The East Carolinian, August 27, 1987






INSIDE
Editorials4
EntertainmentM 10
Sports15
Classifieds6
ENTERTAINMENT
Old monster movies remembered in new flick � See
ENTERTAINMENT, page 10.
SPORTS
Offensive coordinator talks about the Pirate attack
See SPORTS,page 15.
She iEaat (Eawltman
Serving (he I a.siurolma campus community since IV25
ol. ri2 No. 2
Thursday, August 27, 1983
Greenville, NC
ISPages
Circulation 12,000
"They're int had kids
ECU cagers arrested for thefts in Scott hall
By( I -A HI WIIAKPT
An E I has
Edwards, and I
arrested Wed
thefts that , i
Christmas I �
arrest ol a I
A pre-
News Bureau sa
and 1 r.i. vClavl
breakin. i i I
ing in estij
saferv The:
in Brooklyn,
custody by Wed
The three :
pearance in d
Police . hiel �
the crimes r
stereos, can
assorted iti ms. S
$785 worth ol th
A statem nl �
Eakin said, I
ayei rheodore "Blue"
former teammates were
noctii n w ith a series of
u R� idencc 1 lall over
have been issued tor the
i by the ECU
Is ohn aron Williams
� irrested on hargesof
em as j- irt ol a eontinu-
: : artment of public
ard i lliot Brown, lives
;d not been taken into
�ht.
. ' make their first ap-
l m. toda .
-aid in the release that
the theft of $5,729 in
ilculators and other
r have recovered
ancellor Richard R.
news that three
ECU students and one former student have been
charged in connection with thefts from student
rooms in a university residence hall Since the al-
leged crimes occured on university property, the
student judicial system will be charged with the
responsiblity of determining whether the students
involved have violated provisions of the Student
Code ot Conduct
ECU Athletic Director Ken Karr released a state-
ment noting the arrests and saying the athletic de-
partment would have no comment until the legal
system dealt with the matters.
Mike Steele, entering his tirst year as head coach of
the basketball team, said Edwards' future with the
team was uncertain. "It's now a matter of what the
courts decide, or campus security, or whoever
makes the final decision Steele said in a phone
interview Wednesday night.
"1 was looking forward to Blue's senior year, and
1 still look forward to it he said. Steele said he had
been depending on Edwards to bring experience
and leadership to this year's Pirate squad.
"It's unfortunate it happened he said. "It's un-
fortunate it came up now whin it happened at
Christmas
Former coach Charlie 1 tarrison, who recruited the
lour men for the basketball program, said he was
hurt by the news.
"When this initially started back in January, all the
team membersassured me they were not involved in
any such activities I' irnson said. "It (thearrests)
hurts me deeply. These people arc like my family. If
one of our family gets in trouble it hurts, but 1 want
them to understand it not only hurts me and it hurts
their families, but it hurts all ot the other people
involved
Harrison said he was embarrassed tor the school
and the athletes, and that he wished them both the
best ot luck. lk said he hoped the men that were
charged would learn from their mistakes.
"As an athlete you're in a fishbowl, and that's one
of the first things I always tell people when thev
come on campus he said. "1 told them there were
three things 1 couldn't help them with number
one if they didn't go to class and in class it they
cheated; number two if they were caught doing
something against the law; number three if thev lied
to me I couldn't help them. I am still trving to help
these kids as much as I can
1 larnson said the incident could be responsible tor
Career planning helps students
Bv llV
IGI
The ECU -planning center is not
just tor soon to be graduating
seniors, ac I fficials
there.
Althoug �
seniors S1
their spe� ifi I
nccntrah
adv
al to
it in
also
and
;ard-
t
Jim estm i I the assis-
tant dire, tor to I ur
ages an i m innine
tlu ir . are r and ting ir
May rjunel i I �
ister with tl - m as
possible Bj registerii I .dent
will be pi iced on a m .
and receive a monthh i bcu Ic
listing jobs that an be written for
directly and a listii j ol compa-
nies conducting rvicvvs on
campus. The first interviews be-
gin October 6, and students must
be registered before then to be
eligible to participate in the inter-
views.
The registration packet con-
sists of instructions, basic data,
cards listing job ,md location
preferences, three reference
forms and a samph resume.
Furney lames, the center's di-
rector said, 'The job prospects
look good because the economy
is fairlv good. It is up to the stu-
dents to take adva ntace (t what is
laid out before them. Although
the market is competitive, stu-
dents can always maintain the
edge bv being' prepared and
knowing exactly what's out
there
The center receives calls daily
trom companies needing em-
ployees. "This is probable the
only time students will have the
advantage oi an employer com
ing to them. If students don't
register however, then we can't
help them said lames.
Assistance is also offered in
resume and interviewing work-
shops, which the center adver-
tises in The East Carolinian's
announcements. Individual ap
pointments may be made to prac-
tice interviewing on video-tape.
Other specialized workshops are
offered and class or group pres-
entations may include topics
from other career-related areas.
The center also offers informa-
tion on many businesses, school
systems, and governmental
agencies and is arranged in three
rooms on a self-service basis. The
literature is organized and de-
signed to help with career deci-
sions and the career planning
process. There are also brochures
from various MBA, Law, or
graduate schools. Free handouts
and magazines which help on
resume development and typical
interview questions.
John Will
game earl
basketbal
iams, left, with ball, and Theodore "Blue" Edwards, with his back turned, practice their
icr this year with an unidentified coach. The two were among four current and former Pirate
1 players arrested Wednesday for theft.
the team's slide last year after n taring I a 7-2 record
before Christmas The learn lost 14 ot the 19 panics
remaining after the bn ik
"I'm leaving kn tving t it il something like this
hadn't happened, last si as �n might have been bet-
ter. o one i ould ever i ore, in e mi- that this didn't
affect the erratic performance (of the team) down the
stretch last year he said.
1 larnson said he wanted to make sure people
understood one thing "I think i the three kids that
are hen on campus now, they're not bad people,
they're not bad kids he said "They just did a bad
thing
"1 hey just made a mistake Its not like travelling
or double dribbling or making a mistake on the
basketball court thi se are rules for society and eve-
rybody has to abide bv them
"It thev don't, they have to pay the consequences
and hopefully learn from it and not ever get remotely
involved in something like that again he said.
Brown and Williams were both i barged with five
counts of breaking, entering ind larceny, while King
was charged with tour counts and Edwards with
three.
Co-op works to
help find jobs
By TOM PAIGE
Sum Wrilrr
The financial pressures of col-
lege toda) are forcing more and
more students to work to support
their education.
lhat task isn't as easy as it
seems in Greenville a college
town ii over 15,000 students,
many of whom seek employ-
ment. The ECU Cooperative
Education department is de-
signed to help students find those
jobs.
Co-op integrates classroom
study with employment and is
based on the principal that going
into the job market with practical
experience is a must these days.
In the Co-op program students
work with advisors to plan their
See CO-OP, P. 8
ECU gets good chunk of budget pie
By CLAY HI-ANHARDT
ECU got it's fair share of money
in this year's state budget, accord-
ing to Representative Ed Warren,
D-I'itt.
Warren, who chairs the Appro-
priations Base Budget Committee
on Education, said the $13.5 mil-
lion ECU received in the last days
of the legislative session were
well deserved.
"All this money is desperately
needed for our gro wing painsand
it's just appropriate that we have
these funds and they are ear-
marked for certain projects
Warren said in a telephone inter-
view on Wednesday.
These funds include $4.2 mil-
lion to complete the renovation of
the third floor of the Brodv Medi-
cal School Sciences Building;
$4,425 million to complete the
Sports Medical Building; $4.7
million over two years to link
ECU with the University of North
Carolina microelectronics center,
and $350,000 to plan an Eastern
North Carolina Center for Re-
gional Advancement at ECU.
The center is a pet project of
Warren's, who says he sees it serv-
ing like the McKimmon center at
North Carolina State University
Changes slow construction
of unnamed class building
The new classroom
fountain outside th
building is still u
e main building.
t ,V t il
ncompleted, and unnamed. Here some men are working on a
Structural changes have de-
ayed the opening of the new
general purpose classroom
building on campus.
The building, originally sched-
uled to be completed this month,
has been rescheduled to open for
the 1988 spring semester.
"There were a lot of good rea-
sons (for the delay) said James
Lowry, director of the Physical
plant.
"It's a very complicated build-
ing all the way through and there
were a number of changes that
had to be made and requests for
changes he said.
The 160,000 sq. ft. building is
being constructed to accomodate
the lack of available space on
campus, as it will house 65 class-
rooms and laboratories and 180
faculty offices.
"We'll begin bringing in mov-
able equipment in November
and professors will be moving in
their personal belongings
through December and the first
couple of days in January
Lowry said.
"Surely, we hope for every-
thing to open up in the spring
he added.
The $1.5 million structure will
be the largest building on campus
and as of yet remains unnamed.
and the Ramsey Center at West-
ern Carolina.
"The regional center will be our
next big project Warren said.
"We will need to secure funds for
it in the future. This will be our
major project tor all of eastern
North Carolina
Warren said the building proj-
ect, which is entering the second
phase of planning, could ulti-
mately cost as much as $15 mil-
lion.
After the center is built, Warren
said he sees the next major project
for the university dealing with the
ECU library I le said he could
forsee expanding the present li-
brary sometime in the future, but
that it wasn't totally in his hands.
"It is up to theb ird of trustees to
make that determination of what
they would like (to work on
next) he said.
"1 think it (the appropriation)
speaks well ot the chancellor and
the board in their planning ot
these programs Warren said.
'These added facilities will en-
hance our total program for not
only the region, but the whole
state
A 1952 graduate of ECU, War-
ren said he enjoys the relationship
he has with the university. "I for
one plan to continue to see that we
get our fai r share of the University
Board of Governor's budget he
said.
I
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A






INSID1
l ditoi
I nterl
Spoi ts.
C las- ;
"77
.4
10
is
6
IN II KIAINMI NI
Old monster movies remembered in now 11 it. k
I I I K I IMI I , pare 10.
See
SPORTS
Offensive coordinator talks about the Pirate atta k
See SPOR fS,page 15.
OJIte iEaat (Eamltman
( irnnnnil ' 'ii t'
1 huisdas .
(r.
'�
wmm hhi
I kids
E( I cagers arrested for thefts in Scott hall
Ca
ng helps students
E rri ;iri1
works to
help find jobs
" w ith Kill an I I hei
ic two w i'ie am



1
.
1:

EC(7 gete good chunk of budget pie
Ml KI.

;
i m ludi : I
u tin rentvation

niversil
ia nun
plan
u na : � : � �
is a pel ; �
-
- � Mi Kimn
th irolina State L'nivei l
Changes slow construction
of unnamed class building
modati
� iral changes have dt being constructi it
I I pening ol the new the lack of ava
cral purpose classroom campus as it will house fo da
ling on campus. rooms and laboratories and 1
rhebuilding originally sched faculty offices,
ulcd to be completed tin - month, "We'll begin bi inging in m
na hi i ii r
the 1988
�d to open tor
pnng semester.
I here were a lot of good rea
able equipment in Novembt
and professors u ill be n
thrir personal bel .
sons (for the delay) said lames through Decembei and th
said
� � arren
�jrpi

:
�it li-
piw nat
rk on
he new i las iroo
fountain outsid
r �'
� is still uncompleted
uilding.
and unnamed. Here some men are working on a
Lovvry, dire tor ol the I'ln sical
plant
It s ,i ver complicated build-
ing all tin- way through and there
were a number of changes that
had to be made and requests for
i hanges he said
couple ol da) s in lanuan,
1 ow ry snd.
"Sureh. w e hope foi i
thing to open up in the spi �
he added
rhe S! 5 million stru ture will
be the largest building on campus
he loO.OOd sq tt building is and as of yet remains unnamed
It i- iij
m.iK �
Ihev
' �
� ' i � priation
planning ol
Warren said
ties will en
� � program tor not
but the whole
A : � � luateof ECl War
rensaidheenj the relationship
he has itii l � � ersiry 1 tor
one plan to continue to see that we
pet our fairsharcol the Universit
Board ol . !o . mor s budget he
said
V





THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 27, 1987


��f,j

Board of Governors approves funding
(AP)-Efforts by high ranking
legislators to channel more than
$3 million in planning funds to
particular University of North
Carolina campuses have drawn
little criticism although the law-
makers circumvented the UNC
Hoard of Governors.
Of the UNC system's $118 mil-
lion capital budget for 1987-89,
$3.28 million was approved by
the General Assembly to plan
projects on campuses in Chapel
Hill, Raleigh, Boone, Greenville,
Asheville and Charlotte.
The Board of Governors was
created in 1972 in part to stem the
bickering among individual
campuses and to curb a tendency
tor traditionally white campuses
to receive more money than tra-
ditionally black institutions.
1 low ever, none of the eight proj-
ects recommended by legislators
include the system's five histori-
cally black campuses.
L. Felix Joyner, UNC's vice
president for finance, told The
News and Observer of Raleigh he
was not concerned about how the
various projects had made their
way into the UNC budget as long
as lawmakers did not try to
change the role of an institution.
"If a legislator appropriated
funds for a new law school at
Pembroke State, I'd be con-
cerned, " Joyner said. "But for
facilities where the mission of the
university is not concerned, 1 just
don't find any great problem
For the most part, lawmakers
have let the board orchestrate the
growth of the UNC system's 16
campuses. But in recent years
some have skirted the board by
seeking money for programs to
benefit their favored institutions.
Some university officials have
warned that such maneuvering
undermines the Board of Gover-
nors' ability to plan. Some law-
makers, however, claim they are
more in touch with the various
campus's needs than are board
members.
Under the lawmakers' recom-
mendations, UNC-Chapel Hill
was granted $450,000 to plan a
performing arts center and
$150,000 to plan a new building
for the School of Social Work. The
performing arts center was pro-
posed by Sen. Ken Royall, D-
Durham, and the social work
building was proposed by Sen.
Aaron Tlyler, D-Union, co-chair-
man of the Appropriations
Committee.
North Carolina State was
granted $640,000 to plan an engi-
neering graduate research center,
which had been suggested by
Royall and Rep. Wendell
Murphy, D-Duplin. Also at
NCSU, $400,000 was appropri-
ated to plan renovations of Scott
I lall, the university's poultry
center.
Rep. Martin Nesbitt, D-Bun-
combe, said the budget process
was most effective when legisla-
tors collaborated with the Board
of Governors.
"I think what works best is a
combination of the two said
Nesbitt, a member of the
legislature's powerful budget
"superb" committee. "We all
have to realize the buck stops
with the legislature. It'sourjobto
allocate the money. The state
Constitution says that it is our
responsiblilty, and you can only
pass that responsibility on to
groups like the Board of Cover
nors somewhat sparingly
Nebitt said projects for tradi-
tionally black schools would be
funded in coming years. He said
that in the 1985-87 budget law-
makers approved about $20 mil-
lion in capital projects for black
schools.
Mickey L. Burnim, vice chan-
cellor for academic affairs at N.C.
Central University, a predomi-
nantly black campus in Durham,
said he felt the budgeting process
worked fairly well.
"Occasionally you will have
legislators who are trying to get
some special project for the insti-
tution in their particular district
Burnim said. "I hope and this is
my personal hope that that sort
of thing won't become the rule of
operation of the university
Other money approved for
planning purposes included
$300,000 for renovation of the
varsity gym at Applachian State
University in Boone; $350,000 for
a Center for Regional Advance-
ment at East Carolina University
in Greenville; $500,000 for a con
ference center at UNC-Asheville,
and $490,(XX) for an applied re
search facility at UNC-Charlotte
'Money' selects UNC-C as one of the top ten
deals among nation's universities
(AP)-Monev magazine has se-
lected the University of North
Carolina at Charlotte and Fur-
man University in Greenville,
S.C as two of the nation's best
college bargins.
The two colleges are profiled
with eight other instutions in
MONEY's September issue in an
article titiled "10 Great Tuition
Deal for Your Dollars
North Carolina is building
another great state institution at
Charlotte the magazine says of
UNCC
It pronounces UNCC "strong-
est in prepofessional depart-
ments such as accounting, archi-
tecture, business and engineer-
ing, though history also rates a
rave
With a total annual cost of
$2,934 for N.C. residents and
$5,780 for out-of-staters, UNCC
is least expense of10. schools
listed Furman's total cost is
$10,642.
MONEY gives Furman credit
tor its faculty emphasis on teach-
ing over research. Describing the
Furman student work load as
"heavy the magazine lists as
standout departments chemistry,
economics, history, music, politi-
cal science and psychology.
MONEY surveyed education
associations, high school guid-
ancecounselorsand professorsof
higher education to make its
choices, the article says. The
magazine looked for schools that
emphasize a liberal education not
technical or career training.
UNCC Chancellor E.K.
Fretweel Jr. carried a copy of the
magazine in his pocket Monday.
The university, he said, has
"broken into the relatively small
number of institutions that get

