The East Carolinian, October 14, 1986






�he
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.61 No. 13
Tuesday, October 14. 1986
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Alumni Honored
Awards Given Saturday
Registration Begins
J 8 HUMBERT � ECU PHOTO LAB
Although it seems like we just finished drop-add, pre-registration begins Nov. 10. The East Caroli-
nian will publish the schedules Oct. 23.
Legislature Decides Against
Funding Art Gallery's Movie
By DAWN STEWARD
Slaff Writer
A film planned for Gray Art
Gallery depicting sexual assualts
upon women was the topic for
debate at the SGA meeting Mon-
day night.
The film wjv scheduled to be
shown Nov. 7 through Dec. 6 in
conjunction with Sexual Assualt
Awareness Week.
"1 fee! that the film will be very-
blatant, explicit commented
John Simon, a SGA member.
"We were informed that
counselors would be available
after the film was shown for peo-
ple who needed counseling. I
don't think that this is ap-
propriate for students' funds to
be used for
"1 really feel this(the film)
motivates young women of what
is going on contradicted Cor-
alie Patterson. "It doesn't matter
how main times vou are told
what can happen. Until you see
it. it doesn't sink in or hit home
Local high school students
were to be brought in to view the
film as well as ECU students so
that the community could be
reached and informed.
"This is not going to put us in
good favor with the community if
the kids go home upset added
Simon.
Other issues concerning the
film included the lack of actual
student involvement while the ex-
hibit was at the gallery, the fact
that funds had been approved for
Sexual Assault Week, and the
nature of the subject. The
legislature was reminded that ap-
propriations were made last year
for visaual art forms to the
gallery.
In a 22-20 vote, the bill was not
approved.
Other bills that passed included
an ammended constitution for
the Minority Student Organiza-
tion, a constitution for East
Carolina University Campus Girl
Scouts of America Organization,
a constitution for Students of
America Organization and a
transfer of funds for Sigma Gam-
ma Epsilon Fraternity.
The Appropriations Commit-
tee reported that the budget for
MSO would be $115 instead of
the original $4300 the group re-
quested.
Five day representative and
one dorm representative posi-
tions were approved at the
meeting.
Steve Cunanan, SGA presi-
dent, informed the body that Ex-
ecutive Cabinet positions had not
yet been filled and anyone in-
terested who is not a member of
the legislature should stop by
room 228 Mendenhall for an ap-
plication.
By CAROLYN DR1SCOLL
Assistant ews Editor
An executive for the television
show "Seseme Street" and a
retired chemistry professor will
be honored by the East Carolina
University Alumni Association as
recipients of the 1986 Outstan-
ding Alumni Awards.
Receiving the awards on Satur-
day will be Valeria Lovelace of
Teaneck, N.J and C. Ray
Pruette of Franklinton. Reci-
pients are selected each year by
the association's board of direc-
tors based on nominations from
alumni.
Lovelace is director of research
for Sesame Street, an educational
television program for children.
The program is produced by the
Children's Television Workshop
in New York City, N.Y.
Sesame Street' is undoubted-
ly the most successful educational
program for children, and most
of it is due to the careful planning
and research which Dr. Lovelace
is responsible for wrote ECU
psychology professor Rosina C.
Chia in a letter nominating
Lovelace for the award.
Lovelace received a BA in
psychology from ECU in 1973. A
university marshal and a member
of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority,
she was listed in "Who's Who in
American Colleges and Univer-
sities and served as a minority
student counselor.
"She has been a loyal alumna,
exemplified by her coming to
speak to our students at a most
nominal honorarium ($200),
which wasn't even enough to
cover her travel expenses Chia
said.
"Dr. Lovelace is an articulate
and vivacious person whose en-
thusiasm for her work and for
her education at ECU is infec-
tious said Marsha Ironsmith,
an ECU psychology professor.
"She is an excellent role model
for our students and makes our
faculty feel proud to have pro-
duced such a student
Lovelace received her master's
in psychology in 1977 and her
Ph.D in 1980 from the University
of Michigan. Prior to her current
position she held a postdoctoral
fellowship at the University of
Kansas Center for Research on
the Influences of Television on
Children.
She has been a program resear-
cher for KTWU-TV in Topeka,
Kansas, dissertation researcher at
the University of Michigan, and
research associate at the Universi-
ty of Michigan for the Institute
for Social Research, the Project
for Fair Administration of Stu-
dent Discipline and the Universi-
ty Day Care Project.
C. Ray Pruette, a 1939 ECU
graduate, retired in 1985 after 36
years of teaching chemistry and
physics at Louisburg College.
"Dr. Pruette is a distinguished
alumnus who has exemplified the
purposes and objectives of East
Carolina University through his
dedicated years of teaching
said Judith B. Parrish, Louisburg
College librarian. "He was truly
a dedicated teacher who set high
standards for his students
J. Allen Norris Jr president
of Louisburg College, made these
comments at the time of Pruette's
retirement. "You have been
centerstage in faculty leadership
for 35 years, and countless
students and colleagues are the
better by your influenceYou
have earned the respect of all who
in any way have been associated
with Louisburg College, bringing
to your work a commitment to
excellence that continues to
nourish a strong educational pro-
gram
While an undergraduate at
East Carolina, the history and
science major served as editor of
the student newspaper, The Teco
Echo. Later he returned to Last
Carolina and received a master's
degree in science education in
1950.
Pruette also completed
graduate courses at Wake Fore '
University and the University ol
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In
1980 he received the doctor of
arts in education from the
Universitv of Central Arizona.
"The sincere interest and con-
cern that Dr Pruette possesses
for his fellow man is portraed
through his ettecme involvement
with his church, professional and
civic activities Parrish said.
He is a past president of the
North t arolina Institute ol
Chemists and is a member oi the
American Chemical Society. In
1969 he was elected a fellow in
the American Institute of
Chemists.
His awards are main�in
February he was named Citizen
of the Year b the I ouisburg-
Franklin Count) Chamber ol
Commerce. He received the
Distinguished Service Award
trom Louisburg College at his
retirement and m 1983 was
recognized by then-Governor Jim
Hunt with a Human Service
Volunteer Award.
Earlier this year Governor Jim
Martin recognized Pruette's
volunteer service with a Cer-
tificate of Appreciation. In
September. Pruette was keynote
speaker at the ECU Alumni
Association's annual leadership
Conference.
Both will be recognized at the
association's annual awards lun-
cheon on Minges Coliseum and
during haittime ot the homecom-
ing football game.
Tickets to the 11:45 a.m. lun-
cheon are $8 per person; reserva-
tions are necessary and will be ac-
cepted through Thursdav, Oct.
16.
Summit Comes To End
Alcohol Awareness
ECU News Bureau
Alcohol Awareness Week will
be observed Oct. 19-23 at East
Carolina University.
The week coincides with Na-
tional Collegiate Alcohol
Awareness Week, a nationwide
effort to make students aware of
the problems associated with
alcohol misuse and abuse. Ac-
tivities on campus will include
lectures, films, a concert and an
alcohol information fair. These
programs will be open to the
public.
"Alcohol Awareness Week is
intended to emphasize prevention
through education as a means of
helping to solve problems
associated with alcohol misuse
and abuse Dr. John M.
Howell, ECU Chancellor, said in
a statement.
The program will promote
responsible decision making
regarding alcohol. It will also em-
phasize, Howell said, "that it is
ultimately an individual's respon-
sibility to make those decisions
Directing activities for the
week will be Dr. Ron Speier,
associate dean and director of
student services. The activities
are:
�Sunday, Oct. 19, a concert at 2
p.m on the mall or in Hendrix
Theatre, by "The Awareness Art
Ensemble
�Monday at 6 p.m. in the lobby
of Tyler Dorm, an information
session on responsible drinking
by BACCHUS (Boost Alcohol
Consciousness Concerning the
Health of University Students.)
�Tuesday, 4-8 p.m an Alcohol
Information Fair in the lobby of
Tyler and a 6 p.m. BACCHUS
workshop and movie "Choices"
in room 242 of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
�Wednesday, Oct. 22, at 6 p.m. a
BACCHUS Information Session
in the lobby of Slay Dorm. At 7
p.m. Mac McCarley, Greenville
City Attorney, will discuss
"Alcohol and the Law" in the
basement of Jones Dorm.
�Thursday, Oct. 23, at 6 p.m. in
room 242 Mendenhall Student
Center, a BACCHUS Member-
ship Meeting.
Speier said the programs will
be open to the public and will be
aimed at'promoting prevention
through education and through
helping individuals make respon-
sible decisions about alcohol use.
"We must begin to realize that
only a personal commitment to
making responsible decisions
regarding alcohol will make an
impact on the problems
associated with its misuse and
abuse Speier said.
For more information contact
Dr. Speier at 757-6824.
WASHINGTON � (UPI)Before
the Iceland Summit, President
Reagan did not have to explain to
anyone the agenda he was bring-
ing to Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev. Now he has to explain it
to the American people.
Reagan said he offered a
10-year delay in development of
SDI in exchange for the elimina-
tion of ballistic missiles, but Gor-
bachev countered that SDI would
have to be restricted to
laboratory research.
Gorbachev held a news brief-
ing shortly after the Shultz an-
nouncement, speaking at length
about world peace and intern?
tional relations but giving uo
details on the summit.
"The debates were very
pointed and I'm still very much
under the impression of those
debates he said, looking stone-
faced. He added that arms talks
in Geneva are now at a virtual
standstill.
"The road that we have travel-
ed to major accords on reduction
of nuclear arms has given us
substantial gains here in Reyk-
javic Gorbachev said. "We
have reached agreement on a
great deal of things. I feel that
President Reagan would have to
seek advice of Congress, of
American political leaders of the
American public. We are waiting.
We have not withdrawn the pro-
posals we put forward
The abrupt end to the summit
was clearly a disappointment to
both sides. Expectations of a
breakthrough in arms control
was heightened by the unexpected
scheduling of a fourth Reagan-
Gorbachev meeting Sunday after-
noon.
Both Soviet and U.S.
spokesmen hinted that progress
was possible, but that all broke
down over what Reagan and
Secretary of State George Shultz
said was a Soviet refusal to per-
mit more than laboratory testing
of "Star Wars" weapons.
Nonetheless, Reagan said there
were great strides made in his
meeting with the Soviet leader.
"We made more progress than
we anticipated when we came to
Iceland the president said.
"We moved toward agreement
on vastly reduced numbers of in-
termediate range nuclear missiles
in both Europe and Asia. We ap-
proached agreement on sharplv
reduced strategic arsenals for
both our countries. We made
progress in the area of nuclear
testing. But there remained at the
end of our talks, one area of
disagreement" - "Star Wars
"The Soviet Union's objective
was to kill off the SDI program
Secretary of State George Shultz
said in an unusually candid brief-
ing with reporters after the final
meeting. "The president simply
had to refuse to compromise the
security of the United States, our
allies and our freedom. So in the
end we are deeply disappointed at
this outcome
The two leaders also failed to
set a date for a third Reagan-
Gorbachev summit in the United
States. "1 don't see any prospect
of it (a summit) Shultz said,
but he would not rule out the
possibility of such a meeting.
It appeared that the leaders
were making progress when they
suddenly extended their Icelandic
summit to add a fourth meeting,
which ended about 3 p.m. EDT.
In advance of the summit,
Gorbachev had pressed the
United States for action on bann-
ing nuclear tests and making
significant cuts in strategic
arsenals as a step to the total
elimination of atomic weapons.
U.S. officials had emphasized
the search for a "framework" to
reduce medium-range missiles in
Europe and rejected a total test
ban.
Weird Ideas -��-��-�-
Our photographer gets weird ideas sometimes. What is this supposed to be?
ON THE INSIDE
Editorials4
STYLE 9 A look at the literture of horror
9mm �ilf � see STYLE page 9.
Classifieds11 -pliiier schocks Pirates in Satur-
Anaoancements12 d�y's i�me � "� Sports page 12.
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JHEjAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 14, 1986
By MARY ELESHA-ADAMS
student Health Osier
Flu, or influenza, is a group of
viruses that attack the respiratory
tract. Most infections occur dur-
ing winter when humidity is low
so that mucous membrances are
left dried out and easily
penetrated. One person can have
repeated cases of the flu because
there are so many different flu
viruses already and new strains
being created naturally through
genetic mutation. After exposure
to one strain of flu virus the per-
son becomes immune to that par-
ticular strain but is still suscepti-
ble to other strains.
Prevention can take several
forms. Since the flu virus is a
respiratory "bug it is spread by
sneezing or coughing. The sneeze
or cough contains microscopic
moisture droplets of virus. The
droplets then are inhaled by un-
suspecting victims. Therefore,
simply avoiding other students
with flu-like symptoms will help.
Also, try to avoid stress because
resistance to flu is due to the in-
tegrity of the immunological
system. Eat and rest properly.
Avoid fatigue.
Fever, cough, core throat,
headache, muscle aches, and
fatigue are some of the symptoms
that let everyone know a "bug"
is going around. Having these
means you may already have the
flu; the only treatment is symp-
tomatic. Avoid exertion for 24 -
48 hours after the temperature
has returned to normal. Aspirin
or Tylenol helps for muscle aches
and headaches. Salt water gargles
are useful for sore throat. Steam
inhalation, from a vaporizer,
prevents mucous secretions from
drying out. Decongestants can be
helpful for sinus symptoms.
Usually, complete recovery oc-
curs in uncomplicated cases.
However, complications can
result; the most common are
secondary bacterial infections.
These are suggested by per-
sistance of fever and cough for
more than five days. Consult a
doctor then because antibiotics
are needed to cure this infection.
Visit the Student Health Center
"Cold Clinic" between the lobby
and the pharmacy if you have
questions concerning your sore
throat or cold symptoms.
Become a Part of
ECU!
Mail-order Diplomas Available
CINCINNATI, OH
CPS)�Last year, it cost nearly
51800 for U.S. Congressman
Claude Pepper, D-Fl to get
mail-order doctorate.
If he'd only waited a few mon-
ths, Pepper� who was trying to
dramatize the prevalence of
"diploma mills" for a fee�could
have become a doctor of Aztec
Cuisine or Yodeling for just $13,
says Christopher Wigert, the
"Dean of Deans" at Fergle
University in Cincinnati.
"I got up early one morning
and started thinking of strange
universities and the catalogue
business Wigert explains.
"There's a gap in between the
Harvard University catalogue
and Spiegel's
One need only send Wigert $13
for an official Fergle U. t-shirt
and a diploma�thus saving
thousands of dollars in tuition
and hundreds of hours of study
time at a regular college.
"We're talking about
$100,000�just for a B.A. �at
some of the finger institutions
he says. "Here at Fergle. you can
skip all that and go right for vour
Ph.D
As for the low, low cost of an
education, Wigert says it can't be
beat.
"We're definitely in a class by
ourselves. Even Harvard can't
compete he notes. "Take Ben-
nington (College), which costs
about $15,000 an hour. For what
students spend for a few days
there (for a bachelor's degree),
they can come here and get their
Ph.D.
By sending their kids to Fergle,
he adds, parents "can save
enough money to buy that new
house or that new car
However, the campus is small,
Wigert says�about the size of a
five by seven inch post office
box�so don't expect a huge
dorm room.
In the month or so that the
"school" has existed, Wigert
reports nearly 25 alumni associa-
tion members, but says he hopes
to increase the number.
"By 1990, we hope the associa-
tion will get as big as the combin-
ed populations of North Dakota,
Wyoming and Alabama Wigert
continues.
Fergle's motto�Disce Aut
Morere (Learn or Die)�makes
Wigert cringe a little, but "where
else can you get a great education
and a shirt besides he asks.
Although the idea behind
Fergle U. is strictly for laughs,
consumers have in the past been
taken in by mail-order diploma
mills, says David Smith, director
of the Society for Values in
Higher Education.
ABORTIOSS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$205 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at
additional cost. Pregnancy Test. Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For
turther information, call 832-0535 (toll free
number: l-SOO-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5
p m. weekday General anesthesia available.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Cast Carolina Sintbersirp
jfflaortgai
9 inneft
3n �li5aberrjan Crjristmas ftait
DECEMBER 3-6, 1986 7:00 P.M.
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM
TICKETS BY ADVANCE SALES ONLY
CONTACT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
(919) 757-6611, EXT. 2 6 6
A STUDENT UNION
PRODUCTIONS COMMITTEE PRESENTATION
"It's hard to believe someone
offering a Ph.D. in Aztec Cuisine
could be taken seriously, but it
has happened he says. "Con-
sumers can be misled by what
fake credentials are going to do
for them
"The word 'doctor' gets
translated into a resume or on a
business card and that person is
known as 'Dr. So-and So Then,
doors are opened he warns.
Earlier this year, the "open
doors" included those at the
White House and other levels of
government. FBI figures show
about 200 federal employees hold
phony academic or medical
degrees.
Despite a maximum penalty of
$10,000 in fines and a five-year
prison sentence for claiming false
credentials, the FBI discovered
nearly 500,000 Americans�one
out of every 200 employees�use
them for getting jobs.
To dramatize how easy it is to
get such "degrees Rep. Pepper
last year had one of his staff
members answer an ad in
Popular Mechanics magazine,
pay the $1800 fee, and submit
four brief book reports.
The congressman is now "Dt.
Pepper holder of a Ph.D. in
psychology from a Los Angeles
"university
"The danger of misuse
outweighs the humor of the situa-
tion Smith asserts. "Even if 99
percent (of the people in the
country) consider this sort of
thing as just a joke, if only one
percent cause some kind of harm
through misrepresentation, is it
not then unethical?"
"It should show us how thin
the line is between the humor (of
a situation) and the (serious
business) of education Smith
concludes.
for frames
and
lenses
1 ti i i i plasi k lei �
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756-9771
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on
Poll: Sanforu
V
Charlotte, NX (I PI)
Carolinians have less thai
month to select their �
senator, but, according I
newspaper poll, n
evenly divided between v
Broyhill, R-N C and De
Terry Sanford
The Observer Poll
Saturday r the
Observer, shows �
and Sanbrd holding 4
of the vote in statewic
691 registered
Last mun"
Broyhill up at 4 pr
pared to 4? per.c I �
"It's been neck-and
along We believe �f
up momentuir, i .
Brovhill said at a d �
Emerald Isle S
"You ca
campaign is mo ii .
Mon Sa:
begun to get out
merciab
netter play in new
Mature
i
eens mus- be 19
The �
homecomir .
East Carolina I :
tys she
"twice as m .
Mature candidate I
Brady Wightman is
1 nghsh ma
ECU lnernd Langu
Organization (110), a
group which she currently serve-
as secretary. ECU is a carr-
where students of all ages '
�eel at home she says. n
that ECU has several thou-
"non-traditional" ei 2C
�udent- enrolled.
"Non-traditional
should take an active : a
