The East Carolinian, August 25, 1987






INSIDE
EditorialsM A
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Style� �
SP�rls2ZZZIL.35
Classifieds�m fi
SPORTS
Fall football preview for the Pirates and their foes
see SPORTS, page 35.
STYLE Bill Ebison, the singing new song for the Pirate 23.meterman, gridders �has written a see STYLE, page
SI
Otye lEaat �ar0ltman
Serving the Last Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 62 No. 1
Tuesday, August 25, 1987
Greenville, NC
44 Pages
Circulation 15,000
Falsified work petitions lead
ECU to program cancellation
Palt Clark and Kim Mosel (left to right) assist a student at the ECU Student Health Center. The center.
located next to Old Joyaer Library, offers a variety of medical services.
Health center hours reduced
By LESLIE DEES
I ai I ir.pl'nun
! itll 8
� Health Center
o longer otter serv-
the hours of 8 p.m.
rhe health service win be avail-
able from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. week-
days and from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on
Saturday and Sunday.
"What we're trying to do is
concentrate on the needs of the
Students and leave the things that
we shouldn't be delving into such
as intensive care or emergency
rooms for people who are quali-
fied said James McCallum, di-
rector student Health Services.
Ac ordingto McCallum, statis-
tics show that 96.6 percent of the
annual 60,000 patient visits occur
ng the day hours. Therefore,
he said, "the bottom line is that
services will be increased for 96.6
percent of the students and de-
creased for 3.4 percent of the stu-
dents
It we try operating this stu-
dent health service on a 24 hour
basis, which is totally impracti-
cal, there is no need to duplicate
services when there are limited
funds with which to operate. This
is why we're consolidating our
efforts to the greatest need he
said.
A telephone message will be
available if a student calls in case
of an emergency directing them
to other ways of getting help.
According to Elmer Meyer,
vice chancellor of student life,
faculty, staff and the ECU public
safetv office will undergo special
training with the health services
on how they can offer aid to stu-
dents.
The rapidly changing medical
liability issues are a primary
cause for this move, Mc Callum
said. Over the past six years the
cost of medical liability insurance
See YOU, page 10
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Managing Kditor
Officials have looked at the
unusual number of work peti-
tions filed during pre-registra-
tion for the fall semester and have
decided to cancel the program.
A memo issued by the office of
the vice-chancellor for academic
affairs on June 30
readCommencing with early
registration for the 1988 spring
semester, work petitions will no
longer be processed. A review of
work petitions processed during
fall 1987 has revealed that a high
percentage of students falsified
forms.
"The practice of allowing stu-
dents an opportunity to schedule
calsses at time not to conflict with
a work schedule was initiated
before on-line registration. Stu-
dents now have an opportunity
to acceptapprove their sched-
ules which makes it possible for
them to schedule classes at times
to avoid work schedules
According to Dr. Trenton
Davis, the associate vice chancel-
lor for academic affairs, the
change was not a part of a regu-
larly scheduled policy review.
" 1 here seemed to be an inordi-
nate number of requests and
completed forms this spring he
said, "It was discovered that a
large number (of petitions) were
falsified, then we took a look at it
(the program)
Davis said the falsifications put
his office in a dillema. He said
that the quickest way to be dis-
missed from an institution is to
falsify documents, but that most
students he talked to didn't real-
ize faking the petitions could be
such a serious offense.
Instead of punishing all offend-
ers, Davis said he talked with
students and general college
advisors. Eventually he decided
that the work petition was no
longer necessary because of on-
line registration.
Registrar Gilbert Moore said
that the work petition program
began in the late '60s and earlv
'70s when the university was still
on the card system. The card
system meant students had to
stand in long lines and often had
no choice about what section of a
class to take.
'The petition was established
because students had no choice
about class times and we had no
way to know their work sched-
ules Moore said. 'The petition
no longer serves the purpose for
which it was created
Moore said guidelines would
be established later that might
allow special groups such as ath-
letes or the Marching Pirates to
registerearly. "We will make that
determination during the fall
he said.
Moore said he doesn't think
revoking the petitions will have
dire effects. Really it shouldn't
effect them i working students)
adversvlv Gene rally, the depart-
ments will work with students
who have special needs Every
one will have an equal chance
he said.
Davis said that most of the fac-
ulty he knows is willing to give
special permission to enter full
classes when it's necessary.
He also
bear-
be und. r
He said tl
aware of
change would
SS :nd would
luring the tall.
he is not
�cisions made
withregard- - nips.but
that there would probably have
to be a
Mr student hard-
ship cast s
"We will continue to review
how it impacts nts � i how
it impacts a : ivis said.
"Our goal and our challenge is to
provide sufficient stats so stu-
dents don't feel they have to
cheat
Davis said, n no way is any
change in police meant to cause
hardship to students with per-
sonal needs
Dean describes dorm situation
Million dollars beneficial to
ECU and local businessmen
i �� m t.ilf and News Bureau
. vllor Richard R. Eakin
ed a gift of more than $1
llion to the university by two
rn businessmen at last
- r s faculty convocation cere-
vnn
esaa
ittent
aper
The
ninut
- al e-
ration
ence B. "Pop" Beasley and
V Kelso stood up from
ront row seats at the nearly
i Hendrix Theatre Wed-
y to loud applause and the
ion of television and news-
cameras.
two men from the town 40
es southeast of ECU do-
the money in the form of a
state development eoropo-
The corporation's assets
are in land holdings on New
Bern's Scott's Creek. Under the
terms of the unitrust, the ECU
Foundation will own the assets
while the donors receive current
tax advantages and lifetime in-
comes.
"The arrangement turned
out to be a profitable deal for all
parties involved. It allows the
donors have an assured income
for the rest of their lives and will
benefit the University by provid-
ing unrestricted funds for schol-
arships and academic enrich-
ment according to James L.
Lanicr Jr vice chancellor for In-
stitutional Advancement.
See GIFT, page 9
By KRIS REYER
SU� Writer
Overcrowding in the residence
halls is a minor problem again
this year, according to Dean
Carolyn Fulghum, director of
residence life and housing.
"As far as I can tell, the (resi-
dence hall) check-ins have gone
smoothly. Students and parents
have been understanding with
any minor problems we may
have had Fulghum said.
According to Fulghum, 49
men's and 39 women's rooms
must temporarily house three
roommates. The college has the
ability to place 59 men and 88
women with third person rooms
if necessary, and all residence
advisors have had a temporary
roomate placed with them,
Fulghum said. "We expect to
have the situation resolved in two
to three weeks she said.
What steps do temporary
roommates take to get perma-
nently placed? First, Fulghum
said, they can move if they fill out
the proper forms and get the per-
mission of the person they want
to room with. If a third person
cannot find a new roommate on
their own, they can wait and be
placed by the college.
Over-crowding has been a
problem in the men's dorms for
the past several years, Fulghum
said. To help compensate for this,
the university made Fletcher
dorm co-ed, creating 82 new
spaces for men. Fulghum said
this change is partly responsible
for overcrowding the women this
year. She said the Fletcher switch
was not the sole problem how-
ever, noting there just seemed to
be more of a demand for dorm
space this year.
Room change for the rest of
campus will be on Friday and
Monday, when students can
change rooms with no charge.
Room changes can be made after
Monday, bu t there will be a $5 fee.
On Tuesday RAs will have stu-
dents complete a dorm roster by
room. On Thursday a list of va-
cancies will be posted on the front
door of each residence hall. Room
changes are done on a first come
- first serve basis.
Fulghum said the summer
brought renovations to several
residence halls. Air conditioning
was installed in Scott and the
basements of Belk and Aycock.
The basement of Fletcher was
rennovated, and the lobby of
Umstead was refurnished. Jones,
Belk, and Jarvis were painted, as
well.
Two ECU coeds carry lumber into their dorm. Students who got to
Greenville early enough before school started were able make major room
improvements.
T

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THE EAST CAROLfNlAN AUC11ST 25,1987
ECU's image is 'out of date
From staff and New. Bureau
ECU'S image is "15 to 20 years
out of date' said Chancellor
R'chard R. Eakin at faculty con-
vocation last week.
ECU should "project an imaee
through our publications which
fairly conveys the strengths of
our academic programs and
which clearly depicts ECU as a
modern, multi-faceted unitcr-
sity Eakin said at the Wednes-
day ceremony in Hendrix Thea-
ter.
Eakin said ECU should ende-
vor to be recognized by Phi Beta
Kippa. This recognition "will
signal to the world the coming of
age of our undergraduate? pro-
gram i n the arts and the sciences
Eakin said.
The chancellor also expressed
concern about doctorate pro-
grams in the university. Eakin
said ECU "must be willing to
consciously dedicate resources,
in advance, to a limited set of
disciplines
Eakin noted that plans are
being made to initiate master's
programs in such fields as ac-
counting, physical therapy, mo-
lecular biology and biotechnol-
ogy.
The chancellor wants the best
and the brightest of the high
school graduates to come to ECU.
"We need to do much more in
seeking private support for
scholarships and the school
should "communicate effec-
tively with the top 10 of each
high school graduating class,
Eakin said.
Eakin stressed that ECU should
actively recruit minority students
because "all of our "students
black and white, benefit from the
opportunity to learn from and
with persons different from
themselves He noted that while
minorities represented 11 of
ECU's student population in the
fall of 1986, only 2.4 of the fac-
ulty were minorities.
Another speaker at the cere-
mony - James A. Hicks, presi-
dent of the ECU Alumni Associa-
tion � announced the two win-
ners of the Alumni Association's
teaching excellence awards. F
David Sanders of the English
department and Thomas F. Ea-
mon of the political science de-
partment each received a $500
award.
Hicks also announced the
investment of $233,000 by the
Alumni Annual Giving Program
to benefit ECU scholarships. "We
continue to be impressed by the
lununuen nc impressed b)
Candidates' forum scheduled
UNC News Release
(CHAPEL HILL) - Both
Democratic and Republican
presidential candidates will dis-
cuss national education issues
during a forum at the University
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Sept. 11.
Fourteen potential contenders
have been invited to participate
in "Education '88: A Presidential
Candidates Forum sponsored
by the 16-campus University of
North Carolina and the Univer-
sity of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill. '
In a joint statement June 25,
CD. Spangler Jr president of
L NC, and Christopher C.
Fordham, chancellor of UNC-
Chapel Hill, said, "Education is a
vital political issue in both the
nation and the Southeast. We can
think of no more fitting place for
this forum than on the nation's
oldest state University campus
North Carolina Governor
lames G. Martin, who contacted
the Republican candidates on
behalf of the University, has re-
ceived an acceptance from Re-
publican Representative lack
Kemp and positive reaction from
all other Republican candidates.
Former Governor fames Hunt,
who contacted the Democratic
candidates, has received accep-
tances from former Governor
Bruce Babbitt of Arizona, Gover-
nor Michael Dukakis of Massa-
chusetts, Representative Richard
Gephardt of Missori, Senator
Albert Gore Jr. of Tennessee, the
Reverend Jesse Jackson, and
Senator Paul Simon of Illinois.
The free public forum, to be
held in two sessions (one for the
Democrats and one for the Repu-
bicans) at the Dean E. Smith
Center, will be televised live in
North Carolina by the UNC Cen-
ter for Public Television and
More parking spaces offered
ECU officials are trying to alle-
viate the early semester parking
problems by opening two park-
ing lots on Lawrence Street, ac-
cording to a public safety spokes-
women.
According to Johnny Rose,
Assistant Director of Police Serv-
ices, the traffic situation at this
time is typical for the beginning
of the semester and should be
alleviated after the first week of
classes.
Parking stickers can be ob-
tained at Mendenhall Student
Center Tuesday � Friday, 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. and thereafter at the
Public Safety Office on Tenth
Street, Monday � Friday, 8 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m.
The basic fee for parking stick-
ers is $25, with some variation for
specific cases. Applicants need
the car's registration card and a
university ID to get a sticker.
If your car is towed, call public
safety at 757-6150. The cost re-
trieve the car is $20 during the
day and $25 at night.
university's progress Hicks
said.
Student Government Associa-
tion President Scott Thomas was
one of the speakers at the cere-
mony. Thomas had a message for
the students, telling them to de-
velop themselves as individuals
by participating both in class and
out-of-class activities. Thomas
also said ECU is on the "verge of
greatness offering students a
"top-notch" education.
William A. Bloodworth, acting
vice chancellor for Academic
Affairs announced that the gen-
eral classroom building now
under construction will be ready
for the spring semester.
Bloodworth outlined three
main goals for ECU's academic
well-being: insuring quality un-
dergraduate education, planning
and managing academic devel-
opment and retaining minority
faculty and students.
GUtt �aat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
James F. J. McKee. Director of Advertising
Advertising Represents.
Anne Leigh Mallory James Russo Shari Clemens
Pete Fernald Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MOVTHLY RATTS
0 49 Coulumn Inches �� �
50-99 S4 25
100-149 4 15
150-199 4 05
200 249 3 95
250 and above 3 85
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
(Charge in Addition to Regular Space Rate)
One color and black L, � '
Two colors and black SSSSS.lSS
Inserts
BUSINESS HOURS;
Monday Fnday
10:00 5:00 P.M.
�� 757 6366
757 6557 757-6366
757-6558 757-6309
Editor sa
ByPATRK ko , ,
flie 1986 But
i ampusthis sui
months ; ul
The delay v
error in I
tographs
cost!) err r wl f
lor Publis �
year s Bu
months t
Beth Da
Davis
Lijf-
In addition to offering refrigerator reBtabtl J
be renting Microwave 0VMK ,� students. For more
SGA offices.
KASH AND KAl
"It's On Us" G
you to go to sci
Here's How It V
� pizza
Little Caesars when you pay for one delicious pizza,
the second one is free. You always take home twice as many as
you pay for. But dont expect to have a lot left over. When you make
pizza this good, one just isn't enough.�
� VAMUaU COUPON �
TWO PIZZAS
$8.90
Medium Size Pizzas
with Cheese A
2ltem$)
NO LIMIT
Extra Hems and extra cheese available
at additional cost Valid with coupon
at participating Little Caesars One
coupon per customer Carry Out Only
Expires 9-30-87.
SJSfc J
�UUMU COUPON � I
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Buy any size
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(across from Farm Fresh)
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11 AM-12MIDSun-Thur�
11 AM - 1 AM Frt ft Sat
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 23. 1987
lEaat Olaroltnfan
ij the East CarWina rani'us community since 1925
F. J. McKec. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representives
E Mallory James Russo Sharl Clemens
Pete Fernald Maria Bell
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHL? HAn
iches S4.25
4 15
4 05
3 95
,1 85
I 75
OLOR ADVERTISING RATES
Regular Space Rate)
- S9t (V)
ack 155 cXi
Inserts
i
055 each
05 r.ich
'57-6557
- 558
757-6366
757 6366
757-6309
Editor says board didn't care about quality
By PATRICK O N'KILL
Malt Writer
i he 1986 Buccaneer arrived on
npus this summer after several
�nths of publication delays.
he delay was caused bv an
r in the printing of staff pho-
;raphs on the last page a
:1 error which took the Tay-
Publishing, printers of this
sr s Bucccaneer, several
nths to correct, according to
� Davis editor of the journal.
a is said there has been some
controversy involving the pub-
lishers of the annual. In 1986, the
Media Board switched from Del-
Mar Printing Company based in
Charlotte to the Taylor Publish-
ing Company based in Dallas.
The oard voted not to go with
IXi-i lar, which was underbid by
Taylor, despite having worked
with the company from 1983-85.
Davis was not in favor of
switching publishers after hav-
ing developed a working rela-
tionship with Del-Mar.
"I was a little hesitant when
they went to Taylor. In 1983, with
Del-Mar, we were a little late (in
sending the book to be pub-
lished). In 1984, we almost didn't
get it out. In 1985, we almost got it
out in time ' t they stuck it out
with us she said.
Davis believes the board'sdeci-
sion to switch publishers was
strictly in the interest of trimming
the Buccaneer's budget. She said
that the representative from Del-
Mar was not given equal oppor
ECU Health Center offers
students individualized care
r
w
and Students
)VF
le Mates
r
:opy

4ates

hi
i
sM
By PATTI KI-MMIS
Sptciil to TJir lu Carolinian
Students at ECU can make
appointments with Health Cen-
ter physicians for a wider variety
of services than they have had
access to in past years. The serv-
ice, which began July 1, will pro-
vide more personalized care for
students used to family doctors
and individual treatment.
"In the past we've allowed
appointments for such things as
physicals and gynecological ex-
ams, we just felt it would be a
good service to extend siid
Dianne Marshbum, director of
nursing at the I lealth Center.
"We've had students who have
expressed a desire to set up ap-
pointments, and since we've seen
this type of service being utilized
by other health centers we hope it
will be something that the stu-
dents will find convenient for
them she said.
"We've got physicians avail-
ableforappointment times. What
we hope to do is to be able to work
around the times that the student
is able to come in said Marsh-
burn. "When the student who has
in appointment comes in, there
will be a nurse who will channel
that student through the prelimi-
naries
Marshburn said this will climi-
See CENTER, page 11
tunity to make his presentation at
the meeting where the decision to
change companies was made due
to a lack of time.
Davis said she didn't think that
the board members were con-
cerned with the quality of the
annual.
" personally felt the Media
Board had already decided to go
with Taylor to cu t costs she said.
The Media Board has since
switched back to Del-Mar Print-
ing Company, which success-
fully underbid Taylor this year
"I hope the Media Board learns
this lesson and that they won't be
dollar happy Davis said.
The annual can be picked up at
the Buccaneer offices in the pubh
cations building and will be dis
tributed near the student store
sometime this fall.
"As for the 198ft graduates and
juniors, their yearrxxik will be
mailed to them, or they can come
by and pick them up Davis said
The East Carolinian Comics
Coming this Thursday
J
v











MIKE MAN
TRYOUTS
a Be ECU's First Mike Man!
f&ti All interested people should
In addition to ottering refrigerator rentals this semester, the SG V will
he rentin� microwave ovens to students. For more information, call the
SGA offices.






meet in Room 142 Minges at
5:00p.m. on Mon. Aug. 31st.


















-
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t �N iv� J
The Original Beat NC
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$5.00 while they last
'87 Fall Membership Drive
regular was $15.00 now $5.00
lifetime was $25.00 now $15.00
T-shirts and memberships available
Tuesday 25th-Friday 29th from 11:00-5.00 and nightlv
Free Nacho Bar Nitely From
9:00 to 11:30
Schnapps Shot $1:00 Every Nite
�Private club for Members & Guests
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All books, tuition, fees and GPA must be verified.
If you qualify, you can do it on credit. For more
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Number Eight.
This Offer Good Only At Store Number Eight!


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�te Eaat (Hutolmmn
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
'Am Chandler, .��
Andy Lewis, �.���
Shelton Bryant, m
Debbie Stevens, w,
Daniel Maurek, rm,m�
Clay Deani iardt, m���, r.OT
Jimmy Mckee, vtrtorjwn
Anti iony Martin, bcw. ���
MEG NCEDI IAM, CrcuLlum Miuuger
Lori Jackson, ojuaum m�
Kimberly Pierce, An iw�
August 25, 1987
Opinion
Page 4
Opinions
fe rc'fOUNlA
'AW-li:
77y ?�� 7 mefl� fo fo unbiased
Opinions. Board were wrong, as they soon
hvervone s got one. Some people found out. Not only did Shannon
aie tor them. Other people already ask for and receive the support of
nave, so that we can express ours, two of the other three editors, he also
1 here is a page in this newspaper, had every right to express his opin-
as in every newspaper, that exists ion anyway. Just as everyone else
solely for the expression of opinions; has the right to send us letters and
a page where subjectivity, not objec- tell us when they think we're wrong
tivity, is the rule of the game. It is the The point is that expressing opin-
editonal page and you are reading it ions on an editorial page does not
now i
, make a newspaper biased; that is
ine editorial page of The East actually its proper function. A paper
Carolinian is designed to provide an becomes biased only when it allows
open forum for all views, political, opinions to slip over into the news �
moral, ethical or otherwise. To this pages, which should remain as ob- reIiS�0�sbetels� unacceptable to his government In our
end, the "Campus Forum" provides jective as possible This never han modcrn world'the thoufiht o torture and unjust imprison-
an airing ground where anvone that pened in the controversy that almost T,r " SfSn baranc and 'ond comprehension but the
wants to can write in to the paper cost a good man his jo 223 fe thaLtnough these opening wds
nd express their views. The "Cam- The majority of the Media Board
pus Spectrum" provides an even and especially Vice Chancellor
larger forum tor students and fac- Elmer Meyer, deserve commenda-
ulty to editorialize and accept by- tions for realizing that freedom of
line credit the press, even in a campus environ-
Regularly we print views from ment, is something to be cherished
both the left and the right of the and preserved. Unpopular opinions
political spectrum. William F. sometimes, after all, turn out to be
Union
�WMW(fM3
WELCOME
AMTIE 5 I
I 'VE BEEN
WAITING FOR
AI: born to help mankind
"Open your newspaper any day of the week and you will
find a report from somewhere in the world of someone being
imprisoned, tortured, or executed because his opinions or
Buckley's column brings us the
conservative viewpoint on many
issues, and articles from the "New
Republic" give the liberal ideas an
open forum.
written in 1961, they still ring true today. According to re-
ports, as of 1985, one out of every three countries uses torture
and executions in its everyday treatment oi prisoners. These
statistics force people to realize that something must be done
to stop this, someone must take up the cause. That "someone"
is Amnesty International. Al was and continues to be the
largest organization for the protection oi human rights.
AI is the revolutionary brainchild of Peter Benenson a
Campus Spectrum
Bv
Quv Tillman
the better ones after all.
Just ask Thomas Jefferson, or John
Adams, or any of the other founders
Of our nation that found themselves British lawyer. According to Amnesty legend Benenson
fighting desperately against their while riding a subway, read an article about two unjustly
m aacution, we print From the own homeland for something they prisoned Portugese men who, after raising their glasses to
Right and "From the Left' both believed in. freedom, were promptly issued seven years of hard labor
written by students expressing their Here at The East Carolinian we are Bncnonjwasrso struck by their plight, that by the end of his
political views and opinions. beginning to establish a new editn It �r Amncsty was t1�- ,
r Thethere is the mLthead edit J&2�5�& �lo�
rial That is what you are reading the Editorial Board. The board will �lyawerfulbarraVo
right now, and it is usually written be made up of the managing editor ln'cffcct on thcir situation. His first article, "The Forgotten
Prisoner caused quite an uproar in both England and
dv the managing editor, or by an- the general manager, and all desk
nfhf a.J.nv U�� iL . t � . t
other editor when the
editor feels it is proper.
The mastheadWial is a place, willKo�2S�2 Z
too, for opinions. Generally, though weeks editorials, and on the position acti�- "
not always, the opinions expressed that the paper will take on these "noveraU response to Benenson's article was staggering,
here are those of the majority of the topics. The managing editor will Not only vvcre thcre donations ar�d editorials, but more
editors on the newspaper. You may then be responsible for writine the ?!K?J?y�f Was an abu,ndance � volunteer effort.
no. l.ke .hen, but ��� alright; you editorial i, with the coS of SSC-1
don t have too. If everyone agreed the board, he asks another editor to The time arrived for Alto take a firm stand on its beliefs In
on everything, the world would be do it. a pint meeting, the beliefs and goals of AI were put in print
incredibly dull and there would be Someone once said that the pur- dcclarin8 to a" its validity. With its new members came a
very few things in the world worth pose of the editorial was not to re- of �f cons5,cnce:
living, or dieing for. fleet the opinion of the status nuo �oursc'thcma;nob)cctlvcofAIlswork'n8fer the release
Iftun cu,�� c , upnuun or rne status quo, of those men and women imprisoned anywhere for thnir
John Shannon, former managing but to stir it up; to make people think beliefs, color, ethnic origin or religion, provided they have
editor ot the hast Carolinian, came and to get them motivated behind nevcrusedor advocated violence These people are termed
under a lot of criticism last spring for an issue, pro or con. "prisoners of conscience" and AI works against any regime
writing an editorial endorsing Steve If that is the case then lohn w,iichaidsin their entrapment.
Pierce and Rick Brown in their bids Shannon's editorial in Question mav nfcarfirmideaso�ttheuseof torture.The
torSGAomce,ThenewsPaperwashe.hebere"
tailed a rag by many of theconserva- It is the sincere intent of this paper punishment is especially strong in the United States for they
tive bent, and Shannon even had his to provide an open forum for the
job threatened by members of the opinions of students and faculty; it is
campus Media Board. the sincere hope of the editors that
Well, those members of the Media we make you think as well.
see the U.Ss use of the death penalty as harmful. Ai also
advocates "fairand early trials tor all political prisoners" and
works to free those without charges against them.
Amnesty has no governmental ties and it relies on private
and public donations to keep it running. AI's only basii
affiliation is with the United Nations and it uses the U. s
Universal Declaration of Human Rights as its backbone A
also has formal relations with Unesco, the Organization of
African Unity.and theOrganizaion of the American States. Al
works with these organizations, but it remains adament
about its independence. Al, though a united force, is madeol
many smaller branches, with each participating country
having its own branch.
Amnesty uses many techniques to achieve its goals Again
the main core of the organization is volunteers. They are the
ones who do most of the work. These volunteers are required
to "adopt" a set of prisoners The adoptees are selected on an
unbaised measure and with the utmost fairness Itistheduty
of the Amnesty workers to maintaincorrespondance with the
prisoners and to assure them that they have not been forgot-
ten. The volunteers also write to the governments and jailors
oi these people and ask, if not for their freedom, then for them
to at least be treated well during their captivity. The oganiza-
tion stresses their dislike for torture of any kind and urges the
governments to cease with these activities.
Another important function of Al is the collecting organiz-
ing, and distribution of facts and statistics dealing with the
infringement of people's rights. Its data is invaluable to not
only Alitself, but many other orgamzationsas well. Each year
AI issues a report exposing all known cases of torture and it
also publishes in-depth studies on the effects of torture. Al
also publishes a monthly newsletter that enables the different
branches to remain in touch. Each newsletter informs other oi
the prisoner's plight and highlights three seperate case histo-
ries. During the past few years, AI has been greatly aided by
popular rock stars, such as U2, who offer their names and,
more importantly, their time to raise money and further the
cause.
It is obvious that the public awareness has been enlightend
Every day Amnesty International makes more headway in
the fight for individual freedom; unfortunately, this may not
be enough. Admittedly, Amnesty's work, according to sev-
eral officials, is like "dripping water on a rock Fortunatlv.
the dripping remains steady. Amnesty Internationl continues
to fight for human rights, even though the obstacles seem
insurmountable. The believers of AI refuse to back down for
they see their actions as the only way to a freer world. As
Milan Kundera, a Chechloslavakian novelist, once said, "the
struggle of man against power is the struggle of memory
against forgetting According to its believers, "Remember-
ing�not revolution, not relief � is what Amnesty does best
It remembers the political prisoners whom the world would
prefer to forget
AI needs all the help available. If you would like to help
please contact Amnesty International USA, 2112 Broadway
New York, NY 10023.
MacSpl
A new age has arrived at The East the newspaper. Headlines should be
Carolinian. Welcome back to school, straighter, copy neater and lines
and welcome to the future of pub- cleaner. Our typestyle has changed
hshingasit has come to your student somewhat, so maybe you can tell
newspaper. some difference there. There is more
Finally we have moved from anti- spacing in between the lines, and we
quated and inadequate machinery think the print is easier for you to
into the age of technology. We are read.
using, and began using this sum- As mentioned earlier, we are hav-
mer, a Macintosh computer system ing some trouble learning this sys-
to print The East Carolinian. It's tern in the short time we have had it
desk top publishing. It's the wave of Several editors on the staff for the
the future. And we have it here, fall were not here this summer, and
today� they have to catch up with the rest of
Unfortunately, new systems like us. So you might see some gliches
this take time, patience and practice here and there. We apologize for
to learn. Editors, typesetters and those, and we hope most of them
others have already spent hours will be worked out soon,
learning how to do the limited
things we can do now, and our capa- For now though, hold on. It's
bihties grow every day. Still, hours going to be a wild ride, but we hope
more are needed before we are truly you will join us. We are moving into
comfortable with this system. a new age at The East Carolinian,
But even now you should see some and you, the reader, are coming
qualitative changes in the layout of with us. We hope you like it.
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and clas-
sification, address, phone number and
signature of the authoiis). Letters are
limited to two typewritten pages, double
spaced or neatly printed. All letters are
subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are reminded
that they are limited to one every two
weeks. The deadline for editorial material
is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday's edition and
5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday's edition.
Forum
rules
Tlie Reader Speaks
Campus
Spectrum
rules
In addition to the "Campus Forum
section of the editorial page, The East
Carolinian features the "Campus
Spectrum This isan opinion column
by guest writers from the student
body and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tentonly with regard to rulesof gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for thcir efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information may-
contact the managing editor of The
East Carolinian at 757-6366, or stop by
our offices on the second floor of the
Publications Rutldine.
Declaring
"E-NTIYFAIRUJ
,
Ii1 �
, n i�

t at v
the Un
� I
�Mth j
a
is
�stfully at ;
�e in an ai
r is taki � � -
nderland into whi
� usthrqugn Mng
5S, I U rm "cover;
� p rati i - insufficiently cm-
bn :es ll kinds of ad
un lertook. North described a
of undeclared, unlimited
rt war, which the United fr
Stat - waged at the whim oi the ����
v- nal Security Council, tor - si
I
Smwwi Si
0 y
STEREO CONCEPT!
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t
Declaring war may keep the peace
11 IF" I AVI CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 2 S, 1987
B3 M'in FAIRLIF
vague purposes (defending de- They would have understood
.il( n;vr'ia with vague allies why american soldiers were
I'hmi. nsraised (democratic freedom fighters) l,ii,� i u i n f
; ,nu'n r,i,iniK 1. � , j Killing and heme ki ei .
'Tins li11 no and against vague enemies (the Until 1Q17 �k� i
�'k- d the most ,ih, , i .ntil Iil, tin' Ameruan
li ih ,lluous evil empire, communism, Mus- 1 KaH � . ui i .
e Xnii'rir in i , . ixiipr nau not he oved tluv
�ntnean cause m lim fundamenta sm, terrorism) CnXA � r . . 1, ,
lllssirtVni ulu , i , .i would ever re-enter he OK
istration nof c.i, . i m"1" V orki and nartu mate m one ol
no submit a whom would you declare war? ils wars. But Woc�irow WUson
rs, uHl , . cor8 to North, the Nicara- knew the necessity
ntn a civilized guan government is not the real
.to w� '� issued an enemy. And though North sees
h n (iu. t,m? stipu Cubans evcrywhere even Cuba
matum expired, isnottheultimateenemvinNica
' ol theoffendinj
,s i that the two
were at war I he ulti-
tv, vi on a i old
April night, the prim president
drove toapitol I hi! to submit a
War Resolution
After the attack on Pearl '
lar
co v e r I
mankind
and
lS'?Why n0 deClare W3r �" .RooseveltalsodrovetoC api
u . , tol Hill to submit a War Resolu
Having to makea formal decla- t.on That is whv the phrase a
� ; � us Mh ration ol war before you begin dalc thai will live in infamy
g.and , kllhng fe a ,ntrodluvs d
� � � s r hl -h some gravity into thedecision. oratl(,ns Ilu, stre ,h ()( v,
uld be tought; the ro recall the days before 1945 mnTKinl, ,
'war under interna when nations declared war (even 21
I ed adherence to Hitler declared war on America) dca,mKS fhouRh
law linally, when is not the idealize the past. Euro-
shad been achieved, pean nations may have ex
(peace would be signed changed formalities with each
estern tradition was other, but in their colonial em
I hat was the underpin- pires they were not scrupulous,
'ot just war Nevertheless, where the world
do nations do was really dangerous, in Europe,
" i fi war in the need to declare war limited
hnson ob the objectives, and so the killing,
kin Resolu- for centuries
lson au The world has changed since
" it without World War II. Contemporary ter
ul saving rorism is a form ol undeclared
war, and no one denies that Rus-
; undei sian expansionism is a threat the
redoingin United States must ontain
But how much does the United
hd i re war on States stand to lose by trying to
M :it an ar meet the new threats with the
I fsheep;it methods of the enemy (while
AI- gaming, as Rep. Lee Hamilton
id Kept the pointed out, none of the objec-
- ' ace nvt's tor which the arms deals
. d were made). After all, within the
sover "philosophy" of the Constitution
is not only the justification of
is taken certain inalienable rights of the
� � American people, but the as-
sumption, explicit in the Declara-
Air tionof Indepcndance, that Amcr-
" : I It was ind i ;hnnlH h
operations ma) be ne v �sar) in .i
dangerous world, covert war is
not tolerable to a democratic
people
I he cow aids ,it the Iran ontra
hearing have bei n at the w itness
table.
Ihe Iran contra di aling. Iiave
weakened nol only the admini
stratum, the Republican Part)
(again), and any true conserva
live philosophy or poli The)
have weakend the I nilti ; tal
in every i orner ol the w orld
Shouldn't the I nit( ' tati
il it i .in justih war I
N mbs anotl bva, gel
' mgled in anothi i in , il, , i
Joyce
would like
to invite you to
her new location
Roli 4 I lair Eastate Shopping Center
10th Street 757-0143
i
in uts perms highlights waxing
) b oil with this coupon
I ics rhurs
Frl
Saturday .
I
Julienne's Florist
Welcome Hack IX L
This Week Only! While Supply Last.
1 Dozen Long Stem Roses
$18.00
12 Dozen Long Stem Roses
S 10.00
I
1
1
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1703 6th Si
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FALL Leagues Are Now
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Bowl One Game and Receive
Another Game FREE With
This Coupon.
Limit 1 Coupon Per Person.
G
E T SET TO SWEAT!
THE SEARCH IS ON FOR AMERICA'S
I
� ation
the world
peace. In
anarchv of
iver North
v a modi 1 to the
�� rid.
Behind the ju ;tifi ations ol the
a Iministration lies the fear of the
V ietnam svndrome the un
willingness of the American
peopleti i ngage in a difficult and
�rotra Ud war t,r no
i ' f
at this that can be clearh stated.
:1 r If thereissucha "svTidrome,1 it
is not the fault of tl m rican
� �� I h people or their i i � .
� ling representatives, whom North so
� � �' brazenlv dishonors
nth em- It Kennedy or ohnson had
s he pone t i Congress tor a declara-
�scribed a tion of war in Vietnam, he would
mitcd almost certainly have received it.
he I nit d In that case, the American people
� �' e would have been civilly at war -
� r for stated limited objectives
Summer Saving
STEREO CONCEPTS IS
proud to announce the addition
of Polk Audio to our
many fine lines!
Come A: Hear WJiat You've Been Missing!
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207 S. WEST GREENVILLE I3IAT)





J) IF EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25,1987
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
P Wanted: Part time sales position
'iyin
Mali
!rson Zafcs lewelers. Carolina
Brodi i
nas part tune sales associates po-
� all departments for energetic.
�lastM and tashion conscious indi
us Musi be able to work flexible
- and enjoy working with the public
� m person, Brady's Carolina East
Personnel Director, MVV2 4 pm
'J relemarketers interested in
E up to So IX1 per hour 20 hours per
Mnoon and evening positions
� refei s.ilos or telemarketing
� Call 355-7108 between 1:00
1:00pm M Fh
lobs. AlsoC ruiseships, Travel,
�tings Now Hiring To $s�4k
fl
t (
lit
hotographers wanted: Interested in
taking mone) part time photographing
pl No experience necessary, we
� t you are highly sx-iahle, have a
mm camera and transportation give
' I ween 12 noon and p m At 1
Part-time babj sitter needed Tuesday
� n from 12 4 p m and all dav
Roommate Wanted: Oak mom Square, 2
bedroom, 112 baths, $160 per month
plus 1 2 utilities 355-78 or 756-4151.
Roommate Needed: Two bedroom fur-
nished apartment available for 1 or 2
female students 1II block from campus,
washerdryer, AC, pool Call 752-2329
Wanted: Female roommate to share fully
furnished apartment 5165month plus
14 utilities - 752-0741.
Roommate Wanted for 2 BR apartment
ASAP Fully furnished. At Cypress
Gardens on E 10th St Jennifer 757-3984
or leave message
Village Green: 1 bedroom, living room,
kitchen Located on 10th St. $230 mo Call
758-9057
House to share 5 minutes from campus
Furnished Non-smoking female gradu-
ate or medical students, or responsible
upperdasswomen Contact Ray Spears at
Aldndge and Sutherland Realty. 756-
3500758-4362 (No fee).
For Rent: 2 bedrooms with full house
privileges 3 blocks from campus $165 00
per month with utilities paid. 758-1274
after 5 00 p.m
$150.00. Call 758211 after 7:00 p m
FOR SALE
transportation needed 75tv
tresses and drivers with
, l person at Famous
rani n the corner of 100 East
� ins No Phone Calls
rson needed tor laundromat
5 and week-end work,
. 25 hours per week Must
� ash register and calcu-
rking with the public, be
id n alall 752 4511
I OR RENT
ale Roommates Needed immedi
y� a mo AC, Cable; 2 Bedroom
Jus Route
Furniture: Do you need furniture? I have
a sofa sleeper that folds into a queen size
bed plus a love seat Desperate to get rid
of Phone 752 7161.
Forsale: Toaster oven Call 752-7396 atcr
6:00 p.m and leave message
For sale: Light blue carpet - cut perfectly
for Clement, White or Greene dorm
Good condition $25 neg. Call 757-6366
and ask for Parti or 752-3649.
For sale: 10.1 cubic ft refrigerator; sepa-
rate freezer; 5' tall; 2 yrs old, semi-auto-
matic defroster, asking $300; negotiable;
call 758-0222.
For Sale: 1975 Super Beetle VW Excellent
condition Owned by an Auto-Mechanic.
4 Sale: Couch - good condition! Call Mary
at 758-8666 or come by 249 Fleming I lall
Must sell'
Golf club for sale: 3 PW Irons 2,3,4,
woods and bag. Call 355-2725
Blue 10 speed - new only ridden twice.
$75 00 Full-size mattress and box spring
$60 Call Keith before 5 30 pm at 758
2300. After 6:00 p.m at 752 2830.
Cars - $155 (AvgPickups $365 (Avg )
Stationwagons - $151 (Avg)' Info 805-
687-6000 Ext. S 1166
David Bowie Tickets: We have two
David Bowie tickets (first show) would
like to swap for 2 Pink Floyd tickets Call
Mary or Russell after 6 00 p.m - 752-0962
Word Processing and photocopying
services. We offer typing and photocopy-
ing services We also sell software and
computer diskettes 24 hours in and out
Guaranteed typing on paper up to 20
hand written pages. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(Beside Cubbies) Greenville, N.C. 758-
3694
Pick up and delivery of term papers,
theses, resumes to be typed IBM word
processing by professional with 13 years
experience Letter quality print and pro
fessional editing. Call Nanette in Cnfton
at 1-524-5241 Cheap call the best serv-
ice!
Having a party? Need a DJ7 For the best
in Top 40, dance, and Beach, call Morgan
at 758-7967
PERSONALS
Sigma Tau Gamma: Would like to we!
come back all our little sisters'
Attn: The Sack the Pack Party is Back! At
the Sigma Tau Gamma House on Thur.
Sept. 3rd. Bring Your Own Pack.
Sigma Tau Gamma: Would like to wel
come back all students
Pi Kappa Alpha: Welcome back fellas
and 111 sisters' Another year in Greenville,
let's make it the best yet Meeting for
brothers Tues night at 1000 at Daven
ports.
Episcopal Students: Episcopal Student
Fellowship begins Wednesday, August
26 at St Paul's Church, 401 F. 4th Street
5:30 pm. Eucharist Supper provided by
parrish following service Come and
bring a friend'
Attn: Sig Tau little Sisters Mandatory
meeting at the house on Thursday at 5:00.
Please attend' Welcome back! Carol - 756-
9467
Sigma Tau Gamma: Would like to wel
come back all Sig Tau Brothers' Ready for
a great year! Sig Tau little Sisters.
Kappa Alpha little Sisters: Welcome
back' There is a meeting Wednesday,
August 26, at 700 p.m. This is a manda
tory meeting! See you at the Kappa Alpha
house
Alpha Phi: The sisters and pledges of
Alpha Phi congratulate Cindy Hyatt,
Charlcne Leggctt, Sam Goodman, and
Diana Mears and welcome them to our
sisterhood We love you'
All Greeks: Welcome back and good luck
this semester lxve, the Alpha Phi's
AH Fraternity Presidents
IFC meeting todav at 5 00
There is an
Congratulations to Chi Omegas new sis-
ters: Jenni Wallace, Tina Harrelson,
Audrey Pnmcau, Kelly Belton, Kim Ack-
iss, Kelly Easterling, and Carol Shore
We're so proud of you1
To all Sororities - Welcome Back' Hope
you had a great summer! Good luck
during rush Love, the Chi Omegas.
Everyone: Watch out for the BASKET-
BALL BLOWOUT to support the Ronald
McDonald House Sept. 23-25 near the
Student Store You mav win SI00'
Announcements
asketball Blowout
and lntra-fratcrnity
sponsoring a Basketball
student Supplv Store
ipport the Ronald
A S100 prize will be
Counseling Center
msel ngCenter will spon
� - : cinning the Uni-
If Awareness for
idenl designed to assist
� their emerging sense of
gr wth and competence
p rs nal social and aca
in university life. Mem
uraged to come together in
' m irual support and
"�vitic problems and con-
� ' their expenence are ad
-�ons will begin Sept 3 in
aiding from 1 CCCp m to
i t the Counseling Center
� n at 7s7-fhH
Members Named
. � � : iv� g students were selected
' '�'� the judicial board this year
�; ow, Elizabeth L Wooten,
. irke y A Larrimore, Barrv P
� Paul A (ones, Mark France, Erma
L Dillinger, Christopher C Gemski,
han Clemens, I eshe 1 larns.
. members arc asked to contact the
- I A office to drop i H class schedules
and receive information concerning the
first meeting
CQnlinuing Education
1 he department of continuing educa-
tion will offer the following non-credit
courses Mulrimate 829, Camera 91,
Scuba 91, Japanese 93, Sailing 910.
For more information contact the office of
Continuing Education, Erwin Hall (757-
6143).
Campus gt Smuts
The first meeting of Campus Girl
Scouts will be held at the Mendenhall
Student Center Information Desk on
Aug 27th, at 630 p.m. Contact Nande at
551-2994, between 8 am. and 4 p.m for
more information.
Igkiunti Night Captains
All Night Captains please stop by the
Alumni Center before Sept 2 to receive
telcfund information
BACCHUS
The first meeting of BACCHUS
(Boosting Alcohol Consciousness Con-
cerning the Health of University Stu-
dents) will be Sept. 3 in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center Room 242
ECU raddling Our?
An organizational meeting will be held
in Memorial Gym room 105 on Sept. 1 at
4.30 p.m Contact Jim Hix (6764 or 756-
2970) for more details.
WorkStudy Positions
The Department of Political Science
needs workstudy students (already
approved by the Office of Financial Aid)
to fill clerk positions Prefer students that t
are not our own majors. Contact Cynthia
Smith at 757-6030 or apply at
Brewster. A-124.
Self-Help Position
The Department of Political Sdence
seeks a reliable, consaenbous, and effi-
cient student with strong skills and some
experience to assist staff and faculty
Good typing copying and clencal skills
are desired. Please contact Cynthia
Smith, Brewster A-124 personally or by
telephone, 757-6030. 8.30 a.m. to 5 p.m
Monday through Friday
Campus CmsadeJoi
CHE1SI
Campus Crusade for CHRIST is spon-
soring "Prime Time" for ECU students It
will be in Brewster C-103 this Thursday at
7:30pm Freshmen and transfer students
please join us for fun, fellowship and
Biblical teaching.
Scholarships Ava'lflMf
Air Force ROTC has 2- through 4-year
scholarships that can cover full college
tuition and other expenses plus SI00 each
academic month. The Air Force Officers
Qualifying Test (AFOOT) is free and of-
fered on Sept. 3 from 1:00-600 pm. For
further information contact Captain
Houston in Wright Annex or call 757-
6597.
FresbyteriajjMMetbodisj
Students
Open house at the Methodist Student
Center will be Aug 27 from 7-10 p.m.
Food will be provided. The Methodist
Student Center is located at 501 E Fifth St
across from Garrett Hall For more infor-
mation, contact Rev Burcher, 752-7240
Dairy I Brown
In IVK3 l)arr I Brown was managing editor of
The Fast Carolinian
Todav he writes lor Ihv Washington Post;
Kd Nick las
In 19U Va Niiklas was sports editor of
'I he Fast Carolinian
Today he writes lor the ashinglun Post
Al Agate
In tXS l Agate wrote a column for
The Fast Carolinian
The East Carolinian
In IV87 you could work for The Fast Carolinian.
tomorrow. Who knows?
Apply now.
We're located on the second floor of the lublkations Itldg.
The News:
It's hard hitting. It's fast. It can take you places
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it's hard hitting. It's moving fast. It can give you the
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The Job:
News editor. It's an awesome responsibility.
It's one hell of a job. We need the best to produce the best.
MUWMiMMNMi
Beth, Summer in Charlotte was OK but
now its time for some real senous good
times. Meet me tonight in the "pit" at the
Attic for a little of Bruce Frye and his
band Michael
Bo I'm so excited to be back at school
with you We're going to have a awesome
year together I love you bunches1 Angie
Welcome Back! Hope you had a great
summer Good luck with classes Call if 1
can be of assistance for you Scott Tho-
mas, Student Body President 757-6611,
e�t 218, Mendenhall Student I
Room 22x
S.G A I lections All interested persi
in running tor aS(, A office, must
in Room 228, Mendenhall Student I . i
bv Sept 2 at S 00 p m F� more u
757 6611 e�t 218
Ur.1 Onr black wallet In night �
21 downtown at K.ittrrs I'M s or
Federal Bank Please get in touch ��
ID's and Cither art No
asked Call 7Se A , messag)
mail to 77 Borne st Greenvilli
Wanted:
Layout artist for the
news department
Earn while you learn the
latest in desktop publishing
and get experience.
INTERESTED IN
PHOTOGRAPHY
FOR CAMPUS
MEDIA ?
i
Apply at
Media Board
Secretarial
Office in the
Publications
Building.
Announcements
If your organization would like to have � public service announcement published in
The East Carolinian, please stop by our office on the second floor of the PttbHcatior
Building and fill out an official announcement form There is no charge Tor announc.
ments, but space is often limited. Therefore, wecmn.it guarantee that vour annoum �
ment will run as lone � you like. Announcements will be limited to those it.m
pertaining to meetings, departmental matters, and other public service announce
menu at determined by the discretion of The East Carolinian
Beginning Sept. I, new deadlines will be imposed. Announcements and Classifieds to
be published in the Tuesday edition must be submitted no later then 4 p.m the Friday
before. Those running in the Thursday edition must be submitted no later then 4pm
the Monday before.
Classifieds
I
Beginning Sept. new deadlines will be established. Classifieds running in th,
Tuesday edition must be submitted by 4 pm. the Fridav before. Those runnine in th,
Thursday edition must be submitted by 4 p.m the Monday before.
NO Ufa w) hf Hkfn over the nhone
Please notify The East Carolinian immediately If your ad Is incorrect. He will noc h,
responsible for Incorrect ads after the first day of publication. The Fastarolinian
reserves the right to reject any ad for libel, obcenitv, or bad taste
J
Production Manager
Wanted:
Are you a reliable student
with strong computer and organizational skills?
Then you could be gaining valuable management
and technical experience that will give
you the edge in today's highly
competitive job market.
The East Carolinian
is now looking for a new Production Manager to:
?Manage the production staff.
Train new employees.
?Edit Classifieds and Announcements.
?Maintain production equipment.
LdDimg Iln�G2rs9 Sow sijj
hard work, great sczrT�r.y0
Tto� E&stt Car�I!�iin:tt2s.
We're located on the second floor of the Publications Bids.
� '
i
�Ksssnaaa
I m �





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25. 1987 7
aariotte was Ok but
rif real serious good
Ignt in the "pit at the
rruce Fi e and his
be ha, k at school
i to has o a a w eaootc
s vou bundles! Angie
ext 218. Mendenhall Student (.inter.
Room 228
S.G.A. Elections: All interested persons
in running tor a S G A office, must apply
in Room 228, Mendenhall Student (.enter
b) Sept 2 at S 00 p.m For more into call
57 hhll ext 218.
Lost One black wallet. In night. August
downtown at Ratters PBS or Home
1 Bank. Please get in touch Need
- and other articles Mo questions
jm cali 756 tvWS or lea e message or
mail to 77 Barnes St Green ille
ed:
tyout artist for the
news department
while you learn the
in desktop publishing
id get experience.
ITERESTED IN
OTOGRAPHY
IOR CAMPUS
MEDIA ?
ON
COAST
Apply at
vfedia Board
Secretarial
Office in the
Publications
Building.
i
now
�omVVwtV
a.
h
NNOUNCEMENTS
In would like to have a public service announcement published in
please stop by our office on the second floor of the Publications
It an official announcement form. There is no charge for annoume-
ten limited. Therefore, we cannot guarantee that j our annoume-
llong as you like. Announcements will be limited to those items
ings, departmental matters, and other public service announce
i b the discretion of The Fast Carolinian
w deadlines will be imposed. Announcements and Classifieds to
IT uesday edition must be submitted no later then 4 p.m. the Fridaj
ling in the Thursday edition must be submitted no later then 4pm
Classifieds
Uew deadlines will be established. Classifieds running in th.
1st be submitted by 4 pan. the Friday before. Those running in tin
Nust be submitted by 4 p.m the Monday before.
No ads wlil be taken over the phone
I Carolinian immediately If your ad is incorrect. We will not be
rect ads after the first day of publication. The Fast Carolinian
i reject any ad for libel, obcenity, or bad taste.
ON CAMPUS
3P
rodlction Manager
Wanted:
Are you a reliable student
wig computer and organizational skills?
could be gaining valuable management
technical experience that will give
vou the edge in today's highly
competitive job market.
The East Carolinian
)king for a new Production Manager to:
JManage the production staff.
Train new employees.
Edit Classifieds and Announcements.
Maintain product" equipment.
. . � a
7S, Dow j
Li work, ginssift cosnuj
Tto� Sasd CsiirciDllEiffinanno
on the second floor of the Publications Rldg.
ROCKS GREENVILLE
tkw.
i- t I
-�� - - -

V
I
I
���v ��i





. Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25,1987

i

i

ECU will seek vice chancellor
co inCUDN?WS B"reau) - Chan-
no Chdrd R En an-
nounced at last week's faculty
"vocation that a national
-arch to hnd a new vice chancel-
' r ,or academic affairs would
wgm this fall.
Meanwhile, William A. Blood-
Worth Jr professor and chair
Jjwn of the English Department,
has temporarily filled the posi-
tion.
Bloodworth, 44, a nationallv-
recognized scholar in American
uterature, has chaired the De-
partment of English for the past
hve years. Under his direction,
the university established a writ-
ing center and launched a new
program in communications
with a bachelor's degree in jour-
nalism and mass communication
administered by the English
Department.
He also has implemented a new
annual faculty evaluation proce-
dure for the department and re-
vised instruction in freshman
composition to emphasize effec-
tive writing.
"1 am confident that he will
serve the academic affairs area
and East Carolina University
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin, said
in announcing Bloodworth's
appointment.
Bloodworth will serve in an
acting capacity during a national
search for a successor to Angelo
A. Volpe, the newly-selected
president of Tennessee Tech Uni-
versity in Cookeville, Tenn.
Eakin announced earlier that
the interim appointee to be cho-
sen from faculty ranks would not
be a candidate for the permanent
appointment.
He said Bloodworth's appoint-
ment as acting vice chancellor
followed consideration of appli-
Colleges cost more
(AP) � College students re-
turning to campus this fall will
find higher tuitions awaiting
them again.
Tuition increased faster than
the inflation rate for the seventh
consecutive year, according to a
survey by The College Board re-
leased August 9.
In its annual look at what col-
leges are charging students, the
board found four-vear private
schools are now eight percent
more expensive than they were in
fall, 1986.
They now cost an average of
SI 0,493 for tuition, fees, room and
board.
Four-year private schools have
raised tuition by eight percent
each of the last three years, while
four year public schools have
boosted costs by an average rate
of six percent during the same
time period.
Latest figures from the Of f ice of
Management and Budgest in
Washington, D.C indicate the
general inflation rate for 1987
may reach 5.4 percent.
In 1986, prices nationwide in-
creased an average of 2.6 percent,
and have not increased bv as
much as four percent anv year
since 1984.
Nevertheless, students at four-
vear public institutions will pav
an average of $4,104 for school
this fall, a six percent jump since
1986, the College Board said.
At private two-year campuses,
students will pay an average of
$6,945. Students attending two-
year public colleges will pay
average costs of $687.
Campus officials say they need
to raise tuition to compensate for
monev thev no longer get from
state legislatures and the federal
government.
A budget crisis in Oklahoma,
for instance, forced legislators
there to increase tuition at state
campuses by more than 10 per-
cent this fall.
Citing a "fair but inadequate"
increase in funding from his state
legislature, Western Michigan U.
President Diethcr H. Haenicke
said August 5 he'd have to raise
tuition for undergrads a whop-
ping 9.5 percent this fall.
Upon hearing of the College
Board's summary of tuition
hikes, U.S. Sec. of Education Wil-
liam Bennett � who has asserted
colleges raise their tuitions more
than necessary because thev
know their students can borrow
more money from the federal
government � sighed, "There
they go again and agaian and
again. When will they ever stop?"
Tuition plan argued
(CPS) � Vice President George
Bush jumped on the bandwagon
bv endorsing one of the exotic
new "prepaid tution" savings
plans last week, soon after influ-
ential U.S. Sen. Clibomc Pell (D-
RI) also proposed making such a
plan national.
Thus far, only individual col-
leges and states have installed
such plans, which allow parents
to put aside money for their
children's education years in
advance.
In an Aug. 8 speech Bush � as
Pell had done in a July 17 Harvard
address � proposed making
such plans national for .he first
time.
Under the plan, parents could
deposit a certain amount � say,
$4,000 � into a special fund for
their young child. The interest
would compound during the
years so that, once the student got
to college, there would be enough
money in the fund to pay for tui-
tion.
Observers generally credit
Duquesne University in Pitts-
burgh with inventing the idea in
1984.
Since then 45 other private col-
leges and the states of Michigan,
Florida, Indiana, Maine, Tennes-
see and Wyoming have enacted
plans allowing parents to prepay
tuition at their campuses. A West
Virginia plan will become law
with Gov. Arch Moore's signa-
ture.
Illinois and North Carolina's
legislatures reportedly are about
to adopt such plans.
In fact, only Hawaii, Idaho,
Montana, Nebraska and South
Dakota are not considering pre-
paid tuition plans.
Some educators do not like the
plans, however.
They are "a bad idea whose
time has come said Robert
Atwell, president of the Ameri-
can Counil on Education in
Washington, D.C.
In a speech to the July conven-
tion of the Education Commis-
sion of the States, Atwell said, "If
I had a young familiy right now,
I'd invest in a mutal fund
Right and left presidential
hopefuls to visit Chapel Hill
made available for rebroadcast
by public television stations na-
tionwide.
Among the invited guests will
be governors and other educa-
tional leaders from the 15 states
affiliated with the Southern Re-
gional Education Board (SREB).
Thirteen of those states � Ala-
bama, Arkansas, Florida, Geor-
gia, Kentucky, Lousiana, Mary-
land, Mississippi, North Caro-
lina, Oklahoma, Tennessee,
Texas and Virginia � will partici-
pate in the Super Tuesday pri-
mary March 8. Other members of
the SREB are South Carolina and
West Virginia.
The Republican candidates
invited, in addition to Represen-
tative Kemp, are Vice President
George Bush; former Secretary of
State Alexander Haig; the Rev.
Pat Robertson; Senator Robert
Dole, Kansas; former governor
Pierre S. DuPont, Delaware; and
former Senator Paul Laxalt, Ne-
vada.
In addition to the six Demo-
crats who have accepted, Senator
Joseph Biden of Delaware has
been invited.
Tickets are necessary for ad-
mission to the forum, and the
number of tickets available is
limited. For information on out-
lets, call 962-0045. To order tick-
ets by mail, write UNC Ticket
Office, P.O. Box 3000, Chapel
Hill, N.C, 27514.

mmm
cations and consultations with
the president of the University of
North Carolina system, CD.
Spangler Jr. and the UNC vice
president for academic affairs
Raymond Dawson.
In an internal memo, Eakin
said, "Dr. Bloodworth has agreed
to serve in this important post
until a vice chancellor for aca-
demic affairs is selected and
commences service. Please give
Dr. Bloodworth your full sup-
port
Bloodworth, a native of San
Antonio, Texas, has a bachelor's
degree from Texas Lutheran Col-
lege, Scguin, Texas; the MA in
English from Lamar University,
Beaumont, Texas; and the doc-
toral degree in American civiliza-
tion from the University of Texas.
He joined the ECU staff as an
assistant professor of English in
1972.
He is widely known for a series
of articles on western American
literature and the writings of
such western authors as Zane
Grey and Max Brand, essays on
Hal Borland, B.M. Bower, Dec
Brown and others, Clarence Mul-
ford and varieties of American
Indian autobiographies, as well
as studies of Upton Sinclair and
others. His book, "Upon Sin-
clair was published bv Twayne
Publishers, Boston, in 1977.
Dr. Dennis O'Neal
Optometrist
is pleased to announce the
relocation of his practice of optometry
to
Greenville Eye Clinic
Bldg. 1, Doctors Park
Greenville, N.C. 27834
(past hospital on Stantonsburg Road)
in association with
Carl R. Wille, M.D. and William M. Monroe,
M.D.
Opthalmologists
Call for appointment.
758-4166 or 758-6600
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They're tasty chicken seasoned with the
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Perfect for lunch, after-school
snacks, anytime you're in the
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So try our new Chicken Littles�
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They cost just a little and people love 9em a lot!
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freshmandd , up
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April that wi - .
larg
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km �� � m
sometimi s if s a
confuse me with th
can't mvina m
; le that vs
Monetary gifi
ECU plan fo
C ontinued from pjge l
isisasp �
it th(
n the unr.
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il to the I
i eys for this . I
� �
These I
; the
II eentuall help th
enough to acquire a little some-
thing should help the univen
thai helped us make it. We i
to replenish th.
generations, Beasle s,
Kelsi and Beasley we i
� ss partners for 19 .
T5 r Beask j
ates In a real estate ar
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I ach other since 1947 a her, they
were X S. Marine offices9 Uv
t lop e QyafUfr fe'tia m
Before tft-rscursStiaa
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classes in business admimstra- :
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ter.
Kelso parallels ECU to Indiana
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TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUCUST25,1987
Dr. Dennis O'Neal
Optometrist
9U
pleased to announce the
of his practice of optometry
to
Ireenville Eye Clinic
Bldg Doctors Park
eenville, N.C. 27834
�p Stantonsburg Road)
association with
K Wil e, M D and William M. Monroe,
M D
Opthalmo g si -
Call for appointment.
758-4166 or '58-6600

Save 2o-o
)ff Regular Price
A "� Tis Coupon
��"1
HO
Mile
wpn
Specialty Gifts
mm
ze.
you can afford to go a little
icken Littles sandwiches.
Len seasoned with the
)lend of eleven herbs and
;rved on a fresh bun.
frfect for lunch, after-school
lacks, anytime you're in the
mood for fun. Just add our
lew crispy golden fries for a
jncn you'll love.
try our new Chicken Littles�
lay. And you can break out of
r lunchtime, snacktime
me . without breaking your
let.
ive 'em a lot!
nville Blvd.
More students drawn to smaller, 'personable' colleges
(AP) � Despite the declining
number of 18-year-olds nation
ally, many of North Carolina's
private colleges are having a
banner year recruiting students,
officials said Monday.
At Greensboro College, the
freshman class this fall will be up
61 percent, raising total enroll-
ment by about 25 percent to more
than 700 students, said Randy
Doss, admissions director.
"We knew as early as March or
April that we would enter our
largest freshman class in the his-
tory of our institution he said. "1
know the demographics, but
sometimes it's a case of don't
confuse me with the facts. You
can't convince me there aren't 200
people that want to go to Greens
boro College
High Point College expects at
least 30 percent more freshmen
than last year and Catawba Col-
lege in Salisbury projects a 27
percent increase. None of the
schools surveyed at random by
The Associated Press reported
declining admissions, but offi-
cials had varying theories about
the increasing interest.
'The participation rate, those
going to college, is higher said
Robert Gardner, dean of admis-
sions and financial aid at
Davidson College, which limited
enrollment of new students to
360, the same number as last yea r,
despite climbing applications.
"1 think most of the better
schools, by and large, are seeing
Monetary gift helps
ECU plan for future
Continued from page 1
"This is a spectacular gift said
1 akin at the ceremony. "It will
strengthen the university and
brighten the future for new gen-
erations of students. We are
grateful to the Kelsos and the
Beasleys tor this vote of confi-
dence
"These trusts are good tor ev-
eryone. We can use the income
now, and it's nice to know that it
will eventually help the students
of eastern North Carolina. 1 think
those of us who've been fortunate
enough to acquire a little some-
thing should help the universities
that helped us make it. We need
to replenish the store for future
generations Beaslev said in an
interview.
Kelso and Beaslev were busi-
ness partners for 19 years is
owners o�BeasleyKelso Associ-
ates Inc a real estate and insur-
ance firm. Biit they have known
each other since 1947, when they
were -LS. Marine officetst ta�- )
Betore ri7.ni h�hh n� lir.n.w-
ant colonels with more than 20
years of service, they attended
classes in business administra-
tion at ECU's Cherrv Point Cen-
ter.
Kelso parallels ECU to Indiana
State University since both
schools began as normal schools,
became teachers colleges and
then universities. 'ECU has com-
pleted the same cycle as Indiana,
only 20 or 30 years later. My
grandfather was the dean of math
at Indiana' Kelso said in an inter-
view.
"You (LCD have got excellent
programs - a gxd, broad base.
Now it's time to concentrate on
quality. 1 think we need more
doctorates and more attention to
industrial and technical educa-
tion Beaslev said.
Beaslev said he also has two
daughters who graduated from
ECU.
kelso and Beaslev have both
been president ot the New Bern
Board of Realtors and the N.C.
Association of Realtors.
Eakin also announced that an
anonymous donor contributed
$333,000 to the university. The
mncyvittenaMe the university
llll ,1S1H '111111 III Mill I IIH� -
tional studies, possibly leading to
a master's degree program in the
field.
The state will provide $167,000
in matching funds to the univer-
sity, according to a prec3 release.
COUPON
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increases and 1 expect that will
continue for a while he said.
"Parents are a little bit more con-
cerned about economic security
(and) the ability of the school to
get students into good graduate
schools and professional pro-
grams
Doss attributed much of
Greensboro College's growth to
increasing interest in smaller
schools and the personal atten-
tion available there. But he and
most of the other officials con-
tacted cited increasing advertis-
ing and recruiting efforts.
"We have done a lot of aggres-
sive recruiting said Nan Perk-
ins at Elon College, where enroll-
ment was expected to increase by
about 100 students tn i xv �u
fall.
"Like everyone else, we have
been waiting for that falloff (in
enrollment) for a number of
years she said. "Apparently
more students are electing to go
on to college and we've had en
rollment increases for 11 straight
years now
Warren Wilson College in
Swannanoa will have its largest
incoming class since 1981 when
183 students are admitted this
fall, said Joe Carreiro, admissions
officer.
"I think we have done a great
deal of changing and improved
our advertising campaign he
said.
Meredith College in Raleigh
also has filled dormitory rooms
with enrollment about equal to
last year's level of 360 freshmen,
said Renee Keever, a spokes-
woman at the school.
Guilford College in Greens-
boro has taken steps to hold the
freshman class at 310 after it
swelled to 343 last year and "it got
very crowded said Larry West
of the admissions office.
Statistics suggest that more
North Carolina high school
graduates are going to college.
Officials for the University of
North Carolina system estimate
39 percent of North Carolina's
1986 high school graduates were
in college last fall. That's below
the national averageof 54 percent
but Raymond Dawson, the
system's senior vice president for
academic affairs, said North
Carolina appears to be improv-
ing.
While the system doesn't have
college-going estimates before
1986, the percentage of North
Carolina high school graduates
going to colleges in this state has
risen from 20 percent in 1982 to 24
percent in 1986. In addition, a
survey of high school seniors by
the state Department of Public
Instruction indicates the percent-
ageof college-bound North Caro-
lina students has increased from
31.4 percent in 1982 to 34.7 per-
cent in 1986.
Evan Sun, a department stati-
cian, said that gain indicates
more students are choosing col-
lege in part because new high-
technology industries demand
better-educated employees.
ECU Welcome Back
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SINGLE VISION � OLASS � PLASTIC
ONE DAY SEHVICE ON BIFOCALS
OFFEH GOOD THRU AUG. 31, 1987
CLEAR VUE OPTICIANS
2484 STANTONSBURG ROAD
STANTON SQUARE 752-1446
HUPON
� COUPO,
It All
Happens
At The
New
g PORTS PAD
Live The Experience
11AM � Until
Downtown Greenville ' 3o5o
- - ���. -a -�, � ���
X

I
.





.THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25,1W7
�� � wmvi'i iiniain AUGUST25, 1987
Ohio man becomes assistant to the chancellor
JHCU News Bureau) - R,ch- vicna �
rd A P�WS Bureau)
Public r' a in
alia.rs and institutional
! ncement, will become ex-
u'nea tanUo(hochana!ior
O'EOJ effective Sept. 1.
senior r'ardSislcdv,nKa tas
senKW v,ce president for external
��w and associate professor of
communication at Wright State
Lniversity, Dayton, Ohio, to ac-
�ptthe ECU position.
,rs a former colleague of
,� p CIJ?nceno' Richard K. Eakin
�� Bowling Green State Univer-
ty in Ohio, having served at
oowung Green from 1971 to 1984
including two years as vice presi-
dent for university relations as
acting executive vice president.
Riachard A. Edwards
'You get what
you pay for'
Continued from page 1
has increased 3.312 percent and it
threatens to increase more if the
service stays open.
"We're taking away a disserv-
ice, not a service, because the very
best care that's possible to give
can be given 100 percent during
the day, not 40 or n0 percent
said McCallum.
He added, "It boils down to,
you get what you pay for, and
anybody knows when you offer
services; then- must be paid tor
"We can take care of o percent
of your outpatient needs, and we
do it well. We have Vrav facilities
and laboratory facilities Wedoas
good a job as" the hospital does,
but we don't have an intensive
care unit, cardiac care, orthope-
dics or sub-specialties he said.
1 fe went on to say. The reason
eve been able to do these things
so long is we've been fortunate in
that we practice a very good
brand of medicine and have not
done the things that would cause
someone to want to sue us
McCallum said that one of the
goals of the student health center
is to educate the students on
proper health care which will
benefit that student in years to
come.
"Our idea hesaid, "is ho wean
we help you develop a lifestyle
which is going to add years' to
vour lite later on. How can we
help you to learn the proper diet,
types of exercise, how you can
prevent heart disease, or as a
young lady, how to prevent
breast cancer or an unwanted
pregnancy?"
"Because student health is a
particular brand of medicine that
is practiced on a specific age
group with a particular set of
needs, we are specialists in this
field he said.
"You are in a population age
group that rarely needs to be
hospitalized and barring an acci-
dent, you rarely need care that
couldn't be postponed a few-
hours, or if it's available up until
8 p.m. you should be wise enough
to seek care. I think if the students
will make themselves knowl-
edgeable of things we offer, then
they can prevent much of the
problem he said.
He added, "So what we have
done is concentrated on the
things we can do best and this is
what we're trying to do
"We do not want to offer any-
thing less than the best medicine,
and for that reason we had to
revamp our position on this and
do the thing that we do best and
not do the things we're not pre-
pared for he said.
McCallum compared the ter-
mination of the late night hours to
owning a Mercedes.
"Even though you'd like to
have a Mercedes, if you can't af-
ford a Mercedes, you usually take
a Ford or Chevrolet. They both
get you to the same place, maybe
not quite as comfortable, but the
ride is the same and it beats walk-
ing by a long shot

vice president and as executive
assistant to the president.
Eakin, who became chancellor
of ECU March 1, had been vice
president tor planning and budg-
eting at Howling Green State
University
"I consider East Carolina I m
versitv to be very fortunate to be
able to attract a person Of such
talents and experience to this
position Eakin said "lam look
ing forward very much to work-
ing with Dick Edwards again
Announcement ot Edwards'
appointment concluded a search
which began in May. Responsi-
bilities of the position include
internal and external liaison, re-
search related to program and
policy development and admin
istrative staff support to thechan-
cellor.
At Wright State since 1984,
Edwards has focused on legisla-
tive attairs, community relations
and fund raising management.
I le was at Bowling Green State
R p Charles A. Mosherof Ober-
lin, Ohio
His community interests in-
clude promoting mental health,
economic development and the
United Way. He is a member of
numerous honoraries and was
inducted into the Buckeye Boys
State Hall of Fame in 1979 . He
was named an honorary alumnus
of the Bowling Green State Uni-
versity School of Journalism in
1982.
He received a bachelor's de-
gree in journalism at Kent State in
1963 and the MA in political sci-
ence at Kent State in 1972. He also
has studied communication the-
ory at Bowling Green State.
Asa vice president at Bowling
Green, Edwards was involved in
legislative and governmental af
fairs, public relations, commu-
nity relations, student publica-
tions, commencements and spe-
cial events, the campus television
station, alumni affairs, develop
ment and the BGSU Foundation,
Inc.
Edwards and his wife,
Nadine, are natives of Bellevue,
Ohio, and are parents of three
daughters
lor nearly 14 years prior to . ,in
to Wright State and held tl,
demic rank of associate professi r
ot journalism at Bowling (ireen
In 1973-74, he directed j 32-
member Citizens Task Force on
1 ligher Education inhio which
recommended policy initiatives
for the Ohio Board of Regents and
the General Assembl) fi, also
lu�s worked for the National Sci-
ence Foundation, al his alma
mater, Kent State ! ni
Kent. ()hio, and for the lati
EXTRA LOW
USDA Choice Beef Untrimmed
UlHfll F 1�" 12 Lbs. Average
����Wfcfci Sliced FREE!
PRICES
,� USDA
�� CHOICE
k Prices in this ad good thru
fcM" Sunday, August 30, 1987.
Fresh Mixed
FRYER PARTS
We Reserve The Right
To Limit Quantities.
V
USDA Choice Beef
SIRLOIN TIP
ROAST
Snow White
CAULIFLOWER & .
Head
'Bunch
USDA
CHOICE
6.5 Oz. - Reg. a Ritfgie Chips
8 Oz. � Puffed & Crunchy Doodles
Wise - Reg. & No Salt
Cottage Fries
7 5 Oz.
-aA
South CaroJIiii ,
WHITE PACKAGED
POTATOES I PEACHES
10 Lb. Bag
Lb.
Grade A 16-22 Lbs. Average
$109
2 Liter - Pepsi-Free, Diet Pepsi, Diet
Pepsi-Free
EXTRA LOW PRICES Everyday
3 Liter - Assorted Flavors
Creamettes Elbow
MacaroniThin
Spaghetti
3 (feamelfes
7 0z.
'MACARONI
V' . ��- 1 -v.
Heinz
JFG Salad 1
Dressing i BBQ Sauce
32 0z.
18 Oz. - Reg.SmokeOnionMesqurte
, Cajun
Ranch
Hidden Valley 8 Oz.
? OriginalReduced Calorie
Sturdyware I flcitclien
Plates Jl I
Fab
99M19BI19
50 Ct 8 78"
30 Ct. Tall - Food Lion
42 0z.
Cente
r
(ECJJ News Bureau) - The
B Revnolds Health Car,
'rust, d prUdk. ,(lunddtion lo
"ted m Wmston-Salem, has
yarded ECU and Caswoll(,n:
cr, a state-supported institution
n Kinston for the mental
torded, a $167,317 grant to estab-
Usha training and servi
"Our overall goal istopn i
independence for peoplewh
njum-hand.capped sa.d Sarah
'larrel who will coordinate the
project
r A; rnK to Harrell, n
te at Caswell and
wduals in the comrnui
unable to speak or move ��
of physical handicaps. V,
proper equipment, however
communication and acts.
with these individuals art i
sibkv
By using a simple b irdd
rated with pictures � a glas
water for thirst, a plal
hunger, a bathroom for I
needs �a resident .
to speak can indicate
and feelings by poii -
Special switches
activated by the tongue, an
brow or chin enable those .
can't move to perform sin
tasks iike turning a light on and
off or opening a door.
"These are simple tasks, but
they mean a lot to those who were
able to do nothing before Har-
rell said. "You can see it in their
faces, how good it makes them
feel when they're in control of
thi'il
mai
i.
I
.

spend

dents,
fessor
Dean says progran
(ECU News Bureau) � ECU
has established a Science Institute
for the Disabled as a public serv-
ice function among its academic
divisions and will launch the new
program at the start of the 1987-
88 academic year.
Eugene E Ryan, dean of the
College of Arts and Sciences, said
the institute will "help disabled
students pursue careers in sci-
ence related fields by improving
their science instruction at every
level J
Teachers and counselors will
be made aware that science may
be a realistic career choice for
handicapped students and
"extraordinary accomodations
for them" will be made, Rvan
said.
The institute will be a part of
the College of Arts and Sciences
and Ryan said that David Lunnev
of the chemistry taculty will be-
come director effective Aug. 19.
The Institute will begin imme-
diately planning a summer insti-
tute to provide research opportu-
nities for science students with
disabilities. A $40,000 National
Science Foundation grant to plan
two, five-week summer terms
was announced last week.
ECU'S new Science Institute tor
the Disabled will be modeled af-
ter the National Technical Insti-
tute for the Deaf at Rochester.
NY but will be smaller m scale
and cover all disabilities, Rvan
said.
He said the institute here will
seek to help disabled students at
every level for careers in technical
or science-related fields, to pre-
pare teachers to teach science to
disabled students, to conduct
research on means of improving
science instruction for disabled
ECU Health
Center takes
reservations
Continued from page 3
nate the scheduled students from
having to wait the usual time that
walk-ins have to wait
"VVe plan on being verv recep-
tive to appointments and n t
limit the service" she said In
the past the appointment system
was only used for specifics such
as physicals and return visits
Marshburn said that this new
system will allow students to
schedule an appointment at a
time that will work into the
schedule and also allow them to
pick a physician if thev have I
preference.
Appointment hours will be
from8a.m.tol2a.m.andlam to
5 a.m. Any student intended in
making an appointment should
call 757-6317.
� - I
"Gal
as a
ustitia
� sex
activin
there
� � tl
rected I
Thu
ment:
r-
R
D
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
Whi
$151
Air
Sj
l$17l
ECU
12.
,r J





i'
?
THE EAST CARPI INII AM A
UCU5T25 I'
arj�LCU News Bureau) - Rich.
Public Y!VardS' d Sldlist in
aua.rs and institutional
d an ement, wi� Kvomo
r� effective Sept 1.
towards is leaving a post as
n.orv.ce president tor external
v � ws and associate professor of
- mmumcahon at Wright State
vnMrS rV' Davton' to
oeP�tt� ECU position.
Pi i uS a '�nncr colleague ot
� i l??noe� WchaitJ K. Eakin
whng Green State Univer-
" Ohio, having served al
now ling Green from 1971 to NS4
including two years as vice presi-
dent for university relations, as
acting executive vice president
man becomes assistant to the chancellor
Riachard A. Edwards
'You get what
you pay for'
Continued from page 1
has increased 3,312 percent and it
threatens to increase more if the
service stays open
"Were taking away a disserv-
ice, not a service, because the very
best care that's possible to give
can be given 100 percent during
the day, not 40 or 60 percent
said McCallum.
He added. "It boils down to,
you get what you pay for, and
anybody knows when von offer
services they must be paid for
"W e can take care oi 99 percent
of your outpatient needs, and we
do n well. We have X-ray facilities
and laboratory facilities. Wedoas
good a ob as the hospital does,
but we don't have an intensive
care unit, cardiac care, orthope-
dics or sub-specialties he said.
1 le went on to say, 'The reason
e'vebeen able to do these things
so long is we've been fortunate in
that we practice a very good
brand oi medicine and have not
done the things that would cause
someone to want to sue us
McCallum said that one oi the
goals of the student health center
is to educate the students on
proper health care which will
benefit that student in years to
come
"Our idea he said, "is how can
we help you develop a lifestvle
which is going to add years" to
your life later on. How"can we
help you to learn the proper diet,
types of exercise, how you can
prevent heart disease, or as a
young lady, how to prevent
breast cancer or an unwanted
pregnancy?"
"Because student health is a
particular brand of medicine that
is practiced on a specific age
group with a particular set of
needs, we are specialists in this
field he said.
"You are in a population age
group that rarely needs to be
hospitalized and barring an acci-
dent, you rarely need care that
couldn't be postponed a few
hours, or if it's available up until
8 p.m. you should be wise enough
to seek care. I think if the students
will make themselves knowl-
edgeable of things we offer, then
they can prevent much of the
problem he said.
He added, "So what we have
done is concentrated on the
things we can do best and this is
what we're trying to do
"We do not want to offer any-
thing less than the best medicine,
and for that reason we had to
revamp our position on this and
do the thing that we do best and
not do the things we're not pre-
pared for he said.
McCallum compared the ter-
mination of the late night hours to
owning a Mercedes.
"Even though you'd like to
have a Mercedes, if you can't af-
ford a Mercedes, you usually take
a Ford or Chevrolet. They both
get you to the same place, maybe
not quite as comfortable, but the
ride is the same and it beats walk-
ing by a long shot
vice president and as executive
assistant to the president.
Eakin, who became chancellor
Of ECU March I, had been vice
president for planning and budg-
eting at Howling Green State
University.
"consider East Carolina Uni-
versity to be very fortunate to bo
able to attract a person o such
talents and experience to this
position Eakin said "lam look
ing forward very much to work-
ing with Dick Edwards again
Announcement ot Edwards'
appointment concluded a search
which began in May. Responsi-
bilities oi the position include
internal and external liaison, re-
search related to program and
policy development and admin
istrative staff support to thechan-
cellor.
At Wright State since 1984,
Edwards has focused on legisla-
tive atlairs, community relations
and fund raising management
He was at Howling Green State
Rep.harles A. Mosher of Ober-
lin, Ohio
His community interests in-
clude promoting mental health,
economic development and the
United Way. He is a member of
numerous honoraries and was
inducted into the Buckeye Boys
State Hall of Fame in 1979 . He
was named an honorary alumnus
ot the Bowling Green State Uni-
versity School of journalism in
1982.
He received a bachelor's de
gree in journalism at Kent State in
1963 and the MA in political sci-
ence at Kent State in 1972. He also
has studied communication the
ory at Bowling Green State.
Asa vice president at Bowling
Green, Edwards was involved in
legislative and governmental af-
fairs, public relations, commu-
nity relations, student publica
tions, commencements and spe-
cial events, the campus television
station, alumni affairs, develop
ment T.d the BGSU Foundation,
Inc.
Edwards and his wife,
Nadine, are natives of Bellevue,
Ohio, and are parents of three
daughters.
for nearly 14 years prior to going
to Wright State and held tht & �'
domic rank of associate professor
ol journalism at BowlingCreen
In 1973-74, he directed a V-
member Citizens Task Fon e on
I ligher Education in ()hn which
recommended polu v initiatives
for the Ohio B ard of Regi nS and
the General Assembly -
has worked tor the National Sci-
ence foundation, at his
mater, Kent State I nr.
Kent ()lno, and for the 1 ii
lima
sih
EXTRA LOW
FOOD LION
PRICES!
USD A Choice Beef Untrimmed
lAHDl F 10"12 Lbs. Average
IVLL Sliced FREE!
Fresh Mixed
FRYER PARTS
USDA
CHOICE
I k Prices in this ad good thru
fcM" Sunday, August 30, 1987.
We Reserve The Right
To Limit Quantities.
V
Snow White ft?
CAULIFLOWERS & -
Hm :i
USDA Choice Beef
SIRLOIN TIP
U.S. No. 1
WHITE g
� J �
21� W "Bunch
Head lyfr
South Carolina
PACKAGED
I PEACHES
7
Lbs.
Wise
6 5 0z - R
Ot. Put-
Wise - Reg.
Cottage F
Ptpsi. Diet
3 Liter - Assorted Flavors
veryday
MacaroniThin
Spaghetti
HUUI
Cream
Budget
32 0z.
3 (reamelles
MACARONI
-�i-��.��
S
in mmin
SOUR
ZA
CREAM 16 Oz. � Food Lion
10 Oz.
Frozen Assorted Flavors
JFG Salad
32 0z.
18 Oz. - Reg.SmokeOnionMesquite
Cap n
Q,l,lM'
wntn

so.
50 Ct 8 78"
Kitchen
Bags
$f19
30 Ct. Tall - Food Lion
42 0z.
I Five Alive
i Juice
99
Tony Dog
Food
15.5 0i. Beef
��
thai
mal
will
merl
a!sv4
whal
thertf
who
CUf
tht
dents
fessor
studei
scmim
(otthel
"Cial
as a
activ
tht
ncru,
rected
menu
Cente
(HCL News Bureau) - The
�B Revnolds Health C
rW a P?VatC founiaton lo-
cated m Winston-Salem, has
awarded ECU and CaswellCen
Wr,a state-supported institution
n Kinston for the mentally re
fcted,a $16717grant toestab-
�isha training and service center
"Uuroverall goal is to promote
'dependence for people wh
"u,h-handicapped said Sarah
'larrell, who will coordinate the
project
' cording to Harrell,
lents at Caswell and �
viduals in the commui
unable to speak or rr
of physical handicaps V.
proper equipment, how,
communication and a I
with these individuals at
sible.
By using a simple board de
rated with pictures �at
water for thirst, a plate
hunger, a bathroom r - �
needs �a resident v.
to speak can indicate basic r, -
and feelings by pointii
Special switches that can be
activated by the tongue, an eye
brow or chin enable those who
can't move to perform simple
tasks like turning a light on and
off or opening a door.
"These are simple tasks, but
they mean a lot to those who .
able to do nothing before Har-
rell said. "You can see it in their
faces, how good it makes them
feel when they're in control of
Dean says progran
(ECU News Bureau) � ECU
hasestablished a Science Institute
for the Disabled as a public serv-
ice function among its academic
divisions and will launch the new-
program at the start of the 1987-
88 academic year.
Eugene E. Ryan, dean of the
College of Arts and Sciences, said
the institute will "help disabled
students pursue careers in sci-
ence related fields by improving
their sciencainstrucbon at every
level J
Teachers and counselors will
be made aware that science may
be a realistic career choice for
handicapped students and
"extraordinary accomodations
for them" will be made, Rvan
said.
The institute will be a part of
the College of Arts and Sciences
and Ryan said that David Lunnev
of the chemistry faculty will be-
come director effective Aug. 19.
The Institute will begin imme-
diately planning a summer insti-
tute to provide research opportu-
nities for science students with
disabilities. A $40,000 National
Science Foundation grant to plan
two, five-week summer terms
was announced last week.
ECU'S new Science Institute for
the Disabled will be modeled al-
ter the National Technical Insti-
tute for the Deaf at Rochester,
NY but will be smaller in scale
and cover all disabilities, Rvan
said.
He said the institute here will
seek to help disabled students at
every level forcareers in technical
or science-related fields, to pre-
pare teachers to teach science to
disabled students, to conduct
research on means of improvinc
science instruction for disabled
ECU Health
Center takes
reservations
Continued from pace 3
nate the scheduled students from I
having to wait the usual time that 1$ 1
walk-ins have to wait "
"We plan on being verv recep-
tive to appointments and not
limit the service she said "In Air
the past the appointment system S
was only used for specifics, such �� �� -�
as physicals and return visits 13) I
Marshburn said that this new j
system will allow students to
schedule an appointment at a
time that will work into their ,
schedule and also allow them to
pick a physician if they have a
preference.
Appointment hours will be
from 8 a.m. to 12 am and lam. to
5 a.m. Any student interested in
making an appointment should
call 757-6317.
R
D
B
L-I
1 ECU
� 4 - . wJ





e chancellor
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25, 1987
11
U years prior to going
Stat� mA hold thoaca-
-vi.ito professor
it Bow ling Croon.
4 he directed a 32-
ns lask Force on
Huo which
It d polic) initiatives
Regents and
Ho also
National Sci-
�' Kis alma
niversity,
i the late U.S.
RICES!
i
USDA
CHOICE
Sunday, August 30, 1987.
We Reserve The RifHt
hite jV K
rj Fresh Z
OWER bSIi 1
7 I JCBUnci
Head -4s$sjfcfi
South Carolina
I
PEACHES
Diet
Kist
Drinks
99
0
3 Liter Assorted Flavors
I
Budget
Gourmets
$129
10 Oz.
Ffoien Assorted Flavors
9
Five Alive
Juice
99c
64 Oz.
Tony Dog
Food
5$1
15 5 Oz Beef
Center gets funds to help the handicapped
(ECU News Bureau) - The
�te B. Reynolds Health Care
irust, a private foundation lo-
cated in Winston-Salem, has
awarded ECU and Caswell Cen-
ter a state-supported institution
n Kmston for the mentally re-
arded, a $167,317 grant to estab-
lish a training and service center.
"Our overall goal is to promote
independence for people who are
multi-handicapped' said Sarah
Harrell, who will coordinate the
project.
According to Harrell, many
residents at Caswell and indi-
viduals in the community are
unable to speak or move because
of physical handicaps. With the
proper equipment, however,
communication and activities
with those individuals are pos-
sible. K
By using a simple board deco-
rated with pictures � a glass of
water for thirst, a plate of food for
hunger, a bathroom for toileting
needs � a resident who is unable
to speak can indicate basic needs
and feelings by pointing.
Special switches that can be
activated by the tongue, an eye-
brow or chin enable those who
their environment and are able to
make something happen
The bulk of the grant money
will be used to purchase equip-
ment for a lab in which individu-
alswillbcevaluatedtodetcrmine
what devices will best serve
them. In most cases, the grant will
also cover the cost of those de-
vices.
"We won't be able to pay for a
whole computer system said
Judy McCall, coordinator of ac-
tivities between ECU and
Caswell Center, who submitted
the grant proposal through the
School of Education. "We will,
however, work with those indi-
viduals to find funding that will
cover the cost
In addition, the grant money
will be used to pay the salaries of
a part-time secretary, three ECU
graduate students who will serve
as assistants and a speechlan-
guage pathologist, who will be
hired to teach classes at ECU,
conduct research and provide
evaluative services for the proj-
ect.
ECU students majoring in oc-
cupational therapy, physical
therapy, vocational' rehabilita-
tak� �f P .�T Simpl� tion and speechlanguage and
ike turning a light on and auditory pathology wUlbeableto
off or opening a door.
"These are simple tasks, but
they mean a lot to those who were
able to do nothing before Har-
rell said. "You can see it in their
faces, how good it makes them
feel when they're in control of
spend many classroom hours at
the center gaining hands-on ex-
perience in their fields.
'This will be a tremendous
training opportunity for the stu-
dents said Richard Shine, pro-
fessor of speech, language and
auditory pathology at ECU and
co-director of the project. "In the
past we've concentrated on book
teaching and library research in
theclassroom.Wedid have video
tapes that gave them some obser-
vation time, but that wasn't
nearly as good as it's going to be
when they can actually do these
thing themselves
"ECUgraduatesaregoingtobe
two steps ahead of the others if
they already know how to use the
equipment and how to adapt it to
suit the needs of the handi
capped said Harrell, who is a
1981 graduate in occupational
therapy.
Service contracts for equip-
ment repairs and consultation
fees will also be covered by the
grant. "We have to have an export
come in and evaluate what we've
done to see if we're doing every-
thing the way we should be
McCall said.
The lab will be set up at
Caswell, but a van will bo
equipped to bring the electronics
to any developmentally disabled
people who reside in the
institution's 32-county service
area � whether or not they are
mentally retarded.
"A lot of families don't have
require special vans with chair
lifts for transportation, which
many people and county agen-
cies don't have
This fall the staff will be busy
filling the new positions, sotting
the lab up and working out class
participation details with ECU
faculty. "We hope to begin doing
our first evaluations in January or
February McCall said.
During the center's second
vear, ECU's School of Home Eco-
nomics will become involved.
Students majoring in clothing
design will learn how to make
non-binding clothing for the
physically impaired that will al-
low more independence in self-
dressing skills.
"Regular clothing can be very
binding to the handicapped, pre-
venting even the slightest move-
ment McCall said. "If someone
has little control of their hands
and can't work with buttons very
well, we can adapt their clothing
to suit their needs by replacing
their buttons with velcro
McCall said.
In October, McCall plans to
begin submitting requests for
additional funding so that the
center can continue to operate
cation disorders. More than
10,000 have been identified as
being physically disabled
Despite limited resources, the
Caswell Center staff has already
helped hundreds of multi-handi
capped people gain independ-
ence. Devices designed specifi-
cally for Kinston resident Chek-
ieta Williams enable her to an-
swer a telephone, type on a type-
writer and operate an electric
wheelchair.
"My telephone adapter has
given me a job that I never had
before Williams said. "That
made me feel useful
"With the typewriter, I can
write poems or letters to my
family without someone else
reading them. With my wheel-
chair, all 1 have to do is push the
stick and it will take me where I
. �.����� tun t-iumiiui- u o Derate
cars or the money to travel all the after 1989,when the current grant
way to Greenville to have an expires
evaluation made McCall said. 'This is a service that is very
If someone comes from Brun- desperately needed McCall
sw.ck County we're talking said. "In North Carolina there are
about a good three-hour drive, over 3,000 children and adults
And some people with handicaps who have significant communi-
want to go. At the group home
where I live, I can go outside
wi thou t having to ask someone to
take me, and at the mall I can look
at things that I want to look at
without having to wait for some-
one to push me
Once the center becomes
operable, it is hoped that even
more can be done for Williams �
for example, designing a device
that will enable her to feed her-
self.
The Kate B. Reynolds Health
Care Trust was created in 1946
through provisions in the will of
Mrs. William N. Reynolds for the
purpose of improving health care
in North Carolina. Approxi-
mately $3 million is awarded
annually in grants to nonprofit
organizations throughout the
state.
UnttatiMtev
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
Why not com by the REAL Crisis Intervention Center 312 E
10th St; or call 75�-HELP, For Free Confidential Counseling or As-
sistarv�
Our Volunteers and Staff are on duty 24 hrs a day. year around,
In order to assist you In virtually any problem area you might have
Our longstanding goal has always been to preserve and enhance
the quality of life for you and our community.
lic�nf t) �nd Acc�0it�d By Th� Stats ot Nort" Ci'Onn
Dean says program will bring disabled into scientific world
(ECU News Bureau) � ECU
hasestablished a Science Insti tu te
for the Disabled as a public serv-
ice function among its academic
divisions and will launch the new
program at the start of the 1987-
88 academic year.
Eugene E Ryan, dean of the
Collegeof Arts and Sciences, said
the institute will "help disabled
students pursue careers in sci-
ence related fields by improving
their science, instruct � . ery
level
Teachers and counselors will
be made aware that science mav
be a realistic career choice for
handicapped students and
"extraordinary accomodations
for them" will be made, Ryan
said.
The institute will be a part of
the College of Arts and Sciences
and Ryan said that David Lunney
of the chemistry faculty will be-
come director effective Aug. 19.
The Institute will begin imme-
diately planning a summer insti-
tute to provide research opportu-
nities for science students with
disabilities. A $40,000 National
Science Foundation grant to plan
two, five-week summer terms
was announced last week.
ECU's new Science Institute for
the Disabled will be modeled af-
ter the National Technical Insti-
tute for the Deaf at Rochester,
N.Y but will be smaller in scale
and cover all disabilities, Ryan
said.
He said the institute here will
seek to help disabled students at
every level for careers in technical
or science-related fields, to pre-
pare teachers to teach science to
disabled students, to conduct
research on means of improving
science instruction for disabled
ECU Health
Center takes
reservations
Continued from page 3
nate the scheduled students from
having to wait the usual time that
walk-ins have to wait.
"We plan on being very recep-
tive to appointments and not
limit the service' she said. "In
the past the appointment system
was only used for specifics, such
as physicals and return visits
Marshburn said that this new
system will allow students to
schedule an appointment at a
time that will work into their
schedule and also allow them to
pick a physician if they have a
preference.
Appointment hours will be
from8a.m. to 12a.m. and 1a.m. to
5 a.m. Any student interested in
making an appointment should
call 757-6317.
students and to collect and dis
seminate information on science
for the handicapped.
"Classification of the institute
as a public service institute is
justifiable because all the pro-
posed activities are public service
activities Ryan said. "Although
there would be a research compo-
nent, the research would be di-
rected toward public service
The university's announce-
ment said the number of disabled
students seeking to enter scien-
tific and technical fields is likely
to increase in the future.
"The scientific community has
recently become a ware of the fact
that disabled persons are grossly
underreprcscntcd in the sciences
and engineering it said. Several
major scientific organizations
such as the American Association
for the Advancement of Science,
National Science Foundation and
the American Chemical Society
have started programs to recruit
disabled people into scientific
careers and improve their educa-
tional opportunities, it added.
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88 with coupon)
Air Conditioning
Servicing
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I 2� Used Tires
$8.88
VISA-Master Card-Amer.
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88 (with coupon;
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SUBS
Steak and Cheese S3.95
ji Steak and Mushrooms 3.95
Reuben with French Fries 4.45
Isj Hajn end Cheese 3.95
Roast Beef and French Fries 4.4 5
j Cold Sub 3.95
rjfj Chicken Salad Sub 3.95
jn Pastrami Sub 3.95
m Turkey end Cheese 3.95
Super Sub 4.45
B.L.T 3.95
1
GREEK DISHES
d GYRO Sandwich $3.95
j Souvleki Sandwich 3.95
M Aegean Grilled Cheese 2.95
p GYRO Platter 4.45
s Marathon Special 4.45
Athenian-Style Chicken 4.45
1
P SANDWICHES
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Cheeseburger 1.95
Hot Dog 1.35
Chicken Salad Sandwich 2.95
Chicken Breast 2.35
Shrimp Eggroll 1.25
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Chef's Salad 3.95
Chicken Salad Plate 3.95
Tossed Salad 1.95
Potato Salad 1.70
GREEK PASTRIES
Baklava $1.25
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�PGoodrich






AUGUST 25,1987

"1


r.
��rsr

Accuracy in Academia retracts statement
n� P � Scn�o1 may have been
for most of the 12 million
People who attend colleges in the
y, but higher education news
� breaking during the sum-
mer nonetheless.
Educators, of course, some-
times use the summers to resolve
�ssues still burning since the pre-
vious term while students are
Rone and, presumably, political
pressures are lower.
Summer, 1987, was no excep-
tion. r
While protest leaders said they
were disappointed in turnouts at
rallies at Indiana, Utah and Penn
State, for instance, a number of
campuses � the universities of
Houston, Illinois, Pennsylvania,
Stanford and Smith, among oth-
ers � sold off all or part of their
holdings in firms that do business
in South Africa.
"Schools announce divesti-
tures over the summer when
people are away, and people
aren't there to challenge them
observed Josh Nessen of the
American Committee on Africa,
which helps organize anti-apart-
heid rallies in the U.S.
Still other kinds of national
college news broke as a kind of
denouement to 1986-87s events.
Amy Carter, daughter of for-
mer President Jimmy Carter and
the center of a celebrated spring
trial for joining an anti-Central
Intelligence Agency sit-in, was
suspended by Brown University
for failing to keep up her grades.
On theothersideof the political
spectrum Accuracy in Academia,
formed in 1985 to identify "lib-
eral" and "Marxist" professors
by asking students to write about
them, agreed to retract an allega-
tion that the Spartacist League �
a Marxist group � encouraged
"the killing o( police officers
More significant news �
events and phenomena that af-
fect all students � broke, too:
Student Aid
U.S. Secretary of Education
William Bennett, long an advo-
cate of cutting federal student aid
programs by as much as 45 per-
cent, announced he would seek
more modest cuts in the future.
Bennett, explained Dept. of
Education Undersecretary Bruce
Carnes, feared his cutback pro-
posals provoked hostility that, in
tum, turned Congress off to his
efforts to alter campus course-
work, tame tuition increases and
chase down loan defaulters.
The Reagan administration
will send its next education
budget proposal to CongTcss in
January, 1988.
The change may be too late for
some.
In June, the American Associa-
tion of Community and Junior
Colleges reported that federal
support for two-year colleges
dropped by 16.9 percent from
fall, 1985, to fall, 1986.
Moreover, about 40 percent o
the nation's undergraduate stu-
dents and 50 percent of its gradu-
ate students may lose all or part of
their eligibility for student loans
this fall, Michael Novak, head of
the University of Texas at
Austin's aid office, estimated.
Black-White Student Racial
Tensions
Trying to prevent another
round of the startlingly wide-
spread racial incidents that
plagued the universities of
Michigan, Pennsylvania, Massa-
chusetts, California at Los Ange-
les, Georgia and Tufts, among
about a dozen other campuses
last spring, a group of college
presidents promised to investi-
gate just what is causing the ten-
sions.
The Washington, D.Cbased
American Council on Education
said it would release its findings
this fall.
Meanwhile, Northampton
(Mass.) Judge Alvertus J. Morse
sentenced seven white Univer-
sity of Massachusetts-Amhcrst
students to undergo counseling
for "race sensitivity" and per-
form some "community service"
as punishment for beating a black
U. Mass student in October, 1986.
Drugs on Campus
It's been a year since University
of Maryland basketball star Len
Bias died a cocaine-related death,
inspiring tought drug policies at
scores of campuses. But more
than 1,000 colleges failed to give
the U.S. Dept. of Education proof
they had some sort of drug pre-
vention program in place by the
deadline of June 15, 1987.
Theoretically, any college that
missed the deadline would make
their students ineligible to get
federal student aid this fall.
Stanford U. officially asked the
National Collegiate Athletic As-
sociation to excuse it from mak-
ing its athletes take tests proving
they're not using illicit drugs,
while an anonymous U. of Wash-
ington athlete threatened to sue if
she was forced to join a drug-
testing program.
Still, U. Tennessee assistant
basketball coach Bill Brown re-
signed two days after Sacra-
mento, Cal police arrested him
on cocaine possesion charges.
And while Nancy Reagan chas-
tised the June meeting of the
National High School Athletic
Coaches Association in New Or-
leans for ignoring student drug
problems, U. Florida officials
said student Edward Kellie
Quest died of taking too many
nitrous oxide cannisters, called
"whippets
Women on Campus
Women still hold lower-level,
lower-paying jobs than men in
college classrooms, the Women's
Research and Education Institute
charged in July.
At the current rate of increase,
there won't be as many female
college presidents as male presi-
dents until the year 2070, the
group calculated.
In June, New Jersey ordered
Princeton's all-male "eating
clubs" to admit women, while
two U. Arizona female students
sued the Bobcats, an all-male
honorary society, for refusing to
admit them last fall.
Elsewhere, the first male stu-
dents ever to enroll at Seton Hill
College in Greensburg, Pa regis-
tered for classes this summer,
whjle the board of all-female
Wheaton College in Norton,
Mass overcame loud student
opposition and voted to admit
men to the campus, starting in the
fall term, 1988.
KICK OFF A
GREAT WEEKEND
COME TO
SHERATON-
CRABTREE
$50 00 plus tax
(single or double occupancy)
Sept. 5th
ECU vs. STATE X
Call for reservations � J;
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I i r
SMPOW.JA
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j Given With
Coupon
Used Furniture - Dep. Glass - Collectibles
Crafts - Military Collectibles - Antiques
And Much More!
Custom Jewelry
Hours: MonFri. 10-6
Sat. 10-1 Or By Appointment
Phone: (919)830-5288 705 Dickinson Ave.
ATTENTION COLLEGE
STUDENTS
We have part-time jobs available in our warehouse
operation. These are evening hours jrom 6:00 p.m.
to 10:00p.m Monday thru Friday.
No experience necessary, we will train you.
$4 an hour. If interested, reply to Personnel Dept.
A, P.O. Box 1446, Greenville, NC 27834. Please
include name, address, phone number, major and
classification.
SAVES TIME, SAVES MONEY!
WE SAVE YOU TIME & MONEY BY DOING
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1 WE EMPLOY ONLY ASE CERTIFIED
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WE ARE CONVENIENTLY LOCATED WITH 2
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ARRIVERS
WE OFFER COMPLETE CAR MAINTENANCE
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PRICE THEM TO FIT ANY BUDGET
GOODYEAR
DOWNTOWN
729 Dickinson Awe
THE BUYER'S MARKET
756-9371 752-4417
"Guaranteed to be right in writing i
D
E
I R
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
o?. 1 oP
I
!
Fall Cook-Out on
College Hill, September 10th.
Specialty theme events.
Frozen soft serve yogurt.
I
W&TSSAW&jW&APft&CiCg
� 1986 CANTEEN COW
S
'����. �iM�wt WiWi ii�. i
" wj� tf!g�rWI�i-feTiWifWi� wim �iin�iM�wr�i�in � i . - .
II WIMMI
i
Leftist ide
(CPS) � More than 1,(XX)activ-
ate, students and professors met
at Hampshire College in Julv to
try something unlikely:
To transplant a leftist West
German political movement I
the United States
"We want to change politM s
from a spectator sport into a
popular process explained
Howard Hawkins, a leader vi the
American Green Movement
The movement is an ot l shoot ot
the untraditional, anti-nucl. ar
environmental Green Movement
in West Germanv The German
Gro �
and 01
grew fi 'in a i
street demon
politi
f Unusual Cop
Pacific inheril
(ECU News Bureau)
unusual sea creature found onh
in the Pacific Ocean near tin
of Oregon has been named for ai
FCU biologist
Professor Francis P. Belcik
the ECU Department ol Bi
spent 10 years researching the
body form, mouth parts, internal
anatomy and life cycle oi the ani-
mal now called lsmaila belcik 1
fcUiL
A �.
Andyetanother line! These students art wail
to get their parking stickers. Other lini !
SSnnjkk: J
13.
14 .
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To The Oil Ch
HOURS:
Monday thru t-rtday
7:30 am. til 6:30 p m
Saturday 7:30 a.m. "til 5 00 D m





atement
than men in sued the Bobcats, an all-male
the Women s honorary society, for refusing to
n Institute
admit them last fall.
Elsewhere, the first male stu-
dents e er to enroll at Seton Hill
C ollcge inGreensburg, Pa regis-
tered tor classes this summer,
vh)le the board of all-female
Wheaton College in Norton,
Mass overcame loud student
opposition and voted to admit
men to the campus, starting in the
fall term. 1988
NTION COLLEGE
STUDENTS
in our warehouse
rs from 6:00 p.m.
�u riday.
. 'ram you.
Personnel Dept.
, VC 27834. Please
� . mber, major and
3 TIME, SAVES MONEY!
i � DOING
WITH 2
RISERS
NANCE
IRES AND
.OODYEAR
ruse V rcurco
S MARK1T
DOWNTOWN
rkinson Ave
1-9371 752-4417
he right in writing
i i to
NA
SITY
to
1

tu'e
s
;
t on
September lOthj
e events.
erve yogurt.

it
)
it
TIIIl'AM CAROLINIAN
AUCUS1 25. 19 13
Leftist ideas invade the West ESS
(CPS) � More than 1,000activ-
& students and professors met
it Hampshire College in July to
try something unlikely:
To transplant a leftist West
German political movement to
the Lnited States.
We want to change politics
trom a spectator sport into a
popular process explained
Howard Hawkins, a leader of the
American Green Movement.
The movement is an offshoot oi
the untraditional, anti-nuclear,
i nvironmentaJ Green Movement
in West Germany. The German
Greens, who favor disarmament
and oppose taking censuses,
grew from a late-1970s group of
street demonstrators into a major
political force that now holds
seats in the German parliament.
While attendance at the confer-
ence encouraged the organizers,
other observers wondered
whether American students
would be intersted.
"Sure, students are more 1 ibcral
these days conceded Kenneth
Green of UCLA, which, under
Green's direction, surveys
200,000 U.S. freshmen a year
about their political attitudes,
"but whether (the Greens) will
have an impact on college stu-
dents is another matter
He noted Western Europe "is
more likely to accept splinter
political groups like the Green
Movement than we are
American Green leaders, how-
ever, say they'll try to grew one
locality at a time.
"What we want to do is get
strong on a local level Hawkins
said.
This fall the movement, he
added, is running candidates in
New Haven, Conn where Yale's
Black Student Organization has
endorsed the slate.
The Hampshire College confer-
ence, he contended, "just
scratched the surface" of support.
"There are groups scattered all
over the nation, in California,
New England and Wisconsin, to
name a few
Hampshire College officials
said they, too, were pleased by
the conference and engaged by
the prospect of trying to trans-
plant the movement.
Unusual Copepod parasite from the
I Pacific inherits ECU biologist's name
Would you like to do exciting things in the dark?
and get paid for it?
The East Carolinian is looking for
a reliable and technically inclined student with
experience in photography to operate a Goodkin vertical
Camera and PMT Processor.
The Darkroom Technician is responsible for the following:
� I he operation and maintenance of The East Carolinian Darkroom.
�Screening, enlarging, and reducing all photographs,
advertisements, and logos.
0 'Minimal advertising paste up.
Apply in person at The East Carolinian.
I1

�1
FT77VESS V
jRAM f ,
6
(ECU News Bureau) An
unusual sea creature found only
n the Pacific Ocean near the coast
t Oregon has been named for an
CU biologist.
Professor Francis P. Belcik oi
ie ECU Department of Biology
pent 10 years researching the
body form, mouth parts, internal
anatomy and life evele of the ani-
mal now called lsmaila belciki
1 lo. Official listing of the name
was made in the recent issue of
' Crustaeeana an international
journal published in the Nether-
lands.
The creature, an unusual cope-
pod parasite is found on the bod-
ies of Oregon coast sea-slugs
(Antiopella fusca).
There are only three species of
these parasites known to exist.
The other two species are found
in the West Indies and off the
coast of California.
Dr. Ju-Shey Ho, a biologist at
California State University at
Long Beach, named the new spe-
cies in honor of Bclcik's research.
A native of Sharon, Pa Belcik
began studying Oregon marine
life in the 1960s when he was a
graduate student at Oregon State
Unive.sity in Corvallis. He has
done additional research work at
the Oregon Institiute of Marine
Biology and University of Ore-
gon.
He has been a biology profes-
sor at ECU since 1965 and has
published research on a variety of
marine invertebrates, especially
deep-sea animals.
FOUR FOR FREE
jazzerctse
For II FOR FREE
foi ipon in by
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$69.
00
Program I muted to 6 Weeks.
Medical Fee Excluded.
And yet another line! These students are waiting outside Mendenhall the registration terminals, commuter parking lots, Jones Cafeteria,
to get their parking stickers. Other lines could be found on campus at and you get the idea. l
Jiffy Lube
The newest concept in car care maintenance is now
open in Greenville!
Here's what we do in 10 minutes, no
appointment necessary
1. We change your oil with a major brand!
2. We Install a new oil filter!
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4. We check and fill transmission fluid!
5. We check and fill differential fluid!
6. We check and fill brake fluid!
7. We check and fill power steering fluid!
8. We check and fill window washer fluid!
9. We check and fill battery!
10. We check the air filter!
11. We check the wiper blades!
12. We inflate the tires to proper pressure!
13. We vacuum the Interior!
14. We even wash your windowsf
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1'East Carolina's Answer
To The Oil Change Problem
HOURS:
Monday thru Friday
7:30 a.m. til 6:30 p.m.
Saturday 7:30 a.m. 'til 5:00 p.m.
126 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville
(Across from Golden
Corral Steak House)
D$(pP JfA� 09i
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
sopir(y usoi
AUGUST 30 - SEPTEMBER 3, 1987
REGISTRATION: AUGUST 24-27, 1987
AT 10A.M. - 3 P.M.
STUDENT STORES
CROATAN
AND ALL RESIDENCE HALLS
S 1&m corns scat0.
Come &tt J&otu!
1 r -
L
i nm0itmmmtmtm






atement
lbs than men in sued the Bobcats, an all-male
V the W omen s honorary society, for refusing to
ation Institute admit them last fall.
t increase
i male
nresi
r.terev
Elsewhere, the first male stu-
dents ever to enroll at Seton Hill
College in Greensburg, Pa regis-
tered tor classes this summer,
while the board of all-female
Wheaton College n Norton,
Mass overcame loud student
opposition and voted to admit
men to the campus, starting in the
fall term, 1988
�1
NTION COLLEGE
STUDENTS
ui warehouse
� from 6:00 p.m.
�u Friday
vili :rum you.
fy to Personnel Dept.
VC 27834. Please
'?her, major and
TIME, SAVES MONEY!
am b noisc
r TIM 1 V
AlTH 2
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't S 4M3
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MARKhT
DOWNTOWN
1-9371 752-4417
"d to be right in writing �
NA
SITY
to
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September 10th
me events.
erve yogurt.
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H
THE EASTA KOI INIAN
! .
13
Leftist ideas invade the VVestE
iCrS) � More than 1,000activ-
ists, students and professors met
at Hampshire College in July to
try something unlikely:
To transplant a leftist West
German political movement to
the United States.
We want to change politics
trom a spectator sport into a
popular process explained
Howard Hawkins, a leader of the
American Green Movement.
The movement is an offshoot of
te untraditional, anti-nuclear,
t ironmental Green Movement
in West Germany. The German
Greens, who favor disarmament
and oppose taking censuses,
grew from a late-1970s group of
street demonstrators into a major
political force that now holds
seats in the German parliament.
While attendance at the confer-
ence encouraged the organizers,
other observers wondered
whether American students
would be intersted.
"Sure, students are more liberal
these days conceded Kenneth
Green of UCLA, which, under
Green's direction, surveys
21X1,000 U.S. freshmen a year
about their political attitudes,
"but whether (the Greens) will
have an impact on college stu-
dents is another matter
He noted Western Europe "is
more likely to accept splinter
political groups like the Green
Movement than we are
American Green leaders, how-
ever, say they'll try to grow one
locality at a time.
"What we want to do is get
strong on a local level Hawkins
said.
This fall the movement, he
added, is running candidates in
New Haven, Conn where Yale's
Black Student Organization has
endorsed the slate.
The Hampshire College confer-
ence, he contended, "just
scratched the surface" of support.
'There are groups scattered all
over the nation, in California,
New England and Wisconsin, to
name a few
Hampshire College officials
said they, too, were pleased by
the conference and engaged by
the prospect of trying to trans-
plant the movement.
Unusual Copepod parasite from the
f. Pacific inherits ECU biologist's name
Would you like to do exciting things in the dark?
and get paid for it?
The East Carolinian is looking for
a reliable and technically inclined student with
experience in photography to operate a Goodkin vertical
Camera and PMT Processor.
The Darkroom Technician is responsible for the following:
I he operation and maintenance of The East Carolinian Darkroom.
�Screening, enlarging, and reducing all photographs,
advertisements, and logos.
'Minimal advertising paste up.
Apply in person at The East Carolinian.
5
I' News Bureau) An
unusual sea creature found only
1 the Pacific Ocean near the coast
t Oregon has been named tor an
' v I biologist.
Professor Francis P. Belcik ot
te ECU Department or Biology
pent 10 years researching the
vdv form, mouth parts, internal
anatomy and life cycle ot the ani-
mal now called lsmaila belciki
1 lo. Official listing of the name
was made in the recent issue of
"Crustaceana an international
journal published in the Nether-
lands.
The creature, an unusual cope-
pod parasite is found on the bod-
ies ot Oregon coast sea slugs
I Antiopella fusca).
There are only three species of
these parasites known to exist.
Hie other two species are found
in the West Indies and off the
coast of California.
Dr. Ju-Shcy Ho, a biologist at
California State University at
Long Beach, named the new spe-
cies in honor of Belcik's research.
A native of Sharon, Pa Belcik
began studying Oregon marine
life in the 1960s when he was a
graduate student at Oregon State
University in Corvallis. He has
done additional research work at
the Oregon Institiute of Marine
Biology and University of Ore-
gon.
He has been a biology profes-
sor at ECU since 1965 and has
published research on a variety of
marine invertebrates, especially
deep-sea animals.
FOUR FOR FREE 5
jazzercSse
FOUR FOR FREE I
i in by
receive lour tun �
la ise; - (iood I
tvisit only. For �
. i lule and location
til 7 I

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And yet another line! These students are waiting outside Mendenhall the registration terminals, commuter parking lots, Jones Cafeteria,
to get their parking stickers. Other lines could be found on campus at and you get the idea.
dy
MEDICAL
WEIGHT
LOSS
SYSTEMS
LOSE 20 VPOUNDS
FOR ONLY
$69.
00
Program I muted to 6 Weeks.
Medical Fee Excluded.
V�
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In Raleigh Call 846-6691
Jiffy Lube
newest concept in car care maintenance is now
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Here's what we do in 10 minutes, no
appointment necessary
1. We change your oil with a major brand!
2. We Install a new oil filter!
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4. We check and fill transmission fluid!
5. We check and fill differential fluid!
6. We check and fill brake fluid!
7. We check and fill power steering fluid!
8. We check and fill window washer fluid!
9. We check and fill battery!
10. We check the air filter!
11. We check the wiper blades!
12. We Inflate the tires to proper pressure!
13. We vacuum the Interior!
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"East Carolina's Answer
To The Oil Change Problem
HOURS:
Monday thru Friday
7:30 a.m. til 6:30 p.m.
Saturday 7:30 a.m. 'til 5:00 p.m.
126 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville
(Across from Golden
Corral Steak House)
Dp2 I9i 09si
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
sopicT(y RUStt
AUGUST 30 - SEPTEMBER 3, 1987
REGISTRATION: AUGUST 24-27, 1987
AT 10A.M3 P.M.
STUDENT STORES
CROATAN
AND ALL RESIDENCE HALLS
ororiti0 fttlp Hou mitt
gottr corns coaig
Come Mtt Joto!

MBBHRm
- -
j
.1
�- �� - a�riawiNwii�iaMB





; CAROLINIAN AUGUST25.1987
Gov. Martin and Lt. Gov. Jordan seem
ktoo busy' for upcoming campaign
(AP) While prospective can-
didates tor lieutenant governor
dash about the state in search of
support and money, Gov. Jim
Martin and It. Gov. Bob Jordan
seem content to leave the politick-
ing to others tor now.
Martin and ordan, likely com-
batants in the 1988 gubernatorial
race, .ire giving the impression
: ,v. n too busy attending to af-
fairs ol state u devote much time
to preparing for the the campaign.
Martin a Republican, "has a
� erv hectic schedule this tall Phil
Kirk, the governor's chief of staff,
aid Friday. Believe it or not,
vc had no campaign strategy
iions 1 don't know when he'll
getting into tiie hard-core (po-
litical) activity
Ionian, a Democrat, has said
repeatedly he would announce his
. U ntions tor 1988 alter the legis-
ative session, which ended Aug
But spokeswoman Brenda
ummerssaid ordan, who was on
vacation in New England last
eek, had made tew plans tor the
ace.
"V e vc had no time to sit dow n
and review it Ms. Summmers
said. At this point he feels it is
i ni vrt.mt lo carry on in his
') a lieutenant go ernor.
( i ourse, that - not to sa) the
� ampaign is not on both men's
mindsor that they'veeschewed all
; activih
tion in plac(
hose politica
'
I
i
V


11 inia
i do s Martin,
mittee has
remained active since his 1984
election. Martin spent consider-
able time this year working toelect
jack Hawke as state Republican
chairman and mend fences with
supporters of Sen. Jesse Helms,
whose help Martin needs to win
re-election.
Even so, for the moment Martin
and Jordan are adopting their
versions of the "Rose Garden
Strategy in which officeholders
go about running the government
and let aides lay the groundwork
lor future campaign wars
0( course, frequently it's pos-
sible to mix business with politics,
as when fundraisers or other
campaign activities are scheduled
for odd moments during out-of-
town trips for speaking engage-
ments or meetings.
And even trips that include no
campaign activities can pay po-
litical dividends in the form of
publicity and contact with voters.
Martin, tor example, has spent
little time in Raleigh since return-
ing from his much-publicized
Caribbean sailing trip and seeing
the Legislature out of town Aug.
14. Three days later, he traveled
to Tarboro for an industry
groundbreaking, to Williamston
tor a town meting and to Manteo
to celebrate the 400th anniversary
of the Roanoke settlements.
Martin then headed to the
mountains, attending the na-
tional convention of his college
fraternity, making numerous
other appearances and meeting
with local reporters. 1 lisschedule
included a speech to a civic club,
tours of an alcohol rehabilitation
center and a fish hatchery, and a
showing of the outdoor drama
"Unto These Hills
Further down the road. Kirk
says Martin's fall will include
trade missions to the Far East and
Europe, meetings of the Southern
Regional Education Board and
the Council of State Govern-
ments, and more town meetings
and appearances. Any campaign
activity likely will be restricted to
nighttime fund-raising, Kirk
said.
Jordan, meanwhile, will busy
himself with the activities of the
boards and commissions to
which he belongs, including the
State Board of Education.
He'll also have a heavy speak-
ing schedule. "We had to turn
down a lot of speech requests
during the legislative session and
now we can make some of those
up Ms. Summers said.
Neither Martin nor Jordan has
said when he'll formally an-
nounce his candidacy for gover-
nor. Of course, their timetables
may depend on whether they
have opposition for their respec-
tive parties' nominations.
No Republican is known to be
interested in challenging Martin.
Democrats generally believed to
pose the biggest threat to Jordan,
such as Attorney General Lacy
Thomburg, have said they will
not run. But Rep. Billy Watkins,
D-Granville, is exploring a pos-
sible gubernatorial bid, and State
Auditor Ed Renfrew said Friday
he might run as a Democrat.
BROADEN
YOUR
VORIZOVs
HENDRIX THEATRE
KlMERY's
FURNITURE DEPOT ZJ!
Used Furniture
Buy�Sell�Trade
752-3223
Beside the
Railroad Depot
TRAVEL AGENCY FOR STUDENTS
We plan trips to fit students' budgets.
Cruises - Snow Skiing - Air Travel
Welcome back ECU. We want to meet you.
Come in our downtown Greenville office.
QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC.
319 Cotanche Street
Greenville, N.C.
Phone: 757-0234
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center is open Monday through
Thursday, 9 a.m. 4 p.m. For an
appointment or more information,
call24-Hour Helpline. 757-0003.
Ill East Third Street-The Lee Building
Greenville, North Carolina
Free Pregnancy Test-Confidential
Counseling
All Services and referrals are tree of charge.
otfmon's
MENS WEAR
Khaki
and
Bucks
Khakis and Dirty Bucks
have been a bv-word in
every young man's ward-
robe since World War II.
We're not sure who can take
credit for first putting the
two together, but the love
affair for these two timeless
pieces of clothing continues
both on and off campus.
This fall Coffman's con-
tinues to offer you some
great values to help you
build your fall wardrobe.
Khakis, Bucks and a fall
sportcoatbasics for a
young man's campus or
weekend wardrobe. At all
three of our Coffman's
stores you'll find these spe-
cial values during August.
DUCkheadSplain front2 pair for $37.95
pleatedL pair for l�)�t)
Our Own Coffman's
� Fine Quality Khakisplainfront 2Pairfor$57.95
.pleated. L pair for 00. UO
Our Own Coffman's
� Dirty Bucks49.95
� As An Extra Back-To-School Bonus
Take $50 Off Any SporlCoafln Our Stock
oilman's
MENS WEAR
Downtown Greenville
Carolina East Mall
Tarrytown Mall, Rocky Mount
RACK ROOM SHOES
Greenville Buyers Market
Memorial Drive
DENIM AND LEA THER
Two great fashion looks for
BACK-TO-SCHOOL
Choose from our great selection
of woven leather huaraches
in all of your favorite colors. And for
that just right fashion look carry
one of our great acid denim handbags.
You can choose from the many styles
of big carry-alls or the small junior size.
LEATHER
HUARACHES
j)16.97 - $24.97
DENIM
HANDBAGS
$12.97 - $16.97
hi
l

�i�.i�
- m -�� � � �
inority
LLERY, N.C. (AP) Tough
�s in agriculture are dm
y growers off their farms, but
rts say the effect on black
icrs has been even more dra-
tic as minority-owned farms
ckly disappear
t's a familiar cycle says h
lie Willis, a N I � �. Jtate
pversity agriculture pro
spent the summer looking
� failed farms for the Farmers
r�e Administration "1 don't
way out Willis sa
For years, we pushed them
farming after the I
. Now it's tailing, and the
ler farmers then ung
)ple to come along and take
ir place Willis told
jrlotte ()bserver
foung blacks have fallen em
Iticallv out of love with farm
, and ihen u reasoi
rhy
Costs are high, pri �
work load is numbii
never-ending. For small fan
which include ni it 1 ks, I
profit is so little it snearl) in
Sible to take up the busii
I "You won't find n .
S'ng into farmii
avie, said during a br
from her 1 s acres i t Cumberland
County tobacco So anytime
fhey can get out there and get
mem a job and make $6 r 7 an
hour, and not have the i
aches, they not going t :
"VVedon'thaveanyblackfarm-
ers left in Tillery. This is it say s
Gary Grant, nodding toward his
69-year-old father, Matthew
We had 1 iHi families who a
here, and out of their 300 children
We had two in farming. One is
and the other's in bankrupts.
-TBdon't know if vou can count
Km
The Grants went into farming
when the Tillary Farm Proo
Halifax Countv began in the early
1940s as part of Franklin
Roosevelt's "40 acres and a mule"
program to establish America's
poor on land of their own.
g In Matthew Grant's time, cenus
figures show, b!ack cAvrcfship of
most
and
Still N
White
dropped
ing a "
seen all C a!
half But du
ham "
small
What

I

during I
farm, whic
evenines a
SIGN ONMonday 3
5:45 AM 9:00 AMVl7 c J ce, �'�? H c, vft H
12:00 N
3:00 PM
1 6:00 PM
! 8:00 PMTHE:
-
ADVENT! RES
IN
MODERN
10:00PMRECORDIV,
12:00PMMONDAY NIGHT LIVE 1 ALL REQUESTPE
2:00PM
SIGN OFF
j





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1987
15
OADEN
YOUR
RI2QZVS

NDRIX THEATRE
u
2-
m
ii
d

i-
ia
,
S.
IIMERY'S
FURNITURE DEPOT
sed Furniture
(uv�SeII�Trade
Beside the
Railroad Depot
ROIINA
NXV CENTER
am i esl- onfidential
( ounselinjj
. of charge.
SHOBS
EA THER
n looks for
CHOOL
x selection
uaraches
jolors. And lor
:i look carry
lim handbags,
le many styles
nail junior size.
IER
) -
s

Minority farmers disappearing
ni.LCRY, N.C. (AP) - Tough
times in agriculture are driving
nunv growers off their farms, but
experts say the effect on black
urmers has been even more dra-
matic as minority-owned farms
ftuickry disappear.
It's a familiar cycle, says Dr.
Willie Willis, a N.C. A&T State
nnersity agriculture professor
fvet failed farms for the Farmers
lome Administration. "1 don't
set a wav out Willis says.
I or vears, we pushed them
j i tanning, after the Dcpres-
? Now it's falling, and the
i farmers there's no young
: pie to come along and take
heir places Willis told The
lotte Observer.
ung blacks have fallen cm-
I atically out of love with farnv
. and there are logical reasons
N.C. farmland dropped by al-
most 70 percent between 1950
and 1982.
Still, North Carolina has the
nation's second largest concen-
tration of black farmers.
White-owned farmland also
dropped significantly, continu-
ing a trend that since 1920 has
seen all Carolina farmland cut by
ho spent the summer looking half. But during those precipitous
32 years, 1950-1982, black farm-
ers in both states left the land at a
rate 212 times faster than
whites.
Discrimination is harder to
quantify, but many blacks say
they have felt it for years. It
caused them to get their spring
loans later than whites, they say,
and forced them to accept poor
farmland that no white would
have.
The network of white-run
farms, businesses and lenders
seemed designed to keep blacks
poor and at a distance, they say.
'The black farmer, all he was
educated in was working. He
wasn't educated in the market
Matthew Grant says. "We were
too glad to get rid of whatever we
grew to worry about what we got
for it
Farm advocates have a prob-
lem, but 1 think now the problem
has merged into the whole situ-
ation facing all small farmers
says Janet Ledbetter of the Land
Loss Prevention Project in Dur-
ham. "The question now is: Is the
small farm going to survive,
black or white?"
Whatever has happened in Till-
ery, adds Halifax County
extension Chairman Wanda
Sykes, has happened in the
county's other New Deal farm
project, the predominantly white
Darlington community.
"I don't think Tillery is by itself
or excluded in any way she
says.
'There are a lot of them, more
so than giving up farming com-
pletely, taking two jobs a paid job
during the week and then the
farm, which they work in the
evenings and weekends.
But blacks say they face unique
problems not just in earning
money but in finding the crucial
loans to plant and fertilize each
year's crop, and to buy land and
equipmment.
They complain most bitterly
about the Farmers Home Ad-
ministration, the government
agency that makes loans to farm-
ers who con't meet commercial
lending requirements. Manybor
rowers are small farmers, includ-
ing blacks whose 100-acre
average spread compares with
the 440-acre national average.
Suspicions black farmers held
for years gained legitimacy in
1982 with a U.S. Civil Rights
Commission report document-
ing the decline among black
farmers. The report criticized
FmllA for practicing the kind of
bias it was supposed to correct.
Farmers Home in some places
took longer to process minority
loan applications, gave them less
money than nedded or waited
too long to grant it, the report
said.
'That has been a persistent
problem in the agency says
Walter Fredericks, the agency's
special assistant for civil rights.
"What we're attempting to do is
sensitize our people to the low-
income borrowers, many of them
minorities hoping they'll go the
second mile
CURRY COPY
CENTER CAN DO
Photocopies- Quick
Business Cards
Resumes
Memo Pads
Silk Screen of Binders
Tickets
Newsletters-Sororities and Fraternities
Typesetting
Package Mailing and Receiving-Same Day
Postage Stamps
S
JERRYN CREECH
President
i)
CURRY
COPY
CENTER OF GREENVILLE SSSS
(919) 752-1233
Greenville. NC 27834
( osts are high, prices low. The
irk load is numbing, and debt
or ending. For small farmers,
u h include most blacks, the
tit is so little it's nearly impos-
- . ,i to take up the business.
i ou won't find no young'uns
ing into farming Annie Mae
tavie, 57, said during a break
m her 15 acres of Cumberland
tunry tobacco. "See, anvtime
) can get out there and get
� m a job and make $6 or $7 an
ir and not have the head-
les, they not going to do it
Wedon't haveany black farm-
rs left in Tillery. This is it says
1 lary Grant, nodding toward his
' vear-old father, Matthew.
We had 100 families who settled
�re. and out of their 300children
vn e had two in farming. One is out
md the other's in bankruptcy, so
I don't know if you can count
him
The Grants went into farming
w hen the Tillary Farm Project of
i ialifax County began in the early
1940s as part of Franklin
Roosevelt's "40 acres and a mule"
program to establish America's
poor on land of their own.
In Matthew Grant's time, cenus
figures show, black crWncfsrrip of
Newman
Catholic Student
Center
953 East Tenth Street
Greenville, NC 27858
Phone: 757-3760
Campus Mass Schedule
Sunday � 11:30 a.m. - Biology Building, Room 103
9:00 p.m. - at the Newman Center
Wednesday � 5:30 p.m. - at the Newman Center
(followed by a fellowship dinner)
For information about these and other programs sponsored by the Newman Center,
call or visit the center daily between 8:30 a.m. and 11:30 p.m. The Newman Center it
open to all students from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. daily.
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain and Campus Minister
SIGN ON
5:45 AM
9:00 AM
Monda1
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
:525555S?3F35!?
tt

Sfl
VAC
12:00 N
3:00 PM
6:00 PM
8:00 PM
Saturday
A
TOUCH
OF
CLASS
(Classical)
Sunday
SYMPHONY
ON CD
CROSSOVER
(Christian
Music)
mmMmsmm
INSIGHT
PIRATE
TALK
RADIO FREE
G WEEKEND
a SUNSPLASH
E JAMAICA
7.
91.3
ft
�vT
Request Line:
757-6913
Always Open
THE SOUNDS OF JAZZ
10:00 PM
12:00 PM
2:00 PM
ADVENTURES
IN
MODERN
RECORDING
MONDAY
NIGHT
LIVE
ALL
REQUEST
R R
e RADIO e
(: FREE G
JAMAICA
E E
PERMANENT
WAVE
(New WavePunk)
LASER WARS
ALL
COMPACT
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PERMANENT
WAVE
(New WavePunk)
JAMAICA
PERMANENT
WAVE
(New WavePunk)
y 913
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SIGN OFF
FRIDAY NIGHT
CONCERT
ROCK
OUTLET
ALL
REQUEST
BLUES
TRAIN
R&B
CLASSIC
ROCK
INNER
RHYTHMS
(Soul)
METAL SHOP
1204
(Heavy Metal
'til 4 AM)
vi
91.3
"s"
Request Line:
757-6913
Always Open
�a rPwnuMiw�flitf i ffcrfi �� �w� i
.rftommmitoMmm mwm0m0m �wi 'm��twpi� � nfl i. �' � � ' t fm ijtfi






I �
16
Till I A si CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25, 1W7
w-
ABC's of Hrglth Center
Advice, booze and contraceptives
Men enrolled at ECU do not
have to wait until they are sick to
come to the ECU Student Health
Care Center.
The center offers a male health
program that consists of educa-
tion and the prevention, diagno-
sis, and treatment of health prob-
lems. All services are confiden-
tial.
Educational programs ottered
to ECU men cover a variety of
health issues including contra-
ception, self-testicle examination
and sexually transmitted dis-
ease. Other topics are ottered on
prtand. These programs are
ailable to residence hall stu-
tnts and other campus group
A contraception class is held
twice a week at the center in room
llrv Mondays at 10 am and
rhursdays at 3 p.m. tor men and
women.
One ot the goals ot the Student
Health Center is that all male
students learn how to do a simple
three-minute monthly self-tes
tide examination, cancer of the
testes � the male reproductive
glands is one ot the mosl com-
mon cancers in men 1-34 years
ot age.
Itaccountsfoi 12 percent ol all
cancer deaths in this group. It
discovered in the early stages
testicular cancer can be treated
promptly and effectively It's
important for all men to take the
time to learn tht ba i facts about
thisrypcofcana i t's : toms,
treatment and u hat one can do to
get help
Brochure and other informa-
tion about men's health are also
available at the center including
topics such as diet and nutrition,
cancer, high blood pressure, sex
ual dysfunctions, depression,
alcohol and drugs. Tests for sexu-
ally transmitted diseases, herpes
arjd the evaluation ol other men's
health problems are available.
ivclve tor
Condom are sold bv
pharmacy a I lhecost
S2.
INft. -tttiUinv - the
mgjaith prer may be
oqMRipjp:cii!ing 757-681 or
bv stopping by the center.
1 hav
have a
can 1 d
Peer
a friend who
to help her:
e deal with
lem.
tr
� to
hat
and
problems in their lives in differ-
ent ways; some withdraw and
avoid contact or closeness with
other people, while others in-
crease contact with people. Some
spend more time than usual on
schoolwork and others turn to
alcohol and other drugs to help
them cope. It may not be the
amount of alcohol someone
drinks that causes a problem as
much as the reasons behind his or
her drinking and the effect oi the
drinking on studies, relation-
ships, future plans and jobs.
If you're concerned that a
triend has a drinking problem
don't be afraid to bring it up. Try
to show your concern so that you
don't cause your friend to have a
defensive reaction. If you tell the
triend that he or she has a drink
ing problem they will most likely
deny it and become angrv. A bet-
ter approach is to ask the person it
he or she has a problem, be pre-
pared tor possible outcomes of
raising the question ot a drinking
problem. Even if you raised the
issue in an appropriate manner
the person may react with defen-
siveness or denial It's important
to remember that you can't take
control ot anyone's life and you
should not feel guilty about not
helping her get better
It would be helpful lor you to
learn more about alchol abuse
and alcoholism. The Student
Health Center has an excellent
brochure entitled "How to 1 lelpa
Friend With a Drinking Problem"
and additional information
about alcohol and drugs that you
can pick up. BACCHUS, a stu-
dent alcohol education group
located in 301 Erwin Building,
has trained student educators
who can discuss alcohol use with
you. The Counseling Center pro-
vides resource materials about
alcohol and drus.
The ECU Student Health Cen-
ter pro ides educational services
and confidential prevention,
diagnosis and treatment ot
health problems specific to
women.
Sexuality classes are offered at
the center, room 1 lh. Mondays at
10 a.m. and Thursdavs at 3. am.
These classes will also be taught
in the evening in main residence
halls September and October.
Attendance at a sexuality lass
is necessary before making an
appointment to obtain a method
ot contraception from the i enter.
Arrangements can be made to
talk to a peer health educator
about contraception it you have
class conflicts.
Routine pap smears and peh ic
exams are provided by appoint
ment. Morning and afternoon
appointments are available as
well as evening appointments on
IluirsdaysforaSl? fee. Appoint-
ments can be made at the center
or by calling 757-6317.
What contraceptive methods
.ire available at the center?
Oral contraceptive agents
birth control pills) are available
bv prescription. One pack or
i vvie 0i pills costs $5. Students
should plan to buy 3 packs of pits
it a time.
IndividuHfhoug
Like a circleIn a rectangle, each of us Ha
to be unique. Individual thought. Freedom
of expression.
Express yourself in The East Carolinian.
Positions are now open for editors, staff
writers, production manager and layout
artists
The experience, the friends, they can't b
beat.
Team effort.
ly today
-rt-AVW�VWAWA
FRAMES
WITH THH PURCHASE OF PRESCRIPTION LENSES
C hoosp from large selection of fashion frames
I
I
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1.
30 TO 60 OFF
ALL FRAMES IN STOCK
WITH PKtSC RIPTION LENSES
Must present coupon with order for discount
Not qoni uitli other advertised specials
COUPON EXPIRES SEPT 18.1987
I
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SOFT CONTACT
LENSES
SCQOO
-f r pair
8-
J
Sunglasses
25 oft
ent this ad i'n order 'or dis
t good with other advertised
Expires Sept 18. 1987 � "�
i � � ����� iTrirw �nrVB rVi
T.A
OPEN 24 HR. ON FRI.SAT.
757-1955
UNIVERSITY
EXXON

Open 9 30 AM to 6 PM Mon 1 ri Phone 756-4204
�������������������� �l��jj
We Can Arrange An Eye Exam For You On The Same Day
,
OPTICAL
PALACE
703 Greenville Blvd.
(Across from The Plaza)
Gary M Harris, licensed Optician
TTRESS
SALE
50
We don't offer
Specials.
Our prices are
the Best in Town!
Located on Fifth Street.
Hours: 7 am-9 pm
Mon- Sat
E)�pN
BAKED CHOCOLATE CHIP S
RANGER. OATMEAL Off
Peanut Bu
Cookie
4
$
For
1
24 Hr. Wrecker:
830-105
"52-0138
"52-683
m

OFF
AND MORE
WATERBEDS
START AT $99.95
Bookcase
�- Waterbeds $199.95
�f Any Size
I I ALL ACCESSORIES
ON SALE NOW
TWINFULL $49.95QUEEN $139.95KING $179.95 Sets
rconyniy Model1 $39.95 r j Pe
Firm hMl spring$49.95 f . 1$59.95$169.95$199.95
Firm FMrn Firm$59.95 F i I S69.9S l i . $79.00 f i '�$6900 F ,i 1 '� $84.95 F 1 P $99.00$199.00$249.00 Sets
$22995 $289.00 Sol$299.95 SI5
S�aly Oassir$399.00 Sot
kingsdowh Oiyinal 1$ Vr rtafd' $89.00 E.i Pc� 19.00$299.00 Set$499.00 Set
SMI� Pottur jxd'c Fim Firm$119.00 Ea Pc$159.00 Fa Pt$399.00 Set$499.00 Set
WHITEBRASS DAY BEDS
-����
DAY BEDS
START c-
AT $69
WHITE
IRON
$139
V' BRASS $299
targe Sweetie" 0' Day Bed Covers And Pillows Available
BUNK BEDSBUNK BEDS
'Includes Mattresses
2X4
Bunk Bed
Bookcase
Bunk Bed
Crew Quarter .
With Chest 399
ALL SOLID WOOD
19995
$29995
95
Sold in sets only. Mattresses available





I
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Hank's
Homemade Ice
Voted
as
321 East Tenth St. (near Wendy's)
758-0000
the Top Ice Cream in the Nation.
,v
l
"Featured on PM Magazine
pm
� mpgnztnel
Carolina Todav
( ARWIM TOim
WNCT-TV9
I


RMDMY
UJITHT1T
"K" Voted Best Ice Cream in Greenville.
Selected tor inclusion in "The Very Best Ice Cream" by Warner Books.

�The Store's Strawberry Ice Cream was the winnerAkron Beacon Journal
I
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the kinds of frozen desserts that people brave blizzards forCam Robbin
and Herbert Wolff, authors of "The Very Best Ice Cream"
Patricia "Hank" Steele, makes her nationally acclaimed flavors
daily in Greenville.
fc01d Fashioned hard ice cream made right in the store.
I
I
The very best ice cream, using the very best ingredients.
1 Delicious ice cream cakes and pies personalized just for vou
I hank juwj. custom built ice cream machine (o make 1I3 delicioui d�m Ima �
jirw, ,� ,0 run, ih. toh� ,�, ,PM 0, ,ht M h,ontd .JJZrTJ
� A specialty al Hank's ij the BLEJN'D-IN You nirk m�r f.vn �
e put ,han in our spectai blench machine ZlZme 0,1 I !17T S �" frU" " 52 �"d
�the candy or fru, into small P,ec� and mueTu So he � � ,?, , T "ne b'Cndn ra-5? bf�
�. � has �, fun nav0r S Lhe ice .TyZT' "
I Special Offer
I We want you to find out for
FACTORY MATTRESS & WATERBED OUTLET
355-2626
730 Greenville Blvd Next to The Plaza
355-2626
�toW.44V44 jftUmmutkM jMMAMUguU M�tf.��JWfe�W jMVMMWUUW sHM�4MrViUv
DaysCasht "f M�it�wat Financing l 1 Delivery l -f v,� mwc�. ��' T tlH
a





yourself how good ice cream
can be. So bring a friend
and come on down to Hank's
and take advantage of our
coupon offer. (We're on
10th Street, between
McDonalds and Wendy's.)
Open Daily 11 a.m.
Sunday at Noon
Hank's Homemade
Ice Cream
321 E. 10th St. (next to Wendy's)
BUY ONE BLEND-IN OR
MINI SUNDAE. GET ONE
FREE
CLIP THIS COUPON
Good through Sept. 9th, 1987
Jumbo
Roll
KRAFT
Orang
Juice
Gal.
Ctn
$
11

��n� mmwwi
�WWH llll�MiWll�H
letKI&mmmimmmm �m nww wwnaim uhm
mm

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dual thoug
le (n a rectangle, each of us has
ne. Individual thought. FreedO
ron
urself in The East Carolinian,
ire now open for editors, staff
oduction manager and layout
tfnce. the friends, they can't b
t?"
Apf5iy today
����.��.�.�. V,ll�N��V
X Ai
4 HR. ON FRI.SAT.
7-1955
$
.�.�.�.�.�.��.�� V.SW.VS.
IVERSITY
m U1 i
don't offer
Decials.
prices are
'St in Town!
d on Fifth Street,
s: 7 am-9 pm
'on- Sat
tt � ec
154
�2-0138
S2-6834
S .
Ice Cream
v's)
v 0 ' ,
A .if - V ,
WNCT-TV9
B oks.
lurnal
h'obhms
� - � med flavors
-
HI.
ifc lull ui ��� � - � :
rucri jo we t (
� -I vr ir 'unr
' u.e :
- rean navor, and your favorite fruit or CIMy and then
�rr personal flavor. nc blend-in maaDKt breaks up
j -i peal because the candy or fruit doeirVl �e. frorr
t- tie best of b -
fcft
Y
I
Hank's Homemade
Ice Cream
321 E. 10th St. (next to Wendy's)
BUY ONE BLEND-IN OR
MINI SUNDAE. GET ONE
FREE
CLIP THIS COUPON
Good through Sept. 9th, 1987

K
Tl IE CAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25, 1987 17
WELCOME BACK
ECU students!
Copyright 1987
Kroger Saw On
Quantity Rights Ressrved
Nona Sold To Daalari
aam flaP AOVtflT
��. ��-�. I) .
fl �� �" r ioik In l
"�mi and Price
Effective thru Sal.
August 29, 1987.
on
�OVISTHI D irtM POUC
�alwaitJaad n a, maa to t. m
" ���h �����' ���� naaei �
�� art M aa a aajaj ou .� �,
holco �l � camatnM it.� wha
wlH onMlla
� PL' . r Ik,) ��
!� �d.arliaafl ��� wllhln JO dlyi Oil
coupon will �� ai , .Di.ri �� Mom
IN THE DELI
BAKED CHOCOLATE CHIP. SUGAR.
RANGER. OATMEAL OR
Peanut Butter
Cookies
Sandy Mac
Bologna
99
FRESH BAKED
'
Doz
Yeast
Donuts
"79
ASSORTED
Big K
Soft Drinks
S
198
KRAFT
Orange
Juice
Pepperoni
Pizza
Tato Skins
CHOCOLATE CHIP OR
OATMEAL RAISIN
At Kroger, f
your ;n
pharmacist ; IV
fills your
prescription,
while you
fill your
shopping list.
KEEBLER
Soft Batch
Cookies
Zesta Saltines.
8-Oz.
Bag
18-Oz.
Bag
1-Lb.
Box
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
t
nii�.����iyimamiii � .il
� � ����.��
� �i .
"I
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18
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST25,1987
Federal officials say legal abortions decrease 2.7 percent
(AP) � Federal health officials
have reported a decrease in the
number of abortions in the
United States for the first time
since record-keeping began in
In 1983, 1,268,987 legal abor-
tions were performed in the
United States, a 2.7 percent drop
from the 1,303,980 reported in
1982, the National Centers For
Disease Control reported.
The District of Columbia re-
ported the nation's highest abor-
tion rate in both 1982 and 1983 -
greater than 100 abortions per
1,000 women between ages 15
and 44.
West Virginia reported the
lowest rate - six abortions per
1,000 women 15-44.
The CDC, in its annual Surveil-
lance Summaries report, sent last
week to physicians and other
health professionals, drew no
conclusions regarding the rea-
sons behind the first-ever de-
crease in abortions.
But the Atlanta-based agency
noted that another leading abor-
tion statistic began falling two
years earlier; the nation's abor-
tion rate peaked in 1980 at 25
abortions for every 1,000 females
15-44, slowing to 24 per 1,000 in
both 1981 and 1982 and slowing
again to 23 per 1,000 by 1983.
Although data was received
from health officials in all 50
states and the District of Colum-
bia, the CDC noted that the
number of legal abortions re-
ported to federal officials is
probably lower than the number
actually performed. In 1982, The
Alan Guttracher Institute, which
does its own direct studies on
abortion trends, reported 17 per-
cent more abortions than did the
CDC.
The CDC reported that along
with the number of U.S. abor-
tions, the percentage obtained by
teen-agers is also on the decline
Teenagers had 27 percent of re-
ported U.S. abortions. In 1983, the
CDC reported, there were 497
abortions for every 1,000 live
births by blacks or females of
other races, compared to 302
abortions per 1,000 live births by
white females.
DAILY SOCIALS
Triple Deiigh!
CHINATOWN
EXPRESS
218-B E. 5th Street
(University Arcade)
Greenville, NC 27834
(919)757-1183
Sea'ood Plate
tf'owae- Hm 4 Si
Pepper Steak
Bee' witu B'occoii
Moo Goo Ga' Pan
Tai Cian CTchen
Sp'C Cnichen
Sweet & Sour Pork
Sweet S Sour Snnmp
� 95
I 95
I 95
1 95
I 95
t 95
1 95
l 95
250
DINNER COMBO
SKOAL
4 00-10 30
3 39
TWO CNTftff
Out EGGKOll
'��CD mci on io Mem
SOU
OHTUNt COOK
The Wait
Classes began Monday, but lines are still forming as students try to
get registered, drop and add classes and try to figure their classes for
the fall semester. Here several students wait, seemingly bored, in line
in the English department office to get their chance at the registration
terminal.
NEED MONEY?
We Pay CASH For:
SterlingUass Rings
Silver CoinsWedding Bands
Any Gold Jewelry
Coin & Ring Man
4th & Evans Street
Pnces based daily on
gold and silver rates.
oking to Rent?
AMERICAN
HOMELOCATORS
HOUSES & APARTMENTS
SHORT & LONG TERM LEASES
� 10 Years World-Wide Experience
� Student Housing
� Pet Problems a Specialty
� Corporate Relocation
� Appointment Making
Shared Accomodauorts
Rooms
t2
HOMELOCATORS
219 Cotanche St No. 9
752-1375
Welcome Back Students
Come Worship With
GRACE
CHURCH
Grace
Church
At Their New Location:
New Bern Highway At Bells Fork
Enjoy a worshipful experience under the only
glass dome church in the East.
9:45am-College Bible Study
ll:00am-Morning Worship
7:00pm-Evening Service
7:15pm-Wednesday-Team Ministry
Opportunities or Service
College Ministry & Choir
Special Music & Instrumental Ensemble
"A Church that is finding needs
and filling them
The Best Of
is
Sam Says
SAVE S5.00
I with this coupon.
I HOMELOCATORS '
Fall At The
Best Of Prices.
THE AREA'S FINEST WOMEN'S STORE
IS DEDICATED TO MAKING YOUR
NEW WARDROBE A FASHION ASSET
Know how you fed when you've made a peat buy'
How you can't wait to show k! That's how we fed
about our new fail collections. They're a wonderful
example of how good fashion design and good quality
can work together. The result is real wardrobe poten-
tial based on a solid foundation: updated classes with
saying power year after year. That's one fashion
�sset. The quality is another. And. of course, there
that temfic bottom line. Our prices. For value that's
unrivaled anywhere.
FASHION APIWREL
THT feAZA
holarship establ
long-time ECU
U News Bureau) - John
Ebbs, professor ft English
campus representative I i
national scholarship and
hip programs at ECU, died
is home May 21 after an
V of several months He was
R u t h
dren
up and
s were
l is survived by his w
ner Dorol
rchwell, and tvt
3hn Ebbs's s
ice accompli
incredible said
dworth, acting .
for academu
?r turned down an
to be it sen ;
mentand forth
oodworth said fc
�ht through anuar
fill while prcj �
Jan. 30 inaug i
Shaw as pr : �
gPicdmt nl mmu
in Char tl
Hosj � r ��
it disease in
le had returned I
atnville, but had
fcscand re-u � :
aired the fatal s
3tn tile home
�bs, a native i
fhad beer a
�ish faculty at i
�26 years and
�vn as a scholar a
� whose spa
justice in
ticularlv trl
and �
Jn $
wrote i
manui
nr� pap
revised
A
ist Carolinian,
ide,
rtivation,
perience,
iends.
pply today.
travel
to foreign
s

fved. nites
I film 8pm
o
S7F
Up
WSql
Up T
15 S .
0
RE
M) I
East Carolina
t the OFF the CC
$2.00 Iced
Free Pizza 5-
Live D.J. 5 54
No Cover Cn
ionday Movie Mania
Blockbuster Movies
FREE Popcorn
FREE Hotdog Bai
2.00 Pitchers of Draft
No Cover 8 1 am
1HERA TON GR
A
���' 'mmmmmwit '����i� �� w�.
4
' ��
� � 4
I
in





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1987
19
.7 percent
ISO at 25 abortion trends, reported 17 per-
temales cent more abortions than did the
000 in CDC.
mg The CDC reported that along
with the number of U.S. abor-
r xreived tions. the percentage obtained by
all SO teen-agers is also on the decline.
I eenagers had 27 percent of re-
the ported U S abortions. In 1983, the
re IDC reported, there were 497
als - abortions for every 1,000 live
number births b blacks or females of
he other races, compared to 302
abortions per 1,000 live births by
v. on white females.
DAILY SPECIALS1 95 1 95 � 95 � K ' 95 � j� � 95 ' 96
:sc
DINNER COMBO
,reet bade) 27834SPECIAL 4 00 - 10 30 3 39 3 tN'BEf ONE EGGAOU FRIED RICE OR 10 MEIM SOUP r ?R'jNf COO� if
r frrrfrt
r rv .Ku rlrv
tin thi- ����� vi.i' Im'
;889
5100
s2325
usie'
s410
;477
'295
7 Damonfl Wide Band
v
f329
1.50 ct T
7 Diamond Ring
(Wh.te Gold)
'2040
50 ct TW
Marquise Shape Cluster
iYeUo Goictt
5478
1 00 ct TW
Marquise Shape Cluster
(Yellow G
1200
200 Ct TV
Pear Shape Cluster
iWh teGold
Reg S292C
;2037
la Rinfl
13 Diamond Ring with Wide Band
fellow Gold
$579 Re5 S245C
'1705
rnes
id Gallery
Si re I age
iton Jacksonville and Atlantic Beach
At The
est Of Prices.
AREA'S FINEST WOMEN'S STORE
lEDlCATED TO MAKING YOUR
WARDROBE A FASHION ASSET.
how you fed when you've made a great buy?
you can't wait to show it! That's how we fed
It our new fall collections. They're a wonderful
�pie of how good fashion design and good quality
irork together. The result is real wardrolje poten-
i on a solid foundation: updated classics with
ig power year after year That's one fashion
The quality is another And, of course, there's
fernfic bottom line. Our prices. For value that's
Jed anvwhere.
APPAREL
PU�2.A-
Scholarship established in memory
of long-time ECU English professor
(ECU News Bureau) - John
Dale Ebbs, professor of English
,nd campus representative for
nterrutional scholarship and fel-
owship programs at ECU, died
at his home May 21 after an
llncss of several months. He was
61.
1 le is survived by his wife, the
former Dorothy Ruth
Jhurchwcll, and two children.
John Ebbs's scholarship and
service accomplishments were
just incredible said William
Blood worth, acting vice chancel-
lor tor academic affairs. "He
never turned down an opportu-
nity to be of service for our de-
partment and for the university
Blood worth said Ebbs had
taught through January but be-
came ill while preparing toattend
the Jan. 30 inauguration of Dr.
Ruth Shaw as president of Cen-
tral Piedmont Community Col-
, e in Charlotte and entered
Duke Hospital for treatment of
heart disease in early February.
He had returned home to
Greenville, but had suffered a
relapse and re-entered Duke. He
suffered the fata! seizure at his
Greenville home.
I bbs, a native of Carlxmdale,
had been a member of the
English faculty at East Carolina
for 2b years and was widely
known as a scholar and intellec-
tual whose specialty was poetic
justice in English literature, par-
ticularly the worksof John Milton
and Shakespeare.
In 1961, Ebbs compiled and
wrote an East Carolina Univer-
sity manual of style for theses and
term papers, which after three
revised editions, is in its third
printing and still in use.
For a number of years, Ebbs
served as faculty member of the
ECU student Media Board which
supervises all student publica-
tions including the newspaper,
yearbook and literary magazine,
as well as the campus radio sta-
tion. He had received numerous
awards for distinguished service
to the student publications.
Ebbs was a B-29 tail gunner in
the U.S. Army Air Force in the
Pacific during World War II,
flying 35 missions over Japan. He
rose to the rank of staff sergeant
and was awarded the Air Medal
with five Oak Leaf Clusters and
the Distinguished Hying cross.
After the war, Ebbs entered the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill and received
bachelor's, master's and Ph.D
degrees in English. His Ph.D dis-
sertation was "The Concept of
Poetic Justice in Restoration
Tragedy
He had taught in public high
school in Clinton, N.C and was
an instructor at Texas A&M and
at UNC-Chapel Hill. After receiv-
ing his doctorate, Ebbs taught at
High Point College and at Texas
A&M for a year each before join-
ing the ECU faculty.
His teaching and research areas
included medieval and Renais-
sance English literature, Jaco-
bean English literature, linguis-
tics, composition and rhetoric,
Restoration and 18th century
English literature. Inl967-68, he
served as a visiting professor ast
the University of Nebraska at
Lincoln.
On a one-year leave of absence
from ECU in 1966-67, Ebbs
served as State Supervisor of
English for the N.C. Department
of Public Instruction. In this posi-
tion, Ebbs initiated new pro-
grams in English and language
arts and evaluated existing pro-
grams in schools seeking accredi-
tation.
Ebbs served as editor for "A
History of North Carolina au-
thored by Wyatt Brown, which is
to be published soon. He was
editor of a history of Jarvis Me-
morial United Methodist Church
in Greenville.
RESUMES
Professional Resume Composition
Atlantic Personnel Services
209 Commerce Street, Suite B
$5.00 discount with this ad.
355-7931
The
East Carolinian.
Pride,
Motivation,
Experience,
Friends.
Apply today.
travel
to foreign
lands
free.
AA r
potr
wed. nites
film 8pm
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?

?

?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?

?
COLLEGE
G

X
m
o

tf
Hurry! A t These Prices,
They Won't Last Long!
SIZE
Up To
10 Sq. Yds.
Up To
15 Sq. Yds.
$39.99
EACH
$48.88
EACH
Perfect for those cold dorm floors.
OVER 700
REMNANTS IN
STOCK
All Sizes, Colors, Styles, and Prices.
8-6 M-F, Sat. 'til 1:00
All items subject to prior sale.
tm im �n�nt��� 11
VmHiimCWip
CiJiDtfUi
"East Carolina Tea Party"
at the OFF the CUFF Lounge
$2.00 Iced Teas
Free Pizza 5-7p.m.
Live D.J. 9s 5-1 a.m.
No Cover Charge!
Monday Movie Mania:
Blockbuster Movies
FREE Popcorn
FREE Hotdog Bar
$2.00 Pitchers of Draft
No Cover 8-1 a.m.
SHERA TON GREENVILLE
East Carolina University student passes his all-important dropadd form to the computer operator as
others look on, anticipating their turn with the computer.
mmmmmmmammmmmimmmmsBt wmaKmmamammmmammimmmtmmmmmKxmmmmmmmimmmmHmami
FAMOUS
Mtt MI.IT1tf.rT
AMD IVANS ITHff-l
MfBmu.ac
T�m TUB AIL TNE HOT
iswrir ncKST
delivery is 55.00)
$2.49
For Fast Free Delivery, Phone 757-1278 or 757-0731
(minimum delivery is S5.00)
TRY OUR MEAL DEALS
(not for delivery)
Hamburgers, Ham and Cheese, Tuna, RoasfBeef, BLT, Chicken Fillet,
Turkey, and Pizza Burger Sandwiches. Plus French Fries and Drink.
TRY OUR GREEK TACO (sliced ribeye with fried peppers and
onions, spaghetti sauce, lettuce and tomatoes in a pita)
GREEK NIGHTS
WEDNESDA Y and THURSDA Y
Draft Beer On Tap $1.99 a Pitcher!
Buy Any Sub
Get A Free Drink!
Thus Offer Xot Good With Any Other Promotion.
mmatmsuasxsmmiBmmmmmmMmmii
Buy Any Large Pitcher
Get 2 Liter Pepsi Free'
Buy Any Small Pizza I
i
Get 2 Drinks Free'
ThiCoffersTa v BeM lirutran47 TmjTYuSe.
.VXNXXVVVNWWVNWWNSWVV V V
NOW OPEN 24 HOURS ON FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS
Transit
Authority
GREENVILLE
757-1955
HOURS:
11 AM - 2 AM SunThurs.
24 HOURS - Friday & Saturday
PTA pizzas (Small 12 large 16' I Our zests uuie is made with
Iresh romjno cheese and !oprx-d with 100 mnzzarella Double
sauce is free
PizzaTransit
Authority
Toppings
Pepperoni
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n�) m
�m
.i






20
Tt IE CAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST25,1W
Aids count low in N.C. prisons
JACKSON, N.C. (AP) - State
Officials say the expected rapid
spread of AIDS through the
prison system has not happened,
m part because of public miscon-
ceptions about the amount of
homosexuality and intravenous
drug use behind bars.
"My own feeling is the reason
we are seeing less of it in prison is
because there are fewer of the
high-risk gToups entering prison
than the public thinks there are
said H. Parker Eales, director of
nursing health services for the
state Department of Correction
and architect of the state's re-
sponse to AIDS in prison. "This is
just not a high-risk area
CM North Carolina inmates
tested since 1983, 15 have been
diagnosed as having AIDS, nine
of them this year. Of those 15,
nine have died, two have been
paroled, and four are in prison
hospitals.
Another 112 inmates have
tested positive for the acquired
immune deficiency svndrome
virus since 19S5. People with the
virus do not necessarily develop
AIDS, and inmates who test posi-
tive without showing the symp-
toms oi the disease remain in the
general prison population.
The relatively low number of
confirmed AIDS cases in prison is
not unique to North Carolina.
Although AIDS has spread in
prisons throughout the nation,
the growth has been slower than
in the general U.S. population. A
U.S. Department of justice sur-
vey involving 58 prisons found
that AIDS cases among inmates
increased from 766 to 1,232 be-
tween November 1985 and Octo-
ber 1986, or 61 percent. In the
population at large, AIDS cases
have increased 79 percent duning
the same period.
The statistics bring little com-
fort to Luther Marshall, a con-
victed murderer serving a life
sentence at Odom Correctional
lnstutute in Northampton
County.
1 le is worried about the homo-
sexuals who are active at night,
the drug users who brush against
him in the packed prison dormi-
tory and the hundreds of inmates
whose germs may be lurking on
his dinner plates.
More than a few of those in-
mates, he suspects, have the
deadly AIDS virus.
"Whenyou've gotbedsonlv 18
inches apart, you con't help but
rub against people said
Marshall, a stocky man with an
untamed red beard. "I really
worry about my life
Many inmates say the low
number of proven cases might
mean nothing because prison
officials did only limited testing
for acquired immune deficiency
syndrome. In fact, inmates gener-
ally cannot be tested on request,
and officials told The News and
Observer of Raleigh that they
hadn't kept track oi how many
had been screened.
Marshall's situation is one in
which state health officials be-
lieve testing is appropriate, said
the head of the state's communi-
calbe disease control section.
"In general, if a person has a
need to know whether they test
positivethen certainly testing
should be available said Dr.
Rebecca A. Meriwethcr. "But
there are some ramifications to
that question in the corrections
systems. Primarilythe one I'm
aware of is the issue of confiden-
tiality, and I think that's a very
important one
Testing also is appropriate for
those who exhibit symptoms that
could be traced to AIDS and those
who want to donated blood or
body organs, she said.
But testing is no solution for
AIDS in prisons or elsewhere, she
said.
'There isn't anything magical
about testing she said. "The
precautions that have to be taken
are the same, whether he tests
positive or not In addition
there are questions about the
accuracy of test, she said.
In Marshall's case a history of
intravenous drug use and two
recent tattoos didn't merit a test.
"I've asked to be tested twice,
and they say if there's no symp-
toms I can't be tested said
Marshall, 31. "I just want to know
it I'm OK. I'd pay for my own test
if I could
The
East Carolinian
Required reading
for the serious student.
P A R A D 1S E
�. .
329 Arlington
Blvd.
756-1579
Home economics director
appointed to replace Judith
Rollins as ECU dean August 1
ALL HAIR SERVICES
MAKEUP-MANICURES
TANNING BEDS
iHCU News Bureau) - Helen
Grove, the director of profes-
sional education for the Ameri-
can Home Economics Associa-
tion, has been selected as the new
dean of the School of Home Eco-
nomics at ECU.
Grove, selected in a nationwide
search, has been appointed pro-
fessor and dean effective Aug. 1,
according to William A. Blood-
worth, acting vice chancellor for
academic affairs.
"Dr. Grove will bring to the
School of Home Economies not
only her extensive experience in
Home Economics administration
but also specific expense in such
areas as the impact of technology
on American families and the
history and philosophy of Home
Economics as a field of inquiry
Blood worth said.
The new dean will succeed
Judith Rollins who relinquished
the administrative position in
order to persue research inter-
ests. Rollins had served as dean
since 1985 and remains on the
ECU faculty.
Grove received the Ph.D. in
Home Economics from the Uni-
versity of Tennessee in 1980. She
has specialized in family studies,
consumer studies and clinical
psychology. For her master's
degree, also at Tennessee, she
chose child development and
family relations as major areas of
study.
She received the bachelor's
degree from West Virginia
Wesleyan College in 1973.
As director of professional
education for the AHEA since
1984, she has managed the AHEA
criteria and guidelines policies of
the council on Postsecondary
accreditation and federal regula-
tions.
She was head of the division of
Home Economics at the Univer-
sity of Massachusetts, Amherst,
in 1983-84, and from 1980-83 was
assistant to the dean of the Col-
lege of Home Economics, Univer-
sity of Tennessee.
Helen Grove
ECU's School of Home Eco-
nomics includes departments of
Child Development and Family
Relations, Clothingand Housing,
Food, Nutrition and Institution
Mangement and Home Econom-
ics in Education and Business.
20 Discount Off Any Service.
Good Through 9-15-87.
521 Cotanche St.
757-1666
Bienvenidos Amigos
Open 7 days for Lunch & Dinner
PETEY HATHAWAY, Owner
LUNCH SPECIALS $3.95
SERVED MO.V-FRI.
I 1 AM TILL 3 PM
DINNER SPECIALS $5.95
INCLUDES DESSERT
SERVED SUN. THRU THURS
AFTER 5 PM
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SERVED 2-5 DAILY
WELCOME BACK
ECU STUDENTS!
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I oca led at 2753 E. 10(h Si reel.
We have all your conveniences.
CAROLINA COMPUTER
is now
Accepting Applications
for ail positions.
Deadline: August 28th
Located on 2nd Floor, Old Joyner
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1
208 East 5th StPhone: 758-1427
Greenville, N.C. 27834
SUPER FALL SALE!
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EVERY ALBUM
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FREE-A SOFTWARE STARTER KIT (A $100 Value)-
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756-1473
I
ury fin
guilt
YORK.S.C (AP)-Ronn.o
Jurton was convicted Fnda.
suffocation and sexually assault
jng his 4-year-old stepdaughter
a deed he once described a
luction and the proa
sranded as "that filthj a �
The jury of nine women ai
three men deliberated an hour
land 13 minutes Friday before
convicting Burton
Burton, 20, showed not
when the clerk of court read 1
verdict on the ohart
degree criminal sexual
But Burton flinched wl
Architect sa
urgent need
(CPS) � Campuse:
vide have an "extn
need to renovate :
buildings and con
new ones, the Societ) I
and University Plannii
said in a report last v.
Architect David Helpern, au
thor of the report, said fast-crum-
bling and obsolete buildings art-
sabotaging the qualitv of teach-
ing and reasearch on US cam-
puses.
"If we don't have quahf.
excellence in our facilities, we are
not going to have qualitv
� -
Police authorities
evidence from SB
WILKESBORO, N.C
James Hams Littlejohn outlined
his plans to ambush an 5B1 a
and a sheriff's deputv last m
in a tape recording and letter re-
covered after his death aw -
ties say-
Authorities held a news
ence Thursday to release part
the transcript from a tape that
Littlejohn 4ftMLSflLiadvie�.
shortly before tne shootout Au
gust 12. Littlejohn was killed
injuring Robert Risen, an
agent.
The transcript says. "I'm g
to be sitting on the front p
when he arrives, and I've get
Glory stacked right here bes 1
the door, loaded as hcaw a si
get it.
"Uh I'm nervous, but I l -
ing forward to the look on his face
If you hear it clicking, I'm
ting some more shells I
my hip pocket in case I ha.
chance to reload Risen m
come in first and then I'm g ra
make (Deputv ohn 5
freeze, bring him in hei
him take him out H
know what's gonna hit him
When Risen and Summer-
rived at Littlejohn's house I
tlejohn was sitting on the fi
porch steps. He apparent! v n
a gesture to the officers that he
was unarmed and invited them
into his home. He then pulled a
12-gauge shotgun from the!
and fired twice, hitting Riser
both times, Myers said.
Risen shot twice at Littlejohn,
hitting him both times and k
him, Myers said.
Myers and Dunn said there
were five shells left in Littlejohn's
gun.
"I personally feel he (Lit-
tlejohn) was looking for some
cover and was going to shoot
again Dunn said
In the tape and letter, Littlejohn
apparently also discussed plans
for the disposition of his insur-
ance policies and a car he bought
before the shooting, and he made
some personal comments.
However, Charles J. Dunn the
deputy director of the SBI, and
Seriff Fred S. Myers oi Wilkes
County released onlv a portion ot
the transcript from the 10 to 12-
minute tape and did not release
any of the letter.
According to reports, Risen
and Summers went to
Littlejohn's house m the Havs
Community of VViikes County
about 450 p.m. to arrest him on
charges that he sold cocaine and
non-tax-paid liquor to Risen
Dunn said authon ties had been
investigating Littlejohn, a school
teacher, since early April
Littlehohn was confronted
with the charges in early August
and he agreed to turn himselt m
and cooperate with a wider in-
vestigation, Myers said
"He indicated he was going to
t

J
j
� mm
a�.�m i i� �-





The
Carolinian
Required reading
the serious student.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1987
21
�mm
k ican Restaurant
757-1666
i
enidos Amigos
Lunch & Dinner
RS
S9
O
1
l!
o
o
o
ooooooooo
oooooooooo
o o o o a o o o o r
ther Board � 256K RAM
Monochrome Monitor
DSDD Diskettes
99!
ith a 9 month warranty.
:iT(A$100 Value)-
m, & other utilities
orders.
Jury finds stepfather guilty of rape, murder
YORK, S.C. (AP) - Ronnie Lee
Burton was convicted Friday of
suffocation and sexually assault-
ing his 4-year-old stepdaughter -
a deed he once described as a
seduction and the prosecutor
branded as "that filthy act
The jury of nine women and
three men deliberated an hour
and 13 minutes Friday before
convicting Burton.
Burton, 20, showed no reaction
when the clerk of court read the
verdict on the charge of first-
degree criminal sexual conduct.
But Burton flinched when the
clerk read the verdict that he was
guilty of murdering Lisa Marie
Hurst.
Bobbie Ann Hurst Burton, 22,
Lisa's mother, who was sitting
behind Solicitor William "livd
Ferguson, breathed heavily, then
leaned on the shcu.Mor of an aunt
as the murder verdict was an-
nounced.
The attorneys agreed to begin
the penaly phase of the trial - at
which the jury will decide
whether Burton will be sentenced
to death or life imprisonment - at
11 a.m. Saturday.
During closing arguments
Thursday, Ferguson urged the
jury to convict Burton of sexually
assaulting and murdering Lisa,
who was four at the time of the
pi ll ill . mil
"He spent 10 minutes doing his
filthy act. What could be mote
malicious than to take your own
little stepdaughter and do that?
My God Ferguson said.
Burton stared at the defense
table through most of Ferguson's
impassioned 27-minute closing
argument.
Mrs. Burton sobbed silently
while Ferguson repeatedly de-
Architect says colleges have
urgent need for renovation
(CVS) � Campuses nation-
wide have an "extremely urgent"
need to renovate old campus
buildings and construct some
new ones, the Society for College
and University Planning (SCUD
said in a report last week.
Architect David Helpern, au-
thor o( the report, said fast-crum-
bling and obsolete buildings are
sabotaging the quality of teach-
ing and reasearch on U.S. cam-
puses.
"If we don't have quality and
excellence in our facilities, we are
not going to have quality and
excellence in our education
Helpern said
About a third of the 200 cam-
puses participating in SCUP's
first nationwide survey said they
need at least $50 million each for
construction projects in the next
five years.
94 of the campuses hoped to
start a construction project in the
next five years if they could find
the money.
Congress is now debating a bill
that would funnel some federal
money to campuses to build or
rebuild reasearch facilities.
The bill, now in Senate and
House committees, would put
aside $47 million lor college re-
search labs in 1989 and $45 mil-
lion in 1990.
tailed the injuries Lisa suffered ui
the sexual assault and reminded
jurors of Burton's taped confes-
sion of the attack.
In ll" nili ssioh. Binliin ad
��"ll' I ' 'ln iii Lisa about
midnight April 30, then an-
swered "Yes, sir" when police
Capt. Bill Mobley asked if he had
i Mid intercourse with the girl.
Wednesday, a Piedmont Medi
cal Center doctor testified Lisa's
gn tin was "torn out" by the assu-
alt. The girl, taken first to Divine
Saviour Hospital in York and
later to I'Mt , was transferred to
Charlotte Memorial Hospital,
Follow the latest
in Pirate action.
Read the sports
page in The East
Carolinian.
Simply the best.
where she lapsed into a coma and
died June 15. She turned five May
23.
"Can you imagine the honor
thai that little tour cir old girl
was going through lor 10 min
utes?" Ferguson asked.
Ferguson also attacked efforts
by Burton's defense attorneys,
Charles Chiles of Rods I lill and
Public Defender im Boyd, to
blame Lisa's death on doctors at
Divine Saviour and PMC.
In their cross-examinations oi
the doctors who treated Lisa after
the assault Boyd and Chiles
questioned ivheather intravr
nous fluids and anlln � it ma
have caused a iluul overload i
her lungs, thus depriving her or
oxygen and killing her.
"Even if the doctors had been
negligent in treating tv i i.
something (Burton) did u
still guilty of murder Ferguson
said.
eot&
feanehA
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Laundered Shirt Special
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5ujn roust be presented with incoming order
C WAV o ,
(VlMSS I
Police authorities release
evidence from SBI shootout
0f4Ue- 1407. II
SCL
W1LKESBORO, N.C. (AP) -
James Harris Littlejohn outlined
his plans to ambush an SBI agent
and a sheriff's deputy last month
in a tape recording and letter re-
covered after his death, authori-
ties say-
Authorities held a news confer-
ence Thursday to release part of
the transcript from a tape that
Littlejohn yjtfo g tf p ty rm 4
shortly before tne shootout Au-
gust 12. Littlejohn was killed after
injuring Robert Risen, an SBI
agent.
The transcript says: "I'm going
to be sitting on the front porch
when he arrives, and I've got Old
Glory stacked right here beside
the door, loaded as heavy as I can
get :K
"Uh I'm nervous, but I look-
ing forward to the look on his face
If you hear it clicking, I'm get-
ting some more shells to put in
my hip pocket in case I havde a
chance to reload. Risen will
come in first and then I'm gonna
make (Deputy John) Summers
freeze, bring him in here, make
him take him out He don't
know what's gonna hit him
When Risen and Summers ar-
rived at Littlejohn's house, Lit-
tlejohn was sitting on the front
porch steps. He apparently made
a gesture to the officers that he
was unarmed and invited them
into his home. He then pulled a
12-gauge shotgun from the house
and fired twice, hitting Risen
both times, Myers said.
Risen shot twice at Littlejohn,
hitting him both times and killing
him, Myers said.
Myers and Dunn said there
were five shells left in Littlejohn's
gun.
"I personally feel he (Lit-
tlejohn) was looking for some
cover and was going to shoot
again Dunn said.
In the tape and letter, Littlejohn
apparently also discussed plans
for the disposition of his insur-
ance policies and a car he bought
before the shooting, and he made
some personal comments.
However, Charles J. Dunn, the
deputy director of the SBI, and
Seriff Fred S. Myers of Wilkes
County released onlv a portion of
the transcript from the 10 to 12-
minute tape and did not release
any of the letter.
According to reports, Risen
and Summers went to
Littlejohn's house in the Hays
Community of Wilkes County
about 450 p.m. to arrest him on
charges that he sold cocaine and
non-tax-paid liquor to Risen.
Dunn said authorities had been
investigating Littlejohn, a school
teacher, since early April.
Littlehohn was confronted
with the charges in early August,
and he agreed to turn himself in
and cooperate with a wider in-
vestigation, Myers said.
"He indicated he was going to
help with the entire investiga-
tion, but somewhere down the
line he had a change of heart
Myers said.
Myers and Dunn said that the
case is essentially closed, al-
though District Attorney Thomas
Rusher has been asked to make a
final review.
ZWV&X$
UAJHMlfft? WW-�U
ne-MW�fof U�KiP
��r f�
.22
Welcome
Back
Students
Zc&0tM mw&t, ftftesRAy- 4ef f.
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obmu, �.c m aw
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THROUGH THE EAST CAROLINIAN
CALL A SALES REPRESENTWE TODAY
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757-6366
DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING JAMES F.J. McKEF
SERVING THE EAST CAROUNA CAMPUS
COMMUNITY SINCE 1905
A

.�. - �-J
iiWIiiXiiiiii it

m-nmm�mm� ��" iirhninHiBMajii i��-�
mmmmmmmm
�� M

.





The
Carolinian
Required reading
b the serious student.
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1987
21
in Restaurant
757-1666
U
z
enidos Amigos
& Dinner
yo

s
O
1
l!
o
o
o
1
ooooooooo
oooooooooo
o o o o o o o o o
fher Board � 256K RAM
Monochrome Monitor
DSDD Diskettes
99!
'h a 9 month warranty.
:iT (A $100 Value)-
m, & other utilities
orders.
Jury finds stepfather guilty of rape, murder
YORK, S.C. (AP) - Ronn.e Lee
Burton was convicted Friday of
suffocation and sexually assault-
ing his 4-year-old stepdaughter -
a deed he once described as a
seduction and the prosecutor
branded as "that filthy act
The jury of nine women and
three men deliberated an hour
and 13 minutes Friday before
convicting Burton.
Burton, 20, showed no reaction
when the clerk of court read the
verdict on the charge of first-
degree criminal sexual conauct.
Put Burton flinched when the
clerk read the verdict that he was
guilty of murdering Lisa Marie
Hurst.
Bobbie Ann Hurst Burton, 22,
Lisa's mother, who was sitting
behind Solicitor William "Red
Ferguson, breathed heavily, then
leaned on the shoulder of an aunt
as the murder verdict was an-
nounced.
Tine attorneys agreed to begin
the penal v phase of the trial - at
which the fury will decide
whether Burton will be sentenced
to death or life imprisonment at
11 a.m. Saturday.
During closing arguments
Thursday, Ferguson urged the
jury to convict Burton of sexually
assaulting and murdering Lisa,
who was four at the time of the
Api il kl as: .mil
"He spent 10 minutes doing his
filthy act. What could be more
malicious than to take your own
little stepdaughter and do that?
My God Ferguson said.
Burton stared at the defense
table through most of Ferguson's
impassioned 27-nunute closing
argument.
Mrs. Burton sobbed silently
while Ferguson repeatedly de-
Architect says colleges have
urgent need for renovation
(CPS) � Campuses nation-
wide have an "extremely urgent'
need to renovate old campus
dings and construct some
� c w ones, the Society for College
and University Planning (SCUD
said in a report last week.
Architect David Hclpcrn, au-
thor of the report, said fast-crum-
bling and obsolete buildings are
sabotaging the quality of teach-
ing and reasearch on U.S. cam-
puses.
"If we don't have qualitv and
excellence in our facilities, we are
not going to have quality and
excellence in our education
I lei pern said.
About a third of the 200 cam-
puses participating in SCUP's
first nationwide survey said they
need at least $50 million each for
construction projects in the next
five years.
94 of the campuses hoped to
start a construction project in the
next five years if they could find
the money.
Congress is now debating a bill
that would tunnel some federal
money to campuses to build or
rebuild reasearch facilities.
The bill, now in Senate and
I louse committees, would put
aside $-17 million lor college re
search labs in 1989 and $95 mil-
lion in 1990.
tailed the injuries Lisa suffered in
the sexual assault and reminded
jurors of Burton's taped confes-
sion of the attack.
in mi (, mfesston, liui ion ad
� �il. i i dui n.j ij about
midnight April 30, then an-
swered "Yes, sir" when police
Capt. Bill Mobley asked if he had
sexual intercourse1 with the girl.
Wednesdays Piedmont Medi
i al Center doctor testified Lisa's
groin was "lorn out" by the assu-
alt. The girl, taken first to Divine
Saviour Hospital in York and
later to I'NK , was transferred to
Charlotte Memorial Hospital,
Follow the latest
in Pirate action.
Read the sports
page in The East
Carolinian.
Simply the best.
where she lapsed into a coma and
died June 15. She turned five May
23.
"Can you imagine th horror
that that little tour year old girl
was going through lor 10 min-
utes?" Ferguson asked.
Ferguson also attacked efforts
by Burton's defense attorneys,
Charles Chiles of Rock I till and
Public Defender im Boyd, to
blame Lisa's death on doctors at
Divine Saviour and PMC.
In their cross-examinations oi
the doctors who treated Lisa after
the assault Boyd and Chiles
questioned � I i ither intrai r
nous fluids and anesthesia ma
have caused a lluul overload
her lungs, thus depriving her or
oxygen and killing her.
"Even if the doctors had been
negligent in treating h i i.
something (Burton) did he
still guilty of murder Ferguson
said.
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Police authorities relense
evidence from SBI shootout
W1LKESBORO, N.C. (AP) -
lames Harris Littlejohn outlined
his plans to ambush an SBI agent
and a sheriff's deputy last month
m a tape recording and letter re-
covered after his death, authori-
ties say.
Authorities held a news confer-
ence Thursday to release part of
the transcript from a tape that
Lmlejohn ajfrDjjtjy radx
shortly before tne shootout Au-
gust 12. Littlejohn was killed after
injuring Robert Risen, an SBI
a cent.
Fhe transcript says: "I'm going
to be sitting on the front porch
when he arrives, and I've got Old
Glory stacked right here beside
the door, loaded as heavy as I can
get it.
"Uh I'm nervous, but I look-
ing forward to the look on his (ace
If you hear it clicking, I'm get-
ting some more shells to put in
my hip pocket in case I havde a
chance to reload. Risen will
come in first and then I'm gonna
make (Deputy John) Summers
freeze, bring him in here, make
him take him out He don't
know what's gonna hit him
When Risen and Summers ar-
rived at Littlejohn's house, Lit-
tlejohn was sitting on the front
porch steps. He apparently made
a gesture to the oiticers that he
was unarmed and invited them
into his home. He then pulled a
12-gauge shotgun from the house
and fired twice, hitting Risen
both times, Myers said.
Risen shot twice at Littlejohn,
hitting him both times and killing
him, Myers said.
Myers and Dunn said there
were five shells left in Littlejohn's
gun.
"I personally feel he (Lit-
tlejohn) was looking for some
cover and was going to shoot
again Dunn said.
In the tape and letter, Littlejohn
apparently also discussed plans
for the disposition of his insur-
ance policies and a car he bought
before the shooting, and he made
some personal comments.
However, Charles J. Dunn, the
deputy director of the SBI, and
Seriff Fred S. Myers of Wilkes
County released onlv a portion of
the transcript from the 10 to 12-
minute tape and did not release
any of the letter.
According to reports. Risen
and Summers went to
Littlejohn's house in the Hays
Community of Wilkes County
about 450 p.m. to arrest him on
charges that he sold cocaine and
non-tax-paid liquor to Risen.
Dunn said authorities had been
investigating Littlejohn, a school
teacher, since early April.
Littlehohn was confronted
with the charges in early August,
and he agreed to turn himself in
and cooperate with a wider in-
vestigation, Myers said.
"He indicated he was going to
help with the entire investiga-
tion, but somewhere down the
line he had a change of heart
Myers said.
Myers and Dunn said that the
case is essentially closed, al-
though District Attorney Thomas
Rusher has been asked to make a
final review.
Welcome
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P-
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C
-
'OluRsday, August 27, 1907
Tickets: $4.00 Advance, $5.00 At The Gate
8 PM Until "At The House" 803 Hooker Rd.
Purchase tickets in front of Student Store, Monday-Thursday
Rain Site: The Attic
Coolers Welcome � No Glass, Please
Budweiser

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- come early and see the premier of ECU'S
newest band 180 PROOF
- come see register to win the UJRDU
106.1 Rock and Roll Ski Boat
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ji-i ��� 4�
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
AUGUST 2 5, 1987 I'age 23
Band rocks the mall
Bj It. Humbert - ECU Photo Lab
The Pressure Boys offers returning students and freshmen a chance to let off steam before classes
begin Monday. The Student Union arranged the free Sunday night concert. The band featured a hot
brass section which had students dancing in front of the stage.
Rituals of sexy and powerful
reveal there's 'No WayOuf
By CHRIS MITCHHLL
S'aff Writer
Rituals Power Sex. What ritu-
alsbest re eal Washington, D.C.?
Who best- the powerful? Who
has the best se Roger
Donaldson s "NoWaj Out "calls
on those three aspects oi our soci-
ety and hurls them into the Wash-
htgton arena.
The camera opens on the Wash-
ington Monument, pulls away to
reveal the whole of the Pentagon
and eventually rests on the inte-
rior of a nearby residence. Such
an all-encompassing movement
also begins the fabric of the story.
It. Commander Tom Parrell
(Kevin Coster) operates as intelli-
gence liason for Security of De-
fence David Brice (Gene Hack-
man) through his friend Scott
Pritchard (Will Patton). Farrell
secretly begins an intimate rela-
tionship with Susan Atwell (Sean
Young) who doubles as Brice's
mistress.
Bine accidentally murders
Susan in a rage. Pritchard and
Brice supply a cover-up, with
Farrell ordered to find Susan's
mysterious boyfriend whom
Pritchard insists is a Russian spy.
Farrell cannot implicate Brice
to ithoui slipping the noose about
his own neck. 1 le sees no way out
At the beginning we observe
the rituals of those with power.
We see them in rituals of social
and real politics at their parties.
They follow guidelines of influ-
encing others with power to gain
what they want, whether it be
cutting off funds for super-duper
submarines or protecting their
superiors.
Brice must dance around a
senator's insistence for those sub
funds; Brice realizes his powerful
position and flaunts it before the
senator and peons at the parties.
Tritchard follows the ritual of the
ultimate second banana in pro-
tecting Brice at any cost to others
and himself.
Director Roger Donaldson re-
inforces the idea of the ritual only
slightlv with the Maori dance at
the New Zealand Consulate. The
too-brief dance echoes aggres-
sion in search of dominance � a
killer instinct.
Donaldson fools us in the be-
ginning before the "real" film
begins. Kevin Costner's Farrell is
the navy career man, a man's
man, a 'Top Gun's" Tom Cruise
ten years later. On his own time
he cruises topless bars and rips
phones off walls, while manag-
ing to keep his hair bristled, his
shirt collar upturned and his
shades on.
Gene Hackman as Brice comes
across as the all-powerful with
feet of clay, desperate to prevent
himself from toppling over.
Pritchard is just a little too ea-
ger to protect his boss, and his
character borders on the stere-
otypical homosexual psycho-
path.
Sean Young's performance as
Susan Atwell recks of the tired
and untrue l'm-a-whore-but-1-
really-love-you who is either
pulling off her top or pulling up
her skirt to prove it. But the soap
opera relationships between the
characters aren't the real story.
Robert Garland's screenplay
suddenly turns upon itself as
Farrell races to save his life and
reveal the cover-up. There is the
predictable car chase and run
through the mall scenes, but the
core of "No Way Out" rests upon
the suspense wholly within the
Pentagon.
We watch Farrell run through
much of the building avoiding
witnesses who can identify him
as Susan's boyfriend. Farrell hur-
ries from computer to computer
to delay his identity and to reveal
Brice's. The Lt. Commmander
must also evade Pritchard who
eventually realizes FarreU's in-
volvement. Action and suspense
congeal to turn around a lacklus-
ter beginning.
We mustn't forget the sex in
"No Way Out We can't forget
the sex. Within twenty minutes
Farrell has Susan in the limo's
back seat .ith much the same
intensity found between William
Hurt and Kathleen Turner in
"Body Heat To reinforce this
dominant idea, we cut between
the back seat foreplay and the
enormous Washington Monu-
ment.
The characters swap partners
like a potluck dinner, though we
only see Farrell and Susan. And
not much of them. But then the
promise of more sex is what the
producers know will keep our
attention. Though we see rela-
tively little sex, we feel its pres-
ence throughout FarreU's at-
tempts to bring out Brice's in-
volvement in Susan's murder.
We feel his need to dominate, to
capture, to deliver his revenge.
Pritchard's entire character is
based on intense sexual tension
as well.
"No Way Out" begins as com-
mon, predictable and excruciat-
ing. It evolves into an edgy run
through suspense. We're given
obvious clues to a plot twist near
the end, but onlv one slight clue to
the"real" plot twist of who's
behind the mirror.
The film perpetuates the Holly-
wood idea that sex outside the
norm is not only wrong, but that
it'll kill you in an American film.
However, Donaldson places a
suspence thriller in Washington
not by accident; he has made a
film that ever so slightly peeks
under the skirt of the sex drive of
the powerful and the power of
the sex drive.
Fan sings pirate song
By ANDY LEWIS
I'Hura Fditor
A man who reads electrical
meters in Washington, N.C, has
written a song called 'The Purple
and Gold Shuffle And he's not
kidding.
Bill Ebison became a local ce-
lebrity years ago by writing and
playing songs about the chal-
lenges he faces every day as he
reads electrical meters, faced
with malicious meterman-eating
dogs. Now Ebison is seeking air-
play for a rap song written for the
1987 Pirate football team.
Ebison said in an interview last
week that he arranged the song in
a way similar to the "Superbowl
Shuffle written for the Chicago
Bears. "I wanted the Pirates to
l;ave something like that Ebison
said.
Although the demo tape qual-
ity is limited by not using state of
the art studio equipment, Ebison
chants lyrics that show unfailing
school spirit. In fact, Ebison said
some people thought he was
making fun of the Pirates in the
light of past disapointing sea-
sons.
But Ebison is serious about the
Pirates. He said he wrote the song
after being inspired by a practice
session in Ficklen Stadium.
The lyrics, combined with a
funky drum machine beat and a
slightly weird melody from a
synthesizer, make the song funny
yet sincere as it tries to instill you
with "pirate fever
Ebison has been to radio and
television stations promoting the
song, and he said he is optomistic
that he can get the song played
over the air. Furthermore, he is
making arrangements to film a
video.
Ebison wrote the song earlier
this month and recorded it using
a self-designed recording studio
in his home. The song features
Ebison on guitar, base and lead
vocals. Two young friends of his,
Thomas Hardy and Milton
Cobbs, backed him up on key-
boards, percussion and vocals.
Ebison has written other songs
for ECU, including a song called
"The Minges Blues dedicated to
the basketball team. (Ebison
hopes The Minges Blues is what
the opposing team has when it
leaves our colliseum). He also
wrote a song dedicrted to former
chancellor John M. Howell.
Ebison, who has been playing
music since he was 10 years old,
said he writes a song for each club
or event he plays in. The long list
of Ebison appearances includes
more than 15 television and radio
programs, according to his press
release.
He performs songs like "My
Dog Don't Bite: The Meter Reader
Blues "Got to Read the Meter at
All Costs and "The Meter Man
Bites Back " in his novelty one
man show. Ebison said he does a
show every weekend.
Ebison has also put together a
three-song campaign against
drug abuse, for which he has re-
cevied a letter of comendation
from the White House, Ebison
said.
But back at the university, we
students will be watching to see if
Ebison's song comes to life in the
football team Can it create "real
fans from non-believers?"
The Purple and Gold Shuffle
(The Pirate Attack)
ChorusChant
Look at the Pirates � the purple and gold
Fast and strong � mean and bold
Rough and tough � never slack
Brace yourself for the Pirate Attack!
Roll team, roll � wearin' the purple and gold
Roll team, roll � driving toward that goal!
Verse 1
Look at the rirates' quarterback
Razor sharp � right on track!
He can stay in the pocket, move left or right
And all they see is the scoreboard light!
Look at the Pirates' pass receivers
Creating real fans from non-believers
Run by defenders like a rocket blat
Put those 6's on the scoreboard fast!
(Repeat ChorusChant)
Verse 2
Look at the Pirates' running backs
Take every yard they can dig and scratch!
Follow that strong offensive line
Making big holes and blowin' your mind!
The linebackers rule that defensive zone
Hit 'em so hard, they wanna go home!
Look at kickers and special teams
A purple and gold football dream!
Words and music by Bill Ebison
Copyright 1987
Kevin Costner carries Sean Young upstairs to? Costner and Gene Hackman compete for Young's favors
in "No Way Out which is now playing at Plitt Theaters.
Students don't have to be crazy to get help
By LAURA SALAZAR
SuH Wntf r
The ECU Couseling Center
isn't merely a treatment center for
the "whacked out or crazy ac-
cording to the center's director. In
fact, you might be suprised who
the center is supposed to help.
"Our image is changing said
Wilbert R. Ball, director of the
center, in an interview last week.
The center is designed to do more
than just help people with psy-
chological problems, rather, it
tries to help students relate to the
college environment, Ball said.
The following are fictional ac-
countsoftwo students'lives who
needed help from the counseling
center. Ball offered the situations
their lives are based upon merely
as examples.
Caroline was a freshman at
ECU. She received calls from
various merchants in Greenville
because she bounced four checks
worth $500. The merchants har-
assed Caroline for a week and
threatened to have her arrested
for writing bad checks.
She was scared and confused so
she decided to talk to two of her
friends, Erik and Sherry. They
were in disbelief when they
heard Caroline's story because
Caroline was a diligent business
major.
Caroline became very with-
drawn that week and did not at-
tend any of her classes. She was
too afraid and ashamed to tell her
parents because they would be
disappointed with her.
Meanwhile, Caroline's friends
made an appointment with a
counselor without telling Caro-
line about it. They asked Caroline
to go with them to the Student
Store. Caroline agreed to go, not
knowing she was going to see a
counselor at the center, located
next door to the store.
As the three approached the
center, the friends made an ex-
cuse to go to the counseling cen-
ter. Once Caroline realized what
was going on, she started crying.
Caroline's friends grabbed her by
the arm and dragged her into the
counselor's office.
Caroline told her story to
Shawn, a counselor, and released
some of the tension and anxiety of
her situation. Shawn called the
various merchants that had been
harassing Caroline and the mer-
chants were understanding.
They did not file legal action
against Caroline.
Rick was a senior majoring in
psychology. Rick had a 3.8 gpa,
lived in a fraternity house and
was a member of the Student
Government Association.
Rick enjoyed college and the
company of good friends until
one evening, when his parents
called and told him they could no
longer fund his education be-
cause they were getting divorced.
His parents told him he would
either have to quit school or fi-
nance school on his own.
School was Rick's life, and he
could not understand how his
parents could be so cruel to him.
After all, his parents were the
ones getting the divorce, why he
was being deprived of his chance
to finish his education?
Rick made an appointment
with a counselor at the center.
The counselor first talked to Rick
about the problem at home. Rick
said he could deal with the di-
vorce and that it would be for the
best because his parents fought
too much.
Rick was more concerned with
how he would finance his educa-
tion. With one year left, he did not
want to delay graduation. The
counselor pointed out that since
Rick was independent of his par-
ents, he could apply for a student
loan and other types of financial
aid such as grants and scholar-
ships.
Rick decided to move back into
the dorm, and he sold his car and
got a job to pay for school. Rick
later graduated and returned to
thank the counselor that helped
him through a rough time in his
life.
The counseling center consists
of counseling rsvrhologists,
counselors and family therapists
who have had experience with
college students. The center also
offers workshops on study skills,
developing relationships
friendships, stress and time man-
agement.
Offering counseling through
group or individual meetings,
the counseling center staff fol-
lows professional guidelines in
regards to confidentiality.
The center is located in 316
Wright Building, open Monday-
Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Appoint-
ments can be made by stopping
by the center or by calling 757-
6661.
I
.
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t





24
THE EAST CAROLINIA
AUGUST 25, 1987
Angry jury deadlocks in 'Fatal Vision' suit
LOS ANGELES (AP) � An
angrily divided jury deadlocked
Friday, forcing a mistrial in a $15
million lawsuit filed against
"Fatal Vision" author Joe McGin-
niss by his subject, convicted
murderer Jeffrey MacDonald.
Five of the six jurors in the
federal civil trial favored giving
the former Army Green Beret
doctor his fair share of royalties
from the book, which told of his
conviction in the bloody 1970
slayings of his pregnant wife and
two small daughters, the jurors
said later.
But they never voted on any of
the complicated issues in the
breach of contract suit after one
juror declared at the outset that
McGinniss should win on all
counts and refused to deliberate,
they said.
"It was five for MacDonald and
one for McGinniss. 1 was for
McGinniss said Lucille Dil-
lon, 58, a housewife from Agoura.
"There was incredible pressure
on me to conform
She said other jurors were un-
reasonably swayed by sympathy
for MacDonald and feelings that
McGinniss had been "unethical"
in his dealings with the convict.
But jury forewoman Elizabeth
Lane, 64, a retired social worker
from Claremont, said Dillion was
wrong.
'There was an enormous as-
sumption by (Dillion) that we
were in sympathy with
MacDonald and we were going
to give him the Earth Lane said.
"It wasn't true
She said the five never contem-
plated giving MacDonald any
punitive damages and would
have merely returned to him
some $90,000 in royalties which
were placed in escrow when his
Group hands out peach pits
NEW YORK (UPI) � "Sarur-
day Night Live" and the movie
"lshtar" won prizes in an awards
ceremony for programs and films
containing demeaning stere-
otvpes of racial and ethnic
groups.
The "Golden Pit Awards" were
presented at a ceremony Tuesday
to films, television programs and
commercials that "offend mil-
lions of ethnic Americans, mostly
through negative stereotyping
said William Fugazv, who heads
the National Ethnic Coalition of
Organizations. The group pre-
sented the awards.
Winners were represented at
the ceremony in New York by
white styrofoam busts. Each bust
included a peach pit dangling
trom a blue ribbon.
"They (the programs) show
blacks stealing bicycles, lews
arguing over prices, Italians in-
volved in crime and Irish drunks
in bars Fugazy said. "I think
See SATURDAY, page 26
suit was filed.
The unusual legal battle be-
tween the convicted murderer
and the author who became his
close confidant raised cjuestions
concerning freedom of expres-
sion, an author's actions toward
the subject of a book and legal
protections afforded by signed
releases.
McGinniss obtained two
signed releases from MacDonald
before "Fatal Vision" was pub-
lished in 1983. But MacDonald
contended they were invalid be-
cause he was deceived into think-
ing the book would portray him
as innocent. It concluded he was
guilty.
MacDonald, 43, convicted in
1979 of the murders of his wife,
Collette, and daughters Kimber-
ley and Kristen, at Fort Bragg,
N.C, also contended that McGin-
niss shortchanged him on his
share of profits from the book and
a TV movie made from it.
U.S. District Judge William
Rca, who flew back from a judi-
cial conference in Hawaii to deal
with the jurors, reluctantly de-
clared a mistrial after they told
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"9
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him they could go no further.
Rea said a new trial could be
scheduled in January unless the
parties settle.
Both sides claimed a victory of
sorts. McGinniss said jurors,
through their deadlock, pro-
tected a writer's freedom to tell a
story as he sees it.
"If the jury had said that writers
don't have the right to do books
as I do books, it would have been
very scary he said. "But that is
not what they said I'm happy.
To me, it's as good as a win
"The First Amendment still
lives said his lawyer, Daniel
Kornstein. "Writerscan write the
truth. Readers can read books
they want to read. The mistrial
has allowed this to continue
MacDonald's lawyer, Gary
Bostwick, said MacDonald, who
is serving three consecutive life
sentences, was "depressed that a
verdict was not reached but was
encouraged by jurors' com-
ments
"I'm extremely ecstatic that
five people looked at all the evi-
dence we presented and were
leaning in the direction of several
of our theories Bostwick said.
Later in the day, MacDonald
issued a statement from his
prison cell, expressing disap-
pointment that jurors could not
agree but saying he would wel-
come a new trial.
"We are obviously upset that
one juror was able to frustrate the
deliberative process he said.
"Preferably, I'd like to start a sec-
ond trial next week
He said he felt the majority of
jurors agreed with him on many
issues, including the obligations
of journalists in dealing with a
subject.
Lane said the five leaning to-
ward more royalties for
MacDonald felt the book contract
and legal releases given to
McGinniss were valid although
MacDonald may have been fool
ish to sign them
"I certainly think MacDonald
was deceived said lane "He
had been deceived into thinking
the book would portray him as he
wanted and it did not There was
a certain naivete there The only
sympathy I had for the man was
that he signed those contracts,
which I wouldn't have done
Authors William 1 Buckle)
and Joseph Wambaugh testified
for McGinniss and said a verdicl
for MacDonald would be a death
knell fornon-fictionin the future.
But Dillon said the others dis
missed Buckley as "an elitist" and
ignored his testimony.
"I said I thought McGinniss
was telling the trulh and this af-
fected writers and freedom of
speech she said. "But that was
put down
Back to School SALE!
IN THE WOMEN S DEPARTMENT
Casual Pants
Originally S28 $32
Denim Jeans
Originally $21 99-556
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Knit Tops
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Twill Tops
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Select Sweaters
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IN THE MEN S DEPARTMENT
Rugby Shirts $n ��
Originally $25 0 0TT
Denim Jeans $q xx
Originally $26-558 I O UlT
Denim Jackets $
Originally $40-$96
$8 off
$8off
58 off
s6off
s10 off
$10 off
'fl
10 off
�T
� �)�in�
MAURICES
Where Fashion Doesn't Cost A Fortune
.17
? -TJw
CAROLINA EAST MALL
r

MAJORING IN
PREMED?
Air Force ROTC may have
good news tor ou. You may
be eligible tor a 2- or 3-year
scholarship that covers some
college expenses and $100
per academic month Plus,
you'll receive additional help
in medical school Check it
out today
Captain Randy Houston
Wright Annex Rm. 312
757-S57
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE FOR FUN AND FOOD!
ATTIC
WED
COMEDY
ZONE
WED
COMEDY
ZONE
TUESDAY
BRUCE FRYE
And The Lonely Ryder Band
THURSDAY
AXION
Coolest Cooler Night
FRIDAY
VICTORY and TYTON
In Concert CBS Rec Artists
SATURDAY
SKIP CASTRO

� 0
JTC�W
LuomsHir Excellence Sue's Hcm
THANK YOU ECU FOR
MAKING US NO.1 FOR
THE SUMMER OF '87!
Wednesday
Champagne Night
$2.99 a Bottle
jA T hours
fuAW Open T
�JW llpmS'
u
SWed
3am Th-Sat
Corner of 5th
and Reade St
758 1857
Floats
S�
g�s
The Best
Burgers in Town.
Ask Anyone!
Soft Ice Cream
Cones
All Burgers Are 1-4 lb
Pure Beef, Ground Fresh,
Daily From Overton's.
Bring this ad for lOVt OFF
any sandwich selection I
LD
9
Itm?
Presents
Wednesday
Night
b
"The First Of Its Kind Downtown!
LADIES NIGHT
Ladies Only 8:30-10:30
Guys Admitted in at 10:30
ALL 18 YEAR OLDS ARE
WELCOME!
25 25 25
DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT
Top 40- Dance -Rock 'n Roll
i Fn31?

LL �BC Permits
DAILY LUNCHEON SPECIALS
$3.95 Mon-Fri 11am 3pm
The "Steamroller" is back by
popular demand.
Mark Johnson-Every Thursday-
beginning at 10 pm.
In the Fiesta Room. Join us for
Drinks and Appetizers. Must be 21
or older.
S2I Colanche
Gaorqtrown Shops
I ntroducl ng
NEW
752-1444
PIZZA and
m
HiirwhM
Hours: I lam Daily
Mon-Sat-Sun-4-1 am
LUNCH SPECIAL
2 Slices (I topi and 12 oz. Drink
Everyday $1.99 'til 4pm
FRI-Med. Pizza (2 top)
and Pitcher of Drink
$6.99
SAT Dollar Day
$1 Off Any Size Pizza
SUN-Buy Large 16" Pizza
Get 2 Free 16 oz. Cokes
HI 1A1T fTM tTBOT
eananiu, i.e. ms
(tit) 7M-IU4
AUG 29th
THE HEA TERS
Open 7 Nights A Week!
MEMBERSHIP SPECIAL
Ladies $2.00
Gents $5.00
SL
Sports
LIVE THE
EXPERIENCE
POOL-DARTSFOOD
ROCK 'N ROLL
11 AM Until
Downtown Greenville
757 3658
Voted No 1
Hamburger
In Pitt County
Philiy Cheesesteaks
Shrimp Burgers
Hof Dogs
and more
Do�ni��m . 7�,j � '
&&&&
BACK TO SCHOOl P,R1
ALL WEEK LONG!
Tall C ans and Coolers
f? All Night
Eser Night'
Fri. 4-1 VRH lm
FOR All !
Sun. LADIES FRH
Every Tuesday Ls
College Night
7 p.mII p m
99 SUBS
your Choice of
Ptvccrow. Salami a OttCK
Turko a Ckcnt
Hani. Tuko a Ownc
Hun a Om
Botocnt a Ok��c
Ham. Salami m Chcnr
oi Valid On Drlivenrs
60 Oz. Pitchers $1.99
II a mil p m
215 E. 4th S
�"2-2183
Unbelievable
Shakes
C)in
2 FOR 1
Hawaiian Shake
0tlM(
2 FOR 1
Cookie Shake
P-mra
vkjHtQ 2 FOR 1
E�iieve-lt-Or-Nol Burger
��
vjftqutt
2FOR1
�rownie Bottom Wonder
�(n(jniaj 2 FOR 1
Yogurt Split
' 2FOH1
As you Likewlch
"Omr
VjUlti
2FOR1
Yogurt Pies
ll
II
ff
I
f j
J
I
I
I j
I
I
I
� 20 TOPPINGS AVAILA-
DAILY
� WAFFLE CONES
�SUNDAES'SHAKES
i Mrkviii 2 FOR 1 SERV
! Large 9 oi
Exc
ouor o'pt1tarouj bee ts'e � I As A Hofr
its te G-Exp 'es ! I Not tc bem rk!it 15 87 come ned wrtfi -e
-
If. Ge ' tree
� � �
tost lO CQi sonctw
- ps II IS83
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.J





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
sion' suit
AUGUST 25, 1987
25
urors com-
1 ecstatic that
d at all the evi-
InU'd and were
turn of several
; stwick Mid
MacDonald
it from his
ressing disap-
d not
he would wel-
pset that
to frustrate the
� ss he said
start a sec
the majority of
h him on many
; itions
with a
tor
n tract
and legal releases given to
McCinniss were valid although
MacDonald may have been fool-
ish to sign them
"I certainly think MacDonald
was deceived said Lane. "He
had been deceived into thinking
the book would portray him as he
wanted and it did not. There was
a certain naivete there. The only
sympathy I had for the man was
that he signed those contracts,
which I wouldn't have done
Authors William F. Buckley
and loseph vVambaugh testified
tor McCinniss and said a verdict
tor MacDonald would be a death
knell tor non fiction in the future.
But Dillon said the others dis-
missed Buckley as "an elitist" and
ignored his testimony.
"1 said 1 thought McCinniss
was telling the truth and this af-
fected writers and freedom of
speech she said. "But that was
put down
rf-
-3JtOUSk
EAST MALL
N AND FOOD!
- oTerJTToTI
- Hamburger
-jn Pitt County
? Philly Cheesesteaks
.Shrimp Burgers
m� Hot Dogs
and more
BA K. TO si HOOl PARTY
M L WEEK LONG!
Tall C an and,oler
.65 All Night
tvers Nigh
firi 4-1 FREE -dm.
FOR Al I !
Sun I ADIfcS FREE
LMI � lirtteil.
"V
.�SUBSTflTIDij
F.ver Tuesday h
College Night
" p.mII p.m.
99CSLBS
nur C hotce nf
NpMH Saiarr A Occur
ic m. Ltwnr
Hut l-rfcc. 4 1 Oeew
Hut C he
fkwojru A ncesc
Ham. Saim CUcor
Sor Valid On Dtinene
i. PltcfcersSl.99
11 a mll p m
215 E 4th Si
T5I-21I3
Unbelievable
Shakes
jdqirt
Low Cat. Delights
2F0R1
Hawaiian Shake
Paoava mice T.�ed with pineapple iu�ce
ona hatf banana and vanilla yogurt
Expires II 15-87
0�is lam
2 FOR 1
Cookie Shake
Choice ol yogurt blended with vour tavorite
cookie No cookie monsters please'
Expires 11-15-87
HPfJ 2 FOR 1
Believe-it-Or-Not Burger
31 yogurt vedoed between
�e fres' pound cake you we
'npa w,th not fudge and
� ASYOU LIKEIT
AND-CAFE
As You Like It
Specialities
OPENING FIRST WEEK IN
SEPTEMBER!
Finally It's O.K. To Give In!
2for1 coupon specials
(fMllt4
2FOR1
Expires II 15-87

B? 2FOR1
B'ownie Bottom Wonder
Frsn homemade twownte covered wt
-�nitta yOQUfl lopped tth hot fudge and
Expires 11-15-87
vtflqMttf) 2 FOR 1
Yogurt Split
0e oanana accompanied by chocolate
� cin.iLa and strawberry yogurt cnoce of two
toppings ana nuts over whipped cream
�0! sokJ lo Tech Fans'
Expires 11 15-87
9y Ukmwlt
vogui n your choice Between two
:hocoiate chip cookies
Expires 11-15-87.
2FOR1
Yogurt Pies
rot" M eate your ow" pe using up
1 r: "s are as twh flavors o
a . � i Have tun'
Expires 11 15-87
M � 2FOR1
Belgian Waffle
Crap ho! ana defcoexjs watte lopped wit
vanilta yogurt and your setectior ol iwr
!r�sh !nR OehciOiS
Expires l l 15 87
�zporT"
Hot Fudge Mundae
Same as a Hoi Fudge Sundae Put a da,
later Vanilta or chocolate yogurt smome'eo
with hot tudge nuts and whipped cream
Definitely not Mundane
Expires 11-15-87
Vujfkjviita)
2F0R1
Fruit Blender
Your choice al yogurt with two fresh fruits
blended m
Expires I I-15-87
v0qjrt
2FOR1
Tornado
9 02 o' yogurt with 2 toppings btendec;
Expires 11-15 87
Incredible
Crepes
joqnl
� AS � YOU � LIKE � IT
�TW
r- IM
SS 2FOR1
Aerobic Shake
Van yogurt granola and your choice ot
fresh Irmt yxjorously blended to a smooth
nch consistancv
Expires 11-15-87
"�"2" or
Low Cal. Californian
Three layers of yogurt your chowe
separated by any re fresh fruit toppmc.
(Sometimes tts is caftan a Partmll
Expires 11 15-87
Waffle Cones
Momenle waftv "me n ,o(Jinoi�
yogurt
Expires 11-15 87
(f)(Ml
" " 2 FOR 1
Waffle Cone Mundae
vour choice of yog-j " �. I -
Expires 11 15 87
�$ 2FQR1
Chocolaters Dream
Homemade - 'epe
and your c.hoe � Nm ho MM r.
W't" �vn.pped raajT
Expires 11 15 87
ifi(jli!
� 2 FOR 1
Old Fashioned
jfkjirn
2FOR1
Pineapple Delight Crepe
Creamy yantaa yogurt roftad i a treshty
made crepe topped with your cho�.e of
frurt
Expires l I 15 87
Homemade ���;� �-
smothered wtt- hoi Nidgi '�
whipped cream
Expires 11 15 87
"mj"�S"7f"0R7
Bananas and Berries
Hart oanana apM �
�-&e 'th rour choice of .
�strawher-�sar.a�uer� .
Expires II 15 87
fknl(
2FOR1
'
n
'A JU
iSW
f)qiil�
Yogurt -AS-YOU-LIKE-IT- ingredients are pure. The finest anywhere. France produces,
the best strawberry flavor, so that's where we buy it. Every flavor from vanilla to
chocolate to pina colada passes the same test before we will put our name on it.
Our yogurt is completely all natural. We add no preservatives and never will. Our
yogurt is sold by weight, for example our small is 5 oz. and is priced competively with
other frozen desserts in the area.
FROZEN YOGURT IN COMPARISON TO ICE CREAM 4 Oz. Serving
Frozen Yogurt 136 Calories ,3 Fat
Baskins Robbins 240 Calories 12 Fat
Hagen Das 290 Calories ir Fat
fHW I eV�9l "de' with rocyn
p-neaODK" � 3t 2 'van i was P �
Expires 11 15 87
� . S 2 FOR 1
Blueberry Blast
Blueberry or vanilla f-xjurt wf-
bkjeoernes Wended n s A tou
ccncoctxxi wilt cure yQtf rn.K'
Expires 11-15-87

� 20 TOPPINGS AVAILABLE
DAILY
� WAFFLE CONES
�SUNDAES-SHAKES
2FOR1
vp�t 2 FOR l SERVINGS
Kiddie 312 oz.
Expires ll 15-87
WINTER
WARMUP
SPECIALS
Plus
�6DAJLYFUVORS
�FRESH FRUIT CREPES
�WAFFLES-PIES
I MOqMtt 2 FOR i SERVINGS I
Large
. 9oz.
vqMrt2 FOR 1 SERVINGS!
Super 13oz.
� SERVINGS! rt 2 FOR 1 SERVINGS!
27 oz I Small5 oz.
! Giant.
V0qH2 FOR 1 SERVINGS
Regular 7oz.
Expires 11 15-87
Expires 11-15-87
Expires 11 15-87
Expires 11-15-87.
Expires 11-15 87
.1 I
Buy 1 Get 1 Free
8 or Fresh Ground Beef Burger
Guoronteed Good As A Home-
Cooked,
Outside Grill Burger' )5jnt�J
Expires 11 15-87 'J'L
(Not to be combined with other
offers.)
I
Buy 1 Get 1 Free .
! Charbroiled Chicken Filet (Fantastic
EAST CAROLINA: YOU'RE NOT GOING TO
BELIEVE OUR SANDWICHES!
Take Advantage of These 2 For 1 Coupons and Check Us Out!
xjOquit
Buy 1 Get 1 Free
Ham Sandwich
(You won't find a thicker ham
sandwich in the state.)
Expires 11-15-87
I
)0(irt
Buy 1 Get 1 Free msem
Philly Steak Sandwich
(We use a choice charbroiled
ribeye.)
Expires 11-15-87
0qrt�
Buy 1 Get 1 Free i-xxz
Roast Beef Sub
(You'll have to go to NY. to find
one like this.)
Buy 1 Get 1 Free Hi
Turkey Sandwich
(Only prime catering quality breast
of turkey.)
Expires II-15-87.
Sft,lv
Buy 1 Get 1 Free
6 oz. Fresh Ground Btef Burger
Guaranteed Good As A Home
Cooked,
Outside Grill Burger1
Expires 11)5-87.
(Not to be combined with other
offers.)
j tasting lo-cal sondwich.) xl0QNjrt
Expires 1 r-15-87. ,Ti
Being a fast food customer for years has always brought the same question to mind. Why doesn't
anyone make a real hamburger! You know the kind I'm talking about, fresh 100 ground beef,
hand packed at about 1-2 pound, then cooked on a hot charcoal grill. This is the kind of food you
can expect from us! We guarantee your satisfaction. We are trying to set new standards for fast
food!
Buy 1 Get 1 Free
Salad Bar
Expires 11-15-87
' I
I
Waffle
Cones
)5qnt
� AS � YOU � LIKE � IT �
264 BYPASS - AT THE PLAZA
355-6809
(Drive-Thru located on side.)
As You
Likewich
.i ����������
� � � paai�aan��ja.afc.
� O � -I � �l !� � �

s





26
Tt IE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25,1987
'

i
x
BLOOM COUNTY
p&mjm lust
WC� ANP UNNATURAL
BUSINESS SATAN'S
WORK
WHAT, (JH,
exactly
IS IT
NOT SURE. MORAL
eta saip that if eop hap
iheant for there to be
penmn i.ir, he woupnt
hm maps aprm unp eve,
evrmmeK, penny anp
POPPY THE PEN WIN
by Berke Breathed
Thus menewisT star onme
CWNOELISTC HORUON HAP
Mkznep the xvHfiERNo
, popvLAce tv -me mm At
t menace in their mipst.
vCcN MMPH
ANY 6RBIPH
�2 lag - faa
j.
,
j
V
rx
lttf Ml
7H5GTS ONE ' ft
peN&oN lust mtmmrm. i
A WA PPL I NO AFFRONT
70 bOP ORAL 3IU
ANP TRAPIT10NAL
. AMERICAN FAMILY
&k VALVES "
k

HJ
��� APPARemt
�js, moor OF
C me cioser
mho ' HAS eveypNC
oone wrs rs m
Bern peRsecump
mm all sipes
�n HOT SAFl ' TDPAY, I
was pssjursr ay j &wc
of mfb smmmo insipek
papers saip i am
LeAPINb AH 1mOPAL
LIFESTYLE ' WHAT CAN
e Nerr "
CAW
T
yc
W fiHRLEY ?
on fie half ci I brother cpx:$ m
me zoting nu know mm you havf
mmrrroF comittep f
TS FMI
ne library
myye rcvokep
YOlR CARP
O
OH.
NO
V
�35K2
1-
J
, fht me &&le cowmnps
I us to hate me sin avp
love me sinner ahp
ans we m. po
LOVE YOU ' . is
r
mANKS
It I
WWE" PRICI5EIY,
we p tove )vv
to move Oirr

'X
)
I
bii
v a
'Saturday Night Live' receives Platinum Pit award
rn�t:j c.
Continued from page 24
that's stereotyping we've got to
get away from
"Saturday Night Live" won the
special "Platinum Tit Award" �
apit coated with metallic paint
� for its comedy skit, "Ching
Chang depicting a Chinese
store owner and his family.
ABC's "Whose the Boss?
featuring Tony Danza as an Ital-
ian housekeeper; a sitcom with a
black female ex-convict; and
NBC's "The Tortellis depicting
"a crude Italian husband and an
acid-tongued and vulgar Italian
wife also won prizes for nega-
tive stereotypes, the group said.
The film "Ishtar starring
Dustin Hoffman and Warren
Beatty, 'lampooned the highly
sacred pilgrimage to Mecca,
thereby offending many Arab-
Americans Fugazy said.
welcomes you back to ECU
Tuesday - Thursday 9:00 'til 2:00 a.m.
AH Tall Cans and Coolers 65C
ALL NITE
The Best in Rock, Dance, and Top 40
ALL NITE LONG
Free Admission 'til 10:30 p.m.
Friday, 4:00 'til 7:00 FREE Admission
for all!
65C Tall Cans and Coolers
and Rock n' Roll All Afternoon!
Coming in October, the ELBO
will
become a Private Club!
Grand Opening $1.00 Drink Specials
Every Nite!
Memberships on sale now for $2.00.
k
Two great ways to cruise through the semester.
I
The hand on the left is poised on what a )uid fxj the most essential part
of your education.
A Macintosh computer.
.And the hand on the right is gripping pure, simple, unadulter-
ated fun.
A Honda Scooter. One we're giving away.
All you have to do for a chance to drive it away is visit your campus
computer center and fill out an entry form. While you're there, take a
Macintosh for a test drive.
Because Macintosh can help you write term papers, categorize
elements of the periodic table, plot the rise and fall of park-belly
prices, compile computer code, and talk to other computers.
.And the first 250 people on campus who get behind a mouse, so
to speak, will receive a free Apple memo board.
So head over to vour campus computer center today. And ask
about our Student Financing Program.
Who knows? bu may soon find yourself cruising a little farther
than you expected.
�&&
y.w
� � V � �� �
A Test drive a Macintosh. You may ride away on a Honda Scooter.
STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
Owned & Operated by East Carolina Univ . sity
Genwrearicttorowyourcai OrwfrwH.HidiEl.ie" WSaxwillhewanledprfparticngxi iqKi�laudtiK�lfaufa �edbieio�in -w mm, � jerx-nd
onsKrfschoolandnumbcrofcontes.entrants.Nopurchasenecessan �"V�f �'ll' "TT � if " ' ' " TQMI l Ulid�t.fifrh1
HMD
om
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trui
wn
i


Divers fj
YORK
News Bur
from th.
an unusual
under
as a sun . �
workh, p for d
Car Una
Th, � �
tors in ti
and Und -
sch(�! spenl
va. rhe)
British mercha
deliberai .
River at � ,
bonary War
In 1781 the British am
fxird( ishad retreat
Yorktown to mo tthel ritisl
offshore But
French and .
blocked the rr
British fleet.
rounded and
dered the -
ships in th
obstruction-
the French .
Following the
Cornwalhs, the
were turned on
who refloatcxl m
those left on the bott
ships were found in a
vey, and one I l
lected for one ol tl
archaelolgical
made.
The excavati n p
unusual becau I
shipwreck, somt 1
shore from York-
toric battle I
enclosed by a col
pumps and a water filtral
tern keeps the water insidi
coftedam relati.
almost perfect envii
shipwreck si
"Itisa ver � 'tunit
for the students, sai I
Watts, an under ater archai
gist and the director of th I
school.
"Mostarchaeology pi ;ar
surveys done in
and )ust looking .1
to identify them
"Few people h
id
to ti
1 n 1. ni
find
piece
,Pp
nity to get tppenaxe m vxctvat- Asi
FAMI

500 W Greenville Blvd.
"We'r
part t
studentl
ECU Students
LUNCH
A
$3.89
(wDiscount
$3.50)
Help Yo
C
ALL
T
One Low
Entrees �
Veget
Great Food With
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1987
27
you back to ECU
9:00 'til 2:00 a.m.
d Coolers 65C
ITE
'ance, and Top 40
I LONG
til 10:30 p.m.
FREE Admission
HI!
and Coolers
Ml Afternoon!
er, the ELBO
II
vate Club!
)0 Drink Specials
site!
lie now for $2.00.
semester.
M
: x )ter.
HONDA.
jdetiuri 11 Hi wxti

Divers from ECU find Elvis in sunken ship
YORKTOWN, VA. (ECU
News Bureau) - - A shipwreck
from the Revolutionary War and
an unusual diving pool built for
underwater archaeology served
as a summer classroom and
workshop for divers from East
Carolina University.
The students and their instruc-
tors in the ECU Maritime History
and Underwater Research Field
school spent July in Yorktown,
VA. They helped to excavate a
British merchant ship that was
deliberately sunk in the York
River at the close of the Revolu-
tionary War.
In 1781 the British armv under
Lord Cornwallis had retreated to
Yorktown to meet the British fleet
offshore. But a blockade of
French and American ships
blocked the movement oi the
British fleet. Cornwallis, sur-
rounded and under siege, or-
dered the sinking of dozens of
ships in the harbor to serve as
obstructions to a rear attack by
the French vessels.
Following the surrender of
Cornwallis, the scuttled ships
were turned over to the French
who refloated many of them. Of
those left on the bottom, nine
ships were found in a 1978 sur-
vey, and one of them was se-
lected for one (if the most unusual
archaelolgkal excavations ever
made.
The excavation project is
unusual because the site of the
shipwreck, some 100 yards off-
shore from Yorktown and it his-
toric battlefield, is completely
enclosed bv a cofferdam. Large
pumps and a water filtration sys-
tem keeps the water inside the
coffedam relatively clear. It is an
almost perfect environment for
shipwreck study.
'it is a very unique opportunity
for the students said Gordon
Watts, an underwater archaeolo-
gist and the director of the field
school.
"Most archaeology projects are
surveys done in finding ships
and just looking at them enough
to identify them Watts said.
"Few people have the opportu-
nity to get axperjeixein excavat-
ing a shipwreck because there are
so few shipwreck excavations
being done
The ship is a two-masted brig,
75-fect long with a 23-foot beam.
It rested upright in about 25 feet
of water. When the water in the
cofferdam was at its best it was
possible to see the divers and the
outline of the hip from the sur-
face. About eight to 10 feet of
visibility was average. In the
sunlight the 97-by-45 foot coffer-
dam resembled a bright green
pool in a muddy brown river.
Working in teams of five the
students and archaeologist wore
either scuba cylinders of com-
pressed air on their backs or used
hookah masks connected to sur-
face air pumps by long yellow
hoses. In excavating the wreck,
they carefully removed the mud
that has covered the hull of the
vessel for the past 200 years. This
mud has helped keep the vessel
in relatively good shape.
Loose pieces of planking were
carefully removed and hauled to
the surface where they were
photographed and sketched. The
pieces were then returned to a
pile of wood at the bottom in a
comer of the dam. These wood
artifacts had to be kept sub-
merged or they would quickly
dry and crumble into dust.
Other artifacts such as metal
and ceramics were also recovered
from the ship and catalogued.
Some of the artifacts that were
recovered include parts of the
ship's rigging, eating utensils, an
intact wine bottle and fragments
of other bottles. A wooden box
and pieces of leather were also
revovered.
Atypical of most artifacts at the
site, an unbroken drinking glass
was retrieved from about two feet
down in the mud that covered a
portion of the wreck. Inscribed
on the glass was the name and
figure of Elvis Presley.
More in keeping with the 1781
time period wasan unusual small
piece of lead shaped like a bottle
cork and covered with inscrip-
tions and symbols. No one has
identified this artifact.
Aside from the artifacts, the
real value in the excavation was
learning about the ship itself.
'These were merchant ships
and very little is known about
them said Watts. "We know
about warships of the period but
the documentation just doesn't
exist on the merchant vessels.
That makes these ships more
valuable historically he said.
"In terms of what we know
about ships, a vessel such as this
is extremely important
Clues to the vessel's origin and
type became known almost as
slowly as the mud was cleared
from the ship's interior.
"We've excavated enough to
know that it had a very boxy
shaped hull with unusual bow
and stern construction said
John Broad water, Virginia un-
derwater archaeologist and the
director of the Yorktown Ship-
wreck Project.
He said the evidence indicated
the ship was intended for the east
coast coal trade. This type of ves-
sel was called a collier.
Broadwater said that in the
stern of the vessel they found
enough furniture and furniture
items to know the captain had a
fairly comfortable place to live.
There was raised paneling on the
walls and there were brass coat
hooks. Parts to a unique china
cabinet were also found. It had
scalloped shelves with cutouts
for the dishes to fit into so that
they would be displayed but
wouldn't fall out when the ship
rolled about in the sea.
He said most of the artifacts are
in conservation treatment or in
storage.
"We are trying to find a way to
get an exhibit set up he said.
"We hope to have a fairly signifi-
cant exhibit on the materials
Broadwater said the five-year
excavation of the ship's interior is
scheduled to be completed next
fall and hs is unsure of what will
happen to the site once the work
there is ended. He says the vessel
may be raised and placed in a
museum.
"People are talking about that
now but I don't know how far it
will go he said.
He said the hull of the ship, the
part that is deeply buried, is in
good, solid shape and could be
raised with conventional means.
The Yortown Shipwreck Proj-
ect is financed through the Na-
tional Endowment for the Hu-
manities and is run by the Vir-
ginia Division of Historic Land-
marks.
ECU students working at the
site were: Patricia Knoll of Ca-
tonsville, Md Mames Stephen
Schmidt of Towson, Md Lynn
Harris of Capetown, South Af-
rica; Jonathan W. Bream of Car-
lisle, Pa Claude Jackson of
Springfield, 111 Hugh Palmer of
Hickory, N.C; Glenn Overton of
Charlotte and Joe Friday of Gas-
tonia.
"Everything has been going
exceptionally well Watts said.
He said the students were pre-
pared in advance for the kinds of
things they were doing at York-
town by working on a model of a
shipwreck in a diving tank in the
campus swimming pool.
Watts and his students at ECU
have assisted Virginia archaelol-
gists at the Yorktown site since
1982 when the cofferdam was
built. This was the first year the
annual summer field school, a
six-week course in the Depart-
ment of History's Maritime His-
tory and Underwater Research
program, has worked at the site.
Previous field schools have
been conducted in the rivers and
sounds of North Carolina. In 1986
the field school participants did
preliminary survey work at
Roanoke Island, N.C, examing a
theory that a settlement site and
the cultural materials associated
with the first English colony in
America is submerged in
Roanoke Sound.
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GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
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SOCCER COACHES NEEDED
The Greenville Recreation and Parks Department is
recruiting for 10-14 part-time soccer coaches for the
fall soccer program. Applicants must possess some
knowledge in soccer skills and have patience to
work with youth. Applicants must be able to coach
young people, ages 6-15 in soccer fundamentals.
Hours approximately 3-7 p.m. Monday thru Friday.
Some night and weekend coaching. Program will
extend from September 8 to mid November. Salary
rate is $3.46 per hour. Applicants will be accepted
starting August 20. Contact Ben James at
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New Bern
"We're doing our
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ECU Students Get 10 Off With I.D.
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A
J





28
TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25,1967
V
'Free Flicks'
shown at Hendrix
The ECU Student Union will be screening "Free Flicks" at Hendrix
Theater this semester.
Ad mission is tree to ECU students and one guest each with a valid
ECU IP. Faculty and staff will be admitted with a 1987 Fall Semester
Film Pass. The movies are not open to the public.
All shows begin at 8 p.m. except for late shows (11 p.m.).
Aug. 2h Clockwise
Aug Jumpin' Jack Flash
Native Son
Otello
9 1II Weeks
LOUSY MOVIE LOCK-IN�
Radio Days
The Color of Money
Australian Double Feature:
Man of Flowers
Starstruck
Mosquito Coast
Cars That Ate Paris
(Late Show)
Children of a Lesser God
The Moming After
Folice
Peggy Sue Got Married
The Mission
Caravaggio
No Mercy
Kovannisqatsi
The Fly
Frankenstein
(Late Show)
Western Double Feature:
Shane
McCabe and Mrs. Miller
Crimes of the Heart
Sherman's March
Platoon
Erendira
Star Trek IV
Round Midnight
(Late Show)
Name of the Rose
Mannequin
Raising Arizona
Outrageous Fortune
1 ho Lousy Movie Lock-In screens at 2 p.m Sept 13. You pay $3 to
get in. It you leave after the first movie, you get $1 back. After the
second movie, you get $2 back. If you stay through the whole show,
you got your $3 back and a T-shirt proclaiming, "I Survied the Lousy
Movie Lock-In
The throe movies are: "Invasion of the Bee Girls "Sex Madness
.md "They Saved Hitler's Brain
Sept
Sopt. 9
Sopt. Ill-13
Sopt. 13
Sept. lo
Sept. 17-20
Sept.23
Sept.24-27
Sept25-26
Sept.30
Oct.1-4
Oct.�
Oct.8-11
Oct.14
Oct.21
Oct.22 �
Oct.28
Oct29-No
Oct30-31
Nov4
Nov.6-8
Nov.11
Nov.12 15
No18
Nk�19 22
Nov.20 21
Dec.�)
Dec3-6
Decg
Dec.10-13
People flock to to small N.C. town to see demon in church
LAURTNGURG, N.C, (AP) �
At first, the Rev. David Looper
ignored the image � which some
people say looks like a devil �
that appeared in his church win-
dow.
But he couldn't ignore the
crowds � thousands, he says �
who two weeks ago began flock-
ing to the little concrete-block
church on the fringes of this Scot
land County town for a look.
Looper, 46, minister of the
True Apostolic Deliverance Cen-
ter, had a phenomenon on his
hands � one big enough to in-
spire mystical tales and crowd
control. It makes this small-town
preacher wonder whether God is
sending celestial semaphore.
"Many people are looking on it
as a sign he said.
The fuss is over a ghostly,
opaque circle � something like
condensed moisture � that
formed between two layers of
glass in a church window after a
revival a month ago.
Viewed in certian light from a
certain angle, it took on its shape
with three clear holes, something
like two eyes and a mouth. And it
has two pointed appendages at
its top.
"As to what the image is, it's up
to you said Looper, who makes
noclaimsabout it. "Lotsof people
say it's in the shape of a demon
because it's got the horns. And
then some say it's a dove. And
I've had some people say when
you look at it from the outside, it
looks like a cat or a gorilla
The image quickly became the
hottest attraction in town.
"You had a lot of people com-
ing out of curiosity, and a lot of
people who wanted to see if it
was the end of the world or a
message from God said Gerald-
ine Looper, the pastor's wife.
"People want something to
believe in Mrs. Looper said.
The sheriff's department esti-
mated that 500 to 600 people a
day visited the church earlier this
week, making narrow McGirt's
Bridge Road hazardous. A car
Tuesday hit and slightly injured a
6-year-old boy.
'That's what really fbrought it
t�� peak�id?Chi�fe��pwty �
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Chip Murphy. "I couldn't see
anybody getting hurt over fool-
ishness like that
The next day, Wednesday,
Looper removed the 3-foot
square window.
He showed it to a reporter from
the Charlotte Observer on condi-
tion that the newspaper not re-
veal its whereabouts.
"I just come by to get a look at
the hearsay Linwood Calhoun,
31, said after he drove into the
trampled churchyard Thursday.
"It's the talk. People are, well,
fascinated. A small town like this,
you know what I'm saying
Looper said he's not sure why
an image would visit his 50-
member congregation, which
believes in prayer to drive de-
mons from the afflicted. But he
noted that the church was packed
for Tuesday night's services.
"It's been a plus for the church,
definitely he said.
Is it a sign? Or is it a case for
Windex?
"It didn't look like nothing to
31
me, but there's a lot of Christian
people around, and they going to
see what they going to see said
Leo Mclnnis, 27, whose grand-
mother lives next door. "But I
believe in logic, and logic tells me
that if it was inside the window, it
would have to come out
Other preachers disdained the
image, Looper said, but he be-
lieves it was out of jealousy.
Meanwhile, the window be-
came folklore. Stories about its
creation and purported healing
powers abound.
Next-door neighbor Cora
McNeil, a 91-year-old Baptist
who doesn't put much stock in
the stories, heard a cripple threw
away his crutches before the
window.
"I recon it took the meanessout
of him she said. "It took that old
Satan right of him"
Geneva Henegan, wife of the
church's assistant pastor, said
she's heard similar stories. And
she notes, since the apparition
appeared, her rheumatoid arthri-
tis has eased.
"There's something weird
going on here she said. "It
didn't just jump in there
r boos
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25, 1987 29
ulemon in church
doesn t put much stock in
itories, heard a cripple threw
iwa) his crutches before the
low
econ it took the meanessout
of him she said. "It took that old
Satan right ot him
eva 1 lenegan, wife of the
- assistant pastor, said
ard similar stories. And
notes since the apparition
eared her rheumatoid arthri-
ised
something weird
she said "It
ip in there
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30
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 23 1987
Eastern NC makes plans to avoid grim future
(AP) Eastern North Carolina sions or openings said losenh r i, �u
must look to tnuricm mtin. i��f�- B�. sia josepn e. plane with two engines in vears. 34 rvrrpm of thP rom-c v .L .
(AP) Eastern North Carolina
must look to tourism, retirees and
education it it hopes to avoid the
grim future predicted .in analysis
that projects how the area will
change in the next 20 to 30 years.
1 hf critical issue is where do
we go from here said R. Lee
Youngblood, chairman of eco-
nomic development for the East-
ern North Carolina Chamber of
('omrrM rce. 1 his is the first real
broad approach to the problems
we lace.
Possible solutions offered bv
the analysis included a bigger
push to promote tourism in the
region more careful targeting of
advertising to stretch industrial
recruitment dollars; attracting
more retirees because they don't
puta strain on resources or social
I rogi ams;and searching for new
ways to educate the labor force.
Among the problems the
region's 2 million residents must
�ope with during the next two
decades arc declining farm in-
come, migration out oi the re-
gion a drop in the region's al-
ready low per-capita income and
a lack ol industrial plant expan-
sions or openings, said Joseph C
Jeffcoat, consumer products
manager and head of research for
the Branch Bankingand Trust Co.
of Wilson.
jeffcoat and other BB&T staff
members spent about three
moths drawing a statistical pic-
ture of the 43-county region for
the chamber, the News and Ob-
server of Raleigh reported.
Chamber officers and BB&T
staffers presented the analysis to
more than 100 government offi-
cials and business leaders Thurs-
day at the chamber's Special Eco-
nomic Development Conference.
L. Vincent Lowe, BB&T's chief
executive officer, likened the
region's situation to thatof a four-
engine plane that had lost two
engines to fire and had a third
engine burning.
The pilot emerged from the
cockpit and walked into the pas-
senger compartment wearing a
parachute. "As he opened the
door of the plane, he said, 'Don't
anyone panic, I'm going for
help Lowe said.
"Eastern North Carolina, to-
day, is very much thesameas that
I
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plane with two engines in
trouble Lowe said. "I think
you'll all agree that (the) presen-
tation presents a pretty grim view
of the future of eastern North
Carolina
Eight work groups discussed
potential solutions to the litany of
pressing problems ranging from
the decline of farm income to the
outward migration from the re-
gion.
Historically, eastern North
Carolina has been a farm-rich
region, but within the past 15
years, 34 percent of the region's
farmers had to supplement their
livelihood with non-farm jobs.
The analysis said half of the
North Carolina counties desig-
nated as economically "dis-
tressed" by the state � a determi-
nation made by comparing un-
employment rates and per-capita
income � are in the region. They
include Bladcn, Brunswick, Co-
lumbus, Halifax, Hyde,
Northampton, Tender, Robeson,
Sampson and Warren counties.
Jeffcoat said the region also is
hampered by the large numbers
of adults without high school
diplomas, he said 44.5 percent of
the region's residents 25 or older
do not have high school diplo-
mas.
And the statistical analysis
shows that some counties in the
region will actually lose popula-
tion in the coming years, jeffcoat
said those counties wil end up
with a smaller tax base and little
to offer new industries or busi-
nesses.
Jeffcoat and his staff assigned
the 43 counties a numerical rank-
ing from one to six, with six the
highest rating, by comparing
county figures with state
averages in six categories �
population growth, number of
high school graduates number of
new employees, new invest-
ments, unemployment rates and
per-capita income. Only one
county scored a six � Wake.
No county scored a five, and
only Johnson and Craven scored
a four. All the others scored a
three or lower
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Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd
Op�n 24 Hoors-Op�n Mon. 7 a.m Closed Sat. 11 p.m Open Sun 7 am -11 p.m.
, j . ���� : �
��.i m�mimiwiim
i
i
.
aBF ap
'Dream'
starts series
Marcel Marceau is to perform
in Wright Auditorium as an
added attraction in the 1987 "v
ConcertTheater Series
The series offers a variety ot
on-campus entertainment to
students, faculty and the
general public A Shakespeare
play, chamber music perform-
ances and the N.C. Symphom
Orchestra are some : the events
comming to Hendrix Theater
and Wright Auditorium this
school year.
"We're offering what orth
Carolina is doing in the arts
said Marketing Director Stuart
Sect tor.
The first event of the series
Shakespeare's A Midsummer
Night s Dream will take the
Wright Auditorium stage Sept
23. the North Carolina
Shakespeare Festival will
perform the romantic coined)
set in ancient Greece.
The series is divided into
three categories, the Artists
Series, the Chamber Musk
Series and the Theater Arts Se-
ries.
Season tickets are on sale now
at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center
and special 'Tick our Ow n
series are available Young
people and ECL' students
faculty and staff receive special
discounts on all show and
season tickers.
v


A





30
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25,1987

.1
Eastern NC makes plans to avoid grim future
(AP)�Eastern North Carolina sionsorn.vnin� oiuur . .
(AD Eastern North Carolina
must look to tourism, retirees and
education it it hopes to avoid the
grim future predicted an analysis
thai projects how the area will
change in the next 20 to 30 years.
The critical issue is where do
we go from here said R. Lee
Youngblood, chairman of eco-
momic development for the East-
ern North Carolina Chamber of
'ommcrcc. "This is the first real
sions or openings, said Joseph C
Jcffcoat, consumer products
manager and head of research for
the Branch Banking and Trust Co.
of Wilson.
Jcffcoat and other BB&T staff
members spent about three
moths drawing a statistical Dic-
ture of the 43-county region'for
the chamber, the News and Ob-
server of Raleigh reported.
Chamber officers and BB&T
road approach to the problems staffers presented the analysis to
we fact
Possible solutions offered bv
the analysis included a bigger
push to promote tounsm in the
region; more careful targeting of
advertising to stretch industrial
recruitment dollars; attracting
more retirees because thev don't
put a strain on resources or social
program and searching for new
ways to educate the labor force.
Among the problems the
region's 2 million residents must
vope with during the next two
decades are declining farm in-
come, migration out oi the re-
gion a drop in the region's al-
read) low per-capita income and
i lack et industrial plant expan-
more than 100 government offi-
cials and business leaders Thurs-
day at the chamber's Special Eco-
nomic Development Conference.
L. Vincent Lowe, BB&T's chief
executive officer, likened the
region's situation to that of a four-
engine plane that had lost two
engines to fire and had a third
engine burning.
The pilot emerged from the
cockpit and walked into the pas-
senger compartment wearing a
parachute. "As he opened the
door of the plane, he said, 'Don't
anyone panic, I'm going for
help Lowe said.
'Eastern North Carolina, to-
day, is very much the same as that
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Featuring Authentic Tex-Mex
and American Food
�C Spanish Rice
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i( Fajitas
�C Texas Chile
Cincinnati Chile
M Tacos
�C Burritos
t. Enchiladas
� Chimichangas
Also Serving:
(Spicy Chile Sauce Over Spaghetti Noodles)
Call 758-0911
for prompt
carry-out
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THIS AD! '
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� INSTANT REPLAY
� One Hour Color Prints
� One Hour Enlargements
� Overnight Block and White and Slides
� Overnight Portraits
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The Plaza
355-5050
10 Discount to Students
with ECU I.D.
E�cludin9 Camera and Ovttofc Work)
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plane with two engines in years, 34 percent of the region's
trouble Lowe said. "I think farmers had to supplement their
you II all agree that (the) presen- livelihood with non-farm jobs
tation presents a pretty grim view The analysis said half of the
of the future of eastern North North Carolina counties desig-
Carolina
Eight work groups discussed
potential solutions to tl ie litany of
pressing problems ranging from
the decline of farm income to the
outward migration from the re-
gion.
Historically, eastern North
Carolina has been a farm-rich
region, but within the past 15
nated as economically "dis-
tressed" by the state � a determi-
nation made by comparing un-
employment rates and per-capita
income � are in the region. They
include Bladen, Brunswick, Co-
lumbus, Halifax, Hyde,
Northampton, Fender, Robcson,
Sampson and Warren counties.
Jcffcoat said the region also is
hampered by the large numbers
of adults without high school
diplomas, he said 44.5 percent of
the region's residents 25 or older
do not have high school diplo-
mas.
And the statistical analysis
shows that some counties in the
region will actually lose popula-
tion in the coming years. Jcffcoat
said those counties wil end up
with a smaller tax base and little
to offer new industries or busi-
nesses.
Jcffcoat and his staff assigned
the 43 counties a numerical rank-
ing from one to six, with six the
highest rating, by comparing
county figures with state
averages in six categories �
population growth, number of
high school graduates number of
new employees, new invest-
ments, unemployment rates and
per-capita income. Only one
county scored a six � Wake.
No county scored a five, and
only Johnson and Craven scored
a four. All the others scored a
three or lower.
WE BUILT,
A PROUD I Warehouse
NEW
Price Specials
FEELING I The New
sav a center I Sign Of
Fnnn mark etc If
Savings!
FOOD MARKETS
The freshest way to Save
FAMILY PACK FRESH
Fryer Leg
Quarters
Limn One With An Additional $10 Or Mce Purchase
JUMBO CALIFORNIA
Fresh
Broccoli
88
STOP
KRAFT
40 OFF REGULAR
CREAMY
Miracle
Whip
w Tide IW Duke's
Detergent I Mayonnaise
quart
jar
42 oz.
box
Limit One With An Additionai $10 00 O' More Purchase
ALL VARIETIES
Limit One With An Additional $10 00 Or More Purchas
Limit One With An Additional $10 00 Or More Purchase
6.5-7.5 02
Pringles
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-39
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ANN PAGE
Ice
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429
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09
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QUARTERS
Parkay
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Limit One Couoon Per Shopper With An Additional SiO 00 O-
More Purchase Coupon F�pi'es August 29 '98"
SUPER COUPON
Ltmit One Coupon Pe' Shoppe' W A" Ad" �
More Purchase Coupon Expires Auqus' ?9 I
DOUBLE COUPONS
PRICES EFFECTIVE AUG. 23, THRU AUG. 29,1987. QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd
Op�n 24 Hours-Open Mon 7 a.m Closed Sat. 11 p.m Op�n Sun. 7 am-11 p
' " ' "wfRfc -ft��f �
Pii itf�i� � �r m
m4
'Dream'
starts series
Marcel Marceau - i perform
in Wright Aud toriu - an
added attraction in the I987 s-
Concert Theater Series.
The series offers a variet) oi
on-campu entertainment to
students faculty and the
general public. A Shakespt
plav chamber musk perform-
ances and the N C S. mphonj
Orchestra are some of the events
comming to Hendrix Theater
and Wright Auditorium this
school year.
"We re offering what North
Carolina is doing m the arts "
said Marketing Director Stuart
Secttor.
The first event of the series,
Shakespeare's A Midsummer
Night's Dream will take the
Wright Auditorium stage Sept.
23. The North Carolina
Shakespeare Festival m
perform the romantic comedv
set in ancient Greece.
The series is divided into
three categories: the Artist-
Series, the Chamber Music
Series and the Theater Arts Se-
ries.
Season tickets are on sale now
at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center.
and special Tick-i our-Own"
scries are available. Young
people and ECU students,
faculty and -taff receive special
discounts on all shows and
season tickets.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25, 1987
31
grim future
R Ic
irge numtvr
high school
h rcent of
� or older
unties m the
ears eff oal
wil end up
��nd little
tries or busi
the 43 counties a numerical rank-
ing from one to six, with six the
highest rating, by comparing
count) figures with state
averages in si categories �
population growth, number of
school graduates number of
new employees, new invest-
ments, unemployment rates and
per capita income. Only one
count) scored a six Wake.
No county scored a five, and
only ohnson ar.cl Craven scored
a tour All the others scored a
three or lower
arehouse
e Specials
New
.n0f,lSk.
ings ���
W,ll'IHOIl
eg
rs
ea.
MBO CALIFORNIA
Fresh
Broccoli
88
CREAMY
Duke's
Mayonnaise
L
Urn One With An Additional $10 00 Or More Purchase
Ice
Cream
29
ffij
4
are
Coca
Cola
09
(�ef&
1
Coca
Cola '2'20' 098
vOia can ctn C.
size
SUPER COUPON
SAV A CENTER
A&P GRADE A
r-
903
nlte, N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Closed Sat 11 p.m Open Sun 7 am -11 p.m.
tNTITY RIGHTS RESERVED.
'
IV
L



87-88 ConcertTheater Series
The following is a schedule of the 1987-88 ConcertTheater Series:
Artists Series (All shows in Wright Auditorium)
Tonkuenstler Orchestra of Vienna � Oct. 13,1987.
The King's Singers � Nov. 30,1987.
ECU and N.C. Symphony Orchestras with Lynn Harrell, soloist � Jan. 17,1988.
Eugene Istomin � Feb. 4,1988.
50th Anniversary Tour of Woody Herman and the Thundering Herd � Feb 11
1988.
Empire Brass Quintet � April 8,1988.
Theater Arts Series (All shows in Wright Auditorium)
North Carolina Shakespeare Festival in "A Midsummer Night's Dream" � Sept 23
1987. V ' '
North Carolina Dance theater � Oct. 5,1987.
"Purlie"�Jan. 27,1988.
Atlanta Ballet � Feb. 16,1988.
Chamber Music Spries (All shows in Hendrix Theater)
Aspen Wind Quintet � Nov. 5,1987.
Marian McPartland Trio � Nov. 10,1987.
Los Angeles Vocal Arts Ensemble � Jan. 21,1988.
American Chamber Players � March 23,1988.
Marcel Marceau (Special Added Attraction) � March 2, 1988, in
Wright Auditorium.
Art in life
The N.C. Sheakespeare players
(above left) perform a scene from
'As You Like It The company
will be coming to Wright Au-
dirorium in September to perform
'A Midsummer Night's Dream
Marcel Marcear deft) , the ac-
knowledged master of mime will
perform at Wrght on March 2 as a
special feature of the artists se-
ries.
i -
ordon's Golf & Shi Shop
264 ByPass - Beside McDonalds
756-1003
Hours: Mon. thru Sat,10-6 p.m.
All Ladies' and Metis'
Summer Apparel 50-75 OFFl
New Fall Ladies
Warm-Ups
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20 OFF
20 OFF
(With This Ad)
See Our Head. Izod, Le Coq,
Leon Levin, Point of View,
Quantum, Tail and
Ultrasport Lines for Fall.
v(Sale through Sat , Sept 1 1, 1987.)
'Dream'
starts series
Marcel Marceau is to perform
in Wright Auditorium as an
added attraction in the 1987-88
ConcertTheater Series.
The series offers a variety of
on-campus entertainment to
students, faculty and the
general public. A Shakespeare
play, chamber music perform-
ances and the N.C. Symphony
Orchestra are some of the events
comming to Hendrix Theater
and Wright Auditorium this
school year.
"We're offering what North
Carolina is doing in the arts
said Marketing Director Stuart
Sector.
The first event of the series,
Shakespeare's "A Midsummer
Night's Dream will take the
Wright Auditorium stage Sept.
23. The North Carolina
Shakespeare Festival will
perform the romantic comedy
set in ancient Greece.
The series is divided into
three categories: the Artists
Series, the Chamber Music
Series and the Theater Arts Se-
ries.
Season tickets are on sale now
at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center,
and special "Pick-Your-Own"
series are available. Young
people and ECU students,
faculty and staff receive special
discounts on all shows and
season tickets.
TENTH
STREET
ANIMAL
HOSPITAL
WELCOME BACK
STUDENTS
Come Visit
Dr. Mark T. Hayes, D.V.M.
at his new location
10th Street Animal Hospital
830-0881
Specializing in small animals
Quality care
Modem Surgical Facilities
Pet Drop Off Service
Emergencies-756 9582
MonTuesThursFri.
7:30 AM 6:00 PM
Wed& Sat.
7:30 AM-12:00 Noon
3192 East T�nlh Street
(Look for our sign across fro. Riuergate Shopping Center)
we.
Oyster
i�ifeBar
710 North Greene Street
-0090
sx- � �"�-�, �. ww�� w4
Trout
French Fries
& Slaw
� ����� m��wMi
4.50
ttaanfla gaBaaaaaaB
All You Can Eat
Seafood & Salad Bar
Flounder
Deviled Crab
Streamed Shrimp
BBQ
Trout t
With Alaskan Crab Legs14.99
Fried Chicken
Fried Shrimp
Crab Cakes
Clam Strips
8.99
'� . . . . i-v� W��.v�.vv. x�l .�VVW�VK. k ,Mv.VltV4xv� v-
� ��X����"v'�f.
Fisherman's Platter g �
Select 3 Item Of Your Choice
Crab Leg Crab Cake Oysters
Shrimp Deviled Crabs Scallops
Flounder Clam 8trips Barbecue
Trout Steamed Shrimp Fried Chicken
6.75
With Scsllops or Crab Cluster Add 75 each.
- � � - �� ?��� - �, j A JtK. � '
� 'fc � x x X "� " x- � � "V �.
Crab Leg
Special
3 Clusters Legs
2 Vegetables
8.50
nii.u h.
��-W�V'���� k�i
gSSSBSSSbs
Luncheon Buffet 11:00 A.M2.00 P.M.
Sunday Through Friday
Large Variety Of Meats 495
And Vegetables Daily w
include, leverage
.MBBBBM�s��gM�fl
'

' �iiii�I �� dTHi j�jnL a? .��a�jv - � , p - m m .� �� ���- rftr ifaf.sf.a5 JB? �' ��
afcwaSib- �. la. '
t

,





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25, 1987
31
gi im future
numbers the 43 counties a numerical rank-
high school ing from one to six, with six the
iivi44 �i highest rating, by comparing
25 or older auinlv figures with state
school li � averages in six categories �
population growth, number of
dma -is high school graduates number of
the new employees, new invest-
ments, unemployment rates and
fcoat per-capita income. Only one
unt) scored a six Wake.
No count) scored a five, and
only lohnson and Craven scored
a tour All the others scored a
' - � d throe or lower
larehouse
e Specials
New
Pitta:
T?
eg
rs
ea.
MB �� -JRNIA
Fresh
Broccoli
88
crea'my
Duke's
Mayonnaise
r
L
Lmtm One With An MdilMnal $10 00 Or More Purchase
Ice
Cream
129
Coca
Cola
09
1
Coca
Cola
12 12 02.
can ctn
9fl
S Zfe
SUPER COUPON
SAVACENTER
A&P GRADE A
r-
903
Mile. N.C. At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Closed Sat 11 pm Open Sun 7 am -11 p.m.
kNTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
� m .�� �� i(jy . ��.
'


'Dream
starts series
Marcel Marceau is to perform
in Wright Auditorium as an
added attraction in the 1987-88
ConcertTheater Series.
The scries offers a variety of
on-campus entertainment to
students, faculty and the
general public. A Shakespeare
play, chamber music perform-
ances and the N.C. Symphony
Orchestra are some of the events
comming to Hendrix Theater
and Wright Auditorium this
school year.
"We're offering what North
Carolina is doing in the arts
said Marketing Director Stuart
Sect tor.
The first event of the series,
Shakespeare's "A Midsummer
Night's Dream will take the
Wright Auditorium stage Sept.
23. The North Carolina
Shakespeare Festival will
perform the romantic comedy
set in ancient Greece.
The series is divided into
three categories: the Artists
Series, the Chamber Music
Scries and the Theater Arts Se-
ries.
Season tickets are on sale now
at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center,
and special "Pick-Your-Own"
series are available. Young
people and ECU students,
faculty and staff receive special
discounts on all shows and
season tickets.
TENTH
STREET
ANIMAL
HOSPITAL
WELCOME BACK
STUDENTS
Come Visit
Dr. Mark T. Hayes, D.V.M.
at his new location
10th Street Animal Hospital
830-0881
87-88 ConcertTheater Series
The following is a schedule of the 1987-88 Concert Theater Series:
Artists Series (AH shows in Wright Auditorium)
Tonkuenstler Orchestra of Vienna � Oct. 13,1987.
The King's Singers � Nov. 30,1987. '
ECU and N.C. Symphony Orchestras with Lynn Harrell, soloist � Jan. 17,1988.
Eugene Istomin � Feb. 4,1988.
50th Anniversary Tour of Woody Herman and the Thundering Herd � Feb 11
1988. ' '
Empire Brass Quintet � April 8,1988.
Theater Arts Serips (All shows in Wright Auditorium)
North Carolina Shakespeare Festival in "A Midsummer Night's Dream" � Sent 23
1987. v ' '
North Carolina Dance theater � Oct. 5,1987
"Purlie"� Jan. 27,1988.
Atlanta Ballet � Feb. 16,1988.
Chamber Music Series (All shows in Hendrix Theater)
Aspen Wind Quintet � Nov. 5,1987.
Marian McPartland Trio � Nov. 10,1987.
Los Angeles Vocal Arts Ensemble � Jan. 21,1988.
American Chamber Players � March 23, 1988.
Marcel Marceau (Special Added Attraction) � March 2, 1988, in
Wright Auditorium.
Art in life
The N.C.Sheakespeareplu "s
(above left) perform a scene from
'As You Like It' The company
will be coming to Wright Au-
dirorium in September to perform
'A Midsummer Night's Dream
Marcel Marcear (left) , the ac-
knowledged master of mime will
perform at Wrght on March 2 as a
special feature of the artists se-
ries.
II 111 II I
Specializing in small animals
Quality care
Modem Surgical Facilities
Pet Drop Off Service
Emergencies-756 9582
MonTuesThursFr1.
7:30 AM-6;00 PM
Wed& Sat.
7:30 AM-12:00 Noon
3192 East Tenth Street
(Look for our sign across fro. Rivergate Shopping Center)
BITE
Oyster
r -
Wfll
710 North Greene Street 752-0090
5w����-��wajM �-��
Trout
French Fries
& Slaw
All You Can Eat
4.50
-xV��V.�-�
���� �-��������.
acm.uAimr�3g
All You Can Eat
Seafood & Salad Bar
Flounder
Deviled Crab
Streamed Shrimp
BBQ
Trout ��.
With Ala.kan Crab Legs14.99
Fried Chicken
Fried Shrimp
Crab Cakes
Clam Strips
8.99
'�. c v w tx.v vv. v �vl � � � � sx vr.�vv
Fisherman's Platter g f
Select 3 Items Of Your Choice
Crab Lea CraB CaAea Oysters
Shrimp Deviled Crabs Scallops
Flounder Clam Strips Barbecue
Trout Steamed Shrimp Fried Chicken
6.75
With Scallops or Crab Cluster Add 75C each.
� w �� W� �� � X . - JTt ��� '
Crab Leg
Special
3 Clusters Legs
2 Vegetables
8.50J
basses b asay
�'X��.��,�'t� ���� w
on
Luncheon Buffet 11:00 A.M2.00 P.M.
Sunday Through Friday
Large Variety Of Meats r 95
And Vegetables Daily O
�H�?
ppapap:
' piimm-





32 THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUCAKTK 17
Officials disapointed that gorilla in zoo is not
ASHEBORO N r (API l�j
ASHEBORO, N.C. (AP)
Hope, the North Carolina Zoo's
female lowland gorilla, is not ex-
pecting a baby, after all. But she
should be expecting to be put on
a diet.
The zoo announced in early
May that urine samples showed
Hope probably was pregnant.
But recent tests measuring a dif-
ferent hormone indicated she
probably was not expecting a
child.
The gorilla's weight had
jumped from 145 to 212 pounds,
but the gain probably was due to
overeating, zoo officials said Fri-
day.
Zoo spokeswoman Elise Gell-
man-Light said Hope will be put
on a diet and should be back on
exhibit today.
She and Carlos, the male go-
rilla, eat together in their night
quarters � they're fed commun-
ally � so we will be cutting back
her food intake and watching her
weight she said.
The zoo has been trying to
mate Hope with Carlos, one of
the two male gorillas at the zoo,
since May 1986. The zoo has an-
other male lowland gorilla,
Chosen child looks for lost family
ASHEVILLE (AD � Charles HioH in iQ4i a i-�- ii �'
ASHEVILLE (AP) - Charles
Edward Jones always knew he
was a "chosen child but it
wasn't until the death of his
adoptive father that he was given
the clues to begin searching for
the family that gave him up.
"For a long rime, I didn't know
how to pursue the information
that 1 wanted about mv parents
he said. "It was no reflection on
my adoptive parents because
they were wonderful to me, but
questions kept running through
my mind � 1 wondered why my
real mother and father kept three
children and gave me up for
adoption. It's a difficult thing to
deal with
Jones, a produce manager at an
Asheville supermarket, said his
adoptive mother, who lives in a
Buncombe County nursing home
and has no other children, gave
him the names of his biological
parents several years ago during
a visit to his adoptive father's
grave
Adopted from a local orphan-
age just two days before his sec-
ond birthday, Jones has been
searching for his biological par-
ents for more than half his 50
years. It wasn't until last week
that he learned he has two broth-
ers and a sister he has never seen.
"I've known since 1 was a small
child that I was adopted, that I
was a "chosen child he said.
"On many occasions I've put
forth an effort to find out where
my real family is, but all doors
were closed. Now that 1 know
that I have two brothers and a
sister somewhere in this world,
I'm eager to find them
He knew that his real mother
died in 1941, and later learned
that she was a native of Rowan
County, that she lived in
Asheville during the 10 years
prior to his birth and that she had
worked at a local Works Progress
Administration warehouse. The
only thing he knew about his fa-
ther was that he was from Indi-
ana.
A few weeks ago, Jones ac-
quired what he believed to be his
birth certificate � the document
contained no name for the new-
born, but the birthdate corre-
sponded with his own and his
parents' names were included.
The document listed him as the
fourth living child born to the
woman, who had also delivered
two stillborn children, the ccrtifi- see everyday.
cate stated.
To learn more about the other
children, Jones said he obtained a
copy of his mother's death certifi-
cate from the Buncombe County
Courthouse and a newspaper
obituary that listed three chil-
dren, a sister and a brother as her
survivors. Asheville addresses
w ore listed for the three children.
"Seeing those names gave me
cold chills all over he said. "I
haven't been able to locate any of
them yet, but I am going to do
what I can to find them. I've been
in this world serving people,
waiting on people, meeting
people for 35 years � my own
brothers, my own sister might be
people that I know, people that I
The features department at the East
Carolinian is seeking an editor, an assistant-
editor and staff writers. Apply in person at th
publications building.
If you want fresh sandwiches and salads�served with
fresh baked Italian or whole wheat bread, then you 7
lovejne new Subway, .ttyffl
We're fresh and fast�but
we're not "fast food
i
iSUBUJiiW1
v Sandwiches & Salads
The Plaza-756-2110
208 E. Fifth St. - 758-7979
pregnant
Ramar, who was once considered
Hope's mate. But when he failed
to impregnate Hope, zoo officials
moved to obtain Carlos on indefi-
nite loan from the Memphis zoo.
"A gorilla birth would be a very
significant thing for this species,
and of course, it would be an
exciting thing for the zoo as we've
not had a gorilla birth before
Gellman-Light said. "Certainly
we hoped she was pregnant
Officials are still hoping that
Hope and Carlos will eventually
produce an offspring.
"We don't know of any reason
why she might not conceive, and
we're going to continue to hope
that someday we will have a go-
rilla baby Gellman-Light said.
"But right now, we just know it's
not going to be anytime soon
The Cut Above
WELCOME BACK
STUDENTS
Student Specials 20 Off
Permanent Waves
-We Listen Before We Cut
Men $8.00 � Women $10.00
includes shampxx) & cut
201 E. 5th Street � 757-14hJ
Hours: 9-9 MonSat. � No Appointment Necessary
WELCOME BACK
ECU!
WE HAVE MADE MANY IMPROVEMENTS WE
WOULD LIKE TO INTRODUCE TO YOU
OUR FOOD BAR
�2 Meats -3 Soups -5 Desserts
-6 Hot Vegtables -Garden Fresh Fruits
�Fresh Vegtables -Hot Rolls or Hushpupp.es
-FREE SUNDAE BAR-
$3.99
MENU ITEMS
All Your Favorite Steaks
Steak & Shrimp Calves Liver
Grilled Chicken Breast Ham Steak
Fried Flounder
All Served With Deluxe Potatoe Bar or
French Fries and Texas Toast
Present Your ECU ID For Free Drink With
Your Meal (Good through Sept. 10th)
Watch for our coupon In
UBE Coupon Book
FREE SUNDAE BAR With Purchase
Any Meal Except 13, 18 & 22
Sizzlin

2903 E. 10th St.
758-2712-


Boaters may b
NASHVILLE, Tern, (API
Tennessee's
commSnrK,r askeJ �J
trie rennessee Valley A
approve no n ,
�ng companies for the k
River for at I
R "a dramatic increase in
( itin
,i ul" mnease 11
thenumber of commercial rafters
and pnvate boaters" on
southeast Tennessee ri
Lorrussioner I berti
1 l 'III bdlU
year, �s �� .
nver 5 apa
In a letter 1
mai

$20 millioh
against 'fa
NEWYi -
brothel keep 1
Barrows,
exploits a- �
Madam" in a r �
sued for lib
claims the a
in the book.
Carol Lond
million libel suil
the high-das I
edly charge
manager was on the I -
The fashion execul
she was depnv. :
name, character .
ness stand
"great pain a-
said Londers' law)
Fhnkes.
Londers was Ba 1

m 4






le Cut Above
LCOME BACK
STUDENTS
ident Specials20 Off
nent Waves
n Bt f v We Cut
� omen SI0.00
et � 757 1488
V lent Necessary
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25.1987 33
IE BACK
J!
�PROVEMENTS WE
NTRODUCE TO YOU
OUR FOOD BAR
�5 Desserts
ven Fresh Fruits
�He: Roiis or Hushpuppies
EE SUNDAE BAR-
S3.99
MENU ITEMS
'� o ii Fav: � teaks
S Liver
Han Steak
ed F ;
Bar or
� : Tcast
Sizzjn
2903 E. 10th St.
758-2712
V)

ve
llside
ryrtle
S.C.
9-2404
i
Boaters may be crowding Tennessee River
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AD -
Ienncssee's conservation
commissioner asked Friday that
the Tennessee Valley Authority
approve no new white water rait-
ing companies for the Ocoee
River for at least two years.
Citing "a dramatic increase in
the number of commercial rafters
and private boaters on the
southeast Tennessee river,
Comissioner Elbert Gill said two'
years is needed to study the
river's capacity.
In a letter to TVA's general
manager, William F. Willis, Gill
said the time would allow the
state to cooperate with TVA and
the U.S. Forest Service to study
the problem.
Representatives of the Ocoee
River Council, which represents
"My staff has studied this issue
and has found a dramatic in-
crease in the number of commer-
cial rafters and private boaters in
recent years. We think that the
large number of commercial raf-
raft operators along the river, ters and private boaters in recent
asked the Conservation Depart- years. We think that the large
ment in May to help get a one-
year delay in granting new raft-
ing permits. Gill said.
"Recent requests from the
Ocoee River Council and reports
from our acting area manager
indicate a problem with crowd-
ing on peak use days Gill wrote.
number of outfitters being li-
censed is indeed contributing to
the problem the letter said.
Gill said studies show the
number of rafters has increased
from 5,000 to 85,000 over the past
10 years.
$20 million lawsuit filed
against 'MayflowerMadam9
NEW YORK (LTD - Blooded
brothel keeper Sydney Biddle
Barrows, who recounted her
exploits as the "Mayflower
Madam" in a best-seller, is being
sued for libel by a woman who
claims the author lied about her
in the book.
Carol Lenders, 43, filed a $20
million libel suit Tuesdav against
the high-class Madam tor alleg-
edly charging the merchandise
manager was on the take.
The fashion executive claims
she was deprived "of her good
name, character, social and busi-
ness standing" and suffered
"great pain and mental anguish
said Londers' lawyer, William
Dinkes.
Londers was Barrows' supervi-
sor when the future brothel
keeper, a descendant of two
Mayflower pilgrims, worked as
an accessories buyer for the firm
Young Innovators in 1978, the
attorney said.
The fashion executive is furi-
ous over a passage in the 1986
bestseller, "Mayflower Madam,
the Secret Life of Sydney Biddle
Barrows that reads: "Suddenly
the light dawned. Of course �
Carmela was on the take! She had
bought a huge supply of hand-
bags that the manufacturer
couldn't get rid of, and they were
giving her a kickback
Londers contended in court
papers everyone in the fashion
industry knows "Carmela" was a
reference to her.
"She (Barrows) described
Young Innovators perfectly and
the time frame is exactly the
same Dinkes said.
"She accused her of being a
thief, a crook and damaged her
reputation. She (Londers) said
she lost numerous opportunities
for jobs and business the attor-
ney said.
Also named in the suit were co-
author William Novak and the
book's publishers.
Barrows, now 35, was accused
in 1984 of running a million-dol-
lar call girl ring catering to the
rich and prominent, from corpo-
rate chiefs to Arab sheiks.
She pleaded guilty in July 1985
to promoting prostitution and
was fined $5,000.
The staff of the East Carolinian
thanks the Daily Reflector and
the Whichard family for their help in
the publication of today's newspaper.
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GET HOT, DELICIOUS,
CUSTOM-MADE PIZZA
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756-9998
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classes, The Wolfe Tanning System, Dynacam equipment, York Olympic weights and dumbells from
3-100 pounds. Give your body a thorough workout then relax in the whirlpool, sauna, steam room,
plus private showers and dressing rooms. You'll love the way you look! And to take care of the
inside of that hard working body visit The Spa's certified message therapist and registered dietician.
Plus The Spa I.P.F.A. and A.H.A. memberships are honored at locations worldwide. Bring your
body in for a thorough workout at The SpaSouthpark Shopping Center in Greenville.
Greenville's
best health club value.
SOUTH PARK SHOPPING CENTER
756-7991


,j





THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25,1987 33
e Cut Above
LCOME BACK
STUDENTS
ials ynof
20 Off
J ' Waves
Ve I isten Before We Cut
� Women $10.00
� 7S7- 1488
v. poii Necessary
IE BACK
J!
IMPROVEMENTS WE
NTRODUCE TO YOU
OUR FOOD BAR
s 5 Desserts
�Garden Fresh Fruits
s or Hushpuppies
-UNDAE BAR-
S3.99
MENU ITEMS
Liver
-
p Rar
v or
We&teux
Sizzlin
2903 E. 10th St.
758-2712
19
Boaters may be crowding Tennessee River
NASHVIl i n �
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) -
Tennessee's conservation
commissioner asked Friday that
the Tennessee Valley Authority
approve no new white water raft-
ing companies for the Ocoee
River for at least two years.
Citing "a dramatic increase in
the number of commercial rafters
and private boaters on the
southeast Tennessee river,
Comissioner Elbert Gill said two
years is needed to study the
river's capacity.
In a letter to TVA's general
manager, William F. Willis, Gill
said the time would allow the
state to cooperate with TVA and
the U.S. Forest Service to study
the problem.
Representatives of the Ocoee
River Council, which represents
raft operators along the river,
asked the Conservation Depart-
ment in May to help get a one-
year delay in granting new raft-
ing permits, Gill said.
"Recent requests from the
Ocoee River Council and reports
from our acting area manager
indicate a problem with crowd-
ing on peak use days Gill wrote.
'My staff has studied this issue
and has found a dramatic in-
crease in the number of commer-
cial rafters and private boaters in
recent years. We think that the
large number of commercial raf-
ters and private boaters in recent
years. We think that the large
number of outfitters being li-
censed is indeed contributing to
the problem the letter said.
Gill said studies show the
number of rafters has increased
from 5,000 to 85,000 over the past
10 years.
$20 million lawsuit filed
against 'Mayflower Madam'
NEW YORK (UF1) - Blooded
brothel keeper Sydney Biddle
Barrows, who recounted her
exploits as the "Mayflower
Madam" in a best-seller, is being
sued for libel by a woman who
claims the author lied about her
in the book.
Carol Londers, 43, filed a $20
million libel suit Tuesday against
the high-class Madam for alleg-
edly charging the merchandise
manager was on the take.
The fashion executive claims
she was deprived "of her good
name, character, social and busi-
ness standing and suffered
"great pain and mental anguish
said Londers' lawyer, William
Dinkes.
Londers was Barrows' supervi-
sor when the future brothel
keeper, a descendant of two
Mayflower pilgrims, worked as
an accessories buyer for the firm
Young Innovators in 1978, the
attorney said.
The fashion executive is furi-
ous over a passage in the 1986
bestseller, "Mayflower Madam,
the Secret Life of Sydney Biddle
Barrows that reads: "Suddenly
the light dawned. Of course �
Carmela was on the take! She had
bought a huge supply of hand-
bags that the manufacturer
couldn't get rid of, and they were
giving her a kickback
Londers contended in court
papers everyone in the fashion
industry knows "Carmela" was a
reference to her.
"She (Barrows) described
Young Innovators perfectly and
the time frame is exactly the
same Dinkes said.
"She accused her of being a
thief, a crook and damaged her
reputation. She (Londers) said
she lost numerous opportunities
for jobs and business the attor-
ney said.
Also named in the suit were co-
author William Novak and the
book's publishers.
Barrows, now 35, was accused
in 1984 of running a million-dol-
lar call girl ring catering to the
rich and prominent, from corpo-
rate chiefs to Arab sheiks.
She pleaded guilty in July 1985
to promoting prostitution and
was fined $5,000.
The staff of the East Carolinian
thanks the Daily Reflector and
r help in
spaper
�w.yifJifflijj
HOW
II
YOU
GET HOT, DELICIOUS,
CUSTOM-MADE PIZZA
TO YOUR DO
III
IN 30 MINUTES
OR LESS?
Call Domino s Pizza One call from you sets
Domino's Pizza in motion. From that moment
on, we do everything possible to make sure
that your hot. custom-made pizza is deliv-
ered to your door in less than 30 minutes
Hours:
11 AM - 1 AM Sun - Thurs
11 AM - 2AM Fn & Sat

! $8.991 Get a small 12 i ExtravaganZZa ' and i 2 cans of Coca Cola I Classic for only S8 99 i (including tax) 1 One coupon per pizza Offer good through 9-9-87
: ggiivxNot valid with any other
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1 Addiess

Serving East Greenville
Rivergate Shopping Center
752-6996
Serving West Greenville
and ECU Campus
1201 Charles Blvd
758-6660
Serving West Greenville
2405 West Dickenson
756-9998
DOMINO'S
PIZZA
DELIVERS
Our drivers carry tess than $20 00 I .mitec delivery area 198" Dominos Ptfza inc
Welcome
Back!
For the next two weektfoQf " �ffering
ve
Mlside
Tyrtle
S.C.
9-2404
.



Student Membership
PER SEMESTER
The best looking bodies work out at The Spa in Greenville. The Spa offers exercise-aerobic
classes, The Wolfe Tanning System, Dynacam equipment, York Olympic weights and dumbells from
3-100 pounds. Give your body a thorough workout then relax in the whirlpool, sauna, steam room,
plus private showers and dressing rooms. You'll love the way you look! And to take care of the
inside of that hard working body visit The Spa's certified message therapist and registered dietician.
Plus The Spa I.P.F.A. and A.H.A. memberships are honored at locations worldwide. Bring your
body in for a thorough workout at The SpaSouthpark Shopping Center in Greenville.
Greenville's
best health club value.
SOUTH PARK SHOPPING CENTER
756-7991


it
I





34
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25,1987
Welcome Back Students & Faculty
OVERT0N&
WE'RE CHANGING TO
BETTER SERVE YOU!
SALAD BAR
Build your "Perfect Salad" afGreenville's
Freshest Salad Bar" featuring a rotating
variety of over 60 items all freshly prepared
for you!
Choose from the freshest ingredients
including meats, vegetables, cheeses, pasta
salads and more!
HOT FOOD BAR
Scoop up a hot meal with that "Home-
Cooked Goodness Choose from two
meat entrees daily, plus vegetables and
dessert. It's prepared fresh daily!
BAKERY
Take home a loaf of our freshly baked
bread! It's all natural and comes in many
varieties, including wheat, sourdough,
french, rye, pumpernickel, white, cheese,
and more! Our bakery also features freshly
baked pies, pastries, and cookies!
Supmvtet
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH AUGUST 29th, 1987.
ALL COKE
PRODUCTS
AND COCA-
COLA
2 Liter Bottle
BIG SAVINGS
Quality, Selection And Savings . Storewide!
$1.
09
RICHFOOD I,
ASSORTED B'9 3 L,ter Bottle
FLAVORS r-C
SOFT DRINKS . O
PEPSI COLA
12Pock-12 0z. Cans
$2.
99
ALL FLAVORS
GATORADE
32 Oz. Bottle
.89
MILLER LITE
BEER
6 Pack-12 0z. Cons
$2.
49
LAY'S
REGULAR
POTATO CHIPS
6- Oz. Bag
All Varieties.
BUDWEISER
AND
BUD LIGHT
BEER
12 Pack-12 Oz. Cans
Limit 2 Cases.
$4.
MADE-RITE
BREAD
HOT DOG AND
HAMBURGER BUNS
8 Pack
Your Choice.
231.
COCA-COLA
12 Pack-12 Oz. Cans
FRESH FROM OUR BAKERY
ASSORTED
ROLLS
AND BAGELS
Mix or Match.
Baked Fresh Every
Day
5551.
00
$2.
PETER PAN
CREAMY 18 Oz. Jar
OR CRUNCHY
PEANUT
BUTTER (D 1 591
$i.
Com
I Hflt.L
MftU
TlMJvS
H�UL
VfcflMftb
rBT ftuuiMMfr
� s�;H 1 �s.STGetf 7
v. X IF T
FOuBTH t6TR�t"T
TDSffitf
Z X) o
STORE HOURS:
OPEN 8 AM - 8 PM MON.
THRU SAT.
SUNDAYS 1-6 PM
FOOD BARS:
OPEN 11 AM - 7 PM MON.
THRU SAT.
SUNDAYS 1-6 PM
OVERTON'S SHOPPING CENTER IS
CONVENIENTLY LOCATED
WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE OF ECU
ON THE CORNER OF
3RD AND JARVIS STREETS! JUST 2
BLOCKS FROM ECU!
Come by and visit our newly remodeled
laundromat!
New equipment and a fresh new look!
Watch for specials later!
Don't forget to bring your 5 discount coupon'
SHOP WHERE THE PIRATES SHOP FOR PRICE
QUALITY, AND CONVENIENCE!
OVERTON'S 5- DISCOUNT
CLIP THIS COUPON
Present this coupon to cashier at check out
time to receive 5 discount on purchases of
$10.00 or more. Good for ECU Students
and Faculty only. Limit one discount per
i.d. number.Expires 9-5-87.
Name
Amt. of PurchaseI.D. Number.
:WfcfcfcmUtMkW1MIW�,W1MLltnnn1t1M�.�.nnnnni1t1t.
sac
OVERTON'6
SirnuM
Corner of Third and Jarvis Streets, 752-5025.
IHh hASfAROI INA,sJ
I
Pack looking f
Editor's Mote: This is th �:� �
series of stories previewing theopp
nents for the East Cfli
team this season. The
run in the order that the teams
played. The articles will a ntinu
the Thursday sports section
By PAT MOLLCA
Sport Writer
There is a question mark hen i r
ingover the playing fields at N .C
State this fall. It haunts set
year coach Dick Sheridan
staff and his players everywhc i
they go: on the held, in the locker
room and at press conference -
The question is can thev do it
again.
Sheridan took the reins of the
Wolfpack last year after State
suffered through three consecu-
tive 3-8 seasons (Pirate tans take
heart) and led his new squad to a
8-2-1 season and an invitation to
the Peach Bowl, where they lost a
heartbrCaker to the Hokies I
Virginia Tech, another 1987 ECU
opponent. Of course wrini
was nothing new to Sheridan
who was at one time the win-
ningesLactive coach in division
1�A .While at Furman Univer-
sity.
N inning was new however I
the Wolf pack, and expectal
arc high for a second winning
season. The question mark si
team
mpaij
Peebles vsh
down pas - i
Macs fones, mi
punt will be
ride who mil rj
leftik -
the 1987 NF1
veter.
New ECU socc
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sports VNntct
East Carolina, with a record ol
9-10-1, posted the best win
record in soccer historv last sea-
son. But for first year head coach
Charley Harvey, the best still isn't
quite good enough.
Harvey, who served as a Pirate
assistant for three ears, has laid
out the ECU plan ot attack for
1987. "Our goal this year is to
have a training season, no ques-
tion about it Harvey said. We
have to be more competitive in
the conference and as a coach 1
want to establish a continuity in
the ECU soccer organization
At the close of the So season
Harvey was named interim head
coach following the resignation
of Steve Brodv He was named to
the position permanently this
spring. Harvey. 24 is a native ot
Mclean, "A and previously
coached in the high school ranks
at Mclean High School. Dave
McAllister will assist 1 larvev this
year.
Pre-season workouts came to a
close Friday for the Tirates and.
Coach Harvey was impressed
with the team s performance
"All of our players came into
camp in really good shape Har
vey said. "We concentrated
Mainly on our ball control skills
and work within a ten yard range
and we've made great progress
Defense was also a mam am
cern in camp this year with im-
provement being attributed to
bvo newcomers. Andy Britten a
sophomore from Florida Interna-
tional University, and Mart Rich
� a junior from Lawrence N
tack
Har
er si
wenei d d J
In ad
field. ECl wi
id i'ai
d
w ith the
a.
. .
veteran kc pi t
Harvey sa
ast year and -
not get I
has ma.
pre season
L'p front for
year will bt veto
I

Hurk H
1
I
v . �. - �
"� jagnhwowai
J





HBesssoBsssssssaaGssaaooBBSSBaaaMMMN
Faculty
Iwtm

Inc
. DWEISER
AND
BUD LIGHT
BEER
12 Pack-12 Oz Cons
Limit 2 Cases
$4.
99
8 Pack
. O ice.
ND
RBUNS
2$l.
i
COCA-COLA
A 12 Pack-2 0z. Cans
$2
99
�ETER PAN
CREAMY 18 Oz. Jar
RCRUNCHY
PEANUT
BUTTER (M 59
$i.
I'S SHOPPING CENTER IS
ENTLY LOCATED
IALKING DISTANCE OF ECU
ORNER OF
IARVIS STREETS' JUST 2
tOM ECU'
and visit our newly remodeled
laundromat!
ipment and a fresh new look!
fatch for specials later1
discount coupon!
- SHOP FOR PRICE,
AIIIV: ND CONVENIENCE!


As,
?,


THF EAST t AROl INIAN
Sports
AUGUST 2S, 1987 Pago 35
A glance at the '87
Pirate grid squad
Pack looking for encore performance
diior's Note: This is the first in a looms. Can Sheridan do it again, who was in on 47 starts, will be
� of stories previewing the oppo- especially without quarterback pushed by junior Scott Auer, who
nents for the East Carolina football
team this season. The stories will be
run in the order that the teams will be
� layed. The articles will continue in
Thursday sports section.
By PAT MOLLOY
Sport Writer
There is a question mark hover-
ing over the playing fields at N.C.
State this fall. It haunts second
year coach Dick Sheridan, his
: t and his players everywhere
they go: on the field, in the locker
room and at press conferences.
The cfiicstion is can thev do it
again.
Sheridan took the reins of the
Volfpack last year after State
uffered through three consecu-
tive 3-8 seasons (Pirate fans take
iieart) and led his new squad to a
8-2-1 season and an invitation to
the Peach Bowl, where they lost a
heartbreaker to the Hokies of
Virginia Tech, another 1987 ECU
opponent. Of course winning
was nothing new to Sheridan,
who was at one time the win-
ningest active coach in division
1�A A while at Furman Univer-
sity �
Winning was new, however, to
the Wolfpack, and expectations
ire high for a second winning
season. The question mark still
extraordanaire Erik Kramer, the
ACC Player of the Year, and four
other all-ACC picks who gradu-
ated last spring.
The Pack docs return 49 letter-
man and 10 starters, including
all-ACC flanker Nasrallah
Worthen. Worthen caught a
team-leading 41 passes last sea-
son for 686 yards and four touch-
downs. 1987 will be Worthcn's
senior campaign, and should
prove to be his finest year.
At split end, track star Danny
Peebles, who caught four touch-
down passes in '8t, and senior
Mack Jones, who also returns
punts, will be squaring off to de-
cide who will replace Haywood
Jeffires, a first-round selection in
the 1987 NFL draft, at one of the
wide redeiver slots.
Although State lost four of its
top six tacklcrs from a year ago, a
greatdcal of talent remainson the
defensive side of the ball. The
front five should be the corner-
stone of the defense, and several
veteran players are returning.
Mark Smith, one of the Pack's
co-captains, and Scott Wilson
look to be the starting outside
linebackers. Smith, who made 57
tackles last year, and Wilson ,
also saw considerable action in
1986. At nose guard, three-year
letterman Kent Winstead was the
starter after spring drills.
The tackle slots should be taken
by Ray Agnew, the 1986 ACC
Rookie of the Year, and John
Adleta, both of whom have seen
extensive action. Derick
Debnam, a young talent, should
also gain playing time in the
front.
At inside linebacker, Sheridan
must replace Teague and 1986 co-
captain Kelvin Crooms. Fred
Stone, a tough junior, finished his
sophomore campaign as the
Pack's number two tackle and
could be in for a big year. A
number of players will be work-
ing to join Stone. Four sopho-
mores, including Grant Slavin,
Mark King, Jesse Jones and Mike
Woods will compete for that va-
cant spot.
In the secondary , State will
have a pair of returning starters,
but two inexperienced players
will have to step forward at the
cornerback positions.
Leading the defensive backs
will be strong safety Chris
Johnson and free safety Michael
Brooks. Johnson has established
himself as one of the ACC's top
defenders, while the sure-footed
Brooks improved throughout the
1986 season.
Johnson will be backed by
Dexter Royal and Keith Johnson,
both of whom are red-shirt fresh-
men. Brian Gay, a key contributor
last fall, was injured during
spring workouts. If he can return
to his old form, he and Stacey
Mannung will provide depth a
the free safety position.
Izel Jenkins, who runs for the
NCSU track squad, is a leading
candidate for one of the comer-
back slots, but the other is wide
open. Red-shirt freshmen Joe
Johnson and sophomore letter-
men Al Byrd, Barry Anderson,
and Jeff Hairston will all be work-
ing for the job during pre-season
drills.
The Pirates will renew their
rivalry with the Wolfpack on
Sept. 5 at 7 p.m. in Carter Finley
Stadium. This year will mark the
18th time the two teams have met.
The Wolfpack leads the series 12-
5, however the two teams have
split the last four meetings
played. Last year's contest drew a
crowd of 58,650. That was the
largest crowd to ever watch a
football game in the state of
North Carolina.
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Kdttor
Art Baker thinks this might be
the year for the Pirates.
After suffering through three
consecutive 2-9 seasons, head
football coach Baker thinks that
this might be the season for ECU
to finally put together a winning
campaign. No he doesn't mean
an unbeaten season � he just
means a winning season.
'The most realistic goal that
we have, and we've talked about
it alot since last year, is to have a
winning season said the opti-
mistic Baker. "That is a step that
we feel we need to make this year,
and the talent level is there to
achieve the first step
Baker feels that his players and
coaches are behind him 100 per-
cent in his effort. In fact, the team,
according to Baker has taken on a
"new attitude
"Our theme for this season is
'New Attitude said Baker
"We've had the slogan printed up
on shirts for each of the players
and the back of the shirt reads
'Count Me In
Even with the team's new-
found attitude and excitement
about this season, the fact re
mains that the Pirates have to fao �
oneof the nation's most challeng-
ing grid schedules once again this
year.
Among the national power
houses for the Pirates to contend
with are Miami (Fl.), Florida
State, South Carolina, Illinois,
N.C State, West Virginia and
Virginia Tech. Also on the sched-
ule for 1987 are two-time defend
ing NCAA Division I-AA na-
tional champions Georgia South-
ern, Cincinnati, Temple and
Southern Mississippi
Baker realizes the dilticul ol
the schedule, but he also realizes
that there is nothing that he can
do about it except try to overcome
it.
"It's unfortunate that we have
to play our biggest rival (N.C.
State) in the opening game of the
season and then turn right
around and pla v a team in Florida
State who many feel will be in the
top five in the nation next sea-
New ECU soccer coach plans attack
���3�X3kXX3�3K3��3�VVV3K3SX3W3t�
By GEORGE OSBORNE
Sports Writer
East Carolina, with a record of
w -10-1, posted the best win-loss
record in soccer history last sea-
son. But for first year head coach
Charley Harvey, the best still isn't
quite good enough.
Harvey, who served as a Pirate
assistant for three years, has laid
out the ECU plan of attack for
37. "Our goal this year is to
have a winning season, no ques-
tion about it Harvey said. "We
have to be more competitive in
the conference and as a coach 1
want to establish a continuity in
the ECU soccer organization
At the close of the '86 season,
Harvey was named interim head
coach following the resignation
of Steve Brody. He was named to
the position permanently this
pring. Harvey, 24, is a native of
Mclean, VA and previously
coached in the high school ranks
at Mclean High School. Dave
McAllister will assist Harvey this
year.
Preseason workouts came to a
close Friday for the Pirates and
Coach Harvey was impressed
with the team's performance.
"All of our players came into
camp in really good shape Har-
vey said. "We concentrated
mainly on our ball control skills
and work within a ten yard range
and we've made great progress
Defense was also a main con-
cern in camp this year with im-
provement being attributed to
two newcomers. Andy Britton, a
sophomore from Florida Interna-
tional University, and Matt Rich-
tor, a junior from Lawrence, NJ,
have found places in the ECU
starting line-up.
"Andy has a good head for
defense and knows when to at-
tack. 1 le will work well with re-
turning sweeper Larry Bennett
Harvey said. "Matt is simply a
very strong tackier which is what
we needed. He has matured a lot
since coming to East Carolina"
In addition to a strong back-
field, ECU will field a strong
keeper and two solid back-ups.
"Our defense was also helped
with the addition of two fresh-
man goalies and the return of our
veteran keeper Mac Kendall
Harvey said. Kendall played
behind senior George Podgorny
last year, and subsequently did
not get a lot of playing time, but
has made great strides during
pre-season.
Up front for the Pirates this
year will be veterans Robert Lar-
rison and Steve McCarthy. Mc-
Carthy was the second leading
scorer on the team last year with
six goals and two assists. He was
also the only Pirate named the
C A A player of the week and was
high in the voting for all-confer-
ence honors.
Larrison, a junior from Raleigh,
will be called to distribute the
ECU offense. "Robert has the
experience in the mid field necce-
sary to run the show offensively
which includes vocally coordina-
ting the players Harvey said.
The Pirates will go to a one-a-
day practice schedule as they
prepare for the season opening
scrimmage against Mt. Olive col-
lege September 1. ECU will stay
on the road during the early part
of the season traveling to Francis
Marion September 6 and opening
conference play September 9 at
William & Mary.
ECU'S first home match will be
the weekend of September 12-13
with contests against conference
powerhouse George Mason Uni-
versity and James Madison re-
spectively. The Tirates will play
all of their home matched at Var-
sity Field located adjacent to
Minges Coliseum.
Cliatt signed on as
ECU associate AD
Charley Harvey
Ed Cliatt has been named asso-
ciate athletic director for internal
affairs at East Carolina, ECU di-
rector of athletics Ken Karr an-
nounced last Wednesday.
Cliatt, 49, replaces Gene Tem-
pleton, who resigned his position
last month to enter private busi-
ness in Arizona.
Cliatt comes to ECU from the
Air Force Academy, where he
was associate athletic director for
the past four years. He has been
at the academy since 1966 and
will retire his rank of colonel
when he assumes his duties with
the Pirate program in September.
The Norfolk, VA. native began
his career at Air Force in 1966 as
the Falcon's wrestling coach. He degree in education from the
continued as head coach until University of Michigan in 1967.
1970 when he became the director
of the physical education depart-
ment.
"Ed Cliatt brings to the job
more than a decade of experience
in doing exactly what this job
entails Karr said. "We're fortu-
nate to have him join our athletic
department
Cliatt received his under-
graduate degree from the Uni-
versity of Maryland in 1961.
During his years at Maryland, he
was a standout wrestler for the
Terrapins as he won the Atlantic
Coast Conference wrestling
crown in 1959 in the 130-pound
class. He received his master's
son s,nd Baker "Our third
game is our first ever meeting
against Big Ten Conference
member Illinois, so we have our
toughest stretch right at the be-
ginning and we must battle to
overcome that
Baker has reason to enter the
season with confidence. Back
from last year are 16 starters and
a total of 41 letterwinners. And
the much maligned defense of
last season returns nine starters,
who with a year of invaluable
experience behind them, should
produce good results this season.
leading the offense for Baker
tins fall will be sophomore Travis
1 lunter. 1 iunter split time as sig-
nal-caller with Charlie Libretto
last season,but was given the nod
tor the starting job after turning in
an excellent spring. Libretto is
expected to serve as backup to
1 lunter this season.
'Travis Hunter went through
the spring drills and did the job
needed to win the position said
Baker. "That is not to say that
Charlie Libretto had a bad spring
because he did not at all. Both
players improved tremendously
from last year, and that year of
experience behind the ball in
front of teople against the
eventual national champion
(PennState)and national runner-
up (Miami, Fl.) will only make
th m better quarterbacks
Brad V alsh, back from a one-
sear lav oti. will also add depth at
quarterback for the Pirates this
fal .
e tailback position, or slot
position as it is called in the Run
and Shoot offensi which the Pi-
rates employ, is stocked full of
experienced backs this season tor
the Pffates lfctop candidates
�le�- tiie pOsit�Asaft
Willie Lewis wno ti
excellent spring and arrod
Moo.l, who was the leading
pass receiver for the Pirates last
season.
Adding depth at the slot posi-
ti n will be Reggie McKinney
and Ron Jones, who missed last
season due to a knee injury, along
with termer quarterback Todd
See Pirates puj;e 36
t


v

I
I

I
I
!

N
K
(
I
Seventh annual rally slated
for September 3 at Ficklen
The seventh-annual
Budweiscr-East Carolina Uni-
versity Football Pep Rally will be
held on Thursday, Sept. 3 from 7-
7:45 p.m. in Ficklen Stadium.
Numerous prizes will be given
away, including $1,000 worth of
grand prizes to be given away by
Spuds MacKenzie, the official
mascot for Bud Light beer.
The entire football team and
coaching staff will be on hand for
the event. Also present will be
the ECU cheerleaders and
PeeDee the Pirate, along with the
Marching Pirates, who will make
their traditional march up Col-
1 hll Drive at 630 p.m.
iuest speakers for the
pep
rally will include ECL Chancel-
lor Dr. Richard Eakin, ECU Ath-
letic Director Dr. Ken Karr as well
as some of the Pirate football
players
Everyone is encouraged to
come cuit .md get the Pirates tired
up for the N.C. State contest,
which will be played Saturday,
Sept. 5 at 7 p.m. in Raleigh at
Cartcr-Finlev Stadium.
In the event of rain, the pep
rally will be held in Minges Coli-
seum.
ECU grid assistant inked
GREENVILLE, N.C. � Kevin
Gilbride, offensive coordinator
for the Ottawa Rough Riders and
Montreal Alouettes of the Cana-
dian Football League for the past
three seasons, has been named as
an assistant coach at East Caro-
lina.
The announcement of
Gilbridge's hiring was made by
ECU head coach Art Baker Tues-
day. He will replace Jeff Farring-
ton, who resigned last week to
become defensive coordinatior at
Lenior-Rhyne College.
Gilbride has been the quarter-
back and receivers coach for the
Rough Riders of the CFL in 1985,
and he was promoted to offen-
sive coordinator for the 1986 sea-
son. He had just accepted the
position as offensive coordinator
for Montreal when the team
folded just before the 1987 season
was to begin.
Gilbride will be the special
teams coordinator and work
closely with the Pirate offense for
the 1987 season. He was instru-
mental in adding the run-and-
shoot offense at Ottawa and
should add greatly to ECU's
implementation of the offense,
'To say that we were fortunate
to hire Kevin at this time of the
year is quite an understatement
Baker said, "lie's exactly what
we needed with his expertise in
the passing game and the run-
and-shoot. This will also be the
first time in mv three years here
that we've had a special teams
coordinator.
"Anvtime you can add some-
one to your coaching staff who
has professional football experi-
ence as well as experience on the
college level as both a head coach
and assistant is quite a coup
Gilbride was head coach at
Southern Connecticut State Uni-
versity in New Haven, CT from
1980-84. During that time, the
Owls posted a 35-14 record and
were nationally-ranked on the
NCAA Division II level for two of
his last three seasons.
During his time as head coach,
Gilbride's teams were consis-
tently among the leaders in Divi-
sion II offennsive categories.
Gilbride has also been an assis-
tant coach on the collegiate level
at Idaho State (1974-75), Rhode
Island (1976), and American In-
ternational (1977-79).


J
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36
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25,1987
Pirates look for success in y&7
Continued from page 36
Abrams, Carl Barkers and
George Franklin.
The fullback position is proba-
bly the most solid position on the
entire riratc football team. Senior
power-runner Anthony Simpson
returns along with junior backup
Tim James. Simpson led the Pi-
rates in rushing last season with
753 yards on 178 carries.
The receivers for Hunter in the
Run and Shoot formation this
season should produce well as
seven letterwinners return. The
receivers are led by sophomore
Walter Wilson, who is the most-
likely big-play threat for the Pi-
rates. Also expected to garner a
good deal of playing time are sen-
iors Jackie Armstrong and Tony
Smith.
The tight end position should
once again be a strong suit in the
Pirates deck as versatile senior
Ben Billings returns along with
junior Matt McLaughlin. Billings,
according to Baker, will also see
some action on the offensive line.
Speaking of the offensive line,
that was the biggest concern for
the Pirate coaches entering
spring drills. The positions, how-
ever, were all tilled by the time
(all workouts began.
At the tackles, the Pirates will
field sophomore Grant Lowe and
either John O'Driscoll or Todd
Drugac. Also seeing action at
tackle will be senior Leon Hall,
redshirt freshman Chad Martin
and Brad Brown.
The guard positions will be
filed by a pair oi part-time start-
rs from last year. Juniors Joe
Molineaux and Billy Michel are
the likely starters, while junior
Bill Maxwell and sophomore
Stuart Southall are the expected
backups.
1 he center position was won bv
Kyle Condrey during spring
drills. The red-shirt junior will be
acked up by sophomore Carl
Carney.
Defensively, the Pirates need
desperately to have better suc-
cess in the secondary this season.
Baker realizes this and he hopes
.vith the transfer of Ellis Dil-
lahunt from safety to corncrback
and the year of experience gained
by the rest of the secondary that
the Pirates will be greatly im-
proved in that area.
"There's no question that our
biggest culprit is that we have
been hurt in the secondary said
Baker. "Part of that problem has
simply been that we've been
playing with inexperienced,
young players who should be
learning from veterans. But, there
were no veterans
Heading up the secondary this
year will be All-America candi-
date Dillahunt. Senior Robert
Martin will probably get the
starting spot at the other corner
position. Red-shirt freshman Ed
Brogden, a converted quarter-
back, has come on strong at the
position as has sophomore Ricky
Torain. Both could challenge for
playing time.
The likely starters at safety will
be junior Flint McCallum at
strong safety and junior Roswell
Streeter at free safety.
The linebacking corps will be
the strong point of the defense
this season with Bubba Waters
and V'inson Smith returning to
play inside linebacker. The out-
side linebacker spots will be filled
by Willie Pe veil and John Wil-
liamson.
"Our linebackers, like our full-
backs on offense, are very very
strong for us said Baker.
"Bubba Waters and Vinson Smith
ire as good a linebacking duo as
you could ask for
The backups at linebacker will
include Ernie Logan, Junior
Johnson, Barnie Gyant, William
Pretty, James Singletary, Ken
Taylor, Essray Taliaferro, Mike
Leggett and Ron Gilliard.
The nose tackle spot on the
defense will be filled this season
by Medrick Rainbow. The senior
split time as a starter last season.
Rainbow will receive backup
help from Carl Carney and Bruce
Simpson.
The defensive ends will be
anchored by Walter Bryant and
North Carolina transfer Mike
Applewhite. Also seeing action at
the position will be Mike Do- handled by returning starting
nahue, Shannon Boling and Rod- Chuck Berleth. He will be backed
ney Glover.
The placekicking duties will be up by Robb Imperato.
ECU will depend on the passing and running ability of starting
quarterback Travis Hunter in 1987.
FSU feels optimistic
By PAT MOLLOY
Sport Writer
Optimism is the word that best
sums up the Florida State
Seminole's feelings concerning
the 1987 football season. Opti-
mism mixed with a healthy dose
oi potential.
Bobby Bowden, and his sea-
soned squad are looking forward
to a season that may, at last, bring
FSU the national championship.
1 leading the Seminole's offen-
sive attack is senior quarterback
Danny McManus who has
started in ten games and com-
pleted 58 percent of his passing
attempts. Within those ten
games, McManus threw for 872
yards � the most of any quarter-
back on the roster.
At tailback, Florida State ap-
pears devastating. Their head-
liner is Freshman Ail-American
Sammie Smith. At 6-2, 220-
pounds, Smith has already
rushed for 850 yards in his career
� a career that spans one year.
Within that yardage are two 100
yard games. He averages 5.9
yards per carry. Backing Smith is
Victor Hoyd who is only 112
yards away from becoming the
10th mosi productive back in FSU
history. The Seminoles' running
See Seminoles page 38
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Illini hope
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Iditor
Following a disappointing 4-7
season last year, a disgruntled
Illinois head coach Mike White
restructured the coaching staff in
an attempt to once again bring the
Illini back to major prominence
In year's past the fans at Illinois
would have thought nothing at
all about having a losing season,
as before White took over the
coaching reigns the Illini had fin-
ished no better than 5-6 since
before the 147 season. But, after
White struggled through a 3-7-1
record his firs! season, the Mini
had posted winning records e -
cry year until last season
White brought in six new men,
all which have either experience
on the major college level or in the
NFL. The six new coaches in
Champaign this fall an
coordinator Dwain Painter
fensivecoordinator Howard
pett, offensive line coach ,
Moener, defensive back I
coach Bob Wallace receiver
coach Tim Harkness and offen-
sive backficld coach Ron
Hudson.
Paintei s lal
Georgia
Tippett's las
Tampa Bav
NFL
Along wi!
blood at llhr
have tin
transfers th
ILK
used a gre
arrived on ti
On;
have sev
from last
tean ' '

Men!
Eagles enter
By TIM CHANDLER
Sportx r ditor
Georgia Southern College has a
tall task awaiting it as the
football season is nearing its start.
The two-time defending
NCAA Division I-AA national
champions have to replace a
player who head coach Erk
Russell claims can't be replaced
All-American Tracv Ham, who
was named Offensive Plaver-of-
the-Year by one publication, will
no longer be calling the signals
for the Eagle's exciting Hambone
offense.
"He (Tracy Ham) can't be re-
placed said Russell. "That's not
to say that we will fall apart be-
cause he is gone, but he was the
best that I have seen at making
something out of nothing. And
that's something that can't be
ta.ny,ht "
playi
-
Junu
Bulk
I hi
�.on
some b
aid Hai
all :
this year j
rt fresl
1 rank
slot'r -
and she.
most explol
sively. Johns
receiving ck
HELP
-PIZZA
-PIZZA
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Apply at P. T.
of 14th St.
Apply betWi
3:
Be willing to


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By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Following a disappointing 4-7
season last year, a disgruntled
Illinois head coach Mike White
restructured the coaching staff in
jn attempt to once again bring the
lllini back to major prominence.
In year's past the fans at Illinois
would have thought nothing at
all about having a losing season,
.is before White took over the
coaching reigns the lllini had fin-
ished no better than 5-6 since
before the 1975 season. But, after
White struggled through a 3-7-1
record his first season, the lllini
had posted winning records ev-
en- year until last season.
White brought in six new men,
.ill which have either experience
en the major college level or in the
NIL. The six new coaches in
Champaign this fall arc offensive
coordinator Dwain Tainter, de-
fensive coordinator Howard Tip-
pett, offensive line coach Pete
Mocner, defensive backfield
coach Bob Wallace, receiver
coach Tim Harkness and offen-
sive backtield coach Ron
1 hidson.
rt
t U .Ml
;
IGHT
ack ECU
& Staff
f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25, 1987
37
Painter's last two stints were at
Georgia Tech and Texas, while
Tippett's last job was with the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the
NFL.
Along with the new coaching
blood at Illinois, White also will
have the aid of 10 junior college
transfers this season. The use of
JUCO players at Illinois has been
used a great deal since White
arrived on the scene.
On the offensive side, the lllini
have seven starters returning
from last year's squad including
team MVP Keith Jones. Jones led
the lllini in rushing last season
with 534 yardsand healsoearnec"
himself a job as kick returner.
Quarterbacking the lllini this
fall will be Brian Menkhausen.
Menkhausen won the starting job
after turning in an excellent
spring. Menkhausen gained
some valuable experience last
season and completed 57.1 per-
cent of his passes, 96 of 168 for 991
yards.
The fullback slot should be
filled bv Jeff Markland. Last sea-
son, Markland tallied 160 yards
and 10 receptions.
The receiving corps will be
watched very closely this fall by
White. Receivers might even be
hard to come by following the
loss of last season's top two re-
ceivers, Stephen Pierce and Jerry
Reese. The one bright spot on the
receiving unit is Anthony
Wiliams. The senior tight end
returnsafter hauling in 36catches
last season.
The lllini return ninestarterson
the defensive unit. The defense
finished atop the Big Ten Confer-
ence standings last season in pass
defense. The unit also allowed
the fewest yards of total offense
in a game last season. Louisville
managed only 100 yards of total
offense against the defense.
The frontline and linebacking
corps return this season intact, so,
as expected, White expects a lot
from the group. Linemen Mike
Piel and Scott Davis are looked on
to lead the line. Piel was the team
leader with nine tackles-for-
losses last season, while Davis led
the team with four quarterback
sacks.
At season's end last year, three
sophomores occupied the start-
year
ing linebacking roles. The added
year of experience should help
the group to be even tougher this
season. The leader of the line-
backing corps is All-Big Ten se-
lection Steve Glasson. Glasson
was named all-conference after
recording 84 tackles in only eight
starts last season. Adding depth
at linebacker will be Southern
Methodist University transfer
Gabriel De La Garza.
Bouncing back into the uper
echelon of college football will
not be easy for the lllini. In addi-
tion to the rugged Big Ten sched-
ule, which includes teams such as
Ohio State, Michigan, Purdue
and Minnesota, the lllini also
have non-conference match-ups
against North Carolina and
Arizona State.
The Pirates will face Illinois
Sept. 19 in Champaign, 111. at 6
p.m. CT.
This will mark the first time
that Illinois and ECU have met. It
will also be the first time that an
ECU squad has faced a team from
the Big Ten Conference.
tsmrrs
MONDAY NITEIS FOOTBALL!
Half-Time
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CASUAL DINING-FORMAL DRINKING
Eagles enter new season without a Ham
For An All American Family Meal j.
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport! I'd it or
Georgia Southern College has a
tall task awaiting it as the 1987
football season is nearing its start.
The two-time defending
NCAA Division I-AA national
champions have to replace a
player who head coach Erk
Russell claims can't be replaced.
Ail-American Tracy Ham, who
was named Offensive Player-of-
the-Year by one publication, will
no longer be calling the signals
for the Eagle's exciting Hambone
offense.
"He (Tracy Ham) can't be re-
placed said Russell. "That's not
to say that we will fall apart be-
cause he is gone, but he was the
best that I have seen at making
something out of nothing. And
that's something that can't be
taught .
Heading into fall practice, five
players had a shot at being tabbed
as the person to replace Ham.
Juniors Ken Burnette and Ken
Bullock along with sophomore
Ernest Thompson all battled
fiercely for the position in spring
drills. A pair of incoming fresh-
man arc also expected to compete
for playing time.
The fullback position is another
position where someone will
have some big shoes to fill. Ger-
ald Harris, Georgia Southern's
all-time leading scorer, is gone.
Battling for the fullback position
this year is junior Gary Miller and
redshirt freshman Jerome King.
Frank Johnson returns to the
slotback position for the Eagle's
and should prove to be the team's
most explosive threat offen-
sively. Johnson led the Eagles in
receiving during the regular sea-
son last year.
Tony Belscr returns to the wide
receiver position again this year.
Last season, he led the team in
yards-pcr-reception with 243.
The other wide receiver spot is
still up for grabs as Darren Chan-
dler and Ross Worsham entered
fall practice as the top two candi-
dates.
The offensive line for the Eagles
may be the most stable part of the
offensive corps as the season
starts. Dennis Franklin, one of the
top lineman in the country, re-
turns to the center position. Two-
year starter Charles Cochran will
hold down one of the guard
spots, while Sean Gainey, who
started the final three games of
last season, will fill the void in the
other guard position.
Converted guard Ronald War-
nock along with Tony Smith, who
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Apply at P.T.A. on the corner
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Transit
'Authority.
saw limited action last season,
will hold down the tackle posi-
tions.
Defensively, the Eagles have
some holes to fill, but there are
also quite a few bright spots re-
turning.
The linebacker position is by
far the most solid position on the
entire team. Eight players return
to the position to battle for play-
ing time. 1986 leading tackier
Robert Underwood and 1985
leading tackier Flint Matthews
both return. Other probable start-
ers include Thomas Porter and
Dave Hodge. The two split time
at linebacker last season.
The safety position, on the
other hand, is a major concern for
the Eagle coaches as the season
nears. Brad Bowen and Milton
See Eagles page 39
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STEAKHO'JSE
3005 East 10th Street Greenville. NC
Welcome Back Student Staff
The Department of Residence Life and Housing wishes to welcome
back the friendly high energy community builders, information
givers, activity planners, confidants, problem solvers, and floor
leaders that make up our student staff.
We are proud to say that these individuals help to make the resi-
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tlfcliAljiii
IOOBOOBOBB
3KMCSCKVW
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Robin Andrews
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Paige Barber
Camille Barden
Susan Barker
Mike Bassetti
Delbert Bauzon
Diane Best
Mike Bernier
Ron Blackwell
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Terri Can-
Michelle Caswick
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Karen Fowler
Elizabeth Frazzelle
Larry Furlong
Paul Gainey
Tim Garifalon
Jennifer Garris
Jill Gorenflo
David Green
Stephanie Gryder
GregGunter
Brian Hall
Mark Hall
Monica Hampton
Kathleen Heister
Barry Hewett
Deniece Hicks
Mary Higdon
Karen Holloman
Starla Howard
Teri Hueskes
Lori Jackson
Eric Johnson
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Laura Kent
Pat King
Camille Koonce
Jeff Kotzan
Brain Larrick
ReneeLee
Robin Leonard
Karen LiPuma
Pam Martin
Cheri Matthews
David Mayr
Denise McLaughlin
Bill McLuskie
Brandon McNamara
Chris McPhatter
Cathy Mickens
Jeff Miller
Steve Money
Robert Morrison
Anita Mullinax
Karen Mustian
Beverly Nelson
Tracy Newman
Danny Nicholson
Juanita Nicholson
Ed Norman
JoyO'DeH
Toiriste O'Neal
Katrina Parker
Craig Pendergraft
Leslie Person
Billy Peterson
Melissa Price
Ellen Proia
Zina Rhodes
Michelle Richardson
April Ridgely
Laura Salazar
Stephanie Sanders
Stacie Scales
Teresa Schallock
Scott Skinner
Pat Smith
Angela Spear
Scott Strubinger
Brad Swearingen
David Taylor
Reggie Terry
Keith Tew
Greg Thompson
Toni Throneburg
Buddy Tingle
Neal Torrey
Stacy Truitt
Margie Tyson
Patsy Ward
Robbie Washington
David Weber
��




































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38
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25,1987




A
Seminoles in search of top 10
Continued from page 36
game is in prime condition.
At fullback, Bowden's boys
seem to sag a bit. This should be
only a temporary problem. The
coaching staff is counting on 6-1
240-pound junior college transfer
Marion Butts to graduate this
summer and head to Tallahassee.
Butts is reputed to be the bruiser
that FSU is looking for.
Florida State has nine returning
receivers, with senior Herb
Gainer (27 receptions) at the split
end position. Fellow senior
Randy White has won the flanker
job. Sophomores Terry Anthony
and Ronald Lewis both played as
true freshmen last year, and will
most likely rotate positions with
White and Gainer. The remaining
FSU receivers are either sopho-
mores or younger � the Semino-
les will be solid at this position for
a good while.
Starting at tight end will be
All-American candidate Pat Car-
ter. While he doesn't possoss all-
star stats, at 6-4,258-pounds, Car-
ter may well be the best catcher
blocker in the nation. FSU is
banking hard on Carter; and so
are the pro scouts.
Another sore spot shows up at
theoffensive tackle position. Two
starters are returning, but it's the
backup that has Bowden wor-
ried. At right tackle is 300-pound
Pat Tomberlin, an All-American
candidate. Joe Lonata is a veteran
of eight games at the split tackle
position. Backing up Tomberlin
are sophomore John Brown and
junior Anthony Johnson. Brown
has limited game experience, and
Johnson is learning the position
after three years on the defense.
The only backup at the split side
are a pair of freshmen who have
no game experience. Offensive
tackle is a major weak spot.
Florida State's defense is in
basically fine condition. There
are possibly three weak spots, but
overall, the Seminoles are ex-
pected to seek and destroy.
Paul McGowan is the good
news at the inside linebacker slot.
He is a Butkus candidate, and one
of the finest hitters ever to play at
Tallahassee. McGowan has lead
the team in tackles and tackles-
for-loss (21) for the past two
years. However, McGowan's
partner, Fred Jones, is gone, and
with him, the experience that FSU
has enjoyed for the past two
years. The backups at this posi-
tion have extremely high poten-
tial, and should they bloom as
expected, the inside linebacker
position will be a plus for the
defense.
The defensive tackle position is
expected to be solid, but exactly
who the solid player will be is still
unknown. Departed right tackle
starter Gerald Nichols was the
line's anchor last year and must
be replaced. Steve Gabbard, a re-
turner in the left tackle slot
started 10 of the 11 regular season
games and also enjoyed a good
spring. However, if 6-4, 294 Eric
Hayes can translate his potential
into play, he'll push Gabbard.
The safety position seems very
strong for the Seminoles this sea-
son as both starters return along
with the two backups. Junior Stan
Shiver will hold down the strong
safety spot, while fifth-year sen-
ior Greg Newell will start at free
safety. Dedrick Dodge and John
Hadlcy are waiting in the wings
to play if need be.
All-American Deion Sanders
along with fith-year senior Eric
Williams are the likely candi-
Mountaineers seek turnaround
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport Editor
Don Nehlan and the faithful
fans of West Virginia do not like
losing.
Last season the Mountaineers
suffered through a disappointing
4-7 record. It marked the first
time since 1980, when Nehlan
took over as coach, that the
Mountaineers have had a losing
season. For Nehlan, it was the
first losing season since 1970,
when his Bowling Green squad
tallied a 2-6-1 mark.
The problem last year for the
Mountaineers was inconsistency
� both offensively ,and defen-
sively. So, for Nehlan the end of
the season flfcant the beginning
He put the Mountaineers
through rugged off-season train-
ing in an attempt to improve
quickness on the team, which
Nehlan felt was one step behind
the opponents all season.
Nehlan's goal during the offsea-
son was simple � he wanted to
return to the top of the colege
football world.
One of the first difficult deci-
sions awaiting Nehlan when fall
practice cranked up was who
would quarterback the team.
Mike Timko got the starting nod
on eight occasions last year. He
completed 90 of 189 passes, 47.6
percent for 1,191 yards and was
intercepted nine times.
Timko's backup last season
was Ben Reed. Reed started on
three occasions last year and re-
placed Timko on numerous occa-
sions when Nehlan felt that
Timko was not moving the squad
properly during the game. Also
challenging for the job will be
red-shirt freshmen Major Harris
and Browning Nagle.
The Mountaineer running back
corps has some revamping to do
with the loss of John Holifield.
Holifield rushed for 645 yards
last season. The main back this
season will be Undra Johnson,
who tallied 652 yards rushing last
season while scoring five touch-
downs.
A.B. Brown and Eugene Napo-
leon, both transfers from the
University of Pittsburgh, should
contribute to the backfield
greatly. Pat Randolph will be
tried at the fullback position as
the Mountaineers need to fill the
shoes that Chris Peccon and Ed
Hill left.
Nehlan has reason to feel confi-
dent about his offensive line.
Returning center Kevin Koken
will be joined by tacldes Milton
Redwine and Brian Smidef. AlP
three should be much-improved
after gaining a year of experience.
The guard positions will be bol-
stered depth wise with the addi-
See W. V'a. page 40
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dates to start for the Seminoles at
cornerback. The FSU coaches feel
that this position may be the
strongest on the Seminole de-
fense.
ECU will play the Seminoles on
Sept. 12 at 7 p.m. in Ficklen Sta-
dium. The game will be the home
opener for the Pirates. This will be
the fifth time that the two teams
have met, but it will mark the first
time that FSU has played in
Greenville. The Seminloes lead
the series 4-0.
The last time the Piiates faced
FSU, the Seminoles recorded a
48-17 victory. Pirate head coach
Art Baker was an assistant coach
at FSU then. ECU lost a heart-
breaker to the Seminoles in 1983,
as FSU slipped past the Pirates
47-46.
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Eagles nth
Continued from page 37
Gore, both starters last season,
are gone. Calvin Robinson and
converted cornerback Taz Dixon
are the likely candidates to step in
and take charge at the position
this season.
The two cornerback positions
will be filled by the Young broth-
ers � Nay and Terry. Nay has
been a three year starter at Geor-
gia Southern. He is also the all-
time leading pass interceptor for
the Eagles. Terry saw spot action
last season that gave him some
good experience heading into
this year
Everett Sharpe, who shared
time with Danny Durham last
season, will takeover the starting
reigns for the rover position
Heading into fall practice the
main concern at this position was
that there was no quality backups
for Sharpe.
The defensive line seems to be
pretty stable for Georgia South-
ern this season. Larry Boone and
Donnie Allen are gone from their
defensive
Craig Wa
are readv
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roles last
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Tyrone
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Thedefc
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Eagles � .j
impr
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Heisman ho
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport Editor
The University of Cincinnati,
behind the arm of senior quarter-
back Danny McCoin, one of the
nation's top returning QB's, have
high hopes for a successful grid
campaign.
McCoin, a Heisman Trophv
candidate, ranks among the
nation's best in career statistics.
He ranks second in efficiency,
first in completion percentage
and fifth in total yardage.
Those statistics along with the
veteran cast of receivers return-
ing for the Bearcats should make
the Cincinnati offense an explo-
sive one as the Bearcats try to
lmproveon last season's 5-6 rec-
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The quarterback paginon nag
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Eagles must regroup in '87
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1987
39
Continued from page 37
Gore, both starters last season,
are gone. Calvin Robinson and
converted cornerback Taz Dixon
are the likely candidates to step in
and take charge at the position
this season.
The two cornerback positions
will be filled by the Young broth-
ers � Nay and Terry. Nay has
been a three year starter at Geor-
gia Southern. He is also the all-
time leading pass interceptor for
the Eagles. Terry saw spot action
last season that gave him some
good experience heading into
this year.
Everett Sharpe, who shared
time with Danny Durham last
season, will take over the starring
reigns for the rover position.
Heading into fall practice the
main concern at this position was
that there was no quality backups
for Sharpe.
The defensive line seems to be
pretty stable for Georgia South-
cm this season. Larry Boone and
Donnie Allen are gone from their
defensive guard positions, but
Craig Walker and Charlie Waller
are ready to step in. Walker and
Waller, although playing in sub
roles last season, saw almost as
much playing time as did Boone
and Allen.
Tyrone Hull and Rod Eichler
are the likely starters at the defen-
sive tackle spot. Hull is a return-
ing starter at the position and
Eichler returns to the position
after being switched from line-
backer in the middle of the season
last year.
The defensive end starting role
seems to be in the hands of Jeff
Banks. James Carter, who will
challenge hard for playing time at
defensive tackle, could possibly
be called on to assist with duties
at defensive end also.
Even with the loss of the key
players from last year's squad,
coach Russell knows that the
Eagles must continue to try and
improve.
"We have to be better every
year said Russell. "Last year,
teams wanted to beat us because
we were the defending champi-
ons. Now that we've won two in
a row, they want to beat us that
much more. We have to play up
to our capabilities every week. If
we don't, it'll be a long season.
In summing up Georgia
Southern's chance for winning a
third straight Division I-AA na-
tional championship, Russell
simply stated, "HELP
The Pirates will face Georgia
Southern on Sept. 26 at 1:30 p.m. i j
in Ficklcn Stadium. It wil be the
third meeting between the two
teams. ECU holds a 2-0 lead. In
last year's contest, Chuck Berleth
hit a 47-yard field goal with 12
seconds remaining to lift ECU to a
35-33 victory.
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By TIM CHANDLER
Spori Editor
The Universitv of Cincinnati,
behind the arm of senior quarter-
back Danny McCoin, one of the
nation's top returning QB's, have
high hopes for a successful grid
campaign.
McCoin, a Heisman Trophy
candidate, ranks among the
nation's best in career statistics.
He ranks second in efficiency,
first in completion percentage
and fifth in total yardage.
Those statistics along with the
veteran cast of receivers return-
ing for the Bearcats should make
the Cincinnati offense an explo-
sive one as the Bearcats try to
improve on last season's 5-6 rec-
ord. � �-
"The quarterbadH position taS
been the Key" to WTSTylTW Of-
fense said fourth-year head
coach Dave Curry. "And this year
it will be even more obvious be-
cause it encompasses the experi-
ence of our offense. As the quar-
terback goes, so goes our offense.
"Statistically, Danny has out-
standing credentials, " continued
Curry. "He is a proven college
football player who has accom-
plished a lot while playing in
extenuating situations. He has
performed at his best while play-
ing against the top competition.
We need for Danny to have a
good year in order for the team to
be successful
McCoin has a talented corps of
receivers returning to round out a
potent passing attack.
Joe Hice, a 6-1 junior, who led
the team in receiving the last two
seasons, iclui us Mr another yt.hr
See Rugged page 43
EARN EXTRA MONEY WHILE
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Tl IE LAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25,1987
M

V
- �"Xr

W. Va. loaded with receivers
Continued from page 37
tion of redshirt freshman Dale
Wolfley.
The Mountaineers have their
hands full of talented receivers.
The group is led by senior Har-
vey Smith. Smith hauled in 28
aerials for 456 yards and five
touchdowns last season. Also
aiding to the cause will be John
Talley, who pulled in 27 catches
for 353 yards last year, along with
Calvin Phillips and Grant Bell.
The lone problem for Nehlan
concerning the receivers is the
lack of experience or players for
the tight end position. Heading
into the fall, no one person had
been tabbed to handle the duties.
Even with the loss of Matt
Smith, the Mountaineers expect
to field a strong corps of lineback-
ers this year. Darnell Warren and
Robert Pickett, along with Eric
Lester and sophomore Chris
Haering. Warren and Pickett fin-
ished second and third respec-
tively last season in tackles as the
tandem collected 184 stops be-
tween them.
A pair of highly-regarded per-
formers return to the Mountain-
eer defensive line giving the line
some potential for success this
season. David Grant, a 6-4, 271-
pound junior, returns after col-
lecting 68 tackles last season. At
the tackle position. Brad Hunt
will return for another year. Hunt
is considered the most steady
player on the line by Mountain-
eer coaches.
The addition of Ohio State
transfer Terry White should help
bolster the Mountaineer's secon-
dary. White is a former All-Big
Ten Conference performer. An-
other bright spot in the secondary
will be Stacy Smith, who can be
relied on to perform well at either
free safety or cornerback.
West Virginia, as usual, faces
another demanding schedule.
The Mountaineers must face the
likes of Maryland, Pittsburgh,
Penn State, Virginia Tech and
Boston Colege. Others on the
Mountaineer's schedule include
Ohio, Cincinnati, Rutgers and
Syracuse.
ECU will play West Virginia on
Oct. 3 at 1 p.m. at Mountaineer
Field in Morgantown, W.V. It will
be the sixth meeting between the
Pirates and the Mountaineers
with West Virginia holding a 5-0
advantage. West Virginia scored
a touchdown last season with six
seconds remining to defeat the
Pirates in Greenville, 24-21.
FROM:
TO: CLASS OF 1988, 89, 90, 91
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DRINKING
our first ads didn 7 grub your eye, then allow us
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The Pirates hope to run down West Virginia this year and avenge
last season's 24-21 loss.
McNeill captures
bronze medal
DURHAM. N.C - ECU track
star Lee McNeill reaffirmed his
status as a world-class sprinter
over the weekend, capturing a
gold and bronze medal at the
United States Olympic Festival.
McNeill earned his gold as a
member of the South's 400-meter
relay team, which finished the
race with this year's fastest time
in the world.
The South foursome of James
Butler (Tallahassee, Fla.),
McNeill, Dennis Mitchell (Sick-
lerville, N.J.) and Harvey
McSwain cShelby, N.C.) not only
turned in a record-breaking per-
formance, but they beat the West
team in the process.
The West was heavily favored
going into the race because team-
members Thomas Jefferson,
Calvin Smith and 1 larvey Glance
were all former Olympians.
However, it was the determina-
tion of the South squad that kept
the lead safe in their hands.
"Everyone was talking about
the West, and not giving us much
of a chance Mitchell said. "But
they don't realize that all of us
have run a 10.1 in the open 100
meters. All we had to do is get the
baton around the track, which we
did
One of the best at getting
around the track was ECU'S
McNeill. He ran the second leg of
the relay and was the one respon-
sible for putting the South ahead
for good.
In the race for the Olympic
Festival's fastest man (100-meter
dash), McNeill finished just .08
seconds behind Lee McRae to
capture third place and the
bronze medal.
McRae and McNeill were in
adjoining lanes, but it was McRae
who got a good jump at the start
and was able to maintain a slight
advantage throughout the race.
Along his path to victory,
McRae broke the stadium record
of 10.11 set by Jim Green in 1971.
Second place finisher Calvin
Smith also broke the old mark,
clocking in at 10.09.
McNeill's medals were the first
two of his career in festival com-
petition, despite the fact that he is
considered one of ten fastest
sprinters in the world.
McNeill is an All-American in
three different events, and is
considered by many as the most
prolific athlete in East Carolina
University history.
A rising senior at ECU, McNeill
hails from St. Pauls, N.C, and
participates in the 100meters,200
meters and the 400-meter relay
when competing for the Pirates.
McNeill is currently training
for the Pan Am Games later this
month in Indianapolis. From
there, he will take off for Rome
where he will compete in the
World Track and Field Champi-
onships Aug. 29-Sept.6.
State tickets
on sale now
The ECU student allotment of
tickets for the East Carolina-N.C.
State football game went on sale
this morning (Tuesday) at 7 a.m.
at the Minges Coliseum ticket
office.
The tickets will be on sale, at a
price of $15 each, until the allot-
ment has been sold out.
Any student wishing to pur-
chase tickets to the contest must
have a ECU student I.D. with an
updated activity card. A student
can use no more than two I.Ds
when purchasing tickets and
only two tickets will be sold for
each I.D.
The ECU-N.C. State contest
will be played Saturday, Sept. 5 at
7 p.m. in Raleigh at Carter-Finley
Stadium.
Sports Writers
Needed
Call The Hast Carolinian, 757-6366
P.T.A.
OPEN 24 HR. ON FRI.SAT.
757-1955
Sorry for the Inconvenience!
We're remodeling to Serve You Better
Greenville Utilities' main building will be
undergoing renovations for
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During that time, it may be more convenient
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your utitlity bill by mail or at any branch
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Barclays or N.C.
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First Citizens Bank and Trust Co.
Hirst Federal Saving & Loan
Peoples Bank & Trust Co.
Planter's National Bank
Wachovia Bank & Trust
If you have any questions, please call us at 752-71
Greenville Utilities Commission
P.O. Box 1847
Greenville. NC 27835-1847
66.
waP2I
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STUDENT SPECIAL
Discount Membership for Fall Semester
ONLY $40.00
(Offer expires Sunday, Sept. 13.)
Indoor Swimming Pool Weight Room
Gymnasium Air-Dyne Exercise Bikes
Suntanning System Weight Loss Programs
Aerobics, Low Impact Aerobics
Toning, and Aquaerobics Classes
Greenville
ECU FOOTBALL
Burroughs
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Coke
Staton Rd.
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Brushes
ECU-Greenville
758-6892
Try Our Wednesday Night
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Operated by the 10th St.
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Yale
$7.95
every Wednesday
after 5 p.m.
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� French Fries
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It's absolutely all you can eat
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Across from East Carolina University � 752-1907
L
MALPASS MUFFLER
See Us For All
your Automotive Needs
2616 East 10th Street
Greenville,NC 27834
758-7676
lamecocks
ByTIMCHANIHIR
Spurt 1 ditur
ie University of South (an
will emplov a new defensive
sne this seas n in
Kith the explosive Run and
0t offensive formation in an
trtpt to give the Can,
ressful football season thib
r.
ead coach Joe Moni r �
ys his fifth season at the
n, decided at the end
ion, a season whicl av the
lecocks suffer through a �
wd, to change the Car-
nse The r lit
ie "30" stvk
to Morrison ti
iod to the new defense wei
ly smoothly duhi .
Ctice.
I think our players t k to I
v defense with a gr
itement and enthu
i Morrison. i kfoi
jroved on the deft
be ball. 1 think this m
ense is best suited foi
�sonnel and 1 think u I
e players have mal i
ned valuable c-rwr,
mid come into play in th
Morrison also hi ipes f r
i better thii
i Shoot atta -
Tie Run and Sh
lied by theGameo cksir �-
e results allow I
a to place well � in
eral offensive tal I
raecocks placi I
y in passing 289.7
rds per game). 16th in t I
'ense (409 yards per game i 1
th in scoring (28.5 poi
me).
rhe leader o the Gam
ensive troops is sophom -
1-Ameriean candidate i
lis. The 6-3 quarter
r 3,020 vards and 2.1 touch-
wns last season
Sophomore Harold Gre
thetop return
r the Gamecocks this seasoi
ie6-2 Green establisl
�shman nv�rk for :
ason. Adequate backup
reen win come from
�nos and keith Bing.
The Gamecocks return a ven
receive
Betl

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geo
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For the
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noting on your
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IBS!
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every Wednesday
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ie juicy, smoky, meaty
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KJnesday and exclusively
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East Carolina University � 752-1907

UFFLER
r All
ive Needs
Itreet
34
Gamecocks to display new 'D'
TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1987
41
By TIM CHANDLER
Sporta Editor
"he University of South Caro-
lina will employ a new defensive
scheme this season in conjunc-
tion with the explosive Run and
Shoot offensive formation in an
attempt to give the Gamecocks a
successful football season this
year.
I load coach Joe Morrison, who
enters his fifth season at the USC
helm, decided at the end of last
season, a season which saw the
(lamecocks suffer through a 3-6-2
rd, to change the Gamecock
defense. The result was a switch
lo the "50" style defense. Accord-
ing to Morrison the transition
period to the new defense went
fairly smoothly during spring
practice.
I think our players took to the
new defense with a great deal of
i iritement and enthusiasm
uid Morrison. "1 look for us to be
proved on the defensive side
the ball. 1 think this new styleof
It fense is best suited for our
personnel and I think our defen-
ce players have matured and
lined valuable experience that
hould come into play in the fall
Morrison also hopes for bigger
ind better things out oi the Run
ind Shoot attack offensive!v.
The Run and Shoot was in-
stalled by the Gamecocks in 1986.
I he results allowed South Caro-
na to place well nationally in
several offensive statistics. The
lamecocks placed third nation-
ally in passing offense (289.7
vards per game), Ibth in total
offense (409 vards per game) and
!7th in scoring (28.3 points per
came).
The leader oi the Gamecocks
offensive troops is sophomore
Ail-American candidate Todd
Fllis. The 6-3 quarterback threw
for 3,020 yards and 20 touch-
downs last season.
Sophomore Harold Green will
be the top returning running back
tor the Gamecocks this season.
The 6-2 Green established several
freshman m.rk for rushing last
season. Adequate backup tor
Green will come from Kevin
ones and Keith Bing.
The Gamecocks return a very
'
- � Mwa
i
capable and talented corps of
receivers for action this season.
Ryan Bethea, Danny Smith, Vic
McConnell and Jones Andrews
all return to give Ellis plenty of
targets through the air.
Bethea is the long-ball threat of
the Gamecocks. Last season the 6-
3 Bethea hauled in five touch-
down passes including one for 64
yards.
The wingback position could
be the most blessed position of-
fensively for the Gamecocks as
six quality candidates return. All-
America Sterling Sharpe is the
likely starter. Sharpe was fifth
nationally in receiving last year
with 74 catches for 1,106 yards
and 10 touchdowns.
Others at the wingback posi-
tion include Kevin White, Hardin
Brown, George Rush, Carl Platt
and Skeets Thomas.
Seven players who have, at one
time or another, started for the
Gamecocks, return this season to
anchor the offensive line. Mark
Fryar is the expected starter at
right tackle, while Charlie
Gowan will hold down the left
guard spot.
Others battling for positions on
the line include David Poinsett,
Calvin Stephens, Taul Shivers
and Buddy Quarles.
The installation of the "50"
defense called for a few position
changes on the defensive side of
the ball. The biggest change for
the Gamecocks can be seen at the
defensive end spot. Former line-
backer Shed Diggsand converted
defensive back Scott Windsor are
the likely starters at the defensive
end position.
The likely starter for the Game-
cocks at the noseguard position is
Roy Hart, who was named the
Gamecock Defensive Player of
the Year last season.
Sophomore Kurt Wilson is the
likely starter at left tackle with
Derrick Frazier the expected
starter at the right tackle position.
Frazier was named the Defensive
Player of the Game in the USC
spring scrimmage.
The linebacker positions far the
Gamecocks should be filled by-
Derrick Little and Matt McKcr-
nan. Little, a junior, started a year
ago and finished the season with
a impressive 28-tackle showing
against in-state rival Clemson.
McKernan returns after being a
part-time tarter last season.
The defensive secondary is
headed up by Robert Robinson
and Norman Floyd. The two
should fill the comerback posi-
tions. The safety spots, on the
other hand, are up for grabs head-
ing into the season. Ken Sally and
Ron Rabune will fight for the
strong safety position, while
Greg Philpot and Brad Edwards
will battle for playing time at free
safety.
The Gamecocks once again face
a very challenging schedule. The
1987 slate consists of perennial
powers such as Georgia, Ne-
braska, Virginia Tech, Virginia,
North Carolina State, Clemson
and Miami (FL). Others on the
schedule include Appalachian
State, Western Carolina and
Wake Forest.
"Again, we will be facing a very
competitive schedule in 1987
said Morrison. "We will take on
another tough group of teams
this fall, very similar to the sched-
ules we've gone up against the
past few years here
The Pirates will face South
Carolina on Oct. 24 at 1:30 p.m. at
Williams-Brice Stadium in Co-
lumbia, S.C It will be the fifth
meeting between the Pirates and
the Gamecocks with USC hold-
ing a 4-0 lead. In last season's
contest, the Gamecocks exploded
past ECU to post a 38-3 victory.
DONNA
HUGE
Bring in this ad for a 15
discount on a purchase of
$10 or more!
With Valid ECU ID.
Good Selection of Reptiles
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Master Card aa4 Visa are accepted
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GREENVILLE. NX. 27134
PHONE 756-9222
flaaaciag b
Expiration Date:
Sept. 25, 1987
Power running
Anthony Simpson, the Pirates leading rusher last season, returns
this year for his third year as fullback.
ATTENTION
ART MAJORS!
Remember we provide for you:
Student mats.
(We cut out openings for $1.00)
Rush orders for mounting and
matting, Q(t j( COaCfQ
Frame Shop
fy Gallery
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NO EXPIRATION DATE.
ECU
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hair designers
For the latest in
Contemporary Hair Styling

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�Latest New Fall Fashions
� 1 Indoor Tanning System
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Expires Sept. 30
FEED 4
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� 2 PIECES OF CHICKEN (Original Recipe or Extra Crispy)
� 1 MASHED POTATO AND GRAVY
� 1 BISCUIT
$
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per customer. Good on combination orders only. Customer pays all applicable
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Kentucky Fried Chicken �
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Kentucky Fried Chicken
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"

A





42
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 25,1967
F7

A
i
�jfe-
J&
Hurricanes to be strong again
By TIM CHANDLER
Spans Editor
Although the Miami Hurri-
canes will be without a great deal
of the personnel that almost won
the national championship last
fall, many feel that the 'Canes
could challenge for the champi-
onship again this season.
This year the Hurricanes will
be without last year's Heisman
Trophy winner Vinny Testav-
erde as well as running back
Alonzo Highsmith, All-Ameri-
can defensive stalwart Jerome
Brown, All-American center
Greg Rakoczy and offensive line-
men Dave Alekna and Paul
O'Connor.
That would be enough losses to
probably make any coach want to
pack his bags and run for cover,
but head coach Jimmy Johnson,
who is 21-3 for the past two years
at Miami, isn't going anywhere.
In fact, his cupboard is still
stocked full as 45 letermen are
returning for action this year. Six
starters return to the offensive
unit, while nine players that
started last season are returning
for another year with the defen-
sive corps.
The graduation of some of last
year's stars also opens the door to
players that in the past served as
reserves. It is now their chance to
step into the spotlight and keep
Miami a top contender.
One such person is sophomore
quarterback Steve Walsh. Walsh,
the only returning quarterback
with playing experience, has
some tall shoes to fill. Not only
will people be comparing him to
Testaverde, but they will also
compare him to other Hurricane
greats of the past such as Bernie
Kosar, now with the Cleveland
Browns, and Jim Kelly, now with
the Buffalo Bills.
Should Walsh prove unable to
fit into the team's passing
scheme, the likely backups will
be sophomore Bill Trukowski
and freshman Greg Jones. The
surrounding players on the of-
fensive side of the ball should
make the job of settling in at
quarterback a little easier for
whoever is chosen to take the
reigns.
Three juniors will return to
once again give the Hurricanes
one of the best receiving corps in
the country. The juniors are Mike
Irvin, who caught 53 catches for
868 yards last year, Brett Peri-
man, who hauled in 34 passes for
647 yards last season and Brian
Blades, who had 18 receptions
last season and a team-high
average of 21.8 yards per catch.
Irvin is the leader of the receiv-
ers, although all three are threats
to go deep at any time. Irvin al-
ready holds the school record for
touchdown grabs with 20, in-
cluding 11 last season.
Experienced and capable play-
ers are ready to step in and help
ease the pain of the loss of
Highsmith from the backfield.
Melvin Bratton and Warren Wil-
liams are the likely candidates to
do most of the ground work for
the Hurricane attack this season.
Williams, who rushed for 399
yards last season, picked up an
average of five yards per carry,
while Bratton found the
opponent's endzone on eight dif-
ferent occasions last fall.
The offensive line, although hit
hard by graduation, still should
be quite sufficient in protecting
the new quarterback and provid-
ing holes for Williams and Brat-
ton. Scott Provin, John O'Neill,
Matt Patchan and Maurice Mad-
dox have all played the roles on
the offensive line enough to gain
some valuable experience.
Brown will be sorely missed on
the defensive line, however a
strong nucleus that played last
season returns again this year to
offset the loss. Derwin Jones, Dan
Stubbs, Dan Sileo and Bill Hawk-
ins all return for another year of
battle in the trenches. Stubbs, a
fifth-year senior, led the Hurri-
canes in quarterback sacks last
season with 17.
The Hurricane linebacking
corps will be headed up by
George Mira, Jr. Mira set a stan-
dard for career assisted tackles
and he is also closing in on the
record for career total stops. The
record is 456 held by Scott Nicolas
(1978-80). Mira entering this sea-
son has 343.
The secondary returns this sea-
son pretty much intact from last
year. The Hurricanes opponents
completed only 45 percent of
their pass attempts last season for
1,506 yards. The leader of the
secondary is free safety Bennie
Blades. The All-American senior
free safety led the nation last sea-
son with 10 interceptions.
The Hurricane schedule is
somewhat tougher this year than
in year's past. That is something
that will also make the road to the
national championship tough for
the 'Canes to hoe. The schedule
features national powers such as
Florida, South Carolina, Arkan-
sas, Florida State, Maryland, Vir-
ginia Tech and Notre Dame. Also
on the schedule for '87 is Cincin-
nati, Miami (O.) and Toledo.
ECU will face the Hurricanes
Oct. 31 at 1:30 p.m. in Ficklen
Stadium. The game will mark the
sixth meeting between the two
teams with Miami holding a 5-0
advantage. Last year, the Hurri-
canes rolled past ECU, 38-10, to
cap off an unbeaten regular sea-
son.
Miami last played in Greenville
in 1985. In that contestthe Hurri-
canes took a 27-15 victory. The
1985 contest was played before
the second-largest crowd in Fick-
len Stadium history. Attendance
at the contest was 34,511.
Join Tim Chandler
and the sports
department each
week in
The East Carolinian
Stop Shop
Convenience
Western Union
Beer, Wine, Kegs, Coolers, Cups,
Ice, Snacks
j
Your One Stop
Party Store
GAS
Call and Reserve a Keg Today
752-6366
Corner of 5th & Reade Streets,
Next to Beef-n-Shakes
Pirate Football & Stop Shop
7
GO PIRA TES!
� .�
Rugged sche
Continued from page 39
at the split end position. Hice
should get a struggle for plavmg
time from junior Steve Sanders
who played exceptionally well as
a backup last season.
Roosevelt Mukes, who has
played both as a starter and a sub,
will enter his junior season with
some big shoes to fill. Mukes will
be asked to fill in at the flanker
position for Jason Stargell, who
graduated last year. Also provid-
ing depth at the flanker position
will be junior Bill Davis, whx
served as the backup quarterback
for the past two seasons. Davis
proved in spring drills that he
was very capable of moving up to
the flanker position.
Darryl Huber, who is entering
his junior campaign, will be
called on to hold down the tight
end position. Huber, who has
alternated as a starter at the r isi
tion for the past two season
the only returning tight end with
a great deal of experience
The running game for the Bear-
cats will need a lot of patch
now that three-time All-Ar
can Reggie Taylor has depart
Taylor eclipsed the 1,000-yard
rushing mark in each of the i
three seasons. As a receiver
running back, Tavlor accounted
for 36 percent of the total Cincin-
nati offense the past two season
Al McKinney, a 6-0,193-pound
junior, will step in to replace
Taylor. His quick speed, com-
bined with excellent size and
power running should make him
an adequate replacement The
backups for McKinnev have a
good deal of talent, but no experi-
ence. R
Strong
both sr
drills.
The
Bearcat
thn
line A
lacking
Cento
pound
Owens
are tin
Om
cu.ud r

tionin
5, 14-
ira
:
be a
:KSS
i
I
Closing it
The Pirate defense swarmed around Cinci
Danny McCoin during last season's 32-191










�it
EC
Cheerle;
and M;
Tryo
Be Part of ECU's Most
Excellent Opportunity f
& Meet New People
tp-TSr-Ar All Interested People S
? Room 142, Minges at 5:00 p.

M Come dressed to pr
��������� ;






n Tim Chandler
nd the sports
epartment each
week in
East Carolinian
rhe best in sports �poi;ngi
Store
Cups,
3
day
?treets,
es
op
Rugged schedule awaits Cincy
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25. 1987
43
Continued from page 39
at the split end position. Hice
should get a struggle for playing
time from junior Steve Sanders,
who played exceptionally well as
a backup last season.
Roosevelt Mukes, who has
played both as a starter and a sub,
will enter his junior season with
some big shoes to fill. Mukes will
be asked to fill in at the flanker
position for Jason Stargell, who
graduated last year. Also provid-
ing depth at the flanker position
will be junior Bill Davis, who
served as thebackupquarterback
tor the past two seasons. Davis
proved in spring drills that he
was very capable of moving up to
the flanker position.
Darryl Huber, who is entering
Ins junior campaign, will be
called on to hold down the tight
end position. Huber, who has
alternated as a starter at the posi-
tion for the past two seasons, is
the only returning tight end with
a great deal of experience.
The running game for the Bear-
cats will need a lot of patchwork
now that three-time All-Amen-
can Reggie Taylor has departed.
raylor eclipsed the 1,000-yard
rushing mark in each of the past
three seasons. As a receiver and
running back, Taylor accounted
tor 36 percent of the total Cincin-
nati offense the past two seasons.
Al McKinney, a 6-0,193-pound
junior, will step in to replace
Taylor. His quick speed, com-
bined with excellent size and
power running should make him
an adequate replacement. The
backups for McKinney have a
good deal of talent, but no experi-
ence. Red-shirt freshman Terry
Strong and junior Eric George
both showed promise in spring
drills.
The biggest concern for the
Bearcats offensively is filling
three vacancies on the offensive
line. A line which was already
lacking in depth last season.
Center Pat Lavelle (6-4, 260-
pound junior) and guard Ervin
Owens (6-2, 274-pound senior)
are the lone returning starters.
Owens will move to the right
guard position this season after
playing on the left side of the ball
last season.
Jeff Graham (6-3, 279-pound
senior), who served as a backup
last fall, claimed the right tackle
spot during spring drills. The
candidates for the left tackle posi-
tion include Matt Middeddorf (6-
3, 248-pound senior) and Rob
Hausfeld (6-6, 26r-pound sopho-
more). The battle for the left
guard position centers around
three possibilities. They include;
Lazaro Andino (6-3, 256-pound
senior), Greg Heitkamp (6-3,273-
pound juniorand Tim Kow-
alcwski (6-3, 257-pound fresh-
man).
Heading up the Bearcat defen-
sive line will be junior Chris AI-
beck, 6-2, 255. Asbcck will return
to the tackle position for his third
consecutive year. He enters the
season as the school's seventh
leading tackier.
Joining Asbeck on the line will
be a pair of starters from last sea-
son. Senior Bob Leshnak, 5-11,
230, and Tom Szabados, 6-2, 241,
along with J.H. Caldwell, a 6-2,
230-pound junior who led the
team in big plays in 1985 should
prove for an effective line.
Caldwell missed most of last sea-
son due to injuries.
The linebacking corps of the
Bearcats was hit hard by gradu-
ation. Gone is four-year starter
and All-American Alex Gordon,
a second-round draft pick by the
New York Jets, along with two-
year starter Toney Catchings and
last-year's starting middle line-
backer Jerrold Ware. The Bear-
cats return several inexperi-
enced, but capable players to fill
the voids.
The return of senior starters
Terry Noble, John Lewis and
Richard Rhodes make the Cin-
cinnati secondary the most expe-
rienced area of the defense. Noble
will return at left corncrback
where he has been a two-year
regular. Lewis led the Bearcat
defense in big plays last year from
his free safety position and
Rhodes led the team in tackling
two years ago from his strong
safety position.
'This is a key season for our
program said coach Curry.
"We've been at the edge the past
two seasons. We need to get over
that hurdle and have a winning
season, and that is certainly our
primary goal.
"Getting out of the blocks early
will be extremely important to
achieving that goal continued
Curry. "And our competition in
those first four games is tough. It
will be a season of excitement
The Bearcat schedule consists
of national powerhouses such as
Penn State, West Virginia, Miami
(Fl.) and Virginia Tech. Also on
the schedule for 1987 is Rutgers,
Louisville, Miami (O), Tennes-
see Tech, Indiana State and
Austin Pcay.
"It's (the 1987 schedule) is a
player's dream and a coach's
nightmare said Curry. "We
have the schedule that gives us
the opportunity for national ex-
posure. Our goal is to compete at
the highest level and we have the
schedule to do just that
Cincinnati will face East Caro-
lina Oct. 10 in Ficklcn Stadium at
2 p.m. The game will be the
Homecoming contest for the Pi-
rates.
This will be the second meeting
between East Carolina and Cin-
cinnati. ECU won the first meet-
ing, 32-19, last season in Ficklcn
Stadium.

Phifto by Bryan Humbert - Id Photo L�b
Knocking Heads
The Pirate football team is shown going through blocking drills during a recent practice session. The Hues
wound up the two-a-day practice sessions this past weekend. Final preparations are now undent a for the
season-opening contest against in-state rival N.C. State. The opener is slated for Sept. 5 at 7 p.m. in Raleigh
at Carter Finley Stadium.
Great Selection, Price, and Service
M-F 9:30 - 6:00
SAT 9:30-5:00
Closing in
The Pirate defense swarmed around Cincinnati quarterback
Danny McCoin during last season's 32-19 Pirate victory.
������������������
������ f0mmm�




















ECU
Cheerleading
and Mascot
Tryouts!












- i


Be Part of ECU's Most Exciting Sport r i
Excellent Opportunity for Travel
Meet New People








JrtV'fr All Interested People Should Meet in
CRoom 142, Minges at 5:00 p.m. Aug. 31st.
t
it Come dressed to practice! ir
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r
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� $10,000 Accidental Death insurance
. . . AND MORE
We never charge you for using our
BB&T 24 machine. You'll receive a
24 hour card with a checking or
savings account.
Other BB&T Greenville
Offices:
Main Office � Stantonsburg Road
BB&T 24
Downtown Office � Corner 3rd & Greene
301 Arlington Boulevard
BB&T 24
For Service or
Information Call
752-6889
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44 THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST25,1987
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COUPON
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� Jamis (Earth Cruisers)
A Raleigh
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Vold Afttr OctotMT 15, 19�7
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HALF PRICE
Buy any menu item and receive
the second of equal or lesser value
at 50 off.
5th Street
E.C.U.
10th Street
College Hill
264 By-Pass
Greenville Blvd
Pizza Inn
ZACK'S
1898-A Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, NC 752-9440
(Located Next to Pizza Inn)
PLEASE CLIP THIS COUPON
50 off!
Buy any item and receive the next of
equal or lesser value at half price.
Not valid with any other coupon.
EXPIRES SEPTEMBER 30, 1987
"THE BEST PLACE'
ROSE'S STORES, INC.
APPLICATION FOR "V.1.C"
CHECK CASHINGCOURTESY CARD
CONDITIONS OF CARD ISSUANCE AND USAGE
THE BEST PRICE
1. This application must be filled out completely (no blank spaces) and
presented in person to the Customer Service Desk at vour lotal
Rose s Store.
2. Identification numbers and c hec king ac count numbers will be ver-
ilieci tor ac c urac bv the store. It the applic at ion is approved, you
will be issued a permanent Rose's V.I.C. CARD which mav be used
in an Rose's store Allow tour weeks tor delivery. C ard mav be
picked up at the store.
- person must be 18 vears ot age. maintain a permanent local
residence have a telephone be presently employed, and turmsh
tun approved torms ot identification. Drivers license, (redit card.
check guarantee card. Firearms license, military I.D.)
4. rhe pre-authorized check approval limit is the amount ot pure base
plus SHI up to S100.00,
5. Checks over SlOO.OO will require management approval, which is
not assured in advance.
f. The card mav only be used bv the person whose name appears on
the front ot the c ard.
Re
s c annot ac i ept the following types ot c hec ks:
( ounter c hec ks
Two Partv c hec k
Monev (Jrders
Hand or tvpew riter w ritten pav roll c he ks
( hec ks made out to cash
Cost dated h� ks
H. The .I.C. C ARD remains the propertv ot Roses and expires at tour
v ear intervals at which time a new application must be submitted tor
re-issuane e. Roses reserves the right to cancel an card at anvtime
tor am reason without notice.

fxpiration Date:PLEASE PRINTFile :i
(Office Use OnlviOffice Use Only)
NAMEHOME PHONE: BUS. PHONE( )-
Last f.tvt ADDRESSvwldl)-
'Street and NumberMALE MARRIEDj)or FEMALE()
()or SINGLE(11
(�y) (State) II IOINT ACCOUNT, DO YOU NEED(Zip CodeiRENT(i)orOV NO. OF CHILDREf SPOUSE'S FIRST NVN(f) YOURAGE si IIVING AT HOMF
A CARD FOR YOUR SPOUSE? YES NOAME
YOUR EMPLOYERSPOUSE 1 ADDRESSEMPLOYER.
( ompany Name! ADDRESS(Company Name)
(Citv (State OB TITLE(Zipi(City) OB TITLE(StateiiZipi
YOUR BANKCHECKING ACCOUNT
(Name) ADDRESS.HOW LONG? EXP.YEARS
DRIVFRS IICFNSF CREDIT CARDSSTATE
Type (Visa, Mastercard, etc.)Expiration DateAccount Number
Type (Visa, Mastercard, etc.) OTHERExpiration DateAccount Number
Type ID.Expiraion DateI.D. Number
The information given is true and complete. Roses has my permission to verify any of the above information. I hereby authorize
any agency to furnish Roses with all information requested. I also accept the terms and conditions of Roses agreement as
outlined above.

,
Store
Approved By
Date
(Applicants Signature)
(Date)
(Office Use Only)
(Spouse's Signature: If card needed)
MUST BE IOINT ACCOUNT
(Date)
'�� �in
P' '���





WELCOME
BACK
STUDENTS
Make check cashing E-Z with a
CHECK CASHING
COURTESY CARD
From Roses
E-Z CHECK CASHING PLUS
We are extending our Check Cashing Courtesy Card
privileges just for you to welcome you back to our
community. Our V.I.C. Card will open doors for you:
� Simplified Check Writing to speed you thru the checkout.
� You may write your check for more than the purchase price.
� Your V.I.C. Card is accepted at all Roses Stores in any state.
So stop by our Roses Store (& don't forget to bring
your Student I.D.) and fill out an application for your
V.I.C. Card today. It is our way of saying we are glad to
have you as part of our community.





Title
The East Carolinian, August 25, 1987
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 25, 1987
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.552
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57907
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