The East Carolinian, October 7, 1986






Mht Saat (Earnlituan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.61 No.H
Tuesday, October 7, 1986
Greenville, N.C.
14 Panes
Circulation 12,000
ECU Receives MM MM
Co-op Program To Expand
By CAROLYN DRISCOLL
AssUlant News Editor
ECU has received an award of
over $600,000 from the U.S.
Department of Education to ex-
pand its co-op program which
will place 3,000 students in
career-related jobs in the next
three years, according to John M.
Howell, ECU chancellor.
Out of seven awards of this
type given in the nation, ECU's
grant is the largest. It is also the
largest per-year grant ever receiv-
ed by the university. Nationwide,
there are 965 co-operative educa-
tion programs serving 299,698
students, according to Betsy
Harper, program director at
ECU.
"The program furnishes
business and industry access to
highly-motivated and talented
university students who have a
wide variety of work skills said
Howell.
The grant will be used to
achieve co-op's goal of increasing
job placements from 650 � 2,000
this year to 2,498 next year and to
3,000 by 1988-89 "We then hope
to then maintian this level of at
least 3000 student in the pro-
gram" said Harper.
"We're excited because it
means that we will be able to help
a lot more students out. Co-op
jobs can mean so much when you
graduate said Harper.
She added, "Many of our
students graduate with jobs in
hand because they are offered
jobs with the companies they had
a co-op with
Last year, earnings by co-op
students at ECU totalled almost
$1,000,000. ECU's program
places students in 15 states from
California to New York. Univer-
sity credit, up to 18 hours is
usually given.
In the future, the program will
seek to broaden and increase the
employer base with a variety of
employers. The Co-op office
plans to act as a liason between
high schools and the ECU Ad-
missions Office to inform
students of the availability of co-
operative educations Harper
said.
Expansion of the program,
said Angelo Volpe, vice
chancellor for Academic Affairs,
"will mean that more students
will have opportunities to ex-
perience the pressures and
demands of the workplace at a
time when it is not too late to
change their major
He added, "We are excited to
have this opportunitv to offer ad-
ditional services to students and
to increase our interaction with
the employers and region we
serve
We seek to develop private-
sector jobs for the students in ad-
dition to jobs in academic depart-
ments and university support of-
fices�each job placement situa-
tion is different, said Harper.
Harper also said that the pro-
tect is designed to increase oppor-
tunities for students who are
members of traditionally under-
represented groups, such a racial
or ethnic groups, women and
handicapped persons.
Volpe added, "The co-op pro-
gram is an important comple-
ment to our academic program
Court Refuses To Clear Army Doctor
Parents' Day
ECU's Parents' Day, held this past weekend, was the site for
ballons, kids, plenty of parents, and the 11th largest crowd in
Ficklen Stadium.
(UPI) � The Supreme Court
refused today, for the fourth
time, to clear the name of Army
doctor Jeffrey MacDonald, rejec-
ting arguments he was denied a
fair trial for murdering his wife
and two daughters.
The justices, without com-
ment, dismissed MacDonald's
Campus Shanties Vandalized
SALT LAKE CITY, UT (CPS) -
A federal judge last week ruled
University of Utah anti-apartheid
demonstrators don't have to tear
down their symbolic "shanties"
even if they've become a target
for vandals.
In his ruling, U.S. District
Judge Aldon Anderson effective-
ly declared the national anti-
apartheid campus movement has
become an insurance hazard, but
that it shouldn't be enough to
shut the movement down.
The anti-apartheid students
themselves tend to blame conser-
vative students for the vandalism
that has plagued them with in-
creasing frequency since last fall,
though the conservatives deny the
charges.
Arsonists torched shanties at
Indiana during the summer,
while at the peak of the spring
protest season vandals wrecked
or defaced the "shelters" �
meant to symbolize the poverty
of black citizens of segregationist
South Africa � at Berkeley,
Stanford, Yale, North Carolina,
Dartmouth, Missouri and
Maryland, among other cam-
puses.
The hazards persuaded of-
ficials at a number of colleges to
ask protestors to dismantle the
structures before someone got
hurt, and the schools themselves
were held liable.
University of Utah President
Chase Peterson, for one, cited
safety and liability problems
when he asked students to
dismantle the shanties.
But Judge Anderson last week
ruled that, while Peterson could
impose "reasonable" restrictions
on use of the shanties, dismantl-
ing them would violate the pro-
testors' rights to express
themselves politically.
The university is appealing the
ruling.
The shanties in Dunn Meadow,
erected in April, have been the
target of five attacks. BB guns,
eggs, chemicals, tear gas and a
Molotov Cocktail have all come
hurtling toward the buildings and
their occupants.
On Aug. 18, two of the
buildings were burned to the
ground. No one was injured, and
no one has been arrested in con-
nection with the incident.
Josh Nessen of the American
Committee on Africa, which
coordinates national campus
anti-apartheid activities each spr-
ing and fall, blames the
Republican Party.
"Our opposition is housed in
the Republican Party he says.
"They are collaborating with the
South African regime to help set
up moderate student alliances. A
lot of money is being funnelled
from the Reagan administration
to Collect Republican
campaigns
While College Republican of-
ficials readily concede they op-
pose calls for colleges to sell their
stocks in firms that do business in
South Africa, they deny Nessen's
charge.
"We have formally taken a
stand for anti-divestment con-
cedes Dennis Kilcoyne, head of
the National College Republicans
in Washington, D.C. "In fact,
we encourage more investment
(in South Africa). However, we
are not funding any groups
against divestment
Officials, he adds, "would not
touch this (issue) with a 10-foot
pole
University of North Carolina
College Republican chapter
members were involved in a tense
standoff last spring with anti-
apartheid protestors, while staf-
fers at the ultraconservative Dart-
mouth Review were arrested in
connection with the vandalism of
shanties on Dartmouth's green
last February.
A College Republican chapter
member was also arrested at
Penn State for tacking "Don't
Tread On Me, Blackie" posters
around the campus last spring.
At Utah, though, the anti-anti-
apartheid folks are led by Ron
Gardner, who calls himself "a
ON THE INSIDE
�A retrospective look at film pro-
Edltorfab4 ducer George Pal � see STYLE
Style9 page 9.
Sports12
Classifieds14 �Productive week for both the
Announcements10 men's and women's tennis teams
� see SPORTS page 12.
card-carrying Young Democrat
Speaking of the shanty van-
dalism, "I have no idea who did
that, although our organization
was implicated Gardner says.
"We are trying to stay away
from people who seem like
Nazis he says.
Initially, Gardner "thought the
shanties were a great idea. They
heightened political awareness
"People in Utah are usually
content to follow the Mormon
Church or Reagan's line. They
don't tend to think for
themselves
But Gardner decided he was
against university divestment.
SGA
By DAWN STEW ARD
SUff Writer
The second legislative meeting
of the Student Government
Association was held Monday
evening in Mendenhall.
Debate arose at last night's
meeting over the budget of $950
for Sexual Assault Awareness
Week. The original proposal, in
which buttons publicizing the
week were covered by the ap-
propriated funds, was amended
to exclude the buttons.
The amended budget now
covers stickers with emergency
telephone numbers, posters of
the week's events, bookmarkers
with emergency phone numbers
as well as the printing costs of
other miscellaneous items .
Objections to the buttons' be-
ing paid for by the SGA's budget
had to do with whether the issue
was a matter of the SGA sponsor-
ing an awareness week or a major
campaign, and whether certain
items such as the stickers and but-
tons were actually necessary.
"We are working with limited
funds and we have to cut corners
somewhere commented John
Simon, vice chairman of the Ap-
propriations Committee. "I am
all for the week, but I think the
buttons are the place to cut cor-
ners
Janet Johnson, organizer of
Sexual Assault Awareness Week,
spoke in favor of the buttons,
saying, "The purpose of the but-
tons is to remind people as they
walk across campus that this does
happen. Buttons are very infor-
mational and they were suggested
claim that evidence discovered
since his conviction justifies a
new trial.
MacDonald, 42. was a 26-year-
old Green Beret captain and Ar-
my physician when his wife, Col-
ette, and iheir two young
daughters were slain on Feb. 17,
1970, at an Army base. Nine
years later he was convicted of
the crime and sentenced to three
life terms.
In the appeal, MacDonald's at-
torneys say there is new evidence
that Judge Franklin Dupree, who
presided over his trial, should
have disqualified himself because
bis former son-in-law had helped
to prosecute MacDonald in his
role as assistant U.S. Attorney.
In addition, there is evidence
the federal government withheld
and lost materials that could have
helped clear MacDonald's name,
including human skin found
under Mrs. MacDonald's finger-
nail, the briefs say.
The federal government oppos-
ed the appeal, saying all the new
evidence was "meticulously can-
vassed" by the trial judge who
concluded it raised no questions
about MacDonald's guilt.
The appeal was the fourth time
the hight court has considered the
MacDonald case.
In 1978, the justice reversed
the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Ap-
peals, which had dismissed the
charges against MacDonald prior
to trial. Then in 1982, the court
overturned the same court's rul-
ing that his conviction so many
years after the crime violated his
right to a speedy trial.
In January 1983, the court let
stand his conviction, rejecting his
arguments that he was denied the
right to present the evidence
about the people he believed to be
the real murderers.
MacDonald had claimed that
four drug-crazed intruders broke
into their three-bedroom,
ground-floor apartment at Ft.
Bragg, N.C, and attacked his
family�a story that recalled the
previous year's murders by the
Charles Manson gang in Los
Angeles.
In the absence of evidence of
intruders, MacDonald became a
suspect, but the Army failed to
find evidence that he had com-
mitted the murders. Nine months
later, charges were dropped a
he was given an honorable
discharge.
He was indicted again in 1975
after Army investigators referred
the case to the Justice Depart-
ment, but iegal delays prevented
the case from going to trial until
199. By that time. MacDor
had taken up civilian life and a
medical practice in Southerr,
California.
Colette MacDonald's mother
and step-father, Mildred and
Freddie Kassab, who had known
MacDonald since he was a
classmate of their daughter,
strongly supported him following
the murders. Kassab later made
an exhaustive investigaion of the
crime, however, and became con-
vinced only MacDonald could
have committed the murders.
MacDonald is eligible for
parole in April 1991 after 10
years behind bars, even though
he was sentenced to three life
sentences.
He is in the federal prison at
Bastrop, Texas, 25 miles east of
Austin.
Approves Budget
by students on the committee as
well as faculty members
The Student Welfare Commit-
tee reviewed the bill prior to its
submission to the floor. Commit-
tee member Chris Tomasic com-
mented, "The committee found
that the focus of the packet is to
make females aware that 'rapes'
on campus are done by acquain-
tances and not by people lurking
in the dark while walking across
campus
An appropriation for the Gray
Art Gallery to be given $2500 was
unanimously moved to the ap-
propriations committee. The
money would be used for a slide
show on rape located in the Gray
Art Building and for the cost of
printing.
Appropriations for the con-
sitution of the Minority Student
Organization, a change in the
constitution of the East Carolina
Occupational Organization, and
a transfer of funds for Sigma
Gamma Epsilon fraternity were
all approved under new business.
On the renovation of Wright
Auditorium, Rudolph Alex-
ander, associate dean of Student
Unions, said, "Over 3 million
dollars went into the renovation
and its beautiful
He added, "For years this
campus has been in need of a
large hall, I've waited 20 vears
for this
JON O. JOftOAM - TNI PHOTO LAB
Elbow Room
With the renovation of Wright Auditorium near completion, students can plan on more walking
space in front of the Student Store. The fence will come down at last!
1
tv.
- �-
.
T






