The East Carolinian, September 15, 1987






Editorials.
Style
.13
Classifieds
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II
STYLE
Laureen Kirsch talks about the Student Union see
STYLE, page 13.
SPORTS
Florida State crushes Pirates at Ficklen Stadium in
Buc's home opener � see SPORTS, page 17.
Stye iEaat (Eamlmtatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 No. 6
Tuesday, September 15,1987
Greenville, NC
22 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Debate focuses on
upgrading schools
Democratic presidential hopefuls Joseph fiiden, Al Gore and Paul Simon
applaud, acknowledging the weWottie of fellow candidate Jesse Jackson
�. PHOTO 1Y CIA Y DEAN HAROT
to the t hapel Hill presidential forum. Hundreds of students turned out
for the debate held in UNC's Dean Dome Friday.
ECU News Bureau
Committee pushes for earth science
(ECU News Bureau) � A state
wide committee of science, in-
dustry and education leaders has
organized to support the new
earth science curriculum in
North Carolina's public schools,
vowing to make it a model for the
nation.
"We as a group of volunteers
wish to provide immediate and
long-term support to establish
the earth science curriculum in
North Carolina as a model to be
emulated by states across the
country says Dr. Charles Q.
Brown of East Carolina Univer-
sity.
Brown, who co-chairs the 40-
member support group, is pro-
fessor and chair of the Geology
department at ECU and is presi-
dent of the Southeastern Section,
man faces are interdisciplinary in
nature and because of this fact,
earth science is an extremely
valuable element in the science
curricula in the public schools
Earth science, which includes
such studiesasgeology,oeeanog-
raphy, astronomy, meteorology
and others has been added re-
cently as an elective to the science
curriculum in high schools in
North Carolina.
The governor's science advi-
sor. Earl Mac Cormac, is sched-
uled to keynote the first meeting
of the new Education and Indus-
try Committee for Earth Science
in North Carolina with an ad-
dress, "Earth, Geometry and
Dimension The initial meeting
is scheduled at the N.C State
University Faculty Club in
Association.
Brown said the agenda in-
cludes organization of commit-
tees on earth science-public rela-
tions, staffing and teacher certifi-
cation and on curriculum devel-
opment and implementation in
two sections, K-8 and 9-12.
Fred Beyer, science supervisor
of Cumberland County public
rion, will speak on the history of
earth science education in the
public schools in North Carolina.
Brown said the group's goals
are to promote increased under-
standing of earth science among
North Carolina citizens, to pro-
mote the preparation of qualified
earth science teachers, to pro-
mote emphasis on the teaching of
earth science concepts at all edu-
schools, will speak on the status cational levels and to promote the
of earth science teaching and Bill inclusion of a substantive earth
Spooner, consultant of the N.C. science course in all secondary
Department of Public Instruc- schools.
By CLAYDEANHARDT
Managing Editor
CHAPEL HILL � Presidential
candidates from both parties
participating in Friday's debate
on education here in the Dean
Smith Center all agreed that
improvements needed to be
made in the educational system
in the United States.
That's about where the agree-
ment ended.
Seven Democrats � Bruce
Babbit, former governor of
Arizona; Deleware Sen. Joe
Biden; Massachusetts Gov. Mi-
chael Dukakis; U.S. Rep. Richard
Gephardt of Missouri; U.S. Rep.
Ai Gore of Tennessee; the Rev.
Jesse Jackson, and Illinois Sen.
Paul Simon � took part in the
morning forum and afterwards
declared schoolchildren the only
real winners.
Democrats also took the oppor-
tunity to blast President Reagan's
educational policy and Sec. of
Education William Bennett, who
was in the audience.
Gephardt talked about being a
role model for school children as
president. "With this president
(Reagan), we have one who talks
about taw and order and puts the
constitution to the shredder he
said.
All seven candidates said more
money should be spent on educa-
tion, and each said the first place
they would look for it would be in
the defense budget.
"It's a priori ty issue. We can cut
the military budget without cut-
ting our defenses Jackson said.
"Two of four cents (in defense
projects) can be used to reinvest
in thiscountry and reinvest in our
children's lives
"With 11 billion dollars, my
friends, we could do more for
defense in the long term of this
country if we invested that
money in education (as opposed
to weapons) Simon said.
Dukakis said he was not in
favor of the federal government's
tying monetary aid to colleges to
a promise from the college to try
ind keep fees low. He noted that
many states, including his own,
were having great success keep-
ing tuition rates low on a state-
wide level.
Babbit said he wanted to
broaden student aid. "We ought
to tie loan forgiveness in he
said. Babbit said graduates who
take public service jobs such as
teaching should have their loans
erased, thus providing an incen-
tive for well educated people to
take sometimes compantavely
low-paying public service jobs.
After the debate, some of the
candidates were asked about the
possible taxing of student grants,
scholarships and assistantships
under the Tax Reform Act of
1986.
"1 think we've got to stop look-
ing so much at scholarship and
loans and start looking at how
people can put money aside at an
earlier point in a child's life so the
money's there for education
Gephardt said. He went on to
refer to a proposed Michigan
plan where the state guarantees
in-state tuition for youths whose
parents set aside a sum of money
before The child became 3-yean.
old.
"It doesn't make a lot of sense if
you're giving someone a scholar-
ship, and you want them to pay it
back, to cause that to be taxed,
and we ought �o take a
that, he said.
Simon noted that he Cast one of
only three dissenting votes in the
Senate on the tax bill. "That tax
bill was a disaster he said. " Ar.d
. we should not be taxing those
scholarships or graduates and
assistantships
The Republican forum Friday
afternoon pitted U.S. Rep. Jack
Kemp against former Delaware
Gov. Pete DuPont. Conspicu-
ously absent were those consid-
ered by most to be the front-run-
ners for the Republican nomina-
tion in 1988, Vice President
See JACK, page 2
SGA looks after ECU-NCSU relations
By TIM HAMPTON
Staff Writer
National Association of Geology Raleigh Sept. 17, beginning at 9
Teachers.
"Earth science is the most inter-
disciplinary of the sciences
Brown says. "Most problems that
Scientists receive grants
(ECU News Bureau) � Re-
searchers at East Carolina Uni-
versity will study the ecology of
the Albemarle and Pamlico
Sounds region in a series of proj-
ects aimed at improving water
quality in coastal North Carolina.
Two marine scientists and a
a.m.
Co-chairing the committee is
.Fred Allen of Raleigh, executive ,ng, Carter-Finley rampage in
director of the N.C Aggregates jjje first meeting of the legislature
"It's better to go in depth on this
case said Olav Osland, a day
representative, "to develop a
statement which reflects the re-
sponsiblity of the students
After ECU'S 32-14 Saturday
victory over rival NCSU, some
over-zealous fans errupted onto
the field and caused an estimated
$7,200 damage. Several fights en-
sued and a NCSU campus police-
men was injured in the alterca-
tion.
In addition to 7 legislators, the
committee will consist of a stu-
fundraiser, Thomas said in an
interview. Other legislators,
The Student Government As- speaking to a reporter after the
sociation created a committee meeting, eluded to the possibility
with the intent of formulating an of SGA funds being used to repay
ECU student statement concern- NCSU for a portion of the dam-
ages.
"The main issue here is that the
chancellor as well as the presi-
dent of ECU have made state-
. ments and now is time for the
students said legislator Bennet
Eckert, the speaker of the legisla-
ture.
Eckert, who was nomiated to
the speaker position Monday,
held the same position last year.
In other business at the meet-
ing
needs of students on campus.
The committee will initiate a
campus beautification program
along with other campus related
issues, Thomas said.
SGA Treasurer Chris Holland
said he expects a jump in the
government's appropriation fig-
ures as soon as student fees are
Thomas vowed to expand the totaled. Holland says the budget
responsibilities of the student appropriations are usually low
welfare committee to address the this time of year.
quality maintenance and their
value as fish and wildlife habitat.
The study will take five years.
Another ECU biologist, Dr.
Graham J. Davis, will look at the
distribution and management
potential for submersed aquatic
vegetation which serves as
maritime sociologist have re- breeding ground and food for
ceived grants totaling $100,000 to fish. Davis said that the vegeta-
study swamps and aquatic vege- tion has disappeared in some
tation and to collect data on places in recent years and some- ent judicary board member, an
population in and around the times undesirable species have executive board member and a
state's two largest inland water taken over. His study will include faulty member to address a re-
basins. The research grants are transplanting the most desirable sP�nse � N.C. State. The special
provided by the Environmental kinds of vegetation into the Pam- committee will meet on Wednes-
Protection Agency through the lico River.
North Carolina Department of
Natural Resources and Commu- In addition to the biological
ni ty Development. research, Dr. Paul D. Tschetter, a
Dr. Mark M.Brinson, a marine sociologist, will collect data on
biologist, will study the function the population in the Albemarle
and value of swamps that join the and Pamlico region. This project
Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, will develop a data bank of infor-
Brinson says that the major con- mation about the permanent,
cern in his study is the ability of temporary and seasonal popula-
the wetlands to recolonize after tions in the 33 coastal North Caro-
timber harvest, their role in water Una counties.
day and will hopefully produce a
statement by next week, Osland
said in an interview after the
meeting.
"Some have expressed the will-
ingness to set up a fund raising
drive said Scott Thomas, SGA
president.
Possible reparations for the
damages made to Carter-Finley
stadium may come in the form of ����,MWTJIWCTMWH��1Pt �� .
proceeds from a proposed SGA The new Student Government Association legislators are sworn in before getting to work Monday.
M
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INSIDE ;
Bditorials , 4
$�ZZIZZlia
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�������. ���,���.�. ����.�.
STYLE
Laureen Kirsch talks about the Student Union � see
STYLE, page 13.

SPORTS
Florida State crushes Pirates at Ficklen Stadium in
Buc's home opener � see SPORTS, page 17.
She Himt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 No. 6
Tuesday, September 15,1987
Greenville, NC
22 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Debate focuses on
upgrading schools
Democratic presidential hopefuls Joseph ttiden, Al Gore and Paul Simon
applaud, acknowledging the wtfctotne of fellow candidate Jesse Jackson
, PHOTO BY CLAY DEANHARDT
to the Chapel Hill presidential forum. Hundreds of students turned out
for the debate held in UNC's Dean Dome Friday.
ECU News Bureau
Committee pushes for earth science
(ECU News Bureau) � A state-
wide committee of science, in-
dustry and education leaders has
organized to support the new
earth science curriculum in
North Carolina's public schools,
vowing to make it a model for the
nation.
"We as a group of volunteers
wish to provide immediate and
long-term support to establish
the earth science curriculum in
North Carolina as a model to be
emulated by states across the
country says Dr. Charles Q.
Brown of East Carolina Univer-
sity.
Brown, who co-chairs the 40-
member support group, is pro-
fessor and chair of the Geology
department at ECU and is presi-
dent of the Southeastern Section,
National Association of Geology
Teachers.
"Earth science is the most inter-
disciplinary of the sciences
Brown says. "Most problems that
man faces are interdisciplinary in
nature and because of this fact,
earth science is an extremely
valuable element in the science
curricula in the public schools
Earth science, which includes
such studies as geology, oceanog-
raphy, astronomy, meteorology
and others has been added re-
cently as an elective to the science
curriculum in high schools in
North Carolina.
The governor's science advi-
sor, Earl Mac Cormac, is sched-
uled to keynote the first meeting
of the new Education and Indus-
try Committee for Earth Science
in North Carolina with an ad-
dress, "Earth, Geometry and
Dimension The initial meeting
is scheduled at the N.C. State
University Faculty Club in
Raleigh Sept. 17, beginning at 9
a.m.
Co-chairing the committee is
.Fred Allen of Raleigh, executive
director of the N.C. Aggregates
Association.
Brown said the agenda in-
cludes organization of commit-
tees on earth science-public rela-
tions, staffing and teacher certifi-
cation and on curriculum devel-
opment and implementation in
two sections, K-8 and 9-12.
Fred Beyer, science supervisor
of Cumberland County public
schools, will speak on the status
of earth science teaching and Bill
Spooner, consultant of the N.C.
Department of Public Instruc-
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Managing Editor
CHAPEL HILL - Presidential
candidates from both parties
participating in Friday's debate
on education here in the Dean
Smith Center all agreed that
improvements needed to be
made in the educational system
in the United States.
That's about where the agree-
ment ended.
Seven Democrats � Bruce
Babbit, former governor of
Arizona; Deleware Sen. Joe
Biden; Massachusetts Gov. Mi-
chael Dukakis; U.S. Rep. Richard
Gephardt of Missouri; U.S. Rep.
Al Gore of Tennessee; the Rev.
Jesse Jackson, and Illinois Sen.
Paul Simon � took part in the
morning forum and afterwards
declared schoolchildren the only
real winners.
Democrats also took the oppor-
tunity to blast President Reagan's
educational policy and Sec. of
Education William Bennett, who
was in the audience.
Gephardt talked about being a
role model for school children as
president. "With this president
(Reagan), we have one who talks
about taw and order and puts the
constitution to the shredder he
said.
All seven candidates said more
money should be spent on educa-
tion, and each said the first place
they would look for it would be in
the defense budget.
"It'sa priority issue. Wecan cut
tion, will speak on the history of the military budget without cut-
earth science education in the ting our defenses Jackson said,
public schools in North Carolina. "Two of four cents (in defense
Brown said the group's goals projects) can be used to reinvest
are to promote increased under-
standing of earth science among
North Carolina citizens, to pro-
mote the preparation of qualified
earth science teachers, to pro-
mote emphasis on the teaching of
earth science concepts at all edu-
cational levels and to promote the
inclusion of a substantive earth
science course in all secondary
schools.
in this country and reinvest inour
children's lives
"With 11 billion dollars, my
friends, we could do more for
defense in the long term of this
country if we invested that
money in education (as opposed
to weapons) Simon said.
Dukakis said he was not in
favor of the federal government's
tying monetary aid to colleges to
a promise from the college to try
and keep fees low. He noted that
many states, including his own,
were having great success keep-
ing tuition rates low on a state-
wide level.
Babbit said he wanted to
broaden student aid. "We ought
to tie loan forgiveness in he
said. Babbit said graduates who
take public service jobs such as
teaching should have their loans
erased, thus providing an incen-
tive for well educated people to
take sometimes compantavely
low-paying public service jobs.
After the debate, some of the
candidates were asked about the
possible taxing of student grants,
scholarships and assistantships
under the Tax Reform Act of
1986.
"1 think we've got to stop look-
ing so much at scholarship and
loans and start looking at how
people can put money aside at an
earlier point in a child's life so the
money's there for education
Gephardt said. He went on to
refer to a proposed Michigan
plan where the state guarantees
in-state tuition for youths whose
parents set aside a sum of money
before the child became 3-years-
old.
"It doesn't make a lot of sense if
you're giving someone a scholar-
ship, and you want them to pay it
back, to cause that to be taxed,
and we ought to I I
uiu n� iu.U.
Simon noted that he cast one of
only three dissenting votes in the
Senate on the tax bill. "That tax
bill was a disaster he said. "And
we should not be taxing those
scholarships or graduates and
assistantships
The Republican forum Friday
afternoon pitted U.S. Rep. Jack
Kemp against former Delaware
Gov. Pete DuPont. Conspicu-
ously absent were those consid-
ered by most to be the front-run-
ners for the Republican nomina-
tion in 1988, Vice President
See JACK, page 2
SGA looks after ECU-NCSU relations
By TIM HAMPTON
Staff Writer
The Student Government As-
sociation created a committee
with the intent of formulating an
ECU student statement concern-
ing the Carter-Finley rampage in
the first meeting of the legislature
Monday.
fundraiser, Thomas said in an
interview. Other legislators,
speaking to a reporter after the
meeting, eluded to the possibility
of SGA funds being used to repay
NCSU for a portion of the dam-
ages.
'The main issue here is that the
Scientists receive grants
dent of ECU have made state-
. ments and now is time for the
(ECU News Bureau) � Re-
searchers at East Carolina Uni-
versity will study the ecology of
the Albemarle and Pamlico
Sounds region in a series of proj-
ects aimed at improving water
quality in coastal North Carolina.
Two marine scientists and a
maritime sociologist have re-
ceived grants totaling $100,000 to
study swamps and aquatic vege-
tation and to collect data on
population in and around the
state's two largest inland water
basins. The research grants are
provided by the Environmental
Protection Agency through the
North Carolina Department of
Natural Resources and Commu-
nity Development.
Dr. Mark M. Brinson, a marine
quality maintenance and their
value as fish and wildlife habitat.
The study will take five years.
Another ECU biologist, Dr.
Graham J. Davis, will look at the
distribution and management
potential for submersed aquatic
vegetation which serves as
breeding ground and food for
fish. Davis said that the vegeta-
tion has disappeared in some
places in recent years and some-
times undesirable species have
taken over. His study will include
transplanting the most desirable
kinds of vegetation into the Pam-
lico River.
In addition to the biological
research. Dr. Paul D. Tschetter, a
sociologist, will collect data on
biologist, will study the function the population in the Albemarle ingness to set up a fund raising
and value of swamps that join the and Pamlico region. This project drive said Scott Thomas, SGA
will develop a data bank of infor-
mation about the permanent,
temporary and seasonal popula-
tions in the 33 coastal North Caro-
lina counties.
"It's better to go in depth on this chancellor as well as the presi-
case said Olav Osland, a day
representative, "to develop a
statement which reflects the re-
sponsiblity of the students
After ECU'S 32-14 Saturday
victory over rival NCSU, some
over-zealous fans errupted onto
the field and caused an estimated
$7,200 damage. Several fights en-
sued and a NCSU campus police-
men was injured in the alterca-
tion.
In addition to 7 legislators, the
committee will consist of a stu-
dent judicary board member, an
executive board member and a
faulty member to address a re-
sponse to N.C. State. The special
committee will meet on Wednes-
day and will hopefully produce a
statement by next week, Osland
said in an interview after the
meeting.
"Some have expressed the will-
students said legislator Bennet
Eckert, the speaker of the legisla-
ture.
Eckert, who was nomiated to
the speaker position Monday,
held the same position last year.
In other business at the meet-
ing:
Thomas vowed to expand the
responsibilities of the student
welfare committee to address the
needs of students on campus.
The committee will initiate a
campus bcautification program
along with other campus related
issues, Thomas said.
SGA Treasurer Chris Holland
said he expects a jump in the
government's appropriation fig-
ures as soon as student fees are
totaled. Holland says the budget
appropriations are usually low
this time of year.
Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds.
Brinson says that the major con-
cern in his study is the ability of
the wetlands to recolonize after
timber harvest, their role in water
president.
Possible reparations for the
damages made to Carter-Finley
stadium may come in the form of
proceeds from a proposed SGA
The new Student Government Association legislators are sworn in before getting to work Monday.


i
w�
� "i i� m







THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 15,1987
Democrats celebrate the life of their party
HIGH POINT, N.C. (AP) �
North Carolina Democrats gath-
ered in a renovated warehouse
Saturday to celebrate the renewal
of their party and hear four of
their presidential candidates
expound on education, defense
and the economy.
Sen. Terry Sanford, D-N.C
who conceived the idea for the
Funfair as a celebration of Demo-
cratic Victories in 1986, told a
forum for the presidential candi-
dates that "just a few years ago,
folks were saving the Democratic
Partv was dead. Do you believe
that?"
The crowd oi party faithful
responded with a rousing "no"
and waved American flags.
The challenge facing Demo-
crats, Sanford said, is "how do we
move from the twilight of the
Reagan years into the sunshine of
Democratic progress once
again
The seven Democratic candi-
dates have been dubbed "the
Seven Dwarfs" because of their
similarities, but Sanford said they
were better described as "seven
blocks of granite immovable in
their principals" or as "seven pil-
lars of wisdom � they know
whereof they speak
Attending the forum, held at
the Market Center in downtown
High Point, were former Arizona
Gov. Bruce Babbitt, Rep. Richard
Gephardt of Missouri, Sen. Al-
Race conflicts flare up
AMHERST, MA (CPS) � One
of the most notorious of last
school year's nationwide campus
racial incidents came to a close
Sept. 2 when the University of
Massachusetts suspended three
students involved in a black-
white student brawl.
UMass officials also issued a
"special message" to incoming
freshmen that racism among stu-
dents won't be tolerated.
Two weeks before, students
from 17 different campuses met
at the University of Michigan to
explore wavs to combat an appar-
ent resurgence of racial tensions
at scores of colleges.
During the 1986-87 school year,
racial incidents occured at the
University of Maryland-Balti-
more County, The Citadel,
Southern California, Michigan
State, Columbia, Michigan, Bay-
lor, Tulane, Tennessee, North
Dakota, Oklahoma State, Texas-
San Antonio, Cleveland State and
Northern Illinois, among other
campuses.
The outbreaks � which fol-
lowed two school vears in which
the number of minority-majority
student conflicts increased � led
the new group formed at Michi-
gan, the United Coalition Against
Racism, to resolve to publish anti-
racism statements similar to the
one UMas9"dtstnbuted to fresh-
men last week.
UMass announced it has not
"forgotten or put the issue be-
hind said spokesman James
Langley.
The school will train its 400-
member dorm staff to enforce
civility, and Afro-American
Studies Professor Julius Lester is
developing courses about the
history of racism.
The last week of August, the
local district attorney's office
charged five white students with
assault and rioting and a sixth
with rioting following the last
game of the 1986 World Series.
After the New York Mets de-
feated the Boston Red Sox in the
final game of the series last Octo-
ber, a black sophomore from
New York was severely beaten by
white students who rooted for
the Red Sox. The students
charged in the incident pleaded
no contest. Three of the students
involved in the brawl are banned
from campus for the academic
vear, and two others were given
deferred suspensions.
UMass officials plan to beef up
campus security during the week
of Oct. 27, the anniversary of last
year's incident. "There could be
some reaction to the event said
Larry Moneta, associate director
for residence education. "We
mav have some trouble
Jack Kemp calls for a return to basics
Continued from page 1
George Bush and Robert Dole.
Kemp and DuPont both said
the absent Republicans were the
real losers in the debate, and
DuPont went as far as to accuse
them of weakening the Republi-
can cause. He said his party lost
Senate seats in 1986 because it
ducked issues, and that Dole,
Bush and others had better face
the issues in 1988.
DuPont said there are two
things wrong with education.
First, he said, it's not good
enough. "Mediocrity is not good
enough in America" he said.
Secondly, he said the quality of
education lies in competition. He
and Kemp both stressed the idea
of tax credits for private educa-
tion and creating stronger com-
petition between public and pri-
vate schools.
Kemp called for a return to the
ABC's � accountability, basics
and character � in the class-
room. He called for classrooms to
return to traditional American
values and for a return to the
basics, especially English, in edu-
cation.
He also said there was too
much emphasis on style, not
substance, among today's educa-
tors.
Both DuPont and Kemp tried to
divorce themselves from the
educational cutbacks associated
with the Reagan administration.
"1 would not have pushed for
that size ($12 billion) cut Kemp
said.
( EARIY l
ANIMALS
830-1823
Balloons Delivered
in Costumes
Gorilla - Grams
Gator - Grams
w Penguin for Hire ,
Bienvenidos
Amigos
Open 7 days for Lunch & Dinner
HUNGRY PIRATE SPECIAL
SERVED 2-5 DAILY
$2.95
DINNER SPECIALS $5.95
INCLUDES DESSERT
SERVED SUN. THRU THURS
AFTER 5 PM
LUNCH SPECIALS $3.95
SERVED MONFR1.
11 AM TILL 3 PM

bert Gore of Tennessee and the
Rev. Jesse Jackson. Sen.JoeBiden
of Delaware and Massachusetts
Gov. Michael Dukakis were ex-
pected at festivities after the fo-
rum, and Sen. Paul Simon of Illi-
nois could not attend because of
his daughter's wedding.
Hodding Carter, a commenta-
tor for ABC-TV and spokesman
for the State Department during
the Carter administration, said
the 1988 election would be the
first election without an incum-
bent in 20 years and would follow
"eight long years" of a Republi-
can presidency.
More importantly, he said, it
comes at a time when the country
has never been as divided be-
tween "those who have never
had it so good and those who
have never had it so bad since the
Great Depression He said the
Reagan administration's goal
seems to be to "comfort the com-
fortable and afflict the afflicted
The candidates were asked
how they would improve educa-
tion in light of cuts by the Reagan
administration.
Jackson said that the national
attitude about education needed
to be changed and that education
was not a social program "but our
first line of defense
He also said the nation needs a
real commitment to vocational
education and education for the
handicapped. '1 would rather
have Roosevelt in a wheelchair
than Reagan on a horse he said.
Jackson said parents must be-
come partners in their children's
education, and children must
demand more of themselves by
saying no to drugs, alcohol and
unwanted pregnancies.
"A democracy does not guaran-
tee success, but it does grarantee
opportunity he said.
Gephardt said his goal was that
the United States have the best
educated people in the world by
the year 2000. He said school
systems that produce better stu-
dents should be given more
money. And finally, he said, the
president must send a message of
the right values.
Babbitt said he would begin by
firing Secretary of Education
William Bennett, and by con-
centrating more on preschool
education. He said the student
loan program should be ex-
panded to include every student
who needs it.
The nation needs a president
who emphasizes to parents their
role in education, he said. "That's
how we can revolutionize educa-
tion he said.
Gore said he would "restore
the federal government as a full
partner" in the educational proc-
ess and set clear goals, such as 100
percent literacy by the year 2000
He also urged accountability and
responsibility for teachers.
Ok Night Club Ok yr presents J WEDNESDAY NIGHT THE LADIES ZOO! The Pony Bar
�lje fEast (Earolinian Serving the Exsf Carolina campus community since 1925 James F. J. McKee. Director of Advertising Advertising Representives Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo Shari Clemens Pete Femald Maria Bell DISPLAY ADVERTISING MONTHLY RATES 0-49 Coulumn Inches $4.25
50-99 4.15

with the Coldest Pony Bottles in Town! Just .75 each! With .25 Draft Beer and .50 Wine! $1.25 Domestics. $1.50 Premiums. $1 Schnapps and Tequila Shots. Featuring The Jjmmer JEFF DIAMOND'1 Spinning the Hottest D.mce Music in Epstein N C ' So, c'mon out and get you .some Jungle Love from The Zoo at Eastern N.Cs No. 1 Smokin' Nightclub. Beau'sof course Doors open at 9 o'clock. 18 yr. olds are welcome. Phone: 756-6401 Located in the Carolina East Centre.100-149 4.05
150-199 3.95
200 249 3.85
250 and above 3.75
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES (Charge in Addition to Regular Space Rate) One color and blackS90.00
Two colors and black 155.00
Inserts 5.000 or less06 each 5,00110,000055 each 10,001-12,00005 each BUSINESS HOURS; Monday-Friday � 10:00-5:00 P.M. PHONES 757-6366
757-6557 757-6366 757-6558 757-6309 �
WELCOME BACK
ecu students!
i't
CHUNK LIGHT
TUNA
IN OIL OR WATER
Kroger
Tuna
LIMIT 2 WITH $10
ADD'L PURCHASE
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Big K
Soft Drinks
Ltr.
NRB
49
0
12
Oz.
Pkg
KROGER
All Meat
Wieners
99
PREMIUM QUALITY
2-PLY PAPER
Swansoft
Towels
Roll
39
RED, RIPE
Salad
Tomatoes
Lb.
58
KROGER
HOTDOG OR
Hamburger!
Buns t
12
Ct.
Pkgs
$1
M
Lb.
GOLDEN, RIPE
Dole
Bananas
33
WISHBONE (INCLUDES 2 BREAST.
2 DRUMS, 2 THIGHS, 2 WINGS
AND 6 ROLLS)
8-Pc. Fried
Chicken
ICE CREAM
Heath
Bars
4 59
ASSORTED
TOPPINGS
Jeno's
Pizza
$
Ea.
399
REGISTER TO
WIN
A PAIR OF TICKETS
TO PIRATE FOOTBALL!
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12
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Pkg
KROGER
CHEESE FOOD
American
Singles
99
1M7
tovOn
MfMa Reeerved
told Ts Dealers
.� SO 'y� OW O i
'
�Pvll'WC fMOi
i� o� tatter n wr '���'� HfM - '�, �c �
- � ��l'� '��?"� (K W-� u, -i �r , � -
- �-� � ,e s e�:� '� -p �e ��� � "
�� mtm IC �M �� W� �-�0" ' 4wWr ��- B V
Copyright 1986
Kroger SavOn
Quantity RigMf s�rva
Non� Sold fo Dealers
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd � Greenville
DAY)
nville J
How to avoi
What is stress and depression and
what can be done to avoid them ?
Stress is your body's response
to any demand A certain amount
of stress may be helpful, for ex-
ample, by helping you get a paper
written on time or by doing well
in a competition. Too much stress
can make you uncomfortable and
can shorten your life.
Health
Column
By MARY ELESHA-ADAMS
Signs of stress include aches
especially headaches, n. k
aches, and backaches "nerv-
ous stomach diarrhea, chest
pains, grouchiness, eating and
drinking too much or too little,
inability to sit still or concentrate,
insomnia, and having vague
fears about known or unknown
events.
Sleep at least H
sleep helps the
it elt Exercise
ming, running, a
duces tension
mental alertness
your reaction to
increases feeling-
down on sugar
food, and caffeirMJ
Spend time aid
give . iaci
and foi u
friends as sound
ingdail) per
can be rela ing aii
same time. Co
courses in time-
stress redui'
benefit from thj
they can help u
lives back into pel
Depression is
bance; feehp. j
pointment or lone
ent and r
Spangler ask
(AP) - University of orth
Carolina System President CD.
Spangler, harshly criticizing the
current curriculum, savs the state
should lengthen the school vear,
make the Scholastic Aptitude test
mandatory and tighten high
school graduation requirements.
"Let's turn around before we
dupe another generation into
thinking they're getting an edu-
cation when they're really just
putting in time Spangler said
Wednesday.
"We walk the wrong road for
students in the lower socioeco-
nomic strata he said at a lunch-
eon to welcome Charlotte's new
school superintendent, Peter
Relic. Relic and state Board of
Education Chairman Jere Drum-
mond reacted to Spangler's pro-
posals with interest but without
promises of support.
Spangler told more than 100
Charlotte business and commu-
nity leaders that vocational edu-
cation may not adequately pre-
pare students Jor employment.
"ThroW valuable employees
are not skilled 1
ployees with the
he said "Stude
spend their .
vears learn:
use a di a I
He urged e
make high i
requirement
ous - ident;
quirements to be
I990atUru
lina sj st '
Every scu
quired t.
several subjo ts
specific coura - -
Algebra II and a
He cr �
state-approved
in seventh throuj
saving manv
course's v.
line" cours
math cours
the math it l
for students and
He also called1
pay for the mat
narv Schola-
The Student Union Spei
Pro:
G
IN CON
Sunday, Sept.
Central C
Rain Location:
ATTIC
The 1 The
CoMedYl CoMedY
ZONE A ZONE
wedCj wed
THURSDAY
AAE
FRIDAY
CHAIRMAN
OF THE BOARD
SATURDAY
JESSE BOLT
'See Thurs paper for coupon
.�.
Comer o 5th
and Reode St
758 1857
Burgers
Soft Ice Cream As�.
Cones
All Burgers Are 1-4
Pure Beef. Ground t-
Daily From Oerton
Bring this ad for 10
any sandwich teleciio
s
-
MrA
THANK YOU ECU FOR
MAKING US NO. 1 FOR
THE SUMMER OF '87!
Thursday
GROG'S 6th
Anniversary
T-Shirft'and "Grogs
On Discount All Night!
Presents
Wcdnesda
Nigh i
The First Of Its Kind Do
LADIES NIC
Ladies Onh 8 XVlj
Guvs Admitted in a'
All 18 YEAR OLDSl
WELCOME
� Open Tuesda Sui
��� w St,
Top 40- Dance Rock
"
" �i"S"7 JbTH "
$





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 15,1987




Democrats celebrate the life of their party
HIGH POINT, N.C. (AP) �
North Carolina Democrats gath-
ered in a renovated warehouse
Saturday to celebrate the renewal
of their party and hear four of
their presidential candidates
expound on education, defense
and the economy.
Sen. Terry Sanford, D-N.C,
who conceived the idea for the
Funfair as a celebration of Demo-
cratic Victories in 1986, told a
forum for the presidential candi-
dates that "just a few years ago,
folks were saying the Democratic
Party was dead. Do you believe
that?"
The crowd of party faithful
responded with a routing "no"
and waved American flags.
The challenge facing Demo-
crats, Sanford said, is "how do we
move from the twilight of the
Reagan years into the sunshine of
Democratic progress once
again
The seven Democratic candi-
dates have been dubbed "the
Seven Dwarfs" because of their
similarities, but Sanford said they
were better described as "seven
blocks of granite immovable in
their principals" or as "seven pil-
lars of wisdom � they know
whereof they speak
Attending the forum, held at
the Market Center in downtown
High Point, were former Arizona
Gov. Bruce Babbitt, Rep. Richard
Gephardt of Missouri, Sen. Al-
Race conflicts flare up
AMHERST, MA (CPS) � One
of the most notorious of last
school year's nationwide campus
racial incidents camo to a close
Sept. 2 when the University of
Massachusetts suspended three
students involved in a black-
white student brawl.
UMass officials also issued a
"special message" to incoming
freshmen that racism among stu-
dents won't be tolerated.
Two weeks before, students
from 17 different campuses met
at the University of Michigan to
explore ways to combat an appar-
ent resurgence of racial tensions
at scores of colleges.
During the 19S6-87 school year,
racial incidents occured at the
University of Maryland-Balti-
more County, The Citadel,
Southern California, Michigan
State, Columbia, Michigan, Bay-
lor, Tulane, Tennessee, North
Dakota, Oklahoma State, Texas-
San Antonio, Cleveland Stateand
Northern Illinois, among other
campuses.
The outbreaks � which fol-
lowed two school years in which
the number of minority-majoritv
student conflicts increased � led
the new group formed at Michi-
gan, the United Coalition Against
Racism, to resolve to publish anti-
racism statements similar to the
one UMas�-dtstributed to fresh-
men last week.
UMass announced it has not
"forgotten or put the issue be-
hind said spokesman James
Langley.
The school will train its 400-
member dorm staff to enforce
civility, and Afro-American
Studies Professor Julius Lester is
developing courses about the
history of racism.
The last week of August, the
local district attorney's office
charged five white students with
assault and rioting and a sixth
with rioting following the last
game of the 1986 World Series.
After the New York Mets de-
feated the Boston Red Sox in the
final game of the series last Octo-
ber, a black sophomore from
New York was severely beaten by
white students who rooted for
the Red Sox. The students
charged in the incident pleaded
no contest. Three of the students
involved in the brawl are banned
from campus for the academic
year, and two others were given
deferred suspensions.
UMass officials plan to beef up
campus security during the week
of Oct. 27, the anniversary of last
year's incident. "There could be
some reaction to the event said
Larry Moneta, associate director
for residence education. "We
mav have some trouble
Jack Kemp calls for a return to basics
Continued from page 1
George Bush and Robert Dole.
Kemp and DuPont both said
the absent Republicans were the
real losers in the debate, and
DuPont went as far as to accuse
them of weakening the Republi-
can cause. He said his party lost
Senate seats in 1986 because it
ducked issues, and that Dole,
Bush and others had better face
the issues in 1988.
DuPont said there are two
things wrong with education.
First, he said, it's not good
enough. "Mediocrity is not good
enough in America" he said.
Secondly, he said the qualitv of
education lies in competition. He
and Kemp both stressed the idea
of tax credits for private educa-
tion and creating stronger com-
petition between public and pri-
vate schools.
Kemp called for a return to the
ABC's �accountability, basics
and character �in the class-
room. He called for classrooms to
return to traditional American
values and for a return to the
basics, especially English, in edu-
cation.
He also said there was too
much emphasis on style, not
substance, among today's educa-
tors.
Both DuPont and Kemp tried to
divorce themselves from the
educational cutbacks associated
with the Reagan administration.
"1 would not have pushed for
that size ($12 billion) cut Kemp
said.
( PARTY
ANIMALS
830-1823
Balloons Delivered
in Costumes
Gorilla- Grams
Gator - Grams
Penguin for Hire j
Bienvenidos
Amigos
Open 7 days for Lunch & Dinner
HUNGRY PIRATE SPECIAL
SERVED 2-5 DAILY
$2.95
DINNER SPECIALS $5.95
INCLUDES DESSERT
SERVED SUN. THRU THURS
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LUNCH SPECIALS $3.95
SERVED MONFRI.
11 AM TILL 3 PM

