The East Carolinian, September 10, 1987






INSIDE
Editorials�m4
Entertainment��17
Sports��25
Classifieds�Mm '
ENTERTAINMENT
Local restaurant provides exciting alternative to
burgers for lunch � see ENTERTAINMENT, page
17.
SPORTS
Pirates look to scalp the Seminoles� see SPORTS,
page 25.
(Hht lEaHt (Carolinian
Sewing the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 62 No. 5
Thursday, September 10,1987
Greenville, NC
30 Pages
Circulation 12,000
A foreshadowing of things to come? The Carter-Finley scoreboard tells the brighter half o
evening's story: ECU 32, "CSL' 14 (above left). But NC. State campus security found then
f Saturday
themeselves
outnumbered when the flood of people surged over a fence and onto the field nar'the'end of the"
game. Officers had the messy job of breaking up fights such as the one above right
ECU-NCSU game is cancelled over Sat. riot
By MICKI BURBELLA
Suff Wntei
North Carolina State University officials-have
decided to call off the 1988 football game with ECU
as a result of jhe post-game fracas at Saturday's
game.
The North Carolina State University athletic
council decided, unanimously to recomend that
NCSU not play ECU during the 1988 football sea-
son. NCSU Chancellor Bruce R. Poulton concurred
with the recomendation.
After ECU'S 32-14 victor over NCSU Saturday
night, approximately 2,000 ECU supporters rushed
onto the field, destroying a fence in the south
endzone and two goal posts. Estimated damage to
Carter-Finley Stadium is $7200.
Several fights resulted between fans and NCSU
campus security officers. Officer Robert VV. Ma-
lason was reportedly injured trying to pull a man,
wearing a purple T-shirt, off of one o the goal posts.
Malason said the pole climber struck him in the
Officers and
legislators
elected Wed.
There were few hotly contested
races in Wednesday's SG A legis-
lature and class officer elections.
In fact, there were sacarcely any
contests at all.
All students who registered as
candidates for legislature offices
won their offices by default.
Furthermore, some students
will win offices as write-ins on
the basis of less than 16 votes,
according to election committee
members.
Here are the results:
Class officers:
Uisa Carroll, Senior Pres.
Laura E. Frazelle, Senior Vice
Pres.
Amar Pal Singh, Junior Pres.
David Tambling, Junior Vice
Pres.
Marty Helms, Soph. Pres.
Diane K. Hoyd, Soph. Vice
Pres.
Colleen M. McDonald, Fresh.
Pres.
Larry Hudson, Fresh. Vice
Pres.
Dorm representatives:
Julie Boone-Cotten
Susan Cooperman-Fleming
Lynwood Carlton-Garrett
Kelly Jones-Jarvis
Robert Hasty-Umstead
William Walters-Aycock
Marty Helms-Aycock
Elizabeth Frazzelle-Clement
Mary E. Fordham-Greene
Toiriste O'Neal-Scott
Michael Hadley-Scott
Travis Ennis-Belk
Gregory Thompson-Fletcher
Regina Johnson-Fletcher
Thomas Sullivan-Jones
head.
The blow shattered his glasses, lodging frag-
ments in his eye. He was treated and released from
Rex Hospital, but he reportedly received no perma-
nent eye damage. Malason has now identified the
face of the man with the help of a videotape of the
game made by VVR AL-TV and still pictures taken by
a "Ralicgh News and Observer" photographer.
Major Larry Liles, in charge of the investigation
for NCSU Public Safety, said his department is
handling the investigation and has involved ECU
Campus Police in it.
"We are not (investigating) under the assumption
that he (the suspect) is an ECU student said Chief
John Rose of ECU Campus Police. "What we're
trying to do is set up a photo line-up. If it is an ECU
student, we will handle it; if it is not a student, we
will turn it (the case) over to Greenville (police
department)
ECU Chancellor Richard Eakin is still concerned
about Saturday's events.
"Unfortunately, the behavior of a group of fans
after the game has detracted from the efforts of the
team and has brought cmbarassment to this uni ver-
sify. I deeply regret the unruly conduct and have
expressed that regret in an oral apology to Chancel-
lor Bruce R. Poulton of North Carolina State Eakin
had said in a press conference Monday.
Eakin spoke with Poulton Wednesday afternoon
and told reporters at a Wednesday evening press
conference that he was disappointed with the deci-
sion to cancel the 1988 game. Eakin had "hoped for
the opportunity to discuss this matter more fully
prior to a formal decision
"I don't believe we should tolerate either the
destruction of property or the inflicting of personal
injury to those who attended an athletic contest.
East Carolina coach Art Baker said, It was very
embarassing with absolutely no class' � he was
correct Eakin said at the Monday conference.
Both Eakin and Thomas have offered apologies to
their NCSU counterparts and have opened negotia-
tions for communicaiton in 1989 Several ideas are
being discussed which mav make resuming the
series in 1989 a possibility.
"It's been a matter of discussion over the last
several days, and several suggestions have been
offered Eakin said. "One is that we should try to
schedule this game to be played in the daytime;
there are questions about whether or not the fans
should be seated on the grassy slope
Thomas said he and Kevin Ho well, NCSU SGA
president, have exchanged ideas and Thomas
stated that Howcll understood the situation and
realized the SGA "could not be responsible for
every fan
Eakin maintains that more important than the
revenues of the cancelled game is the rivalry be-
tween the "two sister universities of North Caro-
lina
Lab fee issues raised,
who should pay?
J.B. Humtxrt, ECU Photo Ub
An ECU student does his share for democracy by voting in Wednesday's election. Election official? e
now seeking those who were voted for as write-ins so these students can be registered with SGA.
Colleen McDonald-Jones
Mary E. Higdon-Tyler
Nancy Parris-Tyler
(Positions for Slay, Clement,
Greene, White and Belk resi-
dence halls have not been offi-
cially filled until confirmation of
write-in candidates).
Day representatives:
John Howard
Porter Good
Bobby R. Hall Jr.
Jeff Kaufman
Bennett M. Eckert
Tripp Roakes
John W. God kin
Evan Lightner
Russell O. Lowe
William G. Perry
Greg Lucas
Richard Patch
Scott M. Lamm
Terry Hindle
Michael T. Bartlett
PaulD. Becker
Allen Thomas
Mark Berendsen
Richard A. Bramley
Arthur S. Brown, II
Mark Caughron
T.J. Frislid Jr.
Robert A. Landry
Maggie Lawrence
Allen Stancill Manning
Missy Michalove
Larry Murphy
David Nalewalk
Olav Gerhard Osland
Nelson David Sides
David Tambling
Amanda F. Weatherspoon
William L. Toler
Steve Hines
(Five positions have yet to be
filled until confirmation of write-
ins)
The election committee re-
quests that the following people,
who have been filled in on ballots
as write-ins, come to the SGA
office in Mendenhall Student
Center to fill out registration
forms:
Bren t Stough, Jerry Cook, Chri s
Fouts, Nancy Parris, Susan Coop-
erman, Jeff Naylor, Tim Mills,
Dave Kramer, Brian Klinginberg,
Dana Bailey, Kelly Hides, Bill
Martain, Scott Tybruski, Janet
Batlen, Maisic Tyson, Jennifer
Shives, Donna Morris, Tony
Paige, Daysnora Reed and Amay
Phelps.
By JEANETTE HERRERA
Suff Wntcr
Over 7,000 students were
charged a $25 lab fee this
semester for the use of lab materi-
als and computers. But in one
accounting class, the students are
being charged fora lab they won't
be using.
This $25 labcomputer fee
came as a surprise to many stu-
dents who registered for classes
which in the past didn't have a lab
assigned to them. For some
courses the students still may not
have to meet for a lab but will be
required to pay the $25 lab fee for
the use of equipment such as
computers and materials sup-
posed to be used during their
class.
Dean Ernest B. Uhr of the
School of Business explained that
students enrolled in classes with
the $25 lab fees will only have to
pay the fee once per semester,
regardless of the number of
classes with lab fees they are tak-
ing.
A senior taking an accounting
class said he does not believe he
should be charged a lab fee for a
class which doesn't presently use
lab facilities. "There are 12 sec-
tions of (the class) with a $25-a-
person (lab fee). This runs into the
thousands of dollars the stu-
dent stated in a letter to The East
Carolinian.
The student would only com-
ment on the condition of ano-
nymity.
Classes requiring a lab fee can
be found in departments ranging
from physics to music.
A faculty committee was
formed two years ago to research
the possibility of a labcomputer
fee for students at East Carolina
and to study how lab fees are
handled at other large universi-
ties said Dr. William A. Blood-
worth, acting Vice Chancelor of
Academic Affairs.
The committee found that the
$25 labcomputer fee was neces-
sary to cover the cost of mainte-
nance and supplies for existing
computers and labs and "to bring
the Universities' computer and
science labs up to par said Dr.
Robert L. Bemheardt, Chairman
of the Laboratory FeeCommittee.
He pointed out that ECU was
one of the few larger universities
in the State that did not have an
"across the board fee for labs and
computers as of 1986. Bernhardt
added, "We're still the best bar-
gain in the state
Approximately 424 courses
were designated by the commit-
tee to carry a labcomputer fee
Blood worth said. He explained
that there were two criteria used
to designate which courses
would have a labcomputer fee.
1) The class is a lab-type course
which consumes a significant
amount of lab material.
2) The class makes significant
use of computers.
"Where does the $25 go, ex-
actly?" That is what a lot of stu-
dents are wondering. Blood-
worth explained, The $25 does
not go directly back to each de-
partment. It goes into a pool used
See EAST, page 9
�'
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I





-2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 10,1987
Fundraiser benefits Greenville support home
By MICKI BURBELLA
Suff Writer
I he Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity
Plans to contribute an estimated
54,000 in pledges from this past
weekend's football run to the
reenville Ronald McDonald
House, according to the
fraternity's president.
The donation is to help cover
recent construction costs of the
newly built house, said Matt
Hermes, president.
Twelve former patients of the
Ronald McDonald House began
the run Friday afternoon around
2 p.m and different runners car-
ried the football to Carter-Finley
Stadium in Raleigh in time for the
NCSU-ECU football game Satur-
day.
Several local personalities ran
in the event, but Chancellor Rich-
ard Eakin and Greenville Mayor
Leslie Gardner had to cancel due
to schedule complications.
But several television celebri-
ties did run in event, and Hermes
ran the last mile of the event into
the stadium and passed the ball to
Eakin at Carter-Finley.
According to Price, the frater-
nity came to Kathy Brown, who is
in charge of fundraising for the
Ronald McDonald House, with
the idea of a football run.
"It really excites me to see the
University students involved in
something outside of classes to
see students go beyond life on
campusand helpout thecommu-
nity Price said.
IMPORT SERVICE
Price hopes to see other groups
get involved, noting that the
Ronald McDonald House is affili-
ated with the ECU School of
Medicine.
"We're serving not only the
county hospital, but hematol-
ogyoncology and the ECU Med.
School Price said.
Price also recounted the story
of how the Ronald McDonald
House got started.
Fred Hill, a player for the Phila-
delphia Eagles, had a daughter
with leukemia in 1973. After
going through the ordeal, he
went to the team to organize a
place for the families of seriously
ill children to stav; the franchise
of McDonalds restaurants also
backed the idea. The name for the
houses was taken from the
McDonald's trademark clown
because of the cheer he repre-
sented, Price said.
According to Price it is a mis-
conception that the house is a
place for families, who cannot
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Collector's Item
T-Shirt
Celebrate ECU's
Finest (and perhaps last)
Victory
over N.C. State!
Shirts Available
Thu Fri and Sat. Nights.
Shirts are $5.00 while they last!
LETS STOMP ANOTHER STATT
afford other accomodarions, to
stay.
"We create a family atmos-
phere Price said. 'The house is
like a support group, the families
are close. They share their
thoughts with each other �
people in the same situations as
they themselves are
Any other organizations inter-
ested in supporting the Ronald
McDonald House can contact
Kathy Brown (830-0062) for more
information.
U.B.E.
516 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE. N.C.
WELCOME BACK
ECU students!
WHn you moktpina this yxxj on just isn't enough:
, GATE SPECIAL
A k Large Pinas and v
2-32 ox. soft drinks
ONLY
$19.95
.� V ' mm tudm t lm I'ucs
Expires: 9-28-87
KMiu COUP�'
PIRATES
fSIEPIZZAI
IN OIL OR WATER
Kroger
Tuna
39
LIMIT 2 WITH $10
ADD'L PURCHASE
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Big K
Soft Drinks
49
c
KROGER
All Meat
Wieners
99
PREMIUM QUALITY
2-PLY PAPER
Swansoft
Towels
Roll
39
RED, RIPE
Salad
Tomatoes .
Lb.
58
KROGER
HOTDOG OR
Hamburger-
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12
Ct.
Pkgs
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M
Lb.
GOLDEN, RIPE
Dole
Bananas
33
BUY ONE PIZZA, GET ONE FREE!
PIZZA MENU
Chees .
One hem .
Two hems .
Three hems
Little Caesars Special
FV��" r��. ,n- )fe,
Extra hems over i'
Extra Cheese
�1ALL MEDIUM LARGE
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535 7 10 950
b05 800 1060
6 75 890 1170
745 980 1280
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HOOS HWTM THESt TOWING
POIti�ii NVahmoms Orons Hvn Birorv Grr d Br� htfar
S�us)r Gn�a (Vn An. (mows rtu fVppri nW� hV . Okm
OaiOhi
BEVERAGES
Coca Cola Diet Coke Smal Medium Liter
Sprite. Mete Yellow. '55 .66 95
0rry Coke
323 Arlington Blvd.
(across from Farm Fresh)
CAESARS SANDWICHES"
Tuna Melt 2 76
haiar Sub 2 36
r-fam and Cheese 2 36
Vegetarian 2 36
SALADS SMALLMEDIUM LARGE
Tossed 1 19 2 ft 3 69
Greek 139 289 469
Antrpasto 139 289 469
CHOOSf FROM THr St TOWIV ,s
Fnmch. ktbrv ThouMtx! bland Wk & fen '
SPECIALTIES
Freshly Baked Crazy Bread i 19
Akalioltur� Bread Sftik4�thC�rk Bolt, & fWmnMFlf hWM
Crazy Sauce"
Pncts iubptrt rocKdngr FWs sht�rn umhoul tan
AAt our mart) ahouf youp drw-xjn's
756-7256
HOURS: SUN-THU 11 AM-12 MIDNIGHT
FRI-SAT 11 AMI AM
WISHBONE (INCLUDES 2 BREAST,
2 DRUMS, 2 THIGHS, 2 WINGS
AND 6 ROLLS)
8-Pc. Fried
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ICE CREAM
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ASSORTED
TOPPINGS
Jeno's
$
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399
REGISTER TO
WIN
A PAIR OF TICKETS
TO PIRATE FOOTBALL!
2-Pairs to be given
away for each home game
12
Oz.
Pkg
KROGER
CHEESE FOOD
American
Singles
99
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ftav-Oit
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Copyright 19B6
Kroger Sv On
Ouintity Bights Reserved
None sold To Dealers
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
)
Effects o
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fax?
All dnis l
pendent 1 I
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brain and 1 � .
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Health
Column
By Mary Misha Adams
HI stucltnt H.lth enter
Stud
tiro .�
in the � plant, 1
News from theap
Shuttle workings
capec ���
rhe spa e agi n
shuttle rrulest,inc
time to start process
cry tor the first p si
flight, but officials s.
tions were actualiv - I
way
It's bas
thing Nothii
preparj n r la I
as it has r -i .orai w& �
National Aeronaut:
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752-7303
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port home I Effects of d to(
m 1973. After afford other aecomoda tions. to I �
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN SF.PTEMBER 10, IW 3
m 1973. After
the ordeal he
m to organize a
niliesof seriousl)
a. the franchise
aurants also
rhe name for the
ikon from the
�iark clown
cheer ho repre-
it is a mis
�' the houy
at ford other aecomoda tions, to
stay
We create a family atmos-
phere Price said. The house is
like a support group, the families
are close. They share their
thoughts with each other �
people in the same situations as
they themselves are
Am other organizations inter-
ested in supporting the Ronald
McDonald House can contact
Kathy Brown (830-0062) for more
mot information.
$&eee
PADDLES
A

fits!
IRS
ks
o
12
Oz
Pkg
KROGER
All Meat
Wieners
99
KROGER
HOTDOG OR
8C
Hamburger
BunS Ai Pkgs
Ct
�1
ame
� , ��- . m ���� �- � � -i" s� rmm
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
Is the mcotmc in cigarettes addic
tax?
All drugs that produce de-
pendence have certain character-
istics. Cigarettes are considered
to be an addictive drug because
they contain nicotine which:
a) creates a dependence and
leads to compulsive use.
b) affects the chemistry of the
brain and nervous system.
c) may cause physical or emo-
tional distress if you give up ciga-
rettes abruptly.
d) may cause relapses among
former users sometimes months
or even wars after quitting.
Health
Column
By Mary Elisha Adams
ECU Studint Health ("enter
Studies have suggested that
nicotine, which occurs naturally
in the tobacco plant, reinforces
and strengthens the desire to
smoke and causes users to keep
on smoking. The nicotine in ciga-
rettes reaches the brain faster
than in cigars, chewing tobacco
and snuff because it is inhaled.
Whan a smoker smokes, the
following events occur:
-The first cigarette of the day
sends a burst of nicotine to the
brain which produces an almost
immediate feeling of satisfaction
and euphoria.
-For the rest oi the day the
smoker tries to maintain this feel-
ing by manipulating his or her
intake of tobacco smoke. The
smoker may inhale more or less
deeply, take mon- or fewer puffs,
or smoke at different intervals of
time.
-If the smoker exceeds a certain
number of cigarettes, sudden
side-effects may occur, including
nausea, light headodnoss, and a
marked rise in tho heart rate.
-When the smoker smokes less
than a minimal amount of ciga-
News from the Cape
Shuttle workings
CAPE CANAVERAL, FU.(AP)
� The space agency calendar of
shuttle milestones said it was
time to start processing Discov- continued modification work in
ery for the first post-Challenger the mid-body area, aiming for a
flight, but officials said prepara- une 2 launch.
Administration spokesman Dick
Young.
Engineers and technicians
Tuesday worked on the shuttle's
thermal protection svstem and
tions were actuallv well under
way.
"It's basically a procedural
thing. Nothing has changed, rhe
preparation for launch continues
as it has for several weeks said
National Aeronautics and Space
On Aug. 4, the vehicle's electri-
cal power was turned on to the
cheers of a small crowd gathered
in theOrbitcr Procc ssing Facility.
Discovery and the two other
shuttles, Columbia and Atlantis,
have been grounded since Chal-
rettes (around 10 cigarettes a
day), the amount of nicotine in
the blood drops and the smoker
begins to experience distress.
Nicotine can affect the body in
different ways. It can act as an
anti-anxiety drug in stressful
situations, or it can act as a stimu-
1 ,t in serene situations. Some
people enjoy the psychological
effects oi smoking such as han-
dling cigarettes, matches, lighters
and ash trays.
When a person tries to stop
smoking, a number of physical
and emotional reactions may
occur during the first few days:
-occassional headaches.
-mood changes such as irrita-
bility, aggressiveness, anxiety
and difficulty in sleeping.
-gastrointestinal disturbances
such as nausea, bloating, consti-
pation.
-increased or decreased appe-
tite.
-weight gain.
-a feeling of loss.
lenger exploded 73 seconds after
launch on Jan. 28, I486.
Navy launches
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.(AP)
The Navy's Trident 2 subma-
rine missile hurled a dummy
warhead to an ocean target sev-
eral hundred miles southeast of
here in the sixth successful test
flight in as many attempts.
A Navj statement said a tost
Tuesday of its newest, most
powerful weapon was "totally
successful
Attention
All those interested
in
Pirate Walk
Applications are now being accepted for:
Director Operators
Assist. Director Walkers
Apply in 228 Mendenhall, Deadline Mon. 14th at 4:00. Contact
SGAVice President if you have any questions.
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ATTIC
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i n
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4� ECU I
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THISAD ��'�'��-��� s SPECIAL
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HOMH FO TBALL
I THE PRODUCERS
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EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Don't forget!
Celebrity Chef Fall Cookout
Tonight on College Hill
4:30 6:30 p.m.
Taking the campus by storm
Monday, Sept. 14th
Tuesday, Sept. 15th
Wednesday, Sept. 16th
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FIFTH ST.
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RAILROAD
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Female Mudwrestling
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Meet the Brothers and
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7:00
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409 Elizabeth Street
757-1319 or 752-0469
Tomorrow night, come party with Phi
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house starting at 10:00 p.m.
-� .� -
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jport home I Effects of drug told
m 1973 After afford other accomodahons, to I
TlIE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 10, 1987 3
After
Ih the ordeal h.
Bam to organize a
nilies o( serious!)
the franchise
attord other accominiahons, to
sta
We create a family atmos-
phere Price said "The house is
like a support group, the families
restaurants also are close They share their
thoughts with each other �
people in the same situations as
the themselves are
�n other organizations inter-
ested in supporting the Ronald
McDonald House can contact
katfn Brown (830-0062) for more
ikon from the
cheer k
st is a mis-
B -vis a
inot information
$&e&
IW
PADDLES
fits!
ks
c
12
Oz
Pkg
KROGER
All Meat
Wieners
99
KROGER
HOTDOG OR
8C
12
Hamburger
Buns . dm Pkgs
51
ame
V
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd � Greenville
)
Is the nicotine in cigarettes addic
Hoe?
All drugs that p- �d de-
pendence have certain character-
istics. Cigarettes are considered
to be an addictive drug because
they contain nicotine which:
a) creates a dependence and
leads to compulsive use
b) affects the chemistry of the
brain and nervous system.
c) may cause physical or emo-
tional distress if you give up ciga-
rettes abruptly.
d) may cause relapses amone,
former users sometimes months
or even years after quitting.
Health
Column
By Mary Elisha Adams
Ft'l Student Health Carter
Studies have suggested that
nicotine, which occurs naturally
in the tobacco plant, reinforces
and strengthens the desire to
Smoke and causes users to keep
on smoking. The nicotine in ciga-
rettes reaches the brain taster
than in cigars, chewing tobacco
and snuff because it is inhaled.
Whan a smoker smokes, the
following events occur:
-The first cigarette of the day
sends a burst of nicotine to the
brain which produces an almost
immediate feeling of satisfaction
and euphoria
-For the rest ol the day the
smoker tries to maintain this feel-
ing by manipulating his or her
intake of tobacco smoke. The
smoker may inhale more or less
deeply, take more or fewer puffs,
or smoke at different intervals of
time.
-If the smoker exceeds a certain
number of cigarettes, sudden
side-effci. ts may occur, including
nausea, light headedness, and a
niarked risr in the heart rate.
-When the smoker smokes less
than a minimal amount of ciga-
News from the Cape
rettes (around 10 cigarettes a
day), the amount of nicotine in
the blood drops and the smoker
begins to experience distress.
Nicotine can affect the body in
different ways. It can act as an
anti-anxiety drug in stressful
situations, or it can act as a stimu-
lant in serene situations. Some
people enjoy the psychological
effects oi smoking such as han-
dling cigarettes, matches, lighters
and ash trays.
When a person tries to stop
smoking, a number of physical
and emotional reactions may
occur during the first few days:
-occasional headaches.
-mood changes such as irrita-
bility, aggressiveness, anxiety
and difficulty in sleeping.
-gastrointestinal disturbances
such as nausea, bloating, consti-
pation.
-increased or decreased appe-
tite.
-weight gain.
-a feeling of kiss.
Attention
All those interested
in
Pirate Walk
Applications are now being accepted for:
Director
Assist. Director
Operators
Walkers
Apply in 228 Mendenhall, Deadline Mon. 14th at 4:00. Contact
SGAVice President if you have any questions.
Shuttle workings
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.(AP) Engineers and technicians
� The space agency calendar of Tuesday worked on the shuttle's
shuttle milestones said it was thermal protection system and
time to start processing Discov- continued modification work in
en, for the first post-Challenger the mid-body area, aiming for a
("light, but officials said prepara- June 2 launch.
Administration spokesman Dick lenger exploded 73 seconds after
Young
Engineers
launch on Jan. 28, 1986.
Navy launches
tions were actuallv well under
way
"It's basicallv a procedural
thing. Nothing has changed. The
preparation for launch continues
as it has for several weeks said
National Aeronautics and Space
CVi Aug. 4, the vehicle's electri-
cal power was turned on to the
cheers ot a small crowd gathered
in the Obiter Proa ssing Facility.
Discovery and the two other
shuttles, Columbia and Atlantis,
have been grounded since Chal-
CAPECANAVERAL,Fla.(AP)
The Navy's Trident 2 subma-
rine missile hurled a dummv
warhead to an ocean target sev-
eral hundred miles southeast of
here in the sixth successful test
flight m as manv att mpts.
A Navj statement said a test
Tuesday ot its newest, most
powerful weapon was "totally
successful
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1
i

V

�te Eaat (Earnltniati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, c��m�.w
Clay Deanhardt, M��r&to�
Andy Lewis, n� fJtUor JIMMY Mckee, d� ���,
� IM CHANDLER, s ANTHONY MARTIN, 8�,�c�, m
-LAV DEAN! IARDT, Kmm U MEG NEEDHAM, CM. Mp,
IELTON BRYANT, mor MIKE UPCHURCH, MM. m.
DEBBIE STEVENS, s� KlMBERLY PIERCE, 40.
September! 0, 1987
Opinion
Page 4
Responsibility
Student rioters should be punished
The decision made by the North
Carolina State University Athletic
Advisory Committee to put a one
year moratorium on the ECU-NCSU
football series may have been hasty,
but it well may have been just the
slap students at this university
needed.
The debacle that occured after the
game Saturday night shed a bad
light on the university and the foot-
ball team, overshadowing what
should have been a great victory for
both. Instead we found ourselves
once again faced with the ominous
task oi explaining how the gross
behavior of a few drunken,
overzealous fans should not be held
against the school as a whole, or
even the athletic department.
This time we couldn't pull it off.
Instead ECU has been under at-
tack all week from all sides, includ-
ing XCSU Athletic Director Jim
Valvano. Before we go any further it
should be noted that this is the same
Valvano who has never said word
one about the destruction of the
Brickyard at XCSU and downtown
Raleigh after several basketball vic-
tories. The News and Observer,
another of ECU's constant detrac-
tors, talso boarded the bandwagon
with a hasty editorial and coverage
that is normally reserved for a presi-
dential death.
Regardless, it is the actions of
those 2,000 fans that got us into this
mess. Unfortunately no arrests were
made during Saturday's melee since
the police were overwhelmingly
outnumbered, or some students
could be brought in front of the
Honor Board for their actions.
Still, it seems that with the number
of photos taken and video-tapes
made during the riot, a number of
fence crashers and goal post wreck-
ers could be identified. The SGA
Attorney General should look into
this and see what students were
involved. These students should be
brought in front of the Honor Board
to face charges of vandalism and
destruction of state property. It
seems inane that the perpetrators of
the vandalism walk away scott free,
while the football players and the
true Pirate fans are left to pay the
price.
And that, after all, is the ultimate
result of all this. The football team
pays the heaviest price�next year's
seniors don't get their crack at our
only in-state rival � and they had
nothing to do with it. The true Pirate
fans, those that stick with the team
through thick and thin and cele-
brated privately Saturday night are
also denied the chance to see an-
other great ball game to kick off the
1988 season.
The concept of playing in-state
rivals brings up another point. The
stampede has simply given other
universities more reasons than ever
not to schedule ECU for football.
The safety of their fans and their
fields are a legitimate concern if the
actions of Saturday and of the post-
game brawl in 1985 are any evi-
dence.
We don't believe they are, how-
ever. The many are once again being
mistakenly blamed for the few.
Admittedly, punishing the group
may end the problems with the few,
but is it fair, just or truly the only
possible solution?
The first idea that comes to mind is
to charge some of the ringleaders,
the goalpost wreckers, from Satur-
day night. If we punish those that
really caused the problem, maybe
others in the future will realize they
to could face stiff penalties for irra-
tional action.
A second idea, which has been
suggested before, is to move the
game to the afternoon, increase se-
curity and quit selling tickets on the
grassy hill. This seems a ridiculous
solution simply because it should be
unnecessary when dealing with
grown college men and women. If
those steps are needed to protect the
integrity of the game and the enter-
tainment of the average fan, though,
then they should be taken.
The NCSU council acted hastily in
making such strident reccommen-
dations so soon after the incident
took place. It would have been wiser
to wait for more rational heads,
consultation with ECU officials and
student leaders, and time for an in-
depth study on the events leading to
the riot. They cannot shoulder the
blame for the decision, though, since
we brought it upon ourselves.
The point is moot. The damage is
done. To the students, fans and
administration of NCSU all we can
say is we are truly sorry that this
happened. To the ECU football team
we are also sorry that you must bear
the brunt of the punishment which
should be directed towards
drunken fools. To the drunken fools,
we hope you are satisfied with what
you have wrought.
Was it really worth it?
THiHtfe,E?JjeKVW'N3
ET0-STA!�K� VAKES "�
Fell GoNPDUn k3uT U'ti
3t'H& CONFIRMED
Violent students spoiled victory
To the editor:
There is nothing more enjoyable
than a good football game played
with sportsmanship between two
arch rival teams. A game such as this
occurred between ECU and North
Carolina State University until the
last minutes of the game, and the re-
sult was catastrophic.
Never in my years at East Carolina
have I ever been ashamed to wear our
purple and gold until Saturday night
when the game ended. The embar-
rassment that overwhelmed me
made me wish that the "Rack the
Tack" shirt I had worn so proudly
throughout the game would simply
disappear. I put on my raincoat and
tried to exit the stadium as discreetly
as possible. The ECU football team
had just experienced a true victory
but the fans had intervened and
soured the taste oi success.
As of today, the heated rivalry that
draws one of the largest crowds of
any in-state game may be nearing its
extinction. It is a shame that the foot-
ball rivalry has expanded to the fans
at an intolerable level. A strong ri-
valry is only natural in collegiate foot-
ball but the fans' reaction to the com-
petition in this case was totally sense-
less.
I do not understand why security
guards could not have done more to
stop the riot before it began. The secu-
rity guards who were posted at the
bottom of the hill entered the field and
stood in a group around the goal post.
At the 1986 meeting of these two
teams, I remember the police being
more forceful and keeping the
crowds under control.
As I stood helpless in the stands, I
watched the fans completely demol-
ish a field. Overtaken by anger, a State
fan seated behind me reminded me
that every school has a few "sunshine
fans" such as these; the ones who
cheer when the team wins but are the
first to criticize and complain when
the final score is not in ECU's favor.
I am truly sorry that the incident
occurred and I hope that in the future,
we at ECU can still have a "Beat State"
party. A "Beat Georgia Southern"
party just won't hold the same mean-
ing. I surely hope that a few hundred
students' actions will not ruin the fun
of the competition for the remainder
of the 56,800 people who attended the
game.
I can't understand how any college
student could act in such a childish
manner. What makes a person want
to destroy someone else's property
especially without cause? It is one
thing to rush onto the field after a
victory to gTeet your players, but in
this case, the players were not even
glad to see them. They, too, seemed to
be embarrassed by their fans.
Our purple and gold victory shone
with pride until the crowds tarnished
it. I dare say that the destruction of the
field overpowers the Pirate victory in
most minds, mine included.
To those of you who participated in
this exhibition of ignorance, I say
grow up, friend � don't let the ad-
ministration solve your problem like
your daddy did when you were 10-
years-old. You are college students �
act like it. I hope those who rushed
onto the field have realized that the
reprecussions of their actions tremen-
dously outweigh the fun they re-
ceived from doing it.
It's obvious that those who seem-
ingly cared so much about their
school that they had to run onto the
field to express it are the ones who
don't care at all. They can't see past
the present. ECU has long been con-
sidered a second-rate university, a
title that does not reflect the univer-
sity, but instead only a few hundred
of its fans. The majority of us are
proud of our university and feel it is
very underrated.
An image is something difficult to
create but easy to destroy. It is very
disheartening to see a group of people
damage something that it takes so
long to rebuild. However, the dam-
age has been done but I do appeal to
everyone not to let this reflect on the
university but only a few "second-
rate" fans who didn't consider the
damage that would be endowed
upon the university.
,t Ross Renfrow
SGA Vice-President

janic Porter
Senior
Math
Black eves
To the Editor:
Fall semester has just begun and
already the image of our university-
has received two black eyes. The first
of these being the so-called "Biltmore
Massacre Unfortunately, there was
not even time to recover from the
Biltmore incident before another
blow was struck at Carter-Finley Sta-
dium. Sad to say, the entire student
body suffers for the actions of a small
minority of irresponsible students
(and overzealous fans).
Concerning the Biltmore incident,
there has been a great outrage over
the fact that a student was injured bv
police officers. Yet, everyone seems to
have forgotten that the authorities
were there because laws were being
violated. We emphasize that this is
not an attempt to justify the use of
violence by the police. But let's be fair
and remember, the police were there
because neighbors legitimately com-
plained that they were unable to drive
down their own street.
Let us also recogmze the fact that a
permit for this party was denied, yet
the party was held anyway an act of
rather blatant defiance toward
Greenville City statutes. Wouldn't
you agree? And speaking of blatant
defiance, throwing eggs is not the
most diplomatic way to deal with the
police.
On the heels of Biltmore came the
unforgivable actions of some fans
(mostly ECU students) following
Saturday's game. Destruction of
property, fighting with other fans,
and assaulting campus police officers
seems an odd way to celebrate. The
foolish actions of these "fans" leaves a
bitter aftertaste following the sweet
savour of victory. Because of this fi-
asco, the ECU-State rivalry may be
finished. Pirate and Wolfpack fans
everywhere have these 2,000 morons
to thank.
It is impossible to examine these
two events without noticing the large
role that alcohol has played. At both
the Biltmore party and the State foot-
ball game, alcohol was illegally con-
sumed. At both events man v students
were highly intoxicated, and in each
incident this state of drunkness led to
irresponsible behavior (such as
throwing eggs and ploughing down
goal posts). The solution does not lie
in increasing secuntv at athletic
events. Nor does it lie in teaching
police to better understand the needs
of students as was suggested in last
Thursday's Forum. Rather, the solu-
tion lies with students examining
their own behavior, and taking re-
sponsibility for their actions.
If ECU students desire to be treated
with respect, perhaps they might
consider acting in a manner that de-
serves respect.
Paul L. Goodson
Junior
Anthropology
MicheJe Connolly
Junior
Education
Cheerleaders
To the editor:
We, the cheerleaders, are trying to
motivate you, the crowd, and get you
more involved in the football games.
Last Saturday night at Carter-Finlev
Stadium, the fans did a terrific job of
cheering with us and that enthusiasm
had a very positive influence on our
team.
Throughout the first three quarters,
the crowd was great. But as the clock
ran down, that enthusiasm got out of
hand. The unfortunate events that
took place with approximately 10
seconds left in the game and thereaf-
ter have brought embarrassment and
disgrace to this university.
We would like to continue to in-
volve you in the games but we ask
that you act in a manner that is appro-
priate. This Florida State game is one
of the biggest in Ficklen Stadium his-
tory, and the team needs vour posi-
tive support and enthusiasm "with-
out incident So, be there early for
special crowd cheers in the stands
before the game.
Let's Go Pirates!
ECU Cheerleaders
Both sides responsible
To the editor:
Having witnessed last year's loss to
State but unable to attend this year's
game, my husband and I listened
excitedly to the radio Saturday night
as our alma mater achieved such an
overwhelming victory. On Sunday,
however, our bubble' was burst as
State fans related the destruction our
students had caused vet again at
Carter-Finley StadiumWe felt just
awful. Then, on Monday, I spoke to a
friend and fellow Pirate fan who did
attend the game. He gave me a new
perspective on the incident that I
thought I ought to share with vou.
First of all, at the end of the game.
Sec OPINION, page 5
Campus Forum
mmmmAi
Opinion rails
Continued from page 4
there were students on bmh sides
of the held yelling 'Tear it down'
Tear it down While this fact
does not excuse our students'
destruction of the fence, it cer-
tainly hints that there might have
been other parties involved �
collaborators, if you w.ll � the
C State students themselves
Secondly, when I mentioned
the extent of the damage � an
alleged $7,000, my friend noted
that he'd be happy to buy a new
fence and two new goal posts, if
State would only give him the
tens of thousands of dollars they
made on the hill that night Again.
that State's financial gains far
exceed their losses does not ex-
cuse us.
But perhaps part of the blame
should be dropped at State's
administration's doorstep, per-
haps bckets for seating on the
grassy hill should never he sold in
the first place. It is certainly ob 1
ous that the less restricted at:
phere of the hill, as opposed t
regular stadium seats, is n �
conducive to trouble
Please don't see this letter as an
attempt to condone the 1
game incident at Cartcr-Fini
am still embarrassed and resent-
ful of the damage, both to the sta-
dium and to the image of our
tory. Yet there are t. sides to
every story, and 1 felt that sharing
these matters with you might
lessen the blow.
Let us all hope that the ECL-
State football series can continue
and that our students can leam
restraint, maturity, and good
sportsmanship When they do,
irresponsible actions on the part
of either State's students or ad-
ministration will have no effect on
us.
Go Pirates!
Lucy Pake
alumna
English Depart
Take responsibly
To the editor:
Will any one individual (stu-
dent or non-student) who partici-
pated in any of the destructive
aspects of the post-game celebra-
tion. jUgtiee write and give some
sensible rationale for it.
Unfortunaltelv, most of the
individuals I saw on the
seemed more intent on draw ing
attention to themselves than
gratulating the players and
coaches for a job well done. I had
to wonder whether that was the
most effort these individuals had
put into the game itself all night. It
was obvioul
time had
during the
To the mi
students wl
"victory wl
please accepj
"npple effe
m will hal
Ne
To t
1 fiftr
tinv �
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w a.
lted b)
State gamt
night It seei
"mature eno
then he is
pos-
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and rot abl�
super �
maketr
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of trair
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Let us c
new goa 1
enjoy a vicu
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selves n ha
behavior sc
that rcputat
gone Letoti
of ECU
able un;versi
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KINSTOS





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 10,19�7
oiled victory
"l.irn
ut a
examine these
ng the large
has played. At both
I the State foot-
i was illegally cen-
ts man) students
� d and in each
:runknessled to
sible behavior (such as
n : : ughing down
solution dees not lie
security at athletic
- v- ' es it lie in teaching
inderstand the needs
is was suggested in last
rum Rather, the solu-
students examining
� ior and taking re-
ty for their actions.
si idents desire to be treated
� t ips they might
n a manner that de-
Paul L. Goodson
lunior
Anthropology
Micriejte Connolly
funior
Education
Cheerleaders
heerleaders, arc trying to
: the crowd, and get you
ed in the football games.
. night at Carter-Finley
. urn, the tans did a terrific job of
- r g ��� ith us and that enthusiasm
. a very positive influence on our
Thr it the first three quarters,
r I was creat. But as the clock
rvn, that enthusiasm got out of
� . The unfortunate events that
k : �. with approximately 10
� Is in the game and thcreaf-
iv brought embarrassment and
race 1 I s university.
1 like to continue to in-
Ivi you in the games but we ask
that tin a manner that is appro-
la State game is one
� in Ficklen Stadium his-
- ind thi team needs your posi-
� and enthusiasm "with-
incident So, be there early for
- �. d cheers in the stands
et's Co r
ECU Cheerleaders
tant
the
i the
The
nav be
� rans
morons
Both sides responsible
To the editor:
Having witnessed last year's loss to
State but unable to attend this year's
game, my husband and I listened
tedly to the radio Saturday night
as our alma mater achieved such an
overwhelming victory. On Sunday,
however, our bubble was burst as
tans related the destruction our
tents had caused yet again at
Carter-Finlev Stadium. We felt just
awful. Then, on Monday, 1 spoketoa
td and fellow Pirate fan who did
attend the game. He gave me a new
perspective on the incident that I
thought I ought to share with you
First of all, at the end of the game,
See OPINION, page 5
Forum
Opinion rails against students
Continued from page 4
there were students on both sides
of the field yelling 'Tear it down!
Tear it down While this fact
does not excuse our students'
destruction of the fence, it cer-
tainly hints that there might have
been other parties involved �
collaborators, if you will � the
NC State students themselves.
Secondly, when I mentioned
the extent of the damage � an
alleged $7,000, my friend noted
that he'd be happy to buy a new
fence and two new goal posts, if
State would only give him the
tens of thousands of dollars they
made on the hill that night. Again,
that State's financial gains far
exceed their losses does not ex-
cuse us.
But perhaps part of the blame
should be dropped at State's
administration's doorstep; per-
haps tickets for seating on the
grassy hill uld never be sold in
the first place. It is certainly obvi-
ous that the less restricted atmos-
phere of the hill, as opposed to the
regular stadium seats, is more
conducive to trouble.
Please don't see this letter as an
attempt to condone the post-
game incident at Carter-Finley. I
am still embarrassed and resent-
ful of the damage, both to the sta-
dium and to the image of our vic-
tory. Yet there are two sides to
every story, and I felt that sharing
these matters with you might
lessen the blow.
Let us all hope that the ECU-
State football series can continue
and that our students can learn
restraint, maturity, and good
sportsmanship. When they do,
irresponsible actions on the part
of either State's students or ad-
ministration will have no effect on
us.
Go Pirates!
Lucy Pake
alumna
English Department
Take responsibity
To the editor:
Will any one individual (stu-
dent or non-student) who partici-
pated in any of the destructive
aspects of the post-game celebra-
tion, please write and give some
sensible rationale for it.
Unfortunaltely, most of the
individuals I saw on the field
seemed more intent on drawing
attention to themselves than con-
gratulating the players and
coaches for a job well done. 1 had
to wonder whether that was the
most effort these individuals had
put into the game itself all night. It
was obvious what a lot of their
time had been "consumed" with
during the evening.
To the many hundreds of other
students who demonstrated a
"victory with class" attitude,
please accept my apologies for the
"ripple effect" that present criti-
cism will have on you.
S. Richard Brockett
Alumnus
New goal
To the editor:
As a fifth year senior and life-
time resident of Greenville, I
would like to say that I am in no
way proud of the behavior exhib-
ited by my peers at the ECU vs.
State game this past Saturday
night. It seems that if a person is
"mature enough" to go to college,
then he is mature enough not to
participate in that kind of behav-
ior. These are the people that are
possibly taking away opportuni-
ties for our football team.
Obviously, the Pirate football
team worked hard to achieve a
victory like the cne we attained
only to have the "loyal fans" label
us as destructive and immature
and not able to wear the mark of a
superior school. We, the students,
make this university what it is and
we must strive to display the kind
of training we receive not only
from this university but from our
parents. How can we justify ex-
hibiting this kind of behavior?
May I suggest that we contend
to take on a new attitude and not
be so pompous that we forget to
be considerate of our fellow
school. As long as we continue to
participate in these kinds of be-
haviors, we will have to bear the
reputation that comes along with
it. No doubt fans that share in
these kinds of activities would be
highly insulted if one of our rivals
did this to us. I don't think this is
the impression we want our fu-
ture employers to have of East
Carolina.
Let us challenge ourselves to a
new goal. As well as being able to
enjoy a victory over a great team
like NC State, let us pride our-
selves in having good upstanding
behavior so that ECU will carry
that reputation long after we are
gone. Let others see the real spirit
of ECU as it is an upright, respect-
able university that we are proud
to attend and would be proud to
have our children attend.
Catharine White
Senior
Music Education
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center is open Monday through
Thursday, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. For an
appointment or more information,
call24-Hour Helpline, 757-0003.
111 East Third Street-The Lee Building
Greenville, North Carolina
Free Pregnancy Test-Confidential
Counseling
All Services and referrals are free of charge.
Summei Savings
STEREO CONCEPTS IS
proud to announce the addition
of Poik Audio to our
many fine lines!
Come & Hear Vfliat You 've Been Missing!
I'rirrs HvginntnK -tl
179
00
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WE ALSO
REBUILD SPEAKERS
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A9A I �Vf U lf I if Across From Vernon Park Mali
1 he SpNtar spit -al.sts KiNSTON PHONE S2S-S917
History repeats
To the editor:
Everyone who reads this letter
knows full well that the actions of
a few, throughout history, have
oft times reflected on the masses
as a whole.
In Raleigh, on the 5th of Sep-
tember, that very scenerio pre-
sented itself again.
There is really no reason to
chastise the students who were
involved, because most of them
will never admit to being a part of
that ugly scene.
Having been at ECU from 1972-
76, and having wrestled on four
Southern Conference Champion-
ship teams, teams that also beat
NCSU four times in that span, 1
can't say that the enthusiasm as-
sociated with winning against
NCSU isn't hard to control. I
doubt that I could have controlled
my own as a student.
What everyone must realize is
that beating NCSU in football
isn't that large an accomplish-
ment for ECU football. Our pro-
gram is on a par with theirs, and
we should expect to win against
them as frequently as we lose.
To get involved with the activ-
ity that has occurred the previous
two times that we have won in
Raleigh, is to admit to NCSU that
the game is bigger for ECU then it
is for NCSU. The simple fact is, it's
no bigger a game for ECU than for
NCSU. Until the entire ECU fam-
ily realizes this, this behavior has
the potential to continue.
No one and everyone could be
blamed for this occurrence, but
that's nonsense because it woud
serve no purpose.
The graduates of ECU who
choose to support ECU through
the Pirates Club, cryingly ask that
this be the last time that you allow
the accomplishment of the team
and coaching staff be so blem-
ished as to disallow them the due
credit they deserve.
It's very apparent that Art
Baker and his staff have East
Carolina football heading the the
right direction. Not only winning-
wise, but sportsmanlike-wise as
well. What a well-behaved group
of players performed for ECU
Saturday night.
Lets get behind this team like
never before and show them that
ECU is a Division I-A school in
every sense of the word.
Mike Radford
ECU-1976
Winston-Salem, N.C.
We appreciate the help with today's
issue.
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JHE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTFMRFR in 1987
Classifieds
-vSR1nC?AC"ES �"d Referee's
SSaTnJ Tue9� and Thursdays
With I'm r� C�ntJC' Caro1 or Alice
,n ' �� County School at B30 4200
in I �n 'nCOme For nation
MARffi?S wite to: COLLEGIATE
MAKkETlNC. SERVICES. 251 Qenwood
Mooreaville. NC 28115 (704)6M 4063
"HTwr0 10:30-2:30 M-F
r w-w-h Carpet Bargain Center 1009
2�" Avo- GreenviBe APPlv m
Po�� 830-600 M r K '
BODY'S FOR MEN has full tone and
I an time sales associates positions for
: Ujusastk, fashion forward individu
��toilC3othingexperience is required
u'r ,han average starting salary Apply
� pe�n, Brody's Personnel Director,
Molina East Mall M VV 2 4p m
BRODVS has pan time sales associates
�ostions tor enthusiastic, out going mdi
uduab who enjoy working with young
� "temporary unior Fashions, Good sal
�y AppK in person, Brody's Personnel
rector Carolina Fst Mall mw 2-
ip.m
MACKENZIE SECL'KI n is seeking stu
: nts to work as part time, weekend secu
y guards Good Pay! Must have do
I ndabk transportation to work Must
' ave telephone Must NOT have police
record Apply in person at 1127 South
I vans Street 758 2174
I Ul OR tor college algebra 1063 immedi
H I) needed Must be patient and export
need Salary negotiable Call 753-2802
after 6.00 p ni
V ANTED: telemarketcrs interested in
earning up to St, 00 per hour Must spoak
well and be assertive Permanent part
ne Call 355 7108 1 8 p m
SURVE INTERVIEWERS: Field inter
newerslisters are needed for a local
health study to be conducted by Research
nangle Institute, a nationally recognized
university affiliated reasearch organiza-
tion. Paid expenses No selling Survey ex-
perience preferred Car required Send
resume including name address phone,
and summary of experience no later than
September 15, to Survey 301 3 Briardifi
� ive. Groom tile Ni 278
NOW HIRING Hanks Homemade Ice
� ream is currentl) hiring delivery per
SOnneL Must ha e own car Bring OU en
thusiam and a smile and apply
today at Hanks 321 E 10th'St Beside
Wendy's.
MASSEUSES NEEDED: immediately for
full time and part-time in Greenville and
Fayetteville Excellent pay. Apply in per-
son Misty Blue's-1 lieh way 43 South Call
746-9997.
HELP WANTED: Disabled student needs
morning assistant in dressing and groom-
ing. Salary negotiable. Contact Marty
752-2994.
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE NEEDED now through
December. Duplex close to campus.
$132.50 a month. 1 2 utilities. No deposit.
758-6722.
ROOMATE NEEDED (MF) Private
room available. Tar River Ests Call Sandy
or Lisa 758-6950.
ONE BEDROOM SPECIAL Tar River
Estates: $150 off 1st month rent when sign-
ing a 12 month lease or the option to sign
a 9 month lease. 1400 Willow St. 1, 752-
4v
TIRED OF YOUR ROOMATE? Call your
Daddy then call me. One bedroom condo
at Ringgold Towers. Priced to sell. Call
Bob Rains at Caldwell BankcrW.G.
Blount and Associates 756-3000 days or
355-1394 nights.
ROOMATE NEEDED: to share a 2 bed-
room apt. 5 blocks form campus. Private
room 5120mo and 1 2 utilities. Call 758-
790 between 2:30 and 4:30 daily.
R1NGOLD TOWERS: apts for rent - fur-
nished Contact Hollie Simonowich, 752-
2865.
FOR SALE
ECU Want to keep that bronze you
worked all Summer to get! Visit California
Tanning Today & see the difference! Ex-
perience the best tan in town - Special dis-
counts just for you! 355-7858.
BEAUTIFUL AKG golden retreivers ex
cellent bloodline & litter. Wormed & first
shots. SI50, 752-1652.
GOVERNMENT HOMES. Delinquent
tax property. Repossessions. 805-6S7-
mXXlExt. L-llhb.
RACING BIKES for sale: 57 cm Viner
mixed components - $400. New 56 cm.
Colnago frame onlv $375. Call Ray 830-
1215
FOR SALE: dorm refrigerator. Sears 2.5
cubic ft, excellent condition, asking $85,
call Holly, daytime - 551 2772.
DISK JOCKIE: the imitations are simply
that. TRASHMAN DJ Service Golden
grooversbody movers, new wax, new
wave, top 40, any mixer, social Bar
Mitzpha, pool party, etc contact 752
3587. 1 laving a party and need a DJ?
PICK UP AND DELIVERY of term pa
pers, theses, resumes to be typed IBM
word processing by professional with 13
years experience. Letter quality print and
professional editing. Call Wanette in
Crifton at 1 -524-5241 Cheap call the best
service!
HAVING A PARTY? Need a DJ? For the
best in Top 40, dance, and Beach , caL'
Morgan at 758-7567.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville
NC 752 3694
NEED A DJ for your next party7 I play top
40and dance. I'll beat Morgan or any other
Dj's price. Call Mark at 752 4251.
IS IT TRUE YOU CAN BUY JEEPS for
$44 through the U S government? Get the
facts today' Call 1-312 742 1142 Ext 5271-
A
CARS SELL for SI 55 (average)1 Also sur
plus jeeps, trucks, etc Now Available
Your Area Info 805-687 6fXX) Ext S 77
NEED TYPING? Call Cindy - 757-0396.
Call anytime after 5:00 p.m. Low rates
include: proofreading spelling and
gramatical corrections; professional serv-
ice. 10 years experience - IBM typing.
ECU - Visit California Tanning Today for
the best tan in town - Quality tanning with
special discounts just for you! 608 Suit A,
Arlington Blvd 355-7858
PERSONALS
CREEKS: Get ready for the BASKET-
BALL BLOWOUT Come out and help
IFC and Panhellenic support the Ronald
McDonald I louse Sept 23-25 near the stu-
dent store. There will be a grand prize of
$100.
DEAR NOODLEHEAD: If he doesn t
behave zap him right in the badoobies I
need Love. SLUT!
YO LUMBER! Kikihcboi Batter Batter
Batter SWING Batter Men. can't live
with 'em, can't shoot 'em The Virgin
Connie Swale
SIC EP BROTHERS: who we love so
much, you gave our pref-night that spe-
cial "Sig Ep" touch With a beer on their
head and a cooler in their hand, you really
taught our pledges how party in the sand
SUSAN LANEHART: Congratulations
on first runner up Pi Kappa Phi bikini
contest at the Dbo. We're all proud of you
-The brothers and little sisters of Alpha
Sigma Phi.
See CLASSIFIEDS, paee 7
ecu pm ANN LYNN
at the
MiiUfelJlIfMIl&i
Dress & Sportwear
Entire Stock is Always
20 off "
Select groups of
Forenza
?Zena
Jordache
Union Bay
Denim
Career Clothes
ANN LYNN Is New In Greenville
At Greenville Square
Mon. - Sat. 10:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Phone 756-4773
Wednesday, September 16th
Heal Wave Male Reue
Doors open at 7pm. show is from 8 30 ill! in 30 p m
Only Sil ihrrioor
No cowr Barhelor Part for the gu
around the bar In Otarle0 k until 1030 p m
7"C Draft Beer
1
A Welcome
Back!
For the next two weekCfoQ? � offering
Student Membership
PER SEMESTER
The best looking bodies work out at The Spa in Greenville. The Spa offers exercise-aerobic
classes, The Wolfe Tanning System, Dynacam equipment, York Olympic weights and dumbells from
3-100 pounds. Give your body a thorough workout then relax in the whirlpool, sauna, steam room,
plus private showers and dressing rooms. You'll love the way you look! And to take care of the
inside of that hard working body visit The Spa's certified message therapist and registered dietician.
Plus The Spa I.P.F.A. and AHA. memberships are honored at locations worldwide. Bring your
body in for a thorough workout at The SpaSouthpark Shopping Center in Greenville.
Greenville's
best health club value.
SOUTH PARK SHOPPING CENTER
756-7991
W" " m � mwi�mMwiw��ie����� � �' ��"��' -
�iw mm iiawiinaaiw, jpuniiwii �
m-Hi ,m m �
" m IMW�il' �' ��������
mmmmmmmmmm
CIA will go to colleg
(CPS) � Despite campus pro-
tests and budget cuts, the Centra!
Intelligence Agency plans to ac-
celerate its recruiting of college
students, an agency spokes
woman said.
Plans for a new eight .
summer internship program
in which students must promts
not to divulge what they're doing
or how much monev they're
making � were revealed in a let-
ter sent to campus career counsel-
ors.
In addition, the agency will
recruit at 200 campuses this aca-
demic year
and thebngi
ested in cai
I
said
"It tM
with math
ample, red
schools with
ma tics proc;r
Shouting
ii i
ts at the
rado, Minne:
and other scl
Continued from page 6
JEREMY SHADLE-Ty, , : �
greatest six months of my life , �
forward to many more wi
anniversary, baK I o
ROCK with The Moody Dudes FnJav
night at Tequila Bar Great specie- all
night!
INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN FFI -
LOWSHIP. please )oin us' Wednesdaj
nights in Speight 129 at 7 00 :
fellowship -food -teaching-
COLLECE LUNCHEON September �
1987 Emmanuel Baptist Church
Ehn St, Greenville NC 27834
ately following morning worship service
SIC EPS - Don't forget the Car Wash Sat
morning
TYLER 404 & 405: H I r. You ha
personal Give me a "C"
change Lov� M �
DEAR CRAIG IOCAL Too busy I
up to see me' Ah. life can be t
are navel lint Die. Earth Scum 361
TO THE BROTHERS of Alpha Sigma
Phi Here's to a great rush We love
your little sisters.
WAIT GIRLS! It's coming soon '�
Sigma Phi little sister rush Be a par-
best. September 22 and 23
SIG EPS-Don't forget the c . ?
mid-day
LAMBDA CHI! Pref night was awesome'
You guys sure do astcund�it truly is
better the 2nd time around Champagne
and roses flowed from within�a night
like this we wUJjvevei� see again You
welcomed our pledges TMb "CreeV Bfe
���-���Pn-f night with the Lambdas
is aTways a blast! Love, The Alpha Phis
ALPHA PHIS: WE DID IT Thanks tor
such incredible effort durui g rush' l
are great! Love, Elizabeth Clayton
ALPHA PHI. Congratulations to the Beta
Rho pledge class�we're so proud oi va'li'
Tracy Abemathy, Lisa Adcock. Wendy
Arzt, Ami Bannerman. Melissa Beasor
Shannon Bowen. Petnna Bowie, Cvndie
Calloway. Andrea Chase, Lou Dalryrx
Lynn Elliot, Megan Fam, Mana F
Kann Hartman, Cynthia Healev, Alice
larman, Jill Liles, Stacev Lippincott,
Heather Maske, Shen eai. Angela Paige
Cheryl Robinson, Heather Schi I
Mana Sepesv Carol vn Steed, Renee
Story, Klaren Stuckenschrrudt, Julie Thar
nngton, Julie Trepal, Jewell Walker, Beth
Weiler, Lisa Williams. Sarah Williams
and Denise Zech Love. The Sisters of
Alpha Phi
LOST: Guv's class nng If I
call 752-7253. Ask tor Pans REW A
DON'T Throw your seeds in the ash-
tray�Toss them on the side of the road
Passive Resistence.
ALPHA DELTA PI S thank for a peal
pref-night. let s do it again next week
Sig Eps
PI KAPPA PHI RUSH: Tuts Sept 15th�
Come out to the Rotary Gub on Rotan
Drive and get a straight shot ot Rock and
Roll with ECU's hottest new band
proof, who made their appearance at he
7th annual Toga Part S:a a: 7 30
LIZ WALMA: ou did a terrific job with
rush' We knew you a . : W love
you! Your Alpha Phi Sisters
SIG EPS - Don t forget the cocktail parti
Sat. afternoon
CHRIS GAULAND: Thanks eating
our potato chips vou FAT ' - . - .
are definetlv fatter than McAula)
owe us, Pus-monstor voodxvSvo &
Tom Bowles
PIKA - Great jot) fellas tor making the
1st annual Run to Raleigh a great
success Thanks to everyone tor then
support and a special thanks to Mat;
Hermes for all of h: work and dadka
bon to the rraternm
AZty: thanks a lot gjrls kx one h
good time, the bus wa rodon and the
cabin was rolhn the neighbors haead I
admit it, but even thev had a good
let's do it again the TIKA s
THETA CHI - it all Ngan ar-
midnight and continued nght Ma
daylight. The poo! brought a great G
SPLASH, to our pret night hack T
for the run and great timr �t grt
dark shirts next hrm- V �� a chiaaan
Love the Zeta s
ZETA TAU AIPH coif am � .w
the Delta Pledge cla al -1
Ya! The Sisters
SIG EPS - Don t torget le rwi m mm
tickets for tw gam Sat Vfv; v ��� ;w
car wash, after the �xv�k �mI � ' m
cocktail party What f�mf'
TKEBACKiAl
Amateurs Fri
$2.00 in advar
FREI
� -
I U IHt
ATTENTIO
RS
clTiCi Ci"
Office
5 YOl
I wa� �
doon-
Ita
for
638-B Eaj
Gr:
EAJ
DEPARTMl
DWISIj
r
r:
3 Men and!
REGISTRAl
TEAM CAP
iostI
. TKE
SEPTE
MM MhMM





'

A
Jljg EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 10 1987
JjELPWANTFn
Her 6:00
p.m.
WANTED: tolomjrkoi.T interested in
earning up to Sc (X) por hour Must speak
� H and be assertive Permanent part
ne Call 355 7108 1-8 p m
SUKVE INTERVIEWERS I ii d inter
'wersusters aro needed for a local
� alth study to be conducted b) Research
I nanglo Institute, a nationally recognized
university affiliated reaseardi organiza-
tion. Paid expenses No selling Survey ex
nonce preferred Car required Send
resume including name, address, phono,
and summary of experience, no later than
September 15. to: Survey, 3003 Briarcliff
.ive, Groomille NC 27834
NOW HIRING - Hank- Homemade tee
. ream is currently hiring delivery per
sonneL Must have own car Bring you en
thusiam and a smile and apply
today at Hanks. 321 E. 10th'St Beside
v endy's.
Classifieds
VdS on ?AC,HES and Ref��'
S3 00 no, w Tu�days and Thursdays.
"ith Pitt c Contac, Caro1 or Ali�
�t County Schools at 830-4200.
SS K WANTED to �
JnJfanni mcome For WowmHob
Swucfer11 to COLLEGIATE
ET1NC' SERVICES. 251 Gtaiwood
M,xresv,lle. NC28115 (70t)6M 4063
"Hf.NTED H�urs ,030-230 M-F
f Carpet Bargain Center 100)
�s rs nT ,AV� ' C,rw"vaie. Apply in
�' bbob B (0 t! oo m p rr 7
WODYS FOR MEN has full time and
ome salos associates positions for
nusttshc, fashion lor ward individu
' 'tail C lothing experience is required
� "or than average starting salary Apply
Pa�n, Brady's Personnel Director
uoJma last Man N1 w 2-4p.m
BRODVS has part time sales associates
t;ons tor enthusiastic, out going indi
� duals who enjo) working with young
temporary unior Fashions Goodsal-
I Apply in person, Brady s Personnel
rector i arotina East Mall M-W 2-
tp m
MACKENZIE SECUR1 H is seeking stu
I nts to work as part time weekend secu
ry guards Good Pay' Must have do
� -Cable transportation to work Must
ive telephone Must NOT hao police
�cord. Apply in person at 1127 South
� vans Street 758 2174
1 CTOR tor college algebra 1063 immodi-
�tejy needed. Must be patient and experi
need Salary negotiable Call 753-2802
MASSEUSES NEEDED: immediately for
full time and part-time in Greenville and
Fayetteville Excellent pay. Apply in per-
son Misty Blue's- Highway43South. Call
746-9997.
HELP WANTED Disabled student needs
morning assistant in dressing and groom-
ing Salary negotiable. Contact Marty
752-2994. y
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE NEEDED now through
December Duplex close to campus.
$132 50 a month. 1 2 utilities. No deposit.
758 6722
ROOMATE NEEDED (MF) Private
room available Tar River Ests Call Sandy
or Lisa 758-6950.
ONE BEDROOM SPECIAL Tar River
Estates: $150 off 1st month rent when sign-
ing a 12 month lease or the option to sign
a 9 month lease. 1400 Willow St. 1, 752-
4225.
TIRED OF YOUR ROOMATE?Call your
David v then call me. One bedroom condo
at Ringgold Towers. Priced to sell. Call
Bob Rains at Caldwell BankerW.G.
Mount and Associates 756-3000 days or
355-2394 nights.
ROOMATE NEEDED: to share a 2 bed-
room apt. 5 blocks form campus. Private
room S120mo and 1 2 utilities. Call 758-
7990 between 2:30 and 4:30 daily.
RINGOLD TOWERS: apts for rent - fur-
nished. Contact 1 lollie Simonowich, 752-
2865.
FOR SALE
ECU - Want to keep that bronze you
worked all Summer to get! Visit California
Tanning Today & see the difference! Ex-
perience the best tan in town - Special dis-
counts just for you! 355-7858.
BEAUTIFUL AKG golden retreivers ex-
cellent bloodline & litter. Wormed & first
shots S150, 752-1652.
GOVERNMENT HOMES. Delinquent
tax property. Repossessions. 805-687-
6000Ext. L-llbfc.
RACING BIKES for sale: 57 cm Viner
mixed components - $400. New 56 cm.
Colnago frame only S375. Call Ray 830-
1215.
FOR SALE: dorm refrigerator Sears 2 5
cubic ft excellent condition, asking $85,
call Holly, daytime - 551-2772
DISK JOCKIE: the imitations are simply
that. TRASHMAN DJ Service Golden
grooversbody movers, new wax, new
wave, top 40, any mixer, social Bar
Mitzpha, pool party, etc contact 752
3587. Having a party and need a DJ?
PICK UP AND DELIVERY of term pa
pers, theses, resumes to be typed. IBM
word processing by professional with 13
years experience Letter quality print and
professional editing. Call Wanette in
Grifton at 1-524-5241. Cheap call the best
service!
HAVING A PARTY? Need a DJ' For the
best in Top 40, dance, and Beach caU
Morgan at 758-7967.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street fljeside Cubbies) Greenville,
NC 752-3694.
NEED A DJ for your next party7 I play top
40and dance I'll beat Morgan or any other
DJ's price Call Mark at 752 4251.
IS IT TRUE YOU CAN BUY JEEPS for
$44 through the U.S. government'Get the
facts today'Call 1-312-742-1142 Ext 5271-
A
CARS SELL for SI 55 (average)! Also sur-
plus jeeps, trucks, etc. Now Available
Youi Area Info 805-687-6000 Ext S 77
NEED TYPING? Call Cindy - 757-0398
Call anytime after 5:00 p.m. Low rates
include: proofreading spelling and
gramatical corrections; professional serv-
ice. 10 years experience - IBM typing.
ECU - Visit California Tanning Today for
the best tan in town - Quality tanning with
special discounts just for you! 608 Suit A,
Arlington Blvd 355-7858
PERSONALS
CREEKS: Get ready for the BASKET-
BALL BLOWOUT Come out and help
IFC and Panhellenic support the Ronald
McDonald House Sept 23-25 near the stu-
dent store. There will be a grand prize of
$100.
DEAR NOODLEHEAEfc If he doesn !
behave zap him right in the badoobies I
need Love. SLUT!
YO LUMBER! Kuahoboj Batter Batter
Batter SWING Batter Men. can't live
with 'em, can't shoot em The Virgin
Connie Swale.
SIC EP BROTHERS: who we love so
much, you gave our pref-night that spe-
cial "Sig Ep" touch With a beer on their
head and a cooler in their hand, you really
taught our pledges how party in the sand
SUSAN LANEHART: Congratulations
on first runner up Pi Kappa Phi bikini
contest at the FJbo. We're all proud of you
-The brothers and little sisters of Alpha
Sigma Phi.
See CLASSIFIEDS,
I
ecu put ANN LYNN
at the
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� m i� �� ii m �� m m
m m - .� �
CIA will go to colleg
(CPS) � Despite campus pro
tests and budget cuts, the Central
Intelligence Agency plans to ac-
celerate its recruiting of college
students, an agency spokes-
woman said
Plans for a new eight -wo �
summer internship program
in which students must promise
not to divulge what they're doing
or how much money they're
making � were revealed in a let-
ter sent tocampuscareercour
ors.
In addition, the agency will
recruit at 200 campuses this aca-
demic year
and thebrit
ested in cat
spokeswt
said.
"Ittheagei
with math
ample,
schools withl
ma tics progT
Shoutine
� �
dents at the
rado, Minne
and other scj
Continued from page 6
JEREMY SHADLE-Thanks for the
greatest six months of my life L
forward to many more wi
anniversary, baby I LOVE Y
ROCK with The Moody Dudes Fr,c;a
night at Tequila Bar Great specials all
night!
INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN FFl -
LOWSHIP. please pv faesday
nights in Speight 129 at 7 . p -
fellowship -food -teaching-
COLLEGE LUNCHEON iept
1987 Immanue! Bap'
Elm St, Greem N 2 S -
ately following morning r-r ic si -
SIC EPS Don't forget the Car Wash Sa-
morning
TYLER 404 & 405: Hot Spit You have a
personal Give me a "
change Love Mi en
DEAR CRAIG IOGAL Too bus;
up to see me1 Ah, life can be tougr :
are navel lint Die, Earth Scun
TO THE BROTHERS ot -
Phi: Here's to a great rush We love
your little sisters.
WAIT GIRLS! It's coming so
Sigma Phi little sister rush Be a rrr of the
best September 22 and 23
SIG EPS- Don't forget the � at at
mid-day
LAMBDA CHI! Pref night was awes
You guys sure do astound�it tr
better the 2nd time around Champagne
and roses flowed from within�a night
Uke this we wOyevea see again. You
welcomed our pledges "Thtb CreeV JHe
"�fp�Pre' night with the Lambdas
is always a blast' Love, The Alpha Phis
ALPHA PHIS: WE DID IT Thanks �
such incredible effort during rush' You all
are great' Love, Elizabeth Clayton
ALPHA PHI. Congratulations to the Beta
Rho pledge class�we're so proud or v a
Tracy Abemathy, Lisa Adcock Wendy
Arzt, Ami Bannerman, Melissa Beason
Shannon Bowen Petnr.a Bowie C
Calloway. Andrea Chae ou Dalryn
Lvnn Elliot, Megar Fam Mar.a '
Kann Hartman, Cvnthua Healev Alice
larman, Jill Liles Stacev Lippis
Heather Maske, Shen Neai, Angela I
Cheryl Robinson, Heather & h
Maria Sepesv, Carolvn Steed, R
Story, Karen Stuckenschrrudt, Julie Thar
nngton, Julie Trepal. Jewell Walker Beth
Weiler, Lisa Williams. Sarah Wl,
and Demse Zech. Love, The Sisters of
Alpha Phi
LOST: Guy's class r.rc If 1 und p -
call 752-7253. Ask for Par R� KKD
DON'T Throw your seeds in the ash-
tray�Toss them on the side of the road.
Passive Resistence.
ALPHA DELTA PI'S thanks
pref-night, let s do it agan next e, �
Sig Eps
PI KAPPA PHI RUSH" ues Sept 15th-
Come out to the Rotary Club on R
Drive and get a straight shot ot Rock arc:
Roll with ECL's hottest new bard�
proof, who made their appearance
7th annual Toga Party Starts a- 7 3
LIZ WALMA: You did a �� - �-
rush! We knew vou could do t! W� �
you! Your Alpha Phi Sisters
SIG EPS - Don't forget the codctul
Sat afternoon
CHRIS GALL AND: Thanks for eating
our potato ch.ps vou FAT PIG P S you
are definetlv fatter than McAuIa) ' You
owe us, Pus-morster voodoocheese i:
Tom Bowles
PIKA - Great tor- rellas for making the
1st annual Run to Raleigh a great
success Thanks to evervone tor their
support and a special thanks to Matt
Hermes for all of hi work and dedica
hon to the fraternity
AZEr thanks a lot prs for one helluva
good time, the bus was rockin and the
cabin was rollm the neighbors hated to
admit it, but even thev had a good time
let's do it again, the PIKA s
4 li
TKEBACKjAI
Amateurs Fr.c.J
$2.00 in advancl
STRIPP1 i i
FREE AI
TO THF
STIC'
.
WHO �� I :a
I

THETA CHI - it all began around
midnight and continued right into
daylight The pool brought a great BIC
SPLASH, to our pref-night bash Thanks
for the fun and great time we 11 get
dark shirts next time Was it a dream
Love the Zeta s
ZETA TAU ALPHA congratulations to
the Delta Pledge class ot ZTA We love
Ya! The Sisters
SIG EPS - Don't forget to ptck up vour
tickets for the game Sat Night Alter the
car wash, after the cook out and after th
cocktail party What game'
Ita
for
638-B E
G:
EA!
DEPARTM
DIYISK
r
r:
3 M n and!
REGISTR
TEAM CAP!
m
6 i
UOSTI
THE
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A4 Mrkvxi. 1
A





1 Cindy - 757-0398 DEAR NOODLEHEAD: If he doesn't
00 p m Low rates behave rap him right in the badoobtes. 1
leading, spelling and
It; ms professional serv
rnencv iBM typing
ua Tanning Today tor
(.Jualn tanning with
-t tor you! 608 uit A,
lONALS
need Love. SLUT
YO LUMBER! Kikihoboi Batter Batter
Batter SWING Batter Men can't live
with em, can t shoot em The Virgin
Connie Swale
S1G EP BROTHERS: who we love so
much, you gave our pref-night that spe-
cial Sig Ep" touch With a beer on their
head and a cooler in their hand, you really
taught our pledges how party in the sand
SUSAN LANEHART: Congratulations
on first runner up Pi Kappa Phi bikini
contest at the Dbo We're all proud of you.
The brothers and little sisters of Alpha
Sigma Phi
See CLASSIFIEDS, page 7

Wednesday September l()th
Heat Vae Male Reue
show is from 8.30 Ull 10:30 p.m
orih $5 al the door
fSVyeC
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ckV
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CIA will go to colleges to recruit interns
THE EAST CAROLTNLAN
SEPTEMBER 10,1987
(CPS) � Despite campus pro-
tests and budget cuts, the Central
Intelligence Agency plans to ac-
celerate its recruiting of college
students, an agency spokes-
woman said.
Plans for a new eight-week
summer internship program �
in which students must promise
not to divulge what they're doing
or how much money they're
making � were revealed in a let-
ter sent to campus career counsel-
ors.
In addition, the agency will
recruit at 200 campuses this aca-
demic year to seek out "the best
and the brightest students" inter-
ested in careers with the CIA,
spokeswoman Sharon Foster
said.
"I f the agency needs employees
with math backgrounds, for ex-
ample, recruiters will visit
schools with outstanding mathe-
matics programs Foster said.
Shouting opposition to U.S.
policy in Central America, stu-
dents at the universities of Colo-
rado, Minnesota, Massachussetts
and other schools protested the
agency's recuiting on their cam-
puses during the 1986-87 aca-
demic year. Demonstration,
however, won't persuade the
agency to stop recruiting at col-
leges, Foster said.
The CIA is invited by college
officials to recruit at schools, Fos-
terexplained. "We're happy to go
where we're invited. Even
though there have been a lot of
demonstrations at the University
of Colorado, we'll still recruit
there because the university in-
vited us
Classifieds
Continued from page 6
JEREMY SHADLE�Thanks for the
greatest six months of my life. Looking
forward to many more with you. Happy
anniversary, baby. I LOVE YOU! Kathi.
ROCK with The Moody Dudes Friday
night at Tequila Bar Great specials all
night!
INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN FEL-
LOWSHIP, please pin us! Wednesday
nights in Speight 129 at 7:00 p.m. -fun -
fellowship -food -teaching-
COLLEGE LUNCHEON September 13,
1987. Immanuel Baptist Church 1101 S
Elm St Greenville, NC, 27834. Immedi-
ately following morning worship service.
SIG EPS - Don't forget the Car Wash Sat
morning
TYLER 404 & 405: Hot Spit You have a
personal. Give me a "C Don't ever
change Love, Mom
DEAR CRAIG IOCAL: Too busy to get
up to see me? Ah, life can be tough. You
are navel lint. Die, Earth Scum. 3tDD.
TO THE BROTHERS of Alpha Sigma
Phi: Here's to a gTeat rush. We love you,
your little sisters.
WAIT GIRLS! It's coming soon Alpha
Sigma Phi little sister rush. Be a part of the
best. September 22 and 23.
SIG EPS- Don't forget the cook-out Sat. at
mid-day.
LAMBDA CHI! Pref night was awesome!
You guys sure do astound�it truly is
better the 2nd time around. Champagne
and roses flowed from within�a night
like this we wiJLieve9ee again. You
welcomed our pledgesTflR) "Greek life
�WR"��Pr�f night wtth the Lambdas
is always a blast! Love, The Alpha Phis
ALPHA PHIS: WE DID IT1 Thanks for
such incredible effort during rush! You all
are great! Love, Elizabeth Clayton
ALPHA PHI. Congratulations to the Beta
Rho pledge class�we're so proud of ya'P
Tracy Abemathy, Lisa Adcock, Wendy
Arzt, Ami Bannerman, Melissa Beason,
Shannon Bowen, Petrina Bowie, Cyndie
Calloway, Andrea Chase, Lou Dalrvmple,
Lynn Elliot, Megan Farn, Maha Fiano,
Karin Hartman, Cynthia Healey, Alice
larman, Jill Liles, Stacey Lippincott,
Heather Maske, Shen Neal, Angela Paige,
Cheryl Robinson, Heather Schofield,
Maria Sepesy, Carolyn Steed, Renee
Story, Karen Stuckenschmidt, Julie Thar-
rington, Julie Trepal, Jewell Walker, Beth
Weiler, Lisa Williams, Sarah Williams,
and Denise Zech. Love, The Sisters of
Alpha Phi.
LOST: Guv's class ring. If found, please
call 752-7253. Ask for Pans. REWARD
DONT Throw your seeds in the ash-
tray�Toss them on the side of the road.
Passive Resistence.
ALPHA DELTA PI'S - thanks for a great
pref-night, let's do it again next week!?! -
Sig Eps
PI KAPPA PHI RUSH: TuesSept. 15th�
Come out to the Rotary Club on Rotary
Drive and get a straight shot of Rock and
Roll with ECU's hottest new band�180
proof, who made their appearance at the
7th annual Toga Party. Starts at 7:30.
LIZ WALMA: You did a temfic job with
rush! We knew you could do it! We love
you! Your Alpha Phi Sisters.
SIC EPS - Don't forget the cocktail party
Sat. afternoon.
CHRIS GAULAND: Thanks for eating
our potato chips, you FAT PIG. P.S. you
are definetly fatter than McAulay! You
owe us. Pus-monster, voodoocheese &
Tom Bowles.
PIKA - Great job fellas for making the
1st annual Run to Raleigh a great
success. Thanks to everyone for their
support and a special thanks to Matt
Hermes for all of his work and dedica-
tion to the fraternity.
AZD's: thanks a lot girls for one helluva
good time, the bus was rockin' and the
cabin was rollin the neighbors hated to
admit it, but even they had a good time,
let's do it again, the PIKA's.
THETA CHI - it all began around
midnight and continued right into
daylight. The pool brought a great BIG
SPLASH, to our pref-night bash. Thanks
for the fun and great time - we'll get
dark shirts next time. Was it a dream!?!
Love the Zeta's.
ZETA TAU ALPHA: con graduations to
the Delta Pledge class of ZTA. We love
Ya! The Sisters.
SIG EPS - Don't forget to pick up your
tickets for the game Sat. Night. After the
car wash, after the cook-out and after the
cocktail party. What game?
TKE BACKYARD BASH - Featuring the
Amateurs. Friday 4:30. $3.00 at the door,
$2.00 in advance. BYOB. No glass.
STRIPPERS-STRIPPERS: Pi Kappa Phi
Rush: Tues. night, Sept. 15th at the Rotary
Club. Also see 180 proof for some kick-ass
Rock and Roll.
FREE ALL YOU CAN EAT SEAFOOD
Pi Kappa Phi Rush Beach Night Sept. 16th,
7:30 at the house Same location as the
Toga Party Dress for the Beach.
TO THE NEW ALPHA DELTA PI'S:
WELCOME HOME We just want to say
how psyched we are for the times ahead.
So, put on those jerseys and those new
Alpha Delta Pi smiles! We love you, the
Alpha Delta Pi Sisters.
ATTENTION ALL SENIORS &
JUNIORS: Your 1985-86 yearbook is here
and can be picked up at the Buccaneer
Office in the Publications Building.
WHO'S YOUR BUDDY? Who's your
pal? �1 was just thinking about you, the
door is always unlocked if you're thinking
about me. Who do you love?
FRED: You're doing a great job with little
sister; everyone is psyched for an incredi-
bly "special" semester. Keep up the good I
work. Love ya kid, Semaj!
EVERYONE: Get ready for the BASKET-
BALL BLOWOUT Come out and help)
IFC and Panhellenic support the Ronald f
McDonald House Sept. 23-25 near the stu-1
dent store. There will be a Grand Prize of
$100.
SIG EP BROTHERS: who we love sol
much, you gave our PREF NIGHT that
special Sig Ep touch. You kept us so anx-
ious through the whole rush week, youl
kept it a secret, we couldn't sneak a peak. I
But waiting was worth it, we couldn't I
believe our eyes, partying on that Sig Ep I
beach was certainly a surprise. With a beer I
on their head and a cooler in their hand,
you really showed our pledges how tol
party in the sand. Yes, we had troublel
climbing up our steps, but all of ourl
pledges slept with dreams of "Good olel
Sig Eps So the night has come and gone
and our pledges you have met, our "87"
pref night, we know we won't forget. Wei
all left that night waving our goodbyes!
and we want to thank you bunches, with!
love the Alpha Delta Pi's.
�UHMMHII'
GRACE
CHURCH
Interested in
Christian Fellowship
(Call 355-3500)
ftberteuon
Italian Sportswear
for Women and Men
638-B East Arlington Blvd.
Greenville,NC 27858
10-6 Monday-Saturday
355-7473
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
DEPARTMENT OF INTRAMURAL - RECREATIONAL SERVICES
DIVISION OF INTRAMURAL SPORTS
WHERE FUN IS ir
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3 Men and 3 Women a Team
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Monday, September 14
11:00 a.m. - 6.00 p.m.
104-A Memorial Gym
TEAM CAPTAINS MEETING
Wednesday, September 16
6:00 p.m.
Biology 102
FREE T-Shirts
to all Participants
MOST ANYTHING GOES WILL TAKE PLACE
� THE BOTTOM OF COLLEGE HILL
SEPTEMBER 17 3:00-7:i
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204 Memorial Gym or call 757-6387
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This fall Coffman's con-
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J





J?jE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 10, 1987
EAST CAROLINAS OLDEST, MOST ESTABLISHED FRATERNITY
qpnt PHlllfip SEVEN elevn ociock
'ia
mon. g o l f 4
tu.es.
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i
Educatio
GREENSBORO (AP) � In the
14 months before the 1988 presi-
dential election, the American
public can expect to hear a lot
about education.
I've not seen a survey in the
last year that education was not
the first or second (most impor-
tant) issue said William Friday,
retired president of the Univer-
sity of North Carolina. "It rotates
with the economy and defense
While it is not unusual for gov-
ernors and state legislators to
campaign on education, presi-
dential candidates have tended
to focus on issues such as econ-
omy, defense and foreign affairs
But already in this young cam-
paign, the presidential candi-
dates are staking themselves out
on the three Rs as never before,
observers say.
And on Friday, nine of them �
seven Democrats and two Re-
publicans � will be at the Lni
versity of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill for a debate that will
deal only with education.
Political analysts say there are
several reasons for the increased
attention paid to academic issues
Foremost, if s an issue close to
America's heart.
"Public schools are arguably
the No. 1 domestic concern of the
American people Education
Secretary William J. Bennett said
in a back-to-school address at the
National
ton Tues
That cl
by more
gionalar
honal qi
years.
One o(
Risk"
educanol
several
Carol ini.1
overhaul
chinerv
Now
have nu
issue at
into pla J
And i
hal cane
that edu
deal wit
problemj
petihver
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tive ha i
or five v
im Hui
Democrl
Friday's i
"It all
Hunt sail
good pb
we've gc
living.
In ad
learned
slosh-ov
Wide Selectiol
&Local and Ox
Balloons
��o�000�000�0�m�0�0t0490���m
1895





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 10,1987
Education to be debate focus
3 FRATERNITY
v,
GREENSBORO (AP) � In the
14 months before the 1988 presi-
dential election, the American
public can expect to hear a lot
about education.
"I've not seen a survey in the
last year that education was not
the first or second (most impor-
tant) issue said William Friday,
retired president of the Univer-
sity of North Carolina. "It rotates
with the economy and defense
While it is not unusual for gov-
ernors and state legislators to
campaign on education, presi-
dential candidates have tended
to focus on issues such as econ-
omy, defense and foreign affairs.
But already in this young cam-
paign, the presidential candi-
dates are staking themselves out
on the three Rs as never before,
observers say.
And on Friday, nine of them �
seven Democrats and two Re-
publicans � will be at the Uni-
versity of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill for a debate that will
deal only with education.
Political analysts say there are
several reasons for the increased
attention paid to academic issues.
Foremost, it's an issue close to
America's heart.
"Public schools are arguably
the No. 1 domestic concern of the
American people Education
Secretary William j. Bennett said
in a back-to-school address at the
National Press Club in Washing-
ton Tuesday.
That concern has been raised
by more than 100 national, re-
gional and state reports on educa-
tional quality in the last seven
years.
One of them � "A Nation At
Risk" � called for sweeping
educational reforms. As a result,
several states, including North
Carolina, have taken steps to
overhaul their educational ma-
chinery.
Now, the same factors that
have made education the No. 1
issue at the state level are coming
into play nationally.
And in the process, presiden-
tial candidates have discovered
that education is ihe only way to
deal with one of the nation's chief
problems � international com-
petitiveness.
'The drive to be more competi-
tive has just jelled in the last four
or five years said former Gov.
Jim Hunt, who will quiz the
Democratic candidates in
Friday's debate.
"It all goes back to economics
Hunt said. "If we want to have
good jobs that pay high salaries,
we've got to leam to think for a
living
In addition, candidates have
learned that education has a
slosh-over effect � it's at the core
of some of the nation's other
problems.
"Education has everything to
do with the strength of defense,
with the growth of the economy
and with what we are doing to
achieve peace Friday said. "It's
the engine that causes these
things to happen
Friday is heading a national
commission that will issue a re-
port next month calling for a re-
newed partnership among the
state and federal governments,
the corporate community and
colleges and universities.
Many people charge that the
federal government significantly
reduced its role in the educa-
tional partnership during the
Reagan administration.
"In the past eight years, there
has been a pullback in federal
involvement said John Dornan,
head of the Public School Forum
in Raleigh, a group made up of
business people, elected officials
and school leaders that does re-
search on programs in public
primary and secondary schools.
'That's what makes this elec-
tion really critical Dornan said.
"Will education continue to be a
state and local problem, or will
the federal government come
back as a partner ?"
In his speech, Bennett said
presidential candidates should
support holding teachers and
principals accountable for stu-
dent performance; giving parents
their choice of schools; wider test-
ing and comparison of states,
districts and individual schools;
and state takeovers of "bank-
rupt" school districts.
"We've got to have candidates
who understand what we have to
do to reform education in Amer-
ica and put that very near the top
of their priority list Hunt said.
"Red lights ought to go off when
candidates give us easy, simplis-
tic answers
(The
ast Carolinian,
ride,
otlvqtion,
xperience,
riends.
Apply today.
.
East Carolina University
Students comment on fees
Continued from page 1
to support all courses. About 60
percent is used to maintain what
we already have and the rest goes
towards special projects. Money
in this area is used to expand and
create or modernize labs or com-
puter facilities
As of the spring semester, 1987,
the $25 labcomputer fee had not
been approved by the State Legis-
lature said Bloodworth. There-
fore, the information was not
available to students at the time
of pre-registration for fall classes.
Doug Johnson, a Communica-
tions Major, said, "The fee may be
essential to the University but I
didn't approve of the method
used to employ it Johnson said
the University should have made
students aware of the fee in some
other manner than "just slapping
it on our registration receipts
Debbie Tully, a senior, said, "1
think the notices should have
been sent out to notify students of
the possible increase and reasons
for it
Bloodworth explained that
once the legislation was passed
for the $25 labcomputer fee, the
state went through a process of
estimating how much money the
$25 labcomputer fee would
produce. It then allocated ECU
Wide Selection of Calendars
&Local and Out of Town Newspapers
Balloons For All Occasions
Central Book and News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 7 Days A Week
Special ECU Rates
.1 Visit $5.00
.5 Visits $20.00
10 Visits $35.00
22 Visits $66.00
RECEIVE EXTRA VISITS FREE
with Purchase of a Package!
Monthly and 6 Month Memberships Available
First visit free with valid ECL I. D.
California
Tanning Salon
You Can See the Difference
608 Suite A, Arlington Blvd.
MonThurs. 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Fri. 10 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Sat. 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. 355-7858
(Later by appointment)
California Tanning Salon - A relaxing, comfortable
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ility is Our Goal"
i' .
jjssssrttttttstttttttttittttfssisststttttrttcrr'tf���j������iit�����t������ii
R USH The Smallest
Fraternity On Campus
ZETABETATAU
A fraternity can be the best way
to reach social and academic
goals here at E.C.U. The
brothers of ZBT can help you
with; highest overall G.P.A. on
campus, a strong little sister
program, and a chance to be
involved like only a small
fraternity can offer.
Mon Sept. 14 Rosina's Pizza 8:00-11:00
TueSept. 15 Rosina's Pizza 8:00-11:00
Wed. Sept. 16 2401 E. 3rd St 8:00-11:00
Apt. D
830-0524 (Call for a ride.)
'ttsMssttitttrrtrrimtnii9Mttrrtrrtttttttttttttttrrrrrrrrmtwmmttwmtwttttjmtntm��������������tmmmmmmmmmmmmmtmmt
�t in mmk
VI X
I
n
Kim m
�� ija)mxOirfi�l " if mriT�i�-�- - �i��th
'� f$H
1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 10, 1987
Education to be debate focus
3 FRATERNITY
I
V
R S
GREENSBORO (AP) � In the
14 months before the 1988 presi-
dential election, the American
public can expect to hear a lot
about education.
"I've not seen a survey in the
last year that education was not
the first or second (most impor-
tant) issue said William Friday,
retired president of the Univer-
sity of North Carolina. "It rotates
with the economy and defense
While it is not unusual for gov-
ernors and state legislators to
campaign on education, presi-
dential candidates have tended
to focus on issues such as econ-
omy, defense and foreign affairs.
But already in this young cam-
paign, the presidential candi-
dates are staking themselves out
on the three Rs as never before,
observers say.
And on Friday, nine of them �
seven Democrats and two Re-
publicans � will be at the Uni-
versity of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill for a debate that will
deal only with education.
Political analysts say there are
several reasons for the increased
attention paid to academic issues.
Foremost, it's an issue close to
America's heart.
"Public schools are arguably
the No. 1 domestic concern of the
American people Education
Secretary William j. Bennett said
in a back-to-school address at the
National Press Club in Washing-
ton Tuesday.
That concern has been raised
by more than 100 national, re-
gional and state reports on educa-
tional quality in the last seven
years.
One of them � "A Nation At
Risk" � called for sweeping
educational reforms. As a result,
several states, including North
Carolina, have taken steps to
overhaul their educational ma-
chinery.
Now, the same factors that
have made education the No. 1
issue at the state Ic el are coming
into play nationally.
And in the process, presiden-
tial candidates have discovered
that education is the only way to
deal with one of the nation's chief
problems � international com-
petitiveness.
"The drive to be more competi-
tive has just jelled in the last four
or five years said former Gov.
Jim Hunt, who will quiz the
Democratic candidates in
Friday's debate.
"It all goes back to economics
Hunt said. "If we want to have
good jobs that pay high salaries,
we've got to learn to think for a
living
In addition, candidates have
learned that education has a
slosh-over effect � it's at the core
of some of the nation's other
problems.
"Education has everything to
do with the strength of defense,
with the growth of the economy
and with what we are doing to
achieve peace Friday said. "It's
the engine that causes these
things to happen
Friday is heading a national
commission that will issue a re-
port next month calling for a re-
newed partnership among the
state and federal governments,
the corporate community and
colleges and universities.
Many people charge that the
federal government significantly
reduced its role in the educa-
tional partnership during the
Reagan administration.
"In the past eight years, there
has been a pullback in federal
involvement said John Dornan,
head of the Public School Forum
in Raleigh, a group made up of
business people, elected officials
and school leaders that does re-
search on programs in public
primary and secondary schools.
'That's what makes this elec-
tion really critical Doman said.
"Will education continue to be a
state and local problem, or will
the federal government come
back as a partner ?"
In his speech, Bennett said
presidential candidates should
support holding teachers and
principals accountable for stu-
dent performance; giving parents
their choice of schools; wider test-
ing and comparison of states,
districts and individual schools;
and state takeovers of "bank-
rupt" school districts.
"We've got to have candidates
who understand what we have to
do to reform education in Amer-
ica and put that very near the top
of their priority list Hunt said.
"Red lights ought to go off when
candidates give us easy, simplis-
tic answers

The
a$t Carolinian,
ricte,
otivqtipn,
xperience,
riends.
Apply today.
East Carolina University
Students comment on fees
Continued from page 1
to support all courses. About 60
percent is used to maintain what
we already have and the rest goes
towards special projects. Money
in this area is used to expand and
create or modernize labs or com-
puter facilities
As of the spring semester, 1987,
the $25 labcomputer fee had not
been approved by the State Legis-
lature said Blood worth. There-
fore, the information was not
available to students at the time
of pre-registration for fall classes.
Doug Johnson, a Communica-
tions Major, said, 'The fee may be
essential to the University but I
didn't approve of the method
used to employ it Johnson said
the University should have made
students aware of the fee in some
other manner than "just slapping
it on our registration receipts
Debbie Tully, a senior, said, "1
think the notices should have
been sent out to notify students of
the possible increase and reasons
for it
Bloodworth explained that
once the legislation was passed
for the $25 labcomputer fee, the
state went through a process of
estimating how much money the
$25 labcomputer fee would
produce. It then allocated ECU
Special ECU Rates
.1 Visit $5.00
.5 Visits $20.00
10 Visits $35.00
22 Visits $66.00
RECEIVE EXTRA VISITS FREE
with Purchase of a Package!
Monthly and 6 Month Memberships Available
First visit free nith valid ECU f.D.
California
Tanning Salon
You Can See the Difference
608 Suite A, Arlington Blvd.
MonThurs. 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Fri. 10 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Sat.
355-7858
11 a.m. - 1 p.m.
(Later by appointment)
California Tanning Salon - A relaxing, comfortable
atmosphere, and THE BEST TAN IN TOWN!
ility is Our Goal"
R USH The Smallest
Fraternity On Campus
ZETA BETA TAU
A fraternity can be the best way
to reach social and academic
goals here at E.C.U. The
brothers of ZBT can help you
with; highest overall G.P.A. on
campus, a strong little sister
program, and a chance to be
involved like only a small
fraternity can offer.
Mon Sept. 14 Rosina's Pizza 8:00-11:00
TueSept. 15 Rosina's Pizza 8:00-11:00
Wed. Sept. 16 2401 E. 3rd St 8:00-11:00
Apt. D
830-0524 (Call for a ride.)
'vssMstttfitttttt9�s�n�ttttttttt$t$sttttttr�"mii�.nttiiM.�iiMtmm9tmmammtmmmmmmmmm�mmmmmammm�mmmt0m0�00f I
'�
i
m
��
�W�aa������ �� i��w0mmm
�MMMIMiMMIIMMNatfHMM
� � iii�m�





10
�THE EASTCABQLIN1AN SEPTEMBER 10,1987
Activists claim ruling will boost animal rights efforts
Santa Clara (Cal.) County Board
oj Supervisors ruled Aug. 25
Stanford University has to pre-
pare an Environmental Impact
Statement before it can build a
new animal research lab.
The decision, Stanford officials
say, effectively will stall building
the lab at least until 1988.
The decision, rights activists
say, will give them a new weapon
- statements never have been
needed before to build such facili-
ties � in their effort to stop scien-
tists nationwide from experi-
menting on animals.
The activists' efforts were
centered in nothem California in
July and August, where various
humane groups lobbied against
building new facilities at Stan-
ford, the University of California
at San Francisco and Cal at
Berkeley.
The conflict is representative of
the growing national debate
about animal research that swept
through many campuses during
the 1986-87 school year
Demonstrators marched at
UCLA and the universities of
Minnesota, Utah and Arizona,
among dozens of others, during
the year.
At California-Davis, a group
called the Animal Liberation
Front freed turkey vultures from
their lab cages and set fire to a
veterinary laboratory to protest
the school's use of animals in
research.
The Stanford, Berkeley and
Cal-San Francisco rallies suggest
protests and civil disobedience
will continue during the 1987-
1988 academic year.
Stanford officials hope to build
a $17 million facility to house
51,000 rodents used by campus
researchers in scientific experi-
ments. Cal officials want to build
a $14.3 million facility to house
rodents, cats and primates at the
Berkeley facility.
At Berkeley, animals now are
housed at 22 different sites
around the campus, said Dr. Roy
Hendrickson, the director of the
Jackson to be
candidate
RALEIGH (AP) � After origi-
nally planning to announce his
presidential candidacy on Labor
Day, the Rev. Jesse Jackson has
decided to wait until the national
convention of the RainbowCoali-
tion, which will convene next
month in Raleigh.
"1 suspect he and his national
staff chose Raleigh because it is in
the South, and it is a pivotal po-
litical state said Bruce E. Light-
ner, the convention's local coor-
dinator. "Raleigh in particular
has the physical facilities neces-
sary to host a major convention
The convention will give
Jackson an audience of his key
supporters from around the na-
tion, Lightner said.
"I think the consideration was
that No. 1, here in Raleigh during
the convention he will have most
of his national supporters, mean-
ing key people from virtually
every state in the country, "
Lightner said.
"Also, there will be a much
larger forum in terms of media
exposure, and he wanted to do it
in the South, I think Lightner
said.
Jackson, 45, said on Labor Day
he wouLd formally announce his
candidacy for the Democratic
presidential nomination on Oct.
10, the second day of the Rai nbow
Coalition's three-day conven-
tion.
Jackson, a South Carolina na-
tive and a graduate of N.C. A&T
State University in Greensboro,
has strong support in North
Carolina, Lightner said.
"You have to bring into consid-
eration that Reverend Jackson is a
guest in the state frequently, he
has a lot of friends here, he at-
tended school here � he has
stong roots in North Carolina
Lightner said.
The expected announcement
will boost interest in the conven-
tion, organizers said. Convention
planners had expected about
1,200 for the convention before
Jackson's announcement.
"It's a safe bet" that 2,600 to
3,000 people could attend the
gathering, Lightner said.
"We anticipate that because of
the energy and excitement that
traditionally surrounds Rever-
end Jackson that the attendance
will be dramatically higher
Lightner said.
university's animal office who is
overseeing efforts to centralize its
animal facilities.
Hendrickson says a new lab
will improve the animals's lives.
Spurred by complaints from
animal rights advocates, the U.S.
Department of Agriculture last
year fined Berkeley $12,000 for
placing animals in overcrowded,
unsanitary quarters. The USDA
mandated that $10,000 of the fine
should be used to improve ani-
mal facilities.
Berkeley officials responded
by hiring Hendrickson to oversee
the improvements.
Now Hendrickson wonders,
"Why are they opposed to the
building when they said the fa-
cilities are so terrible?"
If s because much campus ani-
mal research is "stupid and re-
dundant countered Dr. Elliot
Katz of In Defense of Animals,
which opposes the construction
of the Berkeley facility and ulti-
mately wants to stop campuses
from experimenting on animals.
Ronnie Zanko of Minnesota's
Animal Rights Coalition agreed,
noting scientists use monkeys to
study the effects of alcohol or
cocaine addiction while "there
are millions of humans addicted
to cocaine and alcohol. Why do
they need to use a monkey? For
the sake of science? That's not
okay with me
"We find it inhumane that dogs
live their entire lives with no
sunlight, fresh air or exercise
added Lise Giraud, a Stanford
employee who opposes the new
animal facility. "It's not humane
to keep long-lived animals in
these cages all their lives
"There is no reason for animal
experimentation said Susan
Rich of the Washington D.C.
based People for the Ethical
Treatment of Animals.
Katz believes much of it is done
to win grants rather than to study
serious medical problems.
"Grants are issued based on the
validity of a project said Margo
Tannebaum of California's Ac-
tion for Animals. "There are
many alternatives that are much
less expensive than using ani-
mals, but that includes additional
experimentation. Animal re-
search is tried and true. If you do
research a different'way, you
won't get the grant "
Other scientists remain un-
bowed. "Research without ani-
mals is idealistic but a bit naive
asserted Dr. Cynthia Gillett of the
University of Minnesota.
Cal-Berkeley spokesman Wal-
lace Ravven added, "University-
researchers are eager to find new,
less complicated and less costly
ways to do research
"If there was convincing evi-
dence that other research areas
were cheaper, they would be
grabbed up
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Red white Seedless Or
BLUE GRAPES
Fresh California Plums Or
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�'
toe

i


� 9


X
p
Wise Snacks
$129
7.5 Oz. � Cottage Fry, BBQ Cot-
tage Fry, Home Fries7 Oz. � No
Salt Cottage Fry, Sour Cream
Cottage Fry
Pepsi
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$109
2 Liter - Pepsi-Free, Diet Pepsi, Diet
Pepsi-Free
Miller
Lite
$279
Pkg. of 6 - 12 Oz. Cans
Budweiser
Beer
$559
Pkg. of 12 - 12 Oz. Cans Reg. & Lt.
EXTRA LOW PRICES
� �
Everyday
Food Lion
Mushrooms
z89c
4 0z. - Pieces & Stems
H'C Ui.r
Fruit Drinks I I
Drinks
$-99
9 Pack - Assorted
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99c
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Butter-Me
-Nots
299C
9.5 0z. - R�fl.Bran Biscuits
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$189
8 Oz. - Grated
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$-59
2 Lb. Frozen � Salisbury Steak;
TurkeyCharbroi! ltd Patties
Large Rail � AssortedDesigner
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99
22 0z. - 40C Off
The hand, n the left i
woureducati
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computer centt
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speak, will re - .
$199
rw��Bm�i ��'�" " ' �
�� iii�mmm
�j





Activists claim ruling will boost animal rights efforts
JAL� ALTO, Ca.(CPS)- The
anta Clara (Cal.) County Board
of Supervisors ruled Aug. 25
Stanford University has to pre-
pare an Environmental Impact
Statement before it can build a
new animal research lab.
The decision, Stanford officials
say, effectively will stall building
the lab at least untill 988.
The decision, rights activists
say, will give them a new weapon
- statements never have been
needed before to build such facili-
ties � in their effort to stop scien-
tists nationwide from experi-
menting on animals.
The activists' efforts were
centered in nothem California in
July and August, where various
humane groups lobbied against
building new facilities at Stan-
ford, the University of California
at San Francisco and Cal at
Berkeley.
The conflict is representative of
the growing national debate
about animal research that swept
through manv campuses during
the 1986-87 school year.
Demonstrators marched at
UCLA and the universities of
Minnesota, Utah and Arizona,
among dozens of others, during
the year.
At California-Davis, a group
called the Animal Liberation
Front freed turkey vultures from
their lab cages and set fire to a
veterinary laboratory to protest
the school's use of animals in
research.
The Stanford, Berkeley and
Cal-San Francisco rallies suggest
protests and civil disobedience
will continue during the 1987-
1988 academic year.
Stanford officials hope to build
a $17 million facility to house
51,000 rodents used by campus
researchers in scientific experi-
ments. Cal officials want to build
a $14.3 million facility to house
rodents, cats and primates at the
Berkeley facility.
At Berkeley, animals now are
housed at 22 different sites
around the campus, said Dr. Roy
Hendrickson, the director of the
Jackson to be
candidate
RALEIGH (AP) � After origi-
nally planning to announce his
presidential candidacy on Labor
Day, the Rev. Jesse Jackson has
decided to wait until the national
convention of the Rainbow Coali-
tion, which will convene next
month in Raleigh.
"I suspect he and his national
staff chose Raleigh because it is in
the South, and it is a pivotal po-
litical state said Bruce E. Light-
ner, the convention's local coor-
dinator. "Raleigh in particular
has the physical facilities neces-
sary to host a major convention
The convention will give
Jackson an audience of his key
supporters from around the na-
tion, Lightner said.
"I think the consideration was
that No. 1, here in Raleigh during
the convention he will have most
of his national supporters, mean-
ing key people from virtually
every state in the country, "
Lightner said.
"Also, there will be a much
larger forum in terms of media
exposure, and he wanted to do it
in the South, I think Lightner
said.
Jackson, 45, said on Labor Day
he wouLd formally announce his
candidacy for the Democratic
presidential nomination on Oct.
10, the second day of the Rai nbow
Coalition's three-day conven-
tion.
Jackson, a South Carolina na-
tive and a graduate of N.C. A&T
State University in Greensboro,
has strong support in North
Carolina, Lightner said.
"You have to bring into consid-
eration that Reverend Jackson is a
guest in the state frequently, he
has a lot of friends here, he at-
tended school here � he has
stong roots in North Carolina
Lightner said.
The expected announcement
will boost interest in the conven-
tion, organizers said. Convention
planners had expected about
1,200 for the convention before
Jackson's announcement.
"It's a safe bet" that 2,600 to
3,000 people could attend the
gathering, Lightner said.
"We anticipate that because ot
the energy and excitement that
traditionally surrounds Rever-
end Jackson that the attendance
will be dramatically higher
Lightner said.
university's animal office who is
overseeing efforts to centralize its
animal facilities.
Hendrickson says a new lab
will improve the animals's lives.
Spurred by complaints from
animal rights advocates, the U.S.
Department of Agriculture last
year fined Berkeley $12,000 for
placing animals in overcrowded,
unsanitary quarters. The USDA
mandated that $10,000 of the fine
should be used to improve ani-
mal facilities.
Berkeley officials responded
by hiring Hendrickson to oversee
the improvements.
Now Hendrickson wonders,
"Why are they opposed to the
building when they said the fa-
cilities are so terrible?"
It's because much campus ani-
mal research is "stupid and re-
dundant countered Dr. Elliot
Katz of In Defense of Animals,
which opposes the construction
of the Berkeley facility and ulti-
mately wants to stop campuses
from experimenting on animals.
Ronnie Zanko of Minnesota's
Animal Rights Coalition agreed,
noting scientists use monkeys to
study the effects of alcohol or
cocaine addiction while "there
are millions of humans addicted
to cocaine and alcohol. Why do
they need to use a monkey? For
the sake of science? That's not
okay with me
"We find it inhumane that dogs
live their entire lives with no
sunlight, fresh air or exercise
added Lise Giraud, a Stanford
employee who opposes the new
animal facility. "Ifs not humane
to keep long-lived animals in
these cages all their lives
"There is no reason for animal
experimentation said Susan
Rich of the Washington D.C.
based People for the Ethical
Treatment of Animals.
Katz believes much of it is done
to win grants rather than to study
serious medical problems.
"Grants are issued based on the
validity of a project said Margo
Tannebaum of California's Ac-
tion for Animals. "There are
many alternatives that are much
less expensive than using ani-
mals, but that includes additional
experimentation. Animal re-
search is tried and true. If you do
research a different" way, you
won't get the grant
Other scientists remain un-
bowed. "Research without ani-
mals is idealistic but a bit naive
asserted Dr. Cynthia Gillett of the
University of Minnesota.
Cal-Berkeley spokesman Wal-
lace Ravven added, "University
researchers are eager to find new,
less complicated and less costly
ways to do research
"If there was convincing evi-
dence that other research areas
were cheaper, they would be
grabbed up
toe


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CUBE STEAK
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POTATOES
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'XH8(
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r-
i
i

AK
' �
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$109
2 Liter � Pepsi-Free, Diet Pepsi, Diet
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$279
Pkg. of 6 � 12 Oz. Cans
Budweiser
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$559
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' "1
kivi
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9 Pack � Assorted
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Jl
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99
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8 Oz. - Grated
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tout educate
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� HI! WIWIOH
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����'�- " i riiiiwgiiiimifcaMiipgajaii
'





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 10, 1987 11
efforts
said Susan
Washington D.C
the Ethical
chol it is done
� than t1 Study
nu - c
. "There art
that are n
an using ani-
research a different' way, you
won t get the grant "
Other scientists remain un-
bowed Research without ani-
mals is idealistic but a bit naive
asserted Pr Cynthia Gillettof the
University vt Minnesota.
Cal-Berkelc) spokesman Wal-
lace Raw en added. University
researchers are eager to find new,
ss complicated and less costly
ways to do research
ore was convincing evi-
e that other research areas
cheaper, they would be
RICES!
Reserve The Right To Limit
luantities On Ail Items.
;h Baking
ATOES
99
15 Lb. Bag
ted, White Seedless Or
BLUE GRAPES
resh California Plums Or
NECTARINES I
I
Budweiser
Beer
$559
Pkg of 12 12 0: Cans Reg. & It
eryday
Food Lion
Parmesan
$189
8 Oz. Grated
Banquet
Entrees
$-59
2 Lb. Frozen � Salisbury Steak
TurteyCharoroil Beef Patties
Naturally
-�f Good
5M
I Oz. Cat Ned iwf-UvtrTma
Uvcr-CMckN
L
Two great ways
to cruise through the semester.
i
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i
t
4
V 'm
r� V
� i j
9 -
The hand on die left Ls p ised hi hat o mJd be the most essential pan of
w )ur educatk mi.
A Macint sh" a Hnputer:
And die hand on die right Ls gripping pure, simple, unadulterated run.
A Honda Son Her. One we're gi ing a a
.All you have tock i fi r a chance t i drive it away is isit your campus
computer center and fill i ut ei itn Ii �m White v )u're mere, take a
Macintosh for a test drive.
Because Macinu sh can help you rite term papers, categorize
elements of the pern dic table, pit i the rise and (all of pork-belly prices,
compile computer a de. and talk t) ther a )mputers.
And die first 25( I pa ple (m campus winget Miind a mouse, so to
speak, will receive a free Apple" menu i f ard.
S) head er tw wr campus o jmputer center t day And ask al ut
our Student financing Pn )gram
Who knows? m may .soon find yourself cruising a little tardier than
you expected.
. Test drive a Macintosh.
HONDA
You may ride away on a Honda Scooter.
Student Stores
Wright Building
.in 1 rear i i- os apph.�mi h ur campus a xnputer center for complete pronxxional details One free Honda Elite" 50 Vooter will be awarded per participating schi��1.
� nh registc-a-il students and faculty are eligible to win Odds of winning van' depending on size of school and number of contest entrants No purchase necessan
C W 1 lc (1 miputer. Iik Appk' and the Apple logo are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. Macintosh ls a trademark of Apple Computer. Inc Elite is a trademark 'it Honda
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efforts
said Susan
ton DC.
the Ethical
chef it is done
r than tostudv
�'Moms
d ist d on the
i .i Margp
nia - Ac-
hero are
that are much
ani-
onal
Anima! re-
true it you do
research a different way, you
won't get the grant "
Other scientists remain un-
bowed Research without ani-
mals is idealistic but a bit naive
asserted Or Cynthia Gillett of the
University or Minnesota
Cal-Berkeley spokesman Wal-
lace Ravven added. "University
researchers are eager to tind new,
complicated and less costly
wa s tv1 do research "
It there was convincing evi-
dence that other research areas
were cheaper, they would be
grabbed up
RICES!
Reserve The Right To Limit
luantities On All Items.
esh Baking
ATOES
99
15 Lb. Bag
led, White Seedless Or
BLUE GRAPES
esh California Plums Or
NECTARINES �

I
Lbi"
Budweiser
Beer
$559
Pkg of 12 12 Oi. Cans Reg & Lt
eryday
Food Lion
Parmesan
$189
8 Oz. Grated
Banquet
Entrees
$-59
2 lb. Frozen - Salisbury Steak
TurkeyCharfaroil Beef Patties
I Naturally
-sssf Good
5M
S Oz. Cat Fawl - ImMjwwTmm
Ifetr-CMckM
L
THEEAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 10, 1987 11
Two great ways
to cruise through the semester.
The hand n the left is p ased on w hat o uld be the m st essential part )f
your education.
A Macintosh" computer.
And the hand on die right Is gripping pure, simple, unadulterated run.
A Honda So x ter. One we're giving ;i av
All you have t) d 11 r a chance t i drie it aw av is visit ur campus
computer center and fill ui an entn t �m While y u re there, take a
Macintosh tor a test drive.
Because Marine ish can help u write term papers, categorize
elements of tlie pern dic table. pl t the rise and fail of pork-belly prices,
compile computer a de. and talk t i )ther a )mputers.
And die first 2S() pa ple n campus h get behind a mouse, so to
speak, will receive a free Apple" menu board.
S() head jver t) wr campus g mputer center t div. And ask afcx )iit
our Student Financing Program.
Who knows? Vbu may a wo find yourself cruising a little farther than
you ecpected
. Test drive a Macintosh.
You mav ride awav on a Honda Scooter.
Student Stores
Wright Building
1 11 liii 1 rt-strii �s apph,�iMt h mr campus computer center ft complete pamiotional details One free Honda Elite 50 Scooter will be awarded per participating school.
1 ink registered students and faculty are eligible- to win Odds of winning van' depending on size of school and number of contest entrants No purchase necessary
HIT 1 let .Miixner. Iik Apple and the Apple logo are registered trademarks of Apple Oarnputer. Iric Maan�)sLsatjadernark()fAppleQ)mputer. Inc Elite is a trademark 4 Honda
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12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 10,1987
Abortion ruled on
ATLANTA (AP) � A federal
judge today struck down
Georgia's new law requiring
minors to notify their parents
before having an abortion, ruling
that two provisions of the law are
unconstitutional. U.S. District
Judge Robert Hall left the door
open for state officials to amend
those two provisions, but en-
ined them from enforcing the
iaW.
The judge said either side may
appeal his ruling to the 11 th U.S.
Circuit Court of Appeals. How-
ever, he noted that the U.S. Su-
preme Court is to consider a simi-
lar case from Illinois within the
next year and that the decision in
that case will be binding on the
Georgia case.
Hall ruled that one portion of
the Georgia law, which requires a
parent or adult to accompany a
woman 17 or younger to an abor-
tion clinic to verify parental con-
sent, was unconstitutional be-
cause it "unduly burdens the
minor's rights
He said the Georgia General
Assembly can solve that problem
by amending the law to allow
verification by telephone or mail,
as allowed in other states.
He also found an unconstitu-
tional violation of a juvenile's
right to anonymity. The law al-
lows a judge to approve a minor's
abortion if parental notification is
not feasible in some cases, but
Hall noted that Georgia Supreme
Court rules do not provide for the
sealing of juvenile court docu-
ments.
Announcements
IndividimJrxhoug
Like a circlem a rectangle, each of us Ha
to be unique. Individual thought. Freedom
of expression.
Express yourself in The East Carolinian.
Positions �re now open for editors, staff
writers, production manager and layout
artists
The experience, the friends, they can't bj
beat.
Team effort.
ly today
Alpha Phi Alpha
The Brothers of the Eta Nu Chapter of
Alpha Phi Alphi Fraternity, lnc will have
a car wash at Wendy's on 10th St Sat.
Sept 12 (before the Fla. State game) from
10a.m. to 1 p m Proceeds will be donated
to the United Negro College Funj
Stress
Free mini class offered to students by
the ECU Counseling Center to help con-
1 stress September 15, 17, 22, 24, in 32
Wright Buildirg from 3-4 p.m. No ad
ance registration is required. Call or stop
by the Counseling Center for further in-
formation (316 Wright Building; 757-
riM).
The Graduate Management Admission
Test (CM AT) will be offered at East Caro-
lina University on Sat. Oct. 17, 1987. Ap-
plication blank are to be completed and
mailed to GMAT, Educational Testing
Service, Box 966-R Princeton, NJ 08540
Application must be postmarked no later
then September 14, 1987. Applications
may be obtained from the ECU Testing
Center. R.vm 105, Speight Building,
Greenville, NC 27834
College Republicans
The ECU College Republicans will
meet Wed night at 7 pm in room 212,
Mendenhall Student Center
Coral Reef Dive Club
Contact Rob or Glenn at 752-4W Tor
information about loimng the Coral Reef
Dive Cub
XAACP
The ECU Chapter of the NAACP is
ing their first meeting I ' ' on
ursday Sept 10th at 5:00 in Rm. 21 of
Mendenhall.
Ice HockeyFencing
It you play hockey or are interested in
fencing, please contact Mike Anderson at
758-6449 These are ECU club sports.
Phi Beta Lambda
First meeting on Wed Sept. 16th in
room R.T02 at 3:00 p.m. Welcome all busi-
ness and business education majors. Phi
Beta Lambda is a counterpart of FBLA.
Education Majors
The Department of Speech-Language
& Auditory Pathology (SLAP) will be
providing the speech and hearing screen-
ing for all students eligible for admission
to the upper division of teacher education
Mon. - Wed Sept 14-16. Test times: Mon
5:00-6:30 pm Tues and Wed. 5:00-7:00
p.m. No appointment needed The SLAP
Department is located in Belk Annex on
Charles St.
ftaftWetball Blowout
IFC and Panhellcnic are holding a Bas-
ketball Blowout on Sept. 23-25 near the
Student Store to support the Ronald
McDonald House Grand prize: $100.00
Law Society
The ECU Law Society will hold its first
meeting on 91087 at 8:00 p.m. at the
Mendenhall Student Center in room 221
All persons interested in going to law-
school are urged to attend.
Phi Sigma Pj
Do you have a 3.30 or higher overall
G.P.A. and have completed between 32
and credit hours? Then Phi Sigma Pi
National Honor (co-ed) Fraternity could
be for you. Come to our Smoker on Sept.
22 St 7:30 p.m. in room 103 of the Biology
building
Cooperative Education
Walt Disney World, the leader in the
entertainment industry, will be on cam-
pus to recruit students for spring
semester. Students from all majors are en-
couraged to participate. Merchandise,
food and attractions, among other posi-
tions, are available. Representatives will
be at ECU on Sept. 29 and 30. Contact the
office of Cooperative Education in the
Rawl Building for further details.
Pi Sigma Alpha
There is an organizational meeting for
Pi Sigma Alpha Political Science Honor
Society, Thursday, September 10th at 5:00
p.m.
Student Homecoming
Committee
Nominations for Homecoming Queen
1987 are now being accepted. Organiza-
tions should send their candidates name
and phone number to Leslie Council -
Student Homecoming Committee, Tay-
lorSlaughter Alumni Center, ECU Cam-
pus.
Business Students
AMA speaker - Mark Rosenberg
Founder of East Coast Creative Design in
Rawl Browning Room Sept. i5th, 3:30
(Tues).
Free Pizza
Aim 1 ligh Air Force ROTC. Free Pizza!
Learn more about ROTC and Air Force
opportunities on Mon , Sept 14th from 5-7
p.m. in Wnght Annex - third floor.
Catholic Student Centgj
The Newman Catholic Student Center
will sponsor a scries of Thursday Evening
Lectures entitled THE BIBLEEXPERI-
ENCING GODS WORD, beginning
Thurs Sept. 10th at 9 p.m. For further
information stop bv the Newman Center,
553 E. 10th St. or call 757-3760.
Baptist Student Union
The BSU invites you to worship with us
every Thurs. evening at 7 p.m. Also, on
Mondays we offer a homt-cooked meal
starting at 5:30 p.m. for the cost of 52. It's
a rime of fellowship and fun It is an infor-
mal type worship)�so come as you are!
ECU Gospel Choir
Anyone wishing to purchase a copy of
the newly released album "Land Oil
Glory should contact any member of the
Gospel Choir.
Assertiveness Training
Three-part workshop offered to stu-
dents at no cost by the University Coun-
seling Center. September 17, 24 & Oct. 1
All three sessions will be conducted from
3-4 p.m. in 312 Wnght Building. Oil the
Counseling Onter at 757-6661 for Regis-
tration.
Pre-Physical Therapy
Any sophomore (or higher) wanting to
make applicaiton to the Physical Therapy
program for May 1988 must go to the P.T.
Department (Allied Health-Belk Build-
ing.) to confirm eligibility to apply. Con-
tact the P.T. Dept. by mid September to
receive the P.T. admission packet and
application for the Allied Health Profes-
sions Admission Test. Completed admis-
sion packet must be returned by Nov. 1,
1987. Application deadline for the
AI IP AT is October 16, 1987.
Pirate Walk
Positions for director, asst. director,
operators, and walkers. Turn in applica-
tions to the SGA office in 218 mendenhall.
If you have any questions call 757-6611
ext. 218.
ECU Lacroisg
All players from last year and any new
players interested in both fall and spring
lacrosse need to contact Chris at 757-0305
or Moog at 757-1122. We need to organize
fund raising and the fall schedule
The Navigators
"Flight 730" takes off every Thursday
night at 7:30 p.m. in Biology 103. Comeflv
with us for an hour and a half of fun, fel-
lowship, and food. We're an interdenomi-
national campus Christian group.
Elementary Education
The Class Meeting for the Department
of Elementary and Middle Grades Educa-
tion is Mon Sept 14 from 4-5:30 p.m. in
Hendrix Auditorium, Mendenhall ALL
majors and certification students are ex-
pected to attend
The 'East CaroCinian
is presently accepting
applications for the following positions:
BUSINESS MANAGER
CREDIT MANAGER
BILLING CLERK
Make yourself marketable.
At The East Carolinian you can gain the
valuable experience needed to give you
the edge in today's highly
competative job market.
Apply in person today.
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Sure A Fraternity is Surrounded by Alot of Fun!
There are Great Benefits besides The
Social Aspects of Being a Pi Kappa Phi.
PI KAPPA PHI FRATERNITY FACT SHEET
Pi Kappa Phi Facts
106 chapters
1 5 colonies
50,240 inflated members
Fastest growing fraternity in the country
83 veors old founded December 10. 1904 at the College of Charleston
The only National Fraternity who has created and supports its own national service proiect PUSH
Has a $500,000 headquarters building located m Charlotte. N.C
Convention Supreme Chapter every odd year
Leadership School Pi Kappa College every even year
A mid year leadership conference (AVATW)
Nine area conclaves
Solicitation of alumni support totalling $200,000 last year
Has over 45 regional alumni associations
A quarterly magazine The Star and Lamp
Has a Natior.al Council made up of 7 of Pi Kappa Phi's distinguished alumni
Enamples of Some Famous Pi Kappa Phi's
Howard Baker Chief of Staff to President Ronald Reogan
Gaylord Nelson Former United States Senator
Jim Edwards Secretary of Energy under President Reogan, former Governor of South Carolina
Thomas Wolfe Author
Joe Sewell Baseball Hall of Fame
Randy Owen Country music award winner, "Alabama" band
Alan C Sundberg Chief Justice, Florida Supreme Court
Phillip M Crane Congressman, United States House of Representatives (R IL)
Pi Kappa Phi sends you this invitation to become a distinguished
member of the Beta Phi Chapter of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity!
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Monday
1 uesday
W
Wednesday
WE COME TO YOU NIGHT"
Meet the Brothers at Mendenhall Student Center.
-Party with the Band from the Toga Party with TTKO's own 180 Proof!
-Cook out with Hot Dogs, Hamburgers, etc.
-ALSO-
Come see 2 EXOTIC FEMALE STRIPPERS! All at the Rotary Club (next to
AOTT's House).
"Beach Party"
At the House (by the lake) with ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP!
CALL FOR A FREE RIDE - 757-1281
FRESHMEN WELCOME!
An nights are from 7:00 'til 11:00 p.m.
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Colleges in
(CPS) � Amid fears of campus
gridlock, worries about how to
get football sod to recover
quickly and lingering questions
about what to do with a $500,000
altar, four colleges are getting
ready to host John Paul II dunng
the Tope's September 10-19 visit
to the United States
On his multi-city tour, the
Catholic leader will drop by the
University of South Carolina at
Columbia, the University of New
Orleans, Xavier University and
Arizona State University, in some
cases for only a few hours
To students at the four cam-
puses, the papal visit will mean
canceled classes, changes in park-
ing arrangements, new construc-
tion and, in one instance, eviction
from their dorm rooms.
To administrators the visit
means a lot of meetings and extra
expenses
The University' of New Or-
leans, for one,
$100,000" on li
mated UNO's
while Xaier.
leans, has beenj
place, sandbi�
and doil
said spol
John Paul li
Carolina for
hours, where
addresses an,
with nn-Cat!
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use.
oces at
forth �
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Tht
USC nev
iarget
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SO
Or
More cash is s,
WASHINGTON, DC ICPS) -
Students, parents, state legisla-
tures and the federal government
will spend $124 billion on higher
education this year, or $14,294 for
each full-time student, the US
Department of Education calcu-
lates.
In its annual back-to-school
forecast, the department � in
recent vears a severe critic of col-
lege spending � also noted this
year's higher education costs
represent a 7 percent jump since
1986-87.
Announcing the forecast last
week, Secretary of Education
William Bennett argued the ex-
pense of higher education does
not justify the return.
'The American people have
made a tremendous financial
commitment to education Ben-
nett said of the record $308 billion
the nation will spend on all levels
of education this year. "We know
i Anti-drug ads
i auneefcat school
WASHINGTON (AP) � An as-
sociation of state boards of educa-
tion is complaining that a new
federal anti-drug advertising
campaign mistakenly suggests
that schools are where most teen-
age drug trafficking and abuse
occurs.
The ads urges students to
"slam the door on drugs in our
schools
"The cynical message behind
this campaign would have us
believe, comfortably and er-
roneosly, that schools are at the
center of this nation's drug prob-
lem said Phyllis Blaunstein,
executive director of the National
Association of State Board of
Education.
The association was among 14
national education groups that
signed on as co-sponsers of Edu-
cation Secretary William J.
Bennett's anb-drug drive, called
"Schools Without Drugs: The
Challenge The association,
based in Alexandria, Va said it
would remain a co-sponsor of the
campaign, despite its misgivings.
"I must tell NASBE that drugs
are a problem in our schools.
There is no doubt about that
Bennett responded in statement
Monday. "NASBE's unwilling-
ness to accept this reality is the
kind of denial that has hurt our
ability to deal effectively with
this problem. Shame on them
China suffers
quake problem
BEIJING (AP) � A series of
earthquakes has destroyed more
than 1,400 houses and injured 87
people in the past month in east
China's Jianxi province, a news-
paper reported today.
A quake measuring 55 on the
Richter scale � signifying � tem-
blor capable of causing consider-
able damage � struck the
province's Xunwu county on
Aug. 2. Since then, nearly 400
quakes of varying intensity have
hit the county of 230,000 people,
said the official English-language
China Daily.
The newspape. said 560
houses were demolished in the
original earthquake, and about
840 were destroyed by later tem-
blors.
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llll EAS1 CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 10, 1987
13
Colleges in U.S. prepare for papal visit
(.CPS) � Amid fears of campus
gridlock, worries about how to
get football sod to recover
quickly and lingering questions
about what to do with a $500,000
altar, four colleges are getting
ready to host John Paul II during
the fope's September 10-19 visit
to the United States.
On his multi-city tour, the
Catholic leader will drop by the
University of South Carolina at
Columbia, the University of New
Orleans, Xavier University and
Arizona State University, in some
cases for only a few hours.
To students at the four cam-
puses, the papal visit will mean
canceled classes, changes in park-
ing arrangements, new construc-
tion and, in one instance, eviction
from their dorm rooms.
To administrators, the visit
means a lot of meetings and extra
expenses.
The University of New Or-
leans, for one, has spent "about
$100,000" on landscaping, esti-
mated UNO's Bill Racek; mean-
while Xavier, also in New Or-
leans, has been "cleaning up the
place, sandblasting buildings
and doing some landscaping
said spokesman Richard Tucker.
John Paul II will be at South
Carolina for only about five
hours, where he'll make two
addresses and meet privately
with non-Catholic religious lead-
ers.
USC, city, state and archdi-
ocesean officals started planning
for the five-hour visit six months
ago.
The objective, said Ann Hill, a
USC newswriter, was "to let the
largest possible number of
people see the Pope without
causing major gridlock in all of
South Carolina
On Sept. 10, the day before the
visit, students who live in dorms
near the site of John Paul IPs first
campus speech will have to leave
their rooms for two days. On the
morning of the visit, the Secret
Service will "sweep" nearby
buildings, and seal them until he
leaves.
Nevertheless, "the students
and everyone on campus are
excited and loking forward to the
visit Hi'l maintained.
Similarly, the University of
New Orleans � where John Paul
II will visit Sept. 12 � will cancel
classes and close its offices and
library in anticipation of an influx
of some 30,000 visitors, Racek
expained.
After the Pope and the visitors
leave, however, UNO will still
have a $500,000 altar the archdio-
cese is building for the occasion.
"The university will have to
decide what to do with it Racek
said of the structure, which en-
closes showers and parking for
the "Popemobile the pontiff's
special limousine.
Racek said it's possible the altar
may become a dressing area for
athletic events.
It will take about a week to
restore the grounds, Racek said.
Xavier's Tucker said it's all
worth it. "This visit has been a
great opportunity for exposure,
for getting some things done that
needed to be done
A few students will be among
the 4,500 people who hear John
Paul II speak at Xavier, but most
of th audience will consist of
members of the National Catho-
lic Education Association and the
Association of Catholic Colleges
and Universities.
Both groups have criticized the
Vatican in recent years for its
proposals to bring Catholic cam-
pus courses under church con-
trol, a move many American offi-
cials say would undermine the
value of degrees granted Hy U.S.
Catholic colleges
"Our only regret Tucker said,
"is that so few Xavier people will
be able to at tend, but we are not in
control of the invitations. Xavier
is only serving as host If more
tickets become available, more
Xavier people will be able to be
there. "
The Pope's last campus appear-
ance will be at Arizona State,
where he will celebrate Mass �
oddly enough in Sun Devil
Stadium on Monday, Sept. 14.
ASU will cancel classes on the
14th, but has not declared a cam-
pus holiday. Classes will be re-
scheduled for a "reading day"
later in the semester, said ASU
spokesman Georgeat hi art.
ASU will encourage students,
staff and administrators to take
the day off or leave campus as
early as possible on the 14th.
The Secret Service alsn had
asked the school to close some
parking areas near the stadium.
ASU is getting less sprucing
than the other campuses the Pope
will visit, though Cathcart re-
ported the diocese is installing a
65 ft. copper cross in the stadium.
University officials okayed the
cross after church leaders agreed
to take "great care" to prevent
damage to the football field.
More cash is spent on school
WASHINGTON, DC. (CPS) �
Students, parents, state legisla-
tures and the federal government
will spend $124 billion on higher
education this year, or $14,294 for
each full-time student, the U.S.
Department of Education calcu-
lates.
In its annual back-to-school
forecast, the department � in
recent years a severe critic of col-
lege spending � also noted this
year's higher education costs
represent a 7 percent jump since
1986-87.
Announcing the forecast last
week, Secretary of Education
William Bennett argued the ex-
pense of higher education does
not justify the return.
'The American people have
made a tremendous financial
commitment to education Ben-
nett said of the record $308 billion
the nation will spend on all levels
of education this year. "We know
Anti-drug ads
aunechat school
WASHINGTON (AP �An as-
sociation of state boards of educa-
tion is complaining that a new
federal anti-drug advertising
campaign mistakenly suggests
that schools are where most teen-
age drug trafficking and abuse
occurs.
The ads urges students to
slam the door on drugs in our
schools
"The cynical message behind
this campaign would have us
believe, comfortably and er-
roneosiy, that schools are at the
center of this nation's drug prob-
lem said Phyllis Blaunstein,
executive director of the National
Association of State Board of
Education.
The association was among 14
national education groups that
signed on as co-sponsers of Edu-
cation Secretary William J.
Bennett's anti-drug drive, called
"Schools Without Drugs: The
Challenge The association,
based in Alexandria, Va said it
would remain a co-sponsor of the
campaign, despite its misgivings.
"I must tell NASBE that drugs
are a problem in our schools.
There is no doubt about that
Bennett responded in statement
Monday. "NASBE's unwilling-
ness to accept this reality is the
kind of denial that has hurt our
ability to deal effectively with
this problem. Shame on them
China suffers
quake problem
BEIJING (AP) � A seri-s of
earthquakes has destroyed more
than 1,400 houses and injured 87
people in the past month in east
China's Jianxi province, a news-
paper reported today.
A quake measuring 55 on the
Richter scale � signifying a tem-
blor capable of causing consider-
able damage � struck the
province's Xunwu county on
Aug. 2. Since then, nearly 400
quakes of varying intensity have
hit the county of 230,000 people,
said the official English-language
China Daily.
The newspaper said 560
houses were demolished in the
original earthquake, and about
840 were destroyed by later tem-
blors.
what makes for a good education.
The generous investment is there.
It's time we started getting a
much better return on that invest-
ment
Bennett's numbers, however,
contradict another report re-
leased last week by Research
Associates of Washington, a pri-
vate research group that studies
higher education.
According to Research Associ-
ates head Kent Halstead, it costs
public colleges and universities
only 4 percent more than last year
to educate its students, an in-
crease "similar to that of many
industries
Halstead concluded public
campuses "remain as productive
as other sectors" of the economy.
He compliments campus offi-
cials for keeping costs down even
while state and local govern-
ments allocated "a seriously de-
clining share of their tax revenue
budgets to public higher educa-
tion � 8.1 percent in 1986-1987
compared to the recent peak of
9.2 percent in 1980-1981
Education costs per student
doubled in the last nine years,
from $254 in 1977-1978 to $5,035
in 1986-1987, while tuition dur-
ing the 1 986-1987 school year rose
just 4.4 percent, the lowest in-
crease in tuition revenues in a
decade, Halstead reported.
Both the Education Dept. re-
port and the Research Associates
study state that college enrol-
lents, despite a shrinking pool of
18-to-24-year-olds, have re-
mained steadv.
STARTING FRIDAY
Hamburger Hill -R-
F.vrnlngs 7.00 9 20
Sat - Sin Manners ; (X) A 20
Robocop -R
Evenings 7 OO 9 10
Snow White G
SatSun M-itlnrr-i 2 OO 1 �)
Living Daylights R
Evening) 7 0O-9 30
Sat. Sun Manners 2 OO-l (0
Untouchables R-
WeekcUys 7 OO ') ir
Sat. Sun 2 00 4 IS. 7 OO 9 IS
$1.50 ALL TIMES
J
The Cut Above
Student Specials
20 OFF Permanent Waves
We Listen Before We Cut.
Men: $8.00 Women: $10.00
Includes Shampoo and Cut.
Hours. 9 Until
TRY OUR WOLFF TANNING BED'
201 E. 5th Street
757 1488 iF
No j
Appointment
Necessary!
St. Paul's Episcopal
Church
WELCOMES YOU
401 East Fourth Street
The Rev. L.P. Houston, Jr Rector
The Rev. M.L. Wootten, III, Assoc. Rector
Marty Gartman, Episcopal Campus Ministry
Schedule of Services
Sunday, September 13th
10:00 Eucharist - followed by
"Homecoming lunch provided
Sunday, September 20th
Fall- Winter Schedule begins
Eucharist - 7:30, 9:00, 11:00
Wednesday - 5:30
Episcopal Student
Fellowship
Eucharist
Supper and conversation follow the service.
Back To School Special
Complete Computer System
with printer (
$ 13CT
i i i
1295
Sale Ends Sept 30. 1987
LEADING EDGE
Model D
Se :e S&fi
iput� Assoc ates
: i.sre'is Kaypro .
juae 'esar
�e�s 0a3au
Leading Edge
Dual Floppy System
� IBM PC XT compatible
� Dual speed 8088-2
4 778mhz
� 2-360K floppy disk
drives
� 512K RAM
� 1 serial. 1 parallel port
� 4 full length (13 inch)
expansion slots
� Monochrome monitor
� Hercules compatible
monochrome graphics
� CGA color graphics
� MS-DOS 3 10
� Microsoft GWBASIC
� 15 month warranty �
parts & labor
System Starter Kit
1 box dOl 5'4
diskettes
all software installed
on diskettes
printer cable
50Q shee' :
pape-
Leading Edge Wordprocessor
software
� - fur rtion
��� 'JP'OCeSSO'
: -�- tutorial
Webster spelling
L -e Hei
Electi
System tor f
documents
le's and
correction with 80.000
ora dictionary
Citizen 120D Printer
� '20 Characters Per
Second
� IBM Graphics
� jctor Feec - ,
FanfciG P3ZC
� Friction Feec
S ngie Sheet Paper
� 4K Da
� One . � ;
S&R Computer Associates, Inc.
Computer Professionals
FREE PARKING IN
REAR OF BUILDING
530 Cotanche Street. Greenville
Beside The Bicycle Post
757-3279
�"WWi
mm
mm9�fm'im w im �mmi-
mm m .mrn�.mm m ��?-?-? �" �� ��
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14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 10.1987
THE E.C.U. INTER FRA
INVITES
RUSH
YOU
'87!
$H?t lappa �au DKT
409 Elizabeth St. 757 1319
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 100
Date and Place of Founding: March 17, 190b
Miami University
National Headquarters Location;
Oxford, Ohio
Fraternity Colors: Havard Red and Old Gold
Philanthropic Organization: Children's Heort Foundotion
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Encourage Brothers to be involved in campus
functions.
f i �tappaifi
803 Hooker Road
nKO
758 1700
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 120
Date and Place of Founding: December 10, 1904
College of Charleston, SC
National Headquarters Location:
Charlotte, North Carolina
Fraternity Colors: Gold, White, Blue
Philanthropic Organization: PUSH
(Play Units for the Severely Handicapped)
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Strongest Alumni Association
Delia JMrjma W
5)0 E 10th St
Numbef of
Date and Place o4 F
College of trw
National Headqua"
Indianapolis Inaia
Fraternity Coic
Philanthropic Orga
What make
The Fraterr I
$i Sappa Alpha fl K A
210Whichard
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 150 752-3874
Date and Place of Founding: March 1, 1866
University of Virginia
National Headquarters Location:
Memphis, Tennessee
Fraternity Colors: Garnet and Gold
Philanthropic Organization:
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Group effort in reaching goals.
Sigma 3Ian (JSamrna
508 W. 5th St.
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 100
Date and Place of Founding: June 28, 1920
Central Missouri State
Teachers College
National Headquarters Location:
Warrensburg, Missouri
Fraternity Colors: Blue and White
Philanthropic Organization:
Greenville Boys Club
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Academics -Individuality
ITT
757-0127
lHappa Sigma
700 E. 10th St. 752-5543
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 200
Date and Place of Founding: December 10, 1869
University of Virginia
National Headquarters Location:
Charlottesville, Virginia
Fraternity Colors: Scarlet. White, Green
Philanthropic Organization: Muscular Dystrophy
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Leadership
Ptmbba �bi Alpha AX A
500 E. Elizabeth St.
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 200 757-1367
Date and Place of Founding: November 2, 1909
Boston University
National Headquarters Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana
Fraternity Colors: Purple, Green, Gold
Philanthropic Organization: March of Dimes
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Diversity
&au Pappa EpBtlon
TKE
951 E. 10th St.
757-3042
Number of Chapters Nationally. Over 200
Date and Place of Founding, January 10, 1899
Illinois Wesleyan University
National Headquarters Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana
Fraternity Colors: Cherry, Gray
Philanthropic Organization:
St. Judes Children's Hospital
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Diversity and Teamwork
(Sfratmtttg TSiMt
To be in a fraternity is not merely to be in a social
club. Fraternities are a way of life. We share ex-
penses as well as experiences, and we are responsi-
ble to each other for our own actions. We live off
campus, for the most part, yet we are very active on
campus. We enjoy a good relationship with our
university's administration and, in the past few
decades, have become a major part of the univer-
sity's student life.
Atljlrtirs
Fraternity men enjoy an active athletic existence.
Whether it be track meets, field events or in-
tramurals, we enjoy competing against one another
in one sport or another.
Mon,Sept.l4th
7:00-ll:00pm
facial Htfr
Tues, SeptJSth
7:00-ll:00pm
Wed, Sept.i6th
7:00-11:00 pm
it never can be said that fraternity people don't en-
joy a good social life. Getting to know many different
pec Die is only natural among such a close-knit
grojp. One seems to fall into a wealth of oppor-
tunities for things to do with his spare time. Events
Sch as Greek Week is just an example of some of
the activities that fraternities plan during the year.
3JIi(( frairruitirs hurt am graces?
� No, there's every evidence that joining a fraternity
improves your chances of graduating.
� 33 of men on campus without fraternities will
graduate, and
� 47 of non-members on campuses with frater-
nities graduate, but
� 65 of all fraternity members graduate.
� Scholarship programs of fraternities produce
greater academic success, and better achievement
for you.
General Fraternity Facts
? All but two U.S. Presidents since 1825 have been fraternity men. Sixteen Vice-Presidents have been fraternity men.
63 of the U.S. President's Cabinet members since 1900 have been fraternity men.
� 71 of the Who's Who in America listees are fraternity members.
76 ol the U.S. Senators & Representatives are fraternity members.
� 85 (40 of 47) of the U.S. Supreme Court Justices since 1910 have been fraternity men.
� 85 of the Fortune 500 executives are fraternity members.
Of the nation's 50 largest corporations. 43 are headed by fraternity members.
Call Any
Brooke St
Chris Holll
Dillon Kalf
James Rusl
Rav Maddl
There will be a RUSH Onet
13th from 8:00 - 10:30p.m.
FRESHMEN IWELC
Seta (Ebfte l
210Whichard
Number of Chapters Nationally 0 i
Date and Place of Founding A.
Miami, Ohio
National Headquarters Location
Miami, Ohio
Fraternity Colors: Pink and Blue
Philanthropic Organization
What makes this Fraternity Unique
Brothers helping Brothers

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THE EAST CAROLINIANSEPTEMBER 10,1987 15
INTER FRATERNITY COUNCIL
VITES I YOU TO
RUSH
hi
nKD
758 1700
Nationally Over 120
undmg December 10. 1904
ton. SC
rs Location.
ite, Blue
PUSH
1
apped)
'87!
AZO
757-0313
Helta jStgtna jbi
510 E. 10th St.
Number of Chapters Nationally. Over 100
Date and Place of Founding: December 10, 1899
College of the City of New York
National Headquarters Location:
Indianapolis, Inaiana
Fraternity Colors: Nile Green, White
Philanthropic Organization: March of Dimes
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
The Fraternity of Engineered Leadership
�tgma Jii lEpstlmt
505 E. 5th St.
ZPE
757 0487
Number of Chapters Nationally: Almost 300
Date and Place of Founding: November 1. 1901
University of Richmond, Virginia
National Headquarters Location:
Richmond, Virginia
Fraternity Colors: Purple, Red
Philanthropic Organization:
Heart Fund
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Diversity
unique
n, Sept, 14th
10-11:00 pm
V
�s, Sept.lSth
00-11:00pm
d, Sept. 16th
0-11:00 pm
.arabda
Chi
Alpha
�oo
tlU�k�tk
Phi Kappa
Tau
40EUsk�k
PI Kappa Phi
(Wed)
Rotary Club
Johnaea St.
Sigma Tau
Gamma
508 W. 5th.
Alpha Slgmr
Phi
422 W 5th.
PI Kappa
Alpha At tie
ITT
5th St.

Zeta Beta Taa 401 4th. Jarria

Pi Kappa Phi
House
S03 Hooker Rd
14th St.
6th St.
CAMPUS
Cotanche St.
ran
tut latk.
Teatb St.
�PP�
Sigma
700 E.lOth.
Arlington Bird
Hooker Rd.
Pi Kappa
Phi
House
Bex
1110
Cotanche
St.
Eleventh St.
Call Any Of The I.F.C. Officers For More Information.
Brooke Stonesifer (iob)- President 758-8010
Chris Holland (m). Exec. Vice President 758-3495
Dillon Kalkhurst M- Adm. Vice President 758-1700
James Russo (okt)- Treasurer 758-8010
Ray Madden (10)- Secretary 752-7638
2eta Seta �au
830-0524
ZBT
Number ot Chapters Nationally. Over 150
Date and Place of Founding: 1898
Clark College, New York City
National Headquarters Location:
New York City
Fraternity Colors: Blue, White
Philanthropic Organization:
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Stress Scholastics, Close-knit members
l&appa Alprja
1dbb
500 E. 11th St.
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 150
Date and Place of Founding: December 21
Washington and Lee
National Headquarters Location:
Lexington, VA
Fraternity Colors: Crimson and vjiu uold
Philanthropic Organization: Muscular Dystrophv
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
1st fraternity on Campus
KA
757-0128
210 Whichard
752-0232
Number of Chapters Nationally: 155
Date and Place of Founding: 1856
Norwich University, Norwich, Vermont
National Headquarters Location:
Trenton, New Jersey
Fraternity Colors: Red and White
Philanthropic Organizations: Ronald McDonald House
What makes this Fraternity unique:
Personal development and service to Alma-Mater.
Facts
Sixteen Vice-Presidents have been fraternity men.
ince 1900 have been fraternity men.
are fraternity members,
ives are fraternity members,
since 1910 have been fraternity men.
are fraternity members.
re headed by fraternity members.
HMEN
There will be a RUSH Orientation Session at Mendenhall 221 on Sunday, September
13th from 8:00 - 10:30p.m. Pizza and drinks will be served.
WELCOME AT RUSH
Seta atyeta f
t
210 Whichard
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 100
Date and Place of Founding: August 8, 1839
Miami, Ohio
National Headquarters Location:
Miami, Ohio
Fraternity Colors: Pink and Blue
Philanthropic Organization:
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Brothers helping Brothers
Ben
757-1840
&lpifa �tgma f rjt
AZP
422 W. 5th St. 757-3516
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 100
Date and Place of Founding: December 6, 1845, Yale
University
National Headquarters Location: Delaware, Ohio
Fraternity Colors: Cardinal and Stone
Philanthropic Organization:
American Lung Association
What makes this fraternity unique
That each brother is an individual and that the fraternity
unites to become the best.
210 Whichard
Number of Chapters Nationally: over 200
Date and Place of Founding: January 1, 1864
Virginia Military Institute,
Lexington, Virginia
National Headquarters Location:
Lexington, Virginia
Fraternity Colors: Black, Gold, White
Philanthropic Organization:
Kidney Foundation
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Founded against hazing
757-6824
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16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 10,1987
Judge says Bork tried to shift
decision in ruling
WASHINGTON (AP) - A re-
tired federal judge says Supreme
Court nominee Robert Bork once
tried to shift the decision of a
judicial panel that both men
served on to reflect Bork's own,
differing viewpoint, according to
a published report today.
The Washington Post said the
criticism of Bork's "basic hon-
esty" came in a letter to the Senate
Judiciary Committee from re-
tired VS. District Judge James F.
Gordon about a 1983 case.
Bork served with Gordon and
the late Judge Roger Robb on a
three-judge federal appeals court
panel that heard a lawsuit by
Republicans challenging their
committee assignments in the
Democratic-controlled House.
In writing the panel's decision,
Assault charge
Bork tried to sidestep an agree-
ment among the three judges and
replace the majority view with
his own opinions, wrote Gordon.
Gordon said he was "shocked
to say the least" when he discov-
ered that Bork was trying to shift
the decision to reflect his own
views. Gordon said he objected
and eventually ended up writing
the majority decision, with Bork
filing a concurring opinion.
Bork declined to comment di-
rectly on Gordon's assertion, but
his office released a letter which it
said he sent toGordonat the time,
saying "it occurs to me toe late
that 1 should have notified you in
advance that I was changing the
rationale
Gordon, however, said he
never received the letter.
N.C. Reverend arrested
CHARLOTTE (AP) � The Rev.
James Council Stirewalt has been
fined $25 after pleading guilty to
simple assault in touching an
undercover vice officer's genitals
in a Charlotte adult bookstore last
month.
Prosecutors said Stirewalt,
minister of Trinity Lutheran
Church in Landis for 13 years,
improperly touched the officer as
an X-rated movie played in a pri-
vate booth.
Stirewalt, a minister since 1956,
had said he visited the Joy Adult
BooKstore to observe what went
on at such businesses.
Stirewalt said his hand may
have brushed against the officer
as the minister was leaving a
booth where X-rated movies
were viewed in privacy.
But Officer Chris Couch testi-
fied Tuesday that Stirewalt had
tried to unbotton the officer's
shirt and had placed his hand on
Couch's genitals. Couch said
Stirewalt was masturbating.
District Court Judge Leonard
VanNoppen fined Stirewalt $25
and ordered him to pav court
costs. VanNoppen suggested
that Stirewalt consider another
line of work and counseling.
Stirewalt refused to comment
when asked if he would resign his
church post.
"Rev. Stirewalt acknowledges
he made a terrible mistake' de-
fense attorney Harry Faggart
said. "He apparently got carried
away with what he saw there.
He got carried awav by things he
docs not yet understand.
"He now faces niin and dis-
grace as a result of this unfortu-
nate event Faggart said. "A
good man has made a mistake.
This is not a time to gloat that a
man has fallen. It is a time for
sympathy
Hart apologizes on TV
WASHINGTON (AP) � For-
mer Democratic presidential
front-runner Gary Hart, grap-
pling with the issue that drove
him from the 1988 campaign,
admits he has committed adul-
tery and says he doesn't plan to
re-enter the race even though he
still wants to be "part of this
debate" over the country's fu-
ture.
"I'm not running for presi-
dent Hart said in a 60-minute
appearance on ABC-TV's
"Nightline" program Tuesday
night. "I have no plans to run for
president
The former Colorado senator
was contrite and defiant by turns
during the question and answer
session, which he concluded with
an emotional apology to his chil-
dren, Andrea and John.
"I just want to say to one very
special young woman and young
man how sorry I am for letting
them down for many others like
them. Haw courage, we are not
defeated and we will not be. I will
tind some way, I promise you, to
continue on he said.
Thus ended an extraordinary
ate-night television session in
which I fart took full responsibil-
ity for the "serious mistake" of
keeping company with Miami
model Donna Rice. Questions
about his relationship with Rice
led to Hart's withdrawal last May
8, at a time when he was the pro-
hibitive front-runner for the
Democratic presidential nomina-
tion.
"I made a serious mistake. I
should not have been in the com-
pany of any woman who was not
a friend of mine or my wife Hart
said. "I should not have been
with Miss Rice
"I am totally and fully respon-
sible for my own actions and I
want to say to everyone how
sorry I am. I want to apologize to
you for those actions Hart said.
Hart has stayed out of the pub-
lic spotlight since his withdrawal
from the race, and his appearance
on the television program
marked the beginning of his re-
emergence as a public figure. He
said he plans to meet later today
with New York Gov. Mario
Cuomo, and has scheduled a
speech in Philadelphia on Thurs-
day that marks the start of a series
of such addresses.
Asked by interviewer Ted
Koppcl whether he had an affair
with Rice, Hart refused to answer
directly.
"If the question is in the 29
years of my marriage, including
two public separations, have I
been absolutely and totally faith-
ful to my wife, I regret to say the
answer is no
"But I also am never going to
answer any specific questions
about any individuals he said.
Hart also said the question was
improper and should not be put
to another candidate.
As for his political future, Hart
said that while he has no plans to
run for president, "I want to be
part of this debate
He also offered an explanation
for a widely circulated photo-
graph showing Rice on his lap.
He said he had been posing for
pictures with several people who
recognized him at a boat dock,
and she sat down on his lap unex-
pectedly. "I was embarrassed. I
chose not todropheroff he said.
Even as he apologized, Hart
sought to score political points
against President Reagan.
Hart admitted he made mis-
takes, but added that, "No troops
were sent into combat to die
unnecessarily. No laws were
broken. No papers were shred-
ded. No money changed hands.
No one lied to Congress.
"And every one of those things
happened under this (the Re-
agan) administration
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
:AduitsS25
Tuesdays and Thursdays
CHILDREN c-p
. ANYTIME 9l.
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
STAKE OUT
Rated R - 2:30-4:45-7:00-9:20
Fat Bovs in
THE DISORDERLYS
Rated PG - 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
Gene Hackman in
NO WAY OUT
Rated R -2:00-4:30-7:00-9:20
" iiiiiiiiiiiiii
WHM
miHE
WMKLl'S
GilNC
IN
A fantastic celebration at St. Timothy"
on October 3rd!
LIVE MAINE LOBSTERS: Live-$7.00 Boiled- $8.00
For ticket or information, call:
Linda Fielda Lorraine McNalrjr Church Office
756-6016 756-6480 355-2125
St. Timothys 10th Annual
Lobster Fair
Students, tickets are available from
Dlrck Spencer 403 S. Harding
830-1438 from 9:00-12:00
Sept. li. 12 and 18.
KAPPA ALPHA
Dear Rushee . . .
As a fraternity rushee this fall at East Carolina University, you
will have an important decision to make. You must choose the
organization which you wish to join. A fraternity of men with whom
you will live for the next four years, and whom you will call your
brothers for the rest of your life. We at Kappa Alpha are sure that you
will make a careful evaluation of the various aspects of fraternity life.
And further more, we believe that you will agree that KA is the most
unique and traditional of any college fraternity. We are looking for-
ward to meeting you during rush, and wish you the best of luck in
deciding on a fraternity and in your college career.
The Brothers of Gamma Rho
Chapter of Kappa Alpha Order
THE HOME OF SOUTHERN GENTLEMEN
RUSH
7:00-11:00
Each Night
MONDAY
Open House
Meet The Brothers
TUESDAY
Open House
WLiT Sisters
WEDNESDAY
By Invitation Only

'



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THF EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
SEPTEMBER 10, 1987 Page 17
Noura's Kitchen breaks burger habit
The sign that greets customers of the restaurant.
By GRETCHEN JOURNIGAN
Staff Writer
Eating well balanced meals and
avoiding the boredom of fast food
restaurants is often a common
dilemma for the average college
student trying to manage a
budget.
Break away from the ordinary
and try Noura's Kitchen, at 405 S.
Evans, a new Lebanese restaurant
serving lunch on weekdays from
11:30a.m. until 2:30 p.m. The food
is creative, different and most of
all affordable. Prices of main
courses served with an appetizer
and salad range from $2 - $3.75.
The daily special "from the
broiler" (Shish Taouk) for $3.50 is
an excellent diversion of taste
from the plain "chicken fillets
Shish Taouk is chunks of mari-
nated chicken, grilled and served
with rice.
They also serve side orders of
Spinach Fatayer-tangy spinach in
Filo dough, Arayess-arabic bread
spread with spicy meat, yogurt,
and Hommos-pureed chickpeas
with lemon, garlic and tahini.
The Hommos is similar to a
vegetable dip but is served with
bread-Arabic bread.
If your taste buds are hesitant
towards tasting new foods, two
spiccy tasting sandwiches are of-
fered � Kufta and Shish sand-
wiches.
For desert, the Baklava � made
of walnuts wrapped in flakey
pastry with a touch of honey
syrup, is only 95 cents.
Other deserts include cake,
bran muffins and scones.
Noura's beverages are basically
the same as the American bever-
age - fresh juices, tea, coffee and
milk. The only unusual, but re-
freshing, beverage is the mint tea.
The distinct taste in the foreign
food is a combination of spices
such as the cardamon, saffaron,
nutmeg and the Jamaica spices-
which comes from a Jamacan tree.
Issami Hamze, owner of restau-
rant, says that the establishment is
doing very well for the area.
He said the restaurant, which
now serves only lunch, will ex-
pand its menu to include dinner
items next month.
Noura's is small, but Hamze
says it seems to be the proper size
for business.
He has no future plans of ex-
panding the business regardless
of its popularity. The size allows
Hamze to be active in all areas of
the restaurant-serving, cooking
and planning meals.
See OWNERS, page 22
It's not easy being 'Big Easy'
Bv CHRIS MITCHELL
Staff Wntrr
When Jim McBride took on the
job of finding a working title for
his new film, he found one to re-
flect the convergence of Dennis
Quaid and Ellen Barkin poured
upon the seediest parts of New
Orleans: "The Big Easv. "
McBride's title comes from
what New Orleans is all about.
Time and again characters re-
mind us New Orleans is the Big
Easy, that you eventually fall into
its rhythm, ways of thinking,
ways of life. The Big Easv al-
refers to Dennis Quaid's being a
slightly crooked cop on a very
crooked police force. And, of
course, the Big Easy for most will
mean how El'en B.irkm .exgntu
auv submits to"TfnTaTcr and
her own lust in a predictably
steamv sex Sex SEX scene.
Quaid's character hails from a
family of Cajun cops. As Cajun is
a rage these days, the producers
make sure we get the idea New
Orleans is nothing but Cajun. Lots
of real Cajun music, real Cajun
cooking, and a very surreal Cajun
accent stumbling out of Quaid. So
where dat Bojangle1
Being only a slightlv crooked
cop, Quaid is bad onlv in a 'tradi-
tional" sense. Since he began on
the force, the lieutenant has par-
ticipated in protection for local
businesses. His share oi the
extortion profits is his share of the
"Widows and Orphans Fund
That's the way oi the Big Easv,
and Quaid has accepted it and
profited by it. After all, it's long
hours, short pay, and the crooks
out there never go away.
But someone is killing "Wise
Guys" (lingo for the Mafia).
Quaid and his band of wi se-crack-
ing, hip-Southern clowns eel cer-
tain the Wise Guys have begun a
drug war with each other. But
witnesses insist the murderers are
plainclothes cops. Police corrup-
tion? Call in the D.A
Ellen Barkin: uptight, not in-
digenous to the Big Easy, lawyer-
ish, uptight, professional, up-
tight, uptight. The D.A. associate
must work with the lieutenant to
sort out any police corruption,
especially if connected to the Wise
Guy murders. Quaid and Barkin
share a mutual attraction, she
loosens up, they go to bed, they
solve the Wise Guy murders. Big
deal, you know who heads the
corruption before the exposition
concludes.
Haws run much oi the film.
Quaid smiles his unbearable
smile too much, much more irri-
tating than his ludicrous accent
His brotrtPr in the film must have
been raised by the gatorf, 'cause
he don got de accent. Barkin, the
ever-professional lawyer, resorts
to lavcrne and Shirley schtick to
"lighten up" those tense moments
when her life is in danger. Ned
Beatty, as the head of the homi-
cide department, relies too much
on his character from "Deliver-
ance The mystery plot is no
mystery � you take no time to
figure the realJybad guys. Sus-
pense in "The Big Easy" docs keep
you on the edgeof your scat � are
they ever going to bed again?
Though McBride dresses a fif-
teen-minute soft-core flick as a
two-hour romancesuspense
actionadventure romp, style
does come out strong. The Cajun
music flavor doesn't step into the
light much; its quality remains a
backdrop with the mood swings
oi the streets and sultry interiors.
When the romance dominates
everything looks inviting, subtle.
The same alleys and bars convey
danger and intrigue in the chase
scenes; McBride accomplishes
this through a slight shift in the
music, camera angles and editing
McBride retains control whether
we find Quaid and Barkin banter-
ing in bed or engaging in legal
intercourse in the courtroom.
"The Big Easy" never
absolutely bores and shouldn't
offend. Its draw is Quaid's grin
and conquest of Ellen Barkin. Its
quality of film-making shows
through in director Jim McBride's
style. Not much on plot, but the
producers felt sure you wouldn't
care anyway.
Movie review:
Noura's seems to be somewhat crowded as some people partake of the lunch-only menu.
New Bond celebrates 25th year
Bv MICAH HARRIS
Staff Writrr
1,
This vear marks the 25th anni-
versary oi the world's most suc-
cessful movie series and arguably
cinema's most successful charac-
ter. Hint: he's not Luke Sky-
walker, Indiana Jones, Rambo or
any '80s pop culture hero. He
debuted in 1962 in a film which
was titled, not after him, but the
villian. The villians name was Dr.
No. The hero's?
Bond James Bond.
That's how Sean Conner)' in-
troduced himself to movie goers
in 1962, and 25 years later Bond
fans wait with delightful anticipa-
tion the utterance of this verbal
calling card in each subsequent
adventure.
Sean Connery, who has created
the somewhat impossible stan-
dard against which all new Bonds
are measured, was ironically not
the producers first choice. That
was Roger Moore who had to pass
because of other obligations.
You wonder if Moore's good-
hearted, cultured playboy inter-
pretation would have taken off in
the early '60s. Connery, whose
tongue-in-check wit was a thin
venure over a saurian-type killing
instinct, scintillated like a Roman
Candle. By "Goldfinger" in 1964,
Bond was riding the crest of a
wave of spy-mania.
James Bond influenced pop
culture in the '60s in a way similar
to "Star Wars" in the late' 70s.
Mattel released a line of Bond
toys: radios and cameras that
folded out into guns (and who-
ever got mine at a yard sale � I
want 'em back!).
There were bcaucoups of movie
imitators, most notably the "Matt
Helm" and "Flint" series. The
comics had Marvel's "Nick Furv"
and Tower's "T.H.U.N.D.E'R
Agents TV was crowded with
spies: "The Man From
U.N.C.L.E "1 Spy "Mission
Impossible "Wild, Wild West"
and even today, soap opera spies
Robert Scorpio and Shane Dono-
van are video descendents of
Bond.
Connery left after five movies,
perhaps feeling his character was
becoming restricted by elaborate
gadgetry. The producers at-
tempted to get Moore again, but
had to settle for George Lazenby
for "on her Majesty's Secret Serv-
ice Lazenby's glib characteriza-
tion just didn't cut it. Co-star,
Diana Rigg (judo-mistress Emma
Peel from "The Avengers")
would have made a far more in-
teresting Bond than Lazenby.
Despite his claims to the con-
trary, Connery returned for
1971's "Diamonds Are Forever"
and for one more performance
(hence the title of his 1983 Bond
film, "Never Say Never Again").
Finally, Moore stepped into the
role and brought 007 through his
70s and early '80s adventures.
Moore's interpretation of the
character remains a subject of
debate among Bond fans. Many
want to believe the series offi-
cially ended with Connery. Oth-
ers preferred Moores suave de-
meanor. The facts remain that
during his tenure, the series be-
gan to become almost keystone
cop style slapstick. There were
attempts to reverse the trend, but
Moore's tongue-in-cheek ap-
proach was already too much of a
trademark to invite much correc-
tive surgery. A transplant was
needed.
It came when Roger Moore fi-
nally kept his promise to quit and
40year old Timonthy Dalton took
part. Here, at last, was a return of
the '60's Bond from "Dr. No yet
tempered for the '80s with a
human warmth. Dalton's first
adventure was toned down from
the epic scale of "Moonraker" or
"The Spy Who Loved Me the
new Bond is more apt to rely on
his wits and prowness than gadg-
etry, and the delightful result is a
suspension of disbelief not felt
sinced the early Connery films
that the spy's adventures could
really happen.
Additionally, the youthful
Bond is joined by a new, young
Miss Moneypenny and C.I.A.
agent Fliex Lighter which adds a
fresh touch, allowing an appro-
priate rejuvenation to the stories
at its 25th year.
Company brings Shakespeare
to East Carolina on Wed.
Players from the N.C. Shakespeare Festival enact a scene from "A Midsummer Nighf s Dream" at a television studio.
Mtndrnhall Prau Releuc
The North Carolina Shakes-
peare Festival will present "A
Midsummer Night's Dream a
romantic comedy about love's
foibles and follies, in Wright
Auditorium Wednesday. The
play is the opening event of the
1987-1988 Department of Univer-
sity Unions' Theater Arts Series.
The North Carolina
Shakespeare Festival was organ-
ized in 1977 in the hopes of pro-
viding students and citizens of
North Carolina and the Southeast
with a consistent program of clas-
sical theatre productions, particu-
larly those of Shakespeare's
plays.
Since its inaugural season, the
NCSF has grown substantially.
The company's annual program
has grown from a three-play sea-
son lasting four weeks to a four-
play season lasting 13 weeks.
"A Midsummer Night's
Dream" is Shakespeare's fairy-
tale literature. One could hardly
imagine a more unlikely combi-
nation of comic plot materials
than that of classical Greek my-
thology, English fairy-tale lore,
Italianate love intrigue, and Eliza-
bethan amateur theatricals. Yet,
these are the elements that
Shakespeare combines in "A
Midsummer Night's Dream It is
a tale of marriage and the compet-
ing claims of love and friendship.
The success of this production
lies in the blending of
Shakespeare's disparate plot and
fairy-tale elements with the ex-
pertise of the NCSF into a unified
whole. Join the NCSF as they
weave the threads of "A Midsum-
mer Night's Dream" into a tapes-
try of magical enchantments and
courtly festivities that everyone
will enjoy.
This production is funded in
part by a grant from the North
Carolina Arts Council ana The
National Endowment for the
Arts, Washington, D.C a federal
agency.
Tickets for this enticing per-
formance can be purchased at the
Central Ticket Office located in
Mendenhall Student Center,
Monday-Friday 11 a.m6 p.m.
Ticket prices are $10 for general
admission, $8 for ECU faculty
staff, and $5 for all ECU students
and youth high school and under.
Wright Auditorium provides
free, convenient parking and easy
accesss to the building for handi-
capped patrons.
For tickets and more informa-
tion call 757-6611, ext. 266, during
the above hours. There will be a
fifty cent handling fee for all
MastercardVisa telephone or-
ders and on all mail orders.

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18
JHE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 10. 1967
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IClLL A iAMP Cf
IV
by Mklver
Sigma Phi Epsilon
a lifetime experience
ECU's Largest Fraternity
Chancellor Cup Champs 3 Years
Running
2nd Highest G.P.A.
240 Chapters Nationally
2 Houses and a Party Room
$90,000 in Scholarships Awarded
Annually
Located at the corner of 5th and Summit.
NEED A RIDE!
757-0487 830-9646
757-0305 830-9647
Sept. 14th and 15th - Sorority Nights - 7-11 p.m.
c
The House With The Heart"
A

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l� Motor KtoflETufrS
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 10. 1987 19
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RAT RACE-MON SEPT. 14 -7:00-11:00 PM
SUBS-TUE SEPT. 15 7:00-11:00 PM
COCKTAILS-WED SEPT. 16 -7:00-11:00 PM
FOOD, FUN
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 10,1987
New videos range from fruit to sound and fury
MICAH HARRIS
SUff Writer
Bananas are good all year, but it
�� the public only has a taste
LrTnarama during the sum-
mer The.r previous two U.S. hits,
ruel Summer" and "Venus
ve played over the summer
months, as does their latest, "I
Heard A Rumor The two songs
'ley released over the previous
n'nemonthsdid nothing. Perhaps
"1 an attempt to capture the suc-
cess of "Venus they have cre-
ated a video in a similar vein, fea-
turing the former models in a
myriad of outlandish costumes,
'here is more of an on old movie
theme here, though, with a nice
effect of projecting black and
white films live on the dancing
set's background.
"If There Was A Man" - the
Pretenders. This Love Theme
from "The Living Daylights" isn't
played in the movie until the
film's end, but it's worth sitting
through the end credits to hear. In
fact, the gorgeaous architecture
and romantically lighted fountain
that the music is dubbed over at
the end of the 007 picture rivals
the visual presentation of this
Pretender's video. The trouble
with movie theme videos in gen-
eral is that they seem hamstrung
by the commercial obligation of
including promotional film foot-
age and not having the actors
present on the video set.
Occasionally, they do get
around this (as Starship did with
"Nothing's Going to Stop Us
Now"). The Pretenders, through
no fault of their own, do not. Still,
the misty incorporation of Film of
Timothy Dalton as James Bond
with the softly sensual perform-
ance of Crissy Hines is a some-
what fitting 25th anniversary trib-
ute to the female fascination with
James Bond.
"Little Lies Fleetwood Mac.
Their best video from the new
album yet, featuring another solid
pop love song from Christine
McVie. The photography is won-
derfully low-key and the special
effects of the group, wraith-like,
fading in and out of existence
enhance the haunting audio dubs
and are much more to the point
than the mini-2001 Kalidoscopeof
"Bie Love It's also nice to hear
Fleetwood Mac functioning vo-
cally as a group, something they
haven't done on a single since
"Hold On To Me Lindsey
Buckingham's strength has al-
ways been more his vocals than
his guitar playing. Now, he's left
the group, and ironically, the
word is he's being replaced with
two guitar players. Hopefully,
this will help Mac be a tighter
band in concert, but
Buckingham's voice, as much a
signature of the group as McVie's
and Nicks, won't be as easily re-
placed.
"Doing It All For My Baby" -
Huey Lewis and the News. Sort of
Michael Jackson's "Thriller"
VITA
wlunkM
111! P YOUR NEIGHBOR
Join individuals and organizations who arc helping
near!) one million people with then tax returns.
The people being helped are low-income, elderlv,
handicapped or have difficulty with English. The
IRS will train ou. The program is called VITA -
olunteei Income Tax Assistance. For details, call
the nearest !Rs office listed in your local telephone
directory.
crossed with an episode of "The
Monkees or a climatic chase
scene from "Scooby-Doo" in
which Shaggy and the gang are
pursued by some "monster" to
the tune of something that's sup-
posed to be "pop" music. The
Huey Lewis song is the best thing
about this video, and, happily, the
plodding lead-in has been excised
and now we get right into the
music. Otherwise, it's silly, pre-
dictable, and only notable for a
character who looks like Quasi-
modo as portrayed by George
"Goober" Lindsey.
"I Want Your Sex" - George
Michael. Michael's song was con-
troversial from the word go be-
cause of its seemingly causal atti-
tude toward intimacy in these
days of AIDS and roses. Michael
responded with a little prologue
to the video urging people to
"explore monogamy Michael's
summary of sexual issues of past
decades, ending with the state-
ment that nowadays sex can kill
you, is an unwittingly sad social
commentary. In the '80s, monog-
amy is being "explored" primar-
ily as a survival tactic, with such
things as - oh, I don't know -
commitment? being secondary.
"U Got The Look" - Prince.
Typical Prince video � full of
sound and fury, signifying noth-
ing.
Tom Togs Factory Outlet
1900 Dickinson Av�nu�
20�c
iESUlii
Sigma Tau Gamma
The dream was conceived at the beginning of the fall semester
1977. A group of 34 ECU students joined together to form a
brotherhood. The Delta Alpha chapter of Sigma Tau Gamma is
composed of men and little sisters who believe that an individual's
uniqueness should not be restricted by an organization. Our
members are encouragea to have their own lifestyles and not to fit in-
to any stereotype. We are a social fraternity that enjoys an at-
mosphere unique from the others. Please visit Sigma Tau Gamma.
Give us a call at 758-4140 for directions to our house. Sigma Tau
Gamma CARES!
OFF SUMMER
0 MERCHANDISE!
Featuring the Hottest Beach Fashions,
Casual Wear, and Famous Brands.
Everything In Store Except Hosiery
1H
-JACKl
trocadero
F.mous Names That Wo Cannot MerK
Tank Top, Tank DniMt, Bicycle Pants, Walk Shorts,
� Tops
roc 1 Ox li
�im Mafia
fW4 'hsi. T-shin
�f you are a newcomer to town, we invite you to
visit our store at 1900 Dickinson Avenue If you
are going to the beach at Morehead City, visit our
new location on Hwy. 70 (just across from
BoJangles).
Shop Tho Store Noarost You-
Hwy. 64E Botwoan
Bothol and Tarboro
Conotoa, N.C.
Wod. - Sat. 9-5
Nassau St.
Yoongsvllla, N.C.
Wadf rl. 9:30-5
Saturday 9:30-4
The Wash House
10th And 14th St.
Laundramat - Dry Cleaning
752-6117 758-6001
Attendants - Snacks - Cable TV
Present Coupon
Expiration Date Sept. 30, 1987
Coupon
20 OFF
Dry Cleaning
or Shirt Laundry !
Coupon
20 OFF
Fluff & Fold
T
I
Coupon
1 Soft Drink
Free
"Come Visit Our Friendly Staff
THURSDAY
IS
I
DRAFT NITE
$ 1.50 ADMISSION GUYS LADIES FREE TIL 12
102 DRAFT ALL NITE
65 TALLS. TOO
FRIDAY
4 TIL 7 RUSH HOUR
FREE ADMISSION FOR ALL
65 TALLS & COOLERS
SUNDAY
LADIES FREE
$1 50 GUYS 65� TALLS & COOLERS
10t DRAFT ALL NITE
WORTH
GOLD
Our Representative is on campus with distinguished traditional and
contemporary styles - each backed by a Full Lifetime Warranty.
dKORVED
X. CLASS RINGS
Representative at the Student Stores
September 10 & 11
9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
�in Mt �0&rf,ijrr4ijm .jp.
1 n I tm. !�,�� i "M' I'M H�glH�IW
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Mojo Nixon
'Bo Day Shu
By CHIPPY BONEHI AD
Sufi VSnlrr
You'll realle from tht-1 �p nine
strains of Mop u n and SI I
Roper's "Bo Day Shu.V that its an
albumtotakeonadate Especially
if you want to gef laid
You and the human (or plastic
mfiatablo) of your choice will
have a blast dancing to the hit
single, "Elvis is Everywl
You'll get in touch with the hi vis
in you
You'll both want to helpd
the evil Anti-Elvis and pun:
Elvis from Joan Rivers I
King karma with a great heat and
loads tunnier than Pi
video tour of Graceland
For your date's
science, Mojo preser
test song for the Eighl
Gonr.a Piss in N
you can write Congn - a
them little nuggets I I
dom.
Surely when the Senat
thelincs, "I ain't gonna pee-
no cupunless Nancy Reagan's
gonna drink it up" and "Thomas
Jefferson's gonna be might) pi
sed when he hears abt
come back from the dead
sock 'em in the head tl
peal those aggraat
After your country sa
forts you'll be hungrv. For
dining pleasure, the gins will
send vou to B.B.Q. USA
have your choice oi anywhere
from Walters Bar-B-Q (an REM
allusion?) to Hog Heaven for ,
dining pleasure, courtesy of Mojo
and Skid's guitars and congas.
After dinner entertainment will
include a fond waltz backward to
your childhood as Skid takes on
lead vocals with "Lincoln L
and then a stunning leap back into
the Sizzlin' Seventies with the
"Polka Polka Lawrence Welk
was never thai
didn't have a
As the albuj
Guzlm' Frei
and your frid
aged to have
age Be 21! Al
dnnk with arc
u and
with �
ers
� the n
in n
n.l
on h.
arly h
muffin" and
Th -
aim. 51
Think or
this m �
Skid -
Th I
maybe �
can write a so
Everywl
Owners ofNoura's Kit
f plan Oct. increase in sj
tfonrinued from page 17
Hamze moved to Greenville
from New Mexico two vears ago
with his wife, Anne, and his three
children
"This is our home he siv He
chose to live in Greenville because
of the location, size and the uni-
versity.
At first, he was in search of a job
in engineering. There were none
available, so he decided to be-
come self-employed with
Noura's Kitchen.
He has had no formal education
in restaurant management but to
him it has made no difference
Hamze, his wife, and sister.
Hind, opera:
gether along
ses.
Michelle G
sa)- that the m
dents pa
drama ma
Hamze
number
from ECl - I
Kitcr
manv
Kit
date.
r
V
-�
?v
rj

t o
v -
c

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c o
"EAST CAROL
TEA PART
Everv Fridav

� $2.00 Iced Teas
�FREE Pizza
5-7 PM
�No Cove
Charge
�ECU Football
Cheerleaders
Pep Rally live
6-7 PM
SjLw Trans '
&r Authority
Sheraton Greenti
� 203 W. Greenville Bh � I
c
-�"� - ?v ?
.i





nd and fury
! its seemingl) causal atti-
oward intimacy in these
- A roses. Michael
ied with a little prologue
video urging people to
re monogamy Michael's
.i' o( sexual issues ot past
- ending with the state-
h.it nowadays sex can kill
� .in unwitting!) sad social
In the '80s, monog-
xplored' pnmar-
tactic, with such
i- oh 1 don't know -
secondary.
k - Prince.
. leo full of
nif) ing noth-
og� Factory Outlet
1900 Dickinson Avenu
0
OFF SUMMER
MERCHANDISE!
he Hottest Beach Fashions,
and Famous Brands.
rvthlng In Store Except Hosiery
Sames That We Cannot Mention
�c I
oo� Tank OrttMs Bicycle Pants. Walk Shorts.
nt Slacks. Puitovart A Tha Original T-
ihin
n � fe vou to
-e If you
i City, visit our
js from
Shop The Stora Naarast You-
Batwsen
a Tarboro
Nassau St.
Youngavllla, n.c.
WadFrl. 9:30-5
Saturday 9:30-4
�wl VIM Acceded
1
TH
LD
a Full L
ditional and
nty.
RVED
CLASS RINGS
he Student Stores
10&11
4:00 p.m.

Mojo Nixon plays
'Bo Day ShusMy
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Wntrr
You'll realize from the opening
strains oi Mojo Nixon and Skid
Roper's "Bo Day Shus" that its an
album to take on a date. Especially
it you want to get laid.
You and the human (or plastic
inflatable) ot your dunce will
have a blast dancing to the hit
single, "Elvis is Everywhere
You'll get in touch with the Elvis
in you
You'll both want to help defeat
the evil Anti-Elvis and purge the
Elvis from loan Rivers. Good
King karma with a great beat and
loads funnier than Priscilla's
ideo tour of Graceland.
For your date's social con-
science, Mojo presents THE pro-
test song for the Eighties, "I Ain't
Gonna Piss in No Jar Together
vou can write Congress, sending
them little nuggets of Mojo's wis-
dom.
Surely when the Senate hears
the lines, "I ain't gonna pee-pee in
no cupunless Nancy Reagan's
gonna drink it up" and "Thomas
Jefferson's gonna be mighty pis-
sed when he hears about this
come back from the dead,Tom
sock em in the head they'll re-
peal those aggravating laws.
After your country saving ef-
forts you'll be hungry. For your
dining pleasure, the guys will
send vou to B.B.Q. U.S.A You'll
have your choice of anywhere
from Walter's Bar-B-Q (an RIM
allusion?) to Hog I leaven for your
dining pleasure, courtesy of Mojo
and Skid's guitars and congas.
After dinner entertainment will
include a fond waltz backward to
your childhood as Skid takes on
lead vocals with "Lincoln Logs
and then a stunning leap back into
the Sizzlin' Seventies with the
"Polka Polka Lawrence Welk
was never this good, but then he
didn't have a stumpfiddle.
As the album segues into "Gin
Guzzlin' Frenzy" perhaps you
and your friend will be encour-
aged to have an alcoholic bever-
age. Be 21! And make it a real
drink with a real hangover please,
as Mojo and Skid have dispensed
with the yuppie world of wine
collers.
For the moreintimate mo-
ments, "In gin oblivion Mojo
and Skid will serenade you with
the dipstv-dumpster romance oi
"Positively Bodies Parking Lot
The soft guiters and washboard
provide vou with five minutes ot
cigarette craving music while
reminding vou to "Be young Be
happy Be foolish
For that painful morning after,
amidst the headache scramble for
classes, perhaps a reprise of "Gin
Guzzling Frenzv" or the cutting
sounds oi "Wash No Dishes No
More"will clear your heads.
As you drive off into the blind-
ing sunrise, pop in "We Gotta
1 lave More Soul" a scathing at-
tack on the Muzak-minded medi-
ocrity oi society. It won't help
your head, but you'll know
your'real least feeling something.
All through the day, you can
hum refrains and choruses.
they're so catchy. You can reflect
on how far Mojo has come since
his early hits, "Stuftin' Martha's
muffin" and "Burn Down The
Malls
Think about his insightful and
almost childish punk phrasing.
Think on how far vou can go in
this world with guts, guitars and
Skid's washboard.
Think about these things and
mavbe when vou grow up you
can write a song called "Bruce is
Everywhere
Owners of Noura's Kitchen
plan Oct. increase in service
Continued from page 17
Hamze mewed to Greenville
from New Mexico two years ago
with his wife, Anne, and his three
children
"This is our home he savs. He
chose to live in Greenville because
of the location, size and the uni-
versitv.
At first, he was in search oi a job
in engineering. There were none
available, so he decided to be-
come self-employed with
Noura's Kitchen.
He has had no formal education
in restaurant management but to
him it has made no difference.
Hamze, his wife, and sister,
Hind, operate the kitchen to-
gether along with three wait-
resses.
Michelle Connolly, waitress,
says that the majority of ECU stu-
dents eating there are art and
drama majors.
Hamze savs that the largest
number of his business comes
from ECU's faculty and down-
town business associates.
After only six months, Noura's
Kitchen seems to be attracting
many different people. Why not
indulge vourself towards some-
thing different? Try Noura's
Kitchen with your next lunch
date.

O i
to"
"EAST CAROLINA
TEA PARTY" "
Every Friday
� $2.00 Iced Teas
�FREE Pizza
5-7PM
�No Covei
Charge
�ECU Football
Cheerleaders
Pep Rally live
6-7PM
Pizza
Transit
Authority
Sheraton Greenville
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 10, 1987
21
BICYCU?
P0S
BICYCLE POST INC.
SCHWINN-RALEIGH-TREK JAMIS(EARTH CRUISER) PEUGEOT
REPAIRS ON ALL MAKES AND
MODELS
-FULL LINE OF ACCESSORIES-
530 Cotanche St.
Downtown Greenville
Join Us Sunday, Sept. 13, 1 p.m. At the Town Commons Downtown Criterium.
WE BUILT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
SAV A CENTER
FOOD MARKETS
Tht? tresh(st v. i to SrJi
Clorox
Bleach
58
rn rr i volume
'JI IVLL Matching
�S DICTIONARY
Buy Volumes 2 & 3 of Funk & Wagnalls New
Encyclopedia for only $4 99 eacn ana receive a
matching 2-volume : I nary
VOLUME 1
IS STILL
ONLY. . .
with S5
-ase
FUNK & WAGNALLS
NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA
Crisco
Shortening
ir Margarine 4 -
Quarters
JSST 99
��4 Duke's .q.
Mayonnaise O
Del Monte0
Catsup OOp
$10��OFF
FRESH CUT GRAIN FED BEEF
20-26 LB AVG -CUT FREE
Whole
Bottom
Round
�5�� OFF
THIN TRIM FRESH CUT
5-7 LB AVG 'CUT FREE
Whole
Boneless
Pork Loin
Cottage Cheese
P&Q Shces
Cool Whip
Pie Shells
IP
69 Vegetables 2
79' Pineapple Juice
89; Del Monte Fruit
) CHOCOLATE CHIP OR
OATMEAL RAISIN
Soft Batch
Cookies
18 oz.
pkg.
ZESTA SALTINES 16 OZ 89-
Coca 2l,tEr Barl;et, Pears
79" Vienna Sausage 2
99- Corn Oil
79 A&P Diapers
99 Alpo Dog Food 3
89
1.79
7.49
1.00
stop 5oo OFF
Whole
Rib Eye
RUSSET
$1.00 OFF
Baking fa
Select
Oysters
Cola
69 Yellow Onions
BOTTLES
Boston Lettuce
$1.09
Dr.Pepper cucumbers 3
89C
69 Kiwi Fruit
99 Tangy Limes 8
LiTER BOTTLES
SAV-A-CENTER SUPER COUPON
Large Avocados 69 Apple Cider
A&P FROZEN
stop Orange l
'I'f Juice "St
Ub On Per Snapper WMh An Addrtional $10 00 Or Mora Purchase Coupon E�p�es Sept 12 1987
99-
99
99
1.79
SAV-A-CENTER SUPER COUPON
ABSORBENT
�� � MM EXPRESS
Money
Orders
25
STOP Bounty
& Towels
Irg
Unn One Per Shopper With An AdAtionai $10 00 Or More Purchase Coupon Ewes Sep V2 '98"
PRICES EFFECTIVE SEPT 6 THRU SEPT 12 1987 QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVEO
Prices Good In Greenville. N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open 24 Hours-Qpep tyon. 7 .m.K Cloec
fonTa.w.Clotid Sat. 11 p-a, Open Sun. 7 �.m11 p �X.
)
- ,i





nd and fury
r I h�.
ne -ire
. a se oi its seemingly causal atti-
tude toward intimacy in these
IDS and roses. Michael
. d a little prologue
a the video urging people to
monogamy " Michael's
summan ot sexual issues of past
s ending with the state-
ment thai nowadays sex can kill
is an unwittingly id social
tan In the 80s, monog-
explored pnmar-
i tactic with such
don t know -
g secondary.
ook" - Trince.
full of
- gnif ing noth-
�9� Factory Outlet
1�0C Dickinson Avenue
00 OFF
0MEF
SUMMER
RCHANDISE!
: the Hottest Beach Fashions,
ir( and Famous Brands.
rvhlng In Store Except Hosiery
TROCADERO
m
Names That We Cannot Mention
k op�. Tank Otmms Bicycle Ptnts, Walk Shorts
ts. Srtont. Slacks. Pullovers 4 The Original T-
lop Untssi)
� � re vou to
le. If you
i City, v is it our
s from
hop The Store Nearest You-
Between
a Tartxro
re N.C.
i 9-5
Nassau St.
YoungsvlMe, N.C.
rVeclFrl. 9:30-5
Saturday 9:30-4
I VIM Ace
Mattecard I
BE
TH
1
i
tditional and
RVED
CLASS RINGS
;he Student Stores
10 & 11
4:00 p.m.
t

Mojo Nixon plays
'Bo Day ShusIy
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Stiff Write
You'll realize from the opening
strains of Mojo Nixon and Skid
Roper's "Bo Day Shus" that its an
album to takeon a date. Especially
it you want to got laid.
ou and the human (or plastic
inflatable) of your choice will
have a blast dancing to the hit
single, "Elvis is Everywhere
You'll get in touch with the Elvis
in you
You'll both want to help defeat
the evil Anti-Elvis and purge the
HI vis from Joan Rivers. Good
king karma with a great beat and
loads funnier than Priscilla's
video tour of Graceland.
Eor your date's social con-
science, Mojo presents THE pro-
test song for the Eighties, "I Ain't
Gonna Tiss in No Jar Together
you can write Congress, sending
them little nuggets oi Mojo's wis-
dom.
Surely when the Senate hears
the lines, "I ain't gonna pec1-pee in
no cupunless Nancy Reagan's
gonna dnnk it up" and "Thomas
Jefferson's gonna be mighty pis-
sed when he hears about this
come back from the dead.Tom
sock em in the head they'll re-
peal those aggravating laws.
After your country saving ef-
forts you'll be hungry. Eor your
dining pleasure, the guvs will
send vou to B.B.Q. U.S.A You'll
have your choice of anywhere
from Walter's Bar-B-Q (an REM
allusion?) to Hog 1 leaven tor your
dining pleasure, courtesy of Mojo
and Skid's guitars and congas.
After dinner entertainment will
included fond waltz backward to
your childhood as Skid takes on
lead vocals with "Lincoln Logs
and then a stunning leap back into
the Sizzlin' Seventies with the
"Polka Polka Lawrence Welk
was never this good, but then he
didn't have a stumpfiddle.
As the album segues into "Gin
Guzzlin' Frenzy" perhaps you
and your friend will be encour-
aged to have an alcoholic bever-
age. Be 21! And make it a real
dnnk with a real hangover please,
as Mojo and Skid have dispensed
with the yuppie world of wine
collers.
For the moreintimate mo-
ments, "In gin oblivion Mojo
and Skid will serenade vou with
the dipstv-dumpster romance of
"Positively Bodies Parking Lot
The soft gutters and washboard
provide vou with five minutes of
cigarette craving music while
reminding vou to "Be young Be
happy Ik foolish
Eor that painful morning after,
amidst the headache scramble for
classes, perhaps a reprise of "Gin
Guzzling Frenzy" or the cutting
sounds of "Wash No Dishes No
More" will clear your heads.
As you drive off into the blind-
ing sunrise, pop in "We Gotta
Have More Soul" a scathing at-
tack on the Muzak-minded medi-
ocrity of society- It went help
vour head, but you'll know
vour'reat least feeling something.
All through the day, vou can
hum refrains and choruses.
they're so catchy. You can reflect
on how far Mojo has come since
his early hits, "Stuffin' Martha's
muffin" and "Burn Down The
Malls
Think about his insightful and
almost childish punk phrasing.
Think on how far vou can go in
this world with guts, guitars and
Skid's washboard.
Think about these things and
maybe when you grow up vou
can write a song called "Bruce is
Everywhere
Owners of Noura's Kitchen
plan Oct. increase in service
Continued from page 17
Hamze moved to Greenville
from New Mexico two years ago
with his wife, Anne, and his three
children
"This is our home he savs. He
chose to live in Greenville because
oi the location, size and the uni-
versitv.
At first, he was in search of a job
in engineering. There were none
available, so he decided to be-
come self-employed with
Noura's kitchen.
He has had no formal education
in restaurant management but to
him it has made no difference.
Hamze, his wife, and sister,
Hind, otx'rate the kitchen to-
gether along with three wait-
resses.
Michelle Connolly, waitress,
says that the majority of ECU stu-
dents eating there are art and
drama majors.
Hamze savs that the largest
number of his business comes
from ECU'S facultv and down-
town business associates.
After only six months, Noura's
kitchen seems to be attracting
many different people. Why not
indulge yourself towards some-
thing different? Try Noura's
kitchen with your next lunch
date.
t s?
r
"EAST CAROLINA
TEA PARTY" "
Every Friday
� $2.00 Iced Teas
�FREE Pizza
5-7 PM
�No Covei
Charge
�ECU Football
Cheerleaders
Pep Rally live
6-7 PM
Pizza
Transit
'Authority
Sheraton Greenville
355-2666
& .
to
203 W. Greenville Blvd.
c
, c
0
a-
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEITEMBER 10. 1987
21
i&f BICYCLE POST INC.
SCHWINN-RALEIGH-TREK JAMIS(EARTH CRUISER)-PEUGEOT
REPAIRS ON ALL MAKES AND
MODELS
-FULL LINE OF ACCESSORIES-
530 Cotanche St.
Downtown Greenville
Join Us Sunday, Sept. 13, 1 p.m. At the Town Commons Downtown Criterium.
WE BUILT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
SAV A CENTER
FOOD MARKETS
J ht �tit w . i to Srive
rw rr 2 volume
I J � l LL. Matchin3
SS DICTIONARY
Buy Volumes 2 & 3 of Funk & Wagi i ��
Ei . pediafoi nly S4 99 each and receive a
VOLUME 1
IS STILL
ONLY. . .
FUNK&WAGNALLS
NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA
FAMILY SIZE
jj OUR OWN 88 OR
Lipton
Tea Bags
24 Ct.
T
22
rE" BEEF
JTFREE
e
m
id
Limit One With An Add'l $10 Or More Purch
Clorox
Bleach
- -vv. i 0.
� I
58�
Crisco fto
Shortening3 �
Margarine 4(
Quarters
Duke's .g.
Mayonnaise f S
Orange QQ Del MonteCQ
Juice 5JtJv Catsup DOv
8 5�� OFF
THIN TRIM FRESH CUT
5-7 LB AVG � CUT FREE
Whole
Boneless
Pork Loin
Cottage Cheese
P&Q Slices
Cool Whip
Pie Shells
69 Vegetables
79" Pineapple Juice
89; Del Monte Fruit
89; Pie Filling
n
79" Vienna Sausage 2 89- P
99 Corn Oil 1.79
79 A&P Diapers" . 7.49
stop $500 OFF
Whole
Rib Eye
99 AipoDog Food 3 1.00
) CHOCOLATE CHIP OR
OATMEAL RAISIN
Soft Batch
Cookies
18 oz.
Pkg-
ZESTA SALTINES 16 OZ 89"
, i-OCa LITER
ULLd Bartlett Pears
SAV-A CENTER
RUSSET
M.OOOFF
Baking f��
Potatoes
Oysters
Cola BOTTLEw
(� fQ Boston Lettuce
Dr.Pepper Cucumbers 3
RQC
J,v Large Avocados
LITER BOTTLES
SAV-A-CENTER SUPER COUPON �
69" Yellow Onions
69 Kiwi Fruit
99- Tangy Limes 8
69- Apple Cider
99 ta�i w
99 Money
99
1.79 ea
AMERICAN EXPRESS
Money
Orders
25
A&P FROZEN
STOP Orange
Juice
906
I I
I I
I I
I I
I I
SAV-A-CENTER SUPER COUPON
ABSORBENT
Urn One Par Shopper WWi An Additional $10 00 O More Purchase Coupon Exptes Sept 12 1987

STOP Bounty
EiP Towels
Urn One Per Snooper Witn An Additional $10 00 Or More Purcnase Coupon Ewes Sec
PRICES EFFECTIVE SEPT 6 THRU SEPT 12 1987 QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVEO
Prices Good In Greenville. N.C- At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open 24 HoursOpey Mon. I.fn� Closed Sat tl p Open Sun 7 a m1 f p �
)
J





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 10,1987

A
.
-e-q

Mtfis afowi apathetic college students
are dispelled in new book on PIRGs
NEWYOUk'lAm �

NEW YORK (AD - A pers.s-
t college students
is that they are selfish, apathetic
politically passive -ccrainly
no match for those who rocked
campuses with protests during
the radical 1960s.
You can sell a lot of books these
kn by bcHulinR students as
shallow and uncommitted. Tha
was one message in University of
Uucago professor Allan Bloom's
vitriolic book, "The Closing of the introduction by Nader suggests
which has that the current myth of campus
"PIRGs public interest research Berkeley where she is completing
groups, which have blossomed graduate work in journalism, first
on 175 campuses in 25 states and came in contact with PIRGs dur-
m Canada since 1970. Inspired ing her undergraduate years at
and nurtured by consumer advo- the University of Houston. She
cate Ralph Nader, PIRGs have eventually went to Washington
teamed students with lawyers, where she worked for columnist
scientists and other professionals Jack Anderson and later, Nader
to do battle on a host of safety,
environmental and consumer is-
sues.
In short, Griffin's book, with an
topped best-seller lists this sum
mer.
But another new book, "More
Action for a Change" (Dembner
Books, $8.95), by Kelley Griffin,
presents a startlingly different
picture of students as among
America's most potent civic mov-
ersandshakersofthe'70sand'80s
a period when toga parties had
supposely replaced sit-ins.
The book is a history oi
apathy is a canard.
"The press has defined student
activism as picketing, demon-
strating and taking over build-
ings Nader said in an interview.
"But meanwhile the PIRG move-
ment is using lobbying, litigation,
referenda, all the mainstream
ways to change society. But that
isn't considered news
Griffin, reached by phone at the
University of California at
Griffin's history of PIRGs
chronicles a remarkable record of
student-generated social change.
Its roots were in Nader's $425,000
court settlement over General
Motors in 1970 in an invasion of
thereafter.
"The key to the success of
PIRGs" writes Griffin, is the pro-
fessional full-time staff which
gives them consistency and ex-
pertise. Students set the priorities
and do important, if not always
glamorous volunteer work - ring-
ing doorbells, distributing peti-
tions, lobbying legislators.
Politically conservative student
groups such as the College Re-
publicans and Young Americans
for Freedom have objected that
privacy case. With the money, colleges have no business acting
Nader founded the first PIRG in as collection agents to finance
Washington, staffed with young organizations of which they
students and professionals and disapprove,
quickly dubbed "Nader's Raid-
ers- "More Action for a Change" is a
He took his fight to campuses, valuable book which reveals the
Finally, at the University of Ore- potential of student political and
gon in Eugene in 1970, he got social action. It's must reading,
enough support to form the first especially, for today's college stu-
of many college-based PIRGs. dents who perhaps didn't realize
Minnesota followed shortly their own strength.

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What do you know about it?
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Jokesters make you Letterman
CHICAGO (AP) - Did you hear
the one about the two guvs who
created a set oi video tapes they
claim can make amateur stand-up
comedians stand out?
The tapes, called "Laugh
Tracks" and "Laugh Tracks
Blue are the 19S0s answer for
frustrated comedians and enter-
tainers everywhere, savs lawyer
Will Hornsbv, who created the
tapes along with his former col-
lege buddy, computer svstems
designer Jim Kaufman.
The two are partners in Humor
Us Enterprises of Chicago, which
sells the tapes for $24.95 each.
"There are a lot of people out
there who are envious of comedi-
ans who would like to take the
stage and get the admiration for
themselves Hornsbv said Mon-
day night. "This is the way to do
Fox company
tours country
LOS ANGELES (AP) � A po-
litical candidate might feel at
home barnstorming across the
country, but Fox Broadcasting
Co. president Jamie Kellner
admits it leaves him exhausted.
At the end of the first week of
the "Great Fox Tune-In Tour
Kellner flew back to Los Angeles
and slept most of the weekend. He
visited Philadelphia and New
Orleans, while colleagues went to
San Antonio and Oklahoma City.
Nevertheless, he was anxious to
get out again and sell Fox and its
new lineup of Saturday and Sun-
day night shows to the public.
Initially, they are screening "21
lump Street" and "Werewolf"
and getting reactions.
"We're going to the cities be-
tween New York and Los Ange-
les he said. "We're going to the
heartland. There the people are
friendly and very sweet. They
take time out to talk to you and to
hear what you have to say
"People watch a lot of television
and they're very sophisticated
about what they like and what
they don't like. No one is in the
middle of anything
The "Tune-In Tour which in-
cludes stars from the Fox shows,
is unprecedented in the history of
network broadcasting. Techni-
cally, Fox calls itself a national
programming service, but that's
as close to being a network as you
can get.
Individual shows have taken to
the hostings to drum support, but
never a network.
Fox has nowhere to go but up.
Its Saturday and Sunday prime-
time lineup of nine shows are at
rock bottom in the A.C. Nielsen
Co. ratings. Its talk show, "The
Late Show hasn't dented
johnny Carson's dominance of
the field.
Fox's initial research showed
that many people were not aware
of the company, an ignorance the
tour is intended to correct. Kellner
said by the time they complete the
tour nearly 100,000 people will
have seen at least one show and
participated in a survey.
Chuck Connors of Fox's "Were-
wolf" and Jonathan Depp of "21
Jump Street" have been on the
road, too. So have Chris Lemmon
of "Duet" and Jonathan Ward of
"The New Adventures of Beans
Baxter
it
The video works by providing
not only the jokes, printed across
the bottom of the television
screen, but the audience to laugh
at them as well.
"Jim and I have always liked to
tell jokes, and we saved up our
best, plus others we compiled
from magazines and things
Hornsbv said.
It isn't just any old group of
people chuckling and occasion-
ally clapping, either. These audi-
ence members sit at nightclub
tables, grinning, giggling, and
sipping drinks. They guffaw
when the jokes are good, writhe
and moan pain when they're
corny.
They respond like a comedian's
dream. Read a line like, "He's so
rich and the audience answers
in chorus, "How rich was he?"
"He's so rich, he gets TV Guide
in hard-cover the viewer re-
plies, and they go wild.
The jokes in "Laugh Tracks
Blue" are off-color, while "Laugh
Tracks" uses straight h mor,
Hornsby said.
Both tapes have themes and
categories like the "smart dog"
category:
"My dog is a great watchdog
the viewer reads, for example. "So
far, he's watched my home get
burglarized three times
Then there are the airplane
jokes, dozen of them.
One goes like this:
"I was on a plane. The weather
was rough, and the plane starts
going up and down and side-
ways.
"The lady next to me gets nerv-
ous and shouts, 'Everyone on the
plane, pray
"I say, 'I don't know any
prayers.
trading jokes.
"We got the idea and sat down
and wrote the comedy routines,
then got a professional produc-
tion company to do the filming
Homsby said.
The audience, consisting of
about 50 "pretty sympathetic"
friends, was invited to a Chicago
nightclub rented for the evening
and treated to both routines, he
said.
Hornsby conceded there is one
potential problem with the vid-
eos. If the would-be comedian
reads the jokes too fast or too
slowly, the timing can get mixed
up, and the audience might start
laughing before the comedian
gets to the punch line.
But said Homsby. "Who cares
IF YOU GET
HAY FEVER O
ASTHMA
IN THE FALL
�Free Allergy
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 10, 1987
23
Ceramic sculptress uses natural tools to
create works on display in world galleries
r
OCOTLAN, Mexico (AP) �
osefina Aguilar makes a point of
saying the only tools she uses for
her ceramic figures st n in muse-
ums and boutiques far from this
southern Mexican town are a
shard of metal, a thorn from a
cactus plant and her hands.
But then, she says, you also
need just a little bit more.
"It's like 1 tell the children the
soft-spoken artisan recently said,
"you've got to put in some soul
That soul is apparent as soon as
one reaches her home and studio,
on the main road from the city of
Daxaca about 15 miles to the
north.
There is a cheerful welcome
sign. The fence posts are topped
by the brightly painted figures
that have made her famous, and
larger ones are scattered about the
cluttered yard that fits between
her home and studio.
Aguilar seems most at home as
she kneels gracefully with her legs
folded on a mat on the corner of
the studio's cement porch, work-
ing with deft fingers as she talks.
One figure just about ready for
sale, that of a woman nursing a
baby and carrying a basket, rests
nearby. The woman's headdress
and necklace are clearly defined
in the simple clay.
Aguilar's work has been exhib-
ited in such places as the Museum
of Cultural History at the Univer-
sity of California Los Angeles,
and the Museum of International
Folk Art in Santa Fe, N.M. It can
also be purchased at boutiques on
such trendy thoroughfares as Los
Angeles' Melrose Avenue or New
York's Columbus Avenue.
The artist and her husband, Jose
Garcia Cruz, keep a cardboard
portfolio of the business cards
from crafts shops that sell her
work, including such places as
West Berlin and Montreal. The
American Southwest figures
prominently on the list: Santa Fe,
N.M San Diego and Long Beach,
Calif San Antonio and Austin,
Texas.
"I started when I was very little
- his age said Aguilar, pointing
to her 4-year-old son, the young-
est of nine children. There are
eight boys, the oldest 20, and one
girl.
All help out at least by painting
some of the figures, she said. Her
husband also works full time in
the business.
Aguilar's parents were utilitar-
ian cotters in Ocotlan whose
decorative figures became popu-
lar. The tradition was passed on to
their children.
"1 used to like making brides
and grooms out of clay the 44-
year-old Aguilar said of her be-
ginnings as a ceramist. "Then I
just liked working with clay
Aguilar's three sisters also
make figures but she is the only
one in the family who works with-
out molds.
Enrique Auddifred, director of
the Oaxaca state artisanry agency,
said the family's work reflects
Oaxaca's rich Indian culture.
Joscfina's figures are baked in
the wood-fueled kiln for seven
hours. Most used to be kept in
their natural earth colors, but
more durable paint in bright col-
ors now is used unless the client
requests an unpainted figure.
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100 Natural Art
Ingredients: ARTISTS SERIES - Tonkuenstler Orchestra of Vien-
na, The King's Singers, East Carolina University and North
Carolina Symphony Orchestras with Lynn Harrell, Eugene Istomin,
Woody Herman and the Thundering Herd with Richard Stoltzman,
Empire Brass Quintet; THEATRE ARTS SERIES - North Carolina
Shakespeare Festival, North Carolina Dance Theater, Purlie
Atlanta Ballet; CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES - Aspen Wind Quintet,
Marian Mc Parti and Trio, Los Angeles Vocal Arts Ensemble,
American Chamber Players; SPECIAL ADDED ATTRACTION -
Marcel M'ceau.
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Greenville, N.C. 27858-4353 or call (919) 757-6611, Ext. 266.








































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j





JHE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 10.1987
History's highliph-
200 years ago the Constitution was signed and a nation bom
SSSsssasz
days left m the year
Today's highlights in history:
1 wo hundred years ago, on
JP 17,1787, the Constitution of
the United States was completed
and signed by a majority of dele-
gates attending the constitutional
convention in Philadelphia.
On this date:
In 1862, Union forces hurled
back a Confederate invasion of
Maryland in th Civil War Battle of
Antietam.
In 1939, the Soviet Union in-
vaded Poland.
In 1947, James V. Forrestal was
sworn in as the first Secretarv of
Defense.
In 1949, more than 130 people ,
most of them U.S. citizens, died
when fire gutted the Canadian
passenger steamer "Noronic" at a
pier in Toronto.
In 1957, two male attorneys
"stood in" as actress Sophia Loren
and producer Carlo Ponti were
married by proxy in a ceremony
in Juarez, Mexicol (however, Ital-
ian authorities did not consider
the couple legally married until
1966).
In 1962, space officials an-
nounced the selection of nine new
astronauts, including Neil A.
Armstrong, who would become
the first man to step onto the
moon in 1969.
In 1976, NASA publicly un-
veiled the space shuttle "Enter-
prise" at ceremonies in Palmdale
Calif.
In 1978. Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime
Minister Menachem Begin con-
cluded their Camp David summit
with the signing of a framework
for peace in the Middle East.
In 1980, former Nicaraguan
president Anastasio Somoza was
assassinated in Paraguay.
In 1983, Vanessa Williams of
New York State became the first
black contestant to be crowned
Miss America. (The following
July, she also became the first
Miss America to resign in the
wake of a "Penthouse" magazine
scandal.)
In 1984, Brian Mulroney was
sworn in as Canada's 18th Prime
Minister, succeeding Liberal John
N. Turner.
Ten years ago: The government
of South Africa acknowledged
there might have been irregulari-
ties in the way police handled the
case of black activist Steven Biko,
who died Sept. 12 while in cus-
tody.
Five years ago: The U.N. Secu-
rity Council condemned Israel for
its military incursion into west
Beirut following the assassination
of Lebanese president-elect
Bashir Gcmayel, and demanded
the Israelis' withdrawal.
One year ago: The Senate con-
firmed the nomination of William
H. Rehnquist to become the 16th
chief justice of the United States.
Seven people were killed, 51
injured when a bomb exploded
outside a department store in
Paris.
Today's Birthdays: Former
Chief Justice Warren Burger is 80.
Actor Roddy McDowall is 59.
Actress Anne Bancroft is 56. Ac-
tress Dorothy Loudon is 54. Sen.
Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, is 54.
Author Ken Kesey is 52. Actor
Paul Benedict is 49. Actor lohn
Ritteris39.
Thought for Today: "The
people made the Constitution,
and the people can unmake it. It is
the creature of their own will, and
lives only by their will � John
Marshall, fourth chief justice of
the United States (1755-1835).
jThe features department at the East:
;Carolinian is seeking an editor, an assistant
i editor and staff writers. Apply in person at th�j
; publications building.
First generation punker Billy Idol has
mellowed, but still proud to be punk
DALLAS (AP) � Billy Idol may
have mellowed, but he's still
proud to be a punk.
"It is definitely 10 years since
punk rock happened. For a lot of
people, it's something they've
only read about in rock 'n' roll
books Idol said in a recent inter-
view, as he neared the end of his
U.S. tour before heading for Aus-
Jim Belushi
shapes up and
gets exec, desk
CULVER CITY, Calif. (AP) �
It's surprising to find Jim Belushi
occupying an office in the Myrna
Loy building at Lorimar studios
or any office, for that matter.
Belushi behind an executive's
desk? He would seem more in
character behind a row of beer
bottles at a saloon.
Yet he can be found these days
in the White Horse Productions
suite of the Loy building. Lori-
mar, new owner of MGM studios,
has renamed landmarks after
MGM immortals. Just so you
won't think that he has gone too
straight, the office contains such
mementos as a football auto-
graphed by Chicago Bears start
and a genuine Jim McMahon
headband.
It does appear that Belushi has
changed his act, despite a recent
misdemeanor battery and assault
charge stemming from a traffic
incident. He's even billed a James
Belushi in his new Tri-Star film,
"The Principal
Belushi stars with Lou Gossett
Jr. and Rae Dawn Chong as prin-
cipal of a seemingly unsalvage-
able inner-city high school. He
describes his role of Rick I itmcr
as "a lost soul, as I was a few years
ago
"I got fired from 'Saturday
Night Live' at the same time as I
wasgettinga divorce he said. "It
was a period of my life when I
wouldn't grow up. It was the
same thing with Rick La timer.
You need something to turn you
around, and the responsibility of
the school does it for Rick La-
timer; he realizes that these kids
need a lot
Belushi admitted that the 1982
drug death of his brother, John,
contributed to his tailspin. Jim
dabbled in the drug culture dur-
ing his "hip period" in the 1970s
but has not had a drug problem.
Beer was something else.
"I did this play in which I drank
three beers a show, eight shows a
week he said. "After the show
I'd ha ve a couple of beers. I was in
� that show for four months, and by
the time it ended I was a heavy
drinker.
Then I went on 'Saturday
Night Live and it had gotten
away from me. At one point I got
fired. It wasn't because I was
drinking I wasn't playing the
game; I wasn't playing by the
rules I was being a punk.
"When I got fired, it really
slapped me around he said.
tralia.
'The fact that there are a few
people likemearound does sort of
keep that attitude and spirit
going. But it has transformed it-
self as an ongoing thing that's just
as alive in 1987 as it was in 1977
The 31-year-old Idol has
changed also. Critics sav his latest
album, "Whiplash Smile is his
most human and vulnerable ef-
fort, an emotional departure from
his three earlier records which
portrayed him as a rock 'n' roll
bully.
His bleached, blond hair still is
spiked and his self-described
"filthy humor" still is evident, as
when he begins concerts by
emerging from between a huge
pair of legs made of wood. But
offstage. Idol wears wire-nmmcd
glasses and his trademark sneer is
often replaced by a smile.
The change in image was
widely noticed by critics when
"Whiplash Smile" was released
last fall with its hit singles, "To Be
a Lover" and the lyrical ballad,
"Sweet Sixteen
However, Idol dismisses the
change as a natural progression
that didn't surprise his fans.
"Rebel Yell Idol's 1984
Grammy-nominated album, had
the hits "Eyes Without a Face"
and "Rebel Yell" and went double
platinum in the United States.
With the LP, he became "estab-
lished a survivor of punk rock.
Inspired by the Beatles, David
Bowie, Gary Glitter, Iggy Pop, the
Sex Pistols and, to a greater extent
than is immediately evident, the
late Elvis Presley, Idol started in
pop music in London in the late
1970s by forming a band with
Tony James called Generation X.
"That's really a punk rock atti-
tude Idol said. "It's to bring back
that sort of need for artisits to
respect their own rights, rather
JUDSON H. BLOUNT, III
ATTORNEY AT LAW
D Wl and Traffic Offenses
Suite 12, Lee Building
111 East Third Street
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Telephone:
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than carelessly throwing them
away to a record company or
some kind of system they don't
like
Idol accepts the punk roots he
secured in Generation X with
pride.
"It's fantastic to think that what
we said in 1977 is true he said.
"You can break into the music
world when there's a strangle-
hold. You can start new move-
ments and they will keep going.
They won't necessarily self-de-
struct even if the original groups
did. The difficult thing is to im-
part the spirit that it had. And I
was definitely a part of it.
"Punk rock isn't dead. It just
smells funnv
tj4pp& cofids
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OPEN MON-SAT 10 AM 'til 9 PM.
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GO PIRATES - BEAT
FLORIDA STATE!
ANNOUNCING
Election of Executive Officers
for the
Student Residence Councils
Area Residence Councils
Residence Hall House Councils
ELECTION DAY
September 15, 1987
Filing Dates are Septemer 8 - September 10
Campaigns will be September 10
to September 15
Candidates Meeting � September 10, 1987
5:00 PM
Mendenhall Student Center
For More Information and Applications
See Your Residence Hall Directors
THE EAST AROt INIAN
The 'No
BYT1MCHAVDLIR
Sporti ttjitur
For East Carolina
Art Baker, Saturda)
against Florida State in Gre i
will mark the second sir
week that he has matched
against a former (
counterpart
"For the second week in a row
I'll be coaching against an old
friend, and someone I ha
respect for in Bobby B
saidBakerat his weekly pr
ference. 1 had the chan
along side of Bobb
1984 at Florida State as
coordinator) and I teit liki
a coaching clinic because lean
so much from him about 1
ing game
But, friends or not, Bakerand
troops will have but one thin
their mind Saturday. Wini
And with the victory over N
State last week under their
the Pirate football team is!
to Saturday's matchup ac lii tt
eighth-ranked Semin. les v.
lot of confidence.
"Obviously it is eas � - I
pare for a team such a-
over
last
Libretto may 1
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports fditer
bretto has been
coaches and
Sophomore, backup-quarter- sibilitv of
back Charlie Libretto mav be call- ever. Libretto i
ing it quits from the ECU football reached I
team. matter.
Reports surfacing Wednesday At am
around campus indicate that Li- Sports Club
Sophomore quarterback Charlie Libretto, who sj
contests for the Pirates last season, mav be lea

J
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A
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partmerit at the Fast
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t


DAY
1987
- September 10
ptember 10
lr 15
riber 10, 1987
I Center
d Applications
Directors
-

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 10, 1987 Page 25
The 'Notes are coming
BY TIM CHANDLER
Spout Kditor
For East Carolina head coach
rt Baker, Saturday's game
against Florida State in Greenville
will mark the second straight
week that he has matched wits
against a former coaching
counterpart
For the second week in a row
I 11 be coaching against an old
Friend, and someone I have great
respect for in Bobby Bowden
said Baker at his weekly press con-
ference. "I had the chance to coach
along side of Bobby Bowden (in
1984 at Florida State as offensive
coordinator) and I felt like 1 was at
a coaching clinic because I learned
so much from him about the pass-
ing game
But, friends or not, Baker and his
troops will have but one thing on
their mind Saturday. Winning.
And with the victory over N.C.
State last week under their belt,
the Pirate football team is looking
to Saturday's matchup against the
eighth-ranked Seminoles with a
lot of confidence.
"Obviously it is easier to pre-
pare for a team such as Florida
State when you have a big win
said Baker. "We realize that we
will have to be even better pre-
pared in order to win, but just
having that first win is a big incen-
tive
The Seminoles, 40-16 winners
over Texas Tech in their opener
last week, will bring a talented
passing attack into Ficklen for the
7 p.m. kickoff, according to Baker.
"(FSU quarterback) Danny
McManus has one of the quickest,
strongest arms of anybody I've
ever worked said Baker. "They
will throw the ball from anywhere
at anytime on the football field
Last week, McManus was 19 of 34
for 275 yards and two touch-
downs.
'They are going to move the
ball continued Baker. "They arc
a solid top-ten team. I would be
very surprised if they don't con-
tend for the national champion-
ship this season, and will certainly
be one of the top bowl contenders
this year
It sounds like a tough assign-
ment for ECU, but with the confi-
dence gained last Saturday Baker
and his players feel that they can
win.
"I have always felt that anything
can happen in any given game
Baker said. "We are going to have
to cut down on our mistakes
though in order to beat a team
with the caliber of Florida State
The Pirate players agreed.
Tailback Jarrod Moody, who
rushed for two touchdownsSatur-
day, said, "We arc going to have to
have a great, great offensive out-
ing. You know Florida State is
going to be one of the top teams in
the nation and we are going to
have to cut down on some of our
mistakes.
"We will have to play a near-
perfect game in order to win con-
cluded Moody.
Quarterback Travis Hunter said
that the Pirates will have to vary
their offensive scheme a little
more in order to be effective
against the Seminloes.
"We want to mix it (the offense)
up against them and put it up in
the air more said Hunter. "We
will need to be consistent and
steady to have a chance against
them. We are going to go out be-
lieving that we can win the game
and not wait until the third or
fourth quarter and say that we can
beat these guys. We have got to go
out believing from the start that
we can win
North Carolina transfer Mike
Applewhite, a sophomore defen-
sive end, and Ail-American hope-
ful Ellis Dillahunt, a senior comer-
back, felt that just the mental atti-
tude of being 1 -0 when they go up
against Florida State will make a
big difference.
"We gained a lot of confidence
by defeating State said Apple-
white. "It was very important to us
to beable to play Florida State with
a 1-0 record, instead of being 0-1.
The win made all the difference.
We now have the confidence and
attitude that we can beat Florida
State if we play the best ball pos-
sible
"Last year, after we lost to State
(38-10) everything was kind of
negative said Dillahunt. "This
year, a lot of positive things came
out of the game. Being 1-0 instead
of 0-1 really motivates us as a
team
Libretto may leave Pirate grid squad
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport Editcr
Sophomore, backup-quarter-
back Charlie Libretto may be call-
ing it quits from the ECU football
team.
Reports surfacing Wednesday
around campus indicate that Li-
bretto has been talking with both
coaches and players abou t the pos-
sibility of leaving the team. How-
ever, Libretto was unable to be
reached for a comment on the
matter.
At a meeting of the Raleigh
Spojts Club Wednesday in
Raleigh, Pirate head coach Art
Baker spoke about Libretto.
"Charlie is having a very diffi-
cult time handling it (the demo-
tion to second-string quarter-
back) said Baker.
Baker went on to say at the
meeting that he thought that it was
possible that Libretto might be
leaving the team, but he added
that he wanted to talk further with
him about the matter when he got
back to Greenville.
According to a reliable source,
Libretto met with Baker early
Wednesday morning about the
possibility of him leaving the team
and at that time he was told to take
24 hours to reconsider the matter
before he came to a definite deci-
sion.
A definite decision about the
status of Libretto should be re-
leased sometime today.
Last season. Libretto got the nod
as starting quarterback in eight of
the Pirates 11 contests. For the year
he completed 71 of 148 pass at-
tempts for 833 yards for a 48 per-
cent clip.
Baker seemed pleased with
Libretto's performance in spring
drills this year even though the
starting spot was given to Travis
Hunter.
'Travis Hunter went through
the spring drills and did the job
needed to win the position said
Baker in a pre-season interview.
"That is not to say that Charlie Li-
bretto had a bad spring, because
he did not at all. Both players
improved tremendously from last
year Charlie started eight games
for us last season and showed un-
canny leadership qualities for a
true freshman
Miami time change
Sophomore quarterback Charlie Libretto, who started in eight
contests for the Pirates last season, may be leaving the team.
GREENVILLE, N.C. � The
starting time for the East Carolina
vs. University of Miami football
game, scheduled to take place Oct.
31,1987, hasbeen changed to 12:10
p.m ECU director of athletics Ken
Karr announced.
That game, which had origi-
nally been scheduled to begin at
1:30 p.m was moved to accomo-
date a television contract for the
game, Karr said. The game will be
televised by the Raycom Network
and will be shown in Florida.
Running for six
Jon Jordan-FCC Photo Ljb
Jarrod Moody eludes Wolpack defenders Saturday enroute to
scoring on a 39-yard touchdown run in the Pirates 32-14 victory.
Hunter leads ECU
to opening victory
By PAT MOLLOY
AMilUnt Sports Fdltor
Red-shirt quarterback Travis
Hunter warmed the ECU offen-
sive bench last year, receiving onlv
limited playing time, as Charlie
Libretto took the reigns of the
gridders and lead them to a 2-9
finish.
This year, the Pirates are sport-
ing a different attitude � and a
different look. Hunter returns this
season; only this year he returns as
starting QB.
And this year, as opposed to last
season, the boys look hungry.
Really hungry.
In their season opener against
N.C State, the Pirates executed
Art Baker's run-and-shoot offense
to touchdown precision. East
Carolina crushed the Wol fpack bv
18 points, posting a 32-14 victory.
The sixth-largest crowd in Car-
ter-Finley history (5b,800)
watched in disbelief as ECU per-
formed play after flawless play,
accumulating 295 yards on the
ground. The vast majority of the
yardage was run up by wav of the
option, which Hunter ran with
poise and control.
"Our players played with
poise said Pirate coach Art
Baker, "There were two rimes in
the game when we were behind,
but 1 could see it in their eyes that
it never bothered them
Indeed, Baker's defensive unit
was strong, giving up only one
touchdown the entire evening.
The second Wolfpack score "be-
longed to the offense Baker said
The Pirate defense was extremely
stingy in the loose ball area, forc-
ing five State turnovers, resulting
in 12 Pirate points.
Travis 1 lunter and the ECU de-
fense were hardly the only things
w irking well for the Pirates on
Saturday night, though. Jarrod
Moody (tailback), and Anthony
Simpson (fullback) were in finely-
tuned condition.
Moody scored two touch-
downs, one on a run of six yards,
and the other on a spnnt of 39
yards. Simpson bulldozed a TD in
from the three. Neither running
backoughed up thhjtU�regasd-i,
less of the rainy weather.
"1 think ouroffensedidanexcel-
lent job under the weather condi-
tions of controlling the football.
Our coaches had a good game plan
and the players were able to stick
See PIRATES page 28
Rosas leads runners
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sport Writer
Bibi Rosas ran a 19:04 to lead the
Lady Pirate cross country team to
fourth place finish at the Campbell
University Cross Country Invita-
tional Saturday. Rosas took sev-
enth place individually and
Stephanie Ingram finished ninth
for ECU with a time of 19:20.
Virginia Commonwealth Uni-
versity took the crown in the
women's five kilometer event fol-
lowed by Winthrop and Method-
ist.
In the men's division, Matt
Schweitzer led the Pirates with a
17 place finish turning in a time of
28:24. Mike McGehee, 31 st overall,
ran a 29:55 and was the second
fastest ECU runner.
The host Campbell Camels won
the men's title with Virginia Com-
monwealth taking second.
This was the season opener for
the Pirates and the times were
slow for the entire field due to the
rain and slick portions of the
course. ECU travels to Pembroke
State September 12 for the Pem-
broke Invitational.
Women's 5-K Race
Bibi Rosas, 7,19:04
Stephanie Ingram, 9, 19:20
Kim Griffiths, 25, 20:30
Terry Lynch. 27, 20:40
Daw:n fillson, 30, 20:42
Kim Abernathv, 32, 21:39
Sheri Swick, 43, 24:06
Men's 8-K Race
Matt Schweitzer, 17, 28:24
Mike McGehee, 31, 29:55
Rob Rice, 43, 30:37
Rusty Meador, 45, 30:58
Russell Williams, 47, 31:38
Vince Wilson, 51,31:45
Jim Lavton, 60, 33:06
Joe Corlev, 67, 36:02
Freddie Fuller, 68, 36:34
Henry Patrick, 69, 36:36
Frances Marion
tops ECU hooters
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sport Writer
East Carolina fell to Francis
Marion College 2-1 in their season
opener at Florence, SC
The Pirates were unable to capi-
talize on scoring opportunities
and were stymied by defensive
miscues.
"We had a lot of times that we
should have scored but didn't
Head coach Charlie Harvey said.
'Too many times we had the shots
but didn't take them
Bob Beck scored the first Patriot
goal on assist from Scott Swain to
make it 1-0 at the half.
At the 27:01 mark in the second
half Francis Marion struck again
when Charlie Haines kicked in
one off a pass from Andy
Roxburgh.
The Pirates only goal came late
in the match when Roy Andersch
and Mike Dorin connected with
only six minutes left.
Mental mistakes plagued the
ECU defense more than the
Francis Marion offense as both
teams took an equal number shots
15 for ECU and 16 for FMC
Keeper Mac Kendall had a good
outing making nine saves.
'Their goals (in the second halfi
were both on defensive mistakes �
Harvey said. "We weren't readv to
play mentally, but we wilfbp
ready Wednesday
The loss puts the Pirates at 0-1 a�
they move into conference nlA
against William & Mary wL�?
day in Williamsburg ECr 2
open its home slate Sg
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aim SUTFMBEKM), 1987
Sooners sit atop AP top 20
"tS jlJSt about imanimnw co�n. tu .1.
Isjust about unanimous
Uklahoma as the nation's top col-
lege football team this week.
Following a 69-14 rout of North
rexas State, the Sooners were
named No. 1 on 54 ol 58 ballots
cast by a nationwide panel of
sports writers and broadscasters.
The Sooners received 1 154
points to 1,054 for Nebraska and
947 for UCLA whoall remained 1-
2-3 Tuesday in The Associated
i ress second college football poll
ol the year and first during the
season Those three teams occu- flopped with Ohio State
ason:H.SPOlS AP'S B2�5��
The Cornhuskers solidified
their No. 2 position with a 56-12
victory over Utah State, while
UCLA remained No. 3 after its 47-
14 drubbing of San Diego State.
Nebraska received three first-
(AP) The Top Twenty teams in
- �� parentheses, record through Sept.
for fifth
ITie remainder of the Top Ten
included: No. 6 Louisiana State,
821; No. 7 Miami, Fla 792; No. 8
Florida State, 744; No. 9 Michigan
7, total points based on 20-19-18-
17-16-15-14-13-12-11-10-9-8-7-6-
5-4-3-2-1 voting:
place ballots and UCLA got the 723, and No. k Clemson, 674 Last'
otherono 1 �. .� 1.1-031
other one.
The only movement in the Top
Five took place when Auburn, a
31-3 victor over Texas, flip-
Cubs' head resigns
CHICAGO (AP) Cene Mi
chael sealed his own fate as man-
ager of the Chicago Cubs and
Dallas Green will take his time to
decide who holds the position
next season
Michael announced his resig-
nation Monday following a loss to
Pittsburgh. Green, the president
and general manager, immedi-
ately accepted the resignation and
on Tuesday named ! rank Lucch
esi interim manager tor the re-
mainder of the season.
"Frank understands th.it it is for
25 games and no longer Green
said. "By naming Frank the in
terim manager, we �!so take some
pressure away from evervboch
c
list
Evervbo
possible s
who held
1986. Tht
Vukovich, H
c achnd formci
Billy Wil .
recent indu I
Hall of fame.
"It would have
put someone like
timing wasn't good Vukovich
said.
"1 understand the situation.
There's a possibility I'll get the job.
I'm not blowing my own horn, but
1 thmk I'm qualified. Certainly 1
want the job, who wouldn't?" "
Green said naming a black
manager "is a possibility. Billv
Wilhanis would be a good candi-
date
In his acceptance speech for the
Hall ol lame, Williams cited the
need for baseball to open its doors
to blacks in managerial and front-
office positions.
Ibe Cubs recently announced
that Williams would get his start
in the Arizona Instructional
1 eague w here he will begin man-
aging next week.
ssor:
hint'
na;
been unfair to
V
r the
ho mai
me last season I I
arrived. 'The pi
have been tcrrifi
Green even ca
and explained why he
mg Lucchesi interin
"He called me and t
re Mi
re would

Id me tht
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
week, it was LSU, Michigan, Ror
idaState,Clemsonand Miami, Ha.
The Second Ten consisted of No.
11 Penn State, No. 12 Washington,
No. 13 Arkansas, No. 14 Tennes-
see, No. 15 Arizona State, No. 16
Notre Dame, No. 17 Michigan
State, No. 18 Pittsburgh, No. 19
Alabama and No. 20 Georgia.
Last week's Second Ten was
Penn State, Arkansas, Washing-
ton, Arizona State, Texas A&M,
Iowa, Tennessee, Notre Dame,
Southern Cal and a tie between
Florida and Georgia tor 20th.
Michigan State, Pitt and Ala-
bama were the newcomers to the
poll, while Texas A&M, Iowa,
Southern Cal and Florida fell out'
Michigan State moved into 17th
with a 27-13 victorv over Southern
Cal. Put beat Brigham Young 27-
17, and Alabama defeated South-
ern Mississippi 38-6.
Texas A&M tell out alter a 17 3
loss to I ouisiana State, and Flor-
ida lost 31-4 to Miami, Ha. Iowa
was idle last week, but the
Hawkeyes lost their kickoff
opener to Tennessee. 23-22,
week bet ore.
L Oklahoma (54)
2. Nebraska (3)
3. UCLA (1)
4. Auburn
5- Ohio State
6. LSU
7. Miami, Fla
8. Florida State
9. Michigan
10 Clemson
11. Penn State
12. Washington
13. Arkansas
14. Tennessee
15. Arizona State
16. Notre Dame
17. Michigan St.
18. Pittsburgh
19. Alabama
20. Georgia
Record
1-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
0-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
0-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
0-0-0
2-0-0
0-0-0
0-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
PLANE RIDES
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I
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the
Other receiving votes: Iowa 87
Texas A & M 50, North Carolina
44. Southern Cal 33, Colorado 27
South Carolina 20, Arizona 2,
Boston College 10, Kent St. H,
Syracuse b, Texas 6, Florida 4
Georgia Tech 1, Oklahoma St. 1
Texas Christian 1.
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THE
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Wi
CAM I S
Honda State at iI
Alabama at Pei i
North Carolina at Oi
Clemson at Va Tech
Virginia at Marj
Notre Dan eal Michigan
N state at Pittsburgh
West Va at (hio State
Purdue at Washington
Iowa at Arizona
Stiff challeng
next for Tar
CHAPEL HILL,
Despiti
tice all
quaru rb ick
bone in 1 . ��
na footba kCrui
Simula'
fOklahon
ssible
Crum said his $� � � �-
kerback this w& k i
May. a freshman who ran I
wishbone at Lexir.
However
� � n t nave I I
quarterback lap
"At 5-foot-l 18 :
Holiewa) is extremely strong
added. "You
down by gral n. 1
tailback playing
Some teamsdon't want th -
terback running the b
want him to run the ball
'They (Oklahoma - � the
book on it I the wishbone I and they
know how to do it Crum
Tuesdav at his weekly news . -
ference. "We don't see a lot I
wishbone around here
The last time Crum s team faced
a wishbone offense was in
when the Tar Heels traveled to
- t �"
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THE HAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 10, 1987
27
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GAMES
Honda State at ECU
Alabama at Penn State
North Carolina at Oklahoma
Clemson at Va. Tech
Virginia at Maryland
otre Dame at Michigan
N.C. State at Pittsburgh
West Va. at Ohio State
Purdue at Washington
Iowa at Arizona
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Uit Week.
(9-1)
Dm ill
(9-1)
Florida State
Penn State
Oklahoma
Clemson
Maryland
Michigan
Pittsburgh
Ohio State
Washington
Arizona
DEAN BUCHANTIM CHANDLER
ECU Sports InformationSports Editor
l-ut Week;Lul Week
(9-1)(7-3)
Overall;Overall
(9-1)(7-3)
ECUFlorida State
Penn StateAlabama
OklahomaOklahoma
ClemsonClemson
VirginiaVirginia
MichiganMichigan
PittsburghPittsburgh
Ohio StateOhio State
WashingtonWashington
IowaArizona
PATMOLLOYDr. RICHARD EAKIN
Assistant Sports EditorECU Chancellor
Last Week.l�r Week.
(7-3)(6-4)
OverallOverall
(7-3)(6-4)
Florida StateECU
AlabamaPenn State
OklahomaOklahoma
ClemsonClemson
MarylandVirginia
MichiganMichigan
PittsburghPittsburgh
Ohio StateOhio State
PurdueWashington
IowaIowa
Stiff challenge up
next for Tar Heels
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AD�
Vspite letting his defense prac-
ice all week against a freshman
uarterback who ran the wish-
� in high school, North Caro-
na football coach Dick Crum said
imulating top-ranked
�klahoma's speed is next to im-
�ssible.
, rum said his scout team quar-
erback this week will be Deems
May, a freshman who ran the
fishbone at Lexington High
h hool 1 lowever, Crum said May
�n't have the speed of Sooners
juarterback amelle Holieway.
"At 5-foot-10, 180 pounds,
lolicway is extremely strong he
ldded. "You just don't knock him
down by grabbing him. He's like a
tailback playing quarterback
kme teams don't want their quar-
terback running the ball, but they
want him to run the ball.
'They (Oklahoma) wrote the
book on it (the wishbone) and they
know how to do it Crum said
Tuesday at his weekly news con-
ference. "We don't see a lot of
wishbone around here
The last time Crum's team faced
a wishbone offense was in 1980
when the Tar Heels traveled to
Norman, Okla and lost 41-7. At
the time. North Carolina was No. 6
in the nation and 7-0.
'They are better than the team
we played in 1980 Crum said.
'They are a very complete foot-
ball team. Thev deserve to be No.
1
Both teams arc TO. Oklahoma
crushed North Texas State 69-14
last Saturday, while North Caro-
lina defeated Illinois 34-14.
"We feel good about going out
there to play them�it's a chal-
lenge Crum said. "I know we are
the underdog, but so what, some-
one has to be the underdog
This year's trip to Norman will
be much different than in 19S0,
Crum said, noting that this year's
game is much earlier in the season.
"Back in 1980, all people wanted
to talk about (the first six games)
was Oklahoma he said.
Crum also said he expects the
Sooners to throw the ball more,
probably to 6-3, 242-pound tight
end Keith Jackson, who led the
nation last season in vardage-pcr-
reccption. In the Sooners opener,
Please see SOONERS page 28
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 10, 1987
27
NERIDES
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�CT Aest 'entM Sueel
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West Va. at Ohio State
Purdue at Washington
Iowa at Arizona
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Last Meek
(9-1)
Overall:
(9-1)
Florida State
Penn State
Oklahoma
Clemson
Maryland
Michigan
Pittsburgh
Ohio State
Washington
Arizona
DEAN BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
u�t Mash
(9-1)
Overall:
(9-1)
ECU
Penn State
Oklahoma
Clemson
Virginia
Michigan
Pittsburgh
Ohio State
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Iowa
TIM CHANDLER
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Lul Week
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Overall
(7-3)
Florida State
Alabama
Oklahoma
Clemson
Virginia
Michigan
Pittsburgh
Ohio State
Washington
Arizona
PAT MOLLOY
Assistant Sports Editor
Last Week.
(7-3)
Overall:
(7-3)
Florida State
Alabama
Oklahoma
Clemson
Maryland
Michigan
Pittsburgh
Ohio State
Purdue
Iowa
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
Laat Week.
(6-4)
Overall
(6-4)
ECU
Penn State
Oklahoma
Clemson
Virginia
Michigan
Pittsburgh
Ohio State
Washington
Iowa
Stiff challenge up
next for Tar Heels
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP)�
tospite letting his defense prac-
ice all week against a freshman
larterback who ran the wish-
bone in high school, North Caro
na football coach Dick Crum said
simulating top-ranked
)kIahoma's speed is next to im-
�ssible.
Crum said his scout team quar-
terback this week will be Deems
May, a freshman who ran the
.vishbone at Lexington High
hool 1 lowever, Crum said May
-�. t have the speed of Sooners
. . irterback lamelle Holieway.
At 5-foot-10, 180 pounds,
� lolieway is extremely strong he
�dded. "You just don't knock him
down by grabbing him. He's like a
tailback playing quarterback
iometeamsdon't want their quar-
terback running the ball, but they
want him to run the ball.
"They (Oklahoma) wrote the
book on it (the wishbone) and they
know how to do it Crum said
1 uesday at his weekly news con-
ference. "We don't see a lot of
wishbone around here
The last timcCrum's team faced
a wishbone offense was in 1980
when the Tar Heels traveled to
Norman, Okla and lost 41-7. At
the time, North Carolina was No. 6
in the nation and 7-0.
They are better than the team
we played in 1980 Crum said.
They are a very complete foot-
ball team. Thev deserve to be No.
1
Both teams are 1-0. Oklahoma
crushed North Texas State 69-14
last Saturday, while North Caro-
lina defeated Illinois 34-14.
"We feel good about going out
there to play them�it's a chal-
lenge Crum said. "I know we are
the underdog, but so what, some-
one has to be the underdog
This year's trip to Norman will
be much different than in 1980,
Crum said, noting that this year's
game is much earlier in the season.
"Back in 19S0, all people wanted
to talk about (the first six games)
was Oklahoma he said.
Crum also said he expects the
Sooners to throw the ball more,
probably to 6-3, 242-pound tight
end Keith Jackson, who led the
nation last season in yardage-per-
reception. In the Sooners opener,
Please see SOONERS page 28
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 10,1987
29
V t
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ternity
irates
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of
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St

arryl's
EFALL
K mart boosts GGO purse to $1 million
GREENSBORO (AP)�After
mitially avoiding corporate spon-
sorship, the Greater Greensboro
Open has acquired a title sponsor
3nd a $1 million purse, placing it
among the top six purses on the
PGA Tour.
The 1988 event will be known as
the K mart Greater Greensboro
Open and carry a first prize of
$180,000. The four-year sponsor-
ship agreement was announced in
ceremonies by GGO chairman
Mike Solomon.
Financial terms of the agree-
ment were not disclosed.
This year, it is strictly purse
said Solomon. "All they are doing
is supplementing the purse and
helping us secure television
The purse increase puts the
Ci 10 in position to negotiate more
seriously for a network television
infract and a date change. The
dates for the 1988 tournament,
which celebrates the event's 50th
anr.i versary, already have been set
for March 31-April 3. The tourna-
ment will be televised nationally
on cable by ESPN.
"First and foremost, we con-
sider the longevity of the K mart
Greater Greensboro Open said
Sid Wilson, director of public rela-
tions for the PGA Tour. "I don't
say this lightly: We think that the
GGO is a premier event
"If they were to request a date
change, they would receive strong
consideration. And when you put
that with a network asking for a
change to get them (the tourna-
ment) on their schedule, you
would go into 1989 with a definite
chance
"A $1 million event doesn't
hurt. But I want to emphasize the
longevity of the tournament. With
that, we want to listen and try to
accommodate
Solomon said the opportunity to
talk with the PGA Tour about new
dates will come with the fall nego-
tiations. The earliest a date change
could be announced would be De-
cember.
The 1987 GGO carried a total
purse of $600,000 and a first prize
of $108,000, which is second place
money for 1988. The GGO purse
did not break into six figures until
1966, when it jumped from $70,000
to $100,000.
The Doral Ryder Open, the
Tournament Players Champion-
ship, the Panasonic Las Vegas
Invitational, the International and
the Nabisco Championships of
Golf also have purses of $1 million
or more.
One other tournament, the
Greater Milwaukee Open, an-
nounced a similar purse increase
within the last month, but that
jump to $1 million will occur on an
incremental basis. The full $1 mil-
lion purse will not be distributed
until the 1990 event.
K mart representatives partici-
oated in the 1987 GGO pro-am,
and apparently liked what they
saw, Solomon said. The initial
discussions began in May and the
negotiations have been under way
since June.
The GGO, which is one of a
handful of tournaments that had
avoided corporate sponsorship
until recently, began the search for
a title sponsor last year because of
uncertainty of the status of its
three primary sponsors. While not
threatening to completely with-
draw support, each of the three-
Piedmont Airlines, Burlington
Industries and RJR Nabisco�
have been involved in mergers,
hostile takeover attempts and
other corporate changes.
"And the key point is that the
tour had given us some direction
on how to improve our own situ-
ation said Solomon. "That oc-
curred in March and television
was an important consideration
The title sponsorship of the
GGO is the first venture on the
profesional golf circuit for K mart,
the second largest retailer in the
world.
K mart began its involvement in
sports marketing during the 1984
Olympic Games. The company
has committed about $20 million
in television advertising for the
1988 games and is the official
sponsor of the U.S. hockey team.
"Over the past few years, K
mart's involvement with sports
activities has grown steadily, in-
cluding our recent committment
to the Winter Olympics in Calgary
and the summer games in Seoul,
Korea said Gerald Habeck, di-
rector of K mart's advertising.
"However, this is the first in-
volvement in an annual event the
size and scope of this tournament,
which has proven itself as one of
the top events on the PGA Tour for
the last 50 years he said.
GRACE
CHURCH
Interested in Bible
Study? (Call 355-3500)
Maryland's Krivak wants to top old boss
NORTH CHINA
CHINESE
RESTAURANT
BEST FOOD IN TOWN!
COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP�
H.iving lost to his alma mater in
his head coaching debut, Joe Kri-
vak faces another special chal-
lenge in Maryland's second game
of the season.
When the Terps entertain Vir-
ginia in an Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence game Saturday, Krivak will
be matching wits with George
Welsh, his former boss at Navy.
nd, as Krivak sees it, Welsh
and the Cavaliers have a built-in
rvchological advantage follow-
ing Maryland's 25-11 loss to
"nracuse in its opener and
Virginia's narrow 30-22 loss to
T th-ranked Georgia.
He'll probably look at our
nlm Krivak told his weekly news
conference Tuesday, "and say,
Hey, we've got a chance to beat
Maryland for the firsi Hme in a
: ng time
The Terps have won 15 straight
over the Cavaliers since last losing
in 1971, and have averaged 38
points a game in the last seven
neeJHn�9jr -r- -��
But Krivak noted the closeness
of a 45-34 victory in 1984 and a 33-
21 decision the following year,
adding: "I don't think they've
been as easy as some people think.
There have been some hairy situ-
ations
Krivak even dug into his mem-
ry bank to recall that way back in
1974, during his first stint as an
assistant with the Terps, a Mary-
land team anchored by All-Ameri-
can Randy White eased by Vir-
ginia only 10-0.
Still, the Terps have been in-
called as 12-point favorites to
bounce back from their inept per-
formance against Syracuse.
While wary of overconfidence,
Knvak said: "We can't practice
Aith attitude that we're afraid of
losing
"We're only as good as the
preparation we get he added.
While generally displeased with
Maryland's overall effort at
Syracuse, Krivak said he was sur-
prised by the lack of intensity on
offense.
Senior quarterback Dan Hen-
ning, he said, "did not have a good
game. He made mistakes he
doesn't usually make, but there
were some catches that should
have been made
Krivak said he wanted better
passing accuracy from Henning,
but tempered his remarks when
he recalled the relentless Syracuse
defense.
"When vou're rushed and
sacked he said, "it can take you
out of vour rhythm
Krivak said while he used 10
offensive linemen extensively
against Syracuse and still had
confidence in all 10, he was mov-
ing three from the starting lineup:
Left tackle Mark Agent, left guard
John Rugg, and right tackle John
Sorna.
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imm
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J





30 THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 10,1987
o
Something to (?
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PLUS A VARIETY OF BREADS. ROLLS. COOKIES. PASTRIES & PIES!
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WHERE THE PIRATES SHOP FOR PRICE, QUALITY & CONVENIENCE.
Sttftwl






28
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTFMRFR 10, 1987

Pirates roll past Pack, 32-14
Continued from pajje 25
to it
At the end oi the halt, the Pirates
lead the Tack 13-7; however,
shades ol last season soon began to
creep in.
Emerging from the dressing
room with a vengeance, the
Wolfpack took the second-half
kickoff and punched it in on six
plays, topping off a 62 yard drive.
FulJbackMalCrite dashed off 17of
those yards, resting the ball at the
three. ECU was then penalized,
and the ball was placed on the one.
From there. Critecrashed through
the middle for the score.
Placekicker Bryan Carter made
the extra point, and gave State the
lead. 14-13.
Baker's team took the score in
stride, and marched off 77 yards
on their first series of the second
half to regain the lead � for good.
The drive was led by Hunter, who
passed and ran his way to the two.
The passes included a 20 yard
reception by Moody. From there,
the Pirates were penalized tor ille-
gal procedure, and brought back
to the seven.
Hunter took the snap, and then
made an option toss to Willie
Lewis who scored, behind the
blocking of Moody, around the
left side. Instead of settling for the
TAT, however. Baker decided to
challenge the Tack defense with a
two-point conversion. After three
delays because of noise. Hunter
took the snap, and attempted a
pass. The ball was deflected at the
line of senmage and ruled dead,
leaving the score at 19-13.
Following the kickoff, ECU re-
covered a Tyrone Jackson fumble
at the 18-yard line. From the 18, the
Pirates lossed ground back to the
24. Hunter then took two option
keepers around the right side for
ten yards apiece, and Simpson
powered the ball in two plays
later. r J
"Something of a significance
that we have not done in the past
years is that we played better in
the second half than we did in the
first half Baker said in a press
conference after the game, "The
defense deserves the credit be-
cause they were so much im-
proved. There were three new
players in our defensive backfield,
and that we were pleased with our
recruiting effort this year.
The victory over N.C State (who
lost a one-point heartbreaker in
the Peach Bowl to Va. Tech last
year) may give the Pirates the in-
centive they need to take on the
Seminolcs of Florida State in
ECU's home opener Saturday.
Sooners await Heels
Continued from page 27
Jackson caught three passes for a
game of the 1982 season, losing 7-
6 to Pittsburgh.
The 2:30 p.m. EST kickoff is a
31.7average. sellout in 75,004-seat Memorial
List time we played them thev Stadium
threw the ball twice, and we inter-
cepted one of those he said.
North Carolina's main weapons
on offense will be senior quarter-
back Mark Maye and tailback
Tonn Dorn, who rushed for 165
yards against Illinois.
Oklahoma's offensive line, not
counting Jackson, averages 280
pounds.
The last time North Carolina
played a No. 1 team was the first
mart boos
Follow the latest
in Pirate action.
Read the sports
page in The East
Carolinian.
Simply the best.
MAUI & SONS � QUICKSILVER � CAT2
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arsh's
SURF � SHOP
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LU

O
rr
GREENSBORO (AP)�After
utially avoiding corporate spon
orship, the Greater Greensboro
)pen has acquired a title sponsor
rid a $1 million purse, placing it
mong the top six purses on the
GA Tour
The 1988 event will be known as
e K mart Greater Greensboro
pen and carry a first prize of
180,000. The four-year sponsor-
lip agreement was announced in
eremonies by GGO chairman
like Solomon.
Financial terms of the agree
ient were not disclosed.
"This year, it is strictly purse
id Solomon. "All they are doing
supplementing the purse and
Iping us secure television "
The purse increase puts the
GO in posi tion to negot la te more
�riously for a network television
ntract and a date change. The
tes for the 1988 tournament,
hich celebrates the event's 50th
niversary, already have been set
for March 31-April 3.
ment will be televis
on cable by ESPN.
"First and foremol
sider the longevity o(
Greater Greens
Sid Wilson, director o
tions for the PGA 11
say this lightly: We tr
GGO is a premier evd
"If they wire to rel
change, they would rel
consideration And w
that with a network
chanp o gel them
mcntJ on their scht
would go inr J
chan
"A $1 million
hurt. But I want
longevity of the tourn
that, we want to hstc
accommoda-
Solomon said th
talk with the PGA Tou
dates will come with t
tiations The ear
cILicfve�!e
50
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Batting it away
Ion (onlan I CL photo Lai
Senior cornerback Ellis Dillahunt leaps to bat an intended pass
away from N.C. State's Danny Peebles during the Pirates victory
Saturday. Dillahunt also had an interception in the contest.
KE
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The Kappa Sigma Fraternity
Welcomes The New Pirates
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The East Carolina University Chapter of
The Kappa Sigma Fraternity Provides
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Also Famous For The Biggest
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X
COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP)�
laving lost to his alma mater in
, head coaching debut, Joe Kn-
faces another special chal-
nge in Maryland's second game
' the season.
When the Terps entertain Vir-
inia in an Atlantic Coast Confer-
ee game Saturday, Knvak will
matching wits with George
tyelsh, his former boss at Navy.
I And, as Knvak sees it, Welsh
tnd the Cavaliers have a built-in
rychological advantage follow-
g Maryland's 25-11 loss to
Syracuse in its opener and
Virginia's narrow 30-22 loss to
20th-ranked Georgia.
"He'll probably look at our
film Krivak told his weekly news
conference Tuesday, "and sav.
Hey, we've got a chance to beat
Maryland for the first time in a
long rime
The Terps have won 15 straight
over the Cavaliers since last losing
in 1971, and have averaged 38
points a game in the last seven
' meeVfngser t- y-
But Krivak noted the closeness
of a 45-34 victory in 1984 and a 33-
21 decision the following year,
adding: "1 don't think they've
been as easy as some people think.
There have been some hairy situ-
ations
Krivak even dug into his mem-
ory bank to recall that way back in
1974, during his first stint as an
assistant with the Terps, a Mary-
land team anchored by All-Ameri-
can Randy White eased by Vir-
ginia only 10-0.
Still, the Terps have been in-
Stalled as 12-point favorites to
fcounce back from their inept per-
formance against Syracuse.
While wary of overeonfidence,
ICrivak said: "We can't practice
ith attitude that we're afraid of
I "We're only as good as the
�reparation wc get he added.
While generally displ
Maryland's overall
Syracuse, Krivak a
pnsed by the lack c
offense.
Senior quarter I
ning, he said, "did not lj
game. He made mi
doesn't usually make,
were some catches t"r
have Kvn m
Krivak said he wai
passing accurao. fr
but tempered his remi
he recalled the rclentl
defense.
"When vou're rui
sacked he said, 'it cal
out oi vour rhvthm
Knvak said while
offensive linemen el
against Syracuse an
confidence in all 10, he
ing three from the start!
Left tackle Mark Agi I
John Rugg, and right
Sorna.
Is
reloeatiol
G
(paT ho?
Carl R. Wi
THE
DO
Located ai
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 10, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 10, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.556
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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