The East Carolinian, November 13, 1986







$ht
(Eawlmtan
Serving the East Carol ma campus community
since 1925
November 13, 1986
New Chancellor Candidates
Plan Visit To ECU Campus
Bv PATT1 KEMM1S
Nf�v Kdilor
According to Ralph Kinsey,
chairman of the Board of
rrustees, two candidates for the
iob of chancellor will be visiting
campus in the upcoming weeks
Gregor O'Brien, provosl at
the University of South Honda in
Tampa, will be here No. 19-21,
while Richard Eakin. vice presi-
dent for planning and budgeting
at Bowlmg (ireen State Universi-
ty in Ohio, will be visiting Vu
23-25.
kmsev said their visits will give
the adminstration, faculty and
students a chance to meet the
candidates.
O'Brien. 42. has been the the
vice president ol academic affairs
and provost at I'SF sinceOctober
1983.
He received a bachelor's degree
in social relations from 1 ehigh
University in 1966 and a master'
m psychology from Boston
University.
He has worked at Harvard
Medical School, the University of
Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and the
University of Michigan Flint
since receiving his doctorate.
O'Brien is married and has two
children.
Fakin, 48, received a
bachelor's degree in math and
physics from Geneva College in
I960, and a master's from
Washington State University. He
�hen earned a doctorate in math
form WSU in 1964.
Eakin has been at Bowling
Green since 1964, when he served
a, an assistant professor. While
at Bowling Green, he has been
assistant dean of the graduate
school and director of graduate
admissions, vice provost for stu-
dent affairs , vice provost for
planning and budgeting and is
now the vice president for plann-
ing and budgeting.
Fakin is also married and has
two children.
The 11 member search commit-
tee responsible for Finding can-
didates to take Chancellor John
Howell's place has choosen less
than five nominees from the 186
applications received since the
committee formed in February,
1986. The committee will submit
two nominations for the job to
the Board of Trustees and to the
University of North Carolina
system by January. The UNC
Board of Governors will then be
sent one of these nominations for
approval.
Howell announced last vear
that he would retire no late than
June 30, 1987. He has been
chancellor since 1982. Before he
was chancellor, Howell served at
ECU as a professor of political
science and dean, provost and
vice chancellor for academic af-
fairs.
Chancellor John Howell will be retiring no later than Jun
be visiting campus next week.
e 30. 1V8" fwo candidates for the job will
New Law Has Effect On Area Taverns
B DON RELTER
Iml Reflector suft
The legal drinking age
North Carolina residents
raised from 19 to 21 just over two
months ago. bin Greenville
tavern owners sdv the change has
alreadv watered down 'heir pro
Fits
for
was
"There has been an across-the-
board decrease in business among
all clubs in the state of North
Carolina that cater to crowds in
the 18- to 30-year old range
said Tom Haines, president of
the Greenville Nightclub Associa-
tion.
"Speciallv hard hit are the col-
lege towns and the resorts com-
munities, but we won't see about
them until next summer
Some bars have been able to
trace their losses directly to their
monthly profits since the drink-
ing age was raised on Sept. 1, ac-
cording to Robert Saieed, owner
of Rafters nightclub at the corner
of Fifth Street and Reade Circle.
'We're off bv at least 40 per
-��, " �� "ii civ at least 40
Expert Lectures On Hunger
� VIRGINIA LIVINGSTON
Staff Writer
"Beyoi the Myths of Hunger:
Towards a Politics of Hope" will
be 're topic of a speech bv the co-
founder of the Institute for Food
and Development, Joseph Col-
lins.
C ollins will be giving his speech
next Tuesday, Nov. 18, at 7 p.m.
in Fletcher Music Auditorium.
Collins, who holds a doctorate
in public policy from Columbia
University, has traveled exten-
sively to research the causes of
hunger and has published manv
books on the subject of hunger
and its causes.
His work with the poor and the
hungry began in the late 50's and
early 60's when he was a
missionary-in-training with
Maryknoll parish priests in Latin
America and Southeast Asia.
It was in the slums of Chile, the
highlands of Guatemala and the
Philippine island of Mindanao
that Collins realized his life work
would be bringing the realities of
underdevelopment to Americans
He said, "1 began to see how all
of our lives are interconnected. 1
decided to help more of my
fellow Americans understand
how our choices, our society and
our government, affect people's
lives in the rest of the world
This decision led him to obtain
his doctorate. He worked at the
Institute for Policy Studies from
1971 to 1973. He directed the
research that led to the publica-
tion of "Global Research the
first major study of the global-
spanning powers of multinational
corporations.
He collaborated on a report to
the 1974 LN. World Food Con-
ference in Rome. The paper was
the First to challenge the accepted
view of hunger: hunger was caus-
ed by scarcity, overpopulation
and malevolent nature. From
then Collins began to work on en-
ding the myths of hunger and
began to try and change interna-
tional understanding of hunger.
Collin founded the Institute
for Food and Development with
the author of the best-seller,
"Diet for a Small Plant
Frances Moore Lappe in 1975.
They refused to accept corporate
and government donations so
their research and education
center could be free of outside
pressures. They began extensive
research in Africa, Asia and
Latin America and two vears
later produced "Food First:
Beyond the Myth of Scarcity
This book proved that hunger
and poverty were not inevitable
but the result of the world's food
production being ever-
lncreasingly concentrated.
Since "Food First Collins
and Lappe have collaborated on
other books that dispell the
myths of hunger. Several of these
books have become required
reading for development
workers.
In 1979. Collins went to
Nicaragua, at the government's
request, to advise their Ministry
Of Agriculture on agrarian
reform and food policies. After
four years of study Collins
published a study on the suc-
cesses and failures of creating a
food system that would benefit
all the people. Collins also co-
authored the first comprehensive
anayisis of food and agricultural
policies in Cuba that was based
on on-the-ground research.
According to the sponsors of
Collins' presentation, Collins
chose East Carolina over Duke
and several other schools that
were vying the hear his message.
cent he said. "The bars
downtown depend almost entire-
ly on students and we're down on
weekdavs especiallv
Meanwhile, others say thev
haven't been affected too harshlv
bv the change in the law.
"I don't believe business has
slacked off that much said Bar-
bara .McDade, daytime manager
of New Deli, a restaurant on
Cotanche Street which serves as a
nightclub on some evenings.
However, Ms. McDade said
New Deli is primarilv a
restaurant.
Despite the expected losses,
Haines said the taverns are sur-
viving.
"To our surprise, we haven't
been devastated said Haines.
who is a part-owner of the Attic
Rock &. Roll and Grog's
nightclub, both located on Fifth
Street. "Even though we've seen
a dropoff, no one to this point
has gone out of business because
of it
Some taverns have been able to
alter admission policies in order
to regain some profits, according
to Haines, who said North
Carolina bar owners have an ad-
vantage over those in several
others states.
"Luckily, 18, 19 and 20-year-
olds are still allowed to enter
establishments Haines said.
"In Georgia, you must be 21 to
get into a place that's a night
club.
"They (the customers) are still
coming out here if they wan-
entertainment or to see a good
band. They accept the fact tha'
thev can't drink and still come
down
Saieed said under-age
customers are still spending
money in his club.
"We're letting 18, 19. and
20-veat-olds in and putting arm
bands on Lhem Saieed
"We also have a small door
charge on them. Thev also buv
some soda.
"We're going o remodel our
format to attract younger
people
Raising the drinking age has
not accomplished what it wa-
designed to do, according to
Haines and Saieed.
"This law basically has ac-
complished nothing more than
making law abiding people
criminals Haines said. "In two
polls taken after the drinking age
was raised, under-age people
gave a 100 percent negative
response" to obeying the law.
"Any time you create a law
that nobody breaks, it's stupid,
and any time you have a law that
everyone breaks, there are pro-
blems
"If it (the law) was working, it
would be better Saieed said.
"But now, all we have is under-
age drinking going
unc
-
� . : � n V
r,c age
"Wl
� � ' i lent
-otc wit
ids H i
� ing � v Utopiai :ie
'�. and ��� c
� �
KJs�j on err. -arher than
Meanwhile, Ha es c
c � mwc in - m.
pact In v�
drink at ��. rial age
' Nor ma � la w -abid
citizens are considered
criminals Haines sa;d It
the respect thev hav aWi
They feel the law is so unfair that
thev autom ica - le. I:
makes it easier for then con-
sider breaking other law. h
creates a disrespc. I foi the whole
svsiern.
"You're telling adults I at hey
are old enough and responsible
enough to vote, fighl for their
country, buv a house, raise a
familv, but they're i old
enough or responsible .
drink a beer
Furthermore, the new drinking
policy has put drinking back in
ee BARS paue 2.
'Fantasy9 Performs Saturday
By SCOTT COOPER
W lo The
I tut Oral Mm
� LLBN MURFMY� The
Wet Yet?
While most students hurry through the rain, some of us seem oblivious to the wetness.
Lak
ECU's Fantasy, a group spon-
sored by the sign language club,
will be giving their fall perfor-
mance "Fantasy, American
Style" Sat. Nov 15 in Fletcher
Recital Hall at 8 p.m. Admission
will bc$l.
An off-shoot of the sign-
language club, Fantasy is made
up of hearing and hearing-
impaired students who perform
popular songs and skits in sign
language. The group, which was
started in 1978, has grown rapid-
ly and has performed on many
occassions throughout Eastern
North Carolina.
Pam King, ECU's Fantasy
director, is excited about the
group and said that their purpose
is to provide a service to the deaf
and hearing impaired.
"Fantasy is basically set up to
provide deaf and hearing-
impaired people to see and hear
music King said. "It's kind of
a way of 'showing' them music.
We have a different way of per-
forming � it's kind of like lips n
cing songs.
"We've performed all over the
place � for basketball games at
halftime, in front of the student
stores, in malls. We performed
for the School of the Deaf in
Wilson King continued. "We
usually do one large one (perfor-
mance) in the fall and another
one in the spring. Whoever asks
us, we'll perform for 'em
Fantasy has about 10 to 30
members, varying from time to
time, according to King. Current-
ly, there are about 25, with a
dozen practicing for Saturday's
big performance.
Sign language club president
Allison Carreras and vice presi-
dent Jeff Campagna are equally
excited about the program.
"I love it. It's a great feeling to
be able to sing a song with your
hands. We've travelled to some
small towns to perform and this
year we've been invited to per-
form in New Mexico Carreras
said. "I live with a hearing-
impaired person and just to show
her what's on the radio� is reallv
whv I enjoy it
"I'm verv pleased with it (the
group). It's been verv educational
for me and the people we per-
form for sophomore Cam-
pagna said. "It's a lot of hard
work, but it's been a great ex-
perience � that's why I plan to
stay with it for three more vears
I really enjoy the people I work
with and performing for other
people
Fantasy performs for everyone
of all ages and for both hearing
as well as the deaf and hearing
impaired. The group urges all
students, facultv and residents to
come out and see their perfor-
mance Saturday night.
(Special thanks to Co-Sports
Editor, Scott Cooper j
ON THE INSIDE
Crime Column 3
Editorials4
Entertainment7
Sports10
Announcements2
Classifieds12
�New movie
reviewed� see
MENT page 7.
Soul Man
ENTERTAIN-
�Men and women's swim teams
keep perfect scores� see
SPORTS page 10.

VI
r- - � " �





NOVEMBER 13.1986
Bars Lose Business.
Continued from page 1.
the cars, which is the reason why
the law was changed in the first
Place, according to Haines.
"Under the old law, people
were drinking a large percentage
of their consumption in a con-
trolled situation by the drink in a
bar with a bartender or a bouncer
telling them when they had
enough, and they were cut off
he said.
"Now, we have an uncontroll-
ed situation where people buy it
by the case, by the bottle and by
the keg. It is consumed in larger
quantities and in uncontrolled
situations in apartments and back
in cars. And that's the one thing
we were trying to do away with
Haines said beer sales at other
Greenville outlets where alcohol
is available are up.
"Sales of beer on the wholesale
level are up in Greenville since the
age was raised while nightclubs
are showing a decline he said.
Furthermore, while nightclub
owners are often overlooked as
members of the business com-
munity, Haines said they should
receive more respect.
"Greenville clubs historically
have better reputations than most
other towns in North Carolina
he said. "Most of the owners are
college graduates, service
veterans, and teachers. They are
people that are very intelligent
and upstanding citizens
Haines said people need to re-
examine the law and determine
what it has done.
"If anything, the community
should support the idea of the
controlled situation. They should
support what we're doing. People
are social animals, and they will
find one way or another to have
an outlet whether it is profes-
sional and controlled or just
haphazard
(This story was reprinted with the
permission of The Daily Reflec-
tor.)
Stye East (EaralftiUtit
Steve Folmar, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives:
Anne Leigh Mallory John Rusk
Steve Mote Jill Tayloi
Announcements
CLOTHING AND
TEXTILES ASSOC.
I "e C o'ng ana Te�t,� AssOO�tiOP will
n9 a'4 45 on NOv 13 " th( VinLl"
� lgham Roo Tnr� w" ot r�frMhm�Ntf
ao a aues' sceake' We will tw vak ng
Ul Q, sas Dar'v �r c'otn.ng
aiCKs are weicomf
. I v
SRA
Attention Pun Loverj! student Resident
Association ,n conjunction wifn Pizza Hut
will sponsor a blood drive Nov II 19 Irom
13 t pm (n room 344 Mendenh�H Eacn par
ticpant will receive a coupon for a free per
sonai pizza Irom Pizza Hut 01 Greenville
ECUWRESTLINGCLUB
So you want to be a wrestler? There will be
an organizational meeting of the new ECU
wrestling club In room 103 Memorial Gym
Nov 20 a' 8 pm jom us
ECU FANTASY
ght s re-ea-Sa for Fan'iit
A ca-S e beg n a' 6 30 " B'Oiogv
'03 Ree-ff e rjrcsa renearsai on
Nf-or 15 a' 12 00 snarp in Fietcher
�e 'a -a Pfrio-mf,s s'age crew
eber. ushers ac ma ntnance us
sow uc a' 'ie r� ta "a aga " b. nj to
CfM'f or "e s"ow a" S o"
ACT
�"�? A-eca" College Tes'g will be of
�free a Eas' Carol na U-versity on Sa'ur
na. DetemCe, 13 9i6 Appi.ca on blanks
a-p to be cocip're ana maieo to ACT
Reg sa' or po Bo� 414 Iowa c ly iowa
5224C Arc ca' os "us1 be Dos"ariied no
�tH fl. ovemt)er i4 i�� ADC1 ca'ons
nan re rra "ec from �"? ECU Test ng
Cee' Room 105 Soe p Bu 0 ng
ECANS
There wii be a meeting Thurs Nov 13 at 6
pm in the Nso B'ao 101 All nurs,ng
students are encouraged to come Come
00k a' us iow
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
The ECU Chap'er of the College
Republicans meet every Tuesday in room
221 Wendenhall Meetings are at 6 30 pm
Don't believe liberal falsehoods America is
still the h0me of a'a word ana success!
Come 0.n us Diai 830 I2v8 for more ,nor
mation
PRIME TIME
Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Chris!
Th.s Thursday, we are having our weekly
meeting ,n B-ews'e- 102 B at 7 30 pm Come
for Christian tenowsh.p, run, ana how to
walk w th jesus Christ ,n the 30th century to
day We hope ta see you there
BIOLOGY CLUB
The ECU B'Oiogy Oub will have its next
meeting on Von , Nov 17 in BN 102 at 7 pm
D' v.ncent Beiiis will oe speaking on the use
of bioiog.cai resources of Costa Rica impor
fant notice those who plan on working the
b'ooa drive in the spr ng should attend this
meet.ngi New memberships will be takem
SED
ou oa a re'a oe'spec' ve or Cu'
9 a"a r�? Mao � with Reagan s
Ods Acae c ac Centra1
-a' SED iSfucen's For Economic
�a ee'ever, Su"3a, t'Om 7 f pm
n 238 2-3 � oo- Menoe-a
ABORTIOSS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$205 Abortion from I? to 18 weeks at
additional eosi Pregnanc) Tes Birth Control
and Problem Pregnanc Counseling For
further information, call 832-0535 (toll free
number: l-MO-532-5384) between �� a.m. and 5
p.m. v.eckdas. General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Admission $1.50 Guys 50c Ladies
75 TALL CANS & COOLERS
10 DRAFT
ALL NITE
SPECIAL OFFER - THE GOOD STUFF - FOR LESS THAN A BUCK!
TRyHfEnoysNEw
JUST
ONE WEEK ONLY
103 Greenville Blvd.
502 E. Tenth St.
624 S. Memorial Dr.
Special Introductory Offer Ends Nov. 20th

We serve Maxwell House Coffee
A
f?
u,
Ni'vember
11:3 i .1
A ' of Jarvis D
reported the larcer �
from the bike i
Dorm.
v:oP m
A Clemen-
reported the breai
mg of her room a:
of mone
5 p.m
A
finding a bag
peared to be mat
10:00 pm
A resident
a as observe I
nance in the area ea
Dorm and re- .
hen requeste I
November 7
12 ?0a.m
Liberal
1 OS -NGEI ES A
Students have become less ii
terested ir.
vulnerable I
pro bar
necessarily more r.
than the) were 2
report released last � �
Higher I
stitute (HERI) at UCLA
L CIA.
American Count
sures some 20 ��
freshmen a ear abou' theii -
lege plans, their social attitudes
and their politi
To mark the 20th anr.
Of the ure HBRI
issued rep n su
some of theii ma i I
The most obvious .
HERls Dr K.C. Gree
majors s-udents cho
have been sharp
numbers of math, humanities
and liberal arts sc . .
education majors. Green says
b cgest increase has been
buMne
"Students are going
(armed with) h preferences
e sasv. "Forthe I - time, we're
seeing the (numbe- I students
aiming primarily) to be financial-
lv well off increasing
By the same token. (
notes, student interest in deelop-
ing "a meaningful philosoph) of
life" is decreasing.
"We're in the materialistic age
now. The countrj is just emerg-
ing from the wors; economic
period since the thirties he
CAROLINA
GULF
1201 Dickinson Ae.
752-7270
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MONDAY





st (ilaralinfan
ins
VdvertiMllki
ig Kt-prt'sentatMes:John Rusk Jill Taylor
I MUrRlNM.
- � 6 5
i � 1 � . � 1 MU
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N V ' i
f-t$ 757-6367
757-6558 57-6309
THE EAST CAROl IMAN
NOVEMBER 13. 1986
� resen ts
raft
86
Nite
- : adies
)OLERS
FT
IITE
CK!
OLD FASHIONED
L HAMBURGERS J
November 6
11:30 a.m.
A resident of Jarvis Dorm
reported the larceny of his bicycle
from the bike rack west of Jarvis
Dorm.
3:20 pm.
A Clement Dorm resident
reported the breaking and enter-
ing of her room and the larceny
of money.
8:55 p.m.
A Jones Dorm RA reported
finding a baggie of what ap-
peared to be mariiuana.
10:00 p.m.
A resident of Garrett Dorm
as observed creating a distur-
nance in the area east of Clement
Dorm and refused to produce ID
when requested to do so.
November 7
12:30 a.m.
An ECU Officer reported
observing five white males
tampering with a vehicle parked
in the 14th and Berkley freshman
lots. The subjects were identified
as ECU students.
1:20 a.m.
Three Aycock residents, a
White Dorm resident and a Tyler
Dorm resident were found to be
in possession of marijuana and
drug paraphenalia. A non-
student was banned from campus
in connection with the incident.
1:51 a.m.
A Scott Dorm resident was
observed exceeding the posted
speed limit and was found to be
in possession of a ficticious ECU
ID card which showed his date of
birth to be April 14, 1963.
2:45 a.m.
An ECU Officer reported that
he attempted to stop a school
bus, being operated on campus in
the area of Brewster Building.
The operator jumped out of the
bus and fled north jthrough the
classroom area of campus. The
bus had been apparently stolen
from Rose High School.
2:10a.m.
A Jones Dorm resident was ex-
tremely intoxicated and was 18
years old. She was violating the
underage alcohol law.
7:15 p.m.
A Belk Hall resident reported
vandalism to his dorm room win-
dow by unidentified white males.
November 9
3:24 a.m.
An ECU Officer reported six
males and three females having a
keg party in a room on the third
floor of Belk.
3:43 a.m.
A Belk Dorm resident was
observed by an ECU Officer,
consuming alcohol outside of a
suite on the third floor of Belk.
November 10
1:15 a.m.
A Greenville resident was ar-
rested with DWI and careless and
reckless driving on 11th St.
2:30 a.m.
A Jarvis Resident was observed
gaining entry to Jarvis Dorm by
forcibly pulling on the secured
door.
10:30 a.m.
An Aycock resident reported
larceny of his bike from a post in
14th and Berkley parking lot.
2:40 p.m.
A White Hall resident reported
the larceny of her bike from the
east side of White Hall.
9:30 p.m.
A Wintcrville resident was ar-
rested for damage to real proper-
ty and was banned from campus
in connection with a vandalism
incident in Belk Dorm.
9:53 p.m.
A Greenville resident reported
having her purse taken from her
while she was southeast of
Mendenhall.
November 11
4:00 a.m.
A Greenville resident was ban-
ned from campus when he at-
tempted to obtain a release form
for his towed vehicle after drug
paraphenalia was observed in the
vehicle at the time it was towed.
4:45 a.m.
A Cary resident was banned
from campus when he attempted
to obtain a release form for his
towed vehicle after drug
paraphenalia was observed in the
vehicle at the time it was towed.
4:40 p.m.
A Greenville resident was ar-
rested for damage to property
and was banned from campus in
connection with an incident that
occured in Belk Dorm.
November 12
12:02 a.m.
A Fletcher Hall resident
reported that unknown persons
sprayed the fire hose on the north
stairwell of the sixth floor of Flet-
cher Hall.
1:15 a.m.
An ECU Officer arrested a
Cherry Point man for trespassing
in Greene Dorm.
Liberal Arts Loses Support
l OS ANGELES, CA (CPS) -
Students have become less in-
terested in liberal arts, are more
vulnerable to job pressures, are
probably less liberal but aren't
necessanh more conservative
than they were 20 vears ago, a
report released las: week bv the
Higher Education Research In-
stitute (HERI) a; LCI A savs.
LCI A, along with the
American Council on Education,
surveys some 2(X).xX) college
freshmen a year about their col-
lege plans, their social attitudes
and their political beliets.
To mark the 20th anniversary
of the survevs, HERI officials
issued a report summarizing
s-me of their major finds.
The most obvious change, says
HERI's Dr. K.C. Green, is in the
majors students choose. There
have been sharp drops in the
numbers of math, humanities
and liberal arts, science, and
education majors. Green says the
biggest increase has been in
business.
"Students are going to college
(armed with) job preferences
he says. "For the first time, we're
seeing the (number of students
aiming primarily) to be financial-
ly well off increasing
By the same token. Green
notes, student interest in develop-
ing "a meaningful philosophy of
life" is decreasing.
"We're in the materialistic age
now. The country is just emerg-
ing from the worst economic
period since the thirties he
CAROLINA
GULF
says. "It cut a wide swathe across
(the nation). Students are saving
i don't want this to happen to
me
Such "materialism" also keeps
showing up in surveys by the In-
stitute for Social Research (ISR)
at the University of Michigan,
which runs another annual na-
tionwide survey of student at-
titudes
"We're seeing similarities (to
the LCI A study) in freshman
statements on desired and prefer-
red work settings the ISR's Dr.
Jerald Bachman reports.
"Students prefer to be employed
by large corporations now
Bachman suspects it's because
the job market is "too crowded
now. These kids are at the tail
end of the Baby Boom, and they
are going to suffer the most
Whatever the reasons, Green
thinks "the declining interest in
certain majors � like engineering
(which has lost about 68,000
students) � doesn't bode well for
the nation's future
"Every major has gone
through 'boombust' cycles
says Bachman. "When engineer-
ing was flooded several years
ago, fewer students went in
Perhaps most surprisingly,
Green says the HERI surveys
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disprove the popular notion that
college students are becoming
more conservative politically.
While fewer students now call
themselves "liberal about the
same number of students call
themselves "conservative" today
as 20 years ago.
The "real growth" area of the
collegiate political spectrum, he
says, has been among students
who call themselves "middle of
the road
But when asked to take a posi-
tion on specific issues, even
students who label themselves as
"conservative" tend to expose
traditionally liberal stances.
Green says.
The vast majority ot students
support abortion rights, want a
bigger federal role in social issues
and would like to see defense
spending cut.
"The students know the
issues he explains. "There is a
very clear, very strong student
support (base) for typically
liberal issues. The only real place
we saw a decline was in 'law and
order
Increasingly conservative on
that point, more students agree
that "there is too much concern
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in the courts for the rights of
criminals" than ever before.
Similarly, more students support
the death penalty than 20 years
ago.
Michigan's Bachman notes
some other political changes, too.
"Democrats had a
preponderance (of student loyal-
ty) ten years ago. We've seen
some modified shift. There's
more balance now between the
Republicans and Democrats, but
the largest number by far is still
not committed to either party
"Students are really not thai
much different from the rest of
the country as a whole
Bachman notes, "and that's true
in just about anything
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�lre iEaat (Earnlmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community
since 1925
Path Kemmis, w,fi
Scott Cooper, ,
Rick McCormac, ,
John Shannon,
fM MOI LOY
T()Ml I'VINDFR ����
Danii i Maurer, .�,���(,��
STFVF Foi.MAR, n,rrc� , Atmm
Anthony Martin. ��� (rMlMmw,
MFC, NFFDHAM. cMm. itaw,
Shannon Short, a ����
DfChanii f Johnson, om
Novembei F3, 1986
Opinion
Gosh! I just
hate lo see
human rights
violations
Page 4
SGA
Matching Revenue Bill Passed
The SGA Legislature debated
and voted on a new bill that will af-
fect every student government
sponsored organization. Ii may well
be the most significant decision the
bod) will make this year.
On Monday night the legislature
passed a bill that will require every
organization petitioning the SGA
for funds to raise at least 15 percent
of their requested appropriations.
This bill can not have come at a bet-
ter time, as our campus is growing
larger and our available monies are
being spread thinner.
At present, there are well over 50
campus organizations thai receive
funds from the SGA. As this school
year progresses that number will
grow larger, but the SGA's budeet
will not.
Having started the 'S68' fiscal
vear with a budget of S126.000, the
SGA now has S19,100 remaining.
With more than 50 percent of the
vear left, they have only 15 percent
of their budget to work with.
This is not as bad as it seems, of
course, as the basic needs of student
groups hae been taken care of in
annual appropriations. Just the
same, new groups are submitting
constitutions almost every week;
upon acceptance these groups
become eligible for funding.
With this in mind, the positive
aspects of this bill become obvious.
First and foremost it will help
delay, perhaps even avoid, the need
for an increase in student fees,
something none of us can truly af-
ford.
It will also force student groups
to unify and be more self sufficient.
Many of the smaller groups on
campus are loosely organized,
which leads to their executive
members doing most of the work.
If required to raise money, perhaps
such groups will find the "unity they
lack.
This bill will also help to weed
out the transient groups; groups
that ask for money one year and
disappear the next due to lack of in-
terest. Such groups are not uncom-
mon.
While this newspaper may not
agree with the SGA Legislature on
every issue, it does on this one. We
only wish some one had thought of
it sooner.
Thats better!
ElyJng The FriendlxSkm
Deregulation Yes Informality No
rit.�. a Iri i.i i - .
Professor Alfred Kahn, who presided
over the liquidation of the old ways by
introducing deregulation of the airlines,
proudly holds up as testimonial to his
good work that the consumer is paying
substantially less (20 percent is the
figure commonly used) than he was pay-
ing under regulation, and that, as thev
say in the trade, is the bottom line. In a
market society the consumer is, and
ought to be, king. However, the ques-
tion is legitimately asked: To what ex-
tent have those airline travelers been
riding on credit?
On The Right
By
WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY Jr.
VERES CWI rKE P�J6 M TViAT 2EAU.Y VvJCRfcg
THE im CZSVPPVi akp vom!
Whose credit? Why, the credit of the
capitalist, the investor. If a consortium
of investors brings together $100 million
to start airline service between Atlanta
and Chicago and sells tickets for $10 a
ride, the statistician can gleefully note
down the savings of Atlanta-Chicago
passengers, but before very long, the
Mad Man Muntz Airline is going to go
out of business, and statistics on a very
different ledger are going to show that
$100 million of risk capital unhappily
disappeared.
Last week I flew the hour's flight
from Los Angeles to San Francisco,
first class, and noted with a start that
my ticket had cost $180. Last summer, I
flew tourist class from New York to San
Francisco and back for $194. That was
10 hours of flying, making the contrast
dramatic. United was charging 10 times
as much per hour in the air in the one
case as compared to the other. Granted,
one was first class, but it is not seriously
suggested that first class should be 10
times tourist class. What it is is the wide
scramble, for opportunistic fares.
Philanthropy today, extortion tomor-
row.
All of this will shake down, but when
it does, expect that the surviving airlines
are going to demand solvency, and
many of the apparently eternal advan-
tages of deregulation are going to fly
away into the horizon. So deregula-
tion, yes; free travel, no.
On another front, airlines have, in
their service, become slaves to the
movies. Flying San Francisco to New
York on TWA, departure time was 9:15
a.m. At 10:15 a.m the passengers were
offered a sumptuous breakfast. Now,
anyone who has a flight at 9:15 wili
have eaten breakfast, so that being serv-
ed at 10 is the equivalent of being served
lunch at 10. Why not wait until noon?
To do so gets in the way of the movie.
Swissair leaves Geneva for New York at
2:30 p.m and, I kid you not, serves
you a Lucullan meal at 4 p.m which is
milk-and-cracker time for English kid-
dies.
But it all pales up against the latest
social amenity experienced at the hands
of Pan Am. The stewardess was taking
drink orders for serving after the
passengers were airborne, and had on
her clipboard the names of the
passengers, alongside which she would
scribble in their choices. She came to me
. and said, "Mr. Buckley. Now, what do
you wish to be called?"
This had never happened to me
before, and I was struck quite dumb. I
recalled the secret name I was assigned
during my months in the CIA. The two
serial numbers I had while in the infan-
try flashed through my mind. I faintly
recalled being told by my mother that I
had been baptized not William Frank,
as requested, but William Francis
because the priest had said huffily that
there was no "St. Frank only a St.
Francis. I was able only to gurgle, "Mr.
Buckley which provoked a cheerful,
"Very well with just a trace of if-you-
want-to-be-stuffy-it's-OK-by-Pan Am,
and she was off, accosting the
gentleman behind me, with the same
questions. He opted for a Bloody Mary
and to be called Phil.
And what do you, madam, sir, wish
to be called? Lillykins? Butch? It would
be fun to try it out on the pope traveling
incognito. Ah, Mr. Wojtvla, what
would you like to be called? "Just call
me Bishop of Rome, Vicar of Jesus
Christ, Successor of St. Peter, the
Prince of the Apostles. Supreme Pon-
tiff, Patriarch of the West, Primate of
Italy, Archbishop and Metropolitan of
the Roman province, and Sovereign of
the State of Vatican Citv Evelyn
Waugh was right. Intimacv, ves; for-
mality, yes; informalitv, no.
Campus
Spectrum
Rules
In addition to the "Campus
Forum" section of the Editorial
Page, The East Carolinian has re-
established the "Campus Spectrum
This is an opinion column featuring
guest writers from the student body
and faculty. The columns printed in
the "Campus Spectrum" will contain
current topics of concern to the cam-
pus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of
grammer and decency. Persons sub-
mitting columns must be willing to
accept "by-line" credit for their ef-
forts, as no entrys from ghost writers
will be published.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information mav
contact Daniel Maurer, managing
editor of The East Carolinian at
757-6366, or stop by our offices on
the second floor of the Publications
Building.
� - � v-�.�in. in. uyicu iui a mooay Mary
Believe It Or Not You Can Campaign For The Peace Prire
Bv.lACOBUEISBERG lmm . L . " "�� M 1,Z
By JACOB WEISBERG
Ihr r� krpuhli.
"I was of course er stunned and grateful and
melancholy EHe Wiesel told The New York Times
about his initial reaction to winning the 1986 Nobel
Peace Prize.
"1 fell back into the mood of Yom Kippur,
serious reflections about my parents and my grand-
parents. It took me half an hour to get out of it
But when Wiesel finally came to, he told a press
conference in New York, "There are no coin-
cidences. It it (winning the prize) happens after
Yom Kippur here, then some of mv friends and
myself have prayed well
Actually, they did a little more than pray. Over
the past several years, a few of Wiesel's friends have
circled the globe in an intensive effort to win him
the prize. Sigmund Strochlitz, who owns a Ford
dealership in New London, Coon has directed the
offensive. A survivor of Auschwitz, Strochlitz has
visited the halls of Congress, the West German
Bundestag, the French Assembly and the
Norwegian Parliament on Wiesel's behalf.
It might sound difficult to lobby for the Nobel
Peace Prize. In reality, it's not so tough. According
to the rules of the Norwegian Nobel Committee,
several categories of people are eligible to make
nominations. Parliamentary representatives,
judges, academics and former Nobel laureates are
among those entitled to send letters by the bushel.
He's succeeded in getting hundreds of them, in-
cluding nominations from Francois Mitterrand and
former Peace Prize winners Henry Kissinger, Lech
Walesa and Mother Theresa.
Wiesel's supporters have concentrated much of
their energy on the U.S. Senate. One Senate aide
described their campaign as "relentless and heavy-
handed
"Strochlitz would show up every winter and say
it's time to write letters again one staffer said.
"He'd say, you did it last year. It's time to do it
again. He'd get the senators to send 'Dear Col-
league' letters to each other in an ever-widening cir
cle Strochlitz, a close friend of Wiesel's, denies
doing any campaigning.
Here's how it worked. Strochlitz asked Sen.
Daniel Patrick Moynihan, for example, to
nominate Wiesel, and to request similar letters from
10 of his colleagues. Strochlitz provided Moynihan
with the names. Of course, many of the legislators
Moynihan asked had no idea they could nominate
anyone for a Nobel Prize. And a few hardly knew
who Elie Wiesel was. The letters they sent are
perhaps less flowery than some the Nobel Commit-
tee has received in the past:
U.S. Senate
January 26, 1984
Members of the Committee.
It is my honor to propose Mr. Elie Wiesel for the
1984 Nobel Peace Prize. As you well know, Mr.
Wiesel has dedicated most of his life toward the
goal of peace throughout the world. In my opinion,
you could not go wrong by awarding the Nobei
Peace Prize to this most deserving gentleman.
With respect,
Barry Goldwater
By Strochlitz's count, more than 50 senators and
140 representatives have written to Oslo on Wiesel's
behalf. More than 70 members of the West German
Bundestag have also nominated Wiesel. After get-
ting a few dozen senators under his belt, Strochlitz
began grouping them in interesting ways. One year
he got the entire Massachusetts congressional
delegation to nominate Wiesel. Another year he
solicited letters from all the members of the Senate
Banking Committee. Strochlitz was helped by John
Silber, president of Boston University, where
Wiesel teaches. Silber called Strochlitz "the real
strategist and campaigner
"Strochlitz did everything in his power Silber
said. "He would say to me: 'John, you know these
people in Congress I'd write to them and send
copies to their responses to Strochlitz, so he could
keep track of everythin we were doing Silber said
that he is especially delighted at Wiesel finally winn-
ing the prize, since it is the second such award
bestowed upon someone associated with his school.
Martin Luther King, who won the Peace Prize in
1964, was a student at Boston Universitv during the
1950s.
In Silber's letters to the Nobel Committee, he
argued that Wiesel was a voice for victims
everywhere. Each year that he renominated Wiesel,
he wrote about some new effort of Wiesel's on
behalf of the oppressed � whether his work for
Cambodian boat people, or Soviet Jews, or Arab
regugees or the disappeared in Argentina. A typical
letter from Silber points out that "Wiesel traveled
at considerable risk to his personal health and safe-
ty into the jungles of Honduras, where he met with
Miskito Indians Attached is an op-ed piece
Wiesel published in the Los Angeles Times, detail-
ing the Miskito's plight. As Silber put it one year,
"I am sure that my letter will not be the first, nor
indeed the only such letter to reach you
Another of Silber's tactics has been to suggest ap-
propriate anniversaries for the Nobel committee to
make use of in honoring his friend. In 1984 he
wrote of the connections between Wiesel and
Orwell. The following year Silber's letter reminded
the committee that it was the 40th anniversary of
the liberation of the death camps. Like journalists,
Wiesel's friends searched endlessly for a new "peg
on which to hang the same old story.
Silber said Wiesel never inquired about the effort
to get him the prize, though he was aware of it. "He
never asked anybody, never asked me, never asked
Strochlitz Silber said. "We said, 'Stand still, Elie.
Step aside, do your work. Don't worry about our
work, which is to make them (the Nobel Commit-
tee) aware of you Silber added, "Nobody wins
unless the Nobel Committee knows about them
Silber and Strochlitz both vociferously decline any
share of the credit for Wiesel's prize in 1986. "That
would be like the trainer claiming he's the
racehorse Silber said. "We mav have fed the
oats, and curried the flanks. But that horse could
run
According to all published reports, Wiesel has
been on the Nobel Committee's short list for the
past few years. And this year members of the jurv
thought it necessary to make a non-controversial
selection.
Looking down the list of past winners one
wonders what the prize is actually for. Some years it
appears to reward good deeds on a large scale
Other times, it seems to honor political leadership
On a few occasions, like 1973, when it was awarded
jointly to Henry Kissinger and Le Due Tho. it has
seemed closer to a war prize than a peace prize
These days, it's a rather amorphous accolade �
sort of a moral hall of fame for the indisputablv de-
cent.
Whatever the Nobel Peace Prize signifies, it's
clear that people lobby for it. Nobody seems quite
sure what Japanese prime minister Eisaku Sato won
his Nobel for in 1974. but it is well known that he
hired a public relations firm to help his campaign
along Jimmy Carter, Armand Hammer and Indira
Gandhi have been among the more recent cam-
paigners who appear to have failed (so far) in drives
for the prize. (Hammer reportedly sent Ann
mT iadC nCckUce with a notc "king iff she
could help him get nominated.) Mohandas Gandh.
never campaigned for, and never got. the most
coveted prize on planet Earth.
Because the prize has such prestige, it's a bit dis-
quieting to discover that the winners actually
wanted it. Nobody wants to think that the Mother
HTSXlfbid f? wth,y r�� m
fact, Mother Theresa never did camnaian fnr th
Nobel Peace Prize. But she seemsbX �ceo
tion, Elie Wiesel the rule. '
Integra
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Jacob Weisberg is a former reporter-resma.
the New Republic. -researcher at
DEBBIE:
Thanks for
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time, one
day we
will get ouii
ork done!
mNmi,rrwxYv:Afj:zi'msA,7TT3r,
mfem M�em� wwwmwm. .







fejft
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Li
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 13. I9W
rmality No
� �. madam, sir, wish
llykins? Butch-7 It would
on the pope traehng
. Mr Wojtyla, what
e to he called? "Just call
Rome, Vicar of Jesus
ssor of St. Peter, the
Vp stles Supreme Pon-
the West, Primate of
larcJ
p and Metropolitan of
nee. and Sovereign of
Vatican Cit
jhi Intimacy,
' a � no.
Exelyn
ves; for-
Campus
Spectrum
Rules
In addition to the "Campus
on" section of the Editorial
gc The East Carolinian has re-
hed the "Campus Spectrum
is an opinion column featuring
from the student bod
The columns printed in
Campus Spectrum" will contain
rent topics of concern to the cam-
community or nation.
he co urnns are restricted in con-
� with -egard to rules of
mer and decency. Persons sub-
- lumns must be willing to
"�-line" credit for their ef-
entrys from ghost writers
be published.
Persons interested in participating
seeking further information may
tact Daniel Maurer, managing
edii r I The East Carolinian at
M66. or stop by our offices on
the second floor of the Publications
Bunding
eace Prize
trainer claiming he's the
"We ma have fed the
the flat ks But that horse could
all published reports, Wiesel has
fe Committee's short list for the
nd this year members of the jury
make a non-controversial
Nar
)f past winners, one
:he'n' tuall) � �r Sme years it
eward good deeds on a large scale,
seems to honor political leadership.
-� ns, like 1973, when it was awarded
Kissinger and Le Due Tho, it has
a ar prize than a peace prize.
s a rather amorphous accolade �
�ral hall of fame for the indisputably de-
the Nobel Peace Prize signifies it's
ople lobby for it. Nobody seems quite
Japanese prime minister Eisaku Sato won
I r in 194, but it is well known that he
blu- relations firm to help his campaign
�m Carter, Armand Hammer and Indira
W been among the more recent cam-
Jo appear to have failed (so far) in drives
he (Hammer reportedly sent Ann
lade necklace with a note asking if she
�'im get nominated.) Mohandas Gandhi
Jigned for. and never got, the most
pe on planet Earth.
he prize has such prestige, it's a bit dis-
1 discover that the winners actually
N -body wants to think that the Mother
I 'he world bid for earthly reward In
fr Theresa never did campaign for the
I , u Ut,Shc secms to th� excep-
fiesel the rule.
�V a former reporter-researcher at
PHILADELPHIA, PA (CPS)-
HalungU and without much suc-
cess, black and white student
croups on a handful of campuses
have experimented with integra-
tion in recent weeks.
At the University of Penn-
sylvania here, for example, a
white student tried to join the
Black Student League until final-
Is being rebuffed last week.
At Alabama, several black
greek groups moved to the
previousl) all-white fraternity
row, and a black sorority admit-
ted a white pledge. Mississippi's
Black Student Union, hoping to
improve campus race relations,
appointed two white students to
its board.
But some whites and blacks on
some of the campuses don't
believe the experiments are worth
doing, or ultimately workable.
"The trend across the country
is thai one person is accepted (in
a fraternity or sorority) for a
shon period of time, and then
thej leave or drop out said
University of Alabama President
Joab Thomas upon hearing of a
white student pledging a black
sororit.
Not Working

enn, freshman Sdne
Thornbury applied for member-
ship in the Black Student League
iBSlin earh September.
BSI leaders initially told
I hornbury, who said she wanted
join because she is "sincerely
t ested" in helping advance
black studenl causes, that they
didn't want her.
"Offering (Thornbury) a full
membership would have changed
rganization explains BSI
spokewoman Traci Miller. "It
have been a black
group an longer.
wouldn'i
students'
But alter some public con-
troversy, the BSI ottered I'horn-
h u r an associate
membership BSI leaders then
tld i decide just w hat an
"associate member" could or
could m d . .md rhornbun last
week withdrew her application.
"She realh wanted to cause
rouivij yi the ranks Miller
sa "SJnt proved � by tracking
�� when we offered her an
associate membership
Black studenl groups, of
course, began to crop up on cam-
puses in the late sixties, when
mostly white colleges first began
admitting minority students in
large numbers.
The new arrivals complained
they telt isolated, out-of-place
and ignored at the colleges, which
often had to be forced by court
orders to admit them.
To promote their special con-
cerns, protect their hard-won
gains and, ultimately, to give
themselves a social center of
gravity, the black students often
formed their own groups.
"There's a profound rejection
for (black students) in white
schools says Barnard College
psychology Prof. Jacqueline
Fleming, who wrote a book call-
ed "Blacks in College
She says, "students don't ex-
pect (the rejection), and it's very
painful, so they retreat into black
organizations
But black student unions at
Michigan State, Cal-Santa Bar-
bara, Illinois State and Loyola-
New Orleans, among others,
struggled for members in the ear-
ly eighties as black students
began gravitating toward newly-
robust minority fraternities for
social sustenance.
Minority fraternities and
sororities, though, also have
stayed to themselves.
At the University of Illinois-
Urbana, for example, "only one
or two (black) greek organiza-
tions choose even to belong to the
lnterfraternity Council or the
Panhellenic says Bruce Nesbitt,
director of the Afro American
Cultural Program.
"They choose to have their
own identity, but they do interact
with non-black greeks on occa-
sion. There is no one campus
establishment blacks identify
with. Most of their socializing
outside of black-only groups is at
house parties
Alabama sociology Prof.
Donald Muir, who has been
surveying black-white race rela-
tions for 20 years, contends social
integration on American cam-
puses has proceeded a lot more
slowly than classroom integra-
tion.
Indeed, many blacks on
predominantly white campuses
now complain more about vague,
social feelings of "discomfort"
than oert racism.
At Penn. "black students
cen't restricted Miller reports,
"but they don't always feel com-
fortable. Feeling welcome on
campus has been a problem
At Illinois, blacks are "very
aware of racism, but most choose
to ignore it or adjust to it
There are, in fact, plenty of
reminders of racism on campus.
Last spring, two Alabama
white students burned a cross in
front of a house on "sorority
wtmmmumiHWiMWAwsss'MmxrHrssssss-sssss's's-ssswssss.
DEBBIE:
Thanks for
the office
time, one
day we
will get ou
work done!
�X -A -A "A & Ar - "skr 4r & Ly "A -4-
gm T� x� -X" "T T "T T" T T "T T T "T "T
CAROLINA GULF
1201 Dickinson Ave.
752-7270
Do It With Us � We P(J & Del.
I ISA. MC, (,11 SOHK). �OKDC.N
row" after a black sorority an-
nounced it was relocating there.
At Texas, two whites wearing
Ronald Reagan masks tried to
push a former Black Student
Alliance president through an
eigth-story residence hall win-
dow.
And at The Citadel last week,
five white students accused of
dressing in white sheets, yelling
obscenities at a black student and
burning a paper cross on his floor
were suspended for the remainder
of the year.
Citadel officials set aside the
suspension on the five's promise
of good behavior, but the cadets
were demoted and must serve
"room confinements" for the
rest of the year.
"There have been no previous
incidents here claims Citadel
spokesman Ben Legare. "This is
a military college, and one is
looked on for his ability to func-
tion as a cadet in a regimented en-
vironment. A cadet's attitude is
'when I put on that uniform, I'm
cadet-gray, not black or white
But the persistance of such in-
cidents at other campuses has
convinced many black student
leaders they need to keep whites
out of their groups, whether
they're social fraternities or more
political black student unions.
Psychologically, Barnard's
Fleming says, students are saying
"The rest of the campus rejects
us and won't let us in, so why
should we let them in?"
"Fraternities and sororities
usually are dedicated to social life
FISHBONE
In Concert In Memorial Gym
SAT. NOV. 15
9:00 P.M.
$3.00 In Advance, $5.00 At Door
Thf Office of Sludeni Financial Aid wishes to remind all students ho have
received iheir College Work-Srudv (CWS) awards but have no! obiained rhe.r
Hmng Authorization Form (CWS-2) to do so. These forms mav be secured ar
the financial aid office. There are Oil numerous CWS jobs available to eligible
CWS srudenis. Eligible CWS students are those who have been offered CWS as a
part of their financial aid package. Students who have applied but have not been
notified of their award should be aware that the financial aid office is continuing
to process applications and make awards to eligible students. Due to the applica-
tion processing backlog, the Office of Student Financial Aid is closed to the
public during certain hours each day Students requinng assistance are requested
to refer to the schedule below which indicates the hours the office is open to the
public.
Monday. Wednesday. Friday 1-5 p.m. Tuesday. Thursday g-12 am
Attention
Early Christmas Shoppers!
Tom Togs
WAREHOUSE SALE
October 27 thru November 15
Monday - Saturday 9:30-6
� �Nothing over $10.00 ��
4Ai:kt
TROCADERG
m
& Famous Names That We Cannot Mention
Everything Direct From Factory
�Close-outs "Overruns �Irregulars
MINS LAOIfS. CHILDREN I INFANTS WIAt
1900 Dickinson Avenue
Located In The Wholesale Area In The Rear Of The Building
SAVE BIG
ON FILM DEVELOPING
STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
12exp ti o-r 15 Exposure $2.47
As Low AsI �" 24 Exposure $3.77
36 Exposure $4.97
Ask for Custom Mark 35 Processing
12exp o-�
As Low As $Z�37
24 Exposure $4.47
36 Exposure $5.97
COLOR PRINT FILM (C-41) DEVELOPED:
Printed Coupon Must Accompany Order (No
Limit) OFFER EXPIRES November 20, 1986
and center around sex, dating,
dancing and such activities
UA's Muir says. "So there's
reluctance to desegregate in that
area based on the premise of
genetics
"And although there's con-
siderable concern on many white
campuses to ease such tensions,
there's reaJly not much happen-
ing. Worrying about it is a far cry
from doing something about it
07
AUDITION
FOR
SOMETHING
GRAND!
PINEHURST
COUNTRY CLUB
�r P'NEHu?cT NOPTH CAPOUNA
PRESENTS AUDITIONS FOR:
on ?
Tke(5jMbmfr)
POSITIONS OPEN
6 Singer Dancers
�� J �� : ; � � � ���� � � . � � .
4 instrumentalists
1 Drummer-1 Bass player-1 Keyboardist-1 Guitar player
AUDITION DATES
unc cnapei mil
Moi la " '7 � �
University of NC Greensboro
at No . ; � � . . � . Roorr
East Carolina university
Sat. Dec. 6,A.S. Fletcher Rehearsal Hall 101,12 5p m
Pinenurst Country club
at L � ' �� n
to fartker .���� m.
j)nr
$39.95
Classic
Metals
Large (5c Small
Wayfarers
Ebony, Tortoise,
Red CX White
All other Rav Bans
at our regular low prices.
We have the largest selection
of Ray Bans in Greenville.
eye si
The Plaza Greenville
736-9771
cne
llorJ
.��MfS�WrWS,iVWMSSWWS'tSr,
Benetton
638 Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, NC
355-7473
Store Hours
10-6 Mon-Sat
Kentucky Fried Chicken !
V4 A � jjjjplus tax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK � COMB.
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Small Mashed Potato and Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
Expires Dec. 31, 1986
i


u (f �
kl





'Hi EAS1 i Roi INiAN
NOW MHl K IV 1986
Roots, Conflicts And Influences Discussed
Kl NrHvBu.v.u liberal modernisation mrwfel nl .k- � L
Orderl) poUticaJ and economic
ogress and stabiUt) in Central
lflka can come about onl bv
reducing the influence ol .is tur
bulenI nghtisi and lett.s. ex
'remes, according to a noted
nistonan.
I fie historian, I), Ralph 1 ee
Woodward Jr oi rulaneUnivei
S1U- views thc roots ol present
conflicts in Central America as
considerably, more complex"
'nan oft-described struggles he;
ween conservative, right wing
oligarchies and Marxist radicals.
A: last Carolina University to
deliver the annual 1 awrence 1
Brewstei Lecture in History,
Woodward said even the terms
"conservative" and �'liberal"
nae rathe, different meanings in
. entral America than in the
I "iled Slates
In the lecture rhursdav night,
Woodward traced historical
erspectives of conflicts and tur-
noil that have wrecked the five
eak Central American republics
foi more than 150 years
He tewed the erne .
the c hristian Democrai pat � as
"a new force which otters a mid-
dle ground or moderaiioi
"1: (the v hristian Democrai
party) is essentially a center right
force, and both in terms of its
leadei ship And philosophy .
eaches back to 19th century con
servatism with its connections to
the church, its paternalistic con-
cern tor the welfare of the poor,
and its concept of corporate
organization of society and
politics V oodward said
V oodward said "the m
� is reality" foi the
liberal modernization model ol
the lasi KH) years in Central
America "was the decline in stan-
dard oi living toi most Central
Americans.
"Mv (he 1970s, there was
widespread poverty And many ol
the undesirable benefits of the
liberal-capitalist development
had Listened themselves on both
rural and urban Nicaragua. It
was in this environment that op-
position to the Somoza dictatoi
ship mounted following the 1972
earthquake
He said a militant group of lef-
tists, dedicated to a social
oriented revolution, eventually
succeeded in leading a massive
uprising that triumphed in 1979
and allowed the Sandinistas to
take over the country .
"( uriously then, in Nicaragua,
by U.S. standards, the liberal
1'aitv had become the more con
servative ol the two patties,
whereas the Conservative Party
represented a more progressive,
20th century position he said
In his lecture. Woodward said
examination of the conser-
i ive tradition suggests that its
roots in C entral America "run
very deep and have provided
greatei continuity in the politics
Mid societies ol the region than is
commonly recognized
He described this as a history
ol oligarchies descended from
Spanish c onquistadores lighting
hold onto their political and
economic i ntrol and being
challenged by middle and work-
ing classes B and large, he said.
; adei ship : th Mai xisi
moveme , . g from an
emei ninu tn .
ass sii uggle
the origin of much of the crises
has become important in the 20th
century Woodward said.
Woodward said that rural
masses gained little from moder-
nization and in most cases suf-
fered a decline in standard of liv-
ing. As epidemic diseases were
eradicated, there was rapid
growth of population without in-
crease in real wages.
"But the growth of exports
and accompanying moderniza-
tion of the cities, development of
transportation and other in-
dustries related to international
trade contributed to the growth
of small, but significant, middle
classes in the cities.
The oligarchies jealously
guarded their economic and
political power, refusing to share
it with the emerging middle
classes he said. Because elec-
tions were almost alwavs rigged,
"the middle and working classes
turned to revolution to bring
about reform
'The old conservative parties
largelv disappeared I heir former
members and their descendants
went into exile, or joined the
liberals. The liberals dominated
C entral America tor about a cen
fury, "but in their failure to k
cept the sort ol social dem�H.ratK
modifications to capitalism
occurred in Western Europe an
North America, rspr
following ihe ' neat Depre-
they became known a- '
vatives' oi . wingi
mosi � f the w
vv odwai d said
Snowskiing As An
Activity
Course
FISHBONE
In Concert In Memorial Gym
SAT. NOV. 15
9:00 P.M.
53.00 In Advance, $5.00 At Door
Sponsored by Departments of
Health, Physical Education,
Recreation � Safety
� Earn Academic Credit
� Attend Pre-Ski Classes
� Take Ski Trip to Steamboat Springs
Resort, Colorado over Spring Break!
( ourses A vailable:
PHYE 1150 Beginning Snowskiing
PHYE 1151 Intermediate Snowskiing
PHYE 1152 Advanced Snowskiing
All interested persons call Karan Israel. Ski Coordinator
355-6215
WE'VE MOVED!
We're in the new building, fa . Ki .� �� . . it.
EVERYDAY LOW PRICES
Haircuts $4 00 Jrl � : � � . �
REG $400 ECU "I
! $3.00 HAIRCUT
Expires 12 27 86
PI i M I'tONf M(l ms K ,�N, s , I
I1
All services performed endusivelv bv students
No appo.ntment neressarv Senuv Sationa:l accredited
OMtchelh
MONDAY "J i�
J II rKI l(
AiRSTfLlNG
to 5 M
1(1 to v M
"vn hi n to 4

I
ECU Music Therapy Club
The ECU Music Therapy Club is sponsoring a
panel discussion on Monday, Nov. 17, from
4:30-5:30 in Room 101 of the School of
Music. A.J. Fletcher Building. The topic will
be, 'Interdisciplinary Dialogue: Rehabilita-
tion Counseling, Therapeutic Recreation, and
Music Therap Featured Guests are Rev.
James Martin, Director of Therapeutic
Recreation of the Baptist Children's Homes
oi North Carolina, and Dr. Paul Alston, Pro-
fessor of Rehabilitation Studies at ECU.
The panel discussion is free and open to the
public, and refreshments will be provided.
CAcademy
il'i rlinKIn HIm1 wy
CO KROCERINC TO
VC" � IU:illlL.M rOOU
DOtJHi
Ml M
UAKV.J1J
fast �aroliiu Slmbersitp
� i i 111 111 � 11 ofB4
� i � 11111 ��Y AY f
I 1 I I I J � j ! I .
11 � i 1111 �Yi an i
niuuii
THE
SAVINGS
We have tr � est selec-
"� and pr ice in town
on C 'Kegs Ot Beer
Reserve . . �
6 703
Kroner Deli Dinner Specials
5pm-7pm
ALLYOU
CAN EAT
ALL VARIETIES
Eat In
Jrders
()nl!
$1.99
Serve n' Save
Lunch Meat
Lb
Pkg
99
ViY.Y.Y, . : VAW? ' � i.ii
111. i. 11111
tii 11111111111
11111.11111 i 11
11.1111111111.
Mlliuiiiiim
I i 11 11 i i i 1111
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1 1 1 1 1 1 I I 1 I I 1 I
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1 I � I I 1 1 I 1 1 1 . .
1 t I 1 t 1 1 1 1 1 1
' I I 1 I I 1 I I 1 1 I t
"iiKikiiiiit
MonFried Chicken
Tues. -Spaghetti
WedTacos
Thurs. Deep Dish
I asagna
Your Food Dollars (Jo turther it hrnx.r:
FAMILY SIZE
Tetley 24
Tea Bags bo
LIMIT 2 WITH $1
ADD l PURCMASF
990
Ltr
NRB
PEPSI FREE OR
Pepsi
Cola
99
( JWabrtgax
6 Binneaa �
�n �lrabcrf)an (Cfjnstmas east
f
QUARTERS
Parkay
Margarine . . . PLkbg 49�
USDA Choice Heavy
Western Grain Fed Beef
DORITOS
Tortilla
Chips .
11
Bag
$- 19
DECEMBER 3-6, 1986 7:OO p m
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM
TICKETS BY ADVANCE SALES ONLY
CONTACT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
(919) 757-6611, EXT. 266
A STUDENT UNION
PRODUCTIONS COMMITTEE PRESENTATION
Cube Steak
$1.99 lb.
Boneless
Chuck Roast
$1.38 lb.
DELMONTE CUT OR FRENCH STYLE
GREEN BEANS CREAM STYLE
OR WHOLE KERNEL
Corn, Peas, or
I Green Beans
i
2 79
Natural Light
or Coors Beer
$9.99
Suitcases
24
VHS Video Movie Rentals
KROGER
$
oz cans
. 24 Hour
E� wml W�t�i
Hundred ot tmvorttm moWti
to chooso from!
,�- Multigrain
0 Bread
69c
EXTRA FANCY WASHINGTON
STATE GOLD OR
f Red Delicious
ji Apples
59c
ADVERTISED ITEM POUC v
Eacn of these aavertispo
itpms is required to op
readily avanaoie for sale in
eacn Kroger Savon enceot
as specifically noted in tnis
ad if we do run out of �n
item we win offer you your
cnoice of a comparaoie
item when avauaoie
reflecting tne same say
mgs or a ramenech wnicn
win entitle you to pur
chase trie advertised item
at tne advertised price
within 50 days Only one
vendor coupon win be ac
repteo per item
JUMBO
SIZE

o Krogering
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Creenvi
'Mr rASW (MKJIINI
i
r-tjin Ml 1.1?
I ickets for tfe .
'Sou! Man' I
-
N H
. i
Today's
Ren
"B
i
-
Dei
' res B
i
:

because
u
� ;�
Ves
iheir h -
exhibits have
-
certa:
er
' u: her . .
with the
alueN
i
heat concern; .
people's" pr
the mid
the "funnj i
heen the dor
Saturda mornii
The prime-time B
changed the face
morning tube s
Space
were in tod
Mcia!ed with s
hone-cru�.hing
"iolence" va- :he
word which opened :he do
'he pressure groups
Things changed 5 -
Now a hero could no
Mllian He couldn't even
him. And shooting a
question, much to the chaf
Race Bannon who had his gun
lifted when "Johnn Ques �a
moved to Saturdav morniri
prime time
The reasoning was simple a
child might actualh slug another





i a
cussed
i
IHI MSIAROI NIAN
Entertainment
ViVlMHI R
i'agr
New Play Entertains
I , . f N ��. - 1 H
Harold and the boys' is now playing at McGinni rheatre through Saturday All perform ,
Ihe play stars (from left to right) urtis lee Jones, Scot Slusarick and Sidnes S Morton
he pla are 4 for students, and S5 tor the general public
1) SV NS()Ngins a friendly aftcn debate with Sam.however, tl e talei ed 'hese people would
Ihe discussion, .oncer
ten iocial reformers, continues onCurtis Jones' Sa
any levels between the the threeimpressive I he a. I
i ters through 'he aftervKide range f drama
lHally's offstage alcoholicfrom happv g tcky to 1
i the ha1 embarassing father intrudes � friendship drawing defen-�� .lass harneis between he andwisdi imi lisgust and Scot Slusai � g as
servarrial 1 y. H i j
imor, and the intin m
betw eei Ha . vmeriority wa
Willie givi :it
� - Musterdl s a
Harold� �
� reography a Weeks should be n i ' tyle and ffectivene gnil especialK since dis the a . � tradu -
�i i
. i edi c Winchi ii face
: r wl-k as a f 1
1 '
11 Mml
�Konarsl
��
Soul Man' Lacks Rhythm
Hs 1 1) I i (Ml C tl
tli idinj
irea. H
i
�H
a Jill. i u
ould.
Sei M i II . pati
rishbone. A 1 os ngeles-based band �� ill be performing their uni-
que form ot musu Saturday night at Memorial o. m I i kets are
available at theentral 1 it k��; ' lenhall.
Southern Magazine
'1 N III�: . I
- 1i1
� �
� uthen Mago
'� �:� i I
md
tern MagazineW � 1 A
� ��� -s a
Nouthei founder ol Vrka
w eeks, ;2 � ect. w mb
n � hai u
1- see SOI 1H1KM Hv pap I
today's Cartoons Are Seen As Bad Influence On Children
l 1 11 M DDIw nrKUm KaiI.An rt
t MM HHKKIs
-J19
Multigrain
Bread
69
Red Delicious
Apples
0
59
'BO
I
Ms is
a i
. I. More

i
� children's
en individuality
feeling
heii "yo
gran ng during
i ; u that point,
mima irtooi
rvatinj ipl
me tune Batman series
irday
,b� Supei heros like
� and the Impossible
�nd it anything is
h supei ' it's
rushinj � lence
was the magic
I whi � ipened the doot foi
� essure groups
rhings .hanged significantly
a a hero could not punch a
in He couldn'1 even trip
im And shooting was out ol the
n, much to the chagrin ol
Rdie Bannon who had his gun
d when "Johnny Quest" was
moved to Saturday morning from
prime time.
The reasoning as simple a
child might actually slug another
M
a a kid
i
.
. ; R
.
� iractei N ipe I hei
a ho w ill
I.
hat it the
� -a orks ga e

.
Now t's the 'tunny
ome undei
tippers.
Nowadays, foi example, .
.�. hunters aiming a
. , it Daffy Dui k! In one
i B igs and Daffy keep cha
� e 'hunting signs' on ea
from duck to rabbit sea
v -tu- end, Daffy asks Buj
� 'Say. w hat seas m is this i eally
i this point, Bugs reveals a
� 'du ason" sign and sevi
hunters emerge from the bushes
and blow Dut fy away. He
returns, bur ned to a gun
vdered crisp, and tells Bugs,
"I hate you
Ihe above is the original vet
roday, the scene ol the
inters shooting Daffy has been
pped out so the following
scene in which he tells Bugs, "1
u no longer makes any
sense w hatsoev ei
What is the message the cen
sors are hindering here? It's
a ' � �ng to shoot a diK k ' )i do
they think a child might see
somebody walking around in a
duck suit, think "aha" A man
sized duck just like on cartoons!
Think I'll shoot him "ome to
think ol it, I guess this sort ol
thing happens all the time.
But the worst thing the
pressure groups do is turn car
loons into a soap box from which
to preach their 'social gospel
C haracters must act only through
committee, thev must only ap
proach a problem by teamwork,
V
A
1
ng the prol
dly iracters g
igl pei a rial crises dr.d 1
ay "Rob . a
view
isy pi

mima
.
epis � 'Rol teel bad
� k a � "G.l Joe" oi "He
i a ' �
Macek
the series, are �

"Robot
series , a
ild Networl
� i Nctw
Saturday i - t �
�'�
B .
Ttainly a
I
11 seems i h
Sal n da � morning
.
ke the a
Aatcl tw dimensi nal
� and; u
expi ession is a
I
ivei
f r i g I
I have i
merchandising
dising being a in
� m d'etre.
1 wonder it the censoi s a
really tt ying to protect themse
from the children 1'er hap- i
projec I theii ow n guilt feelinj
' heii offspi tng At any i ai
not only insult a child's
telligent e bui see 11 I ,t
potential Frankensteins
waiting foi the slightest sugges
tion to send them runn
amock. What a depressing wa
looking at the woi Id
1 should mention that a few
Saturday morning programs
managed to rise above the restl ic-
tion. er v tew Ironically. one ol
the country's most populai cai
toon series in teims both ol
viewers and merchandising is the
violent "Robotech '
The lengthv series deals with a
From The Not So ?ght
Revenge On The Professors
B PAI MOl.l.OY
f-nlrftai
1 guess we ,ill know what
time ol year it is, don't we
gang? "tes, ves, 1 know. The
Holidays are right around the
proverbial corner, the air has
taken on a slight chill; and
thanks to all the women in
tight sweaters, it's becoming
fun to walk to class.
Bu �� importantly, what
ly matte's this week, what
I've been continually
salivating about for the past
two months is "Teacher
Evaluation Week
Yeah. "Teacher Evaluation
Week Don vou get it? For
this one week � or at least two
ds out ol this one week �
we can plav God.
For two days, forty-eight
hours, or 2,880 minutes, we
control the destination of a
single professor like a video
game.
Say, Einstein, you said
simply because my waterbed
exploded and caused an unex-
pected rip-tide on Fifth Street,
that I am unexcused? Well 1
don't understand you very
well in class, pal; I'm sending
you back to Remedial Speech.
What's that you said? 1
didn't put enough thought in-
to my Thesis Statement; I
strayed from my original line
of thought and I used a
hyphen instead of a dash? And
for that you gave me an "F"?
Jeepers Creepers, even Nix-
on got a pardon. But that's all
right, I'll simply pencil in
"Strongly Disagree" for ques-
tion number 4: "The professor
uses adequate sentence struc-
ture and brushes daily
As a matter of fact, 111 even
embellish on it. Afterall, 1
have poetic license. Sol only is
the professor monosyllabic at
his best, and an extra from
Quest For Fire at his worst, he
is mean, wears a suit and tie,
and probably likes Prince.
Seed I say more?
Are you starting to realize
the power the sheer om-
nipotence of your position as a
student?
If you're a freshman, take it
slowly. Heady stuff like this
can result in curvature of the
spine, if you don't know how
to control it.
My advice is to start with a
grad student who's being a
severe weenie. Don't try to
break him in half at first; work
your way up.
Then, when you get to a
biology professor with a bad
case of "You-Spaak-
SpokeB-To4tli a �
ream him. It's ftin, it's
and the best part is: nobody
knows that you wrote it.
If you're a sophomore, you
must also be careful. I have a
friend who was put in traction
because she let her imagina-
tion get out of hand.
However, if you're a junior
or a senior (or a dinosaur, like
me), feel free to test y our skills
as a creative writer.
The following is one of my
favorites: The professor has
absolutely no grasp on realitw
She claims she has been saved
by Ernest Angley, that Meister
Brau really does taste like
Budweiser and that Ronald
Reagan is the Anti-Christ.
No Chairman in his right
mind would keep someone like
that on his faculty. Just think,
in five minutes you've gotten
her fired, depleted her sense of
self-worth and ruined her
career. That'll teach her to
give you a pop quiz in Psvch
1050 on the Friday before Fall
Break.
Of course, there will be
times when you stumble across
a professor who's actually
pretty cool � not anybodv
youVTtap a keg with, but a
teacher with whom you are on
a first-name basis.
ikaJCjtapacaiicritique for
I faaaoa that if





us
sed
UH FAS1 ARui INIAN
I
I
Entertainment
NoVKMBhR m
t'agc
New Play Entertains
I)�SV NSON
the 1
1ilt r,troand the ho -� : ;epei � � p
s
Ell f N Wu� PM '
Master Harold and tht how' ,v no plaxmu at McGinnis 1 htatro through saturda All performance
gm ai 8.15 I h, plax stars (from left lo right) urlis e Jones. soi Musaru k and Sidne s Horton
-ts tor th, plas art- S4 for students and S5 tor tht general public,
begins a friendly afternoon
debate with Sam.
I he discussion, concerning
social reformers, continues
main levels between the the three
characters through the atter
noon Halh offstage alcoholic
and em harassing father intrudes
� friendship drawing defen-
sive class barriers between he and
'the servant
rhe humor, and the intimate
ship between Hally . Sam
and Willie give extraordinary
orce i limai I Master
Harold
il choreograph) hv
Patri la Weeks should be noted
style and effectiveness
recognition is especially
tti( piav
not frequei irtist
e-like as
tring in this praise
' edri in hell I he pa. .
Fine stage
i itulai ns als i g
Steei wl � ed � - ac
� ' me � t the most authe
lia hat Met iinnis
Without 11
'Soul Man' Lacks Rhythm
e s
however, the tal
these people would
si
Curtis J
impressue I he a
wide range
from happ. �
wisdom to disgust a
Scot Slusai k wa
vincing as the pretei i is ad ies
cent, Hallv His a '
both intelle
nt that - �
degradai

5 Iney Horton. a
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Set Mt II page X
fishbone, A I os Angeles-based hand ill ht- performing their uni-
que form ol iiuisu Saturday night at Memorial om rickets are
�bailable ai (heentral fickel I iffit e in Mendenhall.
Southern Magazine
i I'l S mth brims
u a ters, entertaining
tngu ige, and a fascinatii
mes s -Idid history
trp dive rial ins fron
tck-wa tcks in Miss
! celel
A ts own igazme
tthern Magazine
�' i pi uc ed
S itherners I:
i lowi - me fla � i itl
i '
' i in pi n
� ;�;� prei
i easi ge
. Ids cv eis da of at '
S tithem today
.aid I w eeks. 32, editor I
" e ig ine 'That's what our
is about It's a
nagazine I v h
.and
drous reg
Somewhat
Southern Hagazint
md long -nee I
R t .
W ec- I a
a ho mad
: � get
g a cab a
parei

,i - a ewspapi
Leveri11 as t h
la � . -
k II
see SOI I HI-KM Rs. pap s
I oday's Cartoons Are Seen As Bad Influence On Children
MH H H-KKs
-
even
aw Si
. ise) Whs
trip at
le! M - . d ac all

w a
,1

II
l
� in
:
�� ma
Vet, this is
gnificam bat
mtrol fot
wrest led
�� also dealing
i children's
� eii individuality
� began feeling the
theii "y oung
programming during
Up to that point,
u umal" cartoon I a I
: minating staple ol
rnings
rime Batman series
fao f the Saturday
stipt-r heros like
, j the Impossible
nd it anything is
. th supei heros it's
rushing s iolencc
was the magic
I wl ' ipened the dooi foi
in groups
� anged significantly
v a hei ould not punch a
He couldn'l even trip
nd shooting was out of the
much to the chagrin of
Bannon who had his gun
: when "Johnny guest" was
ved to Saturday morning from
e time.
The reasoning was simple: a
d might actually slug another
i ' get hi n his
I ai � He and
'I nc le' Race.
isored the 'human' anima
ei � ipe I ire some
a ' will never
� ed i me I Sal n das moi n
taunc tics' ' 'defenders"
admil . he t reatis e ;
i � w oi ks gave into ev ei
demand, she would still I
lething ��, complain il
Now it's the 'funny animals'
a � . i have come undei
censoi 's snippers.
Nowadays, foi example,
,au' even show hunters aiming a
gun at Daffy Duck' In one t ai
n Hugs and Daffy keep chang
ing the 'hunting signs' on ea
� � ei from duck to i abbii season
At the end, Daffy asks Hues.
' 'Su, w hat season is this really ?
At this point. Hugs reveals a
"duck season" sign and several
hunters emerge from the bushes
and blow Daffy away. He
i etui ns, burned 10 a gun
powdered crisp, and tells Bugs,
' '1 hate on "
I he above is the original vei
sion lodas, the scene of the
hunters shooting Daffy has been
snipped out so the following
scene in which he tells Bugs, "I
hale you no longer makes am
sense w hatsoevet
What is the message the cen-
sors are hindering here? It's
wrong to shoot a duck? )i do
thes think a child might see
somebodv walking around in a
duck Milt, think "aha! A man
sied duck just like on cartoons!
Think I'll shoot him Come to
think of it, I guess this sort oi
thing happens all the time.
But the worst thing the
pressure groups do is turn car-
toons into a soap box from which
to preach their 'social gospel
Characters must act only through
committee, they must only ap-
proach a problem by teamwork,
I
see

e ssai


ting the problem head
; Cl aracters -
igl pei sonal crises and 1
ive � sa "Robotech" gives a
i istic view of love rela-
: - han � I ei fantasy pro-
Dallas or Dy nast �
I igl the animation is
1, sou only have to wa
episode r "R back
bac k witl "G.l Joe" or "He-
Ma ' see its comparitive
i .
C a:
Macek and box
Harmoney-Gold
the series, a I v.
accomodation foi sei
and beyond the cal
"Roh
series.
could survive Netv
jramri g w
wr a ten I pole. B at's
. ay Ne'w . pref
burving their head
ective Saturday mornii c sa
nd an
V : .
. ;
lioned b i
Bug Bui vasi
1 hoi can il
rtainh acted on
cience
ies b yni thinkinj
muc h as clobbet inj I s
It seems those pressu
Sal irday morning programming
a theii cl fdren
like the animatedhai
watel two dimensional i
manipulated b someone el
hand; theii only meai
expression is aw occasional gla
bhnk of the eyes I he hwell
overtones of this situati
fi ightening.
I have no pi oblem witl .
merchandising theii chaia .1
have a problem with mei c I
dising being a cartoon's only
raison d'etre.
I wondei it the censoi s ai
really trying to protect themsel
from the hildren. Perha
project then own guilt feelings on
their offspring. At any rate, they
not only insult a child's in
telligence but see children as
potential Frankensteins jusl
waiting toi the slightest sugges
tion to send them tunning
amock. What a depressing way ol
looking at the woi Id.
I should mention that a tew
Saturday morning programs
managed to rise above the restric-
tion. Very few. Ironically, one of
the country's most popular cai
toon series in terms both oi
viewers and merchandising is the
violent "Robotech
The lengths series deals with a
From The Not So ffjghj
Revenge On The Professors
B PAT MOI I OY
hnicrlaiiunml hdttw
I guess we all know what
time of ear it is, don't we
gang' .es, yes, I know. The
Holidays are right around the
proverbial corner; the air has
taken on a slight chill; and
thanks to all the women in
tight sweaters, it's becoming
fun to walk to class.
But more importantly, what
reallv matters this week, what
I've been continually
salivating about for the past
two months is "Teacher
Evaluation Week
Yeah. "Teacher Evaluation
Week Don't you get it? For
this one week � or at least two
days out of this one week �
we can play God.
For two days, forty-eight
hours, or 2,880 minutes, we
control the destination of a
single professor like a video
game.
Say, Einstein, you said
simply because my waterbed
exploded and caused an unex-
pected rip-tide on Fifth Street,
that I am unexcused? Well I
don't understand you very
well in class, pal; I'm sending
you back to Remedial Speech.
What's that you said? I
didn't put enough thought in-
to my Thesis Statement; I
strayed from my original line
of thought and I used a
hyphen instead of a dash? And
for that you gave me an "F"?
Jeepers Creepers, even Nix-
on got a pardon. But that's all
right, I'll simply pencil in
"Strongly Disagree" for ques-
tion number 4: "The professor
uses adequate sentence struc-
ture and brushes daily
As a matter of fact, 111 even
embellish on it. Afterall, 1
have poetic license. Not only is
the professor monosyllabic at
his best, and an extra from
Quest For Fire at his worst, he
is mean, wears a suit and tie,
and probably likes Prince.
Need I say more?
Are you starting to realize
the power the sheer om-
nipotence of your position as a
student?
If you're a freshman, take it
slowly. Heady stuff tike this
can result in curvature of the
spine, if you don't know how
to control it.
My advice is to start with a
grad student who's being a
severe weenie. Don't try to
break him in half at first; work
your way up.
Then, when you �n to a
biology professor wih a bad
case of "You-Spaak-Wham-
Spokeo-To4tli atf � g�ft
ream him. It's fta, it's easy
and the best part is: nobody
knows that you wrote it.
If you're a sophomore, you
must also be careful. I have a
friend who was put in traction
because she let her imagina-
tion get out of hand.
However, if you're a junior
or a senior (or a dinosaur, like
me), feel free to test your skills
as a creative writer.
The following is one of my
favorites: The professor has
absolutely no grasp on realm
She claims she has been saved
by Ernest Angtey, that Mets
Brau really does taste like
Budweiser and that Ronani
Reagan is the Anti-Christ.
No Chairman in his right
mind would keep someone like
that on his faculty. Just think
in five minutes you've gotten
her fired, depleted her sense of
self-worth and ruined her
career. That'll teach her to
give you a pop quiz in Psvch
1030 on the Friday before Fall
Of course, there wvll be
times when you stumble acroM
�J "ho's actually
teacher with whom you Br-
a first-name basis. Utrt0n

I





-��EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 13, i986
Magazine Of The South I
Now A Reality Of Future
Continued from page 7
successful local magazines in
Arkansas.
Despite a wide gully of dif-
ference in politics - - Weeks is a
former McGovernite, while
leveritt started conservative
newspapers as a high school and
college student � the two found
common ground. Each envision-
ed a magazine by the South, of
the South and for the South that
went beyond the recipes and
gardening tips of other Southern
Publications, and delved into the
odd charms and heated issues of
the region often missed by na-
tional reports.
"The South has tended to be
reflected in the press through a
Northern lens Leveritt said.
"We want to change that and
provide our readers with a
singularly southern vision
Said Weeks, "We're much
more sophisticated than we're
given credit for being by the non-
south media
Weeks and leveritt spent
almost a decade dreaming,
scheming and wondering if such a
magazine would fly.
They had good reason for
trepidation. Successful regional
magazines are rare. The simple
fact is that regions often have lit-
tle more than geography as a
common interest.
"Southerners are very indepen
dent, yet they stick together
Weeks said. "If it can be done
anywhere in America on a major
scale, it can be done in the
South
After a good deal of research
and soul-searching, Leveritt and
Weeks went looking for money.
They found friendly ears and
deep pockets at Stephens Inc. of
Little Rock, the largest invest-
ment banker in the south, which
is betting to the tune of $700
million dollars that Southerners
will pay to read up on their
heritage.
The magazine's circulation
department blanketed the South
over the summer with subscrip-
tion offers to more than 6 million
of the 13-state region's 28 million
households. More than 200,000
subscribers signed up for the
premier October issue.
Leveritt, who says the project
is on course financially, predicts
a profit within four years and ex-
pects circulation to top 1 million.
Southern is fact and fiction,
sports and politics, religion and
humor, home and travel, food
and drink � "with the accent on
drink Weeks says. Creators of
the magazine like to say it will
evolve into a Southern cross bet-
ween "The New Yorker" and
"Texas Monthly
Its first issue featured an essay
on Southern storytelling (in-
cluding a pull-out phonograph
record made by one storyteller),
an elegey oq the disappearance of
mules, a preview of the South in
the 21st century and a biting story
on the trials of Louisiana Gov.
Edwin Edwards, Headlined "Red
Beans and Vice
Molloy
Takes No
Prisoners
Continued from page 7
they'll let someone like me call
them by their given names,
they can take jab in the funny
bone.
At times the professor seems
distant � almost as if he's not
mentally present. His sudden
mood swings lead me to
believe he's not totally
masculine, as does his habitual
out-loud giggling. However,
he does have good rhythm,
and he's easy to dance with.
I'll give him a 75.
But I do wish he 'd stop ask-
ing us to call him "Shirlev. "
Circle K Is Not A Ranch
Circle K Is . . .
THE �
TOTAL
�;�
L�B
COLLEGE
EXPERIENCE
Why not find out more about how
YOU
can benefit by becoming an active member
of ECU Circle K!
All interested students are invited to attend an
"All About Circle K Seminar"
Sunday, November 16, 7:00 p.m.
Room 248 Mendenhall
Refreshments wilt be serxed
Find out whv Circle K is
THE TOTAL COLLEGE EXPERIENCE
inm�re 2" InfJtution Of Higher Learning
Falls Far Too Short On The Entertainment
Continued from page 7
One thing that works pretty
well for Soul Man is its depiction
of a man who suddenly has to
deal with others' prejudices
towards black people as well as
his own.
The gags are for the most part
predictable, but in spite oi' this,
they are occasionally funny simp-
ly by virtue of outrageousnss.
The acting is not poor, but never
especially good.
Where the film runs into real
trouble is the script by Carol
Black. A comedy film isn't
necessarily supposed to be utterly
feasible, but Soul Man jusl stret-
ches our suspension of disbelief.
We are expected to believe
wealthy parents would refuse to
pay for their son's education. We
are supposed to believe that just
when Howell's character needs
this scholarship, his beach
bum tanning scientist friend ac-
cident!) discovers a pill that will
turn white people black. Finally
� and most absurd � we are
supposed to believe that anybodv
would actually think Howell is
black, rather than a white person
in make-up.
Even all of this would not be
asking for too much if the movie
ever gave us reason for stretching
our imagination so far. but
despite a few funny moments
Soul Man just isn't worth the
time or trouble.
BUt Eaat (Sarnlfnian
is now accepting applications
for the following position:
General Manager
for the Spring Semester
Apply in person at the Media Board
Secretary's Office on the second floor
of the Publications Building
between 10 AM and 5 PM.
CHRISTMAS IN NOVEMBER
Over 200 Christmas presents
through the month of November
91.3 FM
vifcd

�3

JOIN THE SPIRIT AND CALL
757-6913
When you hear them sleigh bells
ringin' be the right caller
&
WZMB wishes to thank these area merchants
JMSr
Sunshine Video, Inc.
TWfs Nightlife
Substation II
Spice of Life
Deiner's Bakery
A Cut Above
Hank 9s Ice Cream
Sheir Hair Design
Apple Records
for making a November Christmas possible
ECU Special Concerts Committee
Hooters
ECU Play House
Campus Pizza and Subs
University Rentals
Fabricate Too
Record Bar
Wrong Way Corrigans
Chinatown Express
Your Local Budweiser Distributor
Marsh's Surf & Sea
New Deli
Pizza Hut
Grogs
Tequila Bar
Attic
Simply Elegant Caterers
(LOOM COUNTY
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K Is . . .
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1 HI I ASTAROl IN IAN
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BLOOM COUNTY
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UKXYOUlN
A C10X.T WHH
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NOW COME
BACK IN.
by Berke Breathed
The Beast Carolinian
YA.SllWTVwJiJWR
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Um VW W MAKE A RAPtA.
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ThANKW
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UNDERCOVER
CATS SOLVE
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Sports
NOVFMBER 13, lVgA
Page 10
wimmers Unbeaten
Pirates Down Richmond
s
��
J � HUMBERT - ECU Photo Lab
jJ
I hi- nun
B HUMBERT - ECU Pho�o L.b
Prate Gridders Take On Bearcats
As Seniors Bow Out In Ficklen
By SCOTT COOPER
� �-N�o�i� Mllor
The men's and women's swim
teams remained perfect as both
squads won handily over con-
ference foe Richmond in Minges
Natatorium Tuesday, giving both
teams a 2-0 record.
The men, behind double win-
ners Andy Jeter and Mark
Mazuzan, topped the Spiders
118-82 while triple winner Caycee
Pouce and double winner Robin
Wicks led the women to a 125-82
win.
Freshman Jeter won the 100-
and 200-meter freestyles while
senior Poust won the 200-meter
individual medley, the 200-meter
backstroke and swam a leg on the
400-meter medley relay.
Freshman Mazuzan won the one-
and 3-meter diving while
freshman Wicks took the
200-meter butterfly and was part
of the winning 400-meter medley
team.
"The whole team swam real
weB said ECU coach Rick
Kobe. "This is one of the best
performances in an early meet
since 1 have been here. We beat
one of the better conference
teams in Richmond and we really
couldn't be happier at this point.
"We swam much faster than
we did against Furman Kobe
added. "We were expecting a
close meet, but it just wasn't to
be. We are exactly where we want
to be at this point of the season
The women will be at William
& Mary Friday while both squads
will be at home a week later to
battle UNC-Charlotte on Nov. 22
at 2 p.m.
Men's Summarv
400-Medlev Relav ECU (Pistono. Ken
nedy, Fleming. Brown) 3 43 44
1000 Free: George Edelman (R) 9 47.82;
David Killeen (ECU) 953.32. Andv Lewis
(ECU) 10.10 41
200 Free: Jeter (ECU) 1:47.53; Andv
Johns (ECU) 1 48 29; Matt Pecca (Ri
1:44.63
50 Free: Roto Fleming (ECU) 22 42. Pat
Sanderson (R) 22:68; Jeff Brown (ECU)
22:81
200 IM: Patrick Brennan (ECU) 2 02.08.
Tsge Pistono (ECU) 202 23. John
Sloven (R) 2:03.54
1 Meter Diving: Mazuzan (ECU) 125 95.
Chris Berger (R) 93.05; David Ovenon
(ECU) 203 54
200 Flv: Kevin Hidalgo (ECU) 1 59 43.
John Sloven (R) 2:04.85; Can. Green
2:01.12
100 Free Jeter (ECU) 49 63; Pat Sander
son (R) 48.82. Matt Roca (R) 50.02
200 Back Tvge Pistono (ECU) 205.0;
Clav D'Aughtrv (ECU) 2:07.05; Patrick
Williams (ECU) 2:07.33
500 Free George Edelman (Ri 4:48.57;
Patrick Brennan (ECU) 452.18; Ajidv
1 ewis (ECU) 4:57 34
3-Meter Diving. Maaizan (ECU) 154 75;
David Ovenon (ECU) 163 55
200 Breast David Hallman (R) 2 26 08
Charles Keiso 2 24 58 Roto Fleming
(ECU) 2 V 37 (Exhibition)
400-Free Relav Richmond (O'Brien.
Daughtrv. Roca. Edelman) 3 20 43
W omen s Sum mars
400-Medle Relav ECU (Poust. Phi a
Wicks, Childers) 4 09 83
1000 Free Pam Wilhanks (EC I
1044 83; Scotia Miller (ECU 11:01
Kristin Olsen (R) U 01 1
200 Err- Susan Wager (R) I J7 7; Jen
nifer Dolan (ECU) 1 59 4. Pa' () ki
(ECU) 2:01.73
50 Free Patti Walsh, (EC I , ;n. Do-
Hall (Ri 26 45. Betsv Beausang Ri ft
200 IM Poust (ECU) 2 15 33. 1 e -
W,lson (ECU) 2 P 89; Debbie Delhi
ingut (R) 2 19 16
1 Meter Diving Aiene S:ngea.J (M
126 95; Sherrv Campbei; (EC L 112 5. D
Robinson R( 153 25
200 Flv W.cks (ECU) 2 14 2' Ryai
Philyaw (ECU) 2 16 95. Susan Aufu
(ECU) 2 18 96
100 Free Susan Wager (Ri 54 25. Paa
W,lbanks (ECU) 56 99; Pan W
(ECU) 56 82
200 Back Poust (ECU) 2 15 9. Ginge:
Carrick (ECU) 2 20 4. I on ivin�
(ECU) 2:21 5'
500 Free Pat OUen (ECU) 5 1" 26. Jen
n.fer Dolan (EC li 22 18; Kristin CXse
(ECU) 5 25 17
3-Meter Divmg Sherrv Campbell (ECU)
146 95. D Robinson (R) 41 85. Rene
Seech (ECU) 133.3
200 Breast Debbie Deliaingui (R
2 3181; Jennv Decker Ri 2 39 02
Sozanne Hill (R) 2 54 92
400-Free Relav Richmond (Wagr-
Meissner. Elder. Kistien 3 4' 1
Bj 1IM( HANOI FR
& Ki( K McCORMAC
rl, Unlrrr,
M ai
- will have
to pia in
Sal day . v hen
incinnatj Bcar-
' two college
. ti e thai Cincin-
� L esfo .til :eam ed in Ficklen
setson Pirate
Bak�' his week-
ce. "Ai their f � good this � c were
1 was still lm-
vathe played
. . .1' urrentl) 5-5.
eatedVirginia Tech
S 1 ' I .I(45-38),
V ichita State State (45-14). ave been to
28-481Kentucky
sate (17-23),
(13-45)and Auburn
1 (
( incinnati share
� opponents. For
Sports Fact
lhur. No. 13, 1982
Ra "Boom Boom" Mancinil
knocks out Korean challenger!
Duk Koo Kim in the fourteenth
round on national television to
retain his lightweight title. Kim
collapses after the match and
dies a tew days later, sparking aI
review of the sport that leads toj
the American Medical Associa-
tion's 1984 recommendation I
ihat boxing be banned.
those who like to compare scores.
Auburn defeated the Pirates 45-0
w hile Penn State downed ECU by
a 17-42 score. The Pirates will
close their season on Thanksgiv-
ing against Miami (Fla.)
This week's game is an impor-
tant one for Cincinnati according
to coach Dave Currey. because a
win would mean the first winning
season for the Bearcats since
1982.
"Our kids really want this
win Curre said. "The seniors
want verv badlv to finish on a
winning note � a winning
record
Despite ECU'S 1-8 record,
Currey refuses to take the Pirates
lightlv.
"They (ECU) could very easily
be 3-6 Currey said. "They've
(ECU) had two games decided in
the closing moments, and one of
them was taken from them on a
bad call
The Bearcats feature running
back Reggie Taylor, a two-time
All-America honorable mention
selection, who has run for over
4.000 yards in his career. He is
currently fifth in the nation in
rushing with 1,221 yards for an
average of 122.1 per game.
"It is very unusual for him
(Taylor) to be held under 100
yards in a gamecoach Baker
said. "He is excellent at breaking
tackles
Another weapon in the Bear-
cats' offensive attack is junior
quarterback Danny McCoin. He
holds the school completion
record with 360 and is present I v
second in career passing yardage.
The quarterback situation for
'he Pirates has once again change
in this week's contest.
True-freshman Charlie Libret-
to, who guided the Pirates to a
go-ahead touchdown in the
Southern Mississippi game, will
replace red-shirt freshman Travis
Hunter.
libretto, who started the first
six games for ECU this season,
had been replaced in the line-up
by Hunter. But, he was put in for
Hunter during the final minute of
the Southern Miss game to mount
one final drive for the Pirates.
Libretto came through on the
drive as he capped it off with a
21-yard touchdown pass to
freshman Walter Wilson for his
first touchdown pass as a col-
legian.
The Pirates benefitted from
last week's open date, as
tailbacks Reggie McKinney and
Brian McPhatter will be back in
the lineup after missing action
due to injuries.
The game, designated "Fan
Appreciation Day will mark
the final home appearance for the
16 seniors on the football team.
As previously mentioned, this
Saturday has been designated
"Fan Appreciation Day All
fans entering the stadium will
receive a certificate thanking
them for their loyal support of
the Pirates. In addition, a Honda
Elite 80 scooter will be given
away.
In addition to the Marching
Pirates, the halftime show will be
highlighted by the Cincinnati
marching band. This marks the
first time in a number of years
that a visiting band has appeared
in Ficklen Stadium.
London, Aloia Senior Pirates
KLLBN MURPHY - ECU Photo Lab
Senior Pirates' Gary London (7) and Joe Aloia (25)
Basketball Exhibition
Charlie Harrison's 1986-87
Pirate basketball team will make
then debut tonight (Thurs.) in an
exhibition game against the
Brisbane Bullets.
Tipoff is at 7:30, and student
tickets can be picked up one hour
before game time at the Minges
Ticket Office with a valid student
ID and.activity card.
The Bullets, from Australia,
are currently undefeated against
Division-1 oponents. This will be
the last warm-up for the Pirates
before they open the season on
Nov. 29 in Minges Coliseum
against Edinboro University.
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sport, Write,
On most football teams, you'll
hear them called strong safeties,
but at ECU, they proudly wear
the name 'Pirates ECU's top
two men at this secondary posi-
tion are seniors Gary London and
Joe Aloia.
Approaching their last home
game, both have taken time to
look back at their team, the
season and their careers at ECU.
For London, ECU football has
been good to him. A true senior
leader, London said that the fact
that Saturday will be his last
home game hasn't hit him yet. He
hopes that this won't be his last
season of football as he wishes
for the chance to play profes-
sionally.
"Football has prepared me for
just about anything in life Lon-
don said. "I've learned how to
deal with hard times and you
can't get much harder than this
London, a fourth-year senior,
started in a few games his
freshman year and has found the
starting position a familiar one
ever since.
The 6-2 'Pirate' remembers his
favorite game, which was his first
collegiate start against Temple in
1983.
"I was excited because it was
the first time I was starting. 1 was
ready, but a little scared to be
playing in front of all those peo-
ple London said. "When we
got there it was raining and our
fans were about the only ones
there. That took a lot of pressure
off me and I had a great game
that I will never forget
London's freshman year also
gave the Hampton, Va resident
some funny memories that he's
sure never to forget. "We were
playing Miami and at the end of a
play, I was on the bottom of the
pile. Everyone was pushing and
kicking. As everyone got up, so-
meone kept kicking me Lon-
don explained. "I was ready to
jump up and go to it until I saw
that it was a huge offensive
lineman. Needless to say, I let
him slide
The communications major
has seen many changes since his
freshman year. He said he was
proud of the way the team has
stuck together through so many
coaching staff changes. Because
his personal goals involved team
goals, London hasn't met all his
expectations of the season. But
with some adjustments, he is still
looking to make the best of this
year.
Joe Aloia is also a senior
Pirate The five-year senior
walk-on feels he's been lucky to
have worked with teammate Garv
London. Said Aloia, "We've
gone through hard times but have
enjoyed a lot of good times too "
The 5-10 New Jersey native.
Aloia has made manv close
friends while at ECU and that's
made the long road worth it
because, "they will be my friends
forever.
Aloia has spent most of his
time waiting patiently for a big
break. He sees most of his play
mg time on the specialty teams
Aloia s had the opportunity to
paverThndagainS,SOmc1
Players. These opportunities have
been this non-scholarship
athlete's rewards. "Plaving
against the big name teams is
great Aloia said. "You get the
chance to see just how good they
are He feels this is what has
made his career at ECU so ex
citing and memorable.
One of his well remembered
encounters came against former
ECU player Jody Shuliz. "I was
blocking Jody when he came
across with a forearm to mv
cnin Aloia explained. "Not on-
gJ cut m' chin, but it
,ike?rmIeboul fiv� f�t inio
the backfield
To Aloia, that's what playing
football ,s all about - practicing
hard and playing tough. He
hopes to teach this if he coaches
in the future.
But in the immediate future.
Gary London and Joe Aloia are
looking for big things to happen
�n their last two games as they go
out just as they normally do
giving it their all.
Jn
Intramuri
Co-Rec Cageball
Se'en ,can rd m the
new Intramural � R
Cageball. Ali teams r
si fu"andpd f,he�
which differs from traditional
volleyball. If you arc intern
participating in agehaii. keep an
eve out for info-
hours which .
for this sp.
3 On 3 Basketball
3 on 3 B, .
week with ai
ncipating Tea-
well in the �
The Fellow v. the Get
and the Akj �� r Ski
Racquetball
Tournament
Racque-Ha
tion got un
vember 10 a1 V � .
courts. A larj.
ticipants guai
petition. M5 ma
the open ai
sions and lei
for the
division, c ns will tM
crowned rhurs Nov. 2
luck to all r
Intramural
Point Leaders
As of N .
follows:
THE FRATERN
SION is be
Epsilof -
: p
ChancdloT :
running
IN-THE- MI S trt
DENT DIVISION �
are t
is I
-
The
Trophy S
INDEPENDENT DIVTS1 S
Sigma Ph �
are leadr
with 23? points
sehind are
points, c a
Goldenhear-
Scott Hall
MEN'S RESIDENCI DIM
SION with 2?
closely by Gam Ha
In the CO REC RES
DIVISION, the B �
omen are lead
total of 318 p
last year's trc
I msiead. who ha
-42 points.
The WOMEN S RES
DlMSION points race -
close with Fleming a
points, folio
Hall with 70 po
TheSORORITH -
lle of their own h ZeU
Alpha leading w. 2 7 p
followed by Delta 2a
Points. Las: ear-
the Alpha Phs- are staj t
ith 186 points
Beginning
Weight Training
orkshop
Beginning we gh
workshops are being "ered I
individuals interests. 'nmg
juP muscles and c:ee
greater physical strengtk and er
lurance. The three less
workshops will introduce
l,cipants learn a fundarr
toutine for total bod) de
"Km. The workshop, mi be
idd Nov. 7, 18. and 20,
5:30-6:30 p.m. in Memorial
gymnasium weight room �
f the event is $2.00 for studen:
ind $3.00 f .aff. Regira:
fB begin N�. 10. and will run
trough the 13 from 9:00 a -
�00 p.m. in 204 Memorial Gvm
sium. Register earlv. &
forkshop is limited to only 16 '
rticipants.
; y
�ti0mmmmwBmwmm� ��" " �
jf b
1





I
tl
ichmond
usk
lor
R ' 26 tV.
1458 R I lemmg
R Bnen,
omen's sunim�r
� �
� aw
� 82
1 I
� R 16 f
Deiha
67
R
Ran
- � -
41 85. Ren
-
'11
Pirates
�P
�emembered
' rmer
j �� "I was
he came
"ea-rn � , mv
plained "Noi on
"hin, bur i;
' ve feei into
�, that's what playing
l about - practicing
and playing tough. He
to teach this if he coaches
tuture.
But in the immediate future
tn London and Joe Alo.a are
Ming for big thmgs to happen
I'heir last two games as they go
just is they normally do m-
f'ng it their all.
I
Intramural-
I Hfc EAST CAROl INIAN
NOVEMBER 13. 1986
11
Intramural Action Highlights
Co-Rec Cageball
vv en teams participated in the
new Intramural activity CoRec
1 eball. All teams enjoyed the
:nnd,u� and pace of the game
n A7 from "aditional
vHevball. If you are interested in
partu.pat.ng in Cageball, keep an
eve out tor informal recreation
hours wfuch will be designated
this sport.
3 On 3 Basketball
1 on .1 Basketball began this
'ku,th a total of 47 teams par-
bating. Teams expected to do
I m the tournament include-
he Fellows, the Get Fresh Crew
the AKkdimik Skholars.
Racquetball
Tournament
Racquetball singles competi-
got underway Monday,
November 10 at Minges Colisium
rts, A large turnout of par-
ents guarantees stiff corn-
on 36 men are bracketed in
open and intermediate divi-
and seven women are vying
the championship in their
vision. Champions uill be
rowned Thurs Nov. 20. Good
� o all participants.
Intramural
Point Leaders
V of Nov. 11. the leaders in
caniational race are as
HE FRATERNITY DIVI-
S being led by Tau Kappa
with 348 points; Sigma
silon (the defending
lor's Trophy winner) is
. a close second with 336
IN I Hfc MEN'S INB&PEN-
DENt DIVISION the Alcholics
eading the way with 181
nts followed by last year's
winner, Arm ROTC,
itl 161 points.
defending Chancellor's
winner in the WOMEN'S
INDEPENDENT DIVISION,
Sigma Phi Epsilon Goldenhearts,
Jing in the point battle
233 points. Following
nd are the Enforcers with 159
Can anyone catch the
�idenhearts? Onlv time will tell.
v " Hall is leading the
MEN'S RESIDENCE DIVI-
�N with 239 points, followed
sel by Garrett Hall with 202.
he COREC RESIDENCE
ISION, the Belk men and
�'ien are leading the way with a
'al of 318 points followed by
vear's trophy winners,
instead, who have accumulated
242 points.
The WOMEN'S RESIDENCE
DIVISION points race is running
�se with Fleming leading with
points, followed by White
Hall with 70 points.
The SORORITIES are in a bat-
tle of their own with Zeta Tau
Vpha leading with 217 points,
Mowed by Delta Zeta's with 187
nts. last year's trophy winner
'he Alpha Phi's are staying close
!th 186 points.
Beginning
Weight Training
Workshop
Beginning weight training
workshops are being offered to
individuals interested in firming
up muscles and developing
greater physical strength and en-
durance. The three session
workshops will introduce par-
ticipants learn a fundamental
routine for total body develop-
ment. The workshops will be
held Nov. 17, 18, and 20,
5:30-6:30 p.m. in Memorial
Gymnasium weight room. Cost
of the event is $2.00 for students
and $3.00 f" taff. Registration
will begin Nl . 10, and will run
through the 13 from 9:00 a.m. to
4:00 p.m. in 204 Memorial Gym-
nasium. Register early, as this
workshop is limited to only 16
participants.
Exercise For The Holidays
Drop-In Aerobics
Days
Mon & Wed
Mon & Wed
Mon & Wed
Mon & Wed
Mon & Wed
Mon & Th
Mon & Th
Tu&Th
Tu&Th
Tu &Th
Tu&Th
Tu &Th
Tu&Th
Fri
Fri
Times
4:005:
5:006:
4:305:
6:007
5:156
4:005
5:306
6:457
4:005
5:156
6:007
6:007
6:307
4:005
5:156
00 p.m.
00 p.m.
30 p.m.
:00 p.m.
15 p.m.
00 p.m.
30 p.m.
45 p.m.
:00 p.m.
.15 p.m.
:00 p.m.
:00 p.m.
:30 p.m.
:00 p.m.
:15 p.m.
Locations
MG 108
Tyler
Clement
Fleming
MG 108
White
Green
MG 108
Jones
MG 108
Fletcher
Tyler
MG 108
MG 108
MG 108
Instructors
Clare O'Connor
Lori Stephenson
Chris Day
Vaun Tschieder
Lucy Mauger
Robin Morrison
Patti Williams
To be announced
Theresa Hughes
Mark Brunetz
Lon Stephenson
Lisa Goldberg
Michelle Winiewicz
Jennifer Reed
Lucy Mauger
Mon & Wed
Tu&Th
6:307:30 p.m.
3:004:00 p.m.
Tu &Th
5:306:30 p.m.
Toning
MG 108
MG 108
Aquarobics
MG Pool
Mark Brunetz
Clare O'Connor
Robin Morrison
Chris Dav
ILLMMU�MY-CUWwliLrt
Jarman's
Stables Is
cooperating with the Department
of Intramrual-Recreation Ser-
vices in providing opportunities
for students, faculty and staff to
enjoy the outdoor atmosphere
while horseback riding. Oppor-
tunities are available for trail
riding with groups or individuals
witn a trail guide upon request.
� The trails consist o( farmland,
contry roads and pleasant wood-
ed areas.
The stables open at 9:00 a.m. and
close at dark during the fall for
drop-in business. Group rides
are provided for five dollars. Ad-
vanced registration is required.
Reservation can be made through
the Outdoor Recreation Center at
113 Memorial Gymnasium or
calling 757-6387 during opera-
tional hours.
Cape Fear
Canoe Trip
A small group of rugged outdoor
recreation enthusiasts enjoyed a
canoe trip down the Cape Fear
River on Sat Nov. 8. Nine par-
ticipants braved the cold
November weather (80 degrees)
and frigid waters (72 degrees) for
an enjoyable eight mile run frim
Lillington to Erwin. Conditions
were great for fun with the rapids
and plenty of time for instruction
from the more advanced pad-
dlers. Participants were Michael
Carey, Pat Cox, Jim Hix, Stan
Jolly, Len Olson, Richard Penny,
Anne Simonton, Pamela
Soderstrom, and David
Stanaland. Several of the par-
ticipants were members of the
newly organized paddling club.
Individuals interested in outdoor
trips, either as an individuals or
group, please call the Outdoor
Recreation Center at 757-6387.
Intramural cageball (top) is
becoming one of the most
popular IRS activities as co-rec
basketball (below) has always
been.
11:00
12:00
1:00 2
1:00 2
5:00 6
12:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m.
:00 p.m.
:00 p.m.
:00 p.m.
Weekend Drop in Classes
MG 108
MG 108
MG 108 (Tonine)
MG 108
Vaun Tschieder
Alternating
Alternating
Vaun Tschieder
Michelle Winiewicz
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM:
MWF
M-W
Sat
Sun
12 noon-2 p.m.
3p.m10p.m.
11 a.m5 p.m.
12 noon-8 p.m.
Club Sports
MEMORIAL WEIGHT ROOM:
MF 7a.m10p.m.
S3' H a.m5 p.m.
Sun 12 noon-8 p.m.
MEMORIAL
POOL:
M-F
M-F
M W I
T-Th
Sat
Sun
SWIMMING
3-
"a.m 8 a.m.
12 noon-1:30 p.m.
3 p.m10p.m.
5 p.m. 10p.m.
11 a.m5 p.m.
12 noon-8 p.m.
MINGES SWIMMING POOL:
N1 w F 8 p.m10p.m.
Sun 12 noon-5 p.m.
MEMORIAL
ROOM:
M-F
Sat
Sun
EQUIPMENT
7 a.m 10 p.m.
11 a.m5 p.m.
12 noon- 8 p.m
MINGES WEIGHT ROOM:
M-F 3 p.m10pm.
Sun 12 noon-5 p.m.
On The Move
The Club Sport Program finished
a super fall season with good pro-
gress in numerous clubs. The
Frisbee Club held an on-campus
tournament and competed in
several off-campus tournaments.
The Club's disc golf course
received progressive usage in-
creases to the point of needing an
additional nine holes. The
women's Soccer Club acquired
the talents of a fine coaching-
advisor team in Charles and
Margret Harvey. STheclubalso
managed to , ut together their
largest fall roster in history which
should provide some excellent
talent for the 1987 spring season.
The Paddling Club debuted this
semester with initial involvement
of 18 participants, composed
mainly of faculty-staff. The club
has planned to promote the sport
through instruction and outings
The Windsurfing Club gained a
good following through strong
leadership and much interest
from the student population.
The older, established clubs, such
as Rugby, Lacrosse, Karate, and
Surfing have continued regular
practices and competitions
throughout the fall. New clubs,
such as Wrestling, Weightlifting,
Cycling, and Archery, have
begun a push for memberships
and recognition. If you are in-
terested in joining a sport club
call 757-6387 for more informa-
tion.
This holiday season,
get thewiite Stuff"
at the right price.
Now you can get the competitive
edge when classes begin in Januan With a
Macintosh personal computer, and all the
urxte extras
We call it the Macintosh Write Stuff"
bundle You'll call it a great deal' Because
when you buv a Macintosh Write Stuff
bundle before Januan 9, 1987, you 11 receive
a bundle of extras�and save $250
Not only will vou get your choice of a
Macintosh S12K Enhanced or a Macintosh
Plus, you II also get an Image Writer II
printer, the perfect solution for producing
near letter-quality term papers or reports.
complete with graphs, charts, and
illustrations
Plus, you II get MacLightnmg.
the premier spelling checker con
taii
thesaurus, medical or legal dictionaries
Together with your faonte Macintosh word
processing software, you can transform
vour notes into the clearest, most letter
perfect papers vou ever turned out And
turned in on time
Whats more, there a Macintosh
Support Kit tilled with valuable accessories
and computer care products from M
Complete with all the things vou need to
keep your Macintosh running long after
� u- graduated
Let us show you how to get through
college better, faster, and smarter Stop in
and see us for more information
Outdoor Recreation Center
The Outdoor Recreation Center Center will i-� .� i .
wi� close Dee 5 1986 for .here- F��, � eouZem J?s"
mainder of the fall session. The ������.
25 OFF
BACKPACKS
TENTS
SLEEPING
This ticket is good for 25 OFF BAGS
the price for
"THE TIME OF YOUR LIFE"
You oick the place,
the time, and the activity.
The OUTDOOR RECREATION CENTER
will provide the gear CANOES
at a 25 discount off
the regular rates
for equipment rentals
if you present this ticket.
OFFER EXPIRES
COOK SETS
MARCH 16, 1987
ACCESSORIES
STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
East Carolina University
t
RIP
U






12
IHt t AM c AROl IN IAN
� MM K I . IW�n
PERSONAL
DONNA LUCASrTomorrow is your
birthday gonna have a good time!
Happy 20th) Catch one at your 12 keq
Sig Ep birthday party! Don't worry
' your roomie will pick you up if you
do the ydob mals entrance! Lisa
PARTY The 7th Annual CHILL
THRILL Party at the Phi Kappa Tau
bouse is this Friday at 3 00 Two
bands, prizes, and a jammm' time
Don't miss it
R.MARK: There is only one person
that can touch the danger zone and
return safely and that person is you.
There are still a number of surprises
left in store tor you. PS I love you.
Suuieee
GREEK MENWin a free keq of
beer! Here's how 1st annual all
greek post season football tourna
"nnt Trophies to winners & runner
up Contact Diane 758 3752 or Phyihs
746 2973 Support the enforcers
E "OTTER" We met by chance and
became close by fate Remember
when i asked you out on our first
date? The movie was fun and far
from bland, it got so scary I asked if
I could hold your hand Eleven
weeks down, many more to come. I
hope we have eleven more and then
some Love JRB
TO MS. RIGHT: I'm dying to get to
know you better I'm not too late, am
l7 How about a movie Saturday?
DUTCH
STOOD UP AND DESPERATE: Do
you enjoy exquisite dining, excellent
entertainment, ano dressing up? I
have two tickets to Wright
Auditorium's Re Opening on Nov 16
and I need a date! You are unoer no
obligation, just promised a great
time. Anyone interested please call
day or night 758 0578 and ask tor
David All calls will be given equal
consideration
ROUX'S IN TOWN:lt's party
weekend It's rounos of chair ana
pizza Across the way it's two at a
time and green. Melonballs X Tai
late night, and I need a pin. Dogpiles
wailering, jump on in! So come back
soon and see your brother, once
we've recovered enough for
another!
GREAT VOLLEYBALL GAME
BETAS: Cheese, your bill is now
$5 38 Brothers and Pledges
CAROLYN DRISCOLL: Thanks for
the help who am I going to yell at
now? Get ready for Friday! t'Sqon
na be a repeat of last year! Patti
JENNIFER: ThaKs for selling my
doughnuts! What a doiM Patt.
JOHN RUSK: THANKS FOR THE
PERSONml WE REALLY AP
PRECIATE YOU THINKING OF
US! PATTI AND ANNE
TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE
FORCE :Remember that we are all
on a certain mission, et that mis
sion has not been completed. Suc-
cess is a journey not a destination.
Thank you.
TO THE BORN AGAIN VIRGIN
Thanks for stealing my shdge! Only
kidding Go for if! Love, Virgin 2.
WANTED: Cute blond Homosexual
male, dirty blond is alright Likes
champagne, not into the bar scene
Just likes to be alone by the
fireplace Please call me Ask for
Barry Oliver 758 8265
I CAN'T BELIEVE THIS The Jof
frey II Dancers are coming to
Wnght Auditorium on Tuesday,
Nov 25 at 8 15 pm They are part of
the most incredible ballet in the
world the Joftrey Ballet from New
York City And get this tickets are
only $6 tor students at the Central
Ticket Office. See you at the ballet
LOST: Late October SMALL
female dog, short, straight black
hair except browns around forearms
and calves, distinguishing white
area on nose and chest Reward of-
fered for information 757 3666
PI KAPPA PHI:The time has come
good boys and girls for the annual Pi
Kappa tall formal. Each year we try
to warn our dates that we might act
a bit abnormal We won't attack,
but then we might, there may even
be a chicken fight Ano after we hit
the floor to do the gator, most Pi
Kapps begin to think about what
might be happening later "I mean
with the dates Some of us will want
to hate her; some will want to date
her � some will want to mate her, and
I am sure with such short notice
some will have to weigh her. But
when we wake for our dates
sake "hopefully m her lap we all
look to the sky and look in her eye
ano say, "Thank Goo I'm a Pi
Kapp" Have fun this weekend.
Dillon prez. for 1 more wi � �.
TOM:Thanks tor an unforgettable
time at the formal. Room 146 will
never be the same especially the
bathroom! I hope we can oo it agam
sometime. We'll have to experiment
on that theory of yours. Love, Sarah
K ATHY JOHNSON : Hello
Sweetheart! Cur.ous? I'm just a guy
who thinks you're the sweetest, pret
tiest woman I've ever met. AHA!
Cue No 1 We've met! it was short
but that's all it took! Til Tuesday.
JILL OPDYKE:Conqratulations on
bemg chosen ambassador of the
month You've done a qreat job!
TO THE FELLAS IN SUITE
lll:Monday night was great! Let's
party again real soon Gooo luck on
Saturday. We love ya Kimber &
Karen
ATTENTION ALL ECU
STUDENTS:Come part with Delta
Zeta ana Beta Theta Pi, Wea , Nov
19th at the TAVERN Starts around
9,00 with 50 cent draft
SIG E P BROTHERS,
GOLDENHE ARTS, AND
PLEDGES: Get ready for Camp
Contentnea this Friday niaht. Be
dehydrated enough to drink 10 kegs.
It's going to be another one of those
scary niqhts
HAPPY 21st B DAY, DANAHave a
great tune tonight terrorizing
Greenville wish I could be with you!
Love, your little sis. Judy
PHIL AND DAVE Dinner was at
6 00, Cocktails at 7 00. before we
knew it we were as high as heaven
One more sombrero dance, one
more tequila shot, slack parfiers we
are definitely not! We arrived at the
club with a big bang, and everyone
was so jealous cause our dates could
hang Missing a strap and mmus the
hose, whatever we did after that,
God only knows Thanks for the
memories and the tune together,
we'll treasure them both, now and
forever Love, your dates
SO, YOU WANT TO BE A
WRESTLER&There will be an
organizational meeting of the NEW
ECU wrestling club in Room 102
Memorial Gym, Nov 20 at 8 00 p.m
Join us
SORORITIES:The sale is upon us,
Nov ,19th Biology 103 800 p m. Wear
your letters for the prizes, and buy
your personal Theta Chi slave now
OKAY AOTT'S: Eight more days
until RosebaH! ! !
ALL STUDENTS THAT HAVE
BEEN CLOSED OUT OF INDT 2660
AND 2661: Please go by the Dean of
Technology in 110 Ragsdale! To sign
petition to open another section to
day!
COMMUNICATIONBROAD
CASTING MAJORS: We have an
organizational meeting for our NEW
honor society (GPA 2 5 or above).
Nov 19 (Wed), at 6 pm in Room 224
Old JOyner Library We need you to
get involved! Be there!
WANTED
INTERIOR DESIGN STUDENTS:
Part time work available in your
field Call 758 2300 or stop by Larry's
Carpetlano 3010 E 10th st ana fill
out application.
PART TIME: Warehouse workers
apply fc Lai ' � s Carpetland. 3010 E
10th street
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
For the perfect duplex on Uth ST
Only $140 a month plus 'j utilities
Cali Susa- 758 4231
HELP WANTED: Drivers nee:
immediately for Campus Pizza &
Subs. No phone calls please.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
To share 2 beoroom apt $140 month
and '2 utilities 4 blocks from cam-
pus Non smoker preferred. Call
Lor. 752 7396
GEORGETOWN APARTMENTS:
Need l or 2 female roommates for
Dec 1 anc next semester! Great
location, across from downtown!
Practically on campus! All new
paint and carpet Call 752 9245 Keep
trying.
WANTED: School representat
for collegiate sporting compa
Great pay Can collect
1 813 346 2009
COLLEGE STUDENTS: interested
n ear ig � free Spring Break in the
Bahamas? Call CAMPUS TOURS.
iNC at 305 523 TOUR
SALE
FOR SALE: Brand new set of jobe
ISOcni snow skis Never used or drill
ed for binamqs $150 OBO. Call
757 6491, before 5 pm or 756 9206
after 5
miiiiiiininmnmnmTTTTTT.mnniiiinTT
j JPCheck Out These Prices!
And Help Us Celebrate Our 9th Anniversary
By Saving Lots of Dollars On I
Well-Designed, First Quality Home Furnishings. �
Sale Ends November 15th
��BmaaiaMpi
I Crystal Stemware
IphotoAlbums' ! Storage Drawer umts � - - - - Ce-amic Lamps" I Oyster By Flatware
Milk Crates
2.998
1 9.99S24.99j
me 29.99
i 1
ly �!������� A �������jj)eMmr
1 I She Ph ottw . � I �
Sola Sleepers
Colored
lore hie res
TIME TO BOP DELIVER Contact
the TRASHMAN, superlative DJ
service, best known, most respected
and most reasonable rates for for
nials, semi private affairs and
private parties. Dial 752 3587 Beach
Muzak, RAR, Mid 60s, etc
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc Call
Anne at 752 3015 and leave a
message
TYPING AND WORD PROCESS
ING: Experienced secretary wIBM
computer a letter quality printer
can fulfill all your typing and
secretarial needs. Theses, business
letters, resumes and mailing labels
Call Donna at 355 6434
ADMINISTRATIVE SECRETAR
TIAL SERVICES: Providing full
time typing services to students and
faculty Experienced m thesis,
research manuscripts and term
papers Call 355 2950 for your typing
needs
TUXEDOS: Anyone needing formal
wear this fall for any occassion
please contact jon Reibel 757 0351
20 TOP HITS LP s, 1 assertes, or
compact disds are yours tor only SO
cents each Buy one at regular pnee
and receive additional selection tor
only fifty cents Rock Pop Soul
Country Jan it its solo in a record
store, we have it too! You can save
up to $200 or more! Satisfaction
guaranteed or money back! Order
now send only $10 for each Super
Discount 20 Coupon Booklet to
Down East Marketing, PO Box 190
Ayden NC 28513
TYPING SERVICE: If Ou have
papers, reports, etc that need to be
typed 7588934 between 5 30 and
9 30 p.m Very reasonable rates
T YPING Done on a work processor
with letter quality printer Years of
experience l,pmg for students ano
many more years of secretarial ex
perience that can fulfill all your
secretarial needs 50 000 word die
tionary ano thesaurus, and profes
SiOnal proofing for grammatical er
'ors Low student pr.ces call Debbie
at 355 7595
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Experienced, quality work
i BM Selectnc typewriter Can Lanie
Shive at 758 5301
TYPING: Low rates Proofreading
grammatical corrections 10 yea-v
experience 757 0398 after 6pm
ONSOLIDATLD
rHIATRES
All Seats $2.00 Everyday Til 5:30 PM
BUCCAHEER MOVIE
AenKinK Force SOU MAN
tnds Todm R I Held (Kef Pf.n
A,t
� � i i.i
(Ian of theme
Bear
h nd 1 tda ft-
KATZ PERSONALIZED COM
PUTER DATING SERVICE: An
nounces the opening of a new club m
addition to its regular club Because
of the large response from PROFES
SIONAL SINGLES we will have a
separate club for those people in
terested in meeting other protes
sionals. Call 355 7595 or write to PO
Box 8003, Greenville. NC 27835
KATZ PERSONALIZED COM
PUTER DATING SERVICE Can
help you find that someone special
with whom to spend the holidays
Whether you want a serious relation
ship or just to meet many new
friends we can help Everything con
fidenfial and all referrals personally
given. 355 7595
ALL TYPING NEEDS: Lowest
rates on campus include pro
ofreading, spelling and gram
matical corrections Over 10 years
experience Call 757 0398 and leave
message or call after 5 15 pm.
$100 OF FREE GAS: Could you use
r" Buy raffle tickets from KA l tt �
Sisters in front of the Student Store
CAROLINA GULF
1201 Dick W
752-7270
Best i ted Fires In ! wt u P L
Det
VISA M( (.Ml MIHIn HOKDIV
Starts Tomorrow!
WRQR
Presents:
Sorority Night
Nov. 14th. All
Sorority Members
(any sorority)
Admitted for onK
94C
23MM
1:15-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:1.
War made him a
man . . . Love
made him a hero!
Starts lomorroH
"MATT DILLON REVEALS SOrMT
TRUE GRITaugmenting his screen
charisma with intense conviction
�irm:e ttiilnmuu: Ptmrw
MATT KB8 8ftttk
MiD tmt warn
DORM FOOD
SURVIVAL KIT
Serving West Greenville
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� Rivergate Shopping Center
752-6996
� HOURS
HAM 1AM Sun Thurs
11AM ?AM Fn & Sat
Limited Delivery Areas
Drivers carry less Than S20 00
Got the Dorm Food Blues7 One
call to Domino's Pizza will save
you' We make and deliver hot,
tasty, custom-made pizza in less
than 30 minutes All you have to
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Get your favorite pizza instead
0fA(
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 13, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 13, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.508
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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