university activities, both cur-
tfculir and extra-cur:
Ms. Wightman insists While
"practically live- in the refer
room" at ECL Joyner .
and has achieved a per� -
A) academic grade pom aver
Ms. Wightman has entovec
life on and off campi.
Besides 11 O she be . one
honor -ociety and ha- been in-
vited to join another. She a -
has several off-campus membe-
ships: the local branch o the
English-Speaking Union.
Greenville Museum of Art -
port group and wine con-
noisseurs' club. Evening hour-
often find her at work in her part-
time job a- a uniformed secui
guard.
Her perspective as a produci .
the postwar Babv Boom
resulted in some whims
Kvs. ��.�.�� ������� � - � -��-� � -
Cox Floral
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Present
Bosses' Day
OCT 16
Make This
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698 E. Arlington Bld.
756-7226
�?
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 14, 1986
Poll: Sanford And Brovhill
Charlotte, N.C. (UP1)- North
Carolinians have less than a
month to select their next
senator, but, according to recent
newspaper poll, most voters are
evenly divided between Sen. Jim
Broyhill, R-N.C and Democrat
Terry Sanford.
The Observer Poll, published
Saturday by the Charlotte
Observer, shows both Broyhill
and Sanford holding 44 percent
of the vote in statewide sample of
691 registered voters.
Last month's survey showed
Broyhill up at 48 percent, com-
pared to 43 percent for Sanford.
"It's been neck-and-neck all
along. We believe we're picking
up momentum right now
Broyhill said at a GOP event in
Emerald Isle Saturday.
"You can sense it � for the
last two weeks, the flow of this
campaign is moving in our direc-
tion Sanford said. "We've
begun to get our television (com-
mercials) out; we've been getting
better play in newspapers
Voters Evenly Divided
The poll, conducted Oct. 1-6
with a 3.7 margin of error, also
revealed shifts among voters that
will weigh heavily in making the
election a close-call. While 12
percent are undecided for either
candidate, nearly 43 percent of
those asked said they could easily
change their minds about who
will win their vote.
But the poll indicated that
voters standing behind Sanford
appear more unwavering than
those backing Broyhill. Some 61
percent of those for Sanford,
who was governo- from 1961 to
1965 and Duke University presi-
dent until 1985, said they would
not change their minds. The
other 37 percent of Sanford sup-
porters said they could easily
change their mind.
For Broyhill, a 12-term con-
gressman appointed to the Senate
upon the death of Sen. John
East, R-N.C, last summer, 55
percent of his supporters said
they would vote for him in
November. But 40 percent said
they could easily switch their
vote.
Strategists at both camps at-
tribute the even-handed support
to a campaign marked by little
mud-slinging, which became the
legacy of the 1984 Senate race
between Sen. Jesse Helms,
RN.C, and then-Gov. Jim
Hunt.
"Neither candidate is giving
voters strong reasons against the
other candidates. That reduces
the intensity of their support
said Sanford poll-taker Harrison
Hickman.
"If, all of a sudden, one can-
didate found a silver bullet, you
could drive your support up
said Broyhill strategist Brad
Hays. "But, with the kind of
gentlemanly campaign we're run-
ning, I don't see a silver bullet
anywhere
About the only stickler in the
Broyhill-Sanford race has been a
TV commercial by the senator in
which Sanford is chastised for
creating a food tax. Sanford has
broadcast his own commercial
defending the 1961 food tax as a
means of supporting North
Carolina education and dismiss-
ing the critical ad as "silly
The poll notes that North
Carolinians are not soured by the
food tax. Some 54 percent of the
survey's respondents said that ex-
tending the state food tax for
public education was a good idea
while only 35 percent considered
it a mistake. About 56 percent of
those asked also said the food tax
would not play into their choice
for senator.
"That's the briar patch we
didn't mind being thrown into
Hickman said. "Broyhill looks
pretty foolish being against what
North Carolinians believe was a
correct decision
But Broyhill campaign
manager Kim Hutchens
disagreed.
"Terry Sanford thinks it's an
issue Hutchens said. "He's
taking time and spending money
to defuse it
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Mature Homecoming Candidate
ECl: News Bureau
Who says campus homecoming
queens must be 19 years old?
The first 40-year-old
homecoming queen candidate in
East Carolina University's
history says she offers students
"twice as much for their votes
Mature candidate Elizabeth
Brady Wightman is a French-
English major, sponsored by the
ECU International Language
Organization (1LO), a student
group which she currently serves
as secretary. ECU is a campus
where students of all ages "can
feel at home she says, noting
that ECU has several thousand
"non-traditional" (over 25)
students enrolled.
"Non-traditional students
should take an active part in
junversuy activities, both cur-
rtcular and extra-curricular
Ms. Wightman insists. While she
"practically lives in the reference
room" at ECU's Joyner Library
and has achieved a perfect 4.0 (all
A) academic grade point average,
Ms. Wightman has enjoyed social
life on and off campus too.
Besides ILO she belongs to one
honor society and has been in-
vited to join another. She also
has several off-campus member-
ships: the local branch of the
English-Speaking Union, the
Greenville Museum of Art sup-
port group and wine con-
noisseurs' club. Evening hours
often find her at work in her part-
time job as a uniformed security
guard.
Her perspective as a product of
the postwar Baby Boom has
resulted in some whimsical
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A vivacious redhead with
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Originally from Wilmington,
N.C, she spent half her girlhood
years in Wilmington before the
family moved to Florida.
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Some of the highlights of her
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working as an airline attendant
on flights in and out of Boston,
three years of residence in
England and a most memorable
winter spent on a 29-foot sailboat
in Annapolis, Maryland, with no
heat or bathroom facilities.
While a resident of
Washington, D.C she worked
as a legal secretary and as a
museum guide in historic Alexan-
dria. For one of her favorite
pastimes�rock climbing�she
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Stye �aat (Earfllttriati
Serving the East Carolina campus community
since 1925
TOM LUVENDER, rmttmma
Daniel Maurer, m ��
Path Kemmis, ���,
Scott Cooper, �.�,� tdll�
Steve Folmar, am � ��,
Anthony Martin. �. � � M(1WW,
KICK McCORMAC. r ,�,�� Mr- Nfi.dham
, lrl "HAM, Cimdatitm Manager
John Shannon, &� Shalom qu�t
p SHANNON SHORT. Prolmctkm Ma,
lAT MOM OY. ��. � DECHANII E JOHNSON, An ,�,�
CVtober 14, 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Arms Talks
GRERTJOB OF CflW V00 BELIEVE THAT IT w�c n ri 05E
STRflTE6IC DEFENSE, THIN6 ALMOST GOT THR0U6tt? fAiL FOR ALL
tlTTLEBUPPV! 7 OF US.
Reagan Hangs On To Star Wars
On the failure to reach an agree-
ment at the Iceland pre-summit
meeting, Soviet General Secretary
Mikhail Gorbachev saidWe were
on the verge of taking major,
history-making decisions. The
American administration, as we
understand now, is out to make a
breakthroughto military
superiority
Now it may be true that both Mr.
Gorbachev and President Reagan
were on the verge of making
history. But it is also true that doing
so may not have been in the best in-
terest of the free world.
President Reagan and Mr. Gor-
bachev took unprecedented steps
when they verbally agreed to reduce
long-range missile and bomber
arsenals by half over the next five
years and eliminate them complete-
ly by the year 1996.
Are you surprised? Read on,
there's more. In addition they were
prepared to eliminate all but 100
medium-range missiles on each side
� including all those deployed in
Europe � during the first five vear
phase and the balance of those bv
1996 as well.
Sounds great, doesn't it. Well,
there's a catch. In exchange for all
this, the Soviets wanted one thing
� Star Wars.
They insisted that the present
ABM treaty be changed so as to
confine the research, testing and
development of SDI to the
laboratory. Reagan, however,
stood strong and flatly refused
When he did, the arms control talks
came to a screaching halt.
If you're an advocate of SDI
you're probably doing back nips by
now � beaming with pride that
your President stood by his guns. If
you're an SDI critic you're un-
doubtedly frustrated, wondering
how the President could blow such
a golden opportunity to bring
security to the world.
In the end, it matters little where
you stand in the debate over the
practicality and economics of SDI
� the Soviets believe in it. They
believe in it enough to walk away
from the bargaining table with ma-
jor agreements so close at hand.
Agreeing not to use a deadly
weapon is no guarantee of safety.
The only way to eliminate the
nuclear threat completely is to
render nuclear weapons impotent.
This is the concept behind SDI,
whether you believe it is feasible or
not. This is reason enough to do
what President Reagan did.
-Campus Forum
Sen. Helms: The Debate Continues
n THHK mi tt SURPWBfc � THS Wltfc. ITS W�N ABM R)R mJ
Dear editor:
1 hope someone from the History
Dept. read Matthew Clarke's gattling-
gun response to Bern McCrady's col-
umn ("From the Left") in the Oct. 7
issue of this newspaper, I'm sure that
Queen Elizabeth II and Margaret That-
cher are both doing handsprings to
know that South Africa is still a
member of the British Commonwealth.
Just think of all those back taxes they
can collect!
If he didn't pick it up in his history
books, a quick look at The World
Almanac would have told Mr. Clarke
that on May 31. 1961, by referendum,
the Union of South Africa withdrew
from the Commonwealth and became
the Republic of South Africa.
Notwithstanding his incredibly naive
statement that, "Both blacks and
whites are free to come an go as they
please in South Africa(?!) if Mr.
Clarke can't keep his head straight, he
should at least try to keep his facts
straight.
Jan Higginbatham,
Greenville
On The Right Track
Dear editor:
One would ordinarily think that the
Secretary of the Helms Club at ECU
would offer a better defense for his
favorite senator. Matthew Clarke's
defense of Senator Jesse Helms (Cam-
pus Forum, Oct. 7) was totally irrele-
vant and, at times, uncomplimentary
to our senator. Clarke's ideas are
typical of today's narrow minded right
wing college student.
First of all, he compared Senator
Helms to "the freshest breath of air the
senate has seen since Joe McCarthy,
who cleansed many communists from
America Now, I'm not a history ma-
jor like Clarke, but even I know what a
hoax McCarthy instigated when he ac-
cused many Americans of communist
ties � state department officials, other
politicians, authors, actors, and
various entertainers.
His accusations were credible until
they became too numerous and absurd
to believe. For the most part, The
"Red Scare" was unveiled as a fraud,
and Senator McCarthy soon began to
look like a fool. Now I don't think
Senator Helms would appreciate being
compared to Joe McCarthy.
Another misguided and irrelevant
point of Clarke's was his argument
about the press's liberal bias. In the
case of Grenada, Clarke stated that
"the pinko-panzy press labeled it an in-
vasion, but in truth it was a rescue mis-
sion Isn't an invasion defined as a
forceable entry? Didn't U.S. military
troops force their way into Grenada?
Although it was a rescue mission,
wasn't our government the first source
to refer to it as an invasion?
And finally, I suppose I can agree
with Mr. Clarke on one point. The na-
tion of South Africa definitely deserves
praise for their apartheid, segregation,
suppression, and their ability to stand
up against those who criticize their
martial rule. They should continue to
shoot all South African protestors, and
those who survive should be shot
again!
In addition, the world press should
be banned from that country, for other
nations of the world might become en-
vious of the harmonious existence bet-
ween the South African government
and its citizens. We've all seen news
shots of the military's popular recep-
tion in many black communitites.
(Blacks line the streets in protest and
are met with direct force.)
In conclusion, Mr. Clarke, all of
your points have little to do with defen-
ding Senator Helms. As Secretary for
the Helms Club, don't you think you
should be promoting Senator Helms'
positive aspects? I suppose that since
these are few and far between, you
have to resort to his tactics � attacking
or finding fault with someone else's
ideas.
The time has come for politicians
such as Senator Helms to stress their
own ideas when campaigning. Their
proponents should do the same being
careful not to offend potential voters
like myself. After all, that is the name
of the game, isn't it? It's time the far
right got back on the right track.
Troy Grimes,
Freshman
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the en-
trance of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed.
Punishment
By DAVID LEWIS
Special To TW Eularodriu
Congress, under pressure from constituents to act
on what President Reagan calls his "Drug-Free
America" initiative, is moving quickly to pass such
legislation before the fall recess. The Senate has
already passed its $1.5 billion version 97 to 2, while
the House has its own $3 billion package. The two
deliberative bodies are dangerously close to com-
promise language and a single, unified bill.
"Dangerously" not because there is much doubt a
war on drugs is a war of unanimous appeal, but
because in the heady atmosphere of bandwagoning,
undue haste may saddle us all with unwise legisla-
tion.
Besides the price, one of the differences between
the two bills is that the House version calls for the
death-penalty "for those who intentionally cause
death while committing an offense" under the
"drug kingpin" law. The Senate's version offers
only a non-binding, sense-of-the-Senate resolution
on capital punishment.
In these politically conservative times, it is not
surprising to see calls for broadening the use of ex-
ecution as a crime-fighting device. As with the other
principals of the so-called moral agenda, (ex. abor-
tion, prayer in school), the debate over capital
punishment seldom proceeds at a reasonable decibel
level. It is a volatile issue which generates hyperbole
and ill-tempered invective, quickly establishing two
basic camps: the barbarians versus the soft-headed
bleeding hearts. Yet if ever there was a time for
careful scrutiny and calm, responsible analysis, it is
on such an issue � literally a matter of life and
death.
The most practical claim for capital punishment
is its deterrent capacity. But is the claim true? This
is perhaps the oldest argument in the debate over
execution.
In 1949, King George VI appointed a Royal Com-
mission to investigate the advisability of limiting or
modifying capital punishment in Great Britain. Ser-
ving from 1949-1953, the Commission requested in-
formation and statistics from various countries
which had abolished the death-penalty, in order to
understand what consequences had been observed.
Some nations had no statistics available, but the
following serve as representative comments by na-
tions which had compiled such statistics:
Campus
Spectrum
The Belgian Ministry of Justice wrote, "The
lesson has been learnt that the best means of in-
culcating respect for life is to refrain from taking
life in the name of the law This was substantiated
by the Belgian Government's report that, "since the
practice of commuting all death sentences for civil
offenses was introduced, no increasing crimes or of
fenses have been observed which could be at-
tributed to the failure to carry out the death-
penalty
The Netherlands: "It is definitely established that
the abolition of the death-penalty in the ordinary
penal code has not resulted in an increase or a
worsening of crime
Norway: "There is no information to indicate
that the abolition of the death-penalty has led to
any increase in the number of homicides, of crimes
of violence in general, or of attacks on prison
staff
Sweden: "The general view is that the abolition
of the death sentence has not entailed any increase
in the number of crimes And so on.
In a number of instances, Italy and Germany in
particular, abolition of the death-penalty preceeded
significant drops in homicide. Italy, for example,
enjoyed a thirty year period following abolition,
during which the homicide rate dropped to 13 of
what it was previously.
If this evidence does not show execution is a
deterrent to murder, it certainly does not prove
abolition reduces murder, either. What it tends to
indicate is what the Commission found, "that
whether the death-penalty is used or not, or whether
executions are frequent or not, both death-penalty
states and abolitionist states show rates which sug-
gest that these rates are conditioned by other factors
than the death-penalty Great Britain soon joined
the majority of the developed world in abolishing
capital punishment.
The study referred to by Lance Hardin (Dr.
Stephen K. Layson, Southern Economic Journal,
July 1985) in The East Carolinian (925) admits
"unknown omitted variables" may be responsible
for some of the study's data, and that (regarding
the estimate of 18 murders deterred for every execu-
tion) "under certain conditions this may give
misleading estimates of the true tradeoff.
For example, if juries react to any increased
relative frequency of execution by demanding
greater proof of guilt before convicting, an increase
in the probability of execution may reduce the pro-
' bability of convictions, wholly or partially offset-
ting the deterrent effect of the increase in probabili-
ty of execution This very phenomenon was
reported by E. Roy Calvert in his book Capital
Punishment in the 20th Century.
Concerning criminal statistics during periods of
legal execution, Calvert recorded, "In consequence
of the strong proofs of guilt necessary for convic-
tion of crimes punishable by death, the proportion
of acquittals for murder is higher than for most
other crimes, and an acquittal in such a case does
not necessarily imply failure to detect the
perpetrator of the crime
Many factors are involved in crime, and the
assertion of the deterrent value of one particular
factor (execution) on crimes of murder is difficult
to support. That being the case, other aspects of
capital punishment should be examined.
The irrevocable nature of death as a punishment
is disturbingly clear to all who have contemplated
the possibility of judicial error. Such errors have oc-
cured in the past and will continue in the future.
Lafayette made the issue plain when he announc-
ed, "I will ask for the abolition of capital punish-
ment until I have the infallibility of human judge-
ment demonstrated to me And never is the
likelihood of error greater than when the brutality
of certain crimes makes the public recoil in horror
and demand immediate action by its officials.
As Mr. Hardin indicated in the past, the press
plays a pivotal role in the public's appreciation of
crime. Sensationalism sells copy. Most recently, we
(along with the Law) have pursued Michael'W.
Jackson in his spree of alledged killings, abduc-
tions, and car thefts from Indiana across Illinois in-
to Missouri. The public service that such coverage
offers citizens endangered by such a man is great,
but it overshadows the fact most homicide involves
the unpremeditated crime of passion, not only
unlikely to be repeated, but also unlikely to be
deterred by thoughts of consequences. The public is
left with the unrealistic stereotype of the murderer
as a psychotic serial killer. ,
As Mr. Hardin points out, the victims must never
be forgotten in our search for justice. Retribution is
the responsibility of the state. But we make up the
state, and we have a collateral responsibility to be
sure some just purpose is served by our collective
action. If we are blinded by frustration and
vengeance, then our judgement, too, becomes a
crime of passion.
David Lewis is a graduate student from Green-
ville studying Art. He is presently working on his
thesis.
ft
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The Talk ot the Tor
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Be Wi

" �
�.�?�
� wjff





IT WAS r CL05&
CAll for Pill
of us.

