his Captain Proofreader act for
students at the School of Educa-
tion.
When asked if Captain Proof-
reader was effective, he said, "The
method worked. The students
liked and appreciated my willing-
ness to entertain, to let my hair
down, to be different, to take a
chance This is just one of the
many devices Carter invented to
make learning fun for children.
Ultimately, Carter thinks that
"A teacher's main task is to help
students understand the good-
ness of the past and to see how
each part fits into the mosaic of
learning and life
He sums up his book by saying,
"It's a process of synchronicity
an assimilation of teachers' styles
and experiences He continued ,
"I wanted to provide beginning
and veteran teachers with the ex-
perience of one observer of
American Education
He has really enjoyed ECU the
four years he has been here. He
said, "I see myself in many of the
students, and it brings back
memories of when I was in col-
lege
His hobbies include basketball,
fishing, songwriting and per-
forming in a folk-rock band called
The Wampus Cats. He plays on a
basketball team along with a few
other ECU professors called the
Druid Dudes. The Wampus Cats
have released a single and are
currently working on an album.
His future plans include com-
pleting an extensive monograph
called "Sports in the Middle
Ages The manuscript is due in
July of 1988 and will be published
by the Greenwood Press. He is
also in the process of co-editing a
book called "Ritual to Record Side
by Side: Sports Quantification in
Pre-lndustrial Societies" which is
a product of an International
Association of Sports Historians
from Germany, Japan and the
United States.
�mil yy �!�
1

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setting up lor the Basketball Blowout.
Vou guvs are truely gentlement and
s. holars ! F C exec
l OS I Sel i keys on Phi Sigyna Pi key
M initj o! leased parking lot
metMh s and Reade Circle
UIKi'
: tC74
1Kk B
. . hensh those late, late
re spent together Stealing
moments at a time Mope-
mcountet will show how
mean to each other Love,
tESH VM' HOT Call tor last free
. - , a large pij get 2 liter
a small pia, get 2drinks
� s ! jmous IV.za 7S7-1278
1 1 ION Ml B11R1 OVERS: $.�9
irge pizza EVERY
" Famo Pizza Corner 10th -
rt s i p WITH A Rl Al Dl-
MMA YESTERDAY I saw there the
irolina Dance heater was com-
� the Theatre Arts Senes.
- ne'Which is right? THEA-
Rl haven t slept since
ied Help me decide Meet
- iditorium on Monday,
it 8 00 p.m .I'D be wearing
Sim ed 10OT Natural
HI BIKHrS Who live upstairs,
hang with mv Big
KTTl NTIONn t forget Alpha Xi O Wednesday s the BLST excuse j s classes
AUK KsinCHRISTIAN PELS' Wednesday 29 at 710 pm Fun -
N s'eaching
ML 'SOS we miss seeing n We love vou The � Vita Zeta
wtor the raging social and we 11 trv to keep truck - Love the Delta
T'l k PI �ist at the social � well no pain no eta
CHEAP FREI si da � MCOHOL. GOOD MUSIC, : ; hi-and more at theSig hour at Tequila Bar on Wednes s Maybe
NQLSIMQLPLAY
LQughfJ
, a ptmv bv Ndl
be part of a dinner-theatre
� n Thurs, Oct. 8 and Fn , Oct
; a- 6JI p m in the Mendenhall Audjto
rickets are now on sale at the Cen-
tra! Ticket Office in Mendenhall ECU
students is $10 and all others are $16 Call
now lor vour tickets - 757-6611, ext. 266
ALL TICKETS ARE BY ADVANCE
SALES NO TICKETS WILL BE SOLD AT
THE DOOR
DiY��LO
- s, iba diving snorkehng,
nng � ith friendly outgoing
� nen vou need to iom ECU'S Coral
� more into call 7S2-
1399 ai : ask i enrt or Rob
ATICOOPERATIVE f,p,
isne) �'� r.d will be on campus
Students for spring semester
1 Is from al! maiors are encouraged
Merchandise food, and
ms among other positions are
- : tatives will beat ECU
� ; Contact the office of
� � �� Ed in the Rawl Bldg for
WOMEN'S SOTTCTI Ctim
c.r.s interested in playing on the
- Soccer Team should con-
L NLRS155-4644 ' This dub offers
� �.ile for Madrigalfor travel tn competition
at 7 00 p m ins 1 ools ihe team is coached by
3 US- i h Charlie Harvey
he festr- :ties � in iwrestling: clijb
cetMare $ C for ECU� rested in wrestling this
ail others Call thelul team please call Tom
it 6611 . � 266. 1660 Old and new mem-
s
a
��
a
n
m
a
a
a
ITION
OF 1988
jrsing career'? The Air
jram for 1988 BSNs. If
ze active duty soon
vaiting for the
ds To apply, you must
(age and meet other
Irements As a newly
lull attend a five-
(ajor Air Force medical
ay to prepare for the
:es you'll have serving
;e nurse professional.
butcher
14 7 1 Collect
rOUCi
.J
1
i
Till I ASI CAROI INIAN
Styje
SEPTEMBER 29, 1987 Page 7
ECU hosts Fixx, Anita Baker
The Fixx, shown here in a publicity photo, will appear in Minxes Coliseum Oct. 8 as part of Homecom-
ng week festivities at ECU. Tickets are $7 for students and are available at the Central Ticket Office.
DC comics releases 'Watchmen'graphic
novel; super heroes now literarily legitimate
By LARISSA TRIVETT
Stiff WilTf
Whoever printed the bumper
sticker "Greenville has it all"
obviously knew about upcoming
attractions here.
The Fixx, a British rock band,
will perform in Minges Coliseum
next month. Soul singer Anita
Baker is coming in November.
The Fixx has enjoyed great suc-
cess with albums such as "Phan-
tom "Reach the Beach "React
"Shattered Room" and "Walka-
bout Like most bands, the Fixx
came from rather modest begin-
nings. They began by playing
small gigs in London.
Lead vocalist Cy Cumin, who
was supporting himself by win-
ning fishing tournaments, met
drummer Adam Woods while
they were attending the same
London drama school. Cumin
joined a band that Woods played
in at a show at the school, and they
hit it off.
Later, the two advertised for a
keyboard player. Rupert Green-
hall was the only one to answer
the ad � he got the job. The band
also includes Jamie West-Oram,
and Danny K. Brown.
In an interview in Rolling Stone
Magazine, Woods said it was the
first time he had met someone
who could write songs and un-
derstood the power of words to
the extent he did when he was a
student. Woods said they aimed
their creative expressiveness at
the generation who could appre-
ciate it, and they made it big.
The Fixx puts much of their own
beliefs into the intense lyrics of
their music. The subjects include
anything from nuclear war to
social fascism.
Whether you get into the anti-
nuke verses or the popular beat of
the Fixx's music, the upcoming
show promises to be an exciting
one.
On the other end of the music
spectrum, R&B vocalist, Anita
Baker will be showcasing her
Bv CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Suff Writer
Tins could be the comic book
that ends up in college literature
ooks within the next 20 years.
With the "Watchmen" graphic
ovel, writer Man Moore has est-
ablished super hero characters as
iable as Holdert Caulfield. Mo-
tives, dialogue and situations are
is real as gum under a desk
But perhaps the book's greatest
strength is its liberal usage of a
technique not possible in stan-
dard prose, and largely ignored in
film visual irony.
Some o this is used to a humor-
ous effect. As a reporter interro-
gates the multi-powered Dr.
Manhattan, saying "Am 1 starting
tc make you feel uncomfortable?"
the caption crosses to an ad jioning
panel where the Silk Spectre, in-
volved in a mugging attempt.
knees a crook in the groin
A major portion ot the irony is
concerned with the perception ol
time. For Dr. Manhattan, tune
does not flow in one line, rather, it
is a painting iewed all al once.
Enigma tries hard
Bv CHIPPY BONEHEAD
SimH Mntrr
�� � 9m m ' � I j-i ' �
Fm?xmfl r ��cords tries hard.
1 hev started in 1982 (according
to the album lint, r notes) and are
u ing strong in 1987 Well,
� s great, but vou have to re-
member, this is the label that
markets Strvper, the only heavy
. hand endorsed bv erry
Fa well.
At least they aren't on this
mpilation. "Enigma Variations
is all the stronger for that. And
� s cheaper than the first "Vari-
ns" released in 1US4.
Back then, they had a wider
of artists such as Tex and
iorseheads and John Trubee
ind the Ugly Janitors. That sam-
pler LP only had one song for each
irtist, while "Variations 2" has
two for everybody.
So much for "going strong
Well, it's not that grim. Enigma
ioes have those near gods, Mojo
ixon and the Dead Milkmen,
��. hich is really cool. And Wire,
which is great. But not much
� soon here ison" the cutting edge
of rock and roll (also from the
nor notes.)
The first two sides feature
racks that have been previously
released. Sides three and four are
mostly from the vaults. Surely
there was more than two sides
worth of songs waiting to be sent
� orth into the cold world of music
consumption.
TSOL is a nice surprise. Espe-
cially their cut, "Colors (Take Me
Away) Its some hard, Cult
tinged rock. Onk they write bet
tor Ivrics than the Cult, and don't
sound like Led Zep lr.
SSQ, the group that told Stacey
Q "Surehoney, vou can sing in tl ie
band and thus turned her loose
in the world, turns in a cute instru-
mental and a damn funny song
that Big Audio Dynamite should
cover.
Both Don Dixon (hallowed be
thv name) and Wednesday Week
cover "Why And why not? Don
produces both the Week and
himself. Thev owe him a song or
two. Both versions are good, but
the girl from WW is better lock-
ing. Sorrv Don.
1 never heard of Peter 1 lammill,
but he is obviously schizo. He
can't decide if he's Buster Poin-
dexteror David Byrne. These two
cuts of his may be supposed to
show his versitility, but he's too
wimpv in either oi his identities.
Mojo's "Amsterdam Dogshit
Blues" is hilarious "Burn Down
the Malls" shows he's not infal-
lible and he only knows two Ol
three riffs. But when you're that
funny, who notices?
The Milkmen's "The Tiling that
only Eats Hippies" is required
listening for those who thought
punk was evaporating. Their un-
released "Stupid Maryann" is
fast, but not fast enough to save
it's stupid plot.
Plan 9 and Agent Orange are
throwaway LA bands, even
See ECLECTIC, page 8
rhisespei iallyevident towards
the end, when he speaks to one
person in his present and one in
his future. They ask him unre-
lated questions, and his single
reply answers both.
Another theme hit upon is isola-
tion. A supporting character is
shown reading a comic book
which allegorically summarizes
the plot ol "Watchmen
The philosophy ol "the needs of
the main outweighs the needs of
the tow is presented in the pirate
comic and the book containing it
with similar horrifying results.
('iif ot the Watchmen and a ship-
w recked pirate mirror each other
as thev shoulder similar moral
dilemmas. The actions thev take
to solve each of their respective
problems are hell-bent with good
intentions.
Artist Dave Gibbons uses a
simple layout. For the most part,
"Watchmen" is told in regular
nine panel grids. Thus, when full
page illustrations appear, the
dramatic impact is heightened.
See WATCHING, page 8
Songstress Anita Baker will appear in Minges on Nov. 1. Tickets are
on sale now at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall.
talents as a major, multi-faceted
artist.
Previously known as a jazz and
R&B vocalist, she oversaw her
debut Elektra album, "Rapture
as executive producer, and is fea-
tured as an arranger, composer
and musician
Baker first experienced fame
when she was lead vocalist for the
group Chapter 8 from her home
city of Detroit. Afte the group's
first LP received only marginal
success. Baker returned to Detriot
and took a nine to five job.
The Beverly Glen label tracked
her down and offered her a deal,
launching her 1983 'The Song-
stress" LP, and her popularity
began to grow. She later left Bev-
erly Glen and signed with Elektra
Records, giving her license to cre-
ate "Rapture
Her hard work paid off with the
success of her new album. The
album climbed the charts and
won two Grammy awards in the
Rhythm and Blues category.
Baker took home the title of best
female vocalist, and her big hit,
"Sweet Love won best song.
For her performance in Novem-
ber, we can look forward to her
usual spirited and bubbly person-
ality, combined with a powerful,
hree octave voice.
Some may not agree that
Greenville has it all but we will
tave the Fixx on October 8, and
oiita Baker on November 1 Tick-
ts for both showsareon sale now.
The Fixx are $7 for students and
�9 for all others. For more infor-
nationcall the central ticket office
t Mendenhall, 757-6611 ext. 266.
Ophir lectures
it art gallery
Gilad Ophir, an Israeli photog-
apher currently working in New
York, will discuss his work Thurs-
day at 7:30 p.m. at Jenkins Audito-
rium.
Ophir will be on campus in
connection with Gray Art
Gallery's exhibition of his abstract
photographic art. His slide-lec-
ture will be followed by the
exhibit's opening reception in the
gallery at 8:30 p.m.
Captain Proofreader's secret identity
Professor writes to educate
By SHERRY DAISEY
v " " ��'���
"If vou care about teachers then
vou ultimately care about stu-
dents said Dr. John Marshall
Carter, professor of Medieval
1 listory, in an interview last Tues-
day.
Carter is a native North Caro-
linian, born in what was
1 eaksvillc now referred to as
Eden. This 19 year-old man, gre-
garious, humorous and extrovert-
edy is quite an interesting charac-
ter.
I Ie received a bachelor's degree
from Elon College, master's de-
gree in history from the Univer-
sity of North Carolina at Greens-
boro, and a doctorate in history
from the University of Illinois in
Champaign.
Carter has taught, supervised
and coached at the junior high
The book
Book reveals 'Confessions of a Space Cadet'
By SHERRY DAISEY
o�� mm
"Confessions of a Space Cadet:
The Transformation of �
Teacher by Dr. John Marshall
Carter, Professor of Medieval
History at E.CU. Hamilton Press.
$6.95.
In the book. Carter addresses
the question "What makes a good
teacher?" In tracing his own edu-
cational background (which was
very extensive) he provides the
reader with amusing anecdotes
about previous teachers who he
feels fit the mold of a "space ca-
det"
By his definition a space cadet is
"a teacher who is eccentric, crea-
tive, extroverted, honery, and a
bit of a hum
A space cadet is a teacher who is
out of the ordinary (or on another
planet, as he would say) and de-
vises methods of learning that are
fun and memorable.
He thinks a teacher is not effec-
tive unless heshe provides a sin-
cere and whole-hearted effort in
"making connections and inte-
grating disciplines in order for
real understanding to occur In
the book he said, "knowledge
integration is at the ground and
root of Education
Another point he makes is, out-
standing teachers have the ability
to teach and communicate ideas
on a subject at different levels of
the educational hierarchy.
He dubs a space cadet as an
"individual who is intellectually
and culturally alive
By creating Fictitious characters
such as Professor Ancient, Ms.
Glamorpuss and Mrs. Shoe, he
portrays situations that are very
real to all those involved in the
educational realm of our society
today.
The book appeals to the
reader's individual and humanis-
tic values and mores concerning
teaching and learning.
Carter's "Confessions of a
Space Cadet" is enjoyable, easy tc
read and humorous.
and high school levels in North
Carolina, Virginia and Illinois
before becoming a university
professor.
Carter is a gentleman scholar
and a rhythm guitarist. He con-
siders himself an all-around crazy
character. I must agree.
His office is cluttered with mis-
cellaneous viking-warrior, gar-
goyle-type trinkets and his walls
are covered with historic paint-
ings and photographs of castles
and knights-in-armor. He has
quite a collection of small porce-
lain mythical creatures such as
unicorns and flying horses. A
large oriental rug covers the floor.
Carter has published over 200
articles, essays, stories and
poems, along with four books.
His works have appeared in
many state and national journals
of history, English and education,
such as "Military Affairs
it
"American Benedictine Review
"Social Education and "The
Clearinghouse
His love of the English lan-
guage led him to create a series of
pamphlets on grammar and syn-
tax. In order to make the informa-
tion fun to learn, Carter devised a
character called Captain Proof-
reader. He would dress up in a
bright orange hunting suit, a
space helmet and carry around a
laser gun. His lessons would in-
clude practices of "zapping" out
common English errors.
He invented Captain Proof-
reader to instill in students an
enthusiasm for reading and writ-
ing. This somewhat bizarre idea
has sparked national recognition.
Other teachers around the coun-
try have invented similar charac-
ters such as General Grammar,
Professor Punctuation and Ser-
geant Syntax. He still performs
wfe&smi
ECU professor John Marshall Carter stands posed for the cover of his
new cassette, Trans-Atlantic Tete-A-Tete
his Captain Proofreader act for
students at the School of Educa-
tion.
When asked if Captain Proof-
reader was effective, he said, "The
method worked. The students
liked and appreciated my willing-
ness to entertain, to let my hair
down, to be different, to take a
chance This is just one of the
many devices Carter invented to
make learning fun for children.
Ultimately, Carter thinks that
"A teacher's main task is to help
students understand the good-
ness of the past and to see how
each part fits into the mosaic of
learning and life
He sums up his book by saying,
"It's a process of synchronicity
an assimilation of teachers' styles
and experiences He continued ,
"I wanted to provide beginning
and veteran teachers with the ex-
perience of one observer of
American Education
He has really enjoyed ECU the
four years he has been here. He
said, "I see myself in many of the
students, and it brings back
memories of when I was in col-
lege
His hobbies include basketball,
fishing, songwriting and per-
forming in a folk-rock band called
The Wampus Cats. He plays on a
basketball team along with a few
other ECU professors called the
Druid Dudes. The Wampus Cats
have released a single and are
currently working on an album.
His future plans include com-
pleting an extensive monograph
called "Sports in the Middle
Ages The manuscript is due in
July of 1988 and will be publ ished
by the Greenwood Press. He is
also in the process of co-editing a
book called "Ritual to Record Side
by Side: Sports Quantification in
Pre-lndustrial Societies" which is
a product of an International
Association of Sports Historians
from Germany, Japan and the
United States.
wmmumn �itm
� � �

x
1






8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 29,1987

L
t f
Michener's 'Legacy' reflects America's past
"Legacy By James A. Mich-
ener. Random House. 176 Paecs
$lr��5.
lames A. Michener is best
known tor very long novels
crammed with encylopedic de-
tail. But Michener is quite capable
Of turning out good short fiction
and he has done so with "Leg-
acy
More a collection of related
vignettes attached a bit too obvi-
ously to a contemporary news
event, "Legacy is a highly per-
sonal view of the history of Amer-
ica.
