The East Carolinian, October 16, 1986






She
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina can pus community since 1925
Vol.61 No.14
Thursday, October 16,1986
Greenville, N.C.
Alcohol Awareness
Promoted Next Week
By LOUISE SMITH
Staff Writer
"Pirates have the Proof" is the
theme of this year's campus-wide
Alcohol Awareness Week. Pro-
grammers from various parts of
the University have collaborated
to make Oct. 19-23 a week of in-
formative activities and enter-
tainment.
This is the second year that
ECU has formally celebrated its
own Alcohol Awareness Week,
which runs parallel with the na-
tional event (Oct. 20-26). The ac-
tivities this year will be somewhat
different from last year's
breathalizer demonstrations and
tricycle rides, due to the new
drinking laws; but now alcohol
awareness may be morr impor-
tant than ever.
The Student Union Special
Concerts Committee will kick off
the week on Sunday, Oct. 19,
with a concert by the Awareness
Art Ensemble. This popular reg-
gae band will perform at 2 p.m.
on the University Mall (the rain-
site is Hendrix Theatre). The
Ensemble started off Alcohol
Awareness Week last year and
drew a crowd of more than 1,000
people.
Throughout the week, dorms
across campus will be presenting
.Alcohol Awareness programs for
their residents. According to
Carolyn Fulghum of the
Residence Life Department,
Tyler Hall will have an Alcohol
Information Fair, Central Cam-
pus will hold a Casino Night with
non-alcoholic mocktails, College
Hill will present a concert, and
many dorms will show films and
videos to promote alcohol
awareness. In addition.
Residence Life Professional Staff
members will receive some special
alcohol training. Student Staff
members will be given informa-
tion packets, and some infor-
mative meetings may be held for
dorm residents who are over 21.
Also, says Fulghum, all residence
hall dwellers will be encouraged
to attend campus-wide programs.
The Student Health Center is
also helping to organize Alcohol
Awareness Week. Mary Elesha-
Adams, the Center's Health
Educator, said that the main role
of the Health Center is publiciz-
ing the week and making
available information concerning
alcohol. This information in-
cludes advertisements and articles
in the East Carolinian, a display
case at Mendenhall, and pam-
phlets in brochure racks on cam-
pus.
In addition to these activities,
the campus organization BAC-
CHUS (Boosting Alcohol Con-
sciousness Concerning Health of
University Students) will be par-
ticipating by giving out free but-
tons and hats, holding workshops
and information sessions on
responsible drinking, and en-
couraging students to become in-
volved in BACCHUS.
Dr. Ronald Speier, who
organized the planning of
Alcohol Awareness Week, said
that its aim is to "raise the con-
sciousness about the use and not
abuse of alcohol He emphasiz-
ed the fact that, although this is
one well publicized week of
alcohol information, alcohol
awareness programming is pro-
vided throughout the year by the
Student Union, Residence Life
Department. BACCHUS, and
other campus groups.
Circulation 12,000
16 Pages
J Pirate Walk Stresses
Escorts For Safety
ELLtN MUBPHV - Th. Photo Lab
Anything Interesting?
Art students are often spotted around campus with their drawing
boards close at hand. Carol Riddle took advantage of good weather
to work outside.
By THERESA ROSINSKI
Staff Writer
Pirate Walk is ECU's free
escort service which escorts
students, staff,and alumni, male
or female, to various destina-
tions, according to Scott Miller,
director of Pirate Walk.
Pirate Walk presently operates
from 8 p.m. to 12 a.m. seven
nights a week. "Our escorts
cover all of campus and up to tw o
blocks of off campus. We will
escort them as long as one of
their destinations is somewhere
on campus, " said Miller.
"I wish people wouldn't be so
hesitant to call for an escort. It's
not a burden at all-that's what
the organization was designed
for, and we want to help said
Binford Sloan, assistant director
of Pirate Walk.
Miller stressed that those who
do not use Pirate Walk should
walk in groups of two or three.
"Girls should try to avoid walk-
ing alone at night especially in
certain areas like the mall, the
wooded areas at the bottom of
the hill, behind the Student
Health Center going to Slav or
Umstead, or any other areas that
are not well lighted said Miller.
Appointments for escorts can
be made at 757-6616 from 2 p.m.
till 4 p.m. or during Pirate Walk
hours. Permanent reservations
can also be made to escort people
from their night classes, or any
other function. "If the girls can't
get to a phone, they can alwavs
use the blue light phones for
Campus Security. Security will
call us and we will escort them
said Jeff Fulghum, head o.
Public Relations.
Presently Pirate Walk has 45 to
50 escorts and 15 operators.
"We are the longest running
escort service on the East Coast
said Fulghum.
"Our goal is the have "5
escorts and 30 operators as of
Nov. 2 said Miller.
According to Sloan, Pirate
Walk has hopes of starting at 6
p.m. on Nov. 2 if the manpower
is available.
Escorts are required to work
two hours a week for one night
only, and there are no restrictions
on size. Sloan said.
He explained, "Guys don't
have to be 6'1 and 250 lbs. to be
an escort
To be an escort, males must fill
out an application and have it ap-
proved. Applications are
available in the Pirate Walk of-
fice in Mendenhall.
"It's a great way for people to
help others and to make alot of
friends within the organization
said Miller.
Workshop Offers Tools For Future
Variety Of Films
Shown On Campus
.L NEWS BUREAU
A variety of prize-winning
documentary, dramatic and
demonstration films and
videotapes will be screened at
East Carolina University this
month. The viewings, all schedul-
ed for the auditorium (Room
221) in the old wing of Joyner
Library, are free and open to the
public.
The films to be shown com-
prise Circuit 4 of the 1986
American Film and Video
Festival, a project of the Educa-
tional Film Library Association.
The 28-year old festival's
primary purpose is to showcase
outstanding 16 millimeter and
video releases. ECU's presenta-
tion of the films is a project of
the Joyner Library Media
Resources Center.
Scheduled to be shown are the
following films and videotapes.
(Details about the films are
available from the Media
Resources Center).
�Oct. 15, 3 p.m. "Are We Winn-
ing, Mommy?" 85 minutes; 8:45
p.m. "Retreat from Beirut 52
See CAMPUS page 3.
By TOBI FERGUSON
SUff Writer
The magazine staff of Business
Week Careen will present The
Chrysler-Plymouth Career
Search on Oct. 20th, in room 244
of the Mendenhall Student
Center at 1:00 p.m 3:00 p.m
and 5:00 p.m.
This program is brought to the
ECU campus through the efforts
of the Career Planning and
Placement Center and the student
affiliated organizations of Cotten
Hall, Umstead Hall, AMA, and
the ECU Economics Association.
Business Week Careers
magazine indicates, "The pro-
gram is designed to give soon-to-
graduate collegians 'basic tools'
they require to begin their career
search. From resume to interview
and self-presentation to follow-
up techniques, this presentation
and illustrative video leads the
students through virtually every
step required to achieve career
development confidence
These intense one-hour
seminars focus on several crucial
facets of the career search.
"How Not to Get a Job en-
titles the initial discussion. Ac-
cording to seminar information,
this topic highlights the pro-
blems that stand between the job
seeker and his or her first job
The following topic,
"Deciding Your Future por-
trays a video vignette of self-
assessment. It exhibits that
for each student, the career
search will arrive at a different
conclusion. The program is
designed to demonstrate that a
search strategy is easier to
develop if you first determine
your needs and desires
The next emphasis is "The
Perfect Resume which the
Business Week Careers' staff il-
lustrate as The Resume You
Submit: An Advertisement for
Yourself (it) targets the pro-
blems most people have in
creating their resume and
demonstrates appropriate solu-
tions
According to Jim
Westmoreland, a 42-page
workbook, 'The Chrysler-
Plymouth Guide to Building a
Resume and other materials are
offered to students until supplies
are exhausted during the
seminars.
The Chrysler-Plymouth Career
Search Workshop's fourth topic,
"Follow Up addresses the
importance of cordial persistence
both in terms of demonstrating
your seriousness and converting
rejection into further considera-
tionor even getting leads on
other job opportunities
In "Dress for Success there
is discussion of wardrobe do's
ami don't for interviews.
1 ne final topic covers "The In-
terview According to Business
Week Careers' information,
"Emphasizing the preparations
and the importance of self-
confidence and awareness, this
section of the program portrays
the 'reality' of the interview
situation giving the audience
various tricks and dilemmas with
constructive advice and direction
regarding the appropriate
strategies to use
Participation in the Chrysler-
Plymouth Career Search
Workshop is available to all ma-
jors. There is no participation
fee. For further information,
contact Debbie Thompson or Jim
Westmoreland at the Placement
Office.
Attention Directed To Leadership
Rv I FSI TV nm r-coj j : � . -
Fogerty In Minges
John Fogerty, former lead
singer of Creedence Clearwater
Revival, will be performing in
Minges Coliseum Saturday, Nov.
1.
Eye Of The Zombie, Fogertys
second solo album since CCR's
breakup in 1972, is currently sit-
ting at number 32 on Billboard
magazine's top pop albums
chart. The album debuted two
weeks at number 44, the highest
debuting album of the week.
"I think this will be a great
concert said John Eagan,
chairman of the Major Concerts
Committee.
According to Billboard, Foger-
ty has already proved "con-
clusively that he can make it
without Creedence" on his first
solo tour.
In his tour, Fogerty concen-
trates on music from his recent
album and his first solo album
Centerfield.
Tickets will be on sale starting
Thursday, Oct. 16 from 11
am6 p.m. Monday through
Friday. Student tickets are $10,
general public tickets are $12. All'
tickets sold at the door will be
"Ticket prices are put in a way
so Student Union can break even
on a turn-out of students said
Eagan.
He added, "We are trying to
bring the best concert possible to
the students at the cheapest
price
CORRECTION
On Oct. 14 we reported that a Gray Art Gallery film depicting sex-
ual assaults was the topic of debate at Monday's SGA meeting. It It
not a film, bat an art exhibition entitled "Rape It does not depict
sexual assaults. The East t-roUnito regrets the error. See story,
page 9 for details.
By LESLEY DEES
Staff Writer
The BB&T Center for Leader-
ship Development is a program
designed to focus and direct at-
tention towards leadership in the
university as well as the society.
"Leadership is becoming more
and more a part of education in
institutions and society at large
and we recognized the impor-
tance said Jim Bearden, assis-
tant to the Chancellor and direc-
tor of the BB&T Center.
The selection of students to
participate in the Center is based
on recommendations from the
deans and department chairmans
in the students' field of study.
According . to Bearden,
"Students that have
demonstrated some leadership
potential or have a keen interest
in leadership are probable can-
didates for the center.
The center was established in
1983 with a $250,000 donation
from the BB&T Bank of Wilson,
N.C. in hope to aid and promote
education, service and research
for business and management
through means such as seminars,
lectures, publications and pro-
grams of study and workshops.
Funding, which began in 1983,
will be authorized over a five year
span in increments of $30,000 a
year.
During the 1986 spring
semester, the first seminar in
leadership development was of-
fered. According to Bearden, the
response was good, due in part to
the presence of a few nationally
known business leaders.
T. Boone Pickens, chairmarfpf
Mesa Petroleum, LeRoy Walkei
chancellor of N.C. Central
University, and Ray Shaw, presi-
dent and chief operating officer
for Dow Jones and Co. Inc. were
among the professionals who
spoke.
A three day major planning
session with the board of direc-
tors is scheduled for Jan. 1987.
Plans will be made for the 1987
school yea;
But in the meantime, Bearden
said he "anticipates that a diverse
group of disciplined from
throughout the university and
society will be reached through
the center's activities.
As The Records Spin
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 16. 1986
Disease Infects Employee
�tyx��� Xx0&�S'Vjs
(CPS) - In the last two weeks,
officials at two different cam-
puses 200 miles apart have found
bacteria associated with Legion-
naires' disease in their air condi-
tioning systems.
One person has contracted the
disease, while 20 others are
undergoing tests to make sure
they don't have it.
At Yale's Dunham Computer
Center and Maryland's Mill
Building, officials said they
began searching for causes after
workers complained of
headaches and nausea. On both
campuses, health workers found
Legionella pneumophilla in the
cooling tanks of the air condi-
tioning systems.
The disease, once thought to be
highly contagious, caused a na-
tional panic in 1976 when if first
surfaced among people who at-
tended an American Legion con-
vention in Philadelphia. Doctors
have since found the disease is
not contagious.
Thirty-four people eventually
died from the disease last year.
At Yale's computer center last
week, the water in the cooling
tank was treated with chemicals
to kill the bacteria, but then
overflowed, leaked through the
ceiling and dripped onto the desk
of the now-infected employee.
University officials would not
identify the employee, but said
the person was in satisfactory
condition.
Maryland closed its building
when officials found the bacteria
in the air conditioning system,
and employees complained about
sore throats, nausea and
headaches.
About 20 employees under-
went blood tests, but health of-
ficials found no cases of Legion-
naires' disease and no one is
seriously ill, university health
care officials say.
Other health observers add the
curious timing and appearance of
the bacteria on the two campuses
probably doesn't mean there's a
nationwide outbreak of Legion-
naires' disease incubating on
America's campuses.
"This shouldn't cause
concern says Dr. Suzanne
Laussucq, medical
epidemiologist for rhe Center for
Disease Control in Atlanta.
Connecticut state health
department epidemiologist Dr.
Narda Tolentino concurs the
Yale and Maryland incidents pro-
bably were random flukes,
though the bacteria in question is
"ubiquitous
"If I were to take cultures of
any water faucet, windowsill or
refrigerator, I would find this
bacteria Tolentino says.
College students, she adds, are
not as vulnerable to the
pneumonia-causing bacteria as
older males with respiratory il-
lnesses. Smokers and people who
drink a lot of alcohol also are
more vulnerable than others.
And Laussucq notes the symp-
toms described by Maryland's
employees are not classic Legion-
naires' disease symptoms.
Legionnaires' disease symp-
toms include fever, cough and
shortness of breath, she says.
H
For
Halloween . . . Body
and face paint that
glitters and
shimmers. Let us
show yoj how easy it
is to use. Painting
demonstrations, Sat
Oct. 18 from 12 to 4.
GandalTs
discover UK HKKjie !
Carolina East Mall
Hug an
East Carolinian
employee . . .
WE NEED IT
SPRING BREAK
CARIBBEAN CRUISE
March 9, 1987, for 5 daysfrom $423
Price includes: cruise and 3 island visit all meals
and entertainment port tax
A great party atmosphere with service to match
aboard Norwegian Caribbean Lines ships.
You make a deposit - we'll save a space for you!
Call or stop in for brochure:
QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC.
319 Cotanche Street . q
1
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Phone 757-0234
.
Dependable
Cab Co.
r
Operates 24 Hours a Day
Uniformed Drivers
Prompt and Courteous Service
(A Must)
Radio Dispatched
757-0288
. i
We cater to ECU students "
tie Wer SaUt
2904 East 10th Street
Greenville, NC
757-3857
Homecoming 1986
Mums $6.00 & up
Rose Corsages $7.50 & up
Bouts $3.50 & up

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SPECIAL OFFER � THE GOOD STUFF � FOR LESS THAN A BUCK!
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� 103 Greenville Blvd.
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OLD FASHIONED
HAMBDR0ER8.
Special Introductory Offer Ends Oct. 21st
m
MamhMW I . .
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Trade Z
ECU NEWS BLREAL
Trading with the Chinese and
teaching in China are the chief
focuses of a Wednesday, Oct. 22,
symposium at East Carolina
University, "The Carolinas and
China; A Developing Relation-
ship
The event is the annual ECU
Asian Studies Symposium and is
scheduled for 244 Mendenhall
Student Center, beginning at 10
a.m. AJ1 symposium sessions are
open to the public.
The symposium's morning ses-
sion, "The Opening of China:
Background and the South
Computer I
ECl News Bureau
Computer programs, spon-
sored by the East Carolina Divi-
sion of Continuing Educa
will be held each Saturday begin-
ning Oct. 18 through Nov. 8.
Tommy Harrington, experienced
instructor in microssstems will
instruct three of the course
Computerland, Carolina
Center. Tuition will be $90.
On Oct. 18 from 9-4 p.m in-
troduction to Lotus 1-2-3
provide a large variety
analytical tasks for business use
Little or no experience is
necessary.
The following Saturday Oc
25, from 94 p.m an in-
termediate course, Lotus II, will
be held for those who completed
the introductory course. Topics
Campus Gets
A Look
At Movies
Continued From Page I.
�Oct. 16 3 p.m. "You Got To
Move" 87 minutes; 30 p.m.
"Portrait of the Press 52
minutes.
�Oct. 18, 3 p.m. "Perfect Har-
mony 30 minutes; 3:45 p.m.
"Voice in Exile 29 minutes;
7:30 p.m. "Drum, Sing" 23
minutes; 8:15 p.m. "Ranch 55
minutes.
�Oct. 19, 3 p.m. "A Little
Magic 28 minutes; 3.45 p.m.
"Spoil the Child 23 minutes;
7:30 p.m. "Sex and the American
Teenager 33 minutes; 8:15
p.m. "Tigertown 29 minutes.
�Oct. 20, 2:15 p.m. "Visible
Target 28 minutes; 5 p.m.
"The Relaxation Tape 30
minutes; 7:30 p.m. "Abortion:
Stories from North and South
55 minutes.
�Oct. 21, 3:15 p.m. "Surviving
the Cold 17 minutes; 8:45 p.m.
"India Cabaret 60 minutes.
�Oct. 22, 3 p.m. "Dancing
Silhouettes 27 minutes; 8:45
p.m. "Jean Renoir 60 minutes.
�Oct. 23, 3:15 p.m. "The
Courage to Care 28 minutes; 5
p.m. "In a Jazz Way 28
minutes; 7:30 p.m. "Vietnam �
Talking to the People 52
minutes.
Kentucky
$1.99
FOR ONE COM
2-PIECE PACK -
2 Pieces of Chick
1 Small Mashed P
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
Expires Dec. 31. 198t
Thr
crmpo fox ,wi,
�frm r J '�
READ A BOJ
CENTRAL Bi
Opn 'Til 9 30 P.M.





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ming 1986
6.00 & up
ige S7.50 & up
3.50 & up
K!
A)
OLD FASHIONED
HAMBURGERS
3
Trade Discussed In Symposium
JHEEASTCARQLINIAN OCTOBER 16. 1986 3
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Trading with the Chinese and
teaching in China are the chief
focuses of a Wednesday, Oct. 22,
symposium at East Carolina
University, "The Carolinas and
China; A Developing Relation-
ship
The event is the annual ECU
Asian Studies Symposium and is
scheduled for 244 Mendenhall
Student Center, beginning at 10
a.m. All symposium sessions are
open to the public.
The symposium's morning ses-
sion, "The Opening of China:
Background and the South
Carolina Experience will
feature a presentation by the Dr.
Hillel Soloman, director of Asian
Studies at the University of South
Carolina.
At 1 p.m two educators who
have taught in China will speak
on "Teaching in China: So You
Are Thinking of Going0"
Speakers are Jan Calhoun and
Dr. John Warren, both of ECU.
"Doing Business in China: Ex-
periences and Impacts" is the ti-
tle of the symposium's third and
final session, beginning at 3 p.m.
Speakers include Lloyd Horton
of A.C. Monk and Co Farm-
ville; Ed Skinner of Carolina
Leaf Tobacco Co Greenville
and Dr. Louis Eckstein of the
ECU business management facul-
ty.
Session moderators are three
members of the ECU faculty:
Dr. Robert Thompson of the
political science department; Dr.
Y.J. Lao of the environmental
health faculty and Dr. Avtar
Singh of the sociology faculty.
Further information about the
symposium is available from Dr.
Thompson at 757-6130 or
757-6030.
HOMECOMING
WEEKEND
AT
Computer Instruction
ECU News Bureau
Computer programs, spon-
sored by the East Carolina Divi-
sion of Continuing Education
will be held each Saturday begin-
ning Oct. 18 through Nov. 8.
Tomrm Harrington, experiencec!
instructor in microsystems will
instruct three of the courses at
Computerland, Carolina East
Center. Tuition will be $90.
On Oct. 18 from 9-4 p.m in-
troduction to Lotus 1-2-3 uill
provide a large variety of
analytical tasks for business use.
Little or no experience is
necessary.
The following Saturday, Oct.
25. from 9-4 p.m an in-
termediate course, Lotus 11, will
be held for those who completed
the introductory course. Topics
Campus Gets
A Look
At Movies
C ontinued From Page I.
�Oct. 16 3 p.m. "You Got To
Move" 87 minutes; 7:30 p.m.
"Portrait of the Press 52
minutes.
�Oct. 18, 3 p.m. "Perfect Har-
mony 30 minutes; 3:45 p.m.
"Voice in Exile 29 minutes;
7:30 p.m. "DrumSing" 23
minutes; 8:15 p.m. "Ranch 35
minutes.
�Oct. 19. 3 p.m. "A Little
Magic 28 minutes; 3.45 p.m.
"Spoil the Child 23 minutes;
7:30 p.m. "Sex and the American
Teenager 33 minutes; 8:15
p.m. "Tigertown 29 minutes.
�Oct. 20, 2:15 p.m. "Visible
Target 28 minutes; 5 p.m.
"The Relaxation Tape 30
minutes; 7:30 p.m. "Abortion:
Stories from North and South
55 minutes.
�Oct. 21, 3:15 p.m. "Surviving
the Cold 17 minutes; 8:45 p.m.
"India Cabaret 60 minutes.
�Oct. 22, 3 p.m. "Dancing
Silhouettes 27 minutes; 8:45
p.m. "Jean Renoir 60 minutes.
�Oct. 23, 3:15 p.m. "The
Courage to Care 28 minutes; 5
p.m. "In a Jazz Way 28
minutes; 7:30 p.m. "Vietnam -
Talking to the People 52
minutes.
will include an overview of
Database Management and Pro-
tection of Range Input.
For advanced Lotus users only,
"Writing and Using Macros
for Lotus 1-2-3 will be held Nov.
1. This program will be devoted
to macro generation and applica-
tions. The final computer course,
dBase 111, Nov. 8, includes in-
structions for creating a
database, for adding, deleting,
"cing, and sorting records for
creative reports. Susan Speer, cir-
culation librarian at the ECU
Health Sciences Library will in-
struct this course. Tuition will be
$54.
im 11111 i � 11111 i 111 i; � 111 m 11J1111 s 11) 1111; 111:11 i. 1111111i � 1111 i 11111 m 1111111) 1111111 � 1111111 11
Look What Surfaced
Student ID Schedule
Wednesday
Friday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Friday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Friday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Friday
Wednesday
Wednesday
October 1, 1986
October 3, 1986
October 8, 1986
October 15, 1986
October 17, 1986
October 22, 1986
October 29, 1986
October 31, 1986
2:30pm - 3:30pm
2:30pm - 3:30pm
2:30pm - 3:30pm
2:30pm - 3
2:30pm - 3
:30pm
:30pm
2:30pm - 3:30pm
2:30pm
2:30pm
30pm
30pm
November 5, 1986 2:30pm - 3:30pm
November 12, 1986
November 14, 1986
2:30pm - 3
2:30pm - 3
30pm
30pm
November 19, 1986 2:30pm - 3:30pm
December 3, 1986 2:30pm - 3:30pm
4
Al. ffA
$ro'y pgpofe
Y
FRI 18
SAT 19
COTANCHE ST.
JU4
TAVERN
"The Usuals"
The Amateurs"
757-1227
ALL ABC PERMITS
IIMIIIIMIIIIIIHIIIIH�
$HKhH
Every Thursday Night Is
TACO NIGHT j
Two Great Tacos for only. 99
j 60 oz. Pitchers $1.99
Offer Good From 7p.m11 p.m. � Not Valid on Deliveries I
ALL DAY FRIDAY f
32 oz. Bucket of Your Favorite Draft
1 215 E. Fourth Street Wv 752-2183 I
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ATTIC
"���
THUR
In Concert With
Basket
Case
FRI
BLUSHING
BRIDES
Rolling Stones Jrihuie
All students welcome! Student Residents Association is
sponsoring a dance at Beau's Nightclub on October 18, 1986. It
wfll be from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. 18 year olds are invited. Show your
SRA card at the door with your I.D. and receive a FREE
membership with paid admission.
Kentucky Fried Chicken. j
$1.99 '
plus tax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK � COMB.
2 Pieces of Chicken
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Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
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Daniel Maurer. mmMHaim
Pa n i Kemmis, vm � Steve Folmar. o�r,w �, ��,
Scon Cooper, co-MroeAMr Anthony Martin, ft�, A�
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CIGARETTES
October 16. 1986
Opinion
Page 4
SGA
Exhibition Wrongly Denied Funding
� e. e
votii
V.
1 ms
sei ious injustice took place during
Monday 's meeting of the SGA Legislature
w hen the Gray Art Gallery was denied bad-
eded funding. Why were they denied?
,e more than half of the legislators
misinformed about what they were
lg on.
rcording to reports, John Simon,
lead Dorm representative and vice
o the Appropriations Commit-
mtroduced a bill to the legislature re-
c funding for the Gallery to present
exhibition with rape as its central
. ri the floor opened for debate,
:ook the opposition saying, "1 feel
film will be very blatant, explicit
rst, there is no film. From Nov. 7 to
the Gray Art Gallery will present an
: entitled Rape (see story page 9).
s an an exhibition, not a film. It is
ed ot 24 works by 19 artists, each
- ed for the exhibition by a panel
illj acclaimed artists.
Simon got the idea it was a film is
guess. What's even more puzzl-
he got the idea that the exhibi-
I he "blatant and explicit" in a
waj It is not. The exhibition in-
expose the public to the visual ar-
pretations of the rape ex-
. Not one of those works literally
ape. They're simply artistic inter-
ipposition to the bill, Simon also
'We were informed that counselors
bt available after the (exhibition)
w n for people who needed counsel-
"i think that this is appropriate
dents' funds
fad is, on Nov. 8 the exhibition will
-��ed by a symposium, not a
inseling session. This is when profes-
(voUinteers we might add) will
the prevention, as well as the
sociological and psychological aspects, of
rape.
The symposium will then be followed by
small group discussion sessions. In these
sessions, students and members of the
public are given the opportunity to share
their opinions with, and ask questions of,
counselors.
These professionals are not there to
counsel per se, it is their function to act as
discussion facilitators. On the other hand,
if a student or member of the public
decides to seek counseling, then the oppor-
tunity is there.
Perhaps the biggest misconception held
by Simon and members of the legislature is
that the funds requested by the Gallery
were solely for the rape exhibition. They
were not. The requested funds are needed
to help finance this year's events, a list of
which were submitted to the legislature.
With the neccesary funding denied, the
future of other exhibitions, unrelated to
the rape exhibition, have been placed in
jeopardy.
The rape exhibition, however, will take
place as scheduled. This is not because pre-
sent funds provide for it (far from it), but
because the Gallery is already obligated.
The fact is, SGA funds, had they been ap-
proved, were earmarked for posters,
postage, supplies and shipping costs. None
of the money would have been used to pay
the professionals who, consequently, are
donating their time for free.
Having reviewed the facts, it's quite ob-
vious there has been a gross injustice done
to the Gray Art Gallery. The narrow defeat
of this bill (22 to 20) clearly shows that had
the legislators been properly informed, the
vote could have easily gone the other way.
Having clarified the facts, we feel the
SGA Legislature should seriously recon-
sider the Gallery's request for funding.
The Right Wing Move On Campus
�heir

er the country, college students are
Niibdued by political propaganda
ives on a popular President and on
foolish nature of many University
nts. The organizations operating
in the conservative movement have a
f names, such as Students for a
Bettei America, and the all time favorite,
�liege Republicans.
From The Left
By BERN McCRADY
Mam conservative students have
so paranoid about the "liberal
in the media, college faculties, stu-
Governments, and other organiza-
and publications, they have started
own student publications. Over 50
g publications have been started
era! different Universities. Granted,
-iae the right to do so. But is it not a
radical to publish newspapers that at-
the so-called "liberal bias feminists,
minority groups, and homosexuals?
I it noi extreme to use deceptive methods,
omments, and adjectives full of all
propaganda? Yes, it is very
ical!
se publications, for the most part,
iupport the elimination of educational
piograms intended for "special interest"
groups, including women's studies, Afro-
Arnerican studies, native American
history, and they give at least some support
almost anything the Reagan Ad-
ministration does.
Even worse, a large number of these
publications do not have many student
writers. They use many articles acquired as
press releases from the Conservative
Caucas, U.S. Industrial Council Educa-
tional Foundation, the Republican Na-
tional Committee, and Students for a Bet-
ter America. In other words, these publica-
tions are just puppets for right-wing ex-
tremist looking to gain new recruits.
Many of these publications are funded
b wealthy conservative organizations that
recruit future leaders. Some of these
organizations are kept afloat by
millionaires such as Joseph Coors (of
Coots beer), and former Nixon Treasury
Secretary William Sinon.
One well known organization in the con-
servative youth movement is the College
Republicans. More and more Universities
have chapters, and yes, they do exist right
here at East Carolina.
Around the nation, College Republicans
and members of similar organizations can
be expected to put on a very entertaining
show.
Two years after the invasion of
Grenada, College Republicans at N.C.
State celebrated the anniversary by waving
banners, chanting miltant slogans, and
tearing apart a Russian flag!
During the 1984 election season, the
College Republican President, Jack
Abramoff, invited his counterpart from
the College Democrats, Steve Gersky, to
tour the country and debate. Abramoff
saw to it that the debates would occur at
places where conservatives would get a
warm welcome, and did not even bother to
tell Gersky where he would appear! Even
worse, applause were piped in when
Abramoss spoke! Many of these same peo-
ple have the nerve to complain about
liberal bias!
Well, its only right to be considerate of
behavior such as this. Young conservatives
have felt left out of the democratic pro-
cess, and only want their right of free ex-
pression. They have no reason, as an ECU
College Republican leader once put it, to
"sweep all pacifists, lazy liberals, and
moral outcast back into the closet They
only want to express opinions, including
the belief that liberals hate America and
want to blame all of the worlds problems
on America (basically what last year's
ECU College Republican President
stated).
Another College Republican stated "on-
ly liberals approve the cowardly act of
suicide He tried to justify this belief by
saying that some ultra-liberal college stu-
dent body voted to take poison pills in the
event of a nuclear war.
Yet another College Republican stated
"we can't have good weapons, we can't
have better weapons, we have to have the
best weapons and we can't settle for
anything less Rah, Rah, Rah!
A recent East Carolinian ad for the Col-
lege Republicans asked that members
"help defeat the liberal left on campus
Nothing like a little wishful thinking to get
the ol' heart beating! Few people will
forget the College Republican who con-
siders Joe McCarthy to be "the great
patriot who cleansed many communists
from America
Granted, the preceeding analysis may be
oversimplified, and there are some College
Republicans at ECU who do not agree with
this type of behavior. However, there are
many who do, and will gladly participate.
Anytime Democratic candidates, such as
Jim Hunt and Terry Sanford, appear on
campus, the College Republicans come out
and emphasize their version of democracy.
The only thing they really seek is attention,
so just ignore them and they will probably
fade away.
Campus Forum
Gallery Exhibit Should Be Funded
Dear editor:
I am writing to you in reference to
the article "Legislature Decides
Against Funding Art Gallery's
Movie The article, which appeared
in your issue of Oct. 14, puzzles me.
There seems to be a misconception
about the November activities at the
Gray Art Gallery. A national travelling
exhibition organized by Ohio State
University entitled Rape (not "a
movie as the article states) is to be
shown at the Gallery from Nov.7 to
Dec. 8.
The exhibition, as the press release
issued to the ECU News Bureau on
Sept. 23 clearly states, deals with the
physical and psychological aftermath
of this experience. A symposium on
Nov. 8 will focus on the prevention of
rape, sociological, psychological and
legal aspects, and ways of dealing with
the trauma of rape.
The exhibition and the symposium
take up the issue of rape, which is
clearly an issue for everyday life and
especially for campuses across the na-
tion. Many people from the ECU cam-
pus and surrounding community are
giving their time to help make this
event a meaningful forum for this emo-
tionally charged issue. In presenting
the exhibition and symposium at the
end of the campus-wide Sexual Assault
Awareness Week, the Gray Art Gallery
is providing a valuable community ser-
vice. It should receive the full support
of all ECU students, as represented by
the SGA.
Susanne Nielsen,
Graduate Student,
Art
Drinking Age Debated
Dear editor:
This leter was prompted by your
editorial concerning the drinking law
which appeared in the Oct. 9 issue of
The East Carolinian.
Can we believe there are still holdouts
on the state and local levels concerning
the Federal law requiring the states to
raise the drinking age to 21?
Of course we can; we'd be stupid not
to. And we're not just talking about
people "on the state and local level
As you pointed out, there are eight
states that have missed the Federal
deadline for raising the age limit; this
portends a national defiance. As you
asked, "Why have they abstained?"
The answer is easy. Call it "financial
blackmail call it what you may; it
boils down to the rights an individual
has in this great, free country of ours.
These states believe in the principles
that our country was founded on, and
they are not willing to create a class
system of adults according to bogus
speculation made by certain groups of
individuals (Your editorial pointed out
MADD as a driving force in the appeal
to raise the nationwide drinking age to
21).
The question is not, however, one of
drinking and driving; it concerns an
adult's rights. There are many adults
over 21 who irresponsibly use their
driving priviledges. Statistics which
show that adults under 21 are involved
in alcohol-related accidents to a greater
degree than adults over 21 are invalid
and inconsistant (You pointed out that
"Statistics show a wide range of results
from a 13 percent decrease in alcohol-
related deaths among teen-agers to an
actual increase in the number of
deaths").
So why do we ride the idle train of
apathy that has plagued our society in
recent years?
We don't.
Your editorial mentioned the Beer
Rights Union (BRU) as one group that
was making a stand on this issue. Now,
BRU has united with a Greenville-
based organization, SIP (Students in
Protest), to form a coalition we will
tentatively call SIP-A-BRU.
This association has nationwide con-
nections. Groups in universities all
over the United States are ready and
willing to join the cause to take the
necessary measures needed to bring
about the change.
Petitions are being distributed
throughout the state and nation. Sign
them, and register to vote! We can
make a difference.
As a local effort, SIP-A-BRU is
organizing a Drink-In on Oct. 30 at
3:00 beginning on the campus mall. We
will march downtown and drink water
out of beer cans as a symbolic gesture.
Newspapers will be there; television
stations will be there. The important
thing is that You be there. Take it
seriously, and stay tuned.
David Bradshaw,
Junior
English
Fast For Life
To the editor:
As you read this letter, two US Viet-
nam veterans, Charles Liteky and
George Mizo, have been fasting for 44
and 45 days; and two others, Duncan
Murphy and Brian Nelson, have been
fasting for close to 32 days. The
"Veteran's Fast for Life" is an appeal
to save the lives of innocent
Nicaraguans who will be killed because
of the indiscriminate violence of the
U.Sbacked contras. Our Congress
has granted the contras $100 million
despite the fact that 62 percent of the
American people oppose any involve-
ment in Nicaragua.
It seems strange that there has been
virtually no coverage of these fasters in
the major media and, consequently, no
discussion here on campus of the com-
plex issues involved in such a fast to the
death. Have we become so cynical that
these men's lives don't matter? How
did we resolve the matter of the monks
who burned themselves alive in Viet-
nam?
These four veterans have previously
put their lives on the line for the US in
wartime-three in Vietnam and one in
WWII. They are now prepared to fast
to the death to save the lives of
Nicaraguan civilians. I urge that we in
the University community do two
things: one, debate the morality both
of such a fast and of the contra war in
Nicaragua; and two, write to the
veterans and give them our support so
that perhaps they can be dissuaded
from dying. They can be reached at:
Veterans Fast for Life
P.O. Box 53271
Temple Heights Station
Washington, DC 20009
Mike Hamer,
Lecturer
English
Evolutionism Attacked
To the editor:
I would like to take this opportunity
to respond to David Lewis' most recent
letter (Sept. 25). I will concede one
point to Mr. Lewis. That being my
equating a scientific fact with absolute
truth. A technical error on my part.
This, however, should point out the
fact that science does have its limita-
tions.
Mr. Lewis offers discoveries concer-
ning DNA and modern genetics as pro-
of of evolution. Molecular genetics
happens to be my chosen field of
specialization, and 1 have seen nothing
in the intricate structure of DNA and
the tremendously complex molecular
interractions involved in the expression
of its genes that would lead me to
believe that these all came about b
purely random natural processes.
The evidence to which Mr. Iewi
referred, I suppose, is the fact that dif-
ferent organisms have been found
share certain DNA sequences and
genetic mechanisms, in citing such
evidence, though, proponents are
careful to use only those genetic and
biochemical similarities which would
seem to agree with their concepts ot
phylogenv and to ignore those
characteristics which might link
humans, tor instance, with other
organisms, i.e. invertebrates, more
closelv than with our supposed
"cousins 'he apes
Such similarities are perfectlv com-
patible with, and are even a reasonable
prediction of, the creation model of
origins
Mr. lewis erred in assuming that I
had to return to 1929 to cite reputable
.criticism of evolution. In 1984 there
wa published a book bv Charles B
Thaxton. et al, The Mystery of Life's
Origin: Reassessing Current Theories
This book takes a close look at the
commonly held theory of how life was
supposed to have arisen out of t
"primordial soup The authors
weighed various aspects of this
scenario against established laws ol
chemistry and physics and concluded
that this "is at present a woefullv in-
adequate explanation for the incredible
complexitv associated with even simple
living systems Of course, this book
was not acknowledged by any of the
major scientific publications.
Mr. Lewis mentioned "punctuated
equilibrium" as a modern concept of
evolution but failed to explain what it
is. Scientists searching for proof of
evolution are frustrated on man
fronts. Among these are the embar-
rassing lack of fossils representing in-
termediate forms and the inability of
any present rate of change to account
for the drastic changes they propose.
given any length of time.
So Dr. Gould, among others, has
suggested that our history has con-
sisted of long periods of equilibrium,
or no change, interrupted by brief
quantum leaps in complexity. In other
words, we are to believe not only that
we are the product of a process not in
evidence today, but that this process
occurs more rapidly at some times than
at others. Come now, Mr. Lewis. How
much are we supposed to swallow in
the name of science?
My contention was, and continues to
be, that evolution has not been "con-
firmed to such a degree" as to meet
even Dr. Gould's definition of a scien-
tific fact. Evolutionary theories, and
their so-called "synthesis" with
established scientific phenomena, con-
sist of no more than massive specula-
tion, using, at best, circumstantial
evidence, based upon a prior rejection
of the concept of a creator.
I also maintain that the Constitution
by no means should be interpreted to
dictate that error be taught in schools
merely because the truth happens to be
a part of the Bible. This, Mr. Lewis, is
common sense.
Steve Van Cleave
Graduate Student.
Biology
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the en-
trance of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs).
LU
� be, .
; 0 p.m.
A Fleming D
�er rted �� e breai .
� n.er vehicle and

4:00 p.m
A Fit
icr i
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A I
rep
fron a
m art i
j l p
A Gre
u a Mac! n
himself to hi
near the Gi
teen vear Id
was an
posure. i
mem ofl cei
formation to a law
officer.
October 9
11:21 p.m.
A Greenv
ned from campus du
a non-stader g
dorms.
11:40 p.m.
A Beik Dorm res dei
found to be in viola
N.C. Alcoholic Be
THEI
BECOMII
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ARMY NURl
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 16, 1986
e Funded
Mi I ewis
i dif-
� . d to
i es and
ig such
p neni? are
and
v ould
cepts of
� �se
link
her
ites, more
ipp �scd
:th com-
i reas able
model of
t thai 1
rep able
1984 there
arles B.
- ife
� heories.
the
' h life was
f a
ithors
� this
s of
ncluded
.ulh in-
credible
� simple
this book
of the
mctuated
concept of
what it
if of
many
em bar-
rig in-
it of
i g account
propose,
i
ers, has
as con-
librium,
pted by brief
In other
� nl that
cess not in
l tl process
imes than
Mr Lewis. How
swallow in
and continues to
been "con-
i meet
' a scien-
ces, and
with
phenomena, con-
nan � pecula-
rcumstantial
i pi r reiection
maintain that the (nsutution
I mean . J be interpreted to
i c taught in schools
lusc the truth happens to be
� 'he Bible. This, Mr. Lewis, is
sense.
Steve Van Cleave
Graduate Student,
Biology
Forum Rules
he East Carolinian welcomes letters
jessing all points of view. Mail or
�hem by our office in the Publica-
Building, across from the en-
ce of Joyner Library.
or purposes of verification, all let-
final include the name, major and
ification, address, phone number
sifnature of the author(s).

i
October 8
3:50 p.m.
A Fleming Dorm resident
reported the breaking and enter-
ing of her vehicle and the larceny
of her radio tape deck. The vehi-
cle was parked south of Garrett
Dorm.
4:00 p.m.
A Fletcher Dorm resident
reported the larceny of jewelery
from her room.
4:30 p.m.
An Umstead Dorm resident
reported the larcenv of money
from a letter addressed to her
from a relative.
9:00 p.m.
A Greenville resident reported
that a black male had exposed
himself to her in the Art Building
near the Gray Gallery. A seven-
teen year old Greenville resident
was arrested for indecent ex-
posure, assault on a law enforce-
ment officer and giving false in-
formation to a law enforcement
officer.
October 9
11:21 p.m.
A Greenville resident was ban-
ned from campus due to his being
a non-student and living in the
dorms.
11:40 p.m.
A Belk Dorm resident was
found to be in violation of the
N.C. Alcoholic Beverage Laws.
11:50 p.m.
A Scott Dorm resident was
found to be in violation of the
N.C. Alcoholic Beverage Laws.
October 10
1:30 a.m.
A Scott Dorm resident was
found to be in violation of the
N.C. Alcoholic Beverage Laws.
9:50 p.m.
A Garrett Hall resident, a Slay
Hall resident and a Greenville
resident were observed to be in
possession of alcoholic beverages
while being underage on the
southeast side of Erwin Hall.
October 11
2:00 a.m.
A Scott Hall resident was ar-
rested on College Hill Drive for
driving while license was revoked
and resisting and delaying of-
ficers.
11:20 p.m.
A Kill Devil Hills resident was
banned from campus north of
Fleming Dorm for possession of
liquor and consumption of the
same while being underage.
11:20 p.m.
A Jones Hall resident and a
New York resident were observed
consuming alcoholic beverage
northeast of Minges Collisium.
11:20 p.m.
A Scott Hall student was ar-
rested for DWI and possession of
marijuana on Flanagon Drive.
October 12
3:50 a.m.
A Greenville officer was
assisted in locating suspect who
assaulted a female in the city and
in having papers served on
suspect in Scott Hall.
4:05 a.m.
Two Slay Hall residents were
arrested in the dirt lot north of
Public Safety for larceny of
license plate from a vehicle park-
ed in lot north of 9th Street.
9:05 p.m.
A Tyler Hall resident reported
the larceny of her bike from the
bike rack east of Tyler Hall.
October 13
1:35 a.m.
A Jones Hall resident was
found to have a firearm in a vehi-
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p.m. weekdays General anesthesia available.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
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means you re part of a health care
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career advancement are the rule.
not the exception The gold bar
on the right means xou command respect as an Army officer. If you're
earning a BSN, write Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713
Clifton. ' 07015. Or call toll tree l-800-USA-ARMY
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October 20-24
Student Stores
Wright Building
East Carolina University
cle parked in the 14th and
Berkley freshman parking lot.
2:20 a.m.
A Kentucky resident was bann-
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activity southeast of Tyler Hall.
9:45 a.m.
A Greenville resident was ar-
rested for four counts of posses-
sion of stolen property at ECU
Public Safety.
I
October 14
1:40 a.m.
Three Jones Dorm residents
were arrested for felonious
breaking, entering and larceny of
Jones Cafeteria.
6:00 p.m.
A Fletcher Hall resident was
arrested for assault with a deadly
weapon that happened on an
earlier date in Jones Cafeteria.
10:40 p.m.
A nurse of the Student Health
Services reported that a female
student had reported being
assaulted by a white male on
Summit Street.
October 15
12:45 a.m.
A Greenville resident was ar-
rested and charged with DWI,
careless and wreckless driving,
and consuming a malt beverage
while driving.
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Or�ml. NX. Ptton 7M-S244
: 1
STUDENT STORESk
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Wright Building
Qt
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Owned and Operated By
East Carolina University

rot

SALE
Children 9s Books
Discontinued Texts
New Reduced Tradebooks
Gift Books
SALE
Starts October 20
-
" i � mmmmmtmrmm
-4





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 16, 1986
Artificial Heart Patient Dies
MINNEAPOLIS (UPI) - Mary
Lund, the first woman to receive
an artificial heart, died nine mon-
ths after the pump was replaced
by a human organ, and doctors
said she was "grateful for the ex-
tra time" the surgery gave her.
Lund, 40, died of multiple
organ failure at Abbot-North-
western Hospital at 6:20 p.m.
Tuesday.
She received a mini-Jarvik-7
mechanical pump Dec. 19 as a
"bridge" to keep her alive until
doctors found a suitable donor
organ, which was implanted Jan.
31.
"This is a very sad day for me
and my son, Scott said Lund's
husband, DuWayne, who was at
the hospital when she died.
"From the day she came, and
in the past 10 months, Mary and I
had to make very careful deci-
sions. They were all made in the
hope Mary would go home.
Neither Mary nor I has any
regrets
"Mrs. Lund was happy to see
her son grow to be a man said
Dr. Marc Pritzker, her attending
physician. "She was grateful for
the extra time with her family, to
tell them she loved them
Dr. Lyle Joyce, the chief
surgeon for Lund, said she died
of "multi-organ failure" that
followed decreased brain activity.
The virus that destroyed 40
percent of Lund's natural heart
also caused "insurmountable
damage to her organs including
the brain, kidneys, lungs,
stomach and intestines, Joyce
said.
Joyce said he had no regrets
that the artificial heart was used
to prolong Lund's life until a
human heart was implanted. He
said Lund's body did not reject
the human heart and she never
suffered a stroke from blood
clots that claimed other artificial
heart patients.
"We would do it again said
Joyce, who also served with the
medical team that treated Dr.
Barney Clark, who lived 112 days
after becoming the first artificial
heart recipient.
"There is no question she
would do it again. She told us
that a week ago when she took a
jaunt around the lakes in a
wheelchair Joyce said. "She
was determined to live right up to
the last moment
Lund, a secretary at a home for
the elderly in rural Kensington,
Minn suffered a severe viral in-
fection in December that ravaged
her heart and left it able to pump
only a third of the normal volume
of blood.
"BLUE VELVET is a mystery a masterpiece a visionary story of sexual awakening,
of good and evil, a trip to the underworld
Erotically charged . Whether you're attracted or repelled by Lynch's brilliantly bizarre vision,
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(Highest Rating)
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Starts Friday, October 17th at Janus 4
CAMPUS MASS SCHEDULE
Sunday-11:30 a.m.
Biology Building, Room 103
9:00 p.m. Newman Center
Wednesday-5:30 p.m.
Newman Center
(followed by a fellowship dinner)
SHARE THE WORD BIBLE STUDY
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
at the Newman Center
All are welcome
For information, call 752-4216
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1 lb. Potato Salad
1 Dozen Dinner Rolls
Full Selection Of Party
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Astrop
ECL .News Bureau
An astrophysicist who ex-
perienced a nerve-wracking flight
aboard the Challenger space
shuttle in 1985 will visit Eas:
Carolina University on Oct. 31
Dr. John-David Bartoe, of the
L.S. Navy Research Laboratory.
Washington, D.C was one of
the seven astronauts on Spacelab
2, a scientific research mission in-
volving the Challenger, launched
July 29, 1985. The troubled lift-
off for this flight foreshadowed
the disaster last Jan. 28 when
Challenger exploded killing
crew of six and schoolteacher
Chnsta McAuliffe.
Court
WASHINGTON (UPI) - Th
Supreme Court, stepping back in-
to the debate over capital punish-
ment, will decide this 'erm
whether the death pena
discriminates against black- w
kill whites.
The justices were schedule
hear arguments in an appeal b
Warren McCleskey, a black
Georgia inmate who killed a
white policeman. McCleskej
argues the death per.u
discriminates against defenda
with white victims.
The court also was to hea-
arguments in a related cae Tom
Florida to determine �
capital defendants have a r:gh- I
present evidence showing race-
based disparities in the wa the
death penalty is applied.
McCleskey'� cae has d'
attention from death penalty toe-
nationwide who contend it poses
one of the few remaining c
stitutional challenges to car
punishment.
The state of Georgia, in oppos-
ing his appeal, said its capita
statute meets constitutional
muster and in no way treats
blacks differentlv than whites
McCleskey was sent to death
row for the murder of Atlanta
police officer Frank Schlatt dur-
ing the May 19"8 robbery of a
'UFiuiure store.
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Tuesday, Oct. 14
Thursday, Oct. 16
Friday Oct. 17
Saturday Oct. 18
Sunday Oct. 19
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 16. 19�
"� � � �"
(Highest Rating)
"A MASTERPIECE
�Htuwcll 1 ir�.uii. St Chronicle
"A WONDERFUL MOVIE
Br l IIHI
SOl VHII ABATING
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27858
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q m
5 Room 103
an Center I
5 30 p ti.
Cente-
.vship dinner)
I
RD BIBLE STUDY
7 30 p.m.
�man Center

