The East Carolinian, November 20, 1986






�he �a0t (Earnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.l No.23
Thursday, November 20, 196
, N.C.
If
12,
University History
Author Receives Award
B TOBI FERGUSON
Staff Wttai
During North Carolina's an-
nual Culture Week, Mary Jo
Bratton, professor and director
of graduate studies in history at
ECU, received the first runner-up
award in the Willie Parker Peace
History Book competition of the
NC Society of County and Local
Historians for excellence in the
w nhngs of East Carolina I niver-
sity: The Formative Years
1907-1982.
Bratton was presented the
award at the society's dinner in
Raleigh on Nov. 8th. Various
organizations from North
Carolina participated in this
weeks activities including the NC
Poetry Society, the NC State
I iterary Society, the Historical
Association, NC Society of
County and Local Historians, the
Victorian Society, and others.
According to Bratton awards
are given during the week for
various categories of books that
have been published during the
year
The Willie Parker Peace
History Book award is presented
annuallv to give special recogni-
tion to NC writers who have
published a book about a NC
county, institution, or individual.
The society was organzied in 1941
for the purpose of collecting and
preserving North Carolina
history, traditions and folklore
not only on a statewide basis but
also on a local and countv basis.
According to Bratton, the
writing of East Carolina Univer-
sity: The Formative Years
1907-1982 was initiated as plans
were being formulated to
celebrate the 75th anniversary of
ECU in 1982. Bratton said, "And
so, as we were looking to that
milestone, a number of people in
the administration and othe
said that it would be very good if
we had a history. Of course, we
could not have an instant history
ready before the 75th anniver-
sary, but those were the cir-
cumstances in looking forward to
that celebration that inspired the
idea
Bratton was selected to com-
pile and write the history through
an administrative decision. Brat-
ton commented on this challenge,
"It was a real pn liege to work
with so many people. I was very
impressed with our history. I was
not as familiar as I think most
people have not been with the
whole narrative, the whole focus
of our history over the years and
what an outstanding institution
East Carolina was from its earliest
period. So, I was both pleased
and delighted to see the sort of
heritage we do have
To compile the necessary data
for her book, Bratton did
research on campus and in
Raleigh at the State Archives
where a majoritv of records of
state institutions are kept.
Bratton substantiated this in-
formation with personal inter-
views. She interviewed approx-
imately 75 people who had been
knowledgeable about ECU at
one nme or another
According to bratton, many
interviewees were alumni from
the earlier years. One person in-
terviewed was a member of the
first graduating class. The fur-
therest Bratton travelled to inter-
view was to Florida where a
faculty member had retired. She
said he was extremely
knowledgeable about cir-
cumstances and events that took
place in the 1940s on the campus.
Bratton said, "I tried to select
representative people, not all
from any one period, but a sam-
ple from different student
generations through the years.
All of them shared one thing in
common: a real deep love and af-
fection for the institution
Major historical events of East
Carolina are portrayed in Brat-
ton's book. According to Brat-
ton, these include the glorious
days of Robert Wright who was
the first president of East
Carolina and who was so careful
and concerned that everything he
did be accomplished in a proper
manner as to establish the right
traditions for East Carolina; the
traumatic circumstances surroun-
ding the imprisonment of the se-
cond president in the 1940s for
the embezzlement of student
funds which caused a split of
loyalties within the faculty,
students, and community; to the
excitement of the transition from
college to university status in the
1960s and the establishment of
the East Carolina University
Medical School.
Bratton commented further,
"One thing was not an event but
a continuity of the institution
(which) from the time of its foun-
ding, was it's reaching out to
serve the region, not just being an
educational institution, but see-
ing it's function as one to
enhance the quality of life for the
people within the region. That
(goal) has been a consistent trend
that each head of the institution
has very consistently followed
To compile the necessary data
for her book, Bratton did
research at the East Carolina
campus and in Raleigh at the
State Archives where a majority
of records of state institutions are
kept.
Bratton substantiated this in-
formation with personal inter-
views. She interviewed approx-
imately 75 people that had been
knowledgeable about East
Carolina at one time or another.
According to Bratton, many
interviewees were alumni from
the earliest years. One person in-
terviewed was a member of the
first graduating class. The fur-
therest Bratton travelled to inter-
view was to Florida where a
faculty member had retired. He
was extremely knowlegeable
about circumstances and events
that took place in the 1940's on
the campus.
J a HUMBERT� Tin ��.o!0 L��
Ouchless?
The second blood drive of the semester, co-sponsored b SRA and
Pizza Hut. ended Wednesday.
Lecturer Focuses On World Hunger
By VIRCIMA 1.1V INt.hiON
S��ff Vkrllrr
Dispelling the myths of hunger
was the focus of a speech given
by Joseph Collins Tuesday.
Collins is the co-director of
Food First, an Institute for Food
and Development. His work with
Food First has taken him to
Nicarragua, the Phillipines and
other third world countries. This
has given him first-hand ex-
periences with the causes of
hunger.
Collins said that Americans
believe that hunger is caused by:
not enough food in countries,
over population and lack of
technology in third world coun-
tries.
He said that if grain was the
only food considered there is
enough in the world today to pro-
vide 3600 calories for every man,
women, and child in the third
world. This is grain alone; not
other forms of food. Collins said
these Figures should convince
people that there is enough food.
He said that 60 percent of the
hungry are in such countries as
India, Indonesia and Brazil and
all of these countries produce
food for export.
The audience was visibly
shocked to hear how Indian
military forces guarded the grain
so the poor could not take it. He
said that rats were more increased
at those airfields.
Collins said African nations,
such as Ethiopia and Sudan,
where pictures of the famine stir-
red the American conscious
about hunger, were exporters of
grain.
Collins said the idea of the
world's high population con-
tributing to hunger was not true.
In countries where hunger was
prevalent, families had no
economic security so many
children had to become apart of
the labor force. Collins said in
Cuba and other countries "types
of reforms were set up to increase
the security of at least half of the
population which had led these
countries away from hunger.
Also, American farm
technology is not the way to help
alleviate hunger, according to
Collins.
Collins said usually the only
farmers who can afford the
technology are the elites (farmers
who use he poor as farm labor).
These clue farmers take 2 bushels
of every 3 bushels that the
sharecroppers produce. Accor-
ding to Collins, in situations
where the government does re-
quire poor farmers to invest in
technology, the farmer usually
ends up in debt and has to
remember to stay at resistance
level.
The final myth that Collins
discussed was the idea that
America's standard of living
would decline if the standard of
living in third world countries
would increase.
Collins said the amount of
money the U.S. spends in buying
products from third world
govenments to keep their market
below poverty level is equal to the
amount of money Americans
save by buying cheaper goods
that are made in these countries.
After presenting these views,
Collins began to talk about the
reasons of hunger.
Collins said the root cause of
hunger came from unfair practice
in the use of food resources. He
said "Government budgets skew-
ed the programs to benefit elite
farmers
According to Collins, it is the
elite farmer in third world coun-
tries that prevent reform from
coming about. He said farmers
benefit from having the masses of
people in their country remain
poor and hungry because they
will work for the lowest possible
wages.
In countries where land reform
takes place, farm owners will
often evict tenant farmers so they
do not have to comply to rules
dealing with tenants. This in-
creases the number of people w ho
are landless and without a means
of supporting themselves.
Collins said another contribu-
tion to the hunger problem,
which is not usually viewed as a
problem, is US foreign aid.
US aid, according to Collins,
usually doesn't go to feed the
poor and does not go to countries
who favor land reform.
Program Honors
Early Graduates
By THERESA ROMNSKI
Staff w rttcr
A program and reception is
planned for all 1986 summer
and fall semester graduates on
Saturday Dec. 6, at 10 a.m.
The program is not a com-
mencement or graduation
ceremony, and no degrees,
honors, or awards will be con-
ferred. Caps and gowns are not
to be worn.
"The reason for the pro-
gram said C.C. Rowe, chair-
man of the Commencement
Committee, "is to show ap-
preciation and recognition for
the students' completed
work
"The program does not take
the place of the commencement
exercise, but many are unable
to return in May for the
ceremony. With this program
at least the students gain some
recognition said Rowe.
The program will last ap-
proximately 30 minutes and
will feature guest speakers:
John M. Howell, chancellor;
Angelo Volpe, vice-chancellor
for Academic Affairs; Bryan
Lassiter, senior class president;
and Jeff Parks, class vice presi-
dent.
All friends and family are in-
vited to join the graduates in
this program that will be held
in Wright Auditorium.
"The program is a great op-
portunity for students to
recieve the recognition they
deserve after having worked so
hard to earn their degree said
Lassiter.
If anyone has any further
questions about the program,
they may can contact C.C.
Rowe in Whichard.
Achievement Week Held By Group
By LESLEY DEES
Staff W liter
The Omega Psi Phi fraternity
is held its 3rd annual Achieve-
ment Week Nov. 10-16 in honor
of its 75th year as a worldwide
organization.
Founded on Nov. 17, 1911,
Omega Psi Phi now has 75,000
minority members across the
world and 49 participants at
ECU, all of which maintain a
grade point average of 3.0 or bet-
ter.
"Our goal is to stimulate the
attainment of high ideals in
academics and to acknowledge
students who possess these
qualities said Vincent Peele,
senior student, public relations
director and chaplain of Omega
Psi Phi.
The week of Nov. 10-15 was a
prepatory week for Sunday, Nov.
ON THE INSIDE
�� mw awvftt Tk Boy Who
wf Could Fly, pmlawai �� 9m
1 ENT1XT AINMENT pt�.
2 �Frigiy mamkotkoM

,M
As a conclusion to their Achievement Week, Omega Psi Phi inducted new
ceremony held Sunday.
members daring a
16, which ended achievement
week with a grand finale of quest
speakers, ceremonies and special
award presentations held in
Jenkins Auditorium.
Guest speaker, Ronald Speier
spoke on the need for uplifting
minority students in continuing
their education. Also Larry Hines
talked of the importance of conti-
nuing education in today's socie-
ty.
The ECU Gospel Choir, which
was at the ceremony as entertain-
ment, was awarded the most
outstanding minority organiza-
tion on campus.
Awards were also presented to
two citizens who have con-
tributed their time and efforts for
outstanding service to the com-
munity.
This years recipients were
Rosie Thompson, a former
member of the ECU women's
basketball team and D.D. Gar-
rctt, the president of the Green-
ville Chapter of NAACP.
Omega Psi Phi recognized
three students from D.H. Conne-
ly High School and Rose High
School in areas of academic and
artistic excellence with awards.
John Little, vice president of
Omega Psi Phi captured for the
second year the title of Omega
Man of the year. An outstan-
ding minority student of the year
award went to Deborah
Williams, a senior with a 3.7
grade point average.


piy z'
� Aii�h��.
.����, i � ��
rf�M.���,i�- �.a.jfe.





tASl xv
n s
NOM Mrt N .
Intramural Team Goes To Championships
VBuremu Nationa Collegiate Fla Football rr�t.r. ,s- i . ,
I ruve sm
� annual
a ed s:i: a
ncn e, I v c
a N :Takf
-��:� 1-c-s ani to p �
s - Bowl
� 5 -U v:ha a id
: - are one ol 56
� �� 'N j: ECU thai to
s ttramuraJ spon In
� - ai season, which ended
v 1 n forcers dazzled
' ; �ith e-jv- and
ed he season
V d
Nv'u � -� - is hampion-
- epa ing for the
Na: ona �. ollcgiate Raj Football
Champions hips. Dec 27-31. in
New Orleans It the win there
against about V other coUeges
and universities they'll he
featured at halt time during the
Sugar Bv. same Jan 1
"We're realh excited about
our chances to win the tourna-
ment in New Orleans this vear
vaid Jill Contarino, a senior from
I ynchburg. a . and the team's
captain
"Our team is strongei and
fastei than last year's team she
said n 1985 the Enforcers
finished 12th among the schools
thai participated ai the tourna
ment which is held annual!) at
the University of New Orleans
Contarino said the Enforcer
scored an average ot five
touchdowns i game and gave up
nist three touchdowns dining the
seat 1 hen effective passing at
tack and strong defense is the k.ev
to then success
The team relies on the quick
and accurate passing arm of
quarterback lain a Bellos of
Goidsboro Bellors. who joined
the team this season, spent six
ears in the An Force before
enrolling at ECU She likes to
move her team bv throwing short
passes to middle and sideline
receivers
On defense. Contarino said the
team is -ac bv a fast defensive
front line called the �'killer
bees ' rhetl stiategv is to Mil:
the quarterback On most plavs
the defensive line tushes in takes
the Hag belt ot the opposing
quarterback almost as svvn as the
ball is snapped
In flag football plaveis weai
bteakawav belts with three flags
Ol stieameis hanging from each
Side and the hack Instead of
tackling the plavei with the ball.
the player's belt is grabbed bv the
streamers and removed
�Vlso m flag football a team can
field onlv seven plaveis at a tune
I he plavmg held is divided into
tour 20 vaid ones - team must
gam at least 20 vaids in foui
plavs cm give up possession of the
football
1 he v I Depa
Intramural Recreational Services
is providing transportation and
entiv tees foi the men's and
women's teams competing a: the
tournament In Midtuon team
members aie involved tn a
nuuibei of fund laising pt
selling donuts aA washing �a.
to pav foi tfieu n ip
Piane biamson ! Puifiam,
who is coordinating tfie earns
fund laisiug activities, uud thai
neailv "SI .iHX1 will fv needed to
pa, foi food diut lodging foi the
10 III women plaveis m New
Oi leans "It would tv gi rat II �r
could find a sponsor vhe said
In Addition to v iMitai mo,
Helios and -ttanisou, ihei
s. �h �� Mi N : 3. � v
NI a a i� a �� a v'
i ftuiei Ma sa
N lUoil a
ioldvboi I
� � a '� � .
IXm't
xn naflirv .
leaw onh
tiXt prints.
Announcements
tSttc least (flarulfnfon
3PERATIV E
EDUCATION
ea .v
OPERATIVE
EDUCATION
Nl - N Pos
si If
I
. pgara -v
v. �
PHI BETA SIGMA
. I
EC IX ��

I DENTS FOR
Hi MIC DEMOCRACY
iSED'
- ' �
� �
COUNSELING
CENTER
ST RE &S MAN AGE ME N � � s-
� ' � x DA "r . fx ig , v . as
��� ape � ' �.�.�� s :� � ��. r " a' U)
� " t �l v I. I �f. .�, Ifl . 'rr �r
I � � WOT! t rtfip yOl �' .1- � � ' �. r
i � H v� go tn�mi .� M.�. y� r v
.� � �� tnc �� c � v xt rhi� � � ��' .v �
n � �ivf ��v In hndv tod
CO) 1 r" .V. I - MOT An' �
.s j n. �-�;� � s np . ia ��
r rt 0j Htm
' � I M s
WAIN ENTRANCI I Count ifl C� t�
1 n r r South i MVrtghi
LUTHERAN STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
� .�� � Radavm ��� � � r.
: � � l � � r �� .1' v ,
'�v, v XOt - 'Si .v- ��� � ���, �
FALL SEMESTER
1V87 STUDENT
TEACHERS
� Ot I . a ' Vi � ig hj tl '
1 � .� - 1 �'��. �
�� . � . n .i i � ationai �� ,� stuOeni
� '� -��' re D� S. I�M bv ca
r��cai� w be give - an a. )
- W7l �� - � am to 4 ISp m CAli
' - S -���' N7MEN1 BEFORI
"1 Dl � Nl Dl I MBI R IS ku

The Rum Runner Dive
Shop Inc.
2717 East 10th Street
Dive in the beautiful Florida Keys
January 4th-9th
�s: Five days and nights, lodging, hill
two tank boat dive daily, one night
rkel with the dolphins, & more.
all 758-1444 for more information.
SOLIOATED
EATRES
All Seats $2.00 Everyday "Til 5:30 PM ,
(smsmm
oi i
"A
DEI I A PI
idv Itda H

SOI I MAN
Held 0er' ViA),
H RQR Presents: A special Sneak
Preview Thursday Nov. 20th. All
seats Only 94C 9:30 p.m.
FIREWALKER
Starts Tomorrow!
CHUCK NORRIS LOUGOSSETT
.w 191
ECU MENS
RUGBY CLUB
nembtn try tnyorr� ,fe' r'�� � pi av 'W'
J "r tv( ng I ve rHMrting M :r
�r (9 TrHirt 1 j' i� � Q0 p � I e tvc
nnl ol ftrWtrtoi a n a � vr i1�r��lM
� c-v fl OT rf�� ��� -o t" eak '� p o "r
B�n�m� txn i'v-j rh� Ruotra wok .�
Kr fo tr � luppon�r� .�� r� MM 0�i
vr.1 aVOfl
CORAL REEF
DIVE CLUB
i .�"c v 'fir meeting or I hui w.i, NO (0
� �' Mendenfial �' � ,v m b � r
H naj pa and � da d m otn nr
Holidays All .ncf. .tip plea artend
PRE f'ROFFSSIONAl
HFAITHAU I ANt I
r f r f�
M3 'C .1 a r
Frioav '
u' � ai
� ��a ra
�� me . .
i e v e- V .�
S
v ecM
� �.� SV .
ivpporl i
Stcv c t olmai I I � . �
il� ri (i si it i; KepiiM iiijin i ��
iiik 1 eigh Mallon
Strc M
IHM'I D t K I IMM.
GAMMA BE I A PHI
'f r t-r � jr � r 3 it awl i
Mtfn� oom �t . r
" I �' i' � vat � h! ' j' '
b m y Ou r f ood t O ff� r t Oix1 � v c P t��
�� Iff
atf � �� .
Founda

( K(M IN V
illlHH MiHKIIMSi. Kltv
l"SSH� IN
- �� �M �
��.
BACCHUS
� ' NU5 Bootl rig a . ohol I i m�i . ncern -o rne 'ir.i m a) un c � Student! � rig � ,r, , ��ECU CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIPIII MM ss i H i; Mon.l 1 .i.l 10 � ill s t, llt
neetinglor a � emoei tend pi apei I .n K,�m �.� Mendenhall riturj Not �tl (i 00 i ��� . tr� it au Meaion Khed ed rot Not :ii �!��, � Piae�� 'S3 �J31 io make p .a n � attendrne EC I � i' a '��� � , i 'i le L it be t - km a � evivel in Jenkm Auditoi N ii 1 p � , empul ir. r v � � a' . .I'MIIM s1f.N N H
YOUR ONE
STOP PLACE TO
SHOP FOR:
25 Money Orders
10C Copies
24 Hour Convenience
Quality � Selection � Price
For Your
Convenience We
Sell US Postage
Stamps.
Clue
KROGER 6 CT
English Muffins or
Brown (n Serves
3119
Pkg� X
��
1 ' ' ' Ii . � . i . � �
i i t i . i i � i
� ' ' ' i i i i i i i �
� � � . . i � , ,
i i i ,
� �illilillllll
I II I I I 1 I
I I I I I I H I
1 I � i
i � ,
I I
� ��III
II I I I I I 1 I
Bllllllil
i l � i i i � . ,
� � I I t I
�i �
I l l � . i i i
1 I l I I l I I 1
111111
I 1 � I 1 I 1 I
I 1 I I I I I I
� i . i i . . . .
I 1 �
111
I IGMT OR DARK
BROWN OR
Dixie Crystals
10 X Sugar
O
���� i
�.�.���.�.�.�.�.�.�.�.�.�:�:�:���:�,�:��.��.�.�.�.
I I I Ml I I I I I i i in . . . ?�'�����
t I 1 I I I ! I I I lit . ' '
�lllllllllllll
� ����������.�
� �inn Him
I � � 1 � I t � � � I I (
� llllllll III
lllllllllllll
� � i i . . ,W �
.�lllllllllllll . A
' � � � � �ff
lllllllllllll,
lllllllllllll
llllllll
' 111!
lllllllllllll,
� llllll,
O
Ho.
29
ASSORTED
TOPPINGS
Totlno's
Pizza. .
I IMM Wl III
till ADO I
I'lllK MAM
HI I HI MIN(
New
Coke
iiiii
� 111 � � i
� � i .
i ii
Ull
69
16
Ol
Pkg
99
ASSORT I I)
NABISCO
Snack
Crackers
10
Oj
I'dij
$-29
I HOCK. ANA
Orange
Juice .
ai
In
StRVE N SAVE
Luncheon Meats
OR KROGER
All Beef Wiener "v
99c
Al I VAHII Ml
(I X(.l I ANdl I I OODJ
Duncan Hines
Cake Mixes
$
Lb
Pkg
�29

II Nlil H
II' ,
Ot
Hot
69
I IMM 2 WMM
10 AliO I
I'lJIKMAM
REGULAR, LIGHT
OR DARK
Michelob
12 0z
NRB
79
h.
Fresh
Broccoli
68
IN I Ml Dl I I f.OMPI I II
Ham or Turkey Din
OUR CHOICI
HAM DINNER
INCLUDES
IMJ HAM
2 POUNOS COMNSM AO
nwrniwn
2 POUNDS OHI I N 111 AMI
2 POUNDS YAMS
12 DINNI H HOI I
2395
JUST HEAT N SERVE
TUKKlr DINMIk
IMCLUDl
1 . I: ' ;r
2 PO INDj ' a
2 i" x . ,1'in
1 Pi �� i
:piy.
I I'if. ' M�A t
12 (Vll U W A
I I
. i: 1 -
l:i'( A'
AOrffrrmo itim pi-ai'
Hr ot tne�� ao.i-tieo
itefT.5 u reouifeo to i�
rWdMl vaiiOie tor vii. Mi
earn (Topef Savon e�-eoi
at BpactrKtfN noteo in inn
�0 It ve 00 run Out ot �r
item ere eln oHr tou tout
rnoi' ot 1 'omparaoi
item �ntn avaiiaoie
'efiertinfl trie lame
irm or 1 r�lrtrr�erti erni'r
� Ml entitle fOu to pu'
'nave rne �Over?ite3 nem
�t rne advert ii�o pfi�
�vltnin 10 a�vt Oni� one
enrxr crxipon erin ot �,
'epteo oer item
ATTIC
1 MUK's
In i
Vila
SAVATAGE
M th h :
i K I
Bare Back
SA I
Mairwtn Io
llrat 11
a
� e
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd CreenviliP
EN
LIKE TO

1 ' SIBII
irjv
u
�r
UJFor further inlofitMitiei
m number to MUSIC Nl
BuiIii"j I
!





ionships
players on the team include: Kim
dams oi Rvvk Mount; Sandra
d Bush of Hubert. I aura Conway
d ol Manassas, a. Cheryl Curtis
1 aurel, 1arland; Ann Ellen
Wilson; al Finley of
a Goldsboro; Phvlhs Willis of
and 1 mda Winstead
I Ml U , AK( ,i isis
N I MM H 20 I98�
i
Don't
spoil nature �
leave only
hxtprints.
t (Earolfnfan

IIMM,
ins
n Rusk
Ml favlor
757-6367
ce
For Your
Convenience We
Sell US Postage
Stamps.
� ill
�� 11111 i
1 I ! I
I I 1 I I 1 i I
� I I ! I 1 I I
1 1 I I I I I
�iuiiii
I I ' 1 � I I I
I � 1 I I I I
I I I 1 I I 1 I I
'��nuiii
' i i i i t i i
� J ' I 1 1 I I
� . 1 I 1 I I I I
V.V.VAV
l.AVYA

00CO6
1
.
3V,v,v.�M.O000ooMa
11111
iiii -
touM Y.V.y.V.V.V.V.VAV
� ii .iiiiiiii orV
1 1 1 1 I 1 I 1 1 I I 1 ,
� 11111111111
1 1 1 I I 1 1 I I 1 I 1 1
' 11111111111. Ill
111
IIII
RESHiNG
ew
oke
ii iiiuimrt
1 �' i � i i i i i i i i i
, i � ' 111 it i i A
V � 11 11111 11 111
ii i�i111111111
� i � 1111111 AxYi
� �' 1111111 AA
� ��i i i i 11 i iYkVj
i 11111 i i iYx A
� 111111 A"i i A x i
� � 111 A A A A
ii 11 ii uViYi
i i i i i 11 11 rx.
� v i i I i i i i i i i i i i
� �'iiiiiiii in
v ��iiiiiiiiiiA�
Lti
8-
69
:ana
ge
Ga
Ctn
99C
TENDER
Fresh
Broccoli
68c
inner
TURKEY DINNER
INCLUDES:
1 10-12 LB TURKEY
2 BOUNDS YAMS
2 POUNDS GREEN BEANS
2 POUNDS CORNBREAD
DRESSING
1 PINT GRAVY
12 DINNER ROLLS
cocv'gm 1986
Xon� SOKJ TO 0Jlfr
on
v
Foundation Calls For College Overhaul
WASHINGTON nr.roci �
WASHINGTON. D C (CPS) -
Amencan colleges are in need of
a dramatic overhaul, a big new
report issued last week by the
C arnegie Foundation asserted
Among other things, the foun-
dation urged colleges to stop re-
quinni students to take standar-
dized admissions tests, to make
all students take a "core cur-
riculum" of courses and to have
all students write and defend a
senior thesis" before getting
their degrees.
A number of educators,
moreover, say there's a good
chance colleges may adopt manv
ol the suggestions in the near
tuture. Still others say the recom-
mendations are impractical and
much too expensive.
In pushing the three-year-old
school reform movement up to
the college level, the foundation
asserted colleges are "driven bv
careerism and overshadowed bv
graduate and professional educa-
tion
As a result, "many of the na-
tion's colleges are more suc-
cessful in credentialing than in
providing a quality education for
their students the report said.
In early October, U.S.
Secretary of Education William
Bennett leveled essentially the
same charges, adding colleges
sometimes are so concerned with
finding money to operate that
they don't educate students well.
In response. Harvard President
Derek Bok, Educational Testing
Service President Gregory Anrig.
and American Association of
University Professors General
Secretary Ernest Benjamin,
among others, blasted Bennett as
being hypocritical or short-
sighted.
Bennett later claimed an un-
named educator told him that, if
he continued such criticisms, no
college would rehire him as a pro-
fessor after he leaves the Dept. of
Education.
The response to the Carnegie
Foundation's version of the same
criticisms has been considerably
milder.
"We are always open to discus-
sion said Dr. Thomas Brewer
of Georgia state.
Some administrators were
quick to claim such reforms �
especially in admissions tests and
requiring senior theses � would
be good for others, but not for
them.
"Our view is that Dr. (Ernest)
Boyer (the report's author) is
primarily addressing smaller
undergraduate schools says Dr.
Bernard Cohen, vice chancellor
of academic affairs for the
University of Wisconsin-
Madison.
Georgia State's Brewer adds
"we would devise other admis-
sion standards" if the founda-
tion's case for doing so is good
enough.
Both Brewer and Cohen agree
Boyer's suggestion to make
seniors write and defend theses in
front of a panel of faculty
members would cause a
"logistical nightmare
"We would have lots of
logistical problems. The big
universities, the Universities of
Texas of the world, admit about
14,000 freshmen each year
Brewer says.
"There's no way to do that
Cohen says emphatically. "Our
graduating classes are about four
to five thousand now. To staff
and schedule the small seminars
(at which seniors would defend
their theses) would be an extraor-
dinary cost
The Carnegie Foundation also
proposed making all collegians
demonstrate English language
proficiency to graduate, and pass
a core of English, art, history and
science courses
The proposals, savs Robert
Hochstein of the Princeton-based
foundation, were reached after
three years of interviewing at 29
colleges of differing s:e and mis-
sion.
"Our goal is to make college
better for all students, period. If
in doing so, the colleges become
better known and more suc-
cessful, so be it he lays. "We
are driven by a concern that the
next generation be adequately
prepared to meet their respon
sibilities to not only students, but
adults as well
After years of previous school
reform reports from the Carnegie
foundation, the U.S. Dept
Education, the National Com
mission on Education in the
States and almost a dozen other
bodies, however, many schools
feel they're already on the road
���M.MMHHMM���
Look What Surfaced
ftgf
5UBSTRTpj
CAROLINA GULF
1201 Dickinson ve
752-7271
Best I -t; Fires In ! wn H, P 4
Dei
l M( (.lit nMI MlKIltS
Clue
IT S NOT JUST A GAME ANYMORE
showdale: Nov. 20. 21, 22. 23
lime: 8:00 P.M.
Place: Hendrix I heat it
Riggan Sbor Repair
111 West mk St.
Downtowa GreenvMe
� 'Shoe Repair At The- Very Best"
7SM204
�te East (Earalxnxun
is now accepting applications
for the following position:
General Manager
for the Spring Semester
Apply in person at the Media Board
Secretary's Office on the second floor
of the Publications Building
between 10 AMand 5 PM.

Everj Ihurda Night Is
TACO NIGHT
Two Great Tacos for only.99
60 oz. Pitchers SI. 99
Offer Good From 7p.mU p.m .
ALL DAY FRIDAY
32 oz. Bucket of Your Favorite Draft
ih
99C
I 215 E. Fourth Street
-miiiiiniiiiii��,�iimiiiimmiH
752-2183 I
HMIIIIfllllllllllllllllllllltlllllMIIIIIIIIIIIHIHIIIIIItir:
YOU'LL LOVE OUR
SUNRISE SERVICE.
u
ATTIC
THURS
In Concert
Atlantic Recording Artists
SAVATAGE
with Overlord
FRI
Bare Back
WELCOME
STUDENTS
OUPON SERVICE
SPECIALS
Are you the eorly bird type who like to stay
ahead of the mad morning rush7 Well. Kmko s
is open ertra eorly ust for you Copying,
collaring binding and more
kinko's
Open carry Open late open weekends.
r OOai X3pr- . - - . ,
�jgDi�cky Fried Chicken
$1.99
plus tax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK - COMB.
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Small Mashed Potato and Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
Expires Dec. 31, 1986
'��������������������i
SAT
A Tribute to Led
Zeppelin with
Stairway to
Heaven
Wheel Alignment
$15.
j 4-Wheel Drum or
� Front Disc Reline
88 with coupon)
! $59.
88 (with coupon)
Air Conditioning
Servicing
�P I .88 (ln
icludes l
Can Freon)
Lubrication
: Oil Filter, Oil Change
; $12.88
Oi5
(with coupon)
12-
Used Tires
$8.88
4-Wheel Computer
Balance and Rotate
P I 88 (with coupon)
Offer alid Only With Coupon
S
j Take An Additional
I Our already low, low, everyday
- prices on the complete collect-
ion of over 100 Solid Brass, Brite
L�II�F!
C0GGINS CAR CARE
, N.C. PtWfW 7M-S244
$
$
rVS
ENJOY MUSIC?
LIKE TO MAKE MONEY???
CO
Yolj can do both through the newest networking
2 organization!
i n POSSIBILITY TO EARN SUBSTANTIAL V 5
INCCmE - IN YOUR SPARE TIME '
For further information, send replies with name, address and phone �
number to MUSIC NET co The East Carolinian, Publications
Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353
�� ���� "SAVINGS CERTIFICATE���H
( Pj JPj DI J C NOW OPEN SUNDAY! "
�&Sl)BS $450
o
I
5 FREE TOPPINGS of Your Choice on
ANY LARGE PIZZA
FREE DELIVERY
$1.00
OFF
Any Large
Sub
Downtown Greenville
Across From
Apple Records
752-1444
J
.(
1





�te iEaat (Earolmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, gmmmw.
Daniel Maurer, v�emm
Path Kemmis. &, Steve folmar.
cott Cooper, , � v�� Hl , Anthony Martin, ,�,
Rick McCormac. , �, ,�,�� Mec needham. ,
JoHN Shannon. � Shannon Short. ��, v�
Pat Moll oy, emmm. e�r DeChanile Johnson. dm.
November 21), 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Education
How Should Teachers Be Taught?
What's one of the biggest problems
with the American education
system today? Teachers �
specifically, teacher education.
The debate over teacher educa-
tion has been raging for sometime
and there is no doubt it will con-
tinue to do so far into the future.
Some, like American Educational
Research Association President
David Berliner, believe the key to
producing good teachers is educa-
tion courses.
The opposing camp, of which
Education Policy Studies Director
Denis Doyle is a member, feels too
much emphasis has been placed on
educaton courses and not enough
on subject matter.
These two professionals hae
been debating this issue for
sometime. But what can one say
about such a debate when both
sides are in the right?
Let's look at both positions brief-
ly. Berliner says, "In general,
knowing one's subject matter does
not necessarily make one a good
teacher
How true. Many is the time we've
come across a brilliant professor or
a knowledgeable high school
teacher only to discover they lack
the teaching skills to communicate
their knowledge.
Doyle, however, claims, "You
can't teach what you don't know
This brings back memories of the
coach teachers many of us en-
countered in high school. For those
of you fortunate enough not to
have met them, these are men for
whom teaching is a requirement for
coaching. They are often assigned
Health or History classes, classes in
which the subject matter taught is
not vital to college admissions,
unlike Math or English.
Our point is this: too much of
either one of these schools of
thought can produce an unprepared
teacher and prove detrimental to
the students' education. So why not
take the best of both worlds?
The Carnegie Forum on Educa-
tion and Economy released a study
examining the possibilities of
upgrading teacher training and
salaries. Included in the suggestions
made by the study was a proposal
to eliminate undergraduate educa-
tion degrees. Instead, students
Misconcepti
B JAMES FALLOWS
In his classic work of crackpot anthropology,
"The Japanese Brain Dr. Tadanobu Tsunoda
told his Japanese readers not to feel bad about the
difficulty of learning other languages. "Isn't it
remarkable he said, "that whenever you meet so-
meone who speaks English really well, he turns out
to be a drip?"
Japanese students learn English exactly the way
Americans (used to) learn Latin: through long, bor-
ing analyses of antique written passages. Not sur-
prisingly, most of them feel as comfortable making
English conversation as I would if Julius Caesar
strolled up for a chat. The few who do speak good
English have generally lived overseas- and have
become less Japanese.
Still, for all the peculiar Japaneseness of his senti-
ment, the spirit of Dr. Tsunoda is alive in America
today. It is reflected in the general disdain for bil-
ingualism and bilingual education, and in cam-
paigns like the one on California's ballot last week,
sponsored by the group called USEnglish, to
declare that English is America's "official"
language.
Yes, yes, everyone needs to learn English. We
have enough forces pulling us apart that we don't
want linguistic divisions too. But is there any reason
to get so worked up about today's Spanish-speaking
immigrants? I will confess that I once shared
USEnglish-type fears about Spanish language
separatism. But having spent a long time reporting
among immigrants, I'm not worried. And, having
been out of the country most of this year, I've come
to think that the whole language scare rests on two
bogus and parochial assumptions.
would be required to complete Bac-
calaureates in arts and sciences
followed by a proposed Masters in
teaching.
This would assure a fine balance
between education courses and
courses in the student teacher's
field of concentration.
Also proposed in the study was
the establishment of a board to set
nation-wide teaching standards for
teacher certification. At present,
certification is awarded by in-
dividual states according to varying
criteria. This places teachers in an
akward position as certification in
one state may not be recognized in
another until certain additional
training is complete.
For instance. North Carolina's
Teacher Certification is readily ac-
cepted in only 26 states. An
educaton major seeking work in
one of the reamining 24 states may
be required to complete additional
requirements set forth by that state.
Finally, the study proposes that
teachers who display progressive
levels of skill be rewarded with an
average annual salary of $35,000.
In creasing teachers' salaries is one
of the biggest steps we could take in
improving our education system.
As the National Education Associa-
tion has stated time and again, the
quality of education is linked to the
level of teachers' salaries.
The teaching profession has lost
many prospective educators to
private industry (especiallv in the
Math and Science fields) due to in-
adequate salaries. Few people are
willing to commit their lives to a job
worth, according to marketing
perceptions, $25,257 a year.
Do these proposals sound
idealistic? Do they present more an
educational Utopia than practical
steps to improve education in this
country? If so, then it may still be
to our advantage. Keep in mind,
one must know where he's going
before he sets out on his journev,
and believe us, the American educa-
tion system has quite a trek ahead
of it.
If we only make it half the
distance to these goals, then it is
still a long way from where we
stand now. And at present, from
where we're standing, the view is
not very good.
M?6 TALL
A6AINST
TERRORISM
SUSfSiUisssiSSSSSlSSCiiSikiJ.
It Isn H Over Yet
McDonald Denies 'Fatal Vision
It you have any inclination to despair
over the litigiousness of America and
the appalling effects of it, do not read
on; or if you do, take out insurance
against suicide. Take it out with a
reliable insurance company.
It is hard to imagine a more dramatic
narrative than that which led to the case
of Joe McGinniss v- Employers Rein-
surance Corp.
On The Right
By
WILLIAM K. BUCKLEY Jr.
In 1979, an Army doctor was tried. It
was alleged that nine years hefore he
had murdered his wife and two
children. This astonishing charge
against Dr. Jeffrey MacDonald made its
way quickly into the headlines and at-
tracted to it, among others, Joe McGin-
niss, a talented journalist and author
who undertook to write a newspaper
column on the subject. He put in for an
interview with Dr. MacDonald and,
before long, the indicted doctor said to
McGinniss something on the order of:
Joe, 1 like the looks of you. You are
smart and a good writer. 1 need money
for my defense. I am, needless to say,
innocent. Let's make a deal. I will give
you the exclusive inside run on my
story, and you agree to write it up and
give me a substantial share of the
royalties. OK ?
McGinniss was interested it was a
big story, of many dimensions. But he
entered into an agrement with caution.
His terms were: 1) MacDonald would
agree to let McGinniss listen in on all
defense conferences; 2) McGinniss
would be free to write exacltv as he saw
the case as it developed; andMac-
Donald would sign a release, agreeing
not to sue McCiinnis tor libel in the
event he wrote other than what Mac-
Donald wanted to see in print.
The trial was a sensation, and the
evidence finally conclusive: This doc-
tor, who had been popular and esteem-
ed by his friends and associates, had in-
deed murdered his wife and children.
McGinniss himself had arrived at the
same conclusion. The intimate
knowledge McGinniss had, after hun-
dreds of hours of association with the
doctor made for a best-selling book,
Fatal Vision, followed by a successful
television movie. As the royalties came
in, abiding by the agreement. McGin-
niss sent MacDonald his share - until
MacDonald brought suit.
It isn't unusual for authors and
publishers to get sued by injured par-
ties, and, accordingly, the publishing
firm of Putnam took out, at a cost of
$40,000, an insurance policy with the
Employers Reinsurance Corp protec-
ting the publisher, and derivatively the
author, form legal expenses andadverse
judgments (with a $25,000 deductible).
The lawyer of the publisher assured his
client that it was fully protected.
Dr. MacDonald, sentenced to prison
to life, either himself thought up, or else
was introduced by an ambulance chaser
to think up, a clever means of getting
around the release he had given McGin-
niss. He would sue the author not for
libel or for invasion of privacy, both of
which the murderer had immunized
McGinniss from, but for "fraud
MacDonald now alleged that McGinniss
had really misreported what had gone
on between them, causing him great
damage and emotional distress.
Never mind for a moment how it is
possible to damage the reputaion of a
man sitting in jail for the balance of his
life for the crime of killing his family;
the law is capable of shoving aside such
considerations, at least for the time be-
ing. What then happened was that the
insurance company refused to defend
McGinniss. Ah, you see, said the
Employers Reinsurance Corp Mac-
Donald isn't suing for "libel he is su-
ing for "fraud
McGinniss replied as any sane man
would do. MacDonald. he said, is ob-
viously suing over what I said in Fatal
Vision. And the whole purpose of the
libel policy (what other purpose could it
have?) is to protect me and the publisher
from this kind of suit. That he should
think to call it "fraud" instead of libel
is purely an act of sematic invention.
He might as well have sued for aliena-
tion of affection - there is no question
that an account of how somei � .
his wife and children tend- I
your erstwhile friends against you
then that had already been d nc
jury
The case awaits a petition for
mary judgement against the insui
company before Judge Robert Sweci I
the U.S. District Court in New
The effect of it, thus far. has beei
impoverish McGinniss - the c
legal efforts exceeds $rc ��
public is left wondering i
justice system will tolerate such a ti
tv as Dr MacDonald. who has run
ol people to murder, is no attempi e
and is left wondering, als
probity of American insurance
panics.
Campus
Spectrum
Rules
In addition to the " ai
Forum" section of the Ed
Page, The East Carolinian has
established the "Campus Spectr in
This is an opinion column feal
guest writers from the student b
and faculty. The columns prints
the "Campus Spectrum" will contain
current topics of concern to the ca
pus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules
grammer and decency. Persons sub
mining columns must be willing
accept "by-line" credit for
forts, as no entrvs from ghost i
will be published.
Persons interested in particip
or seeking further information :
contact Daniel Maurer, manag
editor of The East Carolii i
757-6366, or stop by our offices
the second floor of the Publications
Building.
The first is a view of bilingualism as a kind of
polygamy. If a man gives it to one wife, there's not
enough left over for someone else. Similarly with
language: there's only so much room in a person's
brain, and if he speaks one language really well,
he'll be all filled up. And if his brain were not a pro-
blem, his heart would be, since he can be truly loyal
to only one language.
In America, it's easy to see why people feel this
way. Ninety-nine percent of Americans live their
lives speaking in and thinking about no language
but English. Foreign-language education has been
falling off, and except in unusual circumstances �
wars, mainly � it has never had much use anyway.
But suppose that mastering a second language is
more like having two children. Maybe there's not a
limit in the brain or heart, and spreading attention
among several languages � like spreading love
among several children � may enrich everyone.
Without going through the arguments showing that
bilingualism is possible and natural (one impressive
recent summary was Mirror of Language by Kenji
Hakuta), I will merely say that the two-child view
makes much more sense.
Everyone has heard about the Scandinavians and
Swiss, who grow up in a big swirl of languages and
can talk to anyone. Their example may seem too
high-toned in connection with today's Spanish-
speaking immigrants, so consider the more down-
to-earth illustrations of the multilingualism all over
Asia.
Malaysia, a one-time British colony, has three
ethnic groups: Malays, Chinese and Indians. Each
speaks a different language at home. But if you put
any two Malaysians together, it's almost certain
they'll be able to converse, since most people are
bilingual and many speak three or more languages.
I should emphasize that I'm talking about people
who in no way fit modern America's idea of a
rarefied intellectual elite. They are wizened Chinese
shopkeepers, unschooled Indian night guards,
grubby Malay food-hawkers, in addition to more
polished characters who've traveled around the
world. Yet somehow they all find room in their
brains for more than one language at a time. Is it so
implausible that Americans can do the same?
The second anti-bilingual assumption is that
English is some kind of fragile blossom, about to be
blown apart by harsh blasts from the Spanish-
speaking world. Come on! Never before in world
history has a language been as dominant as English
is now. In every corner of the world, people realize
that their chances to make money, have choices or
travel depend on learning English.
In Malaysia, in South China, even in linguo-
phobic Japan, my family's main problem has been
coping with people who spring from behind every
tofu stand, eager to practice their English. Malaysia
ships out tens of thousands of young people each
year for studies in the United States, Australia and
England.
Japan makes many more accomodations to
English than America does to Spanish.
Tokyo has four English-language daily newspapers
� more than most American cities. The major train
and subway routes have English signs. Students ap-
plying for university admission must pass tests in
written English. Most shopkeepers, policemen and
passers-by can make sense of written-down English
messages. The nighttime TV news broadcasts now
come in a bilingual version � you push a button on
your set to switch from Japanese to English. It is as
if the CBS evening news could be simultaneously
heard in Spanish.
Does all of this reduce the incentive to learn
Japanese? Hah! Each day brings reminders of what
you miss if you don't know the language. You can
read the mainstream papers, can't follow mosl
shows on TV, can't communicate above the
"please-give-me-a-ticket-to-Kyoto" level. Without
learning the language, you could never hope to win
a place as anything but a fringe figure.
The incentives for America's newcomers are
stronger. How are an immigrant's children to go to
college, get any kind of white-collar job, live
anything but a ghetto existence unless they speak
English? When are the SATs, Bruce Springsteen
songs and the David Letterman show going to be in
Spanish - or Korean, or Tagalog? If Malaysians
and rural Chinese see English as their route to a
wider world, are Guatemalans and Cubans who've
made it to America so much more obtuse? And if
they keep up their Spanish at the same time, whv
don t we count that as good? It makes their lives
richer and their minds more flexible, and it enlarge
the country's ability to deal with the rest of the
world.
The adult immigrants don't usually succeed in
learning English, any more than my wife and I have
become fluent in Japanese. The Cubans' and Mex
.cans children are the ones who learn, as previous
immigrants children have.
We don't want to become Quebec - and we're
not about to. Quebec, Belgium, Sri Lanka and
other places with language problems have old sett!
F ,T?h�VC Hved �� '1 each other, in
mutual dislike, for many years - not new groups of
immigrants continually being absorbed. We don't
need to declare English our official lanauaite
because it already is that.
8:35 p.m
A Greenvi
� � i.
unes.
A Green, ille re
the larcen
nor- �
10:00 p.m.
Three
reported
each
cut. Th
the B
N -ember
College
To Host
Cosby
NBC .
TV show.

ma
.
characters, attends lr the sJ
Denise's father a
riillmai ites
N B C
nan in New
Spelman. an 8G
Tien . �. "be
emp � llege w
traditional
Hillman to be '
"Tw
peted tor the- chan
fan
Camille C sb toured
ool while researching
master's the- -
i
Osc
i
the
" i
a
-a- M;
the .
fig
am no: a: libei
Moreovt
conned
"Hi� (tighter .
school here Stewart
"and soon his son w
Storehouse (an all-ma
college nea
"Hi a
our la nmencement,
kissed aii
Stewart re
moving
Spellman and M
students will work as ev
the show
(. osbj v ' In-
sley isn't - when actual
filming will -tart on the camp
but sav- � a hit.
NBC may sp ff a series about
the character, piaved bv 1
Bonet, at the college
I
if





NWNG TALL
INST
RORISM


tal Vision'
n �-�one killed
Is to dispose
u. But
done bj a
foi sum-
- trance
' Sw etI �
New
lias beei
51 " his
"� The
our
i ves �
as run out
mpting;
iboui the
. �m-
Campus
xvtrum
Rules
c
"( a.Tipu.
Editorial
is re-
. Spectrum
. � i featuring
� . leni bod)
printed in
� I contain
� e cam-
: in con-
j
sub-
lling to
may
.ieine
tn at
ffices on
i
:anGrowth
: ice 'he incentive to learn
rings reminders of v. hat
a the language. You can't
-apers, can't follow most
communicate aboe the
Kyoto" level. Without
. could never hope to win
i fI nge figure.
America's newcomers are
�.migrant's children to go to
� nd of white-collar job, live
gheti existence unless the speak
�� SATs, Bruce Springsteen
' l.etterman show going to be in
� rean. or Tagalog? If Malaysians
see English as their route to a
are Guatemalans and Cubans who've
America so much more obtuse0 And if
their Spanish at the same time, why
int that as good? It makes their I
leir minds more flexible, and it enlarges
ability to deal with the rest of the
� mmigrants don't usually succeed in
sh, any more than m wife and I have
' in Japanese. The Cubans' and Mex-
kn are the ones who learn, as previous
Ichildren have,
�ant to become Quebec � and we're
Quebec, Belgium. Sn I.anka and
th language problems have old. settl-
re lived alongside each other, in
� � many vears � not new group's of
Dually being absorbed. We don't
English our official language,
is that.
IHf AS! Ak'il 1SIAS
NOVEMBER 20. 1986
November 2
8 $5 p.m.
� Greenville male was banned
campus for being
iscortcd in Greene Dorm.
5 p.m.
Greenville resident reported
larceny of her bicycle from
th oi the International House.
0 p.m.
rhree separate vehicle owners
Krted that all four tires on
h o their vehicles had been
rhe vehicles were parked in
Brod) Building parking lot.
November 13
College
To Host
Cosby
PS i Spelman c olleg(
ince to host an on-
� �� ep le of
sby S tow .
NBC, which airs th ated
ow. andamille Cosb)
sbv -
I a numbei ol southern
black colleges to I
become
i
us black
. i
characters, attends n the show.
Denise's fathe . d fat her
Hill mat g aduates.
a N B(
New York, savs
ti SO � lent private
men's ge best ex-
dl college with
iitional valus that we want
Hillman to be
"Two oi three" colleges com-
e hance to serve a- a
. episode, Alfano saw
tile C osbj toured the
while researching her
� 's thesis on black students
saw I)r
ill foi
� ; gt in Mississippi,
lered for
"We will be recompensed with
gnition Stewart
"Mi Cosby has donated to
liege generously over the
era! years. The figures I
� al liberty to give out
Moreover, Cosbj has a special
. 'ion to Spellman.
His second daughter attends
ol here Stewart reports,
oon his son will attend
ise (an all-male private
tearb)) next fall
"He at on the podium during
our last commencement, and
ed all of the graduates
Mew art recalls. "It was very
ng
Spellman and .Storehouse
lents will work as extras on
I w .
C osb) Show publicist Kim In-
isn't sure as when actual
nlming will start on the campus,
but sas if the episode is a hit,
NB( may spin ofi a series about
the character, played by Lisa
Bonet, at the college.
3:15 p.m.
An Aycock resident reported
being assaulted in the gameroom
of Aycock Dorm.
9:20 p.m.
Two Umstead Dorm room
mates reported the breaking and
entering of their room and the
larceny of monev.
10:20 p.m.
Two Clement Hall residents
and a non-studeni from Kinston
were involved in an alcohol viola-
tion on the 7th floor of (lenient
11:30 p.m.
A Tyler Dorm resident
reported the breaking and enter-
ing of her vehicle and the larceny
of her car stereo. The vehicle was
parked in the 14th St and
Berkley St. freshman lot
November 14
1:20 a.m.
An Him Citv resident was ar-
rested for DW1 south of Hen j
Dorm
November 15
10:48 a.m.
A Greenville resident was
issued a state citation for travel-
ing too fast for road conditions.
10:50 p.m.
A Greenville resident was ar-
rested for breaking and entering
and simple possession of mari-
juana after an ECU Public Safety
Officer reported observing him
attempt to exit a locked room in
the basement of Memorial Gvm.
11:55 p.m.
A Tyler Dorm resident was
written up and referred to Dr.
Speier's office after being observ-
ed travelling in the wrong direc-
tion on a one-way street, ex-
ceeding the limit of persons on a
moped and for giving false infor-
mation to an ECU officer.
November 16
12:26 a.m.
An Aycock resident was found
to be in possession of an
unauthorized keg of beer while
being underage.
1:02 a.m.
Two Aycock Dorm residents
were found to be in possession of
beer while being underage and
were believed to have been in-
Ived in a controlled substance
violation.
10:30 a.m.
Three marines from Cherry
Point were arrested for the
larceny of a fire extinguisher
from Tyler Dorm. One was
issued a state citation for
transporting spiritous liquor with
a broken seal. All three males
were banned from campus.
November 17
9:10 p.m.
Three visiting males were ban-
ned from campus for harassing
females on central and west cam-
pus.
11:48 p.m.
Three Havelock males were
banned from campus for being
unescorted on the 10th floor of
Greene Dorm.
November 18
11:15 a.m.
The equipment manager of
Memorial Gym reported the
larceny of a video cassette
recorder from a room in
Memorial Gym.
November 19
1:15 a.m.
Two Belk Dorm students were
found to be intoxicated and
disruptive in a suite of Belk
Dorm.
Do What
You Do Best
APPEARING THIS
WEEKEND AT
CAROLINA
GULF
1201 Dickinson Ave.
752-7270
We Guarantee Our Work
And Our Used
Tires � PU & Del. A vail.
Do It With Us.
Wrecker Serke
VISA. HC. GLTI MiHKI BOKIlfS
FRI 21
THE
USUALS
757-1227
Cotanche Street
ALL ABC PERMITS
j. 1 B( )R noxs L P
:lS SMM IO 12th WEEK
:mm Wm7m (l rRI (i x -1 N
"�lwP W��
prjkj
4Wm
JJiJmm�
� i vtt'TILIT 1-800-532-5384) betw id 5
jC i
, RALEIGH WOMEN'S
' Iffftl HEALTH
rjHRI "W ORGANIZATIONS
TOM TOGS FACTORY OUTLET
1900 Dickinson Ave 830-01 74
Direct From The Local M� tacturer � F,rst Quality
Close-outs - Overruns eiected Irregulars
Panama Jack Rack
2s8
New Fall Styles Arriving Daily In
Panama Jack and Trocadero
New Trocadero
Sweaters and Leggings
fc�g He'a s
1st Guaht, M,i & Match
$19"
Any Style
JACK
v
9.
IKO VDKKO
.v
�3
& r'amous Names That We Cannot Mention
We Have Added Budget Racks In Our New Outlet Store
Come And Check Us Out
Budget Fleece Pullover
Sweatshirts $450
Seg Retail At $40
Monday thru Saturday t0a.rn4 p.in
Tops s2
SO50
Ae Atoo Who Bit e 4;s Se� ocatior
Tom Togs Is A Mousefio A 3j'gas & �,c ng Fash.ons
in Adult Children X Irigni tis�aa- & Stepesr
Ma-jtefCa-3 & v sa A'cepieC
iceholl Days" duo is back
& headed straighl foi 'He top
Tern Nunn & crew take oH with
first album since Top Gun success
Powerful and provocative release
from leadmq New Music outfit
ffTTTTT
pa$ AGEORGU SATEUJTES GEORGIA SATELLITES tie )
Cassette or IP 6.99
These no frills roadhouse rockers
hit like Herschel Walker
All new material from a man who
shaped the course of modern music
.�- 1r 8FNJAMINO�
1 IBfNJAMMOn THE LACE
rtassetteor LP 6.99
Cars' bassist & co founder checks
in with his first solo release
Return this coupon and get
$2.00
on any Cassette, Lp or Compact disc.
tpnceoi highei Sale ��ems e� led On lempei
'� ;1 �t' Ciny ottu-i ,�� t .p.res U J B6
Record Bar
rr ' �
n ecotd B?






'

1


THF FASTtAROl INIAN
Entertainment
(LOOM COUNTY
NOVEMBER 20 ivw.
Page
Movie ftfyjfw
'The Boy' Flies Very High
B MIC AH HARRIS
Nick Castle's 77? flm HTro
( oud f-iy is a sman gem. an un.
retentious film which is without
mg h is a movie about in-
ward ' ghl and how the human
in rise against insurmoun-
dds.
The movie
begins as 14-year
old Milly (Lucy Deakins) moves
with her mother and little brother
into a new neighborhood. Milly's
father committed suicide when he
discovered he was dying of
cancer. One day, Milly notices
the boy next door sitting on his
roof with his arms outstretched
like a plane's wings.
She learns that the boy, Eric
(Jay Underwood), is autistic.
astlc is the writer and director of I orimar Pictures' 'The Boy
ould Fly a film closely resembling the Jimmy Stewart classic,
un f
Farmville, Home For ECU
And Haven For Sculpture
B JOHN SHANNON
V other university,
nts at ECU tend to ignore
region outside their com-
ty . Their isolation is unfor-
ise often oppor-
vth and new ex-
ire as near as the town
id.
stance, Farmville.
Many students know no more
he name implies; that is,
small, rural communi-
hardrj likely to harbor culture
" �� the "agri" sort.
tdent! recently
. and took advan-
ig � the people of Farmville's
pitalit) and sophistication.
town's historic business
e Farmville Communi-
icil has an old movie
the Paramount, which
ised off and on as a
gall ntil now, most work
- EI 'here has been of the tw r
ional, hang-on-the-wall
vari
In an efl i try something
ferent, the Arts Council con-
ed ECU'S School of Art. Six
idents from the sculpture
department were chosen to do the
exhibit: Robbie Barber. Roger
:atore, Meneh Pilkey, Matt
I no. William Smith and Evan
Stanford. They call their col-
laborate e effort "3-D Picture
Show "
Quite an appropriate title, as it
turns out. From the entrance to
theater, attention is im-
drawn to the stage,
jix large screens (about 3
b 8 feet) stand in front of
pieces of sculpture. The
sculptures are brightly lit from
behind, so their shadows are cast
onto the screens. From the
theater seats, only the shadows
can clearly be seen.
Interestingly, viewers can walk
down to the stage and examine
the works close up, from behind
the screens. When they do this,
their shadows
"We've tried to do something
that would use the idea of the
place as a movie theater said
Stanford. "That's why we used
the screens
Although the six artists had on-
ly three weeks to complete the in-
stallation from the time they
found out about it, at least two of
them (Stanford and Pilkey) con-
structed their sculptures especial-
ly for "3-D Picture Show The
main concept was the work of all
six heads, however.
"At first we thought it was go-
ing to be in a regular gallery
said Barber. "Then we got here
and saw it was a real theater. We
all got together and brainstorm-
ed there was a lot of tension,
but we solved the problem so we
were all happy in the end, which I
think is kind of rare
The installation is in several
ways analogous to a movie. The
flickering, distorted images of the
actors are projected onto the
screen, where they form a two-
dimensional representation of
life. Individual actors, each uni-
que, come together under a uni-
fying scheme, or plot.
Though taken separately the
pieces of sculpture are unique,
the exhibit as a whole is concep-
tually unified.
The integrity and originality of
"3-D Picture Show" attest to the
possibility of constructive
cooperation among individuals,
as well as between neighboring
communities. Hopefully, the suc-
cess of this show will prompt
more exchanges like it and pro-
mote greater dialogue on matters
of significant culture.
When he was five years old, his
parents died in a plane crash.
Before anyone told Eric what
had happened, he began mimic-
ing a plane as though he was try-
ing to save his parents. Since the
tragedy, he has been obsessed
with flight.
The rest of the film deals with
Milly's efforts to help Eric come
out of his own world. As was the
sea captain in Conrad's The
Secret Sharer, Milly is actually
helping herself as she works with
Eric to help him cope with the
real world.
On one level, Eric is a
manifestation of Milly's own
feelings of loss and disjointment
in her new surroundings.
This doppelganger relationship
is symbolically depicted at one
point when Eric begins mimicing
Milly's every move.
There is a literary allusion to
Peter Pan very early in the film
when a falling star shoots bright-
ly across the sky (a la Tinkerbell).
Although Eric plays Peter Pan to
Milly's Wendy, he is actually
leading her to grow up; just the
opposite of his literary
predecessor.
Actually, they lead each other.
Both are refusing responsibility
by living in a never-never land to
avoid painful reality. Eric has
closed everyone out and Milly
refuses to accept that her father
killed himself; she insists he died
of cancer.
The Boy Who Could Fly is
reminiscent of the classic Jimmy
Stewart movie, Harvey, in that
both deal with an individual who,
because of outlandish claims, is
considered crazy by the people
Fred Savage plays Lewis, a disgruntled child who finds escape from his everyday life by pretending he cgn
fly. The film deals with believing in your dreams and those of others.
around him.
In Stewart's case, the claim
was that he had a giant invisible
rabbit as his best friend; Eric
claims he can fly. I won't tell you
if he can or can not, but the direc-
tor waits until the last possible
moment to tip his hand.
Although the leads were wisely
given to unknown actors, there
are a few familiar faces here.
Mindy Cohn of "The Facts of
Life" plays an overbearing, ob-
noxious friend of Milly's. Fred
Gwyne, best remembered as Her-
man Munster, plays Eric's
drunken sod of an uncle.
I might add that Gwyne strong-
ly favors Herman, even without
the green facial makeup (poor
guy). Bonnie Bedalia plays
Milly's mom, and Colleen
Dewhurst gives a good perfor-
mance as a sympathetic teacher
Also, look for the cameo of
film director John Carpenter
(Halloween) with his band "The
Coup Devilles" in a music video
glimpsed briefly during channel
changing on Milly's TV.
There's plenty of good craft -
manship here. The sound of
windchimes, usually announcing
Eric's appearances, suggests not
only flight, but that something
magical is about to happen
Also, when Milly walks in on
her new class in progress, the
camera takes her viewpoint as
everyone turns around and looks
at her. This puts the audience
members in her place and effec-
tively conveys her discoml
The actors are also in
form, rhe grief of Milly's fai
over her father's death is .
municated mostly bv the exj
sions Their relationships
realistically portrayed and
identification is subsequei
heightened.
The Bo) Uh C ould Fly
enriching experience
checking out on v ideo I
local theatre chooses I
it. The message ol the filn
clear I am the boy wl ml
And so are sou.
Whenever we stretch our a
out to another person in
are extending wi g
carrv us above our
blems
Through The Looking Cla
Love On The Rocks: An Ugly Sight
By ANDY LEWIS
SUf��rtlf
It was 4:23 a.m.
I stood outside the door to
Carol's room. I knew Steve was
in there.
Steve, my best friend, was
looking pretty rough. He had
been seeing this girl Carol, and I
knew he was planning to give her
up tonight.
I only met Carol once before.
She was very affectionate, and
kept herself surrounded by lots of
friends � particularly guys.
I knew Steve was doomed. He
told me he meant more to her
than all those other guys, but I
was still afraid he was about to
get trampled. I could see the foot-
prints on his face.
I've never understood why girls
go for the guys who give them the
most abuse. But then there's my
buddy steve, he tends to find girls
who do that to him.
I had to risk embarrassment. I
had to go in and make sure he
was okay. There had been a par-
ty; I hoped there were still other
people in there. I opened the
door.
What I saw there made me
wish I had taken a few shots of
EverClear beforehand. The floor
was littered with empty bottles
and orange juice containers. Two
girls (neither of them Carol) were
sitting on the bed where Steve
lay.
He looked dead. His limbs
were twisted about the messy
sheets and his face was complete-
ly pale. Footage from The Day
After couldn't compete with this
scene.
He was half mumbling, half
whining desperate words to the
girls.
I didn't know them, but I knew
that Steve would wish he hadn't
been born if he kept on emptying
his soul to these girls who hardly
knew him.
"Leave I said quietly, "or
I'm going to keep a picture of this
for evidence when you girls get
charged for raping this poor boy.
Hell, at this school, you might
even get a written warning for
that
I didn't know if they believed
me or not, but they left.
"Jesus Christ, Steve, what
have they done to you
I went over to him and sat
down. His eyes gazed up at me
without focusing. But suddenly,
he recognized me and grabbed
my hand.
"Andy, thank God you're
here. Do me a favor, man �
shoot that goddamn mongoose
whose chewin' on my toes. He's
been making advances on me all
night
"Where's Carol I replied,
choosing not to deal with his
hallucinations for the moment.
He squeezed my hand and said
sadly, "I don't know. One
minute she's here. The next
minute she's not. I wish they had
a chart for Carol like they do for
tides. That way I'd know when
the best surfing was
He started laughing. But soon
his laughter turned into light sob-
bing.
"You know something, An-
dy he said wiping his eves.
"I'm evil
At this point I became a little
concerned. I knew that a state-
ment like this could only mean
that Steve's self-esteem was not
quite what it should have been.
"Steve, why are you saving
this0"
"Because love doesn't mean
the same thing for me as it does
for everybody else
I was getting tired, and Steve's
twisted logic was beginning to
take its toll.
"Don't you understand he
continued, "all I ever get from
love is pain � and yet, I still need
it. Jesus, Andy, get that damn
mongoose off my leg or I'm
never going to speak to you
again
"OK Steve. What's the deal.
Did you tell Carol that you're
willing to let her go?"
"Yeah. Of course I did. You
think I'm a coward or
something1 Hell, she's going
marry some military guv
knows no she car. have security. i
can understand that. Can
understand0 '
"So she told v
other guy . right? '
"Yup
"So you're � 01 gonna see her
anymore, righ?"
"NO he said angnlv. "She
still needs me. She told me that. 1
keep askin' her if she want-
stop seeing me, but she doe;
So I'll just wait here until she
needs me again
I pulled him so he was sitting
up. I straightened his collar and
said. "Steve, you're a mess "
He smiled and said, "I know,
but I know that someday she'll
respect me for hangin' in there.
Someday. I think I'll just lie here
a little. Okay Andy? I'll be
Okay-
He reached down and slapped
his leg saying, "Furry bastard
Then he lay back down on the
disheveled bed, closing his eves
I got up and wrote something
on a sheet of paper that I found
on her desk. I taped it to his chest
and quietly left the room.
I couldn't understand how she
could have left him there like
that, but I hoped the sign I left on
his chest would do some good.
It read: "Please use with
care
Stress On Brain: There's Not An Easy Cure
B D. A. SWANSON
What can a poor student do?
The stress and flu season is upon
�his year with unprecedented
strength. Not only do the faculty
seem to be teaming up against us,
miserable and beaten as we are,
but all the rest of the great wide
world is coming down.
Just the other day I witnessed a
WZMB newscaster nearly self-
destruct from an anxiety attack.
She walked into the classroom,
threw up her arms, screamed,
and then sat down mumbling
something about tranquility and
the Nicaraguan border � or was
that an automatic gun holder?
Anyway, she sat there glossy-
eyed until the relentless professor
walked in and began to lecture.
She began taking notes at
breakneck speed, apparently co-
pying everything that came out of
the prof's mouth, despite the
frantic shaking in her shoulders.
It was not a pretty sight.
Maybe I'm just getting older,
but it seems like in my earlier
days as an ECU student things
didn't get so crazy until a week
before exams. These days things
just go from bad to worse after
midterms without ever taking a
break.
Another symptom of stress or
school fatigue has been displayed
here at The East Carolinian.
Many staff members can be seen
darting about in a slightly
delerious state unable to supress
quiet, psychotic giggles. The only
explanation is that they have long
since bypassed the crying state of
anxiety.
A Gray Gallery employee
recently expressed the root of her
un-ending stress to me. "As soon
as one paper is done, another is
on the drawing board and still
another needs to be completed
When asked who was to blame
for the current state of bedlam,
she glared at me and almost tore
my head off. "I've been going
full steam for three weeks. I
don't get asked that question
anymore Then she brushed me
off, "I haven't got time to go in-
to it
Another WZMB jockette told
how the frenzy began for her. "It
all started Halloween she said
in something of a faraway voice.
There were two professors to
meet with, an interview at Blox-
ten she missed, a seven page
paper still in the works, a test was
returned which she "blew com-
pletely and she was faced with
the prospect that graduation
might pass her by this December.
Situations like these are not
very uncommon. Most likely you
are going through this ordeal
yourself. But what to do? It all
seems hopeless.
My old cure for the bug-eyed,
driving overload used to be a
friendly stroll through the beer
list at the New Deli. This cure has
since been altered in the face of a
mounting pile of tasks to be com-
pleted.
Nowadays sitting quietly in the
dark for fifteen minutes is about
all the time or energy I can af-
ford. Sometimes it works better
than the standard four hours of
sleep that I grudgingly allow
myself each night.
Needless to say, the old stress
monster is getting even more ugly
than ever. It has even become
something of a hot topic in the
wake of the new upward-at-any-
cost mobility syndrome that has
gripped the entire country. Suc-
cess, success. Shout it from every
mountain top. From every shore.
From the third floor of Joyner
Library!
Exercise, the stress experts say,
is the best cure. Meditation, sav
the transcendentalists. Write a
letter, say some academic sorts. I
say get a six pack, some Mr Bub-
ble, your latest flame and hit the
sunny shores of the nearest tub
It may not be Jamaica, but with
the shape your regurgitated brain
is in, it may as well be.
Remember, even if you really
don't have time, make some. You
only get one brain, keep it
healthy and clean.
� tm
m


- s.
fr
w.
'
-
1


s

ifVti!
Walkin' 1 he Flank
- �
LIL.
V
Mcrf 9: � i -
mac.
Fun-O-Kamj
r
-
-c-
H
i
Overkill
o?
i





198
aac f
I
O f �
ersda life h pretending he can
gly Sight
.

B saying, "1

i
� - . . : ind hov
mm the
ped the sign Uefi
y Cure
gripped the entire country. Suc-
Shout it from c-
mountain top From ever
From the third floor of
l.ibran '
Exa
is the besi cure Meditation,
the transcendentalism U - �
letter. sa some academic -
a. get a six pack, some Mi B
latesl flame and
f the nearer i
Jamaica
�P � regurgiv.
. it ma a- welj
Remember, even
don't hae time, make s
onl) get one brain, i
'h and clea

d
e
it
a

BLOOM COUNTY
THE EAST C AROI tNIAM s A EMBER 20, 1986
by Berke Breathed
l ndercovcr Cats
B� PARKER
- �
com. ' a ��� �-�
�-��
���-� -� - I
.����- VfCffl
som tew
E
l v fay?)
g0VP
NO
� wm -
(
$5k
Sneed
Yco CBN T TRVCK ME inTq
DOW �uR HontwoKK I
FWMoRE fRflNK.lKigoW '
! mM
r
i'K SHOCKED rtXJWOULC T U rtf FRIENDSHIP
By BRYANT
1 VJOuoJr tRv 1R
WPTCH
�ME
ITS - Pt�Rfy kflTcH ,� v .
rt f? krT'h '
:
r
Walkin' I he Plank
Tooth
fta ;vt�b �-�- -c
' k ' ' � K or Mir
M
Jy A GUY
� ifa �w �-�'� Srtnic r rm mo
�- ' ' �LliAt A
� , - -� -� M - �
� . �� . . - W1 r,io' g,
� � " - . ft �,
Aio J�4l t5�iVi Mt r3 mv yf
Fun-O-Rama
r
a
r
� n WORE COBB
BWfVrVW
7
�. -v
cS"

' .i -y
,(
Overkill
DOO DO0

����
� � 'r - ��- ,
-� �� ' � ' �
� :� ���. � . . .
By FRIEDRICH
ou iAicj Mirrrr bl you
M1B�� Aerr rty
� 1 � � .TWEYtt
ampus Comics
B BARBOUR
T
YOU RE RIGHT-THAT XS
BETTER THAN BUSCH GARDENS1
fMp)oNuw5aM)is
MOrtKiiroflii
GRAD SCk)0l5,Ati
to J06LI5Tlk65
V
By BROOKS
J�uTwiiFi17rT
J0(J T00"W?y
JBTiNle OR
ROLLCR D�R8
AT 9 00?
Junior
�7 Go BurJum
THE 6002JUA 1 CAffTbeODS
flKK S7WT5 UMAT WUEM
9tomwrFS HELP M� CHOOSE
40 m 5E1UEEN THIS
Pcxj&E-fWtt DAESS Of.
All ri6ht.i
I'm help you akx&t
6tMe ms dftessj
(XM.6UT UMT
iou6cmA
MAIM
STOP Junio '
iOUR XUINN6
Iff MESS'
By GLANKLFR
Ri6HT! sc Pvrch-me
OTHER ONE AMD LETS
ROLL, TOOJS.
&M
tot rrlM rKFJ3rrmjjAiir-iffjer
'�
�B w .�
�1H�
:





I HI I AS! C AKOI INIAN
Sports
NO EMBER 20, I9M
Page
P? Stiff Buc Defense Shaping Up

Junior Pirate linebacker Vinson Smith prepares to slam Southern Mississippi quarterback Andre
son earlier in the vear. Smith has been a mainsta for ECl"s defense all season long.
y Ander-
B SCOTT COOPER
o-Shorts di�
The Pirate defense, which has
seen some tough times during the
year, was quite impressive in
holding the Cincinnati Bearcats
to 19 points Satuday afternoon in
Ficklen Stadium.
ECU coach Art Baker, who
made a defensive backfield
change, telt the Pirates gained
some needed confidence on
defense with Saturday's victory.
"Our defense played much im-
proved � it was their beM perfor-
mance of the year for us Baker
said. "We hit a lot better and put
a lot of pressure on the quarter-
back.
"Another big factor (for the
win) was our moving free safety
Ellis Dillahunt to the cornerback
position Baker added. "He
made some key plays and our
defense hit hard all day. We
stressed to the players to not be
intimidated by the terrible
weather and thev hit like thev
couldn't feel a thing
Indeed the Pirate defense did
hit hard as they forced four Bear-
cat fumbles while Vinson Smith
and Roswell Streeter each
recovered one of the loose balls
Smith, who teams with Bubba
"Our defense played
much improved � it
was their best perfor-
mance of the year for
us.
�Art Baker
Waters to handle the linebacking
duties, was once again all over
the field in leading the Bucs with
10 tackles. Waters was just
behind with nine, followed by
Streeter's eight stops.
The defense, which allowed
Cincinnati just 98 rushing yards
on 28 carries (including OB
sacks), held two-time honor
mention All-Amerua Reggie
Taylor to just 104 arJs on
carries, lavlor is currentl) fifth
in the nation in rushing with a:
average of over 122 ards per
game
"It's a disappointing
because it's one that we rea
wanted Cincinnati c a Dave
Currey said. "They held Re,
down and their defense held .
when the had to
ECU's defense will reall) be
tested in a week when the
on the top-ranked Miam: H u
ricanes. Coach Baker hopes
the Pirate defensive e
Cincinnati will be similar l
against the powerful Hurr
"1 hope that's an indK
what's to come Baker
"It's going to take a
human effort and we're ceri
going to prepare and d
can to try and win the ballg �
Indiana Paces Preseason Basketball Poll
Bv TIM CHANDLER
RKKMcCORMAC
SporU Prof MMftEMan
It's time once again for the an-
nual Top 20 college basketball
poll by the local specialists �
Rick McCormac and Tim
Chandler.
In this poll we will give our
predictions of the Top 20 as we
see it. We will also go mdepth in
our analysis and tell whv each of
the 20 deserv e a spot in the cream
f the crop
Who is No I, North Carolina
Frosh Lewis
Receives
EC A C A ward
� lilback
e Lewis, in ist his second
��� -a as named
ttstand rig rookie of the week
the Eastern Collegiate
etic Conference in the
P rate's 3-19 win over Cincin-
tti Saturday.
The Valdosta, Ga redshirt
freshman rushed for yards
on 15 :arries, including his first
two college touchdowns.
Lewis is the first Pirate I
gain � kie honors this season
���� d he should make his third
-tart of the vear on Thanksgiv-
ing evening in Miami's Orange
Bowl
� nope, maybe defending na-
tional champion Louisville �
sorry not this year Denny. We
give the preseason ranking to the
Hoosiers of Indiana from the Big
10 conference.
Don't laugh fool. Indiana will
probably drop a few games early
and in the rugged Big 10 race, but
who wouldn't? But, Bob Knight
will have his troops ready by
tournament time.
For those who still doubt our
prediction maybe you should
think back to last year when we
successfully picked Louisville in
the preseason Although the Car-
dinals dropped nine regular-
reason games, they rocked the
house in the NCAA tournament.
The Hoosiers will be paced by
senior guard supreme Steve
Alford. It seems like years ago
when Alford leJ the USA to the
gold in Los Angeles � but he is
still tickling the twine with long
range bombs in Bloomington.
With the new three-point goal (19
feet, 9 inches) in effect, Alford
can hit all day long.
Throw in Ricky Calloway, last
year's Big 10 freshman of the
year, and two other returning
starters, Hoosier fans should get
their room reservations in New
Orleans (site of this year's Final
Four) now.
The number two spot we fee
goes to Louisville. Led by last
year's freshman sensation Pervis
"Never Nervous" Ellison, the
Cardinals will surely make
mincemeat of the Metro Con-
ference.
The loss of Billy Thompson
w ill deny a repeat performance of
the national title by Louisville,
however, they will fight till the
end.
The Tarheels get our nod foi
number three. True, they return
all-world point guard Kenny
"The Jet" Smith and recruit-of-
the-year J.R. Reid. but, the loss
of Brad Daugherty and defensive
stopper Steve Hale will cause
some of the thrill to leave Chapel
Hill.
The Runnin' Rebels from
Nevada-Las Vegas claim the fifth
spot in our illustrious poll, much
in part to the superb shooting of
senior guard Freddie Banks
Don't think Tark the Shark's
squad is a one man show as
powerful Armon Gilliam will rule
Center David Robinson should help Nav remain in the top-twenty of
college basketball teams this season.
the paint.
Number five is also a team
from this year's conference of the
year � the Big 10. Purdue is our
choice as they return four starters
including all-conference center
Melvin McCants. Troy Lewis will
greatly benefit from the three
point range with his downtown
jumper as the Boilermakers of
Gene Keady will try to challenge
Indiana for the conference cham-
pionship.
The Kansas Jayhawks behind
multi-talented Danny Manning
earn the sixth position. True, the
Jayhawks lost Ron Kellogg. Greg
Dreiling and Calvin Thompson,
they do return steady point guard
Cedric Hunter and a host of
talented freshmen. While Larry
Brown's squad may not make the
Final Four this year, you can bet
that the battle cry "Rock, Chalk,
Jayhawk" will again be heard
often in Lawrence.
Number seven goes to SEC
power Auburn. No doubt, Chuck
Person will be missed, but the
Tigers have established a winning
program under once-maligned
Sonny Smith. Auburn returns
Frank Ford and Michael Jones,
which should be enough to lead
the Tigers to the SEC champion-
ship.
The Wildcats of Kentucky grab
the eighth spot even though Ken-
ny "Sky" Walker has left for the
NBA and Winston Bennett is out
for the year. The Wildcats do
return Ed Davender and James
Blackmon along with freshman
Rex Chapman, who should make
a killing from the thre-
range.
Without Mark Price and
Salley, many people thii �
will be a rebuilding vear foi
Georgia Tech. However,
ninth pick goes to the Yel
Jackets because Bobby Cremii
doesn't rebuild � he reloads
Returning are Bruce Dalrymp
Tommy Hammonds and Du
Ferrell, all of which have -
named freshman-of-the-vear
the ACC.
Syracuse, ever, with
Dwayne "Pear Washingu n get
our vote as the number I
largely in part to center R
Seilcly. Add freshmen pros pec I
Stevie Thompson and Derr-?
Coleman and the Orangemer.
could have better results than
when Washington was around
The number 11 team in our
poll comes from our verv own
conference, the CAA The Mid
shipmen from Navy have the na-
tion's premier bigman in Dav.J
See MORE, page 9
J Sports Fact
Thur. Nov. 20. 1982
California uses five late
on the Final plav of the game ti
defeat Stanford. 25-20. To
score the winning lown,
California plavers have to
weave their way through
Stanford band, which
prematurelv come out on the
field.
Senior Offensive Line Shares Memories
B CAROLYN JUSTICE
Among ECU's list of seniors
you'll find seven who aren't your
ordinary group � Robert Alex-
ander, Rich Autry, Ken
Bourgeois. Shawn Brady, Paul
Hoggard, Curtis Struyk, and
Greg Thomas are all offensive
linemen who call themselves the
"HOGS
Standing for "honor our great
strength it has made a bond
among these players that the end
of the season, graduation or
anything else could never break.
Five "hogs" began their
careers here at ECU together in
1982 with Guilford College
transfer Curtis Struyk joining
them in 1983 and Mississippi
Gulf Coast College transfer Ken
Bourgeois, coming in for the
1984 season.
They share positions and
rooms as well as memories and
goals. For all of them, the
ECU State games are definitely
the most memorable games.
Offensive guard Autry said he
will never forget the police escort
the team got all the way back
from Raleigh after the 1983 win.
Offensive tackle Alexander and
center Bourgeois enjoyed the
1985 game because, for both of
them, it was their first time star-
ting at ECU. For Hoggard, just
being able to play in front of all
those people made it memorable.
Offensive guardcenter Thomas
enjoyed beating State for one
simple reason: "I hate State he
said.
Louisiana native Bourgeois
and offensive tackle Shawn
Brady, a Pennsylvania native,
both have memories of their
chance to play at "home
"Where I come from said
Bourgeois, "LSU and Tiger
Stadium are the big things. I'll
never forget getting the chance to
play there (in last year's final
game)
"As I was growing up, my Dad
and I went to a lot of Penn State
games said Brady. "I always
dreamed of playing there, and
now I've been given the chance
Tackle Struyk, like all of the
"hogs takes his job very
seriously, and when he's on the
field he means business. But like
the rest, he has his share of amus-
ing moments.
"This year at Temple, I was
late coming out of the locker
room at the half because 1 was
hurt Struyk said. "As I came
out, the Temple fans were yelling
at me about being hurt, so I
started jogging on to the field, ac-
ting like there was nothing
wrong. I slipped and fell fiat on
my face. To make things worse, I
looked up and they had me on the
stadium's big TV screen
Mention falling to Alexander
and he'll laugh as he tells about
former coach Ed Emory. "Coach
Emory was watching drills at
practice. He was walking
backwards, not looking where he
was going and he fell over a pile
of dummies Alexander explain-
ed. "His feet flew up in the air
and everyone was afraid to laugh.
He got up, looked at us and said:
'If you see something that fun-
ny, you ought to laugh! So
everyone just cracked up
Autry remembers falling down
at practice or actually, it was be-
ing knocked down. "I thought I
was gonna be bad and knock
Terry Long down when I went up
on the line Autry said. "He
brought me back down to earth
after he knocked me back about
five yards
Cold weather reminds Brady of
one particular cold, embarrassing
practice. "We weren't given any
sweats, so I wore the only shirt
that I had brought with me out to
practice. It was a red flannel
shirt Brady remembered.
"Coach Emory voted me 'best
dressed' player of the day
For Bourgeois, one practice
will always come to mind when
talking about embarrassment.
"On my first day as starting
center, we went into the huddle
and coach 'Z' (John Zernhelt)
told me 'third down As center, I
was supposed to call the down,
but I was so nervous that I
forgot.
"He said 'say it Bourg, say it
1 thought he was trying to get me
fired up, so I started yelling 'All
right! Let's go said Bourgeois.
"Coach 'Z' said, 'No Bourg, call
third down I was so embarrass-
ed. Then when we lined up, no
one could keep a straight face
and everyone was snickering
Hoggard was nervous on his
first plane ride with the team and
it's something that he'll never
forget. "We were flying to
Florida and I was sitting between
former teammates Norman
Quick and John Floyd Hog-
gard recalled. "The plane hit
some turbulence and that scared
me. Then those two starting pray-
ing to God not to let us die. I
started praying too because I was
scared
As the season comes to an end,
all are looking towards the
future. Brady, a construction ma-
jor, plans to return to Penn-
sylvania He has reached one
goal, the chance to play college
football. Because of his interests
in politics, his next goal is to
become a Senator.
Struyk's goal ; to play profes-
sional football. .s for the rest of
the "hogs they plan to teach
and coach. That is everyone ex-
cept Greg Thomas.A pre-med
major who idolizes Freddie
Kruger because of his wildness
and aggressiveness, Thomas
dreams of a medical career while
his immediate dream is for a
good game against Miami. He
said that's one thing he's learned
about playing football. "It
doesn't matter if it's a big name
school, it's the team that's most
prepared that's gonna win said
Thomas.
These years at ECU have been
special to the "hogs According
to Hoggard. he wouldn't have
traded it "for anvthing in the
world
Alexander probably said it best
when he summed up what being a
"hog" has meant to him. "Being
a "hog" has meant very special
and lasting friendships. It is
special because we all have came
through this together and have
the chance to finish up together "
More B-b
Continued frum page 8
lobinson and could easilv a
( as far as last vear (the I
ight) despite a coacl � ange
nd heavv personnel losse
The Crimson Tide I abama
eturn premier -hot-blocker Der-
jck McKc. fi -r. the goldn �
korld championship team
eceive our vote for the I2tl
ion The Tide a riavi
uard Terr (oner
rsenal and should be
f the SEC race
After waiting for supei
�atnek Ewing and V�ae: ��
o depart the Big i
erence, Pittsburgh w
chance to prove
n& prove it 'he-
arn the luck) ! 5tl
;harles Smith, Den -
nd Curt r �:�-
oach Paul Evau
oach) will have U
possibly one a, i
o the final eight
The 14th team
0's third repress
toll. Re- .
-lawkeye's is (ie
Lot" Wright, k
orenzen The Havs �
najor concern I
eason will be
heir schedule
The ACC's
ative, Clem so r
ranee in our pol
5 position. The
great recruiting
( Ifc
I
anc
Intram
Informal Rt

I
i
V
s.
i
Pictured above is ECU's version of the "hog The senior offensive ilVTtromlniTZu
Autry (62), Paul Hoggard (69), Ken Bourgeois (52), Curtis Struyk (61), Roher EILnwSPS?
Thomas (57) and Shawn Brady (67). � 'uexM�r (76), Greg
n - ,v � r
V,
Shimming Ptt. l�
Eereie l
Now
- - rt i
. � c '
V�. .
y& .
M&
Vs �
'�.
vS '
M
v "

tSi
;
i.v ' '
I
i.

� �
v ft v,
T & T!
i�.
W , i.
n�
s�
Sat
i i
� , MM HHH�
iV i
�i





m
ori.
More
tiff Buc Defense Shaping I

i

mf '
Imiiaiia Paces
tL 4
$. � M
tball Poll
i�ior Offensive I ine

Memone
, , i v version o( th hogs I h, imm lim includ
Vutn I62l, Pa .1 H( tgard 6� Ken Bourj , ��
I �� 1 � " 1 mill shn � 11 H .i '





Page g
Shaping Up
a iisl 98 rushing varJs
28 :a es (including QB
� d two time honorable
N merica Reggie
- 104 yards on 18
s currenth fifth
ush rig with an
yards per
ved
that we rcalh
i coach Dave
e held Reggie
- defens held us
tker
- a be
veek w hen the ak
M i - Hur-
hopes
-i�. amsi
umila
dicatioi �
� i sup
� i nl
�i'
1 Poll
L.ime
should make
he three-point
it Marl md John
ink this
- J ear for
er, the
Br
Yellow
b � remins
e oads.
r mple,
and Duane
a�e een
ai
t e;
� i t h o u t
ington get
umber 10 team
center Ron
Ad men prospects
nps n and Derrick
the Orangemen
- better results than
gl �� was around.
imbcr 11 team in our
-omes trom our ver own
the CAA. The Mid-
:n from Navy have the na-
s premier bigman in David
see MORE, page 9
Sports Fact
I hur. Nov. 20. 1982
i �ses � ��: laterals
f the game to
25-2 To
own.
1 players have to
weav - wa
b h the
lact
ones
ECU have been
According
he wouldn't have
"for anything in the
ald it best
h inimedupwhatbeinga
nog has meant to him. "Being
a "hof as mean; very special
anc friendships. It is
e we all have came
rough 8ether and have
�ne chance to finish up together '
1
I
in

m

,Ti iud�8 ltrom kfl to right) Rich
More
Continued from page 8
Robinson and could easily make
il as far as last year (the final
eight) despite a coaching change
and heavy personnel losses.
The Crimson Tide of Alabama
return premier shot-blocker Der-
rick McKey from the goldmedal
world championship team and
receive our vote for the 12th posi-
tion The Tide also have point-
�niard Terry Coner in their
arsenal and should be in the thick
of the SEC race.
After waiting for super stars
Patrick Ewing and Walter Berry
to depart the Big East con-
ference, Pittsburgh will now have
a chance to prove their worth.
�nd prove it they should as they
earn the lucky 13th spot. With
Charles Smith, Demetreus Gore
and Curtis Aiken. first-year
coach Paul Evans (former Navy
coach) will have the talent to
ossibry once again lead a team
to the final eight.
The 14th team, Iowa, is the Big
10's third representative in our
poll. Returning for the
Hawkeye's is Gerry "Sir Jam-A-
ot" Wright, Roy Marble and Al
: orenzen. The Hawkeye's only
major concern heading into the
reason will be the difficulty of
their schedule.
The ACC's third represen-
tative, Clemson, makes it's en-
hance in our poll at the number
15 position. The Tigers, who had
i great recruiting year, return
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 20. 1986
Horace Grant, Grayson Marshall
and Anthony Jenkins. Add
Syracuse transfer Michael Brown
and the Tigers could surprise
some people on Tobacco Road.
Although talented guard Steve
Kerr suffered an off-season knee
jury in the World Champion-
snips, Lute Olson and his
Arizona Wildcats are number 16.
Sean Elliott, a rising talent at for-
ward, should be enough to boost
the Wildcats to the Pac-10 cham-
pionship.
At number 17, (out of respect
lor Marketing whiz John
AlthofO is the Fightin'IUini of Il-
linois. The return of Doug
Altenberger from injury and
senior center Ken Norman along
with seven highly touted
freshmen make Lou Hensen's
squad a force to be reckoned
with.
The surprise of the poll (for
now anyway) is Duke who gains
our vote for number 18. The Blue
Devils, although without the ser-
vices of Dawkins, Alarie,
Henderson and Bilas, are still
gonna give the ACC foes fits.
Duke returns Tommy Amaker,
Danny Ferry, Billy King, Kevin
Strickland and Quin Snyder.
They easily handled the tourin'
squad from the Soviet Union this
year. We guess Duke coach Mike
Krzyzewski scored a victory for
the Polish with the win over the
Commies.
At number 19 is Notre Dame.
Head coach Digger Phelps will
have no worries at the point
guard spot with the return of
speedy David Rivers. The Irish
also will have the services of
prep-all america Keith Robinson.
The final spot in the poll goes
to the Hurricanes of Miami, Fl.
With leading scorer Eric Brown
coming back along with all five
starters and the addition of the
much-travelled Tito Horford,
look for the Hurricanes to make
waves before the season is over.
Others To Keep An Eye On:
N.C. State, Georgetown,
Villanova, UCLA, California
Cleveland State, DePaul,
Florida, Temple, Western Ken-
tucky and LSU.
Rappin and Slick's
Top Twenty Picks
1.Indiana
2.Louisville
3.North Carolina
4.Nevada-Las Vegas
5.Purdue
6. Kansas
7.Auburn
8.Kentucky
9.Georgia Tech
10.Syracuse
1 l.Navy
12. Alabama
13.Pittsburgh
14. Iowa
15.Clemson
16. Arizona
17.Illinois
18.Duke
19.Notre Dame
20.Miami, Fl.
Classifieds
SALE
KATZ PERSONALIZED COM-
PUTER DATING SERVICE: Can
nelp you find that someone special
with whom to spend the holidays.
Whether you want a serious rela
tionahip or (ust to meet many new
friends we can help. Everything con
fidentlal and all referrals personally
given. 355 7595.
MOUSE FOR SALE BY OWNER.
211 Adams Blvd. 4 bedrooms, 2 baths
on large wooded lot with end of
street privacy, $6,000 down and
assume 9'2 percent fha loan with p
and I payments of $447 93. Call
752 2334 after 5.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Experienced, quality work,
IBM Selectric typewriter Call Lanie
Shive at 758 5301
TYPING: Low rates. Proofreading,
grammatical corrections 10 years
experience 757 0398 after 6 p m
TERM PAPERS TYPED: $15 per
term paper, no matter how long your
paper runs. Proofreading done free
of charge. You supply your work ana
a couple of pages of typing paper, I'll
supply the work. 752 0212, between
3 6, any day but Sunday
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc. Call
Anne at 752 3015 and leave a
message
KATZ PERSONALIZED COM-
PUTER DATING SERVICE: An
nounces the opening of a new club in
addition to its regular club. Because
of the large response from PROFES
SIONAL SINGLES we will have a
separate club for those people in-
terested in meeting other profes
sionals. Call 355 7595 or write to P O
Box 8003, Greenville, NC 27835.
CARTOON CARICATURES: Make
great Christmas presents! Call
752 5910 or write: "The Cartoon
Shop, 1102 Monroe St Greenville
N.C. 27834"
20 TOP HITS: LP's. cassettes, or
compact disds are yours for only 50
cents each Buy one at regular price
and receive additional selection tor
only fifty cents Rock Pop Soul
Country Jazz. If its sold in a record
store, we have it too! You can save
up to $200 or more! Satisfaction
guaranteed or money back! Order
now send only $10 for each Super
Discount 20 Coupon Booklet to
Down East Marketing, PO Box 190
Ayden, NC 28513
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom apartment
for rent in Bryton Hills $250 a
month. Call after 9:30 p.m or before
9 30 a.m. 752 4131.
ALL TYPING NEEDS: Lowest
rates on campus include: pro
ofreading, spelling and gram
matical corrections. Over 10 years
experience. Call 7570398 and leave
message or call after 5.15 p.m.
FOR SALE: '76 Cheverte. 4 speed
Good condition $825 Call 752 6597
TYPING: Done on a work processor
with letter quality printer Years of
experience typing for students and
many more years of secretarial ex
perience that can fulfill all your
secretarial needs 50,000 word die
tionary ana thesaurus, and profes
sional proofing for grammatical er
ror low student prices, call Debbie
at 355 7595
FOR SALE: Volvo '71 2 door, stick
shift, gold color A good buy at $700
Call 753 2325.
FOR RENT: Semi-private room
with kitchen privileges for 2 females
or 2 males, $90month, or private
room with kitchen privileges,
$l45month. Good constructive
students. 758 2201
HOLIDAY GIFT SALE: Many
items, oriental style, $1 $99 1308
Dickinson Ave Nov. 22, Sat, 9-1
Other times call 752 3464
TYPING AND WORD PROCESS-
ING: Experienced secretary wIBM
computer anq letter quality printer
can fulfill all your typing anc
secretarial needs Theses, business
letters, resumes and mailing labels
Call Donna at 355 6434.
See CLASSIFIEDS, page 10
Intramural- Recreation
ft
Y

k-
lr formal Recreation
Mrmoilal Gymnasium
. L 0 .
. J �
lit-
Weight k orrts
I .�
Mivj�
ntjl p crams
� ' 1000 �
'v - 3 00 M
� � 8 00 -v,
0 �v I0O0 �
!0�i� Si i
r iji re with
Equipment Check out
Mrmonai Gym I
vf1 Fn7 ;0 ,M
s - II OO-
Si:n 12 ��.
tacquetDiil Courts
Rfservatii ns : jn be mjJe ,r
i 15 Memorial Gym r by , i
�:
Racquetball Tournamnent
I 0 00 � �
5 00 'v
3 00 �.
erson m
lg 757
2 5 O F F
I.
Oi
s
'hts tu ket it good for 25 OKF the price fcr
"iHl TIME Of- YOUR LiFE"
You pick the p!ace ihe tims ard �he activ�t
Th OUTDOOR RECREATION CENTER
Xe�
will provide the jeai
; a 2b discount off the regular rate
for equipment rentals
��? �
C,
Swimming P�v,l� "�rL
The Racquetball Singles Tourna-
ment is in the final week of ex-
citing competition. The outcome
of the men's intermediate divi-
sion is still a toss up with Patrick
Ricci, Jim Parks, and Tom
Flowers leading the competition.
Results of some of the more
closely contested games include:
Jim Parks defeating Kevin Up-
church. 15-6, 13-15, 11-5; Patrick
Ricci defeating Kevin Platkin.
�ok $
15-13, 17-15; Clark Smith
defeating John Weakland, 15-10
9-15. 11-5.
Individuals interested in com-
peting in the spring Racquetball
Tournament are encouraged to
register January 26 in 105-C
Memorial Gymnasium. Mark
your calendar today and come on
out and join the fun.
e j
it you present th hcket. su-fw'
OFFER LXPIRES MARCH 16 1987
B
r
Department of Intiamw -RecreationalServices
Fail . 26
Free Fitness Class Coupon
'� : '� �� ���.�' is entitled to
one fu c - ! : tonn . oi aq larobics
rhis coupon must bi ; v n, ! with valid ECU identification
to the � mess das endant or instructor
VALID VhHOUCH 'A LiiMBEP 16 19?6
This holiday season,
get the'We Stuff'
at the right price.
Now you can get the competitive
edge when classes begin in January With a
Macintosh� personal computer, and ail the
write extras
We call it the Macintosh Write stuff
bundle You'll call it a great deal' Because
when you bu a Macintosh 'Write Stuff"
bundle before January 9. 1987, you'll receive
a bundle of extras�and save (250
Not only will you get your choice of a
Macintosh SIJK Enhanced or a Macintosh
Plus, you'll also get an Image Writer II
printer, the perfect solution for producing
near letter-quality term papers or reports,
complete with graphs, charts, and
illustrations.
Plus, you'll get Macughtning.
(he premier spelling checker con-
taining an 80.000 word dictionary
thesaurus, medical or legal dictionaries
Together with your favorite Macintosh word
processing software, you can transform
vour notes into the clearest, most letter
perfect papers you ever turned out And
turned in n time
What's more, there s a Macintosh
Support Kit tilled with valuable accessories
and computer care products from M
Complete with all the things you need to
keep vour Macintosh running long after
you've graduated
Let us show you how to get through
college better, faster, and smarter Stop in
and see us for more information
STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
East Carolina University
"Off Good VbtU ufiflMS tost C � W Omhuter Ik uU m- ,� ,
tt- rfmtrr m HmZjgflrnpg tv a trademark y Jaryet cftmmn h

mwnpii'1
I





10
THfcEASTC AKOI IMAN
NOVEMBER 20. ISW
Classifieds
PERSONAL
frODD KIRKPATRICK
(thaay pig guy j
Happ
y Br J
TRIPP R; Were proud to have you
as our Big Brother You've captured
our Golden Hearts Can't wait til
PJ PJ Luv ya. Pam Ann
ATTENTION KA BROTHERS '
PLEDGES: Be prepared guys to
Pick up where we've left off on the
24th i You'll have your work cut out
for you to catch up Can't wait 'til it
comes With the highest of admira
tion always, Your Little Sisters '
Pledges
CRAIG AND BOBBY: Itsoonwillbe
fime to drink beer and wine at the
ZTA formal Well nde the limo all
ghf till we're feelin' just right then
amve at the dub feeling abnormal.
o rest up while you can so you can
Darty Uke a man Wp can,t wait
ove Debbie � Ann!
TODD M: iet me tell you what Dr
said to try a Rose Ball
Aeekendmva Beach to party with
an AOTT Suzanne
CONGRATULATIONS: Kat Jef
res Mitz. Craddock, Myra Ac
3nd Laura Brown, ana Harriet
.aer for bemg the little sister
? nai sts for P, Kappa Alphas
Dreamgirl Good Luck Thursday
night at Greenville C C thePlKAS
TO THE TKE s: Monday night
sooai what a surprise We kidnap
ped the sisters ana covered their
eyes When we got to the house
everything was set The kegs were
a"c t go even better et we
parried down and danced an night,
he cops showed up, and tried
� rig us a frighl But, that's OKay
� "e party came to an end We'll
ust get together and do it again!
-ove the ADTT pledges
ATTENTION ALL ZETAS The
fimeisnear co-our 1st Crown Ball
Ae have nothing to tear? Tradition
beg i You know the place and
e So see you at the club1! P S
-ook for the sign G C C ZTA
SHADES: JuSt wanted to let you
know how glad I am we're together!
You are definately the one Also,
thanks for not ,usf being my
boyfriend but for being my pest
friend! Love -a' Your Neighbor
DEARMR. VICE . Good luck tomor
rOWnghtBe easyon them.LH
P SDon'tnax.e anyplans for efter
,aris
TO THE PINKETTES OP THE
PINK ROOM: Get psyched for this
week-ena. roomies! Roseball '86 will
oe a bias Remember we'll be able
to leave e 'a" at home! i love you
guys Ames
KRISTl SCHIPPER: Get ready for
this wee ena. little sis' Th.s is your
? rr,p t; s- ne rCve jQij A
VBS
TO ALL DC BOUND DELTA
ZETAS sa f time for that trip
lortti to Vary aa Tne caravan
a eave Pr-oay afternoon as plan
ned The cars will rocK and roll the
whole way there i hope the Koutras,
Schm z Aooten, Mangumano
Va- ooc mouses can stand the
wear ana ear We'll sight see and
s"oc arouna capitoi hill, but aon't
get oo t rec because we've go
another still, in Georgetown we'll
meet reaay for fun, we'll party till
we see fne sun. ana when we leave
fhey'l nave to admit those Delta
Zeta s can definitely work it PS
Don' forget the party at Anne's Fri
ca gnt
ANNE RAAMOT: Drinkouruice
ac takeyour pillsyoure nouse
when youare ill!Loveyou,The
Eas Caron a"

DELTA SIGMA THETA: ThesiSters
and pledges of Delta Zeta would like
to thank ya'll for coming over to our
ice cream party We're happy that
everyone enjoyed themselves Good
luck with the rest of the semester!
Lefs do it again soon! always
fr ends, the Delta Zetas
TUXEDOS: Anyone needing formal
wear this fall for any occassion
please contact Jon Reibel at
757 0351
LOST: Late October Small (301b.)
female dog, short, straight black
hair except browns around forearms
and calves Distinguishing white
area on nose and chest Reward of
fered for information 757 366A
TO JULIAN ' TODD: We just don't
want to do right The 18th was a trip
We have to do it again before the
year is up We want to take you two
out to dinner Or we can always eat
at your place, the cafeteria Please
don't go to our ("�) Julian PS Todd
we love your earring From The
Laid Back Three M S . K A , j H
HOT DEADSET Don't miss
ROCK OUTLET tomorrow night on
WZMB 91 3 FM Garcia is in his
prime in Kansas City 8 3 82 Have a
blank tape ready you'll thank me
for it! Also, confirmed dates on both
coasts New Years is coming soon
See you there!
ATTENTION KA LITTLE SISTER
PLEDGES. We're looking forward
to the scavenger hunt at 7 30 p m
Nov 24th. so don't miss it! Along
with a little pre celebrating of our
own for Thanksgiving, before we let
the guys in Be prepared for all sorts
of surprises You're doing a stupen
dous 10b and remember we love you
all! Love always your little sisters
CHI OMEGA PLEDGES Were
really looking forward to Saturday
night Hope you are too Have a good
time Love, the Sisters of Chi
Omega
CHI OMEGA WHITE CARNATION
DATES: The event of ft-e year has
arrived Cant wait to party with
ya'll Saturday night Love, the
Sisters and Pledges of Chi Omega
LINDA HUGHES: Just wanted yOi
to remember you're still the best lil
sis Get ready for this weekend
Love, Kim
DEAR TKE HEGEMON: The morn
mg came a little too soon 1 wished if
hadn't rained so we could have seen
the moon Even though I thought the
"event" would always last, we
stayed up late and had a blast! But
when I saw you with that great big
smile, l knew that things had been
worthwhile! Love Me P S You
done good!
KRISTEN AND MELODY: Thanks
for making the weekend the best it
could! When you walked into the
dance all eyes were glued to the two
most beautiful girls in the room The
weekend is one we will never forget
The flannel and silk was a nice
touch! Love, Eric and Tom
DIABETICS: Fellow student work
mg on research paper requests five
minutes of your time for brief ques
tionnaire Help greatly appreciated
Call Rick 752 1108
TKE's: Another great weekend has
come and gone Thanks to the little
sister pledges we partied till dawn!
We all had a Sfine time but don't you
forget that Monday is our
Thanksgiving dinner and that will be
the best time yet Love TKE Lit
Sisters
PAM: Yes the big 4 has come. It's
been great and so have you, that's
why 1 love you Love, SPANKY
ECU LED ZEPPLIN FANS. Bring
this ad with you on Saturday for a
discount to see "Stairway to
Heaven" at the Attic
WOODY: The rose was beautiful
The chopsticks were fun The ice
cream was pleasing, but the best
part was the company! Love, Some
Jersey Girl P s Can I make you
smile again ' again?
TO JOEL AND DAVID: We want
you to know we love and miss you
We can't wait to see you' Forever
yours Angie and Laura
SIGMA TAU GAMMA: We know the
scam that is taking place! Don't
think we don't You can't escape our
reach Watch out for us in
Greensboro
COLLEGE REP WANTED: To
distribute "Student Rate" subscrip
fion cards at this campus Good in
come For information and applica
fion write to COLLEGIATE
MARKETING SERVICES, 251 Glen
wood Dr , Mooresville, NC 28115
704 664 4063
INTRO. TO LOGIC TUTOR NEED
ED IMMEDIATELY Call Boyette
at 752 1182
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
To share 2 bedroom apt $l40month
and 12 utilities 4 blocks from cam
pus Non smoker preferred Lori,
752 7396
&b
ene
HcJ
Benetton
638 Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, NC
355-7473
Store Hours
10 6 Mon Sat
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
To share an apaartment with 2 other
girls Rent is S90month plus ' 3
utilities and phone If interested,
please call 756 5920 or 752 9717
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
To share a furnished 2 bedroom apt
$135month and '2 utilities Located
on 10th St Call 758 9048
WANTED
WANTED: School representative
for collegiate sporting company
Great pay Call collect
1 813 346 2009
GEORGETOWN APARTMENTS:
Need 1 or 2 female roommates for
Dec 1 and next semester! Great
location across from downtown!
Practically on campus! All new
pamt ano carpet Call 752 9245 Keep
frying
WITNESSES NEEDED We
need witnesses for the accident that
occurred Wednesday, Nov 12 in
front of the Brewster Building
Please call 757 6087 or 757 6486
RIDE NEEDED TO VIRGINIA
BEACH: Can leave Friday the 21st
after 12 Please call Pat at 752 6233
or 757 6366
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
To share 3 bedroom apt S130month
and '3 utilities. Wilson Acres Apts
Fully furnished except for bed Call
757 1208
TUTOR NEEDED FOR BIOLOGY
1050: Call after 9 30 p m or before
9 30 a m 752 4131
LOST COCKER SPANIEL PUPPY:
On Tuesday in the Elm st area
Blonde female with blue collar
Reward offered 752 2636
W k V
AUDITION
FOR
SOMETHING
CRAND!
PINEHURST
COUNTRY CLUB
PRESENTS AUDITIONS FOR:
CAROLINA GULF
1201 Dickinson Ve
752-7270
Do It With Us - We P l A Dei
ZMB On A Roll
The WZMB volleyball
Team is on a roll this
season. The Z-Team
Spikers are 4-1 this year
and will be plaing in the
second round of the
playoffs Thursda in
Minges at 10:30 p.m.
6 Singer Dancers
POSITIONS OPEN
4 instrumentalists
1 Drummer 1 Bass player i Keyboardist 1 Guitar piaye-
AUDITION DATES
UNC Chapel Hill
university of NC Greensboro
East Carolina university
Sat Dec 6.AS Fletcher Rehearsal Hall 101,12 5p m
Pmehurst Country Club
r " 'urifcr nf �rmaMl � .Jfc.
CAROLINA CRISIS
PREGNANCY CENTER
1 1 1 East Third Street The Lee Building
Greenville, North Carolina
Free Pregnanc TestConfidential
Counseling
All Services and referrals are free of charge
The Center is open Tuesdays from 10-2,
Wednesdays and Thursdays from 10 5 and by
appointment. For qd appointment or more
information call 24-Hour Helpline 757-0003
.��utiuiitmiMrM.�l��.�TT
REBEL 87
BUT (OltlPETIOn
Call forEntries
REQUIREMENTS
Presents
Friday November 21
Direct From Myrtle Beach
Open to ECU students
Limit of 5 pieces per
artist
2-D work must be ready
to hang, framed or
matted and acetated
Ultraflash Female Review
MEN ONLY
Doors Open at 7:30
Show at 8:00
Continue Partying . . .
Everyone admitted FREE at 10:30 after the sho.
BRING IN THIS AD AND GET $2.00 OFF
ADMISSION.
No Admitting Ages M d Up
I ibert Ride 758-5570
Door Open at 9:00
A completed entry form
must accompany each
piece
A $1.00 entry fee per
piece
3-D work must be self
supporting
CATEGORIES
Illustration
Mixed Media
Painting
ENTRY DATE
Monday, November 24, 1986, 9-5 p.m.
Bring entries to Mendenhall, from 9-5 p.m.
Winners will be on display in the ECU Library
December 1-6, with a reception on December 1 from
7-8 p.m. at Mendenhall
PRIZES
Best in Show $130.00
First Place per Category $30.00
i
Ceramics
Design
Drawing
Photography
Printmaking
Sculpture
ATTIC
art j( cQucfQ hop
518 SOUTH COTAMCHE Sm&f
GHCENVH.LI. KC. 27834
752-0688
I





Title
The East Carolinian, November 20, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 20, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.510
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy