The East Carolinian, October 9, 1986






Stoc
(Earnlmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.61 No.12
Thursday, October 9, 1986
Greenville, N.C
Circulation 12,000
12 Pages
Schedules Checked
Last Warning For Records
ByP�hEorMM,S
Approximately 100 students
will receive letters this week in-
forming them that their schedules
will be cancelled due to failure to
comply with the new N.C. im-
munization law.
According to Kay VanNort-
wick, administration manager
manager at the Student Health
Center, students who are in viola-
tion of the law have until 4 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 13 to have their
records updated.
"By law, the records should
have been completed bv Sept. 23,
we have stretched it as far as we
possibly can said VanNort-
wick.
The new law affects all
students who enter North
Carolina universities after July 1,
1986. It also applies to students
who have been going to ECU, but
at one time or another break their
enrollment. This means they were
not in school for either the fall or
spring semester
The only students who arc ex-
empt from the new law are those
who take only night classes.
VanNortwick said that since
the first letters informing the
students of the new law were sent
out in early Sept the number of
delinquent students has dropped
from over 1,000 to around 100.
The letters that are being received
now are the third the registrar's
office have sent
"We have had a shot clinic set
up here in the Health Center to
try to help the students.Our main
problem is wc are so busy with
the regular patient load Van-
Nortwick said. "We've assigned
people to just work the shot
clinics to try to make the system
work faster
She said the shot clinic would
run for two more days, Thursday
and Friday, from 2 - 4 p.m. The
clinic is free to students.
"This is it VanNortwick
said. "This is the last chance we
can give students
If students do not get their
shots at the Health Center, the
only three ways to verify their im-
munization records arc: high
school records, a doctor's
signature, or a health department
stamp.
According to Trenton Davis,
assiciate vice - chancellor for
Academic Affairs, the ad-
ministration will do "everything
we can to work with the students
who do get their schedules
cancelled
"We'd prefer not to have to
send any letters at all he said.
"We are trying to do everything
we can to make this easy on the
students
Davis said that if a student
does not comply with the law by
Monday and his or her schedule
is dropped, the administration
will try to retrieve the students
original schedule.
"The longer the student takes
to complete his or her records,
the harder it will be to obtain the
original schedule he explained.
According to academic of-
ficials, the effect of this on the
student's grades and work for
each course will be dealt with on
an individual bases.
Davis said that when students
complete their records after Mon-
day, the first step they should
take is to contact the Student
Health Center to get verification.
After that they will need to con-
tact the registrar's office for their
schedule.
Time To Make Graduation Plans
By THERESA ROSINSKI
Staff Writer
If you are a senior, now is the
time for you to start thinking
about graduation. But before you
do, there's a few things that need
to be done.
Students need to see their ad-
visors and fill out a Senior Sum-
mary at least two semesters
before their graduation date. The
form is a summary of all the
hours the senior has completed
and those hours that need to be
completed before graduation.
Seniors must also fill out an
application for graduation and
pay a S2t fee. The application
may be picked up in the
Registrar's office in Whichard
and must be filed with them no
later than two semesters before
graduation. The $20 fee covers
the cost of a cap, gown and also
the diploma.
Seniors who graduated during
summer school or will be
graduating as of December 1986,
are invited to attend a program
and reception on Saturday, Dec.
6 at 10 a.m. The program is to
show "appreciation and recogni-
tion for the students' completed
work said C.C. Rowe, chair-
man of the Commencement
Committee.
"The program does not take
the place ol the commencement
exercises but many of the
students are unable to return in
Mav for the ceremony and this is
the reason for the program said
Rowe. This year's program and
reception will take place in
Wright Auditorium.
Bryan Lassiter, senior class
president, says that "Seniors
need to get their summaries done
and apply for graduation. They
also need to go to the Career
Planning and Placement Center
early so that they can start look-
ing for a job
The Career Planning and
Placement Service, located in the
Bloxton House, helps students to
fill out a resume and puts them in
touch with employers.
"The first thing seniors need to
do is fill out a registration
packet said Jim
Westmoreland, director of the
Placement Service. The packets
can be picked up in the Bloxton
House. After a student is
registered with the service, each
month they will be mailed a job
guide of companies, banks and
businesses interviewing for
potential employees, according to
Westmoreland. Students may
sign up for the interviews at the
Career Planning and Placement
Center.
"We provide an excellent ser-
vice which seniors should take
advantage of added
Westmoreland. "It could land
them a job
County Fair
J � MUMIItT
!��� Connty Fair will be in town through Saturday. If vour low
� tonight is College Night.
Reagan Campaigns For
Sen. Broyhill In Raleigh
ALE1GH. N.C. fUPH� Pri. InoMhor" h��� , . -
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI)� Presi-
dent Reagan appealed to all
Americans today to drop their
partisanship "at the water's
edge" and support him in his
summit meeting with Mikhail
Gorbachev.
"I'm particularly grateful for
the way we as a free people pull
together" during summitry,
Reagan said.
Campaigning for Sen. James
Broyhill in Raleigh, Reagan in-
voked Sen. Arthur Vandenberg,
the Cold War GOP Senate
foreign relations leader, by say-
ing, "1 think the best policy is
America's time-tested tradition
R,A. Recruiting Begins
By CAROLYN DRISCni I that thev are Innkino fnr ctHnfc ��j i,V . .
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
Assistant News Editor
The Residence Life staff is
beginning to recruit resident ad-
visors (RA's) for the upcoming
spring semester, according to
Janet Johnson, west campus
coordinator in charge of
recruiting and selection.
"Becoming a RA is a great op-
portunity for students to get in-
volved in residence halls in a job
that allows you to meet a lot of
people she said. "And we are
not looking for a certain type of
student � we need a wide variety
of people
Carol Fulghum, associate dean
and director of Student Life, said
that they are looking for students
who are willing to give their time
to help other students as well as
to gain valuable experience.
"Many students don't realize
how much they are learning while
they are RA's stated Johnson.
"But then they get out of school,
get a job and find out how impor-
tant it is to be able to speak
before large groups, work well
and efficiently with other people,
and resolve problems
diplomatically � all skills RA's
learn on the job
Kerry Marcum, head resident
in charge of programming in
Fletcher Dorm commented, "I
like the idea of living in the dorm,
being around all of the people,
and still being on the job at the
same time
Among the benefits of working
in a residence hall are the advan-
tages of holding a leadership
position, learning organizational
strategy, and having a job in
which you can earn approximate-
ly $1500 in an academic year that
does not require any travelling.
Marcum said, "Sometimes I
think people don't realize how
much an RA does. There are
always the slack ones who don't
do everything they're supposed
to, but then there are always
the ones who get involved and
really work hard at it
Dorm life has many advantages, being a R.A. has just as many, if not more.
RA's have several respon-
sibilities, including reporting dai-
ly to the residence director, plan-
ning programs for the floor,
working closely with the house
council, assisting with rule en-
forcement, and responding to
emergencies.
In order to qualify for the posi-
tion, students must:
�Be enrolled as a full time student
�Be at least a sophomore
�Have a minimum 2.2 grade
point average
�Have a clear judicial record
�Maintain a schedule free of
commitments that might conflict
with work
�Show leadership abilities at
ECU through campus organiza-
tions
�Be cleared through the Financial
Aid Office.
"We think it's a great oppor-
tunity for students � they really
seem to grow on the job said
Johnson. "Many come in here
unsure of themselves, for exam-
ple, in public speaking. But we
have a professional staff here to
help them; they are not entirely
on their own
Any students interested in
becoming an RA or in learning
more about the position can at-
tend the question and answer ses-
sions that will be held in each
dorm in the upcoming weeks.
Current members of the resident
life staff will be on hand. There
students can fill out an applica-
tion. Deadline for the applica-
tions is Nov. 3. Applicants will be
interviewed and selected in
November.
For more information,
Johnson can be reached at
757-6100 or in her office in Flet-
cher Dorm.
of leaving politics at the water's
edge. It's great to know that
when I look over my shoulder
that folks back home are with
me.
In addition to asking for his
audience's "support and
prayers" as he flies to Iceland
Thursday morning, Reagan ask-
ed a "personal favor"�the elec-
tion of Broyhill to a full term in
what he said is "a make or break
election" that will decide whether
Republicans keep control control
of the Senate.
If Democrats regain control
forthe first time in six years,
Reagan said, leadership of the
Judiciary Committee "will be
turned over to Teddy Kennedy
(D-Mass.) and Joe Biden
(D-Del.). You can strike a blow
against the drugs, thugs and
hoodlums by casting your vote
for Jim
The president, hitting all the
right buttons in North Carolina
politics, praised senior Sen. Jesse
Helms as "an individual whose
very name causes liberals to
break out in a nervous rash, a
friend of mine, and a champion
of our cause
Reagan called Broyhill's oppo-
nent, former Gov. Terry San-
ford, "a willing accomplice" in
what he said was a Democratic
plan to raise taxes.
Reagan also mentioned recent
trade actions that resulted in a 50
percent cutback in imports of
Japanese polyesters and Japan's
dropping of its tariff on
American cigarettes.
In his last political foray before
leaving for Iceland, Reagan was
flying to Atlanta later in the day
to campaign for Sen. Mack Mat-
tingly. �
Both candidates are aDMtd in
the polls, White House
spokesman Larry Speakes said,
but Reagan's presence was
sought to help them stay on top.
Influences On Suicide
CHICAGO (UPI)� Drug and
alcohol abuse has been a key fac-
tor in an alarming increase in
young adult suicides, which have
more than doubled in the United
States in the past 25 years, resear-
chers say.
"It's clear the most important
thing we can do to lower the
suicide rate in young people is to
intervene early when drug abuse
is suspected said Dr. Richard
Fowler of the University of
California at San Diego.
Fowler and his colleagues
Tuesday reported results of a
study that found more than half
of under-30 suicides in the San
Diego area were caused primarily
by drug addiction or alcoholism
rather than another underlying
mental illness. Substance abuse
was a secondary factor in another
13 percent of the deaths.
"Our data suggests that suicide
is really a consequence of the
drug abuse itself Fowler said.
"The disease process of
alcoholism and drug abuse runs
its natural course and suicide is
just one of the logical conse-
quences
The study was published in the
Archives of General Psychiatry, a
publication of the American
Medical Association.
Another study in the Archives
found decreed activity of two
chemicals i orains of violent
suicide vrtn �, strengthening the
link between depression and
See REASONS page 5
ON THE INSIDE
!Jtale,lt8 television programs - ,ee
yl"?lr10 ENTERTAINMENT page 8
r�n This Saturday's game against
AnnouncementsU Temple previewed - see Sporti
Pftge 12.
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THE EAST C ARCH INIAN
OCTOBER 9 198ft
October 2
1:25 a.m.
Two Ciarrett Dorm residents
w ere intoxicated and disruptive in
the 3rd floor west wing of Ciar-
rett. One of the men damaged the
- on the tire extinguisher box
on 3rd floor west wing of Gar-
ret
2:30 p.m.
Domino's Pizza employee
reported discovering that his
vehicle tire had been punctured
while the vehicle was parked west
of Scott Hall.
3:0(1 p.m.
An Aycock resident was found
in possession of stolen property
at his residence.
4:46 p.m.
An Aycock resident reported
the breaking and entering of his
vehicle and the damage of the
front dash. The vehicle was park-
ed in the 14th and Berkley
freshman lot.
6:00 p.m.
A Gotten Hall resident
reported the breaking and enter-
ing or her vehicle while it was
parked in the 3rd and Reade lot.
10:15 p.m.
A Kingston Place resident and
an Umstead dorm resident were
observed in violation of the
Alcoholic Beverage Law.
11:30 p.m.
Two Aycock residents were
observed in possession and con-
suming alcohol north of Aycock.
11:50 p.m.
A Scott dorm resident was
observed southeast of Scott dorm
and was found in possession of
alcohol while being underage.
October 3
2:30 a.m.
Four students were reported
trying to obstruct and delay an
ECU Officer and all except one
subject were consuming alcohol
under age.
5:30 p.m.
A Greenville resident was ban-
ned from campus for obtaining a
fictitious ECU I.D. card.
4:40 p.m.
Three Jones Dorm residents
reported that their clothing had
been stolen from the 3rd floor
east wing laundry room of Jones
Dorm.
10:30 p.m.
A White Dorm resident was in
possession of a mixed alcoholic
beverage north of White Dorm.
10:50 p.m.
A Fayetteville resident was ar-
rested and banned from campus
for obstructing and delaying an
officer, presenting a fictitious
I.D and possessing an alcoholic
mixed beverage while being under
age.
October 4
12:35 p.m.
A White Dorm resident was in
possession of an alcoholic
beverage while being under age.
1:00 p.m.
An ECU Officer reported a
Greenville resident was in posses-
sion of alcohol at the football
game.
3:15 p.m.
A Greenville resident was ar-
rested at Ficklen Stadium for
trespassing and being intoxicated
and disruptive. The man was also
banned from campus.
3:40 p.m.
An ECU Officer escorted an
ECU student from the football
game after he was observed direc-
ting profanities at fans.
10:28 p.m.
A Tyler Dorm resident
reported that a black male was in
a 2nd floor room and refused to
leave. Another resident reported
that the same black male had
assaulted her in the 2nd floor east
wing bathroom of Tyler Dorm.
11:00p.m.
A Snow Hill man was found to
be unescorted and in the
bathroom of the second floor of
Tyler Dorm.
11:59 p.m.
A Cherry Point resident was
arrested for simple possession of
marijuana and possession of a
weapon on campus. He and his
friend were banned from campus
in connection with the incident.
October 5
12:35 a.m.
A Belk Dorm resident reported
that another Belk Dorm resident
had been assaulted on the 3rd
floor breezeway of Belk.
2:00 a.m.
A Greenville resident reported
the larceny of his wallet by a
white male who had entered Scott
Dorm.
6:10 a.m.
An ECU officer reported fin-
ding a vehicle registered to an
ECU student with the back glass
broken.
8:00 p.m.
A White Dorm resident
reported being harrassed by three
white males near the Brewster
Building. Three men from
Washington, N.C. were bTmned
from campus in connection with
the incident.
10:30 p.m.
A Jones Dorm resident was ar-
rested for the vandalism to a
vehicle.
October 6
2:30 p.m.
A Greenville resident was ban
ned from campus for soliciting
crime against nature, on the se
cond floor, center wing, men's
restroom of the Austin Building
11:55 p.m.
A Greenville resident was ban
ned from campus for suspicious
activity in the 3rd and Reade
freshman parking lot.
October 7
1:15 a.m.
An Aycock resident was ar
rested for DWI on College Hi!
Drive.
10:20 a.m.
A Jacksonville man was ar
rested for obtaining proper!
false pretense.
11:55 am
An Aycock Dorm residerr
reported the larceny of his bicycle
from the bike rack west o
Aycock Dorm.
6:30 p.m.
A Fletcher Dorm residerr
reported the larceny of mone
from her desk in her room.
12:40 am
An E U Officer reported iha'
a vehicle registered to a Sla
Dorm resident had bee:
tampered with while parked
north of Slav Dorm
Increase In Scores Comes To A Halt
NEW YORK. NY (CPS) �
Average Scholastic Aptitude Test
(SAT) scores o this year's
freshmen were about the same as
last year's freshmen, halting a
series of increases dating back to
1980.
Various college officials,
though, say the levelling off o
scores doesn't mean much in the
w av of students skills.
1 as) week, in its annual report
� student performance on the
test . the College Board said
lege-bound seniors' average
combined score wa- 906: 431 on
he verbal portion of the test and
45 on the mathematics portion.
The college-bound seniors oi
198 5�who are college
sophomores this year�had the
same average test scores.
Their average scores, however,
were significant jump over the
1984 average combined scores of
897.
The College Board and Educa-
tional Testing Services�which
administers the tests for the
board � score the SAT's on a
scale of 200 to 800, with 1,600 be-
ing the perfect combined score.
Various observers and
educators in 1985 attributed the
jumps to everything from the
cessation of atmospheric nuclear
testing to test-takers' dwindling
family sizes to the school reform
movement.
Few are readv to say what this
year's levelling off might mean,
though.
"We are not testing the same
group (each year) says Elnor
Pepper, a spokeswoman for the
West Virginia Superintendent's
office.
"Some years of classes are just
better than others she guesses.
"It's not a scientific reason, but a
good explanation
In West Virginia, SAT scores
are down 11 points, but only
seven percent of college-bound
seniors there took the test. Half,
however, took the American Col-
lege Test (ACT), and those scores
increased this year, Pepper says.
In Washington state, testing
Director Dr. Alfred Rapf thinks
average SAT scores fell 10 points
this year because 13 percent more
students took the test.
"(The drop) had nothing to do
with the quality of our
programs Rapf contends.
"The size of the group is just big-
ger. The test takers were once
more of an elite group
Rapf thinks more students
decided to take the test this year
because "the College Board has
received a tremendous amoun1.
of publicity. I wish I had stock in
it
Rapf says he does not know if
he is pleased or troubled by the
national increase in SAT scores
and its levelling off this year.
Nevertheless. Rapf thinks the
general improvement in the test
scores during the decade "doe-
reflect a national focus on berte-
education
The scores, he says, probabh
reflect a "positive" high school
emphasis on academic subject
"But i a student is taking
algebrz when he -h u!d be taking
typing .hat s i.i ing im
"I have mixed te mas.
don't now. 1 really u t know
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"T?
Invest
SANTA FE, N.M. (CPS) - In a
case that could inhibit other cam-
puses from selling their shares in
firms that do business in South
Africa, New Mexico's chief in-
vestment officer ays he couldn't
sell the stocks without violating
the law
Gov. Toney Anaya in July said
he ma order all state agen-
cies�including Eastern Nev.
Mexico, New Mexico Highlands,
Western New Mexico and the
University of New Mexico�to
sell interests in firms with opera-
tions in segregationist &
Africa.
But last week, state nes'men
chief S. Peter Hidalgo 11 said he
couldn't comply with sucri
Baseball
Strikes Out
In Russia
MOSCOW (UPI)-The A-
pastnme traveled to the -
Union Tuesday and struck out on
three pitches
As the United States reveled a
the start of the National and
American League playoffs, a
sparse crowd shivered in Moscow
as baseball had its sen
Soviet premier - ar, exhibition
game between twe La
American teams from Pa
Lumumba University in Moscow
Only about 200 people attend-
ed the game, which was playe:
temperatures hovering around
the freezing mark. Reaction wac
just as cold.
"I was curious. I've never seer,
this game before and I live near-
by, so I came for a look one
man said. "It's boring
"It's tot -
incomprehensible said a young
man who was leaving the radium
in the bottom of the firs inning.
Last Thursday. the Tass news
agency said the Soviet Sr
Committee had made the game
an official Soviet sport, and an-
nounced a premier between
Moscow State University and
Patrice Lumumba.
The exhibition was between
Nicaraguans and students from
Panama and the Dominican
Republic.
An 8-year-old boy named
Sergei was almost alone in his
guarded enthusiasm for the
American institution.
"What a strange mitten re has
on he cried as a ball was hit to
the center fielder. "It must be
very difficult to hit the ball w -
such a small stick
Otherwise, the little boy sa
the game was "boring,
understandable, strange.
"I've never seen it before a
can't understand a thing he
said. "This is an American spoil
ours is hockey or soccer
Anatoly Lebedyev. a univers
physical-education teacher. -
the students had asked to w
the game to observe Constitu
Day, a Soviet national holiday
marking the 19 adoption of a
new constitution.
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lent a
ision oi
(on o a
and hi.
campu-
indent
October 6
2:30 p m
A Greenville resident was ban-
ned from campus for soliciting
crime against nature, on the se-
cond floor, center wing, men's
restroom o( the Austin Building.
11:55 p m
Greenville resident was ban-
ned from campus for suspicious
activity in the 3rd and Reade
�nun parking lot.
I k tobe
1 15
Vvcock lesident was ar-
PV 1 on College Hill
mile man was ar-
itaining property of
Horm resident
cn of his bicycle
k rack west ot
Oorm resident
a ceny of mone
k in her room.
(fficer reported that
stered to a Slas
den! had been
while parked
Doi m
Halt
Rapt thinks the
ement in the test
he decade "does
.i focus on better
f says, probabh
ve" high school
;ademic subjects.
.dent is taking
' uld be taking
ing im
.d fe ings, 1
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 9. 1986
Investment In South Africa Considered
SANTA FE, N.M. (CPS) � In a
case that could inhibit other cam-
puses from selling their shares in
firms that do business in South
Africa, New Mexico's chief in-
vestment officer says he couldn't
sell the stocks without violating
the law.
Gov. Toney Anaya in July said
he may order all state agen-
cies�including Eastern New
Mexico, New Mexico Highlands,
Western New Mexico and the
University of New Mexico�to
sell interests in firms with opera-
tions in segregationist South
Africa.
But last week, state investment
chief S. Peter Hidalgo II said he
couldn't comply with such an
Baseball
Strikes Out
In Russia
MOSCOW (UPI) - The American
pasttime traveled to the Soviet
Union Tuesday and struck out on
three pitches.
As the United States reveled at
the start of the National and
American League playoffs, a
sparse crowd shivered in Moscow
as baseball had its semi-official
Soviet premier - an exhibition
game between two Latin
American teams from Patrice
Lumumba University in Moscow.
Only about 200 people attend-
ed the game, which was played in
temperatures hovering around
the freezing mark. Reaction was
just as cold.
"I was curious. I've never seen
this game before and I live near-
by, so I came for a look one
man said. "It's boring
"It's totally
incomprehensible said a young
man who was leaving the stadium
in the bottom of the first inning.
Last Thursday, the Tass news
agency said the Soviet Sport
Committee had made the game
an official Soviet sport, and an-
nounced a premier between
Moscow State University and
Patrice Lumumba.
The exhibiticfli was between
Nicaraguans and students from
Panama and the Dominican
Republic.
An 8-year-old boy named
Sergei was almost alone in his
guarded enthusiasm for the
American institution.
"What a strange mitten he has
on he cried as a ball was hit to
the center fielder. "It must be
very difficult to hit the ball with
such a small stick
Otherwise, the little boy said,
the game was "boring, not
understandable, strange.
"I've never seen it before and
can't understand a thing he
said. "This is an American sport;
ours is hockey or soccer
Anatoly Lebedyev, a university
physical-education teacher, said
the students had asked to hold
the game to observe Constitution
Day, a Soviet national holiday
marking the 1977 adoption of a
new constitution.
order wihtout violating the state's
"prudent man rule which re-
quires him to manage the port-
folio as profitably as possible.
Selling off all the offending
stock, explains Ted Apodaca of
the state attorney general's of-
fice, would rob the state's port-
folio of some of its most pro-
fitable investments.
Apodaca says a citizen�or
anyone who stood to benefit
from the state investment port-
folio's financial perfor-
mance�could sue to hold state
officials personally liable for any
financial losses that would result
from the divestment.
Asked if he thought such a
citizen lawsuit was likely,
Apodaca said, "I doubt it
But California legislators were
worried enough by such a pro-
spect that they passed a bill last
week to protect administrators
from being held liable for invest-
ment losses stemming from
divestment.
University of California
spokeswoman Valerie Sullivan
says the regents, who voted to
divest during the summer, feared
that if, for example, divestment
depressed the value of the univer-
sity's pension fund, a disgruntled
faculty member might sue them.
Divestiture opponents in many
states have long argued that sell-
ing shares for political, as oppos-
ed to financial, reasons would
break the law.
But regents' vulnerability to
such lawsuits depends on each
state's laws, says Alison Cooper
of the Investor Responsibility
Resource Center in Washington,
D.C.
Cooper notes that some state
constitutions don't have "pru-
dent man" clauses, or have
clauses that are full of loopholes.
In states like New Mexico and
California�which do have con-
stitutional rules requiring of-
ficials to manage their portfolios
for a profit�regents would pro-
bably need a special law to pro-
tect them from lawsuits for
angered "investors
The reason, Apodaca says, is
that "prudent" investors would
not buy or sell shares solely on
ethical or moral grounds.
"(Unless) the investor is con-
cerned about the safety of the in-
vestment� for instance, revolu-
tion is brewing or the factory may
burn down�a prudent man
would not divest he contends.
"(If so), pretty soon all in-
vestments could be affected by
political and moral obligations or
human rights violations
Oddly enough, one of the par-
ties that could lose investment
profits from a divestiture would
be the University of New Mexico,
which has already pledged to
cleanse its stock portfolio of con
nections to South Africa.
UNM started selling off the $6
million worth of offending shares
last spring.
But the state investment fund
that Hidalgo manages�and that
has not agreed to
divest�distributes its profits to a
variety of state agencies, in-
cluding UNM.
UNM annually gets about $5
million of the profits from the
funds under investment officer
Apodaca contends Anaya's
order would eliminate half the
stocks in which Hidalgo's fund
could invest, and cut the profits
the fund could earn.
Neither the university nor the
state has enacted any safeguards
against lawsuits over lost invest-
ment dividents.
Many campus officials don't
think they need any safeguards to
divest.
University of Illinois Trustee
Albert Logan, who plans to sub-
jdalgojs management. mil a divestment plan to his col- people he says
leagues in November, says he
doesn't need legal protection
against lawsuits over lost profits
because he says no university has
lost money by divesting.
Divestment, Logan adds,
should be viewed not as a finan
cial move, but as a symbolic
gesture like the Boston Tea Par-
ty.
"The London Tea Companv
did not miss the tea, but it made a
lot of difference to the American
Kentucky Fried Chicken
$1.99
plus tax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK � COMB.
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Small Mashed Potato and Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
jCCv
4$P
Expires Dec. 31, 1986
r h fVhjm- for, Tmrbt
Jm laonxtU V��t
1&btrO, Ktn&m. A
IIIITTTTT
iiiiiii in:
ECU Hillel Presents
"EVERYTHING YOU
WANT TO KNOW
ABOUT JUDAISM"
Displays and Free Refreshments
Open To All
Cotton Dorm Lobby at 7:00p.m.
October 9, 1986 (tonight)
Mexican Restaurant ?
HUNGRY PIRATE
The
Biggest
Burrito!
$2.95
STUDENT STORES
Microcomputer Product Fair
IBM and Apple Computer Products Demonstrated. Company
Representative Available For Assistance And Information.
DATES:
IBM Wednesday October 15
Apple Wednesday October 22
Watch For Additional Information In the October 14, 21 Issue of The East Carolinian.
STUDENT STORES
East Carolina University
Wright Building
IIIITIIITTITIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
King
Sandwich
Served
2-5 Weekdays
11-5 Weekends
757-1666
G
Q
512 E. 14th St.
"0
752-1005
iO