The
ast Carolinian,
ride,
otivation,
xperience,
riends.
Appiy today.
national attention for positive than 11,000, UNCC turned away
things qualified students this year to
With an enrollment of more avoid overenrollmcnt.
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Khadafy
' s' Libya's leader Moam
"?? Kha br) has given leftist
L s campus groups $300,000 to
turn innocent young students
away from their parents and to
turn America bark into the
�' thing auldron of disrespect
and the late sixties a
reo � fui :raising letter signed
�) ' ge Republican a
u � ' i mmittee (CR'C)
claims
I
tntidote to the problem.
roftheletti r aid,waste
� totheCollegeRepub-
11 � � � ips that suppos
I the money, as well as the
i department, deny
is tunneled money to any
Ami ri( an college grou;
that the F
� ort to lies to discredit
rganization is about
: nn Woerhle of Witm
ine of ti, lenti-
' I thelettera
in entral America
Bill Pierce of the U s
D� partment said th r
dence Khadafy dor
to leltlt Coll(
After che - rds
moreo i r
publicans I
Reeves
i �rn r natil
the political
Carolina
campaign
Minoradrl
but other. I
ment
His succi
said the kt
more suc
though he
much n
manv li
wh
whi � ' '
in
1 e Ke-
� . kton
he is unsure the
group ��� uld officially claim
ownership . ; the letter
! he Kft r stamped "Confiden-
tial Re �� tells readers V
- attempting to over-
throw that country's Sandimsta
government are ill-equiped
demoralized and si klj but con-
tinue to fight brave!) aga
minj Ids ftl n i
the C i ntras, tad, the
ntinues, communism
ad through Central
� the United States
Gn i � such as Witness for
eand C1SPES (Committee in
5 lidarity with the People of El
Sal � i '� � the letter states, are
working to disrupt U.S. cam-
puses like they did during Viet-
nam and hope to "turn innocent
young students away from their
parents and grandparents
The letter is signed by David
Miner, the College Republican s
overwhel
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 27, 1987
ding
lb ana
k e chan
rit ,
predomi
Purham

the ii
iu iniMS
that sort
operation of the university
Other money approved for
planning purposes included
- � 00 tor renovation of the
arsit gymal ApplachianState
I niversity in Boone; $350,000 for
.1enter tor Regional Advance-
ment at East Carolina University
room lllo S1 tX tor a con-
ference center at I NC Asheville;
,d $490,000 tor an applied re-
search facility at I v charlotte.
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Khadafy reportedly funds college leftists
(C PS) Libya's leader Moam-
mar Khadafy has given leftist
I s campus groups $300,000 to
"turn innocent young students
away from their parents" and to
turn America back into the
seething cauldron of disrespect
and violence of the late sixties a
recent fundraising letter signed
by the College Republican Na-
tional Committee (CRNC)
claims.
The antidote to the problem,
the signer of the letter said, was to
give money to the College Repub-
licans
The groups that supposedly
received the money, as well as the
l .S. State Department, deny
I ibya has tunneled money to any
American college groups.
"It's lamentable that the Right
lias to resort to lies to discredit
what our organization isaoout
said Ann Woerhle of Witness for
Peace, one ot the groups identi-
fied in the letter as opposing U.S.
policy in Central America.
Bill Pierce of the U.S. State
Department said there's no evi-
dence Khadafy donated money
to lei list college groups.
Alter checking his records.
moreover, current College Re-
publicans Chairman Stockton
Reeves said he is unsure the
group would officially claim
ownership of the letter.
I he letter, stamped "Confiden-
tial Report tells readers Nicara-
guan rebels attempting to over-
throw that country's Sandinista
government are ill-equiped,
demoralized and sickly, but con-
tinue to fight bravely against
overwhelming odds. If the rebels,
known as the Contras, fail, the
letter continues, communism
will spread through Central
America to the United States.
Croups such as Witness for
Peace and CISPES (Committee in
Solidarity with the People of El
Salvador), the letter states, are
working to disrupt U.S. cam-
puses ' hke they did during Viet-
nam and hope to "turn innocent
young students away from their
parents and grandparents
1 he letter is signed bv David
Miner, the College Republican's
former national chairman, now
the political director of the North
Carolina Jack Kemp for President
campaign.
Minor admits writing the letter,
but otherwise refused to com-
ment
His successor, Reeves, a Uni-
versity of Florida student, at first
said the letter "was one of our
more successful fundraisers
though he would not say how
much money it attracted, how
many letters were mailed, or to
whom they were sent. "I'm not in
a position to say
Reeves said he didn't know
where Miner got his information,
"but if David put it in the letter,
then I know it's true
In a subsequent interview,
however, Reeves said the letter
was not written by the CRNC. "It
doesn't sound like our style.
We're more conservative, and
this sounds like such a wild
plav
But, he added, "I don't know
what happened under David
(Miner's tenure)
The groups Miner named
blasted the letter.
"We've been publicly accused
of having ties to Khadafv, the
PLO, the IRA, you name it said
Woerhle. "It's not true. These are
just attempts to discredit our
group
'This is not the first time the
Right has fabricated a story said
Angela Sanbrano, CISPES' na-
tional coordinator. "It legitimizes
what they say by getting them a
lot of publicity they later use for
fundraising
Especially offended by the let-
ter was the Friends of the Demo-
VERIFICATION
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cratic Center in Central America,
which, in fact, supports limited
U.S. aid to the Contras.
But the group believes U.S.
assistance to the Contras must be
tied to civilian control over the
rebel military, greater respect for
human rights and diplomatic ef-
forts to end the Nicaraguan war,
explained group President Penn
Kemble.
"We're not aligned with these
groups Kemble said of Witness
for Peace and CISPES.
"We've never received tunds
from foreign forces of any kind
Kemble said. "We wouldn't take
money from Libya Allegations
that the group does "are just plain
stupid. It's a stupid mistake, just
incompetence
"Ideological groups don't pay
as much attention to facts as they
should Kemble said.
The attack against CISPES, said
Sanbrano, may backfire against
the College Republicans. "When
they see these things, people get
offended. Students say 'I'm no
m ihi'
i.lK'
Ye
much mone
i campus are teceivinjj to
nd Nicaragua
mmunibt iympaihiers �
�nd support trom Lybia and
tecp meneai college
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prevent mencan servteemen from ��
Central America
Othei S
n niaWe to
help
hi a verification attached to its recent fundraising
letter, the College Republican National Committee asked
recipients not to share this information with any known
liberal
WELCOME
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Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 27, 1987
ding
m ue chan
i' affairs at (
a ;
uve
operation oi the university
Other money approved for
nning purposes included
- � for renovation of the
varsit) gym at Applachian State
I niversih in Boone; $350,000 for
a Center tor Regional Advance-
ment at East v arolina University
reenvillc $5 10.000 for a con-
ference center at I N( AsheviHe;
and $490,000 lor an applied re-
: at L NC-Charlotte.
THEATRE
SPECIAL!
pizza get one
k FREE!
Et ESSAR
IBWtef
l
ter coupon or special.
:a Transit
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es Streets, Greenville
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BeAPort OfTheSpirit
inc

Khadafy reportedly funds college leftists
(C IN) Libya's leader Moam-
mar khadafy has given leftist
I S campus groups $300,000 to
turn innocent young students
away from their parents" and to
turn America back into the
seething cauldron of disrespect
and violence of the late sixties a
recent tundraising letter signed
by the College Republican Na-
tional Committee (CRNC)
claims.
The antidote to the problem,
the signer of the letter said, was to
give money to theCollege Repub-
licans.
The groups that supposedly
received the money,as well as the
L S. State Department, deny
I ib a has tunneled money to any
American college groups.
"It's lamentable that the Right
has to resort to lies to discredit
what our organization is about
said Ann Woerhle of Witness for
Peace, one of the groups identi-
fied in the letter as opposing U.S.
policy in Central America.
Bill Pierce oi the U.S. State
Department said there's no evi-
dence Khadafy donated money
to leitist college groups.
After checking his records,
moreover, current College Re-
publicans' Chairman Stockton
Reeves said he is unsure the
group would officially claim
ownership of the letter.
The letter, stamped "Confiden-
tial Report tells readers Nicara-
guan rebels attempting to over-
throw that country's Sandinista
government are ill-equiped,
demoralized and sickly, but con-
tinue to fight bravely against
overw helming odds. If the rebels,
known as the Contras, fail, the
letter continues, communism
will spread through Central
America to the United States.
Groups such as Witness for
Peace and CISPES (Committee in
Solidarity with the People oi El
Salvador), the letter states, are
working to disrupt U.S. cam-
puses like they did during Viet-
nam, and hope to "turn innocent
voting students away from their
parent- and grandparents
The letter is signed bv David
Miner, the College Republican's
former national chairman, now
the political director of the North
Carolina Jack Kemp for President
campaign.
Minor admits writing the letter,
but otherwise refused to com-
ment
His successor. Reeves, a Uni-
versity of Florida student, at first
said the letter "was one of our
more successful fundraisers
though he would not say how
much money it attracted, how
many letters were mailed, or to
whom they were sent. "I'm not in
a position to sav
Reeves said he didn't know-
where Miner got his information,
"but if David put it in the letter,
then 1 know it's true
In a subsequent interview,
however, Reeves said the letter
was not written by the CRNC. "It
doesn't sound like our style.
We're more conservative, and
this sounds like such a wild
play
But, he added, "1 don't know
what happened under David
(Miner's tenure)
The groups Miner named
blasted the letter.
"We've been publicly accused
of having ties to Khadafy, the
PLO, the IRA, you name it said
Woerhle. "It's not true. These are
just attempts to discredit our
group
'This is not the first time the
Right has fabricated a story said
Angela Sanbrano, CISPES' na-
tional coordinator. "It legitimizes
what they say by getting them a
lot of publicity they later use for
tundraising
Especially offended bv the let-
ter was the Friends oi the Demo-
cratic Center in Central America,
which, in fact, supports limited
U.S. aid to the Contras.
But the group believes U.S.
assistance to the Contras must be
tied to civilian control over the
rebel military, greater respect for
human rights and diplomatic ef-
forts to end the Nicaraguan war,
explained group President Penn
Kemble.
"We're not aligned with these
groups Kemble said of Witness
for Peace and CISPES.
"We've never received funds
from foreign forces of any kind
Kemble said. "We wouldn't take
money from Libya Allegations
that the group docs "are just plain
stupid. It's a stupid mistake, just
incompetence
"Ideological groups don't pay
as much attention to facts as they
should Kemble said.
The attack against CISPES, said
Sanbrano, may backfire against
the College Republicans. "When
they see these things, people get
offended. Students say 'I'm no
In a verification attached to its recent tundraising
letter, the College Republican National Committee asked
recipients not to share this information with any known
liberal
P.T.A. PIZZA
OPEN 24 HR. ON FRI.SAT.
Open until 2:00 a.m Sun Thurs.
757-1955
WELCOME
STUDENTS
STUDENT
SPECIALS
Wheel Alignment
$15
4-Wheel Drum or
Front Disc Reline
88 with coupon)
$59.
88 (with coupon)
Air Conditioning
Servicing
$17.
Lubrication
Oil Filter, Oil Change
88 (Includes 1
Can Freon)
$12.88
(with coupon)
ATiTIC
The
CoMedY
ZONE
CX?V '
The
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tJCPP'
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I CONCERT:
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VGBtty
with
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Castro
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� Nautilus
� Olympic Free Weights
� Aerobic Room
� Separate Locker Rooms For Men & Women
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� And More
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Aerobics $30.00
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Coupon expires:
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j