HIE EAST CAROLINIAN � OBER7, 1986
Colleges Across Country Hike Tuition
(CPS) � Colleges this year will
remain about the last remaining
bastion of inflation in America,
new accountings show.
Students will pay about six per-
cent more in tuition and fees to
go to college thisvear than they
did in 1985-86. the College Board
says,while the nation sConsumer
Price Index rose onl a little more
than two percent since last year.
Some colleges, of course, hiked
their prices even higher and faster
than the national .verages.
Tennessee .i"jJ average tui-
tion byabout 15 percent at state
colleges, while it costs residents
about 14.7 percent more to at-
tend the University of Arizona
this vear than it did last year.
Swarthmore hiked tuition 11
percent, Colorado 10 percent,
Chicago nine percent an Stan-
ford, among many others above
the aerage, seven percent.
College officials, as they have
for the last several years, said
they needed to keep pushing tui-
tion up so fast to help cope with
the long depression in the higher
education industry, which began
in the late seventies.
They need money, they say, to
help pay for long-overdue faculty
salary increases, long-deferred
maintenance of campus buildings
and labs and a need to increase
"the quality of education
Whatever the reasons, the an-
nual College Board survey shows
the total average tuition, fees,
books and housing costs of atten-
ding four-year public colleges
rose five percent from $5,314 to
$5,604 for on-campus students
and $4,240 to $4,467 for off-
campus students.
Four-year private colleges
jumped an average six percent,
from $9,659 to $10,199 for resi-
dent students and from $8,347 to
$8,809 for commuters.
Despite some ongoing protests
at the University of Colorado,
most students natinwide seem to
be taking the increases in stride.
No colleges have reported losing
students because of the rapid rise
in costs, says Cecilia Ottinger of
he American Council on Educa-
ECU Establishes Ties With North
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Formal ties between East
Carolina University and Acadia
University in Nova Scotia, to en-
courage exchange of faculty and
students, have been announced.
Dr. Ennis L. Chestang, ECU
coordinator of international pro-
grams, said a cooperative agree-
ment between the two universities
has been made. The agreement
will offer opportunities for ECU
students and faculty, in a variety
of fields, to study in Nova Scotia
while assisting students and
faculty from the Acadia campus
to study in Greenville.
Acadia is located in Wolfville,
Nova Scotia, a small community
on the Bay of Fundy. About
3.000 students are enrolled on the
campus.
In discussing ihe agreement
Graham R. Daborn, director of
the Acadia Centre for Estuarine
Research, meeting with ECU of-
ficials this week, said ECU and
Acadia share common interests in
liberal arts and in humanitarian
oriented programs of education.
"We're a regional university in
that many of our students come
directly from Nova Scotia and
thev mav not have been to manv
other places he said. "We
think it is extremely important
for students to have this contact
with someone elsewhere. It is a
distinct advantage Daborn
said.
The agreement between the
universities is the result of a
research project conducted by
Daborn and by an ECU scientist,
Dr.Roger A. Rulifson of the In-
stitute for Coastal and Marine
Resources, in the research, that
began last year, the two scientists
are studying the migration of
fish, striped bass, from the
outheastern United States to
Noa Scotia. Research on that
project is expected to be expand-
ed next year to involve additional
researchers from each campus.
Chestang noted research and
study in the marine science will
comprise a large part of the ex-
change program. Bu; he also em-
phasized that many other fields
of study will be included too.
He said thai a project is being
developed now to bring an
Acadia graduate student to ECU
in the spring. Proposals are also
being accepted from ECU
students and faculty for study in
Nova Scotia.
In discussing marine research.
Daborn, a biologist, said he views
the ECUAcadia tie as an oppor-
tunity to learn more about
coastal zone problems and
management.
"The coastal zone here is very
different from the Bay of
Fundy he said.
"We have an enormous tidal
range and any study we do
depends on tides. But down here
the tidal influence is very much
reduced. Wind and industrial ac-
tivities are of greater concern.
"We have a pristine environ-
ment and you have one that is
already heavily used he said.
"1 think if one is going to be
able to understand coastal zone
problems and management you
are going to have to become
familiar with those kinds of
things. It's an educational pro-
cess as far as I am concerned he
said.
ECU conducts similar pro-
grams with the National Univer-
sity of Costa Rica and with Fer-
ret a University in Italy.
I
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FELLOWSHIP
invites you to meet
The Rt. Rev. B. Sidney Sanders
Bishop of the Diocese of East Carolina
Wednesday, October 8th
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
401 E. 4th Street
5:30 p.m. � Eucharist � Bishop Sanders,
Celebrant
Fellowship supper following the service
v&&�
ST�CNCy rViSCSCN
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tion.
"Tuitionincreaseshave not had
that mush of an effect on enroll-
ment she says. "It (enrollment)
has only decreased about one per-
cent, which is not very signifi-
cant
Four of Mississippi's eight
state colleges, for example, are
expecting modest enrollment in-
creases despite raising tuition
$200-$400 this year.
In Mississippi, costs went up to
compensate for a cut in state fun-
ding. Schools everywhere,
however, had no shortage of
reasons for hiking student costs.
Scores of them say they needed
to raise money to increase faculty
and staff salaries.
"Our faculty has gone two
years without a salary increase
says Dr. James Boelkins of
Geneva College in Beaver Falls,
Pa where tuition went up $170
this fall.
At Lewis and Clark State Col-
lege in Idaho, by contrast, tuition
didn't go up, leaving faculty and
staff upset. "I've had one in-
crease in the last four years, and
that's a 12-14 percent loss (in
buying power) for me says
Dale AUdredge, vice president of
finance.
The problem, says Dr. Kent
Halstead, research economist for
the U.S. Department of Educa-
tion, is that "colleges cannot
raise wages fast enough
"Institutions are trying to
make up for the loss (in faculty
buying power) since the mid-
seventies he explains, adding
decining faculty buying power
and morale have led many top
teachers to leave campus for
private industry. "They've gain-
ed ground since '82, but they've
still got a ways to go
During the years of rampant
inflation, declining state funding
and now lower federal budgets,
moreover, colleges put off expen-
sive maintenance and moderniza-
tion of their campuses.
Many say they can't put it off
any longer.
"We have a 100-year old cam-
pus says Geneva's Boelkins,
"and extensive maintenance has
been deferred
In Vermont, Bennington needs
a new roof on one of its
buildings. "We have an endow-
ment that gives us some leeway,
but we are asking (from students)
what it costs (to run the
campus) says spokesman
Charles Yoder.
Bennington students, in fact,
pay more for college than anyone
else: $16,950 a year.
They pay that much, Yoder
says, because Bennington hopes
to build its endowment from the
present $2.2 million to about $30
million in the next three to five
years to hedge against another
crunch like colleges nationwide
felt in the 1970s.
"For 40 years we only increas-
ed with inflation, but strange
things happen in the world
economy, and we want to always
meet costs (of maintenance and
salaries) and have a surplus he
says.
Yoder says Bennington recent
ly balanced its budget by selling
real estate and artwork, but "we
can't sell assets every year
The most expensive public col-
lege in the U.S. this year, the Col-
lege Board found, is The Citadel
Military College in South
Carolina, but Col. Calvin Lyons
protests the designation as
misleading because its fees now
include $2,575 worth of books,
lab fees, hair cuts,
toothbrushes,tennis shoes, sweat-
shirts, laundry and everything
but the cost of transportation to
and from the college.
"Even at that Lyons says.
"we have three applications for
every one opening
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In its 20th a
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MEN'S HEA1 ��
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HEALTH SERVICE
Men's heal
by the Student He
The male heah:
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diagnosis, and
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confideni a
Educational 7
to male stude:
of men's hea
contraception. s
amination and sexua
ted diseases. Othe
fered on demand. Tl
grams are aaslab
hall students and other .
groups. A con"
held twice a week ai
Health Center ol V
10:00 am and Thrusda a ; �
pm for females and rru
One of the goa
Health Center is that a.
students learn how
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1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 7, 1986 3
ition
"Foi 40 ears we only tncreas-
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College Enrollment Shrinks
Number Of Freshman Declines
CpMftJY ZpNE
WASHINGTON, DC. (CPS) �
The American student body will
shrink by "less than one percent"
this school year, the U.S. Dept.
of Education predicts.
But some experts, who have
been waiting for the Great
Enrollment Drop of the Eighties
for six years now, say they're
skeptical that a decrease will oc-
cur this year.
In its 20th annual back-to-
school forecast of national col-
lege enrollment released last
week, the department says there
are fewer l8-to-22-year-olds �
the people traditionally most like-
ly to enroll as freshmen in col-
leges � in the population at
large.
But the forecast also predicts
college enrollment probably
won't suffer that much from the
shortage of 18-year-olds because
B MARY ELESHA-ADAMS
Student Health C enter
MEN'S HEALTH CARE OF-
FERED AT STUDENT
HEALTH SERVICE
Men's health care is provided
by the Student Health Center.
The male health program consists
of education and the prevention,
diagnosis, and treatment of
health problems. All services are
confidential.
Educational programs offered
to male students cover a variety
of men's health issues including
contraception, self-testicle ex-
amination and sexually transmit-
ted diseases. Other topics are of-
fered on demand. These pro-
grams are available to residence
hall students and other campus
groups. A contraception class is
held twice a week at the Student
Health Center of Mondays at
10:00 am and Thrusday at 3:00
pm for females and males.
One of the goals of the Student
Health Center is that all male
students learn how to do a simple
three minute monthly self-testicle
examination. Cancer of the
testes�the male reproductive
r
Quality Copies 5
glands�is one of the most com-
mon cancers in men 15-34 years
of age. It accounts for 12 percent
of all cancer deaths in this group.
If discovered in the early stages,
testicular cancer can be treated
promptly and effectively. It's im-
portant for all males to take the
time to learn the basic facts about
this type of cancer�its symp-
toms, treatments and what to do
to get the help you need when it
counts.
Brochures and other informa-
tion about men's health are also
available at the Student Health
Center including topics such as
diet and nutrition, cancer, high
blood pressure, sexual depres-
sion, and alcohol and drugs.
Tests for sexually transmitted
diseases, herpes and the evalua-
tion of other men's health pro-
blems are also available. Con-
doms are sold by the SHC phar-
macv at the cost of twelve for
$2.00.
More information about the
men's health program may be ob-
tained by calling 757-6841 or by
stopping by the Student Health
Center.
i
more older, part-time students
are registering and will offset
what would have been a major
population drop, says Tom
Snyder of the Education Depart-
ment.
"If there's a drop in college-
age students, enrollment overall
will go down he says. "By the
same token, if there is a rise in
another age group, it may
balance out and show no
decline at all.
In the seventies, demographers
predicted college enrollments
would drop precipitously during
this decade, forcing as many as
200 campuses to close up for
want of 18-year-old matriculants.
The first steep drop, the
Education Dept. said in 1979,
would come in fall, 1981.
It didn't happen, largely
because a recession pushed many
"nontraditional" � meaning
those older than 25 � students
back to school to get deferred
degrees or to retrain.
National enrollment figures
have stayed roughly stable at or
around 12.1 million students
through the decade, college head
counts show.
Last year, the College Board
reported in its annual census
released two weeks ago, college
enrollment finally fell two per-
cent. It was the biggest drop of
the decade.
One reason may be that "non-
traditional" students are not
enrolling in as great numbers as
before, says the Education
Depts Debra Gerald.
"Those trends have slowed a
bit Gerald says. "They're not
increasing as rapidly as they have
in the past
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But some educators are unwill-
ing to listen to Education Dept.
forecasts as seriously as they used
to.
"The truth is we don't get real
concerned (about them). We're
not convinced (the decline is) go-
ing to happen says Julianne
Thrift of the National Institute of
Independent Colleges and
Universities (N1ICU).
"The Education Department
has predicted decreases higher
than one percent in the last few
years, but they haven't come
true
Thrist now has her own
estimates of the course of college
enrollment. "Now, the enroll-
ment for kindergarten through
12th grade is increasing again
As such, the NIICU feels college
enrollment will level off and
eventually increase in a few years.
"The real impact will be in
1992 for colleges. Chances are
enrollment will level off, and in
1997-98, enrollment will go back
up Thrift says.
"It won't be like the 1960s,
when it was really wild. Colleges
were proliferating all over she
recalls. "Our question is, really,
will be lose any colleges by then"
because of projected enrollment
decreases.
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QUfe Ea0t (Earfllitrtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tom Luvender, G-�-aMw�er
Daniel Maurer, .�� &,�
Patti Kemmis, ntm �,��� Steve Folmar, ����- uwm�
Scott Cooper, c��m &��� Anthony Martin, Busr�o�i- m,�
Rick McCormac, amor �,� Meg Needham. cm
John Shannon, stte Shannon Short, w�-�w Manatr
Pat Moi loy, Bmmmmm Edum DeChanile Johnson, 4 ���
(Xtober 7, 1986
Opinion
Page 4
Rev. Falwell At It Again
Contrary to popular belief, cen-
sorship is not dead � at least not
vet. Rev. Jerry Falwell and his
Liberty Federation (formerly
known as the Moral Majority) have
seen to that. However, there has
been an unusual turn of events con-
cerning Falwell's literary crusade.
Just a week ago, Falwell, while
addressing people at an anti-
abortion convention at the Mount
Olivet Baptist Church in Raleigh,
assailed the State Department of
Public Instruction for not allowing
copies of Abortion and the Cons-
cience of the Nation to be donated
to school libraries.
According to The News and
Observer, Falwell said, "(If) there's
nothing wrong with giving young
people access to all information to
make their own decisions, then
why can this book not be in the
library?"
Hold on a minute. Could this be
the words of that political preacher
we've come to know and doubt?
Since when has Falwell stood
behind the idea of letting the young
make their own decisions?
Why, it seems like only yesterday
that he said, "In school textbooks,
pornography, obscenity, vulgarity
and profanity are destroying our
children's moral values in the guise
of values clarification and sex
education. Our children are being
trained to deny their 200-year-old
heritage. Books that don't ac-
curately present the American
heritage must be eliminated. Rise
up in arms to throw out every text
book
It doesn't sound like he was too
much in favor of giving young
people access to all information to
make there own decisions does
it? So why the about face? It's quite
simple. Falwell wants his point
made, his voice heard, and his will
done. And, apparently, if this
means temperarily compromising
his stand on censorship, so be it.
Falwell is quite welcome to take
the "ends justify the means" ap-
proach and compromise his beliefs
whenever he pleases. We have just
one question. When he does this,
are we supposed to take him
seriouslv?
SBV� non,
V0Y� Df)D,
SEE VOU SOON1.
1
v LET'S 60 6ET
? BEER XT'S
BEEN ft LOtiQ
WEEKEND1.
Attention Idiom Readers
The last issue of The Idiom (929) was, unfortunately, the target of
sabotage, as a result, The Idiom staff is disclaiming all responsibility
for the context of page 7. We apologize to anyone that may have been
offended or hurt by this unfortunate act of malice.
Gloria Gimes,
General Manager
of Expressions
�Campus Forum
In Defense Of Senator Jesse Helms
Dear Editor,
I was very offended and down right
ashamed to have an article such as Bern
McCrady's "From The Left" (Sept.
30) in our school newspaper. He
couldn't be more wrong if he tried! His
attack on our illustrious Senator Helms
was typical of today's narrow minded
liberal college student.
First, Jesse Helms is the freshest
breath of air the senate has seen since
Joe McCarthy, the great patriot who
cleansed many communists from
America.
Second, what right has Mr. Mc-
Crady to call school prayer, low taxes,
free enterprise systems, and states
rights ignorant and immoral? I think
he must be thinking of a truly ignorant
senator, Ted Kennedy of
Massachusetts.
Third, Mr. McCrady's opinions sur-
rounding CBS are also false. The
liberal bias that exist in the media are a
very real threat to the security of our
country. Liberal politicians constantly
get better press coverage. The Presi-
dent's programs are down graded and
changed before our very eyes, and in
the case of Grenada, the pinko-panzy
press labeled it an invasion, but in
truth it was a rescue mission for
American medical students from the
hands of the Marxists. Wake up Mr.
McCrady!
Jesse Helms does not have a one
man stand against communism. Per-
sonally, I side with him on his stand
against communism. Don't you Mr.
McCrady? Or are you another
misguided fool who thinks that the
Russians are just "nice people with a
different philosophy than ours"?
Your stand on South Africa is
understandable; you musn't be lam-
basted for believing liberal falacies on
the subject. South Africa, a sovereign
nation, former British colony and now
a member of the British Com-
monwealth, deserves praise for stan-
ding up against the world's criticism.
Why doesn't the west give the USSR
any flack for enslaving over a billion
people? Both Blacks and Whites are
free to come and go as they please in
South Africa. This isn't the case in
Russia. The USSR doesn't allow Jews
to leave nor does she allow Blacks to
enter! (the epitome of discimination).
In closing Mr. McCrady, I must say
as Secretary for the Helms Club at
ECU, that there are many registered
voters, both Republican and
Democratic, who support Jesse Helms.
And fortunately, for the good of North
Carolina and the nation, Senator
Helms will be in office until 1990,
when our team will once again work
for the re-election of the most outstan-
ding man in the United States Senate.
Matthew Clarke
Junior,
History
The Defense Rests
Dear Editor,
I am beginning my second year at
ECU, and in the time I've been here I
have not seen anyone publicly attacked
more than Chris Tomasic. I have
strong admiration for a man who will
take such abuse and still stand up and
fight for the cause he believes in � the
student (despite the fact that he is con-
stantly stabbed in the back by those he
thought were friends.)
In Randy Mizelle's letter that ap-
peared in Tuesday's paper, the com-
ment was made that many thought
Chris Tomasic rode piggy-back on the
ticket with Dave Brown (SGA elec-
tions, spring of '85). Mr. Tomasic,
who ran for Vice-President, actually
won the position (over Bryan Lassiter
and Lee Lane) by a larger percentage
of votes than Dave Brown won his
position as president.
In last spring's election Mr. Tomasic
lost by a mere 12 votes despite all of the
attempts to smear his campaign. Final-
ly, in this past election, three ballot
boxes were invalidated, which indicates
to me that the final count is not
representative of the students' true opi-
nions. Chris could have loss by more or
less, or perhaps even won.
Mr. Tomasic's letter was in response
to Kirk Shelley's letter. Chris did not
resort to attacking individuals to de-
fend his position, but stated his opi-
nion about a group at large. I think the
attacks on him are in poor taste. At
least Mr. Tomasic has the guts to get
out and try to do what is right, rather
than complaining about what is wrong.
Marilyn Baughan,
Senior,
DSC
Album Review
Editor,
This letter pertains to John
Williams' letter concerning The East
Carolinian Album Review. I vsork with
Mr. Swanson on the album review. The
albums are selected on the basis of
popularity in the college radio market,
not a bad indicator of relevant music
for a college newspaper.
Certain aspects of Mr. Williams' let-
ter are well-taken. It would be great for
The East Carolinian to offer music
reviews of all types. There are,
however, many logistical problems
associated with that; principally, time
and space.
It has been the goal of DA Swan-
son and myself to offer reviews of
many different forms of music from
the outset. It is realK difficult to do
that in three issues. We have therefore
elected to review one "popular" and
one lesser-known album a week. You
may look for future reviews on current
jazz, reggae, soul, alternative, and
heavy-metal releases in the future.
As far as your specific recommenda-
tions are concerned, the David Lee
Roth LP is neither new, nor does it
"feature" Steve Vai. Rather, Dave
prostitutes the talented picker in an un-
precedented way. And if anything b
Queensryche is "one of the finest vinyl
offerings in years" in your mind, then
your eclecticism is dubious.
If anyone in your department is truly
interested in helping with the article, it
would appear to me that he or she
would contact The East Carolinian, as
opposed to "being invited As for
you, Mr. Williams. I suggest a life-long
subscription to Circus.
Dave Elliott,
Senior,
Asst. Music Dir
WZMB
Capital Punishment Won't Solve the Problem
Capital punishment is becoming less
frequent in both the U.S. and in other
countries, and for obvious reasons. One
reason is that there is evidence that
shows it to be completely ineffective as
a deterrent against crime. Another
reason is that the death penalty cannot
be morally justified.
From The Left
By BERN McCRADY
One of the most hypocritical things
people say is that only God has the right
to take a life. This premise is often the
basis for an anti-abortion argument.
Yet, these same people will then claim
that "Thou shalt not kill" does not app-
ly in cases of violent crimes, such as
murder.
If abortion is wrong because it is the
taking of a human life, then how can
capital punishment be justified? The
criminal placed in an electric chair is,
without a doubt, a human life,
regardless of what he has done. All peo-
ple are responsible for their behavior
and moral conduct, and one
individual's violation of the law does
not make it right for us to change our
attitude about murder.
Another moral aspect of the death
penalty is that it is often applied in an
inconsistent and prejudice manner. Ac-
cording to criminologist Donald Mac-
Namara, 50 percent of the people ex-
ecuted between 1930 and 1959 were
black. Such factors as the area where a
person lives, his financial status, and
the color of his skin have all played a
disturbing role in the handing down of
death sentences.
There are also effective alternative
penalties that accomplish a great deal
more than death. Mr. MacNamara
points out that nations and states that
have outlawed capital punishment have
experienced smaller capital crime rates
than those that have kept the death
penalty.
When Delaware outlawed capital
punishment, it experienced a sharp drop
in the rate of capital crimes in only one
year! No one argues that outlawing
capital punishment will be enough to
reduce crime rates. The rates drop
because alternative punishments may
offer a greater degree of certainty, thus
crime is deterred.
Many people respond to alternative
punishments, such as the life sentence,
by claiming that they don't want to
spend their hard earned money paying
taxes to support criminals. This argu-
ment is completely inaccurate, however.
Mr. MacNamara notes that the death
penalty really cost more than its alter-
natives. Lengthy jury selections, long
trials and retrials, appeals, security,
support for the felon's family, and
maintenance of expensive death houses
all add up to a very large sum of money.
It does seem a little immoral to look at
capital punishment in terms of money,
but people who believe that the death
penalty is the cheapest way to deal with
felons are wrong.
Capital punishment, according to
many people, is justified because it has
a strong deterrent effect. The theory of
deterrence views a rational man who
considers the possible profit or pleasure
he may gain by committing a felon and
then considers the punishment he may
get.
However, the overwhelming majority
of people guilty of such crimes are too
sick to know what they are doing and
understand the consequences, much less
consider the profit and pleasure. John
William -ftoek did commit, to put it
mildly, a violent crime. But can a per-
son who beats people with a tire iron,
cuts with a knife, rapes, and then runs
over people with a car have really
known the consequences and acted ac-
cordingly? No, such people are mentally
sick and out of control.
Obviously, murder is a hideous
crime. Does it make sense to punish a
hideous crime with a hideous crime? Of
course not! Claiming that the death
penalty is acceptable because it involves
a painless injection is crazy since a
painless punishment is no punishment
at all.
Capital punishment is backwards
thinking since it goes completely against
the basic idea of the U.S. svstem of
rehabilitation. Granted, many criminals
are either too ill or too immoral to be
helped. But there are those who, with
proper treatment, can be helped. Also,
there is always the danger of the inno-
cent being executed (which inevitably
will happen as long as the death penalty
remains a pan of the U.S. system).
There simply is no justification for
capital punishment. It may be human
nature to want to get back at people,
but that does not justify murder No
one suggests ignoring the victim, who
certainly deserves compassion, but no
one suggests compassion for the
criminal, either. What is needed is a
murfer ' punishment. not
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I r � ��! �, -�. .�iti.� i IN ����.��� � - - - n ,1)1,1,1�,





THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 7. 1986 5
I PIPAIY
RAISE MV
SOW 70 BE A
POUTJCMAI,
�Jt�eUC H�fc�
sse Helms
s right, rather
at is vrong.
�"� Baughan,
Senior,
DSC
ibum Review
- 'v1 John
ng The East
1 work with
'eiew. The
he basis of
radio market,
relevant music
Williams' let-
� be great for
offer music
There are,
gisti al problems
principally, time
oal of DA. Swan-
ffer reviews of
I music from
i:f ficult to do
A have therefore
popular" and
a week. You
ews on current
i tentative, and
tie future.
. recommenda-
ned, the David Lee
- new. nor does it
Rj'her, Dave
rented picker in an un-
� i And if anything by
e ol the finest vinyl
5 in war in vur mind, then
I ib 'us
I1 ur department is truly
ted in helping with the article, it
� me that he or she
I he Easi Carolinian, as
ted As for
V illiams, 1 suggest a life-long
to Circus
Dave Elliott,
Senior,
Assi Music Dir
WZMB
'rob lent
people with a car have really
m th quences and acted ac-
ich people are mentally
ut of control.
Deviously, murder is a hideous
Does it make sense to punish a
ks crime with a hideous crime? Of
le not! Claiming that the death
It � acceptable because it involves
fniess injection is crazy since a
fcss punishment is no punishment
)ital punishment is backwards
Ing since it goes completely against
asic idea of the U.S. system of
ilitation. Granted, many criminals
ther too ill or too immoral to be
1. But there are those who, with
treatment, can be helped. Also,
is always the danger of the inno-
peing executed (which inevitably
jippen as long as the death penalty
is a part of the U.S. system).
re simply is no justification for
punishment. It may be human
to want to get back at people,
lat does not justify murder. No
Jggests ignoring the victim, who
ly deserves compassion, but no
uggests compassion for the
1, either. What is needed is a
effective punishment, not
The East Carolinian's
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(Except Aigner, Nike and Reebok)
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Step Out In Style
Homecoming
Special
20 Discount On All
Services WThis Coupon
Good Through Oct. 18, 1986
Drop by and see
our beautiful new shop
Greenville's Newest, Most Unique
Beauty Center!
129 Arlington Blvd. Greenville 756-1579
ALL ABOAARRD
i
Ticket Good for
HOBO SANDY CH
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CAROLINA EAST MALL (Across from KERR Drugs)
Breakfast SUPER TASTE TRIP TICKET! Dinner
Kentucky Fried Chicken. j!
$1.99
plus tax
FOR ONE COMPLETE
2-PIECE PACK
2 Pieces of Chicken
1 Small Mashed Potato and Gravy
1 Biscuit
1 Medium Drink
Expires Dec. 31, 1986
fQr
Pizzainn.
For pizza out it's Pizza Inn
$2.00 Off Any Large
$3.00 Off Any Giant
Eat In Or Take Out
Phone 758-6266
SKIING VACATION FILM
Film on Keystone, Colorado
Wednesday, October 8 7:30 p.m.
MendenhaM Student Center
The Student Union Travel Comittee has 20 places left on the Spring
Break Skiing Vacation at Keystone Resort, Colorado. If you are
interested in going on the trip or just interested in skiing, this film is
for you!
Greenville's Only Premium Quality
Cleaners Since 1935 .
Expires October 15
Laundered Shirt Special
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752-2131
Corner of 10th & Evans
tickets available at
central ticket office mendenhall

� �
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JHE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 7,
1986
&
t&
CAROLINIAN
Elizabeth Wightman
l.L.D.
Amy Norfleet
Sigma Alpha lota
Lisa Reddick
Greene Hall
Voting
The voting booths for the
Homecoming Queen election
will be located infront of the
Student Store and the
Croatan. The Booths will be
open Wed. and Thurs. from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m.

