The East Carolinian, October 21, 1986







i
�he
(Kamlintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.61 No. 15
Tuesday. October 21, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
SGA Seeks Cabinet
Member Applications
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
Assisttnt News Editor
There are currently five posi-
tions open in the Students
Government Association
Cabinet�positions that Steve
Cunanan, SGA president,want s
to fill within the next week.
"The basic purpose of cabinet
members is to get information
and bring it to the attention of
the SGA officers and
legislaturehe said.
The positions include
Secretaries of Minority Affairs,
Traffic and Safety, Academic Af-
fairs, Community and Consumer
Affairs, and Student Affairs.
The Secretary of Minority Af-
fairs, according to Cunanan, will
come into contact with all
minority organizations on cam-
pus, and "make sure the SGA
gets all of the information it
needs
The Secretary of Traffic and
Safety will serve on some of the
faculty-student committees, such
as the parking and sexual assault
awareness committees.
"Seeing that the students'
needs are being met here at the
university" is the purpose of the
person holding the position of
Secretary of Academic Affairs,
said Cunanan. This person will
also serve on several faculty-
student committees.
The Secretary of Student Af-
fairs will cover anything students
feel interested in, he said. "For
example, I know there's been talk
about cleaning up campus. It
would be this person's job to do
the research on it
Lastly, the Secretary of Com-
munityConsumer Affairs will be
in close contact with the SGA at-
torney, dealing with situations in
which students feel taken advan-
tage of, for example, by Green-
ville merchants or apartment
owners.
The only requirements, said
Cunanan. are a genuine interest
in student issues and the en-
thusiasm to work. "I would like
these people to go at it with the
same enthusiasm everyone else in
the SGA does he said. There
are no GPA requirements, he ad-
ded.
Students interested in applying
for any of these positions may do
so in room 228 Mendenhall bet-
ween 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Scholarships Offered To
Soften Blows Of Heavy
Financial Aid Cutbacks
ECU'S Drunk
B SEAN HERRING
taTfWfMw
The night transit bus, which
had been provided for ECU
students for over a year, was ter-
minated this year by the SGA Ex-
ecutive Council.According to
Brennen Collins, Transit
manager, the night transit was an
effort to prevent drinking and
driving.
Collins said the SGA decided
to terminate the service in
September because not enough
people were using the transit.
"The service worked in the
past, but the change in the drink-
ing age effected the project this
semester said Collins. "One
weekend only about twenty peo-
ple rode the buses
The buses picked up students
in the parking lot across from
Chico's from 10 p.m. until 2 a.m.
Service Terminated
The transits routes included Col-
lege Hill Drive, and most area
apartments.
"I believe if there is still some
interest in night transit that it
could work said Collins.
But, some students' opinions
of the "drunk bus as the night
transit is commonly known,
varied.
Tim Bowman said, "the buses
might use some of the SGA
money, but it could save some
lives in the long run
"I am against the drunk
buses said Eric Floyd. "The
only people who would probably
ride them would be those who are
to drunk to be disgraced
According to David Kornegay,
SGA money could be better
spentThe idea is good, but the
timing is wrong due to the change
in the drinking age
By LESLEY DEES
With all of the heavy cutbacks
in federal financial aid programs,
students are turning more to
private sources to aid in financing
their college education.
Higher Education Scholarship
Consultants is a nationwide ref-
feral service between students
and approximately 50,000
sources that assist students in fin-
ding information about awards.
There are over one billion
dollars available in private sector
scholarships, fellowships, grants
and loans.
A wide variety of scholarships,
many of which are not based on
the applicants financial need, are
also available.
Higher Education Scholarship
Consultants was established to
give an up-to-date accessible
source of information on normal-
ly hard to find awards.
"Higher Education Scholar-
ship Consultants is here to pro-
vide another sourcE of financial
aid to students said Scott Gard-
ner, president of Higher Educa-
tion Scholarship Consultants.
In addition to these valuable
financial aid sources. Higher
Education Scholarship Con-
sultants provides information on
internship programs, career
guidance materials, career pro-
jections and study tips.
To use the service, a studen'
must fill out a detailed question-
naire of all relevant information
including field(s) of study, family
history, group affiliations, etc.
Each applicant will receive a
refferal list that includes sources
offering financial assistance, ad-
ditional reference sources, in
structions on applying for
scholarship funds, internship
programs in the students major
field(s) of interest and at the ap-
plicants option, career guidance
material. It is then up to the stu-
dent to apply to the funding
sources.
The cost is S40 for an
undergraduate or graduate
search. The $40 will be refunded
if not at least 8 sources are found
for the applicant. Career
Guidance materials are S30.
For more information write
Higher Education Scholarship
Consultants, P.O. Box 8391.
Greenville, NC 27835-8391 or call
756-6492
Students Encouraged
To Join Committees
B THERESA ROM N MA I
MfWittw
There are approximately 20
positions available to students
who are interested in becoming
involved with a University Com-
mittee.
Applications are now being ac-
cepted for positions on various
committees. The applications are
available in 204 Whichard,
Mendenhall, and in residence
halls. Students are encouraged to
pick them up and return them to
204 Whichard as soon as possi-
ble.
The committees with vacancies
are: Affirmative Action Review
and Advisory Committee (1),
Alcohol and Drug Education
Committee (1), Housing Appeals
Committee (1), International Stu-
dent Affairs Committee (2),
Parking and Traffic Committee
(2), Residence Life Committee
(1), Resident Status Appeals
Committee (1), Status of Women
Committee (3), Calendar Com-
mittee (1), Curriculum Commit-
tee (1), Faculty Computer Com-
mittee(2), Libraries Committee
(1), Student Scholarships,
Fellowships and Financial Aid
Committee (1), and Teaching Ef-
fectiveness Committee(2).
"It's a great opportunity for
students to learn about the
university and to meet faculty
members said Elmer Myer, vice
chancellor for Student' Life.
"The committees also give the
students a chance to become a
part of the university's decision-
making process
"So far we have only received
10 applications for the 20 vacan-
cies said Myer. He added that
applicants must be full-time
students and in good academic
standing.
"Most of the committees only
meet once a month so it doesn't
require a great deal of time for
the student said Myer.
"Without the students on the
committee, we as faculty don't
know how the students feel. We
need the students' input
Anyone who has any questions
about the University Committees
and memberships may contact
the office of the Vice Chancellor
for Student Life at 757-6541.
SGA Speaker Advises Legislature
ON THE INSIDE
Health Column3 'Registrar's office chooses big
Editorials4 business over student
Style6 newspaper� see EDITORIALS
Sports8 page 4.
Classifieds10 ECU Pirates end losing streak�
Announcements10 see SPORTS page 8.
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
Assistant News Editor
Speaker of the legislature, Ben
Eckert, called attention to the
fact that the SGA may be ap-
propriating money to campus
organizations without really
understanding where that money
is going after the SGA passed six
out of eight bills brought before
them at Monday night's meeting.
According to David Tambling,
SGA secretary, by passing those
bills, $1,995 out of the SGA's
$25,000 budget was appropriated
by the legislature.
"It scares me that we represent
the students and we don't even
know what's happening said
Eckert. "When we approve ap-
propriations, we need to find out
if that group is the one that can
best use the money. If it is, fine.
If not, it is up to us to find out
who is and make sure that they
get it
He added, "This (serving on
the legislature) is not for a
resume. It is for the students. We
need to know what's going
on�we don't want to pass or fail
something that will come back to
us as not having been the best
way the money could have been
used
Tambling agreed, stating,
"People come in here and they
get elected to their positions. But
they sit, they watch, and they do
nothing. If you're elected to a
position, you must go looking for
information and learn some of
the procedures on your own. You
can't expect to be handed
everything
Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor
for Student Life said that it
works both ways. "The commit-
tee people should be making the
legislature more aware of what is
in a bill so they know exactly
where the money is goingand if
they don't, then questions should
be asked
It was also suggested at the
meeting that students who have
questions about where the money
is going can attend the appropria-
tions committee meetings
The bills that were approved
included an amended budget for
the Graduate Student Associa-
tion of Social Workers, which
was debated before it's approval,
appropriations to the Marching
Pirates and the International
Language Organization.
The legislature approved the
constitution of the Rugby Foot-
ball Club, the Industrial Arts
Honor Fraternity, the Interna-
tional Geography Honor Society,
and a change in the constitution
of the East Carolina Student
Club of Occupational Therapists
Association.
Appropriations for the An-
thropology Honor Society were
put on the unfavorable calendar.
The only debate that preceeded
the approval of any of the bills
revolved around the appropria-
tions for the Graduate Student
Association of Social Workers.
Bryan Lassiter, member of the
leglislature, who ended up voting
in favor of the appropriations,
questioned the money that would
go toward advertising ($50).
A representative of that group,
David Arney, explained that
March was National Social Work
Month, and that the appropria-
tions would be "put toward help-
ing to advertise that week and the
organizations activities
Speaker of the legislature,
meeting.
�LLBM MUtPMV � T� MM L
Eckert, reminded the legislators of their role hi SGA at Monday's
'r � i (a





IHl I ASI CAKOl INIAN
K IOHI R 21, 1986
Students Voice Their Opinions On Alcohol
ECU has named Oct. 19-25
Alcohol Awareness Week.
Students on campus were asked
the following questions about
alcohol:
Hhat percentage
underage students do
think drink illegally?
of
YOU
Do you think the new age
has had any effect on who
drinks?
Rod 1ims
Senior
Business
Probably 90 percent of the people
here who are underage drink
anyhow � 1 don't think the new
laws hae really had any effect at
all. Most oi the students pro-
bably drink in their dorm rooms.
It vould take about three or four
beers to make me legally im-
paired.
Where do you think peo-
ple drink
most�downtown, in the
dorm rooms, or off-
c amp us?
Are you aware of how
much alcohol it would take
to legally impair you? How
much?
Tips O
Or Aid
H MARN Fl ESHA-ADAM
For more information on Alcohol Awareness
Week, contact Mary Elesha-Adams at 757-6317
Ho
Karen Hunt
Freshman
Political Science
I would guess that less than half
of the students drink illegally.
Yes, r Mew drinking laws have
Jefirr . K ut down on students
drinking. Most people drink
downtown I'm not sure how
much it would take to legally im-
pair me, so 1 coulan't really sav.
Robin Andrews
Freshman
English
I would say about 85 percent of
the people here drink illegally. I
think the new law has had an ef-
fect, but if people want to drink
badly enough, they'll do it
anyhow. Most students probably
drink in dorms, even though
they're not supposed to. 1 don't
know how much it takes to legal-
ly impair me, but I would guess
about two whiskeys; after all,
you can eat rum cake and if you
eat enough you can be legally im-
paired een though you haven't
been drinking.
Stop hurting
the trees
you love.
CAROLINA
GULF
1201 Dickinson Ave.
752-7270
We Guarantee Our Work
A nd Our Used
Tires � P UA Del. Avail
Do It With Us.
Wrecker Service
VKA. MC. GULT, 90RIO, BoRlHS
Chee Sounders
Graduate Student
Geology
1 guess over 50 percent drink il-
legally and I'd do it too if 1
weren't old enough. I think some
folks are going to drink now just
because it's illegal, and if they
want to, they're going to. I have
no idea where students drink
most �1 know it's not
downtown. I would imagine they
drink in off-campus apartments.
Ayman Sashashibi
Sophomore
Business
About 70 percent of the students
drink although they're underage.
1 think some people who used to
drink still do under the new laws,
but maybe they drink less.
Students probably drink as much
in dorms as they do downtown
and off-campus. I guess it would
take about five or six cans of beer
to make me legally impaired.
'Seafood House and Oyster Bar
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� Overnight Block and White and Slides
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J? Standing Purchase
I ne Plaza Order with ECl Credit
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10 Discount to Students
with ECU I. D.
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Time Of Processing ENLARGEMENTS
(Max. 5 Rolls) (Limit 5)
A
TOM TOOS FA4 TORY OUTLET
1900 Dickinson Ave
Direct From The Local M�
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830-0174
tacturer - First Quality
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Panama Jack Rack
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New Fall Styles Arriving Daily In
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fcpg Metan S4.i
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RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
WE HAVE A LARGE
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KEGS OF BEER.
RESERVE YOURS
TODAY 756 7031
CO KROGERING FOR ALL YOUR
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2 Pairs To Be Given Away
For Each Home Game Register Now.

CAROLINA PRIDE
HOT OR MILD
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$
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Qt.
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KROGER 2 LOWFAT
OR HOMOGENIZED
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69
OCCX00C000C!wS"�V�!
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l II 11i I i � �
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DIET COKE. CHERRY COKE
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99
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24-12 OZ CANS
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$
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59
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Each of these advertised
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ad if we do run out of an
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reflecting the same sav
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within 50 days Only one
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I 600
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
Greenville Blvd Greenville
M B -
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Oj� - - . � �X �X- X- �A" -�x- o �X� �X� L
"T -T -T -T �T -T 'T -T -T -T -T r T �f�
lcohol
Are you aware of hov
nuch alcohol it would take
legallx impair vou? Hoh-
nuch?
ruf hM( ki ii ;u
�mation on Alcohol Awareness
irv Flesha-Adams at 757-6317
NT REPLAY
?r Prin ti
irgements
:k and White and Slides
raits
ccessories
fe Paper and Chemistry
Standing Purchase
r with fI (red it
( ard
it to Students
ithECUI.D.
��� Cowwi am Ov�a Work)
T
I
i
I
!
50
OFF
COLOR
ENLARGEMENTS
(Limit 5)
RORT10S IP
TO 2th W EEK
' V 'A7 GNA CY
b ecks ai
: rest. B�rth
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
U
Register To WV I UW
Pirate Football Tickets
2 Pairs To Be Given Away
or Each Home Game Register Ho
wJ
Ltr
NRB
DIET COKE. CHERRY COKE
CAFFEINE FREE COKE OR
Coke
Classic
99
KROGER
OLD FASHION
White
Bread . . .
2& 99�
GRANULATED
Domino
y Sugar
Lb
CHRISTMAS ROSE
California
Red Grapes
59
1 mm sat
�'09r SjwOf
Quantity �gnti antrvta
�ton SOId To 0Mr
on
Tips Offered To Prevent
Or Aid Winter Viruses
(K TOBrR 1986
Bx MAJiYJLESHA.ADAMS
SJiHlrw Hnlm
should try to aoid close contact
, with people who alreadv have
HOH cun keep fr()m geai a cdds
cola?
C olds, or upper respirators il-
lnesses, are caused b iral infec-
tions. There are unfortunately no
neasures to keep from getting a
d However, it you sta awa
� - hoI and drugs, and
aintain a balance of rest, exer-
� �c ���� �'� nutrition you you ma
have a bcttei chance ol avoiding
pcsistani cold. AKo, you
What can I do to treat my
cold?
A cold is a self-limited illness
meaning that it will get better
with time. Some medications and
treatments may ease the discom-
forts and annoyances of the com-
mon cold. You should:
�AVOID INHALING IR-
RITATING SUBSTANCES
SUCH AS SMOKE, HAIR
SPRAY, DEODORANT AND
OTHER SPRAYS, AND
CHEMICALS-These
substances irritate the tiny hairs
that work to clean out mucous
and dust from the breathing
passages.
�DRINK FLUIDS-Drink at
least 8 to 12 glasses of fluids a
day, especially juices, warm
drinks and broths, to help reduce
fever and loosen up secretions
and reduce cough and conges-
tion. Using steam or a vaporizer
will also help.
�AVOID HOT SHOWERS OR
BATHS�Extreme heat can
cause dizziness or fainting.
�REST�Rest for a day or two to
help fight the symptoms of your
cold and to reduce the chance of
infecting other people. Sleep with
your head elevated on pillows if
sinus drainage is present.
�GARGLE�With warm salt
-CAPP
Central American Peace Project
CAPP will meet Wednesday evening, 7:30
p.m. at the Methodist Student Center, 5th
Street. All are welcome. For more info call
830-0349.
water to help reduce the pain and
swelling found with a sorethroa
drops, throai lozengers
and hard candv car also help
- thr uai irritation, but
should � :ake the place of
i ing
Medications I hai m i
"elieve cold sympt ms inci
SPIRIN OR TV! ENOI
d :e!iee
�will reduce fever an
bod ae
DECONGETANTS
�wil relieve stuffv r
pped up e-
NTIHISTAMINI S
�will relieve allergy-type symp-
1 - � a- aten .itching e; es,
runnv n se and sneezing
c O M B I N A T I O N
DECONGESTANTS AND H-
riHIST MIN1 S
� will relieve stuff) sinuses ac-
- mp ir ed b renning nose,
aten e es, and sneezing
The selfcare cold clinic at the
Student Health Service provides a
quick checklist of cold sympvms
and treatments. You can use the
cold clinic 24 hours a day, 7 days
a week.
If your cold symptoms do no:
ce: better after ur to five days
you should -ee , ealth care pro-
vider for naiia n and addi-
tional � � e a � � e n t.
South Park
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� l'� t ijiin lall (irri-nvillr t .THi :SHHI��H
Look What Surfaced
Ever Tuesday Is
College Night
7 p.m1 p.m. Pepperom. Salami A Cbmc
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521 Cotanche St.
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We 've Expanded To
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&
V-
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A
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Exhibition and Sale
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SPONSORED BY
Mendenhall Student Center
DATE:
Mon. Oct. 20 thru Fn Oct. 24
TIME.
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Special Feature:
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2tye Eaat (Earnlfntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, tw �-MJ
Daniel Maurer. mnt
PATTl KEMMIS, v a. Stfvf Foi mad
C, STEVE hOLMAR, Wn, � .����,
RK K VICCORMAC. , �. MEG Needham w w
JOHN SHANNON. v.� SHANNON SHORT. �
AT MOLLOY. i� ��, DECHANILE JOHNSON, o
CXioher 21. 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Early Registration
Students, Newspaper Get The Shaft
Business is business, but getting
the shaft is another story entirely.
That's just what this newspaper,
along with the student body, got
from the Registrar's office w:hen it
came to The East Carolinian's
'1986 Early Registration Issue
For years this newspaper has
been the source of the Earlv
Registration Issue, the semesterlv
issue containing a directory of class
schedules. And for years'we have
been publishing it at no charge to
the students or administration.
That is, until now. It seems the
Registrar's offke, unsatisfied with
our free service, has chosen to have
the class schedules printed
elsewhere.
What will this mean for the
students and the university? First
and foremost, a cost of several
thousand dollars. Instead of having
The East Carolinian (an entirely
student run publication) print the
schedules for free, the Registrar's
office chose to spend 5X800 of
university money to have both the
fall and spring issues done by a pro-
fessional printer.
What's worse, they chose to
spend that money with a New
Jersey firm. So, not only is our
money paying for something we can
get for free, but that money is being
fed into another state's economy.
The problem started last May
when Gil Moore. ECU Registrar,
and Tom Luvender, General
Manager of The East Carolinian,
met to discuss this year's Early
Registration issues. Present at the
meeting was David Rosenbloom,
Vice President of University Com-
munications, a New Jersey printing
company.
According to Luvender, Moore
was dissatisfied with the last Early
Registration issue and had begun
looking into the possibility of going
to another publishing source, thus
RosenblO'm's presence. During the
course of the meeting, Moore sug-
gested that Luvender and
Rosenbloom team up.
Luvender and Rosenbloom then
held a separate meeting in the of-
fices of The East Carolinian. At
that time, Rosenbloom offered
Luvender a 60 40 split. The plan
was for The East Carolinian to sell
the advertisements and University
print the
Communications to
schedules.
Luvender declined the offer
knowing full well that The East
Carolinian could realize a better
return, at no charge to the students,
if we printed the issue ourselves.
When the meeting ended, nothing
was finalized.
However, two weeks later, the
ECU Purchasing Dept. sent notices
to several printing companies
soliciting bids for the issues. The
East Carolinian was never con-
tacted. University Communications
won the bid.
Why? The anwser is unclear; in
tact, this is where questions
abound. The Registrar's office
claims the Purchasing Dept. was to
blame. The Purchasing Dept on
the other hand, says the Registrar's
office gave orders to omit The East
Carolinian from the bidding pro-
cess.
Now for the questions: Why
didn't we receive a bidding notice?
If the Purchasing Dept's story is
true, why wouldn't the Registrar's
office want us to know about the
bid? And finally, if the decision to
solicit bids hadn't been decided on,
much less the bids themselves
finalized, then when Luvender
spoke to Rosenbloom at the second
meeting, how could University
Communications offer The East
Carolinian a 6040 split?
The answers to these questions
have been eluding this newspaper
since May. All we do know is that
The East Carolinian, the newspaper
of the student body, stood to loose
$8,000 in revenue if we did nothing.
We saw this as a loss for the
students and the university as well
as for the paper. Luvender,
however, refused to stand for it.
On Thursday of this week, The
East Carolinian will release its own
Early Registration Issue. It will be
produced by the students, and in
the name of the students.
As Luvender puts it, "We have
no choice but to stand up for
ourselves and do what we feel is
right
We ask you now to support The
East Carolinian's Early Registra-
tion Issue, and those merchants
who placed their faith in this stu-
dent run newspaper.
w
HOW PO I SPELL RELIEF? W-l-N-N-l-N-G
&
Risky: To Cheat Or Not To Cheat
ByTERRIORE
Urn Wrtt.
So, you've waited until the morning
of your midterm to begin studying and
now you have only two hours before the
big test that will count 50 percent of
your final grade. Vou know that you
cannot possibly cram all of the
necessary information into your head in
that short amount of time, and you
can't drop the class because your
parents would kill you. So do you studs
as much as you can and pray that the
professor puts a 90-point curve on the
grades, or do you take another
alternative-cheating?
Sometimes students take that road to
dishonesty by deciding that they
couldn't possibly get caught. So they
make out that major cheat sheet or
write answers on their arms or anything
to keep them from having to really learn
the material. But what happens to those
students who get caught for cheating at
East Carolina University?
Cheating is one of four Academic In-
tegrity Violations that can result in
some severe consequences. Last year. 15
students were "reported for cheating.
However, many more were probably
caught and held accountable by their
professor. Those who were reported,
were either given an "F" for the course
or for the paper, test or project.
Let's use a fictitious person, John J.
to describe what would happen if so-
meone were caught for cheating at
ECU.
If a classmate sees John J. cheating,
they have the option of reporting it to
the professor, Department Chairperson
or member of the Academic Integrity
Board. If the professor catches John
cheating, they must summon him to an
interview within 3 class days after the
alleged violation has taken place.
John J. and the professor may each
have a non-participating observer at the
interview. The faculty observer should
be the Dean or Chairperson of the
Department or Associate Dean of the
School. John may choose another stu-
dent or faculty member as he wishes.
These observers are to watch the pro-
cedures unbiasedly and be prepared to
testify in the event of an appeal of the
judgment of the teacher.
During the interview, the faculty
member must present evidence in sup-
port of the charges against John. After
hearing the student, the faculty member
may give John an "F" in the course or
take other appropriate action. If so, the
action taken will be reported to Dr. Ron
Speier, Associate Dean of Students.
After the first interview is over and if
the professor feels that failing John is
inadequate disciplinary action, he may
turn the whole case over to the
Academic Integrity Board. Then a new
hearing will be held without regard to
the findings in the initial interview.
The Academic Integrity Board will
follow the hearing procedures establish-
ed by the University Honor Board, and
a majority of the Board will decide the
issue. The Chairperson shall vote only
in the case of a tie. Then John and the
professor will be notified of the decision
of the Board.
If the evidence is insufficient to sus-
tain charges against John, in order to
protect both the student and the pro-
fessor, continuation of the class must be
resolved by the Dean or Department
Chairperson.
On the other hand, if the evidence is
sufficient to support the charges, then
the Board may impose a charge of giv-
ing John an "F" for the course, suspen-
ding or dismissing John from the
University, or taking any other action
appropriate with the findings.
One point to make is that John has
the option to appeal the Board's deci-
sion at any time. If he wishes to do -his
he would appeal to Elmer Meyer,
Chancellor of Student Life.
Now, after examining she conse-
quences that can and will follow getting
caught for cheating, would vou try and
cram for that midterm at the las:
minute, or make out a cheat sheet0
Personally, I wouldn't have to think
about it long. I would rather studv for
:he little time that I had and settle for a
possible D, than have to take the class
over the next semester.
Campus
Spectrum
Rules
In addition to the "Campus
Forum" section of the Editorial
Page, The East Carolinian has re-
established the "Campus Spectrum
This is an opinion column featuring
guest writers from the student body
and faculty. The columns printed in
the "Campus Spectrum" will contain
current topics of concern to the cam-
pus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of
grammer and decency. Persons sub-
mitting columns must be willing to
accept "by-line" credit for their ef-
forts, as no entrvs from ghost writers
will be published.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information mav
contact Daniel Maurer. managing
editor of The East Carolinian a:
757-6366, or stop by our offices on
the second floor of the Publications
Buildine.
Reagan Right To Keep Star Wars
Editorial Columnist Wanted:
The East Carolinian is presently seeking a conservative columnist
to present views in opposition to the liberal column, "From The
Left. Applicants must be well versed in both national and cam-
pus politics. A writing sample is required
The disappointing failure of the Iceland summit mav bring
the debate over "Star Wars or the Strategic Defense In-
itiative, to new levels. At one point, the summit appeared to
be destined for the history books, but President Reagan and
General Secretary Gorbachev were unable to reach any kind
of agreement over SDI, so for now the world will have to wait
and see if long-range missiles and bomber arsenals will ever be
reduced by one-half. The possible elimination of all but 100
medium range missiles from both countries will also have to
wait.
From The Left
By BERN MeCRADY
Forum Provides Airing Ground
Are you one of those students who likes
to complain about the status quo but who
doesn't like to "get involved Perhaps
you'd like to say something, but, then
again, who'd listen?
The Campus Forum, otherwise known
as letters to the editor, provides for a vir-
tual marketplace for your ideas, helping
students voice their opinions on the vital
issues of concern on campus. Space will be
made available for all letters, provided the
following guidelines are observed:
�All letters must be typed or neatly
handwritten and double-spaced on clean
white paper;
�Letters must not exceed two pages;
�Letters must focus on a pertinent issue
of concern � no personal attacks will be
permitted;
�All letters must be signed by the
author;
�Author's address, phone number, ma-
jor and classification must be included so
that letters may be verified;
�Students are limited to one letter every
two weeks;
�All letters are subject to editing for
style, grammar, libel and clarity, and
�Deadline for turning in letters is 5 p.m.
on Fridays for the Tuesday issue and 5
p.m. Tuesday for Thursday's paper.
Remember, The East Carolinian's Cam-
pus Forum is the best campuswide vehicle
for dispensing your own thoughts on the
issues that affect students. The newspaper
is here to serve you, so don't neglect the
opportunity to voice an opinion.
Please adhere to the above guidelines for
the Campus Forum and bring your letters
to our office on the second floor of the Old
South Building across from Joyner
Library. Your cooperation and input are
greatly apreciated.
So, don't just sit back and complain;
take action. Granted, a letter won't move
mountains. But, then again, it just might
be the first step towards getting something
done.
Why? The United States and the Soviet Union appear to
have completely differing views regarding a space defense
system from nuclear missiles. President Reagan believes that
SDI could eventually make nuclear weapons obsolete by com-
pletely eliminating their threat. Mr. Gorbachev claims that
SDI is only an attempt by the Reagan administration to gain
military superiority and make a historic technilogical
breakthrough.
Few people have trouble believing President Reagan's
sincerity regarding SDI, but Mr. Gorbachev's reaction is very
interesting, and indeed, very puzzling. Gorbachev has stated
many times that SDI cannot succeed and will develop into a
great failure. If so, why does he take such a strong stand
against SDI? It would seem that if he really thought it was
destined for failure, he would be glad to let Reagan spend
millions and billions of dollars on the system, for that would
work to the Soviet's advantage. Obviously, something about
SDI really bothers Gorbachev.
It may be that he believes that SDI could increase the
chances of nuclear disaster, but it could also be because he
sees SDI possibly giving the United States a strong military
advantage. Whatever the reason, the Soviet Premier stuck to
his guns, Reagan did the same, and the talks are dead.
Is SDI worth it? In order for it to work perfectly, or make
missiles obsolete, a leak proof system would have to be
designed. To be effective, SDI must be survivable and it must
be "cost effective at the margin To be survivable, a space
shield must be able to survive a pre-emptive attack. If an
enemy launched his missiles and knocked out the entire space
defense system, it would be worthless. "Cost effective at the
margin" means it must be cheaper to add new defenses than
to build new offensive systems.
SDI may not be able to survive a direct attack. It could be
easily damaged by anti-satellite weapons and space mines
According to the 1984 report of the Defensive Technologies
study team, which was chaired by James Fletcher, the head of
NASA, an effective space shield would have to be developed
with several different layers of weapons, all of which take
shots in sequence at incoming ballistic missiles. Each laver is
responsible for the different phases of a missile launch These
phases include the boost phase, when rocket engines present a
. bright target; the post-boost phase, when the vehicle is
dispensing its load of re-entry-vehicles (RV's) which are top-
ped with warheads; the 20 minute coasting phase, which is
when RV s can be hidden in a cloud of decoys; and the last
phase, when the RV's go through the atmosphere to their
targets at several kilometers per second.
This system leaves the possibility for manv problems
however. If one layer is over loaded, the entire system would
collapse, since it depends on the layers working in sequence
The system would probably be designed according to the
arsenal the U.S. thought an enemy could launch but if U S
estimates were inaccurate due to violations of an'arms treats
or the intentional escalation of missile stockpiles, then a space
shield might not be built strong enough to handle an attack
No doubt, any enemy would do anything to try and throw off
a space shield. Communications between the hard
waresoftware of different layers in a space shield are critical-
ly important, and any interruption could throw off the entire
system. Also, there is no guarantee that each laver would have
enough time to identify incoming missiles.
Based on the report of the Defensive Technologies studv
team a space shield that could survive a pre-emptive strike
would be very difficult. ,f not impossible, to develop. Would
the system be cheaper to develop than offensive missiles Pro
bablv not since SDI research alone is calling for m l! ons of
dollars. Also, the construction and deployment of such a
system would most definently cost millions more.
In conclusion, SDI is still, for the most part, a proposal
and few people would advocate ending all research. S2ET
ly, a great deal more needs to be learned, especially when a
space shield might not be like what James Fletcher's studv
team described. For this reason, President Reagan waspro-
bably right not to let Gorbachev negotiate awl SI
Research should be continued, but it should be watched
cautiously, taking into consideration that the Presidents mt
iTotimiTtic 8 nUdCar WCaP�nS �bSO,CtC arC .bly om-

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FOR ONK()
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Help
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OPEN MON
SUNDA
' OOOOOOOOOPCSOOCCOOCOOOOOQO
IS ALCOH
If you aluas net.
problem.
Bothered by baboon
Jungle drums pounding
Friends beginning to vr-
Then remember: Alcohol al
it's definitely nothing to mi
careless drinkers � you do
words . . .
Don't Go Banana;
Be Smart. Be
If You D
For information, brochures, or sit
the BACCHIS office in 301 Enm
call 757-6793. Come bv our ne
Mendenhall.
BACCHUS - Boosting kk
Suppc
� �





THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 21. 1986 5
N-l-N-G I!
To Cheat
deci-
!his,
M( - Vice
-
the conse-
� Ilow getting
� tr and
� ai the last
it a c heai sheei ?
;nk
stud) for
. for a
' � ike the class
i npus
ectrum
Rules
�npus
I d tonal
� re-
a � pus S
. umn itv ng
den I " id .
;olumn printed in
an" will contain
ncen lie cam-
con-
es of
Pers ns sub-
ng i

n maj
n aging
ai inian at
Star Wars
k. Ii
e mines.
e Technologies
ehead of
� � be � � ped
'aKe
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eni a
he vehicle is
:op-
g pha (vl ich is
�ind the last
� � :heir
blems,
item would
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� I au :h, but ifl S
Ieaty
'hen a space
die an attack.
" � and throw off
between rhe hard-
pacesl eld are critical-
� : ' ff the entire
at each !aer would have
.
�e Technologies study
� e a pre-emptive strike
ble, to develop. Would
de- an offensive missiles? Pro-
research alone is calling for millions of
'ruction and deployment of such a
� neatly cost millions more.
M is still, for the most part, a proposal,
W advocate ending all research. Obvious-
E needs to be learned, especially when a
' Ke like what James Fletcher's study
this reason. President Reagan was pro-
let Gorbachev negotiate away SDI.
continued, but it should be watched
nsideration that the President's pro-
ear weapons obsolete are probablv over-
The East Carolinian's
COUPON PAGE
(Published Tuesdays)
Pizza inn. is
For pizza out it's Pizza Inn
$2.00 Off Any Large
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Eat In Or Take Out
Phone 758-6266
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FOR ONE COMPLETE
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1 Small Mashed Potato and Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
Expires Dec. 31. 1986
LUNCH
$369
FAMILY BUFFET
iOwMOI
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I i
featuring
Help Yourself Home Cooking
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IS ALCOHOL MAKING A MONKEY
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If you always need alcohol in order to have a swinging time, you may have a
problem.
Bothered by baboon breath?
Jungle drums pounding in your head?
Friends beginning to wish you'd quit hanging around?
Then remember: Alcohol abuse is the number one drug problem in our society, and
it's definitely nothing to monkey around with. Even if your family tree is full of
careless drinkers � you don't have to be a chimp off the old block. In other
words . . .
Don't Go Bananas . . .
Be Smart. Be Responsible.
If You Drink � Drink Moderately.
For information, brochures, or simply to speak to someone about your or a friend's problem, stop by
the BACCHUS office in 301 Erwin Hall, across from Mendenhall, Monday through Friday, 11-2 or
call 757-6793. Come by our new membership meeting, 6:00 Thursday October 23 in room 242
Mendenhall.
BACCHUS � Boosting Alcohol Awareness Concerning the Health of University Students
Support Alcohol Awareness Week Oct. 20-24
& Sigma Nu Little Sisters
Presents
DRAFT NITE
Tuesday, October 21, 1986 9:00-2:00 A.M.
Admission $1.50 Guys 1.00 Ladies
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10 DRAFT ALL NITE
& Pi Kappa Tau
Presents
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Wednesday, October 22, 1986
Admission 1.50 Guys 1.00 Ladies
75 Toll Cans & Coolers
10 Draft All Nite
" i
A
aMMHMMOl
���
. � -�.W





IHl EAS1 CARCN INJAN
Style
OCTOBER 21, 1986
Page 6
The Season Of Ghostly Stories Has Arrived
B MICAH HARRIS
There you are. I've been
wailing for you.
A bit chilly this evening, eh?
Around the neighborhood, pum-
pkins have sprouted from cement
porches; grimacing jack-o-
lanterns lick their rotting mouths
with tongues of fire. Sssh. You
can hear their rustling cackle. A
few brittle leaves � dead things
� are scraping across the
driveway.
Enter freely and of your own
will. You want to talk about
fright? About what reallv scares
you?
The Wolfman? You laugh.
You say Lon Chanev, Jr. looks
like he has a rug stuck on his
face. The Creature? "Forget it
vou chuckle. "1 can seethe zipper
a mile away
Wait a minute. Look. See.
What about what you can't see?
Ah. That's a different story. A
ghost story.
I'll paraphrase Peter Struab. 1
won't tell you the scariest thing
that happened to me, but I'll tell
you the scariest thing that could
happen to me.
And maybe you.
A wind-swept country road on
an October night. The traveler
docs not know how long he's
been driving. Time isn't the same
out here when the sun goes down.
And the car clock is stuck at one
minute after twelve. The traveler
flicks the car light on to check his
watch and flicks it off again.
Only fifteen minutes. He was
sure it had been an hour! A very
long ride ahead.
Suddenly, the headlights flare
on a small form of white and
gold. A fallen angel? No! A little
girl. Alone out here?
His foot grapples for the
brake; the night wind catches the
tires' screech and stretches it out
like a scream from hell. He opens
the door; the red gaze of the
brakelights burns holes in the
night.
"What's wrong, honey?"
"I'm scared, mister. I'm
scared and I'm cold. I want to go
home. Take me home
"Sure, honey, sure He takes
her hand, a fistfull of snow in the
lingering Indian summer night.
He takes her inside the car and
drapes his coat about her.
"Where do you live?"
She stares ahead. "The first
house you come to. On the left
The traveler tries to ask her
questions, but his small passenger
remains distant. He doesn't
mind.
Finally, there is the house. He
pulls into the driveway. It is a
very ancient house. He turns to
his passenger.
She is gone.
The girl, his coat gone. He is
alone.
Alone at the house.
Or is he? He gets out of the car
but leaves the headlights on. The
wooden porch sounds old and
hollow under foot. He knocks. A
rattle, and the door opens slight-
ly.
A very wrinkled face stares
out. The eyes are glazed with
fear. He quickly explains, and the
fear in the eyes melts into a far
away look.
"Yes the woman's voice
cracks. "That was my little girl,
Sally. She was killed on this
stretch of road a long time ago.
She is buried out in the family
plot behind the house
"Crazy the traveler thinks.
But who? The old woman, or
him? He stumbles into the
backyard, his dew-soaked tennis
shoes cold on his feet.
There. From the graveyard so-
meone waves at him. No. It's on-
ly wind blowing a jacket. His
jacket, draped over Sally's tomb-
stone.
And he wonders if some nights
you might make a very wrong
turn on a very long road that
winds like the river Styx into
hades.
A familiar story, you say? A
common bit of folklore that ap-
pears in many collections of
ghost stories, that's all. I thought
the same.
And then I learned that the old
TV series, "One Step Beyond
which specialized in dramatiza-
tions of true supernatural tales
had adapted this old ghost story
in the episode, "If You See
Sally
Following the broadcast, forty-
five viewers wrote in and describ-
ed similar experiences.
Of course, we know it's just a
ghost story. But one word before
you go.
Maybe this Halloween you'll
find yourself on one of those
endless country roads with deep
woods on either side. You'll hear
something slither among the
branches, and you'll assure
yourself it's only the wind. That's
all.
Just the same, you might turn
up the radio and stare straight
ahead in the comforting glow of
your headlights as brittle leaves
flitter up before your car like bats
out of a cave at sundown. And
you'll get a chill because you'll
wonder if the sun never rises out
here and if the road never ends
Keep looking straight. Keep
driving until you're home.
Because a little girl is standing
at the road's edge. And she is
very pale and very, very cold

Motorists should beware of the restless, hungry spirits that would like very much to wavlav them.
Greenville Singles Have Option Of Not Quite Blind Dates
B MICHFLI F SHKKRJN
M�ff Wrllr
Have you ever considered a
dating service? Dating services
can be a good way to meet people
with interests similar to your
own. If you are interested, you
are also in luck because a new
dating service has just opened
here in Greenville.
Debbie Dixon opened Kat
Personalized Computer Dating
Service, located at 103 Oakmont
Drive, on the first day of
September. Dixon said she decid-
ed to start a dating service
because she thought it would be a
good alternative to bars. She also
thought it would benefit those
who are simply shy or quiet.
"The dating service is doing
very well as of now said Dixon.
There are already 50 members,
more males than females, and the
majority of them are ECU
students. Most are between the
ages of 22 and 35, some are
younger or older (up to the age of
67). A few of the members are in
the "professional world
The cost of the dating service is
$15 per month for students. This
discount rate guarantees at least
two matches. The Si5 carries
over to the next month if two
matches cannot be made in the
first month.
Dinner Theatre Is Fine Entertainment
B TOM PAGE
s�ff Writer
If the closest you've come to a
real night out in college is sitting
in the corner booth at
McDonalds and gazing at your
date over a big Mac, save your
lunch money and get ready for a
classy evening at a dinner theatre
right here on campus, at a cost
that is probably within your price
range. The productions commit-
tee of the Student Union is offer-
ing, as part of their dinner theatre
series, an all you can eat buffet
followed bv Bill Manhoff's
Broadway comedy hit. The Owl
and the Pussycat.
Productions committee chair-
man Shari Clemens said, "Con-
sidering comparative prices of a
regular dinner theatre, this is
really a good deal. The average
dinner theatre would cost $30 a
couple or more, but we offer the
same quality evening for almost
half that amount Tickets for
the dinner theatre are $9 for
students and $16 for faculty and
the public.
In the past, the faculty turnout
has generally outweighed the stu-
dent turnout; this year, the Stu-
dent Union would like to see a
larger student interest in the
theatre. Clemens said, "We hope
to see a greater student interest
not only in the dinner theatre, but
also in the Student Union itself.
The Student Union is more than
most students may think
Liz Deupree, this years Student
Union President and last year's
production committee chairman
said, "The productions in the
The mismatched couple of Felix mm Doris cm be seen in "The CM
and the Pussycat Oct. 31 and Nov. 1 at Mendenhall.
past have been a big success. We
had to increase our capacity so
that we could seat more people
per night Deupree said that she
sees the dinner theatre as a quaint
place to go with a date, or where
friends can spend time just relax-
ing and enjoying a different set-
ting. She said it's convenient
because patrons don't have to
hurry through dinner then drive
to the theatre. Rather, they can
just take their time. Students who
are old enough may also bring
their favorite wine to enjoy with
dinner.
The Owl and the Pussycat is a
comedy performed by the Alpha
Omega Players (Repertory
Theater of America), a nationally
acclaimed touring company bas-
ed in Rockport, Texas. The
Alpha Omega Players have per-
formed at ECU in the past in
such productions as California
Suite, Last of the Red Hot
Lovers, and other popular hits by
playwrights such as Neil Simon.
The comedy is about education
yet has nothing to do with school.
The two characters Doris and
Felix (played by Donna Orzano
and Scott Corey) constantly
engage in a sassy rendition of the
war between the sexes. The
unlikely couple � the dumb, kit-
tenlike, sexy girl with the body
and the smart, owlish guy with
the brains � could teach us all a
little something as they set the
pace for the race of who will
educate whom.
Judging from past experience
or not, most can easily imagine
the context of the conversation
which takes place between the
two mismatches (the owl and the
pussycat). The confrontation
develops into not only a comic
verbal battle, but also a contest
of missionary-like conversion in
which each contestant wins.
Guest artist Diana Kirk,
graduate of the University of
Georgia, will direct with technical
assistance by artist-in-residence
Jeff Whitman. Both have just
completed two years of touring
with the Players.
So thats the deal. Play your
cards right and enjoy a classy
evening in an intimate setting, an
all you can eat buffet and an
entertaining broadway comedy at
a price even college students
aren't scared of. The dinner
theatre will take place Friday and
Saturday, Oct. 31 and Nov. 1,
and you must get your tickets in
advance. Tickets and additional
information can be obtained at
the central ticket office in
Mendenhall.
The Review
By now you are probablv
wondering just how the dating
service works. First of all, you fill
out an interview with several
questions. For example, you may
be asked to list favorite hobbies,
favorite places and favorite ways
to spend your time, and to
describe realistically the type of
person you would like to meet.
The second step is to have your
picture taken. Then Dixon will
try to find someone who will be
compatible with you and your in-
terests. It may take a while
sometimes. When Debbie finds a
match for someone she will then
give the person a name and phone
number. And from there,
anything could happen.
Dixon said, "For all the young
women who are considering a
dating service option there are
several attractive young men who
are members at Katz Personaliz-
ed Computer Dating Service
Asked whether she would ever
consider a dating service, one
ECU student said, "That's hard
to say. Right now I don't have
time for a relationship so I
wouldn't consider it. In the
future, well who knows? It's
better than trying to find so-
meone in a bar
Another student said, "Yes,
why not? It gives you a chance to
meet people or one certain person
you would otherwise never have
met. Meeting someone under the
circumstances of this service, you
both have the same interest in
mind, and it's not like trying to
talk to a stranger in a bar If
you are interested, you can call
355-7595 weekdays for an ap-
pointment.
Bad Brains Shred The Beat
By D.
A. SWANSON
Miff �rtl,r
Bad Brains � Against I (SST
Records)
Yellowman � Ramho (Moving
Target Records)
Following up a debut from last
year that shook the reggae world
at its very roots, the Bad Brains,
with Against I, shred any final
vestiges of the sun splash genre
(except for their dread-locks) and
go straight for the throat with an
undeniably metal ax.
This new album is either the
freshest and most vital thing
that's ever happened to heavy
metal, or the most unbelievable
artistic stretch ever taken in the
name of reggae. You decide.
Despite the very clean, very
slick production by Ron St. Ger-
main, the Bad Brains have com-
posed a collection of tunes that
rival and surpass just about
anything ever pumped through a
150 Watt Peavey before. The
guiatar licks on "Let Me Help"
are especially definitive of the
Led Zeppelin, Judas Priest and
Van Halen musical influences
that permeate the new Brains.
The gut level energy roaring
from songs like "I Against I"
and "Re-Ignition while totally
contrary to the band's reggae
roots, is sufficient enough to
make these talented thrashers the
cross-over success of the year.
In contrast to the metal in-
strumentals, however, are the
lyrics. While they are sung in a
traditional rock and roll style
(sometimes David Lee Roth,
sometimes Bon Scott, sometimes
Robert Plant), they deal with
subjects more common to their
rasta roots, such as the spiritual
aspects of love, the insanity and
tragedy of violence and murder
and generally the universal inter-
nal struggles denoted under the
tide I Against I.
Despite its surface level ap-
pearance of commercial appeal,
this is a very penetrating album,
musically and lyrically. I highly
recommend it to any connoisseur
of heavy metal or even pro-
gressive music.
More in the mainstream of
Reggae style is the new album
from the prolific 'wailer
Yellowman. His newest release,
Rambo, does not stray very far
from his standard � a droning
yet musical rasta vocal set over a
solid reggae vamp.
With Sly Dunbar and Robbie
Shakespeare (playing drums and
bassbass synthguitar respec-
tively) behind the board as pro-
ducers, the sound is even more in
the mainstream and any hint of
Yellowman's past fame as an ex-
perimenter and driving force in
the genre is cut to a minimum.
There are, however, two in-
stances in which significant
strides are taken against the slow
and swaying norm. "Tarzan"
and "Computorize" both incor-
porate some synthesizer work
and syncopated stops which
should be just the thing to shock
you out of the hypnotizing effect
of the vamp without being too
disruptive.
On the whole, this is a very-
good, very clean recording of
Yellowman's sometimes political,
sometimes social and always self-
indulgent themes. The tunes are
kept simple, drawing greatly, it
seems, from such areas as nursery
rhymes and children's melodies.
It is very well produced album,
though perhaps a bit on the slick
side compared to his earlier work
in the early eighties. It's a good
L.P. to start with for someone in-
terested in the reggae style. That
is, if you don't take the over-
bearing ego too seriously. You
might see that Yellowman, with
his new album, is the David Lee
Roth of Reggae.
Next week look for comments
on an album from a new band,
Love And Rockets, called Ex-
press. We will also be taking a
short look at a band that is mak-
ing a lot of waves with the ever-
extreme, right wing Christian
censors. The band is Christian
Death and, for all its neo-
Victorian melodies and gutter-
level anti-religious themes, has
withstood everything from record
burnings to physical attacks on
stage.
Beyond that, who knows.
Things are always happening in
receiving at the Z. For the very
latest in that department, listen to
their show "Adventures In
Modem Recording" every Mon-
day night. Again, thanks for
reading and listening. This has
been a Dangerous Frozen Dinner
production with special saluta-
tions to Skully.
Suzuki K
Ten voung musicians, students
of the Suzuki method, will sur-
prise the audience
Bach, Vivaldi, M and
Beethoven at the. -mance
at 8 p.m � .
Auditorium
The Suzu)
Mother! rig ie M
name preterred b
Shinichi Su iki , �
accident all
War II. The method is based
Suzuki's be!
learn to pla an instrument
the same way hi pe -
language �I
itating. Bea �
from imita'
lessons first
song, usual1. kle Tv
Little Si
Before the
around the age
mother
musu �
used to
According
begin, at v
realize an
orb evr
now le
Marine Band
Coming To
Wright Soon
1.4 t Nl� � �
The President
Marine B I
Col. John R Bourge
form here Wednesday,
The will presenT t�
a matinee performar.v
and an evening ever.
Their ECU ap:
of a fall tour of the -
states, which itself is pr'
1986 nationa. I I �ur.
The noted
includes a .
in Washington I
House comm
touring membe-s.
Currentlv, its c er- -
includes severa soli ro-
mances, a - ;
piccolo tri a a
quartet � witl - - - .
ing from Beri kov-
sky to John Phillip -
Sousa, compose!
and S:npes Forever" i
stirring marches, was
conductor in 1891.
ed group unde-
fotming tour.
The Marine 3 i
expense to the taxpa �� -
mg organiza
its performances
proceeds
Membe-
may purchase tickc
performances a v!
S6 (evening) ea
offered for pei i �
20 or more. Tickets are ava
at the ECU Cei
in Mendenhall Student Cen
(telephone 919-757-6611, ext
266).
CAROLINA GULF
: : Dick �
Do li With Us � We P L d �
NIS M. GITJ �1HI�' H. -
POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
AREA REP MANAGER
Earn salary, commission and
free travel Position Invoke
management of area campus
reps for a national college
travel and marketing firm
Approximately 20 hours per
week, ideal for senior M
graduate student
CAMPUS REP
Earn commission and free
travel Market ski and beach
tours on your campus
Call Michael DeBoer at 914
682 1795 or write to Amer
lean Access Travel. 141 Cen-
tral Park Avenue South
Hartsdak. NY 10530
CALLTOLLFREE
(800) 992-3773
H


Ml ��: MHM
� t
I






I HI I -S , XK, N
Bl f
rrived
l ke hato
, A n Alld
se you'll
f out
. vei end
Keep
ding
rv. v
ia them.
?rf Dates
er
e, one
ard
� � � ive
ationship so 1
lei it In the
The Beat
. � .
I

with
. I ee
'mment.s
md,
Ex-
V rig a
� ak-
re ever-
hnsuan
ian
neo-
utter-
themes, has
� �� .m record
i attacks on
who knows.
ire aiwds happening in
- at the Z For the very
at department, listen to
show Adventures In
M dern Recording" every Mon-
night Again, thanks for
kding and listening. This has
been a Dangerous Frozen Dinner
production with special saluta-
tions to Skully
Suzuki Kids To Perform In Wright
young musicians, students
Suzuki method, will sur.
se the audience with works of
Vivaldi, Mozan and
ven at their performance
8 p.m. tonight in Wright
orium
Suzuki method, or the
rongue Method (the
( preferred b its founder,
Suzuki), was discovered
soon after World
II 1 he method is based on
ki's belie! thai a child can
to play any instrument in
( a he learns to speak a
by listening and im-
e Because the child learns
e mother takes
�' ns a simple
" 1 winkle rwinkle

ild's lessons start,
e age ol three, the
iged o play
' � � he will be
' - ii ing � played well.
Suzuki, education
' ' . and we must
fant's ability
Marine Band
Coming To
Wright Soon
Srm H�� r a l.
� � n I -
�:�� H e
Oct 29
; n m
? p m
part
:
W
as
� -� ncen program
several solo perl r-
i baritone vocalist, a
no and ,i saxophone
with a repertoire rang-
� Dm Berlioz and Tchaikov-
-1 John Phillip Sousa
Sousa, compos, � ' he Stars
Stripes Forevei" and other
S es, uas the band's
ductoi n 1891, when the fam-
; group �k its first per-
rming I
The Ma Hand tours at no
pe� � ' axpayer. Sponsor-
is pay the costs of
;s out of ticket
. general public
tse tickets for EC U
es at S5 (matinee r
tg) each, with discounts
� � persons in groups of
re rickets are available
e ECU entral Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
919-757-6611, ext.
CAROLINA GULF
752-7270
H e Pl 4 Del.
POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
AJREA REP MANAGER
Earn salary, commission and
free travel. Position involves
management of area campus
reps for a national college
travel and marketing firm
Approximately 20 hours per
week, ideal for senior or
graduate student
CAMPUS REP
Earn commission and free
travel. Market ski and beach
tours on your campus
Call Michael DeBoer at 914-
682 1795 or write to Amer
ican Access Travel. 141 Cen-
tral Park Avenue South,
Hartsdale. NY 10530
CALL TOLL FREE
(800)992-3773
Bv performing m front of an
informal audience made up o(
mothers and children, the child
becomes more relaxed, Suzuki
says. This way of performing also
allows other students to learn
through observation. They learn
to help one another, not com-
pete.
"We are not teaching them to
become professional musicians "
says Suzuki. "I believe that sen-
sitivity and love for music and art
are important to people of all
ages
His first student, four-year-old
Toshiya Eto, graduted from
Philadelphia's Curtis Institute of
Music, held the post of professor
there for seven years, and after
returning to Japan became that
country's foremost violin vir-
tuoso. Over the past 35 years,
tens of thousands of Japanese
youngsters have been taught
violin by Suzuki or trained
teachers of the Suzuki method.
Suzuki's method has also
caught on in the United States.
An estimated 35,000 American
children are actively studying
violin under Suzuki or his trained
co-workers
His success in America does
not stop with tours. A quarterly,
the American Suzuki Journal, is
put out by the Suzuki Association
of the Americas, a non-profit
organization formed in 19
And in 1983, the International
Suzuki Association was establish-
ed, turning Suzuki's Talent
Education theory into a learning
experience tor both children and
adults worldwide
The 1986-1987 rtisi Serie
ill be presented in the newK
renovated Wrighl Auditorium
With its extraordinary acoustics,
excellent sight lines, and comfor
table, plush carpeting and
searing, Wrighl Audil , be-
ing termed the
east ol Greensfc
Tickets arc a �� ��
McndenhaH'seni
e M : � I lay, 11
i.m. to 6 p.n rickei u 56 foi
I l I itudei ts and gu 56 foi
youths (higl
$10 for EC!
S12 foi
c 6611.
exi 266, during
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT OCTOBER 25 1986 ATA4PIN
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT To LIMIT QUANTITIES
WE WILL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE PRICE IN
GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat. Produce, Deli. Bakery &
Continuity Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With You. We Will Match
Like Items Or Equal Quality.
The supermarket with
WAiriHOUM
mm
4
A
DOUBLE
COUPONS
ore t0' dei s
FAMILY PACK FRESH
Fryer Leg
Quarters
- limit four
A Vtjfcr i family packs
THIN TRIM GRAIN FED BEEf
Whole
Tenderloin
REGULAR OR BUTTER
Crisco
Shortening
SAVE ON
A&P
Shortening
3 b i28
can v
3
lb.
can
168
eCofS,C " C0KE � DIET COKE � CHERRY COKE � TAB
rACcc,cITE ' DIET SPRITE � CAFFEINE-FREE COKE
CAFFEINE-FREE DIET COKE � CAFF-INE-FREE TAB � MELLO VELLO

Coca-
LIMIT ONE OF YOUR CHOICE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
OPEN SUNDAY 7 A.M11 P.M.
703 GREENVILLE BLVD. OPEN
OPEN MON. 7 A.M.
24 H OU RS CLOSE SAT 11 P.M.
V






I HI t AS! mn INIAN
The Monkey's Off Their Back!
Sports
()( iohe-R 21, 19 Pm �
B HMCHANDl KR
&
SCOTT COOPER
Sport Whirrs
It's over, the monkev is final!)
off their ba.k
u � :12 seconds remaining in
game, walk-on placekicker
( huck Berleth nailed a 47-yard
' e d goal that lifted ECU to a
; 33 victorj ovei Georgia
� Uhernand snapped the Pira es
15-game losing streak
"1 just tried to relax .is much as
1 could and take m mind ofl
kick said Berleth. "It (the kick)
� to the left and the wind was
wing from left ghi So 1
oer. We had a strong wind out
there s it w as foi I mate
"I probably, appreciate ,u.s win
e than an other coach in the
EC1 coa Vrl Baker
said "It was a en tough w
and a very touj I ball j
"We tried to keep the bal as
Pirates Snap Losing Streak
JB HUMBERT ECU Photo L�b
1 PI
as we ci
w e l
trolled it foi 30 to 40 minutes
Baker added ai his weekly press
conference, "I'm particularly
proud of our players and
coaches
The Pirates struck first as Matt
Mel aughlin caught the first of
his two touchdown passes on the
da The two-yard reception cap-
ped off a 16-play, 66-yard drive
which absorbed oer seven
minutes of the first-quarter
4 7 probably appreciate
this win more than any
other coach in the coun-
try
�Art Baker
clock. An errant snap on the ex-
tra point turned into fortune as
holder lonj Smith scrambled
dove he endzone as
EC I took an eaily 8-0 load.
The lead increased to 15-0 later
period when Anthony
s i ps n plunged into the end-
zone from a vard out. Free safet
Dillahun! set up ,he 61-vard
drive with a fumble recovery at
the Pirate 39.
However, Georgia Southern
wasted little time cutting into the
ECU lead as quarterback Tracy
Ham led the Eagles on a 73-yard
scoring drive. The drive took on-
1 1:40 as Ricky Harris scored on
an 11-yard sweep. Gerald Harris
added the two-point coversion as
GSC pulled within seven, 15-8.
After forcing the Pirates to
punt, Ham then led GSC on a
14-pIay, 98-yard drive. He cap-
ped it off himself with a one-yard
touchdow n run, tving the game at
15-15.
On the ensuing kickoff, Simp-
son rambled 47 yards to the GSC
34-yard line before losing his
footing. The Pirates' drive stalled
at the Eagle 21-yard line six plays
later. Berleth then came on to
connect on a 38-yard field goal,
giving ECU the lead once again
18-15.
GSC's Tim Foley knotted the
came once again as he connected
on a 32-yard field goal as time ex-
pired in the first half.
After holding Ham and the
Eagles' explosive offense, ECU
embarked on a 66-yard drive,
aided by a 30-yard run bv Simp-
son, in which Jarrod Mood)
scored from four yards out.
Berleth's extra point gave the
Pirates a 25-18 advantage with
:20 left in the third quarter.
After Georgia Southern tied
the game (25-25) with 14:14 re-
maining to be played, ECU went
on a 60-yard, 12-play drive to
recapture the lead. McLaughlin's
eight-yard touchdown pass from
Travis Hunter capped the drive
and appeared to be the winning
score with 8:43 left.
However, Ham, who rushed
for 199 yards (a GSC record) and
threw for 141 more, was not
finished. He directed the Eagles
on an 89-yard drive and then
scored the touchdown and two-
point conversion as well, giving
GSC a 33-32 lead with only 2:59
remaining.
Simpson, who rushed 31 times
for 131 yards (both individual
career highs), gave ECU good
field position as he returned the
ensuing kickoff the Pirate
44-yard line. ECU then drove to
the GSC 30-yard line, setting up
Berleth's game winner.
Dillahunt sealed the game for
the Pirates as he piced up his se-
cond turnover with an osky (in-
terception) on the final play of
the game.
After the game. Baker praised
many individuals for their play.
"Gary London was named the
outstanding defensive player. He
played perhaps his best game
since being here at ECU Baker
See BERLETH'S, page 9
r i - 4fi,il�a
Junior kicker Chuck Bertelh hils the bTnToTl'o'nmnh
his game w.nning field-goal attempt in Saturdays Homec
over Georgia Southern
s hold .r
� mint �in
Pirate Golfers Place Fifth A t Duke
U. MU "LI Vl1 L u "
Anthony Simpson �3l i rambles for some of his career-higrTl31 ards.
Bourgeois Named
DominoVEC Athlete
Domino's Pizza and Tht
Fas; Carolinian are proud l
honor ECl 's Ken Bourgeois as
the Athi-v � the M
September.
Lhe 6-0, 250-pound senior
center from New Orleans, 1 a .
has beer, an impressive
� sistent performer foi the
I rates' offensive line.
"He has done an excellent
job. He's been our most coi
tent blocker ECU coach Art
Baker said of Bourgeois. "He's
one of those guvs you take for
granted. But in one wav, he's
one of the most important
players on the team
He's very intelligent and
determined Baker continued.
"His teammates know that he's
alwavs going to give his best et-
and he leads by that
Bourgeois is the first Athlete
of the Month and a plaque in
recognition of the honor has
been made courtesj of
Domino's Pizza. The October
recipient will be named in the
first November issue of The
East Carolinian.
B 1 IMC HANDIER
&
R1C KMcC ORMAC
The ECU golf team finished in
fifth-place out of 24 teams in the
John Rvan Memorial Golf Tour-
nament this weekend. The tour-
nament v,as held at the Duke
University golf course in
Durham.
The Pirates' 596 total for the
two-dav tournament left them II
, shots in bak of champion
' Georgia Tech's total of 585.
Duke was second in the team
standings at 591, followed by
Campbell with a total of 593
shots. N.C State was fourth at
594. lhe Pirates 596 total put
them five shots ahead of INC
and seven shots ahead of the
University of Maryland.
I NC's John Hughes captured
individual medalist honors with
rounds of "0-69 for a 139 total.
An Robertson of N.C. Slate was
second at 68-72-140, while
Charlie Rvnor of Georgia Tech
was one stroke back at 141.
The top finisher for the
Pirates, Mike Bradley was next
among the individuals. The
senior put together identical
rounds of 71 for a 142 total �
good for a tie for fourth place.
Freshman John Maginnes was
next for the Pirates with a total of
148. Maginnes opened with a
strong 70 in the first round before
shooting a 78 in the final round.
The rest of the Pirate totals
were: Paul Steelman 77-75-152,
Mark Arcilesi 80-75-155, Mike
Nadau 79-78-157 and Chris Rilev
79-79-158.
First-year head coach Hal
Morrison was happy with the
plav of his team in this their se-
cond match of the fall season.
"1 felt a lot more pleased this
week than at Augusta (the
Pirates' fall opener) Morrison
said. "We seemed to be dealing a
little better as a team
Morrison was happv to see the
Pirates fare so well, especiallv
considering despite the number
of strong teams in the field, only
one one faired better than the
Pirates during final round.
"We're getting to the point
where we are getting into conten-
tion to win. We are no' that n
shots behind the good tean
Morrison continued "We I
ed 11 shots behind Georgia "tcl
and they are one of the top five '�
eight teams in the country
Morrison praised a number of
Pirate golfers for their plav in
tournament.
"I was especiallv pleased with
iMike) Bradlev's plav and
freshman John Maginnes plaved
good he said. "Paul Steelr
has been plaving real s-eadv i
is gradually improving. He has
� � �
"Mark A
es. Hep
well th
it M �
"We're rea
ind a
I Mike inj
progrees
The nexi mate
be a
V ilmii gl n at the
� . � I . � .
Pirates will be ti
the
Pirate golfer Mike Bradley finished in fourth place in the John Ryan Memorial Tournament
ELLEN MURPHY - ECU Photo Lab