�lj� iEaat (Earnlfman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Daniel Maurer, cwm�
Clay Deanhardt, M��rf,�(,�
IMMY MCKEE, Dwtdor of AJvcrtmnt
Tim Chandler, src�r
Andy Lewis, r ��r. ei
Shelton Bryant, m
Debbie Stevens, ����
Anthony Martin, b��c�m�
MEG NEEDHAMmWamMtfT
Lori Jackson, w-nw- m�
Kimberly Pierce, mi��.
August 27, 1987
Opinion
Page 4
Petitions
The administration has taken a system, students can see a choice ol
drastic step in eliminating the work classes and work them around theii
petition program. rchedule. The hassle of not getting at
least some of your classes is almost
Drastic, it seems, but probably non-existent for those who pre-reg-
neccessary. ister.
The work petition was designed to Almost, but not quite. And that's
give students who had to work a where the rub lies.
chance to schedule classes around It is likely that several groups of
their work schedules. Thus students students will be allowed to register
were able to both afford and attend early still. Those decisions have yet
classes. This was especially helpful to be made, but we cannot imagine
when the university was on the card the athletic department, among oth-
system and students often could not ers, giving up that priveledge. If they
get any class they wanted. don't have to, then how can the
Unfortunately, since we have been administration tell those students
on-line, many students have begun who truly have to work to support
to abuse the program. Petitions were themselves that they cannot register
falsified, and never checked. Friends early. Sections of classes do close
would sign each other's petitions as fast, and it seems the student who
employers or advisors. It was a way doesn't work would have much
to "beat the system more flexibility in that area than
Why beat the system? To avoid the students who do.
iong lines associated with freshman Special permission entry into full
and sophomore registration, or to classes is not the answer either. Some
make sure you get just those classes classes are already overcrowded,
you want: the ones that start at 11 and the larger the class the lower the
a.m. instead of 8 a.m the ones that quality of the education.
1 xk out early, and the ones that heve The work petition should not be
the nicest professors. eliminated unless no other students
What these people, who were in- are allowed to register early either. If
deed cheating, didn't realize is that registration is going to be grab bag
falsifying documents can get you for those who work, it should be
kicked ou.of,school. Perhaps more grab bag for those who compete,
importantly, some freshmen and play music or perform otherwise,
sophomores were falsifying peti- Just as their extracurricular activities
tions and signing up for classes that are part of their education, for many
even the juniors have a tough time students a job is the only way to
getting. Not everyone was getting a afford an education. To force them to
fair roll of the dice in the registration work and then not get the classes
game. they want because of scheduling
The administration saw it had a seems contrary to the goal of getting
problem. It couldn't turn its back on an education,
students falsifying records. No, University officials have said that
university's traditionally represent they are going to keep the cancella-
truth and knowledge, so turning the tion of the work permits in mind and
other cheek was not a viable option, study the effects of such a step. That
is both commendable and necessary.
Neither could the administration "H 'ion should begin
dismiss the hundreds of students work now on devising a new work
who falsified their petitions. That petition and the means to verify it.
wouldn't be prudent or fair either, It's too important to just let die, and
since most students really didn't in the interest of fairness it seems
recognize the consequences of their that if anyone gets special
actions. priveledges at all on the terminals, it
Instead it was decided that the should be those who are working to
work petition had outlived its try and maintain any kind of access
usefulness. With the new on-line at all.
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
ofjoyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and clas
sification, address, phone number and
signature of the author(s). Letters are
limited to two typewritten pages, double
spaced or neatly printed. All letters are
subject to editing for brezity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are reminded
that they are limited to one every two
weeks. The deadline for editorial material
is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday'sedition and
5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday's edition.
Forum
rules
The Reader Speaks
Campus
Spectrum
rules
In addition to the "Campus Forum
section of the editorial page, The East
Carolinian features the " ampus
Spectrum This is an opinion olumn
by guest writers from the student
bodv and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topicso( concern
to the campus, community or nation
The columns are restricted in con
tent only with regard to rules of gram
mar and decency Persons submitting
columns must be willing t accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en
tries from ghost writers will be pub
lished.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information nun
contact the managing editor ol The
hast Carolinian at 757-6366,�r stop b)
our offices on the second floor ol the
Publications Bnildmr
Board member defends Buccaneer decision
To the editor:
After reading the article (Editor
Says Board Didn't Care About Qual-
ity) which appeared in Tuesday's edi-
tion of The East Carolinian, 1 felt it
necessary to clarify some of the issued
involved in deciding who will print
the Buccaneer.
As a board member the first thing 1
want to do is assure that quality pub-
lications and services are provided to
my fellow students. The last thing 1
want to do is cause reckless student
fee increases. Any decision that is
made must fall between these two
objectives.
Much like comparing apples to
oranges, it is impossible to compare
the quality of an unseen Buccaneer to
the price of a printing contract. Be-
cause of this, the Media Board must
rely on the expertise of its media
heads. One of the prime responsibili-
ties of the editor is to develop a work-
ing relationship with the printer so
that quality is assured.
It is clear that in the case of the
Buccaneer, a working relationship
with the printer did not develop.
Furthermore, you can not assign
blame to any one person. 1 know Beth
Davis and know that she has faith-
fully served the students of ECU for
two years. I also know of many
schools who have used Taylor pub-
lishing and have been extremely
pleased. As to why the relationship
didn't work out, well quite frankly,
the jury is still out. However, we
aren't waiting for an answer. We have
a new printer, Delmar Publishing,
and a new editor, Kimberly Kayes. It
is my sincerest hope that this years'
Buccaneer will be of the highest qual-
ity and arrive on Campus in time for
all of us to enjoy.
Incidentally, one way to increase
your enjoyment of the Buccaneer is to
be sure your photo appears in it.
Make note of the dates for protraits
and be certain to get your picture
taken. It cost you nothing and like the
upcoming victors' over the Wolfpack,
it can be quite enjoyable.
Sven VanBaars
Graduate student
Vandalism
To the editor:
It is a shame that a few of our
"adults of tomorrow and these
same few who will be running our
great country in a few years, are so
petty, destructive, and costly to long
time residents of Greenville.
We welcome these non-tax paying
students to get university level edu-
cation. But, these few, these, your fel-
low students, willfully and mali
ciously damage flowers, shrubs, and
fences and steal yard ornaments.
Last Saturday night, students with
a black paint spray can ruined the
front of a newly painted houseon East
4th Street. Damage $600 to $1000.
You desirable students are in a
position to build on your future, but
you don't need to sit idlv bv and do
nothing.
Ed Smith
Real issues need facing in Bork confirmation
By MICHAEL KINSLEY
The New Republic
Poor Joe Biden, chairman of the Senate Judiciary
Committee, is being savaged for admitting that "I
don't have an open mind" about the nomination of
Robert Bork for the Supreme Court. Conservatives
are demanding that Biden, having prejudged the
issue, should stand aside during the confirmation
process.
There are good reasons for concern about the
condition of Biden's mind, but they don't relate to
whether it is open or closed. These conservative
complaints are wonderfully hypocritical,since they
all come from people (including some on the Judici-
ary Committee) whose minds are equally closed on
the subject.
Of course these complaints about Biden mirror
liberal complaints about Bork. Biden himself com-
plains that Bork lacks an "open mind" and has "a
predisposition on every one of the major issues He
praises retiring Justice Lewis Powell for having said,
"I never think of myself as having a judicial philoso-
"fairness his "detachment his "statesmanship
He says the issue is "qualifications" vs. "politics
Bork himself says, "I don't consider myself a conser-
vative
Puhleez, you guys. Can't we at least have an
honest debate here? The best you can say is that both
sides are confusing two issues. One is whether Bork
andor his critics are more interested in using the
courts to achieve a laundry list of political results
than in any particular theory of jurisprudence. The
other is whether it is illegitimate for Bork even to
have such a theory, or for his opponents to disagree
with it and oppose his nomination on that basis.
Robert Bork has taught and written about consti-
tutional law for a quarter century. He has served six
years on the appellate court. If, after all this, he had
failed to reach any conclusions about ma jor constitu-
tional issues, that would be evidence of an empty
mind, not an open one. To suggest, as do his support-
ers, that Bork's views are unpredictable is an insult
to his intellectual integrity.
phy
But in America, "ideological" is a name-calling
Liberal interest groups accuse Bork of being "ideo- word. So is "partisan" or "political So is "close-
minded" (meaning, you know what you think).
Good things to be are "open-minded" (meaning,
you don't know what you think), "balanced and -
above all - "moderate The Bork war is being
loeical " In response, conservatives accuse the liber-
als of "partisanship President Reagan has taken to
denying that his nominee has anything so nefarious
as a judicial philosophy. He praises Bork for his
fought over possession of the linguistic territory of
balance and moderation.
This notion of closed-mindedness is much in the
air these days, due to Allan Bloom's best-selling
book, 'The Closing of the American Mind Actu-
ally, the title is misleading. Bloom, near as I can tell,
opposes open-mindedness as a quality connected to
moral relativism and the general decline of values.
Although Bork and Bloom are the two great con-
servative culture heroes of the moment, Bork's con-
stitutional closed-mindedness is exactly the kind of
moral open-mindedness that Bloom deplores. Bork
says he came to his narrow view of constitutional
rights based on the conclusion that morality is just a
matter of personal gratification and "there is no
principled way to decide that one man's gratifica-
tions are more deserving of respect than another's
Bloom, by contrast, believes that broad moral pre-
cepts can be derived from natural law, and believes
the Founders thought so too.
In the Aug. 13 New York Review of Books, Profes-
sor Ronald Dworkin powerfully undermines Bork's
contention that his constitutional views merely re-
flect the original intent of the document's authors.
Even Bork, he notes, supports Brown vs. Board of
Education, the school desegregation case. Yet the
Congress that passed the Fourteenth Amendment
also maintained segregated schools in the Distru t ol
Columbia.
Clearly, then, the notion of "original intent" must
be read at some level of generality or Brown g(vsout
the window (and with it, theConstitution's claim t,
be something more than the Founders' own menu ot
gratifications).
Bork doesn't disagree. In fact, he said something
similar himself in a Court of Appeals opinion up
holding broad First Amendment protection against
libel suits even though libel suits were common it
the time of the Founders. But Bork has never pro-
duced a persuasive theory to explain at what level or
generality he chooses to interpret the Founder
intent in different cases, and why.
Is this asking too much? Nobody ever demanded
a theory from Sandra Day O' Connor. On the other
hand, OConnor never claimed to have one that
would justify undoing much of the constitutional
jurisprudence of the past 25 years.
This debate seems to have gotten inverted with
Bork's opponents accusing him of having rigid judi
cial views and his supporters insisting that he's
really a non-ideological moderate with no fund
opinions. That's crazy. Bork's challengers should h,
demanding. "OK, buddy, what's your theory' A
make it a good one 3 na
(Michael Kinsley is editor of The New Republic 1
CPC says
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 27,1987
ampu1 oniiii
in tho student
imi -nimuniK or nation
he columns are restricted m con
rts 3s no
ill be pub
m participating
formation m.n
lit r ol rhc
rstopbj
ond floor ol the
eer decision
1
aver the Wolfpack
iyable.
Svcn VanBaars
c iraduate student
Vandalism
h- It
Jars
lual-
�ase
I'
it.
� a shame that a few ol our
dults � � morrow and these
f who will be running our
iintry in a few years, are so
I tractive, and costly to long
� sidents of (.reenville.
We welcome these non-tax pa) ing
nts to get university level edu-
L But, these few, these, your fel
students, willfully and mali-
ously damage flowers, shrubs, and
- and steal yard ornaments.
t Saturday night, students with
ick paint spray can ruined tlu
� ofa newly painted house on East
th Street. Damage $600 to$1000.
i desirable students are in a
on to build on your future, but
I need to sit idly bv and do
Ed Smith
irmation
p maintained segregated schools in the Distri:
lumbia.
pearly, then, the noti n of "original intent n
read at some level of gene ralityor brown ,
window (and withit,theConstitution'si tain
omething more than the Founders' own menu
Ihfications).
ork doesn't disagree. In fact, he said someth
i!ar himself in a Court of Appeals opinion u
ling broad First Amendment protection
l suits even though libel suits were cornrni
ltime of the Founders. But Bork has never i
ted a persuasive theory to explain at what leu
lerality he chooses to interpret the Founder's
pnt in different cases, and why.
I this asking too much? Nobody ever demanded
leory from Sandra Day O' Connor. On the oth r
Id, O'Connor never claimed to have one that
lid justify undoing much of the constitutional
Isprudence of the past 25 years,
jhis debate seems to have gotten inverted, with
Ik's opponents accusing him of having rigid judi
l views and his supporters insisting that he's
�y a non-idcnlogical moderate with no fixed
lions. Thai's crazy. Bork's challengers should be
Hiding: "OK, buddy, what's your theory? And
ke it a good one
lichael Kinsley is editor of The New Republic j
����� ��.����
��
0
CPC says new job recruitment is good
(CPS)-Spring, 1987, grads
didn't fare as badly in the job
market as the experts had pre-
dicted, the College Placements
Council (CPC) reports.
In its annual review of how
well students did in getting jobs,
the council � a nationwide asso-
ciation of campus placement offi-
cers � said a late spring flurry of
companies recruiting on campus
helped salvage what had been a
'slow" recruiting year at the
nation's can .puses.
While companies always visit
more during the spring, said the
CPCs Dawn Gulick, "We were
surprised at how it picked up
Gulick said many companies,
particularly those in sluggish in-
dustries such as oil, were hesitant
to kick off aggressive recruiting
campaigns earlier in the academic
year. Those companies took a
harder look at their hiring needs
before extending offers to gradu-
ating students, she said.
Many companies, unstable due
to corporate mergers or budget
cuts, also waited before recruiting,
she said.
Other companies visited cam-
puses early in the year but later
decided to hire more people dur-
ing the spring, often making better
salary offers.
The late boom wasn't universal,
however.
The CPCs survey of its member
schools found technical, engineer-
ing, computer science and ac-
counting majors suffered a tighter
job market than liberal arts grads.
Corporate offers to 1987 hu-
manitites grads jumped by 29 per-
cent since last year, with starting
salaries rising 5 percent to an
average $20,256.
Senator Sanford against destroying U.S.
Embassy in Soviet Union after tour
(AP)-A new U.S. embassy in
Moscow that is riddled with
eavesdropping devices should
not be torn down and rebuilt until
the government has considered
other options. Sen. Terry Sanford,
D-N.C,says.
Sanford, who toured the new
embassy last week as part of a
Senate delegation. Monday de-
clined to detail the recommenda-
tions he would make to Senate
leaders, but said rebuilding
would cost millions of dollars
and "we have no greater assur-
ances that it would be much or
even better
Asked if the building should be
razed, Sanford told the News &
Observer of Raleigh, "We should
not do that except as the last alter-
native
Some officials have recom-
mended only a partial rebuilding
plan to protect limited sensitive
areas in the embassy, which U.S.
officials have refused to occupy.
U.S. officials have discovered
listening devices planted in walls
that were prefabricated bv Soviet
workers.
He told the Winston-Salem
Journal the building's security
problems are "one of the greatest
mistakes we've ever made, to
enter into an arrangement where
we wouldn't even supervise the
construction. This really is a Re-
publican mistake and a Republi-
can decision
Razing and rebuilding, San-
ford said, "will make the U.S.
look very inept in the eyes of the
world
James Schlesinger, former sec-
retary of defense, recently com-
pleted a study of the embassy,
recommending that it be substan-
tially rebuilt but not razed.
Sanford was one of four sena-
tors who went to the Soviet Union
in a delegation led by Sen. Daniel
Moynihan, D-N.Y. They in-
spected the new embassy, talked
with U.S. diplomatsand met with
Soviet officials. The group also
visited Leningrad and met in
Moscow with more than a dozen
Soviet Jews who have been re-
fused permission to emigrate.
Sanford said Soviet officials
and reporters were curious about
the U.S. presidential race, but he
declined to make a prediction for
them about the Democratic con-
test.
As for the GOP race, Sanford
said, "I told them I thought (Vice
President George) Bush was
going to be the Republican nomi-
nee. 1 thought I had to tell them
something firm
Sanford made three trips to the
Soviet Union while he was presi-
dent of Duke University. He said
last week's visit was his first since
the introduction of new policies
allowing limited public criticism
of the Soviet system and less re-
strictive economic practices.
Accounting graduates also en-
joyed higher average salaries �
up 2.5 percent since last year, up to
$21,744 � but fielded 16 percent
fewer jobs.
Petroleum engineering gradu-
ates got a resounding 82 percent
fewer job offers last year, while
their starring salaries plummeted
almost 7 percent, to $30,816.
Mechanical engineers received
31 percent fewer job offers com-
pared to last year, and jobs offered
to electrical engineers dropped 35
percent. Computer science gradu-
ates were offered 28 percent fewer
jobs.
"The year wound up being bet-
ter for liberal arts said Jim Keene
of the State University of New
York-Stony Brook. "It was not as
good for Engineering
Keene bel ie ves ma ny compa nies
are eschewing students with lim-
ited degrees for "those who can
think in general terns
While engineering and science
majors at Slippery Rock Univer-
sity in Pennsylvania were in de-
mand, placement counselor
Sam Gagliardo added, "During
the last five years, the tendency
has been that recruiters are
going for liberal arts students
Technical field grads do fare
better, he said, if they've got
some English or history classes
under their belts.
'There's a slight breeze" to-
wards hiring liberal arts gradu-
ates, he said, "but it's not a gale
Liberal arts students are usually
offered "lower end jobs" in
fields such as retailing and cus-
tomer service.
"It's not that there's this sud-
den burst of activity towards
hiring liberal arts majors con-
curred Boyd Armstrong of the
University of Houston's place-
ment office.
"But liberal arts majors are
more flexible, and they're not
already stereotyped by employ-
ers
Bruce Johnston of Humboldt
State College in California
claimed it's because humanities
majors have lower job expecta-
tions than others, and are more
willing to work outside their
field of study.
Others speculate liberal arts
majors are doing better because
companies are changing the
way they recruit.
Grades are no longer as im-
portant as, say, "the total indi-
vidual, the student'sactivities, if
they worked their way through
college, that kind of thing"
maintained Laurie Ray of the
University of Southern
California's placement office.
TheCPCalso found recruiting
never recovered in certain areas.
P.T.A. PIZZA
OPEN 24 HR.
Open until 2:00
757-
ON FRI.SAT.
a.m Sun Thurs.
1955
WV.VV.V.W.V
DUNKIN DONUTS
MUNCHKINS
DONUT HOLE TREATS
MAKES
Dunkin Donuts can help your club or
organization make the most of fundraising
dollars with our delicious
South Memorial Drive
Near the Hospital
Open 24 hours, 7 days a week

DUNKIN'
DONUTS
It's worth the trip
758-5607
? r. nfi iri�. rKili 9f1
WRDUW6.FMm
Only The Finest Rock & Roll rXXAj
Toqa Panty
OjiiKSday
f
AtlQUSt 27, 1987
Tickets: $4.00 Advance, $5.00 At The Gate
8 PM-Until "At The House" 803 Hooker Road
Purchase tickets in front of Student Store
Today
Coolers Welcome - No Glass, Please
Rain Site: The Attic
1
Register to win the WRDU 106.1 Rock and Roll Ski Boat.
Come Early and see the premier of ECU's newest band: 180 PROOF
Buses will pick up starting at 7:00 p.m.
from Mendenhall and The Hill.
udweiser
KING OF BEERS

I
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 27.1987
M

Classifieds
y
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Part-time sales posi-
tion Apply in person, Zales Jewelers,
Carolina East Mall.
WANTED: Telemarketers interested in
earning up to $6.00 per hour. 20 hours per
week. Afternoon and evening positions
available. Prefer sales or telemarketing
experience Call 355-7108 between 100
p m. and 8:00 p.m M-Th.
OVERSEAS JOBS. Also Cruiseships,
Travel, Hotels. Listings Now Hiring. To
S94K. 805-687-6000 Ext. OJ - 1166.
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED: Inter
ested in making money part-time photo-
graphing people? No experience neces-
sary, we train. If you are highly sociable,
have a 35mm camera and transportation,
give us a call between 12 noon and 5 p m
At 1-800-722-7033.
NEEDED: Waitresses and drivers with
own cars; apply in person at Famous
Pizza Restaurant on the comer of 100 East
10th St. and Evans No Phone Calls
COUNTERPERSON NEEDED for laun
dromatdeaners for evening and week-
end work, approximately 25 hours per
week. Must be able to operate cash regis-
ter and calculator, enjoy working with the
public, be responsible and neat. Call 752-
4511.
WANTED: Marathon Restaurant now
hiring: drivers, cooks, cashiers. Apply
after 2:00 p.m Marathon Restaurant
BRODY'S FOR MEN has full-time and
part-time sales associates positions, for
enthusiastic, fashion forward individu
als. Retail clothing experience is required.
Better than average starting salary Ap-
ply in person, Brody's Personnel Direc-
tor, Carolina East Mall, M-W, 2-4 p.m.
BRODVS HAS PART-TIME sales asso-
ciates positions for enthusiastic, out-
going individuals who enjoy working
with young contemporary Junior fash-
ions. Good Salary Apply in person,
Brody's Personnel Director, Carolina
East Mall, M-W, 2-4 p.m.
BABY SITTER NEEDED: Part-time
baby sitter needed Tuesday and Thurs-
day from 12 - 4 p.m and all dav Friday.
Own transportation needed. 756-6319 -
call if you can work any of these times!
DRIVERS WANTED: Part-time drivers
for Dependable Cab Company After-
noon and night shifts available Apply in
1 'pwuii. �BUI Evans-No phojvj'caHa
please.
FOR RENT
1 FEMALE ROOMMATE Neeued im-
mediately, $88.50 plus deposit a mo AC,
Cable; located close to campus on Bus
Route. 758-6837.
WANTED: Female roommate to share
fully furnished apartment $165month
plus 1 4 utilities - 752-0741.
FOR RENT: 2 bedrooms with full house
privileges. 3 blocks from campus. $165.00
per month with utilities paid. 758-1274
after 5:00 p.m.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Two bedroom
furnished apartment available for 1 or 2
female students. 1 2 block from campus,
washerdryer, AC, pool Call 752-2329.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Oakmont
Square, 2 bedroom, 11 2 baths, $160 per
month plus 1 2 utilities. 355-7896 or 756-
4151
HOUSE TO SHARE 5 minutes from
campus. Furnished. Non-smoking fe-
male graduate or medical students, or
responsible upperclass women. Contact
Ray Spears at Aldridge and Sutherland
Realty. 756-3500758-4362. (No fee).
TAR RIVER: One bedroom special. Tar
River Estates: $150 off first months rent
when signing a 12 month lease or the
option to sign a 9 month lease 1400 Wil-
low St 1. 752-4225.
ROOMATE WANTED: Female to share
3 bedroom house. $100 rent plus 1 3 uhli-
ties. Call Laurie or Cathy - 756-9781.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Toaster oven. Call 752-7396
after 6:00 p.m. and leave message.
FOR SALE: 10.1 cubic ft. refrigerator;
separate freezer; 5' tall; 2 yrs. old; semi-
automatic defroster; asking $300; nego-
tiable; call 758-0222.
FOR SA LE: 1975 Super Beetle VW. Excel-
lent condition. Owned by an Auto-Me-
chanic. $1500.00 Call 758-4211 after 7:00
p.m.
CARS - $155 (Avg.) Pickups - $365 (Avg.)
Station wagons - $151 (Avg.)! Info 805-
687-6000 Ext. SI 166.
DAVID BOWIE TICKETS: We have two
David Bowie tickets (first show) - would
like to swap for 2 Pink Floyd tickets. Call
Mary or Russell after 6:00 p.m. - 752-0962.
WORD PROCESSING and photocopy
ing services: We offer typing and photo-
copying services. We also sell software
and computer diskettes. 24 hours in and
out GUARANTEED TYPING on paper
up to 20 hand written pages. SDF Profes-
sional Computer Services, 106 East 5th
Street (Beside Cubbies) Greenville, N C
752-3694.
PICK UP AND DELIVERY of term pa
pers, theses, resumes to be typed. IBM
word processing by professional with 13
years experience Letter quality print and
professional editing. Call Nanette in
Grifton at 1-524-5241 Cheap call - the best
service!
HAVING A PARTY? Need a DJ? For the
best in Top 40, dance, and Beach, call
Morgan at 758-7967.
FOR SALE: heavy duty commercial
washing machines $100.00 each. Call
752-5025. Ask for Charles or Kathy.
FURNITURE: good used furniture for
sale - matching couch, 2 chairs and otto-
man. 1 large dorm refrigerator. 7563698
See CLASSIFIEDS, Page 7

is now
Accepting Applications
for all positions.
Deadline: August 28th
Located on 2nd Floor, Old Joyner
Library, WZMB Studio.
P.T.A. PIZZA
OPEN 24 HR. ON FRI.SAT.
Open until 2:00 a.m Sun Thurs.
204 East 5lh Street � Greenville. NC 27X58
Phone: 758-1-427
SUPER FALL SALE!
757-1955
4$�
LOSE
MEDICAL
WEIGHT
LOSS
SYSTEMS
POUNDS
EVERY ALBUM
and CASSETTE
$1.00 OFF
Regular Low Price
EVERY COMPACT
DISC
$2.00 OFF
Regular Low Price
SALE ITEMS
INCLUDED!
Example: Beatle's Sgt. Pepper's Lonely
Hearts Club Band-$11.99 CD.
Check Our Low Prices and Save Money with Our
SUPER FALL SALE!
Sale Ends September 19th.
GO PIRA TES-BEA T
N.C. STATE!
FOR ONLY
$69.
00
Program Limited to 6 Weeks.
Medical Fee Excluded.
call 756-2611
610 Arlington Blvd.
In Raleigh Call b4b.b6ll
georges
hair designers
For the latest in
Contemporary Hair Styling
i
D0P I9� 091
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
sopiTy usc
AUGUST 30 - SEPTEMBER 3, 1987
AT 10A.M3 P.M.
STUDENT STORES
CROATAN
AND All RESIDENCE HALLS
ororft0 mv �0" HWtfc
Come Mtt ftoto!
�European trained hair
stylists
�Free Consultation
�Latest New Fall Fashions
� 1 Indoor Tanning System
The Plaza
Open 'tilp.m.
i $2.00 off all Services:
with this ad
2 i
I?Eir.5p!30
754-4200
Mil HOlllll
�l��l�1�
if Hii f m � � '?���
M�0iMafMV!i
Cl
Continued from page 6
PERSONALS
ATTN:SigTau .
meeting at the r
Please attend! W
44h7
TO ALL SORORITIES-VV�;
1 lope vou had a great sum mer .
during rush Love, the CM Omegas
EVERYONE: Watch out lot the
KETBALL BLOWOUT to i
Ronald McDonald How .
MM the Student StOB I
S100'
LOST: One K , ,
gust 21 downtown at Rafters
Home Federal Bar
Need ID'S and other arti -
lions asked Cal 756 M �
sage or mail to77Ban -
DANCE? Come down to th.
see our class i.
Fndav nights 165 ta
night long" Good sto
COMMUTER CARPOOL: I
ested in forming a carpooi from lacks �
ville or Rkhlands C afl Mar)
1202 after 2 pm
ATTENTION: PHI TAL 1ITTLE SIS-
TERS- there will be a mai
at 9:45 Mi n la) at the house A
planning to be active this sernesi �
attend. If you have anv q .
Mike at 757 1319 i �
Get psychi dfora an it � �� - stt �
WELCOME BACK PHI TAL BROTH-
ERS. Get p! rajammiri
Love, vour li as rs
E.C.L RL'GBV the tradition con
Stav in shape while playing this intense
hard nosed sport of Rugb)
friends and travel : - Mege
side- No experience needed Onh good
athletic ability and intense
ness Starting Tues at 4 00 behind A
lealth Building For Info. Call Bob I
757-0209
CREEKS - The 1 F C exec; Brooke, Chris
Dillon, James and Rav would hke t) h
come every one back to E C L Let
psyched for another don i
ROBERT i. BOB: just wanted to thank
" youboys Tor an adventurousSunda eve
' vW:wx-xw
ning H
M -stl
WEL
TIES
CRI t
M
.
�� Od �:�
are desul
Smith,
'l"r
rV-
4
NOWO
Transit
Authority.
i
1
FREE DELIVERY
I
If
S J Buy One Get One Free p.J
DELIVERED I IfiJ jJlj
Auti
CMfw oxwra 12-31-87 �J I
as i i�y ��t kai p�� f "� ����
55 I pita �mi ifc M nu"b
jg j Off axptras
i





.JU.
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 27,1987
is now
ccepting Applications
for all positions.
)t ad line: August 28th
p on 2nd Floor, Old Joyner
rarv, W'ZMB Studio.
J
�jccod!
N C 2 y s
I ERY COMPACT
DISC"
52.00 OFF
Regular I ow Price
TEMS
DED!
gt. Pepper's I onely
$11.99 CD.
v ' ne with Our
SALE!
rES-BEA T
TA TE!
ges
igners
atest in
Hair Styling
trained hair
ists
sultation
Fall Fashions
nning System
ftil 9 p.m.
7M-�200
I Servi
Ihisad
Sept. 30
Classifieds
Continued from page 6
PERSONALS
ATTN:SigTau Little Sisters - Mandatory
meeting at the house on Thursday at 500
Please attend' Welcome back! Carol 75f
467.
TO ALL SORORITIES - Welcome Back'
1 lope you had a great summer' Good luck
during rush. Love, the Chi Omegas
EVERYONE: Watch out tor the BAS
KETBALL BLOWOUT to support the
Ronald McDonald House Sept 2.V2S
near the Student Store You mav win
S100'
LOST: One Mack wallet Fn night, Au
gust 21 downtown at Ratters, PBa or
1 lome Federal Bank Please get in touch
Need lOs and other articles No ques-
tions asked Call 7.S6-6495 or leave nuv
sage or mail to 77 Barnes St Greenville
DANCE? Come down to the ELBO and
see our classic female dancers, Thurs. -
Friday nights S fo tall cans and coolers all
night long Good D.J 's too
COMMUTER CARPOOL: I'm inter
ested in forming a carpool from lackson
ville or Richlands Call Martha at 45
1202 after 2 p.m
ATTENTION: PHI TAU LITTLE SIS-
TERS - there will bea mandatory meeting
at 9:45 Monday at the house All hi' sisters
planning to he active this semester should
attend. If you have anv questions contact
Mikeat 757-131 or Amanda at 355-6730.
Get psyched for a great semester
WELCOME BACK PHI TAU BROTH-
ERS. Cetpsvched for ajammin' semester
Love, your til' sisters
E.C.U. RUGBY the tradition continues
Stay in shape while playing this intense,
hard nosed sport of Rugbv. Meet new
friends and travel to plav other college
sides No experience needed Onlv gixxi
athletic ability and intense competitive-
ness Starting Tues. at 4 00 behind Allied
Health Building For Info Call Bob Eason
757-0209.
GREEKi. - The I JF.C exec, Brooke, Chris,
Dillon, James and Ray would like to wel-
come evcrv one back to ECU. Let's get
psyched for another dominating year"
ROBERT &. BOB: just wanted to thank
you"bovs tor an adventurous Sundav eve-
ning Hope everything turned out O.K.
See ya around but hopefully not under
such incriminating circumstances. Ha
I la. Your partners in crime.
SEX-SEX-SEX: at the toga party, tonight
at the house Pi Kappa Phi 7th annual
Toga Party
WELCOME BACK ALL SORORI-
TIES hope you have a successful rush
and a good year Love, the Sigmas.
GREEKS - Happy hour Friday after-
noon ELBO. Wear letters and get a mem
bership for only SI Get ready for dollar
shots at happy hours coming in October
Rock-n Roll.
TOGA - NEED A RIDE? Free bus ride
from Mendenhall and the top of the Hill
to the TOGA party. We'll see you at 7:30
WORD!
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA would like to
wish all the fall prospective rushees good
luck.
WENDY COVEN - just wanted to say hi
and welcome you to E.C.U. See ya soon
The guy with the piece of s� car
TOGA-TOGA-TOGA: the most killer
party at E.C.U. is tonight. We'll see you at
the Pi Kappa Phi 7th annual toga party.
Bus pick up at the bottom of the hill and
Mendenhall begining at 7:30.
K O PI ya'll are doing a
Fantastic job! Thanks for all your help.
Alpha love, Anne Leigh.
TKE - Welcome back brothers and little
sisters. Congratulation to Tim Meigs on
his fourth consecutive "4.0 and the rest
of the brothers that made the TKE Honor
Role. Get psyched for a killer mixer on
Sat. night, and remember rush is right
around the corner Lets make the fall of
'87 the best ever.
Announcements
AVAILABLE POSITIONS
ADVERTISING TECHINAL SUPERVISOR
LAYOUT ARTIST
GET A HEAD START ON YOUR CAREER
JOB REQUIREMENTS
?DEDICATED, MATURE INDIVIDUAL
?INDIVIDUAL MUST STRIVE FOR PERGECTION
?COMMERCIAL ART EXPERIENCE
JOIN THE EAS1 AROLINIAN
ADVERTISING STAFF AND ACCEPT THE CHALLENGE
APPLY IN PERSON AT
THE EAST CAROLINAN
Members Named
The following students were selected
to serve on the judicial board this year:
Dana L. Dunlow, Elizabeth L. Wooten,
Brian Burke, Joy A. Larnmore, Barry P.
Nobles, Paul A. Jones, Mark France, Erma
L. Dillinger, Christopher G. Gemski,
Shan Clemens, Leslie I larris.
New members are asked to contact the
S.G.A. office to drop off class schedules
and receive information concerning the
first meeting.
Honors Program
All Proposals for honors seminars for
spring semester 1988 need to be submit-
ted to David Sanders, co English De-
partment, by Sept. 3. Call 757-6373 for
more information.
College Republicans
The ECU College Republicans will
begin holding its preliminary meetings .
Eor more information call 752-3587.
Self-Help Position
The Department of Political Science
seeks a reliable, conscientious, and effi-
cient student with strong skills and some
experience to assist staff and faculty
Good typing, copying, and clerical skills
are desired. Please contact Cynthia
Smith, Brewstcr A-124 personally or bv
telephone, 757-6O30. 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Motor and Fitness Jf Sf
The physical education motor and
physical fitness competency test will be
held 10 a.m Sept. 4. A passing score on
this test is required of all students prior to
declaring physical education as a major.
Contact Dr. Israel or Mike McCammon at
757-6497 for more information.
Campus Girl Smuts
The first meeting of Campus Girl
Scouts will be held at the Mendenhall
Student Center Information Desk on
Aug. 27th, at 6:30 p.m. Contact Nancie at
551-2994, between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. for
more information.
WorkStudy Position
The Department of Political Science
needs workstudy students (already
approved by the Office of Financial Aid)
to fill clerk positions. Prefer students that
are not our own majors. Contact Cynthia
Smith at 757-6030or apply at Brewster, A-
124.
Telefund Night Captains
All Night Captains please stop by the
Alumni Center before Sept. 2 to receive
telefund information.
mm
NOW OPEN 24 HOURS ON FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS
i
"Transit
'Authority
GREENVILLE
757-1955
HOURS:
11 AM - 2 AM SunThurs.
24 HOURS - Friday & Saturday
2 for 1
Pick-up Special
No Coupon Necessary
Buy any Pizza,
Get One FREE!
Pepsi, Diet Pepsi, Mountain
Dew, Slice or Diet Slice � 59
1b Oz Twist Cap
This store independently owned by
ROGERS FOODS, INC.
P.O. Box 4216, Greenville, NC 27836-4216
Joseph "Josh" M. Rogers, Pres.
Paul Manning, V.P Operations
Jim Kirkman, V.P Marketing Public Relations
MENU
PTA pizzas (Small 12 Large 16"). Our zesty sauce is made with
fresh romano cheese and topped with 100 mozzarella. Double
sauce is free.
"Transit
TOPPINGS
Pepperoni
Ground Beef
Sausage
Canadian Bacon
Green Pepper Rings
Fresh Mushrooms
Black Olives
Green Olives
Anchovies
Onion Circles
Double Cheese
Double Crust
Italian Sauce
Jalapeno Peppers
Pineapple
Deluxe - pepperoni, sausage, green peppers, onions and mushrooms
(5 items for the price of 4).
Pizza Lite - mushrooms, onions, ground beef, green peppers, and
ripe olives.
ft"
II
i
i
i
i
r
Buy
i
One Get One Free
DELIVERED!
Buy any targe puu M �"othw large
puu ���� rt �"� �"��� o lopP1
Iftt! Save $1100 or mw!
Offer expires 12-31-87
C Pizza
Iransit
Authority.
757-1955J
-i r
Save $3.00
Order any Urge piiia
and uvt u 00!
Offer expires 12-31-87
J&Tlransit
Authority.
ST 757-1955
Save $2.00 on
Any Pizza!
Order artu� piua. Urge or wnall.
Transit j
Authority.
Offer expires 12-31-87 757" 1955 j
Free Pepel! fiLJkw
i o �� �.���� ��� rranslt
rswsrc Authority
MMShlM Stea. � DW Sta katj
757-1955J
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8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 27.1987
AIDS not rampant in N.C. prison system
(AP) - Stato Offirials iav �hr ni.� K� j:j ��
(AD - State Officials say the nine have died, two have been
expected rapid spread of AIDS paroled, and four are in prison
through the prison system has hospitals
not happened, in part because of
public misconceptions about the
amount of homosexuality and
intravenous drug use behind
bars.
"My own feeling is the reason
we are seeing less of it in prison is
because there are fewer of the
Another 112 inmates have
tested positive for the acquired
immune deficiency syndrome
virus since 1985. People with the
virus do not necessarily develop
AIDS, and inmates who test posi-
tive without showing the symp-
toms of the disease remain in the
tween November 1985 and Octo- deadly AIDS virus
ber 1986, or 61 percent. In the "Whenyou've gotbedsonly 18
population at large, AIDS cases inches apart, you con't help but
high-risk groups entering prison general prison population
than the public thinks there are
said H. Parker Ealcs, director of
nursing health services for the
state Department of Correction
and architect of the state's re-
sponse to AIDS in prison. "This is
just not a high-risk area
Of North Carolina inmates
tested since 1983, 15 have been
diagnosed as having AIDS, nine
of them this vcar. Of those 15,
The relatively low number of
confirmed AIDS cases in prison is
not unique to North Carolina.
Although AIDS has spread in
have increased 79 percent duning
the same period.
The statistics bring little com-
fort to Luther Marshall, a con-
victed murderer serving a life
sentence at Odom Correctional
Instutute in Northampton
County.
He is worried about the homo-
sexuals who are active at night,
the drug users who brush against
him in the packed prison dormi-
tory and the hundreds of inmates
rub against people said
Marshall, a stocky man with an
untamed red beard. "I really
worry about my life
Many inmates say the low
number of proven cases might
mean nothing because prison
officials did not only limited test-
ing for acquired immune defi-
ciency syndrome. In fact, inmates
generally cannot be tested on
request, and officials told The
News and Observer of Raleigh
prisons throughout the nation, whosegerms may be lurking on that they hadn't kept track of how
the growth has been slower than his dinner plates. many had been screened.
More than a few of those in- Marshall's situation is one in
mates, he suspects, have the which state health officials be-
in the general U.S. population. A
U.S. Department of justice sur-
vey involving 58 prisons found
that AIDS cases among inmates
increased from 766 to 1,232 be-
lieve testing is appropriate, said
the head of the state's communi-
calbe disease control section.
"In general, if a person has a
need to know whether they test
positivethen certainly testing
should be available said Dr.
Rebecca A. Meriwether. "But
there are some ramifications to
that question in the corrections
systems. Primarily the one I'm
aware of is the issue of confiden-
tiality, and I think that's a very
important one"
Testing also is appropriate for
those who exhibit symptoms that
could be traced to AIDS and those
who want to donated blood or
body organs, she said.
Co-op provides students with
jobs and experience
Continued from p. 1
earning to complement their
learning. Students are placed in
jobs pertaining to their field of
interest and gain experience
while making money at the same
time.
By participating in either the
alternate plan or the parallel plan
students can work alternating
semesters or work while going to
school. Students can obtain work
assignments in industry, busi-
ness, government and commu-
nity service. Co-op also allows
the student who is undecided
about a major to explore career
interests.
Betsy Hayes, the director of the
Co-op program said, "A lot of
times students sav they don't
have time to co-op. If you explore
all the opportunities Co-op offers
I don't see how you could not
have time to co-op
Students can be placed in posi-
tions with federal agencies, state
governments, and the private
sector. Application procedures
and general requirements vary
from employer to employer.
Although there is no
committment on the part of the
employer to hire graduating Co-
op students, Hayes said many
employers do decide to make job
offers to their Co-op students.
Many employers even set up Co-
op programs in order to observe
work performance of students in
a realistic high-pressure environ-
ment.
Hayes said ECU'sCo-opdepart-
ment has placed 892 students in
the last year. The successful place-
ment rates continue to increase
each year. Participating were 405
employers from 14 states. A few
students were even placed out of
the country. Michelle Sheeran, a
Co-op student placed in a job in
Ohio said, "I really feel Co-op is
worthwhile. In my job this past
summer I made a lot of valuable
connections and obtained work
experience I could not have gotten
otherwise. It was a great experi-
ence
But testing is no solution for
AIDS in prisons or elsewhere, she
said.
'There isn't anything magical
about testing she said. "The
precautions that have to be taken
are the same, whether he tests
positive or not In addition,
there are questions about the
accuracy of test, she said.
In Marshall's case a history of
intravenous drug use and two
recent tattoos didn't merit a test
"I've asked to be tested twice,
and they say if there's no symp-
toms I can't be tested said
Marshall, 31. "I just want to know
if I'm OK. I'd pay for my own test
if I could-
P.T.A. PIZZA
OPEN 24 HR. ON FRI.SAT.
Open until 2:00 a.m Sun Thurs.
757-1955
� Ill LUUIU.
WELCOME STUDENT STAFF
THE DEPARTMENT OF RESIDENCE LEFE AND HOUSING WISHES
TO WELCOME BACK THE FRIENDLY HIGH ENERGY COMMUNITY
3UILDERS. INFORMATION GIVERS. ACnvrrY PLANNERS. CONFIDANTS.
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STUDENT STAFF. WE ARE PROUD TO SAY THAT THESE
INDIVIDUALS HELP TO MAKE THE RESIDENCE HALLS HOME
FOR OTHER STUDENTS.
THESE INDIVIDUALS ARE IN ADDITION TO THOSE LISTED
Df THE 825 ISSUE.
WE MAKE THE DIFFERENCE
JILL WELLS
SUZANNE WHIT
GIN A WILLIAMS
SARAH WILLIAMS
VERONICA WILLIAMS
ED WTNIKI
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CHRIS WORKMAN
JOHANNE WRIGHT
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Buffet includes: 5 or 6 entrees, 2 appetizers,
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1
ii
i
Hours Mor
Address
Phone
Thurs
Fri
Sat
Sun
520 W Greenville Blvd
355 5360
I 1 30-10 00 pm
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12 11 00 pm
12 1000 pm
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The features department at the East Carolinian is seeking an
: editor, an assistant editor and staff writers. Apply in person
:at the publications building.
Carry-Out Service
Banquet Facilities Available
4444440044'44444444444�44���44440�0����

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NOW ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS FOR THE
1987-88
JUDICIAL BOARDS
PARTY!
That's Right!
Welcome Back "PARTY" People!
Let ANYTHING PAPER" Help You!
Stock your room or
X
house with the paper products
you'll need for everyday
meals and PARTIES.
Cups, plates, napkins, decora-
tions and balloons are just
some of the items
you'll find here.
Purple and Gold Headquarters.
10Discountwith I.D.
"ANYTHING PAPER"
Bells Fork Square
Hwy. 43 South
355-6212
These positions offer an excellent op-
portunity to gain experience and leader-
ship abitities that will benefit you
throughout your life. At the same time,
these positions will enable you to make
valuable contributions to East Carolina
University, For additional information
and applications, contact the Associate
Dean of Student's Office in 209
Whichard or the Attorney General's
Office in 222 Mendenhall.
ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE TURNED IN BY
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4TH































-k
-












































I
��� �

Teachers t
should be
Green si
st hool adr
rushing rut
schools
"W
use then
mav come i
fluid-
vvithutS,
sel �
tant sunenl
scho
avoid the
& �
heirs
was a : ;
boards a
w as de
emplo)
dea! i
Guilfordoi
ment. the
tra
cate thk
connrv
Force m
comer i
boar ii
Two oth
Sha.
qua-
structtin I
broiler wered
as factors in
1st Lt R
1986
. A d V
V .
Eri
3�"
(AP)-Teachers and other em-
ployees in Guilford County's
three school systems are being
urged to wear rubber gloves
when dealing with children's
blood and other body fluids in
order to protect themselves from
communicable diseases, notably
AIDS.
"It's a measure to protect the
staff and students'said Art
Costantini, Guilford County's
assistant superintendent for pu-
pil support services.
Teachers in county schools
were told during backto-school
orientation sessions this summer
to have a pair of rubber gloves
readily available, Costantini said.
"We would certainly recom-
mend that when a teacher is out
supervising kids on the play-
ground, she have rubber gloves
where she could get therr
quickly he said. "But we would
urge them to usccommon sense '
Costantini said teachers should
respond with haste if a child were
to have an emergencv, but also
F-16 pilot eje
for wrong rea
(AP)-A pilot who ejected from
an Sll million F-16 fighter jet near
Shaw Air Force Base in February
1986 was busy with bad weather
and another airplane and failed
to notice a fuel problem in his
own plane, the Air Force said
Monday.
Capt. Thomas D. Entwistle was
treated for minor injuines when
he ejected from the plane Feb. 11,
1986.
Air Force officials have de-
clined to say if Entwistle was
disciplined because of the crash
that destroyed the plane, and
they have decided not to release
details of the crash investigation,
saying it would "constitute a
clearly unwarranted invasion of
personal privacy
The Assosuaitxi Prys had rc-
questedthe report from the flying
evaluation board that was con-
vened at the crash.
Deputy Administrative Assis-
tant Steven A. Thompson, with
the Air Force in Washington, told
the AP in a letter that the crash
occurred because the plane's
engine did not get fuel. "The pilot
failed to recognize a trapped fuel
condition, which caused the en-
gine fuel starvation the report
said.
1st Lt. Kris Duvalle, a spokes-
woman at Shaw, said a "trapped
fuel condition" could mean sev-
eral things - such as a mechanical
problem with the motor that
switches fuel from one tank to
another, a faulty switch to the fuel
supply or a clogged fuel filter.
'That causes engine fuel star-
vation, and your engine stops
running when there's no gas
she said.
A gauge and flashing lights
warn the pilot of such a fuel
"condition she said.
Thompson said Entwistle
failed to recognize the problem in
his own plane 'because of other
significant events occurring si-
multaneously
"During the period in which
the trapped fuel condition devel-
oped, the pilot's new wingman
was experiencing difficulty with
his aircraft, and there was a con-
gested air traffic pattern with
poor weather he said.
Air Force regulations say a
flying evaluation board is con-
vened to probe: a lack of profi-
ciency; failure to meet training
standards; lack of judgement:
College
Republicans
rant
Continued from p. 3
dupe, I'm no dummv Do :K
really believe C1SPES can torn me
against my mother Of grand
mother?
"I don't worry so much boul
the public impact Woerhte st id
"The more important impact - i
the White House" College nt
publicans, she said, have v
ties to White House auic
conservative legislators
"supply key information ID M HI
congressmen
But, she added, "1 dov " v
people really take the � - v
and raving scriousl
D
1212 N.
NEVA
ST
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u n
"snnr
M� ��"�





n IE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 27, 1987
system
i �pnate, said
t.ite s communi-
ltrol section.
a person has a
K thor thov tost
rdj touting
said Or
riwether. But
.unifications to
corrections
. one I m
fiden
k that's a erv
But testing is no solution for
AIDS in prisons or elsewhere, she
said
There isn't anything magical
about testing she said. "The
precautions that have to be taken
are the same, whether he tests
positive or not In addition,
there are questions about the
accuracy ot test, she said.
nato tor
omsthat
In Marshall's case a history of
intravenous drug use and two
recent tattoos didn't merit a test.
I ve asked to be tested twice,
and they say it there's no symp-
toms 1 can t be tested said
Marshall 31 1 just want to know
it I mOk I d pa) tor mvovvn test
it 1 could '
)RTH CHINA
CHINESE
:STAURANT
FOOD IN TO WN!
-Fri. Luncheon Special
11:30 - 3:00 p.m.)
$3.25
m. ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
.uncheon Buffet
(12 - 3:00 p.m.)
$4.95
5 -Tees 2 appetizers,
md fresh iced tea.
30-10 00 p.m
11 30 11 -00 p.m
12-11:00 p.m.
12-10 00 p.m.
- i Greev.iie NC 27834
� .
i!
� es A.aiioble
EPTING
INS FOR THE
�88
BOARDS
IF.HAl
ffer an excellent op-
erience and leader-
will benefit you
. At the same time,
enable you to make
his to East Carolina
litional information
intact the Associate
s Office in 209
ittorney General's
inhall.
ST BE TURNED IN BY

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i

EMBER 4TH
I
Teachers told to battle AIDS
(AP)-Tcachcrs and other em-
ployees in Guilford County's
three school systems are being
urged to wear rubber gloves
when dealing with children's
blood and other body fluids in
order to protect themselves from
communicable diseases, notably
AIDS.
"It's a measure to protect the
staff and students'said Art
Costantini, Guilford County's
assistant superintendent for pu-
pil support services.
Teachers in county schools
were told during back-to-school
orientation sessions this summer
to have a pair of rubber gloves
readily available, Costantini said.
"We would certainly recom-
mend that when a teacher is out
supervising kids on the play-
ground, she have rubber gloves
where she could get them
quickly he said. "But we would
urge them to use common sense
Costantini said teachers should
respond with haste if a child were
to have an emergency, but also
should be careful.
Greensboro and High Point
school administrators are fur-
nishing rubber gloves to all the
schools.
"We're urging employees to
use them whenever they feel they
may come in contact with bodily
fluids, with vomiting, blood,
with cuts, just to protect them-
selves as a matter of course said
Sue Mcdly, Greensboro's assis-
tant superintendent for middle
schools. "Itsa precaution taken to
avoid the spread of disease
School officials are re-educat-
ing their staffs about a policy that
was adopted by all three school
boards a year ago. That policy
was designed to provide school
employees with guidelines to
deal with various communicable
diseases.
Drafted with the help of the
Guilford County Health Depart-
ment, the policy states, among
other things:
"Gloves are recommended
when direct hand contact with
body fluids is anticipated (i.e
treating bloody noses, handling
clothes soiled by incontinence,
cleaning small spills by hand)
Dr. Tim Lane, chief of internal
medicine at Moses Cone Hospital
and an infectious disease special-
ist, said the schools' policy is
prudent, even though North
Carolina has only 255 reported
cases of acquire immune defi-
ciency syndrome and the in-
stance of the deadly disease in
youngsters is uncommon.
"It seems to be a reasonable
policy Lane said. "I think those
recommendations are pretty
standard
Other school systems in the
state also have adopted AIDS
policies, said George Shack-
elford, chief consultant for health
education at the N.C Depart-
ment of Public Instruction.
"I think this is something
you're going to see will be more
widespread Shackelford said.
"But local school systems have a
great deal of autonomy, and it isa
local decision
Shackelford said his depart-
ment has made no suggestions to
school systems aabout adopting
an AIDS policy. This summer,
however, the General Assembly
charged the Department of Pub-
lic Instruction with developing a
curriculum on AIDS to teach
youngsters about the fatal dis-
ease. That curriculum will be
incorporated in class rooms this
fall.
Schools are not alone in devel-
oping AIDS policies.
Upon recommendation from
the Centers for Disease Control in
Atlanta, Greensboro police and
rescue workers recently have
taken to wearing the protective
gloves to guard against contact
with bodily fluids such as blood,
saliva and urine.
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS
BILLY E. CREECH
OPTICIAN &. MANAGER
Doctors Park. Bldg I
Slanton&burg Road
Greenville. NC 27834
Telephone
(�I9) 752 4018
KAYBAN
FRAMES
20 PROFFESSION'AL COURTESY OFF
ON ALL GLASSES
TRANSPORTION PROVIDED BY
GREAT BUS
OPEN MONDAY AND WEDNESDAY VUARNET
NIGHTS UNTIL 7 30 P.M. FRAMES
F-16 pilot ejected
for wrong reasons
Dale Cards
(they're funny!)
r

(AP)-A pilot who ejected from
an$ll million F-16fighter jet near
Shaw Air Force Base in February
1986 was busy with bad weather
and another airplane and failed
to notice a fuel problem in his
own plane, the Air Force said
Monday.
Capt. Thomas D. Entwistle was
treated for minor injuiries when
he ejected from the plane Feb. 11,
1986.
Air Force officials have de-
clined to say if Entwistle was
disciplined because of the crash
that destroyed the plane, and
they have dec led not to release
details of the crash investigation,
saying it would "constitute a
clearly unwarranted invasion of
pcrsoni 1 privacy
The Asooa&U Pre. had j;c-
questedthe report from the flying
evaluation board that was con-
vened at the crash.
Deputy Administrative Assis-
tant Steven A. Thompson, with
the Air Force in Washington, told
the AP in a letter that the crash
occurred because the plane's
engine did not get fuel. "The pilot
failed to recognize a trapped fuel
condition, which caused the en-
gine fuel starvation the report
said.
1st Lt. Kris Duvalle, a spokes-
woman at Shaw, said a "trapped
fuel condition" could mean sev-
eral things - such as a mechanical
problem with the motor that
switches fuel from one tank to
another, a faulty switch to the fuel
supply or a clogged fuel filter.
"That causes engine fuel star-
vation, and your engine stops
running when there's no gas
she said.
A gauge and flashing lights
warn the pilot of such a fuel
"condition she said.
Thompson said Entwistle
failed to recognize the problem in
his own plane "because of other
significant events occurring si-
multaneously
"During the period in which
the trapped fuel condition devel-
oped, the pilot's new wingman
was experiencing difficulty with
his aircraft, and there was a con-
gested air traffic pattern with
poor weather he said.
Air Force regulations say a
flying evaluation board is con-
vened to probe: a lack of profi-
ciency; failure to meet training
standards; lack of judgement;
College
Republicans
rant
Continued from p. 3
dupe, I'm no dummy. Do they
really believe QSPES can turn me
against my mother or grand-
mother?
"I don't worry so much about
the public impact Woerhle said.
"The more important impact is in
the White House" College Re-
publicans, she said, have close
ties to White House aides and
conservative legislators, and
"supply key information to some
congressmen
But, she added, "I don't think
people really take their ranting
and raving seriously
J
willful or wanton violation of
flying regulations; or habits,
traits or characteristics that indi-
cate the officer is undesirable for
continued flying duties. The Air
Force would not give a reason for
convening a flying evaluation
board after Entwistlc's crash.
Two other F-16 crashes near
Shaw in 1986 were fatal. Inade-
quate supervision and poor in-
structions from an air traffic con-
troller were cited by the Air Force
as factors in the crash that killed
1st Lt. Ralph A. Cyr on Oct. 9,
1986.
Runway lights that were too
bright were cited in the crash on
Nov. 12, 1986 that killed Lt. Col.
Eric T Olver.
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The REBEL
STUDENT SPECIAL
Discount Membership for Fall Semester
ONLY $40.00
(Offer expires Sunday, Sept. 13.)
Indoor Swimming Pool Weight Room
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East Carolina University's
National Award-Winning Literary -















Art Magazine
is accepting applications for
the following positions:
Assistant Editor
Coke
Staton Rd.

Empire
Brushes
ECU-Greenville
758-6892
Poetry Editor
Art Director
Yale
Applications must be turned into the Media Board Office, 2nd
Floor of the Publications Building, by Sept. 4, 5:00 p.m.
Operated by the 10th St.
Greenville Recreation and Parks Department













� - Jt M. � 4. mjt , t - -in .IT �-�. �.





THf FAST( AROI INIAN
Entertainment
Scare film digs up old friends
MJCUST27, 1987 Page 10
ByMICAH HARRIS
Slafl Writer
I he Monster Squad" is the
latesl in a series of
"Spielbergesque"films in which
.in '80s equivalent group of the
"Oui Gang" kids confronts won-
ders or horrors beyond their nor-
mal!) mundane existence.
In thecaseoi this film, confron-
tation is definitely with horrors.
Junior high school kids Sean
(Andre Gower) and Patrick
(Robby Kiger) lead a local club of
monster movie fans. Their inter-
ests range beyond the latest splat-
ter movie to the classic Universal
horror films of the '30s and '40s;
11 ley even go so hi r as to del ve 1 nto
actual monster lore.
the latter two interests be-
come useful when who elso but
Count Dracula (Duncan Regehr)
steps mi t oi the late show and into
their home town in search of an
ancient amulet which can upset
the balance of good and e- -1 nd
tie's nut alone. .
Ihe movie is a curious brew oi
success and failure.
1 hemo ie succeeds as a tribute
to the old Universal free-for-all
monster films such as "House of
Frankenstein" or "Housed Drac-
ula" which brought the
Wolfman, Dracula, Frankenstein,
and some variety of hunch-
backed creep into the same
movie.
Although "Monster Squad"
lacks a hunchback, it extends the
concept to include a mummy and
the Creature from the Black La-
goon. With one exception, the
monsters are wonderfully real-
ized in make-ups which allow not
only immediate audience recog-
nition but also a fresh approach in
design.
You know director Fred
Dekker was on a nostalgia trip,
trying to recapture the fascina-
tion he felt for the old horror
movies as a child: movies which
are sadly ignored today by enter-
tainment programming directors
tor full color gore fests.
Indeed, the movie's heroes
probably reflect Dckker-s child-
hood horror tastes from the 6Cs
instead of that of 80's junior high
kids. In fact, there is an exchange
between Sean and his father
which is a sarcastic comment on
the popularity of Jason and
Freddy movies.
The Monster Squad" is at its
best when it's lighthearted; un-
fortunately there is a failed at-
tempt to integrate some serious-
ness: Sean's parents' marital
problems, a realistic incineration
of a likeable cop and something of
a footnote on the holocaust. None
of these elements are fully devel-
oped to justify their being there;
they seem to be merely grafted
on.
The interpretation of Dracula
here epitomizes this failed seri-
ousness. In character, he is quite
chilling. In make-up however, he
is modeled on the Lugosi version
with a cape, high collar, and slick
hair: an American pop-culture
icon as familiar as Mickey Mouse.
His make-up is the least altered
of all the monsters and the least
effective. Regehr's performance
is good, but his Dracula could
have learned some grooming
habits from Chris Sarandon's
vampire in "Fright Night
All in all, "The Monster Squad"
is enjoyable. But don't rush out
and see it unless you're still
twelve years old at heart, or
fondly remember when the late
show was dominatied by classic
monsters and not psychos in
hockey masks.
Let's face it, if s hard to be one
way and not the other when the
subject is monsters.
Society argues for joining up
By LAURASALAZAR
StaM Writer
"It is so intense that you can
feel the pressure said fanice
Schreiber, advisor to the ECU
1 orensics team.
Schreiber was describing fo-
rensics, public speaking events
including a variety oi informa-
tive, persuasive and
extemporaneous speaking.
Other aspects of forensks are
communication analysis prose
interpretation, dramatic duo,
drama interpretation and poetry
interpretation.
According to Schreiber, partici-
pating in forensics develops
important communication skills
which can be used after college.
Schreiber said a great deal of
discipline and diligence is
needed to produce precision
work.
Funded by the Student Gov-
ernment Association, the team
has competed in four tourna-
ments in the past 2 1 2 years of its
existence.
Students research and work on
their own speeches, and
Schreiber helps them with the
delivery and organization of the
speech. Schreiber said all
speeches are memorized except
for the interpretation speeches
where manuscripts can be used.
"The manuscript should be an
extension the speaker said
Schreiber.
Schreiber recalls her most
embarassing moment with the
team: "We went to a tournament
in Shippensburg, Pennsylvania,
and we were very low on funds.
We stayed at this cheap hotel. It
See FORENSICS, page 11
Band with deep rock roots to play Greenville
A band called Victory will be
comming to the Attic Friday
night.
One local music expert has de-
scribed them as hard rock. "Not
heavy metal" hard rock or coun-
try rock but straight hard rock.
The band completed an album
last year, according to a press
release, called "Don't Get Mad,
Get Even The album, carried
by Germany's Metronome Rec-
ords, launched a tour in Europe.
However, the band has been
working on a third album in a
German studio.
Although Greenville may not
have heard much of the name
Victory, people may be more
familiar with the groups many of
the band members have played
with.
Bass player Peter Knorn comes
from Fargo, a "pioneer rock
group in Germany" which once
included a Scorpions drummer,
Matthias Jabs.
Vocalist and guitarist Charlie
Huhn has played with Ted
Nugent and Trevor Rabin of Yes.
Huhn also played with a former
Ozzy Osborne drummer,
Tommy Aldridge.
Dracula tries to get Phoebe's amulet "TOe Monster Squad" is now playing at Plitt Theaters
Humor
Anyone got a car ph@ne?
i
By ANDY LEWIS
feature Editor
Let me ask you a personal ques-
tion.
Have you ever looked under
the hood of your car?
Joe Manual Labor Grogham-
mer (just call him Rock) is out
there laughing at me right now,
slapping his knees with his greasy
hands.
Some of us, like Rock, were
brought up playing with spark
plugs and chewing on fan belts.
Some of us merely like to drive.
When the car breaks, we follow a
simple procedure:
1. Get out the phone credit card
2. Call Dad.
(I've mastered this procedure).
Anyway, for those of you auto-
mobile ignoramuses like me, I've
got a little story for you. I was
driving a 1975 Chevy Nova which
belonged to a friend of mine. I was
driving the borrowed car home
on US 64 under a 98 degree sun.
"Don't turn on the air condi-
tioner my friend warned me as I
took the keys from him Fridav
afternoon.
To make a long story short, I
turned on the air conditioner.
The car groaned, and I heard a
loud crack as some large part of
the engine ignited itself and rock-
eted through the hood and into a
tree.
Steaming furiouslv (both me
and the car), I pulled over, and the
engine continued to sputter after I
took the keys out of the ignition
switch.
'Hmmmm I thought. 'Looks
like a good one-fourth of the
engine is missing. Hmmm. My
friend will not let me borrow even
his TV Guide after this
My luggage had been run over
by a truck.
I'm safely back at school now. I
guess there really isn't a moral to
this story.
But if you don't know more
about cars than I do, you may
want to get a car phone. Ask Dad
to get it for your birthday.
Z103 spins discs on campus
"Greek Street the painted
road in front of the Student Store,
became the broadcast studio of
WZYC-FM (ZI03) Monday
morning.
James Kaye and J.T. of "The
Waking Crew" hosted the morn-
ing broacast from 6 to 10 a.m.
while giving away book covers,
eagle snacks, frisbees and beach
towels.
The purpose of this broadcast
was to let students know the sta-
tion was operating in the
Greenville area, according to
Z103 Program Director J.T. Ste-
vens. "Greenville is our meat
Stevens said in a telephone inter-
view Friday. He added, "We plan
to take a very active role in ECU
this year
broadcastion fror
crans-
The station recently began son
mitter, located in Goldsboro. The
tower is now significantly closer
to Grenville and can get better
transmission because it is located
on a hill.
Students passing by the live
broadcast heard music by such
bands as the Rolling Stones, U2,
Sammy Hagar and Van Morri-
Ethics of
CHARLOTTE (AP) � Carol
Phelps could barely recognize
her father when she walked into
Presbyterian Hosital on Monday
April 27.
At 85, Thomas Phelps had
lived in a rest home since � stroke
and brain surgery five years ago.
In February, he had fallen and
broken his left hi p. On th is day, he
was in intensive care after sur-
gery to drain a massive infection
in that hip.
In a coma, he was kept alive bv
food and water dripping through
tubes in his nose and veins He
weighed 115 pounds, down from
his normal 175. His stomach was
swollen.
"I wouldn't have known it was
my father if Ihadn'tread thechart
at the end of the bed remembers
Carol, a social worker with Char-
lotte Speech and Hearing Center
"He had tubes going in every
opening and just looked terrible
She confronted the inevitable
question:
"At what point do you say
This is it?"
Every day, in hospitals across
the country, patients and families
face the same question.
Dying, once a matter of fate, is
becoming a matter of choice.
Medical advances have made it
possible to keep people alive long
after they have stopped breath-
ing and eating on their own. But
skyrocketing health care costs
and questions about quality of
life are raising ethical dilemmas
over when and how to use
medicine's miracles.
"If you want to live as long as
you can, you can live a long
time said John Lincourt, a medi-
cal ethicist who teaches philoso-
phy at UNC-Charlotte. "But it
might be longer than you want
For Carol, there was no doubt
that Thomas Phelps would have
wanted tc
For foui
Carol trn
doctor to
end of thj
came out.
Her fat
ing, May
Carol is
sion: "I
pening to
ing cath.
Since t.
unhook
respirator,
tures in
ported the
patients tc
But wl
the same aj
and moral
A 3-yeai
zation, tl
Group, is
decisions
doctors aic
Fo
dis
Contini
was so crw
asked if
showed
Tf you ai
ing a team
gamzatior
p.m. Wed i
the Theater
Schreiber
thought of
your mind,
join us. If
dent, and
mgs, you
compete "
IkXJ
r
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U Suiting Jewelry 30 ofj
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James Kaye and J.T. of The Waking Crew laugh it up with students during the morning broadcast

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I





MICUS1 27 W87 Page 10
v
now playing at Plitt Theaters.
arphone?
and the car), I pulled over, and the
engine continued to sputter after I
k the keys out of the ignition
nmmm I thought. 'Looks
ike a good one-fourth of the
, ib missing. Hmmm. My
11 not let me borrow even
iuide after this
M i luggage had been run over
i m safely back at school now. I
there really isn't a moral to
you don't know more
cars than I do, you may
ant to get a car phone. Ask Dad
get it for your birthday.
on campus
it
.g to
non from a new trans-
mitter, located in Goldsboro. The
r is now significantly closer
renville and can get better
transmission because it is located
on a hill.
Students passing by the live
ideast heard music by such
bands as the Rolling Stones, U2,
Sammy Hagar and Van Morri-
son.
� ei
��
up with students during the morning broadcast.
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 27, 1987
11
Ethics of euthanasia argued
CHARLOTTE (AP) � Carol
Phelps could barely recognize
het father when she walked into
Presbyterian Hosi tal on Monday,
April 27.
At 85, Thomas Phelps had
lived in a rest home since a stroke
and brain surgery five years ago.
In February, ne had fallen and
broken his left hip. On this day, he
was in intensive care after sur-
gery to drain a massive infection
in that hip.
In a coma, he was kept alive by
food and water dripping through
tubes in his nose and veins. He
weighed 115 pounds, down from
his normal 175. His stomach was
swollen.
"I wouldn't have known it was
my father if I hadn't read thechart
at the end of the bed remembers
Carol, a social worker with Char-
lotte Speech and Hearing Center.
"He had tubes going in every
opening and just looked terrible
She confronted the inevitable
question:
"At what point do you say
'This is it?"
Every day, in hospitals across
the country, patients and families
face the same question.
Dying, once a matter of fate, is
becoming a matter of choice.
Medical advances have made it
possible to keep people alive long
after they have stopped breath-
ing and eating on their own. But
skyrocketing health care costs
and questions about quality of
life are raising ethical dilemmas
over when and how to use
medicine's miracles.
"If you want to live as long as
you can, you can live a long
time said John Lincourt, a medi-
cal ethicist who teaches philoso-
phy at UNC-Charlotte. "But it
might be longer than you want
For Carol, there was no doubt
that Thomas Phelps would have
wanted to die.
For four days after the surgery,
Carol tried to get her father's
doctor to stop treatment. By the
end of the week, feeding tubes
came out.
Her father died the next morn-
ing. May 2.
Carol is at peace with her deci-
sion: "I felt that what was hap-
pening to my dad was prolong-
ing death, not life
Since the 1975 court battle to
unhook Karen Ann Quinlan's
respirator, judges and legisla-
tures in many states have sup-
ported the rights of terminally ill
patients to die.
But what's legal isn't always
the same as whafs ethical. Values
and morals are personal matters.
A 3-year-old Charlotte organi-
zation, the Bioethics Resource
Group, is dedicated to taking the
decisions out of the hands of
doctors alone and involving the
Forensics
discussed
Continued from page 10
was so cheap that the desk clerk
asked if we minded if they
showed pornographic movies
If you are interested in becom-
ing a team member, the first or-
ganizational meeting will be at 8
p.m. Wednesday in room 211 of
the Theater Arts building.
Schreiber added, "Even if the
thought of forensics has crossed
your mind, please come out and
join us. If you are a diligent stu-
dent, and you come to the meet-
ings, you will get a chance to
compete
people whose lives are at stake.
Bioethics group members
spend hours speaking to civic
groups, encouraging people to
think about how they want to die.
"What would you want if you
had a stroke and the conse-
quences were irreversible?" asks
Lincourt, Charlotte Memorial
Hospital's ethicist-in-rcsidence
for five years.
"Do you want your family in-
come wiped out? Do you want a
full-court press? I can tell you, in
this town they could probably
keep you going for years
One of a growing number of
community bioethics commit-
tees, the Charlotte group devel-
oped out of a discussion by some
Mecklenburg County doctors
who realized that unlimited
health care was not available to
everyone.
"Since our resources are finite,
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wecannot giveevery bit of care to
every person who needs it said
Dr. George Barrett, a radiologist
and chairman of the group.
"Physicians cannot and should
not make these decisions alone.
They must be made by you
To provide a place for doctors,
patients and families to go when
they need help with anguishing
moral questions, the bioethics
group encouraged Charlotte's
three major hospitals to establish
ethics committees.
Charlotte Memorial's commit-
tee, formed in September 1984,
meets once a month to hear cases.
Mercy Hospital is in the process
of forming a committee.
Presbyterian Hospital's
committee has been meeting
since May, 1985. In the last year, it
has been consulted on more than
10 cases involving terminally ill
patients.
1 mc
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a M





1
12 THF EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 27, 1987
Author gives kids the facts about sex
Carole Marsh says the best
approach in writing children's
books about sex and its possible
complications is to be direct and
teful
'Idon I minceany words said
Marsh oi Bath, N.C, who has
a rittcn i series ot sex education
materials for children, teachers
and parents The facts are
rtough you don t have to make
the facts any scarier than they are.
: he one thing 1 really trv to do
is really cover a child's lifetime of
sex.
' I ike money, there will al-
iv- b) something to worry
ibout nd sex is just the same
I m hoping that will bo a
assuring.That's just the
u tsol lite, rhere are good things
rtd bad things and that goes for
ex, too
S i : od thing; you don't
� ki Is to death
dshe tried to be just
d ' hen talking about ac-
nmune deficiency svn-
' � absolutely impos
tell them how you get the
��- ithout telling them
bout homosexuality she said.
s not kui ourselves, they've
it l!i:
s reallv impos
arsh
po
h AIDS without being
�rial includes a lami-
� � ard she hopes will
in ncc a teen-
sex or at least
i get them to read
let's give them
in hcs by three
. i I them
iiicl
' .i card has "Six
. ex Steps" for the
� ants to sav no; the
l( has sex "musts" for
on against pregnancy
ou v ommunicate to
fifth- or sixth-graders)
i really a good idea.
: ial to heart said
who has written
- books tor about 10
' not have a lot of luck
i � - n. essarily. It
�ncompasses the
some kills will be
'involved
; ti n to the laminated
� rial includes books,
. her guides, post-
ers and newsletters. It is pub-
lished by Gallopadc Publishing
Group, which is run by Marsh
and her husband, Bob Long-
meyer. The company publishes
only Marsh's books.
Marsh said some of the mate-
rial, which is geared toward chil-
dren 7 to 17, has been ordered by
national bookstore chains, such
as VValdenbooks. She has re-
ceived inquiries on it from
around the country and has an
international wholesaler. She
said she will find out about North
Carolina's interest in the series
soon, since teachers have just
started returning to school.
"It (sex education) is on
people's minds right now
Marsh said in a telephone inter-
view. 'There's a lot of interest
around the world. So I wrote it
with that in mind without any
American prejudices in it
Lois Chenault is an elementary
school teacher in Bath who de-
scribes herself as conservative.
But Chenault, who reviewed the
material as a favor to Marsh, said
she was impressed by what she
read.
"She didn't preach Chenault
said, adding that Marsh teaches
children how to say no and what
to do when they say yes. "Carole
knows all kids are not going to
say no, and those that don't need
to know what to do
Her explanations "are brief, not
long, not drawn out � this is the
way it is, these are the facts
Chenault said.
The series includes a set of
eight books on specific sex sub-
jects, such as: "First AILS: Frank
Facts for Kids "A Period is More
Than a Punctuation Mark
"Sperm, Squire & Other Squiggly
Stuff "Abstinence Makes the
Heart Grow Fonder "I Con If
You Con(dom) "AIDS-to-Zits:
A 'Scctionary' for Kids "Your
Lifetime of Sex and "The Truth
& Consequences of Sexually
Transmitted Diseases
A set of "Smart Sex Stuff"
workbooks, which include quiz-
zes and games, has been pre-
pared for use in the homeor class-
room. And three books have been
especially prepared for parents:
"Like a Virgin: How to Convince
Your Child to Abstain from Sex
"How to Get Your Kid Out of
School � Without AIDS, a Dis-
ease or a Baby and "Could Your
Child Die Laughing?: AIDS and
Today's Adolescents
For parents who have doubts.
Marsh urges them in her intro-
duction to tear out pages that
disturb them. And although
some of the material is meant for
children, she reminds parents
that they can keep the books in
their possession.
"They can keep control of the
books and show the parts they
want to she said. "I definitely
think the parents should be in
control. If they object to some-
thing, tear the page out
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center is open Monday through
Thursday, 9 am - 4 p.m. For an
appointment or more information,
cal!24-Hour Helpline, 757-0003.
Ill East Third Street-The Lee Building
Greenville, North Carolina
Free Pregnancy Test-Confidential
Counseling
All Services and referrals are free of charge.
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FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY!
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208 E. Fifth St
756-2110
758-7979
�With purchase of a 22 oz. soft drink. Not valid with other coupons or
otters. At parHcipaling stores only. Expires Sept. 30, 1987.
.J
Money grant
research alcohl
Researchers at the Center for
Alcohol Studies hope a now
building approved last week by
the General Assembly will help
them realize Hargrove "Skipper"
Bowls' dream � finding a cause
and prevention of alcoholism.
'This was his last wish said
Mano Prez-Reyes, a University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill
researcher, referring to the $4 ?
million building. The four-story,
56,000-square-foot structure will
be named for Bowles, who died
last September.
As a Guilford County legisla-
tor, Bowles helped steer a bill
through the General Assembly to
establish the center in 1970
"His dream was to solve what
he saw as one of America's most
undcrattended problems said
Stuart Bondurant, dean of the
UNC-CH School of Medicine.
"Many who had great respect
for Skipper knew that achieving
that goal was the wa he would
most like to be rcmebercd
Solving the mysteries of alco-
holism won't be easy, but Bon-
durant and researchers at the
center believe it can be done.
In a relatively few years � esti-
mates range from five to 20 �
researchers think they will be
able to develop a screening test
for alcoholism.
Using a simple medical test,
they will by able to determine if a
child has the genetic tendency to
become an alcoholic
"With that in place, we should
be able to block the addiction to
prevent the development of alco-
holism Bondurant said.
Preventing the addiction could
be as simple as taking a pill or
receiving an injection. In addi-
tion, researchers some dav hope
to develop a drug to reduce alco-
hol intoxication and even the
craving for the drug.
Bondurant and others say the
new building will significantly
advance the center's efforts to
achieve Bowles' goals.
Hvith this building we expect
to be able to expand our work
considerably and in fact become
one of the nation's leading cen-
ters of research Bondurant says.
The building will mean that
human and animal research will
be conducted under one roof and
it will bring more than a dozen
existing researchers into closer
proximity. More researchers will
be added as funds are available.
Currently, the center is operat-
ing out of several sites on the
UNC-CH campus and a clinical
lab at Dorothea Dix Hospital in
Raleigh.
'The center is experiencing
severe growing pains said Prez-
Reyes, who is studying the rela-
tionship of alcohol and other
drugs. "Until space is allocated,
the center is forced to stagnate
Researchers say the new build-
ing also will help them compete
better for national grants.
David Janowsky, director of
the center, already has submitted
a request for a $5 million grant to
broaden the scope of the center's
research. In addition, plans are
under way to raise at least $1
million to equip the new build-
ing.
Despite problems of funding
and space, research underway at
the center, and elsewhere, is
showing progress in understand-
ing alcoholism.
Many researchers believe there
are different kinds of alcoholism
and that alcoholism may be a
generic name for several dis-
eases.
"Alcoholism is probably a col-
lection of illnesses, and it is now
known to be in part a genetic ill-
ness" said J.C Garbutt.
Although researchers think
people can be genetically predis-
posed to alcoholism, they also
think many alcoholics don't have
the genetic factor. For them, so-
cial problems or some other fac-
tor might trigger alcoholism.
Garbutt said the high-risk
group for the disease is the sons of
alcoholic men.
In studies with the offsprings of
alcoholics, Garbutt has been
looking for a "marker" for alco-
holism.
"Finding a marker is part of
what we want to do Janowsky
said. "A marker is an indication
before a person develops a dis-
ease that the person is going to
develop it
Once a marker is found, a test
for the disease can be developed.
In the search for a marker, stud-
ies have shot
have abnornl
tions.
"If you taM
it tendstodnr
says
thvr.
b alcoholi
In other rej
Ronald Thu
the rate at wl
lize alcohol
towhetlv j
alcoholism
While otl
mar -
cbrectorof tru
Research Labi
is look
from gt
Tod
alcohol - i
"Ah
membrane c
said. "We'd
modifv that
we can pi j
tion
Resean rj
possible to
would stop i
alcohol
To reach tl
huge sums tc
Only in tr
federal tundi
les shown
Yet more fe
for dental res
ing a cause f
"It's beei
janowsky
"When alcol
of as a will
nobody vs ai
money into it
to be thougl
disease, then!
ing to suppoi
Ii
PROGRAM

I
I '
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I
I
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I
500 W GrMi
II
pa
stu
ECU
LU
$3.8!
(wDiscoui
$3.
H
Great
V
I
m.m,m I ftiamiilW11' J
�. an � � m �.��M.

M

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.1






ROLINA1
NCY CENTER
i � Monday through1
4 p.m For an
i. � e information,
1 "inline. 757-0003.
; lie 1 ee Building
Northarolina
Liin rest-Confidential
c ounseling
free ol charge.�

MUFFLER I
n All Your j
� ive Needsl
10th Street
.NC 27834
7676
House
St.
h Cleaning
s - Cable TV
Sept. 30. 1987
T
C
Coupon
1 Soft Drink
Free
dIy Staff
.
OUR FRESH
ummrn
ESIMOFF!
T LONG SANDWICH
s fresh and hot. Then we make the
and most delicious fool long sand-
ave $1.00 on a hot deal at Subway.
dwiches & Salads
LAZA 756-2110
ifth St 758-7979
( soft clnnk Not valid with other coupons or
Expires Sept. 30, 1987.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 27,1987
13
Money granted to
research alcoholism
Researchers at the Center for
Alcohol Studies hope a new
building approved last week by
the General Assembly will help
them realize Hargrove "Skipper"
Bowls' dream � finding a cause
and prevention of alcoholism.
'This was his last wish said
Mario Trez-Reyes, a University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill
researcher, referring to the $4.5
million building. The four-story,
56,000-square-foot structure will
be named for Bowles, who died
last September.
As a Guilford County legisla-
tor, Bowles helped steer a bill
through the General Assembly to
establish the center in 1970.
"His dream was to solve what
he saw as one of America's most
underattended problems said
Stuart Bondurant, dean of the
UNC-CH School of Medicine.
"Many who had great respect
tor Skipper knew that achieving
that goal was the way he would
most like to be remebercd
Solving the mysteries of alco-
holism won't be easy, but Bon-
durant and researchers at the
center believe it can be done.
In a relatively few years � esti-
mates range from five to 20 �
researchers think they will be
able to develop a screening test
for alcoholism.
Using a simple medical test,
they will by able to determine if a
child has the genetic tendency to
become an alcoholic.
"With that in place, we should
be able to block the addiction to
prevent the development of alco-
holism Bondurant said.
Preventing the addiction could
be as simple as taking a pill or
receiving an injection. In addi-
tion, researchers some day hope
to develop a drug to reduce alco-
hol intoxication and even the
craving for the drug.
Bondurant and others say the
new building will significantly
advance the center's efforts to
achieve Bowles' goals.
Wv"tt tis building we expect
to be able to expand our work
considerably and in fact become
one of the nation's leading cen-
tersof research Bondurant says.
The building will mean that
human and animal research will
be conducted under one roof and
it will bring more than a dozen
existing researchers into closer
proximity. More researchers will
be added as funds are available.
Currently, the center is operat-
ing out of several sites on the
UNC-CH campus and a clinical
lab at Dorothea Dix Hospital in
Raleigh.
'The center is experiencing
severe growing pains said Prez-
Reyes, who is studying the rela-
tionship of alcohol and other
drugs. "Until space is allocated,
the center is forced to stagnate
Researchers say the new build-
ing also will help them compete
better for national grants.
David Janowsky, director of
the center, already has submitted
a request for a $5 million grant to
broaden the scope of the center's
research. In addition, plans are
under way to raise at least $1
million to equip the new build-
ing.
Despite problems of funding
and space, research underway at
the center, and elsewhere, is
showing progress in understand-
ing alcoholism.
Many researchers believe there
are different kinds of alcoholism
and that alcoholism may be a
generic name for several dis-
eases.
"Alcoholism is probably a col-
lection of illnesses, and it is now
known to be in part a genetic ill-
ness" said J.C Garbutt.
Although researchers think
people can be genetically predis-
posed to alcoholism, they also
think many alcoholics don't have
the genetic factor. For them, so-
cial problems or some other fac-
tor might trigger alcoholism.
Garbutt said the high-risk
group for the disease is the sons of
alcoholic men.
In studies with the offsprings of
alcoholics, Garbutt has been
looking for a "marker" for alco-
holism.
"Finding a marker is part of
what we want to do Janowsky
said. "A marker is an indication
before a person develops a dis-
ease that the person is going to
develop it
Once a marker is found, a test
for the disease can be developed.
In the search for a marker, stud-
ies
that alcoholics
thyroid func-
Lawmakers give boost to setting up a state greenway
have shown
have abnormal
tions.
"If you take out a rat's thyroid,
it tends to drink more Janowsky
says.
'The question is, could hypo-
thyroidism in humans be related
to alcoholism?"
In other research at UNC-CH,
Ronald Thurman has found that
the rate at which people metabo-
lize alcohol might provide a clue
to whether they are susceptible to
alcoholism.
While others are looking for a
marker. Amir Rezvani, associate
director of the Bowles Biomcdical
Research Lab, a part of the center,
is looking for ways to keep poeple
from getting drunk.
To do that, Rezvani is studying
alcohol's efects on the brain.
"Alcohol changes the cell
membrane chemically Rezvani
said. "We'd like to see if we can
modify that with a drug, to see if
we can prevent alcohol intoxica-
tion
Researchers also say it may be
possible to produce a drug that
would stop a person'scraving for
alcohol.
To reach that point will require
huge sums for research.
Only in the past decade has
federal funding for alcohol stud-
ies shown signigicant growth.
Yet more federal dollars still go
for dental research than for find-
ing a cause for alcoholism.
"It's been a closet issue
Janowsky said of alcoholism.
"When alcoholism was thought
of as a willpower disease, then
nobody wanted to put much
money into it. But when it begins
to be thought of as a biological
disease, then people become will-
ing to support its findings
North Carolina lawmakers
adopted a series of measures this
term giving the state park system
� last among the 50 states in per-
capita funding � a higher prior-
ity than before, a state senator
says.
Key among the measures is
the State Parks Act, which calls
for developing a master plan
placing a state park withing 50
miles of every North Carolina
resident.
Sen. Henson Barnes, D-Wayne,
said Friday the problem is par-
ticularly acute in the Piedmont,
since most of the state's 42 parks
are in the eastern or western parts
of the state. Bames was in Greens-
boro to address a state conference
of local parks and recreation
advisory board members.
'The state has been in the park
business since 1915, but it has not
been high profile at the state
Legislature said Barnes, who is
chairman of the State Parks Study
Commission.
The parks act also requires the
Department of Natural Re-
sources and Community Devel-
opment to take an inventory of
every state park and notify the
General Assembly of their needs.
In addition, the Legislature
appropriated $25 million to buy
park land and agreed to limit the
liability of landowners across
whose property the state's pro-
posed mountains-to-the-sea trail
will pass.
Most of the $25 million alloca-
tion will be used to buy land at
existing parks, but $2 million al-
ready has been spent to acquire
land for a new park at Lake James
near Morganton, Barnes said.
The mountains-to-the-sea trail,
which will pass through Greens-
boro, is about 25 percent com-
plete, Bames said. State officials
hope the trail, planned as the
longest state-owned trail in the
nation, will be finished within 10
years.
The mountains-to-the-sea trail
is a stat "greenway" � a natural
corridor making it possible for
hikers to walk long distances
with little contact from motor
vehicles.
"Americans need it (a green-
way) closer to them because
we're becoming more urban-
ized said Mary Jane Pugh, assis
tant secretary of the Departmeni
of Natural Resources and Com
munity Development. She saic
urbanized society needs such
corridors so people can move
easily from place to place without
having to deal with motor vehicle
traffic.
Several North Carolina mu-i
nicipalities, including Greens-
boro, have developed their own
greenway master plans calling
for webs of natural corridors link
ing city parks.
I
I
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Suite 8 A, Parliament Place
I (Directly Behind Farm Fresh)
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FAMILY BUFFET
500 W Grwnville Blvd
n
355-2172
3207 Nuat Blvd.
New Bern
Banquet Facilities Available

We're doing our
part to meet the
student's budget"
ECU Students Get 10 Off With I.D.
LUNCH DINNER
$3'89 featurim $4-89
(wDi�count jeaiunng (woitcoum
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Help Yourself Home
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'

14
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGICT27 1987
COMICS
BLOOM COUNTY

, Tf" �
K
III1III1IIITTTTTTTTTY
by Berke Breathed Overkill For Breakfast By FRIEDRICH
H �V -V
Kb
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spep'
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Christensen h
of Pirate offei
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By GEORGE OSBORNI
The I at arolin i
which sputtered througl a I
pointing 1986sea �
the grid thisfal witl an ��
sive coordii : �
air and gr ui .
Clydehnstensen I
enter hi st
assistant ar.J firsta
coordinator, has I
tions of I - .
"Last vear
to run m
really effective
r tl
THE VAMPIRE
� V.
'�
Si
said. "This yea
to throw for a 1
have to run for a
"S year
ECU will again u
and-s
rate coa hing staff ii
for the first time last a
complex
shoot u-
ety of doul i �
Since taking . -
signal caller - i .
iored the schei I fit
personnel.
W e hav simplil � ��
sive game an Ibi � .
the collegia .
said. "Tins vear �
little more motion ai
the I forrr il
W
jjOVD 1W
-ft ��
K.
4 VS
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by Mklver
icvcrAiiv
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ill team
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Walkin'The Plank
HV�tfhl 177773,
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Campus Comics
'(3CC"ByE 5A
3 w REL"WOJ
fej
ByBARBOUR
o
aahmT'
n'N
-
edition.
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Virgin Tch football
be watching Frank Be
closelv this season.
The first-year coach 11
ray State has some t. ug
fill. Last season : j
the Hokies to their r
ever, as they fir
ord of 9-2-1. Included in
a dramatic victory ovc rv.
in the Peach Bowl.
Doolev. however afl
conflicts with the St
ministration, is n
Wake Forest lr -
he hopes to put the I
the map.
When the unr.
Beamer he became tl
nus to coach at Virginia
years. Beamer has qual
During his six-year stinl at '
Owls to struggl
ByPATMOLLOl
4�isUn; Sports t ii:tor
The Temple L'niver:t v
have a long climb up a st
this year, as they once aga n -
a schedule with a slew if I
notch opponents
Temple will find it doubh h
to compete with the like - I B -
ton College Perm State and I
ida, simplv because t
minus their Heisman
runner-up, Taul Palmer Ha
Ron Jones, shown in action two years ao i
season after sitting out last season v ah a V





IIIIIII
IIIIIIITTIIIII
By FRIEDRICH
x�
dbS2
By JARRELL
'?�
" A
Q t�i v vi i-� u s- T
a V2l
2i�r t
THF hASTt AROI INIAN
Christensen takes over reigns
of Pirate offensive strategy
Sports
AUGUST 2 1987
15
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sports Writer
The East Carolina offense,
which sputtered through a disap-
pointing 1986 season, will take to
thcgnd this fall with a new of fen
ive coordinator and a balanced
air and ground game.
Clvde Christensen, who will
enter his second year as a Pirate
assistant and his first as offensive
coordinator, has high expecta-
tions of his young squad.
"Last year we were never able
to run the option or throw the ball
really effectively Christensen
�-aid. "This year we won't be able
to throw for a living but won't
have to run for a living like last
year
ECU will again utilize the run
and-shoot offense which the Pi-
rate coaching staff implemented
for the first time last season. A
complex offense, the run-and-
shoot uses one setback and a vari-
ety of double-shot formations
Since taking over as offensive
signal caller, Christensen has tai-
lored the scheme to fit ECU'S
personnel.
"We have simplified our offen-
sive game and brought it down to
the collegiate level Christensen
said. "This year we will show a
little more motion and more oi
the 1 formation
,
A major boost for the Pirate
offense this spring was the emer-
gence ot a starting quarterback.
Travis 1 hinter, a red shirt sopho-
more, edged out freshman Char
lie Libretto tor the starting job at
what had previously been a re-
volving door position.
The Winter Park, FL native
started three oi the nine games he
played in last year and improved
Steadil) during spring drills. At
the close of the spring season
hmter'spassing game had come
around to complement his al-
ready excellent speed therefore
setting him up to be a potent
option threat.
As 1 hinter grew stronger at
quarterback the Pirate receiving
corps gained needed confidence
and experience. Senior Ron Jones
will rejoin the lineup after being
sidelined with a knee injury earl v
last year. Along with Jones, will
be sophomore Walter Wilson
who at flanker, had eleven recep-
tions for 220 yards in 'Hb.
"Ron ones and Walter Wilson
will give us some explosive ca
pacity at thecomers that we have
not had in the past Christensen
said. 1 would like to incorporate
our fullback (Senior Anthony
Simpson) into tin. passing game
as well. Hut as with most of our of-
fensive positions, experience will
be a key asset
The inclusion of Simpson into
the passing game gives ECU an
added passing dimension. The 5-
10, 245 pound fullback will pres-
ent a target few quarterbacks can
miss and tackling challenge that
should make the opposing de-
fenses think twice about open
field, unassisted tackles.
Not that the Brooklyn, NY na-
tive is not a challenge in his own
right. Simpson started every
game last year at fullback and
was East Carolina's leading
rusher with 753 total yards. The
veteran back is one of few seniors
on the Pirate offense and can
always be counted on to gain
yards especially on the trap
plays.
"Simpson at fullback will al-
ways be a major plus for us, but 1
feel confident in our ability to run
the option as well Christensen
noted. "A negative may our lack
of big plays on offense. I don't
expect us to take a five yard pass
and make a 40 yard gain out of it
At tailback, Willie Lewis has a
firm hold on the starting job with
Jarrod Moody, Brian McPhatter
and Reggie McKinnev battling
tor sub roles. All of the Pirate
backs had a great spring and will
figure prominantly in the run-
ning and passing game.
Sophomore quarterback Travis Hunter will be called on to run the run-and-shoot offense for the
Pirates.
All offensive plans are contin-
gent upon a solid line up front.
For ECU this spring, the center
position was a big question.
"Our first priority this spring
was a center and Kyle Condrey
came in and did a good job for us
and will start Christensen said.
"What we need to do now is find
us a number two and three cen-
ter
The guard and tackle posi-
tions were pleasant surprises
during spring practice. ECU was
faced with the formidable task of
replacing seniors Greg Thomas
and Rich Autry at guards and
Robert Alexander and Curtis
Struyk at tackles.
"At guard I feel that we will be
as strong as anybody Chris-
tensen said. "At tackle we are
pretty solid too. Grant Lowe and
Todd Drugac had good springs
and have gotten stronger
As the season opener against
N.C. State looms near the bottom
line for the ECU offense will be
experience, depth and athletic
ability. With hard work, the off-
sides penalties and dropped
passes that are inherant with in-
experience are gone for good;
replaced with a lightning quick
and potent offensive attack.
As coach Christensen sized it
up, "We're deeper, more experi-
enced and our players are better
athletes .
Hokies hope to repeat success of 1986 season
Editor's Note: The series of stories
profiling the ojonents for the ECU
football team concludes in this issue.
The Virginia Tech profile was inad
vertently omitted from Tuesday's
edition.
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports i Jitor
VirgmiaTech football ijarts a ill
be watching Frank Beamer very
closely this season.
The first-year coach from Mur-
ray State has some tough shoes to
fill. Last season, Bill Dooley led
the Hokies to their best finish
ever, as they finished with a rec-
ord of 9-2-1. Included in that was
a dramatic victory over N .C. State
in the Peach Bowl.
Dooley, however after having
conflicts with the school's ad-
ministration, is now gone to
Wake Forest University, where
he hopes to put the Deacons on
the map.
When the university named
Beamer he became the first alum-
nus to coach at Virginia Tech in 42
years. Beamer has quality marks.
During his six-year stint at Mur-
ray State, he led his squads to a
42-23-2 mark I ast season, Mur-
ray State tied tor the champion-
ship in the Ohio Valley Confer-
ence and gained a berth in the
Division l-AA playoffs.
But, (hat doesn't change the
picture at Virginia Tech. Gone
trom last vcai :quad ib 12 start-
ers. The 10 starters that do return
are split evenly with the offense
retaining five as well as the de-
fense.
Among the players missing
offensivel) .ire the tailback tan-
dem ot Maurice Williams and
Eddie 1 hinter. I he two combined
for a total oi 1,901 yards rushing
last Si a son.
Another big loss on the offense
is split end Donald Wayne Snell.
Snell hauled in 34 receptiOi is for a
total of 661 yards To top all the
problems off, the offensive line is
in need ot tour new starters.
Back this season to once again
lead the offensive attack is quar-
terback Erik Chapman.
Chapman threw for 1,627 yards
and 10 touchdowns last season,
while adding a pair of TD's rush-
ing. Even with Snell gone,
Chapman will still have a trio of
capable receivers to look for
through the airways. Returning
are tight end Steve Johnson and
flankers David Everett and My-
ron Richardson.
Johnson had 33 receptions for
391 yards, while Johnson
chipped in 15 grabs for 205 yards.
The tailback position will be a
major concern for Beamer this
year now that Williams and
1 hinter have departed. The two
have dominated playing time at
the position for so long that when
they left there was hardly anv ex-
perience remaining. The only
returning player to the position
with any experience at all is Mal-
colm Blacken. Blacken totaled a
mere 68 yards rushing last fall.
Also expected to help out at the
position are redshirt freshmen
Lamar Smith and Ralph Brown.
The tailback position may be
lacking in depth, but the outlook
for the fullback spot is very good.
Three veterans, Earnie Jones,
Sean Donnelly and Rich Fox, all
return to share the workload at
the position.
The only returner to the offen-
sive line this season will be Kevin
Keeffe. He was considered bv the
coaches last season to be the most
consistent blocker on the team.
The defense was also victim-
ized with the loss of some key
performers. Defensive line stars,
Morgan Roane, Curtis Taliaferro
and Paul Nelson, will all be mis-
sed.
Beamer decided to switch to
the wide-tackle-six defensive
scheme in an effort to offset the
losses along the line.
The defensive keys for the
Hokies this season will probably
be linebacker Jamel Agemy and
safety Carter Wiley. Agemy was
the team's second-leading tackier
last season with 80 stops. Wiley
garnered 74 tackles along with
three interceptions and a trio of
fumble recoveries.
Joining Agemy at the line-
backer position will be capable
performer Lawrence White.
White is expected to return to the
starting lineup after sitting out
spring practice due to a knee in
jury.
The only returning lineman for
the Hokies this season will be Vic-
tor Jones. Jones will return to his
position at defensive end.
Several position changes were
made by Beamer and his staff in
an effort to strengthen the de-
fense. Scott Hill was moved from
tackle to end, while former
noscguard Horacio Moronta will
be used at tackle. Also, offensive
lineman Tom 1 lall was moved to
the defensive side of the ball and
a pair oi defensive backs, Sean
Lucas and Eddie Neel, will now
play linebacker.
The cornerback position seems
fairly stable for the Hokies as
three players who saw starting
duty last year return to battle for
playing time. Billy Meyers, Scott
Rice and Mitch Dove will all vie
for playing time at the position.
Another plus for the Hokies
this season will be the return of
junior Chris Kinzer to the kicking
position. Kinzer nailed 22 of 27
field goal attempts last year and
was a perfect 27 of 27 on extra
points. Kinzer provided the mar-
gin of victory for the Hokies in six
of their nine wins and he also hit
a fourth quarter field goal against
South Carolina, which enabled
the Hokies to tie the Gamecocks.
To add to Beamer's problems
this season, the Hokies have one
oi their toughest schedules ever.
For the first time in a while every
team on the Hokies' schedule this
year is a Division I-A school.
Among the opponents for Vir-
ginia Tech are Clemson, South
Carolina, West Virginia. Miami
Fl and Virginia. Also, Syracuse,
Navy, Tulane, Kentucky and
Cincinnati.
ECU will play Virginia Tech on
Oct. 17 at 1 p.m. at Lane Stadium
in Blacksburg, Va. The game will
mark the first meeting between
the Pirates and the Hokies. The
two teams play four common op-
ponents this year in West Vir-
ginia, Miami, Cincinnati and
South Carolina.
Owls to struggle without Paul Palmer
By PAT MOLLOY
Assistant Sports Editor
The Temple University Owls
have a long climb up a steep hill
this year, as they once again face
a schedule with a slew of top-
notch opponents.
Temple will find it doubly hard
to compete with the likes of Bos-
ton College, Penn State and Flor-
ida, simply because they are
minus their Heisman Trophy-
runner-up, Paul Palmer. Having
lost reasonably-effective quarter-
back (lee Saltz), and wide re-
ceiver (Willie Marshall) will
make the arduous task of obtain-
ing respectability this season
almost impossible.
Bruce Arian, the Owl's head
coach, will build his team around
strong lines five offensive and
three defensive linemen are in-
cumbents. Seniors are prevalent
as tackles Kevin Jones and Carl
Holmes are integral members of
the blocking group. Defensive
linemen Rodney Walker, Mike
Swanson and Kirk Drukenbrod
also return for their final year of
eligibility.
There will be serious competi-
tion as several jobs are up for
grabs. Senior James Thompson is
the leading candidate to replace
Saltz asQB. Thompson, who saw
limited duty in five games last
year, will be pressed by redshirt
freshman Matt Baker. Victor Lay
Ron Jones, shown in action two years ago against Temple, will return to the Pirates' lineup this
season after sitting out last season with a knee injury.
is also a candidate, but he suf-
fered a torn achilles tendon early
in the spring and may not be
ready for the opener.
Paul Palmer's understudy, jun-
ior Todd McNair has waited for
the opportunity to start. He was
Temple's second-leading ground
gainer with 253 yards. Sopho-
more Ventres Stevenson will also
see duty at tailback. Seniors Craig
Sawyer and Sheldon Morris will
do battle for the fullback slot
vacated by Shelley Poole.
Senior Keith Gloster will as-
sume the leadership role among
the team's receivers. Gloster,
though overshadowed by Willie
Marshall's presence, was impres-
sive in his own right. He caught
23 receptions for 568 yards and
seven touchdowns. Amazingly,
Gloster averages 26.1 yards per-
catch.
Andy Garczynski and Mike
Palys combined for 10 grabs as
backups � they will compete for
Marshall's spot this fall.
Temple's defensive strength is
in their line. Joining Walker,
Drukenbrod and Swanson up
front is junior Andy Pappalardo,
who will occupy an end spot after
starting at tackle last year. Senior
Mike Johnson and JUCO transfer
Carnell Washington provide
depth at the ends.
Arians is experimenting with
Chris Eaddy, trying the former
end at inside linebacker. Eaddy
will compete with a pair of sen-
See TEMPLE page 17
Tickets for ECU-N.C. State
contest remain at Minges
A limited number of tickets are
still available for the East Caro-
lina - North Carolina State foot-
ball game. Sales of the tickets are
now open to the general public.
As of Wednesday evening,
tickets to the game were still
available at the Athletic Ticket
Office, located at Minges Coli-
seum.
The ECU student allotment
went on sale at 7 a.m. Tuesday
moming. Tickets were sold Tues-
day until 5 p.m. and Wednesday
until 5 p.m. As announced ear-
lier, ticket sales opened up to the
general public this morning
(Thursday).
The ECU - N.C. State contest
will be played Saturday, Sept. 5 at
7 p.m. in Raleigh at Carter-Finley
Stadium.
AD to greet incoming
freshmen before rally
The East Carolina University
Athletic Department, along with
the National Collegiate Athletic
Association (NCAA) is greeting
incoming freshmen with Cam-
pus Welcome Packs, full of vari-
ous toiletries, personal care prod-
ucts, a drug and alcohol educa-
tional booklet, and other helpful
materials. As part of the progTam,
one East Carolina freshman stu-
dent will be awarded a $500.00
tuition scholarship.
Distribution will take place at
Minges Coliseum, September 3,
at 6:00 p.m. and attending fresh-
men will also have the opportu-
nity to meet and mingle with the
Pirate head coaches, athletic offi-
cials and Chancellor Richard
Eakin. Immediately following,
the ECU Kickoff Pep Rally will be
in Ficklen Stadium.
The implementation of this
project here at East Carolina Uni -
versify is part of a nationwide
NCAA program which will dis-
tribute 400,000 Campus Wel-
come Packs at more than 100
NCAA-Member institutions.
The program was designed by
the NCAA to distribute educa-
tional information on drug and
alcohol abuse, as well as needed
items to help incoming students
get started in their new surround-
ings. It will provide individual
athletic departments a communi-
cations link to new students and
give freshmen a more complete
understanding of intercollegiate
athletics programs.
0ammunmmimw

A
�Jf
�� m





16
Tilt EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 27, 1987
Southern Miss, seeks to gain grid recognition
ByPATMOLLOY anv 0.inr t. Al - O
By PAT MOLLOY
Assiitjnl Spurts Iditor
Southern Mississippi is a toot-
ball program which rank' gets
the recognition it deserves. The
Golden Eagles finished the 198f
campaign with a 6-5 record �
quite respectable when one fig-
ures the caliber teams they play
consistently.
USM played Alabama, Texas
1 StM, Kentucky and FSU; and
this year's schedule doesn't get
any easier - that's the way vet-
eran coach Jim Carmody likes it
Carmody can list 14 starters
amongthe401ettermen returning
to Hathesburg. After averaging a
dismal 18-po.nts-per-game last
season, an improved offensive
performance is a must. The
Golden Eagles were held to 17
points or less on six occasions
Carmody's gang lacked a po-
en passing attack in the quarter-
ns k position, and that slot is up
RS sets f;
for grabs now that Andrew An-
derson is gone. An experienced
signal caller is just not to be
found. Ailrick Young is the lead-
ing candidate for the job after
serving as Anderson's under-
study last year.
However, Young threw just 13
passes. David Forbes and Simmie
Carter are in the running for the
assignment.
Anderson is just one of the
standouts missing from the
Golden Eagle's lineup. The top
two rushers, tailback Vincent
Alexander and fullback Ran-
dolph Brown, and starting re-
ceivers Lyneal Alston (flanker)
and split end Andrew Mott have
completed their eligibility. The
backfield is clearly the biggest
question mark. Besides problems
at quarterback, there is limited
experience at the fullback slots.
Carl Jones and Clint Watson head
the list of candidates to replace
Brown.
Alexander's absence isn't a
great blow since the junior tan-
dem of Shelton Candy and Craig
Shackleford return. Gandy
rushed for 419 yards and a team-
high 10 touchdowns. Shackleford
contributed 321 yards. Senior
Chris McGee figures to be the top
deep threat after pulling down 10
passes for 119 yards. More pro-
duction is needed from incum-
bent tight end Carlos Powell,
who hauled in eight passes last
season.
The offensive strength lies in
the blocking. USM's line returns
intact, led by tackle Pat Ferrell, a
6-4, 267-pound senior. Ferrell is
joined by his brother, center Jim
Ferrell, guards Jay Sherron and
Tim Hallman, and tackle Rick
Slater.
Southern Mississippi's defense
will undoubtedly be pressured
by the passing games of FSU and
Alabama. With eight returning
starters, the unit should meet the
challenge head on Tackle Doug
Bolt and secondary starters
Collins Hess and Tim Smith will
be missed.
Linebackers Sidney Coleman
and Onesimus Henry ranked first
and second (respectively)in ta -
See USM page 17
JUDSON H. BLOUNT, III
ATTORNEY AT LAW
D Wl and Traffic Offenses
Suite 12, Lee Building
111 East Third Street
Greenville, NC 27835
Telephone
(919)758 8555
STUDENT X
GOVERNMENT
ELECTIONS t
���T,r rziz:st Sou,hcrn Missusippi bsi ���.��
In Pirate action.
Read the sports
page in The East
Carolinian.
Simply the best
Used Furniture
BuySellTrade

the Pirates' -(







752-3223
Beside the
Railroad Depot
For Day Representives Dorm representives
class officers
Candidates Applications mavbe obtained
at Mendenhall 228. Applications must be
in by 5:00 p.m. Wednesday, September 2nd.
Become involved with ECU Student Gov














ernmen
" � ' � 4J� � I .�
4 Welcome
� � � � IB �
Back!
For the next two weekffa&P �� offering
Student Membership
PER SEMESTER
rhl Thw? xS W�k �Ut Qt ThG SP� in Greenvi� The Spa offers exercise-aerob.c
n'The,Wf Tannin9 System, Dynacam equipment, York Olympic weights ond dumbells from
J-IUU pounds G.ve your body a thorough workout then relax in the whirlpool, sauna steam room
plus pnvate showers and dressing rooms. You'll love the way you look! And to take'care of the '
PltFlAA SuP�'S CertifiCd meSSQ9e therapist and re9istered tician.
Plus The Spa I.P.F.A. and A.H.A. memberships are honored at locations worldwide Brinq your
body ,n for a thorough workout at The SpaSouthpark Shopping Center in Greenville.
Greenville's
best health club value.
SOUTH PARK SHOPPING CENTER
756-7991
The Intramural Sports Depart
lent opens its' season with co-
�ecreational ALMOST ANY-
"TNG GOES. The event, co-
;ponsored by jeffenes Beer &
(Vine Co. (Budweiser), presents
:ontests with a variety of wild
and wacky events where skill and
finesse have nothing to do with
the outcome. Registration for the
annual affair will be held Aup 3
fromll a.m6pm in room I I
A Memorial Gym All partid
pants will receive a FREE Almost
Anything Goes t-shirt. Only 4
teams will be allowd to enter, so
-ct your team together today.
Flag football is second on the
igcnda with registration times
?tforSept.8from 11:00am -
m. in room 104-A Mem
ym. Co-rec Softball, tc:
angles, co-reccageball, home run
derby and racquetball singles
round out the September intra-
mural sports calendar.
kThe Informal Recreation De-
artment offers a variety ol pr
rams for those who wish to?
�eate in all less organized fashion
ymnasium free play, weight
�ooms and swimming pcxls are
vailable for your enjoyment
w 11 h a vali
card. f3otl
sium an
ise inH
equipn
ulty
Car
ma) be1. �
- h
Memorial
Equipm. �
-
Th
insh -
competitr
in in)
ha
I
SM defense la
Continued from page 16
last year, combining for 247
fctops. This pair of hitters
great ize, but makes up I
fvith above-average speed.
Up front are four incumbents
� ends Pat Jackson and Steve
Brown, noseguard Larrv Davis
and tack'e Ulysses Slaughter.
Brown lee he team's ends
60 tackles, while Slaughter paced
interior regulars with 87 hits.
Hess and Smith combined for
172 hits and Carmodv has to be
concerned about the'ir replace-
ments. Vincent Rollins and John
Robertson will have to pick up
the slack. Senior John Bavlor will
Temple
secondary
hurting
Continued from page 15
iors � Joe Possenti and Arturo
Weldon � for playing time. Pos-
senti and Weldon are tentative
starters. Senior Toren Schonver-
another JUCO transfer should
open up at one outside flank.
The Owl's secondary was
crushed by losses. Comerbacks
Terry Wright and Larry Brewton,
I along with rover Pervis Herder,
i will be sorely missed. Free safety
I Eddie Parker will feel the pres-
I sure as the lone returning regu-
I lar. Junior Joe Greenwood should
be able to step in at one corner-
back post. Youth and inexperi-
ence will bedisplayed at theother
corner as top prospects include
sophomore Williard Cooper and
; freshmen Gary Moblev, David
I Bell and Clifton Phillips.
Coach Anan'smafor stumbling
block will be the schedule he has
i taken on. With seven road games
� including an outing to Ficklen
stadium � his team will be too
I tired and inexperienced to play
par ball with the big bovs Give
Ithe Owls an "A" for courage, but
Ithis year, the "L"s on their score
isheets will far outweigh the
"W"s.
ECU will play Temple on
iNov. 7 at 1:30 p.m. in Ficklen
ItStadium. It will mark the sixth
�meeting between the two teams.
Iwith the Owls holding a 3-2 ad-
vantage. The Owls have won the
wast three meetings plaved
I W r r 5C f 2f�.2fC 5C 5(C 2fC
GET
CAUGHT
SljMEufiMTanilinuiu
with USj
in iwl
r
r
WITH THl
3
h-�
SOFT
LE
SC '


�� ��(- rum
I 1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 27, Hh? 17
ognition
b the passing games of FSU and
Alabama With eight returning
starters, the unit should meet the
lenge head on Tackle Doug
ind secondary starters
v - i less and Tim Smith will
S missed
Linebackers Sidney Coleman
Onesimus Henry ranked first
nd (respectively) in tack-
See I SM pa�e 17
ON H. BLOUNT III
'H's
MENT
ONS
NT

















idem Governmen J
rm representivcs
laybe obtained
:ations must be
September 2nd.

ffering
rem bership
MESTER
offers exercise-aerobic
c weights and dumbells from
irlpool, sauna, steam room,
: And to take care of the
ipist and registered dietician.
is worldwide. Bring your
;r in Greenville.
a-
ille's
alue.
ENTER
16-7991



f
A
IRS sets fall activities slate
ii- 5KCklU IN MOWS"
The Intramural Sports Depart-
ment opens its' season with co-
recreational ALMOST ANY-
THING GOES. The event, co-
sponsored by Jefferies Beer &
Wme Co. (Budweiser), presents
contests with a variety of wild
a nd wacky events where skill and
unesse have nothing to do with
the outcome. Registration for the
mnual affair will be held Aug. 31
irom 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. in room 104-
Memorial Gym. All partici-
pants will receive a FREE Almost
nything Goes t-shirt. Only 48
teams will be allowd to enter, so
get your team together today.
Hag football is second on the
igenda with registration times
set for Sept. 8 from 11:00a.m6:00
p.m. in room 104-A Memorial
Gym. Co-rec softball, tennis
-1 ngles, co-rec cageball, home run
derby and racquetball singles
round out the September intra-
mural sports calendar.
The Informal Recreation De-
partment offers a variety of pro-
grams for those who wish to rec-
reate in all less organized fashion.
Gymnasium free play, weight
rooms and swimming pools are
available for your enjoyment
with a valid E.C.U. identification
card. Both Memorial Gymna-
sium and Minges Coliseum
house informal facitities and
equipment for usage by all fac-
ulty, staff and students of East
Carolina. Times of availability
may be found by calling 757-6387
or by dropping by room 204
Memorial Gym. A fully staffed
Equipment Check Out Center is
also available to furnish all infor-
mal recreational needs.
The Club Sports program, open
to all East Carolinians, is de-
signed for recreational activity,
instructional opportunities, and
competitive events. Clubs range
in interest from archery to rugby.
For more information, contact
Pat Cox at 757-6387.
The Physical Fitness program
has proven to be one of the most
popular programs on campus
with a variety of classes in aero-
bics, toning and aquarobics avail-
able for drop-in or semester ses-
sion registration. Several innova-
tive programs have been added
to the Physical Fitness calendar
including SUPRAclass, Exercise
W.I.S.Elv, Aerobic Challenge
and the PEPSI Physical Fitness
Club. Workshops and Clinics are
also available for those interested
in swim conditioning and weight
training. Drop-in Aerobic Fitness
classes start Aug. 24-Sept. 3 with
classes being held at 4 p.m. and
5:15 p.m Monday-Friday.
The Outdoor Recreation Cen-
ter will be holding a Windsurfing
Clinic Sept. 8 and 10 in the Memo-
rial Gymnasium Pool. Clinic reg-
istration will be held Aug. 25-
Sept. 8. The cost is $3.00. This
clinic is one of many held by the
Outdoor Recreation Center de-
signed to introduce beginning
and novice participants to the
sport of Windsurfing. Emphasis
will be placed on outfitting a
board, styles and typed of boards
available, along with basic termi-
nology prevalent in the sport.
Whether a novice or an expert,
you are welcome to particiapte in
the fall WindsurfingHangGIid-
ing Trip held at Nags Head, N.C.
All participants will depart from
Greenville Sept. 13 at 6 a.m. The
cost for HangGliders is $52.00
which covers transportation,
equipment rental and lesson fees.
For $44.00, windsurfers can enjoy
the same trip benefits. A pre-trip
meeting will be held for all inter-
ested persons on Sept. 9 at 4 p.m.
in room 102 Memorial Gym.
The Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services provides
these and other programs to all
interested parties. Whether your
interests lie in the pool, the gym,
the courts, the aerobics room or
the intramural fields, there is a
place for you within the Depart-
ment of Intramural-Recreational
Services. For more information
regarding any and all services or
programs offered, come by room
204 Memorial Gym or call 757
6387.
-1m uni
WAV o
ii oca. A�m� 33- �
4o&?ui4 -ffcww -ittettAys. & c.
'II �
411 IVANS ST�XI MAUONVNTCMM
CMUNMtLC MX TOM
MMCI DUG men a
o�B�v�Br�joe
S I USM defense lacking
Continued from page 16
les last year, combining for 247
-tops. This pair of hitters lacks
Croat size, but makes up for it
a ith above-average speed.
Up front are four incumbents
- ends Pat Jackson and Steve
Brown, noseguard Larry Davis
and tack'e Ulysses Slaughter.
Brown lee he team's ends with
60 tackles, while Slaughter paced
interior regulars with 87 hits.
Hess and Smith combined for
172 hits and Carmody has to be
concerned about their replace-
ments. Vincent Rollins and John
Robertson will have to pick up
the slack. Senior John Baylor will
Temple
secondary
hurting
Continued from page 15
lors � Joe Possenti and Arturo
Weldon � for playing time. Pos-
senti and Weldon are tentative
starters. Senior Toren Schonyers,
another JUCO transfer should
open up at one outside flank.
The Owl's secondary was
crushed by losses. Comerbacks
Terry Wright and Larry Brewton,
along with rover Pervis Herder,
will be sorely missed. Free safety
Eddie Parker will feel the pres-
sure as the lone returning regu-
lar. Junior Joe Greenwood should
be able to step in at one corner-
back post. Youth and inexperi-
ence will be displayed at the other
corner as top prospects include
sophomore Williard Cooper and
freshmen Gary Mobley, David
Bell and Clifton Phillips.
Coach Arian's major stumbling
block will be the schedule he has
taken on. With seven road games
� including an outing to Ficklen
stadium � his team will be too
tired and inexperienced to play
par ball with the big boys. Give
the Owls an "A" for courage, but
this year, the "L"s on their score
sheets will far outweigh the
"W"s.
ECU will play Temple on
Nov. 7 at 1:30 p.m. in Ficklen
Stadium. It will mark the sixth
meeting between the two teams,
with the Owls holding a 3-2 ad-
vantage. The Owls have won the
last three meetings played.
qs� JS fs, fs Sk S. fs, sf m X
also have a starting assignment.
Opponents were able to move the
ball in the air against USM last
year, averaging just under 200
yards per game. This could prove
to be the Golden Eagles' greatest
hinderance.
The Pirates will play Southern
Mississippi on Nov. 14at 1 p.m.in
Robert's Stadium in Hattiesburg,
Ms. The previous 12 mectins be-
tween the team have been split 9-
3, with USM winirtg nine. The
Pirates last beat the Golden
Eagles in 1983 by a score of 10-6.
&benellbn
To Celebrate Our
1st Anniversary
United Colors of Bennetton
presents
"A Pirates Treasure Hunt"
We are offering secret discounts ranging
from 15-50
STORE HOURS 639 B EAST ARLINGTON BLVD.
MONDAY-SATURDAY
10;OO 6;00
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(919) 355-7473

PastaLasagna
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All homemade and cooked to
order.
Frank's Pizza III
Stanton Square
Stantonsburg Road, 1-2 Mile Beyond Hospital
752-009711 AM - Midnight
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Any menu item half-price with this ad.
(Except pizza by the slice.)
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COUPON EXPIRES SEPT. 18. 1987 �
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ADMISSION $1.50 GUYS
$1.00 LADIES AFTER 12
4-7 FREE ADMISSION FOR ALL
FREE PIZZA COURTESY OF ROSINAS
.65 TALL CANS AND COOLERS
ALL DAY
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NITE
9:00 TIL 2:00 FREE FOR LADIES TIL 12
.65 TALL CANS AND COOLERS ALL NITE
LADIES FREE
.10 DRAFT ALL NITE
.65 TALL CANS AND COOLERS
$1.50 ADMISSION FOR GUYS
THURS-FRI-SAT 9:30-11:30
ECU DANCERS EACH NITE
CHECK OUT ECU'S FINEST ALL FEMALE DANCE TEAM
Off
Newman
Catholic Student
Center
Must present this ad with order for dis-
count. Not good with other advertised
specials Expires Sept. 18, 1987 -�
We Can Arrange An Eye Exam for You On The Same Day
The
OPTICAL PALACE
703 Greenville Blvd.
(Actom From The Plata)
Gary M. Harris, Licensed Optician
Open 9:30 AM to 6 PM MonFri. Phone 756-4204
953 East Tenth Street
Greenville, NC 27858
Phone: 757-3760
Campus Mass Schedule
Sunday � 11:30 a.m. - Biology Building, Room 103
9:00 p.m. - at the Newman Center
Wednesday � 5:30 p.m. - at the Newman Center
(followed by a fellowship dinner)
For information about these and other programs sponsored by the Newman
Center, call or visit the center daily between 8:30 a.m. and 11:30 p.m. The
Newman Center is open to ail students from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. daily.
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain and Campus Minister
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18 mE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 27, 1987
WELCOME BACK
ECU students!
Copyright 1987
Kroger Sav On
Quantity RlghU Ratarvad
Nona Sold To Oeaiara
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M�m� and Priest
Effective thru Sal
August 29, 1987
on
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!�� thin JO a.
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IN THE DELI
ASSORTED
LAYS
Potato
Chips
m
CLASSIC
Off
6.5
Oz.
Bag
99
BAKED CHOCOLATE CHIP. SUGAR
RANGER. OATMEAL OR
Peanut Butter
Cookies
Sandy Mac
Bologna
99
7o$
FRESH BAKED
For
SWANSOFT
rrn
TOV�HS
Jumbo
Roll
KRAFT
Doz.
ASSORTED
BigK
Soft Drinks
-98
Orange
Juice
-j. ��
OLD ITALIAN
DELUXE OR
Pepperoni
'
At Kroger. 1,
your j -q �
pharmacist tST
fills your j
prescription
while you �
fill your
shopping list.

KEEBLER
Tato Skins . . 8b�
CHOCOLATE CHIP OR
OATMEAL RAISIN
Soft Batch
Cookies . .
18-0z.
Bag
Zesta Saltines. box
TATO
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville

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Title
The East Carolinian, August 27, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 27, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.553
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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