The East Carolinian, September 22, 1987






INSIDE
Editorials 4
StyleZZZZZZZ.9
Sports13
Classifieds5
STYLE
Pulitzer Prize winning alumnus returns and talks
about his success � see STYLE, page 9.
SPORTS
Illinois capitalizes on Pirate mistakes to win their
first of the season � see SPORTS, page 13.
5Uj� i�uxt (Harnlintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. b2 No. 8
Tuesday, September 22,1987
Greenville, NC
16 Pages
Circulation 12,000
SGA moves to establish dialogue with NCSU
By TIM HAMPTON
Sun Writer
The Student Government As-
socation released a statement
Monday concerning the after-
math of the Sept. 5 NCSU-ECU
game which supports future
communication between the two
schools.
SGA Speaker Bennett Eckert
read the statement � which also
expresses disappointment for the
actions of fans � at a Monday
night meeting.
"We (the SGA) learned about
NCSU's actions through the
newspapersand T.V. In the future
we like to have communication
before a statement is made said
SGA President Scott Thomas in an
interview after the meeting.
"We don't feel that the alterca-
tion was provoked entirely by
ECU students, rather that fans
created the situation; the empha-
sis is on the word 'fans Eckert
said.
Concerning the press which
ECU received in a variety of
North Carolina newspapers,
"Bad press is the reflection of
perceptions which hold that ECU
is supposed to stand in the
shadow of NCSU Eckert said in
an interview after the meeting.
During the meeting Eckert
read exerpts from a column writ-
ten by Jerry Bledsoe of theGreens-
boro News and Record which
called ECU "Yahoo U" and pro-
posed the cancellation of Pirate
football.
The statement will be sent to
NCSU's SGA president, NCSU
Athletic Director Jim Valvano and
to NCSU's student newspaper:
The Technician. In addition, the
response will be mailed to The
News and Observer and The
Greensboro News and Record,
among others.
In other business:
�Eckert announced the mem-
bers and chairmen of four
committees. The new chairmen
are: William G. Perry, Appropria-
tions Committee; Marty Helms,
Judiciary Committee; Kelly Jones,
Student Welfare Committee; and
Larry Murphy, Screening and
Appointments Committee.
� The ECU Marauders club was
appropriated $400 to fund the
travel expenses of a guest speaker
who is to address the group later
this week. Several other bills in-
volving budgets of student
groups w. re sent to the Appro-
priations Committee for further
consideration.
Wheelchair athletes compete
w

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I
Speaker Bennett Eckert reads a statement to the SGA Monday.
Biltmore
City police clarify issues
Students will not be given any special treatment in their run-ins with
Greenville police, according to interim assistant chief Nelson Sta1 n.
On Friday Staton released a statement to clarify positions stated in the
article "Greenville. ECU Officials Meet, Propose Plan which appeared
in Thursdav's The East Carolinian.
"On September 2, University and City officials discussed several
alternatives for avoiding or handling incidents involving ECU student
parties that get out of control. Many different ideas were discussed:
however, no plans or firm proposals were made. Reports of that
meeting may have led some citizens to believe that we have a different
enforcement policy for students than for other citizens. This is not the
case: however, we will continue discussions regarding further policies.
Nothing is final at this time and we will probablv not give anv further
consideration to ideas involving a different enforcement policy for
students in community problems than the enforcement policy for any
other citizen Staton said.
Eakin says ECU must be a good neighbor
By M. BURBELLA
smsUnt Nrv� Id.lor
Wheelchair athletes from
around the nation gave spectators
at Mingcs Coliseum a demonstra-
tion of their abilities Saturday.
The Regional Rehabilitation
Center at Pitt County Memorial
Hospital and the National Wheel-
chair Athletics Association o-
sponsored a workshop featuring
five areas ' of competition in
wheelchair athletics.
Saturday's program was de-
signed to "introduce disabled
people to the world of sports
according to program adminis-
trator JeanAnn Dodulik.
"The effort was a joint effort
between the Pitt County Memo-
rial Hospital staff, NWAA, and
ECU said Jim Barrett of the reha-
bilitation center.
From 8:30 a.m. until 4 p.m.
people attending the workshop
saw demonstrations of five of the
six events sKmsored by NWAA:
archery by Michcal Stauncr, track
and field by Jim Zajac, table tennis
by Gary Blanks, weightlifting by
KaterCornwellandswimmingbv
Kent Hogan. The airgun demon-
strator could not attend.
After surveying people who
saw and participated in the pro-
gram, Dodulik said the workshop
succeeded in helping meet some
of the NWAA's goals.
"The purpose of the event is
two-fold Barrett said. "One, to
get wheelchair disabled individu-
als into sports, and two, to get the
staff to work with wheelchair
individuals
"That was a highlight for me �
for them to get a chance to try to
By ANDY LEWIS
Nrwi Editor
This is the last of a two-part scries
begun Thursday in which Chancellor
Richard R. Eakin speaks about the
way he views recent current events
and how they have affected East Caro-
lina University.
In the first part, Eakin talked about
the post-game incident at the ECU-
North Carolina State University
football game. In this part, Eakin
addresses the Biltmore Street mishap
and explains his plans for ECU's fu-
ture.
At about 6 p.m. August 29,
Greenville Police arrested three
ECU students at an unauthorized
block party on Biltmore Street and
charged them each with different
violations ranging from drunk
and disruptive to assault on a
police officer.
Many students at the party
claim the arresting officers used
unnecessary force in arresting the
students. Police say they used
only enough force necessary to
arrest the students, faced with an
agressive crowd.
The events of that afternoon,
combined with the post-game
incident and the arrests of three
ECU basketball players Aug. 26
on charges of breaking, entering
and larceny, has influenced pub-
lic perception of the university,
according to Eakin.
Eakin said that although he
does not know who is at fault, the
Biltmore Street occurance "cer-
tainly has affected our (ECU's)
image with that neighborhood.
There's no doubt of it. People in
the neighborhood were dis-
tressed with the events of that
afternoon
"I believe that it is incumbent
upon all of us � students, faculty,
staff alike � to be individually
and collectively good neighbors
"I intend to have a meeting
with the city manager and with
others that the city may wish to
have at the meeting and with
several student leaders to explore
ways in which we can, in fact,
improve the relationship
Eakin said he hopes people can
sec that the "intolerable" actions
of a few hundred people have
come to unfairly represent the
attitude and feelings of the ECU's
population at large.
"We have a long rich history;
and even today, things are hap-
pening at this university in which
we should all take great pride.
And we should not allow that set
of circumstances to color the
reputation of East Carolina Uni-
versity
The university is moving on
from the past few weeks, and
Eakin is concentrating on such
projects as reviewing the
university's statement of mission,
increasing the number of minor-
ity student and faculty members,
becoming recognized by Phi Beta
Kappa and beginning new Ph.D.
programs, he said.
After having been chancellor
for about seven months, Eakin
said he views the university as a
"freshman "I simply believe
that this university has such
promise, that it is and will con-
tinue to be a very exciting place to
be
participate Barrett said. "With
the positive feedback we got from
the workshop, these goals should
very well be accomplished
The workshop was sponsored
by the Paralyzed Vietnam Veter-
ans Association, the U.S. Olympic
Foundation and the Wheelchair
Invacare Corporation. If grants
areavailable next year the NWAA
will try to visit North Carolina
again, Dodulik said.
"A lot depends on the funding
we get in the future Dodulik
said. "If we don't get grants, we
don't have a future
"We probably would not return
to Greenville, we would have to
do survey work again � who
would be interested and where
would it be the most benefical to
go?"
Nancy Miles and Bill Kane of
the ECU Intramural Athletic
Department were "a great help to
the workshop according to Bar-
rett. Barrett also said student in-
tern Ann Robin Jarrett provided
useful assistance by doing "a lot
of the leg work
Several Greenville businesses
contributed refreshments and
lunch.
The day ended with an im-
promptu basketball game played
by wheelchair workshop partici-
pants, demonstrators for NWAA
and "able-bodied" workshop
participants.
v
Jim Zajac puts out extra effort and nearly his glasses baturday
(Jon Jordan, Photolab).
Board of Trustees elects Bennett chairman, swears threelm
East Carolina University's
board of trustees elected a chair-
man and swore in three new
board members at a meeting Fri-
day morning in the conference
room of the Nursing building.
Thomas A. Bennett, an execu-
tive vice president of Wachovia
Bank and Trust, was elected chair-
man of the board. Bennett, a trus-
tee since 1981, succeeds Ralph
Kinsey, whose term expired June
30.
Max Joyner retained his posi-
tion as vice chairman of the board
and Sandra Babb became the sec-
retary. New members appointed
by Gov. James Martin who took
the oath Friday include Howard
Rooks, a 1955 graduate of ECU,
Craig Souza, a 1971 graduate and
Vincent Lowe.
The trustees held an executive
session for two hours Friday for
personnel matters.
The board's next meeting is
scheduled for October 30.
The Board of Trustees sets
management policy and creates
an annual budget for the univer-
sity.

' ; "U
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!
.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEI'TEMUCK 22. 1987
lfaaiQ-gQnYfntion
Students seek influence over classes
Honors students from around
� state converged on ECU Fri-
and seemingly agreed that
?"� have more control
over their own destiny.
K L was the host of the North
rohna Honors Association
�nwnt�on. and ECU alumnus
( twnson. winner of a Pulit-
zer 1 rize in journalism, kicked off
� one-day affair as the keynote
speaker.
Atkinson, deputy national edi-
tor o the Washington Post, was
enrolled in ECU's honors pro-
gram and graduated with a BA
degree in English in 1974.
I he wide and probing scope of
honors teaching gave Atkinson a
"ess pinched" view of the world
Atkinson said in his speech. At-
Knson recounted experiences he
has had as a reporter: from having
to watch a dead family being
pulled out of a wrecked car to
�y�ng to sort through the Iran-
l ontra I learings.
(See the interview with Atkin-
son, page 9).
101 students and faculty mem
bersfrom schools including West
ern Carolina University, Appala
chian State University, Gardner
Webb College, UNC-Ashville
and Morris Hill College attended
the one-day convention, accord
ing to Dr. David Sanders, English
professor and director of the 1(1
Honors Program
The participants at the one-day
convention attended workshops
related to honors classes and how
they prepare students for then
future.
The students discussed how
they could have more say in w hat
kind of honors courses are taught
and some proposed that state
wide guidelines be established
concerning honors courses
Sanders said he appreciated the
helpof ECU honors students with
the convention. He added thai
some oi the students provided .i
place to stay the night for about 15
of the convention participants
Foundation selects Edwards
(ECU News Bureau) � The
annual meeting of the East Caro-
lina University Foundation, Inc.
reviewed progress oi the past
year, set goals tor the future and
elected officers and new members
Saturday.
Greenville businessman I.
lackson (lack) Edwards suc-
ceeded VV.R. Roberson r. oi
Washington. N.C as president.
ludge S. Gerald Arnold of Buies
( reek, C. was elected vice
president and will replace Ed-
wards in that post.
The East Carolina University
Foundation, Inc. is a private cor-
poration that supports academic
programs oi the university
through the solicitation of gifts
and the management of re-
sources. Volunteer members
work with the Offices of Institu-
tional Advancement and Alumni
Relations to promote and assist
the Foundation.
lames L Lamer Jr vice chancel-
lor for Institutional Advance-
ment, said, "Jack Edwards is in
the unique position of serving as
president of both the East Caro-
lina University Foundation and
the Pirate Club this year. 1 las dual
role is indicative oi the interest
and support he shows in all of
ECU's endeavors
Edwards accepted the post and
said, "I've been in Greenville
since I was four years old, and I
think the most significant things
that have happened here are the
medical school, the progress ol
the ECU Foundation, and specifi
cally, the University Scholars
Awards program. I'm extremel)
excited about the opportunity to
work with the Institutional .i
vancement staff for greater aca
demic enrichment at East (. aro
lina
Edwards received his MA in
business at ECU in I960 AI
though semi-retired, his busi
nesses � University Bool Ex
change, Art & Camera Shop and
Art & Camera Frame Shop
continue to operate
He was recognized in 198-1 !��
the PittGreenville Chambei of
Commerce as the Small Bus
Leader of the Year. In 1985 he
served as President ol the Pitt
County Chapter o( the iI
Alumni Association
Total giving to the ECI t oun
dation passed $2.1 million for th�
first time last year I his figi re
represents a 24 increase over tru
$1.6 million donated the war be
fore, Lanier s.u,t
rt Night Club
presents
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NOW OFFERS
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758-2400
(Next to Chicos in the Georgetown Shops)
Lecture to be held
on Nicaragua
(ECU News Bureau) � A vet-
eran State Department foreign
officer will lecture on the di-
lemma the U.S. faces in troubled
Nicaragua at ECU Sept. 23.
The program is sponsored by
the ECU departments of Geogra-
phy and Planning, Political Sci-
ence, Aerospace Studies and Mili-
tary Science.
Ur Peter Sarros, a senior for-
eign service officer with broad
State Department experience, will
be the guest lecturer for the pro-
gram at 8 p.m. in B102 Brewster
Building on the ECU campus.
Sarros has served as coordina-
tor of congressional and public
affairs on Central America for the
State Department and has been an
official in the Bureau of lnter-
American Affairs.
I le has served diplomatic posts
in Central America, Venezuela,
the Dominican Republic, Iceland
and Italy anTTirom 1975 to T980
was deputy U.S. envoy to the
Vatican.
Sarros' lecture will be "Nicara-
gua: Dilemma for U.S. Policy
Makers The public is invited to
attend.
New nurses join
ECU faculty
(ECU News Bureau) Rose-
mary A. Pine and Duck-Lee Kang
have joined the faculty of the East
Carolina University School of
Nursing, where they will teach
junior nursing majors at ECU.
Pine, who will hold the rank of
lecturerclinical assistant profes-
sor, will teach medical-surgical
nursing. Kang, appointed lec-
turerclinical instructor, will
teach nursing leadership.
Pine previously taught at
Widener University, Pa where
she received a merit award for
development of a pharmacology
course, and at Villanova Univer-
sity, where she was honored with
a College oF Nursing Distin-
guished Service Award.
She is an alumna of Gwynedd-
Mary College and received the
MS degree from Villanova. Her
professional activities include a
consultantship to a publisher of
nursing skill manuals.
Kang taught at North Central
Technical Institute, Warsaw,
Wis eight years and has
extensive clinical experience in
intensive-coronary care units. She
received bachelor's and master's
degrees from Yonsei University
in Seoul, Korea, where she re-
ceived scholarship honors.
Castroenterologist
joins med school
(ECU News Bureau)
Dr
Douglas Price, a gastroenkrolo
gist, has joined the faculty at the
East Carolina University School
of Medicine as an assistant profes
sor of medicine.
Price, formerly of Texas, comes
to Greenville from Brooke Armv
Medical Center in San Antonio,
Texas, where he had been st.W:
gastroenterologist
He received his bachelor's de-
gree from the University of Texas;
at El Paso and his medical degree
in internal medicine at Walter
Reed Army Medical Center in
Washington. IX After his resi-
dency he pursued a fellowship at
the William Beaumont Army
Medical Center in II I'aso
He is a member ol tin'American
Society for Gastrointestinal Endo-
SCOpy and the American Gastro-
enterological Association.
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"
mmm
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Condoms
(CPS) - This is the fall a set
mgly endless string ol campuses
has added condoms to tl
bars, sodas, cigarette ai
items students can buy in .
vending machines
m,
Once confined to rural .
tions and sleazy oars.
vending machines now caj ��
found at the universitie I I
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Bellevue Community �
Washington, N -
ida, amonj
puses.
Dozens f others ai
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UCLA's Marilyn Schalit
Tests can in
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(Jwvnedd ist Carolina Universit) School
ol Medicine as an assistant profes-
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Price formerly ol rexas comes
. from Brooke Armv
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rexas where he had been Matt
enterologist
He received in- bachelor's de-
� m the Universit) ol Texas
at El i id his medical degree;
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�ton P c tUT his resi-
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22, 19873
Condoms can be found in vending machines
(CPS) - This is the fall a seem-
ingly endless string of campuses
has added condoms to the candy
bars, sodas, cigarette and other
items students can buy in local
vending machines.
Once confined to rural gas sta-
tions and sleazy bars, condom
vending machines now can be
found at the universities of Min-
nesota, California at Santa Cruz,
Bellevue Community College in
Washington, Nebraska and Flor-
ida, among scores of other cam-
puses.
Dozens oi others are busily
debating the propriety of miking
the devices available.
The reason, the condom spon-
sors say, is to help control the
spread of AIDS (acquired im-
mune deficiency syndrome), the
deadly disease transmitted
through sexual intercourse or in-
travenous drug use.
The sponsors add the vending
machines give students anony-
mous, convenient 24-hour access
to condoms, an important value
because sexual encounters are
often unplanned and spontane-
ous.
"We're an educational institu-
tion explained Jane Harris of
Bellevue Community College.
"We educate people about a lot of
things, and one of those things is
sexually transmitted diseases
Condom vending machines were
installed in men and women's
restrooms in Bellevue's student
center in May.
"People often aren't thinking
during the day about what they'll
be doing at night said Dr. Linda
Pneuman, a physician at the Uni-
versity of Colorado's student
health center, where the Colorado
AIDS task force has recom-
mended installing vending ma-
chines.
University of New Mexico
health center Director Dr. Olga
Eaton believes "condoms are a
very good way of preventing the
spread of sexually transmitted
diseases
UNM is toying with the idea of
installing the machines.
"Dispensers encourage people
to use condoms said Dr. Mark
Mitzberg of the University of
California-Santa Cruz student
health center, where condom
machines were installed earlier
this year. "The machines serve as
a reminder of safe sex
"Some people feel very self-
conscious about buying this kind
of product explained Tom
Roberts of the University of Cali-
fornia-Santa Barbara AIDS task
force.
Given the choice of asking a
clerk at the university's pharmacy
for a condom or avoiding emba-
rassment, many students opted
not to buy condoms at all, he said.
"I think it's a good idea said
University of New Mexico junior
Steve Gray. "The more they're
available, the more careful people
will be. If there's anonymity,
people are more apt to buy them
Still, "condom vending ma-
chines are not the only answer
said Betty Newcomb of the Uni-
versity of California-Irvine AIDS
education committee.
Students are more picky about college choices
(CPS) � Students are applying
to more campuses and becoming
"more sophisticated" in choosing
which one to attend, two recent
surveys indicate.
The phenomenon mav help
explain the mystery of why, when
there are fewer 18-year-olds in the
population, colleges are receiving
record numbers of applications.
"Students observed Kristin
Persson of College Connections, a
New York-based mariteting firm
that works with colleges, "have
become smarter consumers
In lt, about 60 percent of the
freshmen at private colleges ap-
plied to four or more schools, a
survey released earlier this year
bv the American council on Edu-
cation and the University of Cali-
fornia at Los Angeles said.
Nearly 30 percent of the stu-
dents applied to at least six col-
leges.
At public colleges, one third of
the freshmen surveyed said they
applied to at least four schools.
UCLA's Marilyn Schalit noted
that statistics compiled during the
last 20 years indicate more stu-
dents now apply to more than one
college.
In 1967, more than half the
nation's college freshmen applied
to just one school, Schalit said. But
in I486, only 35.3 percent applied
to just one school.
"It was predicted that fewer 18-
vear-olds would mean colleges
and universities would receive
fcwerapplications said Persson.
"But that just hasn't happened. A
higher proportion of 18-year-olds
are enrolling in colleges
"Students are realizing how
competitive it is. and they're pre-
paring better bv taking courses to
prepare for the SAT's and ACT's
Persson explained. "They're also
taking a better look at more col-
leges
"A few years ago, a college's
name was the most important
thing. That's not true any more
added John Klockentager, vice
president of Buena Vista College
in Iowa.
Students who in past years
would apply to the state's larger
schools, such as the University of
Iowa, are now more closely exam-
ining their own needs and goals
and choosing schools more care-
fully, he said.
Students also are shopping
around to see which schools offer
the best financial aid programs,
said Dr. Kenneth C. Green of
UCLA.
Students' increasinc sophisti-
cation � and the dwindling
number of 18-year-olds � has
forced collegesand universities to
adopt more aggressive marketing
techniques. Green said. Schools
have successfully maintained
enrollment levels by appealing to
older students and emphasizing
graduate programs.
But the number of 18-year-olds
will decline by 60 percent be-
tween 1988 and 1995, he added,
forcing campuses to recruit more
creatively.
'The worst is yet to come said
Green.
Some critics, in fact, say the
condoms are not even a good
answer.
Last week, researchers at the
University of Massachusetts
Medical School in Worcester ex-
pressed doubts condoms are
failsafe protection, if only because
they can become porous if ex-
posed to heat or light.
Still others worry the condom
vending machines effectively sig-
nal students that sexual promis-
cuity is permissible or advisable
in the dorms.
Conservative groups in par-
ticular argue colleges should be
telling students monogamy and
sexual abstinence are the most
effective ways to avoid AIDS.
"Weteilstudentsabstinenceisa
choice, but not all college students
will choose abstinence Pneu-
man said. "We give them other
options. Monogamy is another.
We'd like to see condoms avail-
able any time, day or night, on
campus to give students another
Tests can indicate
cell abnormalities
just had my yearly Pap smear and
learned I have dysplasia. What is it7
Dysplasia means that some of
the tissue at the mouth of the
womb (cervix) is not normal. The
pap test, or pap smear, is a simple
test for the detection of abnormal
cells from the cervix and makes it
possible to discover dysplasia.
The pap smear collects a random
sample of cells which means the
condition of the cervix may be
better or worse than the pap test
reports.
Health Column
By MARY ELESHA-ADAMS
Dysplasia does not cause pain,
itching or discharge; therefore a
routine pap test is often the only
wav to detect this condition. The
J
detection of dysplasia is impor-
tant because it may lead to cancer
if not treated (dysplasia is not
cancer. Women at risk of de velop-
ing abnormal cervical cells in-
clude:
�those who began having sex-
ual intercourse before age 18.
�those who have had sexual
intercourse with numerous male
partners.
W'liat is the treatment for dyspla-
sia?
When a Pap test shows abnor-
mal cells a special exam called a
colposcopy may be advised. Pub-
lic health departments and uni-
versity health services often rec-
ommend that colposcopy be
done; however so.ne physicians
take a less conservative approach
and may repeat pap smears to see
if dysplasia remains present.
The colposcope resembles a
large microscope and allows the
doctor to look more closely at the
cervix; a tiny sample of tissue will
be taken from the cervix if the
cervix doesn't look just right. This
helps the physician decide what is
wrong. Then the best treatment
can be started.
MARK JENSONS EYES
I LAVE NEVER SEEN PASTER SERVER
It sums with the exam. It ends with the perfect glasses. And it takes
just hours.
At Pearle, vc have a lab right in the store. Wiih professionals
working to exacting standards. So. in many cases, we can give you your
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Add to that a thorough exam by an Independent Doctor of Optomctry
next to Pearle. Hundreds of frames. And a trained consultant to help you
choose the right pair.
At Pearle, we know how glasses work. And care how glasses look.
And fast service is one more reason you be coming to Pearle. Fast.
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option
At Cal-Santa Barbara, where
"the reaction so far has been very
positive Roberts reported
"some critics say, by installing the
machines, we're promoting a cer-
tain lifestyle. But we argue that
the health implications are too
great to ignore
"We've tried to do this without
moral judgement. Let's face it he
continued, "Sex goes on. To ig-
nore it is not dealing with reality
Is the option to let students die of
AIDS? That doesn't cut it in my
book
School officials say it's too early
to determine if condom dispens-
ers have checked the rate of AIDS
and other sexually transmitted
diseases. "I can't give you a pre-
cise scientific answer now said
Mitzberg. "But there's no doubt in
my mind that they will
"If just one person doesn't get
AIDS as a result of those dispens-
ers said Roberts, "they will have
done the job
iuMfl
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i
�te iEaat (Sartfliman
&�rvn� A? East Carolina campus community sine 1925
Daniel Maurer, g��imu,�
Ak . Clay Deanhardt, M.�rBil.A,�
Andy Lewis, �� J1M, M
TlM i JIMMY MCKLE, Dewier of Afcerfiwu
l,M CHANDLER, s,Urtw ANTHONY M mjtim .
CLAY DEANlARDT.ii-te.Mfc, MEG NEEDHAM f u
SSI� M.KE UPCHURCH�,�
KBBin STEVENS. ��� NORWOOD MCDOWELL �
NOW THAT YOU MENTION IT- MAtBE ITJS
TIME Y0U5TARTED EATIN6 AT THE
TASLE WtTri THE REST OFTHE FAMILY!
21
September 22, 1987
Opinion
Page 4
ez7
image must change
The presence of Rick Atkinson on
campus Friday (see story, page 9)
serves as another example of an
ECU student who made it big in the
real world.
A Pulitzer Prize winner, a deputy
national editor for the Washington
Post and a respected journalist,
Atkinson exemplifies the word
'success I le's happy, healthy and at
the top oi his profession � and he's
only 34.
The continued success of alumni
in recent years make a convincing,
positive statement about the state of
education at ECU. The broad, liberal
arts background so strictly main-
tained here, as Atkinson pointed
out, prepares students for many
different problems in the outside
world. The outstanding success of
many of our focused tracks � thea-
ter, business, nursing, physical ther-
apy and others � also points a fin-
ger at a fine educational program.
And yet the question is asked oi us
constantly, as we, the students, rep-
resent the university at home or at
official functions across the state
and nation: how easy is it at good ole
EZU?
It's not hard to understand why
people ask the question. ECU has
long been considered the step-sister
of the two larger UNC system
schools, N.C State and UNC-
Chapel Hill. The university is often
viewed as a brat trying to overstep
its proper place by moving up in the
world and challenging the dogmatic
educational control by the two big-
ger schools.
Part of the problem is jealousy. The
North Carolina piedmont has long
held dominance over the east in
terms of industry, money, growth
and facilities. The east, with
Greenville and ECU in the forefront,
is now challeging that superiority.
With that challenge comes a need for
increased funds, much of which
comes from the General Assembly
in Raleigh.
To increase the funds for the east,
money must come from somewhere
else. The piedmont is rightly afraid
that their money might be cut
shorter at some point to fund a
worthwhile project in the east.
Competition is hell, and the pied-
mont has finally begun to feel a little
competitive heat.
A second problem, however, is the
image we project of ourselves. Not
meaning to harp, incidents like the
one at NCSU Sept. 5 add fuel to the
fire of piedmont cries that the east is
inferior to themselves.
The trend has been turning around
in recent years. The ECU Medical
School is a good example. Despite
heavy opposition from leaders in
places like Charlotte, the medical
school has taken off and become one
ot the finest young medical institu-
tions in the country.
Last year ECU was listed among
the top ten colleges in its class in a
report published by U.S. News and
World Report.
Even the athletics program is be-
ginning to get some notice. Lee
McNeill represented us well at the
Olympic Festival and the Pan Am
Games.
Yes, ECU is moving to take its
place among the top universities in
the state and the nation. Adminis-
trators and alumni have taken the
first steps toward earning the uni-
versity the recognition it deserves. It
is now up to us, the students, to
make the next positive move.
'Spycatcher' lacks details, needs
work to reveal true MI-5 secrets
By MARK HOSENBALL
Tht tw Republic
It is hard to imagine a more graphic demonstration of the
pathology of official secrecy than thecaseol "Spvcatcher the
memoir of Tcter Wright, a retired British counterspy. By
lauching a global crusade to bury this book, which purport's
to chronicle the incompetence and malfeasance of MI-5,
Britain's sneaky domestic counterintelligence service, the
Tha tcher government has raised questions about i ts dedication
to democracy and increased public suspicion of its in-
tellegence service. Above all, the Thatcher government has
turned "Spvcatcher, " a clearly flawed book, into a best seller
and media spectacular, thus helping to expose the very
"secrets" it seeks to suppress.
The name MI-5 itself is a bit of disinformation: MI stands for
"Military Intellegencc but MI-5 is run entirely by civilians
and there is no MI-1 through 4. Like the Evil One, MI-5 is
known by several other Jitles and cover names. Its history and
legal status are just as elusive. Established before World War
I to track down German agents in Britian, its existence has
never been approved by Parliament. Because in law it does
not exist, governments have consistently refused to answer
parliamentay inquiries about its activities.
The agency is not fully accountable to any elected official.
Its only known charter is a 1952 memorandum from the home
secretary (Britian's interior minister) to Ml-5's director. This
marvel of double talk says that MI-5 reports to the home
secretary or to the prime minister, but that elected officials
should not "concern themselves" with details of its investiga-
tions.
Despite its lack of legal standing, MI-5 is shielded from
public scrutiny by a battery of laws, including the notroious
Official Secrets Act, which makes it a crime for Ml-5 agents to
disclose information about their work and for journalists to
receive and publish it. What a field day the late William Casey
and his covert action cowboys would have had with a setup
like this. Successive British governments have pretended that
a Watergate or lranamok could "never happen here and
have left the intelligence services largely to themselves. But
the story of "Spvcatcher" suggests that they should be less
complacent.
A home-taught electronics whiz, Peter Wright joined Ml-5
in 1955 as its first scientific adviser. He initially occupied
himesclf with inventing electronic spy toys. He quickly
learned that bugging and "surreptitious entry into the
homes and offices of enemies foreign and domestic was
standard operating procedure. "For five years we bugged
and burgled our way across London at the State's behest,
while pompous bowler-hatted civil servants in Whitehall
pretended to look the other way Wright explains. They also
cooked up schemes for murdering Gamal Abdel Nasser and
a rebel leader in Cyprus.
Wright's expertise in communications later gave him entry
to what he claims was one of the West's most sacred secrets:
evidence suggesting that the Russians had planted a number
of agents inside British intelligence. Wright concluded that
some of the evidence indicated the existence of at least one
unkown Soviet mole high up in his own department. Wright
launched what was to become an epic hunt, in which first MI-
5's deputy director, Graham Mitchell, and later its director,
Roger Hollis, fell under suspicion. Neither of the principal
suspects was prepared to confess, and since the evidence
against them was so circumstantial, it was impossible to build
a conclusive case.
But for Wright, the existence of a traitor became an article fo
faith. Even after Hollis retired, Wright continued to marshal
evidence against his elusive quarry. And by the mid-1970s,
Wright and a coterie of acolytes were so consumed by canni-
balistic paranoia that, when Labor Prime Mmister'Harold
Wilson returned to power amid a leftist-inspired miners'
strike, they dreamed up a scheme to smear and destabilize the
government, convinced, on the basis of more circumstantial
evidence, that Wilson was a KGB plant.
It is easy to understand why MI-5 might want this talc
suppressed, but it is hard to comprehend why a government
that claims to practice democracy would not wish to under
take an inquiry into such allegations. First it obtained a court
induction banning British newpapers from printing leaks of
Wright's allegations. Then, when it learned the Wright
planned to publish his memoirs in Australia, Mrs. Thatcher
sent her top civil servant to plead with the courts there to ban
his book. The Thatcher administration reportedly tried to
pressure the British parent of Viking, the New York house
that capitalized on the spectiacle by publishing "Spycatcher'
under protection of the First Amendment.
Yet those who bother to plough through Wright's 400-odd
pages may come to the conclusion that there is not much to hiv
tale, first of all, his account is heavily colored by malicetii
toward Hollis, toward anyone in the British government who
did not fully accept Wright's allegations against Hollis. and
especially toward MI-5, which not only rejected Wright's life
work but also sent him into retirement in Tasmania with a tiny
annuity.
Wright's contempt for his former employer has led him to
spill what could be some genuine secrets that even the most
aggressive investigative journalist would think twice before
printing. It is possible, for example, that the French did not
previously know the details of how British intelligence
tapped into their diplomatic cipher traffic, and that the Rus-
sians did not realize how Britain and American experts had
unraveled some of their most secret codes and bugged their
embassies. Wright identifies so many MI-5 informants that he
could challenge Philip Agee's daim on the world name-
dropping championship.
There is an addional pervasive defect: inaccuracy. Wright
purports to recount documents, events and verbatim conver-
sations that are up to 30 years old. The checkable details are
frequently wrong. Describing several trips to Washington,
Wright claims, for example, to have eaten at Harvey's in
Georgetown, to have visited the golden-domed U.S. Capitol
and to have crossed the Potomac by the George Washington
and 44th Street bridges. None of this is correct, so can we
believe him when he quotes from a conversation between
Nixon and Edgar Hoover, which he apparently did not even
overhear?
Thisdisregard for detail raises questions about the accuracy ;
of the secrets he discloses. Even if it mostly turns out to be
trash, however, "Spycatcher" will offer at least one scandal-
ous, if unintended, revelation: that MI-5 demonstrably em-
ployed as senior officer a man whose judgment was hope-
lessly warped. The main distinction between Ollie North and
Peter Wright is that one sports a uniform and the other a
bowler hat and umbrella.
Universal vote, the essence of democracy, practiced by few
By ROBERT KUTTNER
The New Republic
The universal vote is both the essence of political
democracy and its most jarringly radical aspect.
When people from all economic walks of life have an
equal say in governance, ordinary power relation-
ships are transformed. Some people, by dint of
wealth, education, or position, normally enjoy more
influence than others. Yet in the electoral realm,
these deep economic and social inequalities are
supposedly neutralized by the egalitarian logic of
one person-one vote.
Not surprisingly, modern democracies experience
a tension between these two sets of logic � the
economic and the political. The tension is evident
whenever campaign contributions buy votes, when-
ever family fortunes win elections, whenever the
political power of have-nots takes something of
economic value from the haves, or whenever wide
differences in voting participation exist between
different races of social classes. The tension is espe-
cially acute in the United States, which is both the
most durably democratic of nations and the most
fiercely capitalist of the democracies. Ours is also the
democracy where the fewest citizens bother to vote.
In the 1986 election, voting turnout as a fraction of
the adult population, about 38 percent, was the
lowest since the wartime election of 1942. In states
outside the South, it was the lowest since 1798.
One of the most consistent findings of voting
research in America is that when voting participa-
tion falls off, it is the poorer, less educated people
who stop voting, and that the inclination of low-
status people to stay home has much to do with their
greater cynicism about whether civic participation
can make much difference in their lives. Among the
wealthiest fifth of citizens, about 75 percent of eli-
gible voters turned out in recent presidential elec-
tions. Among the poorest fifth, less than 40 percent
voted. In effect, upper-middle-class and well-edu-
cated Americans still turn out to vote at near-Euro-
pean levels. The decay in our civic culture has been
mainly at the bottom.
As a matter of practice, most poli ticians do not care
very much about the general level of political partici-
pation. They care about getting their own likely
supporters to the polls. And most well-educated and
affluent Americans seem to harbor an intuitive belief
that if poorly educated, lower-class people (who are
probably not well informed on the issues anyway)
do not bother to vote, that is a kind of natural
purgative. "Voting ought to be a little bit difficult" is
an axiomatic rejoinder to those who call for easier
registration and more nearly universal voting.
People with the purest of democratic souls catch
themselves saying words to the effect of: voting is a
privilege, not a right.
In a democracy, of course, voting is a right � even
for the unwashed, the ill-informed, and the mean-
spirited. Though it may seem counterintuitive, it is
the political participation of all social classes that
helps build political community and social cohesion.
But the narrowing of the franchise makes it easier for
the inegalitarian market to coexist with the egalitar-
ian polity, because it reduces the political influence
of the less well-off. This phenomenon is especially
vivid in the United States, despite our deeply demo-
cratic origins as a nation of scant class differences
and our liberty-loving spirit.
The Founding Fathers, after all, gave us a Repub-
lic. A republic is generally defined as an indirect and
qualified democracy. The early Federalists worried
as much about the tyranny of majorities as the tvr-
anny of elites, putting all kinds of constraints into
their Constitution, including the well-known checks
and balances, as well as the indirect election of
presidents and senators. Most of the fathers of the
federal Republic also presumed a fairly limited fran-
chise. Though states determined the eligibility of
voters, property qualifications were then the norm.
In elections of the late 18th century, less than five
percent of adults constituted the typical electorate.
It was only in the populist Jacksonian era that the
somewhat patrician Republic began evolving into a
more universalist and raucous Democracy. Gradu-
ally property qualifications fell, and "universal
manhood suffrage" was the cry of the early popu-
lists. According to Walter Dean Burnham of MIT, the
leading student of voting participation and social
class, voting participation began rising dramatically
in the 1820s. By the 1830s it was already higher than
it is in most states today. Between 1848 and 1896,
roughly 75 percent of eligible voters voted.
But as participation increased, so did epic voting
fraud, especially in large cities. As the rabble was
drawn into partisan politics, electoral abuse became
flagrant. According to the historian Joseph P. Harris,
in a charming 1929 volume recapitulating earlier
histories of voting, "Hoodlums were rounded up
and lodged for a night or so in various lodging
houses or cheap hotels and then registered from all
of them. On the day of the election, gangs of 'repeat-
ers' were hauled from precinct to precinct and voted
under different names. Sometimes the same persons
would vote several times at each precinct, changing
coats and hats between times
The system responded with a variety of restraints,
such as literacy requirements and voter registration
systems. Some of these had only the most purely
civic intentions. Often, however, the evident pur-
pose was not only to eliminate fraud but to restore
the narrower franchise of the earlier Republic
Ni'i�iiiiiriwiipirtwiiiiiyMi�iiiiiiiWiiniim
inrtii�iflft mi
mmmmm
Obscure b
BOSTON (AP - Perhaps one
man in five and one woman in 10
know the feeling a gnawing,
burning pain in the upper abdo
men.
Too often, it means )ust one
thing. An ulcer.
Victims blame stress, booze,
cigarettes, the excesses of modern
life. And indeed al! of these may
play some role in aggravating
their ailment But for those �
makea living dealing with u: �
one awkward detail oven
this lore In truth, no one kr
what causes most ulcers
That is why the discovery of a
new suspect has thrown thtsl .
of digestive ills into somethir.
close to a tizzy as medicine all
itself to get. An obscure bug called
campvlobacter pylori rr
just might - be the lor,
cause of ulcers
Th. -
but if the
revolution
ulcers
All
commiir
in the Iininl
u pr �

n, the
are normal
them �.
acid7 An in
Thai is th
I
I
Student center to exp
(ECU News Bureau)
struction is schelduled to h
next month on the $3 6 mi
expansion of Mendenhall Stui
Center, a project that will
1,000 square feet to the center s
facilities.
Include! in the expansion m
be full-service dining facilities
consisting of a 400-seat cafeteria,
kitchen and preparation areas,
storage and office space for food
service personnel.
The entire main floor of the
addition, plus part of the ground
floor, will be used by dining serv-
ices, according to Rudolph Alex-
ander, assistant vice chana
for student life and director of
University Unions and student
activities.
Additional facilities on the
ground floor will include the
campus radio staion, WZMB-FM
the media board photo lab and a
large party room to be used bv
student organizations for dances
and other social activities. Alex-
ander said.
themu I
ed in t
meet
ties
The t
ever
accor
struc-
and the fui
time I
that a I
neee
ana
ated �
The top floor wi
tain
i i Oj i � . .
n;ffcrn yd rn
Two great
The hand on the left is poised n a I
of vour education.
A Macintosh computer
And me hand on the righi is gri
ated fun.
A Honda Scooter One w- ,
All you haw to do for a chanc e:
computer center and fill out an entn
Macintosh for a test drive.
Because Macintosh can help
elements of the periodic table, plot tht
prices, compile computer c de and la
And the first 20 people
to speak, will receive a free Apple' i
So head over to your campus c
about our Student Financing Program
Who knows? Vbu may soon findi
than vou expected
6 Test drive a
Certain resnetjoa. apph mm; tow a
on sue of school and numher .v CMK9 t
��� .i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22, 1987
BE !TIS
TTHE
If'MILX!
:5
s Ms
Obscure bug may be cause of stomach ulcer
v
oV
s�
BOSTON (AP) - Terhaps one
man in five and one woman in 10
know the feeling: a gnawing,
burning pain in the upper abdo-
men.
Too often, it means just one
thing. An ulcer.
Victims blame stress, booze,
cigarettes, the excesses of modern
life. And indeed all of these may
play some role in aggravating
their ailment. But for those who
make a living dealing with ulcers,
one awkward detail overrides
this lore. In truth, no one knows
what causes most ulcers.
That is why the discovery of a
new suspect has thrown the study
of digestive ills into something as
close to a tizzy as medicine allows
itself to get. An obscure bug called
campylobacter pylori might �
just might � be the long-sought
cause of ulcers.
There are plenty of doubters,
but if the theory is true, it will
revolutionize the treatment of
ulcers.
All victims have one thing in
common. Acid has burned a hole
in the lining of their stomach or,
more often, their duodenum, the
upper section of the small intes-
tines.
Often, though, their acid levels
are normal. Has something made
them especially vulnerable to
acid? An infection perhaps?
That is the theory of Dr. Barry J.
Marshall. He and colleagues dis-
covered the corkscrew-shaped
campylobacter bacteria four
years ago. Marshall, who recently
moved from Australia to the Uni-
versity of Virginia, believes that
campylobacter cause at least 90
percent of duodenal ulcers and 60
percent of stomach ulcers.
"We are getting to the stage
where we are saying that you
really don't have duodenal ulcers
if you don't have this bug
Marshall says.
Currently, doctors heal ulcers
by dispensing drugs that neutral-
ize acid or reduce its production.
However, ulcers frequently re-
turn.
If bacteria cause ulcers, that
means that antibiotics may be the
best way to treat them and per-
haps, to cure them for good. The
bug theory raises another inter-
esting possibility, as well. Ulcers
could be contagious.
Scientists also have recently
bund that some people with ul-
ers seem to make too little natu-
al bicarbonate to protect thoir
flpflils llPPds I Student center to expand
Vllilll; IICCU5 (ECU Ncws Buroau . . Con. for the student Gov(
e MI-5 secrets
vss. and since the evidence
n 5tanrial.it wasimpossiWe to build
eol a traitor became an article fo
tired Wnght continued to marshal
juarry And bv the mid-1970's,
� - were so consumed by canni-
hat when Ibor Pnmc Minister Harold
� .m;J a leftist-inspired miners'
vmc te smear and destabilize the
the basis of more circumstantial
KGB plant.
nd why MI-5 might want this tale
ird to omprehend why a government
mocracy would not wish to undcr-
ch allegations First it obtained a court
fwpapers from printing leaks of
when it learned the Wright
nemoirs in Australia, Mrs. Thatcher
lead with the courts there to ban
tration reportedly tried to
"i parent ot Viking, the New York house
jpectiacleby publishing "Spvcatcher"
� the First Amendment.
thor to plough through Wright's 400-odd
ru lusion that there isnot much to his,
lint is heavily colored bv malicet.
�in the British government who
ght s allegations against Hollis, and
v which not only rejected Wright's life
nrement in Tasmania with a tiny
his former employer has led him to
2 � ne secrets that even the most
irnalist would think twice before
- ample, that the French did not
letails ! row British intelligence
rher traffic, and that the Rus-
ritain and American experts had
- most secret codes and bugged their
�o many MI-5 informants that he
ie s claim on the world name-
pervasive defect: inaccuracy. Wright
iocuments, events and verbatim conver-
vears old The checkable details are
- ribing several trips to Washington,
r i (ample, to have eaten at Harvey's in
I the golden-domed U.S. Capitol
� imac by the George Washington
gi s None of this is correct, so can we
s from a conversation between
igar Hoover, which he apparently did not even
iiiraisesqueshonsabouttheaccuracy I
scloses. Even if it mostly turns out to be
�.catcher" will offer at least one scandal-
i n: that MI-5 demonstrablv em-
r a man whse judgment was hope-
The main distinction between Ollie North and ;
' one sports a uniform and the other a ;
11 l
ella.
:ticed by few
rsaiisi and raucous Democracy. Gradu-
ally property qualifications fell, and "universal
d suffrage" was the cry of the early popu-
" I ing to Walter Dean Burnham of MIT, the
udent of voting participation and social
g participation began rising dramatically
in t: 182 s By the 1830s it was already higher than
it is in m 5t states today. Between 1848 and 1896,
- 75 percent of eligible voters voted.
But as participation increased, so did epic voting
fraud, especially in large cities. As the rabble was
Ira n into partisan politics, electoral abuse became
rant. According to the historian JosephP. Harris,
in a charming 1929 volume recapitulating earlier
histories of voting, "Hoodlums were rounded up
and lodged for a night or so in various lodging
houses or cheap hotels and then registered from all
of them. On the day of the election, gangs of "repeat-
ers were hauled from precinct to precinct and voted
under different names. Sometimes the same persons
uld vote several times at each precinct, changing
coats and hats between times
The system responded with a variety of restraints,
such as literacy requirements and voter registration
systems. Some of these had only the most purely
civic intentions. Often, however, the evident pur-
pose was not only to eliminate fraud but to restore
the narrower franchise of the earlier Republic
(ECU News Bureau) � Con-
struction i schclduled to begin
next month on the $3.6 million
expansion of Mendenhall Student
Center, a project that will add
31,000 square feet to the center's
facilities.
Included in the expansion will
be full-service dining facilities
consisting of a 400-seat cafeteria,
kitchen and preparation areas,
storage and office space for food
service personnel
The entire main floor of the
addition, plus part of the ground
floor, will be used by dining serv-
ices, according to Rudolph Alex-
ander, assistant vice chancellor
for student life and director of
University Unions and student
activities.
Additional facilities on the
ground floor will include the
campus radio staion, WZMB-FM,
the media board photo lab and a
large party room to be used by
student organizations for dances
and other social activities, Alex-
ander said.
The top floor will contain offices
for the Student Government As-
sociation and other student or-
ganizations plus additional meet-
ing rooms.
Alexander said the principal
meeting room on the top floor
"will be at least twice the size of
the multipurpose room presently
located in the Student Center to
meet the needs of the university,
particularly improving on-cam-
pus dining and meeting facili-
ties he said.
Theexpansion project hasa 380-
day completion schedule. "If
everthing moves reasonably well,
according to the timetable, con-
struction should be completed
and the furnishings moved in in
time to open the new area at the
beginning of spring semester
1989 Alexander said.
"In the beginning, it was known
that additonal facilities were
needed; the need is far greater
today he said. "All of the noise
and disruption that will be cre-
ated for a few months during the
construction period will be a very
welcome aggravation

insides from digestive acid. Oth-
crsare renewing interest intheold
� and discounted � notion that
some personality typesarc associ-
ated with ulcers.
Probably the prevailing view
these days is that peptic ulcers
have many causes. They result
from a combination of inherited
susceptibilities and insults from
daily life.
Like many experts, Dr. Richard
Hornick of the Orlando Regional
Medical Center in Florida be-
lieves it will be tough to prove that
campylobacter are the leading
cause of ulcers. But he adds, "I
think it's a very intriguing possi-
bility. If it is, it's going to be a
fantastic break-through
���
I
I
I
Here's the theory:
The ulcer victim-to-be inadver-
tantly takes in campylobacter,
perhaps catching them from a
relative. Unlike other bugs, this
variety can withstand acid in the
stomach, and it infects the diges-
tive lining. The result is inflam-
mation called gastritis. Some
people successfully fight off the
bacteria, while others have linger-
ing infections.
The inflammation damages the
ability of the lining to make mu-
cous, which protects it from acid
and digestive enzymes. These
harsh secretions attack the walls
of the stomach or duodenum and
burn a hole.
That's an ulcer.
Marshall believes that if antibi-
otics can be found that reach the
bacteria concealed in the diges-
tive lining, they can cure ulcers for
good � or at least until the vuctim
is re-infected.
Most everybody with ulcers is
infected with the bug, but new
research shows that lots of
healthy people have it, too At the
Veterans Administration Medical
Center in Dallas, Dr. Mark
Feldman found that 60 percent of
the normal people he's checked
carrv the bacteria but have no
symptoms.
"If this is an organism that halt
of us have he says, "it's hard to
believe thai it's the cause of ulcer
disease

Jriendlxj "Hair
(Designers
Operating Under New Ownership
Christine O'Neal
20 Discount wECU-ID & this ad
Our Stylists Arc Here To Serve Your Needs:
Emma Angc � Leigh llamm � Glcnda Holland � Pat Williams
Electrolysis by Barbara Venters (830 0962)
Tanning Booth
V
We Invite Our Friends To Come Out And Visit
Or Call For An Appointment 758 3181
Open WedFit 9 5 � Sat. 9 1
1 19 W. 4th St. � Greenville
CLIFF'S
'Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N.C. 33 Ext.) Greenville. North Carolina
Phone 752-31(72
WELCOME BACK E.C.U. STUDENTS
Mon. thru Thurs. Night
Popcorn
Shrimp
$3.45
Tom Tegs Factory Outlet
12
1000 Dickinson Avenue
OFF
ALREADY LOW
OUTLET PRICES
(SUMMER MERCHANDISE)
Featuring the Hottest Beach Fashions,
Casual Wear, and Famous Brands.
Everything In Store Except Hosiery
M Qwttf � Overrvne � Cloeeoirti . Selected Irregulars
4 Famous Names That We Cannot Mention
TTWttftrg Tank Tops, Tank DrMMS, Bicycle Pants Walk Short.
jam. Camp Shirts, Shorts, Slacks, Pullovers & The Original T-
�Mfta. IMS Cotton (Unisex)
Panama Jack T-shirt
If you are a newcomer to town, we invite you to visit
our store at 1900 Dickinson Avenue. If you are
going to the beach at Morehead City, visit our new-
location on Hwy. 70 (just across from BoJangles).
Warehouse Sale Sept. 28, Nothing over $10.
Shop Tha Store Nearest You
Hwy. ME Between
Bethel and Tarboro
Conetoe, N.C.
Wad. - Sat. 9-5
Nassau St.
YoungsvHIe, N.C.
WedFrl. 9:30-5
Saturday 9:30-4
Mastercard t Vim Accepted
, t.rn
b'ii
') v.tvf.
great ways to cruise through the semester.
The hand on the left is poised on what could be the most essential part
of your education.
A Macintosh" computer.
And the hand on the right is gripping pure, simple, unadulter-
ated fun.
A Honda Scooter. One were giving away.
All you have to do for a chance to drive it away is visit vour campus
computer center and fill out an entry form. White you're there, take a
Macintosh for a test drive.
Because Macintosh can help you write term papers, categorize
elements of the periodic table, plot the rise and fall of pork-belly
prices, compile computer code, and talk to other computers.
And the first 250 people on campus who get behind a mouse, so
to speak, will receive a free Apple memo board.
So head over to your campus computer center today. And ask
about our Student Financing Program.
Who knows? You may soon find yourself cruising a little farther
than you expected.
& Test drive a Macintosh. You may ride away on a Honda Scooter
HONDA
(mmdaiamqfr,mfXM�mwuVB ctmxkramfmaaiaHHmas Or free Honda Elke� 50 Scooteraill be mtxMpapmk&&isdxi;iX& registered students and facult are eligible to win Ofeutamnan u�
on size of school and number of contest entrants. No purchase necessary 01967 Apple Computer. Inc Apple and the Apple logo are registered trademarks of pple Computer, inc Macintosh is a trademark of Apple Computer, inc Fine is a trademark i rfcwfc
��- �.
�at i Spaii mmmmmtatmimm








w
SEITEMBER 22.1987
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
GREENHOUSE TECHNICIANS
needed tor par, ,ime employment R�
hours Weekends and after school
ibk
Call 75s 0879
ONE BEUKOOM special Tar River Es-
tates: $150off Is, month rent when signing
a 12 month lease or the option to sign a 9
month lease 1400 Willow St. �1 7524225.
FOR SALE
GOVERNMENT JOBS S16.040.S59 230
� I,ri"8 Cril 4B4m Ext R-
1 ltt for current federal list
��?��� LjS"nRs ��� Miring To
S4k 806876000 Ext OJ 1166.
A1R1INES NOW HIRING. Might Atten
dan Travel Agents. Mtvhamcs, Cus-
tomer Service L.slmgs Salaries to S50K
ntrv level positions. Call 805-687-6000
STOCKBROKER TRAINEE. College
grad. Opportunity for hardworking, en
thus,astic ,nd,v,dual. Send resume to:
1 U Box 8814 Virginia Beach, VA 23450.
BROOVS for men has lull time and part-
time sales associates positions, for enthu-
siastic, tashion forward individuals. Re-
Jil Clothing experience is required. Bet-
ter than average starting salary. Apply in
person, Brady's Personnel Director Caro
lina East Mall M-W. 2-4 pm
BROOVS has part-time sales associates
positions for enthusiastic, out going mdi
Mduals who enjoy working with young
contemporary Junior fashions. Good Sal
�y Apply m person, Brady's Personnel
Director, Carolina East Mall M-W 2-4
pm
MACKENZIE SECURITY is seeking
students to work as part-time, weekend
security guards. Good Pay! Must have
dependable transportation to work Must
have telephone. Must NOT have police
record. Apply m person at 1127 South
Evans Street. 758-2174.
BELVOIR MANUFACTURING
NEEDS: part time, energetic student for
afternoons M F. Contact Mark Koehlcr
7579710.
FOR RENT
WANTED - ROOMMATE to share 12
of 2 bedroom apt at Tar River Estates Call
752.1032.
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATI wanted
to share 2 bedroom apt at Wedgewood
Arms S120 mo & 13 unlites WiH have
own room! Interested'parties call 355-
7824 alter 2 pm, ask for Tina or Dawn.
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE wantedh
share contemporary home Fireplace
� int�, Pnrtl, AC�fl MuckatoreJ Uyouro,
tired of campus housing this i� what you
have been lo.Kig tor. Caii 555-oofto alter
8 pm
TIRFO OF .OLR ROOMMATE? Call
our Daddy then call me One bedroom
condo at Ringgold Towers Priced to sell
Call Bob Rains at Caldwell Hanker W C
Hlount and Associates 756-3000 da- or
355-2.394 nights
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apts for rent
furnished Contact lloilie Simonowich
752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 2 bed-
room apartment. Private room, shared
bath, SllOmonth, 13 utilities Non-
smoker, non-drinker, serious student pre-
ferred. Call 355-3759.
TYPING and Word Processing: Two
copies for the price of one! From $1.50 a
page Also, custom signs, banners and
greeting cards 752-9637.
PERSONAL COMPUTER Tutoring!
Learn to use a PC! (There are dozens avail-
able on campus) Instructions and free
word processing software 752-9637.
TAKARA CUSTOM 12 speed $100 nego,
Rickcnbacker amplifier, Ibanez Manger,
Chorus, Boss Pedalboard, Fostcx 4-track,
DO-D digital delay, Roland GR 300 sys
tern, Korg Volume Pedal. Must sell soon.
All at great prices Alex - 355-6057 after
5:00.
PROFESSIONAL but not Expensive!
Progressive Data Services offers profes-
sional word processing to students and
professionals. Term papers, dissertations,
themes, reports and much more as low as
$175 per page (Please call for quote on
your project.) Price includes printing on
high quality bond paper and spelling veri-
fication against a 50,000 word electronic
dictionary Ask about our special offers
COMMING SOON - LASER PRINTING
SYSTEM call Mark at 757-3440 after 7:00
pm for free information.
NEED TYPING done? Call 758-1161 ask
for Kim.
DORM SIZE washer and refrigerator,
$100 each Apartment size range arid re-
frigerator, $100 each. Guaranteed and
Good condition
WORD PROCESSINGletter quality or
laser printing. Rush jobs accepted. 752-
1933.
OUR COMPANY, DELTA IMAGES, will
produce a professional TV. News, Res-
ume tape for you af a reasonable price.
our voice and stand-ups professionally
edited with actual news footage. Also
have your tape distributed nationally via
satellite to potentionallv hundreds of
news directors, consultants and agents.
Production crew scheduled in your area
soon. Call for further information 919-
933-8929
FOR SALE 1982 Mazda GLC I latchback.
Good Condition $2,200 neg Call Missy at
756 469 after 7:00 pm weekdays and on
weekends.
FOR SALE: 1980 Chevy Citation. 70,000
miles Good condition Must sell soon!
$2,000 Price negotiable - a little. Call 758-
FOR SALE. Schwinn Cruiser - blue frame,
almost brand new! Call 758 9574.
FOR ALL THE STUDENTS: Who mis-
sed the Grand Opening Extravaganza
Opening at jenni K. Jewelry bring your
ECU ID. and receive 30 off all sterling
Jewelry: 608 Arlington Blvd Suite E. 355-
6714.
IS IT TRUE you can buy jeeps for $44
through the U.S. government? Get the
facts today! Call 1-312-742-1142 Ext. 5271-
A
WORD PROCESSING and photocopy-
ing services. We offer typing and photo-
copying services. We also sell software
and computer diskettes 24 hours in and
out. Guaranteed typing on paper up to 20
hand written pages. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694
PICK UP and delivery of term papers,
theses, resumes, to by typed IBM
workprocessing by professional with 13
years experience Letter quality print and
professional editing. Call Nanette in
Griffon at 1 524 5241 Cheap call - the best
service.
ON A TIGHT BUDGET?? Try our "meal
deal - 1 4 lb. hamburger, hot roast beef,
chick fillet, or pizzaburger - with fries and
drink �$2.49 - Lasagna (or spaghetti)
with salad and garlic bread 'only $3 95
757-0731 757-1278 FAMOUS PIZZA - 10th
& Evans (Specials not for delivery.)
ELECTROLYSIS (PERMANENT re-
moval of unwanted hair) by Barbara
Venteis. People who understand elec-
trolysis will not wax, tweezer or use elec-
tronic tweezer or any other temporary
method. Isn't it time to try the permanent
method. Call 830-0962 for free consulta-
tion.
CHEAP ROUNDTRIP Air fare to NYC
This ticket is $50 off Super Saver price. For
more info about this flight call 756-7397 or
758-1061 ask for GregThaxton.
DISK JOCKIE. The imitations are simply
that TRASMMAN DJ Service. Golden
grooversbody movers, new wax, new
wave, top 40, any mixer, social. Bar
Mitzpha, pool party, etc Contact 752-
3587. I laving a party and need a DJ?
ALPHA SIG: Congratulations on your
great rush We enjoyed helping ya'll and
partying afterwards Get psyched for our
social Oct. 1! Love, the Alpha Phis
ALPHA PHI PLEDGES: Ya'll are doing a
great job! Keep it up We love ya'll - Sisters
of Alpha Phi.
AOTT BI's: I just wanted to let you guys
know that you've been the greatest pledge
class and I've enjoyed working with you
and getting to know you better I lang in
there - the Big "I" is near. Alpha love -
Amanda J. (Your P.T.).
ATTENTION PHI TAUS and Little Sis-
ters: The past two weeks have been awe-
some. Congratulations on two very suc-
cessful rushes. Bcaus Wednesday night
was entirely too much fun. Can't wait to
see everyone out there again this Wednes-
day. Also, lil' sisters are having a cai wash
1:00 Wednesday at 1 lardec's11 lave a great
week.
PHITAUS:The wordisout that you want
a party with your little sisters. Well, get
vour I'j's and get ready to drink your face
off this Thursday. PJ - PJ pre- and post
flagfootball game parly at the house Get
psyched - We are Love - The lil" sisters.
ATTENTION all beer lovers $1 99 60o
pitchers, $99 pitchers with Lg2way
piza EVERY NIGHT Famous Pizza -
Corner 10th Evans 757 1278 757 073
ALPHA PHI: Every Wednesday night is
Ladies night at Rafters Come out and
party with the Alpha Plus"
THETA CHI: Contentnea was a blast, the
beer went too fast1 Let's get together again
real soon' PS Congrats on a great rush'
Love, the Alpha Phis
LITTLE SISTER RUSH! Come by the
Alpha Sigma Phi Mouse tonight and to-
morrow night to meet the greatest greeks
on campus Festivities begin at 9:00 Call
757-3516 for directions or free ride 422 W
5th Street
HEY PHI TAUS! You guys don'l have to
join the Navy to get into a sub Thanks
Rosina's.
ZBT's: Thanks for the rush and your sup
port. Rosina's.
TO THE GUYS at Theta Chi Thanks for
your support! I lope you guys enjoyed the
subs Rosina's
WELCOME new Delta Sigma Phi Sweet
hearts, and much thanks for everyones
help during rush (such wonderful host
esses) Special thanks to the girls who
helped the cooking crew with munchies
Looking forward lo a very raging, very
active year Sincerely, B, A, and The
Brothers of D.S.P. - PS Co Bims - Great
Eootball Action - Down. Set.E.M (They
woulda done it, too, Manly' Yes )
DON'T FORCET your parents and feed
them at Rosina's Parents Weekend at
Rosina's, Mom eats free
TO THE CUYS at Lambba Chi
Rosina's
Thanks
HEY PHI TAUS Are you really and truly
the pizza eating champs' Kosina
AZD SISTERS: We are really excited
about pledging tins tall' We want to make
it the best ever and we hope you have as
much fun as we do' Love, the Beta Nu
Pledge Class
J.P. - When are you going to call' We need
to talk' T P
See CLASSIFIEDS, page 7
PERSONALS
NEED TYPING? Call Cindy - 757-0398.
Call anytime after 500 p.m. Low rates
include: proofreading spelling and gram-
matical corrections; professional service.
10 years experience - IBM Typing.
PHI TAU! It all began with the driver who
tried real hard to be composed though an
Eagle was his goal It didn't quite happen
like he supposed, and Jenny's shot glasses
provoked all of us to compete with each
other but not cause a fuss. The night was
great, the night was fun, too bad ya'll
didn't get a hole in one! Love, The AZDs
AZD: Congratulations to the new sisters
of Alpha Xi Delta: Julie Boley. Susan
Bottrcll, Tracie Odcn, Stefanie Pena, and
Kim Steen. We Love You! Love, The Sister
and Pledges of AZD.
FRESH AND HOT! Call for fast free de-
livery. Buy a large pizza, get 2-liter coke
FREE. Buy a small pizza, get 2 drinks
FREE. Call now - Famous Pizza 757-1278
or 757-0731.
REWA-RDi Any information leading to
tbearrest of person(s) involved in the
vandaHzatton of a WKM Font. Flcro at the
top of the commuter lot next to the Psy-
chology Building on Thursday September
17 between 7:30am and 9:15 am. (Damage
was a long scratch down the passenger
side) Please call 355-5244.
ALL SIC TAU LITTLE SISTERS and
new Pledges. There Ls a meeting at the
house tonight at 6.00 pm. Please attend.
Carol 756-9467.
PHi BETA SIGMA Frat. Inc. The brothers
of Phi Beta Sigma invite all interested men
to our formal smoker Tues. Sept. 22, 1987
at 7:00pm. The Formal Smoker will be
held at the Sigma Mouse at 1112 Dickinson
Ave. If you need a ride or further in forma-
tion contact a brother or call 830-5302
C.O.M.A.B

New Skiers!

We know beginners need help and Information before they're ready to buy ski equipment
or clothing. Thais why we spend time talking with new skiers. So c'mon in and talk.
SEE GQflPQJV'S FOR ALL YOV SNOWfiKima Nvvpfi,
Gordon's Golf and Ski Shop
264 Bypass (Next to McDonald's) 756-1003
s
"CASTING
SHADOW
OUR
TOUCHING THE
WORLD"
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Sept. 24th - Homecoming gueen Nominations and Float,
House, Dorm Applications Due.
Send to: , - 0m
Leslie Council
TaylorSlaughter Alumni Center
7528070
BACK ROOM
BRANDED SHC El
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
OPENMON-SAT 10-9
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
10 OFF
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(EXCEPT AJGNER. NIKE AND
oflftnani
MENS WEAR
Khaki
and
Bucks
Khakis and Dirty Bucks
have been a by-word in
every young man's ward-
robe since World War II.
We're not sure who can take
credit for first putting the
two together, but the love
affair for these two timeless
pieces of clothing continues
both on and off campus.
This fall Coffman's con-
tinues to offer you some
great values to help you
build your fall wardrobe.
Khakis, Bucks and a fall
sportcoatbasics for a
young man's campus or
weekend wardrobe. At all
three of our Coffman's
stores you'll find these spe-
cial values during August.
DUCkheadSplain front2 pair for $37 ,95
.pleated(L pair for 4t � �7t3
Our Own Coffman's
�Fine Quality Khakisplainfront 2pa,rf0r$57.95
.pleated - pair for t)0 .95
Our Own Coffman's
� Dirty BucksH9.95
� As An Extra Back-To-School Rnn.K
Take S50 Off Any Snort CoaTln Our stnHr
o�ftnan�
MENS WEAR
Downtown Greenville
Carolina East Mall
Tarrytown Mall, Rocky Mount
�� � -� ,�� i, m �, �I, i m ,
EURE.GQLD n(, l R$
Tryouls tor the -� ro Qoc
Dancers will be Sepl 3 -
dancers mast attend u
meeting m room ; f Minges
eum, Thurs , Sepl 24 at 7p.n
info, call 757-6491
PRE-PHYSICAL THFtt APy
Any sophomore or hi�� ei wai
make application to the Phvsi al I
program for May 1988 must g � �
Department (Allied Health K. ,
ing) to confirm eligibilityonta ���.
Dept bv mid Sept. I
and receive the P.T. adn
apphcatior (or the
sons Admiss; . �, .
returned by No
deadline tor th. ' TisOct �
Coral R.
ested in se-
nior'
or Rob
DIVE cum
isfori
PHI SIGMA PJ
Phi Sigma Pi is a nation i
nitv for people with a 3 '
and completion ot 32 - �
interested, come to our Sn I
at 7 30 p m in room
building
Walt Di:
PERATIVF F"Uf A
IIQN
to recruit ��! � - �
Students irom all maioi
to participate M - I ,
tractions positions ax i i
bves will be at E ept.29an
further info, contact Co
Building.
SOPHOMORE
Take the first step next sui
a commission as an arm; �� � �
summer can . it Fort - � v K
You ma) bi for a I
ROTCs tfshi, - .
camp pays appri �n il . Sf
info , call 757 6967 � ntacl
ell at the EC I! v
ment, room 319 Erwii
Cla
Continued from page h
m � ftE cvs " Kmppa Si� I tow- wre
the pi.as' Thanks K 4fns �
TO ALL THE CREEK Sororities
Sisters, Fraternities Thanks for mal
Rosina'sa su. cess
you Ron
ATTENTION: Dot
Deltas Happj Horn
night at Pantana's
for missing Thursday - classes
MK MM
J haii m
IK Ul
ART has found a s
Willie and he :
Pvramus and Thisbe Y
what happened U see
September 23rd j: B
Auditorium Buy a ticket
Nigh: s Dream 3rd I U
TOMlvH D
lobbv to t.
carnation
ATTENTION AIL LADIES:
nice' Are sou fun? Ar.
make some everlasting fi
even reading this? It the r-
these questions is yes then c
Kappa Alpha 5 I tttli Sisti �
Monday and Tu sd
We're lookin' for a I n e . d
va there. The Pikes
Xi
PLUS a FR
Ful
FULLSERncTE
hCXRs ' -
Mondo thn � Pact .
730om MfVn J
Sot 7 30 o- � v n. c k
J





v 11 COME new Delta Sigma Phi Sweet-
hearts and much thanks for everyones
sh (such wonderful host
�" s Special : k to the girls who
� crew with munchies.
rward to a er raging, very
� - iv A , and The
I D.S.P PS Oo bims - Great
� Vction Down Set. EM ! (They
nroulda done il km, Manly? Yes.)
DON I FORCI I your parents and feed
it Rosma - Parents Weekend at
si is Mom eats free
fO mi .1sji Lambba Chi Thanks
ill N nil 1 Al S Are you realty and truly
i eating champs? Rosina
ZP SISTERS We are really exated
ill! We w anl to make
I we hope you ha e as
as �� Love the Heta Nu
I 1" - v
ii . ing to call? We need
OM
v. I ASSIFIEDS, page 7
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
10 OFF
R EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
PTAIGNER NIKE AND
REEBOK
MENS WEAR
id
Bucks
ike
less
ues
ill
Ispe-
lust
m pair for J 4 � �)
2pa,rfor45.95
ISplain front L pair for D � jO
pleated L� pair for )U.it3
Icks�49.95
tra Back-To-School Bonus
Off Any Sport Coat In Our Stock
ion's
MENS WEAR
rn Greenville
East Mall
II. Rocky Mount

I
iJ
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBERS. 1987
Announcements
PURE GOLD DANCERS
Tryouts for the 1987-8K Pure Gold
Dancers will be Sept. 29. All interested
dancers must attend an organizational
meeting in room 143 of Minges Colis-
eum, Thurs Sept 24 at 7 p.m. For more
info, call 757-6491
EEE�H YSICAL THERAPY
Any sophomore tor higher) wanting to
make application to the Physical Therapy
program tor May 1988 must go to the P.T.
Department (Allied Health Belk Build
ing) to confirm eligibility Contact the P.T
IX'pt by mid Sept to confirm eligibility
and receive the P.T. admission packet and
application for the Allied 1 lealth Profes-
sions Admission Test Packet must be
returned by Nov. 1, 1987 Application
deadline tor the Al 1PAT is Oct lb, 1987.
DIVE CLUB
Coral Reef Dive Qub is for people inter
ested in scuba diving and snorkehng For
more info call 752-4399 and ask for Glenn
or Rob.
PHI SIGMA PI
Phi Sigma Pi is a national honor frater-
nity tor people with a 330 overall GPA
and completion of 32 credit hours. If
interested, come to our Smoker on Sept 22
at 7:30 p m in room 103 of the Biology
building.
COOPERATIVE EDUCA-
TION
Walt Disney World will be on campus
to recruit students for spring semester
Students from all majors are encouraged
to participate Merchandise, tood and at
tractions positions available Representa-
tives will be at ECU on Sept. 2 and 30. For
further info , contact Co-op Ed. in Ravvl
Building
SOrHOMORES
Take the first step next summer toward
a commission as an army officer during
summer camp at Fort knox, Kentucky
ou may be eligible for a two- year Army
ROTC scholarship The six-week summer
camp pays approximately SSiXl For more
info , call 757 r7 or contact Capt. Mitch
ell at the ECU Military Science Depart
ment, room 319 Ervcin 1 iall
STUDENT UNION
Come to the productions committee
meeting on Sept 22,1987 at 6 pm. in room
8 (ground floor) of Mendenhall All
members and interested students please
attend
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda meeting Wed , Sept.
2.3 in room 302 Rawl at 3:00 p.m. We
welcome all business and business educa-
tion majors�new and old members.
PADDLING CLUB
We meet every week with tn-water in-
struction every other meeting We have all
the equipment. Join us Tuesdays in Me-
morial 105 or in the Memorial pool at 9:00
p.m. Call Jim 1 lix at 756-2970 or Ray lrvin
at 830 1215.
VISUAL ARTS
'The Magic of Neon" will be displayed
at Mendenhall Gallery running Sept 28th
through CVt. 16.
SCHOLARSHIP
ECU sophomores interested in a career
in government service at the federal, state,
or local level are invited to apply for a 1988
1 larrv S Truman Scholarship. In April
1988, the Foundation will award 105
Scholarships nationally The DEADLINE
for all 1988 nominations applications is
November 2, 1987. ECU can nominate
three students for the 1988 competition
The scholarship award covers eligible
expenses up to $7,000 per year for the
lunior year, senior year, and two years of
graduate study For more info contact
Fr. Frank Motley, Truman Scholarship
Faculty Rep , Austin 210 by Nov 2.
MADRIGAL DINNERS
Tickets are now on sale for Madrigal
Dinners to be held Dec 2-5 at 7 p.m. in
Mendenhall To order tickets for a holiday
meal amid the festivitiesof an Elizabethan
Manor Hall call the Central Ticket Office
at 757 6611, ext 266. ECU students S10, all
others SI 6.
BIQLQGYXLIJB
Biology Club will be having a car wash
Sat, Sept 26 from 9 am. -12pm at the
Burger King on 10th Street S2 per car
COFFEEHOUSE
Coffeehouse Committee is holding
open auditions to all bands interested in
performing for upcoming events spon-
sored by Coffeehouse. Auditions will be
held on Thurs, Sept. 24 at 7:30 p.m. in the
Coffeehouse (ground floor of Menden-
hall). Sign up no later than Tues Sept. 22
at Mendenhall. SPECIAL NOTE: All stu
dents are invited to come and pick your
favorite bands on Thurs. to perform at
your Coffeehouse. Free admission and
refreshments.
SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL
The N.C. Shakespeare Festival will
present A Midsummer Night's Dream on
Wed , Sept 2.3 at 8 p mirrWright Audito-
rium. Tickets are on sale at the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall (757-6611,
ext. 266).
NEIL SIMON PLAY
1 Ought To Ik' In Pictures, a play by Neil
Simon will be part of a dinner-theatre pro-
duction on Thurs , Oct. 8 and Fri , Oct. 9 at
630 pm in Mendenhall Auditorium
Tickets are on sale at Central Ticket Office
in Mendenhall (757-6611, ext. 266). $10 for
ECU students; $16 for all others. All ticket
sales are in advance No tickets will be
sold at the door.
BASKETBALL BLOWOUT
There will be a Basketball Blowout to
support the Ronald McDonald House at
the Student Store Sept. 2.3-25. You may
win SI 00! Sponsored bv Panhellenic and
IFC.
SOCCER
All girls interested in playing on the
ECU Women's Soccer Club Team should
contact Rence at 355-4644. The Coach is
Charlie Harvey, ECU Men's Soccer
Coach
"GEOLOGY OF CENTRAL
GUATEMALA"
Dr. David P Lawrence, Dept. of Geol-
ogy, ECU. 3:00 p.m Graham 301.
BAPTIST STUDENT UNTQN
The BSU would like to invite all stu-
dents to dinner on Mon. nights starting at
5:30 p.m. with a cost of S2. On Thurs.
nights we have our worship service.
Classifieds
Continued from page 6
tO Tilt GUVS al Kappa Sir I tow
the pas1 Thanks JR Rosins's.
TO ALL THE CRI.FK Sororities, Little
Sisters, Fraternities: Thanks tor making
Rosina's a success 1 couldn't do it without
you Ron
ATTENTION: Don't forget Alpha Xi
Deltas Happv Hour Every Wednesday
night at Pantana's - It's the BEST excuse
for missing Thursday's classes
ART has found a solution. 1 talked to
Willie and he worked it out thanks to
Pyramus and Thisbe You won't believe
what happened I'll see you Wednesday
September 23rd. at 8 pm in Wright
Auditorium. Buv a ticket to A Midsummer
Night's Dream and I'll meet you in the
lobby to talk about it I'll be wearing a red
carnation Signed, 100 Natural Art.
ATTENTION ALL LADIES: Are you
nice' Are you fun? Are you anxious to
make some everlasting friends? Are you
even reading this' If the answer to any of
these questions is yes, then come to Pi
Kappa Alpha's Little Sister Rush. This
Monday and Tuesday at Grog's from 8-10.
We're lookin' for a few good women. See
va there. The Pikes.
MICHAEL - happy birthday' You de-
serve the best of everything my friend Do
I have to tell you again? Leggo my Eggo
Sunshine
CHEAP ALCOHOL - at the Tequila bar
on Wed. nights. Come down to Sig Ep
happy hour and party till it hurts.
INTER VARSITY Christian Fellowship
Please Join Us! Wednesday nights in
Speight 129 at 7:00 pm - Fun - Fellowship
- Food - Teaching.
THE BROTHERS of Alpha Phi Alpha
will have a dance Sat. night after the game
at the Lcdonia Wright Cultural Center.
Admission SI.
TOMMY DONATHON - 'Predate all the
work and effort you put into RUSH. It
shows in large number of guys we got It
couldn't have been done any better.
LISA M Was he a good lay last Wednes-
day night, or should I say Thursday morn-
ing. We both know you don't like to
spread before 3 a.m. Wait a minute, you
slept on the couch. Ya, I believe that one. I
always trusted you about as far as 1 could
throw you, but with the weight you've
gained. I doubt I could get your Big "A"
off the ground We can still be friends
though KC.
CONGRATULATIONS to the Lambda
Chi's and the Sig Eps on such a successful
rush. Thanks for having us over Love, the
Sigmas.
TAKE A STUDY BREAK with the Sig-
mas and come to Pantana's Tues. Sept. 22
for happy hour. SI .00 shnapps and free
nacho bar.
HEY DZ 's - induction night was wild.
Stop blowing that whistle and get off that
girl James. Where's the beer bong? I'll
walk you home. Famous last words. I lope
we do it again soon. Sig Eps.
EVERYONE: Basketball Blow tut to sup-
port the Ronald McDonald House - be
around the Student Store Sept 23-25. You
may win SI00! Sponsored bv Panhellenic
and IFC.
DID YOU READ Art's personals7 If so,
call the Central Ticket Office at 757-6611,
ext. 266, for a chance to win free tickets for
the N.C. Shakespeare Festival production
of A Midsummer Night's Dream. Be sure
to mention one of the characters in the ad,
and leave your name and phone number.
All entries must be in by 6:00 p.m. Tues-
day, September 22nd. The Drawing will
be held at 9:00 am. Wednesday, Septem-
ber 2.3rd. You need not be present to win
Jiffy Lube
The newest concept in car care maintenance is now
open in Greenville!
Here's what we do in 10 minutes, no
appointment necessary
1. We change your oil with a major brand!
2. We Install a new oil filter!
3. We lubricate the whole chassis!
4. We check and fill transmission fluid!
5. We check and fill differential fluid!
6. We check and fill brake fluid!
7. We check and fill power steering fluid!
8. We check and fill window washer fluid!
9. We check and fill batiery!
10. We check the air filter!
11. We check the wiper blades!
12. We inflate the tires to proper pressure!
13. We vacuum the Interior!
14. We even wash vour wlndowsl
PLUS a FREE Car Wash with
Full Service!
$2.00 OFF ! j95C
FULL SERVICE I i JIFFY CAR WASH
(WITH COUPON)
7
Sat
(WITH COUPON) I I
Reg. $21.95
COUPON GOOD SE 30thJJ87j J COUPONGOQDSEPJlQth, 1987.
Monday thru Friday LflSl 031011113. S AriSWCF Greenville
?�?�:� To The Oil Change Problem" �:�:�
ifrjjfca�W"i ��� 'i��

FREE CONCERT
A free concert, livc-via-satcllite of the
Fabulous Thunderbirds, Georgia Satel-
lites, and Omar and the Howlers will be
broadcast on Sept. 25, 1987 at 9 p m in
White Dorm.
PANEL DISCUSSION
On Sept. 30, 1987, 8 p.m. in room 244
Mendenhall, a panel discussion, "Sex on
Campus" will be shown, live-via-satcllite.
Please attend this free showing.
AMBASSADORS
There will be an Ambassadors meeting
Wed Sept. 23 at 4:30 pm. on the lawn in
front of Fleming 1 lall.
EDUCATION MAJORS
The Student Division of the N.C. Asso-
ciation of Educators is having its planning
session for the 1987-88 year on Wed Sept.
23, 4:00 p.m Speight 301. AU students
interested in men bcrship are invited to
attend. Those planning to student teach
this year are encouraged to be in atten-
dance. Applications and additional info,
will be available.
NEWMAN CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center is open
daily from 8:30a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Tues 9
22, prayer group; Wed 923 mass at 5:30
followed by fellowship dinner Please call
Newman at 757-3760 for additional info,
or outreach publicity chairman, Teresa
Lee at 752-9910.
LF.H.A,
There will be a PP11A meeting on Tues
22 at 7:00 p.m. in Mendenhall room 221.
Anyone interested in acquiring more
health related info, is encouraged to at-
tend.
WESFEL
Come to the Methodist Student Center
every Wed night for a delicious, all-you-
can-eat home cooked meal with a short
program The meal is $2 at the door and
$1 50 in advance, call 758 2030 for reserva-
tions.
KERYGMA
A Bible study only for those who are
serious about studying the Bible Weekly
meetings will be cheduled to accomo-
date those interested Kerygma is interde-
nominational program sponsored bv
Presbyterian Campus Ministry For more
info, call Mike at 752-7240.
WESTINGHQUSE
Two engineers from Westinghouse will
speak to all interested students about en-
gineering careers in industry on Thurs ,
Sept 24 at 3 30 pm in Biology N-109
There will be a brief meeting afterwards
for all students interested in SI'S.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
The Law Society will hold its next meet
ing on Sept 24 at 7:30 p m in room 221 of
the Student Center The guest speaker will
be the recently nominated Federal Court
Judge Malcome Howard All members
and anyone interested are urged to attend
The
East Carolinia
equired reading
for the serious student
Tired of the Dorm?
Roommate Wanted!
Call 355-6686
PARTY
ANIMALS
830-1823
Balloons Delivered
in Costumes
L
Gorilla - Grams
Gator - Grams
Penguin for Hire
rsK-v
SIGMA
NU
FRATERNITY
Announces
1987 FALL RUSH
September 28 and 29
7:00 - 10:00 p.m.
PLACE: To Be Announced
For more information
CALL: 758-6765 or 757-0124
Now You've Seen The Rest
Come and rush the best!
4h, - -





�HIE F.AST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 22. 1W7
Officials struggle with prison pregnancies
I never had to Ieave bab
si m�T ' ' �f Boston- who�
wx-mon h sentence for disorderly
nductkeptherattheMassachu
m iP7n f�r women during
'nuch of her pregnancy.
ihe �s one of hundreds of preg-
nant women or new mothers na-
nonw.de who pose a problem for
Prison and jail officials faced with
balancing concerns about the
safety of society and those for
unborn children.
'Some states are more enlight- helped me
ened than others, but I would sav 25, of Worcester Mass
tnat prison pregnancy is system-
atically a widespread, very seri-
ous problem says Ellen Barry, a
lawyer with Legal Services for
Prisoners With Children, a San
Francisco-based national advo-
cacy group for women prisoners.
Barry and several other pris-
oner advocates are involved in a
spate of lawsuits against correc-
tional systems pressing for better
diets, improved health care and
help with custody issues for preg-
nant inmates.
In California, advocates negoti-
ated a settlement in a class-action
lawsuit that accused prison offi-
cials of denying pregnant women
adequate diets and medical care
In Connecticut, officials are
negotiating a new agreement to
replace one that expired last year
in a similar la wsuit brought by the
Connecticut Civil Liberties
Union.
Massachusetts prisoner advo-
cates, who have also filed a suit,
are working with state and local
leaders to provide alternatives to
prison cells for pregnant woment
accused or convicted of crimes.
Other states have adopted such
innovative programs as mater-
nity leaves for pregnant prisoners
and rejuvenated old programs
such as prison nurseries
In some countries, judges arc
barred from putting pregnant
women behind bars. In Italy, for
example, a 42-year-old woman
avoided serving a 10-month sen-
tence for 10 years by repeatedly
getting pregnant.
Judges in the United States tend
to avoid sentencing pregnant
women or mothers of small chil-
dren to time behind bars, legal
and correctional officials say.
Sometimes, however, the sen-
tence may be imposed out of con-
cern for the baby, whose impris-
oned mother often may be a drug
addict.
Actually, what the judge did
deques,
a preg-
nant cocaine addict who is serv-
ing six months for drug traffick-
ing. "I don't want to say 1 like
being here because it's a prison,
but it has, if nothing else, helped
my baby
She said she had been eating
better, taking prenatal vitamins
regularly and staying off drugs �
unlike when she was pregnant
and on the streets with her
daughter, now 4.
For other pregnant women in
prison, however, the outcome has
been different.
The federal class-action lawsuit
filed in California in 1985 claims
prison officials failed to respond
to some pregnant women's emer-
gencies and complications
In one case, the suit alleged, a
woman who was bleeding and
suffering abdominal cramps was
told her pains were normal until
she went into labor and was trans-
ferred to Riverside General Hos-
pital, where her son was born and
died two hours later.
Another woman who doctors
said might need a Caesarean de-
livery allegedly was taken back to
prison when correctional officers
decided she was not dilated
enough to be at the hospital.
When she returned seven and
one-half hours later, shackled and
strapped to a bench in a security
van, doctors said it was too late to
perform the surgery. The baby
suffered oxygen loss and was
born with disabilities, the suit al-
leged.
Suits elsewhere claim pregnant
women were placed in cells or
medical units with inmates who
had not been examined and may
have been carrying contagious
illnesses that could affect the the
developing fetus.
Others allege drug-addicted
prisoners were forced to go
through withdrawal "cold tur-
key without relief from danger-
ous side-effets such as seizures.
Prison officials say they are
doing the best they can in over-
crowded institutions and and
that many of the health problems
stem from the mothers' poor
medical care before arriving in
prison. Most women inmates are
poor; many are drug addicts.
"The fact is most inmates have
not been exposed to quality medi-
cal care before they get to prison
says Robert Gore, assistant direc-
tor of the California Department
of Corrections, who declined to
comment on specific charges in
the California lawsuit.
Six percent of the nation's fe-
male prison population and 10
percent of the women in county
jails, which tend to house inmates
for shorter periods of time, may be
pregnant at any given time, Barry
estimates.
Many problems, she says, stem
from "glitches and a lot of ill will
She recalls an inmate whose baby
was coming quickly but who had
to wait 45 minutes at the prison
gate while guards processed the
paperwork for her to be put in an
ambulance.
But security concerns must
come first, prison officials say.
"This is a prison first and when
we forget that, we'd better find
new jobs says Martha Rice, pro-
gram director at the Framingham
College students receive controversal booklet about aids
FRAMINGHAM, MASS. (CPS)
�Some 3,000 students arriving at
Framingham State College last
week got an extra gift: a booklet
about how to avoid AIDS.
It was from U.S. Rep. Chester
Atkins, who took the opportunity
to tweak the Reagan administra-
tion and gain some publicity in
handing out the handbooks,
which were sponsored and then
rejected by the White House.
"The Reagan administration
said Atkins, a Democrat, in ex-
plaining why he delivered the
books to students at the student
union, "has failed to meet its re-
sponsibility to educate the pub-
lic
The administration had criti-
cized the hook, published under
the auspices of U.S. Surgeon Gen-
eral C. Everett Koop, for not
stressing abstinence as a way to
keep from getting acquired im-
mune deficiency syndrome.
Critics also objected to the
handbook's anatomical refer-
ences.
But Atkins, saying he was dis-
tributing 3,000 books in the name
of public health, asserted, "As
students come back to school,
they need to know the basic facts
about AIDS
Atkins apologized to those who
might find the book's language
offensive. "However, only
through learning about the trans-
mission of the disease can people
� � � � coupon � � �
protect themselves from its
spread
"1 browsed through the book-
let, said student Ricard Porcelli. "I
thought it was a good idea for an v
college campus
Only on
Tuesdays
and
Thursdays
SACK A PACK
of savings
ECU
Victory
Sale! 422 Arlington Blvd.
o
8
i
i
i
i
V
27868
�coupon
Bring in this
coupon and get
15 off purchase
VALID THRU 9-30-87
Attention
All those interested
in
Pirate Walk
All Positions are being reopened.
Applications are now being accepted for:
Director Operators
Assist. Director Walkers
Apply in 228 Mendenhall, Deadline Thurs. 24th at 5:00. Contact
SGAVice President if you have any questions.
prison. She recalls one pregnant
woman who was placed in maxi-
mum security.
"None of us will pretend that
maximum security is the opti-
mum place for a pregnant
woman she says. "But she tried
to climb the fence
Activists, however claim some
of the security practices have been
unnecessary and dangerous.
In Connecticut, for example,
one woman was shackled as she
was taken to the hospital to give
birth a few years ago.
"They took the leg irons off as
the baby was coming out says
Martha Stone, legal director for
the Connecticut ACLU, which
fought for a strict policy outlining
when leg irons could be used.
In Massachusetts, there is ony
one prison for women, for offend-
ers ranging from drunk drivers to
murderers. Often they must
travel across the state for court
appearances and may miss hot
meals, relying instead on bag
lunches that activists claim may
not be as nutritious.
"Even in the best support sys-
tems, the prison environment is
not a place for a pregnant
woman says Betsey Smith, di-
rector of Social Justice for Women,
an advocacy group in Boston.
As recently as four years ago,
some pregnant prisoners in Mas-
sachusetts faced problemsgetting
maternity clothes, nursing bras
and information about custody
issues, she says.
At Framingham, where the
average sentence for a woman is
4.7 months, about 50 pregnant
women go through the institution
each year. Last year, 17 gave birth
while in prison.
About 100 women are serving
sentences in the California prison
system, the largest in the country,
and about 42 are pregnant in any
given month. Last year, 120 babies
were born to California women
prisoners.
Once the baby is born, prison
officials and activists agree,
comes the big problem: what todo
with a baby who needs immediate
care but whose mother might
have a few more months to serve.
In some parts of the country,
they are getting the women into
halfway houses.
In Georgia, a maternity re-
prieve program gives qalified
pregnant inmates a 60-day fur-
lough 30 days before their due
date so they can deliver their
babies outside the prison.
The seven-year-old program
also allows women prisoners
some time to bond with their in-
fants before the new mother must
return to prison. Other pregnant
Georgia prisoners, like those in
many states, return to their cells
40 to 72 hours after giving birth.
Officials at other prisons are
taking another look at prison
nurseries, which were once com-
mon in women's reformatories in
the United States. The nurseries,
places behind the prison fences
where women could care for their
babies, fell victim to budget cuts
and concern about the possible
effects of growing up behind bars
Today, the nation's onlv active
state prison nursery is at Bedford
Hills in New York, where 18 moth-
crscarefortheirchildren in rooms
on one floor.
"The babies are with their
mothers and that's where they
belong says Sister Elaine Roulet,
who directs the nursery.
New Tax Law
11 help you understand the new t.i law, the 11
has two new publications. Publication 920 xplains
changes affecting mdi iduals and Publication
921 explains changes affee ting businesses Both au-
free. Ask fot ont at am IKs office oi call t'h, IRs
Tax Forms numbei in oui phone book
HJ3BL
ATTRACTIONS
Wednesday
September 23rd at 8:00 p.m.
Australian Double Feature:
MAN OF FLOWERS
STARSTRUCK
September 24-27 at 8:00 p.m.
Movie:
MOSQUITO COAST
September 25-26 at 11:00 p.m.
LATE SHOW:
CARS THAT ATE PARIS
September 29th at 7:00 p.m.
BINGOICE CREAM
PARTY
Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room
Admission: 25
1
For more information, contact the
Student Union at 757-6611, ext. 210.
IMF FAST I AROI IN)
v.
f
f


Rick Atkinson, Pulitzer Prize w inning graduate �
7th Annual NC. Honors Association meeting on
creditshis success to hard work and a liberal ai
Jordan � Photolab)
Kate Bush
By MICAH HARRIS
Suft Wntrt
Kale Rush is pii.HiriMli
a multimedia artist who leaves
conformity scattered in her wake
like so much scrap paper alter a
tornado. Her musical "style� re-
fuses to fall into easy category, her
lyrics are both poetic and literate
demanding you actually listen to
them, and her surreal videos en-
hance her songs instead oi func-
tioning as a mere visual redun-
dancy.
Her MTV award nominated
video, "Blue Sky was a fanciful
and elaborate production number
which she directed a3 well as per-
dB's album he
formed in.
Why, then,
"best p. �
ligent, 1 giie?
artsy to lend i(
plav given
videi
"best fei
donna and
repeated ad ru
Bush remai
scure in the sta
heard herdanc
L'pThat Hill.
Love" album
Benatar's ren
"Wuthenng 1
Peter Gabriel hi
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Suff Wnttr
The dB's new album, "The
Sound Of Music" won't set am
nuns to dancing, but it does have
some killer songs for the rest oi the
free world.
It's a strong album all the way
through. Peter Hoisappte (can
you think of a better name for
going into the music business)
sings with a wierd resemblance to
Michael Hutchcnce of INXS
This probably doesn't seem to
be too flattering to the dB's, but
INXS used to be a respectable
band. Anyway, Holsapple rcallv
�rfir A
breaks a
album's best c
The band it
than 501 bini
else in America!
they grabbed
Mellencamp s
not only got th
gave them ao
playing oi I i
chick in John's
The single is
hazards or uj
Mellencamp s
are used to hittJ
the time. Thevi
expect evervthii
' .
l
r4,
Andre Kole, illusionist, will appear Sept ?0 at Kr I
7:30 p.m. show. Tickets for the event are availabl
They are $2 for students and $5 for non-students
� �i� �� �"� iii
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nancies
i atother prisons are
mo tinr look at prison
s v h it h v ore once com-
�i s reformatories in
ed States The nurseries,
�the prison fences
ould care for their
'tim to budget cuts
ibout the possible
21 isngupbehind Kirs.
�ation - onh active
-on nirscry is at Bedford
rk where 18 moth-
drcn in rooms
ir� with their
that - where they
ister Elaine Rouiet,
' � r
I
ew Tax Law
Publu .ition
Sl
THh FAST CAROi INJAN
style
SEPTEMBER 22, 1987 Page 9
ECU graduate, Pulitzer winner,
credits success to work, education
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Managing tditor
When you ask ECU Alumnus Rick Atkinson about his Pulitzer Prize
he seems somewhat amused.
"It didn't change my life he said. "I had to get up the next morning
and punch the clock
As a matter of a fact, the real world didn't even wait until that next
morning to intrude on Atkinson's success. The certificate and $1,000
check that accompany the prize were mailed to him � postage due, 41
cents.
Back in 1982 when Atkinson won the prize, he was a reporter for the
Kansas City Times. 1 le won it for a scries of stories about the West Point
class of 1966 and what they had been doing since then.
He soon moved to the Washington desk for the Times. From there,
Atkinson jumped ship and became a reporter for The Washington Post.
Two and one-half years later, at age 32, Atkinson became the youngest
editor on the national desk of the Post.
But Atkinson said he prefers reporting to editing. "It's a first rough
draft of history, that kind of thing he said in an interview Friday.
Atkinson was on campus to speak to the 7th Annual North Carolina
Honors Association meeting.
Atkinson has written several rough drafts of history, both as a
reporter and an editor. He said he covered Jesse Jackson's trip to
Damascus, Gcraldine Ferarro's vice-presidential campaign, the U.S.
bombing of Lebanon and the Iran-Contra hearings.
He said one of his favorite assignments was leading a team of
reporters at the summit in Reykjavic. What was suposed to be a do-
nothing meeting almost changed the face of the world forever.
"It was very much a piece of the sort of things�if you're lucky � you
get to do as a reporter he said.
When Atkinson came to ECU as a student, he had no intentions of
being a reporter. As he studied English, he was involved from his
beginnings here in the SGA. He was public defender for former East
Rick Atkinson, Pulitzer Prize winning graduate of ECU, spoke at the Carolinian managing editor Bob Thonen when Thonen was booted
Annual N.C. Honors Association meeting on campus Friday. He from the staff and the university for printing an obscenity.
creditshis success to hard work and a liberal arts education. (Jon Atkinson calls the judicial board that tried Thonen a "kangaroo
Jordan � Photolab) court Thonen later sued the university and was reinstated.
Later, as SGA vice president, Atkinson was student hason on the
Publications Board (today the Media Board), so he did have university
roots with what was then a radical newspaper.
But it wasn't until after graduate school, when Atkinson was desper-
ate and took a job on a small Kansas newspaper, that his love for
journalism began. He started at $135 a week.
"I liked it right away he said. "I knew within the first few months
I had blundered into what was right for me
He admits not having much knowledge of the newspaper business
when he began work. "I didn't know a headline from a outline (photo
caption) he said, laughing.
He still holds that his is the best way to do serious journalism � that
is, getting a broad liberal arts education rather than studying journal-
ism as a major.
"I'm very dogmatic about that he said. "Some journalism students
are great journalists. Other people, they're a little pinched in their view
of things
Atkinson credits his success to his education, serendipity, hard work
and good luck. He said his time here was spent getting more than just
a book education, though, and that the extra lessons he learned still go
with him.
'The times here were singular. There was a certain iconoclasm in the
air that I think was part of my education and very valuable he said.
He referred again to the incident with Thonen, which happened
when Atkinson was a sophomore, "Watching people like that and
seeing what they believed affected mc
Atkinson even admitted to a little trickery while he was in SGA. He
was vice president as a junior, and though he knew he could be
president the next year, he didn't want the fob
Instead, he and the president at the time locked themselves in the
SGA offices and marked ballots so that thev could chose their own
successor. It almost worked. Almost.
Atkinson said he and his comrade let their consciences get the best of
them. They removed the marked ballots bet re the actual election, and
their candidate eventually lost
Of course, today, if Atkinson found someone stuffing a ballot box, he
would probably be the first to report it. And maybe win another
Pulitzer.
Kate Bush hot in England, too unique for MTV
Bv MICAH HARRIS
stiff Unfer
a multimedia artist who leaves
mformity scattered in her wake
; ke so much scrap paper after a
tornado Her musical "stvle" re-
fuses to fall into easy category, her
. ries are both poetic and literate,
iemanding you actually listen to
them, and her surreal videos en-
ance her songs instead of func-
tioning as a mere visual redun-
lancy.
Her MTV award nominated
ideo, "Blue Sky was a fanciful
rid elaborate production number
hich she directed as well as per-
formed in.
Why, then, did Bush lose in the
K-st performance by a female in
niij�" caioor yShe's too iaial�
ligent, I guess Her work is "too
artsy" to lend itself to repeated air
play given MTV's image. Her
videos are hardly played, while
"best female" contenders Ma-
donna and Janet Jackson's stuff is
repeated ad nauseam.
Bush remains relatively ob-
scure in the states. You may have
heard her dance single, "Running
Up That Hill or her "Hounds of
I ove" album last year; or Pat
Benatar's rendition of Bush's
"Wuthering Heights or seen
Peter Gabriel hugging her (lucky
guy) in his "Don't Give Up" video
recently. Or you may not. But
Bush has been popular in Europe
and Canada for several years and
retains something of "Madonna
Status" in England.
Kate Bush was discovered by
Pink Floyd's David Gilmour at
age sixteen when mutual ac-
quaintances introduced the
young dance student to the gui-
tarist. Bush spent several years
making demos before releasing
her first single, and first hit,
"Wuthering Heights Already,
much of what was to be character-
istic of Bush's later work was
present; music rooted in litera-
ture, eccentric vocals, and
elements of mime. (She studied
mime with David Bowie's
teacher.)
The subject matter of her songs
tended toward the imaginative,
such as "Experiment IV" (about a
secret military project to control
and kill people long distance) or
the claustrophobic "Breathing"
(an eerie depiction of life after a
nuclear exchange).
The lyrics themselves were both
poetic and pointed , as in "Wuth-
ering Heights" where she sings of
the paradox of passionate love:
"How could you leave me when
I needed to possess you? I
hated you I loved you, too Or,
in "Breathing "Chips of pluto-
niumare twinkling in every
lung In the same song, the repe-
tition of "In, Out In Out" pain-
fully delineates the plight of the
survivors, breathing in the fall-
out
Bush's videos are different from
any others you arc likely to see
Theatrical is the word which best
describes them. Through her
mime training, she uses her body
as a medium in itself, independ-
ent of, and yet enhancing, the
vocals. Exaggerated gestures and
expressions hichlieht her video
work, oush uses dance to tell a
story, an approach refreshingly
diametrical to the Dionysian
wriggling of Janet Jackson or
Madonna.
Bush exploits sound and sight
to its limits, creating an audio-
visual kaleidoscope which, ad-
mittedly, at times drowns what-
ever message is supposed to be
there. Perhaps in these cases, "the
medium is the message In any
event, Bush is a craftsman who
knows the rules she's breaking; in
most of the hemisphere, there's no
doubt to her artistry, except on
MTV.
dB's album headed for charts
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Writer
The dB's new album, "The
Sound Of Music" won't set any
uns to dancing, but it does have
-me killer songs for the rest of the
ree world.
It's a strong album all the way
�rough. Peter Holsapple (can
ou think of a better name for
ing into the music business)
ngs with a wierd resemblance to
" Hchael Hutchenceof INIXS.
This probably doesn't seem to
e too tlattering to the dB's, but
MXS used to be a respectable
ind. Anyway, Holsapple really
breaks away from this in the
album's best cut.
The band itself sounds tighter
than 501 blues. Like everybody
else in American rock these days,
they grabbed one of John
Mellencamp's producers. This
not only got them cranked up, it
gave them access to the violin
playing of Lisa Germano, the
chick in John's new video.
The single is "I Lie One of the
hazards of using people from
Mellencamp's stable is that they
are used to hitting the Top 40 all
the time. They expect to, and
expect everything they do to, also.
Andre Kole, illusionist, will appear Sept 29 at Wright Auditorium for
a 7:30 p.m. show. Tickets for the event are available at Mendenhall.
They are $2 for students and $5 for non-students.
This is my justification of why "I
Lie" and the almost pop "Think
Too Hard" sound poised to
throttle the charts any moment.
They're still well grafted rock, just
more accessible.
Which is all well and good. But
the dB's succeed most with what
they always do best � straight-
forward rock, tinged with that ol'
country flavor. Which brings us to
the best song on the album.
'Take out your maps and then
look for the flats You'll know
where you're at You're in Bon-
neville Okay, taken out of con-
text it doesn't look like much. But
"Bonneville" is the most happen-
ing.
I don't know if Bonneville is a
real place. It could be. Even so, the
song functions as kind of a meta-
phor for where the dB's are. Bon-
neville is you guessed it, the
Top 40 charts. Holsapple sings,
"It's very hot and very flat And
that is that in Bonneville
A pop desert. MTV wasteland.
Holsapple realizes that the band
is about to topple into the borders
of this Godforsaken place. "Bon-
neville" is a neatly ironic re-
minder of how far the dB's have
come, and where they are really
going.
Oh, it's not? If s just a funny,
honky tonk, guitar swangin' har-
monica tootin' album track? oh.
Well, anyway, if s some down
home stompin' music. Other cool
cuts include "A Better Place" with
some XTC-like riffs, "Never Be-
fore and Never Again" a duet
with Sid Straw, last seen on Anton
Pier's Golden Palomino's records.
"Any Old Thing" is right close
to becoming country metal. While
"Think Too Hard" is pretty hook
oriented, it's easy to see why it
gets heavily played. Lead guitar-
ist Gene Holder gets spot-lighted
�MMN4M4Mto
"The Magic of Neon an exhibition of 30 large scale Cibachrome photographs celebratin
of neon, will be on display Sept 28 through Oct 16 at Mendenhall. This photo from th ��� �?' &&
in West Los Angeles. (Photo by Michael Webb) ���nibit wj,
umiKiiPimnw m immmm0mmmmm0mimmt





10
Till r,sTc-AROMVlAM SEPTEMBERS 1987
The North Carolina Dance
theater is bringing their highly
acclaimed, company to ECU to
perform on Oct. 5 in Wright Audi-
onum as part of the Department
ot University's Unions' Theatre
Arts Series.
The dancers perform both das
sical and contemporary works by
a wide variety of choreographers.
The company's repertoire is an
eclectic one, including some excit-
rft
ing, challenging, and entertaining
choreography.
Of the 18 artists currently danc-
ing with the company, about half
have received their professional
training at the North Carolina
School o( the Arts in W'inston-
Salem, where the company is
based. Others come to the Dance
Theater from companies in New
York, Texas, Pennsylvania, and
other regional companies. They
combine a variety of talents and
backgrounds, giving the North
Carolina Dance Theater the versa-
tility to perform a wide range of
material.
The company was founded and
created in 1970 by Robert Lind-
gren as a proffesional affiliate of
the North Carolina School of the
Arts. Lindgren began his dance
training in Canada and then later
studied in Paris and New York
City, where he was a featured
dancer with the New York City
Ballet and the New York Ballet
Theatre.
In 1965, Lindgren was ap-
pointed Dean of the School of
Dance at the North Carolina
School of the Arts. With the assis-
tance of the Rockefeller Founda-
tion, he established the North
Carolina Dance Theater and has
since served as its director.
In addition to benefitting form
Lindgren's professional dancing
and directing experience, the
company is enhanced by the cho-
reography of its artistic director,
Salvatore Aiello.
Aiello's professional career
began in 1963 with the Joffrey
Ballet, and he later performed as a
Principal Dancer with both the
Eglevsky Ballet and Canada's
Royal Winnipeg Ballet.
In 1979, Aiello joined the North
Carolina Dance Theater as Asso-
ciate Director and has since cre-
ated and choreographed six origi-
nal works and adapted others for
company performances.
The company travels 20-30
weeks each season and has ap-
peared in states from New Eng-
land to Florida, as far west as
Alaska, and in five European
countries. They perform in small
towns, large cities, and in major
festivals like the Festival of Two
Worlds in Spoleto, Italy, where
they received four standing ova-
tions.
Their appearance at ECU is
funded in part by a grant from the
North Carolina Arts Council, and
the National Endowment for the
Arts, Washington, D.C, a federal
agency.
Tickets for this performance can
be purchased at the Central Ticket
Office located in Mendcnhall Stu-
dent Center, Monday through
Friday, II a.m. to 6 p.m. Ticket
prices are $12. for general admis-
sion, $10 for ECU facultystaff,
and $6 for ECU students and
youth high school and under.
Wright Auditorium provides
free, convenient parking and easy
access to the building for handi-
capped patrons.
For rickets and more informa-
tion call 757-6611, ext. 266, during
the above hours.
Auditions
The East Carolina Playhouse
will hold open auditions for
Lovers and Other Strangers
on September 29 and 30 at 7:15
p.m. in room 205 of the Messick
Theatre Arts Center on the ECU
campus (corner of 5 th and Eastern
Streets).
"Lovers and Other Strangers
written by Renee Taylor and Jo-
seph Bologna, is a collection of
comedies that deal with love and
marriage. The playwrights were
married three years before writ-
ing this delightful comedy. By
their own admittance, their life
together provided the basis for
the comic insights into courtship,
love and marriage that they put
into "Lovers and Other Strang-
ers
There are roles available for six
men and six women ranging in
age from early 20's to mid 40"s.
Everyone (18 or older) is encour-
aged to attend
Rehearsals will begin on Octo-
ber 12 and performance dates are
November 18-21 in McGinnis
Theatre. Copies of the script are
on reserve in joyncr Library on
the ECU campus.
For further information please
call 757-6390.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY �
� AND THE
����� DEPARTMENT OF UNIVERSITY UNIONS 'J��
J � PRESENT THE wWfjj





Alpha-Omega Players
Empires October 31.1987
The N.C. Dance Theater will perform Oct. 5 in Wright Audirorium as
part of the Theater Arts Series. Tickets are available now at the J Coupon must be presented with Incoming order
Central Ticket Of f ice in Mendenhall.
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I OUGHT TO
BE IN
PICTURES
HI W. 10THST.
CORNER OF 10THEVANS
A Finer Tuned Blend of Hilarity and Honesty
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8
AND
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
AUDITORIUM 244
Dlnnar: 6:30 p.m. Curtain: 8 00pm
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Lindbergh book
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) h
crimes in history have ir
many armchair sleuths and o
solutions as the 1932 kidi n
ofthe infant son of a vial
A. Lindbergh, and i
inquiry is al
bookshelves
'The Lindl
University Press, $22.9
James Fisher, a I
is the first tobewritti
nal justice �
compiled afI -
poring thr
chives, i � r : :
firsthand a � � �
crime
Fisher reaches ui
conclusions Richard Bi
Hauptmann, the (
carpenter �
the crirm
gat ion
its time; I
but probably fan
decomj
eral miles I
estate was unqu
the a via I -
Hauptmanr
now 88, has.
ing a wrongful deal
against the state, claii
murdered an innocei
Fisher, a profess r
ogy at Edinboro .
Pennsylvania said I
to the case after wat
documentary that arg . �
Hauptmann's innocx
'This case truly gol nl
fabric of Ameri
every strata. Itsrta
investigate crime It n id
broke careers, pe,
selves during the n
Fisher tells
paced narrative beg
the March 1 kidnap: .
child through the nura
dow. He details the t
futile ransom neg
discovery of the h ya 1
away from the West Am
estate and the frustra
investigaion.
Through transcripts hel
story oi the sensational ti
Hauptmann's lame defense
ends the book with Hauptma i
April 3,1934, execution at Tr i
State Prison, with a crowd wait-
He tcUsof the Iuckv brrak when
do
a, U.
ducifs
1
dB's fourth album
stays rock solid
Continued from page 9
here and in ' Never Say W
"Sound Of Musi is a s
piece of work Its
album from the dB's. proving
staying power doesn't need I
measured in sales figures al
though their audience is exp
ing since their move to a m
distributor.
Special thanks for help or,
: review go to WZM B and Da
ous Dave. Cuts from tis L;
I other great rock bands can be
i heard on "Adventures in Modem
1 Recording" on Monday nigl
8 p.m. on WZMB, 91.3 FV
this great review didn't ins
you to go out and buy "The Sound
Of Music listen to "Adven-
I tures
v�
Che
i
d
s
Looking for an�
career Where eacr
Force people have si
navigators Maybe yj
Find out if you quali
recruiter today Call
TSgt Steve W
Station to Stati


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uditions
ina Playhouse the comic insights into courtship,
auditions tor love and marriage that they put
L overs and Other Strang-
er Strangers
into
"here are roles a ailable for six
?n and six women ranging in
n earl) 208 to mid 40's.
I B or older) is encour-
attend
irsals ill begin on Octo-
12 and performance dates are
�vember IS 21 in McGinnis
t?atre copies ot the senpt are
reserve in Unner Library on
. impus
or further information please
757-6390
9
� UNIONS ;��).
(a-Omega Players
In
VTRE PRESENTATION
il Simon's
JGHT TO
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22, 1987
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TRENTON, N.J. (AD - Few
crimes in history have inspired as
many armchair sleuths and exotic
solutions as the 1932 kidnapping
of the infant son of aviator Charles
A. Lindbergh, and now another
inquiry is about to hit America's
bookshelves.
The Lindbergh Case" (Rutgers
University Press, $22.95), by
lames Fisher, a former FBI agent,
is the first to be written by a crimi-
nal justice professional. It was
compiled after he spent four years
poring through evidence ar-
chives, newspaper clippings and
firsthand acounts of the famous
crime.
Fisher reaches unwavering
conclusions: Richard Bruno
Hauptmann, the German-born
carpenter who was executed for
the crime, was guilty; the investi-
gation was flawed but brilliant for
its time; the trial was sensational
but probably fair, and the tiny,
decomposed corpse found sev-
eral miles from the Lindbergh
estate was unquestionably that of
the aviator's son.
Hauptmann's widow, Anna,
now88, has been doggedly pursu-
ing a wrongful death lawsuit
against the state, claiming they
murdered an innocent man.
Fisher, a professor of criminol-
ogy at Edinboro University in
Pennsylvania, said he was drawn
to the case after watching a PBS
documentary that argued for
Hauptmann's innocence.
'This case trulv got into the
fabric of America. It cut across
every strata. It shaped the way we
investigate crime. It made and
broke careers, people killed them-
selves during the investigation
Fisher tells the story in a fast-
paced narrative beginning with
the March 1 kidnapping of the
child through the nursery win-
dow. He details the tense and
futile ransom negotiations, the
discovery of the body a few miles
away from the West Am well, .J
estate and the frustrated police
investigaion.
Through transcripts, he tells the
story of the sensational trial and
Hauptmann's lame defense. He
ends the book with Hauptmann's
April 3,1934, execution at Trenton
State Prison, with a crowd wait-
ir�.fto.tftoriws outside ��
He telteof the luckv break when
a gas station attendant, suspi-
ciousof a $10gold note used to pay
for 89 cents worth of gasoline,
jotted down Hauptmann's license
plate number.
"After thousands of investiga-
tive man hours, hundredsof wild-
goose chases and countless dead
ends, the case had been broken by
a Manhattan pump jockey. Every S"1
thing seemed to fit - a German
carpenter from the Bronx who
matched the description had
passed a $10 ransom bill Fisher
writes.
Pro-Hauptmann students of the
case gloss over the German
immigrant's crime record in his
home country, Fisher said
Movie reviews
'Hamburger Hill'
For 10 days in May 1969, troops
! of the 101st Airborne fought one of
the most brutal battles of the Viet-
nam War More than 1 million
ounds of bombs, including
52,000 pounds of napalm, were
iropped on Hill 937. The soldiers
i called it Hamburger Hill.
1 The terror, confusion and
bloodiness of that jungle warfare
. rhillingly unfold in John Irvin's
r Hill
the Academy Award-
"I'latoon" with its al-
a conspiracy theory.
"Hauptmann was a lone wolf
all the way. Today we would call
Hauptmann a psychopath
Fisher said.
Han
winning
like watching the 6 o'clock news
almost two decades ago. Part of
this reality is due the the special
effects, which were coordinated
by Joe Lombardi. The napalm
sears the screen; the tracers rip
right through it.
And part is because of the col-
lective abilities of 14 unknown
actors who knew how to live with
screenwriter Jim Carabatsos' sen-
sitive writing. What emerges is a
portrait of yesterday's young sol-
dier; innocence takes a back seat
to just plain survival.
Courtney B. Vance, who made
He said he found no evidence of jfrnost poetic visions and Stanley his Broadway debut in the Tony
1 L1:�� J� .r11 1 r .
Kubrick's more sardonic "Full
Metal Jacket the latest Vietnam
JWar movie has even harsher reali-
ies and produces a feeling of deja
lib wee r Hill" i s
��sSm! Hie
IrvinTThe
�xv � -mr
'Cosby' star, Yale graduate,
doesn't believe his success
"Turtle Diary") directs sparingly
but does not allow his actors to
stray. His ensemble is tight.
The Paramount release was
produced by Marcia Nasatir and
Carabatsos with David Korda
and Jerry Offsay as executive
producers. Rated R for violence
and graphic reality.
�Delores Barclay, AP
Princess Bride'
Today's film world is so ob-
sessed with the contemporary
that you almost forget that once
upon a time the movies could
transport audinccs to a time that
wars long ago and far away. Rob
Reiner, of all people, has managed
to restore that magical brand of
Cogs of Wfj storytelling.
" Reiner's first three films dealt
with modern times. His fourth
ffort as a director, "The Princess
Iride.
award-winning "Fences is out-
standing as the angry medic Doc.
He fights not for his country, but
tor the men in his squad.
' is a picaresque epic with a
gently satiric vision. It may well
be the most pleasurable movie
you'll see all year.
William Goldman wrote the
script from his novel, a fairy tale
for adults.
The ilm is studed with deli-
cious performances. Gary Elwes
and Robin Wright as the flaxen-
haird lovers; Chris Sarandon,i
reminiscent of a diabolical James
Mason; Billy Crystal and Carol
Kane as a pair of bickering sorcer-
ors; Peter Cook as a blithering
clergyman.
Ruiner'sdirection maintains the
proper mood throughout: The
action is hilarious vet credible, the
characters outrageous but never
arch.
The 20th Century Fox release
was produced by Andrew Schein-
man. The rating is PG, perhaps
because of the exciting action
Running time: 99 minutes.
-JTaA
2C1C
3�C
NEW YORK (AP) - Geoffrey
Owens remembers his first time
on the set of NBC's hit 'ThcCosby
Show when memories of a prior
meeting with Sabrina Le Beauf
helped relieve a bad case of
nerves.
As an undergraduate at Yale,
Owens had approached Le Beauf
to congratulate her on a Drama
School performance. Now she
was playing Sondra, eldest Hux-
table daughter, and he was play-
ing Flvin, her soft-spoken but
macho-thinking beau.
He said he told her he thought
they had met before, back at col-
lege.
Oh, really"
Didn't she remember"
Well, no.
He went back to studying his
script.
"When I was on the set for first
time, whatever connection with
anyone was nice to have said
Owens. "1 was so scared
But the young, stage-trained
actewieednU have-beerh The pro-
ducers of "The -Gosby -Skew-
liked Owens' characterization of
Elvin so much that he has become
a member of the family. This sea-
son, Elvin and Sondra are mar-
ried. And now, Owens said, he
and Le Beauf are pals, eagerly
discussing their mutual love of
the theater between takes.
Owens, 26, as quietly articulate
as his TV character, though con-
siderably more with-it, recounted
in an interview the brief career
thai preceded his role in the No. 1
network television show.
After graduating from Yale,
where he majored in English lit-
erature, he traveled lor a year, to
France, Italy and Greece, then
came home to start looking for
acting jobs, but was "afraid to
start, really. I was procrastinating
seriously for another eight
months
He finally started auditioning
and landed small stage parts.
When his agent sent him to audi-
tion for a one-time guest shot on
"Cosby he had no film or televi-
sion credits.
"It happened really fast
Owens said. "I was very excited. T
wa. w exc�Ui�-l was numb. 1 still,
am in a way. I still don't believe
that I'm part of it. It's nothing I
ever expected, really. I mean, I
(IB's fourth album
stays rock solid
Continued from page 9
here and in "Never Say When
"Sound Of Music" is a solid
piece of work. It's the fourth
album from the dB's, proving
staying power doesn't need to be
measured in sales figures, al-
though their audience is expand-
ing since their move to a major
distributor.
Special thanks for help on this
review go to WZMB and Danger-
ous Dave. Cuts from this Lp and
other great rock bands can be
heard on "Adventures in Modern
Recording" on Monday nights at
8 p.m. on WZMB, 91.3 FM. So if
this great review didn't inspire
you to go out and buy "The Sound
Of Music listen to "Adven-
tures
I
p5u
DONNA
LAGE
Bring in this ad for a 15
discount on a purchase of
$10 or more!
With Valid ECU ID.
Good Selection of Reptiles
New Shipment of Salt Water Fish Has
Arrived!
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of Dog, Cat, and fish Supplies
Cart mmd Visa arc
111 EVANS ST.
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Expiration Date:
Sept. 30, 1987
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Looking for on exciting and challenging
career? Where each day is different? Many Air
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Find out if you qualify. Contact your Air Force
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'
expected to get well-established
in the theater first and primarily,
and that's my great hope still. 1
mean, that's where my heart lies -
the stage.
"But, this came out of the blue,
and I doubt if I've yet adjusted to
it, or accepted it fully
Owens comes from an upper-
middle-class Brooklyn family not
terribly unlike the Huxtables. He
has two brothers � one older, one
younger � and professional par-
ents, now divorced. His mother
teaches college music and litera-
ture. His father is U.S. Rep. Major
Owens, D-N.Y.
"I think the Huxtable family is
closer to a kind of idealized nu-
clear American family than I grew
up in Owens said. "Mine had a
lot of particular problems and
tensions, and happinesses, too.
The "Cosby" show is based on a
certian kind of typicality in a way,
and it has to be
- INSTANT REPLAY
� On� Hour Color Prints
� One Hour Enlargements
� Overnight Black and White and Slides
� Overnight Portraits
� Cameras and Accessories
� Black and White Paper and Chemistry
Instant Replay
The Plaza
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with ECU I.D.
(Excluding Cameras and OuHab Work)
Ml si PR! MM COl PONS
FREE
i
i
! ENLARGEMENT!
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At time of processing)
One Coupon Per Visit- I
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oupon pires 10-8-87
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j )� e OupOD Per Visit-
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BASKETBALL
BLOWOU
to support the
September 23, 24, 25
in front of Student Stores
For 50J you get 3 tries at the free throw line. Hit 2 out of 3 shots and you are eligible to win prizes.
On Wed. and Thurs. gift certificates from area businesses will be awarded and on Fri. $100 will be
awarded to one lucky winner. Please come out and help IFC and Panhellenic support the Ronald
McDonald House!
$100
GRAND PRIZE
Sponsored by:
Panhellenic & IFC
�'� � ���� � t i�i m m �iUn�aon





SEPTEMBER 22,1987
Gordon Lightfoot is looking for a hit record
� Lightfoot th.nks a lot of
People are under the impression
'hat his music isn't lasting.
But the concert tour says it all.
Uodreco relikebonuses.lt's
P'at Whcn y�u have them both
happening at the same time sa!d
L'fihtfoot, taking another drag
�rom his cigarette hours before a
soid-out concert at the Westbury
Music Fair. y
Having a hit record has eluded
the prolific Canadian artist for
almost a decade, despite several
singles. In late August, he re-
leased another single, "Morning
lory form his latest album,
cast of Midnight
Like many of his other songs,
such as "If You Could Read My
Mind" and "Sundown "Morn-
ing Glory" is about love won and
lost.
While he has developed and
matured, there's a basic style to
Lightfoot: mellow and soft, lack-
in8 aggressive rock rhythms.
Despite forays into electronics
experimemts on his previous
album, "Salute Lightfoot's mu-
sic and lyrical poetry relies on the
folk background he never has
truly abandoned, and which he
hopes will give him a new hit.
"You've got to keep on trying,
refining, not losing faith he said.
The music business has always
been whimsical, he said, noting
how his song, "The Wreck of the
Edmund Fitzgerald about the
sinking of an American freighter
in Lake Superior in 1975, gave him
a 1976 hit single and hit album.
Conductor realizes his dream
NEW YORK (AP) - As a child
growing up in Romania, Sergiu
Comissiona dreamed of one day
conducting orchestras. Today, a't
59, he's the new music director of
the New York City Opera.
"I'll be inviting American con-
ductors to the company, espe-
cially American conductors. I'm
an American conductor, despite
my accent he said. The repertory
for the current July 7 through
Nov. 15 season was already set
when Comissiona took over
Comissiona was principal con-
ductor of the Romanian State
Opera during his last year in his
native country. The Comissionas
became American citizens at Fort
McHenry in Baltimore Harbor on
July 4,1976. He has resisted sug-
gestions to Americanize his
name.
"The origin of it is simple he
said. "My great-grandfather was
commissioner of salt and
matches, productsof the state, in a
distant village. My father said he
changed his name to Comissiona.
There are branches of the family
in Paris who spell it differently. 1
met them once at a party; intro-
ductions were like a Jacques Tati
comedy
Comissiona first conducted the
New York City Opera in 1978.
When Christopher Keene de-
cided to resign as musical direc-
tor, Beverly Sills, the company's
general director, called Comis-
siona and asked if he'd be inter-
ested in the post. He was.
He was music director of the
Haifa, Israel, Symphony from
1960-66; of the Goteborg, Sweden,
Symphony from 1966-77; of the
Baltimore Symphony from 1969-
84; and of the Houston Symphony
from 1983. He has been chief con-
ductor of the Radio Philharmonic
in Hilversum Holland, since 1982.
PARA D I S E
Step nto Partcst
Sfp Our m Sir-
h M
' 329 Arlington
r Blvd.
MaddU7561579
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! Good Through 10-15-87
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orth China m
CHINESE RESTAURANT
'BEST FOOD IN TOWN!
MonFri. Luncheon Special
(11:30-3:00 p.m.)
$3.25
Sat. & Sun. ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
Luncheon Buffet
(12-3:00 p.m.)
$4.95
Buffet Includes: 5 or 6 entrees. 2 appetizers,
soup, homemade desserts and fresh iced tea.
99for ALL KINDS OF BEER (Sun. wed
Hours: MonThura.
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
11:30-10:00 p.m.
11:30-11:00 p.m.
12-11:00 p.m.
12-10:00 p.m.
520 W. Greenville Blvd Greenville, N.C. 27834
359-5360 (Carry Out Service)
?2S ABC Permit
OO; Banquet Facilities Available
He considers it his favorite
song, although he can't explain
why a current events song be-
came so popular.
About that time Lightfoot be-
gan to realize something was
going wrong in his life, because of
his drinking.
"I was always pretty much in
control. But there came a time
when it was evident I drank too
much. It started to show and that
bothered me. I said, That's got to
go
He gave up drinking, joined a
health club and worked off excess
weight, becoming almost as lean
as when his first album was re-
leased 22 years ago.
Since he broke into popular
music, Lightfoot has written over
300 songs, has recorded 18
albums, has three platinum and
five gold albums, a gold single,
been nominated for four Gram-
mys, 16 Juno Awards�Canada's
equivalent of the Grammys,
numerous ASCAP awards and
was recently inducted into the
Juno Hall of Fame.
Peter, Paul and Mary brought
him initial recognition with their
recordings of "Lovin' Me" and
"Early Mornin' Rain Artists as
diverse as Bob Dylan, Marty Rob-
bins, Harry Belafonte, Barbra Stei-
sand, Elvis Presley and Andy
Williams have recorded his
songs.
WE BUILT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
SAV-ACENTER
FOOD MARKETS
The freshest w.jy to S.ivt
A native of Orilha. m northern
Ontario, u former choirboy was
one of the earliest Canadian art-
ists to break into the American
market
He'd like to rerecord many of
his earlier songs for record and
compact disc packages. Hoeever
doing another album doesn't
appeal to him because of the time
it takes. He's comfortable touring
and giving audiences the songs
they clearly like.
The wisest investment you'll ever make
for your family begins with only.
RiNiUGNALLS
NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA
Latest Edition
FREE
2-Volume Matching
DICTIONARY
With Volume 2 & 3 Of The Encyclopedia
Volume 1
only9c
with S5 purchase
Volumes 2-29
only $4.99 ea.
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WITH PURCHASE OF ONE AT
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Land-O-Frost Chipped Meats
ONE HB P . TH RNAI � I - � � Kl
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Turkey Breakfast Strips
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SELECT MEDIUM
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WATERFIELD i ABE;
Boston Lettuce
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99c Egg Plant
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69c Cucumbers
THE EAST AR()1 INI
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Green Peppers 3 99c Florida Limes
PRICES EFFECTIVE SEPT ZQTHRU SEPT 26 1987 QUANTITY HIGHTS RESERVED
Prices Good In Greenville. N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open 24 Hours -Open Mon. 7 a.m Closed Sat. 11 p.m Open Sun. 7 a.m11 p
By TIM CHANDLER
Spom tdnor
CHAMPAIGN 111 - Once
again, blame it on the turnover
For the second straight wei k
the East Carolina football team
was victimized bv errors as it fell
to Illinois, 20-10, Saturd.
The Pirates had three turnovers
in the contest, two of which led to
10 Illinois points Throw in a
botched field goal attempt bv the
Pirates and the picture is (
ECU should have won the con-
test.
The misfortunes of the offen-
sive unit started on the Pirates
first drive. On a second down play
quarterback Travis Hunter
dished a shuffle pass to V.
Lewis, who fumbled the bu
ing the Illini possesion at the IV
rate 33-yard line
Five plays later, ruttninj
KenThomasbulledover t- i
yard out giving Illinois the k i
the!
The ?
rd an!
Quarter
Da:
con
thi
get! i
cat
by I
even th
thr
Hui
spari )

The
ECU loss at I
hard for Art
ByTlMCHANPLl R
Sports I dnor
CHAMPAIGN, 111. - Lea
Illinois Saturdav with a d
was hard for Art Baker espe
since deep in his heart he k
that his Pirates should haw-
Dusk was settling in around
beautiful Champaign, 111. a-
ECU head coach headed down
through the stadium to board the
team bus to head to the airport
Disappointment and frustration
were etched over his i,KC as he
began to explain the kev tr
that went wrong in the 20-1 ss
to Illinois earlier in the dav.
"They hit the big pass plays and
we didn't Baker assessed
'Three times we had the coverage
beaten long and we didn t take
Ukaiyage -
- fflinois. on the other nand. set
up a pair of touchdowns with kev
receptions in the content
"We have got to improve our
passing game continued Baker.
"Our passing game is not as bad
as it seemed todav We can
throw. We have just got to
executing it (the passing gan
Before the game even began
knt
tx M r 1
hea.
once
State
theba
�� r -
trout
He
rumble
how
when he is i
Hunt.
�-
Cliatt aim ou n
Ed Cliatt, recentlv hired asasso-
ciate athletic director at East Caro-
lina University, has announced
his resignation effective immedi-
ately, ECU athletic director ken
Karr announced Thursdav.
Cliatt, who joined the Pirate
athletic program to head internal
operations, cited personal rea-
; sons and his desire to retu rn to the
'Colorado Springs. Colo area as
the basis for his resie n a I n
t S
rank

and
dire.
years
Oia
tion m as a
:
fal
m.
TJ. Aspden is shown in earlier soccer action agan
Aspden is a midfieldback on the Pirate squad, w hi
for the season after dropping a pair of matches o J
(Pfcaj
'
t





JI IE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 22,1987
Gordon Lightfoot is looking for a hit record
do LY'N-Y -AP)-Cor
nSLi g �ot thinks a klt of
We are under the impression
th.s music isn't lasting.
But the concert tour says it all.
Uxrecordsarelikebonuses.It's
grew when you have them both
Ppening at the same time said
L'ghtfoot, taking another drag
'rom his cigarette hours before a
soid-out concert at the Wcstbury
Music Fair.
Having a hit record has eluded
we prolific Canadian artist for
almost a decade, despite several
fugles. In late August, he re-
teased another single, "Morning
lory forrn his ,atcsf album
East of Midnight
Like many of his other songs,
Mich as "If You Could Read My
Mind" and "Sundown "Morn-
ing Glory" is about love won and
lost.
While he has developed and
matured, there's a basic style to
Lightfoot: mellow and soft, lack-
ing aggressive rock rhythms.
Despite forays into electronics
experimemts on his previous
album, "Salute Lightfoot's mu-
sic and lyrical poetry relies on the
folk background he never has
truly abandoned, and which he
hopes will give him a new hit.
"You've got to keep on trying,
refining, not losing faith he said.
The music business has always
been whimsical, he said, noting
how his song, "The Wreck of the
Edmund Fitzgerald about the
sinking of an American freighter
inLakeSuperiorinl975,gavehim
a 1976 hit single and hit album.
Conductor realizes his dream
NEW YORK (AP) - As a child
growing up in Romania, Scrgiu
Comissiona dreamed oi one day
conducting orchestras. Today, at
59, he's the new music director ot
the New York City Opera.
"I'll be inviting American con-
ductors to the company, espe-
cially American conductors. I'm
an American conductor, despite
my accent he said. The repertory
for the current July 7 through
Nov. 15 season was already set
when Comissiona took over.
Comissiona was principal con-
ductor of the Romanian State
Opera during his last year in his
native country. The Comissionas
became American citizens at Fort
McHenry in Baltimore Harbor on
July 4, 1976. He has resisted sug-
gestions to Americanize his
name.
"The origin of it is simple he
said. "My great-grandfather was
commissioner of salt and
matches, productsof the state, in a
distant village. My father said he
changed his name to Comissiona.
There are branches of the family
in Paris who spell it differently. I
met them once at a party; intro-
ductions were like a Jacques Tati
comedy
Comissiona first conducted the
New York City Opera in 1978.
When Christopher Kcene de-
cided to resign as musical direc-
tor, Beverly Sills, the company's
general director, called Comis-
siona and asked if he'd be inter-
ested in the post. He was.
He was music director of the
Haifa, Israel, Symphony from
1960-66; of the Goteborg, Sweden,
Symphony from 1966-77; of the
Baltimore Symphony from 1969-
84; and of the Houston Symphony
from 1983. He has been chief con-
ductor of the Radio Philharmonic
in Hilversum Holland, since 1982.
PARA D I S E
l)j)eMf
Step .flfo oi'ic s�
Sfp Out .ft StyH
329 Arlington
Blvd.
7561579
ALL HAIR SERVICES
MAKEUP-MANICURES
TANNING BEDS
! 20 Discount Off Any Service, j
i Good Through 10-15-87 !
PETEY HATHAWAY, Owner
4
JMorth China M
CHINESE RESTAURANT
VBEST FOOD IN TOWN!
MonFri. Luncheon Special
(11:30-3:00 p.m.)
$3.25
Sat. & Sun. ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
Luncheon Buffet
(12-3:00 p.m.)
$4.95
Buffet Includes: 5 or 6 entrees, 2 appetizers,
soup, homemade desserts and fresh iced tea.
99for ALL KINDS OF BEER (Sun wed
Hours: Mon. Thurs.
Fri.
Sat
Sun.
11:30-10:00 p.m.
11:30-11:00 p.m.
12-11:00 p.m.
12-10:00 p.m.
520 W. Greenville Blvd Greenville. N.C. 27834
355-5360 (Carry Out Service)
-Ql0 -
ABC Permit
Banquet Facilities Available
He considers it his favorite
song, although he can't explain
why a current events song be-
came so popular.
About that time Lightfoot be-
gan to realize something was
going wrong in his life, because of
his drinking.
"I was always pretty much in
control. But there came a time
when it was evident I drank too
much. It started to show and that
bothered me. I said, That's got to
go
He gave up drinking, joined a
health club and worked off excess
weight, becoming almost as lean
as when his first album was re-
leased 22 years ago.
Since he broke into popular
music, Lightfoot has written over
300 songs, has recorded 18
albums, has three platinum and
five gold albums, a gold single,
been nominated for four Gram-
mys, 16 Juno Awards�Canada's
equivalent of the Grammys,
numerous ASCAP awards and
was recently inducted into the
Juno Hall of Fame.
Peter, Paul and Mary brought
him initial recognition with their
recordings of "Lovin' Me" and
"Early Mornin' Rain Artists as
diverse as Bob Dylan, Marty Rob-
bins, Harry Belafonte, Barbra Stei-
sand, Elvis Presley and Andy
Williams have recorded his
songs.
WE BUILT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
SAV A CENTER
FOOD MARKETS
The freshest w,?y to Siv
A native of Onllia, in northern
Ontario, the former choir boy was
one of the earliest Canadian art-
ists to break into the Amencan
market.
He'd like to rerecord many of
his earlier songs for record and
compact disc packages. Hocever,
doing another album doesn't
appeal to him because of the time
it takes. He's comfortable touring
and giving audiences the songs
they clearly like.
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THE EAST( AROl In
Turnover
By TIM CHANDLER
Spom Iditor
CHAMPAIGN 111 - Once
again, blame it on the turnover
For the second straight week
the East Carolina football team
was victimized bv errors as it fell
to Illinois, 20-10, Saturday
The Pirates had three turnovers
in the contest, two of which led to
10 Illinois points. Throw in a
botched field goal attempt bv the
Pirates and the picture is clear,
ECU should have won the con-
test.
The misfortunes of the offen-
sive unit started on the Pirates
first drive. On a second down pla
3uarterback Travis Hunter
ished a shuffle pass t Willie
Lewis, who fumbled the
ing the Ilhni possesion at the Pi
rate 33-yard line.
Five plays later, running b �
Ken Thomas bulled over ft
yard out giving Illinois the le
the 11 Si
Thel
a third an
Quarterbal
Darrvl Ls
con
-
�d of
even the

Hunter
k ontl
31 b.
ECU loss at I
hard for Art
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports id A ot
CHAMPAIGN, 111. - Leaving
Illinois Saturdav with a d
was hard for Art Baker, espe
since deep in his heart he knev
that his Pirates should have won
Dusk was settling in around
beautiful Champaign, 111. as the
ECU head coach headed d
through the stadium to board the
team bus to head to the airport
Disappointment and frustration
were etched over his face as he
began to explain the kev things
that went wrong in the 20-1
to Illinois earlier in the day.
"They hit the big pass plays and
we didn't Baker assessed
'Three times've had the coverage
beaten long and we didn't take
Hka,VaS9 �� .
f HIinrns, onthe other hand, set
up a pair of touchdowns with kev
receptions in the contest.
"We have got to improve our
passing game continued Baker.
"Our passing game is not as bad
as it seemed today We can
throw. We have just got to start
executing it (the passing game)
Before the game even began
Pi n
hea
once 1
State t
the ha
r -

Hui
trouble ag
ball. He
Wetrv
how to p
when he is
Hun
with on! i
I

Cliatt an noun
Ed Cliatt, recently hired as asso-
ciate athletic director at East;
lina University, has announced
his resignation effective immedi-
ately, ECU athletic director Ken
Karr announced Thursday.
Cliatt, who joined the Pirate
athletic program to head internal
operations, cited personal rea-
; sons and his desire to return to the
Colorado Springs, Colo area as
the basis for his resignation.
rank
more than.
and had bed
director the;
years.
Clial
baed
,� �
i
4ft
i
4
TJ. Aspden is shown in earlier soccer action again
Aspden is a midfieldback on the Pirate squad, whi
for the season after dropping a pair of matches o pi
tPhotl

A
i





it record
nent you'll ever make
�� th only . . .
AGNALLS
:lopedia
st Edition

jme 1
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IHh EAST c AROI 1NIAN
Sports

22, 198
Turnovers hurt Pirates in loss to lllini Saturday
By TIM CHANDL1 R
Spetti r ditm
v HAMPAIGN, 111 Once
igain blame it on the turnover
For the second straight week
i East i arolina football team
was victimized by errors as it fell
linois, 20 10, Saturday
he Pirates had three turno ers
the contest, two of which led to
1 Illinois points. Throw in a
k tched field goal attempt by the
rates and the picture is clear,
sl ould have won the con-
he misfortunes ot the often
unit started on the Pirates
rst drive On a second down pla
uarterback Travis Hunter
ed a shuttle pass to V-
s who tumbled the ball gi
the lllini possesion at the Pi
; ard line.
c plays later running back
Ken Thomas bulled over fromone
: out giving Illinois the lead, at
the 11 50 mark ol the first quarter.
rhekey playol the drive came on
a third .md W from the Pirate 42.
Quarterback Scott Mohr found
Darryl Usher for a 41 yard pass
completion at the ECU one.
Not to tx- outdone. ECU took
the ensuing kickofl and put to-
gether dn il play, 7w sard drive
capped off by a one yard plunge
by fullback Anthony Simpson to
even the score at 7-7 midway
through the first quarter.
Hunter proved to be the Pirate
spark on thedriveashe accounted
tor 55 of the 79 yards, 24 by air and
31 by toot. Hunter's passes were
of l3yards(to 1'onvSmith)and 11
yards (to Ron ones).
On the next possession by the
lllini, cornerback Ed Brogden
thrwarted a scoring opportunity
hv pit king ofl a Mohr pass at the
Pirate 22 yard line
The teams then traded blows
until Illinois mounted a six pa.
til vard drive in the second quar-
ter to grab a 14-7 lead. Once again
tor Illinois, a big pass gainer set up
the score. Mohr fired complete to
fullback left' Markland for a 38-
vard completion to the ECU eight.
Lynn McClellan then took care
of the points on the drive as he
pounded in from one yard out.
1 ate in the half, the Pirates had
a chance to tighten the gap follow-
ing a Bubba Waters interception,
which placed the ball at the lllini
24 yard line. The drive stalled at
the nine-yard line setting Pirate
placekicker Chuck Berleth up tor
a 26-yard held goal The snap,
however was mishandled bv
smith, the holder, sending the Pi-
rates away empty handed.
At the onset oi the second half,
the lllini seemed poised to run out
to .i sizeable lead as thev moved
from their own 20-yard line to the
Pirates' five before Thomas
fumbled. Vinson Smith recovered
the loose ball for the Pirates.
Behind balanced running from
Simpson, Lewis, Hunter and Reg
gie McKinney the Pirates
marched to the Illinois 23-yard
line setting Berleth up for a 40-
yard field goal, which closed the
gap to 14-10 with )ust over tour
minutes remaining in the third
quarter.
Illinois charged once again on
the Pirate defense, but it was
forced tosettlc tor a Doug 1 liggins
21-yard field goal when its drive
stalled at the Pirate three-yard
line. 1 he 77-yard lllini drive was
sparked by a 42-yard pass com-
pletion from Mohr to I sher.and
29 yards of rushing from Met lei
Ian, whofmishedthed.lv with 126
yards on the ground
Hie next possession bv the Pi-
rates put the final pieces m the
puzzle. Hunter, while scram-
bling, coughed up the bail giving
thelllini possessionat theECU 42
The lllini then tacked on a 34-
yard field goal by 1 liggins to push
the s�ore to 20-10, with 10:16
remaining dimming the hopes ot
victory tor the Pirates
Hunter was then puked off bv
the lllini'shns Green on a pass
intended for Walter Wilson on the
next Pirate possession, thus put-
ting the final nail in the ECU cof-
fin.
Hr
ECU loss at Illinois Saturday
hard for Art Baker to take
v'


By TIM CHAND1 I R
: MPAK 111 1 e.
B. ker even though ail ng i ith a
case ol the flu, was opl i
about his team s chances
I thought comine m we had a
rates
espo
iC in ar.u
� i ;fi the stadium to b
team bus to head to thi air
ipp intment and frustral
were etched over his face as
began to explain the -
big pass pla s ir :
wt d idn : B iker assess d
"Three times w I ad tl ovei
beaten long and we didn t take
(ikLvlfh;c " .
nhnois on the other hand svt
: � ' f ti tuchdow ns .
� the contest.
�'� � �� � t tii improve i
pass ontinued Bak i
ir ng g ime is not as 1
is it seei I todav . We cai
me e en -
Baker and Illinois head coach
Mike White praised his abiltv to
lead the Pirate offense Saturday.
"1 think that the offense per-
hance to w in Baker said formed a lot better than it did the
n the lockerroom following the week before (against Florida
State), Baker said. "We're getting
there (where we want to be) it's
just a matter ot executing prop-
erly We had seven (ir eight plays
that 1 felt would have won the
ime tor us, but on each one
� meone either missed an assign-
t or made a bad play
ie It s realh trustratin
knew u e w ould ha e to ex
I tter than we d;A '
V ther factor thai ue
ivilvin the Pirate- dt I il
the ball on tl
.s-
I
4
out ot tin two mi tak� s
Hunter, as las! wi el
trouble again h Iding on I
bail He attributed with
fumble
"To East Carolina's credit, they
are a real well-coached team
said White. "And there quarter-
back was one oi the best we have
id faced
I or Baker returning home with-
te outa win wasn't even made easier
bj words oi encouragement from
"We try to emphasize to Travis people who were pleased with the
how to properly hold the ball Pirates' performance, for the
when he is running Bakersaidol coach wanted only one thing Sat-
Huntcr s torun withtheball urday afternoon to win.
withoi I indonit "Travis "1 don't think it ever helps to
isalwaj gfoi lose Baker said. "But when you
c'xtra yai Is Hi has just go! to come in to the Big Ten and play
irn l � �� respectable, it is a consolation to
s, me people. But it is no consola-
1 o 1 lunter scredit though, both tion to me, 1 assure vou
Clicitt announces resignation
itt,recently hired asasso- liatl n c ntl rctii I from the situations falling into place. This
ciateathleticdirectoratEastCaro- U.S. Air Force Academy with the has not been the case, and I now
� a L niversity, has announced rank ol full colonel. Ik served tor feel obligated to return to Colo-
is resignation effective immedi- more than 20years at the academy rado Springs he said.
J athletic director Ken and had been associate athletic "Dr. Karr presented me with an
arr announced Thursday.
. itt, who joined the Pirate years
tic program to head internal
director there for the'past tour
opportunity to be involved with
an up-and-coming Division 1 ath-
letic program and it is with a great The Pirate defense co. to, the cl
nai rea- c att nirtner incluatecl that his deal ot regret that I terminate this
is and his desire to return to the decision to accept the ECU posi- association on such short notice
lorado Springs, Colo area as tion was a "hastily-made decision Cliatt said in a prepared st
asis tor his resiena
based on family and personal ment.
ate-
swarms around lllini fullback Jeff Markland at the line of scrimmage. The Pirate passing game, on the
other hand, left something to be desired. In the bottom photo, quarterback 1 ra is Hunter attempts to pass
over the lllini defense. (Photo b) HaroW � . (l Sp()rLs ,nformaUon ,
Soccer team drops pair over weekend
nville Blvd.
,i mll p m.
T.J. Aspden is shown in earlier soccer action against James Madison.
Aspden is a midfieldback on the Pirate squad, which dipped to 0-6
for the season after dropping a pair of matches over the weekend.
(Photo bv Mar Startari)
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sport Writer
ECU soccer coach Charley Har-
vey just can't understand it. The
Pirates offensively and statisti-
cally have improved on each out-
ing, but have yet to win a match.
The first year head coach saw his
frustrations double as ECU was
shut out twice last weekend in the
North Carolina Weslevan soccer
tournament.
ECU did not score a goal in ei-
ther match as they bowed to
Emory 4-0 Saturday and Salis-
bury State 1-0 Sunday.
Scott Calhoun led Emory Satur-
day with two goals; the first on a
penalty kick late in the first period
and the other coming at the 15
minute mark in the second.
Matt Arnett scored first for
Emory on an assist from Lane
Bruins 20 minutes into the match.
Bruins struck again opening the
second half scoring for Emory
with a goal at the 10 minute mark.
The numbers were even for
both teams with Emory taking 17
shots and ECU 15, but accuracy
was in the favor of the Eagles.
Keeper Mac Kendall had just
three saves and Emory keeper
Phil Scarboro two.
ECU took 20 shots at goal
against Salisbury State but came
away empty handed as they lost
in the second round of the tourna- controlling the ball for up to five Kendall had tour saves an
ment.
Peter N'ato scored for Salisbury
State with five minutes left in the
first period on a pass form Chris
Yancone.
ECU dominated the offense
minutes at a time but poor shoot- Salisbury goalie two.
ing was again the culprit for the
Pirates. East Carolina falls t( �� �
The Pirate defense was all over and will travel to Virt rua
Salisbury allowing them to take to meet Virginia IVesU
only six shots. Pirate keeper Mac Wednesday in a non-conl
Tennis and X-country results
ECU'S cross countrv teams ran
this past Saturday at the Seahawk
Run in Wilmington. C State
won both the men's and women's
competition while ECU's men fin-
ished fifth and the women fin-
ished fourth.
Leading ECU's men was Matt
Schweitzer with a 12th place fin-
ish in 28:20. Other Pirate finishers
were: Mike McGehee 27th in
30:10; Rusty Meador 31st in 30:33;
Rob Rice 33rd in 30:47; Miles
Layton 36th in 31.00; Rusty Wil-
liams 38th in 31:20; Freddie Fuller
44th in 33:22; and Henry Patrick
50th in 36:51.
Kim Griffiths turned in the top
performance for the Lady Pirates
finishing 13th with a time of 19:52.
Stephanie Ingram was 16th in
20:06, followed by Bibi Rosas 19th
in 20:28; Dawn Tillson 21st in
20:45; Kim Abernethv 30th in
22:49; Kathy Ellis 39th in 25:36;
East Carolina had a busy week-
end in men's and women's tennis.
The men's team won three
matches, defeating Christopher
Newport Friday, g-0, George
Mason Saturday, 9-0, and How-
ard Sunday, 7-1 in a rain-short-
ened match. All were on the road,
and it marked the first ECU win
ever against George Mason.
The women's team didn't tare
as well, but managed to win oneof
three weekend matches 1 he win
came Sunday against Pfeif I - - �
Friday, ECU dropp I a mat
Elon 8-1, and then lost I
Greensboro Saturday 5 i
were awa from Greem
I he men's team is r a
while the women are?
and Sheri Swick 42nd in 2
The Pirates, who are
weekend, will return to
Oct. 3 when thev travel to
chburg, Va. tor the Lyncl
College Invitational.
Pure Gold Dancers
announce trvouts
All students who wish to tryoul
for the 1987-1988 PureGold Danc-
ers must attend an organizational
meeting in room 143 of Minges
Coliseum, Thursday, Sept. 24 al 7
p.m.
Actual trvouts for the
troupe, who perform at' J
home basketball games. ,
some Pirate Club fonct,
beheWSepta ranct,�ns





it record
A native of Orillia, in northern
the former choir boy was
ie earliest Canadian art-
ists to break into the American
k to rerecord many of
- . - tor record and
t dist packages Hoeever,
album doesn't
: because of the time
�mfortable touring
�� liences the songs
. like.
investment you'll ever make
imiiy begins with only. . .
INK & WAGNALLS
EW ENCYCLOPEDIA
Latest Edition
Volume 1
only 9�
with S5 purchase
Volumes 2-29
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tOne
Potato Chips
Dry Roasted Peanuts
Flav-O-Rich Buttermilk
Flav-O-Rich Sour Cream
Flav-O-Rich Onion Dip
Topol Toothpolish
Quarters 99
Fryer
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119
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ulwich
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911
I
I
I
I
I
R - E D
THE EASTCAROl INIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 22, 1987 Page 13
Turnovers hurt Pirates in loss to Illini Saturday
Rv T V4 PH AXTrT CD �
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
CHAMPAIGN, 111. - Once
again, blame it on the turnover.
For the second straight week
the East Carolina football team
was victimized by errors as it fell
to Illinois, 20-10, Saturday.
The Pirates had three turnovers
in the contest, two of which led to
10 Illinois points. Throw in a
botched field goal attempt by the
Pirates and the picture is clear,
ECU should have won the con-
test.
The misfortunes of the offen-
sive unit started on the Pirates
first drive. On a second down pla v
quarterback Travis Hunter
dished a shuffle pass to Willie
Lewis, who fumbled the ball giv-
ing the Illini possesion at the Pi-
rate 33-yard line.
Five plays later, running back
Ken Thomas bulled over from one
yard out giving Illinois the lead at
the 11:50 mark of the first quarter
The key play of the drive came on
a third and 19 from the Pirate 42.
Quarterback Scott Mohr found
Darryl Usher for a 41-yard pass
completion at the ECU one.
Not to be outdone, ECU took
the ensuing kickoff and put to-
gether an 11 play, 79 yard drive
capped off by a one yard plunge
by fullback Anthony Simpson to
even the score at 7-7 midway
through the first quarter.
Hunter proved to be the Pirate
spark on thedrivcasheaccounted
for 55 of the 79 yards, 24 by air and
31 by foot. Hunter's passes were
of 13 yards (to Tony Smith) and 11
yards (to Ron Jones).
On the next possession by the
Illini, cornerback Ed Brogden
thrwarted a scoring opportunity
bv picking off a Mohr pass at the
Pirate 22-yard line.
The teams then traded blows
until Illinois mounted a six plav,
61 yard drive in the second quar-
ter to grab a 14-7 lead. Once again
for Illinois, a big pass gainer set up
the score. Mohr fired complete to
fullback Jeff Markland for a 38-
yard completion to the ECU eight.
Lynn McClellan then took care
of the points on the drive as he
pounded in from one yard out.
Late in the half, the Pirates had
a chance to tighten the gap follow-
ing a Bubba Waters interception,
which placed the ball at the Illini
24-yard line. The drive stalled at
the nine-yard line setting Pirate
placekicker Chuck Berleth up for
a 26-yard field goal. The snap,
however was mishandled by
Smith, the holder, sending the Pi-
rates away empty handed.
At the onset of the second half,
the Illini seemed poised to run out
to a sizeable lead as they moved
from their own 20-yard line to vhe
Pirates' five before Thomas
fumbled. Vinson Smith recovered
the loose ball for the Pirates.
Behind balanced running from
Simpson, Lewis, Hunter and Reg-
gie McKinney the Pirates
marched to the Illinois 23-yard
line setting Berleth up for a 40-
yard field goal, which closed the
gap to 14-10 with just over four
minutes remaining in the third
quarter.
Illinois charged once again on
the Pirate defense, but it was
forced to settle for a Doug Higgins
21-yard field goal when its drive
stalled at the Pirate three-yard
line. The 77-yard Illini drive was
sparked by a 42-yard pass com-
pletion from Mohr to Usher and
29 yards of rushing from McClel-
lan, who finished the day with 126
yards on the ground.
The next possession by the Pi-
rates put the final pieces in the
puzzle. Hunter, while scram-
bling, coughed up the bail giving
the Illini possession at the ECU 42.
The Illini then tacked on a 34-
yard field goal by Higgins to push
the score to 20-10, with 10:16
remaining, dimming the hopes of
victory for the Pirates.
Hunter was then picked off by
the Illini's Chris Creen on a pass
intended for Walter Wilson on the
next Pirate possession, thus put-
ting the final nail in the ECU cof-
fin.
ECU loss at Illinois Saturday
hard for Art Baker to take
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport I ditor
CHAMPAIGN, 111. - leaving
Illinois Saturday with a defeat
was hard for Art Baker, especially
since deep in his heart he knew
that his Pirates should have won.
Dusk was settling in around
beautiful Champaign. 111. as the
ECU head coach headed down
through the stadium to board the
team bus to head to the airport.
Disappointment and frustration
were etched over his face as he
began to explain the kev things
that went wrong in the 20-10 loss
to Illinois earlier in the day.
"Thev hit the big pass plavs and
we didn't Baker assessed.
'Three times we had the coverage
beaten long and we didn't take
ryage' . m
ircois, on me other hand, set
up a pair oi touchdowns with key
receptions in the contest.
"We have got to improve our
passing game continued Baker.
"Our passing game is not as bad
as it seemed today We can
throw. We have just got to start
executing it (the passing game)
Before the game even began
tiE
Baker, even though ailing with a
case of the flu, was optimistic
about his team's chances.
"I thought coming in we had a
good chance to win Baker said
in the lockerroom following the
game. "It's really frustrating I
knew we would have to execute
better than we did
Another factor that weighed
heavily in the Pirates' defeat was,
once again, as against Florida
State last week, fumbles. ECU put
the ball on the ground three times,
losing two.
And to make matters even
worse, Illinois produced 10 points
out of the two mistakes.
Hunter, as last week, had
trouble again holding on to the
ball. He attributed with one
fumble.
nWe try to emphasize to Travis
how to properly hold the ball
when he is ru nning Baker said of
Hunter's habit to run with thcball
with only one hand on it. "Travis
is always battling and fighting for
extra yards. He has just got to
learn to carry the ball closer to his
body
To Hunter's credit though, both
Baker and Illinois head coach
Mike White praised his abilty to
lead the Pirate offense Saturday.
"1 think that the offense per-
formed a lot better than it did the
week before (against Florida
State) Baker said. "We're getting
there (where we want to be) it's
just a matter of executing prop-
erly. We had seven or eight plays
that I felt would have won the
game for us, but on each one
someone either missed an assign-
ment or made a bad play
To East Carolina's credit, they
are a real well-coached team
said White. "And there quarter-
back was one of the best we have
faced
For Baker returning home with-
out a win wasn't even made easier
by words of encouragement from
people who were pleased with the
Pirates' performance, for the
coach wanted only one thing Sat-
urday afternoon to win.
"I don't think it ever helps to
lose Baker said. "But when you
come in to the Big Ten and play
respectable, it is a consolation to
some people. But it is no consola-
tion to me, I assure you
Cliatt announces resignation
Ed Cliatt, recently hired as asso-
ciate athletic director at East Caro-
lina University, has announced
his resignation effective immedi-
ately, ECU athletic director Ken
Karr announced Thursday.
Cliatt, who joined the Pirate
athletic program to head internal
operations, cited personal rea-
sons and his desire to return to the
Colorado Springs, Colo area as
the basis for his resignation.
Cliatt recently retired from the
U.S. Air Force Academy with the
rank of full colonel. He served for
more than 20 years at the academy
and had been associate athletic
director there for the past four
years.
Cliatt further indicated that his
decision to accept the ECU posi-
tion was a "hastily-made decision
based on family and personal
�� mm.

situations falling into place. This
has not been the case, and I now
feel obligated to return to Colo-
rado Springs he said.
"Dr. Karr presented me with an
opportunity to be involved with
an up-and-coming Division I ath-
letic program and it is with a great
deal of regret that I terminate this
association on such short notice
Cliatt said in a prepared state-
ment.
The Pirate defense controlled the Illinois offense for the most part Saturday. In top photo, the defense
swarms around Illini fullback Jeff Markland at the line of scrimmage. The Pirate passing game, on the
other hand, left something to be desired. In the bottom photo, quarterback TraLs Hunter attempts to pass
over the Illini defense. (Photo by Har()ld Wm . ECl, Sports Informatinn,
Soccer team drops pair over weekend
jnville Blvd.
n Sun. 7 a.m11 p.m.
T.J. Aspden is shown in earlier soccer action against James Madison.
Aspden is a midfield'back on the Pirate squad, which dipped to 0-6
for the season after dropping a pair of matches over the weekend.
(Photo by Mar Startari)
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sports Writer
ECU soccer coach Charley Har-
vey just can't understand it. The
Pirates offensively and statisti-
cally have improved on each out-
ing, but have yet to win a match.
The first year head coach saw his
frustrations double as ECU was
shut out twice last weekend in the
North Carolina Wesleyan soccer
tournament.
ECU did not score a goal in ei-
ther match as they bowed to
Emory 4-0 Saturday and Salis-
bury State 1-0 Sunday.
Scott Calhoun led Emory Satur-
day with two goals; the first on a
penalty kick late in the first period
and the other coming at the 15
minute mark in the second.
Matt Arnett scored first for
Emory on an assist from Lane
Bruins 20 minutes into the match.
Bruins struck again opening the
second half scoring for Emory
with a goal at the 10 minute mark.
The numbers were even for
both teams with Emory taking 17
shots and ECU 15, but accuracy
was in the favor of the Eagles.
Keeper Mac Kendall had just
three saves and Emory keeper
Phil Scarboro two.
ECU took 20 shots at goal
against Salisbury State but came
away empty handed as they lost
in the second round of the tourna-
ment.
Peter Nato scored for Salisbury
State with five minutes left in the
first period on a pass form Chris
Yancone.
ECU dominated the offense
controlling the ball for up to five
minutes at a time but poor shoot-
ing was again the culprit for the
Pirates.
The Pirate defense was all over
Salisbury allowing them to take
only six shots. Pirate keeper Mac
Kendall had four saves and the
Salisbury goalie two.
East Carolina falls to 0-6 overall
and will travel to Virginia Beach
to meet Virginia Wesleyan
Wednesday in a non-conference
Tennis and X-country results
ECU's cross country teams ran
this past Saturday at the Seaha wk
Run in Wilmington. NC State
won both the men's and women's
competition while ECU's men fin-
ished fifth and the women fin-
ished fourth.
Leading ECU's men was Matt
Schweitzer with a 12th place fin-
ish in 28:20. Other Pirate finishers
were: Mike McGehee 27th in
30:10; Rusty Meador 31 st in 30:33;
Rob Rice 33rd in 30:47; Miles
Layton 36th in 31:00; Rusty Wil-
liams 38th in 31:20; Freddie Fuller
44th in 33:22; and Henry Patrick
50th in 36:51.
Kim Griffiths turned in the top
performance for the Lady Pirates
finishing 13th witha timeof 19:52.
Stephanie Ingram was 16th in
20:06, followed by Bibi Rosas 19th
in 20:28; Dawn Tillson 21st in
20:45; Kim Abernethy 30th in
22:49; Kathy Ellis 39th in 25:36;
East Carolina had a busy week-
end in men'sand women's tennis.
The men's team won three
matches, defeating Christopher
Newport Friday, 9-0, George
Mason Saturday, 9-0, and How-
ard Sunday, 7-1 in a rain-short-
ened match. All were on the road,
and it marked the first ECU win
ever against George Mason.
The women's team didn't fare
as well, but managed to win one of
three weekend matches. The win
came Sunday against Pfeiffer Jj
Friday, ECU dropped a match ,0
Elon, 8-1, and then lost to Lr
Greensboro Saturday 54
were away from Greenville
The men's team is now
while the women arp ?.?
and Sheri Swick 42nd in 2fi 3
The Pirates, who are open next
weekend, will return to acthn
Oct. 3 when they travehoT
chburg. V, fcAe
College Invitational. 6
Pure Gold Dancers
announce tryouts
All students who wish to tryout Actual trvm.i c
forthel987-1988PureColdDanc- troupe, w�2rfr� da
ers must attend an organizational home basketball�? at ed
meeting in room 143 of Minges 8 es'asHeiiis
Coliseum, Thursday, Sept. 24 at 7 m� Pirate Club 6,� u
p.m. be held Sept 29. nchons. win
mmmmm
��r�p-pow� jUIiiM � i� �m Wftomxx





14
. THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 22,1987
What
DALLAS (AP) - H was to have
been a moment of collegiate andi-
ron glory.
At 2 p.m. on Saturday in Texas
Stadium, Southern Methodist
Lniversity was to have opened its
1987 football season against the
No. 1 team in the nation, Okla-
homa.
Instead, the wily SMU athletic
contest was 200 miles away. The
women's soccer team was playing
at Texas A&M.
The NCAA's death penalty
killed SMU's football program
because of a booster slush fund
that reached the highest officeson
the school's campus.
It also exterminated a way of
Saturday life at the private school
on Mockingbird Avenue, for dec-
ades, it was the rallying point tor
fraternity and alumni gatherings
Imagine the plight of the sports
information director at SMU.
You're all dressed up with no
game to trumpet.
"It's been a gut-wrenching ex-
perience sa) s Larry White, who
was at Alabama before taking the
SMU job. "Hopefully this will last
only for two years. But there are
no guarantees. Who knows if we
will ever play again
New SMU President A. Ken-
neth Pye says football will return.
"Properly run big-time college
athletics serve a useful purpose
both in developing talent and
developing � sense of communi-
cation between university and
alumni and also encouraging the
presence ol a significant number
ot minority- students on campus,
the financing ot which would not
be possible without intercolle-
giate athletics he said. "The bot-
tom hue is 1 think SMU should
remain in Division 1 football and
in the Southwest Conference at
the present time
For now, White works on his
basketball brochure
"We have the cleanest files in
the country and plan to have the
earliest basketball media guide
out in history White says. "We
plan to beat everybody and have
it out by October first
But the change still hit White
hard.
I've been thinking back that
every year in my working life
(about 17 years) I've worked 17-
hour days this time oi year he
said.
"I here just seems to be some-
thing missing. 1 sure can wrap
things up in eight hours or less
1 Ic adds, "Right now we're
gearing up for our home opener -
in (men's) soccer. That's what
we've come to
White likes soccer but he real-
izes it doesn't pay the freight for
an athletic department.
"You have to have football and
basketball to do that he says.
White gets cxcassional calls
from the media. They don't want
to know that the men's soccer
team started 0-2 but recently yvon
a tournament by beating UCLA
and Nevada-Las Vegas.
"They yvant to know what life's
like without football he savs.
"We live for small jokes like the
NFL scouting service yvnting the
other day forourstats. TheNCAA
redbook wanted a directory of all
our coaches. It does get comical at
times
Then White takes a walk down
a darkened hall that normally
yvould be swarming with players
and coaches.
"Then I get very emotional he-
says. "Then it really hurts
BROADEN
YOUR
uQRIZQMs
vSW
HENDRIX THEATRE
WEDNESDAY 8 PM
Upcoming IRS events planned
The Department oi Intramural-
Recreational Services Physical
Fitness Program is providing in-
dividuals with an opportunity to
participate in three Wellness
brown Bag Luncheons The
luncheons will cover topics rang-
ing in interests and are available
for all faculty, staff and students
of the University.
On Wed Sept. 23. Dr. Inn
Wright from the English Depart-
ment, will be discussing the topic
"Taking the Mystery out of Select-
ing and Purchasing a Bicycle
Other topics covered in the noon
hour get togethers include:
"Strategies for muscle balancing
and applications for Sports Mas-
sageAccupressure and "Tips
for the Beginning Tnathlete
Each luncheon will feature a dif-
ferent speaker The luncheons
will behold from noon to 1 p.m. in
Mendenhall room 221.
1 ho Outdoor Recreation Center
will be ottering a d. long sailing
adventure ofl the Washington,
C. waters. The trip will take
place Oct. 11. A cost ot $50 will
cover transportation, food and
captain's fees. A maximum of six
participants will be allowed to
register tor the trip. Registration
will be held Sept. 21-2S in room
204 Memorial Gym.
Horseback riding trips are also
available through the Outdoor
Recreation Center. Participants
will be provided w ith transporta-
tion to larman's Stables where
they can enjoy an hour of trail
riding along the outskirts ot
Greenville. Advanced registra-
tion is required.
For those who care to weather
the real outdoors, a backpacking
trip to the Uwharne National
Forest near Troy, N.C will be of-
fered Oct. 2-4. A fee oi $30 covers
food, transportation and equip-
ment Registration will be held
Sept. 21-2S in room 204 Memorial
C m.
The Intramural Sport schedule
continues to heat up with Hag
football action and co-rec Softball
action taking place on several in-
tramural playing fields. In
tonight's action, the men's resi-
dence hall league takes to the
gridiron with teams from the Fal-
consand Bearsdivisions.Slated to
play arc Jones Zoo, Aycock 1 lurri-
cancs and Scott Steelcrs. The tra-
tcmity leagues are also on sched-
ule as the Cardinals and Steelers
divisions try for the all campus
Intramural football rankings
MEN'S DrVlSION
1. US. POU -SA
2. Pi Kappa Alpha A
3. Funk brothers
4. Scott SOB -C Hurricanes
5. Lake Boys
WOMEN'S DIVISION
1. Enforcers
2. Alpha Phi
3. Pi Kappa K-Mart
4. ICCY'S
5. Greene Wild Women
nu understand tht
rax .a'a .IP s has two now
,ns Publication 920
explains;hanec- affecting
individuals and Publication 921
explains rmcs affecting
s Botharefree Avk : i
�. IRs offic� ii the
IRS Tax
phone K� ok
urMiM
iA flWi l�rtf of tfxr MM
y?YS POOL tiQ
517 Cotanche St.
?Under New Management
Pool Prices: $1.50 per how per person
12 PriceFor Females with
Male Partner
75r can beer on
Tues. and Thurs.
Pinball and Video games!
Wednesday
is our special
Ladies Nite
Ladies Only 500 Admission 'til 10:30
9:30 til 10:30 The Elbo Male Dancers
Plus
65 Tails & 10 Draft All Night
Guys in at 10:30 Admission $1.50
Tue. & Thur. Draft Nite
65 Tails & 10$ Draft All Night
title. In women's action, contests
include the top ranked Enforcers,
ROT-Cceand Pi Kappa K-Mart.
For additional information con-
cerning any ot the programs and
services ottered through the De-
partment of Intramural-Recrea-
tional Services, call 757-6387 or
drop by room 204 Memorial Gym.
MtllthlM, SHIM-MS:
When you fill out oui Form
W-4 or W-4A. "Employee's
Withholding Allowana
ertlfic ate remember:
It you can be laimed on oui
patent's ot anothei person's
return. ou generally annot be
exempt from in ome
withholding "0 get it right, i
th- lnsttm tions that amt �. �
youi Form W-4 ot W i
m tea of rM �
M

MfabrK-atHlf
FINAL CLEARANCE
75Cr OFF
All Summer Merchandise
Some Fall and Winter
Merchandise
Large Selections of
Jewelry Si Accessories
Royal Robbins Now Exclusively
at Fabricate Too y
More, Tues Fri Sat 10:00-6:00
Wed. and Thur 10:00-8:00
919-A, Red Banks Road 756-1058
Little Sister RUSH
Sept. 22nd & 23rd
9:00 p.m. until?
Come out and meet the
brothers and Little Sisters
Beverages Provided
Call For Free Ride: 757-3516
422 West Fifth St.
m
BS planning f
FL player's sh
I IAP) BSsaySt iscoi lerini
Jumerous pos�froi
lating 'O triatl
last tune il tht r
1 Mill 1 ootl al
1 ;is ; tHk.
1 "Wei .
Jontit ,
Irjdser
I.kmali.in sdi
Id pe thai
lit1 and a stnkiis�
1 hiring tht,�� .
ijow h
lav Night 1
lilt l
, ' pokes.
lajd on 1
I, hole lot ot th:
��
r.
"Ih
lejiij:
UVA'srCen ii(
f CHAR! OH�
kel i
last Tut51
Kenned fromthe I iliversi!
1 ma team firpoor�
nance.
' Mel was pi.pn i 1
fcry statu.
fcttendem �
ketnester. . 1 have�
Ticket pickup expli
kend.Stud
h � ; : ilined to ha �
e:ts attend thi
S utl rn football game ai
lo let personnel in � M
picket Office know it the e
ticket form was checked b)
jtnts and mailed in to tl
t earlier.
Tickets may be picked u
Miners from s a.m5 p m i
THE
DEPART
1987
FIRST PLACE- SLAY STUDS
Teresa Schallack.
Coursev, Renee Hiner.
03
THIRD PLACE MANIPULATOl
Kim Phillips. Heath Hartley, D
The Department
Jeffrey's Beer and
Almost Anything
years first througt
"Where Fun Is 1

� , .





Till-FAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22,1987
15
BROADEN
YOUR
ORIZOAs
Wfc
IX THEATRE
VEDNESDAY 8 PM
$ fabricate $
TV
vL CLEARANCE
' .v (
OFF
a
lerchandise fffi
11 and Winter i T

:ions of
Accessories
s Now Exclusively
Too
Sal . 10:00-6:00
8:00
756-1058
er RUSH
d & 23rd
. until?
d meet the
Little Sisters
'rovided
ide. 757-3516
Fifth St.
CBS plann ing for
NFL player's strike
yyM
Clip-N-Save
twy?W
I D CBS says it is considering
limcrous possibilities, from auto
icing to triathlons, to till broad-
st lime it there is a strike by Na-
knal Football League players
:s week.
'We have no comment on strike
mtingency plans. We'll just wait
id see NBC spokesman Kevin
tonahan said last week. "We
ipe that they continue to negoti-
e and a strike is averted
During the 1982 strike. ABC"
lowed movies'during the "Mon-
i Night Football" slot and
Rely would do it again
CBS spokesman Mark Carlson
ajd on Wednesday there "are a
hole lot of things under consid-
nii the.l 1.tried tvpla in
i1 lace of a strike.
Ve probably are obligated to
imes it' they (the NFL) can
J them Carlson said
I here are all sorts ot thines
there are no games, we are inves-
tigating possibly doing College
Football Association games, mov-
ing them from Saturday to Sun-
day
In order to do that, the colleges
would have to agree to such a
move.
The current network contract
with the NFL has provisions for
rebates to the networks if there is
a strike.
NBC had no comment on re-
ports that the PGA offered its
weekly tournament finals to the
networks on a rights-free basis if
then is an NFL strike. There are
no golf tounaments scheduled for
TV through the end of the year.
Carlson confirmed the PGA
olter nd said it was also under
consideration.
"That's just one of many
things Carlson said. "Auto
races, boxing. We did a lot of
auto races, triathlons, those kinds
xtigated he said "U ot things during the last strike
UVA's Kennedy ousted
as to whether transferring would
be the best thing for him. Mel
real tinned his desire to stay at
Virginia 1 lolland said in a press
release. 1 le said Kennedy's status
would be reviewed in January.
The h-toot-5 forward averaged
12.1 points per game last year. He
has been a starter for the last two
!��������������
i
m
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
321 E. 10th St. Greenville (next to Wendy s)
758-0000
VOTED THE NATIONS I VANILLA
Buy 1 Sundae or Blend-in, Get 1
12 PRICE
m
t
s
one coupon per order please
coupon good thru Sept. 28. 1987
V
&
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
321 E. 10th St. Greenville (next to Wendy s)
758-0000 '
VOTED THE NATION'S 1 VANILLA
NOW DELIVERS
Order your favorite tee cream treat and we'll bring it to your door!
FREE Delivery with this coupon
CALL 758-0000
one coupon per order please coupon good through SepI 28. 198?
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
CHARLOTTESVIl 1 E.Va.(AP)
ketball coach Terry 1 lolland
st Tuesday suspended Mel
n;ulv from the University ot
irginia team tor poor class atten-
: ncc
' Mel was placed on probation-
v status because of poor class
ttendence during the spring
mester 1 have talked with Mel
� �� �� w r
JUDSON H.BLOUNT,III
ATTORNEY AT LAW
DWl and Traffic Of fenses
Suite 12, Lee Building 111 East Third Street Greenville, NC 27835Telephone (919)758 8555
wars.
Ticket pickup explained
I"he weekend ol Sept 26-27 is day, Wednesday and Thursday,
il s Weekend. Students who andal Mendenhall from 11 a.m6
ve planned to have their par- P ni ' lowevcr, students who are
is attend the ECUGcorgia wishing to pick up tickets to sit
uthcrn football game are asked Wlth thir parents can only do so
let personnel in the Minges at the Minges Ticket Office.
All students are reminded to
take their student ID to the game,
in case of a spot check. Students
who attend the game without
proper identification run the risk
it being turned away at the gate
icket Office know it the extra-
ticket form was checked bv par-
Us and mailed in to the ticket
Mice earlier.
Tickets may be puked up at
' tinges trom 8 a.mo p.m Tues-
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center is open Monday through
Thursday, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. For an
appointment or more information,
cal!24-Hour Helpline, 757-0003.
Ill East Third Street-The Lee Building
Greenville, North Carolina
Free Pregnancy Test-Confidential
Counseling
All Services and referrals are tree of charge
EPARTMENT OF INTRAMURAL-RECREATIONAL SERVlfa&S
1987 ALMOST ANYTHING GOES TEAM CHAMPIONS
2V 8. - �
M
jh ,r-
-
FIRST PLACE- SLAY STUDS; Susan Barker, Lisa Deaton.
Teresa Sehallaek.Chuek Funderburk, Kirk Michie, Jay De-
Coursey, Renee Hiner.
SECOND PLACE- SCRAGS; Julie Turnbaugh. Sharon
Wheeler. Derek Gray. Juliette Contostavlos. Mitehell Powell.
Hicks Rgford.
THIRD PLACE- MANIPULATORS; Mary Cerjan. Chris Glenn,
Kim Phillips. Heath Hartley, David Corbett, Debbie Rose.
FOURTH PLACE- ROCK STEADY; Troy Rose, Libba Daniels.
Monica Harris. Sandra Yancey, Dee Slape, Brian Grady.
The Department of Intramural-Recreational Services would like to thank
Jeffrey's Beer and Wine, Sunnyside Eggs and Z 103 for sponsoring the 1987
Almost Anything Goes. Congratulations to the above teams for capturing this
years first through four place trophies. Through participation, they found out
"Where Fun Is 1
nwiiiiiiiiiiiiii�i�nn ii im i �wnmmMiWMUa
�mmmwwmm
tgni0)0tm0'm$mnmi- iltmmmmji' � ni �
r� IS

-i





16
r�E EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 22, 1987
HOW I MADE $18,000
FOR COLLEGE
BY WORKING WEEKENDS
n
$
When my friends and I graduated
from high school, we all took part-time
jobs to pay for college.
They ended up in car washes and
hamburger joints, putting in long hours
for little pay.
Not me. My job takes just one
weekend a month and two weeks a year.
Yet, I'm earning $18,000 for college.
Because I joined my local Army
National Guard.
They're the people who help our
state during emergencies like hurri-
canes and floods. They're also an
important part of our country's military
defense.
So, since I'm helping them do such
an important job, they're helping me
make it through school.
As soon as I finished Advanced
Training, the Guard gave me a cash
bonus of $2,000. Then, under the New
GI Bill, I'm getting another $5,000 for
tuition and books.
Not to mention my monthly Army
Guard paychecks. They'll add up to
more than $11,000 over the six years
I'm in the Guard.
And if I take out a college loan, the
Guard will help me pay it back-up to
$1,500 a year, plus interest.
It all adds up to $18,000-or more
�for college for just a little of my time.
And that's a heck of a better deal than
any car wash will give you.
THE GUARD CAN HELP PUT
YOU THROUGH COLLEGE, TOO.
SEE YOUR LOCAL RECRUITER
FOR DETAILS, CALL TOLL-FREE
800-638-7600, OR MAIL THIS
COUPON.
In Hawaii: 737-5255; Puerto Rico: 7L;1 4550; Guam: 477-9957; Virgin Islands
'St. Croix : 773-6438; New Jersey 800 452 5794. In Alaska, consult your local
phone directory.
c L985 United States Governmenl as represented b the Secretary t Defense
Ml nhts reserved.
MAIL TO: Army National Guard, P.O. Box 6000. Clifton, J 07015
M F
N A M E
ADDRESS
CITY STATE ZIP
AREA CODE PHONE
SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER
US CITIZEN YES NO
BIRTH DATE
OCCUPATION
STUDENTHIGHSCHOOl
PRIOR MILITARY SERVICE
? COLLEGE
yes no
BRANCH
RANK
A KM MOS
National Guard
TMt IHfO�MATK �(X.�(X JN'ARH� "BC'VIOf 'NC. jO'Wj ' WR SO A. St w ' � MBt -
mi B� USECO���CHuiTinG(vh� Sf b MLT TOUR SOCUM. Sf "��s��eio
Will Bt USED 70 ANAivE RfSPONSf ' 'his a: a ��� '� . h Si v;
AK'UCZWNP
Army National Guard
A mericans A t Their Best.
-
v
i





Title
The East Carolinian, September 22, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 22, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.559
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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