The East Carolinian, November 6, 1986






She
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.61 No. 19
Thursday, November 6, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 20,000
Dem. Sanford Stages Political Comeback
Sanford
JON O. JMDAN� TH� PiMrto Lab
Questions A nswered
By A warenessPanel
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI) - Former
Gov. Terry Sanford registered a
stunning political comeback for
both himself and his party by
defeating Republican Senate foe
Jim Broyhill after a 25-year
hiatus from public office.
"It's great to be a Democrat
a jubilant Sanford said Tuesday
in claiming victory. "Several
years ago the Democratic Party
was in disarray. It was
disheartened. Now the
Democratic Party is on the move,
North Carolina is on the move
Sanford led Broyhill 52 percent
to 48 percent with 99 percent of
the state's precincts reporting.
But Broyhill declined to accept
projections about the race, vow-
ing to wait until the last few votes
are counted before conceding.
"I've got to go back to
Washington and clean out my
desk Broyhill said with tears in
his eyes as he conceded the race at
9 a.m. EST Wednesday.
"1 want to say to the people of
North Carolina, 'Thank you very
much for the privilege of serving
you for the last 24 years, especial-
ly the last four months to serve all
of the people of this state said
Broyhill, a 12-term congressman
appointed to the Senate this sum-
mer to fill the unexpired term of
the late Sen. John East.
Sanford rang up strong vote
totals in predominantly
democratic eastern North
Carolina while holding his own
icross much of the piedmont and
the mountain counties, which
were Broyhill strongholds.
A political analyst said San-
ford's victory meant the bread
and butter issues stressed by the
Democrat were more important
than Broyhill's campaign theme
of maintaining Republican con-
trol of the Senate for President
Reagan.
"People are interested in issue?
that affect them, not whether
Ronald Reagan maintains control
of the Senate said University of
North Carolina political scientist
Thad Beyle. "The president
wasn't running and he cannot
transfer his coattails when he
isn't on the ballot
Reagan made three visits on
Broyhill's behalf, the last only a
week before the election. But a
majority of the state's voters
refused to buy the rosy picture
Broyhill painted of the Reagan
economy.
Sanford successfully blamed
Republicans for farm problems
and the ailing textile and apparel
industry.
Beyle said Sanford also may
have benefited from a strong con-
gressional slate in which
Democrats picked up at least two
seats, and he said Broyhill suf-
fered deeper wounds than were
apparent in a bloody GOP
primary.
"For the first time a
Republican primary showed us
the most fireworks said Beyle
of the race between Broyhill and
David Funderburk, who was
backed by the political organiza-
tion of Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C.
"There may have been some
very deep wounds that didn't
show Beyle said.
But Broyhill said he did not
think the divisiveness of the GOP
primary spilled over into the
general election.
"1 think the party was very
unified he told reporters. "I
never felt there was any division
within the party
Republicans had held both
North Carolina Senate seats and
the Governor's office. The last
Democratic senator was Robert
Morgan, who was defeated by the
late Sen. John East in 1980.
The race had been seen as
crucial for Democrats to staunch
a rising tide of Republicanism.
But Beyle said Broyhill's 49 per-
cent showing with no GOP
presidential candidate on the
ballot means Republicans are still
making gains in the state.
"Broyhill did get 48 percent of
the vote without the advantage of
the coattails of a Republican
president Beyle said. "Tha:
means on a statewide basis the
state is unquestionablv two-
party. This is baseline Republican
support
Helms predicted the
Democratic triumph would be
short-lived.
"It's an off-year election syn-
drome Helms said. "The con-
servative Democrats in the South
will come back and speak, as they
have before in 1980 and 1984
Sanford, 69, won a reputation
as progressive on racial issues
while governor from 1961 to
1965. Under his leadership the
state dodged much of the racial
violence that racked the South.
He delivered the nominating
speech for President John Ken-
nedy and later would blame his
alliance with the Humphrey wing
of the party for poor showings in
presidential bids in 1972 and
1976.
Broyhill, 59, had been ap-
pointed in July to fill the unex
pired term of the late Sen. John
East, R-N.C. An economic con-
servative with a pro-business
voting record in the House.
Broyhill failed to ignite the right
wing coalition that has sent
Helms to the Senate three terms.
More than $7 million was spent
on the race - a far cry from the
S26 million tab for the bitter 1984
race between Helms and
Democratic former Gov. Jim
Hunt.
The race was relatively genteel,
but the candidates exchanged a
few blows in the late stages ol the
campaign. Broyhill resurrected
the nickname "Food Tax Terrv"
for Sanford's imposition of the 3
percent state sales tax on food
while governor.
Sanford, a WWII veteran,
questioned why Broyhill never
served in the Korean War. An
angry Broyhill responded he had
rheumatic fever as a child that
scarred his heart and rendered
him unfit for service.
"I felt that his ads were distor-
ting my voting record, but I'm
not sure that really was a deciding
factor Broyhill said.
In the end, Sanford credited
hard work for helping him edge
past Broyhill in the final das of
the campaign.
"It's nice to know that old-
fashioned campaigning - going
out and shaking hands and talk-
ing to the press - still pays off
Sanford said.
B (A
AROIAN DRLSCOI
NMstanl Nfm F�Rfor
1
A program designed to help
students and faculty define.
recognize and deal with sexual
harassment on campus was held
in Jenkins Auditorium yesterdav,
a- par; of Sexua! Assault
Awareness Week.
The informal program, spon-
sored bj the Women's Studies
Program, consisted of panel
d cussions, skits performed bv
Karen Baldwin, a professor in the
English department and David
Sander head of the honors pro-
gram ai ECU, as well as audience
participation.
One of the skits showed a
situation, a female student com-
ing to a male professor's office
for help on a paper, twice; the
first time, the student made ad-
vances at the professor, and the
second time the professor made
advances at the student.
Panel member Kenneth
Wilson, associate professor of
sociology began the discussion
stating that while the first scene
does not fit the legal definition of
sexual harassment, the second
does. "Sexual harassment deals
with power, creating a situation
in which a person feels threatened
or offended and we must look at
it from the students point of
v iew he said.
Gloria Grimes, the general
manager of Expressions who
served as a student representative
on the pane! agreed, sayingThe
student making advances wasn't
sexual harassment because no
power was involved
"But isn't there the threat of
the teacher losing his job Isn't
that an example of the student us-
ing power over the teacher?"
asked Sanders.
Wilson explained that it is not.
since it does not involve the "for-
mal power the university has
given you (th. professor) In the
situation where the student is
making the advances, he said,
"it is the fact that the ECU is
standing behind you that makes
is sexual harassment. The situa-
tion is no longer just you and a
woman�it's you and ECU
against the woman
According to Mary Ann Rose,
assistant to the chancellor, the of-
ficial ECU policy of sexual
harassment on campus, in part,
prohibits anv "unsolicited,
unwelcomed verbal andor
phvsical conduct of a sexual
nature or with sexual implica-
tions. This does not include per-
sonal compliments welcomed by
the recipient or relationships
which are freely entered into bv
both parties
She noted that men as well as
women may be victims of sexual
harassment.
After a students account of
harassment at ECU was read
aloud, one member of the au-
dience asked that the procedure
of reporting such behavior be
reviewed.
According to Rose, any stu-
dent who has been harassed
should go the the Office of
Academic life, where he or she
will be asked to sign a formal
complaint, stating exactly what
has happened.
From there, the chairman of
the faculty member's depart-
ment, and then the faculty
member will be approached.
Steps can be taken to protect the
student from any action the
teacher may take, such as having
another professor grade an exam
or paper.
Other activities related to sex-
ual assault awareness this week
are a program on "Self Defense
Against Sexual Assault today
at and 7 p.m. at Mendenhall;
"Rape an art exhibit to be
shown November 7 through
December 6 in Gray Art Galleryf
and an all-day symposium on
Saturday entitled "Perspectives
on Rape: A Multi-Dimensional
Approach to Issues of Sexual
Violence" to be held in Jenkins
Auditorium.
Campus Hazards Pointed Out
By TOBI FERGUSON
Waff Writer
On Nov. 4 at 7:30 p.m a con-
cerned group of individuals met
at Joyner Library for project
"Night Walk" as a part of Sexual
Assault Week activities. A crime
prevention officer, the Chairman
of the Campus Wide Safety Com-
mittee, a Psychology Department
representative, the West Area
Residence Hall President,
members of Pirate Walk, several
ECU Campus Police Personnel,
members of Alpha Phi Sigma, af-
filiates of the Sexual Assault
Awareness Committee, and other
university students comprised the
group. The purpose of "Night
Walk" was to point out the
various dangerous areas on cam-
pus at night which provide hiding
places for attackers, lead to
physical injury for those walking
through the area due to low hang-
ing limbs, low visibility, and
rough terrain, and obscure vision
of drivers and pedestrians.
Those gathering at Joyner
Library divided into two groups.
One group concentrated in the
area around the Leo Jenkins Art
Building and Jams Hall, West
Campus around the residence
halls, and the resident and com-
muter parking lots around
Mendenhall Student Center. The
other group combed the area
from the library toward the Cen-
tral Campus area dorms of Slav
and Umstead, to the area encom-
passing the Biology-Physics
Building and Memorial Gym, to
the darkened and heavily wooded
area commonly referred to as the
bottom of the hill (at intersection
of College Hill Drive and 10th
St.) including three commuter
lots and the Marching Pirates
practice field, to the residence
halls on the hill, back towards
campus, around the East
Carolina Playhouse, behind the
ECU Student Store, and encircl-
ing Ragsdale.
According to Janet Batten.
West Area President, last
Wednesday night some of the ex-
ecutive board and presidents
from the residence halls in the
area had a similar walk.
See GROUP page
ECU's Handicap Facilities Assessed
ON THE INSIDE
Editorials4
Entertainment5
�New Music Videos reviewed �
nierounraen.6 sef ENTERTAINMENT page6
1 Announcements3
Classifieds10
�Ref's decision Saturday's game
upheld � see SPORTS page 8
By THERESA ROSINSKI
Staff Writer
"East Carolina University is
one of the most physically ac-
cessible Universities of the 16
state-supported institutions for
handicapped students said
C.C. Rowe, director of the Han-
dicapped Student Services.
According to Rowe, all the
classroom buildings on campus,
except Memorial Gym and
Flanagan, are accessible to the
first floor. Flanagan is an excep-
tion because its first floor is in the
basement, but the students have
access to the second and third
floors.
Of the 51 buildings on campus
only seven are not accessible to
handicapped students. Sixteen of
the buildings are totally accessi-
ble and the rest have partial ac-
cessibility. According to Rowe,
The campus is 90 to 95 percent
accessible to students and has 100
percent program accessibility.
"Program accessibility means
that if a student is physically
limited from making it to class,
we bring the class to the student.
We move the class to a room that
is accessible for the student
said Rowe.
By law, no university can deny
any student program accessibility
or admission because of their
disability. It is also stated by law
that students have a choice as to
where they prefer to live.
Presently three dorms are
totally accessible to disabled
students and can accommodate
them. Students have a choice to
live in a coed dorm, either Cotten
which is all female or Garrett
which is all male.
"Right now we have less than 1
percent of handicapped students
on campus, but there are pro-
bably more since many of the
students never identify
themselves as handicapped and
can care for themselves said
Rowe.
After admission to the univer-
sity, information is also sent to
the student about the Office of
Handicapped Student Services
and Programs. At this point, it is
the student's responsibility to
contact the Office to advise them
of their disability and the accom-
modations they will need.
The Office then functions as a
communication center between
the student, faculty and the
whole community. "We provide
services to compensate for the
limitations the student's disabili-
ty brings upon them said
Rowe.
The Office offers disabled
students tutors, recorded texts
for the hearing impaired and
numerous other aids to help the
student compensate for his or her
disability.
"We are here to help the
disabled, all they have to do is
contact us said Rowe.
J.�. HUMIItT- Tit ���� (.��
Get out those early registration issues of The East Carolinian, it .11 begins Monday.
"
A