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at the bottom of
the hill.
Menu includes:
Steak & Cheese
King Club
King Burger
Hoagies
Rueben
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Cold Long Neck
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Wine Coolers
and much more . . .
Nightly Dinner Specials
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.





2ti?e IzubX (UntalMan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, omtrwiManatf,
Daniel Maurer, wtdn�
PATTI KEMMIS, Xm fittor STEVE FOLMAR, D,c,or f i.r , m,
Scott Cooper, o��m �� Anthony Martin, mmcmk .���,
Rick McCormac. gmpm a�r Meg Needham. oo. ��,�,
John Shannon, � �� Shannon Short, �,�r,�� �.��,
Pat Molloy, !�!��� &�, DeChanile Johnson, � o
October 9. 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Alcohol
Changing The Drinking Age Again
Can you believe it? It's been
more than a week since the Federal
law raising the drinking age to 21
went into affect and there are still
some holdouts, both on the state
and local level.
Among the local holdouts are
two UNC-Chapel Hill students who
have formed a Beer Rights Union.
The 28-year-old co-founders, J.D.
Watson and Paul Cole, support the
right to drink and feel the drinking
age should be lowered.
According to the Associated
Press, Watson said, "The issue is
freedom of choice. I don't agree
with drinking per se, but I do agree
with the right to drink. The Beer
Rights Union's desire and intention
is to return the legal drinking age to
18
Watson feels this goal is at-
tainable if people take a stand.
"If enough people stand up in a
peaceful and confrontational man-
ner, the law will change he said.
"We will march on the police sta-
tion, drinking water out of beer
cans and ask to be arrested
Don't scoff at these optimistic in-
dividuals. Their gesture is not as
futile as it may seem, for the Beer
Rights Union does not stand alone.
According to the National
Highway Traffic Safety Ad-
ministration, eight states missed the
Federal deadline. Under the new
law, those states � Colorado,
Idaho, Louisiana, Montana, Ohio,
South Dakota, Tennessee and
Wyoming � will receive 5 percent
less from the S10.6 billion Federal
highway budget next year.
Why have they abstained? Each
state has its own particular reason,
but their combined sentiment is the
same.
According to the New York
Times, Ohio Governor Richard F.
Celeste (who seems to have summed
it all up) complains that the law
amounts to "financial blackmail"
and undermines a state's right to
make its own decisions
Advocates of a lower drinking
age are claiming the new drinking
age is not going to solve the pro-
blem. Organizations such as
MADD (Mothers Against Drunk
Drivers) were the spark that ignited
a slew of appeals to establish the
21-year-old nationwide drinking
age. They claimed it was essential to
reduce an annual death toll of
10,000 youths in alcohol-related
traffic accidents.
However, in the case of states
that have raised their drinking age
in the past, statistics show a wide
range of results from a 13 percent
decrease in alcohol-related deaths
among teen-agers, to an actual in-
crease of such deaths.
From the time prohibition started
in the early part of this century until
the recent passing of the nationwide
drinking law, the pendulum of
public opinion has swung from a
conservative, to a liberal, and back
to a conservative attitude toward
alcohol.
If public opinion does indeed sw-
ing like a pendulum, and many
sociologists and historians will
agree, then stalwart holdouts such
as Watson and Cole are not making
futile gestures. They're giving the
pendulum a shove in the right direc-
tion.
"TOW TH6R6 WAS SORT , 1
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Campus Forum
Sen. Helms loses One More Vote
i)KE SURE TMiS GETS TO T6SS TODdl ' fS ftNJLMVlC ffTION
OF our Sincere desire for ft negotiated settlement
the Russian firmi tins Begum the JiTttDRnwftL Of
SOME rlRMi UNITS FROM rlFSH)N&T0fif " ��a
To The Editor:
This letter is in response to the "In
Defense of Senator Jesse Helms" letter
in the Oct. 7 issue of The East Caroli-
nian.
I could not believe the views of Mat-
thew Clarke of the Helms Club. To say
that Joe McCarthy was a "great
patriot who cleansed many Com-
munists from America" is a JOKE!
Senator McCarthy was a mean-
spirited, ignorant rabble-rouser who
only used his position in the Senate to
gain personal power. Remember
Charlie Chaplin? He was one of the
'Communists' that Joe McCarthy
"cleansed" from America Rah,rah.
Go Joe.
Are school prayer, low taxes, free
enterprise and states rights ignorant
and immoral? Hardly. But neither are
they inalienable rights. School prayer is
an issue whose time has passed. I keep
seeing these bumper stickers that sav
"Kids Need To Pray No argument
there. My only question is why do they
need to pray at school? What's wrong
with prayer at home, before and after
school? And if a student feels a need
to pray at school, he can. SILENTLY.
There are no laws against private,
silent prayer.
On to CBS. In many independent
surveys all three of the networks have
been shown to be rather neutral in the
way they present the news. Also, I
challenge Mr. Clarke to show me one
incident where the media has changed
any of the President's programs. Only
Congress can do that.
The media in this country has a role
in keeping the government in check.
They report the truth, and being a free
press are able to continue doing so.
One of the best examples of the press
checking the governments power was
the case of Mr. Clarke's beloved
Senator McCarthy. The press brought
him down, and they did it simply by
showing the American public the
Senator in action at one of his commit-
tee meetings.
I have no problem with your feelings
on the Soviet Union, however we are
going to have to start trusting them if
this nation and this world are to sur-
vive.
However, I have a lot of problems
with your feelings on South Africa.
I'm afraid blacks are not free to "come
and go" in South Africa. And any na-
tion that systematically denies the ma-
jority of its people the right to vote and
participate in the government is rotten
to the core
One last thing. I am a registered
Republican. I voted for Ronald
Reagan and Jesse Helms in the last
election. 1 guarantee you that I will
never vote for Jesse Helms again. He
has shown himself to be Joe McCar-
thy's soul-mate: An egotistical, power-
hungry maniac who puts his ambitions
before everthing else, including loyalty
to the President.
David R. Payne,
Senior,
Theatre Arts
Farewell
(EDITOR'S NOTE: ECU student
Kevin Watts was killed in an auto acci-
dent early Sunday morning.)
Dear Editor:
Occurences happen in our lives that
cause us to halt our busy day to day ac-
tivities and reflect on the meaning and
value of our lives. Such an occurence
has recently taken place. Kevin Lee
Watts was put on this earth for a
reason; and likewise he was taken from
us. I do not know or understand why
he was taken, but deep inside I feel
there was a reason for it. The void
space in my life that was filled by his
existence will forever remain. Kevin
was very special to me and I will truly
miss his friendship. Although Kevin is
no longer with us physically, we must
make sure that he lives on with us in
our hearts and spirit. Now we all must
accept the fact that he is gone, and we
should all strive to make our lives more
meaningful and to reach our potential
to make up for the opportunity and
time that Kevin never got to reach his
dreams. Kevin, we will miss you and I
will never forget how you touched the
lives around you.
Ellory S. Farrar,
ECU Graduate
Marching Pirates
Dear Editor:
The other day, I was listening in on a
conversation between two students in
the Croatan. Obviously, they were in
despair over the football team. And
why not? It's been a record losing
season. However, they went on to say
things like, "This school has nothing
reputable, nothing to be proud of
and "I wish I were going to UNC or
N.C. State where there is
Well, I'm writing this letter, for
those two students, others like them,
and any open ears, about one of the
most highly reputable, hardworking
organizations on campus: the ECU
Marching Pirates.
The Marching Pirates are not only
an organization you can be proud of as
a student of ECU, but an organization
you can trust to come out of a football
game victorious, no matter what the
score!
Outranking any of the ACC bands,
the Marching Pirates are one of the top
bands in the southeast, and one of the
finer marching bands in the nation
They have worked religiously at their
sport, to which they are sincerely
dedicated.
I think that it's about time the band
was recognized, and by means beyond
words, by allowing them the expen-
ditures for future travel.
This year, like most, the band h
only traveled to one away game: that
being the opener with N.C. State This
organization deserves better it
represents ECU in her finest form The
band, as a representative, will establish
a definite and long lasting impression
on others, surely to be in the assistance
of gaining future East Carolinians
Already, the band has prove? to be
an imminent financial powtt 10 the
school by bringing in thousands to the
games.
Let's face it, this is an issue long in
coming, and it is one I hope will be
resolved shortly by funding the band
for away travel. Only with the help oi
the students, administration, and ECU
alumni can we make i; happen. I'm
asking for your support and school
spirit because you can be proud. Let's
hear it for the band!
John Bnggs.
Junior,
Criminal Justice
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
'repressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
Over the last few years, the Reagan administra-
tion has taken a policy toward South Africa that
has amounted to no policy at all.
Constructive engagement, as it is so-called, is
supposed to encourage diplomacy rather than con-
frontation, but in truth it has been nothing more
than a smokescreen, an easy way to avoid the situa-
tion. Even if Washington is sincere in this policy,
there are several points that prove it has not work-
ed.
A true policy of constructive engagement would
seek to continue further negotiations over Nambia,
the country traped between South Africa and
Angola, which the South African regime refuses to
grant independence. However, negotiations over
Nambia are dead.
Constructive engagement should seek to
eliminate the conditions that attract Marxism, yet
Soviet influence in the country is growing. Each
day, more violence and racial conflict takes place,
and repression gets stronger as the violence
escalates. Has this policy worked? No, and there is
growing opposition to it in the U.S.
The Reagan administration has been forced to
back down from constructive engagement, beginn-
ing with the passing of limited sanctions in
September of 1985, the providing of Military aid to
Angolan rebels, and just last week, the congres-
sional overrride of the President's em bar rasing veto
Weak South Afi
of strong new sanctions. Still, the administration
has done everything it can, including the veto of a
U.N. security Council resolution for strong sanc-
tions, to keep its sorry excuse of a policy,
Reagan, in part, justifies constructive engage-
ment on the grounds that it has helped bring about
improved conditions for blacks in South Africa.
The President has apparently been fooled by the im-
age of change that Botha has created.
From The Left
By BERN McCRADY
Botha has announced that apartheid is no longer
an ideology, but so what? His regime thinks in
terms of racial discrimination anyway. The judicial
system is being changed, but only enough to be a
token gesture.
For example, a black may now marry a white, but
he or she cannot legally live with a spouse in a
racially mixed community 1 Blacks are now being
permitted to move about the country, but only from
ghetto to ghetto, where approved government
housing exists. Signs reading "whites only" are be-
ing torn down, but many are replaced with signs
reading "right of admission reserved
Also, the South African government claims to be
opposed to discrimination, but supports differen-
tiation (which means nothing less than discrimina-
tion). The President needs to realize that blacks are
not any better off now than they have been, and
that they are still excluded from the political pro-
cess.
During the last two years, a disturbing amount of
violence has developed in South Africa, and
Washington seems content to just sit back and
watch. The ANC (African National Congress) has
taken up a wide range of sabotage and guerrilla ac-
tivity, and has even collaborated with the SACP
(South African Communist Party). No doubt, the
role of the Marxist will grow with Soviet help if
violence continues to spread.
Violence has become so wide spread that Botha
has locked away thousands of people, suspended
civil rights, used his police and defense forces in a
ruthless manner, and put very tight controls on the
press. Even with that, Reagan has said that sanc-
tions "would destroy America's flexibility, discard
our diplomatic leverage, and deepen the crisis
Washington described the 1984 constitution, which
completely excludes blacks, as "a step in the right
direction
While Reagan sits back and watches, the power
of the regime is beginning to slip. Botha's regime is
not sending tax collectors into the townships for
fear of death, and has set up a free telephone
hotline to warn travelers of the places where
violence is taking place.
Obviously, tension is growing into the white
areas. Blacks have gained some momentum, but if
Washington is not careful, South Africa could have
a revolution which is non-white, non-capitalist,
non-American, and Pro-Soviet.
Seeds for Marxist propaganda have been planted
by the regime, and it might only be a matter of a
few years before the fruits of Marx come to spoil.
Drastic steps need to be taken now to force Botha to
reform his government.
The first step may have been taken last week
when both the House of Representatives and the
Senate voted to override President Reagan's veto of
tough new economic sanctions. Congress is to be
commended for its wise judgement, because it is in-
creasingly clear that Reagan won't do anything.
Who knows, the congressional action may shake up
a few other world leaders, such as Margaret That-
cher, and get them to do the right thing and pass
sanctions.
That would probably be too much to ask for,
though, since there will always be someone who will
make a big stink and lobby for Botha. Fortunately,
more and more people are realizing that no
American business has any business doing business
in South Africa. Well, there goes Apartheid again!
)
��
� �� � �
U.S.
shi
in
H
tl
WASHINGTON. DC. (CPS) -
Animal rights groups have lost a thel
major battle in their court fight thel
to moderate or abolish animal ex
penmentation on the nation's
campuses
Researchers had worried
if the court decision had gone the
other way, animal rights u
could have kept them constantly
in court.
"It's a major vict i
says Sheldon Steinbach.
for the American Council on
Education (ACE), whose group
filed a friend of the court brief
trying to protect unive- ed
research.
Specifically, the U.S. �� I
Appeals ruled that People for
Ethical Treatment of Anin
fPETA) could not interfere easilv
in animal research labs' po-
tions
PETA would hae gained ef-
fective power � � ;ienge any
lab's treatment of re
animals, and to free-
Advance
TALLAHASSEE. FL (CPS
Students do much better anc
higher grades ir. viatr �
know what's expected
advance, a Florida State In.
ity professor sa
"Students are more
ork harder when they kr
only what's expected of the
F
:c
Reasons
For Suicide
( onhnued hrom Pane 1.
suicide and suggesting an-
tidepressant drugs may reduce
suicidal episodes.
The rate of adolescent and
young adult suicide has increase
dramatically in the past 25 yea
rising in the I5-to-24 age p
from 5.2 per 100.000 in I960
12 per 100,000 in 1985. The rate
went as high as 13.3 per 100,000
in 1980.
The researched, trying to
determine the factors leading
the increase, reviewed mec
records and interviewed far
and friends of 133 consecutive
young adult suicides. Psychiatric
diagnoses were assigned to the
victims on that basis.
In 53 percent of the suicides.
substance abuse was the primary
diagnosis, and in more than half
of f" jse it was the only (hagnos -
In an additional 13 percent
cases, depression or another men-
tal illness was considered the
foremost diagnosis, but was com-
plicated by substance abuse.
Fowler said it was difficult to
prove substance abuse was solely
responsible for the rise in young
adults suicide
"Certainly, the conventional
wisdom is that drug abuse ha
creased markedly in the past 30
years, but 1 can't prove it becau.se
we don't have population studies
from the 1950's he said "But I
doubt anybodv going to con-
tradict the fact we have a bigger
problem now than we did then
Other social changes such as
the disintegration of the family,
may play a role in the increase in
suicides. Fowler said. However,
he said the other factors are more
likely to lead to substance abue
than directlv to suicide.
Bv
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Coming This Friday
THE PET
TRA
i
Bring In This
Call the Liberty Ride