5

Continues
� . - - attacking
ith someone else's
come for politicians
Helms 10 stress their
campaigning. Their
. d 're same being
ffend potential voters
After all, that is the name
1 It's time the far
he right track.
Trov Grimes,
Freshman
Forum Rules
�welcomes letters
nts of view. Mail or
ffice in the Publtca-
ding, across from the en-
� ner I ibrary.
poses oj verification, ail let-
include the name, major and
in. address, phone number
rure of the authorjsj. Letters
i ��� two typewritten pages,
iced or neatly printed.
X

e Axe?
i) on crimes of murder is difficult
rtg the case, other aspects of
should be examined.
able nature of death as a punishment
clear to all who have contemplated
udicial error. Such errors have oc-
)ast and will continue in the future,
tade the issue plain when he announc-
k for the abolition of capital punish-
tave the infallibility of human judge-
itrated to me And never is the
jerror greater than when the brutality
les makes the public recoil in horror
Immediate action by its officials.
rdin indicated in the past, the press
role in the public's appreciation of
jonalism sells copy. Most recently, we
Jhe law) have pursued Michael W.
jis spree of alledged killings, abduc-
thefts from Indiana across Illinois in-
"he public service that such coverage
endangered by such a man is great,
dows the fact most homicide involves
litated crime of passion, not only
repeated, but also unlikely to be
nights of consequences. The public is
tnrealistic stereotype of the murderer
serial killer. i
din points out, the victims must never
our search for justice. Retribution is
llity of the state. But we make up the
have a collateral responsibility to be
purpose is served by our collective
are blinded by frustration and
len our judgement, too, becomes a
n.
is a graduate student from Grten-
rt. He is presently working on his
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 14, 1986 5
I
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HOBO SANDWCH
Only $2.85
Ribeye, Cheese, Grilled Onions,
French Fries, with Medium Drink
HAMBURGER (14 b.)
Lettuce, Tomato, French Fries, with Medium Drink
Clip & Bring to XTC STATION
$1.99
Stop Your Train At
XTC
STATION
CAROLINA EAST MALL (Across from KERR Drugs)
Breakfast SUPER TASTE TRIP TICKET! Dinner
This Space Could
Be Working For
You!
�M. ?'
�� -
� �t -�??-��.
a a ir.�

mmm�"�����





THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 14, 1986
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iiniim





EASTCAROLINIAN OCTOBER 14, 1986
Anti-Obscenity Law
Greensboro, n.c. (cps) -
A tough new anti-obscenity law is
causing big changes in some
classes at the University of North
Carolina at Greensboro this fall.
At least two professors are
changing their course content to
avoid risking arrest.
As a result, film history
students no longer can study
Curriculum
being very tight-lipped
Indeed, no UNC-G official
would respond officially to Col-
lege Press Service questions
about the course changes.
One campus official, who ask-
ed to remain anonymous,
dismissed the controversy as
overblown. "As far as I know,
it's affected only two professors
. � �� � - ���������� vmj i�w pujitaauia
Fedenco Felhni movies, while art (Tedford and Fragola). I'm not
students can't see slides of certain
artwork.
Some human sexuality books
were removed from the library
and some artists' visions of nude
figures were removed from cam-
pus display until student and
faculty protest forced ad-
ministrators to return them to
public use last week.
Though the new law can be ap-
plied statewide, no other North
Carolina colleges besides UNC-G
are enduring any of its effects.
Some think it's because UNC-
G's liberal reputation seems to
have attracted the attention of a
group of Christian fundamen-
talists who lobbied vigorously for
the new anti-obscenity law in the
state legislature last year.
"UNC-G is really no more
liberal than any other UNC cam-
pus, but it does share a rather
liberal reputation with UNC-
Chapel Hill says North
Carolina State University
spokeswoman Rosalind Reid.
But NC State hasn't "had any-
kind of reaction to the laws as
yet she adds.
"The only controversy, so far,
has been at UNC-G agrees
George Gardner of the American
Civil Liberties Union's (ACLU)
Raleigh Office. "But it's hard to
say what other professors aren't
doing any longer at other cam-
puses
At UNC-G, however, the con-
troversy has been continuous
since film history Prof. Tony
Fragola decided the new law was
"ambiguous" enough to drop the
works of Federico Fellini and a
few other filmmakers from his
syllabus.
Some films Fragola has shown
in class "deal with sexual activity
involving minors, and showing
them could make me susceptible
to prosecution under the law. If
the students seeing the films are
minors, I could also be liable for
displaying sexually explicit
materials to minors
Communications Prof.
Thomas Ted ford's lawyer advis-
ed him to stop showing a slide
show about erotic art and
obscenity court cases from his
class on First Amendment law,
saying he could be arrested for it.
In addition, an art class using
live nude models for life drawing
probably will disappear after this
semester.
School administrators,
moreover, told Fragola they'd
take no responsibility for what
professors teach in their classes,
"leaving it up to the individual to
defend for himself" if obscenity
charges arise, Fragola says.
Karen Carpenter, an assistant
editor of the UNC-G Carolinian,
agrees school officials seem con-
tent to "continue to do things as
always. They say the law was not
made for this school, but they're
40- Year-Old
Homecoming
Candidate
y on tinned From Page 1.
survived snow and ice training at
Mount Baker, an active volcano
in the Oregon Cascades.
Next summer, she plans to
study at the Sorbonne in Paris
under an arrangement with the
ECU Department of Foreign
Languages and Literatures.
When she graduates, Ms.
Wightman would like to teach
high school French-and find a
docked boat to live in.
Right now, being a student
again offers sufficient thrills and
she's still getting used to "having
to study again
This year's homecoming queen
competition winner at ECU
won't just be "queen for a day"
after Chancellor John Howell
places the crown on her head dur-
ing half time at the Oct. 18
homecoming football game. She
will be a "Miss ECU" designate
who will be called upon to repre-
sent the campus in regional fairs,
festivals and other occasions.
aware of any other changes, and I
don't anticipate any others
The new law makes it a felony
for adults to possess por-
nography in their homes, lets
local communities�not state
courts�define what is obscene,
and lets police arrest anyone
suspected of disseminating porn
before a judge determines
whether the material is in fact
obscene.
As a result, Carpenter says,
professors may not chance to
argue the value of their allegedly
obscene course content before be-
ing hauled off to jail.
"There's no fair warning
clause she notes. "Violators
can be arrested on the spot, and
it's up to a jury to determine if
the material under question is
legal or not
The well-publicized course
changes and the prospect of pro-
fessors being carted off to jail
"have raised interest in the issue
on the part of students the
ACLU's Gardner reports.
Although Gardner adds private
citizens are at just as much risk of
arrest as professors, "there's not
that much awareness (of the risk)
on the part of the average person
because most feel they aren't in-
convenienced by the statute
Several UNC-G students,
however, have started a Citizens
Against Censorship (CAC) group
to raise money to try to repeal the
new law.
While students seem to feel ag-
grieved by the law, CAC's Phil
McCaul adds "this is a conser-
vative environment and the law is
vaguely written, so we're holding
seminars and writing letters to
publicize its potential danger
"The law he asserts, "is part
of a big movement to return to
'traditional values' and 'anti-
secular humanism Most people
realize the law is a bad thing
MM
WE WILL MATCH
ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE
PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce,
Oeli, Bakery & Continuity
Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With
You. We Will Match
Like Items Or Equal
Quality.
The supermarket with
WAIN
VMM
WiUtKHIMISi:
I'lUMtt
WML I TV TIM)
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH SAT OCTOBER 18 AT SAv A CENTER IN GREENVILLE
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES L.�ttviLLt
plus
Double Coupons
See store for details
Introducing
New
II
POLICY
BEEF-PORK-LAMB
AAP is trimming more from their beet than ever before and that s good news tor you'
Because lean beef is an important source of nutntion for today s health and diet conscious
American You see. lean beef provides high amounts of nutr.ents especially protein iron
zinc and Vitamin B12 - in relation to its calor.e content Did you know that a 3 oz (80 a)
serving of sirloin tip has just 168 calor.es- So go ahead En,oy lean beef today
AAP s THIN TRIM policy
makes it easy'
Same Flavor
Better Value
MARKET FRESH
(LESS THAN 5 LBS. 98 LB.)
Ground Beef
THIN TRIM GRAIN FED BEEF
�T0P Sirloin
IS'
! BU OSF 1 tB PKG w Meat Franks GET ONE 1 LB PKG FREE!

JCHuT
Double 0
- �- ��

V Double I
6.5
c.
) W'TH AN
OPEN SUM
Horro
B M1CAH HARRIS
The season of hollow go
heads and artificial charac
will soon be upon us anc
reader's fancy ma well
the bizzare, the horrific, ever.
repulsive.
But enough about ro- i
novels. Let's talk about j
fiction. It was in the mid to is
'70s when Stephen Kings' tar
burst the dam of public bia
and the murky waters of � J
fiction entered the main si
King followed up Carrie .
more books than a were I
hairs. Others have joined . j
ing advantage of the accer
the horror novel now
Many authors came out of
closet (where, as everyone
has been a child knows,
monsters are anywa). the nn
notable of King's partr- -i
being Peter Straub. aul
Ghost Story and collabora:
with King on The Talisman
But as important a Kim
been to the welfare of horror f
tion, it has gotten along pre
well without him for ce
From the dirty, pove-
and ignorant peasar. -
shared tales of the super-
while the evening's fire flickei
distorted shadows ovei
faces and a wolf howled tar.
away, to the Universal and Han
mer horror movies on "SI .
Theater to today's pooi
novels, thicker than a New Yo
telephone directory, and
multi-million dollar firms I
ly oozing with special effects, tn
horror industry is going strong.
can remember when it was a thnl
to see on TV a version of "Ho
ror of Dracula" that somehow
escaped the censor's scissors
When Lucy Westmore is siakel
in her crypt, we actually g
Three H
ByD.A.SWANSON
rff�nier
The new drinking age go-
down? Still trying to recuperate!
from mid -terms? Your room n
set fire to your gold fish w
you were out of town
weekend? Sounds like you're
deep need of a good laug
Well, if you're not intereNteu a
paying the costs of a nigh
TW's Comedy Zone then the v
dent Union has the ticket �
For only $2.50 (S4 for fac I
staff) you can be enterta. . f
three of the hottest rising w
stars from New York and L.A
Ron Danan, Mike Duga anc
Brett Butler, on tour with
Playhouse Ai
n?hoa� Dm
The East Carolina Youth
Playhouse will hold open at
tions for Dragon Tale. October
20 and 21 at 7:30 p.m. in Rv j
115, Messick.
The Medieval musical
young audiences, which wii
presented January 21. 22 and 23
in the McGinnis Theatre, offers al
I
The East
CaroiiaJan would tiki
. However, doe tol
, "





8 1 Hr I ASI t AROl INIAN OCTOBER 14,
1986
Anti-Obscenity Law
Curriculum
I'iRH-NSBORO, N.C. (C PS) -
A tough new anti-obscenity law is
causing big changes in some
classes at the University of North
Carolina at Greensboro this fall.
At least two professors are
changing their course content to
avoid risking arrest.
As a result, film history
students no longer can study
Federico Fellini movies, while art
students can't see slides of certain
artwork.
Some human sexuality books
were removed from the library
and some artists' visions of nude
figures were removed from cam-
pus displav until student and
facultv. protest forced ad-
ministrators to return them to
public use last week.
Though the new law can be ap-
plied statewide, no other North
Carolina colleges besides UNC-G
are enduring any oi its effects.
Some think it's because UNC-
G's liberal reputation seems to
have attracted the attention of a
group of Christian fundamen-
talists who lobbied vigorously for
the new anti-obscenity law in the
state legislature last year.
"UNC-G is really no more
liberal than any other UNC cam-
pus, but it does share a rather
liberal reputation with UNC-
Chapel Hill says North
Carolina State University
spokeswoman Rosalind Reid.
But C State hasn't "had any
kind of reaction to the laws as
yet she adds.
"The only controversy, so far,
has been at UNC-G agrees
George Gardner of the American
Civil liberties Union's (ACLU)
Raleigh Office. "But it's hard to
sav what other professors aren't
doing am longer at other cam-
puses "
At UNC -G, however, the con-
trovers) has been continuous
since film history Prof. Tony
Fragola decided the new law was
"ambiguous" enough to drop the
workv of Federico Fellini and a
few other filmmakers from his
syllabus.
Some films Fragola has shown
;n class "deal with sexual activity
involving minors, and showing
rhem could make me susceptible
to prosecution under the law. If
the students seeing the films are
minors. I could also be liable for
displaying sexually explicit
materials to minors
Communications Prof.
Thomas Tedford's lawyer advis-
ed him to stop snowing a slide
show about erotic art and
ibscenit) court cases from his
class on First Amendment law,
saying he could be arrested for it.
In addition, an art class using
live nude models tor life drawing
probablv will disappear after this
semester.
School administrators,
moreover, told Fragola they'd
take no responsibility for what
professors teach in their classes,
"leaving it up to the individual to
defend for himself" if obscenity
charges arise, Fragola says.
Karen Carpenter, an assistant
editor of the UNC-G Carolinian,
agrees school officials seem con-
tent to "continue to do things as
always. They say the law was not
made for this school, but they're
4 0-Year-Old
Homecoming
Candidate
on tinned from Page 1.
survived snow and ice training at
Mount Baker, an active volcano
in the Oregon Cascades.
Next summer, she plans to
study at the Sorbonne in Paris
under an arrangement with the
ECU Department of Foreign
languages and Literatures.
When she graduates, Ms.
Wightman would like to teach
high school French-and find a
docked boat to live in.
Right now, being a student
again offers sufficient thrills and
she's still getting used to "having
to study again
This year's homecoming queen
competition winner at ECU
won't just be "queen for a day"
after Chancellor John Howell
places the crown on her head dur-
ing halftime at the Oct. 18
homecoming football game. She
will be a "Miss ECU" designate
who will be called upon to repre
sent the campus in regional fairs,
festivals and other occasions.
being very tight-lipped
Indeed, no UNC-G official
would respond officially to Col-
lege Press Service questions
about the course changes.
One campus official, who ask-
ed to remain anonymous,
dismissed the controversy as
overblown. "As far as I know,
it's affected only two professors
(Tedford and Fragola). I'm not
aware of any other changes, and 1
don't anticipate any others
The new law makes it a felony
for adults to possess por-
nography in their homes, lets
local communities�not state
courts�define what is obscene,
and lets police arrest anyone
suspected of disseminating porn
before a judge determines
whether the material is in fact
obscene.
As a result, Carpenter says,
professors may not chance to
argue the value of their allegedly
obscene course content before be
ing hauled off to jail.
"There's no fair warning
clause she notes. "Violators
can be arrested on the spot, and
it's up to a jury to determine if
the material under question is
legal or not
The well-publicized course
changes and the prospect of pro-
fessors being carted off to jail
"have raised interest in the issue
on the part of students the
A( LU's Gardner reports.
Although Gardner adds private
citizens are at just as much risk of
arrest as professors, "there's not
that much awareness (of the risk)
on the part of the average person
because most feel they aren't in-
convenienced by the statute
Several UNC-G students,
however, have started a Citizens
Against Censorship (CAC) group
to raise money to try to repeal the
new law.
While students seem to feel ag-
grieved by the law, CAC's Phil
McCaul adds "this is a conser
vative environment and the law is
vaguely written, so we're holding
seminars and writing letters to
publicize its potential danger
"The law he asserts, "is part
of a big movement to return to
'traditional values' and 'anti-
secular humanism ' Most people
realize the law is a bad thing

Ml
WE WILL MATCH
ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE
PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce,
Deli, Bakery & Continuity
Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With
You. We Will Match
Like Items Or Equal
Quality.
The supermarket with
IYjIKI
iva�j�:hihim;
viihus
oiiamty HM
PRIi ES EFFECTIVE THROUGH SAT OCTOBER '8 AT s, A. c
AF RESERVt THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES
ES'f"
plus
Double Coupons
See store for details
POLICY
BEEF-PORK-LAMB
A&P ,s trimming more trom their beet than ever before and (I a1 s qood nevs tor vou'
Because lean beet is an important source ot nutf I in 'or today s health and diet conscious
American You see lean beef provides high amounts n nutrients especially protein ,ron
zinc and Vitamin B12 in relation to its caione content D.d vou know that a 3 oz i80 q
serving of sirloin tip has ,ust 168 calories" So qo ahead LnOy lean beef todav
A&Ps THIN TRIM policy
makes it easy'
Same Flavor
Better Value
MARKET FRESH
(LESS THAN 5 LBS. 98� LB.)
Ground Beef
lbs. or
more
FLORIDA � RED OR WHITE
Grapefruit
Si

CHUNK LIGHT � IN OIL OR WATER
Double Ti��
. q Tuna
uotiOie C
3k
OouDie 0
6.5 oz.
can
W '� AN ADDITIONAL S10 00 OR MORE PURCHASE
DUKE'S
Mayonnaise
Boneless �&
FRESH
EASTERN ROME
Apples
P&Q

Paper Towels
32 oz.
FTP
GE�)
b�c won !
TOWELS
nscol
REGULAR � BUTTER
Crisco Shortening
Shortei
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADOfDONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE.
LUNCHEON MEAT
LIMIT TWO WITH AN AOOmONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
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EN 24 HOURS
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
OCTOBER 14, 1986
Page 9
Horror
By MIC AH HARRIS
Stf f Writer
squirt on her
The season of hollow gourd
heads and artificial characters
will soon be upon us and a
reader's fancy may well turn to
the bizzare, the horrific, even the
repulsive.
But enough about romance
novels. Let's talk about horror
fiction. It was in the mid to late
'70s when Stephen Kings' Carrie
burst the dam of public bias apart
and the murky waters of horror
fiction entered the main stream.
King followed up Carrie with
more books than a werewolf has
hairs. Others have joined in, tak-
ing advantage of the acceptability
the horror novel now enjoys.
Many authors came out of the
closet (where, as everyone who
has been a child knows, the
monsters are anyway), the most
notable of King's partners in fear
being Peter Straub, author of
Ghost Story and collaborator
with King on The Talisman.
But as important as King has
been to the welfare of horror fic-
tion, it has gotten along pretty
well without him for centuries.
From the dirty, poverty-stricken
and ignorant peasants who
shared tales of the supernatural
while the evening's fire flickered
distorted shadows over their
faces and a wolf howled far, far
away, to the Universal and Ham-
mer horror movies on "Shock
Theater to today's spooky-
novels, thicker than a New York
telephone directory, and the
multi-million dollar firms literal-
ly oozing with special effects, the
horror industry is going strong. (I
can remember when it was a thrill
to see on TV a version of "Hor-
ror of Dracula" that somehow
escaped the censor's scissors.
When Lucy Westmore is staked
in her crypt, we actually get to see
a blood stain
blouse. Wow!)
The contribution of three other
writers, all but one of their names
unfamiliar to the general public
(you never see them doing a
Federal Express Card commercial
or on MTV), kept horror fiction
alive and indeed mid-wifed it
through some hard labor.
They granted horror a safe
passage from such far away
gothic settings as a castle in Tran-
sylvania to, in the words of
Stephen King, "the Seven-Eleven
store down the block" in the
home of baseball, hot dogs, and
mom's apple pie.
Ray Bradbury, who entered
mainstream fiction with his gen-
tle (but occasionally biting) blend
of fantasy and science fiction, is
the most notable of these
authors. But Bradbury's early
work, as he confesses in his in-
troduction to The October Coun-
try, is a type of story that I
rarely have done since 1946
Said type was (by Stephen King's
classifications in Danse Macabre)
mostly horror, occasionally ter-
ror, and even a few memorable
gross-outs.
In "The Man Upstairs for
example, a little boy discovers
that one of his grandmother's
boarders is a vampire. After wat-
ching Granny prepare a turkey
for supper, the little rascal goes
upstairs during the day, cuts open
the vampire, and pulls out a
variety of bizzare organs before
sowing the monster with silver
coins.
In "The October Game a
woman discovers she is playing
the Halloween-party game of
"the witches' guts" with her little
girl's � well, you know
Bradbury's horror is also
superb. "The Small Assassin" is
about a literal enfant terrible who
systematically murders his
parents. In "The Emissary a
bedridden youngster realizes he
should have taught his dog not to
dig in another person's garden �
or grave � when the pet returns
home accompanied by the walk-
ing corpse of the boy's favorite
teacher.
A sort-of protege of Bradbury
was the unjustly forgotten writer,
Charles Beaumont. I have yet to
see a book of Beaumont's at
Walden Books or B. Dalton's;
they are probably out of print but
worth searching for in used book
stores and libraries.
Beaumont's most visible work
remains his "Twilight Zone"
teleplays, some of which were
based on his original series, such
as "Elegy in which astronauts
land on a planet where, seeming-
ly, the only inhabitants are em-
balmed corpses posed like man-
nequins throughout the city; or,
"The Howling Man" in which a
sick wanderer stumbles onto a
European monestary where the
devil is imprisoned.
Beaumont was capable of pro-
ducing touching and sentimental
work, as his short story "Fair
Lady" and his script for The
Seven Faces of Dr. Lao attest.
But his fascination with the mor-
bid stems from his upbringing
which was a child's nightmare.
His story, "Miss Gentilbelle
in which a disturbed women liv-
ing in a secluded country man-
sion dresses her young son as a
girl and sadistically kills his pets
in front of him, was based on a
true experience from Beaumont's
own childhood.
Other Beaumont output was in
an Alfred Hitchcock vein such as
The Hunger and Open House.
Sadly, Beaumont's short but pro-
lific career came to a long,
agonizing end when he succumb-
ed to a degenerative brain
disease. He died in 1967.
Richard Matheson, like Beau-
mont, was a regular contributor
to the original "Twilight Zone
Matheson, now a story consul-
tant for this season's "Amazing
Stories remains a much-
beloved author by fantasy and SF
fans although his work has not
received the general recognition it
deserves.
His novel, I Am Legend, is a
tour de force account of the last
human in a society of mutated
vampires. Matheson actually
works out a believable, scientific
rationale for vampirism.
His short fiction is famous for
its morbidly delightful twists. In
"Through Channels a piece
Main Stream
consisting entirely of dialogue, a
family pays little attention to a
television show featuring giant
worms with big mouths and
broadcasting the message
"FEED that is, until the TV
devours them and the message
changes to "FED
Matheson has occasionally
taken the point of view of a
ghastly protagonist. The obvious
example is his first and still most-
famous short story, "Born of
Man and Woman in which a
horribly mutuated child, kept in
the cellar by his parents, ex-
presses his frustrations by diary
entries. Or, "Dress of White
Silk which is a story about a lit-
tle girl who happens to be a
werewolf. And you know how
kids love to eat.
Most of the Bradbury stories
mentioned above should be readi-
ly available in his collection The
October Country. Beaumont's
work is notably present in The
Hunger And Other Stories and
Matheson has sundry collections
you may uncover in used book
stories. Titles include The Shores
of Space, Shock I, Shock II,
Shock III and Born of Man and
Woman.
Just the right stuff to curl up
with by a Jack-OLantern on a
chilly October night.
rp m , The Phantoms
SJEiSZZZ 2 P,a ,hdr diStinCtiVC stations of
some of their originals TdJy ghtZtSSST � " " " " 'W �
ThreeHot Comedians To Laugh It Up In Hendrix Tonight
ByD.A.SWANSON Comedy Laff-Off, will be ap- regularly in Rill n,Wc u L , -
The new drinking age got you
down? Still trying to recuperate
from mid-terms? Your roommate
set fire to your gold fish while
you were out of town this
weekend? Sounds like you're in
deep need of a good laugh.
Well, if you're not interested in
payi the costs of a night at
TW's Comedy Zone then the Stu-
dent Union has the ticket for you.
For only $2.50 ($4 for faculty and
staff) you can be entertained by
three of the hottest rising comic
stars from New York and L.A.
Ron Darian, Mike Duga and
Brett Butler, on tour with the
Comedy Laff-Off, will be ap-
pearing tonight at Mendenhall's
Hendrix Theater at 8 p.m. to
thrill and delight you. Audience
response to the tour has been
nohting but outstanding. For-
dham University in the Bronx
calls it "Exciting and diverse
Eastern New Mexico University
says it was "a tremendous suc-
cess Ron Darian left the St.
Mary's College of Maryland
"Rolling Now, are those rave
reviews, or what?
Headling tonight will be
Darian. Currently he is starring
in national television commer-
cials for Diet Coke and Michelob
beer and will be appearing
regularly in Bill Bogg's new
"Comedy Tonite" series. He also
become something of a regular at
New York's "The Bottom Line"
where he has opened for such
notable club bands as NRBQ and
The Strawbs. His forte is primari-
ly in impersonations of
characters and sounds �
everything from Star Trek to The
Twilight Zone. According to the
reviews and re-bookings that
chase him around the country, he
is definitely a comic not to be
missed.
Also appearing will be fire jug-
gler and New Jersey native, Mike
Duga. He has only recently been
added to the Laff-Off tour roster
and should be full of surprises.
Strangley enough, Duga didn't
begin his comedy career (formal-
ly, that is) until he'd left the
Jersey shore for Salt Lake City.
Must be all those crazy Mormons
and their strange (or are they
really so strange?) ideas about
marriage that turned him to such
a nutty career.
Newest to the Laff-Off roster
is Brett Butler. We're assuming
he's from Mars or something
since his agent didn't send any
promo material in advance. �
That's it. If you're feeling a lit-
tle down, or just enjoy a little
humor, or just plain don't have
anything better to do,
Mendenhall is the place to be
tonite. Two bucks is a piddling
price for this kind of high quality-
en tertainm en t. Be there, or be in
the librarv.
Religions Come Together
Playhouse Auditions Set For 'Dragon Tale'
The East Carolina Youth
Playhouse will hold open audi-
tions for Dragon Tale, October
20 and 21 at 7:30 p.m. in Room
115, Messick.
The Medieval musical for
young audiences, which will be
presented January 21, 22 and 23
in the McGinnis Theatre, offers a
variety of roles: The King (non-
singing), fatherly and dignified;
Princess Rosebud, beautiful and
winsome; Sir Hugh, handsome
and full of bravado; Bryan the
Brave, self-important in the ex-
treme; Walter the Witless, a buf-
foon; Jay, Jack and Jo, three
foolish peasants (Jo is a female
role) and Mada, tender and
motherly.
There will also be a Chorus of
four males and four females who
Buddhists and Christians will
discuss their religions at a con-
ference, October 16, at the ECU
Willis Building (Regional
Development Institute). �
The "Conference on Buddhist-
Christian Dialogue" will feature
Dr. Roger J. Corless, a well-
known author and professor of
religion at Duke University, and
Bhante Henepola Gunaratana
Mahathera, a Buddhist monk at
will play townspeople of varying the Washington Buddhist Vihara
ages and descriptions
Those wishing to audition are
requested to prepare a song to
sing and to do some simple move-
ment patterns.
Rehearsal for Dragon Tale will
begin on Monday, Nov. 3.
� J4
Sessions begin at 10 a.m. and are
free and open to the public.
"The main goal of the con-
ference is to bring together per-
sons who adhere to religions
which derive from very different
cultures said Dr. Calvin
Mercer, an ECU assistant pro-
fessor of religious studies in the
Department of Philosophy.
"We want the speakers to pro-
vide a context for Buddhists and
Christians to learn from one
another. The intent is certainly
not to turn Christians into Bud-
dhists or Buddhists into Chris-
tians, but rather to use religion as
a means of bringing a greater
understanding of and apprecia-
tion for another's culture
Mercer said.
Registration will begin at 9:30
a.m. and the conference will
begin at 10 a.m. Dr. Gunaratana
will speak at 10:15 and Dr. Cor-
less at 11.15. Each will speak on
the use of meditation and con-
templation in their forms of wor-
ship.
Afternoon sessions begin with
a panel discussion at 2 p.m. At 3
p.m. the audience will break into
small groups for discussion of the
issues. Another panel discussion
and group reports, at 3:45 p.m
will follow.
Gunaratana was born in Sri
Lanka and was a Buddhist monk
in India and Malaysia before
coming to the United States in
1968. He earned a Ph.D. in
Philosophy from American
University and is now the chief
incumbent monk of the
Washington Buddhist Vihara.
Corless is the author of
numerous books and articles. He
was recently named to the
editorial board of Buddhist-
Christian Studies.
Restaurant In Review
New Deli Stands Out
By BECKY TOY
Staff Writer
JON JORDAN - CU ���� Lat
Wendy O. Williams
The East Carolinian would like to thank the Attic for giving us the opportunity to review Wendy's
performance. However, due to circumstances beyond our control, a picture will have to say it all this
time.
In a town that caters to the stu-
dent palate, there seems to be an
endless procession of fast food,
drive-in, drive-out
establishments, with nothing
more going for them than the
speed with which they can churn
out an edible plastic burger.
In the midst of this confusion
of arches and girls with strange
red pigtails, there is a place that
stands out: the New Deli. By day,
they are a low-budget, high-
quality restaurant � the closest
thing to a real deli that you'll find
in this town. And by night, The
New DeU offers perhaps the most
eclectic range of musical enter-
tainment.
So, back to the food �- What
do they have?
The Deli's menu offers a daily
selection of soups, the standard
salads (tossed $1.25, chef $3.75),
bagels made any way you can im-
agine ($.60 to $3.55), and a varie-
ty of sandwiches, combos,
construct-your-own, and house
specialties that will make it vir-
tually impossible to decide on
one.
The sandwiches range in price
from $1.35 to $4.65, and the fill-
ings run from the standard roast
beef, ham and turkey to
pastrami, tuna salad, and liver-
wurst (palatable only to the few,
the proud or the real deli-
mongers, by the way).
The New Deli also has a selec-
tion of cookies, cakes, etc, cruel-
ly arranged in a glass case near
the register, so you can't say no.
They offer a wide selection of
domestic and imported beers as
well; Christian Brothers' Chablis,
Rose, and a burgundy by Carlo
Rossi are available by the glass,
the carafe, and the half carafe
but only if you're 21. Sorry kids
In short, The New Deli has ali
the makings of a beloved hangout
� the food is wonderful and
made the way you like it. The at-
mosphere invites you to sit down
and stay for awhile, and the staff
is highly attentive.
They want to ensure that
everything is the way you like it
and that is the best reason to vis it
the New DeU again. U
t�riinni��. -i - �

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;
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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 14, 1986
The East Carolinian Is Proud To Present
Lori Bennett
Alpha Delta Pi
Kelly Cox
Phi Kappa Tau
Lisa Carroll
Pi Kappa Phi
The
1986
Homecoming
Finalists

Mitzi Craddock
Clement Hall
Tonja Howell
ECU Gospd Choir
i
Y.R. Richardson
Omega Psi Phi
Stephannie Piul
Alpha Xi Delta
Elizabeth, Jean Webb
White Kail
1
'TV "I " m" - " mill itmmii �"� j���
Classifi
PERSONAL
SIGMA PHI EPSILON. The Sg El
Brothers, Pledges, an
Goldenhearts would like to weicom
all of the new little sisters! Conj
gratulations!
KENNY
DAY! II!
FAIL: HAPPY BIRTH
iCOTT GIBBS: i have been a'
around the world and I've neve'
seen anyone as cute as you, excepi
for the Pandas at the Washington!
Zoo!
DRAFT NIGHT: TuesdeyTana - I
ELBO. come all! Sponsored by the
sisters and pledges of Delta Zeta
BETA OMICRON The Sisters o
Delta Zeta would like to thanx yov
all for the great surprise pa" �
the TKE'S last Friday! we love ybu
all- Sisters of Delta Zeta
ALPHA SIGMA PHI: Thanks for Tne
social- that graduation "thang " a
proved once agam that De a Ze'a -
can hang! We hac a ball can I a
to party again with you alt! Love
The Graduates of Delta Ze'a
SCOTT: Thanks for being
greatest I owe you for a
late night talks and walks fron-
library Oh, andexpeoally the .
(they're the Dest). I'm ge
Stronger I hope wen always be a
close as we are now Love You a
-me
IBT: Pledges, get in too rt
yourselves P S Watch for arre s
debut in the cr.me column
HAPPY BIRTHDAY DAVE
FRANC, ROB HOWELL AND
MARC KLNECKENER From "
brothers of Zeta Beta Tac
PIKA LIL SISTER RUSH: Oc?
10-22. TIME ano PLACE to oe a'
nounced. "Hold our for ube1
the knights of the
SJBGENIUS: We would like to sa.
0 you m reference to your tetter b
reading your ooe of grpes. a'
could no do much petter The per
sonals, my friend, are wr' -
good humor and jest, greantec s
not what we AIM to do best bul
perhaps the humor for which we
seek, you cannot fina because you
are not Greek. So in closing we rae
some friendly advice, for which a.
�II think should suffice, keep your
nose out of our affairs, because
blatentlyYour opinion, noboay
really cares
KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU: The
beach was great, so were the gnarly
�raves. Did anybody get any?
Somebody was right when they sa d
"Yoy. don't have to take your ciothes
off to have a god timecer'v
wine The only problem is noboc.
told Todd or Kevin Broker egs
wrestling matches, kooks oeae-
sand traps, strange beds, teal eaas
JANET? George Bush ano the pa
made it an interesting weexe
Congratulations to the founc r�c
fathers of the Knee Deep Cub
JEFF D Thanx for the memorable
weekend. You're growing close to
my heart Good luck on your tests
�his week. See you Friaav Lisa A
NANCY N How's the left chee�-
Swimming anyone? Get psychec lor
tocktail, will our dates be able tc
frtang with us? (Growl) Rut Rot-
l-ove. .007
IrlAPPY HOUR: Come outage Da
�with the Phi Taus at the E'bc
prVednesday n.gh� from 9 p.muntil.
PHI TAUS. LITTLE SISTERS AND
I PLEDGES: Don't forge our appv
hour at the Elbo Wednesday night.
1NINlll: A free mempership to the
Greenville Athletic Club, dinner for
2 at Darryl's or Ql cos t-ee ce
cream at Hank's or p zza at Ptm
Hut. Come take a 25� guess n "o
of the Student Store. 11 3 Mon Ff
AOTT'S: Only three aavs unt
cocktails! Grab your aate ano get
ready to party!
WANTED
HELP WANTED: Locai law firm is
seeking Computer Sc ence or Deo
sion Science major with gooo typ,
Skills for part-time wore process u
position. 10-15 hours per week Ca
'$�-4200 ano ask for Mary
ROOMMATE WANTEO: Fr�
security deposit of $150, Kingston
Place Apts central neatair fully
?urnished, includes all kitchen uten
s�ls, and use of pool $150 per month
P'us utilities. For info, call Don
Fazio at 757-3211.
T�AVEL FIELD OPPORTUNITY:
Gain valuable marketing experience
While earning money Campus
representative needed immediately
?or spring break trip to Florida. Call
Campus Marketing at 1 �00-2B2 4221
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share
mobile home; 15 min. from campus
plus V expenses per month Call
�HI 752 711 from �-4.
WANTED: An experienced Chris
Han pianist or organist needed Call
�30-1442 Mon Wed 1:30-3:30
I SPttlMv BREAK 17: Earn a free
vacation to Fort Lauderdate or the
Bahamas. Students seriously in-
terested in becoming a campus
representative, can
j '�00-17 BEACH
QBJJWOMMM WANTED: Top
Pay- worK at home- Call Cottage
'Industries- (405) 340-4042
5- fesirf1
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Classifieds
1 Ml I AM -K' .1 INI s
Bl K 14�'II


PERSONAL
SIGMA PHI EPSILON The S.g Ep
� 11 h e r s Pledges, and
lenhearts would like to welcome
of the new little sisters! Con
lations!
ENNY FAIL
MM
HAPPY BIRTH
,COTT GIBBS I have been all
i to the world and I've neer
aone as cute as you except
the Pandas at the Washington
DRAFT NIGHT Tuesday, and the
� L BO come all! Sponsored by the
stei s and pledges of Delta Zeta
BETA OMICRON The sisters of
fa Zeta would like to thank you
� eat surprise party with
rKi s ast Friday! We love you
v sters X Delta Zeta
alpha SIGMA PHI Thanks for the
a that graduation "thanq " we
� aga n that Delta Zeta's
ve had a ball an'l wa it
a )a n a you all! Love
ites of Delta Z fa
SCOTT � �s tor being "fhe
we you for all those
� s and walks from the
and expe any the fights
� the best) I m cjetlmq
hope a. a ways be as
� a- ar �Ow Love You A Lot
P - dges gel I h with
s ,es PS Watch tor Wai r
the � ni column
HAPPY BIRTHDAY DAVE
PRANC ROB HOWELL AND
vARC KLNECKENER From th(
thers of Z( fa Beta tsu
A LIL SISTER RUSH Oct
1 ME and PLACE to be an
moid Our for number
; IE KNIGHTS OF THE
SjBGENIUS We ou like to say
I our ode of gripes thai �
- no ao much better " � � . �
its my ir fia, are a � tt r
ana jest, greanted f s
' a "a' we aim to ao best
"aps the humor for which wr
Ou cannot t,na because you
are not Greek So m cios'o we ha � �
. sav'ce for a
�' k shou'a sufl � keej �
I our affairs beca
st� � . Your oi noboay
reaMy carps1 !
KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU
beach was great so wen meg
es Da anypodv gel any?
net � - was i a ��� i they sa l
- � ' take youi
off to have a god lirru herry
fh �oboo,
�. - legs
kooks beavei
: trac � sthea
�NET B and thepo
. � �
the foundinq
� " � �d Ciub
EFFD Thanx for the memorable
�� " You n growing close to
Good uck on our tests
� � See ou Friday L sa a
nancy N How's the left cheek?
ng anyone? Get psyched for
-�a will our dates be able to
. a th us? (Growl) Rut Ron
e 007
�iPPY HOUR: Come out and party
� the Pt- Taus at the E I
esday .rt from 9pm u"
Hl TAUS, LITTLE SISTERS AND
LEDGES: Don't forget our happy
" ,r at he Elbo Wednesday night.
WIN A fi'ee membership to the
� ����� . ie Athletic Club, dinner for
at Darryl's or cruco's, free ice
� am at Hank's or Pizza at Pizza
Hut Come take a 2Sc guess in front
the Student Store, 11 3 Mon Fri
-OTT'S Oniy three days until
kta s1 Grab your date and get
eady to party'
WANTED
HELP WANTED: Local law firm ,s
� � ng Computer Science or Deo
Sr ence major with good typing
� s for part time word processing
ton io 15 hours per week Call
'58 6200 ana ask for Mary
�OOMMATE WANTED. Free
ty deposit of $150, Kingston
'�' ace Apts , central heatair, fully
"shed, includes all kitchen uten
s and use of pool. $150 per month
� is utilities For info call Don
cazio at 757 3218
"RAVEL FIELD OPPORTUNITY:
Gain aiuable marketing experience
h ie earning money Campus
'epresentative needed immediately
for spring break trip to Florida Call
rampus Marketing at 1 800 282 6221
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share
mobile home, 15 min from campus
J80 plus ' i expenses per month Call
752 7891 from 8 4
WANTED: An experienced Chris
?an pianist or organist needed Call
S30 142 Mon Wed , 8 30-3:30.
SPRING BREAK '87: Earn a free
vacation to Fort Lauderdale or the
Bahamas. Students seriously in
'erested in becoming a campus
representati ve, call
1 800 87 BEACH.
HOMEWORKERS WANTED: Top
Day Work at home Call Cottage
hdustries (405) 340 4062.
WANTED LIFEGUARD SWIM IN
STRUCTORS: Part time Must have
advanced lifesavmg certificate or
water safety instructor certificate
Applicants should be available to
work 2 4 hour shifts between 6am
and 9pm 612 hours weekly Salary
is $3 46 to $3 75 per hour Application
deadline is Oct 17 1986 Apply at the
City of Greenville Personnel Oftu e
201 W 5th St . Greenville
WANTED PROGRAM LEADER
Part time Plan and instruct rec rea
tion programs and supervise lay
area tor pre school and young sc hool
age children Applicants should be
available to work 930 am to 1 30
p m andor 3 30 p m. to 7:30 pm ,
Mon Fri. and from 12 noon to 4 p m
on weekends Salary is $3 46 pel
hour Application deadline is Oct 17
1986 Apply at the City of Greenville
Personnel Office, 201 W 5th St
Greenville
RECEPTIONIST WANTED G
members, check identification
ards, answer phones, make reser
vations, handle monetary transa
tions, answer members question
concerning programs, policies, etc
Applicant must be trustworthy
dependable, helptuk efficient and
friendly Applicant should be
available to work 2 4 hour shifts b I
ween 6am and 9 p m. Salary is
$3 46 to $3 75 per hour Application
deadline is Oct 17 1986 Apply at the
City of Greenville Personnel Of �
201 W 5th St , Greeny,lie
AEROBICS EXERCISE INSTRUC
TORS: Leads and instructs
aerob'cs exerciseclases, must haw
basic understanding of exei �-�
p h y s ogy. kinesiology, ann
anaton . Should have working
Knowledge of choreographer: .�, �
se programs for adults, childn
older adults ano pregnant won
Must be able to design a safe class
and know CPR Must be in excellent
physical condition, must pass fitness
exam ana be willing to go througl
aerobic'S instructor certification
program Salary is $7 to $10 . -
hour- Application deadline is Oct 17
i986 Apply at the City of Greenville
Personnel Office 201 W 5th St

3,000 GOVERNMENT JOBS List
$16,040 59,230 yr Now hiring Call
805 687 6000 Ext R 1166
LOST: Sept 30 Large herringbone
bracelet Reward offered 746 3849
SALE
COMPUTER DATING No lists of
names distributed or any mforma
tion given without your consent We
offer a very personal way for you to
meet new people Introductions
guaranteed or your money bark
student discounts Katz Services
355 7595
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICES: Typ
ng resumes, term papers, thesis
papers Call SDF Professional Com
puter Services Inc , 106 East 5th St
(neai Cubbies Greenville, 752 3694
CHEAP TYPING. Reports, etc Call
Anne at 752 jois and leave a
n essage
S60 PER HUNDRED PAID For
remailing etters from home! Send
' - : � � stamped envelope
i nf or mationapplication
Associates Box 95 B, Roselle, NJ
07203
TYPING: Top quality word process
ing equipment that can meet all your
needs backed with years of ex
perience Low student rates
Mon Sun 9am to 9 p m 355 7595
FOR SALE: Dean Elertnc Guitar.
$225 Alvarez Acoustic $75 Peave
Classic Amp, $215 David 758 0832
GREEK T SHIRTS: STILL WANT
ONE? ZBT can't sell them at the
Student Store, so we'll come to you!
Next week we'll come to our
houses have your $7 ready! Call
752 0262 for mfo
FOR SALE: Exercise bike, $40 110
lb weightset $15 Call 758 6814 after
6 30
FOR SALE : Wedding gown, size 9 10
and 2 formal gowns, sizes 7 8 ana
9 10 Call 758 5303 after 6pm
FOR SALE: Double bed matt
set new $110 Litton microwave, full
size new $170 Minolta 35 mm
' amera with flash, bag new $200
757 3408
D.J Are you having a party ar
need a D JFor the best m Top 40
oeach and dance call Morgan at
758 7967 Reasonable rats
References on request
FOR SALE : An almost brano new
rug, only used tor 6 months, 12' x 16
color chocolate, price $100 trm, in
dudes foam padding Also a 20
gallon fish tank with hd ana light $45
firm Call 355 6686 after 5pm ana
leave name and phone number a
will get back to ou
SAILING: Explore the NC Coast or
Cruise south this fan Sailboats tor
charter up to 45' Captains ano �
structions avaiiab'e Discounts �
students ana far uit The SAILING
PLACE PO Box 1967 Atla I
Beach, N C 28512
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Experienced, quality a �
1 BM Seiectnc typewriter Call La' �
Shive at 758 5301
COMPUTERIZED TYPING Sf R
V 1C E a � proces;
Dataworks spe n res
I � ' � �
report; k . � I I
H eses � ana mot � A

� � ' : ' - at . Ri
��� as $1 75 p� � . -
ling papei � � ; � �
3 Va' a (44 ll '
ECU POETRY FORUM �
� 240 Me' denha r B �
TYPING: Low stuaent rates D
on high quality wora pn �
equipment with a dict.ona' .
cess of 50.000 woras Pro.
correcting available katz SER
VICES 355 7595
SPRING BREAK
CARIBBEAN CRUISE
March 9. 1987. for 5 daysfrom $423
Price includes: cruise and 3 island visit all meals
and entertainment port tax
A great party atmosphere with service to match
aboard Norwegian Caribbean lines ships.
You make a deposit - we'll save a space for you!
C all or stop in for brochure:
QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC.
TUTOR NEEDED
Mo s Aea s fe
752 7396
319 Cotanche Street
�enulle, N.C. 27?
Phone 757-0234
Greenville, N.C. 27834 t
Financial Acct
1 neg Call LOd
PART-TIME WORK AVAILABLE
Mat cutter, frame bunder and fi
Perso yith frame shop exper �
. t will t-S At :
person at Susan's Gallery, 101 A
� St 752 9594
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
At Georgetown Apts 1 or 2 air" 1
share 2 ri�-o'00m townhouse1 ��
� ihl nexl � � -a �
� � stance to campus' New
carpet, big rooms! Call 752 9245
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Comer 10th A Dickinson Ave
We Buy Gold & Silver
PITT
CCJHTY
COMMISSIONS
1ACI
� ' uj i at
Alt P tl Co W - -t �
.
r auuij�
( unl iiinn i- iniin I
1
� '� ' �
Mary Lou Suqq
Hug an
East Carolinian
employee . . .
WE NEED IT
A-JNSTANT CASH LOANS jfijt,
fu7 Ail Transactions Confidential JP
752-0322
�� �. - 0t pa Moa-Sat
CAPP
Central American Peace Project
CAPP will meet Wednesday evening, 7:30
p.m. at the Methodist Student Center, 5th
Street. All are welcome. For more info ca
8300349
Qnthiak
I y PI KJ
X lowcm
3010A East 10' Street. Greenville
ECU HOMECOMING
CORSAGE and BOl TS
FOOTBALL Ml M CORSAGES $4.75
BOUTS-ROSES $2.99
CARNATIONS $1.99
We have many types of corsages
Roses-carnations, daisy -pom-poms
- Colors - purple, yellow, white, pink, red
ORDER TODAY 757-1892
ft'sJazz'nl
clown ctfst
dance
Ballet Jazz,Tap,&
Modem
( I.isms .n.iil.ihlr acs & up
li� iiiintni Inlirnndidlc � Advdmtd
(MiHHIirnlKiMd � ln-nl llldqr VuKain iltStUI t, ; ('il
H'H ijintHii CmiimtBt m ITa 7SHHi'tti
m ilii.
'�I XL ,rl� l
1 h. .i.
One of the year's best films.
I Jaunting and en ik
"Brilliant
"William Hurts sexual chemistry
produces the heat w .� k, Man. kin
Is .1 K I( I"
"One of the Best Films of 1)X6
fhc most extraordinary loe ston in mam c.ir
rich and protouixlh moving v m
4�
Marlee Matlin in a knock-out
screen debut. Vh r ,n
.Hid H'W lOVe St(�r ?? C, �� Ir-ncrs I'lnl'll ' .
WILLIAM HURT � MARLEE MATLIN
PVKVMtMMPKTIRrS PRESENTS K( Kl M tKM PROM1ION
ARVNUAIUIMSHIM (Mil DRKN Or ALESSERG00 PIPrRI.UKIr PIRUPROSC0
Screenpto b� HKSPKR ANDERSON and MARK MEDOff Bm. ki tk swjh P1i h� MRK IKOOH
Pniducd by Bl RT SI GARMA.N and PATRK K PALMER IHrwitd b RVM H.UNES
R
MtTIIICTIO
25

IT�H��TKV UIBOmiCaBMEO
XPXRVMtHM PKTIRh
NOW PLAYING AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU.






resent
m
Howell
Ispel Choir
Classifieds
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 14, 1986
11
PERSONAL
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: The Sig Ep
Brothers, Pledges, and
Goldenhearts would like to welcome
all of the new little sisters! Con-
gratulations!
KENNY FAIL:
DAY
HAPPY BIRTH
jCOTT OIBBS: I have been all
around the world and I've never
seen anyone as cute as you, except
for the Pandas at the Washington
Zoo!
DRAFT NIGHT: Tuesday, and the
EL BO, come all! Sponsored by the
sisters and pledges of Delta Zeta.
BETA OMICRON: The sisters Of
Delta Zeta would like to thank you
all for the great surprise party with
the TKE's last Friday! We love you
all Sisters of Delta Zeta.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI: Thanks for the
social- that graduation "thang We
proved once again that Delta Zeta's
can hang! We had a ball, can't wait
to party again with you all! Love,
The Graduates of Delta Zeta.
SCOTT: Thanks for being "the
greatest I owe you for all those
late night talks and walks from the
library- Oh, and expecially the fights
(they're the best). I'm getting
stronger. I hope we'll always be as
close ac we are now. Love You A Lot
me.
ZBT: Pledges, get in touch with
yourselves. P.S. Watch for Warren's
debut in the crime column.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY DAVE
FRANC, ROB HOWELL AND
MARC KLNECKENER: From the
Brothers of Zeta Beta Tau.
PIKA LIL SISTER RUSH: Oct.
20-22. TIME and PLACE to be an-
nounced. "Hold our for number
onfr
T'HE KNIGHTS OF THE
S JBGENIUS: We would like to say
o you in reference to your letter, by
reading your ode of gripes, that you
could no do much better. The per-
sonals, my friend, are written in
good humor and jest, greanted, it is
not what we AIM to do best, but
perhaps the humor for which we
seek, you cannot find because you
are not Greek. So in closing we have
some friendly advice, for which we
all think should suffice; keep your
nose out of our affairs, because,
blatentlyYour opinion, nobody
really cares
KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU: The
beach was great, so were the gnarly
waves. Did anybody get any?
Somebody was right when they said,
"You don't have to take your clothes
off to have a god timecherry
wine The only problem is nobody
told Todd or Kevin. Broken legs,
wrestling matches, kooks, beaver
sand traps, strange beds, lost heads,
JANET? George Bush and the police
made it an interesting weekend.
Congratulations to the founding
fathers of the Knee Deep Club.
JEFF D Thanx for the memorable
weekend. You're growing close to
my heart. Good luck on your tests
this week. See you Friday. -Lisa A.
NANCY N How's the left cheek?
Swimming anyone? Get psyched for
cocktail, will our dates be able to
fiang with us? (Growl) Rut Roh.
Love, .007
HAPPY HOUR: Come out and party
with the Phi Taus at the Elbo
Wednesday night from 9 p.muntil.
PHI TAUS, LITTLE SISTERS AND
PLEDGES: Don't forget our happy
hour at the Elbo Wednesday night.
WINIH: A free membership to the
Greenville Athletic Club, dinner for
2 at Darryl's or Chico's, free ice
cream at Hank's or Pizza at Pizza
Hut. Come take a .25 guess in front
of the Student Store, 11-3 VonFri.
AOTT'S: Only three days until
cocktails! Grab your date and get
ready to party!
WANTED
HELP WANTED: Local law firm is
seeking Computer Science or Deci-
sion Science major with good typing
skills for part-time word processing
position. 10-15 hours per week. Call
158 6200 and ask for Mary.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Free
security deposit of $150, Kingston
Place Apts central heatair, fully
furnished, includes all kitchen uten-
sils, and use of pool. $150 per month
Plus utilities. For info, call Don
Fazio at 757-3211.
TRAVEL FIELD OPPORTUNITY:
Gain valuable marketing experience
while earning money. Campus
representative needed immediately
for spring break trip to Florida. Call
Campus Marketing at l 800-282 6221
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share
mobile home; 15 mln. from campus
$80 plus Va expenses per month. Call
Bill 752 7891 from 8-4.
WANTED: An experienced Chris
tian pianist or organist needed. Call
�30-1442 MonWed 1:30-3:30.
SPRING BREAK 'if: Earn a free
vacation to Fort Lauderdale or the
Bahamas. Students seriously in-
terested in becoming a campus
representative, call
1 800-87 BEACH.
HOMBWORKERS WANTED: Top
pay- work at home- Call Cottage
Industries- (405) 340-4041.
WANTED: LIFEGUARD-SWIM IN-
STRUCTORS: Part-time. Must have
advanced lifesaving certificate or
water safety instructor certificate.
Applicants should be available to
work 2-4 hour shifts between 6 a.m.
and 9 p.m. 6-12 hours weekly. Salary
is $3.46 to $3.75 per hour. Application
deadline is Oct. 17, 1986. Apply at the
City of Greenville Personnel Office,
201 W. 5th St Greenville.
3,000 GOVERNMENT JOBS: List
$16,040- 59,230yr. Now hiring. Call
805 687 6000 Ext. R-HoA
LOST: Sept. 30. Large herringbone
bracelet. Reward offered. 746-3849.
SALE
WANTED: PROGRAM LEADER:
Part-time. Plan and instruct recrea
tion programs and supervise play
area for pre school and young school
age children. Applicants should be
available to work 9:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. andor 3:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m
MonFri. and from 12 noon to 4 p.m.
on weekends. Salary is $3.46 per
hour. Application deadline is Oct. 17,
1986. Apply at the City of Greenville
Personnel Office, 201 W. 5th St
Greenville.
RECEPTIONIST WANTED: Greet
members, check identification
cards, answer phones, make reser-
vations, handle monetary transac-
tions, answer members questions
concerning programs, policies, etc.
Applicant must be trustworthy,
dependable, helpfulc efficient and
friendly. Applicant should be
available to work 2-4 hour shifts bet
ween 6 a.m. and 9 p.m. Salary is
$3.46 to $3.75 per hour. Application
deadline is Oct. 17, 1986. Apply at the
City of Greenville Personnel Office,
201 W. 5th St Greenville.
AEROBICSEXERCISE INSTRUC-
TORS: Leads and instructs
aerobicsexercise clases; must have
basic understanding of exercise
physiology, kinesiology, and
anatomy. Should have working
knowledge of choreographed exer
cise programs for adults, children,
older adults and pregnant women.
Must be able to design a safe class
and know CPR. Must be in excellent
physical condition, must pass fitness
exam and be willing to go through
aerobic's instructor certification
program. Salary is $7 to $10 per
hour: Application deadline is Oct. 17,
1986. Apply at the City of Greenville
Personnel Office, 201 W. 5th St
Greenville.
TUTOR NEEDED: Financial Acct.
Mon's� Weds; fee neg. Call Lori
7527396.
PART-TIME WORK AVAILABLE:
Mat cutter, frame builder and fitter.
Person with frame shop experience
preferred but will train. Apply in
person at Susan's Gallery, 101 W.
14th St. 752 9594.
COMPUTER DATING: No lists Of
names distributed or any informa-
tion given without your consent. We
offer a very personal way for you to
meet new people. Introductions
guaranteed or your money back.
Student discounts. Katz Services
355 7595.
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICES: Typ
ing resumes, term papers, thesis
papers. Call SDF Professional Com-
puter Services Inc 106 East 5th St.
(near Cubbies), Greenville, 752-3694.
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc. Call
Anne at 752 3015 and leave a
message.
TYPING: Top quality word process-
ing equipment that can meet all your
needs backed with years of ex-
perience. Low student rates.
Mon. Sun. 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 355-7595.
FOR SALE: Dean Electric Guitar,
$225. Alvarez Acoustic $75. Peavey
Classic Amp, $215. David 758-0832.
GREEK T SHIRTS: STILL WANT
ONE? ZBT can't sell them at the
Student Store, so we'll come to you!
Next week we'll come to your
houses- Ijave your $7 ready! Call
752-0262 for info.
FOR SALE: Exercise bike, $40. 110
lb. weight set- $15. Call 758-6814 after
6:30.
FOR SALE: Wedding gown, size 9-10
and 2 formal gowns, sizes 7-8 and
9 10. Call 758-5303 after 6 p.m.
FOR SALE: Double bed mattress
set new $110. Litton microwave, full
size new $170. Minolta 35 mm
camera with flash, bag new $200.
757-3408.
FOR SALE: An almost brand new
rug, only used for 6 months, 12' x 16
color chocolate, price $100 firm, in
etudes foam padding. Also, a 20
gallon fish tank with lid and light $45
firm. Call 355-6686 after 5 p.m. and
leave name and phone number and
will get back to you.
SAILING: Explore the NC Coast or
Cruise south this fall. Sailboats for
charter up to 45! Captains and in
structions available. Discounts to
students and faculty. The SAILING
PLACE. P.O. Box 1967, Atlantic
Beach, NC. 28512.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Experienced, quality work,
IBM Selectric typewriter. Call Lanie
Shiveat758 5301.
ECU POETRY FORUM will meet in
Room 240 Mendenhall at 8 00 pm
Thursday
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER-
VICE: Word processing The
Dataworks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertations,
theses, resumes and more. All work
is computer checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary. Rates
are as low as $1.75 per page, in
eluding paper. (Call for specific
rates). Call Mark at 757 3440 after 7
p.m.
TYPING: Low student rates. Done
on high quality word processing
equipment with a dictionary in ex
cess of 50,000 words. Professional
correcting available. KATZ SER
VICES 355 7595.
$60 PER HUNDRED PAID: For
remailing letters from home! Send
self-addressed, stamped envelope
for informationapplication.
Associates, Box 95 B, Roselle, NJ
07203.
D.J Are you having a party and
need a D.J.? For the best in Top 40,
beach and dance call Morgan at
758-7967. Reasonable rates.
References on request.
)
SPRING BREAK
CARIBBEAN CRUISE
March 9, 1987, for 5 daysfrom $423
Price includes: cruise and 3 island visit all meals
and entertainment port tax
A great party atmosphere with service to match
aboard Norwegian Caribbean Lines ships.
You make a deposit - we'll save a space for you!
Call or stop in for brochure:
QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC.
319 Cotanche Street . q
t
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Phone 757-0234
WTT
CCVHTY
COMMISSIONERS
RACI
TV�Q � Bo:0 1
�u Mali �� up fo
alactton Hnumtm 4
All Pin Count vot�rt

MARY LOU
SUGG
Counly Commissioner
n9
.ni m!
�U3 lum.C
VottForOn.
��. Fa, Oh
Candidate! For Mggjjjg Election
Damociai?J�
io�. Mam Mary Lou Sugg
Vat.Fot On
Bainath Oawi
Ciu-Kt Mill lima
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave
.j
Hug an
East Carolinian
employee . . .
WE NEED IT
CAPP
Central
n Peace
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
At Georgetown Apts. 1 or 2 girls to
share 2 bedroom townhouse! Great
location, right next to downtown!
Walking distance to campus! New
carpet, big rooms! Call 752-9245.
CAPP will meet Wednesday evening, 7:30
p.m. at the Methodist Student Center, 5th
Street. All are welcome. For more info call
830-0349.
3010A East 10,h Street. Cireenvitie
ECU HOMECOMING
CORSAGE and BOUTS
FOOTBALL MUM CORSAGES $4.75
BOUTS-ROSES $2.99
CARNATIONS $1.99
We have many types of corsages
Roses-carnations, daisy -pom-poms
- Colors - purple, yellow, white, pink, red
ORDER TODAY
757-1892
ItsJazzn!
r
be year's best films.
rid CfOtiC" -Ocnrsiskcl Hit AGO IRlBt f
�n.�tW�
Brilliant!
99
�Maritvn Hik Hl v.o IRlBt l SYNDH Ml
it
William Hurt's sexual chemistry
produces the beat Mar Matims denm
is a victory nnm iraj�im playsoi magazine
One of the Best Films of 1986
The most extraordinary love story in many years
rich and profoundly moving. -iKhJci kihcd sr.k pievews
Marlee Matlin in a knock-out
SCreen O&uUt. A deeply romantic
and sexv love storv. -peter asm raoru magazmi
down CS&t Ballet, Jazz, Tap, &
dance Modem
Classes available ages J a up
Beginning � Intermediate � Advanced
OH B Trrnt Road
4l9rvai
do. 4 Itent Village . Km Bern. NC MM � 637 TO I
NaH � GreeawMe. "C 2783; � 7M-8I98
ta MUi �l MUatii l(M MmU
WILLIAM HURT � MARLEE MATLIN
PARAMOwrnaiiESritiTs AitmsiityiMANnwoicriaN
A RA.NTH HALMS FILM CHIU)RLN OF A LESSER GOD PIPER LAiWE PHILIP BOSCO
Pr�bccdfeBlirTSllR.HAiPAlTUCKPALMER DimtcdIn RAMHHVLNES
IMt
:t & 1
�Ml Kt�VHni
nrmuuiT C mm by nuuMOuir nrrutcs
catKaunm Aiii
A PARMOlT PK1VRE T
NOW PLAYING AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU.
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12
JlliJIN!AN00
1986
Announcements
ECU AMBASSADORS
There w.li be an executive council meeting
? or ECU Ambassadors on Wednesday. Oct
tl at 5 15 p m m room 34? of Mendenhali
S.L.A.P. DEPARTMENT
The SLA P Department will be having a
oake sale m the lobby ot the Allied Health
Building on Wednesday. October 15 from
9 00 until 2 00 Donations will go toward the
scholarship fund
ECU AMBASSADORS
There will be a general meeting for all
members on Wednesday. October 15 at 5:15
p m in the Multipurpose Room of
Mendenhali There are many items to be
discussed regarding homecoming
� Ml r a!
N.A.A.C.P.
There will be an N A AC P meeting on
Thursday. Oct Uatf 30pm ,n room 221 ,n
Mendenhali All interested people art en
vited
PRESBYTERIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Got tht cafeteria blues? Come this
Wednesday and every Wednesday night at 5
p m for a delicious home cooked meal at the
Methodist Student Center, 501 E 5th St
across from Garrett Dorm. This weeks
discussion topic Apartheid. Meal is $2 at the
door SI JO with reservation (75a 2030) Spon
sored by Presbyterian and Methodist Cam
pus Ministries
KARATE CLUB
rt.LriE Crohn� K�� Club will hold a
demonstr.t.on and sign�p beginn.ng
classes or. Thursday Oct HatJOinrm 10.
Memorial Gym. All interested in mart
arts should come The club is open to all belts
�M styles Sponsored by the Department of
intermural Rec. Services.
STUDENT UNION
The Phantoms will be playing at The
Underground (basement of Mendenhali)
Thursday. October 14th at � p.m. Admission
'S 1 00 Sponsored by the Coffeehouse Com
mittee.
JOB SEARCH
WORKSHOP
Come to a 1 hour program with sample
videotapes put on by the Businesswe
Careers Magazine! A tree 43 page workbook
will be given away to those in attendance ano
sect.ons include Dressing for Success.
Resume Writing and New Careers!
Mendenhali 244 1 00 3 00 or 5 00 p m on
Monosy October 20!
WOMEN'S SOCCER CLUB
Attention Soccer Players: ECU Women's
Soccer Club will have an organizational
meeting on October 22 in lose Memorial
Gym at 4 p.m. For more information please
contact Reneeat 75� W97 All are invited
STUDENT RESIDENTS
ASSOCIATION
All students welcome! Student Residents
Association is sponsoring a dance at Beau's
Nightclub on October U. tea. It will be from
� P.m to 1 a.m. it year olds are invited.
Show your SRA card at the door with your
1.0. and receive a FREE membership with
paid admission Come celebrate after the
homecoming football game!
ECUCIRCLE-K
SED
Upse' with Apartheid. American involve
ment in Central America ano U S Govern
ment i,es? Good So are we Students for
Economic Demcxracy meets every Sunday
from 79 p.m m room 238. second floor.
Mendenhali Student Center
FREE! If you are interested in meeting
people, serving your community, leadership
and fun then you are free to attend the next
meeting of the Circle-K Club Sunday Oct It
7pm Menoenhall Bring a friend!
ECUCIRCLE-K
ECU Circle-tC Membersmp tram,ng rally
at States.He What a blast! Our club is ex
c tea about hosing the Christmas sooai
Dec 6 Let's get nvolvea! Next meet ng Oct
18, Sunoay at 7 00 p m Mendenhali New
embers welcome'
VETERANS CLUB
Veterans Benefits The ECU Veterans
dub win meetonTues Oct 14 at 7 30 p m ,n
Rm 221. Menoenhall One of the main ,tems
on the agenoa aril) be a discussion of the 01a
and New G 1 Bills the entitlements ana pro
ceoures Mrs Slay Jackson ana Mrs
Lauraetta Gafhn, who work in the
RegistrarVeterans Affa.rs Otf.ce on cam
pus. will be the guest speakers Th,s is a
crucial meet.ng for EVERYONE receiving
veterans Educational benefits because the
nformaton emanating from this meeting
prove to be extremely beneficial to your
f.nanc s ana educational status We win
also be hoio.ng our election of officers
tcmincttpni will be taken from the floor
Membership m the organization ,s open to an
students faculty, staff, and alumn, of ECU
Refreshments will be served after the
meeting You do not need to be member to
ar�eno
The Films
Committee Will
Have A Special
Showing Of
Gung Ho
On Wednesday,
October 15 at
6:00p.m. Sorry
For The
Inconvenience
Last Weekend.
ECU SURFING
The next contest jS af Hatteras m 2 weeks
aqamst Coastal and UNC W The contest will
be held the weekend of Fall Break and
anyone can surf in ,t (even if you missed the
teamtr.ais) There will be plenty of room on
'he van for any new members For more m-
to . come to the next meeting Thursday. Oct
23 at 8 00 m room B-04 JOyner Library Team
T shirts will be on sale at the meeting so br
a cash Imi Mvella!
STUDENT UNION
RECREATION
COMMITTEE
Ladies Sharpen your pool sticksl Get
ready for the All-Campus Women's Billiards
Tournament on Thursday, October 23rd
Register m the Billiards Center ,n
Mendenhali by Wednesday, October 22nd
before 5 p.m.
LSS SOCIETY
AND STUDENTS
Mandatory meeting for those wanting tn
go to the MorgantonHigh Point (NCRPS)
Conference Weekend. You have to be there if
you want to gol Meeting is Thurs Oct l�th
at 9 30 p m in the LSS Building
Dependable
Cab Co.
Operates 24 Hours a Day
Uniformed Drivers
Prompt and Courteous Service
(A Must)
Radio Dispatched
757-0288
?.
We cater to ECU students "
L
IF YOU CAN TAKE CHARGE HERE,
YOU CAN TAKE CHARGE ANYWHERE
Today's Navy offers one of the best
opportunities you might ever have to
develop leadership experience.
It's experience that has given
a boost to a lot of brilliant careers
in and out of the Navy And it's
an inherent part of a Navy officer's
professional development
Management openings in
finance, inventory control and pur-
chasing, scientific, engineering and
technical fields offer a wide variety
of opportunities to work in a
challenging environment that can
be very rewarding
Exceptional benefits include free
medical and dental care.30 days'
paid vacation each year, plus tax-free
allowances
Minimum qualifications require
a BA or BS degree. IS citizenship,
and security clearance You must
not have reached your 29th birthday
by commissioning An aptitude and
physical test are required. For further
information, call Naw Management
Programs at (800) 662-7231, MonFri
8 a.m4 p.m. There's no
obligation.
CO-OP ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH
Positions available for students interested
m industrial Hygene for Spring im
Graduate or undergraduate students may
apply for these positions located m
Charlotte. Richmond, and New Bern Wh,Ch
pay II100 1500 per month For more informa
tion contact Co-op, 313 Rawl
MODEL CO-OP
PROGRAM
Positions art available m a variety ot ma
iors tor students interested m gaming r�
perience m state government Positions are
located M Raleigh and are available for Spr
ing and Summer For more information con
fact Cooperative Education. 313 nmm
CO-OP TECHNICAL
SALES
Outstanding opportunity tor an ndustr a'
technology student concentrating r.
technical sate ano services Tn,$ pos.t.on
'ocaiad tm Naw tern provides a"n on tu
oer Kt ,n customer service with a maior
corporation Mary to SISDO per n-ontr- For
more information contact cooper
education 313 g,�
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
Help defeat Democrat Dictatorship join
College Republicans today Meetings every
Tuesday evening �t 4:30 in Ml Mendenhali
Call (30 12M or 753 37 or more informa
tion
PHI BETALAMOA
Phi Beta Lamda will meet on Wednesday.
October 15th at 3 p.m. in Rawl 303 Fall Con
ference and fund raising will be discussed
WORKSTUDY
ELIGIBLE STUDENTS
The Department of Political Science needs
workstudy students (already approved b�
the Office of Financial Aid) to fill cier pos
tions Prefer students that are not our own
melors Contact Ms Cynthia Sm.th at
757 030 or appi y to her atRrewster Buidmg
A 134
PADDLING CLUB
The ECU Padding Out) will hoa a"
organ,lationa meeting ano elect.or �� ot
ticerson Thursday night. October � at I 00
pm in Memorial Gym Room 105 Plans tor a
Saturday. October 35 OUt.rvg to Merchant,
Mill Pond State Park win be o.scusseo M
structionai paddling and esk.mo rail sess �.
are planned to Memorial Gyn- Poo a� Ma
meeting ah students staff and fecu't, �no
art interested .n fiatwater aroc
Whitewater peddling ere encouregeo to at
tend this orgennet.onai meet ng
Proud To Say East Carolina .
Catch The Spirit
HOMECOMING 1986
Tuesday, Oct. 14
Thursday. Oct. 16
Friday Oct. 17
Saturday Oct. 18
Sunday Oct. 19
Comedy Laugh Off
8:00 p.m. Hendrix $2.50 Students $3.50 facultystaff
THE PHANTOMS
8:00 ECU Coffee House
7:00 Pep Rally
Ficklen Stadium
8:00 THE BAD CHECKS
Ampitheatre
10:00 a.m. Homecoming Parade
2:00 p.m. ECU vs. Georgia Southern
Crowning of "Miss ECU"
Alumni Awards
THE AWARENESS ART
ENSEMBLE
2:00p.m. University Mall
COMING ATTRACTIONS
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14
Comedy Laugh-Off
8:00 P.M. Hendrix
$2.50 ECU Students $4.00 Public
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15
F.im: Colonel Red I
8:00 P.M. Hendrix
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16
THE PHANTOMS
8:00 P.M. Underground
Admission: $1.00
OCTOBER 16, 17, 18, 19
Film: The Color Purple
8:00 P.M. Hendrix
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17
Concert BAD CHECKS
8:00 P.M. Ampitheatre
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 19
THE AWARENESS ART
ENSEMBLE
2:00 PM. UnivAriK Mall
L
Contect: Lt. Brian Coyle
Navy Representative
October 20-21
NAVY OFFICERS GET RESPONSIBILITY FAST.
iQUI 'OIITM �Ou
A
Rathering place
r
llback Anthom Simpson ��
Iturday's loss lo Temple simpvn
rosh Do
B RICK McCORMAC
Freshmen swimmers
jminated the action as EC
en's and women's swim teams
eld their annual pentathlon last
fhursday.
The top scorer for both
wn and women were first-year
wnmers, and freshman swept
ur of the top-five places for -he
Iromen.
Leading the wa for the
tomen was Jennifer Dolan who
.rushed with a total of 12
ants. Dolan won the 100-me:e-
style and tbe 20Djnei�, m-
ridual medley. hile final .
:ond in both the 100-me:e- flj
100-meter backstroke
finishing second :
)men was senior Cacee F
th 2,880 points. The remaii
the top-five finisher- I i
amen were all freshmen. Leslie
ftlson captured third place � -
Ttl points, followed b Ryan
ilyaw's 2,735 points and R
icks with 2,666.
Other winners for the women
Vre: Philyaw in the 100-meter
Poust in the 100-meter
Jcksrtoke ans Susie Wentick in
100-meter breaststroke.
jCraig Faircloth was the top
)rer for the men finishing with
62 points. He wa cioseiv
Wl
m
Ml
McCarthy
s Booters
By SCOTT COOPER
l o-ports t!or
ECU freshman Stee McCar-
' has been named the Col-
onial Athletic soccer player ol
pc week, CAA information
prector Ken Ries announced
Tsterdav
McCarthy was recognized
to his achievement as a Pirate
Jrward last week in the mat-
tes against Virginia Wesleyan
nd Mehtodist College.
The Columbia. Md native
�d four goals in the pair of
tnes last week and is the first
-U soccer player to gain such
honor this season.
The ECU soccer team,
Vvl
in
oj
as
-eJ
adj
Jal
as
coi
1
Pol
va
mi
botl
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facel
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Store MrCart�
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:
4 ,






12
-IiiSTgAROLINlAN OCTOBER u,
1986
Announcements
ECU AMBASSADORS
There will be an executive council meeting
tor ECU Ambassadors on Wednesday. Oct
M at 5 �S p m in room 242 of MendenhaM
S.L.A.P. DEPARTMENT
The S L A P Department will be hawing a
oahe sale n the lobby of the Allied Health
Boiidmg on Wednesday. October 1$ from
� 00 until I oo Donations will go toward the
scholarship fund
N.A.A.C.P.
There will be an N A A C P meeting on
Thursday. Oct U at 5 � p m ,n room 221 Ml
MendenhaM ah interested people are in
viteo
JOB SEARCH
WORKSHOP
Come to a 1 hour program with sample
v.oeotapes put on by the Businessweek
Careers Magazine! a free 42 page workbook
will be given away to those in attendance and
sections include Dressing tor Success.
Resume Writing and New Careers!
Menoenhan 244 1 00. 3 00 or 5 00 p m on
Monday October 10!
ECU AMBASSADORS
There will be a general meeting for all
members on Wednesday. October IS at 5: IS
p.m. in the Multipurpose Room of
Mendenhall There are many items to be
discussed regarding homecoming.
PRESBYTERIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Got the cafeteria blues? Come this
Wednesday and every Wednesday night at S
P m for a delicious home-cooked meal at the
Methodist Student Center, S01 E Sth St.
across from Garrett Dorm. This weeks
discussion topic: Apartheid. Meal is 12 at the
door. SI SO with reservation (75 2030) Soon
sored by Presbyterian and Methodist Cam
pus Ministries.
WOMEN'S SOCCER CLUB
Attention Soccer Players: ECU Women's
Soccer Club will have an organizational
meeting on October O in 105-c Memorial
Gym at t p m For more information pleat
contact Renee at 75a 9997 All are invited.
THF t
KARATE CLUB
The East Carolina Karate Club will hold a
demonstration and sign up for beginning
classes on Thursday Oct Uat 7:30 in rm tot
Memorial Gym All interested in martial
arts should com Theclubisopen to all belts
and styles Sponsored by the Department of
Intermural Rc. Services.
CO-OP ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH
Positions available tor students interested
�n industrial Hygiene for Spring m
Graduate or undergraduate students may
apply for these positions located in
Charlotte, Richmond, and New Bern wh.ch
pay SI 100-MM per month. For more inform-
tion contact Co-op, 313 Rawl.
MODEL CO-OP
PROGRAM
Positions are available in a variety ma
iors for students interested in gaining ex
perience m state government Positions are
located in Raleigh and are available for Spr
mg and Summer For more information con
tact Cooperative Education, 313 Rawl
CO-OP TECHNICAL
SALES
Outstanding opportunity for an industnai Sm
technology student concentrating ,n
technical sales and services This position -
located in New Bern provides hands on ex
perience in customer service with a maior
corporation Salary to IISO0 per month For 2
more information contact cooperative- -
education, 313 Rawl
STUDENT UNION
1
The Phantoms will be playing at The
Underground (basement of Mendenhall)
Thursday. October uth at p.m. Admission
is $1.00 Sponsored by the Coffeehouse Com
mittee.
STUDENT RESIDENTS
ASSOCIATION
All students welcomel Student Residents
Association is sponsoring a dance at Beau's
Nightclub on October �, ltM It will be from
I p.m. to 1 a.m. 11 year olds are invited
Show your SRA card at the door with your
ID and receive a FREE membership with
paid admission come celebrate after the
homecoming football game!
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
Help defeat Democrat Dictatorship join
College Republicans today. Meetings every
Tuesday evening at 30 in Ml Mendenhall
Call 130 1J9� or 752 351 !y more informa
tlon.
PHI BETALAMDA
Phi Beta Lamda will meet on Wednesday.
October 15th at 3 p.m. in Rawl 302. Fall Con
ference and fund raising will be discussed
PADDLING CLUB
WORKSTUDY
ELIGIBLE STUDENTS
The Department of Political Science needs
workstudy students (already approved by
the Office of Financial Aid) to fill clerk posi
tions Prefer students that are not our own
maiors. Contact Ms Cynthia Smith at
757 4030 or apply to her at Brewster Building.
A 124
The ECU Paddling Club will hold an �
organiietionai meeting and election of of- ,J�J
ficers on Thursday night, October I, at I 0O
p.m in Memorial Gym Room 105 Plans for � -jjj
Saturday, October 2$ outing to Merchants- -5;
Mill Pond State Park win be discussed m 3
structional paddling andeskimo roil sessions
are planned in Memorial Gym Pool after the
meeting AH students, staff, and faculty who
are interested m flatwater andor -2
Whitewater paddling are encouraged to at
tend this organizational meeting
r
SED
Upset with Apartheid. American involve
ment ,n Central America and U S Govern
ment i,es? Good So are we Students tor
Economic Democracy meets every Sunday
from 7-9 pm in room 23�. second floor.
Menoenhaii Student Center
ECU CIRCLE K
FREE! If you are interested in meeting
people, serving your community, leadership,
ana fun then you are free to attend the next
meeting of the Circle-K Club Sunday Oct.II,
7pm Mendenhall Bring a friend!
ECUCIRCLE-K
ECU Crcle-IC Membership training rally
at Statesviiie What a bias Our club is ex
cteo about hos'mg the Christmas sooai
Dec 6 Lef s get involved! Next meeting OC
!�. Sunday at 7 00 p m Mendenhall New
members welcome!
VETERANS CLUB
veterans Benefits The ECU Veterans
Ciub win meet on Tues Oct u at 7 30 p m in
Rm 221. Menoenhaii One of the main 'terns
on the agenoa wiii be a discussion of the 0a
and New G 1 Bills the entitlements 8na pro
ceoures Mrs Slay Jackson ana Mrs
Lauraetta Gathn. who work in the
RegistrarVeterans Affairs Office on cam
Pus. win be the guest speakers Th.s is a
crucial meeting for EVERYONE receiving
veterans Educational benefits because the
"format,or emanating from this meeting
may prove to be extremely beneficial to your
'�nanca! ana educational status We wtH
also be holding our election of officers
-om,nations wll be taken from the floor
Membership .n the organization is open to an
students, faculty, staff and alumn, of ECU
Refreshments win be served after the
meeting you 00 not need to be member to
arera
The Films
Committee Will
Have A Special
Showing Of
Gung Ho
On Wednesday,
October 15 at
6:00p.m. Sorry
For The
Inconvenience
Last Weekend.
ECU SURFING
The next contest is at Hatteras m 2 weeks
agamst Coastal and UNCW. The contest will
be held the weekend of Fall Break and
anyone can surf in it (even if you missed the
team trials) There will be plenty of room on
the van for any new members. For more in-
to , come to the next meeting Thursday, Oct
23 at 8 00 m room B 04 Joyner Library Team
T shirts will be on sale at the meeting so br
9 cash lm. Mvella!
STUDENT UNION
RECREATION
COMMITTEE
Ladles: Sharpen your pool sticks! Get
ready for the All-Campus Women's Billiards
Tournament on Thursday, October 23rd
Register in the Billiards Center in
Mendenhall by Wednesday, October 2Jnd
before 5 p.m.
Proud To Say East Carolina .
Catch The Spirit
HOMECOMING 1986
LSS SOCIETY
AND STUDENTS
Mandatory meeting for those wanting tr
go to the MorgantonHigh Point (NCRPS)
Conference Weekend You have to be there if
you want to gol Meeting is Thurs Oct Uth
at 9 30 p m in the LSS Building
Tuesday, Oct. 14
Thursday, Oct. 16
Friday Oct. 17
Dependable
Cab Co.
Saturday Oct. 18
Operates 24 Hours a Day
Uniformed Drivers
Prompt and Courteous Service
(A Must)
Radio Dispatched . .
� bmm , m a j at
757-0288
Sunday Oct. 19
Comedy Laugh Off
8:00 p.m. Hendrix $2.50 Students $3.50 facultystaff
THE PHANTOMS
8:00 ECU Coffee House
7:00 Pep Rally
Ficklen Stadium
8:00 THE BAD CHECKS
Ampitheatre
10:00 a.m. Homecoming Parade
2:00 p.m. ECU vs. Georgia Southern
Crowning of "Miss ECU"
Alumni Awards
THE AWARENESS ART
ENSEMBLE
2:00p.m. University Mall

4
We cater to ECU students "
COMING ATTRACTIONS
IF YOU CAN TAKE CHARGE HERE,
YOU CAN TAKE CHARGE ANYWHERE,
Today's Navy offers one of the best
opportunities you might ever have to
develop leadership experience.
It's experience that has given
a boost to a lot of brilliant careers
in and out of the Navy And it's
an inherent part of a Navy officer's
professional development
Management openings in
finance, inventory control and pur-
chasing, scientific, engineering and
technical fields offer a wide variety
of opportunities to work in a
challenging environment that can
be very rewarding
Exceptional benefits include free
medical and dental care. 30 days'
paid vacation each year, plus tax-free
allowances
Minimum qualifications require
a BA or BS degree. V S citizenship,
and security clearance. You must
not have reached your 29th birthday
by commissioning An aptitude and
physical test are required. For further
information, call Navy Management
Programs at (800) 662-7231, MonFri
8 a.m.4 p.m. There's no
obligation.
Contact: Lt. Brian Coyle
Navy Representative
October 20-21
NAVY
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14
Comedy Laugh-Off
8:00 P.M. Hendrix
$2.50 ECU Students $4.00 Public
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15
Film: Colonel Redl
8:00 P.M. Hendrix
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16
THE PHANTOMS
8:00 PM. Underground
Admission: $1.00
OCTOBER 16, 17, 18, 19
Film: The Color Purple
8:00 P.M. Hendrix
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17
Concert BAD CHECKS
8:00 P.M. Ampitheatre
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 19
THE AWARENESS ART
ENSEMBLE
2:00 PM. University Moll
anno
GET RESPONSIBILITY MSI J
, CX TO!
gathering place
il
? 1
Jiback Anthony Simpson was the!
iturday's loss to Temple. Simpson
rosh Do
By RICK McCORMAC
C�-Sorti fMlm
Freshmen swimmers
ominated the action as ECU's
ten's and women's swim teams
eld their annual pentathlon last
'hursday.
The top scorer for both the
n and women were first-year
wimmers, and freshman swept
rour of the top-five places for the
omen.
Leading the way for the
women was Jennifer Dolan who
finished with a total of 3,320
points. Dolan won the 100-meter
freestyle and the 2Q0,metrt in-
dividual medley, while finishing
econd in both the 100-mete-
100-meter backstroke.
Finishing second for the
omen was senior Caycee Poust
vith 2,880 points. The remainder
)f the top-five finishers for the
vomen were all freshmen. Leslie
Wilson captured third place with
781 points, followed bv Rvan
'hilyaw's 2,735 points and Robin
Vicks with 2,666.
Other winners for the women
we: Philyaw in the 100-meter
y, Poust in the 100-meter
tcksrtoke ans Susie Wentick in
e 100-meter breaststroke.
Craig Faircloth was the top
icorer for the men finishing with
,662 points. He was closel
mi
M
McCarthy
As Booters
By SCOTT COOPER
Co-Spom Mi lor
ECU freshman Steve McCar-
thy has been named the Col-
onial Athletic soccer player of
fc� week, CAA information
Erector Ken Ries announced
yesterday.
McCarthy was recognized
for his achievement as a Pirate
forward last week in the mat-
ches against Virginia Wesleyan
ind Mehtodist College.
The Columbia, Md native
"d four goals in the pair of
mes last week and is the first
�CU soccer player to gain such
" honor this season.
The ECU soccer team.
pa
u
aM
COI
m
Pol
I
mi
ffMIMpHPW