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(MM � NMM � �
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1986
OMlt
DAT,
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Phi 1 ps
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THE
OMEC
AND!
Lori Bennett
i De i Pi
Patricia Tripp
Medical Records
Js PROUD rQ
ihi-usk aroiin:as k tcbfr . i9gh 7

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Lisa Cai roll
Pi Kappa Phi
Janet Brown
Sla Hall
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Kelly Safrit
Alpha Omicron Pi
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Elizabeth Bilisolay
Sigma Sigma Sigma
f: I





THE EAST CARPI INLMsl nrTopFp-r 19g6
1
Secret Society At UVA Incurs Big Debt
CH ARLOTTESVILLE,
Va.(CPS) �There are $60,000
missing at the University of
Virginia.
And it has something to do
with one of the campuses' secret
societies, in which members fid-
ile with fictional characters from
v S. Lewis's "The Chronicles of
Narnia" and seem to buy com-
puter equipment without paying
�or it.
Trouble is, the secret society�
me of at least four on the
radition-bound UVA campus-is
so secret that no one knows what
to make of the missing $60,000,
another $20,000 in unpaid bills
and what one local merchant calls
a trail of "boogie woogie
At issue is The Council of the
Stone Table, about which cam
pus police Det. Sgt. William
Morris says "we're not even sure
it exists and former student
Patrick Pierce II, who apparently
founded the council in 1984.
Real or not, Morris is in
vestigating them for fraud, he
says.
Hints of trouble started three
weeks ago, when the university
comptroller noticed the society
campus account was some
$60,000 overdrawn, and called in
the police.
Supreme Court Denies
Death Row Inmate's Appeal
WASHINGTON (UP1) � The
Supreme Court denied the appeal
Monday of Florida death row in-
mate William Kelley, who was
charged with murder 15 years
after the crime based on
testimony from a man originally
convicted of the deed.
Kelley was one of 30 death row
inmates losing appeals Monday,
the first day of the court's
1986-87 term.
The justices rejected arguments
from Kelley's lawyer, who said
the case "raises the terrifying
possibility that an innocent man
stands convicted and sentenced to
death
The Kelley case has been win-
ding its way through the legal
system since Oct. 3, 1966, when
Charles Von Maxcy was
murdered in his home in Sebring,
Fla.
John Sweet, who was involved
in a love affair with Maxcy's
wife, was charged with the crime
soon after it occurred. At the
time, the state alleged that Sweet
had hired Kelley and Andrew
Von Etter to commit the murder,
but no charges were brought
against the two men because of
lack of evidence.
Sweet's first trial resulted in a
hung jury. He was tried and con-
victed at a second trial, but the
conviction was reversed on ap-
peal. The state declined to try
him again and eventually allowed
the physical evidence from the
case to be destroyed.
It was five years later that
Sweer approached Massachusetts
law enforcement officials offer-
ing information about the Maxcy
murder and other crimes in ex-
change for immunity. There is no
statute of limitations in Florida
for murder, so Kelley was put on
trial with Sweet as the state's
chief witness. A mistrial was
declared, but he was tried again
and convicted in 1984.
Appealing the conviction to the
high court, Kelley's attorney,
Alan Dershowitz, a law professor
at Harvard University, said, "No
physical evidence connected
Kelley to the crime. No iden-
tification evidence placed him at
or near the crime scene "
"By destroying the evidence it
possessed, therefore, the govern-
ment elimated every shred of
physical evidence (Kelley) might
have used to proe that he was
not at the murder scene Der
showitz said.
The police, in turn, raided
Pierce's Charlottesville home,
finding $40,000 worth of society
stationery, computers and office
equipment.
And even since then, the
university has gotten another
$20,000 in bills for equipment
and services "bought" by the
society at a time when there was
less than $100 in the account.
The council, investigators
eventually found, was not stingy.
It had promised to give a $16,000
scholarship to a Charlottes llle
freshman going to Carnegie-
Mellon University in Pittsburgh.
The letter promising the
scholarship was "very legitimate
looking and on official let-
terhead recalls CMU financial
aid counselor Robert Meek.
t
It was so good-looking that
Meek revoked the aid package he
already had assembled for the
student Pierce promised to help,
but the promised check, he says,
never arrived.
The council did donate approx-
imately $20,000 to two private
schools in the Charlottesville
area, Morris says.
Headmaster William Porter of
the Tandem School, where Pierce
reportedly worked for a while,
says he received two Council of
the Stone Table checks and then
letters from the council promis-
ing more.
The letters were signed with
names of characters from C.S.
Lewis's series of children's
books, "The Chronicles of Nar-
nia
Ken Shapero of OmniCorp, a
local computer store, figures the
secret council took him "down
the garden path "
Shapero says he sold Pierce
$2,500 worth of Macintosh com-
puter equipment and accessories,
and was told to contact Pierce at
the the university for the charge
number to bill him.
He says he had his bookkeeper
call the university repeatedly for
the charge number, and each time
he called he was put off by
Pierce.
Pierce dropped off a letter at
the store, Shapero says, that was
"the biggest pile of boogie
woogie I've ever seen�and no
charge number
"Finally, I called him up and
told him I'd charge him with
fraud, theft and grand larceny if
he didn't bring back my equip-
ment in 20 minutes Shapero
says. " He brought it back in
15
Other Charlottesville computer
retailers were not so fortunate.
"Because of litigation, I can-
not comment Irvin Cox,
manager of Fntre, "but we do
have assets tied up and we have
had dealings with Patrick
Pierce
Pierce himself could not
himself be reached for comment.
"(These people) became so in-
volved in the Chronicles of Nar-
nia that they began to live what
they perceived as reality Morris
says. "They took on the per-
sonalities of the characters
But no one really knows
because the campus secret
societies�others are called The
Seven Society, the Society of the
Purple Shadows and the Z
Society�are so secret, says cam-
pus spokesman Chip German.
"We used to have to com-
municate with the Seven Society
by leaving a leter at the foot of
the statue of (Thomas)
Jefferson German remembers.
The societies themselves offer
members joint activities and
shared experiences, and surface
usually only to donate funds to
campus departments and local
charities.
"We have a well-established
tradition of trust, and there is no
university process for sanctioning
and setting up a secret society
German says.
si
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
Why not com by the REAL Crisis Intervention Contor 312 E.
10th St; or c�H 7SS44ELP. For Fro Confidential CounsoHno. or A�-
Our Voluntoort and Staff �r� on duty 24 hra. � day, oar around,
in order to assist you In virtually any probiom aroa you might havo.
Our longstanding goal has ahways boon to proservo and enhance
tho quality of life lor you and our community
L�c��MMd And ccr�Mt4 y RM Surt at North Carotins
IfsJazz'n!
down cast BalleUazz Tap &
dance Modem
( isr ji.iil.iMt jq- dup
IWqinninq � Inli-rmrrttatt- � Vtumt'tl
���: V. If, nl KJ.1 V. I Ik n! VIU�� �. � K, , n � ;Hij :
lI'HunsMjII fillUlMl X KB(1 :HHI'tH
All This Week
Fairgrounds Located at 264 East By-Pass
I I I I I I I I I I
IT JUST KEEPS ON GETTING BETTER �
(THAT'S WHY IT KEEPS ON GETTING BIGGER)
At 6:00 P.M. On Oct. 6th, 1986 the Pitt County American Legion Agricultural Fair
will open the biggest, finest, most colossal exposition in its 67 year history!
OCT. 6-11
1986
ill j 1111111111111111111111
THE EXHIBITS � Our two large
exhibit buildings will house the finest ex-
hibits to be found pertaining to Agricul-
ture, Industry, Education and Scien-
ce as well as livestock � AN ON
GOING TRADITION AT THIS FAIR FOR 67
YEARS!
THE MIDWAY � Amusements
ot America will bring to Greenville a
colossal "State Fair" type midway with
40 to 50 thrilling rides, shows, and other
attractions. This is expected to be the
largest midway of any fair east of
Raleigh � as it was in 1985.
FREE ATTRACTIONS: MON.
& TUES- 7:00 PM. the Hollan-
ders � 1 White House, 2 World's Fair
performances. A fantastic group of kids
playing and singing folk, country, rock,
Blue Grass, popular, jazz & spiritual
music � Outdoor stage. Free!
WED. & THURSDAY 7:00 PM
JAKE PLUMSTEAD'S ACTION PACKED
ALL AMERICAN AUTO STUNT SHOW �
Back by popular demand for the 4th
consecutive year! Grandstand. Free!
FRIDAY ONLY 6:30 PM the
FANTASTIC BUCK SWAMP KICKIN
CLOGGERS � Outdoor stage. Free!
THURS- FRI. & SAT pig races,
YES, PIG RACES � (For those that think
they've seen everything!) MERLE MILLS'
RAGE OF THE EAST COAST FAIR CIR-
CUIT "THE MAD DASH FOR THE
MASH" �On the Midway Free!
Wednesday. Oct. 8th
Senior Citizens Day! - All Senior
Citizens Admitted Free 1-3 p.m.
CPfCIAL EVENT
The Western Film Preservation Society's "B Western" Mobil
Museum. All Week � Free!
Thursday, Oct. 9th - College Night!
All students at ECU and Pitt Community college
admitted for $1.50 with Student I.D.
ALL WEEK � The Pitt County Fairs
18 building Village of Yesteryear �
recognized now as one of the leading
exhibits of this type anywhere � The 1910
Antique Band Organ will be playing
all night-every night at the Midway Entr-
ance. Free!
ADMISSIONS � Mon. Thru Friday
Adults $3.00, kids free until 6 p.m kids
$1.50 at night and on Saturday.
MONDAY & THURSDAY �
Armband nights.�Buy an armband at
the gate for $7.00 and get unlimited
rides on the midway�6 p.m. until.
TUESDAY � Armband night. Buy
$7.00 armband from the Band Boosters
Clubs of Pitt and suiTdunding counties
and get unlimited rides on the midway.
SATURDAY � Armbands on sale
from 1-6 p.m.
6 Big Days
& Nights
Oct. 6-Oct 11th
1986
Pin COUNTY FAIR
Eastern Carolina's Greatest Regional Exposition!
Sponsored by the American Legion Posh of Greenville, Farmviite ft Ayden
eorge
By MICAH HARRIS
The late film pi
director Goergc Pa; was in n
ways an unsung Vv
Like Disne, Pi.
r the entire fan
with colorful
llike Disne.
t allow
phnical flasl
stones. His movies were
of human nature, ;
aftti streng'
Ceorge Pal a-
Hungary. A cl
the young Pal nthel eat
grim of the h
of Art instead f i c A
course in
cepted Tr
as Pal's subset je:
confirm -V " r , :
honed his era?!
After comple'mg
worked brief �
dV" artmer
Budapest along with John H i
who later made '
sion of Ge rg well's Animal
Farm.
Pal then move
famous UFA studa
in that countr -
Hungarian to flee Taking � �
in Holland, Pai began
stop-motion puppet films
"Rudolph the Red N
Reindeer" and "Dar-
Goliath" type. Pal dubbed
"Puppet oor as opp
conventional "canoe:
But Hitler's malignanc as
spreading through Europe
Holland and so Pal was for
Mangio
By DON RLTLEDGF
Mlf!�ntr
Sitting on the infield grass of
Grainger Stadium in Kinston on
Friday evening, waiting for the
arrival of Chuck Mangione and
his band. I couldn't stop thinking
of strategies for obtaining an in-
terview with the popular horn
player. His management, Gates
Music, Inc. of Rochester, NY,
had denied my request for a brief
talk with Mangione either be-
or after the show, h the
reporter in me wouldn't Id
Then he appeared V -
was giving was to darkr.e
Chuck Mangione came strc
across the grass from the
clubhouse in the left field corner.
Land Of En
Jens Bjerre will present his tratj
Kingdom of longeitv ai 8 p
N.C. Musi
Nl-4
An exhibition which focuses on
the methods by which an b
created opened Saturda at the
North Carolina Museum of Art
"Methods of the Masters.
Techniques in An" will remain
on view through summer 1987.
The exhibition will discuss four
techniques � bronze casting,
stonecarving, egg tempera pain-
ting on panel and painting on
canvas � with examples of each
from the museum's collections.
Like all exhibitions in this
gallery, it will be accompanied by
large-type wall labels, large-type
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g Debt
i "We used to have to com-
municate with the Seven Society
I b leaving a leter at the foot of
the statue of (Thomas)
Jefferson German remembers.
The societies themselves offer
members loint activities and
shared experiences, and surface
usuallv onlv to donate funds to
campus departments and local
charities.
e
"We hae a well-established
idition of trus and there is no
universitv process for sanctioning
and setting up a secret society
German says
111
&
n
I
i
ir
ry!
V
Yesteryear
iui ig
rhe1910
'� oe pla ng
he M Entr
Mon. Thru Friday
6 p.nn, kids
iturday,
RSDAY �
in armband at
get unlimited
D.m. until.
and night. Buy
Band Boosters
ding counties
n the midway.
toands on sale
THE EAST CAROONJAnT
Styje
OCTOBER 7, 1986
Page 9
George PaVs Unsung Artistry Remembered
B MICAH HARRIS
Staff Wttta
The late film producer and
director Goerge Pal was in many
ways an unsung Walt Disney.
I ike Disney, Pal created movies
for the entire family, films dazzl-
. with colorful special effects.
Unlike Disney, however, Pal did
not allow his fondness for
technical flash to override his
lies. His movies were stories
of human nature, its weaknesses
and strengths.
George Pal was born in 1908 in
Hungary. A clerical fluke placed
soung Pal in the fine arts pro-
gram of the Budapest Academy
of Art instead of the Architecture
course in which he had been ac-
cepted. This was pure serendipity
as Pal's subsequent movie career
confirms. At the Academy, he
ted his craft of cartooning.
After completing studies, he
worked briefly in the animation
department of a movie studio in
Budapest along with John Halas
who later made the cartoon ver-
sion of George Orwell's Animal
harm.
Pal then moved to Germany's
famous UFA studio. Hitler's rise
in that country caused the native
Hungarian to flee. Taking work
in Holland, Pal began making
stop-motion puppet films of the
'Rudolph the Red Nose
Reindeer" and "Davey and
Goliath" type. Pal dubbed them
"Puppetoons" as opposed to the
conventional "cartoons
But Hitler's malignancy was
spreading through Europe to
Holland and so Pal was forced to
move his small family to America
in 1939.
Fortunately, Pal's artistry was
already known and Paramount
almost immediately approached
him about continuing his Puppe-
toons for that studio. Pal, of
course, was all too happy to
agree.
Intended to rival the Disney-
type animated short, the Puppe-
toon series was in production
from 1940 to 1950 and was
nominated for an Oscar every
year. Perhaps the most signifi-
cant Puppetoon was "Tulips
Shall Grow an animated ver-
sion of the German invasion of
Holland (drawn, no doubt, from
Pal's personal experience),
featuring an army of nuts and
bolts goose-stepping in Nazi
parody.
As the movie industry entered
the '50s, Pal switched to live ac-
tion science-fiction films, a staple
of the era. Pal's movies,
however, were crafted with more
integrity than such classics as
Teenage Caveman, Plan Nine
From Outer Space, or Attack of
the 50-Foot Woman.
His first SF film was Destination
Moon, based on Robert
Heinlein's book Rocketshlp
Galieo.Untypical of Pal's later
output and now woefully dated,
Destination Moon was at least
produced with careful considera-
tion of the day's science
The first vintage George Pal
movie, however, was his next,
When World's Collide, which
based on the classic '30s story by
Phillip Wiley and Edwin Balmer.
This property was originally in-
tended for Cecile B. DeMille, but
he turned it down. Pal rescued it
from oblivion and the movie won
an Oscar for its special effects.
However, Pal did not succomb
to the temptation to let such
striking visuals as a tidal wave
sweeping through New York
carry the movie along. In the
wake of such epic destruction,
Pal focussed on the lives of in-
dividuals and how they were
touched by the crisis.
Particularly moving was the
plight of one young couple: he is
chosen by lot to escape aboard
the "space ark She is not. As
the movie nears its climax, the
young man passes his lot to so-
meone else and chooses to die
with his love instead of living
without her.
War of the Worlds was next,
and although it took drastic liber-
ties with the novel, it was the first
project to evolve from Pal's love
affair with the works of H.G.
Wells. Pal was involved with a
television mini-series of Wells' In
the Days of the Comet shortly
before his death.
Pal would produce only two
more science-fiction movies:
Conquet of Space, a disappoin-
ting effort unworthy of the
George Pal canon, and The
Power, a thriller involving
psychic researchers who discover
one of their number does indeed
possess "the power" and is using
it to kill the others.
The majority of Pal's other
output falls in the category of
fantasy, where I have arguably
placed one of his best movies,
Wells' The Time Machine. The
visualization of time travel and
the other opticals were beyond
reproach. The time machine itself
was a lovely prop although it
looked more Jules Verne-ish than
Wellsian.
But most integral was the
film's anti-war theme as the time
traveller flees from era to era,
searching for a time of peace.
Ironically, when he discovers his
Eden of the future, he is the one
who must teach the passive Eloi
to fight against the cannibalistic
Morlocks.
Pal adapted fairy tale material
in Tom Thumb and The Wonder-
ful World of the Brothers
Grimm. But his greatest fantasy,
The Seven Faces of Dr. Lae,
stands as a monument to the late
film maker.
The movie was adapted from
Charles Finney's witty, fantasy
novel by Charles Beamont,
himself a writer of note who con-
tributed periodically to the
original "Twilight Zone
Tony Randall, who now seems
as ageless as Dr. Lao, portrayed
the oriental traveling circus
owner and the "seven faces" (in-
cluding Medusa and the
Abominable Snow Man) with the
exception of the talking serpent,
which was a delightful combina-
tion of puppetry and stop-
motion.
The serpent explains Lao's cir-
cus to a bemused Arthur O'Con-
ner: "Itsss like a mirror.
Ssometimes you ssee yourself.
Ssometimes others And all the
patrons come to face their hidden
selves, from O'Conner's
"heavy" land baron, to the
frigid, young librarian, to the
shrewish housewife.
Pal's last movie, 1975's Doc
Savage, the Man of Bronze, was
below Pal's usual standard. The
movie was campy humor of the
Bat Man TV series at a time when
"camp" was cold and in the
ground. Fortunately, the film is
virtually unknown.
Pal continued working on
various projects up to his death a
few years ago, but none came to
fruition.
Sadly, aborted movies litter
Pal's career, including a sequel to
Dr. Lao and a version of Logan
Run which probably would have
been superior to the 1976 release.
Pal's death also brought the cur-
tain down on an original Ar-
thurian fantasy, The Swords of
Galahad, Lord Dunsany's
Pander's People, and a follow-up
to Time Machine concerning the
time traveller's son's trans-
temporal search for his dead
parents.
George Lucas, Steven
Spielberg, and other current
movie fantasists owe George Pal
a great debt. Recently, two of
Pal's greatest, Time Mahcine and
Dr. Lao, have become available
on video cassette. Rent them, in-
sert them in your VHS, and turn
your TV screen into a portal of
imagination and don't be sur-
prised if you ssee yourself.
'The Trip To Bountiful-
Carlin Ghnn and Geraldine page star in 'The Trip to Bountiful.
The film will screen at 8 p.m. Wednesday in Hendrix Theatre.
Mangione's 'Officially Workin" At Kinfest
B DON RLTLEDGE
��ff�rllrr
Sitting on the infield grass of
Grainger Stadium in Kinston on
Friday evening, waiting for the
arrival of Chuck Mangione and
his band, I couldn't stop thinking
of strategies for obtaining an in-
terview with the popular horn
plaver. His management, Gates
Music, Inc. of Rochester, N.Y
had denied my request for a brief
talk with Mangione either before
or after the show, but the
reporter in me wouldn't let it die.
Then he appeared. As twilight
was giving way to darkness,
Chuck Mangione came strolling
across the grass from the
clubhouse in the leftfield corner.
He was dressed all in white, ex-
cept for .he black velvet hat with
its feather band that has become
his trademark. He carried his in-
strument, a variant of the
trumpet called a flugel horn,
loosely in one hand as he walked
the 200 feet to the stage at second
base, unhurriedly and seemingly
unnoticed. (The reporter in me
succumbed to the human being
� I didn't move an inch toward
him. Oddly enough, neither did
anyone else, though amittedly
Mangione's no mega-star like
Mick Jagger.)
The night was right for
Mangione and his eight man
band. The skies were clear, the
heat had risen, and there was
plenty of leg and arm room on
Land Of Eternal Youth?
Jens Bjerre will present his travel documentary film, Hunza -
Kingdom of Longevity' at 8 p.m. Thursday in Hendrix Theatre.
the infield. The band, in tradi-
tional black tuxedos, took the
stage first, followed by Magi one,
who came out clutching his horn
to his chest in his white, vested
tux, complete with a pink carna-
tion on the lapel, and white
shoes.
Mangione and band opened
with a cut off of his album
Togetherness, and then he in-
troduced the band: Joe Banadio
on drums; Billy Martin from New
York City on percussion; Rob
Math is on guitars and vocals;
Mark Minietta on guitars; Gor-
don Johnson on standup bass
and bass guitar; Gordon Shearid
on synthesizer; Regina Brown on
vocals and assorted noise makers;
and, "my utility man playing
The Review
everything Chris Vadala. Ac-
tually, Vadala, who's been with
Mangione for ten years, and is
the only member who also ap-
pears on Mangione's newest
release Save Tonight For Me
(also the name of his tour),
played mainly saxophones, flute,
and piccolo, though he did pick
up noise makers on occasion.
The second piece was a
Mangione arrangement called
"Bellavia" (BELLaVIa) after his
mother's maiden name. It was a
Grammy winner, Mangione in-
formed, being picked over music
from the likes of Quincy Jones,
Stevie Wonder, and Earth, Wind,
and Fire.
Mangione quipped: "I felt like
I was in the Kentucky Derby
riding Mr. Ed "Bellavia a
rolling, full-winded, poignant
tune, featured the hearty tones of
Mangione's flugelhorn in con-
trast to the high pitches of Chris
Vadala's piccolo.
The next four pieces were my
favorites. "Hot Consuello a
hot and spicy, percussive, latin
tune, featured Vadala on tenor
sax, with a dual solo by stickmen
Bonadio and Martin (on snare
and conga), each taking several
turns, building to a heavy,
rythmic finale. Mangione took an
exquisite solo too. Vadala, the
utility man, also played the wood
block and shakers.
The next arrangement, also by
Mangione, "Chase the Clouds
Away featured Regina Brown
and rhythm guitarman Rob
Mathis sharing the mike on iead
vocals. Mangione took a turn on
the keyboards, while Vadala car-
ried the melody on the flute.
Mathis' voice was soulful, raspy
and breathy, but powerful and
controlled. A nice line emerged:
"You were meant to chase the
clouds away
Mangione's smooth, sultry
horn blew the small crowd away
next on "Save Tonight For Me
The band thoroughly enjoyed
this original arrangement by
Mangione, as the horn player
turned his back to the audience
time and again to conduct the
See THE NIGHT, page 11
Boston's Latest Adulterates The Name
By D. A. SWANSON
Staff Writer
The Johnsons � Break Tomor-
row 's Day
(FeverRestless Records)
Boston � Third Stage (MCA)
The Mr. T Experience �
Everybody's Entitled To Their
Own Opinion (Disorder Records)
Forget Fair
� John L. Perry, editor,
Rome, Ga News Tribune, on
proper journalistic policy.
Keep sending those letters,
music fans.
This week we have an in-
teresting sampling of the very
latest in the recording industry. A
notable up and coming pro-
gressive pop band, a comeback
from a rock and roll
heavyweight, and something
from the L.A. hard core punk
presses. Something for everyone,
we hope.
Hailing from the traditionally
tough music city of Philadelphia
are The Johnsons with their stun-
ning debut album, Break Tomor-
row's Day. Here is a band that
combines the sounds of Jason
and the Scorchers, R.E.M Wall
Of Voodoo, Led Zeppelin in and
even some vague Fleetwood Mac
influences into music that sounds
like none of them. This is the
breath of fresh air that popular
recording, in its recent trends,
has desperately needed.
From a strangely up-beat tune
about the tragic life of "Sylvia
Plath to the supernal, coun-
trified dronings of "Breakfast Or
The Air to the bopping har-
monies of "Love You So these
guys will hold your attention.
Almost each song, despite the
variances in tone, follow the
same "guitar intro, throw in
drums, fill in with bass, and add
vocals and volume" format. As
dangerous Dave puts it, "they
writhe and climb to a spineless
climax with almost every song.
Watch for the Johnsons, they
may be mainstream, but they're
hot. Even better than the Smiths,
and homegrown.
Boston? A new album? Fat
chance. With Barry Goudreau
(lead and slide guitars). Sib
Sashian (drums), and Fran
Sheehan (bass) gone from the
original band the Boston title
seems a little presumptuous on
the part of ol' Tom Scholz. In
fact, with original member Brad
Delp on vocals and Scholz play-
See THE MR. T, page 11
N.C. Museum Of Art Exhibit Explores Masters9 Techniques
NfTWA
An exhibition which focuses on
the methods by which art is
created opened Saturday at the
North Carolina Museum of Art.
"Methods of the Masters:
Techniques in Art" will remain
on view through summer 1987.
The exhibition will discuss four
techniques � bronze casting,
stonecarving, egg tempera pain-
ting on panel and painting on
canvas � with examples of each
from the museum's collections.
Like all exhibitions in this
gallery, it will be accompanied by
'arge-type wall labels, large-type
and Braille varsions of the gallery
guide and a recorded tour, mak-
ing it accessible to visitors with
special needs.
The technique of bronze
casting will be represented by the
plaster original and bronze cast
of "Study for Monument to
Presidents Andrew Jackson,
James Polk and Andrew
Johnson" (1947) by Jo David-
son. To illustrate this technique,
the exhibition will include a series
of objects from the Cleveland
Museum of Art which trace the
bronze casting process through
each step.
An example of stonecarving
can be seen in "Federigo da
Montefeltro, Duke of Urbino a
marble relief attributed to 15th-
century artist Francesco
Laurana. Wall panels will
describe how an artist blocks out
large masses from the stone, then
cuts and abrades its surface to
achieve smaller forms.
Egg tempera painting on panel
was the major process used for
small-scale paintings during the
Middle Ages and Renaissance un-
til the 15th century. The paint
comprised natural pigments mix-
ed with egg yolk; this was applied
to a smooth wood panel. Often
the picture included areas of gold
leaf, meticulously applied and
stamped in decorative patterns.
Seen in early works like "St.
Jerome in His Study which was
painted before 1402 by Cecco di
Pietro, the egg tempera technique
has been revived by modern ar-
tists like Andrew Wyeth, whose
"Sea Dog" (1971) is also in the
exhibition.
Finally, "Methods of the
Masters" takes a look at the pro-
cesses used by artists in creating
paintings on canvas in oil or
acrylic. While some artists prefer
to sketch the overall composition
with little attention to detail,
Vernet's "Study for the 'Race of
the Riderless Horses' " (about
1820) demonstrates how he com-
pleted each area of the study
thoroughly before beginning the
next section. Howard Mehring's
"Amarillo" (1958) shows the
freedom of modern artists to
work rapidly and experimentally,
often on a large scale. This is
made possible by the develop-
ment of quick-drying acrylic
paints.
"Methods of the Masters" has
been organized by Diana Suarez,
coordinator of youth programs.
It is made possible by the Z.
Smith Reynolds Foundation and
the Mary Duke Biddle Founda-
tion, and is co-sponsored by the
Duke-Semans Fine Arts Founda-
tion.
Tactile tours of the exhibition,
along with touch tours of the
main galleries and hands-on
workshops, are available to
visually impaired visitors by ad-
vance request. For information,
call the museum at (919)
833-1935.
- ' �� t����fcH li. �n�f�r � �
mmmmmmmmmmm'
A
j





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 7
1986
Announcements
cCOLLEGE DEMOCRATS
V
Will be meet.ng tomorrow at 4 in rm 212
nWenaenhail Anyone mieresteo please come
by or call Hugn at 752 Mil
s �j (STOP SMOKING
A three week 'stop smoK.ng" program
will be held In Room 107 at the Student
fHealth Center The program will be held
from 3 4 pm on Tues oct 7, 14. and 21 and is
ropen to students, statt, and faculty No
tregistrat,on is necessary Can Mary Elesha
Aaams at 757 641 tor additional mforma t.on
DIETING AND
HEALTH EATING
RENT-A-NURSE
Anyone interested In renting a nurse on
Sat Oct n for gyardwor. housework, sit
ting with the elderly or babysitting can
751 4740 or 75 045 after 6 pm The cost will
be40tor�hrs and �0 tor 4 hrs It,s a great
opportunity for getting your fail cleaning
done, and yes we do wmoowsl If you are
unable to reach anyone at these numbers
contact the ECANS office at the School of
Nursing
ECANS
All nursing students there will be an
ECANS meeting Thurs , Oct 9 in N B 101 at
6 pm All nursing students are invited to
come and see what we're all about Hope to
see you there
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement Ser
vice in the Bloxton House is offering one hour
sessions to help you prepare your owr
resume Few graduates get jobs withou'
some outline of their preparation Many
employers request a resume showing your
education and experience Sessions to helc
will be held in the Career Planning Room at:
p m on Oct 7 and 91
INTERVIEWING SKILLS
WORKSHOP
Two more INTERVIEWING
WORKSHOPS are scheduled at the Career
Planning and Placement Service To im
prove your presentation skills, to learn abou'
'he questions employers ask, and to hear
from Mr James about opportunities on anc
off campus, mark your calendar to come tc
the Bloxton House on Oct end 10 at 3 p m
WINDSURFING CLUB
There will be a meeting tomorrow night.
Wed, Oct 8th m 247 Mendenhall Hope to see
everyone there Any new members are
welcome Please remember dues
LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will hold its regular
bi weekly meeting Tuesday night, � Pm in
room 221 Mendenhall All members are urg
ed to attend and all interested students are
welcome
ALPHA EPSILON DELTA
Attention members and 'n'eresteo pre
med students Our meting tonight m f 307 a'
7 will include Or Irvin Lawrence from the
Dept of Anatomy of the ECU School of
Medicine All interested pledges a' an
couragect to attend Therewi'beanotfrer $
meeting a' 6 30 I" 'he S'udy Lounge
HOMECOMING PARADE
Any organiiat'Ons wanting to r,3 on a
firetruck during the 194 Homecomng
Parade please contact j,n Opdrkf
(752 9743) Betsy Peters (355 77�i or Jane
Whittieia (752 8348 0 Oc' 9 '98
CONVERTIBLES
The Student Momecomng Cornrr 'e� s I
eea of or.ye'S with conve't'bie m '
Homecomng Parade it .ntefested peas
a j Opdyke (757 97431 Be's, PMf
355 77M) or jane Whtt.eid 752�Ht! ��
Oct 9 1984
HRM
Mu-ar Resource Managee1 'da
eef "g or Wed Oct 8 at 3 p r ���' ,0J
A e'estec persons a'e IMI 'ec to a"end
I n � v of officers w be e c
Has the Freshman 15" got you down? Are
rou a iunk food iunkie? Our special three
week program may help you understand
where you went wrong ana what to do about
it a three week program will be held on Oct
r 14 and 21 from 4 5 pm m Room 107, Student
Hea" Center about dieting and healthy
eat,ng no registration .s necessary and is
open to stuaents staff, or faculty Can Mary
Eiesha Adams at 757 4841 tor additional in
fornaton

ECU CHEMISTRY
DEPT.
The ECU Chem Dept has opened a
departmental learning center ,n Flanagan
215 The center is open Mon through Thurs
trom 2 5pm The purpose of the center is to
ccv ae help in chemistry outside class to
students who are enrolled in beginning
chem.stry courses, such as CHEM
1150 1160 1120 and 0150
LOUSY MOVIE
LOCK IN
If you have not picked up your Lousy
Mov.e Lock In T shirts, piease come by the
Student union, -oom 234 in Menoenhali Be
sure to Drmg your receipt or ECU ID card in
oraer to receive yOur t shirt
LSSSOCIETY
There will be a meeting Fr . Oct 10. 5 7
p.m n R r'ggoio Towers lobb Pricing par
ty F 'ee p zza provided Memberships
avai'abie Please come!
BACKGAMMON
TOURNAMENT
The Student union Recreation Comm,rtee
s sponsoring an All-Campus Backgammon
Tournament on Tues , Oct 14 at 4 p m in
Venaenha'i Multi purpose room Registra
t.on form must be completed and submitted
to the supervisor on duty at the Billiards
Center or Mon , Oct 13fh at 5 p m An entry
fee of $2 s required
PADDLING CLUB
The ECU Paddling Club will hold an
organizational meeting ano election of of
cers on Thursday night. Oct 14th, at 8 pm
n Memorial Gym room 105. Plans for a Sat ,
Oct 25 outmg to Merchant's Mill Pond State
Park will be finalized An instructional pad
dhng and eskimo roil session is being plann
ed n Memorial Gym pool after the meeting
Ail students, staff and faculty who are In
terested m flatwater andor Whitewater pad
dl.ng are urged to attend this organizational
meeting.
PHI ALPHATHETA
Will be having a bookbake sale tomorrow
fromgam l pm Locations will be in front
of the Student Supply Store and the History
Dept Office, third floor A wing of Brewster
ECU SURFING
All insurance forms must be complete and
turned m today if you are planning on going
'o Maryland for the contest Contact Biair at
75 8393 about turning mem in Also, there
will be a mandatory meeting Thurs at � in
B 04 of joyner Library Anyone who is plann
ng on going to Md must attend this meeting
PPHA
PPHA will meet Oct at 7 p m in rm. 147
at Mendenhall All members are urged to at
fend and bring a friend that would be in
terested in joining PPHA
CO-OP FOR INDT
SOPHOMORES
A-e you nteresteo in gainmg experience ,n
manufacturng wtn a Fortune 500 company,
ea" ng Jl 100 per month, ano being eligible
for free tu'tion unt.i you graduate? if this
sounds good to ou and you have a 3 7 GPA
contact Cooperative Education. 3)3 Rawi to
ea �"ore
COLDSEASON IS HERE
T-e Se f CareCoio Ci.n.c is open 24 hours a
a 7 avs a week it's located at the stu
dent HeaItri Center The chn.c helps rou
"d' n atxx e ��'ea'ents tor colds ano pro
. aes eve- the counter med'C nes at no cost
� s a sc �asf! Check t out
CENTRAL AMERICAN
PEACE PROJECT
Tuesday Oct 7 Eyewitness account from
N caragua. Central American meai ana
iVE MUSIC Featuring Mike "Ligntnin- �
Ap s M ke Hamer Bob Gravlin, Sue
wuaeke anc Emanuei Vargas Begins a'
6 3C pm Mean Si 50 Talk on N caragua
-ec �'sa'l 30 Ai: faculty s'aft a-a students
are v 'ec Sponsored by the Centra
aer ca� Peace Project (CAPPi for tu'
rher nta ca 830 0349
CO-OP IN STATE
GOVERNMENT
Pos t os �re available for students n
'e'es'ec in ca'ee'S n state government for
spr ng se-es,er Stuaef's aiCing n
Bus ness, Accounting, Political Science
Home Ec Computer Science. Criminal
Si � a"c Graphic Arts are neeaeo
Aoen ano minority students are encoyag
ec c appv Fy more info . contact Co-Oc
313 Raw
ANNUAL REVIVAL
T"e Baptist Church will be having its an
"u�' 'evival Sun , Oct 5th thru Wed . Oct
8th Wed night is "college emphasis" night
Rev S'eve Ackerman from Union Hiiis Bap
fist Church will be the guest Musk by Rev
Tea Reea of Yates Baptist Church, SC
Come iOi" us All students welcome
WE WILL MATCH
ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE
PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce,
Deli, Bakery & Continuity
Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With
You. We Will Match
Like Items Or Equal
Quality.
The supermarket with
WjIKI
lYAIfHHINISi:
VllHXS
OIIAIJTYNM
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH SAT OCTOBER 11 AT SAV A CENTER IN GREENVILLE
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES
plus
Double Coupons
See store for details
POLICY
BEEF - PORK - LAMB - VEAL
A&P is trimming more from their beef than ever before, and that s good news for you'
Because lean beef is an important source of nutrition for today s health and d.etconscous
American You see. lean beef provides high amounts of nutrients - especially protein iron
zinc and Vitamin B12 in relation to its calorie content Did you Know that a 3 j oz (80 q)
serving of s.rlom tip has tust 168 calories? So. go ahead En)0y lean beef today
A&Ps THIN TRIM policy
makes it easy'
Same Flavor
Better Value
THIN TRIM GRAIN FED BEEF
TAILLESS
T-Bone Stea
LUNCHEON MEAT
Armour Treet
0
Treet
12 oz.
can
88
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
P&Q
fcss
I! GD�
Big rou
TOWELS
Paper Towels
f:
LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
$10 00 OR MORE PURCHASE
REGULAR-BUTTER
Crisco Shortening
3168
can 1
A&P
Shortening
3 ib -128
can
LIMIT ONE OF YOUR CHOICE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
ANN PAGE
Margarine Quarters
MARGARINE
1 lb.
pkgs.
703 GREENVILLE BLVD. � OPE
rfie Nigh
jQjpttnutd from pa�r V
mA ringing
iati��ucin8 thc '
ifjilrtf, Mar n e
IggglJajnes the hard?
et yon come up with a s .
on a tide e
ftjend and a. -
who had
utl America, called !
Igeitad he name
at Pleruvian city "M,
u.Mlk dld �
mjUMX, playing i
�tallic, enial-� u
jtta Brown crea-r :
nd-like voice "
sitinir h:g
oufhc the - - .
the nc album
A few vocal or
of Make Br
of Love'
For Me
L
he Mr. T
Ceatinued from pa
; aB of the instrun
� two meaninglrv-
urances from oihe-
dng the rolls of m
iger, engir.ee-
ording studio owner.
Boston seenv .
ilterate
rhat eontrovei
album Third
itively acurate resurreci
I sia-years-silenced
ind. You can aKe
at it's worth.
�is always,
ithesizers were ised
thora of impre-
ts (rocket engine;
unch" and strings
1 and there, for example)
tt seems like a si!i
se acoustically synthesized
ts sound exactly like .
nically synthesized efft
ter yet, the real - S
at's the use of it?
lure, as a satisfying sti
vn reminiscence alley.
old Boston sound. I
n more extravagant. The or
stration couldn't get mor
ate or skillfully arranged a
formed, the glass shae- -
ars more glass shattering, the
uiet against gran-
s more pervasive,
't pathetic (which
ain into the blue-
egurgitation.)
mm will go dou-
ause Tom Schoi
, but has it really
ears of waiting1
oved Boston in
ry rock fans.
nk? You either
, or conderr:
black satire and
combined witfc
caustic music
t too much. The
ice, with their
ty's Entitled To
ion on Disorder
)wever, an ba-
ll from this ev
g the nece-u-
tew band has m-
jgh order and
c into the genre
ible. Like ome
ard core band
i Kennedys and
Experience com-
m style with a
ty that raises it
n the seething
talentless punk
opens the col-
ird hard core,
. The vocals are
red, the drums
ained syncopa-
litar just plain
But half-way
s a little in-
led "Surfin"
he origin of the
liscernable. it is
on various
movements,
ue punk tradi-
ost hilarious in
ge Opening
rd broadcast of
with Danny
member of the
; "Partridge
ifter his recent
trial, the song
oy we all grew
pusher on the
nouble hits is
entures' classic
lied "Surfin'
gerous Dave
"hey're kind of
: Ventures, the
Ramones and
" This is the
� � - -

,�f





10
. THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 7, 1986
C
V
'1
V
Announcements
COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
A b� me�i ng tomorrow a' 4 nrm 2i;
Mendenha a .ore "te,�tfopiMsecome
I � " a Hygn at T52 511
STOP SMOKING
A '� e� ttttk S'OP smo ng program
A Room io? at tie S'uoe"
He �� - h tP, rip program will be held
I � . � uti Tues ix' 7 u ana 21 ana
students 5iatt ana faculty no
-� S f.essar. Can Mar, E'�ha
� � - ai 's-6841 for additional mtorma
RENT A NURSE
Anyone .nteresiea in renting a
Sa' Ckt II for gyatdwor housework sit
tmg with the elderly or baa j a
'5� �740 or 75� 0458 after a pm The cost
De MO for 8 hr, ana $20 tor 4 hrS it ,s a
opportunity for getting your fa
aone ana yes we do w.naowst if you are
unable to reach anyone at these nu
contatt the ECANS off,(e at the S, hooi of
Nursing
RESUME WORKSHOPS
Theai eei Planning ana Placement Ser
Ihe Bionton House isoffermg one houi
sessions to help you prepare your owr
�esume Few graduates get jobs withrxr
some outline of their preparation Man,
employe's request a resume showing ,oui
education and experience Sessions to heic
will be held in the Career Planning Room at:
p m on Oct 7 and 91
INTERVIEWING SKILLS
WORKSHOP
Two more INTERVIEWING
WORKSHOPS are scheduled at the Caree-
Planning and Placement Servxe To im
prove your presentation skills, to learn auou'
the questions employers ask, ana to hear
from Mr James about opportunities on �nc
off campus, mark our caienaar to come tc
the Bioxton House on Oct 8 ana 10 at 3 p m
ECANS
a nursing students there will te an
ECANS meeting Thurs Oct 9 N B 101 ai
6 p1 AM nu-vng students arp t
come ano see wa' wve re an about Hope fo
see yOv there
WINDSURFING CLUB
wni be a meeting tomorrow night.
Wed. Oct 8th m 247 Mendenhall Hopetosee
everyone there Any new members are
we'i omp piease remember dues
LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will hold �s r .
bi weekly meeting Tuesday n,ght 8 pm in
room 221 Menoenhaii All memBers are urg
ed to attend and an interested students are
weirome
ALPHA EPSILON DELTA
Attention members aa 7psTeo pre
n ed students Our rreting ton ghr rf 307 a'
7 jde D- � � . aw I net '
Dept of a a' , Of the ECU
M . a lerested pledge) a �
couroged to attend There oea "
� ' at a 31 the S tod
HOMECOMING PARADE
Any organizations want .
I the IWa H
Parade cieasr t a c
(752 9743 BetSr PeV-s 355 77V - �
A' Mie 0 rSJ 8148 by Oct � l�V
CONVERTIBLES
�� 'ee s
� �� ' ! es � - " � �"
� g Pa'aae � ��eres'e
pdyke 7SJ �'3 Be's. pee' 1
M ir jane Whitfieto r� � ' �
� � �v
HRM
. � � va � enta
f ���. Raw
� � �� . �� sors arc invite �' '
DIETING AND
HEALTH EATING
� ' eshmaniygot youoow a
" ' " ' ' ne' Our spe a three
�� I lf�n "ay neip ,ou unaerstana
A � ' � � � " wrong a"a what to oo abou'
�� week program will be held on Oct
4 ' '� ' na-$pm - Room iot stuaen
Hea �- Center abou1 a etng jno health,
N eg stration . lecessa aa s
� ts s'a" M 'a, u Ca Ma' .
� Ada ��. a' "57 6841 to- aaa t ona n
11
ECU CHEMISTRY
DEPT.
! hem Dept ijs opened a
�a earning enter n Pianaga"
� ! '� s open Mon through Thof s
' � N � ' The put pose of the center s tc
� '� "� chem stry outside class to
ts who �re e"roiiea in beg nmng
5try i ourses Suctl as CHEM
M.andOlSO
,
LOUSY MOVIE
LOCK IN
� ' pickei . your L xs.
Movie I � r shirts. C east � ,� r . the
'Oom 234 n Vp'e � a p
re I CM 9 your receipt or ECl D ard u
� � . X � t-Srl -
CO-OP FOR INDT
SOPHOMORES
'� este � ga ng exper p
'� 3 with a Fortune 500 company
i � nontl and being eligibic
free tuit � you graduate? ' iti s
k �na . "j.pj j'gpa
'act Cooperative Education 313 Raw I
COLD SEASON IS HERE
� en Can i . ,
.�� � .����
�� ' ' '� � helps yo
' the treatments .
" � - �� med nes at r rsi
� fast : - - . � oc �

CO-OP IN STATE
GOVERNMENT
- 5'1 ' a-f- a.a ace r students
sreers - s'jv ;ovrr I �
� ' este' Students �a -g
Bs ness A )on1 r�g P � a S �
Hom E Computer Sc ece Crimina
tice. ano O-ac- - a are neeceo
rity students ai ouraQ
�� � Foi '� � ritact Co-Op
ANNUAL REVIVAL
'� oai S Chuf K w be having Is an
eviva Oct. Stti thru Wea Oct
-�� A. : Jht is : egpp�pi-ass �
-� . � i �a-f'O un on Hms Bap
' ' se e gues' Music by Rev
-pc Rpec of vates Bapt s- Ciu'C SC
" .5 A S'odents we'COme
LSS SOCIETY
here w ae a "�ee'ig Fr Oct io 57
R -cjgo'c Towers lobby Pr.cmg par
ty F 'ee p iza provided Memberships
j a at e Pease come)
BACKGAMMON
TOURNAMENT
The S'oaen' Union Rec-eatior- Comm �ee
s sponsor ng an All Campus Backgammon
" X amenl o Tues Od 14 at 4 p m ,p
Menae"ha" Muiti purpose 'oon Reg'Stra
11on form must be completed and supm ttec
perv sor on auty at the BiH.ards
� . Mor- Oct 13th at 5 p m Anentr,
fee � I! s requrej
PADDLING CLUB
"� ECU Paddimg Club will hoia an
organizational meeting and election of of
I cers on Thursday n.ght. Oct l�th. at 8 p m
n Memor a Gym room 105 Plans lor a Sat ,
O't 25 Out.ng to Merchant's Mill Pond State
Park will be ImaMed An instructional pad
dI g aa eskimo roll session ,s being piann
p3 - Memor a1 Gym pool after the meeting
An students staff and faculty who are in
'erestea in fiafwater andor Whitewater pao
dhng are urged to attend this organizational
meeting
PHI ALPHATHETA
Wiibe havng a book bake sale tomorrow
from 9 amp m Locations will bein front
of theStudenSupply Store ana theHistory
DeptOfficehird floor A wing of Brewster
ECU SURFING
All insurance forms must be complete and
'urned m today if iOj are planning on going
'o Maryland for the contest Contact Biair at
758 83V3 about turning them in Also, there
w"1 be a mandatory meeting Thurs at 8 in
B 04 of joyner Library Anyone who is plann
ng on gomg to Md must attend this meeting
PPHA
PPHA Will meet Oct 8 at 7 p m inrm 247
at Mendenhan All members are urged to at
tend and bring a friend that would be m
terested in joining PPHA
WE WILL MATCH
ANY ADVERTISED
GROCERY FEATURE
PRICE IN GREENVILLE
Excluding Meat, Produce,
Deli, Bakery & Continuity
Bonus Items. Bring Current
Week Food Store Ad With
You. We Will Match
Like Items Or Equal
Quality.
The supermarket with
IVAIWHIMISi
vmas
OtlAJIIY HMI
-
PRICES EFFECT'Vc THROUGH SAT OCTOBER 11 AT SAV A-CENTER IN GW I N i
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT r0 L;lunT Q;jA I
WiliriHOIIM
I
r
a
Introducing
CENTRAL AMERICAN
PEACE PROJECT
IV Or 7 E �ew tness accou" from
N .aragoa Central American mea ana
VE MUSIC Featuring Mike "Ligm- ��
flP. Boc Qrfl 5i
Emjnufi Vji gas Bee nj ai
Mea H.50 T� n o s aragua
�� la - �� s-a'f and students
'� . sored bi " � " � � �
Peace I eel - � -
plus
Double Coupons
See store for details
POLICY
BEEF-PORK-LAMB-VEAL
A&P is trimming more from their beef than ever before ana that s good news for you'
Because lean beef is an important source of nutrition for today s health and diet-conscous
American You see lean beet provides high amounts of nutrients - especially proto-n iron
zinc and Vitamin B12 in relation to its calorie content D'd you Know that a 3
serving of sirloin tip has just 168 calories So. go ahead Enjoy lean beef today
A&Ps THIN TRIM policy
makes it easy'
z 80 g
1
Same F
Better Value
THIN TRIM GRAIN FED BEEF
TAILLESS
FAMILY PACK FRESH
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T-Bone SteakrFryer Leg Qtrs.r Head Lettuce
LUNCHEON MEAT
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can
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LIMIT ONE WITH AN ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE AT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
r
THIN TRIM GRAIN FED BEEF
OVEN READY
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703 GREENVILLE BLVD. � OPEN 24 HOURS 3KS SIS:
OPEN SUNDAY 7 A.M.�11PM.
vhe Nigh
gjtjnurd from p�tt
Btroducing the
imber, v- �
a&dmo the
gt you come up
decide on a mmc
w frien"
icUint l
uth An
ggested he nai
�nt Peruvian
a, He did
guitar, pla � .
itallk, onen-
�gina B
nd-like ce-
staining r .
roufho.
the nc- a
A few
,and of Mdi-
kaet i
might For Kit
The Mr. T
Continued fr
;allof
� two rr -
irances
jng the -
iger, eng
ording
Bostc eerr
jlterated
rhat c
h albur
atively a
: six-ye
ind. Y
at it's v �-
s aJwa
ithesizer-
thora of impre
ts (rocke- a b
unch" and
�e and there I
.t seems like a
�se acoustics
ts sound (
nically syr
ter yet, the rea
at's the us?
lure, as a satisi
vn reminiscer.ce i
old Boston -
n more extra
stration couldr .
ate or skill!u arra
formed, the g:
ars more gla shai
;ement of quiet aga
e movements more per
he lyrics more pathetic (which
is us once again im . -lue-
:n abyss of regurgitation.)
'eah. this album w
platinum because Tom Sell
ndled a name, but has it re
n worth six years oi waiting
identally, I loved Bv
h school. Sorr rock fans.
iard core punk1 You e
e it, ignore it, or corde-
most people black -a-
ensive lyric c " b
� ultra-tempo, caustic
d-music), is just:
r. T Experience, with their
but Every Body's Entitled T
teir Own Opinion or. Disorder
rcords, is, however, ar
�esting deviation Froni - ex-
:me.
While retaining the neces
ink mood this neu band has
cted just enough
raight surf rock in
become Ustenable Like �
: the onginal hard core bands
ich as The Dead Kenned
ear, The Mr. T Experience -
ines a root ra ie
hnical virtuosity thai ra ses
Dnsiderably from the seetl:
vong of other talentless
ands
"One Big Lie' opens the col-
jction in standard hard c
hrashing fashion. The vocals art
,iittural and slurred, the
prinkled with strained sym
ions and the guiur iu p
loesn't quit. But ha
hrough there is a b:
itrumental called "Surl
N4ozart While the origin
piece is not quite dicernable.
distinctly based on ar
Mozart-composed moveraa
Satire, in the true punk tradi-
tion, reaches its most hilarious in
"Danny Partndge Opening
with a live recorded broadcast of
an interview with Danny
Bonaduci (former member of the
tver memorable "Partndge
Family") shortly after his recent
Cocain possession trial, the song
likes off; "The boy we all grew
�p with � Is a pusher on the
ttreets
Among the other notable hits is
take off on the Ventures' classic
"Wipe Out" called "Surfin"
-ows As dangerous Dave
lescribed them, "They're kind of
fa blend between the Ventures, the
Beach Boys, the Ramones and
!the Rhythm Pigs This is the



I '
.I





IHt EAST AKOI INIAN
X toHr H 7 lVKf.

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is a
not
The Night Was Just Right For Music
ontinued from pane 9
spnnging off his heels to
��� !emV
oducing the following
i t Ci Mangione said,
letimes the hardest thing
jftd you come up with a song is
v decide on a title explaining
end and actress Shirley
l aine, who had been to
s ' mcrica, called him and
. v ted he name it after the an-
i Peruvian cit "Machu Pi
� He did. It featured Mathis
a playing a-harmonu
oriental-sounding riffs
Brown created haunting,
voices from the past,
and !ow s
one's
ew album.
ew vocal oriented pieces,
g highs and
g out the song. 1 hi-
Make
� 1 oe"
tor 1e
Believe" and
(off of Save
. set up the
danceable, ja pop number
"Sweet t heryl l ynn" (also on
the new album). This one
featured Mangione's ultra-
smooth horn mixing with rythmic
splashes ot sound popping out
from the band behind him.
Shearid made bud like chirping
on the synthesizer. It got a big
I ound ot applause.
I he next one was a surprise.
I he bassman, Gordon Johnson,
�k the mike and belted out a
good old fashioned, gutty gospel
tune called "We Thank You
I otd 'Cause Freddy's WalkinV
Johnson's vocals were tremen-
dously heartfelt, et even he
could not keep the smile off his
face in this hand clappin vellin'
it the top of the lungs, good time
gospel People were singing along
to this one
" I he children of Sanchez"
end ol Mathis' soft,
pleading vocals, Mark Mimetta's
classical Spanish acoustic finger-
ing, and the horn of Mangione
gallantly riding over Bonadio's
cantering Mexican rhythm.
Mathis' airy, raspy voice mixed
well with the brassy, percussive
instrumental.
The show unofficially ended
on Mangione's first and most
memorable hit, "Feels So
Good Not much can this writer
say to do justice to this classic
Mangione song, except that it
proved once again that a good
jazz instrumental needs no lyrics.
Mangione, it seemed, knew what
note to quit on.
But the people at Grainger
Stadium weren't ready to see him
off quite yet. Though there were
no Bics to light the field to sum
mon Mangione back, evervone
stood up and clapped in unison
until he returned And they got
what thev had been waiting for: a
funky, rappin' number called
"Rocknf at at Red Rocks "
Several times during the show so-
meone had shouted for the band
to play it, an obvious favorite. I
must confess that it was one of
two songs that did not make it
onto mv cassette, but as an en-
core, performed live, it was hard
to resist. Grinning ear to ear,
Mangione lett evervone on their
feet grooving to his music with
these words: "We are now of-
ficiall) workin
And then the little man in
w hite left the wa he came: stroll-
ing on the grass with his horn
dangling from on hand, toward
the fieldhouse in left field.
Opera Theater Presents
Traditional Production
The ECU Opera Theater,
directed by Dr. Clyde Hiss of the
School of Music faculty, will pre-
sent "An Evening of Opera
Scenes" on Friday at 8 p.m. in
the A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall
This annual fall production of
the Opera Theater is open to the
public; no admission is charged.
Students in the School of
Music will perform scenes from
five well-known operas �
"Hansel and Gretel" by
Engelbert Humperdinck,
"I.akme" by Leo Delibes,
"C armen" by Georges Bizet, and
(miseppe Verdi's "La Forze del
Destino"and "Mad e Pia
accompanists will be Alisa
Wethenngton, a graduate ol
School ot Music, and Pa
Hiss, a local musk t� I
also costumer for the pi
Students performing will
Jam Hummel, lore M
Margaret Pate, Jennifer Grum.
Carol Greene, Karla Scott, Da
l.edford, Carol Hawkins.
Christopher Bridges, Charles
Hildebrandt. Leigh Anne Clan
Robert Burrell, Dale Smi
Bndgette Cooper. Rej
Hickman, Marv Jay, Mai
Parker and Susan Spe
The Mr. T Experience Offers More
ntinued from page s
the instruments (excepi
meaningless cameo dp
es from others) as well as
�he rolls of writer, ar
engineer, producer and
g stud owner, the name
ton seems grotesquely,
ed
controversy aside, the
a album Third Stage is a
� eiv acurate resurrection of
years-silenced Bos
d You can take that foi
� it's worth.
ilways, no computers
izers were used to create a
ra of impressive sound ef
:ts (rocket engines on "The
ch" and strings inset
A ere, for example). But
� seems like a sill) boas' when
e acoustically synthesized ef-
sound exactly like ele(
ically synthesized effects or,
"er vet, the real thing Si .
at's the use of it?
Sure, as a satisfying stn
ah reminiscence alley, this is
e old Boston sound, thoug
en more extravagant. The oi
nestration couldn't get more
ate or skillfully arranged and
performed, 'ne glass shattei
ars more glass shattering, tl i
cement of quiet agains-
� e movements more perv jmv e,
the lyrics more pathetic (which
� c e again into the blue
� regurgitation.)
Yeah, this album will go d
e platinum because Tom Scholz
swindled a name, but has it really
-seen won � years of waiting'
Incidentally, I loved Boston ii
school. Sorry rock fans.
Hard core punk? You either
e it, ignore it, or condemn it
most people black satire and
"ensive lyrics, combined with
e ultra-tempo, caustic music (oi
music), is just too much. The
T Experience, with then
u1 Every Body's Entitled To
eir Onn Opinion on Disorder
cords, is, however, an m-
esting deviation from this ex-
eme.
While retaining the necessary
k mood this new band has in-
ted just enough order and
aight surf rock into the genre
-ecome listenable. Like some
the original hard core bands
K as The Dead Kennedvs and
�. The Mr. T Experience com
a root raw style with a
deal virtuosity that raises it
derably from the seething
rong of other talentless punk
'One Big Lie" opens the col-
on in standard hard core,
" -ashing fashion. The vocals are
� "ural and slurred, the drums
nkled with strained syncopa-
10ns and the guitar just plain
n't quit. But half-way
igh there is a little in-
rumental called "Surfin'
VI art While the origin of the
e is not quite discernable, it is
inctly based on various
Mozart-composed movements.
Satire, in the true punk tradi-
reaches its most hilarious in
Danny Partridge Opening
A ith a live recorded broadcast of
an interview with Danny
Bonaduci (former member of the
ever memorable "Partridge
family') shortly after his recent
cocain possession trial, the song
akes off; "The boy we all grew
up with � Is a pusher on the
streets
Among the other notable hits is
a take off on the Ventures' classic
"Wipe Out" called "Surfin'
' ows As dangerous Dave
described them, "They're kind of
a blend between the Ventures, the
Beach Boys, the Ramones and
the Rhythm Pigs This is the
bes � . , I've ever heard.
And friends, 1 just plain, don't
. hai d core thai much, i was
� tied
In continuing search
MB's constant slush-
ming 1 .Ps we have
et to clearly determine releases
nexl week- review Can-
: la es ii . Ie new albums by lg-
e. Pop, New Order, Orchestral
Maneuvres In lhe Dark, and
even a new collection ol rare cuts
from the presumed King. Elvis
Vso of important note is
( i on the most lurid love
story of the seventies between Sex
Pistols member Sid Viscious and
Nancy Spungen. Though the film
may not make it to our Emerald
City watch for the sound track bv
Joe Strummer (The (lash).
Rumors sav it shouldn't be miss-
ed.
Keep your eyes tuned to The
Review for the latest suggestions
tor your analog and digital recor-
ding dollars and keep on listening
to WMB's "Adventures In
Moderning Recordings" (Mon-
day evenings) for up to the
minute releases hot off the
presses
NEED MONEY?
We Pay CASH For:
Stei Img Class Rings
Silver Coins Wedding Bands
Any Gold Jewelry
Coin & Ring Man
4th & Evans Street
& Sigma Nu Li'l Sisters
Present
DRAFT NITE
. uesday October 7, 1986 9:00-2:00 A.M.
Admission SI.50 Guys SI.00 Ladies
75 Tall Cans & 10 Draft All Nite
& EEE
Present
DRAFT NITE
Wednesday, October 8, 1986 9:00-2:00 A.M
Admission $1.50 Guys Si.00 Ladie-
75 Tall Cans & Wine Coolers
10 Draft All Nite
1





CONVERTIBLES
g Cow ' W�� I
g ����� ' oter$��i p'easi
� � '�9�3 Be PeteM
mW v
d la' :
IK
TIN!
oupons
details
EAL
Value
i
ME RED OR GOLD
Applesl
N OIL OR WATER
:�
ADDITIONAL
)AY LOW PRICE
iaise
78c
OITIOHAL
LOW PRICE
� CORN � MIXED VEGETAGLES
�TS�CARROTS�SAUERKRAUT
PORK N BEANS
jetables
s
ar
u
r.
C
it
st
h
ie
f
t.
ic
t-
�r
ic

��
IS
e
l-
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n
o
e
d
u
it
d
l-

it
m
i-
it
ie

11PM.
ft
iy
ac-
lly
HIS
a
lOf
ith
es
a
it
is
St
f
Is
fo-
rty
Ity
For
lan
le,
I No
rtio
no
the
is a
not
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 7, 1986
A
The Night Was Just Right For Music
Continued from page 9
band, springing off his heels to
the tempo.
Introducing the following
number. Mangione said,
"Sometimes the hardest thing
after you come up with a song is
to decide on a title explaining
how friend and actress Shirley
MacLaine, who had been to
South America, called him and
"Sri. jfz?y-poP, numbcr Pleading vocals, Mark Minietta's
?. .5 -7wly.nn Jalso on classical Spanish acoustic finger-
ing, and the horn of Mangione
the new album). This one
featured Mangione's ultra-
smooth horn mixing with rythmic
splashes of sound popping out
from the band behind him.
Shearid made bird-like chirping
on the synthesizer. It got a big
round of applause.
The next one was a surprise.
suggested he name it after thejin- The bassman, Gordon Johnson,
took the mike and belted out a
good old-fashioned, gutty gospel
tune called "We Thank You
Lord 'Cause Freddy's WalkinV
Johnson's vocals were tremen-
dously heartfelt, yet even he
could not keep the smile off his
face in this hand clappin yellin'
at the top of the lungs, good time
gospel. People were singing along
to this one.
"The children of Sanchez"
blend of Mathis' soft,
cient Peruvian city "Machu Pic
chu He did. It featured Mathis
on guitar, playing arharmonic,
metallic, oriental-sounding riffs.
Rcgina Brown created haunting,
wind-like voices from the past,
sustaining highs and lows
throughout the song. This one's
on the new album.
A few vocal oriented pieces,
�Land of Make Believe" and
"Secret of Love" (off of Save
Tonight For Me), set up the
was a
gallantly riding over Bonadio's
cantering Mexican rhythm.
Mathis airy, raspy voice mixed
well with the brassy, percussive
instrumental.
The show unofficially ended
on Mangione's first and most
memorable hit, "Feels So
Good Not much can this writer
say to do justice to this classic
Mangione song, except that it
proved once again that a good
jazz instrumental needs no lyrics.
Mangione, it seemed, knew what
note to quit on.
But the people at Grainger
Stadium weren't ready to see him
off quite yet. Though there were
no Bics to light the field to sum-
mon Mangione back, everyone
stood up and clapped in unison
until he returned. And they got
what they had been waiting for: a
funky, rappin' number called
"Rockin' at at Red Rocks
Several times during the show so-
meone had shouted for the band
to play it, an obvious favorite. I
must confess that it was one of
two songs that did not make it
onto my cassette, but as an en-
core, performed live, it was hard
to resist. Grinning ear to ear,
Mangione left everyone on their
feet grooving to his music with
these words: "We are now of-
ficially workin
And then the little man in
white left the way he came: stroll-
ing on the grass with his horn
dangling from one hand, toward
the fieldhouse in left field.
Opera Theater Presents
Traditional Production
The ECU Opera Theater,
directed by Dr. Clyde Hiss of the
School of Music faculty, will pre-
sent "An Evening of Opera
Scenes" on Friday at 8 p.m. in
the A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
This annual fall production of
the Opera Theater is open to the
public; no admission is charged.
Students in the School of
Music will perform scenes from
five well-known operas �
"Hansel and Gretel" by
Engelbert Humperdinck,
"Lakme" by Leo Delibes,
"Carmen" by Georges Bizet, and
Guiseppe Verdi's "La Forze del
Destino" and "Macbeth Piano
accompanists will be Alisa
Wetherington, a graduate of the
School of Music, and Patricia
Hiss, a local music teacher and
also costumer for the production.
Students performing will be
Jam Hummel, Loretta Moore,
Margaret Pate, Jennifer Grum,
Carol Greene, Karla Scott, David
Ledford, Carol Hawkins,
Christopher Bridges, Charles
Hildebrandt, Leigh Anne Clary,
Robert Burrell, Dale Smith,
Bridgette Cooper, Regina
Hickman, Mary Jay, Marina
Parker and Susan Spellane.
The Mr. T Experience Offers More
Continued from page 9
ing all of the instruments (except
for two meaningless cameo ap-
pearances from others) as well as
raking the rolls of writer, ar-
ranger, engineer, producer and
recording studio owner, the name
of Boston seems grotesquely
adulterated.
That controversy aside, the
new album Third Stage is a
relatively acurate resurrection of
the six-years-silenced Boston
sound. You can take that for
what it's worth.
As always, no computers or
synthesizers were used to create a
plethora of impressive sound ef-
fects (rocket engines on "The
Launch" and strings inserted
here and there, for example). But
that seems like a silly boast when
these acoustically synthesized ef-
fects sound exactly like elec-
tronically synthesized effects or,
better yet, the real thing. So,
what's the use of it?
Sure, as a satisfying stroll
down reminiscence alley, this is
the old Boston sound, though
even more extravagant. The or-
chestration couldn't get more in-
tricate or skillfully arranged and
performed, the glass shattering
guitars more glass shattering, the
placement of quiet against gran-
diose movements more pervasive,
or the lyrics more pathetic (which
casts us once again into the blue-
green abyss of regurgitation.)
Yeah, this album will go dou-
ble platinum because Tom Scholz
swindled a name, but has it really
been worth six years of waiting?
Incidentally, I loved Boston in
high school. Sorry rock fans.
Hard core punk? You either
love it, ignore it, or condemn it.
To most people black satire and
offensive lyrics, combined with
the ultra-tempo, caustic music (or
anti-music), is just too much. The
Mr. T Experience, with their
debut Every Body's Entitled To
Their Own Opinion on Disorder
Records, is, however, an in-
teresting deviation from this ex-
treme.
While retaining the necessary
punk mood this new band has in-
jected just enough order and
straight surf rock into the genre
to become listenable. Like some
of the original hard core bands
such as The Dead Kennedys and
Fear, The Mr. T Experience com-
bines a root raw style with a
technical virtuosity that raises it
considerably from the seething
throng of other talentless punk
bands.
"One Big Lie" opens the col-
lection in standard hard core,
thrashing fashion. The vocals are
guttural and slurred, the drums
sprinkled with strained syncopa-
tions and the guitar just plain
doesn't quit. But half-way
through there is a little in-
strumental called "Surfin'
Mozart While the origin of the
piece is not quite discernable, it is
distinctly based on various
Mozart-composed movements.
Satire, in the true punk tradi-
tion, reaches its most hilarious in
"Danny Partridge Opening
with a live recorded broadcast of
an interview with Danny
Bonaduci (former member of the
ever memorable "Partridge
Family") shortly after his recent
cocain possession trial, the song
takes off; "The boy we all grew
up with � Is a pusher on the
streets
Among the other notable hits is
a take off on the Ventures' classic
"Wipe Out" called "Surfin
Cows As dangerous Dave
described them, "They're kind of
a blend between the Ventures, the
Beach Boys, the Ramones and
the Rhythm Pigs This is the
best surf punk I've ever heard.
And friends, I just plain don't
dig hard core that much. I was
startled.
In our continuing search
through WZMB's constant slush-
pile of incoming L.Ps we have
yet to clearly determine releases
for next week's review. Can-
didates include new albums by Ig-
gy Pop, New Order, Orchestral
Maneuvres In The Dark, and
even a new collection of rare cuts
from the presumed King, Elvis
Presley. Also of important note is
a new film on the most lurid love
story of the seventies between Sex
Pistols member Sid Viscious and
Nancy Spungen. Though the film
may not make it to our Emerald
City watch for the sound track by
Joe Strummer (The Clash).
Rumors say it shouldn't be miss-
ed.
Keep your eyes tuned to The
Review for the latest suggestions
for your analog and digital recor-
ding dollars and keep on listening
to WZMB's "Adventures In
Moderning Recordings" (Mon-
day evenings) for up to the
minute releases hot off the
presses.
& Sigma Nu Li'l Sisters
Present
DRAFT NITE
9:00-2:00 A.M.
$1.00 Ladies
Tuesday October 7, 1986
Admission $1.50 Guys
75 Toll Cans & 10 Draft All Nite
&EEE
Present
NEED MONEY?
We Pay CASH For:
Sterling Class Rings
Silver Coins Wedding Bands
Any Gold Jewelry
Coin & Ring Man
4th & Evans Street
Prices based daily on gold and
silver rales
DRAFT NITE
Wednesday, October 8, 1986 9:00-2:00 A.M.
Admission 1.50 Guys 1.00 Ladies
75 Tall Cans & Wine Coolers
10 Draft All Nite

mmmmmmmmmm
�t





; V.

I Ml EASTCAROI INI AN
Sports
OCTOBER 7. 1986
Page 12
Ragin' Cajuns Down Pirates
ELLEN MURPHY THE E AST CAROLI Nl AN
Krehman C harlie I ibretto (10) sits in the pocket as guards Rich Autry
(62) and Paul Howard (55) protect in ECl 's 21-10 loss to
Southwestern 1 ouisiana.
ECU Swim Pentathlon
B RICK McCORMAC
ft-Sporaj r diiix
The ECU men's and women's
swim teams will have their first
real competition this season in
the annual pentathlon Thurs. at
4:0(1 in Minges Natatorium.
Although the competition will
onl) be the clock. Pirate head
coach Rick Kobe sas that the
pentahlon seres a number of
useful purpose.
"It's the first opportunity for
me to see kids swim under meet
conditions Kobe said. "Not
onh do we get to see them com-
pete against the clock, but we
also get to see them compete in
events that are not normally their
specialty
This is due to the format of the
pentathlon, in which all per-
formers swim in each of the five
events.
The events are: the 200-meter
Individual medley, the 100-meter
fl. the 100-meter backstroke, the
100-meter breasitroke and the
100-meter freestyle.
Kobe feels the pentahlon will
have added significance due to
the fact that the season starts
earlier than usual this year.
"We're really looking to have
some good times and maybe even
set a couple of pentathlon
records, he said. "We have the
Purple Gold meet next week,
then we open up at Furman on
November 8
Kobe expects upperclassmen
Stratton Smith and Kevin
Hidalgo to perform well for the
men along with freshman Craig
Faircloth.
For the women, Caycee Poust
looms as the favorite as she has
won the women's pentahlon two
of the past three years. However,
freshman Ryan Philyaw may pro-
vide some stiff competition for
Poust.
Pirate coach Kobe hopes the
students will come out and sup-
port the two teams, as the men
will try to defend their CAA
championship of a year ago while
the women will try to overtake
James Madison for the cham-
pionship.
"The pentahlon is the first
thing the swim team will be doing
this fall Kobe said. "We have
some really big goals and look
forward to a very good season
By TIM CHANDLER
And
RICK McCORMAC
Sporti Mliori
The Pirates missed another op-
portunity to break the nation's
longest losing streak in Division-I
Saturday, dropping a 21-10 deci-
sion to Southwestern Louisiana.
An indication of how the after-
noon would go for the Pirates
came on their second possession.
ECU got the ball in USL territory
after a fumble of a Craig Losito
punt on the Ragin' Cajun 24.
However, on the second play
from scrimmage, Brian McPhat-
ter turned the ball right back over
on a fumble ending the Pirate
scoring hopes.
USL took a early 6-0 lead on
two field goals by Patrick
Broussard.
The Pirates got their only
touchdown following a intercep-
tion by Pirate cornerback Flint
McCallum at the Cajun 20.
On the second play, Anthony
Simpson rambled 16 yards up the
middle for the score. Chuck
Berleth's point-after-touchdown
put the Pirates up 7-6, a lead
which they carried into the
lockerroom at the half.
The Cajuns dampened the
ECU spirits midway through the
third quarter, when Richard Pan-
nell hit a streaking Willie Culpep-
per for a 47-yard scoring strike.
USL was successful in their at-
tempt for two points, as Pannell
hit fullback Glenn Floyd in the
endzone for a 14-7 advantage.
There was no further scoring in
the third quarter as neither of-
fense was able to move the ball.
With 9:40 to play in the con-
test, USL increased their lead to
21-7 on a one-yard plunge by
Felton Parquet which culminated
a 14-play 47-yard drive.
The score was set up by a con-
troversial pass interference call,
in which it appeared cornerback
Roswell Streeter had made a
clean play in going for the ball.
However, the Pirates refused
to give up, quickly marching 62
yards for an apparent touchdown
by Reggie McKinney. However,
the officials detected a motion
penalty on the Pirates, giving
them a third and goal from the
Cajun' seven.
ECU was forced to settle for a
Berleth field goal, when Charlie
Libretto was sacked for a 15-yard
loss on third down.
ECU appeared to have stopped
the Cajuns' on their next posse-
sion, however a roughing the
kicker penalty against Pirate
safety Ellis Dillahunt enabled
Southwest to continue with its
drive.
The Pirates got the ball back
once more with 3:15 to play, but
they missed a fourth and seven
situation at the Cajun' 17 yard
line to end all hopes of victory.
A distraught head coach Art
Baker commented on the Pirates
after the game.
"Obviously, our disap-
pointments continue I
feel now that our
players are more wor-
ried about making
mistakes than looking
for positives
�Art Baker
"Obviously, our disappoint-
ments continue said Baker.
"This was a game we sure didn't
need to lose. I thought we gave a
very lackluster performance �
except for our defense on a few
occasions
Baker felt that the main pro-
blem with the Pirates is more of a
mental thing than of a lack of
talent.
Men
"I feel now that our players are
more worried about making
mistakes than looking for
positives Baker said. "There
isn't anybody who's going to give
us anything
Baker went on to complement
The USL strategv in the second
half.
"They (USL) did an excellent
job of taking advantage of the
wind during the second and third
quarters said Baker. "When
things are going wrong �
everything goes wrong
Among the individuals Baker
praised at his weekly press con-
ference were: Robert Martir.
(defensive plaver of the game).
Walter Bryant (four tackles).
Ellis Dillahunt (18 tackles), Bub-
ba Waters (13 tackles), Vinson
Smith (nine tackles) and Ror.
Gilliard (10 tackles).
"1 was very disappointed tha:
we were not able to control the
line of scrimmage � especiallv
since we had our five seniors back
on the offensive line Baker
said. "Southwestern Louisiana
did not have better athletes or
players
The Pirates will try again this
Saturfday to get a win when thev
travel to Veterans Stadium in
Philadelphia, Pa to take on the
Temple Owls.
By DON RLTLEDGE
SpnrUWrilrr
It was a very productive week
for both men's and women's ten-
nis teams as they approach the
end of their fall campaigns. The
women, playing at home on the
Minges courts all week, hosted
Peace College on Tuesday,
Meredith College on Thursday,
and finally Pfeiffer College on
Friday. The men hosted Mt.
Olive on Wednesday, then
travelled to UNC-Wilmington for
the Wilmington Riverfest Invita-
tional Tennis Tournament this
past weekend.
Peace College landed thr
women their worst defeat of the
season to date, out-duelling the
Pirates 9-0. However, there was
at least one bright spot in the per-
formance of captain Susan Mont-
joy, who has been a consistent
fighter all fall, playing up to the
competition and winning in most
instances. This time she lost
though, to Katie Dukeshire in
three sets. "That was the best and
biggest match of the day coach
Sherman said of Montjoy's ef-
fort. The coach added that,
"They (Peace) are nationally
ranked, and will probably be in
the top-five of Junior College
teams by seasons' end
On Wednesday, the men had a
confidence builder, as they faced
a weak Mt. Olive team on the
Minges courts. The Pirates won
easily, 9-0, and in the words of
Coach Sherman, "played at as
high a level as we could play.
"John Taylor and Jon Melhorn,
I feel, especially attacked well
and played every single point
tough added Sherman.
The women were back on the
courts Thursday, hosting and
defeating Meredith College by a
; Lift�4,
ECU's Irate Frisbee Club Defends
Ultimax-XIII Tournament Title
B SCOTT COOPER
o-Sport, Ml lor
It was a very successful
weekend for ECU's Irates as the
Frisbee Club defended its cham-
pionship of a year ago by winning
the Ultimax-XIII Tournament at
the College Hill Fields.
The six-team field was divided
into to pools. Pool I consisted of
the Irates, N.C. State and UNC-
Wilmington 's Gale Force Victims
while Pool II included Ap-
palachian State, the Wildcards (a
team made up of Greenville
citizens) and Duke.
The Irates domiated the tour-
nament as they were 2-0 in the
weekend-tourney action. On
Saturday, ECU defeated UNC-W
15-9 while trouncing N.C. State
15-5. In the two mathces, each
Irate member managed to score
at least once in the first day of
play.
On Sunday, the Irates received
a bye (after winning their Pool)
and would automatically play in
the semifinal match. Elsewhere,
the Gale Force had a tough time
before downing the Wildcards
15-13, but breezed past ASU
15-6.
After Duke downed State
15-12, ECU dominated Duke
15-5 in the semis and would be
matched with UNC-W in the
final game.
The Irates battled the Gale
Force Victims and managed to
pull out a 15-12 victory to win
their home tournament for the se-
cond year in a row, and maintain
their season's unbeaten record at
6-0. It was the Irates' tough
defense and the play of the
youngsters that was the dif-
ference, according to co-captain
John Wrelch.
"The new guys were the dif-
ference. They still relied on the
older players, but without the
support of the younger players,
we couldn't have done it Welch
said. "It was tough defense all
around. Bob (DeMan) caused
three turnovers in their (UNC-W)
first four possessions � that real-
ly sparked the defense right from
the beginning.
"The team really came
together and were getting good
performances Welch added.
"It was the first time we had it
like that � we had younger
players we could rely on and not
have to worry about
John Taylor
score of 8-1. There were very few
close contests, and those that
were close, saw late surges bv
ECU players to end the matches.
"What really inpressed me was
the ability of our players to come
back from being down, especiallv
Amy and Swaim and Murray
said Sherman, referring to the
comebacks of Amy Ziemer, at
No. 2 singles, and Maria Swaim
and Holly Murray, at No. 2
doubles.
Friday the women made it two-
for-three on the week, as they
took Pfeiffer College 9-0 to bring
their record to 4-3 for the season.
Playing behind the particularly
strong games of Ziemer, Swaim,
and Montjoy, the Pirates lost on-
ly one set as they marched to vic-
tory.
Assistant coach John Anthonv
took the men's team to Wilm-
ington over the weekend, and
what a weekend it was as the
Pirates won the tournament with
a total of 26 points.Because of
the unique format, a round-robin
type, in which each team played
every other in what amounted to
a dual match, the coaches decid-
ed to score the event as four dual
matches. This brings their record
to 7-0 (in dual match play) for the
season.
ECU was first, followed by
Coastal Carolina with 23 points,
then Campbell, Francis Marion,
and UNC-Wilmington pulling up
the rear. According to assistant
John Anthony, it was "their best
tournament by far They played
a lot of matches, and this showed
how mentally tough and physical-
ly fit they are
The men were really impressive
against runner-up Coastal
Carolina, winning all six of the
singles matches; and .Anthonv
echoed this as he said, "The
Coastal match was definitely the
turning point. The guvs knew
that they needed the points to win
the tournament, and thev did
Were there any standouts for
ECU? In the cryptic words of
assistant coach Anthonv: "No
one stood out, because evervone
stoodout I guess that says it all.
Friday and SaUirda Results:
ECl Women 9
Pfeiffer 0
L Eichholz (ECU) d Wend) Bu;ansk
fS-2,6-4
A Ziemer (ECU) d Kim Jones 6-0.6-0
T Mvers (ECL i d. Sheila Shuf
4-6,6-1.6-2
M. Swaim (ECU) d Kristin Ibcrgci
6-0,6-2
H. Murray (ECU) d Angie I ink 6-3.6-4
S Moot joy (ECU) d Emuj Bake' 6-0.6!
Eichhoiz-Ziemer (ECU) d Butai ��
Jones 61.64
Murra-S�aim (ECU) d. Shupir.g-lNrr gei
6-3.6-4
Montjoy-Mers (ECU) d. Lirle-Bake-
6-36
ECU Men 8-1 NC-W 1; ECl 7-Coasta! I;
ECU 6-Campbell 3: ECl 5-Francn
Marlon 4
Individual:
No. 1 Dan LaMont: 2-2 in singles; 1-
doubles w Greg Loyd
No. 2 Jon Melhorn: 4-0 in singles. 1-1 M
doubles � John Taylor
No. 3 Greg Lod: 4-0 in singles. 3
doubles w LaMont and Sumner
No. 4 John Taylor: 3-1 in singles; 3
doubles Melhorn
No. 5 Todd Sumner: 1-2 in singles. 1-2
doubles w Loyd
No. 5 Pat Campanaro: 1-0 in singlev
in doubles w S. Aver
No. 6 Bill Wing. 3-1 in singles, did not
play doubles
PHOTO BY - MA STABTAB
V-Ball Splits
The ECU volleyball team lost
two of three games recently,
dropping their record to 3-4.
Last Wednedsay, the Pirates
defeated Atlantic Christian 3-1.
The game scores were: 15-8, 1-15,
15-9 and 16-14.
On Friday night, the Lady
Pirates travelled to Blacksburg,
Va where Virginia Tech
defeated ECU 3-0. Tech won the
three games by scores of 10-15,
11-15 and 8-15.
On Saturday, Radford
defeated ECU 8-15, 14-16 and
11-15 for a 3-0 win.
z The volleyball team returns to
i action tonight when they will
1 travel to Buies Creek to take on
5 Campbell University.
��
The Irates were successfol this past weekend in defending their Ultimax-IIf Tournament with wins over
N.C. State, Duke and UNC-Wilmington.On the final game).
Sports Fact
Tues. Oct. 7,1987
Walter Payton of the
Chicago Bears runs 154 yards
against the New Orleans Saints
to break Jim Brown's career
record of 12,312 yards rushing.
It is Payton's 59th 100-yard
rushing game, also a record.
Payton's heroics lift the Bears
to a 0-7 victory of the Saints.
The Lady
Coliseum,
Pirate volley ball
but lost road
defeated Adantic Chrfatfaa la �
with Radford and Virginia Tech
IHl EAS1 I Akol INIAN
Vs the season progre
petition for the top honu'
Campus Champions
Highlights from some
games of the past week are
-Alpha Sigma Phi 'H
pa Alpha B'
In the firs? rj the K
opened with a dispia I
ding offense Q . . i�
Trace inched hi
field with short r � �
on the two-yard line B
drAe was sv t
Alpha Sig d'
Alpha Sig's tooko
ied with a i
lion b John Winsh.w a-
resulted in a r
four-yard line
Jiough, the -v
Seid its
�core In the
Quarterback I -
Mall down
Jeff Herman ! I .
�"hen Trave
Jards to put the K
Scoreboard
lot down e; a:
touch I
farlow John M.
evened the
time pla
Upha Sij � " �
utdo
The Outdo - d
program ha�
ings to inchi
and charter
does three full da
a 36-foot cr
as the crew
The trip
hour trip fr m Mc
Marina or. B-
Washingi n, N.
Pamilice River
and down to Oi
the mouth ol
will take 6- I
historic Ba �
hour trip hon
Registrar, n -
Pre-Tnp Meeting: Oc
p.m.
Departure: Oci I 7
Return: Oci 27, 5
Cost; $45.00 pel
There is limited em
if you are interestc
citing sailing advem
come D5 204 Me- i
ign up.
Catch rec jper, gi
silver snapper and
deep sea fishing
offshore in
Have your catch expel
iced down, and ston
trip. Cruise the ���;
Carolina Princess, a new -
24-foot Aluminum (
plete with inside seal g for 65
and a snackood bar
Registration. Oci 1-4 toi 24
Pre-Tnp Mee: rig 29
Departure: No I -
Return: November 2 S
Cost: $55.00 per pen
This cost includes
tion to and from Morehead C
�oat charter and fishing equip-
ment and supplies D i
3EPAB
BACKP
OCTOBER
� 9 l - ' '
� m �.
J
a





!
S6
Pae i;
mi
ren
Pirates
"I reel now thai oui plaersare
more worried about making
mistakes than looking for
positives Bake: aid "There
isn't anybod) who's going to give
us anything
Baker went on to complement
The US1 strategv in the second
" I ne il'SI did an excellent
f tak g advantage ol the
wind during the second and third
said Baker 'When
things are going wrong �
even thing goes wrong
E mdiuduaK Baker
v week!) press con-
ei e Roberi Martin
sive plaver of the game),
B 11 (foui tackles),
18 tackles), B u b -
i W iters (13 tackles). inson
(nine tackles) and Ron
u kles).
is ei � disappointed that
we were not able to control the
scrimmage � especially
�ur five seniors back
� e line Baker
s itl western I ouisiana
e bettei athletes or
again this
Saturfda) taw in when thc
sterans Stadium in
a, Pa to take on the
I bAST CAROLINIAN
uctive
e p astal
�sinning all six of the
gles matches; and Anthony
�� this as he said. "The
was definitely the
The guys knew
te l the points to win
. and they did it
W ere there any. standouts for
I ! in the cryptic words of
ich Anthony: "No
it, because everyone
1 guess that says it all.
Frlda) and Saturda Results:
Ml Women 9 PfeifferO
: (ECU) d Wends Butansky
2 6-4
A Zicmei (EC I d Kim Jones 6-0,6-0
ECU) d. Sheila Shuping
(Ft I
in Iberger
d Angic Little 6-3,6-4
I d Einil) Baker 6-0,6-1
6 4
(E U) d Butansky-
Swaim (E U)d SI .png-Iberger
jr-Myers (ECU) d little-Baker
HI Mrnft-l N(-W I; EC! Coastal 2;
EX I 6-( ampbell V EX I 5-Frmncis
Marion 4
Individual
N : Dar 12 gks; 1-0 in
� :� 4gJes; 3-1 in
i in singles; 3-1 in Sumner
in singles; 3-1 in gles; 1-2 in
v t p fan pa1-0 in singles; 3-1
Ving: 3-1singles; did not
' J r' 1CV
PHOTO JVMAR STARTAHI
M
Intramural-Recreation Services�
OCTOBER 7, 19�6
13
Flag Football Highlights Week's Activities
As the season progresses, com-
petition for the top honors of All-
Campus Champions increases.
Highlights from some of the top
games of the past week are:
-Alpha Sigma Phi 'B' vs. Kap-
pa Alpha 'B
In the first half, the KA's
opened with a display of outstan-
ding offense. Quarterback David
Trace inched his way up the
field with short passes beginning
on the two-yard line. But their
drive was stopped short by the
Alpha Sig defense. When the
Alpha Sig's took over, they open-
ed with a turnover (an intercep-
tion by John Winslow) which
resulted in a run all the way to the
four-yard line. Once again,
though, the Alpha Sig defense
held its goround and denied the
score. In the second half, KA's
quarterback Tracey moved the
ball down the field with passes to
Jeff Herman and Dickie Moore.
Then Tracey ran a keeper 20
is to put the KA's on the
scoreboard. The Alpha Sig's were
not down yet and came back with
a touchdown pass from Pat
Marlow to John Myers. This
eened the score and foced over-
time play which ended with an
Alpha Sig win 7-6.
-Alpha Phi vs Sigma Sigma
Sigma
Battle between these two teams
was sure to be rough because, un-
til this game, both teams were
undefeated in the sorority divi-
sion. The first half was quiet as
both teams moved the ball back
and forth but were unable to
score. But in the second half the
Alpha Phi's came out firing as
quarterback Denise Cromer
threw a touchdown pass to
Sherry Keen and then completed
the drive with a conversion pass
to Meg Conrad. The Sigma's bat-
tled back and came within 10
yards of a score by excellent run-
ning and reverse plays. They were
stopped, however, by quick
defensive provided by Robin
Wilson and Chris Roman. Then
the Alpha Phi's came back firing
once again with another
touchdown pass from Cromer to
Keen to up the score 13-0, and
added the conversion point on a
pass from Cromer to Wilson. The
game ended 14-0 with the AJpha
Phi's on top and still undefeated.
-Enforcers vs. AFBNAF
Defending Women's Indepen-
dent Division Champions, the
Enforcers, were given a good
game by the Women of ARB-
NAF. ARBNAF broke onto the
board first with a touchdown
pass from Patti McDonald to
Teresa Rodsinski. Donna Fauer
completed the drive with a one-
point conversion reception. Nena
Nickel then intercepted a pass
from the Enforcers and ran 15
yards to put the ARBNAF in
scoring position again. But the
Enforcers defense tightened up
and fough off the attack. In the
second half, the Enforcers came
out firing but threw another in-
terception to ARBNAF. This
time Patti McDonald intercepted
the pass. But once again the team
of the ARBNAF came up empty.
Laura Bellos of the Enforcers
threw a 30-yard pass to Jill Con-
tarino to put the Enforcers on the
board. Linda Winstead added the
one-point conversion to knot the
score at 7-7. The game ended tied
and overtime was the only solu-
tion. The Enforcers ended up
taking the victory 8-7.
-Belk Stars vs. Scott Fuber
The Men's Residence Hall
Division is a tightly contested
race this year. Quarterback Dan-
ny Battle of Scott Fabar threw
for the first score to Steve
Outdoor Trip; Tennis
The Outdoor Adventure Trip
program has expanded its offer-
rigs to include deep-sea fishing
and chartered boat sailing. How
Joes three full days of sailing on
a 36-foot chartered boat with you
as the crew sound?
The trip will involve an 8-9
hour trip from McCotter's
Marina on Broad Creek in
Washington, N.C out of the
Pamilico River into the Sound,
and down to Oriental, N.C. near
the mouth of the Neuse River. It
will take 6-7 hours to return to
historic Bath, with an easy 2-3
hoar trip home on the last day.
Registration: Sept. 29-Oct. 10
Pre-Tnp Meeting: Oct. 14, 4
p.m.
Departure: Oct. 25, 7 a.m.
Return. Oct. 27, 5 p.m.
Cost: S45.00 per person
There is limited enrollment, so
if you are interested in this ex-
citing sailing adventure, please
come by 204 Memorial. Gym to
sign up.
Catch red snapper, grouper,
silver snapper and more on our
deep sea fishing trip 40-60 miles
offshore in the Gulf Stream.
Have your catch expertly strung,
iced down, and store during the
trip. Cruise the water in the
Carolina Princess, a new 90-by-
24-foot Aluminum Craft com-
plete with inside seating for 65
and a snackood bar.
Registration: Oct. 1-Oct. 24
Pre-Trip Meeting: Oct. 29
Departure: Nov. 2, 4 a.m.
Return: November 2, 8 p.m.
Cost: $55.00 per person
This cost includes transporta-
tion to and from Morehead City,
boat charter and fishing equip-
ment and supplies. Don't miss
this fishing adventure. For addi-
tional information andor
registration materials, please
drop by 204 Memorial Gym-
nasium.
The tennis tournament is enter-
ing the final rounds of competi-
tion, with smashing perfor-
mances by a number of com-
petitors.
In the men's-open division
Brian Weil has defeated David
Turner to advance to the final
round. Other semi-final action
will see Mike Belangia take on
Sam Earnhardt, Kurt Kolesha
play Greg Willis and Mark Jones
go against William Britt. All of
these players are thus far
undefeated in this double-
elimination contest.
With only one loss and still an
opportunity to take the title, Jeff
Health will play Bo Chase and
David McEwan will take on
Patrick Shirley. Also trying to
make a comeback with only one
loss are Ayman Nashashibi, Billy
Hamilton, Ronnie Hart, and
Gary Jeffrey.
Earl Phipps has advanced to
the play-offs by defeating
Thomas Rogerson in the men's
Intermediate Division. Other
undefeated matches include Chris
Pippens vs. Kevin Hyman and
Russ Emerson against John Mar-
shall. Alex Camacho will play
Dana Troutt and Mike Hobbs
will take on David Hollifield in
their attempt to advance to the
final rounds.
Two undefeated players in the
women's-open division battled
last week. Eleanor Allen was vic-
torious over Cheryl Fout to move
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
DEPARTMENT OK INTRAMURAL-RECREATIONAL SERVICES
M
ri
DIV.SION OF INTRAMURAL SPORTS
'WHERE FUN IS 11"
Jt il BACKPACKING
OCTOBER 10,11& 12
eated Atlantic Chrfetj ,� j
� Radford and Virgin Tech.
UWHARRIE s
NATIONAL FOREST
COST-S30.00 PER PERSON
ask about 10 discount
TRANSPORTATION
EQUIPMENT!
FOOO FURNISHED
registration dates:
SEPT 8-OCT �
PRE TRIP MEETING-
OCT 7 4:00 om
M 102 MEMORIAL GYM
For Additional Information Call:757-6387 or coma By 204 Memorial Gym
out to the final rounds. Linda
Gould will play Karen Jackson in
the bottom bracket to determine
who will challenge the winners.
So as the final sets are played,
a lot of action is yet to happen.
Keep your eyes on this column
for all the divisional winners.
Thanks go to all those who
participated and especially to
those who made the events run so
smoothly. Look forward to next
year when we'll swim it all over
again, just for the fun of it!
The lanes at Mendenhall con-
tinue to echo the sound of
crashing pins as intramural
bowlers roll through the season.
Outstanding performances by all
participants prove to be adding
excitement to the allies in the race
for number one.
The match between Delta Zeta
and Alpha Phi was a very close
one but the Delta Zeta's came out
victorious with a pin score of 960
to 951. Another close match, on
the men's side of the lane, was
between the Flinstones and Phi
Sigma Pi. The pin count at the
end of this battle was 1,007 to
1,003 with the Flintstones on top.
Some participants who deserve
special recognition for bowling
outstanding matches are:
Women
Becky Kerber for Ten Pins: 283
Tammy Edwards for Split City:
266
Men
Jere Cober of Theta Chi 'A 332
Billy Neal of Sig Ep 'B 334
Mike Swain of Phi Kappa Tau
'B 331
John Petticle of Waxers: 337
Whether it is in the pool, on
the tennis courts, at the bowling
alley or on the field, intramural
sports participants are playing
and having fun.
The long awaited swim meet
took place on Wed Oct. 1 at
Minges Gym where enthusiastic
swimmers took to the pool com-
peting for the title of All Campus
Champions. Everyone, frater-
nitiessororities as well as in-
dependents, joined in the fun and
excitement of the meet. The
Lambda CM's retained their title
as Ail-Around Champions in the
men's division while the En-
forcers stole the show for the
women, though the Zeta's were
only one point behind in second
place.
Although competition was
stiff, the relays (T-shirt and inter-
tube relays) were arranged for
pure fun and they were just that,
fun. In the t-shirt relay, the four-
team participants each swam the
length of the pool with the t-shirt
on then gave it to the next team-
mate until all four had completed
the exchanges and a winner was
determined. For the men, the
Lambda Chi's dominated with a
time of 1:21.46 and for the
women, the Delta Zeta'�finished
ahead of the pack in 1:31.89.
Turner. The Belk Stars returned
the favor on a 15-yard pass from
Roger Hailey to Pat King, but
they couldn't complete the extra
point. Hailey and King hooked
up again on a long 45-yard
touchdown to close the half with
the Belk Stars leading 12-6.
Scott Fubar opened the second
half deep in their own zone and
slipped back into the end zone
which gave the Belk Stars a safety
and two points. Steve Sabstain
intercepted a pass and returned it
for 80 yards and a touchdown.
The Belk Stars held on to win the
game 14-12.
Co-Rec Flag Football
If you would like to be a part
of a mixed up group of flag foot-
ball participants, then get involv-
ed with our Co-Rec Flag Football
league. The teams are comprised
of eight members, four men and
four women. It's sure to be a
"rush" for fun. Registration will
be Oct. 20 in Memorial Gym
room 105-C from II a.m. to 7
p.m The team captains meeting
is Oct. 21 in Biology room N-102
at 5:30 p.m. The Third Regiment
was last year's All Campus
Champions and intend to repeat
again this year, so let's give them
some competition for their pass-
ing thoughts.
Cross Campos Fnn Run
The Dept. of Intramural �
Recreational Services will host a
cross campus fun run which will
take place on SatOct. 18, during
homecoming weekend. It will
start at 8:45 a.m. and you can
register between 8 and 8:30 that
morning. The race is open to all
ECU students, faculty, and staff
as well as alumni. The event will
have two separate races, so you
have the choice of a two-mile or a
four-mile run. Get involved, run
for fun!
Putt-Putt-Pan
Team Putt Putt registration
will be held Mon. Sept.29,
Memorial Gym 105-C between 11
a.m. and 7 p.m. The tournament
will be held for one full week of
fun beginning Oct. 6. Organize a
team or register as an individual.
Co-Rec Cageball
Co-Rec Cageball is the newest
co-rec sport sponsored by the In-
tramural Recreational Services.
The action and fun will be ex-
citing for you and your friends in
late October. Watch this space
for more details and registration
dates.
Co-Rec Softball has been filled
with action as the teams enter the
last weeks of regular season play.
The Slayers and the Naturals
fought a defensive battle for the
most part. But the Naturals, led
by homerun hitter Matt Hermes
added a little extra at the plate to
win the contest 6-4.
The Wild Bunch, captained by
Jeff Fulghura should be commed-
ed for demonstrating good sport-
smanship throughout the first
weeks of the season. Although
they have been slightly outmatch-
ed, the team players have enjoyed
themselves and demonstrated the
spirit of having fun.
Other softball action included
a hard fought contest between the
Dodge City Hustlers and the L.L.
squad. In first inning play, the
L.L. team opened up with three
homeruns by Tracy Parrisber,
Mike Baraett, and Eddie Naylor.
But their efforts were not enough
as the Dodge City Hustlers went
on to win the game by five runs.
The Executioners, captained
by Kevin Cutler, fought strong to
recapture the lead in their game
with the Original Fried City, cap-
tained by John Gray; but the
Fried City bats were too tough.
The final score here was the Ex-
ecutioners defeating the Original
Fried City team, 9-7.
Team Putt Putt will be in full
swing beginning Mon Oct. 6
with an expected field of 45
teams. Come out and watch the
fun at Greenville Putt Putt on
10th St. extension where all mat
ches will be held.
A team captain's meeting will
be the following day, Oct. 21. in
Biology N-102, at 6:30 p.m
Each team will consist of five
members, three females and two
males. Rule modifications to ac-
comodate this unique situation
have been made: field goals by-
men are two points but those by
women will be three points. A
team that likes to keep the ball
"live" will be back this year, the
Enforcers, to dribble, shoot and
try to mantain their title as AJ
Campus Champions.
IRS Taping
The Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services
is providing a preventive taping
service for students.
A sports-care staff member is
located in the Intramura1-
Recreation storage shed, im-
mediately behind the Inter-
collegiate soccer field. This atten-
dant will provide taping free of
charge of all intramural sports,
club sports, or informal program
participants. These attendants
are generally on duty each
Monday-Thursday, from 3:30
p.m. until 10:00 p.m and vary-
ing hours on Sundays.
So if you want to protect an
old injury or prevent a new one,
please let us "stick it to you"
ATTRACTIONS
Wednesday, October 8, 8:00 PM.
A Trip To Bountiful
Friday, Saturday, Sunday, October 10 11 12
8:00 P.M.
Gung Ho
LATE SHOW
Friday & Saturday, October 10, 11, 8:00 P.M.
Harold and Maude
Tuesday, October 7, 7.00 P.M.
Ice CreamBingo
Party
Recreational Tournament
All-Campus Women's Table Tennis
MSC Table Tennis Center, 6:30 P.M.
Travel Adventure Film
Thursday, October 9, 8:00 P.M Hendrix
Theatre
Hunio � Kingdom of Longevity
i
ing place
n�ijMhi �� m nm � i swiww��MMai





14
�H! t M t. m, iNIAN
IK IOHI K 7, 186
Classifieds
PERSONAL
bi�5 EPS: We went on a road trip
late Friday night, Chapel Hill was a
scary sight! The Usuals piaved at
the Pika house jam, and we showed
them how to party as only ECU can!
We got out of hand, we really threw
Todd KirkpatricK, where the hell is
your shoe? Liddy stood guard while
we went to pee, Robin fell down ana
into a tree. We were so trashed
oeyond repair Who poured alt the
oeer in my hair? We drank out of
loafers that were new and shincy,
Mike Geraci- "I've got grass on my
niney Tara Cullen you are a sly
little fox, The drunk girls drove
rome while you slept in a box!
James and Maria were really shit-
raced, Michael do you like Channll
iace? Mike Wyies was atraid to let
v,s drive home, Reid and Scott didn'r
oother to phone. Luckily, Keith Alten
was able to drive. But we didn't
think Clark would make it back
alive. Andy Cupcake, Matt ana Jay
We saw you there, but did you see
the band play? Terpack's cooler
jive was a funny sight- But Buddy,
rou better watch where you bite!
Sherri was missing when it came to
-n end. Hey Carl- what did you do
. ith my friend? Billy Neal what
appened to your hood? We thought
.at the Schaeffer can stuck pretty
i,ood! Melissa it seems that you lost
our bow, But you're from Illinois
"what the hell do you know?" We
raised hell and partied 'till the very
cno- But call us outrageous, 'cuz
we'd go it again! ! �
-Cv yYDSURFING CLUB: There
vill ot a meeting tomorrow n,ght.
Wed Oct. 8th in 247 MendenheH
Hupe to see everyone there. Any new
members are welcome. Please
remember dues.
CHI OMEGA, ALPHA DELTA PI.
TRI SiGS AND ALPHA XI DELTA:
-ooking forward to a Scary Hrlo
een! The Brother of Sigma Ph:
�ps:icn, TKE, Lambda Chi, and KA.
CHAPEL HILL: To all those who at
ended The Usuals concert at Chapel
�fill Friday night We were the Dad-
dy Rockers!
TRI SIGS: Thanks for a great time
jt the Nuclear Waste Party las;
Thursday night! -Sig Eps
rWl TAU: Thanks Phi Taus the
social was fun- we danced ana par-
ked fit way past one! the punch was
:ocd. but the fruit was GREAT-
sjuess rhaf s why it ended so late
jynen the punch ran out there wasn't
nuch fuss we just hopoed on the bus
nd awav r -r P or it took us.
Ke kept on aa j tew hours more
probably f - -i -truck 4.
just wani v Srty Tna, we hj,a a
-last Hope ioo apo it won't
i fe iast! Love, me Chi O's.
. EANNIE WHEBY: Thanks tcr
�T.dKing Parents Weekend a
ijecess Keep up the good sooa's
-o We love ya! The Chi O's.
-3MA PHI EPSILON LITTl E
i.STER RUSH: Tonight Frcr,
�1 at the Sig Ep house (505 E. 5th
: across from the Art Blag
COME BY
YNN: Thanks for putting up wit.)
- I enjoy spending time with you
' ora than anyone or anything else. !
vf yco. Mark.
TTENTIONII: Vote TANIA HER
R.NG for Homecoming Court
representing Phi u Home
onomics Honor Society. SU�
r�ORT our candidate and VOTEh
: TKA LIL SISTER RUSH: Oct.
j-22. Time and place to be announc
�d. "Hold out for number 1"
.NTRAMURAL AND SPORTS
xEDICINE: The brothers of TTKA
.vould like to thank you for your help
n assisting our brother Glenr.
namilton after the game, it was
,reatly appreciated.
TKA LIL SISTERS: Thanks to all
TTKA Lii Sisters for cheer and good
I :od on Sunday. Wish we could cook
s good. Thanks again, the Big
rs-others of TKA.
.TTENTION SNU MEN: Esp. Bey
Cc-�e - sorry aidn't get to get in
. 3'il's ribs at the Luau Friday, but l
as having too many fun with -the
'ew apple of my eye(?)� HOY! I'll
. .nee on your heads this wee Vend
a THE BEACH WOO! Ace
' Free Bird"
OGER: Stay away from that
�. rimp, ifs haunted! -Roscoe, Pit
JHop.
KEMMIS: We know "The
Sit
Sfcowdate: Wed. Oct. 8
Time: 8:00 p.m.
Place: Headrix
ANGIE MURDOCK: Your oke with
the candy was pretty tunny. But
keep it in your Chrissy Snow sized
brain that revenge is sweet Wild
Turkey and airplane spins don't
mix Why do you talk so funny,
Georgia girl? Pat M.
PHI SIGMA PI: The pledge class of
Phi Sigma Pi is having a car wash on
Saf. 11th trom 9 until 3 at the Trade
Station on 14th and Greenville Blvd
A drawing for dinner for 2 at
Darryl's will be held for anyone get
ting their car washed.
OX: The brothers of Theta Chi,
again welcoming the pledges, re
mind them of Thursday night Call
Chuck.
ALPHA SIGMAS. Yes, the time is
almost here to party down and drink
some beer. We'll be there early and
stay till late because we're all dying
to graduate Love, the Delta Zeta
Class of 1986. P.S. Anyone going for
a PhD??
SCOTT H CHRIS M SCOTT T
Peg and Joe were tripping. Thanks
for dinner Kroger havoc loved the
Christmas gift, lifetime supply of
Lucky Dog "cops are here Let's
do it again sometime (ha ha) Love
ya, K, E, and A.
TO ALL THE SISTERS OF DELTA
ZETA: Watch out for Friday night!
Love, The Beta Omicrons.
PI KAPPA PHI: Thanks to everyone
who slopped by the house Sunday
The party was great! Hey Margo, I
bet you practiced a lot on holding
that ball on vour toe. Congratula
tions on the shut out, you AZD's real
�y played great. No intramural of
f'cials allowed at the next party!
PI KAPPA PHI: We have a flag foot
ball playoff game Wednesday night.
Everyone should come out and sup
port the team.
JAY VAUGHN AND DAVID
DENISON: Didn't know you guys
were still around Surprise so am I.
It's been awhiie. Look me up- we
need to party Love, "Remote Con
trol"
TERESA MORSE: Glad you finally
got a hold of the right clues! Get
psyched for a wild semester at
AOTT! Love, YBS P.S. Did you ever
find out why aluminum foil doesn't
je' hot?!
BEACH WEEKEND: Brothers and
Lil Sisters of Sigma Nu must get
their money for the upcoming beach
weekend to Gene by Wed at 9:30
o.m. This is sure to be a weekend to
live forever in infamy.
SIGMA NU LIL SISTER RUSH: Will
be Tuesday night at the Elbo Room.
Come early so you can meet the
Brothers and Little Sisters of the
most Elite Fraternity on campus.
Fina out what it means to be a real
little sister to a fraternity.
SIGMA NU LIL SISTERRUSH: Will
be held Tuesday night at the Elbo
Room. All interested women of ECU
should come on down and meet the
brothers and lil sisters of ECU'S
most Elite Fraternity.
THE KNIGHTS OF SIGMA NU:
Would like to extend an invitation to
all of the sorority girls of ECU to at-
tend out Fall Little Sister Rush Tues
day night at the ELBO Room. Come
early and meet the brothers. For in-
fo, call 758-0870.
SIGMA NU: The beach weekend is
at hand, the parties will be grand, at
night on the sand, with the moon
dancing out on the ocean. Let's
make it the best, out party the rest,
and remember not to sleep on the
sand.
GREEKS: Wine and women on Wed.
at the Attic. Free keg for the best
Greek attendance and all females
admitted free. Congratulations to
� ast week's winner: "Loose
Marbles"
"SAY THEa�ETWORD On
Wed. at the Attic and win prizes
(wine and women on Wed. all night
happy bar and ladies admitted free)
"MISS GREEK ECU - 1986 At the
Attic on a future "Wine and women
on Wed $1,000 plus other prizes.
Ask about details.
Riggan Shoe Repair
HI West 4th St.
Downtown Greenville
"Shoe Refiir At The Vtr Best"
758-0204
MM
ALPHA PHIS: Congratulation to the
Alpha Phi's from the Sigma Nu's
(NCSU) for winning the keg at the
Attic last Wed. Signed: An Old
Sigma Nu.
JENNIFER: Some D's are better
than others. What do you think? get
ready for this week you never know
what might happen or who it might
happen with! Love, YlS Patti.
AZD: On Mon. in the midst of the
night, a knock on the door gave us
such a fright. With beautiful hair
and face to match, we were a stunn
ing batch. To all our Fuzzy Buddies,
who wre out to please, we thank you
AZD's! Love, Beta Mu's.
TO THE ADTT FLAG FOOTBALL
COACHES: Thanx for all your pa
tience and support. You know we're
having so much fun! We love you
guys, you're number 1!
KAPPA SIGS: Thanks for the pre
downtown party Saturday night.
You are always fun to party with
Love, the ADPi's.
SIGMA NU: Distinguished guests
and little Tommy Egan thanx for
helping me break in the the
Pleasuredome and thanx for not
puking! Whoa Nellie! It were a keen
o thang! Ace "Over the hills and far
away"
STEPHEN: You keep denying rny
satisfaction, but l like it! Thanks for
everything, sweetie. Love, VERN.
ERIN AND DAVE: Yesterday was
such a blasteven though the boat
went a little too fast. The skiing was
fun and we enjoyed getting some
sun. The flips were a 10, when are wp
going back again? Love, Wendi ana
Paige.
LORI BENNETT, LISA CARROLL,
KELLY FOX, AND TANIA HERR
ING: Good luck to you on Homecom
ing Court. The ADPi's give you all
our support
HAPPY HOUR: Come out and party
with the Tri Sigsat the Elbo Wednes
day night You deserve a break to
day!
SIG EPS: Once again our Nuclear
Waste Social topped the rest! And
once again we proved that when the
two of us get together that we can
truly PARTY! Thanks The Sigmas!
TO MY ROOMMATES AND THE
ZETAS: My birthday was great,
thanks to all of you. The weekend
was very memorable, especially the
party at my apt. after the game. You
all are the best friends anyone could
ask for. LOVE YA, Crims Abdul, the
adopted farm child.
SALE
COMPUTER DATING: No lists of
names distributed or any informa
tion given without vour consent. We
offer a very personal way for you to
meet new people introductions
guaranteea or your money back.
Student discounts Karz Services
355 7595
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICES: Typ
ing resumes, term papers, thesis
papers. Call SDF Professional Com
puter Services inc 106 East 5th St.
(near Cubbies), Greenville, 752 3694.
CHEAP TYPING: Reports, etc Call
Anne at 752 3015 and leave a
message
DJ; Are you having a party and need
a D.J.? For the best in Top 40, Beach
and Dance call Morgan at 758 7967
Reasonable rates. References on re-
quest.
$60 PER HUNDRED PAID: For
remailing letters from home! Sena
self-addressed, stamped envelope
for informationapplication.
Associates, Box 95 B, Roselle, NJ
07203.
South Park
Amoco
Complete Automotive Service
756-3023 24 hrs.
310 Greenville Blvd.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
5205 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks ai
additional cost. Pregnancy Test, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For
further information, call 832-0535 (toll free
number: J-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. weekdays. General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave
We Buy Gold & Silver
INSTANT CASH LOANS J
All Transactions Confidential
Buy
- Sell �
752-0322
A
FOR SALE-Is it true you can buy
jeeps for $44 through the U.S.
government? Get the facts today!
Call 1-312-742 1142 Ext. 5271 A.
TYPING: Top quality word process-
ing equipment that can meet all your
needs backed with years of ex
perience. Low student rates.
Mon. Sun. 9 am to 9 p.m 355 7595.
FOR SALE: Winchester 20 Gai
semi automatic with case. Excellent
condition. $135 Graphite raquetball
racket with cover $15. Powerline
1200 C02 BB Pistol $10 Call 752 3708
after 5 Tues. and Wed
HELP WANTED: Eager student to
help an electrician wire houses No
experience necessary Call Mitchell
Goff at 752 3037
SPANISH TUTOR NEEDED: For
up to level 3 Call 752 1230 ask for
Ryan
R OOMM ATE WANTED: Free
security deposit of $150, Kingston
Place Apts , central heatair, fully
furnished, includes all kitchen uten
si Is, and use of pool $150 per month
plus utilities For mfo call Don
Fazio at 757 3218
BUYING OR SELLING: If you are
interested in buying or selling Avon,
please call 830 0642 Great oppor
tunity!
FOR SALE: Double bed mattress
set new $110. Litton microwave, full
size new $170 Minolta 35 mm
camera with flash, bag new $200
757 3408
LOST: Sept. 30 Large herringbone
bracelet Reward offered 746 3849
ROOMMATE WANTED: To sh�r�.
new apt located at 405 E 5th st
(Regency House Condos Apt 1C)
1 block (300 steps) from Downtown
and 1 block from campus
Everything is new, must see! No
deposits req'd for either apt or
utilities! Rent $175 plus 12 util Can
355 6686 and leave name ft. phon�
number
BARMAID NEEDED: No ex
perience necessary Call 757 0743
The Sports pad
FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED: To share 2 bedroorr
townhouse at Georgetown Apts
Great location, close to campus'
Call 752 9245
FOR SALE: A slick electric guitar!
A cute little diamond ring! And hun-
dreds of neato comic books! Priced
to move! 758 7284
'Seafood House aid Oyster Bar
Washington Highway iN C 33 Ext Greenville. North Carolina
Pone 752-3172
(Past RiverbluffApts.)
GREEK T-SHIRTS: You want one?
ZBT will be selling great looking
tees Oct. 14, 15, 16 at the student
store for only $7 Proud to say
GREEK and ECU! GDI's welcome,
too.
PARACHUTE FOR SALE: Main
7 Cell purple and gold Strato Cloud.
Reserve: Aqua and gold Steerable 26
ft. Lopo. Container: Blue
WonderHog II with To.p. $600 firm.
Serious inquiries only! Call 758-7546
or leave message.
Popcorn Shrimp
Hours 4:30-9:30 Mon Sat.
- NEWLY REMODELED -
125
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER-
VICE: Experienced, quality work,
IBM Selectric typewriter. Call Lanie
Shive at 758 5301
FOR SALE: Can you buy jeeps
cars, 4 x 4's seized in drug raids for
under $100? Call for facts today.
602 837 3401 Ext. S 711.
"ECU PIRATE FAN Signs are
now available at the following loca
tions: University Book Exchange,
Apple Records, Stop Shop BACK
THE PIRATE ATTACT
TYPING: Low student rates. Done
on high quality word processing
equipment with a dictionary in ex-
cess of 50.000 words. Professional
correcting available. KATZ SER
VICES 355 7595
YARD SALE: At the LSS Bldg"
behind McDonald's by campus. Sat.
11th and Sun. 12th from 8 a.m. to 3
p.m. New ECU T shirts being sold
along with lots of other things spon-
sored by the LSS Society.
FURNITURE FOR SALE? Cheap!
Rocker, recliner and sofa. Old but
good condition. Will sell separately
757 0598 after 5
Look mat Syrfacoi
Every Tuesday Is
College Night
Ham Si Cheese
Bologna & Cheese
Ham, Salami & Cheese
Ham, Turkey & Cheese
11 a.m11 p.m.
7 p.m11 p.m. Pepneroni. Salami St Cheese
99C SUBS
Your Choice of
Sot Valid On Deliveries
60 Oz. Pitchers $1.99 M
752-2183
215 t. 4th St.
HII!lllllll!llllllllHlllllllliiIIHM!lltHMIIMtlllllllllllilllllllilltlimmi(llll!
I SP0RTSW0RLD

i
FOR SALE: Meade 1000 mm F10
telescope, 40x, 80x eyepieces, ac
cessories. Telephoto convertible.
$200 or best offer. Call Russ
weeknights 757 3158.
WANTED
HELP WANTED: Local law firm is
seeking Computer Science or Deci
sion Science major with good typing
skills for part-time word processing
position. 10-15 hours per week. Call
758 6200 and ask for Mary.
COLLEGE NITE
Every Tuesday Nite
8:00-11:00
$1.00wCollegel.D. f
j 104 E. Red Banks Road I
1 Greenville, NC I
I 756-6000 I
3
I S
�rrrrfiiiiimiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiigwi�iiiT
Tequila Bar
a Weekly Specials
Hours: 9:00 � m -6:00 p.m. Mon-vm
Sunrise Sunday: Imports $J.25, Tequila Sunrise $2.00
Monday Night FOOtball: Quarter Draft & Melon
Margaritas
TOaSty Tuesday: Toasted Almonds $2.25
Wednesday: Margarita $1.75, Pitcher $6.75
ThirSty Thursday: Drink and Drown - Pitchers $2.75,
Tequila Shot $1.75
Fried Friday: Get Fried Early at our new Attitude
Adjustment hour at 4:30; end the night upside down! Free hors
douevres
Saturday: House Drink � Tequila Blues
109 E. 5 th St.
752-9926
im
mummMamnm.
!������mm � �' ��
HW�I





Title
The East Carolinian, October 7, 1986
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 07, 1986
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.498
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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