The East Carolinian, November 4, 1986






'
She
(Eamltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
oi.61 No.18
Tuesday. November 4, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 20,000
12 Pages
New Drinking Age
Protested At ECU
ILLIN MUKPMY - Tfc, PH�te La
Members of S1P-A-BRI drank water out of beer bottles and passed around petitions at last Thurs-
day night's rail).
Leglisgature Debates
SGA Returns Items
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
Assistant News Editor
Students In Protest�A Beer
Rights Union (SIP-A-BRU) met
on the Mall Thursday night to
protest the change in the drinking
age which took place in North
Carolina on Sept. 1.
After some technical dif-
ficulties, the Phantoms, along
with Lightening Wells, and the
Amateurs performed and Steve
Cunanan, SGA president spoke
at the rally.
SIP-A-BRU members were
handing out beer bottles filled
with water to the students who
had gathered as "a symbol of our
disapproval with the drinking age
laws according to Lee McGee.
Students at ECU formed the
Students In Protest part of the
coalition after the Beer Rights
Union formed in Chapel Hill
earlier this year. According to
David Bradshaw, SIP member,
the organization is "against the
underlying principle of the
federal government's interven-
tion" in individuals' rights.
Cunanan. speaking before the
crowd, agreed that the new drink-
ing law is "terrible and that the
legislatures showed no insight in-
to the "problems associated with
alcohol
He encouraged the students to
carry on their efforts and try to
work within the system. He also
encouraged students to vote,
stating that only 20 percent of
students now vote.
"Most of the SIP members are
over the age of 21 and are
therefore not even affected by the
new laws said Bradshaw.
The organization had original-
ly planned to march downtown
with the beer bottles but could
not obtain a town permit in time,
said one member.
J.D. Watson, head of the
Chapel Hill organization, said,
"SIP and BRl' have formed an
alliance so that we can work
together and have more power,
and a voice to speak to the
Federal government
He cited "riots" which took
place at universities in Mississippi
and Pennslyvania at the time that
the drinking age changed in those
states, as well as the incidents in
Chapel Hill as evidence of
widespread dissatisfaction among
students.
In addition lo limiting
students' rights, said another
ECU student, "We think that
more and more laws restricting
freedom are going to be
enacted
Members handed out petitions
to be signed by ECU students op-
posing the new drinking laws
According to one member, the
petitions will probably be sent to
government officials.
SIP is a university organiza-
tion, with David Sanders, an
ECU professor, as its advisor.
B PATH kKMMlS
Nf� r-dilor
According to Ben Eckert,
speaker of the SGA, making
SGA funded organizations raise
ai least 15 percent of their re-
. ested appropriations "would
require responsibility from the
groups � make them get out and
do something for themselves
A: Monday night's SGA
meeting, Eckert and legislator
Brvan I assiter brought before
the legislature a bill which would
hold each organization responsi-
ble for raising, in fund raisers, at
least l 5 percent in the past year of
w hat it is asking for the next year.
In the bill, which they co-
wrote, Eckert and Lassiter stated
the reasons for the bill as being:
the SGA funds are limited, the
SGA funds over 50 groups an-
nually . efforts need to be made to
avoid a student fee increase and
many groups rely soley on SGA
tor their operating budget.
The bill stated that in the spr-
ing of 1987, groups would be
responsible foi only 10 percent of
the requested money because of
the short notice.
"Groups need to be responsi-
ble for some of their own funds
said Eckert.
After lengthy debate, the
legislature voted to send the bill
to the Rules and Judiciary and
Appropiation Committees for
further discussion.
The legislature then moved on
to discuss a resolution suggesting
the new classroom building to be
named after former Sen. John
East. If passed, the resolution
would be sent to the Chancellor
and Board of Trustees.
According to the author of the
resolution, Jay Dunn, it would be
a way to honor a man who had
served us (the university) as both
a teacher and senator.
Legislator John Simon agreed,
saying it would not only be a way
of honoring East, but also the
university.
In debate, legislator Chris
Tomasic stated, "1 know that a
large part of the faculty would
rather not have the building nam-
ed after East
Vice Chancellor of Student
Life. Elmer Meyer, pointed out
that the legislature needed to send
the bill back to the Student
Welfare Committee to meet with
James I anier, vice chancellor for
Institutional Advancement to
find out the guidelines the
legislature needs to follow. Meyer
explained the Trustees have cer-
tain guidelines they follow and
the SGA needs to be aware of
them.
After additional debate, the
legislature voted to send the
resolution back to the committee.
In other business, the body
voted to give the ECU Gospel
Choir950 to use for traveling
expenses. The Choir is going to
Raliegh on Nov. 15 for a com-
petition.
Protection Tips Offered
By PATT1 KEMM1S
News Editor
Sexual Assualt Awareness
Week will offer students, faculty,
and staff information to help in-
crease awareness about sexual
assualt and how to cope with the
problems that can come after a
sexual assualt has occured, accor-
ding to Mary Elesha-Adams,
health educator at the Student
Health Center.
"We are hoping to inform peo-
ple about the things everyone
should know about sexual
assualts said Elesha-Adams.
"We will also be offering some
good protection tips
The week, Nov. 3-8, is being
sponsored by the committee on
Sexual Assualt Awareness. The
25 member committee is compris-
ed of both students and faculty.
"This is our first activity
said Diane Norton, head of the
committee, "but we hope to
make it an annual event
She added, "We are offering
something every day this week,
by doing this we hope to be able
to get evervone involved
Sexual
Assault
Awareness Week
�Tuesday� Night Walk: those
interested in participating should
meet in front of Joyner Library
at 7:30 p.m. According to Nor-
ton, this will be a chance to call
attention to saftey problems,
such as lack of lighting on cam-
pus. The group will walk around
campus and discuss problems
they see. The ideas and sugges-
tions o the group will be sent to
Chancellor John Howell.
�Wednesday� Sexual Harass-
ment on the ECU Campus: a
panel of students and faculty will
discuss campus-related problems
at 3:30 p.m. in Jenkins
Auditorium.
�Thursday� Self Defense for
Women: tips will be given at 2
p.m. and 7 p.m. in Mendenhall to
help incorporate self-defense
practice into aerobic workouts.
�Friday� RAPE: slide lecture by
Jerri Allyn at 7 p.m. in Gray
Gallery. Gray Gallery will be
hosting the art exhibition from
Nov. 7-Dec. 6.
�Saturday� Perspectives on
Rape - a Multidimensional Ap-
proach to Issues of Sexual
Violence: this symposium, from
9:30 a.m5 p.m will include a
presentation and panel focusing
on rape prevention and sexual
violence in the arts.
President Reagan Signs Education Act
WASHINGTON. DC.
(CPS) �After two years of
debate, promises of wholesale
changes and pointed insults flung
between Congress and the White
House, President Reagan last
week signed the Higher Educa-
tion Reauthorization Act of
1986.
The all-important act sets most
federal college policies for the
next five years.
College lobbyists, who sat with
the legislation since Congress and
the Reagan administration swore
to make it work with fundamen-
tal changes in the ways students
go to college, are generally pleas-
ed with the result.
"This HEA (Higher Education
Act) suits us just fine says
Julianne Still Thrift of the Na-
tional Institute of Independent
Colleges and Universities.
Thrift and others in the educa-
tion association community in
Washington are relieved the final
act didn't include any substantial
cuts in federal funding or federal
student aid.
"Although education has
alwavs been a favorite thing for
the president to recommend
slashing observes Tom
Wolanin, an aide to the House
Postsecondary Education Com-
mittee and a primary player in
pushing the bill through Con-
gress, "Congress hasn't gone
along with him on it
Last year, Education Secretary
William Bennett said he wanted
to use the process of passing a
new HEA�a new one comes up
every five years�as an oppor-
tunity for a philosophical debate
about what role the federal
government should play in col-
leges, what responsibilities
parents have for paying for their
children's education, what ef-
forts colleges should make to in-
sure that aid recipients are mak-
ing academic progress and are of
good character, and other issues.
A number of lobbyists took
Bennett's announcement to mean
the administration would ask for
deep cuts in student aid pro-
grams, and make it harder for
students to qualify for the aid.
No such thing happened.
Bennett never gave Congress a
comprehensive list of reforms he
wanted, and Congress proceeded
to approve of several modest in-
creases for most student aid pro-
grams without him.
"I can say student financial aid
survived the reauthorization pro-
cess Bob Evans, aid director at
Penn State and president of the
National Association of Student
Financial Aid Administrators,
says with a sense of relief.
Evans adds that the new act
does change some of the pro-
grams. Students, for example,
will have to fill out longer, more
complicated aid applications.
They will, moreover, be able to
get less aid in the form of grants,
and will have to repay most of
their student aid after they leave
college. Thanks to some technical
changes, some banks may stop
making Guaranteed Student
Loans, and the ones that con-
tinue to make GSLs will charge
students more.
Students now also must have at
least a "C" cumulative grade
point average by the end of their
sophomore years to be able to get
aid.
"I do not suspect a substantial
number of students will be
knocked out of school as a result
(of the new grade requirement)
Evans says. "While it appears to
be a new thing, all it really is is an
extra bite. Students have always
had to meet certain grade re-
quirements
Though the new law
"authorizes" Congress to ap-
propriate more money for aid
programs, the government will
decide each year how much it
really gives to the programs.
Congress never did appropriate
as much money to aid programs
as the Higher Education Act of
1980 allowed.
Wolanin, for one, is "confi-
dent that the amount will be at
least at the level it is now. (But)
there is no way I can predict if
more will be available (through
the HEA's lifespan)
ON THE INSIDE
Kditorials -Saturday's John Fogerty eon-
Style7 cert reviewed � sec STYLE page
Sports10 7
Announcements �Basketball previewed � see
Classifieds11 SPORTS page 10
Ghosts and goblins weren't the only ones oat Friday night. In keep-
ing with tradition, the streets downtown were Mocked off and
au.au Muamv - t. mm,
creativity abounded. Despite the recent change la the drinking age,
a good time seemed to have been had by all.
W Wk
��"
I
Hi
MMMaMff ;�� . �� MfcaflMMMH � I
SI





NOVEMBER 4.190ft
'
Corporations Pull
�ut of S. Africa
L a AntaPanheid activists
n Amencan campuses won ma-
�' victories last week when a str-
ing of corporate giants-General
Motors, Honeywell, IBM. Coke
and Warner Communica-
tions�announced they were pull-
ing out of segregationist South
Africa.
But the activists say the move-
ment on campuses will keep go-
ing even after achieving one of its
most important goals.
"I don't think it will slow
down the protests at all savs
Bill Northway of Stanford Out of
Africa. "If anything, it will en-
courage us
"It is a victory says Richard
Knight of the American Commit-
tee on Africa, the New York-
based group that has coordinated
anti-apartheid efforts on U.S.
campuses for years, "and it is im-
portant to realize it is a victory.
But I don't think protests will
slow down at all
If last week was any indication,
the movement may grow even
more confrontative. especially at
campuses that refuse to sell more
or all of their shares in firms that
do business in South Africa.
Police, for example, arrested
40 Wellesley students for
trespassing during a demonstra-
tion about the school's failure to
divest. Even as Stanford's
trustees voted to sell off another
$4.5 million in shares in two com-
panies doing business in South
Africa, about 125 protestors
rallied for "total divestment
Austin police, moreover, arrested
16 anti-apartheid demonstrators
at a sit-in at University of Texas
President William Cunningham's
office.
Some schools noted that, in
light of the South Africa exodus
of the blue-chip companies, their
holdings in apartheid-related
firms had fallen without their
having sold a share.
David Swensen, who heads
Yale's investment office, an-
nounced that, since Yale had
"substantial holdings" in IBM,
Coca-Cola and GM, "there will
be a rather dramatic drop in our
South Africa-related holdings
And University of Vermom
Treasurer Gordon Paterson said
Vermont may "reconsider" its
earlier decision to sell its IBM
stock in light of IBM's
withdrawal.
No one really knows how much
American schools' investment in
firms that do business in South
Africa fell as a result of the cor-
porate exodus.
American colleges already have
sold about $600 million�out of a
total investment of $7 billion�in
stock in firms that do business in
South Africa, reports Anne Grif-
fin of the Investor Responsibility
Research Center (IRRC), a
Washington, D.C. group that
tracks the South African opera-
tions of U.S. firms.
But Griffin says it's too early
to calculate just how much less in
South African investments the
schools will have because of the
corporate withdrawals.
But activists say it doesn't mat-
ter. Yale anti-apartheid leader
Matthew Kimble promises in-
vestments the schools will have
because of the corporate divests
completely.
"This is purely speculation on
my part says Griffin, whose
group does not take a stand for
or against divestiture, "but I
don't think the protests will slow
down
She adds an IRRC study about
to be released shows most schools
that have not yet divested plan to
maintain the "conservative" in-
vestment policies�either keeping
their stock or pressuring firms to
treat their black South African
workers well�that provoked stu-
dent protests in the first place.
"A lot depends on the institu-
tions themselves Griffin
observes. "Lots of them are con-
servative, and lots of them have
lots of money at stake
Knight adds the corporate
withdrawals may not really mean
the firms are finished doing
business in South Africa,
anyway. Many of the 24 firms
that have left the country still
have licensing agreements to sell
their wares in the land.
"Forcing a company to
(withdraw) from South Africa is
not good enough anymore, and
students are fully aware of this
Knight says.
Campus protests, he adds, pro-
bably won't go away until apar-
theid goes away. Corporate
withdrawals are pleasing to him,
but "activists are very serious.
After all, there are other things to
do with your life at that age than
sit in front of a Coke building for
three weeks
Hug an
East Carolinian
employee . . .
WE NEED IT
Sign up for Amu ROT! Basic
( amp bull get six weeks of
i Ituilenges that can build up your
leadership skills as well as your
liody You'll also pet almost P700.
But hurry This summer may be
oiir last chance to graduate from
college with a degree and an officers
commission. Be all you can be
Contact: Capt. Alvin Mitchell
757-6967
319 Erwin Hall
the
plunge
thfe
summer.
Army reserve officers' training corps
Heavy Use Of
Steriods Questioned
Anabolic steroids have been
used for years to enhance athletic
performance by making muscles
bigger and stronger, as well as In-
creasing endurance. What exactly
"Steroids"?
Steroids are made from the
male hormone testosterone and
are synthetically made in a
laboratory or obtained from
human or animal cadavers.
Steroids make muscles larger by
Health Column
By Mary Elesha-Adams
Candidate Visits Campus
Democratic nominee Tern Sanford arrived on campus bv
helicopter yesterday afternoon. He landed on the field at the bot-
tom of College Hill, and spoke to students in front of the Music
Building.
Become a Part of
ECU!
increasing protein synthesis
(building up) in the muscle tissue.
In order for steroids to work, a
person must train regularly and
intensely because a muscle has to
be torn down by exercise in order
for it to be rebuilt. Good eating
habits are also essential because a
muscle will not grow if it does not
have the proper nourishment. If a
person takes steroids and docs
not train, there will be no ac-
celerated muscle growth.
Steroids might seem to be a
blessing for some fitness en-
thusiasts, but are they really a
solution for the aspiring sthlete
or bodybuilder? Maybe not -
some effects from steroids are
undesirable but reversible, while
others are dangerously irreversi-
ble and even fatal. In males,
steroids can cause a decrease m
sperm production and testicle nat
because the body stops making ns
own testosterone. This is not evi-
dent until a few weeks after a
male goes off his "Drug Cycle "
Baldness, acne, bloating due to
water retention, and ill.
temperment may be reversible ef-
fects that will go away when the
body regulates back to it's nor-
mal hormone level. An effeci
called gynecomastia (enlarging
of the male breast) is often seer.
in males who are long term and
heavy steroid users. This effect is
reversible only by an operation.
In females, the effects are much
more pronounced. Again, acne,
bloating and receding hajrline as
well as ill-temper can occur and
may be reversible. Dark faciaJ
and body hair, deepening of the
voice and enlargement of the
genitaha are not reversible
For both sexes, there is a risk
of liver damage because the liver
cannot effectively handle such an
increased hormone level. High
blood cholesterol levels can lead
to heart attacks and strokes
resulting complications and ever.
premature death. When using in-
jectable steroids, there is the
chance of hitting and damaging a
nerve, acquiring hepatitis, infec-
tion! and even AIDS
Do the benefits of using
steroids outweigh the risks? Does
winning mean risking your life
for the gold? This is a decision
that an individual has to make
for himself.
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CopynoM is�
coger Sav-On
Ouanttty ttarttt tv�rvc
-ont sota fo so�n
on
Type A
rrv �
-I
I

benefi
Does waiting in line a: super-
market and resiau i
you angrv ever.
particular rea
hurr�
Whenaneleva- i
nve, do you blame
delating it on purpo
I) � i have troubledk .
workl ��-�. and �her
arc " � . ver
their shoul :�
done corre
II you are
very arr - ancj ti,
to hostility, and a .
HabK a Tvpe
which is n
Red ford B tt
�- and rr-
Duke University Me
There
ed. Studies si �
driving Type A
grea . � ractma
College Pre
(C PS� I
other, pub
� normailv a let i
people � ;r. a numb-
last week re
barnstorrr j
lobbying media event
posture
convince state -
impose wl
wiil be a �
budget ,
Texa ; . i
Wisconsin, Montana, rlabarj
Utah, Iowa, and Missc
among �het states, have reca
� or are at :
amour g - �
their public c lieges
�n- their c llege ad
minist-a- rs claiming -
' federa budge
have forced then-
operations to the bone, are w i
ing that new state budget c
force them to take drasi .
measures.
They say they will rave
some academic department
back on student service
tuitions and maybe even r-
with other colleges.
"It S close (to squeezing fc
out of a turnip) says Univr-
of Alaska president Dr. Do
O'Dowd, whose school has I
to slash spending - ?5 percent
over the last several r
Alaska's state revenue ha- een
cut in half the
When Utah did
much in taxes a- it had planned
it ordered all state age-
cies�including colleges�t
their budgets At Weber State
meant firing 58 people, dish
ding the men's wrestling and I
women's goli teams, and
ing the economics deg'ee pi
gram, among othei -
Budge: cuts left tie L'mvera
of Texas unable to make -
promised payments
research partners, and v
losing faculty to better p i
schools, Lt. Go B Hobbi
last week.
The Kansas Board ol Regent
last week announcec c
soon start closing master degree
i
E
rhe
-
I
MW�
I
CAROLINA GULF
120! Dickinson vr
52-T��
Do A With Us - We Pi A Dr
��SA �t Gl"Lf 1HK BO�Dt
& E0E Pledgi
DRA
Tuev, November 4, 1986
75 TALI
0 Drl
A EEE Pres
DRA
Wed November 5. 186 9.
75C TALI
10 Dr





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 4, 1986
Use Of I Type A Students Face Health Risks
Questioned
ten
ttk
$te$
tn-
Lnd
i
�.teroids can cause a decrease in
sperm production and testicle size
because the body stops making its
own testosterone. This is not evi-
dent until a few weeks after a
male goes off his "Drug Cycle
Baldness, acne, bloating due to
water retention, and ill.
temperment may be reversible ef-
fects that will go away when the
body regulates back to it's nor-
mal hormone level. An effect
ed gnecomastia (enlarging
he male breast) is often seen
nates who are long term and
steroid users. This effect is
ersibte onl by an operation.
the effects are much
c pronounced. Again, acne,
I and receding hairline as
ue as 11 temper can occur and
Nr reversible. Dark facial
d) hair, deepening of the
ce and enlargement of the
ge ire not reversible.
�ces, there is a risk
er damage because the liver
cannot effectively handle such an
cased hormone level. High
cholesterol levels can lead
attacks and strokes
ing complications and even
jremature death. When using in-
steroids, there is the
�ing and damaging a
rrve, acquiring hepatitis, infec-
md even AIDS.
Do the benefits of using
ids outweigh the risks? Docs
ng mean risking your life
the gold? This is a decision
an individual has to make
� himself.
H�y Guys! Tok Your
Sw�t4i�ort Som�
Flowars Tonight. For
Tk� aW pric� 4
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KROGER Florol Shop.
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Orange
Juice
COCVtflPit i99�
"�ogf Savon
Oujntirv �ignti KurvH
�too voia H o��i�n
on
Does waiting in line at super
markets and restaurants make
you angry - even if you have no
particular reason to be in a
hurry?
When an elevator is slow to ar-
rive, do vou blame others for
delaying it on purpose?
disease in later years than their
more easygoing Type B counter-
parts, Williams said.
"There is no evidence that
completing chores quickly or be-
ing ambitious and work-oriented
will lead to increased heart risk
he said. "Getting things done in a
DovouhavtrrKi-j i v ��"�unngs cone in a
wort'to"other2 hurry and Wn� competitive on
to others, and when you do, the job obviously have lots of
are you constantly looking over
their shoulders to make sure it is
done correctly?
If you are always in a hurry,
very ambitious and easily moved
to hostility and anger, you are
probably a Type A personality,
which is not uncommon among
college students, according to
Red ford B. Williams, professor
oi psychiatry and medicine at
Duke University Medical Center.
There is reason to be concern-
ed. Studies show that hard-
driving Type A students are at
greater risk of contracting heart
benefits. Rather, the villains in
this type of personality arc
hostility and anger - becoming
frustrated with others a lot.
"If you find yourself thinking
that other people are selfish, that
they can't be depended upon,
that they are out for themselves
and don't care about you, then
you may be exhibiting the hostili-
ty aspect of the Type A personali-
ty
Type A students need to learn
to recognize their feelings of
hostility and then practice
trusting others more, Williams
said.
"Are you always looking over
your roommate's shoulder to see
if he is cooking the spaghetti
right?" he said. "Don't. The
world is not going to end if the
spaghetti is overcooked. Letting
others take charge can be very
liberating
Instead of badgering the
checkout clerk at the super-
market to work faster, channel
your energy into more positive
channels. After all, there's no
point in getting upset over
something that you can't do
anything about.
If you know you have to wait
in line, take along a book, a chess
game or a pizza. "You need to
develop strategies to occupy
yourself when these enforced
delays strike Williams said.
A sense of humor helps
alleviate tense situations, too, he
noted. "Make jokes about stan-
ding in line. Sometimes it's funny
just noticing the agitation of all
the other Type As
If you're taking a plane, don't
demand a window seat when the
ticket agent says none is
available. Say, "Oh, just any seat
is fine designating smoking or
non-smoking.
"It's good practice Williams
said. "And often, you'll find that
others are more accommodating
when they realize that you're so
nice to get along with
Environmental factors are
believed to play a major role in
shaping the Type A personality,
he added.
Youngsters who grow up to
become Type A's probably did
not receive as much positive rein-
forcement from their parents as
did the youngsters who grow up
to become Type B's, he said.
Parents of Type A students
were always saying, "Can't you
do better?" hor example, when
the Type A brought home his
elementary school report card
with four "A"s and one "B his
parents said, "Do you think you
can bring that 'A' up next
semester?" The parents of the
Type B student said, "That's a
wonderful report card
In Duke studies, more men
than women college students
revealed Type A characteristics.
"That doesn't mean that type A
men undergraduates should go
around worrying about having a
heart attack Williams said.
"Most heart attacks don't oc-
cur until much later in life. So
there is time for the Type A col-
lege student to modify his per-
sonality
Loon What Surfaced
College Presidents Fight Budget Cuts

(CPS)� Unbeknownst to each
other, public college presidents
� normally a decorous bunch of
people � in a number of states
last week resorted to "last ditch"
barnstorming trips, splashing
lobbying media events and
postures of outright defiance to
convince state legislators not to
impose what the presidents say
will be a ruinous new round of
budget cuts.
Texas. Alaska, Idaho, Indiana,
Wisconsin, Montana, Alabama,
Utah, Iowa, and Missouri,
among other states, have recently
� or are about to � cut the
amount of money they give to
their public colleges.
And their college ad-
ministrators, claiming six years
of federal budget cuts already
have forced them to cut their
operations to the bone, are warn-
ing that new state budget cuts will
force them to take drastic
measures.
They say they will have to close
some academic departments, cut
back on student services, raise
tuitions and mavbe even merge
with other college . ,
It s close (to squeezing blood
out of a turnip) says University
of Alaska president Dr. Donald
O'Dowd, whose school has had
to slash spending by 35 percent
over the last several months.
"Alaska's state revenue has been
cut in half the last eight months
When Utah didn't collect as
much in taxes as it had planned,
it ordered all state agen-
cies�including colleges�to slash
their budgets. At Weber State, it
meant firing 58 people, disban-
ding the men's wrestling and the
women's golf teams, and dropp-
ing the economics degree pro-
gram, among others.
Budget cuts left the University
of Texas unable to make some
promised payments to one of its
research partners, and it is now
losing faculty to better-paying
schools, Lt. Gov. Bill Hobby said
last week.
The Kansas Board of Regents
last week announced it might
soon start closing masters degree
programs, whe Alaska's
O'Dowd reports "we'll probably
have to cut academics. We can't
continue to protect it any
longer
"This has not been the best of
years observes Montana State
President William Tietz, whose
campus budget is $1.2 million less
than it was last year at this time.
Some state college officials
began fighting back with some
unusual histrionics last week.
University of Wisconsin
System President Kenneth Shaw
tried to make the point of saying
budget cuts that have forced state
campuses to turn students away
"make me cry
"These pleas (college
presidents are making) are last
ditch efforts Eckl says.
Adds Hines, "this is affecting
lives all over
"It's a very difficult spiral to
break, and we're right at the
point where it's most discourag-
ing�if not downright im-
possible�to cope he says.
The presidents of Idaho's four
state-supported colleges went on
a highly publicized "barnstorm-
ing tour of six cities to plead
their case for more funding.
"We were given a good hear-
ing reports Idaho State Presi-
dent Richard Bowen. "The
minds are more open" to college
funding needs.
Purdue and Indiana univer-
sities, rivals in virtually
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wining and dining legislators at
"breakfast, lunch and dinner" to
try to win more funding, reports
Purdue Vice President Dr. John
Hicks.
The Faculty Senate at Utah
State, meanwhile, voted flatly to
refuse to join the
administration's mandated effort
to cut an extra six percent off this
year's budget in order to absorb
the state funding decline.
Northern Iowa's ad-
ministrators were so upset by-
state budget news two weeks ago
that they bought an ad protesting
state education funding
"stinginess" in the Des Moines
Register newspaper.
"The governor believes the
money spent on this ad would be
better spent on student educa-
tion Dick Vohs, Gov. Terry
Branstad's press secretary,
replied angrily. The half-page ad
cost $2,050.
But few expect the state fun-
ding cuts to stop any time soon, if
only because states in the energy
and farm regions don't have
more money to give to their col-
leges.
"Times are tough for the
states. I wouldn't call this a
decline in state funding, but a
flattening says Illinois State's
Dr. Edward Hines, who tracks
state funding of colleges.
"I do expect it to last well
beyond five years, however. The
economic future is not particular-
ly bright or rosy for some farm
states and those with oil- or
mineral-related industries
Hines says. "They will experience
problems again next year
"They can't just raise taxes
he adds, because more
unemployed people need state
social services, welfare, and other
programs which, in turn, con-
sume more of what little money
there is.
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CLASS OF 1987.
The Air Force has a special pro-
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you can enter active duty soon
after graduation�without waiting
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To qualify, you must have an
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Not h i ng cou Id have prepa red me
for the first tew moments with my
roommate. 'Anique"� nothing moa
just "Anique"�was her name Change
the "A" to a "U"and vou Ye got a
description.
When they asked what tvpc of
roommate I wanted, I didn't know that
I needed to be more specific than non-
smoker. I could swear I saw a picture
of Anique on a postcard I got from
London. Within five minutes, I found
out that she was an Art Historv stu-
dent, into the Psychedelic Furs, and
totally, totally against the domesti-
cation of animals.
I was just about ready to put in
for a room transfer when she
reached into her leather
backpack, pulled out a
can of Suisse Mocha and
offered me a cup. Okay, I
decided I'd keen an open mind
As we sipped our cups, I
found out that Anique and I share
the same fondness for Carv Grant �
movies, the same disdain for wine
coolers, and the same cx-bovfriend.
That gave us plenty to talk about.
General Foods International Coffees.
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r '
�te iEaat (Earnlfnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, (w
PATT, KEMM,S DANIEL MAURERl � �'
ivtMMIS, vfi STFVP Fm mad
Scott Coopfb steve i-olmar. mm oatiu
Rick McCor5 " AN��NY MaRT,n �c' "�'
John ��J Meo Needhm. �� "
John Shannon. Sw,w,w Shannon Shopt
PAT Mm i � SHANNON SHORT. ,�, Mtav,
Editor
DeChanile Johnson. �����
November 4, 1986
OPINION
Page 4
SIP-A-BRU
Students Take A Stand On Drinking
While most students took the
changing drinking age law in stride,
there were a handful of students
who took a stand against what they
considered to be a violation of their
rights. Perhaps you caught a glimps
ot their handiwork last Thursday
evening. They call themselves SIP-
A-BRU.
This organization is a coalition of
a Greenville-based group SIP
(Students In Protest) and a group
from Chapel Hill called BRU (Beer
Rights Union). Together they have
dedicated themselves to lowering
the drinking age and protesting the
Federal Government's strong arm
tactics.
Last Thursday evening was the
first local display of their peaceful,
yet determined protest. Represen-
tatives from SIP-A-BRU spoke to
the crowd, as did SGA President
Steve Cunanan. Local bands of-
fered free entertainment, and
students drank water from beer
bottles in symbolic protest.
The days of student apathy on
this campus are over. The members
of SIP-A-BRU and organizations
like it are taking a stand.
Their stand, however, is not just
against the drinking age, but, as
one SIP member put it, "again
the underlying principle of the
federal government's intervention"
into individuals' rights.
Moreover, SIP-A-BRU seems to
be taking an organized and profes-
sional approach. They are playing
by the rules, working within the
system.
Rather than a free-for-all, as was
the case in Chapel Hill on the morn-
ing of Sept. 1, they organized a ral-
ly, the first of many we suspect.
Also, an attempt was made to
secure a permit allowing SIP-A-
BRU supporters to march
downtown carrying beer bottles fill-
ed with water. Though the permit
could not be obtained in time for
the rally, the effort is proof of a
serious attempt to work within the
system; an attempt this newspaper
applauds.
Some may think SIP-A-BRU is
just a soap box for those who have
lost the privilege to drink. The fact
is, most SIP members are over 21.
SIP has even enlisted the services of
a faculty advisor. No, this is not a
group of irate, underaged drinkers.
It is an organized attempt to have
the student voice heard.
DliOI - - MRS OWS A WA1G SUPPLE 5fRL Wf�,
ffi,N? Sm mre MH m0 SHACK6P UP
with SEVEN MIPGET&,
'in i
Campus Forum
Republican Answers Editorial Stab
In case the read� nf Pamnnc � k�. w j.
Will Humanism Survive The 1980 's
By CHRISTOPHER CARSON
SpeaaJ To TV Eastaratirtu
I finally found Sen. Will Sunday at the
Capitol Hill Club, well into his fifth mar-
tini.
"There you are, Rev. Sunday
"By God, what do you college kids want
this time? More student aid? Forget it.
Senate Appropriations can't swing it this
year, especially if this new committee
comes about
"What Committee?"
"The Secular Humanism Committee.
Haven't you heard about the rising tide of
Godless immorality that is wrecking the
public school system?" he quoted, slurring
his speech a little.
"Only when I visited my sister in North
Carolina 1 said, steadying him on his
stool. "What would a Humanism commit-
tee do, anyway?"
"We're going to organize nationwide,
weekly book burnings. Somebody's got to
keep this evolutionist, liberal filth out of
the schools and the nation, in spite of those
Pinkos in the House
"What about the First Amendment?
How can you believe in free speech if you
burn books?" I gasped.
He squinted at me. "What are you, son'7
Some kinda liberal? We hear this whine
constantly from the Press. Johnny, the
First Amendment is a legality. Do you
want to have people reading Catcher jn the
Rye and Huckleberrry Finn over some
legal fiction?" He spat carefully.
"Anything else you would do if you got
the committee formed? Humanist Hunts,
maybe?" I snarled. "Inquisitions?"
"As a matter of fact his face lit up,
"We were thinking of making it illegal to
actually be a humanist
"How in God's name could you get
away with that?" I laughed, knowing I had
him.
"Easy. Throw it under slander or sedi-
tion and you can accuse anybody of
anything. It's the oldest trick in the book
"What about the Justice Department?"
I cried desperately.
"Every time they shout up about so-
meone's civil rights' being violated, Jesse
Helms goes over to the White House and
screams 'foul Then word gets passed
down to cool it
"Ah I said, "but what about the
courts?" It was my last lasso. It had to be
it.
Senator Sunday only smiled. 'The
courts? Really, Johnny. Look who's Chief
Justice
In case the readers of Campus
Forum are wondering, it is hunting
season, and the leader of this witch
hunt is Bern McCarthy, I mean Mc-
Crady. Mr. McCrady is leading the ef-
fort to purge the ECU student body of
College Republicans, or more ac-
curately, anyone who doesn't have his
beliefs.
Why is he trying to deface a perfectly
legitimate off-shoot of the Republican
Party? Obviously, Mr. McCrady is
very disturbed with the right-ward shift
of this country. Or maybe he just
doesn't believe in the two-party
system. I wonder if he believes in com-
petition in the business world?
Concerning his article entitled "The
Right Wing Move On Campus" (Oct.
16) blasting the College Republicans,
he tells us there is something wrong
with freedom of speech (i.e. conser-
vative publications at Universities), be-
ing affiliated with the Republican Par-
ty, supporting the government and
having the best weapons.
Why is it "very radical" to publish
political propaganda in a college
newspaper. Should the "right" move-
ment go to the extremes used by the
Tiew'TeTt movement of the 60's, by in-
citing violence and holding draftcard
burnings. What about all those shan-
ties his liberal counterparts at Chapel
Hill built last year and those die-ins
they held where they pretended to have
been killed by a nuclear blast. You
know Mr. McCrady, most of us on the
right are in agreement with you that
"it's only right to be considerate of
behavior such as this
I still do not see what is wrong with
having the best weapons available.
Handicaps are for the "links not
whatever battle fields we may have to
cross in order to insure the survival of
this country in the hostile and un-
predictable world we are situated with.
I don't 'hink your deceptive repor-
ting method of trying to stereotype all
College Republicans with a few select
"snide" quotes convinces even your
most devoted liberal reader. Nor do I
understand why you think conservative
groups should promote liberal ideals or
why you want to have "moral
outcasts" in the streets.
Before I close, I have a request for
you Mr. McCrady. Why don't you
write about your liberal ideals instead
of trying to blast students who are pro-
ud to belong to one of the dominate
political partys of this country. Show
us your real writing ability and make
those liberal beliefs appealing to us.
When you find fault with expressing
popular beliefs, you give the impres-
sion of a child crying because he
doesn't have everyone's attention.
Also, I am confident the College
Republicans will not "fade away" the
way the College Democrats have, Mr.
McCrady.
Richard A. Pond
Senior
Chairman
ECU College Republicans
AIDS T-Shirts
I've seen them and you probablv
have seen them too, "STOP AIDS"
t-shirts. Finding an answer to cure
AIDS is quite a benevolent sugges-
tion, but I suspect benevolence isn't
what these boys have in mind.
First of all, it raises some questions
about someone's sexual insecurities
Why do they find it o jrr llliii f V c .
wear a t-shirt that essentially says "I'm
but we must remember that this is our
school and they are our football team
We need to be the motivation behind
the team and let them know that we are
pulling for them regardless of their
record. No athletic team, on our cam-
pus or anywhere else, could possibly
succeed without some form of backup.
We, the students must give them en-
couragement to move ahead.
If any of you have football players in
your classes, are friends with them, or
just see them around, take a minute
and notice them. How are they feeling
and looking? A lot of them have cuts
on their faces, bandages on their arms
or broken bones, but do they give up?
No, they continue each week to go in
front of big name teams and large
crowds and battle it out till the end.
How many of us can say we would con-
tinue taking the hits and falls received
during a football game each week, only
to find out no one cared enough to
show up to support us. We must supplv
them with reinforcement.
Show the Pirates your enthusiasm,
come to the games, attend the pep
rallies, tailgate and wish the players
your best! School spirit comes from us
w must cominue cheering if we do not
not gay" or "I hate gays?" And
secondly, if you have ever known
somebody with a fatal disease,
(AIDS, cancer, heart disease) you
know it's a very traumatic experience
for the victim and familv and friends as
well.
This "look for a joke anywhere" at-
titude only multiplies the agony and
anxiety. It's quite simple, people are
laughing because others are dying. This
incompassionate homophobia makes
me sick and frustrated. FIGHT AIDS
NOT ITS VICTIMS!
Steve Sommers
Sophomore
Political Science
Pirate Pride
Laura Clark
Junior
Community and Commercial
Recreation
has
The problem, of school spirit
always laid heavy on my mind.
This year our football team has not
done as well as we all would have liked,
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop inenfbyour office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfsj. Utters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
w�i jumicc. � v � Mi �"� uuucas wen as we an would have liked, tacks will be permitted
Censorship: Does It Have A Place In Democratic America
By DAVID LEWIS
S�rrta To TV K.U CmIMm
The United States is a democratic republic, and
embraces two conflicting ideologies by virtue of this
very designation. The first, represented by the ideas
of John Stuart Mill, that government's role is as
custodian of the public peace and security, and pro-
tector of the individual from acts injurious to his
person or property. Government should not be used
to enforce morality, for such enforcement would
constitute an unnecessary intrusion of government
into private lives.
The second can be characterized by a passage
from the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Trist v.
Child: "The foundation of a republic is the virtue
of its citizens Government has a legitimate in-
terest in maintaining a moral population, and can
be expected to legislate accordingly.
The debate in this country is as old as that bet-
ween Jefferson and Hamilton as to whether a
democratic republic should trust first in its citizens
or in its government. Today this debate is clouded.
Conservatives, such as President Reagan, claim to
seek less government intrusion into private lives
(which often manifests itself in the curious cause of
decontrolling business), yet appear dedicated to
quite the opposite, as the pursuance of this ad-
ministration's "moral agenda" illustrates. Critics
of this moral agenda are not critics of morality, but
rather are concerned with whether or not the regula-
tion of morality is a proper function of govern-
ment.
In the case of obscenity, for instance, there are
two major First Amendment questions with which
any obscenity legislation must deal: 1. How great
are the risks to freedom when goverment makes any
determination as to what can be spoken or heard,
written or read, depicted or seen? 2. If a nation re
jects the concept of religious establishment, can
that nation rightfully enforce a morality rooted in
religion?
The Supreme Court has dealt with both ques-
tions, but in a manner which hardly lays the issues
to rest. First, they have found obscenity to be wor-
thless communication and therefore not to be pro-
tected under the First Amendment (Roth v. United
States). Second, the Court has repeatedly held that
a law is not unconstitutional if it has a primary
secular purpose, even if the law reinforces some
religious principle at some level. Contemporary
problems, therefore, include the definition of what
is obscene and the identification of secular of
religious motivations behind obscenity legislation.
Some feel the recent (July 1986) release of the At-
torney General's Pornography Commission's Final
Report has indicated a secular reason for govern-
ment to take action against obscenity by associating
it with sexual crime. The 1986 Commission's fin-
dings and methods, however, should be weighed
against those of the 1970 Commission on Obscenity
and Pornography.
As the 1986 Commission pointed out, "The 1970
Commission had a budget of $2,000,000 and two
years to complete its task. We had only one year
and a budget of $500,000. Taking into account the
changing value of the dollar, the 1970 Commission
had a budget nearly sixteen times as large as
oursThis meant the 1970 Commission could ar-
range for studies beyond the means of the 1986
Commission, which was restricted by time and
money primarily to public hearings.
The 1986 Commission did not dispute the fin-
dings of the 1970 Commission, but insisted "we
confront a different world than that confronted by
the 1970 Commission Whether the divergent con-
clusions and recommendations of the two groups
are due to the span of years between the reports, or
to financial constraints, or to ideological dif-
ferences is a question worth asking.
The 1970 Commission took a J.S. Mill-like ap-
proach to what harm could be caused by obscenity,
researching actual criminal statistics. They
reported, "The Commission cannot conclude that
exposure to erotic materials is a factor ih the causa-
tion of sex crime or sex delinquency This follow-
ed from the observation "that sex offenders have
less adolescent experience with erotica than other
adults while they "do not differ significantly
from other adults in relation to adult experience
with erotica The conclusion: "Available evidence
suggests that sex offenders' early inexperience with
erotic material is a reflection of their more deprived
sexual environment
The 1986 Commission avoided the Mill-like ap-
proach, rejecting the limited use of "harm" as only-
something "that causes physical or financial harm
to identifiable individuals It directed itself more
to intangible qualities: "Issues of human dignity
and human decency, no less real for their lack of
scientific measurability, are for many of us central
to thinking about the question of harm
These are valid concerns, but the problem with
emphasizing qualities which lack scientific
measurablity is that what the public rightly assumes
to be a fact-finding committee may well evolve into
a committee of speculation. For instance, the 1986
report (dealing with sexual violence) noted, "Fin-
ding a link between aggressive behavior toward
women and sexual violence, whether lawful or
unlawful, require assumptions not found exclusive-
ly in the experimental evidence. We see no reason
however, not to make these assumptions Such
conceivably well-intentioned but methodological
flawed reasoning casts doubt on any connections
the 1986 Commission found possible between some
forms of obscenity and some sexual crimes.
Yet the result of this report's release has been to
increase activity among anti-obscenity organiza-
tions, believing the findings reinforce their conten-
tion of the debilitating influence obscenity has on
society (even the U.S. Attorney General has launch-
ed a new anti-smut campaign). These morally
outraged elements, often supported from the
religious right (which is decidedly not pro-John
Stuart Mill) tend toward extremism in their
demands. Thus, even though the 1986 Commission
declared, "None of us, of course, finds harmful the
use Of nudity in art or for plainly educational pur-
poses the North Carolina legislature had, in 1985,
already bent to pressure and deleted "educational"
from its list of exempting qualities under its severe
stature on obscenity. This could possibly restrict the
kind of sex education recommended by the 1970
Commission and increase, rather than decrease,
sexual crime by contributing to the "deprived sex-
ual environment
Perhaps Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black was
right to believe the First Amendment offers ab-
solute protection to speech and expression.
Obscenity may be but another cross we must bear
for a free society. Crimes associated with obscenity
could be prosecuted under other laws (ex. child por-
nography is prima facia evidence of the sexual ex-
ploitation of a minor). At any rate, the specter of
censorship, or of citizens willingly divesting
themselves of their First Amendment rights, should
send a shudder through this democratic republic,
regardless of ideology.
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r
I0 5HACK8PUP
itorial Stab
al this is our
)iu football team.
tivation behind
:hem know that we are
gardless of their
team, on our cam-
v ere c:e. could possibly
rm of backup.
c:e them en-
n ove ahead.
'Mil players in
ds with them, or
take a minute
H are the feeling
S � :hem have cuts
on their arms
the) give up?
week to go in
� c earns and large
till the end.
saj we would con-
its and falls received
ne each week, only
t :ared enough to
s We must supply
' rcement.
a es your enthusiasm,
- ames, aMend the pep
ate and wish the players
School spirit comes from us,
w must continue cheering if we do not!
-v- � M iC. JfVt? up'
1 aura Clark
Junior
and Commercial
Recreation
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T rt's release has been to
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tg influence obscenity has on '
Attorney General has launch
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list of exempting qualities under its severe
v bscenity This could possibly restrict the
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sion and increase, rather than decrease,
rime bj contributing to the "deprived sex- ,
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ps Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black was I
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society. Crimes associated with obscenity f
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ks of their First Amendment rights, should �
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Iss of ideology.
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GOMIN
TRACTIONS
Wednesday Film � November 5
8: p.m. Hendrix Theatre
SEVEN BEAUTIES
Wednesday, November 5
3:00 & 7:00 p.m. Room 221 Joyner Library
Broodcasted Panel Discussion:
'U.S. Foreign Policy and Dissent:
Are We Saviors or Imperialists?
FREE ADMISSION
Thursday, Friday,
Saturday, Sunday
November 6, 7,j 9
8 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
PRETTY IN
PINK
Thursday and Friday,
November 6 and 7
The Underground 8p.m.
Coffeehouse
Auditions
Thursday, November 6
6 p.m. Multi-Purpose Room
All-Campus
Men's Table
Tennis
Tournament
YOUEE
WORTH
GOLD
Our Representative is on campus with distinguished
traditional and contemporary styles �
each backed by a Full Lifetime Warranty.
yTKKTIRVED
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Representative will be at the Student Store
November 3rd, 4th, 5th
from 9:00 a.m4:00 p.m.
C S86 AnGarvec Class fVgs





NOVEMBER 4, 196
Attit
Decree rC fCW WCeks�
grad un?ran'ua Johns Hopkins
bodilv h haS bcen Pickcd "P
feet I V P�Uce- dracd b ��
dTonrlH055 Md C��.
hand? ff !T a ��� "�"
handcuffed and pushed into a
cold.metal cell, where she was
Kept in solitary confinement for
n'ne hours.
Her university then charged
dlLT: Pn. loitering,
disorderly conduct and disobey-
ng a police office.
K4JHU Presi�,ent Dr. Steven
Muller says his administra-
tion-which last week dropped
tne charges against Gran and 10
other students arrested for defy-
ng a campus ban on building
"shanties" meant to symbolize
Poverty in South America-ac-
tually is growing more lenient
toward anti-apartheid protestors.
But, if recent events are any in-
dication, students joining a
round of nationwide anti-
apartheid protest scheduled for
hundreds of campuses this month
can expect rougher treatment
from authorities.
"It seems that in a number of
cases college officials are getting
tougher on protestors observes
Richard Knight of the American
Committee on Africa (ACA),
which helps coordinate campus
anti-apartheid efforts nation-
wide.
Texas, Yale, Illinois, Utah,
Missouri, Indiana and Dart-
mouth, among others, are all
striking "get tough" poses
toward anti-apartheid students
who, up until last spring, could
count on demonstrating without
much personal risk.
At that point, administrators
began sending police to break up
protestors and their "shanty"
villages for the first time, often
on the grounds the flimsy struc-
tures�none too sturdy and fre-
quently the target of violent van-
dalism by movement op-
ponents�posed insurance risks
for the schools.
Now, administrators seem less
shy about breaking up the pro-
tests, often explaining it's
necessary to maintain campus
order.
The ACA's Josh Nessen says
it's because students themselves
are tending to use more violent,
confirmative tactics in recent
years.
The crackdowns, ironically
enough, are coming as more
schools�about 50 so far this
year, the ACA says�are selling
shares in companies that do
business in segregationist South
Africa.
Just last week, for example,
Harvard, Bucknell and Southern
Cal voted to sell all or part of
their South African holdings.
The same week, Missouri ar-
rested 17 protestors. It was the
first time UM had ever brought
trespassing charges against pro-
testors, says Maj. Jack Watring
of the campus police.
Nearby Illinois refilled trespass-
ing charges against 16 students
involved in a campus protest last
spring. Yale suspended four.
Dartmouth�which refused to
give diplomas to five protestors
last spring�is imposing stricter
disciplinary rules to try to
minimize litigation with students,
spokesman Alex Huppe says.
Some think it's no accident col-
leges are getting tough and
divesting at the same time. "Ad-
ministrators do not want to seem
to be buckling in to students
says Alan Chandler of the
University of Utah's Students
Against Apartheid.
Of the campuses that disciplin-
ed ahti-apartheid students last
week, Johns Hopkins and Ulinios
are scheduled to reconsider
divestiture soon. Missouri
already has sold some $5 million
worth of stock in firms with
South African operations.
But most schools say they're
cracking down to maintain order
on campus, not to avoid looking
like they're surrendering to pro-
testors wishes.
Yale filed charges against nine
protestors�suspending four of
them�because "we cannot allow
the disruption of university ac-
tivities and buildings says
associate Provost Linda K.
Lorimer.
The disciplining was especially
controversial because, a day
before sentencing the anti-
apartheid students, the same Yale
committee rescinded the proba-
tion of a student who last spring
had passed out flyers ridiculing
gays.
"On one hand, (Yale) en-
courages free speech at all costs
complained Sarah Pet tit of Yale's
Gay-Lesbian Co-op. "On the
other hand, the suspensions ef-
fectively take voices out of cir-
culation
But the ami-apartheid students
disrupted Yale operations, while
the anti-gay student didn't,
Lorimer explains. "The students
who staged the sit-in would not
leave when they were asked, and
would not allow people to do
their work
Johns Hopkins President
Muller also says he was trying to
maintain order when he forbade
students to build a shanty outside
a trustees' meeting, and then sent
police to arrest them when they
tried to build one anyway on
Sept. 9.
Upon reconsidering, Muller
Student Activists Change
dropped the charges against the
students, and appointed a com-
mittee to write campus free
speech and protest guidelines.
Not wanting to wait, some
Johns Hopkins students�as well
as threatened protestors from
Vanderbilt�have contacted
Utah's Chandler for help in
preparing legal challenges to their
school's crackdowns.
In September, Chandler's grou
won a lawsuit aganst Utah Presi-
dent Chase Peterson, who tried
to force it to dismantle campus
shanties. Peterson said the shan-
ties, insistently vandalized and
frequently firebombed, had
become safety hazards.
A federal district court,
however, ruled dismantling the
shanties would violate the pro-
testors' right to free expression.
Now seven University of Texas
protestors�four of them UT
students�have sued UT for
violating their right when they
sent police to break up their
April, 1986 campus rally, u
ultimately arrested 18 people
The lawsuit seeks damages
and injunctive relief against the
University of Texas for violatint
constitutional rights of in.
dividuals demonstrating against
apartheid.
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OCEF
Ufa.
r hi
Petty S�k (Kathkrn Turner
Married the stor of a hu�fii
(Now plating at Plaamema
The Review
Hynde's
B D. A.SVVANsOS
The Pretenders � Get Clost
(Sire)
Love and Rockets � tx;
(Bigtime Records)
For better or for worse
seems like all of the g
rock and rollers are .
mellowing out, and turning :
Just look at Mick Jagger. I
Costello, David Bowie, D
Byrne and now Chnssse H)
Not that they aren't -� aj
taleruaianis bui ihcy v. B
mWnnofemarfcer Consrfous.
Such ft the cifte wfth Hwde
latest album, Get Close (
sidenng she is the only remar
member I the
Pretender we'll call
album.) Nearly al.
soul of The Prere-
albums are gone � buried
slick songwnting, shek n
ship, and eve- sJ cka
work
All of this blatant bias
the new band aside. GetI u -
an album brimm t
The smooth ringing "v
Change My I ife
rhythms of "Dance" ai d
Hall-and-Oats-ian
"Don't Get Me Wi
for airplay, and the) deserve
The tunes are al! e:
seductive, and Chrissk's v s
have hit on a new feminir
her old iom-bo wa
while they are driving.
not driven j
In places i"
Moon "Tradition 01 1
and "Room Full Of Mir
foaad bouod Is just one of
'Rape a show which will go on disf
hi Gray Gallery Friday at 8 p.m.


' '
!?

��� . x �,HVV1'






lmHM v AKo
I ISIAN
N( I MM K 4 ISW
Attitudes Toward Student Activists Change
Ovei -he I J
v eu eeks- "On one hand. (Vale) en Ml, .u � . .
le lasl teu weeks
! pran, , Pohns Hopkina
n has been puked ur
b Mice, dra�ed b her
I, Brass and concrete,
" �mo a padd) .agon.
:uff and pushed ,n,o a
mftal cell, where she was
; solitary confinemem tor
H
�� universit
�� with
then charged
trespassing, loitering
'�sorderl conduci and disobey
� police office
. f'Hl Presideni n, Steven
M" lei says his administra
- hich lasi ueek dropped
irges against Gran and 10
idents arrested for defy-
pus ban on building
symbolize
s � �" merica a
� is growing more lenient
apartheid protestors
recent events are am m-
B
students joining a
nationwide anti-
icheduled for
tmpuses this month
exPev ighe i tent
rities
seems I a in a numbei ol
fge officials - getting
- �rs observes
ird Knig f the American
frica i U
ps coordinate can .
i
1 exas aW Illinois, I i
I
all
5 - .t se 5
' � tl
. -
x rs
reak up
anty"
often
e flims struc-
d fre-
an-
p.
risks

' - seem less
�� rig the pro-
it's
iin carr
Nessei sjv
tmselves
i
recent

i
� �
( a s m
are se
do
ga st Sou
sample,
i I s luthern
part
Ha . Buck
' i ding
Missoui
i' vA.ds the
' M had eer brought
iga st pro-
� Ma lack Watring
� the campus police
Nearb Illinois refiled trespass-
igainsl 16 students
m pus pi tesi last
- '� I ended four.
Dan � . h - which refused t
- i lipl as to five protestors
g �is imposing stricter
. .iphnar rules �, -r to
i .ition with � idents,
kesman Alex Huppc says
s �� think it's no accident
getting tough and
g at the same time. "Ad-
lo not want to seem
be buckling in to students
" i andler of the
versitj ol Utah's Students
. ainst Apartheid
�� umpuses thai disciplin-
ed ahti-apartheid students last
� ek, Johns Hopkins and Illimos
:l i iuled to reconsider
estiture soon Missouri
me $5 million
tock in firms with
S
M
ial
(Derations
� schools sa thev"re
� : iwn to maintain order
not to avoid looking
re surrendering to pro-
wishes
filed s(targes against nine
� rs suspending four of
m � because "we cannot allow
the disruption of university ac-
tivities and buildings says
associate Provost I inda K
1 Timer.
The disciplining was especially
nti �versial because, a dav
before sentencing the anti
apartheid students, the same Yale
committee rescinded the proba
tion of a student who last spring
had passed out flyers ridiculing
gas
"On one hand. (Yak) en
courages tiee speech at all costs
complained Sarah Pettil oi Vale's
i av lesbian Coop "On the
other hand, the suspensions el
fecuvcly take voices out o( cii
dilation "
But the anti apartheid students
disrupted Yale operations, while
the anti ga) student didn't,
1 orimei explains " I he students
who staged the sit m would not
leave when thev were asked, and
would not allow people to do
then work "
Johns Hopkins Presideni
Muller also savs he was living to
maintain order when he forbade
students to build a shanty outside
a trustees' meeting, and then sent
police to arrest them when they
tried to build one
Sept. V.
1 pon u onsidering,
some
as well
anvwav on
MulU
dropped the charges against the
students, and appointed a com
mittee to write campus free
speech and protest guidelines
Not wanting to wait,
lohns Hopkins student
as threatened protestors from
Vandei bilt have contacted
Utah's (handler tor help in
preparing legal challenges to then
school's crackdowns.
In September, C handler's grou
won a lawsuit aganst Utah 1'resi
dent (hase Peterson, who tried
to force it to dismantle campus
shanties Peterson said the sr
ties, insistently vandalized and
frequently firebombed, had
become satetv hazards
A federal district ,
however, ruled dismantling the
shanties would violate the pro
testors' right to free expression
Now seven I Inivei sity I feji I
protestors four
students have sued t f
violating their right m
sent police to break
April, 9Hf) campus
ultimately arrested 18 p
The lawsuit seek
and injunctive relief against
University of Texas �
institutional rights
dividuals demonstratu . ,
apartheid
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I





I
H and
li
I
Change
protestors � four of them UT
.lent s�have sued UT for
violating their nght when they
sent police to break up their
April. 1986 campus rally, and
ultimately arrested 18 people.
The lawsuit seeks damages
and iniunctne relief against the
I mversitv of Texas for violating
constitutional rights of fa.
s demonstrating against
fid.
:esi

ices in this ad good thru
nday, November 9, 1986.
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NOVEMBER 4, 1986
Page 7
Turner Shines In 'Peggy Sue
ByEDTOSHACH
S�rt�l I � tm CwalWa
Peggy Sue (Kathleen Turner) is crowned queen of her hith �hnni' YiT MBB
Married the story of a housewife who getsTchance . e�rT.? h . H0- ,D Sue �
(Now placing at Plaza Cinemas.) " desti"y sh ��urm to 1960.
77ie Review
Hynde's LP Slick
What docs a depressed mother
with a failing marriage do, given
the opportunity to go back in
time to her senior year of high
school? What can she change?
These are questions Francis Cop-
pola deals with in Peggy Sue Got
Married. Despite several fine per-
formances and some excellent
cinematography, his answer
seems to be "nothing much
Kathleen Turner plays the title
role in the Tri-Star film; Peggy
Sue is a mother of two, reluctant-
ly attending her high school reu-
nion where she is crowned reu-
nion queen, passes out from all
of the excitement and wakes up
as a teenager in 1960 � her senior
year. Knowing that her slimeball
husband will eventually leave her
for another woman, she must
decide whether to marry him all
over or develop relationships
with guys she passed up, like the
class math and physics genius or
the intense, revolutionary young
poet.
The best thing about Peggy Sue
Got Married is the quality of per
formances turned in by a fine cast
including Nicolas Cage, Barry
Miller, and most notably,
Kathleen Turner. Turner is
flawlessly convincing as the con-
fused Peggy Sue, who's lost in
nostalgia and trying furiously not
to blow her second chance.
Cage, as Peggy Sue's husband
Charlie, and Miller, as the math
nerd who grows up to be a suc-
cess, each handle roles that in-
volve a 25-year age change with
competence and style. Cage is
particularly resourceful; his
Charlie is sometimes ridiculous,
sometimes suprisingly pas-
sionate, but always a creep.
The movie is utterly convincing
in its depiction of 1960; it ac-
complishes this through relentless
detail but also manages to cap-
ture the appropriate subtleties of
mood.
Although inclusive of some
above average, often funny
dialogue, the screenplay by Jerry
Leichtling and Arlene Sarner pro-
vides most of the reaJ problems
with the film. The story seems to
try to cover too much, and doing
so resolves nothing. Miller's
character is dealt with way too
lightly as a teenager to be worthy
of the weight given him in scenes
with a contemporary setting, and
this is a problem with several
characters to a lesser degree.
Charlie is never given room by
the script to deserve the sympathy
that it solicits for him, and the
plot never bothers to explain
Peggy Sue's grandparents'
strange, supernatural belief in
time travel.One scene where her
grandfather's men's club tries to
send her back to the future
(apologies to Spielberg) comes
way out of left field and the en-
ding leaves you with too many
questions to achieve the quiet
resolve it shoots for.
All in all, the movie is
frustratingly close to the quality
movie it could have been. As in
horseshoes, almost sometimes
counts in movie-making but in
this one it just hurts too bad.
Darn.
Minges Rocked By Fogerty
B D. A.SWANSON
M.ff Wnwi
The Pretenders � Get (lose
(Sire)
Love and Rockets Express
(Bigtime Records)
For better or tor worse, ii
seems like all of the good old
rock and rollers are gi w rig up,
mellowing out, and turni
Just look ar Mick Jagger, Elvis
Costello, David Bowie. David
Byrne and now Chrissie Hynde.
Not that ihe aren't still ail very
talented mists, but they do iaca
n.atfrrrTor market consetenis.
Such ft the case with Hvnde's
atesl album, Get Close. (Con-
sidering she is the only remaining
member of the original
Pretenders we'll call it her
album.) Nearly all of the grit and
soul of The Pretender's first
albums are gone � buried under
slick songwriting, slick musician-
ship, and even slicker production
work.
All of this blatant bias against
the new band aside. Get Close is
an album brimming with hits.
The smooth ringing "When 1
C hange My Life the heavy bass
rhythms of "Dance" and the
Hall-and-Oats-ian radio hit
"Don't Get Me Wrong" all beg
for airplay, and they deserve it.
The tunes are all enticing and
seductive, and Chnssie's vocals
have hit on a new femininity over
ho: old torn-boy ways. But.
while they are driving, they are
not driven.
In places ("Light Of The
Moon "Tradition Of Love
and "Room Full Of Mirrors")
the old Pretenders sound does
come through effectively, hut the
promise of the title left me very
dissappointed with the product.
Alter chastising Tom Scholz for
swindling the good Boston name
1 guess 1 really ought to get onoT
( hrissie for selling the soul of the
etenders for her own gam. As a
album Get Close would have
ived high marks in this col-
umn despite the slickness. It is, to
be - .re. a verv mature sound.
One special note, however. The
final cut on the 1 P. "Room Full
01 Mirrors an old Hendnx
jver, is fabulous. Featured on
Ibis .song only are Malcolm
Foster on bass and Martin
Chambers on drums. Both are
veteran Pretenders and their
presence on this cut is obvious
enough to overshadow the rest of
the album. If anything legitimizes
the use of the Pretender name it
was this one song. Buv u for that
reason.
In our continuing search for
really fine debut releases we
stumbled across a new band call-
ed Love and Rockets and their
faintly glimmering I P, Express.
WZMB's Ddt: Elliott seems to
have taken something of a shine
to these unlikely fellows, but
upon repeated screenings, 1 just
can't seem to work up all that
much enthusiasm.
Granted, they are very good at
harmony, broad keyboard and
guitar chords and carefully
groomed guitar distortion; there
just doesn't seem to be anything
all that new here. In a nutshell,
Love And Rockets is a synthesis
Bv PAT MOLLOY
? alr'tiinmi Kditor
For fourteen years John
Fogerty has been attempting
to quell rumors that he would
reunite his super-band of the
sixties, Creedence Clearwater
Revival, and for the past
decade, he has been trying to
prove himself to be a
creditable solo musician.
Saturdav evening in Minges
Coliseum, in front of a modest
crowd of about .1,000, Fogerty
laid to rest any doubts concer-
ning his ability to perform by
himself, and any question
about a possible CCR reunion.
He took the stage
stereotypically dressed in a
black shirt and black pants.
-Ar! �i?nJe handana adorned
his neck. Greeting the crowd
with a quick hello, Fogerty
dispensed with the drawn-out
salutations and launched into -
a riveting version of "Mr.
Greed off his Centerfield
LP.
The song deals with a long-
running feud between Fogerty
and Fantasy Records' Saul
Zaenz. Early on in CCR's
history, the group signed a
contract with Fantasy that
allowed them only minimal
royalties. Fogerty now refuses
to play any music having to do
with that band because only
Fantasy Records would
benefit from it.
After that particular dedica-
tion, Fogerty ended the tribute
with "Zanz Kant Danz off
the same album. The melodv
and the rhythm (due in no
small part to the finger-cutting
licks of bassist Neil
Stubenhaus, and the soulful
thrust of back-up vocalists
Donny Gerrard, Bobby King
and Willie Green Jr.) were
finely-tuned and catchy, but
the lyrics were blatantly ac-
cusatory � "Zantz Kant Dan
but he'll steal your money
Watch him or he'll rob you
blind
In these songs, Fogertv
belies the bitterness he feels
toward Zaenz by pointing a
finger and laughing. Cute, but
perhaps he should let dead
dogs lie, and simply get on
with life.
After finishing these songs
Fogerty seemed more calm, as
if a long-retained tension had
been released, and he chatted
with the audience (albeit brief-
ly). continually thanking them
for "making this comeback
possible
Spinning a yarn between
chosen guitar licks from his
comeback hit "Old Man
Down the Road Fogerty
worked the already frenetic
crowd into an uproar before
plunging into what was
possibly one of the best ver-
sions of that song ever heard.
Even the horrific accoustics of
Minges couldn't restrain the
audience from dancing in the
aisles.
He then kept the up-tempo
mood with a slick rendition of
"Centerfield Sporting a
guitar in the shape of a
See ROCKER, page 9
Artist Tells With Visual Jazz
See LOVE, page 9
By MICAH HARRIS
MarrWtttn
He mixes expressionism with
cartooning to create a potent con-
coction which explodes over the
page in staccatos, sustains and
improvisations: visual jazz.
Cutouts, children's scrawling,
paintings, caricatures and white-
out mix and swirl in a illustrated
stream of conciousness:
dangerous waters, for there is a
method to his madness.
His name is Bill Sienkiewicz,
and like the last name, the man is
unique in the fifty-some year
history of graphic storytelling.
Not that Sienkiewicz is original
in the strict definition of the
term. He draws inspiration from
Picasso, cartoonists Ralph Stead-
man and Ronald Searle, jazz
musicians and animation greats
Tex Avery and Chuck Jones.
Many comic art fans love him,
probably many more hate him;
but in either case, he refuses to be
ignored.
Sienkiewicz's early work gave
no hint of what would follow in
less than a decade. He was initial-
ly an imitator (and a fairly poor
one) of the late 60s and early 70s
comic book legend, Neal Adams.
Ironically, Adams was adored for
bringing "realism" to comic art
� although it was cartooning
masquerading as realism all
along. Sienkiewicz's current
work, however, is as diametrical
to Adams' as possible.
Sienkiewicz has stated that he
doesn't draw things as thev look
but how they feel. He is no longer
concerned with rendering precise-
ly every wrinkle in clothing or
every single beard stubble and
nothing more. He wants to ex-
press characters' minds and emo-
tions through symbols, color and
stylization.
His work in Marvel Comics'
Moon Knight presents a good op-
Performance Artist
To Speak On Rape
portunity to watch an artist's
evolution since it was his earliest
work (appearing first in The
Hulk) and ran for roughly
twenty-five issues of the subse-
quent Moon Knight regular com-
ic book.
As mentioned, Sienkiewicz's
early work was that of a second-
rate Neal Adams. With Moon
Knight's move from magazine to
comic book format,
Sienkiewicz's work began to
metamorphose. A minor but
significant change at this point
was his beginning to incorporate
other artists work besides
See GRAPHIC, page 8
found bound is just one of many works to be displayed in
'Rape a show which will go on display with an opening reception
in Gray Gallery Friday at 8 p.m.
�.m� Grflto RHcur
Gray Art Gallery is very pleas-
ed to present a live performance
and a slide-lecture by New York
performance artist Jerri Allyn.
The lecture, "Out In Public
will take place Friday at 7 p.m. in
Jenkins Auditorium. Following
Allyn's lecture there will be an
opening reception at Gray Art
Gallery for the month-long
display of the national traveling
exhibition, "Rape
On Saturday, Allyn will give a
performance, "Raw Meet and
participate in the symposium on
rape being held at Jenkins
Auditorium. Jerry Allyn has been
creating audio works and perfor-
mances since 1982. She strives to
create humorous works based on
her own social insights. In "Raw
Meet the artist tells stories to
the accompaniment of multi-
layered audio tapes of voices and
music. The stories are about
"different nations women and
love
In 1984, Allyn was awarded an
NEA Artists in Residence grant
in L.A. to produce Love
Novellas, a cassette and book.
She is a 1985-86 NEA New
Genres Fellowship recipient, an
appointed NY State Council for
the Arts Visual Arts Panelist, and
a member of Interaction Arts.
She developed parts of "Raw
Meet" with Interaction Arts
members Bill Gordh, Joe
Lowery, and Debra Wanner
when the artists received an NEA
Interarts Grant and NY State
Council for the Arts funding to
produce a collaborative work.
Jerri Allyn considers herself a
feminist artist. She lived and
taught in Los Angeles as an arts
administrator at The Women's
Building, and office manager at
Astro Ariz, publisher of artists'
books and High Performance
magazine. Last season Allyn was
Program Director at Franklin
Furnace in New York City, and is
currently working as Lily
Tomlin's production assistant on
Broadway.
fi1' r P"0� �rtUt from New York mm
slide lecture Friday at 7 p.m. in Jenkins AudTtoVw SL??"1 �
will participate i� the symposium ZhiS!?RJ� �
V





NOW MM K �� IMKo
NORTHCAROLINA
fASSOC.ATION
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
SCHOLARSHIP
Announcements
PSI CHI
' � A
s �"� ourageo �
OMEGA PSI PHI
� '��. " B GPA .
' n eftei � ��,
- .
A - .
POLITICAL SCIENCE
STUDENT S ASSOC
I
H P t W S
Graphic Style
Earns Artist
Admiration
1 � - . '

d �
?d an I
MiHtn Knigh
t
j �
� lht. - Mutants I

Voon Knight
ice f a 1
t �' 1utani hi
g th
oi images.
� mn
M.kid brother couJd
t�d � " i draw
v-l ler'
11 . � i tevil . m
1 ven pat
uni was thai
e, kne
f hi rafl before he
r lies Despite
c his work wai
haphazard or ar-
ii eni work -
this phase
'�" � 'pmeni Ii; ,
with Frank Millet
-( Ihirk Knight), he has pro
i gra el featuring
Daredevil and an eight
limite I sei ies featuring
' � ninja assaM
'enure Oil the
book
�th the graphic
and the limited series is a
tg printed on slik. quaiit
ei The stories are hi men for
u a I audience and are as
; v ho dramas as adven
ies Sienkiewicz ii
ite i (i 'iinterpoints to the ac-
tion described in Miller's scripts
pposed to a redundant depic-
tion of narrative. This, combined
with his pschoana!tical render
ing of characters, makes both the
Daredevil and hlektra stories a
demanding, but ultimateK reuar
mental exercise.
In these pages, we are privileg-
ed to see the "comic" book
rranscend its genre and enter into
�he realm of art, if only for a
brief moment
' �' . " ,
I N 4 I
I
- �
-
LDSCLUB
��-� . . wondered � , m v
' � really �"n! Mormons? Find ,mi the
' swei io ih,s quMi.w ani many more on
Wed Nlv Jth from � 30 7 � p m ,n roi �
M.n oeni-a An, questions you have
� � an answei B' tg a friend For i�,f.
' � atiOn taM 752 g4fJ7
BETA KAPPA ALPHA
'mancia nanaoen en I fls . � �
� rt Hcr.ny on We1 N St. �, t
in Mmaenhati ,00m r2 w.nn,i. q
� � �� I'f'Son m,nw, ,ro,� Vva. ho.j,
� v US3 ireer, in banking All m
� ��uontj a-e en,ougf, to ����
CORAL REEF
DIVE CLUB
The CORAL REEF DIVE CLUB �
meetina ThulM8, Nov 6 �, 4 p m in
Menaenhaii room 24a The club trip Io Rafl
ivanri Nov 7 � te � ussed Me"il,e-s
areefKOurageotoafieno New member v ; �.
wli be atteptecl at th,4 mating
ECU AMBASSADORS
The will be a �un e.e. ui�( council
meet.ng on Wed . Nov J at 15 p m ,n rfJOm
21 M MenrlenhaM
ECU AMBASSADORS
1 '�. �- �, 11 tie a general meet rvg 01 Weo
Nov 12 �t I) p m m the Mull. pwi
R . vno:enh�ii Also � nee reaas
lor the saa sf Conference t - a' 4
pm in Ihe same . onrr Br .ng morr, '�� A"
nassa Jot sweatsr - ��
STUDENTS FOR AMERICA
S F A will be having a memberini, v
through .he mon.r & No. M,r, ng,
helO in AAenrjenhali rrxfT, 2M at 7 p m a
steJ persons a � . �� � a"eno p
sen. members are en. our.gea ,r.
ALPHA E PSILON OILTA
There �nii re a meeting t �l 1' 1 r
ton.ghi tor pledge and 00' 'egvia' me' �
wii be at 7 p m An art aretcome
OAMM
DAAAAA iO'un�i Ageirvtt AAeo MBMaraj ,
M"9 tormed Our purpaae .� to fount-
M�DO lAAotheri Against Druna r .�- 1
,? . H "es �g. 1 eeoed Hi taa.ng me ar.r.n
priv leges m, i. am mi,ont at .upwi ,
iDunjAmf. n, Our f.rt'stance it agam�.
mothers a. v ng on va'ium and ansy m see
01 NUt d'ug shoua oe banned 'c peo M
�� jo.e age
"JBeSSF The supermarket with
GROCERY FEATURE
PRICE IN Greenville NC
Excluding Meat. Produce.
Deh. Bakery & Continuity
Bonus Items Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With H M B I I
You Wr Will IP m ' 1
Quality � ML IV il
tvllEvflUFef:rTIVE THROUGHSAT "OV 8ATSAV ACENTERIN
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES
M I fja . a aa ��.�-rvjni iu LIMI 1 UUANTITIf s
WilM-HOHSI
plus
Double Coupons
Paper Towels
38c
big
roll
M � ' A WITH AN ADDITIONAL
V Ifl MORE PURCHASE

CREAMY
Dukes Mayonnaise
78
MARKET FRESH
5 LBS OR MORE
Ground Beef
TfOc
12 OZ
can
M" Nl A Ih AN ADDITIONAL
$1000 OH MORE PURCHASE
AMP6EL L S
�I 1st M � � ��
Stokely Vegetables
3 100
14-16 oz. 1
cans I
ASSOR1ED
ASSORTEt
Oodles
of
MTED
8 2b
11 "101
PKq
A4P
FAMILY PACK FRESH
Fryer Breast
lb.
�AIM
ITU
p�q FREE
OW! TRIM GRAM FED- BEEF � FAMJLV PA -
Pork Beans ss I00 Tyson Entrees
Noodles jj 1� Dole Pineapples 89 Cubed'steaks
ASSORTED
.igrit I
Lrvely
STOKElV
THIN TRIM GRAIN f ED BEEF
Tip Roast
100 PURE FRESH ANY SIZE PKG
Totino's Pizza
'C 85
�� . IARTERS
99c a Yogurt
park
Shedd's Spread jj 100 Catsup
J2 oz
btl
Busch
Beer
$3.99
2 Meat Franks
W f
FAMILY P .
1" Ground Round
pnuH�NKSi.inm, saii icifl-
I Young Turkeys
THIN TRIM GRAIN FED BEEF
88c Sirloin Steaks Ber 2s9 Turkey Ham
-J99
1"
IAMIIY PAC FF1ESM FRYf B TMK1MS OP
gg TMAN�SNJAlt � .HS ti,p �nrPACA FRESH fRfRrM,GHS OP
79� Fryer Drumsticks � 99
UDOY DINNER STYLE SMOKED
Bone lean
1
49
��� F�pti, Pepsi
�, Mountain Dew
Pepsi Colo
2 Liter Bottle
AGPXATGVTlOEA
0�AY AT AtP
JUICY SWEET
12-12 oz. cans
I Honey Jo
BEARi
$1Q
GOOD ONLY IN Green.II NC
GOOD ONLY IN �����. NC
REGULAR
Pet
Ritz
A&P � TOPPING
Pie Shells
� TOPPING
Handi Whip
JS" OFF LABEL � QUAKI
Quick Grits
CHEESE FOOD
Kraft Slices
2
pkq
'2 oz
cln
A&P
W S�Rice
LIBBY
79c Corned Beef
I
GOLDEN RIPE
UULUCItMlft
b 99c Bananas 3
CRISP CAUFORNIA
129 ST Lettuce
lbs
12 oi
can
each
bunch
Free Turkey
NORTH CAROLINA � GROWN
5 ftrt- PUNCHY NUT-HONEY GRAHAM
98c Oh's Cereal -s- 159 Sweet Potatoes I 99s
pkg
BONUS BOTTLE
IC I
pkg
rs HersheysSyrupy 139 Greens
iocai u.ro�h COLLAPO ru�mPSA.�r u .��r
DELI SPECIAL
ORDER YOURS EARLY'
Holiday
Turkey Dinner
'�-IO fiaftwy
tb'lf COOfcM:
2t COrnbf0
IXhpumpi C"
dinner
'4
BAKE SHOPPE
OUR VERY OWN
CREAM CHEESE � RASPBERRY
APPLE � WALNUT
Coffee Cake
purchase a
coffee cake and
receive a 30" off
coupon 900O on
�"� ea
JUICY FLORIDA
RED OR WHITE
Grapefruit
IN STORES WITH DELI ONLY
� 20 Oval
Meat Platter
3 Piece
Carving Set
6 Piece
Steak Knife Set
FREETURKEY
X Ova. War Ptane.
5 P�ece Carving Bjj
I Prace IBM KMM Si
OWN SUNDAY 7 A.M.�11RM. �"�"v" v
CLOSE SAT 11 PM
703 GREENVILLE BLVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS
A
( ast mrmrx
Love And U
( oni
Rocker Sti
i
v
V
CLIFF
Seafood House a
Popcorn Shrimp
Hourv
- NEWLY REM
HNKr IHI 1
gran
p
Hours are I
some nig
from l�
v
Pi





IySTCAROL,NlAN
NOVEMBER 4, 1986
"ORTH CAROLINA
SHSASSOC.AT,ON
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
SCHOLARSHIP
'����� North c'l �ccptM tor me
1"l�J,n,h�r en,or�ment officer
,et " s-r,H w D��ty who deceased
� j mXmacve in '� 35S
ADp'caonr;8 ,0 �r'0"1- or
POLITICAL SCIENCE"
STUDENT'S ASSOC.
' � � �'0b�jPW,i,(a!Slien(tS,
H PER S.
Departmental Meet.nu HPERS Ml Ptly
"����� mtwdlrt �,ys Ea �
'� 10 2pm M.no Room u?
Graphic Style
Earns Artist
A dmiration
Continued from page 7
Adams' into his own. The first of
these artists was Stan Drake of
the newspaper soap opera strip,
"The Heart of Juliet Jones
Suddeningly, Moon Knight's girl-
Friday and girlfriend, Marlene,
made a quantum leap in charm
and sex-appeal.
Toward the end of the Moon
Knight run, Sienkiewicz began
bold experimentation with the
medium. He incorporated white-
out in his finished art while
others only used it to correct
mistakes and dropped color from
particular panels, once even
rendering an entire page in char-
coal.
His careful approach to comic-
book page composition began at
this time. He constructed panels
to give a page "music beats
and rhythms. A page of discon-
nected, tiny panels equals a stac-
cato. One image taking the whole
page is a sustain.
After leaving Moon Knight,
Sienkiewicz temporarily left
graphic storytelling to concen-
trate on painting. During this
time, he underwent more artistic
growth. Once again, he was in-
fluenced by other artists but he
was now drawing from attitude
as opposed to style.
This became evident with his
return to drawing comics in the
pages of The ew Mutants. Early
issues in this sequence picked up
the tone of the last Moon Knight
issues. But in the space of a few
issues of the ew Mutants things
became even more radical.
Sienkiewicz was shattering the
rules with his caricatures, styliza-
tion and cacophony of images.
Here, he lost many readers
who made reproachful comments
such as "My kid brother could
draw that good or "You draw
like James Joyce writes
However, what these readers did
not take into account was that
Sienkiewicz, like Joyce, knew the
discipline of his craft before he
began breaking rules. Despite
surface appearance, his work was
methodical, not haphazard or ar-
bitrary.
Sienkiewicz's current work is
the culmination of this phase of
his artistic development. In col-
laboration with Frank Miller
(The Dark Knight), he has pro-
duced a graphic novel featuring
Marvel's Daredevil and an eight-
part limited series featuring
Elektra, a spin off ninja assasin
from Miller's tenure on the
Daredevil comic book.
Every page of both the graphic
novel and the limited series is a
painting printed on slick, quality
paper. The stories are written for
an adult audience and are as
much psycho-dramas as adven-
ture stories. Sienkiewicz il-
lustrates counterpoints to the ac-
tion described in Miller's scripts
as opposed to a redundant depic-
tion of narrative. This, combined
with his psychoanalytical render-
ing of characters, makes both the
Daredevil and Elektra stories a
demanding, but ultimately rewar-
ding, mental exercise.
In these pages, we are privileg-
ed to see the "comic" book
transcend its genre and enter into
the realm of art, if only for a
brief moment.
Announcements
PSICHI
LDSCLUB
There will be a meeting for all Psi Chi
member on Wed Nov 5at4pm Everyone
is encouraged to attend
OMEGA PSI PHI
Omega Pv Phi ,s having ,ts 3rd Annual
Achievement Week Awards AH Minority
Students with a GPA of 3 0 or better should
submit a letter to the fraternity stating their
classification, major, hometown and GPA
We will be accepting letters until Nov u. the
ceremony ,s Nov lath The address is P o
Bo 3014, Greenville, care of co) Omega
Psi Phi incorporated, or for more informa
tion contact any member of the fraternity
Have you ever wondered why Mormons
are really called Mormons? Find out the
answer to this question and many more on
Wed . Nov. $th from a:30 7:30 pm in room
213 m Mendenhall Any questions you have,
we can answer Bring a friend For further
information call 7S2 (407
CORALEEF
DIVE CLUB
The CORAL REEF DIVE CLUB will be
meeting Thursday, Nov. t at p m ,n
Mendenhall. room 7 The club tnp to Radio
island Nov 7 i will be discussed Members
�re encouraged to attend New memberships
will be accepted at this meeting
ECU AMBASSADORS
There will be a general meeting on Wed ,
Nov 12 at Sl$ p m in the Mufti purpose
Room of Mendenhall Also, committee heads
for the SAASF Conference will meat at 4
pm in the same room Bring money for Am
bassador sweatshirts!
BETA KAPPA ALPHA
The financial management association
will hold a meeting on Wed . Nov 5th at 4
P m ,n Mendenhall. room m. Mitchell G
Barnes, personal manager from Wachovia
will discuss careers in banking All in
terested students are encouraged to attend
ECU AMBASSADORS
There will be a full executive council
meeting on Wed . Nov. 5 at $: 15 p m in room
2� of Mendenhall
STUDENTS FOR AMERICA
SFA will be having a membership drive
through the month of Nov Meetings will be
held in Mendenhall. room 230 at 7 pm All in
terested parsons are invited to attend Pre
sant members are encouraged to come
ALPHA IPSILON DELTA
There win be a meefine, to P Ml at �
torignt tar ptedgaa ana) our ritatjlar �Hi
will be at 7 p.m. AH prp watcewta
OAMM (OrwnHs Aewtoa MM Mahar�)
being farmed Our anre,eai is �a counter
MAOO (Mothers A�tot Orvna. Orhyars)
which has succeeded M laktoaj the ejrtnajng
privileges away tram mintens at reiawKiia.ni
young Americans Our first stance IS �ainn
mothers driving on veiium and affcy the sale
of this drug should fed I
middle age
wssracitj The supermarket with
GROCERY FEATURE
P�rCESEFFECTrVC THROUGH SAT NOV � AT SAV-A-CENTMM
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT OOANTITrES
PRICE IN GfMftviiV NC
Excluding Meat, Produce,
Deli, Bakery A Continuity
Bonus Items. Bring Current
Kteek Food Store Ad With
Vbu. We Will Match
Like Items or Equal
Quality.
REGULAR � BUTTER
�Bjam aajpjfv ejajeM aaaam � i"i��ii i u liwi i UUANTITIES
WAKIfflOIJSI
KICKS
I
plus
Double Coupons
See store lor details
nsco
Shortening
CAMPBELLS
Pork & Beans
ASSORTED
�T Noodles
ASSORTED
3oi 100
pfcgs 5
Torino's Pizza r 99
IN QUARTERS
Shedd's Spread it 100
Busch
Beer
$3.99
Tyson Entrees
SLICED � CRUSHCO � CMUtm � in JLHCE
Dole Pineapple
ASSORTED
T Yogurt
STOKELY
Catsup
pack
32 oz
Ml
2"
89
1
88
Meat Franks
12-12 oz. cam
GOOO ONLY IN Green11. HC
Diet Pepsi, Pepsi
Free, Mountain Dew,
Pepsi Colo
99 �
2 Liter Bottle
GOODONLr IN G'
1 lb �i"1
Pg FREE!
THIN TRIM GRAIN FED BEEF � FAMILY PACK
Cubed Steaks , I99
PRE THANKSGIVING SALE' 10 LBS 4 UP
Young Turkeys � TS15
THIN TRIM GRAIN FED BEEF TOP
Sirloin Steaks BooT" 2s9
JUICY SWEET
1"
THWTRTM GRAIN FED BEEF
rip Roast
ICON PURE FRESH-ANY SIZE PKG
Ground Round � 1
FAMK.Y PACK FRESM FRYER TMKJMS OR
Fryer Drumsticks 99
CUOOY DINNER STYLE SMOKED
Turkey Ham
Sonata�' 1
lb I
Honey Jo
Florida Oranges! bear �� -
100 mo
REGULAR
E Pie Shells
A4P � TOPPING
Handi Whip
35- OFF LABEL � QUAKER
Quick Grits
CHEESE FOOD
Kraft Slices
2�
phg
12 oz
cln
5 lb
pkg
69
79
98
A�P
GOLDEN RIPE
SS,Rice 5- ggc 3
lbs
LIBBV
each
bunch
1"
69
CRISP CALIFORNIA
Corned Beef 2r 129 ST Lettuce
CRUNCHY NUT- HONEY GRAHAM NORTH CAROLINA � GROWN
Oh's Cereal "&� 1� Sweet Potatoes I 99
BONUS BOTTLE
16 oz
pkg
1QA � LOCAL OaOWN � Cl
Hershey's Syrup? 139 Greens
DELI SPECIAL
ORDER YOURS EARLY'
Holiday
Turkey Dinner
each
dinner
IN STORES WITH DtUONlY
BAKE SMOPPt
OUR VERY OWN
CREAM CHEESE�RASPBERRY
APPLE � WALNUT
Coffee Cake
Pu'i ar .i
(�'�re Mrti
�ee.�r )0� ,
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i .
Cast members deft to right: v��t sUsan
the EC'l Plahouse production of 'Mas
Love And Rocke
Continued from pant- "
of some of th� most solid
tionaJ rock e heard come
of a studio in a while. B .
same time, so what.
Two songs strucl
though. Stretching fn i
mainstream of the album
teresting white-h
"Ball of Confu
rhythm isn'T too hea at
vocals jab from the sp
There is also a funnj
reminiscence of the mid " �e-
disco sound in some of the gur
licks.
"Yin And Yang And The
Flower Pot Man" also has
Rocker Sti
Continued from page 7
baseball bat, Fogei
lead that would hae n
Chuck Berrs wimper Picking
is certainly one .
strong points.
-
Slowing downCthe Mistering1
pace during the two-hour-long
show. Fogerl . :
pair of Rhythm and B
classic Wilson Pkkette's "I
Found I ove
Cook's "Sootht Me " Re-
played these tw songs
funk, iaz perfrx
n ' i rig up the si
Fogertj rocked
track ol his latest a bum, Eye
of the omhie Turning -
hasn deterred -
reaching th n
wrenching g at:
solid clarity. He showed
can go from the subtler) � the
bass "Change
Weather" the neck-
stretching falsettos in -Zom-
bie" with ery little probk
CLIFF'
Seafood House am
Washington h gr.wa. NC 33 Ext G
Phone
iPas: R:e-
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Hours 4:30-9:30 Ml
- NEWLY REMi
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BASKETBA1 I CO.
Greenville Recreation ana Par
The Greenville Recreation & Pa-k
for 10 to 14 part-time basketball coacj
gram. Applicants must possess some
'Skills and have the ability and patience t
plicants must be able to coach younj
basketball fundamentals.
Hours are from 3 PM to 7 PM. Moil
�ome night and weekend coaching. Ttj
4Vom December 2 to mid-February. Salj
Applications will be accepted from NJ
47. Contact Ben James at 752-413 exi
ff





ALPHVIPSILONOILTA
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IHJ f am . Ah-M INIAN
NOV! MHJ k 4 19M
Play By Renowned South African Fugard
To Be Presented By Playhouse Next Week
Cast members (left to right: Scot Slusarirk iHn�v � �� �
the Kl Pla house orori Jtk� �r � m , 2 .1 and Cur!is Jones,n �he�rMl for
mr rv i rianouse production of Master Harold and the boys '
Love And Rockets Too Hazy
tOINmlvw
Master Haroldand the boys,
an autobiographical play by
renowned South African
playwright Athol Fugard, will be
presented by the ECU Playhouse
Nov. 12 through 15. Perfor-
mances will begin at 8:15 p.m. in
McGinnis Theatre.
Master Harold is about a fami-
ly�a white teenager, Hally, and
his off-stage parents � and
about a friendship between Hally
and one of his family's black ser-
vants. The action takes place in a
tearoom in Port Elizabeth, South
Africa, on a rainy afternoon in
1950.
In the course of the play, which
begins on a light and merry note,
the main character (Hally) comes
to grips with his true feelings
towards his father and his closest
friend, Sam, the black servant.
The production will be directed
by Cedric Winchell of the ECU
Department of Theatre Arts
faculty, and will feature three
ECU drama students: Scot
Slusarick, a sophomore from
Asheville, as Master Hally; Cur-
tis Lee Jones, a junior from
Williamston as Sam; and Sidney
S. Horton, a Plymouth senior, as
Willie. Karen DiBrino, a senior
community arts management ma-
jor from Morganton, is stage
manager for the production.
"As an actor, director and
playwright, Mr. Fugard is obsess-
ed with the idea of 'finding the
truth' through an image found in
a single 'living moment on the
stage said Sally Morgan,
general manager of the
Playhouse. "The climax of his
works emerges from a shifting
pattern of emotions that gradual-
ly increases in strength
throughout the plays
The humor and the intimate
relationship between Hally and
the black servants Sam and Willie
give "extraordinary force to the
climax of Master Harold she
said.
Fugard, who descends from
both English immigrant and
Afrikaans South Africans, is fre-
quently considered an anti-
apartheid, political writer; a
favorite theme in his works is the
plight of ordinary people caught
up in social, political and racial
forces they cannot understand or
control.
Special dialogue coaching for
the ECU performance was done
by Dr. Helen Steer of the ECU
speech faculty. Choreography is
by Patricia Weeks of the ECU
dance faculty.
Tickets to Master Harold are
available at the Playhouse box
office in Messick Theatre Arts
Center, telephone (919) 757-6390.
Continued from page 7
� some of the most solid tradi-
aJ rock I've heard come oul
t studio in a while. But at the
same time, so what.
rwo songs struck m ear,
� ugh. Stretching from the
nstream of the album is an in-
teresting white-boy-rap called
"Ball of Confusion The
thm isn'i too heavj and the
vocals lab from the speakers.
- also a funm little
liniscence of the mid-70s, pre-
disco sound in some of the guitar
licks.
"Yin And Yang And The
Flower Pot Man" also has a
more powered punch. The com-
bination of a 'chucka-chucka'
guitar rhythm with a crooning
Harmon) is ver appealing. Too
bad these nicely flowing bits
aren't the rule throughout.
I ove And Rockets appear to
be somewhere on that hazy line
between hit success and cut-out
wasteland. Give them a chance,
though. I've been known to be
wrong before. Besides,
Dangerous Dave likes them.
That's it for this edition of The
Review. Keep your ears tuned to
the 7 and watch for The Reiew
every Tuesday. Vinyl is where it's
at.
Rocker Still Jams
Continued from pam 7
baseball bat, i ogerty stroked a
lead that would have :
Chuck Bern wimpei Puking
is certainly one of Fogerty's
�ng poii

v ng down the blistering
d . ing the two-hour-long
� . Fogertj touched on a
ol Rhythm and Blues
ics: Wilson Pkkctte's "I
I ind I ove and Sam
ks "Soothe Me " He
ed these two songs
funky, jazzy perfection.
Winding up the show.
I gert) rocked on the title
rack of his latest album. Eye
oj the Zombie. Turning 41
asn'1 deterred Fogcrty from
reaching those throat-
Arenching high notes with
solid clarity. He showed he
can go from the subtlety ol
bass "Change in the
Weather' to the neck-
stretching falsettos in "Zom-
bie" with very little problem.
1 ogerty summed himself up
quite nicely in an interview
the Vews and Observer,
saying It's like a guy who's
22 years-old comes out on
stage with me for each show
John Fogerty has never sound-
ed better.
Opening for John Fogerty
was Delberi McClinton, who
has developed somewhat of a
"cult following" faithful to
his jazzy, horn-filled rock.
McClinton seemed totally
out of place in Minges
however, trying to guess the
tastes of the crowd. He would
joyfully rock in a trumpet-
filled euphoria one minute,
and sink to depressing lows the
next.
The only sahagable part of
his show was his horn section
even on his most famous
hit, "I ivin' it up for Your
1 ove" had to be saved by the
brass. Thankfulh. they played
for only 45 uneventful
minutes.
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Barj
Was ngton Highway (N.C 33 ExtGreenv.He. North Carolina
Phone 752-3172
(Past Riverbluff Aptsj
Popcorn Shrimp
Hours 4:30-9:30 MonSat.
$325
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ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
S203 bortion from 13 to 18 weeks at
additional com Pregnanc Tesi. Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling For
further information, call 832-0535 (toll free
number 1 800 532-5384) betwe i 9 a.m. and 5
p m weekdays General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
BASKETBALL COACHES
Greenville Recreation and Parks Department
The Greenville Recreation & Parks Department is recruiting
for 10 to 14 part-time basketball coaches for the winter pro-
gram. Applicants must possess some knowledge of basketball
skills and have the ability and patience to work with youth. Ap-
plicants must be able to coach young people, ages 9-18, in
basketball fundamentals.
Hours are from 3 PM to 7 PM, Monday through Friday and
some night and weekend coaching. The program will extend
from December 2 to mid-February. Salary rate of $3.46hour.
Applications will be accepted from November 1 to November
17. Contact Ben James at 752-4137, ext. 262.
Ma�raiajoa Irim
Burl Ives, the man whom Carl
Sandburg called "the mightiest
ballad singer of this or any other
century is coming to ECU to
appear in concert at Wright
Auditorium. Ives, who has
popularized folk music for five
decades, will perform at 8 p.m.
Wednesday as part of the 1986-87
ECU Department of University
Unions Artists Series.
Burl Ives is not a man who
happened into singing and enter-
taining. In Jasper County, Il-
linois, where he was born, Ives
acquired local fame as a child
entertainer and evangelistic
singer. His professional career
began in the 1930s, and from that
beginning, he blossomed into one
Wright
of America's most popular folk
singers.
After Ives' start in the 30s, he
soon became a top recording ar-
tist popularizing the folk song.
His career continued in radio,
nightclubs and in concert. He
starred in 13 Broadway shows
before going to Hollywood to
make Smokey, and creating the
role of Big Daddy in Cat On A
Hot Tin Roof. During this time,
Ives received an Academy
Award. For his supporting role in
the 1958 film, The Big Valley,
Ives won an Oscar. He also
created the character Walt
Nichols in "The Lawyers" seg-
ment of "The Bold Ones
Because of his love for nature,
Ives lent his time to the "Johnny
Horizon Program the Depart-
Dance Auditions Tonight
HI PlKliiwRitmr
Auditions for the East
Carolina Dance Theatre have
been scheduled for tonight in
Dance Studio 114 in the Messick
Theatre Arts Center. The audi-
tions will begin promptly at 7
p.m.
The East Carolina Dance
Theatre produces an annual con-
cert each year. Ballet, jazz, tap
and modern works are
choreographed by ECU dance
faculty members Patricia Per-
talion. Mavis Ray, David
Wanstreet and Patricia Weeks.
The dance concert is a popular
event in the Playhouse schedule
each season.
ECU students, staff, faculty
and area residents are invited to
participate. All those wishing to
audition should be warmed up
and ready to dance at 7 p.m.
Dancers should wear leotards or
footless tights and bring their
ballet, pointe, jazz andor tap
shoes to the audition.
Weeks is interested in jugglers
or dancers who also juggle for
her choreographic work this
season. If you have these skills,
you are invited to attend; be
prepared to perform.
The Dance Theatre Concert is
scheduled for February 27, 28
and March 2 and 3, 1987, in the
McGinnis Theatre at 8:15 p.m.
ment of Interior's plan for clean-
ing up the nation's lands.
After being in front of the
camera, he went back on the con-
cert stage in 1974 at the Broad-
moor Hotel in Colorado Springs,
redebuting in the same place he
had given his farewell perfor-
mance 25 years earlier. In 1975,
Ives was given copyright owner-
ship to "The Blue fail Fly Ives
has shared his songs with au-
diences in England, Alaska,
Israel, Australia, and New
Zealand. He and his wife
Dorothy live in Montecito,
California, in an estate surround-
ed by sprawling gardens.
Ives' performance will be
presented in the newly renovated
Wright Auditorium. With its ex-
traordinary acoustics, excellent
sightlines and comfortable, plush
carpeting and seating, Wright
Auditorium is being termed the
finest concert hall east of
Greensboro. It has been
renovated at a cost of more than
S3 million. The Series also offers
reserved seating, so patrons are
urged to purchase their tickets
early to obtain the best seats
available. Those individuals who
have purchased season tickets
will be invited to meet Burl Ives
after the concert.
Tickets are S6 for ECU
students and guest, $6 for youth
(high school and under). $10 for
ECU faculty and staff, and $12
for the public and at the door.
For more information and
tickets, please call 757-6611, ext
266.
Bui Ives
CAPP
Central American Peace Project
CAPP will meet Wednesday evening, 7:30
p.m. at the Methodist Student Center, 5th
Street. All ore welcome. For more info call
830-0349.
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
Award Winning Ice Cream
321 East 10th Street Greenville, N.C. 27858
Call 758-4896
Buy One Blend-In or Sundae
Get the Second
PRICE!
One Coupon Per Order, Please. Coupon Expires Nov. 10
Attention
Early Christmas Shoppers!
Tom Togs
WAREHOUSE SALE
October 27 thru November 15
Monday - Saturday 9:30-6
� � Nothing over $10.00 ��
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"tnF
TROCADERQ
& Famous Names That We Cannot Mention
Wayfarers
Ebony, Tortoise,
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All other Ray Bans
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We have the largest selection
of Ray Bans in Greenville.





IHl l AST t AROl INIAN
Sports
Harrison T 7r.Yr fig Conference
SUMMHIR ��. I98A
Page 10
F!Ii Seniors To Lead Hoopsters In '86
Hrnun A am(al i. � -�� ��
I K , � J � HUMIHT - SOU Fhott) L.b
EC I basketball coach Charlie Harrison Has optimistic about his
.Ten ,hf UPCOmin SeaSOn i0 y�W Press con"
If there is one word to describe
the ECU basketball program in
their upcoming '86-87 campaign,
it would have to be optimism.
After last year's 12-16 record,
and 6-8 conference standing
(good for fourth place in the
CAA), Pirate coach Charlie Har-
rison is greatly looking forward
to the new season.
"If we can stay healthy and get
good chemistry, we're going to
have one heckuva team Har-
rison said yesterday at his season-
opening press luncheon. "We are
very positive and excited about
our prospects for the coming
year
The reason for Harrison's op-
timism is due to a strong senior
class, with a blend of talented
newcomers. Five seniors will oc-
cupy Harrison's roster � ex-
perience that has been lacking in
the past. Among those five are
the three tn-captains, all of
whom are returning starters.
Second-team all-conference
selection Marchell Henry, Keith
Sledge and I eon Bass return
along with other seniors William
Grady and Derrick Battle.
The only junior on the squad is
talented newcomer Theodore
"Blue" Edwards, a transfer from
I ouisburg Junior College.
Four players, transfer Harold
ECU Gridders Lose Game
fS2�U0 Time Remaining
The lateral nirn��l �-�� u :i ii �
he four Pirate home
football games in ! icklen
Stadium were dec ded in tl c lasi
S ' pla as Saturday's contest
tinsi the Universitj
N ithern Mississippi was no e-
cepi n
I nfortunately for ECU, they
iwa on the short end of a
nd (with no time left on
2I defeat. Charlie
ei tered :he game (with
48 remaining) and then drove
Pirates 80 yards in 12 plays.
' W;liter Wilson on an
achdown pas, cutting
LSM's lead to 20-19. The Bucv
the win as I ibretto
rod Mi jy for the two-
� �� �'�'� .i:i 'he ap-
ling points
�� wever, the Golden Eagles
ded in a way that we still
' - ire out. After downing
buck Berleth's ensuing kickoff,
SM had just six neks left to try
-L into scoring position. An-
Irew Anderson's bomb was
.aught by Lyneal Alston at mid-
: and he advanced the ball to
the ECU 10, before lateraling to
"eammate Randolph Brown, who
carried the pigskin into the end-
zone.
The lateral turned ou! to be il-
legal (forward) and the Eagles
nere flagged for the infraction.
The Pirates were forced to take
the penalty and give the Eagles a
chance at a game-winning
fieldgoal.
Rex Banks' 31-yard attempt
split the uprights as Southern
Miss shocked the 18,14" fans in
Ficklen as the Golden Eagles
squeaked out of the stadium with
a 23-21 win.
"I've never been through
anything like that before ECl
coach Ar: Baker said in a posl
game interview. "1 don't exactly
know what to say. But it's fair to
saj that we are stunned.
"The onl explanation that the
referee gave was the gu made a
forward lateral and another
player scored Baker continued.
"We could either take the play or
the penalty and obviously, we
had to take the penaltv
L'SM head coach Jim Car-
mody, who formerly was an
assistant coach at North
Carolina, was equally surprised
with his team's comeback win.
"1 really thought that they
(ECU) had intercepted the ball.
They had two or three people up
there with us Carmody said
I
I
r
9�MB
following the play. "But all of a
sudden, I yneal (Alston) comes
running out of there with the
ball. 1 really don't know how he
caught it.
"We were hollering for him to
lateral the ball, which he finally
did Carmody continued. "It
vsas a forward lateralbut we
scored the touchdown so they
had no choice but to take the
penalty and give us the final
play
The Pirates got a big break ear-
ly as Flint McCallum's blocked
pun: resulted in ECU taking con-
trol on the USM six-yard line.
Rosewell Streeter returned the
blocked kick 4 yards to set up
the first touchdown of the day.
Travis kept the ball around the
right side and just got the ball
over the endzone from one-yard
out. Berleth added the PAT for a
0 Pirate lead with 9:31 remain-
ing in the first quarter.
Southern Miss then responded
with a 15 play, 70-yard drive that
ended on a Shell on dandy two-
yard touchdown plunge. Banks
added the PAT for a 7-7 tie with
just over four minutes left in the
opening quarter.
The Pirates answered on
another one-yard run over the
right side to put ECU back on top
13-7 as Berleth missed his first
point-after attempt of the season.
There was no further scoring in
the remainder of the opening
half.
See, SOUTHERN page 12
Men Hold
PurpleGold
Scrimmage
Pirate fans can preview the
1986-87 ECU basketball squad
this Thursday at 7:00 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum as ECU holds
their Purple & Gold scrimmage
game.
The Pirates open the season
Nov. 13 with an exhibition game
against the Brisbane Bullets. The
regular season begins Sat Nov.
29 at home against Edinboro
University at 7:30 p.m. Admis-
sion to the Purple & Gold game is
free.
J � KUMIIIT - �CU Phot. u.
Flint McCallum (46) blocks BUty Knighten's (39) punt in the first
quarter, setting up ECU's first touchdown.
Sports Fact
Tues. Nov. 4, 1923
Chicago's George Halas
picks up a Jim Thorpe fumble
and establishes an NFL record
by running 98 yards for a
touchdown against Oorang In-
dians. Halas coaches the Bears
for 40 years, and his teams win
an NFL record 325 games and
championships.
six
Brown, Manuel Jones, Jeff Kelly
and John Williams, comprise the
sophmore class for ECU.
Freshmen Reid Lose and
Tracey King round out the roster
for Harrison's Pirates.
Harrison feels that with the
returning talent and the crop of
incoming talent, the Pirates have
the ingredients to play with
"anybody on our schedule.
"We're drastically improved
Harrison said. "It's a combina-
tion of new kids and kids work-
ing hard in the summer to
prepare for the season.
"We have realistic goals as we
enter the season Harrison add-
ed. "We want to go to the con-
ference tournament and win it,
and then advance to the
NCAA's
While this statement may seem
a bit bold to some observers,
Harrison fully believes in his
squad's ability.
"I'm very positive. It's not a
song and dance routine he said.
"We are a good basketball team
at this stage of the season
Harrison has seen his seniors
grow and develop in their four
years here, and is happy about
the way things have progressed
for them.
"We had to throw them
(Sledge, Bass, Grady and Battle)
to the wolves their first year
Harrison said. "But those seniors
aren't any worse for it, except for
maybe a little scar tissue. They've
put in a lot of time to become
successful and they are all good
people and I'm proud of them
As for the conference, Har
rison, as well as the team, feels
that the Pirates can have a suc-
cessful season and that this vear's
conference race mav be a bit
more balanced.
"The consensus is to give it
(the championship) to Navy with
David Robinson, but their sup-
porting cast is going to miss Ver-
non Butler and Kylor Whitaker
You can't just replace two all-
conference players Harrison
explained. "The whole league is
going to be better. Any team can
beat anybody on a given night. I
hope and 1 expect that we are go-
ing to be in the thick of things
"We're looking forward to
playing senior Bass said at
yesterday's luncheon. "We
always look forward to those
(conference) games, especially
the top competition.
"You always want to go nut on
a good note � and we've (the
seniors) definitely paid our
dues Bass added. "This year.
we want to be smiling when we
walk off the court
Teammate Sledge remembers
well their (the seniors) first
season when things weren
cheerful, but said there's a dra
change in the players' attitudes
"Mv freshmen vear.
everything was a big question
mark for us We were map
tion where everyone had to plav
well for us to win, but we still
weren't sure we could Sledge
said. "Now ever y one
matured and we know if we p
well, we can beat anvone on
schedule.
"I'm verv optimistic about tl
season Sledge continued
we get some tvpe of chemist
we are going to be a very g
team. We have a lot ol talen and
just need to put it all together
The Pirate coaching staff
has some new faces as two new
assistants join Harrison's stafl
Stan l.ewtor comes to EC I
from Northern Nash H .
School, while John McCullough.
a former plaver under Harr:
at Oklahoma, comes i f c I
" m Southern Methodisi
University where he was a
volunteer assistant.
lee Talbot, who is in his se-
cond vear under Harrison,
been elevated to top ass .
while former plaver Tony Robin-
son returns as a graduate as
tant.
J.B HUMIHT tCU nw, l
Travis Hunter (5), a redshirt freshman, scores one of his tun m�rhrfn
into the endone. touchdow ns as he goes airborne to get the ball
Pirates Robbed In Controversy?
Play Explained By Referee
By MIKE SMALL
�ZM1 �huiui Sport Dtnrtor
The East Carolina Pirates
had a football game literally
taken away from them. After
an apparent 21-20 electrifying
Pirate comeback victory, there
were :06 left on the clock when
the referee made a controver-
sial call that will remain in the
hearts and minds of ECU fans
for a long time to come.
Here is what happended.
With under 2:00 remaining in
the game, the Southern
Mississippi Golden Eagles were
holding a 20-13 lead. Charlie
Libretto came in and executed
a masterful 80-yard touchdown
drive, and completed the two-
point conversion for the seem-
ingly 21-20 ECU victory.
There was :06 left on the
clock, however, and all the
Pirates had to do was kick off
and not let the Eagles score.
Chuck Berleth's kick was im-
mediately downed. The entire
stadium knew that the "hail
Mary" was coming. Southern
Mississippi's quarterback, An-
drew Anderson, dropped back
and threw the bomb in the
direction of Lyneal Alston with
four ECU defenders around
him. They all went for the
game-clinching interception,
but miraculously Alston emerg-
ed with the ball.
Alston saw that he was going
to be tackled, so he tried to
lateral the ball to his teammate.
He completed the lateral to
fullback Randolph Brown,
who carried the ball into the
endzone. There was a penalty
flag on the play because the
pitch was an (illegal) forward
lateral. After the penalty, the
Eagles were given a play after
the five-yard penalty was im-
posed. Rex Banks' kick was
good and USM won the game
After the game. WZMB
sports reporters Mike McVey,
and Mike Small tracked down
referee Paul Schmitt at his
hotel for an explanation of the
"If they accept the
penalty, Southern
Mississippi gets the
balland one
untimed down. If
they decline the
penalty, it is an
Eagle touchdown. M
�Referee Paul Schmitt
ruling. Schmitt said, there
is a foul against Southern
Mississippi, so East Carolina
gets the option of accepting or
declining the penalty. If they
accept the penalty, Southern
Mississippi gets the ball with a
five-yard penalty, and one un-
timed down. If they declined
the penalty, it is an Eagle
touchdown
However, if the man that
lateraled the ball was down
before the lateral, there is no
penaltv, no time on the clock,
and ECU would get the victory
Coach Baker said that his
players thought the man was
down before he lateraled. and
various freeze-frame camera
angles revealed his players were
correct.
When asked what would
have happened if the man
didn't score, Schmitt said,
"East Carolina would have had
the option of giving Southern
Mississippi one untimed down.
moving them five yards back,
or declining the penaltv and
there wouldn't be any time left
on the clock, so East Carolina
would have won.
"But according to the rules,
ECU's only option was to take
the penalty and try to block the
field goal because Southern
Mississippi scored Scmitt ad-
ded. "That's according to rule
Schmitt checked his rule
book and made sure he was
correct in his ruling - and ac-
cording to rule 3, Schmitt made
'be nght call. According to
what happened in the game
rule 3 is inconsequential to the
P'ay. It is also apparent that the
referees were watching for the
lateral. Consequently, neither
official spotted or realized
there was a tackled receiver
I he receiver was down accor-
d'ng to the replavs. but a
mistake in judgement, rather
'ban a mistake in rule inter-
pretation, robbed the Pirates of
their second victory.
Classifieds
PERSONAL
RANDALL So we n�ar , 0 �
be a transesMe fr0rr T'9nW,ja
Transyivama e tov
Love RAA TC a. m� r�, 0,
Ep 85 crew
ATTl
. al
HEYI WHO IS jomn vab
SMALL Btause nopoc. .
TO ALL MEMBERS OF
FORCE: Success �, fl .
destination Jane
THE
KA. TKE. LAMBDA CM) CHI O
ALPHA XI DELTA. TRi SIG AND
AOTT: We hop ,ou a 8C a v s. .
time at on- "11 Armgj
Basrt " Ov Ihmnki �
for mak.ng 'a immjr - .
Sig Eps
SORl
I
ci
TO THE KNIGHTS OF
S U BG E NI U S .
we're .�� -
Still WOrN &'�:
poetic standards
poets
TMI
FRESHMEN AND N
STUDENTS
during j
Please com
fice ma floor pytj cat
across �
DELTA ZETa Spaghefl
the De a �-
Nov 5 5 30 3C t
available a ��
St $2 50 sisl
Delta Ze'a
SIG EP PLEDGES AND THE
BROTHERS THAT
ENERGETICALLY PAR
TICIPATED a.
You gu,s shot,
aDOut go"9
Goioennea"s
SHARON P Paa-a s a -
And so as 'he cac ' 3e Car -
to see iOKj aga n v e B
THE BROTHERS AND PLEDGES
OF BETA THETA PI A
congratulate jae Re oe
one of the top soccer Daye's r
na'ion Keep up 'he goo- a .
TUXEDO RENTALS Z' ;ega
ana AOTT aates please :onta I
Reipei for Our complete fC'a rar
wear needs 757 0351
THE BETA PLEDGES R
flratu ate Oaudia i.pscomo or
ning the TV raffle
CLAY: You DetTer a' � � -
you put aown your pa�s Dec ay v
bOttle rr.ght get graooec T
-E
PI KAPPA PHI Aa A
O-nan :an-t f0il nanaie t? g
reai tape-ecoraer�ex'�-e -ope poo
icangev omitowmyne shoes
Those g.ris were usoo n�$r
This Space
Be Workh
You
Advertise n
The East Car oh
FACES OF
Tuesday, November
Downstairs Mei
FACES OF WAR, a 30
U.S. involvement in El S
and Nicaragua. On the Big
DUSChbi
America s Euro pea
WILLIAMSBURG VA s
over 200 s
tists act s,1
could he pa
Gardens T
and come $h - a
Audition Dates
GREENSBORO NORTH CAROLINA
Monday Novemba I " ip.m
University k. if
Elliott umve's v Can -
Cone Ballroom
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
Sunday Nowmbw Btti I2"4p.m
East Carolina vn ve'
A J Pietche- Racttari Ma
10th St at College h ?�
Note Dancers rnust tnng a prepared comttmtt
Cassette tapec muck D�i y





ters In '86
astic
les
still
S edge
is
our
good
and

.1" �'ECU
a
�t

A15 a
- ve

R
ivsy
fe
u
Ijfckf. �'JBti
J � HUMIIIT cu PMl
airborne to iel the ball
v Referee
and ac-
N ' " made
game,
sequential to the
� 50 apparen' 'ha1 -he
ferees were 'hatching for 'he
nsequently, neither
final pt!ed or reali?ed
as a tackled receiver
receiver was down accor-
i�n� to the replays, but a
"stake in judgement, rather
than a mistake in rule inter-
pretation, robbed the Pirates of
heir second victory
Classifieds
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 4 19m
11
RANDALL: So we bear you want to
tx? a fransvestite from Transexual
Transylvania We loved the show!
Love RM.TC. & the rest of the Sib
Ep 85 crew
ATTENTION PLEASE: To anyone
knowing ocr Halloween guest Glna
and Jennifer (Raleigh) please call
752 0127.
SORORITIES:
the Christmas
Chi man now.
Need a slave? Avoid
rush, buy an Theta
WORD PROCESSING AND
PNOTOCOPYINO SERVICS: Typ
Ing, resumes, term papers, thesis
Papers. $1.50 per page typing, 05t
photocopy per page. Call SDF Pro
fessional Computer Services Inc. 106
East 5th St. (near Cubbies), Green
vllle 752 3694
TYPING ALL KINDS: $1 25 per
page with paper. $1.50 per page
without paper. Call 752 2100 after 6
p.m
WANTED
HEY. WHO IS JOHNwTAR-
SHALL: Because nobody knows!
TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE
FORCE: Success is a lourney not a
destination Jake
KAPPA SIGS: Thank you for the
pre downtown Halloween gig We
had a blast. The Plkas
KA, TKE, LAMBDA CHI, CHI O,
ALPHA XI DELTA, TRI-SIG AND
ADTT: We hope you all had a scary
?.me at our "ist Annual Monster
Bash " Our thanks to "The Usuals"
�or making it a jammin' party! The
g Eps
SORRY BRAD: The AID contest at
The Attic on wed is for a bare "best
chest" not one covered by liod or
polo.
TO THE KNIGHTS OF THE
SUBGENIUS: We didn't give up.
ap re just bored of your iealousy
1 working hard to meet your
poetic standards. The classified
poets.
PI KAPPA PHI: Thanks to the
Alpha Phis and everyone else who
came to the party Friday. We have
an A team soccer game today at 4
and an A-team volleyball game
tonight at 10:30
FRESHMEN AND NEW
STUDENTS: The books you ordered
"ig the summer have arrived
P ease come by the Buccaneer of
ce 2nd floor Publications building
S( ross from joyner Library
DELTA ZETA. Spaghetti Dinner at
-be Delta Zeta house Wednesday
0 5. 5 30730 Tickets are
able at the door "801 E 5th
S2 50 � sisters and pledges of
�a Zeta
PI KAPPA PHI: The party before
downtown Friday was too much.
Eric Totty the "Atomic Dog"
himself was out of control. Bill, will
you be my White Diamond date?
How many of us were in that
bathroom? I'm mad at you Chris
Roman and you know why. Take a
ride on the WILD side.
SIG EP PLEDGES (AND THE
BROTHERS THAT SO
ENERGETICALLY PAR
TICIPATED): We loved the show)
guys should defmately think
about going on tour! Love, the
Goioenhearts.
PI KAPPA PHI: Jeff, Danny, Casey
The pig was great Saturday morn
mg. I can't beleive I made it Jeff
next time an ABC officer stops you
ano asks what kind of beer is in the
keg you're taking out of Fast Fare at
3 in the morning, don't say DRAFT'
No dogs allowed in Fast Fare.
SHARON P Parana's was great
Ana so was the cab ride Can't wait
0 see you again Mike B.
THE BROTHERS AND PLEDGES
OF BETA THETA PI: Would like to
congratulate Jamie Reibel on being
one of the top soccer players in the
h�1 on Keep up the gooo work
TUXEDO RENTALS. Chi Omega,
ana AOTT dates please contact jon
Reibel for your complete formal
wear needs 757 0351.
PI KAPPA PHI: 1 bad a vision, 1
saw the world burn and the seas had
turned red The sun had fallen, the
final curtain in the land of the dead I
shouldn't do it, the guilt tells me
why 1 ust can't stop it, 1 try and try
X rated demon that lives in my
head, hungry for bodge and he wants
to be fed. Breading laws, knocking
at doors but there's no one at home
Made your bed, rest your head but
you lie there and moan. Where to
hide, suicide is the only way out
Don't you know what it's really
about As I laid in the bushes Friday
night, the walls were moving as this
ran through my head! The M R
Brothers
THE BETA PLEDGES: Con
gratulate Claudia Lipscomb on win
ning the TV raffle
R. MARK: Thanks for all the good
times, l hope they last forever
Suuuieeee
CLAY: You better watch out what
you put down your pants because the
bottle might get grabbed T
SALE
pi kappa phi. What's wrong
O" a1- can't you handle it? Get a
res 'ape reco-jer next time I hope
3-get the vomit off my new shoes
tose girls were just foooo nasty!
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc Call
Anne at 752 3015 and leave a
message
FOR SALE: Alto saxaphone, Salmer
Signet, $600 and clarinet by Sa
Paree, $200 Call 75 7044
This Space Could
Be Working For
You!
Advertise In
The East Carolinian
FACES OF WAR
Tuesday, November 11, 7:00 p.m.
Downstairs Mendenhall
FACES OF WAR, a 30 minute film about
U.S. involvement in El Salvador, Honduras
and Nicaragua. On the Big Screen.
i
r
Busch Gardens
America's European theme park in r
WILLIAMSBURG, VA is conducting auditions for
over 200 singers, dancers, musicians, variety ar- w
tists. actors technicians, and supervisors You J(L.
could be part of the galaxy of stars at Busch f
GardensThe Old Country. So get your act together
and come shine" at our 1987 Auditions
Audition Dates:
GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA
Monday, November 10h, 12-4 p m
University of North Carolina
Elliott University Center
Cone Ballroom
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
Sunday, November 9th, 12-4 p.m.
East Carolina University
A.J Fletcher Recital Hall
10th St at College Hill Dr
Note Dancers must bring a prepared combination
Cassette taped music only r
� '
-Busch
Gardens
i: � �iti jiitf
An Affirmative ActionEqual Opportunity Employer, MFH
TYPING AND WORD PROCESS-
ING: Experienced secretary wIBM
computer and letter quality printer
can fulfill all your typing and
secretarial needs. Theses, business
letters, resumes and mailing labels
Call Donna at 355 6434.
SNOW SKIIS FOR SALE: Dynastar
course Slalom Sklis 190 length.
Have never been used. Retail at $345
will sell for $220. Call Jill 758-0164
NATIONAL COLLEGE
MARKETING COMPANY. Seeks
flroup to work parttime assisting
students in applying for credit
cards. Flexible hours and excellent
money. GREAT FUNDRAISER
Call Susie at 1 800 5W 2121
TRAVEL FIELD OPPORTUNITY
Gain valuable marketing experience
while earning money Campus
representative needed immediately
for spring break trip to Florida Call
Campus Marketing at 1 900 282 622,
GREEK T-SHIRTS: They're here!
ZBT will come to your houses this
week. Have $7 ready cuz you'll want
one! Blue, Red, Maroon, or White.
CR "DIOR Nice to meet you
(again.) Don'teven think you "spent
the nightl" Missed your singing at
p Bs Sunday. Rendezvous at
Beau's Wed. night?
CHEAP JEEPS: Can you buy Jeeps,
Cars 4x4's seized in drug raids for
under $100? Call tor facts today
602 837 3401. Ext S711
HANSON SKI BOOTS: For sale
men's model size 6' (7Vd 8 women)
ask for Abbey 758 2393
1 OR 2 ROOMATES WANTED: To
share a spacious 2 bedroom
townhouse apt for spring semester
Carriage House Apts ECU Bus ser
vice. Rent divided 3 or 4 ways Very
reasonable rates. Non smoker
preferred. Call 355-6642.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
To share 2 bedroom apt $i40montr
and Va utilities. 4 blocks from cam
pus Non smoker preferred Lori
7527396
NEW COSMETIC LINE: Now
available. Free color analysis for
limited time only to all customers.
For appointment call Laura, Beauty
Consultant 756 5920. Mon Sat 9:30-11
p.m. Sun ll 12 pm.
TUXEDOS: Anyone needing formal
wear this fall for any occassion
please contact jon Reibel 757 0351.
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED:
To share 2 bedroom apartment at
Tar River Estates, available now
Call 752 8305 after 4 30
ADMINISTRATIVE SECRETAR
TIAL SERVICES: Providing full-
time typing services to students and
faculty. Experienced in thesis,
research manuscripts and term
papers. Call 355 2950 for your typing
needs.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Experienced, quality work,
IBM Selectric typewriter. Call Lanie
Shive at 758 5301.
TYPING: Low rates. Proofreading,
grammatical corrections, to years
experience. 757 0398 after 6pm
INVASION STATUS: Now announc
ing the TRASHMAN Entertainment
Service. We have bands, we have
DJ's, we have belly dancers, we
have magicians, oh yes! we still
have the platters that matter, the
stax of wax, the mounds of sound
that go round and round. Remember
to dial 752 3587. Quality Entertain
ment at ifs highest.
TYPING SERVICES: If you have
papers, reports, etc. that need to be
typed 758 8934 between 5:30930
p.m. Very reasonable rates
FOR SALE: Large Rip Curl Wet Suit
1 year old, good condition Call
752 7295 ask for Greg
BASKETBALL COACHES: The
Greenville Parks and Recreation
Department is recruiting for 10 to 14
part time basketball coaches for the
winter program. Applicants must
possess some knowledge of basket
ball skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth. Ap
plicants must be able to coach young
people, ages 9 18 in basketball fun
damentals. Hours are from 37 p.m.
Mon Fri and some night ana
weekend coaching. The program
will extend from Dec. 2 to mid
February Salary rate of $3 46 hour
Applications will be accepted from
Nov. to Nov. 17. Contact Ben James
at 752 4137 ext 262
BASKETBALL OFFICIALS: The
Greenville Recreation and Parks
Dept is now recruiting basketball
officials for the men's winter basket
ball league interested persons will
be required to attend a series of of
ficiating clinics Games will be in
the evenings and the rate of pay will
be in the range of $9 12 per game If
interested, please contact Ber
James, 752 4137, ext 262
CAROLINA
GULF
1201 Dickinson Ave.
752-7270
We Guarantee Our Work
And Our Used
Tires � pu & Del. Avail.
Do It With is.
Wrwker Service
A. mc. Gnu, mmn bordo
FOR SALE: Subaru Station Wagon
1980 G.L. 100,000 miles. No engine
problems. $1600. Call Anne Simon
ton. 756 8040.
APPEARING
THIS
WEEKEND
AT
7f
TAVERN
FRI 7
SAT 8
COTANCHE ST.
'Ground Zero"
The Phantoms"
757-1227
ALL ABC PERMITS
' � aaaaa 1
PUT YOUR
COLLEGE DEGREE
TO WORK.
Air Force Officer Training School
is an excellent start to a
challenging career as an Air
Force Officer We offer great
starting pay medical care 30
days ot vacation with pay each
year and management
opportunities Contact an
Air Force recruiter Find out what
Officer Training School can mean
for you Call
TSgt Steve White
(919) 856-4012 collect
(station-tostation)

ATTENTION:
ALL COMPUTER SCIENCE () MAJORS
WITH COBOL EXPERIENCE WANTING
TO START A FULL-TIME CAREER IN
DATA PROCESSING IN JANUARY 1987
Tor equivalent degree)
Datronics Inc. is one of Americas leading soft-
ware consultancies operating from coast to coast. In
conjunction with one of our clients, we are consider-
1987 Tra,neeIntern Program to begin in January
With the security of full time employment plus a
benefits package that includes tuition refunds, free
health insurance and paid relocation, there is no bet-
ter way to start your technical career.
Following your successful completion of the in-
ternship program, you will have the opportunity to
enhance and continue your career with us at various
locations across the nation.
Call Agnes Zaragoza, or Joanne Sauer NOW at
(212) 867-0800 and forward your resume to:
datronics
675 3rd Avenue, 5th Floor
New York, N.Y. 10017
An Equal Opportunity Employ
inc.
i
I





i:
HI I s I i R il i
Ni I MM! k 4 m
Managers Unsung Heroes
H � AKOI , stice
Ni.�. � ill
w hen looking ai the E I
"hall team, one automatically
nks of the players and coaches
et there's a group that's vita to
he program that often goes un
ced -he football managers
otball managers are
� 'v ped as Waterboys,
owelboys and ballboys In reali-
ty, managers aren't thai at all.
tme responsibilities are onh a
of their job The most tune is
pern before and aftet the games
Managers are responsible foi
ball equipment. I his includes
seeing proper fittii g, safet)
ipkeep
�V Baker knows how
' -in ' man ace: s are.
Managers do an awful lot
��� � "We could arr
pi a tice 01 gam with
arles " hoo" lustice, a
iate � EC I . serves as
Southern Miss
Rallies Back
In Win
( ontinued from page 111
A-x Bai ks added a pa r of I eld
1 ard i i
: ate
x H trd Southern
was cary
� ��� � � d m,
x i i � : .
i e I s1
� ead. 20-1 v with ill!
� ��� be played.
� was a bit
ted
Athletic Department Equipment
Managei lustice supervises a
group ol student managers made
up ol seven males and one
female He feels it takes a special
tpe ol person to be a managei
"The must be hardworking
and dedicated as well as be able
to get along with people Justice
said " I he are responsible foi
getting things done and are able
to gel satisfaction out ol othei 's
success b knowing the) had a
�mall part to do with it
One such person is head stu
dent manager, Stuart Blount
junioi physical education major,
Blount. has been with the EC I
tootball team for three years
After managing in high school,
he felt working with EC I
athletics was a good opportunit)
"I've been given the chance to
form a unique relationship with
the coaches, players And
trainers he said. "It's
ECU Football
sO
mething Til benefit from in
le
future.
Managei s have a countless
number ol jobs. Being a manager
is a veai round job. From das
one ol preseason practice,
through to the end ol spring prac-
tice, thev devote man) hours each
dav to then duties. An average
preseason dav consists of about
12 hours. During the season, five
to six hours is spent carrying out
theii job. In addition, after each
practice, one manager has "laun-
dr) " I hat's tour hours of
washing player's practice clothes,
coaches' gear and towels so thai
they'll be read) tor the next day.
One night before each game,
you can find the managers taking
more time to check equipment
and clean the Pirates' helmets.
It it's an awav game, the
managers must pack for the trip
such things as; game uniforms,
all equipment, game balls, media
equipment and the "Pirate
Also they pack extra uniforms
and ram gear for unexpected
situations.
SM - Ban
sed a
erted
indei
ttes rema g. I
em ol Wesi
ad
Bak
i was
Junior linebacker Nin�,n smith ,44. led the PirXwitE H tackle?
East Carolina Coins ft Pawn
Corner 10th A Dickinson Ave
Wc Buy Gold & Silver
JNSTANT CASH LOANS jfi
l� U Transactions Confidential & JfP
Buy � Sdl � Trade
752-0322
� :m.m p.m. M
� e e k s
Do What
You Do Best
South Park
Amoco
MOCO
itomohve Sen ice
�56MI23 24 hrs.
MO Greenville Bhd
APPLICATIONS NOW
BEING ACCEPTED
FOR SGA TRANSIT
MANAGER.
228 Mendenhall
November 4-10
DON'T MISS THIS
OPPORTUNITY TO TALK
WITH US ABOUT
OUR CIVILIAN i
FINANCIAL riANAGEflENT
CAREER PROGRAH
Evp595TiVi
TT
.
i ' feat e h re a select group of entry level accountants, auditors
ano budget analysts for a two year developme- I i training . r �ram lhal
eads to responsible dec.s.on-mak.nq positions in financial management
L.beral arts and other majors are strongly encouraged to apply for budget
analyst positions Accountants and auditors need 24 hours ol accounting
We will be on campus on November 5. 1986 I heck w.tl ,our P iceme I
Office for time and place
Come talk with us or write tor more information
COMPTROLLER OF THE NAVY
0 . onice of Career Management Code NCF 3
Crystal Mall 3 Room 119 Washington DC 20376-5001
(202) 695-3587
Application deadline February 1 ' �
After awa games, everything
must be unpacked and prepared
for the next vseek of practice.
Third vear manager,hns
lohnson lakes care of the "issue
room where players receive and
turn m issued uniforms and
clothes. The Industrial
technology major came to ECU
hoping to play football but dead
ed he wasn't prepared. He didn't
want to stay away from football
so he went to the next best thing
� managing.
"I realized I enjoyed 11 and
could contribute more to the
team this wav Johnson said.
Coach Baker agrees.
"Managers contribute so much
to our program. The are a vital
pan of any program and I think
that this group is probably one of
the best Ie ever had the chance
to work with
Ion Miller is a part of tnat
group. Miller, a broadcast jour
nalism major, managed football
in high school. Wanting to stay a
A
part ol athletics, Mill-
been a managei at EC1 t
years.
"Being a managei is .1 stepping
stone said David lernigan, .1
sophomore finance majoi who
has heei 1 an 1(1 Hball
managei foi two years "I kie the
chance to meet coaches and
future contacts as well as kee
with what's going on in sj
Jamie Dillard, like all of the
managers, keep- will ,p
through Ins job. I he broad a
journalism majoi has been .
the program foi two -
"I've leai ned m re al
hall in the teu weeks I
working here thai I learne I
tour years ol playing I . I
football said Rocc � Val
physical education major a
has just begun his first yeai .is .1
manager "I enjoj footba md
want to . vi, h -� m la � 1 h
1 1 � '�� me a lot
Freshmen Dal 1 dv�. .1 I a
played high school football "1
love I ill bui 1 culdi
any nm ire Fhi a I an
around it
arolyn lustice, a sopl
lournalism majoi, wa
in spurts information B
m.i! igei he meets many pe
: learns a greal lea il
il ill and athletics Sh �
hei j � 1 mique experien
.1 female and hopes 11 �
table in 'he future
But tl vie is a 1.

1 � I .
v hi . ri 1 1 manacei �
iluabli '
it's recognized 1 1 big res
sibilits I'm really . ?
I've got i greal
11 1 jei
Hear Abby:
If you are a real
nurse then why
haven't you given us
that physical we've
been needing lately?
Signed:
The Co-Editors
A D VER TISE
In The East Carolinian
Sports Section
� ��� lllU
CAROLINA GULF
1201 Dickinson Vr
752-7270
( I Ttra In Town We p ; A
Dei
R88�n shoe Repair
Ul West 4th St.
Don ntowa Green vi He
"Shoe Repair Al The Very Best'
7SM2M
IF YOU WANT TO BE
A PHYSICIAN,
WE'LL PAY FOR IT.
TSgt Ken McCullen
' 0 9i 856-4130 collect
1 station-Jo- station i
a s
AVOID
CAll
Meet the MOID He loves
to rum your pizza He
makes your pizza cola
or late or he squashes
your pizza box so the
cheese gets stuck to
the top
With one call to D
P zza you ca a I ll �
NOID So when you w �
hot. delic ou! ; 1
pizza delivere I
than 30 minut
;loes it all
One Free
Topping
i . ��
�. �
i � � �� e topi
� . iui choii � FREI


Not va I a �� 1 .
I
I
I
I

I
I
S PIZZA
Serving West Greenville
and ECU Campus
758-6660
Serving East Greenville
75 996
HOllUS
� MM . I . ��
s
DOMINO'S
PIZZA
DELIVERS
FREE.





12 IHEASICAROLINIANNOVI M BJ K 4. 198
Managers Unsung Heroes
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Nprnh Writer
When looking at the ECU
football team, one automatically
thinks of the players and coaches.
Vet there's a group that's vital to
the program that often goes un-
noticed � the football managers.
Football managers are
stereotyped as Waterboys,
towdboys and ballbovs. In realt-
ty, managers aren't that at all.
Game responsibilities are only a
part of their job. The most time is
spent before and after the games.
Managers are responsible for
football equipment. This includes
overseeing proper fitting, safety
and upkeep.
Coach Art Baker knows how
important managers are.
"Managers do an awful lot
Baker said. "We could not carry
out a practice or game without
them
Charles "Choo" Justice a
graduate of ECU. serves as
Southern Miss
Rallies Back
Athletic Department Equipment
Manager. Justice supervises a
group of student managers made
up of seven males and one
female. He feels it takes a special
type of person to be a manager.
"They must be hardworking
and dedicated as well as be able
to get along with people Justice
said. "They are responsible for
getting things done and are able
to get satisfaction out of other's
success by knowing they had a
small part to do with it
One such person is head stu-
dent manager, Stuart Blount. A
junior physical education major,
Blount, has been with the ECU
football team for three years.
After managing in high school,
he felt working with ECU
athletics was a good opportunity.
"I've been given the chance to
form a unique relationship with
the coaches, players and
trainers he said. "It's
something I'll benefit from in the
future
ECU Football
Managers have a countless
number of jobs. Being a manager
is a year round job. From day
one of preseason practice,
through to the end of spring prac-
tice, they devote many hours each
day to their duties. An average
preseason day consists of about
12 hours. During the season, five
to six hours is spent carrying out
their job. In addition, after each
practice, one manager has "laun-
dry That's four hours of
washing player's practice clothes,
coaches' gear and towels so that
they'll be ready for the next day.
One night before each game,
you can find the managers taking
more time to check equipment
and clean the Pirates' helmets.
If it's an away game, the
managers must pack for the trip
such things as: game uniforms,
all equipment, game balls, media
equipment and the "Pirate
Also they pack extra uniforms
and rain gear for unexpected
situations.
In Win
Continued from page 10
Rev Banks added a pair of field
coals in the third period from 52
And 25 ards awa. to knot the
game al a 13-13 stalemate.
A 12-pIay, 80-yard Southern
Miss drive, was capped off bv
another Gandy touchdown run,
this time from a vard aw as.
Bank's conversion gae ISM
their first lead. 20-13. with 11:11
of the final quarter to be played.
The next nine minutes was a bit
uneventful as each team punted
once and USM's Banks missed a
field-goal tr.
However, with the Pirates' last
chance, coach Baker inserted
I ibretto into the game unh under
two minutes remaining. I ibretto,
in a drive reminiscent of the West
Virginia comeback, quickly mar-
ched the team downfield for what
seemed to be the winning
touchdown and two-point con-
version. But it was not to be. as
the final occurrences proved.
"I thought that we had in-
tercepted the ball at first Baker
said of the final pla of regula-
tion. "It was one of those fluke
plavs that you hope neer hap-
pens to you. bu: it seems like a lot
of bad things have happened to
us this year
The Pirates have an open date
this weekend as they pla host to
the Cincinnatti Bearcats in the
final home appearance two weeks
from Saturdav.
After away games, everything
must be unpacked and prepared
for the next week of practice.
Third year manager, Chris
Johnson takes care of the "issue
room where players receive and
turn in issued uniforms and
clothes. The Industrial
technology major came to ECU
hoping to play football but decid-
ed he wasn't prepared. He didn't
want to stay away from football
so he went to the next best thing
� managing.
"I realized I enjoyed it and
could contribute more to the
team this way Johnson said.
Coach Baker agrees.
"Managers contribute so much
to our program. They are a vital
part of any program and I think
that this group is probably one of
the best I've ever had the chance
to work with
Jon Miller is a part of that
group. Miller, a broadcast jour-
nalism major, managed football
in high school. Wanting to stay a
part of athletics. Miller has now
been a manager at ECU for two
years.
"Being a manager is a stepping
stone said Daid Jernigan, a
sophomore finance major who
has been an ECU football
manager for two ears "I get the
chance to meet coaches and
future contacts as well as keep up
with what's going on in sports
Jamie Dillard. like all of the
managers, keeps with ports
through his job. The broadcast
journalism major has been with
the program for two vears.
"I've learned more about foot-
ball in the few weeks I've been
working here that I learned in rtu
four years of playing high school
football said Rocco Valluzzi, a
physical education major who
has just begun his first year as a
manager. "I enjoy football and
want to coach somedav This
reallv teaches me a lot
Ereshmen Dal Edwards, also
plaved high school football "I
love football, but I couldn't pla
anymore This was I can still be
around it
Carolyn Justice, a sophomore
journalism major, wants a career
in sports information. Being a
manager she meets manv people
and learns a great deal abou'
football and athletics. She feels
her job is a unique experience for
a female and hopes it will be
valuable in the future.
But there is a lot more to be ob
tamed from the job. According
to "Choo" Justice, "Anyone
who works as a manager gains
valuable job experience because
it's recognized as a big respon
sibihtv. I'm really luckv because
I've got a great group ol
managers
Dear Abby:
If you are a real
nurse then why
haven't you given us
that physical we've
been needing lately?
Signed:
The Co-Editors
ADVERTISE
In The East Carolinian
Sports Section
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analyst pos.t.ons Accountants and aud.tors need 24 hours of accounting
We will be on campus on November 5.1986. Check with your Placement
Office for time and place
Come talk with us or write tor more information
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Application deadline February 1. 1987
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 4, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 04, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.505
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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