I
welcome I
n, call 752-4216
lllllllllttllll'imillllllHHHIIHIttilllllllllllllllllllllimilllif
ral Light
cans 4�49
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15 gallons
Astrophysicist Visits ECU
ECU News Bureau
An astrophysicist who ex-
perienced a nerve-wracking flight
aboard the Challenger space
shuttle in 1985 will visit East
Carolina University on Oct. 31.
Dr. John-David Bartoe, of the
U.S. Navy Research Laboratory,
Washington, D.C was one of
the seven astronauts on Spacelab
2, a scientific research mission in-
volving the Challenger, launched
July 29, 1985. The troubled lift-
off for this flight foreshadowed
the disaster last Jan. 28 when
Challenger exploded killing its
crew of six and schoolteacher
Christa McAuliffe.
Bartoe will discuss his eight-
day flight and research aboard
the shuttle at a public lecture in
the Jenkins Auditorium (School
of Art) at 7:30 p.m. His presenta-
tion is titled "Living and Work-
ing in Space: The Spacelab 2
Shuttle Mission
The 1985 Spacelab 2 mission,
termed a "scientific success
brought some heart-stopping
moments for its crew and those in
control of the mission. Within
minutes after take-off one of the
shuttle's main engines shut down
and a sensor on the second engine
warned of failure.
The shuttle could have been
forced to land in Europe or the
ocean if the second main engine
shut down as it had threatened.
Instead, the crew was told to
override the computer-controlled
sensor. The crew also burned fuel
to lighten the plane and fired the
remaining engines an extra 86
seconds to ensure that it reached
orbit.
But the procedure left
Challenger short of fuel in an or-
bit 46 miles lower than planned.
Despite the problems, the shut-
tle returned safely with much
scientific information gathered
from instruments focused on the
sun, the stars and on the Earth's
ionospnere. NASA said the flight
"may be the most important
scientific mission that the shuttle
has flown
Bartoe, a solar physicist, was
one of two scientists involved in
solar research on Spacelab 2. He
participated in the design of the
instruments used during the flight
and was the project scientist for
the development of the solar
ultraviolet telescope.
A native of Pennsylvania, Bar-
toe is visiting Greenville to sec his
sister, Joanne B. Lewis, a
member of the ECU School of
Nursing faculty. His Oct. 31 lec-
ture is sponsored by the ECU
Department of Physics.
Court Questions Discriminations
ALL A
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Breakfast SUPER TASTE TRIP TICKET!
WASHINGTON (UPI) - The
Supreme Court, stepping back in-
to the debate over capital punish-
ment, will decide this term
whether the death penalty
discriminates against blacks who
kill whites.
The justices were scheduled to
hear arguments in an appeal by
Warren McCleskey, a black
Georgia inmate who killed a
white policeman. McCleskey
argues the death penalty
discriminates against defendants
with white victims.
The court also was to hear
arguments in a related case from
Florida to determine whether
capital defendants have a right to
present evidence showing race-
based disparities in the way the
death penalty is applied.
McCleskey's case has drawn
attention from death penalty foes
nationwide who contend it poses
one of the few remaining con-
stitutional challenges to capital
punishment.
The state of Georgia, in oppos-
ing his appeal, said its capital
statute meets constitutional
muster and in no way treats
blacks differentlv than whites.
McCleskey was sent to death
row for the murder of Atlanta
police officer Frank Schlatt dur-
ing the May 1978 robbery of a
�urruture store.
His attorneys, in appealing to
the high court, said imposition of
the death penalty in Georgia "is
marked by persistent racial
disparities" and thus should be
declared unconstitutional in all
instances.
The Florida and Georgia cases
together force the court to return
to an issue thought settled in 1976
in a series of rulings known col-
lectively as Gregg vs. Georgia.
That decision, which ended a
four-year moratorium on capital
punishment, was intended to set
standards to eliminate "arbitrary
and capricious" use of the death
penalty.
But a 1978 study by Professor
David Baldus of the University of
Iowa argues the death penalty is
still arbitrary, depending on the
race of a defendant and his vic-
tim.
Baldus studied all Georgia
murder convictions from 1973-78
and found that 22 percent of
blacks who killed whites received
the death penalty compared to 1
percent of blacks who killed
blacks, 3 percent of whites who
killed blacks and 8 percent of
whites who killed whites.
Problems Of Hunger
Discussed At ECU
ECU News Bureau
Why do people starve in a
world where farmers grow more
corn and wheat than they can
store?
This question will be address-
ed, Oct. 16, World Food Day, in
a teleconference to be shown at
East Carolina University from 12
noon until 3 p.m. in the
auditorium of the Brody Medical
Sciences Building. The public is
invited to attend.
Relayed by satellite from
Washington, the World Food
Day Teleconference is sponsored
��
ONSOLIUAltD
THiAIRiS
All Seats $2.00 Everyday Til 5:30 PM
BUCCANEER MOVIES
SI c
30-3 30-5 30-7 30-9 30
EXTREMITIES
Ends Today! � R-
I 15-3 15-5:15? 15-9 15
THE PATRIOT
Ends Today! �R-
30 3 30-5 30-7 30-9 30
House By The
Cemetery
�R�
J
Starts Tomorrow
KKX
LANCASTER DOUGLAS everyoive's
TOUGH 6BYS "SBSSRf
� Vvw. �� � w TOUGH GUYS!
PGt
�am
by the National Committee for
World Food Day and by the ECU
Division of Continuing Educa-
tion.
Discussing the problems of
hunger in foreign nations and in
the United States will be an inter-
national panel of experts. They
include: Barber Conable, presi-
dent of the World Bank; Cecilia
Lopez, Columbia's ambassador
to the Netherlands; Dr. Muhum-
mad Yunus, founder of the Gra-
meen Bank in Daca, Bangledesh;
and Dr. Patricia Barnes McCon-
nell, director of BeanCowpea
Collaborative Research and Sup-
r
jazzeiH'ise
FREEJAZZERCISE
I FOR TWO.
I �R I
TWO TRIPS I
JUST FOR YOU.
Oct. 31, 1986 j
j Proud To Say East Carolina
Catch The Spirit
HOMECOMING 1986
Tuesday, Oct. 14
Thursday, Oct. 16
Friday Oct. 17
Saturday Oct. 18
Sunday Oct. 19
Comedy Laugh Off
8:00 p.m. Hendrix $2.50 Students S3.50 facultystaff
THE PHANTOMS
8:00 ECU Coffee House
7:00 Pep Rally
Ficklen Stadium
8:00 THE BAD CHECKS
Ampitheatre
10:00 a.m. Homecoming Parade
2:00 p.m. ECU vs. Georgia Southern
Crowning of "Miss ECU"
Alumni Awards
THE AWARENESS ART
ENSEMBLE
2:00p.m. University Mall
port Program at Michigan State
University.
Viewing audiences will be given
the opportunity to direct ques-
tions to the international panel.
A local discussion panel will also
be present to answer questions.
Dieticians attending the con-
ference will receive three continu-
ing education credits towards
professional recertification.
For more information contact
the ECU Division of Continuing
EdjjcojtlUS
FILM DEVELOPING
SPECIAL
2 PRINTS FOR 1 LOW PRICE
12 exp - 24 prints $2.87
15exp - 30 prints $3.67
24 exp - 48 prints $5.67
36 exp - 72 prints $7.87
35mm Shooters
Ask for Custom Mark 35 Processing
12 exp - 24 prints $3.37
24 exp - 48 prints $6.37
36 exp - 72 prints $8.87
COLOR PRINT FILM (C41) DEVELOPED
PLUS TWO PRINTS FROM EACH NEGATIVE:
Printed Coupon Must Accompony Order (No Limit)
OFFER EXPIRES 10-30-86
Come by The Student Stores for all your photographic needs,
and low prices for film, flashes, and batteries.
STUDENT STORES
Wright Building
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
East Carolina University
Alcohol Awareness
Week
October 19�23.1986
Pirates
Sunday, October 19
2 00 PM� Concert "The Awareness Art Ensemble"Mall or Hendrix Theatre
Monday, October 20
6 00 PM� BACCHUS (Boost Alcohol Consciousness Concerning the Health of University Students) information Session on Responsible DrinkingTyler Lobby
Tuesday, October 21
400-8 00 PM� Alcohol Information FairTyler Lobby
6 00 PM�BACCHUS Workshop Movie Choices'242MendenhaU
Wednesday, October22
6 00 PM�BACCHUS Information SessionSlay Lobby
7 00 PM�Alcohol and the Law Speaker Mac McCarley, Greenville City AttorneyJones Basement
Thursday, October 23
6 00 PM�BACCHUS Membership Meeting ALL EVENTS ARE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC for More Alcohol Information Contact Campus Alcohol and Drug Program 757 6793242Mendenhall
����
Z'WM
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 16, 1986
College Football Players Stereotyped
MINNEAPOLIS, MN (CPS)
Some of the best-known, most
eligible, graceful and biggest - in
both the social and physical
meanings of the word - men on
campus moved into Centennial
Hall at the University of Min-
nesota last week, but dorm
women were very, very nervous
about it.
"Everything's gone okay so
far reports sophomore Tracey
Martin. "People are not ignoring
them, but they're not going out
of their way to say 'hi' either
"They" are members of the
UM basketball team, devastated
last season by allegations later
disproven in court - of gang-
raping a Madison, Wis woman
and reports showing it had the
lowest male athlete graduation
rate in the Big 10.
At Minnesota and campuses
around the country this fall, the
athlete - once the Big Man On
Campus has become so sullied
by drug scandals, grade-fixing
trials, under-the-table payments
from boosters and a growing
reputation for crimes and bully-
ing that the gulf between him and
the rest of the campus seems to
have widened dramatically, some
observers say.
"They are looked on as being
dumb jocks whose only
legitimate reason for being there
is playing (sports) says Harry
Edwards, a sports sociologist at
Cal-Berkeley.
They also are looked at as be-
ing dangerous.
The Philadelphia Daily News,
using FBI statistics, counted 88
athletes, at 46 different schools,
charged with criminal sexual of-
fenses since 1983.
And in just the last three mon-
ths, seven Iowa State football
players have been charged for
various assaults, credit card and
bad check schemes.
At the same time a North
Carolina State quarterback was
convicted of sexual assault, while
a Butler quarterback was charged
with attempted murder and ar-
son. Florida State suspended a
linebacker accused of killing one
of his teammates. Police say
three Colorado football players
are under investigation for
threatening to kill a local
restauranteur.
Worries about athletes and
their images are so bad at the
University of Miami, which as of
last week had the number one
ranked football team in the land,
that campus officials formed a
committee to monitor athletes'
behavior.
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Sports Illustrated magazine
recently estimated 40 members of
the team had been in trouble with
the police.
Jack Davis, president of the
NCAA and a sports official at
Oregon State, denies there's a
crime wave, and blames the news
media for the impression that
there is.
"Athletes tend to make the
news more than other students
Davis says.
"For example, the same week
that (Maryland basketball star)
Len Bias died (of cocaine-related
causes), the assistant to the vice
chancellor at the University of
Kansas was found guilty of sell-
ing drugs he notes.
"You didn't hear about that
one, did you?" Davis asks
rhetorically.
But it's the incidents that don't
make the news that worry
students at Centennial Hall at
Minnesota.
When the team was housed in
the same dorm two years ago,
recalls dorm president Larry
Jamie son, "players would hang
out in the lobby and make com-
ments to girls. A lot of girls were
scared to go through the lobby. It
was intimidating to guys, too
Adds Sociology Prof. Dr. John
Clark, "the rape trials (of the
basketball players) turned off a
lot of students, and well it
should. But I hope the students
will see it as fairly isolated
Berkeley's Edwards attributes
such tensions to schools that
recruit and then abandon
athletes, to the difficulty of
handling intense pressures - ones
most students never need con-
front - at too young an age, and
to simply being out of place on
campus.
"The whole situation over-
whelms he says of athletes na-
tionwide. "The majority of them
are black, underclass kids going
to an upper middle class, white
campus. They are going to school
in a whole different culture. They
find themselves not in the same
situation they grew up in, and
have known all their lives
Two other Berkeley resear-
chers, Brenda Bredemeier and
David Shields, found in an Oct.
1985, study of California college
athletes an inverse relationship
between "moral reasoning" and
The Student Stores
in conjunction with
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and
The Pepsi Cola Bottling Company
Offer This Homecoming Special Souvenir Cup
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Through Saturday, Oct. 18th. Available At
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IF YOU CAN TAKE CHARGE HERE,
YOU CAN TAKE CHARGE ANYWHERE.
Today's Navy offers one of the best
opportunities you might ever have to
develop leadership experience
It's experience that has given
a boost to a lot of brilliant careers
in and out of the Navy And it's
an inherent part of a Navy officer's
professional development
Management openings in
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October 20-21
NAVY OFFICERS GET RESPONSIBILITY FAST.
aggression.
Bredemeier and Shields found
that players rated as "most ag-
gressive" by their coaches were
"less mature" than other players
who, in turn, were related "unag-
gressive
Whatever the reasons, Davis
figures the way to ease whatever
tensions may exist is by stressing
"integrity" in college athletics,
taking better academic care of
players and perhaps disciplining
the athletes themselves.
"One group says if a student
athlete is in a brawl of some kind,
he shouldn't be on the team. Kick
him off Davis says. "Another
will say, 'well, boys will be
boys
Edwards instead wants to
"establish programs dealing with
the alienation and discontinuity
(in athletes' lives). Look at the
problems. (Ask) what are the
academic deficiencies. Break up
the athletic dorms
The tension at Minnesota, of
course, arose when officials
broke up the athletic dorms.
But basketball coach Clem
Haskins and athletic department
officials agreed to dorm
residents' requests to have "sup-
port staff" supervise the team in
Centennial, to provide more
academic counseling, to cut down
practice time, help integrate
black athletes into the Twin
Cities' black community, and
even require coaches to better
understand adolescent
psychology.
The athletes themselves arc
aware of the tensions, too. "It
bothers some more than others
reports Elayne Donahure, assis-
tant athletic director for
academic counseling. "1 assume
that time will take care of that
WTT
CCIHTY
COMMJSSIONUtS
tACl
TjVMOl tm Bosta �
n, ��� �� up lo
�tecuon No��i�b�f 4
All PIO County VoU'l
MARY l.OU Jk
�SUGG�i'Y
.Ji
Cindldjlet Few Howtr1 t'etiion
R . U f
Omoc't
Vol. Fo On.
Vol. F On
io. �.�. Mary Lou Sugg
Am J An.)i�i
�rth 0�t
Volt For On
C � �� Mc i �
FROM WASHINGTON, D.C.
"The President's Own"
UNITED STATES
z MARINE BAND
Colonel John R. Bourgeois, Director
Wednesday, October 29, 1986
Wright Auditorium
East Carolina University
Matinee: 2:00 p.m.
i Evening: 8:00 p.m.
ADMISSION
Matinee:
ECU Students and Groups � $2.00
ECU Faculty and Staff � $3.50
Public and at the Door � $5.00
Evening:
ECU Students and Groups � $3.00
ECU Faculty and Staff � $4.50
Public and at the Door � $6.00
Tickets Available al Uie Central Ticket Office
Monda-Frida. 11:00 a.m6:00 p.m.
Call (919) 757-6611. ext. 266
A Student Union Special Concerts Presentation

J L
THt EAST CAROtlNIAN
'Chorus
ByD.A.SWANSON
What can 1 say about the ECU
Playhouse production of A
Chorus Line! The sum total is far
more than adequate for the
average Greenville resident; and
the level of professionalism
definitely meets with this cam-
pus' high standards.
But there was an awkward
balance between certain roles
which interupted the sparkling
flow of the overall performance.
Even though everyone ought to
know by now what this musical
(Broadway's longest running to
date) is about, here's a quick
synopsis: Open on a Broadwa
cattle call (an open audition),
enter Zach, the director of the
hypothetical musical. He makes
the first cut and begins an
unusual probing interview into
the lives of each of the remaining
prospective chorus line members
The result is an entertaining and
t rl
�nl
I
te
I
jei
Fawcett Hit:
By ED TOSHACH
�ii.ff �ni�f
What do you do with a rapist,
once you've captured and in-
capacitated him? This is the
question that Extremities, the
intense new movie starring Far-
rah Fawcett, deals with.
Fawcett plays a single woman
who's on the way home from
her job one night when a rapist
crawls into her car, forces her at
knife point to drive to a
deserted place, and attempts to
rape her.
She escapes and goes to the
police, who tell her that even if
they caught him, they could do
nothing if she wasn't actually
raped; it would be her word
against his.
When she is just beginning to
I recover from the assault, he
' shows up at her house (he got
the address from her wallet) and
Various Artists!
Share Their In
By JOHN SHANNON
While some artists still intend
their work to be appreciated sole-
ly as "an for art's sake for
most the Ivory Tower is no longer
an acceptable sanctuary. Artists
are taking their social respon-
sibilities seriously these days, and
nowhere is this attitude more ap-
parent than in Gray Gallery's up-
coming show, "Rape
Meiian
Authentic
521 Cotanche
Open 7 Day For
"BtenvenKlos
Chico's has
FIESTA ROOM: Great M��.c�n
ROSA S CANTINA: Orinks, A
groups o
fntrodi
I
VOICE AN
in the ti"�
Sunday Monday
� fi 5
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otyped
require coaches to better
understand adolescent
psv hology
iete themselves are
t I the tensions, too. "It
- some more than others
- Elaync Donahure, assis-
etic director for
ounseling "1 assume
11 'ake care of that
SUGG
ou Sugg
ON, D.C.
Presentation
4
i
v
Bp-P
a
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
n lOHf K 1V�6
'Chorus Line9Is Worth Hype
By D.A. SWANSON
What can 1 say about the ECU
Plav house production of A
Chorus Line? The sum total is far
more than adequate for the
average Greenville resident; and
the level of professionalism
definitely meets with this cam-
pus' high standards.
But there was an awkward
balance between certain roles
which interupted the sparkling
flow of the overall performance.
Even though everyone ought to
w by now what this musical
(Broadway's longest running to
date) is about, here's a quick
synopsis: Open on a Broadway
cattle call (an open audition),
enter Zach, the director of the
hypothetical musical. He makes
the first cut and begins an
unusual probing interview into
:he lives of each of the remaining
prospective chorus line members.
The result is an entertaining and
sensitive view into the sometimes
seamy, sometimes hilarious lives
of professional performers.
The beauty of this Pulitzer
Prize winning musical by Michael
Bennett, with music by the ever-
prolific Marvin Hamlisch. is that
no one role really stands out
above another. Each character is
as completely developed as the
next � a stuck-up homosexual, a
caustic aging actress, a bouncy
ex-cheerleader, and even a family
man with two children.
Patrick Mel Boyd, as Paul (the
tragic,depressed homosexual),
was simply spectacular. Many of
the local, more conservative
theater goers may have been a lit-
tle shocked by his authentic por-
trayal of a homosexual coming to
terms with himself and his place
in society. His was the one tear-
jerker of the evening.
Also very emotional was
Virginia Lockwood's, Diana (the
Spanish Harlem native trying to
make it on Broadway). Of the en-
tire cast, her performance was the
most confident, her voice the
strongest and most expressive,
and she gets my vote for best
showing.
And then there was Gina L.
Weathermen as Cassie, the
beautiful fallen star. We'll give
her Looks � 10, DanceSinging
� 3. Her first couple of short,
spotlight solos sounded rather
weak for a lead role, but the real
disappointment came with her
big solo number, "The Music
And The Mirror
Now, I know that it is a com-
mon practice on Broadway for a
lead, fatigued with the rigors of
the part, to dub in some vocals,
but the dubbing inserted last
night was just plain disturbing.
Compared to her earlier weak
vocals, the robust singing of a
piped-in backup singer was about
as obvious as Jesse Helms walk-
ing into a Communist rally.
Luckily, the strong points were
good enough to overcome this
Fawcett Hits Target In New Movie
By ED TOSHACH
SUN Writer
What do you do with a rapist,
once you've captured and in-
capacitated him? This is the
question that Extremities, the
intense new movie starring Far-
rah Fawcett, deals with.
Fawcett plays a single woman
who's on the way home from
her job one night when a rapist
crawls into her car, forces her at
knife point to drive to a
deserted place, and attempts to
rape her.
She escapes and goes to the
police, who tell her that even if
they caught him, they could do
nothing if she wasn't actually
raped; it would be her word
against his.
When she is just beginning to
recover from the assault, he
shows up at her house (he got
the address from her wallet) and
tries again � this time with the
intention of killing her.
After some brutal treatment
� something the rapist seems to
get sadistic joy from � she
manages to turn the tables on
her attacker. As she is preparing
to finish him off, her room-
mates show up.
This is where the question
arises: What do you do with
him? Fawcett's character has
some ideas � like burying him
alive � born not simply from
anger and a need for revenge,
but from fear as well; the police
have already told her that in
such a situation, they would
have to let him go.
The roommates want to call
the police, and the conflict bet-
ween them and Fawcett's
character is the essence oi Ex-
tremities.
One fascinating, although
somewhat uncomfortable
aspect of this movie is that it
takes you inside the situation;
you experience the cruel assault
almost first person. This effect
creates a sympathetic feeling
toward the victim, and you are
almost ready to help her dig the
grave by the time she's disabled
him.
There is a tension about the
film that doesn't let up until the
end. This is not a "feel good"
movie.
But it makes a good picture.
Two especially fine perfor-
mances are turned in by
Fawcett, as the woman who
refuses to be a victim, and
James Russo as the attacker
whom we hate, but can't help
but pity. Both recreate the roles
they played in Mastrimone's
stage play of the same name.
A recent ad said that Ex-
tremities is a movie every
woman should see; but in fact,
no one should miss it. It's a
good one.
Various Artists From Around The Country
Share Their Insights On Rape Experiences
Bv JOHN SHANNON
While some artists still intend
their work to be appreciated sole-
ly as "art for art's sake for
most the Ivory Tower is no longer
an acceptable sanctuary. Artists
are taking their social respon-
sibilities seriously these days, and
nowhere is this attitude more ap-
parent than in Gray Gallery's up-
coming show, "Rape
Planned to coincide with other
university activities during Sexual
Assault Awareness Week (Nov. 3
through 9), "Rape" will include
a variety of works by artists con-
cerned about the phenomenon of
rape. Over half of the artists ex-
hibiting are rape victims.
Jerri Allyn, a New York per-
formance artist, will present a
slide lecture, "Out in Public at
7 p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium.
bVn
'ft.
V
1
Mex lea n Resta u ra nl
v
Authentic Mexican Food
521 Cotanche St 757-1644
Open 7 Days For Lunch a Dinner
"Bienvenidos, Amioosl"
Chico's has expanded!
FIESTA ROOM: Great Mex.c.n D.ning for groups of up to 100
ROSA'S CANTINA: Dnnks. AppeM.rs and good t.mes to,
groups of up to 25
Introducing
GARY SOWEN
VOICE AND GUITAR
in the hit'slii Kix'ri
Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday
10 I
Afterward, there will be an open-
ing reception in the gallery. An
all day symposium, "Perspec-
tives on Rape, A Multi-
Dimensional Approach to Issues
on Sexual Violence will be con-
ducted Nov. 8 in Jenkins
Auditorium.
The symposium promises to
shed light on the issues associated
with rape, both in terms of its af-
fect on the community and its
significance in the arts.
At 9:30 a.m members of the
campus and community who deal
with rape victims will discuss the
sociological, psychological and
legal aspects of the crime, as well
as methods of preventing it and
dealing with its trauma.
At 1 p.m New York artist
Jerri Allyn will perform "Raw
Meet an 18 minute oral piece
which uses dialogue to expose
some of the underlying
preconceptions and myths about
sexual assault.
A panel discussion, "Breaking
Taboos: Portrayal of Sexual
Violence in the Arts will follow
the performance. Allyn and ECU
faculty members from several
departments will discuss topics
such as the conspicuous presence
or absence of treatments of rape
in literature and visual art.
Finally, at 3:30 p.m small
group sessions will be held in
which audience members may
feel free to discuss particular
aspects of the rape experience
with psychologists, campus
police and representatives from
the campus ministries. Anyone
interested may participate in the
group discussions.
It is worth noting that, while
subject matter addressed by the
show and the symposium may be
controversial, one of the func-
tions of a gallery it to provide a
forum for dealing with con-
troversial issues. Also, there is
almost no portrayal of human
nudity in the show, and therefore
little cause for worry about
obscenity or pornography.
and a few other problems.
Take the minor roles of Al
(Benjamin Tweel) and his
airheaded wife, Kristine (Rachel
Johnson). Here is a pair who
nearly stole the show with their
wonderfully comedic number,
"Sing They deserve an ova-
tion of their own.
Other notable performances
were given by Jeffrey Hargett,
Paula Friedland and Kendra
Boster who brought special
qualities to their characters.
On a final and special note, is
the part of Bobby, the happy-go-
lucky, off-the-wall performer,
played by the director of the pro-
duction, David Wanstreet.
My hat is off to him for his
supremely funny acting and also
for his extraordinarily low key
presence as actordirector. A fine
performance.
A Chorus Line will be playing
through the rest of this week to a
sold out house,
Actors from the East Carolina Playhouse production of A Chorus
Line' Featuring � Ralph Ba, Kendra Boster ami Paula Friedman.
Creator Of 'Elm Street' Movies Attempts
More Cinematic Genius With Latest Flick
By MICAH HARRIS
SUff Writer
Combine computer chips with
one dead girl friend and you get a
case of high-tech necrophilia.
You also get Wes Craven's latest
effort, Deadly Friend.
The movie opens as teenager
Paul (Matthew Laborteaux) ar-
rives with his mother and family
robot at their new home where
Paul, an academically gifted
child, will study and work at a
university.
His research is in artificial in-
telligence. The robot, a pet pro-
ject that is capable of thought,
proves to be quite a conversation
piece, thus allowing Paul to
befriend the local paper boy, and
Samantha (Kristy Swanson), an
abused child who lives next door.
The trio of friends play a
Halloween prank on an irate
neighbor who consequently
destroys the robot with good
reason. Somehow, the thing has
developed a mean streak and is
out for blood. (What exactly
causes this is never made clear.)
Paul saves his robot's "brain
a circuit board of micro chips and
the like. It comes in handy when
Samantha's father murders her.
Determined to add new depth to
the term "endless love Paul
steals Sam's body and implants
the robot's "brain" into her
own.
The result, of course, is a living
doll. Unfortunately, she turns
out to be a voodoo doll,
administering vengence on
father and anyone who happens
to give Paul a hard time.
Deadly Friend is a curio
brew of Spielberg' youth fare
and Craven's own jugular-
ripping style. 1 am reminded of
the old B-minus movie hvpe that
goes something like "You'll
Shriek! You'll Scream! You'll
Throw up
Yes, the gore you've come to
expect of Craven i. amply pre-
sent. It is particulars evident in
some self-indulgent dream se-
quences (for 'hose lingering Fred
die fans, I quess) which are
redundant and don't advance
plot one jot or tittle.
What enables Deadly Friend to
rise above the beach-blanke
blood-letting sub-genre is a .�
prising sensitivity uncomm
this type of teen-shock schlock.
The character of Sam, of
course, is the focal point ol this.
She really looks like "the girl
next door" might, and no! a
voluptuous adolescent fantasy.
Also realistic is her pitiful loyalty
to her abusive father. We ace
her both before and � to the
credit of young actress Kristy
Swanson � after her death.
As the revived Sam, her eyes
occasionally Hash with bewilder
ment and then sadness, a painful
ly sharp c ntrasl w I her
mechanical movements. Sam a
victim of both her father and
Paul's passions.
As her presence o mind
returns, though, she takes what
little her owi
hands and cho ies to die agj
fortunatelv, raven
somebodv
leave well
: a
rficia
ending is I cked on, effec
Too
bad.
rhei
d of this pit Me irama
or � . � Sam's situati is
ibs "1. uch
lan's
head lik . rripel ma
hurled h
Thi; - ibsequeni �cene
'he old � 's decapita - d
pse ierk
u and elicit - .
-� � iacl h .
There are al &oi es n
argi
phant to : thn ugh. v h
turn evil? It's hinted
thai it ha som : to do with
Paul's not re a her be' .
her life support �va iff. Bur
then again, the robot turned
m! in for no app
leruj � sac nno -
but �� ' ind
telling me h s? Also, why
isn't Sam's body raising ich?
Paul doesn't mind getting close
to her so I assume that she ;s
v not -
leader than she i
All in all, Deadly Friend is still
e treat than trick. Just don't
e peel more . in you would
) ece of candy corn; en-
joyable, but with empty calories.
Through The Looking Glass
Madonna Strikes A Nerve
By ANDY LEWIS
M Writer
HEY KIDS! Have you hrd
the latest? Madonna, pn.Line
queen of syntho-pop and high
priestess of bellybutton wor-
ship, has stirred the leading
moralists of our country to
harsh words of criticism. How
could such a thing happen?
Well it seems that her latest
hit single, "Papa Don't
Preach (a must for any
masochist's record collection)
may be preaching a bad message
to our impressionable teeny-
boppers. God Forbid!
Until now, most of the
criticism has been directed at
such illustrious artists as Ozzy
Osbourne, Ronny James Dio,
Iron Maiden, and Bon Jovi.
I don't suppose I would want
my son to start wearing make
up and eating lizards. Nor
would I want to find my son
carving up the cat as a sacrifice.
The cat wets the carpet every
now and then, but sacrifice?
That's a bit severe.
But back to the point at hand.
How could that soft, sensuous
(celibate?) woman cause such a
fuss?
According to Pro-Choice ad-
vocates, the song encourages
young girls to disobey their
parents, have casual sex, and
not to have abortions.
Now, I'm not trying to make
fun of a serious issue like abor-
tion; I admit that a baby might
not be the best thing for the
health and future of an 11 year
old, but let's get real, the song
could be interpreted different
ways.
Besides, the biggest impact
Madonna has had is in the area
of fashion. Look at the latest
trends in bellybutton exposure
and Catholic-Punk skirts and
accessories.
I guess I'm a bit amused at
the significance placed on the
lyrics of today's songs. Besides,
you can't hear the words in half
of them anyway.
The reason you can't hear
them could be either because of
screeching guitar licks or simply
because many popular
American artists never learned
English.
Even when you can hear the
words, they mean different
things. For instance, here is one
line in "Papa Don't Preach
"I'm gonna keep my baby
The word "baby" has come to
mean many things in the world
of rock and pop music (there is
a difference between rock and
pop, unless you're Dick Clark).
"Baby" could refer to a
boyfriend, a pet gerbil, a pro-
stitute, a beer, radioactive
waste, etc.
Musicians dress, act, and
write lyrics primarily to attract
attention. If all that weirdness
meant anything else, we'd lock
them up. Some people would
like to lock them up anyway. If
you ask me. just lock Julio Ig
lesias up and we'll all be better
off.
I can just imagine what will
happen next: experts will find
evidence of backwards masking
on "Papa Don't Preach If
you plav it backwards, you can
hear this: "HHCEACCHH
NNNODT AAAHHPAAP
(Translated from Devil-Speak:
"Snort coke, have sex, mastur-
bate, and listen to rock 'n' roll
if you want to party with Satan
for eternity").
1 think moralists ought to
keep their noses out of the pop-
chart; they could spend 'heir
time much better by beir.g
guests on the Phil Donahue
show.
As for parents of America, I
have this advice: If your kids
are so isolated from you that
they have to listen to Top-40
music �o form their moral
beliefs, you might as well put
them up for adoption.
Just one thing, though, don't
let Madonna have them.
tej a�0tmmmm





10
THE EAST C AROl 1NIAN
OCTOBER 16, 1986
Classifieds
TO MY SIG EP PLEDGE Con
qrats! Good luck during your pledge
period. I'm here if you need me and I
support you all the way Love You
Rhonda
BIG SIS MICHELLE: The Ch
Omega big sis hunt was a lot ot fun
Thanks tor everything We'li be
great together! Love Your Lil Sis,
Carol.
DAVET Dieu Voux blenit! Bon An
niversaire Grosses bises. Votre
amie. Merk.
LOOK FOR HALLOWEEN
BALLOON A GRAMS: From KA lit
tie sisters.
THETA CHI MEN: Good luck on
Sunday Hope you have a great time.
From your Pledges
ASHLEY D Looking forward tc
good times and a great fneraship
Thanx tor making Big Sis Hunt tun!
Luv Catnenne.
CONGRATULATIONS TO
STEPHANIE PAUL We'll be
cheering for you Saturday We Love
You! Greer. Brian, James, Pat and
Diane.
BRIAN: These past 15 months have
been wonderful! Here's to 15 more!
Love Greer
MARK: Thanks for all the special
memories: Love Always, Debbie
DIABETICS: Feilow stuaent work
mg on research paper neecs 5
mmutes of your time for brief ques
tionnaire Call Rick at 752 1108. Help
areatly appreciated
THETA CHI PLEDGES:
Remember the homecoming parade
Saturday at 8 a.m. at Rose High
School
CAR WASH: Alpha Sigma Phi Fall
Pledge Class, Friday, Oct. 17 from
12 to 6p.m. at the Shell Quality Mart,
corner of Arlington Ave. and Green-
ville Blvd in front of Farm Fresh.
Cost is S3
SUPPORT S.I.PA BRU. Ifs hip
for you to support SIP. A BRU.
Sign the petition and attend the
drink in on Thursday, Oct. 30 at 3:00
on the mall.
STEPHANIE PAUL: Congratula
tions on making Homecoming Court.
We're behind you all the way! Love,
the AZD's
SCOTT �� sf ny bt sa c SurtsioeROD: We control aia that's all thaT net Have a good weekend iyour � ro The
PAM FORSYTHE:
stressing over your
Night?"
Are you still
'Stranger in the
RAILROAD MAN: Make surt .
oring your mirrors to Homecoming
so we can see your oate! The
Cheeseman.
TO MARIONHappy SweeteslD ). '
m iss ,ou Love Cocd 6 s
JOHN FOG MINGES COL s ec!ERTY iSEUM:INVADES N o. 1, G e'
AMANDA JERNIGAN Birtl �HdPf
MARK. JOHNAND STEVE1 'm
Mt � � p SOfTH
ROBBIE: I iu, Ot
n ov n u t �
me spo . . Bulo�0 1 e t -c Uns Qhtly
ALPHA XI DELTA: Sisters and
pledges of Alpha Xi get ready for the
stranger party. The Tar River Party
Room is the sight to meet your
stranger in the night. Thursday eve
at 7:45 your "mystery date" will ar-
rive. Laughter, happiness, fun and
cheer will be abundant for all to
hear.
PIKALIL SISTERRUSH:October
20 227.30-9:30at theATTIC
Mon.Come as vouare. Tues. Semi
formal, Weu. Semiformal.
SIGMA NU: Brothers and little
?'Ster; should get their money in to
Gene by Friday for the Homecoming
Bash Sat night.
OflSTIN Q - . - 193 n
P.G County Marylai a . -
bom O' Octotx � l" 1963
P G County. Ma ;so �
special oaby boy va boi 1
kful those events took plac� so I
' - al bal boy 23 ears
Happ. B rthday j P.H.L.
Love ikk
SIGMA NU: Schedule of events for
Homecoming 1986. Thur Party 8
a.m. at Gene's, Fri Party (call
3ene for details), Sat: 930 a.m.
Parade Fioat meet at Rose High
wear letters), 2 p.m. Game, 5 30
dinner at Baiely's Wherehouse, 8
Band starts and goes until Sund.
1:30 Pedges dean up at Baiely's
nace 9:30 Brotherhood!
THEKNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU:
Wishthe best ofluck toECU'S
Fightng PIRATESfor thisyear's
Homecoming game.GO PIRATES!

&b
, -nJ
end Ion
Benetton
638B Arlington Blvd.
Greenvfiie, N:
355-7473
V-
Store Hours
10-6 M-T-W
10-v TH-f
10-6 Sat
�ast Carolina Bmuersitp
jflabrip�
M mneft
3n �Iiabetfjan Cfjnstmas fmt
1�
lysis
DECEMBER 3-6, 1986 7:OO P.M.
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM
TICKETS BY ADVANCE SALES ONLY
CONTACT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
(919) 757-6611, EXT. 266
A STUDENT UNION
PRODUCTIONS COMMITTEE PRESENTATION
BILL: Glad I went to the Sheraton
that Friday night. Get yourself
psyched up for COCKTAIL tomor
row night! You'll be partyng with
the best! Just n't stress, ok?
'Preciate it! O-
AZD'S: The brothers and pledges of
Pi Kappa Phi would like to thank you
for your help on the float. Be ready
to party after it is completed Friday
night!
PI KAPPA PHI: People look to me
and say "is the end near, when is the
final day? What's the future of
mankind?" How do I know, I got left
behind. Everyone goes through
changes, looking to find the truth.
Don't look to me for answers. Don't
ask me I don't know! But I do know
that Homecoming 1986 Saturday
night is going to be the KICK ASS
party of the year! An S.J OZ, and
Roach Ratt production.
PI KAPPA PHI: The brothers and
pledges of Pi Kappa Phi would like
to congratulate Lisa Carrol on being
elected to the 1986 Homecoming
Court: We wish you the best of luck!
AMANDA: Tomorrow's your Birth
day and yes, you can get drunk if you
want to! Get psyched for fall
Cocktail but beware of the Great
Pumpkin Patch! Love, The Freds.
P.S. Work that date!
AMY, DONNA, GEORGANN AND
RENE: Get ready for a party. This
is one to remember if you can! YBS
LIZ WEBB: The Best of Luck to you
on this Homecoming weekend The
Sigmas are behind you all the way!
We are so proud of you!
ZBT: The early bird gets the bubbly
So be at Lauren's at 9 Saturday mor
ning. come out and help support the
Pirates.
CINDY NEWMAN: Happy Birth
day! Get ready to party for Horn
coming. It will be a blast. Love,
Your Roommates.
STEVE MAGNUM: Hope your Mnd
birthday is THE GREATEST! The
East Carolinian Staff!
HEY NOW DEADHEADS For
tomorrow night's show we're on me
bus to Charlotte, N.C. October 5th,
1984 That's at 10 p.m. on 913
WZMB, with your host. Dead Redd
Phillips Don't forget, DEADHEAD
JAM is every Wednesday evening at
the New Deli Don't FEEL LIKE A
STRANGER!
PI KAPPA PHI: Well Kurt, I
haven't forgotten about last
weekend. Jammin to Floyd while the
BH Brothers sat on the bridge I
can't believe I didn't know that my
feet were underwater. Oh Shit! The
cops are after us all. I'll ditch the
booze behind that bus up ahead.
Sorry about the hugger. No sir, we
haven't had too much to drink. Yes
sir, thank you sir. Well, we got lucky
once again. Don't crap before this
weekend, I'd hate to lose our
horseshoe! We'll get the project
dwellers later.
LISA G. AND THE REST OF THE
FAMILY: Lets get drunk and
disorderly! Hicks hopes you can
hang! -Nancy.
MITZIE: Good luck on Saturday.
My fingers are crossed. Don't forget
to watch my feet "MICH"
AMANDA: Your Birthday is too
close! Have a great one! Get psych-
ed to celebrate at cocktail! You're a
terrific little sis! I love ya! YBS
Karen.
AMANDA AND COLETTE: To my
two little sis's, be ready to be
radical!
HAPPY Mth BIRTHDAY ZETA
TAU ALPHAI: Founded Oct 15,
1898!
CINDY NEWMAN AND JOYCE
DANIELS: Happy Birthday! Love
the Zetas
Mrs. SPUD: We love you Get
psyched for tomorrow night. Love,
the Pinkettes of the Pink Room
MARK ARCILESI AND MIKE
BRADLEY: We'll only settle for
underpar! Good luck at Duke! -The
Ghost Crew.
AMANDA J Happy Birthday. Ug
Oh, You're not a teen anymore. You
know what that meand. Get ready
for our big weekend because we're
gonna have a blast. Love, Amy
Your AOTT twin.
GET READY): John Fogerty is
coming! Nov. 1 in Mmges Coliseum.
Watch for ticket sales.
TO ROBB H Happy 23rd Birthday.
I love you! -Kathy.
OH YE OF LITTLE TALENT: 1
"Bond" should've read "bard " 2.
Poems don't read as well wnen you
cram all the lines together 3 We
thought of apohzing for the snotty
tone (not content) of our poem, but
then said, "Hey, we don't gotta
apologize to them .they're
PINKS 4 Look up "meter" and
"syntax Maybe you'll get it this
time. 5. Your poetry still sucks. Anx-
iously awaiting your venomous and
ill considered response, KNIGHTS
SALE
Showdate: Thurs. & Fri.
Time: 8 p.m.
Place: Hendrix
COMPUTER DATING: No lists Of
names distributed or any informa
fion given without your consent We
offer a very personal way for you to
meet new people Introductions
guaranteed or your money back
Student discounts. Katz Services
355 7595
Continued On Page 11
Congratulations KAPPA Sweethearts of
1986
We Love You
The Brothers of Kappa Alpha Psi
WE HAVE COLD KEGS
OF BEER TO GO" ORDER
YOURS TODAY

CO KROCERINC FOR ALL YOUR
Tailgate Party
Needs!
WE HAVE THE LA
SELECTIO OF DELL
PARTY TRAYS IN
GREENVILLE. GIVE US A
CALL TO ORDER YOURS
TODAY
756-7031

HOLLY FARMS CUT UP MIXED
FRYER PARTS OR GRADE A
Whole
Fryers
39
Lb.
LIMIT 3 PKGS
WITH $10 ADD L
PURCHASE
Qt
Ctn
KROGER 2�o LOWFAT
OR HOMOGENIZED
Whole
Milk
69
Ltr.
NRB
DIET PEPSI. MT DEW. SLICE
CAFFEINE FREE PEPSI OR
Pepsi
Cola
99
Shedd's
Spread .
KROGER
GRADE A
Lb
Qlrs
KROGER
2 Lowfat
Milk
ALL VARIETIES
Lunch Meats
ECU
Corsage
$3.99
and up
(4.6 OZ. GEL) OR
REGULAR
Colgate
Toothpaste
Tube
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
items is required to be
readily available for sale in
each Krooer Savon except
as specifically noted in this
ad if we do run out of an
item we will offer you your
choice of a comparable
item when available
reflecting the same sav
ings or a ralncheck which
will entitle you to pur
chase the advertised Item
at the advertised price
within JO days Only one
vendor coupon win be ac
ceoted per Item
���� �i
"nmwmir -� ���"hkjui
mmmm
lassifi
j�ontinued From Page 10
�NEAP TYPING: Reports, etc. Cai
Anne at 752 3015 ano eave
message
4��
f PER HUNDRED PAID F01 j
Ktrflnailing letters from home1 Senol
fttfaddressee stamped enve
f or inform-ationapp; c a
Associates, Box 95 B Rose e s
IT203

SALE : Wedding gown s ;e .
2 formal gowns, s zes J e -
f-M. Call 758 5303 afVr 6 e
: Are you having a par ar:
a D.JFor rhe best n Toc 4
beach and dance call Mo-gar
TSi-7967 Reason ace 'ates
References or request
TOR SALE: is ' true Oil -ar
jeeps for 144 nvougr the U S
BOvernmenr? Get me facts to
Call 1312 742 1142 Ext 5271 A
NEED A TUTOR? Car � �
Spanish, Latin ac 'a ar
Reasonable rates Ca a ex a'
752-7522
SKI BOOTS FOR SALE La
Nordica ski oocts size 7
times, So5 Ca sa af & �v,
Maribetn 752 3774
rOR SALE: A to saxaoone Sa
ignet, S600 anc c ar net by Sa
�aree, $200 Call 758 70�4
fBREE: Are you lonely? Tr,ree
fellas need a home n ttens 7 a-
Old- white with black spe's and ex
h-emely cute Can 752 1590
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Experiencec aua ty word
IBM Selectric Vpew er Ca La
Shiveat 758 5301.
TRIUMPHANT RETURN DJ N?a
booking enterta i npe " '
Christmas parties fa forma Is
socials etc Coact the
TRASHMAN at 752 3587 Top N 1
DJ service
WANTED

WANTED: LIFEGUARD-SWIM IN-
STRUCTORS: Part-time. Mus -a.e
r advanced iifesav.ng cert f ca-
I water safety instructor cer �
I Applicants should oe ava able to
I work 2-4 hour shifts Detween 6a"
� and 9 p.m. 6-12 hours weekly Sa a
�js$3.4o to $3.75 per hour Appcatc
; deadline is Oct 17,1980 Apply at the
City of Greenville Personnel Off ce
vMl W. 5th St Greenv.Me
I
s
T
Escorts and
Room 224
Monday-Frr
Please do no
that is our j
students and
We





STEVE MAGNUM: Hope your 22nd
thday is THE GREATEST! The
East Caroimia" Staff!
HEY
NOW DEADHEADS For
ghfs show were on the
Charlotte N C October 5th,
xaf s at 10 p m on 91 3
I a Mi .our host. Dead Redd
s Do" I forget DEADHEAD
, Aeoesday evening at
Don't PEEL LIKE A
OH YE OF LITTLE TALENT: 1
� . eac Oara 2
i � as wen when you
es together 3 We
� i -c foi he snotty
�� � �� xii poern but
� , we oon't gotta
- g ff they're
s� i . . meter ao
qet it this
� . si sucKs Anx-
. . . .e�o�ous ana
-se KNIGHTS
OF ' - l - - - -� - N S.
SALE
OMPUTER DATING No lists Of
� "forma
3"set We
- way for you to
� iductions
no ev back
� atz Sev ces
n Pajje 11
eethearts of
Alpha Psi
E HAVE THE LA
SILECTK3 OF DELL
PARTY TRAYS IN
GREENVILLE GIVE US A
CALL TO ORDER YOURS
TODAY
'56-7031
i111111111 iiYiiVi
IvXvC" OCw OjuOur
t ' ' � 1 ' � l : I l i I i iii
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T DEW SLICE
PEPSI OR
Pepsi
Cola
itf
.owfat
Gal
Jug
$-59
KROGER
Multigrain
Bread
GOLDEN RIPE
Dole
Bananas
29
Htm sea to dcj
on
Classifieds
Continued From Page 10
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc. Call
Anne at 752-3015 and leave a
message
RIDE NEEDED: To Columbus,
Toledo or Athens, Ohio for fall
break. Call Leslie at 752 8722 and
leave a message.
itf PER HUNDRED PAID: For
remailing letters from home! Send
self addressed, stamped envelope
for informationapplication.
Associates, Box 95-B, Roselle, NJ
07203.
FOR SALE: Wedding gown, size 9-10
and 2 formal gowns, sizes 7-8 and
9 10 Call 758 5303 after 6 p.m.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 3
bedroom duplex. Rent, $125
wdeposit, 13 utilities, cable and
phone. 1308 B Willow St Call
752 2475.
WANTED: Female roommate to
share 3 bedroom apt. at 102 D
Eastbrook VS rent, M utilities. Come
by or call 752 1526.
WANTED: Reeds Jewelers at the
mall needs part-time and full-time
help in office and sales.
TRAVEL FIELD POSITION IM-
MEDIATELY AVAILABLE: Good
commission, valuable work ex
perience. Travel and other benefits.
Call Bill Ryan at 1-800-433-7747 for a
complete information mailer.
HELP WANTED: Local law firm is
seeking Computer Science or Deci-
sion Science maor with good typing
skills for part-time word processing
position. 10-15 hours per week. Call
758-6200 and ask for Mary.
D.J Are you having a party and
need a D.J.? For the best in Top 40,
oeach and dance call Morgan at
758 7967. Reasonable rates.
References on request.
HELP WANTED: Bar maid for
Private Club. Must be 21 yrs. old
Call 758-0058 for interview.
FOR SALE: Is it true you can buy
;eeps for $44 through the U.S.
government? Get the facts today!
Call 1 312 742 1142 Ext. 5271-A
NEED A TUTOR?: Can tutor
Spanish, Latin and Italian.
Reasonable rates. Call Alex at
752 7522
SKI BOOTS FOR SALE: Ladies
Nordica ski boots, size 7, worn 4
times, $65. Call Lisa at 758-4809 or
Maribeth 752-3774.
WANTED: PROGRAM LEADER:
Part-time. Plan and instruct recrea-
tion programs and supervise play
area for preschool a id young school
age children. Applicants should be
available to work 9:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. andor 3:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m
MonFri. and from 12 noon to 4 p.m.
on weekends. Salary is $3.46 per
hour. Application deadline is Oct. 17,
1986. Apply at the City of Greenville
Personnel Office, 201 W. 5th St
Greenville.
FOR SALE: Alto saxaphone, Salmer
Signet, $600 and clarinet by Sa
Paree, $200. Call 758-7064.
FREE: Are you lonely? Three little
'eilas need a home- kittens 7 weeks
old- white with black spots and ex-
tremely cute. Call 752-1590.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER-
VICE: Experienced, quality work,
IBM Selectric typewriter. Call Lanie
Shive at 758 5301.
TRIUMPHANT RETURN DJ: Now
booking entertainment for
Christmas parties, fall formats,
socials etcContact the
TRASHMAN at 752-3587. Top Notch
DJ service.
WANTED
WANTED: LIFEGUARD-SWIM IN-
STRUCTORS: Part-time. Must have
advanced lifesaving certificate or
water safety instructor certificate.
Applicants should be available to
work 2-4 hour shifts between 6 a.m.
and 9 p.m. 6-12 hours weekly. Salary
. is $3.46 to $3.75 per hour. Application
deadline is Oct. 17, 1986. Apply at the
City oi Greenville Personnel Office,
201 W. 5th St Greenville.
RECEPTIONIST WANTED: Greet
members, check identification
cards, answer phones, make reser-
vations, handle monetary transac-
tions, answer members questions
concerning programs, policies, etc.
Applicant must be trustworthy,
dependable, helpfulc efficient and
friendly. Applicant should be
available to work 2-4 hour shifts bet-
ween 6 a.m. and 9 p.m. Salary is
$3.46 to $3.75 per hour. Application
deadline is Oct. 17, 1986. Apply at the
City of Greenville Personnel Office,
201 W. 5th St Greenville.
AEROBICSEXERCISE INSTRUC-
TORS: Leads and instructs
aerobicsexercise clases; must have
basic understanding of exercise
physiology, kinesiology, and
anatomy. Should have working
knowledge of choreographed exer-
cise programs for adults, children,
older adults and pregnant women.
Must be able to design a safe class
and know CPR. Must be in excellent
physical condition, must pass fitness
exam and be willing to go through
aerobic's instructor certification
Drogram Salary is $7 to $10 per
-iour. Application deadline is Oct. 17,
986. Apply at the City of Greenville
Personnel Office, 201 W. 5th St
Jreenville.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Free
security deposit of $150, Kingston
Place Apts central heatair, fully
furnished, includes all kitchen uten-
sils, and use of pool. $150 per month
plus utilities. For info, call Don
Fazio at 757-3218.
TRAVEL FIELD OPPORTUNITY:
Gain valuable marketing experience
while earning money. Campus
representative needed immediately
for spring break trip to Florida. Call
Campus Marketing at 1 800 282-6221
WANTED: An experienced Chris-
tian pianist or organist needed. Call
830 1442 MonWed 8:30-3:30.
HOMEWORKERS WANTED: Top
pay- Work at home- Call Cottage
industries- (405) 360-4062.
3,000 GOVERNMENT JOBS: List.
$16,040- 59,230yr. Now hiring. Call
805-687-6000 Ext. R-1166.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
At Georgetown Apts. 1 or 2 girls to
share 2 bedroom townhousel Great
location, right next to downtown!
Walking distance to campus! New
carpet, big rooms! Call 752-9245.
Terrible Ted:
Sorry About
The Pizza The
Other Evening�
How About A
Six And We'll
Call It Even.
� Pat
PIRATE
WALK
Sunday
Thursday
8-12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 16. 1986
11
AO -
oc,
$

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.

