The East Carolinian, October 30, 1986






G
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.61 No. 17
Thursday, October 30, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
arculadOR 12,000
Counterfeit Licenses
x JON O JORDAN - The Photo L�b
J�te!�, Bre"S Bui'di"S s"m"im� �us� Pr�� for ��, ��, motorist but .bo
Survey Asks Students' Opinions
About Campus Traffic Problems
By TON FERGUSON
Staff Writer
Overwhelmingly, students
replied that inadequate parking
In a random survey concerning facilities for commuters and
traffic-related hazards and res,dents is the most prominent
nuisances on campus, par
t ic i pa t i ng ECU students
.inhered a vane'v i tionv
Their responses to "What do
vou consider the most dangerous
traffic-related hazards on the
ECU campus?" varied. The
most cited hazard concerning the
live of students or posing them
bodily harm was crossing the
10th St. intersection at the bot-
tom of College Hill Drive across
from the Brewster and Music
Buildings. The issue of bicyclist
ranked next as a traffic hazard.
Students indicated that bicyclists
crossing at intersections without
carefully observing the traffic of
cars or pedestrians creates a
dangerous situation. Students
also voiced other hazard con-
cerns. These included speedings,
one-wav streets, speed bumps,
obstructive traffic lines at the en-
trances to commuter parking
lots, commuter's "fighting" for
parking spaces, drinking and
driving, resident and commuter
parking lots at night, and sudden
stopping cars who drop-off
passengers.
The next question focused on
injuries sustained from traffic-
related accidents. These included
students as pedestrians,
bicyclists, and automobile
drivers.
Chris Avers, a former Aycock
Dorm resident, spoke about a
bicycle wreck in which he was in-
volved. Avers recalled, "1 was
going down College Hill one
morning on my bicycle, and I hit
a speed bump. When I hit the
speed bump, I lost control (of the
bicycle) and proceeded to hit a
parked car Chris suffered
minor injuries, but his mangled
bicycle had ridden its last
passenger.
Suzanne Liles remembered an
accident from her freshman year
that occured in the freshman
parking lot near West Campus.
"Another car (slipped out of
park) rolled back, and hit my car.
Because there was not adequate
space in the freshman parking
lot, that car had to create its own
parking space and my car was the
road block for that car and kept
it from hitting other cars
There have been several recent
pedestrian-automobile and
automobile-bicycle related ac-
cidents. However, due to legal
complications, students involved
have been advised to make no
comment at this time.
"What do you consider the
major traffic nuisance on cam-
pus?" was another question ask-
ed.
nuisance. Students offered sug-
gestions to rectify this problem.
Solutions included constructing
parking decks at the bottom of
the hill, redrawing parking space
lines so that additional cars can
fit into available lots now, mak-
ing more smaller spaces for to-
day's compact cars, constructing
additional parking areas that do
not damage the existing environ-
ment, selling special parking
cards for the parking deck that
would charge the student by the
amount of time he or she used the
facility, assigning parking accor-
ding to arbitrary classifications,
and better planning for future
parking facilities.
Other nuisances included cars
not giving the right of way to
pedestrians, low visibility at the
intersections between Ringold
Towers and White Dorm due to
the steep road, prolonged stop
lights, sudden stopping vehicles
dropping off passengers,
pedestrians walking out in front
of moving cars, students "runn-
ing down" fellow pedestrians
who are proceeding at a slower
pace, bicyclists on sidewalks, ob-
solete stop sign adjacent to the
English Annex Building, and
uneven grooves and bumps on
campus streets. The ECU campus
police were rarely mentioned as a
nuisance.
Solutions to these irritations
included providing safe bicycle
paths, relocating the stop sign ad-
jacent to the English Annex
Building to an adjoining intersec-
tion, monitor timing mechanisms
on stop lights, closing off some
streets for pedestrians only, pro-
moting student awareness and
courtesy toward other
pedestrians, bicyclists, and
drivers developing designated
passenger drop-off area, repair-
ing bumpy roads, and better
screening of ECU campus police
applicants.
Students responded positively
to "Would you be in favor of an
elevated crosswalk at the bottom
of College Hill Drive crossing
over the intersection of 10th St.
(Business Highway 6 .)
When asked "Would you be in
favor of the reallocation of tui-
tion monies or if necessary a
minimal increase of tuition to
fund a major project such as con-
structing an elevated crosswalk or
a parking deck? students in a
majority responded favorably.
This survey indicated the
students'of ECU interest in the
traffic situations on campus. Fur-
ther solutions should be directed
to the Student Welfare Commit-
tee of your Student Government
Association and or your State
legislature Representative.
By PSJUBIMIS
Twenty-one ECU students
were arrested Thursday, Oct. 23,
on charges pertaining to the
counterfeiting of and possession
of counterfeit driver's licenses.
The students were arrested
with a total of 45 violations after
an investigation by ECU Public
Saftey, Alcohol Law Enforce-
ment agents and state division of
Motor Vehicles agents.
Thirteen of the students ar-
rested were members of the ECU
soccer team.
According to Ronald Speier,
associate dean of Student Ser-
vices, those students were remov-
ed from the soccer team for "ac-
tions unbecoming to a soccer
player
Speier said the university has
taken no action against the 21
students and will not until the ad-
ministration has all the facts and
has proof that the students have
violated the university's student
conduct code.
"We want to have all the facts
before we proceed he said.
"The arrest was made by ALE
officers, they have the files, so we
probably will not know all the
facts until after the first court
date
Speier said the court date is set
for Nov. 5 in the Greenville
ECU Students Arrested
District Court.
"I can't say what action the
university will take, no one can
until we know the facts said
Speier. "It could be a reprimand,
fine, voluntary work, probation
or suspension �I just can't say
Officials said the investigation
began after a license�that was
found near the new classroom
building�was turned into Public
Saftey and found to be
counterfeit.
W.E. Brinson, assistant district
supervisor for the DMV license
and theft section was directed to
conduct an investigation. He said
the counterfeit Vermont and
Georgia licenses were being made
by ECU students and being sold
to students under the age of 21
for the apparent purpose of buy-
ing alcoholic beverages.
According to Brinson. the
equipment used to make the
counterfeit licenses was con-
fiscated.
He said James Christopher
Cole. 18. 205C Scott Dorm was
charged with counterfeiting a
driver's license, possession of a
fictitious license and four counts
of feloniously selling or offering
for sale counterfeit licenses. Brin-
son added Bradley Allan Frazier,
18. of 231 Garrett Dorm, was
charged with counterfeiting a
license, possessing a fictitious
license and displaying or
representing as his own a license
not issued to him.
Charged with one count each
of counterfeiting and possessing
a fictitious license were: Jeffrey
Arthur Corson, 18, 104B Scott
Dorm; Joseph Michael Rzepka,
18, 104B Scott Dorm; Robert
Meacham Phillips, 18, 319
Aycock Dorm; William John
Fitzpatrick, 18, 439 Jones Dorm;
Carl Andrew Walter, 20, 204 Elm
St Scott Starling Barbour, 18,
318 Umstead Dorm; and Melvin
Carlve Morris Jr 18. 208A Scott
George Thomas Brantley, 18,
106C Scott Dorm; Sean Patrick
Flynn, 17, 306B Scott Dorm;
James Edward Owens, 19, 202A
Belk Dorm; Paul McDowell Ken-
dall, 19,411 E. Third St Robert
Michael Santi, 18, 306B Scott
Dorm; Harry Jackson Carter Jr
18, 301 B Scott Dorm; Colin Mat-
thew Rawn, 18, 437 Jones Dorm;
Christopher Michael Lugo, 20,
205 Lewis St. and Paul Benjamin
Friednch, 19, 303 Garrett Dorm
were also charged with
counterfeiting and possessing a
fictitious license.
Charged with possessing a fic-
titious license were: Rov Francis
Andersch. 18. 208A Scott Dorm;
Benjamin Franklin Morton, 18,
231 Garrett Dorm and Marvbeth
McAllister, 19, 50" E. 11th St.
Police Prepare For Halloween Nieht
B THERESA ROSINSK1 nnviii. di i O
B THERESA ROSINSKl
SUff Writer
Ghosts and goblins aren't the
only things ECU students will
have to be aware of Halloween
night. Both Greenville and Cam-
pus Police are planning to tighten
security for the festivities.
In the ECU tradition, the
streets downtown will be blocked
off at approximately 8:30 p.m.
and will reopen "whenever the
crowd disperses according to
Sgt. C.B. Landreth of the Green-
ville Police Department. The
roads that will be blocked off are:
5th and Reed; 4th and Cotanche,
5th and Evans, and Cotanche and
Reed. Drivers should avoid these
roads after 8:30 p.m. Friday
night.
Over 30 officers from the
Greenville Police Departmen.
will be on-duty Halloween night.
"Officers stationed at the bar-
ricades will be checking persons
for the possession of alcohol
said Landreth. "No one will be
allowed through the barricades
with alcoholic beverages. The
containers will either be poured
out or the person will be turned
away whether the container is
open or closed
"We don't anticipate any real
problems. The goal of the depart-
ment is as little contact with the
public as possible. We just want
the students to leave the beer or
liquor wherever they are coming
from said Landreth.
The University Police are
working with Greenville Police in
tightening security for the night.
"We'll be watching the residence
halls very closely especially the
female dorms said Chief Rose
of Campus Security.
"We will especially be wat-
ching for property damages and
minors in the possession of
alcohol said Rose. "Minors
found in possession ot aiconci
w ill be dealt with according to the
� mi 111IIP " said
Rose
"We" It fUlliy fo do everything
we can in the hopes that everyone
can have a safe and happy Hallo-
ween said Rose.
New Name For Queen
Not The Only Change
B pt�Fo?4Mls
According to Tonja Howell,
being named Miss ECU 1986 is a
"honor and privilege
"I was really very excited
said Howell. "Also shocked
Howell, sponsored by the ECU
Gospel Choir, was crowned Miss
ECU at the Homecoming game
Oct. 18. She is a senior from Fort
Washington, Maryland majoring
in business management.
Betsy Davis, chairperson of the
Homecoming Steering Commit-
tee, said there is a difference in
the Homecoming Queens of the
past and this year's Miss ECU
"We wanted to give the queen
more than just the day she is
crowned and the day she gives up
her crown said Peters.
She said the name was changed
from Homecoming Queen to
Miss ECU in order to create a
complete change from the former
years.
"Tonja will act as a public
relations person for the Universi-
ty, we think the name Miss ECU
goes along with her new duties
explained Peters.
She added that the office of In-
stutional Advancements will
determine what duties Howell
will be responsible for during the
year.
"Right now we are thinking
about Tonja being present at
alumni activities and maybe the
Universities Summer Orientation
program said Peters.
"I think the change was a good
idea said Howell. "This will
give me a chance to become more
involved and is also a good
chance for alumni to work with
students.
As Miss ECU, Howell received
a crown and trophy.
The voting system was also dif-
ferent this year. In the past,
students have only voted once. At
that time they could vote for
eight contestants and a winner
would be determined. This year
students were able to vote twice.
The contestants were narrowed to
eight after the first vote and then
students voted for their first
choice.
"I think this way is better
said Peters. "It seems to be a
more intense process
Tonj. Howell was crowned the first Mb WC$7S&i�Z
game on Oct. 18.
ON THE INSIDE
dtlri?ls4 �Horror movies reviewed in time
Entertainment7 for Halloween- see ENTER-
ports10 TAINMENT page 7
Announcements5
ClassifiedsZZZm -Golf team takes third place-
see SPORTS page 10
r
1

1





JQgEASTCAJlOI ISIAN cH TOW k U�. (9M
University Seeks New Doctorate Program
ECU Sew, Burrau
East Carolina University con
Jjnues to hold aspirations to
become a full doctoral degree-
granting university, ECU
chancellor John M. How ell told
the UNC Board of Governors to-
day.
Dr. Howell, who will retire
next year, told the governing
board of the 16-ampus Universi-
ty of North Carolina system that
"an aspiration will continue after
I leave for the classification of
East Carolina University from a
comprehensive university to a
doctoral degree granting universi-
ty and for authorization to offer
doctoral programs outside the
medical school
He said such authorization
may be sought for inter-
disciplinary programs involving
the medical school and depart-
ments of the academic division
"when faculty expertise is present
and in disciplines in which there
is a demonstrated need
Under its present classification
as a comprehensive university in
the UNC system, EC I otters
doctoral degree programs in five
basic medical sciences in the
medical school and has a
cooperative doctoral program in
educational administration with
N. C. State University.
Howell said ECU's academic
division "is looking ahead to e
panded graduate programs
"ECU is now coming into its
own Howell said in a report to
the Board of Governors which
touched upon all aspects of
ECU's growth and development
from its beginnings 79 years ago
to its present enrollment ot
14,460 which is the third largest
in the state.
"After veats of solid building,
this is East Carolina University's
time to flourish, to draw upon its
rich resources, and to enhance its
programs as it provides leader-
ship for a region that is on the
threshold of its most challenging
era Howell said.
He said ECU has the necessary
ingredients in a sound heritage
and the "willingness and ability
to move ahead
The chancellor, who is com-
pleting 30 vears of service at fast
Carolina as a professor, depart-
Rape Lecture Planned
Frederick Storaska. popular
lecturer and author, will present a
lecture entitled How To Say No
To A RapistAnd Survive on
Monday, November 3, 1986. 8:00
pm in Hendrix Theatre on the
campus of East Carolina Univer-
sity. There is no admission charge
for this lecture.
Storaska has lectured on rape
prevention for 19 years. In the
summer of 1964, he broke up a
gang rape of an eleven-year old
girl. Combining his karate and
psychology background.
Storaska dey eloped a unique
methodology of rape prevention.
He replaced fear with knowledge,
guilt with understanding, and
doubts with alt ernatiy es.
Storaska has developed an ap-
proach to teach these skills and
attitudes which he has presented
through lectures to over a million
students at mote than a thousand
colleges and universities. He has
authored a book and a movie that
have become authoritative
sources of rape prevention for the
United States Department oi
Defense, United States Justice
Department, National Crime
Prevention Institute, and hun-
dreds of law enforcement agen-
cies throughout the world.
Storaska's presentation is the
opening event of a week-long
Sexual Assault Awareness pro-
gram ai East c aroiina I ni ei sit).
The lec'ure is being sponsored by
the Student Union Forum Com-
mittee.
THE WEEKEND WORK
THAT PAYS OFF 3 WAYS FOI
COLLEGE STUDENTS.
1. ith the v i.I. Bill, you ov-t up to $5,040 ti t
college, j-s yx u jjo to o illeye.
2. mr i me wekend a month (usualh rw S lu ur
days), yxxj earn over $75 per weekend to start.
. Y(mj train in a useful skill which could he most
helpful in your ci ilian career.
All this in an Anm Reserve unit near where you
goto college. It's training in an Anm schtxil, then
returning home to serve one weekend a month, usu
ally plus ru i weeks annual training. Theres a fourth
benefit, tix. Iriet hance tot a real change ol pace
during your Anm Reserve weekends.
To tinJ out how to quality, stop h or call:
Staff Sgt. Hamilton
756-9695
South Park Shopping Center
ARMY RESERVE.
BEALLYOUCANBE.
gHimtfllimillUIUIIIIIIIINtUIIIHIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIillllllllllliiiiiiiiillllllllllllllllimiillllllHIIIIIIIIIIMIUIHHLi
NEWMAN-CATHOLIC I
STUDENT CENTER
953 East Tenth Street
Greenville, N.C. 27858
LK
CAMPUS MASS SCHEDULE
Sunday-1 1:30 a.m.
Biology Building, Room 103
9:00 p.m. Newman Center
Wednesday-5:30 p.m.
Newman Center
(followed by a fellowship dinner)
SHARE THE WORD BIBLE STUDY
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
at the Newman Center
All are welcome
For information, call 752-4216 I
iiiiiNUiuiHnuHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiHiHiiiiiiiiiiiimHiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiniiiiiiii!
ment head, dean, provost, vice
chancellor and chancellor,
presented members of the board
with copies ot the institution's of-
ficial history, Fast Carolina
University: The Formative Years
1907198 written by history pro-
fessor Mary Jo Bratton and
published earlier this year.
From the book, he said, "you
will see that there has been a
steady and orderly development
to our present condition. It is a
good, solid foundation for the
future
He noted that a survey by chief
executive officers of educational
institutions for the magazine,
U.S. News and World Report,
last year ranked ECU seventh in a
field of 158 comprehensive
universities in the South and
border states.
He said that faculty research
and publications doubled in the
past five years over the previous
10 year period. He noted that in-
ternational conferences are held
here and that ECU has
cooperative instructional and
research programs with institu-
tic Costa Rica, Poland, Ita-
ly, Taiwan, mainlandhma and
Japan.
ECU made 10 new degree pro
grams available in the evening
college this year. The school is
the only university of comparable
size in the (arolinas with com
puteried, online registration
capability.
A major addition is planned
for the main campus library
which has holdings ol nearly 1
million volumes. The medical
school, celebrating its 10th an-
niversary ol its foul yeai
gram is �'bringing in acco �
from fai and wide Howell
" ui . � a � illy re
as among the fop
about 20 medial
established in the mid 1971
saui "We now have
sophisticated medical
eastern N rth aroiina,
eluding open
transplant surgery.
therapy and many other u
undreamed of 2f
said
CO FROM COLLEGE TO THE ARMY
WITHOUT MISSING A BEAT.
I he hardest thing about break
ing into profession;
milsis well, break
ing into professions
music So it you re
HK'Kino t( ran ippoi
tunity to turn your
musical talent into
.i tull-time perform
ing career, take a
L? x IvHk at tht
Anm
It s n� i
parades
and ohn Philip
Sousa Army
ndsnv k
wait: and rxxgit
a.s well as m;
d the :
�'vt� m rt at
diences as we
.is spectat rs
W ith an averagt
ot 40 performances a month, theres
also the opportunity tor travel
not only across America, but possibh
abroad
Most important, you can
expect i first -rate pn�
essional environment
from your instructors,
facilities and fellow
muski,ms The Army
tas educational
programs rh.it
can help y u
pay tor i n
duty instruc-
tion, and it
von ou.il-
tv. even
elp y .
pay
vi ur
federally-insured
student loans
If von can sight
read n
lid be
Chid -
Benjamin H
Or cal
ARMY BAND
BEALLYOUCANBE
The Best Price In Town on
COLD KEGS OF BEER.
Reie've yours today
756-7031
CO K ROGER INC FOR ALL YOUR
Tailgate Party
Needs!
The Best Pr,ce In Town
On deli Party trats
Let the Kroger Deii do the
work tor you'
756-7031
C�"�
KROGER OR SEALTEST
Orange Juice
Gal
Ctn
79
LIMIT 3 ��
PUSCHASF
A1,v.1 t �� I I 1 1 1 I I I I 1 I
L � i i i i i i i � i i i . , i
�i ii i i i i i i i i i i . i
I I I I 1 I 1 t 1 l I l . ;
I I 1 1 I 1 I I 1 t t 1
" 1 I 1 I 1 1 I �
I I 1
"III
.IIMIMI.
I I I 1 I I 1 I 1
� � I I 1 I I I I 1 I ill
i . 1.1 � � I I I I I � I 1J
'� � ' � i i i i i i i i i i i IM
WJWCO i i i i i i i i i
I I . �� � I ' I � I I
' I I I I 1 1 I I I
TO0CO � 11 � 1111
111 � � � 111111
J
II II I 1 I I I X 1
I I I I I 1 I 1 i I I
.II I II I 11 I 1 I I
I t I I 1 I 1 I I I 1
I 1 I I . .1111
"ilium
iiii
i i i i i i i .
l I I I ; . i
liliiiiimii
ill I I i i iiiu u 11 I
11 i i i n i i i u i n 11
iiii i ti i i i i uI I)
UI 11 i i i u a i u u
i i i i i i t i i t t t i i i t i
mi 11 111111
ii it 11 u i u 11
mn 11 mi
i 11 i n 11 u n
n i mn
I I 1 1 ; . . 1 . Ill
Oil III 11 I I I 111(1
lli 11 uiuui ill
ii mi III n I 111)
i i I t i i i i l 1 l :
ALL VARimCS t rLvoRs Of
COKE
997T
6 PK 16 OZ
MM
treat or he iamt
BACARDI
Daiquiri
Mix . . .
6
Oz
Can
79
WSE RIDGES OR PLAIN
Potato
Chips
7
Oi
Bag
PARTY TIME
�9 ICE -69C
SERVE & SAVE
Luncheon Meat
Atst.
Variety
1 Lb. Pfcg
$129
1
12" DUG. B & w
Samsung TV
KROGER PEAS. CUT OR FRENCH
STYLE GREEN BEANS OR
CREAM STYLE OR WHOLE KERNEL
Corn or
Green Beans
4 51
� Cans
LIMIT 8 CANS
WITH $10 ADD L
PURCHASE
B & W, 12'
SCREEN
MODEL
TB1210
39
95
BEAUTIFUL, FRESH CUT
ROSES
$4t99
buy one rncrr
get one rncc
KROGER '6 OZ
Multigrain SAVE
Bread 79c
9
EASTERN RED OR GOLD
Delicious
i Apples
DOZEN
Make Your Sweetheart Happy
rVlth Fresh Cut Flowers Today
ftDVERTlSED ITEM POIICY
Earn of these advertised
items is required to Be
readily available for sale in
earn Kroger Sav on e�cept
as spertflcally noted In this
ad If we do run out of an
item we will offer you your
choice of a comparable
item when available
reflecting the same sav
ings or a raincneck which
will entitle you to pur
chase the advertised item
at the advertised price
within jo days Only one
vendor coupon will be ac
cepted per item
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Creenvi
Attitud
Ovei
Desirec Gra
grad Mudr: ,
bodil b)
fee I
dropped
handcuffed .j
�id, rnf
kept in -
nine h i
Her univei
her a
disorder �
ing a :
JHI
Muller �
stuck
" mea:
in South A
H .
I
. n i
: ;
drc :
ex pet
Richard K .