-TMJEJEVST l AROl INKS
VHIMBFR IV8
Group Discusses Various Campus Hazards
Continued from page ,
Some of the more prominent
Problem areas and the suggested
solutions follow. At the Leo
Jenkins Art Building several kev
tights (light on South East cor-
ner and lights on the upper deck)
Jre not functioning; thus, these
areas are shrouded in darkness.
Bulb replacement and positioning
ome light fixtures higher was
suggested. When the southeast
corner light is operating, it il-
luminates the sidewalk and cour-
ivard below .
The trees between Jarvis and
the Art Building obscure vision
and can injure anyone of height
walking beneath them. Trimming
them will also increase the pro-
ductive of proper lighting.
There is also minimal visibility
on the handicapped ramp at the
entrance to the Art Building.
Under its present conditions, this
represents a serious physically en-
dangering area. Numerous com-
munity members who attend pro-
grams in the Leo Jenkins Art
Building use the handicap
facilities as well as handicapped
university students and faculty.
On the North East corner of
Ciarrett Dorm's front porch area,
the light is not functioning. The
overgrown shubbery around the
porch area reduces usability and
needs to be trimmed.
At the campus entrance off of
5th St. between Fletcher and Gar-
ret! dorms, the densely wooded
area provides too much coverage
possibly waiting for lone
pedestrians. A suggestion was
presented to clear that area.
In the corner of Fletcher lobby
and the wing extending toward
5th St there have been a few at-
tempts by males to enter the
building through the windows.
Trimming the trees and adding
low level lighting in this boxed
area would alleviate this problem
as well as discourage people from
lingering in this area.
The back stairs area of Fletcher
would benefit from raising the
existing light to illuminate the
darkened corner beside the stair-
way.
A suggestion was voiced to
place a high powered sodium
vapor light on an extended pole
to illuminate the area of the am-
phitheater and to also padlock
the fenced in sunbathing area
behind Fletcher Dorm at a certain
time everyday. This precau-
tionary action would curtail the
possibility of female students be-
ing dragged in there by attackers
unobserved or unheard late at
night.
The groups decided all lights in
the West Campus and Central
Campus areas need to be raised
to illuminate more areas as well
as the phasing in of better
lighting equipment. High
powered sodium vapor lighting
was recommended. According to
one group member, although the
initial cost of installation is more
than the cost involved in the pre-
tion, overtime the cost element
would be reversed. Fewer high
powered sodium vapor lights
would be needed because they il-
luminate more area. Examples of
areas using high powered sodium
vapor lighting include Ringgold
Towers (three lights illuminate
the entire parking facility), Bur-
roughs Wellcome, and the former
Union Carbide facility.
Resident parking areas bet-
ween Ringgold Towers and the
International Student House and
commuter parking around
Mendenhall Student Center was
found to have inadequate
lighting.
The stop sign in the commuter
lot adjacent to and facing
Mendenhall Student Center is
obscured by tree limbs and
presents a potential traffic
hazard. The sign should be
relocated or the tree trimmed.
At the northwest corner of
Joyner Library, the depressed
drain represents a hazard. A
fence encircling this area was sug-
gested.
The shrubs surrounding
Mendenhall Student Center pro-
vide areas where an attacker's
presence would be subdued.
Trimming this area was sug-
gested.
The area between Mendenhall
Student Center and Joyner
Library is also enshrouded in
darkness after the library closes
and poses a potential threat to
students and faculty passing
through this area. Installation of
The area around Slay and
Umstead residence halls are dark
and the shrubberies are dence and
reduce visibility. More lighting
can rectify this situation.
The intersection of College Hill
Drive and 10th St. has insuffi-
cient lighting and is heavily
wooded.
The Gold Bus waiting area, the
three commuter lots, and the
practice field were seen as poten-
tially dangerous. The practice
field benefits from no lighting
and is surrounded on three sides
by woods. The largest commuter
lot does have some lighting.
The walkway going up to Jones
Dorm represents a highly
dangerous situation. This area
has poor lighting and is located in
a densely foliated area. Physical
injury (sprained ankles, slips,
broken bones) and assault are
highly probably here. Installation
of adequate lighting and land-
scaping the area would help.
Additional lighting behind the
dorms on the hill especially at the
bicycle racks would also be
beneficial.
In the last portion of their
sweep, the second group passed
through the Croatan area, the
East Carolina Playhouse area,
and down the street behind the
ECU Student Store and adjacent
to Ragsdale. Students were con-
cerned with the darkened areas
surrounding the Croatan.
Around the East Carolina
Playhouse, the group found the
area not meeting desired safety-
standards for the numerous
students walking back from night
classes in near buildings, and
students, faculty, community
members, and special guests
rehearsing for or attending
dramatic and musical produc-
tions at the Playhouse or Wright
Auditorium. This area was ex
tremely dark enshrouding hiding
places, loose gravel, uneven
sidewalks and pavement, and
holes in the ground.
Additional lighting similar to
that used at Ringgold Towers
would rectify the present situa
tion and make travelling around
the Playhouse and the entire
ECU campus a much safer a
more pleasant experience
students, faculty and guests.
g.nyPfgts.lurkn dKtnight Sent ,B�hti.nf.ffypifflft ffitff , lighting wyrid .ry.hcni-firial
This Space Could
Be Working For
You!

ALPHA PHI OMEGA COED
SERVICE FRATERNITY
BROTHERS OF ALPHA PHI
OMEGA
will he getting out their traveling shi'c-
on Saturday, November 8, for their See-
vanl !)� Fund Raiser. They are willing
to do vardwork, paint, ash cars, house
chores or just any oh that you regret
facing. He will he out working from
8-5. Rates are $10 for 2 hours, $20 tor 4
hours, $40 for 8 hours Please contact
one of the following for ohs you iut
keep putting off and off
( assandra Ik k 752-4151
F.rnest Roberts 75t-3t23
Ben Buif 7SS-M51
W e are asking 'or community support'
ZU?e East Olarolinian
Steve Folmar, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives:
Anne Leigh Mallorv
Steve Mote
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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a� �� iaji mm cm� �c
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ORGANIZATIONS
For The Bet Selection
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DELI SUPPER SPECIALS
MONDAY - Fried Chicken
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Must Have Valid ECU I.D.
HOURS:
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THURSDAY. FRIOAY "
8 AM � 5 PM
TUESDAY 8 AM � 7 PM
SATURDAY HRS BY APPT.
COORS OR
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69
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Coor's Light
$
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ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
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as specifically noted in this
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reflecting the same sav-
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within SO days Only one
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ECU Aids
El I Nr�, ourrtu
A community development
group from this rural fcdgecombc
County town has enlisted the aid
of the East Carolina University
School of Medicine to keep
town's onl doctor's office open
The group, known as
Pinetops Devei pment Corpora-
tion, recently, entered into a
"memorandum of understan-
ding" with the school which
keep the clink per rough June
1988. according to Pinetops resi-
dent Har'we F.r
"One ' missions
of the School of Medicine is to
provide family doctors to �
the state's smaller � wns sai:
William F Laupus, EC
chancellor and dear
me
rsen
pre i
grateful
I
have
med
I
prac
- Bon
Me:

ECU.
-
PHYSICAL THERAPYH
CLUB
MASSAGI


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Hazards
faculty, community
' special guests
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ECU Aids Neighboring Town's Clinic
I HI I AM Ri )1 is . ,o h R � ��� 3
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Look What surfaced
ECU NewtBumu
A communitj development
group from this rural Edgecombe
C ountv town has enlisted the aid
oi the East Carolina University
School of Medtcine to keep the
town's only doctor's office open.
The group, known as the
Pinetops Development Corpora-
tion, recently entered into a
�memorandum of understan-
ding" with the school which will
keep the clinic open through June
W88. according to Pinetops resi-
dent Hartwell Fuller.
"One of the pnmarv missions
I the School of Medicine is to
provide family doctors to serve in
the state's smaller towns said
William E. Laupus, ECU vice
chancellor and dean of the
?w
SUBSTBTi
medical school.
"Although this arrangement
represents an innovative ap-
proach to that goal, we are
grateful that we can help assure
that the people of Pinetops will
have convenient access to quality
medical care
The Pinetops clinic is staffed
by Dr. Steven S. LeBlang, a fami-
ly practitioner and graduate of
the Bowman Gray School of
Medicine in Winston-Salem. A
native of Greensboro, LeBlang
lives in Pinetops with his wife,
Linda, and their two young
daughters.
Under the arrangement with
ECU, LeBlang has been ap-
pointed to the faculty of the
medical school's Department of
Family Medicine as a clinical in-
structor.
LeBlang said the communitv
has been served by a succession
of physicians since longtime
Pinetops doctor Albert
Hedgepeth was killed in an
airplane crash in the early 1970s.
Fuller, who is dean of
Edgecombe Community College,
said the prospect of ciosing the
clinic for an indefinite period
forced the community group to
act. The development corpora-
tion has been involved in
recruiting industry and business
to the area.
"Quite naturally we feel that
we need full-time medical services
tor our community Fuller said.
"The Pinetops Development
Corporation was the onl) vehicle
that could provide the structure
and assistance to secure full-time
medical care in South Edgecombe
County
The communitv group pursued
several alternatives to keep the
clinic open, LeBlang said, hut
none bore fruit. In May the
group approached Dean I aupus
to see if the school could help.
I.aupus said he hopes that the
management expertise and the
economics of scale that the
school can provide will help the
clinic become self-supporting
over a two-vear period.
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A
�te Cant (Earnlinten
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender. om ���,
PiT � Daniel MAURER.�Maffrf�w
ATTI Kemmis. ��, Stfvf f mad
Scott Cooppu i-olmar, iw �M,umtm
RickMcC f'l� Anthony Martin, �.o��,
Jnuw, c ORMAC Vv Meg Needham, cmm. �-�
john Shannon, ,� . Shanm� su�t
p. M SHANNON SHORT, �,�, H.at�
oy. ���.��, td,�� DeChanile Johnson. , nm.
November 6, 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Sex Education
New Curriculum Takes Giant Step
Many adults are astounded at na-
tional statistics on teenage pregnan-
cy, teenage AIDS and love related
suicides. While they concern
themselves with eliminating forms
of pornography: porn movies, porn
magazines and porn shops, manv of
them balk at the solution that gets
to the root of these problems, sex
education.
Some parents don't want sex
education taught to their children in
school, and manv local school
boards won't press the issue. The
result is a curriculum with an inade-
quate sex education program.
On the other hand, there are a
few school boards that have taken
the lead in the struggle to make sex
education an inte g U part of the
basic curriculum, 'i he New York
City Board of Education is one
such group, and thev should be
commended.
Beginning in the fall of '87, the
New York City Board of Education
will require that sex education be
taught in all grades from
kindergarten through high school.
Parents who feel strongly against
this may keep their child out of
class, but others will not be denied a
proper and complete education.
However, this program is far
from the traditional sex ed class
taught by many high school gym
teachers. As one official put it,
"There is more information than
just plumbing The central theme
of the program, which was written
in the wake of increasing teenage
pregnancies, is self respect.
The program, written by a com-
mittee of teachers and doctors, is
designed to expose children to in-
formation piece by piece. It builds a
foundation of very basic informa-
tion in younger children so that
when they grow older they'll have a
better understanding of the physical
and social aspects of sexuality.
The Curriculum begins in pre-
kindergarten classes with lessons
identifying such emotional ex-
periences as "happy "sad" and
"angry In the early grades,
classes discuss the family and
reasons for having one.
As students grow up and enter
new stages of maturity, the pro-
gram progresses to answer their in-
creasing number of questions.
While fifth and sixth graders are
entering puberty, for instance, the
program will focus on the physical
changes that occur at this stage of
maturity.
This same idea of telling them
what they need to know when they
need to know it continues into high
school, when students will learn
details about birth control, abor-
tion methods and the importance of
the family in society.
New York City has taken some
giant steps in sex education, but this
curriculum is only part of the story.
Whether one believes in the exact
methods adopted by the New York
City Board of Education or not is
of little consequence. What's
significant is the importance placed
on a child's education as a whole.
Part of growing up is learning to
make choices. Such decisions are
based on information available. A
complete sex education like the one
described could help young people
make those choices intelligently
when the time comes. The New
York City sex education program,
if nothing else, is a step in that
direction.
Campus Forum
Debate Over Rape Show Continues
In reference to the controversy over tant and pvniir-it " n - , , Z.w wmTk
Responsible Drinking A Problem
While walking on the campus at a cer
lain southern college recently, I saw some
frenzied activity in a courtyard.
"Hi guys I said cheerfully. "What are
you doing?"
"Buzz off, Yank a fraternity man
said, and went back to his hammering
"Yank? But I'm from North Carolina.
What are you people doing?"
"Building a giant bottle of Heinecken
a girl said. "We're going to show the state
legislature what we think of the drinking
age Her voice cracked with emotion.
From The Right
By CHRISTOPHER CARSON
"Right. But, ah, what does a giant beer
bottle have to do with the state
legislature?"
The fraternity man turned around and
eyed me with mild condescension. "Ever
heard of social responsibility, Jack? Peo-
ple should stand up for what's right.
Thoreau said that, I think
"Oh Chip his girlfriend said with
adoring eyes. "You're so smart
"Yeah, I do know a thing or two Chip
smiled at her.
"We're going to dump this thing on the
steps of the legislature in Charlotte with
thousands of students' signatures on it to
show protest a linebacker said eagerly at
me.
"The legislature is in Charlotte?" I said.
"Where else would it be, fool he said.
A professor strolled by and grinned at
Chip. "Hi Chip. If you don't pass your
semantics test tomorrow, you're going to
flunk my course
"Don't worry, Doc. I'm studying
"Believe me, worrying I am not
laughed the professor and walked away
Chip stood up straighter. "Aw man, am
I gonna flunk that test tomorrow Chip
said. 'But we've got a job to do here
"It's good that you have your priorities
straight I agreed.
"Hey Chip the football player said
"Remember that chick Kiki last night?
How she downed half the Vodka 151 in
under 20 minutes?"
"No Chip laughed. "I don't
remember anything
"She didn't even know
Coughing up blood, too.
"Man Chip marvelled,
this girl
"No you don't pouted his girlfriend.
"I just don't get it I said. "Why
would they raise the age in the first place?"
"Because those fools don't realize that
we're responsible adults the girl said.
"We're old enough to vote
but not mature enough to drink
Chip said disgustedly.
"That's the most rediculous thing I've
ever heard in my life I said. "How could
they possibly think that?"
who she was.
41 gotta meet
In reference to the controversy over
SGA denial of Gray Gallery funding
due to a single show, (Rape) in its
schedule:
In the Oct. 30 issue of The East
Carolinian, John Simon, Vice-Chair of
the Appropriations, defends his posi-
tion against funding with the following
words, among others, "Rape is a
violent and ugly crime, so unless the ar-
tist is demented, and finds beauty in it,
the exhibition would have to be blatant
and explicit
When I look at the logic behind this
statement, I see first of all the incorrect
equation, Rape does not equal Beauty,
and therefore, does not equal Art. Fur-
ther explored, the logic reveals several
other assumptions: (1) Rape, in its
reality, is not fit for public exposure,
(2) to look too closely at the negative
aspects of reality (rape, in this in-
stance) is bad. (i.e. morally wrong, or
unacceptable), and (3) therefore, keep-
ing one's eyes closed to the negative
aspects of reality (rape) is good,
(morally correct).
It is a fact that if women don't look
closely at the reality of rape, they are
much more in danger of becoming rape
victims, than if they know full well,
beyond all doubt, what they are up
against.
The attitude revealed in John
Simon's logic bolsters the mythology
surrounding rape. It is precisely this
sort of silencing that permits rape to
flourish. The fact that a show which
confronts and reveals many aspects of
this all-too-often silenced crime has
come to our school gallery should be a
good sign. Through history, artists
have used their work as a way to
critically examine society's unspoken
faults.
The show in question is clearly
against rape. Yet Simon seems to feel it
is unfit. The implication is that it is
wrong to protest through the visual im-
age. One work in the show deals with
this particular attitude. The title7
"Shh. Don't Talk About It
Yes. One or two of the 20 or so
works in the show catalogue are "bla-
tant and explicit But every rape that
women experience is "blatant and ex-
plicit and much more than that.
I do not intend to make a personal
attack on Mr. Simon. I am pointing
out that this case of censorship not on-
ly denies freedom of (certain) expres-
sion, but also denies rape as a social
problem worthy of public concern.
Ellie Reinhold
ECU Graduate
Boston's Back
From the first glance at that
malevolent Oct. 7 article ("Boston's
Latest Adulterates The Name"), we,
who wro'e this letter, knew the author
was terribly misguided in his thoughts
about the group Boston. Well, we
decided to inform Mr. Swanson, and
others like him, on some enlightening
facts to which it seems he was
oblivious.
For starters, on Boston's first two
albums, Tom Sholz plays these in-
struments: Lead guitar, rythm guitar,
acoustic guitar, 12-string guitar,
special effects guitar, bass, organ,
clarinet and percussion. Plus, he was
responsible for the cover concept on
the second album and for arranging,
engineering and producing all three
albums. As quoted from the first
album cover, "Tom was living a split
existence at the time his concept for
Boston began to fall together HIS
concept, not someone else's! So, Tom
Scholz stole the name Boston? Yeah,
right.
"A satisfying stroll down
reminiscence alley, this is the old
Boston sound, though even more ex-
travagant Remember the words,
D.A. Swanson? You should because
they are yours. So, why are vou
"sorry" to ail those rock fans? Is it
because your article led up to nothing
conclusive as to whether you liked or
disliked the music on Boston's third
album? And you call yourself a Boston
fan?! You are probably one of those
"fans" who think the title of Boston's
first album is "More Than a Feeling
Lastly, after the talent displayed in
their first two albums, Boston didn
owe the public anything. We're just
glad Tom Scholz went through six
years of frustration to deliver an in-
credibly good album of which we are
proud to listen to.
If Mr. Swanson plans on making a
career out of criticizing other people's
works then we suggest he become bet-
ter informed on his subjects. As stated
on the first album cover. Mr. Swanson
LISTEN TO THE RECORD'
Pat Campanaro
Jeff Morketter
Dave Morketter
Pirates Should Throw
It is getting more and more apparent
that a change should be made in the of-
fensive pla calling of the East
Carolina Pirates football team. Taking
awa criticism from the gradual im-
provement of the offensive players,
and the new run and shoot offense, the
plays being called do nothing to com-
pliment the excellent athletes on the of-
fensive. The object of the run and
shoot is to produce multiple amounts
of yards and high scoring. With the
present offensive philosophy overusing
and abusing the presently talented run-
ning attack, there is no chance to pro-
duce a potent attack. In order to pro-
duce this high-flying balanced attack, a
long pass, or perhaps a pass on 1st
down may be appropriate
The point being made is that East
Carolina poses 2 excellent quarter-
backs, a strong running game and an
adequate set of pass receivers. If 90
percent of the plays being called are
repetitive, then any team can stop this
offense. The onlv example of a suc-
cessful collegiate 1 dimensional attack
is in Philadelphia with Paul Palmer,
and they haven't been very dominating
lately.
Mike Small
Assistant Sports Director at WZMB
Meese's Findings Are An Obscenity
Edwin Meese. Attornev Cenera FH- in o��oi �:�ii it-i i L
Edwin Meese. Attorney General Ed-
win Meese III. What is wrong with this
man, and why does our president put up
with him? Mr. Meese is a political vi-
sion of Jerry Falewell and Pai Rober-
son, and he feels a strong need to press
his very narrow minded views on the
majority of the American people. This
happens to be the reason that our presi-
dent puts up with him; Reagan would
love to see his social agenda become
law, and Meese responds accordingly.
From The Left
ly BERN MeCKADY
in general is socially harmful, although legislation that will cover areas such as
many agree that certain types can be dial-a-porn, coumputer porn and
destructive. The poll clearly showed obscenity on cable TV. What he is reallv
that most people do not believe that doing is trying to find more and more
pornography should be outlawed. Only ways to stick his nose into the private
57 percent felt homosexual acts in
magazines should be outlawed, and on-
ly 43 percent would support outlawing
X-rated movies. The numbers get
smaller and smaller with other types of
pornography.
Although few people question that
lives of Americans.
Anyone who wants to pay to see
X-rated movies on cable TV can do so,
and anyone who does not want to see
them can always change the channel or
just turn the TV off. No one is forced to
there are some legitimate concerns over watch pornographic movies.
Among other things, Meese has led a
censorship drive on pornography, pro-
mising to prosecute an "explosion of
obscenity with a vengeance He has
tried to justify his goals by claiming that
pornography is responsible for the
moral destruction of our society, and
that someone needs to save the moral
structure of the U.S. Of course, he has
the answer. Meese is gifted with perfect
morality and is thus capable of directing
all Americans to a clean, pure life.
pornography, most educated people
agree that the government cannot try to
censor it. Many agree with me that if a
grown adult wants to make a living sell-
ing his pornographic pictures, he has
the right to do so, and it is his business.
Also, anyone who enjoys such
magazines has the right to buy them.
The behavior of the Attorney General
amounts to nothing less than censor-
ship. No doubt, censorship works, and
it is an outstanding way to promote a
single idea. It worked in Nazi Germanv.
and today it works in Iran, Cuba, The
Soviet Union, and numerous other dic-
tatorships. But this is the United States.
Still, Mr. Meese and friends continue the supporter of freedom, the protector
to mount pressure to the -extent that
stores such as 7-eleven have pulled por-
nographic magazines from their shelves
for fear they will be cited for por-
nographic violations. Enough is
enough!
of liberty. Censorship has no place in a
democracy. Continuing outburst from
people such as Meese may serve to
discredit democracy, and possibly do
serious damage. It is high time that the
likes of Edwin Meese, Jerrv Falewell,
Jim Bakker, Pat Roberson Jesse'
The Attorney General recently an
The Attorney General Cairns that his "hich 4EJ� tl
acuons reflect the will of the people, but prosit ion center to try and keep track' TlTZotrZ �l� Z"
of what ,s happening around the nation. The North Carolma leglsUturTThouTd
The plan also mcludes a task force that be strongly criticized for passm! SZr-
wdl supposedly tram local state, and norgraphy law, and aTes
federal prosecuters in the area of should work together to �
obscenity law. When Congress Civil Urrties. OthtHeagln
this is nonsense. A poll printed in the
July 1986 issue of Time magazine show-
ed that 78 percent of its respondents
acknowledged that people should have
the right to buy pornography. Only a
sm.0 number bdieve .ha, pornography reconvenes. M� plan, ,� introduce adminUiVauon maySi
' 1
s. 50

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east �
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ECU's D
Ml S. - . H
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a
mui
I

rhe
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I
Stop hurting!
the trees
you low.
SOi
Sf
pi
cou
PRESENTS AUC
Tfo
6 linger Dan, �
POSITIONS
4 instrumental I
1 Drummer Ba
Pi
AUDITION Di
UNC Chapel Hill
University of NC Greensboro
at Mov Eliot u
East Carolina universe
Friday � � �
Pinehurst Country Club
sat Dec 13 Bra ��







Continues
i F� ing
p aed in
didn't
b We're just
I sl
ver an in-
we are
aking a
people's
�come bet-
v stated
5v� i .on.
ates Should Throw
irent
i � � �
t ht :� �
r a -
im-
� e players,
ttense,the
�thing to com-
. r.letes on the of-
'e run and
uitiple amounts
ring With the
-sng
iiented run-
ii .1 t pro-
ler i pro-
ed attack, a
i
is that East
2 H-uar:er-
s game md an
- If 90
g called are
im can stop this
Paul Palmer,
. minating
UMB
Obscenity
� ireas such as
p rn. and
I '�' � is really
re and
the private
pa) to see
-able TV can do so,
a an' to see
innel or
nci forced to
General
g less than censor-
lip works, and
I i i A i � to promote a
rked in Nazi Germany,
Cuba, The
l I nume7 her dic-
the I mted States,
m, the protector
7 'as no place in a
muing outburst from
Meese may serve to
and possibly do
image It is high time that the
Edwin Meese. Jerr Falewell,
m Bakker. Pat Roberson Jesse
and Ronald Reagan realize that
.orship of any kind is wrong and
I be tolerated in a true democracy.
e North Carolina legislature should
� strong!) criticized for passing its por-
norgraphj law, and all Americans
should work together to protect their
j ivti 1 iberties Otherwise, the Reagan
ministration may let them slip away.
i ktobei 2
9 50 .i m
x ycock Hall resident
ted the larcem of his bike
h w.t i hained to a light post
east o( ycock Hall.
�:05 p m
Fones Hail resident reported
ak . and entering and
ol hei dorm room in
w hik h (e� eh � as taken
October JO
2 20 a.m.
Greenville resident was
reported consuming alcohol
underage, on College Hill Drive.
2 20 a.m.
A Jones Hall resident was
reported consuming alcohol and
littering west of Jones Hall.
1:50 a.m.
A C lenient dorm student
reported an identified white male
peeping into the showers of the
8th floor bathroom of Clement
Hall.
2:25 p.m.
A Scott Hall resident reported
the larceny of his bike from the
bike rack west of Scott Hall.
11:00 p.m.
A Belk Dorm resident reported
the breaking and entering of her
dorm room by another Belk
dorm resident.
October 51
4:40 p.m.
A Greenville resident reported
the larceny of her bicycle from
the northwest corner of
Memorial Gym.
2:50 p.m.
Two Greene Hall residents
reported the breaking and enter-
ing of their car and the larceny of
their carpet from the same.
10:35 p.m.
A Belk resideni was determin-
ed to have broken the glass in the
fire extinguishei case on the 3rd
flooi ol Belk Dorm. He and
anothei Belk Dorm resident were
found to be in possession ol
spirituous liquor while both being
underage.
11:10p.m.
A Belk Dorm resideni was
found to be m possesion ol and
consuming a malt beverage while
being underage.
November 1
12:20 p.m.
A Goldsboro and a 1 aurinburg
resident were banned from cam-
pus for being unescorted on the
second floor of Greene Hall
1:25 a.m.
A Raleigh resident was issued a
State citation for a stop sign
violation and exceeding a
satespeed.
5:30 a.m.
A North Carolina State student
was arrested for the larceny ol a
lamp from Fletcher dorm and
banned in connection with the
theft.
i m i asi H INJ v.
6:30
An ECL Public Safetv Officer
reported that the right front win-
dow had been broken out ot a
vehicle registered to a White
Dorm resident.
500 p.m.
A Kingston Place resident
reported the theft of his vehicle
from east of I instead Dorm.
The vehicle was later located
south of Jov ner 1 ibrarv
10:09 p.m
� New Bern resident wa- ai
resied tor intoxicated and disrup
live behavior after creating pro
blems at the concert at Mingcs
Coliseum.
November 2
2 20 a m.
A Jamaica and a Burlington
resident wen ban edtrom campus
tor public intoxication and
suspicious act iv it
November 3
2:40 p.m.
A Fletcher Hall reside: I
reported the larceny of her bic)
cle from the racks at Fletcher
Hall.
N iv l MHt K !VH
b p m
A Belk Dorm resident reported
the breaking and entering and a
larcem from her room
4 p m
An Aycocli Ha residen- wa-
consuming an alcoholic beverage
while being underage and when
approached, tie obstructed and
delayed the office! b) refusing
show ID
N ��ember 4
3:59 p.rn
A hue Dorm res,
reported the larcenv ol laui I
trom the 5th floor laund- .
ol White Dorm
1! 52 p.i
Harrellsville resideni wa
rested for the larcem ol hubcap?
from a parked � c
and Reave s' pai king
lot.
ECU's Diabetes Program Expanded
t l St�v Hurt-nil
East i ai olina I niversity
Medicine is expanding
it- diabetes management program
people in eastern North
v na I do not currently
e similai patient education
ims a ailable in their com
which includes
lualizedinstruction and
v i.iewill he ottered
h inthe E( I Out pa
b) Di
U an uassociate pro
i ai ECU, helps
people witliabetes to learn
lisease Clients ol
Piicted in
; i 'eais diet, exei
cise, foot care and blood sugar
control.
The program is open to am one
in the eastern part of the state
who has diabetes and wants to
learn more about how to care for
themselves.
Participants must obtain a pa-
tient referral from their regular
physician before thev can enter
the program.
Sue Daughtry, a registered
dietitian and an instructor for the
program, savs that doctors at the
medical school have recognized
that main people with diabetes
lacked information about con-
trolling the disease through pro-
pel nutrition, exercise and other
measures.
Stop hurting
the trees
you love.
CAROLINA GULF
1-01 Dickinson Ave
752-7270
Do It With Us - He P I d Ott
1 IM M (, � �)HHI �ngor.s
APPEARING THIS
WEEKENQ.AT
111 West �fc St.
Downfowi GreeaviH?
"Shoe Repair At The- Very Best "
7SM204
FRI7
Ground Zero
SAT 8
he Phantoms
C'otanche Street
757-1227
AI I ABC
PERMITS
&
AUDITION
FOR
SOMETHINC
GRAND!
PINEHURST
COUNTRY CLUB
,H P'Ni hi V T NORTH CAROliNA
PRESENTS AUDITIONS FOR:
6 Sinqer Dancers
POSITIONS OPEN
: . . : ; i �
r : � )i
4 instrumentalists
1 Drummer 1 Bass player 1 Keyboardist 1 Guitar player
i � . .� : i juitar.anddrun Piai �; . led
AUDITION DATES
UNC Chapel Hill
Monday, Nov 17 n na i n Auditoriun � p.m
university of NC Greensboro
� � - ir . entei Alexai let Pnn- � , ; ��
East Carolina university
� ia � 6, A Retche Rehearsal Hall I 31, i2-5p.m
Pinehurst Country Club 1
ai Dec ' Bra e 12 -i pm J&
Each participant meets with
Daughtry and Zola Harrelson, a
registered nurse, for one or more
individual sessions.
At the individual sessions the
instructors assess the person's
needs and discusses with them
topics like medication, diet and
other illnesses that the may have
in addition to diabetes.
After the individual sessions,
the participant attends three or
tour classes held in a group set-
ting.
Daughtry says that one topic ol
major importance to a person
with diabetes is fool care. Fool
injuries tend to take longer to
heal in people with diabetes.
The classes will he held in
Module C" of the ECU Outpatient
Center located in the Brody
Medical Sciences Building. Move
BKd Greenville.
For more information on the
classes contact Daughtry at
"5" -2564 or HarreUon at
757-2571.
the Offirr of Mudrnl financial id �
etc Work-Stud CWSi a�ards
Hiring A I AS-1
��-� il aid office. There a WS jobs a
C WS Eligible CWS stuck
financial packai
P" �� ipp mom and make aw
n backlog r Stuck il Aid
ng certa - � ii eacl lay. Stuck
refei i (he schedule : � � .
Ik
Mondav Wrdncsdav Fndav 1 p m Iu�da r-ajriia 1 11
consolidated
Theatres
mtmtmtt
Adults s2.oo 5 s
Attention
Early Christmas Shoppers!
Tom Togs
WAREHOUSE SALE
October 27 thru November 15
Monday - Saturday 9:30-6
� Nothing over $10.00 �
JUIi
9"
I I�m VDKKU
& Famous Names That We Cannot Mention
Everything Direct From Factory
�Close-outs -Overruns Irregulars
MIN S LADIfS CHIID8IN S & INFANTS WEAR
1900 Dickinson Avenue
Located In The Whoiesa.e Area In The Rear Of Tne Biding
HOLIDAY MASIE
MATCH UP A GREAT NEW HOLIDAY OUTFIT AND GET $10 OFF AND MORE
Fashion Doesn't Cost A Fortune For Men & Women At
CAROLINA EAST MALL
MAURICES
!
i





' �.
A

TMFFASTtAHONIAN
Entertainment
SOU MM K f. I mm, 'JKC
K- Constantly Changing
Process Of Creating Videos
'Z?��'�y . ' V
By MIC AH HARRIS
M.fl Wrilrt
In this life we have shortages of
maiu things; money, g.rl
friends boy friends, toilet paper,
�c. Bui one thing that there
ncvei seems to be a shortage of is
music videos. So here are a few
relativelj new ones to keep vour
ee out for.
"The Next Time I Fall In
1 ove ' teams former Chicago
lead vocalist pCIei Cetara with
contemporar) gospel singer Ann
Grant. Grant began crossing over
into the Pop charts with "I ove
Will Find A Way" last summer,
and although this �"duet" con-
sists more or less of Grant's back
mg up Cetara, the music sounds
more like her brand of gospel
than anything from Chicago.
The ideo, like the song, is best
dimmed up as "nice Nothing
outstanding. but nice
Photographs and nice
choreography. A solid but minor
song which is still a few bricks
h of the standard Lionel Richie
set for pop love ballads.
The Beach Boy's update of the
old Mama's and the Papa's
"California Dreamin is ap-
propriates in black and white,
effective!) creating a sad over-
cast.
On one level, the video is a
tribute to a type of music that can
never truly be recaptured. As
some wise old man (probablv
Dick Clark) said, "You can tell a
society b its songs if a society
ever spoke through its songs, it
was during the 1960s when a
deliberate attempt was made to
actually say something. Yet,
"California Dreamin is also a
dirge for something else,
something as irreplaceable as the
Beach Boys' receding hairlines.
The Beach Boys themselves are
not associated with "social cons-
cience music In fact, their
music was escapism. They turned
California into a Camelot of teen
mythology, an adolescent Ca-
naan running with surf, sun and
girls. This illusion was destined to
crumble into the sea before the
land that spawned it.
Seen in this light, "California
Dreamin takes on bitter-sweet
and ironic overtones as several
middle-aged teen idols walk
among wind-blown leaves and
rain-slicked streets, realizing that
"all the leaves are brown and the
sky is gray" and their "Endless
Summer" did indeed come 10 an
end.
Michelle Phillips and Papa
John himself make brief cameos
as vanishing wraiths, as does a
former member of The Byrds, the
group that reminded us that for
"everything there is a season
Heavy, man.
Howard Jones' "You Know 1
1 ove You, Don't You?" is a vir-
tual calliope of animation, the
most stunning video usage of the
art form since last spring's
"Sledgehammer
The actual song is also reminis-
cent of "Sledgehammer" with
lines like "I need you and you
need me I need you honey like a
flower needs a bee The video
combines stop motion animation
and the traditional cartoon, but
the dominant and most striking
technique is the use of a process
genencallv called "xerography
although since "Xerox" is a
trademark, a court order may
soon put an end to that.
Here, sequential photographs
are taken of whatever action is
desired. After development, they
are photocopied with the intent
of losing detail, thus, making the
photograph resemble a pencil
sketch.
These photocopies are then
animated. The final effect is
similar to Ah-Ha's "Take On
Me" which seems to have used
the same process.
The Police's video for "Don't
Stand So Close to Me like the
song itself, is pretty much a
remake. Clips of past Police
videos drift hv throughout the
song. These clips are presented in
an innovative manner, especiallv
tor a retrospective, but it's not
the best visual presentation of a
Police number. I consider Sting
"ne ol a handful of actual poets
writing popular music today, and
I hope the imagery oi the Police's
next video will be as Ivrical as the
songs.
Compare the composition of
"Every Breath You Take
"Russians" or even "If You
1 ove Someone Set Them Free"
to the current version of "Don't
Busch Gardens
Busch Gardens is holding auditions Sundav for people who en ��� h �
juggle, or perform magic.The auditions will be MdTswT i � T " P,a " i,r�ent.
also seeking supervisors and ISSliKl ha" fr�m " 4 lh'
per week, performing six to eight shows oer d St Si - Perf�rm Can earn from S20� u ��
form in such Broadway show's LlS'SS'SftPSS T�f "ae i� on to per.
such as 'Magnum P.I and The Coafev Show Jh ?' u aPP�r�l " television in shows
housing for employees e.iminaUng ata�r IZ " '� ���
singer, dancer, magician, mime trumpnLlLer vinTinf, PartKular "�"��" I So if 0u are a
for you to work this summer P ' " �h� Busch (.ardens �,�,� .v� a ptece
Stand So Close To Me and
you'll see what I mean.
1 can't close without mention-
ing Weird Al's latest parody,
"I iving With A Hernia a take-
oft on James Browns' "I iving In
America
As with his previous imper-
sonations of Michael Jackson
and Madonna, Al's version of
James Brown is beyond reach.
His parodies contain so much
hillanous detail that they must-be
considered the video equivalent
of Mad Magazine.
I understand Al's life story is
now available on video cassette,
and it features some of his
popular take-offs. Certainlv
worth checking out.
Well, these video review
umns are hard to cik1 will
suddenly tailing flat. s.
decided to end this one with a
die you can amuse your sell and
your friends with during
M IV commercial breaks
Q. Why do you watch, a Yol
Oiid v tdeo '
A. Because it's there
'The Creek' Doesn't Hit Solid Ground
By D.A. SWANSON
�U1f Wnlrr
Where do 1 get off saving the
thing- 1 do? And whv don't I
cover a broader spectrum of
popular mu '
These questions, 1 am certain,
are frequently asked by you, my
readers. And. to be sure, they are
questions to which I should replv.
Mv authority comes from a
diverse background m popular
music listening, including exten-
sive study of Soul, Rhythm and
Blues, 50s and 60s classics,
Gospel, Contemporar) Chris-
tian. Heavy Metal. Punk, New
Wave, and finally, the manv
faces o progressive music.
But. why concentrate on pro-
gressive rock music in this col-
umn? This is a University. It
should be a cutting edge forum
for everything that is new. Most
Heav v Metal, Rhythm and Blues,
Top-0, and other popular music
is not, and frequently, does not
want to be on that cutting edge
So, despite the continuing pro-
duction of I Ps in these formats, I
will tend to stay away from them.
Reviewing in a journalistic for-
mat is less something to take up
space than it is a service. A ser-
vice to both its readers and to the
art form it covers as a bridge bet-
ween the two. Were this limited
space given over to simple
coverage of the latest record
releases and bands, m other
words, free and irresponsible
publicity, that would be a clear
disservice.
In fact, these tvpes of disser-
v ices are attempting to make their
way into your student newspaper
all of the time. Just the other dav
a promotions director, a Janice
McCeuley, bombarded the office
with all sorts of proclamations
(and a free album) that the band
she represents will be the hottest
thing from North Carolina in
twenty years.
The band Ms. McCeuley was
refering to was a popular, stan-
dard rock and roTT "Valid from
Charlotte called Trie Creek"
(that's their new name, shortened
from "Sugar Creek"). I'm sure
that most of you know who they
are, despite the fact that the) ver)
rarelv plaj in this area.
I had the opportunity to see
them perform about five years
ago when the) were first starting
out. Then, as now, the) were an
electrifying, though rather
'sugar' coated ensemble more
concerned with stage prescence
and professionalism than with ar-
tistic or even personal expression.
With Thereek, their forth
album, they have reached a new
pinnacle of presumptuous profes-
sionalism so crystal clean and un-
controversial that even the likes
of Rev. Pat Robertson might
'dig' them. They still sound like a
synthesis of Styx, Journey, Nan-
tucket and PG-13, though, as I
said, they have become con-
siderably better at it.
Certainly these six guys are
hard workers and talented per-
formers, though their
transparancv should be obvious
to all but lobotomized teen-agers.
Metal and southern-rocker fans,
this juvenile IP is all yours.
But wait! All is not hateful this
fine Thursday. Following this
gross disservice of publicity,
however negative, to so unworthy
a band, there is good news tor
live music fans.
Tonight, at the New Deli, are
the Connells, a rapidly growing
band from Raleigh. Special to
note with this foursome is their
lead singer, Doug MacMillan.
Doug joined the outfit in 1985
after leaving ECU where he was
captain of the swim team during
the '8384 season.
Their debut album is called
Darker Days and features music
roughly cut in the progressive
North Carolina style. Their last
visit to Greenville was marked by
a somewhat less-than-standard
show, but Doug assures us that
tonight there will be no guitar
problems.
Tomorrow night look out for
the Graphic. This ancient band
from the Greensboro Triad area
has played Greenville several
times and claims a respectable au-
dience with their 'older' sound
While they rock hard, thev
likewise roll smoothly. I'm per-
sonally ju-t a little tired of the
"Treva Spontaine' Sound. But if
you've never seen them, thev are
worth it. And for you who have
made it through thus far,
southern rockers, Ice Watei
Mansion and PG-13 will be at the
Attic through this weekend.
"Thanks for the support
Through The Looking Hlass
Shocking Side Of Kitty Porn
By ANDY LEWIS
sirff Wrtlcr
2? g'lly? TSfiSTF fcM,rfl�d w ���� as a band, and its first under that name
The album is simply called TV Creek Above is the review by D.A. Swanson.
1 wiped the sweat from my face
as I sat at the sticky wooden bar.
Dull base rhythms throbbed from
the large speakers as I sipped my
St. Pauli's Dark. But even my
favorite suds failed to slow my
nervous heart.
I wiped my mouth and looked
around the rest of the club. It was
mostly emptv, save for a few
dark-skinned, sweaty young
women in flowery skirts smoking
cigarettes in the corner.
I suspected they were Cuban
refugees. One of them waved at
me. I shivered. So many diseases
compacted into one deadly sex
trap.
Small, round wooden tables
with red candles on them were
scattered chaotically about the
warped floor.
I looked up at the clock.
It was time to go. I quickly
paid my bill and left through the
back door, my long overcoat
flapping behind my back.
I stepped into the alley and
waited. I didn't wait long. Sud-
denly emerging from the
darkness, a filthy Ciruthuanian
smiled at me. His face was
brown, like shriveled leather. His
yellowish, brownish, turquosish
eyes were moist and blood-shot,
like dead slugs.
I knew 1 was a fool. His
manure-like breath told me this.
The trash piled about me in the
dark alley told me this. My
mother once told me this.
"Dou' ave brought ta
mooney?" Danatlihm ar el
kemlin asked slyly. He had told
me to call him "Dan I had
another name in mind but
refrained.
He took a draw on a cigarette
he had rolled himself. The smoke
would have gagged a llama, and I
coughed for the better part of
half a minute.
"Ha,ha,ha,ha he said.
"Yeah (gasp), I've got it I
replied.
"Ha,ha,ha,ha He hadn't
finished laughing. I wanted to
smash his nose with a hammer. I
paused, wondering which end
would hurt more, the hook end
or the blunt end. I was in a foul
state of mind.
I reached down for the paper
bag at my feet and handed it to
him.
"It's all there in unmarked
Australian currency I said.
"Ha,ha,ha,ha he said.
"Goot, very goot
He just stood there with that
Mr. Rodgers grin on his face. I
looked around the forbidding
alley. Strange place to be on a
Saturday night � talking to some
queer, rat-dung-smoking
Ciruthuanian in the midst of rot-
ting TV dinner trays and discard-
ed Mr. T. Underoos.
I looked up at him again.
"You got the stuff?" I asked,
holding out a trembling hand.
He handed me a briefcase. He
smiled. He pulled out a gun
Shit!
"Greenville Vice. You're
under arrest he said, his accent
completely gone.
I whipped the briefcase around
and knocked the gun from his
hand. I ran for a fire escape and
climbed the ladder, the briefcase
handle clenched between mv
teeth. I knew thev wouldn't shoo;
a college stude
BLAM!
Right � mistake number one
BLAM! BLAM!
Quickly followed bv mistakes
two and three.
As I climbed into a window
and shut it behind me, I still
hadn't fully grasped what was
happening. Some modern-dav
Ciruthuanian Don Johnson was
hot on my tail for attempting to
purchase kitty-porn. I had been
in slightly better situations.
The entire Greenville Vice
Squad would be surrounding the
area. Who knows, maybe even
Messy Warhelms would be in
command. His mission was to
purge the state of all
domesticated animal por
nography. And I was carrving
some of the hottest Arabian
feline-porn available on the fcast
Coast.
I knew Messy would take no
prisoners.
The window behind me explod
ed, and gas quickly filled the
small room. I dove blindlv for the
only door. c
But the gas had alreadv �
affect. The whole world seemkeedn
to disintegrate into tinvS?
colored beads. I didn't kLr1,
was hallucinating as I slinH
'he icy waters �T'?
consciousness, but I COu,HU.n"
sworn I saw the Cin.th e
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports

In
NOVEMBER 6, 1986
Page 8
'Exciting' '86-87Lady Squad pntramura
BySCOTTCOOPER team � Manu�ri�n - � �� - . . . ?- I
iSkH ST ,De,phine M�br Oeft) and junior Monique Pompili
num. h.II be looked upon for leadership for the Pirates in '86-S7.
Official s Call
Ruled Unchangeable
B RICK McCORMAC
V.n offical of the Southern
Independent Collegiate Of-
ficals Association was in
Greenville on Tuesday to an-
tnce a decision on
Saturday's controversial last
p ,i
Oscar Edmonds, supervisor
' officials for the S1COA, said
the press conference that
game officals had erred on the
final play of the Pirates' loss to
s ithern Mississippi.
However, Edmonds said
are no provisions for
ng judgment calls made
' g the course of the game,
the final score in L'SM's
23 2 ! ictory will stand.
e error came on the
final plav of regulation,
Southern Miss quarter-
back Andrew Anderson threw
hail mary" pass that was
aughl by flanker Lyneal
Vlstoi Alston then made a
trd lateral to teammate
Randolph Brown who carried
ball into the endzone.
While the officals correctly
carried out the procedure in
ruling on the forward lateral
according to Edmonds, they
missed the fact that Alston had
dread) been tackled when he
ateraled the ball. If Alston had
been ruled down, the game
would have ended with the
Pirates coming out with a 21-20
ictory.
"The official covering the
plaj was in the proper postion
' � make the call � three or
four yards behind the play. At
.� time, the player (Alston)
early went to the ground
Edmonds said. "The player
ng touched the ground
svuisumated the end of the
plav. It was a dead ball and the
game should have ended there
at about the 10-vard line
Edmonds explained that the
officals had clearly made a
mistake.
"In training officals, we try
to instill in them 'Don't call it
like you see it, call it like it is
he said. "Obviously, that's not
what was done here as the of-
fical called what he saw, not
what happened
Edmonds made the decision
on Monday after viewing both
ECU game films and
videotapes supplied by local
television stations.
He agreed that a rule that
allows the defense to be harm-
ed by a game-ending penalty on-
the offense needs to be chang-
ed.
"We feel the rule should be
changed Edmonds said. "A
game ending infraction on the
offense should not penalize the
defense.
He went on to say that the
offical who missed the call
would be punished, but it
would be "an internal matter
Edmonds went on to praise
the way the ECU officals
handled the events after the
game, in which an offical was
assaulted trving to leave the
field.
"After the game, the ad-
ministration, security and
police did an excellant job. I've
been here a number of times in
the past and everything has
been handled in a highly pro-
fessional matter Edmonds
said, "and this time was no dif-
ferent.
"This (ECU) is a fine institu-
tion and the administration and
coaches are super he con-
tinued. "We (SICOA) and the
officals are truely sorry
However, sorry does little
good for Art Baker and the
Pirate coaches players and
fans who had a win taken from
them on Saturday.
By SCOTT COOPER
& TIM CHANDLER
Sporti Wrtl�n
ECU women's head basketball
coach Emily Manwaring held her
initial press conference of the
season Wednesday and expressed
enthusiasm toward her team's
upcoming campaign.
"Lady Pirate basketball will be
exciting said Manwaring. "In
the past our fans have been ac-
customed to a winning program
and they are going to see that
again
Manwaring stressed a few
goals that the team would like to
achieve during the '86-87 season.
Among those goals were that the
team win 20 games, and "to be
the first team from the CAA to
win an automatic berth to the
NCAA's (post-season tourna-
ment)
With the loss of three starters
(Lisa Squirewell, Sylvia Bragg
and Lorraine Foster), all of
which scored over 1,000 points in
their careers, from a year ago, the
Bucs will be looking towards
other leaders to emerge.
Senior guard Delphine Mabry,
junior center Alma Bethea and
junior Monique Pompili were
tabbed by Manwaring to provide
the needed leadership.
"These three were playing in
the shadow of those three and
now it's their (Mabry, Bethea and
Pompili) turn Manwaring ex-
plained. "With the new team,
there's a different emphasis on
what we're able to do
"We're a rebound-and-run
team Manwaring continued.
"We're not blessed with a lot of
size, but we have jumpers and the
athletic ability to play with
anybody
When talking of the three
leaders for this year's team, Man-
waring said nothing but good
words.
"Delphine is probably the
quickest player in the whole
United States, Canada, South
America or anywhere you look
Manwaring said. "Alma has
developed a much better outside
shot and will not be afraid to
shoot the 15 to 17 footer and
she has truly earned her
nickname as 'Pony Monique
will be contributing with Alma on
the inside and her play at the
Olympic Festival this summer
really helped her improve.
"All three players should con-
tend for all-conference honors
this year Manwaring added.
"And the three have really im-
proved in their mental and
leadership abilities
Along with the three leading
returners are a host of other
returnees and newcomers as well.
The other returners include
senior forward Cathy Ellis,
junior guard Jody Rodriquez,
and four sophomores � centers
Rose Miller and Gretta O'Neal,
forward Chris O'Connor and
guard Pam Williams.
The newcomers include a trio
of junior college transfers and
four first-year freshmen. Among
the JUCO transfers are a twin-
sister tandem from Peace College
Karen and Sharon Bond,
along with center Valerie Cooper,
from Louisburg College.
The freshmen include guards
Irish Hamilton and Tammie
Laney and forwards Sarah Gray
and Christi Harris. Manwaring
feels that the transfers can make
an immediate impact, while the
freshmen may still need a little
more time.
"Val Cooper is a very capable
player and could step in and con-
tribute immediately Manwar-
"Lady Pirate basketball
nill be excitingour fans
have been accustomed to a
winning program and they
are going to see that
again. "
�Emily Manwaring
ing said. "Irish Hamilton is close
to Delphine (in speed) but she will
be out three to four weeks. She
was going to gei K.me immediate
time, but we'll have to wait and
see
Defensively, Manwaring is
looking to her assistant Lillion
Barnes to instill the belief that
defense is very important to the
team's success.
"We have a goal of limiting
our opponents to 55 points
Manwaring stated. "You'll see
full court man-to-man defense,
the turnovers will be piling up
and the opponents will probably
take three to four timeouts in the
first half
Manwaring feels that the
athletic ability on the team is very
apparent and if there is an area of
concern it would be the mental
attitude.
"Overall with the team, we are
very athletic, quick and strong
she said. "We're so athletic but
we may have to work on our
mental ability
Some of the team leaders feel
that more contribution from
every player will be needed this
season due to the absence of last
year's key players.
"We'll be looking towards
more of each person contributing
than last year's team Pompili
said. "I would like to contribute
more in terms of leadership With
the team being young, the (the
younger players) look up to us
"The team is more well-
rounded. Everybody is going to
be contributing Mabry said of
this year's squad. "We're going
to work harder than last year �
we've got a lot to prove
The Lady Pirates will hold
their first intra-squad scrimmage
of the season Sat Nov. 8 in
Minges Coliseum at 11:00 a.m.
The scrimmage is open to
everyone and there will be no
charge to come out and get an
early look at the Lad Pirates
Men Ready To Start
By SCOTT COOPER
& RICK McCORMAC
ECU coach Charlie Harrison,
in his fifth year, is more excited
than eer before about his up-
coming season.
What the players' feel about
their abilities, however, is what's
really ilUpxinant according to
Harrison.
"The main thing is that it
doesn't matter what we (the
coaching staff) think, but what
they (the players) think Har-
rison said at Monday's press con-
ference. "If they go into South
Carolina and believe that they
can win, they can. But, if they go
in thinking 'here we go again
then they won't
The player singled out to lead
the team is second-team all-
conference selection of a year ago
Marchell Henry. Henry, who
averaged 15.6 points and 5.5 re-
bounds (both were team highs), is
emerging as a team leader for the
Pirates.
"This year, being a tri-captain,
I feel like I have to take on more
of the responsibility Henry-
said. "With the players we have,
1 think leading by example will be
the biggest thing
Along with captain's Henry,
center Leon Bass and guard Keith
Sledge, two newcomers are
touted as being possible starters.
Harold Brown, a sophomore
from Sheraton Junior College in
Wyoming, and junior Theodore
Edwards, from Louisburg Junior
College, both should give the
Pirates an immediate contribu-
tion.
"Harold Brown and 'Blue Ed-
wards will have an immediate im-
pact on the team Harrison
said. "They are not freshmen.
Harold played a year of junior
college ball and has played on the
playgrounds of New York City.
'Blue' played in about 30 games
at Louisburg last year, so they
both have some experience
Another player capable of
cracking the starting lineup is
senior William Grady. Grady,
who was hampered by an injury
last year, is playing the best
basketball of his life, according
to Harrison.
"Will is healthy now and has
had very, very good practices the
last three or four days Har-
rison explained. "He's had his
best practices since he's been
here. He just needs to get a good
understanding of his role
Grady, whose style of play is
suited for the quick-tempo,
should be right at home as the
Pirates will attempt to run more
this year.
"We're going to try and run
more this year and get some easy
baskets Harrison said. "We
just have to make good decisions
on the break, and if we do, we'll
do better on offense
Aside from the pair of
transfers, two freshmen occupy
this year's roster. Reid Lose,
from Harrisburg, Pa and
Tracey King, from. Hampton,
Va are highly talented
newcomers, but are still
freshmen.
"It's a hard adjustment to
make. What a difference one year
can make Harrison said.
"Hopefully we won't have to
throw them to the wolves like this
year's seniors (were).
"We still have questions as to
whether who's going to play
where he added. "We need to
set the proper rotations and
decide what each player's role is.
We still have some question
marks
Hamilton, Saunders Senior Walk-on's
B CAROLYN JUSTICE through all the good and the one of hi. f�nniNt mnm.n(, ;� ru�n u w m w k
B CAROLYN JUSTICE
sc.rl. Whirr
A special part of the ECU foot-
ball team is it's walk-ons. These
plaers' love for the game and
"petition have enabled them
to endure all that comes with
playing college football.
John Hamilton and Brian
Saunders are two Pirate seniors
that have displayed determina-
tion as walk-ons. As the 1986
season draws to a close, they've
looked back at their five years of
college football � what they've
learned, how they've changed,
what they did, and why they did
it.
Brian Saunders, a New Bern
native, brought to ECU a lot of
determination after a high school
coach told him that he'd never
play college football.
"I love the game and I love be-
ing a part of this program
through all the good and the
bad said Saunders, "I think my
parents and one of my brothers
(Doug) has been my biggest in-
spirations to keep going
The marketing major recalled

one of his funniest moments in
football. "My freshman year, I
was walking through drills, in-
stead of running, when
linebacker Donald Reid leveled
meit introduced me to college
V
Brian "Zoot" Stiidm
?xU
John Hamilton
football, taught me never to walk
through drills again. It will pro-
bably be one thing I'll always
remember
Saunders said he will also
remember the first game that he
played in during his sophomore
year against Murray State.
Football has taught Saunders
discipline and respect � things he
will always find valuable in the
future. Saunders looks forward
to his last semester of college dur-
ing which he'll see what life's like
as a student, not an athlete. After
graduation, he plans to go into
sales.
Known by his teammates as
"Zoot Saunders said he has no
regrets about football because he
loves it. "If you want to do
something said Saunders,
"don't let anyone tell you that
you can't
Walk-on John Hamilton has
learned that college football
means playing hard and never
giving up. The physical education
major gets his inspiration from
his father and brother Steve,
former ECU Pirate, who now
plays for the Washington Red-
skins.
Hamilton remembers the 1983
season as the best times he's had
playing football at ECU. "I'll
always remember beating State in
1983. It was great said
Hamilton, "then waiting for a
bowl bid at the end sticks out in
my mind. When we didn't get it, I
was disappointed because we
deserved it. You could say I've
learned that there's a lot of unfair
things in life
The 6-0 New York native says
he'll never forget some of his
teammates, like his Barbarian
Brothers � Greg Thomas and
Ken Bourgeois, or some of the
funnier moments of football, like
the practice that he got into a
offensive
fight with former
lineman Terry Long.
Hamilton has learned to never
give up and always hope for the
best. These are lessons that not
only apply to football, but to life
and he plans to use what he's
learned to his full advantage in
the future.
Sports Fact
Thur. Nov. 6, U9
In the first collegiate football
game ever pUyed, R
defeats Princeton, 6. In these
times- one-point goals are
hI mSlCd of touchdowns
side T.? �� t0 �
side. (Maybe the Piram could
MHpbyenthmtdmyK)
I
fowling Play-Of Js
(ie Intramural Bowling season
le to a striking end on Nov
Ith four teams battling for the
en's and Women's All-Campus
lampionship.
pon completion of divisional
iy Tau Kappa Epa ame
jt on top over Pi Kappa Alpha
fe64 to 1169 in the Fraternit) A
fusion In Fraterni'v B Divi-
n, Sigma Tau Gamma frarelv
iged out Delta Sigma Phi 1122
103 The Me
dependent's Hammers S
pers breezed by Spare Ribs 267
1120. In -he Men's Residence
tall Division, Imstead D
?estroyers had a run for tl
loney against Garret! Band,
nth a final score of 1183 to 1112
The Men's Ml-Campus semi
inals saw Tau Kappa EfM l -all
the Spare RiS l279to 1147 In
ie final competition, the Ham-
ter's Slammers -emained
defeated for the seas , a
kin over the Spare Ribs IYl
164.
In the women's competition,
)ominatmg Force out bowiec
Rig Ep Gokknhcarts 1169 i H2
in the Independent D The
I Sorority Division was easil) �
tv the Zeta Tau Alpha's et -he
fDelra Zeta's 1021 I IS4 The
undefeated Dominating E
team remained victorious with a
tern over Zeta Tau A .
1003, to capture the All-Can
Championship.
Congratulations to all tea- 5 for a
good season and a job well
I Volleyball
Intramural Volleyball ha
some great teams bur - n
around the Minges courts, ti
week's action, the Armv R
battled for victory over the I
7; 3-15. 14, 15-1. The SigEp
Dominators also ent three
games-against TKE D to wm
15-11. IM5, 15-11
In women's action. The Tyler
Setters beat the Greene Rebels in
two games. 15-5. 16l Clement
Classics also beat Fletcher
C.A.G.S. in two games; 15-13,
15-11. Marnssa Shifiett and
Tonya Wicker showed strong
competative plav for the Clement
Classics.
Canoe Trip
Join the Outdoor Recreation
Staff on Nov. 8 for a daj of pad-
dling and enjoying fail colon on
the Cape Fear River near Lill-
mgton. Registrations will be
taken until 3 p.m. on Not - m
204 Memorial Gvmnasium Cost
�f the trip is $9.00 per indiv,duaJ
and includes transportation,
equipment, and snacks
Racquetball
Singles competition will
underwav on Mon Nov. 10 a:
Minges Cohsium. Particip
will plav on court-2 from 8:00 to
11.�00. Stop by to watch your
favorite player.
Weight Training
Beginning weight training
workshops arc being offered to
individuals interested in firming
up muscles and developing
greater physical streng.n and en-
durance. The three f-
workshops will introduce :
ticipants to principles and techni-
ques of fixed weight training pro-
grams. Goal setting and con
fidence building will also be em-
phasized as participants learn a
fundamental routine for total
bodv development. The
workshops will be held Not 17,
18, and 20, 5:30-6:30 p m in
Memorial Gymnasium weight
room Cost of the event
S2.00 students and $3.00 staff.
Registration will begin November
10, and will run through the 13
from 9:00 a.m. to 400 p.m in
��� Memorial Gymnasium
��lister early, as this workshop
iiimiied to only 16 participants
'sv
I
Begl
sCsl
1
fcrr-





THEEASTCAROIINIAN NOVEMBER, 9t 9
JL5-
Vd�e 8
Squad
e to tour timeouts in the
taring feels that the
abilit) on the team is verv
i id if there is an area of
would be the mental
h the team, we are
quick and strong
"W e're so athletic but
to work on our
earn leaders feel
contribution from
be needed this
he absence of last
c towards
.� - contributing
earn Pompili
�� to contribute
Icrship With
g the) (the
k up to us
is more well-
� ;s going to
Mabrv said of
"We're going
a as: year �
prove
I will hold
: scrimmage
Sal No 8 in
: 1:00 a.m.
nage is open to
there will be no
and get an
� id) Pirates
ations and
Iyer's role is.
fne question
-on's
offensive
ng
Mam � earned to never
aF ��' i ays hope for the
-e are lessons that not
�nl) applj - football, but to life
nd r � use what he's
earned to his full advantage in
rie � .re
Sports Fact
Thur. Nov. 6, 1869
In the first collegiate football
game ever p!aycdi R I
defeats Princeton, 6-4. In these
nmes- �ne-Point goals are
j scored instead of touchdowns
and there are 25 players to a
side. (Maybe the Pirates couldl
� haom success if they could
use 25 players these days.)
a
is
C"
ht
�-

to
rs
a-
�d
3T
Intramural-Recreational Services
Intramural Action Highlights?�?OPINAEROBlCschedule
m "&"MMSmm - All classes are available for participation on a drop-in basis for a nominal fee
Bowling Play-Offs
The Intramural Bowling season
came to a striking end on Nov. 3
with four teams battling for the
Men's and Women's All-Campus
Championship.
Upon completion of divisional
plav Tau Kappa Epsilon came
out on top over Pi Kappa Alpha
1264 to 1169 in the Fraternity-A
Division. In Fraternity-B Divi-
sion, Sigma Tau Gamma barely
edged out Delta Sigma Phi 1122
to 1073. The Men's
Independent's Hammers Slam-
mers breezed by Spare Ribs 1267
to 1120. In the Men's Residence
Hall Division, Umstead Dorm
Destroyers had a run for their
money against Garrett Bandits
with a final score of 1183 to 1112.
The Men's All-Campus semi
finals saw Tau Kappa Epsilon fall
to the Spare Ribs 1279 to 1147. In
the final competition, the Ham-
mer's Slammers remained
undefeated for the season with a
win over the Spare Ribs, 1370 to
1164.
In the women's competition,
Dominating Force out bowled the
Sig Ep Goldenhearts 1169 to 942
in the Independent Division. The
sorority Division was easily won
by the Zeta Tau Alpha's over the
Delta Zeta's 1021 to 854. The
undefeated Dominating Force
team remained victorious with a
win over Zeta Tau Alpha, 1162 to
1003, to capture the All-Campus
( hampionship.
Congratulations to all teams for a
good season and a job well done.
All classes are available for participation on a drop-in basis for a nominal fee
of $1 per student and $2 for faculty or staff.
Days
MW
MW
MW
MW
MW
MW
MTh
TTh
TTh
TTh
TTh
TTh
TTh
Fri
Fri
Time
4-5 p.m.
5-6 p.m.
4:30-5:30 p.m.
6-7 p.m.
5:15-6:15 p.m.
4-5 p.m.
5:30-6:30 p.m.
6:45-7:45 a.m.
4-5 p.m.
5:15-6:15 p.m.
6-7 p.m.
6-7 p.m.
6:30-7:30 p.m.
4-5 p.m.
5:15-6:15 p.m.
Locations
MG 108
Tyler
Clement
Fleming
MG 108
White
Green
MG 108
Jones
MG 108
Fletcher
Tyler
MG i08
MG 108
MG 108
Instructors
Clare O'Connor
I-on StephensonTheresa Hughes
Chris Day
Vaun Tschicder
Lucy Mauger
Robin Morrison
Patti Williams
Jennifer Reed
Theresa Hughes
Mark Brunei
Lori Stephenson
I isa Goldberg
Michelle Winiewic?
Clare O'Connor
Lucy Mauger
ELLEN MUl
fcCU pihko Lab
Men's All-Campus Champion Hammers Slammers
BASKETBALL OFFICIALS WANTED
The Intramural-Recreational Services Department will hold an organiza-
tional meeting for prospective basketball officials on Thur Nov 6 at
9:00 p.m. in 102 Memorial Gymnasium. All interested parties are en-
couraged to attend.
RACQUETBALL
RESERVATIONS
Can be made in person at 115
Memorial Gym or by calling
757-6911
GYM FREE PLAY
Memorial Gymnasium
Mon-Fri.12:00-1:00 p.m.
Mon-Fri3:00-10:00 p.m.
Sat11:00 a.m5:00 p.m.
Sun.12-5:00 p.m.
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
Mon-Fri7:00 a.m10:00 p.m.
Sat11:00 a.m5:00 p.m.
Sun 12:00-5:00 p.m.
Mon-Fri.
Sun
Minges
.3:00-10:00 p.m
12-5:00 p.m.
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial
Mn-Fri7:00-8:00 a.m.
Mon-Fri12:00-1:30 p.m.
M W F3.00-10:00 p.m.
T Th.3-5:00 p.m. -10:00 p.m.
Sat11.00 a.m5:00
EQUIPMENT CHECK-Ol T
(MG115)
Mon-Fri7:00 a.m10:00 p.m.
Sat11:00 am-5:00 p.m.
Sun12:00-8.00 p.m.
Sun
p.m.
12:00-8:00 p.m.
M w
Sun
Minges
.8:00-10:00 p.m.
.12:00-5:00 p.m.
Volleyball
Intramural Volleyball has had
some great teams bumping
around the Minges courts. In last
week's action, the Ann) ROTC
battled for victory over the I ucky
7- 1-15, 15t, 15-1. The Sig Ep
Dominators also went three
feames against TKE D to win
15-11, 11-15, 15-11.
In women's action, The Tyler
Setters beat the Greene Rebels in
two games, 15-5, 16-4. Clement
-lassies also beat Fletcher
A.G.S. in two games; 15-13,
15-11. Marrissa Shiflett and
ronya Wicker showed strong
competative play for the Clement
assies.
Canoe Trip
oin the Outdoor Recreation
Maff on Nov. 8 for a dav of pad-
dling and enjoying fall colors on
'he Cape Fear River near Lill-
mgton. Registrations will be
'aken until 3 p.m. on Nov. 7 in
204 Memorial Gymnasium. Cost
of the trip is $9.00 per individual
and includes transportation,
equipment, and snacks.
�&&, A & �"���
Co-Rec Softball's Exterminators" "
CO ��� L�fc
JON JORDAN - ECO Photo L.b
Co-Ree Softball's Umslead Terminators
YOU'RE
WORTH
GOLD
Racquetball Newly DevolPed Swim Conditioning
Singles competition will get
underway on Mon Nov. 10 at
Minges Colisium. Participants
will play on court-2 from 8:00 to
11.00. Stop by to watch your
favorite player.
Weight Training
Beginning weight training
workshops are being offered to
individuals interested in firming
up muscles and developing
greater physical strength and en-
durance. The three session
workshops will introduce par-
ticipants to principles and techni-
ques of fixed weight training pro-
grams. Goal setting and con-
fidence building will also be em-
phasized as participants learn a
fundamental routine for total
body development. The
workshops will be held Nov. 17,
18, and 20, 5:30-6:30 p.m. in
Memorial Gymnasium weight
room. Cost of the event is
$2.00students and $3.00staff.
Registration will begin November
10, and will run through the 13
from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in
204 Memorial Gymnasium.
Register early, as this workshop
is limited to only 16 participants.
Swim conditioning is a newly
developed program for in-
dividuals who are interested in
getting together with other swim-
mers for a serious workout.
Beginning to advanced swimmers
are welcome to join the one hour
sessions of drills designed to im-
prove speed, endurance, efficien-
cy, and overall fitness. Workouts
will be held Monday, Wednes-
day, and Friday from 7 a.m. to 8
a.m. in Memorial Gymnasium
Pool. The program begins Mon-
day, November 10, and will run
through December 12 for this
semester. Interested individuals
may stop by 204 Memorial Gym-
nasium to sign up or call
Kathleen Hill at 757-6387.
Outdoor Rec Sailing Trip
The Outdoor Recreation Pro-
gram is offering a sailing trip
aboard a 37-foot sloop on Sun-
day November 16. A fully liscens-
ed captain and a mate will voyage
six hardy sea-goers out for a full
day of sailing. Wind conditions
are expected to provide an ex-
cellent day of fun. Participants
will have the opportunity to act
as crew of the ship and will also
take a turn at the helm.
The trip includes transportation,
beverages, captain's fee, boat
charter, and incidentals. Par-
ticipants will need to bring a box
lunch or snacks. Registration will
be taken until Fri Nov 14 at
3:00 p.m. in 204 Memorial Gym-
nasium. Cost of the trip is $30.00
per individual.
Our Representative is on campus with distinguished
traditional and contemporary styles �
each backed by a Full Lifetime Warranty.
IRTCTIRVED
CLASS RlNns
owe It to yourselfto
wm
Representative will be at the Student Store
Thursday & Friday, November 6th & 7th
from 9:00 a.m4:00 p.m.
t t� AnCarv c�s i







- I MM k

Squad
ty
ts
Ig
c-
ht
x-
�g
n
id
to
rs
a-
id
re
id
r


IrtllTll

m
02'5
- ersj
arel
� ' d wns
� � ' a
�� Va,i couldi
if they could
Intramural-Recreational Services
Intramural Action Highlights
Howling Play-Offs
tramural Bowling season
- .1 striking end on ov
foui teams battling fot the
s and Women's Allam pus
onship.
completion of divisional
i lau Kappa Epsilon came
ovei Pi Kappa Alpha
1 1169 in the Fraternit)
I 1 aternit H Divi-
s gma 1 au 1 iamma bare!)
11 Delta Sigma Phi 1122
I he Men's
dei - Hammei s Slam-
eezed hv Spare Ribs 1267
In the Men's Residence
vision, Umstead Dorm
ers had a run tor their
igainst Garrett Bandits
1 score oi 1183 to 1112
Me: - c am pus semi
-au lau Kappa Epsilon fall
Spare Ribs 1279 to 114 In
a competition, the Ham
Slammers remained
ed for the season w ith a
the Spare Ribs, 1370 to
u omen's competition,
nating Force out bowled the
- ioldenhearts 1 lew to 42
dependeni Division. The
it Di ision was easih won
a 1 au Alpha's over the
t's 1021 to 4 The
Dominating Force
d �� ictorious �
Zeta I au Alpha, 1162 to
Vll-C ampus
iti ill teams for a
�� well done.
DROP-IN AEROBIC SCHEDULE
All classes are available for participation on a drop-in basis for a nominal fee
of $1 per student and $2 for faculty or staff.
lHVs
MW
MW
MW
MW
MW
MW
MTh
TTh
TTh
TTh
TTh
TTh
TTh
Fn
Fn
1 ime 4-5 p.mlocationsInstructors
MG Ki8 lare )'( onnoi
5-6 p.mIvler1 �i Stephenson I � � �� aH
4:30-5:30 p.m( lementChi I j.
6-7 p.mFleminglun 1 schiedei
5 15-6:15 p mMG 1081 i � Ma .
4-5 p.m.WhiteM rrison
5:30-6:30 p.m(ireenPatti Will
6:45-7:45 amM( , 108Jennifer R
4-5 p.mJonesI' ere i H
5:15-6:15 p.m.MG 108M 11Bi met?
6-7 p.mFletcher1 �n Stephen �
6-7 p.mTyler1 isa Gold! Mi helle W'miev
6:30-7:30p.mMG 108
4-5 p.m.MG 108��' f)' onn �
5:15-6:15 p.m.M( 1'ls! k . Ma if
en s AIM ampushampion Hammers Slammers
BASKETBALL OFFICIALS WANTED
The Intramural-Recreational Services Department will hold an organiza-
tional meeting for prospective basketball officials on Thur Vn 6 v
9:00 p.m. in 102 Memorial Gymnasium. All interested panic arc en-
couraged to attend.
RACQl KTBA1I
RESERVATIONS.
Can he made in person
Memorial Gvm or h
757-6911
at 115
calling
WEIGH! HOOMs
Memorial
Mon-Fri 700a.m10:0(
sMMMIS(, POOl s
EUEN MUH
Photo Lib
Women's All-Campushampion Dominating Force
Volleyball
1
ie grea
( d
has had
humping
rts 11
ROT
�vei the
r. 15-1 The Sig Ep
h ee
usa wen: rh
I KF i) to win
1 ! 1 1
(,YM FREE PLAY
Memorial Gymnasium
Mon-Fri .12:00-1 :oo p.m.
Mon-Fri 3:00-10:00 p.m.
Sat .l 1:00 a.m5:00 p.m
Sun �.12-5:00 p.m.
Sat
Sun
Mon-Fri.
Sun
11:00 am 5:00 p
.12 00-5 tX
Minges
-
12-5 01
EQUIPMENT! HM k-Ol I
Mon-Fri
Sal
Sun
(MG 115)
7 00 a.m10 - ;
. .11:00 am-5:00 p n
12 00-8 00 n n
M n-Fi
M01 Fi
M v F
I 1 �
M 1
- - �
: �
7 � �
� - .
.PORK PRODUCERS k
1 rie I ler
1 1 rreene Rebe
15-5, 16-4 C iemeni
� - beat Fletcher
games; 15-13,
Marrissa Shifleti and
Wicket showed strong
e play, for 'he Clement
Canoe Trip
Recreation
N � ' ' a da ol pad-
V'ing fall colors on
Fear River near Lill-
Registrations will be
3 p m. on Nov. 7 in
1 gymnasium. Cost
59.00 per individual
ides transportation,
and snacks.
Co-Rec Softball's txterminato icuP-0L"
JON JORDAN ECU Photo L.b
Co-Rec Softball's l mstead Terminatoi
YOU'RE
WORTH
GOLD
trs
Kacquetball Sewly l)evo,l)ei' Sw� onditioning
competition will gel
�i: Mon No. 10 at
( olisium. Participants
n court-2 from 8:00 to
� Stop hs to watch your
��� player.
Height Training
rting weight training
rkshops are being offered to
luals interested in firming
muscles and developing
ltd physical strength and en
mce. The three session
kshops will introduce par-
ts to principles and techni
� �� of fixed weight training pro
Goal setting and con
� huilding will also be em-
1 ized as participants learn a
iamental routine for total
development. The
rkshops will be held Nov. I7,
" and 20, 5:30-6:30 p.m. in
Memorial Gymnasium weight
�om Cosl of the event is
S2.00 students and S.VOO staff.
KeKistration will begin November
f and will run through the 1
� in 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in
204 Memorial Gymnasium.
Register earlv, as this workshop
is limited to onlv 16 participants.
Swim conditioninj
� eloped pi ogran
dividuals who are
getting logethei u itl n I ei w im
mers tor a serious workout
Beginning to advanced sw immei -
au- wel ome to j tin the one houi
sessions ol drills designed to 1111
prove speed, endurance, efficien
c, and overall fitness. 01 k.
vill be held Monday, Wednes-
: I ida !i om 7 a.m. to S
in Memorial Gymnasium
Pool "he program begins Mon-
da. November 10, And will run
�ugh December 12 for this
semestei Interested individuals
ma stop hs 204 Memorial Gym-
nasium to sign up or call
Kathleen Hill ai 757-6387
Outdoor Ret Sailing Trip
I he Outdooi Recreation Pro
gram is ottering a sailing trip
aboard a J7 fool sloop on Sun
dA Novembei 16 , tulK liscens
ed captain and a mate will voyage
six hardv sea goers out foi a tull
dA ol sailing, ind conditions
are expected to provide an ex
cellent da ol fun. Participants
will have the opportunitv to aci
as crew of the ship and will also
lake a turn at the helm,
fhe Tip includes transportation,
beverages, captain's fee, boat
charter, and incidentals. Par-
ticipant will need to bring a box
lunch or snacks. Registration will
be taken until Frr Nov 14 at
3:00 p.m in 204 Memorial Gym-
nasium l ost of the trip is $30.00
per indiv idual
Our Representative is on campus with distinguished
traditional and contemporary styles �
each backed by a Full Lifetime Warranty.
IRTC71RVED
you owe it to yourselfto
uxxUcn
Representative will be at the Student Store
Thursday & Friday, November 6th & 7tn
from 9:00 a.m4:00 p.m.





10
LHX�AST0UNANN0VEMBER6. 1986
Classifieds
SIG EP GOLDENHEARTS: There
will be an EMERGENCY meeting
tonight at 9 30 pm This meeting is
MANDATORY and all old and new
Goldenhearts must attend
SORORITIES: Want a personal
slave? Now's your chance. The OX
men are going on sale, everyone
must go, eager slaves willing to
serve
PI KAPPA PHI: A team volleybal
Sunday at 7 45, court l
PI KAPP PLEDGES. Good
Tuesday night Keep it up
job
AOTT PLEDGES: Friday night at
nine, our time to shine, better hope
"Vicky" is at rest, she'll put us to the
test Party up!
AOTT'S: See all of you party people
at Pantana's Sunday night, if you
can't hang, drink tang"
HEY AOTT pledges will be selling
tickets to win a "dinner for two" at
Annabelle's to benefit the Arthritis
Foundation Help us support a good
cause. It's only 50 cents.
MARK: Can't you join a band or
something? 1 don't know there's
something sexy about guitar
players. Have you ever met one?
Part,
R. MARK: To my favorite fella an
1.0 U that's payable on demand
Suuuieee
WANT TO MEET NEW PEOPLE:
have fun while serving your school
and community? join Angel Flight!
Rush today 4:00 in White Dorm lob
by.
PI KAPPA PHI: Rem.nder to the
ASScn.ate members Terror and
outraae is your motivation, pity and
sorrow is no consideration! You're
left nowhere fast Kick and
v -earn, the race could be your last
Put up or shut up! Just think We're
hot, a fire fed with gas, the fire's up
vre gonna kick some ASS! Stace
pKP The K Daddys
DAVID: Thanks for making our t.rst
.ear so special Looking forward to
Fr,Oav and a lifetime wifh you I
iove you! Happy anmversary jean
1 e
CONGRATULATIONS PIKaIlTT-
TLE SISTER PLEDGES: You held
out for the best The Pikas ana Pika
Pledges
CONGRATULATIONS PIKA LIT-
TLE SISTERS: Your devotion, time
ana effort has been deeply ap
predated. Love, the Brothers of Pi
Kappa Alpha
F RESHMAN AND NEW
STUDENTS: The books your
ordered during the summer have ar
� c Please come by the Buc
-aeer office 2nd floor Publications
ding. Across from Joyner
Library.
TUXEDOS: Anyone neeomg formal
ear this fall tor any occasion
Diease contact Jon Reibel 757 0351
PI KAPPS: OK P. Kapps you want
0 play? The T P you left will soon
come your way One by one we'll get
.0u back the Alpha Phs are never
slack You left here m such a haste
out 1 trie time did we waste We
'racked you down all over town,
.our silver Supra we finally found.
Our airty deeds have just begun, but
iust remember, it's all m tun! The
Alpria Ph.s
TKE BROTHER PLEDGES: The
tot so secret party was great! We'll
definitely have to do it again! Next
time we'll stay off the rails and out
of the closet! Thanks. TKE Little
Sister Pledges
TKE BROS, SIS & PLEDGES:
Sunday will be the annual Brother
Pledge Football Game! There will
be a cookout and party afterwards!
Courtesy of Little Sister Pledges
SCOTT: Roseball '86 will soon be
here, we'll drink some liquor and
some beer That long Nov weekend
will do us right, we're gonna stay up
ano party all night in Virginia
Beach we'll walk the shore, then go
inside and drink some more. Satur
day night to the formal we'll go,
you'll look sharp in your tux, this I
know. Basically, I'm glad things are
all straightened out, no longer do I
have a need to pout! Love, Anne
ZBT BROTHERS & PLEDGES: Get
ready for a "Pretty in Pink" party
on Saturday Nov. 8th from 8 to 11.
I, SUSAN LANEHART: Want
everyone to know what a fool I've
been. 1 almost lost the person that I
love more than anything, Gray
Williams. I hope things will get back
to the way they were before Gray,
I've grown up, I promise! 14-3
ROBBY: It all began a year ago
when to a Sig Tau party we did go.
You gave me a lift, put a smile on
my face You're part of my life no
one can replace So Happy Anniver
sary darlin, each day grows better I
love you today, tomorrow, forever
Gina
JENNIFER: Congrats on your job
in NYC! I'm so proud Of you! On
yeah, are we ready tor Roseball or
what? Love, YLS Patf.
ZBT BROTHERS & PLEDGES: Get
ready for a "Pretty in Pink" party
on Sat , Nov. 8 from 8 to 11 at Chris's
place Then we will continue the fun
downtown! ZBT 11 S.sters.
PEGGY: I'm putting my big crush
on you and loving it. Signed: Your
Favor:te Hoosier
SCOTT AND RICK: Lately? You
boys always need it. I'm sure a
physical from me would help you
graduate with a BANG I'll put you
guys down for Thursday night at
1000 Come over and we'll work it
My physicals start with a shot Bring
liquor! Your Nurse.
BAKE SALE: The pledges of Delta
Zeta will be having a bake sale Tues
day Nov 11 from 10 3
DOES YOUR FRIEND NEED A
LITTLE PAMPERING AT BED
TIME?: Well then sign him up to
have a bedtime story read to him by
a Delta Zeta pledge! Sign up in front
of the Student Store Tuesday Nov
11
SALE "
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc Call
Anne at 752 3015 and leave a
message
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICS: Typ
mg, resumes, term papers, thesis
papers $1 50 per page typing, 05
photocopy per page Call SDF Pro
fessionai Computer Services inc 106
East 5th St (near Cubbies), Green
ville 752 3694
MARK: The secret is between you
and me I got a big chuckle, I hope
vou did too Have any more stories
to teli me? The wild Side sounds good
'c me Chris.
TO THE ALPHA PHI
STRANGERS: Taks for making
the party a success, partying with
.a was rea . � nest. Contentnea
���� c trash, this was the ultimate
Halloween bash! LOve the Alpha
D" s PS We found David in the
ake!
DIABETICS: Fellow student work
rtg on research paper requests five
" nutes of your time for brief ques
:nna re Help qreatly appreciated
Ca R rk at 752 1108
CAROLINA GULF
1201 Dickinson e
752-7270
Re I ed Tires In Toun � We P LA
Del.
VISA. M( d'Ll tHI, BOMWN
3rd Annual Post Season
FLAG FOOTBALL
TOURNAMENT
Sponsored by
THE LAKE BOYS
Double Elimination set for the weekend of
November 21-23. The Winners will receive a
Keg. Entry Fee $20.00. Pay by NOV. 18.
Contact Vernon Holmez, Tro Smitt 752-5562
or Mike McArthur 758-34
Everything For
The Skier!
?5
Sporti
CB's Now
30 Off
Woolrich
20 Off
GORDON'S
Golf and Ski Shop
264By-Piss 756-1003
MM 10 G'��n�ill� ry ,na tgpuaiKd
I

i
Hillcrest Lanes
Memorial Drive
756-2020
FREE
GAME
1
i


i
i
t.
r
Bowl One Game & Receive
Another Game FREE With This
Coupon.
I�LimillCougonPer Person.
n

THERE ARE TWO SIDESTO-
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Qrps The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar ,�M�
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. If you're
earning a RSN. write: Army Nurse Opportunities PO Box 7713
Clifton. NJ 07015 Or call toll free I-800-1 ISA-ARMY.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
PHI KAPPA TAU: Brothers and
Pledges would like to thank Lisa
Allen and Louise Harris tor helping
make Parents Weekend such a big
success
TYPING AND WORD PROCESS
ING: Experienced secretary wIBM
computer and letter quality printer
can fulfill all your typing and
secretarial needs Theses, business
letters, resumes and mailing labels
Call Donna at 355 6434
TUXEDOS: Anyone needing formal
wear this fall for any occassion
please contact Jon Reibel 757 0351
WANTED
CHEAP JEEPS: Can you buy Jeeps,
Cars 4x4's seized in drug raids for
under $ioo? Call for facts today
602 837 3401 Ext. S711.
NEW COSMETIC LINE: Now
available Free color analysis for
limited time only to all customers
For appointment call Laura, Beauty
Consultant 756 5920 Mon Sat 9 30 11
p.m. Sun 11 12 pm.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Experienced, quality work,
IBM Selectnc typewriter Call Lanie
Sh.ve at 753 5301
TYPING: Low rates Proofreading,
grammatical corrections 10 years
experience 757 0398 after 6pm
IS IT TRUE?: You can buy jeeps for
V44 through the US Government?
Get the facts today! Call
1-312-742 1142 Ext 5271 A
TRAVEL FIELO OPPORTUNITY:
Gam valuable marketing experience
wh,ie earnmg money Campus
represenfat.ve neoed I mmeai ate'y
tor sprmg break trip to Fior.aa Ca
Campus Marketing at 1 800 282 t7?i
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDEO
To share 2 bedroom ap' $l40'mOnt
ana I j ut,lif,es 4 blocks from cam-
pus Nor smoker preferreo l Or
752 7396
TYPING ALLKINDS:SI25 per
page with paperSI 50per page
without paperCa1 752 2100after 6
p.m.
ADMINISTRATIVE SECRETAR
TIAL SERVICES: Providing full
time typing services to students and
faculty Experienced in thesis,
research manuscripts and term
papers Call 355 2950 for your typing
needs.
20 TOP HITS: LP'S, cassettes or
compact disds are yours for only 50
cents each Buy one at regular price
and receive additional selection for
only fifty cents Rock Pop Soui
Country Jazz If its soid in a record
store, we have it too! You can save
up to $200 or more! Satisfaction
guaranteed or money back! Order
now send only $10 for each Super
Discount 20 Coupon Booklet to
Down East Marketing, po Box 190
Ayden, NC 28513
YARD SALE: Saturday Nov 8 from
8 1. Located at the Leisure Systems
Service Building (LSS) off of 9th St,
ATTIC
YARD SALE: Furn,ture
nousewares, books, clothes 2702
Webb St 11 8 86 Sam Cash only
THURFRT
Ice
Water
Mansion
LOST: Halloween N,qhT pa,r oi
goggles Amber glass lenses
aluminum body, grey elastic banQ'
Fur tnmmed Sent,mentai value
Rewara Can 758 0795
TWO ROOMMATES WANTED For
Sprmg Semester 3 bedroom �
nished, svvmm.ng pool, only $100 a
month Only 4 blocks fro ra.
752 5886
BASKETBALL COACHES
Greenville Parks ana Recre�r
Department ,s recruiting for 10 �-
part time basketban coacs for ��.
winter program Applicants n
possess some knowledge of oas I
ball sk.iis ana have the ao -
patience to work with youf- c:
pi'cants must be able to coach yr
people aaes 9 18 n baskets �
aamenta s Hours are from 3z
Mop Fr a"d some n gn, anJ
weekena coach,nq Tne program
a, exH from Dec 2 to m.d
Ff-oruary Salary rate of $3.4hour
App. cations will be acceptec from
Nov t0 nov 17 Contact Be- ja
at 752 4137 ex' 262
PASSPORT PHOTOS
�. 3 Minute Service
.0 appointment
No Warting
12 Price
Admission All
ECU All Week!
wl E i0tn street 191a 7S2-087S
-Tfci
This holiday season,
get the" We Stuff'
at the right price.
Now you can get the competitive
edge when classes begin injanuan With a
Macintosh� personal computer, and all the
write extras
tte call it the Macintosh Write Stuff
bundle You 11 call it a great deal' Because
when you bu a Macintosh Write Stuff"
bundle before January 4. t987, you'll receive
a bundle of extras� and save $250
Not onh will you get your choice of a
Macintosh S1JK Enhanced or a Macintosh
Plus, you'll also get an Image Writer� II
printer, the perfect solution for producing
near letter-quality term papers or reports,
complete with graphs, charts, and
illustrations
Plus, you'll get Macl.ightnmg.
the premier spelling checker con-
taining an 80,000 word dictionary
thesaurus, medical or legal dictionaries
Together with your favorite Macintosh word
processing software, you can transform
your notes into the clearest, most letter
perfect papers you ever turned out And
turned in on time
Whats more, theres a Macintosh
Support Kit hi led with valuable accessories
and computer care products from s1
Complete with all the things you need to
keep your Macintosh running long after
you've graduated
Let us shim you how to get through
college better, faster, and smarter Stop in
and see us tor more information
STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
East Carolina University
ilkr �J IMr �s t C 'A Mfie Compute Vy unti , �(im,�t �
� ImagfVrurr m j v CmfB. I H�, � d p ' W rtr fa
torn N.ya.�r fc�

'





Title
The East Carolinian, November 6, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 06, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.506
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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