UNSHINE
Video, inc
grzeat posterns
postsr sate
$15 each
iiflMi
Cvut
t
utt� FUfURS
flmpgir

unwpo
BACK TO THE FUTURE S1LKSCREEN)
CLAN OF THE CAVE BEAR
WITNESS CLOCK
DELTA FORCE
QUICKSILVER
ROCKY IV
OUT OF AFRICA
PRIZZI'S HONOR
KISS OF THE SPIDER WOMAN
ROBIN HOOD
TO LIVE AND DIE IN L. A.
MURPHY'S ROMANCE
PRETTY IN PINK
UNDER THE CHERRY MOON
THE BIG CHILL
RETURN TO OZ
PLENTY
NANCY DREW
STOOGEMANIA
STAR TREK
MAD MAX BEYOND THUNDERDOME
YANKEE DOODLE DANDY
TROLL
��
�v
GHGSTBUSTERS
FLETCH
BLACK MOON RISING
THE KILLING FIELDS
MASK
THE BREAKFAST CLUB
JOURNEY OF NATTV GANN
WHITE NIGHTS
LION IN WINTER
TURTLE DIARY
DAWN PATROL
LIFEFORCE
R. A. D.
MASS APPEAL
MAXIE
A CHORUS LINE
SANTA CLAUS THE MOVIE
DANCE WITH A STRANGER
THE GODFATHER (BRANDO;
THE GODFATHER (PACING)
APOCALYPSE NOW
WHITNEY HOUSTON
SWEET DREAMS
THE EMERALD FOREST
MiBJ
B 1 1 1 1 : - f X 1 1
1
GHGSTBUSTERS

214 Arlington Boulevard. Greenville. NC 27834
s
and
BICYCLE
POS
INC
Escorts and Operators needed. Apply in
Room 224 Mendenhall from 2-4 p.m.
Monday-Friday.
Please do not hesitate to call because
that is our job. This service is for the
students and faculty of East Carolina.
We're Here For You!
Are Having A Fall Giveaway
Win a Black Schwinn Beach Cruiser,
jet your entry blanks at WZMB studio
or at Bicycle Post.
Tune in 91.3 for the station that gives
you a "Wheel of a Deal"
Drawing will be held Oct. 31, 1986
�MWMMMMMMI
i �

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�!���!� II I !�






JANUARY 14. J986
Page 12
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By CHRISTISON
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Suci
By SCOTT COOPER
fo-VU fllor
The Lady Pirate basketball
team has been working dilig e
�d prepare for their i98b
season and coach Emily Manwar-
ing has the women working hard
as they officially began practice
yesterday.
The ladies started their condi-
tioning six weeks ago in three d I
ferent segments of the preea
� aerobics, weight lifting a
running.
The Lady Pirates did aerobics.
twice a week, at the Aero- c
Workshop under Janice Dillon.
Coach Manwaring feels the
aerobic workouts helped hei
players in many ways.
"It's a good wa to stretch
after we lifted he said. "I:
ielped us work on endurance.
timing and rythm.
el
o
n
Sports Fact
Thur. Oct. 16, 1912
New York Giants center
fielder Fred Snodgrass muffs
Ian easy fly ball, leading
two-run rally in the tenth inn-
ing the blows the Giants' one-
run lead and gives the Boston
Red Sox a 3-2 victory in the
seventh and deciding came of
1912 World Series.
"q
V4
Kuater gets into the eadzone
.�- ; . . t
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FANl AR 14. 1986 Page 12
M
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By CHRISTISON
THE FAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 16, 1986 Page 13
ECU Homecoming Game
I-AA Champs Visit Ficklen
n� crnTT rnnorn �
Successful Homecoming?
By SCOTT COOPER
( o-Sooru Editor
Georgia Southern, led by
senior quarterback Tracy Ham,
will be in Ficklen Stadium Satur-
day for ECU's Homecoming
game in which the Pirates will try
to snap their 15-game losing
streak.
The 1985 Division 1-AA na-
tional champions are currently
5-1, their only blemish a 38-14
season opening loss to Florida.
They rolled past Bethune
Cookman 52-31 last week.
Despite the Eagles' overwhelming
success, fifth-year head coach
Erk Russell, 39-14-1, still has
concerns about ECU.
"East Carolina is on a plateau
above us and playing at their
place will not enhance our oppor-
tunity to win Russell said
earlier in the year. "We played
them in '84 and we played pretty
well, but not quite good enough
to win
Georgia Southern's high-
powered offense (averaging 42.8
points and 495.6 yards per outing
in their first five games) is
spearheaded by Ham and
therefore called the Hambone I.
Ham, who passed for 2,184 yards
and 15 touchdowns while rushing
for a team-leading 1,131 yards
and 11 scores, personally ac-
counted for 53.8 percent of the
Eagles' total offense last year.
It's no wonder that Ham is prais-
ed as being one of the best QB's
around.
"Tracey Ham could be the best
quarterback in the country said
Auburn head coach Pat Dye.
"Tracy Ham is a great athlete.
He runs and throws so effectively
that he keeps you guessing
N.C. State coach Dick Sheridan
said.
Along with Ham is a pair of
senior runningbacks. A-Back
Ricky Harris, who led the Eagles
in rushing with 825 yards last
year, and fullback Gerald Harris,
who rushed for 494 yards a year
ago both return. Sophomore
Frank Johnson mans the other
A-Back slot.
The Eagles have much depth at
the wide receiver position. Ham's
number-one target is senior Mon-
ty Sharpe, who holds practically
every Georgia Southern receiving
record, and was tabbed by The
Sporting News as a pre-season
All-America. Sharpe is joined
with sophomore Tony Belser.
The offensive line is manned is
headed by senior guard James
Carter, who is expected to com-
pete for post-season honors, a
pair of sophomores, a junior and
a senior.
Defensively, Georgia Southern
runs a split-60. Russell has had to
replace five graduates, including
second-team AP All-America
linebacker Charles Carper, and
has had to fight to succeed on
defense.
"We have had to fight and
scratch for survival on defense
Russell said, "and it looks like we
will have to continue in that vein
in spite of our experience in the
secondary
Seven senior and four juniors
make up the Eagle defense. The
experienced secondary heads the
unit and includes senior corner-
backs Chris Aiken and Nay-
Young as well as safety Brad
Bowen.
Another strong point for the
Eagles is the linebacking corps.
Flint Mathews heads the unit as
juniors Robert Underwood and
David Hodge man the outside
slots. Danny Durham, who
tallied 42 tackles last year, moved
from linebacker to man the rover
spot this season.
Three seniors and a junior man
the front line for Georgia
Southern. Junior Tyrone Hull,
who had 60 tackles last year,
starts at tackle while seniors
Larry Boone and Charlie Walker
have the guard slots. Edward
Eaves returns from a year ago at
the end position.
The Eagle kicking game is
headed by All-America Tim
Foley. Foley connected on 23 of
26 field goals last year as his 92.3
percent average was tops in the
nation, at any level. "We depend
on Foley Russell said. "He is a
big part of the success of our pro-
gram
Pirate Notes:
The Pirates defeated the Eagles
in their first meeting in 1984 by a
34-27 margin. ECU enjoyed a
seemingly comfortable 24-10
halftime lead and was ahead
31-10 before Tracy Ham (then a
sophomore) brought the Eagles
storming back. Russell's Eagles
set an NCAA record for yardage
gained in the loss with 505 yards,
including 403 passing. ECU's
Travis Hunter will start at the QB
position as he threw for 243 yards
last week, the most yardage in the
air since 1970. ECU holds a 20-6
Homecoming record since 1960
and have won 14 in a row before
losing to Miami a year ago.
� ' jusing io .Miami a vear ago.
Lady Pirate Basketball Preparing For 1986
B SCc�CuCi?oPPER "I think the' did like il- For si J�in five newcomers on the new also have olavers who rFLu -sh. .n i �
By SCOTT COOPER
Co-Sports holior
The Lady Pirate basketball
team has been working dilig ently
to prepare for their 1986-87
season and coach Emily Manwar-
ing has the women working hard
as they officially began practice
yesterday.
The ladies started their condi-
tioning six weeks ago in three dif-
ferent segments of the preseason
� aerobics, weight lifting and
running.
The Lady Pirates did aerobics,
twice a week, at the Aerobic
Workshop under Janice Dillon.
Coach Manwaring feels the
aerobic workouts helped her
players in many ways.
"It's a good way to stretch
after we lifted she said. "It
helped us work on endurance,
timing and rythm.
"I think they did like it. For six
weeks, we were thinking of ways
to get the body ready Manwar-
ing added. "The music, too, was
really nice � it takes your mind
off what you're doing
The ladies hit the weights three
times a week, concentrating on
seven different lifts. Manwaring
felt that the Bucs "had some
good results" with the weight
work outs.
The running segment, twice a
week, consisted of runs of a mile,
join five newcomers on the new-
Lady Pirate roster. Along with
Mabry (8.1 ppg last year),
returners Jody Rodriguez and
Pam Williams will supply guard
support along with freshmen
Irish Hamilton and Tammie
Laney.
"We have good depth, but
naturally we are not as experienc-
ed as our '85-85 squad Man-
waring said of her guards. "Our
strength is in our exceptional
quickness. Lightning would run a
also have players who can handle
the ball here
The center spot may be the
strong point for the women as ex-
perience and size return in Alma
Bethea. Bethea is the leading
returning scorer and rebounder
with 10.2 ppg and 6.5 rpg last
season. Sophomore Rose Miller
and junior transfer Val Cooper
should supply added depth to the
middle.
"We will be relying on a strong
front line to make us a CAA con-
tender. Our inside game is the key
to our offensive success Man-
waring said. "We have the size,
height, the speed and definitely
the springs. This season will have
to be one of the purest team ef-
forts
I
Sports Fact
Thur. Oct. 16, 1912
New York Giants center
fielder Fred Snodgrass muffs
an easy fly ball, leading to a
two-run rally in the tenth inn-
ing the blows the Giants' one-
run lead and gives the Boston
Red Sox a 3-2 victory in the
seventh and deciding game of
the 1912 World Series.
"We have good depth, but naturally we are not as
experienced as our '85-86 squad. Our strength is in
our exceptional quicknessThis season will have
to be one of the purest team efforts. "
�Emily Manwaring
Delphine
800 meters, 200 meters and many
short 100-meter dashes. The
tough regiment is required by the
ladies as Manwaring explained.
"You have to love to run to
play basketball she said, "and
you have to love to work to be a
Lady Pirate
Although the ladies lose three
starters from a year ago, senior
guard Delphine Mabry and
junior center Alma Bethea both
return.
A host of seven other returnees
close second to
Mabry
cond to Delphine Mabry
Junior Monique Pompili leads
a host of forwards including
other returnees Cathy Ellis, Chris
O'Conner and newcomers Sarah
Gray and Christi Harris.
Although the forward spot may
be a bit inexperienced, Manwar-
ing feels that this area does have a
talented array of players.
"This area of our game con-
tains our better outside
MUM MUftPMV -TMt 1AST CAftOUNIAM
The Lady Pirate Basketball team is shown above during an aerobic workout earlier this week. The girls are
shooters Manwaring said. "We getting ready for their 1986-87 campaign.
Hunter Named As Starting QB Sat.
Travis Hunter gets into the endzone earlier this season.
BY CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sporti Writer
After suffering an injury his
freshman year, Travis Hunter
looked for better things to hap-
pen in the 1986 football season.
Despite the Pirates' 0-6 season,
the redshirt freshman is Finding
out that things will get better.
Head football coach Art Baker
announced Monday that Hunter
will start as quarterback in this
Saturday's homecoming game
against Georgia Southern.
Baker's decision came after
Hunter's impressive three
touchdown passes in last week's
game against Temple.
"With his performance against
Temple, Travis has earned the
right to be our starting quarter-
back Baker said at Monday's
press conference. "He proved he
could throw the ball in addition
to running the option and he gave
us a spark on offense which was
encouraging to the team
The 5-10, Winter Garden, Fla
native replaces freshman Charlie
Libretto who had won the posi-
tion after close preseason com-
petition with Hunter and veteran
sophomore Berke Holtzclaw.
Hunter watched for oppor-
tunities during the season and
was able to take advantage of
playing time against Penn State,
where he threw one touchdown
pass and ran for another.
This past Saturday, opportuni-
ty knocked again and Hunter
answered with 12 completed
passes for 243 total yards.
According to Coach Baker,
"Travis gives defenses problems
because he's hard to follow and
unpredictable
Hunter knows about unpredic-
table because these last few years
have been just that for him.
During his exceptional j unior
Travis has earned the
right to be our starting
quarterback.M
� Art Baker
Travis Hunter
year at West Orange High school,
Hunter was approached by many
Division-I schools. Yet things
didn't go quite so well his senior
year and the offers came mainly
from Division I-AA teams.
Hunter found his way to ECU
through a turn of events.
While coaching at Florida
State in 1984, Coach Baker's
team played in the Citrus Bowl.
During that week, Hunter's
coach, a friend of Baker's, came
to him and told him about
Hunter, who he believed was an
excellent quarterback with a lot
of potential. Eventually Coach
Baker returned to ECU as head
coach and Hunter was on his first
list of recruits.
However, in Hunter's
freshman year, he suffered a
hand injury and was redshirted.
"I hated being redshirted
remembers Hunter. "It was
disappointing in my First year of
college. Being away from home, I
got homesick and being hurt only
made it harder. I was given a lot
of encouragement by my room-
mate and friends, especially
teammates who had been through
the same thing. They kept telling
me not to give up � I'm glad I
didn't
Hunter's excited about the
chance he's being given. With a
positive outlook, he expressed his
feelings about this week's game.
"We're practicing hard as a
team and we're looking for good
things to happen on Saturday

11
� jw m �





14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 16, 1986
Ruggers Top ASU Saturday
Speciil lo the East Caroiinitn
Saturday ECU traveled to ASU
in search of yet another victory.
There they took Appalachian
State for a brilliant 24-4 victory.
Neither the inclement weather
nor the Apps squad was any
match for the powerful ECU
team. Senior rugger Rick
Musgrove was quoted as saying,
"We battled the elements, rallyed
to the challenge and walked away
victorious
Long time rugger David
Shumaker opened the scoring by
scampering in off an overloaded
wing. ECU continued to
dominate the game and shortly
thereafter senior rugger Mr.
Hand plowed through three
hapless App ruggers for the se-
cond score of the game.
Both kicks were converted and
ECU led at the half 12-0. During
the five minute halftime break
the ECU ruggers replenished
themselves and prepared for
another 40 minutes of hard-
hitting action.
The second half opened much
like the first with ECU controll-
ing both sides of the field. Twen-
ty minutes into the second half,
ECU again overloaded the wing
and after a fine assist from John
Hooter, Phillip Ritchy exploded
on a mind boggling 50-yard
down-hill dash and the team's
third try. Ritchey was later heard
saying, "No one will ever catch
me running down hill The kick
after was again converted and the
score was pushed to 18-0.
ECU, however, was not done
yet. First-year rugger John
"Tiny' Holten was not to be
denied as he took the ball in from
twenty yards for the final score of
the game.
This weekend the ruggers will
again be in action as 10 years of
gray haired, tired bodied ex-ECU
ruggers return for the first annual
Alumni Game at 10:30. More
grog for the men
�David Sgori & Greg Roche
Announcements
BACCHUS
New membership meeting BACCHUS
Boosting Alcohol Consciousness Concerning
the Health of University Students If you are
interested in helping fellow students with
their problems, BACCHUS is a volunteer sty
dent group promoting responsible drinking
decisions Anyone interested m joining BAC
CHUS is invited to our new member meeting
Thurs Oct 73 at a pm m room J4J
Mendenhan, Or call during our oftice nours
11-2 M F at 757 6793 ano ask now to join
GAMMA BETA PHI
There will be a general business meeting
of Gamma Beta Phi on Thurs Oct 16 in
Biology 103 at 7 pm All members are urged
to attena the meeting The executive com
mittee will meet at 6 pm in the same room
STUDENTS FOR AMERICA
An organned meeting will be held today at
5 pm ,n Mendenhall AM interested part,�
are invited to attend ano memberships are
welcome
POLI SCI ASSOC
There will be a meeting of the Political
Science Student Association on Tues, Oct 21
at 5 pm in BC 104 (Brewster All students in-
terested are .nv.ted to attend regardless of
major The guest speaker be State Rep
Gerald Anoerson He will discuss his ac
t'vities as a State Legislator and will accept
quesf'Ons regarding pertinent issues that
come before the legislature
PHI ETA SIGMA
There will be a meeting Oct 21 Tues at 6
pm in Mendenhall 212 Brig n-oney tor
shirts. Can Pam at 752 2570 or Dana or
752 9952 it you have any questons or if you
are unable to attend
ECU CIRCLE K
ECU Circle K Membership training rally
at Statesvilie What a biastl Our club is ex
cited about hosting the Christmas social
Dec 6 Let's get involved! Next meeting Oct
18. Sunday at 7 00 p m Mendenhall New
members welcome!
CO-OP INTERNSHIPS IN
STATE GOVERNMENT
Lea more abou' summer opportunities
n state government m the N C I O and In
st.fude of government programs Lloyd In
man of the State internship Council will
speak to interested students on October 21 at
11 am ,n Raw 202 and at 3 pm ,n Raw' 306
For more information contact Coop m Rawi
313
JOB SEARCH WORKSHOP
Come to a 1 hour program with sample
videotapes put on by the Business Week
Careers Magazine! A free �2 page workbook
will be given away to those in attendance ano
sections include Dressing For Success.
Resume Writing ano New Careers!
Mendenhall 244 1, 3, or 5 pm on Monday Oc
tOber 20
RHOEPSILON
There will be a Rho Epsiion meeting on
Thursday at 4 pm. Rawi 20 Anyone in
terested please attend If you are unable to
atteno please give Jon Adier a can at
75 5337
SED
Upset w.th Apartheid, American involve
ment ,n Central America, ano US Govern
ment l.es? Good So are we Students for
Economic Democracy meets every Sunday
from 7 9 pm In room 238 Mendenhall
GET THAT JOB
A video conference where national experts
will discuss how to ��get that job" will be held
m Jenkins auditorium on October 30 at 7 pm
Local employers w.n also discuss successful
lOb search techniques. AH seniors ano co-op
students are encouraged to attena For more
information contact Cooperative Education
m 313 Rawi
MUMS FOR HOMECOMING
Sold by Fletcher House Council for 13
each. For more information see Fletcher's
dorm director C'mon guys! Get your date a
mum for the game.
WORK-STUDY
The Office of Student Financial Aid wishes
to remind all studemts who have received
their College Work-Study (CWS) awards but
have not obtained their Hiring Authorisation
F arm (CWS-2) to do so These forms may be
secured at the financial aid office There are
still numerous CWS lobs available to eligible
CWS students Eligible CWS students are
those who have been offered CWS as a part of
their financial aid package Students who
have applied but rave not been notified of
their award should be aware that the firujn
oal aid office is continuing to process ap
plications and make awards to eligible
students The Office of Student Financial Aid
hours of operation are as follows Mon. Wed.
& Fn 15 pm, Tues t Thurs 8 12 am
ECU VETERANS CLUB
Tail Gate Party The ECU Veterans Club
is having a tailgate party before the
Homecoming Game this Saturday from 11
am i p m near me Elmhurst Elementary
School playground (across from Ficklm)
Look for me "stars and stripes " Bring your
friends and refreshments, ano be prepared
to psycheup and party downi Also, bring a
football or frisbee No mafter what the out
come of the game we are going to party 11
VOICE YOUR OPINION
Are you interested about the N C Student
Legislature? You've read about us m the
East Carolinian now come to a meeting
Every Monday at 7 pm in Mendenhall room
212. Freshmen welcome, no requirements.
Just come to the meetings (bring a f rieno or
two!) Any questions call Gordon at 756-632!
NCSL, the campus voice, your voicel
PRIME TIME
Prime Time sponsored by Campus
Crusade for Christ We get together every
Thurs at 7 30 pm m Brewster, room 102 B
Three reasons to have fun, fellowship, and
good Bible teaching. See you there.
ATTENTION BLACK
GRADUATE STUDENTS
There will be an informational meeting
Sun , Oct 19 at 7 9 pm ,n Mendenhall Room
248 If you cannot attend please call Dwight
752 9267 or Adrienne 752 2670 �
"A deeply romantic. andsexy love story.
99
-Peter Traters. PEOP1H MAGAZINE
She Ls tfe most mysterious, independent,
be&itiiul, angry person he has ever met.
He is the first man who has ever
gotten close enough to feel
the heat of her angerand her love
WILLIAM HURT
MARLKE MATLIN
pmvioiyr pim rf,s presents a btrt si carman production
ARIMIAHACVESFILVI CHILDREN Of A LESSER (XX) PIPER LACRIE- PHILIP BOSCO
Screenplay bv HESPER ANDERSON and .MARK MEDOFF Based on the Stage Pkv bv MRK MEDOFF
Produced bv BlTtT SI CARMAN and PATRICK PALMER Directed bv RANDA HAINES
APmMCOTHCTURE
ODfYBCHT � nm BIT MMMM nnWES Ct� fOfUTWH U BOfTJ I
IMMI
�TaM
M
COMING SOON TO A THEATRE NEAR YOU.
Rappin :
You need to have that
speedy recovery, Cuz.
COMPLETE SKI
HEADQUARTERS
Along with our incredible selerlion of the
finest alpine equipment and ski fashion wear,
we have the finest staff of ski sales profes
sionals Serving you in every way we
can is the reason we're here
SKI'S 20-50 OFF
BOOTS 20-70 OFF
SKI APPAREL 2040 OFF
CB JACKETS 20 OFF
CORDON'S
Golf and Ski Shop
2S4 By-Paaa
���� � o�ii 1 rv .d i
756-1003
1 IS ALCOHOL MAKING A MONKEY
OUT OF YOU?
If you always need alcohol in order lo have a sw.nging time, you may have a
problem.
Bothered by baboon breath?
Jungle drums pounding in your head?
Friends beginning to wish you'd quit hanging arouncP
Then remember: Alcohol abuse is the number one drug problem in our society, and
it s definitely nothing to monkey around with. Even if your family tree is full of
careless drinkers - you don't have to be a chimp off the old block In other
words
Don't Go Bananas . . .
Be Smart. Be Responsible.
If You Drink � Drink Moderately.
For information, brochures, or simply to speak to someone about your or a friend nmhlam
MenlnhaU V � 6:0� � October 23 ,n "room 242
BACCHUS - Boosting Alcohol Awareness Concerning the Health of University Students
Support Alcohol Awareness Week Oct. 20-24
HAPPY
HOMECOMING
Serving West Greenville
and ECU Campus
� 1201 Charles Blvd
758-6660
HOURS
11AM
11AM
1AM
?AM
Sun - Thurs
Fn&Sat
Limited Delivery Areas
Drivers carry less than S?0 00
Serving East Greenville
� Rivergate Shopping Center
752-6996
ftA'
Homecoming
Special
$9.99
i
I
Get a large 16" pizza
with any two toppings
of your choice and four !
cans of Coke'for only
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One coupon per pizza f
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'986 CV�nos Pa inr
I