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 9. 1986
Wi WAS SORT 1
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nis the ECU
are not only
be proud of as
an organization
f a football
nattei hat the
e ACC bands,
ne of the top I
one of the
the nation.
ligiously at their
ire sincerely
time the band
"cans beyond
'he e.xpen-
thc band has
vaj game; that
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better. It
'rm. The
will establish
g la ng impression
the assistance
u hnians.
band ha preen to be
uianciaJ po:r to the
mds to the
�ue long in
pc will be
ling the band
'ne help of
and ECU
' appen. I'm
ri and school
be proud. Let's
John Briggs,
Junior,
( riminal Justice
Forum Rules
man m ei comes letters
view. Mail or
e in the Publtca-
rom the entrance
verification, all let-
iu u the name, major and
address, phone number
the authorfsj. Letters
ited to o typewritten pages,
�spaced or neatly printed. All let-
I subject to editing for brevity,
ana libel, and no personal at-
Oe permitted
Policy
ind ha set up a free telephone
travelers of the places where
place.
i growing into the white
ve gained some momentum, but if
Jt careful, South Africa could have
pch is non-white, non-capitalist,
id Pro-Soviet.
ist propaganda have been planted
id it might only be a matter of a
I the fruits of Marx come to spoil.
1 to be taken now to force Botha to
lment.
Imay have been taken last week
louse of Representatives and the
vernde President Reagan's veto of
Imic sanctions. Congress is to be
Is wise judgement, because it is in-
Ihat Reagan won't do anything,
longressional action may shake up
leaders, such as Margaret That-
to do the right thing and pass
)bably be too much to ask for,
1 will always be someone who wili
id lobby for Botha. Fortunately,
people are realizing that no
has any business doing business
fell, there goes Apartheid again!
U.S. Court Approves Animal Research
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS) -
Animal rights groups have lost a
major battle in their court fight
to moderate or abolish animal ex-
perimentation on the nation's
campuses.
Researchers had worried that,
if the court decision had gone the
other way, animal rights activists
could have kept them constantly
in court.
"It's a major victory for us
says Sheldon Steinbach, lawyer
for the American Council on
Education (ACE), whose group
filed a friend of the court brief
trying to protect university-based
research.
Specifically, the U.S. Court of
Appeals ruled that People for the
Ethical Treatment of Animals
(PETA) could not interfere easily
in animal research labs' opera-
tions.
PETA would have gained ef-
fective power to challenge any
lab's treatment of research
animals, and to freeze lab work
until a court could determine if
the group's charges were true. In
the meantime, PETA would take
custody of the creatures.
"We had tried to inspire the
judges to say guardianship
should be set up in cases of severe
abuse says PETA director In-
grid New kirk.
PETA originally sued the In-
stitute for Behavioral Research
and the National Institutues of
Health (NIH) in 1981, claiming
the labs were mistreating the
animals.
Newkirk says her group will
appeal the decision.
For the moment, though, "the
decision is important to all
groups using animals for research
because if PETA had succeeded,
any group could sue to stop
research says NIH spokesman
Storm Whaley.
"Remember, there is no
federal or state legislation giving
an individual the right to take
possession of animals or to halt
animal research Steinbach
adds.
Consequently, the decision's
impact on colleges is slight right
now, says Dr. Michael Jackson,
associate dean of research at
George Washington University
Medical Center.
"It's widely accepted by study
groups�a combination of the
government and the National
Academy of Science who examin-
ed the whole question of animal
research�that the complete
cessation (of research) would be
detrimental to the nation's health
program he says.
The animal rights movement
on campus, of course, has been
growing more powerful and more
strident each school year.
Most recently, activists manag-
ed to excite enough public
outrage to stop a University of
Florida research proposal to
submerge dogs in water to study
ways to help human drowning
victims.
Under pressure from the ac-
tivists, a number of
municipalities near campuses
have stopped giving or selling
stray animals to campus labs for
research purposes.
In November, several states
will poll voters about similar bans
on selling strays to labs.
The PETA suit is the latest in a
series of lawsuits to halt research,
but PETA's differed in that it in-
volved taking custody of the
animals.
In response, the National
Academy of Science, ACE and a
variety of scientific groups have
mounted campaigns to publicize
the human benefits of animal
research.
In Arizona, for example, a
group called The Incurably 111 for
Animal Research, made up of
multiple sclerosis victims, occa-
sionally pickets to dramatize how
animal research helps them.
"Leprosy, which was in
epidemic proportions, is an ex-
ample George Washington's
Jackson says. "It was very dif-
ficult to approach experimental-
ly. When researchers found that
Advance Warning Can Help Grades
Texas armadillos were susceptible
to (the disease), it was possible to
work out therapies
"Now, leprosy is dying out all
over the world. It shows just how
dependent we are on medical
research he adds.
But Students United Protesting
Research on Sentient Subjects
(SUPRESS) at the University of
California at Santa Barbara
earlier this year said "although
researchers in such fields as heart
disease, cancer and diabetes use
the most animals, these diseases
still constitute the three biggest
killers of Americans
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$205 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at
additional cost. Pregnancy Test, Birth Control
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For
further information, call 832-0535 (toll free
number 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. weekdays General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
IIIIIIIIIIMIIIIUJIIIfiniWIWttlHtWIrWmiii
TALLAHASSEE, FL (CPS )�
Students do much better and get
higher grades in classes when they
know what's expected of them in
advance, a Florida State Univer-
sity professor says.
"Students are more likely to
ork harder when they know not
only what's expected of them,
Reasons
For Suicide
Continued l-rom Page I.
suicide and suggesting an-
tidepressant drugs may reduce
suicidal episodes.
The rate of adolescent and
young adult suicide has increased
dramatically in the past 25 years,
rising in the 15-to-24 age group
from 5.2 per 100,000 in 1960 to
12 per 100,000 in 1985. The rate
went as high as 13.3 per 100,000
in 1980.
The researched, trying to
determine the factors leading to
the increase, reviewed medical
records and interviewed family
and friends of 133 consecutive
young adult suicides. Psychiatric
diagnoses were assigned to the
victims on that basis.
In 53 percent of the suicides,
substance abuse was the primary
diagnosis, and in more than half
of these it was the only diagnosis.
In an additional 13 percent of the
cases, depression or another men-
tal illness was considered the
foremost diagnosis, but was com-
plicated by substance abuse.
Fowler said it was difficult to
prove substance abuse was solely
responsible for the rise in young
adults suicide.
"Certainly, the conventional
wisdom is that drug abuse has in-
creased markedly in the past 30
years, but I can't prove it because
we doi't have population studies
from the 1950's he said. "But I
doubt anybody's going to con-
tradict the fact we have a bigger
problem now than we did then
Other social changes, such as
the disintegration of the family,
may play a role in the increase in
suicides, Fowler said. However,
he said the other factors are more
likely to lead to substance abuse
than directly to suicide.
but how the grading works
FSU's Marcy Driscoll found in
studying student performances in
different kinds of classes.
As a result, Driscoll wants the
nation's teachers to adopt
"mastery classes" in which
teachers give students the same
test at least twice, outline grading
policies carefully and make their
expectations of students explicit.
Her research, she says, shows
students in the "mastery" classes
tended to perform at higher levels
than students in other kinds of
courses.
"Students typically work for
the grade they think they can get.
By knowing what can give them
an A, it makes them just that
much more confident adds
Driscoll, who hopes her work will
influence teacher education pro-
grams.
However the National Educa-
tion Association (NEA),
although supporting mastery
classes as a theory, worries
studies like Driscoll's don't
always lead to practical new
teaching techniques.
"Most people who study
teaching methodology support
'mastery despite arguing" over
how difficult it is to give teachers
guidelines to handle all the situa-
tions that might arise spon-
taneously in a classroom, says
Jerry Bledsoe of the NEA.
M�t,sMf,s,�� ���matiKim inn
"The problem we have iden-
tified is that students may learn
just enough to get by. Teachers
fall into the trap of 'teaching to
the tests thereby avoiding stu-
dent experimentation and spon-
taneity he warns.
Driscoll disagrees.
"When I lowered the minimum
score for an A' in my class, I
found students worked harder
and exceeded their
expectations she says.
"Students know where they
stand. They realize they don't
have to get just the minimum
"Minimum" grades used to be
whatever got the student to pass,
but Driscoll thinks the traditional
letter grades may eventually give
way to passail systems.
"It's more a case of the student
saying 'What can I learn out of
this course' instead of only get-
ting a grade she says. The
passail system "gets away from
comparing one student to
another" all the time.
Insisting grades are the least of
the problems in the mastery-
based plan, Bledsoe says schools
have much more difficult
classroom problems.
"Our greatest challenge is
maintaining student's in-
dividuality. Look at the problem
in Japanese schools he says.
Jkcheswtis
FAMILY BUFFET
355-2172
i �i
DINNER
�469
LUNCH
featuring
Help Yourself Home Cooking
ALL YOU CARE TO EAT
One Low Price Does It All!
EntraM � Dnitrt � Solod tar � Vigitrtlw � Drink
Thru October ECU Students
Get 10 Off With I.D.
Great Food Within Your College Budget!
���SSSSSWS
Coming This Friday October 10th To TW's Nitelife
THE PETER ADONIS
TRAVELING FANTASY
SHOW
Doors Open at 7:30 for Ages
18 & Up and Everyone Gets
In For Free After The 10:30
Show
Bring In This Ad For $2.00 Off Admission
Call the Liberty Ride. Z7
AN ABC Permits
"They prepare students well for
math and science, but they stifle
the students' creativity
"There is nothing to indicate
the contents (of a mastery-based
class) is restrictive Driscoll
says.
"I have always felt a student
can learn anything given enough
time and materials and teacher
support she concludes.
NEWMAN-CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
953 East Tenth Street
Greenville, N.C. 27858
i
CK

K
-fefW
fe7
lP
Hf
�f: ti�r
Woodsy Owl says No Noise Pollution Here!
i
I
31!
CAMPUS MASS SCHEDULE
Sunday-11:30 a.m.
Biology Building, Room 103
9:00 p.m. Newman Center
Wednesday-5:30 p.m.
Newman Center
(followed by a fellowship dinner)
SHARE THE WORD BIBLE STUDY
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
at the Newman Center
All are welcome
For information, call 752-4216
.
r

THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they re both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule.
not the exception. The gold bar ����mmm
on the right means you command respect as an Armv officer. If you're
earning a BSN, write. Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O Box 7713
Clifton, N 07015. Or call toll free 1 -800-USA-ARMY.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
:
Every
Tuesday and
Thursday you
can read the most
informative stories about
the news events of the day, the best
sports coverage, and interesting
features about the people, places, and
things surrounding you at ECU and in
Greenville. So can your parents. For
$25 your parents can get a one year mail
subscription to The East Carolinian.
Serving the campus community since
1925, The East Carolinian provides
valuable insight into student Ufe at East
Carolina University for your
parents. Twice weekly we can
tell your family about the most
current campus and local news.
Our remarkable staff works around
the clock to produce the best possible
newspaper containing the most essen-
tial news, sports, and features of in-
terest not only to you, but to your
parents and friends as well, wherever
they may be. The East Carolinian � let
us inform them.
"tm "WJ '�" ' 'M - � mmmi
Bift East (Carolinian
SUBSCRIPTION FORM
NAME.
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE
ZIP
TELEPHONE (
L
RATE: $25.00 peryetr
Pleas send check or money order to:
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
f" ,tt ��Hfcl
i, NC 27344353
j � 1
?ti:
-3M
A
OP

