The East Carolinian, December 2, 1986






�he
(Earnltntati
Serving (he East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tuesday, December 2, 1986
Greenville, N.C
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
SGA Meeting
Appropriations Given To Groups
B LESLEY DEES
Sl.ff Wriln
sTory w & m
The meeting of the 9th sessioi.
of the legislature ended Monday
night with appropriations made
to four campus organizations.
Pi Sigma Alpha Honor Society
will be sponsoring a forum and
debate on religion and politics
which will include four speakers
and a moderator. Two of the
speakers will be presenting their
opinions on the pros of religion
and politics and the other two
will be voicing the cons of politics
and religion. The society was
originally asking for $472 in ap-
propriations but lowered the
amount to $247. They asked for
$30 to be used for advertising,
$50 for fliers and programs. $10
to go toward postage and $157 to
be used for honorariums. The bill
was passed by voice vote.
In the first round of affir-
mative debate that would ap-
propriate funds of $1,3(K) to the
Panhellemc Council, legislator
Mark Simon said, "The girls do a
good job in representing ECU,
and it is an excellent recruitment
job within the school The
ECU sororities must be a member
of the National organization in
order to be a campus organiza-
tion.
The appropriations committee
brought before the SCiA the bill
which passed in favor of 9-1. The
Council was asking for $1,800 in
funds but reduced the request to
$1,300. The amount of monev re-
quested will be used soley to
cover the cost of student rush, in-
cluding rush booklets and pam-
phlets. ECU's Panheilcnic Coun-
cil has twelve sororities, 8 white
and 4 black for a total of about
600 members and an approx-
imated 400 girls go through rush
every year.
legislature member, Karen
Millar opposed to the bill saving.
"We're giving this money, to sup
port parties
Another legislature member,
John Simon, pointed out tin-
legitimate reasons for his support
by adding, "They have never ask
ed us for money, and we fund a
lot of groups. This is our way to
say thank you to these girls for all
their support and help in E I a!
a university. I think that's an
open cause
The bill was passed bv a voice
vote.
A Jazz and Show Festival, be
ing sponsored in part bv the Stu
dent Forum for Musica
Organization, will be held in
April thanks to the funding given
by the SGA to help the progra
get underway.
High school students from
numerous regions across North
Carolina and Virginia will be ask
ed to attend the show where the
will participate in choral produc-
es to be critiqued bv a profes-
sional choreographer.
The amount of $500 was re
quested. $400 of which will be us
ed to pay for the clinicians fee,
including travel costs and hous-
ing. Office supplies, such as
materials needed for bulk mailing
and advertising, will be purchas-
ed with the remaining $100. All
groups entering will be charged a
S6 entry fee that will help to
covet any excess expenses. The
testival is open to the public.
Supportive legislature member,
Bryan 1 assiter. feels that this is
an "educational experience for
the kids and for their directors
He added, "I think this will
definateiy, directly and positively
affect the school overall
The appropriations of $500
passed in favor of bv a voice
. ote
President's Program Raises Questions
IUI� MUMPNV� Tl�� rMt L��
Pirate Spirit
Mthough our Pirates lost 36-10 to Miami Thursday it's nice to
know Pirate Spirit is still alive. This banner appeared Wednesday
on the Chemistry Building.
Fees Discussed At Open
Hearing Held By SGA
Quality of the educational ex-
perience, according to the
I aboratory Computer Usage
Fees Committee, can be greatly
increased at a modest cost.
This committee, set up in
Feburary of 1986 by Vice
Chancellor Angelo Volpe, has
been considering the need and the
methods for instituting
aboratory and computer usage
tees at ECU.
The committee gathered infor-
mation at ECU and other univer-
sities around the state to deter-
mine the necessity of the fee and
the best method of distributing
the collected money. The com-
mittee also had to decide who to
charge the fee to.
A main issue to the committee
was whether or not state funds
would be cut if the university-
raised funds locally. No other
university in the state which
charges lab fees reported a reduc-
tion in state fees.
The committee received strong
support for an across-the-board
charge to every student in the
university, since this would mean
a smaller charge. However, an
across-the-board charge must be
approved by the Board of Gover-
nors of the General Administra-
tion. Since this Board rejected a
similar request by Appalachain
University in 1983, the board
decided the fee should only be
charged to each student in a
designated course.
A designated course will be any
laboratory-type course requiring
the use of unusually costly or a
significant amount of con-
sumable materials or any course
that makes significant use of
computers.
Students enrolled in courses of
this type would pay a fee of $25.
The fee would be non-refundable
and collected at the same time a
student pays tuition and fees for
the semester. The student would
only be charged $25 a semester no
matter how many designated
courses were taken.
In their summer session, the
members of the Board of
Trustees approved the proposal.
This approval means the ad-
mistration has permission to en-
force the fee, but not a mandate
from the Trustees to enforce it.
According to Steve Cunanan,
president of the SGA, the com-
mittee wants to hear feedback
from the students before a deci-
sion is made.
On Wednesday, Dec. 3, the
SGA and the committee will be
sponsoring an open hearing to
discuss the proposed fees. All
students, faculty and staff are
urged to attend.
"I really want to encourage
student participation said
Cunanan. "After all, the
.tudents are going to be the ones
raying the money. The commit-
tee will be present at the hearing,
so this will be the time to let them
know how the students feel
According to Cunanan, the ad-
ditional money would be used for
supplies. He said almost every
other school system in the state
charges extra fees for labs.
"I can't say whether I'm for
the fees or against them he
said. "However, 1 do think
anything adding more fees is un-
necessary until it is proven
necessary
By TOM PAGE
Staff Writer
A number of distinguished
scientist have challenged a recent
poll conducted by a number of
members of the National
Academy of Sciences on the topic
of the Strategic Defense In
itiative.
The poll released indicated that
there existed strong skepticism
about the President's program of
American defense against Soviet
nuclear missiles (SDI). The critics
of the poll attacked the poll
respondents' lack of understan-
ding and experience concerning
SDI and questioned the value of
the poll.
SDI, or "Star Wars as it is
commonly called, was doubted
by 80 percent of the 451 scientists
responding to the mail survey.
They doubted that SDI could be
made survivable and cost effec-
tive within 25 years. Over 90 per-
cent doubted it could provide an
effective defense for the U.S.
population within 25 years.
The results of the poll were met
in opposition by SDI supporters
everywhere, and the relevance
and validity of the poll was im-
mediately questioned. Secretarv
of Defense, Caspar Weinberger
has also commented on the poll
and said that the respondents
could not possibly have the need-
ed information to make the
judgments they have and that
their opinions are "unscientific
Dr. Martin Hoffert, Chairman
of the Department of Applied
Sciences at New York University
said, "You don't settle these
questions bv polling people but
by doing the research and
development and testing
necessary to find the answers
Hoffert also agreed that the
scientists polled "generally lack
the necessary expertise to answer
the poll questions Hoffert said,
"SDI is an engineering problem,
not a science problem. There are
no physical principals preventing
SDI from succeeding
The poll also found that 60
percent of the polled scientists
said that they would slash
America's SDI budget by over
two thirds, to $1.5 billion (The
pentagon estimates that the
Soviets spend $8-10 billion a year
on their SDI). SDI expert Robert
Jastrow said that such cuts are
estimated to eventually kill the
program because the cuts would
not permit the required facilities
to carry out the key test and ex
periments needed to reach a deci
sion on cost and effective deplov
ment.
Why "Star Wars" anyway0
Supporters of SDI stand firm
in the belief that SDI is necessar
in providing realistic protection
for our country in the event that
the Soviets engage in a first-strike
attack against the IS
The goal is to prevent war and
to make real peace possible. SDI
is a defense, not an offense. It is
the theory of supporters that SDI
will maintain peace by taking
away any confidence the enemy
may have in attacking the U.S.
and suceeding. The defense of
SDI will make any aggression so
difficult and expensive that it will
be ruled out by the agressor. The
biggest reason for "Star Wars" is
the rapid growth of the Soviet
own "Star Wars" effort.
The Soviets are spending five
times as much as the US spent
last year in laser research. Sup-
porters believe that the US faces
the greatest danger it has ever
faced and unless we support the
President and persuade Congress
for the requested funds, then we
will have no defense against the
Soviets. The Soviets would have a
good "Star Wars" as well as a
powerful first-strike force.
President Reagan believes that
SDI will make nuclear weapons
"impotent and obsolete His
goal is simply to make it pointless
to continue building nuclear
weapons. He believes that by
discouraging attack by a strong
defense, this will m turn en-
courage peace.
Why not "Star Wars'1"
Opponents of SDI stand firm
m their belief that the program is
an unreasonable idea, whose ob-
jective is ruled out by the limita-
tions of technology. Critics of
SDI also say that "Star Wars"
defenses might upset the fragile
balance of forces between the
East and West so that war may
become more likely than less. The
SDI calls for roughly $12 billion a
year, $200 billion over the spread
of ten years. At this cost, the cer-
tainty of SDI success is often
See QUESTIONS Page 5.
Club Places At Competition
ON THE INSIDE
Editorials4
Health Column5
Style7
Sports10
Announcements2
Classifieds11
�Rebel Winners Announced �
see STYLE page 7.
�Review of the Pirates trip to
f�ce Miami � see SPORTS page
10.
By THERESA ROSINSKI
cr�rttor
ECU was one of five schools
that placed in a speech tourna-
ment held at Marshal University
in Huntington, West Virginia, on
Nov. 21 and 22, according to
Janice Screiber, head of the
Forensic Society.
The Forensic Society, a speech
and debating group, sent Ron
Kingsley, Stacey Stroupe, Jason
Manning and Annette Turlington
to West Virginia to compete
against 17 other schools. Only
five of those schools placed in the
tournament; ECU being one of
them.
Some of the schools that at-
tended were UNC- Wilmington,
East Tennessee State and Univer-
sity of Richmond.
Students can compete in a
variety of different speech
categories. Kingsley, a senior in
Accounting, placed sixth in a
sales speech for energy-efficient
products.
Kingsley said, "The tourna-
ment teaches you how to think on
your feet and how to speak well
in front of people
"The Forensic Society is open
to all students, not just speech
majors said Schreiber. "I
remember the students saying on
the way back that the whole ex-
perience had given and
strengthened their confidence in
themselves. It's a great asset to be
able to think on your feet
The group is supported by
SGA. "Without them, we'd be
sunk said Schreiber. As it
stands, the group only attends
two tournaments. "That's all we
can attend on the funds we
receive The next tournament
that the Forensic Society will be
attending is in January at L'NC-
Wilmington.
"We need more students to get
involved said Kingsley.
The Forensic Society is holding
a meeting for all interested
students on Wednesday, Dec. 3 in
the Theatre Arts Building, room
211.
"It's a great experience and
alot of fun said Kingsley.
"Plus, it looks great on resume
Weird Weather 1LL1M � - - -
Some wore coats and some carried umbrellas Monday morning. The day proved cold, and pretty dr

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 2, 1986
Announcements
STUDENT UNION
COFFEEHOUSE
COMMITTEE
LOOK OUT! The Underground located m
m� baiement o Mendenhaii Student Center
will not be having entertainment during the
month of December Bu� starting ne�
�"ieter. look ou We will be presenting the
winner of the open auditions held in
November every Friday night ttartlng at I
P "� So remember to come out and see your
friends perform at the Underground!
COMPETENCY
TEST
The physical education motor and physical
�itness competency test It, scheduled as
follows Place Minges Coliseum Time and
Date 9 00 a m . Tuesday December a
Passing score on this test is required of all
students prior to declaring physical educa
tion as a maior Passing the test consists of
both i Maintaining en average T score of
J on the six item test battery J Having a
T score of 45 on the aerobics run Any stu
dent with a medical condition that would
contramdicete participation m the testing
should contact Dr Israel or Mike McCam
man at 7J7 m�7 To be eiempted from any
portion of the tes' you must have a physi
oan s excuse A detailed summary of the
test componers is available in the Human
Performance Laboratory (Room 113 Minges
Cot.seumi Your physicians excuse must
spec�'Cally state which items you areexcus
ea from
CLOTHING
TEXTILE
ASSOCIATION
Attention clothing � textile maiors All
clothing and textile association members
will be meeting in the back of the Home
Economics building for dinner al Western
Sizilin This is the end of the year Christmas
party Everyone come and take a break
from studying on Dec 4th at 4 30 p m
N.A.A.C.P.
The ECU Chapter of the N A A C P will
meet on Thurs Dec 4 1986 at 5 00 p m In
the Ledonia S Wright Afro American
Culture Center All interested people are m
vited
CR's
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS The ECU
edition of the College Republicans will mee'
this evening m room Ml Mendenhaii Stu
dent Center Mandatory Executive Officers
meeting immediately following Regular CR
meeting held every Tuesday 4 30 p m , J?l
FALL SEMESTER
1987 STUDENT
TEACHERS
PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS Students
who will be student teaching during the Fan
Semester 197 must make an appointment
for their physical examination at the Student
Health Center before Dec 15 198 by calling
757 4317 Physicals will be given on Jan 4. 7
and I. 1987 from 800am to 4 15 pm CALL
FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT BEFORE
THE DEADLINE DECEMBER 15, 1984
ACCOUNTING
SOCIETY
COOPERATIVE
EDUCATION
INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENT Mr
Michael Smith will discuss internship oppor
tunities with state government on Wednes
day. December 3. 1984 at 4 p m m Rawi 302
For more information on these and other op
portunities. contact Cooperative Education
In Rawl 311
STUDENT UNION
TRAVEL
COMMITTEE
TRAVEL Ski Colorado or cruise to the
Bahamas with the Student union Travel
Committee over spring break Applications
are still being accepted but the deadline is
January 12. 1987, so apply now! For more in
'O . contact the Student union a' 757 4411 ext
210
Dinner meeting
8th
5 30 p m CMco'1 Dec
ECU ICE
HOCKEY CLUB
EARLY
CHILDHOOD
CLUB
Members and past gues�s of iEC), Don
torget about the Holiday Semi Formal Party
Wednesday Dec 3 1984 a' Oua'i Ridge
Clubhouse 7 30 until ij 00 Bring a friend1
Sweatshirts are also on sale In Speight (first
floor) dur.ng week of Dec 15th Price $12 00
STUDENT UNION
PRODUCTIONS
COMMITTEE
Don t forget to bring your organ, ja'ion s
ornament with you when you come 'o the
tree trimming party 8f Mendenhaii today
from 4 30 to 5 30 p m
it is imperative that an participants turn
In dues before exams if we do not ge' these
funds m II will be impossible to operate next
semester We have a lot of activities p'ann
ed so let's not make the trip to Iceland our
last Call George a' 752 0045 or Mike at
752 2051 tor details
PHI BETA
LAMDA
Meeting or Wed . Dec 3rd at 3 p m Rawl
302 Presidential election and last general
meeting for fan semester Please attend1
PHI BETA SIGMA
FRATERNITY
The brothers of Phi Beta Sigma will be
havmga i-ipsmc Contest Tuesday Dec 2 1984
at 7 00 0 m in Hendrix AuO at Menaenhall
Admission is Jl 00 at the door A door prue
win be B've" away A dinner for two at Dar
ryl's
STUDENT NORTH
CAROLINA
ASSOCIATION
OF EDUCATORS
To all SNCAE members and friends You
are invited to our final meeting for Fall 84
on December 4 (Thurs I at 4 00 p m in
Speight 130 Dr Manor,e Calhoun. Director
of Student Teaching, will be our guest
speaker Refreshments will be served
FORENSICS
Are you a forensicator' Do you like to
talk1 Come 10m the trophy winning Foren
sics team people who speak for fun and
competition Organisational meeting Wed
Dec 3. 8 p m ,n 211 Theatre Arts Were
preparing for a tournament at UNC
Wilmington m January Bring your voice,
your talent and enthusiasm The Forensics
team Is exciting challenging, fun and rewar
rlmg Be at our meeting The Forensic
Team at ECU
AMBASSADORS
AMBASSADORS Don't forget about our
last general meeting for the semester on
Wed Dec 3 at 5 15 p m In room 221 of
Menaenhall Our Christmas party is Dec 8
Don't forget'
CANDLELIGHT
COMMUNION
A Candlelight celebration of the Lord s
Supper to prepare for the coming of Christ,
followed By a fabulous turkey dinner with an
the trimmings. Wednesday ilipm at the
Methodist Student Center 501 E Fifth St
across from Garreft Dormi The meal is
free. a collection will be received for the
Soup kitchen Call 758 2030 for reservations
Sponsored by Presbyterian and Methodist
Campus Ministries
Teenagers Apt To Violence
WASHINGTON (UPI) - A
Justice Department survey shows
teenagers are twice as likely as
adults to be the victims of violent
crime, and their assailants are
often casual friends or relatives.
Steven Schlesinger, director of
the Bureau of Justice Statistics,
said Sunday the survey found
that between 1982 through 1984,
young people 12 to 19 years old
were the victims of about 1.8
million violent crimes and 3.7
million thefts annually. Those
crimes were 2.2 times more fre-
quent than for persons 20 years
old or older.
About one-third of all violent
crimes against younger teenagers
and 83 percent of the thefts oc-
curred at school, he said. The
study found that older teenagers
� 16 to 19 years old � incurred
42 percent of their thefts and 14
percent of their violent crimes at
school. Thirty-five percent of
violent crimes against older teens
were in a street or park.
Older teens were violent crime
victims more often than younger
teens aged 12 to 15 but the two
groups were theft victims at
similar rates, the study said.
"Teenagers of all ages also
reported knowing their assailants
more often than adults said the
report. "Younger teens were
most likely to report that the of-
fender was a casual acquaintance
or someone known by sight, but
least likely to identify their
assailant as a complete stranger
But the survey noted crimes
against teenagers by relatives or
family friends may be under-
counted because youths may be
reluctant to say so and adults
gave the answer for nearly all 12
and 13 year olds studied.
Although more likelv than
adults to be attacked during a
violent crime, the study found
that all teens were less likely than
adults to be injured. Also, crimes
against teenagers were less likely
to be reported to the police.
Word Up!
r
AUDITION
FOR
SOMETHING
GRAND!
PINEHURST
COUNTRY CLUB
at PINEHURST NORTH CAROLINA
PRESENTS AUDITIONS FOR:
pared . md wea
POSITIONS OPEN
6 Singer-Dancers
Ptpase nave at i ac companist to pia, . ii
comfortable clothes
4 instrumentalists
-1 Drummer-1 Bass player-1 Keyboardist-1 Guitar player
Please bring your own bass, guitar. ai I .rums Rano will be provided
AUDITION DATES:
UNC Chapel Hill
Monday. Nov 17, Carolina union Auditonum. 5-9 p.m.
university of NC Greensboro
Sat Nov 22. Elliot univ Center, Alexander Room, i-fspm
East Carolina university
Sat. Dec. 6,A.S. Fletcher Rehearsal Hall 101,12-5p.m
Pinehurst Country Club
tar lurtkrr information, call -aaBk.
KH)8MMt, l.ilraaloa 6101 J2L.
Sat Dec 13, Brassies. i2-4pm
RACK ROOM
branded shoes
Greenville Buyers Market
Memorial Dive
OPEN MON-SAT 10-9
SUNDAY 1-6
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
10�e
O OFF
Our Everyday Low Price
(Except Aigner, Nike and Reebok)
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
IVCF mvitei everyone lo the last meeting
of the semester thu Wednesday night
'12 1 14 We would like to thank everyone
tor their participation thu semester and e�
tend an open invitation to ioin us next
semester So come out and ioin us once more
before finals begin tor fun. fellowship, and
singing this Wednesday night at 7 p m in
Rawl Room 130
CORSONASW
This will be the last meeting this semester
It is important that all members be present
m order to wrap up all old business Please
attend, there is information and business
that must be taken care of
VARIETY
SHOWN
Joyner Library will present variety Show
"W on Saturday December 6. at 7 30 p m
m Fletcher Auditorium Tickets art U 00
each Door pnes will be given All proceeds
go to the Pitt County Foster Children's Fund
for Christmas
PRE PROFESSIONAL
HEALTH
ALLIANCE
There will De a Pre Pretest t hm .
Alliance meeting on December 3rd In fioc-
247 n Mendenhaii at 7 00 AH members
encouraged to attend Guest art ataa
welcomed
NC. STUDENT
LEGISLATURE
North Carolina Student Legislature it's
not too late Join NCSL There are no re
quirements except an open m.nd Freshmen
welcome' The East Carolina Delegation of
NCSL will be very active next semester in
terested1 Then voice your opinion Come to
213 Mendenhaii Student Center. 7 00 Mon
days
COOPERATIVE
EDUCATION
STATE GOVERNMENT INTERNS Posi
tions are available for students m a variety
H maiors with state government for Sum
mer 1987 For more information regarding
the North Carolina Internship Program and
the Institute of Government, contact
Cooperative Education m 313 Rawl
METHODIST
PRESBYTERIAN
FELLOWSHIP
The Wednesday Night Supper will be
preceded by a Candlelight Communion ser
vice, and the meal Is turkey with all the trim
mmgs A collection will be received for the
Soup Kitchen 5pm Wednesday Methodist
Student Center (501 E Fifth St across from
Garrett Dorm) Call 752030 tor reserva
tions Sponsored by Presbyterian and
Methodist Campus Ministries
&t taut (Earolinfan
Steve Folmar, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives:
Anne Leigh Mallory John Rusk
Steve Mote Jill Taylor
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MkOHTHtr KATII
PHONES
SO-W 4.U
�'4� m
MK-tn in
70H4� Jf
aan� aawoe It
COLOR tfianK RATES
to�1 mammm � uw, n �n ����
owe mtm 4 mat ����
Twa eaten 4 ktack � w
msaarn
5.aw � eat at eae
SMI � 0JOB itt ear
io.9oi - 'i.ao� M�ac
BUSINESS HOl'R
Moaday - FrMay
ataVJft. � S p.a
757-63o6
757-6557 757-6367
757-655 757-630?
POETRY FORUM
The ECU Poetry Forum will meet Thurs
dayatgpm in room 248 Mendenhaii Poets
and those interested m poetry art invited to
iwn a casual workshop m which particular
poems and the craft of writing poetry will be
discussed Those who wish to receive critical
feedback cm their own work art asked to br
mg eight to ten copies of their poems
CAROLINA GULF
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752-7270
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Reward yourself with a 14K gold ArtCarved ring, and we'll give
you a $50 necklace, free.
Our Representative is on campus with distinguished traditional and
contemporary styles � each backed by a Full Lifetime Warranty.
TO7IKVED
CLASS RINGS
December 3, 4, & 5 from 9-4
Representative at the Student Stores
Grant
HOLLYWOOD (L'PI) Car)
Grant, the epitome of the suave,
elegant man of the world w
dazzled many of the screen
most beautiful actresses in three
decades of films, has died
stroke He was 82
Grant died late Saturday night
in Davenport, Iowa, after being
stricken during a rehearsal ol
one-man show, "A Convcrsauon
With Cary Grant " His body wa�
returned to Hollywood Sundav
His wife, Barbara, was at his
side at St. Luke's hospital when
he died. Dr Jamev Gilson ta
The actor had become ill during
rehearsal, returned to his h
room and from there was
brought comatose to the hosp
and never regained con-
sciousness, Gilson said
Grant's attorney. Stank)
said in accordance ft
actor's wishes he wo.
cremated and there would tx
funeral or memorial service
In one of his last put
pearances, Grant read a n
from President Reagan ii
cent Hollywood tribtlU
mayor Clint Eastwood The sr
was taped and aired on r
television Sunday night.
Although his last film. "V
Don't Run was made
Grant kept in the public e
Financial Aid
For!
dppe

a �

A
A"
'V
-
-
(CPS) - Students a
financial aid forms late this
but won't have to wait lot . i
get their money, 'he College
Board said last week
The Board, whose Co
Scholarship Service processes
many student aid applications I
the government, said t's c-er.
slowed down because it had I
change application forms to com-
ply with the new Higher d
tion Act of 1986
)�,� are �once�n the Mtttif
and their parents ma interpret
the delay in delivery of flnar
aid forms as a sign that there is
no assistance available B
President George Hanford �
a news conference last ween.
"To the contrary he addec
"there will be an estimated SZ
billion available in various types
of federal, state and instit
financial aid for stude-
ing in college in the fall I 981
The College Scho �
vice, Hanford explain �.
couldn't print new ar
forms until Congres- passed and
President Reagan signer th� new
law.
President Reagar. dpr
changes most of which
new ways to define f students are
"independent" of their pa
in October.
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tali
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Grant Dies Of A Stroke
HOLLYWOOD (UPI) - Cary
Grant, the epitome of the suave,
elegant man of the world who
dazzled many of the screen's
most beautiful actresses in three
decades of films, has died of a
stroke. He was 82.
Grant died late Saturday night
in Davenport, Iowa, after being
stricken during a rehearsal of his
one-man show, "A Conversation
With Cary Grant His body was
returned to Hollywood Sunday.
His wife, Barbara, was at his
side at St. Luke's hospital when
he died, Dr. James Gilson said.
The actor had become ill during
rehearsal, returned to his hotel
room and from there was
brought comatose to the hospital
and never regained con-
sciousness, Gilson said.
Grant's attorney, Stanley Fox,
said in accordance with the
actor's wishes he would be
cremated and there would be no
funeral or memorial services.
In one of his last public ap-
pearances, Grant read a message
from President Reagan at a re-
cent Hollywood tribute to actor-
mayor Clint Eastwood. The show
was taped and aired on network
television Sunday night.
Although his last film, "Walk,
Don't Run was made in 1966,
Grant kept in the public eye with
his traveling one-man show and
appearances at charity affairs,
glittery social events and White
House state dinners. He received
the Kennedy Center's award for
excellence in performing arts in
1981.
Grant, a one-time child
acrobat, rose from the vaude ville
stage in the 1920s to eventually
become one of America's
favorite romantic actors, appear-
ing in 72 films in roles ranging
from the perfect leading man to
the raffish scoundrel.
Among the beautiful actresses
who shared top billing with the
darkly handsome Grant were
Grace Kelly in "To Catch a
Thief Mae West in "She Done
Him Wrong Ingrid Bergman in
"Notorious and Katharine
Hepburn in "The Philadelphia
Story
"He was the most handsome,
witty, and stylish leading man
both on and off the screen said
Eva Marie Saint, who starred
with him in "North by Nor-
thwest
"I adored him, and it's a sad
loss for all of us
President Reagan and his wife,
Nancy, said they were "very sad-
dened" by the death of their old
Hollywood friend.
"He was one of the brightest
stars in Hollywood, and his
elegance, wit and charm will en-
dure forever on film and in our
hearts Reagan said.
"We will always cherish the
memory of his warmth, his loyal-
ty and his friendship, and we will
miss him dearly
Actor Charlton Heston called
Grant "one of the screen's last
gentlemen
In 1969, the suave soft-spoken
actor who had never before
received an Academy Award was
honored with a special Oscar in
recognition of his 34-year career.
"I think he was overlooked by
the Academy all these years
said Doris Day, who starred with
Grant in "That Touch of Mink
"He was really a genius at
what he did Day said. "He had
the looks, the charm, and he was
the classiest man I ever met
Some of his other films includ-
ed "Topper "Gunga Din
"An Affair to Remember "His
Girl Friday "The Awful
Truth and "Bringing Up
Baby
Born Archibald Alexander
Leach in Bristol, England, on
January 18, 1904, Grant became
a U.S. citizen in 1942.
Since his retirement from
films, he had served on the cor-
porate boards of MGM, Faberge
and the Hollywood Park race
track. He also spn much of his
time at his 4-acre Beverly Hills
estate with his fifth wife, Bar-
bara, and his only child, 19-year-
old Jennifer by a former wife, ac-
tress Dyan Cannon.
Grant was also married to ac-
tresses Virginia Cherill and Betsy
Drake, and Woolworth heiress
Barbara Hutton.
During one of his rare inter
views, he said the often quoted
"Ju-dee, Ju-dee, Ju-dee" was ac-
tually started by an unknown im-
personator. But it became a
stylistic symbol of his Cockney-
but-classy accent.
Asked which of his movies was
his favorite, Grant said, "I've en-
joyed them all but he admitted
particularly enjoying making
"Indiscreet" with Bergman.
The role he liked the least was
that of the bungling voung
nephew in "Arsenic and Old
Lace which he considered his
worst acting because of the com-
edic nature of the popular stage
play.
His favorite director was
Alfred Hitchcock, who guided
him in the thriller "North By
Northwest and whose presence
Grant said was felt and reacted to
by everyone on the set.
CAROLINA CRISIS
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Greenville, North Carolina
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7
12
Financial A id
Forms Will Be Late This Year
(CPS) - Students will get
financial aid forms late this year,
but won't have to wait longer to
get their money, the College
Board said last week.
The Board, whose College
Scholarship Service processes
many student aid applications for
the government, said it's been
slowed down because it had to
change application forms to com-
ply with the new Higher Educa-
tion Act of 1986.
W� ore eoneern that student
and their parents ma interpret
the delay in delivery of financial
aid forms as a sign that there is
no assistance available Board
President George Hanford said at
a news conference last week.
"To the contrary he added,
"there will be an estimated $20
billion available in various types
of federal, state and institutional
financial aid for students enroll-
ing in college in the fall of 1987
The College Scholarship Ser-
vice, Hanford explained,
couldn't print new applications
forms until Congress passed and
President Reagan signed the new
law.
President Reagan approved the
changes - most of which involve
new ways to define if students are
"independent" of their parents -
in October.
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"Independent" students, of
course, can qualify for more aid
than students whose parents pay
part of their college costs.
Under the new act, students
who turn 24-years-old by Jan.l,
1988, will be considered "in-
dependent" for the 1987-88
academic year. Undergrads
under age 24 will be considered
independent if they were not
claimed as dependents by 'heir
parents in 1985 and 1986, and if
they made more than $4,000 in
salaries and benefits each of
those two years.
Hanford now thinks schools
should have the forms by late
December or early January in-
stead of mid-November, as in
past years. The College Scholar-
ship Service, however, suggests
students complete their applica-
tions as soon as possible after
Jan. 1.
"The hold-up shouldn't fur-
ther delay the financial aid pro-
cess unless a school's deadline for
application is close to Jan. 1
says College Board spokeswoman
Ane Grosso. "If schools get the
forms four weeks before their
deadlines, it should be okay
Earlier this year, another
federal snafu did make thousands
of students across the country
late in getting aid checks.
Complex new verification re-
quirements for aid applicants
buried many college aid officers
under piles of paperwork, delay-
ing the processing of thousands
of loans.
In 1983, application forms for
the fall school term arrived two
months late when Department of
Education officials disagreed on
the questions and format of the
form.
But Grosso doubts the current
problem will stall aid checks if
students fill out the forms cor-
rectly.
"The process will not be more
complicated Grosso insists.
"If the forms are filled out fully
the first time, students should
have no problems. If there are
questions, students should meet
with their counselors right
away
Few campus aid officers
thought the printing delay sould
hurt at all.
"The students will get the ap-
plications when they get back
from break and they'll still have
four-to-six weeks to return them
by the March 1 deadline says
Gary Garoffolo, Okahoma
State's assistant aid director.
"We don't even want students
to sign off on the applications
before Jan. 1 he adds. "But
we do anticipate a minor hard-
ship on our staff member-
because the delay mean? less time
to attach information sheets to
the forms and prepare them for
distribution
The delav, however, could
pose problems for students a:
schools with shorter aid applica
tion periods.
"At some schools it will be a
problem if students don't have
the forms before Christmas
break says Julie Hovle. finan-
cial aid director at National
University in San Diego. "It wiil
mean a smaller window of oppor-
tunity for receiving aid
Give a hoot.
Don't pollute.
Village
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CONGRATULATIoSsT
PHI KAPPA TAU "A" TEAM
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Scott Geoghegan Shayne Parrish
Scott Lindley Danny Redick
David Mason Belton Sessoms
Men's All Campus Volleyball
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Christmas
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STUDENT
STORES
Wright Building
AMERICAN GREETINGS





Stye �aat Ear0linfatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender. g� �anai�
Daniel Maurer. ,��,tdllt�
pATTI KEMMIS. - Ed�o, cTE.T l4 . �
Scott r� Folmar. pirnl� ol �,�,�
Rirw M ANTHONY MARTIN, ��wb .f
KICK MCCORMAC. t� �,�. MFr NFPnu . M
, MEG NEEDHAM. ���, �,�,
John Shannon. ,�,�� �uaiuk.� c.
Pat M Shannon Short. ��� v�
deChanii e Johnson, �
' Ptrrt ttr
December 2, 1986
TJPINIOIN
Page 4
New Usage Fee
Students May Make A Difference
A better opportunity for students
to take part in a major ECU policy
decision could hardly be imagined.
A new fee for laboratory and com-
puter usage is being leveled at the
student body, and if they want to
have anything to say about it, they
had better say it now.
To all those who may be affected
the proposed new
laboratorycomputer usage fee of
S25 per semester (and that is pro-
bably around 9,000 of you, accor-
ding to the committee making the
proposal), we hope you will make
your voices heard at an open hear-
ing at 2 p.m. tomorrow in
Mendenhall 244.
We have all complained at one
time or another of fees which seem-
ed unreasonable or which seemed to
serve special interests, but rarely
have we had the chance to do
anything about them. In most
cases, the decision to implement the
fees was an administrative one in
which the students had no voice.
We either found out about it in the
cashier's office or in a breakdown
of activity fees.
This time we are permitted to ex-
amine the fee before it's inscribed
in stone. To make the best of this
opportunity, we need to ask the
right questions.
For instance: Since students will
have to pay $25 regardless of how
many "designated classes" thev
take in a semester, isn't it likely that
some of them will avoid spreading
those classes over several semesters
in order to save money? Of course
some schedules wouldn't permit
this, but labs require extra hours
and stockpiling them could lead to
academic distress.
How about discrepancies in the
amount of return on fees spent bet-
ween a student who uses fairly inex-
pensive lab equipment (paper
towels, litmus paper) and one who
works with the most sophisticated
telescopes, computer systems, par-
ticle accelerators, or whatever?
Both may be enrolled in designated
courses (see story on page 1 for in-
formation about fees and the Fee
Committee), but is it possible that
underclassmen in survey courses
will end up supporting the specializ-
ed researches of a privileged few?
Quite possibly, the proposed
laboratorycomputer usage fee will
bring about a dramatic improve-
ment in experiential education
here. But don't take maybe for an
answer: we owe it to ourselves to
ask questions and to express our
opinions, to ensure that students
down the road don't regret our
costly mistake.
ACCORDING TO THE f6ENDf THIS IS
OUH lEETm WITH THE CANDIDATE!
I
Campus Forum
Methodist Center Disclaims CA USA
Men Think Women Don V Know
By TERRI ORE
sttff nir�
Why are there eertajn subjects that men
assume women know nothing about0 You
know what subjects I'm talking about:
football, cars, music, just to name a few.
Let's begin with football. What's so
strange about a female being interested in
the Bears or Cowboys? It's not impossible
for a girl to go beyond looking at Jim
McMahon and look instead to the actual
elements of the game. It happens to
thoroughly entertain me to sit down on a
Monday night and watch a good football
game. And, no thank you, I wouldn't
rather be watching "Family Ties
I realize that all men aren't biased
narrow-minded children, but there are
always those that outrage me with their
stereotypical views on women and their
roles.
Just because women happen to like foot-
ball, or any other sport for that matter
does not make them a dyke, or a freak. It
just so happens that women aren't built to
play football so they are forced to abstain
even though there are those females who
would love to play football themselves.
Music is another area that I would like
to comment on. If a girl likes groups such
as Black Sabbath or Iron Maiden, then she
is wild and probably strung out on drugs
If she gets into Janis Joplin or Jefferson
Airplane, then she is a flower child. And if
Led Zeppelin is her faorite group of all
time, then something is definitely out of
line.
As far as cars are concerned. I'm not
really surprised that men think we women
know nothing about them. There are cer-
tain areas that males just feel that females
will never be a part of. and one of those
areas is cars.
However, this is one area in which we
have to blame ourselves. Usually when a
girl pulls into a gas station and the atten-
dent walks over to the car, she very naivelv
says, "Could you Till it up and check the
oil, pleeese?" The attendent is practically
always ready to assist this damsel in
distress, giving himself a sense of control
and superiority. Women of the '80s should
know how to check the oil and change a
tire if necessary.
The essence of this article is not to knock
the male gender but rather to enlighten
them on the thinking of the female mind.
Women do not want to be made to feel
that they can't have the same interests in
say, sports or music. And when a man
openly displays an attitude excluding
women from these areas, he not only
makes himself look ignorant, but turns the
female off as well.
I hope to get through to at least one of
you out there. I just want males and
females alike to realize that there should be
no limits to the interests of anyone.
This is in reply to your article con-
cerning CAUSA-USA in last Thurs-
day's paper, in which you identified
this group as being sponsored by The
Methodist Student Center. Please in-
form your readers that the correct in-
formation concerning this activity at
ECU is as follows:
Two young men from Raleigh
came to my office after being refer-
red by Dr. Ron Speier in the Division
o! Student I ife. Their request was to
spend three days on the ECU campus
inviting students to attend a lecture
concerning their organization's op-
position to Marxist governments in
this hemisphere. The two students,
who claimed no church sponsorship,
were Toshikazu and Fitsrov Davis.
They identified CAUSA USA as "a
non-sectarian, educational organiza-
tion whose purpose is to present a
new ideological perspective for
democracy and the free world
They were sponsored by Dr. Paige of
the Shaw Divinity School in Raleigh.
The President of the national
organization is Philip Sanchez,
former ambassador to Honduras and
Columbia. A call to the Washington,
D.C. office verified this information.
Seeking to encourage the free ex-
change of ideas, and being assured
that they were not raising monev or
selling anything, I signed permission
tor them to spend three days inviting
people to the program, providing
that they followed the ECU policies
concerning such activities.
Later we were informed that this
group was very aggressive in securing
names and addresses for their mail-
ing list. It now appears likely that
despite their disclaimers, the
organization is related to the Unifica-
tion Church.
We do not sponsor CAUSA USA
and we regret any inconvenience
caused by their activities at ECU.
Daniel T. Earnhardt, Director
The Wesley Foundation of Greenville
Apathy Input
Ok, Ok, I'll admit it � I have a
burden to share � 1 now have the
courage to stand up and sav: I am an
apathetic student.
But don't tell my friends. What
would they think? What would the
administration do? Gosh, they might
make me drop back to under 18
hours so I could be more involved.
What if the School of Music found
out? They might take away one of
my 13 classes � and it might be the
one we all take every semester for no
credit! The shame of it all.
How can I explain it to them? If
they ever find out that I missed the
last political lecture series because of
a masterclass and recital by a mere
guest musician, they may make me
change majors. If they knew I stayed
in touch with politics through the
evening news and (Shh) discussions
with my friends instead of attending
the Young Republicans meetings
they'd expel me. I just know it.
What if they found out about my
job? $2000 tuition per semester and a
sister in college is no reason to work
especially in a job related to my
future career. They may take awav
my membership and active participa-
tion in ACDA (Amercian Choral
Directors Association) so that I can
attend the next rape seminar. How
can I tell them that in D.C. we had
rape seminars every vear beginning in
the 4th grade? After all, it can onlv
benefit me to hear again, "There is
no sure way to prevent rape.
However
I just don't know what I'd do if
they found out I attended mv best
friend's senior recital instead of the
last-time management session. And
what about the night I went to bed
early instead of playing intramural
cage ball? And if thev ever found out
that I studied that Saturday night in-
stead of going to the last "major con-
cert" (regardless of the fact that 1
prefer jazz), thev would have me
committed.
Hallelujah, I've seen the light No
more putting grades first, no more
practicing two hours every night no
more typing other people's papers to
buy groceries, no more wasting time
cleaning the apartment or washing
the car, and heaven knows I'll never
"just relax" � who needs sanitv
anyway? Forget Dan Rather and the
esening news � the Young
Republicans can certainly give me an
unbiased view of everything happen-
ing locally, nationally, and globally.
I'll never have to volunteer to sing
for the alumni association again,
never hold an office in a choir, never
voluntarily chair a festival for 1,000
high school choral students, never ac-
company another voice major, never
support my roommate in her ac-
tivities (there aren't many anyway �
she's an ECU student, so apathy is
"a part of her life"), never take time
to write a letter, call a friend, see a
movie, or give blood.
Thank you, Lysa Hieber, for set-
ting my priorities straight � now I
can graduate with the knowledge that
I should learn a little about a lot of
extracurricular concerns, rather than
concentrating on the activities related
to my major. Thank you, thank you,
thank you; I feel better now that I
have been given the inspiration -
come out of the closet and admit the
error of my ways. Hallelujah
Pamela Jones
Senior
Mus.c Education
Debate Urged
As the world we live in seems to
never slow down, we tend to become
complacent and withdrawn from our
surroundings. This in all its essence is
a tragic mistake for us as students to
make. The tendency to become lax
spreads like a disease, ve; it happens
to all of us. No matter what the
reason, we shouldn't �'stick our
heads in the sand" and let the world
go by without our input.
As an upper classman I look back
on my earlier years at East Carolina
and regret not having participated in
more outside actmtes. We should
become more aware of our surroun-
dings. Examine issues that affect the
university. An issue at hand that con-
cerns us ai students is the search for a
new Chancellor. As our esteemed
SGA President reported in last
week's edition of The East Caroli-
nian, student input on matter
such vital importance is lacking. If 1
am correct, it was reported that of
the twenty-five students chosen to at-
tend a quesnon answer session with
one of the chancellorship candidates
only twelve were present.
East Carolina is on the upswing;
don't be left out of its vast and aspir-
ing growth. Take part in the various
extracurricular activities offered on
campus. Get to know your student
legislators. Find out what takes place
in the far corners of this campus. Put
forth your opinions on debatable
issues. Whether you know it or no:
the present administration has chang-
ed the whole system in regard to stu-
dent loans. An issue closer to home is
the new revenue bill passed by the
SGA. Take time to ask questions;
there are people on this campus that
will take the time to listen to your
praises or your complaints.
David Ross Renfrow
Junior
Historv
A
By DAVID LEWIS
Sprdal To Tto fjutMHa
When Mikhail Gorbachev assumed the leadership
of the Soviet Union in 1985, conservatives in this
country lambasted liberals who seemed to fall for
his congenial personality. They rightfully pointed
out the charismatic General Secretary might be a
likeable fellow face to face, but that should not
blind us to the policies he represents. Now those
same conservatives must face similar charges in
regard to Ronald Reagan.
The President's defenders usually dismiss
criticism of their leader by making charges of par-
tisanship and demagoguery, often with good
reason. But even granting prejudices exist, there re-
main questions about the quality of this president's
judgement that are not easily deflected: case in
point, the "arms to Iran" scandal.
To begin, the substantive issues should be
separated from aspects of the controversy which are
not of vital concern. For example, one should not
become too upset over President Reagan's reluc-
tance to admit the error of this adventure. His
empenai temperament, which assumes infallibility,
is a common failing among leaders and stems from
the conviction that it is less important to be right
than to appear right. Inspiring confidence then
becomes a cardinal virtue, and politics, in turn,
becomes a confidence game. It should therefore
surprise no one that Ronald Reagan has a longstan-
ding policy of blaming others for his own mistakes.
In this instance, however, he refused to inform so
many he could later have held responsible that he
has had to search hard for a scapegoat. Blame has
temporarily fallen on the media for exposing the af-
fair, with logic similar to that employed by the con-
vict who blames his troubles on the police
However, look for heads to roll from the
President's inner circle of advisors.
Another less-than-vital aspect of the Iranian flap
is the question of legality (in this case, a possible
violation of both the ban on arms sales to Iran and
the need to notify Congress in a "timely" manner
regarding covert operations). Here President
Keagan is not the first president to appreciate the
claims of privilege associated with the office he
does not break laws; he "waives" them.
A final nonvital consideration involves consisten-
cy. Questions have come from all quarters from
those genuinely confused as well as from those who
stand to gain by a presidential blunder: Why deliver
arms to a nation on the U.S. list of those sponsoring
terrorism, while condemning state sponsored ter-
rorism and cojoling our allies to do likewise? If con-
tact was made only with "moderate" elements
what leverage would they have to gain the release of
our hostages? If this action was not intended to
release hostages, why then did the President claim
we might have had all five home if the press had not
blown his cover? On and on go the questions.
Several briefings and clarifications have not
made sense of the Iranian operation, even accepting
that consistency is not a Reagan strong suit. But
perhaps this is unimportant if the intentions involv-
ed were good. The President has said they were
good, and the President is an honorable man.
Of The Public
What, then, is the substance of this controversy?
First there is the matter of perception, and here it
weighs little whether or not the President intended
to exchange arms for hostages. The perception is
that he did so intend. Call it what he likes, the
perception remains of a de facto swap. Perceptions
are important, for they are as close as many ever get
to understanding issues. Jimmy Carter was perceiv-
ed as weak, while Richard Nixon was perceived as a
crook. Regardless of mitigating circumstances, the
fortunes of the Great in a democratic society are
routinely determined by perceptions.
Campus
Spectrum
The second point of substance is closely related to
he first for in this case it is largely responsible for
tne public s perception of Ronald Reagan This
point involves not the President's ideology, but his
methodology, which is centered on a facination
with military force and its paraphernalia
Understanding this facination may help illuminate
some of the President's enigmatic inconsistencies
the Reagan predisposition for martial rather
than diplomatic solutions to international problems
is well known: Marines sent to Lebanon, an inva-
SfoSjCt IT ChanCd t0 "rcscuc m
fi�hten"wno, ,n SJ8 T S,Upp0rt for "freedom
ngnters (not to be confused with terrorists! rh
provocation of Libya's unstable Qaddafi c cn t
concept of dealing with the arms build up bv pro
posing another weapons system ' P
The wisdom of such a strategy is a judgment for
history to make, but the "get Tough'1' atSShZ
been popular in the United Sues Those ohitt
oein r �f 5"C '� dip.omacvThhrvCe geSv
been drowned out by the applause but no
America is puzzled. Why would our president inH
arms to terrorist Iran? It was only JJ5Short veil
ago our embassy in Teheran was" �!?�Si
hostages held for 444 daysKhoUnt suTreferst
the U.S. as sataiuc. How could President iKLLn
send weapons into such an environment,
know' JTThV nrnmPl! ,Y,�U 80 �� wh�� you
his prescription for what ails Pn�cea,
will remSi. , oiSti fio.T rwch Ronild RM"
Tips On
How can I decrease stress uruuna
the exam period
Stress is a fact of life for a
us. No matter what you are
ing, you are under some am
of stress. Even while
your body continues to fui
and react to the stress a i -
dreaming A certain amount
stress mav be helpful.
centration and energv ie
mcrease with limited amount
stress Too much stress can rr .
you uncomfortable and
shorten vour life
Campu
BO! I DFR.r 0�
CIA pr Tesrs see-
up again on Ame-
last Aee
University
chanted, waved sigi
tested the presence ol � enti
telhgence Agen
camp
Over the last two n
recruiters have draw:
at Texas. Minnesota.
State. Massachu
Iowa and Rhode Islai
other places
� -eems like e
go (the recruitei
tested sa
dent of the U.S. Si
tion in Washington. DC
it seems to be increasing It .
be tied into (the case
ner Eugene) Hasenfus oi
gress's approval of
Contras m Nicaragua '
Sharon Fostor,
spokeswoman, savs the age
visits '�several hundred
puses a year, and docsn
how many time the
been protested.
"I'm asked this ovei
We don keep tracl
number of protests). s e :
listing of the demoi
she says.
Fostor says it doc
because the demonstra
no difference in the
people who sign up
i
I
Questions
About
Defense
Continued From Page 1
questioned. Cn
on the calculations and
penmen conducted
Although results are en.
ing, and SDI is mai g
technological ad
critics don't see - - i
Some believe
resistance of SE
technical, but aUo pc
bureaucratic. Res;are
political side due
ingness to race the ABV
This has resulted in ang S
a bargaining ch
negotiations On the bure
side the resistance
competition I i dollars - the
Defense Departmen: budf
The most important miss
our strategy forces -even:
war from taking place at a
place uncertainty in the m
the agre-
This is one conce:
ponents a- �fl! as - ipp
must agree on Progress md a.
ceptance of SDI is growing,
the President is still mee
resistance in Congress
Pottery, jewelry and other
decorative and functional items
crafted by students in the ECU
School of Art will be offered for
sale on campus Dec. 4-6.
The three-day event is the an-
nual Christmas exhibition and
sale sponsored by the ECU
Ceramics Guild and Craftsmen
East. The sak features dozens of
art objects including handmade
Christmas cards
This year's sak will be held in
the main foyer of the Jenkins
Fine Arts Center. Hours are 8
ia, until 7 pM. Dee. 4 and 5
10 ajn. until 4 pjb. Dec. 6.

1
��� .





ECU
l CC1IT7�E
S
I
s CA USA
ispiration to
and admit the
.ah
�icia Jones
Senior
I anon
Debate Urged
seems to
e :end to become
aun from our
ts essence is
is a students to
become lax
I tease, yet it happens
matter what the
't "stick our
� I d el the world
� r input.
an 1 look back
al East Carolina
�- rig participated in
� activites We should
e aware of our surroun-
Examine issuev that affect the
lniversit An issue at hand that con-
ne search for a
u ii esteemed
in last
East Caroli-
�r.atters of
nice s lacking. If 1
- �� ted that of
tud chosen to at-
i ar.v-f: session with
hip candidates
- � reent.
� the upswing;
' vast and aspir-
�' part in the various
offered on
lit student
-� what takes place
' this campus. Put
ns on debatable
. know it or not
al � as chang-
n regard to stu-
home is
.e bill passed by the
me 1 ak questions;
h .ampus that

Lme to listen to your
complaints
David Ross Renfrow
Junior
History
e Public
ged to "rescue mission")
� time support for "freedom
)t to be confused with terrorists) the
p i , unstable Qaddafi. een the
r deaung with the arms build-up bv pro-
weapons system.
f such a strategy is a judgment for
axe but the "get tough" attitude has
ar m the United States. Those objecting
p force before diplomacy have generally
Kned out bs the applause but now
puzzled Why ouJd our president send
rorist Iran It was only seven short years
fLi Teheran as seized and
Eld for 444 aa,s Khomeini still refers to
s satamc How could President Reagan
ns into such an environment?
ver is simple You go with what you
the proverbial Jewish mother and her
ip, arms are Ronald Reagan's panacea
btion for what ails
Bus perspective, his action seems less
t still comes at a bad time for the Presi-
Jemocrats have retaken the Senate, and
I fC dlstancing themselves from pro-
1 doi not share the popularity of their
f� wS thc G � P taw lh�
Kepubhcan nomination, and are posi-
tives accordingly. It would appear we
o years during which Ronald Reagan
Lacf svfng fathcr but with
SriSS? cunled Given his recent
possibility may not be such bad news
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 2. 1986
Tips On Reducing Exam Stress
Sty Eajat (Earnlhtum
How can I decrease stress around
the exam period?
Stress is a fact of life for all of
us. No matter what you are do-
ing, you are under some amount
of stress. Even while you sleep.
your body continues to function
and react to thc stress caused by-
dreaming A certain amount of
stress may be helpful; your con-
centration and energy level will
increase with limited amounts of
stress. Too much stress can make
vou uncomfortable and can
shorten your life.
Camp
BOLT DFR.CO(CPS)-Anti-
CIA protests seem to be heating
up again on American campuses,
last week, more than 100
University of Colorado students
chanted, waved signs and pro-
tested the presence of Central In-
telligence Agency recruiters on
campus.
Over the last two months. CIA
recruiters have drawn protestors
at Texas, Minnesota, Oregon
State, Massachusetts-Amherst,
Iowa and Rhode Island, among
other places.
"It seems like everywhere the
go (the recruiters), thev get pro-
tested says Tom Swan, presi-
dent of the U.S. Student Associa-
tion in Washington, DC. "And
it seems to be increasing. It could
be tied into (the case of arms run-
ner Eugene) Hasenfus or Con-
gress's approval of aid to the
Contras in Nicaragua
Sharon Fostor. a CIA
spokeswoman, says the agency
visits "several hundred" cam-
puses a year, and doesn't know
how many times the visits have
been protested.
"I'm asked this over and over.
We don't keep track (of the
number of protests). We have no
listing of the demonstrations
she says.
Fostor says it doesn't matter
because the demonstrations make
no difference in the number of
people who sign up
Questions
About
Defense
Continued From Page 1.
questioned. Critics can only go
on the calculations and ex-
periments conducted thus far.
Although results are encourag-
ing, and SD1 is making
technological advances rapidly,
critics don't see this as enough.
Some believe that the
resistance of SDI is not only
technical, but also political and
bureaucratic. Resistance on the
political side due to an unwill-
ingness to face the ABM treaty.
This has resulted in using SDI as
a bargaining chip in arms-control
negotiations. On the bureaucratic
side the resistance is based on the
competition for dollars in the
Defense Department budget.
The most important mission of
our strategic forces is to prevent
war from taking place at all. and
place uncertainty in the mind of
the agressor.
This is one concept that op-
ponents as well as supporters
must agree on. Progress and ac-
ceptance of SDI is growing, but
the President is still meeting
resistance in Congress.
Signs of stress include:
Headaches, neckaches, and
backaches
"Nervous stomach nausea
Diarrhea
Chest pain
Grouchiness
Inability to sit still or concen-
trate
Insomnia
Eating, smoking, and drinking
too much
Loss of appetite
Having vague fears about
known or unknown events
What can be done to reduce
stress?
Sleep at least 6-8 hours a night
or take naps; sleep helps the body
to restore itself.
Exercise such as swimming,
walking, running, and aerobics
reduces tension and increases
mental alertness.
Diet influences your reaction
to stress; caffeine increases feel-
ings of anxiety. Cut down on
sugar, salt, alcohol, junk food,
and caffeine.
Spend time alone each day to
give yourself a chance to unwind
and focus on yourself. Use your
friends as sounding boards; shar-
ing daily experiences with them
can be relaxing and helpful at the
same time.
Consider taking courses in time
management or stress reduction.
All of us can benefit from these
programs; they can help us put
our busy lives back into perspec-
tive.
Servutf the Em OroiO
cDfittmuty
1923
needs
WRITERS
Apply in person at the
East Carolinian
between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Pottery, jewelry and other
decorative and functional items
crafted by students in the ECU
School of Art will be offered for
sale on campus Dec. 4-6.
The three-day event is the an-
nual Christmas exhibition and
sale sponsored by the ECU
Ceramics Guild and Craftsmen
East. The sale features dozens of
art objects induding handmade
Christmas cards.
This year's sale will be held in
the main foyer of the Jenkins
Fine Arts Center. Hours are �
a.m. mall 7 p4�. Dae. 4 and 5
and 10 aJB. tttffl 4 ajb. Dae. 6.
"We go where we are invited to
talk with students who have
already expressed an interest
she says.
Student protestors, however,
forced the CIA to cancel a
recruiter's planned visit to the
University of Massachusetts last
week by blocking the door to the
university's career center.
University oficials say he will
have to return to the school to in-
terview prospective CIA agents.
Explains protestor Barry Lef-
ky, "We don't think brutal
murderers should be on campus
recruiting
"I'm furious says David
Abrams, a student who says he
wanted to speak to th recruiter.
"These people don't know me.
They don't know why I'm in-
terested in the CIA, and yet
they're prohibiting the way I can
express myself. They're deciding
for me whom I can apply to
The CIA has been "very suc-
cessful" in its signups, says Ravi
Jain, a graudate student at the
University of Texas and a
member of Democracy in
Academia.
"This is true because of the
kind of recruiting it's doing he
says. "The kind of people they
are recruiting have never talked
to a liberal in their entire lives.
These are the kind of people we
have trouble reaching
"People still see the CIA as
protecting the American way of
life he says. "We have to go
further to change their minds
At the University of Texas at
Austin, about 40 students pro-
tested the CIA recruitment ef-
forts last week.
The demonstration, which
began at Burdine Hall, followed
a speech by former CIA agent
John Stockwell, in which he ac-
cused the CIA of manipulating
the press, overthrowing
democracies, installing military
dictators and preparing for a
U.S. invasion of Nicaragua.
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The Plaza
355-5050 J0 Discount to Students
with ECU I. D.
(lacludmg Comma ond Outtob Wort)
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Tree-Trimming Party
Tuesday, December 2 4:30-5:30 p.m.
First Floor Mendenhall Lobby
Comedian
TODD YOHN
December 5 8:00 p.m.
The Underground
Upcoming Events:
Film: The Money Pitt December 4-7
Film: Plenty December 10
Film: Murphy's Romance Decembei
11-14
Hawaii Trip � December 30-January 7
Bahamas Cruise � March 8 14
Keystone, Colorado Ski Trip - March
7-12
Star Search Competition
Tuesday January 27 8:00 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
(For More Information. Contact the Student Lnion, Room
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1






HK bMBFR2, 1986
Money Problems Mount On Campuses
DALLAS TEX (cps) As
2 Pr�blems mount at a
' mbcr �f campuses, officials at
�We affected schools in recent
J have proposed the most
raaical solution of all: mergers or
0utnght closures.
Schools in Texas, Louisiana,
Montana, Colorado, North
Dakota, Alaska. Nebraska and
Washington, DC. are among
those threatened.
A 1982 stud predicted a
dwindling number of 18-year-
olds and resulting trouble would
force as many as 200 colleges
most of them private schools to
shut their doors by 1990.
But, this fall's budget pro-
blems in many farm and energy
states are leading some state
legislators to propose closing or
merging "marginal" campuses.
Not all of the troubled schools,
however, are accepting the pro-
posals without a fight.
A recent plan by the Dallas
Citizens Council to merge four
traditionally black private
schools to create one "fiscally
responsible college" with wide
community support, for exam-
ple, was rejected by the colleges.
"We're going to tough it out.
The idea of merger just went over
like a lead balloon with all four
colleges involved states Love
Johnson, spokesman for Bishop
College, one of the institutions
slated for merger.
"It's outside groups that are
saying merge Johnson con-
tinues. "It would bring together a
great deal of debt, but each col-
lege is unique and all are surviv-
ing very well. We're getting good
support from our constituency
and we don't anticipate going
under
Bishop College may be one of
the lucky ones. Some schools see
extinction or severe reorganiza-
tion as a very real possibility.
In Louisiana, where university
regents say they would rather
close one school than cut pro-
grams at all institutions, board
members fear state budget cuts
will force at least one state college
to shut down. But William
Arceneaux, state higher educa
tion commissioner, insists no
schools will be closed.
"There are lots of alternative
actions we can take like raising
tuition, limiting enrollment and
cutting services Arceneaux
says.
Montana University System's
commissioners also say they may
close or merge campuses to cut
costs.
In Colorado, Gov. Richard
Lamm wants to close some of the
14 state-run community colleges
and turn the campuses into
prisons.
"We've got too much higher
education in Colorado Lamm
told journalists in October.
"There are 1,000 beds too few in
our correctional system
In several other states, mergers
and closings already are stark
realities. In Nebraska, for exam-
ple, the Southeast Community
College System closed its Fair-
bury Campus in October - forc-
ing students to attend classes 25
miles away in Beatrice - because
a devastated farm economy forc-
ed all state agencies to cut their
budgets.
"The decision to merge two
campuses took considerable
study oi enrollment projections
and financial information says
SCC spokesman Ted Suhr.
"The number of students was
declining, as were the projections
of the number of high school
seniors in the county Suhr con-
tinues. "We decided there would
be a savings by merging the two
campuses, and we could offer
higher quality education with a
single, bigger campus
While increasing numbers of
state colleges are under the finan-
cial gun, private schools are also
facing similar problems.
In August, the Catholic
Church-supported University of
Albuquerque fell under a moun-
ting budget deficit and declining
enrollment.
At the same time, Antioch
University of Ohio and the
American Bar Association drop-
ped funding of the Antioch Law
School.
And in Tennessee, financially
strapped Morristown College
barely bought itself one more
year of operation by meeting its
190-student enrollment goal this
fall.
But private school's financial
distress still is less than expected,
says University of Michigan
education professor James
Miller, author of the 1982 closure
Court Considers Legal Age
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Supreme Court today agreed to
decide whether it is constitutional
to withhold a portion of federal
highway funds from states that
do not raise their drinking age to
21.
The court will hear arguments
this term in the case brought by
the state of South Dakota against
the government seeking review of
a ruling by the 8th U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals.
The law was passed as part of
an effort to reduce drunken driv-
ing among teenagers, which is
one of the major causes of deaths
for teens.
In 1984, South Dakota, which
allows 19-and 20-year-olds to
drink low alcohol beer, charged
the law was an unconstitutional
violation of the state's right to set
drinking ages. Federal courts
disagreed.
The case involves legislation
passed by Congress in 1984 that
directs the Transportation
Department to withhold a por-
tion of federal highway construc-
tion funds unless states raise their
drinking age to 21. The law
authorizes the withholding of 5
percent of the funds in 1987 and
10 percent in 1988.
Seeking high court review,
South Dakota said the 21st
Amendment, which repealed pro
hibition, gave states, not the
federal government, the right to
set drinking ages.
South Dakota was supported
in its efforts to receive high court
review by Colorado, Hawaii,
Louisiana, Montana, Ohio,
South Carolina, Vermont and
Wyoming.
Arguing against review, the
government said the law was con-
stitutional because the federal
government has a substantial in-
terest in promoting "safety on
the nation's highways and the
health of the nation's teenage
youth
Mary Ferebee Howard of Tar-
boro has established a $10,000
endowment at East Carolina
University to fund scholarships
for graduate students in marine
studies.
According to Dr. William H.
Queen, director of the Institute
for Coastal and Marine Studies,
the scholarships will help
students who choose a marine
studies emphasis in their graduate
coursework and thesis projects.
"Most marine studies people
have undergraduate and master's
degrees in one of the basic
sciences-biology, chemistry or
geology. However, thev can
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RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
structure their electives toward
marine studies, especially if they
plan to pursue PhDs in some area
of marine studies.
"This is the only source of
scholarship monies at ECU for
marine studies. 1 think the
scholarships will attract high
quality students who have the
potential to make substantial
contributions to the marine
studies field after their gradua-
tion Queen says.
Ms. Howard received
undergraduate and master's
degrees in education from East
Carolina in 1954 and 195 She
taught elementary school for
eight years in Tarboro and also
eight years in Rockv Mount.
She is a lifelong resident of
Tarboro, the fourth of six
generations to live there. Her
great-grandfather founded the
Daily Southerner newspaper. Her
grandfather was a superior court
judge and her father was a
lawyer
"I've spent much of my life on
or near the water, so I'm in-
terested in all aspects of marine
life she said.
"The field is almost an un-
touched area for research, but it
is vital to the state of North
Carolina and to our coastal in-
dustries.
"EC I has a number of
students from the coastal coun-
Moving With
ties. I hope these scholarships will
lure others
Ms. Howard has just com-
pleted a term on the ECU Friends
of the Library board of directors.
She has recently completed a
personal memoir, with the
assistance of the East Carolina
Manuscript Collection, of her ex-
periences as a Red Cross recrea-
tional worker in the South Pacific
during World War II.
She is active with the
Edgecombe County Historical
Society and Calvary Episcopal
Church. She serves on scholar-
ship committees for St. Mary's
College and Vassar College.
Contributions to the Mars
Ferebee Howard Scholarship En-
dowment in Marine Studies may
be sent to the East Carolina
University Foundation, Inc
TaylorSlaughter Alumni
Center, ECU, Greenville, NC
27858353.
study.
"Several years ago, we assum-
ed there would be lots of private
closures caused by financial con-
straints and institutional
distress he says. "Now it seems
we're not seeing those schools
closing in the number or propor-
tion we anticipated.
"The enrollment declines pro-
jected for the 1980s are not as
severe as projected, thanks partly
to an increase in the number of
non-traditional or returning
students, so institutions are not
as badly hurt. And it turns out to
be harder to close a college than it
was assumed
Miller recalls several highly-
publicized closure attempts "that
turned into free-for-alls" caused
some rethinking on the part of
those who sought to close other
institutions.
In addition, private schools
have become more willing to
adapt to tighter budgets in the
past few years, relying on pro-
gram cuts, reorganized curricula
and target marketing of students
as money-saving devices.
"Colleges used to keep
everything in their curricula to
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please everybody Miller saj
"Now they're more flexible
about what comes and goes "
Public schools now must learr,
the same lessons as private
schools, he adds, although stau
colleges often have an extra
tection against closure
"There can be great political
difficulties in closing a pul
school Miller s a .
"Legislators from the area whet?
a school is closed can hold a
grudge and effect legislation i
other areas
"Some are cautious a'
pushing to close an institution
another legislator's d
because that move can come bac,
around to haunt them in anotl
area
EXTRA!
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work at night.
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DRAFT NITE
Tues. December 2, 1986 9:00-1:00 AM Adra. $1.50 Guys SI 00 1 adies
75 TALL CANS & COOLERS
10 Draft All Nite
DRAFT NITE
Wed. December 3, 1986 9:00-1:00 AM Adm. $1.50 Guvs SI 00 1 adies
75 TALL CANS & COOLERS
10 Draft All Nite
-y
WZMB will be accepting
applications for the
position of Business
Manager through
December 6th. All
interested persons should
apply at WZMB, 2nd
floor, Old Joyner
Library.
lMUBHHHHBiHlHHHlrai
ATTENTION CUSTOMERS OF
I
For your convenience, we have posted our entire
buyback list in our showcase windows. It will be
updated as necessary. We hope this will prove to
be beneficial to you, our customer
STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
Your On-Campus Shopping Center
Show
B I) A su ss(is
�,�� .
1 3 S
Rebel Magazine
Joyner
pre
Mendc: I
the maga
art
ed
!� �a
man .
pus's ai
including
Board Cha
! asiter a:
writer, Je" -
Accoi
Thornbi
trant. in eacl
compev
��Overall. '�
xeerm to
quality than
Thornb i �
of the mag i
Entra: '
poe
well
Christmas
Bv MK AH H UtRI
mi" ��
Eve-
mohaukc-j d
must adn
Christmas musk
find a season � l
"White
Bells" somewr
Somehov e tia
The ECT Hind rrtsembk w
Joyner Li bran
Special Kids
b (i m HKm
The Cri
again upoi
�nmercia
er ea-v I .
ing sp��
about.
The folks
Library have-
sPmt though, the-
something to preserve
On Saturdav, Do i
7'30 in Fletchei
their efforts u
as they prefer: the
nual Variety Show
The event showcase
�f campus emplovee-
Hbrary staff) wh
mc and hidden talents
a show for thepubiu The
raised through ticket ale-
donated to the Pitt
Se�"vices Fostei
cHristmas Fund
According to Dr Ruth Ka
Director of Librarv Service the
m�ney is used to help I
Parents buv gifts for their I
during Christmas Without
extra monev. manv (os:e-
children would recieve few
any, Christmas gifts
The show itself is testimon
tfle giving spirit of the people in-
volved. Everything dealing �
I
$
W� ifwnitm, n I i .��. a.





I
mpuses
se evervbodMiller savs.
N w they'remore flexible
about what aniics and goes
schooisnow must learn
he same ie�'s as private
. adds,although state
.rave an extra pro-
.ire.
"TvV.great political
css ng a public
MHer says.
� g 'omthe area where
sd .dn hold a
�i'islation in
Vus about istitution in
s district come back lem in another
F.XTRA!
EXTRA!
get
W tn
NITE
i �' ' Guys SI 00 Lad
OOLERS
II Nite
NITE
ies
OOLERS
iys S1.00 Ladies
II Nite
El:
w
'HI EAS1 l AROI INJAN
Style
DECEMBER 2. 1VH6
Page
Show Honors Rebel Winners
Bv D.A.SWANSON
V�ff�rtl�T
I asl night opened the annual
Rebel Magazine Art Show in
lo) ner I ibrar The opening was
preceded h a reception at
Mendenhall, where winners of
i magazine's prose, poetry and
competitions were announc-
as a gala event featuring
an dignitaries from the cam-
s arl and literary community,
uding the likes of Media
ird Chairperson Brvan
ass tei and Daily Reflector
i ferry Raynor.
According to Rebel editor, Tim
r the number of en-
each category of the
far exceeded the
past years.
�. s batch of art
' a much higher
isi year's said
. who has been editor
ie since last car
- in the prose and
- were notable as
A ei 150 poems and
t si � es submitted to
the contest, last year's contest
was literally dwarfed according
Jo Thornburg. Poetry editor,
Richard Wells, commented ihat
determining the finalists was very
difficult because of the high level
Of quality this year.
Taking the most prestigious
award in the Art competition.
�est in Show, was Robbie
Barber's scuIpture'Pagoda
Barber, whose award winning
Piece was recently featured in the
Farmvilk show, "3-D Picture
Show �. said that he entered the
Piece primarily to gain publica-
tion. "The Rebel is a verv good
publication and simply to appear
n it is enough for me at this
point the soft-spoken Barber
said. Barber had work published
m last year's Rebel, and won the
sculpture competion in that issue,
raking first in the ceramics
category was Agyeman Dua with
an untitled piece. In the category
ol design the winner was Barber
again with a work entitled
Italian Neckpiece David I ee
C herry won in the drawing
category with "Tight As A Spr-
ing and The East Carolinian's
own Shelton Bryant won for il-
lustration.
In the category of mixed media
the winner was Roberta Brown's,
"Layered Feather and in pain-
ting it was Denyce Brook's
"Jump-Circle Of Friends CCE
Walker took first in photography
with an untitled work. Hugh
0 ' B r y a n t ' s ,
"Contemplativeness-Noon
won in the printmaking category
and Matt Savino's "Powersource
Inactive took the gold in
sculpture. Savino's piece was also
recently featured in the 3-D Pic-
ture Show.
Elected first from a huge field
of poetry was Linda Johnson
Morton's verse titled, "Free
1 essons Second place went to
another East Carolinian writer,
Micah Harris, for his piece,
'NOW Filling out the poetry
competition was Donald
Rutledge and his work,
"Traces
Coming back from a four year
sabatical from the Rebel is
Theresa Williams with her first
place story, "Places In The
Woods Ms. Williams recieved
first place honors in the 1982
issue of the magazine, and is now
a graduate student here at East
Carolina. Brett Hursey's story,
"The Fortune took second
place and Carolyn Moore reciev-
ed third place with her tale of
love lost, "No Regrets
The art work will be on display
in the lobby of Joyner Library
through this week. Due to limited
space in the library's gallery, not
all of the work that was submit-
ted for the contest, which may yet
be published in the magazine,
was able to be put on display. Ar-
tists who would like to pick up
their work should contact the
Rebel art director or Thornburg
this week.
The Rebel prose editors have
also mentioned that writers who
would like to pick up their work
may do so early next semester,
since final decisions have not yet
been made for publication. They
also emphasised to all aspiring
writers that whenever they submit
anything for publication pur-
poses they should retain a copy of
the original. The Rebel will,
however, attempt to hold on to
See REBEL, page 9
� . B, Bofcbi Barber
Pagoda is the title of this sculpture b Rohbie Barber
i �mr.mm t� rif nariKT
Christmas Albums Can Both Delight And Surprise Audience
BvMK Ml HARRIS the ��Christmas Song" to a sub- predictable and static f u . - !�, U VV
st.rrWriM . � iiuiu�Liii, dllU siaiK. from the a?7 cv-tir.n tn K �iu�- �
-
i ru
�mew
Somehow,
si leather clad,
� ;dual among us
� mdncss for
and we would
thout hearing
or "Jingle
complete.
ave assigned
the "Christmas Song" to a sub
genre of its own, just a notch or
three above "Dentist office
music. And our seasonal listening
pleasure probably consists of
Perrv Como crackling alone on
an old, mono RCA record that
our parents probablv bought for
12.95.
1 et's face it, we tend to think
Christmas music as bland.
predictable, and static
Mannheim Steamroller is a
band which is anything but
predictable. On one album, they
may instrumentally interpret
animals of the wild; on another,
they may present a musical ver-
sion of the descent of Orpheus in-
to Hades. They are so hard to peg
down, that my local record dealer
has moved the band's records
from the Jazz section to the
"New Age" section, which he ad-
mitted he reserved for instrumen-
tal music that eluded definition.
So you would expect a Christmas
album by Mannheim
Streamroller to be different.
And it is.
Mannheim Steamroller
Christmas consists mostly of
traditional carols from ancient
times through the 18th century.
Their interpretation of these
songs combines the traditional in-
struments of violin, dulcimer,
classical guitar, recorders, etc.
with '80s top of the line recording
techniques and a few instruments
that were not handy in Franz
Gruber's day such as a Fender
Rhodes, and a synthesizer. It's a
wedding made in heaven, which,
after all, is totally appropriate for
this time of year.
The album's most powerful cut
is "Stille Nacht the most
beautiful rendition of "Silent
Night" I've ever heard. It's
quietness is demanding; the
violin's lead and the keyboard's
accompaniment are sweet, and
the mere hint of sleigh bells at the
song's end is charming.
Humor is not what you'd ex-
pect of musicians of obvious
"high brow" extraction, but it's
plenty evident, especially in the
album jacket's credits and notes.
Percussionist and Mannheim
Steamroller leader Chip Davis is
credited with playing not only the
drums and the dulcimar, but also
the pencil and dry ice. Ron Dabbs
is credited with "camel bells" on
"We Three Kings" with the ex-
planation of "he's the one in the
middle" (Get it? Three kings'?
"One in the middle?" � nod.
nod, wink, wink � Get it?)
The album is not perfect.
Close, but not quite. The funky,
up-beat versions of "Deck the
Halls" and "Good King
Wenceslas" with their heavv
reliance on synthesizers tend to
sound "canned" against the
superior accoustic tracks. Also,
there are two back to back ver-
sions of "God Rest Ye Merry,
Gentlemen" which are markedly
different, but given the vast
amount of traditional material
out of copyright and the brevity
of the album, we could have done
with one less gentleman.
Still, the album is superior,
woefully underrated, possibly on
sale at a reduced price, and the
five minute-plus version of
"Silent Night" alone is worth the
price of admission.
On the other end of the holiday
music range are the Carpenter's
two Christmas albums Christmas
Portrait and An Old Fashioned
C hrisfmas which are as excellent
as the Mannheim Steamroller's
effort, only different.
The hustle-bustle of holiday
crowds on Main Street, I S.A. the
crinkle of colored wrapping
paper, and the silvery feel of
tinsel are pressed into these cuts
of Americana. (It seems fitting
that the Carpenter's portrait on
the jacket of 4 Christmas Por-
trait is done in imitation Norman
Rockwell style).
Richard Carpenter's talents as
producer and arranger were over-
shadowed bv the mcredibiv rich
and meiiow voice or nis iate
sister, Karen. He comes to the
fore on the extensive medley cuts
herein. 1 kid you not, they've
managed to cram in more
Christmas songs on one album
than I thought possible. So. if
you can onlv buy one Christmas
album this year, either of the two
Carpenters' efforts can't be beat
for quality and quantity. And. if
you were lucky enough to get a
compact disc player last
Christmas, there is a special com-
pact version combining choice
cuts from both albums.
So, break out the egg-nog, trim
the tree, and put on some merry
melody this year. Hear?
Joyner Library To Hold Variety Show For
Special Kids To Have Special Christmas
Gray Exhibit To Leave Soon
By JOHN SHANNON
Sljtf I dtlr.
By CLAY DEANHARDT
s�ff Wrllff
he Christmas season is once
upon us, but in today's
�Tiercialized society it can be
� easy to forget what the giv-
pirit of the season is all
ut.
The folks over at Joyner
Library haven't forgotten that
Wit though; they're busy doing
something to preserve it instead.
On Saturday, December 6, at
" 30 in Fletcher Auditorium.
'�it efforts will come to fruition
as 'hey present their Fourth An-
nal Variety Show.
The event showcases the talent
campus employees (mostly
!lhrar staff) who donate their
me and hidden talents to put on
a show for the public. The money
"aised through ticket sales is
donated to the Pitt County Social
Services Foster Children's
Christmas Fund.
According to Dr. Ruth Katz,
Director of Library Services, the
money is used to help foster
Parents buy gifts for their kids
during Christmas. Without this
etra money, many foster
children would recieve few, if
a"y, Christmas gifts.
The show itself is testimony to
tne giving spirit of the people in-
volved. Everything dealing with
the show � time, talent, door
prizes, tickets and anything else
needed � is donated.
Dr. Katz said that the event is a
joy both to work with and to
watch. She said that it'snot the
Gong Show, just people who do
other things (than perform for a
living)
Highlights include the almost-
world-famous Joyner Sisters, a
group of library workers who do
a remarkable lip-sync act. Two
years ago they arrived by
helicopter, and last year they
were so popular that they had to
be escorted in by the campus
police.
The birth of tne show was the
result of a search into ways in
which the library staff could get
involved in community affairs
and spread some Christmas
cheer.
Dr. Katz also said that it is a
good example of how,
"Employees do more than just
collect their paychecks and go
horn
Siie said that they picked the
fund to work for because, "it is
an excellent example of an agency
that truly does represent the mix
of people in the ECU community
and Greenville
She also said that the show fills
up Fletcher Auditorium every
year, and that with profits of up
to S700, the Social Services
department now looked to the
show as a major source for the
Christmas fund.
Tickets are being sold for a
minimum $3 donation, with an
option, of course, to make a
larger contribution. They are
available at the Joyner Library
circulation desk, and since the
show is expected to sell out you
may want to get your tickets ear-
Because it's the last week of the
semester and most students are
up to their ears in schoolwork,
their lives are being pared down
to essentials, with "culturally
enriching" events being among
the first things to get snipped
from busy schedules.
Not all art is simply fuel for
passive consumption, however.
In fact, for the rest of this week
students have a chance to get in-
volved with art that will actively
engage their intellect and emo-
The Madrigal Dinner will be beM Wedaeaday through Saturday at
Mendenhall. Tickets are still available for Wednesday and Thurs-
day.
tions. "Rape on display in
Gray Art Gallery until December
6, is a multi-media collection of
works thematically linked around
the subject of sexual assault.
Some men think the woman
bears some of the responsibility
for her own rape, according to
Ann Fessler's "Rape, A Crime
Report Large, hanging panels
of cloth with messages like "He
said it was her fault for not lock-
ing the door "She was numb to
everything except fear" and "She
felt she may never gain control
again" force the viewer to
recognize the terror and
a-morality of the crime.
In Margaret Harrison's large
collage, "Rape clippings from
sensationalistic newspaper ac-
counts of rape trials are juxtapos-
ed with painted images of rape
weapons (scissors, knives, broken
bottles) and historical art works,
all leading to the conclusion that
society has contributed to rape by
perpetuating sexist values. Par-
ticularly chilling in this piece are
two advertisements, one of which
glorifies the Army: "In today's
infantry, you need a lot more up
top to handle the weapons
below
The prints of Lynette Molnar's
"MEDITATIONS ON POR-
NOGRAPHY and Other Ways
Men Picture Women" draw
parallels between the commercial
exploitation of women in the por-
nography trade and the sexual ex-
ploitation of rape victims � con-
nections some would deny,
although it's hard to imagine
them doing so after spending
some time with these images. In
case someone doesn't get the
point, it's spelled out clearly in
the type-faced commentary
"The philosophy of pornographv
is one and the same as that of
rape
Standing amidst these and
many other forceful and subtle
declarations of outrage over the
crime of rape, one can't help but
share the anger. The sexual viola-
tion of one person bv another,
specifically of a woman by a
man, is nowhere condemned
more chillingly than in Paul Mar-
cus' 'Rape on the Roof a depic-
tion of a raped woman left
sprawled on the roof of an urban
building. Interesting as one of the
only works in the exhibit to
depict a rape victim with a high
degree of graphic realism, it
shows that a male artist can also
be sensitive to the horror of sev
ual assault.
Equally powerful yet seeming
somehow out of place was
Paulette Nenner's "Central
American Rape which shows
American involvement in Centra!
America as analogous to sexual
assault. While certainh re'a-e
thematically to other works in -he
show, its geo-political focus is'at
the psycho-
�f most of
bent
sociological
"Rape.
Again, this nationallv t0unM
hibit will onlv be nn ,1 !
the rest of this week �,Ugh
�- u. ,ls�k. Trv to fad
ex
an hour or two
t0 80 to Grav
Gallery and experience th,S
hitting show for yourJT
EVi �





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Mi s
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.


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Sat,
REMODELED
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B

I HI
Ki i v
Styje
1)1 i MM � . -�
Honors Rebel Winners
U H V W NsON
s. V � r
s
t Vi
ntest, last
rhornl j
'A . comment
determining the finalists was
Vrl
Show, u

i i
��
� �
i

'
a
u
lelton Bryant won for il
i on
ategon of mixed media
he winnei was Roberta Brown's,
"1 ayered Feather and in pain-
was Denyce Brook's
irele t 1 1 riendsCE
ok first m photographs
itled work. Hugh
nplativeness Noon
aking category
Man Sa "Powersource
the gold in
s.o in �- piece was also
� itured in the 1-D Pic-
turt Shoi
' tirsi :� ,i huge field
was I inda Johnson
verse titled, "Free
Second place went to
ist arolinian writer.
for his piece,
Filling out the poetry
was Donald
his work
" rraces "
"� e back I m a four vear
Rebel is
.i W illiams with lrer first
!ace "Places In The
'Ms v illiams recieved
"N
first place honors in the 1982
issue of the magazine, and is now
a graduate student here at East
Carolina. Brett Hursey's story,
"The Fortune took second
place and Carolyn Moore reciev-
ed third place with her tale of
lose lost, "No Regrets
The art work will be on display
in the lobbs of Joyner Library
through this week. Due to limited
space in the library's gallery, not
all ol the work that was submit-
ted for the contest, which mas yet
be published in the magazine,
was able to be put on display Ar-
tists who would like to pick up
their work should contact the
Rebel art director or Thornburg
this week.
The Rebel prose editors hase
also mentioned that writers who
would like to pick up their work
mas do so earls next semester,
since final decisions have not yet
been made for publication. They
also emphasised to all aspiring
writers that wheneser they, submit
anything for publication pur-
poses thev should retain a .ops of
the original. The Rebel will,
however, attempt to hold on to
Ve RFBFI . page 9
VfV
i ajioda is the title ol ihis sculpture In Robbie Barbel
Christas A,bums Can Both Delight And Surprise Audience
� ' v �� frora the JZ2 section to the album jacket's credits md notes Po,
� V � "Now Age" section, which head- Fere and Ma
:
usic as
v -oiler is a
anytl but
ne album, they
� interpret
: . am
a musical ver
� descent ol ()rpheus in
Hades 1 he are so hard to peg
' ecord dealer
nas moved I i band's record
from the Jazz section to the
"New Age" section, which he ad-
mitted he reserved for instrumen-
tal music that eluded definition
S sou would expect a Christmas
album b Mannheim
Streamroller to be different
And it is.
Mannheim Steamroller
( hrisimas consists mostls
traditional carols from ancient
times through the 18th century
Their interpretation of these
songs combines the traditional in-
struments of violin, dulcimer.
classical guitar, recorders, etc.
with '80s top of the line recording
techniques and a few instruments
that were not hands in Franz
Gruber's dav such as a Fender
Rhodes, and a synthesizer. It's a
wedding made in heaven, which,
after all, is totally appropriate for
this time of year
The album's most powerful cut
is "Stille N'acht the most
beautiful rendition of "Silent
Night" I've ever heard. It's
quietness s demanding; the
violin's lead and the keyboard's
accompaniment are sweet, and
the mere hint of sleigh bells at the
song's end is charming.
Humor is not what you'd ex-
pect of musicians of obvious
"high brow" extraction, but it's
plentv evident, especially in the
album jacket's credits
Perc issi mist and Mai
Steamrolle Da
credited with pla
drums and the : u, but i
'he pencil i ice. Ri
is credited witl "
" vse 1 hree Kings w tl the ex
planati - �� 'he' tl
middle" (Gel �
"(ne in th
nod, wink, wink (�el
The album is not
Close, but not
up-beat versions or "h- .
Halls" dnd " G d K .
Wenceslas" with the i ieavy
reliance on synthesi; ei d t
sound ncd" igainsi he
superior accoustic tracks
there are two back to back ver
sions of "God Res- e Men .
Gentlemen" which are markc
different, but given the �
amount of traditional matt-
out of copyright and the I
' the album, we could �
with one less g(
Still, the album is supe
woefullv underrated, possibh
�-ale at a reduced pri e, at tl
11 s e m i n u t e - p 1 u s
S ent Night" alone
price of admissi
On the other end I
music range are the Carpentet
two Christmas albumshristmas
. -

For qua
i
i
-
�'
.
Joyner Library To Hold Variety Show For
Special Kids To Have Special Christmas
Gray Exhibit To Leave Soon
I 1)1 AMI KI I
l
lay's
� � � se i all
at loynet
i �
buss doing
� � presetse it instead
i. De ember 6, al
Fletcher Auditorium,
" rts will come to fruiti
: -sent their Fourth An
show
iwcase ' alent
is emplosees (mosth
staff) who donate '
� : ten talents to put on
� -he public The money
through ticket sales is
the Pitt C ounty Social
I oster Children's
'mas Fund.
rding to Dr. Ruth Kat.
- of 1 ibrarv Services, the
used to help foster
buy gifts for their kids
ghristmas. Without this
money, many foster
Iren would recieve few, if
an. Christmas gifts.
The show itself is testimony to
tn� giving spirit of the people in-
volved. Everything dealing with
.
Di k.r. �aid tl tt tl event is a
� � � and to
a I that it's
� pei pie who do
in perform fi
I
Highlights include the aim
trld-fam . nei Sistet s, a
i ���� if libra; workers w h
a remat kable lip ss nc a I hm
sears agi hej arrived by
helicopter, and last year thev
were hey had to
be escorted in bv the campus
police
how w,is the
f a search into ways in
which the librai - staff could gel
involved in communitj affairs
and spread some Christmas
. hecr
)r K.it also said that it is a
. id ex am pie of how ,
1 mployees do more than just
collect their paychecks and go
home
She said that thev picked the
fund to work for because, "it is
an excellent example of an agency
that truly does represent the mix
of people in the ECU community
and Greenville
She also said that the show fills
up Fletcher Auditorium every
sear, and that with profits of up
I - the Social Services
- now looked to the
show cls a major source for the
hristmas fund.
rickets are being sold for a
minimum $3 donation, with an
of course, to make a
larger contribution. Thev are
i ailable at the loyner 1 ibrarv
ulation desk, and since the
show is expected to sell out you
want to get your tickets ear-
ly.
B JOHN SHANNON
Sl�1r Mi
Because it's the last week of the
semester and most students are
up to their ears in schoolwork,
their lives are being pared down
to essentials, with "culturally
enriching" events being among
the first things to get snipped
from busy schedules.
Not all art is simply fuel for
passive consumption, however.
In tact, for the rest of this week
students have a chance to get in-
volved with art that will actively
engage their intellect and emo-
The Madrigal Dinners will be held Wednesday through Saturday at
Mendenhall. Tickets are still available for Wednesday and Thurs-
day.
tions. "Rape on display,
Cirav Art Gallery until Decen
6, is a multi-media collet
works thematicaih linked u
the subject of sexual ass �
Some men think th
bears some of the resp
tor her own rape. acc
Ann Fessler's "Rape. (
Report I arge. ging pa
of cloth with messages like "He
said it was her fault for n
ing the door "She was numb to
everything except fear" Ai "S
felt she may never gam control
again" force the viewer
recognize the terror and
a-moralitv of the crime
In Margaret Harrison's la -
collage, "Rape clippings from
sensationalists newspaper a
counts of rape trials are juxtapos
ed with painted images or rape
weapons (scissors, knives, broli
bottles) and historical art works,
all leading to the conclusion tl
society has contributed to rape bs
perpetuating sexist values Pai
ticularlv chilling in this piece are
two advertisements, one of which
glorifies the Army: "In today's
infantry, you need a lot more up
top to handle the weapons
below
The prints of I ynette Molnar's
"MEDITATIONS ON POR-
NOGRAPHY and Other Vavs
Men Picture Women" draw
parallels between the commercial
exploitation of women in the por-
nography tr ide and the sexual ex
ploitation of rape victims � con-
nections some would deny,
although it's hard to imagine
�;
- S .
-
II
spes ficalh f a woma
Mai
. -s R
- - fa
' �
-
alism

I qua
somehow f pla
Pa . ette Nennei 's "
� . Rape w
V
America as a g
assault Wl :erta
thematicaih to
show, its geo p
a tang err' to 1
sociological ;sc
"Rape "
gain, �� s
exhibit wil
the res; of I . . �
an hour ot two I
Callers anc
hitting show �





HI t v
l '
Collectibles Become Fashion Rage
pH Black . W�, in
'uding some thai ere con
lered offensive and racist, have
:on�e out ol the closei lite
and literarih
Dolls. mec hai ca i o n .
postcards, and scores ol othei
items are being I at
tics and closets to he displayed in
the homes of blacks, whites and
3 i a es an expei i on the subje I
said
"It's cha said authoi
PJ. Gil N e seeing lull
Ic here I he 're accepting the
fact thai � he terns exisi. " she
has - :u coffee
subject of
black ai Hlack ollet
tibles Sold In America ((. ollectoi
Books X pp $14 950) and.
HLick Dolls � oltectOl Book
PP $14 951 Gibbs describes
"l" � vhi h feature h
' Roots
bs predicts black collet
ak
become some of the mosi s igl i
. � eas ires n the nati
N me people say, o n e
it in the -c
'Preserve it
a i terns classified as
ectibles is div �
bbs said Paintings b b ack ai
sts, confederate monev w
slaves work
ds, "Mammj" cookie
" music and mechanica
g blanks all qua
Often -V image- used
� ai i a ires and stere t pes
d en with exact
them were sold to w hues foi theii
children
Hei book has examples such
as. "I he t oon Hunt (. iame
manufactured in 1920 b Parker
Brothers, lm . "1 lu Piccaninv
Bowling Game a Greai Britain
Product from 1928, and " I he
loll) Darkie largei Game a
llf Milton Bradlco game
Bui mam of the treasures she
lists are works of art. 1 hex in
elude engravings, watercolors,
wood carvings and silver spoons
Some of the most beautiful black
collectibles are dolls, which
(nhbs said often were purchased white ch
foi white children
Mam black families could noi
afford high qualm black dolls
such as those produced in I rai
and Germany during the late
1800s rhe beautiful dolls with those homemadi
black bisque heads appealed to mass ; .
loesi � blact
she knows pretty Gibbs said
Instead, blacl
be content wit! ran : i
EXTRA LOW
PRICES!
iac kx eatin &
ermeonj v eight �
w ea � .ai dan as
VS hai �
� tasie is now I .

" om
-vani mag
exaggefeatu

-au
E �thoug
bs sa�
thea
- bpart ol
��
.rs w
tem 1 � e p
lui � �
� � 1 i 1 ' a,K � ' ' ' ' k or Ati
. estec
Her interesi i .
tibles started ig
h5 no 11 e
! ex a- an
�ea1 iireda . � .
liapers with a � - p
-aid rig i
xv, h d � .
" 1 took it h me
and he said. Thi �
teresting she sa
her husband. Iys bbs, ran
an ad in an antique- atioi
a-sking for bla, � bles.
"We were bombarded In
xear we goi more than 1 ��
postcards Ve received n
items on approval she sa "
decided then that this wa .
to be mx area "
Gibbs traveled all over
country researching her new in-
�s- She found a few
lectors and alsi I -ered
terns i n museums to be
photographed and included in
her books
�"l also discovered there was a
real void of information, and I
like to suppl) information where
�here is a void
She said some items have
� ries surrounding them I �
example, the familiar cast
black boy hitching post that
lands in many ards is the sub
�� � 'a folk tale. Gibbs said
The item has been produced
almost continuously since the late
lftOOv It is supposed to be a little
boy ho stood and held his
master's horse, as he was in
s'ructed to do, during a
snowstorm When the master
came out of his warm house, the
little hot had froen to death
holding the reins
The statue has changed colors
from time to time over the years
to accomodate the nation's social
conscience, Gibbs said
"He turned white for a while
Now he can be black again she
said
Much of the Memorabilia was,
purely and simply, tacky when it
was manufactured, especially
some of the toys from the 1920s
and 1930s Gibbs said most of
Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday, December 7, 1986.
100 Pure i
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J Diet Coke
Pkq of 12 12 (h Cans Reg & Lt
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n
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BLOOM COUNTY
(r
X
n �


CL�
Olivier
c
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jsual w.
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long av ros h t
to�e tw
JJch aii a, . e
Pretend "





-IHE EAST CAROLINIAN
PhCfcMBtR 2. IV8(S
Collectibles Become Fashion Rage
(UPI) Biack coiinblts. in
eluding some that were con-
sidered offensive and racist, have
come out of the closet literally
and literarily.
Dolls, mechanical toys,
postcards, and scores of other
items are being hauled out of at-
tics and closets to be displayed in
the homes of blacks, whites and
all races, an expert on the subject
said.
"It's changed said author
PJ. Gibbs. "You're seeing full
circle here. They're accepting the
fact that these items exist She
has compiled two new coffee
table books on the subject of
black artifacts Black Collec-
tibles Sold In America (Collector
Books, 190 pp $14,950) and
Black Dolls (Collector Books,
190 pp $14.95). Gibbs describes
her works, which feature hun-
dreds of photographs, as "a pic-
toral kind of Roots "
Gibbs predicts black collec-
tibles are about to take off and
become some of the most sought-
after treasures in the nation.
"Some people say, 'Yes it ex-
ists, but put it in the close
Others say, 'Preserve it she
said.
The range of items classified as
black collectibles is diverse,
Gibbs said. Paintings by black ar-
tists, confederate money with pic-
tures of slaves working in cotton
fields, "Mammy" cookie jars,
sheet music and mechanical toys
featuring blacks all qualify.
Often the images used are
caricatures and stereotypes �
children with exaggerated
features. blacks eating
watermelons, overweight women
wearing bandanas � Gibbs said.
What was once considered in
poor taste is now considered col-
lectible.
"There are some collectors
who only want images with the
exaggerated features and others
who are insulted by that Gibbs
said.
Even though she is black,
Gibbs said she is not offended bv
the racist toys and other collec-
tibles because "it's part of
history But until recently, anti-
que dealers were inclined to keep
such items out of sight, especially
during the 1960s and 1970s, she
said.
"They weren't displayed. You
had to ask for them if you were
interested
Her interest in black collec-
tibles started about 10 years ago
when she spotted a postcard in a
Texas antique shop. The card
featured a little black girl in
diapers with a huge diaper pin.
The card said, "I's pinning a lot
of hop on gittin' a lettah from yo'
all. Why don't yo' write?"
"I took it home to my husband
and he said, 'This is very in-
teresting she said. Gibbs and
her husband, Tyson Gibbs, ran
an ad in an antiques publication
asking for black collectibles.
"We were bombarded. In one
year we got more than 1,000
postcards. We received many
items on approval she said. "I
decided then that this was going
to be my area
Gibbs traveled all over the
country researching her new in-
terest. She found a few serious
collectors and also discovered
items in museums to be
photographed and included in
her books.
"I also discovered there was a
real void of information, and I
like to supply information where
there is a void
She said some items have
stories surrounding them. For
example, the familiar cast iron
black boy hitching post that
stands in many yards is the sub-
ject of a folk tale, Gibbs said.
The item has been produced
almost continuously since the late
1800s. It is supposed to be a little
boy who stood and held his
master's horse, as he was in-
structed to do, during a
snowstorm. When the master
came out of his warm house, the
little bot had frozen to death
holding the reins.
The statue has changed colors
from time to time over the years
to accomodate the nation's social
conscience, Gibbs said.
"He turned white for a while.
Now he can be black again she
said.
Much of the Memorabilia was,
purely and simply, tacky when it
was manufactured, especially
some of the toys from the 1920s
and 1930s. Gibbs said most of
them were sold to whites for their
children.
Her book has examples such
as, "The Coon Hunt Game
manufactured in 1920 by Parker
Brothers, Inc "The Piccaniny
Bowling Game a Great Britain
Product from 1928, and "The
Jolly Darkie Target Game a
1915 Milton Bradley Co. game.
But many of the treasures she
lists are works of art. They in-
clude engravings, watercolors,
wood carvings and silver spoons.
Some of the most beautiful black
collectibles are dolls, which
Gibbs said often were purchased
for white children.
Many black families could not
afford high-quality black dolls
such as those produced in France
and Germany during the late
1800s. The beautiful dolls with
black bisque heads appealed to
white children because "a kid
doesn't know black and white �
she knows pretty Gibbs said.
Instead, black children had to
be content with rag dolls. And
those homemade and inexpensive
mass-produced dolls also are be-
ing sought by collectors now
Gibbs said novice collectors
should zero in on one type ol
black artifact � such as art, dolls
or toys � and try to buy only the
best. At this point, she said.
there is no shortage, but that ma.
not be the case for much longer
EXTRA LOW
PRICES!
Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday, December 7, 1986.
100 Pure;
trvai. k"
Vsny��j5
Fresh Cut Whole Or Rib Half - 14-17 Lbs. Avg. (Sliced FREE')
PORK LOINS
We Reserve The Right
To Limit Quantities.
v -�
"� V
ips '
��- :
f fc&c
l-�v
taut
$128
Beautiful Fresh Cut - Frazier Fir
CHRISTMAS TREES
$2499
fc"� Each
PORK LOIN
California Seedless
Available At Most Food Lion Stores.
6" Large
CHOPS
Fresh Cut
Quarter
i. i j ii-ii i
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JANGERINESWl?'POINSETTIAS
X
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mil Stove 1
-JU,
Jell-O' Pudding or I
at thee1
when r'u bi
3000 1G30C
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Oz. � Pineapple-Orange
Pineapple-Grapefruit
6 Oz. � Frozen
Mardi Gras 1
Towels l
2Ct.
Urge Roll
$149
32 02. � 50C Off
42
20 Or Lynden's Farms Potatoes
Shoestring
m Purina
Cat Chow
$959
4 La.
BLOOM COUNTY
w & mm rrc by
I wx OK. Wr �.
w mm
i
wrm � m si
K a rJ

&l s&ifc
wucohl w: -
stay taut
Y -i-V, ' -
-
t

Olivier Writ
fL'PI) � Laurence
demotes the second
memoirs to the great, ei
love of his life - a .
remembrances becorr.r ,
joyous celebration of I
the motiation and the
that produced a ren i �
career worthy of its �
acclaim.
Titled simph On A.
man widely regarcr i
greatest classical ac i
time not onK traces the step
took toward pi
memorable characters
Hamlet to Heath c
Archie R;ce. but ffet
priceless advice
generation of actors a ac He
ihirimiaTWIffv. charm r �
though in a sobering aside,
is the melancholy re
pushing 80 means the fir
tain is not far off
The joy of being a
says. is
intoxicating and car- -
up there among the �
Sir Larr, the title
after being knighted
Shakespeare in h
England when he wa-
ne remains enthralled
and the stage, though he
making movies stno �
His film caree- ?-� - -
(Greta Garbo rejecte
star for Queen Christina
of her silent mosie pa?
Gilbert - with unh
and it wasn't until - 5th pk
ture. 19?9s M uthenng Hew
that he became a fu fled
American star Rebtcce
ed, but the real break
ame with his film interpre
'f Shakespeare Firs Henry
hen the honored 1941
Hamlet
To Olivier. Hamle: -
reatest pla ever written one
hich "towers above everytri
ise in dramatic I terai -
�ch fine is a discovers ts power
can gif you moments
inknown joy or cast ou ml the
pths of despa:r
"Once you hae played it, it
11 devour ou and obsess
r the rest of sour life It I
' I trunk each da ab
I never pla him aga �
urse. but b God, 1 wish I
uld
Olivier begins his opus nh a
rspective on Shakespearean
trs, from Richard Burbagf
n Barry-more and his close
nds. John Gielgud and Ralph
hardson, with whom he work-
at the Old Vic he discusses
highlights of his career which
in 19P as a pre-teen
tus in Julius Caesar
ixty-nine years later, after
ing cancer and other health
blems, he is still active, plann-
several new roles, including a
sion series and a stage
ical. Even a pop record is in
cards.
1 am 78 going on 18 he
slowed by the years but
as ever to "weave tales and
e magic to conunue for as
as possible his devotion to
two magical words from
all acting stems: "Let's
nd

L
t f
�iw��aM�





Rage
l'c collectors
one :vpe of
i art, dolls
j the
v she said,
a) ma
ongei
BLOOM COUNTY
T-HEjAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 2. 1986
ES!
j
itKiM
Frazier Fir
TREES
HI Most Food Lion Stores.
6" Large
AUTIFUL
NSETTIAS
Each
Old
Iwaukee
419
pg of 12 n 0;
Lb.
'�id Special Recipe
rozen
ch Fries
Mm s Farms Potatoes
Shoestring
urina
t Chow
259
n
xn
ht
iie
ro-
r�
nd
ou
4 Lb
t r
wo me boarpmg moe
toxBtip soopewp we efi
rmer attack by
icmxnm which A
mxi �3 m wcm i f ws
�r MINK a
mc grm fresh mm last
FOKTHCbMCe OF OOP 001
welcome loom
ytsemtn qecorpihk,
.Y i-fOtA. 'PEATHT&toUL
ma sam potm
� )m know rmmrrm
m WORST HARP-CORE
mf tac- crunch awmc
KNOWN IN ME FREE WORLP
4NCKU- m nmsnm
from tu r
� . VRf
n, - vcvse vc
SHIS. MK 'WORKER
F AMP ME BOYS
WERE HAMPERlMb
M WE SHOULP
APPROACH ME
j� ' SECONP VERSE
Of PEMOH
PROOLEROF
by Berke Breathed
KINO Of f-RAOlU HEARNO
ROSFBOP RETREATFr AMP SPENT
THE REST OF 1HE PR IN RE POX
WIPER A miOW. REAPING
LITERATURE Of SOME NOTE
ME TWO TURNIPS STUCK
IN HIS BAR 5 MAKING -
LIFE BEARABLE
Bfromx L -(�
PA Ray
Rebel Makes Awards, Has
Show At Joyner Gallery
The Annual ECU
Wind
attention ' -mete
Mil BB NO REPEAT NO
wers wrm julio
iue$if6 m5 session
9U SUOGESTEP A
GENTU VIBRATO TO
HEIGHTEN MFLOPIC TENSION
BUT IFELTA WICK
PfP TO G�lNOR
AT THE POWN0EAT
WOULP SETTER
BLENP TVE VOCAL
harmonies
JUST WING
MAT MOTHER
mien
Continued from page 7
all work submitted though the
editors claim to make no pro-
mises.
John Thrift, associate editor
for the Rebel, should also be
recognized for his efforts. He
singlehandedly catered the recep-
tion, saving the student funded
publication the added expense of
professional caterers.
The planning of the art show
and reception apear to have pos-
ed something of a problem to
Thornburg and his staff this year
in many ways. In past years the
show and reception were both
held at the UBE Art and Camera
Gallery on Cotanch Street. Due
to the recent renovations to the
gallery, that site became
unuseable for lack of space and
reception facilities, leaving only
the library gallery open to the
show. The new drinking age add-
ed to Thornburg's scheduling
problems. In the past, the Rebel
opening, as with most art open-
ings, featured a choice of
alcoholic beverages. Obviously,
the old tradition was forced to be
broken.
The Rebel's tradition of fine
publishing, however, should not
be sacrificed despite these small
inconveniences, Thornburg said.
Students can look forward to
another award winning issue in
the Spring.
j Easemble Christmas Concert t
J will be held Thursday night at ;
1 7:30 in Wright Auditorium. The
j program is being sponsored by �
' the Friends of the School of �
Music. �
Herbert W. Carter, the diiec- i
tor of the ensemble, will be j
leading the group in renditions
of several traditional Christmas
tunes as well as some lesser-
known holiday works.
The concert is free, and ls (
open to all on a first-come-first-
serve basis.
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave
We Buy Gold & Silver
UNSTANT CASH LOANS i
All Transactions Confidential t
752-0322
: IM nmt-M p m.
I
mnwm mm
Olivier Writes What He Knows
I aurence Olivier
the second volume of his
the great, enduring
his life - acting. His
- brances become at once a
is celebration of fulfillment;
n and the method
thai produced a remarkable
:areer worth) ol its worldwide
acclaim.
Titled simph On Acting, the
man wideh regarded as the
greatest classica ictor of our
.Tie no: l -races the steps he
producing his
mci -iracters. from
Hamlei Hea -cliff. Henry V to
rchie Rice, but offers some
priceless advice to the next
tencraiior. 0f actors as well. He
shis usuaTwTfty, chirmir self,
'ugh in a sobering aside, there
the melancholy realization that
�rung 80 means the final cur-
tain is not far off.
The joy of being an actor, he
v � is ' 'completely
oxicating" and can "hurl you
up there among the gods
Larry, the title he prefers
ifter being knighted, began doing
espeare in his native
ngl and w hen he w as only 10 and
fie remains enthralled by the bard
: 'he stage, though he has been
naking movies since 1930.
His film career grew slowly
reta Garbo rejected him as co-
foi Queen Christina in favor
her silent movie partner John
ilbert with unhappy results)
it wasn't until his 16th pic-
ure, 1939s Huthering Heights,
hat he became a full-fledge
American star. Rebecca follow-
but the real breakthrough
:ame with his film interpretation
Shakespeare. First, Henry V
then the honored 1948 hit,
Hamlet
Olivier, Hamlet is "the
greatest play ever written one
h "towers above everything
-se in dramatic literature
Each line is a discovery its power
'can give you moments of
unknown joy or cast you into the
Jepths of despair.
"Once you have played it, it
will devour you and obsess you
for the rest of your life. It has
e I think each day about it.
I'll never play him again, of
ourse, but by God, I wish I
could
Olivier begins his opus with a
perspective on Shakespearean
acotrs, from Richard Burbage to
John Barrymore and his close
fnends, John Gielgud and Ralph
Richardson, with whom he work-
ed at the Old Vic. he discusses
lrie highlights of his career which
gan in 1917 as a pre-teen
Brutus in Julius Caesar.
Sixty-nine years later, after
battling cancer and other health
Problems, he is still active, plann-
in8 several new roles, including a
'elevision series and a stage
Musical. Even a pop record is in
the cards.
"I am 78 going on 18 he
5ays, slowed by the years but
eager as ever to "weave tales and
eave magic to continue for as
lon8 as possible his devotion to
those two magical words from
which all acting stems: "Let's
Pretend
"I can no longer work in the
theater, but the thrill will never
leave me he says. "The lights
and the combat. The intimacy
between the audience and me
during the soliloquoys in Hamlet
and Richard ; we were like
lovers
Kgntucky Pried Chicken
S -I � JrjJplus tax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
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2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Small Mashed Potato and Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
Expires Dec. 31. 1986
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I Ml I AST (AROI INIAN
Sports
Torretta and Irvin Impressive
DECEMBER2.19M Page in
N
V 4U

T
Senior safety Gary London put a lot of pressure on opposing quarter-
backs late m the season as shown above in the ECU win over Dannv
Wet om and Cincinnati.
Lady Pirates Split With
USC, Tulane In Classic
The Lady Pirates opened the
season with a loss to South
Carolina in the first round of the
Lady Eagle Classic in Statesboro,
Ga before winning the consola-
tion game over Tulane.
In the season opener for both
squads, the Gamecocks broke
open a close game in the closing
minutes of play before winning
61-55. It was Martha Parkers'
three-point play with 2:53 left
that gave L'SC a 57-52 lead the
would never relinquish.
The Pirates could get no closer
than four throughout the re-
mainder of the game. Leading the
way for ECU were Alma Bethea
and Chris O'Connor with 12
points apiece. Bethea, who was
elected to the all-tournament
team, also grabbed a game-high
nine rebounds. Monique Pompili
added nine points and six re-
bounds for the Bucs.
"In the South Carolina game,
there was five ties in the second
half and seven leadochanges
ECU coach Emily Manwarmg.
"We were definitely in the game
� it came down to the free line
In the second round, the
Pirates, behind the play of Pom-
pili, Bethea and Delphine Mabrv,
downed the Green Wave 75-65.
Pompili, who had 19 points,
paced the Pirate scoring while
Mabrv each added 11 points.
Manwarmg was especially im-
pressed with the play of junior
forward Pompili. "Monique
Pompili played the best game I've
seen her plav in her career here
Manwaring said. "She was just
awesome
See LADIES, page 11
MIAMI � Despite being
without Heisman Trophy can-
didate Vinny Testaverde, the
University of Miami handled
ECU 36-10 and will play for their
third national championship in
four years.
ECU coach Art Baker had said
(at his press conference last week)
that a Testaverde illness would be
a good plan, however UM
backup quarterback Jeff Torretta
was impressive enough.
Torretta completed 20 of 30
passes for 328 yards, despite be-
ing sacked five times by a blitzing
Pirate defense. Sophomore split
end Michael Irvin was his most
potent target, catching eight
passes for 194 yards and a pair of
scores.
"Torretta came in and did an
excellent job under adverse
cicumstances Baker said. "1
was very impressed with him. We
put a lot of pressure on him and
he still completed passes. Of
course, there skill players are as
fine as any team I've seen
While Torretta and Irvin had
big nights for the Hurricanes,
coach Baker felt that ECU's ef-
fort was a good one.
"I can't fault our defense.
They were were a little outmann-
ed Baker said. "I was extreme-
ly proud of all of our players. We
got beat, but we didn't get out-
fought
Senior safety Gary London,
who closed out his career with
three solo tackles and a stop
behind the line o scrimmage,
agreed with Baker on the Pirate
defensive effort.
"We played one of our best
games defensively all year Lon-
don said. "We just had a few
break downs. It (the score)
should have been much closer
than the game was
Miami opened the game with a
No. 1 Hurricanes Down Pirates
K�;� 1 I l mm i � �
11 -play, 75-yard drive to take a
3-0 lead on a 22-yard field goal.
ECU retaliated by driving 'right
down their throats' with a
15-play, 71-yard drive, including
67 yards on the ground. Chuck
Berleth's 21-yard field goal knot-
ted the game at 3-3 late in the first
period.
The Pirates were unable to
score again in the first half while
the Hurricanes managed a pair of
big-play touchdowns. Irvin was
responsible for both scores, cat-
ching TD passes of 42 and 50
yards.
With Miami connecting on just
one of their point-after attempts,
the halftime score was 16-3.
The big plays were the story of
the first half. Although the
Pirates controlled the ground
game, rushing for 80 yards while
UM rushed for just 19, the Hur-
ricanes had 203 passing yards
compared to ECU's 49. In turn,
the Bucs maintained the ball for
almost 19 minutes while Miami
had control for just over 11.
In the second half, Miami in-
creased its lead to 23-3 on Alonzo
Highsmith's 25th career
touchdown a UM school
record. Another Irvin big play, a
44-yard pass reception, put the
ball at the Pirate two yard line.
After each team traded punts,
coach Baker decided to insert
freshman Travis Hunter at
quarterback. Hunter promply
drove the Pirates down field on a
12-play, 81-yard scoring drive.
Hunter hit Willie Lewis for 38
yards to the Miami eight, setting
4 7 was extremely proud
of all of our players.
We got beat, but we
didn't get out-fought. "
�Art Baker
up score. After Anthony Simp-
son gained three yards, Hunter
did the honors from five yards
out, cutting the UM lead to 23-10
with 13:19 remaining in the con-
test.
"Once you get out there, you
have to perform Hunter said of
coming off the bench. "1 want to
thank the Lord for giving me the
opportunity to come in and score
a touchdown
The 'Canes got a break on
1I next possession as a Simp
son tumble was recovered by All
America Jerome Brown at the
Pirate 27-yard line Three plays
later, Torretta connected with
Brett "Superman" Pernman on
a 29-yard touchdown pass recep-
tion. Miami orite again missed
the conversion tor a 29-10 lead
Miami's final score ,ame with
:23 remaining in the game as
Warien Williams scored on a
12-yard scamper.
On the final play oi regulation.
Hunter's desperation pass was in-
tercepted by Berime Blades and
returned all the way for an ap-
parent touchdown. However, a
clipping penalty nullified the
score, but gave Blades his loth
theft of the year � another I M
school record.
Although the final score was
36-10, it was not indicative ot the
wav the game went, according
Baker.
"I though; we gave them tw
gifts Baker said of the Hur-
ricanes' final two scores. "The
score should have been 23-10, but
they had a couple of easy ones
� w u vvuiv. vi tas uiit
Baker Pleased By Pirates' Effort
MIAMI � rVtnifP �h p;r�ar' � ,
MIAMI Despite the Pirates'
36-10 loss to the top-ranked
Miami Hurricanes, ECU coach
Art Baker was optimisitic about
the future of Pirate football.
"I was pleased with our
effort Baker said. "51 of the 59
players on this trip will be return-
ing next year, plus a number of
redshirts.
"I think this game and the
final three games are a sign our
players are coming out of the
season with a good feeling of
themselves
After a win over Georgia
Southern and a victory over Cin-
cinnati, it has been apparent that
the Bucs have been steadhlv im-
proving. The improvement has
been seen on a week-to-week
basis, according to senior safetv
Gary London.
"Altogether we played Y-
(against Miami). We have been
improving each week London
jid. "I thought we plaved a little
better against M,ami (than Penn
tate earlier in the year) "
"It's a lot to look forward to
next vear redshirt freshman
Iravis Hunter said. "To be able
to win and to know how to win "
And for the first time in a
number of years, the Pirates wi .
enter spring drills with proven
players at the quarterba.x p
lion as well as other skill posi
tions.
"We have freshmen at everv
skill position, except the fullback
slot for most of the night agams-
Miami Baker explained
"We've had to grow up a lot this
season
In fact, a quick glance at the
depth chart reveals that nine
defensive starters return as six
starters return on offense, despite
the loss of the veteran offensive
line.
Hoopsters Stay Undefeated
The Pirates got a big win last
night in Columbia, S.C as
Charlie Harrison's Pirates moved
to 2-0 on the season with a 67-57
win over South Carolina.
ECU outscored the Gamecocks
21 in a 10-minute period of the
second half to come from behind
and win in the Prank McGuire
Arena. The victory marks the
fourth in a row for the Pirates
over South Carolina of the Metro
Conference, and the first loss for
new USC coach George Felton.
Transfer Blue Edwards, who
put the Pirates ahead for good
(late in the second half) with a
gorilla dunk, led the way with 20
Pirate basketball coach Charlie Harrison cant savor the South
Carolina victory for long as his troops will travel to Durham to face
Duke Wednesday.
Well-Conditioned Athlete
I Sports Fact
Tues. Dec. 2, 1975
Running back Archie Griffin
at Ohio State becomes the only
player in college football
history to win the coveted
Heisman Trophy twice. Griffin
is drafted by the Cincinnatti
Bengals, but his small size and
lack of breakaway speed keep
him from becoming a star in
the National Football League.
points. Marchell Henry chipped
in 16 while Leon Bass added 11.
Another transfer, Howard
Brown added eight points as
freshman Reed Lose hit five.
Henry and Keith Sledge (seven
points on the night) nailed seven
key free throws down the stretch
to ice the win.
"Obviously it was a very big
win for us as a young team and as
a program Pirate assistant
coach Lee Talbot said. "We
stressed, at the beginning of the
season, that if we play as a team,
we can be as good as anybody we
plav. Tonight just reinforces
that
Sophomore forward Perry
Dozier was the only Gamecock in
double figures with 23 points.
The Pirates next game is
Wednesday night in Durham
when they play Duke in Cameron
Indoor Stadium.
The ECU men's basketball
team got off to a good start open-
ing the season Saturday night
with a 109-8 trouncing of Edin-
boro State University in Minges
Coliseum.
The Pirates scored the first six
points of the contest and never
looked back ECU built as much
as a 24-point lead (59-35) on a
Howard Brown lay up with 1:42
left in the first half. The Pirates
went into the lockerroom with a
comfortable 63-41 advantage.
In the first half, the Pirates
shot a blistering 26 of 33 from the
field for a 78.7 field-goal percen-
tage. In fact, ECU only missed
nine shots in the opening half as
they sank 11 of 13 free throws.
The second half was no dif-
ferent as the Bucs poured it on.
The Fighting Scots could get no
closer than 19 points, but ECU
then reeled off seven unanswered
points to put the game out of
reach.
Leading the way for the Pirates
was Marchell Henry, who scored
17 of his game-high 25 points in
the opening half. Junior college
transfer Brown added 18 points
and eight assists while Blue Ed-
wards chipped in 16. Center Leon
Bass also contributed 16 points
on an eight of 11 shooting effort.
Freshman Reed Lose hit 10
points. Although Keith Sledge
added just five points, he grabb-
ed a game high eight rebounds.
The Pirates shot very well as
evidenced in the individual
shooting percentages. In fact, the
Pirate starters connected on 32 of
54 shots (including three-point at-
tempts) as the team hit for a 65.5
percentage on the night.
The 100-point total marks the
51 time smce 1984 (Christopher
Newport) and the second since
IsT9 (South Carolina � Aiken)
that the Pirates topped the cen-
tury mark.
All the Pirates saw action (ex-
cept John Williams, who was
recovering from an illness) in the
contest. And one interesting note
came late m the game when
senior walkon James Mann
brought the house down with a
monstrous dunk.
A11 sports stories for this issue,
other than Carolyn Justices
have been provided courtesy
of Rick McCormac and Scott
Cooper.
ECU's Scott In Pen Rod's Triathalon
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Nporu Milter
Popular belief is that top
athletes make extreme sacrifices
such as no socializing or as we
here at ECU see it �
"Partying Yet Barry Scott is
living proof that you can spend
four nights a week in a bar and
still be a dedicated well-
conditioned athlete.
Scott, a tnathlete, also works
as a bartender at the Sheraton of
Greenville. He fits his training
for competitions in swimming,
biking and running into his busy
schedule of school and work.
While other students begin stu-
dying for finals this weekend,
Scott a junior Physical Education
major, will be in Fort Lauder-
dale, PL No, he isn't taking an
early spring break, he'll be com-
peting in the Pen Rod's Tinman
Triathalon.
Held on Dec. 6, the race con-
sists of a one-mile ocean swim, a
25-mile bike ride and a 6.2 mile
run.
This won't be Scott's first
triathalon. He began running in
1982, biking in 1985 and in June
of 1985, he competed in his triple
competition, last month, he won
a team triathalon, at Camp Le-
his age division.
It may seem that Scott found a
simple inexpensive sport. But the
truth is that it can be very expen-
sive. The race entry fees, bike
costs and maintenance, racing
clothes and shoes, and travel ex-
penses all add up. Scott's
sponser, The Bike Post, helps
rnake his competing possible by
it's a chance to achieve total fitness through the
utilization of three basic sports. "
�Barry Scott
jeune. He had previously won a
team triathalon, in which he was
the biking leg of the team. He
also placed second in a competi-
tion held in West Virginia.
Scott qualified for the National
Triathalon Championships which
were held in Hilton Head, S.C. in
September. Of the 1,800 people
there, Scott placed about 40th in
furnishing everything he needs.
"I couldn't do it without
them said Scott. "They do
everything Scott also gets a lot
of support and encouragement
from them "because of them, I
participate more he said.
"They encourage me to race
every weekend The experience
has paid off, according to Scott,
because in the last two months,
he has won five out of nine races.
Among these are: a triathalon, a
biathalon, a licensed bike race
and two campus runs.
Training for a triathalon takes
a lot of time. During a week of
training, Scott bikes about 150
miles, runs, between 40 and 50
miles and swims about four
miles. Swimming, to Scott, is his
weakness because it is his newest
undertaking. Former ECU swim-
mer Perry Newman assists Scott
in his training.
Why does Scott put all of this
time and effort into this sport?
"For the challenge and the
chance to show my ability said
Scott. "I'm hoping to gain na-
tional sponsorship and if possible
be a full time triathlete because
it's a chance to achieve total
fitness through the utilization of
three basic sports
be a dedicated wdl-conditioned athlete. "
still
Classifieds
s
PER SO N A L
"�LO
OX PLEDGES: Ever rtigM week we study at joyner tr0rr pm For more info call Deke eayour stuffTO IT �-n LOS � A PU' an? � l
TMUNDERKITTEN . but, I'm grinning SCOTT i may e o' pill, tu a' least i m no' v Ihc r nano1 CONGRATULATIONS' Va,� Schecter, ne new TICE presideni and also to me other new ecutivesl We're sure y� make next year Kinl ove Sisters
HAPPY BIRTHDAY DONNA
You're a great roommate rhc tes
of luck to an everlesl . - -
Rodney Love va .ane
I
DOUBLE D
I
KANSAS, BIG BAD
AND THE REST
Diowout ever o Monday n
best recora n me league
points by the wors ae'eve r
league Sounc fa-
45 Jets 3 PS A- afc tea-
never won its division?
FREE IS AS CHEAP AS IT GE'S
So Sandy your excuse . A �
oanos at the Attic are gooc
can't afford the cover
water See you there on Fr p
Lint is on me
TEI
CONGRATULATIONS'
executive board of Sc
Sigma Presaer" s,a
Vice Pres E zatsf- -
Treas- Janice ScKilii Sec-
Tavik. Educ San y E
ly Walker1 And to Ou"
me best week eve' 'ee �
love ya
HATS OFF TO YOU ALPHA s Ova
PHI: Quarters anc Thumper
never be piayea re sae tnj .
we went up the r ver a .
down! We really r-ac a
time with you gts Tha �
Sigmas
CONGRATULATIONS
Sigma Sigma Sgma nlramura
cer team for wtr
division! Good �:� - the a
campus tournamer"
ppi
I
A
BETA THETAS OF A0T
guys were grea a - let Tr
for the lew Sign
Get psyched for me
keeps getting cioser
The Sisters of AC"
PHI TAU BROTHERS LITTLE
SISTERS AND PLEDGES
rOrget about our Mapp� MCKjr Aec
Dec. irm aN�� T�v�v.�om .
NO
i
I
Ladies VU
Continued from page lfj
"We learned fi m the
game ho to ick We
ere down at the ball
back Man war
Tulane game
gutsy effort
The Lady Pirate comeback av
spearheaded bj theii fu
trapping defer.se
Manwaring. i the B
forced Tulane into 52 en
in the game
"We reall developed
full-court defense She a:o
really kept us in the ga
Gretta O'Nea: a& made a
significant contrib
i
3ft & ��
ANNUM










ft
in
I

m
Crafts �
.Yj
ecrion at Cefl
lenkins Fim
Frida
Dec 5 8-7
J
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own Pirates
a break on
as a Simp
i ed b All
B �wn at the
I hree plays
ected with
Perriman on
pass recep
igain missed
29 10 lead
came with
game as
ed on a
egulation,
ass was in-
Blades and
va foi an ap
However, a
the
s is 10th
er UM
score v, d v
dicative ol the
iccording to
- " em t� o
the Hur-
" The
io, but
easy ones
rates' Effort
rates will
proen
tosi-
DOS
at every
f fullback
B against
iained.
i I 'his
e at the
at nine
��urn as six
ffense, despite
ffensive
I
ated
ting efl
. se hit 10
K -iec.ee
he grabb-
reb inds.
ery well as
dividual
In fact, the
- 52 oi
point at-
r a 65.5
-
� the
' Dher
iken)
� ie-
was
n the
imes Mann
th a
'or tf
�� . tries �
- � .
I
T
- : 1 -r
'�� 1

" C ooper and Barry Scot! (pictured here)
ndfourni,ht.saweekinab.ranH.�n
loned athlete
Classifieds
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 2. 1986
OX PLEDGES: Every night this
eek we study at Joyner from 8 10
pm For more info call Deke Learn
your stuff
tmunderkittenI
but, I'm grinning.
This is no rose
SCOTT may bep
Pill, but at least I'm not on the right
Hand!
me Jhi r ' Then COme on do
�� Phi Tau Happy Hour at the
Tavern Wed, Dec. 3rd from 9 1
.L�k$7'J" � 4 month old Chocolate
Labrador Retriever, male with red
collar. Answers to the name
7Z� DLEASE ca" 746 �" or
758W12 REWARDOFFERED
MUST SELLI: '76 Datsun 610
Wagon. Standard. 4 cyl. wCB,
Chllton's guide, rear def. Runs
great! S500 neg. Call 758 9572.
FOR SALE: Couch and love seat
$275 Call 756 6239 after 6. Before 6
call 753 2121 Ask tor Michelle Dail
LOST: Late October Small (30 lb )
female dog, short, straight, black
hair except brown around forehead
and calves, distinguishing white
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vi
Mexican Restaurant
CONGRATULATIONS To Mark
Schecter, the new TKE president
arid also to the other new ex
ecutives! We're sure you guys will
make next year fun
Sisters.
SALE
Love, Lil
HAPPY BIRTHDAY DONNA!
You're a great roommate. The best
of luck to an everlasting future with
Rodney Love Ya! Janet
J,AJ5I,PERSONALI2ED COM
PUTER DATING SERVICE: An
"ounces the opening of a new club in
addition to its regular club. Because
of the large response from PROFES
SIONAL SINGLES we will have a
separate club for those people in
terested in meeting other profes
sionals. Call 355 7595 or write to P.O
Box 8003, Greenville, NC 27835
TYPING: Done on a word processor
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many more years of secretarial ex
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FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
To share 2 bedroom apt. $l40month
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521 CoUnche St.
Make Your Christmas
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KANSAS, BIGBA7b0UBLE D
JME REST: The bi�9�f
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test record in the league, held to 3
points by the worst defense in the
league Sound far fetched? Dolphins
S Jets 3. PS Which AFC team has
ever won its division?
ALL TYPING NEEDS: Lowest
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PUTER DATING SERVICE: Can
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Whether you want a serious rela
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NEEDED: One roommate to share
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people. Very close to campus and
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fe.
c-a
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S160montti and Vj utilities. Call bet
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message. 758 7546
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
For spring semester Prefer close to
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758 8519
FREE IS AS CHEAP AS IT GETS:
Sc Sandy your excuse "I know the
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cant afford the cover" doesn't hold
water See you there on Fri. Pocket
Lint is on me.
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc. Call
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WANTED
CONGRATULATIONS To the new
executive board of Sigma Sigma
Sigma: President Natalie Moore
. ce Pres. Elizabeth Bilisoly
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Tavk. Educ. Sally Ellis, Rush Kel
, vvaiken And to our pledges this is
'he best week ever remember, we
iove ya!
TERM PAPERS TYPED: $15 per
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CARTOON CARICATURES: Make
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HATS OFF TO YOU ALPHA SIGMA
PHI: Quarters and Thumper will
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we went up the river we sure came
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TUTORING: Need help for your
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FOR SALE: Large couch in good
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BETA THETAS OF AOTT: You
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Get psychec for the big "Iit
Keeps getting closer! We love you1
The Sters o AQTT
BRYTON HILLS: 2 bedroom apt for
rent. $250month. 752 4131. Call
before 9 a.m. or 10 p.m.
PHI TAU BROTHERS, LITTLE
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sv.ee. D,�i 752 3587. Thanx much
Ladies Victorious
Continued from page 10
"We learned from the first
game how to come back. We
were down at the half and came
back Manuring said of the
Tulane game. "It was a pretty
gutsy effort
The Lady Pirate comeback was
spearheaded by their full-court
trapping defense, according to
Man waring. In fact, the Bucs
forced Tulane into 32 turnovers
in the game.
"We really developed a good
full-court defense She said. "It
really kept us in the game
Gretta O'Neal also made a
significant contribution scoring
six points and grabbing seven re-
bounds in only 11 minutes of ac-
tion.
Also scoring in the Lady Pirate
win was freshman Irish Hamilton
with seven points, sophomore
Pam Williams with eight and
junior O'Connor also with eight.
In rounding out the scoring,
transfer Val Cooper chipped in
three as senior Jody Rodriguez
added two.
The next game for the Lady
Pirates is tonight (Tuesday) at
7:30 p.m. in Minges Coliseum
against the University of Win-
nipeg.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY FOR SPRING
SEMESTER: 2 bed 2 Vi bath, air,
fully carpeted, dishwasher, pool, ful
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ROOMMATE WANTED: Male or
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ROOMMATE WANTED: Walking
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A





12
JUjEAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 2,
I9t
Pirate coach Rick Kobe felt the
:� � �� f�" � men's comeback victory against
Xmencan was the bes, he's seen since getting involved w.th swirnmt.
W "men's Summin
Rda
aycec Poust, Susan Wen-
- Robin W icks. A. Pamaa Walsh;
13.8
Gingei Carrick, Ran
Pa da irand, & Jenni Pierson;
- (1
�� Free
Pan W banks 10 52 96
i M Uei 11:11.17
� f � ee
f� Di Ian 1 .M
: Pal I Hson 2 iKi 36
50 I ree
w alsl 26 23
ramim c hilders 2b �M
1M
Pousi 2 16 43
id w ilson 2 1 s s i
. Mctei Dive
Shernampbell 160
2 Beck) Ki-rber 14' JO
200 Fl
2 Wicks 2 13.92
'� Susan ugustus 2 N 80
C I ree
. Dolan 56 63
2 hilders 5" 50
2 � Ba li
1 I' usi 2 17 7
2 Carrick 2:21 48
500 ! ree
: Olson 5:17 20
2 W Ibanks 5 19 63
Metei
; an pbe i vh 212 4'
4 Kerbei 1 ! h 82
2 � Breasi
2 W eni nk 2 35 4
ree Rela
1 c ! 1 xh Wilbanks, C hildres,
� 'Ian. A.Hson; 4 Us
: I Cl Exh Walsh. Miller. Wilson.
Pierson; 3 50 v
Final Score ECt 73 -mer I
Men's Summin
4X) Medlev Rela
Kevin Hidalgo, Ravmond Kennedy,
Andv Jeier. A RoUo I leming; 3 40 '4 2nd
1000 Free
1 David Killeen 10:04.03
2 Andv 1 ewis m 2 92
200 F ree
3. Jeier 1 46 64
4 Andv (ohns 1 44 Q
50 Free
2 Fleming 22.33
4. Jeff Brown 2' 02
2i)0 IM
2 Andv Pistorio 2 02 13
3 Pa! rick Brennan 2 02 2
1 Meter Dive
1 Mark Mauan 152 80
200 FK
1 Johns 1:58 81
2. Hidalgo 1 v 75
100 Free
2. Jeier 49.11
4 Brown 50 "4
200 Back
2 Pistorio 2 03 70
4. Wilhams 2:0' 15
500 Free
1 Killeen 4 51.59
2. Brennan 454.08
1 Meier Dive (optional)
I. Mauan 199.95
2 Oven on 152 25
200 Breast
1 Kennedv 2 1 5 08
� Hicks 2:17 67
400 Free Relas
2. FCl Fleming. Pistorio, Johns &
Hidalgo 3 18.06
I-EC! 1 evMs, Brown, Williams. &
Killeen 3:24 H4
Final Score EC I 57 Amer I 56
" SSSsSSSSSSSSSSfeS
V
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'Greenville's Finest Bakery for over 63years"
752-5251
815
Dickinson
Avenue
�AK-E R-y
SJ Family Owned & Operated
SZf Within Walking Distance From
Girl's Dorm
BT Baked Fresh Daily
0 Pies Chocolate lemon apple peach
French apple sweet potatoe lemon
custard blueberry coconut custard
pecan
K Cakes Carrot spice butternut chocolate I
caramel pineapple rum banana
German chocolate
Decorated cakes for all occasions 1
Swimmers In Close Shave
The ECU men's swimming
team pulled one out by "the skin
of their teeth according Pirate
coach Rick Kobe by defeating
conference rival American
University 57-56 while the women
had an easier time trouncing AU
73-38.
"It was the closest you can win
a meet by Kobe said of the
men's come-from-behind victory.
"At the half-way point, we were
getting killed. In all my years in
swimming, it was the greatest
comeback I've ever seen. If I had
"In all my years in
swimming, it was the
greatest comeback I've
ever seen
�Rick Kobe
to choose a most valuable swim-
mer, I'd choose the whole team.
"When we got there, the AU
men's team was completely shav-
ed in an all-out effort to beat
us Kobe added. "It's an honor
for anyone to shave for you
For the women, it was a totalK
different story. The Lady Pirates
rolled from start to finish, winn
ing all but two events. Kobe nam
ed freshman Robin Wicks the
outstanding swimmer for the
winner, but felt the women all did
well.
"The girls meet went reallv
simple. We crushed them Kobe
said.
This is the best start for the
Pirate swimming program as the
women are 5-0 and the men 4-0
for a combined 9-0 record.
The next action for the ECU
swimmers will be today (Tues-
day) at N.C. State for the
women, while both teams ill
battle Duke on Saturday hile
the women will also take on
Navy. The women's meet will
start at I p.m. in Minges
Natatonum while the men will
take on the Blue Devils after
wards at 3 p.m.
"If people want to see some of
the best swimming in the East
Kobe said, "it will be here Satur-
day
The supermarket with
VAin:HOUM
i�i?h:i:j
COUPON SAVINGS
WE WILL REDEEM UP TO FIVE
MANUFACTURERS COUPONS
FOR DOUBLE THEIR VALUE
UP TO THE RETAIL PRICE
REDEEMED AT ITS FACE VALUE 0M.T
xo� ���� ctwnjo ggjg g '�
I � m
THIN TRIM GRAIN FED BEEF
PRICES EFFECTIVE THHU SAT NOVEMBER 72 '9�
AT SAV A-CENTCR IN GREENVKlE
E RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES
TOP
Boneless
Sirloin Steak
roULAR Oh BUTTbH
Shortening
3
lb.
can
68
LIMIT ONE OF YOUR CHOICE WITH AM ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
Duke's
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32 oz.
LIMIT ONE WiTm AN ADDITIONAL
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Open 24 Hours, Open Mon. 7 A.M Close Set. 11 P.M Open Sundey 7 A.M11 P M
703 Greenville Boulevard





f HI :
K. :
'i I I Mill k : (S�H4S
1
�rn- felt the men � comeback victor?
tsi he s seen since getting involved ith s
against
immine
11 11 � Su iiniHr
HMerest Lanes
Nh
'56 2(20
FREE
GAME
Sow One Came � Receive ' '
not her Came FREE li ith This i
( oupon.
i 1'ZZ'l i i oqnJPeJPerson.j
GntnvtUe' Finest Baken for over
Family Owned & Operated
S Within Walking Distance From
Girl's Dorm
Baked Fresh Daily
v Pies Chocolate lemon apple peach
rench apple sweet potatoe lemon
custard blueberry coconut custard
pecan
Y akesarrot spice butternut chocolate
amel pineapple rum banana
(Ierman chocolate
Decorated cakes for all occasions
Swimmers In Close Shave
1 ne l l l men's swimn .
�in pulled one oui b "the
oi ,he� teeth accdding Pirate
coach Rick Kobe In defeating
conference rival Ameri i
I niversitN 57 56while the women
had an easiei time trouncins M
73 ?8
"It u.iv the closest you can win
a meet by Kobe said ol the
nir ome from behind victor)
At the hall wa point, we were
getting killed In .ill my years in
swimming, it was the greatest
comeback I've evei seen it 1 had
" all my wars in
swimming, if was the
greatest comeback Vve
ever seen.
Kick kobt
hoosc a most valuable swim
met, I'd choos am
"v hen � g � there, the
men's tean i pletely sha �
ed in a iui effort to I
Us' K � added "It's an honoi
inyone to shave foi vou "
' ' � .i
diffe
rolled � a finish
ingall butt k ��
I "� hman H � k ,
ling swimme
winner, but fell tl
well
pic. �
said
I I
Pirate sw g program d
women are !
1 combi �����
The supermarket with
COUPON SAVINGS
UIMIMHIM
WE IU REGEfM PTOftVI
MAKUFICTURERS COUPONS
f0R DOUBLE THE P wAiUE
UP TO THE RET�u PRiCf
tEMt FAQ -AiJE ONI'
� � u-
THIN TRIM GRAIN FED BEEF
TOP
Boneless
Sirloin Steak
ins Shortening
CD))
Towels
Open 24 Hours, Open Mon. 7 A.M Close Sat. 11 P.M Open Sunday 7AM 11PM
703 Greenville Boulevard
I





Title
The East Carolinian, December 2, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 02, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.512
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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