le
rii
i
Colleges Still
For Enrollm
have
pec ted
'� .
i
-
- .
Te- . ETS
ueek
Son
spend
or. rcruitinj
may sp � � �
ketmj
lion's p
durii .
enr
is 2
. ties says
B
Pub
b perce
mr
"ate. he sas
S
recruit studer
e.
e�
it

f


e
"I
ver
(stuv i vi- I eroj I
vestem I si
miss
year, we grj
. x
about oim m �
ege Next yea
13 8,900 s
begins
"In 11. e : be do�i
about !N.s . iduates
quite a drop T:i!e a '
"College enrollment
allied to high schoo i ates
Adas Di Gerald Bou v
Twillcy's counterpart ai
University I T'enne�see. ' ve are
all competing foi the top
schoo graduates
Bowker figures the ne em-
phasis on recruiting is here
stav "Colleges realh need
work on deeKvp'n :hcir image,
regardiess ol whether we are in
good times oi a3 'imes It
doesn't slop because last year �as
a good ear
So WRJ's Tille. for one.
came up with a "Western Advan-
tage" ad campaign
Last week. Twiiles h
banquet lot about KX potential
students, and is preparing a direct
mail campaign
"We are doing everything he
says, "from buying mailing lists
from national testing companies.
I






Program
bringing in accolades
A !dc ' Howell said.
H-rallv recognized
- he :opo! the class" 0f
20 medial schools
in the mid 1970's " h
We now have a CT
medical service for
North Carolina, jn
pen-heart surgery
surgery, radiation
an) other services
I
r
!
ears
ago he
IE ARMY
EAT.
� Army

Write
" t Fort
' k216 5005
-ARMY
RMY BAND.
YOU CAN BE.
he Best Price In Town
" DELi PARTY TRAYS
Ul H Kroner Deli do the
wort for you?
756-7031
i i i i i i i i 11 i i i i i i i
� i i i i i i i i i i i � i t 11
� i i i i m i u n u (X
l n n i i i n i i i II I I
wXwj00000000C
MJ. � Bim� t flavors or-
COKE
971
99
6 PK-16 OZ
MM
"� 1he dame'
TIME
8
U
B09
69C
buy one rnrr
get one rricc
iEP
Multigrain SAVE
Bread 79c
EASTERN RED OR GOLD
Delicious
Apples
$
-J39

J
on
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER), 1986
Attitudes Changing Toward Protestors
Over the last few weeks,
Desiree Gran, a Johns Hopkins
grad student, has been picked up
bodily by police, dragged by her
feet across grass and concrete,
dropped into a paddy wagon,
handcuffed and pushed into a
cold, metal cell, where she was
kept in solitary confinement for
nine hours.
Her university then charged
her with trespassing, loitering,
disorderly conduct and disobey-
ing a police office.
JHU President Dr. Steven
Midler says his administration -
which last week dropped the
charges against Gran and l2other
students arrested for defying a
campus ban on building "shan-
ties" meant to symbolize poverty
in South America - actually is
growing more lenient toward an-
ti-apartheid protestors.
But. if recent events are any in-
dication, students joining a
round of nationwide ami -apar-
theid protest scheduled for hun-
dreds of campuses this month can
expect rougher treatment from
authorities.
"It seems that in a number of
cases college officials are getting
tougher on protestors observes
Richard Knight of the American
Committee on Africa (ACA),
which he.ps coordinate campus
anti-apartheid efforts nation-
wide .
Texas, Yale, Illinois, Utah,
Missouri, Indiana and Dart-
mouth, among others, are all
striking "get tough" poses
toward anti-apartheid studetns
who, up until last spring, could
count on demonstrating without
much personal risk.
At that point, administrators
began sending police to break up
protestors and their "shanty"
villages for the first time, often
on the grounds the flimsy struc-
tures � none too sturdy and fre-
quently the target of violent van-
dalism by movement opponents
� posed insurance risks for the
schools.
Now, administrators seem less
shy about breaking up the pro-
tests, often explaining it's
necessary to maintain campus
order.
The ACA's Josh Nessen says
it's because students themselves
are tending to use more violent,
confrontative tactics in recent
years.
The crackdowns, ironically
enough, are coming as more
schools � about 50 so far this
year, the ACA says � are selling
shares in companies that do
business in segregationist South
Africa.
Just last week, for example,
Harvard, Bucknell and Southern
Cal voted to sell all or part of
their South African
holdings. The same week,
Missouri arrested 17 protestors.
It was the first time UM had ever
brought trespassing charges
against protestors, says Maj.
Jack Watring of the campus
police.
Nearby Illinois refiled trespass-
ing charges against 16 students
involved in a campus protest last
spring. Yale suspended four.
Dartmouth - which refused to
give diplomas to five protestors
last spring - is imposing stricter
disciplinary rules to try to
minimize litigation with students,
spokesman Alex Huppe says.
Some think it's no accident col-
leges are getting tough and
divesting at the same time. "Ad-
ministrators do not want to seem
to be buckling in to students
says Alan Chandler of the
University of Utah's Students
Against Apartheid.
Of the campuses that disciplin-
ed anti-apartheid students last
week, Johns Hopkins and Hlinios
are scheduled to reconsider
divestiture soon. Missouri
already has sold some $5 million
worth of stock in firms with
South African operations.
But most schools say they're
cracking down to maintain order
on campus, not to avoid looking
like they're surrendering to pro-
testors' wishes.
Yale filed charges against nine
protestors - suspending four of
them - because "we cannot
allow the disruption of university
activities and buildings says
associate Provost Linda K.
Lorimer.
The disciplining was especially
controversial because, a day
before sentencing the anti-apar-
theid students, the same Yale
committee rescinded the proba-
tion of a student who last spring
had passed out flyers ridiculing
gays.
"On one hand, (Yale) en-
courages free speech at all costs
complained Sarah Pettit of Yale's
Gay-Lesbian Co-op. "On the
other hand, the suspensions ef-
fectively take voices out of cir-
culation
But the anti -apartheid students
disrupted Yale operations, while
the anti-gay student didn't,
Lorimer explains. "The students
who staged the sit- in would not
leave when they were asked, and
would not allow people to do
their work
Johns Hopkins President
Muller also says he was trying to
maintain order when he forbade
students to build a shanty outside
a trustees' meeting, and then sent
police to arrest them when they
tried to build one anyway on
Sept. 9.
Upon reconsidering, Muller
dropped the charges against the
students, and appointed a com-
mittee to write campus free
speech and protest guidelines.
Not wanting to wait, some
Johns Hopkins students�as well
as threatened protestors from
Vanderbilt�have contacted
Utah's Chandler for help in
preparing legal challenges to their
school's crackdowns.
In September, Chandler's grou
won a lawsuit aganst Utah Presi-
dent Chase Peterson, who tried
to force it to dismantle campus
shanties. Peterson said the shan-
ties, insistently vandalized and
frequently firebombed, had
Riggari Shoe Repair
HI West 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
"Shoe Repair At The Very Best"
758-0204
become safety hazards.
A federal district court,
however, ruled dismantling the
shanties would violate the pro-
testors' right to free expression.
Now seven University of Texas
protestors - four of them UT
students - have sued UT for
violating their right when they
sent police to break up their
April, 1986 campus rally, and
ultimately arrested 8 people.
The lawsuit seeks "damages
and injunctive relief against the
University of Texas for violating
constitutional rights of in-
dividuals demonstrating against
apartheidsays attorney Jim
Simmons.
Separately, UT's Democracy in
Academia group last week pledg-
ed to rebuild a shanty torched by
arsonist Oct. 3.
While the UT Safety Office
conceded the group had permis-
sion to rebuild the shanty, assis-
tant Dean of Students Glenn
Maloney warned that, if arsonists
and vandals kept attacking it,
he'd ask to dismantle it for safety
reasons.
Everything For
The Skier!
Q
sports.
CAROLINA GULF
1201 Dickinson Ave.
752-7270
Best Used Tires In Town � We P I A
Del
VISA. HC, GIXF. SOHIO. �RIr s
CBs Now
30 Off
GORDON'S
Golf and Ski Shop
264 By-Pass 756-1003
(N�it to Gr��mill� rV and AQpnancsi
Colleges Still Waiting
For Enrollment Drop
�i?e East ataroiUiiaii
ike
1925
Steve Folmar, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives:
Anne Leigh Mallory john Rusk
Steve Mote Jill Taylor
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY ATIS
(CPS)�American colleges
have not yet suffered the long- ex-
pected Great Enrollment Drop of
the Eighties mostly because
they've learned how to sell
themselves better, a new report
released by the Educational
Testing Service (ETS) said last
week.
Some public colleges now
spend an average $30 per student
on recruiting. Private colleges
may spend as much as $500 per
student.
"An unprecedented marketing
and recruiting effort by the na-
tion's postsecondary institutions
during the first half of the
decade" has helped avoid the big
enrollment drop- thought to be as
much as 20 percent by some
observers-expected during the
eighties, says ETS researcher
Hunter Breland.
Public four- year colleges have
boosted their recruiting budgets
by 63 percent or more since 1980,
more than double the inflation
rate, he says.
Schools figure they have to
recruit students aggressively if
they want to survive.
"Everybody fights for
(students) says Leroy Twilley,
Western Illinois University's ad-
missions director. "In Illinois last
year, we graduated some 138,331
high school students. Figure that
about one- half of those go to col-
lege. Next year, we project about
138,900 students. Then the slide
begins
"In 1991, we'll be down to
about 119,951 graduates. That's
quite a drop Twilley admits.
"College enrollment is closely
allied to high school graduates
Adds Dr. Gerald Bowker,
Twilley's counterpart at the
University of Tennessee, "we are
all competing for the top high
school graduates
Bowker figures the new em-
phasis on recruiting is here to
stay. "Colleges really need to
work on developing their image,
regardless of whether we are in
good times or bad times. It
doesn't stop because last year was
a good year
So WIU's Twilley, for one,
came up with a "Western Advan-
tage" ad campaign.
Last week, Twilley ho a
banquet for about 100 potential
students, and is preparing a direct
mail campaign.
"We are doing everything he
says, "from buying mailing lists
from national testing companies,
sending letters, inviting people to
college activities, college tours,
high school visitation,
telemarketing, etc etc
Such campaigns, regardless of
ETS's findings don't always
work.
The University of the District
of Columbia last week announc-
ed its enrollment this fall is down
by 1,000 students, continuing a
seven-year slide.
�-4t column 1
50 ?
100-141
IS
�!?
100- im
250 m
U.U
4.11
4.0S
?�
its
J.7S
(�m� I�� itw On ME� �c-
COLOR ADVTOmSING RATES
Ono rotor 4, black
Twwcoten 4 ��:�
INSISTS
5.000 or �u
5 001 - 10.000
�0 00! � 11.000
1S5.M
U Men
5� Men
j � i 1111 � 111 � 111111 � 11, � 11, � 1111 � 111 � 111111 � 11111111111111 i i, 1111 c i 1111 i 11 (111 i 11iiiiiiimiiiiimiiiHiiiuiHiiiiiiiiiiiiik
i Look What Surfaced
I
3
Even Thursday Night Is
I TACO NIGHT
� Two Great Tacos for only.99
f 60 oz. Pitchers SL99
I Offer Good From 7p.m11 p.m. � Not Valid on Deliveries
ALL DAY FRIDAY
I 32 oz. Bucket of Your Favorite Draft
215 E. Fourth Street C 752-2183 I
nillllllllllllllltllllttlllllllllllUIIIMIillllllltMtltlllltllllllllllltllIMMIIIIIIIllllllttllttlllltlltlTllMlltllllillirl


BUSINESS HOI KS
Monda � Frida
10 a.m. � 5 p.m.
PHONES757-6366
757-6557 757-6367
757-6558 757-6309
�b
end Ion
Benetton
638B Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, NC
355-7473
Store Hours
10-6 M-T-W
10-9 Th-F
10-6 Sat
sw:
a�5aoo�3aopiaat
MODELS WANTED
Qualifications: Attractive, 21 years of age,
good personality.
For one evening only, business function. No
modeling experience necessary! Interviewing
Monday only, November 3 at 5:00 p.m.
Touch of Class Modeling School
J Corner of 1st and Pitt Streets
I 752-0509
BMMMH
I
i �

1
i
!
I
I
I
I
I
I
Now Admitting Ages
18 & Older

7th Annual
Halloween Costume
�ritest
Kentucky Fried Chicken j�y
3 X � yypte tax r
4JC
plus tax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK � COMB.
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Small Mashed Potato and Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
Expires Dec. 31, 1986
. This coupon good omit m Grrennlle. Wiltiamsion. Tarboro. Wilson. Coldsovrn Kinsion. 4 Jacksomv,ltt SiirnM

i
Hottest
1
m
338
1
For a FREE RIDE on thm Liberty Ride
Call 758-5570
mmmmmwmtmmmmmmmmtm
The Plaza
Your Latest
C Unique Bonus:
"Quick
Difference-
Makers"
Yours at no extra
charge whatsoever
with any Clinique
purchase of 9.50
or more. At the
Plaza Nov. 3-15.
CLINIQUE
MM
���H4�gi �� �r� - - - "�wCq
Oii�i m m �� �� �i�in�i� m tm �� -T�t" f -





