The East Carolinian, September 17, 1987






INSIDE
Editorials�tttmtm 4
Entertainment�7
Sports����� 11
Classifieds��ng
ENTERTAINMENT
First ECU Gospel Choir album ever has been
released � see ENTERTAINMENT, page 7.
SPORTS
Pirates look to a victory Saturday as a key to door
of success � see SPORTS, page 11,
Stfre i�ust (ftamlmiatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 No. 7
Thursday, September 17,1987
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Chancellor says image suffering
after rough weeks for university
Chancellor Eakin makes a point during a Wednesday after-
noon interview.
By ANDY LEWIS
Now Kditor
What has been happening to
ECU's image?
"A measure of a university is how
it responds to events which are not
favorable according to Chancellor
Richard R. Eakin.
The events in the past few weeks
such as the post-game incident at the
ECU-North Carolina State Univer-
sity fwtball game, the Biltmorc
Street mishap and the arrests of three
ECU basketball players have nega-
tively influenced public perception of
the university, Eakin said in an in-
terview Wednesday.
In the first part of a two-part series,
Eakin speaks about the Carter-Finlcy
stadium incident. In the second part,
Eakin addresses other issues and
explains where he thinks ECU
should go from here.
The tearing down of the goal
posts and a fence and the damage
to shrubbery caused by over-
zealous fans at Carter-Finley sta-
dium Sept. 5 was "inappropri
ate" and "unacceptable" ac-
cording to Chancellor Eakin.
Eakin said he has apologized to
NCSU's chancellor for the inci-
dent.
"I personally don't believe that
this (incident) should be a reason
to discontinue the series Eakin
said.
"1 hope and 1 trust that both we
and North Carolina State can,
being "entirely fair" and "objec-
tive" to "unduly harsh and
critical
He added, "In particular, there
were a apuple of editorials that I
thought missed the mark and
made some rather broad and
sweeping allegations about this
university (that were not cor-
our institution has been victimized
by the behavior of a few
�Chancellor Richard R. Eakin
upon reflection, decide upon a
course of action which will in-
deed resume the football series
between the two universities
NCSU officials have decided to
place a one-vear moratorium on
the ECU-NCSU football series.
Speaking to the issue of press
coverage of the event, Eakin said
the reporting has ranged from
rect)
Eakin refused to comment
about specific editorials.
Eakin said many people have
suggested to him that TV and
newspaper accounts of the inci-
dent could be used as evidence to
bring some of the students re-
sponsible for the damage before
the honor board.
"I have problems with that
Eakin said. "I just simply don't
believe it's possible, given the
chaos that we saw there, that one
could with any degree of reliabil-
ity make the judgment that just
because someone was on the field
that that individual was guilty of
destructive behavior andor vio-
lence
Eakin said he believes that
"indivduals also do have funda-
mental rights that we at the uni-
versity cannot trample upon. So
I'm trying to do mv best to respect
everyone's rights, but at the same
time make it clear that we will not
tolerate mob violence
Eakin also said he does not
believe the cheerleaders contrib-
uted either intentionallv or
unintentionally to violent behav-
ior after the game.
"I think that in manv respects,
many people in this whole epi-
sode have been victims; and a lot
of us have been victims in the
sense that we, our institution has
been victimized by the behavior
of a few people
Greenville, ECUofficials meet, propose plan
By CLAY DEANHARDT streets on that day, making three hason between thecity police and who will soon contact the city head of the police record! d.vi- warded to lWhoU SMtnn c�H
Managing Kditor
Acommitteeofcityand univer-
sity officials met Sept. 2 and pro-
posed three plans to prevent inci-
dents like the one on Biltmore
Street on Aug. 29, according to
Greenville interim assistant po-
lice chief Nelson Staton.
Greenville police broke up an
unauthorized block party involv-
ing ECU students on Biltmore
Street between Fifth and Fourth
IFC focuses on
1987 rush
By TONT PAGE
Suff Writer
Rush was the topic at the top of
the Inter-Fraternity Council's
agenda for their Tuesday meet-
ing.
Thisyear a new rush policy was
implemented requiring rushees
to have a grade point average of
2.0. This change in policy was met
with a change in the overall rush
process.
The new rule means first
semester freshmen cannot re-
cieve bids for membership in a
fraternity. However, they are al-
lowed to rush and attend all rush
functions, according to Brooke
Stonesifer, president of IFC.
"We believe the new rule will
improve rush in the long run. We
feel we will be getting more ma-
ture freshmen who have adapted
to college. This will improve
everyone's GPA overall said
Stonesifer.
There will also be a "Fall Rush
Week" in November for inter-
ested freshmen to attend. This
will give them a second opportu-
nity to be exposed to the fraterni-
ties of their choice. The dates of
Fall rush will be announced in the
East Carolinian and interested
students can sign up outside the
student store.
IFC will also be sponsoring
along with the Panhellinic
committee a Basketball Blowout
Sept 22-23. Proceeds from the
function will go to the Ronald
McDonald House. "Everyone is
reminded to bring their quarters
to class and shoot some hoop in
front of the student store. By
making three shots you can qual-
ify to win $100 or various gift
certificates said Stonesifer.
arrests in the process. Some stu-
dents feel police used unneces-
sary force in making the arrests.
Staton referred to the first pro-
posal as a mutual aid agreement.
It would allow Greenville police
to authorize ECU public safety
officers to make arrests off cam-
pus in specific situations, Staton
said.
The second proposal would
prevent officers from being
forced to make arrests in all but
extreme cases, he said. Under this
plan, city police would collect
student identification cards and
turn in the names to university
officials. The students must then
free those officials and possiblv
the Honor Board, Staton said.
Staton said the final plan in-
volved the use of an officer from
public safety that would serve as
his department. This officer
would accompany city police on
city calls where students were
involved, he said.
According to Staton, the pres-
ence of a public safety officer
might make student identifica-
tion easier while providing a
university representative that
students might respond to better
than they do to Greenville police.
Present at the Sept. 2 meeting
were Staton, interim police chief
Randy Nichols, the Greenville
city attorney, SGA President
Scott Thomas, Associate Dean of
Students Ron Speier, Public
Safety Director Joe Calder, Chief
of public safety johnny Rose and
other university officials, Staton
said.
The proposals are being in-
spected by university attorneys.
attorney with their verdict on the
plan's viability, he said.
"I think they are going to be
kind of proactive measures
rather than reactive Staton said,
noting he thought the proposals
were sound and would be effec-
tive.
Staton said other issues also
were discussed at the meeting.
He said the committee agreed
alcohol played a large part in the
Biltmore incident. Because many
students can no longer drink
downtown since the changing of
the drinking age last year, Staton
said, the committee felt the num-
ber of private parties with alcohol
was going to rise.
Another issue the group dis-
cussed was applying for noise
and block party permits, he said.
According to Brenda Saulter,
poll
sion, organizers of the Biltmore
party applied for a noise permit
but were rejected because thev
did not meet qualifications for
application.Shesaid theorganiz-
ers picked up an application for a
permit to block off the street, but
never returned it.
Staton said students had that
application at the partv site,
completed and signed "Chief Big
Mouth" where the proper au-
thorization signature would
have been.
An internal investigation into
the students' allegations of un-
necessary force is near comple-
tion, Staton said.
He said witnesses ave been
interviewed on tape and that
transcripts from those tapes are
nearing completion now. The
transcripts will then be for-
An ECU student avoids watching as he gives blood Wednes-
day. The Air Force ROTC sponsored blood drive is continuing
today on the second floor of Mendenhall Student Center. 400
pints is the goal.
irded to Nicnols, Staton said.
"If we do find that some inap-
propriate action was taken v- UT
officers d
would not be public i
tion he said.
According to Staton, Nichols
met with fraternity and sorority-
leaders soon after the Sept 2
meeting.
'They discussed how to not
have incidents like the Biltmore
See GROUP, page 3
Faculty Senate
begins search
By JEANETTE HERRERA
Staff Writer
The ECU Faculty Senate Tues-
day nominated seven people to
beon the search committee which
will select the new vice chancellor
for academic affairs.
During the meeting at Men-
denhall Student Center, the sen-
ate nominated seven faculty
members to be on the committee.
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin will
pick three of the seven and two
others of his own choice to serve
on the committee.
The seven nominees are Carl
Adler, Conner Atkeson, Larrv
Hough, Ruth Katz, Holly
Mathews, Judith Sadler, and Don
Sexauer.
Eakin commented at the meet-
ing that William Blood worth has
been doing an excellent job as
acting Vice Chancellor. Eakin
noted that any major position
opening will be opened to appli-
cants nationwide.
Eakin began his speech by
saying he was determined to
keep coverage of the ECU-NCSU
game balanced and reasoned.
Efforts to find the person who
injured the officer after the game
have been unsuccessful so far,
Eakin said. He also commented
that "we have been treated in a
way that is unfair and he later
made reference to an editorial
written in a Greensboro paper.
Other election results at the
meeting went as follows: Emily
Boyce and Larry Hough were
elected to the Due Process
Committee; James Bruner and
Tinsley Yarbrough were elected
to the Hearing Committee; Bea
Chauncey and Ted Ellis were
elected to the Reconsideration
Committee.
A
I
Ia
Wk - -i� : if' iji.j�i m
J
-s-
'��- -�-h0m
if i





i
A
.
. Tl IE FAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 17,1987
ECU News Bureau
Seminars scheduled
(ECU News Bureau) � The
"st Carolina University Divi-
sion of Continuing Education
will sponsor four non-credit
seminars beginning today-
Introduction to Stained Class
will be instructed bv Rick Hall,
owner of the Class Shop, Sept. 17
Nov. 19 from 7-9:30 p.m. in
lenkins Building on the ECU
campus. This course will intro-
duce the basics of the art of
stained glass. There will be a
material and equipment fee due
at the first clas.s meeting.
Beginning Piano for Adults
will be held in Fletcher Music
Center Sept. 17-19 from 6:30-7:30
p.m. Students may learn to plav
familiar tunes in a short time. No
prior experience is necessary and
a text is required.
CPK: The Race for Life will be
Sept. 19 from 9-4 p.m. in Memo-
rial Gym. David White, Assistant
1 lealth, P.E Recreation and
Safety professor will instruct this
course. American Red Cross cer-
tification is required.
Sailing and Cruising Instruc-
tion will be Sept. 19-20atSailcraft
Marina, Oriental, N.C. from Sat
10 a.m. - Sun 4 p.m. Sailing and
navigation will be taught by Til-
ton Wilcox, professor in the
School of Business. The class will
be limited to six applicants.
For more information, write or
call the ECU Division of Continu-
ing Education, 757-6143,
Greenville, N.C. 27834.
A lumna joins ECU
(ECU News Bureau) � Dr. Jo-
seph Campinha-Bacote, formerly
psychiatricmental health nurse
consultant at Roanokc-Chowan
1 lospital, Ahoskie, has joined the
Fast Carolina University School
of Nursing as an assistant profes-
sor.
An alumna of the University of
Rhode Island, Campinha-Bacote
holds a master's degree in psychi-
Middle-aged men color hair
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. (AP) �
A large number of middle-aged
men say they think it is acceptable
tor men over age 40 to adjust their
physical appearance to make
themselves look younger.
The study of 1,000 men con-
ducted by lust for Men shampoo
and haircoloring found nearly 70
percent endorsed the idea of cos-
metic surgery for men.
Nearly half the group agreed
with the statement that, "It's OK
for men to color their hair rather
than leaving it gray The firm
says other research indicates that
10 percent of America's gray-
haired men already color their
hair.
Honored alumna to speak
An ECU graduate who has re-
ceived the Pulitzer Prize is to be
the keynote speaker at the North
Carolina Honors Association's
state convention, to be held on
campus Friday.
The association is comprised of
all the honors programs in the
state, and the theme ot this year's
meeting i Honors and Your
Future ' Dr David Sanders, Eng-
lish professor .nd director of the
Honors Program is president-
elect of NCHA and host of the
meeting, according to a press re-
lease.
The keynote address will be
delivered at 10 a.m. in Menden-
hall 244 by Rick Atkinson. Dep-
uty National EditorSFTheWash-
ington Post. Atkinson is also the
onlv Pulitzer Prize winner that
ECU has ever graduated, accord-
ing to the press release.
At 11 a.m. the Associate Dean
of the School of Medicine at
LNC-Chapel Hill, Dr. William E.
Bakewell Jr will discuss admis-
sion to professional schools.
Strategies for gaining employ-
ment in the business world, op-
portunities in cooperative educa-
tion and the changing role of
honors programs and their direc-
tor are other topics to be covered
at the convention.
A detailed schedule is posted
outside the English Department
Office (Austin 124). The registra-
tion fee is$5 ($10 with luncheon).
All Honors students are urged to
attend. If you have anv questions
about the meeting or the Honors
Program, contact David Sanders,
Ragsdale 212 (757-6373).
JUDSON H. BLOUNT, III
ATTORNEY AT LAW
D H and Traffic Offenses
12. I ee Building
'111 asl I hird Street
1 ireenville. NC 27835
Telephone:
(919)758-8555
ii
J
&
)
o (
A T,
EAST CAROLINA
TEA PARTY"
Every Friday
� $2.00 Iced Teas
�FREE x
Pizza
5-7 PM
�No
Cover
Charge
S?L W Transit
Authority
Sheraton Greenville
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
o
o -�
�M� iiiiwiw�'�
h W99m ioiw wmmnnwin
atricmental health nursing from
Texas Women's University and a
PhD in nursing from the Univer-
sity of Virginia.
The new ECU faculty member
has more than 13 years of clinical
experience in psychiatric nursing
at an alcohol treatment center
and has been a privately practic-
ing therapist.
Her research, reported in nu-
merous journal articles and pro-
fessional presentations, has in-
cluded studies of family support
needs for intensive care patients
and implications of "voodoo ill-
ness" for mental health.
Campinha-Bacote received an
American Nurses Association
Clinical Fellowship Award two
years ago and was recognized for
outstanding research at the Uni-
versity of Virginia.
At ECU, she will teach clinical
psychiatricmental health nurs-
ing to senior student and com-
munitymental healm nursing to
graduate students.
NewTaxLaw
TIP
To help you understand the new
t.ix Liu , the IRS has two new
publications. Publication 920
explains changes aflfct nng
individuals and Publication 921
explains changes affecting
businesses. Both are free. Ask tor
one at .my IKS office or call the
IKS Tax Forms number in your
phone book
Wheelchair sports to be held
(PCMH press release) � The
Regional Rehabilitation Center at
Pitt County Memorial Hospital
will be one of ten hosts nation-
wide to co-sponsor the National
Wheelchair Athletic Association
for a two-day wheelchair sports
workshop.
To be held Sept. 19-20 at East
Carolina University's Minges
Coliseum, the free workshop will
present general information and
hands-on experience on five
wheelchair sports by some of the
top athletes in each sport.
The workshops will be held on
Saturday, Sept. 19, from 8a.Hv to
6 p.m. and on Sunday, Sept. 20,
from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. This
workshop is free and open to the
public.
Co-hosts for the two-day event
are the National Wheelchair Ath-
letic Association, Pitt Countv
Memorial Hospital's Regional
Rehabilitation Center, the Spinal
Cord Injury Association and the
East Carolina University Intra-
mural Athletic Department.
For more information about
registration and local accommo-
dations, call Jim Barrett at the
Regional Rehabihtaton Center at
551-4329.
COUPON
UM0MU
-4 PuMi w. . w of tit �ra
3tye liaat Carolinian
Serving the Easf Carolina campus community since 1925
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo Shari Clemens
Pete Fernald Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY RATES
0 49 Coulumn inches $4.25
50-99 4.15
100 1494.05
150-199 3.95
200 249 3.85
250 and above 3.75
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
(Charge in Addition to Regular Space Rate)
One color and blackS90.00
Two colors and black 155.00
Inserts
5,000 or less06 each
5,001-10.000055 each
10.001-12.00005 each
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday -Friday
Durotrc 10:00-5:00 P.M.
PHONES757-6366
757-6557 757-6366
757-6558 757-6309
COUPON
BAUSCH A LOMB
� COUPON
Wayfarer
$31.95plustax

Large Metal Sunglass
$37.95plus tax
SINGLE VISION
LENSES
$1295
Up to t Or 3 (J
HP 'i 2 PC
LINE
BIFOCALS
$39 95
� FLA'
We Can Make Arrangements
To Have Your Eyes Examined Today!
Evening Appointments Available
Call 752-1446
PROGRESSIVE
NO-LINE BIFOCALS
$79 95
ONE HOUR SERVICE
SINGLE VISION � GLASS � PLASTIC
ONE DAY SERVICE ON BIFOCALS
OFFER GOOD THRU AUG. 31, 1987
CLEAR VLJE OPTICIANS
2484 STANTONSBURG ROAD
STANTON SQUARE 752-1446
COUPON
COUPON
WELCOME BACK
ecu students!

PREVIOUSLY FROZEN
. 36-50 COUNT
LARGE
H Headless
J Shrimp
Js399
llTW
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Big K
Soft Drinks
12
12-0z
Cans
$
498

I
i
c
VAN CAMPS SKETTE
NOOCLE. CHILLEE OR
Beanee
Wenees
2 ?109
eWS Cans I
PREMIUM QUALITY
2-PLY PAPER
Swansoft
Towels
Roll
390
KELLOGGS
Pop
Tarts. .
11
Oz.
Box
89
KROGER
Cottage
Cheese.
24
Oz.
Cup
$129
U.S. N01
EASTERN
Red Delicious
Apples
0
3
Lb.
Bag
99
12
Oz.
Can
LUNCHEON MEAT
Armour
Treet
99
ASSORTED
PREMIUM
WH Esprit
�T Yogurt
16
Oz.
Bag
MITCHUM
Potato
Chips
�49
"NEW"
PEPPERIDGE FARMS
AMERICAN COLLECTION
Premium
Cookies
8
Ct.
Pkg
$
J69
1
Lb.
Pkg
GWALTNEY
Great
Dogs
99
CaayfifM 1MT
Kro��f tav-On
Quantity Rifhtt rtti�rv�d
Nona Sold To Oaaiart
� - ��- �-s�- t. ��e- � �;� � � . "are M
� -�- � a 0 - ��� �m a. yr .p. ��� 1 - � -
000 c � - - �; b
COpyngnt '986
�coger Sav-On
OuarttiTy VigrtK �asarveo
Nona Sold To 0ai�r
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Gree
MY 1
nville J
Judge Bor
WASHINGTON (AD
Robert H. Bork, answering sena-
tors who would deny him a Su-
preme Court seat, says his critics
shouldn't assume he would reject
privacy claims, rule against mi
noririesorendawoman'srightto
an abortion.
Bork's message Tuesday, the
first day of hisconfirmation hear-
ings, was that he's neither liberal
nor conservatn
only in his
should not ere,
The nominee!
friend and t M
tions that ram
ingsasa �
sor and his deal
the US (
Was! ii .�� �
Soviet treaty claims pr
WASHIGTON (AP) - US
and Soviet officials meeting in
pre-summit talks are making
muted claims of progress toward
a landmark treaty to ban interme-
diate-range nuclear missiles
The unfinished accord was
back on the table today in a sec-
ond round of talks between Sec-
retary of State George P. Shultz
and Soviet Foreign Minister
Eduard A Shevardnadze.
Their goal was to pare down
their differences over a schedule
for phasing out the missiles and
over U.S. warheads on West Ger-
man rockets, so the treaty could
be in shape for signing at a super-
power summit in Washington bv
year's end
"I think both sides feel prettv
much the same way Shultz said
at a White House news confer-
ence Tuesday "And that is we
should work hard to prepare it
carefully. And that's what we are
doing
Shevardnadze, meanwhile,
said later that "we achieved
greater understanding" on nu-
clear issues, although manv to be
dealt with in the treaty remained
unresolved.
"We are still working on it
Shevardnadze said at the end oi
seven hoursof talks. "We do have
the desire, but what will happen
is difficult to predict
Reflecting the apparent good
feelings, Shultz and Shevard-
nadze embarked Tuesday night
with their wives on a dinner
cruise down the Potomac River
aboard, J JJS. NatVV yacht as-
5tgje4 -to"jHJ� chiefof pavai
operations.
Teams of U.S. and Soviet ex-
perts were left behind in Wash-
ington to grapple over arms con-
trol problems and such bilateral
issues as security problems at the
American Embassy in Moscow.
A third, mixed group goes to
work today on human rights.
"The atmosphere is verv good
for making progress a senior
U.S. official said late Tuesdav at
the White h
On M
Shevardr
negotiate
a treatv
coir
the elimi
L S
laur
rter-n
"th
regime o
� t in
pra's 1
M

he s.
U.S.ofl
1 n
quoted I -
ditior � � r I
nadze
agreement call
reduction cenf
and US capitl
Group
Continue!
Street incident j
Staton said
ered proper
taijrjng necesj
large parties cf
would zovcr
the role of the
ordinances wol
F uir or I I
sued for th
and there m a -
the partu
the v ithe frateJ
ties) reprex.n
bodv verj w
knowledge w
whatsoever
ATTIC
o'
' The, The
CCMedf COMedY
2J0NE 2DNE
752-7303
presents
Mon. Night
Football
And Also ��?
THURSD,
AJI
RAGGAE
15c Dn
all night
Follow
Saturday
93
100.000 Aat
aU of
PLUS Listen
Tuesdavi
PLUS: The Budweisl
93 Wl
P.O Box 1707. Vi
A
i
.�.�. via





chair sports to be held
h p.m. and on Sunday, Sept. 20
lehabilitation Center at from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. This
Memorial Hospital workshop is tree and open to the
public
Co-hosts for the two-day event
are the National Wheelchair Ath-
hair sports letic Association, Fitt County
Memorial Hospital's Regional
Rehabilitation Center, the Spinal
Cord Injury Association and the
East Carolina University Intra
M ten hosts nation-
he National
Association
: at Fast
- Minges
rkshop will
iation and mural Athletic LVpartment.
on rive
t the
or more information about
registration and local accommo-
dations, call im Barrett at the
Regional Rehabilitaton Center at
551-4329
COUPON
BAUSCH & LOMB
COUPON
I

1 1 Ldfge Melai Sunglass $37.95Piusuw
�? SINGLE VISION 1 LENSES $12 95 � C sph
LINE BIFOCALS $39 95 v �- � FLAT TOP
PROGRESSIVE NO-LINE BIFOCALS $79.95 � � � 3 00 sph, � 3 00 -h
752-1446

ME HOUR SERVICE n � glass � plastic rv ce on bifocals
'RU AUG. 31. 1987
I R VUE OPTICIANS
3NSBURG ROAD
SQUARE 752-1446
COUPO.
nts!
tOjftnoqo

gW
A CAMPS SKETTE.
OOCLE CHILLEE OR
Beanee
Wenees
$
�09
KROGER
Cottage
Cheese . . .
24
Oz.
Cup
$-f 29
V TCHUM J V ' S
PotatoXT "3KS
Chips IV
Oz
Bag
�49
1
Lb
Pkg
GWALTNEY
Great
Dogs
99
'
(
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd - Greenville
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 17, 1987
Judge Bork says critics assume too much
WASHINGTON (AP)
Robert H. Bork, answering sena-
tors who would deny him a Su-
preme Court seat, says his critics
shouldn't assume he would reject
privacy claims, rule against mi-
norities or end a woman's right to
an abortion.
Bork's message Tuesday, the
first day of his confirma tion hear
mgs, was that he's neither liberal
nor conservative, but predictable
only in his belief that judges
should not create new law.
The nominee was peppered, by
friend and foe alike, with ques-
tions that ranged over his writ-
ings as a Yale Law School profes-
sor and his decisions as a judge on
the U.S. Court of Appeals in
Washington. When he returns
Soviet treaty claims progress
WASHIGTON (AP) � U.S.
and Soviet officials meeting in
pre-summit talks are making
muted claims of progress toward
a landmark treaty to ban interme-
diate-range nuclear missiles.
The unfinished accord was
back on the table today in a sec-
ond round of talks between Sec-
retary of State George P. Shultz
and Soviet Foreign Minister
Eduard A. Shevardnadze.
Their goal was to pare down
their differences over a schedule
for phasing out the missiles and
over U.S. warheads on West Ger-
man rockets, so the treaty could
be in shape for .gr. 6 at a super-
power summit in Washington by
year's end.
"I think both sides feel pretty
much the same way Shultz said
at a White House news confer-
ence Tuesday. "And that is we
should work hard to prepare it
carefully. And that's what we are
doing
Shevardnadze, meanwhile,
said later that "we achieved
greater understanding" on nu-
clear issues, although many to be
dealt with in the treaty remained
unresolved.
"We are still working on it
Shevardnadze said at the end of
seven hoursof talks. "Wedohave
the desire, but what will happen
is difficult to predict
Reflecting the apparent good
feelings, Shultz and Shevard-
nadze embarked Tuesday night
with their wives on a dinner
cruise down the Potomac River
aboard. Jl JS. Navy yacht as-
signed tcT'tiie' chiefof navd!
operations.
Teams of U.S. and Soviet ex-
perts were left behind in Wash-
ington to grapple over arms con-
trol problems and such bilateral
issues as security problems at the
American Embassy in Moscow.
A third, mixed group goes to
work today on human rights.
"The atmosphere is very good
for making progress a senior
U.S. official said late Tuesday at
the White House. "I think they
are serious about making prog-
ress. I think our feeling is they
came prepared to resolve issues
On Monday, just before
Shevardnadze's talks began, U.S.
negotiators in Geneva presented
a treaty draft to their Soviet
counterparts. It outlined steps for
the elimination of longer-range
U.S. and Soviet missiles and
launchers within three years and
shorter-range Soviet missiles in
one year.
Also, President Reagan said,
the U.S. document contained
"the most stringent verification
regime of any arms control agree-
ment in history
Asked on Tuesday for an ap-
praisal, Shevardnadze said
Moscow had not had a chance to
review the draft thoroughly. But,
he said, "it looked like things
would work out according to a
U.S. official who paraphrased the
Soviet minister.
The official, like the others
quoted here, spoke only on con-
dition he not be named.
Earlier Tuesday, Shevard-
nadze and Shultz signed an
agreement calling for nuclear risk
reduction centers in the Soviet
and U.S. capitals.
Group meets
Continued from page 1
Street incident reoccur he said.
Staton said the meeting cov-
ered proper procedures for ob-
taining necessary permits for
large parties, city ordinances thaT
would govern such parties and
the role of the police when those
ordinances were being violated.
Four or five permits were is-
sued for the following weekend,
and there was no trouble at any of
the parties, Staton said. "I think
they (the fraternities and sorori-
ties) represented the student
body very well he said. "To my
knowledge we had no problems
whatsoever
today, Bork will be asked to re-
turn to those subjects in greater
detail.
Bork repeatedly made the
point that he often opposed court
decisions on civil rights, privacy,
women's rights and even abor-
tion on grounds that justices cre-
ated new rights without any con-
stitutional basis.
"I am not by any means alone"
in that view, he said, denying that
he opposed basic civil rights and
civil liberties.
And Bork said he would give
"much careful thought" before
overturning Supreme Court
precedent, because "it is one
thing as a legal theorist to criticize
the reasoning of a prior decision.
It is another and more serious
thing altogether for a judge to
ignore or overturn a prior deci-
sion
He told a supporter, Sen. Strom
Thurmond, R-S.C, "The law
should not be shifting every
time the personnel of the Su-
preme Court changes
Women's groups fear Bork
would become the swing vote in
overturning Roe vs. Wade, the
ruling that permitted a woman to
Tave an abortion.
But when Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-
Utah, a Bork supporter, sug-
gested to the judge that it is not
certain he would vote to overturn
the decision, the witness replied,
"That is true
Bork had his roughest mo-
ments with Sen. Edward M. Ken-
nedy, D-Mass.
"Your clock on civil rights
seems to have stopped in 1954
Kennedy said. He noted Bork's
opposition in 1963 to portions of
the landmark civil rights law that
passed the next year.
Bork said he has long since
changed his mind about the legis-
lation.
Bork also acknowledged his
criticism of a Supreme Court rul-
ing invalidating poll taxes, a
device critics said was used to
exclude blacks froru voting. He
said there was insufficient evi-
dence in that case that the poll tax
"was applied discriminatorily
Committee Chairman Joseph
R. Biden Jr D-Del reminded
Bork that he also was critical of a
1965 court ruling that invalidated
a Connecticut law which prohib-
ited use of contraceptives�even
by married couples in their
homes.
Bork said he disagreed with
the court's reasoning because it
creates a "free-floating right of
privacy" and added he was not
defending a state's right to ban
contraceptives.
"What I objected to was the
way in which the right of privacy
was created Bork said.
Bork struck back at critics who
used his articles written as a pro-
fessor to predict how he would
rule on the Supreme Court.
"As a professor, 1 felt free to
engage in philosophical writ-
ing he said. "As a judge you
can't be as speculative
'In the classroom, nobody gets
hurt. In a courtroom, somebody
always gets hurt
THERE'S A LOT
OF CHATTER
ABOUT OUR
CHOWDER
Roasted I orn-( rabmeal (. howder.
Come in in and try some. It'll bowl you over.
Hilton Inn Greenville 264 Kypass355-5(KMI
NEW ARRIVALS OF
FALL MERCHANDISE
A
50 OFF'
Merchandise
756-7761
� California Concept Dresses
Carolina East Mall (Acro�� from Kerr Drugs)
iYS POOL Q
517CotancheSt
?Under New Management
Pool Prices:
$ 1.50 per hour per person.
$1.20 per how t siudent
12 Price For Females witti
Male Partner
.75C can beer on
Tues. and Thnrs.
Pinball and Video games!
ATTIC
'o'
-The, The.
CoMedY CoMedY
23DWE ZONE
752-7303
present
Mon. Night
Football
And Also ?
THURSDAY
RAGGAE
15 Draft
all night
FRIDAY
OF
THE
$1.00
membership
Friday with
this ad
15
Draft
(smm
or
TMEl.
$1.00
Membership
SATURDAY
JESSE ROUT
JESSE R0UF
ECU 12
Price
with this ad
12
Price
w
�-
"BE A SPORT"
Follow the ECU Pirates Every
Saturday Starting September 5 on
93 WDLX-FM
a
Your Pirate Station'9
100,000 watts of Pirate Power Covering
all of Eastern North Carolina.
PLUS: Listen To � "The Art Baker" Show each
Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. on 93 WDLX-FM
PLUS: The Budweiser College Football Scoreboard on
93 WDLX-FM on Saturdays
P.O. Box 1707, Washington, N.C. 27889 � (919) 946-2162
� m rti iik
V �� � I - - - �� - cJ" 1
m m i ii m afcu
P
. �





chair sports to be held
day, Sept. 20J
4 p.m. This
rhe t p.m. and on Sunday
labilitation Center at from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m! This!
norial lospttal workshop is free and open to the
t ten hosts nation- public
he National Co hosts for the two-dav event
Athletic ssoc iation are the National Wheelchair Ath-
wheelchair sports letic A.ssoaation, Pitt County
Memorial Hospital's Regional
ll ni ersit
at last Rehabilitation Center, the Spinal
Minges Cord Injury Association and the
hop will Fast Carolina University Inrra
lion and mural Athletic Department.
For more information about
he registration and local accommo-
dations, call lim Barrett at thi
Regional Rehabilitaton Center a
4329
COUPON
BAUSCH & LOMB

COUPON
tdfge Melai Sunglass
$37.95plus tax
SINGLE VISION
LENSES
$ ' 2 9S
LINE
BIFOCALS
$39 95
PROGRESSIVE
LINE BIFOCALS
S79 95
; 00 sp
3 00
add
ONE HOUR SERVICE
N � JlASS � PLASTIC
AVICI ON BIFOCALS
rHRU AUG. 31. 1987
1 AR VUE OPTICIANS
SBURG ROAD
N SQUARE 752-1446
� COUPO.
GER
9'
Cottage
Cheese . .
24
Oz
Cup
$-29
o
Bag
MITCHUM
Potato
Chips
�49
1
Lb
Pkg
GWALTNEY
Great
Dogs
99
�-
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
I 600 Greenville Blvd Creenv
3

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 17, 1987
Judge Bork says critics assume too much
WASHINGTON (AP) �
Robert H. Bork, answering sena-
tors who would deny him a Su-
preme Court seat, says his critics
shouldn't assume he would reject
privacy claims, rule against mi-
norities or end a woman's right to
an abortion.
Bork's message Tuesday, the
first day of his confirmation hear-
ings, was that he's neither liberal
nor conservative, but predictable
only in his belief that judges
should not create new law.
The nominee was peppered, by
friend and foe alike, with ques-
tions that ranged over his writ-
ings as a Yale Law School profes-
sor and his decisions as a judge on
the U.S. Court of Appeals in
Washington. When he returns
Soviet treaty claims progress
WASHIGTON (AP) � U.S.
and Soviet officials meeting in
pre-summit talks are making
muted claims of progress toward
a landmark treaty to ban interme-
diate-range nuclear missiles.
The unfinished accord was
back on the table today in a sec-
ond round of talks between Sec-
retary of State George P. Shultz
and Soviet Foreign Minister
Eduard A. Shevardnadze.
Their goal was to pare down
their differences over a schedule
for phasing out the missiles and
over U.S. warheads on West Ger-
man rockets, so the treaty could
be in shape for signing at a super-
power summit in Washington by
year's end.
"I think both sides feel pretty
much the same way Shultz said
at a White House news confer-
ence Tuesday. "And that is we
should work hard to prepare it
carefully. And that's what we are
doing
Shevardnadze, meanwhile,
said later that "we achieved
greater understanding" on nu-
clear issues, although many to be
dealt with in the treaty remained
unresolved.
"We are still working on it
Shevardnadze said at the end of
seven hours of talks. "We do have
the desire, but what will happen
is difficult to predict
Reflecting the apparent good
feelings, Shultz and Shevard-
nadze embarked Tuesday night
with their wives on a dinner
cruise down the Potomac River
aboard, Jk JJ.S. Navy yacht as-
signed to ffip. chiefW naval
operations.
Teams of U.S. and Soviet ex-
perts were left behind in Wash-
ington to grapple over arms con-
trol problems and such bilateral
issues as security problems at the
American Embassy in Moscow.
A third, mixed group goes to
work today on human rights.
'The atmosphere is very good
for making progress a senior
U.S. official said late Tuesday at
the White House. "I think they
are serious about making prog-
ress. I think our feeling is they
came prepared to resolve issues
On Monday, just before
Shevardnadze's talks began, U.S.
negotiators in Geneva presented
a treaty draft to their Soviet
counterparts. It outlined steps for
the elimination of longer-range
U.S. and Soviet missiles and
launchers within three years and
shorter-range Soviet missiles in
one year.
Also, President Reagan said,
the U.S. document contained
"the most stringent verification
regime of any arms control agree-
ment in history
Asked on Tuesday for an ap-
praisal, Shevardnadze said
Moscow had not had a chance to
review the draft thoroughly. But,
he said, "it looked like things
would work out according to a
U.S. official who paraphrased the
Soviet minister.
The official, like the others
quoted here, spoke only on con-
dition he not be named.
Earlier Tuesday, Shevard-
nadze and Shultz signed an
agreement calling for nuclear risk
reduction centers in the Soviet
and U.S. capitals.
Group meets
Continued from page 1
Street incident reoccur he said.
Staton said the meeting cov-
ered proper procedures for ob-
taining necessary permits for
large parties, city ordinances that
would govern such parties and
the role of the police when those
ordinances were being violated.
Four or five permits were is-
sued for the following weekend,
and there was no trouble at any of
the parties, Staton said. "1 think
they (the fraternities and sorori-
ties) represented the student
body very well he said. "To mv
knowledge we had no problems
whatsoever
today, Bork will be asked to re-
turn to those subjects in greater
detail.
Bork repeatedly made the
point that he often opposed court
decisions on civil rights, privacy,
women's rights and even abor-
tion on grounds that justices cre-
ated new rights without any con-
stitutional basis.
"I am not by any means alone"
in that view, he said, denying that
he opposed basic civil rights and
civil liberties.
And Bork said he would give
"much careful thought" before
overturning Supreme Court
precedent, because "it is one
thing as a legal theorist to criticize
the reasoning of a prior decision.
It is another and more serious
thing altogether for a judge to
ignore or overturn a prior deci-
sion
He told a supporter, Sen. Strom
Thurmond, R-S.C, "The law
should not be shifting every
time the personnel of the Su-
preme Court changes
Women's groups fear Bork
would become the swing vote in
overturning Roe vs. Wade, the
ruling that permitted a woman to
"nave an abortion.
But when Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-
Utah, a Bork supporter, sug-
gested to the judge that it is not
certain he would vote to overturn
the decision, the witness replied,
"That is true
Bork had his roughest mo-
ments with Sen. Edward M. Ken-
nedy, D-Mass.
"Your clock on civil rights
seems to have stopped in 1954
Kennedy said. He noted Bork's
opposition in 1963 to portions of
the landmark civil rights law that
passed the next year.
Bork said he has long since
changed his mind about the legis-
lation.
Bork also acknowledged his
criticism of a Supreme Court rul-
ing invalidating poll taxes, a
device critics said was used to
exclude blacks from voting. He
said there was insufficient evi-
dence in that case that the poll tax
"was applied discriminatorily
Committee Chairman Joseph
R. Biden Jr D-Del reminded
Bork that he also was critical of a
1965 court ruling that invalidated
a Connecticut law which prohib-
ited use of contraceptives�even
by married couples in their
homes.
Bork said he disagreed with
the court's reasoning because it
creates a "free-floating right of
privacy" and added he was not
defending a state's right to ban
contraceptives.
"What I objected to was the
way in which the right of privacy
was created Bork said.
Bork struck back at critics who
used his articles written as a pro-
fessor to predict how he would
rule on the Supreme Court.
"As a professor, I felt free to
engage in philosophical writ-
ing he said. "As a judge you
can't be as speculative
"In the classroom, nobody gets
hurt. In a courtroom, somebody
always gets hurt
THERE'S A LOT
OF CHATTER
ABOUT OUR
CHOWDER
Roasted Corn-Crabme
Come i mi in and try some. It
Chowder.
howl you i iver.
RESTAURANT BAR ��
tuv
Jtvl
. ' XIII
tJ Ivicitellte
NEW ARRIVALS OF
FALL MERCHANDISE
A
50 OFF'
Merchandise
756-7761
� California Concept Dresses
Carolina East Mall (Acro�s from Kerr Drugs)
T?rs pool $Q
517CotancheSt.
If they won't tell you about it,
then you know it must be great
Purple Passion' Out oe bathtub
and onfo 'he she'Ves o' yc i fext
Discover it for yOL'Se �
ATiTIC
CoMedY
8
'The,
COMedY
2�NE
752-7303
presents
Mon. Night
Football
And Also �?
THURSDAY
RAGGAE
15 Draft
all night
FRIDAY
$1.00
membership
Friday with
this ad
ecmsKJ
$1.00 12
Membership
SATURDAY
JESSE IOTP
IESSERQU
ECU 12
Price
with this ad
Price
"BE A SPORT"
Follow the ECU Pirates Every
Saturday Starting September 5 on
93 WDLX-FM
"Your Pirate Station"
100,000 watts of Pirate Power Covering
all of Eastern North Carolina.
PLUS: Listen To � "The Art Baker" Show each
Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. on 93 WDLX-FM
PLUS: The Budweiser College Football Scoreboard on
93 WDLX-FM on Saturdays
P.O. Box 1707. Washington. N.C. 27889 � (919) 946-2162
Entire Stock of
COATS
INCLUDES:
� Leathers
� Denim Jackets
Active Jackets
Long & Short
Wools
Fashion Doesn't Cost A Fortune For Men & Women At
MAURICES
CAROLINA EAST MALL
� � - � � ������- rt T.
m � �mw � � � Bjjfu
U
I
-





m
�.
s

�J?e Ea0t (Earnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, cwm
Clay Deanhardt, M�.r,t r,�
r?r LEW1S' ,1MMY McKEE'�� f �i
�IM CHANDLER ANTHONY MARTIN, � m�,ct
JESSK A STANLEY, r� m Meg Need, ,am Cirf
SI ILL TON BRYANT. � MlKE IJPCHURCH, p, m�
UEBBIE STEVENS, v� NORWOOD MCDOWELL, ah rw.
September, 17, 19P7
Opinion
Page 4
SGA
Legislature begins well
The 1987-88 ECU Student Govern-
ment Association convened for the
tirst time Monday as legislators
were sworn in by Attorney General
Lisa Williamson.
It's now time to get down to busi-
ness.
The legislature should be com-
mended for taking swift action to
make reparations for the destruc-
tion following the North Carolina
State � ECU football game. The
committee formed to look into the
matter should act just as swiftly to
repair the damage done to the
university's image and to improve
relations with NCSU.
It seems appropriate to use stu-
dent funds that might have been
allocated to some other project to
pay for damages, although once
again the good of the many must pay
for the actions of the few.
This committee, or possibly a
separate one, should also investi-
gate what further steps can be taken
to insure nothing like this happens
again. One solution might be the
threat of punitive action against fu-
ture trouble makers, backed up with
concrete proposals to implement
such action in the future.
The election of Ben Eckert to a
second term as speaker of the house
is also a prudent move. Eckert has
proven himself to be a fair and
knowledgable man of good charac-
ter? the SGA could have no better
leader for the challenges of the new
school year.
Chief among these challenges is
rebuilding our school image, which
has been damaged greatly as of late.
It will take a concerted effort by the
SGA along with other student and
administrative leaders to gain back
some of the esteem lost in the last
few weeks and start ECU moving
again along the road to prominence.
Any reperations made to NCSU are
only the first step.
In addition to image repair, the
SGA must concentrate on election
reforms. Never again must elections
be disputed on charges of inept
operations and possible ethical vio-
lations among representatives of the
SGA.
Indeed, the SGA has a long trail to
blaze over the next nine months. As
ECU grows, so does its problems
and the need for strong, effective
leadership.
With a relatively new chancellor, a
new SGA executive branch, a vet-
eran speaker and a fresh legislature,
it will be interesting to see in wtrarfc
form, if any , that leadership
emerges.
No WS Ftttfot?.
PoTiTTHfpfli
Americans ignore Afghan i stan
because of poor news coverage
Forum rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
of foyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and clas-
sification, address, phone number and
signature of the authoris). Letters are
limited to two typewritten pages, double
spaced or neatly printed. All letters are
subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are reminded
that they are limited to one every two
weeks. The deadline for editorial material
is 5p.m. Friday for Tuesday's edition and
5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday's edition.
3
i-

O
D
a,
E
u
In addition to the "Campus Forum"
section of the editorial page, The East
Carolinian features the "Campus
Spectrum This is an opinion column
by guest writers from the student
body and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information may
contact the managing editor of The
East Carolinian at 757-6366, or stop by
our offices on the second floor of the
PublicationsBuilding
How many people do you know who can tell you what
happened at KentState University in 1970? 1 happen to know
.if no one who doesn't have at least so me vague notion of what
transpired on that fateful day during a protest of the Vietnam
war. But if you were to ask these people about what happened
atSuriya High School on April 29,1980,1 would imagine that
not one person could raise hisher hand and tell you.
On this day in Kabul, the capitol city of Afghanistan, 70
people were killed when a Soviet general instructed his men
to open fire upon a crowd of student demonstrators. Why do
so few people in America know about it, when so many know
of the Kent State "massacre"?
The answer lies in the fact that this event and others like it
have received little or no news coverage. The reasons range
from "the public just doesn't care" to "we simply can't get our
camera crews into Afghanistan But regardless of the rea-
sons why, the effect is the same: The American public knows
very little about what is going on in Afghanistan.
Campus Spectrum
by
Brian Haskins
JWc ir.Amttr.ica have a dangerous dependancy upon televi-
sion arid print media for our understanding of what goes on
in the world around us. If an event is not covered, the public
knows next to nothing about it, and the effect is one of the
public turning its back on it as being too unimportant a news
item to be brought to our attention.
The war in Afghanistan is just such a case. That war has
been raging for seven years now, and 1 personally have seen
one hour-long special (by CBS), and four brief mentions about
t in news broadcasts. That is less than one brief glimpse at
what is going on in a year. What in ij i -ssion does this lack of
coverage give to the Afghan people? Do we care1 Hell no, we
would rather hear about Oliver North.
"Virtually every conceivableatrocity every known crime
of war � is taking place in Afghanistan today and on a scale
so vast it defies imagination � Jeri Laber, Executive Direc-
tor of Helsinki Watch.
Five million people, one third of Afghanistan's population,
have fled to neighboring Pakistan and Iran. Approximately
two million Afghans have been killed, and 45,000 children
have been taken into the Soviet Union to grow and learn so
that they may one day return to run the puppet government
of the country of their birth.
The Soviet Union has been able to wage a war in silence,
removed from world public opinion. The Soviet Union will
not tell the world what is going on. The names of Salisbury
t-llsberg, Berrigan, and the Chicago Seven of the Soviet Union
would appear, if at all, on tombstones, not on the front page
of "Pravdalf our news media will not inform us, noone will,
and the cries of millions of Afghans will fall on deaf ears.
"I regTet that I cannot be with you, but we have almost run
out of food and medical supplies. In addition, I have no
blankets for my men �and winter is onlv a few months
away. After four years of fighting one ot the world s great
super powers, our only victory hasbeenlo escape totaldefeat.
Even if the rest of the world continues to ignore our cause we
will fight on. For we are fighting not onlv for ourselves but for
all mankind. We are fighting for freedom and human dignity
and the right to worship the God of our choice. I urge vou to
tell the world of our plight and send whatever help vou can.
God bless you for caring enough to read mv letter - George
Washington, Valley Forge, September, 1780 aQ we forgot-
ten our own heritage?
American education will not
respond correctly to market
GrtTr&hfrvvcUfAW&- A7&emue syv.
fT5 GOlNQ
LONGWEBK
IMWMs
By ANDREW SULLIVAN
The New Republic
In 1960 a year at an average private
college cost around $2,000. Now it costs
around $15,000. The cost of a private col-
lege education has doubled in 27 years.
And it's getting worse.
In economic terms, it makes little sense.
Colleges face declining enrollment as
baby boomers work their way out of the
system. Meanwhile, job-hunting Ph.D.s
have been in huge oversupply. If the
market were operating properly, this
should mean colleges are getting
cheaper.
So where's the catch? Universities
claim they're just catching up with rising
costs, having fallen behind during the
1970's. Salaries and benefits of faculty
and administrators still stand just below
the comparative levels of 1970.
Capital investment suspended 10 years
ago has been increased to compensate in
the boom 1980's. And the huge expan-
sions of past decades are now accelerat-
ing operating costs. Add to this Reagan's
reduction in federal aid to students as
well as tighter state budgets for student
aid, and it's easy to see why colleges have
been passing their costs on to parents.
But what are students getting for their
parents' money? One answer: A declin-
ing proportion of time spent on the fun-
damentals of a liberal education.
The academic industry, as the recent
Boyer Report on undergraduate educa-
tion pointed out, is increasingly geared to
a professionalized faculty and away from
students. Faculty members, through a
tenure system that prizes a journal article
over good teaching, are under increasing
pressure to keep pumping out books.
The costs cut two ways. First, at vast
expense, libraries must keep track of the
mounds of articles.Second, less time and
effort are devoted to teaching. Many re-
gret this paper chase, but remain re-
signed to it in order to get tenure. Others,
often more gifted teachers - or more
committed to a particular college than to
a national "discipline" - become disen-
chanted. Either way, students suffer.
This is not to argue against serious re-
search. It's simply to point out that the
journal junkies are now in control. There
are, for example, some 142 periodicals
now available in the United States on the
subject of sociology.
At a rough count, assuming only three-
quarters of these journals get near the
libraries of colleges, and that there are
about five articlesan issue, there are some
600 articles on sociology produced, pur-
chased and placed on the shelf every
three months. That's 2,400 a year.
Does anybody read them? And this
massive output has coincided with a
decline in student interest in the subject.
It's no accident: Where teaching is ne-
glected, disciplines suffer.
The sciences have a better argument for
the publishing mania, but the footnotes-
culture of the arts is a symptom of the
trend toward relativism and specializa-
tion in America's academy. Once unitary
truths are scorned, there's no reason to
distinguish between the important and
the trivial in education.
The result is all too often a retreat into
irrelevance. It took Allan Bloom to bring
the point home in "The Closing of the
American Mind The massive popular-
i ty of the book (and the widespread indif-
ference serious academics have shown to
it) testifies to the chord it has struck: The
scholarly vocation has lost its core pur-
pose in fragmented overprofessioanlism.
The calling of the academic life to the risk
of self-reflection, or even of a spiritual
journey, is increasingly an anachronistic
joke. It shouldn't be.
This is where the book burning comes
in, but this time the periodicals go first.
Halting irrelevant production is the op-
posite of censorship. If sa way to save the
purpose of undergraduate education.
Colleges should devise a voluntary code
of practice for reform. Here are a few
immodest proposals to start with.
1 Get professors back into the class-
room. A primary condition for tenure
w
mmmmsm&mmmmmmwmm i f i ' "
I
should be at least three years of under-
graduate teaching, with students s as-
sessments of their teachers as admissible
evidence. Professors should be required
to teach at least four courses a vear, and
all tenured faculty should be limited to
one paid academic conference every two
years.
Set a maximum salary for administra-
tors at $10,000 less than the highest-paid
faculty. This will discourage brain-drain
start from Europe and the corporation
mentality of many Ivy League admini-
strations. Finally, set a limit of six years
funding for completion of a Ph.D. This
would discourage universities from re-
taining graduate studentsas cheap teach-
ing labor.
2. Ban all publication of Ph.D. theses
and limit professors to one book pub-
lished every 10 years. Students might
publish underground lists of teachers
who've produced more than five books in
the last 10 years. (Kant was paid by the
number of students who turned up for
class. His first book didn't appear until he
was 57. It was "The Critique of Pure
Reason)
Libraries should keep the number of
new boks acquired to the number thev
bought annually 30 years ago. Each de-
partment should be allowed only five
peroidicals a year in its field.
3. Cut the backslapping and prof-
speak. All acknowledgments sections at
the beginning of books should be limited
to six names or less, forewords by other
academics have to go, along with most
collections of old articals. Footnotes
should be kept to two a page, of no more
than two lines each.
For extra economy, an anti-jargon
board should be set up. Among the
ground rules, the word "dysfunction"
should not appear more than three times
on the same page; and the term
"postmodern" should henceforth be
shortened to "recent If that doesn't get
you more Barthes for the buck, nothing
will.
h
an
ith
United
nomic
irboi
-
Treaty to r
MONTREAL (AP) I
ing a last-minute compromise
between the United Si
European countries 4'
were set today to a n
tone treaty on redu ii .
rofluorocarbons that dan ig �
Earth's ozone
The last remainii
the global agreem. nt was
come late Tuesda
agreement betweei
States and European i
Community on how the trading
bloc would be b
Subject to final approval
by a plenary session I - � �
from Burki: i Fa
Union, the ��
Convicts shovel aspha
70 cents a day to sen
DURHAM (AP) Sh
steaming asphalt in v.
heat would be work hat lei
even for the best of l i
But imagine earning 7
not an hour, but a da
That's right, 70 cents i
For the state corn I i
system's convict lab t I r
wages haven't kept up
tion for quite some time
The convicts, howevei
knowledge that pal
holes, trimming the right
and flagging traffic is
they can do to serve -
"We work because reti
to help somebody else
George Sanders who v. rks
the Guess Tnsor pris i
road-mending crew kirks
hey, I paid mv debt
The crew from Guess F i I
Tnson is one of a number I '� ' -
honor-grade road en � - perat
ing from minimum-s ��. �
ons throughout the 5)
Workers toil under the su - rk-i
sion of a Department ol 11
portationsuper. -
not under armed guard
In some areas, howevei in-
mates work under the g
overseen bv armed prison
guards
A.s ht raWcd a yv�cV� of aspVvaH
smooih and pfossv black Super-
visor Charles Westbr ks :
crew works on all the numbered
highways in Durham Count)
In his 30 years of supen
prison crews, Westbrook said i
one had walked awav from a
V
-
� �
-
lirees
crew he supervised until eai
this vear
Two inmates left the crew
that occasion, he said, but I
were recaptured.
Gary Newkirk, Guess Road
pnson supervisor said ira r
roads is only one of the man)
inmates perform.
They also do laundrv for Wake
Countv Medical Cent - is
as jobs inside the pri� n serving
as janitors, cooks and barbers
Though some mediun
tody prisoners work on tht r
under the gun, the leg irons a
SU prevents
roommate wars
GEORGETOWN, T (C
There ma v be ways to prevent the
low-level "roommate wars
college students often find them-
selves in during the fa when
thev arrive to move in with
strangers, savs Pr ane Morgan
Bost of Southwestern Universit)
here.
Southwestern rather than
making random room ass
ments. tries to match roommates
who have similar lifestyles st
habits, musical tastes and other
interests.
Bost, counseling director at SI
suggests that even before they
meet, prospective roommates
can talk on the phone
'Thev can get to know some
basic things about each other is
one a partier and the a studier?
How much will the stereo ho
played!1"
Bost says some students de-
velop a "contract" that sets
ground rules for the living situ-
ation.
This can help roomie- avoid
problems or work them ou t when
they occur, Bost said.
Once on campus and in their
rooms, students are required to
live with their roommates tor two
weeks. If problems develop dur-
ing that time, student advisors
will help resolve the situation.
After two weeks, the students
may ask for new accomodations
"The important thing is that
each person leam to live with the
other Bost said.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I

HTV ss
WSA
t
Why Pa
Savi
dies 14KI
A .1
3XX03X�

&�
7 Dianv I
lit t
frx S M





Afghanistan
iws coverage
s less than one brief glimpse at
r What impassion does this lack of
pie? Do we care? Hell no, we
r orth
it) overs'known crime
ai istan today and on a scale
Jeri labor. Executive Direc-
"ustan's population,
ind Iran Approximately
e been killed, and 45,000 children
iet Union to grow and learn so
?turn to run the puppet government
rth.
to wage a war in silence,
inion. The Soviet Union will
on. The names of Salisbury,
Seven of the Sov iet Union
tones, not on the front page
ill not inform us, no one will,
bans will fall on deaf ears.
ou, but we have almost run
pplies. In addition, I have no
winter is only a few months
Juing one of the world's great
� has been to escape total defeat
mtinues to ignore our cause we
ng not only for ourselves but for
for freedom and human dignity
the G �d of our choice. I urge you to
ht an send whatever help you can.
?nough to read my letter � George
St ptember, 1780. Have we forgot-
n will not
o market
is re-
that the
here
three-
ir the
H there are
ire some
xiuced, pur-
shelf every
pching is ne-
umentfor
notes-
lptom of the
Id specializa-
"nce unitary
on to
iportant and
retreat into
X)m to bring
g of the
e popular-
read mdif-
ive shown to
Is struck: The
its core pur-
essioanlism.
ife to the risk
If a spiritual
nachronistic
ung comes
cals go first
n is the op-
y to save the
education,
juntary code
are a few
with.
the class-
for tenure
should be at least three years of under-
;raduate teaching, with students's as-
sessments of their teachers as admissible
evidence. Professors should be required ;
to teach at least four courses a year, and �
all tenured faculty should be limited to ,
one paid academic conference every two �
years.
Set a maximum salary for administra- j
tors at 510,000 less than the highest-paid
faculty. This will discourage brain-drain
start from Europe and the corporation
mentality of many Ivy League admini- :
-�rations Finally, sei a limit of six years' ,
ling for completion of a Ph.D. This
would discourage universities from re- I
taming graduatestudentsascheap teach
ing labor.
2. Ban all publication of Ph.D. theses I
and limit professors to one book pub-
lished every 10 years. Students might i
publish underground lists of teachers i
who've produced more than five books in i
the bst 10 years. (Kant was paid by the I
number of students who turned up for i
class. His first book didn't appear until he
was 57. It was "Tho Critique of Pure
Reason)
Libraries should keep the number of ,
new boks acquired to the number they
bought annually 30 years ago. Each de- f
partment should be allowed only five ;
peroidicals a year in its field. i
3. Cut the backslapping and prof
speak. All acknowledgments sections at -
the beginning of books should be limited �
to six names or less, forewords by other ;
academics have to go, along with most
collections of old articals. Footnotes.
should be kept to two a page, of no more
than two lines each.
For extra economy, an anti-jargon;
board should be set up. Among the;
ground rules, the word "dysfunction"
should not appear more than three times
on the same page; and the term
"postmodern" should henceforth be
shortened to "recent " If that doesn't get
you more Barthes for the buck, nothing
will.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 17,1987
Treaty to reduce ozone damage
MONTREAL (AD � Follow-
ing a last-minute compromise
between the United States and
European countries, 46 nations
were set today to conclude a his-
toric treaty on reducing chlo-
rofluorocarbons that damage the
Earth's ozone
The last remaining hurdle to
the global agreement was over-
come late Tuesday, with an
agreement between the United
States and European Economic
Community on how the trading
bloc would be treated.
Subject to final approval today
by a plenary session of 46 nations,
from Burkina Faso to the Soviet
Union, the Montreal Protocol on
protecting the ozone layer will Friends of the Earth.
reduce the use of chlorofluoro- Chlorofluorocarbons are used
carbonsby 50 percent in a 10-year in aerosols, refrigerators, air con-
period.
Lee Thomas, administrator of
the U.S. Environmental Protec-
tion Agency, said he would seek
early Senate ratification. He
termed the accord "in the best
interests of the world and the
United States
Environmental groups hailed
the agreement as a giant step for-
ward, but warned that future
data may indicate a 50-percent
cut is too little, too late.
"It's very important that the
signatories remain ready to re-
convene said Geoffrey Webb of
ditioners, insulation, foam cups
and foam-filled furniture, and are
vital to industries employing
more than 1 million people
worldwide.
Environmentalist hope that
DuPont, Britain's ICI and other
major chemical companies will
develop safer forms of chlo-
rofluorocarbons or substitutes
cases of skin cancer a year.
The accord aims at freezing
consumption at 1986 levels by
1990, cutting consumption by 20
percent by Jan. 1,1994, and reduc-
ing consumption a further 30
percent by Jan. 1,1999.
Developing countries would
have a 10-year grace period un-
der the pact, and the Soviet Union
would be allowed to expand
production by opening plants it
cannot cancel under its centrally
FAMOUS
mitRi
FOR FAST, FR
DELIVERY
PHONE 757-12
OR 757-0731
that don't destroy the protective planned economy, said Lang.
Spaghetti or Lasagne
with Garlic Bread and Salad
(Not fu r deli very.
wrn nB �u iik bt
mnrnfiuT
BUY A LARGE PIZZA
WITH 2 TOPPINGS
AND
GET 2 PITCHERS
FOR 99 �
(Not For Delivery)
$3.95
Convicts shovel asphalt for
70 cents a day to serve society
DURHAM (AP) - Shovelling
steaming asphalt in withering
heat would be work hard enough
even for the best of pay.
But imagine earning 70 cents �
not an hour, but a day.
That's right, 70 cents a day.
For the state correctional
system's convict labor force,
wages haven't kept up with infla-
tion for quite some time.
The convicts, however, ac-
knowledge that patching pot-
holes, trimming the right of way
and flagging traffic is something
they can do to serve society.
"We work because we're trying
to help somebody else said
George Sanders, who works on
the Guess Prison prison unit's
road-mending crew. "I can say,
hey, I paid my debt
The crew from Guess Road
Prison is one of a number of
honor-grade road crews operat-
ing from minimum-security pris-
ons throughout the state
Workers toil under the supervi-
sion of a Department of Trans-
portation supervisor, but they are
not under armed guard.
In some areas, however, in-
mates work "under the gun
overseen bv armed prison
guards.
As he raked a patch of asphalt
smctottvanti glossy black, Super-
visor Charles Westbrook said the
crew works on all the numbered
highways in Durham County.
In his 30 years of supervising
prison crews, Westbrook said, no
one had walked away from a
crew he supervised until earlier
this year.
Two inmates left the crew on
that occasion, he said, but they
were recaptured.
Gary- Newkirk, Guess Road
prison supervisor, said mending
roads is only one of the many jobs
inmates perform.
They also do laundry for Wake
County Medical Center, as well
as jobs inside the prison, serving
as janitors, cooks and barbers.
Though some medium-cus-
tody prisoners work on the roads
under the gun, the leg irons and
SU prevents
roommate wars
GEORGETOWN, TX (CPS) �
There may be ways to prevent the
low-level "roommate wars" that
college students often find them-
selves in during the fall when
they arrive to move in with
strangers, says Dr. Jane Morgan
Bost of Southwestern University
here.
Southwestern, rather than
making random room assign-
ments, tries to match roommates
who have similar lifestyles, study
habits, musical tastes and other
interests.
Bost, counseling director at SU,
suggests that even before they
meet, prospective roommates
can talk on the phone.
"They can get to know some
basic things about each other: is
one a partier and the a studier?
How much will the stereo be
played?"
Bost says some students de-
velop a "contract" that sets
ground rules for the living situ-
ation.
This can help roomies avoid
problems or work them ou t when
they occur, Bost said.
Once on campus and in their
rooms, students are required to
live with their roommates for two
weeks. If problems develop dur-
ing that time, student advisors
will help resolve the situation.
After two weeks, the students
may ask for new accomodations.
'The important thing is that
each person learn to live with the
other Bost said.
chains of books and movies are a
thing of the past, Newkirk said.
In the past, he said, more dan-
gerous prisoners were put to
work outside the prison walls
with the fetters. Policy now,
however, is to keep prisoners in
close custody and maximum
custody�the two levels above
medium�within the walls.
"You don't want to put some-
body out there you think you
might have to shoot if he tries to
run off Newkirk said.
Inmates who are considered
reliable enough can leave mini-
mum-security prisons like the
Guess Road facility on work-re-
lease to area employers or study
at area schools and colleges,
Newkirk said.
Between 50 and 60 of the 144 or
so inmates at the Guess Road
prison are on work-release.
Inmate Richard Culbreth was
working on the road crew re-
cently, but said he could be on
work-release, earning a regular
wage.
The road crew pay isn't very
good, but there's one good fringe
benefit to working the roads,
Culbreth said � a one-day reduc-
tion in the length of his five-year
sentence for every day that it
rains or the mercurv hits 95 de-
grees.
Westbrook estimated that the
men had gotten about a month
taken off their sentences during
the past two summer months.
ozone blanket that absorbs the
sun's ultraviolet rays.
Three percent to 7 percent of
the ozone layer has already been
depleted, and a 40-percent hole
has been discovered over the
Antarctic.
The United States is the world's
largest producer, responsible for
30 percent. It banned chlo-
rofluorocarbons in aerosols in
1978 but the chemicals are more
difficult to replace in other prod-
ucts.
According to the United Na-
tions Environment Program, the
sponsors of the conference, even
a standstill in chlorofluorocarbon
use will prevent 1.65 million
DuPont is the world's largest
manufacturer under the brand
name Freon.
Chlorofluorocarbon gases �
and their more potent variation,
halons � leak upward into the
PIZZA-SUBS-SANDWICHES
SPAGHETTI-LASAGNA
SALADS-TRY OUR GREEK
TACO OR PIZZA BURGER
This offer not QOOd with any other promotion
This offer may be withdrawn at any time
45 DRAFT!
PIZZABURGER NIGHT
g9
sosphendThchiorire I TRY OUR MEAL DEAL $2.49
atoms attack ozone, a gas com-
posed of three oxygen atoms.
Every 1 percent of ozone lost
could lead to 5 percent more skin
cancer cases on Earth, and cause
damage to the eyes and immune
system.
Halons � used to extinguish
fires in military, computer and
communications equipment �
cause up to 10 times as much
damage as chlorofluorocarbons.
�BUY A LARGEBUY A SMALLBUY A SMALL�
�PIZZA AND�PIZZA AND�OR LARGE Sl.H
�GET A 2 LITER PEPSI�GET 2�AND GET
FREEDRINKS FREEDRINK FREE�
Dale Cards
(they're funny!)
RPP Inc
From Recycled Paper Products, Inc.
Local and Out of Town Newspapers
Central Book and News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 7 Days A Week
FOUR FOR FREE
jazzemse
Bring this coupon in by 10187 and
receive four fun Jazzercise classes. Good
for first visit only. Call 756-8302 or 1-800-
422-TRIM
CLASS SCHEDULE
TUTHSAT 9:15 AM Jaycee Park Auditorium
TUTH 5:45 P M Elmhurst School
"Child care available at TUTH Classes
couponi
SACK A PACK
of savings
ECU
Victory
Sale! 422 Arlington Blvd
27858
Bring in this
coupon and get
15 off purchase
VALID THRU 9-30-87
R
o
c
1
S3