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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 14, 1986 Page 13
Too Much Paul Palmer
Temple Topples Pirates 45-28
Fullback Anthony Simpson was the leading rusher for the Pirates in
Saturday's loss to Temple. Simpson gained 85 yards on just 15 carries.
By TIM CHANDLER
Scalar �� WrMar
PHILADELPHIA, Pa. �
Paul Palmer electrified the Tem-
ple fans and shocked ECU as he
rushed for 349 yards and boosted
the Owls to a 45-28 victory over
the Pirates.
Palmer's total came up only
eight yards short of the all-time
NCAA single game rushing
record. The senior running back
and Heisman Trophy hopeful
also added three touchdowns,
one of which came on a 78-yard
scamper.
After the game ECU head
coach Art Baker could only shake
his head at Palmer's perfor-
mance.
"There was too much Paul
Palmer today said Baker. "I
never felt anyone could gain 349
yards against us � he was almost
like a ghost � he is certainly an
outstanding football player
Temple broke out into the lead
first when quaterback Lee Saltz
hit a streaking Keith Gloster with
a 51-yard touchdown pass only
1:03 into the opening quarter.
Bill Wright's PAT made the score
7-0.
The Pirates then began a drive
at their own 31-yard line and
behind the play of freshman
Charlie Libretto moved the ball
all the way to the Temple 34
before a fumble by Libretto turn-
ed the ball back over to the Owls.
After stopping Temple, the
Pirates took over once again at
their own 35 and moved all the
"There was too much
Paul Palmer J never
felt anyone could gain
349 yards against us �
he was almost like a
ghost
�Art Baker
way down for an apparent six-
yard touchdown run. The TD,
however, was called back because
of a illegal formation call, forc-
ing ECU to settle for a 22-yard
Held goal by Chuck Berleth.
After yielding a field goal to
the Owls, the Pirates began what
once again looked like a
touchdown drive. The drive died
at the Temple 18, however, and
the Pirates had to settle for
another Berleth field goal closing
the margin to 10-6.
On Temple's next possesion,
Palmer picked up his first
touchdown of the day with a two-
yard burst over the right side of
the line, giving Temple a 17-6
lead.
The Owls increased their lead
to 24-6 when Todd McNair
rambled 20 yards for a score cap-
ping off an 80-yard drive.
Red-shirt freshman Travis
Hunter came with only 1:30 left
in the half and guided the Pirates
on a 74-yard drive capped off
with a 27-yard pass to Jarrod
Moody to close the gap. Hunter's
two-point conversion pass to Don
Gaylor pulled the Pirates within
24-14 at the half.
At the outset of the second
half, Hunter seemed once again
ready to push the Pirates into the
endzone. A fumble by Moody at
the Temple 37 killed the drive for
the Bucs though.
The Pirates never recovered
from the turnover as Palmer add-
ed a 20-yard touchdown follwed
by a 78-yard burst on the Owls
next possesion to give Temple a
38-14 lead.
Hunter got the Pirates within
16 points late in the third quarter
as he guided the Bucs on a
76-yard drive. A ten-yard pass to
Amos Adams gave the Bucs the
touchdown.
The two teams exchanged
touchdowns in the fourth quarter
to round out the scoring.
Baker said after the game that
he felt that the Pirates had beaten
themselves.
"It was the type of game today
that we could have kept up with
them in scoring if we hadn't
beaten ourselves said Baker.
"We had three consecutive miss-
ed opportunities in the first
quarter where we came away with
only six points instead of at least
17.
Baker, at his weekly press con-
ference said that Hunter had
earned the starting possesion for
this Saturday's game with
Georgia Southern.
"Travis came in and did a very
good job for us at the quarter-
back position said Baker. "He
came in and in the second half
See, HUNTER, page 14
Frosh Dominate Annual Pentathlon
By RICK McCORMAC
Co-Samti Editor
Freshmen swimmers
dominated the action as ECU's
men's and women's swim teams
held their annual pentathlon last
Thursday.
The top scorer for both the
men and women were first-year
swimmers, and freshman swept
four of the top-five places for the
women.
Leading the way for the
women was Jennifer Dolan who
finished with a total of 3,320
j points. Dolan won the 100-meter
j 'reestyle and the. 2Q0amet�C in
' dividual medley, while finishing
second in both the 100-meter fly
and 100-meter backstroke.
Finishing second for the
women was senior Caycee Poust
with 2,880 points. The remainder
of the top-five finishers for the
women were all freshmen. Leslie
Wilson captured third place with
2,781 points, followed by Ryan
Philyaw's 2,735 points and Robin
Wicks with 2,666.
Other winners for the women
were: Philyaw in the 100-meter
fly, Poust in the 100-meter
backsrtoke ans Susie Wentick in
.he 100-meter breaststroke.
Craig Faircloth was the top
scorer for the men finishing with
2,662 points. He was closely
followed by junior Patrick Bren-
nan who compiled 2,584 points.
Tyge Pistorio, also a junior was
third with 2,514. Rounding out
the top-five for the men were
Raymond Kennedy and Ronald
Fleming, who finished with 2,227
and 2,138 respectively.
Pistorio was the only double
winner for the men, as 1 e won
both the 200-meter individual
medley and the 100-meter
backstroke.
Other winners for the men
were: Fleming in the 100-meter
fly, Kennedy in the 100-meter
breaststroke and David Killeen in
the 100-meter fxeeuyie- � �
Pirate swim coach Rick Kobe
was pleased with both the men
and women in their first outing of
the season, especially the depth.
"The meet went very well. It
was the closest we've ever had
Kobe said. "If you score over one
thousand points that's pretty
good, and 38 of our 42 swimmers
scored over 1000
Kobe singled out freshmen
swimmers Charles Thompson
and Faircloth for the men and
Dolan and Wilson for the women
for their performances.
The next meet for swimmers
will be the PurpleGold swim
meet on Thursday at 4:00 p.m. in
Minges Natatorium.
McCarthy Honored
As Booters Win Pair
By SCOTT COOPER
( o-NporU Editor
ECU freshman Steve McCar-
thy has been named the Col-
onial Athletic soccer player of
the week, CAA information
director Ken Ries announced
yesterday.
McCarthy was recognized
for his achievement as a Pirate
forward last week in the mat-
ches against Virginia Wesleyan
and Mehtodist College.
The Columbia, Md native
had four goals in the pair of
games last week and is the first
ECU soccer player to gain such
an honor this season.
The ECU soccer team,
Steve McCarthy
behind the strong play of
freshman McCarthy, took a
pair of matches from Virginia
Wesleyan and Methodist Col-
lege.
McCarthy was instrumental
in ECU's 4-1 comeback victory
over Va. Wesleyan on Sunday
as he accounted for three
second-half goals. Jeff Kime
added the other Pirate goal.
Jaime Reibel had a pair of
assists in the match.
ECU had 19 shots at goal
compared to Va. Wesleyan's
17. The Pirate's George
Podgorny had a dozen goalie
saves while Va. Wesleyan had
nine saves.
The Pirates blanked
Methodist College 1-0 last
Wednesday as McCarthy again
supplied the score.
McCarthy was assisted by
both Robert Larrison and Jeff
Corson on the first-priod score.
The defensive battle saw
Methodist get just seven shots
at goal while ECU had 21 at-
tempts. The Pirates needed on-
ly one goalie save as Mehtodist
accounted for nine.
The Pirates are currently
7-6-1 on the season and will
face Elon College later this
week.
Pentathlon Results
MEN
200-IndividuaI Medley
1. Pistorio 2:04.9
2. Killeen 2:05.7
3. Breenan 2:05.8
100-Fly
1. Fleming 55.8
2. Andy Johns 55.9
3. Thompson 56.5
100-Backstroke
1. Pistorio 59.9
2. Kevin Hidalgo 60.4
3. Stratton Smith 1:01.6
i 00-Breaststroke -
1. Kennedy 1.02.6
2. Faircloth 1:03.1
3. Fleming 1:03.6
100- Freestyle
1. Killeen 50.3
2. Andy Jeter 50.4
3. Thompson 50.9
WOMEN
200-Individual Medley
1. Dolan 2:19.8
2. Wicks 2:20.5
3. Tammy Childers 2:21
100-Fly
1. Philyaw 1:03.3
2. Dolan 1:03.3
3. Jenny Pierson 1:03.9
100-Backstroke
1. Poust 1:05.7
2. Dolan 1:07.3
3 Pat Olson 1:09.9
100-Breaststroke
1. Wentick 1:13.4
2. Philyaw 1:13.9
3. Patricia Grand 1:16.1
100-Freestyle
1. Dolan 57.1
2. Pam Wilbanks 57.7
3. Childers 58.2
Sports Fact
Tues. Oct. 14,1973
The New York Mets defeat
the Oakland A's, 10-7, in the
second game of the World
Series. In the 12th inning of the
four-hour, 13-minute game,
which goes on record as the
longest in World Series history,
Oakland second baseman Mike
Andrews makes two crucial er-
rors and is immediately fired by
owner Charlie Finley. (Of An-
drews, Danny Ozark once said,
"Mike Andrews' limits are
limitless) The A's win the
series in seven games, the se-
cond of three consecutive
world championships.
JORDAN - ECU PtMta Lab
Pirate swim coach Rick Kobe (left) was pleased with both the men's
and women's performance in last week's annual pentathlon. And
below are some of the men swimmers who want a second "peace" of
the conference-championship pie.
Men Netters Roll; Women Close Fall Season
By DON RUTLEDGE
5�orl� Wrllrr
The men's tennis team just
keeps rolling on. They added
another notch in the win column
Wednesday, making their record
8-0 in dual competition. This
time they rolled over Pfeiffer
College, 8-1, on the Minges
asphalt.
It was simple, according to
assistant coach John Anthony.
"We just overpowered them
said Anthony. "We're used to
seeing much better competition
so we took advantage of this and
basically overpowered them
Except for the No. 1 singles
and doubles spots, the Pirates
had little trouble handling Pfeif-
fer for their eighth win of the fall
season.
At the No. 1 spot, Pfeiffer had
a strong left-handed player with a
big serve and unusual spins. Dan
LaMont, playing No. 1 singles
for ECU played a tough match,
winning the first set in a
ubreaker, but eventually fell to
the lefty gun. "I think lefties
should be outlawed quipped
LaMont after the match.
The rest of the team had a fair-
ly easy time dispatching of the
Pfeiffer squad. Anthony credited
preparation and readiness on
boys to the Pirate sucess so far.
The women's teaafc
Maria Swaim, Kin
and Holly Murray,
t A�y
(tnm left to right) Lhw Ekhhob,
, Ty Myers, Sasaa Moatjoy
"Physically, condition-wise, and
mentally, they (ECU players) just
outdid them and played really
smart tennis he said.
"Physically, condition-
wise, and mentally, they
(ECU) fust outdid
them
�John Anthony
The men have just two dual
matches remaining before they go
to William & Mary for the Col-
onial Conference Tournament
over fall break, Oct. 24-26. They
will travel to High Point on
Wednesday to face a tough small
college team, and will return
home for their last dual match
against UNC-Charlotte on Tues
Oct. 21.
Meanwhile, the women, who
are 5-3 on the season, will face a
very strong Atlantic Christian
College team this afternoon on
the Minges Court for their last
dual contest of the fall campaign.
The Lady Pirates are very
hungry to avenge their loss to the
Bulldogs at the Meredith Invita-
tional earlier in the season. The
two teams dominated that seven-
tsam event, facing each other in
all but one individual final. The
Bulldogs came away with first
place, having won seven of the
nine individual flights. ECU won
second, way out in front of the
reminder of the field, winning the
other two flights. Captain Susan
Montjoy had relished a sweet vic-
tory over a tough ACC opponent
in the 6th flight.
So don't miss this, your last
chance to see fierce but lonely
Pirates until next spring.
Summary:
ECU 8 Pfeiffer 1
Greg Caccia (P) d. Dan LaMont
6-7,6-1,6-4
Jon Melhora (ECU) d. Todd Sarmiemo
6-1,6-1
Greg Loyd (ECU) d. John Nebleti 6-2.7-6
John Taylor (ECU) d. Scott Hopkins
6-1,6-2
Todd Stunner (ECU) d. Hugh Gray
6-1,6-4
Kevin Plumb (ECU) d. Jeff Childress
6-2,6-2
Taylor-Melhorn (ECU) d. Caccia-
Sarmiento 6-4,4-6, (8-6)
Loyd-Plumb (ECU) d. Gray-NeWett
6-2,6-4
P. Campamaro-S. Avery (ECU) d.
Hopkins-Childress 6-1,6-2.
Spikers
Drop Two
The ECU volleyball team
dropped two matches this
weekend at Wake Forest to
make their season record 4-6.
The Lady Pirates lost a 3-0
decision to Wake Forest in the
first match. The game scores
were 15-8, 15-13 and 15-10.
Furman downed the Pirates
in the second match also by a
3-0 score. The final game
scores were 15-6, 15-6 and
15-2.
The next match for ECU
will be today at Virginia Com-
monwealth.
� ' '� ,���;
�0m.mnmmmmmt�
i Mi ii EMji���i






14
JHEEASICAROI tNIAN
oc rOBER 14. iw
Palmer Just Short Of
By TIM CHANDLER
Viiiiw Spurl Writer
PHILADELPHIA, Pa. �
Palmer! Palmer! Palmer!
The sparce crowd of 15,384 in
Veterans Stadium began the
chant when the scoreboard at the
stadium flashed that Heisman
Trophy hopeful Paul Palmer was
only 11 yards short of the all-time
NCAA single game rushing
record held by Reuben Mayes of
Washington State.
It was the first time during the
game that the croud had come
together in a chant. The problem
was that there was just a little
over two minutes to go and ECU
had the ball.
The Owls finally got the ball
back with 1:14 to pla, but.
Palmer could manage onl three
yards on three carries.
After the game, Palmer ex-
pressed that the record would
have meant not only a lot to him
but also a lot to the team.
"1 wanted it (the record) pretty
bad said Palmer. "But I
believe my teammates wanted it
even more. The offensive line let
me know about it, and everyone
was fired up.
"It hurt when I realized 1 was
not going to break it (the record),
but everybody gave it their best
added Palmer.
Palmer, who carried the balls
43 times said that he was more
tired in the first half than in the
second.
"I was more tired in the first
half said Palmer. "In the se-
cond half, 1 was psyched up
because of the record and the way
the line and Shelv Poole
(fullback) were blowing people
away
Palmer tied the all-time NCAA
record for all-purpse yardage in
the game as he piled up 417
yards.
"Before the season, my aim
was to lead the nation in all pur-
pose yardage said Palmer.
"And 1 think I took a step
towards that today
Temple head coach Bruce
Arians complemented Palmer on
being a fine athlete and a good
team player.
"He is the finest running back
I've seen said Arians. "He has
earned the recognition that he
deserves and has done more for
this team than anyone.
"He should be recognized for
the Heisman, but our goal is
post-season play � and Paul will
to everything he can to help us
Arians went on to say that he
felt that the team wanted the
record just as much as Palmer
did.
"The team wanted it just as
much as Paul did said Arians.
"It would have been a great
achievement for this entire team,
and it certainly would have
helped to publicize the Temple
progam
Palmer said that post-season
play for the team was more im-
portant to him than breaking
records.
"Our team goal is postseason
play said Palmer. "So in-
dividual records may have to
wait
Entertain
Pirates
Burton, Methany Pace Cross Country
By SCOTT COOPER
( o-Sport, I dilrtr
The men's and women's cross
country teams competed at
Methodist College in Fayetteville
this past weekend.
The men, headed b Milton
Methany, finished fourth (with
79 points) in the 8,400-meter
course behind St. August!nes (38
pts.). Methodist (38 pts.) and
UNC-Wilmington (69 pts.).
The women, again led b An-
nette Burton, finished second
(with 48 pts.) in the 4.000-meter,
four-team field behind St.
Augustines (41 pts.) and in front
oi UNC-W (67 pts.) and Camp-
bell College (76 pts.).
The men move to 19-22 overall
and 2-3 in the conference while
the women are 9-9 overall with a
1-3 conference mark. Both
squads will travel to Duke Thurs-
day for the North Carolina State
Meet. Carolina, Duke, N.C.
State and Wake Forest will be
some of the teams on hand and it
should prove to be a fine test for
ECU, according to assistant
Informal Hours
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial
Mon-Fri00-8:00 am
Mon-Fri12:00-1:30 pm
M W F. 3.00-10:00 pm
T Th3-5:00 pm-7-10:00 pm
Sat.11:00 am-5:00 pm
Sun. 12:00-8:00 pm
Minges
M WF.8:00-10:00 pm
Sun. 12:00-5:00 pm
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
Mon-Fri7:00 am-10:00 pm
Sat11:00 am-5:00 pm
Sun12:00-5:00 pm
Minges
Mon-Fri3:00-10:00 pm
Sun12-5:00 pm
EQUIPMENT CHECK-Ol T
(MG 115)
Mon-Fri7:00am-10:00 pm
Sat.Il:00am-5:00 pm
Sun 12:00-8.00 pm
RACQlETBALL
RESERVATIONS
Can be made in person at 115
Memorial Gym or by calling
757-6911
GYM FREE PLAY
Memorial Gymnasium
Mon-Fri12:00-1:00 pm
Mon-Fri3:00-10:00 pm
Satll:00am-5:00 pm
Sun.12-500 pm
tf im CLIFF'
'Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway N.C. 33E�tifi
coach Steve Thomas.
"We're going up there to try
and see how we rate in the state
Thomas said. "We're using this
(meet) to get ready four our con-
ference meet on Nov. 8
The following are the in-
dividual results for both the
men's and women's teams at
Methodist College.
Men:
M. Mehiarn � 4th, 27.43
M McC'tehee � 14th, 28.31
R. Rice � 15th, 28.32
.1 Bvrd � 16th. 28.33
M Schweitzer � 30th, 30.48
V Wilson � 33rd, 31.20
S. Johnson � 34th, 32.07 (unofficial)
R Williams � 36th, 32.12
P. Higgins � 37th, 32.38
M Curtis � 40th, 35.16
Women:
A Burton - 2nd, 18.53
K Griffiths � 5th, 19.41
S Ingram � 11th, 20.13
1 I ynch � 12th. 20.17
J Jones � 18th. 21.39
I Gorenflo � 19th, 21.57
k hemath � 22nd, 22.37
S Swick � 25th, 24.03
Hunter
Continued from page 12
added excitement to our of-
fense
Hunter in only one half pass-
ed for 243 yards and three
touchdowns.
"Anytime a quarterback
comes in and passes for three
touchdowns in a half it makes
you happy added Baker.
Baker said that going into
the second half he felt that
ECU still had a chance to win.
however mistakes spelled
doom.
"We had two big disappoint-
ments in the second half said
Baker. "The first came when
we took the third quarter
kickoff and immediateh began
driving � only to have a se-
cond and one turn into a fum-
ble.
"The other big mistake was
after we forced a fumble to
start the fourth quarter � we
went backwards on four pla
and gave up the ball added
Baker.
Stagecoach" is the name for Western
Sizzim s bronea Chopped Siriom � served
th hot bread and your choice of bakea
potato or French Vies Dei.oous'
SPECIAL
$1.99
2903 East Tenth Street
I
OVEETONS
$upemto
211 JARVIS STREET
HOME Of GREENVILLE S BEST MEATS
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
Try Our New Hot Bar!
Choose from 2 meat entrees
plus vegetables & bread.
Cooked fresh in our kitchen daily!
And don't forget our Soup & Salad Bar!
Open 1 1 a.m7 p.m Monday - Saturday
Hot Bar - Salad Bar
Your Choice per g,
Fab Detergent 99
giant 42 ox. box each
Limit one with $10.00 or
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excluding advertised
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con
Paper Towels
giant roll
Dawn Dish Detergent
(35 off label) 00 .
22 ox. bottle yy
.reamettes
Elbow Macaroni,
Vermicelli, ,
or Spaghetti 4 $1.00
Kraft Cheese Food
American Singles
12 ox. package
21 I Jarvis Street (2 blocks from ECU)
"Home of Greenville's Best Meats"
We are open 7 days a week,
8 a.m8 p.m Monday through Saturday
Sundays p.m. -6 p.m.
Prices Effective Wednesday, October 15th
through Saturday, October 18th
Red Seeded
Emperor Grapes
Coca Cola
Mello Yello
Dr. Pepper
Sprite
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49 lb
Canada Dry
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o9Ceach
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3$1.19
Limit six of your choice.
Additional drinks:
12 pock - 1 2 02 cons
Gallo Rose, Burgundy,
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3fy V each
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OVERTONS
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 14, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 14, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.500
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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