�te iEafit QIarnliniati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Path Kemmis. s�
Scott Cooper. �&
RlCKMcCORMAC.c .
John Shannon, &&�,
PvtMouoy. &����. e .
Tom Luvender, cm uw
Daniel Malrer, ei�o.
Steve Folmar, dtkh o mmmm
Anthony Martin. ��� o� �.�,�
Meg Needham. o ��,��
Shannon Short, ����. w
DeChanile Johnson. Ann�,
October 30, 1986
Opinion
Page �
Homecoming Issue Explained
On Oct. 20 a combination of human er-
ror on the part of several parties lead to
this newspaper's failure to publish a
Photograph of Ms. Tonja Howell. ECU's
Homecoming Queen. Subsequently, we
received numerous phone calls, office
visits and six letters to the editor. These let-
ters, some written in anger, others with
understanding, called this newspaper
eerything from racist and hypocritical to
understandably human. We would like to
take this opportunity to explain.
There was no decision, conscious or un-
conscious, to omit Mv Howell's photo
from our Oct. 21 issue on the basis of her
race. In fact, space had been provided for
her picture and an order was placed with
the ECU Photo lab to print and deliver
that picture.
The ECU Photo lab has recentlv
undergone a major organizational restruc-
turing which has left them seriously short-
handed. This, accompanied bv some un-
foreseeable circumstances, left the lab with
one photographer on the night in question.
It was his job to print photos for both
The East Carolinian and The Idiom. If you
know anything about photography, you
also know that it sometimes takes up to 20
minutes to print just one picture. He had
roughly 20 minutes to print all of them. As
a result. The East Carolinian received the
wrong photograph late that evening.
Now, an editor can only work so many
16 hour days before fatigue and human er-
ror come into play. Unfortunately, that is
just what happened.
We were unaware that The Idiom was
preparing an issue across the hall, other-
wise we would have gone to them for help.
Also, the Desk Editor was under the im-
pression that all the Homecoming Can-
didate's portraits had been returned to the
Homecoming Steering Committee, which,
though normally routine, was not the case.
Working on deadline, we made a hasty
and regrettable decision to print a picture
of the parade instead of the Homecoming
Queen. At no time did the question of race
ever enter into that decision.
The East Carolinian would like to
apologize to Ms. Howell and thank her for
her understanding attitude. On Oct. 21
Tonja came to our office to ask what had
happened. She told us she did not believe
this was a racist issue, and kept an open
mind as we explained. Following this ex-
change, we requested an interview, which
she politely granted us (see story page 1).
At a time when most people were jump-
ing to conclusions, Ms. Howell kept her
poise and her open mind. The East Caroli-
nian is proud to have Ms. Tonja Howell as
our Homecoming Queen.
Homecoming Error Creates Furor
A rt Gallery Deserves Funding;
Future Art Exhibits In Jeopardy
B JOHN SHANNON
Of the issues raised in recent controversy
over SGA funding of Gray Art Gallery,
misquoting by the campus newspaper,
roundheeled suggestibility on the part of
many student legislators and general misin-
tormation on both sides seem to be the
least worrisome. In the "experimental
world" of the university, mistakes are ex-
pected and forgiven.
More insidious, however, are the
underlying misconceptions that were
revealed. There appears to be some confu-
sion over such issuer as the function of art
in the community and the seriousness of
sexual assault as a social problem.
Many people are not aware, for in-
stance, that the psychic trauma caused by
rape usually has long term effects far
beyond the immediate, devastating disrup-
tion of the victim's emotional and phvsical
life. Well known rape researchers Burgess
and Holmstrom discovered that manv vic-
tims are able to resume their previous level
of functioning only minimally long after
the acute phase of their reaction is over.
Nightmares, depression, disturbed rela-
tions with men, disrupted eating habits, ir-
rational fears, suicidal thoughts and
general interference with the overall enjoy-
ment of life are among many effects suf-
fered by rape victims for years, in some
cases for a lifetime.
A 1980 study, using very conservative
statistics, found that the average adoles-
cent girl has a 20 to 30 percent chance of
being raped at some point in her life. At
least half of all women raped never report
the assault for various reasons, but even in
Greenville there have been 26 rapes
reported since January.
Clearly, sexual assault is a pressing
social problem, a problem of concern to
the communitv. But is it a fitting subject of
art?
The idea that art should not raise con-
troversial issues that might disturb upright
members of the community (or their high-
school-age offspring) is outside the con-
temporary American mainstream, and
frankly, closer to the situation prevailing
in communist countries. The most
rudimentary survey of modern art would
establish its inseparablencss from con-
troversy.
At any rate, the works to be displayed in
Gray Gallery's exhibit, "RAPE do not
depict sexual assault. The images deal with
the complex of psycho- and socio-logical
phenomena that accompany rape � im-
ages which are significant in this place and
time, and which need to be seen, heard and
felt.
It should be noted that in the week since
Gray Gallery was denied its appeal for fun-
ding at a level consistent with previous
years, the SGA has been appropriating
funds at breakneck speed with little or no
debate.
Also, since Gray Gallery is firmly com-
mitted to proceed on schedule with
"RAPE" from Nov. 7 to Dec. 6, the
SGA's denial of funding will only affect
exhibits scheduled for the rest of the
academic year. Shows such as
"Lamplight an exhibit of light-
producing sculpture; a collection of Hai-
tian art; and sculpture and drawings by
Houston Conwill and Luis Jimenz respec-
tively will ultimately be the ones jeopardiz-
ed by the SGA's narrow-margined,
narrow-minded decision.
HoIIoween Night: An ECU Tradition
Bv TERRl ORE
staff Mntrr
Two things always stand out in my mind
when I think of October: Football and
Halloween.
Needless to say, our football record
leaves a lot to be desired. But something
we can all look forward to is Halloween.
There is something about Greenville and
this occasion that appeals to practically
everyone. Just as New Orleans is known
for its Mardi Gras and New York is known
for its 4th of July celebration, our Green
city is known as the place to be on October
31st.
In the four years that I have been at East
Carolina, there has always been a huge
party in the center of downtown with the
streets blocked off. Everyone gathers there
over the course of the evening and parties
non-stop until they run out of beer, or
whatever they're entertaining themselves
with.
A large majority of the crowd is com-
prised of ECU students and Greenville
residents, but we usually end up with par-
tiers from places like Chapel Hill,
Charlotte, Raleigh and other towns.
I am curious to see, however, if the new
drinking age law will affect the number of
participants at this year's celebration.
According to Nelson Staton, Captain of
the Uniform Division for the Greenville
Police Dept, there will be more officers
downtown this year than there were in
years past because of the new drinking age
law. There will be the annual blocking off
of the streets, but we will not be permitted
to consume alcohol freely, regardless of
our ages.
Captain Staton informed me that if
anyone in the crowd is spotted drinking
alcohol, then the officers will do one of
two things: a) take the alcohol and discard
�t or b) take it and hold it until the night is
over. These are simply precautions to
secure that the crowd doesn't get too out
of hand.
Personally I'm hoping that everyone will
dress up and come out despite their age.
Just do your drinking before you come
downtown and inside the bars instead of
on the streets. I'm sure that we can trust
those who aren't of legal drinking age not
to drink at all, right?
Wrong. I asked two of my 19-year old
friends what they were going to do Hallo-
ween and got basically the same response
from both. "Drink inconspicuously as op-
posed to drinking out in the open and
spending the night in jail That does
sound like the safest possible option.
(Editor's Note: The following are only
a sample of the many letters we receiv-
ed concerning our failure to publish a
photograph of ECU's Homecoming
Queen, Tonja Howell. To publish all
the letters would be impossible, as they
would cover two thirds of the page.
For the full story, see the editorial top
left.)
Never have I been so enraged, as
when I read through the recent edition
of The East Carolinian (Oct. 21) and
failed to see, not even a mention of Ms.
Tonja Howell, our new Homecoming
Queen: Pirate: or whatever ter-
minology one wishes to use. I've been a
student here four years and this is the
first time I can remember not seeing
the picture of Miss ECU "tears and
all" covering the front page of our
school newspaper.
My question to the staff of this
publication is, why was such blatant
disregard for such a news worthy event
left out? Many will say racism played a
part, I really hope this is not the case.
I've always had great respect for the
staff of this paper, but you have placed
yourselves in question by your actions.
To you I say right your wrong and
give Tonja her due respect, she is our
Homecoming Queen. To Tonja, I say
even if The East Carolinian never
recognizes youWe're proud of you,
and we know you will represent us
well.
Anthony D. Jackson,
SGA Vice President
Finalist Responds
As a student of East Carolina
University, I feel that it is my duty to
speak up on the terrible injustice that
was imposed upon Tonja Howell, our
newly elected Homecoming Queen.
Why is it that when a Queen is elected
and she happens to have skin of a
lighter shade, she is plastered across
every Tuesday edition (following
Homecoming weekend) of The East
Carolinian with the proper credit that
is due any Queen?
Truthfully, I was surprised to see
even a glimpse of myself on that edi-
tion. I used to look to The East Caroli-
nian for keeping me up to date with the
latest events on campus, but after
reading the Oct. 21 edition, I shall look
elsewhere as a source of information.
In case you have failed to catch the
drift of my complaint, I will simply say
that it is ever so obvious that prejudice
is alive and well on the campus of East
Carolina University. I am sure you are
asking yourselves, why am I showing
such strong objections, as I was not the
Queen. If I had been chosen the win-
ner, I feel confident that I would have
received the same treatment, as would
any other black female. And by the
same token, had the winner been any
of the six "lighter skin colored" can-
didates that were elected to the court,
she would have been pictured shedding
"tears of joy" as last year's represen-
tative was so "proudly" pictured.
What makes a true queen is not the
color of her skin, organizations she
belongs to, or beauty of her face, but
the beauty she possesses inside. Ms.
Howell is, in every sense of the word, a
Queen. By not expressing her objection
to the way she was so unfairly treated,
she has proven that.
With that, let you not question my
abilities as a woman or possibly a
future Queen, for in my society we all
know who we are, where we've been,
and most importantly, where we are
going as individuals, and nothing will
hold us back: We have a dream; and
we will fulfill it.
man to listen intelligently, some would
hurriedly accuse discrimination on the
grounds of race.
Before opening one's mouth one
should first openone'smind. Such clos-
ed mindedness will never eliminate
discrimination but will only encourage
its growth.
Due to an error of the photography
lab the wrong picture was sent to The
East Carolinian leaving the paper with
an improper picture and a deadline to
meet. Unfortunately, this year's
Homecoming Queen's picture was not
in the Oct. 21 edition, all due to a set of
circumstances � race not considered.
How much can be expected of
students who are underpaid? Also keep
in mind that these students have other
responsibilities � mostly to themselves
to get the education that they came
here for. Without the dedication of
these students there would not be an
East Carolinian.
We all make mistakes and no one is
perfect. Unfounded criticisms arc not
appreciated, nor are they productive.
Constructive criticisms are.
James A. Bunn,
Graduate Student,
MBA
Registration Issue
I am writing in regard to the editorial
entitled "Early Registration: Students,
Newspaper Get the Shaft published
in the Oct. 21 issue of The East Caroli-
nian.
It was implied that the Registrar
unilaterally made the decision to have
the schedule of classes published
elsewhere and that the decision was
based on the Registrar not being
satisfied with the last schedule publish-
ed by The East Carolinian. It is true
that the schedule of classes for the 1986
Fall Semester published during the
1986 Spring Semester omitted the
course offerings of a number of
departments and that a supplement
was subsequently published.
However, questions about the quali-
ty of the published schedules had been
raised earlier and on many occasions
by students, faculty and ad-
ministrators. Academic Deans and
Directors during a meeting held in
April, 1986, supported the Registrar's
efforts to have the schedules published
in a tabloid format. When an an-
nouncement was made during the
September 1986 meeting of the Faculty
Senate that the schedule of classes was
to be published in an improved tabloid
format, the Senators immediately
responded with a round of applause.
No mention was made of the fact the
representatives of the Registrar's Of-
fice approached representatives of The
East Carolinian during the 1985-86
academic year to discuss the feasibility
of The East Carolinian publishing the
schedules in a tabloid format. The
Registrar was informed that it would
be "cost prohibitive
I do regret that there has been some
misunderstanding about this issue but
the primary reason for a change is to
provide a schedule of courses in a for-
mat that better serves the needs of
students and faculty.
Trenton G. Davis, Dr.P.H.
Associate Vice Chancellor
for Academic Support
Gallery: Rebuttal
Yolanda Renee Richardson,
Senior,
Foods &. Nutrition
Paper Supported
It is a shame that even in an educa-
tional environment, ignorance over-
whelms intelligence in situations where
emotions are involved. Rather than
asking why or why not and having
enough compassion for their fellow
I write in defense of the Student
Government Association Legislature
and myself, since both were attacked in
the editorial by the Managing Editor,
Daniel Maurer, on October 16.
The editorial, "Exhibition Wrongly
Denied Funding" was actually a great
misuse of the press. The responsibility
of the press is to report the facts as they
happen, but instead The East Caroli-
nian decided to print half-truths, and
false information.
This actually happened twice; the
first was on Oct. 14 when The East
Caorlinian ran a story entitled
"Legislature Decides Against Funding
Art Gallery's Movie In this article I
was mis-quoted as having called the ex-
hibition a "film This same mis-quote
was again used in the editorial The
simple truth is I never called the exhibi-
tion a film. Where The East Carolinian
got this idea is anybody's guess
In debate I referred to the exhih
as an exhibition and made references
the catalog (book of the works to he in
the exhibition) of the exhibition whic-
I myself have seen. This is how I know
that the paintings are "blatant and ex-
plicit
For example one of the works is .
woman covered in blood; this I feel is
blatant, too blatant for the communitv
high school kids we were informed
would be coming to view the exh
The editorial states that these
"works of art" are simply artistic in-
terpretations of the rape experience
Rape is a violent and uglv crime, so
unless the artist is demented, and I
beauty in it, the exhibition would have
to be "blatant and explicit
The editorial also printed a half-
truth in that they only printed half ol a
quote, in order to mis-lead the public
no doubt. According to the editorial I
said that counselors weren't ap-
propriate use for student funds. Wei I
never believed, nor did I ever sav that
monies were going to fund counseling.
1 knew otherwise since there were no
provisions for it in the bill. What I ac-
tually said was that I felt if this exhibi-
tion was of such a nature to require the
services of counselors, thai it would be
a misuse of student funds uo fund hc
exhibition).
The editorial goes as far as trying to
mislead the public into thinking that
there would be no counselors there.
But they say that instead there would
be an opportunity for students and
members of the public to ask questions
of counselors. The editorial goes fur-
ther to say that the opportunity to talk
with counselors would be there. Well it
still sounds like counseling to me.
Further, in the appropriations com-
mittee meeting, the Grav Art Gallery
told us that there would be counselors
available in case anybody was upset bv
the exhibition.
Some points Maurer convenientlv
failed to report, although I stated them
in debate, was that the Grav An
Gallery already gets Student Govern-
ment funds. The legislature ap-
propriated monies through the Visual
Arts Forum to the Gray Art Gallery
The legislature recognizes the Gray Art
Gallery as part of the Visual An
Forum and gives money through them.
Maurer also failed to point out that
the SGA is working with a very limited
budget that is in high demand. We
can't even afford to fund all good pro-
grams, let alone questionable ones.
The place of origin of all the confu-
sion seems to be Daniel Maurer and
The East Carolinian. Perhaps you
should have someone who better
understands the workings of a
legislature cover our meetings. Then
perhaps misquotes and lies would stop.
Also perhaps Maurer should attend the
meeting he writes about so he would be
better informed, instead of writing
blindly.
John Simon,
Vice-Chair
Appropriations
(Editor's Note: On Oct. 20 this editor
stood before the SGA Legislature and
publicly apologized to Mr. Simon for
misquoting him, even though witnesses
claim he did indeed refer to the exhibi-
tion as a film. I chose to give Mr.
Simon the benefit of the doubt.
However, I would like to make it
perfectly clear that I did not apologize
for the editorial, simply the misquote. I
believe in what I said and I will stand
by it.
On the subject of attacks, lies,
halftruths and conscious misleading, I
would like to make it clear that this was
not the case. The editorial in question
was an attempt to voice an opinion op-
posite that of Mr. Simon's. After
writing the editorial, fully expected a
response. I only regret that Mr. Simon
chose to debate the issue on such a
highly emotional level. For more on
this issue see John Shannon's editorial
this page.)
A
College
(CPS) �Colleges are being
dragged unwillingly into the
coming elections by candid.
who just won't leave the
puses' logos alone
Texas Christian, Texa. AA.M
Clemson, South arolina
Oklahoma State, among
schools, in recent wee
found themselves prominei
featured in politician I am-
paigns In all case-
cians never avked the s I
permission to use the collq
registered tradema I
"It is not our
wish to get involved in
paign says one such college
ficial.
Texas Christian and Te
A&M las: week forced U S Rep
Joe Barton R-Tex . � � :
ing several televisioi
featured the college
suggested the schools had end
ed him.
Sen. Don Nick neen
ing film footage of I
State football coach Pal
his reelection ads, desr
rule requiring advance perm
sion to use its logo.
Both gubernatorial candidates
in South Carolina have . ed
L'SC logo, while Repu-
distnl
I
N e
"Her
fundi


i
"did

A I
!
he G
October22
2:30 a.m.
A Tyler Hall resident reported
the larceny of her bicycie fi
the north side of Tyler Hall.
11:12 a.m.
A teacher from the Brewster
Building reported the larcer.v pen
six Geography tests from his of- cen-
fice after breaking and enterii .
of the same.
6:55 p.m.
A Greene Dorm resident reporter
the breaking and entering .i
larceny of money from her dorm
room.
We
October 2?
3:00 p.m.
A teacher from the Brewsier
Building reported the larceny, oJ
80 diskettes and a storage box
from his office.
9:00 a.m3:00 p.m.
21 ECU students were served
with warrants for their arrest as a
results of the cooperative in-
vestigation by ECU Public Safety
Department and the Licence and
Theft Division of the Department
of Motor Vehicles concerning the
selling , reproducing, posses-
displaying and counterfeiting
fictitious driver's license.
October 24
10:30 a.m.
A Belk Hall resident reported the
larcenv of his bike from the bike
shed at Belk Hall.
10:31 a.m.
An Aycock resident reported the
breaking and entering of his vehi-
cle and the larceny of his stereo
and sunglasses The vehicle was
parked on Ficklen Drive.
1:37 p.m.
Sgt. Willis assisted the Greenville
Police Department in aprehen-
ding four residents of Jones Hall
in reference to a hit and run acci-
dent on Fieldside and W Berklev
Drive.
October 25
12:45 a.m.
A student and a nonstudent were
1
m
Ijj
!
m
m
1
M �� MM � �
Is