Intramura
Bowling:
Intramural bowling is in its last
week of regular season pla
I Playoffs are scheduled to begin
on Oct. 20. There are severai
teams which are still undefeatec
such as: Phi Kappa Tau A'
J(4-0), Sigma Phi Epailon A
1(3-0), and Dominating Force
(4-0)fl. We would like to wish all
jthe teams luck in their quest for
the title as All Campus Cham-
fpions.
Co-Rec Softball
Co-Rec Softball teams are
geared up and ready to enter the
playoffs. Three undefeated
iteams, Dodge City Hustlers, The
.Naturals, and Fried City Gang,
will try to maintain their winning
streaks and capture the Cham-
Jpionship. Good luck to all teams
Ppartiapatmg.
Flag Football:
Flag Football is concluding It
I final week of play and the d
sional competition is coming to a
Ipeak. Who will be this years
champion, only this weeks
Iplayoffs will tell. Going into the
playoffs with the advantage are
Upcoming
The Cross Campus Fun Run
will be the Saturday of
I Homecoming weekend Oct' 18 at
8:45 am. Registration will be
from 8-8:30 am. You will have
I the option of running either a 2
I mile or a 4 mile course. Grab
iyour sneakers and come enjoy a
I beautiful October morning.
Co-Rec CagebaU
I What is Co-Rec Cageball? It is an
I action filled co-rec sport which is
"played with an oversized ball.
Registration will be held Mon
Oct. 20, in Memorial Gym room
105-C from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Gather your friends and come get
involved for the fun of it.
Co-Rec Flag Football:
As regular flag football
: seasons come to an end, many
: players just can't lose that foot-
5 ball fever. Never fear, the Dep-
tartment of Intramural Recrea-
�tional Services understands your
needs and are proud to announce
the start of another fun-filled
Sseason of Co-Rec Flag Football.
� Registration will be conducted
Oct. 20, in Memorial Gym room
105-C from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Coming back this year to defend
Stheir title will be the Third Regi-
! lent.
WANTED: Attention all
soccer enthusiasts! Have we got a
perfect opportunity for you, the
:hance to earn some money and
lave some fun. The Department
f Intramural Recreational Ser-
vices will be holding a soccer of-
ficial clinic on Mon Oct. 20 at
pm. i
The �CU Karate Club spon-
lored by the Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services
ifill hold its annual demonstra-
tionregistration meeting on
hurs Oct. 16 starting at 7:30
in room 108110 Memorial
iym. The club is open to all
tudents, faculty and staff and
welcomes all styles of karate as
rell as belts.
I
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Intramurals & Recreation
Intramural Highlights:
Bowling:
Intramural bowling is in its last
week of regular season play.
Playoffs are scheduled to begin
n Oct. 20. There are several
teams which are still undefeated
such as: Phi Kappa Tau A'
4-0), Sigma Phi Epsilon 'A
(3-0), and Dominating Force
4-0)fl. We would like to wish all
the teams luck in their quest for
the title as All Campus Cham-
pions.
Co-Rec Softball
Co-Rec Softball teams are
geared up and ready to enter the
plaoffs. Three undefeated
teams, Dodge City Hustlers, The
Naturals, and Fried City Gang,
try to maintain their winning
-eaks and capture the Cham-
vnship. Good luck to all teams
ticipating.
Flag Football:
Hag Football is concluding its
a. ueek of play and the divi-
taJ competition is coming to a
tk. Who will be this years
:npion, only this weeks
yoffs will tell. Going into the
ifoffs with the advantage are
this weeks top five teams for both
the men and women. For the men
we have the Lake Boys, Shake
Masters, Phi Kappa Alpha,
Alpha Sigma Phi, Scott Voodoo ,
and on the women's side we have
the Enforcers, Alpha Phi, Greene
Rebels, P.K. Spasms, and While
Gurnby's . Come out and see
these teams competing for top
honors, it should be an in-
teresting week to say the least!
SOCCER Are you longing for
the fun of a good romp in the
grass? Soccer registration may be
over, but if you are an individual
who is interested in playing on a
team there may be a team looking
for you. Play does not begin until
Oct. 29 so contact the Intramural
Recreational Office at 757-6387
and find out more on how you
can become involved.
FLASH BULLETIN
All Informal Recreation facilities
will be closed on Saturday, Oc-
tober 18 due to Homecoming ac-
tivities. They will resume regular
operational hours after the
weekend.
Upcoming Events:
The Cross Campus Fun Run
will be the Saturday of
Homecoming weekend Oct. 18 at
45 am. Registration will be
from 8-8:30 am. You will have
the option of running either a 2
�: or a 4 mile course. Grab
ar sneakers and come enjoy a
beautiful October morning.
Co-Rec Cagebail
fc hat is Co-Rec Cagebail? It is an
n tilled co-rec sport which is
ed with an oversized ball.
Regiration will be held Mon
20, in Memorial Gym room
105-C from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
er our friends and come get
;cd for the fun oi it.
Co-Rec Flag Football:
As teguar Hag football
seasons come to an end, many
pavers just can't lose mat foot-
ball fever. Never fear, the Dep-
artment of Intramural Recrea-
lonal Services understands your
: eeds and are proud to announce
the start of another fun-filled
-eason of Co-Rec Flag Football.
Registration will be conducted
Oct. 20, in Memorial Gym room
105-C from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
ming back this year to defend
heir title will be the Third Regi-
ment.
Co-Rec Basketball:
All you "hoop nuts let's play
ball! This activity is sure to be
another one of those fun-filled
activities sponsored by In-
tramurals. The teams will be
comprised of five members (three
female, two male). All women's
points will count for three and
men's points will count for two.
Get your friends together and
register on Oct. 20 in Memorial
Gym, room 105-C between 11
a.m. and 7 p.m. A teams captain
meeting will be held on Oct. 21 in
Biology N-102 at 6:30 p.m. The
tournament will start on Oct. 29
and last approximately three
days. Don't spectate, Participate!
Challenge Day
Challenge Day is an opportunity
for you to challenge any students
to a game of your choosing. Of-
ficials, equipment and super-
visors will be provided for your
game. Challenge Day will be held
Thurs Oct. 23 from 4 p.m. to 9
p.m. Reservations will be taken
in Memorial Gymnasium, room
104-A through Tues Oct. 21 at
12 noon. Join your friends,
choose an activity and come out
and participate.
WANTED: Attention all you
soccer enthusiasts! Have we got a
perfect opportunity for you, the
chance to earn some money and
ave some fun. The Department
of Intramural Recreational Ser-
v ices will be holding a soccer of-
ficials clinic on Mon Oct. 20 at
9 pm. mmmmmmm
The ECU Karate Club spon-
sored by the Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services
will hold its annual demonstra-
tionregistration meeting on
Thurs Oct. 16 starting at 7:30
pm in room 108110 Memorial
Gym. The club is open to all
students, faculty and staff and
welcomes all styles of karate as
well as belts.
Take The
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IRS Outdoor Recreation:
In The
Near Future:
In the near future:
Racquetball:
Are you looking for excitement
in a fast paced game? If you are,
look no further because on Mon
Nov. 3 you will have the oppor-
tunity to register for the quickest
moving game on the courts to-
day, Racquetball. Yes, the Dept.
of Intramural Recreational Ser-
vices is holding a racquetball
tournament for all enthusiasts.
Play will begin with a round
robin tournament with each
league winner advancing to a
single elimination tournament.
Each match will consist of a two
out of three game set to 21
points. There will be 4 divisions,
a men's open and intermediate
and a women's open and in-
termediate. Tournament par-
ticipants may call between 9:30
a.m. and 11 a.m. to reserve
courts at the Equipment Room,
Memorial Gym 115.
Turkey Trot
What is a turkey trot you may
ask? Well, it is an annual two
mile run which the division of in-
tramural sports host each year.
The event is for teams comprised
of four people, each of whom
will run the two mile course. The
four times will be totaled together
and the team with the lowest
score uins. Registration for this
"trot" will be held Mon Nov.
10. Be watching this space for
further information closer to race
time.
Deep Sea Fishing
The Outdoor Recreation
Department is offering a
challenge to all those interested in
the open sea. A deep sea fishing
trip has been planned for Nov. 2,
40 to 60 miles off the coast of
North Carolina. You will have
the chance to catch red snapper,
grouper, silver snapper and more
on the Carolina Princess. The
Carolina Princess is a brand new
90'x24' Aluminum craft com-
plete with inside seating for 65
and snackfood bar. Registration
will run from Oct. 1-24 with a
registration fee of $55 per person.
This fee will include transporta-
tion down and back, the boat
charter, fishing equipment and
supplies.
Wilderness Exploration
by The Outdoor Recreation
Center
On Fri Oct. 10, eight
wilderness adventurists left the
ECU campus in a downpoui
rain in search of bright kies
and clearer weather at the
Uwhanie National Fores I
mission was to explore the
outdoors or at leas' the
rain in this
Carolina. These en-
thusiasts included Heather Bar-
field, Kristen Halberg, Metallic
Lewis, Karen Salter. Michelle
Hameria, Teresa Scanner, Mil
chell Patrick, Michael c irey,
Jeff Shariklin. and Paul Meyers
By early Fridaj i i
plorers were sitting
fire and exchangii g
grizzly bears, snal
food they had to ea
half of the trip qu �
out and hit the sack
males to spin �� an md
dishes.
Saturday m
chilly air, damp �
otherwise warm
up enjoyed a hearty breakfst
of oatmeal, pecan twirls, hot
eolate and a sense of what
vsas to come. They they hit the
trail at about 9:30 am.
A brisk pace and the cool
weather kept them going until
lunch time which was held
around a quiet little open space
ear a picturesque creek and
bridge. lunch consisted of turkey
Iwiches, fruit, pudding and
CiORP good ole raisins and
peanuts. After only another hour
and a half of packing, the group
made camp. Supper consisted of
sandwiches, macaroni and
cheese, fruit, pudding and a
warm campfire.
The trip back to Greenville
proved adventuresome as well,
with the van breaking down near
Lillington, N.C. But never-the-
less, fun was had by all. Maybe
next time you can join in on the
fun and adventure.
Swim Meet Champions
Pictured above are the winners of the Intramural-Recreational Services wim Meet earlier. The women's
team winner was The Enforcers (left) uhile lambda XI tlph i right) as the men's champions.
OVERTON&
Sifemc
21 1 JHVlS STSf ET
- ME 3F GREENVH.LES KST MEATS
j�ANTlTt HiGmTS BESEH.E0
Try Our New Hot Bar!
Choose from 2 meat entrees
plus vegetables & bread.
Cooked fresh in our kitchen daily!
And don't forget our Soup & Salad Bar!
Open 11 a.m7 p.m Monday - Saturday
Hot Bar - Salad Bar 99
Your Choice per lb.
Fab Detergent uu j
giant 42 oz. box each
Limit one with $10.00 or
more food order
excluding advertised
items,
con
Paper Towels 3$ 1.1 9
giant roll
21 1 Jarvis Street (2 b - from ECU)
"Home of Greer � Meats"
H e an 7 day s a week,
Monday through Saturday
Sunc 776 p.m.
Prices Effective Wednesday October 15th
through Saturday, October 18th
Red Seeded
Emperor Grapes
49ib
Coca Cola R Canada Dry
Mello Yello (gjk Ginger Ale
Dr. Pepper f-gsj
Sprite ji 89 each
(Diet Coke
2 liter bottle
Limit six of your choice.
Additional drinks: $1.09
Dawn Dish Detergent
(35 off label) OQ
22 oz. bottle yy
Gallo Rose, Burgundy,
or Chablis Wine � qa
1.5 Liter Bottle �yy
7 ox.
box
Creamettes
Elbow Macaroni,
Vermicelli, mm -
or Spaghetti 4$ 1.00
Kraft Cheese Food
American Singles
12 ox. package
$1.49
RICHFOOD WHOLE
Milk
12 gallon
pop�f carton
99
SEALTEST CHILLED
Orange Juice
each
"ENDER FRESH
.Broccoli
fe
bunc
69
&
&

A
fc
�w
OVERTONS
Supem
Inc
Y �
� . � $j , j � . �
f






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A Valvoline
Mini Race Car
Motor Oil Is Not Just Motoi Oil.
r To
WIN!
FREE PRIZES
Drawings Held Daily
nfe
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WIN a1,000
Shopping Spree
GREENVILLE
Drawing Nov. 1, 1986
Revco
Red Banks Rd
H.r. W. Are: Loeotl at IIS Red lark. �d
Soutti Port. Shopping Center nert to Pood Uo�
PHONE. 756-9899
Valvoline
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mill-ah w"
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the Standard
the Standard
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leets or Exceeds Ne
Car Spec ' cat �

Valvoline 10W30
Or 10W40
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Alter Rebate
E icri Quart
37
Each
Quart
Havoline 10W30
Or 10W40
Motor Oil
Sale Price
Non-Resistor
Mfg Rebate
v
Sale Price
Resistor
Mfg Rebate
Your
Final Cost
Your
Final Cost
� "�
Autolite Spark w
Plugs um,t,� P
LIMIT �
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1 A
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Pennzoil 10W30
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Non-Resistor .� Resistor
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MotorcranV
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LIMIT 16
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HOURS: Monday-Saturday, 8 a.mg p.m. Sunday, 1 pm6 p.m
SOUTH PARK SHOPPING CENTER
115 Red Banks Road
PHONE: 756-9899
Advance
M
I





Title
The East Carolinian, October 16, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 16, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.501
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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