Chuck Berleth's 47-y
he hit a 50-varder in
ard field goal was his longest at ECU. However,
junior college.
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Nooru Wriltr
ECU fans will long
remember the field goal that
won Saturday's homecoming
game and snapped the Pirates
15-game losing streak.
With :12 seconds remaining
in the game, placekicker Chuck
Berleth booted a 47-yard field
goal. It was his longest of the
season and gave the Pirates
their first win.
The junior walk-on from
Chicago, 111 kicked his sixth-
consecutive field goal of the
year. He is seven for nine
overall with his misses being a
blocked kick in the opening
game and a 42-yard attempt
versus West Virginia.
Head coach Art Baker is
pleased with Berleth's perfor-
mance. "Chuck kicked a great
one. There was a lot of pr-
ressure packed kicking out
there today. He did his job
wellhe has been amazing
Going into the kick. Berleth
Memorabh
knew there was a lot riding on
it. "I was a little nervous said
Berleth, "but luckily there was
a slight wind to go with
Earlier in the game, Berleth
was blindsided on a kickoff
and injured his hip. "I concen-
trated more on the kick because
I was hurt. I knew I was close
but couldn't see when the
'7 was a little nervous
but knew by the
crowds reaction that it
was good. M
�Chuck Berleth
referee signaled it. I knew by
the crowd's reaction that it was
good
Berleth, a business major, is
the Pirates' second leading
scorer with 31 points, just
behind fullback Anthony
Simpson with 32 points.
Berleth's effort includes his
seven field goals and 10 con-
secutive extra points.
Berleth gives a great deal of
credit to his teammates whose
efforts make his success possi-
ble. Holder Tony Smith has
made the adjustment to a left-
leg kicker and Matt
McLaughlin has stepped in as
long shapper for injured Tom
Brandon.
Berleth's field goal was
neither his longest nor was it
his first game winning effort.
The Harper Junior College
transfer kicked 19 field goals in
his two years at the Palatine,
111 college. His longest was 50
yards while two of the 19 were
game-winning efforts.
Berleth came to ECU from
Harper JC along with team-
mate John O'Driscoll. "I heard
about ECU from John and
coach Wally Chambers. I knew
their kicker was graduating and
they needed someone. The
thing I like the best here is the
weather. In Illinois it's really
cold, but here it's really nice
and it doesn't affect mv kick
ing
With Jeff Heath, LCI all-
time leading scorer graduating.
Berleth came here knowing that
there were some big shoes to
fill. "I had heard a lot about
him but when I got to ECT , 1
found out that he was a
heroeveryone knew about
him. I felt I had to work extra
hard to be noticed, so I trv to
take one kick at a time and
make the best of each one So
tar it's worked
Sports Fact
Tues. Oct. 21. 1877
Prior to a game between
Boston and Cincinnati, right-
handed pitcher Tommy Bond
and left-hander Bobbv Mitchell
throw curves around a stake
dnven into the ground. The
demonstration is intended to
prove, once and for all, that a
curveball reallv does curve
N mson Smith .44. has rn-t-n a main.ta
Pirates In St
H S 01 1 ' OOPI h
sv . .
The met
count
th C a'
I
Durharr

� s I P �
mance
compel
runners
-
Thoma-
Stephanie
IRS H(
SWIMMING pool -
Mori I �
Fri �
M W F
T Th. 3 -5 00 1
Sun
M v 1
WHGHI ROOMS
M�
Mon-Fri
Sa
Sun.
M
v
COMJNC
E
All C

Coming
Unl
n

Thi
j





THl FAST C AROI IMAS
(K TOBIR :i. 1986
all season.
ELLEN MUIPMY - ECU Pholo L�b
I jnoa mith (44 has been a mainsta for the Pirate defense
Pirates In State Championships
t; M fr
' �
Hv SCOTT COOPER
a-3paf 41 lor
nen's and women's cross
tr teams competed in the
S Carolina Intercollegiate
ss Countn Championships in
last Thursday.
am coach Stee Thomas
eased the teams' perfor-
and felt that the tough
was helpful tor the
conference champion-
ng up later in the year.
he did a real!) good job.
s ran realK well
said "Tern (I ynch),
ie (Ingram) and Kim
ai .i second within
each other. It (the meet) helped
show us that 'yes, we can run
"The men, I felt could have
placed higher than we did
Thomas continued. "We have to
close up the top-five runners into
a tighter pack. But we're looking
good. We're shooting for the
conference meet and we're going
to do the best we can
As a team, the women finished
in fourth place behind Duke. Ap-
palachian State and Brevard Col-
lege. The men had a tougher time
as they placed 12th. Below is a
listing of the Pirate runners and
their overall finishes and times.
Men's 8,000 meters
M. Methany � 57th, 29.02
M Schweitzer � 69th, 29.20
R Rice - 73rd. 29.43
J Byrd � 74th. 29.55
M. McGehee � 81st. 30.23
R Williams � 89th, 31.18
V. Wilson � 96th, 32.50
P. Higgins � 104th, 34.45
M. Curtis � 108th, 37.40
Women's 5.000 meters
A Burton � 16th, 20.07
T. L ynch � 27th, 20.53
S. Ingram � 28th. 20.53
K Griffiths � 29th. 20.54
K. Abernathy � 50th, 22.46
J. Jones � 52nd, 23.11
J. Gorenflo � 57th, 23.55
S. Swick � 58th, 24.21
J Norman � 61st, 25.21
I West � 64th. 27.50
Berleth 9s Kick
Upends
Southern
Continued from page 8
said. "Obviously Chuck Berleth
deserves credit and was the
special teams player of the game.
"The offensive line had a great
day and deserves a lot of credit
Baker added. "Jarrod Moody (81
yards on 17 carries) was a big fac-
tor in the ball gameand An-
thony Simpson (also) deserves a
lot of credit
Baker went on to praise the
defensive play of Henry Ferraro,
Ellis Dillahunt and Billy Michel
and the offensive play of
receivers Amos Adams, Tony
Smith, Andre Fields and Walter
Wilson. Also Willie Lewis, Matt
McLaughlin and Grant Lowe
were singled out for their perfor-
mances.
The Pirates defeated Georgia
Southern despite the fact that 13
first- or second-team members
were unable to play. Also, the
homecoming victory was the
Pirate's 16th in 17 tries since
1960.
"Now we can relax and go out
and play the way we are capable
of Simpson said of the Pirates'
Homecoming win. "It was the
type of win we needed
AMERICAS RADIOACTIVE TRUST
DZ.INGRID SWENG0N
NUCLEI ISSUES CHtR. OF MX,
WILL PRESENT fl PROCURE flf
7:30PM. VWftOQY CXWBBfl23flO
ST PAUL'S EFlbCOPQL CHURiH.
"TKmUbVf HULL. (PQRKfNCr LOT
on eiKT 3Zo st) HmytNhjn.
SLIDE SHOk) F0LU)UJ�P Bf OSCOSS0N
UKZViLLE, mC TTl 78- WOC
mecominc �m
Duke

I � ates
-
: �
IRS HOURS
s
W
v
IMMING POOIs
Memorial
7:00 8 00 a m.
12:00-1 30 p.m.
.3:00-10:00 p.m.
� p.m. ' 10:00 p.m.
11:00 a.m5:00 p.m
12:00-8:00 p.m.
Minges
8 00-10:00 p.m.
12 00-5:00p.m.
EIGH1 ROOMS
Memorial
7 00 .i m. 10 00 p.m.
.11:00 a.m5:00 p.m.
.12:00-5:00 p m.
Minges
.3:00-10:00 p m.
Sun.12-5:00 p.m.
EQUIPMENT CHECK-OUT
(MG 115)
Mon-Fri. .7:00 a.m10:00 p.m.
sa: .11:00 am-5:00 p.m.
Sun12:00-8:00 p.m.
RACQIFTBALL
RESERVATIONS
Can be made in person at 115
Memorial Gym or bv calling
757-6911
GYM FREE PLAY
Memorial Gymnasium
Mon-Fri.12:00-1:00 p.m.
Mon-Fri.3:00-10:00 p.m.
Sat.l 1:00 a.m5:00 p.m.
Sun12-5:00 p.m.
Pirate Volleyballers
Down Coastal Carolina
The Lady Pirate volleyball
team improved defeated Coastal
Carolilina College 3-1 to improve
to 5-7 on the season.
The game scores in the match
were: (ECU first) 17-15, 7-15,
15-6 and 15-12.
The Lady Pirates played a
good match on offense and
defense acording to head coach
Immogene Turner.
"The team followed the game
plan real well both offensively
and defensively and we had a
good serving game Turner
said. "We had 16 service aces and
this caused them (CCC) to have
to pull one of their starters out "
After a grueling eight mat-
chroad streak, Turner's Lady
Pirates return to Minges Col-
iseum Wednesday night for a pair
of matches. ECU will host
Villanova in the first match at
6:30 p.m. and then host UNC-
Wilmington in the nightcap at 9
p.m.
CAROLINA GULF
1201 Dickinson Ave
752-7270
Heu Used Tires In Town � He P LA
Del
VINA. MC.GULV, yiHlll. BOKDKN
COMING ATTRACTIONS


niwn i
ATTENTION BSN
CLASS OF 1987.
Trie Air Force has a special DrC
gromfor 1987 BSNs i� selected
you can enter acr.ve duty soon
after graduation without waiting
for the results o' your State Be irds
To qualify you must have an
overall "B" average After comr- s
sionmg you II attend a five -mor"
internship of a major Air Force
medical facility Itsanexcelle I
way to prepare for the wide 'ange
of experiences you II nave serving
your country as an Air Force nurse
officer For more information call
Capt Anne Butcher
(919)850-9471 collect
(station-to-station)
I "urnamertt
orable
-
-
-
- was a

� extra
�' and
So
Sports Fact
TuevOct. 21. Itfn
" ame between
ind Cincinnati nght-
rurtd cher Tornrm Bond
and left-hander Bobtn Mnchell
throw curves around a .take
driven into the ground The
demonstration is intended to
Prove, once and for ai that a
:urve hall really does curve
Wednesday, October 22
8:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
EASY RIDER
Regular Wednesday Night Movie
Thursday, October 23
6:30 p.m. AASC Billiards Center
All Campus Women's
Billiards
Recreational Tournament
Coming Soon . . .
United States Marine Band
Wednesday, October 29
Dinner Theatre: The Owl and The Pussycat
Friday October 30 & Saturday November 1
In Concert: JOHN FOGERTY
Saturday November 1
East Carolina University
Alcohol Awareness
Week
October 19�23.1986
Pirates
i cxn 10 M�v� �m
gathering place
Sunday, October 19
2 00 Pti
Monday, October 20
6 00 PM
Tuesday, October 21
4 00-8 00 PM
6 00 PM
Wednesday, October 22
6 00 PM
7 00 PM
Thursday, October 23
6 00 PM
� Concert The Awareness Art Ensemble
�BACCHUS (Boost Alcohol Consciousness
Concerning the Health of University Students)
Information Session on Responsible Drinking
�Alcohol Information Fair
�BACCHUS Workshop
Movie Choices
�BACCHUS Information Session
� Alcohol and the Law
Speaker Mac McCarley, Greenville City
Attorney
�BACCHUS Membership Meeting
Mali or
Hendrix Theatre
Tvler Lobbv
Tyler Lobby
242Mendenhall
Slay Lobby
Jones Basement
242Mendenhall
AIL EVENTS ARE OPEN 10 IHE PUBLIC
For More Alcohol Information Contact
Campus Alcohol and Drug Program
757 679J





10
I HI I-ASH AROl IM (HIOBI R 21, l�W�
Classifieds
SALE
CHEAP TYPING Reports etc Call
Anne at 752 3015 and leave a
message
D J Are you having a party and
neea a D JFor the best m Top 40
beach and dance call Morgan at
758 7967 Reasonable rates
References on request
ROOMMATE WANTED: Free
security deposit of $150, Kingston
Place Apts . central heatair, fully
furnished, includes all kitchen uten
sils, and use of pool $150 per month
plus utilities For info call Don
Fazio at 757 3218
FOR SALE: Signet $600 Paree $200Alto saxaphone ano clarinet Call 758 7064Saimer by Sa
FREE Are fe as net d ad e w �� emely cuteyou lonely? Three little home kittens 7 weeks th black spots and ex CaM 752 1590
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE: Wora processing The
Da'avwOKs specializes in student
aou � it services including
ports term papers dissertations,
theses resumes and more All work
s compute! checked against 50000
vord electronic dictionary Rates
� as ovt as $1 75 per paae in
. papei
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICS: Typ
r�g resumes te papers thesis
papers $1 50 per page typ.na 05
tocop pei page Ca SDF Pro
onal Computer Services mc 106
Eaff 5th St neat Cubbies), Green
. � '52 J694
TRAVEL FIELD OPPORTUNITY.
Gain valuable marketing experience
while earning money Campus
representative needed immediately
tor spring break trip to Florida Call
Campus Marketing at 1 800 282 6221
HOMEWORKERS WANTED: Top
pay Work at home Call Cottage
industries (405) 360 4062
3,000 GOVERNMENT JOBS: List
$16,040 59,230 yr Now hiring Call
805 687 6000 Ext R 1166
TRAVEL FIELD POSITION IM
MEDIATELY AVAILABLE: Good
commission, valuable work ex
penence Travel and other benefits
Call Bill Ryan at 1 800 433 7747 for a
complete information mailer.
PI KAPPA PHI: Homecoming
weekend was the ultimate. Thanks
to the AZD's for helping with the
float The football looked like a
what? By the way Poindexter, we
won the football game. We rocked
the Lodge Saturday night as Morgan
jammed. The MOOSE was defmate
ly loose! Get a real fie George.
FOR SALE King s :e bed and
� irru Good lition $150 Can
�ft - 756 2390 Oi '56 5614
TYPING AND WORD PROCESS
I NG: E . I secretary a BM
computer and letter quality printer
� a rour typing ana
-� reta a needs Theses bus ness
� "� - � - nes and mailing labels.
Ca Donna at 355 6434
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE Experienced qua' ry work,
BM Si ectric typewi Tor Ca1' La" e
S we at '58 5301
HELP WANTED: Bar maid for
Private Club Must be 21 yrs. old
Call 758 0058 for interview
LOST: Small black dog with white
spot on nose Answers to name
Oreo' Call Paul 757 3666 $5
reward
WANTED: Female roommate tc
share apartment at Eastbrook Rent
is $142 50 plus '2 utilities Need by
Nov 1 Call 752 3597
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
To share 2 bedroom apt $140 a
month and ' 2 utilities 4 blocks from
campus Non smoker preferred
LOr. 752 7396
PERSONAL
WANTED
HELP WANTED: Loca aw firm s
" � Computer s. ence or Dec
'� e "a 01 a tti good typing
SK pai� a �� � pi s r�g
10 15 hours per week Ca
�nq ask for Ma
DIABETICS: Fellow student work
ng on research paper needs 15
mmutes of your Time for pr,ef ques
t.onnaire Call R ick at 752 1108 Help
areatiy appreciated
KA LITTLE SISTERS: Remember
our meeting on Oct 30th at 8 15 pm
Then it's time to PARTY down with
the brothers ana pledges! Let's
ake it the BEST EVER!
THE M&M SISTERS. The dance
was a blast, we really got smashed
The flaming shorts really topped the
night off. We'll do it again if Margot
can withstand The Eastbrook
"Strangers"
HAPPY HOUR: At the Elbo
Wednesday night, Oct. 22 at 9. Come
on down and party with the Phi
Tau's
501: This weekend was fantastic) I
had the best date and the best time!
Love 105. PS. Get psyched for Nov.
15. It will be radical!
BLOCK PARTY: 7th annual KA
Block Party, Sat Nov 1 immediate
ly following the ECU football game
Bus service provided from game to
the party 3 bands playing until 10
p m.
FREKUS IS DEFINATELY SEEK
ING A COMPANION: Please call
752 7748, compliments of a Sooner
fan.
TO THE MALESTER: Despite our
encounter at Margots, I had a great
time Sat ano Sun with you Con
aratulations to the team for a great
wm, long deserved ILYTD, MA
HALLOWEEN IS ON ITS WAY: We
hate it for you that you have to stay
Most will be m G'viile and that's
okay. Because the DU's at Chapel
Hill know we're on our way So to all
of you we hope your night's a thrill,
because the DELTA ZETA'S will be
partying in CHAPEL HILL
TO ECU STUDENTS AND FACUL
TY : The sisters and pledges of Delta
Zefa are having a Halloween Bake
Sale and Candy Gram sale at The
Student Store today, Tuesday 21!
Come by and support us! Love, The
Ssters anq Pledges of Delta Zeta
KA LITTLE SISTERS AND
PLEDGES AND BROTHERS:
Tonighrs The night to finally throw
oown together it's been long past
due, so let's make it a party we'll
never forget! KA Lil Sister Officers
Announcements
GENERAL COLLEGE
REGISTRATION1
�� . � .� .
A- .
' �
icaoi �. -

COOPERATIVE
EDUCATION
� -� . .
- . . � A�
� � � 11A
�� � �t 7 1
.� - �X
- -X
� �� � , �.���.�.
�' �� . � -� .�

BACCHUS
� . i �
"�"�"� ����. v !��
lei iow students �-
BACCH - � n
Siftle �
�'� � '� � '�-� BAC
HUS an . �� 9ur new member
23 at 6 00 p m .ri
���� . .
2 V f t 7S7 6793 ar. as - � �
PURE GOLDDANCERS
wtfcG ir � -n
� - ssketb gaes
erj �, fund or,
�' 8 00 c �- �
'� ��� UI1J
PUT YOUR
COLLEGE DEGREE
TO WORK.
Air Force Officer Training School
is an excellent start to a
crallengmg career as an Air
Force Officer We offer great
starting pay nedical care 30
days of vacation witti pay each
year and management
opportunities Contact an
Air Force recruiter Find out what
Officer Training School can mean
for you Call
TSgt Steve White
(919) 856-4012 collect
troupe
; 'u'sca,
V BM Cc Mum
- S VANDATORV (or
Decor" ig a memofr
ECU STUDENTS FOR
BROYHILL FOR SENATE
COMMITTEE
haptei M ECU students
�OR BDOYHi.L FOR SENATE COMMT
TEE 'eques'5 s'uaents "Vps'ec n nfor
"� a' v v an � 15 to worn n 'he capa g-
wt� I Larry PerKinj ECU Ca.rpersor
a' 756 IS49 or contact P.tt County Heaa
qua"pr. ai 752 4372 Th, c lS loca,ea at
210 E � SI n Greeny,ne Student ma�
ee� wrtn �ne group after tne College
ReciO"can ee' ng5 or Tuesaa n.gms
Riggan Shoe Repair
111 West 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
"SrW Repair At The yen Best'
75S4204
CAROLINA GULF
1201 Dickinson
752-7270
Auto Repairs, AC Repairs, New & Used
Tires, Wrecker Service, Batteries
Student Discounts On Labor & Parts
Pickup & Delivery Service
Do It With Us And Save $$
yLSA. MASTERCARD, GULF, SOHIO. BORDr
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave
We Buy Gold & Silver
' � Sell � Trade
752-0322
Ho�n: 9:00 a.m4:00 p.m. Mon-Sat
WALT: Row, row, row, your
boat Thanks for the weekend No
hard feelings, OK? Hope to see you
again soon. Jackie.
MIKE: This was the best homecom
mg ever! I love you Nikki.
JEN AND HAL:
ihocolate clake?
Want some
STRANGERS: Before we met in the
midst of the night, we had scared
ourselves to such a fright! After
"cocktails a quick swim, and a
walk through the fence, if was all we
could do to remove such tense! We
partied hard, maybe too hard, but
sure did it up right! We had a blast!
Love, the AZDs.
Dependable
Cab Co.
ZBT LIS SISTERS: Thanks for a
great homecoming! And don't forget
to be at Dave's Wed at 3 The
brothers of Zeta Beta Tau.
ZBT PLEDGES: Beware of things
that go "Bump" in the night! If you
need us we'll call. The brothers of
Zeta Beta Tau
MILTON: Thanks for the use of the
Theta Chi shirt. You did real good on
Sunday Remember the books, the
Canadian and the tape The Pledge
GLENN HAMILTON AND KEVIN
HILDAGO: Thank you for your time
and effort in this weekend's
festivities The Pika's
PIKA: Hope everyone had a
drunken time this weekend at the
Pika extravaganza Let's do it again
real soon. The Pika's
Operates 24 Hours a Day
Uniformed Drivers
Prompt and Courteous Service
(A Must)
Radio Dispatched
757-0288
4 t
We cater to ECU students
j
FLETCHER'S FINEST: Con
gratulations on your Homecoming
"Victory " Now, on for the
Chancellor's Cup Ya'll are the
greatest Love, Your Director.
ALPHA DELTA PI: Congratula
tions to Susan Adkins. Kelly Cox,
Kara Howell and Nancy Jo Knox!
We are thrilled thatwe can officially
call you our sisters now! The road
has been long and trying, but you
have made it. The success is yours,
and no one can take it from you It is
as though you never left us Love,
YourSisters at Alpha Delta Pi.
i
FREEJAZZERCISE
FOR TWO.
OR
TWO TRIPS
JUST FOR YOU.
V-� Oct. 31, 1986
756-&302 and
1-800-422-TRIM
INTERESTED IN
PHOTOGRAPHY
FOR CAMPUS
MEDIA?
Apply at Media Board
Sec. Office in
Publications Bldg.
I
Deadline:
October 30, 1986
The Student Union Recreation
Committee will be sponsoring an
ACU-1 All-Campus Women's
Billiards Tournament on
Thursday, October 23rd at 6:30
p.m. in MSC Billiards Rooms. It
will be an "8" Ball Double
Elimination Tournament with a
$2.00 entry fee.
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
Why not com by th� REAL Crt�l� liH�vwtlon C�mr 312 E.
1(Wi St; or call 7M-HELP, For Fro Confidontiol Coon�Hug or Ao-
Our Voiuntoort and Staff art on duty 24 hra. a day, y
In ordar to aaaiat you In virtually any proMaw araa you i
Our tonoatandlnoj 9a "� ahaaya boon la
tJio ouaWty of Ufa for you and our eonununHy.
around,
Am ,
H�tN:
1 Of PSVfrwl (
Can you believe the holidays are almost here? AEROBICS is your
last chance to lose those few pounds that most people put on
from holiday festivities.
$15 for the rest of the semester!
You must have this coupon to get this great deal.
(Offer expires October 31st, 1986.)
THE AEROBIC WORKSHOP
"We do one thing & we do it the best. "
417Evans Street Mall Downtown 757-1608 Office Hours 2-8 p.m
fW
.





Title
The East Carolinian, October 21, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 21, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.502
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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