The East Carolinian, September 1, 1987






INSIDE
Editorials4
stvleZZZio
Sports15
Classifieds5
STYLE
The faculty art show opened in Gray Gallery this
weekend. For a review � see STYLE, page 10.
SPORTS
The Pirates prepare for this weekend's Wolfpack
attack � see SPORTS, page 15.
�he iEaat (Kartfliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 7925.
Vol. 62 No.3
Tuesday, September 1,1987
Greenville, NC
18 Pages
Circulation 12,000
f
Jan limhtn
The floor of the front porch as seen after the arrest.
ECU Photo tab
SGA president says efforts
taken to ensure fair election
s are busy mak-
for the 1987 88
ByGRETCHI N OURNTGAN
Stall � nttr
Scott Thomas, SGA president
and other offi
ing new ptai
school year.
Thomas said that he welcomes
any student to come by the stu
dent government office nd ex-
press their ideas t lesaid he plans
to hold meetings periodically on
campus Jh.it will K open Jo ,i!l
students wanting to become in-
volved in SGA
Thomas said that during the
summer sessions the SGA
worked with : n 01nta-
tion and a campus blood drie.
Thomas said li priority
is the upcomi tion of S( IA
id issofficers.
the dead-
apphca-
representativesand
Wednesdaj at 5 p n
line for all candic
dons. The election date is set for
September 9th and polls will be
open from 9 ,1 m. until 6 p m.
Thomas said a new committee
was formed after the spring elec-
tion in order to ensure a more fair
and accurate election this tall. The
number of voting polls has been
reduced to keep things operating
smoothly, Thomas said.
Thomas said he was making
every effort to be fair and unbi-
ased in the upcoming election.
Tony Porcellie, election chairper-
son, will be responsible for the
voting procedures at the balloi
tables.
Thomas said Porcellie will be
objective and will do a good job
during the election.
After the election, Thomas
plans to select a new cabinet. He
said he would like to have
enough cabinet positions to cover
all aspects of campus life.
Thomas said another project he
is involved in is the reorganiza-
tion of Tirate Walk � a safety
service for students. Leadership
positions are available and a di-
rector is also needed for the pro-
gram, he said.
Plans are being made to sup-
port and better organize the 1987-
88 ECU Transit System. Scott
Altord, director, is in the process
of hiring new busdrivers, he said.
Thomas said "This is very
important to our school, it en-
ables our commuters transporta-
tion, and without it there would
be total chaos
Thomas said he also will be
involved with organizing the
Homecoming Steering Commit-
tee.
Thomas is an active member of
the City Council and informs the
council and the school of all on-
campusactivities involving SGA,
he said.
1
Block party ends with arrests
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Managing I ditur
Students clashed with the
Greenville City Police Saturday,
leaving some students claiming
the police used excessive force in
breaking up an unauthorized
block party.
Matthew Hall Moore, Anthony
Joseph "Tyge" Pistorio and Mi-
chael Hart, all students at ECU,
were arrested at the party on
Biltmore Street between Fifth and
Fourth streets. Hart was charged
with being drunk and disruptive
while both Moore and Pistorio
were charged with drinking in
public and resisting arrest.
Moore also was charged with
assault on a police officer.
Students at the party said po-
lice used unnecessary violence in
the arrests of Moore and ristorio.
Greg Christenson said he saw
eight officers making one arrest
and that they smashed Moore's
face onto his porch. He said the
police were unprovoked.
'The people were all on their
property he said. "No one was
on the street. People were staying
on their property
According to Sgt. A.S.
Fordham, the shift officer in
charge at the scene, the 400 stu-
dents at the party had spilled
over into the streets. He said the
police received a complaint about
the noise and people in the
streets, and that when the force
arrived they found things to be as
described. He said they checked
for a block party permit to begin
with, but could not find one.
"We found out they had ap-
plied for a permit, but it had been
denied Fordham said later that
night.
He said the police waited on the
students to calm down, but in-
stead they got more aggressive
and started throwing eggs.
"We pulled back and then came
and tried to get them to stop
again he said in describing
what happened next. "At that
point we had to make some ar-
rests. People got too aggressive
It is those arrests that have
some students angry.
Beth Bouillet said of one arrest,
"They were holding him (Moore)
down. His face was purple and
they were beating him. That was
not fair, man, no way
Other students claimed that
officers choked Pistorio and that
the student's face turned a bright
red during the arrest.
Greenville Police Captain Nel-
son Staton, interim assistant
chief, was called to the scene at
about 5:45 p.m. and arrived about
15 minutes later.
He said that upon arrival he
made several pleas for the stu-
dents to break the party up, and
that a few people did indeed start
to leave. Others, he said, started
swearing.
"I did give the order to arrest
one individual (Pistorio) Staton
said, noting he only saw two ar-
rests.
Staton said that in his opinion,
officersonly used the force neces-
sary to make the arrests.
In a later interview, Fordham
responded to abuse charges and
said, "Whenever you've got that
size of a crowd and you have to
make an arrest, you're going to
get that kind of allegation. I don't
think there was any excess force
used. I think there was just
enough force to make the arrests
and clear them out of there
Fordham said there were seven
or eight officers at the scene, not
including Staton.
Small amounts of blood
smeared on the porch at 402
Biltmore St. apparently came
from cuts Moore received on his
face when he and the police
struggled during his arrests ac-
cording to several eyewitnesses.
"1 don't know who the blood on
the porch belonged to Fordham
said. "I know there was blood on
his (Moore's) face
Adam Blankenship, another
student at the party, said he ap-
proached Staton and complained
about officers' actions.
'The captain indicated to me
that yeah, I was right Blanken-
ship said. "The captain nodded
his head and said, 'All I can ask
you to do is get out of the street
According to Staton and
Fordham, the situation was un-
der control a half hour after Sta-
ton arrived. Fordham said that
after the police pulled out at
about 6:45 p.m they did not re-
turn except to drive by once when
a fight was reported to them.
Police found no evidence of the
fight, Fordham said.
By Monday Moore, Pistorio
and Hart were all out of jail.
When approached, they said thev
were advised by lawyers to make
no comment until they made
sworn statements at anv hearings
wk
that might come about. Their
court date is set for the end of Sep-
tember
At a Monday press conference
unrelated to the Saturday inci-
dent, one reporter asked Mayor
Les Garner if there would be an
internal investigation into the
alleged use of excessive force.
Gamer said he had only heard
and read news reports of the al-
tercation, and that he had not yet
been in contact with Staton.
"Until we find out more from
the police department and until
we get complaints we are not
going to take any action. How-
ever, that is up to our captain or
our chief of police, and I feel like
they can handle it real well
After the party on Saturday,
students began circulating a yel-
low pad asking everyone to sign
as witnesses to the alleged exces-
sive force.
A new pav system
Some students to get delayed checks
Both photos by Jon Jordon � ECU Photo I
The old (right) and the new (above) at the payroll office.
By ANDY LEWIS
Newt Editor
The payroll office has changed
the way it pays students in order
to increase efficiency, but some
students will have to go one
month without receiving their
pay from the university.
Under the new system, all de-
partments with students on their
payroll will figure up the the stu-
dents' pay at the end of each
month based on the work they
did during that month. The stu-
dent then will get paid in the
middle of the following month
for that work, according to pay-
roll officer Nora Case.
In the past, payroll administra-
tors have had to project how
much a student would earn for a
given month and pay them based
on that projection. This system
caused trouble. Case said in a
telephone interview, because of-
ten a student would not work the
projected number of hours.
Case said the new system will
save administrators and students
the hassle of having to cancel and
redraw inaccurate checks.
But some students have to pay
monthly expenses such as rent
and utility bills, and the system
change will mean that students
who are paid a flat-rate monthly
salary will not receive their Sep-
tember pay until October 15.
Stacy Hickman, general man-
ager of WZMB-FM, said some
executive staff members have to
subsist on the flat-rate pay they
receive each month. Hickman
expressed opposition to the
change because, for one month,
student employees will be de-
prived of money they live off of.
Any students who receive flat-
rate pay, such as certain East
Carolinian and athletic depart-
ment employees, will have to
wait until October to receive pay
for September's work.
Case admitted that the change
might initially hurt some stu-
dents, but she said the payroll
department surveyed the other
departments before making the
change in May. AH the depart-
ments gave her a favorable re-
sponse, Case said.
She added that most students
are paid on an hourly basis.
Case said she is "very hopeful"
that once people get used to the
new system, "it will be easier
The payroll office is now also
working with new equipment as
part of the effort to increase effi-
ciency. Case said the new on-line
computer will give the payroll
office an easier way to screen out
people who are inelligible to
work for the university.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 1,1987
News Briefs
Grade scho
ECU Registrar announces record enrollment
enrollment
still climbing
(ECU News Bureau) � East
Carolina University has a total
all-time record enrollment of
14,882 students registered for the
fall semester. Registrar J. Gilbert
Moore announced todav.
The new record � 418 more
students than last year � repre-
sented a 2.9 percent growth rate
and marked the 10th consecutive
year that fall semester enrollment
at ECU has exceeded the previ-
ous high.
1 am pleased that our aca-
demic programs are increasingly
attractive to students and their
parents said Dr. Richard R.
Eakin, ECU chancellor. "An en-
rollment growth rate of 2.9 per-
cent is especially remarkable at a
time when enrollments are ex-
pected to be stable or declining in
many parts of the country.
The enrollment increase for
1987-88 continues a decade of
steady, measured growth at
ECU Eakin said. "We are en-
couraged bv the confidence ex-
pressed in East Carolina Univer-
sity by thecitizensof North Caro-
lina
The enrollment increase in-
i hided a jump in fulltime under-
graduate students from 10,853 to
11,167. Fulltime graduate stu-
dents increased from 798 to 829.
Undergraduate students account
for 8339 percent of the student
body and graduate students for
16.6 percent, Moore said.
Parttime graduate student en-
rollment showed an increase of
1,608 to Lb-42. Parttime under-
graduate enrollment rose from
1,205 to 1,244.
ECU is the third largest institu-
tion of higher learning in North
Carolina and is marking the 20th
anniversary of receiving univer-
sity status by an act of the 1967
General Assembly- For two dec-
ades it was the fastest growing
school in North Carolina and one
of the fastest growing in the
South in terms of enrollment.
In the 10 years since the
semester system was adopted,
enrollment increases have been
more moderate but with steady
regularity. Officials noted that
the 14,882 forfall, 1987,isonly 118
students shy of the 15,000 mark.
The figures do not include off-
campus extension programs of-
fered by ECU.
New assistant dean
in nursing school
(ECU News Bureau) � Dr. Gay
Poteet, formerly director of the
graduate program at the Univer-
sity of Texas Medical Branch,
Galveston, Texas has joined the
East Carolina University School
of Nursing as professor and assis-
tant dean of the graduate pro-
gram.
Prior to her appointment at
Texas, Dr. Poteet held a similar
post at the University of South
Carolina.
The new assistant dean is an
alumna of UNC-Chapel Hill and
has a master's degree from the
Medical College of Virginia and
an EdD in higher education from
the University of Virginia. She is
currently completing a PhD in
nursing from Texas Women's
University.
Dr. Potect's professional expe-
rience includes pediatric nursing
and nursing service administra-
tion as well as education. She is
the author of numerous articles
and research reports and has
appeared at a number of profes-
sional meetings. Earlier this sum-
mer, she spoke at the National
League for Nursing convention
in Washington, D.C
Physician joins
emergency dept.
(ECU News bureau) Dr.
Barbara A. Murphv has joined
the faculty at the East Carolina
University School of Medicine as
an assistant p-ofessor of emer-
gency medicine. She will also be
an attending physician in the
emergency department at Pitt
County Memorial Hospital.
Before joining the ECU faculty.
Dr. Murphy had been medical
director of the emergency depart-
ment at Durham Countv General
Hospital in Durham. Prior to her
appointment there, she had been
emergency department physi-
New manager announced
By CLAY DLANHARDT
Managing Editor
The Greenville City Council
decided who will become the
new city manager at a Sunday
night meeting, according to
Mayor Les Garner.
In a press conference held
Monday morning in his office.
Garner announced that Gregory
Knowles, city manager of Inkster,
Mich would fill the position left
bv the dismissal of Gail Meeks in
March.
The council unanimously de-
cided to offer Knowles the job
after he was located by a search
committee consisting of the
mayor and the City Council, ac-
cording to a statement Gamer
read. Garner said Knowles has
accepted the job.
Knowles earned a bachelor's
degree in political science from
Virginia Polytechnic Institute in
1975 and went on to receive a
master's degree in urban affairs
from the College of Architecture
and Urban Systems at VPI, com-
pleting a thesis on budget and
accounting.
As city manager of Inkster,
Knowles has dealt with a city
about the size of Greenville since
1984. An urban, multi-racial
community, Inkster is in the
midst of $40 million in develop-
ment which Knowles said he has
helped to instegate.
Previously Knowles was vil-
lage manager of University Park,
111 where he was responsible for
all services except for water and
sewer. He has also been the city
administrator for Monona, Wis.
Knowles is scheduled to take
his new post in 30days, unless the
Inkster city council releases him
from his commitment to them,
Garner said. If that happens,
Garner said Knowles could be in
Greenville within a week.
Knowles could not be reached
for comment Monday.
Apple comes to student paper
The new look you are seeing in
The East Carolinian is due to
more than just good luck.
Over the summer the offices
received six brand new Apple
Macintosh computers and
moved into the age of desktop
publishing. No k do editors
have to use antuj ted machin-
ery to publish the newspapers �
now they have the computers
which make the type look much
better. The crooked headlines of
the past will hopefully be just
that, of the past. With the new
system, readers should be able to
notice a reduction in the number
of layout miscues and headline
slippages.
The East Carolinian operates
on a networking system that al-
lows the six computers to talk to
each other. Two of the units have
built-in hard disks which store
information and programs for
the other four. The increase in
cian at Albemarle Hospital in
Elizabeth City.
She recevied her undergradu-
ate degree with honors from Ohio
State University, Columbus,
Ohio and later graduated magna
cum laude from the Medical Col-
lege of Pennsylvania in Philadel-
phia.
The Dayton, Ohio native com-
pleted a year-long internship in
internal medicine at Gcisingcr
Medical Center in Danville, Pa
prior to a two-year residency in
emergency medicine, also at
Geisinger.
She isa diplomate of the Ameri-
can Board of Emergency Medi-
cine and is a fellow of the Ameri-
can College of Emergency Physi-
cians.
Pre-school
program offered
(ECU News Bureau) � A new
full-day preschool education
program to be offered by the
Child Development and Family
Relations department at the East
Carolina University School of
I lome Economics will begin Sept
The program is open to chil-
dren who will be three or lour
years old by Oct. 15 and will
operate Monday through I ridays
from 7:30 a.m. until 5.30 p.m. for
46 weeks per year.
Catherine Shepherd, the direc
tor, said the program is designed
to provide a variety of enrich
ment experiences to enhance the
social, emotional, physical and
intellectual development oi the
child. For more information and
application, call 757-6926.
$5 course teaches
Japanese
(ECU News Bureau) The$5
college course in conversational
Japanese had taken hold and is
gaining some measure of fame
at East Carolina University.
will be offered again this
fall, as an non-credit evening
course beginning Sept. 3, through
the ECU Division of Continuing
Education and Department of
Foreign Languages and Lit-
erautres at a total cost of $5 to
cover registration.
Prof. Luis Acevez, instructor in
Spanish and Latin and holder of
two first-class certificates for
teaching Japanese from the Japa-
nese Ministry of Education, will
again waive his fee for instructing
the course.
It will continue for 12 weeks,
through Nov. 19, from 6:30 p.m.
until 8 p.m. on Thursdays in
Brewster Building, D-112.
After several years of trying
unsuccessfully to establish the
course in conversational Japa-
nese, Acevez waived his fee last
spring to instruct the class at a
cut-to-the-bone cost. Thirty stu-
dents signed up.
Acevez meanwhile, has heard
from many of his former students
acrotj the state and across the
country, congratulating him on
the experiment.
"We have succeeded in creat-
ing a great deal of interest and the
interest continues Acevez said.
"It has its practical points. The
course is designed for those inter-
ested in a beginner's working
knowledge of Japanese conversa-
tion and writing systems for prac-
tical purposes
Some area industries with
Japanese connections have indi-
cated they plan to send students
to the $5 course, Acevez said.
3tye lEuBt (Earoitnlan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representing
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo Shari Clemens
Pete Femald Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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One color and black$90.00
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Inserts
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WELCOME BACK
ECU
I.1 . j.
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memory is letting us store more
information and have access to
stories that were run even several
months ago, if an editor feels it is
necessary to store them for that
long.
The system is now in place in
the office, and is bolted to desks
by the Anchor Pad Security Sys-
tem. While they are no longer
mobile, they also cannot b� sto-
len, leaving you without a news-
paper.
The new system has caused
some problems. Late nights have
become the norm rather than the
exception, and the programming
has some bugs in it that need
working out. Inexperience has
also slowed the editorial process,
but all the editors are working
hard to learn the new tools. The
system is designed to eventually
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different things with layout that
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600 Greenville Blvd - Greenville
(AP) School districts,
pressed by relormerstocurbhigh
dropout rates, are appealing to
students' profit motive to get
them to stay in school and studv
hard
Students in a growing number
of cities are winning stereos, bi
cycles, cash, college scholarships
free fast food or merchant dis-
counts tor doing what was once
expected for free attending
ol regularly and earning
good grades.
Ernest L Boyer, president of
!ni arneg I - �. ment for the
Advancement of Teaching and a
: r in education reform, wor-
that the trend is an unfortu-
nate byproduct
reform has plaa
'The pressure
from quantitati
leading sch
emergency
them look good I
card he said ml
Starting in On
nis Club in I
average high schJ
a poor 85 percer
dents movie
concerts and fa
for improving at
Since -
Unified Sdh
voungsters . I
attendance r
Advice about chlamvd
often no symptoms foi
1 recently found out I have ch-
lamydia. How did 1 get it and is it
contagious?
Chlamydia is a bacterial infec-
tion that is sexually transmitted
Public health authorities estimate
that four to five people get ch-
lamydia for every person who
has gonorrhea.
Genital infections caused by
chlamydia occur in men and
women and may cause different
Health
Column
By Mary Elisha Adams
ECU Student Health Center
types of medical problems in-
cluding:
- sterility in males and infertil-
ity in women
- Rciter's syndrome, an arthn-
tis-like condition
-increased chance of cctopic
pregnancy (the embryo grows in
the Fallolopian tube instead of
the uterus)
- pelvic inflamatory disease m
women
- increased chance of ��flN&ane-
us abortion and sMJgfth !n
women who t& fi3lStit
have chlamvdial infections
during prenar
- transrrus
a child dunr .1
infectic" 1
How di
chlamydia
The chla
know that r
ease because
women and 10
with the disease
toms If pe-
have chlarr
others Svmpto
- painful urn
tery discharge rr
men
- women mav
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vaginal
discharge ai
rween menstr
If you thin!
lamydia see yc
practiciont-
tant and a
volves taking a
The Student He4
nnely tests
women who ha v
pap exams boo 1
noticeable svmu
The treatment I
antibonc there-
your sexual r
chlamydia
seek medical att
1
Reagan says Bork is kt
but fair about death
LOS ANGELES tAP) � Presi-
dent Reagan says Robert H.
Bork's courtroom arguments in
favor of the death penalty are one
reason the "tough but fair" judge
should be confirmed as a Su-
preme Court justice.
In a meeting with pro-Bork
law enforcement and other offi-
cials here Friday, Reagan said the
Supreme Court nominee "has
demonstrated a genuine concern
for the right of our citizens to live
in safe communities and a clear
understanding of the problems
facing today's law enforcement
professions
The meeting was the last on the
president's schedule before he
and first lady Nancy Reagan re-
turned Saturday to their ranch
north of Santa Barbara to wind up
a 23-dav California vacation end-
ing Sept. 5.
Illinois Gov. James Thompson,
a member of the pro-Bork delega-
tion that met with Reagan, said
the law officers told the president
they will form a group to lobby
for Senate confirmation oi the
nominee.
The Senate ludiciary Commit-
tee opens 10 days of hearings on
the nomination Sept. 15, with a
committee vote scheduled for
Oct. 1. The administration says it
will press for action by the full
Senate before the court reconve-
nes Oct. 5
Bork is a conservative judge of
the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
in Washington who served as
solicitor general in the Nixon and
Ford administrations. If con-
firmed, he will succeed Justice
Lewis F. Powell.
Powell, often a swing vote be-
tween liberal and conservative
factions on the court, announced
his retirement in June.
Reagan, in an opening state-
ment at Friday's meeting, said
that as solicitor general, Bork
represented the government be-
fore the Supreme Court in
"landmark cases that upheld trie
constitutionality of capital pun-
ishment � a position maintained
by Justice Lewis Powell in his
years on the court
It's essential
lshment remain
were to pr
from the tragedy
nal acts tht prej
As solicitor ce
gued for the a
the death per
which a Georj
lenged on ground
alty is a crw 1
ishment. tor:
Cons. �
The
challenge in a
Powell pinec
while on the apr.
"has handed
decisionsthat ha
rights oi vicl
well as the nghtsl
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THANK YOl
MAKING LSI
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Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1. 1987
enrollment
�rtificates tor
t trom the apa
di will
u�r instnii
i s in
h the
s .it a
ird
from main of hiformer students
across the state and across the
country, congratulating him on
the experiment
We have succeeded in creat-
ing a real deal of interest and the
interest continues Acevez said.
It has its practical points. The
course is designed tor those inter-
ested in a beginner's working
know ledge of la pa nose conversa-
tion and writing systems for prac-
tical purposes
Some area industries with
ipanese connections have indi-
cated thev plan to send students
to the V course. -ce e said.
zafit (Earolitifan
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(Ar) � School districts,
pressed by reformers to curb high
dropout rates, are appealing to
students' profit motive to get
them to stay in school and study
hard. '
Students in a growing number
of cities are winning stereos, bi-
cycles, cash, college scholarships
tree fast food or merchant dis-
counts for doing what was once
expected for free: attending
school regularly and earning
good grades.
Ernest L. Boyer, president of
the Carnegie Endowment for the
Advancement of Teaching and a
leader in education reform, wor-
ries that the trend is an unfortu-
nate byproduct of the pressures
reform has placed on schools.
'The pressure to judge reform
from quantitative outcomes is
leading schools to adopt almost
emergency strategies to help
them look good on some report
card he said in an interview.
Starting in October, the Kiwa-
nis Club in Milwaukee, where
average high school attendance is
a poor 85 percent, will offer stu-
dents movie passes, free rock
concerts and fast food coupons
for improving attendance.
Since 1983, the Napa (Calif.)
Unified School district has given
youngsters with good gradesand
attendance records privately-fi-
nanced gift certificates to local
businesses.
Local merchants in towns like
Richmond, Ind Opelousas, La
and McGehee, Ark offer dis-
counts to students with good
grades and attendance. In De-
troit, elementary and middle-
grade students with perfect at-
tendance can win free steak din-
ners at Ponderosa restaurants.
All Saints School in Indianapo-
lis, a parochial school with about
250 first- through eighth-graders,
qualifies students with perfect
behavior to compete for a bicycle
at the end of the year, said princi-
pal Kathleen Tichenor.
"My theory is unfortunately
Advice about chlamydia:
often no symptoms found
we are in an immediate feedback
society Tichenor said. "We
started allowing these kids to
question authority, but we never
gave them any guidance about it.
When you tell the kids to do
something, they think, 'Why
should I?
"I have found in today's soci-
ety, kids are not ready to accept
anything but a tangible kind of
reinforcement agreed Principal
Dennis Martin of Barker Junior
High in Michigan City, Ind
where for the past two years stu-
dents have earned $50 savings
bonds and free trips to an amuse-
ment park for good attendance,
grades and citizenship.
Such incentives seem to have at
least short-term success. At
Pittsburgh's Peabody High
School, average attendance rose
from 85 to 90 percent in two years
since local businesses helped
start a program of awarding stu-
dents portable televisions, ste-
reos, clock-radios, gift certifi-
cates, T-shirts, hats, and a grand
prize of $100 cash for good atten-
dance.
But critics call such measures
"gimmicky" and say they miss
the complexities of the dropout
problem.
The evidence seems to sug-
gest that in the short term they
boost attendance records and
performance said Boyef. "But
most of these programs touch
only a handful of students, and I
doubt that they will become uni-
versal and hit the heart of the
problem
In contrast to contests and
prizes, for example, Holyokc,
Mass has opened the sta te's only
pregnancy clinic for adolescents
to help keep young mothers-to-
be in school. Corpus Christi and
Garland, Texas, have started eve-
ning classes for students who
otherwise would have to quit
school to work
1 recently found out I have ch-
lamydia. Flow did I get it and is it
contagious?
Chlamydia is a bacterial infec-
tion that is sexually transmitted.
Public health authorities estimate
thai four to five people get ch-
lamydia for every person who
has gonorrhea.
Genital infections caused by
chlamydia occur in men and
women and may cause different
Health
Column
By Mary Elisha Adams
ECU Student Health Center
types of medical problems in-
cluding:
- sterility in males and infertil-
ity in women
- Rcitcr's syndrome, an arthri-
tis-like condition
-increased chance of ectopic
pregnancy (the embryo grows in
the Fallolopian tube instead of
the uterus)
- pelvic inflamatory disease in
women
- increased chance ofsgggfane-
ous abortion and sttll birth in
women who m �BH&i
have chlamydial infections
during prenancy
- transmission of the bacteria to
a child during birth causing eye
infections and pneumonia.
How do you know you ha"
chlamydia?
The chlamydia victim may not
know that he or she has the dis-
ease because 60-80 percent of
women and 10 percent of men
with the disease have no symp-
toms. If people don't know they
have chlamydia they may infect
others. Symptoms may include:
- painful urination and a wa-
tery discharge from the penis in
men
- women may have genital itch-
ing and burning, dull pelvic pain,
vaginal
discharge and bleeding be-
tween menstrual periods.
If you think you have ch-
lamydia see your doctor, nurse
practicioner, or physician assis-
tant and ask for a test which in-
volves taking a genital sample.
The Student Health Center rou-
tinely tests for chlamydia in
women who have routine pelvic
pap exams because of the lack of
noticeable symtoms.
The treatment for chlamydia is
antibotic therepy. You should tell
your sexual partner if you have
chlamydia sohe or she can also
seek medical attention.
J.E. Humbert � ECU Photo Ub
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Reagan says Bork is 'tough
but fair about death sentence
LOS ANGELES (AP) � Presi-
dent Reagan says Robert H.
Bork's courtroom arguments in
favor of the death penalty are one
reason the "tough but fair" judge
should be confirmed as a Su-
preme Court justice.
In a meeting with pro-Bork
law enforcement and other offi-
cials here Friday, Reagan said the
Supreme Court nominee "has
demonstrated a genuine concern
for the right of our citizens to live
in safe communities and a clear
"It's essential that capital pun-
ishment remain on the books if
we're to protect innocent lives
from the tragedy of vicious crimi-
nal acts the president said.
As solicitor general, Bork ar-
gued for the constitutionality of
the death penalty in a 1976 case in
which a Georgia law was chal-
lenged on grounds that the pen-
alty is a cruel and unusual pun-
ishment, forbidden by the
Constitution.
The high court rejected the
Carolina east mall
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understanding of the problems challenge in a decision in which
facing today's law enforcement
professions
The meeting was the last on the
president's schedule before he
and first lady Nancy Reagan re-
turned Saturday to their ranch
north of Santa Barbara to wind up
a 25-day California vacation end-
ing Sept. 5.
Illinois Gov. James Thompson,
a member of the pro-Bork delega-
tion that met with Reagan, said
the law officers told the president
they will form a group to lobby
for Senate confirmation of the
nominee.
The Senate judiciary Commit-
tee opens 10 days of hearings on
the nomination Sept. 15, with a
committee vote scheduled for
Oct. 1. The administration says it
will press for action by the full
Senate before the court reconve-
nes Oct. 5.
Bork is a conservative judge of
the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
in Washington who served as
solicitor general in theNixor and
Ford administrations. If con-
firmed, he will succeed Justice
Lewis F. Powell.
Powell, often a swing vote be-
tween liberal and conservative
factions on the court, announced
his retirement in June.
Reagan, in an opening state-
ment at Friday's meeting, said
that as solicitor general, Bork
represented the government be-
fore the Supreme Court in
"landmark cases that upheld tne
constitutionality of capital pun-
ishment �a position maintained
by Justice Lewis Powell in his
years on the court
Powell joined. Reagan said that
while on the appeals court Bork
"has handed down tough but fair
decisions that have protected the
rights of victims in the society as
well as the rights of the accused
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Tt E EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 1,1987
(Silt lEust (Karnltttiatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, - �
Clay Deanhardt, m�
Andy Lewis, m. e, jIMMY Mcke�, d��, a.m
Tim Ci iandler, s u, Anthony Martin, Bm� �,�
Clay Deanhardt, f-�. meg Needham, c,m
Si ielton Bryant, ��, lori Jackson, WK(m m�,�,
Debbie Stevens, s Kimberly Pierce, mom.
September 1, 1987
Opinion
Page 4
The future
Appropriations signal new prominence for ECU
The recent appropriation ECU only logical that the center should be
received from the state legislature is here. The growth of Greenville as a
another sign that the university is leader in medical technology and
shedding its stepchild image and industrial development also sets the
taking its proper place as one of the city apart as a prime target for such
state's larger universities. a center.
According to Ed Warren, the The question arises as to what
Democratic legislator from Pitt should be included in a project like
county, ECU received its fair share
of the budget for 1988, and we can
only sav that it's about time
this. Many people have suggested
the inclusion of a new coliseum for
major attractions and sporting
Significantly, the money will go to events. While this appears an attrac-
well deserved and important proj- tiveidea to students starving for big
ects. The completion of the Brody name entertainment, it seems fur-
Medical Sciences Building and the ther study on the issue is needed,
new Sports Medicine facilities will A coliseum would be nice, but its
serve to further enhance the reputa- inclusion might alter the orginal
tions of East Carolina programs that goals of a regional center: to provide
are already well known. Linking up a large forum tor meetings, confer-
the university computers with those ences and conventions that will lead
of the UNC System can only help to to the development of the region,
pool the academic resources of the On the other hand, if the coliseum
state and provide the best ecudation were properly managed and
possible for all the students. booked, it could ultimatley help to
Included in the budget are, of pay maintenance and possiblv even
course, plans for the future. The building costs.
$330,000 for the planning of a re- No matter what the final decisions
gional center like the Mckimmon and plans may bring, the simple
Center at NC State hopefully will be notion of ECU having a center like
wisely spent. this is a true sign of progress. The
A regional center is much needed time has come for ECU to take its
in the eastern section of the state, rightful place among the leading
Since ECU has become the academic" educational institutions of the state,
hub of this part of the state, it seems the southeast and the nation.
Reagan must help confirm Bork
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
of foyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and clas-
sification, address, phone number and
signature of the authoris). Letters are
limited to two typewritten pages, double
spaced or neatly printed. All letters are
subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
uniting letters for this page are reminded
ik.it they are limited to one every two
weeks. The deadline for editorial material
is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesd iy' ' 'turn and
5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday's edition.
Campus Spectrum
rules
Forum
rules
In addition to the "Campus Forum"
section of the editorial page, The East
Carolinian features the "Campus
Spectrum This isan opinion column
by guest writers from the student
body and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
'ished.
By FRED BARNES
The New Republic
On July 1 President Reagan made an infrequent appearance
in the White House press room - with Robert Bork. Reagan
said he was nominating Bork to the Supreme Court because
of his "extraordinary abilities" and because he "shares my
view that judges' personal preferences and values should not
be part of their constitutional interpretation
Later, Bork watched C-SPAN with Will Ball, White House
lobbyist in Congress, as Sen. Edward Kennedy denounced
him on the Senate floor. He was stunned.
He shouldn't have been. In Washington politics it really
does matter how much noise you can create. The pressand the
political community fall for it every time.
In the days after the Bork announcement, Kennedy and a
collection of liberal interest groups made more noise in oppo-
sition to Bork than the White House did in favor of him. So
reporters and politicians concluded that Bork was in trouble.
Then in late July the White House organized a Bork task force,
issued a curious loose-leaf binder labeled "Materials on Judge
Robert H. Bork and shoved Reagan out front to make pro-
Bork pronouncements.
Press and pols concluded that the Bork nomination was no
longer in jeopardy.
In truth, nothing had changed. From the time he was
nominated, Bork was odds-on to win confirmation. He still is.
But, as ever in the Reagan administration, there is a clash on
Bork between pragmatists and ideologues.
The pragmatists, mostly at the White House, want to
emphasize what Ball calls Bork's "qualifications, his tempera-
ment, hisintegrityThey want to downplay ideology. They
argue that if Bork is marketed as a fellow who will bring
conservative results, liberal and moderate Democrats
would be all the more justified in voting against him. But if
they stick to Bork's personal qualities, Democrats may be
reluctant to make ideology and issue. And if Bork's judicial
ability is the chief issue, they'll have to vote for him.
The ideologues, mostly at the Justice Departmant, believe
people elected Reagan to put conservatives on the court. They
want to tell those people that the president has nominated
one.
Some ideologues believe Howard Baker, White House chief
of staff, wanted to block the Bork nomination. Several days
before the nomination was announced, Baker and Attorney
General Edwin Meese conferred with Senate Majority Leader
Robert Byrd and Sen. Joseph Biden, chairman of the Senate
Judiciary Committee. The showed Byrd and Biden names of
a dozen potential nominees.
One Justice official said Baker's hope was that Byrd and
Biden would declare that Bork would never be confirmed. A
Baker aide said he was merely going through the motions of
consulting the Senate. In any case, Byrd and Biden didn't veto
Bork.
The pragmatist have largely prevailed. The strange book of
materials on Bork that was sent to senators reflected their
view. It describes Bork as less conservative than Justice An-
tonin Scalia, who was overwhelmingly confirmed last year. It
says that having Bork replace Justice Lewis Powell, a judicial
moderate, will not alter the ideological balance of the court.
Moreover, it says that as an appeals court judge since 1982
Bork has shown a marked willingness to vote against Reagan
and the Republican Party.
The book's initial version, put together by Justice officials,
soft-pedaled Bork's record far less, and thus was more cred-
ible. But the White House Balked.
Until confirmation hearings begin, Bork is in the hands of a
task force composed of White House and Justice officials and
few outsiders such as lobbyist Tom Korologos.
When Bork visits senators - he's chatted with about 20 so far
- he is usually accompanied by John Bolton, deputy attorney
general for legislative affairs and a former student of Bork's
Bork has seen all but one (Sen. Howell Heflin, D-Ala.) of the
members of the Senate Judiciary Committee. His longest
session (three hours) was with Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa who
sometimes votes against the administration.
He spent two hours with Sen. Bob Packwood, R-Ore. Pack-
wood is a strong supporter of the 1973 Roe vs. Wade decision
legalizing abortions. Bork has been a relentless critic of that
ruling. But he told Packwood his mind is open on the issue. If
Packwood could find a constitutional basis for a right to an
abortion, he would "go along This was not serious. Bork is
not awaiting Packwood's finding. The assumption is that
Packwood is a sure vote against confirmation.
At the hearings, Bork won't emulate Scalia, who got away
with scarcely discussing his judicial viewsatali. Bork has said
he'll discuss his judicial philosophy hilly.
Bork is already in training. In early August he was grilled in
a mock hearing held on the f ou r th floor of the Execu ti ve Office
Building. At one point Howard Baker dropped by. He
reached the quick conclusion that Bork wilt be a dazzling
witness. He told a reporter that Bork "will be his own best
witness
For now, Bork's best witness is Reagan.
The ideologues have gotten their way on when the pro-Bork
campaign should begin (early August) and who should be the
point man (Reagan). By mid-August, the president had given
a speech and two radio addresses on Bork. Better yet, in his
Iranmok speech on Aug. 12, he put Bork'sconfimation first on
the agenda for his final 17 months.
"As soon as the Senate returns from its recess next month,
it should consider Judge Bork's qualifications and then vote
yes or no, up or down he said. "This nation and its citizens
deserve a full bench with nine justices when the Court con-
venes in October
This was Reagan's oblique way of saying: Democrats, don't
you dare filibuster. Democrats didn't take the warning sen-
ously, nor should they have. Reagan's remarks on Bork were
mainly just noise. But noise has its place. All the racket gave
Reagan and his aides the impression that Bork would be
confirmed after all.
Moderate makes case against conservative age
Well, here we are caught up in the Age of Conser-
vatism. It was inevitable and forseeable, given the
fact that Reagan was elected to a second term. The
70s saw the nation swing to the left under Carter, but
under his weak presidency it was inconceivable that
he would be elected to a second term. His major
.vcakness was that he was too honest, refusing to
play all the political games necessary to accomplish
what he wanted, but at least he left the legacy of
forging a Middle East peace plan. On top of the fact
that he wasn't a very strong leader was that he
campaigned asan 'outsider telling us that he would
clear up all the waste, fraud and backscratching that
was (is) so prevalent in Washington. Then along
came Reagan with his image of a strong leader, and
he showed up at just the right time, with our hos-
tages being held in Iran for more than a year.
His image and tough talk were instrumental in the
Campus Spectrum
By
Mike Highsmith
release of those hostages, so he started off on the
right foot. Being neither 'conservative' nor liberal'
myself, I try to analyze each situation case by case,
and compare what is said to what is done. I believe
that Reagan has a very stong sense of morality, but it
is his own particular brand of morality; one which he
has been trying to infuse into the nation by way of
judicial appointments, strongarm tactics, and the
general attitude he has created under his admini-
stration. He has had some success with this, al-
though he will meet with considerably more oppo-
sition now that we have had a Democratic Senate
and House for nearly a year.
He has repeatedly stated that he has been given a
'mandate' to pursue his moral agenda as well as his
'foreign policy' agenda because of the fact that he
was re-elected by a landslide. Let us look at the
reason for that. Who did he have for an opponent last
time? Mr. 'I'll raise your taxes' Mondale, and all he
was was Carter revisted. I don't think that a land-
slide re-election was a blank check to use any means
to achieve his goals, no matter how unpopular with
the general population; case in point his dealings of
arms to the most terrorist of nations (Iran), which is
the most hated country by the usually easy going
U.S. Now we find out that those same arms we sold
them might be used against our boys in the Persian
Gulf. Brilliant move, Ron. Using his 'mandate' argu-
ment, I hope he received the right signal during the
last election when the congress turned dramatically
Democratic. Our nation isn't so dumb as to think that
our ideologist administration shouldn't be at least
somewhat temperd by the other side's viewpoint, at
least for the sake of accountability.
I remember when Reagan ran the first time on the
platform to get the government off our backs, which
isn't exactly what has transpired during his tenure.
He has stuck his nose in our lives everywhere from
our cars to our bedrooms. He may not have had
direct responsibility for the specific policies coming
out of his administration, but he was the one who
created the mood for them coming about. Some
examplesare the fact that we must now buckle safety
belts, under penalty of fine, even though the one hurt
will be the individual that failed to buckle up, and no
one else. Now I am a strong advocate of vehicle
safety, and feel that everyone should buckle up, but
I don't feel that we need Big Brother twisting our arm
to get us to do what logic would dictate in the first
place. And now that Reagan has appointed Mr. 'give
me an interest-free loan and I'll give you a govt. job'
Meese as Attorney General, we have to watch what
we do in our bedrooms. We now have to wonder
what kind of felony we are committing when we ask
our spouse to do something we both might enjoy. I
won't go into any details, but you can use your
imagination.
One last strongarm tactic example I will use to
show how government hasn't exactly been taken off
our back is the new pol icy being considered to cu t of f
federal funding to any family planning clinic who
merely lists abortion among all the possible alterna-
tives to unplanned or risky pregnancies. The clinic
does not have to perform or even advocate abortion
to have its funding cut off, they merely need list it as
an alternative along with the many other alterna-
tives that can be considered for such a situation. I am
not promoting or opposing abortion, a topic much
too complex and personal to be adequately covered
in a paragraph (or even a book), suffice it to say that
I can see how it would be inappropriate to the point
of insulting to some people to let a handful of old
men dictate what a nationful of women can and
cannot do with their own body. A woman, just like
everybody else, will be held accountable for her own
actions, as well as be responsible for her own karmic
debt. And now with the nomination of Bork on one
of the news interview shows, I realized just how
idealogically motivated his appointment was. He
not only stated his intent to repeal the Roe vs. Wade
decision (legalizing abortion), but he also expressed
his opinion that the 1st Article of our Bill of Rights
stating our right to freedom of speech pertained only
to political speech, not you and I speaking our mind
on any subject. That opinion by a potential Supreme
Court Justice filled me with a sense of foreboding.
Being a 'constitutional purist' he seems to feel that
rights shouldn't be created to deal with changing
norms, mores and technologies, unless they were
specifically stated in the Constitution. I can't see how �
he would expect our founding fathers to predict and I
deal with the Space Age, and technologies accompa-1
nying it from computers to satellites and everything I
in between. I think we need to come up with ways to �
deal with constantly changing contemporary situ-
ations without contradicting the Constitution.
And now with the IranContra scandal that has :
been consuming the nation, 1 can see another 30 year
old pattern repeating itself. Since the Eisenhower i
Administration, every time we had a 2-term Repub- 1
lican president, we elected a Democrat immdiately j
afterward. With Reagan dealing arms over to Iran
without telling the Congress or the people, he may
have shot not only himself but the Republican Party
in the foot. According to all the polls, the American
people feel betrayed, but we'll see if that sense of
betrayal shows up in the next election. As much ;
good as Reagan has done for this country, it's the
negative aspects of his administration that seem to
stick out in the mind, whether it be foreign policy
contradictions, the high number of former staff
indictments and scandals, unpopular proxv wars
'we' support, the hate inspired by the American
image by many parts of the world (especially the
Arab nations and much of the Third World) due to
our own special brand of gunboat diplomacy, this
administration's corporate mergerbig business,
mentality (under his ideal society we would rl be;
working for The Corporation), our frequent inability
to gain our allies' support due mainly to our unwill-
ingness to consult with them on various matters, or
our method of keeping inflation and interest rates
low by means of a huge deficit and charging the cost
to the future (or 'voodoo economies as Bush called
it during his 1980 campaign). Oh well, I guess
nobody's perfect
Fordham
hut th
CHAPf-1. H1LI a:
topherC Ford
theUniver tyofNorl
at Chapel Hill
scrum s tri. �, , u
noun ing h
endofthel -
Fordhan � lid his I
tion would
1988, and v
versit) i
through ititsl entei
paign, !�-
"I fell thai � era of the i
and mid il - � � � �
end and the
extreme!) well during'I itl
- i in a tele
I felt t
juncture tor th re to be r a
ABORTL
Groups proi
WASHINGTON '
tion rights groups are : i
an all-out battle igaii
administrati n proposal I
federally funded froi
giving our format i
abortion.
"I'm certain we'll b
and very, veryacl
thisattempt tostrai
ics in rod tap
dan. communn tt
tor the National Ab rtion
Action League.
Kate Michelman, president
National AS rtion Rh �. � �
League, called th- proposa
rageous
"You have tl �
tree nation trying I
women'1- reprodu
isan a mpt todei fial
formation al
choices, to deny i
tioners the right t .
medically
tion Michelman aid.
On Saturday, the Departrra
of Health and Human Services
announced the proposed ruicb, �
wfcjqh 0c vaS sidj a J
signed to" "build a Ugh wall f
between abortion clinics and fed- I
erally funded family planning '
programs.
Under the proposals, famih
planning clinics that reeeh e fed- i
eral funds, but carry out abor- I
tions with private funds ���
be required to keep the t
tions totally apart by such rru ar -
as separate entrance- examina I �
tion rooms, and med '
nancial records.
While the supporter- of Pi
dent Reagan's initiative
plauded the action
rights activists pr I Of
regulations will ha e little imme-
diate effect on the d j WVO
due to anticipated - i �?�Uahk
over the regulations. 51J EVAl
"What it means in the si rti GREEN
isitothing'saidWil n PHONE
ton Jr Planned Parenthood - i
i
i
13. W
14. V
PLUS a FRE
Full
$2.00 OFF
FULL SERVICE
(WITH COUPON)
Reg. S2I.95
COUPON GOOD SEPT 30- I987
HOURS
NAondov thru F'icJo
730orn Nl6.30p.ir
Sat 7 30 a t- � fcOO p
"East Ca
To The Oil






Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1, 1987
infirm Bork
rk a- less conservative than Justice An-
helminglyconfirmed last vear. It
istice Lewis Powell, a judicial
ill r , ideological balance of the court.
appeals court judge since 1982
i willingness to vote against Reagan
version put together by lustice officials,
rd tar less and thus was more cred-
se Balked
rmation hearings begin Bork is in the hands of a
I of White House and Justice officials and
h as lobbyist Tom korologos.
senators he's chatted with about 20 so far
ed bv lohn Rolton, deputy attorney
atrairs and a former student of Bork's
tone (Sen. Howell Heflin, D-Ala.)of the
the Senate ludiciarv Committee. His longest
irs was with Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Ta who
nst the administration.
rs with Sen. Bob Packwood, R-Ore. Pack-
porter oi the 1973 Roe vs. Wade decision
ns Bork has been a relentless cntic of that
ood his mind is open on the issue. If
: i institutional basis for a right to an
g This was not serious. Bork is
; Ta. b d s nnding. The assumption is that
te against confirmation,
rings, Bork won't emulate Scalia, who got away
eiy discussmghis judicial views at all. Bork has said
xssVas judicial pYuosopHy futty.
. road v in training, in earlv August he was grilled in
held on the fourth floor of the Execu ti ve Office
ne point Howard Baker dropped by. He
- conclusion that Bork wilt be a dazzling
le told a reporter that Bork "will be his own best
� witness is Reagan.
: ten their way on when the pro-Bork
;uk: earl) AugusOand who should be the
mid-August, the president had given
radio addresses on Bork. Better yet, in his
on Aug. 12,heputBork'sconfimationfirston
his final 17 months.
as the Senate returns from its recess next month,
insider ludge Bork's qualifications and then vote
p or down he said. This nation and its citizens
i nch with nine justices when the Court con-
- T
Reagan s oblique way of saying: Democrats, don't
. ster Democrats didn't take the warning seri-
should they have. Reagan's remarks on Bork were
I- se But noise has its place. All the racket gave
nd his aides the impression that Bork would be
after all.
f votive age 1
Specifically stated 'n the Constitution. I can't see how $
c would expect our founding fathers to predict and I
lea! with the Space Age, and technologies accompa-1
wing i t from computers to satellites and everything t
In between. I think we need to come up with ways to
a! with constantly changing contemporary situ-
vvithout contradicting the Constitution.
Ard now with the IranContra scandal that has
.tr consuming the nation, lean see another 30 year
Id patter repeating itself. Since the Eisenhower
lA iministration, every time we had a 2-term Repub-
lican president, we elected a Democrat immdiately
afterward. With Reagan dealing arms over to Iran
I without telling the Congress or the people, he may
have shot not only himself but the Republican Party
jin the foot. According to all the polls, the American
people feel betrayed, but we'll see if that sense of
betrayal shows up in the rext election. As much
god as Reagan has done for this country, it's the
negative aspects of his administration that seem to I
stick out in the mind, whether it be foreign policy !
contradictions, the high number of former staff
indictments and scandals, unpopular proxy wars;
rwe' support, the hate inspired by the American �
fmage by many parts of the world (especially the
rab nations and much of the Third World) due to j
mr own special brand of gunboat diplomacy, this j
administration's corporate mergerbig business
icntality (under his ideal society we would all be
vorking for The Corporation), our frequent inability,
i gain our allies' support due mainly to our unwill-
ingness to consult with them on various matters, or j
jur method of keeping inflation and interest rates .
w by means of a huge deficit and charging the cost -
Id the future (or 'voodoo economies as Bush called ;
t during his 1980 campaign). Oh well, I guess I
ibody's perfect
!
Fordham resigns after eight years of service
CHAPEL HILL (AP) - Chris-
topher C. Fordham, chancellor of
the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill, surprised the
school's trustees Friday by an-
nouncing he would resign at the
end of the 1987-88 academic vear
Fordham, 60, said his resigna-
tion would be effective June 30,
1988, and would allow the uni-
versity to have new leadership
throughout its bicentennial cam-
paign, 1989-1995.
"I felt that the era of the early
and middle '80s was coming to an
end and the university had done
extremely well during that time
Fordham said in a telephone in-
terview. "I felt this was a good
juncture for there to be new lead-
ership and a good juncture for me
to do something else
Fordham said the university's
bicentennial campaign that starts
in 1989 should have a leader all
the way through it until 1995. The
university was founded in 1789
but the first class of students
wasn't in place until 1795.
Fordham would be eligible for
retirement in five years.
Fordham, a graduate of Har-
vard Medical School, said he
didn't have future plans yet but
did have "plans to make plans
He also said he wouldn't try to
influence the search for a succes-
sor.
Robert Eubanks, chairman of
the board of trustees, told
Fordham after his surprise an-
nouncement at the board meet-
ing, that board members were
stunned.
"Your decision at this time is a
surprise because of the state of
this institution, but you have
turned the battleship around
Eubanks said.
Gary A. Evans, vice chancellor
for development and university
relations, called the resignation
"a statesmanlike gesture
"I firmly believe that a major
problem would be for a univer-
sity to have a change in leader-
ship in the middle of a major
capital campaign Evans said,
adding Fordham may not have
believed he could make a
ABORTION
Groups promise to fight Reagan
WAS! IINGTON (AP) - Abor-
tion rights groups are promising
an all-out battle against a Reagan
administration proposal to block
federally funded clinics from
giving out any information on
abortion.
"I'm certain we'll be very vocal
and very, very active in opposing
thisattempt to strangle these clin-
ics in red tape said Sandra Jor-
dan, communications director
for the National Abortion Rights
Action League.
Kate Michelman, president of
National Abortion Rights Action
League, called the proposal "out-
: ageous
"You have the government of a
free nation trying to coerce
women's reproductive actions. It
is an attempt to deny women in-
formation about one of their vital
choices, to deny medical practi-
tioners the right to give women
medically necessary informa-
tion Michelman said.
On Saturday, the Department
of Health and Human Services
announced the proposed rules,
wtych Ofte o�&aaI sa,i4 WWu&irli
signed to" "fcuild a nigh wall"
between abortion clinics and fed-
erally funded family planning
programs.
Under the proposals, family
planning clinics that receive fed-
eral funds, but carry out abor-
tions with private funds, would
be required to keep the two func-
tions totally apart by such means
as separate entrances, examina-
tion rooms, and medical and fi-
nancial records.
While the supporters of Presi-
dent Reagan's initiative ap-
plauded the action, abortion
rights activists predicted the
regulations will have little imme-
diate effect on the clinics, in part
due to anticipated court battles
over the regulations.
"What it means in the short run
is nothing said William Hamil-
ton jr Planned Parenthood's
chief lobbyist in Washington.
Hamilton said, however, that
his organization was concerned
about the possible impact on low-
income women, the primary
clients in such clinics. Also, he
said, the rules amounted to an
infringement on freedom of
speech and the physician-patient
relationship.
"I don't think thev have the
constitutional underpinning for
what they are trying to do he
said.
"This is pure political philoso-
phy. It has nothing to do with
quality health care he added.
"What we have here is President
Reagan and the White House at-
tempting to do through executive
fiat what they failed to do legisla-
tively
Hamilton, along with other
abortion rights activists, said
their organizations intended to
take the administration to court if
it proceeds with the proposed
rules.
"The representatives of the
reproductive rights community
are ready to litigate the minute
these regulations go into effect
said Jennifer Pizer, legal coordi-
nator for the National Abortion
Rights Action League.
Nicki Nichols Gamble, the ex-
ecutive director of the Planned
Parenthood League of Massachu-
setts, predicted "a major court
fight if they are not actually with-
drawn
Gamble said the abortion and
family planning services are al-
ready separated financially, and
it would be extremely costly to
separate them physically. In ef-
fect, costs for all patients would
rise, she said.
The proposals were outlined in
a policy announced last month by
Reagan. They will be published
Tuesday in the Federal Register
and spell out how thedepartment
would revise Title X of the Public
Health Act.
�VIL
LACE
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GREENVILLE, N.C. 27134
PHONE 7S-t222
Expiration Date:
Sept. 25, 1987
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newest concept in car care maintenance is now
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Here's what we do in 10 minutes, no
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HOURS:
Monday thai Friday
7 30 am 'til 6 30 p.m.
Sat. 7:30 am 'til 5 00 p m
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126 Greenville Blvd.
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(Across from Golden
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� � m. m i. ��.� m m .
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commitment of another eight or
nine years at UNCs bicentennial
campaign.
Fordham suffered a stroke in
1980 while chancellor but Evans
said he did not believe health was
a factor in the decision.
A Greensboro native, Fordham
was UNCs sixth chancellor. He
graduated from UNC and Har-
vard Medical School and joined
the UNC staff in 1958, becoming
chancellor in 1980.
"It is with a warm heart and
strong optimism for the future
that I thank you and all that you
represent for your strong support
and ask that you set about to
prepare the way for the eventual
selection of an outstanding suc-
cessor Fordham told the board.
It is my intention that we
shall move forward with vigor
during the necessary search proc-
ess and effect an orderly and
helpful transition so as not to lose
or diminish one whit the fantastic
momentum which we now pos-
sess
Fordham told the board "the
early and mid '80s have seen
remarkable achievements by the
faculty, staff, students and
alumni of this institution Be-
cause of the distinction and
achievements of these groups,
the university occupies a singu-
lar, pre-eminent position among
southern universities and is
among the top rank in the na-
tion
He said the school's recogni-
tion came about "because of solid
quality and achievement, first by
faculty and staff, followed closely
by present and former students
The
ast Carolinian,
ride,
otivation,
xperience,
riends.
Apply today.
MENS WEAR
Khaki
ancj
� i
Bucks
Khakis and Dirty Bucks
have been a by-word in
every young man's ward-
robe since World War II.
We're not sure who can take
credit for first putting the
two together, but the love
affair for these two timeless
pieces of clothing continues
both on and off campus.
This fall Coffman's con-
tinues to offer you some
great values to help you
build your fall wardrobe.
Khakis, Bucks and a fall
sportcoatbasics for a
young man's campus or
weekend wardrobe. At all
three of our Coffman's
stores you'll find these spe-
cial values during August.
DllCkheadS .plain front2 pair for $37 .95
pleatedLt pair for i�3�D
Our Own Coffman's
� Fine Quality Khakisplainfront 2pairfor57.95
.pleated. - pair for UU � OO
Our Own Coffman's
� Dirty Bucks49.95
� As An Extra Back-To-School Bonus
Downtown Greenville
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Tarrytown Mall, Rocky Mount
" " -A�-ifc"jt"rir-J' - A IT fh iT � in
,m tm fcn� ,�� -i
1
i
. . -