ates Furor
- same mis-quote
c editorial. The
-� 'he exhibi-
f 1 asl Carolinian
dy's guess
e exhibition
adereferences to
. - k of the works to be in
he exhibition which
- how I know
a:ant and ex-
he works is of a
blood; this I feel is
b � ' ' he community
kids we were informed
v view the exhibit.
a:es thrt these
�re simply artistic in-
the -ape experience.
eni and ugK crime, so
! demented, and finds
e exhibition would have
and explicit
" al also printed a half-
t onl) printed half of a
mis-lead the public
ccording to the editorial I
telors weren't ap-
studeni funds. Well. I
did I ever sa that
Ifl fund counseling;
- h- since there were no
the bill. What I ac-
a that I felt if this exhibi-
luch a nature to require the
: counselors, that it would be
� 'udent funds (to fund the
a goes a- tar as trying to
he public into thinking that
be no counselors there.
�.� instead there would
for students and
-e public to ask questions
I be editorial goes fur-
opportunity to talk
11 ic ,r- would be there Well it
k? counseling to me.
n the appropriations com-
meeting, the Gra Art Gallery
ithai ere would be counselors
. bod was upset by
ev
Ma nenientl
gh I stated them
the Gray Art
Student Govern-
The legislature ap-
pr ite rues through the Visual
- to the Gras Art Gallery.
ie ieg.s.a:w.re recognizes the Gra Art
!aer- as part of the Visual Art
:rum and gives money through them.
Maurer also failed to point out that
e SGA is working with a ver limited
idget that is in high demand. We
m't even afford to fund all good pro-
grams, let alone questionable ones.
The place of origin of all the contu-
seems to be Daniel Maurer and
f be East Carolinian Perhaps sou
ls.nould have someone who better
understands the workings of a
(legislature cover our meetings Then
perhaps misquotes and iies would stop.
jAlso perhaps Maurer should attend the
jr-eeting he writes about so he would be
better informed, instead of writing
1 nd!v
John Simon,
Vice-Chair
Appropriations
(Editor's Note On Oct 20 this editor
htood before the SGA Legislature and
I id) apologized to Mr Simon for
Misquoting him, even though witnesses
claim he did indeed refer to the exhibi-
as a film I chose to give Mr.
Simon the benefit of the doubt.
However, I would like to make it
perfectly clear that I did not apologize
or the editorial, simplv the misquote. I
Ibeheve in what I said and I will stand
bv it
On the subject of attacks, lies,
I half truths and conscious misleading, I
1 � ould like to make it clear that this was
not the case The editorial in question
� as an attempt to voice an opinion op-
posite that of Mr. Simon's. After
j u nting the editorial, I fully expected a
response. I only regret that Mr. Simon
chose to debate the issue on such a
thighJy emotional level. For more on
this issue see John Shannon's editorial
tnts page.)
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 30, 1986
College Logos Illegally Used By Politicians
(CPS)�Colleges are being
dragged unwillingly into the up-
coming elections by candidates
who just won't leave the cam-
puses' logos alone.
Texas Christian, Texas A&M,
Clcmson. South Carolina and
Oklahoma State, among other
schools, in recent weeks have
found themselves prominently
featured in politicians' fall cam-
paigns. In all cases, the politi-
cians never asked the schools'
permission to use the colleges'
registered trademarks.
"It is not our job nor is it our
wish to get involved in a cam-
paign says one such college of-
ficial.
Texas Christian and Texas
A&M last week forced U.S. Rep.
Joe Barton R-Tex to stop show-
ing several television ads that
featured the colleges' logos, and
suggested the schools had endors-
ed him.
Sen. Don Nickles has been us-
ing film footage of Oklahoma
State football coach Pat Jones in
his reelection ads, despite an OSC
rule requiring advance permis-
sion to use its logo.
Both gubernatorial candidates
in South Carolina have used the
USC logo, while Republican can-
didate Carroll Campbell also
distributed button linking him to
the Clemson Tigers.
Nebraska's trademarked
"Herbie Husker along with
Ronald Reagan, appeared at a
fundraiser for Republican
guberatorial candidate Kay Orr,
provoking an angry rubukc from
university officials.
"The chancellor reports
campus spokesman Bob Bruce,
"did not and does not feel it's ap-
propriate for the university to be
associated with political ac-
tivities
The reason, of course, is that
such politicains hold campus
pursestrings. Schools that back
the wrong candidate could find
their state or federal funding
budgets cut.
"When you're trying to raise
money says Larry Hugick of
the Gallup Organization in New
York, "you want to get people on
both sides of the aisle. You want
to stay above politics in order to
do that
Hugick says he can't remember
previous campaigns in which can-
didates were so eager to associate
themselves with their local cam-
puses, but he could offer no
speculation why they'd want to
this year.
Colleges also need to protect
the trademarks on their logos.
In recent years, hundreds of
schools have registered their
logos in order to profit from the
sale of t-shirt and other items.
The revenue from licensing the
logos has become important to
many of the colleges.
"We want to restrict any abuse
(of the logo) explains Mike
Gore, who handles logo licensing
for Texas Christian. "Then, it is
only for resale items like t-shirts
and the like
"Congressman Barton doesn't
fall under the resale category
adds Gore of the politician who
used the TCU and Texas A&M
logos on his campaign
bumperstickers and ads.
But Barton, a 197 2 A&M
graduate, didn't realize he was
doing anything wrong, asserts
campaign manager Cathy Hay.
Hay figured using the logos
was just a good way to attract the
student vote.
"Congressman Barton is the
October22
2:30 a.m.
A Tyler Hall resident reported
the larceny of her bicycle from
the north side of Tyler Hall.
11:12 a.m.
A teacher from the Brewster
Building reported the larceny of
six Geography tests from his of-
fice after breaking and entering
of the same.
6:55 p.m.
A Greene Dorm resident reported
the breaking and entering and
larceny of money from her dorm
room.
October 23
3:00 p.m.
A teacher from the Brewster
Building reported the larceny of
80 diskettes and a storage box
from his office.
9:00 a.m3:00 p.m.
21 ECU students were served
with warrants for their arrest as a
results of the cooperative in-
vestigation by ECU Public Safety
Department and the Licence and
Theft Division of the Department
of Motor Vehicles concerning the
selling , reproducing, possession,
displaying and counterfeiting of
fictitious driver's licenses.
October 24
10:30 a.m.
A Belk Hall resident reported the
larcenv of his bike from the bike
shed at Belk Hall.
10:31 a.m.
An Aycock resident reported the
breaking and entering of his vehi-
cle and the larceny of his stereo
and sunglasses. The vehicle was
parked on Ficklen Drive.
1:37 p.m.
Sgt. Willis assisted the Greenville
Police Department in aprehen-
ding four residents of Jones Hall
in reference to a hit and run acci-
dent on Fieldside and W. Berkley
Drive.
October 25
12:45 a.m.
A student and a nonstudent were
in possession and consuming
aTcohol while underage west of
Scott Dorm.
October 28
12:05 a.m.
An ECU officer reported observ-
ing inside of a vehicle being
operated by a Scott Dorm resi-
dent. The vehicle contained three
fire arms and three knives.
CAROLINA
GULF
1201 Dickinson Ave.
752-7270
We Guarantee Our Work
And Our Used
Tires � PU & Del. Avail.
Do It With Us.
Wrecker Service
MS. MC, GULF, SOHIO. tORDIs
only Texas representative with
two Southwest Conference
schools in his district Hay says.
"The student vote is important to
him.
Gallup's Hugick thinks the real
aim is to attract the votes of stu-
dent's parents because "young
people don't vote (often). They
have low rates of registration and
even lower rates of turnout
Barton first used the A&M
logo in 1984, Hay recalls, and
"the university never said
anything, so we figued it was
okay (to do it again)
It was TCU's Gore who ob-
jected this time, convincing A&M
officials to do the same. After
hearing the objections, Barton
quickly recalled the
bumperstickers and vowed never
to use the logos again without
permission.
Everyone, in fact, seems sur-
prised by some of the political ap-
propriations of the campus logos,
symbols and even footba
coaches.
The Man of Your Dreams is Back
THE SPECIAL EFFECTS
ARE ASTONISHING
THE FILM IS
SCARY Fast and
nerve racking
Startling1
I L0VE0 FT1
Wild and scary
Gives you
goosebumps
A classy thnller
When the Nickles ad featuring
OSU football coach Jones ap-
peared on television, the coach
told the school's paper he was
"not sure what political party
Nickles represents although the
two had "met once
South Carolina, which lets
nonprofit groups use its block
"C" logo and Gamecock
emblem, was also caught by sur-
prise. "We did not anticipate (it)
would be used in political cam-
paigns says USC attorney Pat
Ward.
USC, anxious not to offend,
decided to allow both guber-
natorial candidates to use the
symbols this fall, though "the
policy may be reviewed after the
political season is over Ward
adds.
Don't
spoil nature
leave only
footprints.
Get the
word out
in the
Announcements
m The East CaroUahtt
CLIFF'S
'Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway N.C 33 E,t , Greenw.lle North Carol.na 1
Pone 752-3172 J .
(Past RiverbluffApts.)
Popcorn Shrimp
Hours 4:0-9:30 MonSat.
NEWLY REMODELED -
Attention
Early Christmas Shoppers!
Tom Togs
WAREHOUSE SALE
October 27 thru November 15
Monday - Saturday 9:30-6
� � Nothing over $10.00 �
Presents
SHOWDATE: (Vt 31
No. 1
1IMI 11:00 p.m.
PLACE; Hendrix Theatre
-JACKf
TKO VDKKO
$
& Famous Names That We Cannot Mention
Everything Direct From Factory
�Close-outs 'Overruns -Irregulars
MEN LADIES. CHILDREN'S 4 INFANTS WEAR
1900 Dickinson Avenue
Located In The Wholesale Area In The Rear Of The Building
DRAFT
NITE
Every Sunday
9:00 til 1:00 A.M.
Admission
$1.50 Guys � 50C Ladies
75- Tall Cans
& Coolers
10 DRAFT
ALL NITE
STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
Your On-Campus Shopping Center
WMMSMMMMMBM
STUDENT STORES
Your KEY For Getting
The Most For The Books You
3vl I � .
Turn Your Unwanted
Textbooks Into Cash
We Also Buy Discontinued Texts
For The World's Largest Book
Wholesaler
mummmk
MMUMIMUIMU





Im east roi inian
iK 1H� K k), lsKr.
Announcements
SIGMA TAU DELTA
H
SGA
CORSONASW

OMEGA PSI PHI
. .
� . a �. a

OMEGA PSI PHI
ATTJ NT,ON A. I SGA VI MB! ks A.
be how �g � parliamentary
worksnoj tooav .� �� �, M,
� � -j a' 6 p m w
r fed 10know ti b, , � . .
me I eg slature Botti �
he. . a.e Prv Oui aue. I a
CAMPUS CRUSADE
FOR CHRIST
PRIMF TIME Prime
Campus Crusade foi Cfti si We get to
every Thu.s.i�v a' ' TT l �� BrewSt)
R � KB B Three reasons to riavi �
kwstl , �.
' OB SO M a We Penh w
a' � !J 'vs.m. Everyon teresti
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
SERVICE FRATERNITY
key walk Alpha Pi i) eg Sei . �
� �'� be pert,opal
. � . n . t 3
� ,a i is a sp � ent ti pi �. . .
- � . ealth, wtiili
' � ; " � Amei a- Hearl
"bat heart � as. ana
' � � a thers out w.th
K In . adventun
� � � Si - � � Pa '� Readi Si I lOti S1 I
Park Thanks I � - supi
PHI ETA SIGMA
Pri. Eta S ijia Tr.e.e will he a me. �
:a� Nov 4th at 6 p rn m room 212
Mendenhall Please bring money io s' rtj
t v. doughnuts will be distributed toi sale
Plea a fa" a' IS! 1S70 or Dana a'
s? ws 1 ,i ave an questions � a
able ' a
NATIONAL ORGANIZATION
FOR WOMEN
NOW Meet rtg T � � ' a lei
� �� � Naf.onai O'ua' tal t. � a�e a
neeting Mon Nov 1 1944 n,
� � held at Chicos Dmnei a' 6 1
Mepl.no at 7 p m We will llSCUSS ek I -
en1 mrmopi sh.p ,1. v(,
� ���a, ontest A: interested parties a �
n aged 10 attend
SGA
� ' ��� � � 1 . -
44 V- � a a' 4 I '� -
' �'� - � v. . ationai rai
� ' � � � a . � � � . ' .
1 1 a � 11 1 ��
COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
� - ' � � wii 1 be on ca M
a, Nov 1 a' 12 " � la 11
U S Senator about yoi
'a � � . � � iy betwei
Brewsti Bidg a I Fletcher v � "a
. � �
FREE PI7ZA
Aim Hig - Force OT ?�� p 4
- . -� . � BOIf ano A r Fry
hes on Monday, n . troen $.7 p ��
EDUCATION MAJORS
now teach.
.
' IB Ti va. spa .
� 4
N A A C P

-
� ' � ise
� � �� � . -
�� . . j
s - 4 s
S E D
- - N A A C P n e
a. � C �f� HSpn - the v
- � H � the Me �
� � rerest. people ar
COLLEGE
REPUBLICANS
PRICK IfFICTIVI TMHU SAT NOvlMSIS I 9a
AT AlP IN OatlNVILLI NC
Wf RESfRVf THI KiMT TO UM.T CJUANTITID
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN
GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce. Deli. Bakery &
Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With You. We Will Match
Like Items Or Equal Quality.
The supermarket with
WAiriHOIIM
i�kn:i
1

A
plus
DOUBLE COUPONS
See Store For Details
ART SCHOLARSHIPS
- 1
-�� �
THIN TRIM GRAIN FED BEEF
PORTERHOUSE OR
Tailless
T-Bone Steak
��- �
s � s �
' - -

I � ' ,

' - -A

11
- �

COUNSELING CENTER
. -
" " A TT g1
�.�
� -
METHODIST PRESBYTERIAN
FELLOWSHIP
s v

K
PUBLIC SERVICE
ANNOUNCEMENT
- � - .
- -
STUDENT PLANNING
ASSOCIATION NETWORK
� - irtment ,

a 'a
STUDENT UNION
COFFEEHOUSE COMMITTEE
� . te
1 in . �� .
" � .
4th a " �� - :
- � 11 .4V- lenha a- �
�� e a 'he Theatre Arts O
ECU WINDSURFING
CLUB
' � � a � 1 � . - � rsoay O
������ � a .4 a .
who wants me "H x� 1 fi �
"� - 8 � sr ouio at
T shirts P ease nr ing
� . - � � . � . � � � n.v. . n � � �
jr � a ,ee ya ft i
STUDENT HEALTH
SERVICE
a 'a a � itaH ' want to s'oc
smok rir'p t� Community
Health ana the American Cancer Society are
a ��� Tin
A-i-e. a meet s ���. Cessation one.
a. be jsevi a-r v nsirjered to be one of
� e - St eflp" .f e'nods CX nelp,ng
� "�� will ne 4 sessions
f'0 13 noon I p m or Tuesaar Nov 4.
T"ursca Nov � MCe- Nov 10 end ng von
a No. 17 e Drogra m oe "eia In
Veaee Shjdn' Ce'er "X" 24( if In
�e'es'ec c ms a Rose B charas e�
T52 2574 or C D Govt' a' 752 �i
V Double "Q"
SAVE ON
Duke's
Mayonnaise
78�
0PENSUNDAY7A.M11 BMaffiS 703 GREENVILLE BLVD OPEN 24 HOURS
THf FAST t AROI IMA
y�p
K
V
The Beaux Aru Fevtiv
door. Doors open at 9 p rr
must hae no facial m�
Bangles Rock
B S( OT1OOPrk
("o-Saort. ratio � -
G R E E N S B R
Bangle
tale
Auditorium
Green i � .
The all-fema
in front of al
who reali .
wortri The B .
lead singer Susana H I
Michae Stcch
Peterson anc
Pe'e
look- accompam
mu-
Grizzar
(L PI) - I ew
S tthei
� i
nist, au

good o. -
Gr
tain deg
ner in
takes g
doe- n
ex-wne-
each a-
Burne

Kath
Nlr- (
l
married
Schmo � .
- M -
in itse I
She �
. �- N
and Other Fat
I twh � The Semi-1 �
sions of the Third Vfn
(Peachtree
$11.95)
"Be j
other t1- .
wa. beca
New Star F
Turns In Fi
B in IiNU( H
saifc ft Twt�. - anHalai
Scourge ol
'o the kankt.i N
Outback. C rocodile
here in Amei s-
Vork from mug
boredom. It am rVj
1; a light. funn film
you with a go
Paul Hoga
m Crocodile Dundee
crocodile poache
under who's rumor
his leg bitten off b a croc
crawled miles the nea-
hospitaJ. A sew New
reporter (Linda k wsk gets
ind of the stor and traces him
lo his favorite pub, where he
brawls with stuffed crocs and
stuffed shirts � all in the name
�f fun. She persuades him to ake
e
tie r

I
I





'HI 1 m c AROI IN1AN
OCTOBER JO. 198ft
SIGMA TAU DELTA
7S �a"9 � 9ener� Membership met,ng
En9�fh PA:ne,T ATUeSOay N�
OMEGA PSI PHI
Om�
7' Cen,p' Nov 1 ,�� from ,0
�Or TW 0raH '� he'P " '�"
or aijreonecngoco
m x. for row support
OMEGA PSI PHI
O-new P ph. � nav,ng ,� 3ra Annua
l nemen' Day Program honor ,�Q a�
black vuaen,5 �,�, a G p A o, 3 fl m 0p�(r
you woola l.ke to take part of fh,j
" rhe Qualification please sena y0u,
� ' aooress aoa telephone number to
O-ega Pv Ph po Box 30U Green .
NC J7834 before Nov i0 i�86
S ED.
upset th Aparthe.c u s rvolv�
-a an s� S gcive'iment
est ion? CtiMAnti f r-
s'uaenis r o I Eionomu
Democracy meets ever, Sunoay from 7�
�" room 238 second flow Menaenhan
5tuaent .
Center
COLLEGE
REPUBLICANS
Co egc Republicans ecu Chapter M
CRs meet ever, Tuesaav a' 6 � p m
Venc. ,� stuoenl CentP, We a a in the
,e,e81 ' �'� leral 'ef� on camCu
v- ' ' ;i are he d n room 221
ARTSCHOLARSHIPS
One Gravefy Founoation Schotarshii
' 1 ��� � gna lees fo 1 I
� to r� awarded fo a ris fg 1
gradi at stupe �t wilfi an o � b
3 0 GP4 a. ong as ttv re r .�� con1 es
1 " � Si -001 ot Art Two
Un �'��. Book Exchange Scholarships for
an amount of (500 annua . a be awaraec
'0 studefs of junior or sen or -ri, a at
p cants must nave an ove-a Gpa of 3 0
One Richard Steven Bean Memo scholar
ttv am � � - sicic lot the �� ir
acaae a- fix , . � s, a,
east a sophomore beaCommuri cation Arts
a p have at east a 2 5 overSu gpa
i" aac � m student select invt bebas
ec upon need ana artisti ability
Easter- Caro ria Anves-c Fece-a'c
Scrioia-sr- p Fund s at,a-c ryg ore scho at
s- p for the 1984 87 acaaem , ,ea, A �- �
amount x ��. award split evi � iwwr
�a semesters of the year The amount
a .� -r J500 $1000 mp . rsha j
a se- or who s enrolled full ' me �t East
Cat ta University majoring nanadvertis
� ' � ' � - f�usi hav� na -jire a
3 0 overS opa or Better Each appica
si ompiete an appi,Cat on torm ano sub
" a 50C wore essay explaii - how "p she
'� ' "� lerested n acvert s nC ai a CS.PP,
a' . ? snouic rece ve 'he scholar
Ship f ve s ces or current work (name ti
med a s 11 must accompany he
' "��' �PP at on form App cat an
ms -a� se oc'a'neo n the School ot A-t
The aeaai'ne tor an completed ap
matet a s Mov 2! 1986
COUNSELINGCENTER
COPING A TH STRESS A � �� � ass
offeree � East Carol -a or stuck rj
v- a '�. Sources of Stress. Vane
pos Cha fe! V.a-aae V:X' Response to
Stressfu Situa' - and Learr �- Re'ax
"�C'Ove Se' Conf-er-ce NOver-be' 5 '
and IS 2tt I1J A- jjhi Bv, 3 PAN
TO AT-rEND A COuR MEETiNGS' NO
advanceregistrat � srequired Cv or stop
t � me : s. . �. . a furthe-
matiot I6 Wright 8 Jing 757 6��i
METHODISTPRESBYTERIAN
FELLOWSHIP
net the Methodist St � � �� � 501
E Stti S- a � ss �� n Garrett d�- this
�"�� " ' ! �y ht at 5 p n �nd evpr,
Wednesday n,Qht (t, a 0e n,s a iV �,
li mpcookec ea a �� 1 it rtprogram
afterwards This week WC a nave 5hor'
worship serv cewitti he EDiscooal students
Vea s Ji 50 w vj' or- J2 a' the door
Ca 758 2030 to- reserval ms Sponsored by
P'esDe' a- a - Wethodist CamPus
W " str es
PUBLICSEkVICE
ANNOUNCEMENT
Pamiico-Tar R ve' Founoat on Works tor
C'ean water The Pamuco Tar Rver Foun
daf'On s aea-cated to preserving the
ecoioqca' -tea- ty of our 8.200 sq
watershed Water qua ty in coasta: North
Caroi'na ,5 subject fo degradation from
"uerous sources Please 101 n us as the iocai
agents of environmental conscience For
more nformat'On phone 944 7211 or wr.te
P O BOX 1854 Wasn ngton NC 27889
STUDENT PLANNING
ASSOCIATION NETWORK
Geography and Piann,ng Departmenf s
sporsor ig a Planning Alumni Pane' Sub
� ect Planning in the Pr.vate Sector versus
Planning in the Pubi'C Sector Th.s win take
place Ocf 31 1986 at 1 p m - Brewster O
208 A1 "teresfed students are welcome
STUDENT UNION
COFFEEHOUSE COMMITTEE
Open Bud'tions All entertamers. amateur
or professional are nViteo to audition for
future performances at The underground
Dates are Nov 6tri and 7ti- at g D m Appl.ca
fions available at room 234 Vendennall. Art
Offre Music Office and the Theatre Arts Of
fice
ECU WINDSURFING
CLUB
There w 11 be a meeting Thursday. Oct
30tn at 6 p m ,n Menoenhali 248 Anybody
wfo wants to sail in the "Hope it Blows
Regatta" a� Emerald isle Nov 8-9 sfouid at
tend Also more on T shirts Please bring
dues f you forgot last time New members
are still welcome See ya'11 Thursday
STUDENT HEALTH
SERVICE
To an faculty and staff wtio want to stop
smoking The Department o� Community
Health ana the American Cancer Society are
offering a "Quit Smoking Clinic " Th
American Cancer Society Cessation model
will be used, and is considered to be one of
the most "ffective methods of helping
smokers to quit There wi'l be 4 sessions
from 12 noon 1pm on Tuesday, NOv 4.
Thursday. Nov 6, Mon , Nov 10, ending Mon
day, Nov 17 The program win be h�ld In
Menqanhali Student Center, room 24. If in-
terested, please can Rose Richards at
7SJJS74 0rCD Glover at 751 Mil
Announcements
SGA
CORSONASW
ATTENTION ALL SGA MEMBeRS We
will be holding a parliamentary procedure
workshop today ,n room 221 Mendenhaii
starting at 6 p m We will .over everything
you need to know to be an effective member
of the Legislature Both old ano new
members are encouraged to attend
COR SO Meeting in Menoenhali Room 212
at 5 15 Tuesday Everyone interested in
vifed
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
SERVICE FRATERNITY
CAMPUS CRUSADE
FOR CHRIST
PRIME TIME Prime Time sponsored by
Campus Crusade for Chr,st We get together
every Thursday at 7 30 p m .n Brewster
Room 102 B Three reasons to have fun
fellowship, ana good Bible teaching See you
t her e
Turkeywalk Alpha Ph, Omega Service
Fraternity will be participating in a
turkeywalk on Nov 2 from 13pm The
turkeywalk is a spec ial event to promote ex
ere .se and cardiovavuiar health, while ra.s
mq funds to help the American Heart
Association combat heart disease and
stroke Please help an brothers Out with
pledges for our 3 mile adventure, from
Green Springs Park to Reade St to 10th St to
Elm St Park Thanks tor all of your suppor ti
PHI ETA SIGMA
Ph. Eta Sigma There will be a meeting
Tuesday Nov 4th at 6 p m m room 212
Menoenhali Please bring money for shirts
Also, doughnuts will be distributed for sale
Please can P�m at 752 2570 or Dana at
752 9952 if you fyavf any questions or are
unable to attend
NATIONAL ORGANIZATION
FOR WOMEN
NOW Meeting The Greenville Chapter
of the National Organization will have a
meeting Mon. Nov I 1986 The meeting
will be held at Chico's Dinner at 6 p m
Meeting at 7 p m We will discuss elections, a
current membership drive, an upcommq
essay contest All interested part.es. are en
c our aged to attend
SGA
The ECU SGA n sponsor .ng , ann,dates
forum ,n room 244 Menoenhali at 4 p m on
Oct JO All local, state ano national ran
ddates have been inv.ted The student
population is encouraged to attend
COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
Come out and meet your next senator
Gov Terry Sanford will be on rampus Mon
oay Nov 3atl2 15 Come talk wth your next
U S Senator about your concerns Gov San
ford will talk tostudents and tat u'ty betwee-
Brewster Bidq and F letcher MuS" Hall it's
your future!
FREE PIZZA
A.m h gh A Force ROTC Free r, 11,
Leam more about ROTC and A.r Force
portun.ties on Monday Nov 3 from J 7 p rr
n Wright Annex Th.rd Floor
EDUCATION MAJORS
Are ,ou piann.ng to� Come and fn0 oc1
how teachers 00 it better at 're next stude
North Caroi.na Asso- af-on or Educator,
meetng neio Ort jo Thursday Spe.ght 34
a 4 p m
N A AC.P.
'here will be j� N A A C P meet ns y
Thursday. Ort JO I�6�t5pm in tin ajtuii
Purpose Room a the Menaennan S'uoer
Center A nteresfed peope are v.fed
SAV-A-CENTERED
MARKET
i��ICIS IffICTIVl TH�U SAT NOVEMBH im
AT A4P IN GMtNVUU HC
WI RISIIVI TMI RIGHT TO LIMIT QUAMTTTIB
WE Will MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN
GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce, Deli, Bakery &
Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With You. We Will Match
Like Items Or Equal Quality.
The supermarket with
WAiriHOMM
I'ltlCI

i
plus
DOUBLE COUPONS
See Store For Details
THIN TRIM GRAIN FED BEEF
PORTERHOUSE OR
Tailless
T-Bone Steak
A7Q
CHUNK LIGHT � IN OIL OR WATER
Double "Q"
Double
LIMIT
TWO WITH AN AOOmONAL C C qj
can
wuivc a
Mayonnaise
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADOtTVONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
REGULAR OR BUTTER
Crisco
inv Shortening
COKE CLASSIC � DIET COKE � CHERRY COKE . TAB
SPRITE � DIET SPRITE � CAFF FREE COKE -MELLOYELLO
CAFF FREE DIET COKE � CAFF FREE TAB
LIMIT ONE OF YOUR CHOICE WITH AN ADOmnuai
PURCHASE AT EVFRYflAV 1 � f01
0PENSUNDAY7A.M11 MSHfttt 703 GREENVILLE BLVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS
THFFASTf ABOMNIAN
1
Th� Beaux Arts Fetia �ill take piacr U
door. Doors open at 9 p.m Pr-
musl har no facial makeup
Bangles Rock A
B SCOTT C(H)PKk
Vs�x�r�� Uliar tmcen ' rm-
in
GREENSBORO
Bangies displaed
talent Friday nigh1
Auditorium on
Greensboro campus.
The all-female quar-r p
in front of about 5,000 specia
who really got their -
worth. The Bangle, consisi
lead singer Susana Hoffs, b
Michael Steele, lead guitar Vicl
Peterson and drummer De-
Peterson, showed thai their fine
looks accompany ome
musical abilit.
Grizza
(L'Pl) � Lewis Grizzai
Southern humorist who ha- made
his mark as a newspaper
rust, author of funn - .
funny titles and defende
good ol' boy tradition
Gnzzard also has (ained
tain degree of noforiet) ss a p
ner in three failed mai He
takes great delight in M
does no: recall the name-
ex-wives, and playful!) refer-
each as "plaintifl
Burned once too often, one
the plaintiffs has taken a red
poker after Gnzzarj
Kathy Gnzzard wa- the rd
-Mrs. Gnzzard Since her divorce
from Gnzzard in 1983, she
married a cowboy name:
Schmook and moed to Montana
� which is somethk;
in itself.
She also has written
book, How To Tame a W ild Rore
and Other Facts of life With
Lewis � The Semi-True Confes-
sions of the Third Vrt. Griizard
(Peachtree Publishers 160 t?
$11.95)
"Being called pla ie
other things rubbed me the u .
way, because it made peof
-

Bore

S I
I
New Star F
Turns In Fi
By FT) TOSH AC H
Savna Te TV tMU anMiaaa
Scourge of the crocodile, hero
to the kangaroo, the Austra
Outback's Crocodile Dunde.
here in Amenca to ae Nev.
York from mugger, pimps, and
boredom. It ain't Raiders, but it
is a light, funny film that leae
you with a good feeling
Paul Hogan plays the title
in Crocodilr Dundee he's a
crocodile poacher from down
under who's rumored to have had
his leg bitten off by a croc and
crawled miles to the nearest
hospital. A sexy New York
reporter (Linda Kozlowski) gets
wind of the story and traces him
to his favorite pub, where he
brawls with stuffed crocs and
stuffed shirts � all in the name
of fun. She persuades him to take
(turn
I
KI I
j
New
-jke
The
Dund
de
- del
transvi
has
whom
loe
Croc
great
simph
plot is
fiat
forgi
howevi
tie roll
funny
that mi
ii
- �
N
� t V. '�'�' t .






FREE PIZZA
- M pllttl
� � - ni 4 r Foci oc
W - , � s 7 p m
-
EDUCATION MAJORS
ina I -o out
IKl Vuoent
- . ipeighl J4j
N A A C P
� s -
" e g on
� Wn Mull.
s'uOnl
I I
$12
t PONS
Details
eak
8
k vfM IW
S
ise
C
HEONMEAT
WTM AN AOOITIOWAL
EVERYDAY LOW MICE
�B' COKE � TAB
JKE MELLO VELLO
FREE TA8
0
THE EAST CABOIINIAN
Entertainment
OCTOBER 30. 1986 Page 7
Thrillers Appear On Cassette
By MICAH HARRIS
The Beaux Arts Festival will take place toniht'ft tCf , '
door. Doors open at 9 p m Persons 18 .nd ni? �� k " S " M ,n "dVanCe' "nd ��� �
must base no facial makeup � be admed W"h a picture "��� �� ��" 21
Bangles Rock Auditorium In Greensboro
Bv SCOTT COOPER
GREENSBORO � The
Bangles displayed their true
Frida) night in Aycock
1 'rium on the L'NC-
Greensboro campus.
all-female quartet played
about 5,000 spectators
reallj got their money's
I he Bangles, consisting of
Su ana Hoffs, bassist
Steele, lead guitar Vickie
Petei ind drummer Debbi
Petersi wed that their Tine
nans some fine
The opening band, E.I.E.I.O
played for about 45 minutes and
gave the (then) sparse crowd a
pretty good show, despite not
singing their theme song from OP
McDonald. But on the serious
side, E.l.E.I.O. had a rougher,
heavier sound with an upbeat
tempo. The roots to their music
seem to stem from country
western. The band hails from
California.
E.l.E.I.O. has just completed
its second IP entitled Land of
Opportunity. The album was
produced by Steve Berlin and
Mark I men; and members from
Los Lobos and T-Bone Burnette
lent a hand on the new record.
The Fronteir Recording artists,
E.I E.I.O played a few hits
from their new album including
"Go West Young Man "This
Time" and "Every Word True
During the intermission,
before the Bangles played, many
people gathered in front of the
stage despite the campus cops' at-
tempt to shield off the area with a
rope tied to a few chairs.
Something told me that this
would be about as effective as the
fence was at Carter-Finley in
See BAND, Page 8
Terror, at its best, is an in-
timate thing. And that makes the
small TV screen in a darkened
room the perfect medium
through which to experience it.
In this article, I have chosen to
review movies which are not as
well known, as say, Sightmare
On Elm Street or Salem's Lot,
but which are on video cassette
and perfect for your Halloween
party this year.
The cream of the dark harvest
is Black Sabbath, a vintage
American International horror
movie directed by Italian terror
master, Mario Bava.
Boris Karloff hosts this an-
thology film which manages to
successfully combine camp-
silliness with genuine blood-
chills; certainly an achievement.
The "Phone" segment involves a
very long distance caller who
won't stay dead. Karloff gives an
unnerving performance as a nas-
ty, crochety old vampire in "The
Wurdalack a finicky monster
who only drinks his loved ones'
blood. But it is the first segment,
Anton Chekhov's Poeish "The
Drop of Water that must rank
as one of the scariest stories ever
committed to video tape.
Briefly, this story concerns a
woman mortician who is called
on a dark and stormy night to at-
tend to the corpse of a witch who
has suddenly died. The mortician
is warned that the witch has put a
curse on anyone who removes
anything from her room; so,
naturally, she steals a ring from
the corpse's finger.
The resulting haunting is a
masterpiece of terror. Bavo, like
other genre greats such as Jac-
ques Tourneur, Hitchock, and
Romero, uses unsettling patterns
of light and dark to heighten ten-
sion. Camera shots such as a
slow, torturous zoom-in on the
grimacing face of the corpse in
her bed are designed to maximize
fear, and sound is masterfully
manipulated. For example, an
opening door creaks like a savage
predator ready to spring for its
prey.
Walt Disney's The Hatcher in
the Hoods is a wonderful exam-
ple of "suggested fear Now, all
of you snickering out there about
a Disney movie being incapable
of being scary have probably
never seen the devil in "The
Night on Bald Mountain" se-
quence of Fantasia. And no less
an authority than Stephen King
says, Disney movies are
minefields of terror So there.
No explicit, sadistic torturing
and state of the art gore here; just
a suspenseful mystery about a
family which moves into an old
British mansion and discovers
there is "something out there" in
the surrounding woods.
Things are not as they seem in
this movie and the performances,
particularly Bettie Davis are
solid. Beautiful locations. A
four-star effort.
The Changeling is a
remarkable, low-key "haunted
house" film about a composer
(George C. Scott) who uncovers a
horrible secret in his new home.
This movie shares some plot
elements with The Hatcher in the
Hoods, unlike the former,
however. The Changeling is not
for the whole family: the scene of
a child being drowned in his bath
would be too intense for the kid-
dies.
I mentioned Bava's use of
sound in Black Sabbath.
Changeling director Peter Medak
takes this technique further, as in
the scene where an empty
wheelchair pursues a woman
through the house. Its grating
gears sound like a mad dog's
growling. The movie also
features a psychic medium more
disturbing than Poltergist's
razzle-dazzle sequence of the
same type.
Tales From the Crypt, a 1973
movie based on the horrid, gross,
and all-around fun EC. Comics
of the 50s which eventually suc-
cumbed to pressure groups, has
been recently released. There are
no great shocks in this anthology
and the gore is mild by today's
standard, but there are some
delightfully morbid twist en-
dings, a fairly intense, insane
Santa Claus story with the jolly
old elf trying to victimize Joan
Collins while she is trying to burs
a victim of her own (her husband)
(what did you expect?), and an
interesting point-of-view piece,
"Upon Reflection But the old
saving still holds true, "the (com-
ic) book was better This un-
pretentious effort is best enjoyed
with your tongue implanted in
your cheek.
Two classics, The Haunting
and Freaks, are scheduled for an
October release. The Haunting is
considered by many to be the
haunted house movie. Directed
by Robert Wise from Shirley
Jackson's novel, this film has the
distinction of actually being film-
ed in a "real" haunted house.
Todd Browning's (director of
the Bela Lugosi Dracula) Freaks
is a ghastly work which has been
banned several times. Browning
employed people truly suffering
from deformities and handicaps.
The ending is particularly distur-
bing. Not for the sensitive.
So, there's the recommended
list. Of course, since Halloween is
on Friday this year, you could
save the rental fees, tune in to
"Dallas and hope Pam Ewing
will dream up Freddie Krueger.
Grizzard Receives Taste Of Own Humor
1 evvis Grizzard is a
thern humorist uho has made
"ark as a newspaper colum-
. author of funny books with
titles and defender of the
1' boy tradition.
ard also has gained a cer-
legree of notoriety as a part-
:hree failed marriages. He
takes great delight in saying he
d es not recall the names of his
ex-wives, and playfully refers to
each as "plaintiff
Burned once too often, one of
he plaintiffs has taken a red-hot
ker after Grizzard.
Kathy Grizzard was the third
Mrs. Grizzard. Since her divorce
irom Grizzard in 1983, she has
married a cowboy named
Schmook and moved to Montana
� which is something of a story
in itself.
She also has written her first
book, How To Tame a Wild Bore
and Other Facts of Life With
I ewis � The Semi- True Confes-
sions of the Third Mrs. Grizzard
(Peachtree Publishers, 160 pp
$11.95).
"Being called plaintiff and the
other things rubbed me the wrong
way, because it made people
think I was one of the subhumans
he was talking about Schmook
said in a telephone interview
from her home in Pray, Mont a
town of 20 near Yellowstone Na-
tional Park. "I wanted people to
know there was flesh and blood
at the other end
However, Wild Bore is not
quite what one might expect from
an ex-wife writing about her ex-
husband.
Instead of dastardly revela-
tions from the bedroom, 'Wild
Bore is full of laugh-out-loud
stories of Grizzard's closet brim-
ming with dirty underwear and
his assorted redneck ways in non-
Southern places like Europe.
Wild Bore is a dose of Griz-
zard's own medicine. It is very
much like his own stable of quip-
filled humor books; and it is a
hoot.
"I've learned a lot about
humor from Lewis Schmook
said. "In fact, our humor is very
similar � that's one of the things
that attracted us at the
beginning
Of course, a marriage on the
rocks is far funnier in retrospect.
"Oh boy is it said Schmook,
who was married to Grizzard for
two and a half less-than-blissful
years and now is married to her
third husband. "If you had
caught me a year after the
divorce, I could have written one
that would have made Mommie
Dearest look like 'Mr. Rogers
But Wild Bore is pure fun �
biting and indicting as it is.
Schmook takes aim at Grizzard
from numerous angles.
From his penchant for smart
attire (he once wore a slice of
bacon around his neck to an "up-
pity" restaurant that required a
necktie) to his taste for fine
cuisine (Spam and pinto beans
was one of his favorites) to his
pickup lines in bars, ("Grizzard's
the name, news is my game
Came the reply from a woman
flipping him a quarter, "Call
somebody who gives a damn,
Scoop)
Schmook claims to have been
the cultural force who introduced
Grizzard to the finer things in life
� fancy food, travel and Gucci
shoes, to which she says he has
become addicted. Without socks,
of course.
is:
But the burning question
how much of this is true?
"The tragic thing is that it's all
very true Schmook said. "Very
little of it is exaggerated. Most of
it is right on the money
Schmook derived the impetus
to write Wild Bore from watching
Grizzard become a national darl-
ing � syndicated columns, best-
selling books, talk-show ap-
pearances and even a record
album.
Schmook believed she had
escaped the reach of Grizzard
when she moved to the middle of
nowhere in Montana.
"Then one day last year we
were out moving cows from
pasture to pasture and a friend of
mine yelled to ask if I had heard
of 'that hilarious Southern come-
dian, Les Gizzard Schmook
recalled. "That really unnerved
me. I 'galloped right home and
began working on the book
Schmook and Grizzard have
remained good friends � "sort
of like brother and sister she
says � and Wild Bore has done
nothing to hurt their new rela-
tionship. There's nothing like a
little humorous ex-marital strife
to sell a few books.
"He enjoyed the book
Schmook said. "But I knew he
would. He's got such a good,
honest sense of humor. There
were some things he wished I
hadn't put in there.
"He was upset about the
references I made to Georgia and
Goergia Tech football
Schmook said. "Now that is a
true neurotic
Grizzard even offered a quote
for the book jacket.
"This book wrote Grizzard,
"might possibly be the best book
any of my ex-wives has ever writ-
ten about me
Schmook docs not expect Griz-
zard to change his tune, even if he
is forced to autograph her book.
"If Lewis causes a stink
Schmook said, "I'm going to
write a sequel, How To Cook a
Wild Bore, and use all the good
stuff I didn't use this time
New Star From Down Under
Turns In Fine Film Portrayal
OPEN 24 HOURS
BvEDTOSHACH
�in.i T !W Call WH�
Scourge of the crocodile, hero
to the kangaroo, the Australian
Outback's Crocodile Dundee is
here in America to save New
York from muggers, pimps, and
boredom. It ain't Raiders, but it
is a light, funny film that leaves
you with a good feeling.
Paul Hogan plays the title role
in Crocodile Dundee, he's a
crocodile poacher from down
under who's rumored to have had
his leg bitten off by a croc and
crawled miles to the nearest
hospital. A sexy New York
reporter (Linda Kozlowski) gets
wind of the story and traces him
to his favorite pub, where he
brawls with stuffed crocs and
stuffed shirts � all in the name
of fun. She persuades him to take
her to where he was attacked
(turns out his leg wasn't bitten
off, but the bite did leave a nasty
scar) and during the trip decides
that she'll pay Dundee to come to
New York, because it would
make such a good story.
The real fun starts when
Dundee hits the big apple and has
to deal with everything from
bidets to television, from
transvestites to muggers. He also
has to deal with the reporter, with
whom he has fallen hopelessly in
love.
Crocodile Dundee is not a
great movie. It is written very
simply, and for the most part the
plot is predictable, the characters
flat. What makes one want to
forgive any short-comings,
however, is Paul Hogan in the ti-
tle role. As Dundee, Hogan is
funny in a friendly laid-back way
that makes you want to open up a
bottle of Foster's Lager and
laugh along with him. His macho
is not the relentless ego trip of
American "real men" like
Stallone, but he is a likeable hero
who doesn't take himself too
seriously. He's perfect for the
role.
He should be. Paul Hogan co-
wrote the movie, after he himself
had visited New York. The role is
tailor made for him, but you
can't begrudge him that because
he's so good in it.
Don't expect non-stop action
or the high-tech thrills of a
Spielberg film in Crocodile
Dundee. The movie is not an
adrenaline trip, and what action
there is, is mostly for the sake of
humor.
What you should expect is to
laugh a little and leave the theatre
with a smile on your face. And
sometimes, that's enough.
From The Not So fight
Marcos Remembers Manila
By PAT MOLLOY
hMirnmmmtmi Editor
Well, hello, hello, hello. It's
been a while since last we spoke.
I hope all of you have been do-
ing well. I feel quite invigorated
by my long weekend of relaxa-
tion in Hawaii.
Yes, I know. You're think-
ing, "How come tha; goon gets
to go to Hawaii for Fall Break,
and I have to go home to Lizard
Lick, NC?"
Easily answered: Because it
was rumored that Ferdinand
Marcos was dwelling around the
island stealing pineapples from
the natives, the powers-that-be
at this newspaper reasoned I'd
be the perfect candidate to in-
terview such a seedy, low-down,
lying bag of worms and sent me
to Hawaii to do just that. Don't
you love how the bureaucratic
mind works?
So there I was in Hawaii,
coolin' out. I knew I was bad. I
had on Wayfarers. I had a ge-
nuine, artificial Don
JohnsonWillard Scott
Hawaiian shirt. I had a lei �
something I hadn't had in quite
a while. And I had one hell of a
buzz.
The buzz was the cumulative
effect of 17 Mai Tais (trying to
get into the mood of the island),
four Margaritas (trying to get
into the mood for Buffett), and
23 Sex on the Beaches (trying to
get into anything I possibly
could), plus the continual sway-
ing of 2,000 miles of ocean. I
told you I'd never fly again.
My "expert" guide and I (ex-
pert, to be sure � he hopped on
the raft, took three valiums and
told me to turn right at Califor-
nia) paddled all the way from
Nags Head to Maui.
It was rough at first, what
with sea-sickness and the like;
but in the final analysis, I still
think floating is a more viable
alternative than flying when it
comes to long-distance travel.
At least you don't have some
troglodyte from the Land of the
Lost asking, "Coffee, tea, or
shall I shed my skin for you?"
Thanks, but I'd rather help
myself than be served by a
ninth-generation tree climber
who just learned to stand erect.
Oh, but enough of me; let's
move on to that stimulating,
rambling and often libelous in-
terview with the "Killa from
Manilla Ferdinand Marcos.
PM: Good afternoon, Mr. Mar-
cos. I'm glad you could take
time from your hectic schedule
to talk with me.
FM: Hectic schmectic, Peter.
What I do all day is sit around,
drink gin, watch the "Wheel of
Fortune" and listen to Imelda
sing "Where Have All the Good
Times Gone?" If I'm feeling
especially good, I take Imelda
to "Pick 'n' Pay take her
home and make her beg like a
peasant. It's good time.
PM: You're still a rocker, eh,
dude. Tell me, what's the real
scoop about this pineapple
stealing business?
FM: I know of no stealing,
Paul. I am honest man. (Pulls
hard on a gin and tonic) I try to
live my life respectfully. I come
to America because I was asked;
and now I am big fruit thief!
I'm not involved in pineapple
ring.
PM: (chuckle) You're a pistol,
Mr. Marcos. Well then, sir, if
you're not stealing pineapples,
and, as everybody knows, you
stole no money from your peo-
ple, how are you surviving?
FM: Perry, we steal no food
We live off the land, and off of
our love for each other.
PM: Very touching indeed; and
judging from the size of your
land whale � I mean wife �
there must be a lot of love off of
which to live.
FM: That was American joke
right? Let me tell you, Pedro
Sec EX, Page t






