The East Carolinian, September 24, 1987






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THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 24,1987
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East Carolina University School of Medicine
Pitt County Memorial Hospital 1
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13"
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arw-
!� Afro American Cultural
Center
2. Amphitheater
Austin Building
Aycock Residence Hall
Beik Building � School of
Allied Health and Social Work
K. Bdk Residence HaU
Blount House � Public Safe-
ty, Traffic, and Infonnatioin
Center
8. Bloxton House
9. Brewster Building
10. Cafeteria Building
11. Central Supply � 2nd Floor
12. Chancellor's House
13. Christenbury Memorial Gym-
nasium
14. Clement Residence Hall
15. Gotten Residence Hall
16. Croatan Building
17. Erwin HaU
18. Faculty Offices
19. Ficklen Stadium
20. Flanagan Building � School
of Technology
21. Fleming Residence Hall
22. Fletcher Music Center �
School of Music
23. Fletcher Residence HaU
24. Garage
25. Garrett House � Computing
Center Annex
26. Garrett Residence HaU
27. Graham Building
28. Greene Residence HaU
29. Harrington Field
30. Heating Plant
31. Home Economics Building �
School of Home Economics
32. Howard House � News
Bureau
33. Infirmary
34. International House
35. Irons Building
136. Jarvis Residence HaU
37. Jenkins Fine Arts Center �
School of ArtGray Gallery
38. Jones Residence Hall
39. Joyner Library
40. Leisure Systems Studies
41. Maintenance Building, Cen-
tral Warehouse
42. Mamie Jenkins Building
43. MendenhaU Student Center
44. Messick Theatre Arts Center
45. McGinnis Auditorium
46. Minges Coliseum
47. Nursing Building � School
of Nursing
48. Personnel Department
49. Pirate Club Building
50. Publications Building
51. RagsdaJe Hall
52. Rawl Annex
53. Rawl Building � School oi
Business
54. Regional Development In-
stitute
55. Scales Field House
56. Science Building
57. Scott Residence Hall
58. Slay Residence Hall
59. Speech and Hearing Building
60. Speight Building � School of
Education Department of
Psychology
61. Spilman Building
62. Sports Medicine Building
63. TaylorSlaughter Alumni
Center
64. Tyler Residence Hall
65. Umstead Residence Hall
66. Whichard Building
67. White Residence Hall
68. Wright Annex
69. Wright Buii ding
New General classroom
Building now under construction
Parking 1987
- Ficklen Stadium
Ma Boulevard ,?64 Bypassi lo Charles Boulevard
i Lota � Greenv.ue Bivrj or Mih Street lo Charles Bivd lo Fickle Drive
� Either i4th Street or Greenville Boulevard to Elm Street lo Overlook Drive
ither toth Street or 14th Street lo Charles Boulevard
PRIVATE RV PARKING
I united numiw oi pnvate RV parking
spates available Contact the Pirate Club
at (919) 7i7178 lor lurther details

It is suggested that parents park in either of the gray areas on the map
to the left, especially if they plan to attend the pre-game picnic. Park-
ing will not be allowed on the picnic grounds beside the stadium. The
gray parking areas are the closest ones to the picninc grounds.
The staff of The East Carolinian
would like to welcome all
parents to East Carolina University.
We hope you enjoy this newspaper,
as we have interspersed some
older news so you can discover
what day to day life at ECU is
Football seating:
Parents attending Saturday's
football game with Georgia
Southern have been seated in
the areas grayed on this map.
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INSIDE
Editorials
Entertainment.
Sports
Classifieds
riU FAST' AROI INIAN
locus on Central A ml
U.S. non-
B I IM H iri)
men
admir
in humanit
Apartment foreign times the ar
th
Sarros, speaking sa
evening in Brewster how the U
' iunort,v, io iri sseelItlOl
: . i rning the dilemma
� i esin troubled Micara 1 i
i
� � � i '� � pi
kj tna 11 igun
I for hu-I'm
improvi rr nl viidseni son
os. H riticism thatgall) - .
. San - i
' �' 1 pohtica strugglenisi i
1 and inaccurate.American co late 197 t
imdista eovern-economic rec
Game hig
B) rONl PAGE
i4. Mi
natdv 2O0 parents
fsf to participate in Par-
� � kend this year, ac-
r Ronald P. Speier,
dean of student services.
v: d that the 2500 tickets
�thai! game sold this year
ts an increase of about
t!
devious vear.
- weekend is an opportu-
: rusl recognize and show
. reciation to the parents said
s Weekend Committee
� v I Rowe.
ive purchased indi-
lualrick ts for both the football
game and the pre-game picnic.
R l said that the picnics in the
. ; have been very successful
ind he exj vets this one will be
even better. Hie picnic will be
rtsored by Riverside Oyster
:� and w ill be held on the north
�ide "t Ficklen Stadium, accord-
ing to Roue
Students planning to sit with
their parents who have not picked
up their football tickets arc re-
minded to p
Coliseum tic
urday Pare!
mailed to the
need picnii
them ir
dav and
hall room 24-j
mg.
The football
gia Southern
the Parents
planned art.
tion. a tail!
church semi
lowed bv a c
sponsored tj
Committee
There will
Mosquito C
Fndav and
p.m
The ECL A
conducting cj
ents from B
da starting
ing registrar
get the oppor
ous adrrunisH
The new cabinet (from the left) Paul Pucket,
Kemmis, Tony Porcelli, Veronica Williams anc





ECU
lean Cultural
ience Hall
- School of
and Social Work
:eHall
� Public Safe-
Informatioin
f'iing
iiding
tv � 2nd Floor
louse
Memorial Gym-
kjence Hall
fence Hall
Lding
fees
lum
Idiruj � School
lenee Hall
sic Center �
met Hall
� Computing
e e Hal
ing
kc Hall
e'd
lies Building �
nomica
�e � News
37. Jenkins Fine Arts Center �
School of ArtGray Gallery
38. Jones Residence Hall
39. Joyner Library
40. Leisure Systems Studies
41. Maintenance Building, Cen-
tral Warehouse
42. Mamie Jenkins Building
43. Mendenhall Student Center
44. Messick Theatre Arts Center
45. McGinms Auditorium
46. Minges Coliseum
47. Nursing Building � School
of Nursing
48 Personnel Department
49. Pirate Club Building
50 Publications Building
51. Ragsdale Hall
52. Raw! Annex
53. Rawl Building � School of
Business
54 Regional Development In
stitute
55. Scales Field House
56. Science Building
57. Scott Residence Hall
58 Slay Residence Hall
59 Speech and Hearing Building
60. Speight Building - School of
Education Department of
Psychology
61. Spilman Building
62 Sports Medicine Building
63. Taylor Slaughter Alumni
Center
64. Tyler Residence Hall
65. Umstead Residence Hall
66. Whichard Building
6 White Residence Hall
68. Wnght Annex
69 Wnght Building
use
Icr Hail
New General classroom
Building now under construction
v schedule
ation
ident Center
i lrix iheater
Mendenhall Student Center
Room 244
Mendenhall Int.
n Desk
nar
Mendenl all Stu rtter
; ;im
' itadium
thorn
Ito Coast
Mend
enter
cental
enter

Alumni Aition
Irk in either of the gray areas on the map
lan to attend the pre-game picnic. Park-
picnic grounds beside the stadium. The
Jest ones to the picninc grounds.
rr!
X o?25
9
Za26
III H a7
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INSIDE
Editorials 6
EntertainmentZZZZZll
Sports�w15
Classifiedsli o
ENTERTAINMENT
N.C. Shakespeare Festival production is refreshing
approach to traditional play � see
ENTERTAINMENT, page 11.
SPORTS
Pirates to face the defending IA A national champion:
Georgia Southern � see SPORTS, page 15.
rm EASTCAROltNIAN
SEPTEMBER 24, 1W7 Po 1
locus on Central America
U.S. non-war aid plays role
ii IIM HAMPTON
Staff rt ntt-r
l nited States has not pro-
; east west conflicts in Ccn-
: un.a according to a vct-
�tatc Department foreign
Petei Sarros, speaking
IVednesda) evening in Brewster
before an audience of
it one hundred, addressed
concerning the dilemma
i faces in troubled Nicara-
tid to Central American
� s tr m 84 1987 has to
:6 billion. Of that figure,
has been sent for hu-
tarian improvement said
I le said the criticism that
kolvement has
. at the political struggle
led and inaccurate.
i t no
Sandista govern-
ment overthrew the established
Samosa regime in the 1981 Nica-
raguan revolution, the Reagan
adminstration sent $118 million
in humanitarian aid, that is 10
times the amount we ever gave
the Samosa government Sarros
said. Sarros said this example of
how the U.S. has attempted to
remedy the sociocconomic situ-
ation of the war-battered country-
Speaking on the issue of the
corruption of U.S. aid by N'icara-
guan elites, Sarros said, "We are
Irving our damnedest to hold
accountablity of our funding, but
I'm sure of the millions we have
sent, some funding has been ille-
gally diverted
Sarros said the rise in commu-
nist regimes amoung Central
American countries during the
late 1970s was attributable to the
economic recession and the 400
increase in the cost of imports.
Cuatemala, El Salvador and Nica-
ragua instituted authoritarian
regimes as a result of the eco-
nomic crisis.
U.S. aid reversed the economic
hardships in these countries, and
as a consequence agrarian re-
formsand changes in the plurality
of land owners occurred, accord-
ing to Sarros. The political reper-
cussions of the economic U-turn
resulted in free elections and the
establishment of democracies in
the region with the exception of
Nicaragua Sarros said
In El Salvador, significant turn-
abouts in human rights issues
were directly correlated with the
increase in U.S. aid, according to
Sarros. In October, 1981, when the
leftist regime in El Salvador held
power, political motivated mur-
ders numbered 810 per month.
After U.S. assistance in 1984, this
figure was reduced to 52 per
month, SArros said.
Referring to it's strategic value,
Sarros said left-aligned Nicara-
gua enables the Soviets to estab-
lish an increased presence of
U.S.S.R. submarines in the Carib-
bean as well as submarine ports
on the Pacific coast.
While Sarros noted positive
diplomatic ventures towards
Central American peace such as
the San Jose Declaration, the
Contra Dora Objective, and the
recent Guatemala Plan, he also
said these1 measures are difficult
to ratify because Nicaragua won't
comply.
In conclusion, Sarros blamed
the Central American unrest on
outside influences.
"The geo-political reasoning is
not internally based, rather
external elements have come into
play
Game highlights Parents' Day
Hy I ONI PAGE
Mjlt U r.Irf
Approximately 2C00 parents
"��parted to participate in Par-
w eekend this vear, ac-
ling to Dr. Ronald P. Speier,
- it. dean of student services.
, ier said that the 2500 tickets
football game sold this year
: cnts an increase of about
m the previous vear.
his weekend is an opportu-
for us to recognize and show
, e iation to the parents said
nt's Weekend Committee
nber Rowe.
Parents have purchased indi-
. idual rickets for both the football
and the pre-game picnic.
said that the picnics in the
t have been very successful
and he expects this one will be
n better. The picnic will be
�red by Riverside Oyster
Bar and will bo held on the north
idc ol lick I en Stadium, accord-
i g to Rowe.
Students planning to sit with
their parents who have not picked
up their football tickets are re-
minded to pick them up at Minges
Coliseum ticket office before Sat-
urday. Parent's tickets have been
mailed to them. Students who still
need picnic tickets can purchase
them in 209 Whichard until Fri-
day and if necessary, at Menden-
hall room 244 on Saturday morn-
ing.
The football game against Geor-
gia Southern is only one item on
the Parents's Day agenda. Also
planned are: a chancellor's recep-
tion, a tailgating picnic and
church services on Sunday fol-
lowed by a continental breakfast
sponsored by the Panhellenic
Committee.
There will also be a free movie,
"MosquitoCoast at Mendenhall
Friday and Saturday night at 8
p.m.
The ECU Ambassadors will be
conducting campus tours for par-
ents from 8:30 - 10:30 a.m. Satur-
day starting at Mendenhall. Dur-
ing registration, parents will also
get the opportunity to meet vari-
ous administrators of ECU.
According to Dean Nancy excited about the whole weekend.
Smith, assistant director of rajg The past three years have been a
dence life, all residence halls wil , real success alid we are looking
be doing some type of individjin forwardJHhine, a w.nmnc
floor activity and displaying a ball game, and lots of happy fanu-
banner on their dorm. "I'm really lies
Eakin talks aboutECU's imag
Editor's note: The following inter
inew first ajipeared in The East Caro-
linian Thursday and Tuesday. We are
publishing it again for the benefit of
Parents' Day insitors.
What has been happening to
ECU's image?
"A measure of a university is
how it responds to events which
are not favorable according to
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin.
The events in the past few
weeks such as the post-game inci-
dent at the ECU-North Carolina
State University football game,
the Biltmore Street mishap and
the arrests of three ECU basket-
ball players Aug. 26 have nega-
tively influenced public percep-
tion of the university, Eakin said
1
Dr. Peter Sarros illustrates a point at his Wednesday-night presenta-
tion. The program was sponsored by the departments of Geography
and Planning, Political Science, Aerospace Studies and Military
Science (Jon Jordan, Photolab).
in an interview Sept. 16.
The tearing down of the goa
posts and a fence and the damage
to shrubbery caused by over-zeal
ous fans at Carter-Finley stadium
Sept. 5 was "inappropriate" and
"unacceptable" according to
Chancellor Eakin.
NCSU officials have decided to
place a one-year moratorium on
the ECU-NCSU football series.
Eakin has apologized to
NCSU's chancellor for the inci-
dent, but Eakin does not believe
"that this (incident) should be
reason to discontinue the series,
he said.
"I hope and I trust that both we
and North Carolina State can.
See SCHOOL, page 5
Campus beauty
After parents complained
about trash on campus during
parent's weekend last year, an
effort will reportedly be made to
give the ECU campus a better
appearance this year.
Letters were received after last
year's Parents' Weekend that
mentioned unsightly rubbish
strewn around campus, accord-
ing to Dr. Elmer Meyer, vice chan-
cellor of student life.
"We'll make an effort on Friday
afternoon to pick the trash up
said Douglas Caldwell, supenn-
tendant of grounds maintenance.
Caldwell also mentioned possiblv
having a few workers on campus
Saturday to keep things tidy. "If
people don't throw the trash
down, we won't have to pick it
up he added.
"Let's have a nice, clean campus
for Parents' Weekend Meyer
said. Meyer urged all students to
participate in making sure the
campus is kept clean this week-
end.
Thomas announces
'8788 cabinet posts
The new cabinet (from the left) Paul Pucket Angela Russ, Patti SGA President Scott Thomas (center) said he plans to add one more
Kemmis, Tony Porcelli, Veronica Williams and Dillon KalkhursL to the group within a week (Jon Jordan, Photolab).
By TIM HAMPTON
Soif Writer
Student Government Associa-
tion President Scott Thomas an-
nounced his cabinet Wednesday
in Mendenhall Student Center.
The cabinet, which still has one
position to be filled later, will help
Thomas formulate policy at 6
separate levels of student interest,
Thomas said.
"The cabinet will represent a
wide spectrum of the student
voice Thomas said in an inter-
view. "They (the cabinet) will
help me in all aspects of student
response as well as planning pol-
icy
The cabinet members are:
Tony Porcelli, chief of staff, will
aid the president in all adminstra-
ti ve matters and attend functions
the president is unable to attend.
Patti Kemmis, executive assis-
tant of CampusCommunity Re-
lations, will act as a liason be-
tween the SGA and the media.
Kemmis is the former news editor
of The East Carolinian.
Paul Pucket, executive assistant
of Traffic and Public Safety, will
coordinate student action in the
SGA Judiciary, Pirate Walk, and
ECU Campus Safety-
Veronica Williams, executive
assistant of Minority Affairs, will
be the voice for minority organi-
zations in formulating proposals
to the legislature and informing
the president of minority con-
cer i
Russ, executive assis-
-i�.ademic Affairs, will in-
form the president of actions
taken in academic committees.
Dillion Kalkhurst, executive
assistant of Special Projects, will
concentrate on developing pro-
posals to meet the future needs of
ECU. Kalkhurst is presently the
Inter-Fraternity Council Vice
President �
The position of the assistant of
Student Services has not been
filled. Thomas said he expects to
fill the position within a week.
"I'm very comfortable with the
cabinet and fool each member is
qualified to assume the responsi-
bility Thomas said.
"In the past adminstrations.
cabinets have been appointed late
n the semester and ha ve achieve'
little Thomas said.
"My porronal goal is see tht
adminstration and cabinet bo-
come the blue print for future
SGA government " Thorn? -�,d

" P �'���� ���'� .
'i�Hl�n

1





SErTCMHrR24, 1987
Th
m
in review
Post-game fracas
North Carolina State Univer-
i ohflflC,a,s d�dcd to call off the
'football game with ECU as a
result of the post-game fracas
Sept. 5.
The NCSU athletic council de-
cided unanimously to recomend
that their team not play FCU
during the 1988 football season.
NCSU Chancellor Bruce R. Poul-
ton concurred with the recomcn-
dation.
After ECU'S 32-14 victory over
NCSU, approximately 2,000 fans
rushed onto the ficld destroying
a fence in the south endzonc'and
two goalposts. Estimated damage
to Carter Fmlcv Stadium was
$7,200.
ECU Chancellor Richard R.
Eakin formally apologized for the
incident, but'he still maintains
that the series between ECU and
NCSU should not have been
cancelled.
ECU'S Student Government
Association has sought better
communication with NCSU and
has considered paying for some of
the damage.
The incident was a leading
news story for major media in
North Carolina for at least a week.
Basketball team
members arrested
An ECU basketball player,
Theodore "Blue" Edwards, and
���' of his former teammates were
irrested Aug. 27 in connection
with a series of thefts that occured
at Scott Residence Hall over
Christmas, 1986.
A press release issued by the
ECU News Bureau said Edwards,
John Aaron Williams and Tracy
Clayton King were arrested on
charges of breaking, entering and
larceny as part of a continuing
investigation by the ECU Depart-
ment of Public Safety. The fourth
man, Howard Elliot Brown, lives
in Brooklyn, N.Y. and has not
been taken into custody.
Greenville Police Chief Johnny
Rose said the crimes reported
involved the theft of $5,729 in ste-
reos, cameras, tapes, cash, calcu-
lators and other items.
Allegations made
on Biltmore St.
ECU students and police
clashed Aug. 29 when police
broke up an unauthorized block
party on Biltmore Street between
Fifth and Fourth Streets.
Students at the scene accused
the police of using unecessary
force in making three arrests that
day. Policearrested Matthew 1 fall
Moore. Anthony Joseph Pistorio
and Michael Hart on charges
ranging from drinking in public
to assaulting a police officer.
After the party, students began
circulating a yellow pad asking
everyone to sign as witnesses to
the alleged excessive force.
Greenville Police Captain Nelson
Staton, interim assistant chief,
maintained the officers used only
the force necessary to make the
arrests.
On Sept. 2, university and city
officials met to discuss possible
ways to prevent incidents like this
from happening again.
On Sept. 3, District Attorney
Tom Haigwood reportedly sub-
poenaed a television station's
video tape oi the arrests as part oi
an ongoing investigation into the
student's allegations.
Sgt. Doug Jackson was placed in
charge of an in-house investiga-
tion and said he obtained state-
ments from eye-witnesses, the
arrested students, and the arrest-
ing officers.
Senate searches
The ECU Faculty Senate nomi-
nated seven people to be on the
search committee which will se-
lect the new vice chancellor for
academic affairs.
During a meeting at Menden-
hall Student Center, the senate
nominated seven faculty mem-
bers to be on the committee.
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin will
I Night Club
coming
SATURDAY NIGHT
SEPT. 26
BILLY BAZEMORE
AND
THE ATLANTIS BAND
PLAYING
BEACH, TOP 40, ROCK-N-ROLL
18 yr olds welcome!
Doors open at 9:00 p.m.
Phone: 756-6401
Located In Carolina East Center
(beside Carolina East Mall)
If they won't tell you about it,
then you know it must be great.
Pvrple Passion" Out of the botb'wb. no the (.an.
and cnte the shelva or your favorite store
Discover it for yoursef
ca4V' -4t 2lll ?'&3t Cve�r �y �$� '��(�' V lt�i Mot' ' r
pick three of the seven and two
others of his own choice to serve
on the committee.
The seven nominees are Carl
Adler, Conner Atkcson, I.any
Hough, Ruth Katz, Holly
Mathews, Judith Sadler, and Don
Sexaucr.
New building
Structural changes have de-
layed the opening of the new
general purpose classroom build-
ing on campus.
The building, originally sched-
uled to be completed this month,
has been rescheduled to open for
the 1988 spring semester.
"There were a lot of good rea-
sons (for the delay) said James
Iowry, director of the physical
plant.
"It's a very complicated build
ing all the way through and there
were a number of changes that
had to be made and requests for
changes he said.
The 160,000 sq. ft. building is
being constructed to accomodate
the lack of available space on
campus, as it will house" 65 class-
rooms and laboratories and ISO
faculty offices.
"We'll begin bringing in mov-
able equipment in November and
professors will be moving in their
personal belongings through
December and the first couj. e of
days in January 1 owrv said
"Surely, we hope for everything
to open up in the spring he
added.
The $1.5 million structure ml
be the largest building on campus
and as of yet remains unnamed.
Board elections
East Carolina University's
board of trustees elected a chair-
man and swore in three new
board members at a meeting Fri-
day morning in the conference
room of the Nursing building.
Thomas A. Bennett, an execu-
tive vice president of Wachovia
Bank and Trust, was elected chair-
man of the board. Bennett, a trus-
tee since 1981, succeeds Ralph
Kinsey, whose term expired June
30.
Max Joyner retained his posi-
tion as vice chairman of the board
and Sandra Babb became the sec-
retary. New members appointed
by Gov. James Martin who took
the oath Friday include Howard
Rooks, a J955 graduate of ECU,
Craig Souza, a 1971 graduate and
Vincent Lowe.
Budget breaks
ECU got its fair share of money
in this year's budget, according to
Representative Ed Warren, D-
Pitt.
Warren, who chairs the Appro-
priations Base Budget Committee
on Education, said the $13.5 mil-
lion ECU received in the last days
of the legislative session were
well deserved.
"All this monev is desperately
needed for our growing painsand
it's just appropriate that we have
these funds and they are ear-
marked for certain projects
Warren said in a telephone inter-
view on Wednesday
These funds include $4.2 mil-
lion to complete the renovation oi
the third floor of the Brody Modi
. al Sciences Building; $4 425 mil-
lion to complete the Sports Medi-
cal Building; $4.7 million over two
v 'irs to link ECU with the Uni-
versity of North Carolina micro-
electronics center, and $150,000 to
plan an Eastern North Carolina
Center for Regional Advance-
ment at ECU.
The center is a pet project of
Warren's, who says he sees it serv-
ing like the McKimmon center at
North Carolina State University
and the Ramsey Center at West-
ern Carolina University.
"The regional center will be our
next big project Warren said.
"We will need to secure funds for
it in the future. This will be our
major project for all of eastern
North Carolina
Warren said the building proj-
ect, which is entering the second
phase of planning, could ulti-
mately cost as much as $15 mil-
lion.
After the center is built, Warren
said he sees the next major project
for the university dealing with the
ECU library. He said he could
forsee expanding the present li-
brary sometime in the future, but
that it wasn't totally in his hands
'it is up to the board of trustees to
make that determination of what
they would like (to work on
next) he said.
"I think it (the appropriation)
speaks well of the chancellor and
the board in their planning of
these programs Warren said
"These added facilities will en-
hance our total program for not
only the region, but the whole
state
A 1952 graduate of ECU, War
rensaid he enjoys the relationship
he has with the university "1 for
one plan to continue to see that we
get our fair share of the University-
Board of Governor's budget he
said.
Stye Sort (Earoliniati
Serving the East CanAina campus community since 1925
James F. J. McKee. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representives
Anne Ixigh Mallory James Russo Shari Clemens
Pete Fernald Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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The chancellor tnii
School
Continued from page 1
upon reflection, decide upon a
course of action which will indeed
resume the football series be-
tween the two universities "
Speaking to the issue of pn
coverage of the event, Eakin said
the reporting has ranged from
being "entirely fair" and "ol -
bve" to "undu'lv harsh and criti-
cal
He added, "In particular, there
were a couple of editorials that 1
thought missed the mark and
made some rather broad and
sweeping allegations about this
university that were not
rect
Eakin refused to comn
about specific editorials
Eakin said manv people t
suggested to him" that TV
newspaper accounts of the inci-
dent could be used as eviderv
While the ECU-NCSU incid -
was easily visible top
the state, Eakin said the Biltn
Street mishap has affected E(
image at home
At about 6 p.m. August 29
Greenville Police arrested I
ECU students at an unauthorized
block party on Biltmore Street and
m
bni
spt
'I h
ltv m

destn
� . 1
I'm t rv 1 n 1;
Panel to discuss corn
(ECU News Bureau) -
rechons: Crisis and Opp irtui
will be the topic for the annual
meetingof the C. Assiv. ;�
Criminal justice Educators Fri-
day.
The meeting, hosted bv the
department of Criminal usti
the East Carolina University
School of Social Work, will beheld
at the Greenville Hilton begin-
ning at 9a.m.
Keynote speaker for the pro-
gram will be H.G. Moeller, an
ECU professor emeritus of correc-
tions and a former consultant to
the United Nations on correc-
tions. Moeller was also di:
director of the U.S. Bureau
ons and was the past presidir.t i-t
indue
Ben h
Cone:
In ti
Ki
ar
Greeks operate
charitv drive
The Panhellenic Council and
the Inter-Fraternitv Council are
sponsoring a "Basketball Blow
Out to benefit the Ror
McDonald House of Eastern
North Carolina, according to a
press release.
The fundraiser began Wednes-
day and concludes Fndav. Stu-
dents have a chance to test their
skills shooting a basketball in
front of the Student Store and area
businesses have donated gift cer-
tificates and prizes for winners
the press release states.
The Ronald McDonald House
opened in June and has the capac-
ity to serve approximate!v 20
families, according to the press
release
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 24, 19K7
k
w
ersit that it wasn t totalk in hi hands
West h is up to the board of trustees to
make that determination ot what
ii they would like (to work
S3 j next he said
1 think it (the appropriation'
speaks well of the chancellor and
board in their planning ol
se programs Warren sa d
�se added facilities will en
hance our total program foi
. ��� n but the w
EC1
fit Carolinian
tnc
esentives
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The chancellor talks hnrk-

School must be good neighbor
Continued from page 1
upon reflection, decide upon a
course of action which will indeed
resume the football series be-
tween the two universities "
Speaking to the issue of press
coverage of the event, Eakin said
the reporting has ranged from
being "entirely fair" and "objec-
tive" to "undulvharshandcriti-
cal
He added, "In particular, there
were a couple of editorials that 1
thought missed the mark and
made some rather broad and
sweeping allegations about this
university uhat were not cor-
rect)
Eakin refused to comment
about specific editorials.
Eakin said manv people have
suggested to him' that TV and
newspaper accounts of the inci-
dent could be used as evidence to
While the ECU-NCSU incident
was easily visible to people across
the state, Eakin said the Biltmore
Street mishap has affected ECU'S
image at home.
At about 6 p.m. August 29,
Greenville Police arrested three
ECU students at an unauthorized
bring some of the students re-
sponsible for the damage before
the honor board.
"I have problems with that
Eakin said. "I just simply don't
believe it's possible, given the
chaos that we saw there, that one
could with any degree of reliabil-
ity make the judgment that just
because someone was on the field
that that individual wasguiltvof
destructive behavior andor vio-
lence
Eakin said he believes that
"individuals also do have funda-
mental rights that we at the uni-
versity cannot trample upon. So
I'm trying to do my best to respect
everyone's rights, but at the same
time make it clear that we will not
tolerate mob violence
Eakin also said he does not be-
lieve the cheerleaders contributed
either intentionally or
unintentionally to violent behav-
ior alter the game.
"I think that in many respects,
many people in this whole epi-
sode have been victims; and a lot
of us have been victims in the
sense that we, our institution has
been victimized bv the behavior
block party on Biltmore Street and ot a few people
Panel to discuss corrections
(ECU News Bureau) � "Cor-
rections: Crisis and Opportunity"
will be the topic for the annual
meeting of the N C. Association of
Criminal iustiee Educators Fn-
dav
The meeting, hosted bv the
department of Criminal Justice in
the East Carolina University
School of Social Work, will be held
at the Greenville Hilton begin-
ning at 9 a.m.
Keynote speaker for the pro-
gram will be iG. Moeller, an
ECU professor emeritus of correc-
tions and a former consultant to
the United Nations on correc-
tions. Moeller was also deputy
director of the US. Bureau ofpris-
ons and was the past president ot
the American Correctional Asso-
ciation. His presentation is sched-
uled for 9:15 a.m.
Moeller will be followed by a
panel discussion on corrections in
North Carolina. Panelists will
include Lattie Baker of the N.C
Department of Corrections and
Ben Irons, an assistant Attorney
General for North Carolina.
In the afternoon there will be a 2
p.m. panel discussion about aca-
demic programs in prisons with
Richard Kipley, David Chester
and Charles Ward of the N.C.
Department of Corrections; Dr.
esse McDaniel, president of Le-
noir Community College and Dr.
Maria O'Neil, dean of the ECU
of Social Work.
charged them each with different
violations ranging from drunk
and disruptive to assault on a
police officer.
Many students at the party
claim the arresting officers used
unnecessary force in arresting the
students. Police say they used
only enough force necessary to
arrest the students, faced with an
aggressive crowd.
Eakin said that although he
does not know who is at fault, the
Biltmore Street occurrence "cer-
tainly has affected our (ECU's)
image with that neighborhood.
There's no doubt of it. People in
the neighborhood were dis-
tressed with the events of that
afternoon
"I believe that it is incumbent
upon all of us � students, faculty,
staff alike � to be individually
and collectively good neighbors
"I intend to have a meeting
with the city manager and with
others that the city may wish to
have at the meeting and with
several student leaders to explore
ways in which we can, in fact,
improve the relationship
Eakin said he hopes people can
see that the "intolerable" actions
of a few hundred people have
come to unfairly represent the
attitude and feelings of the ECU's
population at large.
"We have a long rich history;
and even today, things are hap-
pening at this university in which
we should all take great pride.
And we should not allow that set
of circumstances to color the
reputation of East Carolina Uni-
versity
The university is moving on
from the past few weeks, and
Eakin is concentrating on such
projects as reviewing the
university'sstatement of mission,
increasing the number of minor-
ity student and faculty members,
becoming recognized by Phi Beta
Kappa and beginning new Ph.D.
programs, he said.
After having been chancellor
for about seven months, Eakin
said he views the university as a
"freshman" and sees the univer-
sity through "fresh eyes I simply
believe that this university has
such promise, that it is and will
continue to be a very exciting
place to be
WALT DISNEY WORLD
COLLEGE PROGRAM
Walt Disney World representatives will present
an information session on the Walt Disney
World College Program on September 29 at
7:00 PM in Joyner Library. Room 221 (Old
Joyner). Attendance at this presentation is
required to interview for the Spring College
Program, January-May, 1988.
Major(s) considered: Hospitality, Speech
Communications, Business and Recreation.
For more information, contact: Dan Schull at
757-6979.
Ualt)isney World
States charged with fear
(CPS) - Despite all the talk, most
states are "afraid" to build "first
class" public campuses, a leading
education group charged Sept. 8.
"Some states seem afraid of
having a great university for fear
that it will become a political
threat or an expensive habit
charged Frank Newman, presi-
dent of the Education Commis-
sion of the States, which pub-
lished a report on nationwide
college reform called "Choosing
Qualitv" last week.
"Some simply do not believe
that they have within themselves
the ability to be first class New-
man added.
Newman figured "fewer than
25" states even are trying to im-
prove their college svstcrr
Greeks operate
charitv drive
The Panhellenic Council and
the Inter-Fraternity Council are
sponsoring a "Basketball Blow
Out to benefit the Ronald
McDonald House of Eastern
North Carolina, according to a
press release.
The fundraiser began Wednes-
day and concludes Friday. Stu-
dents have a chance to test their
skills shooting a basketball in
front oi the Student Store and area
businesses have donated gift cer-
tificates and prizes for winners,
the press release states.
The Ronald McDonald House
opened in June and has the capac-
ity to serve approximately 20
families, according to the press
release.
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Based on interviews with edu-
cators and government officials,
the report focused on about 100
major state universities.
Newman suggested campuses
focus their resources on programs
in which they can be outstanding,
and create a climate that will at-
tract high quality personnel. He
said state governments should
create incentives for campus lead-
ers to improve instead of legislat-
ing changes in the ways colleges
are run.
No state lacks the ability to have
a top state university, Newman
said, naming Ohio as one state
that has invested in quality col-
lege programs even as its econ-
omy has foundered.
JEAN HOPPER
BROKEROWNER
Res. 919756-9142
Whether it's Ringgod Towers Condos or
single family homes, we can find a place for
. you!
1807 Charles B!vd
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I9U�1 HOC'S'K
East Carolina UniveTsityStiidgrrt'Urifi
Major Concerts Committee presents
HOMECOMING
CONCERT
Featuring
THE FIXX
Thursday, October 8th, 8:00 p.m.
MINGES COLISEUM
Tickets:
$7.00 students
$9.00 general public
Tickets on sale
Central Ticket Office
Sept. 24th.
I
�-rrT

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i � � �
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�ije feust (Sarnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, c��jM��f�
An Clay Deanh ardt, m� e�
TimCuS jAMESF B McKEE-���fAhf
Cl av rt DLER'� ANTl tONY MARTIN, . ��-�,
S1mT�DN1,ARDT'Fr MEG Neediiamm
Drnm1 YAW' MlKE Ura ,URC' �-�-
DEBBIE STEVENS, s- jOI N S. MEDL.N, �w
September 24, iJ87
Opinion
Page h
Integrity
Wolfpack should clean den
Integrity.
We have heard the word again and
again over the past several weeks as
the university has been assailed for
the "riot" at'the ECU-NCSU game
on Sept. 5.
The NCSU Athletic Council even
put a one-year moratorium on the
series in order to preserve the integ-
rity of the game. Jim Valvano,
XCSU's athletic director basket-
ball coach media star, consistantly
derided ECU students for their part
in the incident. Always he said he
was worried only about integrity in
college athletics
Hypocrisy.
Hypocrisy is what happens when
you throw stones before making
sure you have not sinned. Hypoc-
risy is what happens when vou can-
cel a football game, crediting alcohol
abuse as an element in the decision,
while you use athletic department
funds to buy beer. Hypocrisy is the
perfect word for the state of affairs at
State.
A just-completed audit of the ath-
letic department at NCSU was re-
leased to the public Monday. It cited
many dubious financial practices
within the department, including
the use of department funds to buy a
portable stereo, beer and wine.
Construction projects were under-
taken through the Wolfpack Club,
thus circumventing state laws that
require bids to be taken before con-
tracts are signed.
In addition, money from the sale of
concert t-shirts in "Reynolds Coli-
� seum was improperly diverted to a
special discretionary fund for the
athletic director. Travel money was
used to pay tips of $25 to $110 with
no explanation. Complimentary
tickets to football games were sold
through the State box office with no
explanation of where the extra profit
went, and the list goes on.
To their credit, Wolfpack adminis-
trators have taken the audit and
made promises to change the ac-
counting practices of the athletic
department and make the 45 im-
provements that were reccom-
mended in the audit. Also it must be
noted that most of the violations, but
not all, took place under Athletic
Director Willis Casey and not Val-
vano. It must also be allowed that
everyone is entitled to mistakes.
Still, these are mistakes that
should not have been made. In addi-
tion to those items listed above, the
university was double-charged for
several things because of lax ac-
counting. That money has now been
paid back.
There are some things, though,
which are inexcusable no matter
what reparations are made. For in-
stance, using department funds to
buy alcoholic beverages is both
against the law and against every-
thing college athletics is striving for
in today's society.
In a time when we are constantly
stressing the importance of saying
no to drugs and alcohol, and when
so many great athletes have ruined
their lives because of both, it is sad to
think that athletic funds went to-
wards that purchase, no matter who
it is for.
From the point of view of ECU, it is
also somewhat laughable that
NCSU denounced pre-game drink-
ing in light of where its money is
going.
The other inexcusable "mistake" is
awarding construction contracts
through the Wolfpack Club (similar
to our Pirate Club � a private ath-
letic booster organization) for uni-
versity improvements, tl is bypass-
ing the required bidding process.
Not only is it illeagal, it could raise
some questions to outsiders as to
whether those that got the contracts
were part of the club or not. This
uncertainty does not say much for
the integrity of NCSU athletic offi-
cials. One of these contracts was
signed Oct. 1, 1986, three months
after Valvano became director.
An unreasonable person could
suggest that, to salvage the integrity
of the NCSU athletic department, a
one year moratorium should be put
on all Wolfpack Club operations.
We won't. That would be ridicu-
lous. In all reality, many of the viola-
tions could have been honest mis-
takes that came with a rapidly grow-
ing program as NCSU officials have
mentioned. It also must be noted
that most of the violations took place
before the Valvano era. Therefore,
though his nose is slightly brown, it
is not as dirty as Casey's.
The point here is that the viola-
tions happened, and that several of
them appeared intentional. That
shows a lack of integrity.
The administration there is taking
steps to remedy the problem, which
is commendable. Still, we find it
strange that $7,000 in damage by
ECU fans is a lead story one week,
while thousands more in misused
funds by NCSU the next isn't. We
also wonder why Valvano is being
so protected and mentioned so sel-
dom in all this when several of the
violations did occur during his short
tenure. It is not healthy for a new
administrator to continue the mis-
deeds of his predecessors until
caught, then apologize and attempt
to make corrections.
Most of all we wonder how NCSU
can speak any longer about integrity
in college athletics. It has become a
classic case of the pot calling the
kettle black, and until NCSU has a
clean athletic program it should re-
frain from belittling the fans and
administrators of another.
. y
Contra debate continues
By MICHAFL KINSLEY
The New Republic
As Henry Kissinger observes (and I once thought my fin-
gers would fall off before typing those words), the missing
element in Central America is any clear sense of what the
United States will settle for in Nicaragua. Genuine democracy
would be nice, of course. Not just in Nicaragua, but also in the
Soviet Union, South Africa, Chile, etc. But we don't ordinarily
insist on it under threat of war.
The official Reagan administration position is that anything
less than a squeaky-clean Minnesota-style civil-liberation
democracy by Nov. 7 on the dot (the regional peace plan
deadline) is inadequate, and justifies new contra funding. If
so, the "peace process" is hopeless.
A hopeless, Potcmkin peace process is exactly what the
Reagan people thought they had started in August. It was
intended as nothing more than a curtain-raiser for this fall's
contra aid debate. But along came the Central American
leaders, and now there is panic that the peace process might
actually produce peace.
The other Central Americans have good reason to feel that
a democracy of gcmlike perfection should not be the only
effective antidote to a U.Ssponscred guerrilla war. Mexico,
for example, is an effective one-party state, maintained
through judicious election-stealing, which (as described in
the current Economist) "invests one office � the presidency
� with the temporary trappings of dictatorship including
the choice of a successor. Its economy is crippled bv wide-
spread state ownership. The government spews noxious an ti-
Yanqui Third-World-style rhetoric.
On the other hand, Mexico doesn't actually make any
mischief outside its own borders. Its press is free within limits,
enforced by the occaisonal shutdown or even murder of a
journalist. Trier's not much torture or arbitrary arrest, as these
things go. Only some government officialsare involved in the
drug trade.
Will this do? The Sandinistas, who are desperate, might
accept something like this, especially if accompanied by tha
hypocritical praise we lavish on Mexico's leaders and its
glorious revolution. By what logic do we impose years of war
on Nicaragua to demand something better?
Some say the Sandinistas are incorrigible Marxist-Leninists
who never will change or abandon their external ambitions.
It's all or nothing at all. If true, this condenms not only today's
peace efforts but the contra campaign itself at anything like
today's level. Kissinger: "The contra aid so far'requested
could not achieve the administration's stated objectives by
military means
The grand political illusion of the Reagan era. indu
both foreign and domestic issues, has been that gi
can be achieved at no great cost. I call it the Grenada IHus
after the exception that proves the rule Thecosl in thi
not just to America but to the people we're ostensibly tr
to help.
The Nicaragua debate has taken place in ai ml
wonderland where opponents charge thai the i i ti
heartless thugs and administration supporters point I
lions being spent on "human rights training P.
human rights training isgoing to prevent civilian
a guerrilla war.
More fundamentally, an effective contra war woul
more, not fewer, attacks on cooperative farms, fuel
electricity grids. That's the whole idea ol guerrill i ,� �
pacitating the country. This would mean years I I
misery, poverty, disease and starvation forNicar is
furtheryearsof instability torCen'ra! America V
supporters think the cost is worth paying. But thev si
honest about the cost, especially sinv they won
To Senator John McCain it's all a game, or perhai
"Colonel Bermudez (the contra commander' send?
best regards he smirked to Daniel Ortega
Managua. "Colonel Bermudez and Ror i I
stop killing Nicaraguan children Ort pa rei
war! The contras brag about killing an arm . '
while in Managua mere's congressional delee it
and thecommandarrte-in-chiet is h.mrrtrthema 11 m
- 1 -
"The civil war began'� Nftcaf&gua" wYS �� (1
promised vou democracy, but tailed to meel theii
ment said President Reagan on contra radii
civil war actually began years earlier when thi S m
were in the hills and "the hated dictal I '�
(Reagan again) was in the warm embrace l I
You can't blame the Sandinistas for d
America's sudden and selective passion lor :
of the border.
Yes, yes, vou can blame them for plenty else M
Sandinista revolution would mellow if every n
didn't have to be seen asa concession to Yanqui imp
Maybe not. It takes a pretty hardened crew to ous
trenched, superpower-supported dictatorship in a
guerrilla campaign. That, as it happens, is another reas
less-than-ideal peace settlement is more ideal than con tint
� and, inevitably, expanding � the contra war
rfevj.
Possible contra cease-fire for Sandinistas in exchange for democracy
The East Carolinian
Editorial page
By MORTON KONDRACKE
The New Republic
Peace, democracy and hemispheric
security might be advanced by the Arias
plan if democrats outside Nicaragua
force the Sandinistas to live up to the
accord they signed.
A debacle is more likely � the disman-
tling of the contras in exchange for some
token steps toward democracy. If this
occurs, the United States will be seen as
abandoning yet another force of indige-
nous fighters who depended upon us.
The third possible outcome is the likeli-
est: that the Guatemala plan will fall
apart.
The peace plan's author, Costa Rican
president Oscar Arias, said that on Nov. 7
he will "pass judgment" on whether the
Sandinistas are following the plan's
terms, but he is not optimistic about their
compliance.
Various U.S. officials insist that when
Arias met with President Reagan on June
17, he said that if the Sandinistas failed to
democratize, "you will be free to do your
thing Arias denied this to me, but all
over Latin America there is evidence that
leaders and populations expect the
United States to act like a great power and
deal with the Sandinista threat.
A poll conducted by an affiliate of Gal-
lup International � published in Guate-
mala the day the Arias agreement was
signed � strongly suggests that the con-
tra policy has public support in Central
America and the Sandinistas do not.
The Sandinistas' strategy for dealing
with the Arias plan seems directed
straight at the U.S. congress. They want
the contras off their backs at the cheapest
possible price in terms of democratiza-
tion � perhaps at no cost at all, if collapse
of the Arias plan can be blamed on the
Reagan administration and if furious
Democrats in Congress then cut off con-
tra aid in revenge.
The Guatemala agreement also con-
tains ambiguities that the Sandinistas are
free to exploit in order to torpedo the pact.
The Sandinistas are spreading word
that they are ready to comply with the
pact's democratization requirements,
and that they are likely to take steps
showing good faith in advance of Nov. 7.
With respect to the contras, the Sandin-
istas want it both ways: They say the force
is less than a third as big as the United
States claims, that it's demoralized and
having no success on the battlefield, yet
also that it's the cause of Nicaragua's
economic misery and suspension of the
constitution under the state ot emer-
gency.
The bottom line is that Sandinismo
stands for political pluralism, a mixed
economy and a nonaligned foreign pol-
icy, and that only the enmity of the United
States prevents its pacific success. The
logical conclusion is that the United
States should cut off the contras and give
peace a chance.
But by the evidence of history and the
testimony of honest people who try to
live under the Sandinistas, all of this is a
collosal deception.
The truth is that the Sandinistas are
Marxist-Leninists, allies of the Soviet
Union and believers in world revolution.
Far from making life better for the Nicara-
guan people, the Sandinistas have made
it worse for almost everybody.
Hiding behind a "democratic mask
the Sandinistas have always acted like
ruthless Communists. They killed some
800 persons after taking power. Peasants
in the country side suspected of collabo-
rating with the contras are often jailed for
years, tortured and sometimes killed.
During the 1984 elecftions, rallies and
speeches of opposition candidates were
broken up by Sandinista toughs.
Amid all this, Managua is a desperate
and sad city.
The Sandinistas blame their woes on
the contras and America, but they I
caused most of their economic probk n
themselves by confiscating land and
truning most of it over to collect;
economy is ostensibly 50 percent ir
vate hands, but the government
businesses what ti produce what pi
to charge, what to pay workers and fur
nishes materials-which are almost al
ways in shortage � cm the basis ot politi-
cal loyalty. The annual inflation rat
more that 1,100 percent.
One gets the strong feeling that
Sandinistas signed on to the Ana- ,
out of desperation. What the Sandinistas
want isa respite from the contra struggk
which, by their own accounts, is cosl
the lives of 100 soldiers a month
driving the economy to the brink of rum
The contras create leverage for tlu
United States and other democracies
almost certainly there would be no rias
pact without them � and thev provide
the only hope there is of making the
Sandinistas live up to the terms ot the
Guatemala agreement.
To make this goal a reality requires
determined action on the part of the
world's democrats. This effort needs pri-
vate financial and moral support 1:
fractured internal opposition needs
unify and it needs training that co
come from the political parties in tin-
United Statcs-or, better vet, thedemocra
cies of Europe and Latin America
Above all, the internal opposition the
contras, the Reagan administration am:
the Latin American democracies need U
develop lists and timetables spelling out
standards of conduct that they expect th
Sandinistas to meet. Watchdog group-
American and international, need to be
formed to monitor Sandinista compli
ance, and groups such as the Organiai
tion of American States need to be read)
to inflict strong sanctions if the Sand mi-
tas show signs of cheating.
'
"
ir���w. '�m.io�����m ,i niiea in �,im'im
,ru,M �i fr�ini,)�leij a,�, m- ��e� �uMfc .���
� �
"� " �� I "iimniwiiwiiw �n"wwi
U. of Tennl
KNUXVJLLfc, Tenn. (CPS) -
After a major controversy, the
University of Tennessee has de
oded to apply its no-dnnkmg-on-
campus rules to nonstudents
On Sept 1, the school's athletic
department reversed an earlier
decision, and banned alcohol
from the expensive new stadium
sky boxes it leases to corporations
and alumni
Earlier this summer, as the lux-
ury stadium boxes were under
construction, Tennessee officials
said patrons would be all
store and drink alcohol in the 4:
sky boxes because they are con
sidered leased property
Except for a faculty club, thev
would be the only places on cam-
pus where
drink hquol
Trustees bai
campus whl
minimum
21
"There
Tennessee
Ass.
said
-v i"
happy a'
pus. Al !
campus I
designated
student
"Thi
i
explain.
Study says bu
(CPS � Reports of the bulin
epidemic among college i
women are inaccurate, a rdini gnil inti
to a new study.
A 1981 survey at one collegi
reported bulimia affected as �� -
many as 19 percent of the women I
on campus, and at least one popu- - I ti
lar magazine suggested that half ; .
the women on campuses suffer cal S
from eating disorders, according rinsta
to a report in the journal of the
American Medical Association.
However, recent research con-
ducted at the University o( Penn- ally
sylvania indicates that only about
1.3 percent of female students and "Ot:
0 1 percent of male students actu- bin.
ally fit the clinical diagnosis ot ;
bulimia, or binge-purge syn-
Med school enrollmel
CHICAGO, 111. (CPS) - Fewer
students are going on to med
school, and the reasons may be
that there are too manv doctors
already and that students are
unwilling to take on an averac. I
$33,000 in debt to graduate, two
med school groups said last week
The groups � the American
Medical Association and the As-
sociation for Medical Colleges
(AMO � reached those conclu-
J sions as part of a probe into why
med school enrollments are drop-
ping.
"If s extraordinarily difficult to
identify any one factor" in the
decline in enrollments, said
Robert L. Beran of the AMC.
Beran said the number of medi-
cal school applicants is expected
to drop9 percent this fall, continu-
ing a five-year trend.
Students may believe there are
too many doctors, in keeping with
a 1980 report predicting a glut ot
physicians by the 1990s, said
Beran.
But they may also be scared
away by the likelihood thev will
owe more than $33,000 bv the
Students don't
think about sex
NEW YORK, NY. (CPS) �
College and high school students
don't think about sex as often as
most people assume, researchers
have found
Researchers pressenting papers
at the annual meeting ot the
American Psychological Associa-
tion Aug. 30. in fact, said students
think about sex only about 1 per-
cent of the time.
"This may be surprising con-
cluded Eric Klingcr. a psychology
professor at the University:
Minnesota who outfitted ; stu-
dents with beepers and had them
record what thev were thinking
when they got a signal from the
devices.
Students spent about 20 percent
of their time thinking about a
"task at hand 14 percent ot their
time "just looking at or listening
to something t percent of their
time "problem-solving 3 per-
cent of their time in "sell evalu-
ation 2 percent of their time
"telling themselves what to de !
percent ot their time in anger
and another 1 percent it East
thinking about sex
The remainder ot the students
thoughts concerned ether
people
Students themselves mav be
surprised by the finding added
Edward Donner, a University ot
Chicago scientist whose research
also found students don t think
about sex all that much
Yet thoughts about sex are more
emotionally charged han Other
so they seem more prominent
when teens are asked to ltd
what they are thinking about
Donner explained

their a
v.as S3�
In ll from m "
debt of$15
TTC
LTJ
I
r
r
' - - "I
-

J





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 24. 1987
&&
�1�ioTV
r -r
t
�ontinues
in exchange for democracy
i the

tas
i mimthand
-ruin, r the Arias uide � the
nttent the
il a rellltVrcuires
' � '� i ' ' n the part of the
5" nocrats. This effort needs pri-
ial and moral support. The
nternal opj l m needs to
' it needs training that could
� n the political parties in the
I �' ites-or,hitter � � ocra-
ic mas) and Latin mei
icted lift bove all, the internal opi I n, the
led som contras Iministration and
ints the Iatin American dcmrx r eed to
� ollabo- develop lists and timetables gout
I tiled for standards! A i onducl that theyexpecl the
I killed Sandinistas to meet Watchdog groups,
lilies and American and international, need to he
ere termed to monitor Sandinista compli-
s. �' and groups such as the Organiza-
� n of American States need to be ready
to inflict strong sanctions it the Sandinis-
?ir woes on tasshow signs of cheating.
U. of Tenn. extends its no-drinking regulations
KNUXVILLE, Tenn (CPS) �
After a major controversy, the
University of Tennessee has de-
cided to apply its no-drinking-on-
campus rules to nonstudents, too.
On Sept. 1, the school's athletic
department reversed an earlier
decision, and banned alcohol
from the expensive new stadium
sky boxes it leases to corporations
and alumni
Earlier this summer, as the lux-
ury stadium boxes were under
construction, Tennessee officials
said patrons would be allowed to
store and drink alcohol in the 42
sky boxes because they are con-
sidered leased property.
Except for a faculty club, they
would be the only places on cam-
pus where people are allowed to
drink liquor, since the Board of
Trustees barred alcohol from the
campus when the state raised its
minimum legal drinking age to
21.
"There was quite an uproar
Tennessee Student Government
Association President Rusty Gray
said.
"A lot of people felt very un-
happy about it. This is a dry cam-
pus. Alcohol is not allowed on
campus. All of a sudden there's a
designated area for alcohol, and
students felt like that was unfair
"This showed that they listened
to what we had to say Gray
explained. "It was a good deci-
sion
"The university felt like it was
in its best interests to have a con-
sistent policy on alcohol on cam-
pus said Tennessee Associate
Athletic Director Mitch Barnhart.
"While the boxes were being
leased Tennessee Executive
Vice President Joe Johnson said,
"alcohol came up. Since the sky
boxes provide a controlled envi-
ronment, and is separate from the
rest of the stadium, we felt that
what ever a person does, as long
as it's legal and ethical, should be
a decision made by the person
who leases the box
When students objected and
pressured the trustees to review
the issue, Tennessee's athletic
department decided to ban liquor
from the boxes.
"The questions raised by stu-
dents were legitimate Johnson
said. "Since the issues were being
raised, we decided we'd go back
to where we were
Despite the ban on alcohol, all
42 of the sky boxes � which rent
for $24,000 a year � have been
leased, Barnhart said. "We
haven't had any cancellations
Allowing drinking in stadium
sky boxes has become an issue on
other campuses as well.
Last week, the University of
Arizona's regents debated � but
failed to decide � whether to let
fans drink alcohol in the sky boxes
to be built at Arizona Stadium,
where liquor is otherwise banned
And last fall The Traveller, the
University of Arkansas' student
newspaper, published photos of
local liquor store employees car-
rying boxes of alcohol up to sta-
dium sky boxes, where some fans
apparently violated a stadium
drinking prohibition.
But the issue tends to fade
quickly in many places.
In 1984, University of Florida
students protested a decision to
allow sky box renters to drink
liquor despite a campuswide
prohibition.
Now, however, "it's a moot
point here said student govern-
ment leader Jeff Jonasen.
The reason, Florida Athletic
Director Bill Arnsbarger ex-
plained, is that the sky boxes are
"owned or rented by the individ-
ual a status that apparently ex-
empts the fans from the local
drinking regulations.
Exempting people who can't
afford sky boxes, Arnsbarger
added, would be impractical be-
cause "a guy going up and down
selling beer would have to ask
everybody for an ID. It's obvious
that would present a problem
"It doesn't bother me Jonasen
said. "I don't think there should
be alcohol in the stadium. The sky
boxes are a controlled environ-
ment. It would be unsafe to have
people drinking in the seats be-
cause they'd get rowdy and de-
structive
Study says bulimia reports innacurate
y
(CPS) � Reports of the bulimia
epidemic among college-age
women are inaccurate, according
to a new study.
A 1981 survey at one college
reported bulimia affected as
many as 19 percent of the women
on campus, and at least one popu-
lar magazine suggested that half
the women on campuses suffer
from eating disorders, according
to a report in the Journal of the
American Medical Association.
However, recent research con-
ducted at the Universitv of Penn-
sylvania indicates that onlv about
1.3 percent of female students and
P 1 percent of male students actu-
ally fit the clinical diagnosis of
bulimia, or binge-purge syn-
drome.
"What we found is that a very
significant number of people who
respond to these surveys are those
who are interested in eating be-
haviors, and that that group tends
to overemphasize said David E.
Schotte, an assistant professor of
psychology at the Chicago Medi-
cal School.
"For instance, many report that
they fast frequently. On followup,
we found this to mean for some
that thev skip breakfast occasion-
ally
"Others characterized an eating
binge as eating a large bag of
potato chips while studying,
while bulimics tend to consume
thousands and thousands of do-
ries at one time, often in secret,
followed by self-induced vomit-
ing added Schotte, who co-au-
thored the Journal report with Dr.
Albert Stunkard of the University
of Pennsylvania.
Stunkard said the most impor-
tant factor the researchers used to
differentiate between bulimia
and bulimic behavior was
whether the respondents purged
their systems after eating � cspe-
Med school enrollment drops
CHICAGO, 111. (CPS) � Fewer
students are going on to med
school, and the reasons may be
that there are too many doctors
already and that students are
unwilling to take on an average of
$33,000 in debt to graduate, two
med school groups said last week.
The groups � the American
Medical Association and the As-
sociation for Medical Colleges
iAMQ � reached those conclu-
sions as part of a probe into why
mod school enrollments are drop-
ping.
"It's extraordinarily difficult to
identify any one factor" in the
decline in enrollments, said
Robert L. Beran of the AMC
Beran said the number of medi-
cal school applicants is expected
to drop9 percent this fall, continu-
ing a five-year trend.
Students may believe there are
too many doctors, in keeping with
a 1980 report predicting a glut of
physicians by the 1990's, said
Beran.
But they may also be scared
away by the likelihood they will
owe more than $33,000 by the
Students don't
think about sex
NEW YORK, N.Y. (CPS) �
College and high school students
don't think about sex as often as
most people assume, researchers
have found.
Researchers pressenting papers
at the annual meeting of the
American Psychological Associa-
tion Aug. 30, in fact, said students
think about sex only about 1 per-
cent of the time.
"This may be surprising con-
cluded Eric Klinger, a psychology
professor at the University of
Minnesota who outfitted 39 stu-
dents with beepers and had them
record what they were thinking
when they got a signal from the
devices.
Students spent about 20 percent
of their time thinking about a
"task at hand 14 percent of their
time "just looking at or listening
to something 6 percent of their
time "problem-solving 3 per-
cent of their time in "self evalu-
ation 2 percent of their time
"telling themselves what to do 1
percent of their time in "anger"
and another 1 percent, at last,
thinking about sex.
The remainder of the students'
thoughts concerned "other
people
Students themselves may be
surprised by the finding, added
Edward Donner, a University of
Chicago scientist whose research
also found students don't think
about sex all that much.
Yet thoughts about sex are more
emotionally charged than others,
so they seem more prominent
when teens are asked to recall
what they are thinking about,
Donner explained.
time they graduate.
Most medical students borrow
to finance their educations, and
their average debt on graduating
was $33,499 in 1986, the AMC
noted.
In 1980, students graduated
from med school with an average
debt of $15,421, the panel said.
cially if a laxative was used.
"That's where the great drop-
off between our survey and others
came
College students, because of
dating and status pressures, may
be more susceptible to eating dis-
orders, according to the report.
But, said Schotte, "an occa-
sional abnormal eating pattern or
an obsession about such patterns
is not the same thing as a bulimia
epidemic'
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SREENVIUE � the Plaza
HUNGRY
Peace Presbyterian Church
(a new church development-near campus)
Invites You
TO LUNCH
All FCU Students and faculty are invited to worship
and then LUNCH, this Sunday, September 27th.
Every Sunday at the
Rotarv Building
(corner of Rotary &
Johnson) 9:45 - Sunday School
11:00 Worship
Bill Goodnight - Pastor 757-0302
BMtg
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N
TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 24, 1987
Classifieds
a K CVfaSh,�n f�rWard khl
quir�S a. a�,hinR "P-l� is re-
ar A Her an "�S� s'�'ng sal
rw)PP ���- fc�dy's Personnel
"tor. C arolma East Mall M VV 2 4 Pm
BRol)Y.s. ,Js paM.hmesaJcs asMVla
P'hons for enthusiastic, out going tnd.
. , ls "� ��Py working with young
temporary Junior fashions Good Sal
w Apply in person, Brody's Personnel
1 "rector. Carolina East Mall M VV 2 4 pm
A LEADING CLOTHING RFTAILER:
�s a hl" time office associate to work
" fc dividual must be accurate and
possess skills in accounting bookkoep
wg Salary based on experience Cood
�Ury and benefits package Apply in
person or call tor interview appointment
Hidith C Simon. Brody's Personnel Direc-
tor M VV 2 4pm 7Sb 2224
NATIONAL MARKETING FIRM:
seeks aggressive individual or student
organization to run campus wiue credit
card marketing program Excellent part
lime fob or fund raiser Call Dennis at
(SIX)) 592-2121
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING
ACCEPTED: Tor students wishing to
serve on Universiu Committees for 1967-
year Questions about University
( om nut toes may be directed to the Office
of the Vice Chancellor for Student 1 He
757-6541
GREENHOUSE TECHNICIANS
NEEDED: Tor Part time employment
Flexible hours Weekends and alter
school. Call 75cv(XS79.
GOVERNMENT JOBS: $16,040-
S59,230yr. Now hiring Call 805-687
6000 Ext R 1 lo6 for current federal list
OVERSEAS JOBS: Also Cnnseships,
Travel. 1 lotels Listings. Now 1 liring To
S94K. 805-687-6000Ext OJ-116b
AIRLINES NOW HIRING: Right Atten
dants. Travel Agents, Mechanics, Cus-
tomer Service Listings Salaries to SiVlk
Entry level postitions Call 805-687 wXXI
Ext. A-lit.
STOCKBROKER TRAINEE: College
Crad, Opportunity for hardworking, en
thusiastic individual. Send resume to
P.O. Box 8814 Virginia Beach VA 23450
MACKENZIE SECURITY: Is seeking
students to work as part-time, weekend
security guards Good Pav' Must have
dependable transportation to work.
MUST have telephone. MUST NOT have
police record Apply in person at 1127
South Evans Street. 758-2174.
FOR RFNT
WF ROOMATF NEEDED: in 2 bedroom
apartment at Wilson Acres No deposit
Manv Extra Call 7s btC
ROOMATF WANTED: Private room 2
bedroom apt on Jarvis St. 1 blk from
'2 utlihes Call Nancy
rH-M.sb
3NE BEDROOM SPECIAL TAR RIVER
ESTATES: S1S0 off 1st month rent when
igning a 12 month lease or the option to
ign a 9 month lease 14iR1
AillowSt �1 7S2-4225.
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE
WANTED: To share contemporary home
Tireplace, Loft, Pool, AC and much
more! If you're tired of campus housing,
his is what you have been looking for!
rail 3S3-66S6 after 8 p.m.
RESPONSIBLE ROOMATE WANTED:
To share 2 bedroom Apt at Wedgewood
Arms $120 mo 13 utilities. Will have
own room Interested Parties call 355-
7824 After 2 pm. Ask for Tina or Dawn.
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apts for rent-
furnished. Contact I lolhe Simonowich
752-2865.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Queen - 4 poster - pine - Semi-
waveless waterbed 3 years old - 20yr.
warranty, heater. Paid $600.00 asking
5250.00 neg 355-3572 Anytime.
FOR SALE: Budweiser Keg tapping Kit
Contact Scott 758-2479.
FOR SALE: Vinyl sofa contact Scott 758-
2479.
TYPING AND WORD PROCESSING:
Two copies for the price of one' From SI. 50
a page. Also, custom signs, banners and
greeting cards 752-9637.
PERSONAL COMPUTER TUTORING!
Learn to use a PC! (There are dozens avail-
able on campus.) Instructions and free
word processing software. 752-9637.
DORM SIZE WASHER & REFRIGERA-
TOR, SI 00 00 each Guaranteed and Good
condition.
APARTMENT SIZE RANGE A RE-
FRIGERATOR, S100.00 each Guaran-
teed and Good condition.
WORD PROCESSING: Letter quality or
laser printing. Rush jobs accepted. 752-
1933.
OUR COMPANY, DELTA IMAGES,
Will produce a professional T.V News,
Resume tape for you at a resonable price
Your voice and stand-ups professionally
edited with actual news footage. Also
have your tape distributed nationally via
satellite to potentionally hundreds of
news directors, consultans and agents.
Production crew scheduled in your area
soon. Call for futher information 919-933-
8929.
FOR ALL THE STUDENTS: Who missed
the Grand Opening Extravaganza Open-
ing at Jenni K Jewelry bring your ECU
ID and receive 30 off all sterling
Jewlelry: 608 Arlmgotn Blvd Suite E. 355-
6714
ELECTROYLYSIS: (permenant removal
of unwanted hair) by Barbara Venteis
People who understand electrolysis will
not wax, twecze or use electonic tweezer
or any other tempc-ary method Isn't it
time to trv the permanent method Call
830-02 tor free consultation
NEED TYPING? Call Cindy 757 0398
Call anytime after 5:00 p.m. Low rates
include proofreading, spelling and gram
matical corrections; professional service
10 years experience IBM TYPING
DISK JOCK1E: The imitations are simply
that TRASHMAN DJ service Golden
grooversbody movers, new wax, new
wave, top 40, anv mixer, social. Bar
Mitzpha, pool party, etc contact 752-
3587 1 laving a party and need a DJ?
PROFESSIONAL BUT NOT
EXPENSIVE! Progressive Data Services
offers professional word processing to
students and professionals Term papers,
dissertations, themes, reports and much
more as low as SI .75 per page. (Please call
for quote on your protectPrice includes
printing on high quality bond paper and
spelling verification against a O.(XX) word
electronic dictionary Ask about our spe
cial offers COMING SXN - LASER
PRINTING SYSTEM" Call Mark at 757
3440 after 7 00 p m. for free information
NEED TYPING DONE? Call 758 1161
until 500 p.m. Call 758 211" after 500
p m. Ask for Kim
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying semes We also sell
software and computer diskettes 24
hours in and out Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional computer Servies, 106 East
5th Street (Beside Cubbies) Greenville
N.C. 752 3h"4
PICK UP AND DELIVERY: Of term
papers, theses, rcsiimes.to be typed IBM
wordprocessing by professional with 13
yearsexpetence. Letter Quality print and
professional editing Call Nanette in
Grifton at 1-524 5241 Cheap call the best
service!
IS IT TRUF: You Can Buv Jeeps for S44
through the U.S. government? Get the
facts today! Call 1-312 742-1142 Ext 5271
A
PERSONALS
,ii
THE "BOND" Will be performing al
Wrong Way Corngans on Thurs Sept 24
Come and party with the BOND
ATTENTION LADIES: The sorors of the
Theta Alpha chapter ot the Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority, Ino would like to invite
you to our fail Formal Rush party on
Sunday, September 27, 1987, 7:(X) p m at
the Ledonia S Wright Cultural Center
Please come out and find mil more of wh.it
AKA is about Thank you
CONGRATULATIONS : To the new ot
fuiers of the AOTT Beta kappa pledge
class Pies Laurie Evans, Vice Pres , Pam
Barbour; Treasurer, Becky Carter, Secre
tary, Susan Donovan; Philanthropy, Al
exis Bobbins; Social Chairman Felicia
Parker, Public Relations, Sharma liar
ness; Chaplin, Denise Clifton; Panhellenk
Exec Lisa Speaks, Panhellenic Delegates,
Juliette Cramer & Amy Stewart I ixiking
forward to a great semester of pledging
So get psyched1
TKE PRESENTS: Monday Night Football
at Sub Station! 8 30 until Come fumble
with the best!
PART. M. I'm not wasted and I'm not
sleepy and I still think you re beautiful
and 1 still think you're a great person
I lope to get to know you better No one
can have loo many friends G.
PI KAPPA PHI: We would like to thank
the AOTTs for their help with our Bca h
night during Rush last week
KAPPA ALPHA PSL Will be having .i
Ladies tight jeans contest al the Wiz II on
Friday nite Free admission for the first 10
ladies that sign up at the Student book
Store The Nupes.
AOTT, A special thanks to the Beta lota's
and the Beta Kappa's for your help last
weekend! We love our wedgemocs! the
sisters of AOTT.
T.T Thanks for being a friend Get psy
iTied tor Tues & Wed Love Ya - Little Liz
BIG E- Don't be so nosy! This is it The
broom means time to play, lets play Love
Ya Dumplin'
T.J Thanx for burvmg the hatchet 1 mis
sed the "hack" jokes and the get right
attitude Any level is belter than no level at
all B Jem
MIKI C.R A VES (RED), The girls upstairs
have voted you "Phallic head of the Urn
verse (Probably pretty small too!) do
yourself a favor and hide your less than
average face because hell hath no fury and
we play hard ball' P S 1 wouldn't pick you
oft the bottom of my shoe. The Bitches
PARTY WITH THE SIG EPS: Wednes
da) night at pm I lappy I lour at Tequila
Bar!
AlPHA SIG HAPPY HOUR: Thursday
night at i.qinla Hat1 Partv with the am
mals!
ARE VOL READY TO ROCK AGAIN?
The Mood) Dudes will play Friday and
Saturday night at Tequila Bar!Come partv
with the Dudes!
THETA CHI: Welcomes the following
men into our organization: David Ar
ensdorf, Gary Brown, Troy Amato, Brad
I rev, Barry Bass, Phillip Warwocl. Buck
Wamon, and Mike Manlev Congratula-
tions Epsilon pledge class
THE BROTHERS OF ALPHA PHI
ALPHA: Will have ad. .�ce Sat night alter
the game at the Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center Admission SI
DZ'S: The brothers of Pi Kappa Phi would
like to thank you for a great Social Friday
night We're looking forward to partying
with you again
REWARD: Anv informantion leading to
the arrest of Person(s) involved in the
vandaliz.ation of a White Pont Fieroat the
top of the commuter lot next to the Psy
chology Building on Thursday September
17 between 7:30 am and 9 15 am (Damage
was a long scratch down the passenger
side) Please call 355 5244
ATTENTION: Don't forget Alpha Xi
Delta's Happy I lour Every Wednesday
night at Pantana's - It's the BEST excuse
for missing Thursday's classes'
DON'T FORGE. YOUR PARENTS:
And feed them at Rosina's Parents
weekend at Rosinas mom eaN fre
INTER VARSITY CHRISTIAN III
IOWSHIP: Please Oin US! Wednesday
Night's in Speight 129 at 7:00 pm Fun
Fellowship I�k1 Teaching
HANGOVER - You should have on.
when you're reading this Come to Sig I n
happy hour at Tequila bar on Wed nights
I HI. SOC IAI VV I HI DZ'S: Was
great But George, I don tunderstai I
the bus was late and .(. i .iirse I need ti
Stacy & Mark that the musu was ;�
and that weal! got oft loth daim � i
A the theme front Bat Man and where
Irc e get to around ten mi! I
been on top the root again' The last �
saw Deny, he was saving sometl
about zoom And Ki.k an.1 It. ir wen
scheming on 3 chicks in the frcx i
for Greenle, he was smasl i sin
beginning of the night ar Mr n I
also feeling right nd m- last tl
would like t.i ask Stew, Wh)
ride on the Moped too?
9eu' 'Deadlines for
CCassifieds and
Announcements
For Tuesdays paper Friday .ii
4:00 p.m.
For Thursdays papci Mi :
at 4:(X) p.in
Tired of the Dorm ?
Roommate Wanted!
Call 355-6686
Introducing
"NEW
KA: Thanks for making Wednesday night
at Pantana's a success You guvs wen'
great to partv with1 Love, the Alpha i
Delta's.
SPSIIKfAJ
J PIZZA and
SUBS
'IHF IlllhSntfl (��iullU N( 77�S�
For a hoideltaous pizza dekveied
to your (foot within 30runmles
Attention Attention!? Attention
Parent Weekend Spectacular
Bring in this AD with Your Parents
and Mom Can Eat Free
Thurs Frl, Sat Sun.
Hours: 11 a.m. lil 3 a.m.
Bring in your football ticket stub and
iet $2.00 off any large 2 Item Pizza.
Coming Next Week: Photo Center, see details next issue.
"Its a Winning Tradition
Tradition
ECU and the Beef Barn!
Join us for dinner after
the game
Special Saturday Football opeing Time of 5 p.m.
BEEF
BARN
r M
� -31
ars is in �
Jjjnrnw .�stTttfip 'ftnie.s �
400 St. Andrews Dr MonthsfrS&foutyULtmslI
756-1161 un. from 5:3ft to 9pm
tyllXcileilu.
NEW ARRIVALS OI
FALL MERCHANDISE
1
A
50 OFF'
Merchandise
! 756-7761
� California Concept Dresses
Carolina East Mall (Across from Krrr Drugs)
Sat. Sm. � Co
3(Xi�H-11 00
LAUNDROMAT
TH
t
Lounge
Video Games
Large Screen "Cable" TV
32 Washers 18 Dryers
Outside Patio
Flutf 6 Fold Service
Dp Cleaning Pick-L'p
Ample Pdiking
Attendant On Duty
Cold Beverages
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight, 7 Days A Week
2510 East 10th Street � Greenville NC .
E�nggla,iicls
premier pop
quintet is back.
Back to ttio
lojafenciai'y lineup
of Chris Difford &
(ilenn Tilbrook,
keyboard wizard
Jools Holland,
Grilson Lavis and
Ken Wilkinson.
Back with a ��mart,
wtreamlined album
full of witty, irresistibly
catchy pop gems. One listen
and you'll be baek for more.
Includes the hit,
TviiU�
The latest findings in wi4Sic and video
THE PLAZA CAROLINA EAST MALL