- m i i
40�mfmmifm0W �
�WM, � .��





4
"
I One Of The Largest Selections Of
'� Hard Parts In The Southeast!
Heavy Duty
Alternators or Starters.
34w88
Each
Exch
Fits Most Domestic Applications
Remanufactured 1 Year Warranty
Alternators or Starters 22.88 Each Exch
High Torque Starters or Alternators W Integral
�; .julators or 26.88 All Others $5 Off
Req 32.99 To 42.99
vw
NEW ,
Water Pumps
OO QQ Each
XOiOO Exch
Fits Most 4. 6 or 8 Cylinder:
For Most ' est c Applications
Remanufactured
1-Year Warranty Water Pumps 1 3.88Each exc�
.to
Brake Shoes'f NEW
or Pads W&,
9.88
Each
Axle Set
W Exch
Brake Shoes or NEW Orig. Equipment Pads 6.88 E
� - �' I Foi Most Domestic Applications
�� . N � Meant As A Warrant
Brake
Master Cylinders
24.88
Each
Exch
n ifactured
Brake Master Cylinders
W 1-Year Warranty 1 4.
- � � irr 3rae Mas tei
I 22 99 To 27 99
Fuel Pumps
13.88
Eacn
Excf
R manufactured 1-Year Warranty
Fuel Pumps . . . 11.99 Each Exch
Jes El trie cuel Pumps
Reg 12.99-13.99
si
if 0
Limited
Lifetime
Warranty
I ALLOY
:�ii
Heavy Duty
Universal Joints
9.88
Each
Reg 13 99
Universal Joints W l-Year
Warranty 5.88 Each
Remanufactured
Carburetors
CQ QBEachlBBL
W9a9w Exch.
2 BBL 79.95 Exch
4 BBL 99.95 Exch
For Most Domestic Applications
Reg 69 99-139 99
Advance Auto
Heavy Duty Shocks
�88 Each f
For Most Domestic Applications
Snap
Brake
Fluid
.99
Each
12 Oz
Monro-Matic
Shocks
IOa88 Each
For Most Domestic Applications
SYLVANIA
(3D
Sealed
Beam Bulbs
!� W Each
Mfg U 4000. 4001. 6014
All Halogen Bulbs $3 Off
Batteries
� NEW S
Radiators
v:
Ready Rri
w
$10 Off
Everyday Low Prices
For Most Domestic Applications
Advance Auto
Radiator Caps
.88
Each
ia CAROL
Thermostats
1.66
For Most Domestic App
Each
Reg 4 59
Moulded or Flex
Radiator Hoses
20 Off
Everyday Low Prices
APD Hershey
Bill Joint King Bolt.
Wet�r �oum� Oil
Scili Control Arm
Shirti 4 Anamblits
Buringi Tie Roa
Sockets Brhn Shift
Support!
Front End Parts
20 Off
Everyday Low Prices tm
Internal Engine
Parts
20 Off
Timing Belli. Chum Cimshitli Rocker Armj
Gean ind SprotktU Mun Litleri Held Gllktti
Biinngi RorJl Vilvet
NEW
Brake , ,
Rotors j
39.99
Reg. 49.99
For Most Domestic Applications,
Each
600
Costo'
uto Parts

LIMIT 12 Qts Motor Oil
kvV
maximur-r protecfto
against vis
thermal bre �
"ALVOllNf
MotorohT
WeVi
Castroi
the Standard
Each
Quart
PENNZOIL
10W30
HOURS. M
Meel
Advance Auto 10W30
Or 10W40 Motor Oil
Meets or E�ceerjs New Car Specifications
.88

Each
Quart
Havoline Or Valvoline
10W30 Or 10W40 Motor Oil :as �W40 Or
Pernzcil 10W30
� Motor Oil
SPECIAL
2 Liter
Coke
Classic
� ��� : .
Knjov
;v�
M!r:T
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Classk:
Non-Resistor � � �� Resisto
Mtg Rebate .O Mt
Your
Final Cost
Eacn LIMIT 16
-
.94
.25
4.Q Your
� "T 9 Fmai Cos!
.69
Motorcraft Spark Plugs
For Most Fprg Applications
Tirrnii r
3.37
Each Reg 3 99-6 49 LIMIT 2
Fram Air Filters
All Other Fram Air Filters $1 Off
For Most Domestic Applications
Advance 4
Auto
Oil Filter
Advancek
Auto
Oil Filter


1.44
Each LIMIT 2
Advance Auto Oil Filters
For Most Domestic Applications
U
Remanufactured
Brake
Calipers
14.88
j
' WW.MJ i.� H(tM'
Each
Exch
For Most Domestic Applications
Sale Price a� m
Non-Resistor � � 9
Mtg. Rebate
Your
Final Cost
.49
Sale Price
Resistor
.94
Mfg. Rebate �
Your
Final Cost
69
Each
99
EachLIMIT 16
Z&�
AtffiffA
40-Month Battery
Oft Aft e
ammtwMtWtW With Trade
From 280 To 335 CCAV ('Cold Cranking Amps)
Autolite Spark Plugs
72-Month
Battery
39.88
50-Month Torque Starter
Battery Battery
34.88 69.88
Each With Trade Each With Trade Each With Trade
From 330 To 510 CCA's From 425 To 570 CCA s
Battery Testing and Charging Installation
Maintenance and Alternator or Starter Testing
Balloons,
And Cokes For The Kids!
� Prices Good Thru Sat Oct. 18, 1966 � We Reserve The Right To Limit �w
Quantities � All Special Order Merchandise Not Subject To Advertised Prices ��
40-Piece Socket Set
Reg 6 99 LIMIT 2
FREE
Advance Auto Parts
Cap To The
First 300
Customers
Friday
�HOtC�
Auto Parts
VISA
Shop our new Super S x
Quality and the Larj
Parts and
� Open 7 Days A Week � ?
� Over 100 Stores In Four St;
� Over 55 Years of Suppiying
Supplies
� Over 12.000 SKU s Availabi
� Top Rated Preferred Gusto
� 1-Year Warranty on Hard Pi
� Quality Parts and Accessol
Import Cars and Light True!

Register

PI'aP

5 Torque
Starter
Batteries
Con
ualified
Qualified Factory
Available to Demoi
Questions concert
Following Product
SPARKOMATIC VtPi
SUPffttOfi �MONI
Demonstrations 0
See the Luck Stone At
Parts Racing (WdsmotwH
Thru Sunday. Oct. 12. 1






I
m
ton
c. '000 I �
Shopping Sprelf
&k Accessories
9

Air Compressors
12.99
eba
iDle on
maximum protection,
against viscosity and"
hermal breakdown. '
We've Got It In Greenville!
tOW-40
OTOR Oil-
M � tii with; 7
PENNZOIL
MOLT I-VIS
10W-30
� BLCl
the Standard
of performance
South Park Shopping Center
s 3
Red Banks Rd.
Here We Are: Located at 115 Red Banks Rd. In
South Park Shopping Center next to Food Town.
PHONE: 756-9899
HOURS: MonSat 8 a.m9 p.m. Sunday, 1 p.m6 p.m.
Meet the Advance Auto Parts
SUPER STORE TEAM
L?v -r-r��
r Valvoline
3W40 Motor Oil
Castrij
Per.nzi
t'If;
I
�ice
Resistor
lost
.69
dotorcraft Spark Plugs
flTO
Advancek
Auto
Oil Filter
Advance4
Auio
Oil Filter
Advance Auto Oil Filters
Applications
A.0
&&
'LMHHHIIIIIIHI
2.99
Ea"
40-Piece Socket Set
eg 6 99 LIMIT 2
Advance Auto Parts
Cap To The
First 300
Customers
Friday
ices �'
MottwCord)!
VISA
Each
Quart!
�JW40 Or
10W30
�4otor Oil

Each
120 PSI
160 PSI 17.�9Each
200 PSI 25.99 Each
j Rubber Queen
Floor Mats
20 Off
Everyday Low Prices
uiynrrs
LeBra
Front End Covers
39.99
Reg 54 99
Each
Includes Special Orders
AFCO AMFM
Cassette Stereo
HaQIO Mfg � 6444
24.95
Reg 39 95
J a � a a
amaaas
� � i
Each
"SPARKOMi
Complete Stereo
System Mtg �c-45
AM FM Cassette Radio- Dual
Cone Speakers Reg 64 99
SPARKOMATrC
Electronic Tune
Auto Reverse Cassette
AMFM Stereo
Shop our new Super Store for Super Service. Availability,
Quality and the Largest Selection of Automobile
Parts and Accessories in Town
ye Got It In Advance!
� Open 7 Days A Week�364 Days A Year
� Over 100 Stores In Four States
� Over 55 Years of Supplying Quality Automobile
Supplies
� Over 12.000 SKU's Available
� Top Rated Preferred Customer Service
� 1-Year Warranty on Hard Parts
� Quality Parts and Accessories for Domestic
Trucks
and
Truck
Running
Boards
$10oft
Everyday Low Prices
Reg 109.99 Tjp 279.99
149.99
Reg 189 99 Mfg � SR-308
Each
Lift Louvers or
Sun Roofs
$10 Off
Everyday Low Prices
DCfZEE
Car Ramps
14.88
Each
Engine
Dress-Up Kits
�W5afai5af5j Each
Reg 62 99 Mfg �6780 678i
SUPCfttO
3
1
Truck
Bed
Mats 'CRubbe?
69.99
Each
1 V2-Ton
Service Jac�
24.77
Reg 39 99
Truck
Passport
Windows
59.99
Rec 65 99
Each
Light
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Tt
Over 3.000 In
Prizes
Given Away!
&
33
5 Torque
Starter
Batteries
Hii Vi -ulinc
MjwIiiw NanulifK
I
�m 4u Ian 4u
50 Cases of
Motor Oil
2 Sparkomatic 4 Sun Roofs"
stereos rrTTA
Restieys
SiUCONE
Westteys
Tire Shine
1f?Q Each
� af 5af 12 Oz
Bleche Wite
Tire Cleaner
mwrWw Each
Mfg 500 20 Oz.
Chemicals
FREE!
m One Gallon
Windshield
Washer Fluid
To The First
200 Customers
On Thursday
Clear Magic
Cleaner
Each
Mg �502
1.99
iiEARMAGt.
�0T�CTS1 .tuTim
KAjTIfllS
10 Sets of
MGSSr
Armorall
jjf Protectant
Each
� J 4 0z
DflNCE
Z Rain Dance
Polish
5QQ Each
� 99 14 Oz
'Mfg �0254
Gumout
Carburetor
Cleaner
1CA Each
� U9 16 Oz
W-D40
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.89
Each
2 0z
"J
RubberQueenRubber Queen 2 Passport
I Floor Mats Windows
IMPORT PARTS HIGH PERFORMANCE
Consumer Demonstrations By
ualified Factory Representatives
Qualified Factory Representatives will be
Available to Demonstrate and Answer
Questions concerning Application or Use of the
Following Products Dee Zee JRIM
PROOUCTS
SPARKOMATIC �����
f�ftioi tmonroet Q�jp Blue (Soul I
Demonstrations Oct. 10th & 11th. lOajtu-4p.m.
See the Luck StoneAdvance Auto
Parts Racing Oldsmobile on Display
Thru Sunday, Oct. 12,1986
f
Import
Alternators Or
Starters
9Q QQ Each
4fc9�95Sf Exch.
� Reg 39 99-44 99
Nippondenso
Or Bosch
Spark Plugs
� m t Each
Sold Only in Pkgs of 4
NEW Import
Water Pumps
$5 Off Each
trfff
High Performance
Carburetors molly
Each
Exch.
Mfg � O-1850Reg 139 99
600CFM'
119.99
zzzzzz
Import
Air and Oil
Filters
20 Off
Engine
Hose Kits
Each
Kit
Mfg � 7052R.7056R
17.99
Traction Bars
34i99 Each
Mfg I 20470 Reg 39 99
Manifolds
I 2li99 Each
Reg. 149.99Mtg 2101

I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
sa Loom county
OCTOBER 9. 1986
P�Sc8
Expectations Of Brand New
Battle Between The Networks
iU TEX! IS UP.
�umm is mm
fZOhT TUTh ME 5THI
i Mm
Wl KNOW WHr
Wendy O. Williams
Wendy O. Williams, singer, performer, daredevU and stuntwoman, will perform at the Attic Thurs-
day with opening act Lexx Luther. Williams is perhaps best known for her performances with the
new wave group, the Plasmaucs; however, when she performs stunts such as crashing through a wall
of televisions in a car, her public visibility cannot help but increase
By MIC AH HARRIS
�hrff Writer
Well, it's early in the new fall
TV season but rumors already
abound as to what to expect of
your favorite programs. Let's
take a look at unseen television,
shall we?
"Dallas which started all of
this end-of-season-cliff-hanging
business several years back, has
come up with a new concept as a
result of this year's innovative
dream resolution to Bobby's
death: the double-season cliff
hanger.
Word has it that this season
will end with Pam asleep in bed.
In the background, we hear the
rapid staccato of shower water.
Pam awakens and makes her way
to the bathroom. She opens the
shower stall.
"You she gasps. Fade out.
Now, the question is: was the
previous season a dream or this
season? Who is in the shower?
Bobby? The plumber? Freddy
Kruger?
"This could go on forever a
"Dallas" producer who shall re-
main nameless chortled. "And
best of all, no character is in-
dispensable now. If an actor gives
us any trouble about a pay raise,
we'll just write 'em off as a piece
of undigested late-night pizza.
Hah-hahf"
Although this dream explana-
tion of Bobby's death has
generated much controversy
among fans, it is better than what
might have been. At one time,
there were talks of signing on
director George Night of the
Living Dead) Romero. His solu-
tion?
Pam opens the shower on Bob-
by's decomposing body. "Would
you mind scrubbing my back?"
he asks. "There is a place I can't
reach since rigor mortis set in
Sick.
"The Dukes of Hazard" will
return (Wait! Put those razor
blades down!) as a one-hour
special only I repeat, one hour
only. PBS will air it as part of the
national literacy campaign,
PLUS.
In this moving story, Uncle
Jesse must come to terms with his
illiteracy. "I don't need no
readin' and writin' learnin he
protests. "I know all I need. One
X on the jug means corn licker.
Two Xs means high octane for
the General Lee and three Xs
means my urine sample for the
county nurse. Or is that one
X?"
A true moment of catharsis in
the history of the medium.
Over on the Cosby Show,
actess Lisa Bonet who plays
Denise will be leaving for her own
show. Although a director has
not yet been assigned, there are
disussions going on with Goerge
Romero.
Bonet has appeared in an
episode of Romero's syndicated
Tales From the Dark Side and
Romero's experience directing
zombies makes him a natural to
direct Denise through her
misadventures. Her show will
probably be laid to rest sooner
than later, anyway.
If you haven't seen "Wizard"
yet, the new CBS series about a
diminutive genius who makes
weapons for the CIA, and nifty
toys for the kiddies on the side
keep an eye on the listings.
Emanuel Lewis will guest star
as an Idi Amin-type ruler of a
third world country. This role
should be quite a stretch for
Lewis.
On "Matlock Andy Griffith
will have to defend hillbilly
murder suspect Ernest T. Bass
who claims he didn't know
Darlene Darling was looking out
the window when he threw a
brick through it.
Things don't look good for
Ernest T. as Daddy Dnscoll Darl-
ing testifies that Ernest hasn't
ever gotten over Darlene's jilting
him twenty years ago "on Sheriff
Taylor's other show w
And, no, your eyes are not
deceiving you. The same man
who plays Dnscoll Darling also
plays Uncle Jesse on the
aforementioned "Dukes of
Hazard" special. Insiders predict s
this will be the vear of Denver �
Pyle.
A poster of the geras actor
wearing nothing but a pair of i
overalls is already outselling .
posters of Don Johnson in cer-
tain Florida communities.
Speaking of Don Johnson,
"Miami Vice" is facing stiff
competition against "Dallas" (no
Bobby Ewing pun intended).
The wiley "Vice" producers
are planning to use this to their
advantage. They are wooing back fr
those viewers they lost after last
year' disappointing season with a
special episode in which G. Gor-
don Liddy, aided by some Soviet
parapsychologists, links into
Pam Ewings brain and you
guessed it! Miami Vice's previous
season never happened
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N. C. Student Legislature: The Future Is In Your Hands
By D.A. SWANSON
�aff Wiilrr
No. Not the SGA. This is the
North Carolina Student
Legislature. A state-wide group
of students who volunteer their
time as spokespeople for
students' views to the North
Carolina government, federal
government, and the world.
So how do they go about this
rather inocuous task? It takes
hours and hours of debate on
each new issue to come to a con-
sensus based on the votes of
representatives from more than
22 schools across the state.
Well, is it some kind of
political group? In a sense, it is.
Politics definitely do play a large
role in the intricate workings of
the Legislature. But political af-
filiation has no bearing on who
becomes a member.
How do you become a
memberAttend at least one of
your school's 'delegation'
meetings, and then attend one of
the monthly Interim-Conference
meetings. This month the ECU
delegation will travel to Raleigh
to meet and debate with the state-
wide body.
Now, for the most important
question Why should I, or
anyone else, join this organiza-
tion? For prestige, an education
in parliamentary procedure and
professional business sense, and
most importantly, for intellectual
stimulation.
At last month's Interim-
Conference in Chapel Hill,
NCSL entered into heated
debates on: a constitutional
amendment to repeal the two-
term limit on presidential oc-
cupancy, gun control, draft
registration requirements for
financial aid recipients, and the
General Assembly's "Pork Bar-
rel These are definitely hot
issues that directly affect
students. At least those who
know the strength of a vocal stu-
dent voice.
But, you say, all of this debate
makes this NCSL thing sound
like a bunch of 'nerds' getting
together for a 'swell' time. Well,
readers, as this observer has
noted, this diverse group of con-
cerned students knows how to
party. A typical monthly Interim-
Conference covers two days, a
Saturday and Sunday. At the
traditional Saturday eveninig
parties one may observe the most
extreme conservative sluggishly
swaying with his arm around the
most extreme liberal. Now this is
Three Hits Continue Rockin'
After Three Month Vacation
how politics ought to be.
Delegation Chairperson of the
ECU delegation, John Simon,
also notes, for interested
students, that NCSL is not only
the oldest such student legislature
in the nation, it also has an ex-
cellent track record for pushing
their own legislation into actual
law. About forty percent to be
more accurate.
For example, although North
Carolina is the only state in the
union whose governor does not
have the power of veto, the North
Carolina Student Legislature has
been pushing for that power since
the fifties. Most political analysts
By JOHN SHANNON
� EAIor
Three months ago, Three Hits
were pared down to three
members, all in the same family,
and no gigs thanks to an abscon-
ding drummer. The band was in
the unfortunate position of hav-
ing to fend off several record
labels who were actively in-
terested in making a deal with
them.
Friday they were back on stage
at New Deli with two new
members, several new songs and
a new sound that was at least as
full as the Deli was that night.
Michael Kurtz, guitarist and
writer of most of Three Hits'
music, described their quarter-
year hiatus as a time for ex-
perimentation and song writing.
"We've been trying out different
styles. We have a bunch of new
songs. We're working on some
Dylan songs but we're not sure
yet how that might affect our
sound or our songs
As of last Friday, Three Hits
didn't sound too much like Bob
Dylan.
What they did sound like, from
their standard set-opener
"Numbers" to the eacore
"MoneyBangkok" (an ode to
Alex Chilton, with whom they
shared gigs), was a band that has
ripened.
Like most rock bands Three
Hits have always fed off raw,
youthful energy. Like not too
many bands they have also been
dedicated craftsmen, whittling
and honing their style through a
long maturing process, somehow
managing to retain a key element
� exuberance.
At least partly responsible for
filling out Three Hits' sound are
new additions Trent Pitts on
drums and Jeff Barbour on
keyboards.
Pitts anchors the band more
firmly than ever in the solid rock
groove tradition established by
former drummer Jim Biddell,
making the sometimes ethereal
tunes emminently danceable.
Barbour's input into the mix is
wisely spare, broadening the
tonal spectrum while allowing
Michael and Danny Kurtz'
guitars to remain dominant.
Sheila (formerly Valentine �
she and Michael were married
last May) carried the night, her
distinct yet reminiscent (Grace
Slick?) voice confidently holding
its own even when the backing
vocals faltered (thanks, no
doubt, to the Deli's unique
acoustical characteristics). Mean-
while, Sheila's bass playing has
evolved into a steady, stylistic
fulcrum for the wide variety of
chordal structures to turn on.
Three Hits' music possesses a
balance all too rare these days.
When the guitars rock, as they
often do, and the bass line
thumps, as it usually does, the
vocal line can be expected to drift
melodically above the fray, as in
"Pressure Dome" and "Lori
second and fourth songs of the
evening.
And when the tune is a ballad
or simply on an emotional theme,
"Time Starts Now" and "Cage
of Gold" come to mind, the band
never lets go of the underlying
tension, preventing boredom
from creeping in. Michael and
Sheila's sensitive songwriting
have to receive credit for this dif-
ficult achievement.
Opening the night, a new
Greenville band, Lost Together,
were anything but lost as they im-
provised their way through a
variety of laid back jams.
Guitaristsinger Rob Frayser and
guitarist Tracy Caine led their
solid rhythm section (Wil and
Cary) in an exploration of the
sonic landscape, promising in the
process to uncover unheard of
continents in Greenville in the
near future.
The second band, Fatal
Shapes, didn't fare as well.
Perhaps Greenville isn't ready for
high technology, at least when
the computer system isn't used
near its potential. Nice
keyboards, though.
expect the state constitutional
amendment to be passed in the
near future.
This has only been a very brief
glimpse at the importance and
operations of "The Official Stu- j
dent Voice of North Carolina
If you would like more informa-
tion on what NCSL does, or even
how you can become more in-
volved in one of the most impor-
tant student legislatures in the
country, contact ECU Delegation
Chairperson John Simon, at
758-8216. Or, just come by one
of the weekly meetings on Mon-
day evenings in room 212 '
Mendenhall at 7:00 pm.
� mm
Cv
From The Not So Right
Soaps: As A Stomach Turns
By PAT MOLLOY
Itfltar
In recent months I've notic-
ed an increase in the populari-
ty of soap operas. It's a scary
phenomenon to consider.
Think of it. Hour after
hour, day after day, we spend
our lives in front of that God-
like creation called the
"tube and watch as other
people act out fairy-tale lives
in order to offer us an escape
from our own tedious ex-
istences.
Will Lance snake on
Ashley? Will Erica marry
Jeremy? Will Phoebe realize
she's really Jesse Helms in
drag? Will Frisco ever get a
real job?
Wlio knows? Or better yet,
who cares?
I have great trouble
understanding the theory
behind these stories. Are we,
as Americans, such trivial en-
tities that we have to tune in to
other people's lives to get our
kicks? I think not.
I can do my own snaking
without the help of some geek
named Lance Burlington HI,
thank you. And I don't need a
quart of V.O.S on my head, or
the national debt of Syria in
my pocket to do it.
And marriage? Who in hell
are these people to glamourize
marriage?
Just check out Erica on "All
My Children This lady is a
walking death trap. If you
marry her, you may as well
start knocking on the gate.
Talk about your kisses of
death.
Have you noticed all of her
husbands die heroically?
Never once does one die of
gum disease or AIDS, like the
rest of America.
Nope. They all bite the big
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Be'ii. ;� r
one in places such as Tibet try
ing to save the life of some ag-
ed priest, who ran up an
awesome gambling dept in
Vegas and had to leave the
States.
Incidentally, Tibet is where
Jeremy, a former mercenary
who used to rip people's lungs
out, denounced his vows as a
monk � just so he could
marry Erica. Is this dude no-
ble, or what?
Speaking of marriage. How
about Wade and Pheobe on
the same soap? Now here's a
cool dude. He doesn't mind
that his wife is ugly enough to
be outlawed � much less old
enough to remember sun dials
� he simply hops in the sack
with her and mentally
substitutes one of her dollar j
bills for every wrinkle he
finds.
Not a bad idea � until you
realize she's only worth a cou-
ple million dollars. I suppose
that could carry Wade down
to her thighs; from then on,
it's pure will power.
He also has to kiss this
witch. Can you imagine hav-
ing your tounge touch hers,
guys? What the heck do you
do, jump-start her? I shudder
at the prospect.
Let's move to a different
soap opera, "General
Hospital This certainly is a
fun one, and quite believable,
too.
Why, any moron can
understand how Frisco, (love
that name, fella) rock-star-
turned-cop, can go undercover
for important police
assignments and not be
recognized.
And any dope can relate to
having as a former governor a
rapist who eventually married
See SOAP, Fags 9
.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 9, 1986
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� �; -nore informa-
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Hi car. become more m-
' the most unpor-
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ntact ECU Delegation
John Simon, at
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Let's move to a different
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Why, any moron can
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See SOAP. Page 9
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Continued From Page 8
his victim.
What we mesmerized, pea-
brained people cannot unders-
tand, what we cannot fathom,
is why that obnoxious, loud-
mouthed bitch Amy is still on
the show.
Good lord, where did they
find her? The Planet of
Perpetual Motion? If you were
to stand in front of her while
she spoke, your cheeks would
get wind-burned.
And what of her little
brother, Mike? I'd love to give
that hyper-active moron the
sedative of his life � with a
Louisville Slugger. That
should calm his nerves con-
siderably. I know it would
calm mine.
Now we come to the final
soap opera, "One Life to
Live And a fine television
show it is. Why just read the
names of the characters on this
one: We have a Clint, a Bo, an
Asa, a Chordaro, (do you
drive it, or talk to it?) and a
Dorian.
No Fred or Bob for these
people. No sir. If you can't
name a brand of jeans after it,
you're out of luck.
So that's it, gang. That's my
rap-up of this particular slice
of Americana. I don't think I
could go any further and still
maintain the level of respec-
tability I have created.
Besides, I have to go see
what happens to Vikki-the-
schizo, who is about to lose it
big time because somebody
kidnapped her kid. Well, it's
not really her kid � she had it
while she was someone else �
probably Elvis. At any rate, I
have to go. I'm all atremble.
Read
'From The
Not So
flight'
Every Other
Thursday
In
The East
Carolinian
T
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lHKEASTt AROI INI AN
Senior cornerback Larry Brewton (28), covering ECT receiver Amos
Adams (6) in last years contest, returns for the Temple secondary.
Lady Pirate Netters
Overwhelm Campbell
By DON RITLEDGE
Npocta Writer
The women's tennis team tip-
ped their season mark to 5-3 with
a win over Campbell University
Tuesday. The 2 victory, at
Campbell, made it three straight
for the ladies, though the final
score belied the closeness of the
battle between the two rivals.
ECU Coach Pat Sherman said
of the contest: "I was pleased
with our ability to win the
pressure points. The matches
were very close and we were able
to pull it out
ECL's depth turned out to be
the critical factor, as the Camels,
stronger at the top end of the
lineup, took the No.l and No.2
singles matches in straight sets.
But that was all she wrote, as the
Lady Pirates turned on the power
to take the remaining four singles
matches, and all three doubles
matches.
ECU's Ty Myers started it off
at the No. 3 singles slot, defeating
a tough opponent in Susan Mat-
tocks. 4-6, 6-2, 6-A. Said Coach
Sherman. "Ty handed Mattocks
her only loss to an ECU player in
the past few ears Then Maria
Swaim, HolK Murray, and Susan
Montjoy continued their sweep
of the last four singles matches.
Captain Montjoy continued
her high level of play, taking out
the Camel's I aura May 6-0, 6-0.
Lisa Eichholz and Amy
Ziemer. who had lost their singles
matches, got revenge on their
conquerors at No. 1 doubles,
beating the team of Missie
Register and Karen Poole in three
sets. 6-3. 4-6, 6-2.
Coach Sherman stated that,
"Susan and Ty and Maria were
outstanding in both singles and
doubles
The ladies last match o' the fall
season is scheduled for Tuesday,
Oct. 14. They will host a very
strong Atlantic Christian Col-
lege, at 3:00 pm on the Minges
Courts.
ECt " i x- pbc :
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Sports
OCTOBER 9. 1986 Page 10
ECU Tries Aeain
Palmer, Owls Host Winless Pirates
iruivniiTD ni . .
By TIM CHANDLER
Scrior SorU Wrt�r
The Pirates will once again try
to break the nation's longest los-
ing streak in NCAA Division I
football as they travel to
Philadelphia, Pa. to take on the
Temple Owls Saturday.
The game, which is scheduled
for a 1:30 p.m. ET kickoff, will
be played in Veteran's Stadium
(71,640).
The Owls, who will bring a 3-2
record into the game, are hot off
an impressive 19-13 victory over
Pittsburgh last weekend. Temple
also owns victories over Western
Michigan (49-17) and Florida
A&M (38-17). Temple's losses
came at the hands of Penn State
(45-15) and Brigham Young
(27-17).
The Pirates will get their se-
cond look at a Heisman hopeful
(the first being Penn States D.J.
Dozier) this week on the gridiron.
Tailback Paul Palmer, the na-
tion's fifth-leading rusher, will
challenge the ECU defense.
Palmer already has 645 yards
rushing for the season on 123 car-
ries for a 129-yard-per-game
average. Palmer has also caught
eight passes for 77 yards and has
returned 11 kickoffs for 298
yards.
Palmer will be going for the
school's all-time scoring record in
Saturday's contest. He already
has scored 216 points during his
career and needs only five points
to break the mark. He already
holds 15 school marks.
Temple, who has won the last
two games over ECU, will be led
by junior quarterback Lee Saltz
along with Palmer and senior
fullback Shelly Poole in the
backfield. Todd McNair will add
depth at the tailback spot, while
Craig Sawyer will fill in at
fullback.
Although the Owls have no
seniors starting on the offensive
line, the average weight across
the front is 265 pounds.
The tackles for the Owls in-
clude juniors Carl Holmes and
Kevin Jones, the guards are
junior Keith Dembo and
sophomore Chris Possenti and
the center is junior John Incoll-
ingo.
The receiver spots are also
dominated by underclassmen for
Temple. The tight end is junior
Mike Hinnant and the receivers
are juniors Andy Garczynski and
Keith Gloster.
Temple's defense is led by
senior linebacker Steve
Domonoski. Also at the
linebacker spot for the Owls is
senior Chris D'Amico and junior
Lance Chisholm.
Larry Brewton and Terry
Wright, both seniors, start for
the Owls at the cornerback spots.
The safety position is occupied by
junior Eddie Parker, while senior
Frank Bongivengo starts at rover.
The defensive line for Temple
"Temple is better than
Southwest Louisiana.
They beat Pitt in really
terrible conditions.
We've really got to get
in gear
� Art Baker
consists of senior Jeff Ward and
junior Kirk Drukenbrod at the
defensive ends and Rodnev
Walker and Andy Pappalardo at
the defensive tackle spots.
Pirate head coach Art Baker
said that the Temple defense was
one of the most aggressive
defense that ECU would face this
season.
"Their team speed on defense
ranks with anybody we play
added assistant coach Paul
Anderson.
Baker went on to say that Tem-
ple could possibly cause more
problems for the Pirates than did
Southwestern Louisiana.
"Temple is better than
Southwest Louisiana stated
Baker. "They beat Pitt in reaJly
terrible conditions. We've really
got to get in gear
A key for the Pirate defense
will be to contain Palmer, who
rushed for 184 yards and all three
of Temple's touchdowns in last
year's 21-7 win over ECU.
"They (Temple) made a few
changes to isolate Palmer more
said assistant coach Rex
Sponhaltz. "They run him on the
sweep and isolation play and
they've installed a load option for
him. Their passing game comes
mostly off the running game
While the Pirates came away
from the USL loss injury free,
Pirate coach Baker is more wor-
ried about his team's emotional
well being.
"Our mental frame of mind is
not the best right now, but it's
something that we're going to
have to deal with if we are going
to salvage anything of the
season Baker said. "I've heard
other coaches who've been in this
position say that they wore only-
inches away from something
good hapening. 1 feel the same
way about our team
This will be the fifth time that
the Pirates have played the Owls.
Each team has won two games in
the series and interestingly
enough the home team has never
won in the series. The Pirates
won the first two games in
Philadelphia, while Temple too
the last two match-ups in Ficklen
Stadium.
Volley bailers Win;
Maintain .500 Mark
CAA TV Exc,
By RICK McCORMAC
Co-Sports Editor
The Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion has announced its 1986-87
men's basketball television
schedule, which includes 21
games on Home Team Sports and
four national TV appearences by
Navy.
However, while every other
conference team will be seen at
least once on the HTS package
during regular season play,
ECU's only television appearance
will be in the conference tourna-
ment (HTS televises all of the
tournament).
Home Team Sports, in its third
year of televising CAA basketball
(formally the ECAC-South), is
based in Washington, D.C It is
carried by 74 cable systems in the
States of Delaware, Maryland,
North Carolina, Pennsylvania,
Virginia and West Virginia.
HTS will televizc Navy and
Richmond six times apiece during
the regualr season. George
Mason will be on four times,
while William & Mary and UNC-
Wilmington will each be on
twice. American and James
Madison will each have one ap-
pearance.
While admitting that it was not
fair for ECU not to at least have
one television appearance, CAA
Information Director Ken Ries
said the ommission of the Pirates
was not intentional.
"Certainly it is unfair that
ECU will not be on in the regular
season, but it was
unintentional Ries said. "East
Carolina was scheduled to play
a number of games on a second
network � Chesapeake Sports
Productions � unfortunately the
deal fell through after the HTS
schedule had been finalized and
ECU was left out in the cold
Chesapeake Sports Produc-
tions, based in Washington,
D.C was to provide a network
for 10-12 games on Saturday
nights. They unlike HTS were to
be an over the air network (HTS
is strictly cable), and were going
to make the telecasts available to
local stations in each Colonial
market.
A schedule had been finalized
over the summer, however, the
flagship station changed owner-
ship and the new owners did not
wish to carry the games.
While ECU coach Charlie Har-
rison agreed there was no inten-
tional effort to keep the Pirates
off the television schedule, he
was nontheless unhappy about it.
"I don't care what their rhyme
or reason is I think it is wrong
and unjust Harrison said. "I
don't think we were left out pur-
posefully, but I do think there
should have been an alternative
when the second network fell
through.
"When you have a league TV
package, every team in the league
ECT Sports Information
The Lady Pirate volleyball
team evened its record at 44 for
the season with an easy 15-1,
15-2, 15-5 defeat of Campbell
University in Buies Creek on
Tuesday.
"We really played together as a
team against Campbell said
fourth-year head coach Im-
mogene Turner. "Playing
together is something we haven't
done that often this season and it
is a real key to a successful year.
We served extremely well and had
some great kills. It was a very
positive game for us.
"We do have a young squad so
when they are good, playing well,
they are very good. But when
they play poorly they are very
bad. 1 hope we use this win to
work towards the rest of the
season. It was the kind of effort
we need to be our best
The blanking of Campbell end-
ed a two-game losing streak for
the Lady Pirates. ECU travels to
Wake Forest this Sat Oct. 11
and will also visit Furman the
same day.
The spikers will aJso travel to
Virginia Commonwealth and
Coastal Caro'lina before return-
ing to Minges Coliseum for an
Oct. 22 match with Villanova and
UNC-Wilmington in their next
home match.
Sports Fact
Thurs. Oct. 9, 1910
Locked with Ty Cobb in a
close race for the batting
crown. Nap Lajoie has eight
hits in the closing day double
header against St. Louis. The
Browns infield has been in-
structed by their manager to
play deep to let Lajoie bunt
safely, trying to help him beat
out the unpopular Cobb, but
the strategy isn't good enough
as Cobb edges Lajoie for the
batting title, .385 to .384.
game is that the Hib people ma
not like the facilities at ECU,
especially the lighting in Minges
Coliseum.
However, this does not appear
to be the case according to the
CAA's Ries.
"Home Team Sports produc-
tion personel really liked
Minges Ries said. "It's a good
size for television production and
the cameras are close enough to
the floor to provide good action
shots
While the lighting is not the
best in the nation, it is of a high
enough quality to televise a game
according to Gene Templeton,
Associate Athletic Director for
Internal Relations at ECU.
"The lighting is not of the
quality that the producers would
like, but it is adequate
Templeton said. "We do know
that we have to upgrade the
lighting and it will be done when
the money is available
Another reason being mention-
ed is the fact that the Greenville
area does not get HTS program-
ming.
However, this argument does
not appear sound either, as Navy
me, ui CApuauic uu �� 11ruiL
affect ECU's recruiting.
"A great deal of the
metropolitan D.C. -Maryland
area recieves HTS, and we recruit
that area heavily Harrison
said. "We have 10 kids from that
area that are planning to visit our
campus and it would have been
nice if they could have seen us
Play
However, they won't and ac-
cording to Harrison it is too late
to do anything about the situa-
tion now.
"It's a dead issue now Har-
rison said. "But number one,
we've already told recruits we
were going to appear on TV and
number two I was not informed
of the decision until I recieved a
memo.from the conference of-
fice
While it is of little consolation
to Harrison, the question of re-
quiring HTS to grant at least one
appearence to each league
member in future TV contracts is
on the agenda for the leagues ECU coach Charlie Harrison is dlsaooointed th.t th. ow.
Classifi
PERSONAL
ATTENTION! I Vote TANA h1
RING tor Homecommg c
representing pro u
Economics Honor Society si
PORT our candidate and vOT�
ATTENTION KA LITTLE SlSl
PLEDGES: Don't torget abOutl
car wash this Sat in add. or to
first meeting Oct 13 a' 9 3c
Don't be late!
TERRY DILL: Than tor a
weekend Jane Fonda never i-ac
good Party Friday night beacl
Sat Your Pss Shiver Budcw
CORAL REEF DIVE CLUB Al
tion all scuDa divers, The C
Dive Club will be holding
meeting Oct 13 in
Mendenhaii Upcoming cac
cookout aT Rao.o Island
discussed An interested
are urged to attend Ne meml
welcome
SORORITIES The Kappa 5
be having a pledge slave a.
Thurs . OC 9 at 5 c rr- v
point to come ano ie' a :
your dirTy work Than � �-
Sigs
KAPPA SIGMA A ke to I
gratulaTe the Fall 8�
Andrews. Greg Bacr-a'a
Baker, paT Qf.r
ClodtelTer, Chris Eaga-
frey, Joe Jenkins, Scotl . . -)
John Magnnes, St
Keith Neims, joey pt
Powel i Greg a sse
Sadlowsk i, Rob Sa- �
SchreiDer, STewar-
Vayo, John Wiley Dor
Welcome aooa'c f� as
Brothers of Kappa S
HAPPY HOUR AT THE ATTIC
FRIDAY AFTERNOON HAS BE
CANCELLED Bui Bv . ;
form REM, Cars Pt � , Qr
Adams, Hue, Lewis nxs
Bruce, The Who Pli Co
Romantics, P' - - p tx
Clash, Billy do joe jacus"
Fry, Monke.s and R
Stones on pr nighl
A A P: Th.s Pr aay s � �
better get psyched p s womans
of town, yes, Ps I me to �� - - ,
Saturday nighl Pepe did us 1 jt
it's time both of yen, two Dse 1
sight. Have some cake -�
really ham too, our pace a
scary. Greeny ue zoo B'
thanx P, ou robbec .s b
we're both 4 bucks beti
vious you both car a � soe �
stip B.S.ing and ,r,
SHAKA
THETA CHI: Pledges 51
party witfi the brothers
should be even better than - A-J
Get in touch with venjr c -I
OX: We maoe a rfstake ana w4
remov� from EC, a b
largest fratern,ty or- ca"Pcs
paid our dues and now we re I
stay! Get ready go.s the '�" �
be here soon so know our si
Theta Chi
TO WFU'S BLONDIE BLONDI
Thanks fo- a fantas c eenei
Fun, dance and romance HJ si
see you soo Sagapo MJH& Kl
rorever Ho . vooc
FAT MAN MELTS Be the �
caller at 757 693 DEAD LINE)
identify the GraTetu Deac s"ow ?-�
win an authentic glossy 0 jerA
Garcis or Bod D. on shot by . I
truly, DEAD REDD ph l pS a "J
Buffalo show it oeg m a' 10 pm
WZMB, 91 3 Thai S ROCkj
OUTLET, tomorrow - z' a'
Could it be Paio Aito' LSO s s'
legal.
PATTI: Thanks for car.ng as e �
day. Means a ot Ho me aa re z
was great! 1 owe vou one! A
ALPHA XI DELTA: Congratulate
.the following for being se'ecteo
apear in our 198? caienoar The Ve-
Of ECU: Brao Brown STeve Chr si
;tian, Chris Glatis Mke Hares Er
Hopkins, Ch' s Ko By
McMillan, John Morr,s. Scott Ove-
:by, Ken Piche, Maniev Pope anc Tec
Yoder Congrats a ons c tre 'es 0
;the participants Mfho will appear 0
;the front cover
ECU
Student L
Th� Alpha-Omi
In
ft

By BUI Manhofl
A Healthy. Hilarious
m m
� -Ml 411 NH 'isslVftMMM





I Ml I S1 t Kt I I N I '
Sports
Classifi
ECU Tries Azain
I A T ' h
PERSONA
Palmer, Owls Host Winless Pirates
AT T t

B riM CHANDLER
VMiv Sporta r1l
rhe Pirates will once again try
lo break the nation's longest los
ing streak in NCAA Division I
ball as the) travel to
Philadelphia. Pa to take on the
I cm pie (wls Saturday.
rhe game, which is scheduled
tot a l:30 p m ET kickoff, will
be played in Veteran's Stadium
(71,640)
I In- ()u Is, v. ho will bring a 3-2
int� i the game, are hot off
ai impressive iw i t ictory over
Pittsburgh last weekend. lempie
also owns victories over Western
Michigan (4s 17) and Honda
&M (38 17). Temple's losses
e at tl e hands of Penn State
4 15) and Bi igham oung
(27 17)
1 he Pirates will get their se
cond look at a Heisman hopeful
first being Penn States D.I
D . er) this week on the gridiron.
I ailbat k Paul Palmer, the na
tion's fifth leading rusher, will
� lenge the ECU defense.
Palmei alread) has 645 yards
rig for the season on 123 car
ries ' �i 129-yard per-game
Senior cornerback I arrv Brewft
s contest.
coering I t receiver m�s
: nph st, ondarv
average Palmer lias also
eight passes I r 77 vards and
ned
,ards.
caught
has
1 k �
Palmei will be going foi
school's all time scoring record in
Saturday's contest He already
has scored 21b points during his
career and needs only five points
to break the mark He alreadv
holds 1 5 school marks.
I emple, who has won the last
two games over ECU, will be led
by junioi quarterback I ee Saltz
along with Palmer and
fullbac k Shelly Poole in il
backfield. Todd McNaii will
depth at the tailback spot, while
raig Sawyer will
fullback.
Although (he Owls have
seniors starting on the ffei
line, the average weight a i
the Iron is 265 pounds
tackle � he (wls
elude junioi s Car! H lmes
Kev in Jones, the .
K tl Den
sophomore hris Possenti
the is junioi lohn In
ingo.
: receivei
dominated bv underclassmei
1 emple ! � � tight end
Mike Hinnant and the reo
are juniors ndy iai zy n
ken1 i, tei
pie defense is
Iineba d S t
noski. lsi at
- backei r t I - the Ow
Lady Pirate betters
Overwhelm Campbell
l� Rl I I I),
�"W
Big Rivalry
JON JORDAN ECU PMOT0 .AR
I he Ruby lub hattled the Wolfpack. the state's No. 1
team, close!) before dropping a heartbreaker on Sundav.
CAA TV Excludes Pirates
Bv Rl( K Mc( IIKMM
l . -si) . .
II
� at
the
H
m A'ill be ���
HTS " � � � ��
1
i r a nc
S �
ti � � g CAA basl
ECA k
A i ington, D.( It
irried by 74 ibl n th
Stau ' ! �� .i ai M �
rti far ilina, Penn
V'irgii a and Wes Virg
HTS a ; tel �� Navy
Ricl I six times apiece dui i .
� � � i :r se.i
Mas n whi be on four
while William & Mary and I N
Wilmingt in ill ea I I e on
�k , � meiicai md lames
Mad: �n will ea I I ave i�ne i
pearan.ee
VA hiie nAr
fair i l not to at leas- �
one television appearance,
Information Director Ken Kie-
said 'he ommission of the Pirat
jvas noi intentional
ns
� : : �
( I
Rii lid. "I ast
; I to play
rcond
� eake Sj
ii a ely the
iftei �� e HTS
inalized and
ts Produc
Vv ashington,
provide a i etwork
� � � �' Saturday
inlike HTS were to
the aii k (HTS
is si ' : I were going
ivailable to
nial
' eduli been finalized
he summer, however, the
� I r tati 'ii changed �w net
i w ow tiers did not
s games
hile 1I coachharlie liar
igreed tl ere was no inten-
" " to keep the Pirates
the television schedule, he
was nontheless unhappy about it.
"I don :are what theii rhyme
� 'ii is think ii is wrong
unjust Harrison said. "I
don't think we were left out pur
efully, but I do think there
tl '� ' i -c been an alternative
a hen the sec. : ���work fell
Vfc ' � ive a league I V
pa f age. r im in the league
�uld appear at least once he
continued. "All kids want to plav
on television � it's a special feel-
ing knowing the game is being
broadcast to people other than
those in the stands
One of the reasons being men-
med tor the lack of a televised
came is that the HTS people did
not like the facilities at ECU,
especially the lighting in Minges
Coliseum.
However, this does not appear
to be the case according to the
-VVs Ries.
"Home Team Sports produc
tion personel really liked
Minges Ries said. "It's a good
ize for television production and
the cameras are close enough to
the floor to provide good action
shots
While the lighting is not the
best in the nation, it is of a high
enough quality to televise a game
according to Gene Templeton,
Associate Athletic Director for
Internal Relations at ECU.
"The lighting is not of the
quality that the producers would
like, but it is adequate
Templeton said. "We do know
that we have to upgrade the
lighting and it will be done when
the money is available
Another reason being mention-
ed is the fact that the Greenville
area does not get HTS program-
ming.
However, this argument does
not appear sound either, as Navv
and George Mason are the only
schools that recieve HTS.
American is in the area, but can't
reallv be considered a subscriber
due to the fact that the city o(
Washington D.C. does not have
cable.
According to Harrison, the
lack ol exposure on HIS could
affect ECU's recruiting
'A g t e a t d e a 1 of t h e
metropolitan D.CMaryland
area recieves HTS, and we recruit
that aiea heavily Harrison
said. "We have 10 kids from that
area that are planning to visit our
campus and it would have been
nice if they could have seen us
play
However, thev won't and ac
cording to Harrison it is too late
to do anything about the situa-
tion now.
"It's a dead issue now Hai
rison said. "But number one.
we've already told recruits we
were going to appear on TV and
number two I was not informed
of the decision until 1 recieved a
memo from the conference of-
fice
While it is of little consolation
to Harrison, the question of re-
quiring HTS to grant at least one
appearence to each league
member in future TV contracts is
on the agenda for the league's
next meeting to be held Oct 22 in
Williamsburg, Va
1)
Lance Cl 1
1 ai r Bi�
W r i g 1�
i L
rhe sat
1�
Frank B
1
" temple isbetter than
SouthwestI ouisiana.
They heat 1itt in really
terrible conditions.
H e've real I got to get
in gear. '
Art Baker
I
Volleyballers Win;
Maintain .500 Mark
I l s,
-�sr
PAT
Alpha .


qreser
1 The Alpha-O
� In
I 9 A,
yv
ECU coach (harlie Harrison , disappointed that the Pirates mM �
appear on the Home learn Sports .elev.sion package this �
season.
pcomto
Bv b
A Healthy Hilarious S
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Senior cornerback Larry Brewton (IS), covering ECU receiver Amos
Adams (6) in last year's contest, returns for the Temple secondary.
Lady Pirate Netters
Overwhelm Campbell
By DON RUTLEDGE
Sporb Writer
The women's tennis team tip-
ped their season mark to 5-3 with
a win over Campbell University
Tuesday. The 7-2 victory, at
Campbell, made it three straight
for the ladies, though the final
score belied the closeness of the
battle between the two rivals.
ECU Coach Pat Sherman said
of the contest: "I was pleased
with our ability to win the
pressure points. The matches
were very close and we were able
to pull it out
ECU's depth turned out to be
the critical factor, as the Camels,
stronger at the top end of the
lineup, took the No.l and No.2
singles matches in straight sets.
But that was all she wrote, as the
Lady Pirates turned on the power
to take the remaining four singles
matches, and all three doubles
matches.
ECU's Ty Myers started it off
at the No. 3 singles slot, defeating
a tough opponent in Susan Mat-
tocks, 4-6, 6-2, 6A. Said Coach
Sherman: "Ty handed Mattocks
her only loss to an ECU player in
the past few years Then Maria
Swaim, Holly Murray, and Susan
Montjoy continued their sweep
of the last four singles matches.
Captain Montjoy continued
her high level of play, taking out
the Camel's Laura May 6-0, 6-0.
Lisa Eichholz and Amy
Ziemer, who had lost their singles
matches, got revenge on their
conquerors at No. 1 doubles,
beating the team of Missie
Register and Karen Poole in three
sets, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2.
Coach Sherman stated that,
"Susan and Ty and Maria were
outstanding in both singles and
doubles
The ladies last match of the fal
season is scheduled for Tuesday
Oct. 14. They will host a ver
strong Atlantic Christian Col
lege, at 3:00 pm on the Minge
Courts.
Sum mar
ECU 7 C amr-Nrll :
Musie Rcpsict (c) d I EkMMt) 6-4. 76
Karen Poole (eld A Ziemer 6-4. 6-4
7 Mycn (ECU) d Susan Mattock 4-6. 6-2, 6-4
M S�aim (ECUi d 1 i.a tjn Meter T-6. 6-3
H Murras (ECU) d Diana Catkins 6-3. 6
S Monijm (ECU) d I aura Mai 6-0. 6-0
exhibition
Antoinette Birken (c) d Kim Bergen 5 " 6. 6-4
EichholvZiemer (ECU) d Register Poole 6-3, 4-6. 6-2
Murras S�aim (K td Mattocks wn Meter 2-6 7-�
6-2
Montios Mjners (ECU) J Mav daskins 62. 6-1
Sports
OCTOBER 9, 1986 Page 10
Classifi
PERSONAL
ECU Tries Attain
Palmer, Owls Host Winless Pirates
irUaMklllltTD r�i it . .
By TIM CHANDLER
StXor Sparta Writer
The Pirates will once again try
to break the nation's longest los-
ing streak in NCAA Division I
football as they travel to
Philadelphia, Pa. to take on the
Temple Owls Saturday.
The game, which is scheduled
for a 1:30 p.m. ET kickoff, will
be played in Veteran's Stadium
(71,640).
The Owls, who will bring a 3-2
record into the game, are hot off
an impressive 19-13 victory over
Pittsburgh last weekend. Temple
also owns victories over Western
Michigan (49-17) and Florida
A&M (38-17). Temple's losses
came at the hands of Penn State
(45-15) and Brigham Young
(27-17).
The Pirates will get their se-
cond look at a Heisman hopeful
(the first being Penn States D.J.
Dozier) this week on the gridiron.
Tailback Paul Palmer, the na-
tion's fifth-leading rusher, will
challenge the ECU defense.
Palmer already has 645 yards
rushing for the season on 123 car-
ries for a 129-yard-per-game
average. Palmer has also caught
eight passes for 77 yards and has
returned 11 kickoffs for 298
yards.
Palmer will be going for the
school's all-time scoring record in
Saturday's contest. He already
has scored 216 points during his
career and needs only five points
to break the mark. He already
holds 15 school marks.
Temple, who has won the last
two games over ECU, will be led
by junior quarterback Lee Saltz
along with Palmer and senior
fullback Shelly Poole in the
backfield. Todd McNair will add
depth at the tailback spot, while
Craig Sawyer will fill in at
fullback.
Although the Owls have no
seniors starting on the offensive
line, the average weight across
the front is 265 pounds.
The tackles for the Owls in-
clude juniors Carl Holmes and
Kevin Jones, the guards are
junior Keith Dembo and
sophomore Chris Possenti and
the center is junior John Incoll-
ingo.
The receiver spots are also
dominated by underclassmen for
Temple. The tight end is junior
Mike Hinnant and the receivers
are juniors Andy Garczynski and
Keith Gloster.
Temple's defense is led by
senior linebacker Steve
Domonoski. Also at the
linebacker spot for the Owls is
senior Chris D'Amico and junior
Lance Chisholm.
Larry Brewton and Terry
Wright, both seniors, start for
the Owls at the cornerback spots.
The safety position is occupied by
junior Eddie Parker, while senior
Frank Bongivengo starts at rover.
Hiedefensive line for Temple
"Temple is better than
Southwest Louisiana.
They beat Pitt in really
terrible conditions.
We've really got to get
in gear
� Art Baker
consists of senior Jeff Ward and
junior Kirk Drukenbrod at the
defensive ends and Rodney
Walker and Andy Pappalardo at
the defensive tackle spots.
Pirate head coach An Baker
said that the Temple defense was
one of the most aggressive
defense that ECU would face this
season.
"Their team speed on defense
ranks with anybody we play
added assistant coach Paul
Anderson.
Baker went on to say that Tem-
ple could possibly cause more
problems for the Pirates than did
Southwestern Louisiana.
"Temple is better than
Southwest Louisiana stated
Baker. "They beat Pitt in really
terrible conditions. We've really
got to get in gear
A key for the Pirate defense
will be to contain Palmer, who
rushed for 184 yards and all three
of Temple's touchdowns in last
year's 21-7 win over ECU.
"They (Temple) made a few
changes to isolate Palmer more
said assistant coach Rex
Sponhaltz. "They run him on the
sweep and isolation play and
they've installed a load option for
him. Their passing game comes
mostly off the running game
While the Pirates came away
from the USL loss injury free,
Pirate coach Baker is more wor-
ried about his team's emotional
well being.
"Our mental frame of mind is
not the best right now, but it's
something that we're going to
have to deal with if we are going
to salvage anything of the
season Baker said. "I've heard
other coaches who've been in this
position say that they wore only
inches away from something
good hapening. I feel the same
way about our team
This will be the fifth time that
the Pirates have played the Owls.
Each team has won two games in
the series and interestingly
enough the home team has never
won in the series. The Pirates
won the first two games in
Philadelphia, while Temple too
the last two match-ups in Ficklen
Stadium.
Volleyballers Win;
Maintain .500 Mark

JON JORDAN � KCU �MOTO LAB
Big Rivalry
The Rugby Club battled the Wolfpack, the state's No. 1
team, closely before dropping a hearthreaker on Sunday.
CAA TV Excludes Pirates
By RICK McCORMAC
Co-S�OfU F.dilar
The Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion has announced its 1986-87
men's basketball television
schedule, which includes 21
games on Home Team Sports and
four national TV appearences by
Navy.
However, while every other
conference team will be seen at
least once on the HTS package
during regular season play,
ECU's only television appearance
will be in the conference tourna-
ment (HTS televises all of the
tournament).
Home Team Sports, in its third
year of televising CAA basketball
(formally the ECAC-South), is
based in Washington, D.C It is
carried by 74 cable systems in the
States of Delaware, Maryland,
North Carolina, Pennsylvania,
Virginia and West Virginia.
HTS will televize Navy and
Richmond six times apiece during
the regualr season. George
Mason will be on four times,
while William & Mary and UNC-
Wilmington will each be on
twice. American and James
Madison will each have one ap-
pearance.
While admitting that it was not
fair for ECU not to at least have
one television appearance, CAA
Information Director Ken Ries
said the ommission of the Pirates
was not intentional.
"Certainly it is unfair that
ECU will not be on in the regular
season, but it was
unintentional Ries said. "East
Carolina was scheduled to play
a number of games on a second
network � Chesapeake Sports
Productions � unfortunately the
deal fell through after the HTS
schedule had been finalized and
ECU was left out in the cold
Chesapeake Sports Produc-
tions, based in Washington,
D.C was to provide a network
for 10-12 games on Saturday
nights. They unlike HTS were to
be an over the air network (HTS
is strictly cable), and were going
to make the telecasts available to
local stations in each Colonial
market.
A schedule had been finalized
over the summer, however, the
flagship station changed owner-
ship and the new owners did not
wish to carry the games.
While ECU coach Charlie Har-
rison agreed there was no inten-
tional effort to keep the Pirates
off the television schedule, he
was nontheless unhappy about it.
"I don't care what their rhyme
or reason is I think it is wrong
and unjust Harrison said. "I
don't think we were left out pur-
posefully, but I do think there
should have been an alternative
when the second network fell
through.
"When you have a league TV
package, every team in the league
should appear at least once he
continued. "All kids want to play
on television � it's a special feel-
ing knowing the game is being
broadcast to people other than
those in the stands
One of the reasons being men-
tioned for the lack of a televised
game is that the HTS people did
not like the facilities at ECU,
especially the lighting in Minges
Coliseum.
However, this does not appear
to be the case according to the
CAA's Ries.
"Home Team Sports produc-
tion personel really liked
Minges Ries said. "It's a good
size for television production and
the cameras are close enough to
the floor to provide good action
shots
While the lighting is not the
best in the nation, it is of a high
enough quality to televise a game
according to Gene Templeton,
Associate Athletic Director for
Internal Relations at ECU.
"The lighting is not of the
quality that the producers would
like, but it is adequate
Templeton said. "We do know
that we have to upgrade the
lighting and it will be done when
the money is available
Another reason being mention-
ed is the fact that the Greenville
area does not get HTS program-
ming.
However, this argument does
not appear sound either, as Navy
ECU Sports Information
The Lady Pirate volleyball
team evened its record at 4-4 for
the season with an easy 15-1,
15-2, 15-5 defeat of Campbell
University in Buies Creek on
Tuesday.
"We really played together as a
team against Campbell said
fourth-year head coach Im-
mogene Turner. "Playing
together is something we haven't
done that often this season and it
is a real key to a successful year.
We served extremely well and had
some great kills. It was a very
positive game for us.
"We do have a young squad so
when they are good, playing well,
they are very good. But when
they play poorly they are very
bad. I hope we use this win to
work towards the rest of the
season. It was the kind of effort
we need to be our best
The blanking of Campbell end-
ed a two-game losing streak for
the Lady Pirates. ECU travels to
Wake Forest this Sat Oct. 11
and will also visit Furman the
same day.
The spikers will also travel to
Virginia Commonwealth and
Coastal Carolina before return-
ing to Minges Coliseum for an
Oct. 22 match with Villanova and
UNC-Wilmington in their next
home match.
Sports Fact
Thurs. Oct. 9,1910
Locked with Ty Cobb in a
close race for the batting
crown, Nap Lajoie has eight
hits in the closing day double
header against St. Louis. The
Browns infield has been in-
structed by their manager to
play deep to let Lajoie bunt
safely, trying to help him beat
out the unpopular Cobb, but
the strategy isn't good enough
as Cobb edges Lajoie for the
batting title, .385 to .384.
and George Mason are the only
schools that recieve HTS.
American is in the area, but can't
really be considered a subscriber
due to the fact that the city of
Washington D.C. does not have
cable.
According to Harrison, the
lack of exposure on HTS could
affect ECU's recruiting.
"A great deal of the
metropolitan D.CMaryland
area recieves HTS, and we recruit
that area heavily Harrison
said. "We have 10 kids from that
area that are planning to visit our
campus and it would have been
nice if they could have seen us
Play
However, they won't and ac-
cording to Harrison it is too late
to do anything about the situa-
tion now.
"It's a dead issue now Har-
rison said. "But number one,
we've already told recruits we
were going to appear on TV and
number two I was not informed
of the decision until I recieved a
memo.from the conference of-
fice
While it is of little consolation
to Harrison, the question of re-
quiring HTS to grant at least one
appearence to each league
member in future TV contracts is
on the agenda for the league's ECU coach Charlie Harrison to dtoaDooiited th.t th� m
next meeting to be held Oct. 22 in appear on the Home Te�m s�KSL V Pklte "� ��
Williamsburg, Va. pon" ����� �- �� -
ATTENTION vote TAN I Ah.
RING for Homecoming c
representing Phi u h
Economics Honor Society $i
PORT our candidate and VOTE
ATTENTION KA LITTLEJ
PLEDGES: Don't forget about
car wash this Sat in addition to A
first meeting Oct 13 at 9 3c
Don't be (ate!
TERRY DILL: fhanx for
weekend Jane Fonda never hac
good. Party Fnaay night, beac
Sat? Your Piss Shiver Buddy
CORAL REEF DIVE CLUT
tion ail scuba divers, the Cc-a
Dive Club win oe holding u
meeting Oct 13 in roc-
Mendenhail upcoming cac
cookout at Radio isianc
discussed All mterestec
are urgea to attend New e
welcome
SORORITIES: The Kappa S 9
be having a pledge slave a.
Thurs Oct 9 at 5 p m vane ,
point to come and let a peage
your dirty work Thank Ob Kai
Sigs.
KAPPA SIGMA: Would like 1a
gratulate the Fan '86 pieages Sc
Andrews, Greg Bac-a'a� st
Baker. Pat Bef B'
Clodfeiter. Chris Eaga'
frey, Joey Jenkins, Sec" . �)
John Maginnes, Se�e Wa.e,
Keith Neims, joey pate a 5f
Powell, Greg Russe
Sadlowsk i, Rob Sa" B1
Schreiber. stewa" s. .a- S'
VayO, John Wiley, Donn,e .
Welcome aboara �e as
Brothers of Kappa S grr-a
HAPPY HOUR ATTHE ATTIC
FRIDAY AFTERNOON HAS BEI
CANCELLED B� BV
form REM, Cars Producers Br
Adams. Hue Lewis INXS
Bruce, The Who, Pn,i Con
Romantics, Pr nee. The Fn
Clash, Billy looi, joe Jackson, i
Fry, Monkeys ana The R:
Stones on F' n ght!
I
A A P: Th.s Fr.aay's the n gnt so
better get psyched. P's wort-as
of town, yes, it's time to throw co
Saturday night Pepe aia us r
ifs time both of you two ose �(
sight. Have some cake hul.
really ham too. our piace was
scary, Greenville zoc Bu -ea
thanx P, you robbec us b z nl
we're both 4 bucks beh "c Ifs
vious you both can a k so-e it
stip B Sing and try ge' ng
SHAKA
THETA CHI: Pledges ge -eac.
party with the brothers It
should be even better than as" a-
Get in touch with your pig I
OX: We made a rftTstafce and
retnoveW from ECL a(ter be -g
largest fraternity on ca-ps
paid our dues and now we 'e oac
stay! Get reaay guys, the WWi w
be here soon so know you' ttuj
Theta Chi
TO WFU'S BLONDIE BLONDI
Thanks for a fantastic weee-id
Fun, dance and romance (HJ si
See you soon Sagapo MJH a. kl
rorever Howooc
� FAT MAN MELTS I: Be the f.
S caller at 757 6913 DEAD LINE)
; identify the Grated Deac sow a-
; win an authentic giossy of jerrj
I Garcis or Bob Dyion shot cy your
: truly, DEAD REDD PHL1 PS at tnJ
Z Buffalo show it oegns a 10 d1- m
� WZMB, 91 3 Tat s ROCk
I OUTLET, tomorrow - pM a 1C
; Could it be Palo Alto? SD s ��"
� legal.
1
� �
� FATTI: Thanks for caring last Fr I
I day. Means a lot to me ana the p
; was great 1 owe you one! Anna
m ����
I ALPHA XI DELTA: Congratulate!
S�.the following for being selectee N
apear in our 1987 calendar The Mer
�Of ECU: Brad Brown Steve Chr s
ftian, Chris Giat.s Mke Hayes Er
Hopkins, Cttr S Knot, B
McMillan, John Morrs, Scott Ove'
by, Ken Piche, Ma'ey Pope anc Te
Z:Yoder. Congratulations to the rest
;the Participants who will appear oh
;ttie front cover
ECU
Student U'
The Alpha-
6$
In
4
1 vv JJ
By Bill Manhofi
A Jfoaftfaf, Hilarious
� � �� �
J





1 198Qg
-
lS
��
Jl-
n!M4US
essPiratesde
H.i - ana stated Pit! in realN e'e realUr-
vPit a:e defense Palmer, whui Is and all threeill
. downs in lastr-
c ECU.3f
mnadc a few '�' sner more o a c h Rex un him on the
Hpla andit
ad op:son foile
a came comes)f
Kg came es came aw a'
ss njur) free.it
- more wor-�y
�� - emotiona
ne of mind iu
o�. hut it'sy
gl Vn
tr� a rigd
- oi
i'e heard
Neen in this
w�re onh
something
he samee t
ime thats
lyed 'a Is.r
games in
erestinglyf
� . team lias neer1
rhe Pirates�
11 , � -1 V Jp5
e Temple too p FicklenI
rs Win;
1500 Mark
�.
' F-urman the
rill also travel to
jmmonwealtb and
"na before return-
liseum for an
�" Villanova and
in their nev.
Sports Fact
Thurs.Oct. 9, 1910 T Cobbin a
� the batting
-T1 ajoie haseieht
losing day double
� Si 1 ouis.The
: as been in-
� -manager to
el Lajoiebunt
-help himbeat
�. ar Cobbbut
sn't good en)ugh
es I ajoie fo 385 to 384� the

H
jisappointed that the Pirates will not
is television package this upcoming
Classifieds
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 9, 1986
11
PERSONAL
ATTENTION Vote TANIAHeT
RING for Homecoming Court
representing Phi u Home
Economics Honor Society $UP
PORT our candidate and VOTE I!
SHARON HANCOCK: Have a Hap
PV 22nd Birthday today! Love, the
AZDs.
'
ATTENTION KA LITTLE sTsTER
PLEDGES: Don't forget about our
car wash this Sat. In addition to your
first meeting Oct. 13 at 9:30 Dm
Don't be late!
KAPPA ALPHA: We didn't just
hear it through the grapevine, man.
We knew you guys were great! Our
LA. bash, we all agree, is the
rockin'est one to date! We can't wait
to do it again, so we will tell you this.
It may be hazardous to your health if
the Sig Ep jam you miss! Love, the
ADPIs.
BE HIP, SUPPORT S.I.P Sign the
petition and attend the drink in on
Oct. 30 at 4:30 at the mall on cam
pus. Stay tuned.
DELTA SIGS: Looking forward to
killer boxer party, Friday 9:30. Br
ing boxers, bring a friend, and bring
the DSP attitudes. Let's have a good
one! And Scott, no gloves involved!
J.S. keep your pants on
GREEK T-SHIRTS: You want one?
ZBT will be selling great looking
tees Oct. 14, 15, 16 at the student
store for only $7. Proud to say
GREEK and ECU! GDI's welcome,
too.
TERRY DILL: Thanx for a wild
weekend. Jane Fonda never had it so
good Party Friday night, beach on
Sat Your Piss Shiver Buddy
CORAL REEF DIVE CLljBTAtteTT
ton all scuba divers, the Coral Reef
Dive Club will be holding its next
meeting Oct. 13 in room 221
Mendenhall. Upcoming camp and
cookout at Radio island will be
discussed. All interested in diving
are urged to attend New members
welcome.
TO OUR SIG EP AND TAR RIVER
FRIENDS BRIAN, BILLY AND
JAY: We would like to cordially in-
vite you to join our newly formed
organizationTHE CROW
CLUB The only requirement is for
you to possess the ability to expel
one HELLACIOUS,
CAAAWWWWWW So guys, what
do you think? (more details later).
THE BLIND SIG EP: Hope you
aren't mad that shot you at Over
ton's Monday afternoon. Nettles.
SORORITIES: The Kappa SigTwTil
De having a pledge slave auction on
Thurs Oct. 9 at 5 p.m. Make it a
Domt to come and let a pledge do
.our dirty work Thank you, Kappa
Sigs
PiKA LIL' SIS RUSH:
Time and place to be
"Hold Out For No. 1"
Oct. 20-22.
announced.
MIKE SHYTLE: Good luck on your
interviews. The Pikas.
KAPPA SIGMA: Would like to con
gratuiatc the Fall '86 pledges: Scott
Andrews, Greg Bacharach, Steve
Baker, pat Bennett, Bryan
C odtelter, Chris Eagan, jeff jef
rey, Joey Jenkins, Scott Kirkland,
hn Maginnes, Steve Mayeux,
ve th Nelms, Jody Patella, She!
Powell, Greg Russell, Chris
Sadlowski, Rob Santi, Brad
Schreiber, Stewart Sullivan, Steve
ayo, John Wiley, Donnie Wrights.
Aeicome aboard fellas! The
Brothers of Kappa Sigma.
BEWARE PLEDGES The Pika
brothers are gonna kick your ass in
football on Saturday. The Pika
Brothers.
An Ode To The Classified Poets: On
Tuesday and Thursday the ECU
paper prints ads of a personal sort,
From pledges of love (or at least
sincere lust) to verbal assault and
retort, From time to time one finds a
rhyme from some fraternal bond, an
ode to drunken revelry, From one
who tries too hard. A night of super
ficial fun and one too many brews,
Inspires insipid Greeks to seek their
simple minded muse; With mangled
meter they opine upon the joys of
drinking wine. And falling down
upon the floor, and throwing up, and
drinking more; Their syntax
scrambled style of verse Makes
poets writhe and teachers curse,
They wallow deep in language
crime, In their attempt to make a
rhyme. And so we end with this re
quest Please stick to that which
you do best. (Though we don't know
what that might be but we're sure it
isn't poetry). KNIGHTS OF THE
SUBGENIUS.
PARACHUTE FOR SALE: Main
7 Cell purple and gold Strato Cloud
Reserve: Aqua and gold Steerable 26
ft. Lopo. Container: Blue
WonderHog ll with T.o.p. $600 firm
Serious inquiries only! Call 758 7546
or leave message.
TRIBUTE: To the late-great Kevin Lee Watts
(1963-1986). A party in his honor will be held Friday
night for friends. Call Randy (758-4519) or Scott
(758-2413) for more information. Moo.
FOR SALE: 1983 Honda Accord LX,
hatchback; excellent condition, fully
equipped, S6,425negotiable. Call
752-6348, day or evening, ask for
Rob.
FOR SALE: KENWOOD 8200 CAR
AMPLIFIER. 75 WATTS PER
CHANNEL RMS. MODIFIED
KICKER HATCHBACK SPEAKER
CGLASS SURFBOARD. CALL
752 3032.
FOR SALE: A slick electric guitar"
A cute little diamond ring! And hun
dreds of neato comic books! Priced
to move! 752 7284.
FOR SALE: Dean Electric Guitar,
$225. Alvarez Acoustic $75. Peavey
Classic Amp, $215. David 758-0832
ECU Hillet Presents
"EVERYTHING YOU
WANT TO KNOW
ABOUT JUDAISM"
Displays and Free Refreshments
Open To All
Cotton Dorm Lobby at 7:00p.m.
October 9, 1986 (tonight)
PI KAPPA PHI: The brothers of
PKP will be having a carwash Fri-
day from 15 at the Shell station in
front of Farm Fresh. Formal
brotherhood is 7 pm Monday at
Western STeer.
SCOTT AVERY: I was going to
write this in verse, but I dare not
after typing and reading the above.
Another event is coming up -
Homecoming Cocktail. Are you
ready for it? Be psyched and let's
make the best of it. Anne
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: Experienced, quality work,
IBM Selectric typewriter. Call Lanie
Shive at 758-5301.
HELP WANTED: Local law firm is
seeking Computer Science or Deci
sion Science major with good typing
skills for part time word processing
position. 10 15 hours per week Call
758 6200 and ask for Mary
FOR SALE: Can y0u buy jeeps,
cars, 4 x 4's seized in drug raids for
under $100? Call for facts today
602 837 3401. Ext. S 711
HAPPY HOUR AT THE ATTIC ON
FRIDAY AFTERNOON HAS BEEN
CANCELLED: But IBM will per
torm REM, Cars, Producers, Brian
Adams, Huey Lewis, INXS, U2,
Bruce. The Who, Phil Collins,
Romantics, Prince, The Fixx, The
C as Billy Idol, joe Jackson, Glen
Cr. Monkeys and The Rolling
Stones on Fri. night!
IP APPAK IHP; lanretarF efiL si
ekil a gnillarips tcejbo ni retuo
ecaps, derebmucnenu yb reludom
emit tpecnoc. hctaC eht evaW!
ANTHONY MARTIN: HAPPY 22nd
BIRTHDAY! WE HOPE THAT YOU
HAVE A GREAT DAY TOMOR
ROW! The East Carolinian Staff.
TO ALL THE PLEDGES OF ZBT:
Congratulations Donovan Caus, Carl
Duvel, Peter Gibbs, Brian Hill, Jack
Nichols, Greg Wollard and Sam
Truesdall. Get ready for a great
semester!
SALE
TYPING: Low student rates. Done
on high quality word processing
equipment with a dictionary in ex-
cess of 50,000 words. Professional
correcting available. KATZ SER
VICES 355 7595.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Free
security deposit of $150, Kingston
Place Apts central heatair, fully
furnished, includes all kitchen uten
Site, and use of pool $150 per month
plus utilities. For info call Don
Fazio at 757 3218
BARMAID NEEDED: No ex
perience necessary. Call 757 0743
The Sports pad
A 4 P This Friday's the night so you
� "� � get psyched, P's womans out
ftown yes. it's time to throw down.
Saturday night Pepe did us right but
e both of you two lose your
sight Have some cake HULK, no
reai r "am too, our place was so
scar� Greenville zoo But really,
thanx p ou robbed us blind, now
we're ooth 4 Ducks behind. It's 00
� ous you botr can talk some shit so
s p B S ing ano try getting lit!
SHAKA
ZBT: The weekend is at hand! Get
ready for a good 'ole good'n at Dave
& Marc's Saturday night!
COMPUTER DATING. No lists Of
names distributed or any informa
tion given without your consent. We
offer a very personal way for you to
meet new people. Introductions
guaranteed or your money back.
Student discounts. Katz Services
355 7595
FURNITURE FOR SALE: Cheap
Rocker, recliner and sofa. Old but
good condition. Will sell separately
757 0598 after 5
DZ POSSIBLE GRADUATES: Get
off your ass and drink it fast,
because you'll never pass unless you
can last. The Deans of Alpha Sig
MARK, JOHN AND STEVE: You
guys just wait until 1 find out
something about you guys' Love
Hatti.
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICES: Typ
mg resumes, term papers, thesis
papers Call SDF Professional Com
pufer Services Inc 106 East 5th St.
(near Cubbies), Greenville, 752 3694
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc. Call
Anne at 752 3015 and leave a
message.
COMPUTERIZED TYPINGSER
VICE: Word processing. The
Dataworks specializes in student
document services including
reports, term papers, dissertations,
theses, resumes and more. All work
is computer checked against 50,000
word electronic dictionary. Rates
are as low as $1.75 per page, in
eluding paper. (Call for specific
rates). Call Mark at 757 3440 after 7
pm.
FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED: To share 2 bedroom
townhouse at Georgetown Apts
Great location, close to campus1
Call 752 9245
Riggan Shoe Repair
111 West 4tn St.
Downtown Greenville
"Shot Repair At The Ver Best'
7584)204
. - ' - Sung Ho
Sov. yo'f,
Time 800 s-
- . . � 1 - ,
ir igr s� � Harold and Maud
Srowclat�s Oc 10 I
T "�� X . nr
WANTED
THETA CHI p ecges get ready to
party . Iti the Drothers tonight, it
h ou! oe even better than last week.
Get in touch with your big brother.
PHI TAU: The party starts Thurs-
day at nine. Be prepared to get way
out of line. Green punch and beer,
will bring us cheer. Bring a pen and
be prepared to write, this graffiti
party will last all night!
$60 PER HUNDRED PAID: For
remailing letters from home! Send
self addressed, stamped envelope
for informationapplication
Associates, Box 95 B, Roselle, NJ
07203.
OX. Vve -aae a rfristake and were
rmtverj vom ECJ after being the
arges fraternity on campus. We
pa'C our dues and now we're back to
s'a' &� 'eaoy guys, the 19th will
ne-e soon so know your stuff
Thefa Ch
T0 WPU'S BLONDIE BLONDE:
banks tor a fantastic weekend,
c" cance, and romance (HJ's).
ee ,ou soon. Sagapo MJH a. KLS
:orever Hollywood.
PAT MAN MELTS I: Be the fir?
:a er at 7576913 (DEAD-LINE) to
denl fy �he Grateful Dead show and
n an authentic glossy of Jerry
3a s or Bob Dylon shot by yours
,r ly DEAD REDD PHILIPS, atthe
Buffalo show. It begins at 10 pm on
AZVB, 91.3. That's ROCK-
OUTLET, tomorrow night at 10.
Could it be Palo Alto? LSD is still
egai
PATTh Thanks for caring last Fri-
day Means a lot to me and the pizza
as great! 1 owe you one! Anne
ALPHA XI DELTA: Congratulates
the following for being selected to
apea' in our 1987 calendar The Men
Of ECU: Brad Brown, Steve Chris-
tian, Chris Giatis, Mike Hayes, Eric
Hopkins, Chris Knott, Byron
McMillan, John Morris, Scott Over-
oy. Ken Piche, Manley Pope and Ted
Yoder Congratulations to the rest of
trie participants who will appear on
the front cover.
SAILING: Explore the NC Coast or
cruise south this fall. Sailboats for
charter up to 45! Captains and in-
structinos available. Discounts to
students and faculty. The SAILING
PLACE. PO Box 1967, Atlantic
Beach, NC 28512. Call 726 5664
FOR SALE :ls it true you can buy
jeeps for $44 through the U.S
government? Get the facts today I
Call 1-312-742-1142 Ext. 5271-A
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share
new apt. located at 405 E. 5th St.
(Regency House Condos Apt 10.
1 block (300 steps) from Downtown
and 1 block from campus
Everything is new, must see! No
deposits req'd for either apt or
-wWtties Rent-frtMpfus 12 util. Call
355-6686 and leave name & phone
number.
SIGMA NU: Brothers and Lil
Sisters. If you need a map showing
how to get to the cottage this
weekend or have any questions
come by and see Gene.
TYPING: Top quality word process
ing equipment thatcan meetall your
needs backed with years of ex
perience. Low student rates.
Mon. Sun. 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 355 7595.
WANTED: Female roommate to
share 3 bedroom apt. v3 rent, v3 util
758 2769 after 3pm
LOST: Sept. 30. Large herringbone
bracelet. Reward offered. 746-3849.
Wear a Benetton sweat shirt or Tee Shirt
Receive a fifteen percent discount on your
purchase at Benetton. Offer ends October 7,
1986.
638 B Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, NC Phone:355-7473
Store Hours
Mon-Sat 10-6
KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU: We will
be having Lil Sister Pledge Induc-
tion Thursday night 10 pm in room
221 Mendenhall. Also there will be a
brotherhood Sunday night at 9:30 pm
in 221 Mendenhall. Everyone must
attend. We have to discuss
homecoming week.
ONSOLIDAltD
THFAlRfS
All Seats $2.00 Everyday Til 5:30 PM 1
� - �����Hill '�'���MM S
TPIIIll PM
BUCCANEER MOVIE
KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU: The
beach weekend is at hand! The party
starts officially Friday Oct. 10 at 9
am and is not scheduled to end til
Sunday at 11:59 am.
SIGMA NU: I hope all of the
brothers, pledges, lil sisters and lil
sister pledges have a wonderful and
eventfull beach weekend. Let's try
to stay out of too much trouble.
Gene.
TO THE ALPHA CLASS OF ZTA:
Thank you very much for all of your
love and support these past few
weeks. We are looking forward to
many years of love and friendship to
come. Love the Betas.
JO .( W Wiv )ii
EXTREMITIES
�R-
�(M 30- SO 7 ?(X9 0
House By The
Cemetery
iiRrTT
-A
; ao-4 to
00-9 .
HEARTBURN
Ends Today! � R
1
Starts Tomorrow!
HE PATRIOT
See The Pros Before You Hit The Slopes
The war is never over
for o navy S.E AU
iwr rtiiriiiv fvm ?� ;�
R
When you're ready to look a
equipment, come see the pros
We've shopped the world to
bring you the finest ski
products available today
Our ski experts can advise
you on which products are
best for you They're here to
help you make the right
decisions before you buy
So before you hit the
slopes, come to a ski shop
that has shopped the world
to bring you the best.
GORDON'S
Golf and Ski Shop
264 Bypass mm io Grn,) Tv .no APpu.�c.)
ECU
Student Union
The Alpha-Omega Players
In
October 31, 1986 and
November 1, 1986
Dinner 6:30 p.m.
Curtain 8:00 p.m.
Admission:
ECU Students $9.00
All Others $16.00
Tickets available by advance sales only. Contact!
the Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student
A Healthv HUarious Sluaiest! �Center' (919) 757-6611, ext. 266.
a neaiwy. nuunous oju9�ssi. ��Ecummp��CommiiittDumtrnmm ,
By Bill Manhof
FROM WASHINGTON, D.C.
"The President's Own"
UNITED STATES
MARINE BAND
Colonel John R. Bourgeois, Director
Wednesday, October 29, 1986
Wright Auditorium
East Carolina University
Matinee: 2:00 p.m.
Evening: 8:00 p.m.
ADMISSION
Evening:
leu ltUdT deG�UPSr $2�� ECU Students and G"UPS - $3 00
ECU Faculty and Staff - $3.50 ECU Faculty and Staff - $4 50
Public and at the Door - $5.00 Public and at the Door ��
Tickets Available at tke Ceatral Tkket Office
Moaday-FrMay. 11:00 Mk4M p.a.
Call (919) 757-�ll, �t. 166
A Student Union Special Concerts Presentation
Matinee:
t
PI
V v





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 9, 1986
Lacrosse Finishes Runner-Up
The First Annual Pirate Fall
Lacrosse Tournament was held
this past Sunday Oct. 5 by the
East Carolina Lacrosse Club.
ECU hosted Elon, Duke, and
N.C. State.
ECU faced N.C. State, to start
the tournament, in a very
physical match which the Pirates
won 5-3. The victory was led by
Kevin Thompson and Jamie
Young. The scoring was ac-
complished by the many fast
break opportunities which the
ELLEN MURPHY - THE EAST CAROLINIAN
The ECU Lacross Club defeated Duke 5-3, before losing to Flon 9-5 in the championship game of the first-
annual Pirate Fall Lacross Tournament.
TRIBUTE: To the late-great
Kevin Lee Watts (1963-1986).
A party in his honor will be
held Friday night for friends.
Call Randy (758-4519) or Scott
(758-2413) for more informa-
tion. Moo
Announcements
ECANS
The time has come for all you hara work
� ng nursing ana med students Come let your
hair oown at the "Nurses Nite Out" spon
sorea Oy ECANS and the Attic Tuesday
night. Oct U at the Attic Reid Richmond
�rill be m concert Admission for nurses will
be W cents Bring your name pm or hosp t�:
I O card All students are invited to attend
Come and Om the tun I
KOLNIDRE DINNER
Attention Jewish students Dr and Mf
Resnik will be hosting a KOI Nidre Dinner
detore Yom Kippur Oct 12 at 5 pm For ,n
formation call the Resniks in advance a'
7S6 S640 or Sarah Patiak at 7S8 8867 There
will also be a break the fast Oct 13 at Qua
Ridge Country Roao Club House
LOUSY MOVIE
LOCK IN
II you t�,e not picked up your Lousy
Movie Lock In T shirts piease come by the
Student union, room 234 in Menoenhgt; Be
sure to bring your receipt or ECU ID card in
order to receve your t shirt
CO-OP FOR INDT
SOPHOMORES
Are you interested in gaming ex per ience in
manufacturing with a Fortune S00 compan,
earning $1,100 per month 8no beng eligible
tor free tuition until you graduate' it this
sounds good to you ano you have a 2 7 GPA
contact Cooperative Education 313 Rawi to
learn more
FALL FASHION SHOW
Tonight Thursday Oct 9 1�8� 7 pm Ga-
rett Han Open to an ECU students FREE
ADMISSION Discounts on clothing to be
given away Sponsored by Greene Ha
MAJOR DECISION GROUP
This program .s designed to aid students Wi
choosing an acaoem,c major ,n a smai
qrouc format Each participant �,n ais0
receive individual aid from the group leade'
if desired Group participants, will increase
self knowledge of their mterel. values anc
abilit.es. learn how these relate to maicxs
and career areas at ECU and narrow the"
options through a systematic career decision
makmq process The major decision group
will meet Mon. Oct 20 Wed . Oct 22 ano
Fr, Oct 24 in 32 Wngth Bldg 3 4 pm
Although advance registration is not re
quireo, we would appreciate advance
notification of interest to insure that we have
adequate materials on hano Please contact
the Counseling center in 31a Wright Building
(757 6661) for further information or to let us
know you plan to attend
LSS SOCIETY
There will be a meeting Fr. , Oct 10. 5 7
pm m Rmggoid Towers lobby Pricing par
ty Free pizza provided Memberships
available Please come!
PHI ALPHATHETA
Will be having a bookbake sale tomorrow
from 9am I p m. Locations will be in front
of tfie Student Supply Store and the History
Dept Office, third floor A wing of Brewster
ECU SURFING
All insurance forms must be complete ano
turned m today if you are planning on going
to Maryland for the contest Contact Blair at
75i 833 about turning them m Also, there
will be a mandatory meeting Thurs at I m
B-04 of Joyner Library Anyone who isplann
mg on going toMd must attend this meeting
PPHA
PPHA will meet Oct 8 at 7 p m in rm 247
at Mendenhali All members are urged to at
fend and bring a friend that would be m
terested m joining PPHA
METHODIST
FELLOWSHIP
Come to the Methodist Student Center this
Wed n.ght and every Wed night at 5 for a
deiic-ous. all you can eat home cooked meal
with a short program afterwards This week
ad scussion of the videotape Media images
of Women " Meals $1 SO with reservation. $2
�t the door Call 751 2030 for reservations
MEDIA IMAGES
OF WOMEN
This videotape featuring an interview with
Florence Rush, author of a bast-seller about
child abuse and chairperson of Women
Against Pornography, will be discussed
after the Wednesday Night Supper at the
Methodist Student Center
CORAL REEF
DIVE CLUB
The Cora Ree Dve Club will be hoidinq
its next nieef �ny on Oct 13 in rm 731
Mendenba'i at 3 30 pm Upcoming c amp ana
cook out at Rao in island nvttl beo-scussed An
interested in awing are urged to aTtena New
members welcome
BE ACLOWNI
An, interested persons wanting to be a
clown m the 198 Homecoming Parade
please contact Jill Opdyke (752 9743) Betsy
Peters (355 7714) or Jane WHitfield
(752 8341 by October 9, 1986
COMEDY LAFF OFF
Don't m,ss thre1 of New York's hottest
comedians at Hentjr . Theatre on Oct u at 8
pm Tickets are available at the centra'
ticket office in Mendenhali
HOMECOMING PARADE
Any organizations wanting to nde on a
tiretruck during the 1984 Homecoming
Parade please contact Jill Opdyke
(7529743) Betsy Peters (355 7784) or Jane
Wh.tfieid (752 8348) by October 9. 1984
ESCOTA
Attent.on interested Occupational
Therap Stuaents Pre OT mixer come fine
out about Occupaoria1 Therapy am you
ever wanted to know ano more Meet current
Juniors and Sen.ors as wen as the Faculty
Thursday Oc' 14 Iron 7 9 pm in the mult,
Purpose rocr- n Meaoenhall
CONVERTIBLES,
CONVERTIBLES
The Student Homecoming Committee is kl
need of drivers with Convertibles tor the 1984
Homecoming Parade It interested please
caM Jill Opdyke (752 9743). Betsy Peters
(355 77841 or Jane Whitfieid (752 8348) by Or
tooer 9 1984
i
PASSPORT PHOTOS
mr-
p. 3 Minute Service
�StJo appointment
No Waiting
�t
321 Eiom street
(919)752-0875
saureay 8� -8M8SW
midfielders set up, and the attack
took advantage of.
Duke and Elon played
eachother next to decide who
would play the Pirates for the
first place position in the tourna
ment. Elon beat Duke, 10-7.
ECU's Lacrosse Club found
themselves falling behind quickly
in the game 2-0, as Elon (a club
which will acquire Division III
Lacrosse status in the spring)
came out eager to play. ECU
made a strong effort to keep it a
close game, and were down just
5-4 at half-time.
Penalties plagued the Pirates
against Elon, but ECU gave their
opponents a fine effort. The
young talent of ECU in both their
defense and their midfielders was
not enough to help the Pirates as
they lost 9-5 to to the well coach-
ed and conditioned Elon squad.
ECU goals should be credited to
two by Stew Sullivan, one by
Hank McCracken, Moog
Seasholtz, and Branin Thorn.
ATTIC
THUR
Look What surfaced
Every Tuesday Is
College Night
Ham & Cheese 7 p.m11 p.m. Pepperom. Salami & Cheese
Bologna & Cheese QQ� ow rnc Turkey & Cheese
Ham, Salami & Cheese BXJDO Ham. Turkey & Cheese
Your Choice of
Not Valid On Deliveries
60 Oz. Pitchers $1.99 ,
11 a.m11 p.m. 752-2183
215 E. 4th St.
Wendy O. Williams
in Concert with
LEXX LUTHER
FRI
IBM
$1.50 ECU
students with
coupon
SAT
a Kara
Good Luck
ECU
From The East
Carolinian
An Evolution of The Original
FOR MEN & WOMEN
Call Today and Reserve
Your Membership!
�" 8,000 Square Feet CO-ED Facility
The Latest Exercise Equipment From California
� Nautilus
� Olympic Free Weights
Aerobic Room
Separate Locker Rooms For Men & Women
Sauna
� Tanning Beds BIT1ieS f � F
� And More! m
Special
'$59.00
�3,
(3 months)
Aerobics
The rest of the semester
$15.00 (3 months)
Coupon Expires Oct.10, 1986 I
. LOCATED IN
A LICENSEE OF GOLDS GYM ENT INC
EVAN STREET MALL
PHONE ORDERS ACCEPTED
CALL TODAY 758-4359
1
�M
�i i �m�ii ii"mi
fe





Title
The East Carolinian, October 9, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 09, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.499
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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