bert Gore of Tennessee and the
Rev. Jesse Jackson. Sen.JoeBiden
of Delaware and Massachusetts
Gov. Michael Dukakis were ex-
pected at festivities after the fo-
rum, and Sen. Paul Simon of Illi-
nois could not attend because of
his daughter's wedding.
Hodding Carter, a commenta-
tor for ABC-TV and spokesman
for the State Department during
the Carter administration, said
the 1988 election would be the
first election without an incum-
bent in 20 years and would follow
"eight long years" of a Republi-
can presidency.
More importantly, he said, it
comes at a time when the country
has never been as divided be-
tween "those who have never
had it so good and those who
have never had it so bad since the
Great Depression He said the
Reagan administration's goal
seems to be to "comfort the com-
fortable and afflict the afflicted
The candidates were asked
how they would improve educa-
tion in light of cuts by the Reagan
administration.
Jackson said that the national
attitude about education needed
to be changed and that education
was not a social program "but our
first line of defense
He also said the nation needs a
real commitment to vocational
education and education for the
handicapped. "I would rather
have Roosevelt in a wheelchair
than Reagan on a horse he said.
Jackson said parents must be-
come partners in their children's
education, and children must
demand more of themselves by
saying no to drugs, alcohol and
unwanted pregnancies.
"A democracy does not graran-
tee success, but it does grarantee
opportunity he said.
Gephardt said his goal was that
the United States have the best
educated people in the world by
the year 2000. He said school
systems that produce better stu-
dents should be given more
money. And finally, he said, the
president must send a message of
the right values.
Babbitt said he would begin by
firing Secretary of Education
William Bennett, and by con-
centrating more on preschool
education. He said the student
loan program should be ex-
panded to include every student
who needs it.
The nation needs a president
who emphasizes to parents their
role in education, he said. "That's
how we can revolutionize educa-
tion he said.
Gore said he would "restore
the federal government as a full
partner" in the educational proc-
ess and set clear goals, such as 100
percent literacy by the year 2000
He also urged accountability and
responsibility for teachers.
Night Club
presents
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
THE LADIES ZOO!
The Pony Bar
MMOk
3tyt 3Eat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representives
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo Shari Clemens
Pete Femald Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY RATES
0-49 Coulumn Inches S4.25
50-99 4.15
100-1494.05
150-199 3.95
200 249 3.85
250 and above 3.75
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
(Charge in Addition to Regular Space Rate)
One color and blackS90.00
Two colors and black 155.00
Inserts
5.000 or less06 each
5,00110,000055 each
10.001-12.00005 each
BUSINESS HOURS;
Monday- Friday
��r- 10:00-5:00 P.M.
PHONES737-6366
757-6557 757-6366
757-6558 757-6309
WELCOME BACK
ecu students!
i'i
CHUNK LIGW?
TUNA
IN OIL OR WATER
Kroger
Tuna
LIMIT 2 WITH $10
ADD'L PURCHASE
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Big K
Soft Drinks
Ltr.
NRB
49
0
1
12
Oz.
Pkg
KROGER
All Meat
Wieners
99
PREMIUM QUALITY
2-PLY PAPER
Swansoft
Towels
Roll
39
RED, RIPE
Salad
Tomatoes
Lb.
58
KROGER
HOTDOG OR
Hamburger,
Buns 4
12
Ct.
Pkgs
$1
M
Lb.
GOLDEN, RIPE
Dole
Bananas
33
WISHBONE (INCLUDES 2 BREAST,
2 DRUMS, 2 TH'GHS, 2 WINGS
AND 6 ROLLS)
8-Pc. Fried
Chicken
ICE CREAM
Heath
ASSORTED
TOPPINGS
Jeno's
Pizza
99
$
Ea.
399
REGISTER TO
A PAIR OF TICKETS
TO PIRATE FOOTBALL!
2-Pairs to be given
away for each home game
12
Oz.
Pkg
KROGER
CHEESE FOOD
American
Singles
99
tmt- o t-ee affv o -��! i ���"� �o e-0 -��a . � ���
�� m 9K� ('Off s, 3- i?fO? a pt � � "iCTW - r M �
�� 99 'u Okrt V " ���� � an 0�- vOu .0 ' "� �� a ���
a? ��i��'i� ������ ic Mn (� o r"oc tOfOer- �� mat
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd - Greenville
-����- - �� �
How to avoi
What is stress and depression and
what can he done to avoid them7
Sta-ss is your body's response
to any demand A certain amount
of stress may be helpful, for ex-
ample, by helping you get a paper
written on time or bv doing well
in a competition. Too much stress
can make you uncomfortable and
can shorten vour life.
Health
Column
ByMARYELESHA-ADAMS
Signs of stress include aches
especially headaches, neck-
aches, and backaches "nerv-
ous stomach diarrhea, chest
pains, grouchiness, eating and
drinking too much or too little,
inability to sit still or concentrate,
insomnia, and having va
fears about known or unknown
events.
Sleep at least 6-
sleep helps the
itself Exercise
ming, running, a
duces tension
mental alertness
your reaction to I
increases feeling
down on sugar
food, and caffeinJ
Spend time aloj
give yourself a d
and focus 01 �
fnends.j
ingdail)
can be relaxing an
same time (
courses in �
stress reductioi
benefit from th
they can help us
lives back into pe
Depression i;
bance; feelings
pointment or i irw
ent and mav cau;
Spangler ask
(AP) - University of N rth
Carolina System President CD.
Spangler, harshlv criticizing the
current curriculum, says the state
should lengthen the school year,
make the Scholastic Aptitude test
mandatory and tighten high
school graduation requirements.
"Let's turn around before we
dupe another generation into
thinking they're getting an edu-
cation when they're really just
putting in time Spangler said
Wednesday.
"We walk the wrong road for
students in the lower socioeco-
nomic strata he said at a lunch-
eon to welcome Charlotte's new
school superintendent, Peter
Relic. Relic and state Board of
Education Chairman jere Drum-
mond reacted to Spangler7 s pro-
posals with interest but without
promises of support.
Spangler told more than 100
Charlotte business and commu-
nity leaders that vocational edu-
cation may not adequately pre-
pare student ior employment.
'TheWfcfcf valuable employees
are not skilled 1,
ployees with tht
he said
spend their
years learnii
use ad' 1
Fie Ul
make high
requi numer-
ous - identical U
quirements to be
1990atUniversit
hna system scho
Even
quired I
several subj(
specific courses si
Algebra li and a l
He cril
state-ap -
in seventh I
saying man I
courses w
lint.
math cours" -
the math r
for students and
He also called
pay for the mai
narv Scholastic
The Student Union Spe
Pros!
G
IN CON
Sunday, Sept.
Central C
Rain Location:
ATTIC
The I The
CoMedYl CoMedY
ZONE A ZONE
wedIj wed
THURSDAY
AAE
FRIDAY
CHAIRMAN
OF THE BOARD
SATURDAY
JESSE BOLT
'See Thurs paper for coupon
Comer of 5tH
ond Reode S?
758 1857
Floats
Burger
A si
Soft Ice Cream
Cones
All Bur-ers Are 1-4 II
Pure Beef. Ground t
Daily From Overton
Bring this ad for 10
any sandwich tekctio
va-a
THANK YOU ECU FOR
MAKING US NO 1 FOR
THE SUMMER OF 87!
Thursday
GROGS 6th
Anniversary
T-shirts'and �Grogs
Ob Discount All Nijht!
The First Of Its Kind
LADIES NIC
Ladies Only 8 JO-ii
Guys Admitted in a'
Ail 18 YEAROLDSl
WELCOME:
� Open Tuesday Sui
nJT $1.00 Wine
DRAF1 Coolers
Top 40- Dance Rock
��





ir party
a wheelchair
arse he said
� rtts mut be-
io!r children's
hildren must
hemselves b)
- alcohol and
icies
tesnot graran-
loes grarantee
is thai
have the best
Babbitt said he would begin by
tiring Secretary of Education
William Bennett, and by con-
centrating more on preschool
education. He said the student
loan program should be ex-
panded to include every student
who needs it.
The nation needs a president
who emphasizes to parents their
role in education he said. "That's
how vse can revolutionizeeduca-
tion he said
Gore said he would "restore
the federal government as a full
partner in the educational proc-
ess and set clear goals, such as 100
percent literacy b the year 2000.
i lealso urged accountability and
responsibility tor teachers.
Ian! aiaroltnian
: . , is n munlty since 1925
J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representives
ames Russ Shari Clemens
Id
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
S4 25
4 15
4
3.95
3 B5
�LOR ADVERTISING RATES
ular Sp;
r
Inserts
"57-6557
757-6558
757-6366
757-6366
757-6309
tits!

12
Oz
Pkg
KROGER
All Meat
Wieners
99
KROGER
HOTDOG OR
Hamburger
Buns . . . . Mm
Ct
$1
ASSORTED
TOPPINGS
Jeno's
Pizza
m
IIV 10
Oz
Pkg
99
KROGER
CHEESE FOOD
g� American
t Singles
99c
1!
12
Oz
Pkg
V
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
I600 Greenville Blvd Greenville J
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15,1987
How to avoid stress, depression
What is stress and depression and
what can be done to avoid them?
Stress is your body's response
to any demand. A certain amount
of stress may be helpful, for ex-
ample, by helping you get a paper
written on time or by doing well
in a competition. Too much stress
can make you uncomfortable and
can shorten vour life.
Health
Column
By MARY ELESHA-ADAMS
Signs oi stress include aches -
especially headaches, neck-
aches, and backaches � "nerv-
ous stomach diarrhea, chest
pains, grouchiness, eating and
drinking too much or too little,
inability to sit still or concentrate,
insomnia, and having vague
fears about known or unknown
events.
Sleep at least 6-8 hours a night;
sleep helps the body to restore
itself. Exercise such as swim-
ming, running, and aerobics re-
duces tension and increases
mental alertness. Diet influences
your reaction to stress; caffeine
increases feelings of anxiety. Cut
down on sugar, salt, alcohol, junk
food, and caffeine.
Spend time alone each day to
give yourself a chance to unwind
and focus on yourself. Use your
friends as sounding boards; shar-
ing daily experiences with them
can be relaxing and helpful at the
same time. Consider taking
courses in time management or
stress reduction. All of us can
benefit from these programs;
they can help us put our busy
lives back into perspective.
Depression is a mood distur-
bance; feelings of sadness, disap-
pointment or loneliness are pres-
ent and may cause the depressed
person to withdraw from people
and activities and develop physi-
cal discomfort such as aches,
pains, fatigue, poor digestion,
weight loss or gain, and sleep
disturbances. The person also
loses the ability to enjoy life.
Depression can occur as the
result of a loss � death of a loved
one, the loss of a relationship or
the loss of an object or dream of a
major emotional meaning. De-
pression may also occur without
a recognizable cause.
Some feelings of depression are
"normal" or common; there is no
need to feel weak or ashamed.
Most depressed people do not
attempt suicide, however, all talk
of suicide should be taken seri-
ously. Help should be obtained
immediately.
If you or someone you know is
feeling down and blue, here are a
few suggestions:
- see a physician for a complete
checkup.
- talk things over with an
understanding friend.
- examine your feelings to fig-
ure out what's troubling you and
what you
can do.
- take a break for a favorite ac-
tivity. Have some fun!
- get some exercise.
- avoid extra stress.
- DO NOT ignore himher.
- DO NOT try to "cheer up" the
person.
- DO NOT criticize or shame,
since feelings of depression can't
be helped.
- DO NOT sympathize and
claim to feel the same way.
- TRY NOT to get angry with
the depressed person .
- Recommend that he talk with
a close friend, campus minister,
counseling center or student
health service staff member.
Justice gives Reagan low rank
WASHINGTON (AP) � Su-
preme Court Justice Thurgood
Marshall puts President Reagan
at the bottom in a ranking of U.S.
presidents because the justice
says Reagan has allowed an ero-
sion of civil rights.
"I don't care whether he's the
president, the governor, the
mayor, the sheriff Marshall said
in an interview to be broadcast
Sunday on WUSA-TV. "Who-
ever calls the shots determines
whether we have integration,
segregation or decency. That
starts exactly with the president
Marshall, 79, predicted that
Harry Truman "will come out on
top" in the judgment of history,
but that Reagan ranks with Her-
bert Hoover and Woodrow
Wilson among the worst presi-
dents ever.
"Honestly, 1 think he's down
there with Hoover and that
group, and Wilson, when we
didn't have a chance said
Marshall, the first black on the
Supreme Court.
Marshall's remarks will air in a
one-hour documentary called
"Searching for Justice: Three
American Stories �
Spangler asks for tougher standards
(AP) - University of North
Carolina System President CD.
Spangler, harshly criticizing the
current curriculum, says the state
should lengthen the school vear,
make the Scholastic Aptitude test
mandatory and tighten high
school graduation requirements.
"Let's turn around before we
dupe another generation into
thinking they're getting an edu-
cation when they're really just
putting in time Spangler said
Wednesday.
"We walk the wrong road for
students in the lower socioeco-
nomic strata he said at a lunch-
eon to welcome Charlotte's new
school superintendent, Peter
Relic. Relic and state Board oi
Education Chairman Jere Drum-
mond reacted to Spangler's pro-
posals with interest but without
promises oi support.
Spangler told more than 100
Charlotte business and commu-
nity leaders that vocational edu-
cation may not adequately pre-
pare students tor employment.
"Themofct valuable employees
are not skilled laborers, but em-
ployees with the abilitv to learn
he said. "Students should not
spend their precious high school
years learning skills no one will
use a decade out
He urged education leaders to
make high school graduation
requirements much more rigor-
ous - identical to admission re-
quirements to be implemented in
1990 at University of North Caro-
lina system schools.
Every student would be re-
quired to complete 12 courses in
several subjects, including some
specific cou rses such as Algebra I,
Algebra II and a lab science.
He criticized the number oi
state-approved courses offered
in seventh through 12th grades,
saving many of the more than 400
courses were "bottom-of-the-
line" courses such as "rinky-dink
math courses designed to make
the math requirement painless
for students and teachers
He also called fbrjhe stateto
pay for the mandatory ifijlirni-
narv Scholastic Aptitude Test
and SAT for all high school stu-
dents.
Those tests of verbal and
mathematical ability, used
widely in college admissions,
would provide a measure of how
well individual schools were
educating students, he said.
He cited equity as one reason to
offer the tests - equity for students
with neither the money nor en-
couragement to take SAT pre-
paratory courses.
Finally, he advocated
extending the school day and
school year to compete with na-
tions that have longer school
years for children.
Spangler unsuccessfully made
that proposal when he was N.C.
Board of Education chairman
several years ago. "I got in big
trouble for trying to do this
before the time was right he
said. "I think the time is nearing
right now
Drummond described
Spangler's proposals as "chal-
tonging ,
"I've jotted them down and we
will be talking about them he
said. Though educators want to
encourage more students to take
college-prep courses such as al-
gebra and science, "that doesn't
mean we're prepared to match
the university sysetm's require-
ments he said.
NEW!
BLUEPRINTING
SERVICES
BLUE PRINTS while you wait
COPIES from blueprints up to 36" wide
TRACINGS from blueprints or from copies
758-2400
Fast Copies for Fast Times
Located m Downtown Greenville
next to Chicos Restaurant m the Georgetown Shops
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Grps. The caduceus on the left
means you're pan ot a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule.
not the exception The gold bar .
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer If you're
earning a BSN. write: Army Nurse Opportunities PO Box 7713
Clitton. Nj 07015. Or call toll tree l-800-USA-ARMY
ARMY NURSE C
The Student Union Special Concerts Committee
Presents:
GWAR
IN CONCERT
Sunday, Sept. 20th - 3:00 p.m.
Central Campus Mall
Rain Location: Hendrix Theatre
ATTIC
The 1 The
CoMedYl CoMedY
ZONE A ZONE
WED (J WED
THURSDAY
AAE
FRIDAY
CHAIRMAN
OF THE BOARD
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any sandwich selection!
DAILY LUNCHEON SPECIALS
$3 95 Mon-Fri Horn 3pm
The "Steamroller" is back by
popular demand
Mark Johnson-Every Thursday
beginning ai 10 pm. $i Admission
In the Fiesta Room. Join us for
Drinks and Appetizers. Must be 21
or older.
J2I council
Georgetown Shoos
THANK YOU ECU FOR
MAKING US NO. 1 FOR
THE SUMMER OF 87!
Thursday
GROG'S 6th
Anniversary
T-Shirfifand "Grogs"
On Discount All Night!
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LADIES NIGHT
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Guys Admitted in at 10:30
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Open Tuesday - Sunday.
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25
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Top 40- Dance -Rock 'n Rolf
mi mat simcii
Every Tuesday b
College Night
p mil p.m.
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romr Choict of
Pepperoni, Salami and Cheese
Turkey and Cheese
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Not Valid On Dtlivtrits
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Ladles $2.00
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exp: Sept. 30. 1987
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m mimm

I 1
J
1





�te East (Earnimtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, cm
a M v. Clay Deani iardt, �� u
Andy Lewis, hM? Mrvf:
Tim rij�� jimmy MCKEE, thrtaorof .�
1 IMC HANDLER, Sport, &��. ANTHOIsJY Martim -
Ickia Ct.� M.N1HUNY MAKTIN, Busaoii M�u,r
Sn rl p LEY' " MEG NEEDHAM, M
D mir MlKE UPCHURCH
'E SEVENS, s. NORWOOD MCDOWELL, ,o,ralar
September 15,1987
Opinion
Page 4
Bad press
ECU viewed negatively
Public attacks against ECU have
been the norm rather than the excep-
tion in recent weeks, rid the
university's image is teetering on
the brink oi disaster.
That shouldn't be the case, as the
university has a fine program of
athletics and academics. Graduates
from ECU can stand proud and
match their knowledge with gradu-
ates front any other school in the
state and from most in the country.
The degree, the diploma that
hangs on the office wall, however, is
getting a little tarnished in the eyes
of many.
The trend started over the sum-
mer, when the university repealed
the work permits because so many
students were cheating on them,
thus violating the honor code. In-
stead of expelling a large part oi the
student population (a possible re-
sult oi such serious honor code vio-
lations as lying on official docu-
ments) the administration decided
the petitions had outlived their
usefulness, and so abolished them.
Then, in the first week of school, a
present and three former members
of the Pirate basketball squad were
arrested on charges of theft. Enough
said.
The next weekend was Biltmore
Street, and an unauthorized block
party was broken up by the
Greenville police. The students in-
volved charge the police with using
ecessive force; the police say the
party was getting out of hand, there
is an ongoing investigation into the
matter.
And finally there was the
Wolfpack Wipeout. First our foot-
ball team did it to theirs, and then
some fans did it to the field. Not only
was it an embarrassment and a dis-
grace, but it opened the floodgate for
written and verbal harrassment of
the university.
Traditionally the media and oth-
ers outside of the immediate area
have lambasted the universitv
whenever even the slightest thing
went wrong, while tending to ig-
nore discrepancies at North Caro-
lina State and UNC-Chapel Hill.
This is because ECU, in improving
both its academics and its athletics,
is challenging the two prima donna
universities and their place in the
state. The fact that ECU wants a
shareof the recognition it deserves is
unbelievable to state and media offi-
cials.
Therefore when we breath wrong,
we come under attack. Take for
example the News and Observer's
coverage of the State incident. It was
called a riot, and we were the bullies
for creating $7,000 damage. As one
person pointed out, when State bas-
ketball fans did $100,000 in damage
in 1983, it was called a celebration.
The difference? Thev're State, and
we're ECU.
Don't get us wrong. The wrongful
treatment ECU often gets in the
press does not justify the State inci-
dent. That was inexcusable and ju-
venile at best. It does, however, raise
some serious questions as to bias in
high places.
It also provides today's students
with a challenge. In the minds of
many it seems that for every small
step ECU takes forward, events like
those of recent weeks are giant leaps
backward. Students, administra-
tors, alumni, fans and faculty need
to be aware of this, We have to be on
our best behavior, simply because
different standards seem to apply to
us. It may not be fair, but that's the
way life goes.
Until the attitude towards ECU
changes (and it will), we need to
work together to put the
university's best foot forward on all
occasions. We must not only be as
good as State, Chapel Hill, Duke and
others, we must be better.
The incidents over the last few
weeks are going to be hard to live
down. They happened, and we are
going to have to live with that. Ifs
time now to regroup, re-evaluate
and move forward into the future.
Actions like those of the last few
weeks must no longer be tolerated,
and the students need to serve as a
self-policing force to see that they
don't.
Your futures, the value of your
degree and the way you are per-
ceived are all up to you. It's a heavy
responsibility, and mistakes can
carry dire consequences.
Government protect!
Reach for dreams
In this, the age of conservatism
and the me generation, it is seldom
that a person is willing to take risks
(legal that is) to make a dream come
true. So seldom, in fact, that it's no-
table when someone does.
Harold Joyner and Doug
Robertson are both recent graduates
of ECU. While they were here, each
distinguished himself in different
ways. Joyner was the news editor for
The East Carolinian, and he also
worked for a time with the Daily
Reflector as a reporter. Robertson
was a staff writer here and worked
with the ECU News Bureau.
When they graduated, they had a
dream � they wanted to bring a
newspaper to the city of Greenville.
Thus, the Greenville Morning Her-
ald was born.
It was a valiant attempt at giving
Greenville something new and
fresh. Working mostly on guts, long
hours and very little money, the two
men produced the Greenville
weekly with help from friends and
students, mostly on a volunteer
basis, bringing it to our doors each
Saturday morning. They almost
made it work.
Almost.
The Greenville Morning Herald
published for the last time on Au-
gust 29. Later that week, the dream
came to an end.
The decision came as a surprise to
those of us that had been watching
the Herald from the beginning.
Things appeared to be looking up,
and advertising seemed to be in-
creasng. Ultimately it appeared the
decision was made to cut losses be-
fore Joyner and Robertson were in
over their heads.
It was a valiant attempt, and note-
worthy that two ECU graduates had
the courage to face up against a well-
established daily and the barrage of
"ad magazines which do nothing
but pack advertisements into 12
small pages.
Alumni respond to State
To (he editor:
As a current member of the ECU
Alumni Association Board of Direc-
tors and a member of the Pirate Club
since graduating in 1975, I was sad-
dened to see an exciting ECU-N.C.
State game end with the destruction
of property at Carter-Finley Staduim.
Our football players gave a spec-
tacular effort to win the game. Coach
Art Baker and his staff did an out-
standing job preparing the team. We
have a dedicated and hard-working
personnel in our athletic department
and Pirate Club. The efforts of these
individuals and the reputation of
ECU was severly tarnished by the
actions of those involved in destroy-
ing the fence, shrubbery and goalpost
at the stadium.
To the students directlv involved in
this incident, I personally challenge
you to do as I have and write letters of
apology to N.C. State Chancellor
Poulton, Athletic Director Valvano
and Coach Sheridan. I further chal-
lenge you to enclose, as 1 have, a check
for $25 with your letter to Poulton to
cover your share of the cost of repairs.
As you sign your name to this check,
I suggest you thank God that you are
not paying a fine to a court of law or
going to jail.
East Carolina is a great university.
She will give you every opportunity
to prepare for your life's work and to
be of service to others. If this letter
applies to you, I hope you can recog-
nize that you made a mistake. I fur-
ther hope that you have the integrity
to admit it and apologize. Write those
letters today, and enclose that $25
check. You and ECU will be better off
as a result.
David H. Englert
Class of 1975
Lost war
To the editor:
A letter to Athletic Director Ken
Karr:
I must express my shock, embar-
rassment and disappointment at the
manner in which some ECU support-
ers behaved at the end of the State-
ECU game September 5. 1 feel sure
that the athletic department, admini-
stration, faculty, alumni and most
students share my feelings.
It is hard to believe that this dis-
graceful occurrence could have hap-
pened a second time. What a shame to
mar such a great performance and
victory by our team.
The one ACC institution that I con-
sider most respectful of our ambitions
and goals must now look for assur-
ance that we can return to Carter-
Finley Stadium and behave with the
same class as our team showed.
I do hope that you and your depart-
ment will take appropriate action to
make sure that no ECU supporter
crosses that fence or hedge at Carter-
Finley Stadium unauthorized ever
again. I only hope that North Carolina
State University will be kind enough
to give us another chance. It will be a
shame for such a great rivalry and
sports spectacle to end because of a
few.
The greatest basketball tournament
in America (The Dixie Classic) ended
because of a few. Will the greatest
football game in North Carolina end
because of a few?
If I ever see ECU supporters behave
again as I witnessed Saturday, I must
seriously consider withdrawal from
the Pirate Club. I can not and will not
be involved in any program at ECU
that does not uphold the reputation,
prestige and goals of our great Uni-
versity.
Proper and enthusiastic support of
the Pirates is a must; but destruction
and defacement of property, personal
injury and boonsh behavior must not
and can not be a part of East Carolina
University.
We won the battle, but we may have
lost the war.
Donald H. Smith
Class of 1957
Show class
To the editor:
After being a witness to the mav-
hem that followed the State-ECU
game September 5; I certainly hope
the students andor the individuals
responsible can someway be identi-
fied and dealt with accordingly.
Having graduated from ECU, I could
not help but be totally embarassed bv
the whole incident.
We're on the verge of losing a great
in-state football series that has been
very good for ECU. Please convey to
the students via the paper that the
behavior of that night hardly reflects
the image ECU needs to have hanging
over its head. While all the people on
the field were not students. I can't
help but but to believe that the major-
ity were. It's quite embarassing to be
apoligizing for our fan's behavior
instead of talking about what a great
game it was for ECU.
Let's all continue to support the
ECU football team, but let's do it with
some class. We have a fine school and
team. Let's not tarnish both by our
idiot actions.
Nat Riddick
Alumnus
Mad as hell
To the editor:
An open letter to the ECU students
who participated in the riot after the
ECUNCSU game: I am mad mad as
hell I sat there in the stands and
watched what should have been a
great football victory go down the
tubes. I watched a small number jeop-
ardize the future of an event which
has become a tradition for ECU
alumni everywhere. Our group alone
had people from Florida, New Jersey
and South Carolina.
Next time, if there is one, t!
about what you are doing and have
the courage to stop. Think about the
rest of us that want to be proud
from ECU.
Gene McFarland
Class of 75
No students
To the editor:
The performance of the team,
coaches, band and thousands of ma-
ture ECU fans was overshadowed
September 5 by a band of immature,
alcohol abusing East Carolina stu-
dents in Raleigh.
I suggest the following steps to
correct the situation:
1. Require the ECU Student Gov-
ernment Association to cancel a pre-
viously budgeted event and use the
money to pay for the damage ai Car-
ter-Finley Staduim.
2. In the future, sell all X.C. State
tickets allotted to ECU to Pirate Gub
members and offer none to students.
3. Have the ECU administration
announce prior to the next game that
any student caught damaging prop-
erty at the N.C State game or any
other game will be permanently ex-
pelled from ECU.
4. Increase the security force for the
State-ECU fame and issue orders to
use night sticks on the knuckles of
anyone who lays a hand on the fence
or goal posts.
5. Change the starting time ot the
1988 State-ECU game to noon to re-
duce the time available for alcohol
abuse.
John Osborne
Class of 19
Campus SpectT-ym
rules
Inaddition to the "Campus Forum"
section of the editorial page, The East
Carolinian features the "Campus
Spectrum This is an opinion column
by guest writers from the student
body and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of gram-
mar and decency. Persons submi tting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information may
contact the managing editor of The
East Carolinian at 757-6366, or stop bv
our offices on the second floor of the
Publications Building.
Campus Forum
I
ByFAREEDZAKARIA
Graduation is over and the cap
and gown are back at the rental
agency. Supporting yourself in
the "real world" is sudder . a
pressing concern The financial
picture is even more threatening
thanks to the student ! ai
took advantage of, which now
have to be paid hack
Life would he much easier with-
out those monthly loan pay
ments. Is there any wa
forget about them"5 Then
work for the government
Student loans are !�'?� ai . -her
loans. A delinquent d
ceives a series ofthreater g
warning' letters from th bai I �
lending agency If tl loesn'i
'a rk, the bank asks d i ourl I
garmshee the debtor
requiring theemployer I
part of the debtor's paycheck di-
rectlv to the hank
But under the d trii i
ereign immunity tl
ment cannot be hau ourt
unless it specifically .
sent In practice, that mens that
government en
cannot be garnished I -
unless Congress i I
passes a statute authorizing it
Surprisingly, although men
of Congress have occasici
introduced such bills, none has
ever passed into !a-A
This legislative - . -
especially absurd since student
loans are generally guaranteed bv
the foderal government, v.
bears the cost when borrowers
don't pay up. In effect, "sovereign
immunity" is preventing the gov-
ernment from collecting monev
owed to it by its own employees.
The student loan program
(Guaranteed Student Loans, Fed-
erally Insured Student Loans.
National Direct Student Loans is
big money. Student loans guaran-
teed by the U.S. government total
almost $45 billion.
Twelve percent of those who
received loans have defaulted; 9.6
percent are "hard-core defaul-
ters persisting even after collec-
tion attempts. These are both
unusually high default rates,
compared with other bank loans.
One reason, of course, is that
banVs Have less incentive tO put-
swe defaulters when the govern-
ment has guaranteed repavment.
including interest, in anv event.
(And if the lender recovers anv
ment hasanl
rebate 7 pel
student
uon
parti
undt �
has pui
'
� up
���
j
l r.t
defa

� �


nani


loans
a
l
men:
directlv -
loans a-
doggie for bai
norrr ; � I
vane,
ever I �
the
monev and red!
The Educatj
argues that it
admit
more -
particular r1
tg en
cost �
the app :
budget d
At pi
on the govei
theoutlavrr.
and collection i
mentm
$45 billion le
h, nan ��
Individurthoug
Like a circlcfn a rectangle, eacl
to be unique. Individual though
of expression.
Express yburself in The East d
Positions pre now open for edit
writers, production manager am
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The experience, the friends. the
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mmmmmm
A





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15,1987
to State
if there is one, think
u are doing and have
stop. Think about the
that want to be pr
ud to be
Gene McFarland
Class of 75
No students
The performance of the team,
I and thousands of ma-
fans a as overshadowed
v a band of immature,
g East Carolina stu-
i eigh.
I suggest the following steps to
� situation:
lire the ECU Student Gov-
runent Assooation to cancel a pre-
budgeted event and use the
pay for the damage at Car-
Staduim.
the future, sell all N.C. State
.lotted to ECU to Pirate Club
rs and offer none to students.
. e the ECU administration
ce pnor to the next game that
ident caught damaging prop-
the N.C State game or any
une will be permancntlv ex-
- mECU.
ase the security force for the
U fame and issue orders to
sticks on the knuckles of
ho lavs a hand on the fence
tl posts.
5. Change the starting time of the
� tate-ECU game to noon to re-
the time available for alcohol
John Osborne
Class of 1969
mai

� ;or
it a great
and
1
idick
mnus

students
)t after the
?d mad as
tands and
he been a
Jdown the
Imber jeop-
ent which
for ECU
roup alone
cw Jersey
Campus Spectrum
rules
In addition to the "Campus Forum"
section of the editorial page, The East
Carolinian features the "Campus
Spectrum This isan opinion column
by guest writers from the student
body and faculty The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of gram-
ma r a nd decency. Person s submi tting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information may
contact the managing editor of The
East Carolinian at 757-6366, or stop by
our offices on the second floor of the
Publications Building.
Forum
i �.
Government protects salary
By FAREED ZAKARIA
Tfce New Republic
Graduation is over and the cap
and gown are back at the rental
agencv Supporting yourself in
the "real world" is suddenly a
pressing concern. The financial
picture is even more threatening
thanks to the student loans you
took advantage of, which now
have to be paid back.
Life would be much easier with-
out those monthly loan pay-
ments Is there any way just to
forget about them? There is. Go
work for the government.
Student loans are like any other
loans. A delinquent debtor re-
ceives a series of threatening "last
warning" letters from the bank or
lending agency. If this doesn't
work, the bank asks a court to
garnishee the debtor's wages �
requiring theemployer to transfer
part of the debtor's paycheck di-
rectly to the bank.
But under the doctrine of "sov-
ereign immunity the govern-
ment cannot be hauled into court
unless it specifically gives its con-
sent. In practice, that means that
government employees' wages
cannot be garnished for bad debts
unless Congress specifically
passes a statute authorizing it.
Surprisingly, although members
of Congress have occasionally
introduced such bills, none has
ever passed into law.
This legislative delinquency is
especially absurd since student
loans are generally guaranteed by
the federal government, which
bears the cost when borrowers
don't pay up. In effect, "sovereign
immunity" is preventing the gov-
ernment from collecting money
owed to it by its own employees.
The student loan program
(Guaranteed Student Loans, Fed-
erally Insured Student Loans,
National Direct Student Loans) is
big money. Student loans guaran-
teed bv the U.S. government total
almost $45 billion.
Twelve percent of those who
received loans have defaulted; 9.6
percent are "hard-core defaul-
ters persisting even after collec-
tion attempts. These are both
unusually high default rates,
compared with other bank loans.
One reason, of course, is that
banks have Jess incenriVe'ft"piif-
swe defaulters whenhe' govern-
ment has guaranteed repayment,
including interest, in any event.
(And if the lender recovers any
part of the loan after the govern-
ment has anted up, it only has to
rebate 70 percent.) In all, overdue
student loans now total $4.4 bil-
lion.
The Department of Education
under Secretary William Bennett
has pursued loan collection very
aggressively. In 1985 the depart-
ment set up an "IRS Offset" pro-
gram, which subtracts outstand-
ing loan payments � sometimes
over $20,000 � from the debtor's
income tax refunds.
There are also plans to make
defaulters pay for collection costs
and to have loan delinquency
hurt their credit ratings. Last year
the department collected $229
million on defaulted loans the
government had paid off, two-
and-a-half times as much as it
collected in 1984 or 1985, and four
times as much as in 1982.
As for federal employees, the
department claims to be creating
files that will match employees'
names with those of loan defaul-
ters. Then the government can
pay itself back directly by with-
holding part of the delinquent
employee's salary�a Federal
Employee Offset program.
Of course, this means that the
government will fiist have to pay
off the banks and take over the
loans itself. This additional and
needless bureaucracy could be
avoided if Congress would sim-
ply pass a law allowing the courts
to collect loans from federal em-
ployees' wages.
You wonder why the govern-
ment doesn't make these loans
directly in the first place? Student
loans are a wonderful boon-
doggle for banks, which get their
normal profits from the loan, plus
various fees, at no risk whatso-
ever to themselves. Cutting out
the middleman would save
money and red tape.
The Education Department
argues that it is not equipped to
administer such a program. But a
more likely explanation for this
particular "privatization" is that
direct government loans�even if
cost-effective� would increase
the apparent size of the federal
budget deficit.
At present, all that shows up
on the government's books are
the'outla vs made to cover defaults
and collection costs. If the govern-
ment made the loans directly, that
$45 billion lent to students would
. be part of the national debt.
IndividiraHihoug
Like a circle An a rectangle, each of us ha
to be unique. Individual thought. Freedo
of expression.
Express yburself in The East Carolinian.
Positions are now open for editors, staff
writers, production manager and layout
artists
The experience, the friends, they can't b
beat.
Team effort.
ly today
HEY'RE HERE
Back By Popular
Demand
2903 E.lOth Street
758-2712
Tuesday
�i ��
Special
No. 3
6oz. BEEF TIPS
limited time
& $2.99
Includes:
FREE Potato Bar &
FREE Sundae Bar
Wmtmn

OPINION � Everyone's got one. Some people die for th
Other people already have, so that we can express ours.
MAKE use of your right to have an opinion. Let people know what
you think. Write to the Campus Forum and the Campus Spectrum.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is devoted to giving everyone a .
chance to have their voices heard. Write today. We also are conducting
a search for the best writers on campus to write editorial columns
about campus issues. Apply today in our offices.
WE BUILT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
SAV A CENTER
FOOD MARKETS
The freshest way to Save
The wisest investment you'll ever make
for your family begins with only. . .
FUNK&WAGNALLS
NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA
Latest Edition
Volume 1
only. . .
FREE
Volume Mk
DICTIONARY
Volumes 2 29
only $4.99 ea.
I PLAIN � SELF-RISING
Red Band
Flour
Limit One With An Additional $10 Of More Purchase
FLAV-O-RICH
STUP I THIN TRIM GRAIN FED BEEF
U 20-26 LB AVG � CUT FREE
Whole
Bottom Round
12
Milk
4- 3iA� 51 ; -
LIMIT 1 W $10 OR MORE PUfl � BEAN COFFEE
,488
Eight
O'Clock
Crisco 4An
Shortening i Y�
Duke's Qtf
Mayonnaise i f O
FAMILY PACK FRESH
Fryer
Breast
THIN TRIM GRAIN FED BEEF
TOP BONELESS
Sirloin
Steaks
LOOK-FIT
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADD L S'C OR MORE URCh
Del Monte
jfgL THIN TRIM BOTTOM OR BONELESS
990 Catsup 680 Roast 1"
SELECTED CAKES MARGARINE QUARTERS ASSORTED
Peppendge Farm 1.89 Parkay 2 1ib 79 Kleenex Tissue
89c Bun Size Wieners 1.69
ORE IDA MINI GOLD
Cob Corn
LIGHT N LIVELY SELECTED
THIN � THICK
99c Fruit Yogurt 2 � 79c Huggies Diapers
MRS SMITH REG � DUTCH (26 OZ I GREAT LAKES
. 1.89 Mild Cheddar
Apple Pie
BONUS pAC � MACAfl i
"� 1.19 Kraft Dinner
GOLDEN CRINKLES
Ore-Ida
KRAFT REGULAR � EXTRA THICK
lM�r I MCUULUM 'CM n� i m,r rn�r i
iZ 2.99 Velveeta Slices '� 1.69 BBQ Sauce
9.89Round Steaks
CAROLINA PRIDE BEE11
89c Meat Bologna
FAMILY PACK FRESH
99c Fryer Thighs
1.99
1.09
79-
PEPPER0NI � SAUSAGE
HAMBURGER
w Red Baron
STOP CALIFORNIA
STOP NEW CROP GOLDEN
IW Jumbo r Delicious
Honeydewsl Apples
STOP ERESH ATLANTIC
W Whole
Flounder
PEPSI
2 LITER
BOTTLE
1.09
RED RIPE Salad Tomatoes10 OZ49cCALIcORNIA GROWN Celery Heartsea rg99c
CRISP CALIFORNIA GREEN Leaf LettuceDen69cFRESH CELLO Red Radishes4T 1 cmgs99c
CALIFORNIA Firm Carrots1 ib bag39cFLORIDA Tangy Limes8.c.99c
LOCALLY GROWN Green Onions 3bchs99cSELECT MEDIUM Yellow Onions3 bag99c
AMERICA EXPRESS
Money
Orders
25
SAV-A CENTER SUPER COUPON
S� Margarine 4Q0
LlT Quarters Br
Limit One P� Snuooe' lrV� A' ajo iji . ' Moe V.ase CouOO �!�.� Set - 'yt�
STOP
SAV-A-CENTER SUPER COUPON
AAP GRADE A
Large
i V SIXW � r fcMrtwri �� � t.� ik, Pjrtmi4 .aortvnSw '9
SEE STORE
FOR DETAILS
INSERT STORE HOURS
AND ADDRESSES HERE
PRICES EFFECTIVE SUN SEPT. 13, THRU SAT, SEPT. 19.1987. QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
r
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open 24 Hours-Open Mon. 7 a.m Closed Sat. 11 p.m Open Sun 7 a mi





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15, 1987
1 to State
:� there is one, think
iat you are doing and have
ge to stop Think about the
that want to he proud to be
Gene McFarland
Class of 75
No students
The r" rmance of the team,
md thousands of ma-
was overshadowed
a band of immature,
I abusing East Carolina stu-
aleigh.
� the following steps to
rreel the situation:
Require the ECU Student Gov-
unent Association to cancel a pre-
udgeted event and use the
pay tor the damage at Car-
Staduim.
ie future, sell all N.C. State
lotted to ECU to Pirate Club
- and offer none t students.
�: the ECU administration
e prior to the next game that
.ent caught damaging prop-
the N.C. State game or any
ime will be permanentlv ex-
� mECU.
rease the security force for the
ate-ECU fame and issue orders to
t sticks on the knuckles of
who lays a hand on the fence
2 il posts.
ange the starting time of the
ate-ECU game to noon to re-
e time available for alcohol
John Osborne
Class of 1969
it a great
the
do it with
:hool and
: . our
t Riddick
Alumnus
11
students
)t after the
mad as
Itands and
he been a
down the
pnber jeop-
fent which
for ECU
roup alone
Jew fersev
Campus Spectrum
rules
In addition to the "Campus Forum"
section of the editorial page, The East
Carolinian features the "Campus
Spectrum This isan opinion column
by guest writers from the student
body and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rulesof gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information may
contact the managing editor of The
East Carolinian at 757-6366, or stop by
our offices on the second floor of the
Publications Building.
Forum
Government protects salary
By FAREED ZAKARIA
Th� New Republic
Graduation is over and the cap
and gown are back at the rental
agencv. Supporting yourself in
the "real world" is suddenly a
pressing concern. The financial
picture is even more threatening
thanks to the student loans you
took advantage of, which now
have to be paid back.
Life would be much easier with-
out those monthly loan pay-
ments Is there any way just to
forget about them? There is. Go
work for the government.
Student loans are like any other
loans. A delinquent debtor re-
ceives a series of threatening "last
warning" letters from the bank or
lending agency. If this doesn't
work, the bank asks a court to
garnishec the debtor's wages �
requiring the employer to transfer
part oi the debtor's paycheck di-
rectly to the bank.
But under the doctrine of "sov-
ereign immunity the govern-
ment cannot be hauled into court
unless it specifically gives its con-
sent. In practice, that means that
government employees' wages
cannot be garnished for bad debts
unless Congress specifically
passes a statute authorizing it.
Surprisingly, although members
of Congress have occasionally
introduced such bills, none has
ever passed into law.
This legislative delinquency is
especially absurd since student
loans are generally guaranteed by
the federal government, which
bears the cost when borrowers
don't pay up. In effect, "sovereign
immunity" is preventing the gov-
ernment from collecting money
owed to it by its own employees.
The student loan program
(Guaranteed Student Loans, Fed-
erally Insured Student Loans,
National Direct Student Loans) is
big money- Student loans guaran-
teed bv the U.S. government total
almost $45 billion.
Twelve percent of those who
received loans have defaulted; 9.6
percent are "hard-core defaul-
ters persisting even after collec-
tion attempts. These are both
unusually high default rates,
compared with other bank loans.
One reason, of course, is that
banks have less incentiV'ftypUf
sue defaulters whenh'govern-
ment has guaranteed repayment,
including interest, in any event.
(And if the lender recovers any

part of the loan after the govern-
ment has anted up, it only has to
rebate 70 percent.) In all, overdue
student loans now total $4.4 bil-
lion.
The Department of Education
under Secretary William Bennett
has pursued loan collection very
aggressively. In 1985 the depart-
ment set up an "IRS Offset" pro-
gram, which subtracts outstand-
ing loan payments � sometimes
over $20,000 � from the debtor's
income tax refunds.
There are also plans to make
defaulters pay for collection costs
and to have loan delinquency
hurt their credit ratings. Last year
the department collected $229
million on defaulted loans the
government had paid off, two-
and-a-half times as much as it
collected in 1984 or 1985, and four
times as much as in 1982.
As for federal employees, the
department claims to be creating
files that will match employees'
names with those of loan defaul-
ters. Then the government can
pay itself back directly by with-
holding part of the delinquent
employee's salary�a Federal
Employee Offset program.
Of course, this means that the
government will first have to pay
off the banks and take over the
loans itself. This additional and
needless bureaucracy could be
avoided if Congress would sim-
ply pass a law allowing the courts
to collect loans from federal em-
ployees' wages.
You wonder why the govern-
ment doesn't make these loans
directly in the first place? Student
loans are a wonderful boon-
doggle for banks, which get their
normal profits from the loan, plus
various fees, at no risk whatso-
ever to themselves. Cutting out
the middleman would save
money and red tape.
The Education Department
argues that it is not equipped to
administer such a program. But a
more likely explanation for this
particular "privatization" is that
direct government loans�even if
cost-effective� would increase
the apparent size of the federal
budget deficit.
At present, all that shows up
on the government's books are
' the outlays made to cover defaults
and collection costs. If the govern-
ment made the loans directly, that
$45 billion lent to students would
be part of the national debt.
IndividimHfhoug
Like a circle m a rectangle, each of us Ha
to be uniqufe. Individual thought. FreedoN
of expression.
Express yourself in The East Carolinian.
Positions ore now open for editors, staff
writers, production manager and layout
artists
The experience, the friends, they can't bj
beat.
Team e
ly today
"
HEY'RE HERE
Back By Popular
Demand
Tuesday
Special
No. 3
6oz. BEEF TIPS
limited time
1$ $2.99
2903 E. 10th Street
758-2712
Includes:
FREE Potato Bar &
FREE Sundae Bar
Wmimn

;
OPINION � Everyone's got one. Some people die for them.
Other people already have, so that we can express ours.
MAKE use of your right to have an opinion. Let people know what
you think. Write to the Campus Forum and the Campus Spectrum.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is devoted to giving everyone a .
chance to have their voices heard. Write today. We also are conducting
a search for the best writers on campus to write editorial columns
about campus issues. Apply today in our offices.
WE BUILT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
SAV A CENTER
FOOD MARKETS
The freshest way to Save
The wisest investment you'll ever make
for your family begins with only. . .
FUNK&WAGNALLS
NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA
Latest Edition
Volume 1
only. . .
FREE
Volume Mft hn
DICTIOAR
. ilh li,mr &. 1 of the EncMtOpMKJT
Volumes 2 29
only $4.99 ea.
i PLAIN -SELF-RISINi
Red Ba
Flour
RIM GRAIN FED BEEF
LB AVG � CUT FREE
ole
iRound
FLAV O-RICH
Miik
LIMIT I rt$:0 OBMOBEPUH �BoV.CGcc
Eight
O'Clock
FAMILY r .CK FRESH
Fryer
LIMIT ONE
Wft Crisco 3 ,68 Lip Duke's
Shortening
Mayonnaise
LIMIT 0N� KffTHANM
78
3
ftfMSL
THIN TRIM GRAIN FEP BEEF
TOP BONELESS
Sirloin
99 ��??e68� �E3
THIN TRIM BOTTOM OR BONfc
ASSORTED
SELECTED CAKES MARGARINE QUARTERS
Peppendge Farm 1.89 Parkay 2 79$ Kleenex Tissue � 89c Bun Size Wieners
ORE IDA MINI GOLD
Cob Corn
THIN � THICK
LIGHT N LIVELY SELECTED
� 99c Fruit Yogurt 2 � 79c Huggies Diapers ��9.89Round Steaks
MRS SMITH REG -DUTCH ,26 01 GREAT LAKES
Apple Pie - 1.89 Mild Cheddar
90nl-ss&c�-v�:
� . � BEEF 5
1.19 Kraft Dinner 2 89c Meat Bologna
GOLDEN CRINKLES
Ore-Ida
cAMIIv PACK RESh
C KRAFT REGULAR-EXTRA THICK KRAFT
S 2.99 Velveeta Slices '1.69 BBQ Sauce '� 99c Pryer Thighs
1.69
1.99
1.09
79-
PEPPER0NI-SAUSAGE
STOP HAMBURGER
w Red Baron
Pizza
ST0P1 CALIFORNIA
Jumbo
Honeydews
STOP NEW CROP GOLDEN
w Delicious
Apples
'STOP I FRESH ATLANTIC
w Whole
Flounder
PEPSI
2 LITER
BOTTLE
1.09
RED RIPE
Salad Tomatoes '�
CRISP CALIFORNIA GREEN
Leaf Lettuce
CALIFORNIA
Firm Carrots
LOCALLY GROWN
Green Onions 3
49c
69c
� 39c
CALIFORNIA GROWN
Celery Hearts 99c
FRESH CELLO
Red Radishes 4 �3 99c
Tangy Limes 8 99c
3t QQC
SELECT MEDIUM
Yellow Onions
AMERICAN EXPRESS
Money
Orders
25
SAV-A CENTER SUPER COUPON
HL Margarine
tr Quarters j
E
imrt On P�r SKiOO" : A-3C '� ' a i DC Mo' Pw "aW . kjOO" I �-
SAV-A-CENTER SUPER COUPON
SEESTORE
FOR DETAILS
INSERT STORE HOURS
AND ADDRESSES HERE
PRICES EFFECTIVE SUN SEPT. 13, THRU SAT, SEPT. 19.1987 QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED

" Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Opan 24 Houra-Opan Mon. 7 a.m Closed Sal. 11 p.m Open Sun. 7 a m1 lPJ

' -�'S�





JH TAST CARPI INI AM SFITEMBER15. 1987
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
"ranks mNTED: Wa"ri- �
n r "� S"�� Scj Shoppng Center
taV' to Food Lk� 1 2 mile behind hospi
ATTENT.ON: Beau needs bartenders
male or temale. 18 vts or older) and DJs
7-lT music) Ca" ,or "PPointaeu
ROOMATE WANTFD tor 2 UK .pan
men! at Cypress Gardens on I 10th St
'�"IIvfurnished AC, dishwasher
l�00a mo and 12 utilities Call len
niter. 757-3984 or leave message
JJJJ ���ted lot Acct 2521 .m.i DS I
aa I lease can Lariat 752 7396 and leave
message
DESK CLERKS The Holiday INN in
Greenville is accepting applications tor
positions at tront desk Experience pre
rerred, excellent starting pay Must appl
"i person, no phone calls please
�NOW HIRING Hanks Homemade Ice
Cream is currently hiring deliver) per
sonnel Must have own car Bring your en
thusiasm and a smile and apply toda) at
Hanks. 321 E 10th Si Beside Wend) s
SOCCEI COACHES and Referees
needed on fuesdays and rhursdays
S-Ol per hour Contact Carol or Alice
with Pitt Count) Schixils at 830 4200
BRODVS TOR NUN has lull time and
part time sales associates positions for en
thustastic. fashion forward individuals
Retail clothing experience is required
Better than average startingsaiar) Apph
in person Brod) s Personnel Director
Carolina East Mall. M VV 2 4 p m
BRODVS has part time sales associates
positions for enthusiastic out goingindi
Mduals who enjoy working with young
contemporar) junior Fashions Good sal
ary Apply in person. Brod) 's Personnel
Director, Carolina Hast Mall, M VV, 2 4
p.m
MACKEN21� SECURITV is seeking stu
dents to work as part time, weekendsecu
ntv guards Good Pay' Must have de
pendabk transportation to work MUSI
have telephone MUST NOT have police
record Apply in person at 1127 South
I vans Street. 758-2174
MASSEUSES NEED! l: immediately tor
lull time and part time in Greenville and
Fayetteville Excellent Pa) Appl in per
-�on Misty Blues - Highway 4" South
Call 74vO�ig7
ROOMMATE NEEDED (MF) Private
nxim avail Tar River Fsts Call Sandy or
lasa 758-6950
ONE BEDROOM SPECIAL Tar River
Estates:$150ofl 1st month rent when sign
ing a 12 month lease or the option to sign
a 9 month lease 14(X) Willow St 1 7
422.
TIRED Ot YOUR ROOMMATE? Call
your daddy then call me One bedroom
condo at Kinggold Towers Priced to sell
Call Bob Rams at Caldwell BankerW.C,
Blount and Associates 7 3(XX) days or
355 2394 nights
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a 2
bedroom apt r blocks from campus Pri
vate room $I20mo and 12 utilities Call
rvK 7990 between 2 30 and 4 30 daily.
RINGOI 1) TOWERS Apts tor rent fur
nished Contact 1 lollieSimonowichat752-
2865
ROOMMA 11 11)11). to share 2 bed
room apartment Private room $135 per
month and 12 utilitiesall 756 9248
ROOMMATE Ml DID: to share a 2
bedroom apt 5 blocks from campus Pn
vate room $120 mo and 12 utilities Call
7"2 2310 between 2 30 and 4 M) daily
DISK JOCK1E The imitations are simply
that TRASHMAN DJ service. Golden
grooversbody movers, new wax, new
wave, top 40, any mixer, social, Bar
Mitpha, pool party, etc contact 7S2
.V5K7 1 laving a party and need a DJ
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We ofler typing
and photocopying services We also sell
software and computer diskettes 24
hours in and out Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDE
Professional Computer Services, 106 I ast
th Street (Beside Cubbies) Greenville
N.C 752 3694
PICK UP AND DELIVERY of term pa
pers, theses, resumes to be typed IBM
wordprocessing by professional with 13
yearsexperience 1 letter Quality print and
professional editing Call Nanette in
Griffon at 1-524 5241 Cheap call the best
service!
NEED A DJ for your next party? I play top
40 ami dance 111 beat Morgan or any
other D)'s price Call Mark at 752 42t1
IS IT TRUE You Can Buy Jeeps for S44
through the US. government? Get the
facts today! Call 1-312-742-1142 Ext 5271
A
FOR SALE
PERSONALS
FOR RENT-
ROOMMA1 f Nl I Dl D n
December Duple, clos,
$1 v 50a month 1 2 util No
6722
PEUGEOT PIP1 LINE CRUIS1 R for sale
black in gins condition 758 rvS4 .
I lie I ROM SIS (permanent removal ol
unwanted hair) Big Barbara Venteis
People who understand electrolysiswill
not wax, tweeze or in1 electronic tweezer
or anv other temporary method Isn't it
time to try the permanent method Call
830 0962 lor tree consultation
ECU - c difi in i Tanning Today tor the
Best IAN in TOWN�Quality Tanning
with Special Discounts RIST FOR YOU!
�1S Suite A Arlington Blvd 355-7858
ECU Want to keep that bronze you
worked all summer to get! Visit California
Tanning Tivlav & see the difference! Expe-
rience the Best TAN in Town - Special
Discounts lliST FOR YOU! 355-7858
GOVERNMENT HOMES. Delinquent
t.n property Repossessions 805-687-6000
Ext L-1166.
Ml D TYPING? Callindy 757 0398
Call anytime alter 3 IX) pm Low rates
include proofreading, spelling and gram
matical corrections; professional service
10 years experience IBM Typing.
FOR SALE: Dorm refrigerator Sears 2 5
Cubic ft excellent condition, asking $8S,
call Holly, daytime 531-2772
CARS SI I I tot $155 (average)! Alsosux
plus jeeps trucks etc Now Available
Your area Info 805-687-6000 Ext S 77
INTER VARSITY CHRISTIAN FEl-
LOWSHIP: Please otn US' Wednesday
Nights in Speight I29at700p.rn -Fun-
Fellowship Food leaching
si KIPPERS - STRIPPI RS PI KAPPA
PHI RUSH: lues night. Sept 15th at the
Rotary Club Also see 180 proof for Some
kick ass R,ek and Roll.
ATTENTION all partygoers. Thanks for
making our Saek the Pack party a success
We had a blast. Sigma Tau Gamma.
ATTENTION all perspective pledges
Tonight Sigma Tau Gamma is having
Casino Night Come on out and get into
the action You may even win a pric.
ZBT I ITTI.E SISTERS: Congratulations
to our new officers V.P. Knsta Burnette.
Secretary Stacy Kahn, and Pledge Train
ers lube Dawkins and Amy Tharnngton
LETS make this one a good one' N.P.
PIKA'S Shoulder to-shoulder on a bus
yvith Pika's and Ai'Ds laughter and
gixui times were sure to be. We weren't
surprised when we had the time ol our
lives St) Thank you Pika's We Love You!
Love, the AZD's.
SIGMA PHI EPS1LON: Happy Hour
every Wed night at TeqiiftHfcr Con
Party w the Sig Pp(L
ALPHA SIGMA PHI: Happ) Hour every
Thursday at Tequila Bar C ome Party w
the Alpha Sigs
XUVE BARKER PROVES HE'S THE NEW
HORROR KING OF MOVIEMAKERS:
-Bill Harris, At The Movies
THE BEST SLAM-BANG,
NO-HOLDS-BARRED, SCARE-
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-Screen International
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HELLRAISER
He'll tear your soul apart.
NEW WORLD PICTURES in association with CINEMARQIE ENTERTAINMENT BV presents
A FILM FUTURES PRODUCTION A FILM BY CLIVE BARKER HELLRAISER siarkim, ANDREW ROBINSON
CLARE HIGGINS and intkodi ling ASHLEY LAURENCE wish r CHRISTOPHER YOUNG
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STARTS EVERYWHERE FRIDAY, SEPT. 18
CONGRATULATIONS to Chi Omega's
New Pledges! We love ya! The Sisters of
Chi Omega.
TO ALL 1987 RUSH COUNSELORS:
Ya'll are great! You really did a terrific job
and I hope we can all get together soon &
visit Sub Station 11 Thanks for everything
Shari
CAM & PAULA: Congratulations on a
terrific job during Rush. We're all so
proud of you Love, your sisters and new
pledges.
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! The
Student Union's Travel Committee is
meeting on Wednesday, Sept 16 at 4 pm.
at Mendenhall Student Center Everyone
is welcome so get involved with travel.
Call 757-6611 for the room.
EVERYONE: BASKETBALL BLOWOUT
to support the Ronald McDonald House -
he around the Student Store Sept. 2J-25.
You may win $100! Sponsored by
Panhellenic and IFC.
A2D: Congratulations to the new pledges
ol Alpha Xi Delta's Beta NU Pledge class.
ZTA's: Pref Nite was a blast from what we
remember. Congratulations to the Zeta
Pledges, welcome to Greek life. Thursday
nite was a taste of things to come when
you party with the men of Theta Chi
GUYS, who could of asked for more, let's
do it again real soon - and by the way
"Good job on the floor Love, fheSigmas
KA's: We could definitely say that on
Sept 3rd we surely did it up right, for the
Sigmas and KA's reunited again for the
most awesome pref nite. With the best
pledges and great group of.
KA's and LAMBDA CHI's: Thanks for
the most memorable trip to the State
game We had a great time! Love, The
Sigmas .
CONGRATULATIONS to the following
new pledges of Sigma Sigma Sigma: Ni-
cole Adams, Janie Barr, Dana Bennett,
Lisa Bianci, Shelly Brady, Angie Camp,
Knsten Chambers, Laura Dupree, Eliza-
beth Ellis, Mary Jo Gondek, Noeue
Ilogan. Katherine Home, Susanna
I ludson, Jenkie Joyce, Kamberly Kayes,
Kathy Kinley, Leah Lassiter, Blair Mat-
thews, Mia McCoy, Nancv Midgctte,
Dawn Miller, Dotty Pivec, Kelly Pleas-
ants, Katherine Porter, Stephanie Quinn,
Verdery Ransome, Kathryn Ray, Apryl
Rumley, Daryl Schiano, Kathryn
Sepenzis, Kelly Sloan, Stacey Stone, Lisa
Tredcnmck and Lisa Wells We love you
fhe Sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma .
TO THE BLONDE BABE IN 303
RINGGOLD: You are terrific, I've been
watching you - But what is your name?
YSA.
RHONDA: Thanks for all of your sup
port. I'm here if you need anything Proud
to be an Alpha Phi (pledge) Love ya,
Sarah .
HAYES - You are a MANIAC These last
couple of weeks have been great at the
House Keep that ball rolling! Proud of Ya
Little Bro SEMAJ.
ATTENTION ALL MALES Don t For
get, Tonight is Sub night at the Phi Tau
House. Come by tomorrow night to see
the Best Little Sister organizations left on
campus
ZBT RUSH: Check out the Smallest Fra-
ternity on campus, tonight and Wednes-
day 8:00-11:00 �
ZBT RUSH: Tonight at Rosina's Pizza
and Wednesday at 2401 E 3rd Street, Apt
D 8:00-11:00-
ZBT LITTLE SISTER RUSH: Meet the
Little Sisters of ZBT Thursday night 8:00-
1100 at 2401 E. 3rd Street. Apt D
ZETAS: Thanks for a job well done during
rush. A special thanks to Kim, Wendy,
Sally, Elena, Joyce, Scotia, Melanie, Tonja.
Ann, Kris K and Jodi You all did a great
job! Marcia, your the best little sister I love
you all You ALL Are The Best' ZLAM
CRINA �
DELTA ZETA: A little late but definitely
not forgotten Hey Alpha Sigs - Partying
til we didn't recall wasn't hard to do but
now that it's all over we're psvehed to do
it again with you! Shred it right, boys!
DID YOU READ ARTS PERSONALS?
If so, call the Central Ticket Office at 757
6611, ext 266, for a chance to win free
tickets for the N.C Shakespeare Festive
production of A Midsummer rVigj
Dream Be sure to mention one of the
characters in the ad, and leave your name
and phone number All entries must be m
by 6 00 pm Tuesday, September 22nd
The Drawing will be held at 9 00 lm
Wednesday, September 23rd You need
not be present to win
ART IS DESPARATELY SEEKlSc
SOLUTION! Hermia is supposed tc
marry Demetnus, but she wants to ir.arrv
Lysander On the other hand, Helena has
the hots for Demetnus, but he desires
Hermia The whole thing is all Tucked"
up What will I do' Meet me at Vs ,
Auditorium for A Midsummer P- �.
Dream. Wednesday, September 23r: a .
pm signed, 100 Natural "Arf:
ALPHA OMICRON PI: Congratulasons
to the new pledges of Alpha Omicron Pi
We love you' The sisters of A
Ormcron Pi .
JPha
"
HAPPY HOUR: Come pm the Sign
and everybody else at Pantana Bobs Tues
Sept 15 Free nacho bar and $1 Qc
Schnapps"
KAPPA ALPHA PSI would like I M
cerely thank all students who parh.
in last weekend's activities at the I
and the Cultural Center The Nuprs
ALPHA SIGMA PHI little sistc
September 22 and 23 Be there'
THE OMEGA PSI PHI Fraternity
will have a party at the Cultural Cer
Friday. Sept 18 from 9 00 pm to2(� i
See CLASSIFIEDS, Page 7
There is an Apostolic Church
near Campus
One Block diagonally behind the
Crows Nest!
Greenville United
Pentecostal Church
ACTS 2:38
Pastor: Ron Lappin 757-1834
The Kappa Sigma Fraternity
Welcomes The New Pirates
East
Carolina
University
The East Carolina University Chapter of
The Kappa Sigma Fraternity Provides
An Excellent Opportunity For Athletic
Leadership, and Scholastic Advancement
Also Famous For The Biggest
and Best Parties On Campus
Sept 14th - 16th at 9:00 p.m.
Come by and see the finest house
on campus.
Located 700 East 10th Street, Beside Darryl
s
RUSH KE STYLE IN THE FALL
Cooperative fccucaion
Would you hi to9) �
spring in Florida' Walt Dn. v .
leader in the enttrtainmnt md
be on campus tor
spring semestr Student!
are encouraged r. p
dise, food and attractions an
posiiiofti �
will be at L( U on Sept 29 and
theofhreof ooperat
Rawl Building tor furthei i.

BpLiit Student I niyn The BSL im ites)�
every Thurv t:d� m Mondays vm offei a 1
surfing at 5 X y ir � a time of fellowship and fun ii mal type worship m
Phi Si&ma I Do you have a 3 i CPA and I � and credit r National Honor bo for youome ti
22 at 7 V) p it ; roon building
Coral R�N�f Djvg Cluh
Contact Rob
information at .
Dive Qub
Siujdfnl HQrneCQrn
Committee
Nominal
1987 are now I
fjons should �
and phone numb-
Student Homecoming G a o tt
lorSlaughter
pus
Business Studenti
AMA speaker Marl
Founder nt East Goes
Rawl Drowning Room S
(Tues)
CospeiCboir
The ECU Gospel Choir m
show on Sept 15, at 7 p nn ,
Auditorium Admission is SI and
support the choir
I
Classifie
Continued from page 6
SHEII
our i
the 5th Si e-
LACROSSE: There will be a
meetmgtodayforaUinteettd mpljvirg KAPPA S1CS VJ
more Thanks i
757-0105. '

FRFT
FM KAPPA PHI
Come
LOST
HOIO Ol
mTi� ti
�.our 1985-86 oar
picked up at the
Publications Bui
HPP HOUR.
DELTA ZETA: We would like to �
Beta P: Pledges good luck on a i
semester' Lorraine Andr. V
Comwath, Jennifer Carpon: - -
Cope, Kirsten Eakes, Tnsh Fra - �
Cough, lennifer Journegar. V
Lentine, Kathie McHate, Mam - M
Charlotte Moffit, Robin Morrison. Kai
Prevost. Melanie Queen Li;
Melissa Richardson, Stephar
Tanva Smythe, Laurie Sodar
Spencer, Lon Stephenson. Sr-
Sumner, Kathie Ulnch, and M(
Walker We're excited about having ea -
one of you as our futurr sisl rs
KAPPA SIGS: Vnat a night! N. �
Say More" Thanks for a men
night' Love, The sisters and pkv.
Alpha Omicron Pi
KELLY WALKER: We ust wanted
you know that vou did a remarkat
wnth rush and we appreciate sour ra
bence with all of us We love you' The
Sigmas.
NORTHSIDE SEA
j All Types of Fresh Sea
Scallops
Softshell Crabs
Crab Legs
All Sizes of Shrimp
10 discount on any scafoox
with ECU-I.D. and this cou
108 East Gum Rood
(Turn right ort North
Green Street, 1 mile past
t.n.jye bv East Coast Roofing )
Hillcrest La,
Memorial Drive
56
FALL Leagues Are
Forming!
Bowl One Game and Ri
Another Game FREE
This Coupon.
Limit 1 Coupon Per Pe
'
i
r
!
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15.1987
�"�- RARE IN 303
v ire terrific ' ve been
kit whai is OLir name1
ud
va
� ,at
t die
DID YOU READ ARTS PERSONALS?
If so. call the Central Ticket Office at 757-
6611, ext 266, for a chance to win free
tickets for the N.C. Shakespeare festival
production of & Midsummer NigbXs
Dream Be sure to mention one of the
characters in the ad, and leave vour name
and phone number All entries must bln
by f00 p m Tuesday. September 22nd.
The Drawing will be held at 0:00 a.m.
Wednesday, September 23rd You need
not be present to win
ART IS DESPARATELY SEEKING
SOLUTION! Hermia is supposed to
marTv Demetnus, but she wants to marrv
I sander On the other hand. Helena has
the hots tor Demetrius, but he desires
Hermia The whole thing is all "Pucked"
up What will 1 do' Meet me at Wright
Auditorium tor A Midsummer Nigfrtj;
'�cam Wednesday. September 23rd, at8
signed, 100 Natural "Art:
ALPHA OMICRON PI: Congratulations
ra to the new pledges of Alpha Omicron Pi.
t We love you! The sisters of Alpha
C"micron Pi .
HAPPY HOUR: Come join the Sigmas
and ever) bodv else at Pantana Bobs Tues
Sept 15 Free nacho bar and $1.00
Schnapps"
KAPPA ALPHA PSI would like to sin-
a students who participated
a weekend a activities at the Wiz
e and the Cultural Center The Nupes .
ALPHA SIGMA PHI little sister rush
September 22 and 23 Be there'
THE OMEGA PSI PHI Fraternity, Inc.
� � a party at the Cultural Center on
Sept ISfromvOOpm to200a.m
See CLASSIFIEDS, Page 7
�N
lti Apostolic Church
near Campus
ck d ig nallv behind the
Crows Nest'
Greenville United
Pentecostal Church
ACTS 2:38
astor: Ron Lappin 757-1834
KI
ligma Fraternity
pie New Pirates
To
ast
olina
versity
University Chapter of
ia Fraternity Provides
portunity For Athletic,
cholastic Advancement
is For The Biggest
ties On Campus
16th at 9:00 p.m.
Isee the finest house
campus.
Kb Street, Beside Darryl's
E IN THE FALL
KI
Announcements
Cooperative jafcmjjnn
Would you like to spend the winter and
spring in Florida? Walt Disney World, the
loader in the entertainment industry, will
he on campus to recruit students for
spring semester Students from all majors
are encouraged to participate Merchan
dise, food and attractions, among other
positions, are available. Representatives
will be at ECU on Sept 29 and 30. Contact
the office of Cooperative Education in the
Raw! Building for further details.
Baptist Student Uninn
The BSU invites you to worship with us
e erv Thurs evening at 7 p.m. Also, on
Mondays we offer a home-cooked meal
starting at 5:30 p.m. for the cost of $2. It's
a time of fellowship and fun. It is an infor-
mal type worship�so come as you are!
Phi Sigma Pi
Do you have a 3.30 or higher overall
G PA and have completed between 32
and credit hours? Then Phi Sigma Pi
National Honor (co-ed) Fraternity could
be for vou Come to our Smoker on Sept.
12 at 7 30 p.m. in room 103 of the Biology
building
Coral Reef Dive Cluh
Contact Rob or Glenn at 752-4399 for
information about pining the Coral Reef
Dive Club.
Student Homecoming
Committee
Nominations for Homecoming Queen
1987 are now being accepted. Organiza-
tions should send their candidates name
and phone number to Leslie Council -
Student Homecoming Committee, Tay-
lorSlaughter Alumni Center, ECU Cam-
pus.
Business Students
AMA speaker - Mark Rosenberg
Founder of East Coast Creative Design in
Rawl Browning Room Sept. 15th, 3:30
(Tues.).
Gospel Choir
The ECU Gospel Choir will host a talent
show on Sept. 15, at 7:00 p.m. in Jenkins
Auditorium. Admission is $1 and will
support the choir.
Alpha Phi Alpha
The brothers of the Eta Nu Chapter of
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. invite all
students to THE JAM of the year Thurs.
Sept 17 at the Unlimited Touch Night
Club, 1311 5th St. Freshmen and all stu-
dents with ECU id. admitted for $1, 10
p.m to 2 a.m.
National Teachers F.irqm
The National Teacher Examinations �
Core Battery Tests � will be offered at
ECU on Sat Oct. 24, 1987. Application
blanks may be obtained from the Testing
Centeer, Room 105, Speight Building,
ECU and must be postmarked no later
than Sept 10,1987.
Intramural Services
Two central campus, one west campus,
and one graduate student needed to be
Campus representatives for the Intralmu-
ral Advisory Council. Apply at 204 Me-
morial or contact Nancy Mize at 757-6397.
Earth Sciences
Sigma Gamma Epsilon presents "De-
positional Environments of Miocene Sedi-
ments from the North Carolina Continen-
tal Shelf by Dr. Scott W. Snyder, Dept. of
Geology, East Carolina University, on
Sept. 17, at 3:00 p.m. in Graham Bldg. rm.
301.
Phi Beta Sigma
There will be an interest meeting at 7:00
p.m. in Room 221 Mendenhall Student
Center on Thursday Sept. 17,1987.
Campus Crusade for Christ
"Prime Time" is sponsored by Campus
Crusade for Christ. These meetings of
fellowship will occur every Thurs. eve-
ning at 7:00 p.m. in Brewster C-103.
Andre' Kole
Andre' Kole, a world renound illusion-
ist will appear in Wright Auditorium
Sept 29th at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are on sale at
Mendenhall - S2 for students, $5 for non-
students.
Gospel Choir
The cut-off date for membership to the
ECU Gospel Choir is Sept. 22.
Classifieds
Continued from page 6
LACROSSE: There will be a players
meeting today for all interested in playing
rinfc
at 4:06r4-vou�B�fi notcnd, caTTChris,
757-0305.
DELTA ZETA: We would like to wish our
Beta Pi Pledges good luck on a raging
semester! Lorraine Andre, Maggie
Comwath, Jennifer Carpenter, Karen
Cope, Kirsten Eakes, Tnsh Frazier. Tncia
Gough, Jennifer Journegan, Melinda
Lentine, Kathie McHale, Marnev McKee,
Charlotte Moffit, Robin Morrison, Karen
Prevost, Melanie Queen, Lizzy Rand,
Melissa Richardson, Stephanie Rvan,
Tanya Smythe, Laune Sodano, Diane
Spencer, Lori Stephenson, Shelley
Sumner, Kathie Ulrich, and Melinda
Walker. We're excited about having each
one of you as our future sisters:
KAPPA SIGS: What a nie;ht! Need We
Say More?! Thanks for a memorable pref
night! Love, The sisters and pledges of
Alpha Omicron Pi.
KELLY WALKER: We just wanted to let
you know that you did a remarkable job
with rush and we appreciate your pa-
tience with all of us. We love you! The
Sigmas.
SHEILA - The Producers will be playing
our song at the Attic Fri. night. Meet me at
the 5th St entrance at 10:00. SHE.
KAPPA SIGS, What a night! Need wc say
.?�?: SP1 f�JCJBT fvtrol pref night.
Tec's dolt again soon. Trie sisters and
pledges of Alpha Omicron Pi .
FREE - All you can eat seafood Pi Kappa
Phi Rush Beach Night Sept 16th, 730 at
the house. Same location as the Toga
Party Dress for the Beach.
PI KAPPA PHI Rush Tues, Sept. 15th -
Come out to the Rotary Qub on Rotary
Drive and get a straight shot of Rock and
Roll with ECU's Hottest new band - 180
proof, who made their appearance at the
7th Annual Toga Party. Starts at 7:30
LOST - Guy's dass ring. If found. Please
call 752-7253. Ask for Paris. Reward.
HOLD OUT for the Best! Rush Alpha Sig
Little Sister.
ATTENTION All Seniors & Juniors!
Your 1985-86 yearbook is here and can be
picked up at the Buccaneer Office in the
Publications Building.
HAPPY HOUR: Come join the Sigmas
and everybody else at Pantana Bobs Tues
Sept. 15. Free nacho bar and $1.00
Schnapps
NORTHSIDE SEAFOOD
All Types �f Fresh Seafood!
Scallops
Softshell Crabs
Crab Legs
All Sizes of Shrimp
10 discount on any seafood item
with ECU-I.D. and this coupon.
108 Eusr Gum Rood
(Turn fight ott North
Green Street, t m.ife'pqst Pf-n ���
bridge by East Coast Rooting � 7SR 0 H
Hillcrest Lanes
Memorial Drive 756-2020
FALL Leagues Are Now
Forming!
Bowl One Game and Receive
Another Game FREE With
This Coupon.
Limit 1 Coupon Per Person.
AMttttBCaOB Training
Three-part workshop offered to stu-
dents at no coat by the University Coun-
seling Center. September 17,24 it Oct. 1.
All three sessions will be conducted from
3-4 p.m in 312 Wright Building. Call the
Counseling Center at 757-6661 for Regis-
tration
Pre-Physical Therapy
Any sophomore (or higher) wanting to
make applicaiton to the Physical Therapy
program for May 1988 must go to the P.T.
Department (Allied Health-Belk Build
ing) to confirm eligibility to apply. Con-
tact the P.T. Dept. by mid September to
receive the P.T. admission packet and
application for the Allied Health Profes-
sions Admission Test. Completed admis-
sion packet must be returned by Nov. 1,
1987. Application deadline for the
AHPAT is October 16,1987.
Intermediate Education
The first meeting for intermediate edu-
cation majors - grades 4-6 - will be Mon.
Sept. 21 in Speight R312 at 4:30 p.m
Piddling Club
The ECU Paddling Club will hold its
first instructional session for canoe and
kayak in Memorial Gym Pool at 9:00 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 15,1987. Bring your bath-
ing suit and a SI fee. Regular member
dues of $5 will be collected at this meeting.
WESFL
The Methodist Student Center will
sponsor all you can eat meals on Wed
nights The meal is $2 at the door and SI 50
in advance. A short program will follow
the meal. Sponsored by Presbyterian and
Methodist Campus Ministries. Call 758-
2030 for more information.
University Unions
Tickets for the Madrigal Dinners to be
held December 2-5 at 7:00 p.m. in Men
denhall Student Center. The tickets are
$10 for ECU students and $16 for others.
Call the central ticket office at 757-6611,
Ext 266 for more information.
ECU HiUel
Jewish students are invited to attend
the opening get together on Thurs. Sep-
tember 17th, at 8:15 p.m. Food will be
served. Call Cantor Michael Weisser at
830-1138 for information. The event will
be held at 1420 E. 14th St.
Resume Help
Career Planning and Placement is
sponsoring a resume help session on
Wednesday, Sept. 16 at 3:00 p.m. and
Thursday, September 17 at 4:00 p.m. The
first 20 to come in will receive workbooks
and work sheets.
Student Unions
The Student Union Productions
Committee will hold its first meeting Sept
15 at 5:30 p.m. in room 242 of Mendenhall
Student Center. New students are en-
couraged attend.
fre-Professional Health
The first meeting of the Pre Profes-
sional Health Alliance will sponsor Ms
Gwendolyn Lee from the Center for Stu-
dent Opportunities. Refreshments will be
served.
The Students for Economic Democracy
will be in front of the Student Store on
Sept. 14-16 to enlist the help of ECU stu-
dents to stop the appointment of Robert
Bork and the allocation of funds to the
Contras.
Interviewing Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement
Service will offer one hour sessions for
interviewing skills. These sessions will be
held in the Career Planning room at 3:00
p.m on Tuesday, Sept. 15 and 2:00 p.m. on
Thursday Sept 17 at the Bloxton House.
Phi Eta Sigma
Phi Eta Sigma freshman honor society
will hold its first meeting Wed Sept. 16 at
6:00 p.m in Mendenhall Student Center in
Room 8-B Contact Diane Everhart at 752-
9121 for more information.
SurfCJub.
The ECU Surf Club will hold an impor-
tant meeting Tues Sept 15 in the multi-
purpose room on the 1st floor of Menden-
hall Student Center Team trials, locatin
and time to be dixcussed. All members
must bring insuance to be clligible.
Phi Beta Lambda
Phi Beta Lambda will hold its first
meeting on Wed. Sept. 16 in Rawl Bldg.
rm. 302 at 3:00 p.m. All Business and
Business Education majors are invited to
attend.
BACCHUS
BACCHUS (Boosting Alcohol con-
sciousness Concerning the Health of Uni-
versity Students) will hold a membership
drive Thurs, Sept 17 at 7:30 p.m. in
Mendenhall rm. 8F.
Minority Pre-Med.
All minority Pre-Med students are
invited to attend a welcome reception on
Thurs. Sept. 17, 1987, at 6:00 p.m. at the
School of Medicine, Brody 2w40. Trans-
portation provided from Mendenhall
5:30, 5:45, 6:00, 6:15 p.m. For more infor-
mation Call 551-2085, or 551-2500
Nuraing Shidfnfr
Orders for nursing pins must'
in the Student Store no la
1987 to redeve your pin by Dac-
14V
Continuing Educating
The following courses are offered tar
the fall semester Intro to Wordstar, 1017;
Lotus 1-2-3 Functions and rwwul�.
1024; Guitar Unlimited, 113; Advance
Macros for Lotus 1-2-3, 125; Scuba, 12
28, Skin Diving and SnorkeUng, 1228;
Hawaii 1988 VacationScuba Diva. For
more information contact the office of
Continuing Education. Erwtn Hafl. 757-
6143.
AFROTORcd 0�
The AFROTC and the Red Cross wiB
sponser a blood drive Sept. 16-17 from
12 00-600. Rm. 244 Mendenhall Student
Center Give the gift of We
Coral Reef Dive Chib
General meeting Thurs 917 at 7 p m
in the Multi-purpose room at Mcndm
hall. Anyone interested ia urged to attend.
Upcoming dives to be djiruaand
BOLUamm
There is a players meeting today at 4:00
in Memorial Gym (downstairs). If you
cannot attend, contact Chris at 757-0905.
Sophomorct
Attend summer camp in Fort Knox,
Kentucky to become eltigible to compete
for a two-year Army ROTC scholarship.
The six-week camp pays apprcx. $800, la
the first step to earning a commission at
an officer in the United Slates Army. For
more information, call 757-6967 or contact
Captain Mitchel at the ECU Military Sci-
ence Department � room 319 Erwin Hall.
The G.O.P.
Pete DuPont (left) and Jack Kemp
discuss a point during the presiden-
tial candidate's debate on education
Friday in Chapel Hill.
Both men strongly supported tui-
tion tax credits for private schools
and endorsed a return to traditional
values and educational basics in the
classroom.
Both also said the absence of
George Bush and Robert Dole hurt
the Republican party and the candi-
dacy of the two.
-
PHOTO BY CIA V DEANMA�OT
If only typewriters let you proofread your
work before they printed it on the page.
What a mess!
You've just proofread your term paper
and it's got typos, spelling errors and
misplaced paragraphs.
Now, you can't hand in a paper like this
So no matter how tired you are, you've
got to retype the entire thing.
That is, unless you typed it on
a Videowriter
The Videowriter solves all
your typing problems.
Take the most obvious one.
typos.
On an ordinary typewriter
it would mean a bottle of
white-out and a frus-
trating interruption.
OnaVideowriter
it just means press-
ing the key marked "delete" That's
all. Because you type your work on a
screen before you print it on a page.
It edits.
And how about those bigger problems
like wanting to rearrange paragraphs?
OrTan ordinary typewriter you have to "cut and
paste" them.
On a Videowriter you only have to press the key
marked "move" and then indicate the area you want
it moved to. It's that simple.
It spells.
What happens when you're typing and you come
to a word you can't spell?
On an ordinary typewriter you have to stop typing,
find a dictionary and look it up.
Not so on a Videowriter. Spelling problems can be
corrected simply by pressing the key marked "spell
It counts words.
If you've ever had a teacher tell you to write a
thousand word essay, you know what a pain it is
trying to count your words.
On an ordinary typewriter you have to do it with
your finger.
But on a Videowriter you can press a mere two
buttons and it does the counting for you.
It makes multiple copies.
From time to time you want a copy of
what you've typed, right?
Well, if you use a Videowriter you won't
have to go to the school library to look
for a copier machine.
All you'll have to look for is the
button marked "print Press it
and the Videowriter will make
another original.
And because your work is auto-
matically stored on a standard
3 !2" floppy disk, you can
make those copies
whenever you
want.
It obviously does
a lot more than type.
That's because the word pro-
cessing features just go on and on.
What's more, we sell the Videowriter Word
Processor for around the price of a good electronic
typewriter.
And that's quite a bargain when you consider
the amount of time it'll save you. Time you can
spend doing the work for your other classes.
You would do that, wouldn't you?
!
nan upsir ik mmmmmmaj-um $m
ajaJaSSS'� fc� � '��- �!� �.
rwmmmmmimm0iimM4mf'mmm&Ki '� " �� �i






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15.1987
J.ONPE BABE IS 303
IN .u are terrific v? twn
Bui uhjt is our name'1
roud
a
DID YOU READ ARrS PERSONALS?
If so call the Central Ticket Office at 757.
toll ext 2t6. tor a chance to win free
tickets for the N C Shakespeare Festival
production oi A Midsummer Nighj
Dream Be sure to mention one of the
characters tn the ad. and leave vour name
and phone number All entries must be in
t- f i" pm Tuesday September 22nd
The Drawing will tv held at 9-00 a.nr
Wednesday September 23rd You need
not be present to win
RT IS DESPARATELY SEEKING
SOLUTION! Hermia is supposed t0
natty Demetrius, but she wants to marrv
. rsandei v.i the other hand. Helena has
:he hots tor Demetrius, but he desires
i The whole thing is all "Pucked"
mil ! do" Meet me at Wright
Auditorium tor A. Midsummer Nigh,
� IrVednesda) September 23rd, at 8
pm signed, ,V Natural "Art
4LPHA OMICRON PI Congratulations
n pledges of Alpha Omicron Pi
We love voi: The sisters of Alpha
HPP HOUR Come pm the Sigmas
and n ery body else at Pantana BobsTuea
Sept 15 Free nacho bar and $100
Schnapps"
KAPPA ALPHA PSI would like to sin-
k aO studer's who participated
- tsl weekend s activities at the Wiz II
itural Center The Nupcs .
AIPrM SIGMA PHI little sister rush
and 23 Be there1
MECA PSI PHI Fraternity, Inc
avea party at the Cultural Center on
&ept 18from930p.m to2 00a.m
See CLASSIFIEDS, Page 7
1
in Apostolic Church
near Campus
ck nally behind the
Crows Nest!
Greenville United
Pentecostal Church
ACTS 2:38
"astor: Ron Lappin 757-1834
KI
ligma Fraternity
he New Pirates
To
ast
olina
Iversity
a University Chapter of
na Fraternity Provides
portunity For Athletic,
:holastic Advancement
is For The Biggest
ties On Campus
16th at 9:00 p.m.
ee the finest house
;ampus.
th Street, Beside Darryl's
,E IN THE FALL
KS
Announcements
Cooperative Frliicr,
Would you like to spend the winter and
spring in Florida? Walt Disney World, the
loader in the entertainment industry, will
he on campus to recruit students for
spring semester Students from all majors
are encouraged to participate. Merchan
chse Kod and attractions, among other
positions, are available. Representatives
will be at ECU on Sept 2i and 30 Contact
the office of Cooperative Education in the
Kawl Building for further details
Baptist Sfudypt Ufll
The BSU invites you to worship with us
ever) Thurs evening at 7 p.m. Also, on
Mondays we offer a home-cooked meal
starting at 530 pm for the cost of $2. It's
j time of fellowship and fun. It is an infor
mal type worship�so come as you are'
PhLSigmaij
Do you have a 3.30 or higher overall
G PA and have completed between 32
and credit hours? Then Phi Sigma Pi
National Honor (co-ed) Fraternity could
be tor vou Come to our Smoker on Sept
22 at 7 30 pm in room 103 of the Biology
building
Coral Reef DivC'�b
Contact Rob or Glenn at 752-4399 for
information about joining the Coral Reef
Dive Club.
Student Homecoming
Committee
Nominations for Homecoming Queen
1987 are now being accepted Organiza
tions should send their candidates name
and phone number to Leslie Council
student Homecoming Committee, Tay-
lor Slaughter Alumni Center, ECU Cam
pus
Business Students
AMA speaker - Mark Rosenberg
Founder of East Coast Creative Design in
Rawl Browning Room Sept. 15th, 3:30
(Tues.V
Gospel Choir
The ECU Gospel Choir will host a talent
show on Sept 15, at 7:00 p.m. in Jenkins
Auditorium Admission is $1 and will
support the choir.
Alpha Phi Alpha
The bn thers of the Eta Nu Chapter of
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. invite all
students to THE JAM of the year Thurs.
Sept 17 at the Unlimited Touch Night
Club, 1311 5th St. Freshmen and all stu-
dents with ECU id. admitted for St, 10
pm to2 a.m.
National Teacher? Eyflm
The National Teacher Examinations �
Core Battery Tests � will be offered at
ECU on Sat Oct. 24, 1987 Application
blanks may be obtained from the Testing
Centeer, Room 105, Speight Building,
ECU and must be postmarked no later
than Sept 10, 1987.
Intramural Services
Two central campus, one west campus,
and one graduate student needed to be
Campus representatives for the Intralmu-
ral Advisory Council. Apply at 204 Me-
morial or contact Nancy Mize at 757-6397.
Earth Sciences
Sigma Gamma Epsilon presents "De-
positional Environments of Miocene Sedi-
ments from the North Carolina Continen-
tal Shelf by Dr Scott W. Snyder, Dept. of
Geology, East Carolina University, on
Sept 17, at 3:00 p.m. in Graham Bldg. rm.
301.
Phi Beta Sigma
There will be an interest meeting at 7:00
pm in Room 221 Mendenhall Student
Center on Thursday Sept. 17, 1987.
Campus Crusade for Christ
�Tit
"Prime Time" is sponsored by Campus
Crusade for Christ These meetings of
fellowship will occur every Thurs. eve-
ning at 700 pm in Brewster C-103.
Andre' Kole
Andre' Kole, a world renound illusion-
ist will appear in Wright Auditorium
Sept. 29th at 7.30 p.m. Tickets are on sale at
Mendenhall - $2 for students, $5 for non-
students.
Gospel Choir
The cut-off date for membership to the
ECU Gospel Choir is Sept. 22.
Classifieds
Continued from page 6
LACROSSE: There will be a players
meeting todayf or all interested in playing
'��& LaeHMpEtternorini Gym downstairs
t4 OOSioCnmim iwttcndrVaTTChris. "
757-0305
DELTA ZETA: We would like to wish our
Beta Pi Pledges good luck on a raging
semester! Lorraine Andre, Maggie
Comwath, Jennifer Carpenter, Karen
Cope, Kirsten Eakes, Tnsh Franer, Tnaa
Gough, Jennifer lournegan, Melinda
Lentine, Kathie Mcllale. Marncv McKee,
Charlotte Moffit, Robin Momson, Karen
Prevost, Melanie Queen, Lizzy Rand,
Melissa Richardson, Stephanie Rvan,
Tanya Smythe, Laurie Sodano, Diane
Spencer, Lon Stephenson, Shelley
Sumner, Kathie Ulnch, and Melinda
Walker. We're excited about having each
one of you as our future sisters.
KAPPA SIGS: What a night! Need We
Say More?! Thanks for a memorable pref
night! Love, The sisters and pledges of
Alpha Omicron Pi.
KELLY WALKER: We just wanted to let
you know that you did a remarkable job
with rush and we appreciate your pa-
tience with all of us. We love you! The
Sigmas.
SHEILA - The Producers will be playing
our song at the Attic Fri. night. Meet me at
the 5th St entrance at 10:00 SHE.
KAPPA SIGS, What a night' Need wc say
"Lei's do it again soon" "Trie sisters and
pledges of Alpha Omicron Pi .
FREE - All you can eat seafood Pi Kappa
Phi Rush Beach Night Sept. 16th, 730 at
the house. Same location as the Toga
Party. Dress for the Beach
PI KAPPA PHI Rush Tues Sept. 15th -
Come out to the Rotary dub on Rotary
Drive and get a straight shot of Rock and
Roll with ECU's Hottest new band - 180
proof, who made their appearance at the
7th Annual Toga Party. Starts at 7:30
LOST - Guy's dass ring. If found. Please
call 752-7253. Ask for Paris. Reward.
HOLD OUT for the Best! Rush Alpha Sig
Little Sister.
ATTENTION All Seniors & Juniors!
Your 1985-86 yearbook is here and can be
picked up at the Buccaneer Office in the
Publications Building.
HAPPY HOUR: Come join the Sigmas
and everybody else at Pantana Bobs Tues
Sept. 15. Free nacho bar and $1.00
Schnapps
NORTHSIDE SEAFOOD
All Types of Fresh Seafood!
Scallops
Softshell Crabs
Crab Legs
All Sizes of Shrimp
10a'o discount on any seafood item
with ECU-l.D. and this coupon.
108 East Gum Road
(Turn right off North .
Green Street. 1 m.le past Pi
bndye by East Caast Rooting )
Sfl i
1
Hillcrest Lanes
Memorial Drive 756-2020
FALL Leagues Are Now
Forming!
Bawfdne Game arid Receive
Another Game FREE With
This Coupon,
Limit 1 Coupon Per Person.
Three-part workshop offered to stu-
dents at no cost by the University Coun-
seling Center. September 17, 24 at Oct. 1.
All three sessions will be conducted from
3-4 p.m. in 312 Wright Building. Call the
Counseling Center at 757-4661 for Regis
trarion.
Pre-Phvsical Therapy
Any sophomore (or higher) wanting to
make application to the Physical Therapy
program for May 1988 must go to the P.T.
Department (Allied Health-Belk Build-
ing) to confirm eligibility to apply. Con-
tact the P.T. Dept. by mid September to
receive the P.T. admission packet and
application for the Allied Health Profes-
sions Admission Test. Completed admis-
sion packet must be returned by Nov. 1,
1987. Application deadline for the
AHPAT is October 16,1987.
Intermediate Education
The first meeting for intermediate edu-
cation majors - grades 4-6 - will be Mon.
Sept 21 in Speight R312 at 4:30 p m
Paddling Club
The ECU Paddling Cub will hold its
first instructional session for canoe and
kayak in Memorial Gym Pool at 9:00 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 15,1987. Bring your bath-
ing suit and a SI fee. Regular member
dues of $5 will be collected at this meeting.
WESV
The Methodist Student Center will
sponsor all you can eat meals on Wed.
nights. The meal is $2 at the door and $1.50
in advance. A short program will follow
the meal. Sponsored by Presbyterian and
Methodist Campus Ministries. Call 758-
2030 for more information.
University Unions
Tickets for the Madrigal Dinners to be
held December 2-5 at 7:00 p.m. in Men-
denhall Student Center. The tickets are
$10 for ECU students and SI 6 for others.
Call the central ticket office at 757-6611,
Ext. 266 for more information.
ECU HiUel
Jewish students are invited to attend
the opening get together on Thurs. Sep-
tember 17th, at 8:15 p.m. Food will be
served. Call Cantor Michael Weisser at
830-1138 for information. The event will
be held at 1420 E. 14th St.
Resume Help
Career Planning and Placement is
sponsoring a resume help session on
Wednesday, Sept. 16 at 3:00 p.m. and
Thursday, September 17 at 4:00 p.m. The
first 20 to come in will receive workbooks
and work sheets.
Student Unions
The Student Union Productions
Committee will hold its first meeting Sept.
15 at 530 p.m. in room 242 of Mendenhall
Student Center. New students are en-
couraged attend.
Fre-Professinnal Health
The first meeting of the Pre Profes
sional Health Alliance will sponsor Ms
Gwendolyn Lee from the Center for Stu-
dent Opportunities. Refreshments will be
served.
The Students for Economic Democracy
will be in front of the Student Store on
Sept. 14-16 to enlist the help of ECU stu-
dents to stop the appointment of Robert
Bork and the allocation of funds to the
Contras.
Interviewing Workshops
The Career Planning and Placement
Service will offer one hour sessions for
interviewing skills These sessions will be
held in the Career Planning room at 3:00
p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 15 and 2:00 p.m. on
Thursday Sept 17 at the Bloxton House.
Phi Eta Sigma
Phi Eta Sigma freshman honor society
will hold its first meeting Wed. Sept. 16 at
6:00 p.m. in Mendenhall Student Center in
Room 8-1). Contact Diane Evcrhart at 752-
9121 for more information.
Surf Club
The ECU Surf Club will hold an impor-
tant meeting Tues Sept 15 in the multi-
purpose room on the 1st floor of Menden-
hall Student Center. Team trials, locatin
and time to be dixcussed. All members
must bring insuance to be elligible
Phi Beta Lambda
Phi Beta Lambda will hold its first
meeting on Wed Sept. 16 in Rawl Bldg.
rm. 302 at 3:00 p.m. All Business and
Business Education majors are invited to
attend.
BACCHUS
BACCHUS (Boosting Alcohol con-
sciousness Concerning the Health of Uni-
versity Students) will hold a membership
drive Thurs Sept. 17 at 7:30 pm in
Mendenhall rm. 8F
Minority Pre-Med,
All minority Pre-Med students are
invited to attend a welcome reception on
Thurs Sept. 17, 1987, at 6:00 p.m. at the
School of Medicine, Brody 2w40. Trans-
portation provided from Mendenhall
5:30, 5:45, 6.00, 6:15 p.m. For more infor-
mation Call 551-2085, or 551-2500.
Nurting Stmkntt
Orders for nursing pins must
in the Student Store no lasar iMM
1987 to redeve your pin by Dae
in
Continuing Education
The following courses are offered far
the fall semester Intro to Wordstar. 1017;
Lotus 1-2-3 Functions and fur�liar.
1024; Guitar Unlimited. 113; Advance
Macros for Lotus 1-2-3.125; Scuba. 12
28. Skin Diving and SnorkeJing. 1228;
Hawaii 1988 VacationScuba Dive Far
more information contact the office of
Continuing Education, Erwin Hafl. 757-
6143.
AFROTCRtd Q�
The AFROTC and the Red Croae will
sponser a blood drive Sept. 16-17 from
12:00-6:00. Rm. 244 Mendenhall Student
Center. Give the gift of We.
Coral Reef Dive Chip
General meeting Thurs. 917 at 7 p.m.
in the Multi-purpose room at Mendm
hall. Anyone interested is urged to attend-
Upcoming dives to be discussed.
Killd�n
There is a players meeting today at 4:00
in Memorial Gym (downstairs). If you
cannot attend, contact Chris at 757-0305
Sophomore
Attend summer camp in Fort Kaox.
Kentucky lo become elhgiMe to compete
for a two-year Army ROTC scholarship.
The six-week camp pays approx. $800, ts
the first step to earning a commission as
an officer in the United States Army. Far
more information, call 757-6967 or contact
Captain Mitchel at the ECU Military Sci-
ence Department - room 319 Erwin Hall.
The G.O.P.
Pete DuPont (left) and Jack Kemp
discuss a point during the presiden-
tial candidate's debate on education
Friday in Chapel Hill.
Both men strongly supported tui-
tion tax credits for private schools
and endorsed a return to traditional
values and educational basics in the
classroom.
Both also said the absence of
George Bush and Robert Dole hurt
the Republican party and the candi-
dacy of the txvo.
If only typewriters let you proofread your
woric before they printed it on the page.
What a mess!
You've just proofread your term paper
and it's got typos, spelling errors and
misplaced paragraphs.
Now, you can't hand in a paper like this
So no matter how tired you are, you've
got to retype the entire thing.
That is. unless you typed it on
a Videowriter
The Videowriter solves all
your typing problems.
Take the most obvious one.
typos.
On an ordinary typewriter
it would mean a bottle of
white-out and a frus-
trating interruption.
On a Videowriter
it just means press-
ing the key marked "delete That's
all. Because you type your work on a
screen before you print it on a page.
; A It edits.
M wL And how about those bigger problems
fj like wanting to rearrange paragraphs?
On an ordinary typewriter you have to "cut and
paste" them.
On a Videowriter you only have to press the key
marked "move" and then indicate the area you want
it moved to. It's that simple.
It spells.
What happens when you're typing and you come
to a word you can't spell?
On an ordinary typewriter you have to stop typing,
find a dictionary and look it up.
Not so on a Videowriter. Spelling problems can be
corrected simply by pressing the key marked "spell
It counts words.
If you've ever had a teacher tell you to write a
thousand word essay, you know what a pain it is
trying to count your words.
On an ordinary typewriter you have to do it with
your finger.
But on a Videowriter you can press a mere two
buttons and it does the counting for you.
It makes multiple copies.
From time to time you want a copy of
what you've typed, right?
Well, if you use a Videowriter you won't
have to go to the school library to look
for a copier machine.
All you'll have to look for is the
button marked "print Press it
and the Videowriter will make
another original.
And because your work is auto-
matically stored on a standard
3'2" floppy disk, you can
make those copies
whenever you
want.
It obviously does
a lot more than type.
That's because the word pro-
cessing features just go on and on.
What's more, we sell the Videowriter Word
Processor for around the price of a good electronic
typewriter.
And that's quite a bargain when you consider
the amount of time it'll save you. Time you can
spend doing the work for your other classes.
You would do that, wouldn't you?
tm0m�mtmma$�0mtmpm0mmmit �aann wMmm0�i -�
� �' Km �mi � i m � Hi � . memtmmmmm
A
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8
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 15, 1987
College student disenrolled because of job
ROCHESTER, V. (CPS)
I he University ol Rochester,
bowing to pressure from the Easl
m.in Kodak Company, "disenrol-
led" a student who worked for
the Fuji Photo Film Company
because he would have shared
business classes with Kodak
employees.
Kodak, whose corporate head-
quarters are in Rochester, is one
of the university's largest corpo-
rate benefactors.
While campus officials said
they kicked Tsunco s.k i out o:
the classes to allow v- - te sru
dents from Kodak to share
freely" ideas in thecourse: critics
ol the decision say it sciously
compromises Rochester auton-
omy, chills academic discussion,
and makes an American campus
into the conference room o a
corporation.
A university is not a place tor
secrecy contended onathan
Knight c�t the American Associa
tion ol University Professors,
which monitors academic tree
dom at the nation's colleges and
universities.
"This implies that it's okay tor
j ou to do background checks on
students before you let them in
v our class
"It's n old story in American
education said Knight
"Wealthy, powerful benefactors
bring pressure upon universities
and colleges. It's manifested in all
sorts of ways, but I've never
heard of a situation involving a
student who was accepted and
then dismissed
Sakai, a Japanese student who
worked for Fuji, Kodak's main
rival in the film and camera busi-
ness enrolled in Rochester's Wil-
liam E Simon Graduate School of
business Administration earlier
this year.
When Kodak officials learned
Sakai planned to attend courses,
they "persuaded the university
to disenroll" him, said UR
spokeswoman an Fitzpatrick.
Rochester then arranged for
Sakai to attend the Massa-
chussetts Institute of Technology
this fall, she said.
Kodak was very concerned
that, in a classroom setting where
students are encouraged to dis-
cuss real-life problems, a student
from a chief competitor would
pose a real threat to proprietary
information Fitzpatrick ex-
plained.
Rochester officials feared
Sakai's presence would inhibit
classroom discussion, Fitzpatrick
said.
In a prepared statement, UR
President Dennis O'Brien said
he'd acted to avoid compromis-
ing "the integrity of the class-
room, in which students share
freely their own understanding
of the subject matter gained
through their own experience
'This is truly an extraordinary
case O'Brien stated. "The objec-
tion to the individual was not a
matter of ideology or normal
business rivalry. It was based on
the judgement that his presence
at the school could present an
immediate and material threat to
the ligitimate proprietary inter-
ests of the Kodak Company
"In a business so fiercely com-
petitive, even t casual conversa-
tion could result in the competi-
tor receiving sensitive informa-
tion Fitzpatrick added.
"We didn't tell the university
what to do said Kodak spokes-
man Ron Roberts. "But we felt it
was best to express our con-
cerns
Both Kodak and Rochester say
the company's financial gifts to
the university were not discussed
during the month-long conversa-
tions about Sakai's future at the
university.
Yet "money is always hanging
over their heads said Susan
Calhounof the Washington D.C
based Council on Foundations,
which tracks corporate dona-
tions.
Kodak contributed $600,000 to
the University of Rochester last
year, Fitzpatrick said, and "cer-
tainly is one of the most impor-
tant donors to the university
Kodak's contributions were
not a "direct factor" in the deci-
sion to disenroll Sakai, Fitzpa-
trick said. "But because Kodak
has been so generous, the univer-
sity felt obliged to give a serious
listening to Kodak's fears
Nevertheless, Fitzpatrick
maintained, "This decision does
not represent some kind of a pol-
icy or set any precedent for the
future. We're an open nstitution.
We'll continue to observe an
open attitude in our admissions
policy
Dr. Mark Frankel of the Ameri-
can Associaton for the Advance-
ment of Science, however, said
Rochester's decision to disenroll
Sakai is "absurd ,
"If obtaining information is hig
motive said Frankel of Sakai,
"there's no reason he couldn't get
it without attending class.
I'm not sure why Kodak em-
ployees would be afraid of drop
ping information in the class
room Frankel said.
Executives privy to sensitive
corporation information, he said,
should be smart enough to realize
what information is sensitive and
how to keep that within the com-
pany. "I'm bothered by their
paranoia
"I think the issue here is the
autonomy and independence of
the institution, " Knight said of
Rochester. "Who they may admit
for study is now influenced by an
external agent. The university
becomes part of that external
agent
'The problem for the univer-
sity he continued, "is not the
role of Kodak but its own self-
conception of what shold happen
in the classroom. There's sup-
posed to be frank discussion. The
classroom is the one place you
expect people to be candid. The
student isn't the one creating the
chilling effect, the university is
"Is the university asked
Knight, "trying to protect its stu-
dents, or is it trying to protect its
autonomy and independence of relationship with Kodak?"
v FOUR FOR FREE �





FITNESS
PfVXiRAM
Pat Robertson beats George Bush in presidential straw vote
ami b lowa I � p a
tivists split over the impact of Pat
Robertson's win and Vice Presi-
dent George Bush's third-place
showing in a straw vote, but
igreed the TV evangelist showed
a force in the part s pn
denti.il fight.
"1 was impressed said George
Wittgraf, Hush's lowa campaign
manager. There was a lot of hard
kvorkanda lot of discipline. He is
i v rious candidate and this s
mother indication of the serious-
ness ol his candidacy
1 le got a lot ol respect tonight
i other candidates Steve
Rol rts a IX's Momes iawyei
�ctiv in Senate Republican
"� b Dole's campaign,
ifter Saturday night's poll
ids of contributors at a
Beverly Tauke, aspdlces-
woman for Dole, called the straw
poll results a defeat tor bush,
because as vice president, he had
more to lose than other contend-
ers.
"heir comments came after
seven GOP presidential hopefuls
paraded before party activists in
what was billed as the first time
the candidates have met on an
equal footing. State Republican
officials conducted a straw poll
among lowans who paid $25 to
the party.
Robertson got 33.6 percent of
he votes cast, outdistancing
Dole's 24.9 percent and Bush's
22.4 percent. Rep. Jack Kemp of
New York was favored bv 13.5
percent and former Delaware
( k)v. Pierre du Pont by 4.1 per-
cent.
Former Secretary jf State Alex-
ander Haig, theonly hopeful who
didn't attend, and little-known
candidates Ben Fernandez and.
Kate Heslop each got less than f
percent.
C.OP officials said 5,700 tickets
and
were sold for the event
roughly 4 200 ballots cast.
a

i
i

o
a
o
o
I
I
I
I
I
L
couponi
"1 think the Robertson people
have shown tonight that they're
going to be there at the caucuses
February 8 regardless of the
weather and that's the most sig-
nificant thing tonight said Iowa
Republican Chairman Michael
M a ha f fey.
Those neighborhood caucuses
will mark an important early test
of GOP presidential strength.
Some argued Robertson hasyet
to demonstrate that his appeal
extends beyond evangelical
Christians.
"I'm still doubtful Mr.
Robertson can develop an appeal
among traditional Republican
voters, " said Charlie Black, a
Kemp spokesman.
Robertson's supporters -made
thQjr pmseace known at the Iowa;
State DnrveTSity coliseum. When'
he was introduced, a band
sounded the theme from
"Rocky" and white-shirted back-
ers tossed straw hats and tinv
SACK A PACK
ECU
Victory
Sale! 422 Arlington Blvd
of savings



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4
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Bring in this
coupon and get
15 off purchase
VALID THRU 9-30-87
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airplanes as a real airplane circled
the basketball arena towing a
banner of support.
Nearly 3,000 of the tickets were
sold in the final two davs before
the event, and the state party
netted about $80,000, Mahaffev
said.
A beaming Robertson met with,
reporters after the event, and
scoffed at suggestions he can't:
win.
He cited, in addition to Iowa,
early successes in Michigan cau-
cuses to choose national conven-
tion delegates, and in the selec-
tion of state party officials in
South Carolina and state conven-
tion delegates in Florida.
"I'vewonfouroutof fourandif
that isn't electable I don't know
what is Robertsoa said.
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Sunday, September 20, 1987
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For more information, contact the
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'
ACLU cal
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
Reagan administration remains
(optimistic about Robert H. Bork's
bility to win confirmation to the
iiipreme Court despite dire pre-
ictions from members of the
nate Judiciary Committee
White House Chief of Staff
lowardH. Baker Jr. said Sunday
he 60-year-old Bork is a "dishn-
ished jurist who is widely
Supported, and I'm hopeful will
be confirmed, 1 think will be con-
firmed by the U.S. Senate
Hearings on the nomination
get under way Tuesday morning
after two months in which con
$ervativeand liberal groups have
waged an ideological struggle
through news conferences, stud-
ies and letter-writing campaigns
As the battleground moves to
the place where it counts � the
Senate Judiciary Committee
Democrats on
nominee to rerj
Lewis F Powel
battle
"1 think the
that are unde
ment,andl thi
has a battle
certainly not
can predict wii
will or will
Sen. HowaroJ
Ohio said Sur
"Meet the Pre!
Another mt
committee,
Concini, D-
undecided on I
"As a judgJ
well, even thoi
with some of
judgment
ABC-TVs
David Brinkk
AIDS creates dil
' CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP)-A
small number of the 500 hemo-
philiacs treated at a center in
Chapel Hill have been or are re-
luctant to tell their sexual part-
ners that they have been exposed
to the virus that can cause AIDS,
opening up a dilemma fnr their
doctors.
"From an ethical point of view,
ifs clear that the partner needs to
know, has a right to know, just as
the hemophiliac has a right to
know then he's been exposed to
the virus said Dr. Gilbert White,
associate director of the Compre-
hensive Hemophilia Diagnostic
Treatment Center at the Univer-
sity of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill.
"At the same time, legally,
there is such a thing as confiden-
tiality he said. 'That is part of
their medical record. So it's an
invasion of privacy to go out and
tell his sexual partner that he's
positive. I'm not sure we can do
that or not
Because of contaminated blood
years ago, hundreds of hemo-
philiacs now treated at the UNC
School of Medicine could be in-
flated with the AIDS virus.
At least five wives now have
tested positive for the AIDS virus.
One girlfriend of a hemophiliac
also was infected during the
months that the patient agonized
over whether to tell his lover
about his AIDS status, the
Greensboro News & Record re-
ported.
The Chapel Hill center for
hemophiliac?
ond largest,
philiacs treate
developed All
200 have testc
AIDS vii
Hemophiliac
protein defi k
blood from ck
require regulai
massive amoul
muchasagalioj
lutionaryproce
that concenrra
dried gallons
era! tablespoor
acs new inder.
Butby 1978
reached the
ply � a discc
made until
more years
treatment pre
blood product
By then, tho
philiacs were
AIDS virus. Mi
Currently, V
push AIDS-in
acs to notify
even though
several relahc
riages.
"The fact th�
wives come n
AIDS) means tj
some inroads II
haven't found
tally resistant A
ers)
'There is a
hemophiliacs
feel that it wo
I
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15,1987
se of job
institution knight said ol
tester ho thcv nuv admit
� stud) is now influenced by an
mal agent T'ho university
s part ot that external
problem tor the univer-
ontmued, "is not the
h dak but its own self-
n of what shold happen
in the v n rhere s sup
I to be frank discussion The
m is the one place you
- candid. The
� creating the
univcrsit is
. rsit) asked
protect its stu
; to protect its
v h Kodak?"
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.m.
irixTheatre
Ingathering pfctee
I
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1
ACLU calls Bork's philosophy radical
WASHINGTON (AP) � The
Keagan administration remains
optimistic about Robert H. Bork's
ability to win confirmation to the
Supreme Court despite dire pre-
dictions from members of the
Senate Judiciary Committee.
White House Chief of Staff
Howard H. Baker Jr. said Sunday
the 60-year-old Bork is a "distin-
guished jurist who is widely
supported, and I'm hopeful will
be confirmed, 1 think will be con-
firmed by the U.S. Senate
Hearings on the nomination
get under way Tuesday morning
after two months in which con-
servative and liberal groups have
waged an ideological struggle
through news conferences, stud-
ies and letter-writing campaigns.
As the battleground moves to
the place where it counts � the
Senate Judiciary Committee �
Democrats on the panel say the
nominee to replace retired Justice
Lewis F. Powell Jr. faces an uphill
battle.
"I think there are many votes
that are undecided at this mo-
ment, and I think that Judge Bork
has a battle ahead of him, that
certainly nobody at this moment
can predict with certainity that he
will or will not be confirmed
Sen. Howard Metzenbaum of
Ohio said Sunday on NBC-TV's
"Meet the Press
Another member of the Senate
committee, Sen. Dennis De-
Concini, D-Ariz said he was
undecided on Bork.
"As a judge he's done fairly
well, even though I may disagree
with some of his decisions, in my
judgment DeConcini said on
ABC-TV's "This Week With
David Brinkley "But prior to
that, some of his writings and
some of his decisions are very
disturbing
More than 100 potential wit-
nesses have asked to testify in
support or opposition to Bork
during the scheduled two-week
hearings. Abortion, pornogra-
phy, the rights of women and
racial minorities and legal protec-
tion for criminal suspects are just
some of the issues to be raised in
questions awaiting the first wit-
ness � Bork.
Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa an
undecided member of the
committee, said on the ABC pro-
gram that he would question the
nominee about the court s au-
thority to rule on such issues.
Bork, a federal appeals court
judge since 1982 and before that
an outspoken law professor, has
produced volumes of speeches,
magazine articles and legal opin-
ions that help illuminate his
views.
'That's what academic writing
is supposed to be about � daring
and speculative and provocative,
trying out ideas Bork said in an
interview with Time magazine
published Sunday.
But the writings also provide a
ready target for opponents hop-
ing to convince wavering sena-
tors that he is an extremist.
AIDS creates dilemma for doctors
Cl 1APEL HILL, N.C (AP) � A
small number of the 500 hemo-
philiacs treated at a center in
Chapel Hill have been or are re-
luctant to tell their sexual part-
ners that they have been exposed
to the virus that can cause AIDS,
opening up a dilemma for their
doctors.
"From an ethical point of view,
it s clear that the partner needs to
know, has a right to know, just as
the hemophiliac has a right to
know then he's been exposed to
the virus said Dr. Gilbert White,
a ssociate director of the Compre-
hensive Hemophilia Diagnostic
Treatment Center at the Univer-
sity of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill.
At the same time, legally,
there is such a thing as confiden-
tiality' he said. 'That is part of
their medical record. So it's an
invasion of privacy to go out and
tell his sexual partner that he's
positive. I'm not sure we can do
that or not
Becauseof contaminated blood
vears ago, hundreds of hemo-
philiacs now treated at the UNC
Scioo of Medicine rr�uld be in-
fected with the ADS .irus.
At least five wives now have
te -ted positive for the AIDS virus.
One girlfriend of a hemophiliac
tlso was infected during the
months that the patient agonized
over whether to tell his lover
about his AIDS status, the
Greensboro News & Record re-
ported.
The Chapel Hill center for
hemophiliacs is the nation's sec-
ond largest. Of the 500 hemo-
philiacs treated there, five to 10
developed AIDS and more than
200 have tested positive for the
AIDS virus.
Hemophiliacs � born with a
protein deficiency that prevents
blood from clotting normally �
require regular transfusions and
massive amounts of plasma, as
much as a gallon at a time. A revo-
lutionary process in the late 1960s
that concentrated and freeze-
dried gallons of plasma into sev-
eral tablespoons gave hemophili-
acs new independence.
But by 1978, the AIDS virus had
reached the nation's blood sup-
ply � a discovery that wasn't
made until 1981. It took three
more years to develop a heat-
treatment process for donated
blood products
By then, thousands of hemo-
philiacs were exposed to the
AIDS virus. Many are now dying.
Currently, White and his staff
push AIDS-infected hemophili-
acs to notify sexual partners �
even though that has shattered
several relationships and mar-
riages.
'The fact that we have had 50
wives come in (to be tested for
AIDS) means that we're making
some inroads. If s frustrating. We
haven't found anyone that is to-
tally resistant (to informing oth-
ers)
'There is a small group of
hemophiliacs who continue to
feel that it won't make a differ-
ence or that it will interfere with
their personal lives if everyone
they come in contact with is told
White says. The most common
reason is, 'I've been having sex
with my husband for seven years
since the virus was introduced
and I'm negative. What's the
harm of another year or two?
Maybe we're special. Maybe
well never get it
By the time some lovers are
told of the risk and some couples
realize the danger and begin to
use condoms, it is too late. White
says.
But White has seen the dark
side of honesty.
Three years ago, a high-school
senior and hemophiliac in a small
rural North Carolina town was
diagnosed as having AIDS. The
student's last wish was to finish
high school and get his diploma,
White says.
"Well, the school system
wouldn't let him go to classes
he recalls. "After a great deal of
pressure from us, the school sys-
tem then said, We'll let a tutor
come in A lot of times, that tutor
would just leave things at the
door and walk away, wouldn't
go into the house
White says the student was al-
lowed to graduate but wasn't al-
lowed to join his class at the cere-
mony.
"He had to stand behind a cur-
tain. When they called his name,
he came out, received his di-
ploma, and had to walk behind
the curtain
RACK ROOM
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Memorial Drive
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"We're opposing judge Bork
for a set of reasons which we can
find in no other nominee in recent
years Ira Glasser, president of
the American Civil Liberties
Union, said on the ABC program.
"His writings and speeches have
consistently suggested that the
role of the court is illegitimate;
that the court should not be de-
ciding what rights people have
according to the Bill of Rights;
that local government should be
deciding
The Justice Department, in a
213-page report released this
weekend, responded to the criti-
cisms of Bork, saying opponents
of the nominee are misleading the
public by portraying the nominee
"as biased and close-minded
The ACLU, in a statement is-
sued Sunday, said the Justice
Department report was a "mis-
leading effort to divert attention
from his radical philosophy
Government pays student loans
WASHINGTON, D.C (CPS) �
Despite an aggressive campaign
to track down people who aren't
repaying their student loans, the
federal government will have to
pay off $1.5 billion worth of de-
faulted Guaranteed Student
Loans during the 1988 fiscal year,
the Office of Management and
Budget estimated August 27.
The amount represents a 25
percent increase over the current
fiscal year, which ends Sept. 30.
The payoffs � made to the
banks that actually lent the
money to the students � typi-
cally happen when the banks are
unable to collect the money.
U.S. Dept. of Education offi-
cials note the $15 billion they're
paying off in bad loans consumes
more than half its $2.8 billion loan
program budget.
The problem, said department
spokeswoman Victoria Tripp, is
that defaulters think "the federal
government is an easy touch
But Mary Preston of the United
States Student Association said
"that's a pretty simple analysis
Economic hardships, poor stu-
dent financial counseling and
rigid loan procedures force some
borrowers to default on their stu-
dent loans, Preston said.
There are definitely abuses,
but a lot of people ave having a lot
of trouble paying back loans
Preston said. The government
needs to work with them
"We've tried in every way we
can Tripp replied.
The government, she said, re-
cently instituted an income-con-
tingent program that reorganizes
loan payments based on a
borrower's income. Borrowers
with certain low-paying careers,
such as teachers in poor regions,
will have their debts "forgiven" if
they qualify.
The program, however, cur-
rently is only in a pilot stage, and
prospective problems with it
kept the vast majority of cam-
puses from applying to join the
pilot program.
To recoup some of its losses,
Tripp said Washington will try
"to send the signal that the fed-
eral government is no longer ar
easy touch
The Internal Revenue Service
doc
DOC
DUG
DOC
still is witholding tax refunds
from defaulters, a move that's
netted more than $135 million in
'85 and '86, Tripp said.
The Education Dept. also is
employing collection agencies
"aggressively tying student
loan defaults to borrower credit
ratings and passing collection
costs on to defaulters.
Defaulters employed by the
federal government also have
their salaries garnished, Tripp
said.
American-made aerosol prod-
ucts are now environmentally
safe because chlorofluorocar-
bons, thought to endanger the
ozone, are no longer used as
propellents, according the Aero-
sol Packaging Council.
DOC
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10 T IE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 15 1987
Talks begin for Iran-Iraq war cease-fire
BAGHDAD, Iraq (AD � U.N.
Secretary -General Javier Perez de
Cuellar, arriving in Baghdad af-
ter high-level talks in Tehran,
said he was "neither pessimistic
nor optimistic about negotia-
tions for a cease-fire in the Iran-
Iraq war.
Iranian President Ali Khame-
nei told the diplomat Sunday that
Iran would not embrace a U.N.
Security Council cease-fire reso-
lution unless Iraq was branded
Poll results
the aggressor.
An Iraqi official said earlier in
the day that his country would
escalate the 7-year-old-war if Iran
does not accept the resolution.
The United States has said it will
seek an international arms em-
bargo against Iran if Perez de
Cuellar's mission is not success-
ful.
"So far I am neither pessimistic
nor optimistic the U.N. leader
told reporters Sundav at
Baghdad's airport.
The 67-year-old Peruvian said
he had had "very important dis-
cussions on various aspects of the
resolution" in his two days of
talks with Iranian leaders, adding
that the discussions dealt exclu-
sively with the implementation
of the resolution.
He would not elaborate, saying
he would convey the resultsof his
mission to the Security Council
on Thursday.
Political views should not decide supreme court
NEW YORK (AP) - Despite
sharp reactions to Robert A.
Berk's conservative views, a ma-
jority of Americans believe a
nominee's political leanings
shouldn't be used to decide
whether he should join the Su-
preme Court, according to a
Media General-Associated Press
poll
Bork's conservative views on
civil rights and abortion have led
an array of civil rights and femi-
nist groups to oppose his nomi-
nation But in the Media Gcncral-
AP poll, 52 percent said a
candidate's legal background,
not his politics, should be the
basis oi any decision to confirm
or deny a nomination.
Only 31 percent of the 1,223
adult Americans in the nation-
wide telephone poll said a
candidate's political leanings
should be the basis of the deci-
sion.
President Reagan's nomina-
tion of the 60-year-old Bork will
be taken up by the Senate Judici-
ary Comittee beginning today.
Oi Bork, a federal appeals court
ludge in the District of Columbia,
respondents were asked, "do you
have a favorable opinion about
him, an unfavorable opinion, or
don't you know enough about
him at this time to have an opin-
ion?" Seventeen percent had a
favorable opinion, 13 percent an
unfavorable opinion, and 70 per-
cent had no opinion.
Bork was in the national spot-
light on Oct. 20, 1Q73, when, as
solicitor general, he tired Water-
gate special prosecutor Archi-
bald Cox on orders oi President
Richard Nixon after higher-rank-
ing Justice Department officials
refused.
The poll results indicated that
most Americans also know very
little about the justices of the
Supreme Court.
Among the sitting justices, onlv
Chief Justice William Rehnquist
and Justice Sandra Dav O'Conncr
had at least a third of respondents
voicing an opinion about them.
About two-thirds said thev did
not know enough about
Rehnquist to have an opinion
about him.
MOIthlM. STUDENTS:
I :
Withh
V
iVi
dme Ml
u ance
remember:
parent - oi anottier pen
turn, u B nerallv r.
exempt m m ome ta
withhold
the instri
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W-4A
A PirfWr Wrvlcv at rh MM
To help you understand the new
tax law. the IRS has two neu
tlications. Publication 920
explains changes affecting
individuals and Publication 921
explains change affecting
businesses. Both are tree Ask tor
one at an IRS office or call the
IRS Tax Form number in vour
phone hook.
Twenty-three percent had a
favorable opinion of him, per-
cent had an unfavorable, and r8
percent had no opinion.
O'Conncr received a favorable
opinion from 34 percent, while 4
percent had an unfavorable opin-
ion and 62 percent had no opin-
ion.
Twenty-two percent thought
the court was too liberal, while 21
percent said it was too conserva-
tive. Fortv percent thought it was
neither too liberal or too conser-
vative.
Younger people were more
likely than older people to think
the court Was too conservative.
Republicans were more likely
than Democrats to say the court
was too liberal.
Arid respondents were split
over whether Supreme Court
justices should be appointed or
elected: 47 percent thought the
present system oi presidential
appointments was best, while 47
percent would prefer justices to
be elected by the public.
Hie poll was a random, scien-
tific sampling of 1,223 adults
across the country August 7-17.
As with all sample survevs, the
results of Media General-AP tele-
phone polls can vary from the
opinions of all Americans be-
cause of chance variation in the
sample.
For a poll based on about 1.200
interviews, the results are subject
to an error margin of 3 percentage
points either way because oi
chance variations in the
The official Iraqi News Agency,
monitored in Cyprus, said Iraq's
ruling Revolutionary Command
Council declared aftera Saturday
night meeting that Iraq will abide
by the resolution "provided Iran
declares a clear-cut stand in sup-
port of the call
An Iraqi official, who spoke on
condition he not be identified
further, said Iraq would not per-
mit Iran to stall.
"Either they accept the resolu-
tion in full or they face a more
severe war in which we will use
weapons we have not deployed
yet he said in an interview. I le
did not elaborate.
Iran and Iraq have not reported
any attacks in the Persian Gulf
since Thursday, the day before
Fere de Cuellar arrived in
Tehran. However, both sides
reported ground fighting and
artillery shelling of border towns
during the weekend.
In addition to meeting with
Khamenei, Perez de Cuellar also
talked in Tehran with Prime
Minister Hussein Musavi, For-
eign Minister Ali Akbar Velayati
and the powerful Parliament
speaker, Hashemi Rafsanjani.
Tehran Radio quoted Khame-
nei as telling the U.N. leader that
Iran has beer "dissatisfied with
decisons made by the Security
Council" but that "considering
your good intentions, we hope
that this trip will be fruitful
The radio, monitored in Cy-
prus, did not say whether
Khamenei conveyed Tehran's
final word on the cease-fire reso-
lution.
The broadcast quoted Khame-
nei as saying "no peace-seeking
group has objected to the Nurem-
berg trials" of top Nazi leaders
after Germany's defeat in World
War II, so branding Iraq the insti-
gator of the Iran-Iraq war would
be "acceptable to the world
Dairy backers reheat pizza war
e sample
WASHINGTON (AP) Con
gressional supporters ot the dairy
industry are churning up a storm
over frozen pizzas that use so-
called cheese substitutes instead
oi the real thing.
I hev want to slap an 'imita-
tion label, or something similar,
on packages of pizza containing
substitutes such as the protein
derivative casein and other prod-
ucts that are almost, but not quite,
cheese
"Should consumers be in-
formed about what thev are buy
ing or not Sen. Robert W.
Kasten Jr R-Wis said last week
at a 1 louse hearing as die long-
running "pizza war" heated up
again.
For the senator from America's
Dairyland, there could be onlv
one answer. And that answer, he
said, was his Truth in Frozen
Pizza labeling Act of 1987. It
would require manufacturers to
indicate the use of cheese substi-
tutes in large letters alongside
their brand name.
That measure and a similar
1 louse version sponsored bv Rep.
Charles Stenholm, D-Texas, are
giving the $71)0 million frozen
pizza industry an acute case of
Oive indigestion.
IisI
But the industry, which con-
sumes a substantial amouijt of
wheat, has found some svmpa-
thetic ears on Capitol Hill and
among consumer advocates.
Rep. Dan Ghckman. D-Kan ,
chairman of the House Agricul-
ture Commitee's wheat, soy-
beans and feed grains sub-
committee, told representatives
of the dairy industry he thought
the plan could boomerang.
He suggested that pizza mak-
ers using real cheese might be
required to post the cholesterol
levels of their products on the
packages.
Before you choose a long distance
service, take a close look.
Shevardn
when thev
U.N. C,
in N
�'� e hav
of optimist
I
'antial
WASHINGTON (AI S
Foreign Minister Eduard A.
Shevardnadze, arriving in Wash
ington "with a degree ot
mism says a decision on an-
other superpower summit meet-
ing depends on the outcon
the talks he opens Tuesday with
President Reagan and S retan
of State George P. Shultz
"We have come her. -
our sleeves and wor
nadzesaid on hisarr
from Moscow aboard a -
Aeroflot flight. "We hv.
ber of problems to dis
consider "
The white-haired S I
cial brought withhim a I
Reagan from Soviet kadei � ummi
Mikhail S. Gorbad � .
disclosing the letter's rttent
Shevardnadze told n i
for the summit, ev� r
depend on the res . � �
here
He was schedule I -
Monday off to rest and prepai cia
before seeing Rt. �.
today. The talks with Shu
continue through T1 i
may be exter led I i
Size of car improve:
repair cost, savs insu
WASHINGTON (AP)
torists with large or n;
cars face less chance of mjur.
lower repair costs, but e. -
of roughlv the same sizi
times provide widely different
levels of protection, accordi i
an insurance industry study
The study, reflecting ace. I
claims, suggested that occur.
of many small cars have a 3 I
percent greater than average
chance of injury. Itsaid the proba-
bility of injury is often twice as
great in small cars as in I
sedans, vans and station wag
The study by the High wav Loss
Data Institute, a research group
affiliated with the Insurance In-
stitute for Highway Safefv, com-
pares the frequency of injury
claims and both the frequency
and cost of vehicle damage
claims filed on 1984-86 mode!
cars.
Historical driver charact
tics are taken into account when
making the comparison, oi
said.
According to the studv.rr.
with the best combined ir
and collision loss record i
Pontiac Pansienne and Oldsmo-
bile Custom Cruiser, both large
station wagons, and the rw
Mercury Grand Marquis sedan.
The cars with the worst result
when both injury and collision
damage is taken into account
were the Mitsubishi Mirage and
Nissan Pulsar, both small two-
smi
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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 15.1987
Talks begin for Iran-Iraq war cease-fire
BAGHDAD, Iraq (AD � U.N.
Secretary-General Javier Perez de
Cuellar, arriving in Baghdad af-
ter high-level talks in Tehran,
said he was "neither pessimistic
nor optimistic" about negotia-
tions for a cease fire in the Iran-
Iraq war.
Iranian President Ali Khame-
nei told the diplomat Sunday that
Iran would not embrace a U.N.
Security Council cease-fire reso-
lution unless Iraq was branded
Poll results
the aggressor.
An Iraqi official said earlier in
the day that his country would
escalate the 7-year-old-war if Iran
docs not accept the resolution.
The United States has said it will
seek an international arms em-
bargo against Iran if Perez de
Cuellar's mission is not success-
ful.
"So far 1 am neither pessimistic
nor optimistic the U.N. leader
told reporters Sunday at
Baghdad's airport.
The 67-year-old Peruvian said
he had had "very important dis-
cussions on various aspects of the
resolution" in his two days of
talks with Iranian leaders, adding
that the discussions dealt exclu-
sively with the implementation
of the resolution.
He would not elaborate, saying
he would convey the results of his
mission to the Security Council
on Thursday.
Political views should not decide supreme court
NEW YORK (AP) - - Despite
sharp reactions to Robert A.
Bork's conservative views, a ma-
jority of Americans believe a
nominee's political leanings
shouldn't be used to decide
whether he should join the Su-
preme Court, according to a
Media General-Associated Press
poll.
Bork's conservative views on
civil rights and abortion have led
an array of civil rights and femi-
nist groups to oppose his nomi-
nation. But in the Media General-
AP poll, 52 percent said a
candidate's legal background,
not his politics, should be the
basis of any decision to confirm
or deny a nomination.
Only 31 percent oi the 1,223
adult Americans in the nation-
wide telephone poll said
Twenty-three percent had a
favorable opinion of him, y per
cent had an unfavorable, and 68
percent had no opinion
O'Conner received a favorable
opinion from 34 percent, while 4
percent had an unfavorable opin-
ion and 62 percent had no opin-
ion.
Twenty-two percent thought
the court was too liberal, while 21
percent said it was too conserva-
tive. Forty percent thought it was
neither too liberal or too conser-
vative
Younger people were more
likely than older people to think
the court was too conservative.
Republicans were more likely
than Democrats to sav the court
was too liberal.
WORKING SiriHMS:
VV hen v on till oiii iui Form
W-4 oi W-4A. "Employee's
Withholding Allowance
i rtificate remember:
If you an be claimed on oui
parent' or anothe
return, ou generally
exempt from income tax
withholding. To ect it right
the instriK tions that i ame ith
sour Form VV-4 or W-4A.
VIMil!
tax
annot K-
reac
A fttit, ton U r- nf tttr '14
New Tax law
i
I o help you understand the new
ux a . the IRS hai tu o new
publications. Publication 920
explains changes affecting
individuals and Publication 921
explains changes affecting
businesses Both ate tree Ask KM
one at an IRS office or call the
IRS Tax Forms number in our
phone book.
wiae telephone poll said a I
candidate's political leanings
should be the basis of the deci-
sion.
President Reagan's nomina-
tion of the 60-year-old Bork will
be taken up by the Senate Judici-
ary Comittee beginning today.
Of Bork, a federal appeals court
judge in the District of Columbia,
respondents were asked, "do vou
have a favorable opinion about
him, an unfavorable opinion, or
don't you know enough about
him at this time to have an opin-
ion?" Seventeen percent had a
favorable opinion, 13 percent an
unfavorable opinion, and 70 per-
cent had no opinion.
Bork was in the national spot-
light on Oct. 20, 1973, when, as
solicitor general, he fired Water-
gate special prosecutor Archi-
bald Cox on orders of President
Richard Nixon after higher-rank-
ing Justice Department officials
refused.
The poll results indicated that
most Americans also know very
little about the justices of the
Supreme Court.
Among the sitting justices, only
Chief Justice William Rehnquist
and Justice Sandra Dav O'Conner
had at least a third oi respondents
voicing an opinion about them.
About two-thirds said they did
not know enough about
Rehnquist to have an opinion
about him.
And respondents were split
over whether Supreme Court
justices should be appointed or
elected: 47 percent thought the
present system of presidential
appointments was best, while 47
percent would prefer justices to
be elected by the public.
The poll was a random, scion
tific sampling of 1,223 adults
across the country August 7-17.
As with all sample surveys, the
results of Media General- AP tele-
phone polls can vary from the
opinions oi all Americans be
cause ol chance variation in the
sample.
For a poll based on about 1,200
interviews, the results are subject
t i an error margin of 3 percentage
points either way because of
chance variations in the sample.
The official Iraqi News Agency,
monitored in Cyprus, said Iraq's
ruling Revolutionary Command
COuncil declared after a Saturday
night meeting that Iraq will abide
by the resolution "provided Iran
declares a clear-cut stand in sup-
port of the call
An Iraqi official, who spoke on
condition he not be identified
further, said Iraq would not per-
mit Iran to stall
"Either they accept the resolu-
tion in full or they face a more
severe war in which we will use
weapons we have not deployed
yet he said in an interview. I le
did not elaborate.
Iran and Iraq have not reported decisons made by the Security
Council" but that "considering
your good intentions, we hope
that this trip will be fruitful
any attacks in the Persian Gulf
since Thursday, the day before
Perez de Cuellar arrived in
Tehran. However, both sides
reported ground fighting and
artillery shelling of border towns
during the weekend.
In addition to meeting with
Khamenei, Perez de Cuellar also
talked in Tehran with Prime
Minister Hussein Musavi, For-
eign Minister Ali Akbar Velayati
and the powerful Parliament
speaker, Hashemi Rafsanjani.
Tehran Radio quoted Khame-
nei as telling the U.N. leader that
Iran has been "dissatisfied with
The radio, monitored in Cy-
prus, did not say whether
Khamenei conveyed Tehran's
final word on the cease-fire reso-
lution.
The broadcast quoted Khame-
nei as saying "no peace-seeking
group has objected to the Nurem-
berg trials" of top Nazi leaders
after Germany's defeat in World
War II, so branding Iraq the insti-
gator of the Iran-Iraq war would
be "acceptable to the world
Dairy backers reheat pizza war
WASHINGTON (AP) Con-
gressional supporters of the dairy
industry are churning up a storm
over frozen pizzas that use so
called cheese substitutes instead
oi the real thing.
rhey want to slap an "muta-
tion" Libel, or something similar,
on packages of pizza containing
substitutes such as the protein
derivative casein and other prod-
ucts that are almost, but not quite,
cheese.
"Should consumers be in
formed about what they are buy
ing or not?" Sen. Robert W.
Kasten r . R-Wis , said last week
at a House hearing as the long
running "pizza war" heated up
again.
For the senator from America's
Dairyland, there could be only
one answer. And that answer, he
said, was his Truth in Frozen
Pizza labeling Act of 1987. It
would require manufacturers to
indicate the use of cheese substi-
tutes in large letters alongside
their brand name.
That measure and a similar
1 louse version sponsored by Rep.
( harles Stenholm, D-Texas, are
giving the $700 million frozen
pizza industry an acute case of
legislative indigestion.
But the industry, which con-
sumes a substantial amount of
wheat, has found some sympa-
thetic cars on Capitol Hill and
among consumer advocates.
Rep. Dan Glickman. D-Kan
chairman of the House Agricul-
ture Commitee's wheat, soy-
beans and feed grains sub-
committee, told representatives
of the dairy industry he thought
the plan could boomerang.
He suggested that pizza mak-
ers using real cheese might be
required to post the cholesterol
levels of their products on the
packages.
Before you choose a long distance
service, take a close look.
�t
.
40rf�L
$
Vou may be thinking about
choosing one of the newer
carriers over AT&T in order to
save money.
Think again.
Since January 1987, AT&Ts
rates have dropped more than
tor direct-dialed out-of-
v
state calls. So they're lower than
you probably realize. For infor-
mation on specific rates, vou
can call us at 1 800 222-0300.
And AT&T otters clear long
distance connections, operator
assistance. 24-hour customer
service, and immediate credit
for wrong numbers. Plus, vou
can use AT&T to call from
anywhere to anywhere, all over
the I 'nited States and to over
250 countries.
You might be surprised at
how good a value AT&T really
is. So before vou choose a
long distance company, pick
up the phone.
AT&T
The right choice.
Shevardn
when they
UJM. Gene
in New Yo
'� e ha
Of optirrus
Of
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WASHINGTON (AP)-Soviet
Foreign Minister Eduard A.
Shevardnadze, arriving in Wash
ington "with a degree of opti-
mism says a decision on an-
other superpower summit meet-
ing depends on the outcon
the talks he opens 7 .
President Reagan and Secretan
of State George P. Shultz
"We have come her � roll up
our sleeves and work
nadzesaidon hisarr
from Moscow aboard a
Aeroflot flight. "We have a num-
ber of problems t�
consider"
The white-haired So �
cial brought with him a l � -� �
Reagan from Sov � I
Mikhail S. Gorbachev
disclosing the letter 5 �� � �
Shevardnadze told n 1 rl -
for the sumrn every!
depend on then- �
here
He was schedule I I �
Monday off to rest and
before set ing :
today. The talks ��. tl
continue through Thursda
may be extended to next
Size of car improve
repair cost, savs insul
WASHINGTON
torists with large or mid
cars face less chance ol 1
lower repair costs, but t. a
of roughly the same sizi
times provide widely different
levels of protection, aca -
an insurance industry stud)
The study, reflecting a
claims, suggested that occupants
of manv small cars have a 3- I
percent greater than avei
chance of injury. It said the proba-
bility of injury is often twi
great in small cars as in I
sedans, vans and station wag
The study bv the Highway Loss
Data Institute, a research group
affiliated with the Insurance In-
stitute for Highway Safetv, com-
pares the frequency oi 1:
claims and both the frequency
and cost of vehicle damage
claims filed on 1Q84-86 mode!
cars
Historical driver char; I - -
tics are taken into account v
making the comparison, oi
said.
According to the study m
with the best combine
and collision loss record wt 1 f
Pontiac Pansicnneand Oldsmo-
bile Custom Cruiser, both large
station wagons, and the two-d
Mercury Grand Marquis sedan.
The cars with the worst result
when both injury and c
damage is taken into account
were the Mitsubishi Mirage and
Nissan Pulsar, both small t

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TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBERS, 1987
11
se-fire
by the Security
thai "considering-
entions, we hope1
ill be truittul "t
ored in C)t
: sav whether
.ed Tehran st
ase tire nesor
s
U d Khame
�.v.u e Peking
the Nurem-m
.ii leaders1
.it in World-
� the insti-J
.s ar w ould
t pizza war
oon-
:t of
mpa
and
Kan
rncul-
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ie right choice.
)
Shevardnadze arrives for summit meeting
WASHINGTON (AP)-Soviet
Foreign Minister Eduard A.
Shevardnadze, arriving in Wash-
ington "with a degree of opti-
mism, " says a decision on an-
other superpower summit meet-
depends on the outcome of
the talks he opens Tuesday with
dent Reagan and Secretary
of State George P. Shultz.
We have come here to roll up
our sleeves and work Shevard-
Ize said on his arrival Sunday
from Moscow aboard a special
Aeroflot flight. "We have a num-
ber oi problems to discuss, to
consider
IThe white-haired Soviet offi-
cial brought with him a letter for
Reagan from Soviet leader
khail S. Gorbachev. Without
disclosing the letter's contents,
Shevardnadze told reporters "as
� the summit, everything will
pend on the results of our work
i e.
He was scheduled to take
I tnday off to rest and prepare
fore seeing Reagan and Shultz
day. The talks with Shultz will
. ntinuc through Thursday and
be extended to next week
when they both attend the special
U.N. General Assembly session
in New York.
"We have come with a degree
of optimism, 1 would say cau-
tious optimism, maybe
Shevardnadze, speaking in Rus-
sian through an interpreter, said
in a brief airport news confer-
ence.
Referring to work on a treaty to
ban U.S. and Soviet intermediate-
range missiles, the foreign minis-
ter said, "We have made very
substantial progress, but a great
deal of work remains
Reagan and Gorbachev agreed
at their first meeting in Geneva in
November 1985 to hold succes-
sive summits the next two years
in Washington and in Moscow.
Instead, they met in Reykjavik,
Iceland, last October, and Gor-
bachev has not responded to the
president's invitation to visit
America this year.
Reagan administration offi-
cials have not pressed the Soviet
leader for a response, but some
anticipated it might come during
the talks to be held with Shevard-
nadze.
The Soviet foreign minister
said differences remained over
warheads. On top of that, he said,
procedures for verifying destruc-
tion of the U.S. and Soviet rockets
as well as the pace still must be
resolved.
Shevardnadze apparently re-
ferred to a Soviet demand that
U.S. warheads on 72 West Ger-
man Pershing 1A missiles, and
other warheads stored at home,
be included in the treaty.
However, Shevardnadze also
declared, "We have come in a
businesslike spirit, and in a work-
ing spirit, and with a degree of
optimism
Similarly, Shultz said Sunday
on CBS-TV's "Face the Nation"
program that despite a public
squabble, there was litle differ-
ence ictween the two s-des on
how to dispose of the withdrawn
missiles.
Asked if he and Shevardnadze
would wrap up the pact, Shultz
replied: "I don't know if we will
or not
Earlier, officials on both sides
seemed to go out of their way to
lower expectations of any break-
Size of car improves chances of injury and
repair cost, says insurance industry study
WASHINGTON (AP) Mo-
rists with large or mid-sized
face less chance of in jury and
wer repair costs, but even cars
of roughly the same size some-
times provide widely different
levels of protection, according to
an insurance industry study.
The study, reflecting accident
claims, suggested that occupants
of many small cars have a 30 to 70
percent greater than average
chance of injurv. It said the proba-
bility of injurv is often twice as
great in small cars as in large
sedans, vans and station wagons.
The studv bv the Highway Loss
Data Institute, a research group
affiliated with the Insurance In-
stitute for Highway Safety, com-
pares the frequency of injure-
claims and both the frequency
and cost of vehicle damage
claims filed on 1984-86 mode!
cars.
Historical driver characteris-
tics are taken into account when
making the comparison, officials
said.
According to the studv, models
with the best combined injurv
and collision loss record were the
rontiac Parisienne and Oldsmo-
ile Custom Cruiser, both large
-ration wagons,and the two-door
V.ercury Grand Marquis sedan.
The cars with the worst result
when both injury and collision
damage is taken into account
were the Mitsubishi Mirage and
issan Pulsar, both small two-
door vehicles.
The performance among cars
ranged widely with those in the
"substantially worst than
average" category experiencing
injury and collision losses
"double those of cars with the
best experience the insurance
group said.
"Even among models of the
same size and body type, injury
and vehicle damage losses vary
widely the insurance group
said. It cited tor example a range
of more than 100 percent in injury
claim frequencies involving
small, four-door cars of generally
the same design.
The injurv record was nearly 50
percent better than average for
the Pontiac Parisienne, Mercury
Grand Marquis, Oldsmobile
Custom Cnuser and Buick Elec
tra, all large station wagons, ano
about 60 percent worse than
average for the Chevrolet Spec-
trum, Hyundai Excel and Mit-
subishi Mirage, all small sedans.
The best rating when only colli-
sion damage is considered, went
to the Chevrolet Astro passenger
van, the four-door Crown Victo-
ria and two-door Mercury Grand
Marquis, all with losses about
half of what is considered
average. Cars with the worst col-
lision damage rating were the
two-door Mitsubishi Starion,
Porsche 944 Coupe and
Volkswagen Scirocco, all of
which had a damage record
nearly 212 times the average.
Of the 75 small cars listed, 34 of
them had injury ratings of
"worse" or "substantially worse"
than average. All but one of the 31
large cars, vans and station wag-
ons was listed above average and
none was below average. More
than two-thirds of the 92 mid-size
cars were considered to have
"average" ratings with 14 above
average and only nine below
average.
College students
spread JAP jokes
NEW YORK, NY (CPS) �
American college students are
helping spread a form of anti-
Semitism with "Jewish-Ameri-
can Princess" jokes that portray
Jewish women an "manipulative,
self-serving, materialistic (and)
sometimes dishonest Susan
Weidman Schneider told a femi-
nist conference Sept. 2.
Schneider, editor of Lillith, a
Jewish feminist magazine, cited
an American University "Biggest
JAP on Campus" contest, "anti-
JAP graffiti" at Syracuse
Universirs Bird Library and the
popularity of "JAP Buster" t-
shirts at the University of Penn-
sylvania as proof of the rise of a
"classic anti-Semitic" racism.
Many people, added author
Francine Klagsbrun, don't seem
to realize the jokes are a form of
racist "stereotyping
you are cordially invited
to attend a
"ush Reception"
sponsored by the
B lacSororities at
"East Carolina University
When: September 20,1987
Where: Mendenhall Student Center
Multi Purpose Room
Time: 7:00 p.m.
Please try to attend!
m
through during Shevardnadze's
visit.
Veteran Soviet negotiator
Viktor P. Karpov hinted in an
interview with the Soviet news
agency Tass on Saturday that
Shevardnadze would take a rigid
stance in the final phase of the
treaty negotiations.
Shevardnadze said in a pre-
pared statement that an accord
on intermediate-range rockets
"would produce a powerful
momentum" to reduce longer-
range weapons as well. But he
stressed that Moscow was insist-
ing on "strict compliance" with
the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile
Treaty.
Gorbachev and other Soviet
officials contend Reagan's "Star
Wars" plan to develop a space-
based shield against missiles is in
conflict with the treaty. Presiden-
tial adviser Edward L. Rowny
last week accused the Soviets of
holding cuts in strategic forces
"hostage to demands that we
abort our hope for protection
against a ballistic missile threat
Reagan, in an interview made
public Saturday, claimed that a
radar installation in the Soviet
Union violates the ABM treaty,
and he questioned the usefulness
of the 15 year-old accord.
In the interview with U.S.
News & World Report, Reagan
said he believed the radar instal-
lation near the city of
Krasnoyarsk "certainly is a viola-
tion of the ABM treaty
Smokeless cigarette eliminates tar danger
ATLANTA (AP) The
"smokeless cigarette" developed
by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. is a
tiny steam generator which de-
livers tobacco taste and nicotine
to the smoker, according to pub-
lished reports.
Edward Horrigan, chairman
and chief executive officer of RJR
Nabisco's tobacco unit, was to
hold a news conference Monday
in New York to announce "a
major new development
There have been published
reports for several days he will
announce a "smokeless ciga-
rette one that does not burn
tobacco.
If there is no burning of to-
bacco, it would eliminate the
dangers of "tar which is created
by the burning, said D. Layton
Davis, director of the Tobacco
and Health Research Institute at
the University of Kentucky.
Phone calls to RJR Nabisco of-
fices in New York and Winston-
Salem, N.C were not answered
Sunday.
Industry observers say the
cigarette will contain a small
amount of tobacco, but will rely
on steam to deliver its taste to the
"smoker The Atlanta Journal
and The Atlanta Constitution
reported in their combined Sun-
day editions.
A short, heat-producing
element is at the tip of the ciga-
rette. When lighted, the element
heats an "aerosol forming mate-
rial probably water. Steam pro-
duced by the heating element is
drawn across tobacco. The
"smoker" inhales the steam,
along with tobacco flavor and
nicotine, the papers said.
The description is contained in
a patent application that Rey-
nolds, based in Winston-Salem,
filed April 3 with the European
Pa ten (office, The Journal and The
Constitution said, quoting a
source who has a copy of the
application.
The cigarette contains "sub-
stantially less tobacco" than a
standard cigarette.
Researchers at Reynolds have
worked for three years on the
project, code-named "Operation
Black I lole
One researcher expressed cau-
tion about the product.
There could be dangers associ-
ated with the heat element, said
Paul Middendorf, a research sci-
entist at the Georgia Institute ot
Technology. 'We don't know
what else is going to be given off
Once you put plastics in there
you have to be concerned about
the compounds in the plastics
Tire makers recommend
against the use of only plugs to
repair holes in tires. Armstrong
Tire Co. says the only safe tire
repair is a vulcanized inside
patch. Plugs, it says, are only
temporary repairs.
f
GRACE
I CHURCH
Interested in
Christian Fellowship?
(Call 355-3500)
JUDSON H. BLOUNT, III
ATTORNEY AT LAW
D U I and Traffic Offenses
Suite 12. 1 ee Building
1 11 I a-t Third Street
Greenville, NC 27835
Telephone
(919)758-8555
l!
Sigma
Phi
Epsilon
a lifetime experience
ECU's Largest Fraternity
Chancellor Cup Champs 3 Years
Running
2nd Highest G.P.A.
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12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 15,1987

&
s�
o�
RUSH PI KAPPA PHI
V



o�

CO'

C0
V9�

Sure A Fraternity is Surrounded by Alot
of Fun!
There are Great Benefits besides The
Social Aspects of Being a Pi Kappa Phi.
PI KAPPA PHI FRATERNITY FACT SHEET
Pi Kappa Phi Facts
106 chapters
15 colonies
50,240 initiated members
Fastest growing fraternity in the country
t , m 83 yearS �'d " founded December 10, 1904 at the College of Charleston
I he only Nat.onal Fraternity who has created and supports its own national service project - PUSH
Has a $500,000 headquarters building located in Charlotte, N.C.
Convention - Supreme Chapter - every odd year
Leadership School - Pi Kappa College - every even year
A mid-year leadership conference (AVATW)
Nine area conclaves
Solicitation of alumni support totalling $200,000 last year
Has over 45 regional alumni associations
A quarterly magazine - The Star and Lamp
Has a National Council made up of 7 of Pi Kappa Phi's distinguished alumni
Examples of Some Famous Pi Kappa Phi's
Howard Baker - Chief of Staff to President Ronald Reagan
Gaylord Nelson - Former United States Senator
Jim Edwards - Secretary of Energy under President Reagan, former Governor of South Carolina
Thomas Wolfe - Author
Joe Sewell - Baseball Hall of Fame
Randy Owen - Country music award winner, "Alabama" band
Alan C. Sundberg - Chief Justice, Florida Supreme Court
Phillip M. Crane - Congressman, United States House of Representatives (R. IL)
Pi Kappa Phi sends you this
invitation to become a
distinguished member of the
Beta Phi Chapter of Pi Kappa
Phi Fraternity!
Monday WE COME TO YOU NIGHT"
Meet the Brothers at Mendenhall
Student Center
Tuesday -Party with the Band from the
Toga Party with TTKO's own 180
Proof!
-ALSO
Come see EXOTIC FEMALE STRIPPERS!
All at the Rotary Club (next to AOTT's house)
Wednesday "Beach Party"
At the House (by the lake) with ALL
YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP!
CALL FOR A FREE RIDE- 75 7-1281
FRESHMEN WELCOME!
All nights arc from 7:00 'till 11:00 p.m.
ye
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
SEPTEMBER 15, 1987 Page 13
Kirsch leads Student Union
in university programming
By CHRIS MITCHELL
Staff Wnter
Student Government Associa-
tion. Student Union. To many
students both organizations mav
seem interchangeable. Laureen
Kirsch, Student Union president,
quickly points out the big differ-
ence.
"Programming � the Student
Union brings ECU students a
variety oi programs and events �
trom a Thanksgiving trip to New
"iork to Anita Baker in concert
While the SGA determines
regulations governing students,
the Student Union voices the stu-
dents' needs in entertainment.
FCU's Student Union involves
eleven committees covering vari-
ous alternatives: films, concerts,
debates, trips, minority arts, spe-
cial events and others. Each
committee has a chairperson, sec-
retary and public relations per-
son. The entire Student Union is
headed by a president and vice-
president, and everything is stu-
dent run.
Laureen stresses, "Students
may not be aware of just how
much of a real companv the Stu-
dent Union is. We have budgets to
follow; we adhere to business
protocol in all dealings
For instance, in order to get
Anita Baker's show, no one in
administration negotiated with
her manager: an employee ot the
Student Union dealt directlv with
Baker's manager. The fee?
$60,000.
"We definitely operate on the
business level Laureen insists.
"We have the funds, we negotiate,
we deliver
Kirsch is quick to point out the
one area where administration
must come in � contracts. Stu-
dents cannot sign contracts; ad-
ministration handles those only.
Other similarities to big business
include an eight to ten hour day,
five days a week. But in terms of
financial compensation. Student
Union workers veer away from
standard business practice.
"The president and vice-presi-
dent each receive $200a month �
the only paid Student Union
employees But working for the
Student Union does pay in other
ways.
"Working for the Student
Union means some oi the best
experiences for those wanting to
round out their educations. Vari-
ety in academics looks great on a
resume, but anyone who applies
himself in this organization de-
velops marketable skills anv
employer would recognize im-
mediately.
"All of us here gain experience
in developing leadership abilities,
delegating authority, communi-
cating effectively as well as work-
ing with budgets and public rela-
tions
As in most organizations, prob-
lems figure into the Student
Union. Laureen cites only one
major problem � student apathy.
Many students choose not to in-
volve themselves with anv stu-
dent organization, resulting in
weaker groups.
"It would be great to never
worry about vacancies. A diver-
sified and intenselv active Stu-
dent Union makes for a stronger
Poetry Forum gives
chance to be heard
Laureen Kirsch is the president of the ECU Student Union-
ECU
A few minor problems include
finding time for academics, but
the committees will not allow any
members to use the Student
Union as an excuse for poor
grades. All members must main-
tain a 2.0 average with a 2.5 for
president, vice-president and
chairpersons. Laureen confides
most maintain a GPA well above
the requirement and that the Stu-
dent Union may well hold the
highest average GPA of any stu-
dent organization.
"Overall, students can expect a
lot this year from us. Towards
homecoming we hope to have the
Fixx perform and to hold an out-
door beach music concert. Within
the next few months we'll be of-
fering trips to New York, Hawaii,
the Bahamas and London, in
addition to special events
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Writer
Back in the dark ages of higher
education, closet poets had to rely
on sympathetic English profes-
sors and surly roomates for an
evaluation of their work. Since the
mid-1960s though, ECU has had
the Poetry Forum to cater to fu-
ture Robert Frosts by creating a
workshop atmosphere without
the formalities of an English class.
And tonight the Poetry Forum
begins its 1987 season with a
meeting at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall
248. Anyone who has a poem �
student, faculty, Greenvile citizen
� is invited to attend. Just make
sure you bring at least 8-10 copies
of your work.
The purpose of the forum is to
have a workshop where amateur
poets can get together and read,
write and criticize each other's
work. "This is a lot more infor-
mal says forum head Dr. Peter
Makuck, sizing up the difference
between the Forum and a regular
poetry class. "People who come a
lot are the ones who might not
have time for a course at school
Participants can get sugges-
tionson how to better their poems
or perhaps be directed to poets
whose style might helj vercome
a structural problem. And, of
course, the forum provides a
place just to get some feedback on
a poem.
Makuck says the membership is
"fluid meaning members come
when they have a poem and want
to have it read. But there are
members who form a core group
and come to most of the meetings.
Atany given meeting,8-18people
show up.
Begun around 20 years ago by
Makuck's predecessor, Vernon
Ward, the forum is still going
strong. In 1978, when Ward re-
tired, Makuck took over. The or-
ganization is still a place where
students, faculty and towns-
people can showcase their work.
The forum has a constitution
with the SGA and is sponsored
financially by them. The English
department gets credit for sup-
plying a forum director. Forum
funds are used to get nationally
recognized poets to come to ECU
and give free readings and work-
shops.
The Poetry Forum does not
have a literary magazine of its
own, but Makuck noted that
many writers from the forum
have been published in ECU'S
"Rebel
Although the forum is an infor-
mal organization and not a class,
many students who take poetry
workshops join it. It isn't limited
to those outside the English de-
partment.
Due to a scheduling conflict,
this week's meeting will be to-
night, but after this week, the
regular forum schedule of the first
and third Thursday of the month
will be continued for the rest of
the semester.
Theater Arts has five productions for '8788
Theater Department Release
The Department of Theatre Arts
at ECU will present five produc-
tions in the McGinnis Theatre.
The 19S7-SS season is oo�yi��i
of a collection of four Broadwav
plays and an evening oi dance
choreography bv the dance fac-
ulty of ECU
Jerome Kern's "Leave it to
Jane opens the season Oct. 7,
with additional performances
Oct. 8, 9,10 and 12.
Originally "Leave it to Jane"
was one of the series of Kern-
Bolton- Wodehouse precedent
setting musical commedies that
came to be known as the Tnncess
Musicals, in reference to the thea-
ter where they were presented.
This series is noted for having
helped to inject a new note oi in-
formality, charm and efferves-
cence into American musicals.
The action is set on the campus
of a small mid-western college in
the 1 20s and concerns the efforts
oi the campus belle, lane, to lure
an AU-Amencan football star
away from a rival team to play for
her own school. In the course of
lots of razzmatazz proceeding,
some of erome Kem's most
memorable melodies are sung
and danced.
On November 18-21, the sea-
sons second offering, "Lovers and
Other Strangers will be pre-
sented. "Lovers Renee Tavlor
and Joseph Bologna's first Broad-
wav success, will run November
18-21, 1987. The play is a collec-
tion of comedies that deal with
love and marriage and the very
human reaction to both.
Taylor and Bologna were mar-
ried three years before writing
this delightful comedy. By their
own admittance, their life to-
gether provided the basis for the
comic insights into courtship,
love, and marriage that they put
into "Lovers
"Lovers" is real. You know the
characters,you'll feel genial to-
wards them because you'll be
laughing as you recognize your
friends, relatives and maybe
yourself.
Lillian Hellman's adaption of
Jean Anouilh's "The Lark" will
run February 10-13. This story of
Joan of Arc was called by Life
Magazine'American Theatre At
It's Best
'The Lai k" is not merely a story
� it is a pensive recollection of the
life of Joan of Arc. It begins with
the trial, and as Joan's testimony
unfolds, the play goes back in
time to uncover the various stages
oi her journey through history
toward martyrdom. It is a titanic
story, full of human anguish and
spiritual wonder.
Appearing fourth in the season
is Ted Tally's "Terra Nova"
March 28-31. The plav focuses on
Captain Robert Falcon Scott's ill
fated expedition to the bottom of
the world, Antartica.
Scott had trekked to the South
Pole only to find that he had lost
out as its discoverer to the Norwe-
gian, Ronald Amundsen. Tally
has alternated scenes of Scott and
his men at various stages of their
ordeal, with others in which Scott
conducts remembered or imagi-
nary dialogues with his wife, and
with Amundsen, who acts as a
combination goad, temptor and
alter ego. "Terra Nova" balances
the old story of courage, suffering,
and fortitude against the modern
questioning of values that got
Scott and his men into such a ter-
minal mess.
The final production of the sea-
son is the "East Carolina Dance
Theater" April 1S-19. The pro-
gram, which showcases modern,
ballet, and jazz choreography by
members of the ECU dance fac-
ulty is a perennial favorite of the
Playhouse season. Performances,
which feature the professionally-
oriented students in the ECU
dance department, are generally
sold out several days before the
event.
All performances will take
place in the McGinnis Theatre in
the Messick Theatre Arts Center,
corner of Fifth and Eastern
Streets.
All performances begin
promptly at 8:15 p.m.
Season tickets for all five pro-
ductions are $20.00 and will be
available beginning September 8.
Subscription rates will be appli-
cable until October 12. Single tick-
ets may be purchased for each
show one week prior to each
opening at the cost of $10 for
"Leave it to J?e and $5 for all
other productions. Students may
purchase single tickets for "Leave
it to Jane" for $8, and $4 all other
productions.
All tickets mav be charged on
VISA or MASTERCARD by tele-
phoning the box office 7576390;
by mail order to General Man-
ager, Department of Theatre Arts,
East Carolina University,
Greenville, NC 27858-4353; or in
person at Room 108, Messick
Theatre Arts Center through Oc-
tober 1, and thereafter at the
McGinnis Theatre box office 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. on performance
days.
The Department of Theatre Arts
is a division of ECU'S College of
Arts and Sciences.
Tips on dorm cooking offered to those
tired of cafeteria life and fast food
By LAURA SALAZAR
Staff Writer
Hunger pangs echo in unison as
the student tries to cram for a
History of Furniture Making
exam. His roommate also joins in
with a version of "Two all beef
patties special sauce, lettuce,
cheese, pickles, onions on a ses-
ame seed bun
Does this scene occur fre-
quently in your dorm room? If so,
you are not alone in your role as a
Chef Tell wannabee.
So your parents insisted on
giving you the money to be on the
meal plan. They visited the cam-
pus and had a taste of college cafe-
terias' delicious re-creations of
the last supper.
Most college students dread
going to cafeterias to eat. In addi-
tion to questionable tasting food,
they offer long lines, salad that
looks like someone sucked the
living daylights out of it, hot dogs
that even Mikey wouldn't eat,
and saladbars that look like they
have 101 varieties of bacteria
rather than 101 delicious selec-
tions.
An alternative to eating at cafe-
terias is cooking in the dorm
room.
Addie Gore, home economics
extension agent for the North
Carolina Extension Service, of-
fered the following advice to help
college cooks:
�Keep milk and other dairy
products 7 days after the indi-
cated expiration date.
�Don't buy dented can foods
because they could give you botu-
lism.
�If frozen foods seem soft and
contain ice crystals, don't buy
them. Ice crystals indicate that
foods are old.
�8 ounce canned foods are
more expensive, but this serving
size eliminates left-overs.
� Make sure to thoroughly clean
cooking utensils with hot, soapy
water.
Announcement
The N.C. Shakespeare Festival
production of "A Midsummer's
Night Dream" is scheduled for
Wednesday, Sept. 23, in Wright
Auditorium. For more informa-
tion, call the Central Ticket Office
at 757-6611.
Mia Farrow stars in the latest film by Woody Allen, 'Radio Days
It will show at Hendrix Theater Wednesday at 8 p.m.
PEPPY POP CORN
3-12 quarts popped corn
14 cup margarine, melted
cheese
1 envelope Italian salad dressing mix
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan
Preheat oven to 300 degrees farenheit. Spread popcorn in a 13X9 inch
baking pan. In a small saucepan, mix margarine, dressing mix and
Parmesan cheese. Pour over popcorn; toss to mix well. Bake 10 minutes.
Serve at once. Makes about 3-12 quarts. Variation: Substitute one
individual serving size envelope of dry onion soup mix for the Italian
dressing and Parmesan cheese.
(Prepared by Rachel Kinlaw, extension food specialist)

mmtfmm� ���
�T�jfcw� " Tii �� m r �� urn .�'nL.W ��
'� m -Win (Kip
I

A
� fc. m





THE EAST CAROUNIAN
Entertainment
SEPTEMBER 15, 1987 Page 13
Kirsch leads Student Union
in university programming
By CHRIS MITCHELL
Staff Writer
Student Government Associa-
tion. Student Union. To many
students both organizations may
seem interchangeable. Laureen
kirsch, Student Union president,
quickly points out the big differ-
ence.
"Programming � the Student
Union brings ECU students a
variety oi programs and events �
trom a Thanksgiving trip to New
t ork to Anita Baker in concert
While the SGA determines
regulations governing students,
the Student Union voices the stu-
dents' needs in entertainment.
ECU'S Student Union involves
eleven committees covering vari-
ous alternatives: films, concerts,
debates, trips, minority arts, spe-
cial events and others. Each
committee has a chaii person, sec-
retary and public relations per-
son. The entire Student Union is
headed by a president and vice-
president, and everything is stu-
dent run.
Laureen stresses, "Students
may not be aware of just how-
much of a real companv the Stu-
dent Union is. We have budgets to
follow; we adhere to business
protocol in all dealings
For instance, in order to get
Anita Baker's show, no one in
administration negotiated with
her manager: an employee of the
Student Union dealt directly with
Baker's manager. The fee?
$60,000.
"We definitely operate on the
business level Laureen insists.
"We have the funds, we negotiate,
we deliver
Kirsch is quick to point out the
one area where administration
must come in � contracts. Stu-
dents cannot sign contracts; ad-
ministration handles those only.
Other similarities to big business
include an eight to ten hour day,
five days a week. But in terms of
financial compensation, Student
Union workers veer away from
standard business practice.
"The president and vice-presi-
dent each receive $200 a month �
the only paid Student Union
employees. But working for the
Student Union does pay in other
wavs.
"Working for the Student
Union means some of the best
experiences for those wanting to
round out their educations. Vari-
ety in academics looks great on a
resume, but anyone who applies
himself in this organization de-
velops marketable skills any
employer would recognize im-
mediately.
"All of us here gain experience
in developing leadership abilities,
delegating authority, communi-
cating effectively as well as work-
ing with budgets and public rela-
tions
As in most organizations, prob-
lems figure into the Student
Union. Laureen cites only one
major problem � student apathy.
Many students choose not to in-
volve themselves with anv stu-
dent organization, resulting in
weaker groups.
"It would be great to never
worn about vacancies. A diver-
sified and intensely active Stu-
dent Union makes for a stronger
Poetry Forum gives
chance to be heard
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Writer
i 1k
m
Laureen Kirsch is the president of the ECU Student Union-
ECU
A few minor problems include
finding time for academics, but
the committees will not allow any
members to use the Student
Union as an excuse for poor
grades. All members must main-
tain a 2.0 average with a 2.5 for
president, vice-president and
chairpersons. Laureen confides
most maintain a GPA well above
the requirement and that the Stu-
dent Union may well hold the
highest average GPA of any stu-
dent organization.
"Overall, students can expect a
lot this year from us. Towards
homecoming we hope to have the
Fixx perform and to hold an out-
door beach music concert. Within
the next few months we'll be of-
fering trips to New York, Hawaii,
the Bahamas and London, in
addition to special events
Back in the dark ages of higher
education, closet poets had to rely
on sympathetic English profes-
sors and surly roomates for an
evaluation of their work. Since the
mid-1960s though, ECU has had
the Poetry Forum to cater to fu-
ture Robert Frosts by creating a
workshop atmosphere without
the formalities of an English class.
And tonight the Poetry Forum
begins its 1987 season' with a
meeting at 8 p.m. in Mcndenhall
248. Anyone who has a poem �
student, faculty, Grcenvile citizen
� is invited to attend. Just make
sure you bring at least 8-10 copies
of your work.
The purpose of the forum is to
have a workshop where amateur
poets can get together and read,
write and criticize each other's
work. "This is a lot more infor-
mal says forum head Dr. Peter
Makuck, sizing up the difference
between the Forum and a regular
poetry class. "People who come a
lot are the ones who might not
have time for a course at schcKil
Participants can get sugges-
tionson how to better their poems
or perhaps be directed to poets
whose style might help overcome
a structural problem. And, of
course, the forum provides a
place just to get some feedback on
a poem.
Makuck says the membership is
"fluid meaning members come
when they have a poem and want
to have it read. But there are
members who form a core group
and come to most of the meetings.
At any given meeting, 8-18 people
show up.
Begun around 20 years ago by
Makuck's predecessor, Vernon
Ward, the forum is still going
strong. In 1978, when Ward re-
tired, Makuck took over. The or-
ganization is still a place where
students, faculty and towns-
people can showcase their work.
The forum has a constitution
with the SGA and is sponsored
financially by them. The English
department gets credit for sup-
plying a forum director. Forum
funds are used to get nationally
recognized poets to come to ECU
and give free readings and work-
shops.
The Poetry Forum does not
have a literary magazine of its
own, but Makuck noted that
many writers from the forum
have been published in ECU's
"Rebel
Although the forum is an infor-
mal organization and not a class,
many students who take poetry
workshops join it. It isn't limited
to those outside the English de-
partment.
Due to a scheduling conflict,
this week's meeting will be to-
night, but after this week, the
regular forum schedule of the first
and third Thursday of the month
will be continued for the rest of
the semester.
Theater Arts has five productions for '8788
Theater Department Rrlease
The Department of Theatre Arts
at ECU will present five produc-
tions in the McGinnis Theatre.
The 1987-88 season is. eamemnm&
of a collection of four Broadwav
plays and an evening of dance
choreogTaphv bv the dance fac-
ulty of ECU
Jerome Kern's "Leave it to
Jane opens the season Oct. 7,
with additional performances
Oct. 8, 9, 10 and 12.
Originally "Leave it to Jane"
was one of the series of Kem-
Bolton- Wodehouse precedent
setting musical commedies that
came to be known as the rrinccss
Musicals, in reference to the thea-
ter where they were presented.
This series is noted for having
helped to inject a new note of in-
formality, charm and efferves-
cence into American musicals.
The action is set on the campus
of a small mid-western college in
the 1920s and concerns the efforts
of the campus belle, Jane, to lure
an AIl-Amencan football star
away from a rival team to play for
her own school. In the course of
lots of razzmatazz proceeding,
some of Jerome Kern's most
memorable melodies are sung
and danced.
On November 18-21, the sea-
sons second offering, "Loversand
Other Strangers will be pre-
sented. "Lovers Renec Tavlor
and Joseph Bologna's first Broad-
wav success, will run November
18-21, 1987. The play is a collec-
tion of comedies that deal with
love and marriage and the verv
human reaction to both.
Taylor and Bologna were mar-
ried three years before writing
this delightful comedy. By their
own admittance, their life to-
gether provided the basis for the
comic insights into courtship,
love, and marriage that they put
into "Lovers
"Lovers" is real. You know the
charactersyou'll feel genial to-
wards them because you'll be
laughing as you recognize your
friends, relatives and maybe
yourself.
Lillian Hellman's adaption of
Jean Anouilh's "The Lark" will
run February 10-13. This story of
Joan of Arc was called by Life
MagazineAmerican Theatre At
It's Best
'The Lark" is not merely a story
� it is a pensi ve recollection of the
life of Joan of Arc. It begins with
the trial, and as Joan's testimony
unfolds, the play goes back in
time to uncover the various stages
of her journey through history
toward martyrdom. It is a titanic
story, full of human anguish and
spiritual wonder.
Appearing fourth in the season
is Ted Tally's "Terra Nova"
March 28-31. The play focuses on
Captain Robert Falcon Scot's ill
fated expedition to the bottom of
the world, Antartica.
Scott had trekked to the South
Pole only to find that he had lost
out as its discoverer to the Norwe-
gian, Ronald Amundsen. Tally
has alternated scenes of Scott and
his men at various stages of their
ordeal, with others in which Scott
conducts remembered or imagi-
nary dialogues with his wife, and
with Amundsen, who acts as a
combination goad, temptor and
alter ego. "Terra Nova" balances
theold story of courage, suffering,
and fortitude against the modern
questioning of values that got
Scott and his men into such a ter-
minal mess.
The final production of the sea-
Tips on dorm cooking offered to those
tired of cafeteria life and fast food
son is the "East Carolina Dance
Theater" April 15-19. The pro-
gram, which showcases modern,
ballet, and jazz choreography by
members of the ECU dance fac-
ulty is a perennial favorite of the
Playhouse season. Performances,
which feature the professionally-
oriented students in the ECU
dance department, arc generally
sold out several days before the
event.
All performances will take
place in the McGinnis Theatre in
the Messick Theatre Arts Center,
corner of Fifth and Eastern
Streets.
All performances begin
promptly at 8:15 p.m.
Season tickets for all five pro-
ductions are $20.00 and will be
available beginning September 8.
Subscription rates will be appli-
cable until October 12. Single tick-
cts may be purchased for each
show one week prior to each
opening at the cost of $10 for
"Leave it to jane and $5 for all
other productions. Students mav
purchase single tickets for "Leave
it to Jane" for $8, and $4 all other
productions.
All tickets mav be charged on
VISA or MASTERCARD by tele-
phoning the box office 7576390;
by mail order to General Man-
ager, Department of Theatre Arts,
East Carolina University,
Greenville, NC 27858-4353; or in
person at Room 108, Messick
Theatre Arts Center through Oc-
tober 1, and thereafter at the
McGinnis Theatre box office 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. on performance
days.
The Department of Theatre Arts
is a division of ECU'S College of
Arts and Sciences.
By LAURA SALAZAR
Staff Writer
Hunger pangsecho in unison as
the student tries to cram for a
History of Furniture Making
exam. His roommate also joins in
with a version of "Two all beef
patties special sauce, lettuce,
cheese, pickles, onions on a ses-
ame seed1 bun
Does this scene occur fre-
quently in your dorm room? If so,
you are not alone in your role as a
Chef Tell wannabee.
So your parents insisted on
giving you the money to be on the
meal plan. They visited the cam-
pus and had a taste of college cafe-
terias' delicious re-creations of
the last supper.
Most college students dread
going to cafeterias to eat. In addi-
tion to questionable tasting food,
they offer long lines, salad that
looks like someone sucked the
living daylights out of it, hot dogs
that even Mikey wouldn't eat,
and saladbars that look like they
have 101 varieties of bacteria
rather than 101 delicious selec-
tions.
An alternative to eating at cafe-
terias is cooking in the dorm
room.
Addie Gore, home economics
extension agent for the North
Carolina Extension Service, of-
fered the following advice to help
college cooks:
�Keep milk and other dairy
products 7 days after the indi-
cated expiration date.
�Don't buy dented can foods
because they could give you botu-
lism.
�If frozen foods seem soft and
contain ice crystals, don't buy
them. Ice crystals indicate that
foods are old.
�8 ounce canned foods are
more expensive, but this serving
size eliminates left-overs.
�Make sure to thoroughly clean
cooking utensils with hot, soapy
water.
Announcement
The N.C Shakespeare Festival
production of "A Midsummer's
Night Dream" is scheduled for
Wednesday, Sept. 23, in Wright
Auditorium. For more informa-
tion, call the Central Ticket Office
at 757-6611.
Mia Farrow stars in the latest film by Woody Allen, 'Radio Days
It will show at Hendrix Theater Wednesday at 8 p.m.
PEPPY POP CORN
3-12 quarts popped corn
14 cup margarine, melted
cheese
1 envelope Italian salad dressing mix
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan
Preheat oven to 300 degrees farenheit. Spread popcorn in a 13X9 inch
baking pan. In a small saucepan, mix margarine, dressing mix and
Parmesan cheese. Pour over popcorn; toss to mix well. Bake 10 minutes.
Serve at once. Makes about 3-12 quarts. Variation: Substitute one
individual serving size envelope of dry onion soup mix for the Italian
dressing and Parmesan cheese.
(Prepared by Rachel Kinlaw, extension food specialist)
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 15,1987
Peter Tosh shot fatally in theft
KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) �
Robbers shot and killed reggae
star Peter Tosh, a founding father
of Jamaica's vibrant music of
revolution, police said today.
The attackers who entered
Tosh's home Friday night also
killed another man and wounded
the 42-year-old singer-
songwriter's wife and four other
people.
The assault left alive just one of
the three original members of The
Wailers, who popularized reggae
and its characteristic loping beat.
Group co-founder Bob Marlev
died of a brain tumor in 1981.
More than 100 people gathered
today at University Hospital,
where the wounded were taken.
Radio stations played Tosh's
music in mourning.
Three armed men who had ar-
rived on motorcycles entered
Tosh's suburban St. Andrew-
home at 8:30 p.m. Friday, de-
manded money and shot Tosh,
his wife, Marlene, and the five
others when they refused to com-
ply. Radio Jamaica reported.
The assailants were still at large
this morning, it said. Uncon-
firmed reports said they opened
fire with 9-mm automatic pistols.
Police refused to discuss details
of the shooting.
The identity of the other victim
was not immediately known.
Radiojamaica identified himonly
as 'Doc'
A police official who refused to
identify himself said Tosh's wife
and the four others were hospital-
ized.
Radio Jamaica identified two of
the wounded as Michael Robin-
son and Free I, a popular disc
jockey with Jamaia Broadcasting
Co. In Jamaican dialect, Free I
means "Free us
"From the time that we heard
that he had been killed, we started
playing his music said David
Geddes, a reporter with Radio
Jamaica.
Tosh was born Winston Hubert
Macintosh Oct. 9, 1944, in
Westmoreland, Jamaica.
Tosh, a baritone, formed the
Wallers with Bob Marley in 1963.
He left the group in 1973 as Mar-
ley increasingly took over the
tarring role.
Tosh is perhaps best known
internationally for his collabora-
tion with the Rolling Stones'Mick
Jagger in the Smokey Robinson
song "(You Got To) Walk And
Don't Look Back
An advocate of marijuana le-
galization. Tosh is also known for
his 197h album and single "Legal-
ize It
Tosh was known to smoke huge
marijuana cigarettes called
"spliffs" on stageduring concerts.
In 1978, before a Kingston
crowd of 30,000 that included
Jamaican Prime Minister Michael
Manley, Tosh smoked a "spliff"
on stage and berated Manley for
30 minutes for not legalizing
"ganja
Tosh had several run-ins with
police and was jailed for posses-
sion of marijuana in the mid-60s.
In early 1975, after a run-in with
authorities, he wrote the anti-po-
lice song "Mark of the Beast
which was immediately banned
from Jamaican radio.
The Wailers had a string of hits
including "Stir It Up "I Shot the
Sheriff" and "Get Up, Stand Up
They probably did more than any
other group to popularize reggae
music around the world.
Many of the Wailers' songs
were highly political, and the
group was extremely popular in
Jamaica. The Wailers' 1973 album
"Catch a Fire won reggae an
international audience.
The Wailers' third star was
Neville 'Bunny' Livingstone, who
left the group with Tosh.
"He (Tosh) was one of three
persons who really got reggae
music moving and only one is left,
and he is Bunny Geddes said.
Reggae has diverse origins,
with influences from Jamaica's
Rastafarian religious sect, Africa
and New Orleans.
Tosh's first album in four years,
"No Nuclear War was released
recently. Among the songs are
"Fight Apartheid" and "Vam-
pire which he recorded in the
late 1970s.
Other Tosh albums included
"Equal Rights 1977; "Bush
Doctor 1978; "Mystic Man
1979; "Wanted Dead or Alive
1981; "Mama Africa" 1983.
He was nominated for a
Grammy in 1985 for best reggae
recording for "Captured Live
'Tosh's solo albums, although
they've never had much non-
Jamaican airing, are excellent,
pure reggae, truer to the spirit and
form of the music than Marlcy's
more celebrated work accord-
ing to the New Rolling Stone
Record Guide.
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'Bonanza' star dies after bout with illness
SANTA MONICA, Calif. (AD
� Lome Greene was Ben
Cartwright to the end Michael
Landon said after the death of his
former "Bonanza" co-star, who
portrayed the firm but compas-
sionate father on one of TV's most
popular series ever.
Greene died Friday at age 72 at
St. John's Hospital, where he
developed pneumonia while re-
covering from an Aug. 19
operation for a perforated ulcer.
Hospital spokeswoman Mary
Miller said that the cause of death
was respiratory arrest followed
by cardiac arrest.
With Greene when he died
were his second wife, Nancy,
their daughter, Gillian, and twins
by his first marriage, Linda Ben-
nett and Charles.
"He was Ben Cartwright to the
end. He was ready with no com-
plaints Landon , who had vis-
ited him in the hospital, said in a
statement.
"The last time I saw him he
couldn't speak said Landon,
who portrayed Cartwright's
youngest son, Little Joe. "I took
his hand in mine and held it. He
looked at me and then slowly
started to arm wrestle like we
used to and he broke into a smile
and nodded and everything was
OK
Services were scheduled Mon-
day at Hillside Memorial Park in
Culver City, said Roxanne Law-
rence, Greene's secretary.
Greene, a barrel-chested man
with white hair, bushv black eve-
brows and a deep, resonant voice,
began his career as a newscaster in
Canada, where he was bom to
Jewish immigrants from Eastern
Europe.
After "Bonanza" finished its 14-
ycar run, he took on different TV
roles, playing a detective in
"Grift a space commander in
"Battlestar Galactica" and a fire
chief in "Code Red He appeared
in recent years in dog food com-
mercials.
But Greene was most closely
tied to his image as widower Ben
Cartwright irrthe old West,owner
of the vast Ponderosa ranch and
stem 'Ta" to three headstrong
sons - Adam, played by Pcrnell
Roberts, Hoss, played by Dan
Blocker, and Little Joe.
"1 think the biggest thing 1 re-
member about him is how he, and
particularly how he and Michael
Landon started to live their roles
said David Dortort, creator and
producer of "Bonanza
"There was a real familv feeling
on the show
Landon would seek advice
from Greene in a real father-son
sort of relationship, Dortort re-
called. "They weren't acting he
said. "The camera wasn't on
them
Greene had planned to perform
again as Cartwright in a television
movie. "Bonanza: The Next Gen-
eration" will begin production as
scheduled on Oct. 26 at the Lake
Tahoe-area site of the original
series, Dortort said.
Greene wasa little-known actor
in 1959 when he was cast for the
NBC series. After a shaky start,
"Bonanza" zoomed in popularity
and was seen by an estimated 400
million people in 80 countries.
NBC canceled "Bonanza" in
January 1973, but the431 episodes
will be seen in reruns for years to
come.
Roberts quit the show in 1965,
and Blocker died in 1972 of a
blood clot after a gall bladder
operation.
Greene, who was bom Feb. 12,
1915, in Ottawa, based his charac-
ter on his own father, Daniel
Greene, a maker of orthopedic
boots and shoes.
"1 don't know whether 1 could
ever match my father as a person,
but as an actor 1 try to be like him
Greene once said.
TURN
PIKE
Stop taking those
side streets for
00m
Gabriel's 'Sledgehammer' takes top video honors for the year
UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. (AP)
� Peter Gabriel's frantic, flashy
"Sledgehammer" video swept the
fourth annual Music Television
Awards, winning best video, best
direction and most experimental
video among its nine awards.
The video used computers and
animation to create a jerky stop-
image of Gabriel singing the Mo-
town-flavored tune amid a
swarm of animated images.
"Sledgehammer" won best
video of the year, best male video,
best concert video, and best over-
all performance in a video.
It also won best special effects in
a video, best art direction in a
video, best editing, best direction
and most experimental video.
The only other multiple winner
was the Talking Heads video
"Wild Wild Life which won the
best new video from a film award
and best group video.
The show, which went 50 min-
utesover its scheduled three-hour
time slot, named other winners
such as the Australian-New Zcal-
ander band Crowded House,
which took the best new artist
award for "Don't Dream It's
Over
The heavy metal rock group
Bon Jovi took the best stage per-
See MTV, page 15
Get ahead go PIKE.
PI KAPPA ALPHA
Fall Rush 87
At the ATTIC
�Tuesday 7:00-9:00 p.m.
�Wednesday 7:00-9:00 p.m.
at 8:15 p.m. the comedy oLeroy Seabrooks, one of
the Funniest comedians on the Comedy Zone circuit
Phone: 752-9829
for more information
PARADISE
329 Arlington
Blvd.
756-1579
ALL HAIR SERVICES
MAKEUP-MANICURES
TANNING BEDS
f
i
20 Discount Off Any Service.
Good Through 9-15-87.
PETEY HATHAWAY, Owner
East Carolina Playhouse's 1987-88 Season
it tfr
Book a Lyrtct by
Ouy BoAon and
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FILL OUT ORDER FORM AND MAIL TO:
State Zip
EAST CAROLINA
DANCE
THEATRE
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East Carolina Playhouse
General Manager
East Carolina University
Greenville. NC 27858-4353
OH, CHARGE BY PHONE
CALL (919) 757-S390
Day Phone N,gh, Phone
PERFORMANCE SELECTION: Please check the night you would like tickets tor each show
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1 00
Producer says come
LOS ANGELES (AP) The
trouble with television comedy
today, laments writer-producer
Mort Lachman, is that it isn't
about anything. "I did 'All in the
Famil for five years he said "1
can't believe how strong and in-
volved those shows were They
said things They had an integntv
I don't see now, a point of view 1
don't see now
M-A-S-H' was a comedy
based on human needs and emo-
tions. We have more shows now,
but no muscle. The shows don't
seem to be about anything We're
back to the days of Ozzie and
Harriet, doing trivia
"It's pathetic When the big
blast comes, we'll all be in fn
the set watching, 'Hello, honey,
I'm home I don't think we're
getting on the tube today what the
world is all about
Lachman iscurrentlvtheexi
tive producer of CBS' "Kate &
Alhe overseeing the statt in
New Yor
produced
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New show ch
NEW YORK (AP) True t
easygoing style, "CBS Sui
Morning" seems perfectly w i
to shove over on its bij ver-
stuffed sofa and let another net-
work program, NBC's new "Sun-
day Today plop right down.
"Sunday Today a version ol
"Today" with a different
makes its debut next weekend. It
promises to be a tad bit more I
ety than its older, more sedate
counterpart on CBS.
"We won't be quite that laid
back said "Todav" executive
producer Martv Rvan, who is
producer of "Sunday Todav
"For my taste, justras a viewer,
that's way too slow
Is there room for another S
day morning show7 "Oh, sure
there is said affable "CBS Sun-
day Morning" host Charles
Kuralt.
"I'm sure they will do a little
livelier, more youthful pt gi
than we do. Ours is a more �
we just decided to (ust do w hat we
liked he said in a recent rnter-
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ofberoy Scabrooks. one of
ins on the Comedy Zone circuit.
52-9829
Information
987-88 Season
WOVA
8 13 Tally
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THE EAST CAROUNIAN
SEPTEMBER 15, 1987
15
Producer says comedies lack social comment
LOS ANGELES (AP) The
trouble with television comedy
today, laments writer-producer
Mort Lachman, is that it isn't
about anything. "1 did 'All in the
Family' for five years he said. "I
can't believe how strong and in-
volved those shows were. They
said things. They had an integrity
1 don't see now, a point of view I
don't see now.
"M-A-S-H' was a comedy
based on human needs and emo-
tions. We have more shows now,
but no muscle. The shows don't
seem to be about anything. We're
back to the days of Ozzie and
Harriet, doing trivia.
"It's pathetic. When the big
blast comes, we'll all be in front of
the set watching, 'Hello, honey,
I'm home 1 don't think we're
getting on the tube today what the
world is all about
Lachman is currently the execu-
tive producer of CBS' "Kate &
Allie overseeing the staff in
New York, where the show is
produced, from here. He is a tall,
thin man with a somewhat mo-
rose look, which sometimes
seems to be the official expression
of gag writers. His horn-rimmed
glasses have earned him the nick-
name "The Owl
He has a number of series under
development, but he can only sell
what the networks are buying.
And what they are buying are
shows that have scant social or
political content. A few shows
ha ve a facade of importance, likea
stage flat, but there's little of sub-
stance behind them.
He spent 28 years writing for
Bob Hope. He wrote for 11 Acad-
emy Award shows and six
Grammy shows. He co-wrote two
movies, "Yours, Mine and Ours"
and "Mixed Company He has
produced, directed or written
such shows as "Baby, I'm Back
"One Day at a Time "Archie
Bunker's Place "Sanford
"Gimme a Break His honors
include two Emmys, a Humanitas
Award, a Golden Globe and a
Peabody Award.
Lachman has also written gags
for political candidates. He last
wrote for George Bush in his 1984
race for vice president. But he
would not be surprised if he's
asked to participate in the next
presidential campaign.
"I wrote some gags for Bob for a
roast in Washington and Barry
Goldwater heard him and called
me for some material he said. "I
also wrote a speech for Robert
Kennedy. After that, I did a lot of
writing for politicians
He wrote gags for many people
at the Republican Convention in
1972. He also wrote for Spiro
Agnew, Walter Mondale,
Rosalynn Carter and columnist
Jack Anderson. "Jack was great to
write for he said. "He new
every straight line in Washington.
All I had to do was talk to him and
I had all the gags I could use "
New show challenges CBS
NEW YORK (AP) True to its
easygoing style, "CBS Sunday
Morning" seems perfectly willing
to shove over on its big, old over-
stuffed sofa and let another net-
work program, NBC's new "Sun-
day Today plop right down.
"Sunday Today a version of
"Today" with a different cast,
makes its debut next weekend. It
promises to be a tad bit more fidg-
ety than its older, more sedate
counterpart on CBS.
"We won't be quite that laid
back said "Today" executive
producer Marty Ryan, who is also
producer of "Sunday Today"
"For my taste, jusras a viewer,
that's way too slow
Is there room for another Sun-
day morning show? "Oh, sure
there is said affable "CBS Sun-
day Morning" host Charles
Kuralt.
"I'm sure they will do a little
livelier, more youthful program
than we do. Ours is a more well,
we just decided to just do what we
liked he said in a recent inter-
view.
Perhaps in response to the im-
pending arrival of "Sunday To-
day "CBS Sunday Morning" has
made minor changes, like adding
more news and hiring wry ob-
server William Geist, formerly of
The New York Times. But the two
shows promise to remain quite
different in style.
"Sunday Today" will look a lot
like 'Today though the anchors
will sit casually on sofas rather
than at a news desk. There will be
news breaks on the hour.
Kuralt said he expected "Sun-
day Today" to run into the same
problems "CBS Sunday Morn-
ing" did when it started most
affiliates air religious program-
ming in the time period. But the
audience, however small, is loyal,
Kuraltsaid.
Ryan said, however, that "Sun-
day Today" is starting with about
106 stations compared to the 70 or
so that "CBS Sunday Morning"
had when it began eight years
ago. The CBS show is now carried
by 180 stations.
Ryan said he wants to capitalize
on the sucess of "Today" while
giving his new Sunday show a
chance to develop a personality of
its own.
For "Sunday Today NBC has
paired Boyd Matson, a lanky,
droll Texan, and witty, glamorous
Maria Shriver as co-anchors. Gar-
rick Utley is resident news an-
chor. Local New York weather-
man Al Roker performs meteoro-
logical duties, and "Today"
sports correspondent Bill
Macatee gets a bigger role on
Sunday, since Ryan expects
sports to loom large.
The "Sunday Today" cast and
crew will have had two rehearsals
by the time the show airs.
"We have a good idea of how to
do it Matson said in an inter-
view.
For the second show, Matson
will be in China with the rest of
NBC News, so it will likely be
People in the news
Hahn to pose
CHICAGO (AP) � Former
church secretary Jessica Hahn,
whose sexual encounter with Jim
Bakker led to his ouster from his
PTL ministry, bares her breasts in
Playboy magazine's November
issue, a newspaper says.
The magazine piece is titled
"Jessica Hahn. Born Again. In
words and pictures the Sun-
Times said Thursday.
"These pictures are a celebra-
tion of a new life for me. A new
beginning Hahn, 28, reportedly
says in the magazine. 'To do this
is probably the most ironic, the
most far-fetched idea for a church
secretary
The West Babylon, N.Y
woman will appear in a 10-page
photo layout, Playboy spokes-
woman Elizabeth Norris said Fri-
day, refusing to say whether
Hahn will be unclothed.
The report did not say what
payment Hahn would receive.
The issue is due on the news-
stands Sept. 28.
Bakker left PTL last March after
the 1980 sexual encounter was
disclosed.
Welty wins honor
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) � Writer
Eudora Welty is to be named a
chevalier, or knight, of the Order
of Arts and Letters, one of
France's highest civilian honors.
"Isn't it wonderful? It all
sounds so alluring said Welty,
78, after the honor was an-
nounced by the French govern-
ment Friday. A presentation is
planned Oct. 18 in Jackson.
Welty won a Pulitzer Prize for
fiction for her 1972 novel, 'The
Optimist's Daughter which has
been published in France. Her
1942 novel, "The Robber Bride-
groom is being re-issued there.
Previous recipients of the
Chevalier de L'ordre d'Arts et
Lettres medals include Tennessee
Williams and Truman Capote.
Amos talks
PARSIPPANY, N.J. (AP) �
Rags-to-riches cookie-maker
Wally Amos, president and
founder of Famous Amos Choco-
late Chip Corp says blacks must
'be committed to their dreams to
make them come true.
"When you say 'I will nothing
can stop you Amos, who is
black, said Friday in a luncheon
speech to delegates at the New
Jersey Black Issues Convention.
Surgery for gov.
MONTGOMERY (AP) � For-
mer Gov. George C. Wallace, with
a history of heal th problems stem-
ming from a 1972 assassination
attempt, will undergo cataract
surgery next week as an outpa-
tient , an aide says.
The procedure was'expected to
be "nothing major aide Elvin
Stanton said Friday.
Wallace, 68, has been paralyzed
below the waist since he was shot
while campaigning for the presi-
dency.
New Davis flick
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil (AP)
� Entertainer Sammy Davis Jr. is
in Brazil to film a role in a Paul
Mazursky film titled "Moon Over
Parador
Davis plays a singer at Carnival
in the fictitious Latin American
country of Parador. The movie
also stars Richard Dreyfuss as the
country's dictator, and Brazil's
Sonia Braga.
The film is being shot in the
historic colonial town of Ouro
Preto. 220 miles north of Rio de
Janeiro
Carson donates
NORFOLK, Neb. (AP) � 'To-
night Show" host Johnny Carson
has donated $650,000 to cap a
fund drive for 3 cancer radiation
unit at a hospital in his old home-
town.
Carson made the donation to
Lutheran Community Hospital in
memory of is parents, H.L. and
Ruth Carson.
The hospital's board voted to
name the unit the Carson Re-
gional Radiation Center after the
talk show host's donation was
announced Thursday-
Carson increased trie amount of
his gift several times to assure he
drive's success, said Norfolk
Daily News Publisher, Jerry
Huse.
Pavarotti ill
CHICAGO (AP) - Tenor Lu-
ciano Pavarotti is suffering from
bronchitis, and has withdrawn
from the Chicago Lyric Opera's
performance of Verdi's "II Trova-
tore the opera company's gen-
eral director announced.
The Italian singer was to have
performed the role of Manricio at
the season premiere Sept. 18, and
will be replaced by tenor Giuliano
Ciannella, general director Ardis
Krainik said Friday.
some weeks before the show's
true rhythm emerges.
Matson, a globe-trotting NBC
correspondent happy to settle
down somewhat now that he's a
"geriatric father" at 40, said he
and Shriver haven't had a lot of
time to work together this sum-
mer she was doing a documen-
tary on Roman Catholics in prepa-
ration for the pope's visit, and he
was off for the birth of his
daughter. But they had met be-
fore.
MTV
Continued from page 14
formance video for its "Livin' On
A Prayer
Janet Jackson's "Nasty" video
won the best choreography
award, with the statue going to
choreographer Paula Abdul.
Madonna won best female
video for her controversial "Papa
Don't Preach" video about a preg-
nant, unwed girl who decides to
keep her baby.
Robbie Nevil's "C'est La Vie"
won best video cinematography.
A founding member of the Brit-
ish group Genesis, Gabriel de-
parted the pop group for a solo
career as an avant-garde and
more politically oriented rocker.
Last year's hit "So" album, which
includes "Slegehammer
brought him back as a popular
artist.
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'
.THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 15,1987
CrannVTu hu8e sca,e model of
- andtathcr Mountain and a too-
W ?tKnRumC�r were what Conrad
i VrL c d,rector of the National
ark vrvice, brought to Raleigh
foMhe televised debate in May
Hugh Morton, the cannv owner
c �ndfather Mountain, had no
model and no engineer. On a
jmmi, he brought along Arthur
mith, the popular country music
former from Charlotte.
The two sides were to argue
whether the Blue Ridge Parkway
jould go over, under or around
Morton's mountain. It was the eve
oj the critical hearing before the
� Highway Commission.
It was no contest.
t Morton quotes Smith as telling
me television audience: "You
�w, when a man owns some-
thing and he loves it the way
Hugh Morton loves Grandfather
Mountain, it just don't seem right
for a bureaucrat to come down
here from Washington and take it
away from him
Morton, barely restraining a
chuckle, recalls, "the sw itehboard
lit up. Wirth didn't know what hit
him
1 he hearing followed the same
script. And Morton handily won
another public relations skirmish
in the battle over the parkway
route that spanned 40 years and
involved a string of North Caro-
lina governors. The sometimes
bitter clash eventually begat the
I inn Coves Viaduct, the sweep-
ing bridge around Grandfather
that will be dedicated by the Park
Service Friday.
It is a monument to compro-
mise.
Morton and the Park Service
will again shake hands during the
ceremonies but detente came
relatively recently.
The struggle evolved into a
slow pincers movement by the
Park Service. Beginning in 1935,
its bulldozers and stonemasons
had been stitching together com-
pleted sections of the parkway
and inching toward Grandfather
from the north and the south.
They were commanded by
were steady-as-she-goes burea-
crats with uncompromising vi-
sions of what the parkway should
become
1 hey wanted the scenic road to
lead across the crags of Grandfa-
Wirth mkI Samuel Weems, the

route
was most content when newspa-
per editorials portrayed him as a
champion of free enterprise or a
noble mountaineer defending his
land.
He wanted the parkway to
meander well below the
mountain's peak and to inspire
the traveler to visit his mile-high
swinging bridge and other for-
profit attractions.
The gauntlet had already been
thrown years before on a June day
in 1955 when Morton emerged
from his office on Grandfather
and collared a handful of engi-
neers taking test borings for a
tunnel through Pilot Ridge. It was
at a point along the high route
coveted by the Park Service.
Morton ordered them off his
property.
Morton was already a thorn in
the side of the Park Service. As the
chairman of the N.C. Board of
Conservation and Development,
he had howled when the Park
Service proposed a string of gov-
ernment-owned tourist accom-
modations along the parkway.
That would have competed
with private enterprise, he said.
Then there were feuds over a
proposal for parkway tolls (it
would discourage tourism, Mor
to project the timber and because be blocked by snow most of the
it thought that was what the Na- winter.
tional Park Service wanted, ac- The 1,700-foot tunnel the Park
cordmg to letters from state engi- Service wanted through Pilot
neers and the Park Service. Ridge would be costly and dan-
However, the letters indicate gerous, he said.
and the proposed high route was with entrenched bureaucracy that
1-12 miles away from the peak, any businessman could hope for
that the Park Service never ap-
proved what would become
known as the low route around
Grandfather.
The World War II years put the
issue on the back burner. A short-
age of money slowed parkway
constructiohn and doomed a pri-
vate citizen's attempt in 1944 to
raise funds to buy Grandfather
Mountain and donate it to the
government.
In 1952, Morton took sole own-
ership of the mountain and built
the swinging bridge at the sum-
mit and the road leading to it.
Embarrassed at having con-
demned the right-of-way on the
high route in 1955, the Highway
Commission deeded it back to
Morton immediately.
Morton recalled, "As soon as I
was able to get to the state high-
way commission and explained
this was totally beyond the law,
they couldn't give it back to me
quick enough
That action seemed to galvanize
the Park Service officials. To use
In 1964, Clark Srratton, the as-
sociate director of the Park Serv-
ice, said, "to settle for a lower stan-
dard for this one gap would be
bke wearing a pair of old tennis
shoes with a $65 suit Remember,
this was in 1964.
Morton countered that a high
route would scar his mountain,
which epitomized the rugged-
ness of the Appalachians.
"It would be like taking a
switch-blade to the Mona Lisa
he said. Asearlyasl953and again
in 1955, the Highway Commision
had suggested a compromise
middle route. Morton said that
was all right with him and if it
didn't require more than 50 acres
of his land, he would donate that.
But in a Park Service report on
the compromise route, a regional
director convinced Weems: 'The
added length, crossing ravines
lower down where they are
deeper which requires more walls
and structures and the rougher
the report said.
No matter. The battle raged and
grew hotter over the next 10 years.
Gov. Terry Sanford � whom
Morton considers his staunchest
ally in the fray � declared in 1962
that North Carolina "will not
make any effort to acquire right-
of-way for a higher route. We
have no legal authority, of ques-
tionable legal authority
During this period, most major
newspapers in the state published
editorials supporting Morton.
It was late 1953 before the Park
Service officially rejected the
and I am genuinely and sincerely
grateful for that
In May 1966, the smoke cleared
as Moore and Udall announced a
compromise for the middle route
The governor and Mildred the
Bear were among the guests at a
celebratory picnic in October 1968
at Grandfather Mountain. Moore
ceremoniously deeded the new
right-of-way to the Park Service
The guests then rode to nearby
Beacon Heights for a ground
breaking of the final seven-mile
link.
Wirth wasn't invited. He had
compromise. Sanford promised been fired duringa squabble with
to take the matter up with Stuart Udall. Weems, meanwhile, had
Udall, the secretary of the Interior
and Wirth's superior. In April
1964, the buck finally stopped at
Udall's desk after the Park Service
declared the issue a stalemate.
In December 1964, the state,
been sent to Australia on loan to
help that nation develop a parks
system.
The departure of those men was
the turning point, Morton said
"A lot of people, including Wirth,
acting independently of the Park thought I was responsible for get-
Service, returned to Morton 250 ting Wirth fired, but I wasn't he
said.
"He was such an arrogant nel-
son, and that got him in trouble
With Wirth gone, Weems didn't
have his soul-mate to back him un
ton said) and even over a change the low route along U.S. 221, they
park
superintendent. Both
to
ther and inspire the traveler
wonderment.
In the middle was Morton, who
in exit signs along the route. (They
dropped all mention of private
tourist accomodations, Morton
fumed.)
In an interview last month,
Morton said, "1 don't have any
doubt they were out to get me if
they could. I guess I was public
enemy No. 1 already
The engineers had appeared on
Grandfather because the High-
way Commission had con-
demned 779 acres on the moun-
tain for the parkway route. Since
the parkway's inception, North
Carolina and Virginia were re-
sponsible for acquiring right-of-
way, which they then deeded to
the Park Service.
Morton called Gov. Luther
Hodges, whom he helped get
elected, and pointed out that the
state had already bought right-of-
way for the parkway link.
And indeed it had.
In 1939, the Linvillc Improve-
ment Co a corporate name for
Morton's family, sold 448 acrres
along eight miles of the old
Yonahlosee Trail, a 19th century
stagecoach toll road that evolved
into U.S. 221 between Blowing
Rock and Linvillc.
The state bought that right-of-
way because at the time it wanted
Dr. Dennis O'Neal
(ptometrisl
is pleased to announce the
relocation of his practice o' optometry
to
Greenville Eye Clinic
Bldg. I, Doctors Park
Greenville, N.C. 27834
(past hospital on Stantonsburg Road)
in association with
Carl R. WiUe, M.D. and William M. Monroe,
M.D.
Opthalmologisis
Call for appointment.
758-4166 or 758-6600
JlSmiiersittj JRcalttj
1 i'u 6a, uout namaM&axk"
JEAN HOPPER
BROKER OWNFH
Res 919 756-914
Whether it's Ringgold Towers Condon or
single family homes, we can find a place for
� arie's BU .
r �cnvv( . ' ?' '
9 355 58- -
said, would require repairing
scars in the landscape along the
crooked highway.
They wanted the high route
because the parkway was con-
ceived to flow across the top of the
Blue Ridge, they said.
Morton argued that the high
route would destroy thecharacter
of the "wild" mountain, would be
too expensive to build and would
acres along the low route in ex-
change for 377 acres along a
middle route.
Soon after taking office, Gov.
Dan K. Moore took up the fight
topography make it particularly and before lobbying the Park and I think that broke the back o,
objectionable. Service for a middle or low route, it "
It s important to understand In 1965, Morton declared vie- I've eot admiration for c
that t terms high route, low tory in a local newspaper and (Weemsf thoulh He wa�
route and nuddle route are rela- sa3, "The Park ServklhEgiven entufl tlTZ
me the most magnificent on-the- be better because hJL� c
J!?ft�2 'en,�r� lobngrS 3 dea��g ����"�
t
highest point on the high route
was at 4,500 feet, compared with
4,200 feet at the highest point on
the low route.
Both were well below
Grandfather's 5,964-foot peak
GRACE
CHURCH
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551-4614
KAPPA ALPHA
Dear Rushee . . .
As a fraternity rushee this fall at East Carolina University, you
will have an important decision to make. You must choose the
organization which you wish to join. A fraternity of men with whom
you will live for the next four years, and whom you will call your
brothers for the rest of your life. We at Kappa Alpha are sure that you
will make a careful evaluation of the various aspects of fraternity life.
And further more, we believe that you will agree that KA is the most
unique and traditional of any college fraternity. We are looking for-
ward to meeting you during rush, and wish you the best of luck in
deciding on a fraternity and in your college career.
The Brothers of Gamma Rho
Chapter of Kappa Alpha Order
THE HOME OF SOUTHERN GENTLEMEN
RUSH
7:00-11:00
Each Night
TUESDAY
Open House
WLil' Sisters
WEDNESDAY
By Invitation Only
iwh.ii im i � . m .inn
"MM
I
IHf S7( AROl INI,
Smith, Floridi
Pirates, 44-3,
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport Iditar
Eighth-ranked Florida State,
behind 244 yards rushing from
sophomore tailback Sammie
Smith, cruised to a 44-3 vie r,
over East Carolina in football ac-
tion Saturday night
Smith, who missed the Semino-
les first game (a 40-16 victory o er
Texas Tech a week earlier) did not
start the game But, when he en-
tered the game on Honda State's
third possesion of the evening he
wasted little time getting yardage
piled up. In fact. Smith delivered
what ECU head coach Art Baker
claimed to be the "killing blow" to
the Pirate team in the second
quarter.
With the Seminoles pinned
back at their own 17-vard line
following a 40-yard Craig Losito
punt, Smith took a pitch out on the
first play of the drive and rambled
83 yards for the touchdown boost-
ing the Seminoles on top 13-3 with
just over six minutes remaining in
the first half.
"I thought that (Samr
Smith's long touchdown run re-
ally took some of our steam
away said Baker. "We were still
in the game at that time despite
making numerous mistakes, but
he broke our will some. He is an
awesome runner We definitely
saw too much of him
Honda State head coach Bobbv
Bowden agreed with Baker's as-
sessment of Smith's run.
"The big swing in momentum
came on the Sammie Smith run
said Bowden. "I reallv didn't
expect him to play that wav in the
ballgame. He reallv hadn't looked
very good in practice this week. I
was really surprised at the dav he
had
In addition to the 83-yard
touchdown run, Smith also set up
rmp more Honda State so��e oa
nfiis of 52 yards and 13 yards.
In the early going, the momen-
tum of the game seemed to be
favoring the Pirates. Not onlv did
the Seminoles fumble a wav the
ball on their first possession, but
an ecstatic crowd of 33,937, the
third largest Ficklen Stadium
crowd and the largest crowd ever
to witnes
t rd . ed th
for the . 'j
"The w,a
with the irJ
siam, I was
game ir j
den.
I
fumble reel
State 49 I
first possess
moved i
fumbled
2-
pro
Piral
yards
Schmidt 4
7:04 remain!
N I
k the
. I -t
Ch -
drive came
from the H
conn-
Simps :
gain
eight-vard
pen.
Pirates J
the tic J
A 35-yari
LeRov Butl�
good t;
drive that r
goal. The
yards in 11
vard �
ing in the n
Alter the
down sjcai
JwWii-
giving the S
the Pirate 2(
later, Schmj
again wit
put:
rou;
Thi
unar
ECU soccer te
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sports Writer
East Carolina, still looking for
it's first soccer win of the season,
lost three straight conference
matches last week.
Last Wednesday at William &
Mary, the Pirates were shut-out 6-
0 in their first conference game oi
the season.
Tim Larkin and lohn Tuttle
scored early for the Tnbe to give
William & Mary a 2-0 halftime
advantage.
Nearly two-thirds of the way
through the second penod Wil-
liam & Man went on a four goal
scoring spree. Mike Cummings
got things started on a pass from
jans Cedergren at the 32:03 mark.
a n ���
final India
four minute:
kicked one
Kanter
The E
most of the rrj
shots at goal
33 The Tn
one save ?H
capitalize
takes head
vey said,
but Wi!liain
stronger tear
The Piratl
against Geoj
losing to the
Sweeper Larry Bennett was a key to the Pirate
Photo by Elbert Kennard - EC

A






mt. route
'�d high route was
-a from the peak,
rhe battle raged and
er the next 10 years
Sanford whom
lers his staunchest
dared in 12
� ina 'will not
: to acquire right
la higher route We
od, nv
state published
V
cted the
Interior
th,r
with entrenched bureaucracy that
any businessman could hope for
and I am genuinely and sincerely
grateful for that
In May 19ri6, the smoke cleared
as Moore and L'dall announced a
compromise for the middle route.
The governor and Mildred the
Bear were among the guests at a
celebratory picnic in October 1968
at Grandfather Mountain. Moore
ceremoniously deeded the new
right-of-way to the Park Service.
ITie guests then rode to nearby
Beacon Heights for a ground-
breaking of the final seven-mile
link
Wirth wasn't invited. He had
be n tired during a squabble with
dall Weems, meanwhile, had
been sent to Australia on loan to
help thai nation develop a parks
rhe departure of those men was
the turning point, Morton said.
� of people, including Wirth,
though! I was responsible for get-
�h tired but ! wasn't he
"He in arrogant per-
� him in trouble.
With Wirth gone Weems didn't
have his soul-mate to back him up
and I th:nk that broke the back of
it
I ve got admiration for Sam
�'� ems) though He was eonsci-
I think the parkway may
uperin-
bo better because he was
tendenl when he was
F YOU GET
�Y FEVER OR
ASTHMA
THE FALL
t.l
5 5
,&�
Vte-2
� � �
�Open to men
and women
ages 18 or older
�Free Skin
Testing
a Our Research Study
. Medicine
: Medicine
551-4614
LPHA
Carolina University, you
. You must choose the
fernity of men with whom
whom you will call your
a Alpha are sure that you
aspects of fraternity life.
agree that KA is the most
jnity. We are looking for-
h you the best of luck in
career.
ma Rho
a Order
N GENTLEMEN
� WEDNESDAY
By Invitation Only
A
X
THF EASTC AROl INIAN
Sports

SEPTEMBER 15, 1987 Page 17
Smith, Florida State roll past
Pirates, 44-3, in home opener
By TIM CHANDLER
Sparta Editor
Eighth-ranked Florida State,
behind 244 yards rushing from
sophomore tailback Sammic
Smith, cruised to a 44-3 victory
over East Carolina in football ac-
tion Saturday night.
Smith, wbo missed the Semino-
les first game (a 40-16 victory over
Texas Tech a week earlier) did not
start the game. But, when he en-
tered the game on Florida State's
third possesion of the evening he
wasted little time getting yardage
piled up. In fact, Smith delivered
what ECU head coach Art Baker
claimed to be the "killing blow" to
the Pirate team in the second
quarter.
With the Seminoles pinned
back at their own 17-yard line
following a 40-yard Craig Losito
punt, Smith took a pitch out on the
first play of the drive and rambled
83 yards for the touchdown boost-
ing the Seminoles on top 13-3 with
just over six minutes remaining in
the first half.
"I thought that (Sammie)
Smith's long touchdown run re-
ally took some of our steam
away said Baker. "We were still
in the game at that time despite
making numerous mistakes, but
he broke our will some. He is an
awesome runner. We definitely
saw too much of him
Florida State head coach Bobby
Bowden agreed with Baker's as-
sessment of Smith's nin.
"The big swing in momentum
came on the Sammie Smith run
said Bowden. "I really didn't
expect him to play that way in the
ballgamc. He really hadn't looked
very good in practice this week. I
was really surprised at the day he
had
In addition to the 83-yard
touchdown run, Smith also set up
tp more Florida State scocee oaT
nlris of 52 yards and 13 yards, tf
In the early going, the momen-
tum of the game seemed to be
favoring the Pirates. Not only did
the Seminoles fumble away the
ball on their first possession, but
an ecstatic crowd of 33,937, the
third largest Ficklen Stadium
crowd and the largest crowd ever
to witness a Pirate home opener
braved the dreary, rainy weather
for the contest.
"The way the game started,
with the crowd and their enthu-
siam, I was really afraid about the
game in the first half said Bow-
den.
Following Ricky Torain's
fumble recovery at the Florida
State 49-yard line on the game's
first possesion, the Pirates quickly
moved inside the Seminole 40
before quarterback Travis Hunter
fumbled on a keeper at the Semi-
nole 25-yard line. The fumble
proved to be the first of 10 the
Pirates would make in the contest,
five of which were lost.
The Seminoles then drove 51
yards in nine plays to score the
first points of the game on a Derek
Schmidt 40-yard field goal with
7:04 remaining in the first quarter.
Not to be outdone, the Pirates
took the ensuing kickoff and
drove 74 yards in 15 plays to set
Chuck Bcrlcth up for a 23-yard
field goal, which knotted the
score, 3-3, with 14:58 remaining in
the half.
The key play of the scoring
drive came on a third and 11 play
from the Florida State 34. Hunter
connected with fullback Anthony
Simpson on a screen pass and a
gain of 26 yards to the Seminole
eight-yard line. A fumble and a
penalty for offsides against the
Pirates stalled the drive forcing
the field goal attempt.
A 35-yard kickoff return by
LeRoy Butler gave the Seminoles
good field position for another
drive that netted a Schmidt field
goal. The Seminoles drove 44
yards in 11 plays to set up a 36
yard field goal with 9:11 remain-
ing in the first half.
After the 83-yard Smith touch-
down scamper, the Pirates' Wal-
ter-Wilson fumbled the kickoff
giving the Seminoles possesion at
the Pirate 20-yard line. Four plays
later, Schmidt split the uprights
again with a 28-yard field goal to
put Florida State on top, 16-3, and
round out the first half scoring.
The second half was all Florida
State as the Seminoles rolled up 28
unanswered points.
The first score of the second half
followed a Hunter fumble at the
Pirate 24-yard line. Four plays
later, the Seminoles found the
endzone when fullback Dayne
Williams plowed over from two
yards out. The PAT boosted the
score to 23-3 with 6:23 remaining
in the third quarter.
The Seminoles struck once
more in the third quarter on a 59-
yard touchdown pass from quar-
terback Danny McManus to wide
receiver Randy White to make the
score 30-3 following Schmidt's
PAT.
Smith's 52-yard burst set up the
next Florida State touchdown,
which was scored by sophomore
tailback Dexter Carter on a five-
yard burst over the right side.
The final tally of the night for
the Seminoles came on a 10-yard
reverse bootleg by backup quar-
terback Chip Ferguson with 4:11
to play in the contest. The
Ferguson score capped off a 13
play, 82 yard drive.
In all, the Seminoles piled up a
total of 548 yards in total offense
compared to only 222 for the Pi-
rates. In the second half, the Pi-
rates could only manage a total
net of 83 yards on offense.
"We played an excellent foot-
ball team and a team that I really
believe will be ranked up near
the top at the end of the season
Baker said Monday at his weekly
press conference. "I said all week
and now I am further convinced
that they can challenge for the
national championship with a
few breaks
Baker credited his defense with
having played a good game, but
said that the offense would defi-
nitely have to work on their turn-
overs.
"Our defense gave us a great
effort said Baker. "We just kept
them on the field too long after the
first quarter. You cannot expect to
be in a game against a team like
Florida State when you put the
football on the ground 10 times
and have (one) interceptions. We
will have to work hard to correct
our poor execution
The Good and the bad
Chuck Berleth (top photo) connects for a 23-yard field goal in ECU'S 44-3 loss to Florida State Saturday.
The field goal proved to be the only points of the night for the Pirates. Sammie Smith (bottom photo) is
shown gaining some of his 244 yards.
(Photos by Jon Jordan - ECU Photo Lab)
Libretto back on grid squad
ECU soccer team drops to 0-3
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sports Writer
East Carolina, still looking for
it's first soccer win of the season,
lost three straight conference
matches last week.
Last Wednesday at William &
Mary, the Pirates were shut-out 6-
0 in their first conference game of
the season.
Tim Larkin and John Tuttle
scored early for the Tribe to give
William & Mary a 2-0 halftime
advantage.
Nearly two-thirds of the way
through the second period Wil-
liam & Mary went on a four goal
scoring spree. Mike Cummings
got things started on a pass from
jans Cedergren at the 32:03 mark.
Jason Kanter then scored two in
a row to put the Tribe up 5-0. The
final Indian goal came with just
four minutes left when Joel Lewin
kicked one in on an assist from
Kanter.
The ECU offense was stalled
most of the match taking only four
shots at goal to William & Mary's
33. The Tribe's keeper had only
one save all day.
"William & Mary was able to
capitalize on our mental mis-
takes head coach Charlie Har-
vey said. "Our guys gave 100,
but William & Mary was just a
stronger team
The Pirates fared no better
against George Mason Saturday
losing to the Patriots 7-1. Mason,
Sweeper Larry Bennett was a key to the Pirate defense last weekend.
Photo by Elbert Kennard - ECU Sports Information
ranked in the pre-season top 20,
was able to overpower ECU on
offense taking 37 shots to ECU'S
eight.
Phillip Taplah and Mark Pulisic
got first half goals for the Patriots
to make it 2-0 at halftime.
GMU scored quickly in the sec-
ond half when Sam Sumo kicked
one to give the Patriots a 3-0 lead.
Two minutes later ECU
mounted its only successful of-
fensive drive of the day when
Steve McCarthy streaked through
the Mason defense and put one in
to give ECU it's only goal.
The Pirate defense, already
weakened by soaring heat and
humidity, was bombarded by the
Mason offense. Larry Tabash and
Gary Ellesar each scored a goal to
put the Patriots out of sight at 5-1.
Bob Lilley put the final nails in
the coffin scoring the last two
GMU goal to make it a 7-1 final.
ECU brought an improved and
coordinated offense to the field
Sunday but could not find any
breaks as they lost a 1-0 heart-
beaker to James Madison.
Ricky Englefried, on an assist
from Craig Baur, got the only
Madison goal as the Pirate de-
fense repeatedly turned back
JMU advances.
Madison took 21 shots but only
three were close giving ECU
keeper Mac Kendall three saves.
ECU sweeper Larry Bennett
kept the Madison offense off bal-
ance allowing seemingly being at
two place at once on the defensive
side of the field.
"Larry runs the show back there
and he knows that if he wants to
make an offensive move he can
Harvey said.
The Pirate offense took 19 shots
but could not get one home hav-
ing two near misses in the second
half.
"I was very pleased with our
performance today Harvey
said. "We need to build on trie
improvements that we have made
though
By TIM CHANDLER
Sporti Editor
Charlie Libretto, who missed
Saturday's ECU football game
against Florida State, was rein-
stated on the Pirate squad Mon-
day.
Libretto, a sophomore quarter-
back from Middleburg, Fl had
left the football team last Tuesday
after reportedly being displeased
with his position as backup quar-
terback. Last season, Libretto had
been the starting quarterback in
eight of the 11 ECU football
games, however he was replaced
as starter by red-shirt sophomore
Travis Hunter after spring drills.
ECU head coach Art Baker told
reporters in Raleigh last Wednes-
day that Libretto was having a
difficult time accepting his demo-
tion to second string. Baker went
on to say that he had given Li-
bretto until Friday (Sept. 11) to
make a final decision.
"Charlie left the squad last Tues-
day and came in quite upset about
his particular situation and asked
if he could have until Friday to
make up his mind Baker said
Monday. "I gave him (Libretto)
until Friday, but, at that time I told
him that no matter what he de-
cided, he would not dress out for
the Florida State Game.
"He did come back in Friday
and asked to be reinstated Baker
continued. "He made an apology
to the team today (Monday) and
he will rejoin the football team
today
Baker said that at the time that
Libretto left the team, third-string
Sports Fact
George Blanda, the career leader
in points scored in pro football,
had 943 on points-after-touch-
down and also 1,005 on field goals
in his mark of 2,002 points
Fran Tarkenton played 18 seasons
at quarterback for the Minnesota
Vikings and New York Giants. His
passes gained a record 47,003
yards.
quarterback Brad Walsh was
moved to second string. Baker
went on to say that Walsh would
remain as the second string signal
caller until Libretto works his way
back up.
"He'll join the team behind Brad
Walsh and he'll just have to work
his way up the ladder from there
Baker concluded.
During his freshman campaign
last year, Libretto connected on 71
completions in 148 attempts for a
48 percent clip. He had one touch-
down pass and six interceptions.
For the year. Libretto totaled 833
yards through the air.
Probably the most memorable
moment for Libretto dunng his
freshman year camo against
Southern Mississippi. After com-
ing off the bench with only 1:48 to
play, Libretto led the Pirates on a
13-play, 80 yard drive, which was
capped off with a eight-yard
touchdown pass to Walter Wilson
with only eight seconds remain-
ing on the clock.
Weekend wrap-up
Men's Tennis at Old Domin-
ion Invitational, Norfolk, VA
Participating teams were Penn
State, William & Mary, Old Do-
minion and East Carolina. The
second day of play was cancelled
due to rainy conditions. ECU'S
number-one singles player, John
Melhom, reached the semifinals
of the "A" (or top) bracket by
defeating John Mackey of Penn
State, 6-4,6-1. He then lost to Will
Harvie of William & Mary, 5-7,6-
2,6-2.
ECU plays Meredith College
Wednesday at the ECU Courts
(women, 3:00).
Pirate Notes
Women's Volleyball at Villa-
nova:
ECU fell to 1-1, losing to Villa-
nova at Villanova, Pa Saturday
byscoresofl5-13,15-13,15-9. The
Pirates had opened the 1987 sea-
son at Minges Coliseum last
Thursday by defeating North
Carolina Wesleyan, 15-8,15-8,15-
7. Sophomore setter Debbie Tate,
a junior college transfer from
Manatee Community College in
Bradenton, Fla led the Pirates in
both hitting (4 for 7) and in setting
(13 for 26). She also had four serv-
ice aces and four digs against N.C
Wesleyan. Senior Kris McKay led
ECU with 12 digs and five block
assists in that match.
Cross Country Results from
Pembroke Invitational:
East Carolina's men's and
women's cross country squads
turned in very good perform-
ances this past weekend at the
Pembroke Invitational in Pem-
broke, NC.
Bibi Rosas once again led the
women finishing fifth overall
with a time of 19:55. Stephanie
Ingram also finished in the top 10
placing ninth with 20:23 mark.
Overall ECU's women finished
third out of seven teams. Themen
placed sixth out of 11 teams in the
overall competition. They were
led by Matt Schweitzer, 18th-
28:19, and Mike McGehee, 22nd-
28:34.
Assistant Coach Mitch Craib
was pleased with this weekend's
results. "The women had a verv
nice run Craib said. "They are a
much improved team
He added, "the men put in a
solid performance led by two
potentially excellent runners -
Schweitzer and McGehee
J





JHE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTFMRFEk; 987
4 look atACC action
'te AtUn? Was �nfidenl
opener io? S0-81 Conference
make JZu:Amold wanted to
make yiro u oia waned to
that w h,S Animates stayed
lastE Arnoldsaidlnour
male fnt KeVe,yone �ust Mid to
P "
MaH!l SL.T'11 � mu that
emi� K , �u c10 over Vir-
Sn'tr'ha,theCaVaer�ficnse
'erbacVThawn M�" O
tourhdu Moore scored a
heCnto Set Virginia within
Pitc U,dn l hand,e Moore's
trvInJ k� 5� P0101 conversion
ry and the Terrapins secured a
league victory.
�'mAnfr y�u win a footbaii
tZ v�ntCarea�a,nstwhoor
KgUsa eat feeling Mary-
land first-year coach Bob Krivak
S? ,T Wcre a ,ot of things
hat could have happened, but
they didn't
Moore took the blame for the
potched conversion attempt, but
ne said he wasn't too sure it would
have worked anyway.
"It was a bad connection on the
toss he said. "I'm not so sure it
would have worked if there'd
been no fumble. Our tight end
was supposd to seal their defen-
sive end, but it didn't happen
The Cavaliers dropped to 0-2
and Maryland evened its record
H I-I,
Elsewhere, No. 10 Clemson
stopped Virginia Tech 22-10
Duke defeated Northwestern 31-
16, Georgia Tech crushed The
Citadel 51-12 and Wake Forest
registered a 24-0 shutout of
Richmond.
North Carolina took a 28-0
whipping from No. 1 Oklahoma
and North Carolina State was
downed 34-0by No. 18 Pittsburgh.
After a first half in which Coach
Danny Ford perceived his offense
as sluggish, tailback Wesley
McFadden rushed for two touch-
downs in the second half to raise
Clemson's record to 2-0. Ford's
concern stemmed from the
offense's failure to conert two in-
terceptions in Virginia Tech terri-
tory into touchdowns.
Those turnovers led to a pair of
David Treadwell field goals.
"Needless to say, our offense
has got to get better Ford said.
"We had good field position early
in the game, and we don't come
out with except six points
Duke's "Airball" promotion in
1987 has given quarterback Steve
Slayden some impressive num-
bers. Against Northwestern, he
was 18 of 35 for 269 yards, al-
though he was intercepted four
times. In the first half alone,
Slayden was 15 of 28 for 295 yards,
figures which led first-year coah
Steve Spurrier to observe that the
Duke offense could have pro-
duced more.
"It was a wild and crazy game
with both teams having opportu-
nities to score a lot of points
Spurrier said. "Our defensive
guys hung in there and kept them
out of the end zone . . . That was
probably the key to the ball
game
When the ball wasn't in the air,
Roger Boone carried it 19 times for
117 yards and a touchdown as
Duke climbed tc 2-0.
Rick Strom passed for three
touchdowns and 317yardstogive
Ross his initial triumph as succes-
sor to Bill Curry. Strom threw a
49-yard touchdown pass to Mal-
colm King, a 34-yarder to Greg
Lester and a 48-yard scoring pass
to Robert Massey.
Darryl McCill rushed 28 times
for 129 yards and one touchdown
for Wake Forest. The rains might
have been as much to blame as
Dooley's traditional conservative
offensive approach for Wake
Forest's relatively low output. But
Ricnmond contributed to the
Wake Forest victory by commit-
ting II mistakes, four of which led
to Demon Deacon scores.
"This was not pretty, but 111
take 'em every time, " Dooley
said. "Defensively, we couldn't
have asked for more. They played
well all night
Georgia Tech was the last team
to shut out the Tar Heels, that in a
31-0 defeat in 1985. Jamelle
Holieway did the damage this
time for Oklahoma, rushing for
170 yards and scoring all four
Sooner touchdowns. Holieway
Gamecocks roll to
second win in a row
COLUMBIA, S.C (AP) - South
Carolina has swallowd its two-
game appetizer whole. Now the
Gamecocks, who before the sea-
son talked of winning the national
championship, will find out
whether they can eat with the big
boys or choke in trying.
South Carolina opened the year
with a 27-3 victory over Appala-
chian State and followed that Sat-
urday evening with a 31-6
triumph over Western Carolina.
Both opponents are members of
the NCAA Division 1-AA South-
ern Conference. Not exactly
tough tests for the 1-A independ-
ent Gamecocks.
But the tests are now in the of-
fering.
After taking this week off, the
undefeated Gamecocks are at No.
20 Georgia on Sept. 26 and at sec-
ond-ranked Nebraska the next
week. Any questions about how
good the Gamecocks are should
be answered after those two
games.
"I think wedid what we wanted
in the first two games in a sense,
but well have to work harder
now because we're getting into
the meat of our schedule wide
receiver Danny Smith said.
"We're going to have to work
harder and get better in the next
couple of weeks
Smith did just fine against the
Catamounts. The 6-foot-3, 209-
pound senior hauled in two of
quarterback Todd Ellis' three
touchdown passes on a rainy
night at Williams-Brice Stadium,
where 24 hours earlier Pope John
Paul II spoke during his five-hour
visit to the state capital.
"We just went out there with the
idea of getting the job done he
said. "The touchdowns came off
play action with the defense sag-
ging
Smith caught a 28-yard TD pass
with 4:16 left in the first period to
cap an 11-play, 90-yard drive to
make it 7-0.
After Western Carolina place-
kicker Kirk Roach was wide right
on a 47-yard field goal, South
Carolina then drove 70 yards on
eight plays to up its lead to 14-0
when Smith leaped high to grab a
23-yard TD pass from Ellis with
4:40 left in the half.
Moments later, tailback Carlton
Terry fumbled after being hit by
South Carolina linebacker Der-
rick Little. End Shed Diggs recov-
ered at the Catamount 40.
Two plays later, Ellis tossed a
37-yard TD pass to wingback Ster-
ling Sharpe with 1:46 to go.
Sharpe has now caught at least
one pass in 24 straight games.
Fred Zeigler holds the record of 29
from 1967 to 1969.
Ellis completed 17 of 34 passes
for 245 yards but also had four
passes intercepted. Ellis has now
thrown for more than 200 yards is
all but one of the 13 games he's
started, but he felt his perform-
ance was not what it should be.
"I'm not particularly happy
Ellis said. "I need to learn to relax
more. My passes were not that
crisp
The Catamounts avoided being
shut out when Roach kicked a 32-
yard field goal with 24 seconds
left in the half following an inter-
ception by linebacker Billy Shep-
ard.
South Carolina all but sealed
the victory when Little inter-
cepted a pass by Todd Cottrell on
the first play of the second half
and returned it 22 yards to the
Western Carolina 8. Three plays
later. Green bulled over from 2
yards out for his fourth TD of the
season to give the Gamecocks a
28-3 lead with 13:32 left.
Green finished with a career-
high 104 vards, including 96 in the
first halt. He played sparingly in
the third period and not at all in
the fourth after straining his knee
near the end of the second quar-
ter.
The 6-foot-2, 205-pound so-
phmore, whose best previous
rushing effort was last year
against Virginia when he rushed
for 81 vards, is the first player to
See USC page 21
offered an assessment of his op-
ponents.
"Hey, in my mind. North
CaroJina'satop20teamhesaid.
"They have an OK defendse, but
they just don't have a lot of team
speed. But, man, they will hit you.
They're as physical as Nebraska
and Miami
Prior to the loss at Pittsburgh,
N.C State hadn't been shut out
since a 45-0 whipping at Virginia
in 1984. It was the first shutout for
a Dick Sheridan-coached team
since his 1982 Furman team suf-
fered a 17-0 loss to South Carolina
State in the last game of that sea-
son.
Pitt gained 557 yards total of-
fense, while the Wolfpack picked
up 168, and more than a third of
that came on Bobby Crumpler's
60-yard run in the second quarter.
"They just dominated the
game Sheridan said. "We really
felt like we had a chance to win
coming into the tame. But they
did to us what they wanted. I was
a little surprised that they were as
good as they were
Next week features two confer-
ence games, N.C. State at Wake
Forest and North Carolina at
Georgia Tech. Outside the ACC,
Maryland hosts West Virginia!
DukeisathometoVanderbiltand
Clemson stays in Death Valley to
take on Georgia. Virginia is at
home to Virginia Tech.
SIT BACK,
RELAX
Youve just advertised in aijc �ast (f aroltntan
Buccaneer Babes
Selections
The Athletic Department is selecting outstanding ECU coeds
to assist the coaches in recruiting scholarship athletes:
For more information and interviews
contact the following person:
SUSan GurgailUS, Recruiting Secretary
757-6034
Football
DELTA SIGMA PHI
ONE STEP AHEAD
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DELTA SIGMA PHI FRATERNITY IS AN ORGANIZATION WORTH EXPLORING WINNER OFTHt: uhct ,ht�.
FRATERNITY AWARD FOR THE 16-17 SCHOOL YEAR BY THE KlSSwlrrSSSSSSS
OFFERS ASOLIDBROTHERHOOD.SPORTSANDCHARITY INVOLVEMENTASLLHni SfJS PHI
IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN RUSHING A HUtTON
OPTIONS. THEN COME BY THE DELTA HOUSE. YOU WILL FIND SOfLjxT
WED
P top 1
AF)- For many college football
teams, playing at Michigan and
Fenn State is intimidating and
usually a matter of survival
But both Notre Dame and Ala-
bama flourished in those sur-
roundings on Saturday
Opening their 100th season the
fcth-ranked Fighting lnsh woke
up some echoes with a shockingly
easy 26-7 victory over the nmth-
ranked Wovennes before 106,098
fens at Ann Arbor The 19th-
ranked Crimson Tide, mean
While, scored a 24-13 win o er the
defending national chami
Nittany Lions, rated No. II, while
85,619 looked on at Un'ivesitv
Park
Elsewhere in the Top Ten No 1
Oklahoma beat North Carolina
28-0; No. 2 Nebraska defeated No
3 UCLA 42-33; No. 4 Auburn
routed Kansas 49-0; No S Ohio
State
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Strike de
WASHINGTON (AP) As a
strike deadline approaches, the
National Football League Players
Association and team owners are
still talking tough. But the sides
say they are willing to compro-
mise
Management and the union
planned to meet today in an effort
to work toward replacing the col-
lecbve bargaining agreement that
expired Aug. 31.
NFLPA executive director
� Gene Upshaw said on Friday that,
unless management is willing to
bend, "nothing would be accom-
plished in these meetings
He accused the league's owners
of using a "take it or leave it"
approach to the talks, which
stalled Sept. 3 when the union
insisted on guarantees for its
player representatives. After
reading a proposed contract sub
mitted by management on Mon-
day, the NFLPA on Tuesday set a
strike deadline of Sept. 22
f 'm willing to do anything that
seems reasonable if we can bring
this to a fast conclusion Upshaw
said. "So far, everything I've done
has been met with resistance The
tactic the NFL has undertaken is
plain and simple union-busting
"Compromise is inherent in our
proposal countered Jack
Donlan, chief negotiator for the
Management Council. "One of
the ways to avoid a strike is to ne-
gotiate and we've had continued
difficulty getting the union to the
bargaining table
Etonian said the proposal sub-
mitted by management on Mor-
day came about because of the
union's unwillingness to con-
tinue the talks.
"They left us no choice
Donlan said. "It wasn't take it or
leave it, but a way to stimulate the
intensive bargaining we need to
avoid a strike
510EAST1OTHST.
757-0313
Upshaw said he met with AFL-
QO officials Friday morning to
discuss putting together a plan
that would provide for support of
the union in the event of a walk-
out.
The owners have also made
preparahns for a possible walk-
out. In addition to financial ar-
rangements, management on
Thursday voted unanimously to
continue operations bv using
non-striking players and free
agents in order to field teams.
Upshaw ridiculed the owners'
plan.
"If these guvs are quality play-
ers, why weren't they on the team
m the first place' Upshaw said.
And what will they call the thing
tfceyhold in San Diego at uV end
Of the vear, the Scab Bowl instead
Of the Super Bow�"
Donlan defended the decision.
Tn 1982, a 57-day stn ke had a dev-
astating effect on the NFL he
id- "The players, owners and
ianssuffered No one thinks this is
a perfect solution, but the owners
�re committed to take a new
course to disengage the cycle of a
trtke every time there are nego-
tiations
Upshaw said the course of ne-
gotiations is not entirely centered
uponunion'sdemands for "total"
h�e agency of guarantees for
player representatives.
"Quite candidly, I feel all the
issues are negotiable he said.
Said Donlan, "We can get the
W� done and avoid a strike, but
ing tal
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CXX NCIL, DELTA SIGMA PHI
VS A WHOLE LOT OF PARTIES.
IOUND AND LOCATE YOUR
-Y WORTH EXPERIENCING.
-11:00
757-0313
n IE EAST CAROLINIANSEPTEMBER 15, 1987 19
AP top 10 results for weekend highlighted
(AP) - For many college football
teams, playing at Michigan and
Penn State is intimidating and
usually a matter of survival.
But both Notre Dame and Ala-
bama flourished in those sur-
roundings on Saturday.
Opening their 100th season, the
ihth-ranked Fighting Irish woke
up some echoes with a shockingly
easy 26-7 victory over the ninth-
ranked Woverines before 106,098
tans at Ann Arbor. The 19th-
ranked Crimson Tide, mean-
u hile, scored a 24-13 win over the
defending national champion
Nittany Lions, rated No. 11, while
85,619 looked on at Univesity
Park.
Elsewhere in the Top Ten, No. I
Oklahoma beat North Carolina
28-0; No. 2 Nebraska defeated No.
3 UCLA 42-33; No. 4 Auburn
routed Kansas 49-0; No. 5 Ohio
State beat West Virginia 24-3; No.
6 Louisiana State downed Fuller-
ton State 56-12; No. 8 Florida State
defeated East Carolina 44-3; and
No. lOClemson beat Virginia Tech
22-10.
In the Second Ten, No. 12 Wash-
ington stopped Purdue 28-10; No.
13 Arkansas trimmed Mississippi
31-10; No. 14 Tennessee beat Mis-
sissippi State 38-10; No. 15
Arizona State topped IlIinois21-7;
No. 18 Pittsburgh defeated North
Carolina State 34-0, and No. 20
Georgia beat Oregon State 41-7.
Quarterback Terry Andrysiak
was the big man for Norte Dame,
completing II of 15 passes for 137
yards, including an 11-yard touch-
down toss to flanker Tim Brown.
Notre Dame's victory avenged
a 24-23 loss to Michigan last year
in South Bend.
The Wolverines turned the ball
over seven times, the most since
losing the ball seven times to
Minnesota in 1960.
The victory gave a starting
boost to the Irish, a longtime
power trying to reverse last
season's disappointing 5-6 rec-
ord. It was the first opening home
loss for Coach Bo Schembechler
since he took over the Wolverines
in 1969, breaking a 17-0-1 string.
At University Park, Bobby
Humphrey rushed 36 times for
220 yards, scored on a 73-yard run
and set up another score by
throwing a 57-yard pass to lead
Alabama over penn State.
The defeat was the first in 23
regular-season games for Penn
State and snapped the Nittany
Lions' I3-game winning streak.
Humphrey's 73-yard run got
the Crimson Tide off to a 7-0 lead
Strike deadline nears
WASHINGTON (AP) As a
strike deadline approaches, the
National Football League Players
Association and team owners are
still talking tough. But the sides
say they are willing to compro-
mise.
Management and the union
planned to meet today in an effort
to work toward replacing the col-
lective bargaining agreement that
expired Aug. 31.
NFLTA executive director
Gene Upshaw said on Friday that,
unless management is willing to
bend, "nothing would be accom-
plished in these meetings
He accused the league's owners
of using a "take it or leave it"
approach to the talks, which
stalled Sept. 3 when the union
insisted on guarantees for its
player representatives. After
reading a proposed contract sub-
mitted by management on Mon-
day, the NFLPA on Tuesday set a
strike deadline of Sept. 22.
Vm willing to do anything that
seems reasonable if we can bring
this to a fast conclusion Upshaw
said. "So far, everything I've done
has been met with resistance. The
tactic the NFL has undertaken is
plain and simple union-busting
"Compromise is inherent in our
proposal countered Jack
Donlan, chief negotiator for the
Management Council. "One of
the ways to avoid a strike is to ne-
gotiate and we've had continued
difficulty getting the union to the
bargaining table
Donlan said the proposal sub-
mitted by management on Mon-
day came about because of the
union's unwillingness to con-
tinue the talks.
"They left us no choice
Donlan said. "It wasn't take it or
leave it, but a way to stimulate the
intensive bargaining we need to
avoid a strike
Upshaw said he met with AFL-
C iO officials Friday morning to
discuss putting together a plan
that would provide for support of
the union in the event of a walk-
out.
The owners have also made
preparatins for a possible walk-
out. In addition to financial ar-
rangements, management on
Thursday voted unanimously to
continue operations by using
non-striking players and free
agents in order to field teams.
Upshaw ridiculed the owners'
plan.
"If these guys are quality play-
ers, why weren't they on the team
in the first place Upshaw said.
"And what will they call the thing
they hold in San Diego at the end
of the year, the Scab Bowl instead
of the Super Bowir
Donlan defended the decision.
"In 1982, a 57-day strike had a dev-
astating effect on the NFL he
said. "The players, owners and
fans suffered. No one thinks this is
a perfect solution, but the owners
are committed to take a new
course to disengage the cycle of a
strike every time there are nego-
tiations
Upshaw said the course of ne-
gotiations is not entirely centered
upon union's demands for "total"
free agency of guarantees for
player representatives.
"Quite candidly, I feel all the
issues are negotiable he said.
Said Donlan, "We can get the
job done and avoid a strike, but
only if we get back to the bargain- the issues. But he claimed nothing
ing table would be accomplished unless
Upshaw, too, said he was anx- the owners become more sympa-
ious to get back to talking about thetic to the union's cause.
�"$$$
s
Whin you fill out your Form W-4 or W-4A,
"Employee's Withholding Allowance Certificate
remember:
If you can he claimed on your parent1! or another
person's tax return, you generally cannot be exempt
from income tax withholding. To get it right,
read the instructions that came with your Form
W-4orW-4A.
ECU HILLEL WELCOME YOU!
ATTENTION JEWISH STUDENTS
PLEASE ATTEND OUR OPENING
GET-TOGETHER
MEETGREETEAT
at �
1420 E. 14th St.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17
8:15 p.m.
Call 830-1138 for infodirectionsrideetc.
1W
Pencflier
$1.89
Whatev- he assiffunent. Pilot has the formula
for writing comfort and precision.
Pilot's Better Ball Point Pen. in medium and fine points,
lets you breeze through long note-taking sessions Infect
we've made writer's fatigue a thmg of the past' This crystal barreled
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throw it out because it's refillable.
The perfect teammate to the Better Ball Point Pen is Pilot's
Pencilier 0.5mm mechanical pencil. It has a continuous lead feed
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the ribbed grip offers the same comfort as the Better Ball Point Pen.
Pick up the Pilot Team at your campus r ��
bookstore todayThe Better Ball Dlf"YT
Point Pen and The Pencilier. LrlfcWl
STUDENT ST
Wright Building
Owned and Operated by East Carolina University.
in the first period and they never
lost the lead.
No. 1 Oklahoma 28, North
Carolina Ch
Quarterback Jamelle Holieway
scored four touchdowns and
rushed for 170 yards to lead Okla-
homa to its second victory in two
decisions. The Sooners broke the
game open with 21 points in the
second quarter after a scoreless
first period.
No. 2 Nebraska 42, No. 3 UCLA
33:
Steve Taylor threw five touch-
down passes to set a Nebraska
record and match the Big Eight
record set by Ralph Miller of
Kansas against Washburn in 1938.
Miller is currently the basketball
coach at Oregon State.
The Cornhuskers managed to
overcome four fumbles and an off
day by their running game to beat
the Bruins.
No. 4 Auburn 49, Kansas 0:
Quarterback Jeff Burger passed
for 185 yards and two touchdowns
to lead Auburn over Kansas. The
Tigers scored the first three times
they had the ball.
No. 5 Ohio St. 24, West Vir-
ginia 3:
Ohio State, which led 10-0 2:18
into the game, forced eight turn-
overs, including three intercep-
tions by William White and two
by Chris Spielman. White raced
29 yards with one intereption.
No. 6 LSU 56, Fullerton St. 12:
Quarterback Tom Hodson
passed for 230 yards and three
touchdowns for LSU. Stan Lam-
bert accounted for all of Fullerton
State's scoring with field goals of
49, 42, 41, and 32 yards.
No. 8 Florida St. 44, East Caro-
lina 3:
Sammie Smith rushed for 244
yards and scored on an 83-yard
run to lead the Seminoles. He
gained 166 yards in the second
quarter alone. Smith's rushing
total was exceeded only by Greg
Allen's school record of 322 set in
1981 against Western Carolina.
No. 10 Clemson 22, Virginia
Tech 10:
Wesley McFadden rushed 21
times for 226 yards, including
touchdown runs of 89 and 44
yards for Clemson. Frank Bcamer
suffered his first defeat as Vir-
ginia Tech coach.
Get Ready For
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20
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMRFB 15,1987
SMU
DALLAS, TX (CPS) Two
weeks after taking office, the new
president of Southern Methodist
University finally talked about
the sports scandals that have
made SMU into a synonym for all
of what's wrong with intercolle-
giate athletics.
The scandal, president A. Ken-
neth Pye said Aug. 29, has as
much to do with education at
SMU "as what's happening in the
Persian Gulf
Pye, who observers thought
would announce dramatic new
athletic reforms, spoke during a
dark time in college sports.
About the time Pye assumed
office, the National Collegiate
Athletic Association (NCAA)
suspended athletes from Ohio
State, Pittsburgh and Alabama for
allegedly taking money from
sports agents.
During the last several years,
athletes have been involved in a
semingly endless string of drug
problems, crimes, classroom
cheating, transcript fixings and
other unsavory incidents.
In response, the American
council on Education (ACE) or-
ganized a group of college presi-
dents to work for reform, and
several states � Ohio, Michigan,
California and, last week, Texas
� have passd laws to punish
sports agents and campus sports
boosters who violate NCAA
rules.
More aminously for campus
sports, in July a Media General-
Associated Press poll found that
half of all Americans believe in-
tercollegiate athletics are "over-
emphasized" in U.S. education.
"College graduates were far
more likely to say that sports are
overemphasized in college than
those with less of an education
said Media General researcher
Dorothy Cook of the poll of 1,304
adults.
"What the public is demand-
ing observed Sheldon Steinbach
of the ACE, "is more stringent
rules, and most schools are re-
sponding on their own
Steinbach cited Virginia Tech,
which this summer passed tough
new regulations of athletes' and
boosters' behavior after being
punishccLior violating NCAA
recruiting rules, as setting a valu-
able new standard for campus
rules.
"College sports are definitely
moving toward more regula-
tions added Marc Dreyfors of
the Institute for Trends Research
in Wilmington, N.C.
Nothing � not the June, 1986,
cocaine-related death of Univer-
sity of Maryland basketball star
Len Bias, the revelations that sev-
eral Georgia athletes were given
special academic treatment or the
firing of a New Mexico coach for
altering some athletes' transcripts
� semcdtosourpublicopinionas
much as the SMU scandal.
"Public reaction to the SMU
scandal Dreyfors said, "was
very important
Last year, the NCAA found
SMU boosters gave $61,000 in il-
licit payments to 13 football play-
ers, "loaned" them cars and apart-
ments, and then tried to cover it all
up.
TexasGov. Bill Clements, more-
over, appartently knew about and
approved the payments while he
served on SMU's Board of Gover-
nors.
The NCAA, in turn, imposed a
"death penalty" on the school,
barring it from playing football
this year and most of 1988.
"Yes said SMU athletic de-
partment spokesman Paul Rid-
ings, "we're hopeful that past
mistakes won't be repeated.
There will be no spec 1 admis-
sions for any athlete who does not
meet SMU's requirements, and
there will be no more payments
Still, observers were waiting
anxiously to hear what Pye � a
Duke professor who took the
SMU job after the scandal forced
out former SMU president, L.
Donald Shields, as well as SMU's
football coach and athletic direc-
tor in the last year � would do
IMAGINE
THAT!
about sports.
His answer in his Aug. 29
speech to SMU's freshmen: essen-
tially ignore the past offenses.
Pye made a "plea for assis-
tance" to SMU freshmen to help
recruit promising athletes for
SMU from their old high schools,
a switch from the high-pressure
recruiting of high school seniors
by boosters.
Pye also promised he will soon
unveil a 10-point program for im- I f
proving academics at the school. '
I
I
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Come join us Thursday
Sept. 17th from
8-11 p.m.
at 2401 East Third
Street Apt. D
1595
For a ride or info call:
752-3682 or 830-0524
Buccaneer
East Carolina University's
Yearbook
is looking for a few good staff
members with experience in
Writing & Photography
Applications can be picked up at the
Buccaneer Office, located on the 2nd
floor in the Publication's Building.
' 4. �
doiiL ior
to rush
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4. We check and fill transmission fluid!
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HOURS:
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So� 7 30 am 'til 5:00 p.m
"East Carolina's Answer
To The Oil Change Problem
126 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville
(Across from Golden
Corral Steak House)
tues
wed
-pizza&subs
�oysters on the 1
91
illiams pacel
(AP) - Doug Williams, u he
onc snap from center in an NFL
game last year, dis over : that
being a backup quarter:
have its rewards
"It was great to be in coi trol"
Williams said after t. � two
touchdown passes as the ashin-
gotn Redskins defeated the
delphia Eagles 4 . ; Sin ij "it
w-as the same old f . ,t lt
I used to be
Jay Schroeder, who played all
but one offensive down U r the Re-
dskins in 1986, played only the
first five minutes t the season
opener bef re leavii g with a
sprained n; � : -
Williams
ious trade queries during th
season from tear okmg for a
starting quarl rback,
complete 17 of 27 passes
(yards, including a (ring :
39 and 6 yards to '�� � t
In other NFL op
New Yorkjel
i Orleans 2i
ton 2 Los
Icinnati 23, Ind
England 28 Miarr
City .
30, San Francisco 17
48, Atlanta 10;Sl
13; Minnesota 34
Angeles Raider I
and Denver 4
Eight ot the T :
sa w I
handshake
dravvme k
strike dtai
agreement
Mat
tie.
tO V � t
SC triumph
Continued from page 18
jgo over 100 yard- iince
Smith had 145 yards i
jSouth Carolina- 45 24 ricton
lover Western Carolina.
Roach kicked a 28-yard
Igoal with 4:4b left in I
period for the Catamounts
points before 66,653 - about 6
more than saw the pope Friday
night at the 72,400-seat stadium.
f
Freshman Col! n Mackie kicked
a 47-yard field goal with 555
!remaining for the final points of
! the game.
The loss was Western
We
Can
5 7-1367AXA
�mwil
mmmmm





mtmmm
��������������
Little Sister Rush
.v join us Thursday
;ept. 17th from
8 - 11 p.m.
I 2401 East Third
Street Apt. D
EO
1595
ror a ride or info call:
52 3682 or 830-0524
PRETTY
GIRLS - -
CHI-ALP
�pizza&subs
oysters on the 1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15, 1987
21
Williams paces Redskin rally
IAD - Doug Williams, who took
one snap from center in an NFL
came last year, discovered that
king a backup quarterback can
have its rewards.
"It was great to be in control
Williams said after throwing two
touchdown passes as the Washin-
gotn Redskins defeated the Phila-
delphia Eagles 34-24 Sunday. "It
was the same old feeling that it
used to be
lay Schroeder, who played all
bul one offensive down for the Re-
dskins in 1986, played only the
first five minutes of the season
opener before leaving with a
sprained right shoulder.
Williams, the subject of numer-
ous trade queries during the off-
season from teams looking for a
starting quarterback, came in to
complete 17 of 27 passes for 272
ards, including scoring plays of
39 and 6 yards to Art Monk.
In other NFL openers, it was the
New York lets 31, Buffalo 28; New
Orleans 28. Cleveland 21; Hous-
ton 20, Los Angeles Rams 16; Cin-
rtnati 23, Indianapolis 21; New
eland 28, Miami 21; Kansas
ry 20, San Diego 13; Pittsburgh
. San Francisco 17; Tampa Bay
IS Atlanta 10; St. Louis 24, Dallas
� Minnesota 34, Detroit 14; Los
r.geles Raiders 20, Green Bay 0;
1 Denver40, Seattle 17.
Eight ot the 13 openers Sunday
saw players exchange solidarity
handshakes before the game,
drawing loud boos from fans in
some cities.
The players union has set a
strike deadline of Sept. 22 if no
agreement is reached in contract
negotiations with the owners.
The Redskins snapped a 24-24
tie on the first play of fourth quar-
ter when Williams passed 39 yards
to Monk.
Williams had two other long
passes to set u p a field goal and an-
other touchdown.
Buccaneers 48, Falcons 10:
Steve DeBerg, who threw seven
interceptions in the first game of
the 1986 season when Tampa Bay
was 2-14 for the second straight
year, passed for 333 yards and a
team-record five touchdowns in
the Buccaneers rout of Atlanta.
DeBerg, who completed 24 of 34
passes and was intercepted only
once, directed first-half scoring
drivesof91,76and80yardsbefore
Rick Woods returned an intercep-
tion 42 yards to set up Tampa
Bay's fourth touchdown.
Steelers30, 49ers 17:
Pittsburgh shut down San
Francisco's running game and
intercepted three passes by Joe
Montana.
Rookie cornerback Delton I all
gave Steelers the lead with a 50-
vard fumble recovery return in the
USC triumphs
Continued from page 18
I go over 100 yards since Anthony
: Smith had 145 yards a year ago in
�South Carolina's 45-24 victory
. over Western Carolina.
Roach kicked a 28-yard held
goal with 4:46 left in the third
(period for the Catamounts' other
points before 66,653 - about 6,000
more than saw the pope Friday
night at the 72,400-seat stadium
Freshman CollinMackie kicked
a 47-yard field goal with 555
remaining for the final points of
the game.
The loss was Western
Carolina's second in a row to a
South Carolina team. Last week,
the Catamounts lost to Clemson
43-0. But Coach Bob Waters isn't
going to get into comparing the
two bitter rivals.
They are two good football
teams Waters said. "They are
totally different teams
As for his team, Waters said he
felt the score didn't indicate how
the Catamounts played.
"I saw some good things and
some positive things he said.
"We could have folded at the half.
We were outmanned, and South
Carolina has some very good
football players
first quarter. Mark Malone, who
completed just nine of 33 passes,
made it 14-3 in the second period
with a 2-yard scoring toss to
Preston Gothard.
Monatana completed 34 of 49
passes for 316 yards, but the 49ers
managed only 47 yards rushing.
Cardinals 24, Cowboys 13:
St. Louis, stifled by the Dallas
defense for 58 minutes, scored
three touchdowns in the final two
minutes to win its first home
opener in 12 years.
Neil Lomax found Roy Green
for 16 - and 22 - yard touchdown
passes in a span of 65 seconds to
give the Cardinals a 17-13 lead,
and Earl Ferrell ran 15 yards for
the clinching score with 19 sec-
onds left.
It was only the second loss in 23
season openers for the Cowboys.
Patriots 28, Dolphins 21:
New England beat Miami with
the help of a two-touchdown burst
in a 50-sccond span of the third
quarter.
Tony Collins' 7-yard run, his
second touchdown of the game,
tied the score 21-21. Then Dan
Marino threw a short pass to Bruce
Hardy, who deflected the ball into
the hands of Ronnie Lippett, and
he ran 20 yards untouched to his
first NFL touchdown with 7:52 left
in the third period.
Marino, who missed most of the
preseason with a dislocated fin-
ger, threw three scoring passes
before leaving with an eye injury
with 2:22 left in the game. Bachup
quarterback Don Stroch led the
Doplhins to the Patriots' 3-yard
line with five seconds left, but his
pass into the end zone was incom-
plete.
Oilers 20, Rams 16:
Houston scored 17 points in the
final 7:28 to beat Los Angeles.
The Rams had a 16-3 lead before
Warren Moon passed 3 yards to
Jamie Williams, then added a 59-
yarder to Ernest Givins, who
caught a short pass over the
middle and sprinted to the end
zone with 2:59 left, giving Hous-
ton its first lead, 17-16.
� CLIP-N-SAVE THIS MENU
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321 East 10th Street (next to Wendy's)
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6:00-11:00 p.m.
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res 9-22-87
RUSH
Tau Kappa Epsilon
THE
Subs & � Tuesday
TKE RUSH Wednesday (Third Night)
Rush times 7:00-11:00
$
951 E. 10th Street
For more
information
757-3042
,5 7-1367AXA

F
i

.�wf





���������������
ittle Sister Rush
? join us Thursday
opt. 17th from
8-11 p.m.
t 2401 East Third
Street Apt. D
r
1593
For a ride or info call:
52 3682 or 830-0524
PRETTY
GIRLS
MHIALP
fjizza&subs
oysters on the 1
Tj IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15.1987
21
Williams paces Redskin rally
IAP) - Doug Williams, who took
one snap from center in an NFL
game last year, discovered that
being a backup quarterback can
have its rewards.
"It was great to be in control
Williams said after throwing two
touchdown passes as the Washin-
gotn Redskins defeated the Phila-
delphia Eagles 34-24 Sunday. "It
was the same old feeling that it
used to be
ay Schroeder, who played all
but one offensive down for the Re-
dskins in 1986, played only the
first five minutes o( the season
opener before leaving with a
sprained right shoulder.
Williams, the subject of numer-
ous trade queries during the off-
season from teams looking for a
starting quarterback, came in to
complete 17 of 27 passes for 272
ards, including scoring plays of
39 and 6 yards to Art Monk.
In other NFL openers, it was the
New York lets 31, Buffalo 28; New
Orleans 28, Cleveland 21; Hous-
ton 20, Los Angeles Rams 16;Cin-
nnati 23, Indianapolis 21; New
igland 28, Miami 21; Kansas
:v 20, San Diego 13; Pittsburgh
San Francisco 17; Tampa Bay
IS Atlanta 10; St. Louis 24, Dallas
� Minnesota 34, Detroit 19; Los
' ngeles Raiders 20, Green Bay 0;
i ind Denver 40, Seattle 17.
Eight ot the 13 openers Sunday
saw players exchange solidarity
handshakes before the game,
drawing loud boos from fans in
some cities.
The players union has set a
strike deadline of Sept. 22 if no
agreement is reached in contract
negotiations with the owners.
The Redskins snapped a 24-24
tie on the first play of fourth quar-
ter when Williams passed 39 yards
to Monk.
Williams had two other long
passes to set up a field goal and an-
other touchdown.
Buccaneers 48, Falcons 10:
Steve DeBerg, who threw seven
interceptions in the first game of
the 1986 season when Tampa Bay
was 2-14 for the second straight
year, passed for 333 yards and a
team-record five touchdowns in
the Buccaneers rout of Atlanta.
DeBerg, who completed 24 of 34
passes and was intercepted only
once, directed first-half scoring
drivesof91,76and80yardsbefore
Rick Woods returned an intercep-
tion 42 yards to set up Tampa
Bay's fourth touchdown.
Steelers 30, 49ers 17:
Pittsburgh shut down San
Francisco's running game and
intercepted three passes by Joe
Montana.
Rookie cornerback Delton Hall
gave Steelers the lead with a 50-
yard fumble recovery return in the
USC triumphs
Continued from page 18
go over 100 vards since Anthony
Smith had 145 yards a year ago in
South Carolina's 45-24 victory
k vet Western Carolina.
Roach kicked a 28-yard field
� coal with 4:4b left in the third
'period for the Catamounts' other
points before 66,653 - about 6,000
more than saw the pope Friday
night at the 72,400-scat stadium
Freshman Collin Mackie kicked
a 47-yard field goal with 5 55
remaining for the final points of
the game.
The loss was Western
Carolina's second in a row to a
South Carolina team. Last week,
the Catamounts lost to Clemson
43-0. But Coach Bob Waters isn't
going to get into comparing the
two bitter rivals.
"They are two good football
teams Waters said. "They are
totally different teams
As for his team, Waters said he
felt the score didn't indicate how
the Catamounts played.
"I saw some good things and
some positive things he said.
"We could have folded at the half.
We were outmanned, and South
Carolina has some very good
football players
first quarter. Mark Malone, who
completed just nine of 33 passes,
made it 14-3 in the second period
with a 2-yard scoring toss to
Preston Gothard.
Monatana completed 34 of 49
passes for 316 yards, but the 49ers
managed only 47 yards rushing.
Cardinals 24, Cowboys 13:
St. Louis, stifled by the Dallas
defense for 58 minutes, scored
three touchdowns in the final two
minutes to win its first home
opener in 12 years.
Neil Lomax found Roy Green
for 16 - and 22 - yard touchdown
passes in a span of 65 seconds to
give the Cardinals a 17-13 lead,
and Earl Ferrell ran 15 yards for
the clinching score with 19 sec-
onds left.
It was only the second loss in 23
season openers for the Cowboys.
Patriots 28, Dolphins 21:
New England beat Miami with
the help of a two-touchdown burst
in a 50-sccond span of the third
quarter.
Tony Collins' 7-yard run, his
second touchdown of the game,
tied the score 21-21. Then Dan
Marino threw a short pass to Bruce
Hardy, who deflected the ball into
the hands of Ronnie Lippett, and
he ran 20 yards untouched to his
first NFL touchdown with 7:52 left
in the third period.
Marino, who missed most of the
preseason with a dislocated fin-
ger, threw three scoring passes
before leaving with an eye injury
with 2:22 left in the game. Bachup
quarterback Don Stroch led the
Doplhins to the Patriots' 3-yard
line with five seconds left, but his
pass into the end zone was incom-
plete.
Oilers 20, Rams 16:
Houston scored 17 points in the
final 7.28 to beat Los Angeles.
The Ram had a 16-3 lead before
Warren Moon passed 3 yards to
Jamie Williams, then added a 59-
yarder to Ernest Givins, who
caught a short pass over the
middle and sprinted to the end
zone with 2:59 left, giving Hous-
ton its first lead, 17-16.
I � CLIP-N-SAVE THIS MENU
Hank's

Homemade Ice Cream
321 East 10th Street (next to Wendy's)
VOTED The BEST ICE CREAM in the USA
CALL
758-0000
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22
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 15,1987
THE DEPARTMENT OF INTRAMURAL - RECREATIONAL SERVICES
(Paid advertisement)
Ine Department of Intramural-Recreational Services offers a wide variety of services and programs for faculty, staff and students of East Carolina
University. These programs include: intramural sports, club sports, informal recreation, aerobicfitness classes, physical fitness activities, outdoor recreation
equipment rentals and trips plus an equipment check out centerWhere fun is 1 tells the story of recreational services around the East Carolina campus
and serves as the motto for the Department of Intramural-Recreational Services. Become familiar with the program and participate rather than spectate. For
more information regarding the Department, drop by room 204 Memorial Gym or call 757-6387.
SEPTEMBER SPORT SPECTACULAR
The Intramural Sport fall pro-
Igram started with a bang in 1987
as over 125 teams registered for the
lever popular flag football raee for
the all eampus title Pollsters have
I chosen the following squads as this
I years teams to beat in both the
1 men's and women's A and B divi-
sions:
I florae's Qttaoi MflosDastfln.
Enforces 1 Funk Brothers
2. P: Kappa K man 2 MnwauKees Best
I 3 Alpha Phi 3 Lake Boys
4 ROT-Cee t Sigma Phi Epsrton
The gridiron action will continue
I through the month on locations adja-
jcent to Ficklon Stadium. The powcr-
I ful Pirates in purple and gold will not
I be the only pigskin powers on cam-
pus this year. Action starts daily at
3:00 p.m. and will continue through-
out the evening.
Intramural co-rec Softball will be
in full swing Monday, September 16
as fourteen teams take to the dia-
monds in search of Intramural gold.
The top three teams in the co-rec pre
season poll are as follows:
1. The Executioner's
2. The Fried City Gang
3. The Naturals
Games will be played on the Allied
Health Fields Monday through
Wednesday from 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Come out and catch the mixed slug-
gers in action.
HowDo I
-find the Intramural-Recreational Services Offices?
The main office of the Department of Intramural Recreational Services
is located in 204 Memorial Gymnasium, and is open Monday Friday
from 8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. Memorial Gymnasium is located on 10th
Street, adjacent to the Drewster Building.
-know when the recreation facilities are open?
Call Intra Action, 757-6562, for around the clock information on
facility availability and operational hours; or stop by our office to pick
up a pocket calendar that indicates the hours for each facility.
-use the weight rooms?
Bring your validated East Carolina University ID card to either Memo
rial Gymnasium or Minges Coliseum weight rooms during scheduled
informal recreation hours.
-join an intramural team?
Check the pocket calendar for registration dates, gather up your
friends to form a team, or come by the office to be placed on an
existing team.
-swim at the pools?
Present you validated East Carolina University ID card to the life-
guards at either Memorial pool or Minges pool during scheduled
informal recreation hours.
-reserve a racquetball court?
Call 757-691 1, or sign up in person at the Memorial Gymnasium
Equipment Room. Courts may be reserved in person from 1 1:30 a.m.
3:00 p.m. and by phone from 12 noon - 3:00 p.m.
-join an aerobics class?
Either sign up in advance in room 204 Memorial Gymnasium during
registration dates or bring your validated East Carolina University ID
card, plus one dollar, to any scheduled class.
-check out sports equipment?
Come over to the Equipment Room, located in room 1 15 Memorial
Gymnasium, and bring your validated East Carolina University ID
card.
-join an East Carolina University Club Sport?
Call 757-6387 for specific information related to the Club Sport that
interests you. or come by the office for additional information.
-join the Pepsi Physical Fitness Club or Aerobics Challenge Program?
Stop by our office to register for the program(s) and set your goals for
walking, running, swimming or cycling. Upon completion of your goal.
you will receive the appropriate award
�apply for a job with the Department of Intramural-Recreational Services?
Come by 204 Memorial Ovmnasium on weekdays between 8:00 a.m.
and 5:00 p.m. and complete an application form
-get permission for spouses and or dependents to use the facilities?
Mendenhall Student Center makes photo ID cards This ID card will
entitle your spouse or dependent to use the University recreational
facilities.
-have fun and avoid boredom?
Become involved in one or more of the many varied programs offered
by the Department of Intramural Recreational Services.
East Carolina University
Department of Intramural-Recreational Services
Division of Intramural Sports
Fall 1987 Calendar
EventRegistrationMeeting
Co-Rec Almost
Anything Goes083111 AM-6 PMMG104-A
Flag Football090811 AM-6 PMMG104-A
'Co-Rec Softball09085 PMBrewD-103
'Tennis Singles09095 PMBrewD-103
Co-Rec Cageball09'236 PMBrew D-103
Home Run Derby09303:30-6 PMVarsity Fid.
'Racquetball Singles09305 PMBrewD-103
'Co-Rec Water Basketball10076 PMBrewD-103
l-On-1 Basketball10077 PMBrew D-103
'Swim Meet10087 PMBio 102
Challenge Day101411 AM-6 PMMG 104-A
Volleyball102111 AM-6 PMMG 104-A
Soccer102111 AM-6 PMMG 104-A
Co-Rec Football10287 PMBrewD-103
Bowling102811 AM-6 PMMG 104-A
Co-Rec Basketball10'288 PMBrewD-103
3-0n-3 Basketball11046 PMBrewD-103
'Turkey Trot11186 PMBrewD-103
'Indoor Soccer11246 PMBrewD-103
Officials Clinics
0901
0908
8 PM
6 PM
1008 8 PM
10128 PM
10126 PM
10278 PM
10298 PM
11058 PM
Registration and Attendance at Team Captains Meetings are Mandatory!
�Registration at these meeting is required to ensure participation.
"Call 757-6387 for specific information.
Intramural-Recreational Representatives Meeting - Tuesday. September 22, 5 PM, Bio 102
Activity
Canoe Trip
Sailing
Kayaking Clinic
Bike Hike
Registration
98-915
914-921
914-921
914-921
Almost Anything Goes
The Outdoor Recreation Center is
open Monday & Friday, 1:30-5:30
p.m Tuesday & Thursday, 3:30
p.m5:30 p.m.
You've seen it on billboards plas-
tered around campus.you've heard it
in the news, you've wondered what it
is! Well, it's finally here - Intramural
Almost Anything Goes will be held
Thursday, September 17 at the hot-
ton of College Hill. Still not .sure what
it's all about? Well, here's a brief
outlook of the events taking place
from 3:00-7.00 p.m.
Bud Light "All American" -Six
menwomen players race to the fin-
ish in what some may call an unusual
fall wardrobe.
Big Bad Bud Relay - Care to look
like a fool in front of over 200 specta-
tors? Participants can't afTord not to.
Thread the Needle - You can be
tied together with three men and
women of your choice. Only campus
heels and hearty souls need apply.
Fill-er Up - Participants cups will
runneth over with laughter and a
little of the wet stuff.
And the Keg Rolls On - And you
thought you were disoriented after
the football game Saturday night!
Ol'McMurala Had a Farm-
Watch participants crack up in this
animal farm event.
Still confused? Find out all you
missed aflerthe event, or take part in
this years Almost Anything Goes
sponsored by Bud LightJeffrey's
Beer and Wine. All participants will
receive a FREE t-shirt while first
through fourth place finishers will
receive individual trophies. All the
action and hilarity begins this Thurs-
day at the bottom of College Hill.
Intramural
Where Fun
ls1
oiptarufur
CO-REC CAGEBALL
REGISTRATION
Stpttmb' 23
6 OOp m
Brtmster O- fOJ
V

fOH K"w�f !f-ft'ATioN CALL. ?sr-6387
Informal Recreation
Memorial Gymnasium
Equipment Check-out
MonFri.
MonFri.
Fri.
Sat
Sun
MonThun.
Fri.
Sat.
12.00 noon-1:30 p.m
4:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
11:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
1200 noon- 5:00 p.m
Memorial Gym 115
Mon.Thurt.
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
10:00 a.m. -9:00 p.m.
10:00 a.m. -7:00 p.m.
11:00 a.m. -6:00 p.m.
12:00 noon- 5:00 p.m.
Weight Baami
Memorial
Minges
10:00 am -9:00 pm
10:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m
11:00 a m. - 5:00 p.m
MonThuri
Fri.
Sun.
3:00 p.m. -9-00 p.m
3:00 pm. -7:00 p.m.
12:00 noorfcOO p.m.
Sun.
12:00 noon- 5 00 p.m
Swimming Pools
Memorial
Minges
8:00 p.m. -10:00 p.m.
12:00 noon- 6:00 p.m.
MonFri. 7:00 a.m. - 8.00 a.m. MonWedFri.
MonFri. 12:00 noon -1 30 p m Sun.
Monk Wed. 3:00 p m. � 9.00 p.m.
Tu� A Thure 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
6:30 p.m. - 9:00 p m.
Fri. 3:00 p.m. - 7:00p.m.
Sat. 11.00 a.m. . 5-00 p.m.
Racouethnll Courts
Keaervationa can be made in perton at 115 Memorial Gym or by calling 757-6911. Court reeervationa are
made one day in advance Monday-Thursday. Reeervationa are made on Friday for Saturday, Sunday and
Monday. CourU may be reeerved in perton from 11:30 a.m. � 3:00 p.m. and 12 noon - 3:00 p.m. by phone.
For Physical
Fitness Fanatics
Do you feel overweight, out of
shape and unfit? The Physical Fit-
ness division of the IRS ran gel you
back on the righ, track to a more
beautiful YOU. An array of special
programs and fitness classes have
been developed to shape up faculty,
staffand students of East Carolina.
Aerobic fitness classes have al-
ready begun for the first session so
don't miss second session rcgistra
tion October 13 16.
You can still enjoy several fitness
programs such as the Pepsi Physi-
cal Fitness Club. Exercise WISE.
ly. Swim Conditioning, and Weight
Training Clinics. The Pepsi Physi-
cal F"itness Club offers six choices
of self-directed exercises on a chal
lenge basis Participants may
choose from jigging, swimming,
walking biking, pushing (wheel
chairs), or a combination of these
activities. YOU select the activity,
work out on you own, record the
distance and receive an award for
your accomplishments. Registra-
tion and mileage participation
forms are available in room 204
DVTRA-ACTION HOTLINE
757-6562
Around the clock Information, facility
availability, operational hours and
sixirt si hrrhilrs.
Outdoor
Recreation
First In
Adventure
The Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services invites you to
take an adventure of a lifetime
through the Outdoor Recreation
Center located in room 113 Memorial
Gym. Outdoorsman may enjoy a sce-
nic bike ride through the outskirts of
Greenville; a canoe trip along the riv-
ers of North Carolina; a sailing excur-
sion along the coast; a windsurfing or
hang gliding trip along the Outer
Banks or a quiet horseback riding
adventure- all brought to you by the
ORC (Outdoor Recreation Center).
These adventure trips and a vari-
ety of specialized clinics have been
designed for all faculty, staffand stu-
dents of the University. If you would
rather design your own weekend fun,
the ORC can supply you with all the
equipment you may need through its
equipment checkout center. A nomi-
nal fee is required for rentals. The
ORC supplies the equipment, you
supply the fun!
Upcoming adventure trips and
their registration deadlines are as
follows:
-
Club Sports
The Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services has one of
the finest Club Sports programs in
the area The Club Sports program,
open to all faculty, staff and stu-
dents on the ECU campus is de-
signed for recreational activity,
Instructional opportunities and
competitive events. The clubs are
developed and run by the students,
with administrative and financial
assistance provided by the IRS.
Any time there is sufficient inter-
est, new clubs may be formed. At
the present time, there are approxi-
mately 15 clubs recognized within
the program, but the possibilities of
expansion are endless. Some of the
clubs now serving as organizations
within the program include: arch-
ery, cycling, frisbce. paddling, ice
hockey, rugby, surfing, wind surf
ing and wrestling If you arc Inter
cstcd In joining a Club Sport or
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
DEPARTMENT Of INTRAUURAl RiCRLATIONAL SERVICES
BIKE
hike
GRIMESLAND SEINE BEACH 16.5 MILE ROUTE
Registration Sept 14-21
Event Date Sept 27
204 Memorial Gym


5
I
j





Title
The East Carolinian, September 15, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 15, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.557
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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