HWPPW.nii"i I ii nil ii win ii Ionian
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmtm
55
SPS CAR WASH Sat. Sept 26th at the
Fuel Doc on the comer of KXh St ��� M
bypws from 9 00 to 4 00 with a $2 dona � , eei
hon
IR1QLT5
Tryouts for the 1987-8S Pun .
Dancers wUI be Sept 29 Ail mterer ! CQQ
dancers must attend an organs-
meeting in room 143 of Minges Coiiseurr,
Thurs . Sept 24 at 7 p m For more info
call 757-6491
SMRA
The Student Medical Record ' � -
t�on is having a vard sale Sep: -
5pm at the Allied Health Bail:
on out andii(�se from a �, �
tng and other items
CQfjFiLHirjt
The Student L'nion ' ��
Committee is holding orx-n audit I -
all bands interested in performing �
upcoming events sponv.�:
feehouse Audjh.ns wi be held oi
Thurs , Sept 24 at p.n in
house (ground floor oi Mend
up no later than Tues Sept 22atM�
hall All students are invited to cor
and pick your favorite bandv T in
24 at 730 to perforn
Free admission and refresl n -
MADEKiAL DINNERS
Tickets are now on sale for Madf ,
Dinners to be held Dec 2-5at 7:00p a
Mendenhall Partake of a scrumi
holiday meal amid the festivities
Elizabethan Manor Hall prepar.ne
Christmas season Tickets are S
students and SI6 for ail others
Central Ticket Office at ?��; ; ,� ;�,
BIOLOGY Cllr?
Biology Club will be having a ar wash
Sat Sept 26 from 9am -12 p.m. at the
Burger King on 10th Street S2 per car
NELLSLMON PLA
I Ought To Be in Picture a pi)
Simon, wUI be part ot a dinner tru-airi
roduction on Thurs , Oct and Fri �
at 630 p m in the
num Tickets are now or v
tral Ticket Office in Mender �
students is S10 and all others ar� 5 -
now for vour tickets - 75" 6611 -��
ALL TICKETS ARE B
SALES NO TICKETS WH
THE DOOR
M A
RESCLD
Read Style on Tuesdays am
Only available in The East
RACK
f?' -
Greenville Buyer's
Memorial Drive
OPEN MOX-SAT 10-9
SUNDAY 1-6
Ati
All thosl
Pirat
All Positions a
Applications arc m
Director
Assist. Direcl
Apply in 228 Mendenhall, A
SGAVice President
w'






Ml'lU PHI I"HE SOCIAL WTHE DZS: Was ieail
sji night artei �;rit Bul Gorge I don't understand why
ultura! th bus was late and at course 1 need to tetl
s(.i. V M)ik. that tho music was grand
m got off to tho Warns tamiU
me from Bat Man and where did
li around ten i oukJ he have
i pa � g be � p the roof again? The last time I
he was saying something
Ri k jiui Boner wore
thefi ; room A
��� smashed nice the
� and t �! me 1 was
id urn last thing
dav Septembei � b�1 Stew U h couldn t I
(ines for
Classifieds and
Announcements
� Frida
knda
Tired of the Dorm?
Roommate Wanted!
Call 355-6686
a Winning Tradition
dition
ICU and the Beef Barn!
oin us for dinner after
the game
irdaj Football opeing Time of 5 p.m.
RN
0"
I iinnw . tAtrnnies: �!
un from d:3i to 9pm
baby
don
m
�- ffiy
( m
VH1
rUl'1
IUM1
iK)ro.
in music ml video
. IOLINA EAST MALL
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 24, 1987
Announcements
SPS
SPS CAR WASH - Sat, Sept 26th at the
Fuel Doc on the co.er of 10th St. and 264
bypass from 9:00 to 4.00 with a $2 dona-
tion.
Tryouts for the 1987-88 Pure Gold
Dancers will be Sept. 29 All interested
dancers must attend an organizational
meeting in room 143 of Minges Coliseum,
Thurs Sept. 24 at 7 p.m For more info,
call 757-6491.
SMRA
The Student Medical Record Associa-
tion is having a yard sale Sept 25 from 1
5 p.m. at the Allied Health Building Come
on out and choose from a variety of cloth
ing and other items.
COFFEEHOUSF
The Student Union Coffeehouse
Committee is holding open auditions to
all bands interested in performing for
upcoming events sponsored bv the Cof-
feehouse Auditions will be held on
Thurs Sept. 24 at 7.30 p.m. in the Coffee
house (ground floor of Mendenhall) Sign
up no later than Tues, Sept 22 at Menden-
hall All students are invited to come bv
and pick your favorite bands Thurs, Sept
24 at 730 to perform at your Coffeehouse
Free admission and refreshments
MADRIGAL DIVNFRS
Tickets are now on sale for Madrigal
Dinners to be held Dec 2-5 at 7:00 p m in
Mcndenhall Partake of a scrumptious
holiday meal amid the festivities of an
Elizabethan Manor Hall preparing for the
Christmas season. Tickets are $10 for ECU
students and $16 for all others. Call the
Central Ticket Office at 757-6611, ext 266
BIOLOGY CLUB
Biology Club will be having a car wash
Sat Sept. 26 from 9 a.m. - 12 p.m at the
Burger King on 10th Street $2 per car
NEIL SIMON TLAY
1 Ought To Be in Pictures, a play bv Ndl
Simon, will be part of a dinner theatre
roduction on Thurs , Oct 8 and Fn , Oct
at 630 p.m in the Mendenhall Audito-
rium Tickets are now on sale at the Cen-
tral Ticket Office in Mendenhall ECU
students is $10 and all others are $16 Call
now for vour tickets - 757-6611, ext 266
ALL TICKETS ARE BY ADVANCE
SALES NO TICKETS WILL BE SOLD AT
THE DOOR
WESTINCHOIIF
Two engineers from Westinghouse will
speak to all interested students about
engineering careers in industry on Thurs
Sept 24th at 330 p.m. in Biology N-109
There will be a brief meeting afterwards
for all students interested in SPS
ECONOMIC DEMOCRACY
Students for Economic Democracy will
be meeting in Mendenhall rm 247 at 7:00
on Sun Sept. 27.
ECANS
ECANS second meeting Fri Sept. 25,
1987 at 12 00 in room 101 of the nursing
building.
EMiPITUDENIS
Any sophomore (or higher) wanting to
make application to the Physical Therapv
program for Mav 1988 must go to the P.T.
Department (Allied Health Belk Build
ing) to confirm eligibility to apply. Please
contact the P.T. Dept. by mid Sept to
confirm eligibility and receive the P.T ad-
mission packet and application for the
Allied 1 lealth Professions Admission
Test. Completed admission packet must
be returned bv Nov. 1. Application dead
line for the AIIPAT is Oct. 16
DJYECLJJB
If you enjoy scuba diving, snorkelmg,
and adventuring with friendly outgoing
people, then you need to join ECU's Coral
Reef Dive dub For more info, call 7S2-
4399 and ask for Glenn or Rob.
STUDENTS NEEDED
Applications are now being accepted
for students wishing to serve on Univer-
sity Committees for the 1987-88 school
year. Nineteen positions are open.
Committees with vacancies are: AIDS
Education, Ad Hoc Advisory (1), Alco-
holDrug Ed (1), Canvassing & Soliciting
on Campus (1), International Student
Affairs (1), Residence Life (1 off-campus),
Resident Status Appeals (1), Status of
Minorities (2), Student Health Services
(2), Career Ed. (1), Continuing Ed. (1),
Curriculum (2), Faculty Computer (2),
General College (1), Libraries (1), and
Teaching Effectiveness (1). Applications
are available at the following locations:
Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student
Life, 204 Wichard, Mendenhall Informa-
tion Desk, SGA Office, Mendenhall; and
Residence Hall Directors' Offices Ques
tions about University Committees and
memberships may be directed to the Of-
fice of the Vice Chancellor for Student Life
(757-6341)
COUNSELING CENTER
STRATEGIES FOR TAKING STAN
DARDIZED TESTSHOW TO DO WELL
ON Tl IE GRE: Workshop will cover basic
info. about these tests, test taking strategy
and sample items Sept. 30, Wed, Stan
dardied Tests, from 4 5 p.m. in 312
Wright Building. If you are planning on
taking the GRE for admission to graduate
school, this workshop will help you pre-
pare. Oct. 1, Thurs preparing for the CKE
from 4-5 p.m. in 312 Wright Bldg.
"THE MAGIC OF NEON"
The Magic of Neon" displayed at
Mendenhall Student Center Gallery run
ningSept. 28th through Oct. 16.
WOMEN'S SOCCER CLUB
All girls interested in playing on the
ECU Women's Soccer Team should con
tact Renee at 355 4644. ! This club ofters
the opportunity for travel & competition
at other schools. The team is coached by
ECU's men soccer coach, Charlie I larvey
"GEOLOGY OF CENTRAL
GUATEMALA"
Dr. David P. Lawrence, Dept. of Geol-
ogy, East Carolina University. Sept. 24,
3 (X) p m , Graham 301.
BSU
The Baptist Student Union would like
to invite all students to dinner on Monday
nights Dinner starts at 5:30 p.m. and the
cost is S2. On Thursday nights at 7:00 we
have our worship service It's a time of
fellowship and fun It is an informal type
worship.
LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will hold its next
meeting on Sept. 24 at 7:30 in room 221 of
the Student Center. Our guest speaker
will bo recently nominated Federal Court
Judge Mulcome I loward. All members
and anyone interested are urged to attend.
PRODUCTIONS
A free concert, live-via satellite, of The
Fabulous Thunderbirds, Georgia Satel-
lites, and Omar and the I lowlers will be
broadcast on Sept. 25, 1S7, 9 p m. White
Dorm.
PANEL DISCUSSION
On Sept. 30,1987,8 p m. in room 244 of
Mendenhall, a panel discussion, "Sex on
Campus" will be shown, live-via-satellite.
Please attend this free showing.
We meet every week with in-water
instruction every other meeting We have
all the equipment Join us Tuesdays in
Memorial 105 or in the Memorial pool at
9:00 p.m. Call Jim 1 lix at 756 2970 or Ray
Irvin at 830-1215.
ICE HOCKEY & FENCING
If you are interested in playing Ice
I loekey or Fencing, contact Mike Ander-
son at 738 6449.
SGA
ALL SGA FUNDED GROUPS: A man
datory organizational meeting of presi
dents or advisors of Student Funded
Groups will meet Thurs , Sept. 24 at 4.00
p m. in Mendenhall 221 Any questions,
call Chris Holland, SGA Tres. 757 6611,
ext 218
WRESTLING CLUB
Anyone interested in wrestling this
year on the club team please call Tom
l.eppert at 752 1660 Old and new mem
bers welcome'
"LUNCHTIMF MOVIES"
We will be showing Lunchtime Movies
about Art in Jenkins Auditorium 12 noon
til 1 p.m. Everyone is invited. Showings
Thurs 924, Meanings in Modern Paint-
ing, Part I & II, Tues , 929, Five British
Sculptors Work & Talk
CATHOLIC CENTER
ECU's Newman Catholic Center is
sponsoring a retreat to Emerald Isle on the
weekend of Oct 2-4. The cost is S40. Con-
tact Kevin Prevost (752-3515) for details
Reminder: this weekend is "Parent's
Weekend Parents are welcome to the
Newman Center for the 11.30 am out-
door mass, should weather conditions
improve. Next Sunday, the NCC will
sponsor a car-wash. Contact Tim Seyfned
(578-8707) for the times and rates. "Bible
Study" will be held tonight at 9:00. Other
scheduled litargies: Sunday, 11:30 a.m. -
weather non permitting, BIO Building,
rm. 103. Sunday, 9:(X) p.m. - Newman
Center. Wed 5:30 p.m. Newman Center
(followed by a shared meal). All are wel-
come!
OMEGA PSI PHI
The Omega Psi Phi will be at the "Un-
limited Touch" Thurs Sept. 24. Admis-
sion is SI with college ID. All proceeds
will be donated to Achievement Week
program.
SOPHOMORES
Take the first step next summer toward
a commission as an army officer at Fort
Knox, Kentucky. You may be eligible to
compete for a two year Army ROTC
Scholarship. The six week summer camp
pays approxunately $800 For more info ,
call 757 6967 or contact Capt Mitchell at
the ECU Military Science Dept, room 319
Erwin Hall.
COOEJLATlVEELL
Walt Disney World will be on campus
to recruit students for spring semester
Students from all majors are encouraged
to participate Merchandise, food, and
attractions, among other positions ar
available Representatives will be at EC U
on Sept 29 & 30 Contact the office of
CYxiperative Ed in the Raw! Bldg for
more info
Read Style on Tuesdays and Entertainment on Thursdays.
Only available in The East Carolinian.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
RACK ROOM
RAHOEO SHOE
Greenville Buyer's Market
TAKE AN
Memorial Drive
E-X-T-R-A
10 OFF
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
OPEN MON-SAT 10-9 (EXCEPT AIGNER, NIKE AND
SUNDAY 1-6 REEBOK)
Attention
All those interested
m
Pirate Walk
All Positions are being reopened.
Applications are now being accepted for:
Director Operators
Assist. Director Walkers
Apply in 228 Mendenhall, Deadline Thurs. 24th at 5:00. Contact
SGAVice President if you have any questions.
&
�?
?
PARTY
ANIMALS
830-1823 &
�Gorilla-Grams, Gator-Grams, Penquins Too!
�Great for Birthdays or any occasion.
�Orders Accepted from out of town.
�Deliveries on campus.
.����.�.��:��� - ji1jjjjviv-W-1vivu
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
Starting Friday
ROXANNE
Starring Steve Martin
2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Rated 1G
M
E3g
Rated FO
SUMMER SCHOOL
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
MAID TO ORDER
Starring Ally Sheedy
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00 Kated re
222
MMMMUM�iiM
ii
WM?M.
iff'M'l
GRAND OPENING
l&sh&l&riy8
RIBBON CUTTING
Thursday, September 24, 11:00 A.M.
10 Speed Bicycle
iNo pu'
You need ni

ft
ee

V0
at
Fried Chicken
Cold Peli Food
Hot Foods
Cold Beverages
And A Whole Lot More
Watch For Our
Kash & Karry
Hot Air Balloon
Over
oc
e
e&
Come On Out,
Enjoy The Fun,
Take Advantage
Of The Savings
w
3 BIG BAYS, SEPTEMBER 24th 25th 26th
TEXACO GAS
Cash Or Credit, Same Price
Home Of The 777 Gas Game
TCash&T&rry
14TH A CNAEI.ES ST.
GREENVILLE
mm0t0&m0kumma �i� ii i 4 ��fc.�-






SEPTEMBER 24.1987
Judge rules schools must hold
hearings before disciplining
tfittlZila dec,si� that could
prvat n�mS Wh� P" a
3 'n N York must offer
Hd.ualheanngstol2ofitsstu-
J nsMorediscipliningthemfor
P'cpat.nginas.t-in
Hamilton had suspended the 12
s "dents who, in the series of ra-
Itensionoutbreaksbuildineon
American campuses last fall, had
� m at a campus building to try
get college President J.Martin
arovano to talk to them about
Mack students' complaints.
I he appeals court decision,
arovano said Sept. II, would give
colleges "less discretion" in disci-
plining students.
The court, which voted 2-1 in
wvor of the students, said
Hamilton's disciplinary policy �
written specifically to comply
with a 1969 New York State law-
violated the students' constitu-
tional rights to due process.
The court said in Albert versus
Carovano that "there is little
doubt that Hamilton would ever
have adopted the new regulations
and the policy reflected therein
had it not been required to do so
by the state
Grading colleges
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS) �
The- groups that certify and ac-
credit colleges should grade cam-
puses by how much students
learn, not "how many books they
have in their library the U.S.
Dept. oi Education proposed
Sept. 4.
It they don't comply, the Educa-
tion Dept. could refuse to recog-
nize any of the 80 accrediting
agencies that now review the
quality anbd legitimacy of pro-
grams at some 9,000 college-level
institutions.
"That's a very medieval view
replied Marjorie Lenn of the
Council on Postsecondary Ac-
creditation.
In making the proposals �
-which will become official regula-
tions unless someone formally
objects to them within 90 davs �
Education Secretary William
Bennett said he hoped to "im-
prove consumer protection" bv
giving students a sense of how
good colleges would be educating
them before they enroll.
But "traditionally, accrediting
agencies have looked at inputs:
how many books are in the library
and how many faculty members
have Ph.D.s" when grading e,
program, Bennett said.
"The focus he contended,
"should also be on outcomes or
student achievement: what stu-
dents actually learn
To judge what they learn, Ben-
nett wants the accrediting agen-
cies to force colleges to reveal data
about academic programs, cost,
refund policies and graduation
requirements, and to "make sure
their claims concerning gradu-
ation rates and job placement
rates are verifiable
Asst. Education Secretary C.
Ronald Kimbcrling cited North-
east Missouri State University's
competency testing program as a
model for deciding what � and
whether � students are learning.
"Accountability added James
T. Rogers of the Southern Associa-
tion of Colleges and Schools, "is
certainly a reasonable expecta-
tion
But Uenn replied, "The accredi-
ting community hasn't been
counting books for a long time
The "community she main-
tained, also has been evaluating
student progress as part of its
accrediting decisions "for a long
time
University club
to meet Sunday
(ECU News Bureau) � The
annual fall welcome of the East
Carolina University Club will be
held at the Chancellor's home
Sept. 27 from 3 until 5 p.m. All
faculty and staff and spouses are
welcome to attend.
The University Club, formerly
the ECU Woman's Club, plans to
sponsor campus beautification
projects thisyear and funds raised
from club events will go for this
purpose.
The case, said the students' at-
torney, Michael Krinsky, could be
used as a precedent in other states
if there is evidence of "state influ-
ence or coercion on how to handle
student protest
"We successfully argued that
the Constitution's due process
clause gives the students the right
to a hearing" before they are
punished, Krinsky said.
Because they are state agencies,
public schools have long been
required to grant hearings in dis-
ciplinary matters. The Hamilton
case, Krinsky said, established
that right for private college stu-
dents if their schools have links to
the state.
"In a broader sense, colleges
must be truly independent oi the
state if they want to avoid
extending constitutional privi-
leges Krinsky said.
The court, according to
Krinsky, also ruled the school
violated federal civil rights laws
by singling out black students
and white students active in civil
rights issues � for "undue pun
ishment
"I consider the court of Appeals
decision a significant step for-
ward in having Hamilton College
deal with student protests in a fair
and responsible fashion and also
in having I lamilton pay attention
to the serious racial situation on
campus Krinsky said.
In thedissenting opinion. Judge
Ralph Winter wrote "the sweep-
ing opinion in this case subjects to
federal judicial review virtually
every decision disciplining stu-
dents tor disruption bv a private
college or university in the State of
New York
"Every independent college in
New York will have to look at its
d iscipli na ry proced u res
Carovano agreed.
Krinsky says the problem arose
during the fall, 198h term, when a
black student received several
death threats, and other black
students said they were verbally
abused by whites. In response,
Hamilton convened a campus
forum on racism, which, the pro-
testers charged, ineffectively ad-
dressed the problem. The forum
they said, was typical of the
school's insensitivity to racial and
gender issues.
When Carovano then refused to
meet the students to discuss ra
cism further, 50 students occu-
pied a campus building for three
days. When threatened with sus-
pension, most left. The 12 who
remained were suspended for 6
months.
In November, 1986, the 12 stu-
dents sued, claiming Hamilton
denied them due process by "se-
lectively enforcing" rules against
students who are "black, Latin or
gay" or supportive of "the rights
oi blacks, Latins and gays and
without old family ties to Hamil-
ton
Krinsky said the definition of
the hearings now required by the
court will depend on the severity
of the discipline imposed by an
institution.
II suspensionsare longer than 10
ir 15 days, he explained, student-
must get the chance to reply to
testimony, call their own wit-
nesses, receive specific, written
barges and have the sentence
Why Pay Retail Prices When You Can
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fact-
reviewed by a imparti
finder.
Carovano announced he will
resign from his post, but, accord-
ing to a Hamilton official, his
decision was not influenced by
the court's ruling.
Law-away Wow For ChristmaT
OAWSON5
Before you choose a long distance
service, take a close look.
You may be thinking about
chasing one of the newer
carriers over AT&T in order to
save money.
Think again.
Since January 198. AT&T's
rates have dropped more than
15 for direct-dialed out-of-
state calls. So they're lower than
you probably realize. For infor-
mation on specific rates, vou
can call us at 1 800 222-0300.
And AT&T offers clear long
distance connections, operator
assistance, 2-4-hour customer
service, and immediate credit
for wrong numbers. Plus, vou
can use AT&T to call from
anywhere to anywhere, all over
the United States and to over
250 countries.
You might be surprised at
how good a value AT&T reallv
is. So before you choose a
long distance company, pick
up the phone.
AI&T
The right choice.
THE EAST CAKOI INIAN
Shakespeare gets
ByM. BLRBELLA
AMl�Un1 Sf.i I di,ot
The lights dim and the gentle
murmer of the audience hushes
Shakespeare's "A Midsummer
Night's Dream" is about to un-
fold. But wait, although
Shakespearian words spew forth
in poetic flow, the characters
dress in present dav garb Is this
the right play?
Apparently so.
A refreshing approach to tradi-
tional Shakespeare had
Wednesday's audience rolling
with laughter Using modern dav
clothing and props to bring
Shakespeare into the '80s, mem
bers of the North Carolina
Shakespeare Festival kept even
first-time Shakespeare tans capti-
vated with their onstage antics.
Working with simply a scaffold
with several offset platforms for
scenery, the actors held full re-
sponsibility for carrying the play
across to the audience. This they
did with ease. Their movement
on and off the stage made it easv
for the audience to imagine the
city of Athens one moment and
the surrounding woods the next.
Michael La Cue, who plavvd
Bottom, a weaver, was particu-
larly stimulating in his role His
antics as the most commical
amatuer actor (who believes he is
the most rious of actors) and
Titania's buffoon lover were
highly entertaining and quicklv
endeared him to the audience.
Cynthia
seemed U
portray t
and her
strained r
those ot h
But, despi
on the wh
pleasing
Theplav
NCSF, 1
theater prl
week sum
dedicates 1
students a
Carolina ar
consistent
theater
Because
many div
modemiza
mer Nit;
helped pt
Shaki
M rk
l"he mc
how.
pi 1 shed so
direction (i
out;
oi thetw
been accoi
great play
butchered
I kwev r
thmg
Wedn. 1
brought cu
and amus.
ity crowd al
Definitely
spend an
Party anin
By CRETCHEN JOL'RNIGAN
Ever wondered what it would
be like if there was wildlife at your
party? No, not your friends, but
real, honest to goodness party
animals?
Call Chip Py. For six years now
he hat been entertaining people o 1
all aes by wearing gorilla, pen-
guin and aligator costumes at
business parties and children's
birthdavs.
Py has been delivering gorilla
grams with bananas here in
Greenville since last Thursday.
When dressed in the penguin suit
he delivers balloons and a gift.
The 'gator also delivers balloons,
Movie review
'Hellraisers' rl
but inci
oi Hein
at$25
Pv :
tume v.
Manteo
thought it
just to
Since thc
two busine
one in Grot
the Outer Ba
The "par
Outer Bank
ness. Py said
During the
centers hist
tiora rs
By MICAH HARRIS
Si at' Writer
The advertisements for "Hell-
raiser" invariably open with a
quote from Stephen King which
goes, "I've seen the future of hor-
ror, and his name is Clivc Barker
If King is a prophet, then the
future is rather bleak.
It's not that the writer director
of "Hcllraiser" is not talented
Barker's main claim to fame prior
to his movie was the "Books of
Blood" paperback scries. He re-
vealed himself asa fine craftsman,
and that craftmanship is also evi-
dent in hisdirctorial debut Hell-
raiser" is technically two steps
and a half above a "Freddv" or
"Jason" movie.
Cliw
the area ot
sex and vk
something lj
"Maxhr
Craven s
blown to the
cinema -
Stooges or
toon. As sue
tertaining
otherhand,
entertainmei
theme i sumr
characters
are lndivisib
The nv t
(Andrew Rq
mysterious
open either tl
Peter Weir is shown here directing the nm r �-v
is showing tonight through Sumia in HwK
A
�l���1
��mm
immtmaimmM� �� "
��





�HiJEAST CARPI INT am ccnxcprp
1987
Judge rules schools must hold
hearings before disciplining
sh.inaidCCisionlha,c
ColhJ: ��k Hamilton
nS! h" Now York mus ���
d n K , annRS � ,2 of �ls stu-
Pfapahnginaat-in
"Jtonhadsuspended the 12
dents who, in the scries of ra-
'tens.on outbreaks building on
American campuses last fall, had
n at a campus buildmg to try
Ret college President j. Martin
J-arovano to talk to them about
�ack students' complaints.
I he appeals court division,
arovano said Sept. 11, would give
colleges "less discretion" in disci-
plining students.
The court, which voted 2-1 in
Jvor of the students, said
Hamilton's disciplinary policy �
written specifically to comply
witha 1969 New York State law -
violated the students' constitu-
tional rights to due process.
The court said in Albert versus
Carovano that "there is little
doubt that Hamilton would ever
haveadopted the new regulations
and the policy reflected therein
had it not been required to do so
by the state
Grading colleges
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS) -
The groups that certify and ac-
credit colleges should grade cam-
puses by how much students
learn, not "how many books they
have in their library the U.S.
Dept. ot Education proposed
Sept. 4.
If they don't comply, the Educa-
tion Dept. could refuse to recog-
nize any of the 80 accrediting
agencies that now review the
quality anbd legitimacy of pro-
grams at some 9,000 college-level
institutions.
"That's a very medieval view
replied Marjorie Lenn of the
Council on Postsecondary Ac-
creditation.
In making the proposals �
which will become official regula-
tions unless someone formally
objects to them within 90 days �
Education Secretary William
Bennett said he hoped to "im-
prove consumer protection" by
giving students a sense of how
good colleges wou Id be educating
them before they enroll.
But "traditionally, accrediting
agencies have looked at inputs:
how many books are in the library
and how many faculty members
have Ph.D.s" when grading a
program, Bennett said.
"The focus he contended,
"should also be on outcomes or
student achievement: what stu-
dents actually learn
To judge what they learn, Ben-
nett wants the accrediting agen-
cies to force colleges to reveal data
about academic programs, cost,
refund policies and graduation
requirements, and to "make sure
their claims concerning gradu-
ation rates and job placement
rates are verifiable
Asst. Education Secretary C.
Ronald Kimberling cited North-
east Missouri State University's
competency testing program as a
model for deciding what � and
whether � students are learning.
"Accountability added James
T.Rogersof the Southern Associa-
tion of Colleges and Schools, "is
certainly a reasonable expecta-
tion
But Lenn replied, "The accredi-
ting community hasn't been
counting books for a long time
The "community she main-
tained, also has been evaluating
student progress as part of its
accrediting decisions "for a long
time
University club
to meet Sunday
(ECU News Bureau) � The
annual fall welcome of the East
Carolina University Club will be
held at the Chancellor's home
Sept. 27 from 3 until 5 p.m. All
faculty and staff and spouses are
welcome to attend.
The University Club, formerly
the ECU Woman's Club, plans to
sponsor campus beautification
projects thisyearand fundsraised
from club events will go for this
purpose.
The case, said the students' at-
torney, Michael Krinsky, could be
used as a precedent in other states
if there is evidence of "state influ-
ence or coercion on how to handle
student protest
"We successfully argued that
the Constitution's due process
clause gives the students the right
to a hearing" before thev are
punished, Krinsky said.
Because they arc state agencies,
public schools have long been
required to grant hearings in dis-
ciplinary matters. The Hamilton
case, Krinsky said, established
that right for private college stu-
dents if their schools have links to
the state.
"In a broader sense, colleges
must be truly independent of the
state if they want to avoid
extending constitutional privi-
leges Krinsky said.
The court, according to
Krinsky, also ruled the school
violated federal civil rights laws
by singling out black students
and white students active in ci il
rights issues - for "undue pun-
ishment
"I consider the court ot Appeals
decision a significant step for-
ward in having Hamilton College
deal with student protests in a fair
and responsible fashion and also
in having I Hamilton pay attention
to the serious racial situation on
campus Krinsky said.
In thedissentingopinion, fudge
Ralph Winter wrote "the sweep
ing opinion in this case subjects to
federal judicial review virtually
every decision disciplining stu-
dent tor disruption by a private
college or university in the State of
New York
"Every independent college in
New York will have to look at its
di sc iplina ry proced u res
Carovano agreed
Krinsky says the problem arose
during the fall, 1986 term, when a
black student received several
death threats, and other black
students said they were verbally
abused by whites. In response,
I lamilton convened a campus
forum on racism, which, the pro-
testers charged, ineffectively ad-
dressed the problem. 7"he forum.
they said, was typical of the
school's insensiti vity to racial and
gender issues.
When Carovano then refused to
meet the students to discuss ra
cism further, 50 students occu-
pied a campus building for three
days. When threatened with sus-
pension, most left. The 12 who
remained were suspended for 6
months.
In November, 1986, the 12 stu-
dents sued, claiming Hamilton
denied them due process by "se-
lectively enforcing" rules against
students who are "black, Latin or
gay" or supportive of "the rights
of blacks, Latins and gays and
without old family ties to Hamil-
ton
Krinsky said the definition of
the hearings now required by the
court will depend on the severity
of the discipline imposed by an
institution.
It suspensions are longer than 10
or 15 days, he explained, students
must get the chance to reply to
testimony, call their own wit-
nesses, receive specific, written
charges and haw the sentence
reviewed by a impartial fact-
finder.
Carovano announced he will
resign from his post, but, accord-
ing to a Hamilton official, his
division was not influenced by
the court's ruling
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Before you choose a long distance
service, take a close look.
You may be thinking about
choosing one of the newer
carriers over AT&T in order to
save money.
Think again.
Si nee January 198. AT&T s
rates have dropped more than
15 for direct-dialed out-of
state calls. So they're lower than
you probably realize. For infor-
mation on specific rates, you
can call us at 1 800 222-0300.
And AT&T offers clear long
distance connections, operator
assistance, 24-hour customer
service, and immediate credit
for wrong numbers. Plus, vou
can use AT&T to call from
anywhere to anywhere, all over
the United States and to over
250 countries.
You might be surprised at
how good a value AT&T reallv
is. So before you choose a
long distance company, pick
up the phone.
AT&T
The right choice.
THFEASTCAROtlNIAN
Shakespeare gets
ByM. BLRBELLA
Km�um Scwt ljn
The lights dim and the gentle
murmer of the audience hushes
Shakespeare's "A Midsummer
Might's Dream" is about to un-
fold. But wait, although
Shakespearian words spew forth
in poetic flow, the characters
dress in present dav gart Is this
the right play?
Apparently so.
A refreshing approach to tradi-
tional Shakespeare had
Wednesday's audience rolling
with laughter. Using mcxiern day
clothing and props to bring
Shakespeare into the '80s. mem-
bers of the North Carolina
Shakespeare Festival kept even
first-time Shakespeare fans capti-
vated with theiron-stageantics.
Working v ith simply a scaffold
with several offset platforms for
scenery, the actors held full re-
sponsibility for carrying the plav
across to the audience. 1 his thev
did with ease. Their movement
on and oii the stage made it easy
for the audience to imagine the
city of Athens one moment and
the surrounding woods the next
Michael La Cue, who played
Bottom, a weaver, was particu-
larly stimulating in his role His
antics as the most commical
amatuer actor tvho believes he is
the most serious oi actors) and
Titania's buffoon lover were
highly entertaining and quick)
endeared him to the audience
( vnthial
seemed ti
portrav tl
and hvr
strained rj
those of
But, despij
on the wI
pleasing
The pLo
NCSr is
theater p
vveel sumr
dedicate
students il
Caroiii I
iisti nl
theater
Be
many divl
moderniza
mer ight
ped fxi

n rk
The :
however
plish -
direction i
out properi
of the
been accord
great play)
butcher
thir
Wed
and amuse!
itv cr a :
niteh
Party anim
By CRETCHEN JOLRMGAN
Suit Vntgr
Ever wondered what it would
be like if there was wild life at your
party! 'o, not your friends, but
real, honest to goodness party
animals?
Call Chip Py. For six years now
he hjt been entertaining pei
all apes by wearing gorilla, pen-
guin and aligator costumes at
business parties and children's
birthdavs.
Py has been delivering gorilla
grams with bananas here in
Greenville since last Thursdav
When dressed in the penguin suit
he delivers balloons and a gift
The 'gator also delivers balloons
but inc!ud
of Heir
at $25 p
Py b
tumc
Manteo li
thought it
lust �
Since thi
two buMne-
one in (
the Outer
The ' pa rtj
Outer P
Pysa .il
During the
center
tioners
Movie review
'Hellraisers' n
ByMICAH HARRIS
The advertisements for Hell-
raiser" invariably open with a
quote from Stephen King which
goes, "I've seen the future of hor-
ror, and his name isQive Barker
If King is a prophet, then the
future is rather bleak.
It's not that the writer-director
of "Hellraiser" is not talented
Barker's main claim to fame prior
to his movie was the "Books ot
Blood" paperback series. He re-
vealed hi msel f a s a fine era ft sman.
and that craftmanship is also evi-
dent in his dirctonal debut. "Hell-
raiser" is technically two steps
and a half above a "Freddv r
"Jason" movie.
the arc
sen and
som
Maximum
Craven -
blov n to the
.
toon A- SIM
tertainii
otherha
entert.v
therm sum
characters
are indi
The movi
(Andrew Re
mysterious
open either tl
M
I
Peter Weir is shown here directing the filming of
is showing tonight through Sunday in Hendriv '
A
I

m�� � i�m�iUM
?
t
J
J

i �uiiWm
����





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irriers rver AT&T in order to
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AT&T
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THFEASTCAROIINIAN
Entertainment
SEPTEMBER 24. 1987 Page 11
Shakespeare gets new twist
By M. BURBELLA
Auuunt ewri tditor
I he lights dim and the gentle
murmer of the audience hushes.
Shakespeare's "A Midsummer
Night's Dream" is about to un-
lold. But wait, although
Shakespearian words spew forth
n poetic flow, the characters
dress in present day garb. Is this
he right play?
Apparently so.
A refreshing approach to tradi-
ional Shakespeare had
Wednesday's audience rolling
ith laughter. Using modern day
lothing and props to bring
Shakespeare into the '80s, mem
:vrs of the North Carolina
Shakespeare Festival kept even
irst-timc Shakespeare fans capti-
vated with their onstage antics.
Working with simply a scaffold
vith several offset platforms for
scenery, the actors held full re-
sponsibility for carrying the plav
ktoss to the audience. This they
iid with ease. Their movement
n and off the stage made it easy
for the audience to imagine the
it) ot Athens one moment and
ihe surrounding woods the next.
Michael La Cue, who played
bottom, a weaver, was particu-
larly stimulating in his role. His
antics as the most commical
imatuer actor (who believes he is
the most serious oi actors) and
Htania's buffoon lover were
highly entertaining and quickly
endeared him to the audience.
Cynthia Strickland, however,
seemed to be trying too hard to
portray the character Hermia,
and her lines came across
strained rather than poetic like
those of her fellow performers.
But, despite this flaw, the acting
on the whole was polished and
pleasing.
The play, made possible by the
NCSF, is one of three classical
theater productions in a four
week summer session. The NCSF
dedicates itself to providing the
students and citizens of North
Carolina and the Southeast witha
consistent program of classical
theater.
Because the NCSF reaches
many diverse audiences, the
modernization of "A Midsum-
mer Night's Dream" may have
helped people unfamiliar with
Shakespeare appreciate his
work.
1 Tie modernization of the play,
however, could not be accom-
plished so well without the fine
direction of David Purslev. With-
out proper direction, the merging
of the two worlds might not have
been accomplished as well, and a
great play might have been
butchered.
However, this plav was any-
thing but butchered.
Wednesday's performance
brought culture, entertainment
and amusement to a near-capac-
ity crowd at Wright Auditorium.
Definitely a pleasant way to
spend an evening.
The 1987 tour of the North Carolina Shakespeare Festival brought
Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Nighfs Dream" toWright Audito-
rium Wednesday evening. Here members of the cast are shown
rehearsing their modernized version of the play.
Party animals come to Greenville via Chip Py
By GRETCHEN JOURNICAN
Still Wnler
Ever wondered what it would
be like if there was wildlife at your
party? No, not your friends, but
real, honest to goodness party
animals?
Call Chip Py. For six years now
helte, Won entertaining people of
all ages bv wearing gorilla, pen-
guin and aligator costumes at
business parties and children's
birthdays
Py has been delivering gorilla
grams with bananas here in
Greenville since last Thursday
When dressed in the penguin suit
he delivers balloons and a gift.
The 'gator also delivers balloons,
but includes a refreshing six-pack
of Heinekens as well. Trices start
at $25 per delivery.
Pv bought his first gorilla cos-
tume when he was a senior at
Manteo High School. He said he
thought it would be a neat idea
just to joke around in a gorilla
costume.
Since then he has established
two businesses "joking around" -
one in Greenville and the other at
the Outer Banks.
The "party animals" of the
Outer Banks is a seasonal busi-
ness, Py said.
During the summer months, Py
centers his business around vaca-
tioners while during the fall he
concentrates on the Greenville
area.
For the Christmas season, Py
has purchased a Santa Claus suit
to spread season's greetings dur-
ing the holiday festivities.
Py spends most of his time
advertising and marketing his
animals. He's distributed busi-
ness cards and flyers to 100 busi-
nesses in Greenville.
"Greenville is a much broader
area than Nags Head � home of
the business Py said.
His most effective advertise-
ment is dressing in one of the
costumes and standing by the
road side with his placard, "gator
grams and I deliver balloons
Py recalls advertising by the
road one day near Manteo. A car
pulled off the road, the driver
foiled down his window and Pv
gave him a business card.
"It's was a couple from Ohio
Py recalls. They had just arrived at
the Outer Banks and were on their
way to Manteo to get married and
they needed a witness.
Py got into their car and wit-
nessed their wedding ceremony
in Manteo that day.
At the wedding, Py said, "1 put
one ring in one wing, and one in
the other, and I wung it
Py also remembered a birthday
party at a school one day. Dressed
in his gorilla outfit, he began his
Movie review
jungle act in front of 15 kids.
"One little girl saw the gorilla
suit and ran into the closet. We
had to send the suit in piece by
piece to convince her it was a cos-
tume said Py.
Even though his business is a
popular one, sometimes the
unique costumes can be disturb-
ing.
"I get a lot of surprised looks
from people savs Pv.
Py also used his attention-get-
ters to promote car sales at local
lots.
He's currently trying to estab-
lish "gorilla gram giveaways for
area radio stations.
His future business goal is to
cater children's birthday parties, a
service that would include, of
course, costumes.
"I enjoy working for myself,
opposed to working for someone
else Pv said.
The costumes came from Holly-
wood adn cost about $800.
Dressing up and delivering
grams is theeasy part, Py said, but
advertising and maintaining his
level of enthusiasm isn't as easy to
do.
Py, a political science major
from ECU, has withdrawn from
school to establish his "party ani-
mals" and to become financially
stable. He hopes to return to col-
lege in 1988.
'Hellraisers' reveals a dark, grim future for cinematic horror
ByMICAH HARRIS
Stiff Writfr
The advertisements for "Hell-
raiser invariably open with a
quote from Stephen King which
goes, "I've seen the future of hor-
ror, and his name is Cli ve Barker
If King is a prophet, then the
future is rather bleak.
It's not that the writer-director
of "Hellraiser" is not talented.
Barker's main claim to fame prior
to his movie was the "Books of
Blood" paperback series. He re-
vealed himself asa fine craftsman,
ind that craftmanship is also evi-
dent in his dirctorial debut. "Hell-
raiser" is technically two steps
and a half above a "Freddy" or
lason" movie.
Give Barker's problems are in
the area of attitude, specifically
sex and violence. Violence in
something like Stephen King's
"Maximum Overdrive" or Wes
Craven's "Deadly Friend" isover-
blown to the point of slapstick: 80s
cinema's answer to "The Three
Stooges" or a "Roadrunner" car-
toon. As such, these films are en-
tertaining. "Hellraiser on the
otherhand, is merely grim. It's
entertainment only for sadists. 1 t's
theme (summed up by one of the
characters) is "pain and pleasure
are indivisible
The movie begins as Frank
(Andrew Robinson) obtains a
mysterious Chinese box that can
open either the door of heaven or
hell. Guess which one Frank
knocks on? He is translated to
another dimension and strung up
on mea t hooks by the Cenobitc, an
anti-social group dedicated to
obtaining pleasure through pain.
The Cenobite spokesman is a
chilling fellow whose face (in
keeping with Barker's "pain is
pleasure" theme) is sprouting
needles like a cactus.
Frank escapes when his
brother, Larry, cuts himself and
the blood somehow allows
Frank's body to begin to reform
physically. But Frank needs more
and more blood. Hisaccomplice is
Julia (Clare Higgins), Larry's
wife, whom Frank pulled a knife
on prior to her wedding and who
consequently becomes his love
slave. Even when Frank is little
more than a cadaver slithering
over the floor, she hardly hesi-
tates to commit murder for his
favor.
This is the most disturbing
thing about "Hellraiser a major
plot catalyst is the absurd
"women's rape fantasy" idea �
yet another example of the
movie's "pain is pleasure" theme.
This ugliness is, sad to say, typi-
cally of Give Barker's work. Vio-
lence and sex gush from it for no
better reason than sh, ck value.
The gore is not comical. Julia's
hammer-murders look too realis-
tic to be entertaining.
Barker unconsciously created a
metaphor for his work in his short
story, "Dread A student being
shown a series of photographs of
a girl under psychological torture
comments he didn't want to keep
looking at her degradation, but
was too fascinated to stop.
The viewer of "Hellraiser"
finds himself in the same position:
compelled by his repulsion to the
disturbing on-screen sadism to
keep watching. But, consider that
Barker's Cenobites have also
taken pleasure from watching
others suffer. Then brush your
face with your hand in the
theater's darkness, and feel if
needles, cactus-like, have
sprouted from vour face.
Tripping with Bonehead:
Childhood and Parents9 Day
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Writer
Apparently, I had a weird
childhood.
I never noticed it at the time.
Even when my parents threat-
ened to replace themselves with
robots, I took it in stride. I figured
that was just the way the life thing
worked.
But years later, I look back on
several incidents with suspicion.
I say to myself
Some things
some things just are not quite slip-knot) screaming,
couldn't stand to see anything
untied. The neighbors marveled
at the square-knotted azaeia
bushes.
Mom wasn't so thrilled. After
he bent the vacuum hose into a
neatly executed four-in-one (and
thereby saving Stonehead the
eleventh from an untimely end)
she lost control.
She ran after him, down the
carpeted stairs (tied delicately
into an aesthetically pleasing
Die, De-
teenth, who Mom had kept in
shocbox for over three years.
.
right.
Like Mom's bizarre habits.
Often during my afterschool
snacks, she would rush into the
kitchen, scream "TRANSFORM-
ERS! ROBOTS IN DISGUISE at
cepticon Scum My brother, the
gerbil and I hid in the clothes
hamper until we heard them run
out into the street
Dinner didn't go well. After my
father inadvertantly let the rat
out by tying its shoebox top into a
handkereheif knot, my brother
became embarrassed and threw a
cajun chicken sandwich on the
restaraunt floor.
Mom responded by veiling.
"That's it! Take my pocketbook!
Go out and wait in the car Dad
reinforced this by knotting a
passing waitress' apron strings ro
Peter Weir is shown here directing the filming of "Mosquito Coast" The film, which stars Harrison Ford,
is showing tonight through Sunday in Hendrix Theater as part of an Australian film festival.
the table
Instead of going to the gam?
they went back to the hotel where
As we grew older, my parents Mom amused herself by dippm
mellowed somewhat. We sold litmus paper in the toilet tocher
the top of her vocal range, and the gerbil cage and bought some itsackdity. Dad spent the evening
then collapse in a valium stupor, industrial strength yarn. The on his new hobby, folding hotS
Otherdays she would sit by the vacuum hoseartd the stair carpet stationary into exquisiteuttteor
gerbil's cage for hours, mutter- my brother replaced as a Christ- garni ducks.
ing. Occasionally she would yell, mas present to my parents.
"This rats the only one I trust
before sticking the vacuum
leaner hose into the $29.95 Habi-
trail complex.
Dad's little quirks were no less
So when Parent's Day rolled
around last year, 1 thought it safe
to invite them up for dinner and a
My brother and I gp .
mrs at the restaraunt L. '
hours
for the hamster. We fuull v
him, dead in the bacon bib
con-
tainer on the salad bar
game. I even let then bring my Apparently, I'm j,
bWlieraiidapniheadtrthir- weird childtwtf t
i
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SUMKrt'StliMli H'M

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12
T IE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 24.1987
U;ilkiiC he Plank
j W-fiiA-i 1 I rutoM?
By A guy Overkill
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By FRIEDRICH
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I'ndercover Cats
By PARKER CFEIVSTER
fat )oeo7)
.50
ALL
TIMES
Krofft puppets take on politics
LOS ANGELES (AD What
has tour hands, three heads and a
mouth guaranteed to poke fun at
a person in the news? The life-size
puppets on brothers Sid and
Marty Krofft's "D.C. follies
"We'll tackle whatever in the
news said Marty Krofft "We
can build a puppet in 36 hours.
Whatever' happening and
whoever's making news, that's
what we'll spool The first show
in the syndicated series will ap-
pear this weekend on 190 stations.
1 hebvious household names,
from President Reagan to Tope
John Taul II to Oliver North, will
make frequent appearances on
the show. It takes two people to
manipulate each puppet, one for
the hands and one for head. A
third person supplies the voice.
The setting is a fictional hang-
out across from the 'lie House
called "DC Follies where Fred
Willard is the real-life ba;tender
and host of the show.
"We're starting out ith 20
puppets said Sid. ea'sr have
Andy Rooney, Don King, Woodv
Allen, Oprah Winfrey, Tammy
Bakker, Geraldo Rivera and
Vanna White. Wealso haveoneof
Dan Rather which appears on the
TV set in the bar. He'll be con-
stantly changing clothes, hair
style and the like
Other puppets for early shows
are former presidents Richard M.
Nixon, Jimmy Carter and Gerald
R. Ford, plus first lady Nancy
Reagan, former national security
adviser John Poindexter, British
Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher, former pro football
coach John Madden, Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev, Princess Di-
ana, Michael Jackson, Jesse
Jackson and actors Jack Nicholson
and Sean Penn.
"We'll have a guest star each
week said Marty. "Martin
Mull's on the first show. We're
going to try to get some people in
the news. We went after Ronald
Reagan Jr. but he turned us down.
He said he didn't want any family
problems
TAXPAYERS
with dependents
HERE'S A TAX TIP:
Beginning with yow l'Js income
tax return that you u ill file in
l)Hh, you generally must list vh ul
security numbers for dependents
who are at least five ears old bv
the end of 1987. It any of your
dependents do not have this
number, gel an application form
today from the Social Security
office in your area.
j&gg
The Wash House
10th And 14th St.
Laundramat - Dry Cleaning
752-6117
758-6001
IMa
�rvr of ejt h�
NEWMAN �
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER 1
953 E. TENTH ST. 1
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27836
PHONE: 757-3760 g
. . OPEN DAILY: 8:30 A.M11:30 P.M. S
Attendants - Snacks - Cable TV
Present Coupon
Expiration Date Sept. 30, 1987
Coupon
20 OFF
Dry Cleaning
or Shirt Laundry
Coupon
20 OFF
Fluff & Fold
Coupon
1 Soft Drink
Free
"Come Visit Our Friendly Staff1
IJWELCOME TO THE PARENTS OF ALL THE E.C.U. STUDENTS
IJWONDERFUL WEEKEND TOGETHER
HAVE Af
jjjWE WISH TO ANNOUNCE THE OPENING OF OUR NEW BLESSED SACRA-
MENT CHAPEL AT 955 E. 10TH ST. - WHY NOT COME AND SPEND SOMEL
QUALITY TIME WITH THE LORD IN REFLECTION AND PRAYER. THE CHAPEd
HlS OPEN DAILY FROM 7 AM TO 10 PM.
m
Thursday
is
CAMPUS MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY- 11:30 A.M
m
p 900 P.M
g WEDNESDAY- 5:30 P.M
WEATHER PERMITTING - OUTSIDE AT THE NEWMAN CENTER
WEATHER NOT PERMITTING - BIO. BLDC RM 103
NEWMAN CENTER
NEWMAN CENTER (FOLLOWED BY A FELLOWSI HP DINNER)
FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT EVENTS AND PROGRAMS SPONSORED
BY THE NEWMAN CENTER, CALL TERESA LEE (752-9910) OUTREACH
CHAIRMAN.
FATIIER PAUL VAETH, CHAPLAIN AND CAMPUS MINISTER
Draft Night
Ladies Free - $1.50 Guys
650 tails too!
Friday
4:00 - 7:00 Free Admission
65 Tails All Day
Sunday
65�.Tails All Night
Quaid ea
iit- tails
(Ellen B
require
leading
display il
tn
kin
LOS ANGELES (AP) -The
movie trade is prettv much in
agreement that this is the year ol
Dennis Quaid.
More like the half-year, as the
affable younger brother of Randv
Quaid reports: 'I've got six pic-
tures coming out in six months
First InnerSpace now The Big
Easy Then Suspect' with (her
comes out in October I did an-
other movie called 'DO A
that follows, 1 don't know m
So that's four right in a row
While "InnerSpace didn't
score as v II as Steven Spielberg
productions are suppose d I
Quaid drew critical acclaim I i
his well-shaded performai
hotshot Navy pilot on a
inside Martin Short' bod
The Big Easy" pro I
other step forv ard . .
brought dimension to
'The Big Town' is a
The saga of the young hotshol
challengingbigtime gamblers has
intrigued filmmakers from "The
Hustler" and "The Cincinnati
Kid" to "The Color ot Money
The theme is c �.plored once more
in "The Big Town" with less fortu-
nate results.
J.C. "Cully" Cullen (Matt Dil
Ion) is a Rockford, Ind auto parts
clerk whose talent for shooting
craps is recognized by a garage
owner, played by Don Franks
Once a big city gambler, Franks
sends his protege to Chicago,
where he apprentices with an
iron-handed promoter, Lee
Grant, and her embittered, blind
husband, Bruce Dern.
The fearless newcomer courts
trouble by entering the biggest
game in town, at the Gem Club
operated behind a stnp joint b)
the dangerous Tommy Lee I.
Dillon not only nsks his safety bv
breaking the bank, he also goes
after Jones' stripper wife, Diane
Lane. Meanwhile, he conducts a
sometime romance with a wait-
ress, Suzy Amis, mother of a
young daughter.
Dillon's jeopardy increases
when a West Coast gambler, Tom
strut
the
equal t
sur; I
j
and (
and
custom;
chara
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Lee k
heaw ?l
inc: i
yoove
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Rush,
7:oo - io-

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEITEMBER24. 1987
13
By FRIEDRICH
J&qS�1�7-r�r
Qin
,�- �� ftiJ si �w �� ��-�.
a
J V . ,
vu
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4
ax
House
St.
)ry Cleaning
758-6001
cks - Cable TV
Date Sept. 30, 1987
i
ion
FF
& -old
Coupon
1 Soft Drink
Free
fetidly Staff
sday

iVioht
$1.50 Guys
lls too!
ay
ee Admission
All Day
day
All Night
Quaid earning name for self
LOS ANGELES (AP) �The
movie trade is pretty much i.i
agreement that this is the year of
Pennis Quaid.
More like the half-year, as the
affable younger brother of Randy
Quaid reports: "I've got six pic-
tures coming out in six months.
First 'InnerSpace now The Big
Easy Then 'Suspect' with Cher
comes out in October. I did an-
other movie called 'D.O.A and
that follows, I don't know when.
So that's four right in a row
While "InnerSpace" didn't
score as well as Steven Spielberg
productions are supposed to,
Quaid drew critical acclaim for
his well-shaded performance as a
hotshot Navy pilot on a cruise
inside Martin Short's body-
"The Big Easy" provided an-
other step forward. Quaid
brought dimension to his role as a
New Orleans cop on the take until
he falls for an upright prosecutor
(Ellen Barkin). Both performances
required more skill than many
leading men are accustomed to
displaying. During most "Inner-
Space" he was seated at the con-
trols of his microscopic space
ship.
In "The Big Easy Quaid man-
aged to handle not one but two
unfamiliar accents.
"1 tried to combine two kinds of
Louisiana accents said the
Texas-born actor. "One was a
kind of New Orleans 'yat which
is kind of Brooklynese with elon-
gated syllables. For the Cajun
accent 1 went down to southwest-
ern Louisiana on weekends and
got that into my system. Then I
tried to put the two accents to-
gether. 1 think 1 got it
Dennis Quaid was speaking by
telephone trom Montana, where
he maintains a refuge from the
pressures of a fast-moving career.
He fell in love with the Big Sky
country while driving through
after the Midwest location of
"Breaking Away During the
rare breaks from films and public-
ity tours, he goes there "to fish the
river, look at the clouds and
empty out my brain � so 1 can fill
it up again
During most of his 33 years,
Dennis has been known as Randy
Quaid's kid brother. Four years
younger, Dennis followed his big,
outgoing brother through Hous-
ton schools, then the University of
Houston, where both studied act-
ing. Dennis credits his father,
William Quaid, with influencing
his sons to be actors.
Randy preceded Dennis to
filmsby five years, scoring in such
films as "The Last Picture Show
"What't Up Doc?" "The Last De-
tail" and "Midnight Express
Dennis followed him to Holly-
wood, making his film debut in
1973 with "9-30-55 James
Bridges memoir about the impact
of James Dean's death on a small
town.
The Quaids appeared together
in "The Long Riders" and off-
Broadway in Sam Shepard's
"True West During the latter
run, the lifelong sibling rivalry
erupted into a wild slugging
match.
"We almost killed each other
one night (during the play) over
some stupid reason that came out
of frustration. Part of it was be-
cause of the play, which is very
difficult. We actually en'ded up
going out and having the best A
time we ever had QuaidsaicL
DIRECTIONS FOR FUN, FOOD, AND
SPIRITS AT:
OPEN 11 AMI AM EVERYDAY
355-2946
Soon to be reasonably well-known as O
CASUAL DINING-FORMAL DRINKING
"The Big Town9 is a big, confusing ruckus
The saga of the young hotshot
challenging bigtime gamblers has
intrigued filmmakers from "The
Hustler" and "The Cincinnati
Kid" to "The Color of Money
The theme is explored once more
in "The BigTown" with less fortu-
nate results.
.C. "Cully" Cullen (Matt Dil-
lon) is a Rockford, Ind auto parts
clerk whose talent for shooting
craps is recognized by a garage
owner, played by Don Franks.
Once a big citv gambler, Franks
sends his protege to Chicago,
where he apprentices with an
iron-handed promoter, Lee
Grant, and her embittered, blind
husband, Bruce Dern.
The fearless newcomer courts
trouble by entering the biggest
game in town, at the Gem Club
operated behind a strip joint by
the dangerous Tommy Lee Jones.
Dillon not only risks his safety by
breaking the bank, he also goes
after Jones' stripper wife, Diane
Lane. Meanwhile, he conducts a
sometime romance with a wait-
ress, Suzy Amis, mother of a
young daughter.
Dillon's jeopardy increases
when a West Coast gambler, Tom
Skerritt, comes to Chicago. He's
the guy who blinded Dern, and
Dillon gets caught in the middle
of the revenge shootout.
The accomplished cast
struggles to instill credibility into
the complex plot, but the odds are
equal to beating the tables in
Nevada. The script by Robert Roy
Pool, based on Clark Howard's
novel, "The Arm affords few
surprises. First-time director Ben
Bolt, son of writer Robert Bolt,
evokes excitement with the gam-
bling scenes, but the climactic
shooting is poorly staged, and the
epilogue is a letdown.
Matt Dillon, with his Elvis side-
bums befitting the 1957 period,
lacks the hard edge and ruthless
quality that his role demands. Far
more convincing is Diane Lane as
the diamond-hard stripper; she
does a sizzling tease both onstage
and off. Lee Grant, Bruce Dern
and Tom Skerritt perform with
customary skill in thinly written
characterizations.
With his hair slicked back, his
face a permanent scowl. Tommy
Lee Jones makes a marvelous
heavy, presaging a thriving career
in character roles.
Produced by Martin Ransohoff
("The Cincinnati Kid"), the Co-
lumbia release is rated R, appar-
ently for language, strip teases,
bed scenes and low moral tone.
Running time: 110 minutes.
�Bob Thomas, AP
W�Il(E�inin� tt�
ECU
PARENTS
1 ' mABORTIONS UP TO 12th WEEK OF PREGNANCY $215. Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks �t additional cost Pregnancy Test, Binh Control, and Problem Pregnancy i Counseling lor further information, call 832 0535 (toll free number: 1-800 532 5384) between 9 am and 5 pjn. weekdays General anesthesia available I

RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS

JUDSON H. BLOUNT, III ATTORNEY AT LAW D Wl and Traffic Offenses Suite 12, Lee Building 111 Last Third Street Telephone: Greenville, NC 27835 (919)758-8555
ANN LYNN
GRAND OPENING
CELEBRATION
Withthis
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take an
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10 off
All
Merchandise
ANN LYNN Is New In Greenville
At Greenville Square
Mon. � Sat. 10:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.ra
Phonc 756-4773
loo ve seen the restowwli fhf
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THE VAMPIRE
Today's criminal is about to face
the darkest -

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6 MR. PAUL
JVSTfS UTJLEBtTOP
Snubbed by Hollywood, 'Crime Story' is a hit
Brothel owner's
bed sold to
southern gent
LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) - Belle
Brezing, Lexington's most fa-
mous brothel owner, was the
model for madam Belle Watling
in "Gone With the Wind so it
was only fitting that Robert E. Lee
bid on the real Belle's bed.
It was also fitting that Lee, an
antiques dealer from Cincinnati,
should lose the bidding war at
Sunday's auction.
"I'm just glad a Yankee didn't
buy a southern lady's bed said
Kirtley B. Amos, a Dexington at-
torney and history buff who was
high bidder.
The price? Well, in the old days
it would have bought 12,600 visits
at Belle's house, where the charge
was$l a time.
Amos also got two dresseis
from the bedroom suite in the
deal.
Belle bought the bed, with its
elaborately carved headboard,
and the rest of the suite at the 1894
St. Louis World's Exposition, ac-
cording to E.I. "Buddy"
Thompson's 1983 biography,
"Madam Belle Brezing
Belle closed her brothel in 1917,
as the Army pressed city officials
to crack down on bawdy houses,
and died in 1940 at age 80.
THE
VAMPIR
I L
LAS VEGAS, Ne . I AP) - From
a distance, it looks like a little
piece of the Us Vegas strip Hew
off and landed farther out in the
desert, a dab of neon glowing in
the night.
This is "Cactus Heaven ar.
elaborate set built for an episode
of "Crime Story It is heaven to
executive producer Michael
Mann, delighted that his series
got a surprise renewal from BC
for a second season.
"Crime Story" moves to its new
Tuesday night time period this
week.
Mann, a film director who
found himself one oi the hottest
television producers around alter
"Miami Vice" became a hit, is
enthusing over the bordello set �
a melange of neon, plastic flamin-
gos and run-down Airstream
trailers. Mann, walks up to a fake
cactus and slaps it. "This is one of
ours
He can't seem to get over that
only days ago this was bare des-
ert, and now it's this funnv, sur-
real little world populated by his
friends.
'To me there's no greater thrill
than making something like this
he says. "There's something
about it. I can't put my finger on
it
"Crime Story" is an odd televi-
sion show, partly because it is so
good, mostly because, to its crea-
tors, producers, cast and crew, it is
something of an objet d'art unto
itself. Here, the vagaries of ratings
and time periods seem an intru-
sion, a distasteful fact of TV life.
"Crime Story" had been perco-
lating in Mann's mind since he
and Chuck Adamson, then Chi-
cago detective, met while Mann
was researching a cop show more
than a decade ago.
"Crime Story" was envisioned
as an epic account of organized
crime's evolution into global en-
terprise and the parallel story of
how law enforcement changed in
response.
The ambition to evolve the se-
ries from the 1960s to the present
has been extinguished by budget
considerations, though, and the
show will remain set in the early
1960s.
This season will feature Russian
pilots defecting and blonde
bombshells trving to seduce Ken-
nedy-esque politicians.
In an over-the-top cliffhanger
last season, Mann and company
nuked villains Ray Luca (An-
thony Denison) and his sidekick
Taulie Taglia (John Santucci),
thinking it was the last episode of
the season. Mann says he'll super-
impose a big question mark over
the mushroom cloud for reruns.
"Crime Story" was a critical hit
from the first strains of its theme
song, "Runaway Establishment
Hollywood has snubbed it,
though. It got only three Emmy-
nominations, in technical catego-
ries.
BASKETBALL
BLOWOUT
to support the
September 23, 24, 25
in front of Student Stores
F,
� � il cutofSshotsandyouarcclitjihlctowinprizes
OnWi I. and Thurs gill ertil ites from arcs businesses will ba awarded and on Fri SlUOwillbe
�war k I � o one lucky winner Please come out and help 1FC and Panheiienic support the Ronald
NKD nal : House!
$100
GRAND PRIZE
Sponsored by:
Panheiienic & IFC
SIGNED, SEALED,
DELIVERED
i
$3
Off a Large,
Three or More
Topping
Pizza!
Offer good only at participating
Domino's Pizza locations
Not valid with other coupons or offer
Offer good thru October 7.1987
Please provide name address phone on coupon
BEFORE drive' arrives
Name
Address
Phone
When Domino's Pizza
Delivers: we guarantee
that you'll get a hot. deli-
cious pizza If you are
not satisfied with your
pizza, call and let us
know within 30 minutes
after delivery We'll deliver
another pizza, free, or
refund your money
Return of at least one-
half pizza required
DOMINO'S
PIZZA
DELIVERS
rivers carry less than S20 00 Limited delivery area c 987 DommosPuja mc
Serving
Central Greenville
and ECU Campus
758-6660
1201 Charles Blvd
Serving East Greeiivme
752-6996
Rivergate Shopping Center
Serving West Greenville
756-9998
2405 W Dickinson Ave
Serving Ayden
and Winterville
746-4042
106 N Lee St
Hours
11 00am-1am Sun-Thurs
11 00am-2amFn & Sat
ExceptAyden
11 00am-I2rr,idnight Sun Thurs
'1 am-2am Fn & Sat
Mil i A M
McKinneyi
o
$
ajoo-c
Pirate golfers
By GEORGE OSBORNr
Sport WrKr-
Fast Carolina opened its
gotf season bv placing loth in ti.
Chris Winkd wh :
top 10, slu-t a "7 and a 72 to lead 534
the Pirates Fres mai - .
' - �
"1 wa real r
Simon's plav ik 1
cell
day he did
jut had a -
Other . ites plavii
ECU ruggers
By TIM HA 1PTON
After tv :
hal es
posted a 18-6
Belmont Abbey in a m
last Saturday in
" Ihc score u as not ir
the way we total
game, " said firs) yea
Ralph Capa
Tuesd 10 was
with the 1 :
Only five 1
game, Belmonl -V: I
ion a score ofl a broki .
�conversion was good :
�Abbey lead r 0 in what pr
be its onlj score.
Midwaj through the first halt
(rookie-rugger Miki Shunk -
ran the defense for tin first 1
blood. Aftera missed
it was ti4 Belmonl Abbej pa� on
the el
I
An ECU rugger known only as "Mr. Hahn" Is
Saturday in the Pirates' lX- victor) oer Htln,
Pirates w ill be in action again this Saturday.
mmmmsmmm





;riminal is about to face
darkest night of all.
MJEffi
by Mklver
m
ttr '��
mM
THE
VAMPtRc
J
a
texican Restaurant
Presents
Mark Johnson
Every Thursday
$1.00 Admission
Starts at 10:00 p.m
In the Fiesta Room.
Join usor
Drinks A Appetizers.
Must be 21 or older.
EALED,
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Serving sntral Greenville u d ECU Campus 758-6660
. East Greeuvme 752-6996
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A IVERS mm mServing Ayden and Winterville 746-4042 106 N La
- Thurs 11 00am . nFn SSat 11 00am-i 2midnight Sun Thurs 11 am ?a Ffi 4 Sat
�"f
1HI: t-ASI CARDI INIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 24, 1987 Page 15
McKinney, Pirates are readying for Eagles
5
rHUtli
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Miter
A book which might tell of a
successful ending to the East
Carolina football hopes of 1987
would probably have a chapter
set aside for tailback Reggie
McKinney.
The sophomore, who has been
lauded over and over again for his
running ability by head coach Art
Baker, just doesn't seem to be get-
ting the ball with any regularity.
In the few times that he has had
the ball, McKinney has accumu-
lated some impressive statistics.
In 11 rushes over the first three
games, McKinney has totalled 92
yards for an average of 8.4 yards
per carry. Toss in five kickoff re-
turns netting 95 yardsand one can
understand why Baker wants the
ball in McKinney's possession
more often.
"We have got to start getting the
ball into Reggie's (McKinney)
hands more said Baker. "When
he has the ball, he has shown that
he can do good things with it
The problem has been recog-
nized by Baker and his staff, now
is the time to find a solution.
Following the Pirates' 44-3 loss
to Florida State, Baker made the
statement about McKinney's
need to have the ball more. And
once again this week, after falling
to Illinois, 20-10, Baker reiterated
the same claim.
So coach, what's the answer?
"I'm not exactly sure was
Baker's response. "We are going
to have to definitely work to-
wards that (getting McKinney the
ball) in practice this week. He
(McKinney) needs the ball in his
hands more
Perhaps Saturday, when the
Pirates entertain two-time de-
fending NCAA-Division IAA
champion Georgia Southern
McKinney will get the opportu-
nity to display his diverse talent
more.
Another key area that the Pirate
coaching staff feels improvement
must be made in is the passing
game. Against Illinois, the Pirates
pounded out 233 yards, of rush-
ing, but only managed a mere 52
yards in the air.
"They (Illinois) hit their big
passes and we didn't was
Baker's assessment of the loss.
"Three times we had people open
behind the coverage and we
didn't get the ball to them.
"Although our (passing) statis-
tics were not all that impressive,
we did come out of the game feel-
ing much better that we do havea
good passing game continued
Baker. "We're just going to have
to execute it better. We a re still not
taking advantage of the opportu-
nities that are there
In Georgia Southern the Pirates
will be facing a team that they
have beaten the past two seasons.
The victory last season (35-33)
helped ECU to end, what was at
the time, the nation's longest los-
ing streak (15 games).
"Simply because we beat them
last year doesn't mean a thing this
year Baker said. "I believe that
Georgia Southern, the last two
times that they came to Ficklen
Stadium, have generated some-
where in the neighborhood of
1,200 yards in total offense
The Pirates do have one thing in
their favor Saturday though, ac-
cording to Baker.
"One person they don't have
back from last year, and thank the
good lord for that, is Tracy Ham
(the former quarterback is now
with the Edmonton Eskimos of
the Canadian Football League)
said Baker "If he were to show up
out there, we might would have to
throw in the white flag
Even though Ham, probably
the biggest key to the Georgia
Southern national champion-
ships, is gone, but Eagle head
coach Erk Russell has, and will
always have a good defense, ac-
cording to Baker. Russell, a for-
mcrGeorgia assistant, introduced
the famous Junkyard Dog De-
fense.
"They have got about half of
their defensive people back from
last year added Baker.
The Eagles will bring a 2-1 into
Ficklen Stadium after defeating
Middle Tennessee State last Sat-
urday, 17-13.
"They had a tremendous win
last Saturday said Baker. "It will
be a very important game for
them. They are not in any confer-
ence, so whether they go to the (I-
AA) playoffs depends greatly on
their record
Medrick Rainbw hopes to help
Pirate golfers finish in 10th �uide Pirates from nose tackle spot
By GEORGE OSBORN'fc
Sport Writer
East Carolina opened its fall
eo)f season bv planner 10th in the
CnrisWinkei, who placed in tin
top 10, shot a 77 and a 72 to lead
the Pirates. Freshman Simon
i carded a 71 and was in a six-
tii for the U ad at the . I se of
first round. (Tie i ireem ille
1U"J l"l vl l
stroke behind Winkel at 150.
I w.is real pleased with
n's play " head coach 1 lal
aid I le played an
nl first n und. I he second
da he didn't hit the ball bad, he
just had a couple of bad holes
Other Pirates playing in the
tournament were: Mike Nadeau,
78-77; ohn Lynch, 77-79; Frances
Vaughan, 80-78 and Mark Hidlcy
1 he University of Virginia took
the crown with a team score of
584 UVA's Jeff Putman was the
individual leader with scores of
71 and 72. Wake Forest was sec-
ond at 591. ECU had a team total
of 609
Cardinal Country Club will be
one of the toughest courses the
Pirates will play on this fall, ac-
cording to Morrison.
"The Cardinal is the kind of
i lurse that a score in the 70's will
be a y,od score Morrison ex-
plained. The rough was real tall
,nd in order to get a decent play
you had to stand on the fairway
Because of class schedules, ECU
sent a split team to the Cardinal,
including three freshmen.
"We didn't play as consistently
as I would like us to play, but that
team was a young team and
you've got to expect that early
on Morrison said. "Overall, I
think we did a pretty good job
The Pirates will play in their
second tournament of the week
Friday and Saturday at the Au-
gusta, Ga. Intercollegiate. The
Augusta, played at Forest Hills
Country Club, features team from
all over the southeast.
"We will see some tough teams
this weekend Morrison said.
"Not quite the caliber of the Car-
dinal, but still good.
ECU ruggers post 18-6 victory
By TIM HAMP ION
Sj rt v ritei
er two rain dren hed
s the ECI Rugby �. lub
� sted a 1S r victory over
Belmonl Abbey in a match played
List Saturday in c harlotte.
" Hie score was not indicativeoi
the way we totally dominated the
game said first year head coach
Ralph Capano in an interview
luesday. Capano was pleased
with the opening-game win.
Only five minutes into the
game, Belmont Abbey struck first
on a score i .a. oken play. The
conversion was good, Belmont
Abbey lead 6-0 in what proved to
be its only score.
Midway through the first half,
rookie-rugger Mike Shunk out
ran the defense for the first Pirate
blood. After a missed conversion,
it was b-4 Belmont Abbey.
Robert "Pugsley" Eason,afour-
year rugby veteran, demon-
strated a textbook assist to team-
mate Phillip Richie, also a senior
rugger, which put ECU ahead for
ghdMike Brown, a six-year per-
ennial star for the team, executed
the conversion as ECU lead 10-6 at
half time.
In second-half action, a player
only identified as "Mr. Hahn"
scored off a line out. A line out
occurs after the ball falls out of
bounds and both 15 member
squads line up for the ball to be
put back in play. ECU Ruggers led
14-6.
Doug Schade scored off an ex-
citing 'scissors play' from Brown
to make the score 18-6. In the scis-
sors play, Brown faked a pass to
one sideas his flanker, Schade, cut
against the grain to receive the
pass on the other side.
The Rugby team's next game
will be at home against Appala-
chian State University on Satur-
day at 10 a.m. The match will be
played on the field directly be-
hind the Allied Health building
located on Charles Boulevard.
"Come out and tailgate at the
rugby game before the football
game Capano said r
"ASU has never beaten us, so
we should win Saturday said
Eason in a phone interview. Eason
said the substantial number of
new recruits has helped the team
in areas of depth and strength.
By PAT MOLLOY
AMitUitt Sporta Editor
Can the ECU Pirates find the
gold at the end of the rainbow? If
their standout nose tackle Med-
rick Rainbow is leading the search,
one would certainly think so.
Rainbow is beginning his senior
campaign with the Pirates in a big
way.
Against the Fighting Illini of
Illinois last weekend, He posted
10 tackles and two sacks. Four of
those tackles were for losses total-
ing 26 yards. He credits much of
his success to defensive line coach
Donnie Thompson, who pushed
hard over spring drills to get the
tackle into peak mental and
physical condition. "He worked
hard over the summer and the
spring said Rainbow, "teaching
me about my technique, and get-
ting on me about playing selfish
defense
"Medrick had his finest game
since he has been here said Pirate
head football coach, Art Baker,
"He just played an excellent game.
Overall, Medrick rated a score of
85 percent. That's an outstanding
score
Rainbow started playing nose
tackle, after playing much as a
linebacker, during his senior year
at Conway High in Conway, SO,
where he received all-state and all-
conference honors. He was also
the leading tackier for two con-
secutive playoff teams. In 1983,
the tackle co-captained the South
Carolina squad in the annual NC
SC Shrine Bowl game.
Last year on the Pirate squad,
the South Carolina native was
switched from his natural position
at the nose to defensive tackle; and
although he was somewhat
unacustomed to that position,
Rainbow produced 41 tackles (28
solo, and 13 assists).
Now, though, this 5' 11" (not the
standard height for a nose tackle)
industrial technology major is
back home at the nose. And he has
brought a new attitude along. "I
think my big problem last year
and the year before was that I was
selfish. I wanted to be the big play
man. You get to the point where
you try to make a lot happen, and
then you hurt the defense. I'm
playing more team ball now
When questioned about Charlie
Libretto's recent departure from
and return to the Pirate program,
Rainbow showed his
committment to team ball.
"Charlie's a good guy he said,
Medrick Rainbow
"he showed a lot of character by
coming back and apologizing to
the team like that. He just had a
few problems, I think; and being
young like he is, he let the pressure
get to him.
As for assertions that he just isn't
big enough to play nose tackle.
Rainbow feels that football has
become too computerized
"Nowadays they just punch in a
number. They say 'we have so and
so, and he's a good player But
when you get out on the field, it
doesn't come to that. It comes
down to the desire and the heart
the person has
Rainbow certainly has a lot of
heart. When talking about the
Pirate's chances of attaining a
bowl bid, he focuses on winning.
"1 believe we have a good chance
he said, "If we carry some momen-
tum into Miami. We're just look-
ing to take one game at a time.
Right now, we're just looking at
Georgia Southern instead of wor-
rying about this game or that
game.
If we continue to do this, I think
we'll win games, and then have a
good chance for a bowl bid
The Pirates are looking to play
the Eagles of Georgia Southern in
much the same way they played
Illinois � only they want to elimi-
nate mistakes. "We'll continue to
play team ball said Rainbow,
"only we want to cut back on the
turnovers. It will be a team effort
With skilled players such as
Medrick Rainbow playing on that
team, the East Carolina Pirates are
halfway there.
Pirate surf team holds first trials
An ECU rugger known only as "Mr. Hahn" is shown in action
Saturday in the Pirates' 18-6 victory over Belmont Abbey. The
Pirates will be in action again this Saturday.
By JOHNNY GHEE
Special to The Eut Carolinian
FRISCO, N.C. - "Excellent surf,
great weather and tough competi-
tion combined to be a splendid
day down under Robert Hurst
Vice-President commented.
The East Carolina Surf Team
held the first team trials of the year
at Frisco Pier N.C. 25 Pirate surfers
and carmen turned out to what
could be called classic contest
waves. Light offshore winds held
four to six foot faces up long
enough for some hot rides. Trace
Yarbrough surfed the shore-break
while everyone else enjoyed the
outside sections.
Freshman Stuart Franck, from
Jacksonville, N.C, took top hon-
ors as his backside take offs
proved effective. Seniors Robert
Hurst, Johnny Ghee, and late ari-
val Todd Parker, along with Paul
Hughes and Tom Irrera made it
through the preliminary heats to
surf in the finals.
Competition for team position-
ing began at 9:30 a.m. with Presi-
dent Johnny Ghee organizing the
event. Team members judged
each other gaining valuable expe-
rience. Stockman State surfers,
Jamie Weeks and Mark Laverty
were voted to organize the polar
bear surf contest to be held in cold
water this winter.
Once again, team accomoda-
tions were at Frisco Woods Camp-
ground, famous for very friendly
mosquitoes. After a long contest
day most of the team members
packed up and headed for home.
A few stayed around and caught a
couch.
The Surf TeamClub is open to
all students and faculty interested rage fixing those long boards,
in having fun at the beach. (Rumor watch out guys.)
has it Advisors Jeff Johnson and The next meeting will be an-
Mike Orbach are busy in the ga- nounced soon so stay tuned.
ECU surfing results
12. Jack Vitale 475
13. Chris Yearley 400
14. Frank Turano 350
15. Trace Yarbrough 300
16.TimHobbs 150
17.JohnChilton 150
18. Ed Nylan 150
19. Mutt Johnson 150
20. David Pridgen 150
21. Mark Laverty 100
22. Scott Stiehl ' 100
23. Daryl Crumpler ioo
1. Stuart Franck1000
2. Rob Hurst950
3. Paul Hughes 4. Johnny Ghee900
850
5. Tom Irrera800
6. Todd Parker750
7. Warren Powell675
8. Jerry Stevenson675
9. Neil Cutler575
10. Jamie Weeks575
11. McKinney Hartman475
MMNft
mmmmmmm
m�i i�ip"� ��
MSmflnAiMi4att���
� mi �!��.�
S
I





16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 24, 1987
No changes atop AP top 20
i af t-l . .
(AD - The top three teams in the
Associated Press college football
poll were idle last weekend and
retained their positions. Ohio
State slipped from fifth place to
seventh with a shakv 24-14 victory
over Oregon.
Oklahoma, Nebraska, Auburn
and LSU held on to the top four
spots in Monday's poll while Mi-
ami and Florida State moved
ahead of Ohio State. In addition,
Michigan State and Pitt fell out of
the Top Twenty while Texas A&M
and Iowa appeared for the first
time since the preseason poll.
Oklahoma, which returns to
action on Saturday at Tulsa, re-
ceived 53 of 60 first-place votes
and 1,193 of a possible 1,200 points
from a nationwide panel of sports
writers and sportscasters.
The other seven first-place votes
went to Nebraska, which visits
12th-ranked Arizona State on Sat-
urday. The Cornhuskers totaled
1,129 points. Auburn, with a road
game against Tennessee on Satur-
day, received 1,028 points.
L5U, an easy winner over Rice,
New faces to invade Top 20
NFL training camps
Twenty-eight new groups of
football players will report to NFL
training camps on Wednesday.
And, within 48 hours, the NFL
will have become the New Foot-
ball League.
Everything changed after mid-
night Monday, when the long-
threatened strike by the National
Football League Players Associa-
tion became a reality.
"There have been other indus-
tries who have started with new
people and started all over
again Detroit Lions general
manager Russ Thomas said.
That's unfortunately the process
that we're confronted with
No one in management is pre-
tending that quickly assembled
teams of free agents can be
molded into NFL-calibcr units by
Oct. 4, the planned debut of alter-
native football.
"We are not putting on games
as typical of the Cowboys said
Tex Schramm, president of the
Dallas cowboys. But he promised
"exciting and competitive
games" even with free agents.
"We are not pretending that it is
the same product Schramm
added.
Denver Broncos owner Pat
Bowlen didn't sound like a man
anticipating fun.
"We've got a very tight relation-
ship here in Denver Bowlen said
of management and plavcrs. "I
think they're all just about as
unhappy as I am. They don't want
to go out on strike over free
agency. (But) 1 think they'redoing
what they have to do. I want my
guys to stick together. They
should probably do it (strike) as a
team
Fullback Mike Guman of the
Los Angeles Rams had said re-
cently he wasn't sure whether
he'd go out on strike because he
had to think of his family. But he
decided on Monday to join his
teammates.
"We're just like any other
union, we don't want people tak-
ing our jobs the Houston Oilers'
Mike Munchak said. "We want to
show them that we are solid I
think when they see how strong
we are, they'll start to pick things
Hill said he expects the plavers
to be painted as the bad guys in
the labor dispute. "I expect the
tans will be tough on us
Tampa Bay tackle Marvin Pow-
ell, an 11-year NFL veteran, said
the strike wasn't just a battle of
wills or free agency.
"You'll find some teams like the
New York Giants are diehards for
free agency Powell said. "There
are some veteran teams like San
Francisco that are interested in
pension. You take a team like this
and it's interested in things that
concern young plavers.
"We couldn't get as lucky as the
baseball players and get away
with a one-day strike said Mi-
ami dolphins player rep. William
Judson.
Caught between the striking
players and the owners who have
promised to import free agents to
meet game commitments are the
coaches.
"If here are (replacement) play-
ers here, I owe it to them and to
myself to do the best job I can
said Bills Coach Marv Lew. "It
won't be a mark-time effort
Although he wasn't pleased at
the tought of continuing the sea-
son with free agents, Chicago
Bears Coach Mike Ditka said he is
"paid to coach. It won't be a prob-
lem. I will feel uncomfortable.
We'll try. Lack of effort will not be
a problem. We'll trv to get it
right
New York Jets veteran Mark
Gastineau said after Monday
night's 43-24 victory over the
New England Patriots in the last
pre-stnke game that he wouldn't
walk out.
"Right now, I feel like I've put a
lot of work in the offseason
Gastineau said. "To give up on it
now is against my judgement. 1
want to play; that's why I re-
ported to camp
Pure Gold tryouts today
All students who wish to trvout
for the 1987-1988 Pure Gold Danc-
ers must attend an organizational
meeting in room 143 of Minges
Coliseum, Thursday, Sept. 24 at 7
p.m.
Actual tryouts for the dance
troupe, who perform at selected
home basketball games, as well as
some Pirate Club functions, will
be held Sept. 29.
These tryouts are not restricted
to dance majors, and all women
interested are urged to attend.
Lynette Johnson, who has in-
structed the Pure Gold Dancers
since 1986, received a masters
degree in dance from ECU.
For more information about the
Pure Gold Dancers, call 757-6491.
OUR BARK
MAKES
GOOD
One of the reasons our fresh food tastes so great is
mesquitc cooking. Mesquite burns three limes hotter
than regular charcoal. It provides an even heat that
cooks taste in. not out.
So. if you're looking for beef, poultry, ribs or seafood
with great taste, try CharleyOs. Our bark improves
the bite.
At the Hilton Inn, 2(4 Bypass at Hooker Road in
Greenville. Telephone. 355-5000.
mm
RESTAURANT BAR
lesquite Grilling And A Whole Lot More.
I.Oklahoma (53) 2-0-0
2. Nebraska (7) 2-0-0
3. Auburn 2-0-0
4. LSU 3-0-0
5. Miami, Fla. 1-0-0
6. Florida State 3-0-0
7. Ohio State 2-0-0
8. Notre Dame 2-0-0
9. Clemson 3-0-0
10. Arkansas 2-0-0
11. Tennessee 3-0-0
12. Arizona State 2-0-0
13. UCLA 2-1-0
14. Michigan 1-1-0
15. Penn State 2-1-0
16. Texas A&M 1-1-0
17. Alabama 2-1-0
18. Washington 2-1-0
19. Iowa 2-1-0
20.Georgii 2-1-0
Other Receiving votes: Florida
143, Syracuse 45, Oklahoma State
34, Pitt 32, South Carolina 30,
Michigan State 21, Southern Cali-
fornia 5, Boston College 3, North
Carolina 3, Duke 2, Air Force 1,
Kent State 1, Kentucky 1, Temple
1.
remained No. 4 with 995 points.
Miami, which has been idle for
two weeks, meets lOth-rankcd Ar-
kansas in Little Rock on Saturday.
The Hurricanes rose from sixth
place to fifth with 888 points. Flor-
ida State, which defeated Mem-
phis State 41-24, climbed from
seventh to sixth with 869 points.
Ohio State fell from fifth to sev-
enth with 867 points. The Buck-
eyes visit LSU on Saturday.
Notre Dame's 31-8 rout of
Michigan state lifted the Irish from
ninth to eighth with 788 points
while Clemson, which needed a
last-second field goal to nip Geor-
gia 21-20, slipped from eighth to
ninth with 777 points.
Arkansas' 30-15 victory over
Tulsa boosted the Razorbacks
from 12th to 10th with 643 points.
The Second Ten consists of Ten-
nessee, Arizona State, UCLA,
Michigan, Penn State, Texas
A&M, Alabama, Washington,
Iowa and Georgia.
Last week, it was Alabama,
Arkansas, UCLA, Tennessee,
Arizona State, Pitt, Michigan
State, Georgia, Michigan and
Penn State.
Texas A&M returned to the
rankings by defeating Washing-
ton 29-12 and Iowa made it back
by crushing Iowa State 48-9 for its
second straight victory after an
opening-game lose to Tennessee
in the Kickoff Classic.
Meanwhile, Michigan State's
loss to Notre Dame cost the Spar-
tans their place in the Top Twenty
and Pitt fell out after a 24-21 upset
at the hands of Temple.
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whenever you
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It obviously does
a lot more than type.
That's because the word pro-
cessing features just go on and on.
What's more, we sell the Videowriter Word
Processor for around the price of a good electronic
typewriter.
And that's quite a bargain w nen you consider
the amount of time it'll save you Time you can
spend doing the work for your other classes.
You would do that, wouldn't you?
W�i.rilir�ii tmt,�m ��, ft
MAGNAVOX
SmartAfery smart.
Vhoopsi
t
ALE1GH (AP) - An internal
it of North Carolina State
versity's athletic department
cizesa wide rane i t account-
practices some of them in-
ving the Wolfpack Club
ster organization - and makes
ecommendations for change
ne 30-page audit says that
ng the past two years,athletic
rials made double payments
several expenses and failed to
i bids for construction proh
, as required b law
e audit also said the athletic
�rtmentfunneied profits from
sale o� rock-concert T-shirts
a discretionary fund used by
tthletic 1 � recta r. It says mone)
School team travel was used t i
a portable stereo, five class B
"th Carolina driver's licenses,
rtrendy for "team members
beer and wine, among other
aigs. State regulations prohibit
i use of such funds to pa) I -
SOholic beverages, the audit
ys
Travel money alos was used to
ytipsof$25to$110with noex-
anation. On several occasions,
30rdsindicated thatbusdrr. -
?re paid $50 tips, say the audit
epared by the internal audit
vision of the school's offia
lance and business
Meanwhile, Richard Farrell,
io was relieved oi his duties as
N C Stafa si
dthletli s in 1
(Mil am
ment ol Rey
being investi
announced hi
letter to '
tor Jim ,il
and a
Weedoi ei
diret

Poull :
April "
SB
)errick Fenne
JPPFK MARLBORO, Md (AP
)errick. Fenner, the former I ni-
rsitv of North Carolina running
ck, pleaded inocent to murder
arges at a hearing in Prince
�orge's County Circuit Court on
mday.
rhe hearing was continued to
t. 8, with a trial date set for Oct.
Fenner, 20, has been charged in
lat authorities say was a drug-
ated shooting in Hyattsville,
i. Authoritits said he was one of
ar youths who allegedly walked
tothe courtyard of an apartment
mplex tipandishing weapons,
flpired ihrvwere taking over
? drug trade thereand opened
e. One man died and another
is wounded in the assault.
Fenner, who was the fifth-lead-
5 rusher in NCAA Division 1
atball with 1,230 yards last sea-
n, is free on $100,000 bond.
Fred Joseph, Fenner's attorney,
id his motion to suppress certain
idence gathered shortly after
nner's June 2 arrest was re-
nted. Joseph had sought to bar as
idence tape recordings Fenner
ade after turning himself in to
ithorities in Hyattsville.
Prosecutors say several evewit-
sses have identified Fenner as
te'of the youths who opened fire
the apartment complex, but (o-
ph maintains Fenner is a victim
mistaken identity and that he
IS nowhere near the apartment
t the night of the shooting.
Tyrone Anthony Davis, 21. de-
ribod as a boyhood acquain-
nce of Fenner's, has also been
arged in the case.
"echsters
eady for
� �.
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� CRISPIN GLOVB
-�JOHNMUTO �
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CAROLINA i
56 14
"V
.r
ugers
-ANT A (AP) - Georgia Tech
Bobby Ross has started his
thinking positive as he pre
the squad for Saturday s
with 9th-ranked Clemson.
fe have our work cut out for
said Ross, whose team is 1-1
Saturday's loss to North
�Olina. "I go into the game
inking that if we do the things
M we have to do we have a good
f fair shot at winning the game
Pe must plav a very good foot-
tame
Icmson is very similar to
Carolina in a lot of ways.
're very, very big Ross said
Monday's practice. "Their
sive line will go 300,295,290
the board. Their lineback-
very tall and rangy. It's a
il Clemson team
said he has two injured
� who could be ready Satur-
They are offensive tackle
' Marion, with a pulled grion
and fullback Malcolm
bruised ribs.
fcht end Chris Caudle could be
for Clemson after missing
�ames with a sprained knee.
SI
& .
to'
A
- m � -






ROADEN
YOUR
ENDRIX THEATRE
ISTflTl
Greenville Blvd.
756-7171
i I'O.MK PARENTS
Any Large
Sub
AILGATE
my 2 large Subs
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17
Clip-N-Save
Whoops! NCSU got caught
RA1 EIGH (AP) - An internal
lit ot North Carolina State
iversity's athletic department
i izesa wide range of account-
practices some of them in
ig the Wolf pack Club
osier organization - and makes
ommendations for change.
JO page audit says that
ing the past two years, athletic
ials made double payments
several expenses and tailed to
k bids for construction proj-
,is required bv law.
i audit also said the athletic
�merit tunneled profits from
sale ol rock-concert T-shirts
a discretionary fund used by
athletic director. It says money
t hool team travel was used to
a portable stereo, five class B
Carolina driver's licenses
arently for "team members
: beer and wine, among other
- state regulations prohibit
so ot such funds to pay tor
Ik beverages, the audit
ivel mone alos was used to
tipsol $25 to $1 111 with no ex-
nation On several occasions,
indicated that busdrivers
i.
�n paid $50 tips, sav the audit,
; ired by the internal audit
t'ision ot the school's office ol
anee and business.
Meanwhile, Richard Farrell,
10 vas relieved ot his duties as
N.C. State's business manager for
athletics in February, will retire
Oct. 1 Farrell, whose manage-
ment ot Reynolds Coliseum is
being investigated by the SBI,
announced his plans to retire in a
let' to N.C State Athletic Direc-
tor im Valvano about a month
and a halt ago, said Frank
Weedon, senior associate athletic
director.
N.C State Chancellor Bruce
Poulton declined to comment
Monday on the audit, saying
(leorge Worsley, Vice Chancellor
lor Finance and Business, was
n re'up to speed" on it. Valvano
declined to comment and
i lerred questions to Worsley.
Worsley could not be reached
tor i omment.
I he audit, which was ad-
dressed to Poulton. is the second
part ot two stage internal investi-
gation ol accounting procedures
at le nold c oliseum and in N.C
State - Athh tu Department. The
coliseum audit was completed
April 15. both audits were re-
quested by Poulton alter The
News and Observer reported that
Farrell - as Reynolds Coliseum
manager moonlighted as a ticket
salesman tor a promoter who had
been indicted on charges of de-
trauding the coliseum
These arc some of the findings
of the internal audit ot the athletic
department, which covers the
period from July ls85 to this
month:
-Six bills totaling $25,948 were
paid twice in a two-month period
The report attributes the problem
largely to a practice of accepting
copies of invoices from vendors
rather than accepting original
invoices only - a practice that has
been halted.
-The athletic department tailed
to collect a $10,CKX) game guaran-
tee from the University of Kansas
for a basketball game played in
Kansas City during the 1986-87
season The report does not sav
whether the money ever was coi
lected.
-Some N.C. State coaches who
ran summer athletic camps ap-
parently failed to pay rent tor use
of Reynolds Coliseum.
-Official team representatives
sometimes did not sign payment
authorization forms when get-
timg money tor team travel. Sum
larly, the business office issued no
receipts indicating the return of
unused money after a trip.
The audit recommends that the
athletic department stop process-
ing payments for various athletic-
related projects through the
Wolf pack Club, the private
sports-booster organization.
The report said the Athletic
Department had made numerous
)errick Fenner trial delayed
PPFR MARI BORO, Md. (AD
rrick I enner. the former I ni-
of North Carolina running
k pleaded inocent to murder
irges at a hearing in Prince
� ge's County Circuit Court on
mday.
i he hearing was continued to
t. 8 with a trial date set torQct
Fenner, 20, has been charged in
hat authorities sav was a drug
related shooting in Hyattsville,
Md. uthorititssaid he ivason
four youths who aliegedh wall
nta the courtyard of an apartment
irii'K brandishing weapons,
"W A-d thf Vwerc taking over
li ig trade there, and opened
e man died and another
i iunded in the assault.
ner, who was the fifth-lead-
rusher in NCAA Division 1
(ball with 1.250 yards last sea-
i is tree on $100,000 bond.
red oseph, Fenner's attorney.
J his motion to suppress certain
nee gathered shortly after
nner's lune 2 arrest was re-
ted. Joseph had sought to bar as
rice tape recordings Fenner
le alter turning himself in to
fiorities in 1 lyattsville.
: secutors say several eyewit-
sses have identified Fenner as
t the youths who opened fire
the apartment complex, but Jo-
maintains Fenner is a victim
mistaken identity and that he
is nowhere near the apartment
the night of the shooting.
y rone Anthony Davis, 21, de-
ibed as a boyhood acquain-
ce of Fenner's, has also been
irgcd in the case.
Tec listers
ready for
Tigers
HANTA (AP) - Georgia Tech
ich bobby Ross has started his
im thinking positive as he pre-
ires the squad for Saturday's
ish with 9th-ranked Clemson.
e have our work cut out for
said Ross, whose team is 1-1
tr Saturday's loss to North
iroiina. "I go into the game
nking that if we do the things
11 we ha ve to do we ha ve a good
i tair shot at winning the game.
v e must play a very good foot-
II game
'Clemson is very similar to
rth Carolina in a lot of ways.
I htey're very, very big Ross said
er Monday's practice. "Their
I fensive line will go 300,295,290
' ross the board. Their lineback-
ers are very tall and rangy. It's a
typical Clemson team
Ross said he has two injured
flayers who could be ready Satur-
day. They are offensive tackle
� ssie Marion, with a pulled grion
muscle, and fullback Malcolm
King, bruised ribs.
Tight end ChnsCaudle could be
rady for Clemson after missing
iwo games with a sprained knee.
"SHOCKING AND UNFORGETTABLE

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EAST CAROLINA
TEA PARTY"
Every Friday
� $2.00 Iced Teas
�FREE Pizza
57 PM N
�No Cover
Charge
�ECU Football
Cheerleaders
Pep Rally live
6-7 PM,
mSJmW Transit
tmAuthority
Sheraton Greenville
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
To
payments to the VVolfpack Culb
which, in turn, had paid vendors
on behalf of the department. It
cited one instance in which an
unnamed senior associate athletic
director asked C. C. Mangum Inc.
in August 1485 tor estimates cov-
ering three paving projects at
Carter-Finley Stadium. Two of
the projects, totaling $20,832 and
$(-1,4(13 , were completed in Au-
gust 1985 and the third was com-
pleted in October 1985 at a cost of
State law says constuction proj-
ects costing between $2,500 and
$30,000 must be awarded alter an
informal bid process. These proj-
ects did not go through such a
process, the report says.
Examples included purchases
of game and tournament tickets;
contracted printing ol media
guides; building materials and
supplies; insurance on courtesy
cars; and meals and refreshments
provided by the Case Dining facil-
it) to offk ials, state troopers and
reporters.
(. harhe Bryant, executive secre-
tary ot the VVolfpack Club, said
Monday he had no problem with
his organization's undertaking
construction projects on behalf ol
the university.
"We'reina position to do what-
ever the university thinks is
proper Bryant said. "Anything
we've ever undertaken tor the
athletic department has been a
cost-saving measure. It the audit
report says we should stop doing
something we're doing, then we
will
j�JC Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
321 E. 10th St Greenville (next to Wendy's)
758-0000
VOTED THE NATIONS 1 VANILLA
Buy 1 Sundae or Blend-in. Get 1
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coupon good thru Sept. 3
ITonlr'c U�n avm n f a 1
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one coupon per orrier please coupon good through Sept M
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MONDAY SATURDAY
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639 H EAST ARLINGTON BLV
GREENVILLE, NC 2785)
(919) 3r5 74i
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Nriuht.
I lcaon ami lell � The ('onclasion oj the North and South Trilogy by .John Jakes.
Mi sen � is a nightmare nl- Stephen King could have, and one only Stephen King � mild
render in such gruesome detail In Stephen Kin�
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Time Mies � Aging is no laughing matter, hut Time Flies will change all that In Mill ("osh.
Central Book and News
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t v
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Greenville, N.C. 27858
Arlington Village
Hrs. 10-6:00 p.m. MS
Thurs. 10-8 :00 p.m.
919-756-3320
:
I





i
I 'S�K?w
A?
-1�THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTTMRn? M 1987
i
���
i
I
Fearless Football Forecast
GAMES
Ga. Southern at ECU
Auburn at Tennessee
Ga. Tech at Clemson
Duke at Virginia
Fla. State at Mich. State
South Carolina at Georgia
Ohio State at LSU
Maryland at N.C. State
Tenn State at Boston Coll.
Arizona at UCLA
BRIAN BAILEYDEAN BUCHAN
WNCT-TV Sports DirectorECU Sports Information
Uul WeekLaM Week:
(6-4)(7-3)
Overall:Overall
(22-8)(22-8)
ECUECU
AuburnTennessee
ClemsonClemson
VirginiaVirginia
Florida StateFlorida State
GeorgiaGeorgia
LSULSU
MarylandMaryland
Penn StateBoston College
UCLAUCLA
TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Uit Week:
(7-3)
Overall:
(22-8)
PAT MOLLOY
Assistant Sports Editor
LatMtafe
(5-5)
Overall:
(19-11)
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
lW Week
(3-7)
Overall
(15-15)
ECU
Auburn
Clemson
Duke
Florida State
Georgia
Ohio State
Maryland
Penn State
UCLA
ECU
Auburn
Clemson
Duke
Florida State
Georgia
Ohio State
Maryland
Penn State
UCLA
ECU
Auburn
Clemson
Duke
Honda State
Georgia
Ohio State
Maryland
Penn State
Arizona
Intramurals slate of events
The Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services Physical
Fitness Program is offering a vari-
ety of services for faculty, staff
and students of the University.
Aerobic classes are being held on
a drop-in basis daily. All classes
are available for a nominal fee
with valid identification. Partici-
pants should acquire a drop-in
card in room 204 Memorial Gym
before participation, a complete
class schedule may be obtained at
the same location.
Fall 1987 Weight Training
workshops will be held through
the semester. The weight training
workshops focus on development
of beginning workout program
for individuals interested in ton-
ing muscles and developing
greater physical strength and
endurance. Each workshop is
composed of three sessions which
will introduce participants to
principles and techniques of fixed
weight programs. Goal setting
and confidence building will also
be emphasized as participants
learn a fundamental routine for
total bodv developement.
Registration for Workshop 1
will be held Sept. 21-25 in room
204 Memorial Gym from 9 a.m
p.m. Only 12 participants will be
allowed to register. The cost of the
program is set at $3 for students
and $5 for facultystaff and
spouses. The workshops will be
held in the Memorial Gym weight
room. Workshop 1 will be held
Sept. 29, Oct. 1-3. For additional
Strike was no surprise
The NFL strike, which came as
no surprise and could be at the
mercy of a mystery man, showed
cracks in union solidarity shortly
aftcf it started.
The walkout, the second in six
seasons, was announced Monday
night by union head Gene Up-
shaw during halfrime of the New
England Patriots- New York Jets
game. It began officially at 12:29
am EDT, when the last player
walked off the field at East Ruth-
erford, N.J.
While emptying the lockers of
1,400 NFL regulars, the stnke will
bring an influx of free agents and
castof fs, who are supposed to pick
up play in two weeks. Although
this week's games have not been
officially canceled, they will be
unless there's some instant settle-
ment.
Upshaw held out some hope of
that when he said the union had
"initiated a move to a person with
some authority a person he
would identify only as "someone
I hope can get the process going so
we can resolve this
Speculation centered on
Commissioner Pete Rozelle and
Dan Rooney, President of the
Pittsburgh Steelcrs. Rooney is
credited with ending the 57-day
strike that wiped out seven weeks
of a 16-week season in 1982.
But Rozelle said earlier Monday
the two sides were too far apart
for him to do any good, "he might
be right about that, " Upshaw
said.
$790
plus tax
8:00 pm-11:30 pm
(Medium size cheese plus 2 Items.)
�Ta 'es �no em� cnt �v�,aoi� � �oO'ton� co�
vai'O wW coupe � pT'C'D�in�, litB� Ciun
O Conor of CLtfomer Carry Out Only
Buy any size
pizza at regular price, get
identical pizza FREE!
NO LIMIT
P��r � vrw� �tosjtt � " "4 numW at iopn�i
mtm&t V�W�lh coupon �t nr��ffaf��f LrHWCavwt
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When you moke pizza this good, on just isn't enough
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LATE HUE APPETITE? J PMPfeBBB !
2 MEDIUM P.ZZAS hOK Ife i
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Cves
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Extra hems over 3 . .
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SMALLMEDIUM LARGE
8 pc 10 pc 12 pc
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6 75
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150
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250
CAESARS SANDWICHES
Tuna Melt
hakan Sub
Ham and Cheese
Vegetarian
SALADS
Tossed
GreeU
Antipasio
2 76
2.36
236
2 16
SMALLMEDIUM IARGE
! 19 2 39 369
139 289 4fj9
139 2H9 469
CHOOSE FROM THESE IOWINGS
Fvpprr"v Muarwmnv Owns Ham Raton Ground Bar haaan
vtivM)r GMI FVpnrrs Anrhnwn Hot FVunrr frv� Fbt Oaw�
(Vaan Oatan
Me4um bier
66
BEVERAGES
Coca Cola. Diet Coke.
Sprite. MefcYelovv.
Cherry Coke
Smal
55
323 Arlington Blvd.
(across from Farm Fresh)
CHOOSE FROM THESE TOPPING
Fr�mh haaan Thousand ktend Grt & Ra- h
SPECIALTIES
Freshly Baked Crazy Bread"
A lot 01 lott warm Bread Sticks with Gark fturwr & Parisian Chaeie
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FVre tuhioci to thtngr iPVvtn shown without id
A�h our manager about group cttcounrs
756-7256
HOURS: SUN-THU II AM-12 MIDNIGHT
FRI-SAT II AM-1 AM
information, contact Kathleen
Hill at 757-6387.
SUMPTIN'S SPECIAL on the
co-rec softball diamonds this
semester. In a recent contest,
SUMPTIN SPECIAL slid over the
opponent OUTFIELDERS in a 10-
3 decision. Top softballers for the
winning team include D. Lefeure,
who connected with a single to
score teammate Fowler, and Fis-
cher who homered in the first
inning. Joey Williams led the
Outfield with Steve King and
Christy McQueen contributing to
the cause. In other action, the
Alpha Sigs came out ahead of
Superstitious 9-7. David Foster
homered in the first followed by
Don Godwins score. Teammate
Don King tacked on four runs
single-handedly with a grand
slam.
The Outdoor Recreation Center
will be 'on the road' again with a
backpacking adventure trip
scheduled for Oct. 2-4 in the
Uwharrie National Forest near
Troy, N.C. Registration will be
held through Sept. 28 in room 204
Memorial Gym. A pre-trip meet-
ing will be held Sept. 30 at 4 p.m.
For additional information, con-
tact Mark Ritter at 757-6387.
For additional information re-
garding any of the programs and
services offered by the Depart-
ment of Intramural-Recreational
Services, drop by room 204 Me-
morial Gym or call 757-6387.

TENTH STREET
ANIMAL HOSPITAL
Mark T. Hayes, D.V.M.
830-0881
(Emergency. 756-9572)
Formerly associated with Bateman Animal Clinic
Dr. Hayes invites you to visit his new office at
3192 E. 10th St. � Across From Rivergate
Shopping Center
Wo rues s F � 30AM PM Wee S n v � -
15 OFF
Professional Services With Ad
SHOP � SHUE
At Overtoil's Supermarket, whether it's for the big game or your week-
end, we have what you need at Great Prices! We're conveniently located
2 blocks from ECU on the corner of Third & Jarvis Streets. Come See Us:
IMZ
GREAT ON THE GRILL!
Grade MAM Fryer
Leg Quarters
v
lb. 280
Limit one 4-5 lb. bag
Dawn Dish Detergent
22 oz. bottle
99 $
Ruffles
Potato Chips
6 12 oz. bagAll Flavors
99
BUSCH BEER
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12 oz. cans PACKS
COORS & COORS LIGHT
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New From Richfood Dairy
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Thompson White jqi
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Breyer's All Natural
Ice Cream
12 Gallon CartonAssorted Flavors!
$2
39
Stouffer's Frozen Lean Cuisine
�Cheese Cannelloni (9 oz.)
� Chicken Chow Mein (11 oz.)
� Spaghetti with meat sauce (11 oz.)
meat sauce (11 oz.)
$39
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Limit 2 - 2 Liter Cokes. Additional Cokes $109
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FROM 11 AM - 7 PM, SUNDAYS 1-6 PM
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Bounty Paper Towels - j��J
giant roll ����
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with this coupon. Without coupon )2
each 79�. Limit 2 rolls per customer.
Expires 9-23-87 (ECU PLU 51)
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
8 a.m. - 8 p.m. Monday - Saturday
Sundays 1-6 p.m.
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 24, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 24, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.560
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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