Asked why he wrote the book,
Michener said, "1 wanted to con-
struct a short novel that would
compress a great deal of Ameri-
can history and American values
in a brief space That he has done.
The book is narrarated by a
dedicated Army officer named
Norman Starr, who, while attend-
ing to the National Security Coun-
cil, has done some things that a
congressional committee on the
Iran-contra matter wants to ask
him about.
With a weekend to go before he
is due to appear, Starr - who re-
lieves "my actions were inspired
by patriotism, my conviction that
Communism is a deadly peril,
and my belief that the free world
must not sit back and let the Reds
run rampant" - reviews the his-
tory of his family. His thoughts
make for interesting as well as
educational reading.
There wasa Starr on the scene at
the beginning. Jared Starr fought
in the Continental Army and
"served in the final battle of the
Revolution at Yorktown, 1781
His son, Simon, helped to draft
and then signed the Constitution.
Another Starr, Edmund, was a
judge on the U.S. Supreme Court,
and Hugh Starr fought for the
South during the Civil War.
Norman's father won the Medal
of Honor during World War II.
Norman was decorated for battle-
field valor during the Vietnam
War.
While Michener's retelling of
the American story is relatively
brief, it also is packed with fasci-
nating detail. That the writing is
good goes without saying.
Watching 'Watchmen' watch success
Continued from page 7
But even the small panels are
crammed with detail, none of it
arbitrary. The first and last images
oi the book contain the "llwc a
nice day" smiley face, one
smeared with blood, the other
with ketchup. This reinforces Dr.
Manhattan's cryptic last words,
"Nothing ever ends" visually.
The chapters are interspersed
with excerpts from books, articles
and interviews written by the
characters. Moore's personas all
have an authentic, seperate voice.
From the monotone ravings of the
upeompromising Rorschach to
the condescending reporting of
journalist Doug Roth, all the play-
ers w rite and speak with a unique
identity.
1 he question ot sanity comes up
a lot. The heroes are extreme per-
sonalities and often wonder if
they and their colleagues are still
rational. The Comedian is an at-
tempted rapist and three oi the
heroes are ga
But others are stable enough,
using their heroics to live out fan-
tasies or as stepping stones to
tame. But as Hollis Mason, the
first Nite Owl writes, "Yes, we
were crazy, we were kinkv, we
were Nazis all thus things that
people saw We were also doing
something because we believed in
it"
The story spans fourdecadeson
an Earth where ordinary people
put on some costumes to fight
crime. Then a true super-powered
adventurer appears. America
wins the Vietnam war and Nixon
is reelected twice. Plausible
enough, given the presence of a
demigod like Dr. Manhattan.
Fiction works if suspension of
Eclectic Enigma
Continued from page 7
though Plan 9 is from Rhode Is-
land. Cliched lyrics and stolen
melodies tend io drag a song
down.
Enigma tries hard. 1 have more
respect for a label that will sign
unknown artists than 1 do for one
that world premieres Michael
son network televi-
hen your artist stable
gets crowded with bands like
ison, Ratt andStryper, and you
try to sell yourself as "eclectic"
liner note's)
ou might as well sign
i ato a and Rebbie. Now that's
n istv.
disbelief is achcived and sus-
tained throughout. Critics have
argued Moore sacrificed content
for form. While the climax is al-
most absurd, the plot behind it is
not. If one accepts a human that
can reassemble himself from
nothing, the crucial turning point
oi the story is as weak as it seems
at first reading.
Moore and Gibbons are a me-
ticulous team. Ramifications and
resonances of situations in
"Watchmen" are explored in
depth. Relationships between
characters could easily have be-
come costumed soap orera fare.
But these people are treated with
integrity.
In a weirdly unexpected move,
20th Century Fox has bought the
movie rights to the "Watchmen"
saga. Alan Moore is slowly phas-
ing out of comics to write novels
and screenplays. Coincidence?
Synchronicituy?
This book was obviously
birthed from a fascination with
mystery novels, science fiction
and of course , comic books. The
Wathcmen heroes began their
careers under those same influ-
ences. If the movie i�; nrnduroH
perhaps some of the MTV genera-
tion will notice it and be thus in-
spired.
"Nothing ever ends
Hillcrest Lanes
Memorial Drive
756-2020
FREE
GAME
Bowl One Game & Receive
Another Game FREE With
This Coupon.
Limit 1 Coupon Per Person.
WALT DISNEY WORLD
COLLEGE PROGRAM
Walt Disney World representatives will present
an information session on the Walt Disney
World College Program on September 29 at
7:00 PM in Joyner Library, Room 221 (Old
Joyner). Attendance at this presentation is
required to interview for the Spring College
Program, January-May, 1988.
Major(s) considered: Hospitality, Speech
Communications, Business and Recreation.
For more information, contact: Dan Schull at
757-6979.
alt rlisneM World
AKl l(X$ OPPORTUNITY IMP,
PARTY
AjNIMALS
830-1823
Balloons Delivered
in Costumes
Gorilla - Grams
Gator - Grams
Penguin for Hire
At The End of Your
ROPE
Call 757-6661
ECU
Counseling
(Center
If they won't tell you about it,
then you know it must be great.
Purpk Pass on" 0 oe bathtub the con
and onto the se'Ves o yc' favor e ;� �-
Discover � for course �
INSTANT REPLAY
�One Hour Color Prints
�One Hour Color
Enlargements
�One Hour Wallets
�Video Transfer
�Slides and Black & White
�Film, Cameras, Frames
and Albums
�Passport and Visa Photos
�Studio Photography
O
KC
FREE
2nd Set
Of Prints
At time of processing
c FREE
Enlargement
With Purchase
Of Any Equal
Value Color
Enlargement
coupon exptrti 10-4V87
c FREE
Developing
$1.99 Value
Por Each Roll
Developed ft Printed
COMING ATTRACTIONS
M
W
KV
Tonight
Make It
v Mexican!
Enjoy one of Chico's delicious
Mexican Specialties
Such As
Fajitas San Antonio For wo o. j -out
We marinate tender stripe of beef or chicken
and then grilled to perfection and eerred at you
table In a ataaibq, platter with flour tortillas,
quacamole and hot sauce and beans, so you can
make you own soft tacos.
For Two Only s" 1 9f
For Four Only s21()()
Try one of our delightful Margueritns oi choose
from 7 different Mexion Been,1
September 29th at 7:00 p.m.
BINGOICE CREAM
PARTY
Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room
Admission: 25
Wednesday
September 30th at 8:00 p.m.
Movie:
CHILDREN OF A
LESSER GOD
October 1-4 at 8:00 p.m.
Movie:
THE MORNING AFTER
October 1 at 8:00 p.m.
Coffeehouse Auditions
Coffeehouse
September 24-October 22
Mendenhall Gallery
Visual Arts Committee Presents
"MAGIC OF MEN"
Exhibition
For more information, contact the
Student Union at 757 6611, ext 210.
A Genera Assembly Meeting will held on Wednesday. September 30 1987
at 5:00 p.m. m Room 221. All Student Union Members are urged to attend
i I
Mf�iknn ftwirmrunt
521 Cotanche St � Greenville 757-1666
����� oui to uwvr iau
lthenn3 place
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Getting i
HOPKINS, Minn. (AD - Cant
interest a publisher in vour new
book? Self-publishing mav be the
answer, say members of the Min-
nesota Independent Publishers
Association.
"I think most everybody ha-
thought they'd like to write a
book says Nancy Radcliff Ed-
wards, the association's presi-
dent
But what the unknown writer
thinks is a great idea mav not fire
the imagination of an established
publisher, she says, even though
the book might have sales poten-
tial.
"The Minnesota Publishers and
Producers Directory" estimates
there are between 1,200 and
publishers in the state prod .
books, magazines and newspa-
pers, but Edwards said there was
no breakdown for book publish-
ers.
Outside New York, however,
Cahfornj
are amtii
number i
S3 id V
dent of it
In Mir
pubhsheJ
varied al
hunting,
med. �'
self-help
children
rap
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book -
inte-
tiona! int
Callet
detract!
list
busu
career
bt sa.
wr �
learnir :
Then
you if t
parents
record c
reached
That s w
for My
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great set
a hit
Hallyc
his faiht
Srner. Da
has both
Not j
his fa the!
ay sa
able � -
liked mv
relate md
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stav there!
Hallyda
sister, Lai
is an act
audition
told then
small Shi
she's goinj
H ally day acts in ne
David Hallyday acts in his first
film, a new comedy release called
"He's My Girl and he's making
his first record.
If his name sounds familiar al-
ready it's because he s the son of
those French singing stars, now
divorced, Sylvie Vartan and
Johnny Hallyday. Johnny Hal-
lyday also is in a new French film.
playing dad in "Family Busi-
ness
"I was born with music 21-
year-old David Hallyday savs
"All I could think about was
music, every single minute oi the
day. Music was mv passion !
started at four to take piano les-
sons. When I was in school, I spent
my time tapping pencils on the
table.
"I didn't think about show busi-
ness. I knew I wanted to be a
musician and singer; wherever it
took me, I just wanted to do that
Interest in acting is a recent
development. He says, "1 love
movie. And music has a big in-
"fluence on movies, fsaid, 'Mavbe
I can do both. I can start acting
too, and that might be real inter-
esting
"There's nothing like acting in a
movie and writing all the songs
j for it He sings twice in "He's Mv
j Girl songs he didn't write. He
wroteonesong, "SheCan Dance
j for the picture, which his mother
sings during a scene where Hal-
; lyday and his "girlfriend" dance
He composed the theme song
i for the film "Lady Beware
"I like to create things. When
: you write songs and play music,
you're creating. In the movie I
acted myself. It was pretty hard
for me; I know myself so well
Hallyday says.
Hallyday was bom in Paris,
lived there until he was 10 and
after that divided his year be-
tween America and Europe. His
mother lives in Los Angeles, and
he has a home there, too.
His album will be distributed
by Columbia Records, made for a
label owned by the Scotti Broth-
ers, who also released "He's My
Girl In that picture, he plavs an
aspiring rocker in Missouri who
wins a trip to Los Angeles for two.
The second person to take the trip
has to be his girlfriend. He wants
to � and does � take his man-
ager, which gives actor T.K. Car-
ter a chance to be funny wearing
dresses, big wigs and makeup.
Hallyday was already signed to
Scotti Brothers for recording
when he auditioned for the
movie. His album has been in the
works for two and a half years.
Hallyday says the album will
come out at the end of this year.
"It'll be all my music and I sang
and played all the instruments on
it, mostly synthesizers. It sounds
like a five-piece band. I wrote
songs with a lyricist, Lisa Cohen,
in Los Angeles
His album will have pop-rock,
Peter Gabriel-type music, Hal-
lyday says. "You don't steal mu-
sic or melodies. You take a feel
and you make it your own. Some
have a real heavy groove, like
Janet Jackson's songs, dancing
rock songs.
"I don't writea lot of rock songs.
I wouldn't consider mv album
J
rock; I consider rock like Bon Jovi
and Van Halen
His favorite songs in the up-
coming album are "Move in
which a friend warns about a
sexy, beautiful girl who'll move
you but let you down in a minute;
"The Shadow Side an aggres-
sive, slow dance tune, and
"Higher a ballad about being on
top of the world.
Ladie:
Bring V id

�-V-





crest Lanes
756 2020
REE
AME
no �!v Receive
I
VRKK With I
s v 'oupon.
ou've never heard of it,
ask your folks.
iey won't tell you about it,
you k now it must be great.
JT' gatherin3 place
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 29,1987
Getting involved in the publishing business
HOPKINS, Minn. (AD - Can't
interest a publisher in your new
book? Self-publishing may be the
answer, say members of the Min-
nesota Independent Publishers
Association.
1 think most everybody has
thought they'd like to write a
book says Nancy Radcliff Ed-
wards, the association's presi-
dent.
But what the unknown writer
thinks is a great idea may not fire
the imagination of an established
publisher, she says, even though
the book might have sales poten-
tial.
"The Minnesota Publishers and
Producers Directory" estimates
there are between 1,200 and 1,400
publishers in the state producing
Ivoks, magazines and newspa-
pers, but Edwards said there was
no breakdown for book publish-
ers.
Outside New York, however,
California, Texas and Minnesota
are among the top states for the
number of books being produced,
said Marlin Brec, a former presi-
dent of the state association.
In Minnesota, there are self-
published books on subjects as
varied as cooking, fishing, art,
hunting, Minnesota data, humor,
medicine, morel mushrooms,
solf-help, travel, poetry, law,
children's activities and photog-
raphy.
Self-published books in Minne-
sota range in price from $2.25 for a
small, self-help paperback to
$1,500 for a limited edition artist's
book. Some are of purely regional
interest, while others are of na-
tional interest.
Called "vanity publishing" by
detractors, success in self-pub-
lishing requires considerable
business acumen. The self-pub-
lisher is responsible for making all
decisons regarding publication,
from selecting typeface and paper
to choosing a printer, and then
marketing and distributing the
book.
Edwards, an artist and former
elementary school teacher, got
into the publishing business abut
three years ago when she began
work on "With Love From My
Kitchen a blank recipe book in-
tended for people who want to
share their special recipes with
friends and relatives.
She did sketches for each of the
2(S4 pages of the recipe book, a
ring-binder edition with tab sec-
tions to separate categories, and
had 1,000 copies printed.
"We put the books together
page by page trom tables all over
the house she said of the meager
beginnings of Paint Box Studiosat
her home in this Minneapolis
suburb.
The book sold and she ordered a
second printing of 5,000 copies,
then a third of 10,000. She now
orders two printings a year of
15,000 copies each and pays to
have the books assembled.
"We just sold our 50,000th copy.
My printingbillsareover $100,000
a year now. I never dreamed my
book would sell this much said
Edwards, whose book is sold for
$16.95 in gift stores.
"You can do this on your own.
You don't have to go through a
big publisher Of course, you
have to do a lot more work
Edwards said.
After the book is written, there's
marketing. "I first thought if you
had something good, people
would just track you down. No
way she said.
The marketing is where many
self-publishers fail, she said.
Large bookstore chains virtu-
ally always turn down independ-
ent publishers because the sales
potential of the books is so uncer-
tain with unknown writers, she
said.
What self-publishers do, she
said, is peddle their books indi-
vidually to bookstores, which
usually stipulate that they be al-
lowed to return unsold copies.
Bree recalled marketing the first
of his company's seven books in
1932.
"On our first book, the truck
pulled up with our books and we
thought, 'What do we do with it?'
We put it in the middle of the
living room so every day we had
to stumble over that pile of books
until we got rid of them. It took at
least two or three months on that
first press run Bree said.
Once bookstores or, in Ed-
wards' case, gift shops agree to
carry the books, they have to be
shipped.
"The most boring job in the
business is shipping, billing and
collecting the money Edwards
said.
The process can be dishearten-
ing for some new publishers, she
noted.
"People will have this 'great
idea They'll put it together and
publish it and sell a few copies.
Then they have to make a deci-
sion. Do they want to continue? Is
it worth the effort? Some of them
are just glad to get rid of that first
printing and get the heck out of
there Edwards said.
She cautions that self-publish-
ing is not a get-rich-quick busi-
ness.
"It would take a number of
years to get to the point of being
able to support a family" in most
cases "But if you enjoy it, it would
be worth it Edwards said.
Hallyday acts in new movie

David Hallyday acts in his first
film, a new comedy release called
'He's My Girl and he's making
his first record.
It his name sounds familiar al-
ready it's because he's the son of
those French singing stars, now
divorced, Sylvie Vartan and
ohnny Hallyday. lohnny Hal-
lyday also is in a new French film,
playing dad in "Family Busi-
ness
"I was born with music 21-
vear-old David Hallyday says.
"All I could think about was
music, every single minute of the
dav. Music was mv passion. I
started at four to take piano les-
sons. When I was in school, 1 spent
mv time tapping pencils on the
table.
"I didn't think about showbusi-
ness. I knew I wanted to be a
musician and singer; wherever it
took me, I just wanted to do that
Interest in acting is a recent
development. He says, "I love
f a movies. Apd music has a big in-
fluence on'movies. I said, Mavbe
I can do both. I can start acting,
too, and that might be real inter-
esting
"There's nothing like acting in a
movie and writing all the songs
for it He sings twice in "He's My
Girl songs he didn't write. He
wrote one song, "She Can Dance
for the picture, which his mother
sings during a scene where Hal-
lyday and his "girlfriend" dance.
He composed the theme song
for the film "Lady Beware
"I like to create things. When
you write songs and play music,
you're creating. In the movie !
acted myself. It was pretty hard
for me; I know myself so well
Hallyday says.
Hallyday was bom in Paris,
lived there until he was 10 and
after that divided his year be-
tween America and Europe. His
mother lives in Los Angeles, and
he has a home there, too.
His album will be distributed
by Columbia Records, made for a
label owned by the Scotti Broth-
ers, who also released "He's My
Girl In that picture, he plays an
aspiring rocker in Missouri who
wins a trip to Los Angeles for two.
The second person to take the trip
has to be his girlfriend. He wants
to � and does � take his man-
ager, which gives actor T.K. Car-
ter a chance to be funny wearing
dresses, big wigs and makeup.
Hallyday was already signed to
Scotti Brothers for recording
when he auditioned for the
movie. His album has been in the
works for two and a half years.
Hallyday says the album will
come out at the end of this year.
"It'll be all my music and I sang
and played all the instruments on
it, mostly synthesizers. It sounds
like a five-piece band. I wrote
songs with a lyricist, Lisa Cohen,
in Los Angeles
His album will have pop-rock,
Peter Gabriel-type music, Hal-
lyday says. "You don't steal mu-
sic or melodies. You take a feel
and you make it your own. Some
have a real heavy groove, like
Janet Jackson's songs, dancing
rock songs.
"I don't write a lot of rock songs.
I wouldn't consider my album
rock; I consider rock like Bon Jovi
and Van Halen
His favorite songs in the up-
coming album are "Move in
which a friend warns about a
sexy, beautiful girl who'll move
you but let you down in a minute;
"The Shadow Side an aggres-
sive, slow dance tune, and
"Higher a ballad about being on
top of the world.
Next year, Hallyday intends to
tour with his still-unnamed band,
which performed with him in the
movie.
Hallyday says he toured in Ja-
pan two and a half vears ago.
"I had a single there, with Scotti
Brothers. It wasn't released here.
It was kind of an experiment; it
was right at the beginning of my
career. I didn't write the song. I
was still learning how to write
he says.
"I can't even count them. I
wrote so many songs while 1 was
learning Hallvday savs.
"There are always people to tell
you if they're good. 1 had mv
parents and the chairman of the
record company. I worked until I
reached the point they said,
That's what you've been looking
for Mv mom is the toughest critic
I could have. She has got a really
great sense of what is going to be
a hit
Hallvday is the stage name that
his father took; his real name is
Smct. David Hallyday's passport
has both Hallvday and Smct.
Not only docs he not sound like
his father's singing voice, Hal-
lyday says, but he wouldn't be
able to sound like him. "I always
liked my parents' music. I could
relate more to my dad's music
because it was rock Johnny
Hallyday isn't well known in
America. "1 think he was so fa-
mous in Europe he just wanted to
stay there his son says.
Hallyday has a 4-year-old half-
sister, Laura, in Paris. "Her mom
is an actress. She went for an
audition for a commercial and
told them, 'I know I'm rather
small She's a character, i think
she's going to be an actress
��� UIUi
IF YOU WANT TO BE
A PHYSICIAN,
WE'LL PAY FOR IT.
If you re willing to invest your skills
and knowledge as an Air Force
medical office we'll invest in you
and pay your way through medical
school It's the Armed Forces Health
Professions Scholarship Program
It pays for
Tuition,
Books, supplies equipment and
lab fees,
Plus a monthly income of more
than $550
Call
TSgt Ken McCullen
(919)850-9673
Station to Station Collect
P A R A D
S E
OdC&M
329 Arlington
I rf B,vd
rMi
756-1579
ALL HAIR SERVICES
MAKEUP-MANICURES
TANNING BEDS
i
20 Discount Off Any Service.
Good Through 10-15-87
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PETEY HATHAWAY, Owner
W
"is
& FIT
Present
The Fall
Bikini Contest
& Elbo Male Strippers
Ladies 50 C Guys $2.00
95 Tails &. Coolers All Nite
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wElbo Male Strippers
10:30 til 2' Bikini Contest
Prizes
1st - $100 cash
2nd - $50 cash
3rd - $25 cash
Ladies can sign up at the Elbo - Doors open at 9:00
Bring this ad In for an Elbo Membership for only $1.00. Buy now Before October 21.
FROM
ANTIGUA$269
ARUBA$279
NASSAU$149
FREEPORT$119
BARBADOS$299
CURACAO$259
DOMINICAN REP.$259
GUADELOUPE$349
JAMAICA$199
MARTINIQUE$349
PUERTO RICO$259
ST CROIX$269
ST LUCIA$309
ST MAARTIN$279
ST THOMAS$269
TRINIDAD$309
All prices par parson doubt occupancy, included is airfare READ rom R�l�'9h on Eastern Airlines, and 3 nights hotel Longer � ur- �'��� available. Hotel upgrades available. Meals, taxes, tips. THE service charges not included. Rates based on Monday depar CiKjc tures-available other days at slightly higher rates. 7 day ad-sefE v�nee purchase required. Prices subject to change. Program PRINT valid un,il 0cmbr 1S- 1987 Nc available November 24-30,
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i





rm-HASTt AROMNIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 29, 1987 Page 10
Simpson paces Pirates to 16-13 comeback win
fc dlfc 4fi� 'v1 ' 3 "�?�, i By TIM CHANDLER who had earlier in the quarter mis fell into the same fumble tr

Victory
scenes
The Pirates, without a
doubt, had a tremen-
dous struggle on their
hands Saturday before
they rallied to defeat
Georgia Southern, 16-
.?. The victory was
highlighted by some
spectacular kickoff re-
turns and tailback runs
from Reggie McKinney
(top) and also by the
s warm ing defense
(left), which kept pres-
sure on Golden Eagle
quarterback Ken
Hurnette all afternoon.
Photos by Klbert kennard ECU
Sports Information
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports d it or
What goes around, comes
around.
On many occasions in the last
several years, ECU came out as the
loser in games which it seemed it
should have won. However, Satur-
day in the Pirates' 16-13 victory
over Georgia Southern, old lady
luck smiled on the players in purple
and gold for a change.
"Many times in the past three
years we've stood in this locker
room and talked about a game we
should have won said ECU head
coach Art Baker following the vic-
tory. "Today, I'm sure Georgia
Southern is saying that in their
locker room. I'll tell you it feels nicer
to win
The Pirates put together a 13 play,
72-yard drive in the game's waning
moments to win, but, ironically the
key play of the drive was contrib-
uted by Georgia Southern head
coach Erk Russell.
After his Golden Eagle defense
had stopped ECU on a third down
play, Russell stormed on the field
disputing a five-yard inadvertent
face mask penalty against his de-
fense. The result was an unsports-
manlike penalty, which gave the Pi-
rates new life at the Georgia South-
ern 13-yard line. Tirate fullback
Anthony Simpson took care of the
rest of the work from there as he
bulled 11 yards to the two-yard line
and then capped off the dri ve wi th a
two-yard plunge with 2:38 remain-
ing.
"I cost us the ballgame with that
unsportsmanlike conduct penalty
late in the game said a dissap-
pointed Russell. "That is something
that I tell my players never to do and
then I go out and do it. I hope this
team will forgive me
Georgia Southern, the two-time
defending NCAA Division I-AA
national champions, got the upper
hand early in the contest as it used a
little razzle-dazzle on its first play
from scrimmage to score a touch-
down.
Backup quarterback Ernest Th-
ompson, who was lined up in the
wingback position, took a pitch
from quarterback Ken Bumetteand
hit Tony Belser for a 68-vard touch-
down pass. Tim Folcy's PAT gave
the Eagles a 7-0 lead less than two
minutes into the first quarter.
Georgia Southern stretched its
lead to 10-0 late in the first period on
a 52-yard Foley field goal. Foley,
ECU linksters place in 10th
at Augusta Intercollegiate
who had earlier in the quarter mis-
sed a 32-yard field goal, capped off
a 31 -yard drive with the boot.
The Pirate defense came to the
rescue in the second quarter, com-
ing up with two key turnovers,
enabling the Bucs to even the score
by the half.
Glen Willis came up with the first
key play when he recovered a
Burnette fumble at the Georgia
Southern 22-yard line. After failing
to move the ball in three plays, the
Pirates called on Chuck Berleth to
attempt a 30-yard field goal. The
Chicago, III. native's successful kick
closed the gap to 10-3 with 9.38 to
play in the opening half.
On the Eagles' first play of the
ensuing drive, Burnette dropped
back to pass on first down. Senior
safety Ellis Dillahunt stepped in
front of the errant pass for an inter-
ception, giving the Pirates posses-
sion at the Georgia Southern 39-
yard line.
Six plays later, Simpson powered
in from 12 yards out to cap off the
drive. Simpson finished the after-
noon with 112 yards rushing on 26
carries.
The scoring drive for the Pirates
was aided by two key passes from
quarterback Travis Hunter. Hunter
connected with Walter Wilson for a
17-yard gain and Ron Jones for a 12-
yard pickup.
Georgia Southern started the sec-
ond half with an impressive open-
ing drive. After starting at theirown
20-yard line, the Eagles moved to
the Pirates' eight-yard line before
the drive stalled. Foley then tacked
on a 25-yard field goal to boost the
Eagles on top, 13-10.
Reggie McKinney set the Tirates
up in good field position for their
first possession of the second half
when he returned the Eagle kickoff
all the way to the Georgia Southern
30-yard line.
McKinney then took the ball on
first down and spurted for 20-vards
out of the I-formation, which the
Pirates utilized at times in the sec-
ond half, to the Eagle 10. One play-
later, McKinney got the call once
again, however this time he
fumbled giving the Eagles the ball
at theirown four-yard line.
"We knew we had to adjust to
Georgia Southern's defense (at
halftime), and we knew that Reggie
McKinney could gain some yard-
age Baker said about the switch to
the I-formation lineup in the second
half. "It worked right away until we
fell into the same fumble trap down
on the goal line
After stopping Georgia Southern
in three plays, the Pirates took over
at the Eagle 37, following a 30-yard
punt. Two quick bursts of 16and 13
yards by Simpson moved the ball to
the Eagle eight-yard line.
The Georgia Southern defense
then stiffened forcing the Pirates
into a fourth and goal at the two.
Simpson was once again called on,
however the usually sure-handed
fullback fumbled into the endzone
thwarting another Pirate drive.
The two teams then swapped
possessions the remainder of the
way until the Pirates came up with
the game-winner.
After ECU scored to go on top, 16-
13, the action was only just begin-
ning to unfold. After recovering
another Burnette fumble, ECU took
over at the Eagle 32. Three plavs
later, with 1:21 remaining in the
contest, the Pirates were faced with
a fourth and three at the Eagle 25.
The Pirate coaching staff decided to
go for the first down in an attempt to
run out the clock, however the
Eagle defense held.
"I'll be second guessed for not
kicking the field goal with 121 left
in the game Baker said. "But, we
needed to get the first down and put
the game a way. Instead, we did not
and it went down to the wire like it
alwaysdoesagainst Georgia South-
ern
Burnette then led the Eagles to the
Pirate 36 with six seconds left on the
clock. In an attempt to throw the
ball out of bounds to set up a game-
tying field goal, Burnette fumbled
to ice the victory for the Pirates.
"We were just trying to get the
ball out of bounds to stop the clock
so we could get Foley into the game
and have a chance at a tic Russell
explained about the last play. "The
ball just slipped out of Snake's
(Burnette's) hand. It was just one of
those unfortunate things that�r,ti
to happen sometimes ' ' �
Although the win was not a pretty
one, Baker said that he was im-
pressed with the way his team
fought for the win.
"Iast year, in a game like this, I
believe our players would have
found a way to lose Baker said.
"But, in this game, they went out
there and found a way to win. That
let's me know that there is a new
attitude out there among our play-
ers
And, a little luck too.
Intramural events slated
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Spo� Writer
East Carolina's golf team turned
in its second lOth-place finish oi the
fall season at the Augusta Intercol-
legiate this past weekend.
The Pirates were led bv senior
Chris Rilcy who shot a 231 in the
three-day tournament. Riley
started out sluggish in the firsl
round with a score of 80,but
bounced back in the final rounds
shooting 78 and 73. The 73 was the
best round of all the Pirates.
John Chapman was second for
ECU with 75,75,82 for a total of 232.
Augusta College, host school for
the tournament, won the event with
a team score of 895 Furman was
second at 904 and I luntington (AL)
third with a 905.
Florida Southern placed fourth at
911 followed by Tennessee-Chat-
tanooga in fifth at 917 Jacksonville
and Virginia Tech tied for sixth with
921 totals, while San Francisco was
eighth at 922. Marshal! grabbed the
ninth spot with a team score of 925
folwed by the Pirates' l28 total.
John Kies, from Marshall Univer-
sity, had the best individual store at
214. He was followed bv Roger
Rowland from Augusta who had a
218.
"I was particularly pleased with
(ohn)Chapman'sperformanccthis
weekend head coach Hal Morri-
son said.
Other scores for the Pirates in-
cluded Simon Moye 75,81, 78 for a
234 toatl; Mark Hidlay 77, 80, 79 to
post a 236 total and Brian Connor
80,81, 77 to finish at 238.
The Augusta, played at Forest
Hill Country Club, was the Pirates
second fall tournament. Next week
ECU travel to Durham for the John
Ryan Memorial hosted by Duke
University.
"At the Ryan I'll play my top five
golfers together for the first time
this season Morrison said.
The Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services sport sched-
ule is highlighted in the month of
October with a variety of water
sports and minor events for all fac-
ulty staff and students.
Co-rec water basketball starts off
the month as teams go head to head
in the Memorial Gym Pool. If
you've ever attempted a layup in-
side a swimming pool and inside an
innnertube, you've mastered theart
of co-rec water basketball.
For those of you who haven't,
you are in store for a season of hilar-
ity. Registration for this FUN FOR
ALL EVENT takes place Oct. 7 at 6
p.m. in Brewster D-103.
The swim meet lights up October
as participants attempt to set new
intramural records and go for the
gold.
A n array of swimming events are
included in the meet including sev-
eral just for fun activities. This is the
chance for each sorority and frater-
nity to battle it out and see who the
best really is. If you would like to be
a part of the event but are unable to
get up a team, drop by room 104-A
Memorial Gym and the sport man-
ager will place you on a team. All
teams are welcome to participate.
Registration will take place Oct. 8
at 7pm in Biology 102.
Also coming up next week is an
activity for all the university basket-
ball lovers.
One-on-one basketball registra-
tion will be held Oct. 7 at 7 p.m. in
Brewster D-103. Talk of 'head-to-
head' competition - this event
should surely be one of the most
competitive sporting events of the
month. For more information con-
cerning any and all events slated on
the intramural schedule, call 757-
6387 or drop by room 204 Memorial
Gym.
Throughout this week, weight
training addicts are able to partici-
pate in one of several fitness work-
shops developed by the Depart-
ment of Intramural-Recreational
Services Physical Fitness Division.
Workshop 1 will consist of
three sessions each familiarizing
participants with aspects pertain-
ing to weight training.
Registration for the falls first
workshop will take place Sept 29
through Oct. 3 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
in room 204 Memorial Gym. A
small fee will be charged for stu-
See IRS page 11
Soccer team wins one of three over weekend
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sports Writer
East Carolina went 1-2 this week-
end in soccer action getting its first
win of the season against Virginia
Wesleyan, while falling victim to
American and Navy.
The Pirates got their first "W" of
the year downing Virginia
Wesleyan 3-1 at Virginia Beach.
Frank Marsh, after a scoreless
first half, scored the first ECU goal
on an assist from Robert Larrsion
midway through the second pe-
riod.
Six minutes later Henry Mitchell,
for VWC, tied the score at 1-1 on a
pass from Andy Walker.
The score was deadlocked for the
next 14 minutes until T.J. Aspdcn
hit a deadball shot from 35 feet. Jeff
Corson got his first goal of the sea-
son with three minutes left to give
the Pirates the 3-1 victory.
"We really controlled the whole
game head coach Charlie Harvey
said. "In order to have a decent
match you've got to control the
midfield and that's what we did.
Their only goal came on a mental
mistake by our defense
ECU returned to conference play
over the weekend but came away
with two losses.
Bruce Simonson scored two first-
half goals to lead American to a 2-0
shutout Saturday.
American took 18 shots to ECU's
nine, but the Pirate defense held fast
holding the regionally-ranked
Eagles scoreless in the second half.
Pirate keeper Mac Kendall had 12
saves and Robert Majidak had three
for American.
"We played a really strong sec-
ond half coach Harvey said. We
were able to hold on for nearly 70
minutes
Sunday the Pirates lost 6-2 to
Navy at Annopolis. The loss
dropped ECU to 1-8 overall and 0-5
in theCAA.
Na vy jumped on top first taking a
2-0 lead in the first 20 minutes on
goals from Dan Altomare and Hal
Zabrowski.
Robert Larrison scored for the
Pirates two minutes later to make it
2-1 Navy. The Midshipmen got two
more goals from Mark Hernandez
and Leon Wilsom to give them a 4-
1 halftime lead.
Scot Benedict opened the second
period for Navy with a goal at the
9:40 mark. The Pirate defense held
for 30 minutes before Mike Dee got
Navy's sixth goal.
Jeff Corson scored with two min-
utes to round out the scoring.
The Pirates will have the week off
before returning to CAA action Fri-
day at UNC Wilmington.
'�?' -
ECU keeper Mac Kendall knocks away a shot on goal
(Photo submitted by Mar Startwi)
during a recent ECU soccer practice.
Wolfpac
RALEIGH (AP) - Coach Dick Sh- didn t
endan has said all season that the Sh.
North Carol.na State quarterbacks offensi
have his utmost confidence But Ourlin
against Maryland, red-shirt fresh bv far
man Preston Poag ma v have gamed jo)
the upper hand over Shane
Montgomery .
Poag directed the Wolfpack to2S
pomtsin the first quarteron the wav
to a 42-14 triumph over the Terra
pins to revive their almost lost ,
hopes to contend for the Atlanti
Coast Conference football title
The Wolfpack, 1-3 , avoided its
first 0-4 start in 16 years and evened
its ACCmarkat 1-1.
"Preston did an excellent job. H
Fans react tc.
(AP) - What does a pro football
fan do on the first 'o NF1 Sunday
of the season7
Plenty.
While the pbyers's stoke krtom-
ized the third weekend of the
schedule, the people who would
have been in the seats at the stadi-
ums or in front of their televisions
didn't lack for entertainment
Some went to the ballparks any
way - to return tickets for Sunda
game, or to party.
"It's going to be a long year .
out football, but what are ve-
to do?" asked Ray Stonev ol Ne
Hudson, Mich who was bi
back eight tickets for the Lions-
Bears game.
About 200 Steelers fans decided
to have a tailgate picnic at Three
Rivers Stadium.
"Just because there was a football
strike didn't mean everybod)
couldn't go out and tailgate anv-
way said Mike Watkins.
operations manager of KDKA Ra-
dio, which sponsored the event
Several hundred New York lets
fans enjoyed themselves at a picnic
with two dozen team members
who signed autographs talked
football and had a barbecue.
"I feel the players have to stick
together said Nick Valenze oi
Mineola, N.Y. "I'm glad to see most
are abiding by the strike.
Many fans showed thev still care
about their teams despite being
robbed of one-sixteenth of the sea
son.
In Falls Church, Va� a radio sta-
tion sponsored a "Skinless Sundav
Party" at a restaurant.
"It's an excuse for Redskins fans
to get together and pretend there's
football on said Wendy N'avlor of
WCXR-FM, the host of'the party
Redskins highlight films and a
picket sign contest was held.
"This just doesn't cut it Joe
Uzabel of Annandale, Va , said oi
the festivities.
At RFK Stadium, which has been
sold out for an NFL-rccord 159
straight games and would have
IRS
events
planned
Continued from page 12
dents and staff.
A 112 participant limit has been
established so be sure to register
There will also be a workshop held
in November for those unable to
participate in the October affair.
The Intramural Outdoor Recrea-
tion division will be holding a kav-
aking clinic for novice as well as
expert kayakers in the Memorial
Gym Pool. Participants will be able
to experience the thnll oi the es-
kimo roll' without the danger
through instruction during the
clinic.
Registration for the clinic will
take place Sept. 28-Oct. 5. for more
information, contact Mark Ritter in
the Outdoor Recreation Center.
al
Tl
E
YY
Pa
1
To help vou understand the new
tax law, the IRS has two new
publications Publication 920
explains changes affecting
individuals and Publication 921
explains changes affecting
businesses. Both are free. Ask tor
one at any IRS office or call the
IRS Tax Forms number in your
phone book.
J�Bl I
I f you arc al
Avenue. If J
Hwy. 70 (jl
1987, Notl
at our atol
I
" �






back win
fell into the same fumble trap down
oal line
(Georgia Southern
tin
stoppmi
l.n
hi
the be
Pirates took over
allowing a 30-yard
Hirsts of 16 and 13
�� r moved the ball to
: ard line.
i Southern defense
d forcing the Pirates
ind goal at the two.
was once again called on,
lowever the usuall) sure-handed
nbled into the endzone
mother Pirate drive.
teams then swapped
- ssions the remainder of the
il the Pirates came up with
, .s mer
CUs : d ti goon top, 16-
ivas only just begin-
I fter recovering
ette fumble, ECU took
;? Three plavs
remaining in the
- .sore taced with
I three at the Eagle 25.
ling staff decided to
in an attempt to
il the clock, however the
1 -fenseheld.
I . be second guessed for not
- - th � d si with 1.21 left
Baker said. "But, we
the first down and put
Instead, wedid not
the wire like it
st Georgia South-
en led the Eagles to the
six seconds left on the
in attempt to throw the
unds to set up a game-
Burnette fumbled
the victory for the Pirates.
�ere just trying to get the
it of bounds to stop the clock
. d get Foley into the game
a - e a chance at a tie Russell
explained about the last plav. 'The
just slipped out of Snake's
l Bumette'sl hand. It was just one of
se umrtxinatv things thatttidt
vn lomotime?
. h the win was not a pretty
Baker said that he was im-
I with the way his team
� r the win.
ai in a game like this, I
' players would have
�und a wa to lose Baker said.
n this game, they went out
ind found a way to win. That
t's me know that there is a new
there among our play-
: little luck too.
ents slated
month. For more information con-
g any and all events slated on
intramural schedule, call 757-
37 r drop by room 204 Memorial
i�hout this week, weight
ning addicts are able to partici-
in one of several fitness work-
developed by the Depart-
nt of Intramural-Recreational
es Physical Fitness Division.
Workshop 1 will consist of
v sessions each familiarizing
participants with aspects pertain-
ht training.
ration for the falls first
p a ill take place Sept. 29
' 3 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
in room 204 Memorial Gym. A
vent small fee will be charged for stu-
� f the most
See IRS page 11
ad-to-
its of tht
weekend

I
i


THE EASTC AKOUNIAN SEPTEMBERV. 1987 11
Wolfpack quarterback revives ACC title hopes
RALEIGH (AP) - Coach Dick Sh-
eridan has said all season that the
North Carolina State quarterbacks
have his utmost confidence. But
against Maryland, red-shirt fresh-
man Preston Poag mav have gained
the upper hand over Shane
Montgomery.
Poag directed the Wolfpack to 28
points in the first quarter on the way
to a 42-14 triumph over the Terra-
pins to revive their almost lost
hopes to contend for the Atlantic-
Coast Conference football title.
The Wolfpack, 1-3 , avoided its
first 0-4 start in 16 years and evened
its ACC mark at 1-1.
"Preston did an excellent job. He
didn't make very many mistakes
Sheridan said. "It wasn't a one-man
offensive performance, of course.
Our line had its best blocking game
by far. And our defense did a good
job of getting away from blocks
Poag drove N.C. State 75 yards
for a touchdown on its opening
possessions when Danny Peebles
took a pitch on a reverse and ran 27
yards for a touchdown. The
Wolfpack scored on its next three
possessions in the period and kept
the Terapins, 2-2 and 1-1, in the
hole.
"I'm overwhelmed, overjoyed
16-12 victory over Appalachian
State, and NorthCarolina went to 3-
1 with a 45-14 victory over winless
Poag said. "Coach told me Monday
that if I had a good week in practice,
I would probably start. Then, on
Wednesday, they told me it was
mine. I'm thrilled it all went so
well
Maryland Coach Joe Krivak saw
the loss in its simplest terms.
"We got an old-fashioned, old-
time butt kicking he said.
Defending champion and ninth-
ranked Clemson started its league
schedule with a 33-12 triumph over
Georgia Tech, and Virginia stopped
Duke 42-17. Outside the league.
Wake Forest climbed the 3-0 for just
the second time in 36 years with a
Fans react to no NFL football
(AP) - What does a pro football
tan do on the first No NFL Sunday
of the season?
Plenty.
While the playcrs's stike victim-
ized the third weekend of the NFL
schedule, the people who would
have been in the seats at the stadi-
ums or in front of their televisions
didn't lack for entertainment.
Some went to the ballparks, anv-
wav - to return tickets for Sunday's
game, or to party.
"It's going to be a long year with-
out football, but what are you going
to do?" asked Rav Stoney of New
Hudson, Mich who was bringing
back eight tickets for the Lions-
Bears game.
About 200 Stcelers fans decided
to have a tailgate picnic at Three
Rivers Stadium.
"Just because there was a football
strike didn't mean everybody
couldn't go out and tailgate any-
way said Mike Watkins,
operations manager of KDKA Ra-
dio, which sponsored the event.
Several hundred New York Jets
fans enjoyed themselves at a picnic
with two dozen team members,
who signed autographs, talked
football and had a barbecue.
"I feel the players have to stick
together said Nick Valenze of
Mineola, N. Y. "I'm glad to see most
arc abiding by the strike.
Many fans showed they still care
about their teams despite being
robbed of one-sixteenth of the sea-
son.
In Falls Church, Va a radio sta-
tion sponsored a "Skinless Sunday
Party" at a restaurant.
"It's an excuse for Redskins fans
to get together and pretend there's
football on said Wendy Naylor of
WCXR-FM, the host of the party.
Redskins highlight films and a
picket sign contest was held.
'This just doesn't cut it joe
Uzabel of Annandale, Va said of
the festivities.
At RFK Stadium, which has been
sold out for an NFL-record 159
straight games and would have
IRS
events
planned
Continued from page 12
dents and staff.
A 112 participant limit has been
established so be sure to register.
There will also be a workshop held
in November for those unable to
participate in the October affair.
The Intramural Outdoor Recrea-
tion division will be holding a kay-
aking clinic for novice as well as
expert kayakers in the Memorial
Gym Pool. Participants will be able
to experience the thrill of the 'es-
kimo roll' without the danger
through instruction during the
clinic.
Registration for the clinic will
take place Sept. 28-Oct. 5. for more
information, contact Mark Ritter in
the Outdoor Recreation Center.
dium. Nearby Calder Race Course
offered free admission to anyone
showing a ticket for the Giants-
Dolphins game. A crowd of 10,447,
including 188 who got in free with
their football tickets, was almost
2,000 higher than last Sunday's at-
tendance, when the Dolphins were
on television from Indianapolis.
Then there were those who were
lost on No NFL Sunday
"I'm a football fan Chuck
Melvin of Romeoville, III said.
"Sunday was my football dav.
Now, I guess I'll just have to cut the
grass
CLIFF'S r
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N.C. 33 Ext.) Greenville. North Carolina
Phone 752-3172
Mon. thru Thurs. Night
been full for Sunday's game be-
tween the Redskins and the Patri-
ots, it was eerily silent.
Some fans actually got into an
NFL stadium Sunday. Supporters
of the Super Bowl champion Giants
were given tours of Joe Robbie Sta-
dium for $4 apiece. The Giants were
scheduled to play in the regular-
season debut of the league's newest
ballpark, and about 60 of their fans
traveled to the Miami area despite
the strike because thev couldn't get
refunds.
Another sport did benefit from
the absence of football at the sta-
Navy.
Clemson's special teams were the
key in raising the Tiger record to 4-
0. Joe I lenderson returned a kickoff
95 yards and Donnell Woolford
scored on a 78-yard punt return.
Never mind, Clemson coach Danny
lord said, that the offense didn't
teams, we would have been in the
ball game Yellow Jacket coach
Bobby Ross said. "But our special
teams just totally broke down. Very
poor
Duke was within2l-17at the start
of the third quarter, but blew three
scoring opportunities. Virginia
cashed in with a 54-yard touch-
down pass from Scott Secules to
John Ford at the end of the period,
produce as much as he would have
liked.
"We're not good at getting the
football into the end zone right
now Ford said. "But that's like a
guy who wrote last week that if you
take away two long scoring runs
against Virginia Tech we don't
average but 2.3 yards a carry. But
you can't do that. If you're hunting
something to say bad, say this:
'We're not getting the football into
the end zone But don't make up
stats on me
(ieorgia Tech dropped to 1-2 and
has lost both its ACC outings.
"If we had played well on special
and touchdown runs by Secules
and Marcus Wilson in the fourth
quarter.
"We knew we could score
points,too, and we just went out
and did it Secules said.
"I don't know if they are that
much better than us Duke coach
Steve Spurrier said, "or if they
played their best game ot the year
Virginia is 2-2 and 1-1, while
Duke fell to 3-1 in its league opener
Wake forest's Wilson I loyle and
Appalachian State's Bjorn Nittmo
were engaged in a battle of field
goals. Nittmooutkicked Hoyle,4-3,
but Warren Belin's return of a
blocked punt in the third period
was the difference as the Demon
Deacons completed their third
game without surrendereing a
touchdown.
"The defense turned in another
excellent effort Wake forest o
Bill Dooteysaid. "I'm proud of thcrp
as thev still haven't allowed Ji
touchdown
Everyone had a hand in North
Carolina'svK torv Eric Starr rushed
for three touchdowns and 127
yards, Randy Marriott scoredonar
end around and urris Davis
picked up a fumble and scored hr�
second touchdown this season
7
i
I
I
X
Greenville's Only Premium
Quality Cleaners Since 1935
have 2 sweaters TLaxJndered Shirt
OR SKIRTS CLEANED
3RD PAIR CLEANED '
FREE
Special
5 For $2.99
111 W. 10TH ST.
Expires October 31. 1987 cok.ver of ioth eva.
Coupon must be presented with incoming order
J
H
(Photo submitted by Mar Startari)
luring a recent ECU soccer practice.
To help you understand the new
tax law, the IRS has two new
publications. Publication 920
explains changes affecting
individuals and Publication 921
explains changes affecting
businesses. Both arc free. Ask for
one at any IRS office or call the
IRS Tax Forms number in your
phone book.
Popcorn
Shrimp
$3.45
The Pitt
County Fair
fastest Growing Fair in N.C.)
will be in Greenville
with its giant exposition
all next week.
The Largest Midway
East of Raleigh.
Watch Next Tuesday's
Paper for details.
Tom Togs Factory Outlet
12
1900 Dickinson Av�nue
OFF
ALREADY LOW
OUTLET PRICES
(SUMMER merchandise;
Featuring the Hottest Beach Fashions,
Casual Wear, and Famous Brands.
Everything in Store Except Hosiery
M Quality � Ovarruiw � CIomouU � S.l.ct.d Irregulars
�a-JW-Kr lOj�0�'
Famous Names That We Cannot Mention
Jff�C�d�fD Tank Top. Tank DrMMi, Bicycle Pants, Walk Shorts,
Mhw Skirts �
Top
Jtffll C�mp Shirts, Shorts, Slacks, Pullovers � The Original T-
aMrts. 100 Cotton (Unisex)
(Unisex)
!� Jt�iL T-shirt
If you are a newcomer to town, we invite youto visit our store at 1900 Dickinson
Avenue. If you are going to beach at Morehead City, visit our new location on
Hwy. 70 (just across from BoJangles.) Warehouse Sale Ends Sat. Oct. 3,
1987, Nothing over $10. Tuesdays are Manager day. Just ask for details
at our store.
�Shop Ths Stor) Noarsst You-
64E Between
Bethel and Tarboro
Conetoe, N.C.
Wed. � Sat. 0-5
Nassau St.
Youngavllie, N.C.
WsdFri. 0:30-5
Saturday 0:30-4
Hast�card S Visa Atcsptsd
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMiHG A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they re both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Orps. The caduceus hi the left
means you re part ot i healthcare
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule.
n t the exceptk i i The g ld bar
on the right means you command respect as an Arm i rl
earning a BSN. write Army Nurse Opportunities, P.G Box 771
Clifton, NJ 07015. Or call toll tree 1-800-1 ISA ARMY
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
East Carolina University Student Union
Major Concerts Committee presents:
HOMECOMING
CONCERT
Featuring
1 H.1L r 1AA
Thursday, October 8th, 8:00 p.m.
MINGES COLISEUM
Tickets:
$7.00 students
$9.00 general public
Tickets on sale
Central Ticket Office
Sept. 24th.





SEPTEMBER 29,1987
Undefeated
CUEMSON, S.C. (AP) - Its 33-12
victory over Georgia Tech in the
ixoks, No. 9 Clemson takes this
JJ � off. The question is, who is the
"Ww foi it - ,he Tigers or their
opponents?
Clemson coach Danny Ford's
answer? The Tigers.
"We're glad for the open week'
PKJ said Saturday after seeing his
tern open defense of its Atlantic
Coast Conference title by defeating
Georgia Tech. "We got a list a mile
fcng of people who are banged up
While his players are trying to
raeal their wounds. Ford will be
looking to put some more people in
his offense after the Tigers had to
rily on their special teams and na-
tionally top-ranked defense for
their spark against the Yellow jack-
ets.
"We had some good defense and
our kicking game was excellent. We
thought Georgia Tech would play
the devil out of us, and I think they
did said Ford, whose Tigers re-
firn to action Oct. 10 when they
play host to Virginia.
"We made some big plays on
them, but sometimes some of you
people (reporters) write that big
playsdon't count. But they docount
because we made them.
"We're not good at getting the
football into the end zone right
now he said. "But that's like a guy
wrote last week that if you take
away the two long scoring runs
against Virginia Tech we don't
average but 2.3 or 2.7 yards a carry.
But you can't do that.
'If your're hunting something to
say bad, say this, 'We're not getting
the football into the end zone But
don't make up stats on me
Clemson didn't need much of an
offensive attack Saturday thanks to
Donnell Woolford and Joe Hender-
son
Henderson returned a kickoff 95
yards for a touchdown and
Woolford scored on a 78-yard punt
return to end long scoring droughts
by the Clemson special teams. It
was also the first time in school
history the Tigers have returned a
punt and kickoff for a touchdown in
the same game.
After having problems handling
the ball, Henderson sprinted down
the left sideline and into the end
zone to give Clemson a 26-6 lead
with 9:53 left. The score came after
Georgia Tech had cut the lead to 19-
6 on a 20-yard halfback pass from
Richard Hills to flanker Greg
Lester.
Henderson's effort was the first
kickoff return for a TD since Hal
Davis brought one back Oct. 13,
1962, against Georgia - a span of 843
kickoffs.
"I know there must have been
some key blocks, but I don't know
who they were Henderson said. "I
just now once I crossed midfield,
there were a bunch of orange jerseys
and green grass in front of me
Woolford's punt return with 4:39
left in the first period gave Clemson
a 7-0 lead and was the first punt
return for a TD by the Tigers since
Oct. 31, 1970, when Don Kelley re-
turned a punt 85 yards against
Maryland - a span of 450 punt re-
turns.
"The punt return might have
gotten us going Woolford said. "It
was great to run one back after we
have worked so hard on it
Clcmson finished with a school-
record 227 yards in punt returns,
breaking the mark of 172 set in the
Tigers' season-opening 43-0 victory
over Western Carolina.
Georgia Tech coach Bobby Ross
said the play of Clemson's special
teams was the difference.
"If we had played well on special
teams we would have been in the
ballgame Ross said. "But our spe-
cial teams just totally broke down.
Very poor
But Ross that didn't lessen
Clemson in his eyes.
"Clemson is every bit as good as
people say they are Ross said.
"I don't think there is any doubt
about that
The victory by Clemson marks
the first time since 1906-07 it has
beaten Georgia Tech in consecutive
seasons. The Tigers are now 4-0
overall, while Georgia Tech falls to
1-2 and 0-2.
Intramural
Co-rec Water Basketball Oct. 7 6 p.m. Brew. D-103
One-on-One Basketball Oct. 7 6 p.m. Brew. D-103
Swim Meet Oct. 8 7 p.m. Bio. 102
WE BUILT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
SAV A CENTER
FOOD MARKETS
The freshest way to Save.
fUnk & WagnalSs Hammond
WORLD ATLAS
Bound to complement your
funk & Wagnalls Mew Encyclopedia
�Ovc 190 j . �
ofdel i � I
maps
including
ev�, si iti
and
' mad u
Provtrx e
�SPECIAL
FEATURE
16 Page
United States
and Canada
Recreation
and Road At as
Challenge Day
Oct. 14
p.m.
11 a.m
MG 104-A
Intramural football rankings
MEN'S DIVISION
1. L.S.rOUS-a
2. Pi Kappa Alpha
3 lake Boys
4. Funk Brothers
5. S ott SOB-C Huricancs
WOMEN'S DIVISION
1. Enforcers
2. IGGY'S
3. Alpha Thi
4. Fletcher Spartans
5. ROT-Cee
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Black, Brown, Tweed, Blue,
Herring Bone, Etc.
150 To Choose From
$19.95 to $49.95
CLOTHES
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Relations and Publicity
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�Interviews will be held
Fit, Oct. 2,1987
�Please call or come by
and schedule an Appoint-
ment at the:
Student Union
234 Mendenhall,
757-6611, ext. 210.
Aiin An Additional $'0 Oi More Purchase
CAMPBELLS
can
Lmit One With An Additional $10 Or More Purchase
Limit One With An Additional $10 Or More Purchase
Tomato
Soup
HOMOGENIZED � LIGHT
BUTTERMILK
KLONDIKE
Flav-O-Rich Ice
Milk Cream Bars
10.75 oz.
18� 99� 249
� ctn. pkq. M
PEPSI
$1.09
Diet Dr. Pepper
6 12 oz. ean ctn.
Limit Three With An Add I $10 Or More Purch
99 �
SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
SAV A CENTER SUPER COUPON
STOP
ASSORTED
Bounty
Towel
I 0�� Coupon Per Snoopei A r At A.y ; v
SEE STORE
FOR DETAILS
PRICES EFFECTIVE SUN SEPT. 27, THRU SAT, OCT. 3,1987. QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED.
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Opan 24 Hours-Open Mori. 7 �.m Closed Sal. 11 p.m Open Sun. 7 a.m -11 p.m.
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 29, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 29, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.561
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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