I
I
I
I
icoupom
Why Pay Retail Prices When You Can
Save With Dawson's Everyday
Low Prices
Ladies 10K Dome Ring
$4997
(gHfe
No 238?0045
Ladies 14K 9-Diamond
Anniversary
2)
No 1007-2085
!9997
Ladies 14K 7-Diamond
Cluster Ring
8997
��i
No 1007-5030
Ladies 14K v4 Ct.
7 Diamond Cluster Ring
m
24997
No 1007-5035
Men's 10K Oval
Signet Ring
��f
i
��
129"
No 2387-2021
10K Diamond Love Ring
3997
No 2389-0364
Ladies V Ct. Diamond
Waterfall Ring
34997
No 1005-5015
Ladies 10K Marquise Shaped
Sapphire & Diamond Ring
$9997
No 2823-5186
Ear Piercing Done Daily
Law-away Now For Christmas
"Greenville's Leading Jewelers'
111 t. AnNtftM �ft7vip
�bvBbk MMM
Fii-Ut. Ml - VM
356-5252
M3-2121
1CJ E. Urn St.
�ara
'����t
THE FUEL
DOC
Located at
2130 Greenville Blvd.
only
ANNIVERSARY SALE - SEPT. 11-20
SPECIALS THROUGHOUT THE STORE
CHECK US OUT FOR ALL OF YOUR
PARTY NEEDS.
reg. 99� qt.
UNOCAL 76
CUSTOM MOTOR
OIL
kx 2-Liter
$J PEPSI�
& PRODUCTS
890
Ml Dew, Sunkist, Diet Pepsi, Pepsi
Free, & Sugar Free Pepsi Free.
EX. Fudge
by
Keebler
3 Flavors to select from:
Vanilla-Fudge-Peanut Butter
$1.49
reg. $2.19
� �11 m- m �� �
�� i�. m � m ��! � �����g-
V
i
.m





SEPTEMBER 17,1987
News Digest
spoken for
Hn-Te general
snahT15 N�rth Erica's
thrt?� CnSCS Tuesday �! the
threat of nuclear attack bv a
wn" or accident in slump-
8 for President Reagan's Strate-
gic Defense Initiative
The warning came from Air
rorceCen. John Piotrowski, com-
mander of the North American
Aerospace Defense Command
and the U.S. Space Command.
It an attack were imminent,
� lotrowski is the general who
would tell the president.
His statements in Charlotte
came as the Reagan administra-
tion increased lobbying for its so-
called "star wars" system.
If the system were in place SDI
computers would make billions
ot calculations per second and
guide lasers and possibly atomic-
particle beams to destroy incom-
ing missiles.
An August study by the Con-
gressional Research Service esti-
mated SDI could eventually cost
$1 trillion, and scientists, con-
gressional representatives and
others are divided over whether
it would work.
Two weeks ago, Defense Secre-
tary Caspar Weinberger said he
intends to accelerate SDI research
and hopes a minimal svstcm can
be developed by the mid-1990s.
The Reagan administration's
principal argument for SDI has
been that it would protect against
a Soviet attack and serve as a
bargaining tool for nuclear mis-
sile treaties.
Tuesday, Piotrowski expanded
that rationale.
'There is always the chance
this nation could be attacked by a
madman or by accident he told
about 200 students at the Univer-
sity of North Carolina at Char-
lotte.
'There is always the chance
that we could have a modern-day
Hitler who would destroy what
he could said Piotrowski. "If
you've got oil money today, you
can develop a ballistic missile.
And if you can hire enough scien-
tists, you can develop a nuclear
warhead
Save the pond?
CONCORD, Mass. (AP) � A
conservation group trying to ban
swimming and limit picnicking
and hiking at Walden Pond,
where Henry David Thoreau
contemplated the simple life, has
found itself at odds with the
Massachusetts Audubon Society.
The Walden Forever Wild
Committee says swimmers are
causing serious damage to the
pond and its environs. But the
society says the committee is
pushing a political and symbolic
issue, not an environmental one.
In a letter written earlier this
year and obtained recently by
The Associated Press, society
president Gerard A. Bertrand
condemned committee chair-
woman Mary P. Sherwood's
"monomaniacal effort" to ban
swimming at the site where
Thoreau built a cabin in 1845. He
lived there for more than two
years before distilling his
thoughts on nature and society
into his 1854 book "Walden
Bertrand, noting his Republi-
can background, rejected allega-
tions that he was opposing a ban
"to curry political favor" with
Gov. Michael S. Dukakis, a
Democratic presidential hopeful.
Accusing Ms. Sherwood of
"unsubstantiated accusations of
conspiracy he also denied alle-
gations that water samples were
tampered with to make condi-
tions at the state-run sanctuary
appear better than they are.
Walden, about 15 miles west of
Boston, has been used for swim-
ming, fishing, hiking and con-
templation for generations. By
the 1960s, a concrete bathhouse
and pier had been erected. They
were later removed.
For some, Walden is a shrine to
Thoreau and his naturalist phi-
losophy. For others, it's just an-
other pond on a hot summer day.
Statewide beach
sweep this weekend
GKhhNSBOKO (AP) � North
Carolinians planning to escape
housework by heading to the
beach this weekend could be-
come involved in another kind of
cleanup.
Saturday is the date set for
Beach Sweep, the first statewide
coastal cleanup.
"We want to pick up trash and
change people's attitudes said
Joanne Braun, who will oversee
teams of volunteers working the
project's Cape Lookout to Sneads
Ferry leg.
The message is clear, Braun
says: Trash should be taken off
the beach in picnic baskets. Boat-
ers should stow it rather than
throw it.
Other kinds of litter reflect
other sources of the problem.
"We have the shipping lane off
our coast, and the military said
Peggy Tuett, who'll direct the
Corolla to Ocracoke cleaup
teams. One recent beach wash-up
was a can of paint thinner bearing
naval insignia, she said.
A third project segment, super-
vised by Andy Wood at the N.C.
Aquarium at Fort Fisher,
stretches from Sneads Ferry to
Sunset Beach, near the South
Carolina border.
More beautiful beaches are the
immediate payoff, Wood said,
but the effort is more than an
exercise in aesthetics.
Each year, 100,000 mammals
and 1 million sea birds die from
encounters with discarded plas
tics, said Kathryn Henderson at
the N.C. Division of Coastal
Management in Raleigh.
Animals, tied up in discarded
nets or floating strands of line,
starve or drown. Sea turtles eat
plastic bags, mistaking them for
their favorite jelly fish. Once in-
gested, the plastic kills the turtles
by inhibiting digestion or by in-
flating into a balloon that makes it
impossible for turtles to dive for
food.
Selling safe sex
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) �
An Orange County mail-order
company that sells sexually ex-
plicit books and other erotic ma-
terials has started including a
flier on safe sex with each order.
Adam & Eve, a division of PHE
Inc. and the nation's largest mail-
order supplier of condoms, is
trying to help its customers un-
derstand the seriousness of
AIDS, said Philip Harvey, the
company's president.
"It made sense to share infor-
mation with the customer Har-
vey said Tuesday. "We're simply
doing our part to help slowly,
gradually build adequate aware-
ness of the problem
The flier presents the effect
AIDS has on the body, how the
disease can be transmitted and
how it can be avoided. It encour-
ages people with more than one
sex partner to reduce that num-
ber to lower the risk of contract-
ing acquired immune deficiency
syndrome.
"In any case, if you do have sex I
with more than one person, the
best line of defense is to use con-
doms every time you have sexual
intercourse the flier says.
Harvey said Adam & Eve offi-
cials were especially aware of in-
creasing concern about AIDS
becauseof a 25 percent increase in
condom sales during the past 18
months.
Get more protein,
eat carbohydrates
NEW YORK (AP) � To get
more protein into your diet, eat
more carbolv drates.
Harvard rutritionist Virginia
Aronson says most of us eat too
much protein. Although our
bodies break protein down for
fuel, it's a wasteful source of en-
ergy.
Eating extra carbohydrates � a
natural fuel � will free your body
to use the protein to repair
muscles. That's protein's best
role, says the Reebok Aerobic
Information Bureau.
National Tohf r F.rMm
The National Teacher Examinations-
Core Battery Tests�will be offered at
ECU on Saturday, Oct 24, 1987. Applica-
tion blanks are to be completed and
mailed to the Educational Testing Service,
Box 911-R, Princeton, NJ 08541d. Applica-
tions must be postmarked no later than
sept. 21, 1987. Get your application from
the Testing Center, Rm 105 Speight, ECU
Baptist StudpnUIrnqn
All students are invited to dinner on
Monday nights. Dinner starts at 5:30 and
the cost is $2 00. At 7:00 we have our
worship service.
Sigma Gamma Epsilon
Earth Sciences Honor Society presents
speaker series: Sept. 17, "Depositional
Environments of Miocene Sediments fron
the N.C continental shelf'at 300 pm ;
Sept. 24, "Geology of Centrla Guatemala"
at 3:00 pm; Oct. 1, "Academic computing
at ECU"at 3:00 pm ; and Oct 9, "Earth
science education in the National Parks"
at 2:00 pm
ECU Paddling Club
Meetings have been scheduled every
Tuesday night at 900 pm during the fall
semester Kayak and canoe techniques
will be held at the Memorial Gym pool on
the 1st, 3rd and 5th Tuesdays of each
month. Regular dub meetings will be held
on the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays. All inter-
ested students , staff and faculty are wel-
come. Contact Jim 1 lix (6764 day and 756-
2970 evenings) for detail.
Women Soccer Club
All girls interested in playing on the
ECU Womens soccer club team should
contact Renee at 355-4644 Immediately
Attention all Students
BASKETBALL BLOWOUT to support
the Ronald McDonald House around the
Student Store Sept. 23-25. You mav win
$100. Sponsored by Panhellenic and IFC
University Unions
1 CXipht To Ik- In Pictures will be part of
a dinner-theatre production on Thursday,
Oct. 8, and Friday Oct. 9 at 6:30 pm in
Mcndenhall Student Center Auditorium.
Tickets are now on sale at the central ticket
office in Mcndenhall Tickets are $10 00
for students and $16.00 for all others. Call
for your tickets, 757-6611 ext. 266. No tick-
ets will be sold at the door
Interviewing Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement
Service in the Bloxon House is offering
one hour sessions to help vou in develop-
ing better interviewing skills. Sessions
will be held in the Career Planning Room
at 3:00 pm on Tuesday Sept 15and2.00on
Thurs. Sept. 17. Other programs will be of-
fered on Sept 21 at 3:00 pm
Resume Help
Career Planning and Placement Service
is offering a resume workshop in Wed.
Sept 16 at 3:00 and Thurs Sept 17 at 4:00
pm. The first 20 to come in will receive
workbooks and worksheets Other pro-
grams will be offered on Sept 22 at 300
pm.
Coffeehouse
The Student Union Coffeehouse
Committee is holding open auditions to
all bands interested in performing for up
coming events sponsered by the Coffee-
house Auditions will be Thurs. Sept. 24,
at 7:30 pm in the Coffeehouse; ground
floor of Mendenhall. Sign up no later than
Tuesday Sept 22 at Mendenhall.
Continuing Education
Personal development non-credit
courses are being offered: Guitar Unlim-
ited Nov. 3, Advanced Macros for Lotus 1-
2 3 Dec 5, Scuba Dec 28, Skin Diving and
Snorkeling Dec 28. In 1988, Hawaii vaca-
tionScuba Dive. For more information,
call 757-6143
You're Invited
Welcome Minority Pre-Med Reception
Thursday, Sept 17 at 6:00pm at the School
of Mediane Brody 2W40 Transportation
provided from Mendehall For More in-
formation call 551-2085 or 551 2500.
ECU Wrestling Club
Anyone interested in wrestling this
year on the ECU club team please rail
Tommy Lepppert at 752 1660 for more
information.
Pi Sigma Alpha
There is a Pi Sigma Alpha meeting at
5:00 on Thursday, September 17 All
members should attend.
Continuing Education
Representatives of Walt Disnev World
will be at ECU on September 29 & 30 to
recruit students for positions during
spring semester Contact the office of
Cooperative Education in the Rawl Build
ing for further details
Phi Sigma Pi
Students with a GPA of 3.3 or higher
and have completed between 32 and
credit hours are invited to attend Phi
Sigma Pi's meeting on September 22 at
7:30 pm in room 103 of the Biology build
ing.
Coral Reef Divg Club
People interested in )oining ECU's
Coral Reef Dive Club should call Glenn or
Rob at 752-4399 lor more information
Pre-Physical Therapy
Any sophomore (or higher) wanting to
make application to the Physical Therapv
program for May 1988 must go to the P T
Department (Aliied Health Bclk Build
ing) to confirm eligibility to apply To be
eligible, you must be able to complete all
general college and physical therapv pre
requisites by the end of spring semester
18 and have a competitive GPA Contact
the PT Dept bv mid September to con
firm eligibility and receive the I' T admiv
sion packet and application for the Allied
Health Professions Admission Test
Completed admission packet must bo
returned bv November 1, IW7 Applica-
tion deadline for the Al 1PAT in 101687
ECU Lacrosse
There is a players meeting Thursday
Sept. 17 at 4:00 m Memorial Gym for all
members and for those who are inter-
ested. Call Chns at 757-0305 if unable to
attend
"Prime Time"
Campus Crusade for Christ sponsors
Prime Time every Thursday at 7 30 pm in
Brewster C-103
Andre' Knle
Illusionist Andre Kole will be at ECU
September 29th at 7J0 pm in Wnght
Auditorium Tickets are on sale at Men-
denhall - students $2 00, public $5.00.
Intermediate Education
Any Intermediate Education maprs
are invited to attend a meeting on Mon-
day, September 21st at 430 p.m. in
Speight 312.
fall Retreat
The Presbyterian and Methodist Cam
pus Ministries will sponsor a retreat to
Camp Albermarle for relaxation and serv
ice this weekend The topic will be "Mary
and Martha, Peter and Jesus, You and
Me " Call 752-7240 for more infomaoon
SQCWCJ
Applicants for fall admission to the
SOCW7CJ Program must have truned in
their application for admission and com
pleted their first faculty interview by
October 14. 1987 The time and location of
the second interview with Gartman will
be announced for the end of Oct Applj
cants must have an overall GPA of 2 5 to
apply
Biology Club
The Biology Qub will is having a car
wash Sat Sept 26th from 9 a m. to 12 Of!
noon at the Burger King on 10th St The
cost is $2 00 per car
Blood Drive
Sponsored by AFROTC Sept 16andl7
from 12 00-6 00 Room 244 Mendenhall
Student Center Give the gift of life
University Unions
Tickets are on sale now for Madngal
Dinners to be held December 2-5, at
700pm in Mendenhall Student Center
Tickets are$10 00 for ECU students and
$16 OOforall others For more information
call the centra! ticket office at 757-6611
ext. 266
BACCHUS
Come join BACCHUS (Boosting Alco-
hol Consciousness Concerning The
1 iealth of University Students) Thursday
night. Sept 17 at 7 30 in Mendenhall Rm
8F
Attention Students
The cut-off date for ECU Gospel Choir
membership is Sept 22 Don't delay
Come now
Sophomores
Take the first step next summer toward
a commission as an Army officer It all
��tarts with summer camp at Fort kjiox
Kentuck v Vou may be eligible to compete
for a two-year Army ROTC scholarship
The six week camp pavs approximately
$8 � 00 For more information call
6967 or contact Captain .Mncheii at the
CCU Military Science Department Rm
319Erwin Hall
L'nLviriirLLjiiojis
The North Carokna Shakespeare Festi-
val will present A Midsummer Nights
Dream on Wednesday, Sept 23, Mt 8:00
pm Tickets are on safe now at the ceutrar
ticket office in Mendenhall Student Co.
ter For more information call 757-6611.
ext 266
Nursing Students
In order to receive vour nursing pin by
Dec orders must be placed in the Student
Stores no later than Sept 18,1987 Orders
should be placed at the jewlery counter
Continuing Education
Continuing Education is offering per
sonal development non-credit courses
through the month of Oct : Intermediate
Lotus 1-2-3 Oct 10, Advising Real estate
Clients Oct. 13, Coping with stress on the
job Oct 13, Introduction to Wordstar Oct
17, and Lotus 1-2-3 Functions and Formu-
las Oct. 24. For more info call 757-6143
Classifieds
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 2
bedroom apartment Private room,
shared bath, $110month, 13 utilities
Non-smoker, non-drinker, serious stu-
dent preferred. Call 355-3759.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: (MF) Private
room avail. Tar River Ests. Call Sandy or
Lisa 758-6950.
ONE BEDROOM: Special Tar River Es-
tates: $150 off 1st month rent when sign-
ing a 12 month lease or the option to sign
a 9 month lease. 1400 Willow St. 1 752-
4225.
TIRED OF YOUR ROOMMATE? Call
your Daddy then call me. One bedroom
condo at Ringgold Towers. Priced to sell.
Call Bob Rains at Caldwell Banker W.G.
Blount and Associates 756-3000 days or
355-2394 nights.
RINGOLD TOWERS - Apts for rent;
furnished. Contact Hollie Simonowich
752-2865.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share 2 bed-
room apartment. Private room $135 per
month and 12 utilities. Call 756-9248.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share a 2
bedroom apt. 5 blocks from campus. Pri-
vate room $120mo. and 1 2 utilities. Call
752-2310 between 2.30 and 4:30 daily.
FOR SALE
FOR ALL THE STUDENTS: Whomissed
the Grand Opening Extravaganza Open-
ing at Jenni K. Jewelry bring your ECU
I.D. and receive 30 off all sterling Jew-
elry: 608 Arlington Blvd. Suite E 355-
6714
CHEAP ROUNDTRIP AIRFARE: To
NYC. This ticket is 50.00 off Super Saver
price. For more info about this flight call
756-7397 or 758-1061 ask for Greg
Thaxton.
INVEST IN YOUR FUTURE- Invest in a
computer from IMEX International. We
have sales & service. Several configura-
tions available. For yours, call 758-8395
today.
ELECTROLYSIS: (Permanent removal
of unwanted hair) Big Barbara Venteis.
People who understand electrolysis will
not wax weeze or use electronic tweezer
on any other temperary method. Isn't it
time to try the permanent method. Call
830-0962 for free consultation.
GOVERNMENT HOMES. Delinquent
tax property. Repossessions. 805-687-
6000 Ext. L-1166.
NEED TYPING? Call Cindy - 757-0398
Call anytime after 5:00 p.m. Low rates
include: proofreading, spelling and gram-
matical corrections; professional service.
10 years experience IBM TYPING.
DISK JOCKIE: The imitations are simply
that. TRASHMAN DJ service, golden
grooversbody movers, new wax, new
wave, top 40, any mixer, social. Bar
Mitzpha; pool party, etc Contact 752-
3587. Having a party and need a DJ?
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24 hours
in and out. Guaranteed typing on paper
up to 20 hand written pages. SDF Profes-
sional Computer Services, 106 East 5th
Street (Beside Cubbies) Greenville, N.C
752-3694.
PICK UP AND DELIVERY: Of term
papers, theses, resumes to be typed. IBM
wordprocessing by professional with 13
years experience. Letter quality print and
professioanl editing. Call Nanette in
Griffon at 1-524-5241 Cheapcall - the best
service!
HANK'S HOMEMADE ICE CREAM
Join us after class, for lunch dinner, or
desert The perfect place to enjoy your
favorite ice cream with your favorite
friend Open til 11 00 p.m. (We're right
beside Wendy's on East 10th Street).
NEED A DJ: For your next party? I play
top 40 and dance. I'll beat Morgan or
anyother DJ's price. Call Mark at 752-4251.
IS IT TRUE: You Can Buy Jeeps for $44
through the U.S. government? Get the
facts today! Call 1-312-742-1142 Ext. 5271-
A.
ICE CREAM CAKESDelicious, deco-
rated and personalized with ANY mes-
sage. If you can think or it, we can write it
Hanks Homemade Ice Cream, 321 E. 10th
Street (between Wendy's and
McDonald's).
HELP WANTED
WANTED: Students interested in babysit-
ting. Mostly on week-ends. Transporta-
tion necessary. Call Mrs. Dunn at 355-
6852.
WHY BAKE? Try an ice cream cake!
Hank's Homeade Ice Cream. 758-0000
321 E. 10th St Greenville.
HELP WANTED: Disabled Student needs
morning assistant in dressing and groom-
ing. Salary negotiable. Contact Marty 752-
2994.
BELVOIR MANUFACTURING
NEEDS: Part-time, energetic student for
afternoons M-F. contact Mark Koehler,
758-9710.
JOIN IN OUR CELEBRATIONOur
newest mud pie YUM YUM YUM
YUM.
TUTOR NEEDED: For Acct. 2521 and
DSd 2223. Please call Lori at 752-73 and
leave message.
BRODY's has pan-time sales associates
positions for engthusiastic, out going
individuals who enjoy working with
young contemporary fashions. Good Sal-
ary. Apply in person, Brody's Personnel
Director, Carolina East mall M-W 2-4 p.m.
DESK CLERKS: The Holiday INN
Greenville is accepting applications for
postitions at front desk. Experience pre-
ferred, excellent starting pay. Must apply
in person, no phone calls pie
MACKENZIE SECURITY: Is seeking
students to work as part-time, weekend
security guards. Good Pay! Must have
dependable transportation to work
MUST have telephone. MUST NOT have
police record. Apply in person at 1127
South Evans Street. 758-2174.
BRODY'S FOR MEN: Has full-time and
part-time ?iles associates postitions, for
enthusiastic, fashion forward individu-
als. Retail Clothing experience is required.
Better than average starting salary. Apply
in person, Brody's Personnel Director,
Carolina East Mall M-W 2-4 pm.
PERSONALS
INTER VARSITY CHRISIAN FELLOW-
SHIP: Please Join US! Wednesday Night's
in Speight 129 at 7:00 pm. - Fun - Fellow-
ship - Food - Teaching
EVERYONE: BASKETBALL BLOWOUT
to support the Ronald McDonald House -
be around the Student Store Sept. 23-25.
You may win $100! sponsored by
Panhellenic and IFC
DID YOU READ ART'S PERSONALS?
If so, call the Central Ticket Office at 757-
6611, ext. 266, for a chance to win free
tickets for the N.C. Shakespeare Festival
production of A Midsummer Night's
Dream. Be sure to mention one of the
characters in the ad, and leave your name
and phone number. All entries must be in
�-y 6.00 p.m. Tuesday, September 22. The
Drawing will be held at 9:00 a.m. Wednes-
day, September 23rd. You need not be
present to win.
CORAL REEFERS: General meeting
Thurs. 917 at 7p.m. in the multi-purpose
room at Mendenhall! Be there to discuss
going down!
SIG EPS - What the heck! Chancellors cup
4??
ECU Did you know that the very best
ICE CREAM in the nation is right here in
Cieenville? It's Hank's Homemade Ice
Cream on 10th Street right beside
Wendy's
SIG EPS - Let's party on the lawn for the
Illinois game
DELTA ZETA: We would like to wish our
BETA PI pledges good luck on a raging
semester! Lorraine Andre, Maggie
Comwath, Jennifer Carpenter, Karen
Cope, Kirsten Eakes, Trich Frazier, Tncia
Gough, Jennifer Joumegan, Melinda
Lentine, Kathie McIIale, Marney McKee,
Charlotte Moffit, Robin Morrison, Karen
Rrevost, Melanie Queen, Lizzy Rand,
Melissa Richardson, Stephanie Ryan,
Tanya Smythe, Laurie Sodano, Diane
Spencer, Lori Stephenson, Shelley
Sumner, Kathie Ulrich, and Melinda
Walker. We're excited about having each
one of you as our future sisters.
PHI BETA SIGMA - There will be a Sigma
Dove interest meeting at 7:00 p.m. w
Room 221 Mendenhall Student Center,
Thursday, Sept. 17, 1987. Blue Phi
THE OMEGA PSI PHI Fraternity Inc
will have a party at the Cultural Center ori
Friday Sept. 18th from 9:00 p.m. to 2:00
LACROSSE - There will be a players
meeting today for all interested in playing
fall lacrosse. Memorial Gym downstairs
at 4:00. If you can not attend call Chris
757-0305.
KAPPA ALPHA PSI would like to sin-
cerely thank all students who participated
in last weekend's activities at the Wiz II
and the Cultural Center. The Nupes.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI little sister rush
September 22 and 23. Be there!
LOST: Guy's class ring. If found please
call 752-7253 ask for Paris. $Reward$.
ATTENTION all Seniors and Juniors!
Your 1985-86 yearbook is here and can be
pitked up at the Buccaneer office in the
Publications Building.
AZD's: Thanks a lot girls for one helluva
good time, the bus was rockin' and the
cabin was rollin the neighbors hated to
admit it, but even they had a good time
let's do it again, the PIKAS.
THETA CHI: It all began around mid-
night and continued right into daylight
The pool brought a great BIG SPLASH to
our Pref-Night Bash Thanks for the fun
and great time - we'll get dark shirts next
time Was it a dream'v Love, the Zeta's
ROBIN, will you let him stop you from
getting to know me' Slap me quick! Ken
PHI TAU'S: Thanks so much for a great
Pref-party The luau really made us feel
like natives. Hoped ya'll enjoyed the subs'
Love, the sisters and pledges of Chi
Omega.
DELTA ZETA: A little late but definitely
not forgotten. Hey Alpha Sigs - Partying
'til we didn't recall wasn't hard to do but
now that it's all over we're psvehed to do
it again with you' Shred it right, boys:
HCEHCS - How does a rendezvous on the
19th sound?
LESLIE Your doing a great job at PT.
Keep up the Kood work. AIM
AMANDA Congratulations! Your year
has only begun. I know you'll do a supper
job! AIM. VY
LAMDA CHI'S Thanks for inviting us
over for rush. We can't wait to party with
you and your new pledges! Love, the
AZD's.
PHI TAUS - Spectators wc will not be for
everyone must tee to see how hilarious it
will be to watch all the AZDs Try to be
golfers with all the rest - and will succeed
to be the BEST ARe you ready? Love, the
AZ's.
ART is still desperate! I don't know what
to do! Oberon has slipped Demetrius a
love potion (9) and the situation is worse
Now Titania is in love with an ass. Where
is Puck when I need him. Meet me at
Wright Auditorium for A Midsummer
Night's Dream Wednesday, September
23, at 8 p.m. Signed, 100 Natural Art.
TMFEASTCAtOIINlAN
New album re
by the Gospel
By CRETCHEN JOLRMGAN
Stiff Kntct
The ECU gospel choir is selling
their first contemporary good
album � "Land Called Glory
for $8.
The 10 recorded songs, includ-
ing "Nothing But the Blood
"He'll Make Everything Alright
and "Hold On were written and
composed by choir director Gre-
gory Horton
The choir began to learn and
practice the songs in September ot
1986. In January the album was
recorded live in Wright Audito-
rium by Megar Sound Studios
from Bailey, N.C.
There are approximately 12
members in the choir, all 1
students, who participated in the
recording In addition to the tradi-
tional choir accompaniments
(organ and piano), keyboard.
drums and bass guitar were used.
The album cover is a nature
scene which refers to the album s
title
Since its release in July, "Its
selling great said choir member
and past president. Sheila
Woo ten.
Choir members are distributing
the 1500 albums among students,
faculty, friends and family. All
profits made from the h. nd raiser
will help the choir financially for
their special tours.
During spring break, the choir
is tentatively planning to perform
in parts of New York, Philadel-
phia, Washington, D.C , Virginia
and Maryland.
This first album may be just the
beginning for bigger and better
fund raisers in the future savs
Wooten.
Radio stations in North Caro-
lina and Virginia are plavinc the
"lia��rCjiHecr Glory '
Wooten said evervbodv had
albumasucc
was record
trom thr �
the Culturd
hind th.
The albui
more a wan
and as a r I
have pined
Wooten
The
Hov
trib .
duct.
the
'en.
jhe
some ot the
bic teacher
their
A- . I
hap
on ca
The ch(
from
a -
tund rais
port
said V
Men
see wh,
instead are
reach th
The ch
area. The vpc
and schools
munities.
)


ij
i �
s
�X
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream! Hank's
Homade Ice Cream Hank's Homeade Ice
Cream
Facul
ECU's School of Art artist-m -residence Dtorr
Monday at 7:30 p.m. in lenkins Auditorium
A painter, pnntmaker and Rlrnrruki w
in Richmond, Ky. He graduated � Ml . MM I
and exhibits nationally Halbnxks i lea "Huai
He will discuss the evolution ot idea-
Examples of Halbrook s work are ptew
Faculty Exhibit, which ends Nturi4 �� �
employing both 3-D illusion and nvxiekv v v!
the edges of the painting surtace pcei�acvM n�rxe
Jenkins Auditonum and Gra tt va.V
information call 757-tvVV.
'


'�.���i'ipg��





cements
tail Retreat
md Methodist Carrt-
s wW sponsor a retreat to
relaxation and scrv-
. ipK- will be "Mary
lesus. You and
� r more intomahon
SQCM CJ
m tail admission to the
igram must have rruned in
m fat admission and com
- interview by
The time and location o
� with Cartman will
the end of (.Vt AppU
verd:iC,rAoi2.5to
Biology Club
� will is having a car
'� m9a.m to 12 00
King on IvXh St The
0 pet car
Blood Drive
Sept 16andl7
� - - T44 Mendenhall
ve the gift of life
versify L'nions
w tor Madngal
�ecetnber 2-5, at
Student Center
1 I students and
l ire in formation
� � " ice at 757-6611,
WCHUS
Boosting Alco-
� rcermng The
dents) Thursday
: Vcrtdenhall Rm.
Students
CU Gospel Choir
22 Don't delay
nQI�5
� � summer toward
v officer It all
p at Fort Knox,
"ble to compete
TC scholarship
� approximately
rmation, call 757-
n Mitchell at the
Department, Rm
nivgrsity Unions
ai lina Shakespeare Fesb-
A Midsummer Nights
Wednesday, Sept 23, at :00
ire on sale now at the central
r Mendenhall Srudert Ofl7
e information call 757-6611,
Nursing Students
. tve vour nursing pin bv
-t be placed in the Student
than sept 18, 1987 Orders
i a: the lewlery counter
uing.FduCjatioji
n is offering per-
rment non-credit courses
1 Intermediate
� vising Real estate
ping vth stress on the
� n to Wordstar Oct
tions and Forrrtu-
; info ca:i757-6143
around mid-
� daylight.
LASH to
ml for the fun
irt shirts next
� i the Zeta's
� : .ou from
�quick'Ken.
much for a great
illy made us feel
edya eninved the subs!
rs and pledges of Oii
: a, � �� ate but definitely
rha Sigs Partying
rasri t hard to do but
- we're psvehed to do
� i Shred it right, boys:
! low does a rendezvous on the
doing a great job at P.T.
� . d� rk AIM
AMANDA r :ratulations! Your year
I Know you'll do a supper
1 MDAHI'S Thanks for inviting us
�"� e can t wait to party with
a new pledges! Love, the
I 5
PHITAUS Spectators we will not be for
rle must tee to see how hilarious it
� watch all the AZD"s Try to be
rs with all the rest and will succeed
to be the BEST ARe you ready7 Love, the
in the
' r one hciluva
j- r ickin' and the
lire neighbors hated to
thev had a good time,
� AS
ART is still desperate! I don't know what
to do' Oberon has slipped Demetrius a
lot e potion (9) and the situation is worse.
Titania is in love with an ass. Where
k when I need him Meet me at
Wright Auditorium for A Midsummer
Night s Dream Wednesday, September
21 at 8 p m Signed, 100 Natural Art.
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream! Hank'a
Homade Ice Cream Hank's Homeade Ice
Cream
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
SEPTEMBER 17,1987 Page 7
New album released
by the Gospel Choir
Bv C.RETCHEN JOURNIGAN
Suit Wntcr
I he ECU gospel choir is selling
r lirst contemporary gospel
album � "Land Called Glory" �
$8.
"he 10 recorded songs, includ-
ing "Nothing But the Blood
He'll Make Everything Alright"
and Hold On were written and
imposed by choir director Gre-
gory Horton.
The choir began to learn and
practice the songs in September of
1986. In anuary the album was
recorded live in Wright Audito-
rium bv Megar Sound Studios
m Bailey, N.C.
There are approximately 125
members in the choir, all ECU
students, who participated in the
i ecording. In addition to the tradi-
nal choir accompaniments
-i;an and piano), keyboard,
drums and bass guitar were used.
The album cover is a nature
scene which refers to the album's
title.
Since its release in ulv, "Its'
selling great said choir member
and past president, Sheila
Wooten.
Choir members are distributing
the 1500 albums among students.
faculty, tnends and family. All
profits made from the fund raiser
will help the choir financially for
their special tours.
During spring break, the choir
is tentatively planning to perform
in parts of New York, Philadel-
phia, Washington, D.C Virginia
and Maryland.
This first album may be just the
beginning for bigger and better
fund raisers in the future says
Wooten.
Radio stations in North Caro-
lina and Virginia are playing the
Land Called Glory
wooten said everybody had
worked together to make the
album a success. Before the album
was recorded, the choir practiced
from three to four times a week in
the Cultural Center, located be-
hind the Student Health Center.
The album has made people
more aware of the gospel choir,
and as a result some new students
have joined the group, says
Wooten.
The choir thanked Chancellor
Howell for helping with the con-
tribution of $2,000 for album pro-
duction
"We've sold almost over half of
the albums since July said
Wooten.
She also said that she had sold
some of the gospel music to aero-
bic teachers who uses the music in
their exercise classes.
As sales increase, the choir an-
ticipates to reorder the recording
on cassette tapes.
The choir will perform music
from the album in Hendrix Thea-
ter on Sept. 29. The free show will
begin at 7 p.m.
Albums will be sold at the pro-
motional concert.
"The album has made the fac-
ualty and students pull together
in love and unity said Wooten.
She also said that through the
fund raiser she had made great
tnends and that when she gradu-
ates this year, she will miss the
choir greatly.
"So far, everyone has sup-
ported us bv buying the album
said Wooten.
Members arc not competing to
see who can sell the most, but
instead are working together te
reach their goal.
The choir is also active in the
area. They perform at area schools
and schools in neighboring com-
munities.
Members of the ECU Gospel Choir are shown here recording their music by the group's director, Gregory Hoton, costs $8 and is avail-
first album last spring. The album, which features some original able from any choir member.
It's a hassle
Parking is major campus pain
By LAURA SALAZAR
Stjff Vntrr
Vulgar language short pa-
tience tardiness to class
dented fenders careful reading
of signs these are all symptoms
of a disease called "Couldn't find
a parking space
Driving around all day looking
for a space is like trying to cor-
rectly answer a Trivial Pursuit
question about Robert Bork's
nomination to the Supreme
Court.
Am 1 eettinc the ixiint across?
it's such a hassle to park on cam-
pus.
When a space is found, it usu-
ally requires expertise maneuver-
ing and a graduate course
inParallel parking 1521 'ITiis is
especially true when a car doesn't
have power steering. Girls who
have cars without power steering
.ire easv to spot. They're the ones
with eight inch biceps.
Once thecar is properly parked,
a sigh of relief is extolled.
Then, when you finally go back
to retrieve your-mechanical mar-
vel, memory J aps� oct uts a nd the
car is nowhere to be found.
Faculty art
Darryl Hallbrook's "Loaf at D. Boon Hat"
ECU's School of Art artist-in-residence Darryl Halbrooks will present a slide-lecture on his work on
Monday at 7:30 p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium.
A painter, printmaker and filmmaker, Halbrooks is also professor of art at Eastern Kentucky University
in Richmond Ky. He graduated with a master's degree in fine art from Southern Illinois University in 1972
and exhibits nationally. Halbrooks is teaching at the School of Art for the fall semester as artist-in-residence.
He will discuss the evolution of ideas in his prints, drawings, and paintings.
Examples of Halbrook's work are presently on view at Gray Art Gallery as a part of the School of Art
Faculty Exhibit which ends Saturday. His paintings show a strong interest in abstract spacial relationships
employing both 3-D illusion and modeled color techniques. The effect is heightened as Halbrooks reshapes
the edges of the painting surface producing pieces which blur the boundaries of sculpture and painting.
Jenkins Auditorium and Gray Art Gallery are located in the Jenkins Fine Arts Center. For more
information call 757-6336.
It's as dark as tar outside and
every car looks the same. It takes
the entire night to find out that the
car was towed because the left
front tire was 2.5 inches over the
white line.
Face it, there just is nowhere to
park. When a space becomes va-
cant, automobiles rush to the
space like it holds the cure for
AIDS.
It's always funny to watch a car
accidentlv bump, dent or smash
into another car. The driver casu-
ally does a ISO of the premises to
check for any possible narcs in the
vicinity.
Some drivers cannot parallel
park. This, "Non-parallel parking
syndrome is characteristic of an
extra P chromosome under an
electron scanning microscope.
Try as they might, the "PP"
drivers continue their futile at-
tempt to properlv align their ve-
hicles in the "TP" fashion.
Since lack of parking space is as
frequent as an acne break-out, my
suggestion is to build a HOV
(high occupancy vehicle) parking
garage adjacent to the new build-
ing under construction. Bv the
way, there are no parkjug spaces
for the new building.
MTV awards no one saw on the boob tube
By MICAH HARRIS
Suff Writer
The MTV' Video Awards were
handed out last Friday in a show
based in Burbank, Calif. The show
spanned both the continent, the
Atlantic, and something of three
hours. . .and still all the awards
couldn't make it in the air time.
We of The East Carolinian Enter-
tainment page are proud to get the
scoop on these obscure, but no
less prestigious, music video
awards.
Best performance by a plucked
chicken in a music video: The
dancing plucked chickens in
"Sledgehammer
Conservation Award for most
creative recycling in a video:
Cyndi Lauper's newspaper skirt
in "True Colors
Best performance by a drag art-
ist in a video: Michael Jackson in
"Nasty" (his second year running
in this category).
Jim and Tammv Bakker
Award: 'True Colors" by Cyndi
Lauper.
Best video commercial for
album not available in any stores:
The Chuck Wagon Gang's
Golden Greats.
Best video performance by an
artist who is only sixteen: Debbie
Gibson.
Clearasil Award for video most
likely to be watched bv kids with
pimples: Anything bv Bon Jovi.
Best mascara in a music video:
Tie: Madonna and Nick Rhodes.
Best duct: Run-D.M.C. and
Cristy Lane for "One Day At A
Time" (rap version).
Best performance bv a sub-
human: Billy Idol.
Video artist who'd look at home
on a motorcycle, flanked by Hell's
Angels: The Grateful Dead's
Gerry Garcia.
Video most likely to be only
shown at three o'clock in the
morning: Anything bvYokoOno.
From the Not So fight
Molloy reads fan mail
By PAT MOLLOY
AMUtanl Sportj Erfiwr
Author's note: To thoze
whom I ophended in my last
ardikte bymisspetSng the word
'Reebok t offer my cinserest
apofagees. It is my moist fer-
vent wish that know harm has
come to you or your tuvd onez
stemming from this catostrofk
event.
From the time 1 began this col-
umn three years ago, I have re-
ceived mail from people asking
very intimate questions.
I usually answer these ques-
tions personally, feeling it is my
respon- sibiliry to my readers.
However, over the summer,
such an assortment of mis-
guided, off-the-wall tetters piled
up, I simply can't afford the post-
age. Hence, I'll answer them as
best I can in my own forum.
The first letter begins nicely
enough, but notice how the au-
thor strays into shades of Liber-
ace:
Dear Pat:
! read your column all the
tune and think you're a very
funny person. I heard some-
where that you're really mel-
low and like Jimmy Buffet if
this is true. I'd sure like to
spend some time with you
over a weekend. Could this
happen?
Sincerely,
Chock
Dear Chuck
I am an hilarious person. I
think listening to Jimmy
Buffett while I toss back a cold
brew is as close to heaven as a
man can get without having to
cease respiration. I also hap-
pen to own a gun the size of
most third-world countries,
and would not hesitate to use
it should you escape from
Behriew.
Mellowing out nicely.
thanks.
Pat MoUoy
Ah, the injustice of it all. Of
course, not all my correspon-
dence is so, uh, forward. Some-
times the people who write me
are hying to say things between
the lines. In these instances, I rely
on my keen knowledge of the
human animal to distinguish
anger from anguish:
Dear Pat:
You are an insidious moron,
incapable of any thought
process not beginning below
your beltline. As a humorist.
you are second even to the
creator of "Blondie And as for
your writing m generaL lVe
been more enthused about
reading maps. Should you,
after college, entertain the
idea of a career in journalism,
please consider that Andy
Rooney went into television. It
will be much appreciated.
Spare us all.
Richard Head
Dear Dick:
I mean that.
From here we drift into the
truly bizzarre. I used to think mat
people who write letters like the
following were from places
where Red Man and overalls are
the norm. However, after receiv-
ing this particular work of art,
I'm convinced of it.
Dear Pat:
I sure like your show. You're
about the funniest dude on
the tube. And that sweet
thang that turns tetters aint
half bad, neither. Say. boy, do
them Daimat ion statues bite?
And tell me somethin. sor,
about that woman Vanna. Are
those mombos real, or what?
Dang if you aint a hoot.
Pm Pullin' for ya, boy,
Jim Valvano.
Athletic Director
NCSli
DearJtm:
No. Vanna's mombos i
not real rm sorry I had to be
ttoeone totellyou, but rmsure i
T
I





8
THEE AS i A ROUN1A N
SI IM'l MKl'K 17, lsS7
New books reviewed
Michael Jackson is a concert smash in Japan
The Man Who Robbed the
Pierre By Ira Berkow An
theneum. 310 Pages. $17.95.
It you find yourself staring al
the same, familiar titles in the
mystery section oi your book
store, take a turn over to the non-
fiction section tor Ira Berkow's
Ihe Man who Robbed the IV
erre
I he reader who cnjo s the ami-
able rogue will find the characters
in this real life caper as colorful as
they would want A cut above the
nal thugsol the police blotter,
Comfort is the kind oi
who tips the hotel employ
v- left bound and gagged in a
l ted vault
1 ans ol the police procedural
ol will find a fine story ol how
�e is real!) broken. A piece of
k here and a stupid mistake
c and the biggest hotel rob-
bery in histor) is solved.
I here s no surprise ending 1 he
- is history and the reader
���show it is going to turn out
characters, thedeta d
Ol the heists and
kov� s skills as a ston teller
keep the reader's interest as we
follow Comfort as he grows from
voung hood to master criminal.
- nlike the criminals ol fiction,
1 omfort is a family man w ho lies
to his wife when he leaves home
d calls home on New
the night before he
nsin cash and jewels
from one of New York Cit) smosl
isive hot! Is wit
fhal was Comfort's iol
body vanished. And though it
wasn't known at the time, a fe-
male friend of the bookkeeper
had disappeared earlier and
probably also had been slain.
The publisher promotes 'The
CBS Murders" by Richard Ham-
mer as a story of "greed and vio-
lence in New York's Diamond
District That it was and then
some.
Bui it was the killing of the three
C BS men, all innocent of anything
except trying to aid a woman in
distress, that horrified New York-
ers beyond measure.
It led the mayor and top city
officials to order no resource
spared in snaring the perpetrator
tast. let it was to prove not so
easily done. It came very near
being the perfect crime.
In time, however, an appalling
tale of multimillion-dollar
swindles in the jewelry industry
was to unfold.Some of the revela-
tions were so astounding as to be
near unbelievable
1 Jammer has dime a superb job
of pulling all the incredible facets
ol the bizarrecase together in such
a way as to deep the reader truly
spellbound
Frank Stilley
For The Al
"g dead. The sum total of these
factors is one great piece of story-
telling. '
Barker has proved to be some-
thing more than a writer. He is a
student oi human nature. His
characters are studies of the intri-
cate workings oft he human mind.
His plot and subplots twist and
dance between mankind's most
private thoughts and its most
dreaded nightmares.
'The Damnation Game" is rep-
resentative oi science fiction at its
best. It evokes both fear and
thought Hns work accomplishes
what good sci-fi should. Gamble
on this sure thing.
William
Associ
at" )� fastello
ciated Press
TOKYO (AP) - Michael Jackson
"moon-walked gyrated and
postured through 16 songs before
a sell-out crowd of 38,000 frenzied
fans at a baseball stadium Satur-
day night, making his first concert
appearance in more than four
years.
The singer drew shrieds of
"Mai-ke-ru the Japanese pro-
nunciation of Michael, as he
sailed through his array of styl-
ized poses, karete kicks and his
trademark moon-walking � slid-
ing backward while appearing to
move forward.
"Ordinary people just can't
move like that. It's superhuman.
Nobody has talent like that said
Atsuko Nogi, 22.
The 29-year-old American su
Iperstar dazzled the crowd of
Sturdy Cotton Duck
Flip Chairs
vofue 49.99
mostly Japanese at Korakuen Sta- with Jackson, changing into doz-
dium with an array of special ef- ens of different costumes ranging
fects during the nearly two-hour from spacemen decked out with
extravaganza. But thedancesteps fiber-optic lights to ghouls
and all but two of the songs were It took a while for Jackson to
largely recycled, vintage Jackson warm the crowd up. Early at-
standards. tempts to have the audience sing
About 700 lights, 100 speakers, along fell flat But most of the
two 24-by-18 foot screens and audience was on its feet and roar-
three lasers using 40 mirrors cre-
ated a set at times reminiscent of a
Steven Spielberg movie. Jackson's
spokesmen refused to disclose the
cost of the production.
Four dancers, four singers and
seven musicians shared the ;
ing before the finale.
It was thefirst showof Jackson'
13-conccrt Japan tour and kicked
off a world solo tour that will take
him to Australia, New Zealand,
Europe and the United States
,&
W
High density foam
�?
cotton duck in assorted
colors Great for dcxrr.s
vacation homes
recreation rooms and mor
y
c
" The Damnation C �ame
live barker. Ace Putnam
Ri
$18.95.
�nc wins when gambling
with a demon in Clive Barker's
thriller, he I damnation Game
No one that is. except the reader
rhisisa dark fantas) alx ul the Friday 13th Parts 1, 2. & 3
y
Plaza Cinema
PLAZA SHP CTB 756O0M
dalleria
!�� Sorth Ridqe DURHAM � North
GkEENIVI
Nlorthgate Ma
LATE SHOWS
Sic All 3 For $2.50
hungers and frailties that drive
the human animal. The story fol
lews the lite of a com icted thiel
w hois hired to protect a captainof STARTING FRIDAY
industn from his past. The tv HELLRAISER-R-
coon had once been a thief him SUMMER HEAT -R-
RACK ROOM
:v
.K
A' HILLS COI
Cm
mi
In the dark days at the end i!
World War 11. the tycoon had
gambled tor mortal stakes with a
; tsei a demon and won. He'd never real-
ized that win r lose, he would
still be called to pay in the end.
The roles ol good and evil shut
from character to character. The
icl characters reveal their complex
" indana natures as the story unfolds. The
"� �'� red as a - intricate!) twisting Mot iss a
keeper p � tta cairn i upon the reader.
ihotto barker creates a hellish land
scape that he populates with the
damned thedyingand thcwalk-
R
I hat wasn t al
IF YOU GET
HAY FEVER OR
ASTHMA
IN THE FALL
vviiifei

� � �
� �; en to men
and women
ages is or�
�Free Skin
Testing
c-�-j��
5 Vv-
Join Our Research Study
Department of Family Medicine
ECU School of Medicine
551-4614
" ll'iu d-a uawv ftamw2oJt"
JEAN HOPPER
BROKEROWNER
Res. 919756-9142
Whether it's Ringgold Towers Comtos or
single family homes, we caq find a place for
you:
?8t7 Cranes B'v i
Q .r,no ?J e?l
919 355 5866
Pert Theatre
STARTS FRIDAY
ROBOCOP -R-
$1 50 ALL TIMES
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
10 OFF
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
OPEN MON-SAT 1 0-9 (EXCEPT AIGNER WIRE AND
, SUNDAY l-6 REEBOK)
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
Livi )i up your Listening with the Latest in Roek. Backed by our exclusive No Risk Guaranty
e.
MAT FARMERS
llii Pursuit of Happiness ficg�as
San Diego band's third effort combines
1� r.i traiing lyru s & roots ink rhythms with
plenh nt hui guitar Includes "Dark Light"
$V-
-V
W't,
t
ifc
m
ECHO ATHE HMIM
A softer, more introspective
approach mark this new collection
from always-adventurous British favoni
$6.49
DANNY WftSOM Meet Damn ilsou
I'K trio mixes sweet sentiment & slick f T"
sophistication maperfect 0 i0 blend of Reach ' �
How - Steel Dan F�
fr.n, i
nil Man
LP or CS
EACH
$12.99
On Sale Through September 30th
�"� The Sound of Music -A
First album in thrtv vt-ars trom Rroup nhnsi e
-Jin�s braitht i, u lit, into r�k " iKofn-rt
Calmer New York Times
The latest findings to music and video
THE PLAZA � CAROLINA EAST MALL
Thomas Clancv wri
said 1
he in

.
NEW YORK (AP)- Tom Clancv
was an English major in college
but he earned his living as an in
suranceagent until his first novel,
"The Hunt for Red G tobrr h
came a best seller in 198S
The book, which was publ;
by the Naval Institute f'n-
Annapolis, Md , has sold more
than 300,000 copies in hard.
and 3 million in paperback Itwaj
based on newspaper articles in
the mid-1970s about a S.
stroyer whose crew ur
fully attempted to defect k
den
Oancy's latest novel. "Patriot
Games was published
weeks after his sevond r,
"Red Storm Rising appear
paperback
"Red Storm Rising ' ba
scenario for a war game
published in 1986 It wad
hardcover bestseller lists foi
nearly a year and hj
than 1 million copies
sales are expected to b
millions.
"Empire Lanes" selli
ST. CLOUD, Vh.in
ing once been an aspir �
himself, Peter Gross has n
grudge against the world ol
art. He just seems to en .
ing his nose at it once in a u
Gross, a 29-year-old St (
native, former St. John's Univer-
sity student and now a residi - I
Duluth, is the creator of the
comic book series, "En
Lanes and is owner of its i
formed, five-person publishing
company. Northern Lights Pub-
lishing Inc. based in Duluth.
Gross' family moved from St
Cloud to Bloomington when he
was 5 years old. He later lived in
Chicago, where he dropped
high school to attend an al
tive school. He then enrolled at St
John's in 1975 as a fine arts n
before moving on to graduate
school at the University of Wis-
consin-Superior.
Gross said he had first learned
to draw from reading Batman,
Superman and Spiderman comics
as a child, but had wanted to be a
serious artist for as long as he
could remember.
"It was just apflSSIHIe job op-
tion, lie said of the comics
"I always considered myself an
artist first, and I thought somedav
I'd do a comic book just beca
always wanted to do one"
These priorities quid
changed, however, when c r
left Wisconsin-Superior and
ized making a living as an .
wasn't that easy.
Swallowing his artistic ambi-
tions, he returned to his first love
-comics.
Gross got one pb through Mar-
vel Comics after sending them
some samples of his work. But he
got discouraged by the length ot
time it took to hear back from
them and to get paid.
"I thought I'd be better off just
trying my own stones he sa;d
"And I improved immenselv the
day I decided tc do w hat I w anted
to do instead of what I thought the
company wanted to do
What he wanted to do was cre-
ate and publish a series that
wasn't "super-hero stuff had a
little more of "an '80s look to it
and had a little more meaning
qui
Tht
- you re i
book artist!
"P
arc.
thinl
but
i
1
in
Th
Draft
Ladies Frei
65c t
Frl
4:00 7:00
85 Tal
Sir

I
s HWMMW
IvI�i
A





8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 17, 1987
New books reviewed
"The Man Who Robbed the
Pierre Bv Ira Bcrkow. An-
theneum. 310 Pages. $17.95.
If you find yourself staring at
the same, familiar titles in the
mvstery section of your book-
store, take a turn over to the non-
tktion section for Ira Berkow's
The Man who Robbed the Pi-
erre
Ilie reader who enjoys the ami-
able rogue will find the characters
in this real life caper as colorful as
they would want. A cut above the
normal thugs of the police blotter,
Bobby Comfort is the kind oi
hood who tips the hotel employ-
ees left hound and gagged ma
depleted vault.
fans of the police procedural
school will find a fine story of how
a case is really broken. A piece of
luck here and a stupid mistake
there and the biggest hotel rob-
bery in history is solved.
There's no surprise ending. The
case is history and the reader
knows how it is going to rum out.
But the characters, the detailed
plotting of the heists and
Berkow's skills as a storvteller
keep the reader's interest as we
tollow Comfort as he grows from
young hood to master criminal.
L nlike the criminals of fiction,
- omfort is a family man who lies
his wife when he leaves home
body vanished. And though it ing dead. The sum total of these
wasn known at the time, a fe- factors is one great piece of s torv
male friend of the bookkeeper telling.
had disappeared earlier and
probably also had been slain.
The publisher promotes 'The
CBS Murders" by Richard Ham-
mer as a story of "greed and vio-
lence in New York's Diamond
District That it was � and then
some.
But it was the killing of the three
CBS men, all innocent of anything
except trying to aid a woman in
distress, that horrified New York-
ers beyond measure.
It led the mayor and top city
officials to order no resource
spared in snaring the perpetrator
- tast. Yet it was to prove not so
easily done. It came very near
being the perfect crime.
In time, however, an appalling
tale oi multimillion-dollar
swindles in the jewelry industry
was to unfold. Some of the revela-
tions were so astounding as to be
near unbelievable.
Hammer has done a superb job
of pulling all the incredible facets
of the bizarre case together in such
a way as to deep the reader trulv
spellbound.
Frank Stillev
For The AP
and calls home on ew
ve. the night before he
steals millions in cash and jewels
from one of New York City'smost
exclusive hotels.
That was Comfort's job
Berkow's is to apply his consider-
By
379
skills
S .is a ru
us fascinating store.
spa penman
A
Sam Bo) le
isociated Press
The CBS Murders
Rich-
ages.
ard Hammer. Morrow. 220
Slo.95.
In the spring of 1982 New York
City was gripped bv one ot the
strangest, ugliest and most sensa-
tional murder cases in the city's
modern history.
The victims were three men,
respectable cil . and all em-
ployees ot the Columbia Broad-
casting System, and an attractive
woman newly hired as a book-
keeper bv a Manhattan camera
service shop. They were all shot to
death at a West Side parking lot.
That wasn't all. The woman s
The Damnation Game.
Give Barker. Ace-Putnam
Pages. SIS.95.
No one wins when gambling
with a demon in Clive Barker's
thriller, "The Damnation Game
No one, that is, except the reader.
This is a dark fantasy about the
hungers and frailties that drive
the human animal. The storv fol-
lows the life of a convicted thief
who is hired to protect a captain of
industry from his past. The ty-
coon had once been a thief him-
self.
In the dark days at the end of
World War II, the tycoon had
gambled for mortal stakes with a
demon and won. 1 le'd never real-
ized that win or lose, he would
still be called to pay in the end.
The roles of good and evil shift
from character to character. The
characters reveal their complex
natures as the store- unfolds. The
intricately twisting plot casts a
spell upon the reader.
Barker creates a hellish land-
scape that he populates with the
damned, the dying and the walk-
IF YOU GET
HAY FEVER OR
ASTHMA
IN THE FALL
xxMid
-Free
Exan
�Tree
Allergy
unation
medicines
� � �
�Open to men
and women
ages 18 or older
�Free Skin
Tesiirm
Join Our Research Study
Department of Family Medicine
ECU School of Medicine
551-4614
" (l Vu di llcuxv PvomWoaJt '
JEAN HOPPER
BROKEROWNER
Res. 919756-9142
Whether it's Ririggdfd Towers Condon or
single family homes, ye can find a place for
Barker has proved to be some-
thing more than a writer. He is a
student of human nature. His
characters are studies of the intri-
cate workingsof the human mind.
His plot and subplots twist and
dance between mankind's most
private thoughts and its most
dreaded nightmares.
'The Damnation Game" is rep-
resentative of science fiction at its
best. It evokes both fear and
thought. This work accomplishes
what good sci-fi should. Gamble
on this sure thing.
William J.Castello
ciated I're
Assoc
ress
Michael Jackson is a concert smash in Japan
TOKYO (AP) - Michael Jackson mostly Japanese at Korakuen Sta- with Jackson, changing into doz-
moon-walked gyrated and dium with an array of special ef- ens of different costumes ranging
postured through 16 songs before fects during the nearly two-hour from spacemen decked out with
a sell-outcrowd of 38,000 frenzied extravaganza. But thedancesteps fiber-optic lights to ghouls,
fans at a baseball stadium Satur- and all but two of the songs were
day night, making his first concert largely recycled, vintage Jackson
appearance in more than four standards.
years
The singer drew shrieds of
"Mai-ke-ru the Japanese pro-
nunciation of Michael, as he
sailed through his array of styl-
ized poses, karete kicks and his
trademark moon-walking � slid-
ing backward while appearing to
move forward.
Ordinary people just can't
move like that. It's superhuman.
Nobody has talent like that said
Atsuko Nogi, 22.
The 29-year-old American su-
pcrstar dazzled the crowd of
About 700 lights, 100 speakers,
two 24-by-18 foot screens and
three lasers using 40 mirrors cre-
ated a set at times reminiscent of a
Steven Spielberg movie. Jackson's
spokesmen refused to disclose the
cost of the production.
Four dancers, four singers and
seven musicians shared th
It took a while for Jackson to
warm the crowd up. Early at
tempts to have the audience sing
along fell flat. But most of the
audience was on its feet and roar-
ing before the finale.
It was the first show of Jackson's
13-cor ' -an tour and kicked
off tour that will take
him i . .vistralia, New Zealand,
Europe and the United States.
LATE SHOWS
Friday 13th Parts 1. 2. & 3
See All 3 For $2.50
STARTING FRIDAY
HKLLRAISER -R-
SUMMER HEAT-R-
EVERLY HILLS COP D -R-
STARTS FRIDAY
ROBOCOP -R-
$1.50 ALL TIMES
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
RACK ROOM
TDE
tw
TAKE AN
Greenville Buyer's Market E-X-T-R-A
Memorial Drive 10 OFF
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
OPEN MON-SAT 10-9 (EXCEPT AIGNER. NIKE AND
.SUNDAY 1- 6 REEBOK)
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
1
I
I
I
I
Liven upyour Listening with the Latest in Rock. Backed by our exclusive No Risk Guarantee.
SLAT FARMERS
The I'until t of Happiness etattftl
San Diego band's third effort combines
penetrating lyrics & roots-rock rhythms with
plenty o! hot xintar. Includes "Dark Light"

��"�'
KMOA1WL
A softer, more introspective
approach marks this new collection
from always-adventurous British favorites.
$6.49
LPorCS .
Meet Danny Wilson
UJC. trio mixes sweet M-ntimen! & slick
sophist icat ion in a perfect 50-50 Wend of Beach
Boys & Steely Dan Features the hit "Mary's
Prayer
tf"
On Sale Through September 30th
!� The Sound of Music -M-
First album in three vears from group whose fl
songs "brrathi mu hh into rock " (Rh-n CIX
Palmer. New York Times)
(Robert
The'latestfindingsih' Music and video
THE PLAZA � CAROLINA EAST MALL
Thomas Clancy wri
NEW YORK (AP) - Tom Clancy
was an English major in college,
but he earned his living as an in-
surance agent until his first novel,
The Hunt for Red October be
came a best seller in 1985.
The book, which was published
by the Naval Institute Press of
Annapolis, Md has sold more
than 300,000 copies in hardcover
and 3 million in paperback. It was
based on newspaper articles in
the mid-1970s about a Soviet de-
stroyer whose crew unsuccess
fully attempted to defect to Swe-
den.
Clancy's latest novel, "Patriot
Games was published two
weeks after his second novel,
"Red Storm Rising appeared in
paperback.
"Red Storm Rising based on a
scenario for a war game, was
published in 1986. It wad on the
hardcover best-seller lists for
nearly a year and has sold more
than 1 million copies. Paperback
sales are expected to be in the
millions.
"It is rat!
books are!
said in a tell
he insists,
novel adj
� and "a
his work gl
Clancy
agent sho
from Loyal
Baltimore
writing tici
decided
could be pj
He no lo
insurance
land thai
chased in
Wanda s
Thes
much ot hj
ing at hi'
nth
hoursa d.i
fourth no
to be fmi-
year
The
rm suburb!
"Empire Lanes" selli
ST. CLOUD, Minn. (AP) - Hav-
ing once been an aspinng artist
himself, Peter Gross has no real
grudge against the world of fine
art. He just seems to enjoy thumb-
ing his nose at it once in a while
Gross, a 29-year-old St. Cloud
native, former St. John's Univer-
sity student and now a resident of
Duluth, is the creator of the new
comic book series, "Empire
Lanes and is owner of its newly
formed, five-person publishing
company. Northern Lights Pub-
lishing Inc. based in Duluth.
Gross' family moved from St.
Cloud to Bloomington when he
was 5 years old. He later lived in
Chicago, where he dropped out of
high school to attend an alterna-
tive school. He then enrolled at St.
John's in 1975 as a fine arts major
before moving on to graduate
school at the University of Wis-
consin-Superior.
Gross said he had first learned
to draw from reading Batman,
Superman and Spiderman comics
as a child, but had wanted to be a
serious artist for as long as he
could remember. ,�.� �
"It was just fy&SSBtpb op-
tion he said of Sfe comics
"I always considered myself an
artist first, and I thought somedav
I'd do a comic book just because I
always wanted to do one
These priorities quicklv
changed, however, when Gross
left Wisconsin-Superior and real-
ized making a living as an artist
wasn't that easy.
Swallowing his artistic ambi-
tions, he returned to his first love
-comics.
Gross got one job through Mar-
vel Comics after sending them
some samples of his work. But he
got discouraged by the length or
time it took to hear back from
them and to get paic
"I thought I'd be better off just
trying my own stories he said
"And I improved immensely the
day I decided to do what I wanted
to do instead of what I thought the
company wanted to do
What he wanted to do was cre-
ate and publish a series that
wasn't "super-hero stuff had a
little more of "an '80s look" to it
and had a little more meaning
than
during a re
Drawing
gam'
� .ndn.6
penod anc
Chka
then
alley
Chk
Gr
pub
"Hamm.
Cle
thieves i
Chk
Bu-
out in D
quick pro
The
two
"Wher
thinking
goes the
you're ft
But
around a 1
thinking,
but it's
peopleare
book. If 1
people wot
in mv lifetq
Gr,
thing to a
"Empire
itself and
slow down
"Eventua
going to be,
on life hel
able to chal
in subtle
Th
Draft
Ladies Fre
650 ti
Fri
4:00 - 7:00
65 Ti
Su
65$ Ti

�� p
�WP

��.
�4t4





Iron cert smash in Japan
n m.j with lackson, changing into doz
al ot ens v-t different costumes ranging
ii from spacemen decked out with
st� ps fiber optic lights to ghouls.
it It took a while for lackson to
n warm the crowd up Early at-
pts to have the audience sing
fell flat But most of the
re was on its feet and roar-
; h fore the finale.
is the first show ofJackson's
icerl a pan tour and kicked
I solo tour that will take
tralia, New Zealand,
and the I'mted States.
Tuesday. September 29. 1987
tO PM
Wright Auditorium
:?00 per student$5.00 non-student
OM
1
I
i
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
10 OFF
RYDAY LOW PRICE
NIKE AND
KEBOK)
i o Risk (htarantce
DANNY WUSOM 7, , ,�� U ��
P
TMi dB � Ihe Soioirf of tfusir
I
fc and video
EAST MALL
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 17, 1987
Thomas Clancy writes adventure fiction with technical skill
NEW YORK (AP) - Tom Clancy
was an English major in college,
but he earned his living as an in-
surance agent until his first novel.
The Hunt for Red October be-
came a best seller in 1985.
The book, which was published
by the Naval Institute Press of
Annapolis, Md has sold more
than 300,000 copies in hardcover
and 3 million in paperback. It was
based on newspaper articles in
the mid-1970s about a Soviet de-
stroyer whose crew unsuccess-
fully attempted to defect to Swe-
den.
Clancy's latest novel, "Patriot
Games was published two
weeks after his second novel,
Red Storm Rising appeared in
paperback.
"Red Storm Rising based on a
scenario for a war game, was
published in 1986. It wad on the
hardcover best-seller lists for
nearly a year and has sold more
than 1 million copies. Paperback
sales are expected to be in the
millions.
"It is rather amazing that all my
books are best sellers Clancy
said in a telephone interview. But,
he insists, "anyone can write a
novel adding that his computer
� and "a superb editor" � help
his work go relatively smoothly.
Clancy became an insurance
agent shortly after graduating
from Loyola College in his native
Baltimore in 1969. He didn't start
writing fiction until 1982, when he
decided to write "something I
could be proud of
He no longer works at the small
insurance agency in rural Mary-
land that he and his wife pur-
chased in 1980, although his wife,
Wanda, still works there.
These days, Clancy spends
much of his time at home, work-
ing at his computer. He starts at
8:30 in the morning, putting in 4-6
hours a day. He is working on his
fourth novel, which is scheduled
to be finished at the end of this
year.
The walls of Clancy's office at
his suburban home are lined with
about 3,000 books, many of which
reflect the author's life-long fasci-
nation with technology. Clancy
has been reading military books
since childhood.
"I mainly like technology, and
the military has the nicest toys
he says. However, Clancy adds,
contrary to what his fans might
think, not all of the books in his
study are about weapons.
Although his novels have been
described as being filled with
technical details about military
hardware and weaponry, Clancy
says "the technology is over-
stated He says he would rather
describe his books as being about
"people in crisis
For example, Clancy says one of
the points he is trying to make in
his latest novel is that "victims of
terrorism aren't abstractions
Jack Ryan, the hero of "Red
October returns in "Patriot
Games" to battle a renegade ter-
rorist group.
Clancy says the main questions
the novel asks are: "What is ter-
rorism? What are the terrorists
after? What is their mehtodol-
ogy? How should we deal with
terrorism as a fact of life?"
ECU HILLEL WELCOME YOU!
ATTENTION JEWISH STUDENTS
PLEASE ATTEND OUR OPENING
GET-TOGETHER
T MEETGREETEAT N
at
1420 E. 14th St.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17
8:15 p.m.
Call 830-1138 for infodirectionsrideetc.
"Empire Lanes" sells well
ST. CLOUD, Minn. (AP) - Hav-
ing once been an aspiring artist
himself, Peter Gross has no real
grudge against the world of tine
art. He just seems to enjoy thumb-
ing his nose at it once in a while.
Gross, a 29-year-old St. Cloud
native, former St. John's Univer-
sity student and now a resident of
Duluth, is the creator of the new
comic book series, "Empire
Lanes and is owner of its newlv
formed, five-person publishing
company. Northern Lights Pub-
lishing Inc. based in Duluth.
Gross' family moved from St.
Cloud to Bloomington when he
was 5 years old. He later lived in
Chicago, where he dropped out of
high school to attend an alterna-
tive school. He then enrolled at St.
John's in 1975 as a fine arts major
before moving on to graduate
school at the University of Wis-
consin-Superior.
Gross said he had first learned
to draw from reading Batman,
Superman and Spiderman comics
as a child, but had wanted to be a
serious artist for as long as he
could remember. �- -
"u was just ryas&e&iptfop?'
tion he said of the comics.
"1 always considered myself an
artist first, and I thought someday
I'd do a comic book just because I
always wanted to do one
These priorities quickly
changed, however, when Gross
left Wisconsin-Superior and real-
ized making a living as an artist
wasn't that easy.
Swallowing his artistic ambi-
tions, he returned to his first love
- comics.
Gross got one job through Mar-
vel Comics after sending them
some samples of his work. But he
got discouraged by the length of
time it took to hear back from
them and to get paid.
"I thought I'd be better off just
trying my own stories he said.
"And I improved immensely the
day I decided to do what I wanted
to do instead of what I thought the
company wanted to do
What he wanted to do was cre-
ate and publish a series that
wasn't "super-hero stuff had a
little more of "an '80s look" to it
and had a little more meaning
than most comics do, he said
during a recent visit to St. Cloud.
Drawing on his interest in the
game, "Dungeons & Dragons
his fondness for the medieval
period and his familiarity with
Chicago, Gross came up with
"Empire Lanes
"Empire Lanes" is the story of
seven fantasy adventurers forced
to flee their world by jumping
through a magic hole that leads
them into the back of a bowling
alley on the south side ofl987
Chicago.
Gross wasn't sure how well the
public would react to a storyline
featuring characters named
"Hammerioot" and "Erick the
Clcrick mixing it up with
thieves and punks in modern-day
Chicago.
But the first issue, which came
out in December 1986, made a
quick profit, selling 24,000 copies.
The second sold 12,000 copies in
two weeks.
"When I started out, I was
thinking to myself, 'Well, here
goes the dreams of being an artist
- you're just going to be a comic
book artist .
"But I'm starting to come
around a little in my own way of
thinking he said. "It's cheap art,
but it's nice knowing 25,000
people are going to read my comic
book. If I was painting, 25,000
people would never see my work
in my lifetime
Gross also hopes to say some-
thing to a wider audience once
"Empire Lanes" has established
itself and he has and a chance to
slow down the storyline.
"Eventually, this comic book is
going to be a vehicle for my views
on life he said. "So I might be
able to challenge political things
in subtle, allegorical ways
The Cut Above
Student Specials
20 OFF Permanent Waves
We Listen Before We Cut.
Men: $8.00 Women: $10.00
Includes Shampoo and Cut.
Hours: 9 - Until
TRY OUR WOLFF TANNING BED1
201 E. 5th Street
757-1488
No
Appointment
Necessary!
f
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
Adults s2.oo5
CHILDREN,
ANYTIME
BUCCANEER MOVIES
r 756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
DRAGNET
2:00-4:30 - 7:00-9:15
Rated PC 13
Rated R
THREE KINDS OF HEAT
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
FULL METAL JACKET
2:00-4:30-7:00-9:15
Togs Factory Out lot
1900 Dickinson Avenue
OFF SUMMER
MERCHANDISE!
20
Featuring the Hottest Beach Fashions,
Casual Wear, and Famous Brands.
Everything In Store Except Hosiery
imOmMv
1 Ovanwns � Ctoaaoute
� Famous Names That We Cannot Mention
TROCADERQ
Tenk Tope, Tank Oreeeee, Bicycle rents. Walk Short.
a Tape
Jejni Camp SMrta, Shorts, Stacks, Pullovers a The Original T-
ms. 100 Cotton (Unisex)
PffhffH HA T-shirt
If you ore a newcomer to town, we invite you to
visit our store at 1900 Dickinson Avenue. If you
are going to the beach at Morehead City, visit our
new location on Hwy. 70 (just across from
BoJangles).
Shop Tho Store Nearest You i �
Hwy. S4E Between
Bethel and Tarboro
Conotoo, N.C.
Wed. - Sat. 9-5
Nassau St.
Youngsville, N.C.
WedFri. 9:30-5
Saturday 9:304
ISVtMi
"North China J
CHINESE RESTAURANT
TBEST FOOD IN TOWN!
MonFri. Luncheon Special
(11:30 -3:00 p.m.)
$3.25
Sat. & Sun. ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
Luncheon Buffet
(12-3:00 p.m.)
$4.95
Buffet includes: 5 or 6 entrees. 2 appetizers,
soup, homemade desserts.
99C for ALL KINDS OF BEER (Sun wed )
Hours: MonThurs.
Fn.
Sat.
Sun.
11:30 10:00 p.m.
11:30-11:00 p.m.
12-11.00 p.m.
12 10:00 p.m.
520 W. Greenville Blvd Greenville. N.C. 27834
355-5360 (Carry Out Service)
ABC Permit
Banquet Facilities Available
?? j�j,r�-j�ji
?j;j'5Jj4j;s)5V't5ts �-?�'
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$205 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at
additional cost. Prcgnanc Test, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For
further information, caJl 832-0535 (toll free
number: 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. weekdays. General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
s!It?s Here
THE FALL87'SORORITY
RUSH AFFAIR
Thursday
is
Draft Night
Ladies Free - $1.50 Guys
650 tails too!
Friday
4:00 - 7:00 Free Admission
65 Tails All Day
Sunday
65 � Tails All Night
h
:wl

f kA4. w (JekoME Vou. to A
A Z of Un�T�D quSH coJv�CATlw,
vSTvieneienhalJ Alulti purpose Roorv
Dite: sept.2.0 197 yVp-n r
in in m niiimmw)

' t I





10
Jill 1AM t AKPI INIAN SEPTEMBER 17, 1W
TTTTTYy
STUDENT COMICS
xxzxxxzz
Wulkin'Thc Plank
IIIIITTIIITTTT
I V
Mi J AtAkY MRP 7
( uu vAjoepl
By A-GUY I ndercover !ats
K$NI�;Yft t(MAKH WiU roMt klri�M
As A 6IHX&W 1 r,
THE CQMINQ OF
B PARK! K
�' m- iuKi foil am i fi awvioB &haw?
-V iAv� i J flmi ft dig; ft.V 0W'1 i(Ailt 5�J
Ultx ' � �i �- iu X' sro iJ f�lj (JoMW
5Mota �.a moo anMin6 a r�
uf - rtp M.�vf '�
YtltMt rUflC MWI �h: .Aa A n U
91 m vi t ; � (Hi M . v j " j.
Thi
fe'
1 ,j a
V
c'41
fW
OMrkill
-� �
AW -to roll ! y
�'
.4 itV&$
n�
WAf ?i
M FRIEDRICl
" � ����� ��� �� � �
HCBii
�� Vfl i 44cn- lWu,
( iimpus ("omics
Vol 1 No 1
The Beast Carolinian
UNDERCOVER
CATS SOLVE
MYSTERY
By Robert Mazzoli
Frank's Ba or. S Hut Street a. -� kei I i I
robtwd last Friday vg' rhe cit r depa
stupped b :hr :hieve. called i Pt u D�v, �
Undercover OaU, foi assistance
Sid Frank, pr p- v � � � - -4- � H -
cops heal when il - mo I tiCM � rhey'rt I
viousl ihe cootesl tteteci .?� aj td
Later, semper compu agr cub dei wd toe tcqua r
miser Sed. patre ei maier sum esi gloria I raiK Mar
cus servare huic felinimus semprt dn virgims
Idokj kis adlkssl Jkiffjkkss id aidkjfdfdi fddkfi dkfdf
.Iddikd kff:fkff8ifkaf kfim � ud, gddu
MARTIAN WOMAN
RAISED BY WOLVES
GIVES BIRTH TO
ELVIS-AND LIVES!
B Jeff Parker
In a Mi.prise development, thens .�.� d -c
phanes reamed up to create a rock album with the i
Lennof to fai� mone tor btomacharuca rnnisnu a
Photo by Daniel Maurer
cFENSTERj
m UiTTuE DARLIM6,
HOrAE FRO COLLEGE
FOK THE WEEKEMI!
c :
PC-
5HCPPI!
LOT Q
S T (A
X ONLN rtfp
IN i
B BAR HOI
THE VAMPIRE
by Mklver
rITus7"l�Vf VATlifW
Tf?E�i, 6,33. 6RD??
r

tmtaimm
AfTHK VvtK AT
THE HOSPITAL.X
AIVAV5 WfAMMK
U
10
L
t
ICHZ SOU j
mmjfflj
-wfU
I Ml I A'
S5
Iutmmximls
�Croat:
� �

1
� �� � S
- ��
S '
g -
2�

Alsoschedi
ition
packing trip l
wc( kend
Oct. 2-4.1
be $30, -
mcnl renl
thr.
Pirate soccer tei
East .
first -
week nd at the ,
Wesh yar
mont
Thi � 1
Emon. Univers S
Salisbury Stata 5ui
time for both e1
ECU h
prcp�iro tr tho ; in
tough VMVK
Pirates losl I
matches Georj
lames Mad
conference re
With the s
ment, esp� cia �
Stll
Bears proved
CHICAGO � ! li
Tomczak, Dennis M K
the Chicago Hi
somothinc to pro J
with such icious
that they left the Supei Bt m
champ"ion cv York -
dumbfounded.
Tomczak threw :
passes ol 42 and 56 yards. McK �
non came ott ot a one i
with a team record W-v�
return tor a touchdow . �
wrMHHMHi






TTITIIIIIIIITTTTT
1YYYTTYTIITIIIITTTT
B PARKER
ym
A. ?'
iw

m,
V
�N-
a�


eV�7 A�4CV5�.�i(f,a,
B) BARBOt.i
i
y, y .
by Mktver

THE EAST C AROLINIAN
Sports
SEITEMBER17, 1987 Page 11
Pirates look for boost in game
against Illinois this weekend
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport Fditor
A repeat of 1983 could begin
Saturday if the East Carolina foot-
ball team could pull out a victory
over Illinois.
The Pirates will take to the road
for the second time this season for
their first ever confrontation
against a Big Ten Conference
opponent. Illinois will enter the
game with a 0-2 mark after losses
to North Carolina (34-14) and
Arizona State (21-7).
Even after last Saturday's 44-3
drubbing to Florida State, which
dropped the Pirates to 1-1, head
coach Art Baker feels that this
season could be as prospective as
the 8-3 record recorded by the Pi-
rates in '83.
"What a lot of people don't real-
ize is that we would have given
Florida State a real good game had
we not made the number of mis-
takes that we did (the Pirates
fumbled the ball 10 times, losing
five and threw one interception)
said Baker. "If we had not commit-
ted those mistakes, I think a lot of
people would have been sur-
prised by the outcome
Baker went on to say that the
team as a whole did not seem to
lose confidence after the defeat.
'They realize that if they had not
made the mistakes that were made
we would have been in the game
said Baker. "We had a real good
Tuesday practice and the spirits
are very good. I think that goes
back to having good senior leader-
ship on the team
Baker doesn't want to leave the
impression that the Pirates must
win against Illinois Saturday, he
just feels a victory would give the
football program, asa whole,a big
boost.
"I think it (the Illinois game) is a
crucial game for us in some re-
spects said Baker. "In '83 we
went to the mid west and won a big
game over Missouri (13-6). That
win made a tremendous impact on
the entire football season and I feel
like a win Saturday would have
the same effect.
"But continued Baker. "I don't
like to think negative, but if we
should lose I don't feel like it will
distract from our season. But I do
know that if we win only positive
things could come from it
The Pirate coaching staff was
put at a disadvantage in the con-
test even before gametime ar-
rived. It seems that sending game
films via the friendly skies people
is not always the best way to go.
The coaching staff usually spends
all day Monday studving game
film and preparing the game strat-
egy, however the film was lost bv
the airlines and did not arrive in
Greenville until late Monday eve-
ning.
When the film did arrive, the
coaches quickly saw that they
were going to be up against a very
big team in Illinois.
"I am very impressed with them
even though they are 0-2 said
Baker. "They have a very big foot-
ball team, by far the biggest foot-
ball team that we have played
against so far, and maybe the big-
gest we will face all season
Baker went on to say that he is
sure that the Illini are just as eager
to bounce back with a win as much
as ECU is.
"They are probably licking their
chops thinking that they are going
to pick up a win said Baker.
They definitely played better in
the Arizona State game than in the
North Carolina game. We will
have to cut out our mistakes and
execute our offense well in order
to win. But, I believe that we can
doit
Game notes: ECU and Illinois
share two things in common head-
ing into Saturday's game. Both
teams opponents for the first two
weeks went to post-season bowl
games in 1986. ECU's first two
opponents were N.C. State (Peach
Bowl) and Florida State (AII-
American Bowl). Illinois first two
opponents were North Carolina
(Aloha) and Arizona State (Rose).
ECU and Illinois plav two of the
top 25 toughest schedules in the
nation, according to USA TODAY.
The publication ranks the Pirates'
schedule as the 19th toughest and
the Illini's as the 25th.
White wary of Pirate squad
Joim&iumte-j.lates sign-ups
I e outdoor Recreation Center
a :n the Department of Intra-
mural Recreation Services will be
offering several 'Adventure
� tor faculty, staff and stu-
dents of the university. A day
sailing trip has boon sched-
uled tor Oct. 11. Participants will
at 9 a.m. and sail away from
Washington, N.C. The cost of $50
ludes transporation, food and
tain's fees. There is a maxi-
mum limit of 6 participants so be
sure to sign up today. Registra-
tion will be be held Sept. 21-Sept.
28 in the Outdoor Recreation
(.enter located in Memorial Gym.
Also scheduled on the Outdoor
Recreation calender is a back-
packing trip to the Uwharrie Na-
tional Forest in Troy, N.C. This
weekend adventure will be held
Oct. 2-4. The cost of this trip will
be 530, which covers food, trans-
poration and equipment. Eqip-
ment rental is also available
through the Outdoor Recreation
Center.
The Informal Recreation Pro-
gram will be sponsoring a 'Well-
ness Brown Bag Luncheon from
noon until 1 p.m. Wednesday,
Sept. 23. Mr. Jim Wright will be
discussing how to Take the Mys-
tery out of Selecting and Purchas-
ing a Bicycle The luncheon will
be held in Mendenhall room 221.
Other Brown Bag Luncheons
concentrating on a variety of
other wellness related topics will
be held throughout the semester.
Due to the E.C.U. vs. Georgia
Southern football game, Sept. 26,
all recreational facilities will close
Saturday. The Informal Recrea-
tion Division would also like to
announce that there will be no
free swim noon hour this Satur-
day,Sept. 19. A lifeguard training
session will be held.
The Department of Intramural-
Recreation Services Intramural
Sports flag football action is heat-
ing up quickly as teams battle it
out on the gridiron in search of the
all campus title. In the women's
division this week, Alpha Phi
sneaked past Chi Omega in a last
minute score attempt. The teams
had to go into overtime with a
scoreless deadlock and attempt to
break the tie with a one shot pass-
ing play. Alpha Phi came out on
the winning end and took the
victory 1-0.
Registration for several intra-
mural events will be taking place
in the next few weeks. Co-rec
cageball sign upsand will be held
Sept. 23 at 6 p.m. in Brewstcr D-
103. Home Run Derby and Rac-
quetball singles registration will
take place Sept. 30. The schedule
of October events is highlighted
by volleyball, soccer and the swim
meet. Be sure to pick up your
schedule in room 204 Memorial
By TIM CHANDLER
Sporti Kditor
"We'll have our hands full
That is Illinois head coach Mike
White's assessment of East Caro-
lina as the two teams prepare for
Saturday's football game, which is
scheduled to begin at 3 p.m. CST.
"East Carolina is the kind of
team that, with the option, will
reallv test us White said in an
interview Wednesday. "That is
something we need though be-
cause there are a lot of good option
teams in the Big Ten
White said that although the
Pirates were 2-9 for the past three
seasons he is still wary of them.
"I feel that East Carolina is a
vastly improved team over what
they have been the last couple of
years said White. They are a
team of speed, they are a team
with nine starters back on defense,
they are a team with some excel-
lent athletes. Their quarterback,
Tr-v Hunter, is excellent, their
funoack Anthony Simpson and
their tailback Reggie McKinney
are all solid football players
Even though the illini have lost
their first two contests of the sea-
son and finished 4-7 last season,
White feels that his team is on the
right track.
"We're getting better said
White. "We were awful against
adversity in the first game against
North Carolina. I think that was a
carry over from the 4-7 record of a
year ago. We had very little confi-
dence, everyone was looking for
somebod) � ' � t. �� � i. lone.
"We rnadi a significant sti ide in
that area this past week contin-
ued White. "We reacted much
better to adversity, we played
much better quality football, the
defense was pretty good, but there
is still some of that mental tough-
ness lacking
White says that his team's "head
is not in the sand" after losing the
first two games of the year, i nstead
he feels that the team is looking
forward to playing East Carolina
and taking on the test that the Pi-
rates will present.
"I just know that they (East
Carolina) is a good football team
said White. "They will run the
option well. I expect a verv tough
and challenging game.
Now in his eighth year at Illi-
is, Wb i u 1 � J.i r
-rJo at the Ik im.
Gym.
Pirate soccer team seeking victory
East Carolina will go after it's
first soccer win of the season this
weekend at the North Carolina
Wesleyan Invitational Tourna-
ment.
The Pirates, 0-4 overall, will face
Emory University Saturday and
Salisbury State Sunday. Match
time for both events is 2 p.m.
ECU has had the whole week to
prepare for the tournament after a
tough weekend home stand. The
Pirates lost two conference
matches, George Mason and
James Madison, and saw their
conference record slide to 0-3.
With the losses came improve-
ment, especially in the offense.
and head coach Charlie Harvey is both 2-0 the championship will be
optimistic that the Pirates can declared by goals for and against
come away with a victory. Harvey said. "What we have to do
"If ECU and N.C. Weslcayn are is win and win decisively
Student ticket pickup
ECU students may pick up tick-
ets for home football games Tues-
day-Thursday 8 a.m5 p.m. the
week of the game at Minges Coli-
seum. Tickets are also available at
the Mendanhall Central Ticket Of-
fice Tuesday-Thursday between
11 a.m6 p.m. Group tickets may
be picked up Monday the week of
the game at the Minges ticket of-
fice only.
All East Carolina University
studentscan receiveone free ticket
and one half-price ticket. In order
to receive any ticket, students
must present a valid university
identification card and activity
card.
For further information con-
cerning tickets for ECU athletic
events contact the athletic ticket
office at 757-6500.
.JH
rf����f0mrT4k ifrHWllll �' j
0idk�
5k �m,i&MAL � l" J-l iSPM� mBesT
1 7$rfl
3 � "l�A
w �
m s?sf 4:
The Pirate football team has been hard at work this week in practice preparing for Saturday's game against
the University of Illinois. Saturday will be the first meeting between the two teams.
Bears proved point against Giants in season opening win
CHICAGO (AP) - Mike
Tomczak, Dennis McKinnon and
the Chicago Bears defense had
something to prove. They did it
with such vicious determination
that they left the Super Bowl
champion New York Giants
dumbfounded.
Tomczak threw touchdown
passes of 42 and 56 yards, McKin-
non came off of a one-year layoff
with a team-record 94-yard punt
return for a touchdown and the
defense registered eight sacks for
losses of 53 yards in a 34-19 rout of
the Giants Monday night.
The much-heralded battle of
the two prevoius Super Bowl
champions turned into a unex-
pected rout.
'Take away the blocked punt
and the interception and what did
they have?" said McKinnon, who
sat out 1986 because of a knee
surgery.
In explaining his punt return,
which eclipsed the previous team
record of 89 yards by Ray
"Scooter" McLean back in 1942,
McKinnon said "I crawled for 20
yards, made a move and hit the
end zone. That play sealed the
coffin
It came shortly after Terry Ki-
nard intercepted a Tomczak pass
and returned it 70 yards for a
touchdown that cut the Bears'
lead to 24-13 and gave the Giants
a brief ray of hope.
"They beat us real good said
Giants' Coach Bill Parcells. "We
haven't been beat like that in a
long time. Their quarterback
was excellent cosidering it was his
first start in a game of this magni-
tude
The vaunted Giant defense did
little to harass Tomczak, while the
Bears were all over Giants quar-
terback Phil Simms, who had his
bell rung several times and twice
had to leave the game to clear the
cobwebs.
Tomczak nevertheless was not
sacked once and threw touch-
down passes of 42 yards to Ron
Morris and 56 yards to Willie
Gault in the third quarter.
Tomczak also sneaked a yard
for a touchdown just before
halftime and finished with 20
completions in 34 attempts for 292
yards.
"The greatest thing about this
game is we got the football season
started said Bears Coach Mike
Ditka, who apparently had his fill
of the hype that centered around
thecontest ever since the NFL first
announced the 1987 schedule.
The Giants took the opening
kickoff and Simms quickly put the
offense into gear as the Giants
marched to the Chicago 10-vard
line. Then came a sack by fodd
Bell and Simms fumbled with
Please see BEAR pagc n
A





12 THE CAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 17,
1987
Fearless Football Forecast
GAMES
ECU at Illinois
North Carolina at (la. I 'ech
Florida at Alabama
(Icorgia at Clemson
West Va. at Maryland
Mich State at Notre Dame
Boston Coll. at Southern Cal
Washington at Texas A&M
Va. lech at Virginia
N.C. State at Wake Forest
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Laal Wrck.
(7-3)
Overall.
(16-4)
Illinois
Georgia Tech
Alabama
Clemson
West Virginia
Notre Dame
Southern Cal
Washington
Virginia
Wake Forest
DEAN BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
(6-4)
Overall:
(15-5)
ECU
North Carolina
Alabama
Clemson
Maryland
Notre Dame
Southern Cal
Texas A&M
Virginia
N.C. State
TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Last Weclc
(8-2)
Overall:
(15-5)
Illinois
North Carolina
Alabama
Clemson
Maryland
Notre Dame
Southern Cal
Washington
Virginia
N.C. State
PAT MOLLOYDr. RICHARD EAKD
Assistant Sports EditorECU Chancellor
Laal Week.Laal Week
(7-3)(6-4)
OverallOverall
(14-6)(12-8)
Illinois North Carolina AlabamaECU Georgia Tech Alabama
Clemson West Virginia Michigan State Southern Cal Washington Virginia TechClemson West Virginia Notre Dame Boston College Texas A&M Virginia Tech
Wake ForestN.C. State
Oklahoma, Huskers
remain 1,2 in poll
Oklahoma and Nebraska, the
cream ol the Big Eight Confer-
ence, remained atop The Associ
ated Press college football poll
: da) alter posting their second
straigl ti mincing victories.
Okla ma received 5-4 first-
tes and 1,193 points in the
nations ideballotingbya panel of
rts writers and broadcasters.
other six first-place ballots
went to Nebraska, which had
1,127 points.
Three Top Twenty teams
tumbled after losing to other
ranked squads. LCI.A. third a
w eek ago bef( -re being overrun by
Nebraska 42-33, dropped to 13th;
in tell from ninth to 19th
atter tailing to Notre Dame 26-7,
and defending national cham-
pion Penn State dropped from
1 lth to 20th after losing to Ala-
bama 24-13.
With the victories, Notre Dame
jumped from 16th a week ago to
ninth, while Alabama. 19th last
week, moved up to NO. 11.
Moving up one spot to third
was Auburn with 1,027 points.
i ouisiana State, No. 6a week ago,
Top 20
1 Oklahoma (54)2-0-0
2. Nebraska (6)2-0-0
3. Auburn2-0-0
4 LSI.2-0-0
5. Ohio State1-0-0
6. Miami, Ha.1-0-0
7. Piorida State2-0-0
S. Clemson2-0-0
u Notre Dame1-0-0
10. Washington2-0-0
11. Alabama2-0-0
12. Arkansas1-0-0
13. UCLA1-1-0
14. Tennessee3-0-0
15. Arizona State1 -0-0
16. Pittsburgh2-0-0
17. Michigan St.1-0-0
18. Georgia2-0-0
19. Michigan0-1-0
20. Penn State1-1-0
Other receiving votes: Iowa 33,
Boston College 25, Texas A&M ,9'
South Carolina 23, Syracuse 14
Oklahoma St. 5, Indiana 3, Eastern
Michigan 1, Florida 1, Oregon 1.
Bears
rip Giants
Continued from page 11
Wilber Marshall recovering.
The Bears were forced to punt,
but it was blocked by Erik How-
ard and Tom Hynn recovered in
the end zone for a 7-0 New York
lead.
Kevin Butler kicked a 24-yard
field goal for the Bears before the
quarter ended and then the Bears
took charge after that with the de-
fense repeatedly sacking Simms.
An 80-yard drive which ended
with Tomczak's 1-yard sneak
with :08 left in the half gave the
Bears a 10-7 lead.
On Chicago's second posses-
sion in the second half, Tomczak
hit Morris with a 42-yard touch-
down pass. The next itme the
Bears got the ball, he threw a 56-
yard touchdown pass to Gault on
the first play.
jumped over Ohio State and
moved into fourth place with 926
points, Ohio State remained at
No. 5 with 90S points.
Rounding out the Top Ten are
Miami of Florida, advancing one
spot from seventh to sixth; No. 7
Honda State, up from eighth
place; No. 8 Clemson, up from
10th; Notre Dame and NO. 10
Washington, which moved up
two spots from No. 12 a week ago.
The Second Ten, in order, are
Alabama, Arkansas, UCLA, Ten-
nessee, Arizona Atate, Pitts-
burgh, Michigan State, Georgia,
Michigan and Fenn State.
List week, Penn State led the
Second Ten, followed by Penn
State, Washington, Arkansas,
Tennessee, Arizona State, Notre
Dame, Michigan State, Pitts-
burgh, Alabama and Georgia.
Alabama's victory snapped
Penn State's 13-gameoverall win-
ning streak, the longest among
major colleges. Boston College's
11-gamc win streak is now the
nation's longest.
"1 hope people don't get too
excited because we still got a long
way to go said Bill Currv, who is
in his first year as coach at Ala-
bama.
ECU
PATRIOTS VS. JETS - SEPT. 21st, 9:00 PM
Soon to be the reasonably famous 'f?VN
CASUAL DINING-FORMAI DRINKING
( EARTY
ANIMALS
830-1823
Balloons Delivered
in Costumes
Gorilla - Grams
Gator- Grams
Penguin for Hire
When you make pizza
i mm hh � vAUMau coutom � �� �� mn
TWO
PIZZAS
Sy�oO plus tax
Medium Size
Pizzas 3 Items
Buy any size
pizza at regular price, get
identical pizza FREE!
NO LIMIT
ordttrd Vfcd�h coupon �t fMfiirip�tin�j L,uif Cmwi
c��vOu. cwv Expires: 9-30-87
756-7256 EC
!����� 'AIUAJU COU�On ����M
this good, om just isn't enough
� ����� VAtUJU COUPON ������I
FREE
BUY ONE I
PIZZA �
GET ONE FREE! I
Buy any size
pizza at regular price, get !
identical pizza FR IE! �
NO LIMIT �
Fxpires. 9-30-87
756-7253 FCj
����� wiiicoupon ibimjI
�1987 ubm (mam tmcipnm, inc
FREEPHZAE
The Student Union Special Concerts Committee
Presents:
GWAR
IN CONCERT
Sunday, Sept. 20th - 3:00 p.m.
Central Campus Mall
Rain Location: Hendrix Theatre
BUY ONE PIZZA. GET ONE FREE!
PIZZA MENl
Qmtm
Vie Ite-n
o hems
SMALL MEDIUM l-ARGE
8rx
5 15
bCfe
hTS
7-IS
851
10 pc
?l(i
800
890
980
1090
12 pc
950
1060
1170
12 80
14 :
Extra hems over 3 . . , . 70 90 j jq
Extra Cheese 15Ct 200 2 50
1 ��)-( m m ruts n ppin,s
�; �" v �- 1 ?� m Ma B ot.Hjnciw du
� tVrw. V �� Hi FVtw R's BiOhn
BEVERAGES
Cm a Cola. Diet Coke' Small Medium Liter
Sprite" Melk. Yellow. � 66 95
Cherry Coke
323 Arlington Blvd.
(across from Farm Fresh)
CAESARS SANDWICHES"
Tuna Melt
Italian Sun
Ham and Cheese
Vegetarian
SALADS
Tossed
Greek
Annpasto
z n
236
236
236
SMALL MEDIUM LARGE
119 2 39 3 69
139 289
-169
469
139 289
CHOOSJ FROM THrSf Ttl'HMGS
- dXdf TVxivand bund lw. & ft)xf-
SPECIALTIES
Freshly Baked Crazy Bread" i 19
AkJlotKwarTrBreShcHs-unhGwri BuMer & ftur?w!a�tn Qw�f
Crazy Sauce g
Prv,��uhct iftLng iPntrsyvjwn ,�h�ji tdnl
Ask our rTwnager arxi' group tiwini
756-7256
HOURS: SUN-THU 11 AM-12 MIDNIGHT
FRI-SAT 11 AM-1 AM
The Wash House
10th And 14th St.
Laimdramat - Dry Cleaning
752-6117 758-6001
Attendants - Snacks - Cable TV
Present Coupon
Expiration Date Sept. 30, 1987
Coupon
20 OFF
Dry Cleaning
or Shirt Laundry
Coupon
20 OFF
Fluff & Fold
Coupon
1 Soft Drink
Free
"Come Visit Our Friendly Staff "
�A
w



x






Title
The East Carolinian, September 17, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 17, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.558
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy