The East Carolinian, November 25, 1986






�he Saat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 192S
Vol.61 No.24
Tuesday, November 25, 1986
Greenville, N.C
10 P
ages
( in ulalion I 2MM)
CAUSA Petitions
J � HUMBERT- Th� Photo Lab
Free Advertisement
If this scene doesn't make you think of Fastarolina. what does?
University College
Offers New Courses
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
staff Writer
In addition to evening classes.
University College also provides
counseling and informational ser-
vices to assist older students over-
Beginning this spring semester, come their anxieties about going
ECU will offer an expanded back to school. "We are able to
schedule of late afternoon and show them examples and la out
evening classes. This new plans about how it can be done
schedule will include approx Svkes said. "The obvious advan-
imated 200 undergraduate and tages and benefits usuallv
graduate courses, forty of which outweigh their fears and hesita-
have not been offered before. tion when they see that it can be
"We are offering courses that done
will appeal to a wide vanetv of in- This semester, 44 students are
terests and career goals of non- enrolled in an industrial
traditional students said technologv degree program of-
Marion P. Sykes, coordinator of fered by University College. Ac-
University College programs cording to Sykes, this is a popular
within ECU's Division of Conti- program because it provides a
nuing Education. He added that technical degree in a field that has
the forty new courses were good employment prospects,
selected because of "increased in- Another popular degree pro-
terest and demand from the local gram is the bachelor of science in
community business education. This
According to Sykes, studies by semester. 22 students are enrolled
the National Insitiute of Indepen- in the program which offers
dent Colleges and Universities several options including ad-
have shown that within the next ministrative services that prepare
decade, there will be as many col- a student for supervisory and ad-
lege and university "non- ministrative positions in any of-
traditional" students (25 years of fice environment,
age or older) as there will be Credits from community
students aged 18 to 25. clleges are easily transferable in
The University College believes both the industrial technology
it can meet the diversified needs and the business education pro-
of these non-traditional students, grams.
many of whom have employment Anyone interested in finding
and family obligations and who out more about these programs
would be unable to attend college can contact the University Col-
except at night. lege at 757-6488.
on theInstoF
portSV 'Pirates are Orange Bowl bound
-a!2ftab ZIZZZS IO n�rid "� SPORTS P�8 8
Organization's Motives Questioned
B PATTI KEMMIS
N�s hditor
Questions are now being raised
as to whether or not a group call-
ed CAUSA USA, which has been
circulating petitions on campuses
across the nation in the last few
weeks, is really a front for the
Unification Church and the Rev.
Sun Myung Moon.
According to Ronald Speier,
dean of Student Services,
CAUSA was on the ECU campus
last month. The group was spon-
sored by the Methodist Center.
"A Chinese-looking guy kept
bothering me whenever I was
around Mendenhall. Finally, I
stopped and signed his sheet
said ECU student Shannon
Short. "The sheet asked for mv
rame, address and phone
number
She added, "He said his group
was representing students against
communism
CAUSA � The Confederation
of the Associations for the Unitv
of the Societies of the Americans
� claim that their petitions are
asking for signers who support
the idea that there should be a
God-centered morality in the US,
that all people should be free and
that communism is dangerous.
Since September, petitions
have shown up in Utah, Ohio,
New Jersey, Alabama, Nebraska,
Minnesota, New York and North
Carolina.
Students at the above schools
have been complaining because
CAUSA members have belately
informed them they're followers
of Rev. Moon, while others claim
the group is just gathering names
of students to recruit for the
Unification Church.
Joy Garrett, CAUSA publicist,
told the College Press Service
that while some members might
belong to the Unification
Church, CAUSA itself was not
affiliated with the church
The Unification Church is a
nonprofit organization that
preaches that the Rev. Moon is
the sole true god who will reign
on earth after the apocalypse.
Ronald Hilton, professor
emeritus at Sanford and editor ol
World Affairs Report, contends
CAUSA is a Moon organization
"Moon has a very complex
network of organizations
Hilton said. "Within the network
of Moon organizations, there is
one called CAUSA International.
ai
which promotes the a
communist cause "
Hilton charges Moon's tie
American campuses "are
more numerous than the
academic world suspects
According to Joseph Sanchez
president of CAUSA, his group
has obtained over seven milh i
signatures on campuses thi-
semester.
Sanchez said the group has not
decided what to do with the
signatures, but that they would
probably be used to let leaders
and politicians know how the
signees feel.
Garrett said the signees will get
more information about the
organization, including a sample
copy of CAUSA's newletter.
I ater, those people will be asked
to subscribe to the Si8 a vear
Studies Offered In Paris
By VIRGINIA I IMNSTON
S!�ff Writtr
This summer East Carolina
students will have the chance to
study at the Sarbonne University
in Paris.
This program, offered through
the foreign language department,
may be used as credit for French
studies, French civilization and
directed readings.
The Sarbonne program will
run from June 30 to August I
Students will be staying at a pen-
sion de famille (boarding house)
across from the Luxemburg
Gardens.
Students will attend class in the
mornings and tour the city in the
afternoons. Weekend tours to
Versailles, Fontainbleau, and
Vaux-le-Vicomte. have been ar-
ranged. There will also be two
optional tours. One to the
French Rivera; which includes
stops in Nice, Monaco, Cannes
and St. Tropez and a three dav
tour of Chartres, le Mont-Saint-
Michel and the American
Cemetery in Normandv.
The cost of the Rivera Tour,
which lasts from June 23 to 30. is
S550 without meals and the tour
of Chartes le Mont-Saint-Michel
and Normandv will cost Si65
without meals.
The c�st o' the Pans program
will be S2.595.00 in-state tuition
and S3.407.00 oui of-state tui-
tion. Fc students attending the
French Civilization, the cost will
be S2.13-i M) for in-state students
and S2.306.UU for out-of-state
student.
This price includes airfare
from JFK airport in New York to
Paris, housing, two meals a dav
at the pension de famille.
transportation in Pans for the
month of July and excursions in
the Paris area.
Costs not cover in the program
are airfare to JFK, passport
books, the 15 ECU application
fee for non-EC U students, sub-
wa fares for June and August,
international student ID cards
and pocket money.
The program is offered to col-
lege students, graduates and non-
degree students. It is recom-
mended that applicants have a
minimum of two years of high
school French and one year of
college French.
The directors of the tour are
Stephen V. Dock and Kanne
Spanow-Ginter. If you need
more information about the Sar-
bonne program you can contact
'hem through the Department of
Foreign Language.
Cunanan Calls For More Involvement
By LESLEY DEES
Staff Writer
"It's very disturbing to me that
the students have more time than
anybody and they did not come
through said Steve Cunanan,
president of the SGA, on the
disappointing turnout of ECU's
student leaders at the chancellor
search meeting.
He added, "It took a lot to get
those meetings, and it's very-
unsettling that only half of
ECU's student leaders showed
up
After Cunanan expressed his
views, the legislature went on to
pass several bills in which over
SI,200 was appropriated to dif-
ferent organizations.
"It's very disturb-
ing to me that the
students have
more time than
anybody and they
did not come
through
�Steve Cunanan
The ECU Womens Flag Foot-
oall Team asked for appropria-
tions of $300 to be used for
registration fees in able to attend
a national tournament in New
Orleans sometime around New
Years. The bill passed by a 11-0
voice vote in favor of appropria-
tion.
Jeff Parks, a representative of
ECU's Rugby Club, proposed an
amendment of S250 to be given to
the club in an agreement for an
additional $250 to be matched by
the club. Mark Simon, legislator,
commented on the proposal.
"We should give these funds, in
order to give them some incentive
to begin and raise some funds for
themselves
The money appropriated will
be used to uniform the team in
jerseys. This amount does not in-
clude shorts or shoes. The bill
was passed allocated $520 for the
Rugbv Club towards the pur-
chase of new jerseys for the team.
Lambda Alpha Anthropology
Honor Society for 1986-198" was
awarded S60 by the appropria-
tions committee for members to
attend an upcoming conference.
This amount will help with a
registration fee along with aiding
in travel expenses. The bill passed
by consent.
A proposal was made for an
appropriation in the amount of
S25 for the SGA Elections Com-
mittee. The proposal passed bv
consent.
A bill was also passed to give
the SGA Executive Counsel S310
to be used towards a conference
table for the cabinet members of
the counsel.
At the meeting, the SGA also
welcomed two visitors from the
Student Government Association
of UNC-Wilmington, President,
Allen Daniel, and Secretary, Kim
Tracv "We are getting a lot of
ideas from this student govern-
ment said Daniel. He went on
to say. "Hopefully we can im-
prove our senate. That is our
main reason for being here
SGA Speaker, Ben Eckert, and Secretary. David fumbling, take time out of the meeting to di$cu�
something with a legislator.

1





I
THE EAST CARiH INIAN
NO I MM K ZJ KM
Campuses Face Problem Of Fake ID's
� the event ol recent weeks
are any measure, the laus that
have pushed up the minimum
'egal drinking age to 21 in many
states have resuscitated an old
campus art form: manufacturing
fake identification cards.
Although there were 21 ECT
students charged with having
conterfeit IDs. ECV is not the
only university having problems
'ith the fake ID's.
At Marshall University in Hun-
tington. W Va . a student
newspaper stud found students
saying it was still easv to buy li-
quor, regardless of their age. The
most common method was using
falsified drner's licenses or col-
lege IDs.
"False IDs are a lot more
widespread now because students
who have been allowed to drink
for the past two years now can't
do it says Parthenon editor
Burgetta Fplin.
"And tew students have
qualms about breaking the law
because few of them agree with
it
West Virginia, like' all the
states in the union, was forced to
raise its minimum drinking age
from 19 to 21 by a federal law
which says states that don't com-
P'v will lose millions in federal
highway funds.
The first wave of new state law
went into effect in 1984. West
Virginia's became ettective in Ju-
ly, 1986.
As of August, only eight states
and the District of Columbia had
refused to raise their legal drink-
ing ages.
North Carolina raised the age
Oct. I. The penalty, if caught
drinking underage, is only a $25
infraction. An infraction does
not go on record.
In the rest of the union, col-
leges have had to make up ways
to force students - many of
whom, of course, are younger
than age 21 to change their
drinking habits Some have bann
ed drinking altogether. Others
have made fraternities and
sororities hold dry rushes, among
other measures.
But some students aren't giving
up their bottles so easily.
Marshall's Eplin says one
underaged student questioned in
the Parthenon survey convinced
an older friend to report his
driver's license missing Ihe
friend filled out the necessar,
paperwork to obtain a new
license, and gave it to the 19 vear
old, who returned it with his own
picture to the state police off �
Word Up!
Announcements
N.C STUDENT
LEGISLATURE
N �- Carolina Student Legislature � .
not too a Join NCS1 There are no rr
Ql 'ff's exccpl �r OCfn na p.esr)mer,
� "? " Eas' Ca'p a rreia'r0m ot
NlSl a oe �ery a. � v, e s,rv,e -
lerestM? ne� vo,ce v(Xjr oc.�i0r Corne ,c
IM WMOfBj" S'udent Center 7 00 Mor
CORAL REEF
DIVE CLUB
MEMBERS Don't forget the heppv
at Teqcia Bar or Tuesoa. i f)h1 B- ng a
'riena Tie Christmas Par �. r a�! end
�eadv to go Come by and I � .
. tat ons Can M.ke Da- e ' �� � � �� �
rnat.on
STAR SEARCH
COMPETITION
T�e V -or �, A-s Comm -ee ol the Sn
denl n y, w �os, a� a campoJ Sfj
sea'c" an Tuesaa, January jntt Tee
cash pr :� at J20C J100 anc ISO ne
aa-3ec ArDi.cat ons ,� - 5 �,en- :a- oe
Filled out - me S'uoe un or o�f ce
Menaenr-a '�,�. ,3, Dm, nwaMl.CJ
' s 5 Wecnesoav Decece' �-
FALL SEMESTER
1987 STUDENT
TEACHERS
PmSC�. EXiVNA'ONS Students
� he stuoent �each ng 0ur -g .? Ca
Semester Iff; must ake a" apoo.n�-
lor the � physics e�a nat or at the Stuoen-
� m Center oetore Dec !5 i�m �, can ng
5? 43 PNSJS Dfgvf-or jjn 6 -
a-a 8 -98' from e X a - 'o 4 5 d CA
c09 vol'R appontvest BEFORE
THEOEtHE DECEMBER l�. 198�
Riggan Sfcor Repair
111 West 4t St.
Downtowa GreeavUte
" Shoe Repair Ai 7r Very Best"
7SM24M
COUNSELING
CENTER
STRESS MANAGEMENT FOR I N
Do vou Becon-e �veas rig ,
' "a 5 aoDroacr- have trouble t on ������
n.i� stuOy ng avoib stubyng - �
Study ng won , help your test perlor - .
oecause you 11 go Blank anyway' Yov ��
a'one ana there ,s hope' Th,s workshop a
"ciuae reia.at.or training, getting .
ed up n a povt,ve way for t.nals
'�a'eq es 01 o'epa'aty anc test tflk
reduce stress Dec 1 3 5 ,Mon vVea Fi
31? Wr ghtBu.la.ng 3 4 p - � , mportani
to attend all three meetings irVew.llbei 1
rg ana budding reia�at,on sk
MAn EN-RANCE t0 Counseling CentP. s
E pva'v v.Pr or south 5,ae of v gh1
South Park
Amoco
AVfOCO
Complete Automotive Service
756-3023 24 hrs.
0 Greenville BKd
TOM TOGS FACTORY OUTLET
T90C Dickfison Ave RO-tAl
Direcl r-rom The iocai M. Jaciure � First Quality
'c-s-g-outs. - Ovefun- .eiecfr-i lrreyuiarS
Panama Jack Rack
2s8
'e , rys Aniving Oail In
in 1 jack anrJTrocaderc
New Trocadero
Sweaters and Leggings
Mil i v itch
Si Q99 .
Any Stye
19
Q
1H(( i)Ko
& Famous Names ThaTwe Cannot Mention
We H? Added Budge! Racks in Our Ne Outlet Store
Come Ann Check Us Out
P-dget Fleece-Pullcver
Sweatshirts $450 jops $20
He 1J0, thru SaturSy 1 j
a rn -6 p rp
' Ahoesae 41 Th,s Ne ocano
'oos hi 4 Househco- yvorj Po Bargains i �,c�r�j f3Sn,0�s
(n 4du'r. Children � �ian. o.aear 4 Se�pWedr
MaslerCard s Visa A-cepted
D�
AUDITION
FOR
SOMETHING
GRAND!
PIIMEHURST
COUNTRY CLUB
at PINEHURST NORTH CAROLINA
PRESENTS AUDITIONS FOR:
The (sMo&M&fr)
6 Singer Dancers
Pleas � � a- accc
POSITIONS OPEN
es
ared �� ti iweai
4 instrumentalists
-1 Drummer 1 Bass player 1 Keyboardist-1 Guitar player
Pleasebi ��.� jvvn oass gua- and li �n Pa c rVillbeprov :� i
AUDITION DATES
UNC Chapel Hill
Monday Nov 17, Carolina union Auditorium rrpm
University of nc Greensboro
Sat Nov 22. Elliot Univ Center. Alexander Room, 1-6 pm
East Carolina university
Sat. Dec. 6,A.s. Fletcher Rehearsal Hall 101,12 5p m
Pinehurst Country club 1
rr- 1 7 n fm '�rlrr l"toM���k�. rail: JKk.
Sat Dec 13 Brassies. 12-4pm mm�mn.wt 11 w s&�
FALL SEMESTER
GRADUATES
Capi ana gonS snouia be pickea up in the
Vuaent store Ar.gbt Bu.ld.ng, Dec 2 3. 4
,T teosale gowns are yours to Keep pro
ng 'ne gradual,cm tee has been paid For
J-aduaton lee pays lor your cap and gown
,n"e s an extra lee lor you- hood An
nouncemen.s Are Now On Sale In The Stu
cent stores There a-e live in a package lor
COOPERATIVE
EDUCATION
INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENT M'
Michael Smith will discuss mternjh.p oppor
tunities with state government on Wed Dec
3. 19S4 at 4 p m m Rawi 30? For more mlor
mation on these ana other opportunities, con
tact Cooperative Education In Raw) 313
N.A.A.C.P.
Trie ECU Chapter ol the N A A C P will
-w xi Thursoay, Dec 4 i��6 at 5 00 p m
the Ledon.a S Wr.ght Alrp American
�, re Center Ail interested people are m
COOPERATIVE
EDUCATION
STATE GOVERNMENT INTERNS Posi
t'ons are available lor students ,n a varety
ol maiors with state government lor Sum
mer 1987 For more mlormation regarding
the North Carolina Internship Program and
the institute ol Government, contact
Cooperative Education in 313 Rawi
OH? �aist (Earolinion
SerirWf th Emm
Sieve Folmar, Director ol Advertising
Advertisiny Keprest-nlatives:
ins
KINGSTON PLACE
SPRING SEMESTER
Due to graduotion, transfer, etc Kingston
Place will offer a limited number of
apartment spaces for rent for the Spring '87
semester. These are affordable, luxurious,
furnished apartments built specifically for
ECU students. This offer won't last long!
Call 758-5393 for further information.
Anne 1 eighvlallorv1 hn Ru
Steve MoteJill
DISPLAY ADVERTISING

4 CO'urrtp rx: 200 :i9 750 mnc OOveMJ3 � '5 4 OS 3 S 1 13 3 "5
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Elections Si
' ps' s!crv in states v. here
coUee � n the hd.
general!) approved higher I
din ' heir campus
Novembe
snow
�add N � Ma
S"rth � and Rl
lsland � approved
itiatives c u. A
raise mom eges
Higher
some bail �� mea
Massachu � d M
tans and Oregon ma u
into lower fundinj
there, however
In man
measures
and their n- 1
iege budge-
Nevada Lisec
state ' refuse 1
share � the e
federal .
then reo
B
rrs vaic �
million to Sv
each year rhe a
on whi
educai
The pr
Thanks
'if heard th
cun o.i.ur around the holida
though! u onli happt-� �
summer, H h is th
Most I
cases

turke. Wl ,
vou: key or chick
remen
�Always
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refrig
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after d
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Reservatii
77 66
J
i





ke ID's
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 25. 1986
s license missing. The
iend filled our the necessary
iperwork to obtain a new
and gave it to the 19-year-
ned it vMth his own
Mate police office.
fit �ar0lfnfan
presentatnev
IVtRri.MV.
� �
)
KI1
15 X
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n Rusk
1 alor
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e
price
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New
Coke
WAW
2
Ltr
Btl
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�range
�uice .
j3
Ctr
99c
'ENDER
Fresh
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Dinner
5
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TURKEY DINNER
INCLUDES
2 LB 'RKEY
2 PC JNDS vamS
2 POUNDS GREEN BEANS
2 POUNDS CORNBREAD
DRESSING
1 PINT GRAVY
12 DINNER ROLLS

'� � raters
on
Elections Show Colleges Want Funding
(C PS) V r,r. O
(C PS) - Voters in states where
colleges issues were on the ballot
generally approved higher fun-
ding for their campuses.
November's election results
show.
Nevada. New Mexico. Maine.
North Carolina, and Rhode
Island voters all approved in-
itiatives and referenda that will
raise money for colleges.
Higher education observers say
some ballot measures votes in
Massachusetts. California. Mon-
tana and Oregon mav translate
into lower funding for campuses
there, however.
In many cases, the ballot
measures were a little obscure.
and their relationship to state col-
lege budgets hard to understand.
Nevada used to be the only
state to refuse to take its rightful
share of the estate taxes that the
federal government collects, and
then redistributes to the states.
But in approving Question 5,
voters said they want the $6
million to $9 million due them
each year the amount "depends
on who dies says Eugene
Paslov. state superintendent of
education - to go to the schools.
The proposal appeared on the
ballot two years ago, but "people
were not aware of it and didn't
know what is was about ex-
plains Karen Zupon, press
secretary for Nevada Gov. Dick
Bryan. "This year, the politi-
cians endorsed it, and it made a
difference
New Mexico voters approved a
$35 million bond issue to finance
construction projects for public
schools, state colleges and univer-
sities.
"We're very lucky the bond
issues have been passing says
New Mexico State University
spokesman Eddie Groth. "It's
important to us because we need
classroom space
Groth says the university had a
six percent enrollment increase
this fall, with especially heavy
growth in its engineering depart-
ment.
"Much of our $4.6 million
share will go to additions to that
department and to remodel ex-
isting facilities he notes. "All
15 state campuses have some pro-
ject approved through this bond
issue
Among the other higher educa-
tion isues on ballots in other
states:
� A Maine bond issue lets the
university system raise $7.7
million for library automation,
computers, facility improvements
and expansion.
�A North Carolina constitu-
tional amendment will let state
agencies issue revenue bonds to
finance building for state col-
leges. The state will not
guarantee the bonds.
� The University of Rhode
Island won approval for its $8.7
million bond issue to build an
Oceanographic and Atmospheris
Laboratory and field house.
� Despite opposition by state
education officials, Montana
voters approved a measure to
freeze agricultural, commercial
and residential property taxes at
1986 levels unless the legislature
cuts will freeze and secures alter-
native funding. Opponents fear
the initiative will freeze state
teachers salaries, and prevent
future education bond issues.
� Oregon voters rejected two
opposing tax amendments. One
would have increased eduction
funding through a five percent
sales tax. The other would have
capped property taxes, and re-
quired voter approval for future
Thanksgiving Tips n
e heard that food noisonino I
increases.
In Massachusetts, voters ap-
proved Question 3, which pro-
hibits the legislature from raising
taxes any faster than the rise in
aggregate statewide wages and
salaries. Education officials fear
the measure - which passed by a
narrow margin - means skimpy
funding for higher education.
� Colorado's Amendment 4 -
which would have prohibited
state or local tax increases
without voter approval in a
general election met defeat.
Officials at colleges, which get
part of the money raised through
yearly tax adjustments, feared
the measure would force them to
defer spending endlessly until
voters could decide to pass new
tax adjustment.
� In California, voters ap-
proved a $400 million bond issue
for new campus buildings, but re-
jected proposals to raise
educator's salaries and to let col-
lege raise taxes without a vote.
California legislators opposed the
bond issu saying state college
enrollment has been dropping
since 1974 while education fun-
ding has been increasing.
Ham & Cheese
Bologna & Cheese
Ham, Salami & Cheese
11 a.ml 1 p.m.
Leek mil surface
P STRTIQKJ
Every Tuesday Is
College Night
7 p.m11 p.m
99C SUBS
Your Choice of
Not Valid On Deliveries
60 Oz. Pitchers $1.99 .
Pepperoru, Salami & Cheese
Turkev &. Cheese
Ham, Turkev & Cheese
752-2183
215 E. 4th St.
I've heard that food poisoning
can occur around the holidays. I
thought it only happened in the
summer. Why is that?
Most holiday food poisoning
cases occur as the result of im-
proper thawing or storage of the
turke) Whether you are cooking
your own turkey or chicken or
ing with friends or relatives,
remember the following points:
�Always thaw the turkey as
directed on the packages which
generally states thawing it in the
refrigerator or for a short time in
cold w ater.
�If the turkey contains stuffing
(dressing), remove it immediately
after dinner. The stuffing can
promote the growth of bacteria if
in the turkey because the
turkev cavity keeps the stuffing
anm and moist.
THE HEALTH
COLUMN
By
Mary hlesfia-Adams
�Refrigerate the turkev im-
mediately after eating. Don't
leave sitting on the counter.
Symptoms of food poisoning in-
clude:
1. Diarrhea with 8-48 hours
after ingesting organism
2. Fever
3. Nausea
4. Vomiting
5. Headaches
If you should develop these
symptoms, you should try to
drink as many liquids as possible
to prevent dehydration and eat
only foods that are bland. The
symptoms may indicate other il-
lness as well; if they do not clear
up within 24-48 hours, you
should consult your health care
provider for treatment.
Give a hoot.
Don't pollute.
FOOD fc SPIRITS
Come Help Celebrate Our 1st
Anniversary
TUESDAY 25, 1986 1
� All Day Drink Specials
� Live Entertainment by Bruce Frye
(9:30 til)
Located behind Quincy's and Ace Cleaners in the Farm Fresh
Shopping Plaza
�2946
Don't
spoil nature �
leave only
footprints.
Kentucky Fried Chicken j�
$1.99 jr
Th,s
CVUP , �
plus tax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK � COMB.
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Small Mashed Potato and Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
Expires Dec. 31, 1986
JMlA
EINSTANT REPLAY
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I
3Uje East (Earnlittiati
Ser-mg the East Carolina campus community since 1925
ptti Kemmis -
Scott Cooper
r�ck McCormac, ,
�!�H Shannon
PatMollo
Tom Luvender, gmm m
Dandei M.MWR.m�
STtVFr FOl.MAR, Omamr �
Anthony Martin, ��� n�.M
Meg Needham. a, Manaf�
Shannon Short. ur,10, WmiBfrf
DeChanile Johnson, ,nirri,�
Novembei 25, N86
Opinion
Page 4
The Pirate Club
Are They Out Of Bounds?
A recent article in the Raleigh
ens and Observer said that the
ECU Pirate Club has voted to place
a resolution that calls for the
resignation of ECU Athletic Direc-
tor Ken Karr on the agenda for its
January meeting.
The resolution cited dissatisfac-
tion with the leadership in the
athletic department. Among the
criticisms were: a lack of improve-
ment in facilities, a lack of progress
n the basketball program and
unrealistic football scheduling that
las brought about losing records in
iach of the past three seasons.
Admittedly, Karr is not the most
personable of people and will never
be compared to N.C. State's AD
Jim Valvano and his one liners.
However, we feel the disenchanted
members of the Pirate Club are off
base in attempting to get Karr to
eMgn.
First of all. a number of im-
provements hae been made to the
facilities while Karr has been in of-
fice. Among the improvements are
the renovation of Bunting Track,
'he air conditioning of Scott Dorm,
:he resurfacing of the playing floor
n Minges Coliseum and the enlarg-
g of the ticket office in Minges.
V hen these improvements are add-
ed to the planned expansion of
-icklen Stadium, it is clear that
Karr has not neglected the athletic
facilities during his tenure.
s for the criticism of the men's
asketball program, no one can
�.cue that the Pirates have not won
as many games in the past three
,ars as Karr. Coach Harrison or
rate fans would have liked.
� wever, this year's team looks to
e the strongest at the school in
me time, and Karr should be
� en credit for having the patience
vail for Charlie Harrison to put
the program on a solid foundation.
While Karr cannot be blamed for
Campus Forum
neglecting the facilities or the past
problems with the basketball pro-
gram, it is obvious that the football
schedule has been too difficult.
ECU's scheduling of schools such
as Miami (Fla), Penn State and,
Auburn was done to get the athletic
department out of debt, as the
Pirates make more money playing
these teams on the road then they
would playing a team of lesser
caliber in Ficklen Stadium.
With the financial objectives ac-
complished, the future schedules
look more realistic with series
scheduled against Cincinnati, South
Carolina, Virginia Tech and West
Virginia. An occasional game with
an Auburn or Penn State is good
for national exposure, but to play
them on back to back weekends (as
was the case this year), is suicide.
While Karr may not have been
perfect in carrying out his duties,
his performance on the job is not as
distressing as the attitude of some
Pirate Club members. The Athletic
Director as well as the running of
the Athletic Department is under
the control and auspices of the
university. While the Pirate Club
has proven invaluable in providing
financial support for ECU
athletics, this does not give them
the right to try and make personnel
decisions.
If the Pirate Club is successful in
getting Karr ousted, it would set a
dangerous precedent. Schools such
as Clemson and SMU have alreadv
run into a great deal of trouble with
their booster clubs getting too
powerful. In fact, at Clemson thev
actually caused the Chancellor to
resign. We feel that any decision
concerning Karr or any other per-
son employed by East Carolina
University should come from the
University Administration, not the
Pirate Club.
umnpmmmrmm
umxxeu&vwAKHe��
Are You Conservative Or Liberal?
What are you, politically that is? Do
you know the difference between the
right and the left? If someone was to
call you a lazy liberal pacifist or a right
wing conservative would you know
what they meant0
There are many ideological divisions
in the political spectrum of this eountrv
and most everyone is. in some degree,
on one side or the other. On the left we
have the Liberals and on the right we
have the Conservatives, where do vou
stand?
From The flight
By THK COALITION
Do you believe in promoting
economic growth and the market
economy? If so, you are more a Con-
servative than a Liberal, on this issue.
Liberals favor a large government and
strict market rules.
When it comes to moral values, it can
be argued that Conservatives exalt
traditional family values more so than
liberals. Proponents of homosexuality
find compassion with-in the Liberal
camp but surely not the Conservative
camp.
One of the biggest distinguishing fac-
tors between who's right and who's left
lies within the nation's foreign and
defense policies. What should be done
about the Soviets and the cancerous
growth of communism in the world?
While most everyone in the United
States hopes and prays that the Soviet
Union, with their oppressive communist
ways, will disappear or cease to exist, it
is the Conservatives who are more apt
to take a realistic approach toward a
communist-free world.
Perhaps it is an unattainable goal,
that of a communist-free world, but the
Conservatives will try to deter the
spreading of communism, as in
Nicaragua.
Defense is a social responsibility, not
just a cost. Protecting the freedom and
the rights of the citizens is a respon-
sibility of the government spelled out in
our Constitution. Protection shall not
be cost-free but it cannot be truly realiz-
ed without a strong deterring defense.
A Liberal likes a big central govern-
ment and the benefits there of, as long
as nothing hinders the social programs
of the welfare state. On the other hand.
Conservatives beleive in a streamlined
government payed for, not through
higher taxes, but through an efficient
allocation of needed revenue.
Liberals would let you believe that
Conservatives have no heart when it
comes to the system of welfare.
However, Conservatives believe govern-
ment has an obligation to help the elder-
ly, indigent and impoverished people
and not to let able bodied men and
women deprive those who are trulv
needy. Remember, give a man a fish; he
eats for a day. Make a man understand
that he must work and pay the ap-
propriate tax; he feeds his family, and
the nation shall prosper.
This conservative column is wt
by the Coalition, a new student
organization dedicated to spreading r ,
conservative ideals as establish,
great statesmen like retiring i
Senator Barr Goidwater, a man a h
represents the Conservative movemi �
The Coalition consists of Richaro
Pond, John T. Lagan III and Hrvan A
Lassiter.
! Spectrum Rules
In addition to the "Campus
Forum" section of the Editorial
Page. The East Carolinian has re-
established the "Campus Spectrum "
This is an opinion column featuring
guest writers from the student bod
and faculty. The columns printed in
the "Campus Spectrum" will contain
current topics of concern to the can
pus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in
tent only with regard to ruie-
grammer and decency Persons
mitting columns must be willing l
accept "by-line" credit for their ef-
forts, as no entrys from ghost writers
will be published.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information mav
contact Daniel Maurer. managing
editor of The East Carolinian at
757-6366, or stop by our offices
the second floor of the Publication
Building.
Hostage-Arms Deal Hurts Reagan
B MORTON KONDRACKL
Apathy Debate Continues;
Reader Says Time No Excuse
I read with interst Barbara Barnes's let-
ter to the editor in the Nov. 18 issue of
j : he East Carolinian. If I understand her
j right, the reason ECU students don't at-
! rend activities, talks, workshops, lectures,
rtc is because they are too busy.
I appeal to these students who have no
tree time to branch themselves outside of
tin) world of academia. social and
�ne financial activities to discover what
this college has to offer.
Did you ever stop to think that these
�:rams vou don't have time to attend
i ;se you are so busy are created by
ts. hke you. who are also busy?
isi look around our campus and see
II :her buv students like you are try-
ing � Jo to bring the rest of the student
lj Kack into the realityof the world
k our gates.
Sue Havnie, for the past two years, has
seen working to get good quality speakers
grams to come to our campus.
ul time student, but she can still
find the time. Look at the members of
Students for Economic Democracy, Cen-
tral America Peace Project, Bread for the
World, and God forbid, the Young
Republicans I can't believe that every one
of these students doesn't have anything
else to do but go to school and organize
activities.
I attend school full-time, teach at night,
volunteer at other programs and make it a
point to attend programs on campus.
Sure, I don't make every program, but I
try to keep myself enlightened on other
issues going on in the world instead of on-
ly issues that directly affect me as a stu-
dent.
This kind of apathy doesn't only exist
on this campus. ie spoken with
organizers from many other campuses
that express disappointment when they try
to get a speaker or program on their cam-
pus. Students just aren't interested
enough in world affairs � or even a sub-
ject like rape � to make the time to at-
tend these programs.
We can't hide our heads in the sands of
ECU. We can't figure everything is going
to be okay because we'll have a job when
we graduate, maybe!
The issues that are being addressed on
this campus directly affect us now and
will continue to affect us in the future.
Students need to get informed about
what's going on, care about how our
politics, as a nation, is having an effect on
the rest of the world, and show some con-
cern. You can't hide from these issues.
Any university's first goal should be to
teach students how to think for
themselves. Students can't think for
themselves if they won't take the time to
get informed.
I'm sorry Barbara, but telling me that
you're too busy isn't a good excuse. As a
matter of fact, it's no excuse at all.
Lysa Hieber,
Nursing,
Sophomore
ITw Sr� KrpuNi,
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or drop
them by our office in the Publications
Building, across from the entrance of
Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number and
signature of the author(s). Letters are
limited to two typewritten pages, double-
spaced or neatly printed. All letters are
subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted.
President Reagan is facing his greatest credibility crisis yet.
Before the 1980 election, he cast aspersions on Jimmy Carter
for negotiating with terrorists and bargaining for hostages.
For six years, he and his minions have declared they would
never do the same, and they have browbeaten allies for
allegedly lacking the courage to follow Reagan's example.
The administration proclaimed neutrality in the Iran-Iraq
war promoted an arms embargo to both sides and urged other
nations to join. Now it appears that all this has been a sham.
For the last 18 months, the administration seems to have been
securing arms for Iran � reportedly $60 million worth, most
shipped through Isreal � in hopes of winning the release of
U.S. hostages in Lebanon. The administration says this isn't
so, but it had better prove it.
The motive was humane: to save lives. Yet President
Reagan has derived political advantage by pretending to have
a special ability to withstand public pressure and coolly serve
the national interst in the face of terrorists and hostage-
holders. It appears this has been just an act.
If that's so, it undercuts his reputation both for strength
and for telling the truth. His enemies think he has always
dealt in rosy fictions, if not outright falsehoods. The
Democrats, sensing the chance to unmask their nemesis at
last, are planning any number of hearings and investigations.
The press, sensing that Reagan's damned Teflon is finally
scratched, is boring in.
Democrats and the press were after Lt. Col. Oliver North
of the National Security Council as the agent used for skirting
congressional restrictions on aid to the Nicaraguan contras.
Now they can go after him for helping funnel arms to Iran.
The NSC is also vulnerable, legitimately, for the botched ef-
fort at "disinformation" directed at Libya's Col. Gadhafi.
There is a serious and potentially dangerous tendency at
work here. It looks as though the NSC staff has caught a
whiff of the "executive action" disease that afflicted several
White Houses in the pre-Watergate era. Whenever it was
politically risky or just inconvenient to trust Congress, the
State Department or even the CIA, they resorted to covert
derring-do. Sometimes such activity is merited. Persisted in, it
inevitably leads to big trouble.
There is a pattern of incompetence to Reagan's recent
foreign policy behavior. After the Iceland summit, the ad-
ministration could not get its story straight. The "disinforma-
tion" flap made the administration look foolish. And,
merited or not, there is suspicion that the White House has
played politics. The offer to sell subsidized grain to the
Soviets certainly was an effort to save some Midwest Senate
seats. Will Democrats probe to see whether former national
security adviser Robert McFarlane was sent to Tehran in
September to produce a pre-election "October surprise
Will they ever.
Finally, if it develops that Reagan has been trading for
hostages after saying for so long that he wouldn't, his word
will never be fully relied upon again. His ability to lead will
have been hurt.
Top White House officials claim to understand the danger,
but they have not yet found an effective wav to deal with ii
White House chief of staff Donald Regan says that historv
will show that the administration has done the right thing,
and meanwhile everyone should please shut up because
hostages' lives are involved.
At the moment, officials are offering up mitigation, not
proof of innocence. They say, first, that whatever weapons
the United States might have allowed to get to Iran could noi
possibly tip the balance in the Gulf war.
Second, the administration says, the United States made-
contacts with Iran primarily for strategic reasons. It's impor
tant for Iran to remain an independent buffer between the
Soviet Union and the Gulf, and elements inside Iran's ruling
hierarchy want to reduce their country's isolation. This group
is believed to be led by Akbar Rafsanjani, speaker of Iran's
Parliament who's at odds with Khomeini's chosen successor
Hussein Ah Montazeri.
Opponents of the NSC gun-running policy sav the United
States had to know that its activities would come to light and
embarrass the very faction the United States was trving to
WO�u S uC H�USe officials acknowledge that the publ.c.tv
probably has embarrassed Rafsanjani, but thev are pleased to
note that he is still saying he would welcome better relations
with the United States if it would just change policy.
A third line of defense is that Iranian-inspired terrorism
agains Western targets has declined. Even administration op-
ponents acknowledge that recently seized American hostages
HfJSbaT. n0t SCCm l� haVC bccn rabtd bv groups iden-
tified with Iran.
Finally sources involved with White House policy declare
as one of them put ,t, that "this was not an arms-forhostage
thaTne8it0hUer BudM T� ,hM "� ' uaran� S
hin. " Wh Jr ,F" anenor ' wo be party to such a
thing Such officials hint that some "secret deal" was in-
volved leading to a change in Iraman policy on terrorism
To demonstrate goodwill, the Iranians got their friends to
release U.S. hostages and the United State's got � "nd o
provide some spare parts. "Believe me �� L;a ncnas K
"the intent behind a.fthis was gand'sen ' ����
talk about it because people's lives are at stake "
Other officials say the White House is lvmg Thev sav that
contacts with Iranians may have started for strategic Masons
but quickly dissolved into a guns-for-hostages trade
S�' ,Wu0nV� ?" �" 0nc sidc' National Security Ad-
viser John Po.ndextcr and Chief of Staff Reaan savint
"trust us On the other, Secretary of State Shulothm ,f
not a moralist, letting it be known he opposed the White
House policy. Congress needs to step in and find out the truth
- quietly, at first, if that's necessary. After all, there reallv
are innocent people's lives at stake here
tl
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Alumni
M V Sewn Burrnu
The I niversit) 5
Awards program and tfu
of Business Golden Am
Campaign at Ea
University will share a
tribution from Mr and
Robert A Ward of h u
Part of the gift �
scholarship end �
covers all exper
vear University Scholar
The remainder will �
School of B
campaign, W mi!
Chancelloi
said. "I am espi
that two ol
chosen I
Bell Se
(4 PS) I
become a;
of the rest ol "
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starts spendir.
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of Education 1
tends in a ne i
To remed
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American
"compara e
Plan the p
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after World �
Some -j
ficials, howevei
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college degrees
probably incr
unemplovn
Bell's goal -
number of collef -
year, from the preser
of the popuia-
25 to 31 percent,
2001.
The report
The Blewng Of I
troduced at lasi
convention of the
Association of Stai
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to overhaul American J
two weeks
The week before
Foundation unveileo
reform plan to change I
education radica I
students take a core
of certain liberal a:
courses, and write
in order to graduate
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of the federal budi '
"Out of a fedc
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make them
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literature and fine
Some of the pe
new grad- get o
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leal with it.
� � that
�- rig thing,
.r because
mitigat'on,
tevei weapons
� an could not
: States made
It's irnpor-
fer between the
'� Iran's ruling
tion. This group
weaker of Iran's
iccessor,
� sa the United
me to light and
�: itate was trying to
H the publicity
� are pleased to
me better relations
tnge policy.
inspired terrorism
I -en administration op-
� -eied American hostages
� en grabbed by groups iden-
� th W hue House policy declare,
was not an arms-for-hostages
' 'nan that. I guarantee you
�arlane nor 1 would be party to such a
hint that some "secret deal" was in-
fhange in Iranian policy on terrorism.
)dwill. the Iranians got their friends to
and the United States got its friends to
arts "Believe me. " said one source,
this as good and serious, but we can't
people's lives are at stake '
the White House is lying. They say that
may have started for strategic reasons,
into a guns-for-hostages trade
1 On one side. National Security Ad-
r and Chief of Staff Regan, saying
ler. Secretary of State Shultz, nothing if
g it be known he opposed the White
Is needs to step in and find out the truth
I that's necessary. After all, there really
Iives at stake here.
Alumni Fund Endowment
WT fcL.�� ntlal nr.tr 1.1
MAI MBhR 2?, 1S�86
ECU Ne�� Bureau
The University Scholars
Awards program and the School
of Business Golden Anniversary
Campaign at East Carolina
University will share a major con
tribution from Mr. and Mis
Robert A. Ward of Burlington
Part of the gift will fund a
scholarship endowment which
covers all expenses for a four
vear University Scholars Award.
The remainder will go to the
School of Business toward its
campaign goal of $2 million
Chancellor John M How ell
said, "1 am especially pleased
two of our alumni have
chosen to support both of these
critical programs I regard these
iwo projects as fundamentally,
important in demonstrating the
academic excellence ol I ast
Carolina. One projeel brings in
outstanding students, which
helps the University in general,
and the othei will serve to main
tain an already excellent School
of Business
"It's alw aj - r atifying w hen
people who attended II come
forward to express theii apprecia
tion for what the school did foi
them, and in so doing, make it an
even better place for others "
Ward is executive vice presi
den of Unifi, Inc a
Greensboro based company with
national and ational in
terests. fhe company specializes
in texturizing and manufacturing
ol synthetic fibers.
Ward earned a bachelor of
science in business at ECU m
162 and is married to the former
Margaret Cude. She received
both bachelors and masters
degrees in education at ECU.
"We wanted to make the con-
tribution while John and Gladys
Mn ell were still leading the
I niversity, to sa thank you for
theii tremendous contributions
w ard said
"Margaret and I both think a
lot oi ECU. We've been very for-
tunate and want to give
something back We're especially
interested in the business pro-
grams, since thai was my area,
but we wani ECU to grow and
prosper on an all-around basis
We believe very strongly in what
Dr. Howell has started with the
University Scholars Program "
Ward is a member ol the EC U
School of Business advisory
council and the golden anniver-
sary campaign steering commit-
tee.
The Wards have also shown
their support for ECU athletics
with assistance to the Department
ot Athletics academic counseling
center.
lhey are originally from
Greensboro. Their youngest son,
Robert, Jr is a freshman at East
( arolina. His brother, David, at-
tends Wofford College in South
arolina.
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UNCERTAIN?
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UgaMOJ M Accr�Oh�� ly Th� $��!�
X Worth CaroMtw
Bell Seeks Money For Education
(UPS)� The United States will
become an "economic colony"
the rest of the world and com
mil "national suicide" unless n
-�arts spending more on higher
education, former U.S. Secretarv
of Education Terrel H. Bell con
'ends in a new report.
To remedy the situation. Bell
wants the U.S. lo revitalize
merican colleges on a scale
"comparable to the Marshall
Plan the policy with which the
I S helped revitalize Europe
after World War II
Some campus placement of-
als, however, sav Bell's goals
- if ever achieved would make
college degrees less valuable and
probably increase the nation's
inemploymeni rate.
Bell's goal is to double the
number of college graduates each
year, from the present 9 percent
' the population over the age of
25 to 31 percent, bv the vear
201
report, called "To Secure
Blessing Of 1 ibertv" and in-
troduced at last week's Phoenix
mention of the American
Association of State Colleges and
I niversities, was the second call
verhaul American colleges in
two weeks.
The week before, the Carnegie
Foundation unveiled a college
reform plan to change undergrad
education radicallv by making
students take a core curriculum
of certain liberal arts and science
courses, and write senior theises
in order to graduate
Bell's report was more vague,
offering no proposal other than a
plea to spend a greater percentage
of the federal budget on colleges.
"Out of a federal budget of
S950 billion Bell told College-
Press Service, "we spend $8.7
billion on student aid now. It
would take an insignificant
percentage increase" to double
the number of collegians
graduating each year.
In delivering the paper in
Phoenix, though. Bell roundly
criticized the Reagan administra-
tion for effectively cutting the
amount of student aid available
by 2? percent since 1980.
Most of those cuts were made
during Bell's tenure as Secretarv
of Education from 1980 to 1984.
Since leaving the administration,
however, Bell has become an in-
creasinglv vocal critic of its col-
lege policies.
"1 am critical of those who
wouid limit educational oppor-
tunities he explains.
The former secretary, now an
education professor at the
University of Utah, contends
"there are hundreds of thousands
of young people in the U.S. who
don't think it's possible to attend
college Many of those are solid
'B students
Getting them into college
wouldn't just make them more
employable, he says. It would
make them better citizens.
parents, consumers and thinkers.
"Life becomes richer and bet-
ter through the education you
receive. You learn to appreciate
literature and fine music
Some of the people who help
new grads get jobs worry that
doubling American college
enrollment would mostly cause
unemployment.
"It's a worthy goal says Vic-
tor Lindquist, placement director
for Northwestern University in Il-
linois, "but might not resources
be better addressed to the secon-
dary or community college
level?"
"We do not need to increase
the number of students attending
college Lindquist says. "We
need to increase our resources:
work study (funds), student loans
t mtern-
and the a iln
ships
If the numb .
ed, moreovi gians mighi
have to settl blue collar jobs,
agrees Mid ienl
Director John Shingleton
"Engineering majors would
have to go into technu es
he savs
"And. assu that stan-
dards (for employmeni I stav.
same, salai
Adds Rhea Naglc ol the Col-
lege Placement Council in
Bethelehem, Pa " I here are just
'V numbei ol jobs out there for
�i person with a college degree.
However, some jobs that (tradi-
tionallyhave been set aside for a
person with a college degree have
now been scaled down for people
h on! two-yeai degrees
W hen told of the placement of-
als' predictions, Bell contend-
'the more college-degreed
people we have driving cabs, the
better off we'll be" as a nation.
Northwestern's I indquist,
though, says he'd "be happy if
the cabbies in Chicago could
speak English
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10th St. M ' fr l
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Our Voturn��ft �nd SUM ,
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Friends don't let friends drive drunk.

)Wh Millet fie�n� C Mtta





THfc EAST I AROl INJAN

ideos Br
NOVEMBER 25, 1986 Pag
Wherein Rome
By PAT MOLLOY
At ECU, nearly 100 students
are residents of foreign countries.
Among those students are two
atuens of France; and onlv one
of those two is involved with the
'nternational Student Exchange
Program.
Her name is Veronique
Fariello, and she comes to Green-
ville from Grenoble, France, a ci-
' overlooked by snow-capped
mountains and bordered by a
calm river.
Upon arrival at ECU in
August. Veronique was first
taken aback by the casual dress
of the students: shorts and tee-
hirts seemed to be the norm,
whereas students dress a bit more
conservatively in Grenoble.
The rate of tuition was her se-
Non
cond surprise. In France, tuition
ranges from $10 to $100, depen-
ding on your parents' income. At
ECU, tuition can range anywhere
from $300 to $2500 per semester.
She also found the system of
education in America to be dif-
ferent from what she was ac-
customed to in France. "The
classes are different here she
said. "In France when you
choose a major, a program of 19
to 21 hours per week is included.
1 took 24 hours and made good
marks she added, smiling.
Until last year, the length of
the school terms were also dif-
ferent. Instead of semesters, the
students attended classes on a
yearly basis, from October until
June. Like us, however, they are
now attending school on a
semester-based system.
Veronique has found
American teachers to be more
Paternalistic than those in
rrance. They are more willing to
neip students than are their
French counterparts. "It is
harder, more difficult to study at
home than it is here. The rela-
tionship between teacher and stu-
dent is more superficial there.
You must teach yourself
The laid-back attitude of
students in Greenville is in sharp
contrast to the competitiveness of
students in Grenoble. The school
� large, (35,000) and because of
the high unemployment rate
students are fiercly competitive.
"In France, students study by
themselves. Most of the time, stu-
dying consists of research. I think
that the students in France realize
that if they want a diploma, they
must work very hard to obtain
it she adds.
1 Ways
Veronique, who is majoring in
English, says that dating in
France is no different than dating
in America. However, people in
general are more friendly
hereI've found students here to
be kind, very open minded and
very friendly she says, "At
school in Grenoble, people are
just there to study. Everybody is
just so busy and preoccupied.
Here, I can walk down the street
and people will say hello, or ask
how I am doing
Veronique will be leaving for
France on Friday, after two days
in New York. She departs from
ECU with good memories and an
understandable eagerness to go
home. "Being an ECU student
was a marvelous experience for
me. I've met many people, and
everyone has been very nice with
me. I hope to see you again
JON D JODAN- Th, Photo Lab
French exchange student Veronique Fariello finds American educa
tion to be quite unlike what she's used to.
B TOM PAGE
S�ifTrtl�
"Circumstances guide us all,
and you never know what kinds
of turns life is going to take" said
Kevin Ousley, one of the many
non-traditional students return-
ing to school to finish their
education.
Ousley is one of the 1611
students on campus over 30, fre-
quently referred to as the "non-
traditional" student. You have
seen them on campus, and you
may have a few in your classes,
but who are they, and what made
:hem come back to school?
Ousley returned to college after
12 years in the work force, un-
satisfied with his work ex-
periences. He saw others around
him with more education, and
this provoked in him the desire to
finish his education and get
ahead. He has not decided on a
major yet, but feels that as long
as he is in a more productive en-
vironment and is trying his best,
he can achieve his goals.
Surprisingly enough, Ousley said
that things haven't changed much
since he went to school in the ear-
ly 70s. The "trappings" as he
referred to fashions, have chang-
ed somewhat, but students still
have one thing in mind when
coming up with new fads, and
that is "to shock the
mainstream "There will always
be the conservatives on campus,
just as there will always be those
who insist on being different he
said with a laugh as he shook his
head.
Some non-traditional students
return to school to move ahead in
their current job, some to gain
more mobility, some to fulfill
personal goals, some for the
sheer sake of learning and some
for the reward they get from con-
quering a challenge.
There are also sacrafices in-
volved in resuming a college
education. Randi Homer, a non-
traditional student who main-
tains a family while going to
school, said, "I found that com-
ing back to school is a major and
carefully thought out decision �
one that's almost always more
complex because we (the non-
traditional students) have already
assumed other commitments and
responsibilities Homer said
that going back to school has an
impact on the very structure of
the non-traditional student's life.
While to some students
sacrifice may mean giving up a
steady income, to others it may
mean giving up a job until they
can return more knowlegeable in
their field. To some sacrifice
means giving up valuable time
that could be spent with the fami-
ly.
Margaret Brothers, 37, return-
ing to get her masters degree, said
she has learned how to deal with
this problem by being more
aware of time management so
that she doesn't take too much
away from her family. She says
she takes her time more seriously
than when she previously went to
school, and she has learned to
budget it effectively because of
the additional areas in her life
that require her attention.
Brothers said that with the help
of her husband and other outside
services she is able to maintain a
job and a family and to go to
school as well. This is not easy of
course, but as with most non-
traditional students, the desire to
learn is what pushes her.
Brothers noted that sometimes
she feels separated from the other
students on campus. She said,
"At times it is like being on the
outside looking in She said that
she is more studious now because
she knows her purpose. By com-
ing back to school she has gained
more leverage in her present job.
Non-traditional students are
not unique in their desire to learn
and succeed. Some traditional
undergraduates also exhibit this
eagerness. Although this
sometimes may be the case, said
Randi Horner, "Many of the
traditional students regard the
university experience as another
example of an adult-instituted
hurdle-one which they must get
over, around, or through before
they can fully engage in their
lives Horner said that the non-
traditional student views the
university as a privilege, and ap-
preciates more the opportunity to
be here.
There are many reasons why
some people come back to school
after so many years. But the most
common motivation the non-
traditional student gave was
simply, "I want to They all ex-
pressed that the desire to learn
outweighed the obstacles that
stood in their way.
Peace Group Seeks
Humanitarian Help
Christmas Videos Ready For The Season
By GENA McKINLEY
SI�ff Writer
By MICAH HARRIS
S�ff�r1t�
Yes, that time of year is
already upon us again: that time
when the house is full of warm
kitchen smells, and outside the
air is crisp and you look at all the
barren trees putting forth twinkly
lights and you say to yourself,
"Say, wasn't it just Halloween
last week?"
Needless to say, the holiday
momentum is building even as
you read this and prepare for
Thanksgiving break. And what
would the holidays be like
without those TV Christmas
specials? Nowadays, there is such
a deluge of Christmas programs,
especially when you add those
available on video cassette, that
there is no way you'll be able to
see them all. Here is a guide for
holiday viewing so you can plan
for maximum enjoyment this
season.
There are two specials without
which it just doesn't feel like
Christmas. The first is Rankin-
Bass's "Rudolph the Red-Nosed
Reindeer perhaps the earliest
and certainly the best in their
long series of puppet-animated
holiday specials. An elusive spirit
enlivens Rudolph and his pals
and even the songs (which are
embarrassing in most kiddie
specials) are enjoyable.
Hey, has anyone else noticed
that "Rudolph" is the only
Christmas special to depict Santa
Claus as a jerk? Remember how
Santa joins in with everyone else
in rejecting Rudolph because of
his glowing nose? In later years,
I've wondered what sort of effect
that had on disabled children
Certainly a moment of bad taste
unique in holiday programming.
Despite this flaw, Rudolph re-
mains a classic. Who doesn't get
a lump in the throat when Clarice
(the sort of doe Wally Cleaver
would date if he were a deer)
starts singing "There's Always
Tomorrow And what about the
old tug on the heart strings you
feel when Santa finally says
"Rudolph with your nose so
bright Won't you guide my
sleigh tonight?" Sniff. Sniff. Ex-
cuse me. I seem to have
something in my eye
The second must-see-every-
year special is "A Charlie Brown
Christmas This was the first
Charlie Brown special and it set
the standard of quality which was
kept until the more recent
specials. The late Vince
Guaraldi's sensitive jazz score,
the use of real children (many of
whom were kids from the pro-
ducer's neighborhood) for the
voices, and animator Bill
Melendez's careful simulation of
the Peanuts newspaper strip com-
bine to create a successful and ge-
nuine innocence which is never
once condescending.
Linus's recitation of the
Nativity, so powerful in its
simplicity, is one of the greatest
single minutes in animation
history.
Do I need to say anything
about It's A Wonderful Life!
Okay, you twisted my arm. This
movie was originally entitled The
Greatest Gift and it remains the
greatest gift Hollywood has ever
sent us for Christmas. As you
probably know, there will be a
new computer colored version
making the rounds this year. If
you have a choice and you have
to choose, see it in black and
white. Director Frank Capra was
a true craftsman in his medium
and colorizing this film is sort of
like enhancing Gustave Dore's
work with crayolas.
Watch for Walt Disney's One
Magic Christmas, which is set to
debut on video this year. It's an
80s version of A Christmas
Carol. If anything has approach-
ed It's a Wonderful Life in recent
years, it's this movie. Character
have "seen his star in the east"
and arrive about two thousand
years too late (you know how
long it takes for light to travel).
The animation of the aliens is
particularly impressive.
See VIDEOS, page 7
The Review
In the wake of our govern-
ment's decision to send a $100
million aid package to the contras
in Nicaragua, another group has
decided to offset that aid with a
counter-mission - a mission of
peace.
Quest for Peace is a national
organization devoted to sending
humanitarian aid to Nicaraguan
citizens who have been battered
by a U.Sbacked war They
strive for a peaceful solution to
the Nicaraguan conflict and hope
to heal some wounds along the
way.
Students and faculty here at
ECU can become involved in
the Quest tor Peace through an
action group on campus. The
Central American Peace Project
is a local group of students,
See QUEST, page 7
Costello's Newest Attracts
By D. A. SWANSON
�ff Writer
and
Elvis Costello � Blood
Chocolate (Columbia)
The Coolies � dig? (DB Recs)
Will the real Elvis Costello
please stand up?
Who, really, is this man? The
album cover attributes the music
to Elvis Costello and the Attrac-
tions. The songs are all written by
McManus (Costello's real last
name). And a photo on the back
cover indentifies a Costello look-
alike and band member as
Napoleon Dynamite. Has
Costello become the new Eve of
three faces? Or is this all just too
much silliness?
Well, whether the musical -
chair names are silly or not, this
album, Blood and Chocolate, is
the least silly and most produc-
tive thing that the 'angry young
man' has done in years. Going
back to his simple rock-and-roll
roots and reintroducing the im-
portance of acoustic guitar that
highlighted his early work, Elvis
has turned around a tragic march
actor Hany Dean Stanton and toward obscurity.
Mary Steenburgen head up a Producing, and helping out
good cast. Cream of the crop. with the acoustic guitars, is Nick
To wrap things up, I'd like to Lowe, long-time Costello cohort
Hey, I thought Christmas was still a month away!
mention a few leaser known
Christmas gems which you may
not have seen but which are
especially wonderful the first
time around anyway. The first is
Canadian animation studio
Nelvana's Cosmic Christmas, the
story of three alien wise men who
His return to the production
room may also have a lot to do
with the return of the old sound.
It is not, however, a pure
return. Many of the pseudo-
psychedelic guitar breaks in songs
like the melancholic "I Want
You seem more indicative of a
contemporary influence. But pin-
ning down Costello, despite the
apparent similarity from tune to
tune, has always been somewhat
difficult because of his well posi-
tioned diversions.
"Battered Old Bird a ballad
about "The landlady's husband"
is his most obvious return to out-
and-out story telling, though
most of the cuts ("Crimes Of
Paris" and "Next Time
Around") are at least conceptual
tales from Europe.
The tinny tenor, with all of his
strange and obscure views of ur-
ban life, is back with Blood A
Chocolate, and thank goodness
for that. He may still be
somewhat self-concious and
painfully indirect in some of his
lyrics, but the music and the
psychedelic breaks are right on
the money.
What is Paul Simon saying
about the Coolies? With their
Atlanta, Georgia versions of
Simon's "Scarborough Fair "I
Am A Rock" and "Cecilia" on
their latest album, dighe must
either be in hysterics or tears.
The entire album, in fact, is
dedicated to old Simon and Gar-
fun kle ballads (except for Paul
Anka's "Having My Baby"), or
perhaps, the massacre of them.
But at least that attack has been
made with a semblance of
humor.
"Scarborough Fair" opens the
collection in a strange, droning
chant, only vaguely reminiscent
of the original, and "Bridge Over
Troubled Water" is so heavy and
convoluted that it might as well
be another tune. "Cecilia" is
played with a rockabilly beat.
It always sets me back when a
new band rewrites old classics. 1
have to make a few more than the
standard attempts at evaluating
the final quality. With dig?, the
verdict has to parallel what a
light-hearted slap-stick comedy,
would deserve. The novelty
alone, like Weird Al's classic
covers, will command attention
from the music listening com-
munity. Beyond that novelty,
though, the bounds of these
classic minstrel songs have been
stretched, in most places, beyond
the breaking point.
Still, there is something to be
said for the humor that these
guys inject into their renditions.
Clay Harper's voice has a very
versatile range, almost as though
he were trying on different
masks. It may even be that anv
success this album finds may be
attributed to his comic nack for
vocal exaggeration.
But a comic bent does not an
entire L.P. sustain. In fact the
best cut on the album is a very
fine instrumental version of
"Mrs. Robinson from the
soundtrack of The Graduate
These five lads hailing from
Hotlanta really do have talent
galore. Their humorous attitude
reflects a lot of influence from
the English band, Madness But
it is a talent that calls for more
than an entire album of mockery
toward Paul Simon, it ju'$t
becomes a bit much after a while
ontinued from pt 6
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I
if elk) finds American educa-
lo
o liege
ier said thai the
ews the
�-
pportunii
� ons whv
- �
. mosi
� - e wa
. , ii
.
p Seeks
an Help
U '
car
)uest � . " an
i group
Amer.a Pea
ee Ql EST, pae 1
Attracts
huioi ,ne.
led with a rocku-
ajwav e: me ba -
band rewrites old cl i
to make a feu n
Idard attempts at e
inai quaht With dig
ict has to para
-hearted slap-stick
lid deserve The n
e. like Weird
Aili command ai
the m . "ening
itv Beyond that n
kgh, the bounds of
lie minstrel songs have
cned, in most places, be
breaking point
�ill, there is sometrnr.�
for the humor thai
inject into their rei .
Harper's voice ha
itile range, alma I
were trying on
is. It may even be thai
ess this album finds ma
')uted to his comic na .
exaggeration
Jt a comic bent doc
le IP. sustain. In fact
:ut on the album is i
instrumental version of
s Robinson from
Idtrack of The Graduate
J�ese five lads hailing from
anta really do have talent
Their humorous attitude
cts a lot of influence from
:nghsh band, Madness But
a talent that calls for more
an entire album of mod
rd Paul Simon, it JUs!
i� a bit much after a vfefc
al?
i ty hrut en
w studt
reac it. real
trm.i I S
i mj' uh
w ement
Rich A
les
"Campus
Editorial
I has re-
�ectrum
fea:
lent body
Minted in
II contain
the cam-
d in con-
rules
tons sub-
rilling to
their ef-
S v. riters
icipating
ion may
nanaging
liiiian at
�ices on
�cations
an
to lev will
the danger,
eal v. :h it.
hat h -torv
ight thing,
ip be.ause
gatior
er weapons
n could not
itates made
It's nripor-
etween the
ran's ruling
This group
er of Iran's
i successor,
the United
to light and
is trying to
ie public
e pleased to
er relations
licy.
d terrorism
stration op-
an hostages
croups id
licy declare,
for-hostages
taranteeyou
ty to men a
Ml" was in
terrorism
�ir friends to
ts friends to
one source,
but we car
T�cy sty that
egic reason
i tri
1
JK6-
Ityin
t. nothing
Jdtte White
ootd itrui
i. tat mil v
Videos Bring Holiday Cheer
THt FASTAROI IN1AN
Ijaw-T.
NOVEMBER 2i 1Y86
Continued from pagt- 6
Tom and Jerry and Friends is
ol like an "IT Comes At
st mas although u was
. before the Spielberg film.
Nexl in line is another cartoon
. ch should show up on the
� pel Station "Peace On
' was released h MGM to
theaters in WN while war raged
I irope but before the United
v e's entrance into the carnage.
Peace On Earth" is more up to
than when it was released
the animation remains
or.
shori begins disarmingly
gh a- three little cherub-like
-els harmonize on "Hark
. Herald ngels Sing" in the
snow filled streets of their little
city. A passing Grandpa Squirrel
encourages them and then ex-
plains to his grandchildren what
men are or were.
"They were the orneriesi crit-
ters, he tells them. "Uniformed
monsters who were always
looking for an excuse to fight
each other.Finally, onlv two men
were left and they managed to kill
each other.
Only the animals survived.
They discovered a Bible in a
bombed-out church. "Hmmm
muses the wise old Owl, "looks
like a mighty good book o' rules
but 1 guess them men didn't pay
much attention to it
They discover the Old Testa-
ment admonition to "Rebuild the
Old Wastes and set about turn-
ing the helments and abandoned
war vehicles into a city. "It's a
fine old world the old squirrel
laughs to himself after the little
squirrels have fallen asleep.
This film, made bv Hugh Har-
mon, is effectively chilling due
not only to the subject matter but
the fine level of craftsmanship.
The scenes ot soldiers fighting
seems to have been traced (a pro-
cess known as rotoscoping) from
actual newsreel footage. After
the last man on earth sinks into
his water-filled fox hole, bloody
red bubbles froth up after him.
Quest Focuses On Nicaragua
I llllllii.wl tr.ir�.
'
ontinued from page 6
t and Greenville residents
meets most Wednesday
il 1 10 in the Methodist
' (. enter.
up jusl formed this fall
nvolved m such protects as
people on the situation
i igua, raising money for
Peace, and trying to in-
egislation. Thev will be
documentary film en-
: �c� of H ar at 7 p.m.
in the library. All
and faculty are en-
(0 attend.
ear guest tor Peace
heir goal of $27 million.
� sent to Nicaragua in
ol medicine, clothing
necessities Since Oc-
new goal has been to
t administration's $100
' military aid with an
ant ol humanitarian
rding to the organiza-
sletter, "As the contra
training take effect, the
greatly intensify And
certainly take its toll on
Ol Nicaragua
use 50 percent of the
- .an economy goes into
there is rampant infla-
d people are going
said Mike Hamer.
an f-nghsh professor at
aa ist in the mis
' � C entral Americ2h"peace
vs first-hand of the suf-
these people. He was in
i in 1985 from February
July as a long-term
for Witness for Peace.
ol his time was spent
the Nicaraguan people-
ose who favored the
and those who didn't.
aid. He said that thev
tvel to areas that had
een attacked and would
hand with them (the
.aits, go to the funerals
� and gnev e with them. "
her purpose of the
more people Hamer said.
Hamer also said that
Americans are entitled to another
point of view, which may involve
a legitimate fear; main are wor-
ried that Nicaragua will become
another Cuba if the contras do
not succeed in overthrowing the
government.
But Hamer believes there is an
alternative. "Reagan has stated
he wants to topple the San-
dinistas. He doesn'
negotiate he said.
convinced that
negotiators, namely t
tadora Peace Process
want to
Hamer is
thro u gh
the Con-
a non-
violent solution can be pursued.
The CPP is an effort bv Central
and South American govern-
ments to negotiate a peaceful set-
tlement to the conflict in
Nicaragua.
"How long do we slay blind to
the fact thai our tax dollars are
killing innocent people He said
tha' we, as Americans, should be
concerned with our government's
ethics. "And 1 think it is a basic
ethical question he said. "Do
we hire terrorists to kidnap, kill
and rape innocent Nicaraguan
citizens
Hamei said thai students
should also assume the respon-
sibility of becoming informed on
both sides of the issue. "There is
Jl1e row,rv thai students here
could be drafted after college and
be sent to Nicaragua to fight a
war he said.
In talking to Nicaraguan
soldiers last year, Hamer learned
of their feelings on the war.
"Thev just want the war to end
so thev can go back to being a
civilian popu 1 a t ion bei n g
carpenters, teachers and just hav-
ing a normal life in their country;
one that's not torn by all this
grief he said. "So it's not really
a socialist or communist revolu-
tion. It's a nationalist revolution
. . . they just want to be left
alone he said.
Ouest for Peace is a way to
demonstrate the concern of main
Americans tor the innocent vic-
tims of this war, Hamer said. But
people often wonder what hap-
pens to aid money. Does it ac-
tually reach those who need it?
According to Hamer, "Most
ol the distribution happens
through church channels . . . m
little parishes throughout the
countryside He said that the
nice thing about church distribu-
tion is that it is not influenced by
political viewpoints. "They will
jusl distribute the goods to the
people who need help the most
he said.
Donations to the victims of
war can be dropped off at the
Baptist Student Center on the
corner of 10th Street and
Lawrence Street. They need
clothing (spring and fall weight),
aspirin (in great demand), school
supplies (new pencils, notebooks,
etc.) and money.
Also, on December 20, there
will be a benefit concert at the At-
tic to raise cash. One dollar can
ship S4O-50 worth of supplies.
The Boomers, The Tommy G.
Experience and the Lemon Sisters
and the Rutabaga Brothers will
play.
All donations will be
distributed bv The Quest for
Peace, which operates from the
Quixote Center in Marvland.
CAROLINA
GULF
1201 Dickinson Ave
752-7270
H f Guarantee Our Work
And Our Used
Tires - P J & Del. A vail.
Do li H irhs.
W reciter Service
USA M( .l t SOHH) HllHlll S
tor Peace program was
� rth Americans into the
' conflict to act as a shield,
-aid. "Experience has
��' the contras have not,
ite, attacked any village
�'�here North Americans
present he said.
rial goal was to get the
ick to the states through
i personal contacts. "I
an ongoing process, try-
think of wavs to reach
East Carolina Coins A Pawn
Comer 10th ft Dickinson Ave
We Buy Gold ft Silver
AJNSTANT CASH LOANS V.V
Cm iV au Transactions Confidential S Jfr
eu 752-0322
�omn. M n.mtm 9.m.
BORTIOS I '
io :�� m n k
ol PHI (,A( )
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS

V
I he implication that there can be
no "peace on earth" as long as
man inhabits the planet is a
sobering thought expressed
strongly in this holiday format
Sadly, the thought is still valid.
Finally, keep an eye out for
The Sight They Saved
Christmas, a TV movie with
Jacklyn Smith which wasn't re-
run last year. Art Carney gives a
great performance as a Santa
Claus menaced by encroaching
nuclear power. It sounds stupid,
but the movie is genuinely-
touching and will hopefully be
seen again this season.
There's my required seasonal
viewing. Your's?
cheson&
FAMILY BUFFET
I WAWMWAIMZ8SZ'
"ui-lM.)
LU�oCH DINNER
369 , $469
featuring
HA.p.YMeifHomeCoo�'ng
ALL YOU CARE TO EAT
One Low Price Does It All"
ID . solo. . yl?
Open Thanksgiving All Day
Traditional
Thanksgiving Dinner $4.69
(,rtnt AiiV U til�
dreaf Food H ithin Vnurn � .
-n "urullee Budget!
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Tree-Trimming
Party
Tuesday, December 2 4:30-5:30 p m
First Floor Mendenhall Lobby
Madrigal Dinners
December 3-6
ii
6:30 p.m.
AASC Multi-Purpose Room
The Money Pit"
December 4-7
Hendrix Theatre
Comedian
TODD YOHN
SGA TRANSIT
Applications
being taken for
drivers.
Experience in
transportation
required.
Apply at 228 Mendenhall
� �
They span the miles and the
years � and show you've remembered.
AMEfNSyGREETINGS
Amencard
The right card for that special person
STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
11 -
I

�1 v !?���' �. � .
: � ' -�� s �





III! i Vsl I KOt ININ
ECU Faces 'Cartes
In Orange Bowl
� scon COOPER
EC I although uist 2-8 on the
�v-iT- will be taking on the
'oil's top-ranked Miami Hur-
canes on Ihanksgiing night in
1 Grange Bowl.
I he Pirates have ahead) faced
ne of the nation's best com
ition and according to coach
Baker, ECU's biggest challenge
� emains ahead
'There's no question that this
the biggest challenge for our
am in a yeai which we've faced
hallenges ECU coach
Bakei "We've already
three teams which are go
i pla in post-season bowl
s (N v State. Auburn,
State) and now we're pla
the numbei one team in the
ntry.
"It there's an opportune time
the best team in the land.
would have to be now for us
kei added "We're coming off
ong performances at home
s we have both counted as
I here's no question that
best overall performance of
seas i was our win over Cin-
tti (Nov. 15)
10-0 Hurricanes are led by
l an .and;date Vinny
taverde, who surpassed the
O yard passing mark last
ek against Tulsa. Testaverde,
the season, has completed 175
n 276 attempts tor 2.55"
ds and 2r touchdowns. He has
rown nine interceptions.
iksgiving's game marks
� time ECl has played a
. iked team in the nation.
b iesi ranked 'earn the
eiosh faced w.ts
Florida Gators, who were
ked third in the country in
83 ECl also played Miami
the eventual na-
n.
- saftej Gary 1 on-
ion . ;rs the previous
(in 1983) and feels this
. � as ex-
b to be a challenge
i d We've played
. basically
same team with a new
� We've watched a lot
him (Testaverde).
to treat this
game
e'll pla loose �
tic iose I on-
don continued. "It's going to be
a pretty exciting game
Junior cornerback Ellis
Dtllahunt will team with I ondon
in the secondary and knowns the
talent of the potent Hurricane ol
fense.
"Thev probablv have the
number-one quarterback in the
nation in Testaverde. and he
should win the H ei s m an
1 r o p h . " D i 11 a h u n t said.
They've also got good receivers
and a big offensive line up there
to protect the quarterback
"Going into the game, we have
nothing to lose Dillahunt add-
ed. "I'll just go down there and
trv to have the best game I
possibly can against the number-
one team
With most of the attention on
the offense, Miami's defense is
somewhat overlooked, despite
two legitimate defensive All-
America candidates. Senior
tackle Jerome Brown leads the
line with 65 tackles while junior
free safety Bennie Blades leads
the Hurricanes with nine in-
terceptions.
ECU quarterback Charie
Libretto knows the Miami
defense is certainly powerful and
that preparation will play an im-
portant role in Thursday's con-
test.
"Personnel wise, they have
great athletes and a great secon-
dary libretto said. "Our
preparation prior to this game
will be a definite key for us.
"We definitely look at this
game as a chance to make a name
for ourselves We got a good
winlast week. We have got
some momentum going and 1
think we are going to be ready for
Miami Libretto said. "It has
been a tough season, but we have
all stuck togehter and that is what
is surprising about this
teamand we are determined to
make what we can out of this
season
The ECL Miami holiday mat-
chup will be televised nationally
bv the SuperStation W'TBS. Mel
Proctor and Paul Hornung will
handle the play-by-play and color
commentary for the game.
This marks the 15th time that
an ECL team has appeared on
regional or national television.
The Pirates hold a 6-8 record on
televised games, dating back to
19-2.
s
V
SuperStation
wras
MIAMI vs. EAST CAROLINA
November 27,1986 7 p.m.
Center Alma Bethea on) will be counted oh to help flU some of the
coring void caused by the loss of three Lady Pirate starters.
Sports
Classifieds
NOVEMBER 23, 1986 Page 8
It vjiU iot tt a Ttary Ttaitegivfrv
for- everybt'
Q 6 O
Swimmers Remain Unbeaten
B RICK McCOKMAC
I he men's and women's swim
teams remained perfect as both
squads won handily over in-state
rival LNC-Charlotte in Minges
Natatorium Saturday.
The men, currently 3-0,
defeated the 49er's 97 -71 . The
Lady Pirates defeated UNC-C bv
a 103-9? score.
leading the wav for the men
were juniors Andv Johns and
Patrick Brennan Both Johns and
Brennan swam on the winning
400-medley relav team along with
Kevin Hidalgo and Jeff Brown.
Johns also won the 200-meter
butterfly while Brennan captured
the 200-meter intermediate.
The Pirates also did well in the
freestyle events, as David Killeen,
Ronald Fleming and Steven Dean
all finished first in their events.
For the women, senior Caycee
Poust won two events. She was a
member of the victorious
400-meter medley relay team
along with Leslie Wilson, Jen-
nifer Dolan and Scotia Miller.
Poust also won the 200-meter
butterfly.
Shern Campbell also helped
the Pirates considerably, winning
both the one- and three-meter
diving events.
The next meet for the Pirate
swimmers will be today (Tues-
day), when both the men's and
women's teams will travel to
Washington D.C. to take on con-
ference foe American
University
Pirates In Lady Eagle Classic
Men's Summin
ECU 9- UNC-C 71
400-Medley Relav ECU (Hidalgo, Bren-
ner). Johns, Brown)
1000 Free: Dean 10:01 "9
200 Free: Killenn 1:49.01
50 Free: Fleming 22:51
200 1M: Brennan 2:02 52
200 F1 Johns 2 06
1-Meter Diving: Mauzan (ECU) 159 73
Women' Summin
ECU 103 UNC-C 93
400-Medlev Rela ECU (Poust. Wilson.
Dolan. Miller) 4:15.72
1000 Free: Patricia Olson 10 44 02
200 Free: Pam Wilbanks 2:93.9.45; Pat
Olsen (ECU) 2:01.73
50 Free: Patti Walsh (ECU) 25:95
200 IM: Robin Wicks 2 1" 38
1-Meter Diving Shern Campbell 1:47.30
200 Fly Poust 2:15.29
1-Meter Diving: Campbell I 59 9
SI Critical
Of ECU,
Top Powers
The ECU Pirate football
team got an inornate amount
of criticism from one of the na
tion's top sports publications in
the Nov. 24 issue of Sport. Il-
lustrated
The article, entitled "It only
hurts for a little while by
Rick Reilly frequently slams
the Piiates while offering
criticisms about the nation's
top football powers scheduling
weaker opponents for sure
wins.
One exerpt from the article
noted, "Macho scheduling is
out. Bake-sale scheduling is in
� a cupcake here, a creampuff
there. Bowling for bucksthe
money is too big to trv
anything else. And it's a
strategy that's limited only hv
the number of games Past
Carolina can play "
But wait, there's more
"And about the time you sit
down to Thanksgiving dinner,
Miami will be kicking off
against East Carolina. You like
the baked, stuffed or
mashed
Now are the Pirates really
that bad. After watching ECl
last week, we think not
Remember, Cincinnati almost
defeated Penn State (23-17).
Also, the Pirates stayed close to
the Hurricanes in last year's
contest before losing 27-15
while Miami slipped past E I
12-7 in '83.
We're not saying that the
Pirates are the favorite here,
but a little respect would be ap-
preciated.
Reilly finishes the story by
saying that fans shouldn't at-
tend games that are apparent
mismatches, and that there
should be a playoff to deter-
mine the true national cham-
pion.
In the final paragraph of the
story, Reilly could not resist a
parting shot at the Pirates as
thev prepare for No. 1 ranked
Miami. He said, "Changes
need to be made for the game's
sake. And if not for the game's
sake, at least for East
Carolina's
Hopefully, the only change
will be in Penn State's post-
season travel plans, as a Hur-
ricane loss would send Penn
State to the Orange Bow 1 with a
battle with Big-8 champion
Oklahoma.
Questions To Be A nswered
By TIM CHANDLER
V�ar sports ft
Several questions about the
state of Ladv Pirate Basketball
will be answered this Saturdav
when ECl tips off the 1986-87
season at the Lady Eagle Classic.
The tournament, which is be-
ing held at Georgia Southern Col-
lege, will showcase the Pirates,
Tulane, Georgia Southern and
perennial power South Carolina.
Among the questions to be
answered about this edition of
the Lady Pirates is how will they
adjust without the three leading
scorers from last year's team
(Lisa Squirewell, Sylvia Bragg
and Lorraine Foster).
Another question that has yet
to be answered is the condition of
the Delphine Mabry, the Pirates
hopeful starting point guard.
Mabry suffered an injury dur-
ing preseason practice drills and
it is not yet known whether the
injury is a stress fracture or not
according to Pirate head coach
Emily Manwaring.
The probable starting lineup
for ECU in its opener will be
returning starter Alma Bethea,
Monique Pompili, junior college
transfer Valerie Cooper, Pam
Williams and Mabry.
Manwaring stated that if
Mabry was unable to play that
she would be replaced in the
lineup by either Jody Rodriquez
or Chris O'Connor.
Manwaring went on to say that
freshman standout Irish
Hamilton, who suffered an in-
jury early in the practice season,
could also see considerable play-
ing time.
1986-87 Schedule
Nov
Dec
Jan
28 at Georgia Southern
Tournament (East
Carolina Georgia
Southern South Carolina.
Tulane)
29 at Georgia Southern
Tournament
2 Winnipeg
5 Lady Pirate Tournament
(East Carolina. East
Tennessee State.
Tennessee Tech. Manst)
6 Lady Pirate Tournament
9 Francis Marion
15 Cheyney
19 at Fairleigh Dickinson
21 at LaSalle
2 at Duke
3 American
8 North Carolina A&T
10 at Richmond
Feb
Mar
12 at William & Mary
17 at UNC-Wilmington
19 at UNC-Charlotte
24 George Mason
26 James Madison
28 Old Dominion
31 at American
2 at Howard
5 at North Carolina State
7 Richmond
9 William & Mary
12 South Carolina State
14 UNC-Wilmington
21 at George Mason
23 at James Madison
27 Colonial Tournament
Quarterfinals
28 Colonial Tournament
Semifinals
1 Colonial Tournament
Championship
"Depending on how fast Irish
gets her speed back � she could
also help us said Manwaring.
"She will see her first action
(since her injury) today in prac-
tice
"It's not a very predictable
situation now because of
the injuries we've had. He
have yet to have a practice
where all five starters have
played together
�Emily Manwaring
Manwaring said that it was
hard to say at this point just how
well the Pirates will play as a
team.
"It's not a very predictable
situation now because of the in-
juries we've had. We have yet to
have a practice where all five
starters played together said
Manwaring. "We've had three
intra-squad scrimmages and we
did not have all the starters for
any of those either
The Pirates, along with South
Carolina, will be the favorites in
the Lady Eagle Classic according
to Manwaring.
South Carolina took the title in
the Metro Conference last year
and gained a berth in the NCAA
tournament enroute to posting a
19-11 record, however, according
to Manwaring the Gamecocks
face much the same situation as
do the Pirates.
"They (South Carolina) face
much the same situation as we do
as far as losing players said
Manwaring. "They also lost their
three leading scorers from last
year
Tulane enters the tournament
hoping to get off to a good start
and a hopefully better record
than last year's J6-12 mark The
Green Wave however also lost i
lot of firepower from las; year's
team as they only return three ol
five starters.
Georgia Southern returns three
backcourt starters from last
year's 13-14 team, one of which is
Regina Daves, the New South
Conference play er-of-t he-year
last year.
Daves averaged 21 points and
nine rebounds a game last vear
and led the NCAA's in shooting
percentage with a sparkling 70 5
percent from the floor.
The Pirates first appearance at
home will beTues Dec 2 when
they take on the Universm of
Wnmpeg (Canada). The game is
scheduled for a 7:30 p.m. t.poff
in Minges Coliseum.
Sports Fact
Ik � ut0 Duran si�nifi� that
Ihe s had enough in the eighth
Iround. and Sugar Ray Uonard
regams the wdtereightTtne
infamous "No mas fuht in
I Leonard mngw � .
Idefea to Dunm, the onl7o�
f fakes on M��
�ffcr
m
n
'
P E R S Q N A i
lie Ep GOLDEN HEARTS
p m Please be at the house ai
,r your covered dish
IE R B A ' t
j Julia ar led 1
anted to sta E .
�n a drean- c�n e
pou fas oee the besl M
fho know ' (
et You a-
ie Things tOU sa . -
,a"fec to let yo - -
lali'ng too Love D a
room)
� �'and
GIRL
-
LOST
KAPPA estcrwed to i ne a a .ove You �ALPHA ��
ATTENTION ow aT Thf T r out Before fSTUDENTS -� � � .
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PEVA
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;ODD MURPH'
ertec' weexe
ad a � -
Jiaf"r
,NN W ' TRACE ' p
jpeii GooDer?
lO pi Here
ioseoa a���
ic A-e rf s, - -
yrg-vaBe-
lotfiers.
KE's ne,

iexi
Mne
,REG HAAGOOO
Ou'
;ocMa'i Gn
congratulations
� rS' cea yr � -
I y ou P t ec
tie s s'ers P -
DAWN - :
"aKsg .
ard
SORORITIES
cass of f�
thank v�
a success .
AZD s tot
501
wee�enc -
it's Sunk si ��XT T,rr
-a '05 PS H�- �
GAMVAALPHip.EDGEC
The time l
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ICONGR c o A DNS rc THE
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Pres.i Rusts,
Kao'ey S� ee - I
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B-j stor Felix I
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plorida Love
babv
OUG -
�eekenet Cv . � �
'a rea . � .
�nough to gc s ��
"0 ADPi AOP ALPHA
kLPHA XI DELTA CH
1ELTA SIGVA THETi DELTA
fETA TRI SIG s ' ZE '
kLPHA
�nc c eoges :� fa
a s s'e-s a hapj
rrtanxsgiV'ng a �
kLPHA PHI OMEGA BROTHERS
M lh� member!
- a Dean De 'a '
p eage C ass a
0u or we
fs'e ��,
p"� .si, a �
9 our pledge ce-
se A p o s
WANTED
'TOR NEEDED FOR B COG'
MO Ca a"e- 9 30
30 a m 752 4131
ST COCKER SPAN EL F
'uesoav n e E
pemae fea e a
tarc offeree 752 2634
kNTED Root
'Oor . , .
KS from caT S-
�s 3 utilities T51
IDE NEEDED S
IHetl fan needs a It 1 -
�r Anarx- I M
ana ottier necess ' ps
after i2 p eas.
1-6233 or 757 6366
FOMMATE WANTE r
rtirnate wonted
froom apt among
'ate -oorv anQ j B
jollities Can K - -v -�-
fNTED. ResDons b I
JPV house anc �eec
istmas break white
� 10 2. 757 2202 at'e � - �
f0r Sally Dunca-
ALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
MEDIATELY FOR SPR'G
STER 2 bed J M� a '
'carpeted, dishwase' p(K I
�rriShed Two Story COnOC S 9
SSO deposit k ul " C:
'nf0 call Leigh a' ?5J iOM
MATE NEEDED TO SHARE
!�ROOM APT $75 pe' montt
P utilities Can 7595"
f�r. call 752 6731
' �. I





f
J
1
SI Critical
Of ECU,
Top Powers
lil i
The
ary
tew
ar-
wn
ce.
i
71
� �
nswered
army
-
Jo
Sports Fact
lues. Nov. 25, im
Roberto Duran s.gn.f that
he s had enough In rhe eighth
round, and Sugar RaM.eonard
regains the welterweight m thc
infamous "No mas fight in
jhe New Orleans Superdorn
l?nar rcnges an earuer
defeat to Duran, the onlv 0nc
Jm his professional boxina
(career Leonard will perL
her his biggest cSJT2C
he takes on Manebufu
J
Classifieds
HI 1 AS! ' K' il INI si i t
P E R S O
N A L
, SS W TRACEY P
. ober?!
HOW 00 yOu
e s to anotl � �. pical
weeken - e�, we sury.vea
� - ' - ac eft our mark a
Be a a re of jew t
� s
The AID s
soc a
GREG HAWGOOD: Thank ,ou for
help during Dreary �
� � -�reg L "vd
- ATULATIONS: Mtr Oad
oe ng p Kappa Alpha's
We are so proua of
� Brothers Pledges anc . I
�� -s of P Kappa Alpha
DAWN �Hope . . ngyou have a ss yougreat Love.
-HIES Te Gamma pleoge "heta Chi would like to u for makmg our slave sale A specai thanks to the r buying the most pledges
ad a great time this
i Watch that 3 beer limit so
k s for you next time Love
P S Happy Thanksgiving!
GAMMA ALPHA PLEDGE CLASS
' e has come to show us what
Cut the shit, work harp, and
you want it1 !
ATULATIONS TO THE
EA TKE EXECUTIVE. Mark
ter Pres A.He CriscitH
Rusty SyKes Treas S
sec Lee Riddle Chap .
� e p Stephen Grubos
F � � Forbes Sgf a' Arms
PATRICK 46: Happ,
�sgiving ac Gooo Luck
L.ove your special frieno.
Tans for a wonderful
� Ov vay you re out of here
�a do tr riK t was warm
o go sw mm ng1
ADPi AOPi ALPHA PHI.
ALPHA XI DELTA, CHI OMEGA,
2EltA SIGMA THETA, DELTA
ZETA TRI SIG s ' ZETA TAU
pHt The Junior Panheilenic
jes of fan '86 would like to
s s'ers a happy and safe
� . . ng holiday1
DHA PHI OMEGA BROTHERS:
"� e members of the James
Dean Deita Theta X. Fall
ige Class would like to thank
Aeicoming us mto your
ty now our fratern ty
- � . XI all for your support dur
z edge period We are proud
A Ph. O'S"
WANTED
'TOR NEEDED FOR BIOLOGY
Cal after 9 30 p m or Defore
� m 752 4131
ST COCKER SPANIEL PUPPY:
"jesaay in the Elm St area
ide female with blue collar
'z offered 752 2636
wanted Roommates to share 2
room, fully furnished apt 5
OCks from campus S95 a month
1 Mes 752 1908
j"DE NEEDED: Non psychotic
(Weft fa needs a lift to Richmond,
� Annapolis, Md Will help with
las ana other necessities Can leave
�"�- after 12 Please call Pat at
� 6233 or 757 6366
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male
mmate wanted to share 2
bedroom apt among 3 people
r ate room and $110 a month plus
' Mes Call Kevin 752 7559
WANTED Responsible student to
cupy house and feed dogs over
r stmas break while dorms are
'�sed 10 2. 757 2202, after 5 758 0637
A for Sally Duncan
PEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
'MEDIATELY FOR SPRING
SEMESTER 2 bed , 2 ' 7 bath, air,
fuHy carpeted, dishwasher, pool, ful
ly furnished Two story condo $150
rmt. $50 deposit, utilities For
more mfo call Leigh at 752 1088
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE
3 BEDROOM APT $75 per month
flus '3 utilities Call 756 9577, if no
answer, call 752 6731
SIG EP GOLDEN HEARTS The
' ner H TONIGHT at
� ' ease be at the house at 6 30
ouroerea dish'
Mt�B When you invited us to drink
a wanted to leave, but i
wanti (1 stay Ever since then it's
a dream come true Meeting
has been the best thing yet And
� ws now much better it will
nake me feel special with
��� �� tgs you say and do i just
1 let you know, l think I'm
too Love, Dianne
PI KAPPA ALPHA. You have
� wed to me a great honor and
�� ' I w.H treasure forever'
All! Miti
ATTENTION STUDENTS Happy
�' " ' r�vern Tues Let's blow
� re turkey day The Alpha
'DO MURPHY Here s to a
� weekend with a perfect da'e
. j fantastii time n � .
ROOMMATE WANTED: Walking
distance to campus, own room
unifies, phone' rent if interested,
Please call 758 9250
GIRL ROOMMATE NEEDED
Starting spring semester Furnished
apartment Will have own bedroom
Rent S S131 43 a month including
.able Please contact stacey at
752 2589 Wilson Acres is the loca
tion
LOST: DEATH IN VENICE
videotape 11 16 at Mendenhall $20
REWARD No questions asked.
Please return to Sunshine Video or
John at 308A Scott 758 8492
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
To share 3 br townhouse
Washer dryer, pool, close to cam
Pus $150 month plus '4 utilities
758 0845
BABYSITTER NEEDED PART
TIME: Once or twice a week! Needs
transportation Fee is neg Prefer a
nursmg student or Home Ec
reiated but not mandatory! Call
758 8569 after 5 30 p m during week
ano anytime during weekend
LOST Late October Small (30 lb.)
?emale dog short, straight, black
hair except brown around forehead
and calves distinguishing white
area on nose and chest Reward of
�preo for information 757 3666
SALE
KATZ PERSONALIZED COM
PUTER DATING SERVICE An
"ounces the opening of a new club in
addition to its regular club Because
of the large response from PROFES
SlONAL SINGLES we w.ll have a
separate club for those people in
terested in meeting other profes
sionals Call 355 7595 or write to P O
Box 8003 Greenville NC 27835
ALL TYPING NEEDS: Lowest
rates on campus include pro
ofreadmg spelling and gram
matical corrections Over 10 years
experience Call 757 0398 ano leave
message or call after 5 15 pm
CHEAP TYPING Reports etc Call
Anne at 752 3015 and leave a
message
TERM PAPERS TYPED $15 per
term paper, no matter how long your
paper runs Proofreading done free
of charge You supply your work and
a couple of pages of typing paper, I'll
supply the work 752 0212, between
3 6, any day but Sunday
CARTOON CARICATURES Make
Great Christmas Presents! Call
752 5910 or write "The Cartoon Shop,
1102 Monroe St, Greenville, NC
27834 "
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT For
rent m Bryton Hills $250 a month.
Call after 9 30 p m or before 9 30
a m 752 4131
TUTORING: Need help for your
algebra 1063 or Physics 1050 final ex
ams' Experienced tutor offering
study sessions Sign up at office
C 405 Biology
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Experienced gual'ty work,
IBM Selecfnc typewriter Call Lame
Shive 758 5301
FREE CENTRAL HEATING AND
AIR CONDITIONING. COLD AND
HOT WATER. AND CABLE TV
These spacious 2 bedroom, fully
carpeted apartments are located
lust a few feet east of the 10th & Elm
St intersection Abundant parking,
on premises laundry facilities and a
full time maintenance mechanic for
this 24 unit complex bordering the
creek and overlooking the park
BEFORE YOU RENT KNOW
WHAT YOU'RE BUYING1 Beverly
Manor Apartments, 1108 E 10th St
756 5156
TYPING: low rates Proofreading,
grammatical corrections 10 years
experience 757 0398 after 6 p.m.
TYPING. Done on a word processor
with letter quality printer Years of
experience typing for students and
many more years of secretarial ex
penence that can fulfill all your
secretarial needs 50.000 word die
tionary and thesaurus, and profes
sional proofing for grammatical er
rors Low student prices, call Debbie
at 355 7595
KATZ PERSONALIZED COM
PUTER DATING SERVICE: Can
help you find that someone special
with whom to spend the holidays
Whether you want a serious rela
tionahip or just to meet many new
friends we can help Everything con
fidential and all referrals personally
given 355 7595
FOR SALE: Large couch in good
condition Asking $75 Call Karen at
7 58 6462
CAROLINA GULF
1201 Dickinson At
752-7270
Do Ii With Us � He P i 4 Dt
B MC (.1 If SOHili Mltl'
KINGSTON1 FLAG
i 1
2 Bedroom 2 Bath Fully Fi
Dishwasher, Ice Maker, Di
Silverware, Cookware, All Line
Desks, Large Closets, Mail
Laundromat, and Swimmmq p
758-5393
Pizza inn
For pi3 out it's Pizz
$2.00 Off Any Large
$3.00 Off Any Giant
Eat In Or Take Out
Phone 758-6266
The Zenith Z-158 Enhanced PC
It beats all-nighters.
Get some shut-eye with the help of this Zenith Personal
Computer now at a Special Student Price!
Everyone brags about them, but no one really likes all-mqhters Es-
pecially when you consider the alternatives sleep parties romance
But now you can finish your classwork in no time with the speedy Zenith
Z-1b8 Enhanced PC now yoLrs at great savings'
The IBM PC XT-Compatible Zenith Z-158 Enhanced PC
Finish your classwork faster with the Z-158 PC. featuring
� Compatibility with virtually all IBM PC" software
� Greater internal expandability
' Sl,hPe,aClfDrCevSTn9 that of,ers a resP�nse time up to 60 faster
man ine idM KC X I
� And up to 20 megabytes of storage
Dual Drive
������
Hard Disk
S999.00 S1.399.00 '

So don t lose any sleep over your classwork qet .
Enhanced PC today at
Taft Office Supply
752-2175
Special Student Prices are also available on these other exciting Zenith Personal Computers
Zenith 2-148 Desktop PC
'IBM PC compatibility
Single Drive
Special Student Price $750.00
Suggested retail pnr� i ?gg 00
Dual Drive
Special Studenl Price S999.00
Si iqqested retail price 1499 00
� ' ng o�er good . � ; , . brectly trom
�'� " �" ' '� ' �' -� ' . sludPnK lai-jilv and statt
lor thew own use No otner discounts apply i im,i .
imputer and one monitor pei individual m any
'? month penod PflCI ' �� ' I ���
Zenith Z-171 Portable PC
'TwoS . drives "Less than 15 lbs
Special Student Price
Suggested retail price
$999 00
SP399 00
Zenith Z-248 Advanced PC-
IBM PC at- compatitxiitv
Single Drive
Special Student Price
Suggested retail price
Hard Disk
Special Student Price
Suggested retail pr.ee
$1.599 00
52.999
$2.299 00
Zenith ZVM 1220 Monochrome
Monitor
. � � � SQ
. about
TftflTH
data
systems
rm QUALITV cots is BfFORl IMt AM CO�S ON

1






1

t ��
,v
'
Intramural Recreation Action
It U.3C 1 L
, as a rather cool and damp
affrnooii last Tu� No. 18th,
bul at did not kccr the turkey.
trotters awav'
TL
. e department of
lntramura! Recreational Services
sponsored their annual turle
trot Whai is a turkey trot you
ma ask" A turke trot is a two-
mi'e run. The catch is that it is
team oriented. Four people run
this two miie course as a team. At
the end of the race the tour in-
dividual times are added together
and the team with the lowest
Cumulative time is declared the
winner.
The first male participant to
cross ine finish line was Barr
Scott, from the Yuk team, with a
time oi 10:14. The first female
across the finish line was Nanc
Eiehner with a time of 12:56.
Eichner was running as part of a
co-roc team called Spur of the
Moment
There were three divisions
(men. women and co-rec). "he
awards were not the usual in-
tramural awards, but rather ap-
propriate for this time o year.
Fast Carolina Dining Services.
under the direction o( ane
Modn, furnished the winning
teams in each division with
turkeys for each person on the
team. Second-place teams were
also acknowledged with pumpkin
pies. The top teams in each divi-
sion were:
Men's Division; First place,
The Sports Staff and
The East Carolinian
would like to wish
everyone a happy
Thanksgiving.
Remember to turn on the
television after that big
feast.
Sincereh,
uk with a combined time of
46:16
Members ol that team included
Wood) ratman, Mark Taylor,
Barr Scott and Mat! lea. Se-
cond place went to Sigma Phi Fp-
silon "A who beat Pi Kappa
Alpha onl b 13 seconds, with a
combined time of 49:40.
Members of the Sig Ep team in-
cluded I re Johnson, Zamil Sid-
diqi. Tim Fullowan and Mike
Honnon.
Women's Division; First place,
T KF I ittle Sisters with a combin-
ed time of 61:05. Members of
their team were Jennie Halstead,
Jeannine Sles, JeniferHarrell and
Margaret Wirt. Second place
went to Alpha Phi with a combin-
ed time of "2:13. Members of the
team included Melanie Williams,
Jacqueline Kartchner, Christ)
Bennett and Karen Klinedinst.
Co-Rec Division; lust place
w�H to Spur of the Moment with
a combined time of SS:20
Members of that team included
aul Myers, Tom Davis, nancv
Jner, and Claire O'Connor,
second place went to Umstead
terminators with a combined
lme of 65:06. Members of the
earn included Tim Castelloe,
Uon Perry, Nancy Pederson and
fctarcy Frazier.
Congratulations to all winners!
'hanks is extended to all par-
"Cipants as well as East Carolina
uimng Services for making this
k- trot a successful event
Racquetball
Tournament
l he racquetball singles tourna-
ment concluded Thur Nov. 20
with some very good matches be-
ing played. The winners were
Kim Swinger in the women's divi-
seafood House and Oyster Bar
Popcorn Shrimp
i S
j
-
T

w
'(!�
th rjroiina
Past RiverbluffApts.)
Hours 4:30-9:30 MonSat
NWLY REMODELED -
"Greenville's Finest Bakery for over 63 yean"
815
Dickinson
Avenue
1
, i
Uf
(U&
id
' -

h-
BlJ Family Owned & Operated
0"Within Walking Distance From
Girl's Dorm
ST Baked Fresh Daily
I KfVies
j m4 Chocolate lemon apple peach
French apple sweet potatoe lemon
custard blueberry coconut custard
i pecan
Sf Cakes Carrot spice butternut chocolated
caramel pineapple rum banana german
chocolate
Decorated cakes for all occasions

&&&&&&&&&
i
RACK ROOM
branded shoes
Greenville Buyers Market
Memorial Dive
OPEN MON-SAT 10-9
SUNDAY 1-6
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
10�c
O OFF
Our Everyday Low Price
(Except Aigner, N,ke and Reebok)
Droft Nite
Tuesday, October 25, 1986
9:00-1:00 A.M.
Admission: $1.50 Guys $1.00 Ladies
10 DRAFT
I ALL NITE

sion, Patrick Ricci in the men's
intermediate and Mike Graves in
the men's open division.
The best match of the tourna-
ment came in the men's in-
termediate finals. Patrick Ricci
was pitted against David
McEwan. The first game was
closer then the score indicated as
both playes were just getting
warmed up. Ricci won this game
15-2. The second game, however,
was probably the best game of
the tournament. McEwan led
most of the way and it looked as
though he would win easily, but
Ricci came roaring back with
some good defensive play and a
nasty serve that tied the score at
14 all. After exchanging serves,
McEwan finally came out on top
17-15. Ricci served the tie-
breaker game and built an insur-
mountable lead that McEwan
couldn't overcome. The final
score was 11-5.
The first place winners each
received IM Champion T-shirts
and the second place finishers
won ECU-Pirates mugs. These
finishing in second were: Jill Mau
women's division; Jim
Bolognesi - men's open and
David McEwan - men's in-
termediate.
Congratulatins to all the par-
ticipants who made this tourna-
ment a success, and we will see
you in the doubles tournament
next spring.
CAROLINA CRISIS
PREGNANCY CENTER
1 1 1 East Third StreetThe Lee Building
Greenville, North Carolina
Free Pregnancy TestConfidential
Counseling
All Services and referrals are free of charge
The Center is open Tuesdays from 10 2,
Wednesdays and Thursdays from 10 5 and by
appointment For an appointment or more
information, call 24-Hour Helpline 757-0003
YOU'LL LOVE OUR
SUNRISE SERVICE.
Are you the eorty bird type who likes to stay
ahead of the mod morning rush? Well. Kinko s
is open extra early just for you Copying,
collating, binding and more
kinko
�n early Open late openi
Monday Fnaa � SaurQay
lOOOpm -Ofi-S 9 3tor 6 00pm
'00am
C
Greenville's Only Premium Quality
Cleaners Since 1935 .
Expires Dec. 31, 1986
Laundered Shirt Special
5 for $2.99
OR
Have 2 Pair of Pants Cleaned
3rd Pair Cleaned FREE
Coupon must he presented vxith incoming order
752-2131
Corner of 10th & FvHns
OCJRE
WORTH
GOLD
A FREE $50 NECKLACE
WHEN YOU BUY I4K GOLD
Reward yourself with a 14K gold ArtCarved ring, and we'll give
you a $50 necklace, free.
Our Representative is on campus with distinguished traditional and
contemporary styles � each backed by a Full Lifetime Warrants
1RTQ1RVED
X. CLASS RINGS
December 3, 4, & 5 from 9-4
Representative at the Student Stores





Title
The East Carolinian, November 25, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 25, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.511
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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