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 1 1987
A


���fcr1
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
MACKENZIE SI CX'RITY is seeking Ml
dents to work as part time, weekend MCU
rity guards Good pay! Musi have depend-
able transportation to work Must have
telephone Must NOT have police record
Apply in person at 1127 South Evans
Street 758 2174
PAKT-TIME HELP WANTED. Thurs
and Sat nights approximately g 30 pm
until l 30 a m driving vacuum sweeping
truck S4 50 hr Must be able to supervise
756 9618
SOCCER COACHES and Referees
needed on luesdays and Thursdays S3
per hour Contact Carol or Alice with I'itt
Count) Schools at 830-4200
DAWSONS: Part time lewelrv engraver
position available Experience necessarv
Apply in person hi 1 Fast Arlington Bivd
SOCCER COACHFS NEEDED: The
Greenville Recreation and i'arks Depart
ment is recruiting tor 10 14 part time soc-
vr coaches tor the tall soccer program
Applicants must pi sess some knowledge
in soccer skN and have patience to work
with youth Applicants must be able to
coach oung people, ages b 13 in scvcor
fundamentals I lours approximately .3 7
p m Monday thru Fndav Some night and
weekend coaching Program will extend
from September S to mid November. Si!
ary rate is i -it- per hour Applicants will
be accepted starting August 20 Contact
Hen fames a! 830-4543
MATH TUTOR NEEDED: immediately
tor Math Lab Must be experienced
knowledgabie, reasonably priced, and
patient Call Mats at 752 1029 and leave
message
HELP WANTED: typist needed to do
reports on weekly ba-is tor 12 wks Pav ne
goriable Contact Anne after 5:00 week
days 732-2421
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED: Inter
ested in making money part time photo
graphing people"1 No experience neces
sary we train If you are highly viable
n v' a I mm camera and transportation
C. c �� i call between 12 noon and 3 p m
At I 800 722 . �
BRODY'S FOR MEN has full-time and
part time sales associates positions, for
enthusiastic, fashion forward individu
als Rot.nl clothing experience is required
Better than average starting salary. Ap-
ply in person, Brody's Personnel Direc-
tor, Carolina East Mall, M-W, 2 4 p.m.
BRODY'S has part time sales associates
positions tor enthusiastic, out going indi-
vidual, who enjoy working with young
contemporary Junior fashions Good Sal-
ary Apply in person, Brody's Personnel
Director, Carolina East Mall, M-W, 2-4
p m
FOR SALE
HOOTER'S RESTAURANT is now ac-
cepting applications for waitstaff, host-
ess and busboy positions. Tuesday and
Wednesday 2 30 p.m. til 4 p m. Apply in
person only, no phone calls. Located
beside Farm Fresh behind the drv clean-
ers
DRIVERS WANTED: Part-time drivers
for Dependable Cab Company. After-
noon and night shifts available Apply in
person 10th and Evans. No phone calls
please.
FOR RENT
1 FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED lm
mediately, $88 50 plus deposit a mo AC,
Cable; located close to campus on Bus
Route 738 68.37.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE:
Needed to share a 2 bedroom apt. near
campus Private room $130mo. and 1 3
utilities Call Sandy or Lisa 758-6950.
A UNIT RINGCOLD TOWERS 719
for sublease S230 deposit $250 monthly
rent lor 2 people FRFE Sept. rent. 83a
5209 and 732-286.3 anytime.
TAR RIVER: One bedroom special. Tar
Rner Estates: $150 off first months rent
when signing a 12 month lease or the
option to sign a 9 month lease 1400 Wil-
low St 1. 752-4225.
ROOMMATE NEEDED (MALE) Tar
River Apartments 105 Oak Apt 4 2
bedroom, kitchen and den 13 rent and
utilities Call 738-7Q52 ask for Doug or
Matt
FOR SALE: Sofa; 8 ft, good condition. $40
or best offer Contact Anne 752 2421
weekdays after 5.00
FOR SALE: Nice loft with shelves and
ladder; also toaster oven Will install loft
for free. Call 752-7396 after six.
FOR SALE: 2.5 cu. ft refrigerator; very
good condition, asking $90. Call 75&
4331.
FOR SALE: Good condition 78 Ford
Pinto, AC Rebuilt engine, rebuilt trans-
mission $1,200 Call 752-9908.
WINDSURFER FOR SALE with Neil
Pryde sail - Alpha facination Great board
- good shape $550 00. 757-3642
FOR SALE: Couch, matching arm chair,
chest of drawers, dresser with large mir
ror and 2 night stands Good condition
752-7166 ext. 351 or 758-6925.
FOR SALE: 34 cu ft Sears refng-
$100.00. 6 drwT chst of drwrs and mirror
S30.00 Call Tim 758 5473.
TWIN BED almost new. For sale Price
negotiable. Phone 355-5386.
NEED A DJ for your next party? 1 play
top 40 and dance. I'll beat Morgan or any
other DJ's price. Call Mark at 752-4251
ARTWORK, AIRBRUSH or tie dyeing
done on T-shirts, sheets, banners, and
canvas. Will gladly do work for clubs,
teams, or other organizations 7 years ex-
perience Quality guaranteed. Call Paul
752-2321.
SOFA FOR SALE: $20 00 Call 758-9707
after 2 p.m.
FORD ESCORT GI 1981 2 door 4 speed
with air 77,000 miles good condition
Call Paul 551-2258 days 756-1865 eve-
nings.
IS IT TRUE You Can Buy Jeeps tor S44
through the U.S. government7 Get the
facts today' Call 1 312-742- ll1 Ext 5"7l
A
FOR SALE: Compact, whirlpool dryer
$70.00. Good condition. Call 752-9908.
FOR SALE: 10.1 cubic ft refrigerator;
separate freezer; 5' tall, 2 yrs old, semi-
automatic defroster, asking $300; nego-
tiable, call 758-0222
FOR SALE: 1975 Super Beetle VW Excel
lent condition Owned bv an Auto-Me
chanic. $1500.00 Call 758-4211 after 7:00
p.m.
WORD PROCESSING and photocopy
ing services: We offer typing and photo
copying services. We also sell software
and computer diskettes. 24 hours in and
out. Guaranteed typing on paper up to 20
hand written pages SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(Beside Cubbies) Greenville, N.C. 752-
3694.
PICK UP and delivery of term papers,
theses, resumes to be typed IBM word
processing by professional with 13 years
experience. Letter quality print and pro-
fessional editing Call Nanette in Grifton
at 1 524 5241 Cheap call the best serv-
ice!
HAVING A PARTY? Need a DJ7 For the
best in Top 40, dance, and Beach, call
Morgan at 758 7967
FOR SALE: heavy duty commercial
washing machines $100.00 each Call
752-5025 Ask for Charles or Kathv
FOR SALE: A J VC 55 watt receiver with
digital display Only $60 Call 758-8010
ask for Brian
FREE FREE FREE: That's right It s face,
and it's going to be a blast' Sack the Pat k
with Sigma Tau Gamma Thursday at 9
p m - until
PI KAPPA ALPHA'S 1st annual run to
Raleigh to raise money for the Ronald
McDonald House will be Sept 4th and
5th For more info call Matt I lermes 83()
0353 Good luck Pikes'
COME HELP US decide the outcome ot
our biggest rivalry State vs ECU at the
Sack the Pack party Thur Sept 3rd at the
Sig Tau I louse B Y O B
PI KAPPA ALPHA: Congrats to the new
brothers of the Fpsilon class. Greg Amos,
Richard Cox, Rich Ceibert, Steve Kreal,
Tyler Riggs, and Billy Sessoms and of
course the rest of the Delta Dogs Steve
Goodwin, Joe Grigsbv, Matthew Ricks.
Kevin Smith end Andrew Van Sickle'
Way to go fellas
GARY Hav.
Ioncs Amir
u seen my wife Mrs
PERSONALS
Announcements
Piratg Pre-GamGalh�ring
"he Wake County Chapters ot the East
Carolina University Pirate Club and
Alumni Association will be holding their
annual I Cl) C Sta.e Pre-gamegather
ing on Friday, September 4th from 8 (XI
pm until at the North Raleigh Hilton,
M15( Hd Wake Forest Road, Raleigh For
tickets contact Craig Ralph at 847-07 Q
Marketing AssQLCJatiQn
Or V;c, 31 and Sept 1. a table will be
set up itside ot the Marketing Depart
' on the second floor in the Rawl
building tor all students interested in the
American Marketing Association On
Sept 2 and 3 a booth will be outside of the
student store.
LSS Society
The first meeting of the Leisure Syv
terns Society will be Sept. 3, at 4:15 pm in
the Lss Building
Ambassadors
The first meeting of the Ambassadors
will be Sept 2 at 5.15 p.m. in room 221
Mendenhall
Pre-Health Professions
All students interested in Medicine,
Dentistry, Optometry, Veterinary Medi-
cine, etc are requested to meet with the
Pre-Health Professions Advisory
Committee on Sept. 1 at 7(X)p.m in F-201
Phi Sigma Pi
The first meeting for Phi Sigma Pi will
beSepI 2 at 5 p.m. in Austin 132 Remem-
ber BIOYA every Monday 9:30 p.m.
Forensic Society
Forensics involves competition in
debate, public speaking and interpreta-
tion. The first Forensic Society organiza-
tional meeting will be Sept 2 at 8 p.m. in
Messick Theatre Arts building room 211.
Paddling Clufr
The ECU Paddling Club will hold an or-
ganizational meeting Sept 1 at4:30pan.in
Memorial Gym 105 All students, staff and
faculty who are interested in learning how
to paddle a kavak or canoe are encour-
aged to attend Whitewater trips and in-
structional outings will be discussed For
more information contact Jim Mix (day
6764, evening 756-2970).
Christian Athletes
The Fellowship of Christian Athletes
will meet Tuesday's at 9:30 pm at the
Pirate Club behind' Ficklen Stadium. Stu-
dents are encouraged to attend
Assault Awareness
There will be a meeting of the Sexual
Assault Awareness Committee on Sept. 3,
from 2:30 to 4 p.m in room 248 of Men-
denhall Student Center. All interested
students, staff, faculty, or community
members are urged to attend.
SEA
The Student Residence Association
election of residence hall officers and area
council officers will be held Sept 15. All
interested candidates must file a notice
with their residence hall director between
Sept. 8 and 10. A candidates' meeting will
be held Sept. 10 at 5 p.m. in Mendenhall to
explain campaign policies and the elec-
tion process. See your residence hall direc-
tor for qualifications.
ECHO
There will be an ECHO meeting on
Production Manager
Wanted:
Are you a reliable student
with strong computer and organizational skills?
Then you could be gaining valuable management
and technical experience that will give
you the edge in today's highly
competitive job market.
The East Carolinian
is now looking for a new Production Manager to:
?Manage the production staff.
?Train new employees.
?Edit Classifieds and Announcements.
?Maintain production equipment.
LdDimg Dn�onDrs9 D�w pay,
fesiirdl wnDFk, gn��sitt cosnimipsiimyo
Tfine Esistl CaroMSnnflaim.
We're located on the second floor of the Publications Bldg.
Sept. 3 at 5 p.m. in Mendenhall room 248.
All members and anyone interested are
invited to attend.
Employment
Employment is available to qualified
students who are interested in becoming
personal care attendants to students in
wheelchairs, readers, tutors and apple
computer operators For an application
contact the Office of Handicapped Stu-
dent Services, Room 212 Whichard Build-
ing.
Girls Ultimate Team
Ultimate is a sport that combines
elements of soccer, football, basketball
and frisbee. The girls ultimate team is
presently recruiting members. For more
information, call Gussie at 758-0908.
East Carolina Friends
East Carolina Friends will be having
interest meetings on Sept. 1 and Sept. 9, at
7p.m. Rm. 221 Mendenhall. Everyone is
invited to attend. For more information,
contact Chris 1 lams at 757-0784 or David
Weber at 752-9652.
Seniors
Registration and other services of the
Career Planning and Placement Service
will be explained in an Information Meet-
ing on Sept. 2 at 4 p.m. in Mendenhall 221.
Employers who are coming will be dis-
cussed as well as sign-up procedures!
Education
The Class Meeting for the Department
of Elementary and Middle Grades Educa-
tion is Sept. 14 from 4 to 5:30 p.m. in
Hendrix Auditorium, Mendenhall. ALL
majors and certification students are ex-
pected to attend.
EUGENE I lappy Birthday sweet heart'
I lope things are going well
REWARD OFFERED for information
leading to the person that hit my car (Red
I londa Civic) Monday, Aug. 24, which
was parked on Ernal Street Call 758 6618
after 5:00
INTER VARSITY CHRISTIAN Fellow-
ship Please join us! Wednesday Nights in
Speight 129at 7:00 p m -Fun-Fellowship-
Food-Teaching-
EVERYONE: It's coming � the Basket-
ball Blowout to support the Ronald
McDonald House! You may win prizes or
5100!
T. DONATHAN - Only the strong can
survive get over it or go insane' The
guvs.
ARE YOU A FORENSICATOR? Maybe
you arc and don't even know it! Forensics
involves competition in debate, public
speaking and interpretation. Come join
the Forensic Society for their first organ
izational meeting Wednesday, Sept. 2 at
8.00 pm. in Messick Theatre Arts Build-
ing room 211 Remember, if you are inter-
ested in enhancing your communication
skills, Forensics may be the answer for
you'
LOST: Set of 5 keys on Aignor key chain
If found please turn in to BA 427 or call
757-1520.
LAMBDA CHI LITTLE SISTLRS W.�
come back girls' Hope all of you had a
good summer We can't wait to see you
chicks so we can get together and spend
that left over cash' Our first meeting will
be Tues. Sept 1 at 7:00 pm We're an mows
to see your prettv smiles and deep brown
tans. So please don't miss it' See va then
the brothers
TAU KAPPA EPSILON LIL SISTERS:
First meeting Wednesday, Sept 2 at 5 1 5
p.m. Call Guppv at 355-611 2 if you cannot
attend
SPUD next time sleep in your own bed'
Hcehcs
PI KAPPA PHI Bikini Contest' Wed
night at the Elbo Brothers come out and
show your support
ATTN. ALL ECU STUDENTS: We want
to see you Thur after the Pep Rally to help
us Sack the Pack at the Sig Tau 1 louse Be
there
PI KAPPA PHI: The brothers of Pi kappa
Phi would like to thank the 5,000 plus
people who attended the 7th annual Toga
Party, killer Party Fellows'
ATTENTION TOGA PART1ERS: Get
your "1 survived the Pi Kappa Phi toga
party" T shirts On sell Tues at the Stu
dent Store
WHAT ARE YOU DOING THUR j
you want to have a good time come to the
Sack the Pack party at the Sigma Tau
Gamma I louse
ECU RUGBY The tradition continues
Stay in shape while piavmg this intense,
hard nosed sport ot Rugby Meet new
friends and travel to piav other college
sides No experience needed Only good
athletic abilit) and intense competitive
ness Starting rues at 4 10behind Allied
Health Bid cj Bob Fas. - 757
0209
ECU RUGBY The tra I � . � :
Stay in shape while ; rtgthisintct
hard nosed spnrt of Rllgb) Meet new
friends and travel to play other college
sides No experience needed Only gooo
athletic ability and intense competitive
ness Starting Tues at 4.O0behind Allied
Health Bldg Tor into call BobEason7! 1
LIKE NC STATE? It not. then join us at
the Sack the Va, party at the Sigma Tau
Gamma ! I tusc Thursday at 9 pm for
fun, music and B'u ' merriment
Classifieds
It.ginning Sept. X ne� deadlines will be established. Classified, running in the
Tuesday edition must be submiu.d bv 4 p.m. the Friday before Those running in the
Iliuisdas ed.ti mils, be uhmiiird bj 4 p ,� ,he M�n(1iv bt.f(ir(.
Nu ads "ill by taken. Bier Ike phone.
Announcements
If your organization would like to have a public service announcement published in
1 he East Carolinian, please stop bv our office on the second floor of the Publications
Building and fill out an offk ial announcement form.There is no charge for announce-
ments, but space is often limited Therefore v�e cannot guarantee that vour announce-
ment will run as long as v.hj like. Announcements will be limited to those items
pertaining to meetings, departmental matters, and other public service announce-
ments as determined by the discretion of The East Carolinian.
Beginning Sept. I, new deadlines will be lmpo$�t. Announcements .mf Oasstrietfs to
be published in the Tuesday edition must be submitted no laler then 4 p.m. Ute t-rida;
before. Those running in the Thursday edition must be submitted no later then 4 p.m.
the Monday before.
AVAILABLE POSITIONS
ADVERTISING TECHINAL SUPERVISOR
LAYOUT ARTIST
GET A HEAD START ON YOUR
CAREER
JOB REQUIREMENTS
�DEDICATED. MATURE INDIVIDUAL
�INDIVIDUAL MUST STRIVE FOR PERFECTION
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JOIN THE EAST CAROLINIAN
ADVERTISING STAFF AND ACCEPT THE CHALLENGE
APPLY IN PERSON AT
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
The News:
It's hard hitting. It's fast. It can take you places
you never even knew existed.
The East Carolinian:
It's hard hitting. It's moving fast. It can give you the
experience you never knew you could get.
The Job:
News editor. It's an awesome responsibility.
It's one hell of a job. We need the best to produce the best
Apply Toda
-� nw �� �
�o -�
1 i .
I
�4" ,
f
500 W G
Fa cults art
Norman Keller's T ;
Gray Gallery during the facu .
A reception will be held Sept. 11
of the show, see STYLE, page 1 I
Jesse Helms
to fight
U.S. sanctions
JOHAWi
rica (APy � Sen. Jes
N.C, said Saturday he will
for repeal of U.S. sanctions
against South Africa, which he
claims have cost the country jobs
land, teighjjyryl voltecS
fsions.
; Holms, who completed a
seven-day visit to South Africa on
Saturday, was a leading 1 1
nent of the bill, which waspassed
I last October over Pros
! Reagan's veto.
"1 have not found one soul oi
j any race who favors the 1
�ation of sanctions Heln -
i reporters at the new -
I "I am now persuaded thai
jtions have had only one K
jcial effect: they have virtua
j united the people oi South A
Iin indignation again
Helms said he met with
idem P.W. Botha and nunx r is
'South African farmers and agri-
cultural officials dur
but declined to answer quest
; on the nature oi the talks
The senator also said he met
I with black leaders and opposi-
tion figures, but he refused to
j give any names other than tha I I
jSoweto's Mayor Nelson Bol
Helms said the sar - ave
j destroyed jobsat a time when t -
� country needs very much to cro-
;ate jobs
; The senator added The
SUnited States is not going to ac-
icomplish anything with meas-
ures like sanction that exacerbate
tensions
Reagan is to report to the G n-
gross by Oct. 2 on the effe
1 sanctions.

P
St
ECL
LU
$3.8!
(w Discoi
S
H
Great
m

s
STU
GOVE
ELE
E
1

For Day Representivq
class
Candidates Applies
at Mendenhall 228
in by 5:00 p.m. Wed
Beeome involved with
MR$i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER I, 1987
PI KAPPA PHI Bikini Contest! Wed
bo Brothers come out and
I : ' U.L ECU STUDENTS We want
� rau I louse Be
h. PA Till th. rsol Pi Kappa
- the n 300 plus
'thannual Toga
Ili'N
PARTII RS: Get
Kappa Phi toga
I ues at the Stu
POINC 1IIL.R.? If
odtm netothe
'ntinties.
ntcnse,
el new
college
� good
I x titive-
: Ulied
?! new
Uege
n us j:
.1 Tau
rm for
I VSSIFIEDS
running in the
� running in the
Ol NCEMENTS
announcement published in
th( Publications
. hargc fur announce-
. ante that your announce-
(�i limited to those items
iir puhliv service announce-
linian.
ill V.i imposed Nnnounti-mvnls and Oasstricds to
i iir I no later then 4 p.m the Friday
must tx ted no later then 4 p.m.
POSITIONS
iPERVISOR
TART ON YOUR
JEER
7REMENTS
CTION
:VA)
LALLENGE
'ERSON AT
CAROLINIAN
take you places
xisted.
nian:
t can give you the
ou could set.
responsibility.
it to produce the best.
I v
A
Are colleges worth the money?
NEW YORK (AP) Most
Americans say a college educa-
tion is more important than ever,
but they question whether col-
leges give good value for the
dollar, according to a Media
General Associated Press poll.
A college education is too ex-
pensive, given the quality of
education provided, according to
a majority in the poll. Money, and
not ability, is often the major vari-
able in choosing where a child
goes to school.
About seven in 10 of the 1,348
adult Americans in the nation-
wide telephone poll said a college
education is more important to-
day than it was in the past.
Nevertheless, nearly six in 10
respondents said tuition at most
private colleges was too high for
the quality of education pro-
vided, while SI percent felt the
same way ai. Hit public school
tuitions.
Only 21 percent thought pri-
vate schools charged the right
amount; 32 percent thought pub-
lic school tuition was a fair value.
Six in 10 respondents said they
would be disappointed if their
children did not want to go to
college. But most � 63 percent �
said financial considerations
would limit where their children
could go to school. About one-
third of respondents said they
could send their children to any
school regardless of the cost.
Interestingly, high school
dropouts in the poll were slightly
more likely than college gradu-
ates to say college was more
important today than it was in the
past.
Also, those respondents who
are taking courses at public col-
leges or universities were more
likely than others to say that
public schools offered a good
value for the dollar. But those
taking courses at private schools
were slightly more likely than
others to say tuition was too high
for the quality of education pro-
vided at those schools.
Respondents in the Media
General-Associated Press poll
included a random, scientific
sampling oi 1,348 adults across
the country June 1-10. As with all
sample surveys, the results of
Media General-AP telephone
polls can vary from the opinions
of all Americans because of
chance variation in the sample.
For a poll based on about 1,300
interviews, the results are subject
to an error margin of 3 percentage
points either way because of
chance variations in the sample.
That is, if one could have ques-
tioned all Americans with tele-
phones, there is only 1 chance in
20 that the findings would vary
from the results of polls such as
this one by more than 3 percent-
age points.
Of course, the results could
differ from other polls for several
reasons. Differences in exact
wording of questions, in the tim-
ing of interviews and in the inter-
view methods could also cause
variations.
Media General Inc a commu-
nications company based in
Richmond, Va publishes the
Richmond Times-Dispatch and
the Richmond News Leader; the
Tampa (Fla.) Tribune, and the
VVinston-Salem Journal in North
Carolina. The company's televi-
sion stationsare VVXFL in Tampa,
VVCBD in Charleston, S.C and
WJKS in Jacksonville, Fla.
Only on Tuesdays
and Thursdays
Faculty art
Norman Keller's "Topsail Icon" is just one of the works on exhibit in
Gray Gallery during the faculty show, which opened this weekend.
A reception will be held Sept. 11. For more information and a review
of the show, see STYLE, page 10.
Jesse Helms
to fight
U.S. sanctions
OHANNESBl RG, South Af-
rica (AP) Sen. esse 1 lelms, R-
N.C said Saturday he will fight
tor repeal ot U.S. sanctums
against South Africa, which he
claims have cost the country jobs
jand heightened political un-
Isions.
1 lelms, who completed a
seven-day visit to South Africa on
Saturday, was a leading oppo-
l nent of the bill, which was passed
last October over President
; Reagan's veto.
"1 have not found one soul of
� any race who favors the continu-
jation of sanctions Helms told
: reporters at the news conference.
"1 am now persuaded that sanc-
tions have had only one benefi-
;cial effect: they have virtually
I united the people oi South Africa
� in indignation against them
Helms said he met with Pres-
ident P.W. Botha and numerous
'South African farmers and agri-
cultural officials during his visit,
but declined to answer questions
on the nature oi the talks.
The senator also said he met
' with black leaders and opposi-
tion figures, but he refused to
. give any names other than that of
� Soweto's Mavor Nelson Botile.
Helms said the sanctions "have
I destroyed jobsat a time when this
: country needs very much to cre-
' ate jobs
The senator added, "The
� United States is not going to ac-
leomplish anything with meas-
ures like sanction that exacerbate
tensions
Reagan is to report to the Con-
gress by Oct. 2 on the effect of
sanctions.
J














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STUDENT I

ELECTIONS I
GOVERNMENT
For Day Representives Dorm representives
class officers
Candidates Applications maybe obtained
at Mendenhall 228. Applications must be
in by 5:00 p.m. Wednesday, September 2nd.
Become involved with ECU Student Governmen
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J





SEPTEMBER 1, 1987
A
UNC Board criticizes funding legislation
(AP) jtqq members of the
BoMrS,PU0f N�rth Carol,na
�rd of Governors have enti-
ced legislators for their pen-
,nanl� appropriate money for
"jeir favorite projects, while the
�ann administration has
munched an attack over eco-
nomic development programs.
' he board members say the
lawmakers' appropriations for
MKh projects threatened to un-
dercut the UNC system's plan-
ning and budgeting process.
William Johnson, a Lillington
attorney who chaired the Board
Of Governors from 1976 until
1980, suggested at a board meet-
ing Friday that the panel should
consider "working with mem-
bers of the General Assembly" to
stem the practice of lawmakers
skirting UNC's budget.
"There is an increasing trend
for the General Assembly to
make appropriations for matters
which the board hasnotseen fit to
include in its budget request
Johnson said. "This is a practice
which, if it increases, is going to
undermine the budgeting proc-
ess of the Board of Governors. 1
think it's something we need to
look at seriously
This summer, lawmakers ap-
proved $3.3 million in planning
funds, all earmarked to lay
groundwork for eight projects
proposed by influential legisla-
tors. None of the projects has
been suggested by the Board of
Governors, and none was pro-
posed for the system's five his-
torically black institutions.
Former Gov. Jim Holshouser
said he recalled vividly why the
Board of Governors was created
and charged with developing a
system-wide budget request.
"1 know the thinking that went
into the policy Holshouser said.
"It was generated in effect to
avoid some of the problems we
had in the '60s
Holshouser said a unified
budget request coming directly
from the Board of Governors was
"sound public policy
"We certainly wouldn't want
to have the campuses fighting
each other Holshouser said.
CD. Spangler Jr UNC system
president, said he thought formal
action opposing lawmakers' spe-
cial budget requests was unnec-
essary.
'The message has been prop-
erly conveyed Spangler said,
adding that he didn't expect the
trend to continue.
Meanwhile, the Martin ad-
ministration criticized the legis-
lature for its failure to make the
state's part-time representative
in Japan a full-time position. It
also chided lawmakers for failing
to put a regional business indus-
try development office in the
northeast portion of the state, and
for failing to add staff in existing
regional offices.
Twice in the last week, the state
Commerce Department issued
statements highly critical of the
legislature for not funding vari-
ous projects being sought by the
Martin administration.
"Unfortunately, while they
gave us a few new tools for help-
ing rural areas get steady growth,
they didn't do much for our pro-
grams designed to put new jobs
in the pipeline said Jim Broyhill,
the former U.S. Senator who
chairs the state Economic Devel-
opment Board, in a prepared
statement.
In the second statement, Com-
merce Secretary Claude Pope
took aim at lawmakers for not
adding $450,000 to the budget for
upgrading the Japanese office.
The decision, he said, "means
thatourstatewillbeunder-repre-
sented in the competition for the
investments that lie ahead.
Ken Eudy, executive director of
the state Democratic party, said it
is "beyond belief that we would
be criticized by this do-nothing
administration on industrial re-
cruiting Luther Hodges in-
vented industrial recruiting in
the 1950s and Democrats have
been the champions of it ever
since
Rep. Al Lineberry Sr D-
Guilford, chairman of the House
Economic Growth Committee
and a member of the state Eco-
nomic Development Board, said
he was surprised at the criticism
given that many of Martin's ideas
landed in the state's budget for
economic development.
I think we unleashed some
tools for economic growth, espe-
cially in rural counties, but also
urban ones Lincberrv said.
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Shooting and suicide brought
on by accusations of theft
BOSTON (AD A man whose
shooting rampage killed six
people, including himself and
four relatives, and critically
wounded two others was retail
ating against family members
who had accused him of stealing,
a survivor savs.
David Huynh, 25, said his 23-
year-old cousin Minh Lebrought
a gun to the Huynh home in the
Dorchester section Sundav after-
noon to settle a dispute. Huynh
said his family had turned Le in
for stealing money from Huynh's
mother's bank account.
"He came back for revenge
said Huynh, the only member of
his family at home who escaped
harm.
Tuan Tran, a Vietnamese inter-
preter called to the scene by po-
lice, said the gunman was a Viet-
namese refugee who apparently
had been accused of stealing the
mother's bank book four years
ago and wanted to clear "his repu-
tation.
The gunman pulled an auto-
matic weapon from a sleeve of his
trench coat and blasted away,
authorities and witnesses said.
"Bullets were flying around
our heads said Juli Nichols, a
paramedic who was among the
first to arrive at the scene.
The gunman killed his 52-year-
old uncle, 48-vear-old aunt, two
female cousins, ages 23 and 26,
and a 24-year-old woman visiting
the family, police spokeswoman
JaneSheehan said.
After a two-hour standoff with
heavily armed police, the gun-
man fatally shot himself, said
Bataan lives
FONTANA VILLAGE, N.C.
(AP) � For survivors of the
Bataan death march, World War
II experiences remain vivid even
after 45 years.
They never forget how they
were forced by the Japanese to
build bridges, work as stevedores
and mine copper. They remem-
ber how many friends died from
disease, beatings, brutality and
overwork. Many starved.
"The treatment, why we were
treated that way. I never could
figure it out said retired Brig.
Gen. Robert Taylor, one of about
350 survivors of the death march
who gathered for their 24th an-
nual reunion Monday. "I think
the only way I made it was
through hate. They were so bru tal
I built up something inside me
More than 11,000 Americans
were taken prisoner at Cor-
regidor and Bataan, but only
about 2,000 survivors are left
from those days.
The recollections of atrocities
by many former prisoners are
tinged with bitterness, but Taylor
says he was able to keep the bru-
tality of his military guards from
affecting his later dealings with
Japanese civilians.
"I stayed on active duty and
went back to Japan. The Japanese
people were nice Taylor said.
"It was the old military, they ran
the goverrment. I have no ani-
mosity toward the Japanese. I just
don't drive no Japanese automo-
bile
After the fall of Bataan, the
Japanese forced their prisoners of
war to march to concentration
camps in the interior. Along the
way hundreds of the famished,
shoeless and fever-ridden pris-
oners died.
Deputy Police Superintendent
Robert O'Toole. A 9mm gun was
found next to his body, O'Toole
said.
Police would not release the
names of the victims, but Huvnh
said his parents and 26-year-old
sister were killed in their house.
He said the gunman shot four
people on the street, all members
of the family except Huynh's 24-
year-old girlfriend, who was
slain.
The two people critically
wounded were Huvnh's 3-year-
old niece, Phuong Huynh and a
19-year-old man. A motorist
braved the gunfire to grab the
wounded child off a neighbor's
porch.
The 19-year-old was in critical
but stable condition today at City
Hospital, and 3-year-old Phuong
Huynh was in critical but stable
condition at New England Medi-
cal Center, hospital officials said.
The worst mass-killing in Bos-
ton iii about 15 years over-
whelmed some residents of the
densely populated neighbor-
hood.
Rick Coppola, a longtime resi-
dent who lives across the street
from the house, said he and his
wife are now thinking of moving.
"I have two daughters and I
don't want this for them hesaid.
"Right after it happened, we
talked about leaving. It takes
something like this to make you
realize what's important
The motorist who rescued the
girl said he thought about his
own chi Idren, and knew he had to
act.
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Pork bam
WINSTON SALEM (AP)
Democratic state budget leaders
offered equal shares of "pork
barrel" money to lawmakers
from both parties this vear, but
money allocated for new or ex
panded programs was awarded
disproportionately a survey
shows.
Budget leaders offered state
representatives up to $40 01
local projects, and each senator
received up to $70,000 the Win
ston-Salem journal reported Fn
dav.
But the $H mil! ion in pork barrel
funds pales in comparis
$292 million that the la
gave out tor new or expanded
programs, new buildings and
other specific projects And the
slices of the larger pie were far
from equal, the journal said
Fourteen counties, includ
two of the state's poorest m i
receive none of the $292 mill
On the other hand, 15 counties
will receive slices rangii
$4 million to $2r million to sup-
plement their pork barrel money
These counties all have state uni-
versities, major arts centers re
gional health programs or state
ports.
hr exal
program:
larger po
( out
mom
2 nui
chiai
Horn it
drama
The I
mom
i.i
nittej
of ml
Secord talks again:
Iraniar
WASHINGTON (AP) � The
Reagan administration shipped
weapons to Iran even though of-
ficials of the Khomeini govern-
ment would not promise in re-
turn that American hostages in
Lebanon would be relea
Richard V. Secord says.
The Iranians said last fall that
they could do "certain things" on
behalf of the hostages, but they
could not free them "by flipping a
switch Secord said in an inter-
view published in the October
editions of Playboy magazine.
"Itv a gross sort ot way, tViev
vrere savWS tiy hai to py on
the Hezbollah Secord said, re-
ferring to the umbrella group oi
Lebanese Shiites believed to hold
the hostages.
"They laid it right out on the
table that they didn't necessarily
command Hezbollah and
couldn't automatically get them
released said Secord, a retired
Air Force major general who
helped arrange the weapons
sales under the direction of Li.
1 r a n i J
i iashemi R
of Ira
J
I
free I
said.
In
las:
Tehrar
way
because it
as well as i
Yocatv n ot
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lUda
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ans becau
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1,1967
islation
lv under -repre-
on tor the
lie ahead
utive director of
itic party Mid it
t!i.it we would
his do-nothing
n industrial re-
t Hodges in
titing in
have
: it ever
Rep Al Lineberry Sr D-
Gutlford, chairman of the House
Economic Growth Committee
and a member of the state Eco-
nomic Development Board, said
he was surprised at the criticism
given that many of Martin's ideas
landed in the state's budget for
economic development.
1 thmk we unleashed some
tools tor economic growth, espe-
cially in rural counties, but also
urban ones Lineberry said.
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location

Pork barrels not spent equally
WINSTON-SALEM (AP)
Democratic state budget leaders
offered equal shares of "pork
barrel" money to lawmakers
from both parties this year, but
money allocated for new or ex-
panded programs was awarded
disproportionately, a survey
shows.
Budget leaders offered state
representatives up to $40,000 tor
local projects, and each senator
received up to $70,000 the Win-
ston-Salem Journal reported Fri-
day.
But the $8 mill ion in pork barrel
funds pales in comparison to the
$292 million that the legislature
gave out for new or expanded
programs, new buildings and
other specific projects. And the
slices of the larger pie wore far
from equal, the Journal said.
Fourteen counties, including
two of the state's poorest, will
receive none of the $292 million.
On the other hand, 15 counties
will receive slices ranging from
$4 million to $2h million to sup-
plement their pork barrel money.
These counties all have state uni-
versities, major arts centers, re-
gional health programs or state
ports.
For example, Ashc County will
receive $50,000 in pork barrel
money for its library and its arts
programs, but nothing from the
larger pool of money. Watauga
County's $35,000 in pork barrel
money will be supplemented by
$10.2 million in aid to Appala-
chian State University and the
"Horn in the West" outdoor
drama.
The key to obtaining the extra
money, Sen. Aaron W. Plyler
said, was having a program with
"statewide implications
Plyler, the Union County
Democrat who is the chairman of
the Senate's Appropriations
Committee. He said the larger
pool of money was used to pay
for projects that applied to re-
gions of the state, rather than to
one county. The money for local
projects generally came out of the
pork barrel pool, he said.
But the legislature's budget
documents show that plenty of
local projects can be found in the
$292 million pool, including
grants for civic centers, local arts
programs and municipal con-
structions projects. By including
these local projects in the larger
pool, the budget leaders in-
creased the size of some legisla-
tors' pork barrel shares.
About $160 millionof the larger
pool will be used for the state's
universities, community colleges
and technical schools for new
buildings and programs. An
additional $9.3 million of the pool
will go to build or improve offices
for the N.C. Department of Trans-
portation in 18 counties. And $10
million will go to six counties for
construction at seven state health
enters.
The rest of the $292 million will
go to a variety of projects similar
to the ones financed by pork bar-
rel money, only bigger. For ex-
ample, $75,000 will go to reno-
vate the Frances Brook Stein
building in Fayettcville for use as
a cultural arts facility, and
$150,000 will go to renovate the
historic Rosedale mansion in
Charlotte.
In contrast, $40,000 to renovate
the Arts Council of Winston
Salem's headquarters and
$25,000 for the Historic
Richmond Hill Law School in
Yadkin County came out of those
counties' pork barrel money.
On the average, counties will
receive $2.9 million from the sec-
ond pool of money. But half of the
counties will receive less than
$700,000 and only 20 will receive
at least $2.9 million.
The largest sums will go to
Mecklenburg County, with 28.6
million; New Hanover County,
with $26.3 million; Orange
County, with $25.2 million;
Guilford County, with $22.6 mil-
lion; and Wake County, with
$19.6 million.
Also faring well were the dis-
tricts represented by three mem-
bers of the elite budget "super-
sub or super appropriations
subcommittee, as well as the dis-
trict represented by House
Speaker Liston B. Ramsey.
Durham County, which is rep-
resented by Sen. Kenneth C
Royall Jr will receive $13.8 mil-
lion; Cumberland County, repre-
sented by Sen. Anthony E. Rand,
will receive $12.6 million; and
Buncombe County, represented
by Rep. Martin L. Nesbitt, will
receive $12.5 million.
And Jackson and Haywood
counties, two counties repre-
sented by Ramsey, will receive
$9.8 million and $3.6 million, re-
spectively.
Individualthougl
Like a circle An a rectangle, each of us Has
to be uniqu&. Individual thought. Freedot
of expression.
Express yburself in The East Carolinian.
Positions are now open for editors, staff
writers, production manager and layout
artists
The experience, the friends, they can't b
beat.
Team e:
ly today)
Sec ord talks again:
Iranians made no promises
WASHINGTON (AP) � The
Reagan administration shipped
weapons to Iran even though of-
ficials of the Khomeini govern-
ment would not promise in re-
turn that American hostages in
Lebanon would be released,
Richard V. Secord says.
The Iranians said last fall that
they could do "certain things" on
behalf of the hostages, but they
could not free them "by flipping a
switch Secord said in an inter-
view published in the October
editions of Playboy magazine.
"In a gross sort of way, they
were sayvpc tfvay had, top�y, ott
trie Hezbouah Secord said, re-
ferring to the umbrella group of
Lebanese Shiites believed to hold
the hostages.
"They laid it right out on the
table that they didn't necessanlv
command Hezbollah and
couldn't automatically get them
released said Secord, a retired
Air Force major general who
helped arrange the weapons
sales under the direction oi Lt.
Col. Oliver North. At one point
the Iranians, associates of
1 lashemi Rafsanjani, the speaker
oi iran's Parliament, offered to
cooperate with the United States
by providing information that
would enable the U.S. military to
free the hostages in a raid, Secord
said.
In discussions with Iranians
last fall, the representatives from
Tehran said "to us that the best
way to clear up the problem �
because it was a problem for them
as well as us � was to give us the
location o( the hostagesand let us
deal with U be said.
Had a raid been authorized, it
would have benefited the Irani-
ans because "they could have
rested assured that we had
knocked off quite a few of those
bastards that they couln't stand,
either. And they (Iran) could
have regained control over the
Hezbollah
Secord said North, a former
National Security Council aide,
balked at the idea of a raid to free
the hostages. North and his supe-
riors "thought they could get
immediate results by negotia-
tion Secord said.
North never moved to shut
down the arms sales to Iran be-
cause he was under pressure
from President Reagan to get the
hostages released, he said, add-
ing, "The president just wanted
the hostages out
Secord dismissed the notion
that Reagan sought some geopo-
litical advantage over the Soviets
by courting officials from the
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini's
regime.
"That's too complex for the
Reagan mentality Secord said.
"I don't think he could handle it
In the interview, Secord also
said North's superiors took ad-
vantage of his energy and non-
stop work habits. "He was like a
mule � and you know how the
Army treats mules. You load him
up and load him up until pretty
soon his back breaks. Then you
eat him
While North was physically
courageous and good at bureau-
cratic in-fighting, Secord said, "I
don't think he's real rough.
Ollie is the kind of guy I would
like to keep on tap � but not on
top
Secord also said members of
an Iranian delegation that made a
secret trip to Washington last
year wanted female companion-
ship, "so their handler made 44
calls to escort services until they
got some girls to go to the Vir-
ginia hotel where they were stay-
ing
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THE EAST CAROLINJAN
7
s
v



SEPTEMBER 1, 1987 Page 10
Faculty show displays strength
By SUSANNE NIELSEN
Stiff Writer
Students at ECU's school of Art
find a dedicated facuIty;willingto
help, give ideas, and point to ar-
eas of strength in the students
work. It is a positive learning
environment. What makes them
such wonderful teachers is that
they maintain strong careers as
artists.
Judging by the excellent work
shown in this year's faculty show
at the Gray Gallery, every free
moment they have seems to be
taken by their artisticendeavours.
The work is well crafted through-
out: each field represented by one
or more artists. Media areas in-
clude painting, drawing, water-
color, sculpture, printmaking,
photography, textiles, metal arts,
wood, glass and ceramics.
The time for this exhibition is
well chosen. The new students
can acquaint themselves with the
faculty and follow an example of
excellent workmanship offered in
This necklace by John Satterf ield, "Blue Dot is on display as part of all fields of the visual arts.
the taculty show currently on exhibit at Gray Gallery.
By I HUMBERT - Photo Ub
�Mil 11 in rpyjnv
Mellencamp ages gracefully
15v CHIPPY BONEHEAD
"Staff Writer
John Mellancamp's eigth
album. "The Lonesome jubilee
has some Haws, but before one
dismisses it as "Pink Houses Part
IV" one should take the strengths
of the album and use them to re-
evaiuate Mellencamp's role in
rock.
Mellencamp is getting older.
Happens to everyone. But not
everyone uses their budding cyni-
cism to write songs that are con-
i rned with the efficient use of
Throughout the "Jubilee you
can sense Mellencamp reveling in
an adult's perspective, while he
retain's an adolescent's schizo-
phrenic optimism. This record is a
celebration, but the MTV zombies
won't understand what the
party's about until the turn of the
century.
"Jubilee" is disappointing in
that it takes less risks than "Scare-
crow" did. On his previous Lp,
the tunes were distinctly his, but
he began experimenting. His
grandmother even sang lead on
one song. He did a duet with Ricki
Lee Jones.
"Scarecrow's" melodies were
the most original Mellencamp
produced. "Jubilee" sounds like it
was originally mixed at the time
of "Uh-huh with some violins,
dulcimers and other exotic coun-
try instruments dubbed in.
Thisisn'tbad,and it'sa pleasing
effect for the most part, but it does
render several of the songs into
filler. Mellencamp would be bet-
ter off sticking to an acoustic
sound, as proved by the B-sides of
"Small Town" and "Pink
Houses He just doesn't need the
accessories.
But he still knows how to fuse
some punishing lyrics into his
front porch symphonies, and he
continues to use very topical
See MELLENCAMP, page 11
Black Mt. influence lingers
By SUSANNE NIELSEN
on
Stjff Writer
In the fall of 1933 a small group
of professors from Rollins Col-
lege in 'intcrpark, Fla. left their
school as a result of disputes over
academic freedom. Together they
rounded Black Mountain College
east of Asheville.
Thus began an experiment in
learning that lasted 24 vears. Its
influence on virtually all areas of
the arts in America can still be felt.
We connect Black Mountain
with names such as Joseph Al-
ivrs, Willcm de Kooning, Ken-
neth Noland, John Cage or Merce
Cunningham and Paul Taylor.
They were teachers and stu-
dents. Some produced their best
works there, for some it was a
creative beginning. All of them
were influenceccd by the unique
atmosphere of Black Mountain
college.
In closing in its thirtieth year,
the college is commemorated in
an exhibiton focusing upon the
artistic contributions of this ex-
periment in education. "The Arts
at Black Mountain College" is a
documentation presently on view
at Raleigh's North Carolina Mu-
seum of Art through October 4.
The exhibition is divided into
three segments, each in a different
gallery of the museum.
We begin in the North Carolina
galleries where the founding and
development of the college, the
planning and construction of it's
own buildings by faculty and
students is described and com-
mented on in newspapers of the
time.
It remained an unconventional
school throughout its duration.
Education at Black Mountain
placed democracy at its center.
Traditional academic structure
such as course hours, credit
points, and grades were abol-
ished. Instead, initiative, coopera-
tion and ingenuity were encour-
aged. The learning experience
was not limited to the classroom.
The college formed a micro-
cosm hardly noticed by local
population but nationally
watched with skeptical anticipa-
tion. Faculty and students lived
the campus and had their
meals in a common dining hall.
The group ran their'own farm,
kept up the campus and con-
structed their own buildings not
far from the college's first cam-
pus.
The principles of democracy
were applied to all levels of life at
Black Mountain, administration
being one of the most vital. Al-
though it wasa liberal arts college.
Black Mountain placed arts at the
center of its curriculum. By this,
the faculty hoped the students
would learn to develop initiative,
independence and a creative ap-
proach to problems in all areas of
life and whatever profession they
were to choose.
Works by faculty and students
displayed in the contemporary
galleries of the exhibition give
evidence of the influence of Euro-
pean Modernism brought to the
college Joseph Albers, highly ac-
claimed former director of the
German Art and Design school
BAUHAUS and his wife Annie,
textile artist and teacher. They
sought freedom for their creativ-
ity in the United States when Nazi
Germany banned their work.
Through their teaching at Black
Mountain College, a fusion of
European culture and American
ideas and creative energies was
brought about that has given
America a leading role in the arts
ever since.
In the works displayed, we
sense the spirit of close interac-
tion, of generated ideas and in-
ventiveness when materials
seemed to set boundaries.
Huston Paschal, assistant cura-
tor who helped coordinate the
show, finds many of the
exhibition's details noteworthy.
"The printing of brochures with
amazing variations of the few
print-types available or the pho-
tographs of such vulnerable
seeming young men as de Koon-
ing or Cage or Noland (last sec-
tion of exhibit in 20th Century
galleries) One of the literary
developments evolving from
Black Mountain College is
Greensboro's Jargon Society, a
small, non-profit publisher.
Originally developed by the poet
Jonathan Williams, student at
Black Mountain, Jargon Publica-
tions printed on any available
paper employing every possible
method to make the publications
look interesting. Black Mountain
College enrolled less then 1,200
students during its 24 year exis-
tence. Fifty-five of them gradu
ated with formal degress. All of
them took with them a piece of the
Black Mountian experience that
lets this unique college live on.
"Arts at Black Mountain Col-
lege" was organized by the Edith
C. Blum Art Institute at Bard Col-
lege, Armandale-On-Hudson,
NY. Mary Emma Harris, who
devoted years to research and the
writing of her book by the same
title, was invited as guest curator.
The Raleigh Museum initially
sponsored Ms. Harris' attempts to
write about Black Mountain. The
book (in paperback) is available
for sale at the museum.
The NC Museum of Art also
offers the viewer of this exhibi tion
comparisons of late work by art-
ists of Black Mountian which
makes you want to view the entire
section or contempory art along
with the exhibition.
A day's excursion is highly rec-
ommended, for newcomers to the
area, Raleigh is about a two hour
dirve from Greenville. The mu-
seum has an excellent contempo-
rary collection. Its newest section
is an oceanic permanent exhibi-
tion. There is a wonderful restau-
rant "with view" and excellent
food. And you can spend hours
alone in the giftshop that carries
everything from books, museum
catalogs, children's toys, a selec-
tion of cards, art reproductions to
museum replicas of many jewelry
pieces, ceramics and silk scarves.
In short, it is not difficult to
spend and entire day at this mu-
seum. You reach the museum
easily form MO west, exiting at
the Fairgrounds exit, where signs
lead you directly to the museum.
Museum hours are 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Tuesday to Saturday, until 9 p.m.
Fridays, 12 noon - 5 p.m. Sundays.
Admission is free. For informa-
tion call 833-1935.
The first pieces encountered in
the exhibition are heavy sculp-
tures of stone, metal, and wood
reminicent of Roman relics. Nor-
man Keller describes his works as
"open air reliquaries containers
for religious relics. Keller spent
some time during his year's sab-
batical as a faculty member of the
University of Georgia's Studies
Abroad program at Cortona, It-
aly. His pieces reflect the Halier
influence, and the artist has done
well translating his impressions
into modern sculpture.
Paintings by this semester's
Artists-In-Rcsidcnce Mark Harris
and Darryl Halbrooks are "very
dynamic comments Perry Nes-
bitt, Director of the Gray Art Gal-
lery.
The Painting field is well repre-
sented and with a wide variety of
styles. From Paul Hartley's very
personal oil and acrylic paintings
that enter realistic imagery into
strange dreamlike worlds in sub-
dued tones of blue and green to
Clarence Morgans colorful geo-
metric abstractions, students may
feel the multitude of possibilities
open to their own work. Hartley's
paintings and the small ceramic
"icons" of Chuck Chamberlain
seem to draw the viewer into an
atmosphere faraway, let us pause
and wonder at this strange world
of their own.
Paintings by Larry Shrcve, ex-
cellently crafted glass by Art
Haney and the three dimensional
mixed media pieces by Terry
Smith have a distinctly eighties
touch in color and design
elements. This also applies to the
enviromcntal designs of commer-
cial interiors by Abdul-Shakoor
Farhadi and new faculty member
Ernst Habrichs.
Textiles are well represented.
Janet Fisher's intricate weavings
using leather designs stand out.
The School of Art's Dean, Dr.
Edward Levine is exhibiting a
large piece. He uses wood and
metal to enclose space working
the piece right into the gallery's
architecture. The viewer can par-
ticipate in this work by walking
into the wooden enclosure gradu-
ally reaching it's center. Bob
Rash's gumpnnts focus on scenes
of Greenville. Mel Stanforth's
small photographs also give im-
pressions of rural America. The
works of Donald Sexaver are
black and white intaglios derived
from his personal life. One of the
pieces on display depicts his son
as "Geologist Who Would be
Chop The print is currently
traveling with the Huntcston
National Print Exhibition of New
Jersey.
Director Perry Ncsbitt finds this
year's faculty exhibition to be a
"very fine show
The exhibition is open to the
public through September 19
There will be an opening recep-
tion on September 11 from 7:30 to
9:00 p.m. At the Jenkins Fine Arts
Center gallery. All events are free
and the public is invited. The
works are on display and for sale
Monday through Friday 10:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. For more infor-
mation call (919) 757-6336.
By ON JORDAN - Photo Ub
VICTORY!
The band Victory played to a small but appreciative crowd Friday night at the Attic
crunching out a tight set of heavy metal tunes. Called by some observers professional and
workmanlike, Victory brought an excellent show featuring nice stage presence to
Greenville. f
The band is made up of former members of such groups as Whitesnake and Ted
Nugent's band.
Black Mountain College weavers practice their craft in this photo from an exhibit rnmm��m,�.�f.�
the school on display now at the North Carolina Museum of Ain Rg" COm,nem,nora,
�jl�. � aii.fe�i� . T.ir t.
i �����-
Historica
RAUiIGH (AP) - North Caro-
lina archivists are using ultra
modern technology to preserve
the state's old and rare historical
documents, officials say.
Security officers at the Division
of Archives and History in
Raleigh use six television screens
to monitor researchers as they
peruse documents Camera
lenses are so powerful fhat offi-
cers can zoom in and read titles on
the files They can also switch on a
videocissette recorder and tape-
any suspicious actions.
The watchers are even more
alert in the wake of news that a
prominent Washington art
scholar was charged with stealing
documents from the Library of
Congress and the National Ar-
chives. Despite tight secuntv,
Charles Merrill Mount allegedly
removed documents including
letters written by Abraham Lin-
coln an d the painter James Abbott
McNeil
"WhJ
like fhil
lead to T
State
in their I
to a poil
"Anyf
thiefj
assistar
News a
In fac
outwittj
Salem
$2,000
with s
Andre
Jacksoni
dent Jel
ingratiai
membci
Paul Fi
water m
turers
"I hal
Bakkers seh
AUBURN, Ind. (AP) - A still-
faithful follower of former televi-
son evangelists Jim and Tammy
Baker might be amon the bid-
ders when a Rolls-Royce once
used at the couple's California
estate goes on the auction block.
The 1953 Silver Dawn Rolls
goes up fur bids next week with
nearly 1,200 other cars, many of
them classics, during the annual
Auburri-Cord-Duesenberg Festi-
val.
Krust? International of Auburn.
the action house conducting the
sale, received a call recently from
a man who identified himself as a
supporter of the Bakkers, Kruse
spokesman Mike Butler said Fri-
day.
"I don't know whether he's seri-
ous or not, but he's interested in
buying it back to give to them to
show forgiveness said Butler.
Officials of the PTL broadcast
ministry anonymously donated
the beige and burgundy luxury
�to a noi-lcr-proiit hospital
�nier this year, just days before a
sex and money scandal forced
Bakker's resignation, said Butler.
The auction list includes a 1908
Mercedes racer and six Duesen-
bergs, including a 1928 Model A
that raced in the 1930 Indianapolis
500 and a 1934 Weymann touring
model that might sell for "mul-
tiple millions said Butler.
"A week ago we sold Greta
Garbo's (Duescnberg) for $1.4
milion. That is the current
Duensenberg record Butler
said. "This car could go for two or
three ti mes that
The auction begins Fndav and
runs through Labor Day, begin-
ning at 10 a.m. each day at Dekalb
High School.
Butler said the Bakker's car was
titled to PTL - which stand for
Praise The Lord, or People That
Mellencamp
matures
happily
Cant, from page 10
themes in his writing.
Princ e tried that in "Sign O' the
Times" and failed, because he
sacrificed content for form.
Mellen amp knows better.
"Down and Out in Paradise"
and "The Real Life" are excellent
examples. "Paradise" is written as
three letters to the President each
with a c horous that contians, "I'm
down and out in paradise looks
like the milk and honey done
runout on me
In "Real Life" he sings, "It's a
lonely proposition when you real-
izetha t there's less davs in front
of the horse' than riding in the
back of the cart
Sad sounding, taken out of
context but the songs are defiant
and uplrvat. In 'Taper and Fire
he tackles the cause of all these
problems in a single line - "But we
keep nc check on our appetites
There really isn't much to say af-
ter that, and it is the first song on
the album.
So instead of offering solutions,
after all you can't take diet pills to
stop a ciraving for control, he uses
the rest of "Jubilee" to illustrate
the consequences. An album of
cause amd effect.
The Who wanted to die before
they got old. The Stones died and
never got buried. Mellencamp
wants to live and stay grateful
Jubilee" shows it can be done.
the j
Skip
Cord A
scum i
similar
ha ve b





THE EAST CAROLINJAN
SEPTEMBER 1, 1987 Page 10
Historica,
Faculty show displays strength
By SUSANNE NIELSEN
Suff Writer
Students at ECU's school of Art
find a dedicated faculty;willingto
help, give ideas, and point to ar-
eas of strength in the students
work. It is a positive learning
enviroment. What makes them
such wonderful teachers is that
they maintain strong careers as
artists.
Judging by the excellent work
shown in this year's faculty show
at the Gray Gallery, every free
moment they have seems to be
taken by theirartisticendeavours.
The work is well crafted through-
out: each field represented by one
or more artists. Media areas in-
clude painting, drawing, water-
color, sculpture, printmaking,
photography, textiles, metal arts,
wood, glass and ceramics.
The time for this exhibition is
well chosen. The new students
can acquaint themselves with the
-fh. faCU!y afnd fo"ow an example of
Ti � , . . , excellent workmanship offered in
Th.s necklace by John Satterf ield, "Blue Dot is on display as part of all fields of the visual arts
the faculty show currently on exhibit at Gray Gallery.
The first pieces encountered in
the exhibition are heavy sculp-
tures of stone, metal, and wood
rcminicent of Roman relics. Nor-
man Keller describes his works as
"open air reliquaries containers
for religious relics. Keller spent
some time during his year's sab-
batical as a faculty member of the
University of Georgia's Studies
Abroad program at Cortona, It-
aly. His pieces reflect the Halier
influence, and the artist has done
well translating his impressions
into modern sculpture.
Paintings by this semester's
Artists-In-Residence Mark Harris
and Darryl Halbrooks are "very
dynamic comments Perry Ncs-
bitt, Director of the Gray Art Gal-
lery.
The Painting field is well repre-
sented and with a wide variety of
styles. From Paul Hartley's very
personal oil and acrylic paintings
that enter realistic imagery into
strange dreamlike worlds in sub-
dued tones of blue and green to
Clarence Morgans colorful geo-
metric abstractions, students may-
feel the multitude of possibilities
open to their own work. Hartley's
paintings and the small ceramic
"icons" of Chuck Chamberlain
seem to draw the viewer into an
atmosphere faraway, let us pause
and wonder at this strange world
of their own.
Paintings by Larry Shreve, ex-
cellently crafted glass by Art
Hancy and the three dimensional
mixed media pieces by Terry
Smith have a distinctly eighties
touch in color and design
elements. This also applies to the
enviromental designs of commer-
cial interiors by Abdul-Shakoor
Farhadi and new faculty member
Ernst Habrichs.
Textiles arc well represented.
Janet Fisher's intricate weavings
using leather designs stand out.
The School of Art's Dean, Dr.
Edward Levine is exhibiting a
large piece. He uses wood and
metal to enclose space working
the piece right into the gallery's
architecture. The viewer can par
ticipate in this work bv walking
into the wooden enclosure gradu-
ally reaching it's center. Bob
Rash's gumpnnts focus on scenes
of Greenville. Mel Stanford's
small photographs also give im-
pressions of rural America. The
works of Donald Sexaver are
black and white intaglios derived
from his personal life. One of the
pieces on display depicts his son
as "Geologist Who Would be
Chep The print is currently
traveling with the Huntcston
National Print Exhibition of New
Jersey.
Director Perry Nesbitt finds this
year's faculty exhibition to be a
"very fine show
The exhibition is open to the
public through September 19
There will be an opening recep-
tion on September 11 from 7:30 to
900 p.m At the Jenkins Fine Arts
C enter gallery. All events are free
and the public is invited. The
works are on display and for sale
Monday through Fndav 10:00
a.m. to 500 p.m. For more infor-
mation call (919) 757-6336.
Album rpyjew
Mellencamp ages gracefully
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Miff Writer
John Mellancamp's eigth
album. The Lonesome Jubilee
has some flaws, but before one
dismisses it as "Pink Houses Part
IV one should take the strengths
oi the album and use them to re-
evaluate Mellencamp's role in
rock.
Mellencamp is getting older.
Happens to everyone. But not
everyone uses their budding cyni-
cism to write songs that are con-
itud with the efficient use of
throughout the "Jubilee you
can sense Mellencamp reveling in
an adult's perspective, while he
rctain's an adolescent's schizo-
phrenic optimism. This record is a
celebration, but the MTV zombies
won't understand what the
party's about until the turn of the
century.
"Jubilee" is disappointing in
that it takes less risks than "Scare-
crow" did. On his previous Lp,
the tunes were distinctly his, but
he began experimenting. His
grandmother even sang lead on
one song. Hedid a duet with Ricki
Lee Jones.
"Scarecrow's" melodies were
the most original Mellencamp
produced. "Jubilee" sounds like it
was originally mixed at the time
of "Uh-huh with some violins,
dulcimers and other exotic coun-
try instruments dubbed in.
Thisisn'tbad,and it'sa pleasing
effect for the most part, but it does
render several of the songs into
filler. Mellencamp would be bet-
ter off sticking to an acoustic
sound, as proved by the B-sides of
"Small Town" and "Pink
Houses He just doesn't need the
accessories.
But he still knows how to fuse
some punishing lyrics into his
front porch symphonies, and he
continues to use very topical
See MELLENCAMP, page 11
Black Mt. influence lingers
� y )ON JORDAN - Photo Ub
By SUSANNE NIELSEN
Staff Wntrr
In the fall of 1933 a small group
of professors from Rollins Col-
lege in Winterpark, Fla. left their
school asa result of disputes over
academic freedom. Together they
founded Black Mountain College
oast of Asheville.
Thus began an experiment in
learning that lasted 24 years. Its
influence on virtually all areas of
the arts in America can still be felt.
We connect Black Mountain
with names such as Joseph Al-
bers, Willem de Kooning, Ken-
neth Noland, John Cage or Mcrce
Cunningham and Paul Taylor.
They were teachers and stu-
dents. Some produced their best
works there, for some it was a
creative beginning. All of them
were influenccced by the unique
atmosphere of Black Mountain
college.
In closing in its thirtieth year,
the college is commemorated in
in exhibiton focusing upon the
artistic contributions of this ex-
periment in education. 'The Arts
at Black Mountain College" is a
documentation presently on view
at Raleigh's North Carolina Mu-
seum off Art through October 4.
The exhibition is divided into
three segments, each in a different
gallery of the museum.
We begin in the North Carolina
galleries where the founding and
development of the college, the
planning and construction of it's
own buildings by faculty and
students is described and com-
mented on in newspapers of the
time.
It remained an unconventional
school throughout its duration.
Education at Black Mountain
placed democracy at its center.
Traditional academic structure
such as course hours, credit
points, and grades were abol-
ished. Instead, initiative, coopera-
tion and ingenuity were encour-
aged. The learning experience
was not limited to the classroom.
The college formed a micro-
cosm hardly noticed by local
population but nationally
watched with skeptical anticipa-
tion. Faculty and students lived
on the campus and had their
meals in a common dining hall.
The group ran their'own farm,
kept up the campus and con
structed their own buildings not
far from the college's first cam-
pus.
The principles of democracy
were applied to all levels of life at
Black Mountain, administration
being one of the most vital. Al-
though it wasa liberal arts college.
Black Mountain placed arts at the
center of its curriculum. By this,
the faculty hoped the students
would leam to develop initiabve,
independence and a creative ap-
proach to problems in all areas of
life and whatever profession they
were to choose.
Works by faculty and students
displayed in the contemporary
galleries of the exhibition give
evidence of the influence of Euro-
pean Modernism brought to the
college Joseph Albers, highly ac-
claimed former director of the
German Art and Design school
BAUHAUS and his wife Annie,
textile artist and teacher. They
sought freedom for their creativ-
ity in the United States when Nazi
Germany banned their work.
Through their teaching at Black
Mountain College, a fusion of
European culture and American
ideas and creative energies was
brought about that has given
America a leading role in the arts
ever since.
In the works displayed, we
sense the spirit of close interac-
tion, of generated ideas and in-
ventiveness when materials
seemed to set boundaries.
Huston Paschal, assistant cura-
tor who helped coordinate the
show, finds many of the
exhibition's details noteworthy.
"The printing of brochures with
amazing variations of the few
print-types available or the pho-
tographs of such vulnerable
seeming young men as de Koon-
ing or Cage or Noland (last sec-
tion of exhibit in 20th Century
galleries) One of the literary
developments evolving from
Black Mountain College is
Greensboro's Jargon Society, a
small, non-profit publisher.
Originally developed by the poet
Jonathan Williams, student at
Black Mountain, Jargon Publica-
tions printed on any available
paper employing every possible
method to make the publications
look interesting. Black Mountain
College enrolled less then 1,200
students during its 24 year exis-
tence. Fifty-five of them gradu-
ated with formal degress. All of
them took with them a piece of the
Black Mountian experience that
lets this unique college live on.
"Arts at Black Mountain Col-
lege" was organized by the Edith
C. Blum Art Institute at Bard Col-
lege, Armandale-On-Hudson,
NY. Mary Emma Harris, who
devoted years to research and the
writing of her book by the same
title, was invited as guest curator.
The Raleigh Museum initially
sponsored Ms. Harris' attempts to
write about Black Mountain. The
book (in paperback) is available
for sale at the museum.
The NC Museum of Art also
offers the viewer of this exhibition
comparisons of late work by art-
ists of Black Mountian which
makes you want to view the entire
section or contempory art along
with the exhibition.
A day's excursion is highly rec-
ommended, for newcomers to the
area, Raleigh is about a two hour
dirve from Greenville. The mu-
seum has an excellent contempo-
rary collection. Its newest section
is an oceanic permanent exhibi-
tion. There is a wonderful restau-
rant "with view" and excellent
food. And you can spend hours
alone in the giftshop that carries
everything from books, museum
catalogs, children's toys, a selec-
tion of cards, art reproductions to
museum replicas of many jewelry
pieces, ceramics and silk scarves.
In short, it is not difficult to
spend and entire day at this mu-
seum. You reach the museum
easily form 1-40 west, exiting at
the Fairgrounds exit, where signs
lead you directly to the museum.
Museum hours are 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Tuesday to Saturday, until 9 p.m.
Fridays, 12 noon - 5 p.m. Sundays.
Admission is free. For informa-
tion call 833-1935.
VICTORY!
The band Victory played to a small but appreciative crowd Friday night at the Attic
crunching out a tight set of heavy metal tunes. Called by some observers professional and
workmanlike, Victory brought an excellent show featuring nice stage presence to
Greenville. � r
The band is made up of former members of such groups as Whitesnake and Ted
Nugent's band.
Black Mountain CoUege weavers practice their craft in this photo from an exhibit ��mm.mmnra�n
the school on display now at the North Carolina Museum of Art inTldgh. �"�nunorat
RALU1GH (AP) - North Caro
iina archivists are using ultra
modern technology to preserve
the state's old and rare historical
documents, officials sav
Secur ity officers at the Division
of Archives and History in
Raleigh use six television screens
to monitor researchers as they
peruse documents. Camera
lenses are so powerful that offi-
cers can zoom in and read titles on
the files They can also switch on a
videoenssette recorder and tape
any suspicious actions.
The watchers are even more
alert in the wake of news that a
prominent Washington art
scholar was charged with stealing
documents from the Librar
Congress and the National" Ar-
chives. Despite tight security.
Charles Merrill Mount allegedly
removed documents including
letters written by Abraham Lin-
coln and the painter James Abbott
M(' I
"WhJ
like tJ
lead to
State
in thcirj
to a poil
"Anvf
thief,
assistar
News st
In tac
outwittl
Sak-rr
$2,000
with si
AndrevJ
lack � I
dent
mgrat;a
membe!
Paui I
watermj
turer-
Bakkers seh
AUBURN, Ind. (AP) - A still-
faithful follower of former telcvi-
son evangelists Jim and Tammv
Baker might be among the bid-
ders when a Rolls-Royce once
used at the couple's California
estate goes on the auction block.
The 1953 Silver Dawn Rolls
goes up for bids next week with
nearly 1,200 other cars, many oi
them classics, during the annual
Aubum-Cord-Ducsenber Festi-
val.
Krust? International of Aubum.
the action house conducting the
sale, re-reived a call recently from
a man who identified himself as a
supporter of the Bakkers, Kruse
spokesman Mike Butler said Fn-
dav.
"I don't know whether he's sen-
ous or not, but he's interested in
buying it back to give to them to
show forgiveness said Butler.
Officials of the PTL broadcast
ministry anonymouslv donated
the beige and burgundy luxury
oMteto a not-ior-peoin hospiiri
Wer this year, just days before a
sex and money scandal forced
Bakker's resignation, said Butler
The auction list includes a 1908
Mercedes racer and six Duesen-
bergs, including a 192? Model A
that raced in the 1930 Inu.anapolis
500 and a 1934 Weymann tounng
model that might sell for "mul-
tiple millions said Butler.
"A week ago we sold Greta
Garbo's (Duesenberg) for $1.4
milion. That is the current
Duensenberg record Butler
said. "This car could go for two or
three times that
The auction begins Fndav and
runs through Labor Day, begin-
ning at 10 a.m. each day at Dekalb
High School.
Butler said the Bakker's car was
titled to PTL - which stand for
Praise The Lord, or People That
Mellencamp
matures
happily
sa
�a�-�. �! � ��ii

"� � in
MM
Cctnt. from page 10
themes in his writing.
Princ e tried that in "Sign O' the
Times" and failed, because he
sacrificed content for form
Mellencamp knows better.
"Down and Out in Paradise'
and "The Real Life" are excellent
exampl.es. "Paradise" is wnttenas
three letters to the President each
with a c horous that contians, "I'm
down and out in paradise looks
like the milk and honev done
runout on me
In "Real Life" he sings, "It's a
lonely proposition when vou real-
ize tha t there's less days in front
of the horse' than riding in the
back of the cart
Sad sounding, taken out of
context but the songs are defiant
and uplneat. In 'Taper and Fire
he tack les the cause of all these
problems in a single line - "But we
keep no. check on our appetites
There really isn't much to say af-
ter that, and it is the first song on
the album.
So instead of oftenng solutions,
after all you can't take diet pills to
stop a ciraving for control, he uses
the rest of "Jubilee" to illustrate
the consequences. An album of
cause and effect
The Who wanted to die before
they got old. The Stones died and
never got buried. Mellencamp
wants to live and stay grateful.
"Jubilee" shows it can be done.
Low - al
the coui
Skip
Cord-Ai
seum i
similar
have b
O
I
I





a
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
K 1 1987 Page 10
jays strength
bilities into the wooden enclosure gradu-
rk lartle) -
mall ceramic
Chamberlain
i into an
, lot u s nausc
ex-
ally reaching it's center. Bob
Rash's gumprints focus on scenes
ot Greenville. Mel Stanforth's
small photographs also give im-
pressions ot rural America. The
works ot Ponald Sexaver are
black and white intaglios derived
trom his personal life. One of the
es on display depicts his son
.is Geologist Who Would be
Chop I ho print is currently
traveling with the Hunteston
National Print Exhibition of New
lersey.
rector Penrj Nesbitt finds this
- faculty exhibition to be a
v i : fine show
c exhibition is open to the
public through September 19.
re will be an opening recep-
on September 11 from 7:30 to
p m At the I on kins Fine Arts
Center gallery. All events are free
and the public is invited The
rksai n display and for sate
igh Friday 10:00
air. � p m For more infor-
alkingmation call (919) 757-6336.
By )ON JORDAN - Photo Ub
ORY!
d I riday night at the Attic,
tbservers professional and
aturing nice stage presence to
groups as Whitesnake and Ted
lW$
rna.w:
M A
laft in this photo from an exhibit commemmoratin
Museum of Art in Raleigh.
Historical documents guarded
t AI KIU im & .1 . .
COUPON
RALKIGH (AP) - North Caro-
lina archivists are using ultra-
modern technology to preserve
the state's old and rare historical
documents, officials say.
Security officers at the Division
of Archives and History in
Raleighi use six television screens
to morutor researchers as they
peruse documents. Camera
lenses are so powerful that offi-
cers can zoom in and read titles on
the files. They can also switch on a
videocassette recorder and tape
any suspicious actions.
The watchers are even more
alert in the wake of news that a
prominent Washington art
scholar was charged with stealing
documents from the Library of
Congress and the National Ar-
chives. Despite tight security,
Charles Merrill Mount allegedly
removed documents including
letters written by Abraham Lin-
coln an d the painter James Abbott
McNeill Whistler.
"Whenever there's an episode
like this, we're so afraid it may
lead to something else
State officials have confidence
in their security systems, but only
to a point.
"Any system can be beat by a
thief Jesse "Dick" Lankford, Jr
assistant state archivist, told the
News and Observer of Raleigh.
In fact, the state archives were
outwitted in 1974 by a Winston-
Salem man who made off with
$2,000 worth of state documents
with signatures by Presidents
Andrew Johnson and Andrew
Jackson and Confederate Presi-
dent Jefferson Davis. The thief
ingratiated himself with staff
members and impressed archivist
Paul Hoffman with his knowl-
edge of 18th and 19th century
watermarks and paper manufac-
turers.
"I had confidence in him
Hoffman said. "I generally liked
the guy
The thief was tracked down and
sentenced to two years for grand
larceny and in 1976 the Division of
Archives and History installed a
security system designed by the
State Bureau of Investigation.
Now researchers must adhere
to rules explained in a seven-
minute slide show. They have to
leave briefcases, coats, books and
other materials in an outer lobby,
taking only note pads, pens or
penciles and small purses into the
reading room. Researchers also
must have identification cards.
In addition, researchers must
keep books and files on tabletops,
may open only one file at a time
and may not change the order of
loose papers insied a file.
Special collections at the Uni-
versity of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, including the papers
of writer Thomas Wolfe and the
papers of Sen. Sam Ervin, have a
similar security system, although
it does not yet inlude televised
surveillance, said Carolyn Wal-
lace, curator of manuscripts and
director of the Southern Histori-
cal Collection. She said even small
libraries find it difficult to balance
public access to documents with
security.
"It is the major problem that the
archival profession faces she
said. "We just try to make our
situation as safe as we can
Bakkers sell Rolls
AUBURN, Ind. (AP) - A still-
faithful follower of former televi-
son evangelists Jim and Tammy
Baker might be among the bid-
ders when a Rolls-Royce once
used at the couple's California
estate goes on the auction block.
The 1953 Silver Dawn Rolls
goes up for bids next week with
nearly 1,200 other cars, many of
them classics, during the annual
Aubum-Cord-Duesenberg Festi-
val.
Kruse International of Auburn,
the action house conducting the
sale, received a call recently from
a man who identified himself as a
supporter of the Bakkers, Kruse
spokesman Mike Butler said Fri-
day.
"1 don't know whether he's seri-
ous or not, but he's interested in
buying it back to give to them to
show forgiveness said Butler.
Officials of the PTL broadcast
ministry anonymously donated
the beige and burgundy luxury
of�to a not-ior-prafit hospital
mer this year, just daysbefore a
sx and money scandal forced
Bakker's resignation, said Butler.
The auction list includes a 1908
Mercedes racer and six Duesen-
bergs, including a 1928 Model A
that raced in the 1930Indianapolis
500 and a 1934 Weymann touring
model that might sell for "mul-
tiple millions said Butler.
"A week ago we sold Greta
Garbo's (Duesenberg) for $1.4
milion. That is the current
Duensenberg record Butler
said. "Iliis car could go for two or
three times that
The auction begins Friday and
runs trirough Labor Day, begin-
ning at lOa.m.eachdayatDekalb
High School.
Butler said the Bakker's car was
titled to PTL - which stand for
Praise The Lord, or People That
Mellencamp
matures
happily
Crmt from page 10
themes in his writing.
Prince tried that in "Sign O' the
Times" and failed, because he
sacrificed content for form.
Mellencamp knows better.
"Down and Out in Paradise"
and "The Real Life" are excellent
exampltes. "Paradise" is written as
three letters to the President each
with a chorous that contians, "I'm
down and out in paradise looks
like the- milk and honey done
run out on me
In "Real Life" he sings, "It's a
lonely proposition when you real-
izetha t there's less days in front
of the horse' than riding in the
back of the cart
Sad isounding, taken out of
context but the songs are defiant
and upleat. In 'Taper and Fire
he tackles the cause of all these
problenns in a single line - "But we
keep nc check on our appetites
There really isn't much to say af-
ter that, and it is the first song on
the albuim.
So instead of offering solutions,
after all you can't take diet pills to
stop a craving for control, he uses
the rest of "Jubilee" to illustrate
the consequences. An album of
cause aind effect
The Who wanted to die before
they gott old. The Stones died and
never got buried. Mellencamp
wants to live and stay grateful.
"Jubilee" shows it can be done.
Love - and insured to Bakker at
the couple's Palm Springs home.
Skip Marketti, an official of the
Cord-Auburn-Duesenberg mu-
seum in Auburn, said models
similar to the former PTL Rolls
have brought from $30,000 to
$50,000 at action.
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center is open Monday through
Thursday, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. For an
appointment or more information,
call24-Hour Helpline, 757-0003.
111 East Third Street-The Lee Building
Greenville, North Carolina
Free Pregnancy Test-Confidential
Counseling
All Services and referrals are free of charge.
COUPON
BAUSCM & LOMB
SEPTEMBER 1,1987
11
COUPON
$31.95plus tax
I I
L�nj� Matai Sunglass
$37.95plus tax
W� Can Maka Arrangements
To Haw Your Eyas Examined Today!
Evening Appointments Available
Call 752-1446
SINGLE VISION
LENSES
$12.95
Up to t or 3 00 sph.
up to 2 00 cy I
LINE
BIFOCALS
$39.95
28mm FLAT TOP
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$79.95
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up to 2 00 cyl, to 3 00 odd
ONE HOUR SERVICE
SMOLE VKJC N � GLASS � PLASTIC
ONE DAY SERVICE ON BIFOCALS
OFFER GOOD THRU AUG. 31, 1987
CLEAR VUE OPTICIANS
2484 STANTONSBURG ROAD
STANTON SQUARE 752-1446
COUPON
COUPON
� COUPOi
-24
3
�1
C
')
Architecture majors
Call it a blueprint
for getting green
Pre-dental majors
See it as a painless
way ti) get money
J
Astronomy majors,
Think of it as a, way,
bank under the
�rs


Geography majors
See it as a way to find
cash in over 15,000
locations
Psychology majors .
Think you d be crazy
not to have one
Geology majors
See it as a way
to dig up cash
Art majors
Think of it as a great way
to draw cash
4c
s&fc
Chemistry majors
Feel it's the perfect formula
for finding money
�.�WK�-�b�
Pre-med majors
Call it the cure
for the no-cash blues
THE
MAJOR
REASONS TO M
HAE A WACHOVIA
BANKING CARD
Economics majors
See it as a way
to increase their cash flow
- J
Use your Wachovia Banking Card to get
cash or check your balances any time of
the day or night at Teller IT machines
across North Carolina. Through the
Relay and CIRRUS networks get cash
�.
5038 3500 2318 5SH1
DHFAHER
OSIf
Office location nearest campus:
University Office
fcmc
802 E
rsiry
10th
St.
at over 15,000 locations across the country.
Your Banking Card is free when you
open a Wachovia checking or savings
account. Stop by any Wachovia office and
find out how convenient banking can be.
Wachovia
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AMMMAMX
��� �-���.� -mmr-
� � � � � o m,m m m, m m
vJ





,
12
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 1,1987
Legendary Huston
dies on location
MIDDLETOWN, R.I. (AP) -
John Huston, the hard-living
I lollywood maverick whose 46-
year career began with the classic
"The Maltese Falcon" and who
crafted such hits as Trizzi's
I lonor" well into his 70s, is dead
at 81.
1 luston died in his sleep Friday
on location tor vet another film,
"Mr. North, of which he was
executive producer. I hs longtime
companion, Marcella I lemandcz,
was at his side, said Patty Raya,
production coordinator tor the
mo ie.
In his 50-year career. Huston
caroused with Humphrey Bogart
and Ernest I lemingway, broke his
nose in a fistfight with Errol
1'lynn, directed Clark Gable in his
last filmand survived an elephant
stampede with Katharine Hep-
burn while making 'The African
Queen
Huston won Academy Awards
as writer-director oi 'The Treas-
ure of the Sierra Madre in which
his lather, Walter, won an Oscar
tor best supporting actor. 1 Ie also
directed his daughter, Anjelica.in
her Oscar-winning rede in
Trizzi's I lonor
1 fis 40 films encompassed I en-
nesse Williams' intense play
iit of the Iguana the musi-
cal "Annie and the swasbuck-
ling adventure 'The Man Who
Would Be King
!l there's a pattern to my work
.i s t i haven't made any two
picturosalike heoncesaid. "Iget
bored too quickly
His battered good looks and
rich, gravelly voice led tea second
career as an actor in films and
commercials.
Huston, a longtime smoker
who was tethered to an o gen
tank in his later years, was re
leased last week froma hospital in
Fall River, Mass three weeks al-
ter collapsing trom pneumonia
complicated by emphysema.
1 le had intended to co-star with
his daughter in "Mr. North
which his son, Dannv is directing
in nearby Newport. Huston had
to give up the role to Robert
Mitchum, but intended to remain
as executive producer.
rhis summer, Huston directed
his last film, theas-yetunreleased
"The Head based on a James.
'owe story.
1 lis body was to be returned to
Los Angeles tor burial.
John Marcellus Huston was
born Aug. 5,1906, in Nevada, Mo.
His lather and his mother split
when he was6, and he spent much
of his childhood shuttling be-
tween them.
He was placed in a sanitarium
at age 12 because of an enlarged
heart and a kidney ailment, but at
night he sneaked out to swim,
building his courage by plunging
over a waterfall.
At 17, Huston became light-
weight boxing champion of Cali-
fornia, and moved from boxing to
study painting. He worked
briefly as a screenwriter, newspa-
per reporter and editor before
joining Warner Bros, as a writer in
1935.
He worked on such films as
"Juarez "High Sierra" and "Ser-
geant York making his debut as
director in 1941 with "The Mal-
tese Falcon featuring Bogart,
Mary Astor, Sydney Grecnstreet
and Peter Lorre.
Huston spent World War II in
the Army, making documenta-
ries. Alter the war, he directed
"No Exit" on Broadway, then re-
turned to film.
Bogart, who became Huston's
offscreen pal, worked with the
director again in "The Treasure of
the Sierra Madre
His other directoral credits in-
clude "Reflections in a Golden
Eye starring Marlon Brando;
"Key Largo" and "Beat the Devil"
with Bogart; "Moulin Rouge"
with Jose Ferrer; "The Man Who
Would Be King" featuring Sean
(. onnerv and Michael Caine, and
'The Misfits which featured
Marilyn Monroe and was Gable's
last film.
1 luston's first acting role was a
small part in "Sierra Madre He
went on to play the corrupt father
in "China Town" and directed
himself as Noah in "The Bible
his biggest moneymaker.
In his later years, Huston made
his home at Las C.aletas, south of
Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, which
was so remote it could only be
reached by boat.
He became an expatriate irv
1952, abandoning -Hollywood
gripped by what fie called the
"moral rot" of McCarthyism. He
moved to Ireland, where he be-
came a citizen in 1964. Huston
was married five times, to
Dorothy Harvey, Lesley Black,
Evelyn Keyes, Enrica Soma and
Celeste Shane. All ended in di-
vorce, except for his marriage to
Miss Soma, who died after a long
seperation.
He had five children, Anjelica
and Tony by Miss Soma; Dannv
by Zoe Sallis; and Allegra and
Pablo, whom he adopted.
FRAMES
WITH THE PURCHASE OF PRESCRIPTION LENSES
Choose from large selection of fashion frames
r


i

i
30 TO 60 OFF
ALL FRAMES IN STOCK
WITH PRESCRIPTION LENSES
Must present coupon with order for discount
Not good with other advertised specials
COUPON EXPIRES SEPT. 18. 1987
I
I
SOFT CONTACT
LENSES
SCQ00
3 PAIR
Must present this ad with order for dis-
count Mot good with other advertised
special, Expires Sept. 18. 1987
&
Sunglasses
25 off
Must present this ad with order for dis-
count Not good with other advertised
specials Expires Sept 18, 1987 -
We Can Arrange An Eve Exam For You On The Saint' Day
OPTICAL
PALACE
703 Greenville Blvd.
(AcroM From The Plaza)
Gary M. Harris, Licensed Optician
Open 9:30 AM to 6 PM Mon Fri Phone 756-4204
l)arrl 'Brown
ro�ii �.� in.m.u'irn; I'd tl hi
l.nljv In wnti fur th. tV.ihiitjton l'i
Eel Nick las
In I vs Id hMjn ujs spurts editor of
100 Cotton Riled
IFull Size Futons
Solid Colors & Printsf
$200 value
Til
f
-V

W .i tllhluii l'n1
Al Agate
!Jl�' �f nil J lliluillll ,rr
jsl jr oilman
I hi s.in I rjiiiismt IiiuiikIi
The Kast Carolinian
In IVS7)uuiould vrktr I hi Fast arohniaii
liiiinirrim . Who knows
Applv now
Wi'n lotatfd on Hit-second floor ol tru Publications llldu
2 Position
Futon Frames
Light Natural Color
Hardwood
150 value!
lena
All Stores Open Nightly & Sundays � f nceo' Cameron Villaoe
PAIEIGH � Cameron Village h Nortn Pidge DuPh am � NortMoale Mall
SPEENVlUi � The Plcuo
NEED MONEY?
We Pay CASH For:
WHM
IN THE
W0RLBS
GtING
SterlingClass Rings
Silver CoinsWedding Bands
Any Gold Jewelry
Coin & Ring Man
4th & Evans Street
Prices based dailv on
gold and silver rates.
A fantastic celebration at St. Timothy's
on October 3!
Buy your lobster tickets today!
LIVE MAINE LOBSTERS: Live $7�� Boiled Q�
For tickets or information, call:
U??lI�l?' "� McNally Church Office
756-6016 756-6480 355-2125
St. Timothy's 10th Annual
lobster Fait
GO PIRATES!
SACK THE PACK!
Shop Overton's For All Your Party and Game Supplies. We Have
Your Favorite Beverages, Plenty of Flasks, and Mixers! Shop
Where The Pirates Shop for Price, Quality, and Convenience.
We're Conveniently Located Just Two Blocks from Campus on The
Corner of Third and Jarvis Streets!
Prices Effective Through Saturday, September 5, 1987.
BUDWEISER and BUD LIGHT
12 pack-1 2 oz. cans
Limit 2 cases.
OPEN 8 a.m 8 p.m.
Monday - Saturday
OPEN Sunday 1 - 6 p.m.
We reserve the Right to Limit Quantities.
None Sold to Dealers.
Coke or Pepsi Soft Drinks
RoJorr'sde6'10 'V Kraft Sin9le S,iced �2
12 poVc� 12 o�ncaS� 6' $2�99 American Cheese 49
$4.99
All Pepsi Products and - i� r tin Lay's Regular
Pepsi and Mountain Dew 3l.Uy J Potato Chips
59C 6,2 g9�
99C
fMade-RiteTresh Bread long loaf
6 12
oz. bag
Assorted
FiQVOt-$
2 Liter Bottle
Richfood
Whole Milk
i 2 gallon carton (paper) Hot Dog and Hamburger Rolls (8 pk) choice 2$l � 1 9
SALAD Build your "Perfect Salad" at "Greenville's Freshest Salad Bar Choose from The
Your
BAR
freshest ingredients, including meats, cheeses, vegetables, pasta salads, and more!
HOT BAR Scoop up the hot meal of y�ur choice and enjoy the "Home-Cooked" goodness.
We have at least 2 meat entrees daily, plus several vegetables, and desserts too!
SvnTA �Td T�P Q steaming Jumbo Idaho Baked Potato with your choice of the traditional
RAR toppings' plus a few more like chili and cheesy broccoli! Or try one of our gourmet
(In S souPs' Clam Chowder and Cream of Broccoli are two favorites!
BAKERY Choose from our many varieties of freshly baked bread, rolls, bagels, pastries, and
cookies! Our breads are all natural with no preservatives! r
Ar
OVERTON'S 5 DISCOUNT
CLIP THIS COUPON
Present this coupon to cashier at check out
time to receive 5 discount on purchases of
$10.00 or more. Good for ECU Students
and Faculty only. Limit one discount per
i.d. number. Expires 9-12-87.



h
te
�i
Name
Amt. of PurchaseI.D. Number.
OVERTON'6
Supem&M
211 JARVIS STREET
JUST 2 BLOCKS FROM ECU
BLOOM
r

L
Burma Shave ,BL001
subject of

man's show
I
SAN FRANSISCO (AP) - Per
tram Minkin knows that
where, he goes nostalgia al-
ways seems to flow.
Burma Shave
Minkin to day opens a stage
show featuring his memorized
collection of all 600 rhymes used
by Burma Shave on roadside
signs or yesteryear.
Minkin brings his "Burma
Shave Man" show to the Mues
uem of Modem Mythology, a 5-
year-old institution that houses
examples of such ad
giants as Snap' Crackle' and I
Buster Brown and his dog Tige
and the Jolly Green Giant
Playing the fictional Burma
Shave Man, Minkin tellsol hi!
as an advance man for the Burma
Vita Co recounting such t
tasks as talking farmers inl
ting the companv use prime
stretches of land for its
The Burma Shave Man. �
twangy drawl, is a -
nal Will Rogers, but Minkin
bumkin. The 36-year
Oakland story teller ha- a
bachelor's degree in classical lit-
erature and a master s in rhetoric
"Those signs say a lot about
Amenca of old he savs
read these signs and it's ea-
imagine the family out on the
road, the kids begging dad to
drive faster, faster, so thev can
read the next jingle
Minkin will invite the audience
to recite their favorite signs dur-
ing the show. "It's part of their
childhood he said.
One of his favorites came from a
woman in her 80 s: "Past school-
houses take it slow let the
little shavers grow
"Burma Shave
Minkin said that each year the
Burma Vita Co. would sponsor a
contest in which SI 00 was paid for
every jingle used. The jingle had
to be six lines long - one line on
each sign - the last line alwaf
F&igging Burma Shave.
BLOO!
-� T
From the mid-1920 stotheearlv
I960 s, 7,000 sets of signs pushed
the slick shaving cream
The signs helped Burma Vita
make anannual $3.5 million profit
in the 1930s and 1940s, but the
company eventually fell behind
Colgate, Palmoliveand Barbasol.
In 1963, it was sold to Phillip
Morns. The signs were gone
within two years, victims of free-
ways and faster speeds.
As an indication of the signs
importance in the anna
Americana, the Smithsonian dis-
plays this set:
'In this vale of toil, and sin
your head goes bald but not
your chin
"Burma Shave
Hunters exacted a heaw toll on
the signs, and horses were hard
on them, too. according to
Minkin.
"Old Dobbin found the sign's 9-
foot height was perfect tor back
scratching Minkin said.
One series oi signs read:
"Old Dobbin reads these
signs each day You see. he
gets his corn that wav
"Burma Shave
ECU Plavhouse
opens auditions
The East Carolina Playhouse
will hold open auditions for
Teave It To lane" today at 730
p.m. in Room 20t of the Messick
Theatre Arts Center on the East
Carolina University Campus
"Leave It To Jane a Jerome
Kern musical comedv about col-
lege life in the 1920s will open the
1987-88 Playhouse season Ter
formances of "Leave It To Jane
will be held in the McGmnis The-
atre October 7 �12 at 8:15 p.m
According to Director Edgar
Loessin, "There are excellent roles
for students 18 or older in this nos-
talgic look back to the early
1920s
People wishing to audition
should bring music for a song
they wish to sing; an accompanist
will be provided. All women
must sing andor dance. There
are some non-singing roles for
men. Rehearsal will begin Sep-
tember 2,1987.
For furthur information call
757-6390.
Gr
9uali
Laun
5
. Coul
ST
Dis
lndvv
C: I
Sur
I
���:�
���� '
��� �





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1. 1987
13
WHAT
IN THE
WORLDS
GOING
UN?
�-�
t
j
celebration at St. Timothy's
on October 3!
ax lobster tickets today!
LOBSTERS: Live $700 Boiled 8��
:kets or information, call:
Lorraine McNally Church Office
756-6480 3552125
ithy's loth Annual
.obster Fair
ACK!
Game Supplies. We Have
. and Mixers! Shop
ind Convenience.
Campus on The
ember 5, 1987.
EISER and BUD LIGHT
12 pack-1 2 oz. cans
Limit 2 cases
$4.99
� �r 4�L� m.
leese
.Need 2ozpkg
$1.49
ar Lay's Regular t
' Potato Chips I
' ,m,89C
r9,oaf Your
f8 pk Choice
Fiovors
2S1.19
Salad Bar Choose from She
hies, pasta salads, and more!
"Home-Cooked" goodness,
(egetables, and desserts too!
mr choice of the traditional
xoli! Or try one of our gourmet
'wo favorites!
ead, rolls, bagels, pastries, and
ratives:
,
&
&
��


Sttpwl
BS STREET
;S FROM ECU


Burma Shave ,BLOOM co�H
subject of
man's show
SAN FRANSISCO (AP) - Ber-
tram Minkin knows that
where he goes nostalgia al-
ways seems to flow.
Burma Shave.
Minkin to day opens a stage
show featuring his memorized
collection of all 600 rhymes used
by Burma Shave on roadside
signs of yesteryear.
Minkin brings his "Burma
Shave Man" show to the Mues-
uem of Modem Mythology, a 5-
year-oW institution that houses
examples of such advertising
giants as Snap! Crackle! and Pop
Buster Brown and his dog Tige
and the Jolly Green Giant.
Playing the fictional Burma
Shave Man, Minkin tells of his life
as an advance man for the Burma
Vita Co recounting such tough
tasks as talking farmers into let-
ting the company use prime
stretches of land for its signs.
The Burma Shave Man, with his
twangy drawl, is a sort of tonso-
nal Will Rogers, but Minkin is no
bumkin. The 36-year-old
Oakland story teller has a
bachelor's degree in classical lit-
erature and a master's in rhetoric.
"Those signs say a lot about the
America of old he says "You
read these signs and it's easy to
imagine the family out on the
road, the kids begging dad to
drive faster, faster, so they can
read the next jingle
Minkin will invite the audience
to recite their favorite signs dur-
ing the show. "It's part of their
childhood he said.
One of his favorites came from a
woman in her 80 s: "Past school-
houses take it slow let the
little shavers grow
"Burma Shave
Minkin said that each year the
Burma Vita Co. would sponsor a
contest in which $100 was paid for
every jingle used. The jingle had
to be six lines long - one line on
each sign - the last line alvvavs
fSSugging, Burma Shave.
11 m v
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r-RO.v TKYINO rr- SWALLOW
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MoisreNep
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HfW'NO omiwN UP
FOPCBP TO CAT ROWNO
SOUIP FOR MACS,
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tmryfts
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BLOOM COUNTY
by Berke Breathed
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The
East Carolinian
Required reading
for the serious student.
L
BLOOM
r
COUNTY
� NiLJ
E
Follow the latest
in Pirate action.
Read the sports
page in The East
Carolinian.
Simply the best.
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St. Pauls Episcopal Bll
Church T7
WELCOMES YOU
401 East Fourth Street
The Rev. L.P. Houston, Jr Rector
The Rev. M.L. Wootten, III. Assoc. Rector
Marty Gartman, Episcopal Campus Ministrv
Schedule of Services
Sunday, September 6th
10:00 Eucharist - followed by
"Lemonade on (he I awn "
Sunday, Septemher 13th
10:00 Eucharist - followed by
"Homecoming"lunch provided
Sunday, September 20th
Fall-Winter Schedule beams
Eucharist - 7:30, 9:00. 11:00
Wednesday - 5:30
Episcopal Student
Fellowship
Eucharist
Supper and conversation follow the service
From the mid-1920 stotheearly
1960 s, 7,000 sets of signs pushed
the slick shaving cream.
The signs helped Burma Vita
make unannual $3.5 million profit
in the 1930 s and 1940 s, but the
company eventually fell behind
Colgate, Palmolive and Barbasol.
In 1963, it was sold to Phillip
Morris. The signs were gone
within two years, victims of free-
ways and faster speeds.
As an indication of the signs'
importance in the annals of
Americana, the Smithsonian dis-
plays this set:
'in this vale of toil and sin
your head goes bald but not
your chin
"Burma Shave
Hunters exacted a heavy toll on
the signs, and horses were hard
on them, too, according to
Minkin.
"Old Dobbin found the sign's 9-
foot height was perfect for back
scratching Minkin said.
One series of signs read:
"Old Dobbin reads these
signs each day You see, he
gets his com that way
"Burma Shave
ECU Playhouse
opens auditionsi
The East Carolina Playhouse
will hold open auditions for
"Leave It To Jane" today at 7:30
p.m. in Room 206 of the Messick
Theatre Arts Center on the East
Carolina University Campus.
"Leave It To Jane a Jerome
Kern musical comedy about col-
lege life in the 1920s will open the
1987-88 Playhouse season. Per-
formances of "Leave It To Jane"
will be held in the McGinnis The-
atre October 7 �12 at 8:15 p.m.
According to Director Edgar
Loessin, "There are excellent roles
for students 18 or older in this nos-
talgic look back to the early
1920s
People wishing to audition
should bring music for a song
they wish to sing; an accompanist
will be provided. All women
must sing andor dance. There
are some non-singing roles for
men. Rehearsal will begin Sep-
tember 2,1987.
For furthur information call
757-6390.
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111 W. 10TH ST.
Expires October 31. 1987 corner of iothevans
Coupon muat be presented with incoming order
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Discount Membership for Fall Semester
ONLY $40.00
(Offer expires Sunday, Sept. 13.)
Indoor Swimming Pool Weight Room
Gymnasium Air-Dyne Exercise Bikes
Suntanning System Weight Loss Programs
Aerobics, Low Impact Aerobics
Toning, and Aquaerobics Classes
Greenville
Burroughs Aquatics and mm
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758-6892
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These positions offer an excellent op-
portunity to gain experience and leader-
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throughout your life. At the same time,
these positions will enable you to make
valuable contributions to East Carolina
University. For additional information
and applications, contact the Associate
Dean of Student's Office in 209
Whichard or the Attorney General's
Office in 222 Mendenhall.
ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE TURNED IN BY
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4TH










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14
THrrAM-CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 1. 1987
On tap Thursday
I HI I AST I AROI INIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 1, 1987 Page 14
Baker, Pirates ready for clash
against Wolfpack on Saturday
By TIM CHANDLER
I'he East Carolina football
team will open its season Satur-
day against an old arch-rival
with high hopes for the 1987 sea-
son.
The opponents tor the Pirates
in the season opening contest will
be N.C State. A contest, which
Pirate head coach Art Baker feels
would be better suited to both
teams involved it it were played
later in the season.
"The N.C. State game is our
biggest gameol theseason said
Baker at his weekly news confer-
ence. "A natural rivalry has de-
veloped between us through the
years. Naturally 1 wish that the
game were later in the year, but
the gameisset for Saturday so we
must prepare for it now
Saturday will mark the 18th
renewal ol the rivalry between
the Firate and the Wolfpack.The
Wolfpack leads the series 12-5,
however the last tour meetings
between the two teams have been
split evenly.
Baker hopes that the trend will
continue this season as well, es-
pecially since the Pirates lost last
season, 38-10.
"We felt that we were embar-
rassed last season in the fourth
qua rterdhe V olfpack scored 28
unanswered points in the final
quarter said Baker. "Ourplay-
ers want to go back up there
(Rak igl a I prove that they can
wm. it v. ilso be a big en-
hancement for our entire season
if we could w in our first game
Bakei feels heading into
is in the best frame of mind that it
has been in since he took over the
coaching reigns three years ago.
We have had a very good year
of practice explained Baker.
"We've been hitting each other
and looking at each other since
lanuary. We are now ready to line
up against a team with different
colored unitorms and start hit-
ting them
And although Baker would
rather play State later in the
seaon, he still admitted that this
week would be an exciting time
for the coaches and the players.
This is an exciting time for us
said Piker. "State is our number
one rival and they are the only
(NCAA Division) 1-A team in the
state that sees tit to play us.
'The last two seasons we have
have played before the two larg-
est crowds ever to see a game in
North Carolina (58,650 in 1986
and 58,300 in 1985), continued
Baker. "It is a game that we look
forward to every year
One difference in this year's
contest compared to that of last
season is the quarterback situ-
ations o the two teams. Last sea-
son, the Wolfpack had a very
stable and efficient Frik Kramer
calling the signals on offense,
while the Pirates started 18-year
old freshman Charlie Libretto.
"1 really felt sorry for Charlie
(Libretto) last season at State
said Baker. "Can you imagine
being an 18-year old, starting in
your first college game, in front of
almost 60,000 screaming fans? It
would be a hard situation for
anyone to handle
Saturday's contest that his squad This year the tables are
changed though. The Pirates
have settled on red-shirt sopho-
more Travis Hunter as starter,
while the Wolfpack has yet to
name a definite replacement for
the departed Kramer.
"I am very pleased with our
quarterback situation entering
this season said Baker. "Both
(Libretto and Hunter) made big
improvements over last season.
Travis' strength continues to be
the option, but he worked hard in
the off-season and greatly im-
proved his ability to throw the
ball and to read defenses.
"We're going with Travis as the
starter, hecarned the job in spring
practice continued Baker. "But
there is a good chance that Char-
lie will probably play some Satur-
day also
When asked the question of
whether or not he would be
pleased if the Pirates managed to
stay close, but still not come out
victorious in the game, Baker re-
sponded with a firm no.
"I'll be dissappointed if we
lose, period said Baker. It
doesn't matter whether the score
is 38-10 or vou lose by only one
point, a loss is a loss. Even last
year when we played Miami
(Ha.), I believed that we had a
chance to win the game. I always
believe that there is a chance to
win in every game
Baker said that for whoever
comes out of Saturday as the los-
ing coach, the job of explaining
why the loss happened will be
difficult.
"I just hope that someone else
has to explain a loss next week,
except me concluded Baker.
Cagers arraigned Thursday
n-
Blue Edwards, shown in action last year, hopes to return to the Pirate
basketball squad for his senior season of action later this fall.
Theodore "Blue" Edwards,
and two former ECU basketball
players were arrested Aug. 26 in
connection with the theft of
nearly $6,000 in property.
The property was stolen, ac-
cording to ECU Police Chief
Johnny Rose, during five separ-
ate break-ins which occured over
Christmas break last year.
Rose said the items stolen in the
break-ins included cassette tapes,
cash and stereos, and came to a
total of $5,729. Of this amount
about $800 has been recovered by
investigating officers.
The former players, Tracy King
and Aaron Williams were dis-
missed from the team Aug. 24 in
a move that raised more than a
few eyebrows. Head Coach Mike
Steele, in an interview with the
Daily Reflector, said the dismiss-
als were made because the two
players were not performing aca-
demically.
'They (King and Williams)
were guys we spent a lot of time
discussing over the summer
said Steele. "They came in on
Monday and we decided it
wasn't going to work out
While Edwards is still on the
squad, and Steele is still looking
forward to a superb senior cam-
paign from the forward, Blue
must face three counts of break-
ing, entering and larceny. The
trial of the three men is scheduled
for Sept. 11.
Pack's Peebles must fill shoes
Raleigh, N.C.(AP) - Danny
Peebles has been playing for 10
years, but the North Carolina
State wide receiver has never
been under the pressure he is ex-
periencing this season.
With speedy wide receiver
Nasrallah Worthen suspended
prior to the start of preseason
drills, Pebbles has moved into the
starting slot, and with it he has
brought the hopes of a passing
game which has not yet settled on
a starting quarterback but will
look to him for leadership.
"There aren't too many receiv-
ers in the whole country who are
as good as Naz, let alone in the
ACC Peebles said in a recent
interview. "I guess that's where
my worries come in the most
Worthen caught a team-lead-
ing 41 passes for 686 yards and
four touchdowns, one of which
was a game-winning reception
against North Carolina. Peebles
is trying to keep those figures in
perspective and meet his own
standards.
Already, Peebles said, he's in-
flicted pressure on himself in
practice, trying to catch every-
thing thrown his way.
"I guess I handled it last year
because most times I went into
the game, I knew I was going to
get the ball in the end zone he
said. "I knew I could be the hero
or the goat
The coaches are trying to con-
vince Peebles to take a relaxed
approach now, and during the
year, but still he wants to become
a better player because of the
change.
"I don't want to set my goals
too high so that 1 can't reach them,
but I don't want to set them too
low and not come around as the
receiver I want to be Peebles
said.
"I need to be more consistent.
I've been an up and down type of
receiver, and a lot of that has to do
with knowing I wasn't going to
be in there too much on game
day he said.
By his own definition, and by
the statistics, Peebles was indeed
a spot performer in Coach Dick
Sheridan's first season in Raleigh.
Although he caught just eight
passes, four of them went for
touchdowns, including a 33-yard
reception with no time left to beat
See PACK page 15
The prc-season preparations for the ECU football squad are almost over. The Pirates arc now making final
preparationsfor Saturday's seasoning opening contest against North Carolina State Saturday at Carter-
Finley Stadium in Raleigh.
Morrison's linksters already
preparing for fall schedule
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sports Writer
East Carolina's golf team, the
1987 Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion champions, is hard at work
preparing for a demanding fall
season. The Pirates will face more
stiff competition during their
five-match schedule, but second
year head coach Hal Morrison is
confident that his team will play
well and maybe even exceed the
.goals that he has set.
m The Pirates will rely heavily-on
(heir veterans as they will have to
step in and fill the void left bv
Mike Bradley. Bradley, one of the
best golfers to come through the
ECU program, played his last
tournament as a Tiratc last
spnng.
Standouts among the Pirate
veterans are junior Chns Winkel
and senior Brian Conner. Conner,
from Enola, PA, transferred from
Methodist College last year and
led ECU in the Campbell Univer-
sity Invitational and the Stouffcr-
Vanderbilt Intercollegiate.
"I'm really going to count on
my returners this fall Morrison
said. "Conner came in last spring
and gave us a real big boost.
Winkel started out slow last
spring but really improved as the
season progressed, he has the
potential to be a good collegiate
golfer
Sophomore John Maginnes,
who was ECU's only regular
freshman player last season, will
sit out the fall but will be ready to
play this spring.
East Carolina's depth im-
proved dramatically with the
ECU golf coach
Hal Morrison
addition of Simon Move, John
Lynch and Francis Vaughn.
Vaughn, who already had a
string of victories under his belt
as a prep golfer, added another
by winning the Junior World
Tournament this summer. The
Junior World, which features the
best amateur gol fers from all over
the world, is one the most prestig-
ious of amateur tournaments.
Also joining the Pirate squad
this year is Jeff Craig, winner of
the Pennsylvania Junior tourna-
ment, and Mark Hidley who
transferred from Franklin and
Marshall college.
The Pirates will face their
toughest challenge in Greens-
boro, re.Uifbrd CrH.egt� 'fvill
host the tournament Wfeich fea-
tures the best teams in North
Carolina
'There is an outstanding field
of golfers at the Cardinal Morn-
son said. "Wake Forest, UNC, all
the good teams will play there.
Our first three tournaments will
be our toughest
Since Morrison has taken the
helm, ECU has seen an improve-
ment in both the performance on
the course and the tournaments
in which the team plays. Recently
East Carolina was notified that
they had been accepted to play in
The Chris Schenkel Invitational
Tournament this spring. Re-
garded as THE spring tourna-
ment, the Schenkel will be played
at Forest Heights Country Club
in Statesboro, GA.
IRS calendar of events
The Department of Intramural-
Recreation Services will be offer-
ing a wide variety of programs
and services throughout the
month of September for faculty
staff and students of East Caro-
lina University.
To begin the month, The
Physical Fitness Program is hold-
ing fintess class registration Aug.
31-Sept. 4. A wide range of times
are available for participation in
aerobics, toning and aquarobics.
Student cost is $10 with staff cost
set at $20 for 12 sessions. Classes
begin Sept. 8 and conclude Oct.
16. Each class offered may also be
attended on a drop-in basis. Valid
identification is required and
nominal fee will be charged. To
pick up a class schedule or regis-
ter for classes offered, drop by
room 204 Memorial Gym or call
757-6387.
While checking out the fitness
classes offered, more advanced
enthusiasts may wish to consider
SUPRA Class. SUPRA Class is an
innovative 90 minute workout
incorporating weights as light
resistence for muscular strength
and endurance in addition to a 30
minute workout in aerobics. Ses-
sions are the same as other fitness
classes. Registration is manda-
tory and a fee of $15 for students
and $20 for staff is required.
Faculty and Staff are welcome
to frop-in free of charge each
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
for the EXERCISE W.I.S.Ely
program. This low impact aero-
bic program is held in room 108
Memorial Gym at the noon hour.
Workshops and clincs covering a
variety of physical fitness topics
are offered throughout the year
along with the PEPSI Physical
Fitness Program and Aerobic
Challenge. For more informa-
tion, contact Kathleen Hill in
room 105-A Memorial Gym of
call 757-6387.
The Intramural Outdoor Rec-
reation Center is offering three
outdoor adventure trips in Sep-
tember. A windsurfing & hang
gliding trip will be held Sept. 13at
Nags Head, N.C. Registration is
taking place now through Sept. 8-
15. Attendance at pre-trip meet-
ings are mandatory for participa-
tion. For more specific informa-
tion, contact the Outdoor Recrea-
tion Center in room 113 Memo-
rial Gym. Horseback riding at
Jarmans Stables and canoeing
trips are available upon request.
The Outdoor Recreation Center is
open Monday & Friday 1:30 p.m.
- 5:30p.m Tuesday & Thursday
3:30pm. -5:30p.m.
The Intramural Sports Pro-
gram opens its season with Flag
Football registration Sept. 8 from
11 a.m. to 6 p.m. in Memorial
Gym room 104-A. Students inter-
ested in officiating flag football
must attend the flag football offi-
cials clinic tonight at 8 p.m. in
Memorial Gym. No experience is
necessary. Co-recreational soft-
ball registration will also be held
Sept. 8 at 5 p.m. in Brewster D-
103.
The annual Almost Anything
Goes competition sponsored by
Budweiser has been postponed
until Sept. 17. Interested teams
are asked to register Sept. 14 from
11 a.m. to 6 p.m. in room 104-A
memorial Gym. A team captains
meeting will be held Sept. 14 in
Biology 102. This meeting is
mandatory for all teams wishing
to compete. Each participant in
the event will receive a free
Budweiser-Almost Anything
Goes t-shirt. Only 48 teams will
be allowed to participate, so sign
your team up early. This event is
perhaps the wackiest of all intra-
mural activities so be sure to at-
tend.
For additional information
regarding any of the programs
and services offered by the De-
partment of Intramural-Recrea-
tional Services, call 757-6387 or
come by room 204 Memorial
Gym. The INTRA-Action Hotline
has also been established to keep
you informed of all Informal
Recreation hours in Memorial
Gym and Minges Coliseum. Just
Dial 757-6562 for a listing of days
and times.
PepR
The festivities kicking off the
1987 East Carolina football sea-
son will begin Thursday night
with the seventh-annual
Budweiser-EastCarolina Univer-
sity Football Pep Rally
The pep rally will be held fi
7-7:45 p.m. in Ficklen Stadium.
The ECU Marching Pirates will
get the event underway with
their traditional march up I
lege Hill Drive to the stadium at
6:30 p.m.
In addition to the Marcl -
Pirates, the entire E :
team and coach ;r
hand for the event
ing entertainmi I the
ECU cheerleaders and
the Pirate.
Guest spejj
the pep rallv
cellor Dr Ri
Athletic Direl
and several 1
ers
Nun
awar I
will be award!
en? :�
ial m
tend
In
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wed. nites
film 8pm


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Firstss A
PROGRA.
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and
11th Annu
Prizes
Lsi 51
2nd
3rd
Lades can- - . p
WedSept 2v
�1 50s � ,
ALSO 9d
Ladies Free with
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sters already
all schedule

rid which features the
I fers from all over
the world isonethemostprestig-
irl lurnaments.
Pirate squad
ff raig winner of
j Ivania junior tourna-
I Mark Hid lev who
rred from Franklin and
lege.
The Tirates will face their
toughest challenge jn Greens-
boro, NC Snlford CMK'ill
host the tournament which faa-
the best teams in North
her - ir utstanding field
rs at th v ardmal Morri-
I Wake Forest, UNC, all
i ' ams will play there.
'roe tournaments will
est
ce Morrison has taken the
helm, ECU has seen an improve-
the
h the performance on
irse and the tournaments
in which the team plays. Recently
' Carolina was notified that
they had been accepted to play in
The Chns Schenkel Invitational
nent this spnnc. Re-
I as THE spring tourna-
t. the Schenkel will be played
at F "� ' ghts Country Club
in Stal r . CA.
r of events
sical
i
re informa-
Hill in
nal Gym of
I r Rec-
� g three
in Sep-
& hang
held Sept. Hat
Registration is
I Sept.8-
Dre-trip meet-
irtici pa-
cific informa-
tdoor Recrea-
m 113 Memo-
ack nding at
and canoeing
upon request.
?ation Center is
Friday 1:30 p.m.
�v & Thursday
J
Sports Pro-
ton with Hag
: Sept. 8 from
in Memorial
Students inter-
flag football
ig football offi-
dinic tonight at 8 p.m. in
rial Gym. 'o experience is
sary. Co-recreational soft-
gistration will also be held
3 at 5 p.m. in Brewster D-
The annual Almost Anything
Goes competition sponsored bv
Budweiser has been postponed
until Sept 17. Interested teams
are asked to register Sept. 14 from
11 a.m. to 6 p.m. in room 104-A
memorial Gym. A team captains
meeting will be held Sept. 14 in
Biology 102. This meeting is
mandatory for all teams wishing
to compete. Each participant in
the event will receive a free
Budweiser-Almost Anything
Goes t-sh.rt. Only 48 teams win
be allowed to participate, so sign
your team up early, this event is
perhaps the wackiest of all intra-
mural activities so be sure to at
tend.
For additional information
regarding any of the programs
and services offered by the De-
partment of Intramural-Recrea-
tional Services, call 757-6387 or
r�me-r 204 M�rial
Gym. The INTRA-Action Hotline
has also been established to kecD
you informed of all informj;
Recreation hours in Memorial
Gym and Minges Coliseum. Just
Dial 757-6562 for a listing of day
and times. J
On tap Thursday
Pep Rally
The festivities kicking off the
19S7 East Carolina football sea-
son will begin Thursday night
with the seventh-annual
Budweiser-EastCarolina Univer-
sity Football Pep Rally.
The pep rally will be held from
745 p.m. in Ficklcn Stadium.
The ECU Marching Pirates will
get the event underway with
their traditional march up Col-
lege Hill Drive to the stadium at
6:30 p.m.
In addition to the Marching
Pirates, the entire ECU football
team and coaching staff will be on
hand for the event. Also provid-
ing entertainment will be the
ECU cheerleaders and Pee Dee
the Tirate.
Guest speakers scheduled for
the pep rally include ECU Chan-
cellor Dr. Richard Eakin, ECU
Athletic Director Dr. Ken Karr
and several Pirate football play-
ers.
Numerous door prizes will be
awarded, including $1,000 worth
of grand prizes. The grand prizes
will be awarded by Spuds MacK-
enzie (person in mascot uniform),
the official mascot for Bud Light
Beer.
Everyone is encouraged to at-
tend. Admission to the rally is
free.
In the event of rain, the pep
rally will be moved inside
Minges Coliseum.
QpaU
1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1,1987
15
Pack to go without Naz
Continued from page 14
South Carolina.
In replacing Worthen with
Peebles, the Wolfpack may be
losing experience but it is not
losing any speed. Last spring, he
ran a 10.29 in the 100 meters and
a 20.16 in the 200 meters, the latter
standing as the world's fourth
fastest time this year at that dis-
tance.
Peebles said the notion of two
primary receivers hasended with
Worthen's absence. Mack Jones, a
senior who caught five passes last
year, now moves into the spot
Peebles expected to occupy, that
of a secondary receiver who
would draw attention a way from
the main threat.
Everybody was looking for
Naz first and then the rest of us
because that's how it is. He's the
proven receiver on the team
Peebles said. "Now, the attention
is spread out. Mack and myself,
we're going to have to move up to
a higher level than we thought we
would have to
to foreign
lands
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111 East Third Street
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Telephone:
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wed. nites
film 8pm
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.jazzeii'fee
Bring this coupon in by 10187 and
receive four fun Jazzercise classes Good
for first visit only. Call 756-8302 or 1-800-
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TllTHSAT 9:15 AM Jaycee Park Auditorium
TUTH 5:45 P M Elmhurst School
"Child care available at TUTH Classes
and TT K 0 Present
11th Annual Bikini Contest
Prizes:
1st $100.00 CASH
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3rd $25.00 CASH
Ladies can sign up at THE ELBO or call 758-4591.
Wed. Sept. 2, 1987 10:30 'til 2:00 AM
$1.50 Guys Ladies Free!
ALSO 9:00 'til 10:30
Ladies Free with THE ELBO MALE
STRIPPERS!
6 New and Hot Dancers
All This Wednesday at THE ELBO!
Tue. Draft Nite
.10 Draft All Nite
Ladies Free 'til 12!






East Carolina University's
National Award-Winning Literary
Art Magazine
is accepting applications for
the following positions:




t




Poetry Editor
Art Director
Applications must be turned into the Media Board Office, 2nd
Floor of the Publications Building, by Sept. 4, 5:00p.m









I Assistant Editor


















�� - � j�
fc � - -IMI �
"x " V
X





.
Tt IE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 1,1987
Volleyballers set goals for CAA title
B GEORGE OSBORXE
Sporti Writer
ECU volleyball coach fmocene
1 urner let her team set their own
goals for the 19S7 season. Their
goal, to win the Colonial Athletic-
Association championship, is of
special significance since ECU
will host the CAA tournament.
"They chose a good one to
?vin Turner said. "It would be
great if we could win in front of
our home crowd
The road to a conference crown
will be a difficult one for the Lady
Pirates. ECU suffered a disap-
pointing 8-18 record last year and
had to rebuild in key positions.
Setter wasonc position that coach
Turner had a great deal of success
with.
Veteran Kerry Weisbrod and
junior college transfer Debbie
Tate will both see time at setter. "I
was real pleased with our setters
Kerry Weisbrod and Debbie
Tate Turner said. "Kerry got a
lot of experience last year and she
and Debbie are both very smart
players. Debbie has a good jump-
set and surprised us by also being
a good hitter
Hitter is another position that is
a plus for ECU as jemma Holley
and Cindy Carden both return.
"Jemma came into pre-season
hitting real hard and I feel like she
will be one of our better hitters
Turner said.
With solid personnel in both at
setter and hitter the Lady Pirate
offense is progressing well. "I
plan to run a more disciplined of-
fense Turner said. "Right now
in August we're past the point
where we were at the end of last
season
Assisting coach Turner this
year will be Nancy Reavis, in her
second year as assistant coach,
and former Lady Pirate hitter
Alyson Barnes.
"I'm fortunate to have them
(Reavis and Bames) both work-
ing with me Turner said.
"Alyson knows volleyball well
enough to be able to pick ou t pat-
terns in our game that we need to
work on and Nancy helps alot
with technique
Volleyball in the Colonial has
undergone some changes in the
past year. The tournament will
now rotate among all member
schools that field a volleyball
team and in addition to a post-
season all conference team, a
CAA volleyball "player Of
the week" will be announced by
the conference office.
The Lady Pirates will open
their season with a home contest
against North Carolina Wesleyan
Sept.10. ECU will take to the road
until Sept. 29 when they start
their conference schedule against
UNC Wilmington.
��
SUN AMERICA
COn�OHATIOM
tollege grid se
A Tradition of Innovation
Only on Tuesdays
and Thursdays
ST RUTHERFORD, N.J
) - If the rest of the college
kball season is anything like
jpener, it won't lack forexcit
t.
here's no guestion the fans
the television people got
lr money's worth Iowa
ch Hayden Fry said Sunday
the fifth annual Kickofi
ssic and his toam lost
even teen th-ranked Tenessee
I the No. 16 Hawkeves 23-22
on three field
in the final 1? mint
a 20-yarder with
left
Reich's field .
from 45
Tennessee's last
sums after tl
nd-period I a
hind 19-14 on K.
on .i
third
quartrr
Tom Togs Factory Owttot
ItOO Dickinson Avenue
teanm,nh1987 " th� Lady Pirate v0,leyba11
20�c
OFF SUMMER
0 MERCHANDISE!
Featuring the Hottest Beach Fashions,
Casual Wear, and Famous Brands.
Everything In Stor Except Hosiery
-jACKi m
TROCADERQ
J5
A Fcmous Narrwt That W. Cannot Mention
TjjJJjJtt T lop. Ttnfc Dtmni, ikyci. Ml, Walk Short.
T-thlri
If you ere a newcomer to town, we invite you to
visit our store at 1900 Dickinson Avenue. If you
are going to the beach at Morehead City, visit our
new location on Hwy. 70 (just across from
BoJangles).
Shop Tha Stora Naaraat You
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Wedf ri. 9:30-5
Saturday 9:30-4
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The
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Whatever the assignment. Pilot has the formula
for writing comfort and precise n
Pilot s Better Ball Point Pen. in medium and fine p into
lets you breeze through long note-taking sessions lr. tad
we ve made writer s fatigue a tiling. t the past' This crystal barreled
veteran of the campus has a nbbed linger gnp for o -ntinuous comfort
and is perfectly balanced for effortless writing Besttail youlnever
throw it out because it's refillable
The perfect teammate t i the Better Ball P. �mt Pen is Pi! i s
Pencilier 0.5mm mechanical pencil It has a continuous lead feed
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breakage The Pencilier s .mmbo eraser does the 10b cieanlv while
the nbbed gnp offers the same comfort as the Better Bail Point Pen
Pick up the Pilot Team at vow campus
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STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
Owned and Operated by East Carolina Un
iversity.
Intramu
Inloraa;
Memo:la 1
MonFri.
HonThurs.
Frl.
Sac.
Sun.
Weight
Hesr.cl
Come on in
the
water's fine
at
Memorial Gym
BICYCll 90S
"The Home of The Clever
Machine
�JAMIS (Earth Cruiser)
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Downtown Greenille
(Next to S & R Computers)
Mastercharge ; Lay Away ; Visa
757-1816
757-3616
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking applications for
Day-Student Representatives
for 1987-1988
The eaZy pc;
Its almost as easy
as turning on your TV
Responsibilities:
Selecting the Student Union President
Approving Committee Chairpersons
Approving the Student Union Budget
Setting Policy for the Student Union
Qualifications: Full- Time Student
Reside Off Campus
Independent
Deadline To Apply: Wednesday, September 2, 1987. Applications and
information can be obtained from the Student Union Office (Room 234),
Mendenhall, 757-6611, ext. 210.
Zenith Data Systems introduces the eaZy pc
now available at great student prices!
You want easy to operate? You've got it! Because
with the eaZy pcr all you have to do is plug the
system in just like a TV. Once you turn it on, it
tells you exactly what to do, in plain English -
thanks to Microsoft's� MS-DOS Manager.
You'll be up and running within minutes after
opening the box. So you can do your homework.
Term papers. Research. And more. All with an
ease you've never before experienced.
Your coursework is difficult enough. So don't
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the eaZy pc� from Zenith Data Systems today!
PLUS-the eaZy pc " offers you all this
� A 14" monochrome monitor attached to a tilt
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� PC-compatibility runs virtually all important
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coursework.
�MM femm �"�' t�� ���� on PVCOMM
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1-800-237-7590
data
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THE OUAUTV GOES IN BEFORE THE NAME GOES ON
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Fri.
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Sun.
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Sun.
MonFri.
MonFri -
Mon & Wed.
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Sec.
Sun.
KonWedFri
Sun.
-
Me
t
Equi paenc
Memorial
MonThurs.
Fri.
Sec.
Sun.
L�Lli�
Lhiil
Reservecions can be made in person at 111
Courc reservecions are made one day in a
�re made on Friday for Sacurday, Sunday
��rson from 11:30 a.is. - 3:00 p.m. and
:



?

Mexican Restaurant f k flUNi
LUNCH SPECIALS $3.95
SERVED MONFRI.
11 AM TILL 3 PM
THERE ARE
BECOMING A Nl
And thJ
settled by the in
as a member o(
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earning a BSN, unto Anm Nut
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all member
a volleyball
n to a post-
��

SUN AMERICA
coupon
Tradition ot Innovation
am a
me contest
Only on Tuesdays
and Thursdays
PttfcTMAKES t
TAKJCACAfiEMjC.
The
Better
BalJ Point Pen 89
PILOT
.DENT STORES
Wright Building
ated bv East Carolina University.
type:
as easy
m your TV
il
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Compact high-capacity 3' 2 720K disk drives.
A complete personal computer system at a
great price . so its easy on your budget, too'
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-w� NAME GO�S "A
n
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1, 1987
17
College grid season opened in style
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
(AP! If the rest of the college
football season is anything like
theopener, it won't lack for excit-
ment.
There's no guestion the fans
and the television people got
their money's worth Iowa
Coach Hayden Fry said Sunday
after She fifth annual Kickoff
Classic and his team lost.
Seventeenth-ranked Tenessee
edged the No. 16Hawkeyes23-22
on three field goals by Phil Reich
in the final 12 minutes, including
a 20-yarder with three seconds
left.
Reich's field goals the first two
from 45 and 25 yards came on
Tennessee's last three posses-
sions after the Vols blew a 14-3
second-period lead and fell be-
hind 19-14 on Kevin Harmon's
second touchdown, a 20-yard run
off a double reverse late in the
third quarter.
Besides Reich, who also kicked
two extra points, Tenessee's late
heroics were produced by junior
quarterback Jeff Francis and re-
dshirt freshman tailback Reggie
Cobb, the game's most valuable
player with 138 yards on 25 car-
ries in his collegiate debut.
"We still have a long way to go,
but is was a great way to start the
season said Francis, who com-
pleted 11 of 23 passes for 151
yards and was 5-7-71 in helping


1
Intramural hours
lolormal Rec.rear.ion
Memorial Gymnasium
MonFri.
MonThurs
Frl.
Sac.
Sun.
12:00 noon -
4:00 p.m. -
3:00 p.m. -
11:00 a.m. -
12:00 noon -
1:30 p.m.
9:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
Weight: Rooum
Hemcrlal
4
i
i
�I
MonThurs
Fri.
Sac.
Sun.
HonThurs.
Fri.
Sun.
MonFri.
MonFri.
Mon & Wed.
Tu�� & Thurs.
Fri.
Sac.
Sun.
KonWedFrl
Sun.
MonThurs,
Frl.
Sac.
Sun.
Hinges
10:00 a . m. -
10:00 a.m. -
11:00 a.m. -
12:00 noon -
3:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
12:00 noon
9:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
9:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
Swimming Pools
.Memorial
Hinges
7:00 a.m. -
12:00 noon -
3:00 p.m. -
4:00 p.m. -
6:30 p.m. -
3:00 p.m. -
11:00 a. m. -
12:00 noon -
8:00 p.m.
12:00 noon
8:00 a.m
1:30 p
9:00
5:30
9:00
7:00
5:00
5:00
Equipacnc Check-out:
Memorial Gym 115
10:00 a.m. -
10:00 a.m. -
11:00 a.m. -
12:00 noon -
10:00 p.io
5:00 p.a
9:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
Uncqtiothull Courtjj
Reservacions can be made in person ac 115 Memorial Cya or by calling 757-6911.
Courc reservacions are made one day in advance Monday-Thursday. Reservacions
are made on Friday for Saturday, Sunday and Monday. Courcs may be reserved in
person from 11:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. and 12 noon - 3:00 p.m. by phone.
to set up Reich's field goals.
The final drive began at the
Tennessee 29 with 4:37 remain-
ing.
"I knew it was just a matter of
going out and executing
Francis said. "We'd been stop-
ping ourselves all game
Cobb carried 14 times on the
last three drives for 102 yards.
Reich kicked two field goals
and three extra points in the 1986
opener when Carlos Reveiz was
ineligible. Majors had put Reich
on scholarship just last
Wedensday.
Tennessee scored both its
touchdowns in the second period
on a 1-yard run by William
Howard and a stunning 96-yard
gallop by linebacker Darrin
Miller after he intercepted a
pitchout from Chuck Hirtlieb,
one of the three quarterbacks Fry
promised Iowa would use.
Besides Harmon's touch-
downs, Iowa's other points came
on field goals of 42, 27, and 42
yards and an extra point by Rob
Houghtlin. But the Hawkeyes
failed on a two-point conversion
pass by Dan McGwire following
Harmon's second touchdown
and that proved costly.
Tennessee seemed about to
break it open when Miller swiped
Hartlieb's pitchout and rambled
96 yards with 5:46 left in the sec-
ond period for 14-3 lead. The play
came on fourth down and capped
a maginificent goal-line stand in
which the Vols' suspect defense
turned Iowa back three times
from the 1-yard line.
Iowa started 6-foot-8 sopho-
more McGwire at quarterback
and he completed seven of 14
passes for 86 yards. Hartlieb, a
senior, replaced McGwire mid-
way through the second period
and was 10-of-17 for 129 yards.
Junior Tom Poholsky completed
five of 13 for 65 yards after taking
over last in the third quarter with
Iowa trailing 14-13.
i r
Gordon's Golf
and Ski Shop
264 Bypass
(Next to McDonald's)
206FF7etai7 onnew7!
i arrived Fall Apparel with i
this ad (Expires. 9-J 2-81 JJ
i
LUNCH SPECIALS $3.95
SERVED MONFRI.
11 AM TILL 3 PM
Bienvenidos
Amigos
Open 7 days for Lunch & Dinner
HUNGRY PIRATE SPECIAL $2 95
SERVED 2-5 DAILY
DINNER SPECIALS $5.95
INCLUDES DESSERT
SERVED SUN. THRU THURS
AFTER 5 PM
'
A
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
. not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. If you're
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713
Clifton, NJ 07015. Or call toll free 1-800-USA-ARMY.
ai� � �i ???���.i ,
N
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
PARKS DEPARTMENT
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED
The Greenville Recreation and Parks Department is
recruiting for 10-14 part-time soccer coaches for the
fall soccer program. Applicants must possess some
knowledge in soccer skills and have patience to
work with youth. Applicants must be able to coach
young people, ages 6-15 in soccer fundamentals.
Hours approximately 3-7 p.m. Monday thru Friday.
Some night and weekend coaching. Program will
extend from September 8 to mid November. Salary
rate is $3.46 per hour. Applicants will be accepted
starting August 20. Contact Ben James at
830-4543.
Don't Miss
the Poster Sale!
Imported from
London:
Rock, Pop, Punk,
and Movie Posters!
A t Mendenhall,
Sept. 1st and 2nd
9:30 a.m. - 5:00
p.m. -
Prices start at $3.00.
IWiovia
Economy
Checking
A Low-Cost Checking Account
That Costs Only $3 A Month.
With no mirurnum balance
requirement, Wachovia
Economy Checking is an
ideal account for students,
retirees, people with fixed
incomes, or anyone who
makes relatively few
monthly transactions.
A total of 12 monthly
withdrawals from your
account, either by check,
draft, or through Teller IP
costs you only $3 per month
Your cancelled checks
are recorded and retained
by Wachovia for safe-
keeping. Each month
you'll receive a complete
statement detailing your
account activity7.
Economy Checking is
just one of several check-
ing accounts Wachovia
offers. To find the one that's
right for you, stop by any
Wachovia office.
Wachovia
'Fifty cents will be charged for each withdrawal beyond 12 per monthly statement cycle As with all Wa -h
?,2&?l�accountsa fee �i 75ff " withdrawal and 50C per balance inquiry will be charged for all RelafJ'3
CIRRUS� transactions performed at automated teller machines operated by other participating financial
institutions.
Nri
1
J





18
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 1,1087
Andre Dawson loves the game during the day
(AP)- Andre Dawson is no fool.
Sometime last winter he looked at
the yearly numbers he compiled
over 10 seasons for the Montreal
Expos and concluded that Bill
Wrigley was right: baseball
should be played in the daytime.
But on Chicago's North Side,
the management of the Cubs was
not convinced.
"We were 70 and 90 last year
General Manager Dallas Green
said in the off-season. "Will
Dawson rum us to 90 and 70? I
doubt it
So Green spumed Dawson and
h'sagent, Dick Moss. Once spring
training camps opened, though,
Dawson and Moss made Green
an offer he couldn't refuse. "I'll
play for whatever you'll pay
they said in essence.
Green set the numbers at
$500,001) guaranteed with
$200,000 in possible bonuses.
Dawson took that instead of the
two-year, $2.2 million offer made
by Montreal. He had boon paid
$1.5 million in 1986 by The Expos,
the final year of a five-year con-
tract.
For $700,000, Dallas Green got
the bargain of the year.
Dawson leads the major
leagues with 43 homo runs and
115 runs batted in. He has seven
multi-homer games and is on a
pace to become the second Na-
tional Leaguer in 22 years to hit 50
or more homers. His manager
thinks he could be the league's
most valuable player. And five
months ago, no one wanted him.
Dawson averaged 23 home
Make
your
g mark
on the
world.
utfje Safit (Earoltntan

Dr. Dennis O'Neal
Optometrist
Jj is pleased to announce the
relocation of his practice of optometry to
Greenville Eye Clinic
Bldg. I, Doctors Park
Greenville. N.G. 27834
(past hospital on Stantonsburg Road)
in association with
Carl R. Wille, M.D. and William M.Monroe,
M.D.
Opthalmologists
Call for appointment.
758-4166 or 758-6600

r0V
y :
East Carolina University
Department of Intramural-Recreational
Services
1st Session Fitness Class
Registration Dates:
August 31 - September 4
Session Dates:
September 8 - October 16
Aerobics
Doys TimesLocations
1. Mon and Wed 4:00-5 00 pmMG 108 1
2. Mon and Wed 5:00-6 00 pmClement 1
3. Mon and Wed 5:15-6:15 pmMG 108 1
4. Tues and Th 6:45-745 amMG 108 !
5. Tues and Th 4:00-500 pmMG 108 1
6. Tues and Th 5:00-600 pmFletcher j
7. Tues and Th 5:15-6:15 pmMG 108 1
8. Tues and Th 6:30-7:30 pm (Low Impact1 MG 108 i
9. Fri 4:00-5:00 pmMG 108 1
10. Fri 5:15-6:15 pmMG 108 I
11. Sat 1:00-2:00 pmMG 108 1
12. Sun 3:00-400 pmMG 108 I
Toning
13. Mon and Wed 3:00 4:00 pmMG 108 1
14. Tues and Th 3:00-4:00 pmMG 108 1
15. Tues and Th 5:30-6 30 pmMG 112 1
16. Sat 1 2:00 noon-1:00 pmMG 108 !
Aquarobics
17. Tues and Th 5:30-630 pmMG Pool
Cow per session (12 classes): $10.00 - Students. $20.00 -Faculty-Staff 1
SUPRA CLASS
An innovative 90 minute workout incorporating weights aslight resistonce j
?or muscular strength and endurance, in addition to a 30 mmute oerobic '
component Registration is required and sessions are the same as all other
fitness dosses. Cost per session (12 classes) is $15 00-students and $20 00
staH.
Moo ami Wed 630-800 pmMG 108
Sat 10:30-12:00 noonMG 108
204 Memorial Gym 9a.m. - 4 p.m.
Questions: 757-6387
runs and 84 RBI per season in
Montreal with a .280 average. He
was a star, but not as big a one as
some expected. But Dawson
knew what the numbers looked
like dissected.
From 1980 to 1986, he batted
318 in day games, .268 at night.
During his final three seasons
in Montreal, he batted .303 with
33 homers in 555 at-bats during
the day. At night, he hit .239 with
27 homers in 1,003 at-bats.
"1 can't explain that Dawson
said. 'There are certain things
you can't explain. It seems every-
one sees the ball better during the
day, but you also have shadows
and glare during the day and
trouble picking up the ball. You
don't have that at night
He knew what he had to do and
that was to get himself to Wrigley
Field. It was there where Dawson
had his only three-homer game
as an Expo, on Sept. 24, 1985.
Dawson's superior perform-
ance in the afternoon has contin-
ued this year. He is batting .324
WE BUILT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
SAV A CENTER
FOOD MARKETS
Tht freshest w.jy toS.w
with 31 homers and 81 RBl'sin79
days games, .238 with 12 homers
and 34 RBI in 43 road games at
night.
Last winter, the Cubs said they
weren't all that interseted in
Dawson. Other major leagues
clubs said the same, not just about
Dawson, but about Tim Raines,
Jack Morris, Bob Horner, Rich
Gedman and Ron Guidry, the
other premier free agents.
The lack of interest prompted
the player's union to file a griev-
ance against the owners, charg-
ing collusion. The union did the
same a year earlier, and the deci-
sion on that grievance is expected
today.
Dawson and Lance Parnsh are
the only premier free agents to
have changed clubs since 1985.
Both did so for less money.
Dawson made the correct deci-
sion for himself. He already has
exceeded his career bests. But
most major league clubs have to
wonder it they made the right
decision in showing the free
agents.
STOP
WttMNMp
' "l Vcxum u�-
DAZE
SALE
FUNK & WAGNALL'S
NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA
Latest
Edition
Volume 1
only. . .
90
with S5
purchasi
Volumes 2-29 only $4.99 ea.
��� 2 4o� th� t -x r opd a
MARKET FRESH
Ground
5 lbs or
more
Beef
LUJ . M!T TWO WITH AN ADO L $10 OR MORE PURCH
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l. i PET ASSORTED
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rj LIMIT TWO WITH ADD L S'O OR MORE PURCH
CHUNK LIGHT TUNA � M Oil OR WATER
Chicken of 2 4QO
the Sea l 1
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LIMIT ONE OF YOUR CHOICE WITH AN ADD L
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Shortening in 1
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VAN I AMP S
FLAV 0 RICH MVD � LT � BUTTtF-V . - I E AN N ME AT � PORK
1-00 M.Ik 1.00 Riblets
SHEDOS SPREAD MINI
r-i � f oncuu a 31-mmu m� THIN TRIM � TAILl ESS
BeaneeWeenee 2 1.00 Banquet Dinners "Wv 1.00 Country Crock 2 .U 1.00 T-Bone Steaks
BOTTEH ME NOT .M,L. �Al K ;�Ei,H FqrER
3.00 A&P Biscuits 2 S 100 Leg Quarters 2
fcA. OR AH i.
Pet Milk
VARIETY TEMPTING TOPPING
2 , 1.00 Torino's Pizza 2 "ST"
NORTHERN
Bath Tissue
ASSORTED
4 1.00 Dole Juice
SHEDDS SPREAD YOUNG N TENDER
1.00 Classic Quarters3 1.00 Cornish Hens
J 'OUNGN TENDER-GRADE A FRYER
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6E3 THIN TRM T0P 0R BOTTOM BONELESS
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4.00
1.00
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" Eight
O'Clock
�MONTEREY SNOW WHlfE
W Fresh
Mushrooms
Limit One Wilt- An Add I $10 Or Mc�e Purah
DAINTY
Lobster
Tails
1 5 lbs
ea
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White Potatoes � 1.00 Green Onions 3 s 1.00
3 , 1.00
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Tomatoes
TROPICAL DELIGHT
1.00 Kiwi Fruit
6 non refundable SELECT MEDIUM
hotties Yellow Onions
O CALIFORNIA GREEN
tS 1.00 Peppers 3 1.00
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Money
Orders
$2.00
TANGY DAILY BRAND WILD
Florida Limes 8 i� 1.00 Bird Seed
h 1.00
25
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double coupons
SEE
STORE F '
DETAILS
f ftlCfcS EFFECTIVE AUG. 30, THRl Qfc. 5.1987 - OPEN ALL DAY LABOR DAY SfcFI.
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Opan 24 Hours-Opan Mon. 7 a.m Ctosad Sat. 11 p.m Open Sun. 7 am11 p.m.
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18
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 1,1W
Andre Dawson loves the game during the day
(AP)-Andre Dawson is no fool.
Sometime last winter he looked at
the yearly numbers he compiled
over 10 seasons for the Montreal
Expos and concluded that Bill
Wrigley was right: baseball
should be played in the daytime.
But on Chicago's North Side,
the management of the Cubs was
not convinced.
"We were 70 and 90 last year
General Manager Dallas Green
said in the off-season. "Will
Dawson tum us to 90 and 70? 1
doubt it
So Green spumed Dawson and
hisagent, Dick Moss. Once spring
training camps opened, though,
Dawson and Moss made Green
an offer he couldn't refuse. "I'll
play for whatever you'll pay
they said in essence.
Green set the numbers at
$500,001) guaranteed with
$200,000 in possible bonuses.
Dawson took that instead of the
two-year, $2.2 million offer made
by Montreal. He had been paid
$1.5 million in 1986 by The Expos,
the final year of a five-year con-
tract.
For $700,000, Dallas Green got
the bargain ofthe year.
Dawson leads the major
leagues with 43 home runs and
115 runs batted in. He has seven
multi-homer games and is on a
pace to become the second Na-
tional Leaguer in 22 years to hit 50
or more homers. His manager
thinks he could be the league's
most valuable player. And five
months ago, no one wanted him.
Dawson averaged 23 home
Make
your
mark
on the
world.
GJI?� �afit (Uaroltnian
Dr. Dennis O'Neal
Optometrist
is pleased to announce the
relocation of his practice of optometry
to
Greenville Eye Clinic
Bldg. I, Doctors Park
Greenville. N.C. 27834
(past hospital on Stantonsburg Road)
in association with
Carl R. Wille, M.D. and William M. Monroe,
M.D.
Opthalmologists
Call for appointment.
758-4166 or 758-6600
East Carolina University
Department of Intramural-Recreational
Services
1st Session Fitness Class
Registration Dates:
August 31 - September 4
Session Dates:
September 8 - October 16
Aerobics
Times Locations
4:00-5:00 pm MG 108
5:00-6:00 pm Clement
5:15-6:15 pm MG 108
6:45-7:45 am MG 108
400-5.00 pm MG 108
500-600 pm Fletcher
515-615 pm MG 108
6.30-7 30 pm (Low Impact) MG 108
4:00-5:00 pm MG 1 08
5:15-615 pm MG 108
1:00-2:00 pm MG 108
3:00-400 pm MG 108
Toning
3:00-4:00 pm MG 108
300-4:00 pm MG 108
5:30-6 30 pm MG112
12:00 noon-1:00 pm MG 108
Aquarobics
17. Tues and Th 5:30-6:30 pm MG Pool
Com per session (12 classes): $10.00 - Students.$20.00 - Faculty-Staff
SUPRA CLASS
An innovative 90 minute workout incorporating weights as light resistance
for muscular strength and endurance, m oddifion to a 30 minute aerobic
component. Registration is required and sessions are the same as all other
fitness classes. Cost per session (12 classes) is15 00-students and $20 00
staff
Mon and Wed 630-8 00 pm MG 108
Sot 10:3012:00 noon MG 108
204 Memorial Gym 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Questions. 757-6387
Days
1. Mon and Wed
2. Mon and Wed
3. Mon and Wed
4. Tues and Th
5. Tues and Th
6. Tues and Th
7. Tues and Th
8. Tues and Th
9. Fri
10. Fri
11. Sat
12. Sun
13. Mon and Wed
14. Tues and Th
15. Tues and Th
16. Sat
runs and 84 RBI per season in
Montreal with a .280 average. He
was a star, but not as big a one as
some expected. But Dawson
knew what the numbers looked
like dissected.
From 1980 to 1986, he batted
318 in day games, .268 at night.
During his final three seasons
in Montreal, he batted .303 with
33 homers in 555 at-bats during
the day. At night, he hit .239 with
27 homers in 1,003 at-bats.
"I can't explain that Dawson
said. 'There are certain things
you can't explain. It seems every-
one sees the ball better during the
day, but you also havo shadows
and glare during the day and
trouble picking up the ball. You
don't have that at night
He knew what he had to do and
that was to get himself to Wrigley
Field. It was there where Dawson
had his only three-homer game
as an Expo, on Sept. 24,1985.
Dawson's superior perform-
ance in the afternoon has contin-
ued this year. He is batting .324
WE BUILT
A PROUD
NEW
FEELING
SAV A CENTER
with 31 homersand81 RBI'sin79
days games, .238 with 12 homers
and 34 RBI in 43 road games at
night.
Last winter, the Cubs said they
weren't all that interseted in
Dawson. Other major leagues
clubs said the same, not just about
Dawson, but about Tim Raines,
Jack Morris, Bob Homer, Rich
Gedman and Ron Guidry, the
other premier free agents.
The lack of interest prompted
the player's union to file a griev-
ance against the owners, charg-
ing collusion. The union did the
same a year earlier, and the deci-
sion on that grievance isexpected
today.
Dawson and Lance Parnsh are
the only premier free agents to
have changed clubs since 1985.
Both did so for less money.
Dawson made the correct deci-
sion for himself. He already has
exceeded his career bests. But
most major league clubs have to
wonder if they made the right
decision in showing the free
agents.
STOP
DAZE
wy SALE
FUNK &WAGN ALL'S
NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA
FOOD MARKETS
The fr&shest w.jy fo S.n i
Latest
Edition
Volume 1
only. . .
90
with S5
purchas
Volumes 2-29 only $4.99 ea.
MARKET FRESH
'� "M i r neon
� Ground
5 lbs or
more
Uj '� rWO WITH AN ADD L $10 OR MORE PURCH
Brawny 2 400
Towels Cl
�jA JMT 0NE WTH AN ADD L $10 OR MORE PI �� H
" Del Monte A
Catsup V OOp
I PET ASSORTED
Ice
Cream �
LIMIT TWO WITH ADD L $10 OR MORE PURCH
CHUNK LIGHT TUNA � IN OIL OR WATER
Chicken of 2 jnn
the Sea S I00
LMT ONE �'� FH MH M5C L$100RM - : - ��
W Duke's -n
Mayonnaise 178
LIMIT ONE OF YOUR CHOICE WITH AN ADD L
I1. J $10 OR MORE PURCH � A&P BRAND $1 28
THIN TRIM � TOP ROUND
London
Broil
J YOUNG N TENDER � GRADE A FRYER
LUCKY I t Ah
Apple Juice
VAN i AMP S
LOOK FiT
1.00 Ice Milk
"Crisco Aft
Shortening 3J low
FlAVORlCHHVD-r -BUTTERMILK LEAN N ME AT v PORK
9 1.00 Milk 1.00 Riblets , 1.00
Quarters 100
J THIN TRIM TOP OR BOTTOM BONELESS
Round 50Q
mm
SHEDDS SPREAD MINI
Beanee Weenee 2 ,1.00 Banquet Dinners " 1.00 Country Crock 2 U 1.00 T-BoneSteaks 4.00
FftMLY �ACk FRESH FRYER
tA. OHATFI)
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NORTHERN
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2 1.00 Totinos Pizza2,i�'
ASSORTED
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� 1.00
SHEDDS SPREAD YOUNG NTENDER
ca- 1.00 Classic Quarters3 1.00 Cornish Hens
BEAN COFFEE
W Eight
O'Clock
-jlp-MONTEREY SNOW WHITE
W Fresh
Mushrooms
Limit One With An Ada I $10 6' Moi
us �� c LOCALLY GROWN
White Potatoes SJ 1.00 Green Onions 3 . 1.00
RED RIPE FAMILY PACK TROPICAL DELIGHT
Tomatoes X 1.00 Kiwi Fruit 3 1.00
6 non refundable SELECT MEDIUM � CALIFORNIA GREEN
bo�ties Yellow Onions �� 1.00 Peppers
Mountain Dew
$2.00
TANGY DAILY BRAND WILD
Florida Limes 8 �� 1.00 Bird Seed
3 - 1.00
tS 1.00
AMERICAN EXPRESS
Money
Orders
25
( SUPER COUPON );
CENTER
HOMOGENIZED
Flav-O-Rich
I L�M One Pe- Shopper With An Additional HO 0C O'
Mce Puichas- C � r c�� '087
SUPER COUPON w
vSAVA
CENTER
Sandwich
Bread
Limit One Pe' Shopper With An Additional S'O 00 O?
Mo-e Purchase Coupon Expires Sept 5 '98?
DOUBLE COUPONS
SEE
STORC '
DETAILS
SlCbS EFFECTIVE AUG. 30, THRl .tt 5.1987 � OPEN ALL DAY LABOR DAY SfcH I.
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Opan 24 Hours-Opan Mon. 7 a.m Closad Sat. 11 p.m Open Sun. 7 am11 p.m.
A
4

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Title
The East Carolinian, September 1, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 01, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.554
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57909
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