IH 'AM ,RO ,NAN
(K IOHIR JO, 1986
Ex-President
Side Of Life
onCinued from p�Ke 7
lme,da � food woman She
"� look like Jabba the Hut
"ha bad case of gas, but when
itie cards are down, there's no
othei person I'd �ant. She's
I'M faithful dog.
PM: Vo" aid u. Let's sa
towards the career side of your
lite. Have you sought employ-
mem here, or have you received
art) otters for employment?
FM: (Makes slurping sound as
his straw meets the bottom of
his now-empt) glass.) in-
teresting you bring that up,
Phil. I have look for work here
in Hawaii. 1 go to Taco Bel! and
7-11. They sav 1 look the part,
but the) don't trust me with
spare change. Also, American
Express has shown interest in
me. l"he want me to do televi-
sion commercial. "1 carr)
American Express didn't
leave home without it I don't
think ii was in good taste.
Reveals Wild
With Imelda
PM: 1 can well understand your
hesitation. Explain to me, if you
will, your relationship with
Mrs. Aquino the present
leader of the Phillipines.
KM: 1 spit on her haircut. What
does she know about running a
country? (Crunches the ice in
his glass) She wants people to
vote. Next thing, she be creating
fobs. Ha! Poor people don't
want work that's why they
poor. What do my followers
think What do you think? I
think I'll have another drink.
PM: Yes, well thank you Mr.
President. 1 can see it's time for
your "Happ Hours On
behalf of The East Carolinian, I
thank you.
FM: Yes, yes, thank you too.
Pierce; it was pleasure. I just
like to say one thing to my peo-
ple in the Phillipines "I shall
retu
PM: Give it a rest, dude.
KM: Ihank you, Pecker.
Band Delivers Quality Performance
Continued from nior 7 ������
Continued from page 7
Raleigh in '85. After the P.A. an-
nouncer got everybody in their
seats. The Bangles finally ap-
peared.
The moment the girls came
out, lead singer Hoffs gestured to
the house to come up and get
closer. The auditorium seats
emptied as the aisles filtered peo-
ple toward the front of the stage.
Hoffs had the audience in the
palm of her hand from the onset,
throwing lingering gazes at the
front row crowd. The Los
Angeles band played everything
from their Different light LP.
Tunes such as "If She Knew
What She Wants "Let it Go
"Manic Monday "Angels
Don't Fall in Love "September
Gurls and "In a Different
light" � the title track � were
getting plenty of response from
those on hand.
The music sounded clear, as
the acoustics were outstanding in
the auditorium. At one point,
HIGH TECH MUSK
both looked
were great
Classifieds
Hoffs strolled over to Peterson,
(playing lead) and picked the str-
ings while Peterson fingered the
chords. It's hard to explain, but it
looked and sounded impressive
When the Bangles finished
their regular set, everyone knew
that an encore was forthcoming;
and the tune was even more
predictable � take a guess.
"Walk Like An Egyptian" was
actually the second song of the
encore, but sounded excellent,
nonetheless. Drummer Peterson
did the intense whistling the song
opens with, as she led the crowd
at that point.
If you don't know, UNC-G is
primarily a female campus � the
ratio (girls to guys) is about seven
to one, if I'm not mistaken.
There was a fair share of women
to speak of, but two blondes real
ly seem to stick out in my mind.
A short, black fishnet skirt
adorned one, and a pair of white
stirrup pants and a halter top
stuck to the other. The babes
definitely left a lasting visual im-
age on me. But seriously, Miss
and Ap � you
maahvelousand
hostesses.
Oh! This review wouldn't be
complete without thanking m
brother, Corey. I can't tell you
how much I appreciated the press
passes. You were and are
definitely the best usher there'
A final thanks goes to
WZMB's Dave Elliot, who sup-
plied all the useful information
on the two bands.
Meet Your Next
U.S. Senator
SALE
D.J Are you hav-ng a party and
need a D JFor thP pes n Top j
: I dance a v � ian aT
'5� 7967 Reasonable � at,
'�� � � es on request
FOR SALE: Alto saxaphone, Sa n i �
S600 and clarinet by Sa
' � � K X! Call 758 7064
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE Wore DrocessinQ The
�� rks spe a ?es n si ,v ���
services
- ' '� pai
md more. All m ork
� '� ' ' � � aga t 50,000
� " I�c1 onar,� Rates
��� as S' t �� � age
: i pa pi
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICS: Typ
� � s, fei
SO per
f 5th SI
752 36i4
m papers, thesis
page typing 05c
te. Call SDF Pro
' Services inc. 106
Cubbies). Green
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc Call
nne at 752 3015 and leave a
message
TYPING AND WORD PROCESS
ING: Experienced secretary vv IBM
putei and letter quality printer
rf'1 fulfil all your typing and
si retai a needs Theses, business
'�� rs resumes and mailing labels.
Call Donna at TS5 6434
TYPING: Low student rates Done
on wora processor with letter quality
printer and 50,000 word built in die
tionary and thesaurus Debb.e
355 759f
CHEAP JEEPS: Can you buy Jeeps,
Cars 4x4's seized in drug raids for
under $100? Call for facts today.
602 837 3401. Ext S711
NEW COSMETIC LINE: Now
available. Free color analysis for
limited time only to all customers
For appointment call Laura, Beauty
Consultant 756 5920 Mon Sat
9 30 11 00 pm. Sun 12 pm 11 pm
TYPING ALL KINDS. $1.25 per
Page with paper. $50 per page
without paper Call 752 2100 after 6
pm
publicity KING: Time is not run
nng out A properly planned social
affair needs the TRASHMAN'S DJ
service to make it complete. Contact
the county wide legacy at 752 3587
Thank you
TYPING SERVICES: If you have
papers, reports, etc that need to be
typed. 758 8934 between 5 30 9 30
p.m. Very reasonable rates
FOR SALE: 1 pair of men's Guess
jeans Grey with black leather in
back Brand new and never been
worn WaiSt30 length 32" Paid $50
will sell for $25 Call Jeff at 758 0940
PARTTIME HELP: National Col
lege Marketing Company seeks
group to work part time assisting
students in applying for credit
cards. Flexible hours and excellenl
money GREAT FUNDRAISER!
Call Susie at 1 800 592 2121
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Experienced, quality work,
IBM Selectnc typewriter. Call Lanie
Shive at 758 5301
PERSONALIZED COMPUTER
DATING: A large, evergrowing list
of people to date Easy and confiden
rial. Call Katz Services 355 7595
FOR SALE: Kenwood KAC 8200
high power car amplifier 75 watts
per channel RMS. New condition
Best offer. Call 752 3032
TYPING: Low rates Proofreading,
grammatical corrections 10 years
experience 757 0398 after 6pm
PERSONAL
BUDDY. Those spaces between
your fingers got the best of you in
Georgetown, but the leather was
sweet! Thanx for everything!
Michele
TKE'S: The car wash on Sunday will
be a big splash That night we'll go to
PB's, be prepared to get smashed
Carwash at Hardee's Sunday after
noon Come by The TKE Little
Sister Pledges
See CLASSIFIEDS, page 12
GOV. TERRY
SANFORD
Candidate for V. S. Senate
See Gov. Sanford in front of
Fletcher Music Hall adjacent to
Brewster Bldg.
MONDAY, NOV. 3rd, 12:15
P.M.
Helicopter Arrival on the
Intramural Field, College Hill
Drive
BE THERE
ITS YOUR FUTURE!

Student Union Major Concerts
Committee Presents:
and
bicycm;
pos
All OVER
Are Having A Fall Giveaway
Win a Black Schwinn Beach Cruiser
Get your entry blanks at WZMB studios
or at Bicycle Post.
Tune in 91.3 for the station that gives
you a "Wheel of a Deal"
Drawing will be held Oct. 31, 1986
with
Delbert McClinton
.
YValkin' 1 he Plank
� v � � � � �� ,
Y Pi' � ��-
����? � �
fftt .f rffe U �
A j �' .� , .
K" s ami i. �
V.
Fun-O-Rama
Campus Comics
J.N JOINER I 3-
sJ
Overkill
� . . y. . . - � -
I Undercover Cat�
A
FELL � -& atxj�
M 15o nVT - MP Wt KRl rAC:��
' CAST J4V� V iUMftfWr Of4T '
� ��ux �. a ; �"��
� I � miiMi i ��-
S fTHl Off JV
Saturday, November J igg6
8:00 p.m. Minges Coliseum
ECU C-JZ12���. �
Door





Wormance
and Ap ou both looked
maahvelous and were great
hostesses
Oh! This review wouldn't be
complete without thanking my
I brother, Corej 1 can't tell sou
uch 1 appreciated the press
You were and are
� best usher there!
A '
:k� oes to
�ho sup-
i! information
D
Senate
tord in front of
Hall adjacent to
P BIdg.
OV. 3rd, 12:15
M.
nval on the
d, College Hill
IK RE
FUTURE!
Concerts
nts:
ton
, 1986
iseum
,e Records
& At The Door
YVaJkin' I he Plank
-f. � . fit, 4- ,U). ctf�
t , M�tM ma-i acu �. fsi ifA
�? .HtAV WOMbO 1i4Ai M" 'Hfc,c if-r '
4- �Mf fW A Wff wJc M�X p
�" - ' w&iUlW
ClOo uJoNOtR -fug f�ip.)kiir
iv Ml if, ftME gJM.K Ml�,
ByAGUY
d�5
W "1

Fun-O-Rama
8t�ex sicc 0Krc hv
6�VS�nrf MAUoAi, SA.VS
1 hJ.i-D AM'Ai.S �Avt KfflO
�CEMSe o SARCASM j- J
Sir
: FIRECRACKERS N
By LATTIMORE-COBB
1MB -sbCiD WAvF ATTACKS
WITH SUA6SH0TS AO �fS"S.
x s .�" . VIE A
iJLt (j. Ait r - 4
v
- � -a. J
.k V � 3EA7 I
1 " r
WE'RE 6�NM
�N
Campus Comics
iL ('7
" ' Big

r
By BARBOUR
SOTHRTS VJHHT HPf?�Nl if
YOU r�y TO SNEAK Pi BOOK
Out of he he. i '
Overkill
By FRIEDRICH
Undercover Cats
hMy BELIEVE IT?
By PARKER
-ByJiLAiaER
u�AMrt Hoono w ccir
�TiToH,tm VNXi MB CA�T
Tooth
Sneed
1 ! J
lbYt6mmM
JOVlMElfRE.
OH,V�SOft(;flN;
1EST LRK
By BRYAN
Jim
F-Y
ri urn umrr td PETZST n
TW6 5TUPD BORDJA 11 ' W$CAU- 6 IMt
.By brook;
ri riG.nr foK rw
JUSrittAUPMK WAY
7
j
Jp
THg FiFVll,y IMACfTVMQUTM
Iw l"ie park
Before Wjton Can
$Y CH��Ry
React, 3ra-a-4(i "S SCCuh y
Cav-ied off by
K�rr� ,�'sld' a I "Hie
.pe qde o-f
;K� ce wire.
iHe qi�-
si�if-
�: �i
r�n
GQMING ATTRACTIONS
Films
HOUSE
October 30, 31, November 1 & 2
8:00 p.m.
Late Show
A Nightmare On Elm
Street: Port II: Freddys
Revenge
October 31 & November 1
11:00 p.m.
. Dinner Theatre
The Owl And The Pussy
Cat
October 31 & November 1
Major Concerts
JOHN FOGERTY
Saturday, November 1 �
8:00 p.m. - Minges Coliseum
Forum: Lecture
How To Soy No To A
Rapist And Survive
Monday, November 3
8:00 p.m. - Hendrix Theatre
FRfE
Sphering place
��� :��
� ��






� HI I AST CAROI INN
Buc Golfers
Place Third
At Seahawk
�yTIMCHANDLEI
Vwm Sp��rl, Wrllrr
The ECU golf team placed
third this past weekend in the
rain-shortened Seahawk Invita-
tional in Wilmington.
1 he tournament was shortened
to onl one lay because of incle-
ment weather on the final day of
the scheduled two-day event.
Campbell I Diversity won the
tournament with a one-day, team
total ol 300. UNC-Wilmington
placed second at 303, while the
Pirates turned in a team total of
$06.
lames Madison took the
fourth spot in the eent at 308
followed b Greensboro College
in fifth place at 309.
The individual honors for the
tournament went to John Zurich
ol Greensboro College who turn-
ed in a 73.
I op honors for ECU belonged
freshman John Maginnes who
ca Jed a 75, which put him in a
tie for fourth place. Next for the
Pirates was Mike Bradle with a
'6. which was good enough to
put him in a eighth-place tie.
Other scores for the Pirates in-
cluded Todd Ramse who shot a
Paul Steelman with a "8 and
Mark Arcilesi with an 80.
Head coach Hal Morrison said
that he felt that if the tournament
had not been rained out on the
final day, that the Pirates could
have fought back and won the
event.
"1 feel like we would have had
a good chance to win on the se-
cond day. We had cut Campbell's
lead to three (strokes) before the
rain (the rain halted play after six
holes) had blown bv (UNO
Wilmington said Morrison.
"Our whole team was plaving
well before the final round was
cancelled
Morrison went on to compli-
ment "several members of the golf
team for their performances dur-
ing the Seahawk Invitational.
"John Maginnes plaved verv
well for us and usually con-
tributes good solid scores for the
team said Morrison. "Paul
Steelman, a always, turned in a
solid score also
Morrison also commented on
team leader Mike Bradley per-
formance.
"Mike got off to a bad star:
(five over ar on the from
nine) said Morrison. "But 1 am
very proud of the way he came
back on the back side (one under
par on the back nine), that is verv
good considering that the back
nine is harder than the front nine
there
The next tournament for the
Pirate linksters will be this
weekend Nov. 1-2 as thev will
travel to Old Dominion Universi-
ty for a two-day event.
Sports
Netters Conclude Fall Season
B DONRUTLEDGI
Sports Fact
Thur. Oct. 30. 1955
College football will never be
'the same as the ever popular
ICigar Bowl is canceled, joining
the Salad Bowl and
Refrigerator Bowl, two other
college bowl games that failed
the test of time.
Five ECU tennis players ad-
vanced to the final round of the
Colonial Athletic Association
tennis tournament consolation
round last Saturday held on the
University of William & Mary
campus.
However, rain forced the
cancellation of the consolation
round which was to be held out-
side.
ECU's Dan LaMoni advanced
to the consolation flight of the
first flight singles, while team-
mate Jon Melborn did the same
in the second flight.
Greg Lloyd advanced to the
consolation finals in the third
flight singles, as did Todd
Sumner in the fourth flight.
Kevin Plumb made it to the same
round in the fifth flight.
The Pirates finished the tour-
nament in fifth place ahead of
American University, George
Mason University and UNC-
Wilmington.
The four top finishers, Navy,
James Madison, William & Mary
and Richmond.
The men's tennis team con-
cluded their fall dual match
season Tuesday (A week ago)
afternoon, losing to UNC-
Charlotte 7-2 on the Minges
courts. (The loss brought them to
8-2 for the fall season).
The Pirates were playing
without starters John Taylor, Pat
Campanaro, Scott Averv, and
Bill Wing, who were out with in-
juries and illnesses. Campanaro,
Averv, and Wing will not be able
to play in the Colonial Con-
ference .Tn�rnamTnt njc
weekend.
Coach Pat Sherman is hoping
that No. 3 singles player will
recuperate from his illness before
the tournament.
Dan LaMont, at No.l singles,
plaved perhaps his best match of
his college career, keeping
pressure on his opponent with
deep shots, and passing him
relentlessly with low drives down
the line and crosscourt topspins.
"Dan played the best match of
his college career and that's a
good way to go into the con-
ference tournament praised
coach Sherman.
I ooking ahead to the con-
ference tournament, the coach
said: "I osing our No. 3 doubles
team (Pat Campanaro and Scott
A very) will hurt us point-wise.
We did have good depth, and
now we're not so strong; but
we're going to give it our best
shot
Last Wednesday, the women's
tennis team ended their fall
season in a disappointing loss to
Atlantic Christian College.
The Bulldogs from ACC, with
the Swedish strong arms at the
top of their lineup, were just too
strong according to coach Sher-
man.
"They (ACC) won a Regional
Tournament (just prior to our
match) which shows how strong
thev are as a team she said.
"Everybody had to plav their
best tennis to beat ACC, and I
don't feel that the girls plaved
their best tennis that dav
There were bright spots,
however, as Susan Montjoy con-
tinued to dominate at No. 6
singles, as well as at No. 3
doubles with Tv Myers. Also, ai
No. 5 singles, Holly Murray
plaved very strong tennis, winn-
ing in straight sets. The women
finished the fall season with a 6-3
dual match record.
Summary:
Women: ACC 6. ECU 3
A. Andbora (ACC) d. L. Ekhhoiz 6-3
6-1
S Milne (ACC) d. A Ziemer 6-1 6-0
S Maxwell (ACC) d. T. Myers 6 6-4
v Smith (ACC')d. M. Swaim 6-2 6-1
H.Murrav (ACC id N. Griffm6-3 6-4
S Montjo) (ACC) d. S. Myers 6-4,6 2
AndbornMUner (ACQ d. Eichhol-
lemer 6-1, 6-2
Maxwell-Smith (ACC) d. Murrav-Swattn
6-4, 6-4
Mootjoy-Myers (ACC) d. .Myers-Parker
6-2, 6-3
Men: IN(.( 7 LCI 2
D. LaMooi (ECU) d. S. Carvalhoe 6-0
6-2
R. Segovia (UNCC) d. J. Melhom 6-1,
6-1
K. Aron (UNCC) d. G. Lovd 6-2, 6-1
M Kanakas (UNCC) d. T. Sumner 6-1
6-0
J. Burke (UNCC) d. K. Plumb 6-2 6-4
I MacNeil (UNCC) d. J. Bums 6-3. 6-2
Cavalhoe-Segovia (UNCC) d. Melhorn-
Hurns 6-1. 6-3
I oyd-l.aMont (ECU) d. Aron-Karukas
1-6. 7-5, 6-2
BurkeMacNeil (UNCC) d. Plumb-
Sumner 6-2, 6-2
CK roBi R �. IVM
Page If)
USM Visits Greenville
As Bucs Seek Revenge
By SC OTT COOPER
The Southern Mississippi
Golden Eagles, coached bv Jim
Carmody, visit ECU this
weekend as the Pirates will be
hoping to avenge last year's 27-0
loss in Hattiesburg, Miss.
The Golden Eagles, 3t in-
cluding a 35-20 loss to Tulane last
week, lead the series 8-3 between
the two schools. ECU's coach
Art Baker remembers Southern
Mississippi, especial!) their
defense.
"Against Texas A & M (a 16-7
loss), I thought thev were one of
the finest looking defensive teams
I've seen all vear long, against
Kentucky (a 32-0 defeat) thev
were not Baker said. "The
thing I always remember about
Southern Miss is that thev are a
well-coached team, and thev have
great athletes
Offensively, L'SM supplies a
potent attack headed by a host ol
seniors. Tailback Vincent Alex-
ander, who has 2,44 career
rushing yards at L'SM, leads the
Eagles in '86 with 48" vards
rushing on 106 carries. Fullback
Randolph Brown teams wrh
Alexander in the veer offensive
set.
Senior quarterback Andrew
Anderson joins Alexander in the
back Held. He has completed
49-of-85 passing attempts for 539
yards and three touchdowns this
season. Anderson, for those who
remember, rallied L'SM back
from a 24-3 deficit, before winn-
ing 31-27 in ECU's final came in
1984
Five juniors ,dT- on !ne otIen.
sive hue for Southern Miss, who
is coached bv former E I assis-
tant Mark McHale.
However, the receiver spots
ma be the big-plav people
Senior split end Andrew Mo
who moved from cornerback a
year ago, returned a punt 66
yards in l"SM comeback win
over ECU in '84. Mott is joined
bv senior flanker Ivneal Alston
"Thev like to play hard-nosed
football. Both offensivel) and
defensively, they're going to
come at you Baker said
"You're not going to have a hard
time locating them � thev 're go-
ing to be there
I SM has a relatively young
defense, with just three starting
seniors � tackle Doug Bolt,
nerback Tim Smith and free sal
ty Collins Hess.
However, the defensive unit
anchored bv junior lineback
Onesimus Henry, who led
Eagles with 121 tackles last y,
and Sidney Coleman. Smith (
stops) and Hess (90 tackles, crJ
"The thing I always
remember about
Southern Miss is that
they are a well-coached
football team, and thev
have great athletes. "
�Art Baker
the second and third-lead .
tacklers from a year ago.
Carmody feels that his d
sive front may be a some
sore spot for USM. Bolt and
the line with junior tackle UK
Slaughter, junior nosegu
Larry Davis and a pair
phomore defensive end- Si
Bi �wn and Maurice Oliver.
One area that Carmody is im-
pressed with is his kicking gan
� placekicker Rex Bai I
who led the Eagles in scoring w
66 points las: vear; and punter
Bills Knighten, who averaged
42.1 yards per punt iast vear.
have the respeci or coach Bake-
as well.
"They have a great kicking
game Baker said.
They have a great scheme in both
blocking kicksand returning
kicks. We're going to have
work a lot on that area
. JC�JO�D�N-ECUPM-LJf
mZrthis?r:rhJackie ,rmsrnR 9 ��" d�n on - ��"
make this grab against South C arolina asl weekend.
ECU Swimmers Tune Ud
Free safety Ellis Dillahunt (19), who ranks third in tackles for K I (with u�0.�.J00N Eu P0,�L,b
By RICK McCORMAC
o-Sjiorl, Editor
The ECU swim teams held
their annual PurpleGold meet
last week, in their final tuneup
before the regular season.
On the men's side, the Gold
team defeated the Purple 49-44,
while the Purple team won the
women's competition 52-42.
"We had some good swims
and some bad swims in the
meet Pirate head coach Rick
Kobe said. "It's still October and
very early in the season.
However, this meet was more im-
portant than past PurpleGolds
because we start the season so
early
Kobe named juniors Andy
Johns and Patrick Brennan
outstanding swimmers for the
men. For the women, who set
five PurpleGold records, Kobe
cited the performances of
and
freshman Pam Wilbanks
senior Caycee Poust.
Brennan won the 1,000-meter
freestyle and the 200-meter
breaststroke, and was one of
three men to win two events
Tyge Pistorio captured the
400-meter medley and the
200-meter individual medlev
while David Killeen captured
both the 200 and 500-meter
freest yles.
Other individual winners for
the men were: Ron Fleming, An-
dy Jeter and Kevin Hidalgo.
For the women, Wilbanks took
f'rst in the 1,000-meter freestyle
with a time of 10:51.71 and the
500-meter freestyle (5:19.8) set-
ting new meet records in both
events.
Poust took first place in both
the 400-meter medley relav and
the 200-meter individual medlev
Poust's time of 2:17.47 in the in-
dividual medley was also a new
both
and
the
the
Purple Gold record.
Jenm Pierson won
50-meter freestyle
200-meter freestyle.
Freshman Ryan Philvaw 's time
of 2:35.76 in the 200-meter
breaststroke was also good
enough for a new meet mark. The
final record setter for the Pirates
was Susan Augustas in the
200-meter butterfly with a time of
2:16.64.
Other individual winners for
'he women were: Patti Walsh
and Jennifer Dolan.
In diving, for the men Dand
Overton captured both the one
and three meter-diving competi-
tions For the women, Sherry
Campbell captured both events '
The Pirates will open the
season on Nov. 8 at Furman
"We have a long ways to go to
get prepared for the season
Kobe said. "But, we will
there
In A
CLUB SPORTS ON
The Club Sports Program is � , .
of enthusiastic clubs such as wir
paddling, and wrestling Man) I the
well with good attendance and'super'prL-
open to all ECU studer andj
club contact person ii vou are intereste
tion can also be obtained bv -
vices office it 757- �
SPORT
Archery
Cycling
Frisbee
Ice Hockey
Karate
Lacrosse
Paddling
Rugby
Soccer
Surfing
Synchronized Swim
Windsurfing
Wrestling
MMr
MikeWl
� -
Marl
Jir
Da
-
-I
M ,
UPCOMING OUTDOOR Hh(
Join the Outdoor k
enjoying the bright
The higher water levels
trip. This trip, as wel!
offered by the Outdoor Recrea
tal. If you are interested
at 757-M87.
Outdxr Recreation (
M nd
Tues -
Upcoming Intrai
DO THE TURKEY
TROT
How do vou the Tut
Register at 105-C Mei
Mon Nov. 10 from 1 an
p.m. The Turkey Tr
event in which four
each run a two-mile c irse.
Divisional teams
lowest combined �
declared the winner are
awarded an 18-22 pound turkej
Second-place teams jj re've
two pumpkins pics. Awards are
donated bv the East Carolina
Dining Services
The big event will be held
Tues Nov. 18 at 4 r m with the
start near the gate at Ha:
Field. In case of indemc
weather, the event will be
postponed until Nov 25 Jti-
divisions available for the 1
Trot are:
Cl
I
fj
new
-
1
M
tagl
Bi
MEN'S
Faculty Staff
Residence Hall
Fraternitv
Fratermtv B
Independent
Women's
Faculty Staff
Residence Hall
Sorority
Independent
Co-Rec
Faculty Staff
Residence Hall
The team captain's meeting
will be held Tues Nov. l in
Biology N-102 at 5:30 p.m. Get
your fleet feet warmed up and go
for the gobbler!
Intramural
Hours
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM:
regisj
N
'eg st
ThetJ
N t
RAG
TOL1
ThJ
C K.a M
up o
will
205-
from
Mon
Menu
-6l
M-W-F
M W
Sat
Sun
12 noon-1 p.m.
3 p.m10p.m.
11 am -5 p m
12 noon-8 p.m
MEMORIAL WEIGHT ROOM:
M-F "a.mlOr
Sa U a.m5 p.m
Sun 12 noon-8 p.m
Thci
pionsq
Tjes
Termil
Exei
Hight
doubH
the I
the El
MEMORIAL
FOOL:
SWIMMING
M-F
M-F
M-W-F
T-Th
Sat
Sun
"am - 8 am
12 noon-1:30 p.m
3 p.mlOp.m
3-5 p.m. � 7-10 p.m
11 a.m5 p.m
12 noon-8 p.m
get
MEMORIAL EQUIPMENT
�OOM:
Jj F 7 a.m 10p.m.
S31 11 a.m5 p.m
n 12 noon-8 p.m
MINGES WEIGHT ROOM:
MF 3p.m10p.m
800 12noon-5p.m.
MINGES SWIMMING POOL:
� W-F 8 p.m10p.m.
r"1 12noon-5p.m
1
"





I
ts Greenville
eek Revenge
k
J nosed
- el and
going to
Hake: said
have a hard
he 're go
' k young
�; starting
� Bolt, coi
ee sate
H
� . unit is
ackers
ed the
51 ear,
(102
.�. kles) were
v always
bout
Wss is that
well-coached
team, and they
ithletes
� Art Baker
I eading
defen-
mew hat
lSM anchors
� le I lysses
seguard
'di
ol
ends Steve
Hivei
d is im-
' � :ne.
Banks,
' oring with
inter
a - aced
ist year,
Baker
king
in both
f turning
to
�n .m a knee to
eekend.
ne Up
x
the
and the
aw 5 ime
200-meter
good
�"ark. The
he Pirates
ustas in The
b with a time of
!dual winners for
en were Patt
Jennifer Dolan
living, for the men David
n Ptured both the one
e meter-duing compeu.
03 For -he womeni Sherrv
captured both evemT
Pirates will
� on Nov. 8 � Fun
ehavealongwavstogoto
Prepared for the season"
Kobe said. �'But,
there "
Intramural-
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 30. 1986
11
CLUB SPORTS ON THE MOVE
oi I�SSZ�Esrl sthis e � �
paddling, and wrestling. Many h(l8; �� swimming,
well with good attendance anSsurLrDroLrftiVO"UeS " hangin in as
open to all ECU students, fJuy n u"V'f5' C,ub sP�rts ar
dub contact person it you are imerS J " f hCS,ta,C to cal1 the
tion can also be obtamed by caHinT mptting. More informa-
vices office at 75787 the IntramuraJ-Recreational Ser-
intramural Action Hiehl
FLAG FOOTBALL underdog prevailed, the ,�� ft"
underdog prevailed, the
tk. undefeated Tau Kappa Epsilons
The Intramural Sports playmg fell to the speedy PW Beta
fields were filled with champion- Sigmas, 13-7, forlhe Frater v
stap game excitement last week. A Divisional Championship In
SPORT
Archery
C wling
i isbee
Ice Hockey
karate
1 acrosse
Paddling
Rugb
Soccer
Surfing
Synchronized Swim
v indsurfing
u restling
NAME
Michael White
Bob Deman
Mike White
Barbara Johnson
Mark Seasholtz
Jim Hix
Dave Sproi
Lisa Grosshandler
Blair Riddick
Gay Blocker
Steve Mote
Mike Lindsay
PHONE
758-4187
758-7819
752-2051
756-8013
757-1470
757-6764
Unknown
758-8325
758-8393
757-6441
758-2960
752-8480
1 PCOMING OUTDOOR RECREATION ACTIVITIES
Women's team action saw the
Alpha Phi's defeat the Delta
Zeta's 13-6 for the Sorority Divi-
sion Championship. The
Women's Residence Hall Cham-
pionship was a defense
dominated game with Belk Ready
For Action and the Fleming
Sugarbabies ending regulation
Play in a scoreless tie. Thc Belk
Ready For Action team ended the
season as the Residence Cham-
pions. The defending Women's
Independent Division Cham-
pions, the Enforcers defeated
ARBNAF 2, 20-O in an offensive-
ly thrilling game to regain the In-
dependent Divisional Champion-
ship. The Enforcers took on
ARBNAF 2 in the All-Campus
Championship title
the Fraternity B competition, the
Sigma Phi Epsilon team rebound-
ed from an earlier season loss to
the Pi Kappa Alpha team by
defeating them in the Champion-
ship game, 20-15. The Indepen-
dent Championship game was
dominated by defensive play and
tough competition with the Lake
Boys defeating Milwaukee's Best,
18-7. This year's pre-season pick,
the Lake Boys compiled an im-
pressive undefeated season by
defeating the Men's Residence
Hall Champions 28-8 to become
the All-Campus Men's Cham-
pions. Congratulations to all the
Divisional and All-Campus
Champions.
pre-season pick to win the All- VOLLEYBALL
he Outdoor Recreation Staff on Nov 8 for a dav of �ar Campus Championship, the En-
tying the bright fall colors on the Cane Fear R.vtr � P f"8 " f�rCers' Prevailed for the second
higher water levels should make a f and far ,L2J Ltl ingto � yCf m a rouw with " �ore of 18-0.
trip I tnp. as well as other trio; sJmrc 8 t"t�"nine-mile In thc batt,c for th Men's
ou � ,n,ereS,ed ,� pan.apaUng. ca, Pa, Cox o? Pau, Me fSE llZJZ" ! �J� TS DM-
Minges Coliseum has been
"bumping" along with In-
tramural Volleyball teams taking
the courts. Looking to remain
All-Campus Champions are the
638
Oi
Recreation Center hours are:
Monday & Friday
Tuesday & Thursday
Saturdays
a thrilling offensive display to
defeat Jones I Tappa Keg, 29-16.
In another contest in which the
1:30-6:00p.m.
4:00-6:00p.m.
11:00a.m2:00p.m.
Beginning
�i.wa.iuX:ULFp.m. .
Upcoming Intramural Events 8 Trainin8
Workshops
DO THE TURKEY r D,w�
trot Co-Rec
How do you the Turkey Trot0
Regis ei ai 105-C Memorial on
Mon Nov 10 from 1 a.m. to 7
p.m. TheTurke Trot is a team
event in which four individuals
each run a two-mile course.
Divisional teams with the
lowest . mhined scores are
,krcd :he winners and are
awarded an 18-22 pound turkey
Place earns will receive
Knpkina pies. Awards are
�1 by the East Carolina
- Services,
big event will he held
Nov. 18 at 4 p.m. with the
a the gate at Harrington
,r case of inclement
� the event will be
stponed until Nov. 25. Team
�ions available for the Turkey
ire:
MEN'S
Faculty Staff
Residence Hall
Fraternity A
miry B
independent
Women's
Faculty Staff
Residence Hall
Sorority
dependent
( o-Rec
FacultyStaff
Residence Hall
Cageball
CO-REC CAGEBALL
Nine teams are currently
registered to participate in the
new and exciting activity of Co-
Rec Cageball. For individuals
who haven't signed up, the op-
portunity to play is avaliable on
Mon Nov. 3 in Memorial Gym-
nasiun from 7-8 p.m. Everyone is
welcome to venture out and par-
ticipate in a fun hour of Co-Rec
Cageball.
Three on Three
Basketball
Three on three basketball
registration will be held Mon
Nov. 3 in 105-C Memorial Gym-
nasium from 1 to 7 p.m. Late
registration will not be accepted
wckfhoni"8 Tjght training A uar.a,ng v
EbSZ EJ2 5�!Lto Th followmgle all
sion and the Good, Bad and Ugly
in the Women's Division. After
completion of first round action,
both teams have come up vic-
torious. The next few weeks will
be exciting in following these
teams to see how they are "set-
ting" up.
PUTT-PUTT
Several teams had strong put-
ters with outstanding perfor-
total of 29. The winner of the
Women's Division was Ann Ellen
(Enforcers) who had a low score
of 15 and a best average score of
32. Congratulations to the putter
champions.
The divisional champions have
been decided in Team Putt Putt
following heavy competition. In
the Sorority Divisino, Zeta Tau
Alpha was crowned the Cham-
pion after defeating the Chi
Omega's by a score of 393 to 369.
The Enforcers continued their
domination of the women's
sports by defeating the Sig Ep
Goldenhearts. The men's team
putters played exciting matches
with close scores recorded in all
divisions. The Fraternity A
Champion was Sigma Phi Ep-
silon following a tiebreaker with
Tau Kappa Epsilon. Phi Kappa
Tau captured the Fraternity B ti-
tle by a slim victory of five
strokes over the Kappa Sigma
team. The Belk Bandits were
defeated by the Guess Who team
in the Men's Residence Hall Divi-
sion. The Men's Independent
winner was Helmick's Rejects
who defeated the Rude Boys. The
All-Campus Championship was
held at Putt-Putt of Greenville on
Tuesday, October 21. The En-
forcers narrowly defeated the
Zeta Tau Alpha team bv five
strokes. Sigma Pm Epsilon
defeated Helmick's Rejects and
Guess Who to win the Men's All-
Campus Championship. Con-
gratulations to the Divisional and
All-Campus Champions.
Cross Campus
Fun Run
The Cross Campus Run was
held on a brisk Homecoming
Saturday morning with over 90
people participating. A two and
four mile course was run with all
first-place finishers receiving In-
tramural Champion shorts and
second-place Finishers receiving
Intramural Champion mugs.
Congratulations to the following
Champions:
Four-mile run
Students: Men-Brent Brewer
Women-Nancy Eicher
FacultyStaff: Jouchim Herr-
mann
Alumni: 22-29 - Charles Justice
409 - Bill Jackson
Two-mile run
Students: Men-Barry Scott
Women-Melissa Hart
FacultyStaff: Robert Morrison
Alumni: 22-29 - Men-Ken Reg-
gsdee
22-29 - Women-Tammie Sligh
30-39 - Jonathon Gouzert
individuals interested in firming
up muscles and developing
greater physical strength and en-
durance. The three session
workshops will introduce par-
ticipants learn a fundamental
routine for total body develop-
ment. The workshops will be
held Nov. 17, 18, and 20,
5:30-6:30 p.m. in Memorial
Gymnasium weight room. Cost
of the event is $2.00 for students
and $3.00 for staff. Registration
will begin Nov. 10, and will run
through the 13 from 9:00 a.m. to
4:00 p.m. in 204 Memorial Gym-
nasium. Register early, as this
workshop is limited to only 16
participants.
Swim
Conditioning
tied with low scores of 14 which is
four under par: Chris Holland
(TKE B), Randall James (Sigma
Phi Epsilon A), Stephan Poplin
(TKE A), James Russo (Phi Kap-
pa Tau B), and Jeff and Ray Taft
(Rude Boys). The Taft brothers
were also the players with the
lowest average score for 18 holes
which consisted of a combined
DRINK-IN s
Thursday, Oct. 30
:00 on the Campus Mall �
.cj.sir.uon win not oe accepted. Swim conditioning is a newlv
The team captain's meting will be develop n� f y
h�iH � t�� kt A-n. aeveioped program for m-
il
The team captain's
be held Tues
Nov
meeting
. 11 in
g N-102 at 5:30 p.m. Get
ur fleet feet warmed up and go
for the gobbler!
Intramural
Hours
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM:
held on Tues Nov. 4 in Biology
N-102 at 5:30 p.m.
Racquetball Singles
RACQUETBALL SINGLES
TOURNAMENT
This tournament is your
chance to see how you measure
up on the courts. Registration
will be held Mon Nov. 3 in
205-C Memorial Gymnasium
from 1 to 7 p.m. Play begins
Mon Nov. 10. Stop by 204
Memorial Gymnasium or call
757-6387 for more information.
program for in-
dividuals who are interested in
getting together with other swim-
mers for a serious workout.
Beginning to advanced swimmers
are welcome to join the one-hour
sessions of drills designed to im-
prove speed, endurance, efficien-
cy, and overall fitness. Workouts
will be held Mon Wed and Fri.
from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. in
Memorial Gymnasium Pool. The
program begins Mon Nov.3,
and will run through Dec. 12 for
this semester. Interested in-
dividuals may stop by 204
Memorial Gymnasium to sign up
or call Kathleen at 757-6387.
YOIPRE
worth
Co-Recreation Softball
M-W-F
M -W
Sat
Sun
12 noon-1 p.m.
3 p.m10p.m.
11 a.m5 p.m.
12 noon-8 p.m.
MEMORIAL WEIGHT ROOM:
MF 7 a.m10p.m.
11 a.m5 p.m.
un 12 noon-8 p.m.
The Co-Rec Softball Cham-
pionship game was played on
Tues Oct. 21 with the Umstead
Terminators defeating a strong
Executioner team, 8-4.
Highlights of the game included a
double play in the first inning by
the Umstead Terminators to hold
the Executioners scoreless. Ex-
cellent hitting was demonstrated
by both teams. Kevin Cutler hit a
homerun in the second inning to
bring the Executioners within one
and Randy Whitaker hit a double
which knocked in two runs for
Umstead. Congratulations to
both teams on a great game.
GOLD
mmw
MEMORIAL
POOL:
Tennis Tournament Results
SWIMMING
M-F
MF
VI -VV
r-Th
Sat
Sun
7a.m 8 a.m.
12 noon-1:30 p.m.
3 p.m10p.m.
3-5 p.m. 7-10p.m.
11 a.m5 p.m.
12 noon-8 p.m.
Tennis singles concluded with
hot action just before the cool
weather settled in. Eleanor Allen
was crowned the Women's Divi-
sion Champion with a victory
over Karen Jackson. Greg Willis
defeated David Turner, 6-2,6-3,
Our Representative is on campus with distinguished
traditional and contemporary styles �
each backed by a Full Lifetime Warranty
in a competitive match for the
Men's Divisional Championship.
Congratulations to all tennis
singles participants. Watch for
the Co-Rec, Men's and Women's
Doubles Tournaments coming up
in the spring.
MEMORIAL
ROOM:
MF
Sat
Sun
EQUIPMENT
7a.m 10p.m.
11 a.m5 p.m.
12 noon- 8p.m
MINGES WEIGHT ROOM:
M-F 3 p.m10p.m.
$un 12noon-5p.m.
MINGES SWIMMING POOL:
M-W-F 8p.mI0p.m.
Sun 12 noon-5 p.m.
Cage (Student), Taterhead, Hollingsworth
ni, Graves, Mac, Siegfried, Foots, P.M
Rappin, Coop and Slick and all the guests
will have a killer Halloween
weekend
IRTQ1RVED
CLASS RiNfiQ
Representative will be at the Student Store
November 3rd, 4th, 5th
from 9:00 a.m4:00 p.m.
C mt ArtCarvw C �v�i
� L t
1





12
im I S I ROl INKS
OCTOBER V), iwtr.
Classifieds
Continued from page 8
SIG EPS: We hope that you guys
have a very happy haliovveen! Love,
your httie sisters.
THE BUCHANAN T. PUKE
AWARD GOES TO SCOTT GAR
RETT: Congratulations Scott! The
award only you deserve!
MONKEY DOODLE There s no
one quite like you there's no two
quite like us Thank you tor the
Dest 7 months of my life! I love you
Bubba
ALISON: I'm glad at VB you found
the ideal date By the way how does
he rate? Claudette
NANCY: Watch out for those flying
prehistoric birds! Practice that
screech!
ALPHA SIGS: The oddi were
against them but they were destined
to win! New York Mets 1986 World
Champions Baseball like it oughta
be! Cubbie
PLANNING ALUMNI PANEL
Geography and Planning Depart
ment is sponsoring a Planning
Alumni Panel Subject Planning in
the private sector versus planning in
the public sector Place Brewster
D 208 When Friday. October 31,
1986 at l 00 pm
SIG EP LITTLE SISTERS Our next
meeting will be Sunday, Nov 2 Be
sure to attend because the pledges
will be auctioned off New little
sisters, your next meeting (ana
test!) is tonight at 9 30 Please be
there! !
KTL: We're studying hard and get
tmg ahead Leading our lives and
not being led Less pressure and
lealousy, it's easy to see we make a
great couple you and me Love
PEF
KA LITTLE SISTERS, PLEDGES, �
BROTHERS: Ton,ghfs the night to
finally throw down together it's
been long past due so let's make it a
party we'll never forget! KA Lil
Sister Officers
ATTENTION HALLOWEENERS
It starts one n.ght early at the Attic
Oct 30th That's right, the 12th An
nua BEAUX ARTS BALL Don't
forget Costumes manaa'orv $100
1st pr.re ano lots of ooor prizes S3 50
n advance, $4 50 at the door Spon
soreo by the VAF Tickets at Apple
Records. 18 yrs. and older aam,tted
KIM ALEXANDER: Good luck with
your new job. You have been such a
terrific friend since those gooa ole'
Alpha Chi days! I'm looking forward
to Boston! Love. Anne
AOTT HAPPY HOUR At Paotana s
Sunoay night! Come part, wth us!
CASPER (C PR MAN) I ac too
much fun a'Cockta You sure know
how to par Hope you nac a grea'
Pan Break Pameia B
TOTHESITTERSATTHE VILLA
You guys were fantastic I couicm't
have made it without you! Love. Suz
TKE'S: We just wanted to cordially
thank you all for ,et another jam
min' time aT the "bash" last
Weanesaav! You guys still know
now to party can't wait until Friday!
The Sigmas
TO THE BROTHERS AND
PLEDGES OF PIKA: Our deepest
appreciation is given to you for mak
ng the fan season so geat for us ana
the rest of the men's tennis team
Sincerely, Jon Meihorn, Greg LOyo
ano Kevm Plumb
LOOK FOR THE BEST CHEST
CONTEST: Coming soon
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
NEW SISTERS OF ALPHA XI
DELTA: Susanne Barr, Michelle
Boyo, Jenny Jarvis, Alison King,
Denise Moore, Tracey More, Becky
McLaurin, Meg Neeoham, Vanessa
Meomore ano Rachel Wmsteao
Welcome to our sisterhood We love
you.
PAM PORSYTHE: We hope you hao
a very happy 22nd birthday. Wish we
could have celebrated it with you
Love, the Alpha Xis.
BETA MU'S. Get psyched about
Tuesday night. The sisters of Alpha
Xi Delta
LEX AND BOB: I'll let the Rich
mond Times Dispatch say it for me
"Penn State Rips Alabama "Roll
Tide Roll?" Wrong Milhause.
PAM AND BETH: The bet is that
both of you will back out of going to
the Beaux Arts Ball ai the Attic
tonight as "The Lady Godiva
Twins
PRANK: Your dream has come true
Panic and 50 cent beer both on the
same night see you at the Attic on
Sat � I'll be wearing red
TRIP OR TREAT DEADHEADS
Where were you last Halloween?
Redd was with Shane, Rob, Michael.
Susan and Beverly in Columbia, S C
Werewolves will be out tomorrow
night on WZMB, 91.3 FM, your zom
bie station. Don't tell me this town
ain't got no heart, just gotta poke
around.
AZD'S: You're the best I love you
over all the rest The Great Pum
Dkin
KA'S: Let's rock the block Love,
The AZD'S
SIG EPS, TKE'S, KA'S, LAMBDA
CHI'S, ADTT'S, TRI SIGS ANDCHI
O'S: Looking forward to the Monster
Bash As usual the USUALS will be
ready to thrash We'll pull together
and have a ball Have a blast and
give it your all The AZD'S
LAMBDA CHIS: Get ready for the
party tonight That Lambda Chi
brew gives us such a fright The
goblins and ghosts and all the great
host, will last and last til the very 1st
toast Beware! The AZD's.
WARREN TAKACS: The weekend
of November 22nd is coming near,
that means that Roseball 'M is
almost here Roseball will be held at
Virginia Beach, and a weekend full
of fun will be in our reach if ll be a
weekend full of dancing and drink
ing, (And yes that too. I know what
you're thinking! 11J So on this
weekend if you are free, then accept
this invitation for a weekend with
me
RAILROAD MAN: Isn't it tough to
"work" in the rain with the car hood
up. Signed, the "H's"
STEPHEN J. PIRON: I sat on the
roof and watched the day go
by. "I'll keep holdin' on" "Sayin'
just what we feel today " I love you,
Rebecca
NEEDS APT: Single male (non
smoker) looking for l bedroom apt
Can go up to $200 a month for rent
Call 355 6077 Ask or leave name ana
phone number for David
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
To share 2 bedroom apt Sl40month
and 'j utilities 4 blocks from cam
pus Non smoker preferred Lon
752 7396
BASKETBALL OFFICIALS The
Greenville Recreation and Parks
Dept is now recruiting basketball
officials for the men's winter basket
ball league interested persons will
be required to attend a series of of
fiaating clinics Games will be m
the evenings and the rate of pay will
be m the range of $9 12 per game If
interested, please contact Ben
James, 752 4137, ext 262
ROOMMATE WANTED: Free
security deposit of $150, Kingston
Place Apts , central heatair, fully
furnished, includes all kitchen uten
sils, and use of pool $150 per month
plus utihties For info call Don
Fazio at 757 3218
HELP WANTED Bar mad for
Private Club Must be 21 fn old
Call 758 0058 for interview
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
$112 50 per month 758 4783 757 6729
Leave messages during 8 5pm
GEORGETOWN APARTMENTS
Need 1 or 2 female roommates to
share 2 bedroom townhouse Ail new
inside! Across from oowntoA'
walking distance to campus Call
7 52 9245
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male or
female serious student needed t0
share 2 bedroom apt close to cam
Pus. $135 mo plus '3 utiht,es Can
758 7709
AZD, TRI SIGS, CHI O, KA, LAMB
DA CHI, SIG EPS AND TKE: Look
mg forward to beastly fun come this
Friday night! Having the eight of us
under one roof is sure to cause a
fright! The mischief begins at the
witching hour, when the clock
strikes four o'clock. So grab a mask
and your sisses and bros ano let's
make the Sig Ep house rock! "Best
Witches" the ADTTs
TRACEY: The date was great ana
the shots warmeo us up. But Pan
tana's really got me up! However
the lonely walk home really got me
aown, but m the end we set a new
trend Can 1 tackel your bush again?
Clay
PIKA LIL SIS: Thanks to a ii
sisters who helped on the float
especially Shay Berry ana Kelly
Cam The Pikas
CONGRATULATIONS: To the Pika
Football team on a great season.
MICHAEL AD: Here's to the bos'
cooking guy m oceanography ! 1 hope
you had a fantastic weekend 1 was
thinking about you! Ria
TO JOHNNY CAINE: Watch out for
the "httie red bug" thatcrawls down
10th Street cause it's gonna bitcha
one day. Lady (Catherine
BILL: Don't get so hung up on wmn
.ng that game rematch commq
soon. Let me know about that
weekena another fun time with
me!
IF YOU THINK YOU HAVE A
CHEST THAT'S BETTER THAN
THE REST: Come to 'he Art c ana
put it to the test Can 758 2381 by
Nov 4tn cash prize AZDs
WANTED
TRAVEL FIELD OPPORTUNITY
Gain valuable marketing experience
while earning money Campus
representat.ve needed immediately
tor spring break trip to Florida Call
Campus Marketing a' I 800 282 6221
HOMEWORKERS WANTEO Top
pay Work at home Can Co�tage
industries (405)360 4062
3.000 GOVERNMENT JOBS St
$16,040 59,230 if Now n,r,ng Can
805 687 6000 Ext R 1166
TRAVEL FIELD POSITION IM
MEDIATELY AVAILABLE Good
commission, valuable wor P�
penence Travel ano other benpt ��
Call Bill Ryan at 1 800 433 7747 tor a
complete information mailer
A HOR TIONS I P
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
J205 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at
additional cosi Pregnanc) Tesi, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancounseling -
furthei atton, .all hi; nm rn tlt.e
numbei I 800 532 5384) between s� a.m and 5
i weekdays General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
PET
VILLAGE
DONNA EDWARDS
Owner
All Freshwater Fish
12 PRICE
Thursday, Friday, Saturday
OCT. 30 - NOV. 1
150 Dynaflow Outside Filters
NOW $�.99 1 Free Cartr
Reg. $26.99 sue
dreemille, N( 27834
Phone: 756-9222
Mastei Card and Visa arc accepted and financing is available.
Take
the
plunge
this
summer.
(
��������mm.
. nwwww
BASKETBALL COACHES: The
Greenville Parks and Recreation
Department is recruiting tor 10 to 14
part time basketball coaches for the
w-nter program Applicants mus
possess some knowledge of basket
ban skills ano have the ability aic
patience to work with youth Ap
plicants must be able to coach ouno
people, ages 9 18 in basketball fun
damentais Hours are from 3 7pm
Mon-Fr ano some night anc
weekend coaching. The program
will extend from Dec. 2 to m
February Salary rate of S3 46 hour
Applications will be accepted from
Nov to Nov. 17 Contact Ben James
at 752 4137 ext 262
CONSOLIDATED
"HEATRES
Mitsttoo
CHILDREN
ANYTIME
I
Contact: Capt. Akin Mitchell
757-6967
319 Irwin Hall
S:y.yM
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756 3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
Ends Today
2 W 7:30
Gone With
The Wind
A' '� R " �
( RP5
CAROLINA GULF
1201 Dickinson Ave
752-7270
Do It With Us � We P L & Del
VSA.MC.CULF.SOnO Mitims
jKlabripx
mne&
3n �lnabett)an Christmas jftast :
y
DECEMBER 3-6. 1986 7:00 P M
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTFR
MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM
TICKETS BY ADVANCE SALES ONTv
CONTACT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
C919) 757-6611, EXT. 266
A. STUDENT UNION
PRODUCTIONS COMMITTEE PRESENTATION
PAnic
5(K Bottled Beer All
Night!
The Plaza Greenville
756-9771
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
i
10
RACK ROOM
branded shoes
Greenville Buyers Market
Memorial Dive
j
OPIN MON-SAT 10-9
SUNDAY 1-6
JUwiwwrnb j
O OFF
Our Everyday Low Price
(Except A.gner, Nike and Reebok)
I'
i





Title
The East Carolinian, October 30, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 30, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.504
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy